• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Map of campus
 Table of Contents
 University calendar
 Administrative officers
 Faculty
 General information
 Admissions
 Expenses
 Housing
 Student life: services, facilities,...
 Colleges, schools, and curricu...
 Description of courses
 General index














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00202
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1950
Copyright Date: 1950
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00202
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Map of campus
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    University calendar
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Administrative officers
        Page 9
    Faculty
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    General information
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Admissions
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Expenses
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Housing
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Student life: services, facilities, activities, regulations
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
    Colleges, schools, and curricula
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
    Description of courses
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
        Page 385
        Page 386
        Page 387
        Page 388
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 391
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
        Page 403
        Page 404
        Page 405
        Page 406
        Page 407
        Page 408
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
        Page 412
        Page 413
        Page 414
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Page 417
        Page 418
        Page 419
        Page 420
        Page 421
        Page 422
        Page 423
        Page 424
        Page 425
        Page 426
        Page 427
        Page 428
        Page 429
        Page 430
        Page 431
        Page 432
        Page 433
        Page 434
        Page 435
        Page 436
        Page 437
        Page 438
        Page 439
        Page 440
        Page 441
        Page 442
        Page 443
        Page 444
        Page 445
        Page 446
        Page 447
        Page 448
        Page 449
        Page 450
        Page 451
        Page 452
        Page 453
        Page 454
        Page 455
        Page 456
        Page 457
        Page 458
        Page 459
        Page 460
    General index
        Page 461
        Page 462
        Page 463
        Page 464
Full Text


74e
Sff


wwA4!sO


SRecord



*7&z4


Catalog
1950-51


Vol. XLV, Series I


No. 5


May 1, 1950


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida




























The Record comprises:
The Report of the President to the Board of Control, the Catalog, the Bulletin of
the Summer Session, the Schedule of Courses for each term or semester, the University
Directory, and various bulletins on regulations and policies.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli-
cant should specifically state which bulletins or what information is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
























L) -
m: I


S. 0)
* 0
I,


m -


I !
W"















KEY TO MAP OF CAMPUS

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


1. Administration Building
2. Law Building
3. Anderson Hall
4. Library
5. Peabody Hall
6. Parking Area
7. Walker Hall
8. Benton Hall
9. Building E-Classrooms
10. Residence
11. Building G-Faculty Offices
12. Green House
13. Temporary Residence
14. Farm Machinery Laboratory
15. Women's Dormitories
16. P. K. Yonge-Laboratory School
17. Cattle Feeding Barn
18. Nutrition Laboratory
19. Poultry Disease Laboratory
20. Temporary Dormitory J
21. Building -Mechanical Drawing
22. University Auditorium
23. Science Hall
24. Building I-Classrooms
25. Leigh Hall
26. Floyd Hall


27. University Post Office
28. Horticulture Building
29. Temporary Dormitonres-A thru H
30. Dairy Products Laboratory
31. Fumigation and Spectography
Laboratories
32. Buildings A-Accounting and
B-Civil Engineering
33. Student Service Center
34. Newell Hall
35. Building J
36. Temporary Dormitory I
37. Florida Union
38. University Cafeteria
39. Sledd Hall
40. Buckman Hall
41. Fletcher Hall
42. Thomas Hall
43. Murphree Hall
44. Women's Gymnasium
45. Building R-Music
46. Infirmary
47. Florida Gymnasium
48. Building K-Classrooms
49. Wood Products Laboratory
50. Cancer Research Laboratory


51. Greenhouse
52. Horticulture Laboratories
53. Tung Oil Laboratory
54. Garage
55. Reed Laboratory
56. Engineering and Industries
Building
57. Graham Field
58. Building L
59. Plant and Grounds Building
60. Maintenance Shops
61. Temporary Dormitories-K thru S
62. Military Building
63. Building N-Engineering
Laboratories
64. Men's Dormitories
65. Sewage Treatment Plant
66. Sewage Laboratory
67. Poultry Laboratory
68. Poultry Storage
69. Citrus Packing Plant
70. WRUF Radio Station
71. Pest Control Building
72. Perry Field
73. Tennis Stadium








TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE
University Calendar ............................ ...... ............ .. ...................... 5

Administrative Officers ................................--....... ........................ 9

Faculty ............................................................................................ 10

General Information ....................-............... -- ......................---------------------................ 52

A dm missions ...................................................................................... ..................... ...... 59
Expenses .......................................................................................................................... 64
H housing ............................................................................................................................ 68

Student Life-Services, Facilities, Activities, Regulations ........................................ 71

Colleges, Schools, and Curricula

University College ..................-------- -----........... ... ..... --------- ---------..................... 98
College of Agriculture ....................................-----------------------..................................... 109

College of Architecture and Allied Arts ...................----------------------.........................-------...... 123

College of Arts and Sciences ................................................................................ 132

College of Business Administration ................................................---------------------------------...................... 141
College of Education ............................---................................................................. 157
College of Engineering ......................................................................................... 168
School of Forestry .............................................................---------------------------------------------...................... 184

School of Journalism ...................---------- ..-- --- ------------..................... 187

College of Law .......................----------------------------------------------.................................................................... 189

College of Pharmacy .....-..-...........................................................------------------------------------------................... 196

College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics .......................................... 199
Physical Fitness Program ...................---------------............................................................ 208

The Division of Music .............--.......... .................................................................. 211
The Division of Military Science and Tactics ...................................................... 212

Radio Broadcasting ..................................................................--------------------------------------------....................... 214

Training of the Handicapped ................................................................................ 217

Graduate School ...................................................................................................... 220
Description of Courses .................................................................................................... 234

General Index .........................----- ------------------------------------ ------ ---------.................... 461






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1950-51

REGULAR SESSION SEPTEMBER 1950 JUNE 1951

1950
August 19, Saturday ............................Last day for filing preliminary application for
first semester.
Sept. 18, 19, Monday, Tuesday........ Placement tests for entering students.
Sept. 18-23, Monday-Saturday............Registration according to appointments assigned
on receipt of preliminary application.
Sept. 25, Monday, 7:40 a.m...............Classes begin. All registration fees increased by
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.
Sept. 30, Saturday, 12 noon...............Last time for completing registration for first
semester. No one permitted to start registration
after 10 a.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses and for changing
sections.
October 2, Monday, 12 noon..............Last time for submitting resignation for first semes-
ter and receiving any refund of fees.
October 13, 14, Friday, Saturday........Homecoming. Classes suspended at 1:30 p.m.
Friday.
October 21, Saturday, 12 noon............Last time for filing application with Dean to be
designated as honor student.
October 28, Saturday, 12 noon............Last time for making application at the Office of
the Registrar for degree to be conferred at end of
first semester.
November 11, Saturday.......................Georgia-Florida football game in Jacksonville,
classes suspended.
November 6, Monday, 4 p.m...............Last time for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E.
November 22, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m....Thanksgiving recess begins.
November 27, Monday, 7:40 a.m.........Thanksgiving recess ends.
December 2, Saturday, 12 noon............Last time for removing grades of I or X received
in preceding semester or term of attendance.
December 20, Wednesday, 5:30 p.m...Christmas recess begins.
December 30, Saturday ..................... Last day for filing preliminary application for
second semester.

1951
January 3, Wednesday, 7:40 a.m.........Christmas recess ends.
January 12, Friday................................Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at end of first semester to complete corres-
pondence courses.
January 15, Monday, 4 p.m................Last time for candidates for Master's and Doctor's
degrees to be conferred at end of first semester to
file theses with the Dean of the Graduate School.






CATALOG 1950-1951


January 20, Saturday, 2:30 p.m.........Final examination period begins.
January 22, Monday..........................Second semester registration begins for students
who were enrolled during the first semester.
February 1, Thursday, 4 p.m.............Grades for all candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at end of first semester due in the Office
of the Registrar (special lists are sent to the facul-
ty for this report).
February 2, Friday..............................Faculty meetings, at times announced by the
Deans, to pass upon candidates for degrees.
February 3, Saturday, 5 p.m.............First semester ends.
February 3, Saturday, 8 p.m...............First semester Commencement Convocation.
February 5, Monday, 4 p.m...............All grades for first semester due in the Office of
the Registrar.


SECOND SEMESTER
February 7, Wednesday......................Placement tests for entering students.
February 8-10, Thursday-Saturday......Registration according to appointments assigned
on receipt of preliminary application.
February 12, Monday, 7:40 a.m.........Classes begin. All registration fees increased $5.00
for persons completing registration on or after
this date.
February 17, Saturday, 12 noon..........Last time for completing registration for the sec-
ond semester. No one permitted to start regis-
tration after 10 a.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses and for changing
sections.
February 19, Monday, 12 noon............Last time for submitting resignation for second
semester and receiving any refund of fees.
March 10, Saturday, 12 noon..............Last time for filing application with Dean to be
designated as honor student.
March 17, Saturday, 12 noon..............Last time for making application at the Office of
the Registrar for a degree to be conferred at the
end of the second semester.
March 22, Thursday, 5:30 p.m............Spring recess begins.
March 27, Tuesday, 7:40 a.m...............Spring recess ends.
March 27, Tuesday, 4 p.m....................Last time for dropping courses without receiving
a grade of E.
April 14, Saturday, 12 noon..............Last time for removing grades of I or X received
in preceding semester or term of attendance.
May 5, Saturday..................................Last day for filing preliminary application for
1951 summer session.
May 18, Friday .....................................Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at the end of the second semester to com-
plete correspondence courses.
May 21, Monday, 4 p.m.....................Last time for candidates for Master's and Doctor's
degrees to be conferred at end of second semester
to file theses with the Dean of the Graduate
School.
May 26, Saturday, 2:30 p.m.............Final examination period begins.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


May 28, Monday.................................... Summer session registration begins for students
who were enrolled during the second semester.
June 7, Thursday, 4 p.m.....................Grades for all candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at the end of the second semester due in
the Office of the Registrar (special lists are sent to
the faculty for this report).
June 8, Friday.................----..................------.....Faculty meetings, at times announced by the
Deans, to pass upon candidates for degrees.
June 10, Sunday..................................Baccalaureate Service.
June 11, Monday..................................Commencement Convocation.
June 11, Monday, 4 p.m.....................All grades for second semester due in the Office
of the Registrar.


SUMMER SESSION 1951
June 13, Wednesday............................Placement tests for entering students.
June 14-16, Thursday-Saturday ............Registration according to appointments assigned
on receipt of preliminary application.
June 18, Monday, 7 a.m .....................Classes begin. All registration fees increased $5.00
for persons completing registration on or after this
date.
June 19, Tuesday, 5 p.m...................Last time for completing registration for the
summer session. No one will be permitted to start
registration after 3 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses or changing sections.
June 22, Friday, 4 p.m......................... Last time for submitting resignation for the sum-
mer session and receiving any refund of fees.
June 23, Saturday, 12 noon................Last time for making application at the Office of
the Registrar for degree to be conferred at the
end of the summer session.
July 4, Wednesday................................Holiday-Classes suspended.
July 9, Monday, 4 p.m..--...............-----........Last time for dropping courses without receiving
a grade of E.
July 27, Friday........................-------..-....-......----Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at end of the summer session to complete
correspondence courses.
July 30, Monday, 4 p.m.......................Last time for candidates for Master's and Doctor's
degrees to be conferred at the end of the summer
session to file theses with the Dean of the Grad-
uate School.
August 14, Tuesday, 7 a.m.............Final examination period begins.
First semester registration begins for students en-
rolled in the summer session.
August 16, Thursday, 4 p.m..... ......Grades for all candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at the end of the summer session are due
in the Office of the Registrar (special lists are
sent to the faculty for these reports).
August 17, Friday..........................Faculty meetings, at times announced by the
Deans, to pass upon candidates for degrees.


























8 CATALOG 1950-1951

August 18, Saturday, 12 noon..............All grades for the summer session due in the Of-
fice of the Registrar.
August 18, Saturday, 8 p.m..............Summer Commencement Convocation.

REGULAR SESSION 1951-52
1951
August 18, Saturday..............................Last day for filing preliminary application for
first semester.
September 17, 18, Monday, Tuesday..Placement tests for entering students.
September 17-22, Monday-Saturday....Registration.
September 24, Monday ..................... Classes begin.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
FULLER W ARREN .......................................................................................................... Governor
R. A. GRAY...........--....................................................... ................................ Secretary of State
J. EDWIN LARSON .............................................................................................. State Treasurer
RICHARD ERVIN .......................................................................................... Attorney General
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Secretary........................State Superintendent of Public Instruction

BOARD OF CONTROL
FRANK M. HARRIS, LL.B., Chairman............................................................Attorney at Law
St. Petersburg, Florida
ELI FINK, LL.B.,............................................................................................ Attorney at Law
Jacksonville, Florida
N B. JORDAN........................... .....................................................................................Banker
Quincy, Florida
HOLLIS RINEHART, LL.B.,............................................................................. Attorney at Law
Miami, Florida
GEORGE L. WHITE, SR-- .....................................................................................................-----------------------Banker
Mount Dora, Florida
WILLIAM F. POWERS ........................Secretary of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida

ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILS
OF THE UNIVERSITY
1950-51

J. HILLIS MILLER, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D., L.H.D.............President of the University
JOHN STUART ALLEN, Ph.D.................................................Vice-President of the University
WILLIAM TOBIAS ARNETT, M.A. in Arch.
Dean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts
GEORGE FECHTIG BAUGHMAN, LL.B., M.A.---------------...............................................--------Business Manager
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A.............................................................................Dean of Men
ALVAH ALDEN BEECHER, M.M..............................-----------------------------...............................--Director of Music
MARNA VENABLE BRADY, Ed.D..................................--------------------------------...............................Dean of Women
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S.....................................................Dean of the University
HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON, M.S.A...---..............Director of the Agricultural Extension Service
HENRY ANDERSON FENN, LL.B.................................................Dean of the College of Law
WILLARD MERWIN FIFIELD, M.S.............Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D.............................................Dean of the College of Pharmacy
LEWIS FRANCIS HAINES, Ph.D..................................-----.----......-Director of the University Press
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P........................------------..............---------...............------........-----Registrar
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A.......--------------.............................--. ---Dean of the University College
JOHN FLETCHER MARTIN, LL.B., M.A...Director of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D.....................Dean of the College of Business
Administration
DONALD RAY MATTHEWS, M.A................................................. Director of Alumni Affairs
JOHN VREDENBURGH McQUITTY, Ph.D.................................................University Examiner
RALPH ALEXANDER MORGEN, Ph.D..-.......Director of the Engineering Experiment Station






CATALOG 1950-1951


HAROLD STEPHENSON NEWINS, M.F...........................Director of the School of Forestry
RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D..-------------...................-........Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
GARLAND WHEELER POWELL----------------------........................................Director of Radio Station WRUF
GEORGE SHELDON PRICE, B.S., Col. F.A.............Professor of Military Science and Tactics;
Coordinator of the Military Department
J. WAYNE REITZ, Ph.D .............Provost for Agriculture and Acting Dean of the College
of Agriculture
BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.A., B.S.A ........................-- Dean of the General Extension Division
NILE CLARETT SCHAFFER .............................Acting Director of the Florida State Museum
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D.--............------........................----------Dean of the Graduate School
DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.Ed...............Dean of the College of Physical Education,
Health and Athletics
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S....-------......... ........ ............Dean of the College of Engineering
RAE 0. WEIMER ......................................................----- Director of the School of Journalism
STANLEY LEROY WEST, LL.B., B.S. in L.S ............Director of the University Libraries
JOSEPH BENTON WHITE, Ph.D......................................... Dean of the College of Education
EDWARD DEMING WHITTLESEY, B.A......................................... --- Director of Public Relations
W. MAX WISE, Ed.D.................. ..... ...---- ....................... .. Dean of Student Personnel


OFFICERS OF
INSTRUCTION, RESEARCH AND ADMINISTRATION
1949-50

(The first date indicates the year of first employment, the second the year of present rank)
ABBOTT, OUIDA DAVIS, Ph.D. (Missouri), Home Economist and Head of Department,
Agricultural Experiment Station (1925-1925).
ADAMS, FRANK THOMPSON, Litt.M., Assistant Professor, General Extension Division
(1946-1947).
ALBERTSON, RACHEL, B.A., Editor, Engineering Experiment Station (1948-1948).
ALLEGER, DANIEL EUGENE, M.S., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1945-1947).
ALLEN, JOHN STUART, Ph.D. (New York), Vice-President of the University (1948-1948).
ALLISON, ROBERT VERRILL, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Vice Director in Charge, Everglades Ex-
periment Station (1926-1944).
AMES, BURTON WEBER, M.A.E., Director of Non-Academic Personnel (1923-1948).
ANDERSON, CARL ARTHUR, B.S., Instructor in Accounting (1947-1947).
ANDERSON, CYRUS EDWARD, M.A.E. Assistant Professor of Education (1949-1949).
ANDERSON, EDWARD ARTHUR, B.S. in E., Instructor in Art (1949-1949).
ANDERSON, JOHN DAVID, M.A., Instructor in Economics (1948-1948).
ANDERSON, MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND, Ph.D. (Brookings), Professor of Business Sta-
tistics and Economics (1927-1927).
ANDERSON, RICHARD JAMES, M.A., Assistant Professor of Vocational Guidance (1943-
1946).
ANDERSON, WILLIAM JENNINGS, B.S.E., Interim Instructor in Physical Sciences (1946-
1946).
ANDREWS, SAMUEL GENE, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
APPERSON, FRANCES EUGENIA, B.A. in L.S., Head of Serials, Library (1943-1948).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ARNETT, WILLIAM TOBIAS, M.A. in Arch., A.I.A., Dean of the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts; Professor of Architecture; Director, Bureau of Architectural and
Community Research (1933-1949).
ARNETTE, JAMES HILTON, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering (1948-1948).
ARNOLD, LILLIAN ELEANORE, M.S., Assistant Botanist, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1927-1936).
ARNOLD, P. T. Dix, M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry; Assistant Dairy
Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1931-1934).
ARRINGTON, LEWIS ROBERTS, M.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Dairy
Manufactures (1946-1946) (Resigned January 31, 1950).
ATCHLEY, MELL H., M.A., Assistant Professor of Sociology (1947-1947).
ATKIN, ERNEST GEORGE, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of French (1927-1927).
BACHMAN, HAROLD BURTON, B.S., Professor of Music; Director of Bands (1948-1949).
BAGLEY, RUSSELL ELMER, B.S. in L.S., Interim Instructor in Speech (1948-1948).
BAIER, JOHN FREDERICK, M.A., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1947-1949).
BAIR, ROY ALBERT, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Agronomist, Everglades Experiment Station
(1941-1946).
BAKER, FRANK SLOAN, B.S.A., Assistant Animal Husbandman, North Florida Experiment
Station (1945-1945).
BAMBERGER, FLORENCE EILAU, Ph.D. (Columbia), Visiting Professor of Education
(1949-1949).
BANISTER, JOHN ROBERT, M.S. in L.S., Assistant Professor, General Extension Division
(1947-1947).
BARINGER, WILLIAM ELDON, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor of Social Sciences (1947-1949).
BARNLUND, DEAN C., M.S., Instructor in Speech (1949-1949).
BAROFF, EUGENE, B.A., Interim Instructor in Social Sciences (1948-1948).
BARRETT, WILLIAM JORDAN, M.A., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1947-1947).
BARRINEAU, THOMAS LORREN, M.A.E., District Supervisor, Agricultural Education
(1946-1947).
BARRUS, EDITH YOUNG, B.A., District Home Demonstration Agent, Agricultural Ex-
tension Service, Tallahassee (1918-1943).
BARRY, DAVID EDWARD, M.S.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering (1949-1949).
BARTLETT, GEORGE ROBERT, Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor of Practical Logic (1947-1949).
BARTLEY, ERNEST, Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor of History and Political
Science (1949-1949).
BATTE, EDWARD Guy, D.V.M. (Texas A.&M.), Associate Professor of Veterinary Science;
Associate Parasitologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1949-1949).
BATTISTA, JULIUS BERNARD, B.A.E., Assistant Coach (1941-1946).
BAU, DANIEL TSUH-ENG, M. Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
BAUGHAN, DENVER EWING, Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor of English (1946-1946).
BAUGHMAN, GEORGE FECHTIG, M.A., Business Manager (1941-1948).
BAULT, ROGER QUINCY, M.A., Interim Instructor in Physical Sciences (1947-1948).
BEAL, JOHN WALTER, Shop Foreman, College of Engineering and Engineering and In-
dustrial Experiment Station (1943-1946).
BEALE, CLYDE KENYON, B.A.J., Associate Editor, Agricultural Experiment Station and
Agricultural Extension Service (1935-1946).
BEARD, PERCY MORRIS, M.S., Associate Professor of Professional Physical Education;
Business Manager of Athletics; Track Coach (1936-1949).
BEARDSLEY, DANIEL W., B.S., Interim Assistant Animal Husbandman, Everglades Ex-
periment Station (1949-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


BEATY, ROBERT COLDER, M.A., Dean of Men (1925-1948).
BECKENBACH, JOSEPH RILEY, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Horticulturist in Charge, Vegetable
Crops Laboratory (1937-1943).
BECKER, CHARLES HENRY, Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor of Pharmacy (1947-
1947).
BECKER, RAYMOND BROWN, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Dairy Husbandry; Dairy
Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1929-1935).
BECKWITH, STEPHEN LYON, M.F., Assistant Professor of Forestry (1948-1948).
BEECHER, ALVAH ALDEN, M.M., Director of Music (1948-1948).
BEEM, JEAN, B.S.A., Assistant Soil Surveyor, Mobile Unit, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1948-1948) (Resigned October 31, 1949).
BEISLER, WALTER HERMAN, D.Sc. (Princeton), Head Professor of Chemical Engineering
(1923-1939).
BELL, CHARLES EDWARD, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Associate Chemist, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station (1921-1932) (Deceased October 15, 1949).
BELL, EUDORIAN N., Maintenance Superintendent (1940-1946).
BELL, OTIS, M.A.E., District Supervisor, Agricultural Education (1947-1947) (On
leave, 1949-1950).
BENTLEY, GEORGE ROBERT, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Freshman Logic
(1938-1946).
BERGEN, TALLMADGE, B.S., Interim Assistant Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1949-1949).
BERGENGREN, ROY FREDERICK, M.A.E., Interim Instructor in Industrial Arts Education
(1949-1949).
BERNER, LEWIS, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Biological Science (1946-1946).
BERRY, CHARLES VARDAMAN, B.S.B.A., Assistant Purchasing Agent (1947-1948).
BEVIS, JOYCE, M.A., Clothing Specialist, Agricultural Extension Service, Tallahassee
(1940-1943).
BIGGERS, EDGAR W., B.S., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans Guidance Center
(1949-1949).
BIGGIN, BEVERLY BASSET, B.A., Architect, Office of the Consulting Architect (1949-
1949).
BIGHAM, TRUMAN CICERO, Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of Economics (1930-1931).
BISHOP, JOHN AUGUSTINE, M.S.Eng., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1947-
1949).
BLACK, ALVIN PERCY, Ph.D. (Iowa), Head Professor of Chemistry (1919-1949).
BLACK, JOHN HUNTER, M.S.E., Assistant Professor of Education (1947-1947).
BLACK, KENNETH LEROY, LL.B., Associate Professor of Law (1949-1949).
BLACKLOCK, RAYMOND WILLIAM, B.A., State Boys' Club Agent, Agricultural Extension
Service (1916-1920) (Retired August 31, 1949).
BLACKMON, GULIE HARGROVE, M.S.A., Horticulturist and Head of Department, Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (1923-1937).
BLAKE, ROBERT GEORGE, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1943-1949).
BLALOCK, JAMES CAREY, M.A., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1947-1947).
BLALOCK, LEWIS FLORENCE, M.A., Associate Registrar and Director of Admissions
(1930-1945).
BLANKNER, LEONARD FREDERICK, B.S., Field Representative, General Extension Division
(1948-1948) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
BLANTON, LAWTON WALKER, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1942-1946).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BLEDSOE, ROGER WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Iowa), Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1943-1947).
BLESS, ARTHUR AARON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Physics (1928-1936).
BLOCK, HERMAN H., B.S.C.E., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1949-1949).
BLOCK, SEYMOUR STANTON, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State), Assistant Research Engineer,
Engineering Experiment Station (1944-1946).
BLOOMFIELD, WILLIE KATE, B.S. in L.S., Reference Assistant, Library (1948-1948).
BODE, BOYD HENRY, Ph.D. (Cornell), Special Lecturer in Education (1948-1948).
BOLDT, ALBERT W., M.A., Assistant Dean of Men (1948-1948).
BOLICK, RALPH EUGENE, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1949-1949).
BOLLES, ROBERT STEPHEN, Ed.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Music (1948-
1949).
BONEY, KATHERINE McKoY, B.S., Assistant Chemist, Animal Industry, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1944-1944).
BOOMSLITER, GEORGE PAUL, M.S., Lecturer in Engineering Mechanics (1949-1949).
BOONE, LALIA PHIPPS, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
BORNMAN, CASPER SAMUEL, Instructor in Military Science and Tactics (1948-1949).
BORRELL, EDWARD HARLEY, B. Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
BORUM, OLIN H., Ph.D. (North Carolina), Interim Assistant Professor of Cancer Re-
search (1950-1950).
BOSWELL, JAMES HARLAN, M.A., Associate Professor of Professional Physical Education
and Recreation (1947-1947).
BOURKE, NORMAN, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1943-1948).
BOUTELLE, MARGARET WHITE, M.A., Teacher and Librarian, P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School (1934-1946).
BOWEN, FRANCIS JOHN, M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1947-1947).
BOWERS, JOHN COLANGELO, M.S., Assistant Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station (1948-
1948).
BOWERS, ROBERT HOOD, JR., Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor of English (1946-1946).
BOWMAN, HAZEL Lois, M.A., Instructor in Correspondence Study, General Extension
Division (1948-1948).
BOYER, WILLIAM W., M.A., Interim Instructor in Political Science (1950-1950).
BRACKEN, ANDREW JOSEPH, M.Ed., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-
1949).
BRADBURY, ROBERT W., Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor of Economics (1950-
1950).
BRADSHAW, JAMES PHILIP, M.A., Instructor in English (1946-1946) (On leave, first
semester, 1949-1950).
BRADY, MARNA VENABLE, Ed.D. (Columbia), Dean of Women (1948-1948).
BRAND, MICHAEL, M.A., Instructor in Economics (1948-1948).
BRANSFORD, THOMAS LEROY, B.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1948-
1948).
BRATLEY, HOMER EELLS, M.S.A., Assistant Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1932-1932).
BREGGER, THOMAS, Ph.D. (Cornell), Sugar Cane Physiologist, Everglades Experiment
Station (1935-1935).
BRISTOL, LORIS ROOD, M.A., Instructor in Education (1932-1948).
BRODKORB, PIERCE, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor of Biological Science (1946-
1946).
BROHM, HENRY DORE, Ph.B., Associate Professor of Marketing (1949-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


BROMILOW, FRANK, M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering (1948-1948).
BROOKE, DONALD LLOYD, M.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1946-1946).
BROOKER, MARVIN ADEL, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Agricultural Economics (1927-
1947).
BROOKS, ALBERT NELSON, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Plant Pathologist in Charge, Strawberry
Investigations Laboratory (1926-1941).
BROOKS, JOHN HAPGOOD, M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture (1948-1948).
BROOKS, MARY REESE LAND, M.A.E., Instructor in Visual Education, General Extension
Division (1947-1947).
BROWN, CARL FRASER, Ph.D. (Peabody), Associate Professor of Education (1949-1949).
BROWN, CHARLES KENNETH, B.S.E.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948) (Resigned January 31, 1949).
BROWN, EADWARD MURRILL, B.A., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans Guidance
Center (1950-1950).
BROWN, EUGENE, M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1950-1950).
BROWN, IRA DONNA, M.S.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station (1949-1949).
BROWN, RICHARD DEWITT, B.M., Professor of Instrumental Music (1920-1947).
BROWN, WOODROW WILSON, B.S.A., Assistant Boys' Club Agent, Agricultural Extension
Service (1943-1946).
BROWNE, ELEANOR BODE, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Interim Professor of Education (1948-
1948).
BROYLES, ARTHUR A., Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of Physics (1949-1949).
BROYLES, JOHN FRANKLIN, B.S.I.M., Assistant Football Coach (1950-1950).
BRUNET, JOSEPH, Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of French and Classical Languages (1927-
1944).
BRUSH, WARREN DAVID, Ph.D. (American), Instructor in Forestry (1948-1948).
BRYANT, FRED DAVID, B.A. in L.S., Cataloger, Library (1947-1947) (On leave, first
semester 1949-1950).
BRYNGELSON, BRYNG, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Visiting Professor of Speech (1950-1950).
BUCKHANNAN, MARGARET B., R.N., School Nurse, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
(1945-1945).
BUGG, STERLING LOWE, M.S.C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1948-1949).
BUNTING, DONALD CHARLES, B.A., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering; Assist-
ant Professor of Physical Sciences (1948-1949).
BURDGE, JOHN MILTON, B.S., Lt. Colonel, F.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1948-1948).
BURGER, OTHMAR JOSEPH, Ph.D. (Purdue), Assistant Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment
Station (1950-1950).
BURGIS, DONALD STAFFORD, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Vegetable Crops Labora-
tory, Agricultural Experiment Station (1946-1946).
BURNEY, HAROLD W., B.M.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1947-1948).
BURNSON, CHARLES MALCOLM, M.A.E., Instructor in Psychology (1947-1947) (Re-
signed August 31, 1949).
BUSBY, JOE N., B.S.A., Assistant Boys' 4-H Club Agent, Agricultural Extension Service
(1947-1949).
BUSHONG, CHARLES CECIL, B.S., Assistant Professor of Field Organization, General
Extension Division (1947-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BUSSELL, WILLIAM HARRISON, B.M.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station (1948-1948).
BUTLER, GEORGE BERGEN, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor of Chemistry
(1946-1947).
BYERS, CHARLES FRANCIS, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Biology and Chairman of
Biological Science (1927-1942).
CALAWAY, WILSON THAYER, B.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1946-1948).
CALDWELL, ROBERT EDWARD, M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Soils; Assistant Soils Sur-
veyor, Agricultural Experiment Station (1941-1948).
CALHOUN, EUNICE ZIPPERER, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1944-
1944).
CALLENDER, WILLIAM F., LL.B., Visiting Lecturer in Agricultural Statistics (1950-
1950).
CALOHAN, CARL E., M.S., Instructor in Economics (1949-1949).
CAMBEL, PERIHAN, M.D. (Istanbul), Associate Professor of Cancer Research (1949-
1949).
CAMERON, EDITH McBRIDE, B.J., Associate Professor and Head of Women's Activities,
General Extension Division (1927-1944).
CAMP, ARTHUR FORREST, Ph.D. (Washington), Vice Director in Charge, Citrus Ex-
periment Station (1923-1944).
CAMP, LOUIE THOMAS, B.A., Instructor in Education and Undergraduate Counselor
(1948-1948).
CANELL, DAPHNE S., M.A., Head Dietitian (1949-1949).
CAPRETZ, PIERRE J., M.A., Instructor in French (1949-1949).
CARLETON, WILLIAM GRAVES, J.D., Professor and Chairman of Social Sciences (1927-
1940).
CARR, ARCHIE FAIRLY, Ph.D. (Florida), Professor of Biological Science (1937-1949).
CARRIGAN, RICHARD ALFRED, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Soils and Biochemist, Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (1938-1948).
CARROLL, RALPH E., B.S., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering Experiment Station
(1940-1946).
CARROLL, WILLIAM RICHARD, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Bacteriology (1927-1941).
CARSON, ROBERT EMMETT, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Humanities (1946-1946).
CARTER, BONNIE J., B.S., Home Improvement Specialist, Agricultural Extension Service,
Tallahassee (1936-1948).
CARTER, LILLY ISABELLE, B.A.E., Order Librarian (1943-1944).
CARTER, SIDNEY, M.C.R.P., A.I.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1948-1949).
CARVER, WILLIAM ANGUS, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1925-1931).
CAUSEY, EVELYN LUMBLEY, M.A., Instructor in Education (1948-1948).
CHACE, JAMES EDWARD, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor of Real Estate (1930-1946).
CHANDLER, HARLEY WILLARD, M.S., Dean of the University (1923-1939).
CHAPMAN, WILLIS HARLESTON, M.S., Associate Agronomist, North Florida Experiment
Station (1942-1945).
CHENEY, MAX WILTON, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1947-1947).
CHERRY, HENRY SPURGEON, M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education and Head,
Department of Intramurals (1942-1946).
CHILDERS, GEORGE HENRY, B.S.M.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948).






CATALOG 1950-1951


CHOATE, RUSH EDGAR, B.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering; Assistant
Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural Experiment Station (1947-1947).
CHOTAS, NICHOLAS E., B.S. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1949-1949).
CLARK, FRED A., B.S., Assistant Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1940-
1940).
CLARK, VERNON WILMOT, LL.B., Professor of Law (1946-1946).
CLARK, WASHINGTON AUGUSTUS, M.A., Assistant Professor of English (1931-1937).
CLAYTON, HAROLD GRAY, M.S.A., Director, Agricultural Extension Service (1917-1947).
CLEMENZI, ROBERT LouIS, B.S.B.C., Instructor in Architecture (1948-1948).
CLEVELAND, MAX JEAN, B.S., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1949-1949).
CLINARD, ANNE BOEGHOLT, B.A., Assistant Director of Florida Union (1949-1949).
CLOVER, GEORGE WILLIAM, Head Cashier (1946-1948).
COBIN, MILTON, B.S., Associate Horticulturist, Subtropical Experiment Station (1947-
1947).
CODDING, JACK L., B.C.S., C.P.A. (Georgia), Instructor in Accounting (1950-1950).
CODY, MADISON DERRELL, M.A., Professor of Botany (1919-1939).
COLLINS, ERNEST CLIFFORD, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Organization and
Operation (1948-1948).
COMINS, HARRISON DURIGEN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1946-
1946).
CONGLETON, JAMES EDMUND, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of English (1937-
1946).
CONKLING, RANDALL MURRAY, M.S., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1949-1949).
CONNER, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of English (1935-1948).
CONOVER, ROBERT ARMINE, Ph.D. (Illinois), Plant Pathologist, Subtropical Experiment
Station (1947-1948).
CONSTANS, HENRY PHILIP, M.A., Head Professor of Speech (1929-1937).
COOPER, BRYANT SYMS, Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), Professor of Humanities (1946-1946).
COOPER, JOHN FRANCIS, M.S.A., Editor, Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricul-
tural Extension Service (1925-1925).
COPE, OTIS MERRIAM, M.D. (Michigan), Interim Professor of Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology (1948-1948) (Deceased January 28, 1950).
COVINGTON, HARRISON WALL, B.F.A., Instructor in Art (1949-1949).
COWAN, RUSSELL WALTER, Ph.D. (California), Associate Professor of Mathematics
(1947-1947).
Cox, DONALD WILLIAM, Ed.D. (Columbia), Instructor in Education (1948-1948).
Cox, ERNEST HAYNES, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of Practical Logic (1947-
1947).
CRABTREE, FREDERICK HOWARD, B.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering (1948-
1948).
CRAFT, CHESTER LEE, B.S. in L.S., Instructor in Architecture (1948-1948) (Resigned
August 31, 1949).
CRAGO, ALFRED, Ph.D. (Iowa), Head, Veterans' Guidance Center (1929-1945).
CRAPS, JOHN ELLIS, M.A., Instructor in German (1939-1946).
CRAWFORD, CHARLES MERLE, M.S., Instructor in Marketing (1949-1949).
CRAWFORD, WAYNE HULBERT, Ed.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Professional
Physical Education (1949-1949).
CREIGHTON, JOHN THOMAS, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Head Professor of Entomology (1929-
1937).
CRESAP, IDA KEELING, Librarian, Agricultural Experiment Station (1923-1923).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CREVASSE, JOSEPH M., M.S.A., Superintendent of Grounds (1947-1947).
CREWS, JAMES WILLIAM, M.A.E., Instructor in Business Education (1948-1948).
CROM, THEODORE R., B.S., Assistant Superintendent of Construction (1947-1947) (Re-
signed December 31, 1949).
CROMARTIE, JOEL BLAKE, B.S.A., Assistant Soil Surveyor, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1945-1947) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
CROSS, CLARK IRVIN, M.S.F., Instructor in Geography and Physical Sciences (1949-
1949).
CROWSON, HERBERT, B.S., Interim Instructor in Physical Sciences (1946-1946).
CRUTCHER, GEORGE LEE, M.A.E., Associate Professor and Interim Head of Visual In-
struction, General Extension Division (1946-1946).
CRuz, ORLANDO EARL, B.S.A., Assistant Soil Surveyor, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1949-1949).
CUMBEE, CAROLL FLEMING, M.A.E., Associate Professor of Education (1936-1946).
CUMMINGS, ROBERT JAY, B.I.E., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering (1947-
1948).
CUNHA, TONY JOSEPH, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry;
Associate Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1948-1948).
CUNKLE, ARTHUR LEE, Ph.D. (Virginia), Assistant Professor of Economics (1948-1948).
CUTLER, RONALD JOHN, M.A., Assistant Professor of English (1946-1949).
CYZYCKI, VICTOR WALTER, B.S.A., Assistant Soil Surveyor, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1947-1947).
DALE, LEON ANDREW, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor of Labor Economics
(1949-1949).
DANBURG, RUSSELL LAVERNE, M.M., Associate Professor of Piano (1948-1949).
D'ANGIO, CLAUDE JAMES, B.A., Assistant Chemist, Everglades Experiment Station
(1949-1949).
DASHIELL, JOHN FREDERICK, Ph.D. (Columbia), Visiting Professor of Psychology
(1950-1950).
DAUER, MANNING JULIAN, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor of History and Political Science
(1933-1946).
DAVAULT, JAMES W., Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Accounting (1947-1947).
DAVIDSON, ROBERT FRANKLIN, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor and Chairman of Humanities
(1946-1946).
DAVIS, GEORGE KELSO, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Animal Nutrition; Animal Nu-
tritionist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1942-1942).
DAVIS, JOHN HENRY, Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor of Botany (1946-1946) (On leave,
second semester, 1949-1950).
DAVIS, ROBERT P., B.A., Interim Instructor in Social Sciences (1950-1950).
DAWKINS, MATHER EMORY, B.C.E., Superintendent-Chemist, Sewage Disposal Plant
(1948-1948).
DAY, JAMES WESTBAY, J.D., Professor of Law (1921-1930).
DAY, RICHARD L., M.A., Instructor in Geography (1950-1950).
DEAN, GEORGE WARREN, C.E., Lecturer in Civil Engineering (1948-1948).
DEBRUYN, JOHN WILLIAM, M.A., Assistant Professor of Voice (1926-1926).
DECKER, PHARES, Ph.D. (Cornell), Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1942-1948).
DEINZER, HARVEY T., Ph.D. (Michigan), C.P.A. (Michigan), Professor of Accounting
(1947-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


DELLASTATIOUS, JOSEPH WILLIAM, M.S.Ed., Instructor in Required Physical Education
and Golf Coach (1948-1948).
DELONY, DEXTER, LL.M., Associate Professor of Law (1948-1948).
DENNIS, ROBERT SOLOMON, B.S.A., Executive Officer, Production and Marketing Ad-
ministration, Agricultural Extension Service (1927-1947).
DENNISON, RAYMOND ALEXANDER, Ph.D. (Iowa), Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1945-1945).
DENT, JOHN ADLUM, M.E., Interim Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
(1946-1946).
DESKINS, ANDREW J., B.S., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance Center
(1950-1950).
DIAz, GEORGE FRANCIS, B.M.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial Ex-
periment Station (1949-1949) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
DICKEY, DALLAS CLAUDE, Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Associate Professor of Speech
(1946-1946).
DICKEY, RALPH DAVIS, B.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1927-1933).
DICKINSON, JOSHUA CLIFTON, M.S., Instructor in Biology (1946-1947).
DICKISON, RAYMOND ROBINSON, M.S., Assistant Director of Libraries; Associate Pro-
fessor of Library Science (1947-1949).
DIERLAM, ROBERT JACKSON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor of Speech (1948-
1948).
DIETTRICH, SIOISMOND DERUEDESHEIM, Ph.D. (Clark), Head Professor of Geography
(1931-1945).
DIETZ, JOHN WAMSER, M.A., Professor of Finance (1940-1946).
DIXON, JAMES CANNON, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of Psychology
(1949-1949).
DOHERTY, HERBERT J., M.A., Interim Instructor in Social Sciences (1949-1949).
DOLBEARE, HARWOOD BURROWS, B.A., Professor of Economics (1927-1942).
DONOVAN, CLEMENT HAROLD, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of Public Finance
(1940-1948).
DOSTAL, BERNARD FRANCIS, M.A., Associate Professor of Mathematics (1927-1949).
DOTY, FRANKLIN AHASUERUS, Ph.D. (Iowa), Assistant Professor of Social Sciences
(1946-1946).
DOVELL, JUNIUS ELMORE, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor of History and
Political Science and Social Sciences (1946-1947).
Dow, ANDREW N., M.A., Interim Instructor in Psychology (1949-1949).
DOWD, DAVID LLOYD, Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor of History and Political
Science (1949-1949).
DRAKE, CHESTER WARREN, B.S.E.E., Lecturer in Electrical Engineering (1948-1948).
DRIGGERS, CORLIS JEFFERSON, M.A., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance
Center (1949-1949).
DRIGGERS, JAMES CLYDE, Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry;
Associate Poultry Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1939-1949).
DUCHARME, ERNEST P., M.S., Plant Pathologist, Citrus Experiment Station (1946-
1946) (On leave, 1949-50).
DUCKWORTH, FRANK A., LL.B., Instructor in Pharmacy (1948-1948).
DUER, MARGARET DICKINSON, B.S. in L.S., Head of Circulation, Library (1941-1945).
DUNCAN, EDWIN CHEEK, B.S., Captain, Infantry, Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1948-1948) (Resigned August 31, 1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DUNCAN, JAMES MOYER, M.S. in Ch.E., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
(1948-1948).
DUNKLE, JOHN R., B.A.E., Instructor in Physical Sciences (1949-1949).
DUNN, CHARLOTTE DELIA, M.A., Instructor in Education (1934-1948) (On leave,
1949-1950).
DUNSON, WILLIAM MARTIN, Superintendent, Conservation Reserve (1939-1939).
DUPREE, STERLING AGNEW, B.S.Ed., Assistant Coach (1948-1948) (Resigned February
1, 1950).
DURRANCE, CHARLES LIVINGSTON, Ed.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Educa-
tion (1940-1948).
DURRANCE, JOHN R., M.A., Interim Instructor in Psychology (1949-1949).
DUSENBURY, DELWIN BENNETT, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor of Speech
(1947-1947).
DZUBAS, FRIEDBALD, Instructor in Art (1949-1949) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
EATON, WILLIAM BROWNLOW, M.Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1948-1948).
EBAUGH, NEWTON CROMWELL, M.S., Head Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1935-
1935).
EDDINS, AUTHUR HAMNER, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Plant Pathologist in Charge of Potato
Laboratory (1928-1937).
EDMONDSON, CORNELIA, M.S., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1948-1948).
EDSON, CHARLES GRANT, B.S., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics (1946-
1946).
EDWARDS, EARL WILLIAM, B.S., Lt. Col., Infantry, Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1946-1946) (Resigned July 31, 1949).
EDWARDS, NAOMI LOUISE, B.S. in L.S., Head of Reference, Library; Assistant Professor
of Library Science (1943-1949).
EDWARDS, RICHARD ARCHER, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Interim Head Professor of
Geology (1940-1948).
EGGERT, CHESTER LEE, M.A., Principal, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-1948).
EHRMANN, WINSTON WALLACE, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of Sociology and Physical
Sciences (1938-1946).
EIBNER, JOHN R., B.S., Assistant Football Coach (1950-1950).
EIKEL, FRED, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
ELDRIDGE, JOHN GRADY, M.A., Professor of Economics (1925-1935).
ELLIOTT, LEONARD PAUL, Ph.D. (Kansas), Associate Professor of Physical Sciences
(1948-1948).
ELVIN, EVERT J., B.S., Interim Assistant Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1950-1950).
EMERSON, DAVID LEE, M.S., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1944-1944).
EMERSON, ROBERT L., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Bacteriology (1948-
1948).
EMIG, ELMER JACOB, M.A., Professor of Journalism (1927-1949).
EMMEL, MARK WIRTH, D.V.M. (Iowa), Professor of Veterinary Science; Veterinarian,
Agricultural Experiment Station (1933-1949).
EMORY, CHARLES WILLIAM, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Marketing (1948-1949).
EPPS, CHARLES KLEIN, B.S., Major, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics
(1949-1949).
ERWIN, THOMAS CHURCH, Assistant Chemist, Everglades Experiment Station (1943-
1945).






CATALOG 1950-1951


ESHLEMAN, SILAS KENDRICK, M.E., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering (1922-
1943).
EUBANK, WAYNE C., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Associate Professor of Speech (1946-
1946) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
EUTSLER, ROLAND BYERLY, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Associate Dean of the College of
Business Administration; Professor of Economics (1935-1949).
FAGEN, WILLIAM FREDERICK, M.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1947-
1949).
FAIN, JOHN TYREE, Ph.D. (Vanderbilt), Associate Professor of English (1947-1947).
FAIRING, ROBERT LEWIS, Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), Associate Professor and Interim Head,
Department of Citizenship, General Extension Division (1947-1949).
FAVILLE, Louis W., Ph.D. (Michigan State), Assistant Chemist, Citrus Experiment
Station (1948-1948).
FAWCETT, MARY SOLTE, B.A.E., Teacher-Dietitian, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
Cafeteria (1937-1937) (On leave, first semester, 1949-1950).
FEARNEY, EDWARD MAURICE, B. Arch., A.I.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1946-
1948).
FENN, HENRY ANDERSON, LL.B., Dean of the College of Law; Professor of Law (1948-
1948).
FERNANDEZ, PEDRO VILLA, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish (1947-1947).
FIFIELD, WILLARD MERWIN, M.S., Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
(1932-1950).
FINNERAN, THOMAS CHARLES, Captain, Assistant Professor of Military Science and
Tactics (1949-1949).
FIREBAUGH, JOSEPH JESSE, M.A., Assistant Professor of Humanities (1947-1947) (Re-
signed August 15, 1949).
FIRMAGE, DAVID ALLEN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1947-1947).
FISHER, FRANCINE, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist, Citrus Experiment Station (1946-
1946).
FLAGG, NORMAN BYRON, B.S. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1946-1946).
FLANIGAN, FRANK MCCHESNEY, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1947-
1947).
FLOWERS, JOHN WILSON, Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor of Physics (1947-1947).
FOGLE, STEPHEN FRANCIS, Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor of English (1946-1946).
FOGLEMAN, WILLIAM HARRY, B.A., Assistant Professor of Required Physical Education
and Tennis Coach (1948-1949).
FOLKS, SOLOMON JOHN, B.S.A., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry; Assistant
Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1946-1946).
FOOTE, PERRY ALBERT, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Dean of the College of Pharmacy; Pro-
fessor of Pharmacy; Director, Bureau of Professional Relations (1928-1949).
FORBES, RICHARD B., M.S.A., Interim Assistant Professor of Soils (1948-1949).
FORD, E. S., Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor of Botany (1947-1949).
FORD, HARRY W., Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Sta-
tion (1950-1950).
FORSEE, WILLIAM THOMAS, Ph.D. (Florida), Chemist, Everglades Experiment Station
(1937-1946).
FOSTER, CHARLES R., Ed.D. (Harvard), Professor of Education (1947-1947).
FOSTER, FREDERICK DOUGLAS, B.A.H.Pl., Superintendent of Infirmary (1946-1948).
FOSTER, WILLIAM FLOYD, Lt. Colonel, Air Forces, Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1948-1948).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FOUTS, EVERETT LINCOLN, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Head Professor of Dairy Husbandry
and Dairy Manufactures; Head, Department of Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Man-
ufactures, Agricultural Experiment Station (1940-1949).
FOWLER, TALBERT B., LL.B., Assistant Law Librarian (1949-1949).
Fox, GEORGE GILLESPIE, Ph.D. (Princeton), Head Professor of Philosophy (1939-1946).
Fox, LAURETTA EWING, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor of Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology (1949-1949).
FRASH, EDWIN STANTON, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1934-
1941).
FRAZER, PERCY WARNER, M.F., Associate Professor of Forestry (1936-1949).
FRENCH, A. LEE, M. Ag., Instructor in Agricultural Economics (1948-1948).
FRENCH, ROWLAND BARNES, Ph.D. (Iowa), Biochemist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1935-1943).
FRIEDMANN, WALTER J., M.S.A., Interim Assistant Biochemist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1949-1949).
FROSCHER, JEAN LONGDON, M.A., Cataloger, Library (1948-1948) (Resigned November
15, 1949).
FULLAGER, WILLIAM ALFRED, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education (1948-1948).
FULLER, DAVID DOWD, B.S., Assistant Coach (1946-1946).
FUNK, ARTHUR LAYTON, Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor of Social Sciences (1946-
1946).
GADDUM, LEONARD WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Missouri), Professor and Chairman of Physical
Sciences (1926-1939).
GAGER, WILLIAM ATKINS, Ph.D., (Peabody), Professor of Mathematics (1942-1949).
GAITANIS, Louis ANDREW, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Business Organization and
Operation (1946-1946).
GALLAGHER, FRANK JOSEPH, Captain, A.F., Assistant Professor of Air Science and Tac-
tics (1948-1948).
GALLATIN, MELVIN HERMAN, B.S.A., Cooperative Soil Conservationist, Subtropical Ex-
periment Station (1947-1947).
GALLENTINE, DONAL OGDEN, B.M.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1946-1946).
GAMMON, NATHAN, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Soils Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1946-1946).
GARDNER, HENRY ROBERT, B.A.A., Instructor in Art (1949-1949).
GARRIS, EDWARD WALTER, Ph.D. (Peabody), D.Sc. (Clemson), Professor of Education
and Head, Agricultural Education (1927-1927).
GEHAN, FREDERICK EDWARD, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of English (1946-1946).
GEHRKE, WILLIS TIMOTHY, M.S., Assistant Professor of Geography (1948-1948) (Re-
signed August 31, 1949).
GELTZ, CHARLES GOTTLIEB, M.S.F., Professor of Forestry (1946-1946).
GEMMER, EUGENE W., M.F., Interim Assistant Professor of Forestry, State Ranger
School (1949-1949).
GENOVAR, FRANK DENNIS, Swimming Coach and Instructor in Required Physical Edu-
cation (1929-1946).
GENUNG, WILLIAM GORDON, B.S.A., Assistant Entomologist, Everglades Experiment Sta-
tion (1949-1949).
GEORGE, BETTY MAE, M.A.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1948-1949).
GILBERT, SEYMOUR GEORGE, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1947-
1947).






CATALOG 1950-1951


GILL, DON, Head Trainer, Intercollegiate Athletics (1949-1949).
GILLESPIE, JOE GILL, B.S., Lt. Col., Air Forces, Professor of Air Science and Tactics
(1946-1946).
GLASSCOCK, RAYMOND SYLVESTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor of Animal Husbandry;
Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1942-1944).
GLEASON, JOHN EMORY, B.E.E., Interim Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1948-
1948).
GLUNT, JAMES DAVID, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of History (1923-1938).
GOEN, OLIVER FORREST, D.V.M. (Texas A.&M.), Animal Husbandman, Agricultural
Extension Service (1949-1950).
GOETHE, SAM PAUL, M.E., Director of Plant and Grounds; Campus Engineer (1942-
1949).
GOETTE, WILLIAM Louis, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1934-
1936).
GOGGIN, JOHN M., Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology
(1948-1948).
GOIN, COLEMAN JETT, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Biological Science (1942-
1948).
GOLTZ, WALTER A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Music (1949-1949).
GOOD, MERRILL ROY, M.S., Professor of Industrial Engineering (1948-1948).
GOODWIN, FRANK, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of Marketing (1947-1949).
GORMSEN, SVEND THEODORE, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics (1947-1947).
GOYDER, CECIL WILLIAM, B.S., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
GRAEFFE, ARNOLD DIDIER, Ph.D. (Berlin), Associate Professor of Humanities (1948-
1948).
GRAMLING, LEA GENE, Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemis-
try (1946-1949).
GRAND, JOHN LouIS RocHON, M.A., A.I.A., Head Professor of Architecture (1937-
1948).
GRANGER, JOHN ANDREW, B.S.A., Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station (1945-
1947) (Resigned December 31, 1949).
GRANTHAM, GEORGE RICHARD, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1947-
1947).
GRATZ, LEVI OTTO, Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Director, Research, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station (1923-1943).
GRAY, LEON ARCHIBALD, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Education (1941-1948).
GREAVES-WALKER, ARTHUR FREDERICK, D.Sc. (Alfred), Lecturer in Ceramic En-
gineering, Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station (1946-1946).
GREEN, ELEANOR KUHLMAN, M.A.E., Instructor in Education (1938-1948).
GREEN, ROY NATHANIEL, B.S., Instructor in Art (1950-1950).
GREEN, WARREN EMMETT, M.A., Instructor in English (1946-1946).
GREENE, ROBERT EDWARD LEE, Ph.D. (Cornell), Agricultural Economist, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
GREENMAN, JOHN ROOSEVELT, B.S.A., Professor of Agricultural Economics (1939-1945).
GRENNELL, MYRON GAYLORD, B.S.A., Assistant Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1948-1948).
GRIFFIN, ROBERT CUSHMAN, B.S.J., Field Representative, General Extension Division
(1949-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GRIFFITHS, JAMES THOMPSON, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Associate Entomologist, Citrus
Experiment Station (1946-1946).
GRIOSBY, MAC G., B.A., Assistant Director of Non-Academic Personnel (1948-1949).
GROBMAN, ARNOLD BRAMS, Ph.D. (Rochester), Assistant Professor of Biology (1946-
1946).
GROPP, ARMIN HENRY, Ph.D. (Oregon), Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1947-1948).
GROSS, HERBERT MICHAEL, B.S., Interim Instructor in Pharmacy (1949-1949).
GROTH, JOHN HENRY, Ph.D. (Washington), Professor of Humanities (1946-1946).
GUILD, CHARLES JAMES, Ph.D. (Boston), Assistant Professor of Real Estate (1947-
1947) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
GUISTWHITE, JACK COLE, B.S.B.A., Tabulating Supervisor, Office of the Registrar
(1947-1947).
GUITERAS, GEORGE G., M.D. (Pennsylvania), University Physician (1949-1949).
HAAR, FRANKLIN BLAINE, Ph.D. (Pittsburgh), Associate Professor of Professional Physi-
cal Education (1946-1947) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
HADLOCK, EDWIN HAROLD, Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor of Mathematics (1948-
1948).
HAGERMAN, ROBERT SCOTT, M.S. Eng., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station (1948-1948).
HAINES, LEWIS FRANCIS, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Freshman Logic; Editor of
the University of Florida Press (1941-1946).
HALE, LESTER LEONARD, Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Professor of Speech (1935-1949)
(On leave, second semester, 1949-50).
HALL, CHESLEY BARKER, Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1950-1950).
HALLADAY, DANIEL WHITNEY, M.A., Assistant Professor of Professional Physical Educa-
tion (1947-1948).
HALSEY, LAWRENCE HENRY, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1948-1948).
HAMBLEN, CHARLES HILLEN, M.A.E., Instructor in Education (1947-1947).
HAMILTON, HENRY GLENN, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Agricultural Economics;
Marketing Economist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1921-1949).
HAMILTON, JEFFERSON MERRITT, B.S. Arch., A.I.A., Consulting Architect (1947-1948).
HAMMOND, EUGENE ASHBY, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of Social
Sciences (1942-1946).
HAMMOND, HANS, M.A., Assistant Professor of Social Sciences (1940-1946) (Resigned
October 1, 1949).
HAMMOND, JOYCE, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1949-1949).
HAMMOND, LUTHER C., Ph.D. (Iowa State). Assistant Professor of Soils (1950-1950).
HAMPSON, CHARLES MARLOWE, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Extension;
Economist, Agricultural Extension Service (1937-1946).
HAND, WILL MASON, M.S., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance Center
(1950-1950).
HANNA, LOYD G., LL.B., Captain, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics
(1949-1949).
HANNA, PAUL LAMONT, Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of Social Sciences (1939-1946).
HANSON, BERNARD ALLEN, M.A., Instructor in Humanities (1947-1947).
HANSON, HAROLD PALMER, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor of Physics (1948-
1949).
HANSON, WARREN DURWARD, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agronomy (1949-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


HARDY, FREDERICK KNOWLTON, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Marketing
(1948-1948).
HARKNESS, Roy WENDELL, Ph.D. (California), Assistant Chemist, Subtropical Experi-
ment Station (1945-1945).
HARLAN, WILLIAM EDWARDS, M.A.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-
1949).
HARLOW, JUSTIN EDWARDS, M.A., Assistant Professor of Psychology (1948-1948).
HARMAN, WILLIS W., Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
(1949-1949).
HARRELL, LEE WYLEY, B.S.P., Associate Director, Bureau of Professional Relations,
College of Pharmacy (1947-1947) (Resigned September 15, 1949).
HARRIS, HENRY CLAYTON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Agronomy; Agronomist, Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (1943-1947) (On leave, second semester, 1949-1950).
HARRIS, KENNETH A., B.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Engineer, Everglades Experiment
Station (1950-1950).
HARRISON, JOHN A., Ph.D. (California), Instructor in History and Political Science
(1949-1949).
HART, FREEMAN HANSFORD, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Humanities (1946-1946).
HART, THOMAS ALONZO EDWARD, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor of Humanities
(1946-1946).
HARTMANN, FREDERICK H., Ph.D. (Princeton), Assistant Professor of History and Political
Science (1948-1948).
HARVIN, RICHARD LAWSON, M.Ch.E., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
(1947-1947).
HAUPT, CHARLES S., B.S.P., Associate Director, Bureau of Professional Relations, Col-
lege of Pharmacy (1950-1950).
HAUSER, FRANCIS I., M.P.A., Associate Professor of Real Estate (1949-1949).
HAWK, MIRIAM ELAH, B.A. in L.S., Periodicals Assistant, Library (1949-1949).
HAWKINS, HAROLD MILLS, M.S.Ch.E., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
(1946-1946).
HAWKINS, JOHN ERSKINE, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of Chemistry, Director of
Naval Stores Research (1935-1944).
HAYES, FRANCIS CLEMENT, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of Spanish
(1946-1946).
HAYNIE, JOHN DALE, B.S.A., Apiculturist, Agricultural Extension Service (1947-1947).
HAYSLIP, NORMAN CALVIN, B.S.A., Associate Entomologist, Everglades Experiment Sta-
tion (1943-1947).
HEATH, FRED HARVEY, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of Chemistry (1923-1925).
HECK, ROBERT WARREN, B.A., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
HELD, RAY ELDRED, M.A., Instructor in Library Science (1948-1949).
HELMS, CLYDE C., B.S.A., Assistant Agronomist, Watermelon Laboratory (1950-1950).
HENDERSON, JOHN STEALE, Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Assistant Professor of Economics
(1946-1946) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
HENDERSON, JOSEPH RUSSELL, M.S.A., Agronomist, Agricultural Extension Service;
Soil Technologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937-1947).
HENDERSON, LEON NESBITT, Ed.D. (Columbia), Professor of Education (1940-1945).
HENDRICKSON, RUDOLPH, B.S., Assistant Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station (1947-
1947).
HERBERT, THOMAS WALTER, Ph.D. (Princeton), Associate Professor of English (1946-
1946).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HERNDON, ROBERT STUMON, M.Ed., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1947-
1948).
HERNDON, THOMAS GLENN, M.S.F., Instructor in Forestry (1949-1949).
HESKIN, OSCAR EDWARD, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Head Professor of Economics (1938-
1949).
HESTER, JANICE PARHAM, B.S. in L.S., Cataloger, Library (1927-1947).
HETRICK, LAWRENCE ANDREW, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology (1947-1947).
HICKS, DORA ADELINE, M.A., Associate Professor of Health Education (1948-1948).
HIGLEY, HOWARD COGSWELL, B.S.C.E., Major, Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1949-1949).
HILL, CLIFTON CARR, M.S., Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics (1947-1947).
HILLS, WALTER ALLEN, M.S., Associate Horticulturist, Everglades Experiment Station
(1949-1949).
HINCKLEY, ELMER DUMOND, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor of Psychology; Director
of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene (1927-1937).
HINES, VYNCE A., Ed.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor of Education (1947-1950).
HIxsON, IMOGENE, B.S. in L.S., Cataloger, Library (1949-1949).
HODGES, ELVER MYRON, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Associate Agronomist, Range Cattle Experi-
ment Station (1941-1941).
HODGES, HENRY G., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Lecturer in Industrial Management (1949-
1949).
HOFF, ROBERT STEPHEN, B.S.E.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and In-
dustrial Experiment Station (1946-1946).
HOFFMAN, PAUL CHARLES, M.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
(1948-1948).
HOGAN, WILLIAM DUDLEY, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist, Everglades Experiment
Station (1949-1949).
HOLBROOK, HOLLIS HOWARD, B.F.A., Head Professor of Art (1938-1948).
HOLLOWAY, ETHEL CLIO, B.S., District Home Demonstration Agent, Agricultural Ex-
tension Service, Tallahassee (1926-1937).
HOOSER, HOBART, M.A., Assistant Coach (1950-1950).
HORNE, EDWARD PORTER, Ph.D. (Iowa), Associate Professor of Psychology (1949-1949).
HORSFALL, ALEXANDER BATES, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Business Organization and
Operation (1948-1948).
HORTON, SAMMIE RUSHING, M.S., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-
1949).
HOWARD, EVERETT EDMUNDS, M.D. (Louisville), University Physician (1949-1949).
HUGHES, CHARLES ROY, M.A., Associate Professor and Head of Department of Cor-
respondence Study, General Extension Division (1933-1947).
HUGHETT, RALPH HAROLD, B.S., Major, Inf., Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1946-1946) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
HULL, FRED HAROLD, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Agronomist and Head of Department, Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (1927-1948).
HUNTER, WILLIAM ARMSTRONG, S.J.D., Professor of Law (1949-1949).
HURFF, GEORGE BRYAN, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Director, Bureau of Economic and
Business Research (1948-1949).
HURST, HUBER CHRISTIAN, LL.B., Professor of Business Law (1927-1946).
HUSA, WILLIAM JOHN, Ph.D. (Iowa), Head Professor of Pharmacy (1923-1923).
HUSTAD, MYRNA STENGEL, B.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1945-1945).






CATALOG 1950-1951


HUTCHERSON, WILLIAM ROBERT, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Mathematics (1949-
1949).
HUTSON, ALBERT DONALD, B.S.E.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station (1946-1946).
HUTTON, CURTIS EVAN, Ph.D. (Iowa), Agronomist and Head, West Florida Experiment
Station (1949-1949).
INGLE, KELSEY HUDLESON, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1945-
1945).
INGWALSON, RAYMOND WESLEY, B.A., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1949-1949).
JACKSON, ELMO Louis, Ph.D. (Harvard), Associate Professor of Economics (1946-
1946) (On leave, second semester 1949-1950).
JACKSON, VESTUS TWIoos, Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor of Chemistry (1924-1935).
JACKSON, WILLIAM, B.S.A., Animal Husbandman in Charge, West Central Florida Ex-
periment Station (1948-1948).
JACUNSKI, EDWARD WALTER, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1947-
1947).
JAMISON, FRANK STOVER, Ph.D. (Cornell), Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment
Station; Vegetable Crops Specialist, Agricultural Extension Service (1934-1948).
JANES, BYRON EVERETT, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1942-1943) (Resigned July 11, 1949).
JENKINS, HENRY HARRISON, B.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
JENNINGS, ROY TURNEY, M.S.C.E., Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics (1947-
1947).
JETER, MAx ALBERT, M.S., Interim Assistant Professor of Animal Industry (1949-1949)
(Resigned January 31, 1950).
JOHNS, ROE LYELL, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Education; Head of Department
of Administration and Field Service (1946-1946).
JOHNSON, CARL HENRY, Ph.D. (Washington), Associate Professor of Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology; Supervisor of Medicinal Plant Gardens (1939-1949).
JOHNSON, JAMES GUYTON, Ph.D. (California), Interim Professor of Economics (1948-
1948).
JOHNSON, JOHN MALCOLM, B.S.A., Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural Experiment
Station and Agricultural Extension Service (1945-1945).
JOHNSON, JOSEPH STUART, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Assistant Dean of the College of
Engineering; Professor of Electrical Engineering (1946-1947).
JOHNSON, McMILLAN HOUSTON, B.S.Arch., Associate Professor of Architecture (1946-
1948).
JOHNSON, RAYMOND CLARENCE, M.S.Eng., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering
and Industrial Experiment Station (1946-1946).
JOHNSON, RICHARD SADLER, B.S.P., Registrar (1933-1939).
JOHNSON, WARREN OSWALD, B.A., Meteorologist in Charge, Weather Forecasting Ser-
vice, Agricultural Experiment Station (1935-1946).
JOHNSON, WILLIAM EDWARD, B.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1943-1946).
JOHNSTON, HOWARD JAMES, B.S., Instructor in Real Estate (1949-1949).
JONES, DAVID WILSON, B.S.A., Assistant Soils Technologist, Range Cattle Experiment
Station (1946-1947) (On leave, second semester 1949-1950).
JONES, EDMUND RUFFIN, Ph.D. (Virginia), Professor of Biology (1946-1947).
JONES, JOHN PAUL, M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism (1948-1948).
JONES, OSCAR FREDERICK, Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of German (1937-1945).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


JONES, WAYLAND, Captain, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics (1949-
1949).
JONES, WILLIAM ELLIS, B.S.B.A., Assistant Business Manager (1948-1948).
JoY, FRED LEIPOLD, B.S.F., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1947-1947) (Resigned July 16, 1949).
KAHN, SANDERS ARTHUR, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Real Estate (1949-1949).
KARP, J. ROBERT, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics (1949-1949).
KATTERHENRY, ARNOLD ALLEN, B.C.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1948-
1948).
KELBERT, DAVID GUSTAF ALFRED, Associate Horticulturist, Vegetable Crops Laboratory
(1923-1946).
KELLEY, FORREST MANLEY, B.S.Arch., A.I.A., Associate Professor of Architecture (1946-
1948).
KELLY, CHARLES JACKSON, B.S., Captain, Assistant Professor of Air Science and Tac-
tics (1949-1949).
KELLY, EARL M., B.S.A., Assistant Animal Husbandman, Range Cattle Experiment
Station (1949-1949).
KELSHEIMER, EUGENE GILLESPIE, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Entomologist, Vegetable Crops
Laboratory (1942-1942).
KENDALL, GLADYS HARBAUGH, B.A., Specialist, Home Industries and Marketing, Agri-
cultural Extension Service (1937-1949).
KENNEDY, E. DONALD, M.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1947-1949).
KENNEDY, JOHN WESLEY, M.A., Assistant Professor of Labor (1949-1949).
KENNEDY, WILLIAM MICHAEL, Captain, F.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1946-1946).
KEOWN, MARY ELLEN, M.S., State Home Demonstration Agent, Agricultural Extension
Service, Tallahassee (1916-1936).
KESSLER, WILLIAM J., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station (1943-1945).
KESTERSON, JAMES WALTER, M.S., Associate Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1947-1947).
KIDD, KENNETH PAUL, Ph.D. (Peabody), Associate Professor of Education (1938-1949).
KIDDER, RALPH WYMAN, M.S., Associate Animal Husbandman, Everglades Experiment
Station (1932-1945).
KIKER, JOHN EWING, M.C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering (1947-1949).
KILBY, JOHN DAVIS, M.S., Instructor in Biology (1947-1947).
KILLINGER, GORDON BEVERLY, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Professor of Agronomy; Agronomist,
Agricultural Experiment Station (1941-1943).
KILPATRICK, WYLIE, Ph.D. (Brookings), Research Economist (1948-1948).
KIMMEL, ALBERT LOUIs, M.Ch.E., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering (1945-
1945).
KIMMEL, DONALD CARVER, Ph.D. (Penn State), Assistant Marketing Economist, Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (1950-1950).
KINCAID, RANDALL RICH, Ph.D. (Missouri), Plant Pathologist, North Florida Experiment
Station (1929-1943).
KIRK, WILLIAM GORDON, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Vice Director in Charge, Range Cattle
Experiment Station (1936-1944).
KIRKLAND, EDWIN CAPERS, Ph.D. (Northwestern), Associate Professor of English (1946-
1946).






CATALOG 1950-1951


KITCHING, EUGENE AUMAN, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1938-
1946).
KNORR, Louis CARL, Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Histologist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1948-1948).
KNOWLES, HAROLD LORAINE, Ph.D. (Kansas), Professor of Physics (1931-1949).
KNOX, MARGARET ENID, M.S. in L.S., Senior Reference Assistant; Assistant Professor
of Library Science (1949-1949).
KOEN, Ross Y., M.A., Interim Instructor in History and Political Science (1949-1949).
KOKOMOOR, FRANKLIN WESLEY, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Mathematics and
Chairman of Fundamental Mathematics (1927-1935).
KONRAD, E. WAYNE, D.O., Head Trainer (1948-1948) (Resigned August 15, 1949).
Koo, T. Z., B.A., L.H.D. (Denver), LL.D. (Colgate), L.H.D. (Lewis and Clark),
LL.D. (Kenyon), Visiting Lecturer in Religion (1950-1950).
KORUTURK, SADI SABIT, B.Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1947-1947).
KOVACH, EUGENE GEORGE, Ph.D. (Harvard), Instructor in Physical Sciences (1949-
1949).
KRASTIN, KARL, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law (1948-1948).
KRIENKE, WALTER ALBERT, M.S., Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry; Associate
Dairy Technologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1946-1946).
KUITERT, Louis CORNELIUS, Ph.D. (Kansas), Associate Entomologist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1948-1950).
KURTH, ARTHUR LINCOLN, Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of French (1947-1947).
LAESSLE, ALBERT MIDDLETON, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Biology (1942-
1947).
LAGASSE, FELIX SCOTT, Ph.D. (Maryland), Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1939-1943).
LAIRD, DOROTHY STEPHENS, M.A.E., Instructor in Education (1944-1948).
LAIRD, GLADYS O'NEAL, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1936-1936).
LANG, GAINES BARRETT, Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor of Mathematics (1942-
1949).
LANHAM, JAMES SAMUEL, Ph.D. (Texas), C.P.A. (Texas), Head Professor of Account-
ing (1947-1947).
LARGE, JOHN R., M.S., Associate Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1948-1948).
LARRICK, THOMAS, M. Arch., A.I.A., Professor of Architecture (1946-1946).
LARRY, CYNTHIA, Ph.D. (Columbia), Assistant Professor of Speech and English (1949-
1949).
LARSEN, SWEN AAGE, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949) (Resigned
August 31, 1949).
LATOUR, MARINUS HENRY, B.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering (1946-
1946).
LAUTER, WERNER M., Ph.D. (Griefswald), Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
(1950-1950).
LAWRENCE, FRED PARKER, B.S.A., Citriculturist, Agricultural Extension Service (1947-
1947).
LAWRENSON, RAYMOND EARL, M.M., Associate Professor of Piano (1948-1948).
LAWSON, STANTON CLOWES DAVISON, M.S., Associate Professor of Engineering Mechan-
ics (1947-1947).
LEAKE, JAMES MILLER, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Head Professor of History and Political
Science (1919-1919).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


LEAR, WILLIAM EDWARD, M.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering (1949-
1949).
LEAVITT, BENJAMIN BURTON, Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor of Biological Science
(1946-1946).
LEE, AUBREY K., Assistant Comptroller (1947-1947).
LEE, PERMILLAS ARTEN, M.A., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1948-1948).
LEE, ROBERT CHARLES, Ph.D. (Peabody), Assistant Professor of English (1947-1947).
LEENHOUTS, LAURA NELJA, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Education (1945-1948).
LEGGETT, JAMES THOMAS, M.S.Eng., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
(1941-1944).
LEIGHTY, RALPH GEORGE, B.S., Assistant Soil Surveyor, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1947-1947).
LEPS, JOSEPH MCELROY, Ed.D. (Columbia), Professor of Education (1943-1945).
LEWIS, CHARLES ANDREW, B.S., Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics
(1949-1949).
LEWIS, CLARK SAMUEL, B.L.S., Social Sciences Librarian; Instructor in Library Science
(1949-1949).
LEWIS, HAL GRAHAM, M.A.E., Professor of Education (1936-1944).
LEWIS, HOWARD KENNETH, E.E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1946-1946).
LILES, ANNETTE LUCILLE, B.S. in L.S., Reference Assistant, Library (1947-1947).
LINCOLN, FRANCIS Busy, Ph.D. (California), Horticulturist, Subtropical Experiment
Station (1947-1947).
LINDSEY, HARRY LEE, B.S. Arch., A.I.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1947-1947).
LIPPITT, MARY DAWSON, B.S., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1948-1948).
LIPSCOMB, RALPH WALDO, M.S., Associate Agronomist, Mobile Unit, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1944-1944).
LITHERLAND, ALLYN CAPRON, M.A., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1947-1947).
LITTLE, HERSCHEL WRAY, M.S., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station (1948-1948).
LITTLE, WINSTON WOODARD, M.A., Dean of the University College; Professor of Prac-
tical Logic (1931-1937).
LITZENBERGER, SAMUEL CAMERON, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Associate Agronomist, Agri-
cultural Experiment Station (1948-1948) (Resigned August 15, 1949).
LIVENGOOD, DOROTHY CROFT, M.A., Instructor in English, General Extension Division
(1949-1949).
LOFT, BERNARD IRWIN, M.A.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education; Assistant
Swimming Coach (1948-1948).
LOFTEN, WILLIAM TRAVIS, M.A.E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education
(1937-1947).
LONG, WALLACE T., M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station (1949-
1949).
LONG, WILLIAM PALMER, B.A.B.A., Manager, Cafeteria and Soda Fountain (1946-1946).
LORz, ALBERT PROTUS, Ph.D. (Virginia), Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1948-1948).
LOWRY, WILLIAM LEONARD, B.A., Associate Professor of Journalism (1930-1941).
LUNDY, HOSEA WILLIS, B.S.A., Associate Agronomist, West Florida Experiment Sta-
tion (1946-1947).
LUPKIEWICZ, JOSEPH VINCENT, M.M., Associate Professor of Choral Music (1948-1948).
LYONS, EDWARD, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Lecturer in Chemistry (1947-1947).
LYTLE, ANDREW NELSON, B.A., Lecturer in English (1948-1948).






CATALOG 1950-1951


LYTLE, ERNEST JAMES, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics (1946-1946).
MCALLISTER, SAMUEL JOSEPH, B.A., Head Basketball Coach (1937-1937).
McCACHREN, JAMES ROLAND, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Required Physical Educa-
tion; Freshman Baseball Coach (1946-1946).
MCCALL, WADE WILEY, M.A., Assistant Professor of Soils (1946-1948).
McCARTY, MARTIN EDGAR, M.A., Interim Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1946-
1946).
McCHESNEY, WILLIAM WALLACE, M.D. (Virginia), University Physician (1949-1949).
MCCLELLAN, MARGARET CAVE, M.A., Instructor in Speech (1948-1948).
MCCLELLAND, HAYES K., M.A., Advisor to Student Organizations (1949-1949).
McCLOUD, DARRELL EDISON, Ph.D. (Purdue), Assistant Professor of Agronomy (1948-
1948).
MCCOLLIN, EDMOND MORGAN, M.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1948-1948) (Re-
signed July 9, 1949).
McCRACKEN, JANET MAY, M.S., Instructor in Education (1947-1948) (On leave, 1949-
1950).
MCCRACKEN, MARY RUTH, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-1948).
McCuBBIN, EARL NOEL, Ph.D. (Cornell), Horticulturist, Potato Laboratory (1940-
1941).
McCUTCHEN, KENNETH SHANNON, B.S., Assistant Professor of Psychology (1947-1947)
(Resigned August 31, 1949).
MACDONALD, FRANK WADSWORTH, M.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
(1948-1948).
McEACHERN, FLOY MCCALL, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1944-
1944).
McFERRIN, JOHN BERRY, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Head Professor of Business Organiza-
tion and Operation (1937-1948).
McGAUOHEY, RICHARD EDWARD, B.A.E., Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance
Center (1945-1946) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
McGREGOR, JAMES ALAN, B.S., Assistant Animal Industrialist, Agricultural Extension
Service (1950-1950).
McGRIFF, JACK, M.A.E., Instructor in Professional Physical Education (1946-1949).
McGUIRE, VINCENT, M.A., Instructor in Education (1947-1948).
MCINNIS, SAM W., M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1930-1937).
MCINTOSH, P. R., M.F.A., Associate Professor of Art (1949-1949).
McKisSOCK, GEORGE DAWSON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1948-
1948).
McLANE, WILLIAM M., M.S., Interim Instructor in Biology (1950-1950).
McLENDON, HORACE S., B.A., Soil Conservationist, Agricultural Extension Service
(1917-1948).
McLENDON, IDA RUTH, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Professor of Education (1936-
1948).
MACLEOD, MALCOLM LORIMER, Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor of English (1939-
1947).
McMULLEN, KENNETH SMITH, B.S.A., District Agent, Agricultural Extension Service
(1935-1946).
MCPHEETERS, EDWIN KEITH, B.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
McQuITTY, JOHN VREDENBURGH, Ph.D. (Kentucky), University Examiner (1929-1935).
McVoy, JAMES DAVID, B. Arch., A.I.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1948-1948).
MACDONALD, WILLIAM DICKSON, LL.M., Associate Professor of Law (1948-1948).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


MACK, LEAH ALWILDA, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-1948).
MACLACHLAN, JOHN MILLER, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Head Professor of Sociology and
Anthropology (1938-1941).
MAGIE, ROBERT OGDEN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Plant Pathologist, Vegetable Crops Labora-
tory (1945-1945).
MAGUIRE, LILLIAN IRMA, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1934-1934).
MALCOLM, JOHN LOWRIE, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Associate Soils Chemist, Subtropical Ex-
periment Station (1948-1948).
MALONE, EUBERT HARRISON, 1st Lt., Inf., Assistant Professor of Military Science and
Tactics (1948-1948).
MALONEY, FRANK EDWARD, LL.B., Associate Professor of Law (1946-1946).
MARSHALL, SIDNEY PAUL, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry;
Associate Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1942-1947).
MARTIN, EARL OLNEY, B.S.E.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station (1947-1947) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
MARTIN, FLETCHER, Visiting Professor of Art (1949-1949).
MARTIN, JAMES A., M.A.E., Instructor in Vocational Guidance (1939-1947).
MARTIN, JOHN FLETCHER, LL.B., M.A., Director of the Institute of Inter-American
Affairs (1942-1942).
MARTINSON, EARL PEHR, M.A., Interim Head Professor of Industrial Engineering (1948-
1949).
MASON, RAYMOND WOODROW, LL.B., Associate Professor of Business Organization and
Operation (1947-1947).
MASON, ROY HOMER, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics (1947-1947).
MATHERLY, WALTER JEFFRIES, M.A., LL.D. (William Jewell), Dean of the College of
Business Administration; Professor of Economics (1926-1926).
MATHIAS, ARTHUR FREDERICK, B.S.A., Assistant Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1948-1948) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
MATTHEWS, CHARLES ARNOLD, Ph.D. (Virginia), Assistant Professor of Business Or-
ganization and Operation (1948-1948).
MATTHEWS, DONALD RAY, M.A., Director of Alumni Affairs (1936-1947).
MATTHEWSON, CLARKE, M.S.F., Interim Assistant Professor of Forestry; Superintend-
ent, State Ranger School (1949-1949).
MATTHIES, WILLIAM R., M.S., C.P.A., (Illinois and Wisconsin), Associate Professor of
Accounting (1949-1949).
MAUDERLI, MAX OTTO, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor of German (1948-
1948).
MAXWELL, HUGH CLYDE, M.S.E., Assistant Professor of Business Education (1945-
1948).
MAYNARD, ZOLLIE McCuLLOR, B.A.E., Assistant Professor of Required Physical Educa-
tion (1946-1949).
MEAD, ARTHUR RAYMOND, Ph.D. (Columbia), Ed.D. (Miami), Director, Bureau of
Educational Research; Professor of Education (1931-1935).
MEANS, SAMUEL ALBERT, JR., B.S.B.A., Senior Accountant (1946-1946).
MEEK, WILBUR T., Ph.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Economics (1947-1948)
(Resigned August 31, 1949).
MEHRHOF, NORMAN RIPLEY, M.Ag., Head Professor of Poultry Husbandry; Head, De-
partment of Poultry Husbandry, Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricultural
Extension Service (1924-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


MELBY, MARIAN LUcy, M.A., Head Dietitian, Cafeteria (1948-1948) (Resigned Octo-
ber 31, 1949).
MELTON, HOLMES MITTS, B.A.E., Assistant Director of Alumni Affairs (1949-1949).
MERWIN, HENRY D., Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1950-1950).
MEYER, HARVEY KESSLER, M.A., Associate Professor of Trade and Industrial Educa-
tion (1946-1948) (On leave 1949-1950).
MEYER, HERBERT ALBERT, Ph.D. (Iowa), Associate Professor of Mathematics (1946-
1946).
MIDDLETON, JAMES W., LL.B., Assistant in Law Research (1949-1949).
MILESKI, THEODORE GERALD, B.S., Interim Instructor in Biological Science (1948-1948).
MILLAR, JANE CARREE, M.A., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1948-1948).
MILLER, CLYDE EDWARD, M.S.E.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and In-
dustrial Experiment Station (1948-1948).
MILLER, ELIZABETH M., M.B.A., Associate Resident, Mallory Hall (1949-1949).
MILLER, EUGENE FRANCIS, B.S., Major, A.F., Assistant Professor of Air Science and
Tactics (1947-1947).
MILLER, GEORGE JOHN, B.A. (Oxon.), LL.M., doctor en derecho (Madrid), Professor
of Law (1948-1948).
MILLER, HAROLD EDGAR, M.D. (Georgia), University Physician (1947-1947) (Resigned
October 15, 1949).
MILLER, HOWARD NILE, Ph.D. (California) Associate Plant Pathologist, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
MILLER, JAMES W., B.S.F., Associate Professor of Forestry (1936-1949).
MILLER, J. HILLIS, Ph.D. (Columbia), Litt.D. (Keuka), LL.D. (Alfred), President
of the University (1947-1947).
MILLICAN, CHARLES NORMAN, M.A., Instructor in Economics (1949-1949).
MILLICAN, GEORGE COREY, B.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
MIMs, BERNICE ASHBURN, M.A., Associate Professor and Head, Department of Gen-
eral Information and Service, General Extension Division (1928-1946).
MITCH, GEORGE FREDERICK, M.A., Interim Assistant Professor of Economics (1949-
1949).
MITCHELL, JEAN OLTMAN, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1944-
1944).
MOONEY, ERNEST GORDON, B.A.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1940-
1945).
MOORE, JAMES FRANCIS, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting (1948-1948).
MOORE, JOHN MEREDITH, B.A., Manager, Bookstore (1948-1948).
MOORE, JULIAN STEPHEN, M.S.A., Extension Poultryman (1950-1950).
MOORE, WILLIAM EDGAR, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Logic and Student Counselor
(1930-1948).
MOORMAN, JOHN HAYNES, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Business Education (1944-1949).
MOORMAN, ROBERT, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
MORALES, JULIO ALFRED, M.A., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1946-1946).
MORELOCK, JAMES CRUTCHFIELD, M.A., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1949-
1949).
MOREY, DARRELL D., Ph.D. (Iowa State), Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station (1949-1949).
MORGAN, BARBARA BERKLEY, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1949-
1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


MORGAN, MARCELLUS, B.A., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance Center
(1949-1949).
MORGEN, RALPH ALEXANDER, Ph.D. (California), Director, Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station; Professor of Chemical Engineering (1938-1947).
MORRIS, ALTON CHESTER, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of English (1927-1946).
MORRISON, SHEILA GRAHAM, M.A., Instructor in Speech (1947-1947).
MoRRow, HAROLD WILLIAM, M.A., Instructor in Engineering Mechanics (1948-1948).
MORROW, KENNETH WAYNE, M.A., Engineering Librarian (1949-1949).
MOSES, PHILIP JOHN, B.S.F., Instructor in Forestry, State Ranger School (1949-1949).
MOSHIER, WILLIAM FRANKLIN, B.S.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Ac-
counting (1946-1946).
MOUNTS, CHARLES EUGENE, Ph.D. (Duke), Associate Professor of English (1927-1945).
MowRY, HAROLD, M.S.A., D.Sc. (Florida), Director of the Agricultural Experiment
Station (1922-1943) (Retired January 31, 1950).
MUEHLNER, FELIX, U.J.D. (Frederick William), Associate Research Economist, Bureau
of Economic and Business Research (1950-1950).
MULL, LEON EDMUND, M.A.D.H., Assistant Dairy Technologist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1940-1940).
MURPHEY, MILLEDGE, B.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology (1947-1947).
MURPHREE, ALBERT ALEXANDER, B.A. (Oxon.), Assistant Professor of English (1929-
1934).
MURPHREE, CLAUDE LEON, B.A., Professor of Music and University Organist (1925-
1948).
MURRAY, FRANK JUNIOR, M.A., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-1949).
MYERS, FORREST EARL, M. Ag., Assistant Vegetable Crops Specialist, Agricultural Ex-
tension Service (1948-1950).
MYERS, JULIAN MOSTELLA, B.S., Associate Agricultural Engineer, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station (1947-1947).
NEALE, JAMES RALPH, B.A., Instructor in English (1946-1946).
NEELY, GRACE IONA, M.A., Associate Economist in Food Conservation, Agricultural
Extension Service, Tallahassee (1948-1948).
NEFF, THOMAS O'NEIL, B.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics (1946-
1946).
NELLER, JOSEPH ROBERT, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Soils Chemist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1930-1944).
NELSON, PAUL HARRY, M.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1947-1947).
NETTLES, VICTOR FLEETWOOD, Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1938-1938).
NEUBAUER, GERHARDT W. F., M.S., Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts Education
(1948-1948).
NEWHALL, RUBY, Administrative Manager, Agricultural Experiment Station and Agri-
cultural Extension Service (1914-1932) (Deceased October 18, 1949).
NEWINS, HAROLD STEPHENSON, M.F., Director of the School of Forestry; Professor of
Forestry (1935-1937).
NEWMAN, FLOYD WARREN, M.A., Interim Instructor in Psychology (1949-1949).
NICHOLS, JOHN WILSON, M.A., Interim Instructor in Psychology (1949-1949).
NIELAND, Louis THEODORE, Farm Forester, Agricultural Extension Service (1914-1938).






CATALOG 1950-1951


NOBLE, CLARENCE VERNON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Dean of the College of Agri-
culture; Head Professor of Agricultural Economics; Agricultural Economist and
Head of Department, Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension
Service (1926-1947).
NOLA, Louis, M.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Accounting (1947-1949).
NOLAN, WILLIAM JOHN, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Chemical Engineering (1946-
1949).
NORMAN, JAMES WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean Emeritus of the College of Edu-
cation; Professor of Education (1916-1946).
NORTHROP, FLOYD LORRAIN, B.S.A., District Supervisor, Agricultural Education (1948-
1948).
NORTON, BESSIE AMANDA, M.A.E., Instructor in Education (1934-1948).
NOVAK, ARTHUR FRANCIS, Ph.D. (Purdue), Assistant Professor of Bacteriology (1947-
1948).
NUTTER, HAZEN EDWARD, M.A., Associate Professor of Education (1938-1938).
ODOM, DRAKON BURK, B.S.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida), Instructor in Accounting (1948-
1948) (Resigned January 15, 1950).
OLIVER, CLIFTON, M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Organization and Operation
(1946-1948).
OLIVER, JAMES ARTHUR, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor of Biology (1948-1948).
OLIVER, JAMES WILLARD, Ph.D. (Harvard), Assistant Professor of Philosophy (1949-
1949).
OLSEN, GEORGE LIEBERG, M.A., Order Assistant, Library (1949-1949).
OLSEN, JULIAN OLE, B.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1947-1948).
OLSEN, ROBERT WINTHROP, B.S., Biochemist, Citrus Experiment Station (1947-1947).
OLSON, CLARA McDONALD, Ph.D. (Peabody), Associate Professor of Education (1934-
1949).
OPP, CARL BRADEN, B.A., Assistant Director of Residence (1940-1946).
ORAS, ANTS, B. Litt. (Oxon.), Visiting Professor of English (1949-1949).
ORMOND, WILLIAM NEWMAN, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1948-1948).
OSBORN, GEORGE COLEMAN, Ph.D. (Indiana), Associate Professor of Social Sciences
(1947-1947).
O'STEEN, ALVA WOODROW, B.S.A., Supervisor, Florida Egg Laying Contest, Agricul-
tural Extension Service, Chipley (1941-1945).
OTTE, BURTON J. H., M.S., Associate Professor and Curator of Chemistry (1925-1937).
OWEN, HARRY ASHTON, B.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1948-1948).
OWEN, JOHN HINSEY, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology
(1949-1949).
OWEN, JOHN M., M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
OWENS, ALVIN JEWEL, M.S., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1949-1949).
OWENS, JAMES BACOT, B.S., Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1945-1945).
PACE, JAMES EDWARD, B.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry; Assistant Animal
Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station (1942-1949).
PAGE, RALPH EMERSON, Ph.D. (Syracuse), Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences;
Professor of Political Science (1948-1948).
PALM, RAYMOND LESTER, M.A., Assistant Professor of Art (1948-1948) (Resigned
September 30, 1949).
PAPY, WILLIAM ANDREW, B. Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


PAQUETTE, RADNOR JOSEPH, M.S., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and In-
dustrial Experiment Station (1948-1948).
PARDEE, MARY RUTH, B.S. in L.S., Cataloger, Library (1945-1947).
PARKER, WILLIAM DAVIS, M.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Accounting
(1947-1949).
PARRIS, GEORGE KEITH, Ph.D. (Cornell), Plant Pathologist in Charge, Watermelon
Laboratory (1945-1945).
PARVIN, FAYETTE WARD, B.S.A., Associate Economist, Agricultural Extension Service
(1946-1948).
PATRICK, JOHN MAx, D.Phil. (Oxon.), Professor of English (1948-1948).
PATRICK, REMBERT WALLACE, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of Social Sciences
(1940-1945).
PATTERSON, PAUL BRYAN, M.A.E., Instructor in Mathematics (1943-1947).
PAUL, OUIDA FAY, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music (1949-1949).
PAYNE, ANCIL NEWTON, Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor of History and Political
Science (1929-1945).
PEARCE, JAMES MARTINE, M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1946-1946).
PEARSON, ALBERT M., Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry (1949-
1949).
PEARSON, CHARLES ROBERT, B.M.E., Assistant Professor of Aeronautical Engineering
(1947-1949).
PEELER, RUTH BEATRICE, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1934-1934).
PEET, JAMES CLINTON, E.E., Lecturer in Electrical Engineering (1947-1947).
PENN, RICHARD KENNETH, B.I.E., Office Manager, Maintenance (1948-1948).
PERRY, FRANKLYN STANTON, B.S.A., District Agent, Agricultural Extension Service
(1946-1949).
PETERSON, ERHART GUSTAF, LL.B., Associate Professor of Accounting (1947-1949).
PETTIS, AUBREY MARSHALL, B.S.A.E., Farm Electrification Specialist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station and Agricultural Extension Service (1947-1947).
PHELPS, EARLE BERNARD, B.S., Lecturer in Sanitary Engineering (1944-1944).
PHELPS, GEORGE OSBORN, M.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
(1937-1946).
PHILLIPS, ARTHUR MINIS, B.S., Associate Entomologist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1941-1948).
PHILLIPS, GRACE RACHEL, M.A.E., Interim Instructor in Biological Sciences (1950-
1950).
PHILLIPS, LAWRENCE ROY, Ph.D. (Indiana), Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1946-
1947).
PHILLIPS, THOMAS 0., B.S., Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics (1949-
1949).
PHILLIPS, WAYLAND B., M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-1948).
PHILPOTT, FRANK EXCELL, M.A., Assistant Professor of Required Physical Education
and Assistant Track Coach (1946-1946).
PHILPOTT, HARRY MELVIN, Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of Religion (1947-1947).
PHIPPS, CECIL GLENN, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Mathematics (1924-1943).
PIERCE, EMORY LOWE, Ph.D. (Florida), Associate Professor of Biological Science (1945-
1949).
PIERSON, WILLIAM HASKELL, M.S., Associate Professor of Geography (1946-1946).
PIERENIAN, ZAREH MEGUERDITCH, M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics (1925-
1937).






CATALOG 1950-1951


PISANI, FRANK WARREN, B.A., Instructor in Citizenship Training, General Extension
Division (1948-1948).
PITTS, EDITH PATTI, Administrative Assistant to the President (1937-1937).
POLLARD, CASH BLAIR, Ph.D. (Purdue), Professor of Chemistry (1930-1937).
POLOVKAS, VINCENT GEORGE, B.S.A.E., Instructor in Aeronautical Engineering (1948-
1948).
POOLE, LEWIS ALBERT, B.S.E.E., Interim Instructor in Physics (1947-1947) (On leave,
1949-1950).
POOLE, REID, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music (1949-1949).
PORTER, RALPH E., B.A.E., Assistant Director of Florida Union (1949-1949).
PORTER, REBECCA ELIZABETH, B.A.J., Assistant Editor, University Press (1949-1949).
POTTER, WILLIAM MELVILLE, B.A., Assistant Professor of Required Physical Education;
Freshman Tennis Coach (1946-1946).
POWELL, GARLAND WHEELER, Director of Radio Station WRUF (1929-1930).
POWELL, ROBERT D., B.S., Assistant Professor of Botany (1949-1949).
PREODOR, EDWARD, B.M., Associate Professor of Music; Orchestra Director (1948-1948).
PRESCOTT, FORD LEWIS, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1923-1946).
PRICE, GEORGE SHELDON, B.S., Colonel, Professor of Military Science and Tactics;
Coordinator of Military Department (1948-1948).
PRICE, JOSEPH EDWIN, B.A.E., Associate Professor of Social Sciences; Student Counselor
(1930-1949).
PRICE, THOMAS JAMES, Comptroller (1927-1947).
PRIDGEN, ILA ROUNTREE, LL.B., Law Librarian (1929-1947).
PRINCE, VIVIAN CHRISTINE, B.S. in L.S., Head Cataloger, Library; Assistant Professor
of Library Science (1943-1949).
PRITCHETT, WILLIAM LAWRENCE, M.S., Assistant Biochemist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1948-1948) (On leave, 1949-1950).
PROCTOR, SAMUEL, M.A., Assistant Professor of Social Sciences (1946-1949).
PROSSER, DAVID STANLEY, B.S., Assistant Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1948-1948).
PRYOR, BETTY LOUISE, LL.B., Assistant Law Librarian (1948-1948).
PULLARA, ANTHONY LIBERO, B.S.B.C., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
PUMPHREY, FRED HOMER, E.E., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering (1946-1946).
PURDY, DONALD RODERICK, M.S., Instructor in Physics (1948-1948).
PYE, RUBY LEE, B.S., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-1949).
QUACKENBUSH, ORVILLE FRANCIS, M.A., Associate Professor of Sociology (1941-1946)
(On leave, 1949-1950).
QUALLS, LEROY LILLARD, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor of Economics (1948-
1948).
RALSTON, CHARLES WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Professor of Silviculture (1949-
1949).
RAMIREZ, ADOLFO, M.A., Instructor in Spanish (1948-1948).
RAMSEY, JAMES C., M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1949-1949).
RANDOLPH, JOHN W., M.S., Agricultural Engineer, Everglades Experiment Station
(1947-1947).
RAPPENECKER, CASPAR, Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor of Geology and Physical
Sciences (1949-1949).
RAY, DELMAS DENNIS, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting (1948-1948).
RAY, FRANCIS EARL, D.Sc. (Oxon.), Director of Cancer Research Laboratory; Pro-
fessor of Cancer Research (1949-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


RAY, ROBERT EUGENE, LL.B., Interim Instructor in Business Law (1949-1949).
REAVES, CLARENCE WILLIAM, B.S.A., Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Extension Ser-
vice (1947-1947).
REAVES, JACK SHELDON, B.S.B.A., Purchasing Agent (1948-1948).
REBER, KARL WILLIAM, B.Ch.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1948-1948).
REDFEARN, PAUL L., M.S., Interim Instructor in Botany (1950-1950).
REDFIELD, ROBERT H., B.S.E.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station (1949-1949).
REED, HAROLD MERRILL, B.S., Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1948-1948).
REED, HOWARD WILLIAM, M.D. (Rush), Interim Head, Department of Health Service
(1948-1948).
REEVES, FRANK BLAIR, B.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
REHLING, CONRAD H., M.A.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-1949).
REID, ALFRED S., B.Ed., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
REID, CHARLES EDWARD, Ph.D. (Louisiana State), Instructor in Chemistry (1948-1948).
REID, EUGENIE CHAZAL, B.S. in L.S., Cataloger, Library (1947-1947).
REID, GEORGE KELL, M.S., Interim Instructor in Biological Sciences (1949-1949).
REITZ, HERMAN J., M.S., Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station (1946-1949).
REITZ, J. WAYNE, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Provost for Agriculture and Acting Dean of the
College of Agriculture (1949-1949).
REMP, GEORGE EDWARD, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1946-
1946).
RETHLINGSHAFER, DOROTHY ADELAIDE, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor
of Psychology (1947-1947).
REYNOLDS, JOHN HENRY, M.A., Assistant Professor of Social Sciences (1946-1947).
REYNOLDS, MABLE MARIE, B.S. in L.S., Cataloger, Library (1949-1949).
RHOADS, WINIFRED CARL, M.S., Entomologist, North Florida Experiment Station (1949-
1949).
RICHARDSON, JAMES GILBERT, B.S.B.A., Assistant Professor of Finance (1946-1949).
RICKETT, CLARENCE CORNAIRE, M.A., Interim Instructor in English (1949-1949).
RIETZ, EDWARD GUSTAVE, Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor of Chemistry (1946-
1947).
RIKER, HAROLD CLARK, M.A., Director of Housing (1938-1946).
RILEY, BERT CLAIR, B.S.A., Dean of the General Extension Division (1919-1928).
RING, ALFRED A., Ph.D. (New York), Professor of Real Estate (1947-1949).
RION, WILLIAM E., B.A., Interim Director of Florida Union (1945-1948).
RITCHEY, GEORGE EDGAR, M.S., Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1927-
1942).
RITTER, LEO JOHN, M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering (1946-1947).
RoBBINS, GEORGE LEROY, W.O.J.G., Assistant Professor of Air Science and Tactics
(1949-1949).
ROBERTS, LEONIDAS H., M.S., Interim Instructor in Physical Sciences (1949-1949).
ROBERTS, MERRIL J., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Transportation and Economics
(1948-1948).
ROBERTSON, ALAN J., M.A., Instructor in Economics (1949-1949).
ROBERTSON, CHARLES ARCHIBALD, M.A., Professor of English and Chairman of the
Division of Language and Literature (1918-1946).
ROBERTSON, JOE MAYS, B.S., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1949-1949).
ROBINSON, FRANK ALBERT, M.S., Assistant Apiculturist, Agricultural Extension Service
(1950-1950).






CATALOG 1950-1951


RODGERS, EARL GILBERT, M.S.A., Instructor in Agronomy (1946-1947) (On leave,
1949-1950).
ROGERS, ANDREW JACKSON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology (1946-1947).
ROGERS, FRAZIER, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering; Agricultural
Engineer and Head of Department, Agricultural Experiment Station (1918-1923).
ROGERS, WILLIAM BRADLEY, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1947-
1947).
ROSE, GILLIS NORMAN, B.S., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1943-1945).
ROSE, HAROLD CLELAND, B.Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1947-1949).
ROSENBERGER, STANLEY E., M.Ag., Assistant Vegetable Crops Specialist, Agricultural
Extension Service (1949-1949).
ROTHROCK, COMAN WENDELL, B.S., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
ROTHWELL, DONALD FREDERICK, B.S.A., Instructor in Soils (1948-1948).
ROUSE, ALVIN H., M.S., Associate Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station (1949-1949).
RUEHLE, GEORGE DEWEY, Ph.D. (Washington State), Vice Director in Charge, Sub-
tropical Experiment Station (1930-1944).
RUFF, WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Yale), Associate Professor of Humanities (1946-1946).
RUNZLER, WILLIAM THEODORE, Ph.D. (Erlangen), Interim Assistant Professor of Ger-
man (1947-1947).
RUPRECHT, RUDOLPH WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Massachusetts Agricultural College), Vice Direc-
tor in Charge, Central Florida Experiment Station (1920-1946).
Russ, CLEMENTINE LUCILLE, M.S.P.H., Health Improvement Specialist, Agricultural
Extension Service (1948-1948) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
RYAN, JOHN EDWARD, B.S.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-1949).
RYBERG, MILTON EMANUEL, B.S., Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial Ex-
periment Station (1947-1949).
SABELLA, FRANK JOSEPH, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor of Insurance (1949-
1949) (On leave, March 15, 1950 to May 31, 1950).
SALT, ELLIS BENTON, Ed.D. (New York), Head Professor of Professional Physical Edu-
cation (1930-1946).
SANDERS, DORSEY ADDREN, D.V.M. (Kansas State), Head Professor of Veterinary
Science; Head, Department of Veterinary Science, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1925-1949).
SANDERSON, ROBERT THOMAS, Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor of Chemistry
(1949-1949).
SASHOFF, STEPHAN PENCHEFF, M.S., Professor of Electrical Engineering (1932-1946).
SAUER, JOHN E., B.S., Assistant Coach (1950-1950).
SAVAGE, ZACH, M.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1931-1934).
SAWYER, EARL M., B.S.E., Interim Instructor in Physical Sciences (1947-1947).
SAWYER, GEORGE WILLIAM, B.A., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance Cen-
ter (1950-1950).
SAWYER, WILLIAM LINCOLN, M.S., Interim Head Professor of Engineering Mechanics
(1929-1949).
SAXE, HARRY CHARLES, M.S.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering (1949-1949).
SCARBOROUGH, TRUMAN GUY, M.A.E., Assistant Principal and Teacher, P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School (1949-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SCHAEFFER, WENDELL GORDON, M.A., Assistant Professor of History and Political
Science (1948-1948) (Resigned February 11, 1950).
SCHAFFER, NILE CLARETT, Interim Director of the Florida State Museum (1942-1946).
SCHMIDT, DORIS THEODOTIA, M.A., Associate Professor of Music (1949-1949).
SCHNELL, HERMAN WALKER, M.A., Head Professor of Required Physical Education
(1946-1947).
SCHOCH, WILFRED LEROY, Superintendent of Construction (1935-1935).
SCHOONMAKER, LUCAS ELMENDORF, B.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineer-
ing (1947-1947).
SCHRADER, GEORGE F., B.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering (1947-1947).
SCHRAMM, JOHN CLARENDON, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech (1948-1948) (Re-
signed August 31, 1949).
SCHWEYER, HERBERT ENGLISH, Ph.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Chemical
Engineering (1946-1946).
SCOLES, EUGENE FRANCIS, LL.M., Associate Professor of Law (1949-1949).
SCOTT, EMILY SUSAN, B.S. in L.S., Senior Cataloger, Library (1944-1947) (Resigned
September 30, 1949).
SCOTT, LINUS ALBERT, B.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1948-1948).
SCOTT, NED HOBSON, M.B.A., Instructor in Accounting (1949-1949).
SCOTT, THOMAS McDONALD, M.A.E., Instructor in Required Physical Education (1949-
1949).
SCOTT, WILLIAM H. 0., M.A. in L.S., Reference Assistant, Library (1949-1949).
SCUDDER, DELTON LEWIs, Ph.D. (Yale), Head Professor of Religion (1946-1946).
SEABERG, LILLIAN MARIE, B.S. in L.S., University College Librarian (1949-1949).
SEALE, CHARLES COLIN, D.I.C.T.A. (Imperial College of Tropical Agriculture), As-
sociate Agronomist, Everglades Experiment Station (1945-1946).
SEBOLD, HOWARD R., M.L.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (1948-1948) (Resigned
August 15, 1949).
SELLERS, FRANCES EVELYN, M.A., Head Resident, Mallory Hall (1949-1949).
SENN, PETTUS HOLMES, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Agronomy (1929-1939).
SEVERIN, PAUL VINCENT, B.A., Assistant Coach (1946-1946) (Resigned February 1,
1950).
SHAFFER, CHARLES VERNON, B.E.E., Assistant Research Engineer, Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station (1946-1946).
SHARPE, RALPH HAROLD, M.S., Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1948-1948).
SHEALY, ARTHUR LISTON, JR., B.S.B.A., General Auditor (1949-1949).
SHEALY, ARTHUR LISTON, D.V.M. (McKillip), Head Professor of Animal Husbandry;
Animal Industrialist and Head of Department, Agricultural Experiment Station
and Agricultural Extension Service (1919-1935) (Retired September 1, 1949).
SHERMAN, DAVID HARTSHORN, M.Ed., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-
1948).
SHERMAN, HARLEY BAKWEL, Ph.D. (Michigan), Interim Head Professor of Biology
(1925-1949).
SHERMAN, JOSEPH E., B.S., Head, Department of Sports Publicity (1947-1947).
SHIELDS, MURRAY WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Washington), Professor of Economics and Market-
ing (1947-1949).
SHIRLEY, RAY L., Ph.D. (Michigan State), Biochemist, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1949-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


SHOEMAKER, SAMUEL PERRON, Assistant Coach (1949-1949) (Resigned February 1,
1950).
SHOWALTER, ROBERT KENNETH, M.S., Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1945-1945).
SIKES, ANNA MAE, M.S., District Home Demonstration Agent, Agricultural Extension
Service, Tallahassee (1928-1949).
SILER, HARRY KITTRELL, M.S.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial Ex-
periment Station (1946-1946).
SILLIMAN, CHARLES VRTACEK, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law (1948-1948).
SIMMONS, FAYE Lois, B.S. in L.S., Serials Assistant, Library (1947-1947).
SIMMONS, GLENN BALLARD, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor of Education; Director
of Off-Campus Instruction (1928-1949).
SIMPSON, CHARLES FLOYD, D.V.M. (Cornell), Associate Veterinarian, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
SIMPSON, THOMAS MARSHALL, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Dean of the Graduate School;
Head Professor of Mathematics (1918-1938).
SITES, JOHN WILBUR, M.S.A., Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station (1942-1947).
SKAGGS, ALLEN ORRIN, B.A.J., Interim Director of Publicity (1942-1945).
SKINNER, BLANCHE ESTELLE, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1945-
1945).
SKINNER, THOMAS COBB, M.Ag., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering (1947-
1949).
SKOFIELD, HARRIET CLARK, M.A., Cataloger, Library (1945-1945).
SLAGLE, DEAN, LL.B., Professor of Law (1924-1924).
SMITH, ALEXANDER G., Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Professor of Physics (1948-1948).
SMITH, ARTHUR ALLEN, Interim Instructor in Architecture (1948-1948).
SMITH, CHARLES BASSEL, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Mathematics
(1946-1946).
SMITH, DAvID BARRY, M.S.S.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1949-1949).
SMITH, DOYLE WILLIAM, B.S., Assistant Chemist, Everglades Experiment Station (1948-
1948).
SMITH, EDWARD FRANK, E.E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1928-
1937).
SMITH, FREDERICK BUREAN, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Head Professor of Soils; Microbiologist
and Head of Department, Agricultural Experiment Station (1937-1944).
SMITH, JAMES HUNN, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering (1947-1947).
SMITH, JESSE LEE, District Agent, Agricultural Extension Service (1920-1925).
SMITH, JOEL ALLEN, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law (1949-1949).
SMITH, JOSEPH GORDON, M.A.E., District Supervisor, Agricultural Education (1943-
1947).
SMITH, MARTIN HARRIS, B. Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
SMITH, PEGGY JANE, M.A., Foreign Documents Assistant, Library (1948-1948).
SMITH, RALPH LESLIE, M.S., Associate Agronomist, Mobile Unit, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1943-1947).
SMITH, REYNOLDS BELDEN, Ph.D. (New York State College of Forestry), Associate
Professor of Forestry (1949-1949).
SMITH, SYDNEY EDWARD, B.E.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
SMITH, T. LYNN, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Sociology (1949-1949).
SMYTH, CORNELIUS JOSEPH, LL.B., Professor of Law (1947-1947).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 41

SOPCHAK, JOHN ANDREW, M.A., Interim Instructor in Physics and Physical Sciences
(1949-1949).
SPANGLER, BYRON DEMENT, B.C.E., Interim Instructor in Civil Engineering (1949-
1949).
SPECHT, RANDOLPH CHILLIAN, B.S.Ch.E., Professor of Chemical Engineering (1944-
1944).
SPENCER, ERNEST LEAVITT, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Soils Chemist, Vegetable Crops Labora-
tory (1943-1943).
SPINKS, DANIEL OWEN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Soils (1947-1947) (On leave, 1949-
1950).
SPURLOCK, ALVIN HAROLD, M.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1934-1940).
STANLEY, DENNIS KEITH, M.A.E., Dean of the College of Physical Education, Health
and Athletics; Professor of Physical Education (1931-1946).
STATON, WESLEY MORGAN, Ed.D. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Professional
Physical Education (1949-1950).
STEARNS, CHARLES ROBERT, B.S.A., Associate Chemist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1941-1942).
STEARNS, ROLAND FRED, C.W.O., Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics
(1949-1949).
STEARNS, THOMAS WESLEY, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Agricultural
Chemistry (1935-1949).
STEFFENS, JOHN F., B.S., Agricultural Statistician, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1947-1947).
STEIS, WILLIAM B., B.A., Instructor in Speech (1948-1948).
STEPHENS, RICHARD BADENOCH, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law (1949-1949).
STERLING, HUGO OTTO, B.S., Assistant Horticulturist, Citrus Experiment Station (1942-
1942). 0
STERRETT, DELBERT ELLINGSWORTH, M.A., Instructor in Voice (1948-1948).
STEVENS, BILLIE KNAPP, M.A., Associate Professor of Professional Physical Education
(1936-1947).
STEVENS, FREDERICK DELOS, B.S., Sugarcane Agronomist, Everglades Experiment Sta-
tion (1930-1930).
STEVENS, GRACE ADAMS, M.A., Instructor in Education (1936-1948).
STEVENS, LORENE HELEN, B.S., State Girls' Club Agent, Agricultural Extension Service,
Tallahassee (1948-1948).
STONER, WARREN NORTON, Ph.D. (California), Assistant Plant Pathologist, Everglades
Experiment Station (1949-1949).
STORER, MORRIS BREWSTER, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of Humanities (1947-1947).
STOUT, GERALD JOHN, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Professor of Horticulture (1947-1949).
STRICKLAND, THOMAS WHITNEY, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Education (1943-1944).
STRIPLING, ROBERT OLIN, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Education (1941-1946). (On
leave, 1949-1950).
STRYKER, PHILIP DAVID, Ph.D. (Northwestern), Assistant Professor of English (1947-
1947).
SUIT, Ross FRISBIE, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Plant Pathologist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1945-1946).
SULLIVAN, ARNOLD WAYNE, B.E.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948).






CATALOG 1950-1951


SUMMERHILL, GEORGE WINSTON, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting (1948-
1948).
SUMMERS, MELVIN DALE, B.F.A., Instructor in Art (1948-1948).
SUSKY, JOHN EARLE, M.A.E., Interim Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance Cen-
ter (1950-1950).
SUTTON, GEORGE EDWIN, B.S.M.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948).
SVARLIEN, OSCAR, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of Social Sciences (1946-
1946).
SWANSON, DANIEL CRAMER, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Physics (1929-1949).
SWANSON, LEONARD ERWIN, D.V.M. (Ohio State), Professor of Veterinary Science;
Parasitologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1941-1949).
SWEENEY, VICTOR VALENTINE, M.A., Associate Professor of Insurance (1947-1949).
SWEETING, BENJAMIN, M.A., Vocational Appraiser, Veterans' Guidance Center (1945-
1945).
SWETT, MANETTE, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-1948).
SWIFT, LEONARD FORDYCE, M.A., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-1948).
SWINFORD, KENNETH ROBERTS, B.S.F., Assistant Professor of Forestry (1937-1949).
TAPPAN, WAYNE ROGERS, B.A., Instructor in Education (1947-1947).
TARRANT, PAUL, Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1946-1947).
TEDDER, PAUL MATHEW, B.S.E.E., Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial Ex-
periment Station (1943-1943).
TEEL, WILLIS AUBREY, B.S.E.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (1948-1948) (Resigned September 30, 1949).
TELFORD, GEORGE BALDRIDGE, Ph.D. (Iowa), Assistant Professor of Political Science
(1947-1947).
TELLER, MORTON HERMAN, M.A.E., Curator of Physics (1943-1949).
TESELLE, CLARENCE JOHN, LL.B., Professor of Law (1928-1929).
TEW, ROY EDWARDS, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech (1937-1942) (On leave,
1949-1950).
THAMES, WALTER HENDRIX, M.S., Assistant Entomologist, Everglades Experiment Sta-
tion (1948-1948).
THOMAS, GERALD ANDREW, M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1946-1946).
THOMPSON, ARTHUR WILLIAM, M.A., Assistant Professor of Social Sciences (1946-1947).
THOMPSON, BUFORD DALE, B.S.A., Interim Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1948-1948).
THOMPSON, ROBERT ALDEN, M.S. Eng., Head Professor of Aeronautical Engineering
(1933-1946).
THOMPSON, WILLIAM LOUDEN, B.S., Entomologist, Citrus Experiment Station (1927-
1944).
THOMSON, KEITH W., M.A., Interim Assistant Professor of Geography (1949-1949).
THOR, ERIC, B.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1947-1947) (Resigned
August 31, 1949).
THORNTON, GEORGE DANIEL, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Professor of Soils; Soils Microbiologist,
Agricultural Experiment Station (1941-1949).
THURSTON, JAMES M., D.Sc. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Associate Pro-
fessor of Electrical Engineering (1949-1949).
TIFFIN, WILLIAM T., M.S.M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1944-
47).
TILLEY, WESLEY H., M.A., Assistant Professor of the Humanities (1949-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


TILLMAN, JAMES McRAE, B.S.B.A., Interim Assistant Chemist, Citrus Experiment Sta-
tion (1949-1949) (Resigned February 28, 1950).
TIMMONS, DOYAL EDGAR, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Agricultural Extension Service
(1927-1931).
TISDALE, WILLIAM BURLEIGH, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Botany and Bac-
teriology; Plant Pathologist and Head of Department, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1922-1939).
TISON, EUNICE PIEPER, M.A.E., Instructor in Education (1936-1948).
TIssoT, ARCHIE NEWTON, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Entomologist and Head of Department,
Agricultural Experiment Station (1925-1946).
TODSEN, THOMAS K., M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1949-1949) (Resigned
January 31, 1950).
TOMLIN, ROBERT FRANKLIN, LL.B., Assistant in Law Research (1949-1949).
TOPETE, JOSE MANUEL, Ph.D. (Southern California), Interim Assistant Professor of
Spanish (1949-1949).
TORRACA, PASQUALE MARIO, M.Arch., A.I.A., Associate Professor of Architecture (1947-
1947).
TOWNSEND, JULIUS CHARLES, B.S., Agricultural Statistician, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1945-1945).
TRAXLER, FELICIA W., M.A., Instructor, General Extension Division (1928-1928).
TRUJILLO, VIDAL, M.A., Assistant Professor of Spanish (1944-1946).
TUCKER, WOODSON COLEMAN, M.S., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1946-1946).
TURLINGTON, RALPH DONALD, M.B.A., Instructor in Marketing and Statistics (1947-
1947) (Resigned August 31, 1949).
TURNER, GLOVER MANUEL, LL.B., Assistant Dean of the General Extension Division;
Head of Teacher Training and Adult Education (1929-1945).
TUTTLE, FRANK WALDO, Ph.D. (Iowa), Associate Professor of Economics (1935-1947).
TWITTY, MARTHA UNDERWOOD, B.S.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
(1944-1944). (Resigned August 31, 1949).
TWOMEY, TIMOTHY ALOYSIUS, B.S.C., Assistant Coach (1946-1946) (Resigned February
1, 1950).
TYNER, MACK, Ph.D. (Cincinnati), Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering (1944-
1944).
VALK, MELVIN EHRMAN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of German (1947-
1947).
VAN KLEECK, ANNE GATEWOOD, M.A., Instructor in Art (1949-1949).
VAN NESS, GLENN, D.V.M. (Kansas State), Associate Professor of Veterinary Science;
Associate Poultry Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1946-1946).
VEDDER, CLYDE BENNETT, Ph.D. (Southern California), Assistant Professor of Social
Sciences (1948-1948).
VEITH, DONALD PRIOR, M.A., Assistant Professor of English (1946-1946).
VOLK, GAYLORD MONROE, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Soils Chemist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1939-1939).
VOORHEES, RICHARD KENNETH, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Horticulturist, Citrus
Experiment Station (1931-1947).
Voss, ELBERT, Ph.D. (Florida), Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
(1948-1948).
VOYLES, Louis VERNON, B.A., Assistant University Examiner (1948-1948).
WAGLOW, IRVING FREDERICK, M.Ed., Assistant Professor of Required Physical Education
(1946-1946).






CATALOG 1950-1951


WALKER, BIRON HELTON, M.A., Assistant Professor of English (1942-1947).
WALKER, JAMES H., M.S.A., Assistant Soil Surveyor, Agricultural Experiment Station
(1949-1949).
WALKER, ROBERT DIXON, B.S., Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station (1944-1944).
WALKER, SUE ROBERTS, B.S., Periodicals Assistant, Library (1947-1947).
WALKER, VIRGINIA HALL, Associate Resident, Nancy Yulee Hall (1949-1949).
WALLACE, HAROLD D., Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor of Nutrition (1950-1950).
WALLACE, HOWARD KEEFER, Ph.D. (Florida), Professor of Biology (1932-1949).
WALLACE, MAXWELL JOSEPH, M.A., Instructor in French (1936-1946).
WALLACE, RUSSELL WILLIS, B.S., Associate Agronomist, Mobile Unit, Agricultural
Experiment Station (1942-1942).
WALTER, JAMES MUNDAY, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Plant Pathologist, Vegetable Crops Lab-
oratory (1947-1947).
WALTERS, KENNETH, M.A., Interim Instructor in Mathematics (1949-1949).
WANDER, IRVIN WOODROW, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Soils Chemist, Citrus Experiment Sta-
tion (1947-1947).
WARFEL, HARRY REDCAY, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of English (1948-1948).
WARNER, JACOB DEWEY, M.S., Vice Director in Charge, North Florida Experiment
Station (1929-1944).
WARREN, BARBARA K., M.A., Instructor in Art (1949-1949).
WATERMAN, ARTHUR JOHN, Ph.D. (New York), Associate Professor of Political Science
(1948-1948) (Resigned January 31, 1950).
WATERS, Louis A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Russian (1949-1949).
WATKINS, JOHN VERTREES, M.S., Associate Professor of Horticulture (1926-1948).
WATKINS, LAURA JONES, M.A., Interim Assistant Professor of Education (1943-1949).
WATKINS, MARSHALL OWEN, M. Ag., Assistant to the Director, Agricultural Extension
Service (1941-1945).
WATKINS, MAUDE C., M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1946-1948).
WATTENBARGER, JAMES LORENZO, M.A.E., Assistant Principal, P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School (1947-1948) (On leave, 1949-1950).
WEATHERS, JAMES WESLEY, B.S., Captain, Inf., Assistant Professor of Military Science
and Tactics (1948-1948).
WEAVER, JENNINGS CLARK, Ph.M., Assistant Professor of Speech (1949-1949).
WEBB, JOHN NYE, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Economics (1943-1944).
WEBER, GEORGE FREDERICK, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Plant Pathology (1922-
1938).
WEEKLY, ELSIE, M.S., Head Resident, Nancy Yulee Hall (1949-1949).
WEEKS, MARGARET SIGMON, M.A., Associate Professor of Physical Education (1947-
1949).
WEIL, JOSEPH, M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering; Professor of Electrical En-
gineering (1921-1938).
WEIMER, RAE 0., Director of the School of Journalism (1949-1949).
WELBORN, ELIZABETH C., M.A.E., Cataloger, Library (1949-1949).
WELCH, LYDIA ERICKSON, M.A.E., Teacher, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School (1948-
1948).
WENZEL, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Massachusetts), Chemist, Citrus Experiment
Station (1948-1948).
WERSHOW, IRVING ROBERT, Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of Spanish (1946-1947).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 45

WEST, ERDMAN, M.S., Professor of Botany; Botanist and Mycologist, Agricultural Ex-
periment Station (1925-1927).
WEST, STANLEY LEROY, B.S. in L.S., Director of Libraries; Professor of Library Science
(1938-1948).
WESTFALL, MINTER JACKSON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor of Biological Science
(1947-1947).
WESTGATE, PHILIP JOHN, Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Horticulturist, Central Florida
Experiment Station (1943-1949).
WHITE, DAVID CALVIN, Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
(1949-1949).
WHITE, JAKE B., B.S.A., Associate Agronomist, Mobile Unit, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1941-1944).
WHITE, JOSEPH BENTON, Ph.D. (Peabody), Dean of the College of Education; Pro-
fessor of Education (1948-1949).
WHITEHEAD, RICHARD HOLMES, B.A., Assistant Registrar (1938-1938).
WHITNER, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, B.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Central Florida Ex-
periment Station (1922-1945).
WHITTLESEY, EDWARD DEMING, B.A., Director of Public Relations (1949-1949).
WICKLUND, HAROLD ALPHONSE, B.S., Major, A.F., Assistant Professor of Air Science
and Tactics (1946-1946).
WILKINS, WOODROW W., B.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
WILKOWSKE, HOWARD H., Ph.D. (Iowa State), Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufac-
tures; Assistant Dairy Technologist, Agricultural Experiment Station (1940-1950).
WILLIAMS, CLIFFORD DAVID, B.S.C.E., Head Professor of Civil Engineering (1945-1946).
WILLIAMS, HERMAN BARNES, B.M.E., Associate Research Engineer, Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station (1946-1946).
WILLIAMS, OSBORNE, Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor of Psychology (1927-1927).
WILLIAMS, WALTER ROLLIN, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Professor of Industrial Arts Educa-
tion (1942-1947).
WILLIAMSON, EDWARD CHARLES, M.A., Instructor in History (1948-1948).
WILLIAMSON, ROBERT CROZIER, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Physics (1930-
1930).
WILLSON, ALLAN EDMOND, B.S.A., Associate Biochemist, Citrus Experiment Station
(1947-1948).
WILMOT, ROYAL JAMES, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion (1933-1933).
WILSON, JAMES LARRYMORE, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor of English
(1939-1947).
WILSON, JOHN WALLACE, Sc.D. (Harvard), Entomologist, Central Florida Experiment
Station (1930-1938).
WILSON, JOHN WESLEY, M.S. Eng., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (1933-
1943).
WILSON, WILLIAM HAROLD, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor and Chairman of Freshman
Logic (1927-1946).
WIMBERLY, STANLEY EUGENE, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences; Associate Professor of Psychology (1941-1949).
WINCHESTER, CLARENCE FLOYD, Ph.D. (Missouri), Associate Professor of Animal Hus-
bandry (1947-1948) (Resigned September 15, 1949).
WINN, COLUMBIA, M.A., Interim Assistant Professor of Education (1949-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


WINSOR, ARTHUR NELSON, M.S.E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering (1945-
1948).
WINSOR, HERBERT WILLIAMS, B.S.A., Assistant Soils Chemist, Agricultural Experiment
Station (1930-1930).
WIRTALA, ARNOLD ERNEST, M.M., Instructor in Cello (1948-1948).
WISE, JACOB HOOPER, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor and Chairman of Freshman English
(1925-1935).
WISE, WILLIAM MAX, Ed.D. (Columbia), Dean of Student Personnel (1948-1948).
WOFFORD, IRVIN MIRLE, M.S.A., Instructor in Agronomy (1949-1949).
WOFFORD, KATE VIXON, Ph.D. (Columbia), Head Professor of Elementary Education
(1947-1947).
WOISLAWSKI, SIEGFRIED, Ph.D. (Berlin), Assistant Professor of Cancer Research (1949-
1949).
WOLF, EMIL ANDREW, M.S., Assistant Horticulturist, Everglades Experiment Station
(1948-1948).
WOLF, RAYMOND BERNARD, B.B.A., Professor and Head, Department of Intercollegiate
Athletics; Head Football Coach (1946-1946) (Resigned February 1, 1950).
WOLFE, HERBERT SNOW, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor of Horticulture (1930-1938).
WOLFENBARGER, DANIEL OTIS, Ph.D. (Cornell), Entomologist, Subtropical Experiment
Station (1945-1948).
WOLFF, GEORGE ELLIOTT, B.A., Interim Instructor in Social Sciences (1948-1948) (Re-
signed September 15, 1949).
WOODLEY, MARIE YOUNG, B.S., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Industrial Ex-
periment Station (1948-1948).
WOODRUFF, GEORGE ROBERT, B.S.Eng., Head Football Coach (1950-1950).
WORCESTER, DONALD EMMET, Ph.D. (California), Assistant Professor of History and
Political Science and Social Sciences (1947-1947).
WUNDERLICH, HENRY, Ph.D. (Texas), Associate Professor of Psychology (1945-1947).
WYATT, JOHN WALTON, LL.B., Instructor in Business Organization and Operation
(1948-1948) (On leave, 1949-1950).
WYKE, EDWARD DEAN, B.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (1949-1949).
YODER, LOWELL C., M.A., Associate Professor of Marketing (1949-1949).
YONGE, JULIEN CHANDLER, Director, P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History (1944-
1944).
YONGE, PHILIP KEYES, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law (1949-1949).
YOUNG, FRANK NELSON, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Biological Science
(1946-1946) (On leave, 1949-1950).
YOUNG, JOHN ADAMS, M.A., Interim Instructor in Chemistry (1947-1947).
YOUNG, JOHN WILLIAM, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics (1946-1946).
YOUNG, RALPH WALDO, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics (1948-1948) (Resigned
August 23, 1949).
YOUNGS, MARIAN AMELIA, M.A. in L.S., Senior Cataloger, Library (1934-1949).
ZETROUER, WALLACE FEASTER, B.E.E., Assistant in Research, Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station (1943-1946).
ZIEGLER, EDWIN ALLEN, M.A., Sc.D. (Franklin and Marshall), Professor of Forestry
(1937-1937).
ZIEGLER, Louis WILLIAM, B.S.A., Assistant Professor of Horticulture (1930-1947).
ZIEGLER, RAYMOND JOHN, M.B.A., Instructor in Statistics (1949-1949).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ZIMMERMAN, MARY Vooz, B.S., Cataloger, Library (1948-1948) (Resigned September
30, 1949).
ZINN, CHARLES JOSEPH, M.D. (Pennsylvania), Resident Physician (1947-1947).


MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY WHO RETIRED PRIOR TO THE
1949-50 SESSION
BRISTOL, Lucius MOODY, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor Emeritus of Sociology (1945).
BRISTOL, MARY CORNELL, B.S., Biology Librarian (1949).
BROWN, HAMLIN L., B.S.A., Dairy Husbandman, Agricultural Extension Service (1946).
CAWTHON, WILLIAM STANMORE, M.A., Associate Professor of History and Political
Science (1942).
COCKRELL, ROBERT SPRATT, LL.B., Professor Emeritus of Law (1940).
CRANDALL, CLIFFORD WALDORF, LL.B., LL.D., Professor Emeritus of Law (1949).
DEBUSK, EZRA FRANKLIN, B.S., Citriculturist, Agricultural Extension Service (1947).
FARR, JAMES MARION, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor Emeritus of English (1942).
FARRIS, LESTER COLLINS, M.A., Associate Professor of English (1948).
FINEREN, WILLIAM W., M.E., Research Engineer, Engineering and Industrial Experi-
ment Station (1945).
FULK, JOSEPH RICHARD, Ph.D. (Nebraska), Professor of Public School Administration
(1945).
GRAHAM, KLEIN HARRISON, LL.D., Business Manager (1948).
HATHAWAY, WILLIAM BYRON, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Spanish (1944).
HUME, H. HAROLD, D.Sc. (Clemson), Litt.D. (Florida), Provost Emeritus for Agricul-
ture; Dean Emeritus of the College of Agriculture (1949).
LITTLE, WILBERT ALVA, M.A., Professor Emeritus of Ancient Languages (1945).
NETTLES, WILLIAM THOMAS, B.S., District Agent, Agricultural Extension Service
(1947).
PERRY, WILLIAM SANFORD, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics (1947).
REED, PERCY LAWRENCE, M.S., Professor of Civil Engineering (1945).
ROGERS, RUBY ROSE, M.A.E., Instructor in Education (1949).
SHEELY, WALTER JEFFERSON, B.S., Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Extension Service
(1949).
SPENCER, ARTHUR PERCIVAL, M.S., Director of the Agricultural Extension Service
(1947).
TIGERT, JOHN JAMES, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D. Litt., L.H.D., F.R.S.A.,
President Emeritus of the University (1947).
TRUSLER, HARRY RAYMOND, LL.B., Dean Emeritus of the College of Law (1947).
WALKER, EDGAR SMITH, B.S., Professor of Mechanical Engineering (1945).
WILLOUGHBY, CLAUDE HOUSTON, M.A., Professor of Animal Husbandry (1947).
YEATON, PHILIP 0., B.S., Professor of Industrial Engineering (1947).


COUNTY AND HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS,
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
ARMOR, JADIE 0., B.S.A.E., Assistant Hillsborough County Agent (1941-1941).
ATKINSON, ETHEL, B.A., Escambia County Home Demonstration Agent (1929-1929).
AYERS, EDWARD LEE, B.S., Manatee County Agent (1922-1924).
BAETZMAN, FREDERICK ERNEST, B.S.A., Orange County Agent (1935-1935).






CATALOG 1950-1951


BARBER, FREDERICK WILLIAM, B.S.A., Okaloosa County Agent (1936-1939).
BEEM, JEAN, B.S.A., Assistant Hillsborough County Agent (1948-1949).
BELL, STUART CRAIO, B.S.A., Holmes County Agent (1940-1940).
BELOW, CHARLES CLAYTON, B.S.A., Assistant Alachua County Agent (1950-1950).
BLITCH, LooNms, B.A.E., Alachua County Agent (1931-1931).
BOOTH, EDWIN W., B.S.A., Assistant Hillsborough County Agent (1946-1946).
BOTTS, LORA A., B.S., Santa Rosa County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-1947).
BOUDET, MARCEL A., B.S.A., Indian River County Agent (1943-1943).
BOYLES, CLIFFORD R., Okeechobee County Agent (1945-1945).
BRABSON, CATHERINE, M.S., Highlands County Home Demonstration Agent (1945-
1945).
BRANT, RUBY, B.A., Pasco County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-1947).
BRINKLEY, HARRY JOHN, M.S.A., Hernando County Agent (1941-1941).
BROCK, MARGUERITE RISH, B.S.H.E., Walton County Home Demonstration Agent
(1946-1947).
BROTHERS, SHELBY LEE, B.S.A., Lafayette County Agent (1935-1935).
BROWN, LALEAH BURNETT, B.S., Sarasota County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-
1947).
BROWNLEE, MARY L., B.S.H.E., Washington County Home Demonstration Agent (1948-
1948).
BUFFINGTON, MARY D., B.S.H.E., Assistant Escambia County Home Demonstration
Agent (1950-1950).
CAHOON, DORIS ANNETTE, B.S., Suwannee County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-
1947).
CAMPBELL, JOHN DOUGLAS, B.S.A., Assistant Dade County Agent (1947-1947).
CARLTON, MINNIE McCLAMROCK, B.A., Assistant Polk County Home Demonstration
Agent (1949-1949).
CAUSEY, JOHN HJALMAR, B.S.A., Assistant Palm Beach County Agent (1948-1948).
CLARK, BERNARD HENTZ, B.S.A., Assistant Gadsden County Agent (1948-1948).
CLARK, KENNETH A., B.S.A., Sarasota County Agent (1942-1942).
CLAY, RALPH THOMAS, B.S.A., Assistant Putnam County Agent (1949-1949).
CLEMMONS, ALEXANDER HERSCHEL, B.S.A., Assistant Leon County Agent (1948-1948).
COLSON, LUCILLE B., B.S.H.E., Assistant Duval County Home Demonstration Agent
(1947-1947).
COWEN, ELIZABETH MAE, B.S., Suwannee County Home Demonstration Agent (1949-
1949).
COWEN, WILLIAM JOSHUA, B.S.A., Union County Agent (1946-1948).
CROOM, LAURENA, B.S., Holmes County Home Demonstration Agent (1948-1948).
CUNNINGHAM, LEMUEL EDWARD, B.S.A., Assistant Pinellas County Agent (1947-1947).
CURTIS, MARY AGNES, B.S.H.E., Jefferson County Home Demonstration Agent (1948-
1948).
DALLY, MARY M., B.S., Dixie County Home Demonstration Agent (1949-1949).
DAUGHERTY, MAMIE SKINNER, B.S., Marion County Assistant Home Demonstration
Agent (1947-1947).
DAVIS, ANNE DORSEY, B.S.E., Manatee County Home Demonstration Agent (1946-
1946).
DAVIS, HENRY PITTMAN, B.S.A., Assistant Santa Rosa County Agent (1950-1950).
DAVIS, JOHNNIE EVERETTE, B.S.A., Assistant Manatee County Agent (1948-1948).
DAWSON, CHARLES RALPH, M.S.A., Seminole County Agent (1934-1934).






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DENINGTON, FRANCES POYNER, B.S., Hardee County Home Demonstration Agent (1949-
1949).
DICKENSON, ELIZABETH CARRIE, B.S., Orange County Home Demonstration Agent
(1941-1941).
DICKINSON, CLARENCE LEROY, B.S.A.E., Dixie County Agent (1943-1943).
DRIGGERS, ALBERT GILCHRIST, B.S.A., Gadsden County Agent (1945-1945).
EBY, EDNA LOUISE, B.S.H.E., Volusia County Home Demonstration Agent (1943-1948).
EDWARDS, J. LAWRENCE, B.S.A., Assistant Dade County Agent (1935-1936).
ELKINS, RUTH McKEOWN, B.S.H.E., Taylor County Home Demonstration Agent
(1942-1942).
ELLIS, GORDON BROOKS, Nassau County Agent (1944-1946).
EUBANKS, FLOYD LEE, B.S.A., Assistant Lake County Agent (1949-1949).
EVANS, WILLIAM EDGAR, B.S.A., Sarasota County Agent (1926-1926) (Retired Novem-
ber 30, 1949).
GATLIN, FLORENCE Lou, B.S., Calhoun County Home Demonstration Agent (1949-
1949).
GAY, EUNICE F., B.A., Brevard County Home Demonstration Agent (1934-1934).
GEORGE, HARRY E., B.S.A., Gilchrist County Agent (1946-1946).
GLENN, WOODROW WILSON, B.S.A., Jackson County Agent (1944-1944).
GRADY, EUNICE, M.S., Dade County Home Demonstration Agent (1934-1934).
GREEN, FRED JACKSON, B.S.A., Assistant Calhoun County Agent (1949-1949).
GRIFFIS, RALEIGH SIDNEY, M.Ag., Assistant Hillsborough County Agent (1949-1949).
GUNN, JUNE RAWLS, B.S.A.E., Osceola County Agent (1923-1923).
HARRELL, AUBREY LUTHER, B.S.A., Assistant Columbia County Agent (1950-1950).
HARRIS, BERT JEROME, B.S.A., Assistant Highlands County Agent (1948-1948).
HARRISON, HENRY OSCAR, B.A.E., Washington County Agent (1944-1946).
HAYMAN, WILLIAM PAUL, B.S.A., Polk County Agent (1928-1928).
HEATH, ALYNE CARTER, Jackson County Home Demonstration Agent (1943-1943).
HEIST, ANNA EUGENIA, B.S.H.E., St. Johns County Home Demonstration Agent (1917-
1917).
HENDRICKS, CARL, B.S.A., Marion County Agent (1941-1946) (Resigned December
10, 1949).
HEUCK, CARL PETER, B.S.A., Lee County Agent (1926-1926).
HIGGINS, JAMES FRANCIS, M.A., Pasco County Agent (1944-1944).
HORTON, SARA, N.A., Palm Beach County Home Demonstration Agent (1945-1945).
HUGGINS, GEORGE THOMAS, B.S.A., Assistant Duval County Agent (1941-1942).
HUTCHINSON, ARNOLD GLEN, Glades County Agent (1942-1942).
INSCOE, LUCILE JOSIE, B.S.H.E., Martin County Home Demonstration Agent (1945-
1945).
JERNAGAN, JULIA PRICE, B.S., Nassau County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-1947).
JOHNSON, FRANCES EVELYN, B.S.H.E., Assistant Pinellas County Home Demonstration
Agent (1948-1948).
JOHNSON, HUBERT L., Hendry County Agent (1944-1944).
JOHNSON, LEVI MOTT, B.S.A., Martin County Agent (1944-1944).
JONES, THOMAS BYRON, B.S.A., Calhoun County Agent (1948-1948).
KENDRICK, WILSON HARPER, B.S.A., Assistant Polk County Agent (1946-1946).
KENNEDY, JOHN MORGAN, Jackson County Agent (1942-1942) (Resigned January 31,
1950).
KENT, OLGA MARY, B.S.H.E., Assistant Dade County Home Demonstration Agent
(1935-1935).






CATALOG 1950-1951


KIERCE, STERNER CLIVE, B.S.A., Suwannee County Agent (1934-1934).
KILLGORE, SAMMIE JORDAN, B.S., Assistant Orange County Home Demonstration Agent
(1948-1948).
KIME, CHARLES DAVIDSON, B.S., St. Lucie County Agent (1917-1944).
KING, EMILY ELIZABETH, B.S., Assistant Hillsborough County Home Demonstration
Agent (1946-1946).
KISER, LORA ANTOINETTE, B.S.H.E., Hillsborough County Home Demonstration Agent
(1946-1946).
LAFFITTE, ELISE NOLTING, Gadsden County Home Demonstration Agent (1923-1925).
LAFFITTE, PEARL GARNET, B.S., Duval County Home Demonstration Agent (1919-1920).
LAIRD, ADDISON SHULER, M.S.A., Wakulla County Agent (1936-1936).
LAIRD, CUBIE R., B.S.A., Gulf County Agent (1945-1945).
LATTIMER, CHARLOTTE M., B.S.H.E., Pinellas County Home Demonstration Agent
(1950-1950).
LAWTON, ALBERT SIDNEY, B.S., Duval County Agent (1927-1927).
LAWTON, BEVERLY ELDRIDGE, B.S., Broward County Agent (1921-1932).
LOGAN, JOHN HENRY, B.S.A., Pinellas County Agent (1927-1927).
MCCALL, EMMETT DEHYRL, B.S.A.E., Santa Rosa County Agent (1942-1942).
McCLANE, THOMAS K., JR., Bradford County Agent (1936-1936).
MCCLOUD, DANIEL DAVID, B.S.A., Taylor County Agent (1935-1935).
MCINTYRE, ARCHIBALD E. C., B.S.A., Assistant Dade County Agent (1949-1949).
MCMULLEN, P. R., B.S.A., St. Johns County Agent (1933-1933).
McQUEEN, NATHANIEL HOLDERBY, B.S.A.E., Charlotte County Agent and Assistant
4-H Club Agent (1935-1942).
MCRORIE, THOMAS H., B.S.A., Assistant Alachua County Agent (1942-1946) (Resigned
December 31, 1949).
McSWINE, JOSEPHINE H., B.S.H.E., Alachua County Home Demonstration Agent
(1945-1945).
MAINES, ORLANDO MELVIN, B.S.A., Sumter County Agent (1942-1942).
MALONE, JOSEPH WHEELER, B.S., Jefferson County Agent (1929-1929).
MALTBY, HUBERT EDMOND, Putnam County Agent (1943-1943).
MEDLIN, QUENTIN, B.S.A., Citrus County Agent (1947-1950).
MICHAUD, MILDRED JOHNSON, B.S.H.E., Assistant Palm Beach County Home Demon-
stration Agent (1943-1943).
MILLER, LUCIE KRAMER, B.S., Lake County-Home Demonstration Agent (1936-1936).
MILLS, JAMES RAYMOND, B.S.A., Baker County Agent (1937-1937).
MOUNTS, MARVIN UMPHREY, Palm Beach County Agent (1925-1929).
NEFF, SAM FRANK, M.S.A., Assistant Hillsborough County Agent (1948-1948).
NESMITH, AMBROSE E., B.S.A., Hamilton County Agent (1947-1947).
NORRIS, ROBERT ELFRED, B.S.A., Lake County Agent (1935-1937).
ODOM, ALBERT HILL, B.S.A., Assistant Escambia County Agent (1947-1947).
OXER, VAN TUYL, B.S.A., Highlands County Agent (1944-1944).
OXFORD, JAMES THOMAS, B.S.A., Brevard County Agent (1942-1942).
PEARSON, LAMITTICE, Calhoun County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-1947) (Re-
signed August 31, 1949).
PLATT, WILLIAM J., M.S.A., Volusia County Agent (1936-1936).
PRYOR, ROBERT SHEPHERD, B.S., Assistant Broward County Agent (1946-1946).
RADNEY, CAMILLA R., B.S., Liberty County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-1947).
REVELL, WILMA ALSOBROOK, B.S., Gulf County Home Demonstration Agent (1945-
1945).










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


RHODEN, JAMES LLOYD, B.S.A., Leon County Agent (1946-1946).
RICKENBAKER, THOMAS DEWEY, B.S., Levy County Agent (1936-1936).
ROBBINS, CAREY ARNETT, B.S.A., Assistant Marion County Agent (1949-1949).
ROBERTS, IRENE, M.A., St. Lucie County Home Demonstration Agent (1948-1948).
ROESEL, TILLIE A., M.S.A., Sumter County Home Demonstration Agent (1927-1927).
Ross, DOROTHY P., B.S.H.E., Bradford County Home Demonstration Agent (1947-
1948).
RUSH, ALLIE LEE, B.S., Marion County Home Demonstration Agent (1929-1929).
SEWELL, GLENN MCCLELLAN, Columbia County Home Demonstration Agent (1945-
1945).
SORENSON, JOHANNES AUGUST, Bay County Agent (1943-1944).
SPEER, HERBERT L., M.S.A., Assistant Palm Beach County Agent (1943-1946).
STARBIRD, ELIZABETH WILLIAMS, B.S., Putnam County Home Demonstration Agent
(1942-1942).
STEARNS, MARY R., B.S.H.E., Pasco County Home Demonstration Agent (1950-1950).
STEFFANI, CHARLES HENRY, Dade County Agent (1926-1928).
STENHOLM, FRANK A., B.S.A., Assistant Columbia County Agent (1948-1948) (Resigned
November 30, 1949).
STEPHENS, EUGENE NORBERT, B.S.A., Escambia County Agent (1941-1941).
SUMNERS, FRED CLIFTON, B.S.A., Assistant Jackson County Agent (1948-1948).
SWANSON, HENRY FREDERICK, B.S.A., Assistant Orange County Agent (1948-1948).
SWARTSEL, Ross VERNON, B.S.A., St. Johns County Agent (1946-1946).
TAYLOR, ANNA RUTH, B.S.H.E., Assistant Dade County Home Demonstration Agent
(1948-1948).
TAYLOR, EULA LOUISE, B.S., Broward County Home Demonstration Agent (1937-1937).
TOWNSEND, THOMAS RALPH, B.S.A., Assistant Volusia County Agent (1948-1948).
TURNER, DORIS R., B.S., Citrus County Home Demonstration Agent (1941-1941).
VANCE, EDMUND HUME, B.S.A., Hardee County Agent (1928-1928).
WARREN, EMMA SUE, B.S., Assistant Duval County Home Demonstration Agent (1949-
1949).
WATSON, JAMES N., B.S.A., Columbia County Agent (1946-1949).
WEBB, OUIDA JANE, B.S., Assistant Escambia County Agent (1948-1948) (Resigned
December 31, 1949).
WHITE, ALEC, B.S.A., Hillsborough County Agent (1935-1935).
WILDER, BENNIE F., Madison County Home Demonstration Agent (1936-1936).
WILKINS, MITCHELL, B.S.A., Walton County Agent (1928-1928).
WILLIAMS, VIRGINIA BRYAN, B.S., Levy County Home Demonstration Agent (1949-1949).
WILLIS, ELMA B., B.S.H.E., Polk County Home Demonstration Agent (1946-1946).
WOODARD, LILA, B.S., Seminole County Home Demonstration Agent (1944-1944).
WOODBERY, IVAN S., B.S., Assistant Gadsden County Home Demonstration Agent
(1947-1947).
WOODs, WILLIAM LYLE, B.A., DeSoto County Agent (1943-1943).
ZORN, WILLIAM CARLTON, B.S.A., Assistant Suwannee County Agent (1949-1949).






CATALOG 1950-1951


GENERAL INFORMATION

HISTORICAL NOTE
The University of Florida is a combined state university and land-grant college
located approximately in the center of the State. While its beginnings go back to the
days previous to Florida's admission to the Union in 1845, its first college-the College of
Arts and Sciences-did not open until 1853. A few years later the passage of the Morrill
Act, providing lands for state institutions of higher learning which would promote agri-
culture, mechanical arts, and military science, resulted in the beginnings of the College
of Agriculture, the College of Engineering, and the Agricultural Experiment Station.
By 1905 there were a half-dozen state-supported institutions of higher learning in
Florida, located in various parts of the State and struggling for existence. At that time
the Florida Legislature took a step unprecedented in the history of education in any state
by passing the Buckman Act which abolished the six State Colleges and provided for the
establishment of two new institutions, of which the University of Florida was one. It was
established, for men, at Gainesville and placed under the directions of the Board of Con-
trol, a body created by the Buckman Act, composed of five members representing the
five geographical sections of the State, and serving without compensation, except for
travel and incidental expenses incurred in the performance of duty. Under the Consti-
tution of Florida all responsibility for the State educational institutions is vested in the
State Board of Education, an ex-officio body composed of the Governor, the State Super-
intendent of Public Instruction, the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, and the
State Treasurer. All acts of the Board of Control are subject to the approval of the
Board of Education.

SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT
The University of Florida is located on the western fringe of Gainesville, a city
with a population of about 18,000. Situated in the rolling highlands of central Florida,
midway between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, the city is fortunate in its
natural endowments. Its temperature ranges throughout the year are those of semi-
tropical climate, the mean average temperature being 69.9 degrees. Extremes of heat
are unknown and frost rarely occurs. These favorable conditions, together with the
relatively slight variations in humidity, insure an equable climate that is ideally suited
the year round for study, recreation, and rehabilitation.
In addition to its moderate climate, Gainesville offers many other advantages to
students of the University. Well known as a winter resort, it is excellently equipped
with a wide variety of recreational facilities. The city golf course is within easy reach
of the campus, and swimming and boating accommodations are available at nearby springs
and rivers. The lakes in the vicinity abound in fresh-water fish, while the Atlantic
Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, meccas of deep-sea fishermen, are within a two hours'
drive. As the seat of Alachua County, the city is the focal point of diversified industrial
and farming activities.
A modem and well governed municipality, Gainesville has the distinction of being
one of the cleanest and most progressive cities in the State. Its people are hospitable and
cooperative, and the moral and religious atmosphere is wholesome. Churches that are
active include the Presbyterian, Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist, Catholic, Episcopal, Chris-
tian Adventist, Christian Scientist, Church of Christ, Christian and Missionary Alliance,
Advent Christian, B'nai Israel, and the First Church of the Nazarene. Several of these
denominations maintain chapels adjacent to the campus. These include Crane Hall






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


(Roman Catholic), the Baptist Student Union, Wesley Foundation (Methodist), Chapel
of the Incarnation (Episcopal), the Presbyterian Student Center, and the Hillel Founda-
tion (Jewish). All of the chapels carry on extensive programs of vital interest to
University students.
The city is served by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Seaboard Air Line
Railway. A schedule of daily bus service, with connections to all points in the United
States, is maintained by the Florida Motor Lines.


ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY

GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY

Direct supervision over the University of Florida, its policies and affairs is vested
in the Board of Control, a body composed of five citizens from different regions of the
state who are appointed by the Governor for a term of four years. All actions of the
Board of Control are subject to the final approval by the State Board of Education,
composed of the Governor, who is chairman, the Secretary of State, the Treasurer, the
Attorney General and the Superintendent of Public Instruction, secretary.
University affairs are administered by the president with advice and assistance of
the Academic Council and the Administrative Council. The legislative body of the
University is the University Senate.

UNDERGRADUATE INSTRUCTION

THE LOWER DIVISION

The University College administers all of the work for the freshman and sophomore
years, offering a program which includes the basic comprehensive courses in the major
areas of knowledge and the courses prerequisite to the advanced work in the colleges
and schools of the Upper Division. Upon the successful completion of the University
College program, a student receives the Certificate of Associate of Arts.

THE UPPER DIVISION

The College of Agriculture offers curricula in all of the major fields of agriculture
and grants the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers curricula in architecture, building
construction, landscape architecture, drawing, painting, commercial art, and interior
design and crafts and confers the degrees of Bachelor of Architecture, Bachelor of Build-
ing Construction, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor
of Applied Arts.
The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to degrees of Bachelor of
Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with opportunities for
specializing in all liberal art fields. It gives many of the courses in mathematics, science,
social sciences and humanities required in the curricula of other colleges.
The College of Business Administration offers curricular programs leading to the
degree, Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with specialization in all of the
fields of business and a program in public administration leading to the degree, Bachelor
of Science in Public Administration.
The College of Education has curricula in elementary and secondary school instruc-
tion, and administration leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Education or






CATALOG 1950-1951


Bachelor of Arts in Education. It also carries on an extensive service program for the
schools and teachers of the state. It also administers the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
enrolling students from the kindergarten through the secondary school program.
The College of Engineering offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor of
Aeronautical Engineering, Bachelor of Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Civil Engi-
neering, Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering and
Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering.
The School of Forestry is a unit of the College of Agriculture, offering a professional
curriculum in forestry and wildlife management leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Forestry.
The School of Journalism, a unit of the College of Arts and Sciences. It offers
curricula leading to the degree, Bachelor of Science in Journalism.
The College of Law offers a curriculum leading to the degree, Bachelor of Laws.
The College of Pharmacy offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Pharmacy.
The College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics administers the Student
Health Service, required physical education program, intramural athletics and offers
a professional curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Edu-
cation and Health.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL UNITS SERVING ALL COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

The Division of Music has the responsibility for such musical organizations as the
University Band, Orchestra and Glee Clubs and offers courses in the following areas:
(1) Theory of Music, (2) History, Literature and Appreciation, (3) Applied Music,
(4) Music Education, and (5) Ensemble Music.
The Division of Military Science and Tactics gives the four-year program of the
R.O.T.C. leading to a reserve commission in Field Artillery, Infantry, Air Force Admin-
istration, Air Force Supply or Transportation Corps.
The Department of Required Physical Education administers the program in physical
fitness and sports required of all students.
The Radio Broadcasting curriculum offers opportunity for specializing in radio work
including operation, programming and commercial aspect.

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION

The Graduate School offers programs leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy
in a number of fields, Doctor of Education, Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of
Arts in Education, Master of Architecture, Master of Arts in Building Construction,
Master of Fine Arts, Master of Science in Agriculture, Master of Science in Engineering,
Master of Science in Forestry, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Agriculture,
Master of Education, Master of Business Administration and Master of Physical Educa-
tion and Health. All students pursuing work leading to these advanced degrees are
registered in the Graduate School. All instruction is carried on by the faculties of the
colleges and schools listed above.

STUDENT LIFE
Description of the various services, facilities and activities and regulations concerned
with student life will be found elsewhere in the catalog. The Office of the Dean of
Student Personnel has the responsibility of coordinating a majority of these factors affect-
ing non-instructional aspects of student life.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS
The Dean of the University assists the administration in the improvement of instruc-
tion, the correlating of instructional activities, the adjusting of teaching loads, and in
keeping personnel records of the academic staff.
The Board of University Examiners formulates and administers policies governing
comprehensive examinations and also determines and administers the requirements for
admission to the University.
The Business Manager has the responsibility for collecting and disbursing of funds,
purchasing, auditing, and maintenance of property, buildings and grounds.
The Inter-American Institute was established on June 2, 1930, to foster better educa-
tional and cultural relations between the countries of the Western Hemisphere.
The Faculty Committee on Inter-American Affairs, appointed by the President of the
University, is the governing body of the Institute and controls the policies and program
with the guidance and recommendations of the Advisory Council, made up of individuals
pre-eminent in their separate fields and especially interested in Inter-American Affairs.
The executive officer is the Director appointed by the President of the University, and
directly responsible to him and to the Faculty Committee for the performance of his
duties.
The Inter-American Institute was founded with the following specific aims: (1)
to foster international good will between the Americas, (2) to promote the teaching
of Western Hemisphere languages and civilizations in schools, colleges and universities,
(3) to encourage the exchange of students and professors between colleges and universities
of the Americas, (4) to hold conferences and institutes on Inter-American Affairs, (5) to
stimulate specific studies common to the Americas, (6) to promote an interplay of cultural
ideals, (7) to stimulate exchange of ideas, and (8) to advance Inter-American interests
in all fields of human endeavor.
The Department of Field Services in cooperation with other Departments of the
College of Education organizes conferences and studies in educational procedures deal-
ing with instruction and administration of elementary and secondary schools and gathers
and prepares materials for such activities.
The Office of the Registrar has charge of the registration of students, the mainten-
ance and evaluating of academic records, and the issuance of transcripts of student
records.
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SERVICES
The University Libraries include the General Library and several college and de-
partmental libraries. The latter, located in or near buildings housing the corresponding
colleges and departments include libraries for Agriculture, Biology and Geology, Chemis-
try and Pharmacy, Education, Engineering, Forestry and Law. In the Architecture Book
Room in Peabody Hall is a collection of selected materials for the use of students and
faculty in architecture and allied arts. The P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, an
outstanding collection of Floridiana, is a research center for students of Florida history.
The library serving the Extension activities of the University is located in the Seagle
Building. The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library serves the Laboratory School.
The General Library is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 A. M. to 10:00
P. M. On Saturday the hours are from 8:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M.; on Sunday from
2:00 to 5:00 P. M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P. M. The University College Reading Room
is open until midnight daily except Saturday. When there are changes in the library
schedule for holidays, a holiday schedule is posted. Students are required to present
identification cards when borrowing books.






CATALOG 1950-1951


The basic plan of the General Library: First floor: main circulation desk, card
catalog indicating the holdings of all the libraries on the campus, University College
Reading Room, Reference and Bibliography Room, P. K. Yonge Library of Florida His-
tory. Second and third floors: Browsing Room, and three large divisional reading rooms
for the Humanities, the Social Sciences, and Science and Technology. Fourth floor:
music rooms, and seminar rooms. For the use of graduate students and faculty members,
carrels and study cubicles are provided in the stacks.

GENERAL STATE AND UNIVERSITY AGENCIES
The Agricultural Extension Service selects, prepares, and distributes information
derived from research and observation by specialists in agriculture. It assists county
and home agents in the practical application of recommendations useful for county pro-
grams. The county extension agents help the rural people of the state to carry on
demonstration work, and make available to them the benefits of research and teaching.
The program of this service is coordinated with similar programs of federal agencies.
The General Extension Division organizes and supervises extension classes, corre-
spondence courses, workshops, conferences, and short courses for professional, educational,
occupational, and cultural groups; provides loan collections of books and audio-visual
aids; and maintains adult education consultation services for individuals and organiza-
tions. The Division also serves the Florida State University and the Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical College. The faculty of all three institutions participate in its program.
The Division of Public Relations coordinates the work of interpreting the Univer-
sity's aims, policies and needs through the media of newspapers and radio and special
brochures, pamphlets and pictures.
The Division of Alumni Affairs maintains contact with alumni of the University
and coordinates the activities of the various state alumni clubs. It publishes the Florida
Alumnus, a quarterly magazine containing news items about alumni and University
activities.
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the legislature in 1917 as a de-
partment of the University of Florida.
The main objective of the Florida State Museum is to collect, preserve and interpret
data concerning the history of Florida, both natural and civil. In the natural history of
the state the endeavor is to collect the minerals and exhibit them in connection with their
manufactured products of economics and commerce; to collect the fossils of vegetable
and animal life showing the evolution of life through the geologic ages; to collect speci-
mens of recent vegetable and animal life illustrating the flora and fauna of the state in
connection with their economic and commercial enterprises. In the civil history of the
state the endeavor is to collect material and data of the works of mankind from the early
aborigines on up through the beginning of civilization to the present time; to maintain
exhibits of artifacts of early man, and exhibits of articles in the economic, industrial
and social life showing the advancement of civilization.
Other objectives are to maintain a department of archives for the preservation of
the records of the state; to maintain a library of publications pertinent to the general
and diversified activities of the museum; to maintain a gallery of art for the preserva-
tion and exhibit of portraits of persons who have been responsible for making Florida
a better place to live, and for the exploitations of works of art for the edification of and
as a social center for our citizens; to maintain a department of museum extension among
the schools and communities of the state; to publish reports, bulletins, and monographs
of the progress of the work are some of the activities for which the Florida State Museum
strives, and for which the law provides.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


WRUF, State and University of Florida Radio Station, operates on 850 kilocycles,
with a power of 5,000 watts until sunset Denver, then 100 watts by special authorization
of the Federal Communications Commission. It is an affiliate of the Mutual Broadcasting
System.
One of WRUF's more important functions is that of furnishing practical experience
to students enrolled in the Radio Broadcasting Training program of the University. The
extent to which this policy is applied is demonstrated by the fact that the operating per-
sonnel of WRUF consists almost entirely of University students specializing in radio
work, and the effectiveness of this training is demonstrated by the nationwide reputation
which WRUF has achieved for developing some of this country's leading announcers and
radio executives. The various Radio Broadcasting Training Curricula in addition to
providing this practical operating experience require a selection of courses from many
of the departments of instruction of the University. The student is taught an awareness
of the social obligations placed on any medium whose purposes include public entertain-
ment, information, education, and cultural advancement. He is given the broadest
possible background, to the end that the social implications of radio as a medium for
influencing the public may be recognized and acted upon. These are important aspects
of the program and should be the beginning of the building of a breadth of viewpoint
on the part of the student which he will continue to cultivate by reading and study after
he has completed the training program.
The University of Florida Press. The purpose of the University Press is to encour-
age, seek out, and publish original and scholarly manuscripts which will aid in developing
the University as a recognized center of scholarship and research.
The Press edits and publishes scholarly books and monographs under its own
imprint, and also special addresses, pamphlets, reports, and bulletins for special pur-
poses, without the imprint. It has no responsibility for, or connection with, the editing
and publishing of official university publications such as the University Record Series,
the publications of the Agricultural Experiment Station, the Agricultural Extension
Service, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station.
The Board of Managers of the Press have the responsibility of formulating the
policies and directing the functioning of the Press. They have sole responsibility for
accepting and rejecting manuscripts offered for publication.

ORGANIZED RESEARCH
The Agricultural Experiment Station, a department of the University and the
State's only agricultural research institution, is charged with conducting researches and
experiments leading to the improvement of all phases of Florida's widely varied livestock
and crop production. The Station system, with some 7,500 acres of lands in 14 areas,
comprises the Main Station on the University campus, 7 branch stations and 6 field
laboratories, the whole operating as an integral unit. Field stations are located with full
regard to the needs involved and each has its defined responsibilities and fields of opera-
tion. Much of the work is cooperative with the United States Department of Agricul-
ture and other Federal Departments and State agencies.
Research at the Main Station is conducted within nine departments-agricultural
economics, agronomy, agricultural engineering, animal industry (including animal hus-
bandry, animal nutrition, veterinary science, parasitology and dairy products manufac-
ture), entomology, home economics, horticulture (including vegetable and tree crops and
vegetable packaging and processing), plant pathology (including the herbarium), and
soils. There is maintained, in addition to the research departments, an editorial division
and the Station library which is accessible for use by students.






CATALOG 1950-1951


The field stations and their scope of investigations are as follows:
Citrus Station, Lake Alfred. All phases of citrus production and fruit handling, pack-
ing and processing.
North Florida Station, Quincy. Tobacco, general farm crops and livestock.
Everglades Station, Belle Glade. Specialized agriculture and livestock on the peat
and muck soils of the Everglades.
Subtropical Station, Homestead. Subtropical fruits and winter vegetable production
on the rock and marl soils of the lower east coast.
Range Cattle Station, Ona. All phases of beef cattle improvement and management
and pasture development for the range areas.
Central Florida Station, Sanford. Vegetable production, including insect and disease
control.
West Florida'Station, Milton. Livestock and general farm crops of the extreme west
Florida area.
Pecan Laboratory, Monticello. Pecan insects and diseases.
Potato Laboratory, Hastings. Culture and diseases of potatoes and vegetables.
Watermelon Laboratory, Leesburg. Culture and diseases of watermelons and
grapes.
Strawberry Laboratory, Plant City. Strawberry diseases and culture.
Vegetable Crops Laboratory, Bradenton. All phases of vegetable production in the
southwestern area, and gladiolus diseases.
Frost Warning Service, Lakeland. Cooperative with U. S. Weather Bureau. Min-
imum winter temperature forecasting.
Results of the experimental work of the several stations are published in scientific
journals, bulletins and reports. The latter are available to Florida citizens without
charge.
The Florida Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station is not only the research
division of the College of Engineering but it is also the development laboratory for the
industries of the state. It was officially established in 1941 by the Legislature as an inte-
gral part of the College of Engineering "to organize and promote the prosecution of re-
search projects of engineering and related sciences, with special reference to such of
these problems as are important to the industries of Florida."
The facilities of the station include all the equipment of the College of Engineer-
ing, now valued at about $3,000,000. The station also has available for its use the lab-
oratories, staff and facilities of other divisions of the University, including chemistry,
physics, biology, agriculture, economics, and many others. Because of the close relation
that exists between the study and research activities, students secure much practical in-
formation about engineering and industrial problems which would normally not be en-
compassed in a collegiate program.
The station receives only a small portion of its operating revenue from the state.
The remainder is secured from grants received from research foundations and funds
provided by contracts with the federal agencies and industrial organizations. Large and
small manufacturers avail themselves of one of the finest research laboratories in the
Southeast. Among the outstanding laboratories, in addition to a well equipped shop,
are those in Public Health Engineering, Electronics, Chemical Engineering, Air Condi-
tioning, Soil Mechanics, Electrical Machinery, Paper, Pulp, and Wood products Utiliza-
tion, Farm Mechanization and Corrosion.
Conferences for industrial workers are held at various intervals. These give an
opportunity for intellectual exchange between the University and industry.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The Bureau of Architectural and Community Research is one of the activities of the
College of Architecture and Allied Arts.
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research is a division of the College of Busi-
ness Administration.
The Bureau of Educational Research is administered by the College of Education.
It promotes and directs educational research, assists in educational surveys, publishes
and distributes results of research and other educational publications.
The Bureau of Professional Relations is a research and service unit of the College
of Pharmacy.
The Naval Stores Research Laboratory conducts basic research with the purpose of
contributing new products and new and more efficient industrial processes in the field
of naval stores. It is a part of the Department of Chemistry.
The Public Administration Clearing Service is a branch of the Political Science De-
partment in the College of Arts and Sciences. It provides consulting services to state,
county and local governments in Florida; and publishes surveys of governmental and
administrative problems. Where governmental problems are broader than administra-
tion it acts in cooperation with other branches of the University. Under the General
Extension Division it cooperates in training programs and short courses for public officials
and employees, such as the Short Course for City Managers.
The Sloan Project in Applied Economics is carried on by the members of the staff
of the College of Education with the aid of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and is pri-
marily concerned with the preparation of materials for use in school instruction dealing
with ideas and methods for improved housing.
Cancer Research Laboratory. With the cooperation and assistance of the Damon
Runyon Cancer Fund, the United States Public Health Service and the State Health
Department, the University is carrying on several research projects in the cause, diagnosis
and treatment of cancer.

SUMMER SESSION
During the summer months the University operates a twelve weeks Summer Session
organized in two terms of six weeks each. The Summer Session provides a means for
acceleration of program for the students of the Regular Session with a selected list of
offerings from each of the Colleges and Schools.
The Summer Session offerings of the College of Education are expanded to include
courses of particular interest to teachers in the elementary and primary fields, and the
offerings of many other departments are selected to provide both graduate and under-
graduate courses especially helpful to teachers in both the elementary and secondary
fields. Detailed information is given in the Bulletin of the Summer Session which is
usually published in April.

ADMISSIONS

GENERAL STATEMENT
The Board of University Examiners is the agency responsible for administering all
admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time will
be considered for admission as follows:
1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not attended
college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.






CATALOG 1950-1951


2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university
and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college credit for ad-
vanced standing, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university
and is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college credit as ad-
vanced standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be considered for admis-
sion to the Upper Division school or college of his choice provided his record
indicates the completion of college work in the Social Sciences, the Physical
Sciences, English, the Humanities, and the Biological Sciences.
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated from a
standard college or university, he will be considered for admission to the Graduate
School.

ADMISSION 1950-51

All persons considering attending the 1950-51 session are urged to read the following
carefully.
Date of Application
No applicant will be considered for admission to the 1950-51 session unless the pre-
liminary application has been received at the Office of the Registrar on or before Saturday,
August 19, for the first semester, Saturday, December 30, for the second semester. Other ap-
plication forms (if required), which will be sent upon the receipt of the preliminary application,
must be in the Office of the Registrar on or before September 1, for the first semester, January
15, for the second semester. It will be absolutely impossible to consider applications received
after these dates. All persons planning to attend the Fall Session, whether or not they have
previously attended the University, must file the preliminary application form to be considered.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

A. For students who have never attended college:
1. Graduation from high school. Records show that the student who does not gradu-
ate from high school in the top half of his class rarely succeeds in college work.
The University urges the prospective student to consider this fact carefully before
making application. Non-Florida students will not be considered for admission if
they do not meet this criterion.
2. Satisfactory achievement in high school. The University does not specify any high
school units as required, but the general pattern of the units presented and the
student's achievement will receive careful consideration. The records reveal that
those students who scatter most in their choice of subjects are those who accomplish
least in any of them. Therefore applicants who present a record which shows no
unity or a lack of essential subjects cannot be considered.
3. Satisfactory scores on placement tests. All applicants must take the placement
tests before being admitted to the University College. These are achievement tests
in the fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and natural sciences. Attain-
ments in these fields are possible without specific high school courses and are not
guaranteed by the acquiring of certain high school units. If the scores on the
placement tests indicate inadequate foundation for college work, the applicant may
be denied admission.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


B. For transfer students:*
1. Honorable Dismissal. The student must be eligible to return to the institution
last attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed to return to the in-
stitution last attended cannot be considered for admission.
2. Satisfactory record. All transfer students must have made an average of C or
higher on all work attempted at all institutions previously attended to be considered
for admission.
3. The University of Florida accepts on transfer only those courses completed at
other institutions with grades of C or higher.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION
A. From the University College:
See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the University College and the
specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools.
B. By advanced standing from other institutions:
1. Honorable dismissal from the institutions previously attended. An applicant for
admission who for any reason is not eligible to return to the institution last attended
cannot be considered for admission to the University.
2. An average of C or better. The average grade for all work attempted at other
institutions must be C or better. An average grade of C or better is required for
graduation from the University of Florida, and one who has not maintained this
average before coming to the University need not apply.
3. A minimum of 64 semester hours accepted as transfer credit (only those courses
completed at other institutions with grades of C or higher) not more than four of
which are in Military Science or Physical Education.
4. Specific course requirements for the professional school of the applicant's choice.
The courses listed as required for admission to the Upper Division under the various
curricula or acceptable substitutes must be offered as advanced standing to qualify
the student for admission to the Upper Division. An applicant lacking some of
these requirements may be permitted to enroll in the Upper Division and complete
them without reducing the credits required in the Upper Division for a degree.
In some cases the student may be required to enroll in the University College until
these requirements are met.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
Special students may be admitted to the various schools and colleges of the Upper
Division only by approval of the Board of University Examiners. Each case will be con-
sidered on an individual basis. Application for admission as a special student must in-
clude: (1) records of previous educational experience (high school or college transcripts) ;
(2) a statement as to the type of studies to be pursued; (3) a brief statement of the
reason or reasons for selecting a special program other than a regular one; (4) satisfac-
tory evidence of ability to pursue these studies-for example, a student to enroll as a
special student for some technical courses and who feels qualified to do so by reason of
employment or other experience should submit a brief description of this experience.



*The student who has matriculated at any college or university, regardless of the
amount of time spent in attendance or credit earned, is regarded as a transfer student.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW
Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have received a degree in arts
or science in a college or university of approved standing, or must be eligible for a degree
in a combined course in the University of Florida, upon the completion of one year of
work in the College of Law. The University also offers this combined course with the
Florida State University. The combined course will be discontinued in 1952. The last
class that can qualify for admission to law thru one of the combined curricula will be
that class which enters the College of Law in February, 1952.
Under existing legislation veterans may continue to enter on two years of academic
college work meeting the standards of the Association of American Law Schools.
The applicant who has not received a degree must have made an average of C or
higher in all work taken in the college or university where he has prepared for entrance
to the College of Law. For information on admission to the College of Law with ad-
vanced standing see the section of the catalog headed College of Law.

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of an
accredited college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient
in quantity and quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student pro-
poses to major.
A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration.

ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR VETERANS
In addition to the regular academic requirements as set forth in the foregoing pages,
the entering veteran will be interested in the procedures necessary to qualify for the vari-
ous types of educational benefits available to veterans of World War II.
THOSE ENTERING UNDER THE G. I. BILL (PUBLIC LAW 346)
Under the provisions of this act the United States Veterans Administration assumes
responsibility for fees and costs of instructional materials actually needed by any veteran
who holds an honorable discharge and who had ninety days or more of active duty.
Application should be made to the Veterans Administration well in advance. Special
forms for this purpose are available at the various offices of the Veterans Administration.
If there is no office in your city, the forms can be obtained by addressing the Veterans
Administration, Pass-a-Grille Beach, Florida. With this form must be submitted appro-
priate documents as required by the Veterans Administration. These include certified
copies of honorable discharges or certificates of separation, which would show your
entire service history. If claim is to be made for dependents, additional evidence must
be submitted. It is advisable that you consult with some representative of the Veterans
Administration for assistance in preparing such documents.
If the application is approved, the veteran will receive from the Veterans Adminis-
tration a form called a Certificate of Eligibility. The veteran should keep this in his
possession until he actually reports for registration at the University. If the Certificate of
Eligibility has not been received by the applicant by the time he is to report for registra-
tion, he will be charged for fees and books until the Certificate of Eligibility has been
cleared with the Veterans' Record Section of the Office of the Registrar. The veteran
will be refunded monies expended for fees and required supplies obtained from the Uni-






CATALOG 1950-1951


versity Bookstore upon presentation of receipts to the Auditor of Veterans' Accounts after
his Certificate of Eligibility has been cleared. The veteran's subsistence payments (which
are made directly to him) cannot begin until the Certificate of Eligibility properly en-
dorsed by the veteran has been filed with the Office of the Registrar, in turn endorsed by
him, and forwarded to the Veterans Administration.

THOSE ENTERING UNDER VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ACT
(PUBLIC LAW 16)
Government benefits are awarded to certain veterans who have service-connected dis-
abilities. Application must be made to the Veterans Administration and should be made
well in advance of the time the student expects to enter. If the veteran's application for
benefits under this act has not been approved by the time he is to report for registration,
he should bring a copy of his discharge or certificate of service and begin his University
work under the provisions of Public Law 346. Advisors from the Veterans Administration
will be present during registration to assist such men in making application for benefits
under Public Law 346. These advisors will not, however, be in a position to act upon
applications for Public Law 16 in such a way that the eligibility for benefits can be
determined immediately.

COLLEGE CREDIT FOR SERVICE TRAINING
Veterans will be allowed credit for training and experiences obtained in the armed
forces during the war in accordance with the recommendations of the American Coun-
cil on Education as set forth in "A Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences
in the Armed Services." All veterans entering or reentering the University should con-
sult the Director of Admissions in the Office of the Registrar. In many cases it will be
helpful to the student and his dean in planning a program if this can be done in ad-
vance of registration.

INFORMATIONAL AND ADVISORS' SERVICES
All agencies of the University are serving student veterans and can be of assistance
in many ways. Probably the best results can be obtained if the following are consulted
for the types of information or services indicated:
A. Information pertaining to Veterans Administration procedure and regulations: Officer
in Charge, Veterans Administration Contact Office, Tenth Floor Seagle Building,
Gainesville.
B. Vocational Guidance: Veterans Guidance Center, Seagle Building, Gainesville, or
The Bureau of Vocational Guidance, Building E, University of Florida, Gainesville.
C. College credit for service training: The Director of Admissions, University of Florida.
D. General information and advice: Office of the Counselor for Veterans, University of
Florida.

ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE NOT
CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES

The student from another country must:
1. Comply with the regulations of that country or nation and adhere to the regu-
lations of the Department of Justice of the United States.
2. Meet the admissions requirement of the University of Florida.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SPECIAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ALIENS
English Language Proficiency
The student must present satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the use of spoken
and written English, adequate to assure success in the program of studies to be pursued.
Financial Arrangements
The student must present satisfactory evidence that adequate finances are assured
in an amount sufficient for the student to pursue his program of studies.
When to Apply
The times set forth in this catalog for making application for admission are the dates
after which the application will not be considered. It is urged that the first application
or letter of inquiry be made at least six months before the student plans to begin study
at the University of Florida.
Where to Apply

Make application to: Director of Admissions
Office of the Registrar
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A.

Follow carefully the instructions submitted by the Director of Admissions.

EXPENSES

REGISTRATION FEES
Each student, depending upon his classification, pays one of the following registra-
tion fees each semester, if registration is completed in the regularly scheduled registration
period (see University Calendar).

Florida students enrolled in all colleges and schools other
than the Graduate School ...................................................................... $ 50.00
Florida students enrolled in the Graduate School ..................................... 35.00
Part-time Florida students (undergraduates carrying 9
hours or less) ....................................................... .................. .................. 35.00
In-service Florida public school personnel enrolled in the
Graduate School .......-----------------------------...........................................-------------.........---..................... 25.00
Florida school personnel enrolled in Principals' or Class-
room Teachers' Conference courses ........................................................ 15.00
Non-Florida students enrolled in all colleges and schools
other than the Graduate School .............................................................. 225.00
Non-Florida students enrolled in the Graduate School .............. ................. 210.00
Non-Florida part-time students (undergraduates carrying
9 hours or less) ........................................................................................ 210.00
Fees for registration after the regular registration period are increased $5.00. There
are no waivers of the increased fees for any reason.

DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRATION FEES
The registration fees listed in the above table include the following:
Contingent Fee. A fee of $28.00 per semester is charged each student.
Building Fee. A fee of $2.50 per semester is charged each student, the income
being used for building construction and rehabilitation.






CATALOG 1950-1951


Infirmary Fee. Each student is charged an Infirmary fee of $7.50 per semester,
which secures for the student the services of the Infirmary staff. Additional charges are
made for board at the rate of $1.75 per day. Consultation, special duty nursing, special
medicines, special treatments, special laboratory work, and X-ray interpretation by a
qualified Radiologist are all services not covered by this fee and an additional charge
is made for them. No major surgery is performed at the Infirmary except in an extreme
emergency, and therefore all expenses incurred for major surgery or any other referred
service are the responsibility of the student and his parents.
Student Activity Fee. A fee of $12.00 per semester is assessed to maintain and
foster athletic sports, student publications, and other student activities. Student fees are
assessed by a vote of the student body and approved by the Board of Control before they
are adopted.

COURSE FEES
The only course fees charged are those for music. Fees for applied music lessons,
instrument rental and practice room rental are payable at the time of registration.
No deduction will be made for lessons missed by the student. In case of serious
illness, make-up lessons will be arranged in the Division of Music office. Lessons missed
because of University holidays or during examination week will not be re-scheduled.

APPLIED MUSIC LESSON FEES
One lesson per week, one-half hour......................$30.00 per semester
Two lessons per week, one-half hour each..........- 60.00 per semester
PRACTICE ROOM RENTAL FEES
One hour per day for the semester ...............................................------------------------$ 5.00
Two hours per day for the semester ............................................ 10.00
Three hours per day for the semester .......................................... 15.00

INSTRUMENT RENTAL FEES
Brass, woodwind and string instruments owned by the University may be rented by
students at the rate of $5.00 per semester.

SPECIAL FEES
Fees which apply in special cases only are listed below:
Breakage Fee.-Any student registering for a course requiring locker and labora-
tory apparatus in one or more of the following departments is required to buy a break-
age book: Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology, and Soils. This book costs $5.00. A refund
will be allowed on any unused portion at the end of the year, when the student has
checked in his apparatus to the satisfaction of the departments concerned. Veteran
students do not buy these books. They are charged by the Laboratory concerned for
breakages incurred and for consumable materials.
Comprehensive Examination in Education.-All graduate students in Education
are required to take a special comprehensive examination (National Teachers Examina-
tion or equivalent). A fee is charged each student and is payable with other fees at the
time of registration. For the current year the fee is $6.00.
Application Fee for Comprehensive Examination.-A non-refundable fee of $1,
payable on the day of application, is charged for each application for a comprehensive






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


examination in one of the basic courses of the University College Program. Applica-
tions are necessary only in case the student is not currently registered in the course
concerned.
Graduation Fee. Each candidate for a Bachelor's degree must make application for
the degree in accordance with the date set forth in the University Calendar and pay at
the time of application the graduation fee of $15.00. This will cover the cost of the
candidate's diploma, rental of cap and gown, and twelve commencement invitations. If
the candidate applies for two Bachelor's degrees at the same commencement, the fee will
be $20.00. In the event that the applicant does not fill the requirement for graduation at
the time specified in the original application for degree, he shall be charged a fee of
$5.00 for each subsequent application for the same degree.
Each candidate for a graduate degree (Master's or Doctor's) must make applica-
tion for the degree in accordance with the date set forth in the University Calendar and
pay at the time of application a fee of $25.00. This will cover the cost of the candi-
date's diploma, rental of a cap and gown, twelve commencement invitations, thesis bind-
ing fee, and cost of printing cover and title page of thesis. The candidate will also be
given the hood representative of his degree. In the event that the applicant does not
fill the requirement for graduation at the time specified in the original application for
degree, he shall be charged a fee of $5.00 for each subsequent application for the same
degree.
Transcript Fee. A student is furnished a first copy of his record free (regardless
of the amount of work completed). Subsequent copies are charged for at the rate of
$1.00 each, unless more than one copy is ordered at the same time, in which case there
is a charge of $1.00 for the first copy and 25 cents for each additional copy on the same
order. University transcripts may be obtained only from the Registrar's Office.
Library Fines.-A fine of 5 cents a day is charged for each book in general circu-
lation which is not returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be
checked out overnight, and if they are not returned on time the fine is 15 cents for the
first hour and 5 cents an hour or fraction of an hour thereafter until they are returned.

DEPOSITS
Room Reservation. Students wishing to apply for rooms in University Housing
Facilities must forward to the Director of Housing a Room Reservation Deposit of $10.00
at the time such application is made.
R.O.T.C. Deposit. All students enrolled in Basic Military Science and Tactics are
issued regulation uniforms and other military equipment necessary. To provide against
loss and insure prompt return each student enrolled in any R.O.T.C. course is required
to make a deposit of $20.00 at the time of registration. This will be refunded upon re-
turn of all Government property in satisfactory condition.

PAYMENT OF FEES AND DEPOSITS
Fees are payable as a part of the registration procedure (except for the non-Florida
fees for the first semester of attendance which must be sent to the Office of the Registrar
with admission credentials).
The Room Reservation Deposit must accompany the application for room reservation
that is sent to the Director of Housing.
The Special Fees are payable by the date set in the University Calendar or at the
time the student expects to receive the service for which the fee is assessed.






CATALOG 1950-1951


R.O.T.C. Deposit is payable at the time of registration.
Failure to pay registration fees when due makes the registration incomplete and
will result in the charging of the increased registration fee as described above.

REFUND OF FEES
A student cancelling his registration on or before the date scheduled for first class
meetings of a semester will be entitled to a full refund of registration and course fees.
A student whose registration is cancelled by official University action at the be-
ginning of a semester will be entitled to full refund of registration and course fees.
Students withdrawing from the University before the date specified in the Univer-
sity Calendar are entitled to a refund of all registration and course fees except $5.00
of the contingent fee. This $5.00 is the cost of service in registering the student and
cannot be refunded.

TUITION
Non-Florida students, including those pursuing graduate work, pay tuition of
$175.00 per semester in addition to the fees charged Florida students.
Classification of Students.-For the purpose of assessing tuition, students are classi-
fied as Florida and non-Florida students.
A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents have
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his regis-
tration; or (2) whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death, and
who has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) whose parents were not residents
of Florida at the time of their death but whose successor natural guardian has been a
resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding the student's
registration.
A Florida student, if over twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents are
residents of Florida (or were at the time of their death) and who has not acquired
residence in another state; or (2) who, while an adult, has been a resident of Florida
for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration, provided such
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in Florida; or
(3) who is the wife of a man who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve
consecutive months next preceding her registration; or (4) who is an alien who has
taken out his first citizenship papers and who has been a resident of Florida for at least
twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida
students.
The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his first
registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, in the
case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this State, by main-
taining such residence for twelve consecutive months. If the status of a student changes
from a non-Florida student to a Florida student, his classification may be changed at the
next registration thereafter.
A fee of $10 will be charged all students registering incorrectly. In the case of non-
Florida students, this fee will be assessed in addition to the tuition. In the case of
Florida students who give an out of state address at the time of registration or any other
time, this fee will be charged unless the student files a written explanation acceptable
to the Registrar stating why the out of state address was given and giving proof that his
residence is Florida.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OTHER EXPENSES
Room Rent.-Rent for rooms in the Residence Halls varies from $30.00 to $110.00
per student per semester. Remittances for room rent should be made in accordance
with the directions issued by the Director of Housing. If the student does not reside
in one of the units of the Residence Hall System the arrangements concerning rates and
method of payment are the responsibility of the individuals concerned.
Meals.-Cost of meals in the University Cafeteria varies with the individual. Books
of coupons having cash value may be purchased from the Office of the Business Man-
ager or meals may be paid for in cash.
The P. K. Yonge Cafeteria, located in the Yonge Building, serves noon day meals
five days each week, and offers to University students high quality food at reasonable
prices.
The University Soda Fountain, located in the basement of Florida Union, offers
strictly fountain service, all kinds of sandwiches, candies, tobaccos, etc.
Books and Supplies.-Cost of these items varies with the program of the student. It
is estimated that from $40.00 to $90.00 per year will cover this expense for most stu-
dents.

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR
Typical
Registration fees and course expenses ............................... ...................$100.00*
Books and Training Supplies ................. ... ............ 75.00
Laundry and cleaning ...... .................................. .......... .............. 55.00
Room and board .................. ...................................................... 600.00
Incidental expenses ............... ........... ----........... ................ 200.00

*Non-Florida students are charged $350 tuition per year in addition. Students
enrolled in R.O.T.C. (required of Freshmen and Sophomores) must deposit
$20.00 at time of registration. This is refundable at end of year if all equip-
ment is returned in acceptable condition.

STUDENT BANK
Banking facilities are available to students on the campus through the Cashier's
Department of the Office of the Business Manager. The purpose of this service is to
provide a safe repository for cash balances which the student may withdraw as needed.
A flat fee of 50c per semester or term is charged regardless of the number of deposits
or withdrawals. $750 is the maximum balance that may be carried. Any part or all of
it may be withdrawn at one time. Deposits may be made through the mail by check
or money order.

HOUSING

GENERAL INFORMATION
It is the responsibility of each student to obtain his own housing by (1) Applying
to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to University Housing Facilities,
or (2) Making his own arrangements direct with the property-owner for off-campus
accommodations in private housing.






CATALOG 1950-1951


Rates quoted on all housing facilities are subject to change. All facilities are
equipped with basic furniture requirements such as beds, mattresses, dressers, desks,
and chairs. Residents may supply their own drapes, pictures, bedspreads, rugs, lamps,
and linens.
Linens (sheets, towels, and pillow cases) are available for rent on a weekly exchange
basis; pillows, blankets, and limited amounts of extra equipment are available for rent
on a term or semester basis. Linen rates per week are: sheets, 150 each; towels, 74
each; pillow cases, 64 each. Blankets, pillows, and lamps are 800 per semester, 404
per six-week term.
Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, prepaid, addressed in the student's name and
assigned room number. Such shipments will be held in the area trunk rooms until called
for by the student. The University assumes no responsibility beyond the exercise of
reasonable care for any shipment so received.
Carefully selected and trained personnel is in charge of each area, building, or
section. Students with personal problems or questions concerning procedure or policy
are aided by the Head Resident, Resident Manager, or Student Counselor in charge of
the area, building, or section.

APPLICATIONS, ROOM DEPOSITS, AND ASSIGNMENTS
All communications or inquiries concerning housing, applications, deposits, and rent
payments in University Housing Facilities should be sent to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville. An application for space in housing facilities may be
filed at any time. Checks or money orders should be made payable to the University of
Florida. Cash should NOT be sent through the mail.
A room deposit payment of ten dollars must accompany applications for assignment
to facilities for single students. The room deposit will not be accepted unless an ap-
plication accompanies it. Applicants for assignment to housing facilities for married
couples are not required to post a deposit until requested to do so by the Housing Of-
fice.
Each applicant will be given advance notice of exact assignment and deadline date
for payment of rent, if possible.
Roommate requests are honored wherever possible, provided the individuals con-
cerned submit their applications and pay room deposits on the same date and clearly
indicate on their respective applications their desire to room together.
All freshman single students, with the exception of those whose homes are in the
Gainesville area, are required to live in University housing facilities as long as space is
available.

LIVING FACILITIES FOR SINGLE MALE STUDENTS
Five Permanent Residence Halls (Buckman, Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher, and Murph-
ree) of modern brick, concrete, and steel construction. Rooms have been increased in
capacity, through use of double-decker beds and extra equipment, to accommodate
three or four men in the suites, three men in the doubles, and two men in the singles.
Each hall is divided into sections accommodating from 30 to 60 men per section. All
but a few rooms have lavatories, and there is a community bath with shower and toilet
facilities on each floor in each section. Several lounges are available for study and en-
tertainment. Regular Session rates range from $35 to $88 per person per semester.
Four New Residence Halls of modern brick, concrete, and steel construction are
scheduled for completion before September, 1950. Accommodations will consist of single






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


and double rooms. A lavatory room and two community baths with toilets, lavatories,
and showers are located on each floor of each hall. Each building contains a large lounge
on the main floor and a small lounge on each of the upper floors; in addition there
are three recreation rooms and a snack bar in the building group. Coin operated wash-
ing machines and dryers are available for student use. Regular session rates range from
$75 to $100 per person per semester.
Nine Temporary Dormitories, located on-campus, are of one-story construction, and
contain from 16 to 25 rooms each. Each building has a community bath, with shower,
toilet, and lavatory facilities, and a community study room. Each room is set up to
accommodate four students during the Regular Session. In addition to the basic furn-
ishings, each room has a lavatory. However, individual room space is limited. Regular
Session rates are $26 per person per semester when four men are assigned to a room.

FACILITIES FOR SINGLE WOMEN STUDENTS
Three New Residence Halls (Mallory and Yulee completed in September, 1949, and
a third hall scheduled for completion early in 1950) of modern brick, concrete and steel
construction. Accommodations consist of single and double rooms. Community baths
with toilets, lavatories, and showers are located on each floor of each hall. Each build-
ing contains a large lounge on the main floor, a small lounge on each upper floor, and
a recreation room on the ground floor. Provision is made for snack bars in each build-
ing and there are laundry rooms, sewing rooms, and hair-dressing rooms with coin-
operated machines in the group of buildings. Coin-operated irons and ironing boards
are located on each floor of each building as well as in the laundry rooms. Regular
Session rates range from $75 to $100 per person per semester.
Seven Temporary Dormitories, located on-campus, are of one-story construction,
and contain from 16 to 25 rooms each. Each building has a community bath, with
shower, toilet, and lavatory facilities, and a community study room. In addition to the
basic furnishings, each room has a lavatory. However, individual room space is limited.
Regular Session rates are $52 per person per semester for a double room.

FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES
Three Apartment Villages (Flavets), located on-campus, have been provided
through the Public Housing Authority. Assignments are currently restricted to married
veteran students only, with Flavet Village I and II further restricted to couples with
children only. Flavet I contains 26 buildings of one-story, temporary construction, di-
vided into 100 apartment units of one, two, or three bedrooms. Flavet II, similar to
Flavet I in construction, contains 20 buildings divided into 76 apartment units of one,
two, or three bedrooms. Flavet III contains 54 buildings, of two-story, temporary con-
struction, divided into 448 apartment units of one or two bedrooms. All apartments are
equipped with basic furniture requirements, but residents must furnish their own linens,
rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating are by gas, metered to the individual apart-
ments. Electricity consumption in excess of the basic minimum is paid on a monthly
basis on meter readings. Rent rates per month (including basic electricity) are one-
bedroom apartment, $26.75; two-bedroom apartment, $29.50; three-bedroom apartment,
$32.25.
One Temporary Dormitory, located on-campus, provides room space for couples
without children at a monthly rate of $22.50. The building is of one-story, temporary
construction, provides 17 rooms, with a lavatory in each room, separate community






CATALOG 1950-1951


baths, with toilet and shower facilities, for men and women, and a community lounge
or study room. Cooking or kitchen facilities are not available.

PRIVATE ROOMING HOUSES
Facilities and Rates-Many excellent rooming accommodations are available in
private homes or privately operated rooming houses in the Gainesville area. In general,
rates for rooms are somewhat higher than those in University facilities.
Lists-Lists of rooms for single men and single women, and lists of rooms or apart-
ments for married couples are maintained at the Housing Office. In view of frequent
changes in availability, no lists are available for mailing. Definite arrangements must
be made directly with the property-owner by the student.

COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION
The Cooperative Living Organization, organized and operated by students to furn-
ish economical living accommodations for its membership, is located at 227 North Wash-
ington Street. The qualifications for membership are financial need, scholastic ability,
and references of good character. In order to secure membership in the CLO, students
should apply to the CLO President at the above address.

GEORGIA SEAGLE COOPERATIVE
Georgia Seagle Cooperative, organized in September, 1946, is unique in that its
main tenet is Christian fellowship in all phases of college life. It is organized on a non-
profit basis, with each member being assessed his pro-rata share of actual operating
cost, and is only successful through the active participation of all members in its pro-
gram. Georgia Seagle Cooperative is non-sectarian and has most of the major religious
denominations represented in its membership. The administrative powers of the organi-
zation are vested in its representative group, the Co-op Board.
Applications for membership in this organization may be obtained at the Georgia
Seagle Hall, 1110 West University Avenue.

STUDENT LIFE-SERVICES, FACILITIES,
ACTIVITIES, REGULATIONS

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT PERSONNEL
The Dean of Student Personnel coordinates the counseling and service activities
which are available to aid the student in solving personal and educational problems
and to help him in selecting a balanced program of social and recreational activities.

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN
The Dean of Men is the counselor to men students. He is interested in the total
life of the student, including his academic, financial, social, and recreation activities.
In cooperation with the Adviser to Student Organizations and the Dean of Women, his
office serves as a clearing house for all non-classroom activities. The Dean of Men
serves as an adviser to student self-government so that these activities may provide
training in citizenship and leadership. He cooperates with the Director of Housing in
providing counseling for men who live in University living facilities.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN
The Dean of Women has broad responsibilities for the welfare of women students.
She serves as a personal and social counselor for students on a variety of interests and
problems and refers students to other services or agencies if necessary. In cooperation
with the Adviser to Student Organizations and the Dean of Men she serves as an ad-
viser to student government and to such student organizations as the Women's Student
Association, Residence Hall Counselors, and the Panhellenic Council. The Dean of
Women, in cooperation with the Director of Housing, acts in administrative, supervisory,
and counseling capacity with relation to the University residence halls and women's
fraternity houses.

OFFICE OF THE ADVISER TO STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
The Adviser to Student Organizations, whose office is related to the Offices of the
Dean of Men and the Dean of Women, is interested in the activities of all organized
student groups on the campus. This includes the 150 or more student societies and
clubs, the 23 national men's fraternities, and the 11 national women's fraternities. He
is a counselor for personal and group problems related to all student organizations, and
also provides the Interfraternity Conference and the Student Organizations Advisory
Council with leadership and guidance.
The Office of the Adviser to Student Organizations provides the machinery for the
formation and recognition of new organizations on the campus and maintains a com-
plete file about all campus organizations including such things as constitution, officers,
faculty adviser, list of members, etc. It is also the center for the authorization of all
social functions to be given by fraternities and other student organizations.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING
University housing facilities are under the supervision of the Director of Housing.
Major objectives of this office are to develop and maintain comfortable living accom-
modations and to promote policies and programs aimed toward improving scholastic
achievement, personality development and the participation of the individual student
in the responsibilities and opportunities of group living.
Residence halls for women are carefully supervised by qualified fulltime personnel.
In addition, elected hall councils exercise positive responsibility in the day-to-day activi-
ties of the women students. In the residence halls for men there are full-time resident
advisers and resident faculty counselors. Carefully selected student counselors, heading
student groups of approximately 60 men each, assist individual and group activities.
Resident student managers have operational charge of the veterans' apartments.

BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
The services of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene are avail-
able to all students. The chief functions of this Bureau are to analyze the characteristics,
interests, and abilities of the individual student; and to present these analyses to the
student, together with complete descriptions of the occupations involved, in order that
he may choose more intelligently his life vocation.
The bureau makes use of numerous vocational tests to supplement other informa-
tion obtained. A vocational guidance reading shelf is maintained by the bureau in the
University Library to provide students with information about various vocational op-
portunities.






CATALOG 1950-1951


In addition to the services described above, the bureau offers services to students
who find their work hampered by worries, maladjustments, and other unnatural condi-
tions.
VETERANS GUIDANCE CENTER
The University Veterans' Guidance Center provides guidance and counseling in the
matter of helping veterans with the problems they confront in the choosing of and
preparation for their life work. The center may refer veterans to other agencies for
help in the solution of special allied problems.
Through the use of data obtained from interviews, tests and other sources the center
assists in planning a program most suitable to the individual. Tests of aptitude, interest
and personality characteristics are used.
Interested veterans may make an appointment by contacting Veteran Administra-
tion Chief, Advisement and Guidance Center on the tenth floor of the Seagle Building,
or the Director of the Veterans' Guidance Center, tenth floor of the Seagle Building.

OFFICE OF STUDENT PERSONNEL RECORDS
Using various sources, the office of Student Personnel Records collects and inte-
grates information concerning social and scholastic activities of each student. It makes
this information available to qualified counselors who aid the student in making educa-
tional, social, psychological, and vocational adjustment. The keeping of personnel
records is an effort in the understanding of, and service to, the individual student as
he has contact not only with the classroom, but also with all phases of his university
life.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Every effort is made to aid qualified students in obtaining part-time employment.
Opportunities are limited; consequently the number of part-time jobs available does not
approach the number of applicants seeking these jobs. Every attempt is made to place
students in work that utilizes their training and experience.
Each student who is employed by the University must have an honor point average
of "C" for the semester or term immediately preceding his employment. The average
rate of pay per hour is between 50 and 75 cents; the average earnings per month are
about $40.
Student employment is directed by the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships
and Awards, with the Assistant Dean of Men administering the program. All applica-
tions for work should be made prior to the opening of the semester in which employment
is desired. Applications for work, however, may be filed at any time.
Inquiries should be addressed to: Assistant Dean of Men, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.

SCHOLARSHIPS
The University of Florida does not have large sums of money available for cash
scholarships. Many of the scholarships available to students are awarded directly by
the donors, and administered through the Business Office of the University and the
Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships, and Awards. However, there are a number of
scholarships awarded and administered by the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships
and Awards. This Committee collects all information relative to the basis of award,
the value, and other pertinent facts pertaining to scholarships. The Committee also






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


collects information on the applicants and supplies this information to donors. In some
instances the Committee has been given the authority to make awards without con-
sulting donors.
While scholarship as evidenced by academic attainment is an important feature in
making awards, it is by no means the only consideration. The student's potential capacity
to profit by college training and to make reasonable returns to society are important
considerations in making all awards.
In addition to the opportunities for scholarship awards at the University, prospective
students are urged to consult the resources in their home communities. Many civic clubs
and community organizations are interested in providing means whereby students may
attend college when they are convinced the investment will be worth while.
Unless otherwise specified, applications for scholarships listed below should be made
to the Dean of Men, who is Chairman of the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships
and Awards at the University of Florida, Gainesville.



Board of Control Scholarships.-This is a group of scholarships which are awarded
through the Board of Control. Applications should be made to the Chairman of the
Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards in the Dean of Men's Office.
Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is open to students
of the junior and senior classes. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this
award.
Arthur Ellis Hamm Memorial Scholarship.-Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth
C. Hamm in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain
Arthur Ellis Hamm, a former student of the University, who fell in battle at St. Mihiel,
France, on September 14, 1918.
Loring Memorial Scholarship.-A scholarship maintained by Mrs. William Loring
Spencer in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring.
The Charles E. Tufts Memorial Scholarship.-The Charles E. Tufts Estate has
provided for a scholarship to be awarded to a student or students who are graduates
of any high school in Hillsborough County who shall have demonstrated by their in-
dustry and attainments that they are in all respects worthy of such assistance. The
amounts of these scholarships will vary from year to year inasmuch as they are derived
from an investment.
The Cecil Willcox Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship was provided for in
the will of Cecil Willcox and is derived from the income of a sum of money which he
left the University for this purpose. The scholarship is to be awarded to a young man
either born in or a resident of the State of Florida, the applicant to be selected upon
the following bases:
1. He must be qualified to enter the freshman class of said University without con-
dition or without being deficient in any subject required therefore.
2. He must be in actual need of this help to enable him to attend the University
of Florida.
3. He must be worthy to receive such help, and to be worthy must be a young man
of good character and habits, and one who has a capacity for education and
who has demonstrated by his previous work that he is studious and has the de-
sire for an education.
David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is awarded annually
on the basis of scholarship, and is open to members of the junior and senior classes.






CATALOG 1950-1951


Borden Company Foundation, Inc., Agricultural Scholarship. A scholarship amount-
ing to $300 per year for a period of seven years has been made available by the Borden
Company Foundation, Inc. This scholarship is available to the eligible senior student
of Agriculture who has achieved the highest average grade in all college work preceding
the senior year. To be eligible, students must have included in their curricula two or
more dairy subjects. Application should be made to the Dean of the College of Agri-
culture, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Borden Scholarship Award in Pharmacy. The Borden Company Foundation, Inc.,
has made available a scholarship amounting to $300 per year for a period of five years.
This scholarship is available to that eligible senior pharmacy student who has achieved
the highest average grade in all college work preceding the senior year.
The Colonial Dames of America Scholarships.-Occasional scholarships amounting
to $250 per year, toward board and lodging, are awarded by The Colonial Dames of
America. Applications for these scholarships should be made to Mrs. Byron Stookey,
421 East 61st Street, New York 21, New York.
Confederate Memorial Scholarship.-These scholarships were made available by
the Board of Commissioners of State Institutions under authority of Section (1), Chap-
ter 8505 (No. 110, Laws of Florida). The amount of the scholarships is $150 per year.
Applicants must be lineal descendants of a confederate soldier or sailor. There are a
limited number of these scholarships. Ordinarily only two per year are awarded.
County Agricultural Scholarships.-Provision has been made by a legislative act
for a scholarship from each county-to be offered and provided for at the discretion of
the Board of County Commissioners of each county. The recipient is to be selected by
a competitive examination under rules and authority prescribed by the respective County
Board of Commissioners. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for
board in the dining hall and room in the dormitory. Whether such a scholarship has
been provided for by any county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, or the County Agent of the county in question. If it is desired, questions
for the examinations will be provided and papers graded by the University.
The Davis Brothers Scholarship.-Mr. A. D. Davis, President of Winn and Lovett
Grocery Company, Jacksonville; Mr. Tine W. Davis, President of Economy Wholesale
Grocery Company, Miami; Mr. Austin Davis, President of Steiden Stores, Louisville;
and Mr. James E. Davis, Executive Vice-President of Winn and Lovett Grocery Com-
pany, Jacksonville, have made available a sum of $600 to be awarded to students in the
Colleges of Law, Business Administration, Education, and Agriculture. Award is based
on scholarship and economic need of the student and the committee's opinion of the
student's potential promise.
Alfred I. duPont Scholarship Fund.-The purpose of this scholarship is to aid
worthy and needy students. Funds for the scholarship came from stock donated to the
University by Mrs. Alfred I. duPont. Applicants must have completed at least one
semester of college work and must have a "C" average or better. "These scholarships
are to be given-not loaned-but the recipients are requested after their graduations,
when they have earning capacity, to pass a like amount, as they have received, on to
some deserving boy or girl who needs assistance in acquiring an education." The amount
of funds available for these scholarships varies from year to year; the amount of each
scholarship depends on the total amount available.
Duval High Memorial Scholarship.-An act creating the Duval High School
Memorial Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually $275 of the Duval
County funds as financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by
House Bill No. 823, and was approved May 20, 1927. This scholarship, created to






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and traditions of the Duval
High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated, was established
by the Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Application should
be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jacksonville, Florida.
Florida Association of Small Loan Companies Scholarship.-The Florida Associa-
tion of Small Loan Companies has set up a scholarship fund of $150 per year, the
termination of the award to be at the discretion of the donors. The scholarship is
limited to residents of the State of Florida who are seniors in the College of Business
Administration. Need and promise of good citizenship and leadership, along with scholar-
ship, will be the basis of the award. Applications should be made to the Office of the
Dean of Men.
Florida Bankers Association Scholarships.-The Florida Bankers Association awards
three scholarships annually; one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida,
and one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given
at the Annual Boy's Short Course. The examination is given and the award is made
by the State Boys' Club Agent. Applications for these scholarships should be made to
the Dean of the College of Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Lovett-Steiden-Table Supply Fund (Lovetts and Table Supply Food Stores Welfare
Association).-Lovetts and Table Supply Food Stores Welfare Association is a non-
profit corporation organized under the laws of the State of Florida. One of its primary
objectives is the furtherance of higher education through recognition, encouragement
and assistance to meritorious and deserving boys and girls who are eligible for college
training.
Subject to approval by the Executive Committee of this Association, Fully-Paid
Scholarships (including adequate allowance for books, supplies, etc.) may be awarded
meritorious high school graduates upon their recommendation by not less than three
prominent citizens in the community in which the student makes his or her home. Not
more than one such Scholarship shall be awarded in any one year to graduates of any
one high school. Preferred consideration shall be given recommendations made by the
Principal of the high school attended by student, together with the Superintendent of
Schools for the county, district or community in which such school is located. Such
Scholarships may be provided at any accredited institution of higher learning selected
by the eligible student. The Executive Committee of Lovetts and Table Supply Food
Stores Welfare Association will act upon recommendations submitted and its decision
as to Scholarships to be awarded shall be final. Scholarships granted by the Executive
Committee are subject to review by the Committee at the end of each semester or scholas-
tic term and are subject to cancellation in the event the student fails to pass all required
subjects or in the event the student's conduct does not justify continuance of the
Scholarship awarded.
Malever Scholarship.-Mr. Fred Malever of Ocala, Florida, has made available
the sum of $100 as an annual award to a senior boy from one of the Marion County
High Schools to be used to partially defray his expenses for the first year at the Uni-
versity of Florida. The faculties of each of the several high schools may recommend
to the County Superintendent one boy who, in their judgment, is most deserving of this
award. These recommendations are to be submitted to the County Superintendent's
office on or before the last school day in April and the announcement as to the recipient
of the award will be made at the graduation exercises of that student.
The John G. and Fannie F. Ruge Memorial Scholarship and Loan Fund.-This
scholarship and loan fund was made available through the will of the late John G. and
Fannie F. Ruge of Panama City who stated in their will that "there is no greater






CATALOG 1950-1951


privilege in this world than to give young men and women the means of intellectual
growth." A limited amount of the fund has been set up for scholarships; the remainder
is operated as a loan fund. No applicant will be considered who does not have a "C"
average or better, based on all academic work taken. Applicants must have earned at
least thirty hours of acceptable college credit. The maximum scholarship granted any
one student is $250 per year, or a total of $500 while in school.
Franklin County Ruge Awards.-Under the will of John G. and Fannie F. Ruge
a provision was made for two $300 per year scholarship awards. These are made an-
nually to two students registered from Franklin County in the University whose scholar-
ship meets the requirements of the University regulations. Applications for these scholar-
ships should be made to the Dean of Men's Office.
Sears, Roebuck Scholarships.-The Sears, Roebuck Company has given funds to
the University of Florida for the establishment of a number of scholarships in the amount
of $100 annually to first-year students particularly interested in agricultural activities.
At the end of each year the Sears, Roebuck Company awards a scholarship in the
amount of $200 to the outstanding freshman in the Sears, Roebuck Scholarship group,
the money to be made available for his sophomore year.
The State Board of Education Scholarships.-These scholarships are made avail-
able by the State Board of Education for the purpose of encouraging students to prepare
themselves for the teaching profession in the State of Florida. The scholarship awards
are made by the State Board of Education in cooperation with the county superin-
tendents of Public Instruction of the various counties. The examinations for these
scholarships will be held twice each year, usually in April and August, and upon special
call by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The values of the scholarships
are $200 and $400 per year. The number of scholarships for each county available to
University of Florida students is determined by the number of Representatives from
that county in the State Legislature.
National Association of Thoroughbred Breeders Scholarship.-The National Asso-
ciation of Thoroughbred Breeders Scholarship is awarded to a first year student. The
amount of the scholarship is $100.00 per year for two years. The applicant must hold
membership in Future Farmers of America, must be in need of financial assistance and
placement test scores must indicate ability to do high grade college work. Application
should be made to the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards.
United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships.-Scholarships have been estab-
lished by the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Applications
should be made to Mrs. D. A. Avant, 203 West Park Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida.
Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships.-The Rehabilitation Section of the State
Department of Public Instruction provides limited assistance to persons who are phy-
sically handicapped. Requirements for eligibility for this assistance are as follows: The
applicant must have a permanent major physical disability, he must be sixteen years
old or over, he must have a good scholastic record, and must take courses that will pre-
pare him for some vocation at which he can earn a living. Applications for this as-
sistance should be made prior to July 1 for the following school year. Students who
wish to apply should write to the State Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, De-
partment of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida.
Children of Deceased World War Veterans Scholarships.-The scholarships are
for the benefit of children whose parents participated in World War I or World War
II. The Act providing for the scholarships is as follows: "It is hereby declared to be
the policy of the State of Florida to provide educational opportunity at State expense
for dependent children, either of whose parents entered the army, navy, marine or






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


nurses corps of the United States from the State of Florida, and died in that service
or from injuries sustained or disease contracted therein between the 6th day of April,
1917, and the 2nd day of July, 1921, or who have died since or may hereafter die from
diseases or disability resulting from such war service; and also the dependent children
either of whose parents served in any of the military or naval services of the United
States from the State of Florida during the period from December 7, 1941, to the close
of World War II; where the parents of such children have been bona fide resi-
dents of the State of Florida for five years next preceding their application for the
benefits hereof, and subject to the rules, restrictions, and limitations hereof." The
maximum amount to be received by any one student within a period of twelve months
cannot exceed $300. Applications should be made to the State Adjutant of the Ameri-
can Legion of Florida.
REAL ESTATE SCHOLARSHIPS:
Greater Daytona Beach Board of Realtors Scholarship.-This scholarship amounts
to $240 annually and is to be awarded to a student from Greater Daytona Beach pur-
suing the curriculum in real estate. The student will be selected by the Principal of
the Daytona Beach High School. Application for the scholarship may be filed either
with the Dean of the College of Business Administration or with the Principal of the
Daytona Beach High School.
Jay Hearin Scholarship.-This scholarship, which is offered in 1950-51, and which
amounts to $240, is given by Jay Hearin of Tampa. It is awarded by the University
Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards to any student living anywhere
in Florida who is pursuing the curriculum in real estate. Application for this scholar-
ship should be made to the Dean of the College of Business Administration.
Jacksonville Board of Realtors Scholarships.-This scholarship amounts to $240
annually and is to be awarded to a student from Duval County pursuing the curriculum
in real estate selected by the Committee on Student Aid and Scholarships and Awards.
In the event no student from Duval County applies for the scholarship, it is to be award-
ed to a student living anywhere in the state of Florida. Application for this scholarship
may be made to the Scholarship Committee through the Dean of the College of Busi-
ness Administration.
The Keyes Scholarship in Real Estate.-This scholarship which amounts to $240
is offered annually by the Keyes Company of Miami. It is awarded by the University
Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards to a student from Dade County
who is pursuing the curriculum in real estate. Applications therefore should be made
to the Dean of the College of Business Administration.
Lakeland Board of Realtors Scholarship.-This scholarship amounts to $240 an-
nually and is to be awarded to a student from Polk County pursuing the curriculum in
real estate selected by the University Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and
Awards. In the event no student from Polk County applies for the scholarship, it is to
be awarded to a student living anywhere in the state of Florida. Application for this
scholarship may be made to the Scholarship Committee through the Dean of the Col-
lege of Business Administration.
Orlando Board of Realtors Scholarship.-This scholarship amounts to $240 annually
and is to be awarded to a student from Orange County pursuing the curriculum in real
estate selected by the University Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards.
In the event no student from Orange County applies for the scholarship, it is to be
awarded to a student living anywhere in the state of Florida. Application for this
scholarship may be made to the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards
through the Dean of the College of Business Administration.






CATALOG 1950-1951


St. Petersburg Board of Realtors Scholarship.-This scholarship amounts to $240
annually and is to be awarded to a student from Pinellas County pursuing the curri-
culum in real estate selected by the University Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships
and Awards. Application for this scholarship may be made to the Scholarship Com-
mittee through the Dean of the College of Business Administration.
Tampa Board of Realtors Scholarship.-This scholarship amounts to $240 an-
nually and is to be awarded to a student from Hillsborough County pursuing the curri-
culum in real estate selected by the Scholarship Committee of the Tampa Board of
Realtors. The need of the applicant will be taken into consideration as well as scholar-
ship. Application for this scholarship may be made to the Scholarship Committee through
the Dean of the College of Business Administration.
Winter Haven Board of Realtors Scholarship.-This scholarship, which is offered
in 1950-51 and which amounts to $240, is given by the Winter Haven Board of Realtors
to a student from the Greater Winter Haven area who has attended the Winter Haven
High School and who is pursuing the curriculum in real estate. The Scholarship is
awarded by the Principal of the Winter Haven High School with the approval of the
Board of Directors of the Winter Haven Board of Realtors. Application for the scholar-
ship may be filed either with the Dean of the College of Business Administration or
with the Principal of the Winter Haven High School.


LOANS

The several loan funds listed below may be divided into two classes: (1) The
long-term loan fund which allows the student to complete his college education and
repay the loan after graduation, in installments over a period of years; and (2) the
short-term emergency loan fund which aims to meet the needs of unforeseen emergen-
cies that arise in the financing of college expenses. As a rule, the short-term loans are
for small amounts and are repayable within the semester.
Unless otherwise specified, application for loan funds listed below should be made
to the Dean of Men who is Chairman of the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships
and Awards.


American Association of University Women.-The Gainesville Branch of the Ameri-
can Association of University Women offers a loan scholarship of $100 each to women
students who need financial help to continue their education. Gainesville, Florida girls
will be given preference. (No interest while in college; 5% beginning September fol-
lowing last year in college. Repay at minimum rate of $5 a month after graduation
or withdrawal.) Apply to Dean of Women, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
The American Bankers Association Loan.-The American Bankers Association has
allocated to the University of Florida one loan for a student whose major course is in
banking, economics, or related subjects in classes of junior grade or above. The value
of this loan is $250.
Benton Engineering Loan Fund.-On May 20, 1938, a friend of the late Dean
Benton gave to the Engineering College $500 to be used as a revolving loan fund. This
fund is to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial difficulties,
worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some assistance.
Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class. Applications
for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engineering,
University of Florida, Gainesville.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Chemistry Department Loan Fund.-A friend of the Department of Chemistry,
who wishes to remain anonymous, has created a revolving loan fund available to needy
students of chemistry who show promise of success. Eligibility is to be determined by
the Head of the Department of Chemistry or his selected representatives. The maximum
amount to be loaned to a deserving applicant is $200 per year. No interest is to be
charged. No co-signer or endorsement is required. The principal is to be repaid within
five years.
The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida
Loan Fund.-The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of
Florida has established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is
administered by the Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Applications
should be made to the Chairman of the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and
Awards.
William Wilson Finley Foundation.-As a memorial to the late President Finley
and in recognition of his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway Com-
pany has donated to the University of Florida the sum of $1,000 to be used as a loan
fund. No loan from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients
are selected by the Dean of the College of Agriculture, University of Florida, to whom
applications should be sent, or to the Chairman of the Committee on Student Aid,
Scholarships and Awards.
Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund.-The Florida Association of Architects
has created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in
Architecture who have proved themselves worthy. Applications should be made to the
Dean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Humble Oil Company Loan Fund.-A loan fund of $18,500 has been made avail-
able by the Humble Oil Company through the Board of Control. Applicants must have
completed at least one semester of college work with a scholastic average of C or better.
The amount of these loans will not exceed $200 per year to undergraduates. Applicants
will be required to furnish a satisfactory endorser of notes. A schedule of repayment
is provided whereby the borrower will be allowed a period of three years after leaving
the University to complete repayment, with the understanding that at any time while in
attendance at the University or after graduation or leaving the University the total
amount or any part of the loan may be repaid. Loans will bear 5% interest, but will
not begin bearing interest until the borrower is graduated or for any other reason leaves
the University.
The William Kenneth Jackson Loan Fund for Latin-American Students.-Dr. Wil-
liam Kenneth Jackson donated $250 to be used as an emergency loan fund for Latin-
American students in attendance at the University of Florida. Applications for loans
from this fund may be made in the Office of the Dean of Men for amounts not to ex-
ceed $50 to any one student. They are to be repaid within the semester in which the
loan is made.
Kappa Delta Pi Loan Fund.-The Kappa Delta Pi honorary educational fraternity
at the University of Florida has established a loan fund for students who are pursuing
work in the College of Education preparatory to entering the teaching profession. The
fund at the present time amounts to $300. Further information concerning this loan
fund and forms for making application for a loan may be secured from the treasurer
of Kappa Delta Pi at the College of Education, P. K. Yonge School, University of
Florida, Gainesville. Loan Fund Committee: Dr. Kenneth Kidd, Chairman, Mrs. Grace
A. Stevens, and Dr. Charles Durrance.






CATALOG 1950-1951


Kiwanis Club Loan Fund.-The Kiwanis Club of Tampa, Inc., has a limited amount
of money set aside in a revolving student loan fund. Any student from Hillsborough
County is eligible to apply for a loan. Application may be made to Mr. Edward D.
Cooper, 704 First National Bank Building, Tampa 2, Florida.
Knights of Pythias Scholarship Loans.-Several scholarship loans have been estab-
lished by the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Application for these loans
should be made to Mr. Frank Kellow, Secretary-Treasurer, Student Aid Department,
Grand Lodge of Florida Knights of Pythias, Fort Myers, Florida.
The Knights Templar Student Loan Fund.-The Grand Commandery Knights
Templar of Florida has a revolving student loan fund available to students in the various
colleges of the State, for their junior and senior years, where satisfactory references per-
taining to character and scholastic records are furnished. Students should contact local
Commander nearest their homes, as their first step, and then they will be referred to
a committee handling the loan.
The Alfred Morton Kohn Memorial Loan Fund.-The Alfred Morton Kohn
Memorial Loan Fund was established by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kohn in memory of their
son, Alfred Morton Kohn, who was a graduate of the 1942 Class of the University of
Florida. He served in the United States Army as Editor of Stars and Stripes, and after-
wards as War Correspondent of Stars and Stripes in France. He was killed August 29,
1944, in line of duty.
This loan fund is limited to two loans per year of $250 each to students registered
in the College of Arts and Sciences, majoring in Journalism. The loans will be ad-
vanced, without interest, to the two students qualifying, and is to be paid back be-
ginning three years after graduation. The administration of the loan fund shall be
through the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards at the University of
Florida. Applications should be sent to the Dean of Men.
The Ladies' Auxiliary Fund.-The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharma-
ceutical Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in
need of assistance. Further information may be obtained from the Dean of the College
of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Senior Law Loan Fund.-A loan fund available to seniors in the College of Law
was established by the Law Class of 1938 and has been increased by subsequent gifts.
Applications should be made to the Dean of the College of Law, University of Florida,
Gainesville.
The James F. and Elsie A. Magurno Loan Fund.-Applicants must be residents
of the State of Florida and qualify as follows:
1. Be a bona fide resident for three (3) years of the area comprised of Clearwater,
Belleair, Largo, Dunedin, Tarpon Springs and Safety Harbor.
2. Have a total immediate family income of less than $3,000 per annum.
3. Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Sea Scouts and Mariner Scouts are to be given first
preference.
4. Applicants must have a high school average of at least 80% or a college average
of "C". Loans will be made on basis of greatest need.
5. All applicants are to take oath of allegiance to the United States. The maximum
amount for any given semester is $125, with $250 maximum to any one student. No
interest will be charged until one year after the loan is in effect; thereafter, interest,
not compounded, will be charged at the rate of 4%.
Applications should be made to the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and
Awards at the University of Florida or to the local Committee, Courthouse, Clearwater,
Florida.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The Board of Education of the Methodist Church Loan Fund.-The Board of
Education of the Methodist Church has set up a loan fund which is available to students
who are members of the Methodist Church. Information relative to the conditions under
which these loans are made can be secured from The Board of Education of the Metho-
dist Church, 810 Broadway, Nashville, Tennessee; or from the Director of the Wesley
Foundation, West University Avenue, Gainesville, Florida.
The Verne E. Minich Educational Foundation Loan Fund.-The Verne E. Minich
Foundation has made available a loan fund to University of Florida students. The
applicant for a loan from this fund must be a graduate of an accredited high school,
and must have completed at least two semesters of college work with a scholastic aver-
age of C or better. The amount of loans will not exceed $250 per year to any one
individual. Loans will bear 4% interest, but will not begin bearing interest until the
borrower is graduated or for any other reason leaves the University. Applicants will be
required to furnish a satisfactory endorser of their note. A schedule of repayment is
provided whereby a borrower will be allowed a period of three years after leaving the
University in which to complete repayment. Application should be made to the Chair-
man of the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards, Office of the Dean
of Men.
The Albert Alexander Murphree Loan Fund.-A friend and former student of
Dr. Albert Alexander Murphree has contributed $500 to be used as an emergency loan
fund for University of Florida students. Other friends are invited to add to this fund.
This loan fund is designed to meet emergency needs of students. Loans will be
limited to $50 to any one student and are to be repaid within a three months period or
before leaving school. Application for the loans should be made through the Office of
the Dean of Men, University of Florida.
Murphree Engineering Loan Fund.-On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late
President, Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500 to be used as a
revolving loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account
of financial difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they
could receive some assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members
of the junior class. Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean
of the College of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Pharmacy Loan Fund.-The Duval County Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State
Pharmaceutical Association has established a short-term loan fund of $200 for the use
of students in the College of Pharmacy. These loans are made in amounts not exceed-
ing $50 and for periods not exceeding 90 days. Further information may be obtained
from Mrs. P. A. Foote, 729 South Seventh Street, Gainesville, Florida.
P. E. 0. Educational Loan Fund.-This loan fund is available to women students
at the University of Florida. Loans may be secured in amounts of $400, maximum for
one year, or $800.00, maximum for two years. Applications should be made to the Dean
of Women, University of Florida, from whom additional information may be obtained.
Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund.-The Florida chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, national
honorary scholastic society, has established a $250 annual loan fund for Phi Kappa
Phi members. Loans will be made principally to students intending to pursue graduate
work. Application should be made to Professor W. A. Gager, Phi Kappa Phi Loan
Fund, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund.-The Pickett and Hatcher Educational
Fund was created by the late Claud Adkins Hatcher, of Columbus, Georgia, founder of
the NEHI Corporation and its predecessors. In his will, Mr. Hatcher set aside a sub-
stantial sum to assist worthy students to obtain a college education. Inquiries concerning






CATALOG 1950-1951


loans from this fund should be addressed to Pickett and Hatcher Educational Fund,
P. 0. Box 1233, Columbus, Georgia.
Rotary Loan Fund.-The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum
of money to be used in making loans to worthy boys or girls who would not otherwise
be able to attend college. The maximum loan is $300 per year. These loans are not
available to freshmen. Applications for these loans should be made to the President of
the Rotary Club of the city from which the student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham,
Secretary-Treasurer, Florida Educational Loan Corporation, University of Florida,
Gainesville.
The Leo S. Rowe Pan American Fund.-Through the generosity of Dr. Leo S.
Rowe, the late Director General of the Pan American Union, a revolving loan fund was
created to render supplementary assistance to deserving Latin American Students who
wish to pursue studies or investigations in the universities and colleges of the United
States.
The Fund thus created through his will is known as the Leo. S. Rowe Pan Ameri-
can Fund. It is administered through a Permanent Committee, designated by the Coun-
cil of the Organization of American States.
The benefits of the fund are extended in the form of loans to students in the fol-
lowing categories:
1. Latin American students who, having completed their technical or professional
studies, wish to come to the United States to pursue advanced studies or engage in
special research or investigations of a technical or scientific nature.
2. Latin American students who are already pursuing studies or research in the
United States, and who require additional assistance to enable them to complete their
work or to meet an emergency.
3. Latin American students who are the recipients of scholarships for study in the
universities or colleges of the United States, or have resources of their own to undertake
such studies, but who may require additional assistance to enable them to meet their
needs.
The Permanent Committee has particularly stressed the importance that these loans
be granted to applicants whose studies have a direct bearing on the economic, social
and cultural development of the Latin American countries. Emphasis has also been
placed on the fact that all applicants must complete their studies, leading to a degree,
within the maximum period of two years. The maximum obtainable for students already
in the United States is $500 per year. The loans bear no interest and must be repaid
within five years after the completion of the purpose for which they were granted.
All inquiries should be addressed to the Secretariat of the Leo S. Rowe Pan
American Fund, Pan American Union, Washington 6, D. C.
The John G. and Fannie F. Ruge Memorial Scholarship and Loan Fund.-This
scholarship and loan fund was made available through the will of the late John G. and
Fannie F. Ruge of Panama City who stated in the will that "there is no greater
privilege in this world than to give young men and women the means of intellectual
growth." A limited amount of the fund has been set up for scholarships; the remainder
is operated as a loan fund. "Such loans," he stated, "are to be made on the condition
that the recipient refund the money thus loaned as soon as he or she may reasonably be
able to earn it after providing for their livelihood in an economical manner." These
loans, if not repaid, will not only manifest ingratitude to those individuals who made
them possible, but will work gross injury to the John G. and Fannie F. Ruge Loan
Fund.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The applicant must be a bona fide full time student of the University of Florida
and must have completed at least thirty hours of college work with a scholastic average
of C or better. The maximum loan granted to any one student during the year is $500,
or a total of $1,000 while in school. Applications for both scholarships and loans should
be made to the Office of the Dean of Men.
John J. Tigert Student Loan Fund.-At its meeting on April 15, 1946, the Board
of Control accepted $500 from a friend of the University to be used as a revolving
loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial
difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive
some assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior
class. Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College
of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Tolbert Memorial Student Loan Fund.-Through the efforts of various student
organizations approximately $12,000 has been accumulated for making short-term loans
to students to meet financial emergencies. These loans are made in amounts not ex-
ceeding $50 and for periods not exceeding 90 days.
The Edward 1. Triay, Jr. Memorial Loan Fund.-This loan fund was made avail-
able through the will of the late Edward J. Triay, Jr. Requirements for this loan are:
The applicant must be a bona fide resident of Florida, male, and must have completed
at least one semester of college work with a scholastic average of C or better.
The amount of these loans will not exceed $200 per year to undergraduates. Ap-
plications should be made to the Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards,
of which the Dean of Men is Chairman.
The Jacksonville Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy Loan Fund.-
The Jacksonville Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy grants a loan of
$200 each year to a student registered in one of the colleges or universities in the State
of Florida. Applications should be made to the President of Jacksonville Chapter No.
1128, Jacksonville, Florida.
The Martha Reid Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy Loan Fund.-
The Martha Reid Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy has established
a loan fund of $200 to be given to a junior or senior in the University of Florida who
is of Confederate lineage and is not affiliated with a social fraternity. Applications for
this loan fund may be made to Mrs. J. M. Warren, Jr., President, Martha Reid Chapter,
No. 19, United Daughters of the Confederacy, Jacksonville, Florida. This loan shall be
repaid in monthly installments, of not less than $10 without interest beginning with
October of the second year after graduation.
Joseph Weil Student Loan Fund.-At its meeting on April 15, 1946, the Board
of Control accepted $500 from a friend of the University to be used as a revolving
fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial
difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive
some assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior
class. Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College
of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Rudolph Weaver Student Loan Fund.-Under the provisions of the will of Rudolph
Weaver, Director of the School of Architecture from 1925 to 1944, a $500 loan fund
was created to aid students in Architecture who have completed two years of their Uni-
versity course. Applications should be made to the Dean of the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.






CATALOG 1950-1951


STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE

Applicants for admission to the University are furnished a medical history and
physical examination form by the Registrar's Office. The medical history is filled in by
the applicant before going to his doctor for the physical examination. The physical
examination must be performed and completed by a licensed Doctor of Medicine and
mailed by the doctor directly to Head, Student Health Service, University of Florida,
Gainesville. This medical history and physical examination must be approved by a Uni-
versity Physician before the applicant is cleared for registration in the University.
The Health Service strives to prevent students with communicable diseases from
entering the University. All students enrolled at the University are given annual chest
x-rays and every effort is made to detect evidence of tuberculosis of which the student
may be entirely unaware. (Faculty members and employees of the University are also
given annual chest x-rays). Students should have been successfully vaccinated against
smallpox within the past five years and the Health Service advises all students to be
immunized to typhoid fever and tetanus before coming to the University.
The University maintains the Student Health Service in the Infirmary Building on
the campus for the protection and medical care of the students in residence. The Out-
patient Clinic is open during the day from 8:00 A. M. to 12:00 P. M. to provide all stu-
dents in need of medical care with consultation and treatment. The hospital, of 70 beds,
provides the student in need of hospitalization with twenty-four hour general nursing
care and patients entering the hospital are under the constant observation of a University
Physician. An emergency service is available to students who become acutely ill or are
injured when the clinic is closed and such students may obtain treatment at any time by
reporting to the Infirmary. University Physicians do not make calls outside the Infirmary
or attempt to treat students in their rooms where the facilities for treatment are inade-
quate. Students should be instructed before leaving home to report immediately to the
Infirmary should they become ill. Parents will be notified by a University Physician
whenever a student is believed to be seriously ill.
The Infirmary is staffed and equipped for treating the acute illnesses, injuries and
emergencies which commonly occur while the student is in residence at the University.
It is not organized, however, to provide for the care of students suffering from chronic
diseases. The Student Health Service does not assume the responsibility for treatment of
students having Epilepsy, Organic Heart Disease, Asthma, Rheumatic Fever, Diabetes
or prolonged illnesses. Students with such chronic diseases may receive emergency treat-
ment in the Infirmary but they must arrange for a continuation of their medical care out-
side the University Health Service.
There are no facilities for dental work or eye refractions in the Student Health Serv-
ice and therefore students are urged to have defects of vision and teeth corrected before
coming to the University.
Major surgery is not performed at the Infirmary. Some minor surgery is performed
in the Infirmary at University Physicians' discretion only. However, all surgical oper-
ations are the responsibility of the student and his parents and are performed with their
consent, and if at another hospital at their expense. Whenever an emergency operation
is imperative, the student shall be referred to a competent surgeon and transferred to the
Alachua County Hospital in Gainesville, which is fully approved for surgery by the
American College of Surgeons. Students receiving severe, multiple or compound fractures
will be handled in the same manner as students in need of emergency surgery.
Competent physicians and surgeons in Gainesville cooperate readily with the Health
Service in consultations. Whenever a student is found to be in need of a consultant, the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


University Physician will arrange for such a consultation at the student's expense. Stu-
dents requesting the professional attention of a physician or registered nurse of their
choice may do so at their expense and by the approval of the Head of the Medical Staff
of the Infirmary. Local physicians are available for medical service to students at their
places of residence, at the student's expense.
The Health Service is available only to those students currently enrolled in the
University who have paid the student health fee. In the case of married students, who
are unacquainted with local physicians, the Health Service will be glad to recommend
well qualified physicians to attend their families.
The Health Fee does not include surgery, consultation, special duty nursing, special
medicines, treatments or laboratory work and an extra charge is made for these. The
Infirmary offers students a diagnostic x-ray service at a very nominal cost. All x-rays
are interpretated by qualified Radiologist. A charge of $1.75 per day for board is also
made.
The University is not responsible for the care of students during vacation periods.
The Infirmary will be closed during official University vacation periods, but in certain
instances it may make special arrangements for the continued care of students who were
hospitalized before the vacation period.
During epidemics, the facilities of the Student Health Department may be so over-
taxed that the care of all ill students at the Infirmary would be impossible. In such an
emergency every effort will be made to provide for the care of students outside of the
Infirmary, but the Student Health Service will not assume payment for services rendered
by outside doctors or other hospitals.


FLORIDA UNION

The Florida Union, the official center of student activities, is almost entirely
financed by a student activity fee, and is governed by a Board of Managers, consisting
of five students and four faculty members.
A Social Board, composed of students interested in planning student activities, is
empowered by the Board of Managers to plan and promote all social, cultural and
recreational activities in the union. This board and its committees are open to any
student interested in participation.
Among the weekly activities sponsored by the Social Board and open to all students
are bingo parties, bridge tournaments, dancing classes, coffee hours, movies at the union,
Flavet III and the Air Base Gym, and Club Rendezvous. Special activities such as re-
ceptions, dances, billiard tournaments, open house, vesper services, community sings, art
exhibits, Wauburg picnics and Christmas parties are all part of the union program.
Among the facilities and services offered by the union are a music listening room,
a craft and hobby shop, browsing library, game room, lounges, embosograf poster services,
a mimeographing service for student organizations, free notary public service, rental
typewriters, a lost and found department, public telephones, information desk, Western
Union substation, auditorium and meeting rooms for student activity groups.
The union also operates Club Rendezvous, the recreation building directly east of
the Infirmary. This building, open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., is available
for lounging, meetings and noon-time recreation programs. Every Friday night the Club
is open to dancing with student floor shows, entertainment and refreshments.
Offices for the President of the student body, the Executive Council, Honor Court
and all student publications are located in the Union Building as are offices for the
Director of Religious Activities and the Institute of Inter-American Affairs.






CATALOG 1950-1951


The University's Camp Wauburg operated by the Florida Union, is a recreation
area for the exclusive use of University personnel. This area, overlooking a beautiful
lake, is located nine miles south of the campus. Facilities include a large picnic area,
a recreation building, a bath house, and a dock with a diving board, many small out-
door fireplaces for cooking, and a playground area for volleyball, horseshoes, badminton
and softball. Other activities include swimming, boating and fishing.
The popularity of the Union, which is open daily from 7:00 a.m. until 11:00
p.m., is attested by the fact that over 7,000 students used the building on a daily average
during the 1949-50 school year.

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA

The Cafeteria, located adjacent to the Residence Halls, offers to University students
high quality food at reasonable prices. The meals are carefully planned, offering a pleas-
ing variety of foods attractively served.
All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish
well prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary
value of $5.00 or $15.00 are available for the convenience of students.


STUDENT ACTIVITIES

ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
Student Government.-Student government in the University of Florida is a co-
operative organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the
faculty. Considerable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation
and conduct of student affairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body
has been the disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the
authority granted them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regula-
tion of extra-curricular affairs and the administration of the Honor System.
Every enrolled student, having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student
Body and has an equal vote in its government.
The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth
of the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic, occupying its
franchise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval.
Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, but
adapted to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Executive Council; (2) judicial,
which is embodied in the Honor Court with penal and civil jurisdiction of all judicial
matters; (3) executive, embodied in the President and shared with the Vice-President
and the Secretary-Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three branches are
elected directly by the Student Body once a year.
Student government enacts and enforces suitable laws, and promotes athletics,
debating publications of the Student Body, entertainments of a general educational
value, and such other activities as the Student Body may adopt. The officers of the
Student Body are the President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, members of the
Honor Court, Athletic Council, Executive Council, Lyceum Council, editors and business
managers of student publications, and student members of the Board of Student Publica-
tions.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Women Students' Association.-The Women Students' Association of the Univer-
sity is a subsidiary of the student body. Its purposes are:
1. To promote the welfare of women students in cooperation with the administra-
tion, the student body, and the Dean of Women.
2. To deepen the sense of individual and collective responsibility.
3. To promote loyalty to all college activities and organizations and to uphold high
social and academic standards among University women students.
Every undergraduate woman student upon registration in this University auto-
matically becomes a member of the Women Students' Association of the University of
Florida.
The business of the association is conducted by a council composed of an executive
committee consisting of the officers, one representative from the Freshman, Sophomore,
Junior, and Senior Classes respectively, and the Secretary of Women's Affairs, and
representatives elected from Alpha Lambda Delta, the Hall Councils, Panhellenic,
Women's Glee Club, Women's Independent Society, Women's Recreation Association
and other women's organizations as they are admitted to the campus and passed on
by the executive committee. There are also elected representatives from Off-campus
students. Voting in these elections is limited to undergraduate women students.
Debating.-Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the
varsity and University College debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the De-
bate Club, is under the direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an
extensive schedule of intercollegiate debates.
Dramatics.-Any student has an opportunity to participate in several plays which
are presented each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under direction of the
Department of Speech.
Executive Council.-The Executive Council is composed of representatives elected
from the colleges on the campus and in general acts as administrator of Student Body
affairs. The Athletic Council and the Lyceum Council have jurisdiction over their
respective fields.
Publications.-The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The
Florida Alligator, the student newspaper; The "F" Book, the student's guide; and The
Orange Peel, the campus literary magazine.
Religious Activities.-A broad program of inter-denominational religious activities
is sponsored on the campus by the Student Religious Association. Composed of repre-
sentatives of all denominational student religious groups and of the student body at
large, the Association brings outstanding lectures in the field of religion to the Uni-
versity, holds group discussions and seminars, and enlists students in a program of serv-
ice to the University and the state. A faculty committee on religion, appointed by the
President of the University, assists the Student Religious Association in its program and
work.
Denominational centers adjacent to the campus and full-time student pastors are
provided by the following religious groups: Baptist, Episcopal, Jewish, Methodist, Pres-
byterian, and Roman Catholic. Other denominations, most of which have churches in
Gainesville, offer special student programs and services through the local groups.
Social Fraternities.-Twenty-three national social fraternities have established chap-
ters at the University; most of them have already built chapter houses and others have
leased homes. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Interfraternity
Conference, composed of one delegate from each of the national fraternities. The na-
tional fraternities at Florida are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta
Pi, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma,






CATALOG 1950-1951


Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa
Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu,
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, Theta Chi, and Zeta Beta Tau. The two local
colonies Alpha Epsilon and Tau Kappa Epsilon are expected to gain national recogni-
tion in the near future.
Eleven national women's social fraternities have established chapters at the Uni-
versity. The eleven chapters are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi,
Alpha Omicron Pi, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Kappa Delta, Phi
Mu, Sigma Kappa, and Zeta Tau Alpha.
Professional and Honorary Fraternities.-Alpha Delta Sigma, advertising; Alpha
Epsilon Delta, pre-medical; Alpha Kappa Psi, business; Alpha Phi Omega, service;
Alpha Tau Alpha, agricultural education; Alpha Zeta, agriculture; Beta Alpha Psi,
accounting; Beta Gamma Sigma, commerce; Delta Phi Alpha, German; Delta Sigma
Pi, business; Delta Theta Phi, law; Florida Blue Key, leadership; Gamma Sigma Ep-
silon, chemistry; Gargoyle, architecture; Kappa Delta Pi, education; Kappa Epsilon,
pharmacy; Kappa Kappa Psi, band; Kappa Psi, pharmacy; Los Picaros, Spanish; Mortar
and Pestle, pharmacy; Nu Rho Psi, psychology; Pershing Rifles, military; Phi Alpha
Delta, law; Phi Alpha Theta, history; Phi Delta Delta, law; Phi Delta Phi, law; Phi
Delta Kappa, education; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic; Phi Sigma, biology; Pi Mu,
pre-medical; Rho Chi, pharmacy; Scabbard and Blade, military; Sigma Delta Chi,
journalism; Sigma Delta Pi, Spanish; Sigma Delta Psi, athletic; Sigma Tau, engineer-
ing; Sigma Tau Delta, literary; Tau Kappa Alpha, debating; Thyrsus, horticulture;
Xi Sigma Pi, forestry.
Clubs and Societies.-There are more than one hundred and fifty student clubs and
organizations on the campus representing varied interests and activities. These include
home town and county clubs, hobby groups, veterans' organizations, religious organiza-
tions, academic interest clubs, and social and dance organizations.

HONOR SYSTEM
The Honor System.-One of the finest tributes to the character of the students at
the University of Florida is the fact that the Student Body is a self-governing group.
The details of the system by which this result is reached will be explained to all fresh-
men during the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent,
as well as each prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor
System, as this phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system.
In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members
of the Student Body, execution of the laws passed, and the expenditure of student funds,
the governing system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disciplining
themselves through the means of the Honor System. Inaugurated by some of our greatest
educators in higher institutions of the nation and early adopted in some departments of
the University of Florida, the Honor System was finally established in the entire Uni-
versity in 1914 as the result of student initiative. This plan, having met with the ap-
proval of all officials of the University, was given the sanction of the Board of Control,
and student representatives were selected by the students to administer the system.
Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the convictions that self-
discipline is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-
respect, and that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the
University and the Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should
be assumed to be honest and worthy of trust, and they display this confidence by means
of an Honor System.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The success of the System is dependent upon the honor of each individual member
of the student body in that: (1) he is duty-bound to abide by the principles of the
Honor Code, and (2) he is further pledged to report to the Honor Court such violations
of the Code as he may observe.
Many men coming to the University for the first time feel hesitant about assuming
this responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created feelings of antipathy
toward one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor System ade-
quately overcomes this natural reaction, however, when it is realized that this system is
a student institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline, and that to
be worthy of the advantages of the Honor System each student must be strong enough
to do his duty in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each man's conduct is
placed where it must eventually rest-on himself.
The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity; yet it embodies the
fundamentals of sound character. Each man is pledged to refrain from:
(a) cheating, (b) stealing, (c) obtaining money or credit for worthless checks.
On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the
basic right of men of Honor. There are no proctors or spies in the examination rooms,
each student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Sec-
ondly, fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that
each man will pay for any he may take. This system makes each man the keeper of his
own conscience until he has proved to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the
trust placed in him.
A breach of the System may be flagrant and serious, or it may be extenuated by
circumstances. It may need only mild corrective measures to help the violator obtain a
finer conception of right and wrong; it may need strong measures. To enforce the System
equitably the students have established the Honor Court. The Court is composed of
twelve students and a chancellor all of whom are elected annually from the upper classes
of the various colleges on the campus. Any student convicted by this Court has the right
of appeal from its ruling to the Faculty Discipline Committee. A tribute to the efficiency
of the Honor Court in its existence on the Florida campus is realized in the fact that,
since its establishment, a surprisingly insignificant number of the Court's decisions have
been altered upon appeal.
The penal purpose of the Honor Court should receive less stress, perhaps, than its
educational purpose, which is its most important function. The responsibility of acquaint-
ing every member of the Student Body with the purpose, advantages, and principles of
the Honor System is placed upon members of the Court. In line with this work, members
of the Honor Court participate in the orientation program each year during Freshman
Week. In addition to a series of explanatory talks at that time, special chapel programs
are conducted by the Honor Court during the school year. Honor System talks are de-
livered in the high schools of the State upon request and at regularly scheduled times
each spring, and radio programs are broadcast especially for the high schools from Station
WRUF in Gainesville. In this way the Honor Court has endeavored to fulfill its re-
sponsibility to the Men who undertake the problem of self-government and self-discipline
at the University of Florida.
The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to
stress the paramount importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son while the
latter is in attendance at the University of Florida. Dishonest action brings sorrow both
to parent and to student.
Because University students have proved worthy of the trust and responsibility in-
volved in administering an Honor System, this feature of student government has become






CATALOG 1950-1951


the greatest tradition at the University of Florida. It must be remembered that inasmuch
as it is primarily a student responsibility, the future of the system rests with each new
class of students entering the University.
The University faculty and administration pledge their support to the Honor System.
Each student must support it or in failing to support it, contribute to the loss not only of
a cherished tradition but the right of self-government. We at the University of Florida
are fully cognizant that by fostering and supporting the ideals of self-government as re-
flected in student government, the support of American Democracy will be more thor-
oughly imbedded in the hearts of tomorrow's leaders.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
The University of Florida Intercollegiate Athletics Program is among the best in the
South and compares favorably with the programs of leading institutions throughout the
nation. As a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the South-
eastern Athletic Conference, the University guides its Intercollegiate Program by the
policies and regulations of those organizations. Major sports are football, basketball,
baseball, swimming and track. Minor sports are golf, tennis, cross country and rifle
shooting.
Physical facilities include the recently completed $1,600,000 gymnasium which pro-
vides facilities for Physical Education as well as Intercollegiate Athletics; the 26,500-
seat football stadium equipped for night contests; five basketball courts, among them the
6,500-seat intercollegiate court; three baseball diamonds; a large swimming pool; a
quarter-mile running track and 1,500-seat track stadium; sixteen handball courts; twenty-
six tennis courts; and a 20-acre area available for Intramural Sports activities. Golfing
facilities are arranged with the Gainesville Golf and Country Club.

INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS AND RECREATION
The function of Intramural Athletics is to encourage the student body to participate
in organized athletic sports and wholesome recreation. The Department of Intramural
Athletics and Recreation offers two types of programs: (1) group competition and (2)
individual competition.
The program comprises some fourteen to twenty sports categories ranging from such
individual and dual activities as handball, tennis and golf to the more highly organized
sports such as track, basketball and touch football. There are three units of competition
included in the program: (1) Fraternity (orange and blue), (2) Dormitory, and (3)
Independent. The program provides diversified recreational activities and facilities for
the use of the faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students who wish to participate.
Facilities and instruction are available at specified hours. Where interest warrants, new
activities and clubs are introduced and new units of competition formed.
The Department maintains a well stocked storeroom of athletic equipment for the
use of all University of Florida students. Any regularly enrolled student may check out
equipment between the hours of 8:30 A.M. and 6:00 P.M.
It is to be emphasized that the Intramural and Recreation Program is a University
of Florida tradition. It is administered largely by voluntary student help and is essen-
tially a highly democratic form of student expression.

PRIZES AND AWARDS
Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Medallion.-Each year Alpha Kappa Psi, inter-
national professional fraternity in commerce, awards a white gold-bronze medallion to
the Senior in the College of Business Administration who for his first three years at the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


University of Florida has been most outstanding in scholarship and campus activities
and has shown the most likely qualifications for a successful business career in the fu-
ture.
The American Institute of Architects Silver School Medal.-The American In-
stitute of Architects presents each year to the College of Architecture and Allied Arts,
a silver medal to be awarded to a student in Architecture who, by his scholarly stand-
ing and character, is qualified to receive the award. This medal is accompanied by a
copy of the book "Mont Saint Michel and Chartres" by Henry Adams. A copy of this
book is also presented to a second student in the College similarly qualified and who is
considered a runner-up.
American Institute of Chemical Engineering Award.-Each year an award con-
sisting of an AIChE key and certificate is given to the junior enrolled in the Chemical
Engineering Department who has the highest scholarship for the first two years at the
University.
Art Society Award.-In recognition of scholastic standing and leadership the Uni-
versity of Florida Art Society offers a bronze medal and citation to an outstanding stu-
dent receiving the baccalaureate degree in Art. The award is generally made annually
but may be offered less frequently.
Attwood Leadership Award.-Mr. J. K. Attwood, Jacksonville pharmacist, annually
offers a wrist watch to the senior pharmacy student who has shown outstanding leader-
ship among his classmates and in campus activities. The award is given by vote of the
faculty of the College of Pharmacy.
Beta Gamma Sigma Scroll.-Each year the Florida chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma,
National honorary business administration fraternity, awards a scroll to the junior in
the College of Business Administration who has achieved the highest scholarship stand-
ing in course studies during freshman and sophomore years at the University of Florida.
Board of Control Awards.-The Board of Control annually awards the following
medals:
1. The University College Declamation Medals, to the two best declaimers of the
University College.
2. Junior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the Junior Class.
3. Senior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the Senior Class.
The Chapter Scholarship Award.-A Certificate of Merit, signed by the President
of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Chairman of the Committee on
Student Chapters, and a student membership badge are given to the junior in Chemical
Engineering who is a member of the Student Chapter and who has attained the highest
scholarship standing during his freshman and sophomore years.
Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key.-Each year the Florida chapter of the interna-
tional fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi, professional business administration fraternity,
awards a gold key to that male senior in the College of Business Administration who
upon graduation ranks highest in scholarship for the entire course in Business Admin-
istration.
Dillon Achievement Cup.-Mr. Ralph M. Dillon, Tampa, has given a large silver
loving cup on which is engraved each year the name of that student graduating in
journalism who, in the opinion of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the
faculty of the School of Journalism, possesses the highest qualifications for service to
the press of Florida.
Emrich Prize.-William Emrich, Orlando pharmacist, annually gives a year's mem-
bership in the American Pharmaceutical Association to that pharmacy student who ob-
tains the highest scholastic average in pharmaceutical subjects during the junior year.






CATALOG 1950-1951


Florida Association of Architects Medal.-The Florida Association of Architects
of the American Institute of Architects Medal is awarded each year to the student in
Architecture who has made the most meritorious contributions in leadership and service
among his fellows.
Florida Association of Realtors-Bronze Plaque.-The Florida Association of Real-
tors Bronze Plaque is awarded each year to the graduating student majoring in Real
Estate who has achieved the highest scholastic standing in this field.
Florida Chapter of the American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers-Silver Cup.
-The Florida Chapter of the American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers Silver Cup
is awarded each year to the student who in his course of studies submits the best judged
appraisal report.
Gargoyle Key.-The Gargoyle Club awards a gold key each year to the graduate
of the University College who, in the opinion of the members, was outstanding in
scholarship, leadership, initiative, and general ability. To be eligible for this award,
the student must have completed the fundamental courses in Architecture or in Art.
Groover Cup.-The late F. C. Groover who was president of the Groover-Stewart
Division of McKesson and Robbins, gave a large silver loving cup which is awarded to
the graduating class in the College of Pharmacy attaining the highest general average
in scholarship and is held by that class until this average is exceeded by a subsequent
graduating class.
Harrison Company Award.-Kooman, Florida Chancery Pleading and Practice
with Cumulative Pocket Supplement is offered by the Harrison Company to the senior
law student doing all his work in this institution who makes the highest record during
his law course.
Harrison Company First Year Award.-Adkins, Florida Criminal Procedure Act
Annotated, with Supplement, is offered by the Harrison Company to the first year law
student making the highest average in twenty-nine hours of law taken in this institution.
Interfraternity Debate Cup.-A silver loving cup is awarded to the fraternity
winning the Intramural Debate Tournament. The cup becomes the permanent pos-
session of the fraternity winning three years in succession.
Interfraternity Scholarship Cup.-A silver cup is awarded to the fraternity having
the highest over-all scholastic average at the end of each year. The cup becomes the
permant possession of the fraternity winning three years in succession.
Interfraternity Sing Trophy.-A trophy is awarded to the fraternity winning the
Christmas Carol Sing Contest held each year. The cup becomes the permanent pos-
session of the fraternity winning three years in succession.
Law Week Award.-The Bureau of National Affairs offers the award of a year's
complimentary subscription to Law Week to the student who, in the judgment of the
faculty of the College of Law, has made the most scholastic progress in his senior year.
The James Miller Leake Medal.-This is a medal awarded annually for an essay
in American History. The medal is given by the Gainesville Chapter of the Daughters
of the American Revolution and named for the Head of the Department of History and
Political Science of the University of Florida.
Lehn & Fink Medal.-The Lehn & Fink Products Corporation annually awards
a gold medal to a graduate in the College of Pharmacy for excellency in courses in
Pharmacy, Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology.
Haisley Lynch Medal.-The University is grateful to Mrs. L. C. Lynch of Gaines-
ville for her gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for the best essay in American History.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


This medal is awarded annually by her in loving memory of her son, Haisley Lynch, a
former student of the University, who was killed in action in France during World War
I.
Claude Pepper Award.-Recognition is given in an inscribed plaque to the student
who has performed the best all-around service to a weekly newspaper in Florida and
to the University; limited to student correspondents of Florida weekly newspapers. This
award is offered through the cooperation of the School of Journalism and the Depart-
ment of Publicity.
Phi Sigma Society Scholarship Award.-The Phi Sigma Society, national honorary
biological society, awards each year a medal to the undergraduate or graduate student
who is considered to have done the most outstanding research in one of the fields of
the biological sciences. Research achievement and scholarship count equally.
David W. Ramsaur Medal.-Mrs. D. W. Ramsaur bequeathed to the University
a trust fund, the income from which is to be used to purchase annually a gold medal
in memory of her husband. It is awarded to that graduate of the College of Pharmacy
making the highest honor point average.
Redfearn Prize.-For the past five years Hon. D. H. Redfearn of Miami has of-
fered a prize of $50 for the best essay by a law student on some topic of legal reform.
This prize will be continued in 1950-51.
Rho Chi Prize.-Iota Chapter of Rho Chi, honorary pharmaceutical society, an-
nually gives a key to the junior pharmacy student who obtains the highest scholastic
average during the sophomore year.
St. Petersburg Times Trophy.-A trophy is awarded by the St. Petersburg Times
to the student who has performed the best all-round service to his newspaper and the
University; limited to student correspondents of daily newspapers in Florida. This
award is offered through the joint cooperation of the Department of Publicity and the
School of Journalism.
Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Key Award.-Sigma Delta Chi, professional journal-
istic fraternity, awards annually a key to ten per cent of the students graduating in
journalism who have the highest scholastic average for the three years' academic work
immediately preceding the year in which the nominees are candidates for degrees.
Sigma Tau Award.-The Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau awards annually a medal
for scholastic ability to the sophomore in the College of Engineering who, during his
freshman year, made the highest average in his scholastic work.
The State Department of Education Award.-Each year the State Department of
Education awards a medal to the student in Architecture who attains the highest stand-
ard in the study of a problem in the field of School Architecture.
Tau Alpha Nu Award.-Tau Alpha Nu, honorary forestry fraternity, awards each
year a one-year subscription to the Journal of Forestry to the University College student
who, upon entering the School of Forestry, has made the best scholastic and activity
record in the University College.
The David Levy-Yulee Lectureship.-Under the provision of the will of Nannie
Yulee Noble, a sum of money was bequeathed to the University of Florida, the income
of which was to be used to bring outstanding speakers to the University to deliver lec-
tures to the student body and faculty on the general topic "Honor and Service in
Politics".






CATALOG 1950-1951


STUDENT REGULATIONS
For information relative to graduation, failure in studies, conduct, social activities,
etc., the student should consult the Bulletin of Student Regulations and the sections of
the Catalog containing regulations of the separate Colleges and Schools. Each student
is held responsible for observance of the rules and regulations of the University insofar
as they affect him. Some regulations and interpretations supplementing the Bulletin of
Student Regulations are given here.
CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one
semester hour.
DEGREES
The Board of Control will confer the degree appropriate to the course pursued under
the following conditions:
1. Curriculum requirements.-Certification by the Registrar and the Dean of the
college concerned that all requirements of the course of study as outlined in the college
announcement, or its equivalent as determined by the faculty of the college offering the
course have been completed.
2. Recommendation of the faculty.
3. Residence requirements.-(a) The minimum residence requirement for the bac-
calaureate degree is two regular semesters, or one regular semester and three summer
terms, or five summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet this
requirement after entrance to the University. Students who break their residence at the
University by attending another institution for credit toward the degree must meet this
requirement after re-entering the University. (b) For the master's degree two regular
semesters or six summer terms are necessary to satisfy the residence requirements. (c)
Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (twenty-eight in the College
of Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college
from which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made
only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned.
4. Attendance at commencement.-All candidates for degrees are required to be
present at commencement exercises (Baccalaureate Sermon and Commencement Convo-
cation). A student who fails to attend shall not have his degree conferred until he
makes another application and complies with this requirement.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
Some colleges have a maximum load regulation which is stated in the description of
the college in this bulletin. In the absence of such statement the general University
regulation is followed. This regulation allows a maximum load of 17 hours for an aver-
age below C made during preceding term of attendance and 21 hours for an average
above C during the preceding term of attendance. The minimum load is 12 hours.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Graduation with Honors is voted by the faculty concerned and is not automatically
granted upon the achievement of any minimum average. Some colleges state the mini-
mum average required for consideration by the faculty. Where no mention is made in
the college section of this bulletin on the requirements for consideration the student is
advised to consult the dean of the college for detailed information.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


For graduation with High Honors the above statement applies, except that in most
colleges some independent work or an examination or both are prerequisite for considera-
tion by the faculty. The student should consult the dean of the college for further in-
formation.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED

No student will be allowed to take more than one fourth of the credits toward a
degree by correspondence study and extension class work. Extension work to apply on
the last thirty hours is authorized only by special action of the faculty of the college in
which a student is registered. Such authorization must be obtained prior to enrollment
in extension work. If authorization is given, no student is permitted to earn more than
twelve of the last thirty-six hours in this manner. Under no circumstances will a student
in residence be permitted to register for a correspondence course if that course is being
offered in residence.

ATTENDANCE

If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent that fur-
ther enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to him and detrimental to the
best interest of the class, it shall be the duty of the instructor to warn such student in
writing that further absences or failure to do class work will cause him to be dropped
from the course with a failing grade. Where possible this warning will be delivered
personally; otherwise, it will be mailed to the student's last University address by the
Registrar. Instructors shall immediately report all such warnings to the Course Chairman
or Department Head.
Should any absences or failure to do class work be incurred after this warning, the
student will be dropped from the course and be given a failing grade. Should he be
dropped from more than one course his case will be considered by the Committee on
Student Progress, who may rule that he be dropped from the University and his record
marked "Suspended for Non-Attendance" or "Suspended for Unsatisfactory Work" as the
case may be.
SUSPENSION FOR POOR SCHOLARSHIP

A person registered in one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper
Division who fails fifty per cent or more of his work in any term or semester will be
suspended for one semester for poor scholarship and will not be readmitted to the Uni-
versity until the lapse of one semester, except upon approval of a formal petition by the
Sub-Committee of the University Senate. A student who has been suspended once and
in any subsequent period of attendance fails fifty per cent or more of his work shall be
suspended for poor scholarship and not be eligible for readmission. In administering
the above regulation, in no case shall failure in one course only cause a student to be
dropped.
Students registered in the University College will have their records reviewed by a
Committee on Student Progress at the end of each period of attendance. In general the
committee will be guided by the following policy. The student in the Lower Division who
has been in attendance one semester or the equivalent (two six-weeks summer terms are
considered the equivalent of a semester) and in any subsequent period of attendance
fails fifty per cent or more of his work will be suspended for one semester for poor
scholarship and will not be eligible for readmission until the lapse of one semester, ex-















CATALOG 1950-1951


cept on approval of a formal petition by the Sub-Committee of the University Senate.
A student who has been dropped once and in any subsequent period of attendance fails
fifty per cent or more of his work shall be suspended for poor scholarship and will not
be eligible for readmission. In administering the above regulation, in no case, however,
shall failure in one course only cause a student to be dropped.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must successfully
pass six or more to complete the program of the University College) are administered by
the Board of University Examiners and are given in January, May, July, and August of
each year. A student must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able
to think in the several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations.
Standings on the comprehensive examinations are issued by the Board of Examiners
and are not subject to change by any other agency.

APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the examina-
tion is given need not make application for it. University College students who are not
enrolled in a course at the time an examination is given and who wish to take the com-
prehensive examination must apply in writing to the Board of Examiners for permission
prior to the last date set for filing such applications. Applications will not be accepted
from students registered in the colleges of the Upper Division. Before the application is
accepted the applicant will be required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof
that this privilege has not been used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Ap-
plications will be accepted only for those examinations which are administered by the
Board of Examiners. The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give
University College students examinations by application.
Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify to repeat
the examination by repeating the course or by further independent study. Evidence of
additional preparation must be submitted to the Board of Examiners with the formal
application to repeat the examination.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


THE LOWER DIVISION

THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
In a reorganization at the University of Florida in 1935, all freshmen and sopho-
mores were placed in one college. The University College administers all the work of
the Lower Division, which includes the preprofessional work for the Upper Division
Schools and colleges and a core program of basic education for all students. In 1944
the American Council on Education defined this program: "General education refers
to those phases of nonspecialized and nonvocational education that should be the com-
mon denominator, so to speak, of educated persons. . the type of education which
the majority of our people must have if they are to be good citizens, parents, and work-
ers." During his freshman and sophomore years at the University, a student's time is
about evenly divided between these objectives of general education and those of pre-
professional or professional preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility toward the professional training of her stu-
dents who remain four years or longer and earn degrees, the University of Florida as a
state institution also accepts its civic responsibility to help those who spend only one or
two years at the University. These students-more than two-thirds of all enrolled-
are not "failures" because they do not continue and earn degrees, and they probably
deserve more from the state university than an odd assortment of only "introductory
courses." Consequently at the University of Florida a group of comprehensive courses
have been worked out to give some unity and meaning to a beginner's program. These
comprehensive courses that make up the core program are:

1. American Institutions (known hereafter as C-1)
2. The Physical Sciences (C-2)
3. Reading, Speaking, and Writing: Freshman English (C-3)
4. Practical Logic: Straight Thinking (C-41)
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
5. The Humanities (C-5)
6. Biological Science (C-6)

GUIDANCE
If a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not urged to guess on
registration day. His program may be made up largely from the comprehensive which
help him direct his thinking toward a desirable objective, together with approved electives
that may further enable him to explore interests and needs. But whether the student is
decided or undecided about his life's work, these comprehensive courses provide basic
preparation that every educated person should have.
Thus since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, the pro-
gram absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course of the
University College program is designed to guide the student. During the time that he
is making tentative steps toward a profession by taking special subjects to test aptitudes,
interests, and ability, he is also studying the several great areas of human understanding
and achievement. The work in the University College presents materials which are
directly related to life experiences and which will immediately become a part of the
student's thinking to guide him to making correct next steps. Thus the whole program




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs