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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00229
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1947
Copyright Date: 1943
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00229
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
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Full Text

The University
of the


.0! rW
^,- -*
C ^.K


Record
5 -/ .
*^ /'.


University


of


Florida


Bulletin


'he


qjniversit


Summer


Session


1947


llp~ 1
























































H:I
W- I


p*^



















1947


SUMMER


SESSION


FIRST TERM


June


- July


SECOND TERM


July 24


- September 5


Applications for the First Term must be filed with the Registrar not later than


Saturday,


Applications


Second


Term


must


Registrar


not later


Saturday, June 28.




The University Record Comprises:

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Annual Catalog, the Schedules,


the Bulletin of the Summer Session, and announcements of special


courses of


instruction.


These bulletins will


be sent without charge


to all


persons


apply


them.


applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired.


THE


Address


REGISTRAR,


University of Florida,


Gainesville,


Florida











TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE


Campus


............................................................................. ............... ....................................... .... 3


Officers of Administration ................


Summer


Session


Calendar


Admission


Information


Veterans


................... :..........................--..................-......................................... 8


Expenses


Loan


Funds


Housing Facilities ......


General


Information


Reading
Spanish
Libraries


Program
Program


**&*----**********>** ...*.**.. -*****- -f --** *- ..* -*..* *-* -* *** -- .* -<, **< --* <-


Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene ..........


Certification
Extension o


Teacher


if Teachers
Certificates


Placement


.- .............* ............... .-.-I -- .....-- . .- **. -...... ......... ... --* ,I--- -...< .. . .


Bureau


Laboratory
University


School
Institute


Academic Regulations


Schools


Colleges


University


College


College .......- ............................ ....... ........ ..


Agriculture


School of Architecture and Allied Arts .............. .....................................---


College of


Arts and Sciences ................................... ...................


College
College


Business


Administration


Education


College of Engineering ..........................................................


School


of Forestry


School of Pharmacy
College of Physical


Education,


Health


and Athletics


College of Law


U -- I-I _


........................................ 4


.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . .. .. .5


............................................................. ..............-................................ 6


................. .I... ... .... ... ... .....*.***.**.*..-- *--.*****k .*-. .*.***.**,*.i--ii>-.- >r -*-(1----. .. . -.- -.I


t' I n


n II







F

-a--


II
//'//VR SlYr


AVfJI _


Language Hall
Library
Temporary Reading
Peabody Hall
Benton Hall & Sho]
Engineering Buildil
Temporary E, Lab.
Auditorium
Temporary F, M.E.
Temporary C, Draft
Temporary G, Facu
Dairy Barn
"Horticultural Green
P. K/ Yonge Labor:
Poultry Disease Lal
Nutrition Laboratoi
Poultry Husbandry


Dairy


ps
ng
& Classroom

Shop
;ing Room
lty Offices

house
atory School
boratory
ry


Products Laboratory


Temporary B, Civil 1
Temporary A, Accot
Temporary J, Recrea
Newell Hall
Horticulture Buildin
Campus Post Office
Agriculture Building
Chemistry-Pharmacy
Science Hall
Temporary H, Classr
Fletcher Hall
Thomas Hall
Sledd Hall
Buckman Hall
Florida Union
Cafeteria
Murphree Hall
Basketball Court
Gymnasium
Infirmary


g
r-
*


rooms


"F" Club
Temporary K, Phys
Wood Products Lal
Photographic Lab.
Hydraulic Lab.
Heating Plant
Drake Laboratory
Service Area
Temporary L, Serv
Military Departmer
Sewage Laboratory
Temporary Dormite






STATE BOARD


OF EDUCATION


MILLARD CALDWELLU......--....--..-..-....-...-..-..---....................-.-......-.......-..-......-,.--..... Governo
R. A. GRAY ....... ............................................................................ ..... ... Secretary of State
J. EDWIN LARSON.......-..._......_..-...e....................... .._........- ......... State Treasurer
J. ToM WATsoN- .........--.-.....-.-.....-.-.....-...-.o....-. -.-...-............ .........Attorney General
CouN ENGLISH, Secretary.............................State Superintendent of Public Instruction


BOARD OF


CONTROL


THOMAS


THOMAS


GURNEY,


A.B.,


LLB.,


W. BRYANT, B.S., LL.B.


, Chairman................... ........................... .... Attorney-at-Law
Orlando, Florida
(Florida) ....................... ............................ Attorney-at-Law
Lakeland, Florida


N. B. JoRDAN................_...............-........ ............................ ........................Banke
Quincy, Florida
HENSON MARKHAM, LL.B. (Florida) ............. ..... ....... .....Attorney-at-Law
Jacksonville, Florida
M. LrrTHER MERSHON, LL.B. (Florida) .........................-...................Attorney at-Law
Miami, Florida


Jonx T. DIAMOND...... ....................Secretary o/ the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida
J. W. BLANDIN............................ ...... Auditor for the Board of Control
Gainesville, Florida


UNIVERSITY


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS


JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D, D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D.
President of the University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Sc.D ...--................... ...... Vice-President of the University;
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
WI.LLAM T. ARNETT, M.A. in Arch.......Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M A....... ............n..e........................Dean of Students
HARLEY WILLAR) CHANDLER, M.S......... ......................._.....-.... Dean of the University
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D....-..................................Director of the School of Pharmacy
KLEIN H. GRAHAM, LL.D..-.-... ...-..........-............-...... BusinessManager
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc........Provost for Agriculture and Dean of the College of Agriculture
RI~aR SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P............................. .c.n--...-......-...................Reistrar
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A..............................Dean of the University College
HAROLD MOWaY, M.S.A............................Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
HAROLD STEPHENSON NEiWINS, M.F..............................Director of the School of Forestry
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D.........._....... ..................... Dean of the Summer Session
BERT CLAmI RRLEY, B.A., B.S.A... ........................Dean of the General Extension Division
GLCNN BLLtAnn SIMMONS. Ph.D ....---_..------Actinu, Dean of the Collene of Education









May 31, Saturday


CALENDAR FOR 1947 SUMMER SESSION
.................. Last day for filing application for First
mer Session.


Term


1947 Sum-


FIRST TERM


June 11, Wednesday ....................
June 12, 13, and 14, Thursday,


Placement tests.


Friday and Saturday .
June 16, Monday, 7 a.m.


Registration for the First Summer


Classes begin.
on this date.


Term.


See page 130.


Late registration fee of $5 for registering


June


June


Tuesday


Saturday,


Last day for registration for the First Summer
for adding courses.


noon


Term, and


Last day for making application for a degree that is to
be awarded at the end of the First Summer Term.
Last day for filing application for Second Term 1947 Sum-
mer Session.


July 4 and 5, Friday and


Saturday ......................................
July 7, M onday ....... .........................


12, Saturday, noon


Holidays.


Last day for graduate students graduating at the end of
the First Summer Term to submit theses to the Dean.
Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the First Summer Term to complete correspond-


ence courses.


17, Thursday, 4 p.m. ............


Last day for filing application for extension of certificate.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade
of E.


July 23,


Wednesday,


4 p.m. ........


Grades for all students expec
the end of the First Summer
of the Registrar.


ting to receive degrees at
Term are due in the office


July 24,


Thursday


Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.


July 25, Friday, noon ....................


July 25, Friday, 8 p.m.


First Summer Term ends. A
of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
Conferring of degrees.


11 grades are due in the office


SECOND TERM


July 24, 25, and 26, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday ................


Registration for the Second Summer


Term.


See page 130.


July 28, Monday,


a.m.


Classes begin.
on this date.


Late registration fee of $5 for registering


29, Tuesday


ist day for registration
and for adding courses.


for the Second


Summer


Term,


August 9, Saturday, noon ............ Last day for making application to t
Examinations in the Second Summer


August 9, Saturday, noon ............

August 16, Saturday, noon ..........

August 23, Saturday, noon ..........


ake
Ter


Comprehensive
m.


Last day for making application for a degree that is to
be awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term.
Last day for graduate students graduating at the end of
the Second Summer Term to submit theses to the Dean.
Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the Second Summer Term to complete correspond-


PnrnP PnirIcI






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ADMISSION

GENERAL STATEMENT


The Board of University Examiners is
admissions to the University and its various
Students who are planning to enter the
considered for admission as follows:


the agency responsible for administering all
components.
University of Florida for the first time will be


1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not attended
college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university
and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college credit for advanced
standing, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university and
is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college credit as advanced
standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be considered for admission to the
Upper Division school or college of his choice provided his record indicates the
completion of college work in the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English,
the Humanities, and the Biological Sciences.
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated from a
standard college or university, he will be considered for admission to the Graduate
SchooL
If a student desires to attend the Summer Session not for pursuing work toward a
degree but for meeting some specific need, such as the satisfaction of teacher certification
requirements, he will be considered for admission as an unclassified student.


ADMISSION TO THE 1947 SUMMER SESSION


1947


Summer


and to all qualified
provided preliminary
in the following para
No applicant will


Session is


open


residents of t
application is
graph.
be considered


to all former


he State
i filed in


students


of Florida,
accordance


admission


both
with

i 1947


University


men and women,
instructions listed


Summer


Session


unless the prelimina
received at the Office
application forms (if
liminary application,
It will be impossible
persons planning to


ry application (the card
of the Registrar on or befe
required), which will be
must be in the Office of t
ito consider applications
attend the Summer Sessio


found in this bulletin) has been
wre Saturday, May 31, 1947. Other
sent upon the receipt of the pre-
he Registrar on or before June 5.
received after these dates. All
n, whether or not they have pre-


viously attended the University, must file the preliminary application form to be
considered.


f


)







ADMISSION


University urges the prospective student to consider this fact carefully before making
application. Non-Florida students will not be considered for admission if they do
not meet this criterion.
2. Satisfactory achievement in high school. The University does not specify any high
school units as required, but the general pattern of the units presented and the
student's achievement will receive careful consideration. The records reveal that
those students who scatter most in their choice of subjects are those who accom-
plish least in any of them. Therefore applicants who present a record which shows
no unity or a lack of essential subjects cannot be considered.
3. Satisfactory scores on placement tests. All applicants must take the placement
tests before being admitted to the University College. These are achievement tests
in the fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and natural sciences. Attain-
ments in these fields are possible without specific high school courses and are not
guaranteed by the acquiring of certain high school units. If the scores on the
placement tests indicate inadequate foundation for college work, the applicant may
be denied admission.


B. For
1.



2.


transfer
Honorabl
attended.
tion last
Satisfacto
on all w
admission


students:*
e Dismissal. The student must
Students who for any reason w
attended cannot be considered f
ry record. All transfer students
ork attempted at all institutions
I.


be eligible to return to the institution last
rill not be allowed to return to the institu-
or admission.
must have made an average of C or higher
previously attended to be considered for


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION

From the University College:
See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the University College and
specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools.


B. By advanced standing from other institutions:
1. Honorable dismissal from the institutions


admission
cannot be


who
con!


An average of
stitutions must
ation from the
before coming


fo;
sidi
C
be
U
to


r any reason is not eligible
ered for admission to the
or better. The average g:
C or better. An average g
university of Florida, and o
the University need not ap


previously
to return
University.


radio
rad
ne
ply.


attended.


applicant


to the institution last attended


e for all work attempted at other in-
e of C or better is required for gradu-
who has not maintained this average


Specific


course


requirements


professional


school


applicant's


choice.


The courses listed as required for admission
___ __i __ _m __ - r


to the Upper Divisic
Sr _-- - -


in under the various
. a- ___ 1-







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW


Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have credits for at least two
of academic college work meeting the requirements of the Association of American
Schools. Evidence of this work must be presented to the Registrar of the University
before the date on which the applicant wishes to register.


years
Law
on or


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major.

A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS


a -


Special students may be admitted to the various sch4
Division only by approval of the Board of University Exa
sidered on an individual basis. Application for admission ai
(1) records of previous educational experience (high
(2) a statement as to the type of studies to be pursued
reason or reasons for selecting a special program other thai


ools an
miners.


s a special
school o0
; (3) a
a regul


colleges


Upper


Each case will be con-
id student must include:
r college transcripts);
brief statement of the
ir one; (4) satisfactory


evidence of ability to pursue these studies-for example, a student to enroll as a special
student for some technical courses and who feels qualified to do so by reason of employment


or other experience should submit a brief description


of this experience.


ADMISSION OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS


To be admitted as an unclassified student the applicant
honorable dismissal from the institution last attended.


must


submit


a statement


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR


VETERANS


In addition to the regular academic requirements as set forth in the foregoing pages, the
entering veteran will be interested in the procedures necessary to qualify for the various
types of educational benefits available to veterans of World War II.


THOSE ENTERING UNDER THE G. I. BILL


(PUBLIC LAW 346)


Under


provisions


act the


United


States


Veterans


Administration


assumes


responsibility for fees and costs of instructional materials actually needed
_.-L- .. -1J- --- I... 1 -.,1-- I -. L- j ... -.- i-.- ... - -r -


by any veteran
-.--., .,-.--


Is i


I J






ADMISSION


evidence must be submitted.


It is advisable that you consult with some representative of


Veterans Administration for assistance in preparing such documents.


If the application is approved,


the veteran


will receive from


Veterans


Administra-


tion a form called a Certificate of Eligibility.


The veteran should keep this in his possession


until he actually reports for registration at the


University.


If the Certificate of Eligibility


has not


been received by the


applicant


to report


registration,


should bring a copy


of his discharge or certificate of


service.


Credit for fees and books


given


upon


presentation


such


a document


even


though


Certificate


Eligibility


has not been issued.


However,


the veteran's subsistence


payments


(which


made directly to


him)


cannot begin


until


the Certificate


by the veteran has been filed with the Office of the


Eligibility


Registrar,


in turn


properly
endorsed


endorsed


and forwarded to the


Veterans Administration.


THOSE ENTERING UNDER


VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION


ACT (PUBLIC LAW


Government


benefits


are awarded


to certain


veterans


have


service-connected


abilities.


Application must be made to the


Veterans Administration and should be


made


well in advance of the time the student expects to enter.


If the veteran's application for


benefits under this act has not been approved by the time he is to report for registration,


he should bring a copy


of his discharge or certificate of service and begin his


work under the provisions of Public Law 346.


Advisors from the


University


Veterans Administration


present during registration to


assist


such men


in making application


benefits


under


Public


applications


These


Public


advisors
in such


not, however,


a way


be in


a position


eligibility


to act


benefits


upon


can be


determined immediately.


COLLEGE


CREDIT FOR SERVICE


TRAINING


Veterans


allowed


credit


training


experiences


obtained


in the


armed


forces in accordance with the recommendations of the American Council on Education as set


forth in


"A Guide to the


Evaluation


of Educational


Experiences in


Armed Services."


veterans


entering


or reentering


University


should


consult


Special


Assistant


for Veterans in the Office of the Registrar.


In many cases it will be helpful to the student


and his dean in planning a program if this can be done in advance of registration.


INFORMATIONAL AND ADVISORS


SERVICES


All agencies
in many ways.


University


are serving


student


veterans


can be


assistance


Probably the best results can be obtained if the following are consulted


for the types of information or services indicated:


A. Information


in Charge,


pertaining to


Veterans


Administration


Veterans Administration Contact Office,


procedure


regulations:


Tenth Floor Seagle Building,


Officer
Gaines-


ville.


_ _I _*


I_ _ _ __


I_






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES


Registration Fee,


(Florida


University


Students)


Institute and All


per term


Schools and


Colleges except Law,


..................................................................................... .... 23.50


Registration Fee,


University


Institute and All


Schools


Colleges


except Law,


(Non-Florida Students)


per term


Registration Fee, College of Law,


Registration


College of Law,


Registration Fee, Special Three


(Florida Students)


(Non-Florida


term ...................................


Students)


per term


Weeks Courses


43.50
35.50
55.50
12.00


Late Registration


Biology


and Chemistry


Diploma Fee


EXAMINATION FEES


non-refundable


application


payable


a comprehensive


on the


examination.


application,


Applications


is charged


are necessary


each
case


the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.

REFUND OF FEES


Fees paid in advance for room reservation


be refunded


up to and including,


not after June 13, for first term reservations, or July 20 for second term reservations.


If before 4 P. M. on Friday


of the first


week


each


term


students for


any reason


wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3,
No refunds will be made after this date.


LIVING


will be refunded.


EXPENSES


Board and lodging will


be somewhat


higher this summer than in normal


times.


Food


can be


obtained


at the


University


eating places near the campus.


cafeterias,


average


at certain
breakfast


rooming


houses,


to 504;


at various


lunch


dinner will cost 50<


to $1.00.


Lodging outside the residence halls is available in


private


homes, in rooming houses, and in fraternity houses adjacent to the campus for $12.50 to $30
per person per month, depending upon the quality of the accommodations.


The following table will


afford


an estimate


expenses


for the


Summer


Session


six-weeks' term. The cost of board and lodging is,
the tastes and financial situation of the individual.


course,


variable,


depending


upon


High


Registration


(Florida


Students)


......$ 23.50


$ 23.50


Room
Board
Books


12.50
40.00


30.00
65.00
10.00


Fee a.......................







EXPENSES 11

LOAN FUNDS

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of Summer Session


teachers through


the establishment


certain


funds-the


Florida


State


Scholarship


Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan


Fund, the R. A.


Gray


Loan Fund,


Doyle


Carlton


Loan


Fund,


Sheats


Memorial Loan Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund.


Through the Office of the Dean


of Students, information can be secured concerning other loans available to Summer Session


students.

(1)
(2)
(8)


Loans are governed by the following regulations:


Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
Applicant must be in need of aid.


Applicant must apply for


loan at least two weeks


before opening of a Summer Term.


Application must be made directly to the Dean of the Summer Session.


Applicant must


be recommended


by two school


teaching at the time of application.
Loans are to be used for attendance at the


officials of


the county


in which


he is


University of Florida Summer Session.


Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine months.


Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%,


which is added to the principal fund.


Upon application to the Dean of the Summer Session, blank forms for application for
a scholarship loan will be furnished.


KAPPA DELTA


LOAN


FUND


Upsilon


Chapter


of Kappa


Delta


established


a loan


fund


small


loans


graduate and undergraduate students who are preparing for the teaching profession.


Amon


other eligibility requirements,


a student


desiring a


must


have


a scholarship


average


of not less than B.


Information concerning this loan fund and forms for making applica-


tion for a loan may be secured from the Secretary of the College of Education, Room


P. K.


Yonge Laboratory School.


LEWIS SUMMER SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIPS


1945


Legislature


provided


annual


Summer


School


Scholarships,


now


known


Lewis Scholarships, for approximately one fourth of Florida's teachers. These scholarships
are awarded to teachers upon recommendations of the county superintendents. Application


should be made for them prior to entrance to the Summer Session.


Each of these scholar-


ships carries


a stipend


those


earn


six semester


hours


credit


during


summer term at one of the institutions of higher learning.

UNIVERSITY HOUSING FACILITIES








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


facilities at the Alachua Army


Base.


Rates


quoted below


on all


these facilities are


subject to change.


All facilities are furnished with basic furniture requirements such as


beds, mattresses,


dressers, desks and


chairs.


Residents may


supply their own linens although a linen


equipment


rental


supply


room


is maintained


in Murphree


Basement


convenience


of residents.


A limited


quantity


of extra


equipment as well as pillows


blankets


available for rent.


FACILITIES FOR WOMEN STUDENTS


New dormitory


buildings


on campus,


be reserved,


as required,


for use


women


students during the Summer Session only.


(See description below.)


FACILITIES FOR SINGLE MEN


STUDENTS


Five Permanent Dormitories:


Buckman,


Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls


have been increased in capacity by converting single rooms to rooms for two, doubles and


suites to rooms for three or four, and some triples to rooms for four.


into sections accommodating from 30 to 60 men each.


Each hall is divided


All but a few rooms have lavatories,


there is a community


bath-with shower


toilet facilities-on


each


section.


Steam heat is furnished.


Term rent rates range from $8.25 to $15.00 per person.


Sixteen


New


Dormitories:


These


buildings, located


on-campus,


are of


one-story


con-


struction, contain from 17 to 25 rooms each, and have community showers and toilets and


community study rooms.


Each room will accommodate two students at term rates of $15.00


per student unless demand


for space requires increased


capacity.


Individual


room


space


is limited.


Lavatories are being installed in individual rooms.


Temporary


Structures at


Alachua Army


Air Base:


These buildings, located six miles


from


the campus


on the Jacksonville


highway,


are of


one story,


temporary


construction,


with t
shower


ar-paper


toilet


exteriors.


buildings,


Regular


barracks


are divided


structures, grouped
a community study


around
room 4


concrete


block


a dormitory


sleeping room to accommodate a maximum


30 students.


into rooms for four students each and have inside toilet facilities.


v structures are divided
Heat for all is provided


by coal stoves;


hot water is available.


transportation


is available.


Term rent rates


are $9.00 per person.
FACILITIES FOR MARRIED STUDENTS

Three apartment villages, located on-campus, have been provided by the Federal Public


Housing Authority for veteran' students.


Flavet I contains 26


buildings of


one-story, tem-


porary
rooms.


construction,


divided into


apartment


units containing


Flavet II contains 20 buildings, similar to Flavet I, divided into


or three


76 apartment units


containing


or three


bedrooms.


Flavet


contains


54 buildings


two-story,


temporary construction,


which may provide 448 one or two


bedroom apartments when the


project is completed.


All apartments are equipped with basic furniture requirements, but


* 1- 1


. 4 A


- 4 *


.I I- *- zt-----------------------------------------a_ _ *-_- *__ __


* I







EXPENSES


New


Dormitory, located


monthly rental rate of $22.00.


on-campus,


provide


This building is similar


room
to the


space


new


17 couples


dormitories


described


under facilities for single students.


Cooking will


not be permitted.


APPLICATIONS AND


ASSIGNMENTS


Applicants for assignment to facilities for single students must post a room deposit fee


of $10.00 before an application will be considered for an assignment.


All applications from


incoming students for a given period of school are considered in chronological order accord-
ing to date of room deposit payment, after reassignments of current residents and students


handled.


at the


wherever


University


possible,


Assignments


provided
provided


are made


attendance


for the


is continuous.


individuals


concerned


Il estimated
Room-mate


submit


their


period


requests


f attendance
are honored


applications


room deposit fees on the same date.


Applicants requiring special accommodations because


physical


disabilities


given


every


consideration.


A doctor's


certificate


stating


disability and need is required.
The room deposit fee is not a payment on rent but is a separate deposit against incidental


charges,


damages,


completion


of lease


agreement.


It is refundable


on request


assignment


cannot


be made


or when


student


completed


assigned


period


residence


and removed


from


quarters


same


have


been


checked


as to condition.


If an assignment is cancelled by the assignee


before the day


classes


begin


for the


period,


one-half


deposit


is refunded.


If the


assignment


is cancelled


on or after


classes begin for the period or if the student does not


fulfill


the terms of his assignment,


the fee


is not refundable.


Insofar


as possible,


applicants


notified


in writing


advance as to their exact assignments.


Applicants


assignment to


facilities


married


couples


are not required


to post


deposit until requested to do so by the Housing Of
sidered chronologically, according to date received by


rce.


Such


applications


Housing Office,


con-


when an assignment


can be


made.


Couples


children


receive


priority


over


those


without


children


assignment to apartment units.


GENERAL POLICIES


Rent


other


charges


single


students


are due and


payable


at the beginning


each term or semester,


without


demand


or billing,


at the


Housing


Office.


Failure


rent when due may result


in cancellation


of University


registration.


Rent and other


charges


for married


couples


are due and


payable,


without


demand


billing, at the Housing Office on or before the first day of each calendar month.


Assignees


assigned.


check


in person


at the


Housing


Office


If assignee has not checked in by midnight of day


before


occupying


before classes


begin


quarters
for the


period,


the assignment


be cancelled


deposit


taken


unless


written


notice


arrival after that date has been filed with the Housing Office.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


A student vacating


quarters in Housing Facilities,


either


during or at


the period, must check out in person at the Housing Office.
The University reserves the right to change or cancel any assignment and


the right of


entry by its authorized personnel into any quarters at any time for purposes of inspection,


repair, or


discipline.


Extra electrical appliances are subject to charge per item per term.


The wiring of all


electrical equipment is subject to inspection and must meet required standards.


The use


of hot plates and similar heating and cooking devices and radio sending sets is prohibited.
Applicants who have received room assignments may send heavy luggage ahead, prepaid


addressed


assumes
received.


to their own names, in


no responsibility


beyond


care of
exercise


Murphree


reasonable


Basement.


care


The University
any shipment so







GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL


SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE


INFORMATION


SUMMER SESSION


THE TEACHING OF BEADING PROGRAM

In response to a demand from teachers, supervisors, and administrators in the State,
the College of Education has designed a series of courses in the field of reading to assist


in avoiding and
Laboratory and
two to three we
program. The
basic physical,
teaching reading
and En. 575 anm


Sin solving reading difficulties. Dr. Stella Center, Director of
Clinic of New York University, and a member of her staff will
eks during the first term as special lecturers and consultants in
courses and the laboratories connected with the program will
emotional, biological, psychological, and intellectual factors
g in the courses and laboratories connected with the program. (
1d 576, First Term.)


the Reading
spend from
the reading
examine the
involved in
'See En. 480


SPANISH PROGRAM

A special program, designed for both teachers and students, will be offered. In addition
to the regular courses, there will be films, lectures, and Spanish tables at the University
dining hall. For further information see Spanish under Departments of Instruction.

ENTERTAINMENTS AND PLAYS

Adequate facilities for entertainments and plays are provided in the University Audi.
torium, which has a seating capacity of approximately 1800. In addition to the main
University Auditorium, the auditoriums in Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School will be available. Stress is placed upon performances by the students in plays
and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by the staffs of the depart-
ments of Speech and Music.


RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE


The moral
religious denoi
every service.
for religious Il
tional services
the Student A
in the Florida


and religious a
minations have
Students inte
leadership may
are held from
assembly, and v
Union.


atmosphere
attractive
rested in
take cour
time to til
resper serv


ses
me
icee


the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
aces of worship, and students are welcomed at
study of religion and in preparing themselves
offered by the Department of Religion. Devo-
in the University Auditorium in connection with
s are conducted weekly on the campus lawn, or


THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


meeting


holdings


University


Library


in the


Education.


library


serving the extension activities of the


University is located in the Seagle Building.


of the


outstanding


collections


in the


University


is the


Yonge


Library


Florida History.


This library,


gift of


Julien


Yonge of Pensacola,


was established


in 1944 as a research center for students of Florida history.


It is one of the best of the


libraries of Floridiana,


and is


being steadily


University


Library


developed


are the


under


University


guidance
College


its donor.


Reserve,


Periodicals Reading Rooms.
desk, and the card catalog.


On the second floor are the Reference Room, the circulation


This catalog indicates the holdings not only of the


University


Library but also of the separate libraries mentioned above.


In the book stacks are forty-


eight carrels for use of graduate students.

BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE


The services of the


Bureau


of Vocational


Guidance and


Mental


Hygiene


are available


to all students.


The chief function of the Bureau is to provide the individual student with


an analysis


characteristics,


interests,


abilities,


together


necessary


information about occupations, so that he may choose his vocation more intelligently.


Vocational information is


provided by


a reading shelf


which the


Bureau maintains


University


Library.


shelf


is supplied


an extensive


series


authoritative


monographs on various occupations.


In addition, the
hamper their work.
as to those referred


Bureau aids students in


the solution


personal


problems which may


This service is open both to students who request it themselves as well


to the


Bureau


by members of


the faculty


administrative officers.


CERTIFICATION


OF TEACHERS


Persons


write


to the


desiring


State


on Certification


Undergraduate


information


Department
Teachers.
Certificates


concerning
? Education,


booklet


in the


certification


Tallahassee,


gives


various


fields


of teachers


Florida,


requirements


as well


are advised


requesting


for regular


as instructions


Bulletin


Graduate
concerning


applications for certificates.
Persons interested in shifting from temporary certification to regular certification should
write the State Department of Education for recommendations as to what summer courses


count toward fulfilling requirements.


case


the individual


does not hold a


degree


from


an accredited


institution,


as defined


college,


should


in Certificate


have


Bulletin


transcript


before


evaluated


writing


State


an accredited
Department for


such suggestions.
Certificates are


granted by


the State


Department


Education, not by the


University.


For the student's


information, some of the requirements of the State Department of Educa-


tion listed in Bulletin A on Certification of Teachers are repeated below, together with the
numbers of courses offered by the University to meet these requirements.


*UNIVERSITY COURSES MEETING THE







GENERAL INFORMATION


Elementary


Certificates:


Child Development
Educational Psychology
History and Principles o
to Education
Elementary School Cun
Methods of Teaching
Elementary School
Principles and Methods


Readily
Children'
Methods
Eleme


En. 385 (or En. 203 or En. 319)
En. 386 (or En. 207)


r Introduction


En. 241


riculum
in the


(or CEn. 13 or En. 101 or 102)


471 (or En. 308)


of Teaching


ng


s Literature
of Teaching Science in
rntary School


Methods in Arithmetic
Methods in Social Studies
Geography
Observation and Practice Teaching
Public School Music
Public School Art
Health Education in Elementary Grades
Physical Education in Elementary
Grades
Penmanship


471 (or En. 221)


Gl. 301 or G1. 302


En. 480


(or En. 209 or 222)


En. 471 (or En. 124)
Sc. 301 or 302 (or En. 201)


C-2 or Courses in Gpy.
En. 405 or En. 421-2 (
Msc. courses
Pc. courses
HPI. 387


HPI. 373
BEn. 97


For Secondary Certificates:
English
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science:
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Conservation


C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh.
C-42, C-421 and courses in CMs. and Ms.
Courses in HP1.


C-2, Courses in Ps. and Cy.
C-6, Courses in Bly. and Bty.
C-l or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385 or
or Es. 381 or Es. 382


Gpy.


Social


Studies:


History
Political Science
Economics
Sociology
Geography
Conservation
General


Courses
Courses
Courses
Courses
Courses


CHy.
CP1.
CEs.
CSy.
Gpy.


See Science
C-1 will be counted
required but will
requirements.


381, 385


as 8


the total


not reduce


hours


the specific


Some of the certification requirements listed


in the


literature of


the State


Department


may not be represented by the same titles in this bulletin.


To facilitate finding the proper


course descriptions for such fields consult the guide on page 49.


or En. 253)


(or Hg. 101)







BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


3. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for
the same. In case the student fails to apply on the Registration Card at the
time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 110, Lan-


guage Hall, to have his application for extension properly recorded.


A list


of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 11 for the First Term and August


20 for the Second Term.


In case of error in this list, students should report


to the


Registrar.


student will


be recommended


extension


whose


name does not appear on this list by


29 for the Second Term.


18 for the First Term or August


Students should indicate exactly the name that


appears on the certificate which they wish to


have extended.


4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin English,


State Superintendent


of Public


Instruction,


Tallahassee,


Florida,


within


year after the close of the Summer


Term.


Otherwise extension will not be


granted.


TEACHER PLACEMENT BUREAU


The purpose of the


Teacher Placement Bureau of the College of Education is to assist


in placing


utilize


charged


their


University


special


University


Florida


training


students.


students
abilities


Those who


alumni


to the


wish


to avail


in teaching
t advantage.
themselves <


positions


which


service
service


should


submit complete credentials to the Director and arrange an interview with him if possible.
Superintendents, principals, and other officials seeking competent teachers and students


desiring


assistance


from


Teacher


Placement


Bureau


in finding


desirable


positions


should address all requests to the Director of the


Teachers' Placement Bureau,


College of


Education,


University of Florida,


Gainesville.


THE P. K.


YONGE LABORATORY


SCHOOL


The P.


Yonge Laboratory


School


was established


to serve the


public


schools


other educational agencies through four major functions:
1. By demonstrating an excellent quality of teaching in elementary and high school.


2. By


assisting the


schools of


the state through


counseling


teachers


distribution of educational materials.


3. By


serving


as an experimental


educational


laboratory


investigation


kinds of school


problems, for the production of


materials,


and for


experiments


in improved methods of teaching and supervised student teaching.
4. By providing opportunities for observation of classroom management and partici-
nation in teaching.







GENERAL INFORMATION 19

FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY


The Florida


Curriculum Laboratory


is located


on the third


floor


P. K.


Yonge


Building.


This Laboratory is made possible by the cooperation of the Florida State Depart-


ment of Education, the College of Education, and the P. K.


Yonge Laboratory School of


University


bulletins,


magazine


Florida.
s. and


Professional
supplementary


books, tF
materials


extbooks,


courses


are available


study,


use of


pamphlets,


Florida


educators.
The Joseph R. Fulk Library of School Administration is located in the Florida Curricu-
lum Laboratory for the use of school administrators.


UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE


University


Institute


been organized for veterans


adult


students who


wish


to complete their high school


requirements


to the


University.


work under an


Classes


at tl


accelerated I
ie secondary


program and


school


level


meet the entrance


are organized


English,


mathematics,


social


studies,


Institute receive benefits under the


Veterans


science.


Veterans


Administration an


enrolled
id enjoy


in the
regular


University
University


privileges.


For further information


apply


to the


Director


University


Institute,


Room


Yonge Building.


For admission make application to the Registrar.


ANNOUNCEMENTS


The Orange


mimeographed sheet,


on all


bulletin


boards,


Bulletin


published


carries


is the


every


notices


official


other


changes


bulletin
during t


Summer


Summer


in schedule,


Session.


Session


meetings,


This


posted
found


articles, and other pertinent information.


Announcements made in the General Assembly;


notices on


bulletin


boards in Florida


Union,


Peabody


Laguage


Hall;


news


items


in the


Summer


Gator


serve


to keep


Summer


Session


students


informed


concerning student activities.


ORGANIZATIONS

PHI KAPPA PHI


A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the


University in


1912.


eligible


consideration


membership,


a student


must


previously


have


earned at the


University at least thirty semester hours of credit, must have been guilty of


no serious


breach of discipline, and must stand


among the


upper tenth


candidates


degrees


in his college.


Eligibility


consideration


for membership


is assured


every


Blue






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


and service. Both men and women are admitted to membership. Members are chosen from
juniors, seniors, graduate students, faculty, and alumni Requirements for membership
are, in general, as follows: a scholastic average of at least B; evidence of abiding interest
in educational service; a good professional attitude; and good personal-social character-
istics. During the Summer Sessions the chapter holds a meeting each week.


PHI BETA KAPPA


Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776.


objectives of the society, the
of Arts and Sciences. Not
semester, including both gra
In addition to conferring
Sciences, the society seeks, I
to honor each year not more
who, irrespective of his ho
undergraduate career in suc]
the fine arts, or any other li]


University of Florida
more than 15 per cen
duatine classes of the


chapter
t of the
Summer


University


of Florida


In conformity with


restricts
senior c
Session,


election to
lass gradua
is eligible


in 1938.
national
College
in each
election.


membership upon qualified seniors in the College of Arts and
by means of an Award in Recognition of Creative Achievement,
than one graduating senior from all the colleges on the campus
nor point average, has distinguished himself throughout his
h fields of activity as creative writing, dramatics, and forensics,
beral discipline, and has revealed a decided talent, a persistent


interest, and a prospect of mature achievement in later life.


RECREATION

THE FLORIDA UNION


The Florida
place for clubs
tainment and I
to use the game
in the Union b
teas, piano recit
The Florida
and permission


Union is the official
and student officials.
recreation. Students a
room, library, lounges,
building. The Summer
als, and other events of
Union operates Camp


center


The Un
attending
pianos,
Session
special
Wauburi


student


activities,


provides


a


ion also sponsors a broad program
the Summer Session are cordially
meeting rooms, and all of the other
lecture series, artist exhibitions, re
interest will be presented during the
z. located about nine miles from the


to use the camp may be obtained at the Union desk.


Camp


meeting
of enter-
r invited
facilities
ceptions,
summer.
campus,


Wauburg has


picnicking and swimming facilities.

INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS

A broad recreational program of athletics will be conducted for the students and faculty
by the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics during both terms of the Summer
Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will be organized with competition in softball
during both terms. Competition in tennis (singles and double), shuffleboard (mixed


Y


,







GENERAL INFORMATION


six weeks at the Athletic Office.


The Summer Gator, the


Orange and


Blue


Bulletin, and


the Florida Intramural Bulletin will carry current notices and announcements about various
phases of the program.


THE SWIMMING POOL


swimming


open


daily,


except


Monday,


from


until


P.M.


Dressing facilities for women will be located in the Old


Gym, and men will


dress in the


basement of the Basketball Court.






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ACADEMIC


REGULATIONS


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and


for fulfilling


should


requirements


confer


deans


degree.


their


respective


Several


colleges


before


regarding


registration


choice


students
courses.


Juniors and seniors should confer with the heads of the departments in which they expect


to earn majors.


Seniors must file, in the office of the Registrar, formal application for a


degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive


the degree.


The official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.


Courses can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college
in which the student is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change


at the office of the Registrar.


Unclassified students must secure the approval of the Dean


of the University for this purpose.

CREDITS

The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester
hour.


RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS


1. The minimum residence requirement for the


baccalaureate degree is two semesters,


or one semester


three summer


terms,


or five


summer terms.


advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the


break


their


residence


at the


University


attending


another


students


University.
institution


offering
Students


credit


toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the Master's Degree two semesters or six summer terms are necessary to satisfy


residence


requirements,


except


Master


Education


Degree,


for which


requirements are two semesters and one summer term, or six summer terms.


3. Students are required to complete the


Law)


thirty


credit


hours


(28 in


applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in


the College of
the respective


colleges from which they expect to be graduated.


Exception to this regulation may be made


only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case
may the amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six
hours required for a baccalaureate degree.


AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED

No student will be allowed to take more than one fourth of the credits toward a degree


*~~~ U --







ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD


The maximum load for which an undergraduate student may register is 7 semester hours
per term. The maximum load in the Graduate School is 6 semester hours per term.
The minimum load for any student is four semester hours. Registration for less than
four hours must be approved by the Dean of the college in which the student is enrolled.
After registration, the student may reduce his load to less than four hours only with the
approval of the Senate Committee on Student Petitions.


GRADUATION WITH HONORS


For
Catalog.


regulations


various


colleges


covering


graduation


Honors,


see the


UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities who wish
to earn credits in the Summer Session to be transferred eventually to their respective insti-
tutions, and (b) other students not candidates for degrees.
2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an unclassified
student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of the colleges or schools
of the University, he may do so (1) by regularizing his admission to the University (pre-
sent all the credentials required) and (2) by meeting the requirements (in effect at the
time of his application for candidacy) for admission to the school or college he desires
to enter.


such a student is admitted


to candidacy for


a degree, credits


earned


while an


unclassified student will be accepted in so far as they apply
(in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the
student. A student must have been registered as a regular
from which he expects to receive the Bachelor's Degree for
in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the
requirement of at least five summer terms in the University


toward
college
student
at least
Master'


the degree requirements
or school chosen by the
in the college or school
three summer terms and
s Degree. The residence


will not be waived in any case.


4. Students regularly enrolled during
students during the Summer Session.


academic


cannot


become


unclassified


5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite statement
of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy in the various colleges
and schools. This statement will make clear that credits earned while a student is regis-
tered as an unclassified student can be applied toward a degree in the college of his choice
only if under regular procedure this credit will apply toward that degree.


6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will 1
the University and assistants chosen by him from the faculty.


approved


Dean of






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


otherwise, it will be mailed to the s
Instructors shall immediately report al
ment Head.
Should any absences or failure to
student will be dropped from the cot
dropped from more than one course
Student Progress, who may rule that
marked "Dropped for Non-Attendance"
may be.


student's last University address by the Registrar.
I such warnings to the Course Chairman or Depart-


class work be incurred after this warning, the
and be given a failing grade. Should he be
case will be considered by the Committee on
be dropped from the University and his record
"Dropped for Unsatisfactory Work", as the case


FAILURE IN STUDIES


A person registered in one of the colleges or professional schools of the


who fails fifty per cent or more of his work in any term
failure in studies and will not be readmitted to the U
semester, except upon approval of a formal petition by the
Senate. A student who has been dropped once and in an3
fails fifty per cent or more of his work shall be dropped
for readmission. In administering the above regulation,
course only cause a student to be dropped.


Upper Division


or semester will be dropped for
university until the lapse of one
Sub-Committee of the University
r subsequent period of attendance
permanently and not be eligible
in no case shall failure in one


Stude]
Committee
committee
has been
consider


nts registered in th
:e on Student Progr
e will be guided by
in attendance one
d the equivalent of


fifty per cent or m
readmission until 1
the Sub-Committee
subsequent period
permanently and ,


lore
the
of
of
Aill


of J
laps
the
attend
not


bit
e
U'


*(


University


College


have


their records


at the end of each period of attendance.


the following policy.


reviewed 1
In general


The student in the Lower Division who


semester or the equivalent (two six-weeks
a semester) and in any subsequent period
I work will be dropped first time and will
of one semester, except on approval of a
diversity Senate. A student who has dronn


dance fails fifty per cent or
be eligible for readmission.


summer terms are
of attendance fails


not be
formal
ed once


more of his work shall
In administering the


lation, in no- case, however, shall failure in one course only cause a student to


eligible for
petition by
and in any
be dropped
above regu-
be dropped.


COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS


The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must successfully paw
six or more to complete the program of the University College) are administered by the
Board of University Examiners and are given in January, May, July, and August of each
year. A student must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think
in the several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. Standings
on the comprehensive examinations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are not
subject to change by any other agency.


APPLICATIONS FOR COMPI


iSIVE EXAMINATIONS


TTnivrem; af (!nll(ahl ctnAcntc wrima Qar onnwnlaA in a nmi at thi


tnma tlia evanainatann wa


IO







ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


accepted only for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Examiners.
The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give University College students
examinations by application.


Should a student fail a comprehensive
the examination by repeating the course
additional preparation must be submitted
application to repeat the examination.


course examination, he may qualify to repeat
or by further independent study. Evidence of
to the Board of Examiners with the formal







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SCHOOLS


THE


AND


UNIVERSITY


COLLEGES

COLLEGE


INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT


In a reorganization at
were placed in one college
Division, which includes
colleges and a core progr


the University of ]
. The University
the pre-professiona
am of basic educa


Council on Education defined this program
of nonspecialized and nonvocational educati
so to speak, of educated persons. . the
people must have if they are to be good
freshman and sophomore years at the Univei
between these objectives of general education
preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility t
remain four years or longer and earn degrees,
also accepts its civic responsibility to help
the University. These students--more than
because they do not continue and earn degri
state university than an odd assortment o:
at the University of Florida a group of con
give some unity and meaning to a begin


Florida in 1935, all freshmen and sophomores
College administers all the work of the Lower
d work for the Upper Division schools and
tion for all students. In 1944 the American
: "General education refers to those phases
on that should be the common denominator,
type of education which the majority of our
citizens, parents, and workers." During his
rsity, a student's time is about evenly divided
i and those of pre-professional or professional


toward the professional training
the University of Florida as a s
those who spend only one or
two-thirds of all enrolled-are
ees, and they probably deserve 3
f only "introductory courses."
aprehensive courses have been
ler's program. These compreh


; of men who
tate institution
two years at
not "failures"
more from the
Consequently
worked out to
ensive courses


that make up the core program are:


American Institutions (known hereafter as C-1)
The Physical Sciences (C-2)
Freshman English: Reading, Speaking, and Writing
Practical Logic: Straight Thinking (C-41);
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
The Humanities (C-5)
Biological Science (C-6)


(C-3)


GUIDANCE

If a freshman has definitely decided to study toward a certain profession, these compre-


hensive courses make up an essential
the respective colleges.) However, if


on registration day
a a J


about
al I


his life's !
a al al -.


part of his
he is still
work. His
a-t a i


program. (See
"undecided," he
program may b
*l al a q


programs that follow for
is not urged to "guess"
e made up largely from
S1 a 4l[ aR -t -






SCHOOLS


AND COLLEGES


tive steps toward a profession by taking special


subjects


to test aptitudes,


interests,


ability, he is also studying the several great areas of human understanding and achievement.


The program is adjusted to the individual, but there must be a more
adjustment than just his chance whim of the moment. The material o
courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary function.
this training must point forward to distant goals, this work in the Uni
also present materials which are directly related to life experiences
mediately become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in
steps. Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress reports,
tests, basic vocational materials, selected material in the comprehens
conferences, adjustments for individual differences, election privileges,


examinations-all


are parts of


a plan


designed


guide


students.


substantial basis for
f the comprehensive
While, of necessity,
versity College must
and which will im-
making correct next
vocational aptitude
ive courses, student
and comprehensive
specifically, however,


a student is assigned
his staff acts as the
professional schools
who are working in 3
Guidance, then, ii
at more than a doze
of directing the thin


is attempted at t
students consult U
the last month of
formal conference


h



n


to a comprehensive course
student's official advisor.
iave special committees to
lajor part in the special su
not attempted at one office
i places. The whole drive
king of the student. While


he University
pper Division
each school ye
at which eac


chain
Man
help
ibjecl
-e by
Sof
le th


irn
ly

t


man. This chairman or a member of
of the Upper Division colleges and
those students in the Lower Division
fields.


one individual with a sm;
the University College pro
e necessary correlation anm


College Office, throughout the University Co
deans and department heads to discuss future w
ar these informal conferences are concluded by
,h student fills out a pre-registration card for


all staff, but
gram is one
d unification
llege period
rork. During
a scheduled
the coming


year.
Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests to all seniors in every


high school of the state.
with the common body of
ment test results indicate


Since many
knowledge a
the variation


student at the University. Additional
examinations required in each of the
University to be used as a further ai
should take. A student who has had
and whose standings on the placement


high schools are
so needed by all,
I that should be I
placement tests,
areas mentioned
d in determining


three
tests


also trying to acquaint the student
their records along with the place-
nade in the program followed by a
similar to the final comprehensive
above, are being worked out at the
the pattern a freshman's program


or four years in any subject field listed above
indicate superior knowledge and understanding


at that level may elect more specialized work in the subject field


THE ASSOCIATE OF


The Associate of Arts Certificate is
of two years of planned work. In spec
hours including pre-professional work
core program.


hereafter indicated.


ARTS CERTIFICATE


awarded in recognition of the successful completion
ific detail, one must pass at least sixty-four semester
and the comprehensive courses that make up the


1






BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NORMAL PROGRAM


Freshman


Year


Hours


Sophomore Year


HoBn


1.-American Institutions _........--... 8
2.-The Physical Sciences ...-.-- 6
8.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--
Freshman English 8
4.-Logic and Mathematics ,, 6
5.-Departmental Electives ....... ........ 2-6
Military Science; Physical Fitness --
80-84


1.-The Humanities .- ---.... 8
2.-Biological Science ---.--- 6
3.-Departmental Electives .-..----16-20
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
80-84


A student who has had three or four years of preparatory school study in any one of the
subject-areas of the comprehensive courses and whose placement test grades indicate superior
knowledge and understanding at that level may substitute an approved elective.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS ENTERING THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE IN THE SUMMER SESSION


Freshmen
attending the


be able to complete nearly


entire


twelve


weeks


Summer


Session.


program for the first year


Suggestions


as to Summer


Programs are listed below.


These should be used in conjunction with the regular University


Catalog and after consulting the Dean of the University College or a member of the Advisors
Group.


1. For the majority of students-any


combination


totalling not more than seven hours per term.


First Term Hours
C-ll American Institutions ............ 4


C-21 The Physical Sciences ..........

C-31 Freshman English ................

C-41 Practical Logic or
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics ....


C-61 Biological Science ..............


Basic


Program


covers the minimum


Association


or by t


for Pre-Medi
1 pre-medical
he American


'c


;al or Pre-Dental
or pre-dental work
Dental Association


SE


of the following 3 and 4 hour courses


second Term Hours


C-12 American Institutions ............
(cont'd)
C-22 The Physical Sciences ......
(cont'd)
C-32 Freshman English ................
(cont'd)
C-41 Practical Logic or
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics ....
(cont'd)
C-62 Biological Science ..................
(cont'd)


Students.


-The


prescribed


its member


program


listed


3


below


the American Medical


schools.


Since


some


schools require more, the student should write directly to the medical


or dental school he


is considering for a catalog and specific information concerning its requirements.







SCHOOLS


AND COLLEGES


SUGGESTED SUMMER SESSION PROGRAM FOR PRE-MEDICAL OR PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS


First Term


Hours


Second Term


Hours


C-ll American Institutions


C-31 Freshman English

or


C-61 Biological


Science .....................


C-12 American Institutions
(cont'd)


Freshman English
(cont'd)


C-62 Biological


Science ................


(cont'd)


And one or two of the following each term to make a total of not more than


seven


hours.


First Term


C-42 Fundamental


Hours


Mathematics


Second Term
C-41 Practical


Hours


Logic


Cy. 101


General


Chemistry


General Animal Biology


Cy. 102 General Chemistry ........
(cont'd)
Bly. 102 General Animal Biology
(cont'd)


AGRICULTURE


program


for freshmen


sophomores


working


a degree


in the


College


Agriculture:


Freshman Year


Hours


Sophomore Year


Hours


1.-American Institutions --..- .. --


2.-Biological


Science


8.-Biology and Botany Laboratories ....


4.-Reading,
Freshman


Speaking and Writing--
in English ......... .... -


1.-Agricultural Chemistry


2.-Logic
3.-The


5.--lectivpa in Agriculture or C-2 .........
(May be postponed until 2nd year)
Military Science; Physical Fitness


and Mathematics _.......... --


Humanities


4.--Bty. 303,


or Bly.


5-Electives in Agric


Military


Science;


102. or Ps. 226-- 8
culture or C-2..-- 6-9
Physical Fitness -4
81-24


28-34


At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower Division;
additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number of hours
required for an Upper Division degree.


A student taking electives in Agriculture or
year additional electives.


C-2 the first year may carry during


his second


Electives in Agriculture are:


Ag. 301, Ag. 306*


, Al. 211*


, As. 201*


, As. 306, Ay. 321 *


Ay. 324*, Dy. 311*, Ey. 202*, Ey. 301, Fy. 313*


, He. 201, He. 312, Py. 301*


, Sis. 301, Sis. 302,


limited to one course per


freshman year.


department.


Starred


courses only


Students should consult the curriculum


may


be elected


the department in


during
which


expect to major for suggestions as to courses to be elected.
Students intending to major in Agricultural Chemistry are required to take Cy.
instead of Acy. 125-126.


101-102


Forestry.-Students working for


a degree


in Forestry


follow the


program


-


above







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Freshman


Year


Sophomore


Year


1.-American Institutions


*2.-The Physical


Sciences


3.-Freshman English
*4.-Logic and Mathematics
5.-Fundamentals of Architecture


Military


Science;


1.-The Humanities


2.-Biological


3.-Basic


Science


Mathematics


4.-Fundamentals of Architecture
5.-Electives


Physical Fitness


Military


Science:


*A student who has had three or more


and whose


standings on the placement


levels may substitute Chemistry


Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.


electives


tests


years


of mathematics and


science


in preparatory school


indicate superior knowledge and understanding at these


or Physics for the Physical


Sciences


and Basic


This choice permits during the sophomore


which may be chosen from advanced work in Architecture.


Mathematics for


year


additional


At least


Division


sixty


academic


; additional approved


of hours required for


hours p3
electives


Military


taken


an Upper Division degree.


Science


are required


during the first two


years


to complete


may


the Lower


reduce the number


Students


substitute


working


125-126,


degree


Agricultural


of Bachelor
Chemistry, f


Science


105-106,


Mathematics.


Students


working for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor


mercial Art substitute P


mental


g. 101-102, Fundamentals of Pictorial Art, for Ae.


of Architecture, and take electives in place of Ms.


in Com-


101-102, Funda-


105-106, Basic Mathematics.


ARTS AND SCIENCES


A student who


plans to earn a 4


degree


in the


college of Arts and Sciences has


the following basic program


Basic Program


Freshman Year
1.-American Institutions
'2.-The Physical Sciences
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--
Freshman English
*4--Logic and Mathematics


Sophomore Year
1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science
3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20


semester


Military


hours)


Science;


Physical Fitness


5.-Electives
Military


(2-6 semester hours)


Science;


Physical Fitness


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at
these levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics
for Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number


of hours required for an


Upper Division degree.


Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.-There are no specific electives to be taken


during the freshman and sophomore years;


however, it is impossible to earn a major in


four semesters in some departments of the College of Arts and Sciences.


It is, therefore,


distinctly to the advantage of the student to include as electives during the first two years
as much as he can of the contemplated major field or of the required foreign language.


Bachelor


Journalism.-It


strongly


recommended


Public


Opinion;


Jm. 214, Introduction


to Journalism


Jm. 215, History


of Journalism;


and Jm.


216, Principles of Journalism, be taken as electives during the first two years.


Physical Fitness


in Landscape


Basic


Architecture








SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


of Arts, another to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and the third to the degree


of Bachelor of Science.


In order to complete one of these combined curricula in the shortest


possible time, it is necessary that a student select as electives in


University


College


program courses which will form an integral part of his major in the College of Arts and
Sciences.


School of


Pharmacy.-A student working for a degree in Pharmacy should follow the


Basic Program for Arts and Sciences including among


his electives


101-102,


General


Chemistry; Phy. 223-224, Galenical Pharmacy; and Pgy. 221-222, Practical Pharmacognosy.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


The program for students who are working for a Bachelor


's degree directly or a degree


in combination with Law in the College of Business


Administration is


as follows:


Freshman


First Semester


Hours


Year


Second Semester


Bourn


1.-American Institutions
*2.-The Physical Sciences
*8.-Logic or Mathematics


S.- .. .. a
.. . -a
tv411 gL tDl
4 teIt OI NI


4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--


Freshman


5.-Approved
Military


English


I Electives
Science; P


.-. .C *.. ... -.
- 4 4**-* -l an


physicall Fitness


1.-American


*2.-The


Physical


*3.-Mathematics


Institutions


Sciences
or Logic


- Is II a nI a a n
. -. CS - C*


4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-


Freshman


5.-Approved
Military


English


Physical Fitnes...

Physical Fitness-


Electives
Science;


14-17


14-17

Sophomore Year


1.--Accounting
2.--Economics


. -. n*- -*- .. .... a ... a a4*f. l
S- C 4tSt -.... ..- ...a .....


3,.-The Humanities -........ -. ... ... -....


4.-Biological
5.-Statistics


Science


Military Science; Physical Fitness


1.--Accounting
2.-Economics


- --.. ... .. .- .- ..... e .n .
. .t ......... .. .... ........ilai


3.-The Humanities .......- .-....... ....


4.-Biological


5.-Elective ..... ............................................. 3-4
Military Science; Physical Fitness --
15-17


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at
these levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics
for Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.


At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division.


COURSES IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


following


courses


Economics


Business


Administration


taken


students in the University College:


Es. 203, Elementary Statistics;


Es. 205-206, Economic


Science .... ............ ........







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Other


related


courses


available


to students


Introductory Typewriting; BEn. 91, Introductory
BEn. 98, Office Organization and Practice.


in the


University


Shorthand;


BEn.


College are BEn.
94, Stenography;


EDUCATION


program


for freshmen


sophomores


working for


a degree


College


Education is as follows:


Freshman Year


1.-American Institutions
*2.-The Physical Sciences
8.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--
Freshman English
*4.-Logic and Mathematics
5.-Electives (2-6 semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Sophomore Year


1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science
3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20
semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitnees


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at
these levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics
for Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.

With the exception of those specializing in the fields listed below, students in Education


should include during the first two years


232, Sy. 241, and Psy. 201.


En. 241, HP1. 387, HP1.


If En. 241 and HPl. 387


131 or 132 or 231 or


are taken during the first year, the


student


carry in


the second


additional


electives from


subject


matter


fields


from Education.
A student majoring in Health and Physical Education should take during the first two
years HP1. 131-132, HP1. 231-232, and sufficient electives in Education to meet Lower


Division requirements.


If HPL


131-132 are taken in


the first year,


there is room in


program the second year for additional electives in the subject matter fields or in Education.
A student majoring in Industrial Arts Education should take during the first two years
In. 111-112, HPi. 131 or 132 or 231 or 232, In. 211-212, En. 241, HPI. 387, En. 305 and


En. 385.


If In. 111-112 are taken the first year, the student may, during the sophomore


year, take additional electives in Education.
A student majoring in Business Education should take during the first two years BEn.
81 and 91, Es. 205-206, Bs. 211-212, En. 241, and En. 386. If BEn. 81 and 91 are taken


during


year,


student


in the


second


additional


electives


Education.


Program for Students Majoring in Agricultural Education


Freshman


Year


Hours


Sophomore Year


Hours







SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS WHO EXPECT TO TEACH IN GRADES 1-6


The following courses are required to complete the regular program


of the


University


College and to meet the requirements of the
graduate Certificate in Elementary Education,
Certification of Teachers.
Completion of the basic comprehensive cc
from the other courses will entitle the studies
admission to the College of Education, where
pleted for the Uundergraduate Certificate am


State Department of Education for an Under-
as stated in the State Department's Bulletin A,


and at least
the Certificate
remainder of
apply on the


twenty-two semester hours
of Associate of Arts and
the courses may be comn-
bachelor's degree.


Basic Comprehensive Courses Minimum Credit
C-i American Institutions ...................t..............a................................e. 8
C-2 The Physical Sciences ........................................-...-....................... 6
C-3 Freshman English ..... ................................................................ 8
C- 41 Practical Logic .n..... .................. ..................-.....-............. ......... 3
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics ............................................................. 3
C-5 The Humanities ............... -.............. ................................ 8
C-6 Biological Science .......................... ..................-....sc...... 6


Additional Courses Required
for Undergraduate Certificate


En. 241


En.
En.

En.
En.
*En.

*En.
Gl.

Gl.
Eh.
ScL

Sdl.


BEn. 97
HPI. 387
HP1. 373


Minimum Credit


Introduction to Education
or -.-..-. ......
Development and Organization of Education
Child Development

Educational Psychology
Problems of Instruction.............................. ................................
Student Teaching

Student Teaching
Children's Science
Sor a t""..........."."-".....'.... ...-'......"....et. t"......
Children's Science
Children's Literatur e..........................................
Children's Social Studies 1


or
Children's Social Studies J
Public School Music ................................................................
Public School Art ........................................... ..........
Handwriting .......................... ........... ...................................
Health Education ....... .................................................- .......
Methods and Materials in Physical Education........................
Geography .......... ................................ ...... ........................
History or Political Science .....n......e..-..............c......*..-


*







BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


General Preparation Requirements


American


Minimum Credit
......... 8


Institutions


The Physical Sciences

Biological Science
Freshman English ...........................................................................
The Humanities ....................... ......... ................. ......... ...............


HPI. 387
HPl. 373


Health


Education


Methods and Materials


in Physical


Education


Professional Requirements


Minimum Credit


Introduction to Education
or
Development and Organization of Education


*En.
En.
G1.


Problems


Student


Instruction


Teaching


- .... -,..,,.-........,. -


Child Development


Children's
Children's
Children's


Science ..
Literature


Social


Studies


Public School Music


Public School


History


Art .........................................................................


or Political


Science


Note:


Total for all courses must be at least 64 semester hours.


who will have had 16 months actual


teaching


experience within


three-year period immediately preceding the completion of the application for teachers'


certificate.


*Not required of those


**Not required of those who have passed the State Department of Education examination on
the Constitution.


ENGINEERING


program


for freshmen


sophomores


working


a degree


in the


College


Engineering is as follows:


Freshman Year


Sophomore


Year


1.-American


*2.-C-2


Institutions


or Cy. 105-106


3.-Freshman English
*4.-C-41 and C-42 or Ms. 105-106


**5.-M1.


181, Elective


Military Science


1.-The Humanities


(from list below)
Physical Fitness


2.-Biological


Scie


students in
3.-Ms. 353-354


4.-Ps. 205-20
5.-Electives


6,


mnce (elective except for
Public Health Engineering)


207-208


(departmental electives as listed


below)
Military Science:


Physical Fitness


Departmental


prerequisites


are as follows


Chemical


Engineering,


Cg. 342, Cg.


Civil Engineering (General)


M1. 182, Ig. 365, Cl. 223-226; -Civil Engineer-


(Public Health Option)


Cy. 204,


Cy. 26


Electrical


Engineering,


Industrial


Engineering,


Mechanical


Engineering,


Ml inn nn0i nnn


*n -Ix i y^ _^f^


lVI I







SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


SUGGESTED SUMMER SESSION PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS PLANNING TO ENTER THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


First


Term


Hours


Second Term


Hours


Ms. 105 Basic Mathematics ..............

And one of the following:

C-l1 .American Institutions ................

C-31 Freshman English ......................


Ms. 106 Basic Mathematics ..............
(cont'd)
And one of the following:

C-12 American Institutions .............
(cont'd)
C-32 Freshman English ......................
(cont'd)


These


dean


are not inflexible


or an advisor


there


programs; tney
is a particular


varied


need


or if


upon


a student


consultation


produces


with


satisfactory


evidence of his ability to carry more advanced courses.

*Both Cy. 105-106 and Ms. 105-106 are required, but students who have not had four years of
mathematics and four years of science in their high school preparatory work are urged to take
C-2 and C-41 and C-42 first.
**Students desiring to graduate in minimum time in Engineering must complete their course
in engineering drawing during their firat year in residence. This will require equipment costing
approximately thirty dollars.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND


ATHLETICS


The program for Freshman and Sophomore students who are working toward a Bachelor's
degree in the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics.


Freshman


Year


Courses


First Semester


Credits


C-l--American Institutions ..................
C-3-Reading. Speaking and Writ-
ing-Freshman English ............
C-6--Biological Science ......... ........
HPI. 121-Observation and Participa-
tion I ....................... .....................
HPI. 131-Athletic Coaching I ......................
Military Science
Physical Education


Sophomore


Courses


Second Semester


Credits


C-l-American Institutions ............
C-3-Reading, Speaking and Writ-
ing-Freshman English ........
C-6--Biological Sciences ...................
HPI. 122-Observation and Participa-
tion II .................... ..................
HPI. 132--Athletic Coaching II ................
En. 241-Introduction to Education ........
Military Science
Physical Education


Year


First Semester


C- 2-The Physical
C-41--Practical Log
C- 5--The Humaniti


Sciences .................
ic . .. ,
es ~.. ~....


HPI. 221-Observation and Participa-
tion III n..........................................
HPI. 231--Athletic Coaching III ....................
En. 385-Child Development ..........................
M i+-i fr Sl/ n f*


Credits


Courses


Second Semester


C- 2-The Physical


Credits


Sciences


C-42-Fundamental Mathematics ......
C- 5--The Humanities ..........................
HP1. 222-Observation and Participa-
tion IV .................... ........ --
HPI. 232--Athletic Coaching IV ................
HPI. 485--Anatomy, Physiology and
K inesiolo y .................. ...... ........


Courses


<






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


OF


THE


UPPER


DIVISION


COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE


Summer Session


offerings of


College


Agriculture


provide


basic


courses


the several curricula and a few advanced courses which will enable students now enrolled
to speed up their individual programs.
A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture are


offered.


complete


information


on the


requirements


these


curricula


student


should consult the University Catalog.


SCHOOL OF


ARCHITECTURE AND


ALLIED


ARTS


Undergraduate work in Architecture, Building Construction,


Painting,


Commercial


Art will be offered during the 1947 Summer Session.


Subjects will be taught by the project


method,


in which


student


progresses


individually


according


to his


own


proficiency,


ambition, and experience.


Credits are


given


on the


basis of


acceptable


work completed.


detailed


requirements


for the several


degrees


offered,


as well


as for


more


complete


description of the courses, consult the University


Catalog.


COLLEGE


ARTS


AND


SCIENCES


Inasmuch as most


subjects taught


in the


public


schools


are continued


on the


college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular


service to teachers of the State.


Others who


profit


particularly


operation


College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish


either to make
institutions and


deficiencies


or to


other colleges of


hasten


graduation,


University who wish


students


to complete


other collegiate
basic arts and


sciences


requirements or


electives.


Returning veterans are


invited


to discuss


their


academic


problems


Dean


the College or his representative.


As far as circumstances permit,


the College will adapt


its program to the needs of the individual student.

CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES


The College


of Arts and


Sciences offers curricula leading to


the degrees of Bachelor


Arts,


Bachelor


of Science,


Bachelor


in Journalism,


Bachelor


Science


Chemistry, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy.


The curriculum leading to the degree


Bachelor


Science


in Pharmacy


is administered


Director


School


Pharmacy.


(See School of Pharmacy.)


Instruction and research in geography and geology


are administered by the


Director


Division


Geography


curricula above are administered by the Dean of the College of


Geology.


Arts and Sciences.


other
Only


students who have completed the University College or its equivalent


(as determined by the







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


The degree of Bachelor of Arts will


be conferred


upon


those who fulfil the specified


requirements and whose majors center in one or
Bible, economics, English, French, German, history,
sociology, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the d
conferred upon those who fulfill the specified rec
one or more of the fields of biology, botany, c


more of t
journalism:
degree of
quirement2
chemistry ,


students who major in geography, in mathematics or in
of Bachelor of Arts while others receive the degree of Bache
determined by the direction of the student's interests and
work.


he


fields


of ancient languages,


m, philosophy, political science,
Bachelor of Science will be
s and whose majors center in
geology, and physics. Some
psychology receive the degree
or of Science, the degree being


accomplishments


in his


major


THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF


Instruction in journalism is designed to
in: (1) journalism as a career, and who
field of communication, such as printing,
either in editorial or business phases; (3
(4) careers closely related to journalism,
would conduce to greater success: and (5)


-- - - - -


ARTS IN JOURNALISM


provide study and training for those interested
aspire to the more important positions in the
radio, and films; (2) newspaper production,


) reporting and evaluati
in which journalistic kn
the cultural perspective


on
ow
to


study of journalism as a means of understanding the evolving events of
Sixty-four semester hours with an average of C or higher, and a gr
in all journalism courses to be counted toward the degree are required
semester hours must be included the journalism courses required for
and Editing Sequence or the Business Sequence. The remainder of the
hours must be earned in approved electives, with not less than six nor


of public affairs;
ledge and training
be attained by the
civilization.
ade of C or higher
. In the sixty-four
either the Writing
sixty-four semester
more than eighteen


credits in any one department, and with at least eighteen credits in courses outside the
Department of Journalism. For detailed information concerning the two sequences (Writing
and Editing Sequence and Business Sequence) see the University Catalog.


THE PRE-LAW


COURSE


In cooperation with the College
bined academic-law curricula. For
possible to earn the academic and 1
in the University College, one in the
of Law.


of Law, the College
students who make
aw degrees in six ye
College of Arts and


of Arts
adequate
ars, of w
Sciences,


and Sciences offers com-
scholastic progress it is
which two years are spent
and three in the College


PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

Students who upon graduation from the University College are eligible for admission to
the College of Arts and Sciences and who have not completed requirements for admission
to medical and dental schools should continue and complete their pre-professional training
in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select courses in accordance with
requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes to enter, and should corre-
spond with the dean of that school for information and advice.


* /






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


The purposes of instruction in


of business leaders;
the development of


Business Adminstration


are four:


second, the preparation of business executives and


an understanding of


complex


training


technicians;


relationships between


third,


business


all other social phenomena from which, it is hoped, there will emerge business statesmen;
and, fourth, the prosecution of research projects for the improvement of business methods,
techniques, and policies.
The operations of business enterprise in recent years have become increasingly complex


in character.


highly


They


have ceased


involved-state-wide,


to be simple and localized;


nation-wide,


world-wide.


have


manage


become


business


intricate
concerns


and to make money, broad training is necessary.


The principles upon which the economic


system
market,


functions,


services


forms


business


transportation


units,


ramifications


Communication,


production


impact


taxation,


methods of


financing-all require consideration.


Those who


would


enter


business in


present or who would serve as specialists in accounting,


statistics or


in other facilitating


activities of modern business must be provided with training in fundamentals-professional
training in fundamentals.


The College of Business Administration is organized toward


this end.


out finished business men-managers, executives and department heads.
its graduates with some skills, they are not expected to start at the top


down,


get experience


learn


actual


contact


operations


It does not turn
While it supplies
they start lower
he establishments


with which they identify themselves.


Their training helps to shorten


their apprenticeship


and enables them to move up faster than they would move without training.
Instruction in Public Administration is designed to provide analysis of the busic prin-


ciples


Government


government.


become


s purpose is
increasingly


to prepare students for


complex and


requires


public


personnel


service


occupations.


thoroughly


trained


in political science, economics, history, and other related sciences.


ing offered supplies basic courses in these fields.


The program of train-


skills; it is designed to provide them with broad training in the structure and function of
government and to prepare them for readier entry into public life and occupations.


DEGREES AND CURRICULA


It does not equip students with specific


The College of Business Administration offers two undergraduate degrees:


The Bachelor


of Science in Business Administration and the Bachelor of


Science in


Public Administra-


To secure the first named


degree students must complete either the Curriculum in


Business Administration


Proper or the Curriculum in


Combination with Law.


To secure


the second named degree they must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration.


CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER

In order to enter the College of Business Administration and to register for any of its


n 'r


-~~~ ~~~ I~~~1~..- .. .. .. .. - -- S . .. n f


I I


-







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


The curriculum in Business Administration


Proper is


divided


groups


or pro-


grams of studies.


Each student is required to select and complete one of these groups or


programs.


sixty-six semester hours required for


graduation


forty-eight


semester


hours


in seven groups and forty-two in two groups are prescribed.


Where adequate cause there-


for is shown students may by petition in some cases substitute other courses in economics


business


administration


these


prescribed


courses.


remaining


hours


in each


group are approved electives.


Of these hours; twelve may consist of courses offered outside


the College of Business Administration, including six


semester


hours in advanced military


science.
groups.


University Catalog should be consulted


for the requirements of each


of the


CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW


The College of Business Administration


combines with


the University College


College of Law in offering a six-year program


study to students who


desire


ultimately


to enter the College of Law.


Students register during the first two years in the University


College and the third year and one term of the Summer Session in the College of Business


Administration.


When they have fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College


of Business Administration,


during their last three
have, after entering the
hours with at least a C


are eligible


to register in


years complete the course in


College


the College of Law.


College of Law, completed one year's work


average)


they may offer this year's work


fourth year in the College of Business Administration and receive


in law


When students


semester


as a substitute for the
the degree of Bachelor


Science


Business


Administration.


University


Catalog


should


consulted


the requirements of this curriculum.

CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION


order to enter the College of Business


Administration


to register


riculum in Public Administration, students are required to


complete the curriculum in the


University College as specified on page 31 or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses
or areas of knowledge listed including the following courses:

Es. 205-206.-Economic Foundations of Modem Life


Bs. 211-212.-Elementary


Accounting


Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics
Pcl. 241.-Political Foundations of Modern Life

The University Catalog should be consulted for the requirements of this curriculum.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


cur-







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GRADUATION


WITH


HONORS


For graduation With Honors, a student must earn an honor point average of at least 3.2


in the work of the Upper Division.


the following requirements:


For graduation With High Honors, a student must meet


attain an honor point average of at least 3.5 in the work


Upper


Divisions;


which has supervised


detailed


regulations


obtain


a special
governing


project o:
graduation


recommendation


r program o
With High


work
Honors


, Faculty
student.
e obtained


Committee


copy
from


office of the Dean.


DEGREES


AND CURRICULA


Two degrees are offered in the College of


Education-Bachelor of


Arts in Education


and Bachelor of Science in Education.


For either degree the student is required to com-


plete


semester


hours,


an average


or higher,


after


graduation


from


University College.


CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF


ARTS


IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other


institutions with less than the equivalent of two years'


college credit.


Graduation from the University College.
Professionalized Subject Matter:


Credits


Children's Social Studies .........................................................................-.
Children's Science ..................................... ...............----- .......................
Children's Literature ......... ...................... ................... ............ -............-. ... --.........
Health and Physical Education .............................................................................
Health Education (HP1. 387) ...................................... ................... .........................
Public School Art .........................................................-.... ....................
Public School Music ...............................................................................................


Handwriting


Education:


En. 241


(CEn.13) -Introduction to


Education


En. 385--Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 421422--Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School)


*English


15 credits


Total of at least 60 credits in the


Upper


Division.


- A -a a S SS S


................. .......-.. ........... ....... ..... ...... ... ...... ........ ........ ........... ......... .......







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


Professionalized Subject Matter: 4
Children's Social Studies ............................................................................ .....
Children 's Science ..................... .... ..........--------..... ..-----.. --------..........
Children's Literature ...... ..... tune.................. ...-. ....... ............. .-.....---....
Health and Physical Education ........................ .........................................
Health Education (HPI. 387) .................................................................................
Public School Art ...............I......................--...---- ..........------- .......... --- ---- --...........
Public School Music ........ ............................... ...................................
Handwriting .......................--...--.............--------------.--------------.---- --.------------------.....


Credits
3
2
3
3
3
4
4
.Oorl


Education:


En. 241


(CEn.13) -Introduction to


Education


En. 385--Child Development
En. 386--Educational Psychology
En. 421-422--Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School)


*English


15 credits


*Social


Studies


Electives, exclusive of Military Science, if required, needed to make a total of


.:.... 15 credits
......124 credits


*By permission of the Dean of
other areas.


the College


of Education,


these hours may


be completed in


CURRICULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF


ARTS IN


EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other


institutions with less than the equivalent of two years'


Graduation from the


college credit.


University College.


3 credits
2 credits


Health Education ........................ .... ........................ .........-- .............. ............ .........--..---...........
Health and Physical Education ............................................ ....................................


Education:


(CEn.13)--Introduction to Education


385-Child Development
386--Educational Psychology
401-School Administration
421-422-Student Teaching
471-Problems of Instruction


(Secondary School


(See page


Complete certification requirements in two fields.


Electives, if needed, to make a total of 60 semester hours completed in the Upper Division.

IL For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.


241


En.
En.
En.
En.
En.
En.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Education:


En. 241


(CEn.13)--Introduction to Education


En. 385-Child Development
En. 386--Educational Psychology
En. 401-School Administration


En. 421-422--Student


Teaching


En. 471-Problems of Instruction


(Secondary School)


Complete certification requirements in two fields.


page 16.)


Electives, exclusive of Military Science, if required, needed to make a total of ......124 credits


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


The College of Engineering is offering several


courses


during the Summer


Session


various departments so that students may


graduate in a minimum


time.


Many


other


courses included in the engineering curricula, such as mathematics and


available.


physics, are also


During the summer months the engineering student may also take subjects to


meet elective requirements.


Students entering the


University for the first time may


find it


to their


advantage to


enroll


in mathematics,


either


Freshman


English,


American


Institutions


or General


Chemistry.
culus and


Students having completed one year at the University may take courses in cal-


physics.


For those students who


have completed


calculus


physics,


statics,


dynamics and strength of materials are suggested.


Elective subjects in mathematics, physics


and the humanities are recommended to all students.
For advanced students, special laboratory work in connection with the Florida Engineer-


ing and Industrial Experiment Station may


also be secured.


Students


contemplate


registration


in the


College of


Engineering


those


are already registered in this college should confer about their schedules with the depart-
ment heads and the dean as soon as possible.


SCHOOL OF FORESTRY


Courses


Camp should


in Forestry


are offered


taken between


during


the second and


Summer


third


Session.


year's


work


required


provided


Summer
necessary


prerequisites have been completed.


The work of


the Camp requires one full summer and


it must


completed


contemplate


in that


time.


registration


cannot


School


e divided
Forestry


over


should


summers.


consult the


Students
University


Catalog for courses which are prerequisite or are required in the Forestry


curriculum.







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

To enter the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics students are required


to present a certificate of graduation from the


University College,


to be certified


by the


Board


to have the


of University


Examiners


approval


as qualified


Committee


Education, Health and Athletics, and


pursue


on Admissions


to have completed


work


College


pre-professional


College,
Physical
courses


listed below in


University College, although


a student may


be enrolled


in the


Upper


Division
College


"on probation"
do not indicate


until he completes them.


are qualified


Students whose records in the University


to take


professional


courses


Upper Division will not be admitted to the College.


HPI.


121-122-Observation and


Participation


and II


HP1. 131-132-Athletic Coaching I and II
HP1. 221-222-Observation and Participation III and IV
HP1. 231-232-Athletic Coaching III and IV


HPl. 485


-Anatomy, Physiology


and Kinesiology


-Introduction to Education
-Child Development


to graduation


from


University


College,


as determined


Board


University


Transfer students entering from other institutions must present college credit equivalent


Examiners, and have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the College of Physical
Education, Health and Athletics.


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION


minimum


requirement


graduation


from


College


Physical


Education,


Health and Athletics is 66
required for his degree.


semester


hours,


an average


or better


on all


work


In addition


to completing


the requirements


the student must have earned eight "activity units"


before being recommended for graduation.


are called


activities
dramatics,


on to perform


while


in college


debating


many
(such


serving


varied


as student
on student


le prescribed
in approved


Experience shows


services.


government,
committees)


professional


extra-curricular


that men


Participation


student
contribute


curriculum,


activities


in this profession
in extra-curricular


publications, a
e substantially


Athletics,
to the


success of persons in this profession.


For this reason the activity units must be distributed


over three different types of


extra-curricular


activities.


student


earn


as many


four activity units in one semester but no more.


Activity units are not to be confused with







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF


ARTS IN PHYSICAL


EDUCATION, HEALTH, ATHLETICS AND RECREATION

Junior Year


Courses


First Semester


Credits


Courses


Second Semester


Credits


HPI. 331-Problems and Projects I


HPI. 383-Physical Activities in Schools....
Sch. 241-Effective Speaking ........................
En. 397-Secondary School Curriculum
and Instruction .......................... -
Approved Electives ........................


HPI. 332-Problems and Projects II ........


HPI. 384-Physical


Activities


in Schools


En. 386-Educational Psychology


YEn. 398-Secondary


School


Curriculum


and Instruction ........................
Approved Electives ..............


Senior Year


Courses


First Semester


Credits


Courses


Second Semester


Credits


HPl. 431-Problems and Projects III
Sch. 301--Advanced Public Speaking
Approved Electives ............


*. -


HPl. 432-Problems and Projects IV .....
En. 42 1-Student Teaching ................ .......
En. 422--Student Teaching ..........................
Approved Electives ....................


15 17

COLLEGE OF LAW


purpose of


College


is to impart


a thorough,


scientific


practical


knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in this


field.


Since


the College of Law


has operated


during the Summer


Session.


Courses


offered during the winter are rotated.


in the Summer Session.


Some courses not given during the winter are offered


The variety of courses offered during the Summer Session of 1947


is sufficient to enable students of


different types


to carry a full load


to appeal to a


wide range of students.


ADMISSION


Applicants for admission


to the


College


of Law must have


received


a degree


or science in a college or university of approved standing, or must be eligible for a degree
in a combined course in the University of Florida, upon the completion of one year of work


in the College of Law.


University also offers this combined course with


the Florida


State College for


Women.


present,


applicants


admitted


completed


years


academic


college work meeting the standards of


Association


American Law


Schools.


In addition to other requirements, all applicants for admission


to the College of Law,


whose


pre-law


training has


not been


received


at this


institution,


must


satisfactorily


scholastic


legal


aptitude


tests


given


Board


University


Examiners,


unless


from the nature of their previous record they are excused by the law faculty.


THE


GRADUATE


SCHOOL







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


REQUIREMENTS


FOR ANY MASTER'S DEGREE EXCEPT MASTER OF EDUCATION


AND MASTER OF


AGRICULTURE


Work Required.-The work for the Master's Degree shall be a


definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester


unified program with a


hours or the equivalent, at least half


of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as


determined


student's


Supervisory


Committee.


principal


work for the Master's Degree shall be in courses designated strictly for


of the


graduates.


course
How-


ever, in the case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered
upon the approval of the Supervisory Committee.


In all departments


a general examination, either


or written or


both,


covering the


whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required.


This may em-


brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.


A thesis is required of all candidates.


subject.


This thesis should be closely allied to the major


The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer.


thesis


itself


should


completed


submitted


to allow


an interval


three


full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion


of the student's


Supervisory Committee.


If it is required the examination should be passed


by the end of the third summer term, or when the work is half completed.
The work for the Master's Degree must be completed within seven years from the time


first registering for


graduate


work.


Summer


Session


students


means


seven


summers.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION


A dmission.-A


may


be admitted


student


to the


Bachelor's


Master of Education


Degree


program


from


whether


an accredited


or not he


institution
previously


earned any prescribed amount of credit in Education.
A student from a non-accredited institution may be permitted to register as an unclassified


student while his standing is being determined.


Upon the recommendation of the general


supervisory committee and the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, credits earned


while a student is unclassified


(not to exceed one term)


may count toward his degree.


2. Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to the work of this program is not a guarantee


that the student will


committee


admitted


recommend


to candidacy


student


for the


admission


degree.


to candidacy


general
as soon


supervisory


as "he


satisfied them of his qualifications.


This will not be done in any case before the student


has submitted his own proposed program for completing the degree.


(See No. 6 below.)


3. Residence.--A


minimum


six summer


terms,


or two semesters


one summer


4 r 'I *







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


I


a


requested, the
the committee i
6. Planning
writing to the
This must be d


Dean of the G
n charge of the
the Individual
Dean of the G
one by the end


radu
arec
Stu
radu
oft


The area of educational theory and practice includ-


Educational sociology, the
of human growth.
psychology, measurement and
philosophy of education.
to teach in the elementary sch


economics


education


growth.


a. For candidates for this degre
ing the following sub-division
(1) Educational foundations.
and the biological basis
(2) Problems in educational
(3) Problems in history and
b. For all candidates preparing
tary education.
c. For all candidates preparing \
education, including subject
d. For candidates preparing to
in school administration.
Competence is to be judged (1)
i at the end of each term, and
t before graduation.
The program is so arranged tha
competence be determined in


Problems in elemen-


to teach in the secondary school: Problems in
matter in two teaching felds.
be principals, supervisors, or administrators:


t secondary

Problems


by oral or written, or by both oral and written, evalua-
(2) by a comprehensive oral and written examination


t each individual student may at any time request that
one of' the areas represented in the program. When
ate School will direct the student to the chairman of
a. who will arrange for an examination.
len's Program.-Each student is required to submit in
Late School his own proposed program for the degree.
he first six weeks of residence. This develops with the


aid of the instructional staff members and should grow out of the needs, interests, and
desires of the student.
7. Transfer of Credits.-Credits earned prior to admission to the University will be
governed by the same regulations that apply to all other graduate degrees. If recommended
in advance by the general supervisory committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate
School, a student may be permitted to study with some competent teacher in another
institution for one six-weeks summer term.


8. One Year Teaching Experience.-Each candidate must have
of teaching experience prior to the last summer term.


9. Transfer Students.--Students in Education who h
wish to study for the Master of Education Degree may
supervisory committee to comply with the requirements
10. Thesis.-A thesis will not be required, but the
a considerable amount of written material in the form
work accomplished, etc., all of this written material to
adaptation and utilization of the student's program.
11. Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of a f<


at least one year


iave started graduate work and who
do so by arranging with the general
of this program.
student will be required to submit
of reports, term papers, records of
be directed toward the integration,


foreign language will not be required,


tiol
jus

his


ool:


..


_ _I







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE


UPPER DIVISION


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF


AGRICULTURE


1. Admission.-Qualified students holding the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricul-


ture, or its equivalent, may


enroll in courses leading to the professional


degree of Master


of Agriculture.


2. Residence.-A


minimum


two semesters,


or six six-week


summer


terms,


or the


equivalent, is required as residence.
3. Work Required.-A minimum


of thirty


semester hours of


course


work is required,


at least fifteen of which must be designated strictly for graduates.


Each student's program


is designed so as to take into account the qualifications and needs of the individual and is


subject to the approval


the Supervisory Committee.


thesis is not required,


student will submit reports, term papers and records of


work accomplished.


A final


examination by the Supervisory Committee covering the whole field of study of the candidate
is required.
4. Supervisory Committee.-A Supervisory Committee, consisting of the major professor


as chairman and two others from the related fields of study,


appointed by the Dean of the


Graduate School, has charge of the program of work of the candidate.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR


OF PHILOSOPHY


degree


Husbandry


nosy


Doctor


Philosophy


(Animal Nutrition), Biology


and Pharmacology.


It is expected


is offered
(Zoology),
that other


in the


departments


Animal


Chemistry, Pharmacy, and Pharmacog-


departments


be added from


to year as facilities are increased.


Residence.-A minimum


of three


academic years of


resident


graduate


work,


which


at least the last year must be spent at the University of Florida, is required of all candidates


for the doctor's degree.


In many


cases, it will be necessary to remain longer than


three


years, and necessarily so when the student is not devoting his full time to graduate work.


Distribution of


Work.-Two-thirds of


the student's


is expected


to be


spent


upon


his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his minor or minors. The
student will be guided in his whole course of study by the professor of his major subject


his special


supervisory


committee.


Graduate


Council


not specify


what or how many courses will be required.
is thrown largely upon his own responsibility.


The work is mainly research, and the student


Minors.-The


student


must


one minor


not take


more


two.


general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will require at least one year.


Special


Supervisory


Committee.-When


student


advanced


sufficiently


towards


his degree, a special


committee will be appointed by the dean,


major subject as chairman. This
The dean is ex-officio member of


professor


committee will direct, advise, and examine


all supervisory


of the


the student.


committees.


r --- . - .... A 1---.L---- .t .... 1----' -- I* .. _l _ . .... Ui







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


oral and covers both major and minor subjects.


After passing the qualifying examination,


the student must put in at least one full academic year of residence before the degree is


conferred.
opportunity


the student


unless


fails the


special


qualifying examination, he


reasons


a re-examination


not be


given


is recommended


another
special


supervisory committee and approved
Dissertation.-A satisfactory disse


by the


Graduate Council.


:ration showing independent investigation


and research


is required


candidates.


typewritten


copies


dissertation


must


sented to the dean on or before the date specified in the


University Calendar.


Printing of


sented


to the


Dissertation.--One hundred


University


within


years


printed copies of


after


the conferri


the dissertation must be pre-
ing of the degree. Reprints


from reputable scientific journals may be accepted upon the recommendation of the special


supervisory


committee.


After


dissertation


been


accepted,


candidate


must


deposit with the Business Manager, not later than one week before the degree is conferred,


the sum of


$50 as a


pledge that the dissertation


published


within


prescribed


time.


This sum will be returned if the printed copies are received within two years.


Final


Examination.--After


all the work of the candidate, he will be given a final examination, oral or written, or both,
by his special supervisory committee.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION


acceptance


dissertation


completion


The requirements for the degree are


the same


as those


the Doctor


Philosophy,


exception


candidates


for the


degree


Doctor


Education


either


satisfy the usual language requirement or substitute the following:


course


in educational


research


An examination covering the techniques of using the library
An elementary course in statistics


The work will be offered mainly in the field


of school administration,


with the proviso


that candidates who


wish


to study in


the instructional fields


admitted


on an in-


dividual basis with the approval of the Graduate Council


A minor will


twelve
minor.


semester


supporting


work


hours for the


taken


nmnor


in another


at least


field.


It will


six semester


consist


hour


for the


at least
second


Minors may not be taken in any branch of Education.


The residence requirement


may not


be satisfied


Summer


Session


attendance alone.


The last year of residence must be one continuous academic year.







GUIDE TO COURSES


LISTED


GUIDE


TO


COURSES


LISTED


THIS


CATALOGUE


course


followed


registration


offerings


are listed


the departmental


student


should


separately


courses


always


each


term,


alphabetical


use the


comprehensive


order


departmental


department


abbreviation


courses
name.
course


number, not abbreviations of the course title.


Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of


not be represented


same


titles


in this catalogue.


the State
facilitate


Department


finding


proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided:


Elementary Teachers


General Preparation-the


basic comprehensive courses of


University


College


(C-1,


C-2, C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, and C-6)


Elementary Science-listed under General Science


(Gl. 301 or Gl. 302)


General Psychology-Psy. 201 listed under Psychology

Child and Educational Psychology-listed under Education


(En. 385, En. 386)


Children's


Literature-listed under English


(Eh. 391)


Social Studies in Elementary Grades-listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Sol. 302)


Handwriting-listed under Busi

Health Education-listed under


ness Education


(BEn. 97)


Health and Physical Education


(HPI. 387)


Secondary Teachers


Commercial Subjects-listed


under


Business Education and


under Economics and Busi-


ness Administration

English-C-3 and courses listed under English and Speech


Mathematics--C-42, and courses listed under


Science-C-2,


Mathematics


C-6, and courses listed under Chemistry, Biology, and Physics


Social


Studies-C-l


courses


listed


under


Geography,


History,


Political


Science,


Economics, Social Studies, and Sociology






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


DEPARTMENTS


OF


INSTRUCTION


AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

First Term


All classes ordinarily meet for sixty-five minutes. C
ly meet Monday through Saturday.
Students not registered in the Graduate School w
ister for graduate courses unless they secure written
the Graduate School and the instructor concerned.


]lasses scheduled


to meet


ill not be permitted to
approval from the Dean


ABBREVIATIONS


Under the heading Dept.
adopted for official records.


found


department


name


abbreviations


The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:


AGRICULTURAL BUILDING
AREONAUTICAL ENGINEER-
ING LAB
(Bldg. T 236, Alachua Air Base)
ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING
ROOM
(Bldg. T 243, Alachua Air Base)
AUDITORIUM
BENTON ANNEX
BASKET BALL COURT
BENTON HALL
BUCKMAN HALL
CHEMISTRY BUILDING
DAIRY LABORATORY
ENGINEERING BUILDING
"F" CLUB
GREENHOUSE
GYMNASIUM
HYDRAULIC LABORATORY
HORTICULTURE BUILDING


LA
LW
MI
MU
NE
PE
PO
SC
SE
TA

TB

TC

TH
UA
WO

YN


LANGUAGE HALL
LAW BUILDING
MILITARY BUILDING
MURPHREE HALL
NEWELL HALL
PEABODY HALL
POULTRY LABORATORY
SCIENCE HALL
SEAGLE BUILDING
TEMPORARY BUILDING A
(Accounting)
TEMPORARY BUILDING B
(Civil Engineering)
TEMPORARY BUILDING C
(Mechanical Drawing)
TEMPORARY BUILDING H
UNION ANNEX
WOOD PRODUCTS LABORA-
TORY
YONGE BUILDING


COMPREHENSIVE COURSES


C-11.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion


Section.)


dai]

reg
of


_ __







DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.


00 daily.


TH-102.
TH-102.
TH-102.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.


C-12.--American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture


Section and


one Discussion


Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section 21


Section


STAFF.


10:45


CH-AU


STAFF.


Discussion


Sections


Section


Section 202.
Section 203.
Section 204.


Section
Section
Section


Section 208.
Section 209.


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


9:30


daily.


10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2':30 daily.
3:45 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.


AG-104.
UA-205.
AG-104.
SC-206.
SC-206.
AG-104.
AG-104.
UA-209.
UA-209.
UA-209.
UA-209.
UA-209.
UA-209.


C-11-12:


Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems


of the modern social


world.


The unequal


rates


of change in


economic


life, in government,


education, in


science,


and in religion


are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more


effective coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today.


Careful scrutiny


is made of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that
a consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.


C-21.--The Physical


Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one


Lecture Section and


one


Discussion


Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section
Section


2:30 T.


: 3:45 Th.


BN-203.
BN-203.


STAFF.
STAFF


Discussion Sections


f3r dfl 1a *-


PIIh- *** -k A _


j I *






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


C-22.--The Physical Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and


one Discussion Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section
Section


2:30


10:45


BN-203.
CH-AU


STAFF.
. STAFF.


Discussion


Sections:


Section 201.
Section 202.
Section 203.
Section 204.
Section 205.


Section


Section 207.
Section 208.


7:00 daily.


daily.


9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.


BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.


G-21-22:
ence to man's


An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular refer-
immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain


the more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical


materials, forces, and relations.


The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,


astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential


unity.


The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.


C-31.--Reading, Speaking, and Writing


(Register


one


Lecture


(Freshman English).


Section,


one


Discussion


4 credits.
Section,


Laboratory


Lecture


Section


Lecture Section 12:
Discussion Sections


Section.)
9:30 T.


10:45


AU.
AU.


STAFF.
STAFF.


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


Section 108.


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00


daily.


8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.


00 daily.


1:15


daily.


2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.


2:30


daily.


LA-201.
LA-201.
LA-201.
LA-201.
LA-201.
LA-201.
LA-201.
LA-201.


LA-20


LA-203.
LA-203.
LA-203.
LA-203.
LA-203.
LA-203.


one






DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


Section
Section


Section 309.
Section 310.


12:00
12:00


2:30


2:30 T.


LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.


C-32.-Reading,


(Register


Speaking, and Writing (Freshman


Lecture


Section


, one


English).
Discussion


4 credits.
Section,


Laboratory Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section 21:
Section 22:


9:30


10:45 T


. AU


STAFF
STAFF.


Discussion Sections


Section 201.
Section 202.
Section 203.
Section 204.
Section 205.
Section 206.
Section 207.
Section 208.
Section 209.
Section 210.


Section


Section 212.


Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.


LA-212.
LA-212.


LA-21


LA-212.
LA-212.


LA-21


LA-212.
LA-212.
LA-307.
LA-307.
LA-307.
LA-307.
LA-307.
LA-307.
LA-307.


Writing


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


C-81482:


8:15
8:15


10:45
10:45
10:45


1:15
1:15


3:45


Reading, Speaking, and Writing.


LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.


Designed to furnish the training in reading, speak-


ing and writing necessary for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter.


This training


will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking,


in fundamentals of form and style,


voice in speaking.


in extension of vocabulary and in control of


Students will be encouraged


the body and


to read widely as a means of broadening their


n a ban 4 n A 4 n a n Jk e a .n 4 + nn S U t


one






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Section
Section


12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.


SC-212.
SC-212.


Both in private life and in vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking. In this
course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, (2) to be able to use objective standards necessary in critically
evaluating his own thinking process and product as well as the conclusions reached by others,
and (3) to record both process and product of thinking in effective language. The material used
applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure practice, many
illustrations are given, and numerous exercises are assigned.


C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics.


3 credits.


(Register for


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


one section


3:45


daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.


only.)


PE-2.
PE-102.
PE-2.
PE-102.
PE-2.
PE-102.
PE-2.
PE-102.
PE-2.
PE-2.
PE-2.
PE-2.


A
algebra


general
as a


elementary beginning course
generalization of arithmetic,


covering the
the application


development
of algebra


of the number system,
to practical problems,


geometry, elementary trigonometry, logarithms, and the mathematics of finance. This
designed for students who do not intend necessarily to specialize in mathematics, but
taken by those who plan to continue their mathematical work. Not open to students
completed Basic Mathematics.


C-51.-The Humanities.


course is
it may be
who have


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture


Section and


one Discussion


Section.)


Lecture


Section


2:30


AU.


STAFF.


Discussion Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
CLT -A. -


daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
I3 "1-_


UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
rflTT iml








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


C-52.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture


Section and


one


Discussion


Section.)


Lecture


Section 21


: 2:30 T


. AU


STAFF.


Discussion Sections:


Section 201.
Section 202.
Section 203.
Section 204.
Section 205.


7:00
8:15


daily.
daily.


:30 daily.


10:45


daily.


12:00 daily.


1:15


Section
Section
Section


C-51-52:


The Humanities.


daily.


7:00 daily.


daily.
course


UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-205.
UA-307.


designed to provide an


understanding and


appreciation


of the literature,


philosophy.


art and music


in which


the enduring


values


of human


life have


found


expression.


course


deals


with our cultural heritage and with the culture of our


own day.


Its larger purpose


is to enable


the student to


develop


a mature


sense


of values.


enlarged appreciation and


C-61.-Biological Science.
(Register for one


a philosophy of life adequate for the needs of our


credits.


section only.)


7:00


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


daily.


8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.


10:45


daily.


12:00 daily.


1:15


daily.


0 daily.


3:45 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


SC-101.


SC-2
SC-2


SC-101.
SC-101.
SC-101.
SC-101.
SC-101.
SC-205.
SC-111.


C-62.-Biological Science.


credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section


Section 202.


Section


Section 204.
Section 205.


Section


7:00 daily.


daily.


9:30 daily.


10:45
12:00


daily.
daily.


1:15 daily.


SC-111.
SC-209.
SC-111.
SC-111.
SC-111.
SC-111.


C-61-62:


The biological


problems


and principles


associated


with


the organism's


a living individual,


a member


a socially


a member of


a race,


and economically


(3) a product of


inter-related


complex


evolutionary processes,


of living


organism


supply


age.


-, I


as:







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Section


10:45
9:30
9:30


CH-112.


to 11:50


REITZ,
CH-AU


CH-AU


REITZ


,H. C.


. REITZ, H.


10:45 W
9:30 to


. CH-112.


11:50 T.


REITZ,
CH-AU


H. C.
. REITZ, H.


A basic


course


embodying selected fundamentals of both inorganic and organic chemistry and


designed primarily for agricultural students.


Suitable also for the general student who wishes a


non-laboratory


course


in science.


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


As. 308.-Marketing.


credits.


7:00 M. T.
Laboratory:


AG-208.


HAMILTON


1:15 to 3:35 M.


H. G.


AG-208.


Principles of


marketing


agricultural


commodities;


commodity


exchange


and future


trading


auction companies; market finance; market


news;


marketing of important agricultural commodities.


One or two field trips at an estimated


cost


of $4 each, to be paid by the student at the time trips


are made.


As. 409.-Cooperative Marketing.


3 credits.


9:30


M. T


Laboratory:


AG-208.


1:15 to


:35 T


HAMILTON


AG-208.


Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their


successes


and failures;


methods of organiza-


tion. financing, and business management.


Two-day field trip at an estimated cost of $10,


to be


paid by the student at the time the trip


is made.


AGRICULTURAL


301.-Drainage and Irrigation.


ENGINEERING


3 credits.


8:15 M. T. 1
Laboratory:


AG-210.


ROGERS, F.


2:30 to 4:50 M.


The drainage and irrigation of


lands with attention to their


necessity


for the production


field, fruit and vegetable


crops.


cost,


design, operation and upkeep of drainage and irrigation


systems.


Field work in laying out


systems.


303.-Farm Shop.


3 credits.


10:45 M.


Laboratory:


AG-210.


2:30 to 4:50 T


ROGERS, F.


AG-210.


The farm


are common


to the farms


of Florida.


Carpentry,


concrete


struction, light forging, soldering, tool


care


and repair


are some of the jobs given special emphasis.


Laboratory work includes actual shop practice.


AGRICULTURAL EXTEN


SION


Axt. 303.-Audio-Visual Aids in Agricultural Extension.


credits.


(June


4 T,1s 0 \


con-








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


workers or those having permission of instructor.


12:00 daily.


NE-404.


HAMPSON


STAFF.


Advanced training in the art of rural leadership.


Axt. 507.-Advanced Agricultural Extension Service


Youth Program.


credits.


(June


16 to July


The first


half


of the course


Axt. 507-508.


Open


only


Agricultural


Extension


workers


or those


having permission


instructor.


10:45 daily.


NE-404.


HAMPSON


and STAFF.


Advanced


training in


developing and


conducting


4-H Boys'


and Girls'


Club


work and other


Extension rural youth programs.


ANIMAL


PRODUCTION


Al. 309.-Fundamentals in Animal Husbandry.


credits.


7:00 M. T.
Laboratory


: 2:


. AG-210.
30 to 4:50 T


AG-101.


Types and breeds of farm animals

Al. 314.-Livestock Judging. 3


8:15 T.


principles of breeding, selection and management.


credits.


AG-209.


Laboratory:


1:15 to 4:50


Special training in livestock judging


. AG-209.


show ring methods


contests at fairs.


ARCHITECTURE


Courses


in Architecture are carried


on by


means


problem


or project


method


and accomplishment is


criterion


advancement.


Credits


depend


upon


number


projects


completed.


Laboratories


be conducted


hours


daily and


remain


open


additional


hours


those who wish to use them.


101.-Fundamentals
24 to 48 hours


Architecture.


, to be


arranged.


Variable


UA-401.


credit.


FEARNEY


, E. M.,


GAR-


LAND,


A creative


introductory


course


for beginners.


Ae. 102.-Fundamentals of


Architecture.


Variable credit.


to 48


hours


arranged.


UA-401.


FEARNEY


GAR-


LAND, J.


A continuation of


Ae. 101.


Ae. 211.-Projects


48 hours


in Architecture,


, to be arranged.


Group
PE-302.


Variable credit.


KELLEY


JOHNSON


A continuation of


Ae. 102.


fDRipan


.-- - -- .- -a- -,


delineation, history, construction, structures.








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


222.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 3.


Variable credit.


48 hours to be arranged.


PE-201.


FLAGG, N


B., KELLEY


. M., JOHN-


SON, M. H.
A continuation of Ae. 221.


Ae. 313.-Projects in Architecture,


48 hours to be arranged.


Group 3.
PE-302.


Variable credit.


ARNETT,


., GRAND, J


L., LAR-


RICK, T.


A continuation of


Ae. 212.


314.-Projects in Architecture,


Group


Variable


credit.


48 hours to be arranged.


PE-302.


ARNETT


., GRAND, J


LAR-


RICK, T.


A continuation of


Ae. 313.


323.-Projects


Building Construction,


Group


Variable


credit.


48 hours to be


arranged.


PE-301.


FLAGG


LARRICK


A continuation of


Ae. 222.


Ae. 324.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 4.


Variable credit.


48 hours to be


arranged.


PE-301


. ARNETT,


FLAGG


LAR-


RICK,


A continuation of


Ae. 323.


415.-Projects in Architecture,


48 hours to be arranged.


Group 5.
PE-201.


Variable


ARNETT


credit.


., GRAND, J


LAR-


RICK, T.


A continuation of


Ae. 314.


416.-Thesis in Architecture.


Variable


credit.


hours to


arranged.


PE-201


. ARNETT


STAFF


A continuation of


Ae. 415.


BACTERIOLOGY


Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology.


4 credits.


(Register


both


Lecture


Section


one


Laboratory


Sections


Lecture


Section


:15 T


SC-104.


CARROLL,


Laboratory
Laboratory


1:15


Section
Section


to 3:35


:45 to 6:05


SC-104.
SC-104.


Morphology,


physiology, and


cultivation


of bacteria and


related


micro-organisms.


304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology.


9:30 M.


SC-104.


4 credits.
CARROLL


Laboratory


1:15 to


8:15


to 10:45


SC-104.


-.S - I I I


II - ..


T-


II


J


1 r 1 I







DEPARTMENTS OF


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


BIOLOGY


101.-General Animal Biology.


3 credits.


The first half of the course


101-102.


Pre- or corequisite: C-6.


Credit for


Bly. 101 and 102 depends upon


a grade of C or better in


(Register for one Lecture


Section and one


Laboratory


Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section 1:


Section


9:30


. Th.


SC-101.
SC-101.


WALLACE
WALLACE


H. K.


Laboratory


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


Sections:


10:45


to 2


2:30 to
10:45 to
10:45 to
2:30 to


6:05


SC-10.
SC-10.
SC-10.
SC-106.
SC-106.


2:20
6:05


WALLACE, H.


WALLACE,
WALLACE,
WALLACE,
WALLACE,


An introduction


to the morphology,


physiology,


development


and classification


of animals.


Designed
necessary


to complement


and extend


the account


of biology


given


in C-6, and to provide


training in laboratory methods and viewpoint for more advanced work in


biology.


laboratory for Bly. 101 provides


a detailed study of the morphology of the frog, and the lectures


and assigned readings


are concerned


with the evolution


and biology of


vertebrate animals.


102 is an account of the chief patterns of morphology and life history of the invertebrates.


course


Each


is complete in itself and may be taken singly or in either order.


133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida.


credits.


No credit toward


a major or group


major


except with


specific


permission


Head


Department.


service


course


offered


special


needs


various


groups of students.


9:30 T


. Th.


SC-101.


LAESSLE


Laboratory: 1:15 to 4:50 T


SC-106.


Designed to provide a recognition and an acquaintance with


and plants


of Florida.


Especially planned


to prepare


some


teachers


of the more common animals


answer


the question,


"What


animal--or what plant-is that ?"


ence


Individual work in the field and the making of personal refer-


collections of plants and animals are encouraged.


209.--Comparative


Vertebrate


Anatomy.


4 credits.


(Register for the


Lecture Section and


one


Laboratory


Section.)


Lecture


Section:


8:15 dail


SC-2


GROBMAN


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section
Section


10:45


2:30 to


7:00


:20 M.


6:05


to 10:35


SC-107.
SC-107.
SC-107.


GROBMAN
GROBMAN
GROBMAN


The morphology and classification of chordate animals.


GRADUATE


COURSES


8:15 T







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Bly. 513.-Vertebrate Morphology.


3 to 5 credits.


To arrange.


SHERMAN


, H. B., and


GROBMAN


A. B.


Bly.


515.-Invertebrate Morphology.


3 to 5 credits.


To arrange.


STAFF.


Bly. 519.-Individual


Problems in Animal Biology.


Variable credit.


To arrange.


STAFF.


Bly. 519-520 is required of all applicants for the Master's Degree.


an approved individual problem in biology,


Each applicant undertakes


the results of which will be presented in a Master's


thesis.


Such problems will be carried out under the direction of a member of the staff.


Problems


be chosen


from


one of the following


fields:


vertebrate


or invertebrate


morphology


embryology; classification or taxonomy of certain approved groups; natural history or distribution
of a selected group of local animals; investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area.


Bly.-521.-Natural History of Selected Animals.


To arrange.


3 to 5 credits.


STAFF.


A detailed study of the life history or life histories and ecological relationships of some species
or natural groups of local animals.


Bly. 523.-Natural History of Selected Animals.


To arrange.


Variable credit.


STAFF.


Bly. 533.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy


and Nomenclature.


2 credits.


To arrange.


STAFF.


A critical
a


reference


study


of selected


taxonomic


synopses.


revisions


to the bearing of the principles and concepts of


and monographs


distribution, genetics


with


special


and ecology on


taxonomic problems.


Bly. 541.-Problems in Game Management.


To arrange.


Variable credit.


STAFF.


The application


a taxonomic and


ecological


background


to various


specific


problems


Florida game and wild life management.


BOTANY


Bty.


303.-General Botany.


3 credits.


The first half of the course Bty.


303-304.


(Register for the Lecture Section and


one of the Laboratory


Sections


Lecture


Section


8:15


SC-2


CODY


M. D.


Laboratory
Laboratory


Section


Section 1


1:15 to


:35 T.


7:00 to 9:20


Th. S.


SC-2.
SC-2.


A study of the form, structure, growth, reproduction, physiology and functions of plants and


their


various


organs;


relation of plants to their environment and to each other; principles under-


* _- _A __-- - -.- -;-- ac -j- i- -j.


-. - -- LI -a


may


1 I


t Jn


--


-


r


1 -e~ .





1


* *







DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


BUSINE


ADMINISTRATION


Bs. 211.-Elementary


Accounting.


credits.


first


half


course


211-212.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


Section 5.


Section


Designed to provide the


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.


basic training


TA-1.
TA-1.
TA-1.
TA-1.
TA-1.
TA-1.


EMMANUEL, M.


JOHNSON


in business practice and in accounting.


A study


business
reports.


papers


and records


recording


transactions


Prerequisite for advanced standing in


; preparation


of financial


statements


Economics and Business Administration.


Bs. 212.-Elementary


Accounting.


credits.


The second half of the course


211-212.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


Section 3.


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.


:45 daily.


TA-2.
TA-2.
TA-2.
TA-2.
TA-2.
TA-2.
TA-2.
TA-2.


BURNS, D.
BURNS, D.
HUMBLE,
HUMBLE.


PETERSON
PETERSON


310.-Accounting


Mathematics.


credits.


Prerequisite:


211-212.


registration in Bs. 311 is recommended.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


TA-3.
TA-3.


COUCH,
COUCH,


The computations will apply directly to accounting problems considered primarily


in Bs.


and other Upper Division


courses


in acco


hunting.


311.-Accounting


Principles.


credits.


Prerequisite:


211-212


or its


equivalent.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section


10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
7:00 daily.


TA-3.
TA-3.
TA-4.


EVANS, A
MOSHIER,
MOSHIER,


A nt..Al.


^f. h h.1 n nnfnl


.n t n4-ti4 l


nn ettn+n


f nea untinst


of rV rdn


a nnlrtlon


sury o e rnme nna an .


bookts







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


analysis and interpretation of financial statements; financial ratios and standards,


their prepara-


tion. meaning, and use.


313.-Cost Accounting.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


8:15


daily.


SC-202.


EVANS, A.


A study


of the methods of


collection.


classification.


and interpretation


of cost data; special


problems,
problems.


standard


costs,


cost systems,


uses of cost data


business


control.


Lectures


Bs. 391.-Property
7:00 daily.


Managemen
LA-314.


3 credits.


CHANCE, J. E.


Management of


and organization


real properties


collections.


as part of


expenditures and


the real
services;


estate


physical


business


; principles,


care of the


management


property; records;


agent's


relations with tenant.


Bs. 401.-Business Law


(Register for one


. 3 credits.


section


The first half of the course Bs. 401-402.
only.)


Section
Section


8:15 daily.
10:45 daily.


AG-104.
AG-104.


HURST,
HURST,


Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal and third party; termi-


nation


of the relationship


agency.


Conveyances


and mortgages


of real property


sales


mortgages of personal property; the law of negotiable instruments.


411.-Advanced Accounting.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


8:15 daily.


TA-4.


LANHAM, J. S.


A study of specialized accounting problems; mathematics of accounting; statement of affairs;
consignments; installments; ventures; insurance; and other related subjects.


Bs. 422.-Investments.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


1-322.


10:45 daily.


SC-202.


DOLBEARE,


The nature of investments, investment policies and types of securities, analysis of securities, the


mechanics


and mathematics


of security


purchases,


factors


influencing


general


movements


security prices.


Bs. 427.-Principles and Problems of Corporation Finance.


3 credits.


8:15 daily.


LA-314.


MCFERRIN, J. B.


Lectures,


discussions, and


problems.


A study


of the economic


and legal


forms


of business


enterprise; the instruments of business finance; financial problems


as they relate to the ordinary


operations of the business involving working capital,
credit extension, and the business cycle.


income,


dividend policy, current


borrowing,


433.-Advertising.
1:15 daily.


3 credits.


0C-215.


The relation of the principles of advertising to economic


theory


psychology


of advertising;


a study of


agencies,


media and methods.


GRADUATE COURSES


Bs. 511.-Accounting Theory.


3 credits.


To arranree.








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION


-FIRST


TERM


Section 1
(Limited
Section 2


Introduction


daily.


to students


to touch


1:15 daily.
typewriting;


YN-306.


MAXWELL


in BEn.


enrolling


YN-306.


practice upon


MAXWELL,
personal and


business problems.


BEn. 91.-Introductory Shorthand.


3 credits.


9:30


daily.


YN-305.


MAXWELL, H.


Introduction to Gregg shorthand by the functional method.


BEn.


461.-Principles of Business Education.


8:15 daily.


YN-203.


credits.


MOORMAN


A study


of the purposes of business


education;


problems


relating


to the development


appropriate program


problems in administration and supervision.


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


345.-Industrial


Stoichiometry.


3 credits.


Prerequisites


corequisites:


354, and Ps. 206.


15 daily.


BN-208.


TYNER,


Industrial


processes


calculations.


Weight


balances.


gas calculations,


vapor


pressure,


vaporization,


CHEMISTRY


Cy. 101.-General Chemistry.


4 credits.


The first half of the course C


101-102.


Offered first term


only.


(Register for one Lecture-Discussion Section, and one Laboratory Section.)


Lecture-Discussion


Sections


Section


Section


CH-AU


2:30
8:15
2:30


CH-110.


CH-AU


JACKSON


JACKSON


JACKSON


CH-110.


Section


Section


CH-AU


7:00
2:30
7:00


CH-212.


CH-AU


CH-212.


JACKSON


GILBERT,


JACKSON,


GILBERT,


Section


CH-AU


JACKSON


7:00 Th.


CH-212.


GILBERT,


Section


Section


2:30
9:30
2:30


n. nf Fr


CH-AU


Th. F


CH-110.
CH-AU.


. JACKSON


JACKSON


n'i wi n


IJl


1







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Section


7:00 to


10:35


p.m.


1:15 to 4:50


8:15
8:15


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


8:15 to
8:15 to
8:15 to
8:15 to


to 11:5


0 Th.


to 11:50


11:50 Th.


11:50
11:50
11:50


CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.


JACKSON


Fundamental


laws


and theories


of chemistry,


and the preparation


and properties


of the


common non-metalic elements and their compounds.


Cy. 105.-General Chemistry.


4 credits.


The first half of the course Cy. 105-106.


Offered first term only.


Prerequisites


Upper percentile rating in


placement


tests in physical sciences and mathematics or satisfactory


In general,
chemistry.


completion of C-2.


freshmen should present evidence that they have had high school


Pre- or corequisite:


Basic Mathematics.


(Register for one Lecture-Discussion Section, and one Laboratory Section.)


Lecture-Discussion


Sections:


Section


8:15


CH-AU


. TUCKER,


1:15 T


Section


2:30 T


Section


Section


Section


Section


8:15
3:45
8:15
1:15
8:15
2:30
8:15


CH-110.
CH-AU.
CH-110.
CH-AU.
CH-110.
CH-AU.
CH-110.
CH-AU.
CH-110.
CH-AU.
CH-110.


THOMAS,
TUCKER,
THOMAS,
TUCKER,
THOMAS,
TUCKER,
THOMAS,
TUCKER,


TUCKER,


LEMMERMAN


Laboratory


Sections:


1:15
1:15


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


1:15 to


to 4:50
to 4:50


4:50


M. F.


1:15 to 4:50


1:15


1:15 to


to 4:50 T


4:50 T


CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.
CH-130.


LEMMERMAN


A first


course


designed to meet the requirements of engineering students.


This course includes


some qualitative analysis.


Cy. 201.-Analytical Chemistry


(Mainly


Qualitative).


credits.


The first half


1







DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Laboratory Sections


Section
Section


8:15


8:15 to


11:50
11:50


CH-230.
CH-230.


INGWALSON


Theoretical


principles and


laboratory technique involved


in the qualitative


detection


of the


common metals and acid radicals.

Cy. 301.-Organic Chemistry.
Offered first term only.


4 credits.


The first half of the course Cy.


301-302.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory


Section.)


Lecture


Section


9:30


daily.


CH-112.


BUTLER,


Laboratory Sections


Section
Section


1:15


to 4:50


1:15 to 4:50


CH-230.
CH-230.


BUTLER,


Preparation


and properties


of the


various


aliphatic


compounds.


401.---Physical Chemistry.


4 credits.


The first half of the course Cy. 401-402.


Offered first term only.


Prerequisites:


One year of College Physics,


Cy. 202,


and Ms. 353-354.
10:45 daily.
1:15 to 4:50


CH-110.


HAWKIN
CH-204.


TUCKER,


GRADUATE COURSES


Cy. 516.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.


To arrange.


3 credits.


HEATH, F


Cy. 570.-Research in Inorganic Chemistry.


2 to 6 credits.


To arrange.


HEATH


, or JACKSON,


Cy. 571.-Rsearch in Analytical


Chemistry


. 2 to 6 credits.


To arrange.


BLACK, A. P.


Cy. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry.


to 6 credits.


To arrange.


POLLARD,


C. B


., or BUTLER, G. B.


Cy. 573.-Research in Physical


Chemistry.


2 to 6 credits.


To arrange.


HAWKINS, J.


Cy. 574.-Research in Naval Stores.


To arrange.


to 6 credits.


HAWKINS, J.


575.-Research in Sanitary Chemistry.


To arrange.


2 to 6 credits.


BLACK, A. P.








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Section
Section
Section


8:15
1:15
1:15


to 11:50 T.


4:50


4:50 T.


TB-100.
TB-100.
TB-100.


MOBLEY, G. S.
WINSOR, A. N.
WINSOR, A. N.


The use of chain, level and transit;


traversing and balancing


of surveys,


calculating


areas,


contour


work;


line azimuth


sun observation,


stadia


surveying;


topographic


mapping


subdivision.


CI. 326.-Statics of Simple Structures.


4 credits.


Prerequisite:


Ig. 365.


10:45 daily.
Laboratory:


HL-302.


SAWYER,


1:15 to 4:50 T.


HL-301.


Applications of the methods of statics to structural analysis;


a correlation between graphical


and analytical


methods;


moments,


shears,


reactions,


resultants,


stress


diagrams,


and influence


lines for statically determinate structures.


368.-Materials


Laboratory.


credit.


Prerequisite:


Corequisite:


Ig. 367.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


1:15 to 4:50


1:15


to 4:50 T.


TB-107.
TB-107.


COMINS,
COMING,


A laboratory


course


of experiments involving the strength and physical properties of engineer-


ing materials that


are studied in Strength of Materials.


GRADUATE


COURSES


CL 527.-Advanced


Sanitary


Engineering.


credits.


To arrange.


EMERSON, D. L.


An advanced


study


of the biological,


chemical


and physical


principles


utilized


in water,


sewage


and industrial


waste


treatment


processes.


529.-Advanced


Sanitary


Engineering


Design.


3 credits.


To arrange.


EMERSON, D. L.


Special problems in the design of


water,


sewage


and industrial


waste


plants.


Cl. 533.-Hydraulic Engineering.


To arrange.


3 credits.


HANSEN, H. L.


Broadened


theoretical


treatment


and amplification


of hydraulics.


Application


to unsteady


flow in open channels,


erosion,


flood control, dams,


drainage structures


the flow net.


CL. 538.-Analysis of


Statically


Indeterminate Structures.


3 credits.


To arrange.


Frames


variable moment of


inertia; closed


rings;


column


analogy; secondary


stresses;


continuous


trusses;


columns.


Cl. 548.-Advanced Soil Mechanics.


To arrange.


3 credits.


RITTER, L.


A correlation


of literature on


the subject


and special


applications


to Florida


soils.


Field


investigations


and special laboratory analysis.







DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


414.-Manufacture of Butter and Cheese. 3 credits.
10:45 M. T. Th. F. DL. ARRINGTON, L. R.
Laboratory: 1:15 to 3:35 M. F. DL.


Principles and practices of


butter and cheese manufacture.


ECONOMICS


Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics.


4 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section 1.


Section


Section


daily.
to 4:50
daily.
to 2:20
daily.
to 4:50


ANDERSON,

HENDERSON,


The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,


sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics.
for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.


Prerequisite


Es. 205.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life.
course Es. 205-206.


3 credits.


The first half of the


(Register for


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


one


7:00
8:15
9:30
10:45
12:00
1:15


section
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.


only.)


PE-208.
SC-206.
PE-208.
LA-204.
PE-208.
LA-204.


OLIVER, C.
HENDERSON,
OLIVER, C.
MCFERRIN,

SHIELDS, M.


This is an introductory course in economics designed primarily to meet the requirements
of all University students who feel the need for a workable knowledge of the economic system.
Emphasis is placed on analyses and descriptions of the more important economic organizations and
institutions which, in their functional capacities, constitute the economic order. Economic principles
and processes are explained, especially those relating to an understanding of value, price, cost,
rent, interest, wages, profit, money, banking, commerce, foreign exchange, foreign trade and
business cycles. The first half of the course Es. 205-206 is devoted largely to the study of economic
organizations and institutions and to the principles governing value and price. It may be taken
for credit without the second half.


Es. 206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life.


credits.


The second half of


the course Es. 205-206.


(Register
Section 1.


for one section only.)


7:00


daily.


SC-213.


RICHARDSON.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Es. 246.-The Consumption of Wealth. 3 credits.
3:45 daily. LA-204. SHIELDS, M. W.


An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent
consumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand.


and trends


321.-Financial Organization of Society. 3
course Es. 321-322. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.


credits.


first


half


(Register for one section


Section 1.
Section 2.


7:00 daily.
10:45 daily


i only.)
SC-202.
CH-212.


DOLBEARE,


An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary,
banking and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu-
tions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to
the economic system as a whole.


Es. 327.-Public Finance. 3
12:00 daily. SC-202.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Es. 205-206.


Principles governing expenditures of modern government; source of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.


Es. 335.-Economics of Marketing. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. SC-206. HESKIN, O. E.


Prerequisite:


Es. 205-206.


The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular atten-
tion given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages,
and comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying
on trade operations; retail and wholesale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of
marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition; the relation of the government to marketing.


Es. 351.-Elements of Transportation.
9:30 daily. SC-215. BIGHAM,


3 credits.
T. C.


Prerequisite:


Es. 205-206.


Significance, history, facilities, and economic characteristics of transportation agencies;
theory of rates; rate structures; present system and problems of regulation and promotion of all
forms of inter-city transportation.


Es. 372.-Labor Economics.
10:45 daily. SC-215.


credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
CHANCE, J. E.


Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial con-
flict; attempts to solve labor problems by employees; unionism in its structural and functional
aspects; attempts to solve labor problems by employers; personnel management, employee repre-
sentation, employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by the state; protective labor
legislation, laws relating to settlement of industrial disputes.


Es. 382.-Utilization of Natural Resources. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. SC-208. DIETTRICH, S. R.


A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed
hv nn i4ntonsivo fat-ln of tho whin nnAd wrntofil n1rnatinoa nf crnlnitantn nn nd tflhtit'.nni n f +thoa








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


408.-Economic Principles and Problems.


3 credits.


The second half


of the


course Es. 407-408.


2:30 daily.


PE-112.


ELDRIDGE, J.


454.-Principles of


Public


Utility


Economics.


credits.


Prerequisite:


205-206.


7:00 daily.


SC-215.


BIGHAM,


The nature, place and development of


public


service corporations; types


of public


control


valuation and rate making; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities
public relations; public ownership.


Es. 469.-Business Cycles and Forecasting.


combinations


3 credits.


10:45 daily.


PE-1.


ANDERSON


M. D.


A survey of the problems of the reduction of business risk


by forecasting general


business


conditions; statistical methods used by


leading commercial agencies


Es. 478.-Problems in State and Local Finance.


3 credits,


in forecasting.

. Prerequisite: Es. 327


9:30 daily.


SC-202.


Allocation


of functional


responsibility


property


taxation;


sales


taxes


highway


finance,


business taxation


: supervision of local finance.


Emphasis on Florida problems.


Es. 537.-Imperfect Competitions.


3 credits.


To arrange.


EDUCATION


En. 241.-Introduction to Education.


3 credits.


8:15 daily.


YN-138.


PITCHING, A. E.


Principles upon which present-day education is based.


En. 317.-Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices.


3 credits.


10:45 daily.


A study


of the basic


YN-138.
principles


and methods


of measurement


and evaluation


of school


practices.


En. 385.-Child Development.


9:30 daily.


3 credits.


YN-138.


Designed to acquaint the student with the growth and development of children


into mature


personalities.


The findings


of recent


research


will be studied


through


outside


reading,


class


discussion


and observation.


Methods


of evaluation of child growth


will be included.


En. 386.-Educational Psychology.


8:15 daily.


3 credits.


YN-134.


The individual and education.
social growth of the adolescent.


A study will be made of the physical, emotional, mental, and
Achievement will be considered in terms of growth.


1in9- aiT a.. a C aL an1 t' fl fll n T.. n 4...- a a


0 a,, f:A.


mrt ,.,.,. 1,.-1.








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


En. 401.-School Administration.


3 credits.


12:00 daily.


YN-138.


CAMPBELL


Problems


peculiar


to schools


in Florida


the supervising


principal,


qualifications,


relation


to superintendent,


boards,


teachers, pupils, patrons,


and community


adapting the school to the


child's needs;


business practices.


En. 421.-Student Teaching.


3 credits.


The first half of the course En. 421-422.


daily


one hour daily to


arrange


between


8:15


11:50.


-118-A.


HENDERSON


The student


for the


given


teaching-learning


practice in
situation,


the art of
and putting


teaching


by actually taking


into operation


under


over


direction


responsibility


and supervision


the theories, methods, materials, and teaching techniques acquired during his junior
observation and participation.


year


through


En. 422.-Student Teaching.


credits.


The second half of the course En. 421-422.


3:45 daily


one


hour daily to


arrange


between


8:15


YN-118-A.


HENDERSON


(En. 421 or En. 422 may be completed in three weeks provided the student devotes full time to
the course.)


471.-Problems of


Instruction.


4 credits.


12:00 and to arrange.


YN-140.


An integrated


educational


program


will be stressed.


472.-Methods and


3:45 daily.


Organization in Industrial Arts.


YN-Shop.


STRICKLAND,


. W.


3 credits.


Organization of industrial arts materials for the various grades and schools; planning courses


of study, selecting equipment and supplies; study of aims and objectives of
study of the utilization of current acceptable teaching techniques and devices.


480.-Teaching of Reading.


industrial arts.


3 credits.


practical


1:15 daily


A comprehensive


methods


other


survey


and procedures


hours


of the problems


for attacking


arrange.
of teaching


these


YN-236.


reading


problem in his own school and submit a proposed solution for it.
reading can be applied toward a degree.)

GRADUATE COURSES


problems.


MCEACHERN


in all grades,


Each


student


(Not more than


specific


will identify


6 hours in


NOTE:


orientation
Auditorium.


new


graduate


meetings at 7:00
Information w:


students


June


given


Education


required


, 18,


about


types


graduate


attend
Yonge


study,


planning


individual


programs,


facilities


available,


other


matters


terest to graduate students.


En. 501.-Elementary School Curriculum.


3 credits.


- 'U I


* a a1


- - -


S* .*a j I -- ^ nj i Wi A> InIU nnnrnhr-


11:50.








DEPARTMENTS


STRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


En. 519.-High


School


Curriculum.


3 credits.


45 daily.


YN-134.


LEWIS


High school


curriculum problems.


En. 530.-Individual Work.


Variable credit


maximum


credit 6.


arrange.


MEAD, A.


STAFF.


En. 536.-Supervision of the Elementary School.


3 credits.


12:00 daily.


YN-134.


MORRISON.


The objectives,


procedures,


means


of evaluation


of supervision


in elementary


schools


the preparation of teachers.


540.-Foundations


Education.


Variable


credit


maximum


credit


:15 to


daily.


-325.


STEVENS


GRACE


En. 541.-Problems in Child and Adolescent Growth and Development and


Edu-


national Psychology.


9:30 daily.


Variable credit


-218.


maximum credit 6.


CUMBEE


En. 544.-Legal Phases of Public School Administration.


3 credits.


10:45


daily.


YN-140.


MORPHET.


Special


emphasis


will be given


to Florida conditions,


school


laws,


constitutional


provisions,


judicial


decisions,


Attorney


General's rulings, and regulations


of the State


Board


of Education.


Students will be required to prepare a term report dealing with some special field of school law.


Only graduate students with experience in administration


and supervision


will be admitted.


En. 547.-Problems in Elementary


Education, Principles and Practices in Grades


Variable credit; maximum credit 6.


7:00 daily.


YN-209.


STEVENS,


GRACE A.


En. 555.-Florida


Workshop: Bulletin Series Division.


Variable credit;


maximum


credit 6.


(Register for one section


only.)


Section
Section
Section


8:15 daily.


8:15


daily.


8:15 daily


YN-203.


YN.


(June


MOORMAN


WILLIAMS,


- July


YN-150.


WELLMAN.


MEYER, H. K.


GOETTE


WEBB


and HENDERSON


Section


8:15 daily


(June


- July


YN.


Preparation of bulletins by


a special group.


En. 556.-Florida


Workshop


Bulletin Series Division.


Variable credit; maximum


credit 6.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
C.. I


'-S -tn- 4.',


8:15 daily.


~ 4 r


YN-13
IT --


LEPS, J.


._. ^1-- \


*tIT mt


A r v my


,- -. v. n "n flf II I *[ n to T nr t fn iirj *I Ii-** l.a * ul; I4 ti


1 _-


J_1-. -







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


En. 576.-Corrective Reading Laboratory.


3 credits.


Prerequisite or Corequisite:


En. 575.


9:45 daily.


YN-236.


CENTER, and McCRACKEN,


Practical application with selected groups of children of methods and materials for diagnosing,
correcting, and preventing reading difficulties.


En. 600.-The School Survey.


8:15 daily.


YN-140.


3 credits.
MORPHET.


A study of school survey techniques and their application.


programs


Long term planning of educational


is emphasized.


En. 602.-School Plant Planning.


3 credits.


2:30 daily.


YN-138.


JOHNS, R. L., and HAMON.


A study of the planning of building programs and the planning of school buildings in relation
to instructional needs.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


341.-Elements of Electrical


Engineering.


3 credits.


first


half


course


341-342.


Prerequisites:


year


college


physics,


including


electricity and magnetism; differential and integral calculus


(Register for one section


and M1.


only.)


Section
Section


8:15 daily.
10:45 daily.


EG-213.
EG-213.


SMITH


E. F.


SMITH, E. F.


Electric and magnetic circuits; electrostatics;


electro-magnetics; representation of alternating


current by vectors and complex quantities; measurement of power in single phase and polyphase


circuits; generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy
selection, testing, and installation of electrical equipment.


characteristics of apparatus;


El. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering.


3 credits.


The second half of the


course El. 341-342.


8:15 daily.


EG-301.


PUMPHREY


El. 349.-Dynamo Laboratory.


1 credit.


The first half of the course El. 349-350.


Corequisite: El.


(Register for one


section


only.)


Section
Section


Section 3.


Section


7:00 to
7:00 to
1:15 to


1:15


10:35
10:35


4:50


4:50 T.


. BN-106.


BN-106.


.BN-106.


BN-106.


SCHRADER,
SCHRADER,
SCHRADER,
SCHRADER,


Experimental studies and tests on

El. 350.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1


direct current and alternating


credit.


current apparatus.


The second half of the course El. 349-350.


Corequisite


: El. 342.







DEPARTMENTS OF


'STRUCTION


-FIRST


TERM


ENGLISH


Eh. 217.-Literary


Masters of England.


3 credits.


The first half of the course


Eh. 217-218.


May be taken for credit without Eh.


9:30 daily.


LA-210.


ROBERTSON


The most


interesting


and significant


English


writers


are read


and discussed,


primarily


an appreciation of their art and outlook on life.


223.-Masterpieces


World


Literature.


credits.


first


half


course Eh. 223-224.
8:15 daily. L


May


A-311.


be taken for credit without Eh. 224.
FARRIS, L. C.


A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of the great


books


of the world.


Eh. 302.-Shakespeare.


3 credits.


10:45 daily.


LA-210.


ROBERTSON


C. A.


The great tragedies will be studied, notably Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony
and Cleopatra.


Eh. 303.-Major


7:00 daily.


Poets of


LA-311.


Victorian Period.
KIRKLAND, E. C


3 credits.


Reading and discussion of such major writers


as Browning,


Tennyson, Arnold,


the Rossettis,


Morris, Swinburne, and Kipling.


Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language.


3 credits.


12:00 daily.


LA-314.


MCMILLAN.


Designed


to meet


the needs


of three


types


of students:


for the general


student


it offers a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good Eng-


lish"


(b) for the English


teacher in the secondary school


it provides an


adequate minimum


knowledge of the English Language;


for the English Major and beginning graduate student


it serves as an introduction


to further


linguistic study.


Primary emphasis


is placed,


upon


grammatical rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and
spoken.


iEh. 306.-Modern English


Grammar.


3 credits.


30 daily.


LA-210.


MOUNTS, C. E.


A study of modern English inflection and syntax.


The course


is designed to be of practical


value to teachers' of English, and is intended especially for students in the College of Education


majoring


in English.


Eh. 363.-Contemporary Literature:


Drama.


credits.


12:00 daily.


LA-311.


MOUNTS,


C. E.


A study


of recent


and contemporary


drama,


with


emphasis


upon


such


major


English


American playwrights as Shaw and Eugene O'Neill.


The work of Ibsen and other Continential


writers will be treated briefly.


Eh. 391.-Children's Literature.


3 credits.


9:30 daily.


LA-204.


WISE







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


409.-Chaucer.


9:30


daily.


3 credits.
LA-311.


MCMILLAN.


Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer


as a story teller,


as a wise,


humorous,


penetrating observer of human life, and


as a great poet.


Eh. 418.-The Literature of the South.


3 credits.


7:00 daily.


LA-210.


SPIVEY, H. E.


Restricted


to a study


of the most important contemporary


fiction


dealing with


the South-


novels by Ellen Glasgow, Thomas


Wolfe, Erskine Caldwell,


William Faulkner, Mrs. Rawlings, etc.


Eh. 419.-Elizabethan Drama.


credits.


10:45 daily.


LA-311.


BAUGHAN, D. E.


A course in the origins and development of the Elizabethan drama, exclusive of Shakespeare,


with emphasis upon such major writers


as Marlowe, Kyd, Chapman, Marston,


434.-English Literature of the Eighteenth


Century.


Webster, and Jonson.


3 credits.


1:15 daily.


LA-314.


CONGLETON, J. E.


A study of the


prose


and poetry of the


age of Dr. Johnson.


GRADUATE


Eh. 502.-American Literature.


COURSES


3 credits.


8:15 daily.


Eh. 509.-Chaucer.


9:30 daily.


LA-210.


3 credits.
LA-311.


SPIVEY, H.


MCMILLAN.


A thorough study of the Canterbury


Tales;


collateral readings


(in translation)


of important


medieval writings.


Eh. 519.-Elizabethan Drama.


credits.


10:45 daily.


LA-311.


BAUGHAN, D. E.


Eh. 534.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century.


1:15 daily.


credits.


CONGLETON, J.


ENTOMOLOGY


Ey. 201.-Man and Insects.


3 credits.


8:15 M. T. 1
Laboratory:


AG-308.


1:15 to 3:35 T. ]


ROGERS, A. J.
ih. AG-308.


The influence of insects upon man's agricultural and social world.


The course treats of the


contrast


agriculture,


between


the history


commerce,


industry.


man
wars,


and insects;


human


the influence


diseases,


medical


of insects


practices,


upon


machine


domestic


development,


engineering, legal practices, scientific investigations, and other insects.







DEPARTMENTS


TRUCTION FIRS T


TERM


GRADUATE


Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology.


COURSE


2 to 4 credits.


To arrange.


AG-309.


CREIGHTON


J. T.


The study of an entomological problem,


which may be in any field of specialization,


including


histology, morphology, taxonomy, embryology, biological control, ecology,


toxicology, plant quaran-


tine, biology, life history and habits, commercial entomology, structural pest control, and medical
and veterinary entomology.


FORESTRY


Fy. 220.-Introduction to


8:15 M.


A basic course designed


Forestry.
. HT-410.


to acquaint the


2 credits.


GELTZ
student


with


the various


phases


and fundamental


underlying principles of the field of Forestry.


Fy. 226.-Dendrology
12:00 to 4:50


Angiosperms.


. HT-410.


3 credits.
GELTZ. C


The botany of the angiosperms of the United States, silvical characterization including general
and local occurrence, field identification.


431.-Forest Problems
To arrange. Giver


Seminar.


credits.


n in Summer Camp.


STAFF.


This course is designed to cover particular fields of forestry,.


to be determined by the staff.


The work will be made to supplement the student's training during previous semesters.

FRENCH


Fh. 33.-First-Year


Open


French.


to students who


have


credits.
had no


first


half


previous work in


course


33-34.


French.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


A besrinnine


course


7:00
8:15
basic


daily.
daily.


for further


BU-101.
BU-201.


study.


WALLACE,
The objective


a moderate


proficiency


reading and speaking the language.


Emphasis on oral work.


34.-First-Year French.


0 daily.


BU-201.


credits.
KURTH.


second half


of the course Fh.


201.-Second-Year


French.


credits.


first


half


course


201-202.


Prerequisite:


year


college


French,


or two


years


high


school French.


9:30 dail


BU-205.


WALLACE


305.-French
the course Fh.


Conversation


Composition.


credits.


first


05-306, but either half may be taken for credit.


half


Prerequisite







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY SUMMER


SESSION


GRADUATE


Fh. 530.-Individual Work. V


COURSE


variablee credit.


Confer
study, for
are no rej
Students w


To arrange. BU-101. ATKI
ences, reading and reports. The
credit, certain phases of French
gular course offerings. May be
till be helped to plan a definite pi


N, E. G.


course
literature
elected f
program.


offers graduate students an opportunity to
, language and civilization for which there
or additional credit in subsequent sessions.


GENERAL


GL 301.-Children's Science.
9:30 daily. YN-201.


SCIENCE


2 credits.
TISON, J.


The content of elementary science, together with its organization for use both in the integrated
program and in the departmentalized school. Consideration given to the interests and experiences
of children. Investigation of instructional aids that will assist teachers of the elementary school
to meet the needs of individual children.


GEOGRAPHY


Gpy. 204.-Elements of World Geography, II.
12:00 daily. SC-208. TERRELL, R. P.


credits.


A continuation of Gpy. 203, with greater emphasis on the economic and political aspects of
geography. Here are considered population problems, race, language, and religion, and especially
the regional distribution of occupations and environmental adjustments that lead to the inter-
dependence of peoples and nations, and the political influence of geographic factors.

Gpy. 305.-Geography of Florida. 3 credits.
10:45 daily. SC-208. DIETTRICH, S. R.
A study of the geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions of Florida.
The distribution of population, routes of communication, industries, resources, and strategic
location in their geographical and historical aspects; explanation and interpretation of major
phenomena such as weather and climate, geologic structure and land forms, surface and under-
ground drainage, shoreline characteristics, natural vegetation, soil types, and animal life. Optional
field trips.


Gpy. 385.-Principles of Human Geogrs
9:30 daily. SC-208. TERRELI
Basic principles underlying the study and
school; the earth as a planate; wind systems
climate; land forms. How people have adjusted
The correlation between geography and history
wish to carry on special studies relating to an:


3 credits.


teaching of modern geography in the elementary
; seasons, elements of meteorology; weather and
d life and work to changing world environment.
is stressed. Opportunity is given students who
y specific part of the course.


GEOLOGY


Gy. 207.-Topography


and Geology of Florida. 3 crei


dits.







DEPARTMENTS OF


INSTRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


GERMAN


Gn. 33.-First-Year German.


3 credits.


The first half of the course Gn. 33-34.


For students who have had no previous work in German.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
12:00 daily.


BU-305.
BU-305.


CRAPS, J.


A beginning course basic for further study.


The objective


a moderate proficiency in speak-


ing and reading the language.

Gn. 34.-First-Year German.


3 credits.


The second half of the course Gn. 33-34.


Prerequisite: Gn. 33 or equivalent.
8:15 daily. BU-301.


201.-Second-Year


German.


3 credits.


first


half


course


201-202.


Prerequisite:


10:45 daily.


BU-:


Gn. 34 or equivalent.
305. CRAPS, J. E.


An intermediate course.


The objective


is proficiency


in reading,


writing,


and speaking


language.


Gn. 430.--Individual Work.


To arrange.


Variable credit.


JONES, O. F.


Readings and reports in fields chosen


by the individual student.


course


may be repeated


without duplication of credit.


HEALTH AND


PHYSICAL EDUCATION


HPl. 121.-Narcotics Education.


2 credits.


(Offered June 16


- July


8:15 daily and 7:00 T


ECHOLS.


A factual, scientific, and unemotional approach


to the present-day problem of


narcotics.


study


of the nature of


alcohol and


its relation


to the psychological,


physical,


social,


economic.


and educational aspects of the problem


will be considered briefly.


Suggestive


teaching projects,


units, and methods for the various


age-grade


and subject levels will be explored and developed.


HPl. 351.-Intramural Athletics and


Officiating.


2 credits.


1:15


CH-212.


CHERRY


Designed to prepare the student to


organize


and conduct


a program of


intramural athletics


on both the collegiate and public school levels.


Emphasis is placed


upon


the objectives


of the


program, the organization of a department, units of competition,


the program of sports, methods


of organizing participation, scoring plans, awards and intramural rules and regulations.


Students


will be given an opportunity to


assist


with the conduct of the intramural program.


The techniques


of officiating and the training of officials will be included in the course.


HPI.


373.-Methods


Materials


Elementary


School


Physical


Education.


3 credits.


9:30 daily. GY.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY Y


SUMMER


SESSION


HPI. 383.-Physical Activities in Schools.


credits.


Section
Section


(For men)


(For


Women)


8:15 daily.


8:15


SCHNELL


daily.


The entire program of physical education in the public schools in grades seven


presented


so that the student may get a complete picture of this program and


to twelve is


become aware of


the progression from grade to grade.


The student


receives


training in leadership through taking


his turn serving


tunity

HP1.


as leader and receiving the suggestions of classmates and instructor.


is provided for the student to develop skills in all of the activities presented.


387.-Health
2:30 daily.


Education.


UA-201.


The oppor-


3 credits.


HAAR, F. B.


A consideration of the principles underlying health education,


together with the organization


and administration of such a program; the role of the teacher in health instruction; the organiza-
tion of materials for instructional purposes; criteria for the evaluation of health materials and
methods; the role of local, state and national non-official organizations in health teaching programs.


HPI. 481.-Advanced Basketball Coaching.


2 credits.


(Open only to men.)


Pre-


requisite:


HP1.


or permission


instructor.


10:45


UA-201.


MCALLISTER,


Designed to instruct individuals in coaching
on both offense and defense.


a basketball


team;


based entirely on team play


GRADUATE C

HPI. 533.-Problems of Physical Education.


OURSE


credits.


10:45 daily.


UA-205.


SALT, E.


Designed


to give


the student


an understanding


of the contemporary


problems


in physical


education.


It forms the basis for the organization of research projects and provides an analysis


of the techniques used in problem solving.


HISTORY


Hy. 241.-History


of the


Modern


World.


credits.


Prerequisite:


or Hy.


313-314.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
10:45 daily.


PE-112.
PE-112.


REYNOLDS, J.


A study of the modern world from the Congress of Vienna to the present time.


251.-Florida


History.


credits.


The first half


the course


Hy. 251


-252.


12:00 daily.


AG-104.


PATRICK, R.


Designed to familiarize the student with the discovery, exploration, settlement and development


of that area now comprised in the present state of Florida.
period since Reconstruction.


Special emphasis


will be given


* 301.-American History, 1492 to 1776.
T_ a a


Um .i I fl .J


credits.


The first half of the course







DEPARTMENTS OF


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


361.-English History to


361-362.


1688.


Prerequisite: C-l or Hy.


3 credits.
313-314.


first half


of the course


9:30 daily.


PE-112.


PAYNE, A. N.


A survey of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolution.


363.-Latin


American


History


to 1850.


3 credits.


first


half


course Hy. 363-364.


Prerequisite:


or Hy.


313-314.


10:45 daily.


survey


LA-306.


GLUNT, J.


of the colonization and development of Latin


America.


GRADUATE COURSES


Hy. 501.-American History,


8:15 daily.


PE-112.


1492 to
LEAKE


1776.
J. M.


credits.


Hy. 509.-U.


History Seminar.


3 credits.


To arrange.


LEAKE, J. M.


For graduate students majoring

Hy. 561.-English History to


in history.


1688.


3 credits.


9:30 daily.


PE-112.


PAYNE, A.


563.-Latin American History to


1850.


credits.


10:45 daily.


LA-306.


GLUNT, J. D.


HORTICULTURE


He. 314.-Principles of Fruit Production.


3 credits.


9:30 daily.


AG-209.


ABBOTT,


The principles underlying


fruit production,


with


special


reference to such


factors


as water


relations,


nutrition,


temperature,


fruit


setting,


and geographic


influences.


He. 316.-Citrus Culture.


credits.


7:00


Laboratory:


AG-209.


2:30 to 4:50 T.


ABBOTT,


AG-209.


A thorough study


of all phases of the


growing


of citrus fruits, including propagation, selection


of site,


planting,


grove


operations, harvesting and


varieties.


A three-day trip


is required.


INDUSTRIAL ARTS


In. 111.-Mechanical Drawing.


EDUCATION


2 credits.


9:30 daily.


YN-Shop.


STRICKLAND,


For industrial arts students.


construction,


Freehand sketching, lettering, orthographic projection, geometric


working drawing and blue printing, care and use of instruments.


In. 211.-General Shop.


2 credits.


V'KT 1 ^n


RernmurAnn


I l L U I *fI l I I .''SE i I .t f .' I *


(1 1- AK rinily







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


In. 411.-General Machine Shop and Metal Work.


2:30


daily.


YN-Shop.


STRICKLAND,


3 credits.


. W.


Recommended for properly qualified students


in the College of Education.


Classroom


study


and laboratory practice in pattern work, foundry, and general machine shop operations.


INDUSTRIAL


ENGINEERING


Ig. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics.
353, ML 182.
(Register for one section only.)


3 credits.


Prerequisites: Ps. 205, Ms.


Section 1.
Section 2.


8:15 daily.
10:45 daily.


EG-209.
EG-209.


KING, I. L.
KING, I. L.


Principles of statics;


resolution and equilibrium of concurrent forces; numerical and graphical


solution of trusses and hinged frames; couples, centers of gravity;


forces in space; and moments


of inertia.


Ig. 366.-Engineering


Mechanics Dynamics.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


8:15 daily.
10:45 daily.


EG-211.
EG-211.


HIRSCH,
HIRSCH,


Principles of


dynamics:


rectilinear,


curvilinear, and


harmonic


motions


momentum and


pulse; work and energy; force,


mass,


and acceleration; projectiles


simple, torsional, and compound


pendulums


balancing of rigid bodies; and relative motion.


JOURNAL


Jm. 213.-Propaganda.


3 credits.


8:15 daily.


LW-202.


EMIG, E. J.


A study of newspapers,


magazines, the radio, and movies designed to develop an understanding


of the


forces


that create and control public action.


Analysis of the attitudinizing of people,


strategy of symbol-makers, and the techniques of propagandists in


agencies


their use of idea-transmitting


and in their influence on war and peace.


Jm. 407.-Interpreting the News.


credits.


10:45 daily.


LW-202.


EMIG, E. J.


Investigation


of the human


ecological factors that affect such


idea-transmitting


agencies


newspapers,


magazines,


books, radio, and film, and a study of the standards of evaluating public


affairs.


together with preparation of


interpretations of


events.


LAW


courses


offered


each


term


provide


for entering


as well


advanced students.


303.-Contracts.


3 credits.







DEPARTMENTS OF


INSTRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


Introduction


therein,
licenses;


including
convenani


to the law of


the land itself,
ts running with


conveyances;


air, water,
the land.


rights


fixtures,
Warren,


incident


to ownership


emblements,
Cases on J


waste;


Property,


of land
profits;


and estates
easements;


2nd edition


Outline on Property.


Lw. 404.-Quasi Contracts.


7:00


Th. F.


2 credits.
LW-105.


CRANDALL,


Origin and nature of quasi contract; benefits conferred in misreliance on rights or duty, from


mistake of law, and on invalid,


through


unenforceable, illegal, or impossible contracts;


dutiful intervention in another's affairs


benefits conferred


benefits conferred under constraint;


action


restitution.


Woodruff,


Cases


on Quasi Contracts, 3rd edition.


415.-Abstracts.


2 credits.


12:00 M.


Th. F.


LW-201. DAY, J.


Interpretation


maps


and plotting


of lots described


metes


and bounds


the formal


requisites of


conveyances


in use in Florida; deeds executed


by public and judicial officers


liens


and contracts for the sale of lands.


Florida Statutes and selected Florida


cases.


Lw. 417.-Partnership.


credits.


2:30 M. T. Th. F.


LW-105.


BROWN, R. C.


Creation, nature, characteristics of
duties; rights and remedies of creditors


a partnership


partner's interest, liability;


termination of partnership.


Mechem,


powers


Cases


rights;


ship, Matthews' Revision.


419.-Air


Law.


credit.


8:15 W.


LW-105.


TESELLE,


C. J.


Aviation; air space rights; interstate commerce; airports


insurance;


carriers;


treatment of


torts, contracts, and crimes in relation to aviation.


431.-Appellate Procedure and


Dykstra, Law of


Judgments.


2 credits.


10:45 M.


Judgments:


briefs; arguments;


appeals:


Th. F


what


decision.


. LW-105.
is reviewable;


Special


emphasis


CRANDALL,


methods
on new


; parties


appeal


assignments


rules


of Florida


error;


Supreme


record;
Court.


Sunderland.


Cases


and Materials on Appellate Practice, 2nd edition.


Lw. 505.-Federal Jurisdiction.


2 credits.


3:45 M.


W. F.


LW-105.


SLAGLE


System


of courts created under authority of the United States; jurisdiction; removal of


from state courts


substantive


law applied


by federal courts; appellate


jurisdiction.


lDobie


cases
and


Ladd,


Cases


on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure.


Lw. 520.-Creditors' Rights.


9:30 daily.


LW-105.


3 credits.
TESELLE


C. J.


Remedie,
assignment


s of the
for benefit


unsecured


creditor;


of creditors;


fraudulent


equity


conveyances;


and statutory


creditors'


receiverships;


agreements


bankruptcy.


; general
Holbrook


and Aigler, Cases on Bankruptcy, 4th edition.


Lw. 522.-Admiralty.


credits.


1:15 M. T.


W. F. LW-105.


SLAGLE, D.


on Partner-


Aviation.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


MATHEMATICS


Ms. 105.-Basic Mathematics.


4 credits.


(Register for one section


only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.


0 daily.


10:45


daily.


12:00 daily.


daily.


2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.


PE-101.
BN-208.
PE-101.
PE-101.
BN-208.
PE-101.
PE-101.
PE-101.
PE-101.
PE-101.


LEE


BLAKE,
MEYER
LEWIS,


GORMSEN


An additional hour each week for each section will be arranged.


In place


of the traditional college algebra,


trigonometry, and analytic geometry in


succession,


course


offers


a sequence


of topics including the above plus some calculus.


Teachers of high


school


mathematics


who wish


to advance


in technical


command


of the subject


matter


should


elect


Ms. 105 and Ms.


course


is designed


also for those


who plan to major in


mathematics or to elect


courses


above the freshman level.


Ms. 106.-Basic Mathematics.


4 credits.


(Register for one section


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


0 daily.


10:45


daily.


2:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.


only.)
PE-10.
PE-11.
PE-11.
PE-11.
PE-11.
PE-11.
PE-11.
PE-11.


GILLIS
SNOW.


GORMSEN


An additional hour each


week for each section


will be arranged.


A continuation of Ms. 105.


Ms. 225.-Arithmetic for Teachers.


credits.


7:00 daily.


PE-11.


MCINNIS,


Meaning


short


cuts.


and cultural


values of


arithmetic.


Study of fractions, approximations,


Principles,
percentages,


fundamentals,


processes,


checks


projects and activity programs; and


many other
arithmetic.


topics


so treated


as to give


the student


a connected


idea of


the subject matter of


Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon beginning


processes,


which


many teachers


never


have


the opportunity


to investigate.


Designed


not only


for teachers of arithmetic, but also for teachers of any


science


in which familiarity with number


processes


is desirable.


353.-Differential


Calculus.


4 credits.


v







DEPARTMENT


STR AUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


Section


Section 8.


10:45 daily.


12:00


daily.


PE-10.
PE-10.


QUADE,


An additional hour each week for each section will be arranged.


A beginning


course.


Differentiation,


one of the most


important


and practical


fields


mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse operation
of differentiation.


Ms. 354.-Integral


Calculus.


4 credits.


(Register for one


section


only.)


Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
10:45 daily.


EG-209.
PE-208.
PE-208.


MEYER, ]
MCINNIS,
GILLIS, 1


An additional hour each week for each section will


be arranged.


Integration.


inverse


operation


of differentiation,


is used


in the calculation


areas,


volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.


Ms. 420.-Differential Equations.


3 credits.


9:30 daily.


AG-210.


DOSTAL, B. F.


The classification,


solution,


and application


of various


equations


which


contain


expressions


involving not only variables but also the derivatives of


Ms. 431-College Geometry.


these variables.


3 credits.


7:00 daily.


EG-211.


BLAKE, R. G.


The use of


elementary methods


in the advanced study


of the triangle


and circle.


Special


emphasis
teachers.


on solving


original


exercises.


Recommended


for prospective


school


geometry


GRADUATE COURSES


Ms. 540.-Fourier Series.


3 credits.


1:15 daily.


PE-10.


QUADE,


The use of series


of terms involving sines and cosines in


the solution


of physical


problems


such


as those relating to the flow of heat, conduction


of electricity,


and vibrating strings.


Ms. 551.-Advanced


7:00 daily.


Topics in
LA-204.


Calculus.
SMITH, C.


credits.


Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differentiation,


Taylor's


theorem,
Green's


infinite
theorem,


series,


continuation


of simple


multiple


integrals,


line and surface


integral.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


181.-Engineering


Drawing.


2 credits.


Corequisite


(Register for the


Lecture


Section and four


Laboratory


Sections.)


Lecture


Section


V. CH-AU


FRASH.


T.ahnratnrv pnatinn*?







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Section
Section


Section 20.
Section 21.


Section
Section


Section 24.


Section
Section


10:45


8:15


to 1


1:05 W


0:35


10:45 to


1:15


:35 Th.


to 10:35 F.


10:45
1:15


8:15 to
10:45 to


1:05
3:35


1:05


FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,
FRASH,


Designed to teach the student how to make and read


engineering


drawings.


French, Engineer-


ing Drawing


Frash,


Instructions,


Letter


Plates and


Sketch


Plates for


Engineering


Drawing.


282.-Mechanism


Kinematics.


credits.


Prerequisite:


requisites: Ps. 205 and Ms.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section
Section


9:30
10:45


EG-202.
EG-202.


BOURKE,
BOURKE.


Laboratory
Laboratory


Section
Section


1:15
1:15


to 4:50
to 4:50


. EG-304.
. EG-304.


BOURKE
BOURKE


Revolving and oscillating bodies,


link work, belts, pulleys,


gears,


cams ;


trains of mechanisms


and the velocity and directional ratio of moving parts.


Keown and


Faires,


Mechanics.


Ml. 385.-Thermodynamics.


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


354, Ps.


206, and


9:30 daily.


EG-211.


EBAUGH


Energy


applications
Engineering


equations


in flow of fluids,
Thermodynamics;


availability


vapor


power


Keenan and


energy;
cycles,


Keyes,


gases,


vapors,


gas compression


Thermodynamics


mixtures


and refrigeration.


Properties


, engineering


Ebaugh,


387.-Mechanical Laboratory.
(Register for one section


credit.


Corequisite:


only.)


Section 1.


1:15


:30 to


Section


. EG-213.


4:50


1:15


:30 to


EG-103.
EG-213.
EG-103.


4:50


PRE


PRE


PRE


PRESCOTT,


The preparation


of engineering


reports,


computation


and the measurement


of length,


area,


time, speed,


pressure,


and temperature.


Shoop and Tuve, Mechanical Engin


eermng


Practice.


MUSIC


Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One,


Two, and Three.


3 credits.


Sotn i *1


TTAT 91 1


1 -


'T T


. w, A rsonar


Steam.


SCOTT,


SCOTT, F


SCOTT,







DEPARTMENT


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Msc. 301.-Rudiments of Vocal Music.


2 credits.


5:30 to 6:30


., Laboratory to arrange.


AUD.


DEBRUYN


The basic


elements


of vocal


music.


Notation,


solfeggio,


interpretation,


survey


of styles,


mastery of certain principles of voice necessary for development.


Practical work, ensemble singing.


PAINTING

Courses in Painting are carried on by means of the problem or project method,


and accomplishment is


the sole criterion for advancement.


Credits will depend upon the number of projects completed.


Laboratories will


be conducted nine hours daily and will remain open for additional hours for those
who desire to use them.


101.-Fundamentals of Pictorial


Art.


Variable


credit.


24 to 48 hours to be arranged.


LW-302.


HOLBROOK


A creative


introductory


course for


beginners.


102.-Fundamentals of Pictorial


Art.


Variable


credit.


24 to 48 hours to be arranged.


HOLBROOK, H.


A continuation of Pg. 101.


211.-Projects


in Painting,


Group


Variable


credit.


48 hours to


be arranged.


LW-302.


HOLBROOK


A continuation


of Pg.


Pictorial


composition,


freehand


drawing


history


of art,


painting.


212.-Projects


in Painting,


Group


Variable


credit.


hours to


arranged.


-302.


HOLBROOK,


continuation of Pg. 211.


221.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group


Variable


credit.


48 hours to


arranged.


LW-302.


HOLBROOK,


A continuation of Pg. 102.


222.-Projects in Commercial Art,


Group 2.


Variable credit.


hours to


arranged.


LW-302.


HOLBROOK,


A continuation of Pg.


PHARMACOGNOSY


Pgy.


221.-Practical


Pharmacognosy.


credits.


first


half


course


Pgy.


221-222.


1:15


. CH-316.


JOHNSON


Laboratory:


8:15 to 11:50 T


CH-316.


JOHNSON


Sources of crude drugs and systematic classification of the vegetable and animal drugs of the







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


The inorganic compounds used in medicine; their Latin titles, origin,
and physiological properties; their preparation and use in compounding


and physical, chemical,
remedies.


Phy.


354.-Organic


Analytical


Pharmacy.


credits.


second


half


the course ]
9:30 dr
Labora
The chemistry


Phy. 353-354.


aily.
rtory


CH-306. FOOTE
: 1:15 to 4:50 &I


and pharmacy


of natural


analysis.

PHILOS

Ppy. 351.-Recent Social Philosophies. 3


9:30 daily.


SC-209.


CONNER, ]


CH-306.


and synthetic


FOOTE


drugs,


including


qualitative


OPHY


credits.
. W.


A study of the philosophical bases and logical articulation of
social creeds of the present day.


certain outstanding moral and


Ppy.


452.-The Philosophy


10:45 daily.


SC-209.


Santayana.
CONNER, F


3 credits.
W.


A study


of the philosophy of


his critical realism, his


Santayana in


terms of his scepticism.


theory of truth, and his conception


of the good


his doctrine of


of ethics,


essence,


politics, art,


and religion.


PHYSICS


Ps. 101.-General Physics.


3 credits.


The first


half


the course


101-102.


Prerequisite:


or consent of


the instructor


Corequisite:


(Register for one Demonstration Section and one Discussion Section.)


Demonstration


Section 1.


Section
Section


Sections:
10:45 F


2:30
3:45


. BN-203.
. BN-203.
. BN-203.


WILLIAMSON
WILLIAMSON
WILLIAMSON


Discussion


Sections:


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
9:30 daily.


BN-209.
BN-209.


WEST,


A course in general physics for science students.


Ps. 205.-General Physics.


credits.


The first half of the course


205-206.


Prerequisite:


One year of


college mathematics.


Corequisite:


(Register for one Demonstration Section and one Discussion Section.)
Demonstration Sections:


Section
Section
Section


10:45
2:30


3:45 F


. BN-203.
. BN-203.
. BN-203.


WILLIAMSON,
WILLIAMSON,
WILLIAMSON,






DEPARTMENT


'STRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Section


12:00 daily.


BN-209.


Theory of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and light.


Primarily


for engineering students.


Ps. 207.---General Physics Laboratory.
(Register for one section only.)


Section


7:00 to


1 credit.


To accompany


BN-306.


or 205.


KNOWLES, H.


STAFF.


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


Section 14.


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 to
9:30 to
9:30 to
12:00 to
12:00 to
2:30 to
2:30 to
7:00 to
7:00 to
9:30 to
9:30 to
12:00 to
12:00 to
7:00 to
7:00 to
9:30 to
9:30 to


9:20
11:50
11:50
2:20
2:20
4:50
4:50


9:20 T.
9:20 T.
11:50 T.
11:50 T.
2:20 T.
2:20 T.


9:20
9:20
11:50
11:50


BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.


Pa. 311.-Electricity and Magnetism.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: one year of college


Physics.
(Register for one section only.)


Section 1.
Section 2.


8:15 daily.
10:45 daily.


BN-203.
BN-208.


KNOWLES,
KNOWLES.


Designed to meet the growing need of physics, chemistry and electrical engineering students
for a working knowledge of the basic principles of electricity and magnetism.

GRADUATE COURSE


Ps. 503.-Kinetic Theory of Gases.


3 credits.


7:00


daily.


BN-203.


WILLIAMSON


The elements of the kinetic theory, and the application of the theory to gases and liquids.

POLITICAL SCIENCE


Pcl. 309.-International


Relations.


3 credits.


The first


half


course


309-310.


Prerequisite: C-l, or Pcl. 313-314, or its equivalent.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
10:45 daily.


LA-306.
SC-205.


PAYNE, i
PROCTOR,


A study of state, county, and municipal governments.


This course


is a prerequisite for other


courses
College.


in political


science


and for students not entering the


Upper Division from the University


405.--History


405-406.


Political


Prerequisite


Theory.


or Pcl.


credits.
313-314,


first


half


the course


or its equivalent.


9:30 daily.


LA-314.


A study and analysis of Ancient and Medieval political theories.


407.-Comparative


Government.


credits.


first


half


course


Pcl. 407-408.


12:00 daily.


PE-102.


DAUER, M. J.


A comparative study of the theory and practice of modern governments.


GRADUATE


COURSES


Pcl. 505.-History


of Political Theory.


credits.


9:30 daily.


LA-314.


Pcl. 507.-Comparative


Government.


credits.


12:00


daily


. PE-102.


DAUER,


Pcl. 509.-International Relations.


credits.


daily.


LA-204.


SVARLIEN


513.-Seminar.
To arrange.


credits.


DAUER, M.


PORTUGUESE


(BRAZILIAN)


. 33.--First-
course Pe. 3


Year
13-34.


Portuguese


(Brazilian).


credits.


first


half


9:30 daily.


BU-101.


ATKIN


A beginning


course


basic for further study.


The objective


a moderate proficiency in reading


and speaking the language of Brazil.


Emphasis on oral work.


POULTRY


SBANDRY


303.-Poultry


Practices.


credits.


(June


16 to July


Open


to Agri-


cultural Extension


workers


ONLY.


8:15 M.


. PO.


MEHRHOF


R., and STAFF.


Laboratory:


1:15 to 4:50


. PO.


Fundamentals


breeds;


housing,


in poultry


feeding,


raising,


and managing


including


chicks,


importance


broilers,


of the poultry


and layers;


common


industry


poultry


popular
diseases


and parasites.


Special emDhasis in laboratory work on culling and judging poultry: caponizina







DEPARTMENTS OF


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Section
Section
Section


8:15


daily.


9:30 daily.


1:15


daily.


PE-206.
PE-206.
PE-114.


KISKER,


DAVENPORT,


SPELT,


An elementary treatment of the general topics in the field of psychology.


Designed to provide


an understanding of human


behavior, approached as


a natural phenomenon subject


to scientific


study.


The unifying concept of the course is the adaptation of the individual to his physical and


social environment.


Psy. 304.-Experimental Psychology.


3 credits.


1:15 to 4:50 M.


Th. F


. MU-Basement.


SPELT, D. K.


Methods


of psychological


investigation;


individual


differences,


reactions,


work


and fatigue,


sensations, perceptions, illusions, images, memory, attention,


learning, judgments.


Psy.


309.-Personality


Development.


credits.


(Register for one section


only.)


Section
Section


9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.


PE-114.
PE-114.


HINCKLEY, E. D.
HINCKLEY, E. D.


A study of the mechanisms of personality formation,


of human adjustment.


with special emphasis upon the varieties


The more inevitable problems of human life with their normal and abnormal


solutions.


The origin


and modification


of behavior.


Processes


of motivation


and adjustment.


Development and measurement of personality traits.


Psy. 310.-Abnormal Psychology.


Techniques of mental hygiene.


3 credits.


10:45 daily.


PE-206.


FISCHER, R. P.


A study of the abnormal phases of mental life, and the


ways


in which the individual develops


abnormal habits of thinking and acting.


A survey of the signs of beginning maladjustment and


the procedures


which


should


be followed


to correct


these


tendencies.


Special


suggestions


given for the prevention and treatment of mental diseases.


Psy. 406.-Psychological Tests.


3 credits.


12:00 daily.


PE-114.


DAVENPORT, K.


Tests


of general


intelligence,


special


personality


traits,


and business


ability;


organization


and administration


methods and results: practical


use* of


tests.


Psy.


410.-Advanced


Abnormal


Psychology.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


Psy.


8:15 daily


. PE-114.


HINCKLEY, E.


Lectures


diagnosis,


and readings


symptoms,


on the various


and treatment.


forms


Psychiatric


of mental


information


disease,


with


for social


attention
workers


causes,


and school


psychologists.


GRADUATE


Psy. 506.-Psychological Tests.


COURSES


3 credits.


12:00 daily.


PE-114.


DAVENPORT, K.


Offered with Psy. 406 with extra readings and reports for graduate students.


Psy. 510.-Advanced


Abnormal


Psychology.


3 credits.


8:15 daily


PE-114.


HINCKLEY,


are






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


Rn. 351.-Comparative Religion.
12:00 daily. UA-201.


3 credits.
SCUDDER, D. L.


The religions of India, China, Japan, the
general lines. An investigation of Hinduism,
Mohammedanism. Judaism, and Christianity.


Near East,
Buddhism,


and Europe are compared along
Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism,


SCHOOL ART

Pc. 253.-General Art for the Elementary Grades. 4 credits.
1:15 to 4:50 M. W. F. YN-316. MITCHELL, J. 0.
Students who have had Pc. 251.-Art for the Primary Grades, or Pc.
Elementary Grades, may register for either half of Pc. 251-252 for 2 credits.


252.-Art


for the


General


survey


and practice in all types of art work for grades one through six.


Pc. 301.-Creative School Art. 2 credits.
1:15 to 3:35 T. Th. YN-316. MITCHELL, J.


A series


of original projects based on the fundamental principles and factors of design.


SOCIAL STUDIES


Scl. 301.-Children's Social Studies.
8:15 daily. YN-209.


3 credits.


The content material in the social studies field with implications for the activity program.


Scl. 302.-Children's Social Studies.
2:30 daily. YN-209.


3 credits.


A continuation of Scl. 301.


SOCIOLOGY


Sy. 241.-Sociological Foundations of Modern
8:15 daily. PE-4.


Life.


credits.


The outlook for the individual in the modern world.
of invention and technological change in modern America.
on social institutions. A review of the American regions
lenges.


Sy. 322.-The Child in American Society.
8:15 daily. CH-212.


Direct measurement of social credits
The effect of the metropolitan epoch
as cultural environments and chal-


3 credits.


A study of the social adjustment of children in a changing world. Factual study of social
situations in American life as they affect children. Emphasis is upon the adjustment and
development of the normal child, with attention to the problems of abnormal and maladjusted
children. The course provides factual sociological materials designed to supplement, rather
than to duplicate. parallel courses in Education and Psychology.


Sy. 337.-Cultural Anthropology. 3 credits.
9:30 daily. PE-4. EHRMANN, W.


Physical anthroDolaoR: Dhysical characteristics of prehistoric and modern man: race dia-







DEPARTMENTS OF


STRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


for marriage.


The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in Florida.


Divorce, family


disorganization, child training.


Sy. 424.-Criminology.
12:00 daily.


3 credits.


PE-4.


Nature


causes


of crime;


punishment,


treatment,


prevention.


Sociological


aspects


criminal law and procedure.


Sy. 443.-The American Negro.


3 credits.


10:45 daily.


PE-4.


BROWDER,


Social, economic, and political aspects of racial problems in the United States,


emphasis on the American negro.


with particular


Brief history of the negro from early days of slavery to the


present.


Contrast between the cultures of the whites and the negroes in


the North and South.


Racial segregation and discrimination.


The role of the negro in Southern culture today.


GRADUATE COURSES


Sy. 522.-The Child in American Society
8:15 daily. CH-212.

Sy. 524.-Criminology. 3 credits.
12:00 daily. PE-4.


Sy. 537.-Cultural Anthropology.


credits.


credits.


9:30


daily.


PE-4.


EHRMANN


Sy. 544.-Marriage and the Family.


3 credits.


7:00


daily.


PE-4.


EHRMANN, W


.


560.-Special Topics.


3 credits.


To arrange.


EHRMANN


STAFF


Special topics in sociology, by arrangement with the instructor.


SOILS


Sis. 301.-Soils.


credits.


Prerequisite


: Acy. 12


126 or Cy


101-102.


8:15 M. T.
Laboratory:


. AG-208.


3:45 M. F


HENDERSON


J. R.


AG-202.


The nature and


properties


of soils


elementary


treatment of


genesis,


morphology


classification.


Soil types and problems in Florida.


GRADUATE COURSE


Sis. 570.-Research in Soils.


to 6 credits.


To arrange.


AG-206.


SMITH


. W







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


tion


classes


conducted


Spanish.


Courses


are arranged


under-


graduate and graduate credit,


include study


literature


, culture, and


institutions


given in Spanis


Spain and H
ih: a number


:ispanic


America.


motion


picture


Special
. with


evening
Spanish


lectures
dialogue,


shown.
brought


There


also


University


opportunity


Florida


contact


campus


with


through


Latin-American


Institute


students


Inter-


American affairs.


1947


session


elementary


courses


Portuguese


(Brazilian)


be offered.


Sh. 33.-First-Year Spanish.


3 credits.


The first half of the course Sh. 33-34.


Open to students who have had no


previous training in Spanish.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


7:00 daily.


9:30 daily


-205.


. BU


TRUJILLO


FERNANDEZ


Sh. 34.-First-Year Spanish.


3 credits.


The second half of the course Sh.


33-34.


Prerequisite:


Sh. 33.


10:45 daily.


BU-205.


Sh. 201.-Second-Year Spanish.


3 credits.


First half of the course Sh. 201-202.


Prerequisite


Sh. 34 or equivalent.


daily.


BU-205.


WERSHOW


313.-Advanced
of the course Sh.
given in Spanish.


Composition


13-314.


Conversation.


Prerequisite: Sh.


credits.


202 or equivalent.


first


half


This course is


8:15


daily.


BU-305.


FERNANDEZ


Sh. 405.-Contemporary Spanish Literature: Generation of 1898.


credits.


Pre-


requisite:


Permission of instructor.


12:00 daily.


-205.


WERSHOW


I. R.


423-The
structor.


Teaching


Spanish.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Permission


10:45 daily.


BU-201.


TRUJILLO


GRADUATE COURSE


Sh. 505.--Contemporary Spanish Literature


Generation of 1898.


credits.


12:00 daily.


BU-205.


WERSHOW


I. R.


SPEECH
nfl SI A fl t 1* I 1 1 A *1







DEPARTMENT,


INSTRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


Sch.


241.-Effective


Speaking.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or consent


student's dean.


(Register for


one section


only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


9:30


daily.


10:45 daily.


PE-205.
PE-205.
PE-205.
PE-205.


CONSTANS,
CONSTANS,


DICKEY


Designed to aid the


student through demonstration and practice to talk effectively to


a group.


Sch.


307.-Interpretation


Literature.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Sch.


consent of instructor.


9:30 daily.


Voice training


PE-209.


exercises


EUBANK,


for developing the effectiveness of the body and voice; oral reading


of short stories and narrative poetry.


Sch. 309.-Dramatic Production: Staging and Lighting.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Sch. 241 or consent of instructor.


3:45 daily.


PE-205.


The staging of the play


designing, constructing, painting, assembling, and shifting of


scenery.


The lighting of the play


lighting instruments, plan, and use of color and special effects.


Sch. 314.-Types of Public Discussion.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


Sch. 241


or con-


sent of instructor.


8:15


daily.


PE-209.


EUBANKS


Study and practice in the principles and methods of group discussion.


to panel and open-forum discussion.


Special attention given


How to use parliamentary procedure.


Sch.


410.-Scientific Bases of Speech.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


Sch.


or con-


sent of instructor.


30 daily.


PE-208.


A survey in certain related fields of the scientific material which
standing of the normal speaking process and of speech abnormalities.


is fundamental to an under-


Sch. 420.--Speech Activities in the School.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Sch.


consent of instructor.


10:45 daily.


PE-209.


course


designed


primarily


for teachers.


organization of materials and activities


The place


of speech


education


discussion of specific problems that


arise


in the school;
in the teaching


of public speaking, debate, auditorium programs, oral reading, dramatics, and speech improvement.


GRADUATE COURSES

Sch. 502.-Plays, Players, and Playwrights. 3 credits.


10:45 daily.


AG-208.


CONSTANS


A study of recent plays primarily from the point of


view of production


the techniques of


* ^ -t


KJ






BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


A survey in certain related fields of the scientific material which
of the normal speech process and speech abnormalities.


Sch. 513.-Southern Oratory.


is basic to an understanding


3 credits.


7:00 daily.


PE-209.


DICKEY, D. C.


The speaking and speeches of selected outstanding southern speakers studied from the stand-


points of the speaker, speech situation, the period and the speeches
of Southern speakers, their influence on the South.


synthesis and interpretation






DEPARTMENTS


STRUCT


DEPARTMENTS


AND


OF


SCHEDULE


ION SECOND TERM


INSTRUCTION


COURSES


Second Term


All classes ordinarily meet for sixty-five minutes.


Classes


scheduled to meet


daily meet


Monday through


Saturday.


Course


descriptions


are omitted


same course was offered


the first term.


See the schedule for the first term for


this information.


Students


registered


Graduate


School


not be


permitted


register for graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean
of the Graduate School and the instructor concerned.


COMPREHENSIVE


COURSES


Students


should


consult


official


announcements


Board


University


Exanminers for details concerning


C-11.-American Institutions.


comprehensive examinations.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture


Section


3:45


CH-AU


. STAFF


Discussion


Sections:


Section 101.


Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.


10:45


daily


SC-215.
SC-206.
AG-104.
SC-206.


C-12.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section 21


Section


3:45


CH-AU.
CH-AU.


STAFF.
STAFF.


Discussion


Sections:


Section 201.


Section


7:00 daily.


8:15


daily.


UA-101.
UA-202.


Section 203.
Section 204.
Section 205.
Section 206.
Section 207.
Section 208.


9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.


AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.
AG-108.






BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


Discussion Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


9:30


daily.


10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.


BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.
BN-205.


BN-20


-205.
-205.


C-22.-The Physical Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one Lecture


Lecture
Lecture


Section
Section


2:30 T.


Section i
BN-203.


-203.


one


Discussion


Section.)


STAFF.
STAFF.


Discussion Sections


Section 201.
Section 202.


Section
Section


Section 205.


Section
Section
Section


daily.


8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.


10:45


daily.


12:00 daily.


1:15
2:30


daily.
daily.


:45 daily.


BN-201.
BN-201.
BN-201.
BN-201.
BN-201.
BN-201.
BN-201.
BN-201.


C-31.-Reading,


(Register


Speaking,


one


Writing


Lecture


(Freshman


Section,


one


English).
Discussion


4 credits.
Section, a


Laboratory


Section.)


Lecture
Lecture


Section
Section


AU.


10:45


STAFF.
STAFF.


Discussion Sections


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.


9:30 daily
10:45 daily
12:00 daily
1:15 daily


2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.
7:00 daily.


daily.


0 daily.


10:45 daily.


LA-201.
LA-201.


. LA-201.
. LA-201.
. LA-201.
. LA-201.


LA-201.
LA-203.
LA-203.


LA-20


LA-203.


one






DEPARTMENTS OF


INSTRUCTION


- SECOND


TERM


Section 307.
Section 308.


2:30


2:30 T.


Section


LA-209.
LA-209.
LA-209.


C-32.--Reading, Speaking, and Writing


(Freshman English).


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture


Section,


Discussion


Section,


Lecture
Lecture


Laboratory
Section 21:


Section


Section.)
9:30 T.


10:45


AU.
AU.


STAFF.
STAFF.


Discussion


Sections


Section 201.
Section 202.
Section 203.
Section 204.
Section 205.
Section 206.
Section 207.
Section 208.
Section 209.


Section
Section
Section


210.
211.
212.


7:00


daily.


:15 daily.


9:30


daily.


10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.


3:45


daily.


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.


LA-21


LA-212.


LA-21
LA-21
LA-21


LA-212.
LA-212.


LA-21


LA-


LA-307.
LA-307.
LA-307.


Writing


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


Section 409.


8:15
8:15


10:45
10:45
10:45


1:15
1:15


:45 T.


-209.
-209.


LA-209.


LA-209.
LA-209.


-209.


LA-209.


LA-2


C-41.-Practical Logic.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.


SC-212.


daily.


9:30 daily.


10:45


-212.


daily.


C-42.---Fundamental Mathematics.


3 credits.


one









Section


Section 8.


Section


OF THE UNIVERSITY


1:15 daily.
2:30 daily.
3:45 daily.


PE-2.
PE-2.


C-51.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture


Section


2:30 T


. AU


STAFF.


Discussion


Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.
1:15 daily.


UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.
UA-307.


C-52.--The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and


one


Discussion Section.)


Lecture


Section 21


2:30


STAFF.


Discussion Sections


Section 201.
Section 202.
Section 203.
Section 204.
Section 205.


Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.
12:00 daily.


1:15


Section 207.
Section 208.


daily.


2:30 daily.


3:45


daily.


UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.
UA-304.


C-61.-Biological Science.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


Section 103.


Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.
10:45 daily.


12:00


daily.


1:15 daily.


SC-111.


SC-111.
SC-1ll.
SC-111.
SC-111.


C-62.-Biological Science.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section 201.
Scetion 202.
Section 203.


7:00 daily.
8:15 daily.
9:30 daily.


SC-101.
SC-205.
SC-205.


BULLETIN


SUMMER SESSION




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