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Title: University record
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 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 1948
Copyright Date: 1943
Frequency: quarterly
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 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00218
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Departments of instruction and schedule of courses, summer session 1948
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Full Text





The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Schedule of Courses
FIRST TERM

Summer Session

1948


Series 1, No. 4


April 1, 1948


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act ol Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida


Vol. XLIII





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

First Term
All classes ordinarily meet for eighty minutes with a five minute recess at
the end of the first forty minutes. Classes scheduled to meet daily meet Mon-
day through Saturday.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to
register for graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean
of the Graduate School and the instructor concerned.

ABBREVIATIONS
Under the heading Dept. will be found the department name abbreviations
adopted for official records.
The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:


A BUILDING A
(Accounting)
AG AGRICULTURAL BUILDING
AE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEER-
ING LAB (Bldg. T 236
Alachua Air Base)
AU AUDITORIUM
B BUILDING B
(Civil Engineering)
BA BENTON ANNEX
BB BASKET BALL COURT
BN BENTON HALL
BU BUCKMAN HALL
C BUILDING C
(Mechanical Drawing)
CH CHEMISTRY BUILDING
DL DAIRY LABORATORY
E BUILDING E
(Classrooms and Laboratories)
EG ENGINEERING BUILDING
F BUILDING F
(Engineering)
FM FARM MACHINERY LABORA-
TORY
GH GREENHOUSE


GY GYMNASIUM
HL HYDRAULIC LABORATORY
HT HORTICULTURE BUILDING
I BUILDING I
(Classrooms)
K BUILDING K
(Classrooms)
LA LANGUAGE HALL
LI LIBRARY
LW LAW BUILDING
MI MILITARY BUILDING
NE NEWELL HALL
NL NUTRITION LABORATORY
PE PEABODY HALL
PO POULTRY LABORATORY
SC SCIENCE HALL
SE SEAGLE BUILDING
UA UNION ANNEX
VL VEGETABLE PRODUCTS
LABORATORY
WO WOOD PRODUCTS LABORA-
TORY
YN YONGE BUILDING


COMPREHENSIVE COURSES
C-11.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 10:00 T. AU. STAFF.
Lecture Section 12: 2:30 W. AU. STAFF.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


Section 101. 7:00 daily. E-178.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. E-178.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. E-178.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. E-178.
Section 105. 8:30 daily. E-179.
Section 106. 10:00 daily. E-179.

C-12.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 10:00 M. AU. STAFF.
Lecture Section 22: 8:30 Th. CH-AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. E-188.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. E-188.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. E-188.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. E-188.
Section 205. 7:00 daily. E-189.
Section 206. 8:30 daily. E-189.
Section 207. 10:00 daily. E-189.
Section 208. 11:30 daily. E-189.
C-11-12: Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the Interrelated problems
of the modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, In government, in
education, in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more
effective coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny
is made of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that
a consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.

C-21.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 11:30 T. BN-203. STAFF.
Lecture Section 12: 2:30 T. BN-203. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 daily. BN-205.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. BN-205.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. BN-205.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. BN-205.
Section 105. 1:00 daily. BN-205.

C-22.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 11:30 M. BN-203. STAFF.
Lecture Section 22: 2:30 M. BN-203. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. BN-201.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. BN-201.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. BN-201.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. BN-201.
Section 205. 1:00 daily. BN-201.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-21-22: An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with pa-ticular refer-
ence to man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain
the more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.

C-31.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 1:00 M. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 daily. LA-203.
Section 102. 7:00 daily. LA-314.
Section 103. 8:30 daily. LA-203.
Section 104. 8:30 daily. LA-314.
Section 105. 10:00 daily. LA-203.
Section 106. 10:00 daily. LA-314.
Section 107. 11:30 daily. LA-203.
Section 108. 11:30 daily. LA-314.
Section 109. 2:30 daily. LA-203.
Section 110. 2:30 daily. LA-314.
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 301. 7:00 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 302. 7:00 T. F. LA-209.
Section 303. 10:00 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 304. 10:00 T. F. LA-209.
Section 305. 2:30 M. Th. LA-209.

C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 1:00 T. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. LA-306.
Section 202. 7:00 daily. LA-307.
Section 203. 8:30 daily. LA-306.
Section 204. 10:00 daily. LA-307.
Section 205. 10:00 daily. LA-306.
Section 206. 11:30 daily. LA-307.
Section 207. 11:30 daily. LA-306.
Section 208. 2:30 daily. LA-307.
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 401. 8:30 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 402. 8:30 T. F. LA-209.
Section 403. 11:30 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 404. 11:30 T. F. LA-209.
Section 405. 2:30 T. F. LA-209.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


C-81-32: Reading, Speaking, and Writing. Designed to furnish the training in reading, speak-
ing and writing necessary for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter. This training
will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking,
in fundamentals of form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body and
voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their
interests and increasing their appreciation of literature.

C-41.-Practical Logic. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. SC-212.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. SC-212.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. SC-212.
Section 4. 11:30 daily. SC-212.
Section 5. 1:00 daily. SC-212.
Both in private life and in vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking. In this
course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, (2) to be able to use objective standards necessary in critically
evaluating his own thinking process and product as well as the conclusions reached by others,
and (8) to record both process and product of thinking in effective language. The material used
applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure practice, many
illustrations are given, and numerous exercises are assigned.

C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. PE-2.
Section 2. 7:00 daily. E-117.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. PE-2.
Section 4. 8:30 daily. E-117.
Section 5. 10:00 daily. PE-2.
Section 6. 10:00 daily. E-117.
Section 7. 11:30 daily. PE-2.
Section 8. 11:30 daily. E-117.
Section 9. 1:00 daily. PE-2.
Section 10. 2:30 daily. PE-2.
A general elementary beginning course covering the development of the number system,
algebra as a generalization of arithmetic, the application of algebra to practical problems,
geometry, elementary trigonometry, logarithms, and the mathematics of finance. This course is
designed for students who do not intend necessarily to specialize in mathematics, but it may be
taken by those who plan to continue their mathematical work. Not open to students who have
completed Basic Mathematics.

C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:30 M. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 daily. E-175.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. E-175.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. E-175.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. E-175.
Section 105. 1:00 daily. E-175.
Section 106. 4:00 daily. E-175.
Section 107. 7:00 daily. E-176.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section 108. 8:30 daily. E-176.
Section 109. 10:00 daily. E-176.
Section 110. 11:30 daily. E-176.
Section 111. 1:00 daily. E-176.
Section 112. 4:00 daily. E-176.
Section 113. 7:00 daily. E-118.
Section 114. 8:30 daily. E-118.
Section 115. 10:00 daily. E-118.
C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 2:30 T. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. E-177.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. E-177.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. E-177.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. E-177.
Section 205. 1:00 daily. E-177.
Section 206. 4:00 daily. E-177.
Section 207. 11:30 daily. E-118.
Section 208. 1:00 daily. E-118.
C-51-52: The Humanities. A course designed to provide an understanding and appreciation
of the literature, philosophy, art and music in which the enduring values of human life have
found expression. The course deals both with our cultural heritage and with the culture of our
own day. Its larger purpose is to enable the student to develop a mature sense of values, an
enlarged appreciation and a philosophy of life adequate for the needs of our age.
C-61.-Biological Science. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 101. 7:00 daily. 1-101.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. 1-101.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. 1-101.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. 1-101.
Section 105. 2:30 daily. 1-101.
Section 106. 7:00 daily. 1-107.
Section 107. 8:30 daily. 1-107.
Section 108. 10:00 daily. 1-107.
Section 109. 11:30 daily. 1-107.
Section 110. 1:00 daily. 1-107.
C-62.-Biological Science. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 201. 7:00 daily. 1-109.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. 1-109.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. 1-109.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. 1-109.
Section 205. 1:00 daily. 1-109.
Section 206. 2:30 daily. 1-109.
C-61-62: The biological problems and principles associated with the organism's role s:
(1) a living individual, (2) a member of a race, (3) a product of evolutionary processes, anad
(4) a member of a socially and economically inter-related complex of living organism supply
the main sequence and material of the course.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


ACCOUNTING

Atg. 211.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The first half of the course Atg.
211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-2.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. A-2. TORNWALL, G. E.
Section 3. 11:30 daily. A-2. ScoTT, N. H.
Section 4. 1:00 daily. A-2. PETERSTON, E. G.
Atg. 211-212: Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting.
A study of business papers and records; recording transactions; preparation of financial statement
and reports. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

Atg. 212.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The second half of the course
Atg. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-3.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. A-3.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. A-1. ANDERSON, C. A.
Section 4. 10:00 daily. A-3. PETERSON, E. G.
Section 5. 11:30 daily. A-3. ANDERSON, C. A.

Atg. 310.-Accounting Mathematics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-1. RAY, D. D.
Section 2. 1:00 daily. A-3. RAY, D. D.
Open only to students who have completed Atg. 211 and 212 and should be currently registered
in Atg. 311. The computations will apply directly to accounting problems considered primarily
in Atg. 811 and other Upper Division courses in accounting.

Atg. 311.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-4. MOSHIER, W. F.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. A-2. HUMBLE, T. N.
Section 3. 1:00 daily. A-4. GRADY, R. S.
The mechanical and statiscal aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts; fiscal period
and adjustments; working papers; form and preparation of financial statements; followed by
an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the preparation of
the balance sheet and income statements.

Atg. 312.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 311.
10:00 daily. A-4. GRADY, R. S.
Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from
the legal organization form used by businesses; liabilities; proprietorship; partnerships; corpora-
tions; capital stock; surplus; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as
disclosed by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements; financial ratios and standards,
their preparation, meaning, and use.

Atg. 313.-Cost Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 311.
11:30 daily. A-4. DAVAULT, J. W.
The methods of collection, classification, and interpretation of cost data; special problems,
standard costs, cost systems, uses of cost data in business control. Lectures and problems.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Atg. 411.-Advanced Accounting. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 312.
8:30 daily. A-4. GRADY, R. S.
Specialized accounting problems; mathematics of accounting; statement of affairs; consign-
ments; installments; ventures; insurance; and other related subjects.

Atg. 417.-Governmental Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 312.
1:00 daily. A-1. HUMBLE, T. N.
The basic principles underlying fund accounting. Detailed consideration is given to the
preparation and use of the budget, system of accounts, special vouchers, records, statements.

Atg. 418.-Advanced Accounting. C.P.A. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
Atg. 312.
10:00 daily. A-1. DAVAULT, J. W.
A continuation of the study of specialized accounting problems; receiverships; foreign ex-
change; stock brokerage; estates and trusts; budgets; business taxes; consolidations and
mergers; and other problems usually covered in C.P.A. examinations.


GRADUATE COURSE

Atg. 511.-Accounting Theory. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 418.
11:30 daily. A-1. LANHAM, J. S.
The theory behind accounting functions in their relation to the business enterprise.


AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

An. 301.-Aviation. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205-6-7-8, appropriate medical
and C.A.A. certificates and insurance coverage.
To arrange. STAFF.
(This course is evaluated as maximum load for one summer session.)
A laboratory course open only to aeronautical engineering majors who have not had flight
piloting experience. Theory of flight, elementary meterorology and navigation, radio, civil air
regulations, general service of aircraft, and actual flight instruction to familiarize the student
with actual flight problems and the performance of the airplane. This course leads to the
Private Pilot certificate. This is an extra fee course, the laboratory fee approximating $500.00.
This course will be given in accordance with C.A.A. Manual 50 for the Private Pilot.


AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

Acy. 125.-Agricultural Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Acy.
125-126.
(Register for the Lecture Demonstration, Section 1, and one Discussion
Section, 11 or 12.)
Section 1. 10:00 M. W. F. S. CH.-Aud. NOVAK, A. F.
10:00 T. Th. CH.-Aud. NOVAK, A. F.
Section 11. 11:30 M. F. CH.-212. NOVAK, A. F.
Section 12. 11:30 W. S. CH.-212. NOVAK, A. F.
Section 13. 7:00 T. F. CH.-110. NOVAK, A. F.
A basic course embodying selected fundamentals of both inorganic and organic chemistry and
designed primarily for agricultural students. Suitable also for the general student who wishes b
non-laboratory course in science.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

As. 201.-Agricultural Economics. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. AG-210. GREENMAN, J. R.
An introduction to the field of agricultural economics; principles of economics as applied
to agriculture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.

As. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal. 3 credits.
7:00 M. T. W. Th. F. AG-209. BROOKER, M. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 W. AG-209.
Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given
to the Farm Credit Administration. Field trips, at an estimated cost of $3 paid at time trips
are made.

As. 306.-Farm Management. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. AG-104. BROOKER, M. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. AG-104.
The factors of production; systems of farming, their distribution and adaption; problems
of labor, machinery, layout of farms, and farm reorganization. Field trips, at an estimated
cost of $3 paid at time trips are made.

As. 413.-Agricultural Policy. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. HT-409. GREENMAN, J. R.
A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. Evaluation of present legislative programs
and policies affecting the farmer.

GRADUATE COURSES

As. 505.-Research Problems in Farm Management.
To arrange.

As. 511.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products.
To arrange.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 3 credits.
7:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-210. CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. FM.
The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power. The care, oper-
ation, and repair of electric motors, internal combustion engines (including automobile, stationary
gasoline engines, truck and tractor), and windmills. Laboratory work includes actual operation
and repair.

Ag. 303.-Farm Shop. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-210. CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. FM.
The farm shop jobs that are common to the farms of Florida. Carpentry, concrete con-
struction, light forging, soldering, tool care and repair are some of the jobs given special emphasis.
Laboratory work includes actual shop practice.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

GRADUATE COURSES

Axt. 502.-Advanced Rural Leadership. 1 credits. (June 14 to July 2.) The
last half of the course Axt. 501-502. Open only to Agricultural Extension
workers.
1:00 daily. NE-404. HAMPSON, C. M., and STAFF.
Advanced training in the art of rural leadership.

Axt. 508.-Advanced Agricultural Extension Service Youth Programs. 1%
credits. (June 14 to July 2.) The last half of the course Axt. 507-508.
Open only to Agricultural Extension workers.
10:00 daily. NE-404. HAMPSON, C. M.
Advanced training in developing end conducting 4-H Boys' and Girls' Club work and other
Extension rural youth programs.

AGRONOMY

Ay. 321.-General Field Crops. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-302. SENN, P. H.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. AG-302. SENN, P. H.
A study of the grain, fiber, sugar, peanut, tobacco, forage and miscellaneous field crops,
with special emphasis on varieties and practices recommended for southern United States. The
history, botanical characteristics, soil and climatic adaptations, fertilizer and culture practices,
growing processes, harvesting, uses, economic production and cropping systems are discussed.

GRADUATE COURSE

Ay. 526.-Special Agronomic Problems. 3 credits.
To arrange. SENN, P. H.
Library, laboratory, or field studies relating to crop production and improvement. Experi-
ments are studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.

ANIMAL PRODUCTION

Al. 309.-General Animal Husbandry. 4 credits.
7:00 daily. AG-104. PACE, J. E.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 T. Th. AG-104.
Types and breeds of farm animals; principles of breeding, selection and management.

AL 311.-Elementary Nutrition. 4 credits.
8:30 daily. AG-104. WINCHESTER, C. F.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 M. W. AG-104.
Elements and compounds, metabolic processes in animal nutrition; biological assays.

Al. 314.-Livestock Judging. 3 credits.
8:30 T. Th. S. AG-102. PACE, J. E.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 M. W. F. AG-102.
Special training in livestock judging; show ring methods; contests at fairs.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSES

Al. 501.-Advanced Animal Production. 3 credits.
To arrange.
Assignment of abstracting scientific articles in the fields of animal production, nutrition and
genetics. Reviews and discussions.

Al. 509.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 1 to 4 credits. (Credit assigned must
be shown on registration blank.)
To arrange.

ARCHITECTURE

Ae. 101.-Fundamentals of Architecture. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 11. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-301. KORUTURK, S. S.
Section 12. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-401. WILLIAMS, R. L.
Section 13. 1:00 to 5:30 daily. UA-301. FEARNEY, E. M.
A creative introductory course consisting of a series of beginning projects each of which
involves an analysis of human actions and needs, the design of a simple building to meet those
needs, and a study of the problems involved in the process. Emphasis is placed upon the creation
of buildings to meet the requirements of use. Drawing of all kinds is taught, not in a formal
manner, but as an incidental accompaniment to design. A study of principles of design and of
materials and methods of construction forms an integral part of the work from the beginning.
Projects 1 to 6 inclusive. The first half of the course, projects 1 to 3 inclusive, is equivalent
to 3 credits, and the second half, projects 4 and 5, is equivalent to 8 credits.

Ae. 102.-Fundamentals of Architecture. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 11. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-301. KORUTURK, S. S.
Section 12. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-401. WILLIAMS, R. L.
Section 13. 1:00 to 5:30 daily. UA-301. FEARNEY, E. M.
A continuation of Ae. 101. Projects 6 to 9 inclusive. The first half of the course, projects
6 and 7, is equivalent to 3 credits, and the second half, projects 8 and 9, is equivalent to 3 credits.

Ae. 324.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 4. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. PE-206. GARLAND, J. E., MABRY, A. E.
A continuation of Ae. 323.

Ae. 415.-Projects in Architecture, Group 5. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. PE-201. MABRY, A. E., Rost, H. C.
A continuation of Ae. 314.

Ae. 416.-Thesis in Architecture. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. PE-201. Rost, H. C.
A continuation of Ae. 415.

BACTERIOLOGY

Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: C-6, or equivalent;
Cy. 101-102, or Acy. 125-126.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one of the Laboratory Sections.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 daily. SC-111. CARROLL, W. R.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. SC-104. CARROLL, W. R.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 4:00 W. F. SC-104. CARROLL, W. R.
Morphology, physiology, and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms.

GRADUATE COURSES

Bey. 500.-Advanced Bacteriology. Variable credit.
To arrange. CARROLL, W. R.
Problems in Pathogenic. Dairy. Sanitary. Industrial, Food and Soil Bacteriology.
The following Bacteriology courses are taught in the Bureau of Laboratories,
State Board of Health, Jacksonville, and are open only to qualified Board of
Health workers approved by the staff of the State Board of Health. Such persons
must meet regular admission requirements and follow same registration pro-
cedures as resident students.

Bey. 600.-Advanced Public Health Bacteriology and Parasitology. 1 to 6 credits.
(Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.) MITCHELL and STAFF.
Public health aspects of Bacteriology and Parasitology. Treats of etiology, epidemiology,
laboratory diagnosis of all of the important disease.

Bey. 610.-Advanced Immunology and Serology. 1 to 6 credits. (Credit assigned
must be shown on registration blank.) MITCHELL and STAFF.
Principles of immunology and serology as applied to the prevention of diseases and public
health.

Bey. 620.-Laboratory Administration. 1 to 6 credits. MITCHELL and STAFF.
(Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.)
Methods employed in managing or directing a bureau of laboratories or a division thereof.

Bey. 690.-Research. 1 to 6 credits. (Credit assigned must be shown on regis-
tration blank.) MITCHELL and STAFF.
Recent advances in the field of public health investigation. Opportunity is offered for the
student to do original research under the supervision of the staff, on one of the public health
problems of Florida. Field studies are combined with laboratory investigations.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 3 credits. No credit toward
a major or group major in the College of Arts and Sciences except with the
specific permission of the Head of the Department. A service course offered
for the special needs of various groups of students.
1:00 M. W. F. SC-111. LAESSLE, A. M.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. SC-205.
Designed to provide a recognition and an acquaintance with some of the more common animals
and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question, "What
animal-or what plant-is that?" Individual work in the field and the making of personal refer-
ence collections of plants and animals are encouraged.

Bly. 161.-Biology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-61.
Section 11. 7:00 to 10:00 M. W. F. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.
Section 12. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Section 13. 7:00 to 10:00 T. Th. S. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.
Section 14. 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. S. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.
An introductory laboratory course dealing with cells, the organization of a mammal and of
the major groups of plants and animals.

Bly. 209.-Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Section 1: 10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. SC-111. GROBMAN, A. B.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 11. 7:00 to 10:00 M. W. F. SC-107. GROBMAN, A. B.
Section 12. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. SC-107. GROBMAN, A. B.
The morphology and classification of chordate animals.

Bly. 411.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 2, 3 or 4 credits.* Prere-
quisite: At least twelve credits in approved major courses in Biology and
permission of the Head of the Department. Qualified students and the
instructor concerned may choose a particular topic or problems for study.

GRADUATE COURSES

Bly. 507.-Taxonomic Studies. 3 to 5 credits.*
To arrange. STAFF.
A detailed classification of a selected group of animals, well represented in the local fauna.

Bly. 511.-Florida Wild Life. 3 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.
Studies in the application of ecological principles to specific wild-life research and to the
practice of wild-life conservation.

Bly. 513.-Vertebrate Morphology. 3 to 5 credits.*
To arrange. SHERMAN, H. B., and GROBMAN, A. B.

Bly. 515.-Invertebrate Morphology. 3 to 5 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.

Bly. 519.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.
Bly. 519-520 is required of all applicants for the Master's Degree. Each applicant undertakes
an approved individual problem in biology, the results of which will be presented in a Master's
thesis. Such problems will be carried out under the direction of a member of the staff. Problems
may be chosen from one of the following fields: vertebrate or invertebrate morphology or
embryology; classification or taxonomy of certain approved groups; natural history or distribution
of a selected group of local animals; investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area.

Bly. 521.-Natural History of Selected Animals. 3 to 5 credits.*
To arrange. STAFF.
A detailed study of the life history or life histories and ecological relationships of some species
or natural groups of local animals.

Bly. 523.-Natural History of Selected Animals. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Bly. 533.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature. 2 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.
A critical study of selected taxonomic synopses, revisions and monographs with special
reference to the bearing of the principles and concepts of distribution, genetics and ecology on
taxonomic problems.

Bly. 541.-Problems in Game Management. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.
The application of a taxonomic and ecological background to various specific problems of
Florida game and wild life management.

Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.

BOTANY

Bty. 303.-General Botany. 3 credits. The first half of the course Bty. 303-304.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one of the Laboratory Sections.)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. FORD, E. S.
Lecture Section 2: 10:00 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory Section 11: 8:30 to 11:30 T. Th. SC-2. FORD, E. S.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 4:00 W. F. SC-2. DAVIS, J. H.
A study of the form, structure, growth, reproduction, physiology and functions of plants and
their various organs; relation of plants to their environment and to each other; principles under-
lying inheritance, variation and organic evolution. Required of students majoring in Botany.
Bacteriology and Plant Pathology.

Bty. 308.-Plant Taxonomy. 4 credits.
11:30 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. FORD, E. S.
Laboratory: 8:30 to 11:30 M. W. and 7:00 to 1:00 S. SC-1. FORD, E. S.
Principles of classification of plants and the use of manuals for the identification of common
seed plants and ferns.

Bty. 311.-Plant Physiology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: Bty. 303 or 304, Acy.
125-126, or equivalent. Desirable prerequisites: SIs. 301, Pt. 321.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. T. Th. F. SC-1. DAVIS, J. H.
A study of absorption, assimilation, transpiration, respiration, growth, water relation, and
other functions of plants.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bs. 291.-Real Estate Fundamentals. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-201. RING, A. A.
A survey of the real estate field with emphasis on the essentials that concern the consumer.
The aim is to develop a fuller understanding of the significance of realty as a commodity and
to equip the student with the fundamentals essential to successful home ownership. Classroom
lectures and problems are further designed to provide a qualifying background for those seeking
further training in real estate law, brokerage, management, appraising and real estate finance.

Bs. 333.-Salesmanship and Sales Management. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. AG-108. GOODWIN, F.
An introduction to selling. Analysis of types, stages, problems and psychology of selling
situations.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Bs. 360.-Fundamentals of Insurance. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-201. MASON, R. W.
A study of the basic fundamentals underlying the business of insurance as a prerequisite
for more advanced and detailed work in the subject, designed to serve two distinct needs:
(1) to give students of economics and commerce a general knowledge of the subject: and (2) to
lay a foundation for the future work of those interested in entering the business.

Bs. 390.-Property Valuation. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-201. RING, A. A.
Meaning of value; influence of population growth; F.H.A. system and its effect on appraising
technique; capitalizing income; depreciation; appraising homes, business property, apartment
houses, office buildings, special purpose buildings; appraisals and taxation.

Bs. 393.-Urban Land Utilization. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-202. GUILD, C. J.
Land and population; economics of land utilization; urbanization and urban land; manu-
facturing as an urbanizing factor; labor as a factor; transportation and commerce in city location
and urbanization.

Bs. 401.-Business Law. 3 credits. The first half of the course Bs. 401-402.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. 1-202. GAITANIS, L. A.
Section 2. 7:00 daily. 1-201. MASON, R. W.
Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal and third party; termi-
nation of the relationship of agency. Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales and
mortgages of personal property; the law of negotiable instruments.

Bs. 402.-Business Law. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-202. GAITANIS, L. A.
Sales: Formation and performance of contracts of sale of personal property; remedies of
sellers and buyers for breach. Negotiable Instruments: Formation and operation of negotiable
contract; rights and obligations of various parties on negotiable instrument; discharge.

Bs. 422.-Investments. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 321.
11:30 daily. 1-206. RICHARDSON, J. G.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.

Bs. 427.-Principles and Problems of Corporation Finance. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-208. MCFERRIN, J. B.
Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of the economic and legal forms of business
enterprise; the instruments of business finance; financial problems as they relate to the ordinary
operations of the business involving working capital, income, dividend policy, current borrowing,
credit extension, and the business cycle.

Bs. 440.-Trade Relations in Caribbean America. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. SC-208. PIERSON, W. H.
A regional trade course covering the West Indies, Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and
Venezuela. The commercial importance of each republic and island as a market for American
goods and as a source of raw materials and foodstuffs; Florida's commercial position in such trade.

Bs. 492.-Real Estate Finance. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-201. GUILD, C. J.
Functions of real estate finance; the loan contract; the mortgage market; elements of mort-
gage risk; loan policy and administration of loans; analysis of current mortgage market conditions.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BUSINESS EDUCATION

NOTE: These courses, with the exception of BEn. 461, do not count as credit
in Education.

BEn. 81.-Introductory Typewriting. 2 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. YN-306. CREWS, J. W.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. YN-306. CREWS, J. W.
Introduction to touch typewriting; practice upon personal and business problems.

BEn. 91.-Introductory Shorthand. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-305. CREWS, J. W.
Introduction to Gregg shorthand by the functional method.

BEn. 97.-Handwriting. 1 credit.
7:00 P.M. M. T. YN-315. TISON, J. P.
Primarily for those training to become elementary school teachers.

BEn. 181.-Advanced Typewriting. 2 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-306. MAXWELL, H. C.
Emphasis will be placed on increased speed and special forms, including reports and manu-
scripts.

BEn. 191.-Shorthand Dictation. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-305. MAXWELL, H. C.
Dictation is developed with emphasis on both speed and accuracy.

BEn. 291.-Shorthand Dictation and Transcription. 2 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-306. MAXWELL, H. C.
An advanced course in Gregg shorthand to develop a higher degree of skill in taking dictation.
Transcription speed from shorthand notes is emphasized.

BEn. 461.-Principles of Business Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-305.
Undertakes to develop an understanding of the purposes, administration, and supervision of
business education.

BEn. 462.-Teaching Secretarial Studies. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-305.
Designed for teachers of business subjects or those in preparation for teaching. It includes
a study of the curriculum, materials, and methods of teaching the secretarial subjects.

GRADUATE COURSES

BEn. 561.-Principles of Business Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-305.
A study of the purposes of business education; problems relating to the development of an
appropriate program; problems in administration and supervision.

BEn. 562.-Teaching Secretarial Studies. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-305.
Comprehensive study of the curriculum, materials, and methods of teaching the secretarial
subjects.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Cg. 361.-Materials of Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Cy. 102 or Cy.
106, and Ps. 206.
8:30 daily. F-101. SCHWEYER, H. E.
Production, properties and uses of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, cement, bricks,
politics, timber, etc.
Cg. 447.-Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cg.
346.
10:00 daily. BN-209. BEISLER, W. H.
The fundamental chemical engineering operations; fluid flow, heat transmission, evaporation,
humidity, etc.
GRADUATE COURSE
Cg. 580.-Research in Chemical Engineering. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.

Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.

CHEMISTRY
Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102.
(Register for the Lecture, one Discussion Section and one Laboratory
Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. S. CH-Aud. STEARNS, T. W.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 1:00 T. Th. CH-110. STEARNS, T. W.
Section 12. 2:30 T. Th. CH-110. BLALOCK, J. G.
Section 13. 4:00 T. Th. CH-110. BOWEN, F. J.
Section 14. 1:00 M. W. CH-110. BARRETT, W. B.
Section 15. 2:30 M. W. CH-110.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 1:00 to 5:30 M. F. E-166. STEARNS, T. W.
Section 102. 1:00 to 5:30 M. F. E-166. BOWEN, F. J.
Section 103. 1:00 to 5:30 M. F. E-166. BLALOCK, J. G.
Section 104. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. E-166. BARRETT, W. B.
Section 105. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. E-166.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and properties of the
common non-metalic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 105.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 105-
106. Prerequisites: Upper percentile rating in placement tests in physical
sciences and mathematics or satisfactory completion of C-2. In general,
freshmen should present evidence that they have had high school chemistry.
(Register for the Lecture, one Discussion Section and one Laboratory
Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 2:30 M. T. Th. F. CH-Aud. LEMMERMAN, L. V.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 8:30 M. W. CH-402. LEMMERMAN, L. V.
Section 12. 10:00 M. W. CH-402. LEMMERMAN, L. V.
Section 13. 7:00 M. W. CH-110.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 to 11:30 T. Th. E-166. INGWALSON, R. W.
Section 102. 7:00 to 11:30 T. Th. E-166.
Section 103. 7:00 to 11:30 T. Th. E-166.
A first course designed to meet the requirements of engineering students. This course includes
some qualitative analysis.

Cy. 201.-Analytical Chemistry (Qualitative). 4 credits. The first half of the
course Cy. 201-202.
(Register for the Lecture, one Discussion Section and one Laboratory
Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 1:00 M. T. Th. F. CH-Aud. RIETZ, E. G.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 10:00 T. Th. CH-212. RIETZ, E. G.
Section 12. 8:30 T. Th. CH-402. BLALOCK, J. G.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 8:30 to 1:00 M. W. CH-130. BLALOCK, J. G.
Section 102. 8:30 to 1:00 M. W. CH-130. RIETZ, E. G.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.

Cy. 203.-Analytical Chemistry (Qualitative). 3 credits. The first half of the
course Cy. 203-204.
10:00 M. W. F. S. CH-212.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. CH-130.
A course in qualitative analysis offered primarily for students in Pharmacy.

Cy. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 daily. CH-212. BUTLER, G. B.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. CH-230. BUTLER, G. B.
Section 102. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. CH-230.
Section 103. 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. CH-230.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds.

Cy. 401.-Physical Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 401-402.
Prerequisites: One year of College Physics, Cy. 202, and Ms. 353-354.
8:30 daily. CH-110. HAWKINS, J. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. CH-204. TUCKER, W. C.

GRADUATE COURSES
Cy. 533.-Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 3 credits.
To arrange. GROPP, A. H.
Cy. 570.-Research in Inorganic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. JACKSON, V. T.
Cy. 571.-Research in Analytical Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. BLACK, A. P., GROPP, A. H.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Cy. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange, POLLARD, C. B., or BUTLER, G. B.
Cy. 573.-Research in Physical Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. HAWKINS, J. E., PHILLIPS, L. R., GROPP, A. H.
Cy. 574.-Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. HAWKINS, J. E.
Cy. 575.-Research in Sanitary Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. BLACK, A. P.

Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 223.-Surveying. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ms. 105-106 or Trigonometry.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 M. T. W. Th. B-109. MOBLEY, G. S.
Laboratory Section 11: 8:30 to 11:30 M. W. F. B-108. MOBLEY, G. S.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. B-108.
The use of chain, level and transit; traversing and balancing surveys, calculating stress.
contour work; line azimuth by sun observation, stadia surveying; topographic mapping; land
subdivision.

Cl. 311.-Structural Drawing. 2 credits. Prerequisites: Ml. 182, Ig. 365.
10:00 to 1:00 daily. K-103.
Structural representation; detailing beams, columns, trusses, built-up girders, riveted and
welded joints, reinforced concrete members, and timber connections from design drawings.

CL 313.-Fluid Mechanics. 4 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205, Ms. 354.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 daily. HL-100. EDSON.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. HL-302.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. HL-100.
Mechanics of compressible and incompressible fluids. Special emphasis on viscosity effects,
Bernoulli's theorem, surface and form resistance, force momentum principles, lift and drag, laws
of similarity and dimensional analysis. Study includes statics, kinetics, and dynamics, and the
application of basic principles to the flow of fluids through measuring devices and pipes, and
around immersed bodies.

Cl. 323.-Materials Laboratory. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365. Corequisite:
Ig. 367.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M.W. HL-301. COMINS.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. COMINS.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. COMINS.
Study of the principal materials used for engineering purposes with special attention to their
physical properties and the reasons for the importance of these properties to the engineer,
including definitions and methods of measurement.

Cl. 326.-Statics of Simple Structures. 4 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365.
8:30 daily. HL-302. SAWYER, W. L.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. HL-301. SPANGLER, B. D.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Applications of the methods of statics to structural analysis; a correlation between graphical
and analytical methods; moments, shears, reactions, resultants, stress diagrams, and influence
lines for statically determinate structures.

Cl. 426.-Water Supply and Treatment. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CL 813.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. HL-302. GRANTHAM.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. HL-301. GRANTHAM.
Sources of supply, methods of treatment; the design of water systems Including supply,
treatment and distribution.

GRADUATE COURSES

Cl. 527.-Advanced Sanitary Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CL. 426,
Cl. 429.
To arrange. EMERSON, D. L.
An advanced study of the biological, chemical and physical principles utilized in water,
sewage and industrial waste treatment processes.

CL 529.-Advanced Sanitary Engineering Design. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CL
527, Cl. 588.
To arrange. GRANTHAM.
Special problems in the design of water, sewage and industrial waste plants.

CL 547.-Advanced Highway Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cl. 489,
Cl. 450.
To arrange. RITTER.
Special problems in the fields of highway planning, design and construction.

Cl. 548.-Advanced Soil Mechanics. 1 to 6 credits. (Credit assigned must be
shown on registration blank.) Prerequisite: Cl. 424.
To arrange. RITTER.
Special problems in the application of soil mechanics to the design and construction of
buildings, foundations, dams, levels and highways.

CL 549.-Experimental Stress Analysis. 3 credits. Corequisite: Cl. 538.
To arrange. SAWYER, W. L.
Structural similarity; preparation of models; deformater methods of analysis; polarized light
studies; current literature; strain gage methods of analysis.

DAIRYING

Dy. 311.-Principles of Dairying. 3 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. DL-203. ARRINGTON, L. R.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. DL-203.
Composition and properties of milk; sanitary milk production; common methods of analyzing
milk; common dairy processes; farm methods of handling milk; dairy breeds, selection, breeding,
and raising of dairy battle.

Dy. 419.--Cheese Making. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. DL-203. ARRINGTON, L. R.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 W. F.
The manufacture of soft cheeses; a study of the manufacture and ripening of American cheese,
and other varieties being manufactured commercially.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSE

Dy. 521.-Problems in Milk Products. 1 to 4 credits.
To arrange.

ECONOMICS

Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics. 4 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 10:00 daily. PE-1. JACKSON, E. L.
1:00 to 2:30 M. W. PE-1.
Section 2. 7:00 daily. PE-1. TURLINGTON, R. D.
1:00 to 2:30 T. Th. PE-1.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. PE-1. ANDERSON, M. D.
2:30 to 4:00 T. Th. PE-1.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,
sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. Prerequisite
for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

Es. 205.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Es. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. 1-205. WILCOX, J. P.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. 1-205. MANSFIELD, L. F.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. 1-205. MEEK, W. T.
This is an introductory course in economics designed primarily to meet the requirements
of all University students who feel the need for a workable knowledge of the economic system.
Emphasis is placed on analyses and descriptions of the more important economic organizations and
institutions which, in their functional capacities, constitute the economic order. Economic principles
and processes are explained, especially those relating to an understanding of value, price, cost,
rent, interest, wages, profit, money, banking, commerce, foreign exchange, foreign trade and
business cycles. The first half of the course Es. 205-206 is devoted largely to the study of economic
organizations and institutions and to the principles governing value and price. It may be taken
for credit without the second half.

Es. 206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. The second half of
the course Es. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 1:00 daily. 1-203. JACKSON, E. L.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. 1-203.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. 1-203. RICHARDSON, J. G.
Section 4. 11:30 daily. 1-203. MCFERRIN, J. B.
Section 5. 7:00 daily. 1-203. SHIELDS, M. W.

Es. 208.-Economic History of the United States. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-206. TUTTLE, F. W.
The industrial development of America: the exploitation of natural resources; the history
of manufacturing, banking, trade, transportation, etc.; the evolution of industrial centers: the
historical factors contributing to the growth of the United States.

Es. 246.-The Consumption of Wealth. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-209. SHIELDS, M. W.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of con-
sumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand.

Es. 321.-Financial Organization of Society. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Es. 321-322. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
11:30 daily. 1-208. TUTTLE, F. W.
An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary,
banking and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu-
tions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to
the economic system as a whole.

Es. 327.-Public Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
1:00 daily. 1-201. MEEK, W. T.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; source of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.

Es. 335.-Economics of Marketing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
10:00 daily. 1-208. TURLINGTON, R. D.
The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular atten-
tion given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages,
and comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying
on trade operations; retail and wholesale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of
marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition; the relation of the government to marketing.

Es. 351.-Elements of Transportation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
8:30 daily. LA-201. BIGHAM, T. C.
Significance, history, facilities, and economic characteristics of transportation agencies;
theory of rates; rate structures; present system and problems of regulation and promotion of all
forms of inter-city transportation.

Es. 382.-Principles of Resource Utilization.
7:00 daily. SC-208. DIETTRICH, S. R.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation,
with special reference to Florida.

Es. 404.-Government Control of Business. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
10:00 daily. AG-108. GOODWIN, F.
A study of the evolution of economic control: an examination of the effectiveness of laeses
fair control in the American economy; legality and chief methods of effectuating the govern-
mental control; the development of the relationship between government and non-public utility
monopolies; Federal Trade Commission control of competitive practice: a critical appraisal of
recent development in the field of government control

Es. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Es. 407-408. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
10:00 daily. PE-112. ELDRIGE, J. G.
An advanced course in economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic mal-
adjustments arising from the operation of economic forces.

Es. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The second half of the
course Es. 407-408.
11:30 daily. PE-112. ELDRIDGE, J. G.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Es. 469.-Business Cycles and Forecasting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 203.
11:30 daily. PE-1. ANDERSON, M. D.
A survey of the problems of the reduction of business risk by forecasting general business
conditions; statistical methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting.

Es. 487.-Economic Geography of Europe. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. SC-208. PIERSON, W. H.
A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjust-
ments in Europe and in its commercial connections with the other continents, especially with
North America.

GRADUATE COURSES

Es. 508.-Present-day Schools of Economic Thought. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-206. WEBB, J. N.
An examination of the main currents of contemporary American and English economic
thinking with particular reference to the developments occurring between the two World Wars.
The writings of Hansen, Mitchell, Clark and Commons, in the United States, and of Keynes, Cole,
Robinson. and Hobson in England will be examined.

Es. 537.-Imperfect Competitions. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. 1-212.
A comprehensive review of recent attempts to reconstruct economic theory in terms of
"imperfect" or "monopolistic" competition.

EDUCATION

En. 241.-Introduction to Education. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. YN-222. HAMBLEN, C. H.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. YN-222. HAMBLEN, C. H.
Principles upon which present-day education is based.

En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-222. GRAY, L. A.
Historical development of our schools.

En. 316.-Elementary Quantitative Methods in Education and Psychology. 3
credits.
1:00 daily. YN-140. KIDD, K. P.
Application of statistical processes and formulas to educational and psychological data.

En. 317.-Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices. 3 credits. Begins
July 5 and runs through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-226. HINES, V. A.
A study of the basic principles and methods of measurement and evaluation of school
practices.

En. 318.-Introduction to Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-142. CRUTCHER, GEO.
The techniques needed to provide better classroom utilization of the audio-visual aids to
learning. As far as the class time permits, opportunity to develop skill in these techniques will
be presented to students.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 885.-Child Development. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 10:00 daily. YN-138. LAIRD, D. C.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. YN-140. LAIRD, D. C.
Section 3. 2:30 daily. YN-134. ROGERS, RUBY ROSE.
The growth and development of children into mature personalities. The findings of recent
research through outside reading; class discussion and observation. Methods of evaluation of
child growth.

En. 386.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: En. 385.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. YN-140. ROGERS, R. R.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. YN-140. McGUIRE, V.
Section 3. 11:30 daily. YN-226. McGUIRE, V.
The individual and education. A study of the physical, emotional, mental, and social growth
of the adolescent. Achievement in terms of growth.

En. 397.-Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction. 3 credits. The first
half of the course En. 397-398. Prerequisites: En. 241 or En. 305 and En. 385.
En. 386 should be taken prior to or concurrently with the taking of En. 397.
1:00 daily. YN-222. KITCHING, A. E.
The curriculum and instruction. The study of a group of children, planning a program
for the group, and setting up a system of evaluation.

En. 398.-Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction in the Major Subject
Fields. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 397-398. Required
unless the student takes a special methods course in his teaching field.
2:30 daily. YN-222. KITCHING, A. E.

En. 403.-Philosophy of Education. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-134. NORMAN, J. W.
A critical examination is made of various theories and philosophies of education, their
relationships to the democratic principle, and their significance to the evolving system of education
in the United States.

En. 406.-Elementary School Administration. 3 credits.
4:00 daily. YN-134. BLACK, J. H.
The principles of administering the elementary school are studied. Stress is laid on the
problems that usually confront the school principal.

En. 408.-High School Administration. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-134. LEPS, J. M.
The principles of administering the modern high school are studied.

En. 421.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The first half of the course En. 421-422.
Prerequisites: En. 385 and En. 386. En. 397 and 398 or special methods
course or En. 471 and En. 480 must be taken prior to or concurrently with
En. 421.
To arrange. YN-143. WILLIAMS, W. R.
The student is given practice in the art of teaching by actually taking over responsibility
for the teaching-learning situation, and putting into operation under direction and supervision
the theories, methods, materials, and teaching techniques acquired during his junior year through
observation and participation.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


En. 422.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 421-
422. Prerequisites: Same as for En. 421.
To arrange. YN-124. LEWIS, H. G.

En. 462.-Guidance of School Pupils. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-150. CRAGO, A.
An introductory survey of pupil guidance work in the schools with particular attention to the
secondary levels. The guidance functions of the home-room; the guidance relationships of all
school staff members.

En. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 4 credits.
1:00 daily and to arrange. YN-207. TISON, J. P.
An integrated educational program will be stressed.

En. 480.-Teaching of Reading. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-150. BARRY, M. E.
A comprehensive survey of the problems of teaching reading in all grades, specific and
practical methods and procedures for attacking these problems. Each student will identify a
problem in his own school and submit a proposed solution for it. (Not more than 6 hours in
reading can be applied toward a degree.)

En. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living. 3 credits. Begins July 5 and
runs through July 23. In addition to the regular class time, students register-
ing for En. 482 must reserve the time from 2:30 to 5:30 for field trips and
group projects.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-325. STEVENS, G. A.
The techniques of using Florida resources in the areas of arts and craft, architecture, housing,
interior decorating, and landscaping. Attention is given to developing understandings and
appreciations of the fine arts, costume designing, health practices, and the more intimate human
relationships.

GRADUATE COURSES

NOTE: All new graduate students in Education are required to attend
orientation meetings at 7:00 P.M., June 15, in the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Information will be given about types of graduate study, the planning of in-
dividual programs, facilities available, and other matters.

En. 501.-Elementary School Curriculum. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-138. BLACK, J. H.
Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten: selection and evaluation of material

En. 503.-Measurement and Evaluation. 3 credits. Begins July 5 and runs
through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-226. HINES, V. A.
Guided investigation of problems involving measurement, evaluation of school procedures
and diagnostic and remedial practices. Problems directly related to the needs of students enrolled.

En. 506.-Introduction to Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-142. CRUTCHER, GEO.
Comprehensive study of the techniques needed to provide better classroom utilization of the
audio-visual aids to learning and development of skill in these techniques.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 507.-Advanced Educational Psychology. 3 credits. Begins July 5 and runs
through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-207. FOSTER, C. R.
The trends in the applications of psychology to problems of education will be made. Problems
directly related to the needs of students enrolled.

En. 510.-History of Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-134. NORMAN, J. W.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher,
student, curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginning; and
to point out present tendencies and possible developments.

En. 518.-Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-134. LEPS, J. M.
The varied duties of principals in junior high schools, senior high schools, and junior colleges
are comprehensively studied.

En. 519.-Foundations and Problems of Curriculum Construction. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. YN-134. MORRISON, R. W.
Topics such as the following are studied in this course: conflicting viewpoints in currioular
practice, the relationship of pupil maturity to curriculum development, implications of the guid-
ance emphasis, approaches to writing courses of study, reorganizing the program of studies,
developing core courses, planning the co-curricular and extra-curricular programs. Each student
will present a discussion of some curriculum problem.

En. 522.-Educational Organization and Administration. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-138. JOHNS, R. L.
The basic course in school administration. It includes the following areas: Federal, state
and local relationships and functions; systems of educational organization in the United States;
duties of superintendents, board members, principals and trustees; the organization of local
school units; and the interrelationships of teachers, administrators and supervisors.

En. 524.-Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools. 3 credits.
4:00 daily. YN-134. BLACK, J. H.
The organization of the elementary school in the light of its purposes and functions is
studied. The duties of the school principal are considered in their broad applications to ele-
mentary school problems.

En. 529.-Florida Workshop: Cooperating Schools Division. 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-218. CUMBEE, C. F.
This workshop is designed to provide an organization, materials, and assistance for principals
and teachers of the cooperating schools in the Florida Program for Improvement of Instruction.
Participants will be responsible for the production of programs that can be used in their school
situations. Membership is limited to the faculties of the cooperating schools.

En. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit; maximum credit 6.
To arrange. YN-143. WILLIAMS, W. R.

En. 535.-Fundamentals of Educational Supervision. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-236. GREEN, E. K.
The functions of supervisory officers related to improving instruction are critically reviewed
in their backgrounds of educational purposes and the organization of school systems. Introductory
consideration is given to the use of various supervisory devices and procedures in elementary and
secondary school situations.

En. 537.-Supervision of Student Teaching and Internships. 3 or 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-101. WOFFORD, K. V.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Designed to help teachers who supervise student teachers or interns. It will consider the
many problems, procedures, materials involved in such work and also provide actual laboratory
experiences for the supervising teachers. The work will be conducted largely on the cooperative
plan with a leader and help from other staff members. Students who have a good background
in the field of supervision will occasionally be admitted for 3 hours credit. All others, 6 hours.

En. 538.-Evaluation of the Secondary School Program. 3 credits. Begins July
5 and runs through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-315.
Designed primarily to assist the secondary school principal and his staff in the systematic
evaluation of their school program.
En. 540.-Foundations of Education. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-150. LEWIS, H. G. and GREEN, E. K.
An orientation course for those studying for the M. Ed. degree. Graduate programs are
planned in the light of each student's educational needs. The socio-economic bases for education
are comprehensively surveyed.
En. 541.-Problems in Educational Psychology. 3 or 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-304. McLENDON, I. R.
Individualized study is made of problems dealing with child development, adolescence, learning,
and other areas of educational psychology.
En. 555.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division. Variable credit; maxi-
mum 6. OLSON, C. M., Coordinator.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. Social Studies: 8:30 daily. YN-232. OLSON, C. M. and
WATTENBARGER, J. L.
Section 2. Speech: 8:30 daily. YN-201.
Section 3. Mathematics: 8:30 daily. YN-114. GAGER, W. A.
Section 4. Physical Education: 8:30 daily. K-111. SALT, E. B. and
STEVEN, B. K.
Preparation of bulletins by a special group.
En. 562.-Principles of Pupil Guidance. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-150. CRAGO, A.
Students carry out an individual guidance project in addition to their survey of guidance
principles and practices in schools.
En. 584.-Education for Young Children. 3 or 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-228. HOLDFORD, A. V.
A course designed to assist teachers of children of pre- and early school age.
En. 640.-School and Society. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-234. LEWIS, H. G.
This course will supply a social and philosophic frame of reference through a rigorous study
<" the society in which education takes place and will develop the implications of this society
for the more adequate fulfillment of the functions of the school. The course will be concentrated
upon theoretical suppositions, issues, problems, principles and values. It will be conducted on
a seminar basis for a limited number of students in the sixth year program of teacher education
and for candidates for the doctor's degree in education.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

El. 341.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The first half of the
course El. 341-342. Prerequisites: One year of college physics, including






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


electricity and magnetism; differential and integral calculus; and MI. 182.
7:00 daily. BN-210. JOHNSON, W. E.
Electric and magnetic circuits; electrostatic; electro-magnetics; representation of alternating
current by vectors and complex quantities; measurement of power in single phase and polyphase
circuits; generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy; characteristics of apparatus;
selection, testing, and installation of electrical equipment.

El. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The second half of the
course El. 341-342.
Section 1. 7:00 daily. F-101. SMITH, E. F.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. F-101. SMITH, E. F. (Section 2 open only
to Electrical Engineering students.)

El. 344.-Problems in Direct and Alternating Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Corequisite: El. 342.
10:00 daily. EG-209. SCHOONMAKER, L. E.
Kirchhoff's Laws for electric magnetic circuits; single phase circuit analysis; energy and
power; wave form; coupled circuits: balanced and unbalanced polyphase circuits. Kerchner and
Corcoran, Alternating Current Circuits.

El. 349.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The first half of the course El. 349-350.
Corequisite: El. 341.
1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. BN-106. JOHNSON, W. E.
Experimental studies and tests on direct current and alternating current apparatus.
EL 350.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The second half of the course El. 349-350.
Corequisite: El. 342.
Section 1. 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. BN-106. SCHRADER, G. F.
Section 2. To arrange. SCHRADER, G. F.

ENGLISH

Eh. 133.-Effective Writing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3
Course Chairman.
1:00 daily. LA-209.
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are urged to do creative work.
Eh. 134.-Contemporary Reading. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission
of C-3 Course Chairman.
8:30 daily. LA-307.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded program in reading,
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought. Some time will be
spent in introducing each student to the bibliography and writing in the area of his special
professional interest.
Eh. 217.-Literary Masters of England. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Eh. 217-218. May be taken for credit without Eh. 218.
11:30 daily. LA-210. FOGLE, S. F.
The most interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for
an appreciation of their art and outlook on life.
Eh. 223.-Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Eh. 223-224. May be taken for credit without Eh. 224.
8:30 daily. LA-212. RUFF, WILLIAM.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM 79

A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of the great books
of the world.

Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-210. HERBERT, T. W.
The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays.
Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including, A Midsummer Night's
Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado, As You Like It, Twelfth Night. Richard the Second,
and Henry the Fourth. As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting
features of the Elizabethan stage and drama are treated briefly.

Eh. 303.-Major Poets of the Victorian Period. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. LA-212. FAIN, J. T.
Reading and discussion of such major writers as Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, the Rossettis,
Morris, Swinburne, and Kipling.

Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 8 credits.
8:30 daily. LA-311. KIRKLAND, E. C.
Designed to meet the needs of three types of students: (a) for the general student
it offers a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good Eng-
lish" is; (b) for the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum
knowledge of the English Language; (e) for the English Major and beginning graduate student
it serves as an introduction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon
grammatical rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and
spoken.

Eh. 306.-Modern English Grammar. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-210. COX, E. H.
A study of modern English inflection and syntax. The course is designed to be of practical
value to teachers of English, and is intended especially for students in the College of Education
majoring in English.

Eh. 366.-Contemporary Literature: Poetry. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-212. FOGLE, S. F.
Reading, critical interpretation, and discussion of modern British and American poetry, with
chief emphasis upon recent poetry.

Eh. 380.-English in the Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. LA-210. COX, E. H.
Designed to help teachers of English by (1) a review of the contents, both the language
and the literature, of secondary school English. with attention to some of the methods widely
used in high school English courses, and (2) a study of both the ultimate and immediate objectives
of the Secondary English program.

Eh. 391.-Children's Literature. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. LA-210. GEHAN, F. E.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. LA-212. GEHAN, F. E.
Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to
make him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.

Eh. 401.-American Literature. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. LA-210. SPIVEY, H. E.
A study of American literature from the beginning to 1850.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Eh. 407.-Introduction to Folklore. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. LA-311. KIRKLAND, E. C.
Designed to examine the various types of folklore, including the folktale, legend, myth, folk-
song, proverb, riddle, superstition, etc.; to relate folk material to literary and other artistic
media; to acquaint the student with folklore motifs in a diversified body of comparative litera-
ture; to show the significance of folklore as an aid to understanding the racial and cultural
heritage of American life, and to explore the appropriate utilization of folk materials by teachers,
sociologists, students of literature, and creative artists.

Eh. 409.-Chaucer. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. LA-311. HERBERT, T. W.
Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, humorous, and
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet.

Eh. 434.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-311. CONGLETON, J. E.
A study of the prose and poetry of the age of Dr. Johnson.


GRADUATE COURSES

Eh. 501.-American Literature. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. LA-212. SPIVEY, H. E.
A study of American literature from the beginning to 1850. Intended for graduate students,
both majors and minors.

Eh. 509.-Chaucer. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. LA-311. HERBERT, T. W.
A thorough study of the Canterbury Tales; collateral readings (in translation) of important
medieval writings.

Eh. 529.-Graduate Seminar. 1 credit.
2:30 Monday through Thursday. LA-311. FAIN, J. T.

Eh. 534.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-311. CONGLETON, J. E.
A study of the prose and poetry of the age of Dr. Johnson.


ENTOMOLOGY

Ey. 301.-Economic Entomology. 3 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. AG-308. HETRICK, L. A.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:20 T. Th. AG-308.
An introduction to economic entomology, which is based upon a study of the life histories,
and control of major insect enemies of American agricultural crops. Particular stress is placed
upon southern and Florida economic insects. This course is designed for all students in the
College of Agriculture either as a pre- or corequisite for other entomology courses. Textbook,
Destructive and Useful Insects by Metcalf and Flint: or Insects of Farm, Garden and Orchard
by Peairs.

Ey. 303.-Insect Collection. 1 credit.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 7:00 F. HETRICK, L. A.
A companion couse for Ey. 301, in which a laboratory is held weekly for students desiring
to make a general or economic insect collection.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSE
Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology. 2 to 4 credits. (Credit assigned must be
shown on registration blank.)
To arrange. AG-308. HETRICK, L. A.
Consists of a problem for study which may be selected in any field of entomological specializa-
tion; including Histology, Morphology, Taxonomy, Embryology, Biological Control, Ecology,
Toxicology, Plant Quarantine, Inspection, Control, Commercial, Life History and Habits, Biology,
and Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

FORESTRY
Fy. 220.-Introduction to Forestry. 2 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. HT-410. FRAZER, P. W.
A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the various phases and fundamental
underlying principles of the field of Forestry.
Fy. 221.-Summer Camp. 5 credits.
Field. MILLER, J. W. and SWINFORD, K. R.
Summer Camp work covers the entire field of Forestry. Students are given practical work
in surveying, cruising, silviculture, mensuration, and forest management work.
Fy. 228.-Forest Mensuration. 3 credits.
7:00 M. T. W. Th.; 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. HT-410. FRAZER, W. W.
Principles and practice of measuring forests and forest products with special attention to
Florida conditions.
Fy. 431.-Forest Problems Seminar. Variable credit.
To arrange. STAFF.
Designed to cover particular fields of Forestry, to be determined by the staff. The work will
be made to supplement the student's training during previous semesters.

FRENCH
Fh. 33.-First-Year French. 3 credits. The first half of the course Fh. 33-34.
Open to students who have had no previous work in French.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-182.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. E-182.
A beginning course basic for further study. The objective is a moderate proficiency in
reading and speaking the language. Emphasis on oral work.
Fh. 34.-First-Year French. 3 credits. The second half of the course Fh. 33-34.
7:00 daily. E-130. KURTH, A. L.
Fh. 201.-Second-Year French. 3 credits. The first half of the course Fh.
201-202. Prerequisite: One year of college French, or two years of high
school French.
10:00 daily. E-182. ATKIN, E. G.
Reading from modern French writers, and oral work.
Fh. 305.-French Conversation and Composition. 3 credits. The first half of
the course Fh. 305-306, but either half may be taken for credit. Prerequisite:
Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor.
8:30 daily. E-180. KURTH, A. L.
Training and practice in oral and written expression.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Fh. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. E-187. ATKIN, E. G.
Conferences. reading and reports. The course offers an opportunity to study, for credit,
certain phases of French literature, language and civilization for which there are no regular
course offerings. May be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be
helped to plan a definite program.

GRADUATE COURSE

Fh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. E-187. ATKIN, E. G.
Conferences, reading and reports. The course offers graduate students an opportunity to
study, for credit, certain phases of French literature, language and civilization for which there
are no regular course offerings. May be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions.
Students will be helped to plan a definite program.

GENERAL SCIENCE

GL 301.-Children's Science. 2 credits.
4:00 daily. YN-140. TISON, J. P.
The content of elementary science, together with its organization for use both in the integrated
program and in the departmentalized school. Consideration given to the interests and experiences
of children. Investigation of Instructional aids that will assist teachers of the elementary school
to meet the needs of individual children.

GEOGRAPHY

Gpy. 305.-Geography of Florida. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. SC-208. DIETTRICH, S. R.
The geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions of Florida. The
distribution of population, routes of communication, industries, resources, and strategic location
in their geographical and historical aspects; explanation and interpretation of major phenomena
such as weather and climate, geologic structure and land forms, surface and underground drain-
age, shoreline characteristics, natural vegetation, soil types, and animal life. Optional field trips.

GEOLOGY

Gy. 207.-Topography and Geology of Florida. 3 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. 1-104. EDWARDS, R. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. 1-104.
No credit towards major or group major without the specific permission of
the Head of the Department. Designed to meet the special needs of certain
groups of students.
An interpretation of the topography, scenery and geology of Florida in the light of the
principles of physical and historical geology. Special attention is devoted to the mineral resources
of the State.
GERMAN

Gn. 33.-First-Year German. 3 credits. The first half of the course Gn. 33-84.
For students who have had no previous work in German.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-123. VALK, M. E.
Section 2. 1:00 daily. E-182. CRAPS, J. E.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


A beginning course basic for further study. The objective is a moderate proficiency in speak-
ing and reading the language.

Gn. 34.-First-Year German. 3 credits. The second half of the course Gn. 33-34.
Prerequisite: Gn. 33 or equivalent.
8:30 daily. E-125.

Gn. 201.-Second-Year German. 3 credits. The first half of the course Gn.
201-202. Prerequisite: Gn. 34 or equivalent.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 10:00 daily. E-123. VALK, M. E.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. E-182.
An intermediate course. The objective is proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking the
language.

Gn. 325.-Scientific German. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Gn. 201-202 or permission
of instructor.
10:00 daily. E-102. CRAPS, J. E.
The reading of representative selections in Chemistry, Biology, Physics and other fields.
Designed to provide the student with an adequate tool for research involving German publications.

HISTORY

Hy. 241.-History of the Modern World. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-1 or Hy.
313-314.
7:00 daily. PE-112. HAMMOND, H.
A study of the modern world from the Congress of Vienna to the present time.

Hy. 251.-Florida History. 3 credits. The first half of the course Hy. 251-252.
1:00 daily. 1-110. PATRICK, R. W.
Designed to familiarize the student with the discovery, exploration, settlement and development
of that area now comprised in the present state of Florida. Special emphasis will be given the
period since Reconstruction.
Hy. 303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Hy. 303-304.
8:30 daily. PE-112. LEAKE, J. M.
The Civil War and Reconstruction.

Hy. 313.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Hy. 313-314.
10:00 daily. PE-5. GLUNT, J. D.
The history of Western Europe from 476 A. D. to the Renaissance and Reformation.

Hy. 331.-Survey of American History. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Hy. 331-332.
8:30 daily. 1-102. GLUNT, J. D.
A general survey course on the development of the United States.

Hy. 361.-English History to 1688. 3 credits. The first half of the course Hy.
361-362. Prerequisite: C-1 or Hy. 313-314.
11:30 daily. PE-5.
A survey of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolution.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Hy. 363.-Latin American History to 1850. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Hy. 363-364. Prerequisite: C-1 or Hy. 313-314.
10:00 daily. 1-102. WORCESTER, D. E.
A survey of the colonization and development of Latin America.

Hy. 373.-History of Mexico and the Caribbean Area. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-102. WORCESTER, D. E.
Indian and colonial background; the West Indies as a center of international rivalry; Mexicaa
independence; French intervention: the dictators, Santa Ana to Calles; the Mexican Revolution.
1910 to the present; the West Indies today; Central America in modern times.

GRADUATE COURSES

Hy. 503-American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. PE-112. LEAKE, J. M.

Hy. 509.-U. S. History Seminar. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-212. LEAKE, J. M.
For graduate students majoring in history.

Hy. 561.-English History to 1688. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. PE-5.

Hy. 573.-History of Mexico and the Caribbean Area. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-102. WORCESTER, D. E.

HORTICULTURE

He. 311.-Home Gardening. 11/2 credits. (June 14 to July 2. Open to Agricul-
tural Extension workers only.)
8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. AG-209. STOUT, G. J.
Laboratory: 10:00 to 1:00 W. GH.

He. 314.-Principles of Fruit Production. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Bty. 311.
10:00 daily. AG-209. WOLFE, H. S.
The principles underlying fruit production, with special reference to such factors as water
relations, nutrition, temperature, fruit setting, and geographic influence. Textbook: Gardner,
Bradford, and Hooker. Fundamentals of Fruit Production.

GRADUATE COURSE

He. 570.-Research in Horticulture. Variable credit. (Credit assigned must
be shown on registration blank.)
To arrange. WOLFE, H. S.

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION

In. 101.-Introduction to Industrial Arts. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-Shop. CHENEY, M. W.
Orientation is given to the basic industrial arts through reading, discussion, visitation.
experimentation, participation in planning, and execution of shop problems.
In. 103.-Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-Shop. CHENEY, M. W.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


Emphasizes care and use of drafting instruments, practice in sketching, lettering, dimensioning,
orthographic projection, making of working drawings, and blueprint reading.

In. 303.-Machine Woodwork. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-shop. CHENEY, M. W.
The practical work in this course includes power machinery and machine maintenance, and
use of the jointer, tilting arbor bench saw, band saw, lathe, mortiser, drill press, router, shaper
and other small machines.

In. 402.-Problems in Architectural Drawing. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-Shop. STRICKLAND, T. W.
Attention is centered on problems of architectural development, materials, and techniques
of construction and on problems of building orientation, heating, lighting, ventilation, landscaping,
and adaptability.

In. 412.-Art Metal Design and Construction. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. YN-Shop. STRICKLAND, T. W.
Problems are studied involving design principles as applied to metals. Construction is done
on projects which involve hand processes and simple machine work to accomplish spinning.

GRADUATE CURSES

In. 506.-History and Philosophy of Industrial and Vocational Education. 3
credits.
10:00 daily. YN-132. WILLIAMS, W. R.
Penetrating inquiry is made into the historical background which highlights the significant
educational philosophies and objectives underlying the programs of industrial arts and vocational
education. Emphasis is given to modern concepts and their implications.

In. 523.-School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-132. WILLIAMS, W. R.
Study is made of standards as they apply to the physical setting of the program of industrial
arts involving design, selection and maintenance of equipment in industrial arts and vocational
shops.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Ig. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205,
Ml. 182. Corequisite: Ms. 354.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. EG-209.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. EG-209.
Principles of statics; resolution and equilibrium of concurrent forces; numerical and graphical
solution of trusses and hinged frames; couples; centers of gravity; forces in space; and moment
of inertia.

Ig. 366.-Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ig. 365,
Ms. 354.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. EG-211.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. EG-211.
Principles of dynamics; rectilinear, curvilinear, and harmonic motions; impulse and momentum;
work and energy; force, mass, and acceleration; projectiles; simple, torsional, and compound
pendulums; balancing of rigid bodies; and relative motion.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ig. 367.-Strength of Materials. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ig. 365, Ms. 354.
7:00 daily. EG-211.
Tension, compression, shear, stress and strain; combined stresses; riveted joints for pressure
vessels and structural work; torsion: bending moments; stresses and deflection of simple,
cantilever, and continuous beams; concrete beams; curved beams and hooks; eccentric loading;
columns; and elastic strain energy.

Ig. 370.-Job Evaluation. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Upper Divisions Registration.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. EG-213. CUMMINGS, R. J.
Analysis of duties and responsibilities of various jobs and comparison from point of view
of difficulty, responsibility, skill education and working conditions; determination of rates of
compensation and proper relation to each other according to the relative value of the Job to
industry.

Ig. 463.-Specifications, Engineering Relations and Industrial Safety. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: Senior Classification.
10:00 daily. F-101. ESHLEMAN, S. K.
Specifications for materials and construction of engineering projects; advertising and letting
contracts; agreements and contractural relations; organization of safety work in industry;
accident causes and legal responsibility of employer and employee.

Ig. 472.-Human Engineering. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 463.
11:30 M. T. W. Th. EG-202. CUMMINGS, R. J.
Problems of production engineering and management; the human factors in industry.

JOURNALISM

Jm. 216.-Principles of Journalism. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. E-102. LOWRY, W. L.
Principles and ethics underlying newspaper and magazine publishing and news reporting.

Jm. 314.-Magazine Writing and Editing. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. E-102. LOWRY, W. L.
Preparation of special articles for publication in newspapers and magazines coordinated with
study of magazine editing problems. Supervised marketing of articles produced in the course.

LAW
Lw. 300.-Equity I. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. LW-201. CURRAN, J. W.
Section 2. 2:30 daily. LW-201. CURRAN, J. W.

Lw. 303.-Contracts I. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LW-201. SMYTH, C. J.

Lw. 400.-U. S. Constitutional Law I. 2 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 11:30 M. T. Th. F. LW-204. MILLER, G. J.
Section 2. 2:30 M. T. W. F. LW-204. MILLER, G. J.

Lw. 404.-Quasi Contracts (Restitution). 2 credits.
10:00 M. Th. LW-204. MACDONALD, W. D.
7:00 W. S. LW-204.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Lw. 407.-Legal Bibliography. 2 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. F. LW-105. MENARD, A. R., Jr.

Lw. 415.-Abstracts. 2 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 M. T. Th. F. LW-204. DAY, J. W.
Section 2. 10:00 T. W. F. S. LW-204. DAY, J. W.
Section 3. 4:00 M. T. Th. F. LW-204. DAY, J. W.
Lw. 431.-Appellate Procedure and Judgments. 2 credits.
7:00 W. S. LW-105. TESELLE, C. J.
10:00 M. Th. LW-105.

Lw. 509.-Sales. 2 credits.
8:30 Th. S. LW-105. CONDRICK, J. A.
1:00 M. LW-105.
4:00 W. LW-105.

Lw. 518.-Federal Rules. 2 credits.
7:00 M. T. Th. F. LW-105. TESELLE, C. J.

Lw. 521.-Trusts. 2 credits.
10:00 T. W. F. LW-105. MACDONALD, W. D.
11:30 Th. LW-105.

Lw. 530.-Administrative Law. 2 credits.
1:30 M. T. W. F. LW-105. MENARD, A. R., JR.

Lw. 533.-Labor Law. 2 credits.
1:00 T. W. Th. F. LW-105. CONDRICK, J. A.

Lw. 536.-Security Transactions. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. LW-204. WALDO, S. F.

Lw. 537.-Office Practice. 2 credits.
6:30 to 9:20 p.m. F. LW-105. WILSON, J. R.
10:00 to 12:50 S. LW-105.

MATHEMATICS
Ms. 105.-Basic Mathematics. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-102.
Section 2. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-4.
Section 3. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-102.
Section 4. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-4.
Section 5. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-102.
Section 6. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-102.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a sequence of topics including the above plus some calculus. It is designed
for students who plan to study architecture, engineering, any of the physical sciences, or who
wish to major in mathematics. It is also recommended for teachers of high school mathematics
who desire to advance in technical command of the subject matter.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ms. 106.-Basic Mathematics. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-10.
Section 2. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-101.
Section 3. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-10.
Section 4. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-101.
Section 5. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-4.
Section 6. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-10.
Section 7. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-4.
A continuation of Ms. 105.

Ms. 225.-Arithmetic for Teachers. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. SC-206.
Meaning and cultural value of arithmetic. Principles, fundamentals, processes, checks and
short cuts. Study of fractions, approximations, percentages, projects, and activity programs;
and many other topics so treated as to give the student a connected idea of the subject matter
of arithmetic. Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon
beginning processes, which many teachers never have the opportunity to investigate.

Ms. 311.-Advanced College Algebra. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Ms. 311-312. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college mathematics, or equiva-
lent.
7:00 daily. SC-206.
The further treatment of some of the material and processes given in the usual freshman
college course, and the introduction to more advanced topics.

Ms. 353.-Differential Calculus. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-11.
Section 2. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-11.
Section 3. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. SC-202.
Section 4. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-11.
Section 5. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-10.
Section 6. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-11.
Section 7. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-101.
Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields of mathematics, is treated
in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse operation of differentiation.

Ms. 354.-Integral Calculus. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. SC-202.
Section 2. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. SC-202.
Section 3. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. SC-202.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.

Ms. 420.-Differential Equations. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. SC-206.
The classification, solution, and application of various equations which contain expressions
involving not only variables but also the derivatives of these variables.

Ms. 431.-College Geometry. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. PE-101.
The use of elementary methods in the advanced study of the triangle and circle. Special
emphasis on solving original exercises. Recommended for prospective high school geometry
teachers.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSES

Ms. 502.-Vector Analysis. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. SC-206.
The algebra and calculus of vectors in two and three dimensions; applications to problems
In Physics and Engineering.

Ms. 551.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. EG-213.
Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differentiation, Taylor's
theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple multiple integrals, line and surface integrals,
Green's theorem, etc.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

MI. 181.-Engineering Drawing. 2 credits. Corequisite: Ms. 105.
1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. C. FRASH, E. S., PHELPS, G. 0.
Designed to teach the student how to make and read engineering drawings. French, Engineer-
ing Drawina,; Frash, Instructions, Letter Plates and Sketch Plates for Engineering Drawing.

MI. 182.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 181.
8:30 to 11:30 M. W. F. C. TANKERSLEY, J.
The principles of projection and the development of surfaces. Frash, Geometric Drawing.

MI. 282.-Mechanism and Kinematics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 182. Co-
requisites: Ps. 205 and Ms. 353.
Section 1. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. EG-301. SMITH, J. H.
1:00 to 5:30 M. W. EG-304.
Section 2. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. EG-301. DENT, J. A.
1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. EG-304.
Revolving and oscillating bodies, link work, belts, pulleys, gears, and cams; trains of mechanisms
and the velocity and directional ratio of moving parts. Keown and Faires, Mechanism.

ML 385.-Thermodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ms. 354, Ps. 206, and Cy.
102.
10:00 daily. EG-202. PRESCOTT, F. L.
Energy equations and availability of energy; gases, vapors, and mixtures; engineering
applications in flow of fluids, vapor power cycles, gas compression and refrigeration. Ebaugh,
Engineering Thermodynamics; Keenan and Keyes, Thermodynamics Properties of Steam.

MI. 387.-Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. Corequisite: Ml. 385.
Section 1. 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. EG-103. GAGLIARDI, F. A.
Section 2. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. EG-103. GAGLIARDI, F. A.

MI. 491.-Machine Design. 3 hours. 4 credits. 3 hours drawing. Prerequisites:
Ml. 281, 366, and 367.
8:30 daily. EG-202. BOURKE, N.
1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. EG-300.
The calculation, proportioning and detailing of machine parts, shop and mill layouts, and the
design of machines to perform certain functions. Faires, Design of Machine Elements.

MUSIC
Msc. 100.-Fundamentals of Music. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-311. COGHILL, K. R.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Acquisition of adult song repertoire, music reading, problems of pitch, scales, rhythm, writing
of original melodies, directed learning, and functional piano keyboard experience.

Msc. 104.-Music for the Upper Elementary Child. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. YN-311. COGHILL, K. R.
The understandings, techniques, and skills involved in singing, rhythmic, listening, instru-
mental, and creative activities which are desirable for children in grades four through six.
The attainment of sight-seeing, tonal problems, rhythms commonly used, and part-singing.

PAINTING

Pg. 101.-Fundamentals of Pictorial Art. 3 credits.
7:00 to 11:30 daily. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A comprehensive introductory course in the theory, application, and appreciation of art
fundamentals carried on by means of a coordinated series of beginning projects emphasizing the
principles of creative design. Problems in the elements of design are followed by their practical
use in every day art, exemplified by simple problems in interior decoration, stage design, textile
design, etc. Charcoal drawing from the cast and model; oil painting from still life; improvisa-
tion and abstract design. Acquaintance with the various media including water color, pencil,
charcoal, and oil.
Projects 1 to 3 inclusive. The first half of the course is equivalent to 8 credits, and the last
half to 8 credits.

Pg. 102.-Fundamentals of Pictorial Art. 3 credits.
7:00 to 11:30 daily. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 102.
Projects 4 to 6 inclusive. The first half of the course is equivalent to 8 credits, and the
last half to 8 credits.

Pg. 211.-Projects in Painting, Group 1. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 102.

Pg. 212.-Projects in Painting, Group 2. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 211.

Pg. 221.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group 1. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 102.

Pg. 222.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group 2. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 221.

Pg. 313.-Projects in Painting, Group 3. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 212.

Pg. 323.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group 3. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 222.

Pg. 415.-Projects in Painting, Group 5. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 814.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


PHARMACOGNOSY

Pgy. 221.-Practical Pharmacognosy. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Pgy. 221-222.
7:00 daily. CH-316. JOHNSON, C. H.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:20 T. CH-316. JOHNSON.
1:00 to 5:20 Th. CH-316. JOHNSON.

PHARMACY

Phy. 211.-Inorganic Pharmacy. 5 credits. Prerequisites: Cy. 101-102 and Phy.
223-224.
8:30 daily. CH-212. BECKER, C. H.
Laboratory: 10:00 to 1:00 M. T. Th. F. CH-306. BECKER, C. H.
The inorganic compounds used in medicine; their Latin titles, origin, and physical, chemical,
and physiological properties; their preparation and use in compounding remedies.

Phy. 353.-Organic and Analytical Pharmacy. 5 credits. The first half of the
course, Phy. 353-354.
10:00 daily. CH-402. FOOTE, P. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. CH-306. FOOTE, P. A.

PHILOSOPHY

Ppy. 301.-Ethics. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-201. FOX, G. G.
Beginning with an examination of current theories of moral relativism, the course will
attempt to discover objective criteria for moral obligations. Hedonism, Stoicism, theories of
self-development, and Christian ethics will be studied. Reading will include Plato, Aristotle,
Epicurus, Marcus Aurelius, Dante. Kant, J. S. Mill. Niehbuhr. and Maritain.

Ppy. 410.-Modern Philosophy. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-311. FOX, G. G.
The history of philosophy from the Renaissance to the present, with particular emphasis
upon theory of knowledge.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

PHA. 131.-Football. 2 credits.
11:30 M. T. Th. F. K-107. WOLF, R. B.
Theory and Practice. The fundamentals of football including instruction in the coaching
of individual techniques of offensive and defensive play.

PHA. 141.-Tennis. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 143. Open only to men.
8:30 M. W. F. GY. SCHNELL, H. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in the various strokes of tennis together
with a knowledge of the rules and court strategy.

PHA. 142.-Elementary Gymnastics and Tumbling. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA.
144. Open only to men.
11:30 daily. K-205. MOONEY, E. G.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in activities covering light and heavy apparatus,
tumbling, calisthenics, rope climbing and all-out effort activities.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


PHA. 143.-Combat Sports. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 141. Open only to men.
8:30 T. Th. S. GY. HALLADAY, D. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills and a knowledge of the rules and strategy
in boxing, wrestling, fencing and hand-to-hand combat.

PHA. 144.-Swimming and Water Sports. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 142.
Open only to men.
11:30 daily. K-205. RILEY, J.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in the various swimming strokes and diving.
The course also includes instruction in water polo, water basketball, water contests and relays,
and exhibition swimming.

PHA. 231.-Basketball. 2 credits. Open only to men.
8:30 daily. K-203. MCCACHREN, J. R.
Theory and Practice. The fundamentals of basketball including instruction in the coaching
of individual techniques of offensive and defensive play.

PHA. 232.-Baseball. 2 credits. Open only to men.
10:00 daily. K-205. MCCACHREN, J. R.
Theory and Practice. Fundamentals of coaching baseball including the play of each position
on a baseball team.

PHA. 239.-Narcotics Education. 2 credits.
8:30 M. T. Th. F. K-205. HAAR, F. B.
A factual, scientific, and unemotional approach to the present-day problem of narcotics.
A study of the nature of alcohol and its relation to the psychological, physical, social, economic,
and educational aspects of the problem will be considered briefly. Suggestive teaching projects,
units, and methods for the various age-grade and subject levels will be explored and developed.

PHA. 241.-Golf. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 243. Open only to men.
10:00 M. W. F. K-203. HALLADAY, D. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in using the various clubs together with
a knowledge of the rules and golf etiquette.

PHA. 242.-Recreational Sports. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 244. Open only
to men.
1:00 M. W. F. K-203. HALLADAY, D. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills and a knowledge of the rules in the follow-
ing recreational sports: archery, badminton, bowling, horseshoes, table tennis, shuffleboard, paddle
tennis and games and relays.

PHA. 243.-Advanced Gymnastics and Tumbling. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA.
241. Open only to men.
10:00 T. Th. S. GY. HAAR, F. B.
Theory and Practice. A continuation of the activities in the areas covered in PHA. 142
with emphasis upon advanced skills. This course also includes pyramids, marching, gymnastic
relays and the staging of gmnastic exhibitions.

PHA. 244.-Life Saving and Water Safety. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 242.
Open only to men.
1:00 T. Th. S. K-203. RILEY, J.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills in lifesaving, canoeing, boating and survival
swimming.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


PHA. 245.-Team Games. 2 credits. Open only to men.
2:30 daily. K-205. MCCACHREN, J. R.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills and a knowledge of the rules and strategy
in the following team games: volley ball, touch football, softball, soccer, speedball and gator ball.

PHA. 373.-Methods and Materials in Elementary School Physical Education.
3 credits.
2:30 daily. K-107. WEEKS, M.
The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group
play, large group play, directed play, team game units; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.

PHA. 387.-Health Education. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. K-107. HAAR, F. B.
A consideration of the principles underlying health education, together with the organization
and administration of such a program; the role of the teacher in health instruction, who shall
teach health, the organization of materials for instructional purposes, criteria for the evaluation
of health materials and methods, the role of local, state and national non-official organizations
in health teaching programs.

PHA. 388.-Recreational Activities and Leadership. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. K-107. BOSWELL, J. H.
A study of the activities comprising each of the various phases of a community recreation
program: social recreation, playground, dramatics, music, handcraft, sports, nature and outing,
special features and events. The training of playground leaders, recreation center directors,
sports program directors and directors of specialized activities as it pertains to planning and
conducting the respective programs.

PHA. 446.-Organization and Administration of Community Recreation. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. K-107. BOSWELL, J. H.
A consideration of those problems involved in organizing and administering a Community
Recreation Department: legal aspects, setting up the organization of a department and its pro-
gram, budgeting and financing, records and reports, public relations, facilities and equipment,
selection and supervision of the departmental staff.

GRADUATE COURSE

See En. 555.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division, Section 5, Physical
Education. This course will be found under Education on page 73.

PHYSICS

Ps. 101.-General Physics. 3 credits. The first half of the course Ps. 101-102.
Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: Ps. 207.
(Register for one Demonstration Section and one Discussion Section.)
Demonstration Sections:
Section 1. 10:00 F. BN-203.
Section 2. 2:30 F. BN-203.
Discussions Sections:
Section 11. 7:00 daily. BN-209.
Section 12. 8:30 daily. BN-209.
Section 13. 11:30 daily. BN-209.
A course in general physics for science students.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ps. 205.-General Physics. 3 credits. The first half of the course Ps. 205-206.
Prerequisite: One year of college mathematics. Corequisite: Ps. 207.
(Register for one Demonstration Section and one Discussion Section.)
Demonstration Sections:
Section 1. 10:00 F. BN-203.
Section 2. 2:30 F. BN-203.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 7:00 daily. BN-208.
Section 12. 8:30 daily. BN-208.
Section 13. 10:00 daily. BN-208.
Section 14. 11:30 daily. BN-208.
Theory of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and light. Primarily for engineering students.

Ps. 207.-General Physics Laboratory. 1 credit. To accompany Ps. 101 or 20&
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 to
7:00 to
10:00 to
10:00 to
1:00 to
1:00 to
1:00 to
1:00 to
7:00 to
7:00 to
10:00 to
10:00 to


10:00 M.
10:00 M.
1:00 M.
1:00 M.
4:00 M.
4:00 M.
4:00 M.
4:00 M.
10:00 T.
10:00 T.
1:00 T.
1:00 T.


W. F.
W. F.
W. F.
W. F.
W. F.
W. F.
W. F.
W. F.
Th. S.
Th. S.
Th. S.
Th. S.


BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.
BN-306.
BN-307.


Pa. 311.-Electricity and Magnetism. 3 credits.
physics.


Prerequisite: one year of college


(Register for one section only.)
10:00 daily. BN-210. KNOWLES, H. L.
Designed to meet the growing need of physics, chemistry and electrical engineering students
for a working knowledge of the basic problems of electricity and magnetism.

Ps. 320.-Modern Physics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: one year of college physics
and calculus.
11:30 daily. BN-210. FLOWERS, J. D.
X-rays and radioactivity; the Bohr theory; photoelectric effect; nuclear phenomena, cosmic
rays, and the production of high voltages.

GRADUATE COURSE

Ps. 517.-Modern Physics. 3 credits. The first half of the course, Ps. 517-518.
8:30 daily. BN-210. BLESS, A. A.
Electromagnetic theory; based on Maxwell's equations: the electronic Electromagnetic theory
of atomic structures; the interpretation of the properties of matter and radiation from the
standpoint of this theory; spectroscopy and nuclear physics.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


PLANT PATHOLOGY

Pt. 321.-Plant Pathology. 3 credits.
8:00 M. W. F. HT-407. WEBER, G. F.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. HT-407. WEBER, G. F.
Plant diseases caused by mechanical injury, environmental factors, parasitic bacteria, fungi
and other plants; life cycles and role of parasitic fungi and bacteria; the economic importance
and control of plant disease.

GRADUATE COURSE

Pt. 570.-Research in Plant Pathology. 3 to 6 credits.
To arrange. WEBER, G. F.
A study of methods of research in plant pathology applied to life histories of parasitic organ-
isms in relation to the host plant and environmental factors influencing the development of
diseases.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 3 credits. The first half of the course Pel.
309-310. Prerequisite: C-1, or Pcl. 313-314, or its equivalent.
11:30 daily. 1-102. FUNK, A. L.
The nature of international relations, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, armaments; history
of international relations; foreign policies; function and problems of democracy: international
organization; the League of Nations and the World Court.

Pcl. 313.-American Government and Politics. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Pel. 313-314. Prerequisite: C-1.
7:00 daily. 1-102. TELFORD, G. B.

Pc. 401.-American Constitutional Law. 3 credits. The first half of the course,
Pel. 401-402.
8:30 daily. PE-5. TELFORD, G. B.
A complete study and analysis of the Federal Constitution, with study and briefing of the
leading cases in constitution law.
PcI. 405.-History of Political Theory. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Pel. 405-406. Prerequisite: C-1, or Pel. 313-314, or its equivalent.
10:00 daily. 1-110. DAUER, M. J.
A study and analysis of Ancient and Medieval political theories.

Pcl. 407.-Comparative Government. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Pcl. 407-408.
1:00 daily. PE-5. ALLINSON. B. D.
A comparative study of the theory and practice of modern governments.

GRADUATE COURSES

Pel. 501.-American Constitutional Law. 3 credits. The first half of the course,
Pcl. 501-502.
8:30 daily. PE-5. TELFORD, G. B.

Pcl. 505.-History of Political Theory. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-110. DAUER, M. J.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Pel. 507.-Comparative Government. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. PE-5. ALLINSON, B. D.

Pcl. 509.-International Relations. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-102. FUNK, A. L.

Pcl. 513.-Seminar. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-212. DAUER, M. J.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-174.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. E-174. ANDERSON, R. J.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. E-174. MCCUTCHAN, K.
Section 4. 11:30 daily. E-174. RETHLINGSHAFER, D.
Section 5. 1:00 daily. E-174.
An elementary treatment of the general topics in the field of psychology. Designed to provide
an understanding of human behavior, approached as a natural phenomenon subject to scientific
study. The unifying concept of the course is the adaptation of the individual to his physical and
social environment.

Psy. 309.-Personality Development. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. PE-114. HINCKLEY, E. D.
A study cf the mechanisms of personality formation, with special emphasis upon the varieties
(f human adjustment. The more inevitable problems of human life with their normal and abnormal
solutions. The origin and modification of behavior. Processes of motivation and adjustment.
Development and measurement of personality traits. Techniques of mental hygiene.

Psy. 404.-The Measurement of Personality. 3 credits.
1:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. PE-114. RETHLINGSHAFER, D.
Intensive study in the methods of measuring personality, including questionnaires, rating
scales, objective measurements and projective techniques. Laboratory practice in interpretation
and construction of tests.

Psy. 410.-Abnormal Psychology. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. PE-114. WUNDERLICH, H.
A study of the abnormal phases of mental life, and the ways in which the individual develops
abnormal habits of thinking and acting. A survey of the signs of beginning maladjustment and
procedures which may be followed to correct these tendencies. Special attention is given to the
prevention and treatment of mental disease.

Psy. 447.-Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. PE-114. HINCKLEY, E. D., and STAFF.
A survey of the basic concepts, methods, and procedures used in evaluating human personality:
abilities, and behavior disorders. Case studies will be analyzed. Techniques of guidance and
mental hygiene will be considered.

GRADUATE COURSES

Psy. 504.-The Measurement of Personality. 3 credits.
1:15 to 5:00 M. W. F. PE-114. RETHLINGSHAFER, D.
Offered in conjunction with Psy. 404 with additional assignments.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


Psy. 510.-Seminar in Psychopathology. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. PE-114. WUNDERLICH, H.
Lectures, readings, and discussions of the various forms of mental disorder, with attention
to causes, diagnosis, symptoms and treatment.

Pay. 517.-Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. PE-114. HINCKLEY, E. D., and STAFF.
Offered in conjunction with Psy. 417 with additional assignments.

Pay. 521.-Learning.
8:30 daily. E-109. MCCUTCHAN, K.
A presentation and interpretation of the experimental evidence on the influence of various
factors of learning and retention.

Psy. 525.-Research. 3 credits.
To arrange.
Qualified students and the instructor concerned may choose a particular problem for investiga-
tion or study from the various areas of experimental psychology. A formal written report on the
work will be required of the student.

RELIGION

Rn. 341.-The Old Testament in the Light of Today. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-204. PHILPOTT, H. M.
An inquiry into the literature and history of the Hebrews as reflected in the English Bible.

Rn. 371.-Principles of Religious Education. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours
in Religion, or permission of the instructor concerned.
10:00 daily. 1-204. PHILPOTT, H. M.
Contemporary educational theories and practices as they relate to the religious nurture of
children. Attention will be given to the role of the church school and the problem of religion
in public education.
SCHOOL ART

SCA. 253.-General Art for the Elementary Grades. 4 credits.
4:00 to 6:00 daily. YN-316. MITCHELL, J. 0.
General survey and practice in all types of art work for grades one through six.

SCA. 301.-Creative School Art. 2 credits.
1:00 daily. YN-316. MITCHELL, J. 0.
A series of original projects based on the fundamental principles and factors of design.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Sdl. 301.-Children's Social Studies. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-140. BARRY, M. E.
Content material in the field of the social studies with implications for the activity program.

Scl. 302.-Children's Social Studies. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-228. STEVENS, G. A.
A continuation of Scl. 301.

Sdc. 303.-Social Studies in the Secondary School. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-236. WATTENBARGER, J.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Designed to fit the needs of teachers in the Florida schools. The work will consist of three
parts: (1) the need for integration in the social sciences, (2) the program of social studies in
the Florida junior and senior high school, (3) work with groups of teachers on the particular
problems of materials for different grade levels. This course is for advanced undergraduates
in the social studies and for graduate students.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 241.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. 1-207.
The outlook for the individual in the modern world. Direct measurement of social credits
of invention and technological change In modern America. The effect of the metropolitan epoch
on social institutions. A review of the American regions as cultural environments and chal-
lenges.

Sy. 316.-The Field of Social Work. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-207. ATCHLEY, M. H.
Administrative and promotional social work. Detailed study of the growth of public social
work agencies, 1980 to date. Study of casework techniques, of the range of duties of social
workers in modern public and private administration. Field analysis of public welfare agencies
in Florida.

Sy. 322.-The Child in American Society. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-207. ATCHLEY, M. H.
The social adjustment of children in a changing world. Factual study of social situations in
American life as they affect children. Emphasis is upon the adjustment and development of the
normal child, with attention to the problems of abnormal and maladjusted children. The course
provides factual sociological materials designed to supplement, rather than to duplicate, parallel
courses in Education and Psychology.

Sy. 344.-Marriage and the Family. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. CH-Aud. EHRMANN, W. W.
The nature and development of domestic institutions. Problems of adjustment to modern
conditions. Changes in marital and domestic relations with particular emphasis on preparation
for marriage. The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in Florida. Divorce, family
disorganization, child training.

Sy. 421.-Rural Sociology. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-207.
American rural life; changing regions; major trends in relation to resources and problems;
rural social and economic planning; the rural resources of Florida.
Sy. 409.-The South Today. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-207. MACLACHLAN, J. M.
The social resources and challenges of the modern South; measures of Southern culture; the
place of the South in the nation; programs and plans for the region reviewed; a broad view
of the foundations of Southern life.

GRADUATE COURSES

Sy. 516.-The Field of Social Work. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-207.
Sy. 522.-The Child in American Society. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-207.

Sy. 544.-Marriage and the Family. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. CH-Aud.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Sy. 521.-Rural Sociology. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-207.

Sy. 560.-Special Topics. 3 credits.
To arrange.

Sy. 590.-The South Today. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-207.

SOILS
Sls. 301.-Soils. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Acy. 125-126 or Cy. 101-102,
Lectures:
1. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. AG-208. SPINKS, D. 0.
2. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-208. CALDWELL, R. E.
Laboratories:
11. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. AG-202. SPINKS, D. 0.
12. 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. AG-202. CALDWELL, R. E.
13. 8:30 to 11:30-2:30 to 5:30 F. AG-202. CALDWELL, R. E.
The nature and properties of soils with elementary treatment of genesis, morphology, and
classification. Soil types and problems in Florida.

SIs. 402.-Advanced Soil Fertility. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sls. 302.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-102. SPINKS, D. 0.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 T. Th. AG-202.
Soil and plant relationships especially from the standpoint of normal growth under field
conditions; interrelationships of chemistry, physics and microbiology; mineral and organic bal-
ance, the role of trace elements; deficiency symptoms; quality production; fertilizer materials;
placement and cultural relationships. Soil Conditions and Plant Growth, Russell.

GRADUATE COURSE

SIs. 570.-Research in Soils. 1 to 6 credits.
To arrange. AG-206. THORNTON, G. D.

SPANISH

The Spanish department will offer a special program adapted to the needs of
all students and teachers of Spanish interested in acquiring a mastery of the
written and spoken language. During the entire summer Spanish tables will
be provided at the University dining hall; these will be presided over by native
speakers and members of the teaching staff. Oral practice will be supplemented
by the use of the recording machine and record players, and advanced conversa-
tion classes will be conducted in Spanish. Courses are arranged for under-
graduate and graduate credit, and include study of the literature, culture, and
institutions of Spain and Hispanic America. Special evening lectures will be
given in Spanish; a number of motion pictures, with Spanish dialogue, will be
shown. There is also opportunity for contact with Latin-American students
brought to the University of Florida campus through the Institute of Inter-
American affairs.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Sh. 33.-First-Year Spanish. 3 credits. The first half of the course Sh. 33-34.
Open to students who have had no previous training in Spanish.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-125. PORGES, J.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. E-125.
Sh. 34.-First-Year Spanish. 3 credits. The second half of the course Sh. 33-34.
Prerequisite: Sh. 33.
11:30 daily. E-125. PORGES, J.
Sh. 201.-Second-Year Spanish. 3 credits. First half of the course Sh. 201-202.
Prerequisite: Sh. 34 or equivalent.
8:30 daily. E-123. HAYES, F. C.
Sh. 313.-Advanced Composition and Conversation. 3 credits. The first half
of the course Sh. 313-314. Prerequisite: Sh. 202 or equivalent. This course is
given in Spanish.
8:30 daily. E-134. FERNANDEZ, P. V.

Sh. 401.-Nineteenth Century Drama. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor.
11:30 daily. E-185. HAYES, F. C.

Sh. 414.-Latin-American Civilization. 3 credits. Prerequisite: None. This
course is given in English and is designed to complement Sy. 364 and the
courses in Latin-American Literature.
11:30 daily. E-123. CROW, J. A.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sh. 510.-Oral Spanish and Advanced Composition and Syntax. 3 credits. This
course is for teachers and advanced students who have completed Sh. 313-814
or its equivalent. This course is conducted entirely in Spanish.
10:00 daily. E-127. FERNANDEZ, P. V.

SPEECH
The Department of Speech maintains a clinic in speech and hearing for chil-
dren and adults. Any resident of Florida may come to the clinic during the
summer for diagnosis and treatment. Hours: 2:30 to 4:40 M. T. Th. F., E-134.

Sch. 222.-Introduction to Radio. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-31.
1:00 M. T. Th. F. E-126.
A survey of the field of broadcasting: requirements and opportunities in the different phases
of the profession; writing, producing, selling, management; industry's obligations to the public.

Sch. 241.-Effective Speaking. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or consent of the
student's dean.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-126.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. E-126.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


Section 3. 10:00 daily. E-126.
Seetion 4. 11:30 daily. E-134.
Section 5. 1:00 daily. E-134.
Designed to aid the student through demonstration and practice to talk effectively to a group.

Sch. 300.-Advanced Public Speaking. 1% credits. Prerequisite: Sch. 241 or
consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to Agricultural Extension Workers
attending short course.
7:00 daily. E-134.

Sch. 301.-Advanced Public Speaking. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sch. 241 or
consent of instructor.
10:00 daily. E-134.
Structure, style, and delivery of speeches for formal occasions, with special emphasis on the
psychology of audience persuasion; practice in speaking before off-campus audiences.

Sch. 307.-Interpretation of Literature. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sch. 241 or
consent of instructor.
10:00 daily. E-130.
Voice training; exercises for developing the effectiveness of the body and voice; oral reading
of short stories and narrative poetry.

Sch. 309.-Dramatic Production: Staging and Lighting. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
Sch. 241 or consent of instructor.
4:00 daily. E-126.
The staging of the play: designing, constructing, painting, assembling, and shifting of scenery.
The lighting of the play: lighting instruments, plan, and use of color and special effects.

Sch. 314.-Types of Public Discussion. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sch. 241 or con-
sent of instructor.
8:30 daily. E-130.
Study and practice in the principles and methods of group discussion. Special attention given
to panel and open-forum discussion. How to use parliamentary procedure.

Sch. 321.-Radio Programming and Production. 3 credits. Prerequisite or co-
requisite: Sch. 241.
11:30 daily. E-126.
Planning and producing programs for the local station and the networks on a commercial
and sustaining basis; program casting, directing, rehearsing, cutting, and timing.

Sch. 410.-Scientific Bases of Speech. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sch. 241 or con-
sent of instructor.
A survey in certain related fields of the scientific material which is fundamental to an under-
standing of the normal speaking process and of speech abnormalities.

Sch. 417.-Correction of Speech Defects. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of
instructor.
2:30 daily. E-130.
A beginning course in the recognition and correction of common speech defects, especially
designed for teachers and those planning to enter the teaching profession. The problem of
individual language difficulties and the diagnostic and corrective procedure in cases of lisping,
indistinct enunciation, pitch and quality difficulties, and foreign accent. Observation and work
in the Speech Clinic.


























102 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATE COURSES

Sch. 504.-Problems in Dramatic Production. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. E-126.
An advanced course in the problems of the play director; selecting, casting, rehearsing, and
mounting the play; designing and lighting of scenery. Participation in directing and producing
plays.

Sch. 510.-Scientific Bases of Speech. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. E-130.
A survey in certain related fields of the scientific material which is basic to an understanding
of the normal speech process and speech abnormalities.

Sch. 517.-Speech Correction. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. E-130.
Problems of articulation, vocal pitch and quality, foreign accent; preparation of a working
manual. Clinical practice.




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