• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00154
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: February 1951
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00154
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

VID00154 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Foreword
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
    Back Cover
        Page 128
Full Text

S 1e h tiaelti Rfecad
S

M Yi1we4dzid q0 lo4ida

M4

M II'



E












5
VOL. XLVI Series 1, No. 2 February 1, 1951
Publisheld m monthly by the Universityl of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida. Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as
second class matter, under Act of Congress, A.lugst 24, 1912.
Office of Publication, Goinesville, Florida.























































































































































n






























The University Record Comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Annual Catalog,
the Schedules, the Bulletin of the Summer Session, and announcements of
special courses of instruction.

These bulletins will be sent without charge to all persons who apply for them.
The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is
desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida























*
















































m S6
" so


I TO
.as.













1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
S 13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.


Administration Building
Law Building
Anderson Hall
Library
Peabody Hall
Parking Area
Walker Hall
Benton Hall
Building E-Classrooms
Residence
Grove Hall
Green House
Temporary Residence
Farm Machinery Laboratory
Women's Dormitories
P. K. Yonge-Laboratory School
Cattle Feeding Barn
Nutrition Laboratory
Poultry Disease Laboratory
Temporary Offices J
Building C
University Auditorium
Science Hall
Building I-Classrooms
Leigh Hall
Floyd Hall
University News Bureau


KEY TO MAP OF CAMPUS

8. Horticulture Building
9. Temporary Offices and Dormi-
tories-A thru H
). Dairy Products Laboratory
1. Fumigation and Spectography
Laboratories
3. Buildings A-Accounting and B-
Geography and Geology
i. Student Service Center
. Newell Hall
i. Building J-Faculty Club
i. Temporary Dormitory I
7. Florida Union
i. University Cafeteria
1. Sledd Hall
i. Buckman Hall
.. Fletcher Hall
.Thomas Hall
I. Murphree Hall
1. Women's Gymnasium
i. Building R-Music
1. Infirmary
'. Florida Gymnasium
i. Building K-Classrooms
i. Wood Products Laboratory
I. Cancer Research Laboratory
. Greenhouse


52. Horticulture Laboratories
53. Tung Oil Laboratory
54. Building T-Transportation
55. Reed Laboratory
56. Engineering and Industries
Building
57. Graham Field
58. Building L
59. Plant and Grounds Building
60. Maintenance Shops
61. Temporary Dormitories-K thru
S
62. Military Building
63. Building N-Engineering Labora-
tories
64. Men's Dormitories
65. Sewage Treatment Plant
66. Sewage Laboratory
67. Poultry Laboratory
68. Poultry Storage
69. Citrus Packing Plant
70. WRUF Radio Station
71. Pest Control Building
72. Perry Field
73. Tennis Stadium











STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
FULLER W ARREN.......................................................... .. ......................... Governor
R. A GRAY ................................................................. .Secretary of State
J. EDWIN LARSON............................................ ........... ......... .... State Treasurer
RICHARD ERVIN ................................... ........ .................................... Attorney General
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Secretary............State Superintendent of Public Instruction
BOARD OF CONTROL
FRANK M. HARRIS, LL.B., Chairman........................................... Attorney at Law
St. Petersburg, Florida
ELI H. FINK, LL.B................................................................................. Attorney at Law
Jacksonville, Florida
N B JORDAN......................................................................................................... B anker
Quincy, Florida
HOLLIS RINEHART, LL.B................................................................ Attorney at Law
Miami, Florida
GEORGE J. W HITE, S ........................................................ ............... Banker
Mount Dora, Florida

WILLIAM F. POWERS....................Secretary of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida
UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOSEPH HILLIS MILLER, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D.
-President of the University
JOHN STUART ALLEN, Ph.D.................................Vice-President of the University
WILLIAM TOBIAS ARNETT, M.A. in Arch.
-Dean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts
GEORGE FECHTIG BAUGHMAN, M.A., LL.B.................................Business Manager
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A ................ ........................................... Dean of Men
ALVAH A. BEECHER, M.M ........................ .......................... Director of Music
MARNA VENABLE BRADY, Ed.D......................................................... Dean of Women
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S.....-----..........----.................Dean of the University
HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON, M.S.A.....Director of the Agricultural Extension Service
HENRY ANDERSON FENN, LL.B....................................Dean of the College of Law
WILLARD M. FIFIELD, M.S.A.....Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D.............................Dean of the College of Pharmacy
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P-------................................... -----Registrar
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A.........................Dean of the University College
JOHN VREDENBURG MCQUITTY, Ph.D.........------...........................University Examiner
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D.
-Dean of the College of Business Administration
DONALD RAY MATTHEWS, M.A.......................................Director of Alumni Affairs
RALPH ALEXANDER MORGEN, Ph.D.
-Director of the Engineering Experiment Station
HAROLD STEPHENSON NEWINS, M.F.............Director of the School of Forestry
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D.................Dean of the College of Agriculture
RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D.................Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
J. W AYNE REITZ, Ph.D...................................... ....... ........ Provost for Agriculture
HAROLD CLARK RIKER, M.A.......................................................Director of Housing
BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.A., B.S.A.............Dean of the General Extension Division
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D.........................Dean of the Graduate School
DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.Ed.
-Dean of the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S...........................................Dean of the College of Engineering
RAE O. WEIMER ..........................................Director of the School of Journalism
STANLEY LEROY WEST, B.S. in L.S., LL.B----..........----...................Director of Libraries
J. B. WHITE, Ph.D...................................................Dean of the College of Education
EDWARD D. WHITTLESEY, B.A....................................Director of Public Relations
WILLIAM MAX WISE, Ed.D...............................................Dean of Student Personnel








CALENDAR 1951 SUMMER SESSION


ALL UNITS EXCEPT COLLEGE OF LAW

May 5, Saturday........................Last day for filing preliminary application for
1951 summer session.

June 13. Wednesday..........................Placement tests for entering students.
June 14-16, Thursday-Saturday......Registration according to appointments as-
signed on receipt of preliminary application

June 18, Monday, 7 a.m............. Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
June 19, Tuesday, 5 p.m.................Last time for completing registration for the
summer session. No one will be permitted to
start registration after 3 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses or changing
sections.
June 22, Friday, 4 p.m................... Last time for submitting resignation for the
summer session and receiving any refund of
fees.
June 23, Saturday, 12 noon............ Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for degree to be conferred at
the end of the summer session.
July 4, Wednesday..........................Holiday-Classes suspended.
July 9, Monday, 4 p.m....................-Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.
July 27, Friday................................ Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at end of the summer session to com-
plete correspondence courses.
July 30, Monday, 4 p.m....................Last time for candidates for Master's and
Doctor's degrees to be conferred at the end of
the summer session to file theses with the Dean
of the Graduate School.
August 14, Tuesday, 7 a.m.............Final examination period begins.
First semester registration begins for students
enrolled in the summer session.
August 16, Thursday, 4 p.m...........Grades for all candidates for degrees to be
conferred at the end of the summer session
are due in the Office of the Registrar (special
lists are sent to the faculty for these reports).
August 17, Friday............................Faculty meetings, at times announced by the
Deans, to pass upon candidates for degrees.
August 18, Saturday, 12 noon..........All grades for the summer session due in the
Office of the Registrar.
August 18, Saturday, 8 p.m.............Summer Commencement Convocation.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSION

GENERAL STATEMENT
The Board of University Examiners is the agency responsible for administer-
ing all admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first
time will be considered for admission as follows:
1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not
attended college, he will be considered for admission to the University
College.
2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or
university and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable
college credit for advanced standing, he will be considered for admission
to the University College.
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or
university and is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable col-
lege credit as advanced standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will
be considered for admission to the Upper Division school or college of his
choice provided his record indicates the completion of college work in
the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English, the Humanities, and
the Biological Sciences.
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated
from a standard college or university, he will be considered for admission
to the Graduate School.
5. If a student desires to attend the Summer Session not for pursuing work
toward a degree but for meeting some specific need, such as the satis-
faction of teacher certification requirements, he will be considered for
admission as an unclassified student.

ADMISSION TO THE 1951 SUMMER SESSION
The 1951 Summer Session is open to all qualified applicants, provided prelim-
inary application is filed in accordance with instructions listed in the following
paragraph.
No applicant will be considered for admission to the 1951 Summer Session
unless the preliminary application has been received at the Office of the Regis-
trar on or before Saturday, May 5, 1951. Other application forms (if required),
which will be sent upon the receipt of the preliminary application, must be in
the Office of the Registrar on or before June 1. It will be impossible to consider
applications received after these dates. All persons planning to attend the Sum-
mer Session, whether or not they have previously attended the University, must
file the preliminary application form to be considered.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
A. For students who have never attended college:
1. Graduation from high school. Records show that the student who does
not graduate from high school in the top half of his class rarely succeeds
in college work. The University urges the prospective student to consider
this fact carefully before making application. Non-Florida students will
not be considered for admission if they do not meet this criterion.








2 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

2. Satisfactory achievement in high school. The University does not specify
any high school units as required, but the general pattern of the units
presented and the student's achievement will receive careful consideration.
The records reveal that those students who scatter most in their choice of
subjects are those who accomplish least in any of them. Therefore appli-
cants who present a record which shows no unity or a lack of essential
subjects cannot be considered.
3. Satisfactory scores on placement tests. All applicants must take the place-
ment tests before being admitted to the University College. There are
achievement tests in the fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and
natural sciences. Attainments in these fields are possible without specific
high school courses and are not guaranteed by the acquiring of certain
high school units. If the scores on the placement tests indicate inadequate
foundation for college work, the applicant may be denied admission.

B. For transfer students:*
1. Honorable Dismissal. The student must be eligible to return to the institu-
tion last attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed to re-
turn to the institution last attended cannot be considered for admission.
2. Satisfactory record. All transfer students must have made an average of
C or higher on all work attempted at all institutions previously attended
to be considered for admission. The University of Florida accepts on
transfer only those courses completed at other institutions with grades of
C or higher.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION
A. From the University College:
See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the University College
and the specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges
and schools.
B. By advanced standing from other institutions:
1. Honorable dismissal from the institutions previously attended. An appli-
cant for admission who for any reason is not eligible to return to the insti-
tution last attended cannot be considered for admission to the University.
2. An average of C or better. The average grade for all work attempted at
other institutions must be C or better. An average grade of C or better
is required for graduation from the University of Florida, and one who
has not maintained this average before coming to the University need
not apply.
3. A minimum of 64 semester hours accepted as transfer credit (only those
courses completed at other institutions with grades of C or higher) not
more than four of which are in Military Science or Physical Education.
4. Specific course requirements for the professional school of the applicant's
choice. The courses listed as required for admission to the Upper Division
under the various curricula or acceptable substitutes must be offered as
advanced standing to qualify the student for admission to the Upper Di-
vision. An applicant lacking some of these requirements may be permitted
to enroll in the Upper Division and complete them without reducing the
credits required in the Upper Division for a degree. In some cases the

The student who has matriculated at any college or university, regardless of the amount of
time spent in attendance or credit earned, is regarded as a transfer student.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


student may be required to enroll in the University College until these
requirements are met.

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW
Beginning courses in Law are not offered in the Summer Session, hence new
students are not admitted in June. For admission requirements for regular ses-
sions see The University Catalog.

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of
a standard college or university and have a foundation in the major subject
sufficient in quantity and quality to be satisfactory to the department in which
the student proposes to major.
A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be
transmitted to the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration.

ADMISSION OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS
To be admitted as an unclassified student the applicant must submit a state-
ment of honorable dismissal from the institution last attended.

ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR VETERANS
In addition to the regular academic requirements as set forth in the fore-
going pages, the entering veteran will be interested in the procedures necessary
to qualify for the various types of educational benefits available to veterans of
World War II.

THOSE ENTERING UNDER THE G. I. BILL (PUBLIC LAW 346)
Under the provisions of this act the United States Veterans Administration
assumes responsibility for fees and costs of instructional materials actually
needed by any veteran who holds an honorable discharge and who had ninety
days or more of active duty.
Application should be made to the Veterans Administration well in advance
of the Summer Session. Special forms for this purpose are available at the
various offices of the Veterans Administration. If there is no office in your city,
the forms can be obtained by addressing the Veterans Administration, Pass-a-
Grille Beach, Florida. With this form must be submitted appropriate documents
as required by the Veterans Administration. These include certified copies of
honorable discharges or certificates of separation, which would show your entire
service history. If claim is to be made for dependents, additional evidence must
be submitted. It is advisable that you consult with some representative of the
Veterans Administration for assistance in preparing such documents.
If the application is approved, the veteran will receive from the Veterans
Administration a form called a Certificate of Eligibility. The veteran should
keep this in his possession until he actually reports for registration at the Univer-
sity. If the Certificate of Eligibility has not been received by the applicant by the
time he is to report for registration, he will be charged for fees and books until
the Certificate of Eligibility has been cleared with the Veterans' Record Section
of the office of the Registrar. The veteran will be refunded monies expended for
fees and required supplies obtained from the University Bookstore upon presen-
tation of receipts to the Auditor of Veterans Accounts after his Certificate of
Eligibility has been cleared. The veteran's subsistence payments (which are made







4 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

directly to him) cannot begin until the Certificate of Eligibility properly endorsed
by the veteran has been filed with the Office of the Registrar, in turn endorsed
by him, and forwarded to the Veterans Administration.
THOSE ENTERING UNDER VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ACT (PUBLIC LAW 16)
Government benefits are awarded to certain veterans who have service-
connected disabilities. Application must be made to the Veterans Administration
and should be made well in advance of the time the student expects to enter. If
the veteran's application for benefits under this act has not been approved by
the time he is to report for registration, he should bring a copy of his discharge
or certificate of service and begin his University work under the provisions of
Public Law 346. Advisors from the Veterans Administration will be present
during registration to assist such men in making application for benefits under
Public Law 346. These advisors will not, however, be in a position to act upon
applications for Public Law 16 in such a way that the eligibility for benefits can
be determined immediately.
COLLEGE CREDIT FOR SERVICE TRAINING
Veterans will be allowed credit for training and experience obtained in the
armed forces during the war in accordance with the recommendations of the
American Council on Education as set forth in "A Guide to the Evaluation of
Educational Experiences in the Armed Services." All veterans entering or
reentering the University should consult the Director of Admissions in the Office
of the Registrar. In many cases it will be helpful to the student and his dean
in planning a program if this can be done in advance of registration.
INFORMATIONAL AND ADVISORS' SERVICES
All agencies of the University are serving student veterans and can be of
assistance in many ways. Probably the best results can be obtained if the
following are consulted for the type of information or services indicated:
A. Information pertaining to Veterans Administration procedure and regula-
tions: Officer in Charge, Veterans Administration Contact Office, Tenth Floor
Seagle Building, Gainesville.
B. Vocational Guidance: Veterans Guidance Center, Seagle Building, Gainesville,
or The Bureau of Vocational Guidance, Room 308, Administration Building,
University of Florida.
C. College credit for service training: Director of Admissions, Room 135, Ad-
ministration Building, University of Florida.
D. General information and advice: Office of the Counselor for Veterans, Room
128, Administration Building, University of Florida.

ADMISSIONS INFORMATION FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE NOT
CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES
The student from another country must:
1. Comply with the regulations of that country or nation and adhere to the
regulations of the Department of Justice of the United States.
2. Meet the admissions requirements of the University of Florida.


SPECIAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR ALIENS
English Language Proficiency
The student must present satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the use of
spoken and written English, adequate to assure success in the program of studies
to be pursued.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Financial Arrangements
The student must present satisfactory evidence that adequate finances are
assured in an amount sufficient for the student to pursue his program of studies.
When to Apply
The times set forth in this catalog for making application for admission are
the dates after which the application will not be considered. It is urged that
the first application or letter of inquiry be made at least six months before the
student plans to begin study at the University of Florida.
Where to Apply
Make application to: Director of Admissions
Office of the Registrar
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A.
Follow carefully the instructions submitted by the Director of Admissions.

EXPENSES
REGISTRATION FEES
Three Six Nine
Week Week Week
Term Term Term
Registration Fee (Florida students) ................ $ 20 $ 35 $ 45
Registration Fee (non-Florida students) ........ 55 105 145
SPECIAL FEES
Late Registration Fee ........................................-----5 5 5
Breakage Fee (Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology,
Physics and Soils) .............................-............. 5 5 5
Graduation Fee, Bachelor's Degree .................. 10 10 10
Graduation Fee, Master's or Doctor's ........... 20 20 20
Field Trip, AS 406 ........................................... 3 3
Field Trip, AS 409 ........................-.................. 10 10
Applied Music Fee .............................................. 20** 30**
Practice Room ................................................... 5** 5**
Instrument Rental ..............................................* 5** 5**

EXAMINATION FEES
A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for
each application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary
only in case the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.
A comprehensive examination for all entering graduate students in Education
(National Teachers Examination, or equivalent) is required. A fee of $6.00 is
charged.
REFUND OF FEES
If before 4 p.m. on Friday of the first week of each term students for any
reason wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3,
will be refunded. No refunds will be made after this date.

LIVING EXPENSES
Current costs of living are reflected in charges for food and lodging in the
Gainesville area. Meals may be obtained at relatively reasonable cost at the new
Not offered.
** Accelerated scheduling during 6 week session.







6 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

University Cafeteria, the Campus Club, University Soda Fountain, and at various
restaurants and cafeterias located adjacent to the campus. Lodging is available
in University Housing Facilities, in private rooming houses off-campus, and in
fraternity and sorority houses.

STUDENTS DEPOSITORY
For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the
University, funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of fifty
cents is made on each account, per term.

STUDENT LIFE
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT PERSONNEL
The Dean of Student Personnel coordinates the counseling and service activi-
ties which are available to aid the student in solving personal and educational
problems and to help him in selecting a balanced program of social and recre-
ational activities.

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN
The Dean of Men has broad responsibilities for the welfare of men students.
He serves in an advisory capacity to the Office of Student Personnel and to the
other University agencies interested in the welfare of students.
More specifically, the Dean of Men (1) Is a personal counselor to students
(both men and women) on a variety of interests and problems. (2) Advises
with the Office of Student Personnel concerning the need for new student per-
sonnel services and the modification of present services to more adequately meet
the needs of the student body. (3) Is the principal adviser and counselor to
men's social fraternities and the Interfraternity Council. (4) Serves as a chief
adviser to student self-government, consulting with various officials and bodies
which guide these activities. (5) Serves as a chief adviser to students who are
charged with breach of discipline. (6) Has contact with the parents of men
students and draws attention of parents to problems handicapping the student
in his progress at the University. (7) Serves as a member of University com-
mittees which are directly concerned with the welfare of students. (8) Con-
tributes to the student personnel records and cooperates in the development of
these records by furnishing information for them. (9) As chairman of the
Committee on Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards, he administers the loan
and scholarship funds of the University. He further supervises the administra-
tion of campus employment of students to the extent of counseling students
seeking jobs, certifying their eligibility and of referring them to positions which
are known to be available. (10) In cooperation with the Director of Housing,
acts in administrative, supervisory, and counseling capacity with relation to the
University residence halls and men's fraternity houses.

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN
The Dean of Women has broad responsibilities for the welfare of women
students. She serves as a personal and social counselor for students on a variety
of interests and problems and refers students to other services or agencies if
necessary. In cooperation with the Adviser to Student Organizations and the
Dean of Men she serves as an adviser to student government and to such student
organizations as the Women's Student Association, Residence Hall Counselors,
and the Panhellenic Council. The Dean of Women, in cooperation with the
Director of Housing, acts in administrative, supervisory, and counseling capacity
with relations to the University residence halls and women's fraternity houses.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


The Adviser to Student Organizations, whose office is related to the Offices
of the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women, is interested in the activities of
all organized student groups on the campus. This includes the 150 or more
student societies and clubs, the 24 national men's fraternities, and the 11
national women's fraternities. He is a counselor for personal and group prob-
lems related to all student organizations and also provides the Interfraternity
Council with leadership and guidance.
This office provides the machinery for the formation and recognition of new
organizations on the campus and also maintains a complete file about all organ-
izations. It is the center for all social authorizations and in addition has the
responsibility of the publication of a weekly and an annual social calendar.
OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING
University housing facilities are under the supervision of the Director of
Housing. Major objectives of this office are to develop and maintain comfortable
living accommodations and to promote policies and programs aimed toward
improving scholastic achievement, personality development and the participa-
tion of the individual student in the responsibilities and opportunities of group
living.
Residence halls for women are carefully supervised by qualified full-time
personnel. In addition, elected hall councils exercise positive responsibility in
the day-to-day activities of the women students. In the residence halls for men
there are full-time resident advisers and resident faculty counselors. Carefully
selected student counselors, heading student groups of approximately 60 men
each, assist individual and group activities. Resident student managers have
operational charge of the veterans' apartments.

FLORIDA CENTER OF CLINICAL SERVICES
The clinics which operate as a coordinated service under this division are
available to all University students. The Coordinator of this Center is located
in Room 339, Administration Building, telephone extension 526. This organ-
ization of clinics is intended to provide the student with comprehensive clinical
service. Students are urged to avail themselves of these services before their
problems or difficulties become aggravated and greater than may be necessary.
The services of the clinics are available to the residents of the State of
Florida for diagnostic purposes and therapy insofar as personnel and facilities
will permit. Residents of the State should make appointments through the office
of the Coordinator. University students should contact the Coordinator of the
Center or the head of the clinic in which he desires assistance.
BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
The Head of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene is in
Room 312, Administration Building, telephone extension 345. This bureau has
offices and testing rooms in the north wing of the third floor of the Administra-
tion Building.
Certain members of the staff of the Department of Psychology who have
comprehensive training and experience in clinical work serve in the bureau.
One of their functions is to aid the student on an individual basis to plan a voca-
tional objective consistent with his capacity, interest, and temperament. Ap-
proved test and interview methods are used, and results are supplemented by a
complete description of the occupations involved. A wealth of additional occupa-
tional information is available in the bureau reading room under the direction of
a staff member.
Other services of the bureau include help to students who find their work
hampered by worries, adjustment difficulties, and other troublesome conditions.







8 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Speech and Hearing Clinic is located on the third floor of the Administra-
tion Building. The office of the Head of this clinic is in Room 323, Administra-
tion Building, telephone extension 347. The clinic functions as a service to
University students who have speech and hearing problems which are handi-
capping in nature and which render a student's communication less attractive
and suitable to his personal potentialities. In addition to losses in hearing,
such impairment includes: stuttering, cleft palate speech, articulatory problems,
paralyses, voice abnormalities. Special instruction is provided to meet the needs
of foreign speaking students.
In pursuance of its function the clinic conducts an examination of all incom-
ing students during the week of orientation for the purpose of discovering those
who need special instruction.
In addition to diagnostic and remedial speech service, the clinic offers com-
plete hearing evaluation. This service gives attention to various methods for
the conservation of hearing and includes the fitting of hearing aids.
READING LABORATORY AND CLINIC
The Reading Laboratory and Clinic is the center for training and research in
reading and the allied language arts. The clinic is situated on the north side
of the third floor of Anderson Hall. The office of the Head of this clinic is in
room 310, Anderson Hall, telephone extension 379.
Through the use of interviews and diagnostic tests, the clinic plans a program
of study and training in reading skills for each individual who demonstrates a
need for assistance. This training is undertaken at the clinic under the super-
vision of trained personnel. The program is scheduled according to the needs
of the student, the time available, and the amount of training necessary for
permanent improvement of reading skills.
In addition to remedial functions, the clinic trains teachers and graduate
students in the techniques of diagnosis and remediation. This training is carried
on through the medium of laboratory courses and participation in the work -of
the clinic. The clinic also carries on a program of research in many aspects
of the field of reading and aids students and faculty members engaged in allied
research.
ADAPTED AND THERAPEUTIC PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The Adapted and Therapeutic section of the Department of Required Physical
Education assists those students who have physical deviations which necessitate
individual consideration in developing a sports program that is within the limits
of their physical capacity. In planning these programs, due consideration is
given to the individual's interests and the social and recreational needs of adult
life. This clinic is located in the Florida Gymnasium. The office of the Heac
of this division is Room 134, Florida Gymnasium, telephone extension 244.
Programs of functional therapeutic exercise are provided for those students
having physical deviations that can be corrected or ameliorated by such work.
In such cases the exercise takes precedence but is not a substitute for the require-
ments for developing the recreational program. The work is conducted under
careful supervision and is based on adequate medical diagnosis and information
Every effort is made to guide individuals to other campus and community
agencies and clinics that may assist them in solving problems arising from theii
physical condition.
MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT
The staff of the Department of Student Health provides diagnostic and con-
.sultative services to the Center.
The reader should refer to the description of Student Health Service, page 13








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


VETERANS GUIDANCE CENTER
The University Veterans Guidance Center provides guidance and counseling
in the matter of helping veterans with the problems they confront in the choos-
ing of and preparation for their life work. The Center may refer veterans to
other agencies for help in the solution of special allied problems.
Through the use of data obtained from interviews, tests, and other sources
the center assists in planning a program most suitable to the individual. Tests
of aptitude, interest and personality characteristics are used.
Interested veterans may make an appointment by contacting Veteran Admin-
istration Chief, Advisement and Guidance Center on the tenth floor of the Seagle
Building, or the Director of the Veterans Guidance Center, tenth floor of the
Seagle Building.

OFFICE OF STUDENT PERSONNEL RECORDS
Using various sources, the office of Student Personnel Records collects and
integrates information concerning social and scholastic activities of each student.
It makes this information available to qualified counselors who aid the student in
making educational, social, psychological, and vocational adjustment. The keep-
ing of personnel records is an effort in the understanding of, and service to, the
individual student as he has contact not only with the classroom, but also with
all phases of his university life.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Every effort is made to aid qualified students in obtaining part-time employ-
ment. Opportunities are limited; consequently the number of part-time jobs
available does not approach the number of applicants seeking these jobs. Every
attempt is made to place students in work that utilizes their training and
experience.
Each student who is employed by the University must have an honor point
average of "C" for the semester or term immediately preceding his employment.
The average rate of pay per hour is between 50 and 75 cents; the average
earnings per month are about $40.
Student employment is directed by the Committee on Student Aid, Scholar-
ships, and Awards, with the Assistant Dean of Men administering the program.
All applications for work should be made prior to the opening of the semester in
which employment is desired. Application for work, however, may be filed at
any time.
Inquiries should be addressed to:
Assistant Dean of Men
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS
For information on scholarships and loans at the University of Florida
students should refer to the Dean of Men, who is chairman of the committee on
Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards, and to the regular session catalog or the
special bulletin on Scholarships, Loan Funds and Student Employment for
details on the various types of aid.

HOUSING
GENERAL INFORMATION
It is the responsibility of each student to initiate action for the purpose of
obtaining his own housing by (1) Applying to the Office of the Director of Hous-







10 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ing for assignment to University Housing Facilities, or (2) Making hi o-.\n
arrangements direct with the property owner for off-campus accommodari.Ins
in private housing.
All freshman single students, with the exception of those whose hon-:.: a;i
in the Gainesville area, are required to live in University Housing Facilit.,- a'
long as space is available. All women students are required to live in Univer--ity
Housing Facilities during the Summer Session, regardless of classification, ja
long as space is available.
Rates quoted on all housing facilities are subject to change without notr.<
All facilities are equipped with basic furniture requirements such as bJs,.
mattresses, dressers, desks, and chairs. Residents may supply their own dirnpr.
pictures, bedspreads, rugs, lamps, and linens.
Linens (sheets, towels, and pillow cases) are available for rent on a v.eelly
exchange basis; pillows, blankets, and limited amounts of extra equipment :'ir
available for rent on a term basis. Linen rates per week are: sheets, 15( eaS.h:
towels, 74 each; pillow cases, 64 each. Blankets, pillows, and lamps are: 60t'
per nine weeks term; 454 per six weeks term; and 304 per three weeks term.
Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, prepaid, addressed in the student's nawin
and assigned room number. Such shipments will be held in the area rrlni..
rooms until called for by the student. The University assumes no responsibility,
beyond the exercise of reasonable care for any shipment so received.
Carefully selected and trained personnel are in charge of each area, bu'.Idnz.
or section. Students with personal problems or questions concerning proce-dare
or policy are aided by the Head Resident, Resident Adviser, or Student Coun-
selor in charge of the area, building, or section.
APPLICATIONS, ROOM DEPOSITS, AND ASSIGNMENTS
All communications or inquiries concerning housing, applications, de-i-.rt-.
and rent payments in University Housing Facilities should be sent to the Director
of Housing, University of Florida, Gainesville. An application for spa .e Ir
housing facilities may be filed at any time. Checks or money orders hli:uldi
be made payable to the University of Florida. Cash should NOT be sent thioui-hl
the mail.
Completed applications should be forwarded to the Housing Office att the
earliest possible date. The completed application and ten dollar deposit nmiur
be received at the same time; it is not possible to accept them separately
Each applicant will be given advance notice of exact assignment and dead-
line date for payment of rent if application and deposit are received in surfi tnt
time before the summer term begins.
The various halls, sections, or floors of halls will be assigned in acco.rlari .,
with the stated length of time that applicant will be in residence during, tih
Summer Session. Specific areas will be set aside for the following groups th.:"'
in residence nine weeks; six weeks; and three weeks.
In general, only those applicants attending for similar periods of time '.an
be assigned as roommates. Roommate requests are honored wherever pos-ibl,:.
provided the individuals concerned submit their applications and pay room .e--
posits on the same date and clearly indicate their desire to room together
LIVING FACILITIES FOR SINGLE MEN STUDENTS
Five Permanent Residence Halls (Buckman, Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher. and
Murphree) of modern brick, concrete, and steel construction. Types of r.-iom.
available are: two room suites (study room and bedroom) for two; double ruomn
for two; and single rooms. Each hall is divided into sections accommo.dating
from 30 to 45 men per section. All but a few rooms have lavatories, an.d therc
is a community bath with shower and toilet facilities on each floor in each se,.cion.
Several lounges are available for study and entertainment. Summer Sesiori








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


rates range from $27.00 to $38.00 per person per nine weeks term. For special
groups rates are: $19.50 to $27.00 per person per six weeks term; $10.50 to $14.50
per person per three weeks term.

LIVING FACILITIES FOR SINGLE WOMEN STUDENTS
Three Permanent Residence Halls (Mallory, Yulee, and Reid) of modern brick,
concrete, and steel construction. 'Accommodations consist of single and double
rooms. Community baths with toilets, lavatories, and showers are located on
each floor of each hall. Each building contains a large lounge -on the main floor,
a small lounge on each upper floor, and a recreation room on the ground floor.
There are laundry rooms, sewing rooms, and hair-dressing rooms with coin-
operated machines in the group of buildings. Coin-operated irons and ironing
boards are located on each floor of each building as well as in the laundry rooms.
Summer Session rates range from $38.00 to $52.00 per person per nine weeks
term. For special groups, rates are: $27.00 to $36.00 per person per six weeks
term; $14.50 to $21.00 per person per three weeks term. Space is not available
in these halls for assignment to women with children. (See below for information.)
Temporary Hall (Grove) of two-story frame construction. Accommodations
consist of single rooms. Community baths with toilets, lavatories, and showers
are located on each floor of this hall. There is a small lounge on the main floor
and an ironing room, with coin-operated irons, on each floor. This hall will be
opened for use on the basis of demand only. Rates will be comparable to those
listed above.

LIVING FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES
AND FOR WOMEN WITH CHILDREN
Three Apartment Villages (Flavets), located on campus, have been provided
through the Public Housing Authority. Assignments are currently restricted to
married veteran students only, with Flavet Village I and II further restricted to
couples with children only. Flavet I contains 26 buildings of one-story, temporary
construction, divided into 100 apartment units of one, two, or three bedrooms.
Flavet II, similar to Flavet I in construction, contains 20 buildings divided into
76 apartment units of one, two, or three bedrooms. Flavet III contains 54 build-
ings, of two-story, temporary construction, divided into 448 apartment units of
one or two bedrooms. All apartments are equipped with basic furniture require-
ments, but residents must furnish their own linens, rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cook-
ing and heating are by gas, metered to the individual apartments. Electricity
consumption in excess of the basic minimum is paid on a monthly basis on
meter readings. Rent rates per month (including basic electricity) are one-
bedroom apartment, $26.75; two-bedroom apartment, $29.50; three-bedroom
apartment, $32.25.
Murphree Hall, Sections J, K, L, and M, will be available for assignment
to couples and to women with children. The accommodations consist of two room
suites (study room and bedroom). All suites have lavatories, and there is a
community bath with shower and toilet facilities on each floor in each section.
Cooking or preparation of food is not permitted. Summer Session rates are
$63.00 per suite per nine weeks term. For special groups, rates are: $50.00
per suite per six weeks term; $30.00 per suite per three weeks term.

PRIVATE ROOMING HOUSES
Facilities and Rates. Many excellent rooming accommodations are available
in private homes or privately operated rooming houses in the Gainesville area.
In general, rates for rooms are somewhat higher than those in University
facilities.







12 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Lists. Lists of rooms for single men and lists of rooms or apartments fur
married couples are maintained at the Housing Office. In view of frequent
changes in availability, no lists are available for mailing. Definite arraingm-ienti
must be made directly with the property-owner by the student.

COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION
The Cooperative Living Organization, organized and operated by student t..:
furnish economical living accommodations for its membership, is locat.:-.J t 117
N.W. 15th Street. The qualifications for membership are financial need, sch.lastc
ability, and references of good character. In order to secure membership in
the CLO, students should apply to the CLO president or Housing Matin:er at
the above address.

GENERAL INFORMATION

LECTURES AND PLAYS
The University presents outstanding lectures as part of the general educa-
tional and cultural life of the campus. The speakers are selected with a view to
offering to the University community stimulating presentations in the different
areas of learning.
During the Summer Session, under the direction of the Department -.f
Speech, full length plays, experimental one-act plays, and interpretative readJiii
programs are presented. The University provides facilities for high grade per-
formances under competent direction.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The leading religious denominations have attractive places of wo'rhip andr
students are welcome at every service. Students interested in the study of
religion and in preparing themselves for religious leadership may take cou.urse-
offered by the Department of Religion. Vesper services are conducted -.'.iklv or,
the campus lawn or in the Florida Union.

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
The library resources of the University total more than 292,000 volume:. The
greater part of the collection is housed in the University Library, but thlde ale
separate libraries for Law, Agriculture and Forestry, Architecture and Allied
Arts, Chemistry and Pharmacy, Biology and Geology. These libraries are located
in the buildings which house the corresponding activities.
The College of Education and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School alte er'ed
by the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library, a collection of books fo:.r boy.
and girls from kindergarten through the twelfth grade, and the College at Edu-
cation Library, a collection of professional materials supplementing the h...Idi'rs
of the University Library in the field of Education. The library serving the ex-
tension activities of the University is located in the Seagle Building.
One of the outstanding collections in the University is the P. K. Yourge
Library of Florida History. This library, the gift of Julien C. Yonge of Pecnsa..:la.
was established in 1944 as a research center for students of Florida histco y. It I1
one of the best of the libraries of Floridiana, and is being steadily d<-,:eli..p..I
under the guidance of its donor.
On the first floor of the University Library are the University College PR~ er.e.
and Periodicals Reading Rooms. On the second floor are the Reference R:m.ni.
the circulation desk, and the card catalog. This catalog indicates the h.:.ldingsl
not only of the University Library but also of the separate libraries nieriti.:.nel
above. In the book stacks are forty-eight carrels for use of graduate students.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Applicants for admission to the University are furnished a medical history
and physical examination form by the Registrar's Office. The medical history is
filled in by the applicant before going to his doctor for the physical examination.
The physical examination must be performed and completed by a licensed Doctor
of Medicine and mailed by the doctor directly to the Head, Student Health
Service, Infirmary, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. This medical his-
tory and pre-entrance physical examination must be approved by the University
Physician before the applicant is cleared for registration in the University.
The Health Service strives to prevent students with communicable diseases
from entering the University. All students enrolled at the University are given
semi-annual chest X-rays by a unit of the State Board of Health and every
effort is made to detect minimal tuberculosis of which the student may be
entirely unaware. Students should have been successfully vaccinated against
smallpox within the past five years and the Health Service advises all students
to be immunized to typhoid fever and tetanus before coming to the University.
The University maintains the Student Health Service in the Infirmary
Building on the campus for the protection and medical care of the students in
residence. The Out-patient Clinic is open during the day from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00
p.m., to provide all students in need of medical care with consultation and treat-
ment. The hospital, of 75 beds, provides the student in need of hospitalization
with twenty-four hour general nursing care and students entering the hospital
are under the constant observation of a University Physician. An emergency
service is available to students who become acutely ill or are injured when the
clinic is closed and such students may obtain treatment at any time by reporting
to the Infirmary. The University Physicians do not make calls outside the
Infirmary or attempt to treat students in their rooms where the facilities for
treatment are inadequate. Students should be instructed before leaving home
always to report immediately to the Infirmary should they become ill. Parents
will be notified by the University Physician whenever a student is believed to be
seriously or critically ill.
The Infirmary is staffed and equipped for treating the acute illnesses, in-
juries and emergencies which commonly occur while the student is in residence
at the University. It is not organized, however, to provide for the care of students
suffering from chronic diseases. The University does not assume the responsi-
bility for the treatment of students with Epilepsy, Organic Heart Disease,
Asthma, Rheumatic Fever, Diabetes or prolonged illnesses. Students with such
chronic diseases may receive emergency treatment in the Infirmary when needed
but they must arrange for a continuation of their medical care outside the
University Health Service.
Dental work and prescribing glasses are not provided by the Health Service
and students are urged to have defects of vision and teeth corrected before
coming to the University.
Elective surgical operations, such as removal of diseased tonsils, repair of
hernia, excision of hemorrhoids, etc., are not performed in the Infirmary and
should be done at home by the family physician or surgeon before the student
enters the University. Emergency surgical operations are the responsibility of
the student and his parents and are performed with their consent at another
hospital at their expense. Whenever an emergency operation is imperative, the
student shall be referred to a competent surgeon and transferred to the Alachua
General Hospital in Gainesville, which is fully approved for surgery by the
American College of Surgeons. Students receiving severe, multiple or compound
fractures will be handled in the same manner as students in need of emergency
surgery.







14 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Competent physicians and surgeons in Gainesville cooperate readily 'v.ith the
Health Service in consultations. Whenever a student is found to be in n. :,J :t a
consultant, the University Physician will arrange for such a consultation at the
student's expense. Students requesting the professional attention of a p'. itian
or registered nurse of their choice may do so at their expense and by the
approval of the Head of the Medical Staff of the Infirmary. Local phyil,;.ia
are available for medical service to students at their places of residence, at thi
student's expense.
The Health Service is available only to those students currently enmlledJ In
the University who have paid the student health fee. In the case of marri;-d
students, who are unacquainted with local physicians, the Health Ser-.'ic. '.'.ll
be glad to recommend well qualified physicians to attend their families.
The Health Fee does not include surgery, consultation, special duty nut-ing,
special medicines, treatments or laboratory work and an extra charge is male
for these. Physical examination forms cannot be completed by Universit,; Phy-
sicians, except by the request of another Student Health Service, or '. ith the
approval of the Director of Student Health Service. The Infirmary ofl'fcr stu-
dents a diagnostic X-ray service at a very nominal cost. All X-rays art intrl-
preted by a qualified Radiologist. A charge of $1.75 per day for boar:l i.s -lo
made.
The University is not responsible for the care of students during .acaintio
periods. The Infirmary will be closed during University vacation periods, but in
certain instances it may make special arrangements for the continued c:ar of
students who were hospitalized before the vacation period.
During epidemics which necessitate the hospitalization of large numbierr ot
students, the facilities of the University Infirmary may be overtaxed and unri-r
such abnormal circumstances it would be impossible for the University to a .ur,
all students hospital care. However, during epidemics the University ill make
every effort to provide such emergency arrangements as are deemed most satis-
factory for the care of ill students. Both the staff and hospital facilitie: '.Ill
usually be capable of giving essential care to students of the University. uin.r
normal conditions. In case the University Infirmary is filled to capacity, the
University does not assume payment of the student's doctor or hospital bLilk for
services rendered outside the Infirmary.

BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
The services of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene are
available to all students. The chief function of the Bureau is to provide th,:- in-
dividual student with an analysis of his characteristics, interests, and abilities.
together with the necessary information about occupations, so that hlie n
choose his vocation more intelligently.
Vocational information is provided by a reading shelf which the Bureau
maintains in the University Library. This shelf is supplied with an extensi:e.
series of authoritative monographs on various occupations.
In addition, the Bureau aids students in the solution of personal problems
which may hamper their work. This service is open both to students who request
it themselves as well as to those referred to the Bureau by members of the
faculty and administrative officers.

CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS
The curricula in the College of Education include State certification r-quire-
ments. Students are to consult their counselor to plan a sequence of course to
meet requirements for their degree and certification.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Persons desiring further information concerning the certification of teachers
are advised to write to the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida,
requesting Bulletin A on Certification of Teachers.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES
The following more important items govern the granting of extension cer-
tificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the same time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade is
below C.
3. No students will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply
for the same to the Registrar, Room 33, Administration Building. A list
of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in the
Yonge Building, Anderson Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 10.
In case of error in this list, students should report to the Registrar.
No student will be recommended for extension whose name does not
appear on this list by July 17. Students should indicate exactly the name
that appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended.
4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to T. D. Bailey,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within
a year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension will not
be granted.

TEACHER PLACEMENT BUREAU
The Teacher Placement Bureau is a service agency for both former students
of the University and public school officials. Up-to-date records are kept on
registrants who have requested the Bureau to assist them in securing positions.
Also the Bureau keeps a current list of educational administration and teaching
vacancies. The services of the Bureau are free. Persons who wish to avail
themselves of this service should communicate with the Placement Bureau,
Yonge 120.

THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
The Laboratory School will be open from June 18 to July 28. Children of
summer session students and all others are eligible for enrollment. Application
for admission should be made to the Laboratory School office as soon as possible
since the number who may be accommodated is limited. Classes from the kinder-
garten through the sixth grade will be held.
Pupils will register Monday, June 18, 8:30 to 10:00 A.M., in the P. K. Yonge
Building.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Orange and Blue Bulletin is the official bulletin of the Summer Session.
This mimeographed sheet, published every other day during the Summer Session
and posted on all bulletin boards, carries notices of changes in schedule, meet-
ings, lost and found articles, and other pertinent information. Announcements
made in the General Assembly; notices on the bulletin boards in Florida Union,
Peabody Hall, and Anderson Hall; and news items in the Summer Gator serve to
keep the Summer Session students informed concerning student activities.







16 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ORGANIZATIONS
PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the Uni-
versity in 1912. To be eligible for consideration for membership, a stu-id-t nmusr
previously have earned at the University at least thirty semester hours of credit.
must have been guilty of no serious breach of discipline, and must st nrld ;.iinl:'n
the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees in his college. Eligibility t.,r ,.on-
sideration for membership is assured every student with an honor point a'.erage
of 3.30 or higher, but a student who comes within the quota of his collhce mjy bt
considered if his honor point average is not below 3.00. Graduate student. nicil-
ing certain prescribed requirements are also considered for membership
KAPPA DELTA PI
The Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the Ur. i Lr s-:, ,,
Florida in 1923. The purpose of the society is to recognize and promote rierit in
educational study and service. Both men and women are admitted to incibri b
ship. Members are chosen from juniors, seniors, graduate students, fna.uit:., and
alumni. Requirements for membership are, in general, as follows: a i.:I':.lI:IrI.
average of at least B; evidence of abiding interest in educational servi,..: .a g.--,d
professional attitude; and good personal-social characteristics. During the Sumn-
mer Sessions the chapter holds a meeting each week.
PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University :of Florida
in 1938. It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In cintf.rnimt:,
with the national objectives of the society, the University of Florida chaptci
restricts election to the College of Arts and Sciences. Not more than lj iper c.-nt
of the senior class graduating in each semester, including the graduating ilasj(
of the Summer Session, is eligible for election.
In addition to conferring membership upon qualified seniors in tle C.:.lle,-e
of Arts and Sciences, the society seeks, by means of an Award in Rec,:-rntii.rn :,f
Creative Achievement, to honor each year not more than one graduating senr..r
from all the colleges on the campus who, irrespective of his honor point avra ,t.
has distinguished himself throughout his undergraduate career in such li.l1: .f
activity as creative writing, dramatics, and forensics, the fine arts, or an. ,:thler
liberal discipline, and has revealed a decided talent, a persistent intece:r-. and a
prospect of mature achievement in later life.
PHI DELTA KAPPA
Beta Xi chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, national professional education frarernr:,
for men, was installed at the University of Florida early in 1949. Deli:atEd t.o
ideals of research, service and leadership, this organization is one of the oldeIii-
and largest professional fraternities. Men are chosen for Phi Delta Kapl.a on
the basis of scholarship, leadership, potentiality, and qualities of p~)rs.inallr,
considered as promising for the development of public education in the s.tte
and in the nation.

RECREATION
THE FLORIDA UNION
The Florida Union, the official center of student activities is financed, to a
large extent, by student activities fees. Some of the facilities and r-rvices
offered by the Union include music listening rooms, a craft and hobby, sh.p,.
darkrooms, browsing library, game room, and lounges where a student can Sl,:-niJ
his leisure hours. Fifteen guest rooms are available for guests of student and








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


University personnel. The Union also provides an embosograf poster service,
a mimeographing service, a lost and found department, information desk, a
Western Union substation, auditorium, and meeting rooms for student activity
groups. Offices for the President of the Student Body, the Executive Council,
Honor Court, and all student publications, in addition to a general student or-
ganizations office, are located in the Union Building.
The Florida Union Social Board, composed of students interested in planning
student activities, sponsor a variety of social programs for the student body.
Some of the regular activities sponsored by the Social Board are bridge tourna-
ments, dancing classes, square dances, coffee hours, movies, outings, dances, and
Club Rendezvous (the campus night club). Other special activities are spon-
sored by the Social Board during the year. The committees of this board are
open to all interested students.
The University's Camp Wauburg operated by the Florida Union is a recre-
ational area for the exclusive use of University personnel. This area is located
nine miles south of the campus. Facilities include a large picnic area, a recre-
ational building, a bath house, and a play ground area for volley ball, horse-
shoes, badminton, softball. Camp Wauburg has swimming, boating, and fishing
facilities.
INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS
A broad recreational program of athletics will be conducted for the students
and faculty by the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics during
the Summer Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will be organized with competition in
softball, tennis (singles and mixed doubles), shuffleboard (singles and mixed
doubles), swimming, volleyball, table tennis, and handball tournaments. Appro-
priate awards will be made to winning teams and individuals in all sports.
A sports' clinic will be conducted prior to the tennis, volleyball, and handball
tournaments. Students have the opportunity to learn skills in recreational
sports through the Department of Required Physical Education. Further in-
formation may be obtained at Room 134, Florida Gymnasium.
The athletic and physical educational facilities, including the use of the
swimming pool and equipment room service, will be available to all bona fide
University students. Use of these services and facilities will also be extended
to students' families, faculty, employees, and their immediate families, upon
payment of a fee of $1.00 per individual. The Summer Gator, the Orange and
Blue Bulletin, and the Florida Intramural Bulletin will carry current notices
and announcements about various phases of the program.
SWIMMING POOL
The swimming pool will be open daily during the Summer Session. Dress-
ing facilities for women are located in the Women's Gymnasium. The facilities
for men are located in Florida Gymnasium.

THE DIVISION OF MUSIC
The Division -of Music offers during the Summer Session opportunities for
those students interested to participate in bands, orchestras and choral groups.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Several days before
registration students should confer with the deans of their respective colleges







18 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

regarding choice of courses. Juniors and seniors should confer with the heads of
the departments in which they expect to earn majors. Candidates for graduation
must file, in the office of the Registrar, formal application for a degree aind niut.
pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive td
degree. The official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be dorne
Courses can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the d a-n ,,t tl,:
college in which the student is registered and by presentation of th- r.,.,
authorizing the change at the office ofthe Registrar. Unclassified students mun t
secure the approval of the Dean of the University for this purpose.
CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses i: e-qunal t(o
one semester hour.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is t'.'.
semesters, or one semester and three six-week summer terms, or five si::-wcEk
summer terms or four nine-week summer terms. New students offering ad-
vanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the iUnhersity.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending anoithi
institution for credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-
entering the University.
2. For the Master's Degree two semesters or six six-week summer term' .:.r
four nine-week summer terms are necessary to satisfy the residence re:quire-
ments, except for the Master of Education Degree, for which the requiiemierit-
are two semesters and one six-week summer term, or six six-week summer ter'irs.
or four nine-week summer terms.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours :,5; in the
College of Law) applied toward the baccalaureate degree during regular resi-
dence in the respective colleges from which they expect to be graduated. E:xcep-
tion to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by the
faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extienslitl
work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours rEquired
for a baccalaureate degree.
AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No student will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the creditr t.. ar.l
a degree by correspondence study and extension class work. Extension .rork to.
apply on the last thirty hours is authorized only by special action of the fac'ltl
of the college in which a student is registered. Such authorization n.u it L-
obtained prior to enrollment in extension work. If authorization is .i. .-ri, no,
student is permitted to earn more than twelve of the last thirty-six hli:ut In
this manner. Under no circumstances will a student in residence be Ipe intte.l
to register for a correspondence course if that course is being offered in the
Summer Session.
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
The maximum load for which an undergraduate may register in a iline-xeck
term is 9 semester hours. The maximum load in a six-week term is C eii~es.ttr
hours per term.
The minimum load for any student is three semester hours. Original rtzis-
tration for less than three hours must be approved by the Dean of the college
in which the student is enrolled. After registration, the student may redut.e hi'
load to less than three hours only With the approval of the Senate Coiinillitte,
on Student Petitions.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATION WITH HONORS
For regulations in the various colleges covering graduation with Honors, see
the Catalog.
UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS
1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities
who wish to earn credits in the Summer Session to be transferred eventually to
their respective institutions, and (b) other students not candidates for degrees.
2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an
unclassified student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of
the colleges or schools of the University, he may do so (1) by regularizing his
admission to the University (present all the credentials required) and (2) by
meeting the requirements (in effect at the time of his application for candi-
dacy) for admission to the school or college he desires to enter.
3. If such a student is admitted to candidacy for a degree, credits earned
while an unclassified student will be accepted insofar as they apply toward the
degree requirements (in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the
college or school chosen by the student. A student must have been registered
as a regular student in the college or school from which he expects to receive the
Bachelor's Degree for at least three six-week summer terms or two nine-week
summer terms, and in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for
the Master's Degree. The residence requirement (see above) in the University
will not be waived in any case.
4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become
unclassified students during the Summer Session.
5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite
statement of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy
in the various colleges and schools. This statement will make clear that credits
earned while a student is registered as an unclassified student can be applied
toward a degree in the college of his choice only if under regular procedure this
credit will apply toward that degree.
6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will be approved by the
Dean of the University and assistants chosen by him from the faculty.

ATTENDANCE
If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent
that further enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to him and
detrimental to the best interests of the class, it shall be the duty of the instruc-
tor to warn such student in writing that further absences or failure to do class
work will cause him to be dropped from the course with a failing grade. Where
possible this warning will be delivered personally; otherwise, it will be mailed to
the student's last University address by the Registrar. Instructors shall imme-
diately report all such warnings to the Course Chairman or Department Head.
Should any absences or failure to do class work be incurred after this warn-
ing, the student will be dropped from the course and given a failing grade.
Should this reduce his load below the minimum of three hours he will be dropped
from the University and his record marked "Suspended for Non-Attendance" or
"Suspended for Unsatisfactory Work", as the case may be.

FAILURE IN STUDIES
A person registered in one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper
Division who fails fifty per cent or more of his work in any term or semester will
be suspended for one semester and will not be readmitted to the University







20 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

until the lapse of one semester, except upon approval of a formal petition by the
Senate Committee on Student Petitions. A student who has been suspended once
and in any subsequent period of attendance fails fifty per cent or more of his
work shall be suspended and not be eligible for readmission. In administering
the above regulation, in no case shall failure in one course only cause a student
to be suspended.
Students registered in the University College will have their records reviewed
.by a Committee on Student Progress at the end of each period of attendance. In
general the committee will be guided by the following policy. The student in the
Lower Division who has been in attendance one semester or the equivalent (one
nine-week summer term is considered the equivalent of a semester) and in any
subsequent period of attendance fails fifty per cent or more of his work will be
suspended and will not be eligible for readmission until the lapse of one semes-
ter, except on approval of a formal petition by the Senate Committee on Student
Petitions. A student who has been dropped once and in any subsequent period of
attendance fails fifty per cent or more of his work shall be suspended and wil:
not be eligible for readmission. In administering the above regulation, in no case
shall failure in one course only cause a student to be dropped.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must success-
fully pass six or more to complete the program of the University College) are
administered by the Board of University Examiners and are given in January.
May, and August of each year. A student must be familiar with the work of
the various courses and be able to think in the several fields in a comprehensive
way in order to pass these examinations. Standings on the comprehensive
examinations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are not subject to
change by any other agency.

APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the
examination is given need not make application for it. University College stu-
dents who are not enrolled in a course at the time an examination is given anc
who wish to take the comprehensive examination must apply in writing to the
Board of Examiners for permission prior to the last date set for filing such appli-
cations. Applications will not be accepted from students registered in the col-
leges of the Upper Division. Before the application is accepted the applicant
will be required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege
has not been used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Applications
will be accepted only for those examinations which are administered by the
Board of Examiners. The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to
give University College students examinations by application.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
In a reorganization at the University of Florida in 1935, all freshmen and
sophomores were placed in one college. The University College administers all
the work of the Lower Division, which includes the pre-professional work for
the Upper Division schools and colleges and a core program of basic education
for all students. In 1944 the American Council on Education defined this pro-
gram: "General education refers to those phases of nonspecialized and non-
vocational education that should be the common denominator, so to speak, of
educated persons . the type of education which the majority of our people
must have if they are to be good citizens, parents, and workers." During his
freshman and sophomore years at the University, a student's time is about
evenly divided between these objectives of general education and those of pre-
professional or professional preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility toward the professional training of
men who remain four years or longer and earn degrees, the University of
Florida as a state institution also accepts its civic responsibility to help those
who spend only one or two years at the University. These students-more than
two-thirds of all enrolled-are not "failures" because they do not continue and
earn degrees, and they probably deserve more from the state university than an
odd assortment of only "introductory courses." Consequently at the University of
Florida a group of comprehensive courses have been worked out to give some
unity and meaning to a beginner's program. These comprehensive courses that
make up the core program are:
1. American Institutions (known hereafter as C-1)
2. The Physical Sciences (C-2)
3. Reading, Speaking and Writing: Freshman English (C-3)
4. Practical Logic: Straight Thinking (C-41);
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
5. The Humanities (C-5)
6. Biological Science (C-6)

GUIDANCE
If a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not urged to guess
on registration day. His program may be made up largely from the comprehen-
sives which help him direct his thinking toward a desirable objective, together
with approved electives that may further enable him to explore interests and
needs. But whether the student is decided or undecided about his life's work,
these comprehensive courses provide basic preparation that every educated
person should have.
Thus since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, the
program absorbs 'much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course
of the University College program is designed to guide the student. During the
time that he is making tentative steps toward a profession by taking special
subjects to test aptitudes, interests, and ability, he is also studying the several
great areas of human understanding and achievement. The work in the Univer-
sity College presents materials which are directly related to life experiences and
which will immediately become a part of the student's thinking to guide him to
making correct next steps. Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress
reports, vocational aptitude tests, basic vocational materials, selected material in







24 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

required to complete the Lower Division; additional approved electives taken
during the first two years may reduce the number of hours required for an
Upper Division degree.
For desirable electives in Agriculture, students should consult the head of
the department in which they intend to major. These electives during the first
two years should be distributed so as to give some acquaintance with the different
phases of Agriculture, and are limited to a single course in any one department.
It is required that all students graduating in Agriculture take at least one course
in each of the following departments: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural
Engineering, Agronomy, Entomology, Horticulture, Soils, and one of the follow-
ing: Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, or Poultry Husbandry. Courses
suitable for election in the freshman year are AG. 306, AL. 309, AY. 221, DY.
211, EY. 201, EY. 203, FY. 313, and PY. 201. In the sophomore year these may
also be elected, and in addition the following: AG. 301, AS. 201, AS. 306, AY.
324, CL. 223, HE. 201, PT. 321, SLS. 301, and SLS. 302.

FORESTRY
The program for freshmen and sophomores planning to earn a degree in the
School of Forestry should be:
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-l, American Institutions ............... 8 1.-ACY. 125-126, Agric. Chem. or
2.- BTY. 101-102 .......................................... 6 CY. 101-102, Gen. Chem. ................ 8
3.- MS. 105 and C-41 .................................. 7 2.- C-5, The Humanities ............................ 8
4.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and 3.-CL. 223, Surveying .............................. 3
W writing .................. ............ ............. 8 4.- FY. 220, FY. 226, and FY. 228 ............ 8
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness .... 2 5.-Electives (from list below) .............. 4
6.-Military Science; Physical Fitness .... 2
31
33
Electives: ES. 203, ES. 205, EH. 135, GPY. 203.
The above is designed for students who have had three or more years of
science and mathematics in preparatory school, and whose standing on place-
ment tests show adequate preparation for science work. This means that some
students should take C-6 before taking BTY. 101-2 and C-42 before taking
MS. 105.
Students interested in a major in Wildlife Management should add FY. 227
and BLY. 161-2 among electives.

ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The program for freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in thc
College of Architecture and Allied Arts is as follows:
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hour"
1.- American Institutions ............................ 8 1.- The Humanities ...................................... 8
2.-The Physical Sciences ........................ 6 2.- Biological Science ............................... 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writ- 3.-Departmental Electives as listed
ing: Freshman English .................... 8 below ...................................................14-20
*4.-Logic and Mathematics .................... 6 Military Science; Physical Fitness .... 2
5.-Departmental Electives as listed
below ......................................... . ......... 0-6 30-31
Military Science; Physical Fitness .... 2
30-36
*Students who are exempt from C-4 should elect PPY. 310-Advanced Logic, and MS. 325-
Advanced General Mathematics.
DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES
Architecture or Building Construction.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan
to earn a degree in Architecture or in Building Construction should elect the
following courses as part of their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 205-206.-Building Technology, 4-4 credits (Sophomore year)








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Landscape Architecture.-Freshmen or sophomores who plan to earn a
degree in Landscape Architecture should elect the following courses as part of
their basic program:
AE. 101,-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman year)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman year)
ACY. 125.-Agricultural Chemistry, 4 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
BTY. 303.-General Botany, 3 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
AE. 205.-Building Technology, 4 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
SLS. 301.-Soils, 3 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)

Interior Design.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in
Interior Design should elect the following courses as part of their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman and sophomore year)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 205.-Building Technology, 4 credits (Sophomore year)
Approved Elective (Sophomore year)
Painting and Drawing, Commercial Art, or Crafts.-Freshmen and sopho-
mores who plan to earn a degree in Painting and Drawing, in Commercial Art,
or in Crafts should elect the following courses as part of their basic program:
ART 121.-The Visual Arts, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
ART 122.-Materials and Spatial Design, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
ART 223.-Color and Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
ART 224.-Drawing and Visual Perception, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
ART 225.-Scientific Contributions to Art, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
ART 226.-Pictorial Composition, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
Departmental electives in Landscape Architecture should be begun during
the freshman year. In all other cases, departmental electives may be begun
during the freshman year or postponed until the sophomore year without loss
of time.
Students who upon entering the University are undecided as to a particular
field in the College of Architecture and Allied Arts, may take either of two
orientation courses during the first semester of their freshman year: AE. 101.-
The Arts of Design, or ART 121.-The Visual Arts. At the beginning of the
second semester, those students who plan to earn a degree in Architecture,
Building Construction, Landscape Architecture, or Interior Design should take
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics. Those who plan to earn a degree in Painting
and Drawing, Commercial Art, or Crafts should take ART 122.-Materials and
Spatial Design. The appropriate elective courses for the sophomore year for
the various fields of study are listed above under Departmental Electives.
Students who transfer to the University of Florida without having completed
the Departmental Electives listed above, will be required to complete these De-
partmental Electives before entering the Upper Division.

ARTS AND SCIENCES
A student who plans to earn a 4-year degree in the College of Arts and
Sciences has the following basic program:
Basic Program
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-The Physical Sciences 2.-Biological Science
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20
Freshman English semester hours)
4.-Logic and Mathematics Military Science; Physical Fitness
5.-Electives (2-6 semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.-Students working toward these
degrees should secure credit in all of the comprehensive areas as indicated by
the University College. Electives in the first two years should be taken in








24 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

required to complete the Lower Division; additional approved electi.e= taken
during the first two years may reduce the number of hours requir...l t ..! jn
Upper Division degree.
For desirable electives in Agriculture, students should consult ilh healil of
the department in which they intend to major. These electives during tht 6irtt
two years should be distributed so as to give some acquaintance with the different
phases of Agriculture, and are limited to a single course in any one .:eparlnitim
It is required that all students graduating in Agriculture take at least one cour-e
in each of the following departments: Agricultural Economics, Agriultltual
Engineering, Agronomy, Entomology, Horticulture, Soils, and one of the f..1luw--
ing: Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, or Poultry Husbandry. C:'.ur-cs
suitable for election in the freshman year are AG. 306, AL. 309, AY. 2*2. DY.
211, EY. 201, EY. 203, FY. 313, and PY. 201. In the sophomore year the-e niaN
also be elected, and in addition the following: AG. 301, AS. 201, AS ::,i', .\Y.
324, CL. 223, HE. 201, PT. 321, SLS. 301, and SLS. 302.

FORESTRY
The program for freshmen and sophomores planning to earn a d-eree in the
School of Forestry should be:
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year ii ,:
1.-C-1. American Institutions ........... 8 1.-ACY. 125-126, Agric. Chem. .:r
2.- BTY. 101-102 .......................................... 6 CY. 101-102, Gen. Chem.
3.-MS. 105 and C-41 .................................. 7 2.-C-5, The Humanities .........
4.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and 3.-CL. 223, Surveying ............
Writing ....................................... ...... 8 4.-FY. 220, FY. 226, and FY. :I
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness .... 2 5.-Electives (from list below) 1
6.-Military Science; Physical I otr.:
31
Electives: ES. 203, ES. 205, EH. 135, GPY. 203.
The above is designed for students who have had three or mor:- :.:ar- .:.
science and mathematics in preparatory school, and whose standing ..n plac.-
ment tests show adequate preparation for science work. This means that -.,me
students should take C-6 before taking BTY. 101-2 and C-42 be!f,re taking
MS. 105.
Students interested in a major in Wildlife Management should a.l.. FY. 2"'
and BLY. 161-2 among electives.

ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The program for freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a digr..: iii I-.
College of Architecture and Allied Arts is as follows:
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year H. ur
1.-American Institutions ........................... 8 1.- The Humanities ...................
2.-The Physical Sciences ................. 6 2.-Biological Science .................
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writ- 3.-Departmental Electives as Ii:L~.-
ing: Freshman English .................... below ................................
*4.-Logic and Mathematics .................... 6 Military Science; Physical i .or-..
5.-Departmental Electives as listed
below .................................................... 0-6 :
Military Science; Physical Fitness .... 2
30-36
Students who are exempt from C-4 should elect PPY. 310-Advanced Logic, .-,.1 r.1; 5.-
Advanced General Mathematics.
DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES
Architecture or Building Construction.-Freshmen and sophomore- r.ho h ipl:
to earn a degree in Architecture or in Building Construction should tl-ct tht
following courses as part of their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 205-206.-Building Technology, 4-4 credits (Sophomore year)









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Landscape Architecture.-Freshmen or sophomores who plan to earn a
degree in Landscape Architecture should elect the following courses as part of
their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman year)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman year)
ACY. 125.-Agricultural Chemistry, 4 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
BTY. 303.-General Botany, 3 credits (Sophomore year, first semester)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
AE. 205.-Building Technology, 4 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)
SLS. 301.-Soils, 3 credits (Sophomore year, second semester)

Interior Design.-Freshmen and sophomores who plan to earn a degree in
Interior Design should elect the following courses as part of their basic program:
AE. 101.-The Arts of Design, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, 3 credits (Freshman and sophomore year)
AE. 203.-Basic Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 204.-Organic Planning, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
AE. 205.-Building Technology, 4 credits (Sophomore year)
Approved Elective (Sophomore year)
Painting and Drawing, Commercial Art, or Crafts.-Freshmen and sopho-
mores who plan to earn a degree in Painting and Drawing, in Commercial Art,
or in Crafts should elect the following courses as part of their basic program:
ART 121.-The Visual Arts, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
ART 122.-Materials and Spatial Design, 3 credits (Freshman or sophomore year)
ART 223.-Color and Design, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
ART 224.-Drawing and Visual Perception, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
ART 225.-Scientific Contributions to Art, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
ART 226.-Pictorial Composition, 3 credits (Sophomore year)
Departmental electives in Landscape Architecture should be begun during
the freshman year. In all other cases, departmental electives may be begun
during the freshman year or postponed until the sophomore year without loss
of time.
Students who upon entering the University are undecided as to a particular
field in the College of Architecture and Allied Arts, may take either of two
orientation courses during the first semester of their freshman year: AE. 101.-
The Arts of Design, or ART 121.-The Visual Arts. At the beginning of the
second semester, those students who plan to earn a degree in Architecture,
Building Construction, Landscape Architecture, or Interior Design should take
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics. Those who plan to earn a degree in Painting
and Drawing, Commercial Art, or Crafts should take ART 122.-Materials and
Spatial Design. The appropriate elective courses for the sophomore year for
the various fields of study are listed above under Departmental Electives.
Students who transfer to the University of Florida without having completed
the Departmental Electives listed above, will be required to complete these De-
partmental Electives before entering the Upper Division.

ARTS AND SCIENCES
A student who plans to earn a 4-year degree in the College of Arts and
Sciences has the following basic program:
Basic Program
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-The Physical Sciences 2.-Biological Science
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20
Freshman English semester hours)
4.-Logic and Mathematics Military Science; Physical Fitness
5.-Electives (2-6 semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.-Students working toward these
degrees should secure credit in all of the comprehensive areas as indicated by
the University College. Electives in the first two years should be taken in









tion of Unsaturated Quaternary Ammonium Compounds," Journal,
Am. Chem. So., Vol. 71, p. 3120 [1949] )

Carter, Mary Eddie
(Butler, G. B.)
Polymerization Studies on Beta-Nitrostyrene Derivatives and Some
of the Properties of the Polymers
(Butler, George B., and Carter, Mary Eddie, "Some New Substituted
B-Nitrostyrenes," Journal, Am. Chem. Soc., Vol. 72, p. 2303,
[1950] )

Childers, Eugene
(Gropp, A. H.)
The Polagraphic Reduction of Mono-and Dialkyl Ammonium
Halides

Fried, Melvin
(Tarrant, Paul)
The Preparation of Certain Alpha-Halogenated Acetamides

Goodson, Jr., James Brown
(Black, A. P.)
The Oxidation of Sulfides by Chlorine in Dilute Aqueous Solutions

Gudwani, Marais S.
(Pollard, C. B.)
Derivatives of Monophenyl Piperazine

Hunt, Harry Gage
(Hawkins, J. E.)

The Kinetics of the Thermal Isomerization of the Pinenes
(Hawkins, J. E. and Hunt, Harry, "The Rates of The Thermol
Isomerization of Alpha-Pinene and B-Pinene in the Liquid Phase,"
Journal, Am. Chem. Soc., Vol. 72, p. 5618, [1950] )

Ingley, Francis L.
(Butler, G. B.)

Polymerization Studies of Halogenated, Unsaturated Quaternary
Ammonium Salts
(Butler, George B. and Ingley, Francis L., "Preparation and










Polymerization of Unsaturated Quarternary Ammonium Compounds,
II, Halogenated Alkyl Derivatives," Journal, Am. Chem. Soc. Vol.
73, p. 895, [1951] )

Lilyquist, Marvin Russell
(Tacrant, Paul)

Some Reactions of m-Aminobenzotrifluoride and its Brominated
Derivatives

Nash, Jr., James L.
(Butler, G. B.)

Preparation and Polymerization of Vinyl Ethers of Unsaturated
Alcohols

Parcell, Robert F.
(Pollard, C. B.)

The Dehydrohalogenation of Halo-Alkenylamines with Sodium
Amide in Liquid Ammonia
(Pollard, C. B. and Parcell, Robert, "Tertiary Acetylenic Amines I"
Journal, Am. Chem. Soc., Vol., 72, p. 2385 (1950) and "Tertiary
Acetylenic Amines, II," Journal, Am. Chem. Soc., Vol. 72, p. 3312,
[1950] )

Riddles, Milton Jackson
(Gropp, A. H.)
The Effect of Digestion Times and Drying Temperatures on Gravi-
metric Chloride Determinations Using Sintered Glass Crucibles

Young, David Caldwell, Jr.
(Pollard, C. B.)

The Mechanism of the Leuckart Reaction

Young, John Adams
(Tarrant, Paul)

The Preparation and Reactions of Some Aliphotic Fluoroethers
(Tarrant, Paul and Young, John A., "The Preparation of Some
Derivatives of Chlorofluoroacetic Acid," Journal, Am. Chem. Soc.,
Vol. 71, p. 2432 [1949] )
and
Tarrant, Paul, and Young, John A., "A New Method of Pieparation








28 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Electives:
Elementary Education: EN. 105-106; English 6 hours; PHA. 361; SCL. 205-206.
Secondary Education: EN. 105-106; SCL. 205-206.
Business Education: BEN. 81, 91, 181; EN. 105-106; ES. 205-206; SCL. 206.
Industrial Arts Education: EN. 105-106; IN. 101-102, 103-104.
Five hours in the Human Adjustment area, other than C-41, are required. These electives
may be taken either in the University College or in the College of Education.
For the basic programs in Agricultural Education and Education for the
Exceptional Child, consult the Catalog, 1951-52.

ENGINEERING
The program for freshmen and sophomores expecting to earn a degree in the
College of Engineering is as follows:
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
*2.-CY. 105-106 2.-MS. 353-354
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-PS. 205, 207 and PS. 206, 208
Freshman English 4.-Departmental Prerequisites (from list
*4.-MS. 105-106 below)
**5.-ML. 181-182t and Departmental 5.-Military Science and Physical Education
Prerequisites (from list below)
6.-Military Science and Physical Education
Both CY. 105-106 and MS. 105-106 are required, but students who are not in the upper per-
centile group must take C-2 and C-42 first.
Students who are not qualified to take CY. 105-106 and MS. 105-106 in the freshman yea-
cannot graduate in four years unless they attend Summer School.
** Drawing equipment required for ML. 181 costs approximately thirty dollars.
t Prospective Civil Engineers (Public Health) will elect C-61 instead of ML. 182.

Departmental prerequisites in sequence are as follows:
Aeronautical Engineering: ML. 282, ML. 281, EM. 365
Agricultural Engineering: AG. 306, GY. 203, AL. 211, EM. 365
Chemical Engineering: CY. 205, CG. 347
Civil Engineering (General): CL. 223, CL. 226, EM. 365
Civil Engineering. (Public Health): C-61, BLY. 161, CY. 205, EM. 365
Electrical Engineering: ML. 282, EL. 211, EM. 365
Industrial Engineering: ML. 282, EM. 365
Mechanical Engineering: ML. 282, ML. 281, CG. 361
The student should make every effort to complete these courses before entering
the Upper Division, although he may in some instances, be permitted to enroll
in the Upper Division on probation until he completes them.
Students whose records in the University College do not indicate that they
are qualified to take the professional courses in Engineering will not be admitted
to the College of Engineering.

JOURNALISM
To enter the School of Journalism students are required to have completed
the six comprehensive courses: present credit in pre-professional work-JM
214-216, ES. 205-6, HY. 241 and PSY. 201; have a grade average of C or better,
and a working knowledge of typewriting.
Those falling below a 2.0 grade average in University College will not be
considered for admittance to the School of Journalism until they have demon-
strated their ability to pursue with profit professional work in the Upper Division
by satisfactorily completing one semester's work prescribed by the Director of
the School of Journalism.
At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours Military
Science, are required to complete the Lower Division.
Transfer students or those with a special hour-credit problem who have not
completed some of the pre-professional work in University College, may be ad-
mitted provisionally to the School of Journalism on approval of the Director.
They will be expected, however, to complete the lower-level work without upper-
division credit for graduation.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 29


LAW
Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have received a degree
in Arts or Sciences in an accredited college or university except as stated in the
description of the College of Law in the Catalog.
Although no particular courses are prerequisites, a student preparing for
admission to the College of Law should obtain a thorough mastery of the basic
comprehensive courses and also should take at least two courses in each of the
following general fields: Accounting, Economics, English, History (American and
English), and Political Science. Words being the tools of the legal profession, it
is essential that a student be able to read rapidly and meaningfully and to write
clearly and concisely; therefore courses requiring the rapid assimilation and diges-
tion of written materials and courses in expository writing are recommended.

PHARMACY

The basic program for students planning to work for a degree in the College
of Pharmacy:
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-Physical Sciences 2.-Biological Science
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 3.-General Chemistry
Freshman English 4.-Galenical Pharmacy
4.-Logic and Mathematics 5.-Practical Pharmaeognosy
Military Science and Physical Fitness Military Science and Physical Fitness

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS
The program for freshmen and sophomores expecting to earn a degree in the
College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics is as follows:
Freshman Year Sophomore Year
1.-American Institutions 1.-The Humanities
2.-Reading, Speaking and Writing *2.-The Physical Sciences
3.--Logic and Mathematics 3.--Departmental Electives as listed below
4.-Biological Science 4.-Military Science and Physical Fitness
5.-Departmental Electives as listed below
6.-Military Science and Physical Fitness
Students planning to major in Health Education must take CY. 101-102. Students whose
high school records and placement tests indicate satisfactory preparation may substitute CY.
101-102 for C-21-22. Others should take C-21, upon satisfactory completion of which they may
enter CY. 101.

Departmental electives in sequence are as follows:
Physical Education for Men:
First Semester: PHA. 151 or 171, PHA. 142 or 141: PHA. 144 or 143.
Second Semester: PHA. 171 or 151: PHA. 141 or 142; PHA. 143 or 144.
Third Semester: PHA. 261 or SCL. 205 or EN. 385; PHA. 242 or 245.
Fourth Semester: PHA. 132 or 231; PHA. 245 or 242.
Physical Education for Women:
First Semester: PHA. 151 or 171: PHA. 247 or 248; PHA. 142 and/or 144 or 261.
Second Semester: PHA. 171 or 151: PHA. 248 or 247; PHA. 144 and/or 142 or 261.
Third Semester: SCL. 205 or EN. 385; PHA. 261 or 141 and/or 241 and/or 244; PHA. 271 or 242.
Fourth Semester: EN. 385 or SCL. 205; PHA. 141 or 241 or 244; PHA. 242 or 271.
Health Education:
First Semester: PHA. 151 or 264: PHA. 261 or EN. 385.
Second Semester: PHA. 264 or 151; EN. 385 or PHA. 261.
Third Semester: SCL. 205 or PHA. 315; PHA. 262 or SY. 344; CY. 101.
Fourth Semester: PHA. 315 or SCL. 205; SY. 344 or PHA. 262; CY. 102.
Recreation:
PHA. 151, 171, 242, 261; SY. 241; SCH. 241; MSC 162.







30 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS OF THE UPPER DIVISION

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The Summer Session offerings of the College of Agriculture provide basic
courses in the several curricula and a few advanced courses which will enable
students now enrolled to speed up their individual programs.
A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri-
culture are offered. For complete information on the requirements for these
curricula the students should consult the University Catalog.

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers professional programs of
study leading to appropriate undergraduate degrees in Architecture, Building
Construction, Commercial Art, Crafts, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture,
and Painting and Drawing. Professional programs at the graduate level are
offered in Architecture, in Building Construction, and in Art.
The College offers courses to students in other colleges of the University who
wish to broaden their cultural background in the arts. General courses in the
Department of Architecture and in the Department of Art are open to all students
in the University, and certain upper division courses in the Departments of Art,
Commercial Art, Interior Design, and Crafts require no prerequisite training.

1951 SUMMER SESSION
During the 1951 Summer Session the College will offer most of the under-
graduate courses in Architecture, Art, Building Construction, Commercial Art,
Crafts, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Painting and Drawing,
as well as graduate courses in Architecture and in Art.
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers courses leading to certifica-
tion in Art for teaching Art in the secondary schools in the State of Florida.
Regulations describing certification of teachers are published by the State De-
partment of Education and it is imperative that all students who expect to be
certified familiarize themselves with these regulations. Application for certifi-
cate should be made immediately after graduation, and should be addressed to
the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida.
DEGREES AND CURRICULA
For detailed information on admission, undergraduate degrees, graduate
degrees, and programs of study for the various curricula, see the University
Catalog.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
The subject matter fields regularly offered to students in the College of Arts
and Sciences and the extent of these offerings is indicated in the table below:
Elective Group Dept.
Subject Work Major Major MA. or MS. Ph.D.
Anthropology ................ X X Some work available under Sociology
Art .................................. X X X Graduate work offered
through College of Archi-
tecture and Allied Art








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Astronomy ................... X
Bacteriology ................ X


Biology .......................... X
Botany .......................... X


Chemistry .....................
Economics ....................


Education ...................

English ........................
French .........................
Geography ...................
Geology ........................
German ........................
Greek ..............................
History ..........................
Italian .......................
Journalism ...................

Latin ................
Library Science ............
Mathematics .........
Meteorology .........
Music .......................
Philosophy ....................
Physics ..........................
Political Science ..........
Portuguese ....................
Psychology ..............
Religion .. .................
Russian ....................
Sociology ......................
Spanish ..........................
Speech ............................
Zoology ......................


X Major and Graduate
lege of Education
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X Major and Graduate
of Journalism


X Graduate work offered
through College of Agri-
culture
X X X
X Graduate work offered
through College of Agri-
culture
X X X
X Graduate work offered
through College of Busi-
ness Administration
work offered through the Col-


work offered through the School


See Biology listed above


For information regarding details of these programs of study and degree
requirements, the University catalog for 1951-52 should be consulted.

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Business Administration of the University of Florida was
organized in 1926-27 to meet the needs of Florida business. The purposes of the
College of Business Administration are five in number: First, to provide students
with the fundamentals of business; second, to prepare them to become business
leaders and executives; third, to train them to serve as business technicians-
accountants, economists, statisticians, sales and market specialists and research
workers; four, to develop students-at least some students-into prospective
business leaders; and fifth, to prosecute projects of research.







32 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The operations of business enterprise in recent years have become increasingly
complex in character. They have ceased to be simple and localized; they have
become intricate and highly involved-state-wide, nation-wide. To manage busi-
ness concerns and to make money, broad training is necessary. The principles
upon which the economic system functions, the forms of business units, the
ramifications of production and of markets, the services of transportation and
communication, the impact of taxation, the methods of financing-all require
consideration. Those who expect to be business owners and managers or who
desire to serve as business specialists must be provided with training in funda-
mentals-professional training in fundamentals.
The College of Business Administration is organized toward this end. It does
not turn out finished business men-managers, executives and department
heads. While it supplies its graduates with some skills and gives them a basic
understanding, it does not equip them to start at the top. They must start lower
down-even at the bottom-and by actual contacts and experience rise to the
top-rise more quickly and even more surely than they would be able to rise
without such training. Business today demands intensive study. It requires not
only experience but also scientific training.
Instruction in Public Administration is designed to provide analysis of the
basic principles of government. Its purpose is to prepare students for public
service occupations. Government has become increasingly complex and requires
personnel throughly trained in political science, economics, history, and other
related sciences. The program of training offered supplies basic courses in
these fields. It does not equip students with specific skills; it is designed to
provide them with broad training in the structure and functions of government
and to prepare them for readier entry into public life and occupations.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
To graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from the Univer-
sity College with honors and completed the work of the Upper Division with an
average of 3.2 or higher, or in lieu of graduation from the University College
with honors, have completed the work of the Upper Division with an average
of 3.4 or higher. To graduate With High Honors, a student must have graduated
from the University College with honors and completed the work of the Upper
Division with an average of 3.5 or higher, or in lieu of graduation from the
University College with honors, have completed the work of the Upper Division
with an average of 3.65 or higher, and receive an affirmative vote from the faculty
of the College. All students who graduate With Honor or With High Honors
shall have completed a minimum of 45 hours in the Upper Division of this College.

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES AND CURRICULA
The College of Business Administration offers two undergraduate degrees:
The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and the Bachelor of Science
in Public Administration. To secure the first named degree students must com-
plete either the curriculum of Business Administration proper or the curriculum
in Combination with Law. To secure the second named degree they must com-
plete the Curriculum in Public Administration.

GRADUATE DEGREES
Courses are offered in the Graduate School leading to the degree of Master
of Business Administration, the degree of Master of Arts with a major in eco-
nomics and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. For requirements for these
degrees consult the section of the Catalog entitled The Graduate School.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER
In order to enter the College of Business Administration and to register for
any of its curricula students are required to complete the curriculum in the
University College as specified or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses
of areas of knowledge listed, including the following:
ES. 205-206-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
ATG. 211-212-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203-Elementary Statistics
MS. 208-Business Mathematics

The Curriculum in Business Administration proper is divided into fifteen
groups or programs of studies. Each student is required to select and complete
one of these groups or programs. Of sixty-six semester hours required for gradu-
ation, from thirty-nine to fifty-one hours are prescribed. Where adequate cause
therefore is shown students may by petition in some cases substitute other courses
in economics and business administration for these prescribed courses. The
remaining hours in each group are approved electives. Of these hours, twelve
may consist of courses offered outside the College of Business Administration,
including six semester hours in advanced military science. The University
Catalog should be consulted for the requirements of each of the groups.

CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Business Administration combines with the University College
and the College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who
desire ultimately to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first
two years in the University College and the third year and one term of the
summer session in the College of Business Administration. When they have fully
satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration,
they are eligible to register in the College of Law. When students have, after
entering the College of Law, completed one year's work in law (28 semester hours
with at least a C average), they may offer this year's work as a substitute for
the fourth year in the College of Business Administration and receive the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. The University Catalog
should be consulted for the requirements of this curriculum.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for a Cur-
riculum in Business Administration proper, for the Curriculum in Combination
with Law, or for the Curriculum in Public Administration, students are required
to complete the curriculum below or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses
or areas of knowledge listed including the following:
ES. 205-206-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
ATG. 211-212-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203-Elementary Statistics
MS. 208-Business Mathematics
Freshman Year
First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours
1.- American Institutions ........................ 4 1.- American Institutions .......................... 4
*2.-The Physical Sciences .......................... 3 *2.-The Physical Sciences ......................... 3
*3.-Logic or Mathematics ........................... 3 *3.-Mathematics or Logic .......................... 3
4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing- 4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing-
Freshman English ............................... 4 Freshman English ............................ 4
5.- Approved Electives ............................... 3 5.- Approved Electives ................................ 3
Military Science, Physical Fitness Military Science, Physical Fitness
14-17 14-17







34 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Sophomore Year
1.- Accounting ..................................... .. 3 1.- Accounting .............................................. 3
2.- Econom ics ............................................ 3 2.- Economics ............................................. 3
3.- The Humanities ...................................... 4 3.- The Humanities ........................................ 4
4.- Biological Science ................................... 3 4.- Biological Science ....................................... 3
5.- Statistics ...................... ........... .......... 4 5.- M S. 208 ............................................... 3
Military Science, Physical Fitness Military Science, Physical Fitness -
17 16
*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at these
levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics for
Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower Division.

CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
In order to enter the College of Business Administration and to register for
the curriculum in Public Administration, students are required to complete the
curriculum in the University College as specified or the equivalent thereof in
each of the courses or areas of knowledge listed including the following courses:
ES. 205-206-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
ATG. 211-212-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203-Elementary Statistics
MS. 208-Business Mathematics

The University Catalog should be consulted for the requirements of this
curriculum.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education students will be required to present
a certificate of graduation from the University College, or its equivalent, and to
have the approval of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.

PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION*
In addition to the basic program with required electives, the following courses
are required for certification in Elementary Education (Certificate Bulletin A.
June, 1949, State Department of Education), and for the bachelor's degree.
EN. 307, 405**, 407; GL. 301 or 302; SCL. 301 or 302; GPY. 315; MSC. 160;
PHA. 361, 373; SCA. 253.

RESTRICTED CERTIFICATION IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION FOR HOLDERS
OF CERTIFICATES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
Teachers already certified in secondary subjects may have the Elementar:.
School Course added to their certificates by one of the following three plans.
If a student is working toward an advanced degree, the courses outlined in the
plan must be approved by his counselor.

PLAN I
EN. 307-Children and Learning ......................................................... 15
Electives (to be determined by student and his counselor) ................... 3

18
EN. 471 and EN. 480 are being offered for the last time this summer (1951) for students
who need these courses toward completion of requirements toward a degree in Elementary Educa.
tion under the old program.
** Students having three years of teaching experience within the five year period immediately:
preceding the date of application for a degree may substitute six semester hours of Education
electives.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


PLAN II
tEN. 545-Modern Practices in Elementary Education ............................ 6
EN. 547- Problems in Elementary Education ........................................... 6
Electives (to be determined by student and his counselor) ..................... 6

18
PLAN III
"Satisfactory completion of the following: No less than 19 semester hours
in courses taken in addition to any professional preparation work required for the
secondary certificate." (See Certificate Bulletin A, June, 1949, p. 29).

PROGRAM IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
Students who are preparing to teach in the secondary schools have the oppor-
tunity of specializing in the following teaching areas: agricultural education,
business education, industrial arts education, art, English, foreign languages,
library science, mathematics, music (restricted certification), health education,
physical education, sciences, social studies, and speech.
Students working in the program of secondary education (except in agricul-
tural education) will enroll for EN. 301, 302 and 423 as their basic professional
courses.
For formation of programs and planning of sequence of courses the student
should consult his counselor.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate work in Education offers an opportunity for teachers to specialize
in such areas as foundations of education (psychology, philosophy, human growth
and development, guidance and counseling), elementary education, secondary
education, agricultural education, business education, industrial arts education,
school administration, supervision, educational research, education for the ex-
ceptional child, and junior college education.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering is offering several courses during the Summer
Session in various departments so that students may graduate in a minimum
time. Many other courses included in the engineering curricula, such as mathe-
matics and physics, are also available. During the summer months the engineer-
ing student may also take subjects to meet elective requirements.
Students entering the University for the first time may find it to their ad-
vantage to enroll in mathematics, Freshman English, American Institutions or
General Chemistry and an appropriate engineering prerequisite. Students hav-
ing completed one year at the University may take courses in calculus and
physics. For those students who have completed calculus and physics, statics,
dynamics and strength of materials are suggested. Elective subjects in mathe-
matics, physics and the humanities are recommended to all students.
Students who contemplate registration in the College of Engineering and those
who are already registered in this college should confer about their schedules
with the department heads and the dean as soon as possible.

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY
Courses in Forestry are offered during the Summer Session. The required
Summer Camp should be taken between the second and third year's work pro-
t Must be taken as summer workshops.







36 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

vided the necessary prerequisites have been completed. Students who contem-
plate registration in the School of Forestry should consult the University Catalog
for courses which are prerequisites or are required in the Forestry curriculum.

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
A UNIT OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Curriculum of the School of Journalism leading to the Bachelor of Science
in Journalism degree, is designed to provide the best possible education and
professional training. It is in no sense narrowed to a technical or trade school
The program aims to provide its students with a broad background in liberal
arts and sciences-literature, economics, history, political science, sociology.
psychology-which are vital aspects of contemporary life and essential to the
well-trained journalist. Some of these cultural subjects are required, others
elective, giving latitude to the likes and goals of individual students.
The general plan of education in journalism calls for the student to devote
about three-fourths of his university career to general background courses.
In the other fourth he is combining background knowledge with learning
journalistic techniques and putting into actual practice these techniques.
Students entering the School of Journalism must choose one of the programs
of study.
The professional courses break down into two principal fields: editorial and
advertising. The editorial sequence is recommended for those going into editorial
departments of newspapers or magazines, wire services or news agencies. Vari-
ations in the editorial sequence can be made for those seeking special training
for weekly papers, radio news writing or public relations.

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
The Graduate School offers programs leading to the degrees of Doctor of
Philosophy in a number of fields, Doctor of Education, Master of Arts, Mastel
of Science, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in Architecture, Master
of Science in Building Construction, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Science in
Agriculture, Master of Science in Engineering, Master of Science in Forestry.
Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Agriculture, Master of Business Ad-
ministration, Master of Education, and Master of Physical Education and Health.
All students pursuing work for these advanced degrees, as well as all students
working for Post-Graduate Certificates, are registered in the Graduate School.
All instruction is carried on by the faculties of the colleges and schools listed
above.
The work for the Master's Degree must be completed within seven years
from the time of first registering for graduate work. For summer session stu-
dents this means seven summers.
Passing grades for graduate students are A and B in all courses numbered
below 500; passing grades for courses numbered 500 and above are A, B, and C.
However, C grades count toward a graduate degree if, and only if, an equal
number of credits hours in courses numbered 500 and above Are earned with
grade of A.
National Teacher Examinations.-All graduate students and students work-
ing on advanced programs in the Department of Education are required to take
the National Teachers Examinations early in their programs. A preliminary
application blank is available in the Office of Graduate Studies in Education,
YN. 202. This examination is given at stated intervals by the Board of Univer-
sity Examiners. A fee of $6.00 is required for full-time students, or $10.00








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


for part-time students. The examination is given early in each term and prompt
application is necessary.
Residence.-Two semesters, or four nine-weeks summer terms, are necessary
to satisfy the residence requirements.
Admission.-All applications must be made to the Admissions Section of the
Registrar's Office in accordance with the dates set forth in the University Calen-
dar. Please note that all communications concerning credentials needed and
acceptance or rejection must be handled by the Director of Admissions.
A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work of the appli-
cant must be transmitted by the registrar of the institution where the work was
completed to the Director of Admissions before the date of registration.
To be eligible for unqualified admission to graduate study, the applicant must
(1) be a graduate of an accredited college or university, and (2) have an overall
grade average of "C" (2.0). If he meets these two criteria the applicant is
referred to a committee for final recommendation. If the applicant fails to meet
either or both of these criteria, he will be notified by the Director of Admissions
that he cannot be admitted to the Graduate School. If the applicant has a good
record but is a graduate of a non-accredited institution, he will be advised that
while he cannot register in the Graduate School he may register as an under-
graduate and attempt to qualify for admission to the Graduate School at a later
date.
MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS
Work Required.-The work for the Master's Degree shall be a unified pro-
gram with a definite objective, consisting of 24 semester hours, at least 12 of
which shall be in the student's major field in courses designated strictly for
graduates (numbered 500 or above), or, if approved by the Dean, in courses
designated for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. At least one
six-hour minor in a single related field, in a department other than the major,
is required. Courses in the minor may be numbered 300 or above. The remain-
ing six hours of the 24 required may be used to apply either to the major work,
or the minor, or on a second minor, as determined by the student's supervisory
committee.
Admission to Candidacy.-Whether an applicant has been provisionally or
regularly admitted, his supervisory committee shall review his entire academic
record at the end of the first semester or summer session of residence. In addi-
tion to the approval of the committee, the formal approval of the principal
department concerned will be necessary to admit the applicant to candidacy, to
fix definitely the additional residence and course requirements, and to approve
the program as submitted. In the Department of Education, candidates for
advanced degrees or teaching certificates, should consult the department for
additional information affecting admission to candidacy.
Foreign Language Requirement.-The requirement of a reading knowledge
of a foreign language is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory
committee. If it 'is required, the examination should be passed by the end of
the second summer term, or when the course work is half completed.
Supervisory Committee.-A special supervisory committee is appointed by
the Dean of the Graduate School to supervise the course work and the thesis
of all candidates. This committee is recommended to the Dean by the head
of the department in which the student is majoring when the course work
is well along. The chairman of the committee, in general, takes the responsi-
bility for directing the thesis to completion. This supervisory committee con-







38 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ducts the final oral and/or written examination and if satisfactory, rec(:mniiiind-s
the candidate to the Graduate Council for the proper degree.
Thesis.-Two copies of a thesis in a subject closely allied to the majoi subj,.ct
are required. The title of the thesis should be submitted on the f.-rn i':.r
Application for Admission to Candidacy when the course work is about halt
completed (at the end of the second summer term). The original and rir4t
carbon copy of the thesis, in temporary bindings, must be submitted at thi dwat.
noted in the "Calendar," which is three weeks before the date of graduation.
Two copies of a brief abstract of the thesis must be submitted at th.: iiri:
the thesis is presented. Candidates should consult the office of the Dean uf
the Graduate School for instructions.
Final Examination.-In all departments a final general examination. either
oral or written or both, covering the whole of the field of study of the candidate ,
or any part of it, is required. This may embrace not only the thesis and the.
courses taken but also any questions that a student majoring in that departlimnt
may reasonably be expected to answer.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITHOUT THESIS
MASTER OF EDUCATION
Description and Purpose.-This degree is designed for the pr,,fes io.ral
preparation of teachers, rather than for research. The work aims t .le .clof.:
in public school workers a wide range of essential abilities and to give thlmni ,
broad background of advanced general education, rather than to encouraiu, thin
to specialize narrowly. While not neglecting to add to the qualifications already
attained, it further aims to overcome weaknesses in a student's develop .:int.
The Master of Education program seeks to develop the student in:
1. An understanding of the nature of the individual and the learning I.r.o..v-ss:
2. An understanding of the purposes, issues, and trends of educati,:.n in
American democracy;
3. An understanding of the social realities of our time and how the0 e corn-
dition the educative process;
4. A fairly comprehensive, internally consistent pattern of values inr keeping
with our democratic traditions; a value-system which the student (an
apply where issues are concerned;
5. A personal philosophy of education which he can make explicit and \b i.:l
is consistent with his value patterns;
6. The ability to think and act creatively and adequately within hi- ar-:a (.r
specialization or field of work, i.e., to see new problems, to work out .olu-
tions, and to communicate the results of his thinking and acting t,. oth -i'.
Admission.-Prospective students must apply to the Registrar, Unix.iit. ..ft
Florida, for admission well in advance of registration. (See Admission ..:- GIr.l-
uate School, p. 37.)
Residence.-A minimum of four nine-weeks summer terms, or two e rm:t-tLr. i
and one summer term, or the equivalent, is required as residence. Any tl-tu ,jit
whose undergraduate work does not fit into this program may have to spend Kmore
than the minimum time to earn the degree.
Transfer of Credits.-If recommended in advance by the Graduate Cnimmitt.ee
and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student may be pe mrittid tk:'
study with some competent teacher in another institution for one sumnler t.:nri.
No graduate credits earned prior to admission to the University may be trans-
ferred without special recommendation of the Graduate Committee and the ap-







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


proval of the Graduate Council. No more than six semester hours of credit may
be thus transferred. This transfer of credit does not reduce the residence re-
quirement for the degree.
Work Required.-Instead of having a fixed requirement of majors and minors,
each student will be required to submit a plan of study which shows a reasonable
amount of balance and direction. The planned program is approved by the stu-
dent's counselor, with whose assistance the plan is first developed, then by the
Education department head concerned and the Office of Graduate Studies in
Education. After the program has been developed, any changes must be re-
quested in writing and similarly approved.
Minimum course requirement is 36 semester hours, of which not more than
nine may be taken in any summer term (six in six weeks, three in three weeks),
and not more than fifteen in any one semester. Six semester hours of workshop
or extension courses may be allowed and will count as residence credits.
Where the student has had no previous work in professional courses in
Education he must have completed a minimum of 36 hours of professional work
in Education including work at the graduate and undergraduate level in order to
qualify for this degree. Students planning to take work in closely related fields
should consult their counselors as to the acceptability of such work toward meet-
ing this requirement. In general, a minimum of twelve semester hours outside
the field of Education is required.
A thesis is not required. A reading knowledge of a foreign language is not
required, but the effective use of the English language is expected of all candi-
dates. Admission to the work of this program is not a guarantee that the student
will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
Admission to Candidacy.-The faculty makes a determination as to the com-
petence of the student at the time of his admission to candidacy. Admission to
candidacy for the Master of Education degree may be recommended to the
Graduate Council by the Graduate Committee on the basis of an unassembled
examination to be given at the end of from 12 to 18 semester hours of graduate
work at the University of Florida. The unassembled examination is evaluated
by a committee of the faculty, which may recommend supplementary oral and/or
written examinations for students whose admission to candidacy is in doubt.
The unassembled examination includes: (1) the student's academic record
to date, (2) the student's scores on the National Teacher Examination, (3) evi-
dence of competency in the use (oral and written) of the English language,
(4) evaluation of personal qualities and promise of professional attainment by
persons to whom the applicant's record is known, (5) the student's experience
record, and (6) any other appropriate information.
The unassembled examination is administered through the Office of Graduate
Studies in Education for the Graduate Committee.
The student's remaining program of study will be planned in terms of needs
as revealed in the Admission to Candidacy Examination. On approval of the
Graduate Committee, the candidate will be recommended for the degree upon the
satisfactory completion of the designated course work.
The candidate must have completed at least one year of teaching prior to
taking the last six semester hours of work, or must have included in his record
the satisfactory completion of an internship program or a minimum of six
semester hours of student teaching.
The Graduate Committee of the Department of Education.-A special coun-
selor is appointed for each student in the Master of Education program. His
work is under the general supervision of the Graduate Committee in the Depart-
ment of Education. The program is administered through the Office of Graduate
Studies in Education.







40 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

MASTER OF AGRICULTURE
Admission.-Qualified students holding the degree of Bachelor of Scienl.e in
Agriculture, or its equivalent, may enroll in courses leading to the profes-nnal
degree of Master of Agriculture. Qualifications for admission are outlined under
Admission, p. 37.
Residence.-A minimum of two semesters, or four nine-weeks summer t,.inis.
or the equivalent, is required as residence.
Work Required.-A minimum of thirty semester hours of course w.:Iak i:
required, at least fifteen of which must be designated strictly for graduate-
Each student's program is designed so as to take into account the qualificatii..nr
and needs of the individual and is subject to the approval of the Super\ i;.:s.
Committee. A thesis is not required, but the student will submit reports, ta in,
papers and records of work accomplished. A final oral examination by the Super-
visory Committee covering the whole field of study of the candidate is require: .
Supervisory Committee.-A Supervisory Committee, consisting of the majrrij
professor as chairman and two others from the related fields of study, app.fr.tedJ
by the Dean of the Graduate School, has charge of the program of work .:.f tih
candidate.
Admission to Candidacy.-The regulations regarding application for iadni:-
sion to candidacy under "Master's Degrees with Thesis" above apply also Zit thi
degree.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
This is a professional degree representing a fifth year of work for those- stu-
dents who plan to enter business occupations and wish to go beyond the under-
graduate degree.
Admission.-Qualified students holding the degree of Bachelor of Science ia
Business Administration, or its equivalent, may be admitted to courses leading
to the degree of Master of Business Administration. (See Admission, p. "7. 1
Residence.-A minimum of two semesters, or four nine-weeks summer terrim.
or the equivalent, is required as residence.
Work Required.-Thirty semester hours of economic and business c,:.ur-ii-
are required. Of these, not less than 15 semester hours must be in courses dleig-
nated strictly for graduates and numbered 500 or more.
Admission to Candidacy.-The regulations regarding application for adri-nis.n
to candidacy under "Master's Degrees with Thesis" above apply also to this degre-.
Supervisory Committee.-Students registered for the M.B.A. degree 3re
supervised by the Committee on Graduate Offerings of the College of Buain.es
Administration through the Chairman of the Committee and with the assjitfanie
of the professor of the student's major subject.
Examinations.-A thesis is not required, but candidates must pass two et.ir-
inations. The first is a written examination covering accounting, statnitics.
economic theory, and finance given at the time of admission to candidacy v.%hich
is ordinarily near the end of the first semester of graduate work. The se.in'ri
is an oral examination on the candidate's field of specialization given at the .:1, "e
of course work by a committee composed of the candidate's major professor and
two members of the Committee on Graduate Offerings.

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
Admission.-Qualified students holding the degree of Bachelor of Scieri,:e in
Physical Education and Health, or its equivalent (such as a Bachelor of Arrs ir,
Education with a major in Physical Education), may be admitted to cuulse








BULLETIN OF THE -UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


leading to the professional degree of Master of Physical Education and Health.
(See Admission, p. 37.)
Residence.-A minimum of two semesters, or four nine-weeks summer terms,
or the equivalent is required as residence.
Work Required.-A minimum of thirty semester hours of course work is
required, at least fifteen of which must be courses in the fields of Physical
Education, Health Education or Recreation designated strictly for graduates
(courses numbered 500 or above). Of the remaining fifteen hours, at least nine
semester hours must be taken in courses outside the College of Physical Educa-
tion, Health and Athletics.
Supervisory Committee.-A committee of five members of the faculty of the
College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics, with the Dean of the
College or some person designated by him serving as chairman, will supervise
the work of students registered in this program.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to the work of this program is not a
guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The
student will be required to successfully pass a written and/or oral examination
in addition to being recommended by the supervisory committee for admission
to candidacy. This examination should be taken by the end of the student's
first semester of residence.
Final Examination.-A thesis is not required but the candidate must pass
a final examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or oral
examination will be administered by the supervisory committee and will cover
the student's whole field of study.

DOCTOR'S DEGREES

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in the department of Agricul-
tural Economics, Animal Husbandry (Animal Nutrition), Biology (Zoology),
Cancer Research, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Economics, Electrical Engi-
neering, English, History, Horticulture, Latin American Studies, Mathematics,
Pharmacy, Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology, Physics, Political Science, Psy-
chology, Spanish, and Speech. It is expected that other departments will be
added from year to year as facilities are increased.
Residence.-A minimum of three academic years of resident graduate work,
of which either the second or the third year must be spent continuously (in con-
tinuous residence) as a full-time student at the University of Florida, is required
of all candidates for doctors' degrees. In many cases, it will be necessary to
remain longer than three years, and necessarily so when the student is not
putting in his full time in graduate work.
Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is expected to be
spent upon his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his
minor or minors. The student will be guided in his whole course of study by the
professor of his major subject and by his special supervisory committee. The
Graduate Council does not specify just what or how many courses will be required.
The work is mainly research, and the student is thrown largely upon his own
responsibility.
Minors.-The student must take one minor and may not take more than two.
In general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will require at least one
year.







42 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSI 'N'

Special Supervisory Committee.-When the student has advanced iirticiently
towards his degree, a special committee will be appointed by the dean, ithll the
professor of the major subject as chairman. This committee will dire.t. adlvie.
and examine the student. The dean is ex-officio member of all suptri i.,ry
committees.
Language Requirements.-A reading knowledge of both French and Gi oian
is required of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. Upon the rec.r.iniredatior,
of the candidate's supervisory committee, in special cases anotlc,:r f.,rchen
language may be substituted for French or German. The examiiati:,n ii the(
languages are held by the language departments concerned. These requirements
should be met as early as possible in the student's career and must be -atlitice,
before the applicant can be admitted to the qualifying examination.
Qualifying Examination.-The qualifying examination, which is req-uired of
all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, may be taken during the
second term of the second year of residence. The examination, ;which will be
conducted by the special supervisory committee, is both written and ,.ral aind
covers both major and minor subjects.
Between the qualifying examination and the conferring of the legree there
must elapse a minimum interval of one academic year in full-time re4ilteni., .. r
one full calendar year.
If the student fails in this qualifying examination, he will not be gi\ve;, an-
other opportunity unless for special reasons a re-examination is recoinic ) nded
by his special supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate C.urncii.
Dissertation.-A satisfactory dissertation showing independent in'.'etigati.,n
and research is required of all candidates. Two typewritten copies .4f thii dis-
sertation must be presented to the dean on or before the date specrifed in the
University Calendar.
Printing of Dissertation.-One hundred printed copies of the ,di .-rtat.:.'i
must be presented to the University within two years after the c.niifrring of
the degree. Reprints from reputable journals may be accepted upoc. the reco:m-
mendation of the special supervisory committee. After the disiertati:.n lIha
been accepted, the candidate must deposit with the Business Managei. not later
than one week before the degree is conferred, the sum of $50 as a p-leldg. that
the dissertation will be published within the prescribed time. Thisu uii will be
returned if the printed copies are received within two years.
Final Examination.-After the acceptance of the dissertation and the onm-
pletion of all other prescribed work of the candidate, but in no case eail er than
sixty days before the conferring of the degree, the candidate will be given a final
examination, oral, or written, or both, by his special supervisory comlmirttei(.

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
The requirements for the degree are the same as those for the ['nc4ti ,f
Philosophy, with the exception that candidates for the degree of D.'ct.r .f Edu-
cation may either satisfy the usual language requirement or suh rittte the
following:
1. A course in educational research
2. An examination covering the techniques of using the library
3. An elementary course in statistics
These requirements must be met before the student is eligible t.:. appl. fi.r
the qualifying examination.
The doctoral candidate in Education must choose, as his area of s p. c~alizatin,
an instructional field in which competent supervision is available.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


A minor will be supporting work taken in another field. It will consist of at
least twelve semester hours for the first minor and at least six semester hours
for the second minor. Minors may not be taken in any branch of Education.
Before he can be recommended for admission to candidacy, the student must
present a project outline approved by his supervisory committee to a graduate
seminar, consisting of representatives of the Graduate Committee of the College
of Education, his supervisory committee, other faculty members, and graduate
students.
Residence.-The residence requirement is the same for the Ph.D. degree.
It may not be satisfied by summer session attendance only. Either the second
or third year must be in continuous residence as a full-time student at the Uni-
versity of Florida.

FLORIDA POST GRADUATE CERTIFICATES
For regulations governing the securing of recommendations for the Florida
Post Graduate Certificate and the Advanced Post Graduate Certificate, consult
the Office of Graduate Studies in Education, 202 Yonge Building.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
1. Correspond with the Dean and if necessary with the head of the depart-
ment in which you propose to take your major work.
2. If you are found eligible and decide to come to the University of Florida,
have the Registrar of your school send a transcript of your work to the Registrar
at the University. This should be at least a month before the date of registra-
tion, and it must be on file before the student will be allowed to register.
3. At the proper time, register with the Dean. He will give you blank form
No. 1 to take to your department head. Either the head of the Department or
some other professor in this department will become the professor of your major
subject and will suggest courses for which you should register for the session.
Take this blank to the Dean and complete your registration.
4. Observe the dates for satisfying the language requirement and for apply-
ing for admission to candidacy.
5. Early in your last term before graduation, notify the Registrar that you
are a candidate for a degree. See calendar for Last day for making application
for a degree.
6. When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at the
Dean's office. Watch your time. Consult the calendar.
7. Consult the professor of your major subject and your special supervisory
committee for guidance.
8. Consult the Dean's office if you wish interpretation of any requirement.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF INTER-AMERICAN STUDIES
This department, headed by a Director, operates in accordance with the
standards of the University Graduate School and Graduate Council. Its Director
and staff in Inter-American Affairs in the humanities and social sciences will
advise the students at the graduate level in conformity with the regulations of
the Graduate School.
The general Inter-American program of the University in connection with
Inter-American Affairs embraces all phases of University work including agri-
culture, engineering, etc., and is worked out cooperatively with existing units
in these areas.







44 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE
INSTITUTE OF NUCLEAR STUDIES
The University of Florida is one of the Sponsoring Universities of the Oak
Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Thr,,ugh
this cooperative association with the Institute our Graduate Research Pr,:-ram
has at its disposal all the facilities of the National Laboratories in Cal: Ridge
and of the research staffs of these laboratories. When Master's and D.-ter.:al
candidates have completed their resident work it is possible, by special arrange-
ment, for them to go to Oak Ridge to do their research problems and prepare
their theses. In addition, it is possible for the staff members of this uir'..-er. ty
to go to Oak Ridge for varying periods, usually not less than three m.:.nthr. for
advanced study in their particular fields. Thus, both staff and stud-ntrs may.
keep abreast of the most modern and up-to-date developments in atomic and
nuclear research that is in progress at the Oak Ridge laboratories.
The students will go to Oak Ridge on Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowship- n liich
have varying stipends determined by the number of dependents they hane arnd
the level of work that they are doing. Staff members may work in Oak Ridge
on stipends commensurate with their present salary and rank.
A copy of the Bulletin and Announcement of the Graduate Training Pi.:.cran,
of the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies is available in the offi,: of the
Dean of the Graduate School. Should you be interested, ask for this ulletin
at his office, and he will be glad to assist you in making an application fo.r an
Oak Ridge Fellowship. If you prefer you may request a Bulletin by v ritlng to
the Chairman of the University Relations Division of the Oak Ridge In-t itut
of Nuclear Studies, Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
All arrangements for these fellowships will be made between the 'Dean -.f
the Graduate School and the Institute.

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
The Summer Session offerings of the College of Pharmacy provide t'.:- c.':utie:
in the Lower Division and several courses in the Upper Division. One graduate
course is offered, and graduate students will be given guidance on these leading
to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees.
For complete description of the courses and requirements for admi:i.:.i andl
graduation the student should consult the University Catalog.

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Students entering the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletic- are
required (1) to present a certificate of graduation from the Universir. Colleg-
or its equivalent as determined by the Board of University Examiner;. I2i to.:
be certified by the Board of University Examiners as qualified to purItIe tli
work of the College, (3) to have the approval of the Committee on AlImir:.,or.:
of the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics, and (4) to hcvLe conm-
pleted the professional courses listed under the basic program in the Uiriir.er.it
College section of this catalog, although a student may be enrolled in the Upper
Division "on probation" until he completes them. Students whose ritcord; in
the University College do not indicate that they are qualified to takv the pro-
fessional courses of the Upper Division will not be admitted to the Colltge.
Transfer students entering from other institutions must present college credit
equivalent to graduation from the University College, as determined by th e Board
of University Examiners, and have the approval of the Committee on Adnisi.:.:ns
of the College of Physical Education, Health and Athletics.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
The degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education and Health is granted
to students who satisfactorily complete one of the following curricula: Physical
Education for Men, Physical Education for Women, Health Education, or
Recreation. The minimum requirement for graduation from the College of
Physical Education, Health and Athletics is 66 semester hours with an average
of C or higher. Each student is required to select and complete one of the
curricula offered in this college.
In addition to completing the requirements of one of the several curricula,
the student must have earned six "Activity Units" in approved extra-curricular
activities before being recommended for graduation. Experience shows that
men and women in this profession are called on to perform many and varied
services in their respective schools and communities. Participation in extra-
curricular activities while in college (such as student government, student pub-
lications, athletics, dramatics, debating and serving on student committees)
contributes substantially to the success of persons entering the profession. For
this reason "Activity Units" must be distributed over two different types of
extra-curricular activities. Such extra-curricular activities will be accepted
from the date of matriculation in the University. "Activity Units" are not to
be confused with regular course credits. Detailed information on this require-
ment may be secured from the Head of The Professional Curriculum.

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
Courses are offered in the Graduate School leading to the degree of Master
of Physical Education and Health. For requirements for the Master's Degree,
consult the section of this Catalog entitled The Graduate School.







46 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SPECIAL THREE WEEK COURSES

The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run
for three weeks only. Enrollment is limited to these special groups
as indicated. Students registering for courses listed in this section
follow the same admission and registration procedures as other stu-
dents but are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.


JUNE 18 TO JULY 7

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
GRADUATE COURSE
AXT. 507.-Advanced Agricultural Extension Service Youth Program. I ired its.
Open only to Agricultural Extension workers.
M W F 10:00 and T Th S 9:00 to 11:00. HAMPSON, C. M.
Advanced training in developing and conducting 4-H Club work. Securing leJ.J,.r' Ir'n.rn1
leaders and officers, maintaining interest are given special attention.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
GRADUATE COURSE
AL. 501.-Advanced Animal Production. 1/2 credits. Open only tc Agrnc\riilluir
Extension Workers.
Section 2. M W F 8:00 to 10:00 and T Th S 8:00. NE 211.. CUNIIA
and STAFF.
Reviews and discussions on the latest developments in the fields of animal pr-.duct.'-,r. nirl.
tion and genetics.

EDUCATION
GRADUATE COURSES
EN. 572.-Preparing Course Materials and Community Programs in Aericulture.
3 credits. Open only to graduate students in Education. I'P.requisile:
Bachelor's degree in Agricultural Education or equivalent.
9:00-11:00 and 3:00 daily YN 150 GARRIS, E. W.
Each student will prepare a program to suit his particular locality.
EN. 615.-Program and Functions of Teacher Education Institutions. ; iredir.
Open only to graduate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 232. HENDERSON, L. N. and WATTENB.ARGER,
J. L.
For the college teacher who expects to serve on the faculty of a teacher educatei-n irl:L, .lAr-r.
Emphasis on organization, teacher education programs, types of students, pattern: .f ,e.rr.'.Jin.
functions of staff, significant organizations and agencies, and special studies.

JOURNALISM
JM. 320.-Agricultural Journalism. 1%credits. Open only to Agilultural Ex-
tension workers.
1:00 daily and 2:00-4:00 M W F. K 103. JONES, J. P.
Fundamentals of presenting news and information to the public about the act. ',l. .-.f atrl-
cultural and home demonstration workers.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 47

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

PHA. 324.-Social Recreation. 1% credits. Open only to Agricultural Extension
Workers.
Section 2. 11:00 daily and 3 hours to arrange. FG 224. MILLAR, J.,
and BOSWELL, J. H.
Methods, materials and techniques of conducting social recreation programs. Instruction is
given in planning and participating in social activities for groups of varying sizes and for different
situations. The activities include progressive parties, quiet, and semi-active group games, stunts
and contests, social mixers, outing events including hikes and picnics, and activities for special
occasions, such as Thanksgiving. Halloween and Christmas.







48 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


JULY 9 TO JULY 28


EN. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living. 3 credits. Open only to graldute
students in Education.
Section 1. 9:00-12:00 daily. YN 323. INGLE, K. H.
Techniques of using Florida resources in the areas of arts and crafts, architecture, h...uir,'.
interior decorating, and landscaping. Attention to developing understandings and' arpr.-.eit.'r,;
of the fine arts, costume design, health practices, human relationships.
GRADUATE COURSES
EN. 580.-Workshop in Economic Education. 3 credits. Open only to graduate
students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 214. MOORMAN, J. H. and SHIELDS, M. \\'
For teachers of social studies, business education and related fields, and for supers ,:c0- and
administrators. Purposes are: (1) to increase understanding of our national economy t.- a .j ud,
of fundamental principles and concepts, (2) to make plans for more and better t-5.hrc r.(
economic understandings in the elementary and high schools. The work will be direc.e! ,.:.1rorl
by specialists in economics and in education.
EN. 614.-Seminar in Secondary Education. 3 credits. Open only to g ladua:t
students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 150.
Primarily for majors in secondary education or secondary school administration.
EN. 685.-Seminar in General Education for Colleges. 3 credits. Open only to
graduate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 232. HENDERSON, L. N. and WATTENBARGER.
J. L.
An advanced course designed to acquaint the student with the several aspects .,. c..r..rwl
education programs in higher institutions, including junior colleges. Investigation of :..r.:..: .:..r- .
tributing to the general education movement, of the characteristics and needs of the "nev i' l-~r "
of objectives of general education, of types of courses and programs, of the content .. c..ur--
and of similar related problems will be features of the seminar. The student will have cp runr.A.,
to observe in University College one of America's older and more successful general .lu.:u.:;.r.
programs in action.












:!








BfULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


JULY 30 TO AUGUST 18

BUSINESS EDUCATION
GRADUATE COURSE
:lEN. 5,64.--Materials and Methods of Teaching General Business. 3 credits.
I-i.ii-12 00 daily. YN 305. MOORMAN, J. H.
Tr. -.r .,:cr..s, content, resource materials, and methods of teaching general business in high
*h....-l: i.t- ...*rlination of general business and social studies.

EDUCATION
EN. 12..--Planning for Improved Daily Living. 3 credits. Open only to graduate
tuJl. iit in Education.
S-cti:.n 2. 9:00-12:00 daily. YN 323. INGLE, K. H.

GRADUATE COURSES
EN. 506 -Introduction to Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits. Open only to
eraj.durtt students in Education.
'.9 'l-12.00 daily. YN 142. ALEXANDER, V. W.

EN. 509 -Teaching Science in the Elementary School. 3 credits. Open only
r.) rra.duate students in Education. Prerequisite: GL. 301 or equivalent, and
I ai hiini Yexperience.
'.i.-l?' 00 daily. LE 138. BINGHAM, N. E.
1::00- 00 daily. LE 142.
t-.- r l.,- !' science in the elementary school, the scientific approach, science experiences
.L.tur...L.ri-- ..r -lementary school pupils, preparation of scientific materials for use in elementary
:ch-o.1 cl. r.-..m' new developments in teaching science in elementary schools.
EN. 520).-Laboratory Workshop in Curriculum Development. 3 credits. Open
only 1.1 graduate students in Education. Prerequisite: EN. 527 or equivalent;
in adilltion EN. 519 recommended.
.:111.i-12:00 daily. YN 203. PADGETT, E.
Elc, I.-l.j i. will be expected to survey the research and best thinking on practices in the
: ..r ,.:l r', ri ,p .n which he works in the laboratory. He will spend most of his time developing

EN 521 -Public School Business Administration and Finance. 3 credits. Open
*..nI, I.) graduate students in Education.
9 1:1-12 00 daily. YN 138. JOHNS, R. L.
I r.l,,..- 1 ir. he scope of this course are the following areas: state, local, and federal financing
S.. -JuC:Li..r -chool financial records and reports: the preparation and administration of budgets;
pu.r ,r. .r.c r.r.: 'ures; the issuance and sale of school securities.
EN. 5.i6.-- Methods and Problems of Educational Supervision. 3 credits. Open
..rnl\ t.: graduate students in Education.
.t'.11-12:00 daily. YN 236. GREEN, E. K.
Craicr.l 'ru.j/ of supervisory practices as applied to typical instructional problems. Methods
S .al .. I,-l. nre ntruction.
EN. 510..-Socio-Economic Foundations of Education. 3 credits. Open only to
gtrailuate students in Education.
Sectinr 2. 9:00-12:00 daily. YN 311. COX, D. W.

EN. 511.-Problems in Educational Psychology. 3 credits. Open only to grad-
uat. rruidents in Education.
:':i:.0-12-00 daily. YN 134.








50 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EN. 544.-Legal Phases of Public School Administration. 3 credits. Openi ..i1;.
to graduate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 207. LEPS, J. M.
The legal status of schools in the United States; emphasis on Florida conditions, sch...l lia:
constitutional provisions, judicial decisions. Attorney General's rulings, and regulations: f t..
State Board of Education. Only graduate students with experience in administration andJ *.p-r
vision will be admitted.
EN. 550.-Workshop in the Language Arts in the Secondary School. 3 i.r -.it
Open only to graduate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 214. BOUTELLE, M. W.
Gives opportunity to principals, supervisors, graduate students, and in-service tea.-r,: i..
work on their own problems at the various levels in grades 7 through 14. Present tren.: Lb,.i
principles, methods, and materials will be considered.

EN. 562.-Principles of Pupil Guidance. 3 credits. Open only to graduate -tu-
dents in Education.
Section 2. 9:00-12:00 daily. YN 101. STRIPLING, R. O.

EN. 563.-Techniques in Guidance and Counseling. 3 credits. Open only to V radJ-
uate students in Education. Prerequisite: EN. 562 or equivalent.
Section 2. 9:00-12:00 daily. YN 201. FAGIN, B.

EN. 578.-Language Arts in the Elementary School-Skills. 3 credits. (Opltn
only to graduate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 150. HILLIARD, P.
The latest trends and practices in the teaching of reading, oral and written expression .-rd-
writing and spelling.

EN. 581.-Teaching in Small Schools. 3 credits. Open only to graduate stu.d -ni
in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 226. WOFFORD, K. V.
To assist teachers and supervisors of small schools of less than six teachers where -.'-,r .r-,
special problems.

EN. 585.-Workshop in Junior College Education. 3 credits. Open ::rnly t-o
graduate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 232. WATTENBARGER, J. L.
Problems of administrators, teachers, and other professional workers in junior co:' ,-- -r.
general education programs.
EN. 590.-Problems in School Administration and Supervision. 3 credits. (l':urlt:.'
Superintendents.)
To arrange. YN 128. JOHNS, R. L.

EN. 592.-Problems in School Administration and Supervision. 3 credits. I Ele-
mentary Principals.)
To arrange. YN 130. LEPS, J. M.

EN. 593.-Problems in School Administration and Supervision. 3 credits, I~ i -i -
dary Principals.)
To arrange. YN 130. LEPS, J. M.

EN. 603.-School Transportation. 3 credits. Open only to graduate stud-tlll
in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 132. BAIRD, J. P. and JOHNS, R. L.
The organization and administration of transportation services for school children -r.-.ric
of school buses, transportation safety standards; the organization and administration of p.-li.I:l
owned systems of transportation.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EN. 607.-Administration of Teacher Personnel. 3 credits. Open only to grad-
uate students in Education.
9:00-12:00 daily. YN 316. SIMMONS, G. B.
Consideration of the human factors in school administration.

INDUSTRIAL ARTS

IN. 312.-Elementary School Handicrafts. 3 credits.
Section 2. 8:00-11:00; 1:00-4:00 daily. YN 304-B. BERGENGREN, R. F.

GRADUATE COURSES
IN. 533.-Industrial Arts and Vocational Laboratory Seminar. 3 credits.
Section 2. 8:00-11:00 daily. YN 302. WILLIAMS, W. R.

IN. 535.-Curriculum Development in Industrial Education. 3 credits. Pre-
requisite: IN. 506 and one graduate Education course in curriculum.
1:00-4:00 daily. YN 302. WILLIAMS, W. R. and STAFF.
A staff course concerning the industrial arts and vocational industrial curriculum in its
wider implications, comprising review of the current situation and advanced study and research
of a projective nature, proceeding from basic educational concepts to specifics of the field.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

PHA. 361.-The Elementary School Health Program. 3 credits.
Section 2. 9:00-12:00 daily. FG 208. HICKS, D. A.
Principles of developing the health program with procedures for protecting and improving
Lhe health of the elementary school child through: home-school-community resources and cooper-
ation; health screening and follow-up; use of school plant and health services; selection and use
of health instructional materials, records and reports in providing health experiences at various
levels of the elementary school; integration and evaluation of health instruction.
GRADUATE COURSE
PHA. 510.-Evaluative Procedures in Physical Education and Health Education.
3 credits.
9:00-12:00 daily. FG 210. STATON, W. M.
Basic concepts of measurement and evaluation as applied to the fields of physical education
and health education. Status of evaluative procedures, application of elementary statistical
methods; problems of administering testing programs in the schools. Analysis of instruments
and techniques used in measuring ability, capacity, and progress.








52 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SIX WEEK COURSES


The courses listed in this section are for graduate students in
Education only and run for six weeks only. Students registering for
courses listed in this section follow the same admission and registra-
tion procedures as other students but are limited to a maximum load
of six semester hours.


JUNE 18 TO JULY 28

BUSINESS EDUCATION
GRADUATE COURSES
BEN. 552.-Teaching Office Machines. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BEN. .'::2 or
equivalent.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F and 5 hours laboratory to arranjg. YN .305.
BRADDY, V.
Methods of teaching the operation of machines commonly used in business c.f.-.',
BEN. 575.-Administration and Supervision of Business Education. 3 cridils.
Prerequisite: One year of teaching experience in Business Educa'tiuoi and
approval of department head.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. K 203.
Problems and duties of administrators and supervisors of business education ar 'rh' ...*s nd
county levels are studied.
BEN. 585.-Problems in Business Education. 3 credits.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 305.
Areas of interest to students enrolled will be studied intensively; emphasis .: r. :.bl'm-r in
business education in Florida schools.

EDUCATION
EN. 317.-Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices. 3 crtd-fil.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. OF. HINES, V. A.
Study of basic principles and methods of measurement; evaluation of pupil learrnr.. n ,r,..-l1:
EN. 325.-Teaching and Administration in Schools of Nursing. 6 credl-.
8:00-12:00 M T W Th F. FG 220. RITTER, B. E., and SALISBURY, A.
Conducted on a workshop basis. Consideration of problems in nursing school .Jd-..rrnrarlcri
such as organization and control, faculty selection, curriculum construction, ac, r-.Ir'rMlor.. per-
sonnel management; and of problems of instruction such as methods and materlil .-i te ihirrrl
and techniques of evaluation.
EN. 385.-Child Development. 3 credits.
Section 2. 8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. YN 236. McLENDON, I. R.

EN. 386.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
Section 2. 2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 236. McLENDON, 1. R.

EN. 403.-Philosophy of Education. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 236. BAMBERGER, F. E.
A critical examination of various theories and philosophies of education, tt.lr realni rh: ip.
to the democratic principle, and their significance to the evolving system of 1ll.:rai-n in Lh.'
United States.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EN. 428.-Materials and Methods for Teaching Slow Learners. 3 credits. Pre-
requisite: PSY. 312 or equivalent.
8:00-10:00 daily. OD.
Programs will be constructed which will correlate skill subjects with the cores of interest.
Curricular materials will be considered which can be used to teach mentally handicapped children
at various maturation levels and in various situations.

EN. 429.-Methods of Teaching Crippled Children. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
PSY. 312 or equivalent.
10:00-12:00 daily. OD.
An analysis of academic difficulties and needs due to specific handicaps. Consideration to
maintaining a "normal" school program for each child.

GRADUATE COURSES

EN. 500.-Research and Thesis Writing. No credit.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 323. BAMBERGER, F. E.
Candidates for the Master of Education degree are invited to enroll. Consideration of methods
of research, use of primary materials, problems of measurement, statistical analysis of research,
graphical representation of educational data, and the assembling and organization of materials
for the thesis.

EN. 503.-Measurement and Evaluation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EN. 316 is
recommended.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. OF. HINES, V. A.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems involving measurement, evaluation
of school procedures and diagnostic and remedial practices.

EN. 506.-Introduction to Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 142. ALEXANDER, V. A.
Techniques to provide better classroom utilization of the audio-visual aids to learning; some
opportunity to develop skill in these techniques.

EN. 507.-Advanced Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 134.
Trends in the application of psychology to problems of education; problems directly related
to the needs of students enrolled.

EN. 508.-The Educational Philosophy of John Dewey. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 134. NORMAN, J. W.
The more important trends in present-day education and the philosophical and psychological
theories' which constitute the background.

EN. 510.-History of Education. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. YN 134. NORMAN, J. W.
Attempt is made to evaluate present-day education by tracing back to their beginnings such
dominant factors as the teacher, the curriculum, the school plant, and the sources of support
and control for schools.

EN. 515.-Mental Health in the Classroom. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. WA 202.
Personal development of healthy mental attitudes; techniques to help children to develop
normal attitudes and behavior; techniques to assist those who deviate from the normal.

EN. 516.-The Junior High School Program. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. OE. EGGERT, C. L., and PADGETT, E.
Teachers, principals, and supervisors are given an opportunity to analyze and evaluate the
curriculum offerings in the modern junior high school. Emphasis will be placed on developing
a school program to meet the needs of early adolescents.








54 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EN. 518.-Organization and Administration of Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. YN 138. LEPS, J. M.
The duties of principals of junior and senior high schools and of junior colleges are comr
prehensively studied.
EN. 519.-Foundations and Problems of Curriculum Construction. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: EN. 527 or equivalent. This is a basic course for graduates
doing major work in the instruction or guidance fields.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. I 103. KITCHING, E.
Conflicting viewpoints in curricular practice, the relationship of pupil maturity to curriculum
development, implications of the guidance emphasis, approaches to writing courses of study, re-
organizing the program of studies, developing core courses, planning the co-curricular and extra-
curricular programs. Each student will present a discussion of some curriculum problem.
EN. 522.-Educational Organization and Administration. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 138. JOHNS, R. L.
The basic course in school administration. It includes the following areas: Federal, stat-
and local relationships and functions; systems of educational organization in the United States
duties of superintendents, board members, principals and trustees; the organization of local school
units: and the interrelationships of teachers, administrators and supervisors.
EN. 524.-Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools. 3 credits.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 140. EGGERT, C. L.
The organization of the elementary school in the light of its purposes and functions is studied.
The duties of the school principal are considered in their broad applications to elementary school
problems.
EN. 530.-Individual Work. 3 or 6 credits.
Section 2. To arrange. YN 302. WILLIAMS, W. R.

EN. 533.-Problems in Teaching Science in Senior High Schools and Junior Col-
leges. 6 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or teaching experience.
8:00-12:00 MTWThF. LE 138. BINGHAM, N. E.; ELLIOTT, P.;
1:00- 3:00 MT W Th F. LE 142. McCRACKEN. M. R.; LEAVITT, B. B
Recent developments in the sciences and their implications for high school and junior college
teaching; new techniques of teaching; current problems.
EN. 535.-Fundamentals of Educational Supervision. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. YN 311. GREEN, E. K.
The functions of supervisory officers related to improving instruction are critically revieweJ
in their backgrounds of educational purposes and the organization of school systems. Introductor.
consideration is given to the use of various supervisory devices and procedures in elementary an-J
secondary school situations.

EN. 537.-Supervision of Student Teaching and Internships. 6 credits.
8:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 226. LEENHOUTS, L. N., WILES, K.
For teachers who supervise student teachers or interns in the elementary school.

EN. 539.-Teaching Exceptional Children. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. OE. MASE, D. J.
Study of methods of finding, diagnosing, and educating children who find difficulty in adjust.
ing to the usual public school environment.

EN. 540.-Socio-Economic Foundations of Education. 3 credits.
Section 1. 2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 311. HINES, V. A.
The socio-economic bases of education are comprehensively surveyed.

EN. 541.-Problems in Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. WA 202.
Individualized study of problems dealing with child development, adolescence, learning, an.
other areas of educational psychology.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EN. 545.-Modern Practices in Elementary Education. 6 credits.
8:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN. HILLIARD, P.
An orientation course for all graduate majors in elementary education. Emphasis is placed
on modern school curriculum practices and on child development as it is related to learning.
EN. 547.-Problems in Elementary Education. 6 hours.
8:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN. WOFFORD, K. V.
Principles and practices of elementary school education are studied by the problem approach.
The area of social earnings will be stressed.
EN. 562.-Principles of Pupil Guidance. 3 credits.
Section 1. 10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 311. STRIPLING, R. 0.
Students carry out an individual guidance project in addition to their survey of guidance
principles and practices in schools. Those who have had an introductory course in guidance should
take EN. 563 as their second course in the field.
EN. 563.-Techniques in Guidance and Counseling. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
EN. 562 or equivalent.
Section 1. 10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. K 203. FAGIN, B.
Experience is given in the use of measuring instruments useful in guidance; counseling
techniques are carefully considered; the keeping and use of records are examined; and the
functions of a guidance specialist are studied.
EN. 575.-Modern Trends in the Teaching of Reading. 3 credits.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. AN 306. SPACHE, G. D.
To help teachers on all grade levels to understand the purpose of teaching reading, to know
the specific skills and attitudes which should be developed, and to become acquainted with the
techniques of teaching them.
EN. 576.-Laboratory in Corrective Reading. 3 credits. Prerequisite or co-
requisite: EN. 575 or equivalent.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. AN 306. SPACHE, G. D.
Intensive study is made of the diagnosis, correction, and prevention of reading difficulties.
Application of the principles studied will be made in work with individuals and selected groups
of children. This course deals with both elementary and secondary school reading problems.
EN. 584.-Education for Young Children. 6 credits.
8:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 209.
For teachers of children of pre- and early school age. The course includes such topics as the
following: what young children are like; curriculum experiences to meet the needs of young
children; methods and materials; reports and records; working with parents.
EN. 608.-Administration of Pupil Personnel. 3 credits.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. YN 316. SIMMONS, G. B.

EN. 675.-The Core Program in the Secondary School. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. I 103. KITCHING, E.
A program for teachers interested in learning how to work effectively in schools which
utilize the core curriculum type of organization.

ENGLISH
EH. 306.-Modern English Grammar. 3 credits.
1:00-3:00 M T W Th and 1:00 F. AN 210. COX, E. H.
A study of modern English inflection and syntax. Designed to be of practical value to
teachers of English.
EH. 308.-American Folksongs. 3 credits.
3:00-5:00 M T W Th and 3:00 F. AN 210. MORRIS, A. C.
A course designed (1) to acquaint the students with the large body of American folksongs
such as the English and Scottish popular ballads, cowboy songs, sea chanteys, negro spirituals,
tolk hymns of the whites, songs of the lumberjacks, dialogue and nursery songs, play-party songs,
and mining camp songs; and (2) to point out the value inherent in the folksong material for
the classroom teacher and for students interpreting the American cultural heritage.







56 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

INDUSTRIAL ARTS

IN. 312.-Elementary School Handicrafts. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8:00-11:00 daily. YN 304-B. BERGENGREN, R. F.
Primarily for teachers. Individual creative expression in both structural and decorative
design application: simple projects in leather, textiles, clay, reed, felt, linoleum block, metal,
cork, woods; the development of native craft materials.

IN. 313.-Handicrafts. 3 credits.
1:00-4:00 daily. YN 304-B. BERGENGREN, R. F.
The course deals with secondary school, recreational, and adult programs. Major areas
explored include leather carving and tooling, metal etching, wood carving, pottery, plastics and
textiles.

GRADUATE COURSES

IN. 506.-History and Philosophy of Industrial and Vocational Education. 3
credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. YN 304-A. MEYER, H. K.
The historical background which highlights the significant educational philosophies and ob-
jectives underlying the programs of industrial arts and vocational education. Emphasis is given
to modern concepts and their implications.

IN. 525.-Advanced Industrial Arts Design. 3 credits.
1:00-4:00 daily. YN 304-A. MEYER, H. K.
Industrial arts project design for various media. Laboratory practice.

IN. 533.-Industrial Arts and Vocational Laboratory Seminar. 3 credits.
Section 1. 10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. YN 302. WILLIAMS, W. R.
Advanced laboratory techniques; opportunity for in-service graduates to exchange experiences.


LIBRARY SCIENCE

LY. 303.-Library Organization and Administration. 3 credits.
8:30 daily. LI 454.
Survey of the basic functions and procedures of school libraries.


MUSIC

MSC. 160.-Music Skills. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. R 201.
Laboratory: 12:00 M W F. R 201.
MSC. 160 and 161 are state certification requirements for teaching in the elementary schools.
Designed for the classroom teacher. A study of the fundamentals of music needed by the
classroom teacher for teaching music in the elementary school.

MSC. 161.-Music for the Elementary Child. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. R 201.
Laboratory: 1:00 M W F. R 201.
Designed for the classroom teacher. This course presents the study of principles, problems,
and procedures relative to the teaching of music in the elementary grades.

MSC. 363.-Projects and Problems in Music Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. R 103. SCHMIDT, D. T.
Laboratory: 2:00 M W F. R 201.
This course is designed primarily for the advanced student who wishes some help in the
problems of teaching music in an individual situation.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MSC. 364.-Projects and Problems in Music Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. R 103. SCHMIDT, D. T.
Laboratory: 2:00 M W F. R 201.
This course is designed primarily for the advanced student who wishes some help in the
problems of teaching music in an individual situation.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS

PHA. 315.-Applied Anatomy and Physiology. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-6.
2:00-4:00 M T W Th F. FG 210. STATON, W. M.
For students planning to teach in the area of physical education or health education. Basic
understandings with respect to the structure and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous,
respiratory, digestive, reproductive, endocrine, excretory and circulatory systems; and their
application to the fields of physical education and health education.
PHA. 325.-The Conduct of Playgrounds and Indoor Centers. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. FG 210. BOSWELL, J. H.
For community recreation workers, school personnel and volunteers interested in the operation
of playground and indoor center programs. Physical facilities, layout and equipment, personnel,
activities, program planning and problems of operation and administration.

PHA. 371.-Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Rhythmical Activities.
3 credits. Prerequisite: PHA. 171, 271. Open only to women.
2:00 M W F. FG 214. FAULDS, B. B.
Laboratory: 8:00-10:00 daily. FG 214.
Methods and materials in teaching rhythmic fundamentals, modern, folk, tap, American
country, and social dance at the secondary school and college levels.

PHA. 373.-Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School. 3 credits.
Section 3. 2:00 M W F. FG 222. HORTON, S.
Laboratory: 10:00-12:00 daily. FG 222.
The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group
play, large group play, directed play, rhythmic activities and team games, together with methods
and procedures for conducting such a program.

PHA. 421.-Driver Education and Traffic Safety. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Limited
to senior and graduate students who hold a valid driver's license.
12:00-2:00 M T W Th F. FG 224.
Prepares teachers to conduct Driver Education and Training courses on the secondary school
level. Methods and materials concerned with the psycbophysical limitations of drivers, driving
practices, automobile construction, manipulation and maintenance, pedestrian protection, road
training, and skill tests.

GRADUATE COURSES

PHA. 505.-Research Methods in Physical Education, Health Education and Rec-
reation. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. FG 208. WAGLOW, L F.
Elements and techniques of research and their application to problems in the fields of physical
education, health education and recreation. The identification of the various research methods,
familiarization with outstanding and significant research reports, evaluation of published research.
Investigations in the physiology of exercise, kinesiology, anthropometry, body mechanics, strength,
endurance, and motor skills.

PHA. 515.-Supervision of Physical Education. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. FG 208. CRAWFORD, W. H.
For those now employed or planning to become supervisors of state, county or city programs
of physical education. Observational techniques, the evaluation and improvement of programs
and teaching, standards for judging instruction, types of conferences, principles of curriculum
construction, and administrative relationships.








58 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

PHA. 520.-Problems in the Administration of Athletics. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. FG 210. CHERRY, H. S.
Problems of administering the interscholastic athletic program. The place of athletics in
education; various methods of organizing the programs; establishment of policies relating to
staff, budget, equipment, facilities, program, awards, public relations, membership in conferences,
and legal liability. The intramural athletic program.
PHA. 533.-Problems in Physical Education. 3 credits.
12:00-2:00 M T W Th F. FG 208. SALT, E. B.
Contemporary problems in physical education designed to broaden the student's understanding
of principles and current practices as they relate to school programs in this field. Through a
comprehensive study of current literature, the student will be given an opportunity to examine
the effect of recent educational trends upon physical education.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PCL. 301.-American Government and Politics. 3 credits. The first half of the
course PCL. 301-302.
Section 2. 8:00-10:00 M T W Th F. PE 201. DOHERTY, H. J.
A study of the structure and function of the federal government.
PCL. 309.-International Relations. 3 credits. The first half of the course PCL.
309-310.
Section 2. 10:00-12:00 M T W Th F. PE 201. DOTY, F. A.
The nature of international relations, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, armaments;
history of international relations; foreign policies; function and problems of democracy; inter-
national organization; the League of Nations and the World Court.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SCHEDULE OF COURSES

SUMMER SESSION 1951

JUNE 18 TO AUGUST 18

MINIMUM SIZE OF CLASSES
No undergraduate class or section will be continued or offered if, at the end of
the regular registration period, prior to the day classes begin for a term or
semester, the registration does not meet the following minimum requirements.
For Freshmen and Sophomore classes or sections (the comprehensive courses
and courses numbered in the 100's and 200's) the minimum is 12 registrations.
For Junior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 300's) the minimum is
8 registrations.
For Senior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 400's) the minimum is
6 registrations.
ABBREVIATIONS


The following abbreviations have
A BUILDING A
(Accounting)
AD ADMINISTRATION
BUILDING
AN ANDERSON HALL
AU AUDITORIUM
B BUILDING B
BA BENTON ANNEX
BN BENTON HALL
C BUILDING C
(Art)
CR CANCER RESEARCH
LABORATORY
DL DAIRY LABORATORY
E BUILDING E
El ENGINEERING AND
INDUSTRIES BUILDING
F BUILDING F
FG FLORIDA GYMNASIUM
FL FLOYD HALL
FM FARM MACHINE
LABORATORY
GH GREENHOUSE
HT HORTICULTURE BUILDING
I BUILDING I
(Classrooms)
K BUILDING K
(Classrooms)
LE LEIGH HALL


been used to designate buildings:
LI LIBRARY
LW LAW BUILDING
MI MILITARY BUILDING
N BUILDING N
(Engineering Classrooms and
Laboratories)
NE NEWELL HALL
NL NUTRITION LABORATORY
OD OFFICE D
OE OFFICE E
OF OFFICE F
PE PEABODY HALL
PO POULTRY LABORATORY
R BUILDING R
(Music)
RE REED LABORATORY
SC SCIENCE HALL
SE SEAGLE BUILDING
SL SANITARY LABORATORY
U BUILDING U
(Architecture and Art)
UA UNION ANNEX
VL VEGETABLE PROCESSING
LABORATORY
WA WALKER HALL
WG WOMEN'S GYM
WO WOOD PRODUCTS
LABORATORY
YN YONGE BUILDING







60 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COMPREHENSIVE COURSES

C-11.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:00 M W AU
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 daily PE 208
Section 102 8:00 daily PE 208
Section 103 9:00 daily PE 208
Section 104 10:00 daily PE 208
Section 105 10:00 daily PE 209

C-12.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 2:00 T Th AU
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 7:00 daily PE 209
Section 202 8:00 daily PE 209
Section 203 9:00 daily PE 209
Section 204 11:00 daily PE 209
C-11-12: Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems
of the modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in
education, in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more
effective coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny
is made of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that
a consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.

C-21.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:00 M BN 203
Lecture Section 12: 2:00 T BN 203
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 daily BN 205
Section 102 8:00 daily BN 205
Section 103 9:00 daily BN 205
Section 104 10:00 daily BN 205
Section 105 11:00 daily BN 205

C-22.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one section.)
Section 201 7:00 daily BN 203
Section 202 8:00 daily BN 203
Section 203 9:00 daily BN 201
Section 204 10:00 daily BN 201
Section 205 11:00 daily BN 201
C-21-22: An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular
reference to man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to
explain the more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the under-
standing of them: and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize
physical materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of
physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demon-
strate their essential unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is
emphasized.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-31.-Reading, Speaking and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 1:00 M AU
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 M T Th F S AN 307
Section 102 9:00 M T Th F S AN 307
Section 103 11:00 M T Th F S AN 307
Section 104 7:00 M T Th F S AN 311
Section 105 9:00 M T Th F S AN 311
Section 106 11:00 M T Th F S AN 311
Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 301 1:00-3:00 T F AN 203
Section 302 1:00-3:00 T F AN 209
Section 303 3:00-5:00 T F AN 203
Section 304 3:00-5:00 T F AN 209

C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section, one Discussion Section, and one
Laboratory Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 1:00 T AU
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 8:00 M T Th F S AN 307
Section 202 10:00 M T Th F S AN 307
Section 203 12:00 M T Th F S AN 307
Section 204 8:00 M T Th F S AN 311
Section 205 10:00 M T Th F S AN 311
Section 206 12:00 M T Th F S AN 311

Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 401 1:00-3:00 M Th AN 203
Section 402 1:00-3:00 M Th AN 209
Section 403 3:00-5:00 M Th AN 203
Section 404 3:00-5:00 M Th AN 209
C-31-32: Reading, Speaking, and Writing. Designed to furnish the training in reading,
speaking, and writing necessary for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter.
This training will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading,
in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control
of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of
broadening their interests and increasing their appreciation of literature.

C-41-Practical Logic. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 8:00 daily AD 208
Section 2 9:00 daily AD 208
Section 3 10:00 daily AD 208
Both in private life and in vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking. In
this course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with
greater accuracy and thoroughness, (2) to be able to use objective standards necessary in critically
evaluating his own thinking process and product as well as the conclusions reached by others,
and (3) to record both process and product of thinking in effective language. The material used
applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is to insure practice, many
illustrations are given, and numerous exercises are assigned.







62 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits.
Section 1 7:00 daily PE 4
Section 2 8:00 daily PE 102
Section 3 9:00 daily PE 4
Section 4 10:00 daily PE 4
Section 5 11:00 daily PE 4
A beginning course covering the development of the number system, computation with approxi-
mated and exact numbers, algebra as a generalization of arithmetic, practical geometry, func-
tional relationships, logarithms and the simple trigonometry of the triangle, simple and compound
interest, and annuities. Not open to students who have completed Basic Mathematics.

C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 1:00 M W R 122 STAFF
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 daily AN 112
Section 102 8:00 daily AN 112
Section 103 9:00 daily AN 112
Section 104 10:00 daily AN 112
Section 105 11:00 daily AN 112
Section 106 12:00 daily AN 112
Section 107 7:00 daily AN 115
Section 108 8:00 daily AN 115
Section 109 9:00 daily AN 115
Section 110 10:00 daily AN 115
Section 111 11:00 daily AN 115
Section 112 12:00 daily AN 115

C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 1:00 T Th R 122 STAFF
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 7:00 daily AN 113
Section 202 8:00 daily AN 113
Section 203 9:00 daily AN 113
Section 204 10:00 daily AN 113
Section 205 11:00 daily AN 113
Section 206 12:00 daily AN 113
C-51-52: The Humanities. A course designed to provide an understanding and appreciation
of the literature, philosophy, art and music in which the enduring values of human life have
found expression. The course deals both with the culture of our own day and with our cultural
heritage. Its larger purpose is to enable the student to develop a mature sense of values, an
enlarged appreciation and a philosophy of life adequate for the needs of our age.

C-61.-Biological Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 4:00 T LE 207
Lecture Section 12: 2:00 M LE 207
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 7:00 M T W Th F I 101
Section 102 8:00 M T W Th F I 101
Section 103 9:00 M T W Th F I 101
Section 104 10:00 M T W Th F I 101
Section 105 11:00 M T W Th F I 101
Section 106 7:00 M T W Th F I 107








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section 107 8:00 M T W Th F I 107
Section 108 9:00 M T W Th F I 107
Section 109 10:00 M T W Th F I 107
Section 110 11:00 M T W Th F I 107

C-62.-Biological Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: 4:00 M LE 207
Lecture Section 22: 2:00 T LE 207
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 8:00 M T W Th F I 109
Section 202 9:00 M T W Th F I 109
Section 203 10:00 M T W Th F I 109
Section 204 11:00 M T W Th F I 109
C-61-62: In C-61 a biological interpretation of the living animal and plant in terms of
self-maintenance and reproduction will be considered. In C-62 the important aspects of genetics,
evolution, and the social-economic inter-relations of organisms will provide the main sequence
and material. The lectures will be devoted to a consideration of biological topics and contribu-
tions of current, social, political or ideological interest.


DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

ACCOUNTING

ATG. 211.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The first half of the course
ATG. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 7:00 daily A-1 SCOTT, N. H.
Section 2 9:00 daily A-1 TORNWALL, G. E., JR.
Section 3 10:00 daily A-1 TORNWALL, G. E., JR.
Section 4 11:00 daily A-1 FORTIN, G. E.
Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of
business papers and records; recording transactions; preparation of financial statements and
reports. Prerequisites for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

ATG. 212.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. The second half of the course
ATG. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 8:00 daily A-2 SUMMERHILL, G. W.
Section 2 9:00 daily A-2 CODDING, J. L.
Section 3 10:00 daily A-2 ANDERSON, C. A.

ATG. 311.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 211-212.
7:00 daily. A-4. RAY, D. D.
The mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts; fiscal period
and adjustments; working papers; form and preparation of financial statements; followed by an
intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the preparation of the
balance sheet and income statements.

ATG. 312.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 311.
9:00 daily. A-4. RAY, D. D.
Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from
the legal organization form used by businesses; liabilities; proprietorship; partnership; corpora-
tions; capital stock; surplus; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as dis-
closed by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements; financial ratios and standards,
their preparation, meaning and use.








64 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ATG. 313.-Cost Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 311.
8:00 daily. A-4. CODDING, J. L.
The methods of collection, classification, and interpretation of cost data; special problems,
standard casts, cost systems, uses of cost data in business control. Lectures and problems.
ATG. 411.-Advanced Accounting. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 312.
11:00 daily. A-4. PARKER, W. D.
Specialized accounting problems: partnerships; statement of affairs; consignments; install-
ments; ventures; insurance; and other related subjects.
ATG. 412.-Principles of Auditing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 312.
10:00 daily. A-3. SUMMERHILL, G. W.
Auditing theory and current auditing practice; principal kinds of audits and services of the
public accountant; professional and ethical aspects of auditing. Lectures, discussions, and problems.
ATG. 414.-Income Tax Procedure. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 311.
8:00 daily. A-3. PARKER, W. D.
The Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations, and related accounting problems; preparation
of tax returns for individuals, corporations and fiduciaries. Practice is provided in the use of
the loose-leaf income tax services.
ATG. 417.-Governmental Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 212.
10:00 daily. A-4. SCOTT, N. H.
The basic principles underlying governmental and institutional accounting. Detailed con-
sideration is given to the operation of recommended types of funds, the budget process, account
structure, tax accounting for cities, and the utilization of accounting in the preparation of sig-
nificant reports.
ATG. 418.-Advanced Accounting. C.P.A. Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
ATG. 312.
7:00 daily. A-3. MATTHIES, W. R.
A continuation of specialized accounting problems; receiverships; foreign exchange; stock
brokerage; estates and trusts; budgets; business taxes; consolidations and mergers; and other
problems usually covered in the C.P.A. exmaination.

GRADUATE COURSES
ATG. 512.-Public Accounting: Problems and Reports. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
ATG. 412.
9:00 daily. A-3. MATTHIES, W. R.
Some of the leading problems in the field of public accounting, including the services offered,
the need for and the manner of regulation of the profession, requirements for success in the
profession, liabilities of public accountants, criteria for evaluating auditing standards, and the
formulation of audit reports. Use is made of selected case studies. Consideration is also given
to the relation of public accounting to other professions, and attention is directed to the bibli-
ography of the field.
ATG.-513.-Cost and Budgeting Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ATG.
313, ATG. 411, and ATG. 412.
8:00 daily. A-1. DaVAULT, J. W.
An analysis of complex cost problems, managerial use of cost reports in management and
budget preparation, as well as the design and installation of cost systems.

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

ACY. 125.-Agricultural Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course ACY.
125-126.
(Register for the Lecture (Section 1), and one Discussion (Section 11
or 12).)
Section 1. 10:00 M W F S. LE 207. THOMAS, G. A.
10:00-12:00 T Th. LE 207.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 65

Section 11. 11:00 M F. LE 142.
Section 12. 11:00 W S. LE 142.
Selected fundamentals of inorganic chemistry designed primarily for agricultural students.
Suitable also for the general student who wishes a non-laboratory course in chemistry.
ACY. 126.-Agricultural Chemistry. 4 credits. The last half of the course
ACY. 125-126.
9:00 M W F S. LE 154.
8:00 to 10:00 T Th. LE 207.
8:00 M F. LE 154.
(For graduate courses in Biochemistry see Chemistry.)

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

AS. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. HT 410. GREENE, R. E. L.
Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given
to the Farm Credit Administration. One field trip is required.
AS. 306.-Farm Management. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. HT 410. GREENE, R. E. L.
The factors of production; types of farming and their distribution; factors affecting profits
in farming; problems of labor, machinery, layout of farms, and farm reorganization.
AS. 308.-Marketing. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. HT 410.
Principles of marketing agricultural commodities; commodity exchanges and future trading;
auction companies; market finance; market news; marketing of important agricultural com-
modities.
AS. 413.-Agricultural Policy. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. HT 410.
A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. Evaluation of present legislative programs
and policies affecting the farmer.
GRADUATE COURSES
AS. 505.-Research Problems in Farm Management.
To arrange.

AS. 511.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products.
To arrange.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

AG. 301.-Drainage and Irrigation. 3 credits.
9:00 M T W Th. FL 210, CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 3:00 T Th. FM.
The drainage and irrigation of lands with treatment of the necessity for such in the pro-
duction of field, fruit, and vegetable crops. The cost, design, operation and upkeep of drainage and
irrigation systems. Field work in laying out systems.
AG. 302.-Farm Motors. 3 credits.
7:00 M T W Th. FL 210. CHOATE, R. E.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 3:00 M F. FM.
The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power. The care, operation,
and repair of electric motors, internal combustion engines (including automobile, stationary
gasoline engines, truck and tractor), and windmills.









66 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSIOn

AG. 303.-Farm Shop. 3 credits.
11:00 M T W Th. FL 210.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 3:00 W. FM.
3:00 to 5:00 F. FM.
The farm shop jobs that are common to the farms of Florida. Carpentry, concrete construt:...r,
light forging, soldering, tool care and repair are some of the jobs given special eniiha: l
Laboratory work includes actual shop practice.
AG. 306.-Farm Machinery. 3 credits.
8:00 M T W Th. FL 210. SKINNER, T. C.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 M W. FM.
The operation, care, and repair of farm implements designed to give the students .' f.r, n
mental knowledge of the various machines commonly used on the farm.
AG. 401.-Farm Structures. 3 credits.
10:00 M T W Th. FL 210. SKINNER, T. C.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 T Th. FM.
A study of the functional requirements, design, cost, construction, and the structural .ral, i.
of farm buildings with some training in the preparation of blueprints.
AG. 407.-Farm Shop Power Equipment. 3 credits.
8:00 M F. FL 102.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 M W. FM.
8:00 to 12:00 F. FM.
The care, operation and repair of both metal and woodworking power shop equipr:rnr u.:-1
in the construction and repair of farm buildings and equipment.

GRADUATE COURSE
AG. 570.-Problems in Agricultural Engineering. 3 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. STAFF.
Special problems in agricultural engineering.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

GRADUATE COURSE
AXT. 521.-Special Problems in Agricultural Extension Methods. r t.:.
credits.*
To arrange. HAMPSON, C. M.
Library and workshop relating to agricultural extension methods. Research work it .AuJdJ
publications reviewed, written reports developed.

AGRONOMY

AY. 321.-General Field Crops. 3 credits.
11:00 M T W Th F. FL 302. RODGERS.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 3:00 W. FL 302. RODGERS.
Grain, fiber, sugar, peanut, tobacco, forage and miscellaneous field crops, with sp-..:al ..m-
phasis on varieties and practices recommended for southern United States.

AY. 329.-Genetics. 3 credits.
9:00 M T W Th F S. FL 302. HANSON.
The fundamentals of inheritance, emphasizing the application of genetics and its .:.,a .te
branches of science in the improvement of economic plants and animals and in program, f.ur
human betterment.

Credits assigned must be shown on registration card.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


AY. 426.-Individual Problems in Agronomy. Variable credits.
To arrange. FL 302. STAFF.
Individual problems selected from the fields of crop production, genetics, or plant breeding.
AY. 436.-Pastures. 2 credits. Prerequisite: AY 321 or AY. 324.
8:00 M W. FL 302. McCLOUD.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 M W. FL 302. McCLOUD.
The development and management of grazing areas of southeastern United States, with par-
ticular reference to Florida conditions.
GRADUATE COURSES
AY. 526.-Special Agronomic Problems. Variable credits.
To arrange. FL 302. STAFF.
Library, laboratory, or field studies relating to crop production and improvement. Experi-
ments are studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.
AY. 570.-Research in Agronomy. Variable credits.
To arrange. FL 302. STAFF.
Original work on definite problems in field crops, ecology, or plant breeding.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

AL. 309.-General Animal Husbandry. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. FL 104. PACE, J. E.
Types and breeds of farm animals; principles of breeding, selection and management.
AL. 311.-Elementary Nutrition. 4 credits.
8:00 daily. FL 104. WALLACE, H. D.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 M W. FL 104.
Elements and compounds; metabolic processes in animal nutrition; biological assays.
AL. 314.-Livestock Judging. 3 credits.
8:00 T Th. FL 102. PACE, J. E.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 M T W F. FL 102.
Special training in livestock judging; show ring methods; contests at fairs.
AL. 413.-Swine Production. 3 credits.
10:00 M T W F. FL 104. FOLKS, S. J.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 T Th. FL 104.
Selection, feeding and management of hogs; forage crops and grazing; diseases and parasite
control.
GRADUATE COURSES
AL 501.-Advanced Animal Production. Variable credit.
Section 1. To arrange. GLASSCOCK, R. S., CUNHA, T. J., and PEAR-
SON, A. M.
Reviews and discussions in the latest developments in the fields of animal production, nutrition
and genetics.
AL. 509.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 1 to 4 credits.
To arrange. DAVIS, G. K., and WALLACE, H. D.
Problems in Animal Nutrition.
AL. 570.-Research in Animal Husbandry. 1 to 6 credits.
To arrange. CUNHA, T. J., GLASSCOCK, R. S., and PEARSON, A. M.
Experimental problem and thesis in various phases of animal husbandry.








68 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ANTHROPOLOGY

APY. 400.-Field Session in Archeology. 6 credits.
8:00-11:00 daily. PE 312. GOGGIN, J. M.
Excavation of archeological sites, recording of data, laboratory handling and anal..ij specimens, and study of the theoretical culture principles which underlie field methods and jrt!'ua.:
analysis. Two hours of lectures and discussions, four hours of supervised laboratory and field -..rk
APY. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange. GOGGIN, J. M.

ARCHITECTURE

AE. 101.-The Arts of Design. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. U 103.
A survey to provide an insight into the several fields of design, and a basis for the salcrllon
of a career in the arts of design. A study of social and economic influences and the urpo'real
principles in the visual arts.
AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics. 3 credits.
1:00-4:30 M T W Th F. U 107.
The elements of visual design, each examined in the light of principles. An elementary an.
analytical course in observation, and the representation of three dimensional objects ir. T',.:
dimensions.
AE. 203.-Basic Design. 3 credits.
9:00-12:00 daily. U 108.
The basic influence which natural and social environment, materials, and psychologictJI irn,
physical functions exerted in man's development of shelter.
AE. 204.-Organic Planning. 3 credits.
1:00-4:30 M T W Th F. U 109.
Projects in design. Analysis and synthesis; methodology of planning. Elementary exirc,~.
in the integration of all design considerations. Symbols and techniques of representation.
AE. 205.-Building Technology. 4 credits. First half of the course AE. 205-206.
7:00-9:00 daily. U 107.
The functional and structural approach to the design and construction of buildings. Th.L
course includes the elements of structures, the nature of building materials, loads and i.'r.' -,
service elements and surveying.
AE. 206.-Building Technology. 4 credits. Second half of the course AE. 203-20I'.
Prerequisite: AE. 205, C-42 or MS. 325 and prerequisite or corequisite C-22.
7:00-9:00 daily. U 109.
The frames of structures, the loads on building frames, the mechanics of building I.- l:,
elements of heating, wiring and plumbing, and the responsibilities of architects and builders.

UPPER DIVISION COURSES*
AE. 301-302-303-304-305.-Projects in Architecture, Group 1. 3 credits ca.h:
-group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pr:-
requisite: Completion of Lower Division program in Architecture or equiva-
lent.
Hours to arrange. E 189.

AE. 306-307-308-309-310.-Projects in Architecture, Group 2. 3 credits ea.-h:
-group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: The series AE. 301-302-303-304-305.
Hours to arrange. E 179.

For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


AE. 401-402-403-404-405.-Projects in Architecture, Group 3. 3 credits each;
-group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: The series AE. 306-307-308-309-310.
Hours to arrange. E 116.
AE. 406-407-408-409-410.-Projects in Architecture, Group 4. 3 credits each;
-group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: The series AE. 401-402-403-404-405.
Hours to arrange. E 126.
AE. 441-442-443-444-445.-Projects in Architecture, Group 5. 3 credits each;
-group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Pre-
requisite: The series AE. 406-407-408-409-410.
Hours to arrange. E 157.
AE. 446-447-448-449-450.-Thesis in Architecture. 3 credits each;-group total,
15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite: The
series AE. 441-442-443-444-445.
Hours to arrange. E 164.
AE. 456-457-458-459-460.-Thesis in Planning. 3 credits each;-group total,,15
credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission
of the Faculty.
Hours to arrange. E 164.

GRADUATE COURSES
AE. 501.-Architectural Design. Variable credit. The first half of the course
AE. 501-502. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in Architecture.
Hours to arrange. E 161.
Research on a special phase of architectural design, selected by the student with the approval
of the Faculty.
AE. 502.-Architectural Design. Variable credit. The second half of the course
AE. 501-502.
Hours to arrange.
AE. 503.-Architectural Research. Variable credit. The first half of the course
AE. 503-504. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in Architecture.
Hours to arrange. E 161.
Detailed investigation of a selected problem for the purpose of providing insight and under-
standing in some field of fundamental importance in architecture.
AE. 504.-Architectural Research. Variable credit. The second half of the course
AE. 503-504.
Hours to arrange. E 161.

AE. 505.-Community Planning. Variable credit. The first half of the course
AE. 505-506. Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in Architecture, AE. 457 or
equivalent, and permission of the Faculty.
Hours to arrange. E 161.
The analysis and solution of an advanced problem in community planning, selected by the
student with the approval of the Faculty.
AE. 506.-Community Planning. Variable credit. The second half of the course
AE. 505-506.
Hours to arrange. E 161.








70 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AE. 551.-Building Construction. Variable credit. The first half of the course
AE. 551-552. Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in Architecture or in Building
Construction.
Hours to arrange. E 161.
Advanced study of a problem in materials or methods of building construction selected by
the student with the approval of the Faculty.
AE. 552.-Building Construction. Variable credit. The second half of the course
AE. 551-552.
Hours to arrange. E 161.

AE. 553.-Structural Design of Buildings. Variable credit. The first half of the
course AE. 553-554. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in Architecture or in
Building Construction.
Hours to arrange. E 161.
Advanced study of a problem in the structural design of buildings, selected by the student
with the approval of the Faculty.
AE. 554.-Structural Design of Buildings. Variable credit. The second half of
the course AE. 553-554.
Hours to arrange. E 161.

ART
ART 121.-The Visual Arts. 3 credits.
Lectures: 10:00 M Th. U 103.
Discussion Group: 10:00 T W F S. E 176.
Introduction to the interrelationship of the visual arts; i.e., painting, sculpture, commercial
art, architecture, etc.
ART 122.-Materials and Spatial Design. 3 credits.
10:00-12:00 daily. C 103.
Organization of three dimensional forms. Projects in construction, modeling, and carving.
ART 223.-Color and Design. 3 credits.
9:00-11:00 daily. C 100.
Organization of basic visual elements-line, tone, form, color, and texture.
ART 225.-Scientific Contributions to Art. 3 credits.
9:00-11:00 daily. C 100.
Problems and discussions relative to perspective, color, illumination, media, etc.
ART 226.-Pictorial Composition. 3 credits.
9:00-11:00 daily. C 105.
Pictorial composition using the oil medium, employing elements studied in Art 122 and Art 223.
UPPER DIVISION COURSES*
ART 301.-Design I. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. C 101.
6 hours to arrange.
Watercolor techniques in a study of color, line, and design.
ART 302.-Design II. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. C 101.
6 hours to arrange.
Techniques and media. Organization in oil paint, encaustic, and egg tempera.
For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ART 394.-Modern Man and His Art. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. E 176.
Orientation to contemporary art. An interpretation and explanation of the practical and
philosophic significance of the twentieth century art forms.

ART 403.-Design III. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. C 101.
6 hours to arrange.
Advanced problems in design through abstract and representational interpretations.

ART 404.-Design IV. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. C 101.
6 hours to arrange.
Emotional qualities, organization of idea, and communication through visual elements will
be emphasized.

ART 494-Modern Art. 3 credits.
Lectures: 8:00 M T W Th. E 176.
Laboratory: 8:00-9:00 F S. C 103.
2 hours to arrange.
The history of art from 1850 and the development of art leading to movements such as
fauvism, cubism, futurism, expressionism, etc. Emphasis devoted to French and American art.

GRADUATE COURSES*

ART 503.-Art Problems. Variable credit. The first half of the course ART
503-504.
Hours to arrange. C 105.
A series of projects relating to a field of specialization. The areas from which selection can
be made are painting, crafts and advertising design.

ART 504.-Art Problems. Variable credit. The second half of the course ART
503-504.
Hours to arrange. C 105.

ART 505.-Art Research. Variable credit. The first half of the course ART
505-506.
Hours to arrange. C 105.
Research in naive materials or native art forms or a study of technical processes or the like.

ART 506.-Art Research. Variable credit. The second half of the course ART
505-506.
Hours to arrange. C 105.


ASTRONOMY

ATY. 141.-Descriptive Astronomy. 3 credits. Not open to students who have
had any other astronomy course.
8:00 daily. PE 10.
Concepts useful for the appreciation of the universe about us. Telling time by the stars:
getting acquainted with constellations; variable and double stars; planets and meteors. Selected
experiments with occasional observation periods.
*For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.








72 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BACTERIOLOGY

BCY. 301.-General Bacteriology. 4 credits.
(Register for the lecture and one laboratory section.)
Lecture: 8:00 M T W Th F. PE 205. CARROLL, W. R.
Laboratory Section 11: 9:00-11:00 M W F. SC 104. CARROLL, W. R.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00-3:00 T Th F. SC 104. CARROLL, W. R.
Morphology, physiology, and cultivation of bacteria and related microorganisms. Frobisher,
Fundamentals of Bacteriology. 4th Ed.
BCY. 302.-Agricultural Bacteriology. 4 credits.
Lecture: 9:00 M T W Th. SC 111. NOVAK, A. F.
Laboratory: 1:00-3:00 M T Th F. SC 10. NOVAK, A. F.
Bacteria and associated microorganisms in relation to water, milk, silage and farm problems.

GRADUATE COURSES

BCY. 500.-Advanced Bacteriology. Variable credit.* (6 hours laboratory for
1 semester credit.)
To arrange.
Problems in Pathogenic, Dairy, Sanitary, Industrial, Food Bacteriology.
BCY. 570.-Research in Bacteriology. Variable credit.* (6 hours work per week
required for each credit.) Prerequisite: BCY. 500.
A study of methods and their application in research problems in different fields of Bacteriology.
Required of graduate majors.
Bacteriology courses in the 600 group are taught in the Laboratories of State
Board of Health, Jacksonville, and are open only to qualified Board of Health
workers approved by the staff of the State Board of Health. Such persons must
meet regular admission requirements and follow same registration procedures
as resident students.

BCY. 600.-Infectious Diseases. 1 to 6 credits.*
To arrange. Jacksonville. HARDY.
Publ'c health aspects of bacteriology and parasitology. Treats of etiology, epidemiology,
laboratory diagnosis of all of the important diseases.
BCY. 610.-Immunology, Advanced. Variable credit.*
To arrange. Jacksonville. GALTON.
Principles of immunology and serology as applied to the prevention of diseases and public health.
BCY. 620.-Laboratory Administration. Variable credit.*
To arrange. Jacksonville. HARDY.
Methods employed In managing or directing a bureau of laboratories or a division thereof.
BCY. 690.-Research. Variable credit.*
To arrange. Jacksonville. GALTON.
Recent advances in the field of public health investigation.


BIOLOGY

BLY. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 3 credits.
Register for the Lecture (Section 1) and one Laboratory (Section
11 or 12).
Credit assigned must be shown on registration card.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Lecture Section 1. 10:00 M T W Th. K 107.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 3:00 M W.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 3:00 T Th.
Designed to provide a recognition of, and an acquaintance with some of the more common
animals, and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question,
"What animal-or what plant-is that?" Individual work in the field and the making of a
personal reference collection of plants and animals is encouraged.
BLY. 134.-The Life of the Inland Waters of Florida. 3 credits.
Register for the Lecture (Section 1) and one Laboratory (Section
11 or 12).
Lecture Section 1. 11:00 M T W Th. K 107.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 3:00 M W.
Laboratory Section 12: 1:00 to 3:00 T Th.
A companion course to BLY. 133, but concerned with the common plants and animal life of
our streams, pools, ponds, lakes and marshes. Particular attention is given to obtaining an
acquaintance with those species and groups of organisms that comprise the more important, more
conspicuous, and more interesting members of Florida's rich aquatic biota. Laboratory demon-
strations, field trips and individual projects will form an important part of this course.
BLY. 161.-Biology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-61.
8:00 to 10:00 M T W Th. J 101.
An introductory laboratory course dealing with cells, the mammalian anatomy, the major
groups of plants, methods of reproduction and germ cell formation.
BLY. 162.-Biology Laboratory. 2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-62.
1:00 to 3:00 M T W Th. J 202.
An introductory laboratory course dealing with genetics, homology, embryology, evolution,
taxonomy and ecology.
BLY. 207.-Vertebrate Natural History. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BLY. 161-162.
Lecture: 9:00 M T W Th. K 107.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 4:00 M T W Th.
An introduction to the classification and natural history of the vertebrates.
BLY. 210.-Vertebrate Embryology. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BLY. 209.
Lecture: 1:00 M T W Th. K 107.
Laboratory: 8:00 to 11:00 M T W Th.

BLY. 325.-Genetics and Speciation. 3 credits. Prerequisites: 161-162.
8:00 daily. K 107.
An introduction to the data and methods of genetics with special reference to their bearing
on the problems of speciation and organic evolution.

GRADUATE COURSES

BLY. 505.-History of Biology. 2 credits. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major
in Biology. Required of all graduate majors in the Department.
11:00 M T Th F.

BLY. 509.-Zoogeography. 2 credits.
10:00 M T Th F.
Zoogeographic divisions of the world and their characteristic animals; factors influencing
the distribution of animals; the relation of geographic races to speciation and evolution.
BLY. 543.-Research in Ecology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 544.-Research in Fresh Water Biology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 545.-Research in Marine Biology. Hours and credits to be arranged.







74 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BLY. 546.-Research in Zoogeography. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY. 547.-Research in Game Management. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY. 548.-Research in Acoelomate Invertebrates. Hours and credits to be ar-
ranged.
BLY. 549.-Research in Coelomate Invertebrates. Hours and credits to be ar-
ranged.
BLY. 550.-Research in Parasitology. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY. 552.-Research in Insect Biology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 553.-Research in Ichthyology. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY 554.-Research in Herpetology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 555.-Research in Ornithology. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY. 557.-Research in Comparative Anatomy. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 558.-Research in Embryology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 559.-Research in Experimental Biology. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY. 560.-Research Cytology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 561.-Research in Histology. Hours and credits to be arranged.

BLY. 565.-Seminar in Cancer Research. Hours and credits to be arranged.
BLY. 581.-Cancer Research. Hours and credits to be arranged.


BOTANY

BTY. 101.-General Botany. 3 credits. First half of the course BTY. 101-102.
Register for the Lecture (Section 1) and one Laboratory (Section
11 or 12).
Lecture Section 1: 7:00 M T W F. F 101. GRIFFITH, M.
Laboratory Section 11: 1:00 to 3:00 W F. SC 2. STAFF.
Laboratory Section 12: 7:00 to 9:00 Th S. SC 2.
The form, structure, growth, reproduction and function of plants and their various organs;
relation of plants to their environment and to each other. Required of students majoring in
Botany, Bacteriology and Plant Pathology.

BTY. 211.-Plant Physiology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BTY. 101 or BLY. 161
and ACY. 125-126 or equivalent.
Lecture: 8:00 M W Th F. SC 111. POWELL, R. D.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 3:00 M T Th F. SC 1. POWELL, R. D.
A study of absorption, assimilation, transpiration, respiration, growth, water relations and
other functions of plants.

BTY. 401.-Plant Ecology. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BTY. 101-102 or their
equivalents. Desirable prerequisites: BTY. 211, 306, SLS. 301 or 302, FY. 311.
Lecture: 9:00 T W Th F. SC 111. DAVIS, J. H.
Laboratory and Field: 3:00 to 5:00 W F, 8:00 to 12:00 S. DAVIS, J. H.
Kinds and classification of vegetation, particularly those of Florida and consideration and
measurement of climatic, edaphic, physiographic, and biotic factors and of plant successions.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATE COURSES

BTY. 500.-Advanced Botany. 4 credits.
To arrange. STAFF.
Laboratory and problems in one or more fields of botany, taxonomy, physiology, ecology, plant
geography and anatomy, depending on requirements of the minor or major student in botany.
Admit ed only by approval of head of department and instructor.
BTY. 501.-Vegetation of Florida. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BTY. 401.
To arrange. DAVIS, J. H.
All types of vegetation in Florida in relation to soil, climate, physiographic and geologic
conditions-also the uses of various types.
BTY. 570.-Research in Botany. 6 hours of laboratory or field work for each
semester hour credit. 1 to 4 credits.*
To arrange. STAFF.
Research in one of the fields of botany.

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION**

BCN. 301-302-303-304.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 1. 3 credits
each;-group total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequ.site: Completion of Lower Division program in Building Construction
or equivalent.
Hours to arrange. E 175.

BCN. 311-312-313-314.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 2. 3 credits
each;-group total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequisite: The series BCN. 301-302-303-304.
Hours to arrange. E 178.

BCN. 401-402-403-404.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 3. 3 credits
each;-grcup total, 12 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequ.site: The series BCN. 311-312-313-314.
Hours to arrange. E 174.

BCN. 411-412-413-414-415.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 4. 3 credits
each;-group total, 15 credits. Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.
Prerequisite: The series BCN. 401-402-403-404.
Hours to arrange. E 188.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

BEN. 81.-Introductory Typewriting. 2 credits.
8:00 daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 306. BRADDY, V.
Skill in typewriting developed through practice on personal and business problems.
BEN. 91.-Introductory Shorthand. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 306. MAXWELL, H. C.
The theory of Gregg shorthand is completed, using the functional method.
BEN. 181.-Advanced Typewriting. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BEN. 81 or per-
mission of instructor.
10:00 daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 306. MAXWELL, H. C.
Provides more intensive training in typewriting.
Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.
** For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.








76 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BEN. 191.-Shorthand Dictation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BEN. 81 and 91, or
permission of instructor.
9:00 daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 306. MAXWELL, H. C.
Dictation developed, with emphasis on speed, accuracy, and shorthand skills.
BEN. 352.-Office Machine Techniques. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BEN. 81 or per-
mission of instructor.
9:00 daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 305. BRADDY, V.
The voice-writing machines, duplicating machines, adding machines and calculating machines
are studied, both as to techniques and operation.

BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION
BS. 204.-Business Ethics. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 205. KAHN, S. A.
A study of ethical standards and theories of right and justice underlying business relations.
Stress is laid on problems involving social morality, the profit motive, price policies and unfair
competition. Specific codes of ethics are analyzed in order to determine the place of business
ethics in American contemporary society.
BS. 231.-Principles of Marketing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
Section 1. 7:00 daily. I 210. BREESE, W. E.
Section 2. 9:00 daily. I 203. CRAWFORD, C. M.
The institutions and methods developed for carrying on trade operations; retail and wholesale
agencies: elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of marketing; price maintenance; unfair
competition; the relation of the government to marketing.
BS. 233.-Salesmanship. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 205. YODER, L. C.
An introduction to selling. Analysis of types, stages, problems, of psychology of sale situations,

BS. 260.-Fundamentals of Insurance. 3 credits.
7:00 daily. I 201. PIERCE, J. E.
The basic fundamentals underlying the business of insurance as a prerequisite for more ad-
vanced and detailed work in the subject, designed to serve two distinct needs: (1) to give students
of economics and commerce a general knowledge of the subject; and (2) to lay a foundation for
the future work of those interested in entering the business.
BS. 271.-Industrial Management. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. I 202. HODGES, H. G.
The basic fundamentals of management underlying the solution of problems of organization
and operation of business enterprises. Application of these fundamentals to specific fields of
industrial management such as production, material personnel, purchasing, etc.
BS. 336.-Credits and Collections. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. I 206. YODER, L. C.
Retail and mercantile credit; the principles that guide a creditor both in the acceptance of
risk and the collections that must follow; credit department operation.
BS. 363.-Life Insurance: Elements. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 104. PIERCE, J. E.
All types of life insurance, giving a picture of the business as interrelated with our economic
world through examination of uses; selection methods; policy provisions and conditions; and
carriers. Designed to familiarize the student with the general principles of the business and/or
to form a foundation for advanced study.
BS. 373.-Personnel Management. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 207. LUCK, T. J.
A comparison of and critical evaluation of public and private personnel practices and tech-
niques of recruiting, selecting, transferring, promoting, classifying and training workers. Atten-
tion is centered on the problem of training to fit workers for the different types and levels of
duties called for by government, by industry and by other types of business enterprises. Con-
sideration of organization, policies, and procedures of managing men.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BS. 401.-Business Law. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 108. WYATT, J. W.
Contracts: Formation and interpretation; operation and discharge; remedies. Agency:
Nature and formation of relationship; inter-relationship responsibilities and rights; responsibility
as to third parties, termination of relationship.

BS. 402.-Business Law. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 206. WYATT, J. W.
Sales: Formation and performance of contracts of sale of personal property; remedies of
sellers and buyers for breach. Negotiable Instruments: Formation and operation of negotiable
contract; rights and obligations of various parties on negotiable instrument; discharge.


BS. 422.-Investments. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 321.
11:00 daily. I 208. FLOYD, J. S.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.

BS. 427.-Corporation Finance. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 210. FLOYD, J. S.
A study of the economic and legal forms of business enterprises; the instruments of business
finance; financial problems as they relate to the ordinary operations of the business involving
working capital, income, dividend policy and current borrowing.

BS. 428.-Corporation Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 427. A continuation
of BS. 427.
9:00 daily. I 108. McFERRIN, J. B.
The sale of corporation securities; problems incident to growth and expansion; business
failures and financial reconstruction; social aspects of corporate financial policy.

BS. 433.-Advertising. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. I 110. HARDY, F. K.
A comprehensive guide to the planning and preparation of modern advertising in all of its
phases.

BS. 437.-Retailing. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 208. BREESE, W. E.
The fundamentals of retailing: problems, policies, trends and procedures in retail distribution.

BS. 438.-Sales and Market Analysis. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 208. CRAWFORD, C. M.
The application of scientific method to the solving of marketing and distribution problems;
survey, observational, and experimental methods of gathering data; specific investigations into
sales, advertising, brand, price, and trade channel problem solving.

BS. 439.-Principles and Problems of Merchandising. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. I 208. BROHM, H. D.
Methods and policies relative to business management functions of merchandising; buying,
product analysis, pricing, brands, channels of distribution, and sales administration.

BS. 444.-Ocean Transportation. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 105. BRADBURY, R. W.
Problems in ocean transportation; types of ocean carriers; ocean routes; ocean ports; services
of ocean freight carriers; ship brokerage and freight brokerage; passenger carriers; steamship
combinations and conferences; ocean freight rate-making; vessel and cargo documents; regulation
of shipping; government aid to ship-building and operation; shipping of Florida ports.








78 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BS. 459.-Field Work in Marketing. Variable credit up to 3 hours.*
To arrange. D 102. McFERRIN, J. B.
Up to three credit hours for weekly reports and a final report on problems as they arise in
a full time three months period of work in Sales, Retailing, Advertising, Wholesaling, Credits
and Collections, Market Research, or other work in Marketing under supervision of an approved
employer. Open only to students majoring in Marketing, Sales, Retailing, or Advertising curricula
only before the last term on the campus, only after completion of a course in the principles of
the subject to be prac iced, and only with written permission from a sponsoring Professor.
Complete course regulations may be secured from sponsoring professor. All registrations in
this course are subject to these regulations.

BS. 464.-Statistical Controls for Management. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. I 104. COLLINS, E. C.
The methods and devices used by management in the collection, interpretation and application
of daa for the control and correction of managerial problems.

BS. 472.-Collective Bargaining. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. I 207. LUCK, T. J.
A study of the practices and techniques of collective bargaining with respect to the relation-
ship of the individual worker and his union, of the union and the employer, and of the union
and the general public.

BS. 479.-Business Policies. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 108. BROHM, H. D.
A study of Business Policies correlating the functions of sales, procurement, personnel, finance,
and covering various industries and cyclical movements. Open only to seniors and graduate students.

BS. 482.-Fidelity and Surety Bonding. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 207. CRIST, G. W., JR.
The bonding coverages guaranteeing performance and/or honesty and capacity of third parties
as well as the underwriting principles applicable to this field.

BS. 484.-Legal Aspects of Insurance. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. I 207. CRIST, G. W., JR.
The essentials of the law peculiarly applicable to the business of insurance including Florida's
statutory regulation thereon.

GRADUATE COURSES

BS. 528.-Central Banking, Policies and Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
ES. 321.
To arrange. D 109. MATTHEWS, C. A.
The functions, powers, and policies of central banks; the changing role of central banks in
the economy, with special emphasis on the place of central banks in a "free" economy and in a
"state" economy.

BS. 535.-Market Management. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 438, and BS. 439
or equivalent.
To arrange. D 116. HARDY, F. K.
Some marketing policy problems from the standpoint of the individual enterprise. Channels
of distribution, pricing, sales promotion, marketing trends and sales organization.

BS. 575.-Management Problems. 3 credits.
To arrange. D 112. HODGES, H. G.
Deals with specific current industrial problems in the fields of administration, production,
finance, personnel, labor relations, purchasing and distribution. Problems are selected from tech-
nical magazines in the management fields, and from contacts with key operating personnel in
industry.

Credit must be assigned on the registration card.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

CG. 347.-Industrial Stoichiometry. 4 credits. Prerequisites or corequisites:
CY. 202, MS. 354, and PS. 206.
8:00 daily. El 430. TYNER, M.
2:00-5:00 MW. N 105.
Industrial processes and calculations, weight balances, gas calculations, combustion processes,
vapor pressure, humidity, etc.

CG. 361.-Materials of Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CY. 102 or CY.
106, and PS. 206.
10:00 daily. El 328. BEISLER, W. H.
Production, properties, and uses of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, cement, bricks,
plastics, timber, etc.

CG. 447.-Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CG. 348.
10:00 daily. El 430. SCHWEYER, H. E.
The fundamental chemical engineering operations: fluid flow, heat transmission, evaporation,
humidity, etc.

CG. 467.-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites:
CY. 401 and MS. 354. Corequisite: CY. 402.
11:00 daily. El 430. DUNCAN, J. M.
Fundamental applications of thermodynamics to chemical engineering.

CHEMISTRY

CY. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course CY.
101-102.
(Register for the lecture, one discussion section, and one laboratory
section.)
Lecture Section 1: 9:00 M T Th F LE 142
Discussion Section 11: 9:00 W S LE 142
Laboratory Section 111: 1:00-4:00 M W LE 138
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry and the preparation and properties of the common
non-metallic elements and their compounds.

CY. 102.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course CY.
101-102.
Lectures: 11:00 Daily LE 212
Laboratory: 1:00-4:00 T Th LE 138
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry; common metals and their compounds and uses.

CY. 105.-General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 4 credits. The first half
of the course CY. 105-106. Prerequisites: Upper percentile rating in place-
ment tests in physical sciences and mathematics or satisfactory completion
of C-2. In general, freshmen should present evidence that they have had
high school chemistry. Pre- or corequisite: Basic Mathematics.
Lectures: 9:00 Daily LE 118 TARRANT, P.
Laboratory: 2:00-5:00 M W LE 138

CY. 106.-General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. 4 credits. The second
half of the course CY. 105-106.
Lectures: 11:00 Daily LE 118
Laboratory: 2:00-5:00 T Th LE 136







80 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CY. 203.-Qualitative Analysis. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CY. 102 or a grade
of B or better in ACY. 126.
Lectures: 10:00 M T W Th LE 118
Laboratory: 1:00-4:00 T Th LE 136

CY. 205.-Introductory Quantitative Analysis. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CY.
106 or CY. 203.
Lectures: 8:00 M T W Th LE 118 GROPP, A. H.
Laboratory: 1:00-4:00 M T W Th LE 112
Theoretical principles and laboratory techniques in gravimetric and volumetric determinations.

*CY. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 5 credits. Prerequisite: CY. 102 or CY. 106.
(Register for the lecture section, one laboratory section, and one dis-
cussion section.)
Lecture Section 1: 10:00 M T Th F LE 118
Discussion Section 11: 10:00 W S LE 118
Discussion Section 12: 1:00 T Th LE 212
Laboratory Section 111: 2:00-5:00 T Th
1:00-4:00 W F LE 236
Laboratory Section 112: 2:00-5:00 T Th
1:00-4:00 W F LE 236

CY. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course CY. 301-302.
Prerequisite: CY. 205.
(Register for the lecture section, one discussion section, and one labora-
tory section.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:00 M T Th F LE AUD RIETZ, E. G.
Discussion Section 11: 8:00 W S LE 212
Discussion Section 12: 1:00 W F LE 212
Laboratory Section 111: 2:00-5:00 W F LE 238
Laboratory Section 112: 2:00-5:00 W F LE 238
Preparations and properties of the various aliphatic and aromatic compounds.
CY. 402.-Physical Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course CY.
401-402.
Lectures: 9:00 Daily LE 212 PHILLIPS, L. R.
Laboratory: 1:00-4:00 T Th LE 204
Colloids, electricity as applied in chemistry, chemical kinetics, photo-chemistry and introduction
to quantum theory.

GRADUATE COURSES
**CY. 502.-Structural Inorganic Chemistry. 3 credits.
To arrange.

**CY. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 credits.
To arrange.

**CY. 513.-Colloids. 3 credits.
To arrange.

*Premedical students should take CY. 301-302 rather than CY. 262.
** That one of these courses will be given for which the greatest demand develops.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CY. 547.-Biochemistry (Proteins and Colloids). 2 credits. Prerequisite: A
course in general biochemistry.
To arrange. NOVAK, A. F.
Composition, structure, physico-chemical properties and function of the proteins; the relation
of colloid systems to biochemical processes.

CY. 549.-Biochemistry Laboratory (Proteins and Colloids). 1 credit. Pre-
requisite or corequisite: CY. 547.
To arrange.

CY. 565.-Seminar in Cancer Research. 1-3 credits.*
9:30-12:30 S.

CY. 570.-Research in Inorganic Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 571.-Research in Analytical Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 573.-Research in Physical Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 574.-Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 575.-Research in Sanitary Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 576.-Research in Biochemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.*

CY. 581.-Cancer Research. 1 to 6 hours credit.*


CIVIL ENGINEERING

CL. 223.-Surveying. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MS. 105.
(Register for the lecture (Section 1) and one laboratory (Section
11 or 12).)
Section 1. 9:00 M T W Th. El 416. KATTERHENRY, A. A.
Section 11. 2:00-5:00 M W. El 343. KATTERHENRY, A. A.
Section 12. 1:00-4:00 T Th. El 343. KATTERHENRY, A. A.
Use of surveyors tape, level and transit; traversing and balancing of surveys; calculation of
areas, contour work; line-azimuth by observation on sun, stadia surveying with transit; topo-
graphic mapping; land subdivision and determination of the accuracy or order (first, second or
third) of survey required for the purpose.

CL. 226.-Higher Surveying. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CL. 223.
11:00 M T W Th. El 415. BRANSFORD, T. L.
1:00-4:00 M W. El 343. WINSOR, A. N.
Adjustment of instruments; precise leveling; precise base-lines; first order triangulation;
highway profiles and curves; line azimuth by Polaris observations; use of alidade and plane table;
topographic mapping; pbotogrammetry.

CL. 301.-Forest Surveying. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CL. 223.
8:00 T Th. El 324. WINSOR, A. N.
9:00-12:00 T Th. El 324. WINSOR, A. N.
1:00-4:00 T Th. El 324. WINSOR, A. N.
Topographic mapping; resurvey of land lines and boundaries; timber road detail by compass
and Abney level; mapping and traverse from aerial photograph data; plane table surveys; stadia
measurements; line azimuth determination; adjustment of instruments; leveling.
Credit assigned must be shown on registration blank.








82 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CL. 321.-Highways and Airports. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CL. 226.
8:00 daily. El 416. BRANSFORD, T. L.
The principles of highway planning, location, construction, maintenance, financing and ad-
ministration, as applied to interregional, primary and secondary roads and city streets; planning
and design of airports.
CL. 326.-Statics of Simple Structures. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EM. 365.
11:00 daily. El 416. DANIELS, S. R.
1:00-4:00 M W. El 320. DANIELS, S. R.
Applications of the methods of statics to structural analysis; a correlation between graphic.
and analytical methods; moments, shears, reactions, resultants, stress diagrams, and influence
lines for statically determinate structures.
CL. 333.-Design in Reinforced Concrete. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EM. 367.
CL. 326.
9:00 daily. El 415. BUGG, S. L.
The principles of reinforced concrete design; design of concrete mixtures; design of beams
for bending; combined bending and axial loads; bond, shear, and web reinforcing; composite
beams; columns; simple retaining walls.

CL. 368.-Strength of Materials Laboratory. 1 credit. Corequisite: EM. 367.
1:00-4:00 M W. El 120. COMINS, H. D.
A laboratory course of experiments involving the strength and physical properties of engineer-
ing materials that are studied in Strength of Materials.
CL. 424.-Soil Mechanics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: GY. 210, EM. 367.
10:00 M T W Th. El 415. ZIMPFER, W. H.
1:00-4:00 T Th. El 112. ZIMPFER, W. H.
Origin and composition of soils; classification and routine testing, subsurface exploration and
sampling; permeability and capillarity of soils; compaction, field and laboratory methods; stresses
in soil masses as determined by elastic theory; consolidation; strength theory; shearing character-
istics of sands; shearing strength of cohesive soils.

CL. 426.-Water Supply and Treatment. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EM. 313.
10:00 M T W Th. El 204. KIKER, J. E.
1:00-4:00 T Th. El 320. KIKER, J. E.
Sources of supply, methods of treatment; the design of water systems including supply, treat-
ment and distribution.

CL. 429.-Sewerage. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EM. 314, CL. 333. Corequisite.
CL. 438.
9:00 M T W Th. El 204. HENDRICKSON, E. R.
1:00-4:00 M W. El 324. HENDRICKSON, E. R.
The hydraulic and structural design of the sewerage system and sewage treatment plants
including a study of the elementary principles of sewage treatments.

GRADUATE COURSES

CL. 523.-Advanced Concrete Structures. Variable credit.* Prerequisites: CL.
438, CL. 333. Corequisite: CL. 538.
10:00 daily. El 416. CUTTS, C. E.
Comparisons of modern methods of concrete proportioning; design with relation to ultimate.
prestressing and contrastressing; plastic flow; special structures; admixtures and protective treat-
ments; study of research development, the design of concrete rigid frame bridges.

CL. 526.-Three Dimensional Stress Analysis. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CL. 326.
9:00 daily. El 420. BROMILOW, F.
The resolution of forces, computation of reactions, and calculation of forces and stresses ir
structures that cannot be reduced to co-planer structures.

Credit assigned must be shown on the registration blank.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CL. 529.-Advanced Sanitary Engineering Design. 3 credits. Prerequisites:
CL. 429, CL. 438, CL. 527.
9:00-12:00 daily. El 320. GRANTHAM, G. R.
Special problems in the design of water, sewage, and industrial 'waste plants.

CL. 547.-Advanced Highway Engineering. 1 to 6 credits.* Prerequisites: CL.
439, CL. 450.
11:00 daily. El 411. RITTER, L. J.
Special problems in highway economics, planning, design and construction.

COMMERCIAL ART**

CT. 360.-Layout. 3 credits.
1:00-3:00 daily. WA 300 B.
The elements of design in layout.

CT. 361.-Lettering and Instrumental Drawing. 3 credits.
1:00-3:00 daily. WA 300 C.
The design of letters suitable to the subject. Instruction in the mechanical aids to drawing.

CT. 461-462-463.-Projects in Advertising Design, Group I. 36 hours of lecture
-laboratory. 3 credits each;-group total, 9 credits.
Hours to arrange. WA 300 D.
Page ads, direct mail pieces, poster design, package design and educational visual aids.
Analysis of product, market, media and reproduction processes.

CRAFTS**

CS. 381.-Crafts I. 3 credits.
1:00 to 3:00 daily. WA 301 and WA 304.
Construction, glazing, and firing of ceramic products. The design and construction of woven
fabrics, silver, copper, and leather articles.

CS. 382.-Crafts II. 3 credits.
3:00 daily. 6 hours to arrange. WA 304.
Specialization in three areas from any of the fields studied in CS. 381.

CS. 482.-Ceramics II. 6 credits.
3:00 daily. 18 hours to arrange. WA 304.
An advanced course in ceramics combining research in design and ceramic technology.

CS. 484.-Special Problems in Crafts. 6 credits.
3:00 daily. 18 hours to arrange. WA 304.
Area of specialization selected by the student in consultation with the instructor.

DAIRY SCIENCE

DY. 311.-Principles of Dairying. 3 credits.
9:00 M T W Th. DL 203. WILKOWSKE, H. H.
Laboratory: 1:00-3:00 T Th. DL 110.
Composition and properties of milk; sanitary milk production: common methods of analyzing
milk; common dairy processes; farm methods of handling milk.

Credit assigned must be shown on the registration blank.
** For detailed course description refer to the University Catalog.







84 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

DY. 411.-Dairy Cattle Management. 3 credits.
7:00 M T W Th. DL 203. ARNOLD, P. T. DIX.
Laboratory: 1:00-5:00 F. DL 203.
Dairy breeds, selection, breeding and raising of dairy cattle. One or more trips to dairy farms.

GRADUATE COURSES
DY. 521.-Problems in Milk and Milk Products. Variable credit.
To arrange. WILKOWSKE, H. H.
A course designed to teach methods in dairy products research.

DY. 523.-Problems in Dairy Production. Variable credit.
To arrange. STAFF.
Research for majors in dairy husbandry.

DY. 508.-Methods in Animal Research. 2 credits.
To arrange. BECKER, R. B.
Methods employed in nutritional investigations with farm animals, including feeding and
management.

ECONOMICS

ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics. 4 credits. Prerequisite: C-42 or equivalent.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:00 daily. PE 1. ZIEGLER, R. J.
1:00-3:00 M W.
Section 2. 9:00 daily. PE 1. ANDERSON M: D.
3:00-500 M W.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. PE 1. ZIEGLER, R. J.
2:00-4:00 T Th.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,
sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics.

BS. 205.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. First half of the
course ES. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 7:00 daily. I 110. CALOHAN, C. E.
Section 2. 8:00 daily. I 110. CALOHAN, C. E.
Section 3. 9:00 daily. I 110. KARP, J. R.
Section 4. 10:00 daily. I 110. ANDERSON, J. D.
Introductory course in economics designed primarily to meet the requirements of University
students who feel the need for a workable knowledge of the economic system. Emphasis is placed
on analysis and descriptions of the more important economic organizations and institutions which,
in their functional capacities, constitute the economic order. Economic principles and processes
are explained, especially those relating to an understanding of value, price, cost, rent, interest,
wages, profit, money, banking, commerce, foreign exchange, foreign trade and business cycles.
The first term, which is devoted largely to the study of economic organizations and institutions
and to the principles governing value and price, may be taken separately for which 3 semester
hours of credit are given.

ES. 206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. Second half of the
course ES. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:00 daily. I 106. BRAND, M.
Section 2. 9:00 daily. I 106. ROBERTSON, A. J.
Section 3. 10:00 daily. I 106. ROBERTSON, A. J.
Section 4. 11:00 daily. I 209. MILLICAN, C. N.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ES. 210.-Machine Technology in American Life. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 209. MILLICAN, C. N.
Shift from agrarian to industrial economy; development of machine technology and mass
production; finance capitalism; impact of technological change on cultural pattern: class stratifi-
cation and conflicts; relation of technology to nationalism and internationalism.

ES. 246.-The Consumption of Wealth. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. I 206. CUNKLE, A. L.
An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of con-
sumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand.

ES. 296.-Industry and Trade of Latin America. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 209. COLLINS, E. C.
The industrial importance of the several Latin American countries viewed in the light of their
economic background. Attention is devoted to the development of the industries of each country,
the volume and types of exports and imports as well as the trade practices and customs of these
countries.

ES. 321.-Money and Banking. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
9:00 daily. I 202. MATTHEWS, C. A.
An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary, bank-
ing and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions;
central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to the
economic system as a whole.

ES. 327.-Public Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 9:00 daily. I 210. ANDERSON, J. D.
Section 2. 11:00 daily. I 210. CUNKLE, A. L.
Principals governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.

ES. 347.-Principles of Foreign Trade. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
7:00 daily. PE 1. SHIELDS, M. W.
Fundamental principles of foreign trade; significance of geographic, economic, social, and
political influences; current practices and development in foreign trade; products of international
commerce, protective tariffs and other barriers to world trade; tendencies in the foreign trade
of the United States.

ES. 351.-Elements of Transportation. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
8:00 daily. I 105. ROBERTS, M. J.
General survey of the significance, characteristics, and major problems of intercity trans-
portation.

ES. 372.-Labor Problems. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
10:00 daily. I 202. KENNEDY, J. W.
Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income; hours, sub-standard workers, industrial con-
flict; attempts to solve labor problems by employees; unionism in its structural and functional
aspects; attempts to solve labor problems by employers; personnel management, employee rep-
resentation, employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state, protective labor
legislation, laws relating to settlement of industrial disputes.

ES. 382.-Principles of Resource Utilization. (Identical with GPY. 382.) 3
credits.
9:00 daily. B 114. DAY, R. L.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation
with special reference to the South. Course designated to satisfy resource certification for social
studies teachers.








86 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ES. 404.-Government Control of Business. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 20.-2111
9:00 daily. I 205. BRAND, M.
The evolution of economic control; an examination of the effectiveness of laissez faire .'.-.*tr-.i
in the American economy; legality of and chief methods of effectuating governmental c.rnr..I.
the development of the relationship between government and non-public utility monor',.-.i
Federal Trade Commission control of competitive practices; a critical appraisal of recent i --
velopments in the field of government control.

ES. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The first half cf the
course ES. 407-408. Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:00 daily. I 201. QUALLS, L. L.
Section 2. 9:00 daily. I 201. FRISTOE, C. W.
Section 3. 11:00 daily. I 201. FRISTOE, C. W.
An advanced course in economic theory, dealing especially with the theories of producil...1.
price determination, and income distribution and their application to a selected list of c.-T.:r.t
economic problems.

ES. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems. 3 credits. The second half o.f th
course ES. 407-408.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1. 8:00 daily. I 202. MITCH, G. F.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. I 201. MITCH, G. F.

ES. 409.-Comparative Economic Systems. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. I 210. BLODGETT, R. H.
The economics of capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. The theoretical econ.-.-,,:
of capitalism, socialism, and communism and the actual economies of the United States, ,.,, r.t
Russia, England, Nazi Germany, and Fascist Italy are compared on the basis of such rm.;. r
as industrial production, agriculture, exchange, credit and banking, income distribution, the :I:,.d:
of labor, and international trade. Marxian Socialism is also considered briefly.

ES. 429.-Introduction to Business Cycles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 321.
10:00 daily. I 104. KARP, J. R.
An introduction to the principal theories of the business cycle including also a descrip,..,n ..
the various types of cycles and an examination of the important remedies that have been prior ..--:.

ES. 469.-Business Cycles and Forecasting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 2"I.
11:00 daily. PE 1. ANDERSON, M. D.
Mathematical and statistical theory of the relationships of important variables in the bi,:n-::
cycle, such as profits, the price level, wages, national income, employment, savings and investoLi n'
Application of this theory to business forecasting and problems of governmental control.

ES. 477.-Problems in Federal Finance. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ES. 327.
9:00 daily. I 209. QUALLS, L. L.
Economic effects of public expenditure; war finance; personal income and estate taxes,
porate income and profits taxes; excise taxes; debt problems.

GRADUATE COURSES

ES. 545.-The Economy of Latin America. 3 credits.
To arrange. D 109. BRADBURY, R. W.
A study of contemporary economic and commercial problems of Latin America. At-r..'r,
will be given to current developments in production, transportation and trade of the ru:
countries.

ES. 551.-Transportation Policy. 3 credits.
To arrange. D 120. ROBERTS, M. J.
Critical examination of the development, effects, and proposed improvements of c--.-r;, I
transportation policy, including regulation, promotion, taxation, and labor.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ES. 574.-Labor Economics. 3 credits.
To arrange. D 111. KENNEDY, J. W.
The seminar in wage theory has for its purpose an intensive and advanced study of the various
theories of wage determination and the economic role of wages in the economy.

ES. 591.-Neo-Classical Economics. 3 credits. The first half of the course ES.
591-592.
2:00-5:00 M W. LI 417. BLODGETT, R. H.
Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-classical price and production theories. Demand,
supply, cost of production, and price determination under various conditions of the market will
be considered. The writings of Marshall, Hicks, Boulding, Davenport, Stigler, Fellner, J. Robin-
son, and Chamberlin provide the background for the discussion.

EDUCATION

EN. 301.-Principles and Practices of the Secondary School Program. 3 credits.
EN. 301 and EN. 302 must be taken concurrently.
8:00-10:00 daily. YN 140. BROWNE, E. B.
Work will consist of readings, class discussions, observation and participation in school and
community situations: attention to the scope, functions, and types of secondary school curriculums;
contributions and techniques of the specific teaching fields; theories of learning and growth.
EN. 302.-Principles and Practices of the Secondary School Program. 3 credits.
8:00-10:00 daily. YN 140. BROWNE, E. B.

EN. 303.-Methods in Vocational Agriculture. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. YN 140. LOFTEN, W. T.
General methods of teaching vocational agriculture

EN. 309.-Teaching of Secondary Mathematics. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. YN 316. KIDD, K. P.
For students who plan to teach mathematics in grades 9-12. Basic concepts and skills that
should be taught in algebra and geometry with emphasis on procedures and materials.

EN. 316.-Elementary Quantitative Methods in Education and Psychology. 3
credits.
8:00 daily. YN 316. KIDD, R.
Application of statistical processes and formulas to educational and psychological data; the
interpretation of typical quantitative treatments of findings in psychology and education.

EN. 385.-Child Development. 3 credits.
Section 1. 9:00 daily. YN 222.
Growth and development of children into mature personalities. Recent research studied
through outside reading, class discussion and observation. Methods of evaluating child growth.

EN. 386.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
Section 1. 11:00 daily. YN 222.
Application of psychological principles to the education process. Individual differences, prin-
ciples of learning, transfer of training, and the nature of reasoning.

EN. 418.-Audio-Visual Materials. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. YN 142. ALEXANDER, V. W.
The techniques needed to provide better classroom utilization of the audio-visual aids to learn-
ing. Some opportunity to develop skill in these techniques will be presented to students.

EN. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 4 credits.
1:00 daily and 2 hours to arrange. YN 207.
Curriculum practices and development of plans for classroom experience.







88 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EN. 480.-Teaching of Reading. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. YN 140.
A comprehensive survey of the problems of teaching reading in all grades; practical pro-
cedures for attacking these problems.

GRADUATE COURSES
NOTE: All new graduate students in Education are required to attend an
orientation meeting at 7:00 P.M., June 19, in the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Information will be given about types of graduate study, the planning of in-
dividual programs, and facilities available.

EN. 527.-Secondary School Curriculum. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. YN 316. BROWNE, E. B.
This course is the graduate counterpart of EN. 397, but students are expected to carry out
an individual project in addition to studying about general methods of teaching in high schools.
Students who have taken EN. 397 or its equivalent will not receive credit for EN. 527.

EN. 530.-Individual Work. 3 or 6 credits.
Section 1. To arrange. YN 302. WILLIAMS, W. R.
Restricted to students with special problems. Registration may be arranged only with the
approval of the instructor and the head of the department.

EN. 579.-Methods and Materials in Secondary Mathematics. 3 credits.
10:00 daily.
To help teachers obtain and use materials for the enrichment of teaching in junior and senior
high school mathematics classes; simple field problems in surveying, construction and use of the
slide rule, navigation problems, examination of films and filmstrips, construction of resource units.

EN. 588.-Language Arts in the Elementary School-Creative Expression. 3
credits. This course satisfies the requirement for certification in the element-
ary school Area II.
1:00 daily. YN 140.
The literature for young children and the arts related-illustration, puppetry and other
dramatic forms, story telling, creative writing; the evaluation and study of children's books.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

EL. 211.-Introduction to Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. Corequisites: PS.
206, PS. 208, MS. 354.
8:00 daily. El 334.
A course to provide sophomore students who are planning to enroll in the Department of
Electrical Engineering with basic knowledge of fundamentals of electric, magnetic, and dielectric
circuits, and direct current methods of measurements.

EL. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The second half of
the course EL. 341-342. Prerequisite: EL. 341.
9:00 daily. El 346.
For engineering students not majoring in electrical subjects.
Representation of alternating current by vectors and complex quantities; measurement of
power in single phase and polyphase circuits; generations, transmission, and utilization of elec-
trical energy; characteristics of a.c. machinery; testing of a.c. equipment.

EL. 343.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MS.
354, PS. 206, PS. 208.
11:00 daily. El 346.
For students majoring in Civil Engineering. The course covers as much of the power field
of Electrical Engineering as possible within the allotted time, including electric and magnetic
circuits, theory and application of direct and alternating current machines, illumination and
wiring problems.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 89

EL. 346.-Electrical Communications. 4 credits. Corequisite: EL. 362.
(Register for the lecture (Section 1) and one laboratory (Section 11
or 12).)
Section 1. 9:00 daily. El 328.
Section 11. 1:00-4:00 M W. El 427.
Section 12. 1:00-4:00 T Th. El 427.
Speech and hearing; receivers and loud speakers; principles of various systems of wire and
radio telegraphy and telephony; elementary tube theory; amplifiers; radio receivers; and trans-
mitters.

EL. 350.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The second half of the course EL.
349-350. Prerequisite: EL. 349.
Section 1. 1:00-4:00 M W. El 220.
Section 2. 1:00-4:00 T Th. El 220.
A laboratory course for engineering students not majoring in electrical subjects. Experimental
studies and tests of alternating current circuits and apparatus.
EL. 362.-Electric Circuits. 4 credits. The second half of the course EL. 361-
362. Prerequisite: EL. 361.
(Register for the lecture (Section 1) and one laboratory (Section 11
or 12).)
Section 1. 8:00 daily. El 328.
Section 11. 1:00-4:00 T Th. EI 424.
Section 12. 1:00-4:00 M W. El 424.
Unbalanced polyphase circuits ; filters; elements of transmission lines ; symmetrical components;
non-sinusoidal waves ; transient conditions; laboratory experiments in measurements; etuwly of
instruments, and verification of theorems.
EL. 445.-Electrical Instruments, Meters, and Relays. 3 credits. Prerequisites:
EL. 362, EL. 363.
10:00 M T W Th. El 346.
1:00-4:00 Mi W. El 230.
Indicating instruments; demand instruments; recording and integrating; instrument trans-
formers; measurement of circuit constant at low frequency and at radio frequency; measurement
of frequency; wave form, power factor and phase angle; vacuum tube instrument.
EL. 446.-Electric Power Transmission 3 credits. Prerequisites: EL. 362. EL.
363.
8:00 daily. El 346.
Characteristics of power and communication lines derived from the distributed constant
circuit standpoint; traveling and standing waves; impedance loci and transmission line charts.
EL. 473.-Industrial Electronics. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EL. 346, EL. 362,
EL. 363.
9:00 daily. El 430.
1:00-4:00 T Th. El 450.
Analysis of vacuum tube application with special emphasis on industrial devices such as
high frequency heaters, rectifiers and inverters, timers, photoelectric controls, voltage regulators,
and instruments.
EL. 493.-Electrical Design and Experimental Procedure. Variable credit.
To arrange.
Special projects are studied and reports prepared thereon.

GRADUATE COURSES
EL. 537.-Transients in Linear Systems. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. El 411.
Transient analysis of electrical and mechanical systems stressing Laplace transform methods.









!)t BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EL. 552.-Theory of Vacuum Tubes. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. El 411.
Fundamental principles of electronic motion, space-charge effects, and interactions of electrons
with electromagnetic fields; analysis of vacuum-tube operation.

El.. 591.-Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Variable credit.*
To arrange.
Laboratory, lectures, or conference covering specially selected topics in Electric Enrv -r-..,

ENGINEERING MECHANICS

EM. 313.-Fluid Mechanics. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EM. 365, MS. 351
11:00 daily. RE 401.
1:00-4:00 T Th. RE 100.
Me-hanics of compressible and incompressible fluids. Special emphasis of viscosit. -'I-,i:
Bcrnoilli's theorem, surface and form resistance, impulse-momentum principle, lift and d : i-
of similarity and dimensional analysis. Study includes statics, kinetics, and dynamics, r. I ii
application of basic principles to the flow of fluids through measuring devices and pi ,: Is..
around immersed bodies.

EM. 314.-Hydraulic Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EM. 313.
10:00 daily. RE 403.
Hydrology: analysis of rainfall and stream flow ending in the determination of a ur..rr. ...
graph: flood control engineering. Open channels: study of critical flow, transilatory w;, .u'
the hydraulic jump; backwater computations; reservoir routing; channel design. Pi.-: .-..
struction of nomographs: pipe network, Cross method; water hammer, Gibson meth..- r. i.
design. Pumps: use of service and pump characteristic curves based on manufacture : I
cavitation studies. Turbines: significance of performance curves and specific speed ; .-c- r
intake structures, control works, and draft tubes. Structures: design of a gravity dar, l.
method of zones.

EM. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PC' -...
ML. 182. Corequisite: MS. 354.
Section 1. 8:00 daily. RE 401.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. RE 401.
Principles of statics: resultants and equilibrium of co-planar force systems; result- .r ,-.
equilibrium of space force systems; trusses containing two force members; structures ci ir n1,r
three force members; friction; centroids; moments of inertia; Mohr's circle.

EM. 366.-Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisite, E iJ
365. MS. 354.
Section 1. 9:00 daily. RE 402.
Section 2. 11:00 daily. RE 402.
Principles of dynamics: rectilinear translation; curvilinear translation including i r--, i.
equations for highway banking and dynamic balancing of rotating weights; mass me .r
inertia: rotation; plane motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.

EM. 367.-Strength of Materials. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EM. 365, MS. '-!
Section 1. 8:00 daily. RE 402.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. RE 402.
Tension. compression, shear, stress and strain; combined stresses; Alohr's circle 'I -I
joints for pressure vessels and structural work; torsion, bending moments; stresses, and .i rl.r-.
of simple. cantilever, and continuous beams; eccentric loading: columns.

GRADUATE COURSE

EM. 564.-Advanced Strength of Materials. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EM,. i.
To arrange.
Special problems in localized stress, principal stresses, strains due to principal stress. Ii..
wall cylinders, shear center, unsymmetrical bending, curved flexural members, closed ri... r 11.,
plates.

Credit assigned must be shown on the registration blank.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ENGLISH

EH. 133.-Effective Writing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permis-
sion of C-3 Course Chairman.
10:00 daily. AN 2. WALKER, B. H.
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are urged to do creative work.

EHI. 134.-Contemporary Reading. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or per-
mission of C-3 Course Chairman.
12:00 daily. AN 2. FOGLE, S. F.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded program in reading.
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought. Some time will be spent
in introducing each student to the bibliography and writing in the area of his special professional
interest.

EH. 135.-Word Study. 2 hours. 2 credits.
1:00 M T W Th. AN 311. BAUGHAN, D. E.
Effective ways of increasing vocabulary, improving skill as a reader and enhancing command
of the arts of communication. Prerequisite: C-3.

EH. 217.-Literary Masters of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. The first half of
the course EH. 217-218. May be taken for credit without EH. 218.
8:00 daily. AN 210. STRYKER, D.
The most interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for
an appreciation of their art and outlook on life. The selections begin with Beowulf and include
the Age of Johnson.

EH. 218.-Literary Masters of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. The second half
of the course EH. 217-218. May be taken for credit without EH. 217.
8:00 daily. AN 311. FAIN, J. T.
Covers the periods in English literature from Wordsworth and Coleridge to the present.

EH. 223.-Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. The first half
of the course EH. 223-224. May be taken for credit without EH. 224.
11:00 daily. AN 212. PATRICK, J. M.

EH. 301.-Shakespeare. 3 hours. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. AN 210. HERBERT, T. W.
Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays. As an aid to the reading
of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting features of the Elizabethan stage and drama are
treated briefly.

EH. 303.-English Literature of the 19th Century. 3 hours. 3 credits.
12:00 daily. AN 210. STRYKER, D.
Attention will be focused on Tennyson and Browning; Newman, Carlyle, and Macaulay;
Dickens, Thackeray, and the Brontes.

EH. 328.-Imaginative Writing. 2 hours. 2 credits. The second half of the
course EH. 327-328. May be taken for credit without EH. 327.
2:00 M T W Th. AN 212. BAUGHAN, D. E.
Designed to help the student who desires guidance in developing his capacity for original
work. Group discussion, individual conferences, many papers.

EH. 355.-Business English. 3 hours. 3 credits.
12:00 daily. AN 212.
A general course in business writing, including business letters and elementary report writing.
Prerequisite: C-3.









92 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION "


Ell. 3s0.-English in the Secondary Schools. 3 hours. 3 credits.
8:00 daily. AN 212. COX, E. H.
Designed to help teachers of English by (1) a review of the contents, both the I r.c',ic c :In.1
the literature, of secondary school English, with attention to some of the methods I.i. i.:,l -i
high school English courses, and (2) a study of both the ultimate and the immed.'-,- t .-r -
of the Secondary English program.

EHl. 391.-Children's Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits.
10:00 daily. AN 212. GEIIAN, F. E.
Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart Ir -ni r. ,I
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature :S.i. ., rp.sI-
him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.

EH. 399.-Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 hours. 3 credit
9:00 daily. AN 210. HERBERT, T. W.
The nature of literature, its types, forms, content and values. Designed t i. ..1 ir.,
student with a better critical understanding of literary art. Lectures, wide reading '.,1 I. I.. : -....

EH. 401.-American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. AN 210. WARFEL, H. R.
Together with EH. 402, a critical and historical survey of American literal Il:.m !,-'
to the present, considering the broad movements in the development of this literature. ,i. .. il,. r
to its social and cultural background, and the artistic merit of its principal pro .w, .: .... F H
401-402 is suitable for English majors and for students preparing to teach English in rl -....
school.

EH. 409.-Chaucer. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of dt.:l, I t llm l.l
adviser.
9:00 daily. AN 311. PYLES, T.
Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, i.1 ... I j. .
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet.

EH. 415.-Milton. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of d!-n- ri.,trit.i
adviser.
11:00 daily. AN 311. ORAS, A.
Though the emphasis will fall upon Paradise Lost, all of Milton's poetry will -.. r: tI ,d-
much of his prose.

EH. 418.-The Literature of the South. 3 hours. 3 credits.
9:00 daily. AN 212. FAIN, J. T.
Poetry and prose written by Southerners or reflecting the life in the region. :. I, .r
on 19th and 20th century literary productions.

EH. 419.-Elizabethan Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: A-.i.i' .il ',
departmental adviser.
12:00 daily. AN 311. PATRICK, J. M.
The origins and development of the Elizabethan drama, exclusive of Shakespe., ,I. u r.-
phasis upon such major writers as Marlowe, Kyd, Chapman, Marston, Webster and I.-.--

EH. 433.-English Literature of the 18th Century. 3 hours. 3 cr-.l.r- Plr-
requisite: Approval of departmental adviser.
2:00 M T W Th F.* AN 311. HODGES, J. R.
English prose and poetry from Dryden through Pope, with chief emphasis upon i.. ,, r i
Addison and Steele, Pope and Swift.

Eli. 443.-The English Romantic Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. I'. .*..i....
Approval of departmental adviser.
10:00 daily. AN 311. FOGLE, S. F.
Chief emphasis on the work of Burns, Coleridge and Wordsworth.
One hour to arrange.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs