• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Calendar of 1954 summer sessio...
 Admissions
 Expenses
 Student life - services, facilities,...
 Schools and colleges of the upper...
 The graduate division
 Special three week courses
 Comprehensive courses
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00187
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: February 1954
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00187
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Calendar of 1954 summer session
        Page i
        Page ii
    Admissions
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Expenses
        Page 5
    Student life - services, facilities, activities, regulations
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Schools and colleges of the upper division
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The graduate division
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Special three week courses
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Comprehensive courses
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Back Cover
        Page 117
        Page 118
Full Text



The fitueiat4


Record


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VOL. XLIX


Series 1, No. 2


February 1, 1954


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida. Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida,
as second class matter, under Act of Congress, August 24,
1912. Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida.











ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILS


OF THE UNIVERSITY

Summer 1954

JOHN STUART ALLEN, Ph.D. -----.---- Vice-President of the University
WILLIAM TOBIAS ARNETT, M.A. Arch., A.I.A.
-Dean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts
GEORGE FECHTIG BAUGHMAN, LL.B., M.A. ---....-- .....--- Business Manager
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A. ___.. _..._... .....-_ Dean of Men
ALVAH ALDEN BEECHER, M.M. ___-__._--_ - -..-____. Director of Music
MARNA VENABLE BRADY, Ed.D. --_____ ---- -__- ___. Dean of Women
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S. _-...---- Dean of the University
HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON, M.S.A.
-Director of the Agricultural Extension Service and County Agent Leader
HENRY ANDERSON FENN, LL.B.. Dean of the College of Law
WILLARD MERWIN FIFIELD, M.S. Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D. . --. .-----..... Dean of the College of Pharmacy
LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D......... -----.._ Dean of the Graduate School
ARNOLD B. GROBMAN, Ph.D. -. Director of the Florida State Museum
LEWIS FRANCIS HAINES, Ph.D. ---___- Director of the University Press
GEORGE THOMAS HARRELL, M.D. -..-------- Dean of the College of Medicine
LELAND W. HIATT .-._ _-. --- --............. Director of Alumni Affairs
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P. __ Registrar
CLEMENS MARCUS KAUFMAN, Ph.D. --. ---- Director of the School of Forestry
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A. -__..- Dean of the University College
JOHN VREDENBURGH MCQUITTY, Ph.D. -..-__-__-- -- -. ... University Examiner
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D.
-Dean of the College of Business Administration
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D. __.... .. Dean of the College of Agriculture
RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D. _---.-.---- Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
RUSSELL SPURGEON POOR, Ph.D. ___ __Provost for Health Center
GARLAND WHEELER POWELL .---....---- -.-.....- Director of Radio Station WRUF
GEORGE SHELDON PRICE, B.S., Colonel, Field Artillery
-Professor of Military Science and Tactics and Coordinator
of Military Departments
J. WAYNE REITZ, Ph.D. .- .......--..--- -.. .- Provost for Agriculture
RALPH RHUDY, Colonel, Air Force -..__.-- Professor of Air Science and Tactics
BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.S.A. _-----.---.. Dean of the General Extension Division
DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.A.E.
-Dean of the College of Physical Education and Health
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S. --__. ..._. -_ ... .. .......-..... Dean of the College of Engineering
RAE O. WEIMER ____ .... ... Director of the School of Journalism
STANLEY LEROY WEST, LL.B., B.S. in L.S. .-- Director of the University Libraries
JOSEPH BENTON WHITE, Ph.D. ____ ______ Dean of the College of Education
EDWARD DEMING WHITTLESEY, B.A. ___ Director of Public Relations
A. CURTIS WILGUS, Ph.D. -... --- Director of the School of Inter-American Studies
W. MAX WISE, Ed.D. ...-.. --......------------- Dean of Student Personnel











CALENDAR OF 1954 SUMMER SESSION


1954
May 22, Saturday -


-Last day for filing preliminary application for
1954 Summer Session.


June 10, Thursday .--.-...-- -.... Placement tests for entering students.
June 11, 12, 14, Friday Saturday,
Monday _- --. Registration according to appointment assigned
on receipt of preliminary application.


June 15, Tuesday, 7 a.m .. --


June 16, Wednesday, 5 p.m. -


......-Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.
----_ Last time for completing registration for the
summer session. No one will be permitted to
start registration after 3 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses or changing sec-
tions.


June 19, Saturday, 12 Noon -......-Last time for submitting resignation for the
summer session and receiving any refund of
fees.
June 21, Monday, 12 Noon -------Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for degree to be conferred at
the end of the summer session.
July 5, Monday, 4 p.m. _.. ---------Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.


July 16, Friday ------


July 19, Monday -------



August 5, Thursday


--..-....-- Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at end of the summer session to com-
plete correspondence courses.
._.--- ---_Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be conferred at the end of
the summer session to file theses with the Dean
of the Graduate School.
..-_...First semester registration begins for students
enrolled in the summer session.


August 5-7, Thursday-Saturday --.Final Examination period.
August 6, Friday, 7:30 p.m. ---_ _Grades for all candidates for degrees to be
conferred at the end of the summer session are
due in the Office of the Registrar (special lists
are sent to the faculty for these reports).
August 7, Saturday _.------ __ Faculty meetings, at times announced by the
deans, to pass upon candidates for degrees.
August 7, Saturday, 12 Noon .....-- All grades for the summer session due in the
Office of the Registrar.
August 9, Monday .---.-.. .... Summer Commencement Convocation.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSIONS

PRELIMINARY APPLICATION

All persons planning to attend the 1954 Summer Session, whether or not they have previously
attended the University, must file the preliminary application form to be considered. The pre-
liminary application may be obtained by writing to Office of the Registrar. No applicant can be
assured that his admission to the 1954 Summer Session will be considered unless the preliminary
application has been received at the Office of the Registrar on or before Saturday, May 22, 1954.
Upon receipt of the preliminary application, the applicant will be notified of the additional in-
formation (if any) that must be submitted. This additional information must be in the Office of the
Registrar on or before June 1, 1954.

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS
For the summer session only, the University of Florida provides a category for
those persons who may wish to take college courses and:
a. transfer back to the institution they regularly attend in the winter session;
b. meet certain specific certification requirements;
c. are (in the case of those who have previously attended college) unable to
obtain complete transcripts from all schools previously attended in time
to clear as regular students.
Persons from the groups defined above may enroll as unclassified students pro-
vided they obtain a statement of honorable dismissal (eligibility to return) from
the institution they last attended. Forms for this purpose may be obtained upon
request from the Office of the Registrar.
It is possible, if the student later files all necessary credentials and
meets all the requirements for registration as a regular student, for credit
earned during one term as an unclassified student to be counted toward a
degree program at the University of Florida. Under no circumstances
will credit for more than one term in an unclassified status be applied
toward any degree conferred by the University. Thus, persons that have
been registered as unclassified in a previous summer session should com-
plete the requirements for admission as regular students before attending
subsequent summer sessions if they anticipate completing work for a de-
gree at the University of Florida.
Students entering the University after high school graduation and prior
to college attendance at any other institution are never admitted as un-
classified students and must qualify for admission as regular students as
described below.

REGULAR STUDENTS
Persons who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time
as regular students will be considered for admission as follows:
1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not at-
tended college, he will be considered for admission as a freshman to the
University College.
2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or
university and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable col-










2 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

lege credit for advanced standing, he will be considered for admission to
the University College.
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or
university and is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college
credit as advanced standing, he will be considered for admission to the
Upper Division school or college of his choice provided his record indicates
the completion of college work in the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences,
English, the Humanities, and the Biological Sciences, plus the required pre-
professional courses of the school or college of his choice.
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated
from a standard college or university, he will be considered for admission
to the Graduate Division.

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION FOR REGULAR STUDENTS
A. For students who have never attended college:
1. Graduation from high school. Records show that the student who does
not graduate from high school in the top half of his class rarely suc-
ceeds in college work. The University urges the prospective student to
consider this fact carefully before making application. Non-Florida stu-
dents will not be considered for admission if they do not meet this criterion.
2. Satisfactory achievement in high school. The University does not specify
any high school units as required, but the general pattern of the units
presented and the student's achievement will receive careful consideration.
The records reveal that those students who scatter most of their choice
of subjects are those who accomplish least in any of them. Therefore ap-
plicants who present a record which shows no unity or lack of essential
subjects cannot be considered.
3. Satisfactory scores on placement tests. All applicants must take the
placement tests before registering in the University College. Those ap-
plicants who did not graduate from high school in the top half of their class
must take the placement tests before being admitted to the University.
These are achievement tests in the fields of English, mathematics, social
studies, and natural sciences. Attainments in these fields are possible
without specific high school courses and are not guaranteed by the ac-
quiring of certain high school units. If the scores on the placement tests
indicate inadequate foundation for college work, the applicant may be
denied admission.
B. For undergraduate transfer students:*
1. Honorable Dismissal. The student must be eligible to return to the in-

*The student who has matriculated at any college or university, regardless of
the amount of time spent in attendance or credit earned, is regarded as a transfer
student.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


stitution last attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed
to return to the institution last attended cannot be considered for ad-
mission.
2. An average of C or better. The average grade for all work attempted at
other institutions must be C or better. An average grade of C or better
is required for graduation from the University of Florida, and one who
has not maintained this average before coming to the University need not
apply.


C. For the College of Law:

1. The beginning courses in Law are not offered in the Summer Session,
hence students are not admitted in June unless they have completed
satisfactorily at least one semester of work in an accredited law school.
2. A student wishing to transfer from another accredited law school who,
at the time of beginning his study of law, qualified for admission to this
College under the stated requirements for beginning students (other
than the Law School Admission Test) and who has maintained a schol-
astic average of C or higher on all previous law school work undertaken,
may apply for admission with advanced standing. Courses completed
with a grade of C or higher in other accredited law schools will be ac-
cepted for credit up to but not exceeding a total of thirty hours.
3. Applicants for admission must have received before admission a 4-year
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university, except in
the case of veterans, who will be admitted after they have completed 94
hours of satisfactory work in an accredited college or university if they
have maintained a scholastic average of C or higher on all work under-
taken.


D. For admission to the Graduate Division:

Limitations of space and staff restrict the enrollment of graduate students.
The records of applicants for graduate study are reviewed by the graduate se-
lection committees of the various colleges and schools. In general, no student will
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the University who is a graduate
of a non-accredited institution.
However, graduates of accredited institutions are not guaranteed admission.
In some units of the University, an undergraduate average considerably above
B is required for consideration. The acceptability of the student's undergraduate
record for admission to the Graduate Division will be determined on an individual
basis with consideration given to the desired area of concentration.
All applications must be made to the Admissions Section of the Registrar's
office in accordance with the dates set forth in the University calendar. Pro-
spective graduate students may correspond with any University officer for advice
and information but they must definitely understand that they cannot be con-
sidered for admission or permitted to register unless all of the admission forms










4 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

specified by the Admissions Section of the Registrar's office are filed in that office
on or before the dates specified in the University calendar. In addition to forms
required by the Admissions Section, the student must furnish a transcript from
each institution previously attended. These transcripts must be transmitted by
the registrar of the institution where the work was completed to the Directer of
Admissions at the University of Florida.
In some instances students who do not meet the quantitative or qualitative
requirements for admission for graduate study may pursue a semester or a year's
work classified as a senior in an attempt to meet the qualifications set by the unit
of the University concerned for the program of the student's choice. Upon ap-
proval of the Graduate Council, some work (but in no case all of the work) com-
pleted during this period might be used to reduce the course requirements for a
graduate degree.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR VETERANS

In addition to the regular requirements for admission set forth in the pre-
ceding sections and the forms incident thereto required by the University of
Florida, any veteran who expects to enroll under provisions of any of the various
federal laws governing education or rehabilitation training of veterans must be
sure that he has cleared the necessary details with the Veterans Administration
and has obtained the necessary documents from them.
For the most part, the benefits of Public Law 346 (the G. I. Bill of Rights)
are not open to any who were not in training on July 25, 1951 or who have in-
terrupted training since that time. There are some circumstances under which
these benefits are open to the veteran, but each case must be cleared in advance
with the Veterans Administration.
The government benefits available under Public Law 16 (Vocational Rehabili-
tation Act) for veterans who received service connected disabilities are provided
for only after review of each individual case by the Veterans Administration.
All veterans who believe they are entitled to educational benefits are urged to
contact the appropriate Veterans Administration office in order that the decision
may be made in their individual case. Veterans who at the time of registration
do not have the necessary papers showing clear entitlement to government benefits
are required to pay their own fees. If the proper clearances are subsequently pre-
sented to the Office of the Registrar, authorization for refund of fees and ex-
penses appropriate in the individual case will be issued.


COLLEGE CREDIT FOR SERVICE TRAINING

Veterans may be entitled to credit for training and experiences obtained in
the armed forces during the war in accordance with the recommendations of the
American Council on Education as set forth in "A Guide to the Evaluation of
Educational Experiences in the Armed Services." All veterans entering or re-
entering the University should consult the Assistant Director of Admissions in
the Office of the Registrar. In many cases it will be helpful to the student and
his dean in planning a program if this can be done in advance of registration.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EXPENSES

REGISTRATION FEES

Three Eight
Week Week
Term Term
Registration Fee (Florida Students) -___.._ $ 20.00 $ 45.00
Registration Fee (non-Florida Students) --____--- 55.00 145.00

SPECIAL FEES

Late Registration Fee ........._ ___ 5.00 5.00
Breakage Fee (Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology,
Physics and Soils) ._...____ ..~ 5.00 5.00
Graduation Fee, Bachelor's Degree .__- 10.00 10.00
Graduation Fee, Master's or Doctor's ....-_. 20.00 20.00
Applied Music Fee _.-- _____..._ .-* 30.00
Practice Room --_---.-- -------..--.---- .-* 5.00
Instrument Rental --__ -- ---- __ ___ .-* 5.00

EXAMINATION FEES
A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for
each application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary
only in case the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.
A comprehensive examination for all entering graduate students in Education
(National Teachers Examination, or equivalent) is required. A fee of $6.00 is
charged.
REFUND OF FEES
If before 4 P.M. on Friday of the first week of each term students for any
reason wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of
$3, will be refunded. No refunds will be made after this date.

LIVING EXPENSES

Current costs of living are reflected in charges for food and lodging in the
Gainesville area. Meals may be obtained at relatively reasonable cost at the new
University Cafeteria, the Campus Club, University Soda Fountain, and at various
restaurants and cafeterias located adjacent to the campus. Lodging is available
in University housing facilities, in private rooming houses off-campus, and in
fraternity and sorority houses.

STUDENTS DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the Uni-
versity, funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of fifty cents
is made on each account, per term.

*Not offered.










6 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

STUDENT LIFE-SERVICES, FACILITIES, ACTIVITIES

REGULATIONS

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT PERSONNEL
The Dean of Student Personnel coordinates the counseling and service activi-
ties which are available to aid the student in solving personal and educational
problems and to help him in selecting a balanced program of social and recrea-
tional activities.
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN
The Dean of Men is the counselor to men students. He is interested in the
total life of the student, including his academic, financial, social, and recreation
activities. In cooperation with the Dean of Women, his office serves as a clearing
house for all non-classroom activities. The Dean of Men serves as an adviser
to student self-government so that these activities may provide training in citi-
zenship and leadership. He cooperates with the Director of Housing in providing
counseling for men who live in University living facilities.
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN
The Dean of Women has broad responsibilities for the welfare of women stu-
dents. She serves as a counselor to students on a variety of problems and interests
including personal, academic, financial and social.
In cooperation with the Dean of Men and the Adviser to Student Organiza-
tions she serves as an adviser to student government and other student organiza-
tions.
The Dean of Women in cooperation with the Director of Housing, acts in an
administrative, supervisory, and counseling capacity with relation to the Univer-
sity residence halls and women's fraternity houses.
OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING
The office of the Director of Housing coordinates the residence halls and Fla-
vet programs and operations. See section on "Housing" for details.
OFFICE OF THE FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISER
The Foreign Student Adviser is the coordinator of arrangements for all alien
students at the University. His office cooperates with other University agencies
in handling admissions, scholarships, loans, and employment for foreign students.
The office is primarily responsible for the reception and orientation of new stu-
dents from abroad and for all of the University's relations with the U.S. Immi-
gration Service. The Foreign Student Adviser and his staff cooperate with other
officials and agencies of the University in providing necessary counseling for
foreign students on personal, academic, financial, language, or social problems.
Assistance in an advisory capacity is provided for individuals and organizations
interested in international understanding and intercultural exchange.
OFFICE OF THE ADVISER TO STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The Adviser to Student Organizations, whose office is related to the Office of
the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women, is interested in the activities of all










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


organized student groups on the campus. He is a counselor for personal and
group problems related to all student organizations, and also provides the Inter-
fraternity Council with leadership and guidance.
This Office should be contacted regarding the formation and recognition of
new student organizations. It maintains a file of all campus organizations.
FLORIDA CENTER OF CLINICAL SERVICES
The services of the clinics which operate as a coordinated unit under this
division are available to all University students without charge. Students are
urged to avail themselves of these services before their problems or difficulties
become aggravated.
The services of the clinics are available to the residents of the State of
Florida for diagnostic purposes and therapy to the extent that personnel and
facilities will permit.
PSYCHOLOGICAL CLINIC
One of the functions of this unit is to aid the student on an individual basis
to plan a vocational objective consistent with his capacity, interest, and tempera-
ment. Approved test and interview methods are used, and results are supple-
mented by a complete description of the occupations involved. Other services
of this clinic include help to students who find their work hampered by worries,
adjustment difficulties, and other troublesome conditions.
In addition to the regular staff, several members of the staff of the Depart-
ment of Psychology, who have comprehensive training and experience in clinical
work serve in the clinic.
SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The clinic functions as a service to the University students who have speech
and hearing problems which are handicapping in nature. In addition to losses in
hearing, such impairment includes: stuttering, cleft palate speech, articulatory
problems, paralyses, voice abnormalities. Special instruction is provided to meet
the needs of foreign speaking students.
In pursuance of its function the clinic conducts an examination of all in-
coming students during the week of orientation for the purpose of discovering
those who need special instruction. In addition to diagnostic and remedial speech
service, the clinic offers complete hearing evaluation. This service gives attention
to various methods for the conservation of hearing and includes the fitting of
hearing aids.
READING LABORATORY AND CLINIC
Through the use of interviews and diagnostic tests, the clinic plans a program
of study and training in reading skills for each individual who demonstrates a
need for assistance. The program is scheduled according to the needs of the
student, the time available, and the amount of training necessary for permanent
improvement of reading skills. Training in reading is available in the clinic
to any registered University student upon application to the clinic.
In addition to remedial functions, this unit trains teachers and graduate stu-
dents in the techniques of diagnostic and remediation. The clinic also carries
on a program of research in many aspects of the field of reading and aids students
and faculty members engaged in allied research.










8 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ADAPTED AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISES
This program assists those students who have physical deviations which neces-
sitate individual consideration in developing a sports program that is within the
limits of their physical capacity. In planning these programs, due consideration
is given to the individual's interests and the social and recreational needs of
adult life.
Problems of functional exercise are provided for those students having physical
deviations that can be corrected or improved by such work. In such cases the
exercise takes precedence but is not a substitute for the requirements for de-
veloping the recreational program. The work is conducted under careful super-
vision and is based on adequate medical diagnosis and information.
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY CLINIC
The Marriage and Family Clinic deals with marital, premarital and family
adjustment problems.
The primary function of the personnel in this unit is to give assistance and
guidance to clients by supplying information, to assist in gaining insight into
problems, and to assist in weighing advantages and disadvantages of alternative
adjustments. University students will find continued understanding and help
with their marital and premarital problems in this unit.

MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT
The staff of the Department of Student Health works closely with the staffs
of the clinics in the Florida Center of Clinical Services.
The reader should refer to the description of Student Health Service.

OFFICE OF STUDENT PERSONNEL RECORDS

Using various sources, the Office of Student Personnel Records collects and
integrates information concerning social and scholastic activities of each stu-
dent. It makes this information available to qualified counselors who aid the
student in making educational, social, psychological, and vocational adjustment.
The keeping of personnel records is an effort in the understanding of, and service
to, the individual student as he has contact not only with the classroom, but also
with all phases of his university life.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

Every effort is made to aid qualified students in obtaining part-time employ-
ment. Opportunities are limited; consequently the number of part-time jobs
available does not approach the number of applicants seeking these jobs. Every
attempt is made to place students in work that utilizes their training and ex-
perience.
Each student who is employed by the University must have an honor point
average of "C" for the semester or term immediately preceding his employment.
The average rate of pay per hour is between 50 and 75 cents; the average earnings
per month are about $40.
Student employment is directed by the Committee on Student Aid, Scholar-










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ships, and Awards, with the Assistant Dean of Men administering the program.
All applications for work should be made prior to the opening of the semester
in which employment is desired. Application for work, however, may be filed at
any time.
Inquiries should be addressed to:
Assistant Dean of Men
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS

For information in scholarships and loans at the University of Florida stu-
dents should refer to the Dean of Men, who is chairman of the committee on
Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards, and to the regular session catalog or
the special bulletin on Scholarships, Loan Funds and Student Employment for
details on the various types of aid.


HOUSING

GENERAL INFORMATION
Each student must make personal arrangement for his housing either by (1)
applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to the University
Housing Facilities or, (2) in the case of an upperclassman who wishes to do so,
obtaining an accommodation in private housing or in his fraternity house.
All inquiries concerning housing applications, deposits, or rent payments in
University Housing Facilities should be addressed to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville. Checks or money orders for room deposits or
rent payments should be made payable to the University of Florida and mailed
to the Office of the Business Manager, Cashier, together with the application or
rent invoice. Cash should NOT be sent through the mail.
An application for housing space may be filed at any time. Prospective fresh-
men are urged to apply for housing as early as possible.
A deposit payment of ten dollars must accompany the application for housing.
Each applicant is given advance notice of exact assignment and deadline date
for rent payment, if possible. Each applicant should read carefully the terms
and conditions covering housing assignments as stated on the back of the ap-
plication form and on the notification of assignment.
Roommate requests are honored wherever possible, provided the individuals
wishing to room together submit their applications and pay room deposits at the
same date, clearly indicate on their respective applications their desire to room
together. A large number of selected foreign students are available for assign-
ment as roommates with American students who are interested in foreign lan-
gauges, trade, and international relations; any student interested in the program
should indicate this on his application.
RESIDENCE REGULATIONS
All freshman men and all undergraduate women, with the exception of those
whose residence is Gainesville or vicinity, are required to live in University










10 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Housing Facilities as long as space is available. With University approval under-
graduate women students, excepting freshmen, may live in their sorority houses.
HOUSING ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES
Carefully selected and trained personnel are in charge of each area. Students
with personal problems or questions concerning procedure or policy are aided
by Head Residents, Resident Advisers, and Student Counselors.
The rates quoted are subject to change. All facilities are equipped with basic
furnishings of beds, mattresses, dressers, desks, and chairs. Residents are en-
couraged to bring their own drapes, pictures, bedspreads, rugs, and lamps.
Linens may be rented on a weekly exchange basis; pillows, blankets, and
some extra equipment may be rented on a term or semester basis. Linen rates
per week are: sheets, 15e each; towels, 7c each; pillow cases, 6c each. Blankets,
pillows, and lamps are 60c per Summer Session.
Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, prepaid, addressed in the student's name
and showing his assigned room number. Such shipments will be held until called
for by the student. The University assumes no responsibility beyond the exercise
of reasonable care for any shipment so received.

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
Mallory, Yulee, and Reid Halls
These three halls of modern design and of brick, concrete, and steel con-
struction are normally reserved for women students. Features include; office-to-
room intercommunication system; post-office boxes for each room in building
lobbies; large lounge for each building; study lounge on each upper floor; large
recreation rooms; laundry and other self-service facilities. Double and single
rooms only, with the number of single rooms limited. Community bath facilities
on each floor. Hot water system thermostatically controlled for each building.
Fluorescent lighting. Rates (subject to change): Single room $49.50 per student
per Summer Session; double room, $42.50 per student per Summer Session.
Buckman, Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls
These four halls of modern brick, concrete, and steel construction are normally
reserved for men students. Each hall is divided into separate sections with ac-
commodations for from 30 to 48 students per section. All but a few rooms have
lavatories, and there is a community bath on each floor in each section. There are
lounges, recreation rooms, and laundry facilities in the area. Room types: two-
room suites for two, double rooms for two or three students, and single rooms.
Summer Session rates range from $28.00 to $36.00 per student per Summer
Session (Thomas Hall will not be available for use by single students dur-
ing the 1954 Summer Session.)
FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES AND
FOR WOMEN WITH CHILDREN
Three Apartment Villages (Flavets), located on-campus, have been provided
through the Public Housing Authority. Applications are accepted from married
veteran and non-veteran students, but assignment priority is given to
veterans. Flavet I contains 26 buildings of one-story, temporary construction,










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


divided into 100 apartment units of one, two, or three bedrooms. Flavet II, similar
to Flavet I in construction, contains 20 buildings divided into 76 apartment units,
of one, two, or three bedrooms. Flavet III contains 54 buildings, of two-story,
temporary construction, divided into 448 apartment units of one or two bedrooms.
All apartments are equipped with basic furniture requirements, but residents
must furnish their own linens, rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating are
by gas, metered to the individual apartments. Electricity consumption in ex-
cess of the basic minimum is paid on a monthly basis on meter readings. Rent
rates per month (including basic electricity) are one-bedroom apartment, $26.75;
two-bedroom apartment, $29.50; three-bedroom apartment, $32.50.
Murphree Hall, Sections J and K willbe available for assignment to couples
and to women with children. The accommodations consist of two room suites
(study room and bedroom). All suites have lavatories, and there is a community
bath with shower and toilet facilities on each floor in each section. Cooking or
preparation of food is not permitted. Summer Session rates are $63.00 per suite
per eight weeks term.
PRIVATE ROOMING HOUSES
Many rooming accommodations are available in private homes or privately
operated rooming houses in the Gainesville Area.
Definite rental arrangements must be made directly with the property-owner
by the student.
Each single undergraduate woman student under 21 years of age living off-
campus must file with the Office of the Dean of Women a permission blank signed
by her parents or guardians giving their approval of her living arrangements.
Such blanks are available in the Housing Office as well as in the Office of the
Dean of Women.
COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION
The Cooperative Living Organization, organized and operated by students
to furnish economical living accommodations for its membership, is located at 117
NW 15th St. The qualifications for membership are financial need, scholastic
ability, and references of good character. In order to secure membership in the
CLO, students should apply to the CLO President at the above address.
SPRINGFIELD HALL
Springfield Hall, organized in September 1951, is the first women's living co-
operative to be established on the campus. It is sponsored by the Wesley Founda-
tion and is open to any student at the University who is interested in Christian
cooperative living. It is organized on a non-profit basis, with each member being
assessed her pro rata share of the actual operating cost.
Application for membership may be obtained from the resident counselors at
1113 West University Avenue, or from the Wesley Foundation, 1320 West Uni-
versity Avenue.
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Most national fraternity and sorority chapters maintain their own houses
adjacent to the University campus. Freshman women are not permitted to live
in sorority houses. Special regulations apply to freshman men living in their
fraternity houses. University student regulations are in effect for all sorority
and fraternity houses.










12 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GENERAL INFORMATION

LECTURES, PLAYS AND EXHIBITIONS
The University presents outstanding lectures as part of the general educational
and cultural life of the campus. The speakers are selected with a view to offering
to the University community stimulating presentations in the different areas of
learning.
During the Summer Session, under the direction of the Department of Speech,
full length plays, experimental one-act plays, and interpretative reading pro-
grams are presented. The University provides facilities for high grade per-
formances under competent direction.
Exhibitions of contemporary work in the arts are brought to the campus
under the sponsorship of the University Center of the Arts. Such exhibitions
provide an opportunity to study examples of the best contemporary work in
painting, industrial design, furniture, crafts, community planning, architecture,
and the other arts.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The leading religious denominations have attractive places of worship and
students are welcome at every service. Students interested in the study of re-
ligion and in preparing themselves for religious leadership may take courses
offered by the Department of Religion. Vesper services are conducted weekly on
the campus lawn or in the Florida Union.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES SERVICES
The University Libraries, consisting of the General Library and 12 college,
school and departmental libraries, contain more than 450,000 volumes and receive
currently approximately 3500 serials.
The larger part of the library holdings are kept in the General Library build-
ing where four reading rooms offer seating space for 1200 readers. Located on
the first floor is the University College Reading Room which has on open shelves
some 8000 volumes useful to students in the first two years of college. The Hu-
manities Reading Room and the Social Sciences Reading Room, on the second
floor, are designed primarily as centers of library activity for the upperclassmen
in the humanistic and the social studies. Around the walls on open shelves in
each of these rooms are approximately 15,000 volumes and current issues of
learned journals. On the third floor is the Science Reading Room with books and
complete sets of journals in psychology, general science, mathematics, physics,
geology and geography. Additional services in the General Library are the
Browsing Room for recreational reading, the Map Alcove and Reading Room,
music rooms, seminar rooms, and carrels and study cubicles for faculty members
and graduate students.
The Library collection is particularly strong in Floridiana with research cen-
tered in the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, located on the first floor of
the General Library building. Manuscripts and books by Florida authors are col-
lected in the Florida Authors Room, which is the center for activity in creative
writing.
Libraries for Agriculture, Architecture and Allied Arts, Biology, Chemistry-
Pharmacy, Education, Engineering, Forestry, and Law are located in or near
buildings housing the corresponding instructional units. The Library serving the










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


extension activities of the University is located in the Seagle Building. The P.
K. Yonge Laboratory School Library serves the Laboratory School.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Applicants for admission to the University are furnished a medical history
and physical examination form by the Registrar's Office. The medical history is
filled in by the applicant before going to his doctor for the physical examination.
The physical examination must be performed and completed by a licensed Doctor
of Medicine and mailed by the doctor directly to Head, Student Health Service,
University of Florida, Gainesville. This medical history and physical examination
must be approved by a University Physician before the applicant is cleared for
registration in the University.
The Health Service strives to prevent students with communicable diseases
from entering the University. All students enrolled at the University are given
annual chest x-rays by the State Health Department and every effort is made to
detect evidence of tuberculosis of which the student may be entirely unaware.
(Faculty members and employees of the University are also given annual chest
x-rays). Late registrants will be charged a special fee of $2.00 for their chest
x-ray. Students should have been successfully vaccinated against smallpox with-
in the past five years and the Health Service advises all students to be immunized
to typhoid fever and tetanus before coming to the University.
The University maintains the Student Health Service in the Infirmary Building
on the campus for the protection and medical care of the students in residence.
The Outpatient Clinic is open during the day from 8:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M. to pro-
vide all students in need of medical care with consultation and treatment. The
hospital, of 65 beds, provides the student in need of hospitalization with twenty-
four hour general nursing care and patients entering the hospital are under the
constant observation of a University Physician. An emergency service is avail-
able to students who become acutely ill or are injured when the clinic is closed
and such students may obtain treatment at any time by reporting to the Infirmary,
University Physicians do not make calls outside the Infirmary or attempt to treat
students in their rooms where the facilities for treatment are inadequate. Stu-
dents should be instructed before leaving home to report immediately to the In-
firmary should they become ill. Parents will be notified by a University Physician
whenever a student is believed to be seriously ill.
The Infirmary is staffed and equipped for treating the acute illnesses, injuries
and emergencies which commonly occur while the student is in residence at the
University. It is not organized, however, to provide for the care of students
suffering from chronic diseases. The Student Health Service does not assume
the responsibility for treatment of students having Epilepsy, Organic Heart
Disease, Asthma, Rheumatic Fever, Diabetes or prolonged illnesses. Students
with such chronic diseases may receive emergency treatment in the Infirmary but
they must arrange for a continuation of their medical care outside the University
Health Service.
There are no facilities for dental work or eye refractions in the Student
Health Service and therefore students are urged to have defects of vision and
teeth corrected before coming to the University.
Major surgery is not performed at the Infirmary. Some minor surgery is
performed in the Infirmary at University Physicians' discretion only. However,










14 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

all surgical operations are the responsibility of the student and his parents and
are performed with their consent, and if at another hospital at their expense.
Whenever an emergency operation is imperative, the student shall be referred to
a competent surgeon and transferred to the Alachua General Hospital in Gaines-
ville, which is fully approved for surgery by the American College of Surgeons.
Students receiving severe, multiple or compound fractures will be handled in the
same manner as students in need of emergency surgery.
Competent physicians and surgeons in Gainesville cooperate readily with the
Health Service in consultations. Whenever a student is found to be in need of a
consultant, the University Physician will arrange for such a consultation at the
student's expense. Students requesting the professional attention of a physician
or registered nurse of their choice may do so at their expense and by the approval
of the Head of the Medical Staff of the Infirmary. Local physicians are available
for medical service to students at their places of residence, at the student's ex-
pense.
The Health Service is available only to those students currently enrolled in the
University who have paid the student health fee. In the case of married students,
who are unacquainted with local physicians, the Health Service will be glad to
recommend well qualified physicians to attend their families.
The Health Fee does not include surgery, consultation, special duty nursing,
special medicines, treatments or laboratory work and an extra charge is made
for these. The Infirmary offers students a diagnostic x-ray service at a very
nominal cost. All x-rays are interpreted by a qualified Radiologist. A charge of
$1.75 per day is made for inpatients.
The University is not responsible for the care of students during vacation
periods. The Infirmary will be closed during official University vacation periods,
but in certain instances it may make special arrangements for the continued care
of students who were hospitalized before the vacation period.
During epidemics, the facilities of the Student Health Department may be
so overtaxed that the care of all ill students at the Infirmary would be impossible.
In such an emergency every effort will be made to provide for the care of students
outside of the Infirmary, but the Student Health Service will not assume pay-
ment for services rendered by outside doctors or other hospitals.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Orange and Blue Bulletin is the official bulletin of the Summer Session.
This mimeographed sheet, published every other day during the Summer Session
and posted on all bulletin boards, carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings,
lost and found articles, and other pertinent information. Announcements made
in the General Assembly; notices on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Pea-
body Hall, and Anderson Hall; and news items in the Summer Gator serve to
keep the Summer Session students informed concerning student activities.
ORGANIZATIONS
PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the Uni-
versity in 1912. To be eligible for consideration for membership, a student must
previously have earned at the University at least thirty semester hours of credit,
must have been guilty of no serious breach of discipline, and must stand among
the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees in his college. Eligibility for con-










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


sideration for membership is assured every student within an honor point average
of 3.30 or higher, but a student who comes within the quota of his college may be
considered if his honor point average is not below 3.00. Graduate students meeting
certain prescribed requirements are also considered for membership.
KAPPA DELTA PI
The Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of
Florida in 1923. The purpose of the society is to recognize and promote merit
in educational study and service. Both men and women are admitted to member-
ship. Members are chosen from juniors, seniors, graduate students, faculty, and
alumni. Requirements for membership are, in general, as follows: a scholastic
average of at least B; evidence of abiding interest in educational service; a
good professional attitude; and good personal-social characteristics. During the
Summer Sessions the chapter holds a meeting each week.
PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida
in 1938. It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity
with the national objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter re-
stricts election to the College of Arts and Sciences. Not more than 15 per cent
of the senior class graduating in each semester, including the graduating class of
the Summer Session is eligible for election.
In addition to conferring membership upon qualified seniors in the College of
Arts and Sciences, the society seeks, by means of an Award in Recognition of
Creative Achievement, to honor each year not more than one graduating senior
from all the colleges on the campus who, irrespective of his honor point average,
has distinguished himself throughout his undergraduate career in such fields of
activity as creative writing, dramatics, and forensics, the fine arts, or any other
liberal discipline, and has revealed a decided talent, a persistent interest, and a
prospect of mature achievement in later life.
PHI DELTA KAPPA
Beta Xi chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, national professional education fraternity
for men, was installed at the University of Florida early in 1949. Dedicated to
ideals of research, service and leadership, this organization is one of the oldest
and largest professional fraternities. Men are chosen for Phi Delta Kappa on
the basis of scholarship, leadership, potentiality, and qualities of personality con-
sidered as promising for the development of public education in the state and in
the nation.
RECREATION
THE FLORIDA UNION
The Florida Union, the official center of student activities is financed, to a
large extent, by student activities fees. Some of the facilities and services offered
by the Union include music listening rooms, a craft and hobby shop, darkrooms,
browsing library, game room, and lounges where a student can spend his leisure
hours. Fifteen guest rooms are available for guests of students and University
personnel. The Union also provides an enbosograf poster service, a mimeograph-
ing service, a lost and found department, information desk, a Western Union
substation, auditorium, and meeting rooms for student activity groups. Officers










16 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

for the President of the Student Body, the Executive Council, Honor Court, and
all student publications, in addition to a general student organizations office, are
located in the Union Building.
The Florida Union Social Board, composed of students interested in planning
student activities, sponsors a variety of social programs for the student body.
Some of the regular activities sponsored by the Social Board are bridge tourna-
ments, dancing classes, square dances, coffee hours, movies, outings, dances, and
Club Rendezvous (the campus night club). Other special activities are spon-
sored by the Social Board during the year. The committees of this board are
open to all interested students.
The University's Camp Wauburg operated by the Florida Union is a recrea-
tional area for the exclusive use of University personnel. This area is located
nine miles south of the campus. Facilities include a large picnic area, a recrea-
tional building, a bath house, and a play ground area for volley ball, horseshoes,
badminton, softball. Camp Wauburg has swimming, boating, and fishing facilities.
INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS
A broad recreational program of athletics will be conducted for the students
and faculty by the College of Physical Education and Health during the Summer
Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will be organized with competition in
softball, tennis (singles and mixed doubles), shuffleboard (singles and mixed
doubles), swimming, volleyball, table tennis, and handball tournaments, Appro-
priate awards will be made to winning teams and individuals in all sports.
A sports' clinic will be conducted prior to the tennis, volleyball, and hand-
ball tournaments. Students have the opportunity to learn skills in recreational
sports through the Department of Required Physical Education. Further in-
formation may be obtained at Room 134, Florida Gymnasium.
The athletic and physical educational facilities, including the use of the swim-
ming pool and equipment room service, will be available to all bona fide University
students. Use of these services and facilities will also be extended to students'
families, faculty, employees, and their immediate families, upon payment of a
fee of $1.00 per individual. The Summer Gator, the Orange and Blue Bulletin,
and the Florida Intramural Bulletin will carry current notices and announce-
ments about various phases of the program.
SWIMMING POOL
The swimming pool will be open daily during the Summer Session. Dressing
facilities for women are located in the Women's Gymnasium. The facilities for
men are located in Florida Gymnasium.

THE DIVISION OF MUSIC
The Division of Music offers during the Summer Session opportunities for
those students interested to participate in bands, orchestras and choral groups.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The leading religious denominations have attractive places of worship and
students are welcome at every service. Students interested in the study of re-
ligion and in preparing themselves for religious leadership may take courses
offered by the Department of Religion.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Several days before
registration students should confer with the deans of their respective colleges
regarding choice of courses. Juniors and seniors should confer with the heads
of the departments in which they expect to earn majors. Candidates for gradu-
ation must file, in the office of the Registrar, formal application for a degree and
must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree. The official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Courses can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the
college in which the student is registered and by presentation of the cards au-
thorizing the change at the office of the Registrar. Unclassified students must
secure the approval of the Dean of the University for this purpose.
CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one
semester hour.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two
semesters, or one semester and three six-week summer terms, or one semester
and two eight-week summer terms, or five six-week summer terms or four nine-
week summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet this
requirement after entrance to the University. Students who break their residence
at the University by attending another institution for credit toward the degree
must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (except in the
College of Law) applied toward the baccalaureate degree during regular resi-
dence in the respective colleges from which they expect to be graduated. Ex-
ception to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by
the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extension
work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for
a baccalaureate degree.
3. For the degree of Bachelor of Laws, a student must complete at least 96
weeks of study in residence in an accredited law school of which at least 62 must
have been in residence in the College of Law, University of Florida. The last 28
credits and the last 30 weeks of study must be in residence in this College unless
other arrangements are made in advance by written petition approved by the
faculty of the College of Law. (In the case of a student admitted prior to Sep-
tember, 1953, completion of at least 90 weeks of study in residence at an accredited
law school is required of which at least 56 weeks must have been in residence at
this College.)
4. For residence requirements for the various graduate degrees see the
Graduate School section of this bulletin.
AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED

No student will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward










18 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

a degree by correspondence study and extension class work. Extension work to
apply on the last thirty hours is authorized only by special action of the faculty
of the college in which a student is registered. Such authorization must be ob-
tained prior to enrollment in extension work. If authorization is given, no student
is permitted to earn more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours in this manner.
Under no circumstances will a student in residence be permitted to register
for a correspondence course if that course is being offered in the Summer Session.
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
The maximum load for which an undergraduate may register in an eight-week
term is 9 semester hours. The maximum load in a six-week term is 6 semester
hours.
The minimum load for any student is three semester hours. Original regis-
tration for less than three hours must be approved by the Dean of the college in
which the student is enrolled. After registration, the student may reduce his
load to less than three hours only with the approval of the Senate Committee on
Student Petitions.
UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS
1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities
who wish to earn credits in the Summer Session to be transferred eventually to
their respective institutions, and (b) other students not candidates for degrees.
2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an unclassi-
fied student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of the colleges
or schools of the University, he may do so (1) by regularizing his admission to
the University (present all the credentials required) and (2) by meeting the re-
quirements (in effect at the time of his application for candidacy) for admission
to the school or college he desires to enter.
3. If such a student is admitted to candidacy for a degree, credits earned
while an unclassified student will be accepted insofar as they apply toward the
degree requirements (in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the
college or school chosen by the student. A student must have been registered as
a regular student in the college or school from which he expects to receive the
Bachelor's Degree for at least three six-week summer terms or two eight-week
summer terms, and in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the
Master's Degree. The residence requirement (see above) in the University will
not be waived in any case.
4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclas-
sified students during the Summer Session.
5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite
statement of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy, in
the various colleges and schools. This statement will make clear that credits
earned while a student is registered as an unclassified student can be applied
toward a degree in the college of his choice only if under regular procedure this
credit will apply toward that degree.
6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will be approved by the
Dean of the University and assistants chosen by him from the faculty.
ATTENDANCE

If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


that further enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to him and
detrimental to the best interests of the class, it shall be the duty of the instruc-
tor to warn such student in writing that further absences or failure to do class
work will cause him to be dropped from the course with a failing grade. Where
possible this warning will be delivered personally; otherwise, it will be mailed to
the student's last University address by the Registrar. Instructors shall imme-
diately report all such warnings to the Course Chairman or Department Head.
SUSPENSION FOR ACADEMIC REASONS

A student may be suspended from the University because of Poor Scholarship
(failure to receive passing grades in more than fifty per cent of the hours carried
in any term or semester) or Non-Attendance (having been dropped from a course
with a failing grade for excessive absences when registered for less than the mini-
mum load, or when such drop will reduce the load below the minimum) or Un-
satisfactory Work (having been dropped from a course when registered for less
than the minimum load, or when such drop will reduce the load below the mini-
mum). The specific methods for determining when a student shall be suspended
are set forth below.
The first suspension from the University for any of the three reasons cited
above shall be for one semester, and the student so suspended shall be automat-
ically eligible for readmission after the lapse of the one semester. Thus a student
who is suspended for one semester for Non-Attendance during the first semester,
or for Poor Scholarship at the end of the first semester, will be eligible for re-
admission after the end of the second semester. A student suspended during or at
the end of the second semester is eligible to return after the following fall
semester.
A second suspension for any of the three reasons above at any time will be
considered final and the student will not be eligible for further attendance at the
University. Any suspension for violation of Admissions or Acadamic Probation
will also be considered final.
Suspension for Poor Scholarship
Any undergraduate student (all those classified other than 6) who fails to
receive passing grades in more than fifty per cent of the semester hours carried
in any term or semester shall be suspended for Poor Scholarship. If such action
be the first suspension for any academic reason, his record shall be marked "Sus-
pended for One Semester for Poor Scholarship" and he shall not be eligible for
readmission to the University until the lapse of the semester or summer term
following. If at any time previous to such suspension the student has been sus-
pended for any academic reason, his record shall be marked "Suspended for
Poor Scholarship" and he shall not be eligible for further attendance at the
University of Florida. In administering this regulation, however, failure in only
one course carrying five semester hours credit or less shall not cause the student
to be suspended, nor shall any freshman in the University College be suspended
for failures incurred in his first period (semester or summer session) of college
attendance.
Suspension for Non-Attendance or Unsatisfactory Work
Any undergraduate student (all those classified other than 6) who is dropped
from a course for excessive absences or unsatisfactory work and as a result of










20 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

such drop is left with a load of less than 12 semester hours shall be suspended
for Non-Attendance or Unsatisfactory Work as the case may be. If such action
be the first suspension for any academic reason, his record shall be marked "Sus-
pended One Semester for (reason)" and he shall not be eligible for readmission
until the lapse of the following semester or summer term. If at any time previous
to such suspension the student has been suspended for any academic reason his
record shall be marked "Suspended for (reason)" and he shall not be eligible for
further attendance at the University of Florida.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must success-
fully pass six or more to complete the program of the University College) are
administered by the Board of University Examiners and are given in January,
May, and August of each year. A student must be familiar with the work of
the various courses and be able to think in the several fields in a comprehensive
way in order to pass these examinations. Standings on the comprehensive ex-
aminations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are not subject to change
by any other agency.
APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the exam-
ination is given need not make application for it. University College students who
are not enrolled in a course at the time an examination is given and who wish
to take the comprehensive examination must apply in writing to the Board of
Examiners for permission prior to the last date set for filing such applications.
Applications will not be accepted from students registered in the colleges of the
Upper Division. Before the application is accepted the applicant will be required
to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege has not been
used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Applications will be ac-
cepted only for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Ex-
aminers. The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give Uni-
versity College students examinations by application.

THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
In a reorganization at the University of Florida in 1935, all freshmen and
sophomores were placed in one college. The University College administers all
the work of the Lower Division, which includes the pre-professional work for
the Upper Division schools and colleges and a core program of basic education
for all students. In 1944 the American Council on Education defined this pro-
gram: "General education refers to those phases of nonspecialized and non-voca-
tional education that should be the common denominator, so to speak, of educated
persons . the type of education which the majority of our people must have if
they are to be good citizens, parents, and workers." During his freshman and
sophomore years at the University, a student's time is about evenly divided be-
tween these objectives of general education and those of pre-professional or pro-
fessional preparation.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


While fully accepting its responsibility toward the professional training of
men who remain four years or longer and earn degrees, the University of Florida
as a state institution also accepts its civic responsibility to help those who spend
only one or two years at the University. These students-more than two-thirds
of all enrolled-are not "failures" because they do not continue and earn degrees,
and they probably deserve more from the state university than an odd assortment
of only "introductory courses." Consequently at the University of Florida a
group of comprehensive courses have been worked out to give some unity and
meaning to a beginner's program. These comprehensive courses that make up the
core program are:
1. American Institutions (known hereafter as C-1)
2. The Physical Sciences (C-2)
3. Reading, Speaking and Writing: Freshman English (C-3)
4. Practiced Logic: Straight Thinking (C-41)
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
5. The Humanities (C-5)
6. Biological Science (C-6)
GUIDANCE
If a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not urged to guess
on registration day. His program may be made up largely from the comprehen-
sives which help him direct his thinking toward a desirable objective, together
with approved electives that may further enable him to explore interests and
needs. But whether the student is decided or undecided about his life's work,
these comprehensive courses provide basic preparation that every educated person
should have.
Thus since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, the
program absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course
of the University College program is designed to guide the student. During the
time that he is making tentative steps toward a profession by taking special
subjects to test aptitudes, interests, and ability, he is also studying the several
great areas of human understanding and achievement. The work in the Univer-
sity College presents materials which are directly related to life experiences and
which will immediately become a part of the student's thinking to guide him to
making correct next steps. Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress
reports, vocational aptitude tests, basic vocational materials, selected material in
the comprehensive courses, student conferences, adjustments for individual dif-
ferences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations-all are parts of a
plan designed to guide students.
UPPER DIVISION COOPERATION
While the necessary correlation and unification is attempted at the University
College Office, throughout the University College period students consult Upper
Division deans and department heads to discuss future work. During the last
month of each school semester these informal conferences are supplemented by a
scheduled formal conference at which each student fills out a pre-registration card
for his prospective Upper Division work.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE COUNSELLORS
The University College Counsellors do not assume the responsibility that every











22 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

student himself must take, but they help in every way possible as he assumes a
greater and greater share of responsibility in his University education. The
counsellors are located in the University College Office.
Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests to all seniors
in every high school of the state. Since many high schools are also trying to ac-
quaint the student with the common body of knowledge so needed by all, their
records along with the placement test results indicate the variation that may be
made in the general program.
A student who has had three or four years of preparatory school study in
any one of the subject areas of the comprehensive courses, and his placement
tests or progress tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at this
level may consult one of the counsellors for subsequent needed program adjust-
ment.
THE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATE

The Associate of Arts Certificate is awarded in recognition of the successful
completion of two years of planned work at the University of Florida. In spe-
cific detail, one must pass at least sixty-four semester hours including pre-pro-
fessional work and the comprehensive courses that make up the core program.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NORMAL PROGRAM

Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
1.-American Institutions 8 1.-The Humanities 8
2.-The Physical Sciences 6 2.-Biological Science __
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 8.-Departmental Electives __ ..16-20
Freshman English 8 Military Science; Physical Fitness -
4.-Logic and Mathematics 6 80-84
5.-Departmental Electives ___ 2-6
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
80-84
At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours of Military
Science, are required to complete the Lower Division.

Basic Program for Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Students.-The program listed
below covers the minimum pre-medical or pre-dental work prescribed by the
American Medical Association or by the American Dental Association for its
member schools. Since some schools require more, the student should write
directly to the medical or dental school he is considering for a catalog and specific
information concerning its requirements.

BASIC TWO-YEAR PROGRAM FOR PRE-MEDICAL OR PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-General Chemistry 2.-Organic Chemistry
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-General Physics
Freshman English 4.-French or German
4.-Biological Science Military Science; Physical Fitness
5.-General Animal Biology (Laboratory)
Military Science; Physical Fitness

AGRICULTURE

The program for freshmen and sophomores expecting to earn a degree in the
College of Agriculture should be:












BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


a) For students intending to major in Agricultural Economics and Horticul-
ture (Ornamental and Floriculture programs)-
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-l, American Institutions .. .. 8 1.-CY. 109-110, Elements of
2.-C-6, Biological Science, or BTY. Chemistry 6
101-102 6 __ 6-12 2.-C-4, Logic and Mathematics 6
3.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and 3.-C-5, The Humanities _____. 8
Writing: Freshman English __ 8 4.-Electives in Agriculture or
4.-Electives in Agriculture or Basic Sciences ____ 8-14
Basic Sciences 6-12 5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
80-36
80-86
b) For students intending to major in Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy,
Animal Husbandry and Nutrition, Bacteriology, Botany, Dairy Husbandry, Dairy
Manufactures, General Agriculture, Horticulture (Fruit and Vegetable pro-
grams), Plant Pathology, Poultry Husbandry, and Soils-


Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-6, Biological Science, and/or
BTY. 101-102 6-12
2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ___- 8
3.-CY. 121-122, General Chemistry 8
4.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic Sciences -----___ 0-6
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness -. 2
80-36
c) For students intending to major in
Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-1, American Institutions .. 8
2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ._ 8
*3.-MS. 105-106, Basic Mathematics 8
**4.-CY. 217-218, General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis __ 8
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
34


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-l, American Institutions ___ 8
2.-C-4, Logic and Mathematics 6
3.-C-5, The Humanities 8
4.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic Sciences _...__.._. 6-12
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
80-36


Agricultural Chemistry-
Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-5, The Humanities 8
2.-C-6, Biological Science 6
3.-C-41, Practical Logic 8
4.-EH. 133, Effective Writing 8
5.-CY. 331, Introductory
Quantitative Analysis 4
6.-Approved Electives _.. 6
7.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ._ 2


d) For students intending to major in Agricultural Education-
Freshman Year Hours Sohpomore Year Hours
1.-C-l, American Institutions __. 8 1.-C-41, Practical Logic ..__. ... 3
2.---C-3, Reading, Speaking and 2.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics __ 3
Writing: Freshman English .___ 8 3.-C-5, The Humanities 8
3.-C-6, Biological Science ___- -. 6 4.-BTY. 101-102, General Botany ... 6
4.-AY. 221, General Field Crops _. 8 5.-CY. 109-110, Elements of Chemistry 6
5.-PY. 201, Fundamentals in 6.-HE. 212, Vegetable Gardening 8
Poultry Production ...-.. ... 7.-Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
6.-DY. 211, Principles of Dairying __ 3
7.-Military Science; Physical Fitness __2 31
33
Some variations from these programs are desirable in the different curricula
of the College. The curriculum of the department in which the student intends to
major should be consulted for these details. Students planning to major in Ento-
mology should consult with the department head regarding which of the above
programs to follow. Students planning to major in Animal Husbandry or Dairy
Husbandry are required to take BLY. 161-162 as corequisites with C-6 and ACY.
208. At least 64 semester hours which may include 4 hours of Military Science
are required to complete the Lower Division. Additional approved electives

*Students not qualified for MS 105-106 will take C-42 and 3 hours of electives during the fresh-
man year and MS. 105-106 in the sophomore year. These students will take CY. 331 in the Upper
Division.
**Students not qualified for CY. 217-218 will take CY. 121-122 in the freshman year and CY. 123
in the sophomore year.











24 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

taken during the first two years may reduce the number of hours required for
an Upper Division degree.
For desirable electives in Agriculture, students should consult the head of
the department in which they intend to major. These electives during the first
two years should be distributed so as to give some acquaintance with the different
phases of Agriculture, and are limited to a single course in any one department.
It is required that all students graduating in Agriculture take at least one course
in each of the following departments: Agricultural Economics, Soils, either Agron-
omy or Horticulture, and either Animal Husbandry and Nutrition, Dairy Science
or Poultry Husbandry. All such students, except those majoring in Agricultural
Chemistry and Bacteriology, shall also take at least one course in Agricultural
Engineering and in Entomology. Courses suitable for election in the freshman
year are AG. 306, AL. 309, AY. 221, DY. 211, EY. 201, EY. 203, FY. 313, and
PY. 201. In the sophomore year these courses may also be elected, and in ad-
dition the following: AG. 301, AS. 201, AS. 306, AY. 324, CL. 223, HE. 201, PT.
321, SLS. 301, and SLS. 802.

FORESTRY

The program for freshmen and sophomores planning to earn a degree in the
School of Forestry should be:
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-1, American Institutions 8 *1.-CY. 121-122, General Chemistry 8
2.-BTY. 101-102 _6 2.-C-5, The Humanities _.._____.. 8
3.-C-8, Reading, Speaking and Writing 8 3--CL. 223, Surveying _.___- 8
*4.-MS. 105-106 ___. ____ 8 4.-FY. 220, FY. 226-227, FY. 228 -- 10
5.-Approved Electives ___ 0-6 5.-EH. 812, Exposition 2_
6.-Military Science 2 6.-Approved Electives ...._..._ 0-6
Physical Fitness 0....__-- O 7.-Military Science 2
Physical Fitness .0.___
81-88
83-89
Approved electives and specific requirements:
For Specialization in Forest Management
Electives: C-21, ES. 205-206, PS. 110, ATG. 211-212, CY. 123
For Specialization in Forest Products Technology
Electives: ES. 205-206, ATG. 211-212, ML. 181
MS. 105-106 are required.
For Specialization in Wildlife Management
Electives: C-21, GY. 203, ES. 205-206, SY. 241, GPY. 203, GPY. 305, GPY.
323, C-61-62, BLY. 161-162, and BTY. 306 are required. BTY.
101-102 are not required for this curriculum.
ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The program for freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in the
College of Architecture and Allied Arts is as follows:
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
1.-C-l, American Institutions -_ 8 1.-C-5, The Humanities 8
2.-C-2. The Physical Sciences 6 2.-C-6, Biological Science 6
8.-C-8, Reading, Speaking and 3.-Departmental Electives
Writing: Freshman English -- 8 as listed below 12-14
4.-C-4, Logic and Mathematics -- 6 Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
5.-Departmental Electives as
listed below a. 6 28-80
Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
86
*The above is designed for students whose placement tests and preparatory school work entitle
them to this election. Others must take the general subjects first, C-4 and C-2.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES*

Architecture or Building Construction.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan
to earn a degree in Architecture or in Building Construction should elect the fol-
lowing courses as part of their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman year, first semester)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman year, second semester)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 8 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 8 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
AE. 205-206.-Building Technology, 4-4 credits (Sophomore year)
Landscape Architecture.-Freshmen or sophomores who plan to earn a degree
in Landscape Architecture should elect the following courses as part of their
basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 8 credits (Freshman year, first semester)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman year, second semester)
CY. 109.-Elements of Basic Chemistry, 3 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 208.-Basic Design, 8 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
AE. 205.-Building Technology, 4 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
Interior Design.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in
Interior Design should elect the following courses as part of their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman year, first semester)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 8 credits (Freshman year, second semester)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 8 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
AE. 205.-Building Technology, 4 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
Approved Elective, 8 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
Painting and Drawing, Commercial Art, Crafts, Costume Design, or History
of Art.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in Painting and
Drawing, in Commercial Art, in Crafts, In Costume Design, or in History of
Art should elect the following courses as part of their basic program. The order
in which these courses are taken should be determined in consultation with the
head of the Department of Art.
ART 121.-The Visual Arts, 8 credits
ART 122.-Materials and Spatial Design. 8 credits
ART 223.-Color and Design, 8 credits
ART 224.-Drawing and Visual Perception, 8 credits
ART 225.-Scientific Contributions to Art, 8 credits
ART 226.-Pictorial Composition, 8 credits.
ARTS AND SCIENCES
A student who plans to earn a 4-year degree in the College of Arts and Sciences
should secure credit in all of the comprehensive areas as indicated by the Uni-
versity College. Electives in the first two years should be taken in introductory
courses in possible major fields and in foreign languages. Students who have
selected a major should limit their University College electives in the major
to permit taking introductory and intermediate courses in other liberal arts areas.
For information concerning special programs of instruction and the details of
degree requirements the student is referred to the regular University Catalog.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the
Curriculum in Business Administration or for the Curriculum in Public Admin-
istration, students are required to complete the curriculum below or the equivalent
thereof in each of the courses or areas of knowledge listed including the following:

*Students who transfer to the University of Florida without having completed the departmental
electives, will be required to complete these electives before entering the Upper Division.











26 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ES. 205-206.-Basic Economics
ATG. 211-212.-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics
MS. 208.-Business Mathematics
Freshman Year
First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours
1.-American Institutions 4 1.-American Institutions 4
*2.-The Physical Sciences 3 *2.-The Physical Sciences 3
*3.-Logic or Mathematics 8 *3.-Mathematics or Logic 3
4.-Reading, Speaking and 4.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English 4 Writing: Freshman English 4
5.-Approved Electives 3 5.-Approved Electives __3_8
Military Science; Physical Fitness 1 Military Science; Physical Fitness 1
15-18 15-18
Sophomore Year
1.-Accounting 8 1.-Accounting -..---- 3
2.-Economics 8 2.-Economics 3 8
3.-The Humanities 4 3.-The Humanities 4
4.-Biological Science 3 4.-Biological Science 8
5.-Statistics or MS. 208 3-4 5.-Statistics or MS. 208 8-4
Military Science; Physical Fitness 1 Military Science; Physical Fitness 1
17-18 17-18
At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours of Military
Science are required to complete the Lower Division.

COURSES OFFERED BY THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

The following courses offered by the College of Business Administration may
be taken by students in the University College: ATG. 211-212, Elementary Ac-
counting; BS. 231, Principles of Marketing; BS. 260, Fundamentals of In-
surance; BS. 271, Principles of Management; ES. 203, Elementary Statistics;
ES. 205-206, Basic Economics; ES. 246, Consumer Economics; RE. 291, Real
Estate Fundamentals; and RE. 295, Housing and Home Ownership.

EDUCATION

University College students working toward a degree in the College of Edu-
cation should pursue one of the following programs:
Basic Program
(Except Agricultural Education and Education for the Exceptional Child)
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
1.-American Institutions _ _-- 8 1.-The Humanities -----__ 8
2.-The Physical Sciences ___ 6 2.-Biological Science 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-Logic or Mathematics 8
Freshman English 8 4.-Military Science or Electives 2
4.-Logic or Mathematics 8 5.-Electives (from list below) 12
5.-Military Science or Electives --- 2 6.-Physical Fitness 0
6.-Electives (from list below) 6_6-8
7.-Physical Fitness 0 31
83-35
Electives:
Elementary Education: EN. 105-106; English 6 hours; PHA. 361; SCL. 205-206.
** Secondary Education: EN. 105-106; SCL. 205-206.
** Business Education: BEN. 81, 91, 181; EN. 105-106: ES. 205-206; SCL. 206.
** Industrial Arts Education: EN. 105-106; IN. 101-102, 103-104.
For the basic programs in Agricultural Education and Education for the
Exceptional Child, consult the Catalog.

*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at
these levels may substitute one of the introductory basic sciences for the general Physical Science
course (C-2) and Basic Mathematics for Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
**Three hours in the Human Adjustment area, other than C-41, are required. These electives
may be taken either in the University College or in the College of Education.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ENGINEERING

The program for freshmen and sophomores expecting to earn a degree in
the College of Engineering is as follows:
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-CY. 217-218 2.-MS. 353-354
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-PS. 205-206
Freshman English 4.-Departmental Prerequisites (from
4.-MS. 105-106 list below)
**5.-ML. 181-182 and Departmental 5.-Military Science and Physical
Prerequisites (from list below) Education
6.-Military Science and Physical
Education
Department prerequisites in sequence are as follows:
Aeronautical Engineering: ML. 282, ML. 238, EM. 365
Agricultural Engineering: AG. 306, GY. 203, AL. 309, EM. 365
Chemical Engineering: CY. 881, CG. 347
Civil Engineering: CL. 223, CL. 226, EM. 865
Electrical Engineering: ML. 282, EL. 211, EM. 365
Industrial Engineering: ML. 282, EM. 365
Mechanical Engineering: ML. 282, ML. 288, CG. 361
The student should make every effort to complete these courses before entering
the Upper Division, although he may in some instances, be permitted to enroll
in the Upper Division on probation until he completes them.
Students whose records in the University College do not indicate that they
are qualified to take the professional courses in Engineering will not be admitted
to the College of Engineering.

JOURNALISM

To enter the School of Journalism students are required to have completed
the six comprehensive courses; present credit in pre-professional work--JM.
114, 215, ES. 205-206, SY. 201 and PSY. 201; have a grade average of C or
better; and a working knowledge of typewriting.
Those falling below a 2.0 grade average in University College will not be
considered for admittance to the School of Journalism until they have demon-
strated their ability to pursue with profit professional work in the Upper Divi-
sion by satisfactorily completing one semester's work prescribed by the Director
of the School of Journalism.
A least sixty-four hours, which may include four hours Military Science, are
required to complete the Lower Division.
Transfer students or those with a special hour-credit problem who have not
completed some of the pre-professional work in University College, may be
admitted provisionally to the School of Journalism on approval of the Director.
They will be expected, however, to complete the lower-level work.

LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have received before
admission a four-year baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or uni-
versity except as stated in the description of the College of Law in this Catalog.
No entering law students are admitted to the Summer Session.
Both CY. 217-218 and MS. 105-106 are required, but students who are not in the upper per-
centile group must take C-2 and C-42 first
Students who are not qualified to take CY. 217-218 and MS 105-106 in the freshman year cannot
graduate in four years unless they attend Summer School.
**Drawing equipment required for ML. 181 costs approximately fifty dollars.











28 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Although no particular courses are prerequisites, a student preparing for ad-
mission to the College of Law should obtain a thorough mastery of the basic
comprehensive courses and should take also at least two courses in each of the
following general fields: Accounting, Economics, English, History (American
and English), and Political Science. Since concepts expressed in words are tools
of the legal profession, it is essential that a student be able to read rapidly and
meaningfully and to write clearly and concisely. Courses requiring the rapid
assimilation and digestion of written materials and courses in expository writing
therefore are recommended.
PHARMACY

In keeping with the requirements of the American Council on Pharmaceutical
Education, all students expecting to earn the degree of B.S. in Pharmacy must
be enrolled in one or more Pharmacy courses for a minimum of three academic
years or a total of twenty-seven months. This regulation applies regardless of
the number of studies completed in other fields. Upon enrolling in Pharmacy
courses for the first time students must sign the register in the office of the Dean
of the College of Pharmacy. Students are advised to pursue the following
program:
Freshman Year and Summer Session Hours Sophomore Year Hours
C-11-12, American Institutions 8 C-52, The Humanities 4
C-21, Physical Sciences 8 C-62, Biological Science __
C-81-32, Freshman English 8 PS. 201-2, General Physics 8
C-41, Practical Logic 8 PGY. 221-2, Practical Pharmacognosy 6
C-42, Fundamental Mathematics 8 PHY. 223-4, Galenical Pharmacy 6
C-51. The Humanities 4 CY. 123, Qualitative Analysis 8
C-61, Biological Science 8 CY. 881, Quantitative Analysis 4
CY. 121-2, General Chemistry 8 Military Science; Phys. Fitness 2
PHY. 106, Pharmaceutical Calculations 2
Military Science; Physical Fitness 2 Total 86
Total 44
Only students having an average of C or higher will be admitted to the Col-
lege of Pharmacy and/or pharmacy courses in the Upper Division. In addition,
all pre-pharmacy students entering the University in September, 1950, or there-
after must have grades of C or higher in each of the following courses: C-42, CY.
121, CY. 122, PGY. 221, PGY. 222, PHY. 106, PHY. 223, and PHY. 224.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

The program for freshmen and sophomores expecting to earn a degree in the
College of Physical Education and Health, with a major in Physical Education,
Health Education, Recreation, or Physical Therapy, is as follows:
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-Reading, Speaking and Writing *2.-The Physical Sciences
8.-Logic and Mathematics 3.-Departmental Electives as listed below
4.-Biological Science 4.-Military Science, and Physical Fitness
6.-Departmental Electives as listed below
6.-Military Science, and Physical Fitness
Departmental electives in sequence are as follows:
Physical Education for Men.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a
degree in Physical Education should elect the following courses:
PHA. 284.-Team Games for Men, 1 credit (Freshman year, First semester)
*Students planning to major in Health Education or Physical Therapy must take CY. 121-122.
Students whose high school records and placement tests indicate satisfactory preparation may sub-
stitute CY. 121-122 for C-21-22. Others should takeC-21, upon satisfactory completion of which
they may enter CY. 121.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EN. 105-106.-Human Growth and Development, 3-3 credits (Freshman year)
PHA. 282.-Basketball, 2 credits (Freshman year, Second semester)
PHA. 285.-Individual and Dual Sports for Men, 1 credit (Freshman year,
Second semester)
PHA. 287.-Gymnastics and Combatives for Men, 1 credit (Freshman year,
Second semester)
PHA. 251.-Folk, Social and Tap Dance, 1 credit (Sophemore year, First
semester)
PHA. 281.-Football, 2 credits (Sophomore year, First semester)
SCL. 205.-Children and Culture, 3 credits (Sophomore year, First semester)
PHA. 283.-Track and Baseball, 2 credits (Sophomore year, Second semester)
PHA. 286-Aquatics for Men, 1 credit (Sophomore year, Second semester)

Physical Education for Women.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn
a degree in Physical Education should elect the following courses:
EN. 105-106.-Human Growth and Development, 3-3 credits (Freshman year)
SCL. 205.-Children and Culture, 3 credits (Sophomore year, First semester)
PHA. 251.-Folk, Social and Tap Dance, 1 credit (Freshman year, First se-
mester)
PHA. 272.-Team Sports for Women, 1 credit (Freshman year, First se-
mester)
PHA. 273.-Aquatics and Gymnastics for Women, 1 credit (Freshman year,
Second semester)
PHA. 275.-Individual, Dual and Team Sports for Women, 1 credit (Fresh-
man year, Second semester)
PHA. 276.-Individual, Dual and Team Sports for Women, 1 credit (Sopho-
more year, First semester)
PHA. 277-278.-Dance Acitvities, 2-2 credits (Sophomore year)
PHA. 301.-Tennis for Women, 2 credits (Sophomore year, Second semester)

Health Education.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in
Health Education should elect the following courses:
BLY. 161-162.-Biology Laboratory, 2-2 credits (Freshman year)
EN. 105-106.-Human Growth and Development, 3-3 credits (Freshman year)
SCL. 205.-Children and Culture, 8 credits (Sophomore year, First semester)
PHA. 261.-Personal Hygiene, 3 credits (Sophomore year, Second semester)
Recreation.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in Recrea-
tion should elect the following courses:
PHA. 284.-Team Games for Men or PHA. 272, 1 credit (Freshman year,
First semester)
EN. 105-106.-Human Growth and Development, 3-3 credits (Freshman year)
PHA. 285.-Individual and Dual Sports for Men or PHA. 275, 1 credit (Fresh-
man year, Second semester)
SY. 201.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life, 3 credits (Sophomore
year, First semester)
PHA. 286.-Aquatics for Men or PHA. 273, 1 credit (Sophomore year, First
semester)
IN. 312.-Elementary School Handicrafts, 3 credits (Sophomore year, Second
semester)










30 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

PHA. 251.-Folk, Social and Tap Dance, 1 credit (Sophomore year, Second
semester)
Physical Therapy.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in
Physical Therapy should elect the following courses:
BLY. 161-162.-Biology Laboratory, 2-2 credits (Freshman year)
PSY. 201.-General Psychology, 3 credits (Sophomore year, First semester)
PSY. 205.-Social Psychology or PSY. 202.-Personality Development or
PSY. 211.-Psychological Development, 3 credits (Sophomore
year, Second semester)
PHA. 295.-Introduction to Physical Therapy, 2 credits (Sophomore year)

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES OF THE UPPER DIVISION

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
The College of Agriculture is composed of three units, namely, 1. (Instruction),
2. Research (Agricultural Experiment Station), and 3. Extension (Agricultural
Extension Service). The Instructional Division (The College proper) is made
up of departments in the College devoted to the various phases of technical and
practical agricultural work. The work of these departments is closely related,
and the aim of the College is to afford students the best possible training for
service in agriculture.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural Chemistry, (administered
jointly with the College of Arts and Sciences), Agricultural Economics, Agri-
cultural Engineering, Agricultural Education (administered jointly with the
College of Education), Agronomy, Animal Husbandry and Nutrition, Bacteriology,
Botany (including Botany and Plant Pathology), Dairy Science, Entomology,
Horticulture, Poultry Husbandry, Soils, and Veterinary Science.

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers professional programs of
study leading to appropriate undergraduate degrees in Architecture, Building
Construction, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Painting and Drawing,
Commercial Art, Crafts, Costume Design, and History of Art. Professional pro-
grams at the graduate level are offered in Architecture, in Art, in Building Con-
struction, and in Community Planning.
The College offers courses to students in other colleges of the University who
wish to broaden their cultural background in the arts. General courses in the
Department of Architecture and in the Department of Art are open to all stu-
dents in the University, and certain upper division courses in the Department of
Art and in the Department of Interior Design require no prerequisite training.
1954 SUMMER SESSION
During the 1954 Summer Session the College will offer most of the under-
graduate courses in Architecture, Art, Building Construction and Interior Design,
as well as graduate courses in Architecture, Art, and Building Construction.
In addition to the regular Summer Session on campus, the College of Architec-
ture and Allied Arts will conduct another Summer Art School on the Gulf Coast of










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Florida at Tarpon Springs, in cooperation with the General Extension Division of
Florida. The session will extend from June 14 to July 17, 1954. Further informa-
tion may be obtained by communicating with the Department of Art, University
of Florida, Gainesville.
The University Center of the Arts, a unit of the College of Architecture
and Allied Arts, will continue its regular program of educational and illustrative
exhibitions of work in the arts during the 1954 Summer Session.

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES

The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers courses leading to certifi-
cation in Art for teaching Art in the secondary schools in the State of Florida.
Regulations describing certification of teachers are published by the State De-
partment of Education and it is imperative that all students who expect to be
certified familiarize themselves with these regulations. Applications for certifi-
cate should be made immediately after graduation, and should be addressed to
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

For detailed information on admission, undergraduate degrees, graduate de-
grees, and programs of study for the various curricula, see the University Catalog.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

The subject matter fields regularly offered to students in the College of Arts
and Sciences and the extent of these offerings is indicated in the table below:
Elective Group Dept.
Subject Work Major Major MA. or MS. Ph.D.
Anthropology -__--_---- X X X -
Art ---. _- --- X X X Graduate work offered
through College of Ar-
chitecture and Allied


Astronomy
Bacteriology


Biology ---.
Botany ---


Chemistry ---
Economics



Education --


English _--
Family Life -


X
------------- X
____


X-X


Art

X Graduate work offered
through College of
Agriculture
X X X
X Graduate work offered
through College of
Agriculture
X X X
X Graduate work offered
through College of
Business Administra-


tion
X Major and Graduate work offered through the Col-
lege of Education
X X X X X
X X -










32 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

French X X X X -
Geography X X X X
Geology X X X -
German __ X X X X -
Greek X X X -
History X X X X X
Italian __ X X -
Journalism .__ X Major and Graduate work offered through the School
of Journalism
Latin X_ X X X -
Library Science ___ X X -
Mathematics __ X X X X X
Meteorology X -
Music ____.. X X X -
Philosophy X X X X -
Physics X X X X X
Political Science X X X X X
Portuguese X X -
Psychology _... X X X X X
Religion X X X -
Russian ..... X -
Sociology X X X X X
Spanish X X X X X
Speech X X X X X
Zoology See Biology listed above
For information regarding details of these programs of study and degree re-
quirements, the University catalog for 1954-55 should be consulted.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The summer session offerings of the College of Business Administration pro-
vide basic courses in the several curricula groupings, a selection of advanced
courses to enable students to go ahead with a normal academic program and a
selection of graduate courses.
A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Busi-
ness Administration or Bachelor of Science in Public Administration are offered.
For complete information on the requirements for these curricula and for the
graduate program, the University Catalog should be consulted.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education students will present a certificate
of graduation from the University College, or equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education. (See General Catalog
for detailed requirements).
UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Students who are preparing to teach have the opportunity of specializing in
the following teaching areas: agricultural education, art, business education, ele-










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


mentary education, English, foreign languages, health education, industrial arts
education, library science (restricted certification), mathematics, music (re-
stricted certification), physical education, sciences, social studies, and speech.
(See General Catalog for curricula).
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate work in Education offers an opportunity for teachers to specialize
in such areas as foundations of education (educational psychology, philosophy,
human growth and development), elementary education, secondary education,
agricultural education, business education, industrial arts education, school ad-
ministration, supervision, guidance, junior college education, teacher education,
educational research, and education for the exceptional child. (See General
Catalog for requirements).
CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS

The curricula in the College of Education include State certification require-
ments. Each student should consult his counselor to plan a sequence of courses
to meet requirements for his degree and for certification.
For further information concerning the certification of teachers, write to the
State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting State Board
Regulations Relating to Florida Requirements for Teacher Education and Cer-
tification, April 3, 1951, revised July 21, 1953.

EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the summer term attended and
at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade is
below C.
3. Students who desire an extension of certificate should apply for the same
to the Registrar, Room 33, Administration Building prior to July 10. Name of
students who are eligible for an extension will be presented to the State De-
partment of Education. Students should indicate exactly the name that appears
on the certificate which they wish to have extended.
4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to T. D. Bailey,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a year
after the close of the summer term, otherwise extension will not be granted.
EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT OFFICE
The Educational Placement Office serves both former students of the Uni-
versity and public school officials, without charge. The Office keeps up-to-date
records on registrants for positions and a current list of educational adminis-
tration and teaching vacancies. Persons who wish this service should communi-
cate with the Educational Placement Office, Yonge 120.
THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
The summer term of the Laboratory School will extend from June 14 through
July 23. Children of Summer Session students and all others are eligible for










34 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

enrollment. Classes from the kindergarten through the sixth grade will be held.
The fees are $2. for University registration and $3. for expendable materials.
Parents will register pupils Monday, June 14, 9:00 to 10:30 A.M., in the first
floor hall of the elementary wing of the Yonge building. Teacher-parent con-
ferences will be held on Monday, June 14, and parents should not be accompanied by
their children.
Application for admission should be made at the Laboratory School Office,
218 Yonge Building, as soon as possible since the number who may be admitted
is limited.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering is offering several courses during the Summer
Session in various departments so that students may graduate in a minimum
time. Many other courses included in the engineering curricula, such as mathe-
matics and physics, are also available. During the summer months the engineer-
ing student may also take subjects to meet elective requirements.
Students entering the University for the first time may find it to their ad-
vantage to enroll in mathematics, freshman English, American Institutions or
General Chemistry and an appropriate engineering prerequisite. Students having
completed one year at the University may take courses in calculus and physics.
For those students who have completed calculus and physics, statics, dynamics
and strength of materials are suggested. Elective subjects in mathematics, physics
and the humanities are recommended to all students.
Students who contemplate registration in the College of Engineering and
those who are already registered in this college should confer about their sched-
ules with the department heads and the dean as soon as possible.

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY
Courses in Forestry are offered during the Summer Session. The required
Summer Camp should be taken between the second and third year's work pro-
vided the necessary prerequisites have been completed. Students who contemplate
registration in the School of Forestry should consult the University Catalog for
courses which are prerequisites or are required in the Forestry curriculum.

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
(A UNIT OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES)
Curriculum of the School of Journalism leading to the Bachelor of Science in
Journalism degree, is designed to provide the best possible education and pro-
fessional training. It is in no sense narrowed to a technical or trade school.
The program aims to provide its students with a broad background in liberal
arts and sciences-literature, economics, history, political science, sociology, psy-
chology-which are vital aspects of contemporary life and essential to the well-
trained journalist. Some of these cultural subjects are required, others elective,
giving latitude to the likes and goals of individual students.
The general plan of education in journalism calls for the student to devote
about three-fourths of his university career to general background courses. In
the other fourth he is combining background knowledge with learning journalistic
techniques and putting into actual practice these techniques.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Students entering the School of Journalism must choose one of the programs
of study.
The professional courses break down into four principal fields: editorial, ad-
vertising, radio news and advertising, and public relations.
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

The Summer Session offerings of the College of Pharmacy provide three
courses in the Lower Division and several courses in the Upper Division. Grad-
uate students will be given guidance on theses leading to the M.S. and Ph.D.
degrees.
For complete description of the courses and requirements for admission and
graduation the student should consult the University Catalog.

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

GENERAL STATEMENT

The College of Physical Education and Health offers programs of instruction
and services under five departments, namely, Health Service, Intramural Ath-
letics and Recreation, Required Physical Education for Men, Required Physical
Education for Women, and The Professional Curriculum.

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
For admission to the College of Physical Education and Health students must
present a certificate of graduation from the University College, or the equivalent,
and have the approval of the Admissions Committee of the College of Physical
Education and Health. (Consult the 1954-55 University Catalog for detailed
requirements).
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
The College of Physical Education and Health offers four undergraduate de-
grees: The Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, The Bachelor of Science
in Health Education, The Bachelor of Science in Recreation, and The Bachelor of
Science in Physical Therapy. For complete information concerning the several
curricula and the requirements for these degrees, the University Catalog for
1954-55 should be consulted.
GRADUATE DEGREE
Courses are offered by this College in the Graduate School leading to the
degree of Master of Physical Education and Health with a major in physical
education. Admission and degree requirements for graduates of accredited
institutions are described under the Graduate Division section of this Catalog.
Graduates of non-accredited institutions, in order to do graduate work in
the College of Physical Education and Health must either make a minimum score
of 555 on the National Teacher Examination or they must complete a semester
of undergraduate work at the University of Florida with a grade average satis-
factory to the Graduate Admissions Committee of the College of Physical Edu-
cation and Health.










36 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

THE GRADUATE DIVISION

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
ADMINISTRATION
The Graduate School consists of the Graduate Dean, the Graduate Council,
and the Graduate Faculty. The Graduate School is responsible for the standards
of graduate work in the University and for coordination among the graduate
programs of the various colleges and divisions of the University. The responsi-
bility for the details of the graduate programs is vested in the respective col-
leges and divisions through their deans and established graduate committees.
ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Limitations of space and staff restrict the enrollment of graduate students.
The records of applicants for graduate study are reviewed by the graduate se-
lection committees of the various colleges and schools. In general no student will
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the University who is a graduate
of a non-accredited institution.
Members of the faculty of the University of Florida with a rank of assistant
professor (or equivalent) or above cannot receive a graduate degree from this
institution. This does not prohibit such faculty members from registering for
course work in the Graduate School, nor from using such credits upon a graduate
degree conferred by some other institution.
All admissions are granted on the condition that students must be responsible
for becoming informed of all rules, regulations, and requirements; for complying
with all official procedures; and for fulfilling all course and degree requirements.
Unqualified admission to the Graduate School for study toward all degrees
except those in the College of Education and the College of Physical Education
and Health is dependent upon presentation of an undergraduate record from an
accredited college or curriculum with an average grade of "B" for the junior
and senior years. If the student's undergraduate grades do not meet this standard
he may be granted qualified admission as a fifth year student through the college
of his choice. If so accepted by the college he will be given a program of about
15 semester hours involving advanced undergraduate courses and including not
more than six semester hours of graduate work. Upon completion of this pro-
gram with an average grade of "B" the student will be given unqualified ad-
mission to the Graduate School. Up to 12 hours of the trial program may be
credited to his graduate record. The trial program will not be continued beyond
the original planned period. In some units of the University, an undergraduate
average considerably above "B" is required for admission.
Admission for study toward the degree of Master of Arts in Education, Master
of Education, or Master of Physical Education and Health for a graduate of
an accredited college may be approved on any one of the following bases:
(1) A 2.5 grade-point average, as calculated at the University of Florida, for
the last two years of undergraduate work including at least 60 semester
hours.
(2) A score of 555 or above obtained on the National Teacher Examination
taken prior to admission, or when taken during the first semester of
registration under provision (3). Course work taken concurrently while










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


obtaining a satisfactory NTE score may be counted where applicable on
a graduate program.
(3) Completion of 15 semester hours of a planned and approved trial pro-
gram while registered as a fifth year student at the University of Florida
with an honor point average of 3.0 or above. Not more than 9 semester
hours of this work can be taken in courses numbered 600 and above.
If the student makes an honor point average of 3.0 or above, upon the
approval of the Graduate Committee of the College up to 15 semester
hours of his trial program may be credited to his graduate record.
In Agriculture, normally only those students who have maintained at least
an honor-point average of 2.5 in their upper division work and 3.0 in their major
subject should be considered for admission to the Graduate Division. For students
with an undergraduate major in general agriculture, the minimum upper division
average is 2.75. In exceptional cases, when a candidate has demonstrated in
some other way his fitness to do graduate work, as for instance outstanding
achievement since earning the bachelor degree, he may be considered for ad-
mission.
DEGREES OFFERED
Non-thesis Degrees
Master of Agriculture with major studies in any field in Agriculture;
Master of Business Administration with major studies in any field in Business
Administration, as Accounting, Business Organization and Operation, Eco-
nomics, Real Estate;
Master of Education, with major studies in any field in Education including Busi-
ness Education and Industrial Arts Education;
Master of Physical Education and Health.
Specialist in Education.
Thesis Degrees
Master of Science in Agriculture, with major studies in one of the following de-
partments:
Agricultural Economics Dairy Science
Agricultural Education Entomology
Agricultural Engineering Horticulture
Agronomy Plant Pathology
Animal Husbandry and Nutrition Poultry Husbandry
Bacteriology Soils
Botany Veterinary Science
Master of Science in Building Construction
Master of Science in Community Planning
Master of Science in Engineering with major studies in one of the following
departments:
Aeronautical Engineering Engineering Mechanics
Chemical Engineering Industrial Engineering
Civil Engineering Mechanical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Master of Science in Forestry










38 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Master of Science in Pharmacy, with major studies in one of the following de-
partments:
Pharmacy Pharmacology
Pharmacognosy Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Master of Science, with major studies in one of the following departments:
Bacteriology Entomology
Biology (Zoology) Geography
Botany Mathematics
Cancer Research Physics
Chemistry Plant Pathology


Master of Fine Arts
Crafts
Master of Arts in Architecture
Architectural Design
Master of Arts in Education, with major
apartments:
Education
Business Education


Painting and Drawing

Building Construction
studies in one of the following de-

Agricultural Education
Industrial Arts Education


Master of Arts, with major studies in one of the following departments:
Accounting Latin
Business Administration Mathematics


Economics
English
French
Geography
German
History
Inter-American Area Studies
Journalism


Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Real Estate
Sociology
Spanish
Speech


Doctor of Education
Doctor of Philosophy, with major studies in one of the following departments:


Agricultural Economics
Agronomy
Animal Husbandry (Nutrition)
Biology (Zoology)
Business Administration, including
Accounting
Business Organization
and Operation
Real Estate
Cancer Research
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Economics
Electrical Engineering
English
History


Horticulture
Inter-American Area Studies
Mathematics
Pharmacy, including
Pharmacy
Pharmacology
Pharmacognosy
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology (Latin-American)
Soils
Spanish
Speech










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Maximum Registration.-Nine semester hours is the maximum graduate load
for summer registration. Part-time employment of any kind reduces this load.
Full-time employees may register for 3 semester hours; %-time or %-time gradu-
ate assistants may register for 6 semester hours; full-time students may register
for 9 semester hours but candidates for thesis degrees are limited to 7 credit
hours of course work plus registration in 699 or 799.
Time Limit.-All work for the master's degree must be completed within seven
years from the time of first registration.
Residence Requirement.-For any master's degree, the student must spend at
least one full-time academic year at the University or the equivalent thereof,
as a graduate student.
Summer Session Residence.-If the work for the master's degree is done in
the summer, four eight-week summer sessions will satisfy the residence require-
ment. Transfer of work from another institution or use of extension or other
non-resident credit where accepted by the college concerned and the Graduate
Council may be permitted to reduce the full-time residence to but not below three
eight-week summer sessions. The candidate must be in residence the term at the
end of which the degree is awarded, unless other arrangements are specifically
approved by the Graduate Council.
Transfer of Credits.-Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number
of credits to the University will be allowed, but the final acceptance of credits from
other institutions is subject to the recommendation of the student's supervisory
committee and the approval of the Graduate Council.
Pre-Baccalaureate Registration for Graduate Credit.-An undergraduate
student at the University of Florida who has less than one semester of unfinished
course work for the bachelor's degree may request in writing through the Dean
of the appropriate College approval of the Dean of the Graduate School, of
course registration applicable for graduate credit. Such approval can only be
given to undergraduate students who have maintained a B record in the Upper
Division and whose total proposed semester program does not exceed 15 hours
in a regular semester or 6 hours in a summer term. Commonly, courses to be ap-
proved should be of full graduate caliber. Approval of an advanced undergraduate
course will be restricted to one not normally a part of the undergraduate program
prerequisite to the graduate studies to be undertaken. For application to a
specific advanced degree the course work taken must be recommended for transfer
to the student's graduate record by his supervisory committee after he has been
admitted to the Graduate School. Courses beyond the requirement of the Bac-
calaureate Degree that are taken without such approval are not eligible for
transfer as graduate credit. Background work required for a change of emphasis
should be taken without graduate credit.
National Teacher Examination.-All graduate students carrying programs
in Education are required to undergo a comprehensive examination. At the
present time the National Teacher Examination is used. The purposes of the
examination are two-fold: (1) to provide additional data to be used in counseling
and guiding students, and (2) to be one of the factors in determining the fitness
of the student to pursue the doctoral program. A fee for the National Teacher










40 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Examination is charged each student doing graduate work in Education, payable
with other fees at the time of registration. The fee is $7.00 for full-time students
or $11.00 for part-time students. The examination is given early in each se-
mester and prompt application is necessary.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to candidacy for an advanced degree
and the award of such a degree shall depend among other requirements upon
maintainance for all courses taken in the fields of the major and minor studies
of an average grade of "B." Any grade of "incomplete" in the fields of the major
and minor studies shall be removed by completing all required work unless a
grade point average of 3.0 is maintained including the hours of incomplete
courses. Grades in courses numbered 699 and 799 are not considered in meeting
this requirement.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITHOUT THESIS
MASTER OF EDUCATION
Description and Purpose.-This degree is designed for the professional prepa-
ration of teachers, rather than for research. The program has been planned to
develop in public school workers a wide range of essential abilities and to give
them a broad background of advanced general education, rather than to en-
courage them to specialize narrowly. While not neglecting to add to the quali-
fications already attained, it further aims to overcome weaknesses in the student's
development.
The Master of Education program seeks to develop the student in:
1. An understanding of the nature of the individual and the learning process;
2. An understanding of the purposes, issues, and trends of education in
American democracy;
8. An understanding of the social realities of our time and how these con-
dition the educative process;
4. A comprehensive, internally consistent pattern of values in keeping with
our democratic traditions; a value-system which the student can apply
where issues are concerned;
5. A personal philosophy of education which he can make explicit and which
is consistent with his value patterns;
6. The ability to think and act creatively and adequately within his area of
specialization or field of work, i.e., to see new problems, to work out
solutions, and to communicate the results of his thinking and acting to
others.
Transfer of Credits.-If recommended in advance by the Graduate Committee
and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student may be permitted
to study in other institutions to the extent of (but not to exceed) six semester
hours. No graduate credits earned prior to admission to the University may be
transferred without special recommendation of the Graduate Committee and the
approval of the Graduate Council. No more than six semester hours of credit
may be thus transferred.
Work Required.-Instead of having a fixed requirement of majors and minors,
each student will be required to submit a plan of study which shows a reasonable










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


amount of balance and direction. The planned program is approved by the stu-
dent's counselor, with whose assistance, the plan is first developed, then by the
Education department head concerned and the Office of Graduate Studies in Edu-
cation. After the program has been developed, any changes must be requested in
writing and similarly approved.
Minimum course requirement is 36 semester hours, of which not more than
nine may be taken in any summer term (six in six weeks, three in three weeks),
and not more than fifteen in any one semester. Six semester hours of workshop
or extension courses may be allowed and will count as residence credit. At least
50 per cent of the minimum course requirements shall be from courses numbered
600 and above.
Courses designated as field laboratory courses may be taken to the extent of
six semester hours of credit. It should be noted, however, that the University
imposes a limit of 12 hours of credit in the aggregate on work allowed from (a)
off-campus workshops and extension courses, (b) field laboratory courses, and
(c) courses transferred from other institutions.
Where the student has had no previous work in professional courses in Edu-
cation he must have completed a minimum of 36 hours of professional work in
Education including work at the graduate and undergraduate level in order to
qualify for this degree. Students planning to take work in closely related fields
should consult their counselors as to the acceptability of such work toward meet-
ing this requirement. In general, a minimum of twelve semester hours outside
the field of Education is required.
A thesis is not required.
A reading knowledge of a foreign language is not required, but the effective
use of the English language is expected of all candidates. Admission to the work
of this program is not a guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy
for the degree.

Admission to Candidacy.-The faculty makes a determination as to the com-
petence of the student at the time of his admission to candidacy. Admission to
candidacy for the Master of Education degree may be recommended to the
Graduate Council by the Graduate Committee on the basis of an unassembled
examination to be given at the end of from 12 to 18 semester hours of graduate
work at the University of Florida. The unassembled examination is evaluated
by a committee of the faculty, which may recommend supplementary oral and/or
written examinations for students whose admission to candidacy is in doubt.
The unassembled examination includes: (1) the student's academic record to
date, (2) the student's scores on the National Teacher Examination, (3) evidence
of competency in the use (oral and written) of the English language, (4) evalua-
tion of personal qualities and promise of professional attainment by persons to
whom the applicant's record is known, (5) the student's experience record, and
(6) any other appropriate information.
The unassembled examination is administered through the Office of Graduate
Studies in Education for the Graduate Committee.
The student's remaining program of study will be planned in terms of needs
as revealed in the Admission to Candidacy Examination. On approval of the
Graduate Committee, the candidate will be recommended for the degree upon the
satisfactory completion of the designated course work.










42 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The candidate must have completed at least one year of teaching prior to
taking the last six semester hours of work, or must have included in his record
the satisfactory completion of an internship program or a minimum of six se-
mester hours of student teaching.
The Graduate Committee of the Department of Education.-A special counselor
is appointed for each student in the Master of Education program. His work is
under the general supervision of the Graduate Committee in the Department of
Education. The program is administered through the Office of Graduate Studies
in Education.
MASTER OF AGRICULTURE

The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who wish
additional training before entering business occupations or professions, rather
than for those interested primarily in research. The basic requirements, in-
cluding those for admission, residence, supervisory committee, plan of study and
admission to candidacy, are the same as for the Master of Science in Agriculture
degree, as outlined elsewhere, but the work requirements are made to conform
to the specific objectives of this degree.
Work Required.-A minimum of thirty-six semester hours of course work shall
be required, at least eighteen of which shall be designated strictly for graduates.
Each student's program is designed to take into account the qualifications and
needs of the individual and is subject to the approval of the supervisory com-
mittee. A thesis is not required, but the student must submit reports, term
papers, and records of work accomplished. A comprehensive written qualifying
examination, given by his supervisory committee, covering his major field of
work is required before the beginning of the second semester of work. Failure
to qualify in this examination will result either in the student's elimination from
the program or in the taking of the additional course work indicated. A final
oral examination by the supervisory committee covering the whole field of study
of the candidate is required.
For further details, inquire of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

This is a professional degree representing a fifth year of work for those
students who plan to enter business occupations and wish to go beyond the under-
graduate degree. It is available for qualified students holding the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, or its equivalent.
Work Required.-Thirty semester hours of economic and business courses are
required. Of these, not less than 15 semester hours must be in courses designated
strictly for graduates and numbered 600 or above.
Examinations.-Two comprehensive examinations are required; a written
examination at the time the candidate is admitted to candidacy, and an oral ex-
amination at the end of the course work and confined largely to the field of con-
centration. The written examination, which is offered through the Chairman of
the Committee on Graduate Offerings at the end of each semester, must be passed
at least one semester prior to the time the candidate receives his degree. The










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


oral examination is conducted by a special committee nominated by the Chairman
upon application by the candidate.
Supervisory Committee.-The work of students registered in this program is
supervised by the Committee of Graduate Offerings of the College of Business
Administration through its Chairman.

Admission to Candidacy.-Candidates for this degree must make formal ap-
plication for admission to candidacy after passing the first of the examinations
referred to above, on an appropriate blank form obtainable from the office of the
Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Offerings.

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

Work Required.-A minimum of thirty semester hours of course work is re-
quired, at least fifteen of which must be courses in the fields of Physical Education,
Health Education or Recreation designated strictly for graduates or courses
numbered 500 or above if approved for graduate major credit. Of the remaining
fifteen hours, at least nine semester hours must be taken in courses outside the
College of Physical Education and Health. At least 50 per cent of the minimum
course requirements shall be from courses numbered 600 or above.

Supervisory Committee.-A committee of five members of the faculty of the
College of Physical Education and Health, with the Dean of the College or some
person designated by him serving as chairman, and the Dean of the Graduate
School as ex-officio member, will supervise the work of students registered in this
program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to the work of this program is not a
guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The
student will be required to pass a written and/or oral examination in addition to
being recommended by the supervisory committee for admission to candidacy.
This examination should be taken by the end of the student's first semester of
residence.

Final Examination.-A thesis is not required but the candidate must pass a
final examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or oral ex-
amination will be administered by the supervisory committee and will be con-
fined largely to the student's major field of study.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS

Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program
with a definite objective, consisting of thirty semester hours of registration, in-
cluding not less than twenty-four hours of course work plus six hours in Research
and Thesis. At least one-half of the required twenty-four hours of course work
shall be in a single field of study designated as the major and the remainder, or
minor, in related subject matter. One six-hour minor is required; two six-hour
minors or one twelve-hour minor may be taken. Minor work must be from a
department other than the major. In special cases, this requirement may be
modified upon written authority of the Dean of the Graduate School. The work in
the major field shall be in courses designed strictly for graduates, or if approved










44 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

by the Graduate Dean, in courses designed for advanced undergraduates and
graduates. In minor work courses numbered 300 and above may be taken. All
work must be approved by the student's supervisory committee.
Thesis.-In addition to the course work the student will be required to pre-
pare and present a thesis (or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to the Super-
visory Committee, the Dean of the Graduate School and the Graduate Council.
The candidate should consult the Dean's office for instructions concerning the
form of the thesis. The original copy of the thesis bound in temporary binding
and accompanied by three copies of a brief abstract of the thesis must be in the
Dean's office on or before the dates specified in the University Calendar. The
original copy together with the first carbon will be deposited in the Library
if the thesis is accepted.
Language Requirement.-(1) A reading knowledge of a foreign language
is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory committee. When a foreign
language is required the examination will be conducted by the language depart-
ment concerned. The requirement must be satisfied before the beginning of the
last semester. A student in the regular session must pass the language examin-
ation by April 20 if he expects to graduate at the end of the summer term of
that year. In case the student is completing all his work in the summer terms,
the foreign language requirement must be satisfied before the beginning of the
fourth summer term. If the student is majoring in a foreign language, that
language cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. (2) The effective use of
the English language as determined by the student's supervisory committee is
required of all candidates for the master's degree.
Supervisory Committee.-A special supervisory committee consisting of not
less than three members will be appointed for each student by the Graduate Dean
upon the recommendation of the college concerned. The supervisory committee
should be appointed as early as possible after the student is admitted and in
general not later than the end of the first semester of study. The Dean of the
Graduate School is ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. The duties
of the supervisory committee are given under several of the items relating to the
requirements for master's degrees.
Admission to Candidacy.-Whether an applicant has been provisionally admit-
ted or regularly admitted, his supervisory committee or official counselor shall
review his entire academic record at the end of his first semester or summer ses-
sion of residence work. In addition to the approval of the committee, a formal
vote of the principal department concerned will be necessary to admit the ap-
plicant to candidacy, to fix definitely the additional residence and course require-
ments, and to approve the program the applicant has submitted. Application for
Admission to Candidacy must be made on a special form supplied by the Dean's
office. This is done when the candidate has completed about one-half of his
course work. In the Department of Education, candidates for advanced degrees,
or advanced teaching certificates, should consult the Office of Graduate Studies
in Education for additional information affecting admission to candidacy.
General Examination.-It will be the duty of the Special Supervisory Com-
mittee, when all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


courses and the thesis, to conduct a general examination, either written or oral
or both, to embrace: first, the thesis; second, the major subject; third, the minor
or minors; fourth, questions of a general nature pertaining to the student's field
of study. The Committee shall report in writing to the Dean not later than one
week before the time for the conferring of the degree if all work has been com-
pleted in a satisfactory manner and the student is recommended for the degree.
Special Thesis Abstract Required-At the request of the State Department
of Education of the State of Florida, the College of Education requires all candi-
dates for the degree of Master of Arts in Education to prepare a 750 word ab-
stract of the thesis which is forwarded to the State Department for informational
purposes.

THE ADVANCED SCHOOL OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
The Advanced School of the College of Education offers two degrees, the degree
of Specialist in Education and the Doctor of Education degree. Work in the
Advanced School will be available only to those who have shown a high degree
of ability in their first year of graduate work. The purpose of the Advanced
School is to develop leadership, research competency, and specialization.
Admission to Advanced School.-Admission to the Advanced School will
open only to persons who have:
1. Completed two school years of successful professional experience;
2. Successfully completed thirty-six hours in education.
Admission to the Advanced School will be based on the following criteria:
1. High scholastic average during the fifth year work (3.5 grade point aver-
age or above as computed at the University of Florida will be considered
evidence of good scholarship);
2. Results from the National Teacher Examination;
3. Results from the Miller Analogies Test;
4. An oral examination administered by the department in which the student
seeks to specialize;
5. Special interviews for individuals for whom the department of specializa-
tion seeks more data.
The judgment concerning admission of an individual student will be based on a
consideration of a student's performance in all of these areas by the department
in which the student desires to specialize. The department will certify to the
Admissions Committee that the student has met the criteria for admission to
the Advanced School.
In all cases the record, experience, and personal qualifications of the person
applying for admission are subject to the approval of the Admissions Committee.
Where possible, students should seek admission to the Advanced School before
enrolling in any courses beyond the master's degree. Where this procedure is
impossible, the student will register in the graduate school and during the first
semester of his work beyond the master's degree apply for admission to the
Advanced School. If such candidate is found to be eligible the work taken during
that term will be counted.
After completion of the fifth year any student approved by the Admissions
Committee may register for courses but admission to the Advanced School must










46 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

be obtained before work may be counted for degrees or certificates above the
master's level.
Specialist in Education Degree.-If the student chooses the Specialist in Edu-
cation program he will plan a minimum thirty-six hour program with his counse-
lor. A maximum of six hours of transferred credit may be included.
The planned program of specialization must include at least twenty-four
hours in courses open only to graduate students and the remainder in courses
open to graduate and undergraduate students. The student may specialize in
any of the established areas of the College of Education.
A thesis is not required. Emphasis will be placed upon the use of research
rather than upon the development of skills in research techniques.
Admission to the Advanced School plus successful completion of one semester
of work of his planned program will automatically constitute admission to candi-
dacy for the Specialist in Education degree.
At the end of the thirty-six hour program the student will be given a final
examination both written and oral by a committee selected by the head of his
area of specialization. Upon passing the examination the candidate will be
awarded the Specialist in Education degree upon the approval of the faculty,
and the Graduate Council.
The Ed.S. is planned as a terminal degree. If at the end of his program the
student wishes to work for the Ed.D he must meet the requirements stated for
that degree.
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
The requirements for this degree are the same as those for the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy, with the exception that candidates for the degree of Doctor
of Education may satisfy the usual language requirement or may substitute the
following:
1. A course in educational research;
2. An examination covering the techniques of using the library;
3. Two courses in statistics or measurements.
These requirements must be met before the student is eligible to apply for
the qualifying examination.
The doctoral candidate in Education must choose, as his area of specialization,
an instructional field in which competent supervision is available.
A minor is supporting work taken in another field. It consists of at least
twelve semester hours for the first minor and at least six semester hours for the
second minor. Minors may not be taken in any branch of Education.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present a suitable program
of not fewer than eighteen hours of work in fields other than Education. This
program must be approved by the student's Supervisory Committee.
Before he can be recommended for admission to candidacy, the student must
present a project outline approved by his supervisory committee to a graduate
seminar, consisting of representatives of the Graduate Committee of the College
of Education, his supervisory committee, other faculty members, and graduate
students.
Residence-The residence requirement may not be satisfied by summer session
attendance only. Either the second or third year must be in continuous residence
as a full-time student at the University of Florida.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

Residence-(1) A minimum of three academic years of graduate work on a
full-time basis beyond the baccalaureate degree completed at institutions approved
by the Graduate School is required for the degree of doctor of philosophy. Either
the second or third academic year of the three-year program shall normally be
spent in full-time study on the campus at the University of Florida. (2) In ful-
filling the requirements of resident study of paragraph (1) part-time study to
the extent permitted will be evaluated on the basis of proportionate credit hours
assuming 15 credit hours of any approved combination of course work and re-
search to represent a full graduate study load. For part-time study when recom-
mended by the Supervisory Committee a total of 30 semester hours in a calendar
year or 35 semester hours of graduate courses and research encompassed within
four successive registrations (i.e., normally three successive semesters plus the
intervening summer school, or as an alternate choice the use of four successive
semesters without summer registration) completed successfully while engaged
in resident study on the campus of the University of Florida may be accepted by
the Graduate School as meeting this requirement. An overload program, even
when approved, will be valued as a normal program for this purpose. Since a
teacher while fully employed cannot meet this requirement of continuous inten-
sive study, fellowships and assistantships are made available wherever possible
to doctoral candidates.
Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is usually spent
upon his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his minor or
minors. The student will be guided in his whole course of study by the professor
of his major subject and by his special supervisory committee. The Graduate
Council does not specify just what courses or how many courses will be required.
Doctoral work is mainly research, and the student is thrown largely upon his own
responsibility.
Candidates in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Plant Pathology,
and Soils may do their research at certain branch stations of the University of
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station where adequate staff and facilities are
available.
Minors.-The student must take at least one and not more than two minors.
Supervisory Committee.-The Supervisory Committee for a candidate for the
doctor's degree should consist of at least five members, chosen from the Graduate
Faculty. At least three members should be from the college or department recom-
mending the degree. In addition one or two members from a different educational
discipline should be recommended for the purpose of coordination between col-
leges or disciplines and to represent the students minor or minors. Supervisory
Committees are nominated by the department head (in no case by the student),
approved by the Dean of the College and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School. It is recommended that the Supervisory Committee be appointed as early
as possible after the student is admitted and in general not later than the end
of the first semester of study. The Graduate Dean is an ex officio member of all
supervisory committees.
Duties of the Supervisory Committee are as follows:
1. Inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought.










48 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

2. Meet as a committee immediately after appointment to pass on the quali-
fications of the student and to prepare with the student a written program
of study meeting major and minor requirements, languages, residence, etc.
3. Meet at an appropriate time to approve the proposed subject of the thesis
or dissertation and to approve a projected program leading to completion
of the thesis or dissertation.
4. Meet as a Committee of Examination to arrange for the written examina-
tion and to conduct the oral qualifying examination for the doctor's degree.
The Supervisory Committee shall hold two additional meetings. (a) When
the work on the dissertation is at least one half completed the committee
shall review the procedure, progress and expected results and make sug-
gestions for completion. (b) When the dissertation is completed the
Supervisory Committee shall conduct the final oral examination pri-
marily but not exclusively on the subject of the dissertation to satisfy
itself that the result is a piece of original research and a contribution
to knowledge in the field of research scholarship.

Language Requirement.-The required languages for the Ph.D. degree are
German and French. If the Supervisory Committee believes that another ro-
mance language would be more appropriate than French in the program of a
particular student, it may advise the Graduate Council in writing to the Graduate
Dean of its reasons for recommending such a substitution. The Council will also
consider the substitution of another language for French on the basis of its
cultural influence upon the student. The substitution of a romance language
is not permitted for German. Any other substitution for German should be
recommended only on the basis of the use to be made of the substitute language
in the preparation of the thesis. Council action for any language substitution
must be obtained before the language examination is taken.
The Department of Foreign Languages will certify to the Graduate School
the competency of each student in the required foreign languages whether es-
tablished by examination on the campus or elsewhere. The language require-
ment should be met as early as possible in the student's program and must be
satisfied before the applicant can be admitted to the qualifying examination.
In Business Administration and in Agricultural Economics, Advanced Mathe-
matics including a knowledge of calculus may be substituted for one language
under special conditions.

Qualifying Examination.-The qualifying examination, which is required of
all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, may be taken during the
second term of the second year of residence. The examination conducted by the
special supervisory committee is both written and oral and covers the major and
minor subjects. The oral examination coming after the language examination and
the written part of the qualifying examination gives the Supervisory Committee an
opportunity to reach a conclusion as to the advisability of pursuit of the Ph.D.
degree.
Between the qualifying examination and the conferring of the degree there
must elapse a minimum interval of one academic year in full-time residence or
one full calendar year if the candidate is on less than full-time basis.
If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not be given another










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


opportunity unless for special reasons a re-examination is recommended by his
Supervisory Committee and approved by the Graduate Council.
Dissertation.-A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation
and research is required of all candidates. Since all theses will be published
either by microfilm, microcard or as a monograph it is necessary that the research
be of publishable quality and that the dissertation be in appropriate form for
publication. The original copy of the dissertation must be presented to the
Graduate Dean on or before the date specified in the University Calendar. The
sum of $50.00 should be deposited with the Business Manager to cover the
cost of publication as explained below.
Publication of the Dissertation.-Candidates for the Ph.D. and D.Ed. degrees
may make one of three choices for publication of their thesis which involves the
disposition of the standard 50-dollar deposit.
1. Micro-film publication in which case the University will return 30 dollars
of the deposit immediately.
2. Micro-card publication in which case the University will determine the
cost of publication and will either return the un-needed part of the deposit
or bill the student for the cost above 50 dollars as the case may be.
3. Publication as a book or monograph. If publication of the dissertation
in essentially complete form is arranged, the deposit will be fully re-
fundable up to a time limit of two years upon receipt without charge of
5 copies of the publication at the office of the Graduate School. Accept-
ance of the publication and authorization of the refund requires approval
of the Graduate Council.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS
There are a number of special graduate programs that are described in detail
in the University Catalog. Students interested in the following programs are
referred to the catalog for complete information:
Cancer Research
School of Inter-American Studies.
Graduate Program in Public Administration
Research Program at The Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies
Statistical Laboratory
Graduate Program in Community Planning

SOUTHERN REGIONAL GRADUATE SUMMER SESSIONS IN STATISTICS
At the request of the Southern Regional Education Board's Advisory Com-
mission on Statistics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, the University of Florida,
and the Consolidated University of North Carolina have agreed to initiate a
continuing program of six-week graduate summer sessions in statistics to be
held at each of the three institutions in rotation, beginning in the summer of
1954 at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia (June 9 to
July 17), at Florida in 1955 and at Raleigh in 1956.
Each course offered will carry approximately three semester hours of graduate
credit and each of the sponsoring institutions will accept credits earned in the
summer sessions as residence credit. The courses are arranged to provide con-










50 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

secutive work in successive summers so that those who wish can complete the
course work in statistics for a master's degree in three summers; students must
satisfy the remaining requirements for course work and thesis at the institution
where they have been admitted to candidacy. The advanced courses may be ac-
cepted as part of the Ph.D. program.
Full particulars concerning the content of the courses, teachers, fees and ex-
penses may be obtained by writing the Department of Statistics, Virginia Poly-
technic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia. Those on the campus may consult Dr.
Herbert A. Meyer, Director, Statistical Laboratory, Building OE.

FLORIDA POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATES
For regulations governing the securing of recommendations for the Florida
Post Graduate Certificate and the Advanced Post Graduate Certificate, consult
the Office of Graduate Studies in Education, 202 Yonge Building.

INSTRUCTIONS AND INFORMATION

1. The requirements for admission to the Graduate School are printed in the
the Admission section of this catalog. Additional requirements may be im-
posed by individual colleges and divisions. (See General Index.)
2. Correspond with the Head of the Department of the college in which you
propose to do your major work for specific information concerning course
requirements, deficiencies to be completed, etc.
3. Eligibility for admission to graduate study can be determined only after
you have filed all the credentials specified in the Admissions section of the
catalog. The proper forms will be furnished by the Admissions Section
of the Office of the Registrar and the prospective student will also be advised
concerning other credentials he must submit in order to be considered for
admission to graduate study.
4. The fees which graduate students must pay are listed in the section of this
catalog dealing with expenses. (See General Index)
5. At the time designated by the Registrar, register with the dean of the college
or division in which you propose to take your major work. Your registration
form must be signed by the dean or someone designated by him. Either
the head of the department or some other professor in this department will
become the supervisor of your program, and he will suggest courses for
which you should register.
6. Passing grades for graduate students beginning with the 1954 summer session
in courses numbered below 600 are A and B. Passing grades for courses
numbered 600 and above are A, B, and C; however, C grades in courses
numbered 600 and above count toward a graduate degree only if an equal
number of credit hours in courses numbered 600 and above are earned with
grade of A.
7. No courses may be taken for graduate credit by correspondence. Up to six
hours of approved credit may be transferred from accredited institutions to








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


count on the requirements for masters' degrees. For the Master of Arts
in Education and the Master of Education degrees, six hours of authorized
extension graduate courses may be taken for both course and residence
credit.

8. Observe the regulations and dates for satisfying the language requirements
and for applying for admission to candidacy.
9. Normally students in the Graduate School must be registered in the Uni-
versity at the time they receive a degree. In the event that a student has
completed at the time of the initial presentation of the completed thesis or
dissertation to the Graduate School all requirements for a degree including
courses, residence, thesis, or dissertation, and all examinations for the degree,
the Graduate Council will entertain a petition to waive this requirement.
10. Early in your last term before graduation, notify the Registrar that you
are a candidate for a degree. (See Calendar for Last day for making ap-
plication for a degree.)
11. When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at the
office of the Dean of the Graduate School.

12. Caps, gowns and hoods are worn at commencement exercises. Graduating
students must arrange for proper sizes of academic costumes through the
University Bookstore.

13. Consult the professor of your major subject and your special supervisory
committee for guidance. Consult the office of the Dean of the Graduate
School if you wish interpretation of any requirement.










52 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SPECIAL THREE WEEK COURSES
The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run for
three weeks only. Enrollment is limited to these special groups as in-
dicated. Students registering for courses listed in this section follow
the same admission and registration procedures as other students but
are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.

JUNE 15 to JULY 2

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
GRADUATE COURSE
AG. 670.-Problems in Agricultural Engineering. 3 credits. Open to vocational
agriculture teachers only.
To arrange. FL 210. ROGERS, F. and ROGERS, C. J.
Special problems in agricultural engineering.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

GRADUATE COURSES
AXT. 602.-Advanced Rural Leadership. 1% credits. Open to agricultural exten-
sion workers only.
10:30 daily. K 111. HAMPSON, C. M. and STAFF.
Advanced training in the art of rural leadership.
AXT. 607.-Principles in the Development of Youth Programs. 1% credits. Open
to agricultural extension workers only.
8:10 daily. K 111. HAMPSON, C. M.
Advanced training in conducting 4-H Club work.

EDUCATION-GENERAL
ED. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living (Formerly EN. 482). 3 credits.
Section 1. 8:10-12:40 Daily YN 323 INGLE, K.
Study of the techniques of using Florida resources in the areas of arts and crafts, architecture,
housing, interior decorating, and landscaping. Attention is given to developing understandings
and appreciations of the fine arts, costume designing, and health practices.

EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS
GRADUATE COURSE
EDF. 640.-Problems in Evaluation of Pupil Development and Learning (Formerly
EN. 542). 3 credits.
8:10-11:30 Daily K 107 CUNNINGHAM, M.
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 Daily K 107
Study is made of problems of particular interest to students in the field of pupil growth and
learning.

EDUCATION-VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE COURSE
EDV. 673.-Supervision of Vocational Education (Formerly EN. 573). 3 credits.
8:10-11:30 Daily YN 132 LOFTEN, W. T.
Supervisory problems of a national, state and local level will be considered.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 53

HORTICULTURE

HE. 311.-Home Gardening. 1% credits. Open to agricultural extension workers
only.
9:20 M T W F. VF. STOUT, G. J.
Laboratory: 10:30 to 12:40 M. Th. VF.
A consideration and study of the methods of culture, varieties, and pest control for common
vegetable crops which may be grown successfully in Florida home gardens.

SOILS

SLS. 352.-Soils and Soils Management. 1% credits. Open to agricultural ex-
tension workers only.
9:20 daily. K 111. EDSON, S. N.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 4:10 M. W. Soils Greenhouse.
The physical, chemical, and biological nature of soils with special emphasis on soil management.
Laboratory problems in soil management.








54 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SPECIAL THREE WEEK COURSES
The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run for
three weeks only. Enrollment is limited to these special groups as in-
dicated. Students registering for courses listed in this section follow
the same admission and registration procedures as other students but
are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.

JULY 5 to JULY 23

EDUCATION-GENERAL
ED. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living (Formerly EN. 482). 3 credits.
Section 2. 8:10-12:40 Daily. YN 323 INGLE, K.

EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS
GRADUATE COURSES
EDF. 620.-Socio-Economic Foundations of Education (Formerly EN. 540). 3
credits.
Section 3. 8:10-11:30 Daily. K 203 BAKER, M. C.
The socio-economic bases for education are comprehensively surveyed.
EDF. 642.-Problems in Educational Psychology (Formerly EN. 541). 3 credits.
Section 2. 8:10-11:30 Daily K 107 CUNNINGHAM, M.
Individualized study is made of problems dealing with child development, adolescence, learning,
and other areas of educational psychology.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SCHEDULE OF COURSES SUMMER SESSION 1954
JUNE 15 TO AUGUST 7

MINIMUM SIZE OF CLASSES
No undergraduate class or section will be continued or offered if, at the end of
the regular registration period, prior to the day classes begin for a term or
semester, the registration does not meet the following minimum requirements.
For Freshmen and Sophomore classes or sections (the comprehensive courses and
courses numbered in the 100's and 200's) the minimum is 12 registrations.
For Junior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 300's) the minimum is
8 registrations.
For Senior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 400's and 500's) the
minimum is 6 registrations.
ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:
A BUILDING A L BUILDING L
(Accounting) LE LEIGH HALL
AD ADMINISTRATION LI LIBRARY
BUILDING LW LAW BUILDING
AE BUILDING AE MI MILITARY BUILDING
(Family Life) N BUILDING N
AN ANDERSON HALL (Engineering Classrooms
AU AUDITORIUM and Laboratories)
B BUILDING B NE NEWELL HALL
BA BUSINESS ADMINISTRA- NL NUTRITION LABORATORY
TION BUILDING OD OFFICE D
BX BENTON ANNEX OE OFFICE E
BN BENTON HALL OF OFFICE F
C BUILDING C PE PEABODY HALL
(Art) PO POULTRY LABORATORY
CR CANCER RESEARCH R BUILDING R
LABORATORY (Music)
DL DAIRY LABORATORY RE REED LABORATORY
E BUILDING E SC SCIENCE HALL
El ENGINEERING AND SE SEAGLE BUILDING
INDUSTRIES BUILDING SL SANITARY LABORATORY
F BUILDING F U BUILDING U
FG FLORIDA GYMNASIUM (Architecture and Art)
FL FLOYD HALL UA UNION ANNEX
FM FARM MACHINE VL VEGETABLE PROCESSING
LABORATORY LABORATORY
GH GREENHOUSE WA WALKER HALL
HT HORTICULTURE BUILDING WG WOMEN'S GYM
I BUILDING I WO WOOD PRODUCTS
(Classrooms) LABORATORY
K BUILDING K YN YONGE BUILDING
(Classrooms)
Classes listed as meeting daily will meet Monday through Friday.
Classes will begin at the time shown and last 60 minutes.










56 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

COMPREHENSIVE COURSES

c-1
C-11.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Student registers for one lecture (2 digit section number) and one
discussion (3 digit section number).
Lecture Section 11: 10:30 M W WA AUD
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 Daily PE 208
Section 102 7:00 Daily PE 209
Section 103 8:10 Daily PE 208
Section 104 8:10 Daily PE 209
Section 105 9:20 Daily PE 208
C-12.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one lecture (2 digit section) and one discussion (3 digit
section number) ).
Lecture Section 21: 10:30 T Th WA AUD
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 7:00 Daily PE 206
Section 202 8:10 Daily PE 206
Section 203 9:20 Daily PE 206
C-11-12: Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of
the modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education,
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective co-
ordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interpendent activities so that a conscious-
ness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may be developed,
from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.

C-2
C-21.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:00 M BN 203
Lecture Section 12: 2:00 T BN 203
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 Daily BN 201
Section 102 8:10 Daily BN 201
Section 103 9:20 Daily BN 201
Section 104 10:30 Daily BN 201
Section 105 7:00 Daily BN 205
Section 106 8:10 Daily BN 205
C-22.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one section.)
Section 201 7:00 Daily BN 203
Section 202 8:10 Daily BN 203
Section 203 9:20 Daily BN 205
Section 204 10:30 Daily BN 205
Section 205 11:40 Daily BN 205
Section 206 12:50 Daily BN 205
C-21-22: An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference
to man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain the










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical
materials, forces and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.
C-31.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section)
Lecture Section 11: 9:20 W WA AUD
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 MT Th F AN 20
Section 102 7:00 MTThF AN 112
Section 103 8:10MTThF AN 20
Section 104 8:10 MT Th F AN 307
Section 105 12:50MTThF AN 20
Section 106 12:50MTTh F AN 112
Section 107 2:00 MT Th F AN 20
Section 108 2:00 MT Th F AN 112
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 301 9:20-11:30 M Th AN 203
Section 302 9:20-11:30 T F AN 209
Section 303 12:50-3:00 T F AN 209

C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section)
Lecture Section 21: 8:10 W WA AUD
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 9:20MTThF AN 20
Section 202 9:20 MT Th F AN 307
Section 203 10:30MTThF AN 20
Section 204 10:30 MTThF AN 112
Section 205 11:40MTThF AN 20
Section 206 11:40MTThF AN 112
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 401 12:50-3:00 MTh AN 209
Section 402 7:00-9:10 T F AN 209
C-31-82: Reading, Speaking, and Writing. Designed to furnish the training in reading,
speaking, and writing necessary for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter. This
training will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical
thinking, in fundamentals of form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body
and voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their
interests and increasing their appreciation of literature.
C-41

C-41.-Practical Logic. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 8:10 Daily AD 208
Section 2 9:20 Daily AD 208
Section 3 10:30 Daily AD 208
Section 4 11:40 Daily AD 208
Both in private life and in vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking. In this
course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, (2) to be able to use objective standards necessary in critically evaluating
his own thinking process and product as well as the conclusions reached by others, and (3) to record
both process and product of thinking in effective language. The material used applies to actual living










58 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

and working conditions. The case method is to insure practice, many illustrations are given, and
numerous exercises are assigned.

C-42

C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 7:00 Daily PE 10
Section 2 8:10 Daily PE 11
Section 3 10:30 Daily PE 4
Section 4 12:50 Daily PE 10
A practical elementary course consisting of the subject matter considered most useful for students
who do not plan necessarily to specialize in mathematics. It covers the development of the number
system, computation with approximate and exact numbers, algebra as a generalization of arithme-
tic, practical geometry, functional relationships, logarithms, the simple trigonometry of the triangle.
simple and compound interest, and annuities. Not open to students who have completed Basic
Mathematics.

C-5

C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 11:40 M W WA AUD.
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 Daily AN 115
Section 102 8:10 Daily AN 115
Section 103 9:20 Daily AN 115
Section 104 10:30 Daily AN 115
Section 105 7:00 Daily AN 113
Section 106 8:10 Daily AN 113
Section 107 9:20 Daily AN 113
Section 108 10:30 Daily AN 113
C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 11:40 T Th WA AUD.
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 7:00 Daily AN 13
Section 202 8:10 Daily AN 13
Section 203 9:20 Daily AN 13
Section 204 10:30 Daily AN 13
Section 205 8:10 Daily AN 112
Section 206 9:20 Daily AN 112

C-6

C-61.-Biological Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:00 M SC 101
Lecture Section 12: 3:10 T SC 101
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 Daily SC 112
Section 102 8:10 Daily SC 112
Section 103 9:20 Daily SC 112
Section 104 10:30 Daily SC 112











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Section 105 11:40 Daily SC 112
Section 106 8:10 Daily SC 110
Section 107 9:20 Daily SC 110

C-62.-Biological Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 3:10 M SC 101
Lecture Section 22: 2:00 T SC 101
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 7:00 Daily SC 104
Section 202 8:10 Daily SC 104
Section 203 9:20 Daily SC 104
Section 204 10:30 Daily SC 104
C-61-62: The biological problems and principles associated with the organism's role as: a
living individual, a member of a race, a product of evolutionary processes, and a member of a
socially and economically interrelated complex of living organisms. Under these headings such
topics as the structure and functioning of the human body, the structure and functioning of the
higher plants, methods of reproduction, heredity and variation, the theory of evolution, and eoology
are discussed. The lectures will be devoted to a consideration of biological topics and contributions
of current, social, political or ideological interest.



DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

ACCOUNTING

ATG. 211.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The first half of the course ATG.
211-212.
Section 1. 9:20 Daily BA 225
Section 2. 10:30 Daily BA 120
The basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of business papers and
records; recording transactions; preparation of financial statements and reports.
ATG. 212.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The second half of the course
ATG. 211-212.
Section 1. 8:10 Daily BA 120
Section 2. 10:30 Daily BA 225

ATG. 311.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 212.
9:20 Daily BA 224
The mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts; fiscal period
and adjustments; working papers; form and preparation of financial statements; followed by an
intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the preparation of the
balance sheet and income statements.
ATG. 312.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite ATG. 311.
8:10 Daily BA 224
The legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from the legal organization
form used by businesses; liabilities; proprietorship; corporations; capital stock; surplus; followed
by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as disclosed by an analysis and interpretation of
financial statements; financial ratios and standards, their preparation, meaning and use.
ATG. 313.-Cost Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite ATG. 212.
11:40 Daily BA 225
The methods of collection, classification, and interpretation of cost data; special problems,
standard costs, cost systems, use of cost data in business control.
ATG. 411.-Advanced Accounting. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 312.
8:10 Daily BA 119
Specialized accounting problems; partnerships: statement of affairs; consignments; installments;
ventures; insurance and other related subjects.











60 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ATG. 412.-Principles of Auditing. 3 credits. Prerequisite ATG. 312.
11:40 Daily BA 120
Auditing theory and current auditing practice; principal kinds of audits and services of the
public accountant; professional and ethical aspects of auditing.
ATG. 414.-Income Tax Accounting. S credits. Prerequisite ATG. 311.
10:30 Daily BA 224
A study of the federal income tax law and related accounting problems. Determination of gross
income and of deductions is studied for taxpayers generally. The course emphasizes this process for
individuals. Practice is provided in the preparation of returns for individuals, and in the use of the
loose-leaf income tax service.
ATG. 417.-Governmental Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite:
ATG. 311.
9:20 Daily BA 120
The basic principles underlying governmental and institutional accounting. Detailed consideration
is given to the operation of recommended types of funds, the budget process, account structure, tax
accounting for cities, and the utilization of accounting in the preparation of significant reports.
GRADUATE COURSES
ATG. 611.-Accounting Theory. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 411.
9:20 Daily BA 13
The theory behind accounting functions in their relation to the business enterprise.
ATG. 613.-Cost and Budgeting Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ATG. 313,
ATG. 411, and ATG. 412.
10:30 Daily BA 13
An analysis of complex cost problems, managerial use of cost reports in management and budget
preparation, as well as the design and installation of cost systems.
ATG. 699.-Research and Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 208
Directed research and writing for the M.A. degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours required for the master's degree.
ATG. 718.-Evolution of Accounting Theory and Practice. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
ATG. 411.
8:10 Daily BA 13
Development of accounting principles and practices and their relation to economics, law and
finance.
ATG. 799.-Research and Dissertation. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 208
Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the hours of regular courses required by the candidate's
supervisory committee for the doctor's degree.

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY
GRADUATE COURSE
ACY. 699.-Research in Agricultural Chemistry and Master's Thesis. Variable
Credit.
To arrange STEARNS, T. W.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

AS. 201.-Principles of Agricultural Economics. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily F1 104 GREENMAN, J. R.
An introduction to the field of agricultural economics; principles of economics as applied to
agriculture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.
AS. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily F1 104 BROOKER, M. A.
Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given to
the Farm Credit Administration. One field trip is required.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.











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AS. 306.-Farm Management. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily Fl 108 BROOKER, M. A.
The factors of production; systems of farming, their distribution and adaption; problems of
labor, machinery, layout of farms, and farm reorganization. One or more field trips are required.
AS. 308.-Marketing. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily OD McPHERSON, W. K.
Principles of marketing agricultural commodities; commodity exchanges and future trading;
auction companies; market finance; market news; marketing of important agricultural commodities.
One or two field trips are required.
AS. 413.-Agricultural Policy. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily F1 102 GREENMAN, J. R.
A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to im-
prove the economic and social status of agriculture. The basic problems and concepts involved in
developing and carrying out an agricultural policy. Evaluation of present legislative programs and
policies affecting the farmer.
GRADUATE COURSES
AS. 605.-Research Problems in Farm Management. 3 credits.
To arrange GREENMAN, J. R.

AS. 611.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products. 3 credits.
To arrange McPHERSON, W. K.

AS. 699.-Research and Masters Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange HAMILTON, H. G.

AS. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit.*
To arrange HAMILTON, H. G.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

AG. 302.-Farm Motors. 3 credits.
8:10 MT W TH FL 210 CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 2:00-4:10 W FM
The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power. Laboratory work in-
cludes actual operation and repair of units.
AG. 306.-Farm Machinery. 3 credits.
10:30 M T W Th FL 210 DOUGHTY, R. E.
Laboratory: 2:00-4:10 T FM
The care, design, operation and repair of farm machinery.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

GRADUATE COURSE
AXT. 621.-Special Problems in Agricultural Extension Methods. Variable credit.
To arrange HAMPSON, C. M,
Library and workshop relating to agricultural extension methods. Research work is studied, pub-
lications reviewed, written reports developed.
AGRONOMY
AY. 324.-Forage and Cover Crops. 3 credits.
8:10 MT W Th FL 302 McCLOUD, D. E.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 3:00 Th AL 1 McCLOUD, D. E.
Plants that produce feed for livestock. Methods of growing and utilizing forage crops. Plants
suited for cover and conservation programs.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.










62 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AY. 329.-Genetics. 3 credits.
11:40 Daily FL 302 EDWARDSON, J. R.
The fundamentals of inheritance, emphasizing the application of genetics and its associated
branches of science in the improvement of economic plants and animals and in programs for human
betterment.
AY. 426.-Individual Problems in Agronomy. Variable credit.*
To arrange FL 302 EDWARDSON, J. R. and McCLOUD, D. E.
Individual problems selected from the fields of crop production, ecology or weed control.
GRADUATE COURSES
AY. 626.-Agronomic Problems. 3 credits.
To arrange FL 302 EDWARDSON, J. R. and McCLOUD, D. E.
Library, laboratory, or field studies which relate to crop production and improvement. Experi-
ments are studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.
AY. 627.-Problems in Genetics and Cytogenetics. 2 credits.
To arrange. FL 302 EDWARDSON, J. R.
Modern methods applied to specific genetic or cytogenetic research problems.
AY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange FL 302
AY. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit.*
To arrange FL 302

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

AL. 309.-General Animal Husbandry. 3 credits.
7:00 Daily FL 104 LOGGINS, P. E.
Types and breeds of farm animals; market classification; selection and management.
GRADUATE COURSES
AL. 601.-Special Topics in Animal Science. 3 credits.
To arrange
Reviews and discussions of scientific literature in the field of animal science.
AL. 609.-Problems in Animal Husbandry and Nutrition. Variable credit.
To arrange DAVIS, G. K. and WALLACE, H. D.
AL. 699.-Research and Thesis in Animal Husbandry and Nutrition. Variable
credit.*
To arrange
AL. 799.-Research and Dissertation in Animal Husbandry and Nutrition. Vari-
able credit.*
To arrange
ANTHROPOLOGY

APY. 500.-Field Session in Archeology. 6 credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of
anthropology, including APY. 201.
To arrange GOGGIN, J. M.
Excavation of archeological sites, recording of data, laboratory handling and analysis of
specimens, and study of the theoretical culture principles which underlie field methods and artifact
analysis.
APY. 530.-Individual Work. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of anthropology,
including APY. 201.
To arrange GOGGIN, J. M.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ARCHITECTURE

AE. 101.-The Arts of Design. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily U 108
A survey of the visual arts: Landscape Architecture, Community Planning, Architecture, Building
Construction, Interior Design, Sculpture, Crafts, Industrial Design, Commercial Art and Painting.
A study of the basic nature of each art, its social significance and its relationship to other areas
of the visual arts to provide a broad understanding of the visual arts and to form a basis for the
selection of a career in the arts of design.
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics. 3 credits.
7:00 to 10:20 Daily U 107
Functions and limitations of vision. Perception as the medium of our experiences in the visual
arts. Space and light in visual design. Visual and graphic exercises for development of observation,
graphic techniques, imaginative ability, visual design and aesthetic judgment. Study of the elements
of design and principles involved in their use.
AE. 203.-Basic Design. 3 credits.
7:00 to 10:20 Daily U 107
Projects in Research and Design: The study of the basic influences of climate, natural en-
vironment, technology and culture on the design and construction of shelter. Introduction to the
organization of space for human activity. Tools, materials and techniques of graphic representation.
AE. 204.-Organic Planning. 3 credits.
7:00 to 10:20 Daily U 107
Projects in Research and Design: Analysis and synthesis-the methodology of planning: the
study and application of planning techniques utilized in the organization of space for human activity.
AE. 205.-Building Technology. 4 credits.
11:40 to 1:50 Daily U 103, U 109
The analysis of natural and manufactured building materials; their origin, physical, structural
and aesthetic properties, methods of assembly and their proper use in building. The study of
elementary framing systems; their methods of construction and architectural expression. An in-
troduction to hydraulic, mechanical and electrical installations for buildings, and professional
responsibilities in the building field.
AE. 206.-Building Technology. 4 credits.
11:40 to 1:50 Daily U 108, U 109
The study of types of loads exerted on buildings, their transmission through the building frame
and the forces and stresses produced in the structural framing members. The characteristics of
basic types of structural building frames and their integration in design.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES*
AE. 301-302-303-304-305.-Projects in Architecture, Group 1. 3 credits each;-
group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: Completion of Lower Division program in Architecture or equivalent.
To arrange E 175

AE. 306-307-308-309-310.-Projects in Architecture, Group 2. 3 credits each;-
group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: The series AE. 301-302-303-304-305.
To arrange E 179
AE. 401-402-403-404-405.-Projects in Architecture, Group 3. 3 credits each;-
group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: The series AE. 306-307-308-309-310.
To arrange E 126
AE. 406-407-408-409-410.-Projects in Architecture, Group 4. 3 credits each;-
group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite:
The series AE. 401-402-403-404-405.
To arrange E 116
*For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.










64 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AE. 501-502-503-504-505.-Projects in Architecture, Group 5. 3 credits each;-
group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite:
The series AE. 406-407-408-409-410.
To arrange E 157

AE. 506-507-508-509-510.-Thesis in Architecture. 3 credits each;-group total,
15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite: The series
AE. 501-502-503-504-505.
To arrange E 189.
GRADUATE COURSES
AE. 601.-Architectural Design. 3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree
in Architecture.
To arrange E 127
Research on a special phase of architectural design, selected by the student with the approval
of the Faculty.
AE. 602.-Architectural Design. 3 or 6 credits. The second half of the course
AE. 601-602.
To arrange E 127

AE. 603.-Architectural Research. 3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree
in Architecture.
To arrange E 127
Detailed investigation of a selected problem for the purpose of providing insight and under-
standing in some field of fundamental importance in architecture.
AE. 604.-Architectural Research. 3 or 6 credits. The second half of the course
AE. 603-604.
To arrange E 127
AE. 605.-Structural Design of Buildings. 3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: Bachelor's
degree in Architecture or in Building Construction.
To arrange E 127
Advanced study of a problem in the structural design of buildings, selected by the student with
the approval of the Faculty.
AE. 606.-Structural Design of Buildings. 3 or 6 credits. The second half of the
course AE. 605-606.
To arrange E 127
AE. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. 3 or 6 credits.
For students working for the master's degree. Credits cannot be used to reduce the total
required for the degree.

ART

ART 105.-Art Laboratory. 3 credits.
10:30-12:40 Daily C 101 HOLBROOK, H. H.
An opportunity for students in the University College and others to work at various art pro-
cesses such as painting, modeling, sculpture, and the like.
ART 121.-The Visual Arts. 3 credits.
3:10 Daily E 176 ANDERSON, E. A.
Introduction to the interrelationship of the visual arts; i.e., painting, sculpture, commercial art,
architecture, etc.
ART 224.-Drawing and Visual Perception. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily C 101 HOLBROOK, H. H.
Creative drawing will include the drawing of still life and figure objects observed from the
standpoint of form and content.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ART 225.-Scientific Contributions to Art. 3 credits.
10:30-12:40 Daily C 101 McINTOSH, P. R.
Problems and discussions relative to perspective, color, illumination, media, etc.
ART 226.-Pictorial Composition. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 100 KACERE, J. C.
Pictorial composition using the oil medium, employing elements studied in ART 122 and ART 228.
ART 290.-Art Survey. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily E 176 GRISSOM, E. E.
An introduction to important examples of painting, sculpture, architecture and related arts
from 4000 B.C. to contemporary art movements.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES*
ART 301.-Design I. 3 credits.
10:30-12:40 Daily C 100 ANDERSON, E. A.
Watercolor techniques in a study of color, line, and design.
ART 302.-Design II. 3 credits.
10:30-12:40 Daily C 100 ANDERSON, E. A.
Techniques and media. Organization in oil paint, encaustic, and egg tempera.
ART 311.-Freehand Drawing. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily C 101 HOLBROOK, H. H.
Studies will be made from the model relating the structure of the human figure to its movement.
ART 312.-Freehand Drawing. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily C 101 HOLBROOK, H. H.
A continuation of ART 311 with emphasis on the structure of the head and figure.
ART 330.-Patternmaking. 3 credits.
10:30-12:40 Daily X 15 BORGIA, A. P.
Fundamental principles of flat pattern designing by use of basic foundation patterns in various
scale measurements.
ART 333.-Costume Construction I. 6 credits.
8:10-12:40 Daily X 15 BORGIA, A. P.
A study of basic principles of clothing selection and construction.
ART 335.-Textiles. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily X 13B HANSEN, R. C.
Survey of fundamentals of fabric construction, yarn, weaves, color, dye, finishes and design.
ART 338.-Draping. 3 credits.
4:20-6:30 Daily X 13B HANSEN, R. C.
Introduction of principles of designing patterns by use of dress form.
ART 341.-Elementary Photography. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-21 and C-22.
8:10-10:20 Daily WA 308 EBERSOLE, R. P.
A course in photographic technique and design for those who have had no previous experience
with photography.
ART 342.-Advanced Photography. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ART 341.
10:30-12:40 Daily WA 308 EBERSOLE, R. P.
Special problems in photography.
ART 351.-Landscape and Figure Painting I. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 101 KACERE, J. C.
Pictorial organization in terms of nature.
ART 352.-Landscape and Figure Painting II. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 101 KACERE, J. C.
Advanced work in the pictorial interpretation of nature.
*For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.











66 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ART 360.-Layout. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 105 DAVIS, C. R.
The elements of design in layout.

ART 361.-Lettering and Instrumental Drawing. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 105 DAVIS, C. R.
The design of letters suitable to the subject. Instruction in the mechanical aids to drawing.

ART 362.-Advertising Design. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 105 DAVIS, C. R.
The various media and techniques used in commercial art. Problems include illustrations and
spot designs.

ART 381.-Crafts I. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily WA 301 and WA 304 PEABODY, K. E.
Construction, glazing, and firing of ceramic products.
ART 383.-Jewelry and Metalwork. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily WA 304 PEABODY, K. E.
A creative and technical approach to the design problems in jewelry and metal forming.
ART 413.-Freehand Drawing III. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily C 101 HOLBROOK, H. H.
Interpreting gestures, weights, and contours of the human head and figure.
ART 453.-Figure and Portrait Painting. 6 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 101 KACERE, J. C.
12 hours to arrange.
Work from the model with stress on pictorial organization .
ART 454.-Special Problems in Painting. 6 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily C 101 KACERE, J. C.
12 hours to arrange.
The course is planned to permit the student to follow such problems as are worked out between
himself and his instructor with the purpose of developing a more personal direction in the student's
work.
ART 464-465-466.-Projects in Advertising Design. Group 2. Each course six
hours of lecture-laboratory for 3 credits;-group total, 9 credits.
Hours to arrange. C 105 DAVIS, C. R.
Problems involving more complex design elements. ART 465 and ART 466 will allow students
to explore specialized fields.
ART 481.-Ceramics I. 6 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily WA 304 PEABODY, K. E.
10 hours to arrange.
A continuation of ART 381.
ART 482.-Ceramics II. 6 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily WA 304 PEABODY, K. E.
10 hours to arrange.
A continuation of ART 481.
ART 483.-Special Problems in Crafts. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily WA 304 PEABODY, K. E.
Special problems selected by the student with approval of the instructor. Stress will be placed
on the use of native materials.
ART 494.-Modern Art. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily E 176 GRISSOM, E. E.
The history of art from 1850 and the development of art leading to movements such as fauvism,
cubism, futurism, expressionism, etc. Emphasis devoted to French and American Art.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ART 503.-Art Problems in Art Education. (Workshop) 3 credits. Students taking
ART 503, are advised to register for EDS 610-6 credits; however, this is not
required.
2:00 Daily C 105
GRADUATE COURSES
ART 651.-Art Problems in Painting and Drawing. 3 credits.
Hours to arrange WA 301
ART 655.-Art Research in Painting and Drawing. 3 credits.
Hours to arrange WA 301.
ART 681.-Problems in crafts. 3 or 6 credits.
Hours to arrange WA 301
ART 685.-Art Research in Crafts. 3 credits.
ART 691.-Art of the Twentieth Century. 3 credits.
Hours to arrange WA 301
Individual work with occasional conferences. An analysis of the art movements beginning with
Cezanne including Post-Impressionism, the Fauves, Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, Purism, and
other schools, and their relationship to contemporary art expression.
ASTRONOMY
ATY. 141.-Descriptive Astronomy. 3 credits. Not open to students who have
had any other course in astronomy.
8:10 Daily PE 10
An elementary survey of the astronomical universe with a minimum of mathematical work.
Primarily intended as an elective for those not majoring in a physical science or mathematics.
Occasional observing periods with the telescope and demonstrations with the Spitz Planetarium.

BACTERIOLOGY
BCY. 301.-General Microbiology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: General Chemistry,
C-6, and Biology Laboratory or equivalents.
Lecture Section: 8:10 Daily Bn 108 CARROLL, W. R.
Laboratory Section: 12:50 to 3:00 M W F Bn 108
Introduction to morphology, physiology and classification of bacteria and related microorganisms.
BCY. 513.-Microbial Metabolism. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BCY. 413, ACY.
642, 644.
To arrange Bldg. L PRATT, D. B.
An advanced and detailed study of the intermediary metabolism of representative bacteria and
related forms.
GRADUATE COURSES
BCY. 600.-Public Health Microbiology. Variable credit.*
To arrange Jacksonville.** BUREAU OF LABORATORIES STAFF
Principles and methods in diagnostic public health microbiology.
BCY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange. STAFF

BIOLOGY
BLY. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 3 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section)
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 T TH SC 101 LAESSLE, A. M.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.
**Course given at Bureau of Laboratories, State Board of Health, Jacksonville.











68 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Laboratory Sections:
11: 2:00 to 5:20 MW SC 14
12: 2:00 to 5:20 TTh SC 14
Designed to provide a recognition of, and an acquaintance with, some of the more common
animals and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question,
"What animal-or plant-is that?" Individual work in the field and the making of a personal
reference collection of plants and animals is encouraged.

BLY. 161.-Biology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-61.
9:20 to 11:30 MT W Th J 101 HUSSEY, R. F.
An introductory laboratory course dealing with cells, the mammalian anatomy, the major groups
of plants, methods of reproduction and germ cell formation.

BLY. 162.-Biology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-62.
7:00 to 9:10 MT W Th J 202 JONES, E. R.
An introductory laboratory course dealing with genetics, homology, embryology, evolution,
taxonomy, and ecology.

BLY. 210.-Vertebrate Embryology. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BLY. 209.
7:00 MT Th F SC 102 HEATH, H. D.
Laboratory 8:10 to 11:30 M T Th F SC 2
Lectures on the embryology of the various groups of chordate animals are accompanied by
laboratory work dealing chiefly with the frog, chick and pig.
BLY. 301.-Biological Laboratory Technique for Teachers. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
BLY. 161-162.
11:40 M T Th F SC 102 GRIFFITH, M.
Laboratory 2:00 to 5:20 M W SC 4
Designed to provide prospective instructors at the high school level with a sound background
in biology and information regarding methods of preparation of material and sources of supply
for the high school course.
BLY. 303.-Birds of Florida. 3 credits.
12:50 T Th SC 2 WESTFALL, M. J.
Laboratory: 2:00 to 5:20 T Th SC 2
Designed to acquaint students with the bird life of Florida. Particular attention is given to
the recognition and identification of local birds.

BLY. 325.-Genetics and Speciation. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BLY. 161-162.
8:10 Daily SC 109A DICKINSON, J. C.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 4:10 T Th SC 4
An introduction to the data and methods of genetics with special reference to their bearing
on the problems of speciation and organic evolution.

BLY. 530.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 3 credits. For undergradu-
ates only. This course may not be offered as part of the minimum 24 hours
required for the major. Prerequisites: At least 14 hours in approved major
courses in biology, and consent of instructor. This course may be repeated
for full credit.
To arrange STAFF
Qualified students and the instructor concerned may choose a particular topic or problem for study.
GRADUATE COURSES

BLY. 606.-Biological Literature and Institutions. 2 credits. Required of all
graduate majors.
8:10 MT W Th LI 419 BERNER, L.
A review of the compendia, journals and bibliographic sources in the various fields of biology,
and a survey of the workers, collections, and special fields or research of some of the more im-
portant laboratories and museums. Methods used in the preparation of scientific papers for publi-
cation are also included. Considerable emphasis will be placed on a study of library methods and
the most advantageous use of bibliographic sources.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BLY. 609.-Zoogeography. 2 credits.
9:20 M T W Th SC 109A BRODKORB, P.
Zoogeographic divisions of the world and their characteristic animals; factors influencing the
distribution of animals; the relation of geographic races to speciation and evolution.

BLY. 630.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours and credit to be
arranged. Prerequisite: Graduate status and consent of the instructor.
To arrange STAFF
Problems may be chosen from one or more aspects of the following fields: comparative anatomy,
cytology, ecology, embryology, experimental biology, fresh water biology, game management, herpe-
tology, histology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoology including arachnology and insect biology, mam
malogy, marine biology, ornithology, parasitology, general or comparative physiology, protozoology,
vertebrate paleozoology, and zoogeography. May be repeated for full credit.

BLY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.*

BLY. 799-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit.*


BOTANY

BTY. 101.-General Botany. 3 credits.
9:20 M T W Th UA 120 GRIFFITH, M.
Laboratory: 12:50-3:00 T Th UA 113
The form, structure, growth, reproduction, and physiology of plants and their various organs.

BTY. 102.-General Botany. 3 credits.
8:10 T W ThF UA120 DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory: 2:00-4:10 W F UA 113
Representatives of major groups of plants regarding their classification, life histories and en-
vironmental relations.
GRADUATE COURSES

BTY. 602.-Ecology of Aquatic Plants. 3 credits.
10:30 T Th UA 112 DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory: To arrange
Aquatic plant communities of lakes, ponds, rivers and marshes.
BTY. 614.-Plant Physiology Laboratory. 2 credits.
To arrange POWELL, R. D.
Laboratory experiments on subjects covered in BTY. 612. The experiments are designed to intro-
duce the student to research methods.

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION**

BCN. 301-302-303-304.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 1. 3 credits
each;-group total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequisite: Completion of Lower Division program in Building Construction
or equivalent.
To arrange E 180

BCN. 311-312-313-314.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 2. 3 credits
each;-group total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequisite: The series BCN. 301-302-303-304.
To arrange E 177

*Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.
**For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.










70 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BCN. 401-402-403-404.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 3. 3 credits.
each;-group total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequisite: The series BCN. 311-312-313-314.
To arrange E 178
BCN. 411-412-413-414.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 4. 3 credits
each;-group total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequisite: The series BCN. 401-402-403-404.
To arrange E 188

GRADUATE COURSES
BCN. 501.-Building Construction. 3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree
in Building Construction or Architecture, or equivalent.
To arrange E 188
Advanced studies in building technology or in specialized areas of the building construction field
selected by the student and approved by the faculty.
BCN. 502.-Building Construction. 3 or 6 credits. The second half of the course
BCN. 501-502.
To arrange E 188
BCN. 503.-Building Research. 3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree
in Building Construction, Architecture, or equivalent.
To arrange E 188
Detailed investigation of a selected problem in the building construction field designed to make
a significant contribution to present knowledge and practices in that field.
BCN. 504.-Building Research. 3 or 6 credits. The second half of the course BCN
503-504.
To arrange E 188
BCN. 599.-Research and Master's Thesis. 3 or 6 credits. For students working
for the master's degree. Credits cannot be used to reduce the total required
for the degree.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

BEN. 81.-Introductory Typewriting. 2 credits.
8:10 Daily and 2 hours to arrange YN 306 BABB, E.
Skill in typewriting developed through practice on personal and business problems.
BEN. 91.-Introductory Shorthand. 3 credits.
12:50 Daily and 2 hours to arrange YN 305 BABB, E.
The theory of Gregg shorthand is completed, using the functional method.
BEN. 181.-Advanced Typewriting. 2 credits. Prerequisites: BEN. 81 or 82 or
permission of instructor.
9:20 Daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 306 MAXWELL, H. C.
Provides more intensive training in typewriting.
BEN. 191.-Shorthand Dictation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BEN. 91 or 92 or
permission of instructor.
10:30 Daily and 2 hours to arrange YN 305 BABB, E.
Dictation developed, with emphasis on speed, accuracy, and shorthand skills.
BEN. 291.-Shorthand Dictation and Transcription. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BEN.
181 and 191 or permission of instructor.
10:30 Daily and 2 hours to arrange YN 306 MAXWELL, H. C.
Provides opportunity for developing a higher degree of skill in taking dictation and transcribing
shorthand notes on the typewriter.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BEN. 352.-Office Machine Techniques. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BEN. 81 or
permission of instructor.
9:20 Daily YN 305 MOORMAN, J. H.
The voice-writing machines, duplicating machines, adding machines and calculating machines
are studied, both as to techniques and operation. The student will be given opportunity to develop skill
in the operation of each of these machines.
GRADUATE COURSES

BEN. 652.-Teaching Office Machines. (Formerly BEN 552) 3 credits.
Prerequisite: 352 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
9:20 Daily and 2 hours to arrange YN 305 MOORMAN, J. H.
Methods of teaching the operation of machines commonly used in business offices.

BEN. 662.-Teaching Secretarial Studies. (Formerly BEN. 562) 3 credits.
2:00 Daily YN 305 MOORMAN, J. H.
The curriculum, methods, and materials in secretarial subjects are studied.

BEN. 775.-Administration and Supervision of Business Education (Formerly
BEN 575) Prerequisite: Approval of head of department.
8:10 Daily YN 305 MAXWELL, H. C.
Problems and duties of administrators and supervisors of business education are studied.
Emphasis will be placed on the duties and responsibilities of the department head and the
supervisor at the city or county level.

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION

BS. 231.-Principles of Marketing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
9:20 Daily BA 3 YODER, L. C.
The institutions and methods developed for carrying on trade operations; retail and wholesale
agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of marketing; price maintenance; unfair com-
petition: the relation of the government to marketing.
BS. 260.-Fundamentals of Insurance. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily BA 14 PIERCE, J. E.
The basic fundamentals underlying the business of insurance as a prerequisite for more advanced
and detailed work in the subject, designed to serve two distinct needs; (1) to give students of
economics and commerce a general knowledge of the subject; and (2) to lay a foundation for the
future work of those interested in entering the business.
BS. 271.-Principles of Management. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily BA 7 HODGES, H. G.
The basic fundamentals of management underlying the solution of problems of organization and
operation of business enterprises. Application of these fundamentals to specific fields of industrial
management such as production, material, personnel, purchasing, etc.
BS. 365.-Fire Insurance. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily BA 14 PIERCE, J. E.
The principles and practices of the coverage of losses due to fire: the fire insurance contract;
insurable interest; endorsements; settlement and adjustment of losses; co-insurance; non-concurrence;
rates; reserves; consequential losses; re-insurance.
BS. 373.-Personnel Management. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily BA 7 LUCK, T. J.
A comparison of the critical evaluation of public and private personnel practices and techniques
of recruiting, selecting, transferring, promoting, classifying, and training workers. Attention is
centered on the problem of training to fit workers for the different types and levels of duties
called for by the government, by industry and by other types of business enterprises. Consideration
of organization, policies, and procedures of managing men.
BS. 401.-Business Law. 3 credits.
7:00 Daily BA 9 HOVEY, S. W.
Contracts: Formation and interpretation; operation and discharge; remedies. Agency: Nature
and formation of relationship; inter-relationship responsibilities and rights; responsibility as to
third parties; termination of relationship.











72 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BS. 402.-Business Law. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily BA 9 HOVEY, S. W.
Sales: Formation and performance of contracts of sale of personal property; remedies of sellers
and buyers for breach. Negotiable Instruments: Formation and operation of negotiable contract;
rights and obligations of various parties on negotiable instruments; discharge.
BS. 422.-Investments. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 427.
9:20 Daily BA 119 McFERRIN, J. B.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.
BS. 427.-Corporation Finance. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily BA 5 FLOYD, J. S., JR.
The economies and legal forms of business enterprise; the instruments of business Inance;
financial problems as they relate to the ordinary operations of the business involving fixed and
working capital, income, dividend policy, and current borrowing.
BS. 433.-Advertising. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily BA 3 YODER, L. C.
A comprehensive guide to the planning and preparation of modern advertising in all its phases.
BS. 437.-Retailing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 231.
8:10 Daily BA 12 BROHM, H. D.
The fundamentals of retailing: problems, policies, trends and procedures in retail distribution.
BS. 439.-Principles and Problems of Merchandising. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
BS. 437.
9:20 Daily BA 12 BROHM, H. D.
Methods and policies relative to business management functions of merchandising; buying,
product analysis, pricing, brands, channels of distribution, and sales administration.
BS. 459.-Field Work in Marketing. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 106 McFERRIN, J. B.
Up to three credit hours for weekly reports and a final report on problems as they arise in a full
time three months period of work, in Sales, Retailing, Advertising, Wholesaling, Credits and Col-
lections, Market Research, or any other work in Marketing under supervision of an approved em-
ployer. Open only to students majoring in Marketing, Sales, Retailing, or Advertising curricula only
before the last term on the campus, only after completion of a course in the principles of the
subject to be practiced, and only with written permission from a sponsoring professor. Complete
course regulations may be secured from sponsoring professor. All registrations in this course are
subject to these regulations.
BS. 482.-Corporate Suretyship. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily BA 12 CRIST, G. W., JR.
A generalized treatment of the background, purpose and functions of corporate suretyship, with
examination of the major classes of bonds, its issues, the markets it is intended to serve, and how
it serves them.
BS. 484.-Legal Aspects of Insurance. 3 credits.
11:40 Daily BA 12 CRIST, G. W., JR.
The essentials of the law peculiarly applicable to the business of insurance including Florida's
statutory regulation thereon.
GRADUATE COURSES
BS. 673.-Problems in Collective Bargaining. 3 credits.
12:50-4:10 T LI 417 LUCK, T. J.
4:20-6:30 Th LI 417 LUCK, T. J.
An examination of the history, present status, and trends, of collective bargaining with an
analysis of its economic, social and legal aspects .
BS. 675.-Management Problems. 3 credits.
7:00-9:00 p.m. M LI 417 HODGES, H. G.
7:00-10:00 p.m. W LI 417 HODGES, H. G.
Deals with specific current industrial problems in the fields of administration, production,
finance personnel, labor relations, purchasing and distribution. Problems are selected from
technical magazines in the management fields, and from contacts with key operating personnel
in industry.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BS. 699.-Research and Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 106
Directed research and writing for the M.A. degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours required for the master's degree.
BS. 799.-Research and Dissertation. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 106
Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the hours of regular courses required by the candidate's
supervisory committee for the doctor's degree.

CANCER RESEARCH
GRADUATE COURSE
CR. 665.-Cancer Research Seminar. Variable credit.*
9:20 to 12:10 S CR 10

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

CG. 347.-Industrial Stoichiometry. 4 credits. Prerequisites or corequisites
CY. 331, MS. 354, PS. 206.
10:30 Daily EI. 430 TYNER, M.
Laboratory: 2:00 to 5:20 M W MI 25.
Industrial processes and calculations, weight balances, gas calculations, combustion processes,
vapor pressure, humidity, etc.
CG. 361.-Materials of Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CY. 122 or CY.
218 and PS. 206.
10:30 Daily El 328 SPECHT, R. C.
Production, properties and uses of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, and Portland
cement.
CG. 447.-Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CG. 348.
9:20 Daily MI 25 SCHWEYER, H. E.
The fundamental chemical engineering operations: Handling of solids, crushing and grinding,
flow of fluids, classification, flotation, sedimentation, filtration.
CG. 467.-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CY.
401 and MS. 354. Corequisites: CY. 402.
8:10 Daily MI 25 HARVIN, R. L.
Fundamental applications of thermodynamics of chemical engineering.

CHEMISTRY

CY. 121-General Chemistry. 4 credits.
9:20 Daily LE 207
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 M W LE 138
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Non-metalic elements and their compounds; metals
and their compounds and some of their uses.
CY. 122.-General Chemistry. 4 credits.
9:20 Daily LE 212
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 T Th LE 138
The second half of the course CY. 121-122.
CY. 123.-Qualitative Analysis. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CY. 122.
10:30 M T Th F LE 212
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 M W LE 236
Theoretical principles and laboratory techniques involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.










74 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CY. 217.-General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 4 credits. Prerequisites:
Upper percentile rating in placement tests in physical sciences and mathe-
matics or satisfactory completion of C-2. In general, freshmen should present
evidence that they have had high school chemistry. Prerequisite or corequisite:
MS. 105.
8:10 Daily LE 207
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 T Th LE 136
A course in general chemistry including the fundamentals of qualitative analysis.
CY. 218.-General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 4 credits.
10:30 Daily LE 118
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 M W LE 136
The second half of the course CY. 217-218.
CY. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CY. 331.
8:10 Daily LE 212
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 T Th LE 238
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic and aromatic compounds.
CY. 331.-Introductory Quantitative Analysis. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CY. 123
or CY. 218.
8:10 MT Th F LE 142
Laboratory 12:50-4:10 M T W Th LE 112
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in quantitative determinations. De-
terminations include gravimetry, acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidimetry and iodimetry.
CY. 362.-Organic Chemistry. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CY. 122 or CY. 218.
Corequisite: CY. 363, except for Physics majors.
8:10 Daily LE 154
A brief elementary course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds.
CY. 363.-Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 2 credits. Corequisite: CY. 362.
12:50-4:10 M T Th F LE 238

CY. 402.-Physical Chemistry. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CY. 401. Corequisite:
CY. 406, except for Physics majors.
9:20 Daily LE 142
Colloids, electricity as applied in chemistry, chemical kinetics, photochemistry and introduction
to quantum theory.
CY. 406.-Physical Chemistry. 1 credit. Corequisite: CY. 402.
12:50-4:10 W F LE 204

GRADUATE COURSES

CY. 624.-Chemical Kinetics. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily LE 154
Acids and bases; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis; rates and mechanism.
CY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit. 1-6 hours.

CY. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit. 1-6 hours.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CL. 223.-Surveying. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MS 105.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section)
Lecture Section: 8:10 M T W Th El 432 KATTERHENRY, A. A.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Laboratory Sections:
Section 11 2:00-5:20 M W El 320 KATTERHENRY, A. A.
Section 12 2:00-5:20 T Th El 432 KATTERHENRY, A. A.
Use of surveyors tape; level and transit; traversing and balancing surveys; calculation of areas;
topographic mapping; land subdivision; adjustment of instruments.
CL. 226.-Higher Surveying. 2 credits. Prerequisite: CL. 223.
12:50 M W El 432 GARTNER, WILLIAM, JR.
Laboratory: 2:00-5:20 T Th El 324 GARTNER, WILLIAM, JR.
Triangulation systems; precise base-line measurement; map projections; coordinate systems;
precise levels; line azimuth by Solar and Polaris observations; hydrographic surveys; introduction
to photogrammetry; horizontal curves; cross-sections; plane table surveys.
CL. 326.-Statics of Simple Structures. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EM 365.
10:30 Daily El 324 GARTNER, WILLIAM, JR.
Laboratory: 2:00-5:20 M W El 324 GARTNER, WILLIAM, JR.
Application of the methods of statics to structural analysis; a correlation between graphical and
analytical methods; moments, shears, reactions, resultants, stress diagrams, and influence lines
for statically determinate structures.
CL. 435.-Design in Metals and Timber. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EM 377, CL 326.
8:10 MT W Th El 320 SPANGLER, B. D.
Laboratory: 2:00-5:20 T Th El 320 SPANGLER, B. D.
The structural design of metal and timber elements; connections; tension and compression
members, members subjected to combined bending and axial loads, as applied to structures.
GRADUATE COURSES

CL. 623.-Advanced Concrete Structures. Variable credit.* Prerequisites: CL
338, 433; Corequisite: CL 538.
To arrange ARDAMAN, E.
Comparisons ot modern methods of concrete proportioning; design with relation to ultimate:
prestressing; plastic flow; special structures; admixtures and protective treatments; study of
research development; the design of concrete rigid frame bridles.
CL. 630.-Problems in Sanitation. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CL 329, CL 429 or
permission of instructor.
To arrange JAFFE, T.
Approved problems for study or research selected from any field of sanitary specialization.

DAIRY SCIENCE

DY. 211.-Introduction to Dairy Science. 3 credits.
9:20 M T W Th DL 203 WILKOWSKE, H. H. and WING, J. M.
Laboratory: 12:50-4:10 M W DL 110
Composition and properties of milk; sanitary milk production; common methods of analysing
milk; common dairy processes; farm methods of handling milk.
DY. 418.-Approved Dairy Practice. 3 credits.
To arrange.
Practical experience on approved dairies or in approved dairy plants.
DY. 420.-Problems in Dairy Technology. 3 credits.
To arrange.
Qualified students may choose an approved problem covering some phase of dairy technology.
GRADUATE COURSES

DY. 623.-Problems in Dairy Production. Variable credit.*
To arrange.
Research for majors in dairy husbandry.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.











76 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

DY. 627.-Advanced Dairy Microbiology. 4 credits.
To arrange WILKOWSKE, H. H.
Advanced methods of microbiological control of dairy products.
DY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.*

ECONOMICS

ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics. 4 credits. Prerequisite: C-42 or equivalent.
8:10 Daily BA 225 ANDERSON, M. D.
Laboratory: 2:00-4:10 M W BA 225
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,
sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics.
ES. 205.-Basic Economics. 3 credits.
Section 1 7:00 Daily BA 4 FENLON, P. E.
Section 2 8:10 Daily BA 4 ANDERSON, M. D.
Section 3 10.30 Daily BA 4 MERCER, N. A.
After a preliminary discussion of the nature, scope, and method of economics, economic concepts,
and economic institutions, this half of the course in Basic Economics, ES. 205-206, deals primarily
with the theories of production, determination of prices, and distribution of income.
ES. 206.-Basic Economics. 3 credits.
Section 1 8:10 Daily BA 6 LOWE, J. W.
Section 2 9:20 Daily BA 6 MILLICAN, C. N.
Section 3 11:40 Daily BA 6 KARP, J. R.
This half of the course ES. 205-206. for which separate credit may be earned, emphasizes the
accounting, analytical, and policy aspects of national income and product, along with such
closely related topics as governmental finance, money and banking, and international trade and
finance. Some attention is also given to the problems of industrial relations, monopolies, transpor-
tation and public utilities, and to the leading alternatives to capitalism.
ES, 246.--Consumer Economics. 3 credits.
11:40 Daily BA 13 SHIELDS, M. W.
A study of consumer buying practices, management of personal and family finance, spending
the income wisely, consideration of buying guides and consumer protection agencies.
ES. 321.-Money and Banking. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
8:10 Daily BA 5 FLOYD, J. S.
A study of money systems and standards; of the factors determining the size of the money
supply with special emphasis on the role of commercial and central banks and government fiscal
policy; and of the relationship between money, prices, and production and employment.
ES. 327.-Public Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ES. 205-206.
11:40 Daily BA 5 QUALLS, L. L.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.
ES. 351.-Elements of Transportation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
10:30 Daily BA 9 ROBERTS, M. J.
General survey of the significance, characteristics, and major problems of intercity transportation.
ES. 372.-Labor Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Es. 205-206.
8:10 Daily BA 11 FRISTOE, C. W.
Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial conflict,
attempts to solve labor problems by employers; personnel management, employee representation,
employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state; protective labor legislation, laws
relating to settlement of industrial disputes.
ES. 382.-Principles of Resource Utilization. 3 credits. (Identical with GPY. 382)
7:00 Daily B 114 GILDEA, R. Y., JR.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed by
an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation with
special reference to the South. Course designated to satisfy resource certification for social studies
teachers.
*Credit assigned must be shown on the registration card.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ES. 404.-Government Control of Business. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ES. 205-206.
11:40 Daily BA 4 MERCER, N. A.
The evolution of economic control; an examination of the effectiveness of Laissez-faire control
in the American economy; legality of and chief methods of effectuating governmental control; the
development of the relationship between government and non-public utility monopolies; Federal
Trade Commission control of competitive practices; a critical appraisal of recent developments in
the field of government control.
ES. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ES. 205-206.
9:20 Daily BA 4 ANDERSON, J. D.
An advanced course in economic theory, dealing especially with the theories of production,
price determination, and income distribution and their application to a selected list of current
economic problems.
ES. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The second half of the
course ES. 407-408.
10:30 Daily BA 6 KARP, J. R.
ES. 409.-Comparative Economic Systems. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily BA 11 BLODGETT, R. H.
The economics of capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. The theoretical economics of
capitalism, socialism, and communism and the actual economies of the United States, Soviet Russia,
England, Nazi Germany, and Fascist Italy are compared on the basis of such matters as industrial
production, agriculture, exchange, credit and banking, income distribution, the status of labor,
and international trade. Marxian Socialism is also considered briefly.
ES. 429.-Introduction to Business Cycles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 321.
10:30 Daily BA 11 JACKSON, E. L.
An introduction to the principal theories of the business cycle including also a description of
the various types of cycles and an examination of the important remedies that have been proposed.
ES. 477.-Problems in Federal Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 327.
9:20 Daily BA 5 QUALLS, L. L.
Economic effects of public expenditure; war finance; personal income and estate taxes; corporate
income and profits taxes; excise taxes; debt problems.
GRADUATE COURSES
ES. 622.-Money, Prices, and Business Cycles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 321.
8:10 Daily LI 417 JACKSON, E. L.
An analytical survey of the economic instabilities in capitalistic society, with emphasis upon
forces operating to bring about changes in the general level of prices, including prices of pro-
ductive agents, employment, and income.
ES. 643.-Theory of International Trade. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily LI 417 SHIELDS, M. W.
The historical and economic background of foreign trade; the theory of international trade;
the fundamentals of international exchange; international commercial policies and international
trade; exchange fluctuations and their control; the international monetary institutions.
ES. 650.-Policies of Federal Transportation Commissions. 3 credits.
12:50-4:10 W LI 417 ROBERTS, M. J.
4:20-6:30 F LI 417 ROBERTS, M. J.
Critical consideration of the policies of the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Civil
Aeronautics Board.
ES. 671.-Mathematical Economics-Part II. 3 credits.
To arrange BA 204 ANDERSON, M. D.
Continuation of the study initiated in Part I.
ES. 672.-Organized Labor in the United States. 3 credits.
4:20-6:30 T LI 417 FRISTOE, C. W.
12:50-4:10 F LI 417 FRISTOE, C. W.
A study of the problems connected with the relationship of organized labor with itself, mal
agement, government, and the public-labor policy and public welfare.
ES. 678.-Governmental Finance Administration. 3 credits.
To arrange BA 204 KILPATRICK, W.
Governmental finance critically examined according to administrative processes within and
among governments; compares operating behavior of governments in managing, revenue, expendi-
ture, debt, budgets, records, and reports, appraises methods by policies implicit in administration.










78 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ES. 691.-Neo-Classical Economics. 3 credits.
4:20-6:30 M LI 417 BLODGETT, R. H.
12:50-4:10 Th LI 417 BLODGETT, R. H.
Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-classical price and production theories. Demand,
supply, cost of production, and price determination under various conditions of the market will be
considered. The writings of Marshall, Hicks, Boulding, Davenport, Stigler, Fellner, J. Robinson, and
Chamberlin provide the background for the discussion.
ES. 699.-Research and Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 204
Directed research and writing for the M.A. degree, taken toward the end of the student's gradu-
ate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours required for the master's degree.
ES. 799.-Research and Dissertation. Variable credit.*
To arrange BA 204
Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the hours of regular courses required by the candidate's
supervisory committee for the doctor's degree.
EDUCATION-GENERAL AND CROSS-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

ED. 418.-Audio-Visual Materials of Instruction (Formerly EN. 418.). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 140
A general course for teachers at all grade levels. Presents sources and methods of using
audio-visual materials of instruction.
ED. 500.-Materials and Methods for Teaching Slow Learners (Formerly EN.
428). 3 credits. Prerequisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.
8:10 Daily I 103
Curricular materials will be considered which can be used to teach children who are mentally
handicapped, at various maturation levels and in various situations.
ED. 504.-Therapeutic Care of Crippled Children (Formerly EN. 430). 3 credits.
Prerequisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.
9:20 Daily I101 SULLIAN, K.
Consideration is given to a comprehensive program of care and treatment of the orthopedically
handicapped.
GRADUATE COURSES
NOTE: All new graduate students in Education are required to attend an orienta-
tion meeting at 7:00 P.M., Tuesday, June 15, in the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Information will be given about types of graduate study, the planning of individual
programs, and facilities available.
ED. 600.-Teaching Exceptional Children (Formerly EN. 539). 3 credits. Pre-
requisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.
11:40 Daily I 107 SULLIVAN, K.
An advanced course in the care, treatment, and education of children with problems and handi-
caps whom we refer to as "exceptional children."
ED. 601.-Administration and Supervision of Programs for Exceptional Children
(Formerly EN. 427). 3 credits. JPrerequisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.
10:30 Daily I 103
The principles of administering and supervising programs for the mentally and physically
handicapped and for the mentally superior are considered.
ED. 610.-Principles of Guidance (Formerly EN. 562). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily I 107
An introduction to the field of student personnel work.
ED. 611.-Occupational Information (Formerly EN. 564). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily K 109
Methods of studying occupations; sources of information concerning employment conditions,
job requirements, training facilities, occupational trends; evaluation of occupational literature; use
of occupational information in counseling.
*Credit assigned must be shown on the registration card.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ED. 612.-Techniques in Guidance (Formerly EN. 563). 3 credits. Prerequisites:
ED. 610 or equivalent; or approval of instructor.
8:10 Daily YN 222
A survey of various guidance techniques and programs.
ED. 613.-Personnel Testing (Formerly EN. 534). 3 credits. Prerequisites: EDF.
360 or PSY. 211.
12:50 Daily K 109
A survey of the principal aptitude tests and inventories used in personnel work, with assigned
readings in test literature. Procedures for standardizing and validating tests will be considered,
with emphasis on the evaluation of the various instruments for use in personnel work.
ED. 618.-The Organization and Administration of Guidance Programs (Formerly
EN. 513). 3 credits.
9:20 Daily YN 222 STRIPLING, R. O.
Methods of organizing and administering personnel programs in educational institutions.
ED. 630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530). 3 credits.
To arrange YN 302 BERGENGREN, R.
For advanced students who wish to study individual problems under faculty guidance. Before
registering, the student must submit in writing to the coordinator of the course a statement of a
proposed problem. Forms for this purpose are available in YN. 202.
ED. 631.-Educational Leadership I. (Formerly EN. 557). 3 credits. (Must be
taken with ED. 632).
8:10 Daily YN 214 JOHNS, R. L., MYERS, R. B., WOFFORD, K. V.
This is a basic leadership course recommended for majors in administration and supervision.
Emphasis is given to the development, initiation, and implementation of programs and policies;
to goal determination; and to human relationships. Research projects will center around leadership
problems of administrators and supervisors.
ED. 632.-Educational Leadership II. (Formerly EN. 558). 3 credits. (Must be
taken with ED. 631).
9:20 Daily YN 214 JOHNS, R. L, MYERS, R. B., WOFFORD, K. V.
ED. 633.-Methods and Problems of Supervision (Formerly EN. 536). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 236 BURRESS, N.
Critical study of supervisory practices.
ED. 640.-College Curriculum and Teaching. (Formerly EN. 502). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 232 HENDERSON, L. N.
Development, functions, and problems of colleges in the American society. Emphasis on curriculum,
learning process and teaching procedures, instructional aids, and evaluation.
ED. 651.-Audio-Visual Education (Formerly EN. 506). 3 credits.
Section 1. 9:20 Daily YN 140
Section 2. 11:40 Daily YN 140 CATE, C. A.
The selection, evaluation and use of audio-visual materials, with emphasis upon projected still
and sound motion pictures.
ED. 652.-Production and Utilization of Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits. Pre-
requisite: ED. 651 or consent of instructor.
10:30 Daily YN 140 CATE, C. A.
Designed to train materials supervisors, audio-visual coordinators and other school personnel in
the production of materials by photographic processes, and in the operation of materials centers.
ED. 655.-Mental Health in the Classroom (Formerly EN. 516). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 236 CUMBEE, C. F.
To assist teachers in the personality development of children.
ED. 659.-Laboratory in Corrective Reading (Formerly EN. 576). 3 credits.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: EDE. 675.
11:40 Daily AN 306 SPACHE, G.
Study of the diagnosis, correction, and prevention of reading difficulties in both elementary and
secondary schools.










80 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ED. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. 1 to 6 credits.
ED. 740.-Programs of Teacher Education (Formerly EN. 615). 3 credits.
9:20 Daily YN 232 HENDERSON, L. N.
For the college teacher who expects to serve on the faculty of a teacher-education institution.
Emphasis on significance, organization, problems of teacher-education programs; types of students,
patterns of curricula, functions of staff, significant organizations and agencies, and special studies.
ED. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.

EDUCATION-ADMINISTRATION

GRADUATE COURSES
EDA. 600.-Educational Organization and Administration (Formerly EN. 522).
3 credits.
Section 1. 10:30 Daily YN 226
Section 2. 11:40 Daily YN 226
EDA. 601.-Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools. (Formerly
EN. 524). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 222 LEPS, J. M.
EDA. 602.-Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools (Formerly
EN. 518). 3 credits.
12:50 Daily YN 222 LEPS, J. M.
EDA. 603.-Public School Business Administration and Finance (Formerly EN.
521) 3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 222 JOHNS, R. L.
EDA. 607.-Administration of Teacher Personnel (Formerly EN. 607). 3 credits.
9:20 Daily YN 228 SIMMONS, G. B.
Consideration will be given to problems concerning the human factors in school administration.
EDA. 608.-Administration of Pupil Personnel (Formerly EN. 608). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 228 SIMMONS, G. B.
This course deals with techniques of child accounting and of providing pupil personnel services.
EDA. 609.-Problems in School Administration and Supervision (Formerly EN.
590). 3 credits.
To arrange YN 128 JOHNS, R. L., LEPS, J. M.
EDA. 630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530). 3 credits.
EDA. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis (Formerly EN. 599). 1 to 6 credits.
EDA. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation (Formerly EN. 699). 1 to 6
credits.

EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY

EDE. 400.-Problems of Instruction. (Formerly EN. 471). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily I 101
The course in elementary curriculum required for certification to teach in grades 1-12 in certain
specialized fields.
EDE. 560.-Teaching Science in the Elementary School. (Formerly EN. 509). 3
credits. Prerequisite: GL. 301 or equivalent and teaching experience or per-
mission of instructor.
11:40 Daily YN 150 PILTZ, A.
Content, methods, materials in teaching science in the elementary school.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 81

EDE. 570.-Teaching of Reading (Formerly EN. 480). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily I 101
A survey of the problems of teaching reading in all grades.

GRADUATE COURSES

EDE. 600.-Elementary School Curriculum. (Formerly EN. 501). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 236
A survey of the content and methods of the elementary school curriculum.

EDE. 601.-Practices in Elementary Education I. (Formerly EN. 545). 3 credits.
(Must be taken with EDE. 602).
8:10-11:30 Daily YN 311 GREEN, E. K.
Orientation course for majors in graduate work in elementary education with emphasis upon
modern practices in elementary education.

EDE. 602.-Practices in Elementary Education II (Formerly EN. 545). 3 credits.
Continuation of EDE. 601.
8:10-11:30 Daily YN 311 GREEN, E. K.

EDE. 603.-Early Childhood Education, I (Formerly EN. 584). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 228
To assist teachers of children in kindergarten and grades 1-3.
EDE. 630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530). 3 credits.
To arrange YN 102 WOFFORD, K. V.
This course is provided for advanced students studying individual problems.
EDE. 635.-Supervision of Pre-Service Teachers, I. (Formerly EN. 537). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 228 HAINES, A.
To help teachers who supervise student teachers or interns.
EDE. 660.-Science Education in the Elementary School (Formerly EN. 509).
3 credits. Prerequisite: EDE. 560 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
8:10 Daily YN 142 BINGHAM, N.
Current problems in teaching science in elementary schools, new materials and techniques of
teaching, recent developments in the sciences and their implications.
EDE. 670.-Language Arts in the Elementary School-Skills (Formerly EN. 578).
3 credits.
10:30 Daily I 101 CAREY, J.
Trends and practices in the teaching of reading, writing and spelling.
EDE. 675.-Trends in the Teaching of Reading (Formerly EN. 575). 3 credits.
9:20 Daily I101
To help teachers on all grade levels to understand purposes, skills, and techniques of teaching
reading.
EDE. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis (Formerly EN. 599). 1 to 6 credits.

EDE. 700.-Problems in Elementary Education, I (Formerly EN. 547). 3 credits.
(Must be taken with EDE. 701).
8:10-11:30 Daily YN 234 LINDBERG, L.
An advanced course in elementary school problems.
EDE. 701.-Problems in Elementary Education, II (Formerly EN. 547). 3 credits.
Continuation of EDE. 700.
8:10-11:30 Daily YN 234 LINDBERG, L.

EDE. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation (Formerly EN. 699). 1-6 credits.










82 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS

EDF. 220.-Children and Culture (Formerly SCL. 205). 3 credits.
12:50 Daily YN 236 MUNTYAN, B.
A study of effects upon children of the social, economic, geographic, and other circumstances
of community life.
EDF. 221.-Children and Culture (Formerly SCL. 206). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily K 109 CURRAN, R. F.
EDF. 360.-Elementary Statistical Methods in Education (Formerly EN. 316).
3 credits.
12:50 Daily YN 316 PHILLIPS, W. B.
Application of selected techniques to organization and interpretation of educational data.
EDF. 440.-Child Development (Formerly EN. 385). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 138 McLENDON, I. R.
Growth and development of children into mature personalities.
EDF. 442.-Educational Psychology (Formerly EN. 386). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 138 McLENDON, I. R.
Application of psychological principles to the education process; individual differences; principles
of learning; transfer of training; the nature of reasoning.
EDF. 450.-Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices (Formerly EN. 317)
3 credits.
10:80 Daily YN 316 SCATES, D. E.
Study of basic principles and methods of measurement; evaluation of pupil learning in school.

GRADUATE COURSES
EDF. 600.-History of Education (Formerly EN. 510). 3 credits.
12:50 Daily YN 311
Attempt is made to evaluate present-day education by tracing back to their beginnings such
dominant factors as the teacher, the curriculum, the school plant, and the sources of support and
control for schools.
EDF. 610.-Democracy and Education (Formerly EN. 508). 3 credits.
Section 1. 8:10 Daily YN 138 NORMAN, J. W.
Section 2. 11:40 Daily YN 134 NORMAN, J. W.
A study of the reciprocal relationships of democracy and education.
EDF. 620.-Socio-Economic Foundations of Education (Formerly EN. 540). 3
credits.
Section 1. 12:50 Daily YN 138 BAKER, M. C.
Section 2. 9:20 Daily YN 316 MUNTYAN, B.
The socio-economic bases for education are comprehensively surveyed.
EDF. 630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530). 3 credits.
To arrange YN 239
This course is provided for advanced students who wish to study individual problems under
faculty guidance.
EDF. 642.-Problems in Educational Psychology (Formerly EN. 541). 3 credits.
Section 1. 9:20 Daily YN 236 CUMBEE, C. F.
Individualized study of problems dealing with child development, adolescence, learning, and other
areas of educational psychology.
EDF. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis (Formerly EN. 599). 1-6 credits.
EDF. 720.-School and Society (Formerly EN. 640). 3 credits.
2:00 Daily YN 138 HINES, V. A.
Provides a social and philosophic frame of reference through a rigorous study of the society
in which education takes place, and the implications of this society for the functioning of the school.
Conducted on a seminar basis. Limited to students in the sixth year program of teacher education
and candidates for the doctor's degree in education.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EDF. 730.-World Trends in Education (Formerly EN. 617). 3 credits.
2:00 Daily YN 311
An analysis and synthesis of the role of education in promoting contemporary national and in-
ternational goals.
EDF. 760.-Techniques of Research (Formerly EN. 604). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 234 SCATES, D. E.
Training is given in identifying research problems, selecting and organizing useful means for
research, methods of gathering data, and best practices for interpreting and reporting observed
phenomena.
EDF. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation (Formerly EN. 699). 1-6 credits.

EDUCATION-SECONDARY

EDS. 300.-The Secondary School Program, I. (Formerly EN. 301). Class and
laboratory. 3 credits. EDS. 300 and EDS. 301 should be taken concurrently.
8:10 Daily YN 134 BROWNE, E. B., HILL, T.
The function and program of the secondary school, and the role of the teacher. Classwork is
organized around the problems and issues facing secondary education today.
EDS. 301.-The Secondary School Program, II. (Formerly EN. 302). Class and
laboratory. 3 credits. EDS. 301 and EDS. 300 should be taken concurrently.
9:20 Daily YN 134 BROWNE, E. B., HILL, T.
GRADUATE COURSES
EDS. 600.-Foundations of Secondary School Curriculum (Formerly EN. 519).
3 credits.
9:20 Daily YN 138 MENGE, W.
An analysis of the assumptions underlying the secondary school, the research on which present-
day programs are based and the emerging patterns in secondary school curricula.
EDS. 601.-The Junior High School Curriculum (Formerly EN. 516). 3 credits.
9:20 Daily YN 226 VERGASON, A.
Teachers, principals, and supervisors are given an opportunity to analyze and to evaluate the
curriculum offerings in the modern junior high school. Emphasis will be placed on developing a
school program to meet the needs of early adolescents.
EDS. 602.-The Secondary School Curriculum (Formerly EN. 527). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 134 VERGASON, A.
An analysis of the scope, functions, and types of secondary school curricula. Consideration will
be given to criteria for judging the secondary school curriculum and ways of improving existing
programs.
EDS. 605.-Evaluation of the Secondary School Program (Formerly EN. 538).
3 credits.
12:50 Daily YN 226 HOCK, L.
A study of procedures and of techniques by which secondary school programs may be evaluated.
EDS. 610.-Secondary Curriculum Workshop (Formerly EN. 520). 6 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily YN 43 WATTENBARGER, J. L., SUDLOW, D., KREBS,
R., KIDD, K. P., McGUIRE, V., CARTER, P.
A workshop designed to assist secondary school teachers and administrators to plan programs of
curriculum improvement. It is recommended that teams of teachers from high school faculties
use this program as a way of working together in solving school problems or in formulating plans
for program improvement.
EDS. 611.-The Core Program in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 675). 3
credits.
8:10 Daily YN 226 HOCK, L.
A study of the organization, the methods, and the materials used in core classes.
EDS. 630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530). 3 credits.
To arrange YN 328
This course is provided for advanced students studying individual problems.










84 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EDS. 640.-Social Studies in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 559). 3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 316 MYERS, R. B.
Consideration of the problems of teachers, supervisors, and principals in teaching social studies
in grades seven through fourteen. Trends, basic principles, recent improvements in methods and
materials will be emphasized. Each student will be given opportunity to develop understandings
and skills in a special problems in the social studies.

EDS. 650.-Mathematics in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 579). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 316 KIDD, K. P.
Selection and use of resource materials in junior and senior high school mathematics; current
problems in the teaching of mathematics; laboratory experiences in surveying, preparation of delays,
construction of equipment, and examination of films and other types of materials.

EDS. 660.-Science in the Secondary School (Formerly first half of EN. 533).
3 credits.
11:40 Daily YN 142 BINGHAM, N. E.
Current problems in teaching science in secondary schools and junior colleges. New materials
and techniques of teaching, and recent developments in the sciences and their implications.

EDS. 670.-Language Arts in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 550). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 232 McGUIRE, V.
Gives opportunity to principals, supervisors, graduate students, and in-service teachers to work
on their own problems at the various levels in grades seven through fourteen. Present trends,
basic principles, methods, and materials will be considered.

EDS. 690.-Student Activities in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 552). 3
credits.
11:40 Daily YN 232 MENGE, W.
An exploration of the purposes, phases, and operations of student activities to assist student
activity directors, activity sponsors, and principals in improving the school activities program.

EDS. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis (Formerly EN. 599). 1-6 credits.
To arrange YN 328

EDS. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation (Formerly EN. 699). 1-6 credits.
To arrange YN 328


EDUCATION-VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE

EDV. 306.-Vocational Education (Formerly EN. 306). 3 credits.
10:30 Daily YN 150 GARRIS, E. W.
The development, function and principles of vocational education.
GRADUATE COURSES
EDV. 630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530). 3 credits.
To arrange YN 136 GARRIS, E. W.

EDV. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis (Formerly EN. 599). 1-6 credits.
To arrange YN 136 GARRIS, E. W.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

EL. 211.-Introduction to Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. Corequisites: PS. 206,
MS. 354.
9:20 Daily El 346
A course to provide sophomore students who are planning to enroll in the Department of Elec-
trical Engineering with basic knowledge of fundamentals of electric, magnetic and dielectric cir-
cuits, and direct current methods of measurements.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 85

EL. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The second half of the
course EL 341-342. Prerequisite: EL 341.
9:20 Daily El 334
For engineering students not majoring in electrical subjects. Representation of alternating cur-
rent by vectors and complex quantities; measurement of power in single phase and polyphase
circuits; generations, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy; characteristics of a.c. ma-
chinery; testing of a.c. equipment.

EL. 343.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MS 354,
PS 206.
11:40 Daily El 346
For students majoring in Civil Engineering. The course covers as much of the power field of
Electrical Engineering as possible within the allotted time, including electric and magnetic circuits,
theory and application of direct and alternating current machines, illumination and wiring problems.

EL. 346.-Elementary Electronics. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EL 361.
9:20 Daily El 328
Lab.: 12:50 to 4:10 M W El 450
Basic principles of electron-tubes and electron-tube circuits, vacuum tubes as circuit elements,
amplifiers. Classroom and laboratory examples taken from the fields of telephone and radio com-
munications, and electron instrumentation.

EL. 350.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The second half of the course EL 349-
350.
12:50 to 4:10 T Th El 230
A laboratory course for engineering students not majoring in electrical engineering. Experi-
mental studies and test of alternating current circuits and apparatus.
EL. 362.-Electric Circuits. 4 credits. The second half of the course EL 361-362.
Prerequisite: EL 361.
8:10 Daily El 328
Lab.: 12:50 to 4:10 El 424 T Th
Unbalanced polyphase circuits; filters; elements of transmission lines; symmetrical components;
nonsinusoidal waves: transient conditions; laboratory experiments in measurements; study of in-
struments, and verification of theorem.
EL. 493.-Electrical Design and Experimental Procedure. Variable credit.*
To arrange
Special projects are studied and reports prepared thereon.

GRADUATE COURSES

EL. 641.-Non-Linear Circuits. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.
Analytical and topological approaches to non-linear circuits; non-linear resonance: relaxation
oscillations.
EL. 656.-Electromagnetic Fields and Waves. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EL 555.
To arrange.
Electromagnetic theory from the engineering point of view; propagation and reflection of waves,
guided waves, resonant cavities, antennas and radiation.
EL. 691.-Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Variable credit.*
To arrange
Laboratory, lectures, or conference covering specially selected topics in Electrical Engineering.
EL. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.*
Directed research and writing. For students working for the master's degree. Credits cannot
be used to reduce the total required for the degree.
EL. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit.*
Directed research and writing. For students working for the doctor's degree. Credits cannot
be used to reduce the total required for the degree.
*Credit assigned must be shown on the registration card.











86 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ENGINEERING MECHANICS

EM. 313.-Fluid Mechanics. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EM 365, MS 354.
9:20 Daily El 440
Laboratory 2.00 to 5:20 T Th RE 100
Mechanics of compressible and incompressible fluids. Special emphasis on viscosity effects.
Bernoulli's theorem, surface and form resistance, impulse-momentum principle, life and drag, laws
of similarity and dimensional analysis. Study includes statics, kinetics, and dynamics, and the
application of basic principles to the flow of fluids through measuring devices and pipes, and around
immersed bodies.
EM. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PS 205, ML
182. Corequisite: MS 354.
10:30 Daily El 440
Principles of statics: resultants and equilibrium of co-planar force systems; resultants and
equilibrium of space force systems; trusses containing two force members; structures containing
three force members; friction; centroids; moments of inertia; Mohr's circle.
EM. 366.-Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EM 365,
MS 354.
11:40 Daily El 440
Principles of dynamics: rectilinear translation; curvilinear translation including special equations
for highway banking and dynamic-balancing of rotating weights; mass moment of inertia; rotation;
plane motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.
EM. 377.-Mechanics of Materials. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EM 365, MS 354.
8:10 Daily and 12:50 T Th El 440
Stress and strain, tension, compression, shear, torsion of circular shafts, shear and moment in
beams, deflection of beams, riveted and welded connections, combined stresses, columns, fatigue
stresses, stress concentration, impact loading.

ENGLISH

EH. 133.-Effective Writing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3
Course Chairman.
2:00 Daily AN 203 WALKER, B. H.
3:10 W
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and clear
but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are urged to do creative work.
EH. 134.-Contemporary Reading. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of
*C-3 Course Chairman.
8:10 Daily AN 2 FOGLE, S. F.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded program in reading, which
will serve to keep him abreast of the bNt in contemporary thought. Some time will be spent in
introducing each student to the bibliography and writing in the area of his special professional
interest.
EH. 202.-Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 credits. The second half of
the course EH. 201-202. May be takenforeredit without EH. 201. Prerequisite:
C-3.
9:20 Daily AN 2 HODGES, J. R.
Readings and lectures in the great masterpieces of English literature. Selections chiefly from the
work of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, and Browning.
EH. 215.-Literary Masters of America. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3.
10:30 Daily AN 2
A selection of major American writers from Benjamin Franklin to Robert Frost. Emphasis is
placed on understanding and critical appreciation rather than on literary history.
EH. 235.-Word Study. 2 credits.
11:40 MTWTh AN 212
Designed to give the student a view of the English language in its relationship to the other
languages of the Indo-European family and of the manifold sources of its work stock. Exercises and
drills provide effective ways of increasing vocabulary.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 87

EH. 255.-Business Communications. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3.
12:50 Daily AN 2
Instruction and practice in giving short oral reports, dictating and writing the most generally
used business letters, and planning and executing short written reports, in accordance with
the standards of business usage. The student is introduced to business and professional publi-
cations, corporation and municipal reports, and other media of communications.
EH. 306.-Modern English Grammar. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3 and C-5.
12:50 Daily AN 212 COX, E. H.
A systematic review of modern English grammar, intended especially for students majoring in
English, Journalism, and speech, and for students preparing to teach English.
EH. 363.-Contemporary Literature: Drama. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3 and C-5.
11:40 Daily AN 2 STRYKER, D.
Recent and contemporary drama, with emphasis upon such major English and American play-
wrights as Shaw and Eugene O'Neill. The work of Ibsen and other Continental writers will be
treated briefly.
EH. 402.-Shakespeare. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, C-5, and one course in
English or Speech.
10:30 Daily AN 210 HERBERT, T. W.
The great tragedies will be studied, notably Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony
and Cleopatra.
EH. 408.-Ballads and Folksongs. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3 and C-5.
9:20 Daily AN 210 MORRIS, A. C.
English and Scottish popular ballads: their origin, development, and spread to America. American
folksongs: their nature, development, and place as social and folk documents.
EH. 480.-English in the Secondary School. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, C-5, and
one course in English.
10:30 Daily AN 212 STRYKER, D.
Designed to help teachers of English by (1) a review of the content, both the language and the
literature, of secondary school English, with attention to some of the methods widely used in high
school English courses, and (2) a study of both the ultimate and the immediate objectives of the
secondary English program.
EH. 491.-Children's Literature. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3 and C-5.
8:10 Daily AN 210 WISE, J. H.
A course designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make
him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.
EH. 506.-History of the English Language. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, C-5,
and one course in English or in a foreign language.
9:20 Daily AN 212 PYLES, T.
The nature, origin, and development of the English language, with special stress upon structural
and phonetic changes and upon the principles which govern modern usage.
EH. 514.-The Renaissance in England. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, C-5, and
one course in English.
11:40 Daily AN 210 BOWERS, R. H.
The lyric and epic poetry from Spenser through Milton; the prose from Sidney through Browne.
Emphasis will be placed on such figures as Bacon, Donne, Drayton, Herbert, Walton, Fuller, Milton,
Marvell, and Browne.
EH. 533.-English Literature of the 18th Century. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3,
C-5, and one course in English.
8:10 Daily AN 212. HODGES, J. R.
A study of English prose and poetry from Dryden through Pope, with chief emphasis upon
Dryden, Defoe, Addison and Steele, Pope, and Swift.
GRADUATE COURSES
EH. 600.-Bibliography and Methods of Research. No credit.
2:00-4:10 T Th LI 404 BOWERS, R. H.











88 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EH. 630.-Individual Work. Credit arranged.
To arrange STAFF
Provision for students who need to supplement the regular courses by individual reading or in-
vestigation under guidance.
EH. 665.-Literary Criticism, Historical and Analytical 3 credits.
12:50 Daily LI 404 ORAS, A.
Classical and Renaissance criticism.
EH. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable Credit. 1 to 6 hours.
EH. 771.-Studies in Victorian Literature. 3 credits.
To arrange LI 404 FAIN, J. T.
A seminar. The particular program varies from year to year.
EH. 787.-American Poetry. 3 credits.
To arrange LI 407 CONNER, F. W.

EH. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit. 1 to 6 hours.

ENTOMOLOGY

EY. 203.-Economic Entomology. 3 credits.
8:10 MT W Th FL 808 MURPHY, MILLEDGE, JR.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 8:00 M FL 306
An introduction to economic entomology, which is based upon a study of the life histories, and
control of major insect enemies of American agricultural crops. Particular stress is placed upon
southern and Florida economic insects. This course is designed for all students in the College
of Agriculture either as a pre- or corequisite for other entomology courses.
Textbook, "Destructive and Useful Insects" by Metcalf, Flint and Metcalf.
EY. 432.-Florida Fruit & Vegetable Insects. 3 credits. Prerequisite or corequi-
site: EY. 203, or EY. 207.
10:30 M T W Th FL 308 MURPHY, MILLEDGE, JR.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 3:00 T FL 306
The identification, life histories, and control of the major insect pests of Florida's fruit and
vegetable crops. For all students in the College of Agriculture, especially those interested in economic
plant life.
Textbook, "Subtropical Entomology" by Ebeling.
GRADUATE COURSES
EY. 603.-Problems in Entomology. 2 to 4 credits.*
8:10 T FL 308.2 ROGERS, A. J.
Other hours to be arranged.
A problem for study which may be selected in any field of entomological specialization; including
Histology, Morphology, Physiology, Taxonomy, Embryology, Biological Control, Ecology, Toxicology,
Plant Quarantine, Commercial Entomology, Life History and Habits, Biology, and Medical and
Veterinary Entomology.
EY. 699.-Entomological Research. 3 credits. Prerequisites: 24 hours of ento-
mology.
8:10 T FL 308.2 ROGERS, A. J.
Other hours to be arranged.
Field or laboratory research of entomology problems. Results to be used in preparation of thesis.

FAMILY LIFE

FAM. 201.-Home Decoration I. 3 credits.
8:10 to 10:20 A.M. M W F MILLICAN, G. C.
Elements and principles of interior design as applied to the home. A study of interior space and
furnishings, and a consideration of basic factors such as scale, form, color, and arrangement.
*Credit assigned must be shown on the registration blank.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 89

FAM. 202.-Home Decoration II. 3 credits. Prerequisite FAM. 201.
8:10 to 11:30 A.M. T Th MILLICAN, G. C.
Problems in the application of fundamental principles to the interior design and decoration of
the home. Solutions presented in the form of plan and model arrangements, schematic drawings,
color and texture collages, and idea sketches.

FAM. 244.-Marriage and the Family. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily AUD. EHRMANN, W. W.
Forms of marriage and the family. Sex developmental differentiations. Sex education. Social
relationships between men and women. Preparation for marriage. Legal and social factors affecting
marital adjustment.

FAM. 246.-Consumer Economics. 3 credits.
11:40 Daily BA 13
A study of consumer buying practices, management of personal and family finances, spending
the income wisely, consideration of buying guides and consumer protection agencies.

FAM. 301.-Family Relationships. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Fam. 244.
9:20 Daily AE 2 ROCKWOOD, C. A.
Personal and family relationships; guidance of the student in establishing successful family
patterns.

FAM. 308.-Genetic Psychology. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSY. 201.
9:20 Daily AE 1 HORNE, E. P.
A consideration and interpretation of the experimental findings relating to the development
of behavior. Phylogenetic as well as human ontogenetic development sequences will be considered.

FAM. 391.-Children's Literature. 3 credits.
8:20 Daily AN 210
A course designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make
him more aware of degree of excellence in content and form.


FORESTRY

FY. 220.-Introduction to Forestry. 2 credits.
10:30 M T W Th HT 410 GELTZ, C. G.
A basic course concerned with the phases of forestry and the history and policy pertinent to the
present day forestry situation. Offered primarily for students other than forestry majors.

FY. 221.-Summer Camp. 5 credits.
Field.
Summer camp covers the entire field of forestry. Students receive field instruction in surveying,
cruising, silviculture, and forest management.

FY. 229.-Forest Mensuration. 3 credits.
Field WILLINGHAM, J. W.
Note: This course will be given in conjunction with FY. 221.

FY. 313.-Farm Forestry. 3 credits.
12:50 MT W Th HT410 GELTZ, C. G.
Laboratory: 2:00 to 5:20 M W
Farm forests in farm management; economic and other values of farm forests; protecting, grow-
ing, measuring, marketing forests and forest products.

FY. 431.-Forest Problems Seminar. Variable Credit.*
To arrange STAFF
Supervised study and investigations in some particular phase of forestry or wildlife management.
*Credit assigned must be shown on the registration card.










90 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GRADUATE COURSES
FY. 602.-Research Problems in Silviculture. 3 to 6 credits.*
To arrange
Individual research on a specific problem in silvies, forest tree seed, forest tree propagation,
forest soils, forest ecology, and silvicultural practices.
FY. 603.-Research Problems in Wood Utilization. 3 to 6 credits.*
To arrange.
Individual research in wood technology, wood preservation, naval stores, small sawmill operation.
FY. 604.-Research problems in Forest Economics and Management. 3 to 6
credits.*
To arrange.
Individual research in forest economics, forest finance, or forest management.
FY. 605.-Research Methods in Wildlife Management. 3 credits.
To arrange. BECKWITH, S. L.
A detailed study of field and laboratory procedures used in wildlife research.
FY. 606.-Research Problems in Wildlife Management. 3 to 6 credits.*
To arrange BECKWITH, S. L.
Individual problems in the field of wildlife management.
FY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable Credit.*
To arrange.

FRENCH

FH. 134.-First-Year French. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FH. 183 or the equivalent.
Lecture: 8:10 Daily AN 4 KURTH, A. L.
Laboratory: 9:20 Daily AN 9.
FH. 201.-Second-Year French, 3 credits. Prerequisite: FH. 134 or the equivalent.
Lecture: 9:20 Daily AN 4 CAPRETZ, P. J.
Laboratory: 10:30 Daily AN 9.
FH. 202.-Second-Year French. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FH. 201 or the equivalent.
Lecture: 10:30 Daily AN 4
Laboratory 11:40 Daily AN 9.
Fi. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the head of
the department.
To arrange AN 3-A CAPRETZ, P. J.
By means of this course advanced students may study for credit any 400 course not currently
offered. Conferences, readings and reports.
GRADUATE COURSES
FH. 630.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange AN 111 KURTH, A. L.
By means of this course students may study for credit any 400 course not currently offered.
Conferences, readings and reports.
FH. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable Credit.

GENERAL SCIENCE

GL. 301.-Children's Science. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 150 SCHULTZ, B.
Satisfies certification requirement in the elementary school course Area II. To help elementary
teachers acquire background for science and materials.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GL. 302.-Children's Science. 3 credits. Continuation of GL. 301.
9:20 Daily YN 150 PILTZ, A.


GEOGRAPHY

GPY. 382.-Principles of Resource Utilization (Identical with ES. 382). 3 credits.
Prerequisite: GPY. 204.
7:00 Daily B 114 GILDEA, R. Y., JR.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed by an
intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these resources.
A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation with special ref-
erence to the South. Course designated to satisfy resource certification for social studies teachers.

GPY. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits. For undergraduates only.
To arrange
Qualified students and the instructor concerned may choose a particular topic or problem for
study. GPY. 430 may be repeated for full credit with change of content.

GPY. 490.-Field Course in Resource Utilization. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES./
GPY. 382.
Field DYER, D. R.
An integrated study of the problems of local resources and their use in a designated unit area,
such as a county or a city. The course consists of a combination of classwork and fieldwork. First
week on campus, three weeks in the field and one week on the campus.

GPY. 587.-Economic Geography of Europe. 3 credits. Prerequisite: GPY. 204
and permission of student's adviser.
9:20 Daily B 114 DIETTRICH, S. DE R.
The characteristics and distribution of population and of economic activities in Europe as related
to the natural resources of the continent; relationships to other parts of the world, especially North
America.

GRADUATE COURSES

GPY. 600.-Field Course in Geography. 3 credits.
Field. DYER, D. R.
Methods of geographical field work. Observation, classification, interpretation, note taking,
traversing and mapping of data. Areal analysis; landforms, climate, vegetation, soils, resources,
settlement patterns and land use. Required of all candidates for graduate degrees in geography.
First week on campus, three weeks in the field and one week on the campus.
GPY. 630.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange STAFF
A reading or research course in such areas of Geography as are needed by graduate students.
May be elected for full credit in subsequent sessions with change of content.
GPY. 682.-Seminar in Regional Geography. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate
status with a major or minor in geography.
10:30 Daily B 114 CRIST, R. E.
Discussion and directed research in the geography of selected regions.
GPY. 684.-Seminar on Geographic Problems in Latin America. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily B 114 CRIST, R. E.
The intensive study and investigation of specific regional and topical problems in Latin American
countries.
GPY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit. 1 to 6 hours.

GPY. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit. 1 to 6 hours.
For students who are working on the doctor's degree in the area of Latin American Studies.










92 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GEOLOGY

GY. 203.-Elements of Physical Geology. 3 credits.
8:10 MT W Th B 102 EDWARDS, R. A.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 3:00 T Th B 102
A study of minerals and rocks and their formation, geological processes, land forms and their
interpretation, and the applications of geological knowledge to human affairs.
GY. 360.-The Geology and Mineral Resources of Florida. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
GY. 204.
10:30 MT W Th B 104 EDWARDS, R. A.
Laboratory or field work: 12:50 to 5:20 W B 104
Geological history, stratigraphy, and mineral resources of the state.

GERMAN

GN. 134.-First-Year German. 3 credits. Prerequisite: GN. 133 or the equivalent.
Lecture: 9:20 Daily AN 6 KUCERA, J.
Laboratory: 10:30 Daily AN 9.

GN. 201.-Second-Year German. 3 credits. Prerequisite: GN. 134 or the equiva-
lent.
Lecture: 8:10 Daily AN 6 CRAPS, J. E.
Laboratory: 9:20 Daily AN 9.

GN. 202.-Second-Year German. 3 credits. Prerequisite: GN. 201 or the
equivalent.
Lecture: 10:30 Daily AN 6 MAUDERLI, M. O.
Laboratory: 11:40 Daily AN 9.

GN. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the head of
the department.
To Arrange AN 3-B CRAPS, J. E.
By means of this course advanced students may study for credit any 400 course not currently
offered. Conferences, readings and reports.
GRADUATE COURSE
GN. 630.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To Arrange AN 111 MAUDERLI, M. O.
By means of this course students may study for credit any 500 course not currently offered.
Conferences, readings and reports.

GREEK

GK. 530.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange AN 5 ARATOWSKY, B.
By means of this course advanced students may study for credit any course not currently
offered. Conferences, readings and reports.

HISTORY

HY. 202.-History of World Civilizations Since 1650. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily PE 114 DOWD, D. L.
A survey of civilizations in the modern era.
HY. 246.-United States History Since 1865. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily PE 112 THOMPSON, A. W.
A survey of recent United States History.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


HY. 372.-Modern Latin American History. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily PE 114 MC ALISTER, L. N.
A survey of Latin American history from the wars of independence to present.
HY. 552.-The New South. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily PE 112 BENTLEY, G.
A survey of the South from the Civil War to the present.
GRADUATE COURSES
HY. 603.-Introduction to Historical Research. 3 credits.
2:00 Daily LI 418 DOWD, D. L.
Historical method, bibliography and historiography.
HY. 630.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange PE 104 OSBORN, G. and PATRICK, R. W.
Readings in phases of United States history.
HY. 683.-The United States in the Far East. 3 credits.
3:10 Daily LI 418 HARRISON, J. A.
United States interests and policies in Eastern Asia.
HY. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.
HY. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit.

HORTICULTURE

HE. 201.-Principles of Horticulture. 3 credits. Desirable prerequisite: BTY.
101-102.
8:10 MT W Th FL 209 WOLFE, H. S.
Laboratory: 8:10 to 10:20 F FL 209
Home and commercial production of fruits, vegetables and flowers. Both for students not expecting
to major in horticulture and as an introductory course for horticulture majors which should be taken
in the sophomore year. Textbook: Schilleter and Richey, Textbook of General Horticulture.
HE. 341.-Citrus Growing. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BTY. 101-102 or C-6.
9:20 MT W Th FL 209 ZIEGLER, L. W.
Laboratory: 12:50 to 3:00 T FL 209
Citrus production and methods of culture designed to fill the need of the general student in
agriculture. It is not to be taken for credit by citrus majors, but is required of students majoring
in Agricultural Education and Agricultural Engineering. Textbook: Hume, Cultivation of Citrus
Fruits.
HE. 403.-Physiology of Fruit Production. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BTY. 211,
HE. 201.
7:00 Daily FL 209 STOUT, G. J.
Physiological principles underlying the production of fruit crops. Textbook: Gardner, Bradford
and Hooker, Fundamentals of Fruit Production.
GRADUATE COURSES
HE. 614.-Advanced Citriculture. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily FL 209 ZIEGLER, L. W.
An advanced course in citrus growing, emphasizing the problems offered by varying sites, soils,
climates, stocks and varieties.
HE. 670.-Non-thesis Research in Horticulture. 1 to 6 credits.
To arrange WOLFE, H. S.
HE. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit.*
To arrange WOLFE, H. S.
HE. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation. Variable credit.*
To arrange WOLFE, H. S.
*Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.











94 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION

IN. 100.-General Shop I. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily YN 20 SHACKELFORD, R.
Elementary hand tool techniques in woodworking, sheet and bench metal work, general drawing.
Industries studied through the use of films, industrial visitation, and other devices.
IN. 102.-Elementary Woodwork. 3 credits.
10:20-12:40 Daily YN 20 STRICKLAND, T.
Projects, shop sketching, wood finishing, common tool techniques in hand woodworking, and
related information.
IN. 303.-Machine Woodwork. 3 credits. Prerequisite: IN. 102 or approval of
instructor.
2:00-4:10 Daily YN 20 CAPRON, H.
Power machinery and machine maintenance, and use of the jointer, tilting arbor saw, band saw,
lathe, mortiser, drill press, router, shaper, and other machines.
IN. 312.-Elementary Handcrafts. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 Daily YN 304B BERGENGREN, R.
Creation of simple projects in such media as leather, textiles, clay, reed, plastics, linoleum block,
metal, wood, and native material.
IN. 313.-Handcrafts. 3 credits.
2:00-4:10 Daily YN 304-B KURTH, E.
Major areas include leather carving and tooling, metal etching, wood carving, pottery, plastics,
and textiles.
GRADUATE COURSES
IN. 624.-Problems in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (Formerly IN.
524). 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.
10:30 Daily YN 302 BERGENGREN, R. F.
Seminar for advanced students.
IN. 630.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange YN 302 BERGENGREN, R. F.
Problems approved by instructor.
IN. 633.-Industrial Arts and Vocational Laboratory Seminar. (Formerly IN.
533). 3 credits.
8:10 Daily YN 302 STRICKLAND, T. W.
Advanced laboratory techniques and opportunity for in-service graduate students to exchange
experiences.
IN. 653.-Industrial-Technical Resources (Formerly IN. 553). 3 credits.
9:20 Daily YN 302 MEYER, H. K.
A study of resources through visitation, observation, evaluation, and report.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

IG. 201.-Introduction to Industrial Engineering. 2 credits. Prerequisite: MS. 106.
8:10MTWTh EI312
The analytical engineering approach as applied to problems encountered in modern industry
in coordinating manpower, materials, equipment and methods. Orientation in industrial engineering
responsibilities and opportunities in industry and the community.
IG. 371.-Job Analysis and Evaluation. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Upper Division
classification.
9:20MTWTh EI312
Analysis of the mental and physical requirements, responsibilities and working conditions of
jobs and the several systems of determining the relative worth of jobs. Wage determination. Job
evaluation plan installation and maintenance. Merit rating.











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


IG. 463.-Specifications, Contracts, Ethics and Industrial Safety. 3 credits. Pre-
requisite: Engineering classification.
8:10 Daily El 343
Specifications writing for materials and construction of engineering projects; advertising and
letting of contracts, agreements and contractural relations. Engineering ethics. Organization of
safety work in industry; accident causes and legal responsibility of employer and employee.

IG. 472.-Human Engineering. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Engineering classification.
10:30MTWTh EI343
Human nature in engineering and management. Consideration of the human element in the
design of equipment and processes, as well as human reactions to plant situations.


INTERIOR DESIGN*

IR. 201.-Home Decoration I. 10 hours of conference and studio work. 3 credits.
8:10-10:20 M W F E 174.
5 hours to arrange.
Elements and principles of interior design as applied to the home. A study of interior space
and furnishings, and a consideration of basic factors such as scale, form, color, and arrangement.

IR. 202.-Home Decoration II. 10 hours of conference and studio work. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: IR 201.
8:10-11:30 T Th E 174
5 hours to arrange.
Problems in the application of fundamental principles to the interior design and decoration of
the home. Solutions presented in the form of plan and model arrangements, schematic drawings,
color and texture collages, and idea sketches.

IR. 301-302-303-304.-Projects in Interior Design, Group I. 3 credits each; group
total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite:
Completion of Lower Division program in Interior Design or equivalent. This
series constitutes the beginning work in the Upper Division professional cur-
riculum.
To arrange. E 174
A study of the problems involved in the design, construction, and execution of a variety of types
of room interiors.

IR. 311-312-313-314.-Projects in Interior Design, Group 2. 3 credits each; group
total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. This series of
courses is a continuation of the work of the series IR. 301-302-303-304.
To arrange. E 174
A study of the problems involved in the design, construction, and execution of more complex
types of room interiors and suites.
IR. 401-402-403-404.-Projects in Interior Design, Group 3. 3 credits each; group
total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. This series of
courses is a continuation of the series IR. 311-312-313-314.
To arrange. E 174
A study of the problems involved in the design, construction, and execution of commercial and
institutional interiors of a special nature or magnitude.
IR. 411-412-413-414.-Projects in Interior Design, Group 4. 3 credits each, group
total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. This series of
courses is a continuation of the series IR. 401-402-403-404.
To arrange. E 174
A study of the problems involved in the design, construction, and execution of the monumental
and the interior of special nature or magnitude.
*For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.











96 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

JOURNALISM

JM. 408.-Public Opinion. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily K 205 EMIG, E. J.
The force of public opinion in modern life; the psychological technique and strategy of directors
of public opinion; attitude measurement; reader-interest surveys; effects of newspaper practices
on public opinion.
JM. 509.-Law of the Press and Radio. 3 credits.
10:30 Daily K 205 LOWRY, W. L.
How to avoid legal difficulties in journalistic activities, with special attention to provisions of
Florida law relating to journalism.
GRADUATE COURSE
JM. 699.-Research and Master's Thesis. Variable credit. 1 to 6 hours.

LATIN

LN. 105.-The Latin Element in English. 2 credits.
9:20 MT W Th AN 7 ARATOWSKY, B.
LN. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the head of
the department.
To arrange AN 5 ARATOWSKY, B.
By means of this course advanced students may study for credit courses not currently offered.
Conferences, readings and reports.
GRADUATE COURSE
LN. 630.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange AN 5 ARATOWSKY, B.
By means of this course a student may study for credit any 500 course not currently offered.
Conferences, readings and reports.

LAW

LW. 402.-Contracts II. 2 credits.
9:20MTThF LW 201 MAUTZ, R. B.
The effect of various types of non-performance on the rights and duties of the parties to a
business agreement; assignability of contracts: rights of third-party beneficiaries.
LW. 404.-Criminal Law and Procedure II. 2 credits.
11:40 M T Th F LW 201 CLARK, V. W.
A continuation of LW. 408. Also defenses in criminal prosecutions; Federal Rules of Criminal
Procedure and their construction.
LW. 412.-Torts II. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily LW 203 MALONEY, F. E.
Negligence: early developments, standard of care, duty to act, functions of judge and jury, res
ipsa loquitur, proximate cause, defenses, measure of damages; nuisance; liability of owners and
occupiers of land; relationship of tort and contract liability; misrepresentation.
LW. 501.-Commercial Transactions I. 3 credits.
8:10 Daily LW 201 DELONY, D.
Formerly "Sales" and "Negotiable Instruments." An integrated study of the law applicable to
commercial transactions, with emphasis on the distribution of goods, the issuance and negotiation
of commercial paper, and the means by which transactions are secured, such as, conditional sales,
chattel mortgages, liens, pledges and contracts of suretyship.
LW. 504.-Private Corporations. 3 credits.
9:20 Daily LW 104 SLAGLE, D.
State constitutions and statutes; articles of incorporation; powers reserved by the state; pro-
moters and underwriters: pre-incorporation stock subscriptions; corporate organizations; drafting
and adoption of by-laws; exercise of corporate powers; rights and duties of officers and directors;
classes of stock; rights of stockholders; state regulation of transfers of stock; liability of stock-
holders, officers and directors; stockholder's derivative and representative suits; voluntary dissolution.




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