• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The report of the president of...
 Six-year plan at the University...
 Enrollments and degrees confer...
 Staff
 Building appropriations and...
 Gifts and grants
 Student loans
 Books published by faculty and...














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00226
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: December 1948
Copyright Date: 1943
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00226
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The report of the president of the university
        Page 5
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    Six-year plan at the University of Florida
        Page 37
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    Enrollments and degrees conferred
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Staff
        Page 80
    Building appropriations and funds
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Gifts and grants
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Student loans
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Books published by faculty and staff
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
Full Text
ix


A~Vp.










BIENNIAL REPORT

OF THE PRESIDENT
of the
UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
to the
BOARD OF CONTROL


FOR THE BIENNIUM
ENDING JUNE 30
1948


r






















TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
The Report of the President of the University................................................. 5

Six Year Plan at the University of Florida...................................................... 37



Appendix

Enrollments and Degrees Conferred.............................................................. 75-79

Staff ---------....................... ......................................................................... ............... 880

Building Appropriations and Funds........................................... ................... 81, 82

G ifts and G rants......................................................................... ..... .................... 83-85

Student Loans------------............................... .......--.............. 86

Books Published by Faculty and Staff........--.... -------............................... 88






To the Honorable Board of Control


Gentlemen:
Annual or biennial reports to governing boards by executive officers have
a way of being deadly monotonous, trite and repetitive. This one may not be
an exception. However, if it does avoid these dangers it is because an attempt
has been made to give it meaning and significance. Moreover, any serious
report dealing with the period covered by this statement is bound to reflect
dynamic activity, seriousness of purpose, confident expectancy, and a consid-
erable amount of definite progress. The reason for this is the fact that the
University of Florida and the State of Florida may well be characterized in
these terms.
Whatever may be the tribute paid to those who have had some part in this
resurgence of strength and power in the University, it would be neglectful not
to attribute the spearhead of this advance to the Board of Control. Few if
any institutions of higher learning in the country have enjoyed the services
of a lay board with more vision, unselfishness, and devotion to duty than has
the University of Florida during this critical period in its history.
The vision to which reference is made is reflected in the 1945-1947 biennial
report to the Governor by J. Thomas Gurney, Chairman of the Board of Control.
After analyzing the dynamic situation which faced higher education in Florida
and making pertinent recommendations and drawing helpful conclusions, Mr.
Gurney set forth the following challenge:
"Higher education in Florida is at the cross roads of its destiny. Now, if
ever, is the time for the State and its people to "step out" and develop its
institutions of higher learning so that they will occupy, not only creditable,
but outstanding positions in their respective fields in this country. No other
course of action is consistent with the general development and forward move-
ment of the State and its culture and economy. Florida is rapidly becoming
the home of people who demand along with sunshine and flowers, the best
in educational opportunity, and the people of the State are likewise awakening
to the fact that the best in higher education is their rightful possession, and
the heritage of their children.
"The people of this State are now alive and articulate in their demand for
the best in this field. They realize that it costs money, but they also realize that
it has a value beyond the value of money, as well as contributing to the State's
economy in a way that will ultimately show the State a pecuniary profit
rather than a loss.
"That is the basis, largely, upon which we have assumed the prerogative
of "stepping out" on the road to accomplishment of this high objective. This
we conceive to be our duty-nothing more and nothing less."
The least that can be said of Mr. Gurney and his Board may be said in
that classical reference to Michael Angelo: "He wrought better than he knew."
It was this progressive attitude of the Board, more than anything else, that
persuaded the writer to return to the South to make whatever contribution
he could to this forward-looking and highly potential Commonwealth.
The writer was likewise convinced that the Cabinet, the Governor, the
Board of Education, and the Budget Commission had seen the vision of out-
standing progress for the State. It was also the promise of support from the





men that comprised these official boards that led us to believe that sound
progress could be made.

It was a combination of the sane elements of progress and the dynamic
leadership of the State that led us to declare in our inaugural address that
"higher education, broadly defined, is the balance wheel of progress in any
state or nation, and particularly in the State of Florida which is on the thres-
hold of great developments." The alternative, we thought, was obvious. "Without
adequate higher education in Florida, we shall build a society that will be both
superficial and artificial, and that will lack the solid core of culture, intel-
lectual attainments, and factual information which will keep us steadily on a
course of sound progress."
We also said at that time:
"The State of Florida is on the way to becoming one of the wealthiest
states in the Union. This fact implies agricultural, industrial, recreational,
cultural, and research activities quite beyond anything we have known in the
past. These activities, in turn, demand statesmanship of the highest order in
governmental and educational services if the State is to achieve her ultimate
destiny."
During the relatively brief period it has been our privilege to head this
great institution we have had the vigorous support of all state officials as
well as "the blessing and praise of the people" of the State. If sound progress
has been made it has been due to that support.

It has been customary for the deans of colleges, directors of schools, and
administrative heads of independent departments to submit detailed biennial
reports for inclusion with the President's report to the Board of Control. An
analysis of the reports for the biennium 1946-48 reveals striking similarities in
several important respects, namely, an emphasis on the abnormal increase in
enrollment, the lack of space and facilities, the need for additional personnel,
and the necessity for increasing the salaries of the faculty and staff to enable
them to meet the greatly increased cost of living. In order that the reader
may be spared a repetition of these self-evident but nonetheless significant
facts, it seems appropriate to depart from customary procedure and incorporate
with the general report of the President only a summary of outstanding
activities.

The recommendations of deans and department heads have been given
critical study by the President and a University committee in recent months,
and such recommendations as seem wise or feasible have been incorporated
as formal proposals in a six-year plan for the University. The biennium ending
June 30, 1948, covered two administrations, the first year falling within the
administration of President John J. Tigert and the second year within the
administration of the writer, except for an interval of one month, during which
Dr. H. Harold Hume served as Acting President. The activities of this period
are so closely interwoven and interrelated that it would be difficult to separate
them into specific fiscal years. The accompanying report attempts to give
not only a resum6 of the biennium ending June 30, 1948, but also a review
of the activities of the University since the end of World War II. By this
means we hope to present a decade of progress at the University of Florida-the
four years, 1945-49, encompassing the immediate past, and the six-year period,





1949-56, looking into the future. The formulation of the Six-Year Plan con-
stitutes a part of this report and outlines our specific recommendations for the
next three bienniums.
Respectfully submitted,
J. HILLS MILLER
PRESIDENT

GENERAL STATEMENT

In the fall of 1944 the United States of America was engaged in a second
world war. The campus of the University of Florida was largely an armed
camp. Its facilities, converted from peacetime to wartime operations, were
used for the most part in the training of engineers, aviators, finance officers,
and other personnel for war services. More than one hundred of the teaching
and administrative staff had been given leaves of absence for service in the
several branches of the armed forces. Both the agricultural and engineering
research divisions developed projects of significance to the winning of the war.
Civilian enrollment fell to the lowest point in more than two and one-half
decades.
In the interim since the cessation of hostilities in August of 1945, the Uni-
versity of Florida has probably witnessed more phenomenal changes than
any other institution of higher learning on the North American continent.
Soldiers, upon being demobilized, invaded the campus in great numbers. The
passage of Public Laws 16 and 346, which granted educational benefits to
veterans, opened new horizons for them. The total enrollment during the first
semester of the 1945-46 school year was 1,503. At the opening of the fall
semester of 1946-47, this enrollment had increased to 6,334 students of whom
79 per cent were veterans, and by the fall of 1947-48 the figure had reached
8,778. At the opening of the present academic year the University enrolled
10,160 students of whom 58 per cent were veterans. The overall increase
since 1945 is 670.3 per cent. Among the other land-grant colleges or state
universities in the United States only Rutgers has had an increase in enroll-
ment which corresponds to that of the University of Florida. Rutgers, by
way of explanation, was formerly a semipublic institution and only recently
has been reorganized and consolidated with other educational institutions in
New Jersey as a state university.
The facilities of the University of Florida, which had been pronounced
wholly inadequate to meet the requirements of a prewar body of 3,500, were
suddenly compelled to serve almost three times that number. The supreme
effort which was made by the University administration in collaboration with
State officials, to meet the emergency and to provide education to returning
veterans and Florida youth is a saga in the history of American education.
Since the passage of the Buckman Act in 1905, the University of Florida
has served men students primarily, admitting women only in professional
schools, in the graduate school, and in the summer terms. The enactment of
a coeducation bill in the 1947 session of the Florida Legislature opened the
University for the first time to women students in the regular sessions. Though
welcomed by the University and by the citizenship of the State, coeducation
brought with it problems of providing courses designed for women, additional





staff members, infirmary anc recreational facilities, and, most important of
all, housing accommodations.
That the University was successful in meeting the impact of such a change,
in addition to the influx of veterans, without sacrificing correspondingly its
standards or quality of work is indicative of its vitality. Yeoman service was
rendered by faculty and students alike in adjusting to the new situation with
a minimum of friction and annoyance.
Public officials gave earnest and wholehearted cooperation by providing
operating expenses for the vastly expanded program of activities as well as
appropriations for both temporary and permanent buildings and equipment.
The aid of the Federal Government in all respects was invaluable.
The individual records of the various teaching units and research divisions
are replete with accounts of unusual efforts expended, scarcity of materials
and equipment, shortages of faculty and staff, and in some instances disillu-
sionment tempered with the will to accomplish. There is evidence in all quar-
ters of a spirit of wholehearted cooperation and of determination to achieve,
despite physical handicaps. The immediate goals of the University-to provide
a high quality of educational opportunity to Florida students and to develop
a research program that will enhance the economic and social life of the State
-have been more than satisfactorily met. The student bodies, influenced by
the serious-mindedness of the veterans' groups have expanded their scholastic
horizons. Membership in honor societies attests to the great number who are
achieving a high mark of scholarship. Initiates within a quadrennium included:
Phi Beta Kappa, 64; Phi Kappa Phi, 380; Sigma Xi, 23; and Phi Eta Sigma, 262.
The faculty, though carrying heavier teaching loads than customary, have
made a creditable showing in their creative endeavors. During the years
1944-48, the faculty and staff of the University published several hundred
articles in various professional bulletins, journals, and magazines. Their
scholarly activities are also reflected in the impressive list of books appended
to this report.
Gifts and Grants for research, fellowships, scholarships, and miscellaneous
purposes received during the biennium totalled approximately two million
dollars. (See Table in the Appendix.) To the donors we wish to express
our grateful appreciation.

CHANGES IN ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL

Before proceeding further with this report, which sets forth some phases
of the growth of the University within the past four years as well as the prin-
cipal changes in and additions to the academic program, it is fitting to call
attention to several far-reaching administrative appointments and changes
which have taken place in this period of transition and to record the apprecia-
tion of the University to those who have served its interests long and faithfully.
The first and major change was that of the chief executive officer. After
a period of nineteen years of faithful and constructive service, Dr. John J.
Tigert announced his retirement early in the spring of 1947, to become effective
September 1 of that year. Coming to Gainesville in the fall of 1928 from
Washington, D. C., Dr. Tigert brought to his task a rich educational background





and experience gained from the dual role of teacher and educational adminis-
trator over a span of two decades. He was a worthy successor to his two
predecessors at Gainesville, the learned Andrew Sledd and the much-loved Dr.
A. A. Murphree. His first years at Florida were devoted to organizing and
reorganizing colleges, schools, and departments and adding new courses and
curricula which would enable the University to conform to the high standards
of American higher education. The College of Business Administration, the
University College, the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics, the
Graduate School, the School of Architecture and Allied Arts, the School of
Forestry, the Inter-American Institute, the Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station, and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School were inaugurated during
his administration. Two great honor societies, Sigma Xi and Phi Beta Kappa,
installed chapters, and the academic programs in the several fields were given
recognition by the national accrediting agencies. When Dr. Tigert assumed
office, he found a student body of slightly over 2,000; when he retired as
President Emeritus on September 1, 1947, applications had been processed for
the admission of 8,750 students. The peaceful campus which he had inherited
on assuming the presidency had become a vortex of activity. Hundreds of
young women, admitted for the first time under the coeducational bill of 1947,
added to the influx of returning veterans and helped to swell enrollments.
After guiding the institution safely through the dark and turbulent days of
World War II, he had brought it safely to harbor with its splendid faculty
and institutional reputation intact. In recognition of his stewardship, high
tribute was paid him by students, faculty, the press, and the people of the
State.

After a period of preliminary negotiations and conferences, the writer was
invited by the Board of Control and the Board of Education to assume the
presidency of the University beginning October 1, 1947. Dr. H. Harold Hume,
venerable dean and scholar, served as Acting President during the one-month
interim.
The first major change of the new administration was the appointment of
a full-time Vice-President to assist in the expanding administrative activities
of the University. Dr. John Stuart Allen, a native of Indiana, assumed this
important post on February 1, 1948. Holding the B.A. degree from Earlham
College, the M.A. degree from the University of Minnesota, and the Ph.D. degree
from New York University, Dr. Allen embarked upon his educational career
as Instructor in Astronomy at the University of Minnesota and, subsequently,
held positions on the staff of Colgate University as Assistant Professor of
Astronomy and Dean of men. Considered an authority in the field of astronomy,
Dr. Allen became a member of the Franklin Institute Solar Eclipse Expedition
in 1932 and was guest lecturer of the Hayden Planetarium in 1935. He also
served as Science Consultant for the Faculty Workshop of the Association of
Colleges and Universities of New York State in 1941. From 1942 to 1948 he
transferred from active teaching to educational administration while serving
as Director of the Division of Higher Education of the New York State Edu-
cation Department. In this capacity he served as Chairman of the Committee
on Approved Schools for Veterans for New York State and State Coordinator
of the Veterans Education Council of the National Education Association. He
is the author of several books and numerous articles on the subject of astron-





omy and other educational topics. Dr. Allen is a Fellow of the American Asso-
ciation for the Advancement of Science and holds membership in the American
Astronomical Society, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, the Socidt6
Astronomique de France and other organizations.

Another significant change occurred with the retirement on February 15,
1948, of Dr. Klein H. Graham, who had served in the capacity of Business
Manager since December, 1906, almost coincidental with the removal of the
institution from Lake City to Gainesville. Dr. Graham was possibly without
a peer in point of tenure and service rendered to the University,

The University was fortunate in having available as a successor to Dr.
Graham an outstanding alumnus, Mr. George F. Baughman. Receiving the
B.S.B.A. at Florida in 1937, the LL.B. in 1939, and later the M.S. from George
Washington University, Washington, D. C., Mr. Baughman initiated his busi-
ness training as an employee of the National Metropolitan Bank, Washington,
D. C. Later he served in the United States Navy. He has rendered a splendid
account of his stewardship of this important office since his appointment on
March 15, 1948.

Other important appointments and changes include:
The appointment of Stanley L. West as Director of Libraries on November
18, 1946, succeeding Miss Nelle Barmore, resigned.
The retirement of Harry R. Trusler as Dean of the College of Law, effective
June 30, 1947, and the subsequent service of Clifford W. Crandall as Acting
Dean for a full academic year until the appointment of Henry Anderson Fenn
to the deanship in the fall of 1948.
The retirement of A. P. Spencer as Director of the Agricultural Extension
Service, effective June 30, 1947, and the appointment of H. G. Clayton as his
successor.
The change in status of J. W. Norman from Dean of the Summer Session
to Professor of Education and Dean Emeritus on July 1, 1947.
The appointment of John Stuart Allen as Vice-President of the University
on February 1, 1948.
The appointment of A. A. Beecher as Director of a newly reorganized De-
partment of Music, effective March 1, 1948.
The reorganization of student activities, effective September 1, 1948, with
the appointment of W. Max Wise as Dean of Student Personnel, and the change
in status of R. C. Beaty from Dean of Students to Dean of Men; also the
appointment of Marna V. Brady as Dean of Women.
The retirement of Townes R. Leigh from the deanship of the College of
Arts and Sciences to become full-time head of the Department of Chemistry,
with an emeritus status as Dean, and the appointment of Ralph Emerson Page
as his successor.

The new President was the recipient of numerous invitations to speak before
civic, alumni, and educational groups throughout the State during the first
year of his administration and was persuaded to avail himself of the reservoir
of good will so apparent in all quarters and to channel it into active service
for the University. Such contacts have afforded him an opportunity to become





acquainted with the people and organizations of the State and take to them
a message of his aims and aspirations for their State University.

The inauguration of the President took place on March 5, 1948, and the
University family, as well as the University community, cooperated in making
this event a significant one for the institution and its new chief executive.
Approximately three hundred delegates from learned societies, foundations,
and educational organizations attended, as well as high officials of the State,
including the Honorable Millard F. Caldwell, Governor, and members of the
Cabinet, also members of the Congress, Justices of the Supreme Court, mem-
bers of the Legislature, and mayors of numerous cities. Highlight of the
inauguration was the conference on "Regional Planning in Higher Education
in the South" over which Governor Caldwell presided, and which was addressed
by Dr. 0. C. Carmichael, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advance-
ment of Teaching, the Honorable Owen D. Young, and other distinguished
educators. Educational representatives of the governors of thirteen Southern
states attended and participated in this conference. Other important confer-
ences included the Conference of the American Society for Engineering Educa-
tion, Southeastern Section, the Conference on Regional Planning for Library
Resources in the South, and the Conference on In-Service Training for
Teachers. Social activities included luncheons, dinners, receptions, teas, bar-
becues, an Inaugural Concert by Miss Gladys Swarthout, mezzo-soprano of the
Metropolitan Opera Company, and a recital by Joseph Schuster, cellist.

Honorary degrees were conferred upon Ralph H. Allee, Director of the
Inter-American Institute of Agricultural Sciences of Costa Rica; 0. C. Carmi-
chael, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching;
Colgate W. Darden, President of the University of Virginia; George D. Stoddard,
President of the University of Illinois; and Owen D. Young, former President
and Chairman of the Board of the General Electric Company.

THE PHYSICAL PLANT AND FISCAL OPERATIONS

The biennium just concluded witnessed a period of unprecedented expan-
sion of the University insofar as the physical plant is concerned. The floor
area of the campus buildings was almost doubled-a total floor area of 883,982
square feet having been erected in contrast to the 939,000 square feet which
existed before the expansion began. This included temporary as well as
permanent construction.

A preliminary survey disclosed the inadequacy of all utilities, and resulted
in extensive changes to bring the various services up to date. With the aid
of the construction and maintenance departments, offices, classrooms, dormi-
tories, etc., have been repaired, renovated, and remodeled, adding substantially
to student welfare and effective administration. The purchase of the Pinkoson
tract, an area consisting of ninety acres adjacent to the campus, was consum-
mated April 21, 1947, at a cost of $197,371.60. Permanent buildings authorized






for construction during the biennium on the University campus, the branch
experiment stations, and field laboratories included:

Name of Project Date of Contract or Amount of Contract
Authorized Construction

Vegetable Processing Laboratory .................July 29, 1946 $ 55,200.00
Greenhouse ............... ..................... Aug. 13, 1946 12,500.00
Sewage Disposal Plant .......................... Sept. 3, 1946 280,000.00
Staff House, Quincy Station ....................Sept. 11, 1946 26,000.00
Vegetable Crops Laboratory, Bradenton .........Sept. 20, 1946 27,500.00
Citrus Processing Laboratory, Office Bldg. and
Packing House, Lake Alfred ................. Nov. 16, 1946 150,000.00
Laboratory, Belle Glade .........................Feb. 18, 1947 121,549.00
Quonset Warehouse, Belle Glade ................Feb. 18, 1947 9,000.00
Cafeteria ............ .......................... Jan. 7, 1947 655,000.00
Infirmary Addition ............... ............. April 1, 1947 276,900.00
Laboratory Addition, Homestead ................April 1, 1947 15.252.00
Warehouse ....................................... April 1, 1947 5,432.00
Residences for Staff. Milton Station (Barns,
Garage, Sheds, etc.) .......... ............. April 1, 1947 47,841.00
Laboratory Addition, Sanford .................... April 1, 1947 10,986.00
Gym nasium ......................................April 3, 1947 1,556,704 00
Chemistry Addition .............................. April 3, 1947 716,000.00
Dairy Products Laboratory ...................... April 3, 1947 79,240.00
Sanitary Sewers ............... ................. April 5, 1947 85,180.00
Steam Distribution System ....................... .April 5, 1947 416,453.74
Electrical Distribution System .................. April 10, 1947 245,907.35
Storm Sewer ................................... April 14, 1947 16,500.00
Machine Shelter, Hastings ....................... April 14, 1947 2,000.00
Residences for Staff, Quincy .................... July 8, 1947 44.824.00
Office and Laboratory, Ona ..................... July 15, 1947 27,650.00
Staff Houses, Ona ............................... July 15, 1947 24,800.00
Addition to University Library (First Unit)......March 10, 1948 797,000.00
Renovation of and addition to Law Building ...June 10, 1948 300,000.00


Total .............. ............... $ 6,005,419.09

Within a four-year period, the State provided $12,399,783 for new buildings
on the University campus and at its branch experiment stations, while the
Federal Government contributed temporary housing and classroom buildings
valued at $2,303,219.72. Total new and temporary construction following the
war to the present time approximates $15,000,000.00 (A detailed list of build-
ings for the four-year period is attached.)

Meanwhile, State appropriations for operating expenses increased from
$2,652,457 in 1945-46 to $5,996,628 in 1948-49, while Federal appropriations for
the same periods were $570,338 and $1,045,472, respectively-a total increase
in Federal and State appropriations from $3,222,795 in 1945-46 to $7,042,101
in 1948-49. The overall University budgets for these periods, including student
fees and funds from all sources, jumped from $3,936,028 in 1945-46 to $9,980,866
in 1948-49. (For further details see the tabulation which follows.)






STATE APPROPRIATIONS FOR OPERATION
1945-1946---1948-1949


1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49


i' diversity .. . ....... ..... . .. 1,141,837.10 $1,141,897.56 $3,636,948.49 $3,627,575.00*
Florida Engincering and Industrial Experinceit Station .. 110,000.00 62,117.57 106,610.00 106,610.00*
Agricultural Experiment Station ..... . .. 1,211,420.00 1,111,375.13 1,788,207.05 1,954,469.00*
Agricultural Ext( nsion Serviec .. .... I 189!,200 00 189,200.00 302,974.56 307,974.56*

Total State A4 propris tions ..... .... ... 2. 952,457 10 82,504,590.26 85,834,740.10 85,996,628.56*


FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OPERATING EXPENSES


University ..... .. ..... . .. ...... 8 -S 45,827 55 $ 45,827.55 $ 45,827 00 $ 45,827.00
Florida Engineering anid Jndustrial Experiment Station .... . .. 217,879.05 298,759.19 414,100.00*
Agricultural Experimtnt Station ........... 152,680.68 147,680.70 175,053.56 259,952.00
Agricultural Extension Service .. ...... . 371,830 54 347,421.34 299,214.75 325,593.82

Total Federal Funds ... ........ 570.338 77 $ 758,808.64 S 818,854 50 $1,045,472.82


OTHER OPERATING FUNDS


University-
Fees arid other incidrleital collcctions ..n . .. 555,080 61 1,967,942.56 2,522,017.00 2,623,065 00
Alachua County for P. K. Yonge .............. 14,400.00 16,000 00 49,500 00 56,400.00
Agricultural Experiment Station..... .... ..... 131,663.41 161,598.95 231,088.36 244,300.00
Agricultural Extension Service .......... ....... 12,088.37 12,208 10 17,973.89 15,000.00

$ 713,232 39 $2,157,749.61 $2,820,579.25 $2,938,765.00

GRAND TOTAL ALL FUNDS .............. 3,936,028 26 85,421,148 51 $9,474,173.85 $9,980,866.38


Estimated.

THE STUDENT BODY AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES
HOUSING

The record of the Housing Office in the postwar years might be compared
to a barometric reading with higher and higher pressure areas of demand
for housing moving into areas of low supply, thereby creating turbulent and
unsettled conditions. This period saw the end of World War II with Univer-
sity enrollments rocketing from 1,503 to 10,160. To the basic problems of
finding or creating living space for the vastly increased number of single men
students were added problems of housing for married veteran students, single
women students, as well as for many new faculty and staff members.

To meet these unprecedented demands, the University had available five
permanent dormitories for single men, with a normal total capacity of 1,122.
Beginning in 1946, vigorous, unremitting efforts on the part of the University
administration resulted in acquisition, construction, and development of: (1)
624 temporary apartment units for married veteran students; (2) 17 temporary

13





dormitories for 1,152 single men students; (3) the Alacnua Air Base for 866
single men students in former barracks buildings, and 180 married students
in trailers and converted barracks; (4) the leasing of 30 housing units for
faculty homes; and (5) the leasing of 10 buildings for 237 women students.
As a result of limited State aid, a partially self-liquidating project of two
new dormitories for 300 women students is now under construction, and it is
expected that four new dormitories for 700 men students will be under con-
struction within a few months. Plans are underway also for the development
of a new University faculty housing area to include 25 units. In all available
housing facilities for single students, the addition of extra beds and desks
became necessary to accommodate larger numbers. This resulted in over-
crowded and undesirable living conditions. Intensive campaigns were conducted
in Gainesville in an effort to secure maximum utilization of every available
room. By September, 1948, the University was prepared in a marginal manner
to offer space to 47 per cent of the total enrollment. However, the use of
temporary and overcrowded housing facilities has created multiple and difficult
problems. There have been periods when students have had no electricity, no
heat, and no hot water. Surplus property beds are of poor quality and uncom-
fortable. There has been inadequate closet space as well as a shortage of
desks and chairs. Many roofs have leaked. Surface water has flowed into
temporary buildings with low foundations. Students crowded into insufficient
space have experienced both study and personal relations problems. There
have been frayed tempers and irritated feelings. The students' acceptance of
these unsatisfactory conditions has, on the whole, been remarkable. The
staff has been supplemented with advisers and counsellors, a fact which repre-
sents milestones in development of significant educational values to be achieved
through the experience of group living.
OFFICE OF DEAN OF STUDENTS
The Office of the Dean of Students rendered great service during the trying
period of readjustment following the war. Early in the postwar period the
Assistant Dean of Students was designated as Veterans' Counsellor. He main-
tained close contact with the Veterans' Administration and other agencies
interested in veterans and, under his guidance, an extensive program of
individual counselling to veterans and their wives was developed.
The increased enrollment of necessity complicated the problem of student
conduct and morale. During the biennium unfortunate accidents claimed the
lives of twelve students and a number of others were involved in discipline or
serious conduct cases necessitating contacts with parents, relatives, friends.
hospitals, undertakers, or law enforcement officers. The contacts incident to
pursuing such matters to a final conclusion have rested largely upon the Dean
of Students and his staff.
During the past biennium 5,217 loans involving $165,976.52 have been made
to students, and 922 scholarships and fellowships amounting to $244,306.56
have been awarded, each transaction necessitating one or more interviews with
personnel of the Office of the Dean of Students. More than 2,000 students
were given campus employment each year, with the earning of each averaging
$50 per month. This amount was almost doubled by student earnings off-
campus.





A majority of the fraternities became inactive during the war period.
Twenty-two nationals were reactivated after the cessation of hostilities. With
the advent of coeducation five national women's fraternities were chartered
and six additional sorority colonies recognized. Installation exercises were
held and national charters granted September 1, 1948, to Chi Omega, Delta
Delta Delta, Alpha Delta Pi, Kappa Delta, and Alpha Omicron Phi.
With only one major personnel addition, a fraternity adviser, the office
of the Dean of Students has struggled with an inordinate load during the
biennium and is entitled to commendation for doing a splendid job under very
trying circumstances.
BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
Working in close harmony and intimately related to the work of the Office
of the Dean of Students is the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental
Hygiene under the direction of Dr. Elmer J. Hinckley. During the biennium
it has been a unit administered by the College of Arts and Sciences although
it has served the student body of the entire University. In cooperation with
the Department of Psychology, the Bureau has rendered psychological services
to the students of the University in vocational guidance, mental hygiene, and
on problems of academic nature. The Bureau has used the best available
measuring instruments and widely used clinical procedures and techniques.
Students avail themselves of this service either on their own initiative or by
being referred to the Bureau by administrative officers or faculty members.
Each student has conferences with the counsellors and other professionally
trained personnel on the University staff. During the biennium 2,543 students
were granted conferences and a total of 25,986 tests were administered.
The Department of Psychology has during the biennium expanded its
graduate training program and has given special emphasis to the training of
graduate students in the area of. clinical psychology. Each graduate student
in the area of clinical psychology is required to have a considerable amount of
supervised experience in which the staff of the Bureau has lent effective
assistance.
FLORIDA UNION
The Florida Union Building, since its establishment in 1936, has fulfilled
its objective of serving as the official center of student life. The number of
persons using the facilities of the Union daily average between 6,000 and 7,000.
In addition to students many other groups use the facilities of this building.
The Union activities have been extended during the biennium by the establish-
ment of a branch at the Air Base and the construction of a temporary Recrea-
tion Hall directly opposite the Union on the main campus. At the Air Base
the Union set up a soda-fountain service and provided a lounge with daily
papers, periodicals, a radio, and a piano for leisure-time activities. A hostess
was employed to promote different forms of activity and special entertainment.
With the transfer of the majority of Air Base students to campus dormitories
the service of the hostess was no longer needed, but the main features of the
Union service were continued.

In order to provide additional recreation and social life the Union purchased
new motion picture equipment, a public address system, new radios, and a





new piano, and has purchased new or rehabilitated its old furnishings. A full-
time hostess was employed to assist the Director in planning and promoting a
program of social activities, recreation, and entertainment for the student body
and to assist various organizations in sponsoring social functions. As a further
service to students, a Western Union substation was set up in the Union build-
ing. Staff assistants, who are primarily students, are trained to make available
a wealth of general information concerning specific programs and extra-
curricular activities in order to aid the hundreds of students who use the
Union as a central source of information. Upon the transfer of Mr. D. R.
Matthews, who served as Director of the Union from its beginning in 1936, to
the position of Secretary of Alumni Affairs, Mr. William Rion was appointed
as Acting Director.
Services of the Union have been almost phenomenal in view of the increased
demands which have been made upon it. The extent of these services may
be comprehended by the fact that approximately 2,000,000 visits have been
made during the biennium to Bryan Lounge, the Game Room, the Information
Desk, the Library and other focal points of activity in the Union by students
or visitors. Approximately 70,000 telegraphic messages have been received
or delivered. Some 197 student, educational, faculty, or charitable organiza-
tions have used the facilities. An attendance of 107,517 persons is shown for
the 2,129 meetings which have been scheduled during the biennium.
An important adjunct to the recreational facilities of the Florida Union is
Camp Wauberg, located a few miles from the University campus. So much
use has been made of the area for recreational purposes by students and faculty
that a proposal for more extensive use will be made under the general recom-
mendations which will follow this report.
THE BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS
Beginning in September, 1945, the four college-level tests of General Edu-
cational Development prepared by the United States Armed Forces Institute
were given to all veterans entering the University College. In September, 1946,
a locally prepared test of mathematics achievement was added to the battery
administered to all freshmen, veterans and non-veterans. The results of these
tests were used for guidance purposes, granting of election privileges, and
awarding of college credits. The practice of assigning college credit for out-
standing attainment on these tests was adopted as a temporary expedient to
permit veterans to make up time lost during war service, and was extended
to nonveterans to give all outstanding students an opportunity to advance
as rapidly as their abilities would permit. By the spring of 1948, the Board
felt that the needs of most veterans had been fulfilled and the administration
of these tests was discontinued. Entering freshmen now must take the high-
school placement tests which are used for guidance and elective purposes,
but for which no college credits are awarded. Students of outstanding ability
and attainment are permitted to advance more rapidly by passing compre-
hensive course examinations without course attendance.
The Florida Statewide Twelfth Grade Testing Program was conducted
each spring of the biennium. Each participating school was sent a report of
the scores made by its students. At the conclusion of the program, each college
in the State was sent a composite report of the scores for all persons tested.





The results of this program make it possible to compare the performance of
Florida high-school seniors with that of seniors in the rest of the nation. As
a whole, Florida does not quite meet the levels of accomplishment reached by
the rest of the nation. However, the State was slightly above the national
average in the natural sciences, near the average in mathematics, and made
its poorest showing in English and social studies. The results of this program
indicate the degree of selectivity which takes place from the high-school senior
class to the freshman class at the University of Florida, and show that about
42 per cent of the freshmen come from the highest quarter and 12 per cent
from the lowest.
The usual program of progress tests and comprehensive examinations was
conducted during the biennium. In theory there is a separation of teaching
and examining functions, but in practice there is close cooperation between
the instructional staffs and the Board. Most of the item-writing is done by
the staffs; the Board then makes analyses of the items and reports the findings
to the staffs for their guidance in improving the items.
During the last month of the biennium the Board began testing all appli-
cants for nonacademic positions in the University. Tests of clerical aptitude,
language skills, general ability, and competence in stenography and typing are
now given. Approximately ninety persons were tested during the month of
June, 1948.
During the next biennium the Board proposes to expand its services and
facilities to handle more adequately an enrollment of ten thousand students.

REORGANIZATION OF STUDENT RELATED ACTIVITIES
The foregoing summary sets out in brief the far-reaching scope of activities
related to students and student administration. To insure administrative effi-
ciency in such a rapidly growing organization, it became evident that there
should be a reduction in the number of officers directly responsible to the
President. An immediate correlation and coordination of student activities
loomed as an imperative need. In order to have the benefit of the best profes-
sional advice available, Dr. James A. McClintock of Drew University was invited
to come to the University and make a survey of our student personnel problems.
His survey confirmed the necessity of greatly extending the student counselling
services of the University and unifying all student personnel activities under
one administrative head. As a consequence, recommendations were made to
the Board of Control for the appointment of a Dean of Student Personnel,
responsible for the administration of all student activities at the University.
Dr. W. Max Wise, an authority in the field of student personnel and adminis-
stration, was invited to assume this new post and will take office September
1, 1948. Under his general administration it is planned to group the Housing
Department, the Florida Union, the work hitherto performed by the Office of
the Dean of Students, the Board of University Examiners, the Bureau of
Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene, and the Veterans' Guidance Center.
Dean R. C. Beaty will continue the activities for which he has been chiefly
responsible in the past insofar as they relate to men students. Dr. Marna V.
Brady has been appointed Dean of Women and will assume her duties on
September 1, 1948. Her activities with women students will correspond in a
large measure to those performed by Dean Beaty with men students. It is hoped





by this coordination of student activities that relief will be given to the over-
burdened department heads who have carried on so effectively during the past,
as well as enable the University to render progressive and effective counselling
and guidance service to its ever increasing student body.

THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM
ADDITIONS
One of the principal postwar additions to the academic program was the
establishment in January, 1946, of a College of Physical Education, Health and
Athletics. This program was conceived as a result of war time experiences
which pointed to the neglect of well-rounded physical education programs in
American colleges and universities. The high percentage of young men dis-
qualified by selective service was convincing evidence of the need for such a
program in postwar university planning. A brief summary of the achievements
of this college will be presented elsewhere in this report. Selected to direct the
new College was an outstanding alumnus of the University and a well-known
athlete, Dennis K. Stanley. He was designated Dean of the College shortly after
its establishment.
Another significant addition to the academic program has been the Division
of Music. The interest which has been manifested in music instruction and
appreciation has resulted in the expansion of its staff and the creation of a
Department in the College of Arts and Sciences wherein degrees in music may
be offered.
A Personnel Board was organized in the spring of 1948 to screen the records
of candidates for faculty and staff positions. This board, composed of persons
already on the staff and without additional expense to the University, reviews
recommendations from all University departments in order to assure equity
between departments and colleges and to be certain that rank and salaries
offered are commensurate with training, experience, and achievements. The
Personnel Board has been able to bring about an improvement in the quality
of faculty appointments and a greater uniformity in interdepartmental salaries
and in the distribution of the faculty.

AGRICULTURE
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY
During the past few years Agriculture and Forestry have assumed an ever
increasing importance in the economic life of the State. In 1946 these interests
represented a $713,000,000 industry. Consequently, more and more students have
turned to agriculture and forestry as fields of study.
In its organization the College of Agriculture is divided into the following
departments: Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Economics (Farm Manage-
ment, Marketing, etc.), Agricultural Education (College of Education cooperat-
ing), Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy (Genetics, Plant Breeding, and Gen-
eral Agriculture), Animal Industry (Animal Husbandry, Poultry Husbandry,
Dairy Husbandry, and Dairy Industry), Botany (General Botany, Bacteriology,
and Plant Pathology), Entomology, Horticulture (Fruits, Vegetables, Economic
Ornamental Plants, and Food Processing) and Soils (Fertility, Microbiology,
and Surveying). The curricula covering these fields of study have been care-
fully and critically revised to meet the needs of an ever increasing student





body. New courses have been added, others have been expanded, and the con-
tents of all have been kept up to date. Within the scope of facilities and space
provided, the College of Agriculture is now offering students excellent training
in the general fields of scientific and applied agriculture.
The Administration of the University of Florida recognizes that all students,
no matter what their specialty, will become citizens with all the rights, privil-
eges, and obligations of citizenship. They will have homes and family obliga-
tions and they will participate in community and church activities. They must
be prepared for these responsibilities with the best possible education for
citizenship in its broadest sense. This calls for general education or education
of the whole man. We must not have our science laboratories filled with
politically immature students, nor our social science classes filled with scien-
tific illiterates.
The program of the College of Agriculture, as of all other upper division
colleges, is built upon the broad foundation of general education given in the
lower division or University College. While receiving his general education, the
agricultural student starts simultaneously on a program of scientific courses
such as botany, chemistry, and zoology, all of which are basic to future spe-
cialized courses in agriculture. At the same time students have the opportunity
to take twelve hours in fundamental agricultural subjects in the University
College. In an effort to make certain that students have wide contacts with
different phases of agriculture, it is required that these courses be taken in
several departments. No student graduates from the College of Agriculture
without having had courses in seven different fields. Even though a student's
attendance may be terminated at the end of two years, he still has the basis
of a general education, not only in fundamental subjects, but in certain aspects
of specialized agriculture. Work in the upper division is designed to train good
farmers, to prepare students as county agents, agricultural teachers, and
research workers, as well as to equip them to be leaders in the future develop-
ment of agriculture.
Certain new facilities have been added since the war which have enabled
the College of Agriculture to cover more adequately the instructional field
in several departments and which have made it possible for the College to
offer instruction in Food Processing, Citrus Fruit Handling, Dairy Manufac-
turing, and honey production.
Thirty-one outstanding members have been added to the staff. The services
of many of these are divided among the Resident Teaching Division, the Agri-
cultural Extension Service, and the research work of the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station.
The nation has witnessed, since the close of World War II, the greatest
building program in its history. Consequently the many forest industries and
industrial lumber concerns have competed for the services of men trained
in forestry. At the present time, the School of Forestry has requests for twice
as many professional foresters as it now graduates. These are being sought
by the larger forest landowners for managing timber growing enterprises. The
State and national government agencies charged with the rapidly increasing
responsibilities in forest research, forest protection, and public education are
also competing for the services of forestry students. The enrollment in the





School of Forestry has increased during the biennium until there are now 260
students registered in various classes, 120 of whom are candidates for the
degree Bachelor of Science in Forestry. Also five men have completed graduate
requirements for the degree Master of Science in Forestry. This increased load
has required for the School additional personnel, space, and equipment, some
of which has recently been made available. An Assistant Professor of Forestry
in Charge of Game Management, an Instructor in Dendrology, and a Consult-
ant in Wood and Wood Preservation have been added to the staff. Research
work has been expanded, particularly in forest utilization, including the
development of logging and sawmill practices upon both the Austin Cary
Memorial Forest and Welaka Conservation Reserve, and also in wood preserva-
tion at the Wood Products Laboratory on the University campus. Likewise, the
forest nursery has been expanded sufficiently to satisfy the requirements of
both forests and to afford field work for students. Summer camps have been
developed to meet the needs of the industries and for practical field work for
students. The School has been honored by the installation of the National
honorary Forestry Fraternity, Xi Sigma Pi, and also in the awarding of the
Tree Farm Certificate featuring the Austin Cary Memorial Forest.

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
Research by the Agricultural Experiment Stations, conducted by the nine
departments of the main station, seven branch stations, and six field labora-
tories, contributed significantly toward keeping Florida in the forefront of
agricultural production during the war and immediate postwar periods. The
noteworthy commercial yields of high-quality fruits, vegetables, farm and tree
crops, and better pastures and more high-grade livestock reflected directly
the better nutritional programs, management practices, improved plant and
animal pest control methods, and better plant varieties which were originated
or tested and proved by Station workers.

New kinds and varieties of vegetable and farm crops, as well as new insecti-
cides and fungicides for plant and animal pest control have been tested, and
their adaptability, application, and worth have been evaluated. Packaging,
marketing, storage, processing, and handling of agricultural products have
received all possible attention within the limits of available facilities.

Among the Stations' major contributions are the following:

Introduced Pangola pasture grass, hairy indigo and sweet lupine, and many vegetable and
potato varieties.
Bred new vegetables combining resistance to commonly occurring diseases (tomato, watermelons,
eggplant).
Developed controls of tobacco and other aphids, mole crickets, corn ear worm, and other
insects with new organic insecticides, and nematodes with soil fumigants (as DDT, chlordane,
benzene hexachloride, methoxychlor, parathion. ED. etc.I.
Developed methods for controlling weeds, water hyacinths, nut grass, etc., with new organic
chemicals.
Developed dithane-zinc-lime control for vegetable blights and controls for several diseases of
fruits and vegetables with new chemicals.
Identified two new serious gladiolus diseases, with progress on control.
Reduced losses from blossonm-end rot of tomatoes through combined control of nitrogen
source and soil acidity.
Showed that Florida vegetables are adapted to commercial quick freezing, and developed
values of precooling and antiseptics in prepackaged vegetables.





Found the vitamin and mineral content of Florida vegetables to be comparable to those of
other areas.
Determined further minor element deficiencies of fruits and vegetables.
Found that copper deficiency in animal nutrition results in excess removal or lack of deposi-
tion of phosphorus in bones; developed techniques for the use of radioactive isotopes of copper,
cobalt, molybdenum, and phosphorus, which revealed the degree of absorption, retention, and losses
by tissues and organs, pathways of excretion, extent of appearance in milk, etc., of these
elements.
Determined cause of "swollen joints" in calves to be bacteria entering wounds during screw-
worm infestation.
Found that house flies and gnats transmit mastitis in cattle and that iodized mineral oil and
penicillin are effective curative agents
Found rabbits to be hosts of the cattle liver fluke, and hexachlorethane a safe drug for use
in treating affected cattle.
Developed new supplementary winter feeds and determined values of citrus and by-products
as feeds. Also feed values of sweet blue lupine seed meal, citrus oil meal, ramie meal, and
dehydrated vegetable wastes.
Developed grass-clover pasture program and discovered the need of minor elements on
pastures.
Made many agricultural economics surveys.
Determined the intake of nutrients by peanuts through "pegs" as well as roots.
Showed the feasibility of using the radioisotope of phosphorus and heavy isotope of nitrogen
in soil fertility investigations.
During the recent war showed invert sugar and honey as satisfactory sugar substitutes in
ice cream mixes.
Developed cooperatively complete citrus spray and fertilizer programs.
Found the cause of variation of the properties in citrus peel oil and developed a method of
standardizing the manufacture of this oil.
Developed correction of mineral deficiencies of citrus into a workable fertilizer program.
Determined that soil acidity bears a relationship to nutrition of citrus, that noncultivation
of citrus groves results adversely from production standpoint, that improperly timed sprays may
result in subsequent crop loss and impaired tree condition, that one type of tree decline is due
to nematodes, that DDT, while killing some scale insects, permitted later development of severe
scale population through killing of parasites and predators, that nutritional condition of the tree
affected development of scale insects, that ethylene used in coloring rooms increased stem-end
rot, but that without ethylene the holding of citrus under coloring room conditions reduced
decays due to mold fungi.
During the past four years the Agricultural Experiment Station staff has
published 46 Station bulletins, 57 press bulletins, and 569 articles in scientific
journals and magazines.
The West Florida Station near Milton has recently been established and
is now proceeding with experimental work applicable to the extreme West
Florida Area.
THE AGRICULTURE EXTENSION SERVICE
The Agricultural Extension Service, with county and home demonstration
agents in all the principal agricultural counties, has carried the University to
rural people throughout the State. In its organization it enjoys the cooperation
of the University of Florida, Florida State University, the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, and county governments. It works closely with many other
groups and agencies interested in improving farming and rural home life.
Each year specialists and county and home agents hold hundreds of meet-
ings and visit thousands of farms to assist rural people in improving their
crops and livestock, in developing methods for operating farms on an econo-
mical, business-like basis, in improving their homes and health, and in making
their lives healthier and happier. The work has been extended to more phases
of rural life than ever before.





Significant developments in which the Extension Service has taken a very
active part during the past four years include:
Widespread testing of family cows for tuberculosis and Bang's disease, thus reducing the
possibility of members of rural families contracting tuberculosis or undulant fever from milk.
Health examinations for more Florida rural people.
Production of large quantities of vegetables for home use, canning of thousands of containers
of vegetables, fruits, and meats and the production of clothing and craft articles by rural women
and girls.
Activities of nearly 25,000 4-H club members, boys and girls, in crop production, home improve-
ment, and in many phases of farming and homemaking. The summer camping season enabled
nearly 5,000 boys and girls to attend 4-H club camps each year.
More extensive efforts than ever before to control rats.
Development of a long-range dairy program for Florida. Promoting improvement of dairy
cattle with the first State 4-H Dairy Show and three district shows. Organization of two artificial
breeding associations for improving dairy replacements.
Continued expansion of improved pastures for beef and dairy cattle, and production of feed
crops.
Agricultural conservation work on thousands of acres, planting of large number of trees, and
application of thousands of tons of lime and other materials to Florida soils.
Planning crop production in conformity with prospective demand, production costs, and
returns.
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Student enrollment in the College of Arts and Sciences declined perceptibly
during the war period. However, there was no curtailment of full-course offer-
ings leading to the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees. In 1944
there were only 37 students in the College of Arts and Sciences; currently the
enrollment is 602. The instructional staff, including those serving partially in
the University College, numbered only 76 in 1944, as compared to a present
staff of 175.
In addition to the students who register as majors in the College of Arts
and Sciences, many who are registered in other colleges of the University take
service courses in Arts and Sciences. For example, Agricultural Chemistry is
taught by the Department of Chemistry of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Mathematics is taught in this College to students who may be registered in
Engineering or Business Administration. Therefore, the service rendered by the
College of Arts and Sciences is not measured by the number of students
enrolled as majors in that College.
The College has been consistently conscious of the desirability of correlat-
ing its curricular offerings with the needs of its students and the well-being
of the State of Florida. As rapidly as such needs are discovered, they are
studied intensively in an attempt to ascertain whether or not the College can
assist in meeting them. As a result of such studies, several new activities have
been incorporated into the educational program of the College. These include:
Latin-American Area Studies, the Curriculum in Social Administration, and
the Public Administration Clearing Service. Plans are being developed for
programs of nurses' training, library science, and homemaking.
The new curriculum in Latin-American Area Studies replaces the course
major in Inter-American Affairs and affords the student the opportunity of
selecting a course major in Latin-American Area Studies. Courses in Latin-
American literature, history, civilization, geography, industry, and trade, as
well as Spanish, are included. Other offerings in most of these fields and in





related fields, such as Economic Geography of South America, Peoples and
Cultures of Latin America, Latin-American Art, Latin-American Music, and
kortuguese are available as electives.
Students may now elect a departmental major or a component of a course
major in Art. This is made possible through the cooperation of the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts, which provides a teaching staff for the art courses.
The Curriculum in Social Administration is designed to train personnel
for work in the social agencies of the State and Federal Government.
Other curriculum improvements of consequence have also been made. The
Journalism curriculum has been expanded to include the following course
sequences: advertising, business, editorial, graphic arts, and teaching. The
Biology curriculum now includes studies of marine and land fauna in Florida.
The curriculum offerings in Geography and Geology have been transferred
from a separated division to the jurisdiction of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Courses have been introduced in the field of Sociology to increase the under-
standing of marriage and family relations and to reduce the causes of divorces
and broken homes. Undergraduate offerings have also been expanded in
Chemistry, English, Greek, Latin, Spanish, History, Mathematics, Philosophy,
Political Science, Psychology, Religion, and Speech.
The graduate program of the College is being expanded as rapidly as staff,
facilities, and sound educational philosophy permit. The offering of courses
leading to the Ph.D degree has been authorized recently in American History,
Psychology, and certain areas of English, while the doctoral programs in
Biology and Chemistry have been strengthened and expanded.
One of the major concerns of the College of Arts and Sciences is the
development of youth's capacity for faith. Through courses in the Department
of Religion, students may investigate the religions of the world, particularly
the Hebrew-Christian faith. Major consideration in these courses is given to
the development of religious intelligence and mature convictions. The Depart-
ment also sponsors a program of voluntary activities through the Student
Religious Association, and with the cooperation with the denominational stu-
dent groups, which provides opportunities for religious service and training in
religious leadership.
The success of the Florida Debate Teams in competition with groups from
outstanding institutions in this section and in the East, and the remarkable
performances of the Florida Players bear eloquent testimony of the magni-
ficent service which is being rendered by the Department of Speech. The clinical
work in speech correction is further indicative of the wide range of activities
of this Department. The achievements in this field, also, have been outstanding.
A $1,500,000 construction program has vastly improved the facilities used
for instruction and research in chemistry and pharmacy, and renovated quar-
ters have provided the Department of Physics with some relief from over-
crowded conditions which existed in former years.

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
The past four years have witnessed a rapid development of the School of
Pharmacy. A comparison of enrollments in the sixty-eight colleges reporting in





September, 1947, to the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy reveals
that the School has the largest enrollment in the South, and that it is the
eighteenth in size in the United States. About 15,000 square feet of space in the
new Chemistry-Pharmacy Building have been allocated to Pharmacy.
There are about five hundred new drugs placed on the market each year.
The pharmacist is the specialist in drugs who must know them, understand
them, and assist others to understand them. During the past four years the
Florida State Board of Pharmacy has given approximately $14,800 for the
operation of the Bureau of Professional Relations, established in the School of
Pharmacy. The Bureau attempts to promote more ethical pharmaceutical pro-
cedures and better understanding and closer cooperation among the medical
and allied professions, and to disseminate information relative to the charac-
ter of new drugs. To implement this program the Associate Director of the
Bureau visited practically all Florida physicians and drug stores during the
biennium. The Bureau mailed approximately 400,000 pieces of educational
literature.
During the twenty-five years of its existence, the School of Pharmacy has
done much for the advancement of pharmacy in Florida and the nation. Seek-
ing new avenues of income and industry for the State, the faculty and graduate
students have investigated and reported on many problems, including the
growth of medicinal plants, analysing native plants for valuable constituents,
and preparing new chemicals from them. The School maintains a ten-acre
medicinal plant garden which is the largest of its kind in the South.
In recognition of the striking growth of the School and its outstanding
work on both the undergraduate and graduate levels, it is being recommended
that the School be redesignated, "The College of Pharmacy," and that the
Director be given the title of Dean.
In bringing to a close the biennial report covering the College of Arts and
Sciences and the School of Pharmacy, it is fitting to pay tribute to Dr. Townes
R. Leigh who is retiring from the deanship at the close of the biennium but
who will continue on the staff of the University as Head of the Department of
Chemistry, in which field he has attained noted success. Dr. Leigh came to
the University of Florida in 1920 as Head of the Department of Chemistry and
served from 1923 to 1933 as Dean of the College of Pharmacy. In a reorganiza-
tion which took place at that time, the College of Pharmacy became the School
of Pharmacy and was made an adjunct of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Dr. Leigh assumed the deanship of the new College in 1933. He also served as
Vice-President of the University until the spring of 1948, when the sudden
expansion of the University's administrative activities necessitated the full-
time services of a Vice-President and the College of Arts and Sciences required
the undivided attention of a dean. Dr. Leigh continued as Honorary Vice-
President of the University. Because of his long and valuable services to the
University, he has been granted an emeritus status as Dean. Because of his
reputation in the field of Chemistry, it is fortunate that he will be largely
responsible in directing the furnishing of the new $750,000 wing of the Chemis-
try-Pharmacy Building, which is nearing completion, and in readjusting the
Department of Chemistry to the expanded program which is contemplated.
To succeed Dean Leigh, Dr. Ralph Emerson Page has been named Dean
of the College of Arts and Sciences and is expected to assume his duties by





the opening of the fall semester, 1948. Dr. Page is a native of Indiana and is
currently Vice-President of Parsons College, Fairfield, Iowa. He received his
A.B. degree from Bluffton College, Bluffton, Ohio, and his M.A. and Ph.D.
degrees from Syracuse University. He has had varied experience as teacher and
administrator at Syracuse University and Bucknell University, particularly in
the fields of political science and the social sciences. Dr. Page served in the
Army of the United States in World War I, and in World War II he served
as Director of Training at the New York State Maritime Academy.
THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The ultimate objective of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts is to
improve man's physical environment and to enrich his life. The immediate
objectives toward that end are to provide training for professional students,
cultural instruction for nonprofessional students, and appropriate service to
the citizens of Florida in general.
Programs of study have been instituted to enable nonprofessional students
to major in Art. In addition to these cultural offerings, undergraduate pro-
grams at the professional level are offered in Architecture, Building Construc-
tion, Landscape Architecture, Drawing and Painting, Commercial Arts, Interior
Design, and Crafts. The curriculum in Architecture has recently been revised
to permit an option in the important and rapidly expanding field of Com-
munity Planning.
Significant professional recognition has recently been accorded the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts. In 1947, the School was elected a member
organization of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture; and in
1948, it was selected for inclusion in the list of accredited schools of architec-
ture by the newly instituted National Architectural Accrediting Board. The
School was one of two in the United States selected during 1948 to receive
a grant from the Carnegie Fund of the American Institute of Architects to
foster wider public appreciation of architecture and the arts of everyday life.
Exhibitions of contemporary work in the arts continue to be a major contri-
bution of the School to the community and the State. A beginning has been
made of a great teaching, research, and public service center in which students,
faculty, and the general public can study examples of the best work in painting,
industrial design, furniture, crafts, community planning, architecture, and the
arts.
The development of architecture and kindred arts at the University of
Florida has progressed at such a rapid pace and there is such a deep and
moving trend in American life toward increasing interest in the arts that the
Board of Control, upon the recommendation of the University Senate, authorized
the redesignation of the School to that of College of Architecture and Allied
Arts, effective at the beginning of the second semester of the academic year
1948-49.
The College of Business Administration

Since the academic year 1945-46, four new training programs have been
provided in the College of Business Administration: Business Statistics, Econ-
omics of Latin-American Trade, Real Estate, and Executive Secretaryship.
Other programs have been revised and brought up to date. In 1945 the Depart-





ment of Real Estate was established-the first such department in any state
university. Three staff members were appointed in the new department and
student enrollments increased rapidly. This College has perhaps attracted more
attention through this new department than through any other phase of its
activity. The Department of Accounting was separated from the Department
of Economics and General Business in 1946. The College now has four depart-
ments: Economics and General Business with thirty-four staff members,
Accounting with fifteen, Real Estate with three, and the Bureau of Economic
and Business Research with two.
Two full-time research economists in the Bureau of Economic and Business
Research were added this year. This addition was made possible in part by a
grant from the General Education Board. The program in economic research
is getting underway and by the end of this year will show tangible results.
During the past two years, a placement service has been put into operation
and through it the College has been instrumental in placing a large number or
graduates in positions for which they are best suited. The College has also
expanded its extension work (1) by retail short courses and institutes, ana
more important, (2) by conducting its First Annual Business Conference,
which was held October 14, 15, and 16. This Conference was for top-level busi-
ness executives and owners. It was held in Gainesville and attracted State-wiae
attention. Plans are already underway for holding a similar conference nexc
year and. for making it an annual affair. There has been continued ana nm-
proved publication of Economic Leaflets.

Since its founding in 1926-27, the College of Business Administration nuo
graduated 1,561 students. No other college has witnessed a larger percentage
of increase in enrollment.

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
AND
THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
Several major accomplishments of the College of Education during the
period 1944-48 are deserving of mention. A teaching staff was made available
for twenty-nine workshops in various counties of Florida. Twenty-four in-
service training conferences for County Superintendents of Public Instruction
and six conferences for principals were conducted. Also, one work conference
for school accountants was held and consultive service was furnished to Boards
of Public Instruction, school architects, and lay groups.

Action of the 1947 Legislature in providing more adequate remuneration
for public school teachers and stressing academic preparation has greatly
emphasized the importance of teacher training in the total educational pro-
gram. A tremendous expansion in enrollment of both undergraduates and
graduate students has ensued. Undergraduate enrollment has risen from 73
in 1945-46 to 432 during the current semester, while graduate enrollment has
increased from 7 to 471 in the same period.

In order to alleviate the teacher shortage in Florida, graduate courses were
offered in various towns, thereby giving a large segment of Florida teachers
the benefit of additional academic training. The offering of the degree of
Doctor of Education was authorized in May, 1946. This was a boon to many





Florida teachers who hitherto were compelled to go outside the State to secure
the doctorate in Education.
A convention of Future Teachers Clubs in Florida was organized in 1947,
and 150 high school boys and girls interested in the teaching profession were
brought to the campus. Members of the faculty of the College directed or parti-
cipated in more than forty school building surveys. Assistance was given the
State Department of Education in preparing a new budget system for the
County Boards of Public Instruction and in developing a new financial report-
ing system for County Boards of Public Instruction.
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
AND
THE ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENT STATION
During the war the work done by the Engineering and Industrial Experiment
Station on the development of Sferics equipment for the study of storms by
electronic devices and the mortar type radio proximity fuze brought the Uni-
versity national renown. At the cessation of hostilities, the University was
asked to expand its work in the field of electronics. Research contracts have
aggregated approximately $800,000 during the past four years in this field alone.
In the postwar period the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
has also used its staff and facilities to assist Florida industries in finding new
uses for Florida's natural resources and in helping to conserve them. It is perti-
nent to mention the development of a spray gun to improve methods of collect-
ing turpentine for the Naval Stores Industry, the studies made on the utiliza-
tion of scrub oak from a tannin and wood pulp standpoint, the drying of tung
nuts, refrigeration, air conditioning, solar water heating, waste utilization, and
sewage treatment research. Research in these fields from private sources has
aggregated approximately $400,000 during the past four years.
Curricula in aeronautical, chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical,
and public health engineering have all received national accreditation. As
more and more Florida students are becoming cognizant of the fine quality
of the University's engineering laboratories, they elect to stay at home rather
than to go elsewhere for their professional education. Upper division enrollment
in the College of Engineering is four times the prewar peak.
New laboratories that have been established include those in aeronautics,
public health engineering, soils stabilization, materials testing, pulp and paper
utilization, ceramics, corrosion, plastics, and metallography.
Over two million dollars' worth of equipment has been added since 1944,
and the professional staff has been increased from 24 to more than 200 for
teaching and research. Ninety-four per cent of the College staff are new mem-
bers of the faculty. This growth is probably without equal in the nation. About
80 per cent of the activities of the College of Engineering are carried on in
temporary, highly inflammable structures. The lack of permanent and appro-
priate space presents the only serious deficiency at this time.
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
The action of the Legislature of 1947 in improving the status of public
school teachers has shifted the emphasis in teacher-training from the under-
graduate to the graduate level, and has caused great numbers of teachers to





return to the University to earn advanced degrees. To meet this need, the
Graduate School, in cooperation with the College of Education, has instituted
a progressive program for supplying graduate training to in-service teachers.
The tremendous expansion of enrollment in graduate study during the past
four years may be observed from the following table:
ENROLLMENT
Academic Year 1st Semester 2nd Semester 1st Summer Term 2nd Summer Term
1944-45 ................. 58 71 106 85
1945-56 ................. 75 136 358 245
1946-47 ......... . .. . 255 295 666 527
1947-48 ................. 547 710 1.011 879
This large increase is also reflected in the total number of degrees granted
in the four years. In 1944-45, forty-seven graduate degrees were awarded; in
1945-46, fifty-five; in 1946-47, one hundred twenty-one; and in 1947-48, one
hundred sixty-one. The number of degrees awarded has thus more than trebled
since 1944-45, when the Graduate School ranked fourth in number of degrees
granted among eleven degree-granting units.
In the past four years there has been a marked increase in the number of
departments offering work leading to the doctorate. At the beginning of the
period the doctorate was offered in only four departments: Animal Nutrition,
Biology, Chemistry, and Pharmacy (including Pharmacognosy and Pharmo-
cology). Since 1944, the doctorate has been added in the following fields:
Education (the degree of Doctor of Education), Economics, English, History,
Psychology, Horticulture, Chemical Engineering, and Mathematics. Other
departments are at present working to improve their facilities and personnel
to the point where they may apply for permission to offer the doctorate.
The master's degree may be earned in forty-seven areas at the University
of Florida. Three departments have recently been authorized to offer profes-
sional, or nonthesis, masters' degrees in Education, Agriculture, and Business
Administration.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW
The past four years have comprised the period of greatest development
and change in the history of the College of Law. The first-semester enrollment
has increased from 81 to 504. During the last three of these years, from 88 to
90 per cent of the students have been veterans, and their maturity and
seriousness of purpose are reflected in what is probably the highest degree of
student achievement that has been attained since the College was founded.
The University of Florida Law Review was established during the academic
session of 1947-48 as a result of a long period of preliminary work and the
enthusiastic support of the students, the faculty, the President of the Univer-
sity, the Governor of Florida, and many others. Conceived as a major factor
in improving the jurisprudence of Florida, both by training future attorneys
in painstaking research and developing the clear style required for skilled brief-
ing, and by furnishing the bench and bar of Florida with a wealth of material
unavailable in any other publication, the Law Review is already a success.
On February 1, 1948, the requirements for admission to the College, which
in accordance with law school practice throughout the country had been
lowered at the beginning of the war, were increased for students other than





veterans to the former standards-the possession or an academic degree or the
completion at the University of Florida or at Florida State University of three
years or more of academic requirements in a combination course leading to
an academic degree and a degree in law.

The Law Building has been remodeled in the recent months, and the con-
struction of a new wing has been authorized. Approximately eight thousand
volumes have been added to the Law Library. Dean Harry R. Trusler, who had
been with the College since it was founded in 1909, and who had served as its
Dean since 1915, retired on June 15, 1947. During the following year Dr.
Clifford W. Crandall served as Acting Dean in charge of the administration of
the College. Henry A. Fenn, formerly Assistant Dean of the Yale University
Law School, was selected to assume the deanship of the College beginning
September 1, 1948. Under his guidance revisions are to be made in the curri-
culum, and the groundwork laid for further extensive changes that will facilitate
the acquiring by students of needed lawyer techniques and a familiarity with
more phases of the law. Several additions have been made to the faculty and
further additions are needed so that more time may be devoted to students
in conferences and individualized instruction.
THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS
Among the most significant additions to the University program was the
establishment, in 1945, of the College of Physical Education, Health, and
Athletics which is now in its third year. Embracing the fields of Student Health
Service, Required Physical Education, Teacher Training, Intramural Athletics
and Recreation, Sports Publicity, and Intercollegiate Athletics, the College is
steadily expanding its areas of service.

In addition to the regular service offered, the following are some of the
highlights of the work being done:
The revision of the teacher-training curricula to provide areas of concentration in physical
education for men, physical education for women, health education, and recreation leading to
the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education and Health.
Opportunity for training in general safety as well as driver education.
Provision for serivce to the public schools through the establishment of a field service division.
The development of a program of required physical education for women.
The classification of men and women in various categories of medical rating and the follow-up
program of adapted and corrective work for the various categories of physical disabilities.
A guidance and counselling program for all students in physical education.
In cooperation with the College of Education, a revision of the work leading to the Master
of Education degree, which provides concentration in areas of work that enables graduates in
physical education to make use of that degree.
The establishment of a sports news service to every newspaper in the State.
Expansion of the services and facilities of student health service; in cooperation with the
Alachua County Health Department, the provision for an annual chest X-ray for students and
faculty; and sanitary supervision and inspection of campus and fraternity eating and- living
establishments.
Capital improvements, namely, a new gymnasium, a filtration swimming pool system, a
sprinkler system on playing fields, new courts, fields, and general play areas.

THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
The most impressive single achievement of the University College during
the biennium has been the successful handling of the unprecedented student
enrollment. This unit has taken the brunt of an expansion so great that, were
the University organization different, academic standards and economic effi-

29





ciency could not have been maintained. However, the G. I. rush came first to
the University College where it was comparatively easy to add duplicate sections
in each comprehensive area course and thus in the most economic way to
provide for the large numbers. The other ten colleges and schools of the campus
were given added time to determine the numbers expected from the lower
division and to plan for additional facilities and teaching staff. The sudden
increase could not have been economically estimated or adequately handled
had each unit been confronted with the enrollment problem at the same time.
At the opening semester of recent school years the enrollment was as follows:
Year University College- The Other Ten Schools- Total
Lower Division Upper Division
1945 ......................................... 1,134 369 1,503
1946 ....................... .................. 2,083 848 2,931
1947 ....................... ............ 4,672 1,662 5,334
1948 .......................... ............. 5,648 3,130 8,778
The unifying factors of the University College, such as the common syllabi,
the uniform Progress Tests for all students, the presentation and summarizing
lectures, and the group examinations, kept new students and new instructors
in line with procedures established at the University which have given the
University an enviable reputation throughout the country.
The veterans, of course, are the most mature group we have had. Also, in
regard to serious purpose and earnest endeavor, they are far ahead of the
typical nonveteran freshman. However, the group was quite heterogeneous.
Diverse war experiences had quickened many minds, dulled others, and had
given the individuals many varying attitudes. But we have never had a group
that understood better the citizenship training plan of the University College
and achieved more than has the G. I. group.
The academic mortality, despite the diversities mentioned, was not so great
as many feared. It is true that students were entering college who in high
school had not prepared for college. Nevertheless, the grade distribution for
the groups which include veterans shows a favorable comparison with non-
veteran groups before the war.
Years Averages
A B C D F
1932-33 ....................................... 8.8% 18.6% 45.2% 18.3% 9.1%
1936-41 .......... ...... .... .. ............ .. .. 8.4% 16.7% 37.3% 21.9% 15.7%
1946-47 ........................................ 7.2% 16.2% 44.6% 22.7% 9.3%
The University College has from its establishment "borrowed" a large num-
ber of teachers from other colleges and schools of the campus. However,
because of their depleted faculties at the close of the war period, it was not
always able to obtain this help. A faculty for the lower division has been
recruited as follows:

Year 1945 1946 1947 1948
Number in faculty 15 50 63 73

With respect to university training, graduate degrees, and experience, the
level of the new group is higher than the old University level. These men were
selected primarily on the basis of university degrees, recommendations, and
reported successful experience. When it was found, however, after a trial period





that a few did not work out satisfactorily, they were released. On the whole,
the new faculty group has brought not only increased training but added
enthusiasm and drive to the University's program.
A plan that has been developed recently enables students in need of guid-
ance to go to any one of eight counsellors in the University College. These
counsellors are experienced teachers who continue to teach, but who devote
one third or one fourth of their time to this work. The counsellors are trained
men. However, if something arises on which clinical advice is needed they act
in an administrative capacity and secure the aid of special clinical agencies of
the University.
The Department of Military Affairs
Operation of the Reserve Officers Training Corps was resumed in February,
1946, with Colonel E. M. Edmonson detailed as Professor of Military Science
and Tactics. There were slightly over two hundred students in the basic courses
and only twenty-five in the advanced courses, divided almost evenly between
the Infantry Advanced Course and the Field Artillery. An Air Force Unit was
added in the fall of 1946 and a Transportation Corps Unit in July, 1948. The
total enrollment this year for all units is 2,247. Seventeen Army and Air offi-
cers and twenty-one non-commissioned officers are on duty at the present
time. Colonel E. M. Edmonson, who was assigned to foreign service in May,
1948, was replaced by the detail of Colonel George S. Price as Professor of
Military Science and Tactics. The administration of the University is giving
attention to the possibility of providing better quarters for the Military Depart-
ment. In view of recent national legislation relating to national defense, the
work of the ROTC, always of importance to the University because of its land-
grant tradition, has assumed even larger significance.

The Division of Music
In the first year of the biennium the established offerings of the Division
of Music were: the University Band, the University Orchestra, the Men's Glee
Club; one course in Fundamentals of Music; two courses in Music Education;
one course in Conducting; one course in Music Appreciation.
The inadequacy of this program had long been recognized. Our University
was the only state university in the country not offering a comprehensive music
program, providing professional training and a full-scale campus musical life,
and the demand herein was becoming increasingly urgent. Accordingly, early
in the 1947-48 academic year preliminary plans for the reorganization and
expansion of the Division were launched. A. A. Beecher was appointed as full-
time Director of the Division and assumed his duties March 1, 1948.
During March and April, 1948, a thorough study was made of the Univer-
sity's needs and practical potential in music. In the study was included a
questionnaire distributed to sixteen hundred University of Florida students,
to establish a factual measure of musical experience and interest on the campus.
Tabulation of the returns disclosed that 76.2 per cent of the group had studied
music before entering the University, and 72.1 per cent desired to continue
the study of music. The questionnaire replies further revealed that our students
consider music one of the essentials in good living and one of their educational
rights.





Thereafter followed a series of surveys to determine the immediate physical
needs and the following basically essential additions were recommended and
approved for the opening of the 1948-49 academic year:
Course offerings in theory, history, appreciation, literature, music education, ensemble, and
applied music; office, classroom, studio, library, rehearsal hall, and laboratory working area; office
and classroom equipment and supplies, studio, practice room and organization instruments; nine
faculty members; and supporting budget.
The reorganized Division of Music has its course charted toward the goal
of bringing music, in its full functional, educational and cultural worth to our
University and our State. A normal healthy growth of the Division will require
increased housing facilities, equipment and staff, as well as broader course
offerings, research opportunities, and the granting of academic degrees.

AUXILIARY UNITS
The General Extension Division
The General Extension Division reached directly 48,455 adults in itl
organized educational program conducted throughout the State during the
past biennium. Regular University instruction was given to 10,910 teachers,
veterans, and others who continued their education at home through corre-
spondence study, classes, and workshops. The Extension adult education pro-
gram enrolled 37,545 in courses concerned with business and the professions,
home and family living, recreation, economics and government, public welfare,
citizenship, health, safety, community leadership, and others.
Professional, business, civic, and welfare organizations and the public
schools drew heavily upon the Division for help in connection with their own
educational programs. Consultant services were given, and all kinds of materials
were lent as follows: 86,440 items, including bibliographies, study guides, dis-
cussion outlines, books, package libraries, and records from the Extension
Library; and, in addition to other visual aids, educational films for 49,767
showings averaging an attendance of 70 persons. Carefully adapted and selected
to fit definite needs, these services and materials helped adult groups and
school people make their programs of greater educational benefit. In each of
the sixty-seven counties, people participated in the Extension program, making
"the State the campus of the University."
The citizens of Florida are becoming increasingly aware that the University
is a great reservoir of knowledge which they can use in meeting the complex
problems of adjustment and living in a changing world. In greater numbers
than ever before, laymen and professional people turn to the General Exten-
sion Division not only for spot courses which will help them with immediate
problems, but also for programs involving long-range constructive planning.
More and more, public administration and private enterprise call on the
Division as the logical agency to conduct their training courses.
In response to these demands, the General Extension Division is offering
programs for social education, with special emphasis on problems in human
relationships and welfare and on the procedures for group study and com-
munity action for their solution; for government, with training for naturaliza-
tion, for public employees, and for more and intelligent participation in current
affairs; for business and the professions in keeping up to date with new





methods, materials, trends, and responsibilities. Many opportunities are offered
also to the individual for personal growth and development in order that he
may cultivate his talents for his own satisfaction and for a larger place in
the community and in society.

The General Extension Division opened its program in social education for
the past biennium with a series of youth forums in which students from one
hundred high schools discussed their own problems. For the first time, school
officials, civic leaders, and parents got the viewpoint of the youth of the State,
and began to measure the resources of their communities for meeting the
expressed needs for guidance and counselling and for family life education.
Since the lack of trained leadership in both fields was apparent, college level
and informal courses in guidance and counselling were given to teachers, minis-
ters, social workers, and other youth leaders in as many centers as the number
of available instructors permitted. Family Life Institutes were held for adults
in a number of cities.
Film forums, short courses, and institutes were conducted throughout the
State in cooperation with the numerous lay and professional organizations
working with problems of social implication. The value and importance of the
Social Education program of the Division are evidenced by the fact that 29,143
persons enrolled in its various offerings.

The General Extension Division has continued its offerings of short courses,
correspondence courses, and loans of visual aids materials. The Division is the
only agency of the State which is giving the people a varied and functional
lending library service. Communities and schools are provided expert assistance
in improving their local libraries. The State Information Center answers any
reasonable request for information either directly or by referral to an appro-
priate authority. A great variety of expertly correlated material is lent to stu-
dents and groups for study and discussion. One of the finest juvenile book
collections in the South is maintained for Florida's children.

The University Library

Possibly no other objective attained during the postwar period has meant
so much to the teaching faculty and research scholars as the assurance of two
new wings to be added to the Library building at a cost of $1,415,000. It is
hoped that construction on these new wings can be started at a very early date.
It has heartened those who are interested in research, in creative writing, and
particularly in developing a greater graduate program. It may be interest-
ing to consider generally the growth of the Library collections and the de-
velopment of its services during the last four years. Whereas in 1944 the
Library was completing the expenditure of a second General Education Board
grant designed to secure the basic needs of an undergraduate collection, it
received in June 1948, a third General Education Board grant to be used
almost entirely for the purchase of research materials. In 1944, Mr. Julien
Yonge brought his magnificent collection of Floridiana to the University, and
the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History was set up as a memorial to his
distinguished father, the late P. K. Yonge, for many years Chairman of the
Board of Control. A companion collection on the West Indies has been started.
Recently the papers of David Levy Yulee, Florida's first United States Senator,





were acquired by gift from Senator Yulee's daughter, Mrs. Wallace Neff, thus
adding another invaluable source of Floridiana to our collections.
In 1945 the Library had 254,363 volumes. Currently there are 331,294
volumes. For the year 1944-45 the recorded circulation of Library materials
was 39,740. For 1947-48, this figure was 225.241.

The University of Florida Press
Since the organization of the University Press on January 4, 1945, its
primary aim has been to encourage, seek, and publish original and scholarly
manuscripts which will bring credit to the University of Florida as a center of
research and an academically productive institution.
During the past biennium, the sales of Press publications in this country
and abroad have continued at a heartening pace. Nearly 3,500 copies of Florida
Under Five Flags, by Dr. Rembert W. Patrick, have been distributed, and the
book has been approved for use in the public school libraries of the State.
The Native Trees of Florida, by Erdman West and Lillian E. Arnold, is now
in its third printing, and there is every indication that a fourth printing will
be required within the next few months. Both of these volumes are used as
class texts at the University of Florida.
Two other titles issued by the Press during the biennium have been favor-
ably received by specialists in the field of Botany and Zoology. The first, An
Annual Cycle of the Plankton and Chemistry of Four Aquatic Habitats in
Northern Florida, was written by Dr. E. Lowe Pierce, of the University College.
The volume presents a quantitative study of the microorganisms and of their
physical and chemical environments at stations located within a ten-mile
radius of Welaka, Florida. The second title, Studies on the Life History of
"Eleutherodactylus Ricordii Planirostris" (Cope) in Florida, by Dr. C. J. Goin,
of the University College, describes the life history and genetics of an introduced
greenhouse frog, with a discussion of the application of the genetics to geo-
graphic variation. There has been a steady demand for these volumes, as well
as for the other items in the Biological Science Series distributed by the Press.
Books which are now in press and which will appear in the near future
include Southern Freight Rates in Transition, by Dr. W. H. Joubert, and
Bibliography of Animal Venoms, by R. H. Harmon and Dr. C. B. Pollard. Dr.
Joubert, formerly a member of the faculty of the College of Business Adminis-
tration, is now associated with the Tennessee Valley Authority. Mr. Harmon
is a Fellow in the Department of Chemistry; Dr. Pollard is Professor of Chemis-
try and a widely known toxicologist.
Two book-length manuscripts have been accepted for publication by the
Press, and five manuscripts are being critically appraised by nationally known
authorities in their respective fields.
A secondary activity of the Press has been to edit special addresses, pamph-
lets, reports, and bulletins which do not carry the Press imprint and which
are subsidized from University reserve funds. The Press staff has edited
fourteen of these special projects during the biennium.
At present the personnel of the Press includes the Editor, who devotes half
his time to teaching in the University College and half to Press activities, a





secretary, and two part-time student assistants. During the coming biennium
it is hoped that the Press may be expanded in order that it may (1) become
an increasingly effective medium for the dissemination of the research findings
of a faculty alive to its scholarly responsibilities; (2) foster a wide program of
regional enrichment through the publishing of the Centennial studies; and
(3) present to the citizens of the State and the nation, through interpretative
brochures and bulletins, the dignity, traditions, and high ideals of a great
university.

Public Relations and Alumni Affairs
For more than a decade prior to World War II, the offices of Director of
Public Relations and Alumni Secretary were held by Mr. Frank S. Wright in
a dual capacity. A separation of the responsibilities for these two important
functions became a necessity with the postwar growth. Mr. Wright, who was
granted a leave of absence for the duration of the war, tendered his resignation
upon returning from a tour of foreign duty. During the war period, the Alumni
Office was manned by a limited clerical staff. Through a monthly newsletter,
The Fighting Gators, our Alumni Office kept in touch with over 5,000 alumni
and former students in the armed forces. During the conflict 408 alumni are
known to have been killed or to have died in line of duty. Photographs of
the war dead were secured from members of their families, and these will be
used in connection with an appropriate war memorial center. The work of the
Publicity Office has been carried on by Mr. Allen Skaggs as Acting Director
of Publicity. On December 1, 1947, the work of the Alumni Office was
reactivated under the direction of Mr. D. R. Matthews as Acting Director of
Alumni Affairs. At that time there were only five active clubs in the State
and one outside the State. At the present time, there are more than thirty
clubs with the organization of ten more planned before the end of 1948. The
paid-up membership in the Alumni Association has increased from 750 as of
December 1, 1947 to nearly 5,000 at the close of the biennium. The Department
of Alumni Affairs is planning ten class reunions for the current year and will
undertake as one of its major projects for the immediate future a drive for
funds through the Alumni Association to develop a suitable war memorial
center at the University. Publication of The Florida Alumnus, a quarterly
alumni magazine, was resumed in the spring of 1948 and the first issue met
with widespread interest. The files of the Alumni Office now include correct
addresses for more than 10,000 alumni.

Radio Station WRUF
For the past two years, Radio Station WRUF has maintained a puanc
service program, and at the same time prepared for an expansion of service
through WRUF-FM.
The Federal Communications Commission has granted WRUF a Construc-
tion Permit to move the transmitter and antennas approximately three miles
west of Gainesville, and the station will go on full power of 5,000 watts day
and night with a directional array. Plans for this construction and operation
are well under way.
The Federal Communications Commission has likewise granted us a license
for Channel 281 on Frequency Modulation, which is 104.1 megacycles. Tem-





porary operation at 1,000 watts is planned to begin the middle of August
at our present site, and permanent operation at 3,000 watts will begin when
the construction is completed at the site west of Gainesville.
FM will permit WRUF-FM to carry a great many more University activities
than our limited time on AM now permits. WRUF receives no appropriations to
operate the station and is entirely operated on the revenues from our com-
mercial operation on AM. All improvements are paid for from the profits
derived from AM commercials and through our network affiliation, the Mutual
Broadcasting System.
A complete renovation of our present studios and offices, which is under
immediate contemplation, will include two studios, a library, and office space
to house the staff and take care of the additional programming for AM as well
as FM. The station continues to render public service programs without cost
to the people of our area.

The Inter-American Institute
Owing to the exigencies of the housing situation, the admission of Latin-
American students was curtailed drastically in May, 1946. and the number
dropped from forty-two to twenty-eight. During the biennium, fifteen degrees
were awarded to Latin-American students including one Ph.D., three Masters'
degrees and eleven bachelors' degrees. The eleven countries represented were:
Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Peru,
Puerto Rico and Venezuela. Hector Flores, Ph.D., Puerto Rico, and Alvaro
Dobles, B.Arch., Costa Rica, were elected to Phi Kappa Phi. Since the United
States entered World War II on December 8, 1941, forty-six degrees have been
conferred upon Latin-American students, of whom one was elected to Phi
Beta Kappa and six to Phi Kappa Phi. It is also worthy of notice that on
February 7, 1948, the University conferred the degree of Master of Education
upon Mr. Lawrence H. Gibson, the first candidate specializing in Inter-American
Affairs and Education.
Several Latin-American scholars were brought to the University to lecture
under the auspices of the Inter-American Institute. Included among others
were Dr. Hernane Tavares de Sa, brilliant Brazilian scholar, and Dr. Carlos
Davila, former President of Chile and former Ambassador from Chile to the
United States. Latin-American students made talks to civic clubs and other
bodies and also participated in radio broadcasts.





SIX-YEAR PLAN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


During the past year the administration and faculty of the University
of Florida have reviewed our present program, made an evaluation of
our needs, and established the goals for which we must strive if the Uni-
versity is to take its place as one of the great state universities. These
goals cannot be reached in one year or one biennium. We believe that the
developments can be assimilated over a period of six years and that the
financial requirements will be more reasonable if spread over three
bienniums.
The following pages summarize the Six-Year Plan developed at the
University of Florida to serve the 10,000 students on the campus and the
people of the State. This statement covers the educational program, the
staff needs, plant needs, and the student personnel program of the
University.

Florida-A Growing State
The population of Florida is growing faster than the national rate. In 1948
there are approximately 2,500,000 people in Florida. If the population continues
to grow as it has since 1930, there will be nearly 4,300,000 in Florida by 1960.

Moreover the income of Floridians has increased from $484 per capital in
1929 to $1,104 per capital in 1947. Floridians have the highest per capital income
in the South and although it is less than the national average, the per capital
income of Floridians increased more rapidly from 1940 to 1947 than was true
for the nation as a whole.

As the State's population and wealth increase and as business and industry
develop, the demand for people with technical, professional, and other kinds
of higher education will pyramid. This development in itself will attract addi-
tional people to Florida for their permanent residence.

Florida Public Schools have been improved and enlarged over a period of
years. Larger numbers of Florida youth continue to high-school graduation
and larger percentages of these graduates are going on to college. In the past
slightly over 1 per cent of the white population has attended college in Florida
at one time. Assuming no increase in this percentage there will be 20,000 non-
veterans in Florida colleges in 1949 (plus about 10,000 veterans), and 30,000
nonveterans in Florida colleges by 1958.

In the past the University of Florida has enrolled from 32 to 40 per cent
of the college population in the State. It has 10,000 students (veterans and non-
veterans) now and by 1958, with increasing population trends, it will surely
have 10,000 nonveterans alone.

What Is A University?
Strictly speaking, a college is organized for the purpose of teaching students.
Its primary function is transmitting the results of scientific and cultural study
to the younger generation. In contrast to this, a University has a threefold
function: teaching through its various colleges; research, both theoretical and
applied; and public service through the dissemination of the results of research,





not omy to its own students but to the entire population of the State in sucn
programs as its extension services, adult education programs, and publications.
In addition to research which is theoretical, the University of Florida serves
the people of the State in the practical application of theoretical research
which can be of both immediate and long term value to the State. Such investi-
gation is found in the research done by the Agricultural Experiment Station
for the farmers of the State; research done by the Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station for the industries of the State; research done by the
Bureau of Economic and Business Research for business; research done by the
Public Administration Clearing Service for governmental agencies in the State:
and the research done by the College of Education for the assistance of the
schools of the State.
In the fields of literature, history, art, music, and architecture, much can
also be done to interpret the rich heritage of Florida to all Floridians. We
should collect the historical materials, study the literature, produce and publish
books to acquaint both college students and the public with the story of Florida's
culture. A great history of the State should be written, but the materials for
it must be collected. Art must be taught and works encouraged that can be
placed on exhibition elsewhere.
For the building and construction trade, architectural and design research
in the use of native materials adapted to Florida's conditions can be of great
utility in this rapidly growing State.
These varied functions of a university are integrated into one overall pro-
gram. For instance, in research programs scientists in one area must consult
with those in another. Mathematics, chemistry, engineering, and physics are all
needed in studying advanced scientific problems. Laboratories and materials
for research are used in teaching, especially on the graduate levels at which
advanced specialists are trained. There is an investment of several million
dollars in the books and buildings of the University Library. These collected
and coordinated facilities are used by all branches of the University.
Staff
A staff composed of creative scholars, great teachers, research specialists,
and technicians is required. They cannot be compared with the staff of a
college whose main function is only that of teaching.

The University of Florida is in competition for staff with the leading uni-
versities of the country. We have recently lost some of our outstanding faculty
to other institutions because we could not match salary and other benefits,
such as retirement and conditions of employment. With the recent growth of
the University we have had to enlarge our staff, and we have generally been
able to find qualified personnel, but we have not always been able to attract
the outstanding teachers and scholars who would be so valuable in augmenting
our present staff.

We have just completed a study of the salary ranges in twenty-three uni-
versities located in all parts of the United States. Most of this group were
state universities and land-grant institutions such as the University of Florida,
although some of them were non-tax-supported institutions.





The following table indicates the salary schedule required at the University
of Florida to exceed slightly the average of our twenty-three leading competi-
tors. The table also indicates the salary schedule required to compete with
the top ten universities.
Exceed Average of Leading Competitors To Equal Average Top Ten
Low HIGH AVERAGE Low HIGH AVERAGE
Deans and Directors .... ...... 6500 12,000 8500 7750 13,500 9925
Professors ...................... 5800 9,500 7200 5900 12,000 7700
Associate Professors ............. 4800 7,000 5400 4800 7,500 5700
Assistant Professors ........... 3800 5,500 4500 3900 6,000 4700
Instructors ........................ 3000 4,500 3750 3150 4,750 3660
During the last year, the University of Florida has made offers to numerous
prospective staff members who refused the offers when they discovered the
inadequacy of the benefits under the Teachers' Retirement System. This letire-
ment system was created to serve the public school teachers of the State and
was not designed for University staff members. Either the upper limits on this
system should be raised or a new retirement system created for University
personnel.
With the great number of students who deluged the University in recent
years, we have used every device possible to accommodate them with the staff
available. In those situations where quality of education nnd teaching are not
sacrificed by large classes, we have used them; however, we have been forced
to resort to them in some instances where it was not desirable. We are bending
every effort to provide adequate staff so that small classes can be provided
when necessary and personalized education be made available to all of our
students.
Our Six-Year Plan proposes a staff which will enable us to avoid the pit-
falls of mass education and still render economically to the youth of the Ltate,
and to the entire population, the services which are expected of a great State
University. This aim requires a larger staff than that now at the University
of Florida.
The ratio of teaching staff to total enrollment is at present 1 to 17.6. For
effective teaching on both the graduate and undergraduate level the ratio
should be not greater than 1 to 12. It will require 260 additional teachers to
meet the desired ratio.
The University's responsibilities for research cannot be discharged entirely
by the teaching staff. If we are to make the basic studies and work out iheir
practical applications to agriculture, business, industry, and public affairs in
the State we need to increase our research staff by 140 people.
Plant
The permanent plant of the University of Florida was built for only 2,500
students. With the addition of some temporary buildings, 8,700 students were
enrolled and accommodated last year by means of classes and laboratories
meeting morning, noon, and night in makeshift and crowded quarters. This was
possible only because the largest part of the enrollment was still in the Univer-
sity College (the first two years). Now that the bulge is moving into the upper
division our situation grows more critical.
Certain permanent additions to the physical plant are under construction.
The addition to the Chemistry-Pharmacy Building may be available by Novem-





ber of 1948. The new Gymnasium may be available by March, 1949. The Library
additions may be completed by 1950. Other construction is now underway for
the housing, feeding, and medical care of students, and for dairy research and
instruction.

The University of Florida is a land-grant college. A study of the educa-
tional space available in fifty land-grant colleges and universities shows that
they average 142.16 square feet of educational space per student. Studies made
by the United States Office of Education recommend 170 square feet of educa-
tional space per student yet the University of Florida has only 66.61 square feet,
counting permanent and temporary buildings. The educational space at the Uni-
versity of Florida falls in the following categories:
Square Feet
Per Student
Permanent buildings, including those now under construction .......................... 39.95
Tem porary buildings ............................. . ........... ............................... 15.36
Permanent buildings which have been authorized but are not under construction ....... 11.30
On the basis of the comparison with fifty state universities and land-grant
colleges, the deficit in permanent buildings at the University of Florida amounts
to 90.91 square feet per student. Compared to the recommendations of the
United States Office of Education the deficit at Florida is 118.93 square leet
per student.
To add approximately 100 square feet per student for an enrollment of
10,000 will require 1,000,000 square feet in permanent educational buildings.
Even the provision of a million additional square feet of educational space at
the University of Florida will bring us up to only the average of comparable
institutions throughout the country. For the University of Florida to take its
rightful place among the great state universities of the country, it will need
additional space, additional staff, and additional equipment over and above
that required to meet the average. The figures on costs as presented by a study
of the United States Office of Education establishes the ratio between expenses
for educational facilities and equipment as eight to three. The University of
Florida must also plan to house 60 per cent of its student body. With its present
dormitory capacity of 1,100, this requires additional permanent housing for
5,000 students. Construction is to start in the fall of 1948 on dormitories for
1,000 students, leaving a deficit of 4,000 places in the requirements for dormi-
tory space.

INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH PROGRAM
AND CONSEQUENT BUILDING NEEDS

The College of Arts and Science
The College of Arts and Sciences is one of the largest and most funda-
mental units in the University of Florida. It not only is the unit which trains
such specialists as chemists, physicists, biologists, linguists, sociologists, mathe-
maticians, historians, political scientists, public administrators, and psycholo-
gists, but it also provides courses required for practically all other colleges in
the University. In addition to undergraduate programs, graduate work is offered
in all departments of the college. Its activities are now widely scattered. Many
of its departments are in temporary buildings. Other departments are crowded





into buildings primarily used by other colleges. Its teaching, research programs,
and building needs are outlined below.

Zoology.-Zoology makes an important contribution to the State, and plans
to offer additional courses needed in ichthyology, genetics, physiology, and
related fields. Pre-medical training is also given for undergraduates. On the
graduate level, training of biologists by the department is nationally recognized.
Much research work on the abundant and unique wildlife of the State is carried
on.
As a contribution to the industry of the State, work in marine biology has
a great future. With a coast line of 1,197 miles, longer than that from the
Georgia line to Canada, Florida has unequaled marine resources. Work can
be done toward the expansion of Florida's fishing industry, oysters beds, and
sponge industry, as well as on the development of fertilizer from fish not useful
as human food or as game fish. This part of the program can be developed
with proper financial support.
Geology.-The Department of Geology is being developed at the University
toward a more adequate program. Trained geologists are necessary to help in
developing the mineral resources of the state. Additional staff, laboratory, and
research space are needed.
Geography.-The Department of Geography offers work for teachers and
economic geography courses for Business Administration, in addition to giving
general courses and training geographers. Its work, now scattered over the
campus, should be located in one place with adequate space, and its map collec-
tion should be increased.
Chemistry.-One of the first departments to offer the Ph.D. degree, Chemis-
try now has outstanding offerings in organic chemistry, and it plans to expand
and strengthen analytical, inorganic, agricultural, and biological chemistry.
The Department also has plans for expanding its research in naval stores and
for increasing its courses related to the chemistry of home arts and nursing.
This department can be adequately housed if the present Pharmacy space is
given to Chemistry and a new building of at least 33,000 square feet is erected
for Pharmacy.
History.-In addition to the standard history offerings which are now given
at the University, the History Department plans to expand its offerings in
American, European, and Latin-American history. It plans also to develop the
doctoral program and institute a research program in Florida history. The
latter includes an extensive program in the collection and study of manuscripts,
original documents, and other sources of Florida history. This will result in the
publication of information necessary to understanding the rich heritage of
the State.
Journalism.-The Department of Journalism has been inadequately staffed,
equipped, and housed. This important area in the education of Florida youth
who plan to do newspaper and other journalistic writing is to be expanded.
A committee representing the Associated Dailies of Florida made a survey of
the University's offerings in Journalism and recommended improvements that
would make it possible for our work to be accredited by the American Council
on Education for Journalism. The University is anxious to make the necessary





adjustments in curriculum, and additions to staff, space, and equipment that
will enable us to meet these high standards.
Language and Literature.-Current world developments require that we
offer language courses in Russian, Portuguese, and Italian, in addition to the
languages now being offered. The general development of the Division of
Language and Literature and the coming of coeducation requires that our
offerings be extended in Greek literature, English classical literature, and in
French, English, and American literature. Linguistics, Comparative Literature,
and possibly the Scandinavian languages, as well as the doctoral program in
this Division, are of great importance, and additional staff is needed to
strengthen the offerings for the students registering in this important field.
Mathematics.-In addition to strengthening the graduate program leading
to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the Mathematics Department needs to
expand its undergraduate offerings to include astronomy.
Philosophy.-The offerings in Philosophy are limited because of inadequate
staff. More than one approach to philosophy should be represented in the staff
of a university department. With appropriate expansions in staff, offerings
can be made in advanced logic, ethics, aesthetics, semantics, and metaphysics.
Political Science.-Courses in government are taken by many undergraduates
as a part of elective programs, as preprofessional training, and as training as
professional public administrators. This includes programs for those entering
the local, state, and federal civil service, as well as the field of city manage-
ment. The graduate program should be expanded to offer the Ph.D. degree.
Additional work in city planning, coordinated with other branches of the Uni-
versity, should be given. In the international field, training of students for
foreign service and work in the Latin American area studies program is being
expanded. The Public Administration Clearing Service has already made
valuable contributions to governmental units in Florida. Its contribution should
be increased. This department requires additions to its staff and space to
provide this program.
Physics.-The Physics Department has been seriously handicapped because
of lack of adequate space. The war created such a demand for physicists that
the University of Florida staff has been seriously depleted. It is now offering
standard work in Physics, but needs to move immediately into such fields as
Theoretical Physics, Meteorology, and Nuclear Physics, and to extend its offer-
ings on the graduate level to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The Physics
Department will be called upon to cooperate with the Cancer Research Labora-
tory and with the Oak Ridge laboratory in its work on nuclear physics and
atomic energy.
Psychology.-Expansion is planned in the Psychology Department for fur-
ther work in experimental, physiological and comparative psychology, measure-
ment of intelligence and personality, and the training of clinical psychologists.
In this field there is a great shortage of personnel. Adequate laboratory facili-
ties and increased staff are an urgent need.
Religion.-It is contemplated that increased enrollment and the advent
of women students will require the addition of at least one new member to
the Department of Religion. This new staff member should be a woman,





Sociology and Anthropology.-Anthropolgy and Archeology are new addi-
tions to the work of this Department. Further extension of their offerings are
planned in social administration, rural and urban sociology, and proposed
studies for research methods in all of these areas. Significant surveys of the
sociological development of the State are needed in connection with graduate
work in this department. This will require several additions to the depart-
mental staff.
Speech.-The Department of Speech now has an outstanding program at
the University of Florida. This program is to be augmented by courses in
play-writing, costume and scene design, and radio. The Department is called
upon to teach spoken English to Latin American students who attend the
University under the auspices of the Inter-American Institute. The Speech
and Hearing Clinic is an outstanding service to the people of the State, and
its clinical services must be expanded. It correlates the work required in the
training program for the handicapped and exceptional child. The Department
is prepared to offer the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Speech.
The following programs represent additional majors or service courses
made mandatory by the admission of women to the University.
Library Training.-A minimum amount of library training is required for
students who are preparing for the teaching profession, as well as for students
who are obtaining their undergraduate degree primarily for admission to a
library school. It is proposed that this minimum training be furnished at the
University of Florida by setting up a department of preprofessional library
training in the College of Arts and Sciences under the direction of the Direc-
tor of University Libraries. The University plans only service courses for
teachers and for those preparing for admission to professional library schools.
There is such a professional school at Florida State University. This important
service can be furnished with a minimum of additional staff.
Home Arts.-Every girl will eventually operate a home of her own. If she
marries (and 90 per cent will), she will have a family to rear. If she does
not marry, she will still have some kind of home of her own. Every girl, then,
needs to know something of human nutrition, food and dietetics, clothing and
textiles, home management, family living, marriage and the family, interior
decoration, art, psychology, and many other elements that go to make up a
liberal education. Until it is demonstrated that the University of Florida should
offer opportunities for girls to major in various fields of home economics, a
plan should be developed whereby a girl majoring in almost any department
in the University can elect six or twelve semester hours in home economics
which will give her the major elements of these various fields which are of
importance to all girls.

Nursing Education.-During the spring of 1948 the Public Health Services
of the Federal Security Agency, in cooperation with the University of Florida,
the Florida Nursing Association, the Florida State League of Nursing Educa-
tion. and the Florida State Board of Nursing Examiners made an extensive
survey of needs for educational facilities and courses in the State of Florida.

Their report sets forth clearly and indisputably the need for increased
nursing educational facilities in Florida, particularly those designed to train





personnel for the top levels to staff the existing program of nurses' training
now being carried on in the State. The report sets forth the essentials of a
program leading to a degree in nursing education, and indicates that all aspects
of the professional education, with the exception of psychiatric nursing, can
be carried on in facilities which exist in Florida. The construction of the Vet-
erans Administration Hospital near Gainesville for psychopathic cases will fill
this need.
It is proposed, therefore, that there be set up in the College of Arts and
Sciences a School of Nursing, and that the first year of the program begin in
the fall of 1949 since all of the basic courses are now taught in the University
College and the College of Arts and Sciences. This proposal involves the neces-
sity of providing funds for staff, scholarships, and regular expenses.

Cancer Research Laboratory.-The importance of cancer research is recog-
nized by everyone. At the University of Florida we propose to establish a
Cancer Research Laboratory composed of the following sections (1D Radio-
chemistry, (2) Radio Biology, (3) Radio Physics, and (4) Cancer Research
Clinic.

Figures released by United States Public Health Service show that of one
hundred persons who are afflicted with cancer, twenty-five can be cured by
existing methods. Another twenty-five could be cured if a reliable diagnostic
test were available to detect internal cancer in the early stages. We propose
to attack the problem of diagnosis in two ways, namely to attempt to develop
radioactive compounds that will localize in cancerous tumors and thus enable
us to detect the tumor with a Geiger Counter, and to study the disfunction of
the thyroid and other glands which appear to be caused by cancer in the
body. Studies are also planned on the causes of cancer, the treatment of
cancer, and the structure of certain molecules related to cancer.

It is proposed to establish temporarily this cancer research project on the
campus of the University of Florida in a building which will be vacated when
the Gymnasium is completed. In the beginning the Laboratory will be a unit
of the College of Arts and Sciences and will require an annual budget of about
$70,000. Attempts are being made to secure these funds from private founda-
tions and from agencies of the Federal Government. If the researches of the
Laboratory prove to be productive, it is conceivable that this program should
be expanded.

Building Needs.-In later sections of this report, which present the neeus
for the College of Agriculture and Engineering, we shall explain the shift
in building assignments which will provide additional space for several units
of the College of Arts and Sciences. In particular, the transfer of engineering
to the new area assigned to it in the campus plan will release Benton Hall
and the Engineering Building for the use of the Social Sciences and Humanities
Departments. With the construction of the agricultural group in the agricul-
tural area, the Horticulture Building and the Agriculture Building can De
vacated and made available for certain science units in the College of Arts
and Sciences. With the addition of the already planned wing to the Horticul-
ture Building, the Physics Department can be adequately housed. As pointed
out above, this Department has been the least adequately housed unit at the





'University. This basic science, which is important to so many units or ime
University such as engineering, agriculture, and architecture, must be ade-
quately housed and equipped.
It is proposed to provide space for speech and dramatics in the building
planned for the Fine Arts. As the program in Home Arts develops, appropriate
space will be needed.
A building to house experimental animal colonies and to provide appro-
priate laboratories is needed by several units of the University-the Agricultural
Experiment Station, the Nutrition Laboratory, the Biological Science Depart-
ments, the College of Pharmacy, the Department of Psychology, and the Cancer
Research Laboratory. The building to house this animal laboratory will require
10,000 square feet.
Reconditioning of Existing Buildings.-As we have indicated above, the con-
struction of new buildings would release space in the present out-moded Engi-
neering Building, Peabody Hall, Benton Hall, Science Hall, Language Hall, and
the Agriculture Building. These were among the first buildings constructed on
the campus.
Structural defects and deterioration made the recent rehabilitation of the
Law Building necessary. Had this not been done, the weakened condition of
the building might have led to a catastrophe within a few months. Other old
buildings, such as Science Hall, are approaching a similar condition. Our experi-
ence with the remodeling of the Law Building indicates that these other build-
ings can be rehabilitated, modernized, and made completely safe for continued
use at approximately $225,000 per building.
We propose that as soon as these buildings can be vacated by their present
occupants, the rehabilitation program be inaugurated. As pointed out above,
Peabody Hall, Benton Hall, the Engineering Building, and Language Hall are
to be used for the Social Sciences and the Humanities. Science Hall is to be
used for the Biological Sciences, and the Agriculture Building is to be available
for additional space for mathematics and the other sciences.
Agriculture
The College of Agriculture embraces the teaching division (the College
proper), the research division (the Agricultural Experiment Station), and the
extension work (the Agricultural Extension Service). The integrated program
of these three divisions has had, and will continue to have, far-reaching results
in the improvement of farm, grove, ranch, and industrial agricultural interests
in Florida.
The expansion of activities in the next six years will give increased emphasis
to animal genetics and breeding, particularly in those areas related to beef,
range, and dairy cattle; expanded research in agricultural marketing; the
design and analysis of agricultural experimentation; seed analysis; weed con-
trol; crop nutrition and ecology; plant genetics and cyto-genetics; rural elec-
trification; botanical studies and research in West Indian, Central American,
and Florida flora; insecticides and insect control; entomology's relation to
health; floriculture; and the processing of fruits and vegetables.
These expanded activities in teaching and research, as well as in exten-
sion work, fill in the gaps in the program of this College. Added to the





tremendous program that has been underway for many years, this will provide
a program of inestimable value to the students in Agriculture and all agricul-
tural interests in the State.
Building Needs.-A building is needed at Gainesville to house and coordinate
the activities of the College of Agriculture, the main Agricultural Experi-
ment Station, and the Agricultural Extension Service. A building for Agricul-
tural Engineering is also needed. These buildings will require a total of 225,050
square feet. Other specialized buildings are needed at Gainesville, such as a
livestock judging pavilion, feeding units, machine repair shops, machinery,
storage sheds, and greenhouses. In addition to this, the branch stations of
the Agricultural Experiment Station throughout the State need a variety of
buildings for their special purposes.
With the construction of the Agricultural group at Gainesville, the Horti-
cultural Building can be vacated and made available to the Departments of
Physics and Psychology of the College of Arts and Sciences. With the addition
of a wing, which is already planned, the Physics Department and the Psychology
Department can be adequately housed. The old Agriculture Building can be
assigned to Mathematics.

The School of Architecture and Allied Arts
The School of Agriculture and Allied Arts is composed of the Department
of Architecture, the Department of Art, and the Bureau of Architectural and
Community Research. Enrollment in Architecture and Art rose from a prewar
high of 83 students to over 525 in September, 1948, making the unit one of
the larger units of its kind in the country. The Six-Year Plan embodies the
beginning of a great teaching, research, and public service center to be known
as the "Center of the Arts" in which students, faculty, and the general public
can study examples of the best work in painting, industrial design, furniture,
crafts, community planning, architecture, and the arts. In arriving at this
goal it is proposed that the unit shall be designated as "College of Architecture
and Allied Arts."
Architecture.-The building industry, for which the work in Architecture
trains leaders, is one of the largest in the nation, in terms of expenditures and
employment, and it will be many years before the demand for men trained
in architecture and in building construction can be met. The program now
under way must be expanded to include community planning and a broader
research program. Instruction is conducted by the "project method," a system
which has brought unusual recognition to the University of Florida.

Art.-The University of Florida has not been alone in its mounting interest
and enrollment in art, for during the last quarter-century there has been
more than a 300 per cent increase in the number of art museums, art schools,
art societies, and professional artists. The University of Georgia has 235 art
majors at the present time. At the University of Iowa, more than 120 students
are enrolled in the arts at the graduate level. At no point in the University
is the impact of coeducation greater than in this field. The program now
under way in painting and commercial art must, therefore, be expanded to
include work in crafts, interior design, photography, sculpture, and a grad-
uate program in art.





Building Needs.-Students now enrolled in the departments which will
make up the proposed College of Architecture and Allied Arts are now being
taught largely in makeshift space, including the unfinished wing of the
Florida Union and in Peabody Hall, including its attic and corridors. The
College is in serious need of a building designed for its purposes. The space
vacated in Peabody Hall must be used by the social science units of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences. The new building will need teaching exhibition
space ,drafting rooms, classrooms, materials sample rooms, book rooms, studios,
craft workshops, and offices. A building to meet the minimum needs of the
College of Architecture and Allied Arts will require 88,000 square feet.

The College of Business Administration

Business Administration is one of the largest professional schools in the
University, and an increasing number of students are preparing for careers
in business. To meet their needs, the College of Business Administration offers
fourteen curricula wherein specialized study is offered. These are: (1) Account-
ing; (2) Banking and Finance; (3) Real Estate; (4) Marketing; (5) Trans-
portation and Public Utilities; (6) Foreign Trade and Economic Geography;
(7) Public Finance and Taxation; (8) Labor and Personnel Management;
(9) Business Statistics; (10) Economics and General Business; (11) Economics
of Latin-American Trade; (12) Executive Secretaryship; (13) Business Adminis-
tration in combination with Law; and (14) Public Administration.
But the training program in Business Administration extends beyond the
undergraduate level. The traditional Master of Arts degree has long been
offered. Added last year were the degrees of Master of Business Administration
and Doctor of Philosophy. Student response resulted in an initial heavy enroll-
ment which has increased to forty-nine this year. Graduate degrees are com-
manding more and more attention and recognition by business. As a result,
greatly increased graduate enrollments are expected.
The College is divided into four departments with course offerings from
each integrated into the curricula already enumerated. These departments are:
(1) Economics, with a staff of 20; (2) Business Organization and Operation,
with a staff of 16; (3) Accounting, with 13 staff members; and (4) Real
Estate which has 3 staff members. There are. a total of 52 persons on the
teaching staff. Also included in the College of Business Administration is the
Bureau of Economic and Business Research, with a staff of two full-time
research economists. The Bureau recently received funds from the General
Education Board to expand its facilities in fundamental research in the
business and economy of Florida. It is planned to expand this unit so that
it may be of significant usefulness to the business, governmental, and indus-
trial units of the State.
The problem of this college and the hindrances to its development are
(1) additional staff; (2) space in which the teaching and research work can
be more effectively done; and (3) coordination of space activities.
Additional Staff.-The most acute problems faced by this College are
those of reducing the size of classes and increasing the staff to care for in-
creasing student enrollments. There are now 646 students registered in Busi-
ness Administration, and an estimated 1200 students are taught in its pre-





business courses. These students are handled in the 182 classes offered during
the fall semester of 1948-49. More than a third of these classes had over 40
students, and of this group 23 classes had more than 70 students in each.
All of these oversized classes were composed of juniors and seniors for whom
the most intensive work is done.
Evidence of increasing enrollments in Business Administration is given
by the number of graduates which increased from four in 1926 to 277 in
1947-48. To meet these needs of reducing classes to an effective teaching
size and to provide for additional enrollment, it is conservatively estimated
that the teaching staff must be increased by more than a third-from its
present 52 to 80.
Building Needs.-The College of Business Administration, if it is to attain
effective performance, must have adequate quarters. It has never had quar-
ters of its own. Its staff and its teaching assignments have been scattered
over the campus. The Dean and a few of the staff are in Language Hall, the
rest of the staff are in temporaries G and A, Peabody Hall and Science Hall.
Classes are held in temporaries A and I, Peabody Hall, Language Hall, and
the Agriculture Building. This situation is not conducive to good teaching,
good administration, or good faculty-student relationships.
For efficient operation and coordination of the staff, the College of Busi-
ness Administration should have a building of its own. In addition to office
space for the faculty, the building should have at least 32 classrooms, a
statistical laboratory, facilities for the Bureau of Economic and Business
Research, including a reading room and departmental library and a business
equipment and machine room. This will require 48,000 square feet of space.
The College of Education

One of the chief functions of the University of Florida is to train the
teachers, administrators, and supervisors of the public schools of the State.
The quality of the student body of the University of Florida is largely deter-
mined by the quality of the elementary and high schools of the State from
which the University students come. High university standards can be main-
tained only if high standards are maintained in the elementary and secondary
schools of the State. Therefore, the University of Florida has a major respon-
sibility for providing adequate and comprehensive pre-service and in-service
programs of teacher education; advanced programs of graduate training for
teachers, administrators and supervisors; consultative and research services
for the solution of specific problems facing the public schools; and extensive
field services which introduce improved educational procedures into the stream
of educational practice.
The 1947 Legislature greatly increased the responsibilities of the University
for training the educational leadership of the State when it provided for the
admission of women into the University, and when it provided for substantial
salary increases for public school teachers and administrators with advanced
graduate training. For instance, the Foundation Program law provides an
allotment of $3,600 for teachers with six years of college training; $3,000 for
those with five years of college training, and $2,550 for those with four years
of college training. These salary differentials are creating an enormous increase
in the demand for graduate training.





The 1947 Legislature also provided for a system of publicly supported junior
colleges as a part of the public school system of the State. Many of the
graduates of these junior colleges will continue their work at the University
of Florida. In order to assure a high quality of junior college graduates enroll-
ing at the University of Florida, the University must assume a major respon-
sibility in training the staffs of these junior colleges and furnishing guidance
and leadership in the formulation of junior college programs.
Factors other than new legislation are causing an increased demand for
teacher education services. The complexities of modern life are creating a
demand throughout the nation for teachers with more advanced scholarship
and professional training. Pressure groups of various kinds, striving to exert
influence on our schools, make it imperative to include on our program for
teacher training serious consideration of the relation between the ideal of
democracy and our system of public education. The people of Florida have
both the right and the obligation to share in the task of interpreting this
ideal in the light of modern conditions, through the agency of the public
schools of the State.
The State of Florida has never provided sufficient teacher education facili-
ties to staff the public schools of the State. Each year boards of public instruc-
tion have been compelled to import from without the State hundreds of
teachers who have little knowledge of Florida and the specific educational
needs of the children they teach. Many of these teachers are recruited through
commercial agencies and from advertising in newspapers. Florida can never
develop its public school system to its highest point of efficiency as long as
it depends so heavily upon mail-order teachers. The University of Florida must
assume a larger responsibility in training the teachers and educational leader-
ship of the State in order to correct this condition.
An adequate program of teacher education and graduate training for
developing professional leadership involves the following services: (1) a
laboratory school for experimentation, demonstration, and student teaching;
(2) a comprehensive pre-service training program for undergraduate students,
including a program of off-campus training; (3) an in-service, on-the-job
training program for teachers, administrators, and supervisors who are advanc-
ing their training beyond the pre-service level; (4) an enriched graduate pro-
gram leading toward the masters' and doctors' degrees; (5) a comprehensive
research program for advancing the science of education; (6) a larger field
service program in order to make the services of the University staff directly
available for consultative and research service in solving specific educational
problems; (7) counselling and placement services for student guidance and
for assisting local school officials with personnel problems. The College of
Education is now operating a year-round program of work conferences for
superintendents, supervisors, principals, and teachers who come to the Uni-
versity periodically for help on specific educational problems. Approximately
330 principals and 60 superintendents meet periodically throughout the year
at the University for three-day work conferences.
As soon as housing facilities are provided for women, the winter term enroll-
ment in the College of Education, including undergraduate and graduate stu-
dents, will exceed 800. The graduate enrollment alone of those majoring in





Education exceeded 800 students during the summer term of 1948. More
graduate students are majoring in Education than in any other division of
the University. Approximately 100 students are already embarked upon the
sixth year of graduate training which leads toward the doctorate. Research
facilities are woefully inadequate for these advanced post-graduate students.

In addition, the College of Education provides service facilities for indus-
trial arts, business education, and professional courses for agricultural educa-
tion and physical education students.

Building Needs.-The College of Education is now crowded into the P. K.
Yonge Laboratory School. The Laboratory School should be a physical unit by
itself even though it is administered by the College of Education. A separate
building should be made available nearby for the College of Education, and
a second building should be provided to house industrial arts education. These
will require 60,000 square feet.

The College of Engineering

Teaching and research are closely coordinated in the College of Engineer-
ing, which includes the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station.

In the prewar period the entire staff of the College consisted of 24 mem-
bers, all paid from State funds, working with meager equipment, much of
which was contributed by industry. The staff has now increased to over 200,
a large number of whom are not paid from State appropriations. The equip-
ment in the laboratories has increased to a great extent through contribu-
tions from the Federal Government and various industrial organizations,
although the present limitations of space handicap its usefulness and proper
maintenance.
The College recognizes that a Florida student receiving his education in
the State will more than likely remain here to work and will be trained to
meet the needs peculiar to the region; whereas those leaving the State for
training too often do not return. Continued plans for expansion are projected
to provide effective staff and equipment to train the youth of the State in
technology, and to provide the research necessary for promoting the economic
and industrial welfare of Florida through the utilization of the State's natural
resources and in the creation of new industries.
The expansion of the activities of the College will include those fields
which are of value to engineering and to Florida's continued industrial growth.
Research activities will be supplemented by new courses at both the under-
graduate and graduate levels. It is pertinent to emphasize that the research
and teaching activities should progress together as a unit.
In the aeronautical field, research on supersonic flow and air traffic con-
trol will permit experts in those fields to give courses covering that area.
Chemical engineering research will be expanded to cover the processing
of the three basic raw materials of the State: food products from agriculture,
wood products from the forests, and non-metallic minerals. Specialized courses
in these fields will be taught at the graduate level leading to the Ph.D degree
as well as to the master's degree.





The Civil Engineering department will expand its offerings in both the
Public Health and general options. Research in improved sanitary facilities
will increase the demand by both industry and civic organizations for trained
engineers in this field. The tremendous growth of population and its mobility
points to the need for more studies and courses in city planning and the
improvement of the highway systems.
The Electrical Engineering department plans to expand its activities in
those fields in which it has gained national recognition. Application of the
studies on atmospheric disturbances should be found in better weather fore-
casting, in improved air line communications, and in radio and television com-
munication. Particular emphasis will be given by this Department to advanced
graduate courses.
Industrial Engineering bridges the gap between business administration
and engineering. Typical research studies in this Department include a survey
of the existing and potential industries for the State based on available natural
resources, a study of the effect of climatic conditions on industrial efficiency,
and improved industrial safety practices. Students trained by experts in these
fields are in demand by the industries of the State. Another responsibility
of this Department is the operation of the Co-operative Plan whereby stu-
dents in teams work part time for industry to supplement their classroom
studies and in effect are "earning while learning."
The Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering Departments plan to increase
their offerings and activities in the fields of hydraulics, air conditioning, and
mechanization of industry. Owing to Florida's flat topography the problems of
hydraulics are highly specialized, and the need for training in that field is
quite apparent. The present rate of beach destruction through erosion makes
the need for research in this field of paramount importance. While air condi-
tioning refers to all-year control of temperature, the emphasis in this State
will necessarily be placed on improved refrigeration and cooling processes.
Building Needs.-The greatest need of this College at the present time
appears to be for adequate housing of the valuable equipment which has been
built and obtained. The fire hazard in present quarters is great, and a fire can
undo the work of years. Plans for a new Engineering and Industries Building
have been prepared, and it is estimated that this new building with furnishing
will cost approximately four million dollars. This will provide a building which
can adequately house under one roof, in a closely integrated group, all the
teaching and research activities in Aeronautical, Chemical, Civil, Electrical,
Industrial, and Mechanical engineering. To provide this space 220,150 square
feet are needed. The released space will help to care for some of the needs
of the Social Sciences and the Humanities in the College of Arts and Sciences.
The Division of Music
Prior to the coming of coeducation, the University had noted a great
upsurge of interest in various phases of art and music. To meet this develop-
ment of interest among the men students, the University had planned for,
and the Legislature had appropriated funds for, an expanded program in
music and related fields, not only for those wishing to specialize in music but
also to serve the avocational interests of hundreds of students majoring in





other fields. With the advent of women students, these department are prov-
ing even more popular; and their enrollments have been increasing faster than
we have been able to provide staff and space.
A quarter of a century of public school music, accompanied by the contri-
butions of radio and screen, has given our people a hearty appetite for music
and a musical literacy. Music of worth is no longer the exclusive privilege of
the few. It now belongs to all our people. Music has become a highly pro-
ductive tool in commerce, industry, and in the medical field. This maturing
of music in concept and breadth has brought a new responsibility to higher
education. The demand for public school music teachers grows each year.
Radio and the moving picture industries are realizing their need for thoroughly
trained music staffs and are turning to established schools for personnel.
Civic and community music is growing by leaps and bounds, encompassing
both adult and youth educational and cultural programs on a year-round
basis. Churches are giving music a more important role in their services and
are budgeting substantial increases in expenditures for it. Industry wants more
and more workers in the music field. Social service agencies and hospitals,
particularly those devoted to psychiatric and rehabilitation services, are asking
for skilled music therapists.
If the University of Florida is to assume its responsibilities in the train-
ing of the youth of the State, music will be an integral part of its program
and the life of its campus. Bands, orchestras, and choruses of quality are
not built out of the avocational musician material alone. They require talented,
skilled musicians in the key chairs at least. The University cannot hope to
attract talented, earnest, young musicians without the establishment of a
School of Music.
Building Needs.-The proposed program in Music, together with the drama-
tics section of the Speech Department, will need speech and radio studios,
drama rehearsal rooms, a little theater seating 700, music practice rooms, music
teaching studios, music rehearsal rooms, music listening rooms, classrooms,
a music auditorium seating 400, and offices. Because of the nature of the
program, sound proofing and other special facilities will be needed in these
rooms. To meet these needs 65,000 square feet are required.

The University Auditorium
The present auditorium seats 1,800, which is not sufficient to seat even
our freshman class. The new gymnasium could be used for large commence-
ments, or perhaps for concerts and lectures, but since the building was not
designed primarily as an auditorium, its use for that purpose will not be
entirely satisfactory and will interfere with its proper function. A university
auditorium is needed which can seat from 3,500 to 5,000 for concerts, lectures,
smaller commencements, meetings, and similar occasions. This will require an
expenditure of approximately $2,000,000 for building and equipment.
It is proposed that the present auditorium be converted into a war memorial
chapel, which can supplement the new, larger auditorium and can be used for
smaller concerts and lectures. It can also supply the office and classroom space
needed by the Department of Religion. In the reconstruction into a chapel,
the serious fire hazard which now exists in the building will be remedied.





The present exits are narrow and blocked, and are not adequate in size or
appropriately arranged to empty the building in an emergency.
The School of Forestry

Florida is the second largest state in area east of the Mississippi River and 70
per cent of its area is in forest lands. But these lands are not being used
efficiently, and unless an improvement is made, Florida may soon become
an importing state in lumber and wood products. Because of the importance
of forestry to Florida and the Southeast, the School of Forestry will be
expanded to meet the increasing need for both instruction and research in
forestry and its related problems. Florida is the only region in the Southeast
in which a Forestry School is located where the slash-pine and long-leaf
pine grow naturally. This has obvious implications for the development of
a College of Forestry designed to serve the entire slash-pine, long-leaf pine
area.
It is proposed to set up departments in Forest Management and Adminis-
tration, Silviculture, Forest Utilization, and Game and Wild Life Management.
New areas to be covered are Forest Law, Park and City Forestry, Lumber Mar-
keting, Naval Stores, Wood Pulp and Plastics, Wood Preservation and Season-
ing, Game Fish Propagation, Game Production, and Recreational Forestry.
It is also proposed that the teaching and research program in Forestry,
which is so important to the economy of Florida, be embodied in a College of
Forestry.
Building Needs.-The plans for new buildings for the Agriculture group
contemplate some space for the School of Forestry. Forestry is now a school
in the College of Agriculture, but the University cannot discharge its respon-
sibility in this field without an expanded staff, both in instruction and research,
and adequate facilities for these functions. A building especially designed for
teaching and research in a College of Forestry will eventually be required.

The College of Law

The overall objective is to establish the College of Law as one of the
acknowledged centers, if not the acknowledged center, of legal thought and
activity in this region. It is hoped that ultimately this area will expand to
include the Southeastern and Gulf states and also the more adjacent Latin-
American countries. The present status of the College and the hoped-for devel-
opments toward the overall objective may be discussed under six headings:
Student Personnel; Curriculum; Faculty Personnel; Library Facilities; Intra-
University Relations; Extra-University Relations.

The registration for the 1948 fall term is 501 as compared with 520 at the
beginning of the 1947 session. This would seem to indicate that the school has
passed its peak enrollment and is leveling off at approximately 500 students.

At the present time the bachelor's degree is required for admission except
in two instances: (1) The so-called "combined course" offered in conjunction
with the University of Florida and Florida State University whereby a stu-
dent in certain departments of those schools is admitted to this College for
his fourth year of college work and is granted his bachelor's degree upon





satisfactory completion of his first year of work in the College of Law. (2)
Veterans who are admitted after having satisfactorily completed at least one
half of the required work leading to the bachelor's degree in an approved
college or university. During the past year 71 students failed to maintain
the average required to continue in the school. Of these, 47 students entered
under the veteran's exception.
It is expected that within the next biennium, admission standards will be
raised to require the bachelor's degree of all applicants except veterans. Vet-
erans will be urged to complete their degree requirements before entering the
College of Law.
The value and efficacy of any specific courses or specific curriculum as
requirements for admission to the College of Law is doubtful. However, it is
planned that during the ensuing year a faculty committee investigate and
make recommendations concerning pre-legal work desirable for prospective
applicants.
Curriculum.-It is planned to undertake, during the fall and spring terms
of this year, a complete reconsideration of the curriculum. The desired objec-
tives are threefold: (1) Sound grounding in legal techniques, such as legal
research, case analysis, statutory construction, and the drafting of documents;
(2) detailed and critical study of Florida law in the regular courses; and (3)
individual research by students under faculty supervision.
To attain the first of these objectives, it will be necessary to reorganize
the first-year curriculum to a considerable extent in order to emphasize cer-
tain techniques which are now touched on lightly, if at all, during the year.
Some revision of the first-term curriculum has already been made, and further
changes may be made in the curriculum to be offered to students entering in
the spring term. Teaching methods will also have to be revised to stress tech-
niques. Teaching materials will have to be written inasmuch as the existing
materials are not designed to stress particular, legal techniques.
The second objective will be to require the faculty to prepare their own
teaching materials since existing materials do not give sufficient emphasis to
Florida law or to alternative methods of handling a particular problem.
To attain the third curriculum objective, it will be necessary to reduce the
time required for our present courses in order to make additional time for
individual research. Again it will be necessary to rewrite teaching materials
and to reconsider teaching methods. As the case method of instruction is too
time consuming after the first year to be used exclusively, a considerable
amount of text should be introduced into the teaching materials in order that
the students may obtain more readily the essential, informational content of
a course. Where a particular problem cannot be satisfactorily handled by text
material, the case method of instruction will be used.
With a rewriting of teaching materials and reconsideration of teaching
methods, it should be possible to impart a sound grounding in legal techni-
ques during the first year of student work. The second year of student work
will be devoted primarily to obtaining additional information in particular
fields and in using the techniques acquired in the first year. The third year
will be devoted partially to a continuation of the informational courses and





partially, perhaps as much as 50 per cent of the student's time, to individual
research under the supervision of various members of the faculty. This research
will be practical legal research on problems which come up in the law office.
This type of program will better prepare the student for the transfer from
Law School to law office.
The revised curriculum will be substantially completed by the end of the
1951-53 biennium. If this schedule is met, the third biennium, 1953-55, can
be devoted to developing a program of graduate law study.
Graduate Law Study.-Since the graduate study in law is primarily of
interest to men who are planning to go into the teaching profession, it seems
inadvisable to offer graduate work until we are in a position, by virtue of our
faculty and library facilities, to meet the demands of such a program. The
envisioned program for the curriculum leading to the LL.B. degree will go far
towards calling the College of Law to the favorable attention of its sister
institutions. The requirements of an adequate library for graduate study are
discussed in connection with library facilities.
Faculty Personnel.-There are now 13 full-time members on the faculty
as compared with 9 full-time members and 4 part-time members during the
1948 spring term. In order to implement the new curriculum it will be necessary
at least to double the size of the faculty. The minimum ratio of faculty to stu-
dents required to operate the envisioned curriculum is one to twenty. For 500
students we need at least 25 faculty. At this ratio it will be necessary to sup-
plement the full-time faculty members by research assistants. A more desirable
ratio would be one member of the faculty for every 15 students. Ten qualified
men will be added to the faculty between now and the end of 1949-51 biennium,
bringing the faculty to full strength during the 1951-53 biennium.
Qualifications.-The College desires staff members who will win and retain
the respect of the students, their faculty colleagues, and the members of the
legal profession, and who also are interested in the type of program being
developed. Specifically, those employed should be able classroom teachers,
who, in addition, are interested in individual work with the students, have
had several years of experience in practice, and are interested in practical
legal scholarship. Practical legal scholarship means scholarship in the best
sense, and scholarship directed to the needs of students and the practicing
legal profession, in contrast to the type of legal writing, now so prevalent,
which seems to be directed primarily towards other members of the law-
teaching profession with the view to personal advancement of the writer in
the eyes of his colleagues.
It is necessary that the teaching load of each faculty member shall not
exceed six hours of class work per week, in order that he may have sufficient
time to supervise individual students and to prepare the revisions of his teach-
ing materials.
Library Facilities.-The renovation of the College of Law Building leaves the
library as our most pressing problem insofar as physical facilities are concerned.
At the present time there is no reading room, and space for student study
in the library stacks is woefully inadequate. This situation will be remedied
with the completion of the new wing to the College, construction of which
will start this fall (1948).





Books.-Duplicate sets of reports, periodicals, and established treatises
must be provided if the library is to fill satisfactorily the needs of the present
student body. Looking forward to the offering of graduate work within the
next few years, a detailed program of book purchases which offers proper
source material in graduate work should be instituted immediately. This pro-
gram should be worked out within the University Library.

Intra-University Relations.-It is hoped that mutually beneficial arrange-
ments can be made with other departments of the University whereby mem-
bers of the law faculty can contribute to their programs and, in turn, receive
the benefit of their specialized knowledge and skills.
Extra-University Relations.-During the next few years a widely expanaec
program of activities outside the University is envisioned.
Law Review.-The Law Review is now in its second year and has already
proved itself. It is already reaching well over 50 per cent of the members
of the State Bar. It is likely that within a year the Law Review will be issued
quarterly rather than three times a year.
Practice Courts.-A series of practice courts at which members of the
bench and the bar of the State will sit as judges will be developed. These courts
will have cases at both the trial and appellate level.
Practice Legislatures.-The possibility of setting up a practice legislature
for training in parliamentary law and in the legislative process will be consid-
ered. Perhaps members of the Legislature and State officials who have frequent
dealings with the Legislature will cooperate with this program.
Circulation of Student Memoranda.-The anticipated curriculum revision
requiring substantial individual research of third-year students will furnish
a body of research work which will be of considerable value to members of
the practicing profession. Rather than having this material lie unused in the
files of the Law School, it is expected that much of it will prove of sufficient
value to warrant its being mimeographed and circulated to members of the
legal profession who wish to receive it. After the individual research program
is well under way, a monthly, or even a fortnightly, mailing of student material
to the practicing profession might prove feasible.

Faculty Aid in Law Revisions.-When the faculty has attained full size and
the student research work is under way, members of the faculty should be
made available (by an adjustment of teaching loads) for work with law
revision commissions or legislative committees investigating particular fields of
law in which members of our faculty have special competence. Teams of stu-
dents working under a particular faculty member could do much investiga-
tory work and collecting of facts. It should be emphasized that any such pro-
gram would be undertaken only at the request of the Commission or Commit-
tee charged with the problem, and that the College would not initiate the
investigation.

Building Needs.-The College of Law Building has been remodeled and re-
furbished in the summer of 1948. An addition is to be constructed during 1948-
49, which will partially alleviate the crowded conditions. The most urgent need,
at the moment, is for additions to the library collection and to the staff.





The School of Pharmacy
The program of this School includes: (1) the preparation of young men
and women for the successful practice of pharmacy in drug stores, in hospital
pharmacies, in the Armed Forces, in the laboratories of the pharmaceutical,
chemical, biological, and cosmetic industries, and as analysts and inspectors
of food, drug, and cosmetic products; (2) graduate work leading to the degrees
of Master of Science in Pharmacy and Doctor of Philosophy. That this pro-
gram has been highly successful is demonstrated by the fact that all grad-
uates have passed the licensing examinations of the Florida State Board of
Pharmacy, and also by the number of advanced graduates who are now in
top positions in colleges of pharmacy throughout the nation, as well as those
in leading research positions in the large pharmaceutical companies of the
nation.
The relationship between the School and the pharmacists of the State
is most significant. They financially aided its establishment in 1923. Since
1940 the Florida State Board of Pharmacy has assisted the University in sup-
porting in the School a Bureau of Professional Relations which has attained
national recognition.
Historically this has been a school in the College of Arts and Sciences.
It is recommended that it be set up as a College of Pharmacy. The offerings will
be expanded to include new courses in Formulas, Pharmaceutical Manufac-
turing, and Hospital Pharmacy. The research program, already highly and
significantly developed, will continue to receive prominent attention, provided
additional staff becomes available.

Building Needs.-The School is now housed in unduly crowded quarters
on the fourth floor of the Chemistry-Pharmacy Building. A building is needed
with 33,000 square feet, properly equipped with the variety of laboratories
required for adequate training in Pharmacy.

Military Science
The University of Florida over a period of many years has maintained an
outstanding Reserve Officers' Training Corps and through this medium has
made substantial contributions to the national security.
The Military Department, like all other components of the University, has
had to utilize to the maximum its available facilities in order to accomplish
its assigned mission. Since the war the old military stables have been modi-
fied to provide four classrooms, a supply room, garage, storage for motor
equipment, and office space. Prior to these alterations, military classes were
held on the campus wherever a free classroom could be found. The military
property custodian for the storage and issuance of military property has avail-
able only the basement of the auditorium. This space is most inadequate and
leads to certain unavoidable inefficiency. The arsenal near Headquarters
ROTC (the old stable building) is not large enough to provide for the small
arms required for the large corps of cadets nor is the security of these arms
of that degree desired by the Armed Forces. The issuance therefrom of large
numbers of rifles for drill is inescapably accompanied by confusion. The only
small caliber rifle range available provides but sixteen firing points, a num-
ber most inadequate to provide firing for the corps. This range is of temporary





construction outdoors and does not provide an opportunity for night firing.
In order to make room for men's dormitories, this range must be moved prob-
ably after the 1948-49 session; as a result, money expended in its maintenance
is in large part wasted. The development of winning rifle teams and of the
desired popularity of rifle firing can be accomplished only when firing can be
made attractive, comfortable, and readily available. An indoor range is most
essential.
The present ROTC Headquarters can be modified and expanded, at not too
great expense, to provide office space and classrooms adequate to any foreseen
needs of the Corps of Cadets. This building cannot be enlarged to provide
storerooms, arsenal for storage and issuance of small arms, and rifle ranges.
Another building to provide adequately for the last-named facilities could be
erected to the east of the ROTC headquarters.
It would be ideal, however, could there be built a new complete Armory
in the southeast corner of the present drill field. It should be of size adequate
to provide office space, classrooms, storerooms, arsenals for storage and issuance
of small arms, rifle ranges, and open space sufficient for the assembly of sev-
eral hundred students and for the display and demonstration of such equip-
ment as could not properly be displayed outside. The additional building
for storage and rifle ranges proposed in the preceding paragraph might well
be designed eventually to become a portion of such a new Armory.
The cost of a well-designed armory adequate for future needs of the Uni-
versity will be great. It is to be hoped that the Federal Government will in
whole or in part bear the cost of such a building. The State of Florida might
well direct its plans toward paying a set portion of this cost or of matching
such Federal funds as may be proffered.

The College of Physical Education,
Health and Athletics

The program for this College, which has been in operation only two years,
must now include plans to meet the needs of women students. The College
functions include intercollegiate athletics, required physical education, the
professional curriculum, intramural activities, health education, and student
health. A service and training program in health, recreation, and athletics is
designed for every student in the University. In the required program every
student participates in some kind of directed activity. Those who are handicap-
ped are given special diagnosis, and corrective activities are prescribed.

The intramural program is designed to provide recreational and physical
activity in competitive sports for all students in the University. At some time
during the year nearly 90 per cent of the student body engages in this pro-
gram. The professional program offers curriculums for the preparation of
teachers of Physical Education, Health and Recreation. The University
Infirmary, under the direction of this college, has the responsibility for the
health of the student body. The staff and facilities needed by this College
must increase with the enrollment in the University.
Building Needs.-In the spring of 1949 the new gymnasium will be ready
for use. It will provide adequate space for the men students whom the Uni-





versity will enroll during the next decade, but the University has no adequate
facilities for gymnasium space for women students. It is estimated that a
women's gymnasium will cost $900,000. The playing fields for college sports,
intramural sports, and required physical education are also inadequate for
women students. An appropriate program of women's physical education
requires playing fields, tennis courts, and a swimming pool, as well as a
gymnasium.
The men's facilities need to be improved by placing a roof over the existing
swimming pool and by additions to the existing playing fields.

The University College
The University College is the basic unit for the entire University. All stu-
dents spend their first two years enrolled in the University College, taking
courses which are designed to prepare them for citizenship in its broadest
definition, and which prepare them for admission to the upper division of their
choice, such as the College of Arts and Sciences, or the various professional
schools.
The work and departments of this college are closely coordinated with the
general areas and departments of the upper division. The College is commis-
sioned to:
1. Administer the pre-professional work of all freshmen and sophomores, because one unit
can do this more economically and efficiently than can six or eight small units-that is,
one in each of the several colleges.
2. Arrange the two-year program so that students who change professional objectives can
do so with minimal loss to themselves. Students are encouraged to use the program for
guidance purposes.
3. Provide a basic core of general education subjects needed alike by all responsible citizens.
The program offers the student courses in Reading, Speaking, and Writing; American
Institutions; the Physical Sciences; the Biological Sciences; Mathematics; Logic and Intro-
ductory psychology; and the Humanities, (Literature, Art, Philosophy, and Music).
4. Provide freshmen and sophomores with the best teachers of the University.
The courses in this College are being continually revaluated and improved.
For example, expansion of clinical work in reading and writing is projected.
In the preparation of students for their life work, nothing is more vital than
reading and writing their own language. Failure to reach their objectives
is usually due to their inability to read understandingly and write intelligently.
The program of student educational guidance is being expanded to insure
the most efficient service to all students. Every effort is being made to give
individualized guidance and instruction in order to avoid the pitfalls of mass
education. This will require additional staff.
Building Needs.-For its work the University College needs classrooms, large
lecture rooms, a science lecture and demonstration room, music lecture rooms,
art galleries, and writing laboratories. The various units of the University
College are closely coordinated with corresponding departments of the College
of Arts and Sciences and the proposed College of Architecture and Allied Arts.
Staff members frequently carry dual appointments and all carry dual assign-
ments in the University College and the upper division colleges.
The special needs of the University College for space have been considered
in developing the plans for the upper division colleges. For example: the





lecture-demonstration room needed by C-2 (Physical Sciences) would be pro-
vided in the Physics Building, and thus be available for use by the Physics
Department also.
The laboratory facilities needed by C-6 (Biological Sciences) have been
planned for Science Hall so that they can also be used by and coordinated
with the Zoology Department. The art galleries and music listening rooms
needed by C-5 (The Humanities) have been planned for the College of Fine
Arts and would thus receive dual use. Three of the comprehensive courses
assemble their class sections once a week into lecture groups of 400 to 500.
To accommodate these lectures an auditorium must be available twelve to
fifteen periods a week. The little theater and the music auditorium described
above can serve this need.

The Graduate School
The graduate offerings of any department are given under the auspices
of the Graduate School. It is presided over by a dean who is advised by the
Graduate Council. In the fall of 1948 there are 1,000 students enrolled in the
Graduate School. The demand is so great for college teachers, for research
staff, for specialists, and for secondary school teachers with advanced degrees
that this enrollment may well double in the next two or three years. Over the
last ten years the Graduate School has ranked fourth among the colleges at
the University of Florida in the number of degrees granted. Despite this
increase in enrollment, there is still greater demand for specialists in the State.
Masters' degrees are now offered in 43 areas, and the doctorate is offered
in 11 areas. As the staff of various departments can be augmented and
strengthened, additional offerings will be made which will serve more doctoral
candidates. However, these additional students cannot be accommodated until
the staff is available with time assigned in their teaching loads to direct the
research and study of the graduate students. For this unit no building or
equipment is needed which is not provided for in the plans for the various
colleges and departments, but the development of a strong graduate program
requires greater library resources than we now have.

The University Libraries
A plan for the development of the University of Florida Libraries during
the next six years should reflect the expanded objectives of the University
as an instrument of instruction and research. Attendant upon the growth and
expansion of the University and upon the consequent changes within the
Libraries themselves, the program for library service will be guided by the
following aims: (1) the development of a scholarly research collection in
response to increased emphasis in .the University on graduate work and
research; (2) the reorganization of library collections and services made neces-
sary by the erection of new Library units and the development of new depart-
mental and college libraries; (3) the inclusion of new activities such as the
administration of the University's audio-visual aid equipment; and (4) the
expansion and improvement of services now offered to care for the increased
enrollment.
In developing this program we plan to use as an objective the standards
prescribed by Classification and Pay Plans for Libraries in Institutions of





Higher Education (Volume III-"Universities") published in 1948 by the
American Library Association. For a student body of 10,000, according to this
set of standards, the Library, as a minimum, should:
(1) Provide a collection of 516,000 volumes
(2) Spend $192,000 a year for salaries
(3) Spend $104,000 a year for books and periodicals for resident University
instruction and research.
It is to be noted that the above figures do not include the library programs
for the General Extension Division and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School.
It should also be noted that the above figures represent only minimum
standards.
As libraries and divisional reading rooms are provided upon the com-
pletion of the additions to the University Library and of new buildings for
the various colleges, they will be staffed by librarians with suitable training
and appropriate subject background. In some cases this will mean replacing
non-professional employes with professional ones. With the development of
an expanded graduate school, the staff will need librarians with the requisites
in professional training and scholarship for giving reference aid to research,
and the cataloging and handling of specialized and technical materials.
The problem of space which is currently so acute will be solved when the
present building plans are carried out. With the completion of the wing now
under construction and of the second or reading room unit, there should be
space enough in the main library for both readers and books for at least ten
years. Adequate space for the libraries in Law, Chemistry, Agriculture, and
Engineering will be provided upon completion of buildings or additions for the
respective colleges. Further plans include recommendations for provision in
the new College of Education Building for an expanded Education Library,
and for provision of better housing for the Biological Sciences Library. Since
branch libraries are expensive to maintain, and since their value is qualified
by the general inconvenience which they cause, additional branches will be
created only after careful study.
So far as books and related library materials are concerned, the aim is
to build a collection which will support all areas of the University's instruc-
tional and research program. For Florida and the West Indies we hope to
assemble a collection of materials to which scholars throughout the State and
nation will be attracted. Early in 1948 the University departments of instruc-
tion and the Library prepared a list of books and materials needed in connec-
tion with the teaching and research program. The list totaled something over
$500,000. This amount is a large sum, but it must be considered that we are
called upon to do in ten years what many universities have taken decades to
accomplish. The list mentioned above will be a buying guide for several years.
The plan for the development of the library collection envisions the expendi-
ture for the next six years of a minimum of $104,000 per year for books and
periodicals.
By means of various types of photographic processes, the Library will be
able to add to its collection many valuable materials which it could not hope
to secure in the original. We hope to obtain microfilms of all the important





mnanuscripts pertaining to Florida, which exist in Libraries on this continent
and in Europe, as well as microfilms of the files of representative newspapers
of the State.

Building Needs.-The Library buildings now under construction will serve
the University's needs for several years. There remains the necessity of provid-
ing metal stacks for books, and tables and chairs for students to use while
studying.

The General Extension Division

The State Universities of Florida, through the General Extension Division,
are helping to meet those needs of the people which come with maturity,
experience, and the impact of a changing environment for which their formal
education did not sufficiently prepare them.

In conducting the program, the General Extension Division endeavors to
help people become more proficient and more productive; to stimulate public
opinion for enlightened participation in government; to improve understand-
ing of human relationships for effective social action; and to encourage per-
sonal growth and development.
The areas in which programs of adult education have been successfully
carried out follow, with a brief resum6 of the types of programs carried on
and some recommendations for the future:
Education for Social Progress.-The following topics are typical of the va-
rious programs carried on by this Department: A series of discussion con-
ferences on problems of youth and family life education; extension classes and
workshops in guidance and counselling; family life institutes; parent-teacher
leadership short courses; and short courses in current developments in the
treatment and prevention of juvenile delinquency.
This area must be subsidized almost wholly by the State. People interested
in social problems invariably are contributing time, energy, and personal
funds to community improvement. Money should be provided to secure the
services of visiting consultant-specialists for short courses or institutes, espe-
cially in home and family relations and in social conditions and problems.
Citizenship and Government.-This area is concerned with the 30,000 aliens
of the State and an Americanization education program for them. It aids the
American Legion in conducting its state oratorical contests for high-school
students. It carries on an in-service educational program for public employees,
which includes short courses for city managers, water and sewage plant
operators, municipal finance officers, wildlife officers, and others.
It is urgent that funds be provided to secure visiting specialists in additional
state-wide annual short courses for public employees, and to prepare a series of
special home study courses.
Business and Professional Extension Education.-Florida business enter-
prises need help in modern methods which the Extension Division can give
them. These businessmen and their employees want courses which are imme-
diately practical. The short course, with student discussion and performance,
is the most successful method for instructing these groups.





During the current year, some of the programs offered were: short courses
in retail selling; extension courses for bankers; correspondence courses for
automobile dealers who wished to prepare for license to sell automobile insur-
ance; consultant services to business organizations in the use of visual aids
in training programs; a post-graduate course for dentists; and a safety course
for motor vehicle fleet supervisors.
While honoraria for visiting instructors in business and professional short
courses should be paid from fees, funds must be provided for special operational
and promotional costs of short courses for professional groups and short courses
for business groups.
Technical and Industrial Education.-Isolation from the industrial centers
of the nation has made it impossible for many Floridians in building, supply,
sales, and services to keep up to date in the use of new materials and processes
through observation or work experience. Consequently, too much work has been
lost to local people. A specialist in technical-industrial education should be
provided together with sufficient funds to conduct state-wide and regional short
courses.
Teacher Training.-An extension in-service teacher training program to
help improve the quality of teaching in the public schools is taking into the
field all faculty and material resources which can be spared from residence
instruction at both Universities. This program represents an all-out effort;
yet the Division has met only about 50 per cent of the requests for in-service
teacher training. Additional members should be added to the College of Edu-
cation staff to meet this need for extension classes and the workshop program.
The General Extension Division should have one additional specialist to assist
in the organization and administration of teachers' workshops and graduate
extension class work.

Correspondence Study Courses.-In addition to college and high school
credit work, the Department must furnish a large number of noncredit adult
education courses on the high school level for individual study, and it must
also produce a great variety of study guides to be used by extension classes
and discussion groups.

To provide college credit work, more assistance must be made available
through the faculties of the various colleges of the Universities. To rewrite,
augment, and service high-school courses, the Department must be provided,
either by appointments to the staffs of the laboratory schools or to its own
staff, with instructors equivalent to one English teacher, one distributive train-
ing teacher, one social sciences teacher, one mathematics teacher, one com-
mercial teacher, and one home economics teacher. The General Extension
Division must have as quickly as possible three specialists in the production
of materials and noncredit courses for adults.

Visual Instruction.-Widespread and growing interest in the use of audio-
visual aids requires efficient and economical operation of the State's lending
program and collections. Duplication of materials and services should be
avoided. Provision for necessary expansion should be made. The only state-
owned audio-visual aids lending library is operated by the General Extension
Division. In addition to the training films and other visual aids regularly pur-





chased, it is necessary to add at least 2,000 new films and other materials to
the collection. A special appropriation is required to purchase these materials.
Research in the use of mass media and audience reactions may well be left
to others; however, an additional specialist to work in the training and service
program should be added to the Extension staff.

Information and Library Service.-To take care of the overwhelming num-
ber of requests from individuals for information and service, the supply of
Extension Library books, basic reference materials of all kinds, and teaching
aids must be increased without delay. To permit this Department to function
more effectively, a reference librarian and bibliographer to offer informational
services and a librarian to be in charge of the circulation of materials are
needed.

To handle a marked increase in demands from communities, schools, and
churches for library consultant service, an additional library field specialist
should be added to the staff. The Lecture Bureau should be re-activated and
expanded into the General Extension Division on Lecture, Artist, and Consult-
ant Booking Service. An experienced programmer and booker will be required.

Cultural-Avocational.-The cultural-avocational area in University Adult
Education has been neglected too long in Florida, not through choice, but
through necessity. A comprehensive plan has been worked out, including (1)
community activities for group instruction in music, theater, recreation, art
and architecture, film classics, creative writing, radio, and library; and (2)
community events for mass instruction through art-form festivals, socio-drama,
and historical pageants.

An instructor in voice is being provided by the University of Florida Divi-
sion of Music to begin work with church choirs in small communities, leading
to county-wide music festivals. In addition, we must inaugurate an arts and
crafts program for adults as part of the cultural-avocational work, stressing
the use of native materials. Arts and crafts for adults will give many older
Floridians and newcomers not only an opportunity for self-expression through
pleasant leisure pastime, but also a chance to supplement their incomes through
sale of their work.

Relying upon help from the faculties of the two State Universities, the
General Extension Division will begin this work. In addition to this help, the
Division must have one organizer-specialist in community recreation. Socio-
drama and historical pagentry should also be undertaken as splendid means
of adult education. It is therefore recommended that an organizer-specialist in
socio-drama and historical pagentry be provided. In addition one organizer-
specialist will be needed in community art and architecture, and one in com-
munity theater and school dramatics.

Community Development.-Universities recognize a responsibility for help-
ing communities organize and train leaders for self-analysis and self-
improvement. It will encourage businessmen, clubwomen, and others to evalu-
ate local natural and human resources, and to plan for their best development
as community assets. Two specialists-one in community organization and
leadership training and one in resource-use-will be required for this work.





Investigation and Research.-The determination of public needs in Uni-
versity Extension, the evaluation of work accomplished, and the interpretation
of results to the public are becoming increasingly important. The size of the
Division's program, the variety of activities, and the extent of funds to be
spent on University Extension adult education all indicate that the constitu-
tional department of investigation and research should be activated and staffed;
one specialist will be needed to head this work.
Building Needs.-Neither the City of Gainesville nor the University of
Florida can properly house the large groups of adults who come to our campus
for short courses. The General Extension Division needs a building for univer-
sity adult education. In this building should be a library, especially designed
for this kind of education; audio-visual facilities; exhibition space, research
and lounge areas; conference and committee rooms; offices; discussion rooms
and large classrooms.
For the limited time the adult is a student, school and home should be
under the same roof. The learning situation-because so much must be com-
pressed into so little time-should be as nearly adequate as possible for quick
adjustment and unification of the group. In the building which houses the
above-mentioned facilities, provision should be made for dormitories and dining
hall accommodations. It would be possible to amortize in part the construction
cost of this building by the rentals collected on the dormitory rooms. This
would follow the pattern established twenty years ago by the University of
Minnesota and other great state universities in making their facilities available
to leaders in the ministry, banking, business, parent-teachers association, civil
officials, and many other groups. This building would require 90,000 square feet.
The College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing

There is a great need for medical education in the State of Florida in
order to give adequate opportunity to the youth of Florida to study medicine
and to provide better medical services for the people in the State and of the
nation. All medical schools have many more applicants than they can accom-
modate. It is likely to become more and more difficult for students to gain
entrance into medical schools outside their state of residence. It is natural
for a state-supported medical school to give preference to the applicants from
the state in which it is located over applicants from other states. Equality of
opportunity for Florida youth to study medicine cannot be attained unless
the State eventually provides medical education. There is an equally great
need for opportunities for the youth of Florida to study dentistry.
The U. S. Public Health Service reports that present facilities for medical
personnel will supply only 80 per cent of the needs of the nation. To eliminate
the present shortage it will be necessary to train, during the next ten years,
15,000 more doctors, 5,000 more dentists, 40,000 more nurses, and several thou-
sand more laboratory technicians. The establishment of the additional hospi-
tal facilities planned in Florida by Federal, State, and private agencies will
make the shortage of medical personnel particularly acute in this area.
A recent study made by the U. S. Public Health Service, entitled "A Survey
of Needs and Educational Facilities for Nurses in Florida and a Proposed Plan
for a University School of Nursing," clearly sets forth the indisputable need





for increasing nursing educational facilities in Florida. This study points to
the deficit in trained personnel which exists now and which will be greater
in 1952 at the proposed completion of the State's program of hospital expan-
sion. The prime need is to train personnel at the top levels to staff and improve
the programs of nurse training in present nurse education facilities of the
State. The report recommends a curriculum of four calendar years combining
university and hospital training and leading to a baccalaureate degree. And
it urges that 100 to 200 superior young women and men should be admitted
to the program each year.
George St. J. Perrott in "Education for the Health Services" says: "In
any consideration of the relationships between a medical school (or a dental
or nursing school) and the quality of medical care in the community, the
opportunities for state-aided institutions would seem to be especially clear.
Judgment relating to the value of, or need for, public supported professional
education must, therefore, evaluate the potential ability of the schools to
enhance the general standards of health care in the surrounding regions and
in the State as a whole."
The first two years in schools of dentistry are essentially identical to the
first two years in schools of medicine. Many of the basic medical science
courses are also included in nurses' training programs which lead to degrees.
Therefore, many economies can be achieved by the establishment of a unit
of the University of Florida designed to prepare personnel for the health
services. In a recent survey of medical education as it affects the State of
Florida, made by Dr. William T. Sanger, President of the Medical College
of Virginia, it was estimated that the facilities for a reasonably complete
medical school with associated teaching hospital and other necessary facilities
-would cost from $9,000,000 to $10,000,000, and that its operation would cost
annually about $1,000,000 in addition to fees from students and patients.
However, it would not cost nearly this sum to start the medical education
program.
What should be the size of the combined medical, dental, and nursing
school? Among the largest medical schools in the country are those operated
by Columbia University (600 medical and nursing students), and the Univer-
sity of Minnesota (350). The typical medical school admits about 75 students
a year and has a total enrollment for the four-year program of about 250.
The typical dental school admits about 60 students per year and has a total
enrollment of 160. The nurse education survey reported above recommended
at least 100 nurse candidates be admitted each year. The size of school needed
in Florida should depend on the number of Florida youth who are qualified
for and wish to enter the health service professions.

At the University of Florida in the spring of 1948, there were 68 upper-
class students who were preparing for and seeking admission to medical schools.
There were 15 pre-dental students and many others who were completing
programs which would qualify them for medical or dental school, but they
gave their vocational objective as "undecided." Any Florida youth who desires
preparation for the health services knows he must go out of the State for his
professional training, and he knows that admission to out-of-state schools
is difficult, since those schools give preference to their own residents. He





knows further that if he attends a state-supported school, his out-of-state
fees may be almost as large as those in non-tax-supported institutions. These
fees are in excess of $500 for a normal school year and do not include per-
sonal living expenses, etc. If more opportunities were available, more students
at the University of Florida would have chosen the health service professions.
The above figures are only for the University of Florida. They do not include
Florida State University and the several non-tax-supported institutions in
the State who are also offering pre-professional education for the health
service. For many years the University of Florida has enrolled about one third
of all students attending college in Florida. As a rough approximation, the
above figures might be increased threefold to give us an estimate of the
minimum statewide demand under present conditions of no medical or dental
school in the State.
Medical and dental schools consist of two parts-the two pre-clinical
years teaching basic medical science to both medical and dental students,
and the two clinical years using hospital and out-patient facilities to supple-
ment the usual laboratory and classroom work. If the University of Florida
were to establish a professional school for the health services with a total
enrollment of 250 medical students, 150 dental students, and 200 candidates
in nursing, it would be able to admit each year about 75 medical, 45 dental,
and 75 nursing students. It would be difficult to do effective teaching and
provide adequate facilities for larger numbers in one school.
The annual per-student cost of providing the pre-clinical instruction in
basic medical sciences is not so great as it is for the last two years, which
are primarily clinical and bedside instruction. It is difficult to allocate the
costs in existing medical schools between these two divisions. The allocation
is not too important since a medical school must have both kinds of facilities.
During the period of establishment of a medical school, the cost in the pre-
clinical years would be relatively higher than later, when the full program is
in operation. The financial reports from medical and dental schools in the
East and South indicate the following figures are reasonable averages, and
they are used as estimates for what such education would cost in Florida.
Average Annual Cost of Professional Education for Health Services
Number of Total Annual
Per Student Students Cost
Medical .................................................. $3000 250 $ 750,000
Dental .................................................. 1200 150 180,000
Nursing ................................................... 500 200 100,000
T otal ................................................................................ $1,030,000
The establishment of a medical college is costly. The State of Florida
should be prepared to give adequate support and this should be assured. This
support must be given in addition to other needs of the University. In no
case is a recommendation made that the medical college be established at the
sacrifice of other phases of the University program. At the same time, the
need for the medical school is great and support for the general University
program and the medical school should be forthcoming.

The Inter-American Institute
Since 1930, when the Institute was founded, students from nearly every
Latin-American country have attended the University. The Institute has





arranged for their coming, counselled them during their stay, and utilized
their knowledge and abilities in radio broadcasts and in speeches on Latin-
American subjects. The Latin-American students benefit by studying Business
Administration, Agriculture, Engineering, Architecture, or any of the many
offerings found at the University of Florida. They acquire a familiarity with
the people and institutions of the United States, and they get an insight into
the scientific, political, and social development of this country.

The faculty of the University has developed curriculum in Latin-American
area studies for the benefit of our own students. Instead of a major in a
limited field, such as literature or history, the student may elect a group
major in Latin-American studies in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Busi-
ness Administration, and Education. An adequate understanding of the differ-
ing geographical areas, the economics, the civilizations, and the people of
Latin-America requires the cooperation of experts in the various disciplines
and sciences. Our students benefit further by association with the Latin-
American students who live and study on our campus.

The influence of the Inter-American Institute can be greatly expanded on
the campus. But it should not be limited to that. It can be a significant force
for the development of understanding, exchange of ideas, promotion of busi-
ness and commerce, and scientific progress. It must reach the adults of the
State and the nation. This can be done in part through the services of the
General Extension Division. It can be furthered by holding institutes and con-
ferences to which scholars, political and business leaders, and experts in
various areas would be invited. Adult education is an important part of the
University's program in Latin-American affairs.

To promote this program of the Institute, we propose to erect on the
campus an Inter-American House. The design, which has been developed, is
one of great beauty and dignity; and it will immediately draw attention and
lend prestige to the activities of the Institute. It will serve as a dormitory for
about eighty students, half of whom will be from Latin America. It will have
guest rooms for Latin-American scholars visiting our campus for conferences
or lectures. It will provide space for a reference library and a general reading
room for Latin-American materials.

Another important function of the Inter-American House will be to supply
a meeting place for the institutes and conferences to be held. On the first
floor of the building, which is planned in Spanish Colonial style, there will
be rooms representing Mexico, Central America, the Antilles, Greater Colombia,
the Plata region, and the Andean republics. Each of these rooms will be dec-
orated and furnished in representative style to help impart the spirit of Latin-
America. This is a project that is of importance to Florida and to the nation
and it should be supported from State funds. Because of the urgent needs
of basic units in the University which, of necessity, must take priority, it is
hoped that the funds for the Inter-American House can be obtained from
private individuals and grants from foundation funds.

Florida is the gateway to Latin America, and this is a step in the develop-
ment of cooperation and understanding between "good neighbors."





The Student Personnel Program

A student personnel program for the University of Florida must be inte-
grated with the major educational objectives of the institution. In order to
provide maximum services to the University, the program should have two
major aims:
(1) It should provide leadership for an educational program, exclusive
of class activities, which promotes a higher quality of individual and group
living. This total living pattern should be planned so that each student may
have ample opportunities to develop his personal life in order to realize his
full potentialities as a citizen in the college community, in the State of Florida,
and in the American democracy. It is not expected that the student personnel
program would fully plan such an educational program, but it must provide
the central leadership so that these opportunities may be provided for the
student body of the University.
(2) It should assist in building an environment outside the classroom
which facilitates academic progress. Unless the student personnel program
provides assistance in the major objectives of the University in the academic
programs, it fails to fulfill its obligations to the University and to the State.
In order to develop more fully a plan for the student personnel program
during the coming six years, specific objectives have been established. These
objectives are not intended to be all-inclusive, nor are they intended fully to
inform the reader about the numerous activities within the student personnel
program. They may, however, provide a framework so that the personnel pro-
gram may be more readily discerned. The specific objectives are:
(1) To develop a program which is sensitive to the needs of an expanding
student body. This program must be equipped to obtain an overall view of
the needs of individual students and groups of students as these needs are
evidenced in the student body. It must be based upon at least two methods of
observation: (a) personal observations by skilled staff members, and (b) care-
ful research which obtains and interprets facts about student life.

(2) To help small groups of students plan and carry out programs of social
living which satisfy basic desires of the individual to be accepted and under-
stood by others and which encourage his growth and development. Although
large social activities may be planned and may contribute to social life among
students, research shows that it is within small groups (these small groups
may well be a part of a very large social group) that individual needs are best
met. These small groups offer maximum possibilities for students to find help
in achieving adjustment to University life. An aspect of this program of social
living is the orientation of new students to University life. This total person-
nel program might best be sponsored within living groups in the dormitories
and fraternities. It should provide opportunities for each student to be well
known by a trained personnel worker. This provides the student with an
opportunity to seek help with his personal problems from a trained and
sympathetic person.
(3) To foster student self-government in all its aspects. This objective
may well develop into a major need at the University of Florida as the pres-





sures of an expanded and increasingly heterogeneous student body present a
number of problems. The system of student government which is now in
operation at the University has worked so well that it deserves major attention
in the student personnel program. It should be studied carefully and should be
strengthened, and the personnel program should work closely with it.
(4) To provide clinical and specialized services for students who need aid
in overcoming handicaps of physical disabilities, speech or hearing disorders,
mental or emotional disorders, and to provide help for those students who
have particularly difficult problems of adjustment or who require help in
vocational planning. These clinical and specialized services are available now
in some measure. They require extension and integration with other objectives
of the personnel program.
Their development would help to make the facilities of the University
available to persons who now fail to enter as freshmen and to those who drop
out before conclusion of a full program of studies but who have the capabilities
for college work. Many of these persons could become successful graduates of
the University and make a significant contribution to society if they could
secure special help in overcoming their problems.
(5) To aid in further development of the faculty advisement program
through cooperation with faculty advisers who want specialized help for their
students and through the development of an in-service education program for
advisers, if they so desire.
(6) To extend and expand student aid facilities. The need for scholarships,
grants, loans, and part-time employment will increase markedly unless the
present trend of increasing costs is reversed. Student aid ought to be closely
integrated with other student personnel services. It ought to be administered
by an office which understands as much as possible the needs and desires of
students.
It should be recognized that increased student aid provides no permanent
answer to the problem of lack of educational opportunities because of cost
barriers. If the University is to be available to all capable young men and
women, ways must be found to reduce costs. Student aid can provide services
for needy students, but if it attempts to solve the problems of a general increase
in costs of education, it must inevitably fail.
(7) To provide aid in locating suitable employment for graduates and for
students who terminate their courses before graduation. Many graduates are
now receiving valuable help in this respect from the colleges, schools, and
departments from which they graduate. Nongraduates are apparently receiv-
ing less help. A University Placement Office would not centralize placement
activities. Such centralization would deprive students of the essential services
which separate University units now perform. Rather, such a central place-
ment office should give help to the separate units of the University in placing
their students. It should be planned so that each department, school, or college
retains its initiative in contacting prospective employers. That such an office
could be initiated has been proved by experience at other universities.
Building Needs.-The University now has permanent dormitories for 1,100
men-these are now housing 1,800 men by overcrowding through the use of





oouble-decker beds. In addition, temporary dormitories have been erected
which house 1,152 men on the campus. Three Flavet Villages have been pru-
vided, accommodating 624 veterans and their families.
Two permanent dormitories for women have been authorized for construc-
tion, to be started in the fall of 1948. They are to house about 300 girls. Four
dormitories for men have been authorized and we hope to have them ready
by the fall of 1949-they will house about 700 men. These six dormitories are
to cost about $5,000,000 and they will be partially, but not sufficiently, self-
liquidating. The contribution of only $1,000,000 made by the State will require
a higher rental charge to students than should be charged at any state
university.
An enrollment of 10,000 nonveterans by 1958 will probably consist of 7,000
men and 3,000 women. We should provide dormitories for at least 4,000 men
and 2,000 women. Our capacity by September of 1949 will be nearly 1,800 men
(counting normal capacity) and 300 women. We should launch immediately
upon an extension of our dormitory construction program to provide additional
dormitories on the campus. The program by the end of the Six-Year Plan
should be to house 4,000 additional students, and additional units should be
started immediately at a cost of $10,000,000. This whole program will cost
$20,000,000. The State's contribution to this partially self-liquidating project
should be sufficient to make possible reasonable rentals for rooms in all
dormitories at the University of Florida.

Coordinated with the need for dormitories is the need for additional eating
facilities. A dining hall will be required in the women's area on the campus.
The first unit, which should be designed to accommodate at least 600, will
cost $240,000. As the expansion of dormitories proceeds, eating facilities to
care for 1,000 additional students must be provided. This will cost approximately
$400,000.
The original section of Florida Union was built in 1935 when the University
had 2,500 students. It is crowded and its facilities are completely inadequate
for the present demands made upon it. A new Student Union Building located
centrally in the expanding campus plan is a necessity for the full develop-
ment of our student personnel program and for the morale of the University
community. This building would serve as the headquarters for student govern-
ment, the honor court, all student publications, and campus organizations. It
would also provide recreational facilities for students and guest rooms for
parents, visiting lecturers, and other guests of the University. The State should
contribute as its share of the cost of such a building at least $750,000.

Campus Plan

The University of Florida campus was laid out many years ago on an inter-
secting grid of streets. The problem of automobile traffic, the integration of
related functions, the student pedestrian traffic between buildings, and the
provision of space for buildings requested above, as well as buildings which
will be needed in the more distant future, has caused us to study the long-
range needs of the University and develop a campus land-use plan to meet
its needs. This land-use plan was started by a faculty committee made up





primarily of specialists from the School of Architecture. The planning got
beyond the stages of committee work and required the services of a profes-
sional planner.
The areas have been designated for the group of Science buildings; for
the Agricultural group of buildings; the Engineering group; the Humanities;
the Fine Arts; Business Administration; women's dormitories; women's soro-
rities; men's dormitories; men's fraternities; the Auditorium; and athletics
and recreation.
The approximate location of each of these buildings within their respective
areas has been agreed upon. The specific plans for several of these buildings
have already been developed and plans for the others are proceeding. As each
of these specific plans is developed, the actual location of the building is also
determined. A model of the campus plan has been constructed for use in
further study of the details of the plan.

Central Heating Plant
These additional buildings, spread over a much larger area of the campus
than is now used, will require new equipment for and rehabilitation of the
Central Heating Plant, which will cost about $200,000. It will also require an
extension of the campus utilities system and connections, such as storm sewers,
sanitary sewers, steam lines, telephone lines, power lines, streets, sidewalks,
and landscaping.
Rather than provide utility connections in a haphazard way, a system
should be planned in advance that will assure adequate service. The connec-
tions to the buildings already under construction or authorized for construc-
tion are urgently needed. About $300,000 will be required to extend and develop
the campus utilities system, and $250,000 will be required for other campus
development, including landscaping.

The University Maintenance Department
The Maintenance Department has temporary buildings which must be
replaced, and a warehouse building is seriously needed. Such a building for
the Maintenance Department will cost about $250,000.
Planning
All of the buildings listed in the Six-Year Plan will, of course, require
architectural services in connection therewith. The need for many of these
projected buildings is so urgent that the preliminary architectural studies,
which often require up to eight months for completion, must necessarily
proceed concurrently with the overall integration of the academic program.
In some instances it may be necessary to carry the preliminary studies and
specifications to the stage where professional cost estimates can be prepared
in order to determine the limitations of a specified group. For the purpose of
preparing preliminary architectural studies, there should be appropriated dur-
ing the first biennium of the Six-Year Plan the sum of $150,000.

Summary of Building Needs
Coordinating and integrating the activities of the various colleges of the
University so that they may function at a satisfactory level of performance





will require all the buildings and improvements listed in Part I of the follow-
ing table. The construction of the buildings listed in Part I will bring the
University of Florida up to the average of the fifty land-grant colleges and
state universities, on the basis of square feet available per student enrolled.
The buildings listed in Part II of this table must be constructed to bring the
University up to the average of the greater universities. Part III of the table
lists the buildings necessary for adequate housing, feeding, and recreational
facilities for a student body of 10,000. Not all the funds required for the con-
struction of the items listed in Part III must come from the State, as some
of the projects can be built on a self-liquidating basis. Part IV of the table
includes facilities which will be needed in the future. The State can supply
some of the facilities listed. Others can come from private donations and
public subscriptions.

The estimated costs indicated below are based on building costs as of July
1, 1948. Any change in these prices, upward or downward, from that base
will require a corresponding revision in estimates.

PART I

To bring the University to the average of 50 land-grant colleges and univer-
sities on the basis of square feet available per student enrolled*
Agricultural Units (1) (including Agricultural Engineering, the Experiment Station,
and Forestry) ........................... ............................................ $ 4,200,000
Agricultural Units (2) (including off-campus buildings, the Livestock Judging Pavilion,
etc.) ......................... ................................................ 500,000
Engineering Units .......................... ... .. ............................... 4,200,000
Rehabilitation of Science Hall and Benton Hall ................................. .. 450,000
Physics Building (addition to and rehabilitation of the Horticulture Building) .......... 1,000,000
Business Administration Building ....................................................... 1,000,000
Education and Industrial Arts Education Building ..................................... 1,180,000
Architecture and the Arts Units (including Architecture, Art, Music, Speech, and
Dramatics) .......................................... .. ........... .................... 2,750,000
Extension of Utilities and Campus Development ....................................... 560,000
Women's Gymnasium .............................................................. 900,000
Development of Athletic Areas (1) ...................................................... 150,000
Planning ................................................................................. 150,000
Library Equipment and Stacks .................... ....................................... 70,000

$17,110,000
And also Unit A of additional dormitories and eating facilities. See Part III.

PART II

To bring the space available per student enrolled in line with greater univer-
sities. this additional space is needed:
Agricultural Units (3) (including all other off campus buildings) .......................$ 500,000
University Auditorium to seat from 3,500 to 5.000 ...................................... 2,000,000
Pharmacy Building ............................................................... 790,000
Biological Sciences Building ................... .. .................................. 215,000
Home Arts Building ...................................... ................................... 580,000
General Extension Building, including dormitories ...................................... 1,300,000
Maintenance Building and Shop ....................... ............ ................. 250,000
Central Heating Plant-rehabilitation and replacement of equipment .................... 200,000
Enclosing Swimming Pool and rehabilitation of Old Gym .............................. 350,000
Development of Athletic Areas (2) .. .... ... 150,000





Rehabilitation of the Agriculture Building and of Language and Peabody Halls, Una
Engineering Building ..................... .................... .................. 950,000
Final Addition to Law Building ..................................... ................... 500,000

$ 7,285,000

PART III
Construction necessary to furnish adequate housing, feeding and recreational
facilities for 10,000 students
Unit A
Dormitories for 2,000 ($10,000,000)
Eating facilities-Women's Area (600) ($240,000) ....................State's Share $ 8,000,000
Unit B
Dormitories for 2,000 ($10,000,000)
Eating facilities-Men's Area (1,000i ($400,000) ..................... .State's Share $ 8,000,000
Student Union Building (new)-State's Share ........................................... 750,000

$16,750,000

PART IV
Construction to be provided after the State can meet the needs presented
in the first three parts of this table
Medical, Dental and Nursing College and Hospital* ........................$7,000,000 to 10,000,000
Inter-American Building ($500,000) ....................................................By donations
Remodeling of present Auditorium into a ($350,0001
Chapel as a War Memorial ............................. ...............Public Subscriptions
Depending on location.


Conclusion

The State of Florida has a great future. It has the second largest area
of any state east of the Mississippi River. Much of its land is undeveloped
and unused. Its industry and business is expanding rapidly. More trained
people are needed to pace this expansion and development. But technical
training alone is not enough. Prior to World War II, the Germans probably
had the best technical training of any people. But something was lacking
when they were so naive politically and socially as to let a man like Hitler
mislead them. We must give to all the best education possible for them to
meet their responsibilities to their families, State and nation.

To accomplish this objective, we have developed a Six-Year Plan for the
University of Florida which will require, in addition to the buildings and
equipment listed above, 400 more staff members on the professional level,
280 additions to the nonacademic staff, a total of 300 graduate assistants,
and 260 student assistants. Florida is a great State, and it must have a great
University. It deserves and needs the program we have outlined.






APPENDIX


TABLE I

A. REGULAR SESSION ENROLLMENT FOR THE BIENNIUM


1946-47 ENROLLMENT 1947-48 ENROLLMENT

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
Men Women Total Men Women Total


College of Agriculture............................. 234 3 237 347 2 349
School of Architecture and Allied Arts.............. 118 1 119 196 2 198
College of Arts and Sciences ....................... 337 17 354 536 61 597
College of Business Administration................. 337 2 339 595 8 603
College of Education.............................. 143 13 156 234 173 407
College of Engineering ............................ 254 2 256 427 .......... 427
School of Forestry................................ 47 .......... 47 94 ......... 94
Graduate School................................. 292 43 335 600 219 819
College on Law................................... 403 17 420 590 13 603
School of Pharmacy.............................. 65 9 74 127 15 142
College of Physical Education. Health and Athletics.. 14 ........ 14 33 .......... 33
University College ...... ........... ......... 5,457 61 5,518 5,900 372 6,272

*Less Duplicates........................... 488 8 496 713 44 757

Net Total Enrollment............................ 7,213 160 7,373 8,966 821 9,787


Persons registered in one college or school the first semester and another the second semester.


B. SUMMER SESSION ENROLLMENT FOR THE BIENNIUM


1946 SUMMER SESSION 1947 SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
Men Women Total Men Women Total


College of Agriculture............................. 96 1 97 180 2 182
School of Architecture and Allied Arts.............. 52 .......... 52 84 ......... 84
College oi Arts and Sciences ....................... 162 8 170 306 22 328
College of Business Administration ................. 130 2 132 353 6 359
College of Education .............................. 72 151 223 132 272 404
College of Engineering ........................... 73 1 74 191 .......... 191
School of Forestry ................................ 21 ..... .. 21 61 .......... 61
Graduate School ................................ 253 173 426 510 364 874
College of Law................................... 227 11 238 360 21 381
School of Pharmacy.............................. 17 1 18 59 5 64
College of Physical Education, Health, and Athletics.. ............ ..... ..... 19 ........... 19
University College ............................... 1,985 86 2,071 2,337 212 2,549
Unclassified........................... ........... 11 26 37 40 175 215

*Less Duplicates................ ............. 50 4 54 146 16 162

Net Total Enrollment........................... 3,050 456 3,506 4.486 1,063 5,549


Persons registered in one college or school the first term and another the second term.






TABLE II

A. ENROLLMENT OF VETERANS BY COLLEGE AND SCHOOL
REGULAR SESSIONS OF THE BIENNIUM


1946-47 1947-4;

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
Students Veterans Percent Students Veterans Percent
Enrolled Enrolled Veterans Enrolled Enrolled Veterans


College of Agriculture............................. 237 208 87.7 347 315 90.7
School of Architecture and Allied Arts.............. 119 98 82.3 198 180 90.9
College of Arts and Sciences ....................... 354 285 80.5 597 422 70.7
College of Business Administration................. 339 288 84.9 603 522 86.6
College of Education.............................. 156 116 74.3 407 172 42.3
College of Engineering ............................ 256 238 92.9 427 387 90.6
School of Forestry ...... ...... .................. 47 46 97.8 94 87 92.5
Graduate School.............. .. ................ 335 207 61.7 819 384 46.9
College of Law...... ........................... 420 376 89.5 603 543 90.0
School of Pharmacy ............................. 74 61 82.4 142 117 82.4
College of Physical Education, Health, and Athletics.. 14 12 85.7 33 33 100.0
University College............. ................. 5,518 4,210 76.2 6,272 3,774 60.2

*Less Duplicates............. ................ 496 417 .......... 757 597

Net Total Enrollment ............. ............ 7,373 6,145 83.3 9,787 6,339 64.7


Persons registered in one college or school the first semester and another the second semester.

B. ENROLLMENT OF VETERANS BY COLLEGE AND SCHOOL
SUMMER SESSIONS OF THE BIENNIUM


1946 SUMMER SESSION 1947 SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
Students Veterans Percent Students Veterans Percent
Enrolled Enrolled Veterans Enrolled Enrolled Veterans


College of Agriculture ............................ 96 88 91 7 182 172 94.5
School of Architecture and Allied Arts .............. 52 42 80 8 84 77 91.7
College of Arts and Sciences....................... 170 128 75.3 328 277 84.5
College of Business Administration......... ....... 132 111 84.1 369 326 88.3
College of Education..................... .. ....... 223 41 18.4 404 82 20.3
College of Engineering.. ......................... 74 63 85 1 191 182 95.3
School ot Forestry ............. .. ............... 21 20 95 2 61 59 96.7
Graduate School.............. ....... .......... 426 166 38 9 874 323 36.9
College of Law.................................. 238 211 88.7 381 346 90.8
School of Pharmacy................ .............. 18 16 88.9 64 56 87 5
College of Physical Education, -i .ii. ... l ,. ,. i ......... ... .. .. . 19 19 100.0
University College .............. ... ...... 2,071 1,627 78 6 2,549 1,978 77.6
Unclassified................... ..... ........... 37 24 64 9 215 21 9.7

*Less D uplicates............. .... .......... 54 33 .......... 162 133

Net Total Enrollment ......... . ............. 3,506 2,504 71.4 5,715 3,918 68.6


Persons registered in one college cr school the first term and another the second term.






TABLE III


DIPLOMAS, CERTIFICATES, AND DEGREES CONFERRED SINCE 1905



fNumber of
Diplomas and Baccalaureate Professional Masters' Doctors' Honorary
Certificates Degrees


1905-1938*.............. 1,730 5,054 53 467 23 21
1938-39 ................. 446 408 .............. 22 2 2
S 1939................. 122 166 .............. 47 .............. ..............
1939-40................. 457 437 .............. 22 1 ..............
SS 1940................. 83 170 .............. 41 3
1940-41................. 452 488 2 33 4 2
SS 1941 ................. 71 187 ............ 41 1
1941-42................. 381 386 1 22 4 2
SS 1942................. 116 140 .............. 17 2 ..............
1942-43................. 170 337 .............. 15 4 ..............
SS 1943 ................. 33 110 .............. 27 1
1943-44................. 39 102 .............. 11 .............. 3
SS 1944................. 16 69 ...... ...... .. 24 ........ ...
1944-45................. 35 54 1 15 1 1
SS 1945................. 27 89 .............. 29 2 ....
1945-46................. 205 136 .............. 13 3 2
SS 1946................. 294 112 .............. 39 .............. ... . ....
1946-47................. 740 334 .............. 38 1 1
8 1947................. 389 280 .............. 61 2 .. ...
1947 48................. 883 799 1 71 ............ 5

Total........... 6.689 9,858 58 1,055 54 35



For distribution by years see the Biennial Report for the biennium ending June 30, 1938.
t In the column headed "Diplomas and Certificates" is grouped the number of all awards made upon the completion of
curricula of fewer than four years' duration.



























77






TABLE IV


ENROLLMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FROM 1905 TO 1948


Regular Session


1905-06...........................
1906-07 ...........................
1907-08...........................
1908-09 .............. ..........
1909-10 ..........................
1910-11 .........................
1911-12 ..................... .....
1912-13 ...........................
1913-14 ....................... ...
1914-15 ...........................
1915-16 ...........................
1916-17 ...................... ....
1917-18 ..........................
1918-19 ...........................
1919-20...........................
1920-21 ...........................
1921-22...........................
1922-23 ...........................
1923-24...........................
1924-25.................. ........
1925-26.................. .......
1926-27.................. ........
1927- 28 .................. ........
1928-29.................. .......
1929-30.................. ......
1930-31 ..........................
1931-32 ............ ............ .
1932-33...........................
1933-34 ...........................
1934-35 ............ ...............
1935-36 ...........................
1936-37...........................
1937-38........................ .
1938-39...... .................. .
1939-40 ...........................
1940-41...........................
1941-42 ...........................
1942-43t ..........................
1943-44t ..........................
1944-45...........................
1945-46...........................
1946-47...........................
1947-48...........................


Number Number*
Enrolled Summer Term Enrolled Total


1913 .......................
1914. ..........................
1915 ........................ .
1916 ........................ .
1917 ........................ .
1918 ........................ .
1919 ...................... .....
1920 ............................
1921 ........................ .
1922 ............................
1923 ...........................
1924 ...........................
1925 ............................
9126...........................
1927 ............................
1928 ...........................
1929 ............................
1930 ........................ .
1931 ........................ .
1932...........................
1933 .........................
1934 ............................
1935 ........................ .
1936 ................. ..........
1937 ............................
1938 ...........................
1939 ................ .......
1940 ...........................
1941 ............................
1942 ............................
1943 ............................
1944 ............................
1945 ... ........................
1946 ............................
1947 ............................
1948............................


269
402
539
434
434
612
743
783
895
1,028
944
987
908
1,269
1,686
1,613
1,480
1,530
1,746
1,086
1,310
1,602
1,706
2,136
2,631
2,591
2,805
2,622
2,625t
1,032
1,042
1,023
3,506
5,711
6,278


630
797
986
894
855
1,166
1,407
1,606
1,897
2,211
2,291
2,475
2,768
3,237
3,759
3,883
3,737
3,918
4,304
3,714
3,681
4,450
4,689
5,205
5,909
6,029
6,261
6,060
5,864
3,742
1,733
1,961
6,722
13,084
16,065


These figures include the enrollment in the demonstration school, except for the Summer Sessions of 1933 and after.
t The figures given are for civilian enrollment only. In addition to enrollments shown in the table during the period from
March, 1943, to December, 1944, 2,961 trainees were given from 3 to 5 months' instruction for the Army Air Forces and 1,495
trainees were given from 3 to 15 months' instruction under the Army Specialized Training Program.
T Includes 379 students registered in the September, 1942, inter-session.






TABLE V


A COMPARISON OF ENROLLMENTS OF A PRE-WAR AND POST-WAR

ACADEMIC YEAR AND SUMMER SESSION


College of Agriculture.............................
School of Architecture and Allied Arts..............
College of Arts and Sciences.......................
College ot Business Administration ...............
College of Education..............................
College of Engineering............................
School of Forestry........... ....................
Graduate School..., ............... . ......
College of Law .............. ... . ...........
School of Pharmacy..............................
College of Physical Education, Health, and Athletics..
University College................................
School of Trade and Industrial Education...........
Unclassified................................

*Ieas D uplicates..................... ..........

T otals .................... ..........


Students
Enrolled
1939-40


Students
Enrolled
1947-48


155 349
51 198
300 597
255 603
99 407
179 427
24 94
196 819
168 603
43 142
.......... 33
2,103 6,272




117 757

3,456 8 9,787


percent
Increase


225
388
199
236
411
238
391
417
359
330

298

. . . . . .


Students Students
Enrolled Enrolled
SS 1939 SS 1947


72

271
195
1,329
24

499
72
5

701
532


182
84
328
369
404
191
61
874
381
64
19
2,549

215


Percent
InTrease


253

121
189
fDecrease
795

175
529
1,280

363


....... 564 162 ..........

283 2,595 5,715 220


Students registered in one school or college the first semester or term and another the second.
t 1939 was the third summer of the University College-students who had previously enrolled under the old program wee
frmitted to continue-actually over 1000 of the 1,329 were lower division students if classified by credits earned.






TABLE VI



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FULL-TIME PROFESSIONAL STAFF



1946-47 1947-48
Agriculture:
College of Agriculture................................. .......... 39 50
Experiment Station-
M ain Station.... ...................... . ............ 65 53
Branch Stations ..... .............. ....... ...... 77 142 89 142

Extension Service-
M ain Station........................................ 27 29
Tallahassce ........................................... 9 11
County Agents and Assistant County Agents............... 90 92
Home Demonstration Agents and Assistant Home Demon-
stration Agents.............. ..................... 61 187 62 194

School of Forestry ...................... ............. ......... .. 8 9

Total.................... ........... ...................... 350* 3671

Architecture and Allied Arts, School of. ....................... ............... 15 ,27
Arts and Sciences, College of.......................... ..... ................ 109 139
Business Administration, College of......................... ... ........... 39 50
Education:
College of Education ....................... ...... .... ......... 20 39
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School.................... ........ ........ 28 48 33 72

Engineering:
College of Engineering............... .............. .............. 35 86
Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station ....................... 52 41

Total........................... ......................... 75*" 981t

General Extension Division................................................ 7 17
Law C college of........ ............................ ...................... 9 12
L library ....................................... .. .................... 15 25
Military Science and Tactics, Division of....................... .............. 12 17
M music, Divisio" of .................................. ..................... 3 5
Physical Education, Health, and Athletics, College of:
Instructional Division ............................... ............ 16 22
Coaching Staff .................................................. 5 7
Medical Staff............................. .................... 4 25 4 33


Pharmacy, School of ...................................... ................ 4 S
U university College.. ................................... ................... 8 75

GRAND TOTAL.............................................. 774*** 940ttt



Excluding 26 duplicates. t Excluding 28 duplicates.
** Excluding 12 duplicates. ft Excluding 9 duplicates.
*** Excluding 43 duplicates. tft Excluding 42 duplicates.





80





TABLE VII


STATE APPROPRIATION FOR BUILDINGS



1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 Total


Veterans Housing (Flavet )* ... .. 250,000 00 $ ...... S ...... $ .. .. $ 250,000.00
76 Additional Houming U'lits (Flavet II). 50,000 00 .......... . ..... . ...... 50,000.00
Purchase of Surplus Building Supplies .. 20,000.00 ... ....... 30,000 00 .... 50,000.00
Housing and Classroom Fatilities..... 367,500 00 925,000 00 ............ .... 1,292,500 00
Store and Post Office ... .. 6,000 00 . ..... .. ...... 6,000.00
Auxiliary Sewage Treatment Plant .. . 35,000 00 35,000.00
Gymnasium and Auditorium .. .. 50,000 00 1,631,000.00 ......... ... ... .. .... 1,681,00.00
Cafeteria and Equipment .. 10,000.00 881,000.00 ......... .. ......... 891,000.00
Sewage Disposal Plant ....... 5,000 00 293,000.00 129,150.00 . .. 427,150.00
Athletic Improvements. . ...... 105,875.00 23,125.00 ..... .... ........... 129,000.00
Revision of Utilities ......... . ... ....... 852,800.00 ............ . 852,800.00
Purchase of 90 Acres of Land ........... ............... 197,372.00 ............ ............... 197,372.00
Lease Arlington Hotel ... ........ ... .. 24,000.00 ............ . 24,000.00
Cost of Use 30 Houses 3 Years.......... .............. 50,000.00 ........... ........... 50,000.00
Livestock Pavilion ........... .......... .. ......... .. 50,000 00 ...... . .... .......... 50,000.00
Maintenance Building Plans ..... .. ......... 5,250.00 .......... ............. 5,250.00
Horticultural Building Plans ....... 8,050.00 . ......... .. .. 8,050.00
Engineering Building Plans ...... .. 70,000 00 .. .. .. ... .. ... 70,000.00
Agriculture Building Plans . .. ..... 70,000 00 .... ...... ..... 70,000.00
Agricultural Engineering Building Plans ...... ..... 6,300 00 ........ . . . . 6,300.00
Horticultural Laboratory ..... .. .... 3,500 00 ... . . . ........ 3,500.00
Addition to Infirmary .. ... .. . ... 325,000.00 ............. .... ...... 325,000.00
Library Addition ..9 .............. ...... ....... 800,000.00 615,000.00 1,415,000 00
Addition to Chemistry Building. .... . .. 775,000.00 ...... .... .... .. 775,000.00
Furnishing Chemistry Building ...... .... ... ... .. . 100,000.00 .. . . . ... .. 100,000 00
Furnishing Infirn ry ..... ..... .. 45,000.00 .. .. .. .. . ........ 45,000 00
University of Florida Dormitories ... .. ........ .. . .. l,000,000 00 1,000,000.00
Classrooms and Administration Buildings .. ... .... ... . ....... 1,373,000.00 1,373,000.00
Rehabilitation Law Building .. ........ ... . ....... 175,000.00 170,000.00 345,000.00

S 893,375.00 $6,341,397.00 S1,134,150 00 S3,158,000 00 $11,526,922.00



$204,594.26 reimbursed by Federal Government.
t Includes $300,000.00 transferred from Operating Fund.





TABLE VII (Con't)

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
BUILDING FUND


1946-47 1947-48 1948 49 Total


Poultry Disease Laboratory . . .... ... S 5,900.00 $ ........... S. ... . 5,9000.00
Fibre Laboratory, Everglades Station . ... 18,000 00 ... .... .... 18,000.00
Vegetable Processing Laborator,, Main Station. .. 46,000.00 ............ ... .. 46,000.00
Vegetable Crop Laboratory.... . ... ........ 27,500.00 ..... ........ ...... ...... 27,500.00
W arehouses, Evergiades Station ... . . .. ...... 9,000.00 ... ........... .. 9,000 00
Dwelling Units, Everglades .... .... .. . .. 29,000.00 ... ... ... .. ........... 29,000.00
Office and Living Quarters, North Florida Station ........ 23,000.00 ...... ... . .. ........ 23,000.00
Greenhouse, M ain Station................... .. ...... 12,500.00 ............. ...... 12,500.00
Laboratory Addition, Everglades..... ...... ... . 130,000.00 .. . ... ........ 130,000.00
M achinery Shelter, Potato Laboratory. .. .. ......... 2,000.00 .......................... 2,000.00
Completion Dairy Products Laboratory, Main Station. .. 86,315.00 .............. .... ........ 86,315.00
Storage and Implement Shelter Vcgetabli Crops Laboratory 3,180.00 .. ... . ............. 3,180.00
Laboratory Addition, Celery Laboratory. .......... .. 11,800.00 .. . ..... 11,800.00
Staff Housing, North Florida Station ....... .. . .. 46,500.00 ..... ....... ..... 46,500.00
Laboratory Addition, Sub-Tropical Station. ............ 16,300.00 ............. ...... . 1 6,30(1.00
Laboratory and Hosing, Range Cattle Station ..... .... 55.000,00 .... ....... .. ...... 55,000.00
W est Florida Exieriment Station .. ....... .. ... . 50,000.00 . ... .. .. ..... 50,000.00
Office and Administrationi Building, Citrus Station.. ...... 50,000.00 .. .... .. ..... 50,000.00
Warehouses, Sub-Tropical Station. .................... 3,166.00 ............. .......... 3,166.00
Purchase of Equipment, Vegetable Processing Laboratory .. .............. 13,700 00 .............. 13,700.00
Purchase of Equipment, Dairy Proccssing Laboratory. .... .. ...... 23,000.00 ............. 23,000.00
Dairy Unit, Gainesville....... .. ... .. .... ..... .... . ....... 211,000.00 211,000.00

$ 625,161.00 3i6,700.00 8 211,000.00 8 872,861.00



FEDERAL FUNDS FOR BUILDING


1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 Total


Flavet I* ........................... ... ...... . . $ 204,594.26 8. ........ ............ 3 204,594.26
Flavet II.............. ... .. .... .. .. ..... 257,042.00 .............. 257,042.00
Flavet I I .. ........... . .... ....... .... . ... ... 875,000.00 468,188.00 1,343,188.00
Temporary Offices and Classroomns (Lake City Buildings)... ............. 270,320.15 228,075.31 498,395.46

8 204,594.26 181,402,362.15 S 696,263.31 $2,303,219.72


Reimbursement of State Funds.

OTHER BUILDING FUNDS


1945-46 1946-47 1948-49 Total


Released from Earnings from Radio Station WRUF ..... $........... $............. S 101,041.69 $ 101,041.69
General Education Board Fund tor Experiment Station,
Soils Laboratory ........... ........................ .......... ........... 50.000.00 50,000.00

S...... .. ............. .8 151,041.69 S 151,0411.69






TABLE VIII

GIFTS AND GRANTS
A. Gifts and Grants for Research


American Camellia Society . ...... . ...... .S 3,300 00
Caiumet & Hlelca Consolidated Copper Comi:auy for Citrus Station)........... ... ... 4,000 00
Culumet & lHlea Consolidated Copper Company (for Everglades Station) .......... .. 1,500 00
Group of twelve companies interested in livestock research having to do with investigations
of the interrelationships of phosphorus with nitrogen, potash and other mineral elements
upon the nutritive quality of pastures, forage and feed for livestock. (for Main and
Range Cattle Stations) ............... ..... ......... . . . .... 3,000.00
Julius Hymiian & Company (for Vegetable Crops Laboratory)........... ... ...... 1,000 00
Julius Hyman & Company (for Sub-Tropical Station) .......... ..... .. ... 1,000.00)
International Minerals & Chemical Corporation (for Main Station) ........ 1,500) 0
International Minerals & Chemical Company (for Everglades Station) .................. 1,500.00
Pacific Coast Borax Company (for Everglades Station).............. ........ 500 00
Shark Industries (for M ain Station)..................... ............ ... .... 350.00
United States Golf Association (for Everglades Station) ............. ......... 300.00
United States Phosphoric Products of the Tennessee Corp. (for Main Station) ... ........ 1,500.00
Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railroad Company (for Everglades Station)............. .... 1,500 00
Nutrition Foundation, Inc. (for Main Station) ........... .......... .. ........ 2,500.00
Swift & Company (for M ain Station)........... ........ ..... . .. .. . . 20,000.00
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (for Project in Applied Economics) ........... ....... 23,116.64
National Bureau of Standards(Research in Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station) 235,265.97
Stapling Machines Company (E. & I. E. S.) ............. ....... .. ....... . 13,500 00
Florida Phosphate Industries (E. & I. E. S.) ......... .... ........... .. 18,720 00
Research Corporation of New York (E. & I. E. S.)... . .. 8,5010.00
Army Air Forces (E. & I. E. S.) ....... .............. 87,089.40
Signal Corps (E. & I. E. S.) ............ .. ..... .. 58,357 00
Florida Citrus Commission (E. & I. E. S.)........... ....... ....... .... 5,099.98
Insect Wire Screening Bureau (E. & I. E. S.) .. ... ....... 2,000.00
Limerock Association (E. & I. E. S.)........... 5,000 00
Invcx Company (E. & I. E. S.) ........... .. 100 35
Canada Dry Bottling Co. (E. & I. E. S.) ........ ... . 7,833.31
U. S. Forest Service (E. & I. E. S.)........... ......... .. . ..... 2,788,96
Gilbert Seed Co. (E. & I. E. S.) ........... 336.00
Simpson Nursery (E. & I. E. S.) ........... . 1,350,00
State Road Department (E. & I. E. S.).. ... . .. .. 4,166 65
Metermen's Association (E. & I. E. S.) ....... . 555 00
Miscellaneous Contributions tor Engineering Research.. 883 75
Office of Naval Research (College of Arts and Sciences). ... .. 20,000 00
U. S. Public Health Service (College of Arts and Sciences) .... ...... 6,800.00 $ 544,912.66


B. Gifts and Grants for Fellowships


Number Donor
3 Wallace and Tiernan Research Fellowships (Sanitary Engineering) ..... ... 3,650 00
1 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs (H. Harold ltume Fellowships) ...... 500 00
1 Florida Citrus Exchange Fellowship in Cooperative Marketing .. 1,000.00
1 Naval Stores Research Fellowship .............................. ........ 1,020 00'
1 The William S. Merrell Company, Cincinnati (Pharmacy Foundation Fellow-
ships)............ .................. ..... .. .......... .......... 700 00
2 Velsicol Corporation for Insecticide Fellowship .... ..... ..... 4,036.56
1 Dow Chemical Corporation (Chemical Fellowship) ...................... 1,550 00
1 American Sumatra Company and the Max Weedies Tobacco Co. (Tobacco Re-
search Fellowships) ..................................... ....... ... 2,500.00
8 University of Florida Graduate Fellowships ...... 10,800.00" 25,816.58


State Funds-University of Florida Budget.






TABLE VIII (Con't)

C. Gifts and Grants for Scholarships


Number

2
1
3
30
1l
2
4
10
4
3
2
1
1
5
1


1
2
:






1
2


Donor

Borden Company Foundation (Agricultural) ..... ..
Borden Company Foundation (Pharmacy)... .........
Womens Auxilary of the American Legion ....... .
Sears Roebuck Co .. ... ...... .
State Bankers' Association (Future Farmers) ......
Melbourne Lions Club ...... ....... .... .......
W. Atlee Burpce Company. ... ....... ..
Lovetts Table and Food Supply............ . ........
A. D. and James E. Davis (Davis Brothers) .... .
M rs. Alfred I. duPont ... ......... ... .......
Miami Beach P.T.A ....... ... ..
Florida Assoiation of Small Loan Companies. .. ....... ...
M elbourne Lions Club...... .. . . ...
Colonial Dames of America, ........ .. ... ........
The Government of Egypt.. ........ ...... ... .
The Government of India .. ..... ..... ... .
Miami Beach Civic League. .
Dow Chemical Corporation .........
W illiam P. Turnipseed (O ala) ...... ... ... ....
American Association for Pharmaceutical Education .. ....
United States Sugar Corporation-
(a) Duncan U. Fletcher ... . ... ,
(b) James D. Westcott. . .. .


$ 520 70
985 00


E dw ard W Ball......... ... ........... . ................
H orne Foundation........... ... .. .. .. .... .......
Jesse A. Cox..... .. .


1,505.70

... 318 00
... 150.00
... 400 00


STATE-
State House of Representatikes. ........ ....... . .. .. .. 19,223.74
State Senatorial. .. . ..... ........... ......... .. ... 17,100 .89
"Lewis" Teaching Scholarships (Florida Legislature) . .. .. . ... 35,999.74
"Lewis" Summer School Scholarships .......... .. ..... 10,350 00
Vocational Rehabilitation (State).......... ...... . ... ... .. 15,669.11)
State Council for the Blind .... ................... .. . 4,158 10
University of Florida Graduate Scholarships ............. .. ... 34,000.00*
Rehabilitation Scholarship (Maine) ........ .... 236.05
Deaf and Blind (State of Florida) . . . ...... . ...... . 625.00
Inter-Anterican (University of Florida).. ................ . 2,663.80*
American Legion (State of Florida).. .. 3,235 90
Children of Deceased War Veterans....... ... 1,315.00


ENDOWMENT
4 Confederate Memorial . ......... .
11 Albert W Gilchbrist. ........ ...... ..
6i Arthur Ellis Hamm....... .. ..
13 Charles E. Tuft Memorial. ... ...
11I John and Fannie Ruge Memorial.......... .
5 Loring M emorial.......... ..... .......
1 Cecil Wilcox Memorial ..... .... ...
5 David Levy Yulee Memorial. .. ..........

COUNTY
1 Duval County Scholarship., ...............
2 Lake County Registration ... .........
2 Pinellas County Agricultural ... ........ .
I Manatee County Agricultural ... .....

* State Funds-University of Florida Budget.


.. ... s 1,800.00
...... 1,500 00
. . 825.00
.. 2,700 00
. .. .. 50 00
..... .. 400 00
.. 990.00
.. .... 3,205 85
............ 750.00
....... 900.00
... 475 00
...... .. 150.00
. .. ....... 400.00
. . 998.50
.. 320.00
... 350 00
. ..... 700 00
220 00
... 225.00
. .. 300.00


500 00
738.04
331.07
1,610 00
9,455 00
300.00
90.00
330.43


550.00
110 00
500 00
175 00






TABLE VIII (Cont'd)

C. Gifts and Grants for Scholarships (Con't)


Number


Donor
REAL ESTATE
A nne T M orris ........ .............................. .... ....... 240 .00
0. L. Schulstad .... . ........................ ... 240.00
Levie D Sm ith ... ............................ ........ ........ 240 .00
J. E. Hollenbeck .. .......... ......... . 240 00
Winter Havea Board ot Realtors. ... . . . ........... 240.00
The Keyes Company ..... . . . . . . . 720 00
Greater Daytona Beach Board of Realtors .................. .. ........ 240.00
Bradenton Board of Realtors ............ .. ............ . 240 00
Jacksonville Board of Realtors .. ....... .. . . .. 720,00
George C. Roughgarden............................ ...... . ... 240.00
Orlando Board of Realtors ..... ......................... .... 720.00
Lakeland Board of Realtors .. ... ......... ....... . . 480 00
Jay H earin .... ..... ......... . . ....... . 720 00
Tampa Board of Realtors ........................ . 1,200.00


3 St. Petersburg Board of Realtors... ................... .. .
2 West Palm Beach Board of Realtors. ..... ..

INDIVIDUAL
Two hundred shares of stock from E. I. duPont de Nemiours and Co. from
Mrs. Alfred I. duPont for a memorial scholarship fund in honor of her
husband and to lie known as the Alfred I. duPont Scholarship Fund


720 00
.180 00


32,000 00 $ 218,490.00


* State Funds-University of Florida Budget.


D. Miscellaneous Gifts and Grants


General Education Board (Grant for Spectographic Laboratory) .............. ........ $ 50,000.00
General Education Board (Grant for University Library ncud development of research on
the graduate level) ........ .............. ... ......... .. ...... 30,000 00
General Electric Company (One Electron Microscope) ............ ................... 10,000.00
Florida Power and Light Company (One cylinder Worthington 25 h.p. Diesel Engine)..... 1,000.00
Westinghouse Electric Company (Instruments) ... ... ............................ 200.00
General Electric Company (Electrical engineering equipment) ............ . ... 15,000 00
Wallace Tiernan Company (Sanitary Laboratory equipment) ........................... 600.00
Ivy Smith Company (Sanitary Laboratory equipment). ......... .. ................ 400.00
International Nickel Company (Metals Testing Equipment).... ..... ............. 150.00
Western Electric Company (Communication Equipment) ........... .... .. 3,500.00
War Assets Administration and other government agencies ....... .. .. ..... .... 034,236 80'*
Mr. T. C. Montgomery (five Santa Gertrudis yearlings) .............. .... ........ 350 00
Jewish Community Council of Jacksonville (for Judaica Collection) .................... 300.00


$1,045,736.80


E. Gifts of Undetermined Value


Mrs. Hasse 0. Enwall and Mr. Hayford 0. Enwall-700 books from the library of Dr. Hass( 0. Enwall-value unknown.
Mrs. S. R. MrDaniell-470 books from the library of Major W. L. Floyd-value unknown.
Mrs. Wallace Neff-valuable collection of manuscripts, letters, etc., relating to early L.evelopment of Florida and Civil War
Period, belonging to her father, Senator David Levy Yulee, Florida's first Senator-value unknown.
Mrs. Wallace Neff- portrait of Senator and Mrs. David Levy Yulee and of self-value unknown.


* Estimated.






TABLE IX


STUDENT LOANS

July 1, 1946-June 30, 1947



Nuniher of
Loan Fund Students Principal Loans Made


Tolbert . ..... 1,955 S 14,518.05 $ 56,518.05
lHuinbhl Oil.. .. . 25 30,004.50 3,775.00
Colonial Da. . ..... 18 1,220.36 913.75
Sumner School Exectivr .... 98 1,039.61 2,025.50

2.096 S 19,346.94 S 63,232.30




July 1, 1947-June 30, 1948



Sherrll. .. ...... .. 29 S 1,360 45 S 1,764 501
Ruge ....... . ........ ...... 60 8,249.00 11,735.50
Humble Oil.. .. ... ..... ...... 23 30,012.66 3,675.00
Verne E. Minich.. . . .. 2 1,013.50 400.00
Colonial Daiis. . .. ..... 1 1,277.01 1,445.00
Kappa Delta Pi . .1 546.25 300.00
Tolbert. .. . ..... 2.987 22,033 10 83,174.22
W illiam K. Jackson ..... 256.50 ......... ..
Rudolph Weaver. .. ........ ... . ..... 500.00 ........... ..
Florida Association of Architects . .... . . . . ... 94.94 ...........
A A. M urphrce .... ...... .. . ...... ... . 510 00 ..............
John J. Tigert ............... . . .. ........ 500.00 .......... .
Joseph W eil ....... .. ..................... .. 500 00 ........... ..
Southern R ailway . .... .. . .. .. .. ...... 2,968.23 ..............
East Florida Sem inary ...... .... .. . ........ .. ... 954.44 ..............
Alfred M. Kohn. ......... .... .. .. .. ..... 1 750.00 250.00
Suminoer Schoul Miscellaneis . . . ... 394 36 ........

3,121 8 72,650.44 S 102,744.22

I.?HAND TOTA . .... 5217 8 91,997 3S $ 165,976.52





TABLE X


RECAPITULATION
A. Gifts and Grants


A. Gifts and Granis for R esareh .
B. Gilts and Grants for Fellowthils ...
C. (lifts and Grants for Scholarships. .....
D M is(ellaneous. ...... ........ .....



LESS State Funds budgeted for Fcllowshil s and Sclmlarshi sa in University of Florida Budget..

TOTAL GIFTS AND GRANTS..


5 1 I '1912 lili
25. s1l( 51
21S,490 00
1,()45,736i 80

S1.83-1.956 02


48,183 80


, 1.786(, 172.22


B. Scholarships, Fellowships, Loans and Student Employment




Number Receiving Aid
905 Scholarships....... ..... .218.490 00 $.219,190 00
Lest State Budgeted Funds.... 36,663 80 1813 826 20

17 Fellowships ........ . $25,816 56 25,S11i.56
Lets State Budpeted 1, u,ds ......... 11,820 00 13,996i 50

922 New Funds from Miscellaneous Sources ... 195 822 711
TOTAL for Scholarships and Fellowships. ... .. .. .. 241,306 56


5,217 Loans ................ . 1i5,97 52
3,235 Student Emlloynient. 1,(il,00 00





BOOKS PUBLISHED BY THE FACULTY AND STAFF OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1944-1948


1944
Kokomoor, F. W. Popular Matematik. (Mathematics in Human Affairs, trans-
lated into the Swedish Language). Sweden: Meijels Bokindustri.
Olson, Clara M. A Community School of Social Action. Gainesville: College
of Education, Alfred P. Sloan Project in Applied Economics.
Patrick, R. W. Jefferson Davis and His Cabinet. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State
University Press.
Phelps, E. B. Steam Sanitation. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
Simpson, T. M. Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. Second Edition. Phila-
delphia: John C. Winston Company.


1945
Baringer, William E. A House Dividing-Lincoln as President-Elect. Springfield:
Abraham Lincoln Association.
Davidson, R. F. (Co-Author). Preface to Philosophy. New York: MacMillan.
Dickey, Dallas C. Seargent S. Prentiss, Whig Orator of the Old South. Baton
Rouge: Louisiana State University Press.
Fernandez, Pedro V. Por Esas Espanas. New York: Henry Holt.
Foote, P. A. (Co-Author). American Pharmacy, Vol. I Philadelphia: Lippincott.
Patrick, R. W. Florida Under Five Flags. Gainesville: University of Florida
Press.


1946
Bigham, T. C. Transportation: Principles and Problems. New York: McGraw-
Hill.
Byers, C. F. (Co-Author). El Hombre Y El Mundo Biologico. (Spanish transla-
tion of Man and the Biological World by Rogers, Hubbell, and Byers. A
textbook in biology published by McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York,
1942.) Buenos Aires: Libreria Hachette.
Ebaugh, E. C. Air Conditioning-Principles and Practice. Second Edition.
Atlanta: Southern Power and Industry.
Farris, E. W. Southern Horticultural Enterprises. Revised Edition. Philadelphia:
Lippincott.
Hayes, Francis C. Stephen Vincent Benet: The U. S. A. Sucre: Bolivia.
Hume, H. H. Camellias in America. Harrisburg: J. Horace McFarland Company.
Olson, Clara M., and Norman D. Fletcher. Learn and Live. New York: Alfred
P. Sloan Foundation.
Patrick, J. M. Hugh Peters, A Study in Puritanism. Buffalo: University of
Buffalo Press.





Pumphrey, F. H. Electrical Engineering-Essential Theory and Typical Appli-
cations. New York: Prentice-Hall.
Warfel, Harry R. Cuentistas Norteamericanos. Buenos Aires: W. M. Jackson, Inc.
Wofford, Kate V. Teaching in Small Schools. New York: MacMillan.

1947

Davidson, R. F. Rudolph Otto's Interpretation of Religion. Princeton: Princeton
University Press.
Foote, P. A. (Co-Author). U. S. Pharmacopoeia. Thirteenth Revision Easton:
U. S. Pharmacopoeial Convention, Inc.
Goggin, John M. An Anthropological Bibliography of the Eastern Seaboard.
New Haven: Federation at the Yale Peabody Museum.
Goin, C. J. Studies on the Life History of "Eleutherodactylus Ricordii Planiro-
stris" (Cope) in Florida. Gainesville: University of Florida Press.
Husa, W. J. Pharmaceutical Dispensing. Third Edition. Iowa City: Husa
Brothers.
Lytle, Andrew Nelson. A Name for Evil. (A Novel). Indianapolis: Bobbs-
Merrill.
Lytle, Andrew Nelson. Bedford Forrest and His Critter Company. Re-issue.
Putnam's: Minton, Balch.
Pierce, E. Lowe. An Annual Cycle of the Plankton and Chemistry of Four
Aquatic Habitats in Northern Florida. Gainesville: University of Florida
Press.
Warfel, Harry R. (Co-Author). The American Mind. Revised Edition. New
York: American Book Company.
Wise, J. H., J. E. Congleton, H. E. Spivey, and A. C. Morris. The Meaning in
Reading. Revised Edition. New York: Harcourt, Brace & Company.

1948

Fernandez, Pedro V., and F. C. Hayes. Beginning Spanish: A Conversational
Approach. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Fouts, E. L. Dairy Manufacturing Processes. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
Greaves-Walker, A. F. Drying Ceramic Products. Fourth Edition. Chicago:
Industrial Publications, Inc.
Grobman, Arnold B. Island Life: A Study of the Land Vertebrates of the
Islands of Eastern Lake Michigan. Cranbrook: Cranbrook Institute of
Science.
Hansen, H. J. Modern Timber Design. Second Edition. New York: John Wiley
& Sons.
Hansen, H. J. Timber Engineer's Handbook. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
Harmon, R. W., and C. B. Pollard. Bibliography of Animal Venoms. Gainesville:
University of Florida Press.
Hume, H. H.,Azaleas-Kinds and Culture. Harrisburg: J. Horace MacFarland
Company. New York: The MacMillan Company.





Palm, Raymond L. The Esthetic Aspect of Mimbres Culture. Sante Fe: Ridell
Press.
Patrick, J. Max. (Ed). The Essays of Francis Bacon. New York: Crofts.
Phelps, E. B. Public Health Engineering. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
Watkins, John V. ABC of Orchid Growing. Chicago: Ziff-Davis Publishing
Company.
West, Erdman, and Lillian E. Arnold. The Native Trees of Florida. Third
Printing. Gainesville: University of Florida Press.
Williams, C. D. Analysis of Statically Indeterminate Structures. Second Edition.
Scranton: International Textbook Company.




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