• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Map of campus
 Officers of administration
 Summer session calendar
 Admission
 Information for veterans
 Expenses
 Loan funds
 Housing facilities
 General information
 Academic regulations
 Schools and colleges
 Guide to courses
 Departments of instruction
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00217
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1948
Copyright Date: 1943
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00217
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Map of campus
        Page 3
    Officers of administration
        Page 4
    Summer session calendar
        Page 5
    Admission
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Information for veterans
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Expenses
        Page 11
    Loan funds
        Page 12
    Housing facilities
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    General information
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Academic regulations
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Schools and colleges
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Guide to courses
        Page 51
    Departments of instruction
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
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    Back Cover
        Page 143
        Page 144
Full Text


The University Record
of the
University of Florida
Bulletin of
%he VUniversity Summer Session

1948

Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida. Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida,
as second-class matter, under Act of Congress August 24,
1912. Office of Publication, Gainesville, 'Florida.

Vol. XLIII Series I No. 3 March I, 1948















1948 SUMMER SESSION


FIRST TERM
June 10 July 24
SECOND TERM
July 26 September 4

Applications for the First Term must be filed with the Registrar not later than Saturday,
May 22.
Applications for the Second Term must be filed with the Registrar not later than Satur-
day, June 26.



The University Record Comprises:
The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Annual Catalog, the Schedules,
the Bulletin of the Summer Session, and announcements of special courses of instruction.
These bulletins will be sent without charge to all persons who apply for them. The
applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida












TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE

Map of Campus ............................................................................. ................................................. 3
Officers of Administration .............. .... .................--............... ..... ........ ........ ................ 4
Summer Session Calendar ................................................................................................................ 5
Admission .................................................................................--..... .................................................... 6
Information for Veterans ............................................................. ................. ............................. 8
Expenses ..................-........--....... ....................................................................................................... 11
Loan Funds ....... ................................................................................................................................ 12
Housing Facilities ............................................................................................................................ 13
General Information ........... ........................................................................................... ............... 16
Spanish Program ................................ ................................................................................... 17
Libraries ..............-....... .................................................................................. .................... 17
Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene ................-............. ... ............ 18
Certification of Teachers ........--...... ...... .-- ........... ......... ......................................... 18
Extension of Certificates .......................................................................... ............................ 19
Teacher Placement Bureau ....... --.... ......-- --........................ ......................... 20
Laboratory School .................................................................................................................... 20
Academic Regulations ...................... ............................................................................................ 23
Schools and Colleges ---........ ...................... ............... .......................................... 27
The University College ...................................... .................. ............................................ 27
College of Agriculture ................................. .............-- .... .......- ................- 37
School of Architecture and Allied Arts ... ..................................................................... 37
College of Arts and Sciences ..........................................----------.......................................... 37
College of Business Administration .................................................................................... 39
College of Education ............................................................................................................... 40
College of Engineering ...................................... ---... --..... ......--....- .................................... 43
School of Forestry .......................................................--....................................................... 43
School of Pharmacy ............................................................ ................................................... 43
College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics .................................................... 44
College of Law .........-.........-------------- --...... ... --....---.....-----.. ------..... .. -----..-.5....... 45
Graduate School .............-....--...-.. -------- ..-------- -------.............. -........-- 46
Guide to Courses ...........................-----------------------------....................-..............-------------------...................................... 51
Departments of Instruction (Courses and Schedules) ............................................................ 52




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STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
MILLARD CALDWELL ..........................................-............................................................. ...... Governor
R. A. GRAY-..........-------------.............................................................. .............................Secretary of State
J. EDWIN LARSON ........-..........................................................................................-- State Treasurer
J. ToM WATSON.................................................-........................-.....-........... .....Attorney General
COLIN ENGLISH, Secretary ........................................ State Superintendent of Public Instruction

BOARD OF CONTROL
J. THOMAS GURNEY, A.B., LL.B., Chairman........-................................ ...... .......Attorney at Law
Orlando, Florida
THOMAS W. BRYANT, B.S., LL.B. (Florida) ....................................................Attorney at Law
Lakeland, Florida
N. B. JORDAN............................. .-- -........................-- ................................... ............................. Banker
Quincy, Florida
JOSEPH HENSON MARKHAM, A.B., J.D. (Florida) ...............................................Attorney at Law
Jacksonville, Florida
HOLLIS RINEHART, LL.B ........................................................................ ................... Attorney at Law
Miami, Florida


WILLIAM F. POWERS ............Business Manager and Acting Secretary of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida
J. W. BLANDING ..........................................---..............................Auditor for the Board of Control
Sarasota, Florida

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOSEPH HILLIS MILLER, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D.............President of the University
JOHN STUART ALLEN. Ph.D.........................................................Vice-President of the University
WILLIAM TOBIAS ARNETT, M.A. in Arch.
Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
GEORGE FECHTIG BAUGHMAN, M.A., LL.B ............................................................. Business Manager
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A................................................................................... Dean of Students
ALVAH A. BEECHER, M.M ........................... ........................................................... Director of Music
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S ................................................................. Dean of the University
HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON, M.S.A............--........... Director of the Agricultural Extension Service
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, LL.B.....................................Acting Dean of the College of Law
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D......................................................... Director of School of Pharmacy
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc.........Provost for Agriculture and Dean of the College of Agriculture
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P. ....................................................................................... Registrar
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Sc.D.................Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences;
Honorary Vice-President of the University
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A ........................................................-- Dean of University College
JOHN VREDENBURG McQUITTY, Ph.D ............................................................... University Examiner
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D.......Dean of the College of Business Administration
HAROLD MOWRY, M.S.A ............................ .......Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
HAROLD STEPHENSON NEWINS, M.F........................................Director of the School of Forestry
HAROLD CLARK RIKER, M.A ..................................---........................................... Director of Housing
BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.A., B.S.A..................................... Dean of the General Extension Division
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D......... ......................Acting Dean of the College of Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D................................................. Dean of the Graduate School
DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.Ed.
Dean of the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S.......................................... .................... -- Dean of the College of Engineering
STANLEY LEROY WEST, B.S. in L.S., LL.B..----.....-----.................................Director of Libraries







CALENDAR FOR 1948 SUMMER SESSION
May 22, Saturday ........................ Last day for filing application for First Term 1948 Sum-
mer Session.
FIRST TERM
June 10, Thursday ........................ Placement tests.

June 10, 11, and 12, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday ............... Registration for the First Summer Term.
June 14, Monday, 7 a.m. .............. Classes begin. Late registration fee of $5 for registering
on this date.
June 15, Tuesday .......................... Last day for registration for the First Summer Term, and
for adding courses.
June 18, Friday, 4 p.m. .......-....... Last day for submitting resignation and receiving any
refund of fees.
June 26, Saturday, noon .............. Last day for making application for a degree that is to
be awarded at the end of the First Summer Term.
Last day for filing application for Second Term 1948 Sum-
mer Session.
July 3, Saturday .......................... Holiday.
July 5, Monday .............................. Last day for graduate students graduating at the end of
the First Summer Term to submit theses to the Dean.
July 10, Saturday, noon ................ Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the First Summer Term to complete correspond-
ence courses.
July 15, Thursday, 4 p.m. ............ Last day for filing application for extension of certificate.
Last day for dropping courses or resigning without
receiving grades of E.


July 21, 22, and 23, Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday ..............
July 22, Thursday, 4 p.m. ............

July 23, Friday ............................
July 24, Saturday, noon ..............

July 24, Saturday, 8 p.m. ............

July 21, 22, 23, and 24, Wednes-
day, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday ....................................
July 26, Monday, 7 a.m. ..............

July 27, Tuesday, 5 p.m. ..............

July 30, Friday, 4 p.m. ...............

August 7, Saturday, noon ............

August 7, Saturday, noon ............

August 13, Friday, 5 p.m. ............

August 14, Saturday ....................
August 21, Saturday, noon ........

August 26, Thursday, 4 p.m. ........


Final examinations.
Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at
the end of the First Summer Term are due in the office
of the Registrar.
Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.
First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the office
of the Registrar.
Conferring of degrees.

SECOND TERM

Registration for the Second Summer Term.
Classes begin. Late registration fee of $5 for registering
on this date.
Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
Last day for submitting resignation and receiving any
refund of fees.
Last day for making application to take Comprehensive
Examinations in the Second Summer Term.
Last day for making application for a degree that is to
be awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term.
Last day for graduate students graduating at the end of
the Second Summer Term to submit theses to the Dean.
Holiday.
Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the Second Summer Term to complete correspond-
ence courses.
Last day for filing application for extension of certificate.
Last day for dropping courses or resigning without
receiving grades of E.


September 1, 2, and 3, Wednes-
day, Thursday and Friday ........ Final examinations. Registration for fall term.
September 2, Thursday, 4 p.m..... Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the Second Summer Term are due in the office
of the Registrar.
September 3, Friday .................... Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.
September 4, Saturday, noon ...... Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the
office of the Registrar.
September 4, Saturday, 8 p.m....... Commencement Convocation.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSION

GENERAL STATEMENT
The Board of University Examiners is the agency responsible for administering all
admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time will be
considered for admission as follows:
1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not attended
college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university
and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college credit for advanced
standing, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university and
is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college credit as advanced
standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be considered for admission to the
Upper Division school or college of his choice provided his record indicates the
completion of college work in the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English,
the Humanities, and the Biological Sciences.
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated from a
standard college or university, he will be considered for admission to the Graduate
SchooL
If a student desires to attend the Summer Session not for pursuing work toward a
degree but for meeting some specific need, such as the satisfaction of teacher certification
requirements, he will be considered for admission as an unclassified student.

MISSION TO THE 1948 SUMMER SESSION
The 1948 Summer Session is open to all qualified applicants, both men and
women, provided preliminary application is filed in accordance with instructions
listed in the following paragraph.
No applicant will be considered for admission to the 1948 Summer Session
unless the preliminary application has been received at the Office of the
Registrar on or before Saturday, May 22, 1948. Other application forms (if
required), which will be sent upon the receipt of the preliminary application,
must be in the Office of the Registrar on or before June 1. It will be impossible
to consider applications received after these dates. All persons planning to
attend the Summer Session, whether or not they have previously attended the
University, must file the preliminary application form to be considered.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
A. For students who have never attended college:
1. Graduation from high school. Records show that the student who does not graduate
from high school in the top half of his class rarely succeeds in college work. The
University urges the prospective student to consider this fact carefully before making










ADMISSION


application. Non-Florida students will not be considered for admission if they do
not meet this criterion.
2. Satisfactory achievement in high school. The University does not specify any high
school units as required, but the general pattern of the units presented and the
student's achievement will receive careful consideration. The records reveal that
those students who scatter most in their choice of subjects are those who accom-
plish least in any of them. Therefore applicants who present a record which shows
no unity or a lack of essential subjects cannot be considered.
3. Satisfactory scores on placement tests. All applicants must take the placement
tests before being admitted to the University College. These are achievement tests
in the fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and natural sciences. Attain-
ments in these fields are possible without specific high school courses and are not
guaranteed by the acquiring of certain high school units. If the scores on the
placement tests indicate inadequate foundation for college work, the applicant may
be denied admission.

B. For transfer students:*
1. Honorable Dismissal. The student must be eligible to return to the institution last
attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed to return to the institu-
tion last attended cannot be considered for admission.
2. Satisfactory record. All transfer students must have made an average of C or higher
on all work attempted at all institutions previously attended to be considered for
admission.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION
A. From the University College:
See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the University College and the
specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools.

B. By advanced standing from other institutions:
1. Honorable dismissal from the institutions previously attended. An applicant for
admission who for any reason is not eligible to return to the institution last attended
cannot be considered for admission to the University.
2. An average of C or better. The average grade for all work attempted at other in-
stitutions must be C or better. An average grade of C or better is required for gradu-
ation from the University of Florida, and one who has not maintained this average
before coming to the University need not apply.
3. Specific course requirements for the professional school of the applicant's choice.
The courses listed as required for admission to the Upper Division under the various
curricula or acceptable substitutes must be offered as advanced standing to qualify
the student for admission to the Upper Division. An applicant lacking some of these
requirements may be permitted to enroll in the Utpper Division and complete them
without reducing the credits required in the Upper Division for a degree. In some
cases the student may be required to enroll in the University College until these
requirements are met.

The student who has matriculated at any college or university, regardless of the amount
of time spent in attendance or credit earned, is regarded as a transfer student.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have received a degree in arts
or science in a college or university of approved standing, or must be 'eligible for a degree
in a combined course in the University of Florida, upon the completion of one year of
work in the College of Law. The University also offers this combined course with the
Florida State University.
The above rule, waived at the beginning of the war, went back into effect at the
beginning of the second semester, 1947-48.
Under existing legislation veterans may continue to enter on two years of academic
college work meeting the standards of the Association of American Law Schools.

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major.
A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS

Special students may be admitted to the various schools and colleges of the Upper
Division only by approval of the Board of University Examiners. Each case will be con-
sidered on an individual basis. Application for admission as a special student must include:
(1) records of previous educational experience (high school or college transcripts);
(2) a statement as to the type of studies to be pursued; (3) a brief statement of the
reason or reasons for selecting a special program other than a regular one; (4) satisfactory
evidence of ability to pursue these studies-for example, a student to enroll as a special
student for some technical courses and who feels qualified to do so by reason of employment
or other experience should submit a brief description of this experience.

ADMISSION OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

To be admitted as an unclassified student the applicant must submit a statement of
honorable dismissal from the institution last attended.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR VETERANS

In addition to the regular academic requirements as set forth in the foregoing pages, the
entering veteran will be interested in the procedures necessary to qualify for the various
types of educational benefits available to veterans of World War II.

THOSE ENTERING UNDER THE C. I. BILL (PUBLIC LAW 346)

Under the provisions of this act the United States Veterans Administration assumes
responsibility for fees and costs of instructional materials actually needed by any veteran
who holds an honorable discharge and who had ninety days or more of active duty.
Application should be made to the Veterans Administration well in advance of the
Summer Session. Special forms for this purpose are available at the various offices of










ADMISSION


the Veterans Administration. If there is no office in your city, the forms can be obtained
by addressing the Veterans Administration, Pass-a-Grille Beach, Florida. With this form
must be submitted appropriate documents as required by the Veterans Administration.
These include certified copies of honorable discharges or certificates of separation, which
would show your entire service history. If claim is to be made for dependents, additional
evidence must be submitted. It is advisable that you consult with some representative of
the Veterans Administration for assistance in preparing such documents.
If the application is approved, the veteran will receive from the Veterans Administra-
tion a form called a Certificate of Eligibility. The veteran should keep this in his possession
until he actually reports for registration at the University. If the Certificate of Eligibility
has not been received by the applicant by the time he is to report for registration, he
should bring a copy of his discharge or certificate of service. Credit for fees and books
will be given upon the presentation of such a document even though the Certificate of
Eligibility has not been issued. However, the veteran's subsistence payments (which are
made directly to him) cannot begin until the Certificate of Eligibility properly endorsed
by the veteran has been filed with the Office of the Registrar, in turn endorsed by him,
and forwarded to the Veterans Administration.

THOSE ENTERING UNDER VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ACT (PUBLIC LAW 16)

Government benefits are awarded to certain veterans who have service-connected dis-
abilities. Application must be made to the Veterans Administration and should be made
well in advance of the time the student expects to enter. If the veteran's application for
benefits under this act has not been approved by the time he is to report for registration,
he should bring a copy of his discharge or certificate of service and begin his University
work under the provisions of Public Law 346. Advisors from the Veterans Administration
will be present during registration to assist such men in making application for benefits
under Public Law 346. These advisors will not, however, be in a position to act upon
applications for Public Law 16 in such a way that the eligibility for benefits can be
determined immediately.

COLLEGE CREDIT FOR SERVICE TRAINING
Veterans will be allowed credit for training and experiences obtained in the armed
forces in accordance with the recommendations of the American Council on Education as set
forth in "A Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services."
All veterans entering or reentering the University should consult the Special Assistant
for Veterans in the Office of the Registrar. In many cases it will be helpful to the student
and his dean in planning a program if this can be done in advance of registration.

INFORMATIONAL AND ADVISORS' SERVICES
All agencies of the University are serving student veterans and can be of assistance
in many ways. Probably the best results can be obtained if the following are consulted
for the types of information or services indicated:
A. Information pertaining to Veterans Administration procedure and regulations: Officer
in Charge, Veterans Administration Contact Office, Tenth Floor Seagle Building, Gaines-
ville.
B. Vocational Guidance: Veterans Guidance Center, Seventh Floor Seagle Building, Gaines-
ville, or The Bureau of Vocational Guidance, Room 210 Peabody Hall, University of
Florida, Gainesville.


































10 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

C. College credit for service training: Special Assistant Registrar for Veterans, Room 105
Building D, University of Florida, Gainesville.
D. General information and advice: Office of the Counselor for Veterans, Room 112, Lan-
guage Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville.










EXPENSES


EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES
Registration Fee, All Schools and Colleges except Law, (Florida Students) per term....$23.50
Registration Fee, All Schools and Colleges except Law, (Non-Florida Students)
per term ............................................................................. ................ ................................... 53.50
Registration Fee, College of Law, (Florida Students) per term ....................................... 35.50
Registration Fee, College of Law, (Non-Florida Students) per term ......-......................... 65.50
Registration Fee, Special Three W eeks Courses .................................................................... 12.00
Late Registration Fee ......................................................................................... ................... 5.00
Fee for Biology and Chemistry ................................................................................................ 5.00
D iplom a F ee ................................................... .......................................... ..................... ....... 5.00

EXAMINATION FEES
A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.

SPECIAL FEES
The field trip fee for those registered for Agricultural Economics 304 or 306 is $3;
for Agricultural Economics 409, $10.
The laboratory fee for those registered for Aeronautical Engineering 301 is $500.

REFUND OF FEES
Fees paid in advance for room reservation will be refunded up to and including, but
noot after June 11, for first term reservations, or July 18 for second term reservations.
If before 4 P. M. on Friday of the first week of each term students for any reason
wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded.
No refunds will be made after this date.

LIVING EXPENSES

Board and lodging will be somewhat higher this summer than in normal times. Food
can be obtained at the University cafeterias, at certain rooming houses, and at various
eating places near the campus. An average breakfast will cost 254 to 504; lunch and
dinner will cost 504 to $1.00. Lodging outside the residence halls is available in private
homes, in rooming houses, and in fraternity houses adjacent to the campus for $12.50 to $30
per person per month, depending upon the quality of the accommodations.
The following table will afford an estimate of expenses for the Summer Session per
six-weeks' term. The cost of board and lodging is, of course, variable, depending upon
the tastes and financial situation of the individual.
Low High
Registration (Florida Students) .................... $ 23.50 $ 23.50
Room ......................... ... ................ ............ 12.50 30.00
Board ........... ................................. 40.00 65.00
Books ...................... ..... .......................... 6.00 10.00

$ 82.00 $128.50










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University, funds
may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of fifty cents is made on each
account, per term.
LOAN FUNDS

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of Summer Session
teachers through the establishment of certain loan funds-the Florida State Scholarship
Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan
Fund, the R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, the W. N. Sheate
Memorial Loan Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund. Through the Office of the Dean
of Students, information can be secured concerning other loans available to Summer Session
students. Loans are governed by the following regulations:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
(8) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening of a Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Dean of Students.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which he is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Session.
(8) Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine months.
(9) Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which is added to the principal fund.
Upon application to the Dean of the Summer Session, blank forms for application for
a scholarship loan will be furnished.

KAPPA DELTA PI LOAN FUND

Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi has established a loan fund for small loans to
graduate and undergraduate students who are preparing for the teaching profession. Among
other eligibility requirements, a student desiring a loan must have a scholarship average
of not less than B. Information concerning this loan fund and forms for making applica-
tion for a loan may be secured from the Secretary of the College of Education, Room 120,
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School.

LEWIS SUMMER SCHOLARSHIPS

Lewis summer scholarships are awarded annually to approximately one-fourth of
Florida's teachers. There are two types of scholarships: one, the $75 scholarship for those
who earn six semester hours credit during the summer at one of the state institutions of
higher learning; the other, the $20 scholarship awarded for satisfactory workshop or
work-conference participation. These scholarships are awarded prior to the opening of the
summer session upon the recommendation of the county superintendent. Complete informa-
tion may be obtained from the county superintendent's office.
Scholarship checks will be available for distribution about three weeks after the term
begins. Teachers may draw on scholarship funds for fees, dormitory room rent and books
by presenting the notice of scholarship award to the University cashier. This notice should
also be presented at registration.
Additional information may be obtained at Yonge 126 or Language 2.










EXPENSES


UNIVERSITY HOUSING FACILITIES

GENERAL INFORMATION
Each student is responsible for making his own arrangements for housing accommoda-
tions. He may do this by (1) applying to the Director of Housing for assignment to
University Housing Facilities or (2) making his own arrangements for accommodations
off-campus in private housing, where the Housing Office can act only as a referral agency,
and direct contact between the student and the householder is necessary.
Room facilities have been increased by expansion of room capacity in permanent dormi-
tories, construction of new (temporary) dormitories on campus and by use of temporary
facilities at the Alachua Army Air Base. Rates quoted below on all these facilities are
subject to change.
All facilities are furnished with basic furniture requirements such as beds, mattresses,
dressers, desks and chairs. Residents may supply their own linens although a linen and
equipment rental supply room is maintained in Murphree Basement for the convenience
of residents. A limited quantity of extra equipment as well as pillows and blankets is
available for rent.
FACILITIES FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
New dormitory buildings on campus, will be reserved, as required, for use by women
students during the Summer Session only. (See description below.)

FACILITIES FOR SINGLE MEN STUDENTS
Five Permanent Dormitories: Buckman, Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls
have been increased in capacity by converting single rooms to rooms for two, doubles and
suites to rooms for three or four, and some triples to rooms for four. Each hall is divided
into sections accommodating from 30 to 60 men each. All but a few rooms have lavatories,
and there is a community bath-with shower and toilet facilities-on each floor of each
section. Steam heat is furnished. Term rent rates range from $10.00 to $20.00 per person.
Sixteen New Dormitories: These buildings, located on-campus, are of one-story con-
struction, contain from 17 to 25 rooms each, and have community showers and toilets and
community study rooms. Each room will accommodate two students at term rates of $15.00
per student unless demand for space requires increased capacity. Individual room space
is limited. Individual rooms contain lavatories.
Temporary Structures at Alachua Army Air Base: These buildings, located six miles
from the campus on the Jacksonville highway, are of one story, temporary construction,
with tar-paper exteriors. Regular barracks structures, grouped around concrete block
shower and toilet buildings, are divided into a community study room and a dormitory
sleeping room to accommodate a maximum of 30 students. A few structures are divided
into rooms for four students each and have inside toilet facilities. Heat for all is provided
by coal stoves; hot water is available. Bus transportation is available. Term rent rates
are $10.00 per person.
FACILITIES FOR MARRIED STUDENTS
Three apartment villages, located on-campus, have been provided by the Public Housing
Authority for married veteran students. Flavet I contains 26 buildings of one-story, tem-
porary construction, divided into 100 apartment units containing one, two, or three bed-
rooms. Flavet II contains 20 buildings, similar to Flavet I, divided into 76 apartment units
containing one, two, or three bedrooms. Flavet III contains 54 buildings of two-story,










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


temporary construction, providing 448 one or two bedroom apartments. All apartments
are equipped with basic furniture requirements, but residents must supply their own linens,
rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating are by gas, metered to the individual apart-
ments. Rent rates per month are $26.75 (one bedroom), $29.50 (two bedrooms), $32.25
(three bedrooms). Electricity is metered to serve units.
Three Temporary Trailer Parks are located at the Alachua Army Air Base for use by
couples who have trailers. Water and electricity are available at each lot. There are
concrete block lavatory buildings for men and for women, and former barracks provide
community study and recreation rooms. Rent rates are $8.00 per month.
One New Dormitory, located on-campus, provides room space for 17 couples at a monthly
rental rate of $22.00. This building is similar to the new dormitories described under
facilities for single students. Cooking is not permitted.

APPLICATIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Applicants for assignment to facilities for single students must post a room deposit fee
of $10.00 before an application will be considered for an assignment. All applications from
incoming students for a given period of school are considered in chronological order accord-
ing to date of room deposit payment, after reassignments of current residents and students
have been handled. Assignments are made for the total estimated period of attendance
at the University provided attendance is continuous. Room-mate requests are honored
wherever possible, provided the individuals concerned submit their applications and pay
room deposit fees on the same date. Applicants requiring special accommodations because
of physical disabilities will be given every consideration. A doctor's certificate stating
disability and need is required.
The room deposit fee is not a payment on rent but is a separate deposit against incidental
charges, damages, and completion of lease agreement. It is refundable on request if an
assignment cannot be made or when the student has completed his assigned period of
residence and removed from his quarters and same have been checked as to condition.
If an assignment is cancelled by the assignee before the day classes begin for the period,
one-half of the deposit is refunded. If the assignment is cancelled on or after the day
classes begin for the period or if the student does not fulfill the terms of his assignment,
the fee is not refundable. Insofar as possible, applicants will be notified in writing in
advance as to their exact assignments.
Applicants for assignment to facilities for married couples are not required to post a
deposit until requested to do so by the Housing Office. Such applications will be con-
sidered chronologically, according to date received by Housing Office, when an assignment
can be made. Couples with children receive priority over those without children for
assignment to apartment units.

GENERAL POLICIES

Rent and other charges for single students are due and payable in advance upon noti-
fication of space assignments, without demand or billing, at the Housing Office. Failure
to pay rent when due may result in cancellation of University registration.
Rent and other charges for married couples are due and payable, without demand or
billing, at the Housing Office on or before the first day of each calendar month.
Assignees will check in in person at the Housing Office before occupying quarters
assigned. If assignee has not checked in by midnight of day before classes begin for the
























EXPENSES


period, the assignment will be cancelled and deposit taken up, unless written notice of
arrival after that date has been filed with the Housing Office. Assignee must be a regularly
enrolled student, during period of occupancy.
Right of Occupancy is restricted to assignee himself for assigned space only, subject
to assignee's observing principles of conduct and procedure stated in dormitory policy
and supplements thereto. Assignee cannot sub-lease his assigned space to another person
or transfer to another space without advance approval from the Housing Office.
A student who withdraws from Housing Facilities during the period covered by his
assignment is not entitled to refunds unless withdrawal is due to required service in armed
forces, certifiable illness, or other circumstances beyond his control.
A student vacating his quarters in Housing Facilities, either during or at the end of
the period, must check out in person at the Housing Office.
The University reserves the right to change or cancel any assignment and the right of
entry by its authorized personnel into any quarters at any time for purposes of inspection,
repair, or discipline.
Extra electrical appliances are subject to charge per item per term. The wiring of all
electrical equipment is subject to inspection and must meet required standards. The use
of hot plates and similar heating and cooking devices and radio sending sets is prohibited.
Applicants who have received room assignments may send heavy luggage ahead, prepaid
and addressed to their own names, in care of Murphree Hall Basement. The University
assumes no responsibility beyond the exercise of reasonable care for any shipment so
received.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GENERAL INFORMATION

SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE 1948 SUMMER SESSION

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
A three weeks' special school from June 14 through July 2, will be conducted for
Agricultural Extension Workers and others who are in rural leadership work, or who
aspire to become rural leaders. There will be two courses in Extension Methods, including
how to conduct demonstrations, tours, discussion meetings, farm and home visits, exhibits,
4-H Club camps, picnics, rallies and other educational events. In addition one course
each in home gardening and in advanced public speaking will be offered.

CARNEGIE A. I. A. SUMMER SESSION
From July 26 to August 14, the School of Architecture and Allied Arts, in cooperation
with the General Extension Division will offer a special course, Architecture and the Arts
in Everyday Life. The course will consist of lectures, demonstrations, conferences and
field trips. It is designed for teachers, school principals, public officials, leaders in edu-
cational and civic affairs, and others interested in the community, the school, the commer-
cial and industrial elements, and the home as environmental influences in human
development.
The University of Florida has been selected by The American Institute of Architects
as one of two institutions in the United States to offer the Carnegie A. I. A. Summer
Session in 1948, and a grant from the Carnegie Fund of the Institute will enable the
University to secure a comprehensive series of teaching exhibitions, to pay part of the
regular University registration fee and to defray most of the cost of field trips for students
who enter the course.
A descriptive leaflet on the course together with the necessary application blanks for
admission are available from the Registrar upon request. Registration will be limited to
60 students and applications will be considered in order of date of receipt by the
Registrar. (See Ae. 201, Second Term.)

CURRICULUM BULLETINS
Work on curriculum bulletins for the State of Florida will continue during the first
term in the fields of Social Studies, Speech, Journalism, Mathematics, Physical Education
(see En. 555).
LECTURES AND PLAYS
The University presents outstanding lectures as part of the general educational and
cultural life of the campus. The speakers are selected with a view to offering to the
University community stimulating presentations in the different areas of learning.
During the Summer Session, under the direction of the Department of Speech, full
length plays, experimental one-act plays, and interpretative reading programs are presented.
The University provides adequate facilities for high grade performances under competent
direction.
NEW PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS
The College of Education, in response to the need for training in these fields, is for
the first time employing a specialist, Dr. Ann Holdford, and offering work in kindergarten










GENERAL INFORMATION


and nursery school education. (See En. 584.) Work is also provided in the training of
supervisors of practice teaching and internships. Dr. Kate Woffard, a specialist in the field,
will direct it. (See En. 537.) An opportunity will be offered for teachers in small schools
to study and plan the solution of problems peculiar to these schools (see En. 581). In
response to the request of the Southern Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges
a course is offered to train secondary school principals and their staffs in the use of the
evaluative criteria. The Association is requiring that all new schools applying for ad-
mission must conduct a program of evaluation and that all old members not previously
accredited conduct this program within three years (see En. 538). Laboratory work in
corrective reading will continue.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The leading religious denominations have attractive places of worship and students are
welcomed at every service. Students interested in the study of religion and in preparing
themselves for religious leadership may take courses offered by the Department of Religion.
Vesper services are conducted weekly on the campus lawn or in the Florida Union.

SPANISH AND LATIN AMERICAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM
A special program, designed for both teachers and students, will be offered. In
addition to the regular courses, there will be films, lectures and Spanish tables at the
University dining hall. Special offerings of interest will be found in the Departments of
Instruction section of the catalog under Spanish, History (for Latin American History),
and Economics (for Economic Geography).

SPECIAL SCHEDULES FOR TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS
Many teachers and principals will not be released from school work by June 14; many
will have to return to their jobs before September 4. Special schedules have been worked
out for these, though the summer session as a whole is operated in two six-week terms
between these dates.
Some three week courses begin July 5 and run through July 24; others begin July 26
and end August 14; still others begin August 16 and end September 4. All regular second
term classes in Education, Business Education, Industrial Arts Education, Social Studies,
Science for Children, School Art, and School Music, will end on August 28. Students
registering only for these classes may complete their work on that date.

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

The library resources of the University total more than 292,000 volumes. The greater
part of the collection is housed in the University Library, but there are separate libraries
for Law, Agriculture and Forestry, Architecture and Allied Arts, Chemistry and Pharmacy,
Biology and Geology. These libraries are located in the buildings which house the cor-
responding activities.
The College of Education and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School are served by the
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library, a collection of books for boys and girls from
kindergarten through the twelfth grade, and the College of Education Library, a collection
of professional materials supplementing the holdings of the University Library in the field
of Education. The library serving the extension activities of the University is located in
the Seagle Building.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


One of the outstanding collections in the University is the P. K. Yonge Library of
Florida History. This library, the gift of Julien C. Yonge of Pensacola, was established
in 1944 as a research center for students of Florida history. It is one of the best of the
libraries of Floridiana, and is being steadily developed under the guidance of its donor.
On the first floor of the University Library are the University College Reserve, and
Periodicals Reading Rooms. On the second floor are the Reference Room, the circulation
desk, and the card catalog. This catalog indicates the holdings not only of the University
Library but also of the separate libraries mentioned above. In the book stacks are forty-
eight carrels for use of graduate students.

BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE

The services of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene are available
to all students. The chief function of the Bureau is to provide the individual student with
an analysis of his characteristics, interests, and abilities, together with the necessary
information about occupations, so that he may choose his vocation more intelligently.
Vocational information is provided by a reading shelf which the Bureau maintains in
the University Library. This shelf is supplied with an extensive series of authoritative
monographs on various occupations.
In addition, the Bureau aids students in the solution of personal problems which may
hamper their work. This service is open both to students who request it themselves as well
as to those referred to the Bureau by members of the faculty and administrative officers.

CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS

Persons desiring information concerning the certification of teachers are advised to
write to the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting Bulletin A
on Certification of Teachers. This booklet gives all requirements for regular Graduate
and Undergraduate Certificates in the various fields as well as instructions concerning
applications for certificates.
Persons interested in shifting from temporary certification to regular certification should
write the State Department of Education for recommendations as to what summer courses
will count toward fulfilling requirements. In case the individual does not hold a degree
from an accredited college, he should have his transcript evaluated by an accredited
institution, as defined in Certificate Bulletin A, before writing the State Department for
such suggestions.
Certificates are granted by the State Department of Education, not by the University.
For the student's information, some of the requirements of the State Department of Educa-
tion listed in Bulletin A on Certification of Teachers are repeated below, together with the
numbers of courses offered by the University to meet these requirements.
*UNIVERSITY COURSES MEETING THE
REQUIREMENTS REQUIREMENTS
For All Certificates:
General Preparation C-1 and C-3 and C-2 or C-6
Health Education PHA. 387 (or En. 387 or En. 103)
Physical Education PHA. 363, 364, 373

*Based upon present offerinKs. Discontinued courses which will meet the requirements are
shown in parentheses.










GENERAL INFORMATION


For Elementary Certificates:
Child Development
Educational Psychology
History and Principles or Introduction
to Education
Elementary School Curriculum or
Methods of Teaching in the
Elementary School
Principles and Methods of Teaching
Reading
Children's Literature
Methods of Teaching Science in
Elementary School
Methods in Arithmetic
Methods in Social Studies
Geography
Observation and Practice Teaching
Public School Music
Public School Art
Health Education in Elementary Grades
Physical Education in Elementary
Grades
Penmanship

For Secondary Certificates:
English
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science:
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Conservation


Social Studies:
History
Political Science
Economics
Sociology
Geography
Conservation
General


En. 385 (or En. 203 or En. 319)
En. 386 (or En. 207)

En. 241 (or CEn. 13 or En. 101 or 102)

En. 471 (or En. 308)

En. 471 (or En. 221), En. 480
Eh. 391

Gl. 301 or Gl. 302 (or En. 209 or 222)
En. 471 (or En. 124)
Scl. 301 or 302 (or En. 201)
C-2 or Courses in Gpy.
En. 405 or En. 421-2 (or En. 253)
Msc. courses
Pc. courses
PHA. 387
PHA. 373
BEn. 97 (or Hg. 101)


C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh.
C-42, C-421 and courses in CMs. and Ms.
Courses in PHA.

C-2, Courses in Ps. and Cy.
C-6, Courses in Bly., Bty. and Bay.
C-1 or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387
or Es. 381 or Es. 382


Courses in CHy. and Hy.
Courses in CPI. and Pcl.
Courses in CEs. and Es.
Courses in CSy. and Sy.
Courses in Gpy. and Es. 381, 385
See Science
C-1 will be counted as 8 of the total hours
required but will not reduce the specific
requirements.


Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department
may not be represented by the same titles in this bulletin. To facilitate finding the proper
course descriptions for such fields consult the guide on page 51.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the granting of extension certificates*
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.

2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade is
below C.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


3. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for
the same. In case the student fails to apply on the Registration Card at the
time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 105 Build-
ing D, to have his application for extension properly recorded. A list
of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 10 for the First Term and August
20 for the Second Term. In case of error in this list, students should report
to the Registrar. No student will be recommended for extension whose
name does not appear on this list by July 17 for the First Term or August
27 for the Second Term. Students should indicate exactly the name that
appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended.
4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin English,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a
year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension will not be
granted.

TEACHER PLACEMENT BUREAU

The Teacher Placement Bureau of the College of Education renders employment
services to graduates of the University of Florida and to other teachers both within and
without the state. It aids school officials in locating well-qualified candidates for positions
in the Public schools. There is no charge for the services of the Bureau. Teachers or
employing officials who wish to avail themselves of these services should write the Director
of the Teacher Placement Bureau, Room 126, Yonge Building, University of Florida.

THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School was established to serve the public schools and
other educational agencies through four major functions:
1. By demonstrating an excellent quality of teaching in elementary and high school.
2. By assisting the schools of the state through counseling with teachers and the
distribution of educational materials.
3. By serving as an experimental educational laboratory for investigation of all
kinds of school problems, for the production of materials, and for experiments
in improved methods of teaching and supervised student teaching.
4. By providing opportunities for observation of classroom management and partici-
pation in teaching.

The Laboratory School will be open the first term of the summer session. Children
of summer session students are welcome for enrollment. Application for admission should
be made to the Director of the Laboratory School as soon as possible since the number
who may be accommodated is limited. Classes from the kindergarten through the sixth
grade will be held.
Pupils will register Monday, June 14 in Yonge 230, from 8:30 to 10:00 A.M.

FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY

The Florida Curriculum Laboratory is located on the third floor of the P. K. Yonge
Building. This Laboratory is made possible by the cooperation of the Florida State Depart-










GENERAL INFORMATION


ment of Education, the College of Education, and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School of
the University of Florida. Professional books, textbooks, courses of study, pamphlets,
bulletins, magazines, and supplementary materials are available for the use of Florida
educators.
The Joseph R. Fulk Library of School Administration is located in the Florida Curricu-
lum Laboratory for the use of school administrators.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Orange and Blue Bulletin is the official bulletin of the Summer Session. This
mimeographed sheet, published every other day during the Summer Session and posted
on all bulletin boards, carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings, lost and found
articles, and other pertinent information. Announcements made in the General Assembly;
notices on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody Hall, and Laguage Hall; and
news items in the Summer Gator serve to keep the Summer Session students informed
concerning student activities.

ORGANIZATIONS

PHI KAPPA PHI

A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University in
1912. To be eligible for consideration for membership, a student must previously have
earned at the University at least thirty semester hours of credit, must have been guilty of
no serious breach of discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates
for degrees in his college. Eligibility for consideration for membership is assured every
student with an honor point average of 3.30 or higher, but a student who comes within
the quota of his college may be considered if his honor point average is not below 3.00.
Graduate students meeting certain prescribed requirements are also considered for member-
ship.
KAPPA DELTA PI

The Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of Florida
in 1923. The purpose of the society is to recognize and promote merit in educational study
and service. Both men and women are admitted to membership. Members are chosen from
juniors, seniors, graduate students, faculty, and alumni. Requirements for membership
are, in general, as follows: a scholastic average of at least B; evidence of abiding interest
in educational service; a good professional attitude; and good personal-social character-
istics. During the Summer Sessions the chapter holds a meeting each week.

PHI BETA KAPPA

Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida in 1938.
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity with the national
objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College
of Arts and Sciences. Not more than 15 per cent of the senior class graduating in each
semester, including both graduating classes of the Summer Session, is eligible for election.
In addition to conferring membership upon qualified seniors in the College of Arts and
Sciences, the society seeks, by means of an Award in Recognition of Creative Achievement,













BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


to honor each year not more than one graduating senior from all the colleges on the campus
who, irrespective of his honor point average, has distinguished himself throughout his
undergraduate career in such fields of activity as creative writing, dramatics, and forensics,
the fine arts, or any other liberal discipline, and has revealed a decided talent, a persistent
interest, and a prospect of mature achievement in later life.


RECREATION

THE FLORIDA UNION

The Florida Union is the official center of student activities, and provides a meeting
place for clubs and student officials. The Union also sponsors a broad program of enter-
tainment and recreation. Students attending the Summer Session are cordially invited
to use the game room, library, lounges, pianos, meeting rooms, and all of the other facilities
in the Union building. The Summer Session lecture series, artist exhibitions, receptions,
teas, piano recitals, and other events of special interest will be presented during the summer.
The Florida Union operates Camp Wauburg, located about nine miles from the campus,
and permission to use the camp may be obtained at the Union desk. Camp Wauburg has
picnicking and swimming facilities.

INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS

A broad recreational program of athletics will be conducted for the students and faculty
by the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics during both terms of the Summer
Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will be organized with competition in softball
during both terms. Competition in tennis (singles and double), shuffleboard (mixed
doubles), and swimming will be offered during the first term; and tennis (mixed doubles),
volleyball, and handball during the second term. A sports' clinic will be conducted prior
to the tennis, volleyball, and handball tournaments. Appropriate awards will be made
to winning teams and individuals in all sports.
The athletic and physical educational facilities, including the equipment room service,
will be available to all students. Use of these services and facilities will also be extended
to faculty members and wives of students upon the payment of a fee of $1.00 per term of
six weeks at the Athletic Office. The Summer Gator, the Orange and Blue Bulletin, and
the Florida Intramural Bulletin will carry current notices and announcements about various
phases of the program.

THE SWIMMING POOL

The swimming pool will be open daily during both terms of Summer Session.
Dressing facilities for women will be located in the building immediately south of the
Gymnasium, and men will dress in the Gymnasium.










ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Several days before registration students
should confer with the deans of their respective colleges regarding choice of courses.
Juniors and seniors should confer with the heads of the departments in which they expect
to earn majors. Seniors must file, in the office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree. The official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Courses can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college
in which the student is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change
at the office of the Registrar. Unclassified students must secure the approval of the Dean
of the University for this purpose.

CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester
hour.
RESmENCE REQUIREMENTS

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two semesters,
or one semester and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students offering
advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University. Students
who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for credit
toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the Master's Degree two semesters or six summer terms are necessary to satisfy
the residence requirements, except for the Master of Education Degree, for which the
requirements are two semesters and one summer term, or six summer terms.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (28 in the College of
Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the respective
colleges from which they expect to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made
only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case
may the amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six
hours required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No student will be allowed to take more than one fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class work. Extension work to apply on the last
thirty hours is authorized only by special action of the faculty of the college in which a
student is registered. Such authorization must be obtained prior to enrollment in exten-
sion work. If authorization is given, no student is permitted to earn more than twelve
of the last thirty-six hours in this manner. Under no circumstances will a student in
residence be permitted to register for a correspondence course if that course is being
offered in the Summer Session.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD

The maximum load for which an undergraduate may register in a term is 6 semester
hours or two courses not to exceed 7 semester hours. The maximum load in the Graduate
School is 6 semester hours per term.
The minimum load for any student is three semester hours. Registration for less than
three hours must be approved by the Dean of the college in which the student is enrolled.
After registration, the student may reduce his load to less than three hours only with the
approval of the Senate Committee on Student Petitions.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS

For regulations in the various colleges covering graduation with Honors, see the
Catalog.
UNCLAssIFIED STUDENTS

1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities who wish
to earn credits in the Summer Session to be transferred eventually to their respective insti-
tutions, and (b) other students not candidates for degrees.
2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an unclassified
student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of the colleges or schools
of the University, he may do so (1) by regularizing his admission to the University (pre-
sent all the credentials required) and (2) by meeting the requirements (in effect at the
time of his application for candidacy) for admission to the school or college he desires
to enter.
3. If such a student is admitted to candidacy for a degree, credits earned while an
unclassified student will be accepted in so far as they apply toward the degree requirements
(in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the college or school chosen by the
student. A student must have been registered as a regular student in the college or school
from which he expects to receive the Bachelor's Degree for at least three summer terms and
in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the Master's Degree. The residence
requirement of at least five summer terms in the University will not be waived in any case.
4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclassified
students during the Summer Session.
5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite statement
of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy in the various colleges
and schools. This statement will make clear that credits earned while a student is regis-
tered as an unclassified student can be applied toward a degree in the college of his choice
only if under regular procedure this credit will apply toward that degree.
6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will be approved by the Dean of
the University and assistants chosen by him from the faculty.

ATTENDANCE

If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent that further
enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to him and detrimental to the best
interest of the class, it shall be the duty of the instructor to warn such student in writing
that further absences or failure to do class work will cause him to be dropped from the










ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


course with a failing grade. Where possible this warning will be delivered personally;
otherwise, it will be mailed to the student's last University address by the Registrar.
Instructors shall immediately report all such warnings to the Course Chairman or Depart-
ment Head.
Should any absences or failure to do class work be incurred after this warning, the
students will be dropped from the course and given a failing grade. Should this reduce
his load below the minimum of three hours he will be dropped from the University and
his record marked "Dropped for Non-Attendance" or "Dropped for Unsatisfactory Work",
as the case may be.
FAILURE IN STUDIES
A person registered in one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper Division
who fails fifty per cent or more of his work in any term or semester will be dropped for
failure in studies and will not be readmitted to the University until the lapse of one
semester, except upon approval of a formal petition by the Senate Committee on Student
Petitions. A student who has been dropped once and in any subsequent period of attendance
fails fifty per cent or more of his work shall be dropped permanently and not be eligible
for readmission. In administering the above regulation, in no case shall failure in one
course only cause a student to be dropped.
Students registered in the University College will have their records reviewed by a
Committee on Student Progress at the end of each period of attendance. In general the
committee will be guided by the following policy. The student in the Lower Division who
has been in attendance one semester or the equivalent (two six-weeks summer terms are
considered the equivalent of a semester) and in any subsequent period of attendance fails
fifty per cent or more of his work will be dropped first time and will not be eligible for
readmission until the lapse of one semester, except on approval of a formal petition by
the Senate Committee on Student Petitions. A student who has dropped once and in any
subsequent period of attendance fails fifty per cent or more of his work shall be dropped
permanently and will not be eligible for readmission. In administering the above regu-
lation, in no case, however, shall failure in one course only cause a student to be dropped.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must successfully pass
six or more to complete the program of the University College) are administered by the
Board of University Examiners and are given in January, May, July, and August of each
year. A student must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think
in the several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. Standings
on the comprehensive examinations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are not
subject to change by any other agency.

APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the examination is
given need not make application for it. University College students who are not enrolled
in a course at the time an examination is given and who wish to take the comprehensive
examination must apply in writing to the Board of Examiners for permission prior to the
last date set for filing such applications. Applications will not be accepted from students
registered in the colleges of the Upper Division. Before the application is accepted the
applicant will be required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege
































26 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

has not been used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Applications will be
accepted only for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Examiners.
The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give University College students
examinations by application.
Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify to repeat
the examination by repeating the course or by further independent study. Evidence of
additional preparation must be submitted to the Board of Examiners with the formal
application to repeat the examination.










SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
In a reorganization at the University of Florida in 1935, all freshmen and sophomores
were placed in one college. The University College administers all the work of the Lower
Division, which includes the pre-professional work for the Upper Division schools and
colleges and a core program of basic education for all students. In 1944 the American
Council on Education defined this program: "General education refers to those phases
of nonspecialized and nonvocational education that should be the common denominator,
so to speak, of educated persons. . the type of education which the majority of our
people must have if they are to be good citizens, parents, and workers." During his
freshman and sophomore years at the University, a student's time is about evenly divided
between these objectives of general education and those of pre-professional or professional
preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility toward the professional training of men who
remain four years or longer and earn degrees, the University of Florida as a state institution
also accepts its civic responsibility to help those who spend only one or two years at
the University. These students-more than two-thirds of all enrolled-are not "failures"
because they do not continue and earn degrees, and they probably deserve more from the
state university than an odd assortment of only "introductory courses." Consequently
at the University of Florida a group of comprehensive courses have been worked out to
give some unity and meaning to a beginner's program. These comprehensive courses
that make up the core program are:

1. American Institutions (known hereafter as C-l)
2. The Physical Sciences (C-2)
3. Reading, Speaking, and Writing: Freshman English (C-3)
4. Practical Logic: Straight Thinking (C-41);
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
5. The Humanities (C-5)
6. Biological Science (C-6)

GUIDANCE
If a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not urged to guess on
registration day. His program may be made up largely from the comprehensive which
help him direct his thinking toward a desirable objective, together with approved electives
that may further enable him to explore interests and needs. But whether the student is
decided or undecided about his life's work, these comprehensive courses provide basic
preparation that every educated person should have.
Thus, since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, the program
absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course of the University
College program is designed to guide the student. During the time that he is making
tentative steps toward a profession by taking special subjects to test aptitudes, interests,
and ability, he is also studying the several great areas of human understanding and achieve-
ment. The program is adjusted to the individual, but there must be a more substantial










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


basis for adjustment than just his chance whim of the moment. The material of the
comprehensive courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary function. While,
of necessity, this training must point forward to distant goals, this work in the University
College must also present materials which are directly related to life experiences and
which will immediately become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making
correct next steps. Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress reports, vocational
aptitude tests, basic vocational materials, selected material in the comprehensive courses,
student conferences, adjustments for individual differences, election privileges, and com-
prehensive examinations-all are parts of a plan designed to guide students. Specifically,
however, the University College has a staff of counsellors located in the college office.
Here, a student's high school preparation, the results of vocational and aptitude tests,
his academic achievement, all are used in the many individual counselling conferences.
Guidance, then, is not a function of one specialized group.
The whole drive of the University College program is one of directing the thinking
of the student. While the necessary correlation and unification is attempted at the Uni-
versity College Office, throughout the University College period students consult Upper
Division deans and department heads to discuss future work. During the last month of
each school year these informal conferences are concluded by a scheduled formal confer-
ence at which each student fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year.
Every spring the university is privileged to give placement tests to all seniors in every
high school of the state. Since many high schools are also trying to acquaint the student
with the common body of knowledge so needed by all, their records along with the
placement test results indicate the variation that should be made in the program followed
by a student at the university. As a result of placement tests a good student from high
school may be excused from general education work in one or more of the comprehensive
areas.

THE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATE

The Associate of Arts Certificate is awarded in recognition of the successful completion
of two years of planned work at the University of Florida. In specific detail, one must
pass at least sixty-four semester hours including pre-professional work and the compre-
hensive courses that make up the core program.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NORMAL PROGRAM
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
1.-American Institutions ....... ... 8 1.-The Humanities ------- ---. 8
2.-The Physical Sciences 6 2.-Biological Science 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-Departmental Electives ----..16-20
Freshman English -_ 5 Military Science; Physical Fitness -
4.-Logic and Mathematics 6 80-84
5.-Departmental Electives .. 2-6
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
30-84
A student who has had three or four years of preparatory school study in any one of the
subject-areas of the comprehensive courses and whose placement test grades Indicate superior
knowledge and understanding at that level may substitute an approved elective.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are repaired to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.










SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS ENTERING THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE IN THE SUMMER SESSION

Freshmen will be able to complete nearly half of the program for the first year by
attending the entire twelve weeks of the Summer Session. Suggestions as to Summer
Programs are listed below. These should be used in conjunction with the regular University
Catalog and after consulting the Dean of the University College or a member of the Advisors
Group.
1. For the majority of students-any combination of the following 3 and 4 hour courses
totalling not more than seven hours per term.


First Term Hours
C-11 American Institutions ......... 4

C-21 The Physical Sciences .......... 3

C-31 Freshman English ............... 4

C-41 Practical Logic or
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics .... 3

C-61 Biological Science ................ 3


Second Term Hours
C-12 American Institutions .......... 4
(cont'd)
C-22 The Physical Sciences ....... 3
(cont'd)
C-32 Freshman English ............... 4
(cont'd)
C-41 Practical Logic or
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics .... 3
(cont'd)
C-62 Biological Science ........... 3
(cont'd)


Basic Program for Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Students.-The program listed below
covers the minimum pre-medical or pre-dental work prescribed by the American Medical
Association or by the American Dental Association for its member schools. Since some
schools require more, the student should write directly to the medical or dental school he
is considering for a catalog and specific information concerning its requirements.

Basic Two-Year Program for Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Students
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions i.-The Humanities
2.-General Chemistry 2.-Organic Chemistry
8.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-- .-General Physics
Freshman English 4.-French or German
4.-Biological Science Military Science; Physical Fitness
5.-General Animal Biology (Laboratory)
Military Science; Physical Fitness

SUGGESTED SUMMER SESSION PROGRAM FOR PRE-MEDICAL OR PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS


First Term Hour
C-11 American Institutions ............... 4

or
C-31 Freshman English ................... 4

and
C-61 Biological Science ................... 3


s Second Term Hours
C-12 American Institutions ............. 4
(cont'd)
or
C-32 Freshman English ................... 4
(cont'd)
and
C-62 Biological Science ................... 3
(cont'd)


And one or two of the following each term to make a total of not more than seven hours.
First Term Hours Second Term Hours
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics ...... 3 C-41 Practical Logic ....................... 3


Cy. 101 General Chemistry ........... 4

Bly. 101 General Animal Biology .... 3


Cy. 102 General Chemistry ............. 4
(cont'd)
Bly. 102 General Animal Biology .... 3
(cont'd)











30 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AGRICULTURE

The program for freshmen and sophomores working for a degree in the College of
Agriculture:
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
1.-American Institutions 8 1.-Agricultural Chemistry 8-- ....--
2.-Biological Science .... .... -- 6 2.-Logic and Mathematics ---
8.-Biology and Botany Laboratories .... 6 3.-The Humanities ............. ....__ 8
4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 4.-Bty. 303, or Bly. 102, or Ps. 226-- 8
Freshman English .... .... 8 5-Electives in Agriculture or C-2.__ 6-9
5.-Electives in Agriculture or C-2 ........ 6 Military Science; Physical Fitness -
(May be postponed until 2nd year) 31-34
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
28-84
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower Division;
additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number of hours
required for an Upper Division degree.
A student taking electives in Agriculture or C-2 the first year may carry during his second
year additional electives.

Electives in Agriculture are: Ag. 301, Ag. 306*, Al. 211*, As. 201*, As. 306, Ay. 321*,
Ay. 324*, Dy. 311*, Ey. 202*, Ey. 301, Fy. 313*, He. 201, He. 312, Py. 301*, Sls. 301, Sis. 302,
limited to one course per department. Starred courses only may be elected during the
freshman year. Students should consult the curriculum of the department in which they
expect to major for suggestions as to courses to be elected.
Students intending to major in Agricultural Chemistry are required to take Cy. 101-102
instead of Acy. 125-126.
Forestry.-Students working for a degree in Forestry follow the program above with
the following exceptions. For (5) in the Freshman Year substitute C-41 and C-42; in the
Sophomore Year take either Cy. 101-102 or Acy. 125-126 for (1) ; take Fy. 220 for (2);
and Bty. 303, Cl. 223, Fy. 226 and Fy. 228 for (4) and (5).

ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

The program for freshmen and sophomores working toward a degree in the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts is as follows:

Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-The Physical Sciences 2.-Biological Science
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-Freshman 3.--Departmental Electives as listed below
English Military Science; Physical Fitness
4.-Logic and Mathematics
5.-Departmental Elective as listed below
Military Science; Physical Fitness
A student who has had three or four years of preparatory school study in any of the
subject areas of comprehensive courses and whose placement test grades indicate superior
knowledge and understanding at that level may substitute an approved elective.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division.

Departmental electives are as follows:
Architecture and Building Construction.-Ae. 101-102, Fundamentals of Architecture,
and Ms. 105-106, Basic Mathematics.
Landscape Architecture.-Ae. 101-102, Fundamentals of Architecture, and Acy. 125-126,
Agricultural Chemistry.
Painting and Commercial Art.-Pg. 101-102, Fundamentals of Pictorial Art, and an
approved elective.










SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


Fundamentals of Architecture or Fundamentals of Pictorial Art may be begun during
the freshman year, or may be postponed until the sophomore year. If begun during the
freshman year the work will require a nominal time of 9 hours a week for four semesters,
or if postponed until the sophomore year, a nominal time of 18 hours a week for two
semesters.
Students who records in the University College do not indicate that they are qualified
to pursue with profit the professional work of the Upper Division will not be admitted
to the School of Architecture and Allied Arts.

ARTS AND SCIENCES

A student who plans to earn a 4-year degree in the College of Arts and Sciences has
the following basic program:
Basic Program '
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
*2.-The Physical Sciences 2.-Biological Science
8.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20
Freshman English semester hours)
*4.-Logic and Mathematics Military Science; Physical Fitness
5.-Electives (2-6 semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness
*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at
these levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics
for Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.-There are no specific electives to be taken
during the freshman and sophomore years. However, in order to complete the requirements
of a major in four semesters in some departments of the College of Arts and Sciences,
it is necessary for the student to include as electives during the first two years as much
as he can of the contemplated major field and of the required foreign language.
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.-It is strongly recommended that Jm. 213, Public
Opinion; Jm. 214, Introduction to Journalism; Jm. 215, History of Journalism; and Jm.
216, Principles of Journalism, he taken as electives during the first two years.
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry.-The University College program for students planning
to earn this degree should include Cy. 101-102 and 111-112, General Chemistry; Ms. 105-
106, Basic Mathematics; Ms. 353-354, Differential and Integral Calculus; and Cy. 201-202
and 211-212. Analytical Chemistry. If the student is unable to complete these courses
before entering the Upper Division, it will be necessary to take them in the Upper Division.
Combined Academic and Law Curricula.-The College of Arts and Sciences offers three
different curricula in combination with Law. One of them leads to the degree of Bachelor
of Arts, another to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and the third to the degree
of Bachelor of Science. In order to complete one of these combined curricula in the shortest
possible time, it is necessary that a student select as electives in his University College
program courses which will form an integral part of his major in the College of Arts and
Sciences.
School of Pharmacy.-A student working for a degree in Pharmacy should follow the
Basic Program for Arts and Sciences including among his electives Cy. 101-102, General
Chemistry; Phy. 223-224, Galenical Pharmacy; and Pgy. 221-222, Practical Pharmacognosy.











32 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The program for students who are working for a Bachelor's degree directly or a degree
in combination with Law in the College of Business Administration is as follows:


Freshman Year


First Semester
Hours
1.-American Institutions 4
*2.-The Physical Sciences 3
*3.-Logic or Mathematics 3
4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-
Freshman English __ 4
5.-Approved Electives
Military Science; Physical Fitness .._ -
14-17


Second Semester
Hours
1.-American Institutions 4
*2.-The Physical Sciences .3 8
*3.-Mathematics or Logic 8
4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-
Freshman English ------ -- 4
5.-Approved Electives 8
Military Science; Physical Fitness- -
14-17


Sophomore Year


1.-Accounting .... -..-_......... 3
2.-Economics ... .......... ............ 3
3.-The Humanities ................ .... 4
4.-Biological Science -........... ........... 35
5.-Statistics ....-....... 4
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
17


1.-Accounting .... ... ..... 3
2.-Economics ..... .. ...... ........ 8
3.-The Humanities ................ 4
4.-Biological Science .... ............ .... 8
5.-Elective ...................----- ..........__ 3-4
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
15-17


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at these
levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics for
Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.

At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division.

COURSES IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

The following courses in Economics and Business Administration may be taken by
students in the University College: Es. 203, Elementary Statistics; Es. 205-206, Economic
Foundations of Modem Life; Es. 208, Economic History of United States; Es. 209, Economic
History of England; Es. 303, Machine Technology in American Life; Atg. 211-212, Ele-
mentary Accounting; Atg. 310, Accounting Mathematics and Machines; Atg. 314, Federal
Taxes for Individuals; Bs. 291, Real Estate Fundamentals; Bs. 304, Business Ethics; Bs.
360, Fundamentals of Insurance; and Es. 246, The Consumption of Wealth. It is antici-
pated that some students who do not plan a four-year program will elect to take many
of these courses or to arrange a program of two years or less in length in which many of
these courses would be included. Also some students not headed for the College of Business
Administration may wish to elect one or more of the courses for one reason or another.


EDUCATION

The program for freshmen and sophomores working for a degree in the College of
Education is as follows:


Freshman Year
1.-American Institutions
*2.-The Physical Sciences
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-
Freshman English
*4.-Logic and Mathematics
5.-Electives (2-6 semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Sophomore Year
1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science
3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20
semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness











SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at these
levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics for
Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.

With the exception of those specializing in the fields listed below, students in Education
should include during the first two years En. 241, Sch. 241, Sy. 241, and Psy. 201.
A student majoring in Industrial Arts Education should take during the first two years
In. 111-112, In. 211-212, En. 241, PHA. 387, En. 305 and En. 385. If In. 111-112 are taken
the first year, the student may, during the sophomore year, take additional electives in
Education.
A student majoring in Business Education should take during the first two years BEn.
81 and 91, Es. 205-206, Bs. 211-212, En. 241, and En. 386. If BEn. 81 and 91 are taken
during the first year, the student may take in the second year additional electives in
Education.

Program for Students Majoring in Agricultural Education


Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-1, American Institutions .................. 8
2.-C-6, Biological Science -............ 6
3.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English ......... 8
4.-AI. 211, Principles of Animal
Husbandry .......... ... 8
5.-Ay. 321, General Field Crops ......-----. 8
6.-Py. 301, Fundamentals of Poultry 83
7.-Ag. 306, Farm Machinery 8........... 8
8.-Military Science: Physical Fitness........... -
34


Sophomore Year Hours
1.- C-41, Practical Logic .............................. 8
2.-C-42, Fundamentals of Mathematics.. 3
3.-The Humanities ... .... .. ........... 8
4.-Bty. 303-304, General Botany ............. 6
5.-Acy. 125-126, Agricultural Chemistry- 8
6.-As. 306, Farm Management .......... 8
7.-He. 312, Vegetable Gardening ...... 8
8.-Military Science: Physical Fitness .... ....
84


At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.


PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS WHO EXPECT TO TEACH IN GRADES 1-6

The following courses are required to complete the regular program of the University
College and to meet the requirements of the State Department of Education for an Under-
graduate Certificate in Elementary Education, as stated in the State Department's Bulletin A,
Certification of Teachers.

Completion of the basic comprehensive courses and at least twenty-two semester hours
from the other courses will entitle the student to the Certificate of Associate of Arts and
admission to the College of Education, where the remainder of the courses may be com-
pleted for the Undergraduate Certificate and also apply on the bachelor's degree.


Basic Comprehensive Courses
C-1 American Institutions .........
C-2 The Physical Sciences .......
C-3 Freshman English ..... .....
C-41 Practical Logic ...........
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics
C-5 The Humanities ................
C-6 Biological Science ..............


Minimum Credit
.......... 8
.......... 6
......... 8


.........................................................


. .........................................................
.....................................................................
......................... .........................................
................. .................. ....... ........... ............ .










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Additional Cour
for Undergr
En. 241

En. 305
En. 385

En. 386
En. 471
*En. 421

*En. 422
Gl. 301

Gl. 302
Eh. 391
Scl. 301

Scl. 302


BEn. 97
PHA. 387
PHA. 373


rses Required
aduate Certificate
Introduction to Education


Minimum Credit
*1


or .... .....
Development and Organization of Education
Child Development 1
or .......................... .........................
Educational Psychology
Problems of Instruction.........................................................
Student Teaching 1
or ......... ......................................................
Student Teaching
Children's Science
or ................... ............
Children's Science J
Children's Literature...................... ...................................
Children's Social Studies
or ...................
Children's Social Studies
Public School Music .................. ....... .............
Public School Art .......... ...... .................................
Handwriting ............................... ................................................
Health Education ........................... ...................................
Methods and Materials in Physical Education.................
Geography ..................................... .................................


Special Program for Undergraduate Certificate for Elementary School Teachers
The following courses are required to complete a program offered at the University and
especially approved by the State Department of Education leading to an undergraduate
certificate for elementary teachers. Completion of this program does not qualify a student
for the Certificate of Associate of Arts from the University of Florida. The Certificate is
awarded only to those who satisfactorily complete the comprehensive examinations in all
the basic courses of the University College.


General Preparation Requirements


Pr


Minimum Credit


C-1 American Institutions ........................... ............................... 8
C-2 The Physical Sciences1
or I ........................................................... 6
C-6 Biological Science J
C-3 Freshman English ............................................................................ 8
C-5 The Humanities ........................................................................... 8
PHA. 387 Health Education ......................................................................... 3
PHA. 373 Methods and Materials in Physical Education..................... 3
nfessional Reauirements Minimum Credit


En. 241 Introduction to Education 1
or J........
En. 305 Development and Organization of Education
En. 471 Problems of Instruction ...........................................................
*En. 421 Student Teaching .....................................................................
En. 385 Child Development ...................................................................
Gl. 301 Children's Science ................................... ..................................
Eh. 391 Children's Literature ...............................................................
Sc1. 301 Children's Social Studies .......................................................
Public School Music .............................................................
Public School Art .................................................
Note: Total for all courses must be at least 64 semester hours.


*Not required of those who will have had 16 months actual teaching experience within the
three-year period immediately preceding the completion of the application for teachers' certificate.


Pro


3











SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 35


ENGINEERING

The program for Freshmen and Sophomores working for a degree in the College of
Engineering is as follows:
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
*2.-C-2 or Cy. 105-106 2.-Biological Science (elective except for
3.-Freshman English students in Public Health Engineering)
*4.-C-41 and C-42 or Ms. 105-106 3.-Ms. 353-854
**5.-Ml. 181, Elective (from list below) 4.-Ps. 205-206, 207-208
Military Science; Physical Fitness 5.-Electives (departmental electives as listed
below)
Military Science; Physical Fitness
*Both Cy. 105-106 and Ms. 105-106 are required, but students who have not had four years of
mathematics and four years of science in their high school preparatory work are urged to take
C-2 and C-41 and C-42 first.
"*Students desiring to graduate in minimum time in Engineering must complete their course
in engineering drawing during their first year in residence. This will require equipment costing
approximately thirty dollars.
Departmental prerequisites are as follows: Chemical Engineering, Ml. 182, Cy. 202,
Cg. 342, Cg. 345; Civil Engineering (General), MI. 182, Ig. 365, Cl. 223-226; Civil Engineer-
ing (Public Health Option), Bly. 102, Cy. 204, Cy. 262; Electrical Engineering, MI. 182,
282, Ig. 365; Industrial Engineering, Ml. 182, 282, Ig. 365; Mechanical Engineering,
Ml. 182, 281-282.
The student should make every effort to complete these courses before applying for
admission to the Upper Division, although he may be enrolled in the Upper Division "on
probation" if he has a good scholastic record and lacks only a few hours of required work.
Students whose records in the University College do not indicate that they are qualified
to take the professional courses in Engineering will not be admitted to the College of
Engineering.

SUGGESTED SUMMER SESSION PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS PLANNING TO ENTER THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
First Term Hours Second Term Hours
Ms. 105 Basic Mathematics .............. 4 Ms. 106 Basic Mathematics .------....-......... 4

Ml. 181 Engineering Drawing .......... 2 Ml. 182 Descriptive Geometry .......... 2
This is not an inflexible program; it may be varied upon consultation with the dean or
an advisor if there is a particular need or if a student produces satisfactory evidence of
his ability to carry more advanced courses.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

The program for Freshman and Sophomore students who are working toward a Bachelor's
degree in the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics.

Freshman Year
Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits
C-11-American Institutions ................. 4 C-12-American Institutions .......... 4
C-31-Reading, Speaking and Writing- C-32-Reading, Speaking and Writ-
Freshman English ..................... 4 ing-Freshman English ........
C-61-Biological Sciences ....................... 8 C-62-Biological Sciences ..................... 8
PHA. 141-Tennis and Handball ..................... 1 PHA. 1381-Fundamental Football ................ 2
PHA. 143-Combat Sports ............................. 1 PHA. 142-Elementary Gymnastics and
PHA. 151-Introduction to Physical Eduea- Tumbling .............................. 1
tion, Health, Athletics and PHA. 144-Swimming and Water Sports.... 1
Recreation ................................ ... 2 Military Science; Physical
PHA. 231-Fundamental Basketball ............. 2 Fitness
Military Science; Physical
Fitness -
17 15







































BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Sophomore Year
C-21-The Physical Sciences -.......... 3 C-22-The Physical Sciences ............. 8
C-41-Practical Logic .... .... .... 3 C-42-Fundamental Mathematics .... 3
C-51-The Humanities ........ ................ 4 C-52-The Humanities ..... 4
PHA. 241-Golf .... ............. ........ ..- 1 PHA. 132-Track .................. 2
PHA. 243-Advanced Gymnastics and PHA. 242-Recreational Sports ........ 1
Tumbling ......... .............. 1 PHA. 244-Life Saving and Water Safety 1
En. 241-Introduction to Education .......... 3 En. 385-Child Development ............. 3
Military Science; Physical Military Science; Physical
Fitness Fitness
15 17
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the lower Division;
additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number of hours
required for an Upper Division degree.










COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
The Summer Session offerings of the College of Agriculture provide basic courses in
the several curricula and a few advanced courses which will enable students now enrolled
to speed up their individual programs.
A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture are
offered. For complete information on the requirements for these curricula the student
should consult the University Catalog.

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
Lower Division courses in Architecture, Building Construction, Landscape Architecture,
Painting, and Commercial Art will be offered during the 1948 Summer Session, as well
as several advanced courses and graduate courses. For detailed requirements for the
several degrees offered, as well as for more complete description of the courses, consult
the University Catalog.
The School of Architecture and Allied Arts in cooperation with the General Extension
Division will offer the Carnegie A.IA. Summer Session from July 26 to August 14. (See
Ae. 201, Second Term, and announcement on page 16.)

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Inasmuch as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the
college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular
service to teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the
College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish
either to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, and students of other collegiate
institutions and of other colleges of the University who wish to complete basic arts and
sciences requirements or electives.
Returning veterans are invited to discuss their academic problems with the Dean of
the College or his representative. As far as circumstances permit, the College will adapt
its program to the needs of the individual student.

CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES
The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in
Chemistry, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. The curriculum leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy is administered by the Director of the School of
Pharmacy. (See School of Pharmacy.) Instruction and research in geography and geology
are administered by the Director of the Division of Geography and Geology. The other
curricula above are administered by the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Only
students who have completed the University College or its equivalent (as determined by the
Board of Examiners and approved by the Dean of the College) are eligible to enter the
curricula and become candidates for degrees.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Every student who wishes to be a candidate for one of these degrees should read
carefully the description of requirements under the heading College of Arts and Sciences
in the Catalog.
The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified
requirements and whose majors center in one or more of the fields of economics, English,
French, German, history, journalism, Latin, philosophy, political science, religion, sociology,
Spanish and speech. Similarly, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon
those who fulfill the specified requirements and who majors center in one or more of the
fields of bacteriology, biology, botany, chemistry, geology, and physics.
The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon those
who fulfill the requirements for the degree with majors in one or more fields of Geography,
Mathematics, and Psychology when their remaining courses are selected predominantly
fXom the other fields which lead to either one or the other degree.

THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM

Instruction in Journalism is designed to provide study and training for those interested
in: (1) journalism as a career, and who aspire to the more important positions in the
field of communications, such as printing, radio, and films; (2) newspaper production,
either in editorial or business phases; (3) reporting and evaluation of public affairs;
(4) magazine and special writing; (5) advertising; (6) public relations; (7) careers
closely related to journalism, in which journalistic knowledge and training would conduce
to greater success; and (8) the cultural perspective to be attained by the study of
journalism as a means of understanding the evolving events of civilization.
Sixty-four semester hours with an average of C or higher, and a grade of C or higher
in all journalism courses to be counted toward the degree are required. In the sixty-four
semester hours must be included the journalism courses required for either the Writing
and Editing Sequence or the Business Sequence. The remainder of the sixty-four semester
hours must be earned in approved electives, with not less than six nor more than eighteen
credits in any one department, and with at least eighteen credits in courses outside the
Department of Journalism. For detailed information concerning the two sequences
(writing and editing sequence and business sequence) see the University Catalog.

THE PRE-IAW COURSE
In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers com-
bined academic-law curricula. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is
possible to earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent
in the University College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and three in the College
of Law.
PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

Students who upon graduation from the University College are eligible for admission to
the College of Arts and Sciences and who have not completed requirements for admission
to medical and dental schools may continue and complete their pre-professional training
in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select courses in accordance with
requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes to enter, and should corre-
spond with the dean of that school for information and advice.










COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

GENERAL STATEMENT

The College of Business Administration of the University of Florida was organized in
1927 to meet the needs of Florida business. It offers instruction in three fields: Business
Administration, Business Administration in Combination with Law, and Public Administra-
tion. The purposes of instruction in Business Adminstration are four: first, the training
of business leaders; second, the preparation of business executives and technicians; third,
the development of an understanding of the complex relationships between business and
all other social phenomena from which, it is hoped, there will emerge business statesmen;
and, fourth, the prosecution of research projects for the improvement of business methods,
techniques, and policies.
The operations of business enterprise in recent years have become increasingly complex
in character. They have ceased to be simple and localized; they have become intricate
and highly involved-state-wide, nation-wide, world-wide. To manage business concerns
and to make money, broad training is necessary. The principles upon which the economic
system functions, the forms of business units, the ramifications of production and of
market, the services of transportation and communication, the impact of taxation, the
methods of financing-all require consideration. Those who would enter business in the
present or who would serve as specialists in accounting, statistics or in other facilitating
activities of modern business must be provided with training in fundamentals-professional
training in fundamentals.
The College of Business Administration is organized toward this end. It does not turn
out finished business men-managers, executives and department heads. While it supplies
its graduates with some skills, they are not expected to start at the top; they start lower
down, get experience and learn by actual contact the operations of the establishments
with which they identify themselves. Their training helps to shorten their apprenticeship
and enables them to move up faster than they would move without training.
Instruction in Public Administration is designed to provide analysis of the basic prin-
ciples of government. Its purpose is to prepare students for public service occupations.
Government has become increasingly complex and requires personnel thoroughly trained
in political science, economics, history, and other related sciences. The program of train-
ing offered supplies basic courses in these fields. It does not equip students with specific
skills; it is designed to provide them with broad training in the structure and function of
government and to prepare them for readier entry into public life and occupations.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

The College of Business Administration offers two undergraduate degrees: The Bachelor
of Science in Business Administration and the Bachelor of Science in Public Administra-
tion. To secure the first named degree students must complete either the Curriculum in
Business Administration Proper or the Curriculum in Combination with Law. To secure
the second named degree they must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration.

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER

In order to enter the College of Business Administration and to register for any of its
curricula, students are required to complete the curriculum in the University College as










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


specified on page 32 or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses or areas of knowledge
listed, including the following:

Es. 205-206.-Economic Foundations of Modem Life
Atg. 211-212.-Elementary Accounting
Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics
The curriculum in Business Administration Proper is divided into ten groups or pro-
grams of studies. Each student is required to select and complete one of these groups or
programs. Of sixty-six semester hours required for graduation forty-eight semester hours
in seven groups and forty-two in two groups are prescribed. Where adequate cause there-
for is shown students may by petition in some cases substitute other courses in economics
and business administration for these prescribed courses. The remaining hours in each
group are approved electives. Of these hours, twelve may consist of courses offered outside
the College of Business Administration, including six semester hours in advanced military
science. The University Catalog should be consulted for the requirements of each of the
groups.
CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Business Administration combines with the University College and the
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the University
College and the third year and one term of the Summer Session in the College of Business
Administration. When they have fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College
of Business Administration, they are eligible to register in the College of Law and may
during their last three years complete the course in the College of Law. When students
have, after entering the College of Law, completed one year's work in law (28 semester
hours with at least a C average), they may offer this year's work as a substitute for the
fourth year in the College of Business Administration and receive the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Business Administration. The University Catalog should be consulted for
the requirements of this curriculum.

CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
In order to enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the cur-
riculum in Public Administration, students are required to complete the curriculum in the
University College as specified on page 32 or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses
or areas of knowledge listed including the following courses:
Es. 205-206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
Atg. 211-212.-Elementary Accounting
Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics
The University Catalog should be consulted for the requirements of this curriculum.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the University College, or its equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.










COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


GRADUATION WITH HONORS
For graduation With Honors, a student must earn an honor point average of at least 3.2
in the work of the Upper Division. For graduation With High Honors, a student must meet
the following requirements: (1) attain an honor point average of at least 3.5 in the work
of the Upper Divisions; and (2) obtain the recommendation of the Faculty Committee
which has supervised a special project or program of work for the student. A copy of
detailed regulations governing graduation With High Honors may be obtained from the
office of the Dean of the College of Education.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
The degrees Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor of Science in Education are
offered in the College of Education. For either degree the student is required to complete
at least 60 hours (in the Upper Division) with an average of C or higher, at least 18
resident hours of which must be in Education and the remaining hours of which will be
elected by the student in conference with an adviser. In every case, the student must
complete at least 24 hours in a subject or field of concentration to be eligible for graduation.

CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.

Graduation from the University College.
Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits
Children's Social Studies ...................................................................................... 3
Children's Science ........... .................................---........................................... ........ 2
Children's Literature ....... ... ..................................................... ................ 3
Health and Physical Education ........................................................................... 3
Health Education (HPI. 387 or PHA. 387) ........................................................ 3
Public School Art ............................................. ............................................... 4
Public School Music ......-..-............................................................................-... 4
H handwriting ....................... .......... ............................... ................................ ..... 0 or 1

Education:
En. 241 (CEn.13) -Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School)
*English ............. .................................................................................... -.............. ... 15 credits
Total of at least 60 credits in the Upper Division.

H. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.
General Background: Credits
C -1 .................................................................... ........................ ................... ......... 8
C-2 or C-6 ......................................................................................................... ..........8 or 6
C-3 ...... .................. ........................... .. ........... ............... ............................... ... 8
C-41 ...................-.......................................--....................................................4 or 3










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits
Children's Social Studies ................................... .................................................... 3
Children's Science ................... ................................................ ......................... 2
Children's Literature .............................................. ........................................ 3
Health and Physical Education ................................................................................ 3
Health Education (HP1. 387 or PHA. 387) ........................................................ 3
Public School Art ............... .. .........................----.............---.... ..................... ............. 4
Public School Music .......................................................... ..................................... 4
Handwriting ................................---- ----................................................................ ...........0 or 1
Education:
En. 241 (CEn.13) -Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School)
*E english ..--..................................... .................. ...... .. ......................................................... 15 credits
*Social Studies ........................................................................................... ......................... 15 credits
Electives, exclusive of Military Science, if required, needed to make a total of ......124 credits

*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in
other areas.

CURRICULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.
Graduation from the University College.
Health Education ..................................................... ..................................................... 3 credits
Health and Physical Education ........................................................................................ 2 credits

Education:
En. 241 (CEn.13) -Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 401-School Administration
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Secondary School)
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 18.)
Electives, if needed, to make a total of 60 semester hours completed in the Upper Division.

IL For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.

General Background: Credits
C -1 ........... .................................................. .......... ..................................................... 8
C-2 or C-6 ........................................... ........................................................ .......8 or 6
C-3 ......................................................---..........--.................................................... 8
C-41 ................--........................ ............................................................................ ......4 or 3
Speech ............................................................................. .............................................. 3 or 4
Health Education (HP1. 387 or PHA. 387) ....................................................... 3
Health and Physical Education ....................................................................... 2










COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


Education:
En. 241 (CEn.13) -Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 401-School Administration
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Secondary School)
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 18.)
Electives, exclusive of Military Science, if required, needed to make a total of ......124 credits

ADVANCED AND GRADUATE WORK IN EDUCATION

Teachers and students who are working under the direction of the Department of
Education on master's programs, doctor's programs, or courses of study leading to post
graduate or advanced post graduate certificates, are advised to consult the office of the
Director of Graduate Studies in Education, Yonge 202, for counseling and advice with
respect to these programs.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering is offering several courses during the Summer Session in
various departments so that students may graduate in a minimum of time. Many other
courses included in the engineering curricula, such as mathematics and physics, are also
available. During the summer months the engineering student may also take subjects to
meet elective requirements.
Students entering the University for the first time may find it to their advantage to
enroll in mathematics, Freshman English, American Institutions or General Chemistry and
an appropriate engineering prerequisite. Students having completed one year at the
University may take courses in calculus and physics. For those students who have com-
pleted calculus and physics, statics, dynamics and strength of materials are suggested.
Elective subjects in mathematics, physics and the humanities are recommended to all
students.
Students who contemplate registration in the College of Engineering and those who
are already registered in this college should confer about their schedules with the depart-
ment heads and the dean as soon as possible.

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY

Courses in Forestry are offered during the Summer Session. The required Summer
Camp should be taken between the second and third year's work provided the necessary
prerequisites have been completed. The work of the Camp requires one full summer and
it must be completed in that time. It cannot be divided over two summers. Students
who contemplate registration in the School of Forestry should consult the University
Catalog for courses which are prerequisite or are required in the Forestry curriculum.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

Courses will be offered by the School of Pharmacy during both terms. These courses
have been chosen to meet the greatest demand.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

To enter the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics students are required
(1) to present a certificate of graduation from the University College, (2) to be certified
by the Board of University Examiners as qualified to pursue the work of the College,
(3) to have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the College of Physical
Education, Health and Athletics, and (4) to have completed the pre-professional courses
listed below in the University College, although a student may be enrolled in the Upper
Division "on probation" until he completes them. Students whose records in the University
College do not indicate that they are qualified to take the professional courses of the
Upper Division will not be admitted to the College.
PHA. 131 -Fundamental Football
PHA. 132 -Track
PHA. 141 -Tennis and Handball
PHA. 142 -Elementary Gymnastics and Tumbling
PHA. 143 -Combat Sports
PHA. 144 -Swimming and Water Sports
PHA. 151 -Introduction to Physical Education, Health, Athletics and Recreation
PHA. 231 -Fundamental Basketball
PHA. 241 -Golf
PHA. 242 -Recreational Sports
PHA. 243 -Advanced Gymnastics and Tumbling
PHA. 244 -Life Saving and Water Safety
En. 241 -Introduction to Education
En. 385 -Child Development

Transfer students entering from other institutions must present college credit equivalent
to graduation from the University College, as determined by the Board of University
Examiners, and have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the College of Physical
Education, Health and Athletics.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
The minimum requirement for graduation from the College of Physical Education,
Health and Athletics is 66 semester hours and the student must earn an average of C or
better on all work required for a degree.
In addition to completing the requirements of the prescribed professional curriculum,
the student must have earned six (6) "Activity Units" in approved extra-curricular activities
before being recommended for graduation. Experience shows that men and women in this
profession are called on to perform many and varied services in their respective communi-
ties, and in schools for those who become public school coaches and teachers. Participa-
tion in extra-curricular activities while in college (such as student government, student
publications, athletics, dramatics, debating and serving on student committees) contribute
substantially to the success of persons in this profession. For this reason the "Activity
Units" must be distributed over two different types *of extra-curricular activities. Such
extra curricular activities will be accepted from the date of matriculation in the university.
"Activity Units" are not to be confused with regular course credits. Detailed information
on this requirement may be secured from the Head of the Professional Curriculum.











COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


DEGREE

The College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics offers the degree Bachelor of
Arts in Physical Education, Health, Athletics and Recreation to students who meet all of
the prescribed requirements for graduation.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL
EDUCATION, HEALTH, ATHLETICS AND RECREATION

The program for Freshman and Sophomore students is listed under the various programs
of study in the University College. See page 35.


Junior t
Courses Credits
PHA. 221-Observation and Participation 1
PHA. 245-Team Games .-...-....-........-- 2
PHA. 486-Personal and Community Hygiene 3
Sch. 241-Effective Speaking .......... .... 8
En. 397-Secondary School Curriculum
and Instruction ..-......... .... 8
Approved Electives 4



16


PHA. 351-Intramural Athletics and
Officiating ....--.... .... ....
PHA. 387-Health Education .....................
PHA. 441-Organization and Administration
of Physical Education and
Athletics ............ ..................
En. 421-Student Teaching .........-........ -
Approved Electives ..........


enlor Ye

2


3
6
17


Courses Credits
PHA. 222-Observation and Participation 1
PHA. 232-Baseball ............................ 2
PHA. 363-Teaching Physical Education
in Secondary Schools ......--..... 8
PHA. 388-Recreational Activities and
Leadership ......................--- 8
PHA. 485-Anatomy, Physiology and
Kinesiology ................---- 3
En. 386-Educational Psychology ...... 3
Approved Electives ............ 2
IT


PHA. 446-Organization and Administra-
tion of Community
Recreation .................... ...
Sch. 301-Advanced Public Speaking ....
En. 422-Student Teaching ....................
Approved Electives -...... .....


COLLEGE OF LAW

The purpose of the College of Law is to impart a thorough, scientific and practical
knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in this
field. Since 1927 the College of Law has operated during the Summer Session. Courses
offered during the winter are rotated. Some courses not given during the winter are offered
in the Summer Session. The variety of courses offered during the Summer Session of 1948
is sufficient to enable students of different types to carry a full load and to appeal to a
wide range of students.

ADMISSION

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have received a degree in arts
or science in a college or university of approved standing, or must be eligible for a degree
in a combined course in the University of Florida, upon the completion of one year of work
in the College of Law. The University also offers this combined course with the Florida
State University.
The above rule, waived at the beginning of the war, went back into effect at the begin-
ning of the second semester, 1947-48.
Under existing legislation veterans may continue to enter on two years of academic
college work meeting the standards of the Association of American Law Schools.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


In addition to other requirements, all applicants for admission to the College of Law,
whose pre-law training has not been received at this institution, must satisfactorily pass
scholastic and legal aptitude tests given by the Board of University Examiners, unless
from the nature of their previous record they are excused by the law faculty.

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The Graduate School offers work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of
Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Science, Master of Science in
Agriculture, Master of Science in Engineering, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master
of Science in Forestry, Master of Education, Master of Agriculture, Master of Business
Administration, and Doctor of Education. The Ph.D. degree is offered in selected fields.
The work for the Master's Degree must be completed within seven years from the
time of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means
seven summers.
Passing grades for students registering in the Graduate School are A and B. All other
grades are failing.
MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS
Work Required.-The work for the Master's Degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half
of which shall be in a single field of study, designated as the major, and the remainder,
or minor, in related subject matter as determined by the Student's Supervisory Committee.
One six-hour minor is required; either two six-hour minors or one twelve-hour minor
may be taken. The principal part of the course work for the Master's Degree shall be
in courses designated. strictly for graduates. However, in the case of related subject
matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the approval of the Super-
visory Committee.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
The thesis should be closely allied to the major subject. The title of the thesis should
be submitted by the end of the first summer. The thesis itself should be completed and
submitted in time to allow an interval of three full weeks between the day of submittal and
the graduation day of the summer term.
Each thesis and each dissertation is to be accompanied by a separate summary, or
abstract. The student should consult the Graduate Office for details.
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion
of the student's Supervisory Committee. If it is required the examination should be passed
by the end of the third summer term, or when the work is half completed.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITHOUT THESIS

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION
1. Admission.-A student with the Bachelor's Degree from an accredited institution
may be admitted to the Master of Education program whether or not he has previously
earned any prescribed amount of credit in Education.










COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


A student from a non-accredited institution may be permitted to register as an unclassified
student while his standing is being determined. Upon the recommendation of the general
supervisory committee and the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, credits earned
while a student is unclassified (not to exceed one term) may count toward his degree.
2. Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to the work of this program is not a guarantee
that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The general supervisory
committee will recommend the student for admission to candidacy as soon as he has
satisfied them of his qualifications. This will not be done in any case before the student
has submitted his own proposed program for completing the degree. (See No. 6 below.)
3. Residence.-A minimum of six summer terms, or two semesters and one summer term,
or the equivalent, is required as residence.
4. Courses.-A minimum of thirty-six semester hours is the course requirement. Not
more than six of these may be earned in any one summer term, and not more than fifteen in
any one semester.
5. Competence in Certain Areas.-Instead of having a fixed requirement of majors and
minors, each student will be required to show a reasonable amount of competence in four
areas of work from the following:
(1) Educational foundations. Educational sociology, the economics of education and the
biological basis of human growth.
(2) Problems in educational psychology, measurement and growth.
(3) Problems in the history and philosophy of education.
(4) The fourth area will be selected by the student in terms of his particular interests
and specializations. This fourth area may be one of the following:
(a) Problems in elementary education (to be designated by persons preparing to teach
in elementary schools).
(b) Problems in secondary education, including subject matter in two teaching fields
(to be designated by persons preparing to teach in secondary schools).
(c) Problems in school administration (to be designated by persons preparing to serve
in administrative or supervisory capacities).
(d) Problems in another area of education as determined by the candidate's specializa-
tion, if it is not included under the specific areas above listed.
Competence is to be judged (1) by oral or written, or by both oral and written, evalua-
tion at the end of each term, and (2) by a comprehensive oral and written examination
just before graduation.
The program is so arranged that each individual student may at any time request that
his competence be determined in one of the areas represented in the program. When
requested, the Dean of the Graduate School will direct the student to the chairman of
the committee in charge of the area, who will arrange for an examination.
6. Planning the Individual Student's Program.-Each student is required to submit in
writing to the Dean of the Graduate School his own proposed program for the degree.
This must be done by the end of the first six weeks of residence. This develops with the
aid of the instructional staff members and should grow out of the needs, interests, and
desires of the student.
7. Transfer of Credits.-Credits earned prior to admission to the University will be
governed by the same regulations that apply to all other graduate degrees. If recommended
in advance by the general supervisory committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


School, a student may be permitted to study with some competent teacher in another
institution for one six-weeks summer term.
8. One Year Teaching Experience.-Each candidate must have had at least one year
of teaching experience prior to the last summer term.
9. Transfer Students.-Students in Education who have started graduate work and who
wish to study for the Master of Education Degree may do so by arranging with the general
supervisory committee to comply with the requirements of this program.
10. Thesis.-A thesis will not be required, but the student will be required to submit
a considerable amount of written material in the form of reports, term papers, records of
work accomplished, etc., all of this written material to be directed toward the integration,
adaptation and utilization of the student's program.
11. Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of a foreign language will not be required,
but the effective use of the English language is expected of all candidates.
12. The General Supervisory Committee.-Students in this program will be directed
by a general supervisory committee of five members, with Dr. A. R. Mead as chairman.
Other members of the staff will be called in to aid in individual cases.
Those students entering for the first time in the first term of the Summer Session
will be expected to register for Education 540 and during the first term to submit in
writing their proposed programs for all of the work which they are to do for the degree.

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF AGRICULTURE

1. Admission.-Qualified students holding the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricul-
ture, or its equivalent, may enroll in courses leading to the professional degree of Master
of Agriculture.
2. Residence.-A minimum of two semesters, or six six-week summer terms, or the
equivalent, is required as residence.
3. Work Required.-A minimum of thirty semester hours of course work is required,
at least fifteen of which must be designated strictly for graduates. Each student's program
is designed so as to take into account the qualifications and needs of the individual and is
subject to the approval of the Supervisory Committee. A thesis is not required, but the
student will submit reports, term papers and records of work accomplished. A final oral
examination by the Supervisory Committee covering the whole field of study of the candidate
is required.
4. Supervisory Committee.-A Supervisory Committee, consisting of the major professor
as chairman and two others from the related fields of study, appointed by the Dean of the
Graduate School, has charge of the program of work of the candidate.

THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

This is a professional degree representing a fifth year of work for those students who
plan to enter business occupations and wish to go beyond the undergraduate degree.
Admission.-Qualified students holding the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration, or its equivalent, may be admitted to courses leading to the degree of
Master of Business Administration.
Residence.-A minimum of two semesters, or six six-weeks summer terms, or the equiva-
lent, is required as residence.










COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION


Work Required.-Thirty semester hours of economic and business courses are required.
Of these, not less than 15 semester hours must be in courses designated strictly for
graduates and numbered 500 or more.
Comprehensive Report.-In lieu of the traditional thesis, the preparation and presenta-
tion of an acceptable comprehensive report on some subject, with no credit thereon, will
be required of each student.
Supervisory Committee.-A faculty committee of five members from the faculty of
the College of Business Administration, with the Dean of the College or some persons
designated by him serving as Chairman, will supervise the work of students registered in
this program.

THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the departments of Animal Husbandary
(Animal Nutrition), Biology (Zoology), Chemistry, Economics, English, History, Horticul-
ture, Pharmacy, Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology, and Psychology. It is expected that
other departments will be added from year to year as facilities are increased.
Residence.-A minimum of three academic years of resident graduate work, of which
at least the last year must be spent at the University of Florida, is required of all candidates
for the doctor's degree. In many cases, it will be necessary to remain longer than three
years, and necessarily so when the student is not devoting his full time to graduate work.
Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is expected to be spent upon
his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his minor or minors. The
student will be guided in his whole course of study by the professor of his major subject
and by his special supervisory committee. The Graduate Council does not specify just
what or how many courses will be required. The work is mainly research, and the student
is thrown largely upon his own responsibility.
Minors.-The student must take one minor and may not take more than two. In
general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will require at least one year.
Special Supervisory Committee.-When the student has advanced sufficiently towards
his degree, a special committee will be appointed by the dean, with the professor of the
major subject as chairman. This committee will direct, advise, and examine the student.
The dean is ex-officio member of all supervisory committees.
Language Requirement.-A reading knowledge of both French and German is required
of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. The examinations in the languages are held by
the language departments concerned. These requirements should be met as early as pos-
sible in the student's career and must be satisfied before the applicant can be admitted
to the qualifying examination.
Qualifying Examination.-The qualifying examination, which is required of all candi-
dates, may be held during the second term of the second year of residence. The examina-
tion, which will be conducted by the special supervisory committee, is both written and
oral and covers both major and minor subjects. After passing the qualifying examination,
the student must put in at least one full academic year of residence before the degree is
conferred. If the student fails the qualifying examination, he will not be given another
opportunity unless for special reasons a re-examination is recommended by his special
supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate Council.




















BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Dissertation.-A satisfactory disseration showing independent investigation and research
is required of all candidates. Two typewritten copies of this dissertation must be pre-
sented to the dean on or before the date specified in the University Calendar.
Printing ol Dissertation.-One hundred printed copies of the dissertation must be pre-
sented to the University within two years after the conferring of the degree. Reprints
from reputable scientific journals may be accepted upon the recommendation of the special
supervisory committee. After the dissertation has been accepted, the candidate must
deposit with the Business Manager, not later than one week before the degree is conferred,
the sum of $50 as a pledge that the dissertation will be published within the prescribed
time. This sum will be returned if the printed copies are received within two years.
Final Examination.-After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of
all the work of the candidate, he will be given a final examination, oral or written, or both,
by his special supervisory committee.

THE ,DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION

The requirements for the degree are the same as those for the Doctor of Philosophy,
with the exception that candidates for the degree of Doctor of Education may either
satisfy the usual language requirement or substitute the following:

(a) A course in educational research
(b) An examination covering the techniques of using the library
(c) An elementary course in statistics

The work will be offered mainly in the field of school administration, with the proviso
that candidates who wish to study in the instructional fields may be admitted on an in-
dividual basis with the approval of the Graduate Council.
A minor will be supporting work taken in another field. It will consist of at least
twelve semester hours for the first minor and at least six semester hours for the second
minor. Minors may not be taken in any branch of Education.
The residence requirement may not be satisfied by Summer Session attendance alone.
The last year of residence must be one continuous academic year.












GUIDE TO COURSES LISTED


A GUIDE TO COURSES LISTED IN THIS CATALOGUE

The course offerings are listed separately for each term, the comprehensive courses
first, followed by the departmental courses in alphabetical order by department name.
In registration the student should always use the departmental abbreviation and course
number, not abbreviations of the course title.
Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the
proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided:


Elementary Teachers
General Preparation-the basic comprehensive courses of the University College (C-1,
C-2, C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, and C-6)
Elementary Science-listed under General Science (GI. 301 or GI. 302)
General Psychology-Psy. 201 listed under Psychology
Child and Educational Psychology-listed under Education (En. 385, En. 386)
Children's Literature-listed under English (Eh. 391)
Social Studies in Elementary Grades-listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Scl. 302)
Handwriting-listed under Business Education (BEn. 97)
Health Education-listed under Physical Education, Health and Athletics, (PHA. 387)


Secondary Teachers
Commercial Subjects-listed under Business Education and under Economics and Busi-
ness Administration
English-C-3 and courses listed under English and Speech
Mathematics-C-42, and courses listed under Mathematics
Science-C-2, C-6, and courses listed under Chemistry, Bacteriology, Biology, Botany
and Physics
Social Studies-C-1 and courses listed under Geography, History, Political Science,
Economics, Social Studies, and Sociology
Conservation requirement may be met with any of the following courses: C-1, C-2,
C-6 (listed under comprehensive courses), or Es. 382 (listed under Economics).










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

First Term
All classes ordinarily meet for eighty minutes with a five minute recess at
the end of the first forty minutes. Classes scheduled to meet daily meet Mon-
day through Saturday.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to
register for graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean
of the Graduate School and the instructor concerned.

ABBREVIATIONS
Under the heading Dept. will be found the department name abbreviations
adopted for official records.
The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:


A BUILDING A
(Accounting)
AG AGRICULTURAL BUILDING
AE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEER-
ING LAB (Bldg. T 236
Alachua Air Base)
AU AUDITORIUM
B BUILDING B
(Civil Engineering)
BA BENTON ANNEX
BB BASKET BALL COURT
BN BENTON HALL
BU BUCKMAN HALL
C BUILDING C
(Mechanical Drawing)
CH CHEMISTRY BUILDING
DL DAIRY LABORATORY
E BUILDING E
(Classrooms and Laboratories)
EG ENGINEERING BUILDING
F BUILDING F
(Engineering)
FM FARM MACHINERY LABORA-
TORY
GH GREENHOUSE


GY GYMNASIUM
HL HYDRAULIC LABORATORY
HT HORTICULTURE BUILDING
I BUILDING I
(Classrooms)
K BUILDING K
(Classrooms)
LA LANGUAGE HALL
LI LIBRARY
LW LAW BUILDING
MI MILITARY BUILDING
NE NEWELL HALL
NL NUTRITION LABORATORY
PE PEABODY HALL
PO POULTRY LABORATORY
SC SCIENCE HALL
SE SEAGLE BUILDING
UA UNION ANNEX
VL VEGETABLE PRODUCTS
LABORATORY
WO WOOD PRODUCTS LABORA-
TORY
YN YONGE BUILDING


COMPREHENSIVE COURSES
C-11.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 10:00 T. AU. STAFF.
Lecture Section 12: 2:30 W. AU. STAFF.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Section 101. 7:00 daily. E-178.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. E-178.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. E-178.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. E-178.
Section 105. 8:30 daily. E-179.
Section 106. 10:00 daily. E-179.

C-12.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 10:00 M. AU. STAFF.
Lecture Section 22: 8:30 Th. CH-AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. E-188.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. E-188.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. E-188.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. E-188.
Section 205. 7:00 daily. E-189.
Section 206. 8:30 daily. E-189.
Section 207. 10:00 daily. E-189.
Section 208. 11:30 daily. E-189.
0-11-12: Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems
of the modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in
education, in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more
effective coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny
is made of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that
a consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.

C-21.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 11:30 T. BN-203. STAFF.
Lecture Section 12: 2:30 T. BN-203. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 daily. BN-205.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. BN-205.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. BN-205.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. BN-205.
Section 105. 1:00 daily. BN-205.

C-22.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 11:30 M. BN-203. STAFF.
Lecture Section 22: 2:30 M. BN-203. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. BN-201.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. BN-201.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. BN-201.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. BN-201.
Section 205. 1:00 daily. BN-201.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-21-22: An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular refer-
ence to man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain
the more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.

C-31.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 1:00 M. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 daily. LA-203.
Section 102. 7:00 daily. LA-314.
Section 103. 8:30 daily. LA-203.
Section 104. 8:30 daily. LA-314.
Section 105. 10:00 daily. LA-203.
Section 106. 10:00 daily. LA-314.
Section 107. 11:30 daily. LA-203.
Section 108. 11:30 daily. LA-314.
Section 109. 2:30 daily. LA-203.
Section 110. 2:30 daily. LA-314.
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 301. 7:00 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 302. 7:00 T. F. LA-209.
Section 303. 10:00 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 304. 10:00 T. F. LA-209.
Section 305. 2:30 M. Th. LA-209.

C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 1:00 T. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. LA-306.
Section 202. 7:00 daily. LA-307.
Section 203. 8:30 daily. LA-306.
Section 204. 10:00 daily. LA-307.
Section 205. 10:00 daily. LA-306.
Section 206. 11:30 daily. LA-307.
Section 207. 11:30 daily. LA-306.
Section 208. 2:30 daily. LA-307.
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 401. 8:30 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 402. 8:30 T. F. LA-209.
Section 403. 11:30 M. Th. LA-209.
Section 404. 11:30 T. F. LA-209.
Section 405. 2:30 T. F. LA-209.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


C-31-82: Reading, Speaking, and Writing. Designed to furnish the training In reading, speak-
ing and writing necessary for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter. This training
will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking,
in fundamentals of form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body and
voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their
Interests and increasing their appreciation of literature.

C-41.-Practical Logic. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. SC-212.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. SC-212.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. SC-212.
Section 4. 11:30 daily. SC-212.
Section 5. 1:00 daily. SC-212.
Both in private life and in vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking. In this
course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, (2) to be able to use objective standards necessary in critically
evaluating his own thinking process and product as well as the conclusions reached by others,
and (3) to record both process and product of thinking in effective language. The material used
applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure practice, many
illustrations are given, and numerous exercises are assigned.

C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. PE-2.
Section 2. 7:00 daily. E-117.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. PE-2.
Section 4. 8:30 daily. E-117.
Section 5. 10:00 daily. PE-2.
Section 6. 10:00 daily. E-117.
Section 7. 11:30 daily. PE-2.
SSection 8. 11:30 daily. E-117.
Section 9. 1:00 daily. PE-2.
Section 10. 2:30 daily. PE-2.
A general elementary beginning course covering the development of the number system,
algebra as a generalization of arithmetic, the application of algebra to practical problems,
geometry, elementary trigonometry, logarithms, and the mathematics of finance. This course is
designed for students who do not intend necessarily to specialize in mathematics, but it may be
taken by those who plan to continue their mathematical work. Not open to students who have
completed Basic Mathematics.

C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion SectioL.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:30 M. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 daily. E-175.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. E-175.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. E-175.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. E-175.
Section 105. 1:00 daily. E-175.
Section 106. 4:00 daily. E-175.
Section 107. 7:00 daily. E-176.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section 108. 8:30 daily. E-176.
Section 109. 10:00 daily. E-176.
Section 110. 11:30 daily. E-176.
Section 111. 1:00 daily. E-176.
Section 112. 4:00 daily. E-176.
Section 113. 7:00 daily. E-118.
Section 114. 8:30 daily. E-118.
Section 115. 10:00 daily. E-118.
C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 2:30 T. AU. STAFF.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201. 7:00 daily. E-177.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. E-177.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. E-177.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. E-177.
Section 205. 1:00 daily. E-177.
Section 206. 4:00 daily. E-177.
Section 207. 11:30 daily. E-118.
Section 208. 1:00 daily. E-118.
C-51-52: The Humanities. A course designed to provide an understanding and appreciation
of the literature, philosophy. art and music in which the enduring values of human life have
found expression. The course deals both with our cultural heritage and with the culture of our
own day. Its larger purpose is to enable the student to develop a mature sense of values, an
enlarged appreciation and a philosophy of life adequate for the needs of our age.
C-61.-Biological Science. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 101. 7:00 daily. 1-101.
Section 102. 8:30 daily. 1-101.
Section 103. 10:00 daily. 1-101.
Section 104. 11:30 daily. 1-101.
Section 105. 2:30 daily. 1-101.
Section 106. 7:00 daily. 1-107.
Section 107. 8:30 daily. 1-107.
Section 108. 10:00 daily. 1-107.
Section 109. 11:30 daily. 1-107.
Section 110. 1:00 daily. 1-107.
C-62.-Biological Science. 3 credits.
registerr for one section only.)
Section 201. 7:00 daily. 1-109.
Section 202. 8:30 daily. 1-109.
Section 203. 10:00 daily. 1-109.
Section 204. 11:30 daily. 1-109.
Section 205. 1:00 daily. 1-109.
Section 206. 2:30 daily. 1-109.
C-61-62: The biological problems and principles associated with the organism's role as:
(1) a living individual, (2) a member of a race, (3) a product of evolutionary processes, and
(4) a member of a socially and economically inter-related complex of living organism supply
the main seauence and material of the course.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


ACCOUNTING

Atg. 211.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The first half of the course Atg.
211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-2.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. A-2. TORNWALL, G. E.
Section 3. 11:30 daily. A-2. SCOTT, N. H.
Section 4. 1:00 daily. A-2. PETERSTON, E. G.
Atg. 211-212: Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting.
A study of business papers and records; recording transactions; preparation of financial statement
and reports. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

Atg. 212.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The second half of the course
Atg. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-3.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. A-3.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. A-1. ANDERSON, C. A.
Section 4. 10:00 daily. A-3. PETERSON, E. G.
Section 5. 11:30 daily. A-3. ANDERSON, C. A.

Atg. 310.-Accounting Mathematics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-1. RAY, D. D.
Section 2. 1:00 daily. A-3. RAY, D. D.
Open only to students who have completed Atg. 211 and 212 and should be currently registered
in Atg. 311. The computations will apply directly to accounting problems considered primarily
in Atg. 311 and other Upper Division courses in accounting.

Atg. 311.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. A-4. MOSHIER, W. F.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. A-2. HUMBLE, T. N.
Section 3. 1:00 daily. A-4. GRADY, R. S.
The mechanical and statiscal aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts; fiscal period
and adjustments; working papers; form and preparation of financial statements; followed by
an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the preparation of
the balance sheet and income statements.

Atg. 312.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 311.
10:00 daily. A-4. GRADY, R. S.
Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from
the legal organization form used by businesses; liabilities; proprietorship; partnerships; corpora-
tions; capital stock; surplus; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as
disclosed by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements; financial ratios and standards,
their preparation, meaning, and use.

Atg. 313.-Cost Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 311.
11:30 daily. A-4. DAVAULT, J. W.
The methods of collection, classification, and interpretation of cost data; special problems,
standard costs, cost systems, uses of cost data in business control. Lectures and problems.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Atg. 411.-Advanced Accounting. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 312.
8:30 daily. A-4. GRADY, R. S.
Specialized accounting problems; mathematics of accounting; statement of affairs; consign-
ments; installments; ventures; insurance; and other related subjects.

Atg. 417.-Governmental Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 312.
1:00 daily. A-1. HUMBLE, T. N.
The basic principles underlying fund accounting. Detailed consideration is given to the
preparation and use of the budget, system of accounts, special vouchers, records, statements.

Atg. 418.-Advanced Accounting. C.P.A. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
Atg. 312.
10:00 daily. A-1. DAVAULT, J. W.
A continuation of the study of specialized accounting problems; receiverships; foreign ex-
change; stock brokerage; estates and trusts; budgets; business taxes; consolidations and
mergers; and other problems usually covered in C.P.A. examinations.


GRADUATE COURSE

Atg. 511.-Accounting Theory. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Atg. 418.
11:30 daily. A-1. LANHAM, J. S.
The theory behind accounting functions in their relation to the business enterprise.


AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

An. 301.-Aviation. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205-6-7-8, appropriate medical
and C.A.A. certificates and insurance coverage.
To arrange. STAFF.
(This course is evaluated as maximum load for one summer session.)
A laboratory course open only to aeronautical engineering majors who have not had flight
piloting experience. Theory of flight, elementary meterorology and navigation, radio, civil air
regulations, general service of aircraft, and actual flight instruction to familiarize the student
with actual flight problems and the performance of the airplane. This course leads to the
Private Pilot certificate. This is an extra fee course, the laboratory fee approximating $500.00.
This course will be given in accordance with C.A.A. Manual 50 for the Private Pilot.


AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

Acy. 125.-Agricultural Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Acy.
125-126.
(Register for the Lecture Demonstration, Section 1, and one Discussion
Section, 11 or 12.)
Section 1. 10:00 M. W. F. S. CH.-Aud. NOVAK, A. F.
10:00 T. Th. CH.-Aud. NOVAK, A. F.
Section 11. 11:30 M. F. CH.-212. NOVAK, A. F.
Section 12. 11:30 W. S. CH.-212. NOVAK, A. F.
Section 13. 7:00 T. F. CH.-110. NOVAK, A. F.
A basic course embodying selected fundamentals of both inorganic and organic chemistry and
designed primarily for agricultural students. Suitable also for the general student who wishes a
non-laboratory course in science.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

As. 201.-Agricultural Economics. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. AG-210. GREENMAN, J. R.
An introduction to the field of agricultural economies; principles of economics as applied
to agriculture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.

As. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal. 3 credits.
7:00 M. T. W. Th. F. AG-209. BROOKER, M. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 W. AG-209.
Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given
to the Farm Credit Administration. Field trips, at an estimated cost of $3 paid at time trips
are made.

As. 306.-Farm Management. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. AG-104. BROOKER, M. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. AG-104.
The factors of production; systems of farming, their distribution and adaption; problems
of labor, machinery, layout of farms, and farm reorganization. Field trips, at an estimated
cost of $3 paid at time trips are made.

As. 413.-Agricultural Policy. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. HT-409. GREENMAN, J. R.
A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. Evaluation of present legislative programs
and policies affecting the farmer.

GRADUATE COURSES

As. 505.-Research Problems in Farm Management.
To arrange.

As. 511.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products.
To arrange.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 3 credits.
7:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-210. CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. FM.
The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power. The care, oper-
ation, and repair of electric motors, internal combustion engines (including automobile, stationary
gasoline engines, truck and tractor), and windmills. Laboratory work includes actual operation
and repair.

Ag. 303.-Farm Shop. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-210. CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. FM.
The farm shop jobs that are common to the farms of Florida. Carpentry, concrete con-
struction, light forging, soldering, tool care and repair are some of the jobs given special emphasis.
Laboratory work includes actual shop practice.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

GRADUATE COURSES

Axt. 502.-Advanced Rural Leadership. 1 credits. (June 14 to July 2.) The
last half of the course Axt. 501-502. Open only to Agricultural Extension
workers.
1:00 daily. NE-404. HAMPSON, C. M., and STAFF.
Advanced training in the art of rural leadership.

Axt. 508.-Advanced Agricultural Extension Service Youth Programs. 1%
credits. (June 14 to July 2.) The last half of the course Axt. 507-508.
Open only to Agricultural Extension workers.
10:00 daily. NE-404. HAMPSON, C. M.
Advanced training in developing rnd conducting 4-H Boys' and Girls' Club work and other
Extension rural youth programs.

AGRONOMY

Ay. 321.-General Field Crops. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. AG-302. SENN, P. H.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. AG-302. SENN, P. H.
A study of the grain, fiber, sugar, peanut, tobacco, forage and miscellaneous field crops,
with special emphasis on varieties and practices recommended for southern United States. The
history, botanical characteristics, soil and climatic adaptations, fertilizer and culture practices,
growing processes, harvesting, uses, economic production and cropping systems are discussed.

GRADUATE COURSE

Ay. 526.-Special Agronomic Problems. 3 credits.
To arrange. SENN, P. H.
Library, laboratory, or field studies relating to crop production and improvement. Experi-
ments are studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.

ANIMAL PRODUCTION

Al. 309.-General Animal Husbandry. 4 credits.
7:00 daily. AG-104. PACE, J. E.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 T. Th. AG-104.
Types and breeds of farm animals; principles of breeding, selection and management.

Al. 311.-Elementary Nutrition. 4 credits.
8:30 daily. AG-104. WINCHESTER, C. F.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 M. W. AG-104.
Elements and compounds, metabolic processes in animal nutrition; biological assays.

Al. 314.-Livestock Judging. 3 credits.
8:30 T. Th. S. AG-102. PACE, J. E.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 M. W. F. AG-102.
Special training in livestock judging; show ring methods; contests at fairs.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSES

AL 501.-Advanced Animal Production. 3 credits.
To arrange.
Assignment of abstracting scientific articles in the fields of animal production, nutrition and
genetics. Reviews and discussions.

AL 509.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 1 to 4 credits. (Credit assigned must
be shown on registration blank.)
To arrange.

ARCHITECTURE

Ae. 101.-Fundamentals of Architecture. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 11. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-301. KORUTURK, S. S.
Section 12. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-401. WILLIAMS, R. L.
Section 13. 1:00 to 5:30 daily. UA-301. FEARNEY, E. M.
A creative introductory course consisting of a series of beginning projects each of which
involves an analysis of human actions and needs, the design of a simple building to meet those
needs, and a study of the problems involved in the process. Emphasis is placed upon the creation
of buildings to meet the requirements of use. Drawing of all kinds is taught, not in a formal
manner, but as an incidental accompaniment to design. A study of principles of design and of
materials and methods of construction forms an integral part of the work from the beginning.
Projects 1 to 6 inclusive. The first half of the course, projects 1 to 3 inclusive, is equivalent
to 3 credits, and the second half, projects 4 and 5, is equivalent to 3 credits.

Ae. 102.-Fundamentals of Architecture. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 11. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-301. KORUTURK, S. S.
Section 12. 7:00 to 11:30 daily. UA-401. WILLIAMS, R. L.
Section 13. 1:00 to 5;30 daily. UA-301. FEARNEY, E. M.
A continuation of Ae. 101. Projects 6 to 9 inclusive. The first half of the course, projects
6 and 7, is equivalent to 3 credits, and the second half, projects 8 and 9, is equivalent to 3 credits.

Ae. 324.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 4. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. PE-206. GARLAND, J. E., MABRY, A. E.
A continuation of Ae. 323.

Ae. 415.-Projects in Architecture, Group 5. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. PE-201. MABRY, A. E., Rost, H. C.
A continuation of Ae. 314.

Ae. 416.-Thesis in Architecture. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. PE-201. Rost, H. C.
A continuation of Ae. 415.

BACTERIOLOGY

Bey. 301.-General Bacteriology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: C-6, or equivalent;
Cy. 101-102, or Acy. 125-126.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one of the Laboratory Sections.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 daily. SC-111. CARROLL, W. R.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. SC-104. CARROLL, W. R.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 4:00 W. F. SC-104. CARROLL, W. R.
Morphology, physiology, and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms.

GRADUATE COURSES

Bey. 500.-Advanced Bacteriology. Variable credit.
To arrange. CARROLL, W. R.
Problems in Pathogenic. Dairy. Sanitary. Industrial, Food and Soil Bacteriology.
The following Bacteriology courses are taught in the Bureau of Laboratories,
State Board of Health, Jacksonville, and are open only to qualified Board of
Health workers approved by the staff of the State Board of Health. Such persons
must meet regular admission requirements and follow same registration pro-
cedures as resident students.

Bey. 600.-Advanced Public Health Bacteriology and Parasitology. 1 to 6 credits.
(Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.) MITCHELL and STAFF.
Public health aspects of Bacteriology and Parasitology. Treats of etiology, epidemiology,
laboratory diagnosis of all of the important disease.

Bey. 610.-Advanced Immunology and Serology. 1 to 6 credits. (Credit assigned
must be shown on registration blank.) MITCHELL and STAFF.
Principles of immunology and serology as applied to the prevention of diseases and public
health.

Bey. 620.-Laboratory Administration. 1 to 6 credits. MITCHELL and STAFF.
(Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.)
Methods employed in managing or directing a bureau of laboratories or a division thereof.

Bey. 690.-Research. 1 to 6 credits. (Credit assigned must be shown on regis-
tration blank.) MITCHELL and STAFF.
Recent advances in the field of public health investigation. Opportunity is offered for the
student to do original research under the supervision of the staff, on one of the public health
problems of Florida. Field studies are combined with laboratory investigations.


BIOLOGY

Bly. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 3 credits. No credit toward
a major or group major in the College of Arts and Sciences except with the
specific permission of the Head of the Department. A service course offered
for the special needs of various groups of students.
1:00 M. W. F. SC-111. LAESSLE, A. M.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. SC-205.
Designed to provide a recognition and an acquaintance with some of the more common animals
and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question, "What
animal-or what plant-is that?" Individual work in the field and the making of personal refer.
ence collections of plants and animals are encouraged.

Bly. 161.-Biology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-61.
Section 11. 7:00 to 10:00 M. W. F. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.
Section 12. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Section 13. 7:00 to 10:00 T. Th. S. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.
Section 14. 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. S. SC-213. WALLACE, H. K.
An introductory laboratory course dealing with cells, the organization of a mammal and of
the major groups of plants and animals.

Bly. 209.-Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Section 1: 10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. SC-111. GROBMAN, A. B.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 11. 7:00 to 10:00 M. W. F. SC-107. GROBMAN, A. B.
Section 12. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. SC-107. GROBMAN, A. B.
The morphology and classification of chordate animals.

Bly. 411.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 2, 3 or 4 credits.* Prere-
quisite: At least twelve credits in approved major courses in Biology and
permission of the Head of the Department. Qualified students and the
instructor concerned may choose a particular topic or problems for study.

GRADUATE COURSES

Bly. 507.-Taxonomic Studies. 3 to 5 credits.*
To arrange. STAFF.
A detailed classification of a selected group of animals, well represented in the local fauna.

Bly. 511.-Florida Wild Life. 3 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.
Studies in the application of ecological principles to specific wild-life research and to the
practice of wild-life conservation.

Bly. 513.-Vertebrate Morphology. 3 to 5 credits.*
To arrange. SHERMAN, H. B., and GROBMAN, A. B.

Bly. 515.-Invertebrate Morphology. 3 to 5 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.

Bly. 519.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.
Bly. 519-520 is required of all applicants for the Master's Degree. Each applicant undertakes
an approved individual problem in biology, the results of which will be presented in a Master's
thesis. Such problems will be carried out under the direction of a member of the staff. Problems
may be chosen from one of the following fields: vertebrate or invertebrate morphology or
embryology; classification or taxonomy of certain approved groups; natural history or distribution
of a selected group of local animals; investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area.

Bly. 521.-Natural History of Selected Animals. 3 to 5 credits.*
To arrange. STAFF.
A detailed study of the life history or life histories and ecological relationships of some species
or natural groups of local animals.

Bly. 523.-Natural History of Selected Animals. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Bly. 533.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature. 2 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.
A critical study of selected taxonomic synopses, revisions and monographs with special
reference to the bearing of the principles and concepts of distribution, genetics and ecology on
taxonomic problems.

Bly. 541.-Problems in Game Management. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.
The application of a taxonomic and ecological background to various specific problems of
Florida game and wild life management.

Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.

BOTANY

Bty. 303.-General Botany. 3 credits. The first half of the course Bty. 303-304.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one of the Laboratory Sections.)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. FORD, E. S.
Lecture Section 2: 10:00 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. ,DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory Section 11: 8:30 to 11:30 T. Th. SC-2. FORD, E. S.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 4:00 W. F. SC-2. DAVIS, J. H.
A study of the form, structure, growth, reproduction, physiology and functions of plants and
their various organs; relation of plants to their environment and to each other; principles under-
lying inheritance, variation and organic evolution. Required of students majoring in Botany,
Bacteriology and Plant Pathology.

Bty. 308.-Plant Taxonomy. 4 credits.
11:30 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. FORD, E. S.
Laboratory: 8:30 to 11:30 M. W. and 7:00 to 1:00 S. SC-1. FORD, E. S.
Principles of classification of plants and the use of manuals for the identification of common
seed plants and ferns.

Bty. 311.-Plant Physiology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: Bty. 303 or 304, Acy.
125-126, or equivalent. Desirable prerequisites: SIs. 301, Pt. 321.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. SC-101. DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. T. Th. F. SC-1. DAVIS, J. H.
A study of absorption, assimilation, transpiration, respiration, growth, water relation, and
other functions of plants.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bs. 291.-Real Estate Fundamentals. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-201. RING, A. A.
A survey of the real estate field with emphasis on the essentials that concern the consumer.
The aim is to develop a fuller understanding of the significance of realty as a commodity and
to equip the student with the fundamentals essential to successful home ownership. Classroom
lectures and problems are further designed to provide a qualifying background for those seeking
further training in real estate law, brokerage, management, appraising and real estate finance.

Bs. 333.-Salesmanship and Sales Management. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. AG-108. GOODWIN, F.
An introduction to selling. Analysis of types, stages, problems and psychology of selling
situations.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


Bs. 360.-Fundamentals of Insurance. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-201. MASON, R. W.
A study of the basic fundamentals underlying the business of insurance as a prerequisite
for more advanced and detailed work in the subject, designed to serve two distinct needs:
(1) to give students of economics and commerce a general knowledge of the subject; and (2) to
lay a foundation for the future work of those interested in entering the business.

Bs. 390.-Property Valuation. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-201. RING, A. A.
Meaning of value; influence of population growth; F.H.A. system and its effect on appraising
technique; capitalizing income; depreciation; appraising homes, business property, apartment
houses, office buildings, special purpose buildings; appraisals and taxation.

Bs. 393.-Urban Land Utilization. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-202. GUILD, C. J.
Land and population; economics of land utilization; urbanization and urban land; manu-
facturing as an urbanizing factor; labor as a factor; transportation and commerce in city location
and urbanization.

Bs. 401.-Business Law. 3 credits. The first half of the course Bs. 401-402.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. 1-202. GAITANIS, L. A.
Section 2. 7:00 daily. 1-201. MASON, R. W.
Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal and third party; termi-
nation of the relationship of agency. Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales and
mortgages of personal property; the law of negotiable instruments.

Bs. 402.-Business Law. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-202. GAITANIS, L. A.
Sales: Formation and performance of contracts of sale of personal property; remedies of
sellers and buyers for breach. Negotiable Instruments: Formation and operation of negotiable
contract; rights and obligations of various parties on negotiable instrument; discharge.

Bs. 422.-Investments. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 321.
11:30 daily. 1-206. RICHARDSON, J. G.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.

Bs. 427.-Principles and Problems of Corporation Finance. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-208. MCFERRIN, J. B.
Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of the economic and legal forms of business
enterprise; the instruments of business finance; financial problems as they relate to the ordinary
operations of the business involving working capital, income, dividend policy, current borrowing,
credit extension, and the business cycle.

Bs. 440.-Trade Relations in Caribbean America. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. SC-208. PIERSON, W. H.
A regional trade course covering the West Indies, Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and
Venezuela. The commercial importance of each republic and island as a market for American
goods and as a source of raw materials and foodstuffs; Florida's commercial position in such trade.

Bs. 492.-Real Estate Finance. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-201. GUILD, C. J.
Functions of real estate finance; the loan contract; the mortgage market; elements of mort-
gage risk; loan policy and administration of loans; analysis of current mortgage market conditions.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BUSINESS EDUCATION

NOTE: These courses, with the exception of BEn. 461, do not count as credit
in Education.

BEn. 81.-Introductory Typewriting. 2 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. YN-306. CREWS, J. W.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. YN-306. CREWS, J. W.
Introduction to touch typewriting; practice upon personal and business problems.

BEn. 91.-Introductory Shorthand. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-305. CREWS, J. W.
Introduction to Gregg shorthand by the functional method.

BEn. 97.-Handwriting. 1 credit.
7:00 P.M. M. T. YN-315. TISON, J. P.
Primarily for those training to become elementary school teachers.

BEn. 181.-Advanced Typewriting. 2 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-306. MAXWELL, H. C.
Emphasis will be placed on increased speed and special forms, including reports and manu-
scripts.

BEn. 191.-Shorthand Dictation. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-305. MAXWELL, H. C.
Dictation is developed with emphasis on both speed and accuracy.

BEn. 291.-Shorthand Dictation and Transcription. 2 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-306. MAXWELL, H. C.
An advanced course in Gregg shorthand to develop a higher degree of skill in taking dictation.
Transcription speed from shorthand notes is emphasized.

BEn. 461.-Principles of Business Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-305.
Undertakes to develop an understanding of the purposes, administration, and supervision of
business education.

BEn. 462.-Teaching Secretarial Studies. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-305.
Designed for teachers of business subjects or those in preparation for teaching. It includes
a study of the curriculum, materials, and methods of teaching the secretarial subjects.

GRADUATE COURSES

BEn. 561.-Principles of Business Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-305.
A study of the purposes of business education; problems relating to the development of an
appropriate program: problems in administration and supervision.

BEn. 562.-Teaching Secretarial Studies. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-305.
Comprehensive study of the curriculum, materials, and methods of teaching the secretarial
subjects.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Cg. 361.-Materials of Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Cy. 102 or Cy.
106, and Ps. 206.
8:30 daily. F-101. SCHWEYER, H. E.
Production, properties and uses of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, cement, bricks,
plastics, timber, etc.
Cg. 447.-Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cg.
346.
10:00 daily. BN-209. BEISLER, W. H.
The fundamental chemical engineering operations; fluid flow, heat transmission, evaporation,
humidity, etc.
GRADUATE COURSE
Cg. 580.-Research in Chemical Engineering. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF.

Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.

CHEMISTRY
Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102.
(Register for the Lecture, one Discussion Section and one Laboratory
Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. S. CH-Aud. STEARNS, T. W.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 1:00 T. Th. CH-110. STEARNS, T. W.
Section 12. 2:30 T. Th. CH-110. BLALOCK, J. G.
Section 13. 4:00 T. Th. CH-110. BOWEN, F. J.
Section 14. 1:00 M. W. CH-110. BARRETT, W. B.
Section 15. 2:30 M. W. CH-110.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 1:00 to 5:30 M. F. E-166. STEARNS, T. W.
Section 102. 1:00 to 5:30 M. F. E-166. BOWEN, F. J.
Section 103. 1:00 to 5:30 M. F. E-166. BLALOCK, J. G.
Section 104. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. E-166. BARRETT, .W. B.
Section 105. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. E-166.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and properties of the
common non-metalic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 105.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 105-
106. Prerequisites: Upper percentile rating in placement tests in physical
sciences and mathematics or satisfactory completion of C-2. In general,
freshmen should present evidence that they have had high school chemistry.
(Register for the Lecture, one Discussion Section and one Laboratory
Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 2:30 M. T. Th. F. CH-Aud. LEMMERMAN, L. V.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 8:30 M. W. CH-402. LEMMERMAN, L. V.
Section 12. 10:00 M. W. CH-402. LEMMERMAN, L. V.
Section 13. 7:00 M. W. CH-110.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 7:00 to 11:30 T. Th. E-166. INGWALSON, R. W.
Section 102. 7:00 to 11:30 T. Th. E-166.
Section 103. 7:00 to 11:30 T. Th. E-166.
A first course designed to meet the requirements of engineering students. This course includes
some Qualitative analysis.

Cy. 201.-Analytical Chemistry (Qualitative). 4 credits. The first half of the
course Cy. 201-202.
(Register for the Lecture, one Discussion Section and one Laboratory
Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 1:00 M. T. Th. F. CH-Aud. RIETZ, E. G.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 10:00 T. Th. CH-212. RIETZ, E. G.
Section 12. 8:30 T. Th. CH-402. BLALOCK, J. G.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 8:30 to 1:00 M. W. CH-130. BLALOCK, J. G.
Section 102. 8:30 to 1:00 M. W. CH-130. RIETZ, E. G.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.
Cy. 203.-Analytical Chemistry (Qualitative). 3 credits. The first half of the
course Cy. 203-204.
10:00 M. W. F. S. CH-212.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. CH-130.
A course in qualitative analysis offered primarily for students in Pharmacy.

Cy. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 daily. CH-212. BUTLER, G. B.
Laboratory Sections:
Section 101. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. CH-230. BUTLER, G. B.
Section 102. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. CH-230.
Section 103. 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. CH-230.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds.

Cy. 401.-Physical Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 401-402.
Prerequisites: One year of College Physics, Cy. 202, and Ms. 353-354.
8:30 daily. CH-110. HAWKINS, J. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. CH-204. TUCKER, W. C.

GRADUATE COURSES
Cy. 533.-Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 3 credits.
To arrange. GROPP, A. H.
Cy. 570.-Research in Inorganic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. JACKSON, V. T.
Cy. 571.-Research in Analytical Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. BLACK, A. P., GROPP, A. H.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Cy. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange, POLLARD, C. B., or BUTLER, G. B.
Cy. 573.-Research in Physical Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. HAWKINS, J. E., PHILLIPS, L. R., GROPP, A. H.
Cy. 574.-Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. HAWKINS, J. E.
Cy. 575.-Research in Sanitary Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. BLACK, A. P.

Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 223.-Surveying. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ms. 105-106 or Trigonometry.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 M. T. W. Th. B-109. MOBLEY, G. S.
Laboratory Section 11: 8:30 to 11:30 M. W. F. B-108. MOBLEY, G. S.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. B-108.
The use of chain, level and transit; traversing and balancing surveys, calculating stress,
contour work; line azimuth by sun observation, stadia surveying; topographic mapping; land
subdivision.

Cl. 311.-Structural Drawing. 2 credits. Prerequisites: Ml. 182, Ig. 365.
10:00 to 1:00 daily. K-103.
Structural representation; detailing beams, colunins, trusses, built-up girders, riveted and
welded joints, reinforced concrete members, and timber connections from design drawings.

Cl. 313.-Fluid Mechanics. 4 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205, Ms. 354.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 daily. HL-100. EDSON.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. HL-302.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. HL-100.
Mechanics of compressible and incompressible fluids. Special emphasis on viscosity effects,
Bernoulli's theorem, surface and form resistance, force momentum principles, lift and drag, laws
of similarity and dimensional analysis. Study includes statics, kinetics, and dynamics, and the
application of basic principles to the flow of fluids through measuring devices and pipes, and
around immersed bodies.

Cl. 323.-Materials Laboratory. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365. Corequisite:
Ig. 367.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M.W. HL-301. COMINS.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. COMlINS.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. COMINS.
Study of the principal materials used for engineering purposes with special attention to their
physical properties and the reasons for the importance of these properties to the engineer,
including definitions and methods of measurement.

Cl. 326.-Statics of Simple Structures. 4 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365.
8:30 daily. HL-302. SAWYER, W. L.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. HL-301. SPANGLER, B. D.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Applications of the methods of statics to structural analysis; a correlation between graphical
and analytical methods; moments, shears, reactions, resultants, stress diagrams, and influence
lines for statically determinate structures.

Cl. 426.-Water Supply and Treatment. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C1. 313.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. HL-302. GRANTHAM.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. HL-301. GRANTHAM.
Sources of supply, methods of treatment; the design of water systems including supply,
treatment and distribution.

GRADUATE COURSES

Cl. 527.-Advanced Sanitary Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cl. 426,
Cl. 429.
To arrange. EMERSON, D. L.
An advanced study of the biological, chemical and physical principles utilized in water,
sewage and industrial waste treatment processes.

Cl. 529.-Advanced Sanitary Engineering Design. 3 credits. Prerequisites: C1.
527, Cl. 538.
To arrange. GRANTHAM.
Special problems in the design of water, sewage and industrial waste plants.

Cl. 547.-Advanced Highway Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cl. 439,
Cl. 450.
To arrange. RITTER.
Special problems in the fields of highway planning, design and construction.

Cl. 548.-Advanced Soil Mechanics. 1 to 6 credits. (Credit assigned must be
shown on registration blank.) Prerequisite: Cl. 424.
To arrange. RITTER.
Special problems in the application of soil mechanics to the design and construction of
buildings, foundations, dams. levels and highways.

Cl. 549.-Experimental Stress Analysis. 3 credits. Corequisite: Cl. 538.
To arrange. SAWYER, W. L.
Structural similarity; preparation of models; deformater methods of analysis; polarized light
studies; current literature; strain gage methods of analysis.

DAIRYING

Dy. 311.-Principles of Dairying. 3 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. DL-203. ARRINGTON, L. R.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. Th. DL-203.
Composition and properties of milk; sanitary milk production; common methods of analyzing
milk; common dairy processes; farm methods of handling milk; dairy breeds, selection, breeding,
and raising of dairy cattle.

Dy. 419.-Cheese Making. 3 credits.
10:00 M. T. W. Th. DL-203. ARRINGTON, L. R.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 W. F.
The manufacture of soft cheeses; a study of the manufacture and ripening of American cheese,
and other varieties being manufactured commercially.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSE

Dy. 521.-Problems in Milk Products. 1 to 4 credits.
To arrange.

ECONOMICS
Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics. 4 credits. *
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 10:00 daily. PE-1. JACKSON, E. L.
1:00 to 2:30 M. W. PE-1.
Section 2. 7:00 daily. PE-1. TURLINGTON, R. D.
1:00 to 2:30 T. Th. PE-1.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. PE-1. ANDERSON, M. D.
2:30 to 4:00 T. Th. PE-1.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,
sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. Prerequisite
for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

Es. 205.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Es. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. 1-205. WILCOX, J. P.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. 1-205. MANSFIELD, L. F.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. 1-205. MEEK, W. T.
This is an introductory course in economics designed primarily to meet the requirements
of all University students who feel the need for a workable knowledge of the economic system.
Emphasis is placed on analyses and descriptions of the more important economic organizations and
institutions which, in their functional capacities, constitute the economic order. Economic principles
and processes are explained, especially those relating to an understanding of value, price, cost,
rent, interest, wages, profit, money, banking, commerce, foreign exchange, foreign trade and
business cycles. The first half of the course Es. 205-206 is devoted largely to the study of economic
organizations and institutions and to the principles governing value and price. It may be taken
for credit without the second half.

Es. 206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. The second half of
the course Es. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 1:00 daily. 1-203. JACKSON, E. L.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. 1-203.
Section 3. 8:30 daily. 1-203. RICHARDSON, J. G.
Section 4. 11:30 daily. 1-203. MCFERRIN, J. B.
Section 5. 7:00 daily. 1-203. SHIELDS, M. W.

Es. 208.-Economic History of the United States. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-206. TUTTLE, F. W.
The industrial development of America; the exploitation of natural resources; the history
of manufacturing, banking, trade, transportation, etc.; the evolution of industrial centers; the
historical factors contributing to the growth of the United States.

Es. 246.-The Consumption of Wealth. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-209. SHIELDS, M. W.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of con-
sumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand.

Es. 321.-Financial Organization of Society. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Es. 321-322. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
11:30 daily. 1-208. TUTTLE, F. W.
An introduction to the Jield of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary,
banking and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu-
tions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to
the economic system as a whole.

Es. 327.-Public Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
1:00 daily. 1-201. MEEK, W. T.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; source of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.

Es. 335.-Economics of Marketing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
10:00 daily. 1-208. TURLINGTON, R. D.
The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular atten-
tion given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages,
and comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying
on trade operations; retail and wholesale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of
marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition; the relation of the government to marketing.

Es. 351.-Elements of Transportation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
8:30 daily. LA-201. BIGHAM, T. C.
Significance, history, facilities, and economic characteristics of transportation agencies;
theory of rates; rate structures; present system and problems of regulation and promotion of all
forms of inter-city transportation.

Es. 382.-Principles of Resource Utilization.
7:00 daily. SC-208. DIETTRICH, S. R.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation,
with special reference to Florida.

Es. 404.-Government Control of Business. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
10:00 daily. AG-108. GOODWIN, F.
A study of the evolution of economic control: an examination of the effectiveness of laissez
faire control in the American economy; legality and chief methods of effectuating the govern-
mental control; the development of the relationship between government and non-public utility
monopolies; Federal Trade Commission control of competitive practice; a critical appraisal of
recent development in the field of government control.

Es. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Es. 407-408. Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.
10:00 daily. PE-112. ELDRIGE, J. G.
An advanced course in economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic mal-
adjustments arising from the operation of economic forces.

Es. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The second half of the
course Es. 407-408.
11:30 daily. PE-112. ELDRIDGE, J. G.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM.


Es. 469.-Business Cycles and Forecasting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Es. 203.
11:30 daily. PE-1. ANDERSON, M. D.
A survey of the problems of the reduction of business risk by forecasting general business
conditions; statistical methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting.

Es. 487.-Economic Geography of Europe. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. SC-208. PIERSON, W. H.
A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjust-
ments in Europe and in its commercial connections with the other continents, especially with
North America.

GRADUATE COURSES

Es. 508.-Present-day Schools of Economic Thought. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-206. WEBB, J. N.
An examination of the main currents of contemporary American and English economic
thinking with particular reference to the developments occurring between the two World Wars.
The writings of Hansen, Mitchell, Clark and Commons, in the United States, and of Keynes, Cole,
Robinson. and Hobson in England will be examined.

Es. 537.-Imperfect Competitions. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. 1-212.
A comprehensive review of recent attempts to reconstruct economic theory in terms of
"imperfect" or "monopolistic" competition.

EDUCATION

En. 241.-Introduction to Education. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. YN-222. HAMBLEN, C. H.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. YN-222. HAMBLEN, C. H.
Principles upon which present-day education is based.

En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-222. GRAY, L. A.
Historical development of our schools.

En. 316.-Elementary Quantitative Methods in Education and Psychology. 3
credits.
1:00 daily. YN-140. KIDD, K. P.
Application of statistical processes and formulas to educational and psychological data.

En. 317.-Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices. 3 credits. Begins
July 5 and runs through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-226. HINES, V. A.
A study of the basic principles and methods of measurement and evaluation of school
practices.

En. 318.-Introduction to Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-142. CRUTCHER, GEO.
The techniques needed to provide better classroom utilization of the audio-visual aids to
learning. As far as the class time permits, opportunity to develop skill in these techniques will
be presented to students.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 385.-Child Development. 8 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 10:00 daily. YN-138. LAIRD, D. C.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. YN-140. LAIRD, D. C.
Section 3. 2:30 daily. YN-134. ROGERS, RUBY ROSE.
The growth and development of children into mature personalities. The findings of recent
research through outside reading; class discussion and observation. Methods of evaluation at
child growth.

En. 386.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: En. 885.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. YN-140. ROGERS, R. R.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. YN-140. McGUIRE, V.
Section 3. 11:30 daily. YN-226. MCGUIRE, V.
The individual and education. A study of the physical, emotional, mental, and social growth
of the adolescent. Achievement in terms of growth.

En. 397.-Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction. 3 credits. The first
half of the course En. 397-398. Prerequisites: En. 241 or En. 305 and En. 385.
En. 386 should be taken prior to or concurrently with the taking of En. 897.
1:00 daily. YN-222. KITCHING, A. E.
The curriculum and instruction. The study of a group of children, planning a program
for the group, and setting up a system of evaluation.

En. 398.-Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction in the Major Subject
Fields. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 397-398. Required
unless the student takes a special methods course in his teaching field.
2:30 daily. YN-222. KITCHING, A. E.

En. 403.-Philosophy of Education. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-134. NORMAN, J. W.
A critical examination is made of various theories and philosophies of education, their
relationships to the democratic principle, and their significance to the evolving system of education
in the United States.

En. 406.-Elementary School Administration. 3 credits.
4:00 daily. YN-134. BLACK, J. H.
The principles of administering the elementary school are studied. Stress is laid on the
problems that usually confront the school principal.
En. 408.-High School Administration. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-134. LEPS, J. M.
The principles of administering the modern high school are studied.

En. 421.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The first half of the course En. 421-422.
Prerequisites: En. 385 and En. 386. En. 397 and 398 or special methods
course or En. 471 and En. 480 must be taken prior to or concurrently with
En. 421.
To arrange. YN-143. WILLIAMS, W. R.
The student is given practice in the art of teaching by actually taking over responsibility
for the teaching-learning situation, and putting into operation under direction and supervision
the theories, methods, materials, and teaching techniques acquired during his junior year through
observation and participation.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


En. 422.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 421-
422. Prerequisites: Same as for En. 421.
To arrange. YN-124. LEWIS, H. G.

En. 462.-Guidance of School Pupils. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-150. CRAGO, A.
An introductory survey of pupil guidance work in the schools with particular attention to the
secondary levels. The guidance functions of the home-room; the guidance relationships of all
school staff members.

En. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 4 credits.
1:00 daily and to arrange. YN-207. TISON, J. P.
An integrated educational program will be stressed.

En. 480.-Teaching of Reading. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-150. BARRY, M. E.
A comprehensive survey of the problems of teaching reading in all grades, specific and
practical methods and procedures for attacking these problems. Each student will identify a
problem in his own school and submit a proposed solution for it. (Not more than 6 hours in
reading can be applied toward a degree.)

En. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living. 3 credits. Begins July 5 and
runs through July 23. In addition to the regular class time, students register-
ing for En. 482 must reserve the time from 2:30 to 5:30 for field trips and
group projects.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-325. STEVENS, G. A.
The techniques of using Florida resources in the areas of arts and craft, architecture, housing,
interior decorating, and landscaping. Attention is given to developing understandings and
appreciations of the fine arts, costume designing, health practices, and the more intimate human
relationships.

GRADUATE COURSES

NOTE: All new graduate students in Education are required to attend
orientation meetings at 7:00 P.M., June 15, in the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Information will be given about types of graduate study, the planning of in-
dividual programs, facilities available, and other matters.

En. 501.-Elementary School Curriculum. 3 credits.
2:80 daily. YN-138. BLACK, J. H.
Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten; selection and evaluation of materiaL

En. 503.-Measurement and Evaluation. 3 credits. Begins July 5 and runs
through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-226. HINES, V. A.
Guided investigation of problems involving measurement, evaluation of school procedures
and diagnostic and remedial practices. Problems directly related to the needs of students enrolled.

En. 506.-Introduction to Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-142. CRUTCHER, GEO.
Comprehensive study of the techniques needed to provide better classroom utilization of the
audio-visual aids to learning and development of skill in these techniques.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 507.-Advanced Educational Psychology. 3 credits. Begins July 5 and runs
through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-207. FOSTER, C. R.
The trends in the applications of psychology to problems of education will be made. Problems
directly related to the needs of students enrolled.

En. 510.-History of Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-134. NORMAN, J. W.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher,
student, curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginning; and
to point out present tendencies and possible developments.

En. 518.-Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-134. LEPS, J. M.
The varied duties of principals in junior high schools, senior high schools, and junior colleges
are comprehensively studied.

En. 519.-Foundations and Problems of Curriculum Construction. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. YN-134. MORRISON, R. W.
Topics such as the following are studied in this course: conflicting viewpoints in curricular
practice, the relationship of pupil maturity to curriculum development, implications of the guid-
ance emphasis, approaches to writing courses of study, reorganizing the program of studies,
developing core courses, planning the co-curricular and extra-curricular programs. Each student
will present a discussion of some curriculum problem.

En. 522.-Educational Organization and Administration. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-138. JOHNS, R. L.
The basic course in school administration. It includes the following areas: Federal, state
and local relationships and functions; systems of educational organization in the United States;
duties of superintendents, board members, principals and trustees; the organization of local
school units; and the interrelationships of teachers, administrators and supervisors.

En. 524.-Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools. 3 credits.
4:00 daily. YN-134. BLACK, J. H.
The organization of the elementary school in the light of its purposes and functions is
studied. The duties of the school principal are considered in their broad applications to ele-
mentary school problems.

En. 529.-Florida Workshop: Cooperating Schools Division. 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-218. CUMBEE, C. F.
This workshop is designed to provide an organization, materials, and assistance for principals
and teachers of the cooperating schools in the Florida Program for Improvement of Instruction.
Participants will be responsible for the production of programs that can be used in their school
situations. Membership is limited to the faculties of the cooperating schools.

En. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit; maximum credit 6.
To arrange. YN-143. WILLIAMS, W. R.

En. 535.-Fundamentals of Educational Supervision. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-236. GREEN, E. K.
The functions of supervisory officers related to improving instruction are critically reviewed
in their backgrounds of educational purposes and the organization of school systems. Introductory
consideration is given to the use of various supervisory devices and procedures in elementary and
secondary school situations.
En. 537.-Supervision of Student Teaching and Internships. 3 or 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-101, WOFFORD, K. V.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Designed to help teachers who supervise student teachers or interns. It will consider the
many problems, procedures, materials involved in such work and also provide actual laboratory
experiences for the supervising teachers. The work will be conducted largely on the cooperative
plan with a leader and help from other staff members. Students who have a good background
in the field of supervision will occasionally be admitted for 8 hours credit. All others, 6 hours.

En. 538.-Evaluation of the Secondary School Program. 3 credits. Begins July
5 and runs through July 23.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-315.
Designed primarily to assist the secondary school principal and his staff in the systematic
evaluation of their school program.
En. 540.-Foundations of Education. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-150. LEWIS, H. G. and GREEN, E. K.
An orientation course for those studying for the M. Ed. degree. Graduate programs are
planned in the light of each student's educational needs. The socio-eeonomic bases for education
are comprehensively surveyed.
En. 541.-Problems in Educational Psychology. 3 or 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-304. McLENDON, I. R.
Individualized study is made of problems dealing with child development, adolescence, learning,
and other areas of educational psychology.
En. 555.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division. Variable credit; maxi-
mum 6. OLSON, C. M., Coordinator.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. Social Studies: 8:30 daily. Y'N-232. OLSON, C. M. and
WATTENBARGER, J. L.
Section 2. Speech: 8:30 daily. YN-201.
Section 3. Mathematics: 8:30 daily. YN-114. GAGER, W. A.
Section 4. Physical Education: 8:30 daily. K-111ll. SALT, E. B. and
STEVEN, B. K.
Preparation of bulletins by a special group.
En. 562.-Principles of Pupil Guidance. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-150. CRAGO, A.
Students carry out an individual guidance project in addition to their survey of guidance
principles and practices in schools.
En. 584.-Education for Young Children. 3 or 6 credits.
8:30 and 10:00 daily. YN-228. HOLDFORD, A. V.
A course designed to assist teachers of children of pre- and early school age.
En. 640.-School and Society. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-234. LEWIS, H. G.
This course will supply a social and philosophic frame of reference through a rigorous study
of the society in which education takes place and will develop the implications of this society
for the more adequate fulfillment of the functions of the school. The course will be concentrated
upon theoretical suppositions, issues, problems, principles and values. It will be conducted on
a seminar basis for a limited number of students in the sixth year program of teacher education
and for candidates for the doctor's degree in education.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

EL 341.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The first half of the
course El. 341-342. Prerequisites: One year of college physics, including










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


electricity and magnetism; differential and integral calculus; and Ml. 182.
7:00 daily. BN-210. JOHNSON, W. E.
Electric and magnetic circuits; electrostatics; electro-magnetics; representation of alternating
current by vectors and complex quantities; measurement of power in single phase and polyphase
circuits; generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy; characteristics of apparatus;
selection, testing, and installation of electrical equipment.

El. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The second half of the
course El. 341-342.
Section 1. 7:00 daily. F-101. SMITH, E. F.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. F-101. SMITH, E. F. (Section 2 open only
to Electrical Engineering students.)

El. 344.-Problems in Direct and Alternating Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Corequisite: El. 342.
10:00 daily. EG-209. SCHOONMAKER, L. E.
Kirchhoff's Laws for electric magnetic circuits; single phase circuit analysis; energy and
power; wave form; coupled circuits: balanced and unbalanced polyphase circuits. Kerchner and
Corcoran, Alternating Current Circuits.

El. 349.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The first half of the course El. 349-350.
Corequisite: El. 341.
1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. BN-106. JOHNSON, W. E.
Experimental studies and tests on direct current and alternating current apparatus.
El. 350.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The second half of the course El. 349-350.
Corequisite: El. 342.
Section 1. 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. BN-106. SCHRADER, G. F.
Section 2. To arrange. SCHRADER, G. F.

ENGLISH

Eh. 133.-Effective Writing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3
Course Chairman.
1:00 daily. LA-209.
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are urged to do creative work.
Eh. 134.-Contemporary Reading. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission
of C-3 Course Chairman.
8:30 daily. LA-307.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded program in reading,
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought. Some time will be
spent in introducing each student to the bibliography and writing In the area of his special
professional interest.
Eh. 217.-Literary Masters of England. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Eh. 217-218. May be taken for credit without Eh. 218.
11:30 daily. LA-210. FOGLE, S. F.
The most interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for
an appreciation of their art and outlook on life.
Eh. 223.-Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Eh. 223-224. May be taken for credit without Eh. 224.
8:30 daily. LA-212. RUFF, WILLIAM.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM 79

A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of the great books
of the world.

Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. 3 credits.
10:00 daily.' LA-210. HERBERT, T. W.
The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays.
Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including, A Midmsssa Night'e
Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Richard the Second,
and Henry the Fourth. As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting
features of the Elizabethan stage and drama are treated briefly.

Eh. 303.-Major Poets of the Victorian Period. 8 credits.
7:00 daily. LA-212. FAIN, J. T.
Reading and discussion of such major writers as Browning, Tennyson. Arnold, the Rossettis.
Morris, Swinburne, and Kipling.

Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 8 credits.
8:30 daily. LA-311. KIRKLAND, E. C.
Designed to meet the needs of three types of students: (a) for the general student
it offers a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good Eng-
lish" is; (b) for the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum
knowledge of the English Language; (e) for the English Major and beginning graduate student
it serves as an introduction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon
grammatical rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and
spoken.

Eh. 306.-Modern English Grammar. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-210. COX, E. H.
A study of modern English inflection and syntax. The course is designed to be of practical
value to teachers of English, and is Intended especially for students in the College of Education
majoring in English.

Eh. 366.-Contemporary Literature: Poetry. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-212. FOGLE, S. F.
Reading, critical interpretation, and discussion of modern British and American poetry, with
chief emphasis upon recent poetry.

Eh. 380.-English in the Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. LA-210. COX, E. H.
Designed to help teachers of English by (1) a review of the contents, both the language
and the literature, of secondary school English. with attention to some of the methods widely
used in high school English courses, and (2) a study of both the ultimate and immediate objectives
of the Secondary English program.

Eh. 391.-Children's Literature. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. LA-210. GEHAN, F. E.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. LA-212. GEHAN, F. E.
Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to
make him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.

Eh. 401.-American Literature. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. LA-210. SPIVEY, H. E.
A study of American literature from the beginning to 1850.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Eh. 407.-Introduction to Folklore. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. LA-311. KIRKLAND, E. C.
Designed to examine the various types of folklore, including the folktale, legend, myth, folk-
song, proverb, riddle, superstition, etc.; to relate folk material to literary and other artistic
media; to acquaint the student with folklore motifs in a diversified body of comparative litera-
ture; to show the significance of folklore as an aid to understanding the racial and cultural
heritage of American life, and to explore the appropriate utilization of folk materials by teachers,
sociologists, students of literature, and creative artists.

Eh. 409.-Chaucer. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. LA-311. HERBERT, T. W.
Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, humorous, and
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet.

Eh. 434.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-311. CONGLETON, J. E.
A study of the prose and poetry of the age of Dr. Johnson.


GRADUATE COURSES

Eh. 501.-American Literature. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. LA-212. SPIVEY, H. E.
A study of American literature from the beginning to 1850. Intended for graduate students,
both majors and minors.

Eh. 509.-Chaucer. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. LA-311. HERBERT, T. W.
A thorough study of the Canterbury Tales; collateral readings (in translation) of important
medieval writings.

Eh. 529.-Graduate Seminar. 1 credit.
2:30 Monday through Thursday. LA-311. FAIN, J. T.

Eh. 534.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-311. CONGLETON, J. E.
A study of the prose and poetry of the age of Dr. Johnson.


ENTOMOLOGY

Ey. 301.-Economic Entomology. 3 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. AG-308. HETRICK, L. A.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:20 T. Th. AG-308.
An introduction to economic entomology, which is based upon a study of the life histories,
and control of major insect enemies of American agricultural crops. Particular stress is placed
upon southern and Florida economic insects. This course is designed for all students in the
College of Agriculture either as a pre- or corequisite for other entomology courses. Textbook.
Destructive and Useful Insects by Metcalf and Flint: or Insects of Farm, Garden and Orchard
by Peairs. I

Ey. 303.-Insect Collection. 1 credit.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 7:00 F. HETRICK, L. A.
A companion couse for Ey. 801, in which a laboratory is held weekly for students desiring
to make a general or economic insect collection.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSE
Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology. 2 to 4 credits. (Credit assigned must be
shown on registration blank.)
To arrange. AG-308. HETRICK, L. A.
Consists of a problem for study which may be selected in any field of entomological specializa-
tion; including Histology, Morphology, Taxonomy, Embryology, Biological Control, Ecology,
Toxicology, Plant Quarantine, Inspection, Control, Commercial, Life History and Habits, Biology,
and Medical and Veterinary Entomology.

FORESTRY
Fy. 220.-Introduction to Forestry. 2 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. HT-410. FRAZER, P. W.
A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the various phases and fundamental
underlying principles of the field of Forestry.
Fy. 221.-Summer Camp. 5 credits.
Field. MILLER, J. W. and SWINFORD, K. R.
Summer Camp work covers the entire field of Forestry. Students are given practical work
in surveying, cruising, silviculture, mensuration, and forest management work.
Fy. 228.-Forest Mensuration. 3 credits.
7:00 M. T. W. Th.; 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. HT-410. FRAZER, W. W.
Principles and practice of measuring forests and forest products with special attention to
Florida conditions.
Fy. 431.-Forest Problems Seminar. Variable credit.
To arrange. STAFF.
Designed to cover particular fields of Forestry, to be determined by the staff. The work will
be made to supplement the student's training during previous semesters.

FRENCH
Fh. 33.-First-Year French. 3 credits. The first half of the course Fh. 33-34.
Open to students who have had no previous work in French.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-182.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. E-182.
A beginning course basic for further study. The objective is a moderate proficiency in
reading and speaking the language. Emphasis on oral work.
Fh. 34.-First-Year French. 3 credits. The second half of the course Fh. 33-34.
7:00 daily. E-130. KURTH, A. L.
Fh. 201.-Second-Year French. 3 credits. The first half of the course Fh.
201-202. Prerequisite: One year of college French, or two years of high
school French.
10:00 daily. E-182. ATKIN, E. G.
Reading from modern French writers, and oral work.
Fh. 305.-French Conversation and Composition. 3 credits. The first half of
the course Fh. 305-306, but either half may be taken for credit. Prerequisite:
Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor.
8:30 daily. E-180. KURTH, A. L.
Training and practice in oral and written expression.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Fh. 430-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. E-187. ATKIN, E. G.
Conferences, reading and reports. The course offers an opportunity to study, for credit,
certain phases of French literature, language and civilization for which there are no regular
course offerings. May be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be
helped to plan a definite program.

GRADUATE COURSE

Fh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. E-187. ATKIN, E. G.
Conferences, reading and reports. The course offers graduate students an opportunity to
study, for credit, certain phases of French literature, language and civilization for which there
are no regular course offerings. May be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions.
Students will be helped to plan a definite program.

GENERAL SCIENCE

GL 301.--Children's Science. 2 credits.
4:00 daily. YN-140. TISON, J. P.
The content of elementary science, together with its organization for use both in the integrated
program and in the departmentalized school. Consideration given to the Interests and experiences
of children. Investigation of instructional aids that will assist teachers of the elementary school
to meet the needs of individual children.

GEOGRAPHY

Gpy. 305.-Geography of Florida. 8 credits.
10:00 daily. SC-208. DIETTRICH, S. R.
The geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions of Florida. The
distribution of population, routes of communication, industries, resources, and strategic location
in their geographical and historical aspects; explanation and interpretation of major phenomena
such as weather and climate, geologic structure and land forms, surface and underground drain-
age, shoreline characteristics, natural vegetation, soil types, and animal life. Optional field trips.

GEOLOGY

Gy. 207.-Topography and Geology of Florida. 3 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. 1-104. EDWARDS, R. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 T. 1-104.
No credit towards major or group major without the specific permission of
the Head of the Department. Designed to meet the special needs of certain
groups of students.
An interpretation of the topography, scenery and geology of Florida in the light of the
principles of physical and historical geology. Special attention is devoted to the mineral resources
of the State.
GERMAN

Gn. 33.-First-Year German. 3 credits. The first half of the course Gn. 38-84.
For students who have had no previous work in German.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-123. VALK, M. E.
Section 2. 1:00 daily. E-182. CRAPS, J. E.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 83

A beginning course basic for further study. The objective is a moderate proficiency in speak-
ing and reading the language.

Gn. 34.-First-Year German. 3 credits. The second half of the course Gn. 33-34.
Prerequisite: Gn. 33 or equivalent.
8:30 daily. E-125.

Gn. 201.-Second-Year German. 3 credits. The first half of the course Gn.
201-202. Prerequisite: Gn. 34 or equivalent.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 10:00 daily. E-123. VALK, M. E.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. E-182.
An intermediate course. The objective is proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking the
language.

Gn. 325.-Scientific German. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Gn. 201-202 or permission
of instructor.
10:00 daily. E-102. CRAPS, J. E.
The reading of representative selections in Chemistry, Biology, Physics and other fields.
Designed to provide the student with an adequate tool for research involving German publications.

HISTORY

Hy. 241.-History of the Modern World. 8 credits. Prerequisite: C-1 or Hy.
313-314.
7:00 daily. PE-112. HAMMOND, H.
A study of the modern world from the Congress of Vienna to the present time.

Hy. 251.-Florida History. 3 credits. The first half of the course Hy. 251-252.
1:00 daily. 1-110. PATRICK, R. W.
Designed to familiarize the student with the discovery, exploration, settlement and development
of that area now comprised in the present state of Florida. Special emphasis will be given the
period since Reconstruction.

Hy. 303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Hy. 303-304.
8:30 daily. PE-112. LEAKE, J. M.
The Civil War and Reconstruction.

Hy. 313.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Hy. 313-314.
10:00 daily. PE-5. GLUNT, J. D.
The history of Western Europe from 476 A. D. to the Renaissance and Reformation.

Hy. 331.-Survey of American History. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Hy. 331-332.
8:30 daily. 1-102. GLUNT, J. D.
A general survey course on the development of the United States.

Hy. 361.-English History to 1688. 3 credits. The first half of the course Hy.
361-362. Prerequisite: C-1 or Hy. 313-314.
11:30 daily. PE-5.
A survey of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolutioe










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Hy. 363.-Latin American History to 1850. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Hy. 363-364. Prerequisite: C-1 or Hy. 313-314.
10:00 daily. 1-102. WORCESTER, D. E.
A survey of the colonization and development of Latin America.

Hy. 373.-History of Mexico and the Caribbean Area. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-102. WORCESTER, D. E.
Indian and colonial background; the West Indies as a center of international rivalry; Mexican
independence; French intervention; the dictators, Santa Ana to Calles; the Mexican Revolution,
1910 to the present: the West Indies today; Central America in modern times.

GRADUATE COURSES

Hy. 503-American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. PE-112. LEAKE, J. M.

Hy. 509.-U. S. History Seminar. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-212. LEAKE, J. M.
For graduate students majoring in history.

Hy. 561.-English History to 1688. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. PE-5.

Hy. 573.-History of Mexico and the Caribbean Area. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-102. WORCESTER, D. E.

HORTICULTURE

He. 311.-Home Gardening. 1%' credits. (June 14 to July 2. Open to Agricul-
tural Extension workers only.)
8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. AG-209. STOUT, G. J.
Laboratory: 10:00 to 1:00 W. GH.

He. 314.-Principles of Fruit Production. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Bty. 311.
10:00 daily. AG-209. WOLFE, H. S.
The principles underlying fruit production, with special reference to such factors as water
relations, nutrition, temperature, fruit setting, and geographic influence. Textbook: Gardner,
Bradford, and Hooker. Fundamentals of Fruit Production.

GRADUATE COURSE

He. 570.-Research in Horticulture. Variable credit. (Credit assigned must
be shown on registration blank.)
To arrange. WOLFE, H. S.

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION

In. 101.-Introduction to Industrial Arts. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-Shop. CHENEY, M. W.
Orientation is given to the basic industrial arts through reading, discussion, visitation,
experimentation, participation in planning, and execution of shop problems.
In. 103.-Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-Shop. CHENEY, M. W.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Emphasizes care and use of drafting instruments, practice in sketching, lettering, dimensioning,
orthographic projection, making of working drawings, and blueprint reading.

In. 303.-Machine Woodwork. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-shop. CHENEY, M. W.
The practical work in this course includes power machinery and machine maintenance, and
use of the jointer, tilting arbor bench saw, band saw, lathe, mortiser, drill press, router, shaper
and other small machines.

In. 402.-Problems in Architectural Drawing. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. YN-Shop. STRICKLAND, T. W.
Attention is centered on problems of architectural development, materials, and techniques
of construction and on problems of building orientation, heating, lighting, ventilation, landscaping,
and adaptability.

In. 412.-Art Metal Design and Construction. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. YN-Shop. STRICKLAND, T. W.
Problems are studied involving design principles as applied to metals. Construction is done
on projects which involve hand processes and simple machine work to accomplish spinning.

GRADUATE CURSES

In. 506.-History and Philosophy of Industrial and Vocational Education. 3
credits.
10:00 daily. YN-132. WILLIAMS, W. R.
Penetrating inquiry is made into the historical background which highlights the significant
educational philosophies and objectives underlying the programs of industrial arts and vocational
education. Emphasis is given to modern concepts and their implications.

In. 523.-School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. YN-132. WILLIAMS, W. R.
Study is made of standards as they apply to the physical setting of the program of industrial
arts involving design, selection and maintenance of equipment in industrial arts and vocational
shops.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Ig. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205,
Ml. 182. Corequisite: Ms. 354.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. EG-209.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. EG-209.
Principles of statics; resolution and equilibrium of concurrent forces; numerical and graphical
solution of trusses and hinged frames; couples; centers of gravity; forces in space; and moments
of inertia.

Ig. 366.-Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ig. 365,
Ms. 354.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:30 daily. EG-211.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. EG-211.
Principles of dynamics; rectilinear, curvilinear, and harmonic motions; impulse and momentum;
work and energy; force, mass, and acceleration; projectiles; simple, torsional, and compound
pendulums; balancing of rigid bodies; and relative motion.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ig. 367.-Strength of Materials. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ig. 365, Ms. 354.
7:00 daily. EG-211.
Tension, compression, shear, stress and strain; combined stresses; riveted joints for pressure
vessels and structural work; torsion; bending moments; stresses and deflection of simple,
cantilever, and continuous beams; concrete beams; curved beams and hooks; eccentric loading;
columns; and elastic strain energy.

Ig. 370.-Job Evaluation. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Upper Divisions Registration.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. EG-213. CUMMINGS, R. J.
Analysis of duties and responsibilities of various jobs and comparison from point of view
of difficulty, responsibility, skill education and working conditions; determination of rates of
compensation and proper relation to each other according to the relative value of the job to
industry.
Ig. 463.-Specifications, Engineering Relations and Industrial Safety. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: Senior Classification.
10:00 daily. F-101. ESHLEMAN, S. K.
Specifications for materials and construction of engineering projects; advertising and letting
contracts; agreements and contractual relations; organization of safety work in industry;
accident causes and legal responsibility of employer and employee.

Ig. 472.-Human Engineering. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 463.
11:30 M. T. W. Th. EG-202. CUMMINGS, R. J.
Problems of production engineering and management; the human factors Ia industry.

JOURNALISM

Jm. 216.-Principles of Journalism. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. E-102. LOWRY, W. L.
Principles and ethics underlying newspaper and magazine publishing and news reporting.

Jm. 314.-Magazine Writing and Editing. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. E-102. LOWRY, W. L.
Preparation of special articles for publication in newspapers and magazines coordinated with
study of magazine editing problems. Supervised marketing of articles produced in the course.

LAW
Lw. 300.-Equity I. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. LW-201. CURRAN, J. W.
Section 2. 2:30 daily. LW-201. CURRAN, J. W.

Lw. 303.-Contracts I. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LW-201. SMYTH, C. J.

Lw. 400.-U. S. Constitutional Law L 2 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 11:30 M. T. Th. F. LW-204. MILLER, G. J.
Section 2. 2:30 M. T. W. F. LW-204. MILLER, G. J.

Lw. 404.-Quasi Contracts (Restitution). 2 credits.
10:00 M. Th. LW-204. MACDONALD, W. D.
7:00 W. S. LW-204.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


Lw. 407-Legal Bibliography. 2 credits.
8:30 M. T. W. F. LW-105. MENARD, A. R., Jr.
Lw. 415.-Abstracts. 2 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 M. T. Th. F. LW-204. DAY, J. W.
Section 2. 10:00 T. W. F. S. LW-204. DAY, J. W.
Section 3. 4:00 M. T. Th. F. LW-204. DAY, J. W.
Lw. 431.-Appellate Procedure and Judgments. 2 credits.
7:00 W. S. LW-105. TESELLE, C. J.
10:00 M. Th. LW-105.

Lw. 509.-Sales. 2 credits.
8:30 Th. S. LW-105. CONDRICK, J. A.
1:00 M. LW-105.
4:00 W. LW-105.

Lw. 518.-Federal Rules. 2 credits.
7:00 M. T. Th. F. LW-105. TESELLE, C. J.

Lw. 521.-Trusts. 2 credits.
10:00 T. W. F. LW-105. MACDONALD, W. D.
11:30 Th. LW-105.

Lw. 530.-Administrative Law. 2 credits.
1:30 M. T. W. F. LW-105. MENARD, A. R., JR.

Lw. 533.-Labor Law. 2 credits.
1:00 T. W. Th. F. LW-105. CONDRICK, J. A.

Lw. 536.-Security Transactions. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. LW-204. WALDO, S. F.

Lw. 537-Office Practice. 2 credits.
6:30 to 9:20 p.m. F. LW-105. WILSON, J. R.
10:00 to 12:50 S. LW-105.

MATHEMATICS
Ms. 105.-Basic Mathematics. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-102.
Section 2. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-4.
Section 3. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-102.
Section 4. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-4.
Section 5. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-102.
Section 6. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-102.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a sequence of topics including the above plus some calculus. It is designed
for students who plan to study architecture, engineering, any of the physical sciences, or who
wish to major in mathematics. It is also recommended for teachers of high school mathematics
who desire to advance in technical command of the subject matter.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ms. 106.-Basic Mathematics. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-10.
Section 2. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-101.
Section 3. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-10.
Section 4. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-101.
Section 5. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-4.
Section 6. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-10.
Section 7. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-4.
A continuation of Ms. 105.

Ms. 225.-Arithmetic for Teachers. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. SC-206.
Meaning and cultural value of arithmetic. Principles, fundamentals, processes, checks and
short cuts. Study of fractions, approximations, percentages, projects, and activity programs;
and many other topics so treated as to give the student a connected idea of the subject matter
of arithmetic. Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon
beginning processes, which many teachers never have the opportunity to investigate.

Ms. 311.-Advanced College Algebra. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Ms. 311-312. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college mathematics, or equiva-
lent.
7:00 daily. SC-206.
The further treatment of some of the material and processes given in the usual freshman
college course, and the introduction to more advanced topics.

Ms. 353.-Differential Calculus. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. PE-11.
Section 2. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. PE-11.
Section 3. 8:30 daily and 2:30 T. Th. SC-202.
Section 4. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. PE-11.
Section 5. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-10.
Section 6. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-11.
Section 7. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. PE-101.
Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields of mathematics, is treated
in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse operation of differentiation.

Ms. 354.-Integral Calculus. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. SC-202.
Section 2. 10:00 daily and 2:30 W. F. SC-202.
Section 3. 11:30 daily and 4:00 T. Th. SC-202.
Integration. the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas.
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.

Ms. 420.-Differential Equations. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. SC-206.
The classification, solution, and application of various equations which contain expressions
involving not only variables but also the derivatives of these variables.

Ms. 431.-College Geometry. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. PE-101.
The use of elementary methods in the advanced study of the triangle and circle. Special
emphasis on solving original exercises. Recommended for prospective high school geometry
teachers.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSES

Ms. 502.-Vector Analysis. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. SC-206.
The algebra and calculus of vectors in two and three dimensions; applications to problems
in Physics and Engineering.

Ms. 551.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. EG-213.
Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differentiation, Taylor's
theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple multiple integrals, line and surface integrals.
Green's theorem, etc.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

MI. 181.-Engineering Drawing. 2 credits. Corequisite: Ms. 105.
1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. C. FRASH, E. S., PHELPS, G. 0.
Designed to teach the student how to make and read engineering drawings. French, Engineer-
ing Drawina; Frash, Instructions, Letter Plates and Sketch Plates for Engineering Drawing.

MI. 182.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 181.
8:30 to 11:30 M. W. F. C. TANKERSLEY, J.
The principles of projection and the development of surfaces. Frash, Geometric Drawing.

Ml. 282.-Mechanism and Kinematics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 182. Co-
requisites: Ps. 205 and Ms. 353.
Section 1. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. EG-301. SMITH, J. H.
1:00 to 5:30 M. W. EG-304.
Section 2. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. EG-301. DENT, J. A.
1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. EG-304.
Revolving and oscillating bodies, link work, belts, pulleys, gears, and cams; trains of mechanisms
and the velocity and directional ratio of moving parts. Keown and Faires, Mechanism.

ML 385.-Thermodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ms. 354, Ps. 206, and Cy.
102.
10:00 daily. EG-202. PRESCOTT, F. L.
Energy equations and availability of energy; gases, vapors, and mixtures; engineering
applications in flow of fluids, vapor power cycles, gas compression and refrigeration. Ebaugh,
Engineering Thermodynamics; Keenan and Keyes, Thermodynamics Properties of Steam.

MI. 387.-Mechanical Laboratory. 1 credit. Corequisite: Ml. 385.
Section 1. 1:00 to 5:30 M. W. EG-103. GAGLIARDI, F. A.
Section 2. 1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. EG-103. GAGLIARDI, F. A.

ML 491.-Machine Design. 3 hours. 4 credits. 3 hours drawing. Prerequisites:
Ml. 281, 366, and 367.
8:30 daily. EG-202. BOURKE, N.
1:00 to 5:30 T. Th. EG-300.
The calculation, proportioning and detailing of machine parts, shop and mill layouts, and the
design of machines to perform certain functions. Faires, Desian of Machine Elements.

MUSIC
Msc. 100.-Fundamentals of Music. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN-311. COGHILL, K. R.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Acquisition of adult song repertoire, music reading, problems of pitch, scales, rhythm, writing
of original melodies, directed learning, and functional piano keyboard experience.

Msc. 104.-Music for the Upper Elementary Child. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. YN-311. COGHILL, K. R.
The understandings, techniques, and skills involved in singing, rhythmic, listening, instru-
mental, and creative activities which are desirable for children in grades four through six.
The attainment of sight-seeing, tonal problems, rhythms commonly used, and part-singing.

PAINTING

Pg. 101.-Fundamentals of Pictorial Art. 3 credits.
7:00 to 11:30 daily. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A comprehensive introductory course in the theory, application, and appreciation of art
fundamentals carried on by means of a coordinated series of beginning projects emphasizing the
principles of creative design. Problems in the elements of design are followed by their practical
use in every day art, exemplified by simple problems in interior decoration, stage design, textile
design, etc. Charcoal drawing from the cast and model; oil painting from still life; improvisa-
tion and abstract design. Acquaintance with the various media including water color, pencil,
charcoal, and oil.
Projects 1 to 3 inclusive. The first half of the course is equivalent to 8 credits, and the last
half to 8 credits.

Pg. 102.-Fundamentals of Pictorial Art. 3 credits.
7:00 to 11:30 daily. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pa. 102.
Projects 4 to 6 inclusive. The first half of the course is equivalent to 3 credits, and the
last half to 3 credits.

Pg. 211.-Projects in Painting, Group 1. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 102.

Pg. 212.-Projects in Painting, Group 2. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 21L

Pg. 221.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group 1. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 102.

Pg. 222.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group 2. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 221.

Pg. 313.-Projects in Painting, Group 3. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 212.

Pg. 323.-Projects in Commercial Art, Group 3. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 222.

Pg. 415.-Projects in Painting, Group 5. Variable credit.
48 hours to be arranged. LW-302. HOLST, W. M.
A continuation of Pg. 814.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


PHARMACOGNOSY

Pgy. 221.-Practical Pharmacognosy. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Pgy. 221-222.
7:00 daily. CH-316. JOHNSON, C. H.
Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:20 T. CH-316. JOHNSON.
1:00 to 5:20 Th. CH-316. JOHNSON.

PHARMACY
Phy. 211.-Inorganic Pharmacy. 5 credits. Prerequisites: Cy. 101-102 and Phy.
223-224.
8:30 daily. CH-212. BECKER, C. H.
Laboratory: 10:00 to 1:00 M. T. Th. F. CH-306. BECKER, C. H.
The inorganic compounds used in medicine; their Latin titles, origin, and physical, chemical,
and physiological properties; their preparation and use in compounding remedies.

Phy. 353.-Organic and Analytical Pharmacy. 5 credits. The first half of the
course, Phy. 853-354.
10:00 daily. CH-402. FOOTE, P. A.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. CH-306. FOOTE, P. A.

PHILOSOPHY

Ppy. 301.-Ethics. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. LA-201. FOX, G. G.
Beginning with an examination of current theories of moral relativism, the course will
attempt to discover objective criteria for moral obligations. Hedonism, Stoicism, theories of
self-development, and Christian ethics will be studied. Reading will include Plato, Aristotle,
Epicurus, Marcus Aurelius, Dante. Kant, J. S. Mill. Niehbuhr, and Maritain.

Ppy. 410.-Modern Philosophy. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. LA-311. Fox, G. G.
The history of philosophy from the Renaissance to the present, with particular emphasis
upon theory of knowledge.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

PHA. 131.-Football. 2 credits.
11:30 M. T. Th. F. K-107. WOLF, R. B.
Theory and Practice. The fundamentals of football including instruction in the coaching
of individual techniques of offensive and defensive play.

PHA. 141.-Tennis. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 143. Open only to men.
8:30 M. W. F. GY. SCHNELL, H. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in the various strokes of tennis together
with a knowledge of the rules and court strategy.

PHA. 142.-Elementary Gymnastics and Tumbling. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA.
144. Open only to men.
11:30 daily. K-205. MOONEY, E. G.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in activities covering light and heavy apparatus,
tumbling, calisthenics, rope climbing and all-out effort activities.











92 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

PHA. 143.-Combat Sports. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 141. Open only to men.
8:30 T. Th. S. GY. HALLADAY, D. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills and a knowledge of the rules and strategy
in boxing, wrestling, fencing and hand-to-hand combat.

PHA. 144.-Swimming and Water Sports. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 142.
Open only to men.
11:30 daily. K-205. RILEY, J.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in the various swimming strokes and diving.
The course also includes instruction in water polo, water basketball, water contests and relays,
and exhibition swimming.

PHA. 231.-Basketball. 2 credits. Open only to men.
8:30 daily. K-203. McCACHREN, J. R.
Theory and Practice. The fundamentals of basketball including instruction in the coaching
of individual techniques of offensive and defensive play.

PHA. 232.-Baseball. 2 credits. Open only to men.
10:00 daily. K-205. MCCACHREN, J. R.
Theory and Practice. Fundamentals of coaching baseball including the play of each position
on a baseball team.

PHA. 239.-Narcotics Education. 2 credits.
8:30 M. T. Th. F. K-205. HAAR, F. B.
A factual, scientific, and unemotional approach to the present-day problem of narcotics.
A study of the nature of alcohol and its relation to the psychological, physical, social, economic,
and educational aspects of the problem will be considered briefly. Suggestive teaching projects,
units, and methods for the various age-grade and subject levels will be explored and developed.

PHA. 241.-Golf. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 243. Open only to men.
10:00 M. W. F. K-203. HALLADAY, D. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skill in using the various clubs together with
a knowledge of the rules and golf etiquette.

PHA. 242.-Recreational Sports. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 244. Open only
to men.
1:00 M. W. F. K-203. HALLADAY, D. W.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills and a knowledge of the rules in the follow-
ing recreational sports: archery, badminton, bowling, horseshoes, table tennis, shuffleboard, paddle
tennis and games and relays.

PHA. 243.-Advanced Gymnastics and Tumbling. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA.
241. Open only to men.
10:00 T. Th. S. GY. HAAR, F. B.
Theory and Practice. A continuation of the activities in the areas covered in PHA. 142
with emphasis upon advanced skills. This course also includes pyramids, marching, gymnastic
relays and the staging of gmnastic exhibitions.

PHA. 244.-Life Saving and Water Safety. 1 credit. Corequisite: PHA. 242.
Open only to men.
1:00 T. Th. S. K-203. RILEY, J.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills in lifesaving, canoeing, boating and survival
- swimming.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


PHA. 245.-Team Games. 2 credits. Open only to men.
2:30 daily. K-205. MCCACHREN, J. R.
Theory and Practice. Designed to develop skills and a knowledge of the rules and strategy
in the following team games: volley ball, touch football, softball, soccer, speedball and gator ball.

PHA. 373.-Methods and Materials in Elementary School Physical Education.
3 credits.
2:30 daily. K-107. WEEKS, M.
The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group
play, large group play, directed play, team game units; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.

PHA. 387.-Health Education. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. K-107. HAAR, F. B.
A consideration of the principles underlying health education, together with the organization
and administration of such a program: the role of the teacher in health instruction, who shall
teach health, the organization of materials for instructional purposes, criteria for the evaluation
of health materials and methods, the role of local, state and national non-official organizations
in health teaching programs.

PHA. 388.-Recreational Activities and Leadership. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. K-107. BOSWELL, J. H.
A study of the activities comprising each of the various phases of a community recreation
program: social recreation, playground, dramatics, music, handcraft, sports, nature and outing,
special features and events. The training of playground leaders, recreation center directors,
sports program directors and directors of specialized activities as it pertains to planning and
conducting the respective programs.

PHA. 446.-Organization and Administration of Community Recreation. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. K-107. BOSWELL, J. H.
A consideration of those problems involved in organizing and administering a Community
Recreation Department: legal aspects, setting up the organization of a department and its pro-
gram, budgeting and financing, records and reports, public relations, facilities and equipment,
selection and supervision of the departmental staff.

GRADUATE COURSE

See En. 555.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division, Section 5, Physical
Education. This course will be found under Education on page 73.

PHYSICS

Ps. 101.-General Physics. 3 credits. The first half of the course Ps. 101-102.
Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of the instructor. Corequisite: Ps. 207.
(Register for one Demonstration Section and one Discussion Section.)
Demonstration Sections:
Section 1. 10:00 F. BN-203.
Section 2. 2:30 F. BN-203.
Discussions Sections:
Section 11. 7:00 daily. BN-209.
Section 12. 8:30 daily. BN-209.
Section 13. 11:30 daily. BN-209.
A course in general physics for science students.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ps. 205.-General Physics. 3 credits. The first half of the course Ps. 205-206.
Prerequisite: One year of college mathematics. Corequisite: Ps. 207.
(Register for one Demonstration Section and one Discussion Section.)
Demonstration Sections:
Section 1. 10:00 F. BN-203.
Section 2. 2:30 F. BN-203.
Discussion Sections:
Section 11. 7:00 daily. BN-208.
Section 12. 8:30 daily. BN-208.
Section 13. 10:00 daily. BN-208.
Section 14. 11:30 daily. BN-208.
Theory of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and light. Primarily for engineering students.

Ps. 207.--General Physics Laboratory. 1 credit. To accompany Ps. 101 or 205.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 to 10:00 M. W. F. BN-306.
Section 2. 7:00 to 10:00 M. W. F. BN-307.
Section 3. 10:00 to 1:00 M. W. F. BN-306.
Section 4. 10:00 to 1:00 M. W. F. BN-307.
Section 5. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. BN-306.
Section 6. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. BN-306.
Section 7. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. BN-307.
Section 8. 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. BN-307.
Section 9. 7:00 to 10:00 T. Th. S. BN-306.
Section 10. 7:00 to 10:00 T. Th. S. BN-307.
Section 11. 10:00 to 1:00 T. Th. S. BN-306.
Section 12. 10:00 to 1:00 T. Th. S. BN-307.

Ps. 311.-Electricity and Magnetism. 3 credits. Prerequisite: one year of college
physics.
(Register for one section only.)
10:00 daily. BN-210. KNOWLES, H. L.
Designed to meet the growing need of physics, chemistry and electrical engineering students
for a working knowledge of the basic problems of electricity and magnetism.
Ps. 320.-Modern Physics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: one year of college physics
and calculus.
11:30 daily. BN-210. FLOWERS, J. D.
X-rays and radioactivity; the Bohr theory; photoelectric effect; nuclear phenomena, cosmic
rays, and the production of high voltages.

GRADUATE COURSE

Ps. 517.-Modern Physics. 3 credits. The first half of the course, Ps. 517-518.
8:30 daily. BN-210. BLESS, A. A.
Electromagnetic theory; based on Maxwell's equations; the electronic Electromagnetic theory
of atomic structures; the interpretation of the properties of matter and radiation from the
standpoint of this theory; spectroscopy and nuclear physics.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION- FIRST TERM


PLANT PATHOLOGY

Pt. 321.-Plant Pathology. 3 credits.
8:00 M. W. F. HT-407. WEBER, G. F.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M. W. F. HT-407. WEBER, G. F.
Plant diseases caused by mechanical injury, environmental factors, parasitic bacteria, fungi
and other plants; life cycles and role of parasitic fungi and bacteria; the economic importance
and control of plant disease.

GRADUATE COURSE

Pt. 570.-Research in Plant Pathology. 3 to 6 credits.
To arrange. WEBER, G. F.
A study of methods of research in plant pathology applied to life histories of parasitic organ-
isms in relation to the host plant and environmental factors influencing the development of
diseases.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 3 credits. The first half of the course Pcl.
309-310. Prerequisite: C-1, or Pel. 313-314, or its equivalent.
11:30 daily. 1-102. FUNK, A. L.
The nature of international relations, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, armaments; history
of international relations; foreign policies; function and problems of democracy; international
organization; the League of Nations and the World Court.

Pcl. 313.-American Government and Politics. 3 credits. The first half of the
course Pcl. 313-314. Prerequisite: C-1.
7:00 daily. 1-102. TELFORD, G. B.

Pel. 401.-American Constitutional Law. 3 credits. The first half of the course,
Pcl. 401-402.
8:30 daily. PE-5. TELFORD, G. B.
A complete study and analysis of the Federal Constitution, with study and briefing of the
leading cases in constitution law.

Pel. 405.-History of Political Theory. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Pcl. 405-406. Prerequisite: C-1, or Pcl. 313-314, or its equivalent.
10:00 daily. 1-110. DAUER, M. J.
A study and analysis of Ancient and Medieval political theories.
Pel. 407.-Comparative Government. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Pcl. 407-408.
1:00 daily. PE-5. ALLINSON. B. D.
A comparative study of the theory and practice of modern governments.

GRADUATE COURSES

PcL 501.-American Constitutional Law. 3 credits. The first half of the course,
Pcl. 501-502.
8:30 daily. PE-5. TELFORD, G. B.

Pcl. 505.-History of Political Theory. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-110. DAUER, M. J.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Pcl. 507.-Comparative Government. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. PE-5. ALLINSON, B. D.

Pcl. 509.-International Relations. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-102. FUNK, A. L.

Pel. 513.-Seminar. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-212. DAUER, M. J.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. E-174.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. E-174. ANDERSON, R. J.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. E-174. McCUTCHAN, K.
Section 4. 11:30 daily. E-174. RETHLINGSHAFER, D.
Section 5. 1:00 daily. E-174.
An elementary treatment of the general topics in the field of psychology. Designed to provide
an understanding of human behavior, approached as a natural phenomenon subject to scientific
study. The unifying concept of the course is the adaptation of the individual to his physical and
social environment.

Psy. 309.-Personality Development. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. PE-114. HINCKLEY, E. D.
A study of the mechanisms of personality formation, with special emphasis upon the varieties
of human adjustment. The more inevitable problems of human life with their normal and abnormal
solutions. The origin and modification of behavior. Processes of motivation and adjustment.
Development and measurement of personality traits. Techniques of mental hygiene.

Psy. 404.-The Measurement of Personality. 3 credits.
1:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. PE-114. RETHLINGSHAFER, D.
Intensive study in the methods of measuring personality, including questionnaires, rating
scales, objective measurements and projective techniques. Laboratory practice in interpretation
and construction of tests.

Psy. 410.-Abnormal Psychology. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. PE-114. WUNDERLICH, H.
A study of the abnormal phases of mental life, and the ways in which the individual develops
abnormal habits of thinking and acting. A survey of the signs of beginning maladjustment and
procedures which may be followed to correct these tendencies. Special attention is given to the
prevention and treatment of mental disease.

Psy. 447.-Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. PE-114. HINCKLEY, E. D., and STAFF.
A survey of the basic concepts, methods, and procedures used in evaluating human personality;
abilities, and behavior disorders. Case studies will be analyzed. Techniques of guidance and
mental hygiene will be considered.

GRADUATE COURSES

Psy. 504.-The Measurement of Personality. 3 credits.
1:15 to 5:00 M. W. F. PE-114. RETHLINGSHAFER, D.
Offered in conjunction with Psy. 404 with additional assignments.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION -FIRST TERM


Psy. 510.-Seminar in Psychopathology. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. PE-114. WUNDERLICH, H.
Lectures, readings, and discussions of the various forms of mental disorder, with attention
to causes, diagnosis, symptoms and treatment.

Psy. 517.-Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. PE-114. HINCKLEY, E. D., and STAFF.
Offered in conjunction with Psy. 417 with additional assignments.

Pay. 521.-Learning.
8:30 daily. E-109. MCCUTCHAN, K.
A presentation and interpretation of the experimental evidence on the influence of various
factors of learning and retention.

Pay. 525.-Research. 3 credits.
To arrange.
Qualified students and the instructor concerned may choose a particular problem for investiga-
tion or study from the various areas of experimental psychology. A formal written report on the
work will be required of the student.

RELIGION

Rn. 341.-The Old Testament in the Light of Today. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-204. PHILPOTT, H. M.
An inquiry into the literature and history of the Hebrews as reflected in the English Bible.

Rn. 371.-Principles of Religious Education. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours
in Religion, or permission of the instructor concerned.
10:00 daily. 1-204. PHILPOTT, H. M.
Contemporary educational theories and practices as they relate to the religious nurture of
children. Attention will be given to the role of the church school and the problem of religion
in public education.
SCHOOL ART

SCA. 253.-General Art for the Elementary Grades. 4 credits.
4:00 to 6:00 daily. YN-316. MITCHELL, J. 0.
General survey and practice in all types of art work for grades one through six.

SCA. 301.-Creative School Art. 2 credits.
1:00 daily. YN-316. MITCHELL, J. 0.
A series of original projects based on the fundamental principles and factors of design.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Scl. 301.-Children's Social Studies. 3 credits.
2:30 daily. Y-N-140. BARRY, M. E.
Content material in the field of the social studies with implications for the activity program.

Sel. 302.-Children's Social Studies. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. YN-228. STEVENS, G. A.
A continuation of Scl. 801.

Scl. 303.-Social Studies in the Secondary School 3 credits.
8:30 daily.- YN-236. WATTENBARGER, J.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Designed to fit the needs of teachers in the Florida schools. The work will consist of three
parts: (1) the need for integration in the social sciences, (2) the program of social studies in
the Florida junior and senior high school, (3) work with groups of teachers on the particular
problems of materials for different grade levels. This course is for advanced undergraduates
in the social studies and for graduate students.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 241.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. 1-207.
The outlook for the individual in the modern world. Direct measurement of social credits
of invention and technological change in modern America. The effect of the metropolitan epoch
on social institutions. A review of the American regions as cultural environments and char-
lenges.

Sy. 316.-The Field of Social Work. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-207. ATCHLEY, M. H.
Administrative and promotional social work. Detailed study of the growth of public social
work agencies, 1930 to date. Study of casework techniques, of the range of duties of social
workers in modern public and private administration. Field analysis of public welfare agencies
in Florida.

Sy. 322.-The Child in American Society. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-207. ATCHLEY, M. H.
The social adjustment of children in a changing world. Factual study of social situations in
American life as they affect children. Emphasis is upon the adjustment and development of the
normal child, with attention to the problems of abnormal and maladjusted children. The course
provides factual sociological materials designed to supplement, rather than to duplicate, parallel
courses in Education and Psychology.

By. 344.-Marriage and the Family. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. CH-Aud. EHRMANN, W. W.
The nature and development of domestic institutions. Problems of adjustment to modern
conditions. Changes in marital and domestic relations with particular emphasis on preparation
for marriage. The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in Florida. Divorce, family
disorganization, child training.

Sy. 421.-Rural Sociology. 3 credits.
1:00 daily. 1-207.
American rural life; changing regions; major trends in relation to resources and problems;
rural social and economic planning; the rural resources of Florida.
Sy. 409.-The South Today. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. 1-207. MACLACHLAN, J. M.
The social resources and challenges of the modern South; measures of Southern culture; the
place of the South in the nation; programs and plans for the region reviewed; a broad view
of the foundations of Southern life.

GRADUATE COURSES

Sy. 516.-The Field of Social Work. 3 credits.
11:30 daily. 1-207.
Sy. 522.-The Child in American Society. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. 1-207.

Sy. 544.-Marriage and the Family. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. CH-Aud.




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