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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00135
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1957
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00135
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Main
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Full Text

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University


of Florida


,Cqt^IVES



George A. Smathers Libraries


I - ---


I


University


Record Comprises:


Reports


of the


President


to the


Board


of Control,


Annual


Catalog,


hedules, the Bulletin of the Summer Session, and announcements of special


COu rses


of instruction.


These bulletins wil


be sent without charge to all


persons who apply for them.


applicant


should


specifically


state


which


bulletin


or what


information


desired.


Address


THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida


_


I


--















FLORIDA STATE


BOARD OF EDUCATION


L E R O Y C O L L IN S -... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ......... .. .. .. ...... .. ... .. ...... .. .. .. .. .. .


Governor


GRAY


J. EDWIN


. ------..... ------------_ Secretary


LARSON


of State


State Treasurer


RICHARD ERVIN _.....


Attorney General


THOMA


BAILEY


, Secretary


State Superintendent of Public Instruction


BOARD OF CONTROL OF FLORIDA


RALPH L.


MILLER


Chairman


...---......-........... Citrus Grower


Orlando, Florida


J. LEE BALLARD


Banker


Petersburg, Florida


JAMES


CAMP


Banker


Lauderdale


Florida


KENDRICK GUERNSEY


.. .. ..... Business


Man


Jacksonville, Florida


FRED


KENT


Attorney


at Law


Jacksonville, Florida


JAMES J


L O V E ... ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ... ............. _________.__________ _


Agriculturist


Quincy, Florida


HOLLIS RINEHART


Attorney at Law
Miami, Florida


J. BROWARD CULPEPPER, Executive Director of the
Tallahassee. Florida


Board of Control








ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILS


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


Summer Session


1957


J. WAYNE REITZ


JOHN


STUART


Ph.D


ALLEN


LL.D. ........


Ph.D.


Vice


President of the


President of the


University

University


TURPIN CHAMBERS BANNISTER


Ph.D


D.F.A.


-Dean of the College of


Architecture and Fine Arts


ROBERT COLDER


BEAT


M.A.


SDean


of Students


JOSEPH RILEY BECKENBACH


ALVAH ALDEN BEECHER


Ph.D.


M.M..


Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station

.. Director of the Division of Fine Arts


MARNA


ENABLE BRADY


Ed.D.


....... Dean of Women


MARVIN ADEL BROKER, Ph.D. ....D

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S


Dean of the College of Agriculture

Vice President for Academic Affairs


HENRY


ANDERSON FENN


LL.B.


Dean of the College of Law


WILLARD


MERWIN


FIFIELD


M.S.


Provost for


Agriculture


PERRY ALBERT FOOTE


Ph.D.


Dean of the College of Pharmacy


LINTON


GRINTER, Ph.D.
-Dean of the Graduate School and Director of Research


ARNOLD BRAMS GROBMAN


Ph.D.


Director of the Florida State Museum


LEWIS FRANCIS HAINES


, Ph.D. .,................... .. Director of the University Press


LESTER LEONARD HALE, Ph.D. _

GEORGE THOMAS HARRELL, M.D.


.........Dean of Men


Dean of the College of Medicine


DONALD J


HART


, Ph.D.... .. Dean of the College of Business Administration


LELAND WILBUR HIATT ..


Director of Alumni Affairs


RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON


B.S.P.


.. Registrar


WILLIAM ELLIS JONES, B.S.B.A.


Business Manager


CLEMEN


MARCU


KAUFMAN


Ph.D.


.... Director of the School of Forestry


MARVIN ARNOLD KREIDBERG, B.S.B.A.,


Colonel


, Infantry


-Professor of Military Science and Tactics








BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.S.A.


Dean


of the


General


Extension


Division


DOROTHY


MARY SMITH, M.Ed. __


Dean of the College of Nursing


DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.A.E.
-Dean of the College of Physical Education and Health
MARSHALL OWEN WATKINS, D.P.A.


---Director of the Agricultural


Extension


Service


JOSEPH


WEIL, M.


-Dean of the College of Engineering and Director of the Engineering
and Industrial Experiment Station


RAE O.


WEIMER


Director of the School of Journalism and Communications


STANLEY LEROY WEST, LL.B.,


B.S.


in L.S. Director of the


University Libraries


JOSEPH BENTON


WHITE


Ph.D.


Dean of the College of Education


A. CURTIS WILGUS, Ph.D


Director of the School of Inter-American Studies


GEORGE ROBERT WOODRUFF, B.S.E. .--........... Director of Intercollegiate Athletics










May 4, Monday


CALENDAR OF 1957 SUMMER SESSION

. .... ^........ Last day for filing preliminary application for
1957 summer session.


June 13,


Thursday


.... .......... Placement Tests for entering students.


June 14, 15, 17, Friday
Saturday, Monday ... ___ Registration according to appointments a
signed on receipt of preliminary application.


June 18, Tuesday, 7 a.m. .....C...Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.


June 19,


Wednesday, 5 p.m. .......Last time for completing registration for the
summer session. No one will be permitted to
start registration after 3 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding or changing sections.


June 21, Friday, 4 p.m. .-.-... ._._Last time for submitting resignation for
summer session and receiving any refund
fees.


June 22, Saturday, 12 Noon ---.... Last time for making application at the office
of the Registrar for degree to be conferred at
the end of the summer session.


July


Thursday


...... .. .... ... ... H holiday.


Classes suspended.


July 6, Saturday, 12 Noon ....... Last time for graduate students to apply to
Department of Foreign Languages for reading
knowledge examination on July 21.

July 9, Tuesday, 4 p.m. ..._....--.. Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.


July 19, Friday


...................Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at end of the summer session to complete
correspondence .courses.


- .^^ff U JUfc ^^H CIu" *7"l.^JB ry ---r.-nr***-.









August 6,


Tuesday,


a.m. ...........Final examination period begins.


First semes-


ter registration begins for students enrolled in
the summer session.


August


Thursday


4 p.m.


Grades for all candidates for degrees to be con-
ferred at the end of the summer session are due
in the Office of the Registrar.


August 9,


Friday


Faculty


meetings, at


times announced


by the


Dean


s, to pass upon candidates for degrees.


August 10,


August


Saturday, 12 Noon


10, Saturday, 8 p.m. .-.-- Summer


All grades for the summer session due
Office of the Registrar.


Commencement


in the


Convocation.











BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ADMISSIONS

PRELIMINARY APPLICATION

All persons planning to attend the 1957 Summer Session, whether or not they have previously


attended the University, must file the


preliminary application form to


be considered.


liminary application may be obtained by writing to Office of the Registrar.


No applicant can be


assured that his admission to the 1957 Summer Session will be considered unless the preliminary


application has been received at the Office of the Registrar on or before Monday, May 20,


Upon receipt of the preliminary application, the applicant wil


1957.


be notified of the additional


formation (if any) that must be submitted.


This additional


information must be in the Office of the


Registrar on or before June 1,


1957.


GENERAL


STATEMENT


The Admission Requirements have been arrived at after a very careful study of


the experiences of thousands of students over a long period of years.


In every


case


they are minimum requirements that have evolved from studies of student perform-


ance at the University of Florida.


These studies


have had


as a primary objective


the identification of factors that would indicate a reasonable chance for successful
completion of University work.
The Board of University Examiners is the agency responsible for administering
all admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time


will be considered for admission


as follows:


Fres


hmen


(those who have never attended any college)


If the student is entering the


University from high school and has not at-


tended college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.


Section I)


Undergraduate Transfer Students


2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or uni-


vers


ity and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college


credit for advanced standing, he will be considered for admission to the Uni-


versity College.


Section II).


If the student is transferring to the University from another college or uni-


versity and is presenting 64 semester


hours


or more of


acceptable college


credit


as advanced standing toward a baccaulareate degree, he will be con-


sidered for admission to the


Upper


Division school or colle


of his choice


S1I 1* I I. n 0 at * II







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Medical Students (See Section V)
Law Students (See Section VI)


ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE


tion I Freshman (Applicants who have never attended college)


A. Graduates of Florida High Schools:
1. Graduation from an accredited high school is required. No specific units are
required but students expecting to apply for admission to the University
are advised to emphasize in their high school programs the following sub-
jects: English, social studies, mathematics, foreign languages and the
natural sciences.


2. Minimum
Program.
mitted to
lish, math
fields are
teed by th
Florida se


Standing on the Placement Tests of the Florida 12th Grade Testing


All applicants
the University.


ematics,
possible
e acquire
condary


Grade Testing Pro
the lowest 40% of
ble for admission.


social
with
ing of
school
'gram
the hi
The


si
ut
C

te


must take the placement tests before being ad-
These are achievement tests in the fields of Eng-
tudies, and natural sciences. Attainments in these
specific high school courses and are not guaran-
ertain high school units. Graduates of accredited
who attain scores on the Florida State-Wide 12th
!sts which place them above the scores attained by


gh school seniors of the state are academically eligi-
University may re-test any applicant prior to ad-


mission to validate the scores attained in the State Program.
High school graduates who do not meet the above requirements may apply


for special consideration. In eacl
an individual basis, and any, or a]
of evidence may be used in appr;


mission to
reference
the high s<
or request
evidence c
admission.


the
to th
thool
ed by
ailed
In


U


university


a per


e student's cumul
principal, and/or
r the university a
for, the Board of
such cases the U


h case the application will be


consider


11, or any combination of the following
raising the eligibility of the student fo
sonal interview, grades and rank in
ative high school files, recommendati
review of the results of tests already
admissions committee. After reviewing
University Examiners may grant or


university


mill give


considerable


ed on
types
>r ad-
class,
on of
given
g the
deny


weight


results on such other tests as are recommended by the Board of Examiners.
4. Non-Florida students entering the University as first time freshmen must, in
addition to meeting the requirements stated in 2, above, have graduated from
an accredited high school with standing in the upper half of their graduating
class. They must also present recommendations from the high school princi-
pal or school superintendent. Non-Florida applicants are urged to take the
College Entrance Board Examinations, the results of which can be satis-


I

[
t
'








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


tion last attended.


Students who for any reason will not be allowed to return


to the institution last attended cannot be considered for admission.


Satisfactory record.


All transfer students must have made an average of C


or higher on all work attempted at all institutions previously attended to be
considered for admission.


3. Undergraduate transfer students shall
score on a general ability test.


be required


to make a satisfactory


The University of Florida accepts on transfer only those courses completed
at other institutions with grades of C or higher.


ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION


From the


University College:


See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the


University College


and the specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges
and schools.

section III Transfer Students


Honorable


dismissal from the


institutions


previously attended.


An applicant


for admission who for any reason is not eligible to return to the institution
last attended cannot be considered for admission.


An average of


or better.


The average grade for all


work attempted at


other institutions must be C or better. An average grade of C or better is re-


quired for graduation from the


University of Florida,


and one who has not


maintained this average before coming to the University need not apply.


A minimum


courses


completed


semester
at other


hours accepted


institutions


with


as transfer credit


grades


(only those


or higher)


more than four of which are in Military Science or


Physical Education.


Specific course requirements


for the professional school of


the applicant's


choice.
under


The courses listed as required for admission to the


various


curricula


or acceptable


substitutes


Upper


must


Division


offered


advanced standing to qualify the student for admission to the


Upper


Divi-


sion.


An applicant lacking some of these requirements may be permitted to


enroll in the Upper Division and complete them without reducing the credits


required in the Upper Division for a degree. In some


cases


the student may


TTn^70ty r.llrO+r rliflf fui + O lrv- ar cd


h pnrpfa yonm iy^/i n +kT~l ain+i







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Limitations of space and staff restrict the enrollment of graduate students.
The records of applicants for graduate study are reviewed by the graduate selec-


tion committees of the various colleges and schools.
considered for graduate study in any unit of the Uni
non-accredited institution. Unqualified admission to
toward all degrees except those in the College of
Physical Education and Health is dependent upon p
ate record from an accredited college or curriculum


In general no student will be
diversity who is a graduate of a
the Graduate School for study
Education and the College of
presentation of an undergradu-
with an average grade of "B"


for the junior and senior years. All applicants are required to make a sat
score on the Graduate Record Examination before admission to the (
School can be granted.

Section V-ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

(Candidates for the M.D. degree are accepted for admission only in
of each year. See also more detailed description in the section of the
headed College of Medicine.)

Section VI-ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW


isfactory
Graduate


the Fall
Catalog


beginning


courses


in Law


are not offered


Summer


Session,


hence students are not admitted in June unless they have completed
satisfactorily at least one semester of work in an accredited law school.


A student wishing to transfer from
at the time of beginning his study of
College under the stated requireme]
than the Law School Admission Test
astic average of C or higher on all pi
may apply for admission with adva
with a grade of C or higher in othei


another accredited law school who,
law, qualified for admission to this
nts for beginning students (other
) and who has maintained a schol-
:evious law school work undertaken,
Lnced standing. Courses completed
r accredited law schools will be ac-


cepted for credit up to but not exceeding a total of thirty hours.

Applicants for admission must have received before admission a 4-year
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university, except in
the case of veterans, who will be admitted after they have completed, in
residence, three-fourths of a degree program (94 semester hours) in an
accredited college or university if they have maintained a scholastic average
of C or higher on all work undertaken.


Section
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS


VII
FOR SPECIAL


STUDENTS


Rnominl ancients ma


A rmt4f


en +n 4h\


vaia whol a a


nnll ana of


y ..,- t ...








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


submit a brief description of this experience. (5) Satisfactory scores on such
ability or achievement tests as may be prescribed in individual cases by the Board
of Examiners.

Section VIII
UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS
For the summer session only, the University of Florida provides a category for
those persons who may wish to take college courses and:
a. transfer back to the institution they regularly attend in the winter session;
b. meet certain specific certification requirements;
Persons from the groups defined above may enroll as unclassified students pro-
vided there is evidence that they would meet admission requirements as regular
students.


possible,


student


later


files


necessary


credentials


meets all the requirements for registration as a regular student, for credit
earned during one term as an unclassified student to be counted toward a


degree program at the University


will credit for mor
toward any degree
been registered as t
plete the requiremel
subsequent summer
gree at the Universi


e than one
conferred b
unclassified
nts for adm
sessions if


term
y the
in a
mission
they


of Florida. Under no circumstances
in an unclassified status be applied
University. Thus, persons that have
previous summer session should com-
as regular students before attending
anticipate completing work for a de-


ity of Florida.


Students entering the University after high school graduation and prior
to college attendance at any other institution are never admitted as un-
classified students and must qualify for admission as regular students as
described below.

ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR VETERANS

In addition to the regular requirements for admission set forth in the pre-
ceding sections and the forms incident thereto required by the University of
Florida, any veteran who expects to enroll under provisions of any of the various


federal laws governing education or
sure that he has cleared the necessa
and has obtained the necessary docu
For the most part, the benefits o
are not open to any who were not in
terrupted training since that time.


rehabilitation training of veterans
ry details with the Veterans Admin
ments from them.
f Public Law 346 (the G. I. Bill of
training on July 25th, 1951 or who
There are some circumstances und<


must be
istration


Rights)
have in-
er which


these benefits are open to the veteran,


but each case must be cleared in advance







B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


date


they


expect


to enter


University.


Under


veteran


receives
wptl p


monthly payments which cover educational expenses (fees and books) as well as
subsistence. As most of the fee and book expense must be paid at the beginning
of the school term it is essential that the veteran be in a position to meet these
expenses as they are due which will almost always be before any remittance has
been received from the government. Veterans expecting to attend college under
PL 550 are urged to familiarize themselves with the requirements and restrictions
relative to the benefits of this act. Officials of the Veterans Administration should
be consulted on any points not clear to the student or prospective student. It is
especially important that the student understand the procedures that must be
followed to obtain Veterans Administration approval of original choice or any
change of educational objective.
All veterans who believe they are entitled to educational benefits are urged to
contact the appropriate Veterans Administration office in order that the decision
may be made in their individual case. Veterans who at the time of registration
do not have the necessary papers showing clear entitlement to government benefits
are required to pay their own fees. If the proper clearances are subsequently pre-
sented to the Office of the Registrar, authorization for refund of fees and ex-
penses appropriate in the individual case will be issued.

COLLEGE CREDIT FOR SERVICE TRAINING


Veterans may be entitled to credit for training a
the armed forces during the war in accordance with 1
American Council on Education as set forth in "A
Educational Experiences in the Armed Services." A
entering the University should consult the Assistant
the Office of the Registrar. In many cases it will be
his dean in planning a program if this can be done in


Lnd experiences obtained in
the recommendations of the
Guide to the Evaluation of
11 veterans entering or re-
Director of Admissions in
helpful to the student and
advance of registration.


REGISTRATION FEES AND TUITION


Three
Week
Term


Eight
Week
Term


Florida
Non-Flo
Florida
rolled
four s
dents


Students .. .-.. .............-.-..--- ..--..-.......... $ 20.00
rida Students .......... 55.00


and
for
eme
are


$ 45.00
145.00


Non-Florida students en-
thesis only (not to exceed
!ster credit hours) (such stu-
not entitled to student








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SPECIAL FEES


Graduation Fee-Bachelor's Degree _
Graduation Fee-Master's Specialist's or
Doctor's Degree ...--....-----.-.
Applied Music Fee* ..
Practice Room Rental -.............-.-.-.. -
Instrument Rental


10.00

20.00
30.00
5.00
5.00


*Applied Music courses are offered during the eight week term
only.


SPECIAL


FEES


Breakage Books. Any student registering for a course requiring locker and
laboratory apparatus in any department is required to buy a breakage book.
Breakage books cost $3.00 or $5.00 each as determined by the department and
laboratory concerned. A refund will be allowed on any unused undetached coupons
upon completion of the course, after the student has checked in his apparatus to
the satisfaction of the departments concerned. Breakage books are sold and re-
deemed at the Student Bank.


Graduate Record Examinations. The Aptitude Test of
Examinations is required for admission to the Graduate S
covers the cost of this examination. Students who take one
of the Graduate Record Examinations in combination with
a fee of $12.00. For further information see the Graduate
Catalog.


REFUND OF FEES

A student cancelling his registration on or before
first class meetings of the summer term will be entitle
tration and course fees.
A student whose registration is cancelled by office
beginning of the summer term, but on or before th
versity Calendar covering the term involved shall b
tration and course fees less a fixed charge of three d
A student who withdraws or is suspended by Unive
date set for full refund less three dollars and on or
the end of the first week of classes shall be refunded
** A


the Graduate Record
school. A fee of $8.00
of the Advanced Tests
the Aptitude Test pay
School Section of the


e the date scheduled for the
led to a full refund of regis-


ial University action at the
e date indicated in the Uni-
e refunded all tuition, regis-
lollars.
irsity action after the catalog
before the day which marks
50% of tuition, registration







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


LIVING EXPENSES


Meals may be obtained on camp
available at several campus locations
the University. Several restaurants
campus. Lodging is available in Univ
houses off-campus, and in fraternity


is at reasonable cost.
operated by the Food
and cafeterias are local
'ersity housing facilities
and sorority houses.


Cafeteria service is
Service Division of
Lted adjacent to the
, in private rooming


STUDENT LIFE-SERVICES, FACILITIES,
REGULATIONS


ACTIVITIES,


OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT PERSONNEL
The Dean of Student Personnel coordinates the counseling and service activi-
ties which are available to aid the student in solving personal and educational
problems and to help him in selecting a balanced program of social and recrea-
tional activities.


OFFICE OF THE DEAN


OF MEN


The Dean of Men, as a counselor to men students, is interested in the total life
of the student, including his academic, financial, social, and recreation activities.
In cooperation with the Dean of Women, his office serves as a clearing house for
all non-classroom activities. The Dean of Men serves as an adviser to student
self-government so that these activities may provide training in citizenship and
leadership. He cooperates with the Director of Housing in providing counseling
for men who live in University housing facilities.


OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN


The Dean
dents. She ser
including pers
In cooper
tions she serve<
tions.
The Dean
administrative
sity residence




I'


of
vet
on
tio
S


Women has broad responsibilities for the
s as a counselor to students on a variety of
al, academic, financial and social.
n with the Dean of Men and the Advisei
as an adviser to student government and I


welfare of women stu-
problems and interests

r to Student Organiza-
other student organiza-


of Women in cooperation with the Director of Housing, acts in an
supervisory, and counseling capacity with relation to the Univer-
halls and women's fraternity houses.


OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING


The Office of the Director of Housing coordinates the
Flavet programs and operations and compiles off-campus
and listings. See section on "Housing" for details.


residence halls and
housing information









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


students on personal, academic, financial, language or social problems. Assistance
in an advisory capacity is provided for persons interested in study or travel
abroad and for individuals and organizations concerned with international under-
standing and intercultural exchange.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS OFFICE

The student organizations office is interested in the activities of all organized


student groups oi
including date of
authorization age
vides information
The Assistant


n the campus.
recognition,
ncy for social
regarding reg
Dean of Men


It maintains
officers, consti
activities of
,ulations for si
is in charge


and should be contacted regarding the format
organizations and regarding any problems
operation of student organizations.


complete


tution,
all stu
ich act
of the
ion anm
which


records


these


groups,


etc. This office is also the
dent organizations and pro-
ivities.
student organizations office
d recognition of new student
may arise concerning the


UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT SERVICE


University Placement Service is the core of the


University placement system.


serves


as the


coordinating


working in cooperation w
At the present stage of
activities which are carri
to graduating students of
The primary objective


age


ith the
develop
ed on by
colleges
of the


rncy for all placement activity on campus by
University departments, schools, and colleges.
lent, the U. P. S. supplements the placement
r various colleges, and offers direct assistance
who do not have their own placement activity.
placement system is to assist students in the


problem of finding suitable employment following graduation. This is
supplying students with vocational information, information concerning
portunities, and also assisting them in the preparation of credentials
sentation to prospective employers.
Representatives from business, industry, and government who v
campus or write this office are given every opportunity to engage qualify
versity of Florida graduates.


don
job
for


isit
ied


e by
lop-
pre-

the
Uni-


FLORIDA


CENTER


CLINICAL


SERVICES


The services of the five clinics


Division of Student
charge. Students are
become aggravated.
the State of Florida
tent that off-campus


which operate as a coordinated unit under the


Personnel are available to all University students without
urged to seek assistance before their problems or difficulties
The services of the clinics are available to the residents of
for diagnostic purposes, therapy and counseling to the ex-
subjects are needed in training programs and as personnel


and facilities will permit.


t








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC

This clinic conducts a speech and hearing examination during orientation
week of all freshmen and transfer students. The personnel of this unit are
available to all University students who have speech and hearing problems which
are handicapping in nature. In addition to losses in hearing such impairments
include: stuttering, cleft palate speech, articulatory problems, voice abnormalities
and other deviations from acceptability. This clinic operates as a laboratory for
those students in the Speech Department who are training for speech and hearing
therapists, speech pathologists, and audiologists.

READING LABORATORY AND CLINIC

Through the use of interviews and diagnostic tests, this clinic plans a program


of study
need for
student, t
necessary
functions
diagnosis
in many
engaged


and training in reading skills for each individual
assistance. The program is planned according
;he time available in the student's schedule, and th
' for permanent improvement of reading skills. In
, this unit trains teachers and graduate students
and remediation. The clinic also carries on a
aspects of the field of reading and aids students
in allied research. This clinic is an integral part o:


who


to thi
e amo
addit
in thi
progr
and fi


demonstrates a
e needs of the
unt of training
ion to remedial
e techniques of
am of research
iculty members


f the C3 program.


ADAPTED EXERCISES CLINIC


This program assists those stu
necessitate individual consideration
within the limits of their physical
individual's interests as well as the
Programs of functional exercise are
deviations that can be corrected o:
careful supervision and is based on


MARRIAGE AND FAMILY

The Marriage and Family Clinic deals with
adjustment problems. Clients are assisted in gal
in weighing advantages and disadvantages of
versity students will find understanding and help
and premarital problems.


dents who have physical deviations which
in developing a sports program that is
capacity. Due consideration is given to the
social and recreational needs for adult life.
provided for those students having physical
r improved. The work is conducted under
adequate medical diagnosis and information.


CLINIC

marital, premarital and family
ining insight into problems and
alternative adjustments. Uni-
in the solution of their marital








B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


EMPLOYMENT


Every effort is made to aid qualified students
ment. Opportunities are limited; consequently
available does not approach the number of appli<
effort is made to place students in work that
perience.
Each student who is employed by the Univer
average of C for the semester or term immedia
The average rate of pay per hour is between 6
earnings per month are about $50.
Student employment is directed by the Comn
ships, and Awards, with the Assistant Dean of I
All applications for work should be made prior
in which employment is desired. Application for
any time.
Inquiries should be addressed to:

Assistant Dean of Men
University of Florida
Gainesville. Florida


in obtaining part-time employ-
the number of part-time jobs
cants seeking these jobs. Every
utilizes their training and ex-


'sity must have an honor point
.tely preceding his employment.
0 cents and $1.00; the average

nittee on Student Aid, Scholar-
Men administering the program.
to the opening of the semester
work, however, may be filed at


SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS
For information on scholarships and loans at the University of Florida stu-
dents should refer to the Dean of Students, who is chairman of the Committee on
Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards, and to the regular session catalog or
the special bulletin on Scholarships, Loan Funds and Student Employment for
details on the various types of aid.


HOUSING
GENERAL INFORMATION
Each student must make personal arrangement for his housing either by (1)
applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to the University
Housing Facilities or, (2) in the case of an upperclassman who wishes to do so,
obtaining an accommodation in private housing or in his fraternity house.
All inquiries concerning housing applications, deposits, or rent payments in
University Housing Facilities should be addressed to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville. Checks or money orders for room deposits or
rent navments should be made navable to the University of Florida and mailed


STUDENT








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Roon
wishing
same da
together
ment as
guages,


mate requests ar
to room together
te, clearly indicate
A large number
roommates with
trade, and internal


e honored wherever possible,
submit their applications and
e on their respective applicat
of selected foreign students
American students who are i
tional relations; any student


provided
pay room
ions their
are avail
interested
interested


the individuals
deposits at the
desire to room
able for assign-
in foreign lan-
in the program


should indicate this on his application.

RESIDENCE REGULATIONS

All freshman men and all single undergraduate women, with the exception of
those whose residence is Gainesville or vicinity, are required to live in University
Housing Facilities as long as space is available. With University approval under-
graduate women students, excepting freshman, may live in their sorority houses.


HOUSING


ADMINISTRATION


AND


SERVICES


Carefully selected and trained personnel are in charge of each
with personal problems or questions concerning procedure or pc
by Head Residents, Resident Advisers, and Student Counselors.
The rates quoted are subject to change. All facilities are equip
furnishings of beds, mattresses, dressers, desks, and chairs. Res
courage to bring their own drapes, pictures, bedspreads, rugs, and
Linens may be rented on a weekly exchange basis; pillows,
some extra equipment may be rented on a term or semester basi
per week are: sheets, 154 each; towels, 8 each; pillow cases, 6* e
pillows, and lamps are 604 per Summer Session.
Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, prepaid, addressed in the
and showing his assigned room number. Such shipments will
called for by the student. The University assumes no responsibil
exercise of reasonable care for any shipment so received.


area.
ilicy


Students
are aided


iped with basic
didents are en-
1 lamps.
blankets, and
s. Linen rates
ach. Blankets,

student's name
be held until
ity beyond the


RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS


llory and Yi
These halls
normally
ce-to-room


ilee Halls
of modern design
reserved for under
intercommunication


and of brick, concrete, and
graduate women students.
system; post-office boxes


steel construction
Features include:
for each room in


building lobbies; large lounge for each building; study lounge on each upper floor;
large recreation rooms; laundry and other self-service facilities. Double and
single rooms only, with the number of single rooms limited. Community bath
facilities on each floor. Hot water system thermostatically controlled for each


Ma

are
office








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


are lounges, recreation rooms, an
two-room suites for two, double
rooms. Summer Session rates rang
Summer Session. (Murphree Hall
during the Summer Session.)


d laundry facilities in the area. Room types:
rooms for two or three students, and single
e from $26.50 to $33.00 per student per 8-weeks
will not be available for use by single students


FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES AND
FOR WOMEN WITH CHILDREN


Three Apartmer
through the Public
and should be sent
from non-veterans
veteran application
exceeded the space
non-veteran can e:


contains


build


apartment units
in construction,
two, or three bed
construction, divi
ments are equipp
their own linens,


nt


Villages


(Flavets)


located on-campus,


have


been


Housing Authority. Applications may be filed at a
as soon as possible. Although applications are being
for assignment, no such assignment can be made
s have been placed. Applications from married veter
available for the past three years and it is doubtful
expect assignment for the 1957 Summer Session.
ngs of one-story,. temuorarv construction. divided


'-


of one,
contains
rooms.
ded into
ed with


two,
20


6


or three
buildings


Flavet I
448 apI
basic fu


rugs, kitchenwa


to the individual apartments.
minimum is paid on a monthly


a -- .


Flavet


bedrooms.


divided


similar to


apartment


provided
any time
accepted
until all
ans have
that any
Flavet I
into 100
Flavet I


units,


one,


II contains 54 buildings, of two-story, temporary
artment units of one or two bedrooms. All apart-
trniture requirements, but residents must furnish
ire, etc. Cooking and heating are by gas, metered
Electricity consumption in excess of the basic
basis on meter readings. Rent rates per month


(including basic electricity) are one-bedroom apartment,
apartment, $29.50; three-bedroom apartment, $32.50.


$26.75;


two-bedroom


Murphree Hall, Sections
and to women with children
(study room and bedroom).
bath with shower and toilet
preparation of food is not p
per eight weeks term.


J and K will be available
n. The accommodations c
All suites have lavatories,
facilities on each floor in
permitted. Summer Session


for assignment to couples
onsist of two room suites
and there is a community
each section. Cooking or
rates are $59.50 per suite


OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING


Private homes and privately operated rooming houses and apartments provide
many accommodations for students.
Off-campus listings are maintained in the Housing Office but are not compiled
for mailing since availability changes constantly and a mutually satisfactory








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION


The Cooperative Living Organization, organized
to furnish economical living accommodations for its me
NW 15th St. The qualifications for membership are
ability, and references of good character. In order to
CLO, students should apply to the CLO Vice-President


and operated by students
mbership, is located at 117
financial need, scholastic
secure membership in the
at the above address.


SPRINGFIELD HALL


Springfield Hall, organized in September 1951,
operative to be established on the campus. It is spo
tion and is open to any student at the University
cooperative living. It is organized on a non-profit 1
assessed her pro rata share of the actual operating
Application for membership may be made at
West University Avenue.


is the first women's living co-
nsored by the Wesley Founda-
who is interested in Christian
basis, with each member being
cost.
the Wesley Foundation. 1320


w


FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES

Most national fraternity and sorority chapters maintain their own houses
adjacent to the University campus. Freshman women are not permitted to live
in sorority houses. Special regulations apply to freshman men living in their
fraternity houses. University student regulations are in effect for all sorority
and fraternity houses.


GENERAL


INFORMATION


LECTURES, PLAYS AND EXHIBITIONS


The University presents outstanding lectures as part of the general
and cultural life of the campus. The speakers are selected with a view
to the University community stimulating presentations in the differed
learning.
During the Summer Session, under the direction of the Department
full length plays, experimental one-act plays, and interpretative re
grams are presented. The University provides facilities for high
formances under competent direction.
Exhibitions of contemporary work in the arts are brought to t
under the sponsorship of the University Center of the Arts. Such
provide an opportunity to study examples of the best contemporary
painting, industrial design, furniture, crafts, community planning, at


educational
to offering
It areas of


of Speech,
ading pro-
grade per-


he campus
exhibitions
y work in
architecture,


If









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES SERVICES


The University Libraries, consisting of the General Library and 12 college,
school and departmental libraries, contain more than 500,000 volumes and receive
currently approximately 3500 serials.
The larger part of the library holdings are kept in the General Library build-
ing where four reading rooms offer seating space for 1200 readers. Located on


the fi
some
mani
floor,
in th
each
learn


rst floor is the University College Reading Room which ha


8000 volumes useful to
ties Reading Room and
are designed primarily
ie humanistic and the s
of these rooms are aj
led journals. On the thi


complete sets
geology and
Browsing Ro
music rooms,
and graduate
The Libra


of
geo
om


on open shelves


1 students in the first two years of college
I the Social Sciences Reading Room, on


as centers of
social studies.
approximately
rd floor is the


library
Around
15,000 v
Science


journals in psychology, gene
graphy. Additional services
for recreational reading, the


!ral


activity for the
the walls on
volumes and cu
Reading Room
science, mathel


upp<
open
rrent
with
matic


. The Hu-
the second
erclassmen
shelves in
issues of
books and
s, physics,


in the General Library are the
Map Alcove and Reading Room,


seminar rooms, and carrels and study cubicles for faculty members
students.
ry collection is particularly strong in Floridiana with research cen-


tered in the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, located on the first floor of
the General Library building. Manuscripts and books by Florida authors are col-
lected in the Florida Authors Room, which is the center for activity in creative
writing.
Libraries for Agriculture, Architecture and Allied Arts, Biology, Chemistry-
Pharmacy, Education, Engineering, Forestry, and Law are located in or near
buildings housing the corresponding instructional units. The Library serving the
extension activities of the University is located in the Seagle Building. The P.
K. Yonge Laboratory School Library serves the Laboratory School.


STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE


Applicants for


admission


University


are furnished


a medical history


and phys
is comply
examinat
licensed
Director,
using the
and phys
the appli
a lAnn 4an r


ical examination form by the Registrar's Office. The
eted by the applicant before going to his physician f<
ion. The physical examination must be performed and
Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) and mailed by the doctor
Student Health Department, University of Florida, Gain
business reply envelope supplied for that purpose. The
dical examination must be reviewed by a University P
cant is cleared for registration in the University. The t
a 1-7ht 4-hn* Oflfll nI4Q- nio antclflr ivtt 4-hA h nhitvaonal ,f1


medical
)r the
complete
directly
esville,
medical


history
physical
ed by a
rto the
Florida,
history


physician before
ype of physical
r-.ai;Tn P mal inI


I


1 _ _








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


are given annual chest x-rays by the State Health Department and every effort


is made
unaware
annual
their ch
Health
vaccina


this
this


?to detect evidence of tuberculosis of which the student may
e. (Faculty members and employees of the University are
chest x-rays.) Late registrants will be charged a special fee
iest x-ray if units of the State Health Department or the Alac
Department are not available. Students must have been
ted against smallpox within the past five years. No exceptions


be entirely
also given
of $2.00 for
:hua County
successfully
are made to


re given
advises


students to take care of this requirement before coming to the University, as
the immunization limits participation in swimming and other required activities
for a number of days after being applied. It is also advised that all students be
immunized for typhoid fever and tetanus prior to arrival in Gainesville.


Student


Health


University maintains


building o
residence.


Midnight, to provide all students in nee
treatment. Between the hours of 12:00
locked, but students who are in need ol
Staff stationed on the hospital floors of
will summon a Nurse to the Clinic. A


emergencies too severe to be cared for by the Nursing


Department


care


of the


;are
8:00
are
A ca
n 24
Staff


with
SA.M
seen
ll-bell
hour


a Infirmary
students in


00 A.M. to 12:00
consultation and
., the building is
by the Nursing
at the entrance
call to care for


The
zation
pital a
hour o:
transp(
Student
all case


Hospital, consisting of 65 beds, pr
with twenty-four hour general nu
re under constant observation by
f 9:30 P.M. and 7:30 A.M., an a
)rt students from the Residence H
ts are urged to report to the Infir
's where the illness is thought to be


ovides the students in need of hospitali-


rsing care.
a University
automobile is
alls to the I
mary at the


Patients
y Physici
kept at
infirmary
first sign


of more than average severity, parents


will be notified by collect telephone by physician in charge of the case.
The Student Health Department gives as complete a diagnostic, treatment, and
public health program as possible within the limitations of its personnel and


equipment. It is staffed and organized for treating the acute ill
commonly occur while the student is in residence at the University.
the University Infirmary include the services of a competent me
psychiatrist, x-ray and clinical laboratories, pharmacy, and a physical
There are no facilities for dental work or eye refractions in
Health Denartment and therefore students are urred to have defects


teeth corrected before coming to
Some minor surgery is perfo


the University.
irmed at the University


Infirmary


* _." 1 . ..... .. ---. 1---- 1e ....t.LL A ^ a^^,L ^.


ruling. Students who have not been vaccinated within five years a
vaccination during registration week. The Infirmary, however,


campus for the protection and medical


The Outpatient Clinic is open during the day from 8:(


d of medical c
Midnight and
E medical care
the building.
physician is o0


entering the hos-
lan. Between the
the Infirmary to
for medical care.
of an illness. In


nesses which
Facilities at
dical staff, a
therapy unit.
the Student
of vision and


no major
nn~i~in


Wh .


I


A-t- **f ^


r


__








B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


to be in need of a consultant, the University Physician will arrange for such a
consultation. Local physicians are also available for medical service to students
at their places of residence at the student's expense.
Health service is available only to those students currently enrolled in the
University who have paid the student health fee. In the case of married students,
who are unacquainted with local physicians, the Student Health Department
will be glad to recommend well qualified physicians to attend their families.
The Health Fee does not include surgery, consultation, or special duty nursing.
These must be paid by the patient. Laboratory work done at the Infirmary is
free of charge, but any work that has to be referred elsewhere is the responsibility
of the patient. Diagnostic x-ray service is offered at a very nominal cost; All


x-rays are interpreted
made for students adm
The University is
vacations, but, in cert
continued care of stud<
During epidemics,
so overtaxed that the t


by
itted
not
ain
cents
the
care


a qualified Radiologist. A charge of $2.20 per day is
i to the Infirmary as inpatients.
responsible for the medical care of students during
instances, it may make special arrangements for the
who were hospitalized before the vacation period.
facilities of the Student Health Department may be
of all ill students at the Infirmary will be impossible.


In such an emergency every effort will be made to provide for the care of students
outside of the Infirmary, but the Student Health Department will not assume pay-
ment for services rendered by outside physicians or other hospitals.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Orange and Blue Bulletin is the official bulletin of the Summer Session.
This mimeographed sheet, published every other day during the Summer Session
and posted on all bulletin boards, carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings,
and other pertinent information. Announcements made in the General Assembly;
notices on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody Hall, and Anderson Hall;
and news items in the Summer Gator serve to keep the Summer Session students
informed concerning student activities.

ORGANIZATIONS

PHI KAPPA PHI


A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the


Uni-


versity in
previously
must have
the upper
*1 t *


To be eligible for consideration


have earned at the


University at least


been guilty of no serious
tenth of all candidates fo
I


for m
thirty


breach of discipli
r degrees in his c
.-A... .


membership, a student must
;y semester hours of credit,
ne, and must stand among
college. Eligibility for con-
"I............1







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Education


pursuits, by
postgraduate


ability
faculty
develop
are, in
for elec


th
(


during
member
ment.


Le
:la
th
rs
M


ind a
electi
sses
Leir u
who
inimu


general, 3.0 av
tion, and high i


to do satisfactory


wo


high degree of excellence in the practice of
on to membership of those students of the gra
in the Agricultural College who have shown
undergraduate or graduate work, and of those
have rendered signal service to the cause of
m requirements for membership for graduate
rage, at least one year's residence at time of c
noral character. Graduate students must have s
rk in advanced study in agriculture, and mus


agricultural
dating and
exceptional
alumni and
agricultural
sing Seniors
consideration
hown ability
t have com-


pleted at least one semester or its equivalent in the Graduate School at the
versity of Florida.


Uni-


KAPPA DELTA PI

The Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of
Florida in 1923. The purpose of the society is to recognize and promote merit
in educational study and service. Both men and women are admitted to member-
ship. Members are chosen from juniors, seniors, graduate students, faculty, and
alumni. Requirements for membership are, in general, as follows: a scholastic
average in the upper quintile; evidence of abiding interest in educational service;
a good professional attitude; and good personal-social characteristics. During the
Summer Sessions the chapter holds a meeting each week.

PHI BETA KAPPA


Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the
in 1938. It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded
with the national objectives of the society, the University
stricts election to the College of Arts and Sciences. Not
of the senior class graduating in each semester, including t
the Summer Session is eligible for election.
In addition to conferring membership upon qualified se


university of Florida
1776. In conformity
Florida chapter re-
re than 15 per cent
graduating class of


niors in the College of


Arts


Creative
from all
has dist
activity
liberal cd
prospect


d Sciences, the
Achievement, t
the colleges on
inguished himself
as creative writ
discipline, and hi


society seeks, by means of
o honor each year not more
the campus who, irrespectiv
If throughout his undergrad
ing, dramatics, and forensic
as revealed a decided talent,


an Award in Recognition
e than one graduating seni
e of his honor point average
late career in such fields
s, the fine arts, or any oth
, a persistent interest, and


of mature achievement in later life.


PHI DELTA KAPPA


t
f








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


RECREATION
THE FLORIDA UNION

The Florida Union, the official center of student activities, is financed pri-
marily by student activities fees. Some of the facilities and services offered by
the Union include music listening rooms, a craft and hobby shop, photographic
darkrooms, browsing library, game room, and lounges where students may spend
leisure hours. Fifteen guest rooms are available for guests of students and Uni-
versity personnel. The Union also provides an embosograf poster service, infor-
mation desk, a Western Union substation, auditorium, and meeting rooms for
student activity groups. Offices for the President of the Student Body, the Execu-
tive Council, Honor Court, and all student publications are located in the Florida
Union.
The Florida Union Social Board, composed of students interested in planning
student activities, sponsors a variety of social programs for the student body.
Some of the regular activities sponsored by the Social Board are bridge tourna-
ments, dancing classes, coffee hours, movies, outings, dances, and Club Nautilus
(the campus night club). Other special activities are sponsored by the Social
Board during the year. The committees of this board are open to all interested
students.
The University's Camp Wauburg operated by the Florida Union is a recrea-
tional area for the exclusive use of University personnel. This area is located
nine miles south of the campus. Facilities include a large picnic area, a recrea-
tional building, a bath house, and a play ground area for volley ball, horseshoes,
badminton, softball. Camp Wauburg has swimming, boating, and fishing facilities.
INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS


A broad recreational program of athletics
and faculty by the College of Physical Educati
Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will
softball, tennis (singles and mixed doubles)
doubles), swimming, volleyball, table tennis,


private awards will
A sports' clini
ball tournaments.
sports through th
formation may be


will be conducted for the students
ion and Health during the Summer


be organized
, shuffleboard
and handball


be made to winning teams and individuals
c will be conducted prior to the tennis,
Students have the opportunity to learn


ie
o


Department of
obtained at Room


The athletic and physical educatic
ming pool and equipment room service
students. Use of these services and


with competition in
(singles and mixed
tournaments, appro-
in all sports.
volleyball, and hand-
skills in recreational


Required Physical Education. Ft
134, Florida Gymnasium.
onal facilities, including the use of
e, will be available to all bona fide I
facilities will also be extended to


irther


the swim-
Jniversity
students'








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


THE


DIVISION


MUSIC


The Division of Music offers opportunities during the Summer Session for
those students interested in participating in bands, orchestras and choral groups.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE


The leading religious denominations
students are welcome at every service.
ligion and in preparing themselves for
offered by the Department of Religion.


have attractive places of
Students interested in the
religious leadership may


worship and
study of re-
take courses


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY


Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the


courses and for fulfilling all
registration students should
regarding choice of courses.


requirements for his degree. Several days
confer with the deans of their respective


Juniors and s


of the departments in which they expect to
ation must file, in the office of the Registrar
must pay the diploma fee very early in the
the degree. The official calendar shows the
Courses can be dropped or changed only


college


which


the student is registered c


seniors should confe
earn majors. Cand
, formal application
term in which they


latest day on which
with the approval o
nd by presentation


proper
before
colleges


r with the heads
idates for gradu-
for a degree and
expect to receive
this can be done.
f the dean of the
of the cards au-


thorizing the change at the office of the Registrar.

CREDITS

The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one
semester hour.

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS


minimum


residence


requirement


for the


baccalaureate


degree


semesters, or one semester and three six-week summer terms, or one semester
and two eight-week summer terms, or one semester and two nine-week summer
terms, or five six-week summer terms, or four eight-week summer terms or four
nine-week summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet this
requirement after entrance to the University. Students who break their residence
at the University by attending another institution for credit toward the degree
w*-i r.


]



*I









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


3. For the degree of Bachelor of Laws, a
weeks of study in residence in an accredited 1


has been in residence
credits and the last 30
other arrangements a
faculty of the College
tember, 1953, completic
law school is required
this College.)


in the C
weeks o
re made
of Law.


college of Law,
f study must b
in advance by
(In the case


student must complete


aw school of which at least 6
University of Florida. The
e in residence in this College
r written petition approved
of a student admitted prior


'2 must
last 28
unless
by the
to Sep-


of at least 90 weeks of study in residence at an accredited
which at least 56 weeks must have been in residence at


4. For residence requirements for
Graduate School section of this bulletin.


various


graduate


degrees


AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED


No student will be allo
a degree by correspondent
apply on the last thirty h
of the college in which a
trained prior to enrollment
is permitted to earn more
Under no circumstances


wed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward
ce study and extension class work. Extension work to


ours is authorized only
student is registered.
in extension work. If a
than twelve of the last
will a student in resi


by special action o
Such authorization
authorization is give
thirty-six hours in


dence


permitted


f the
mus
n, no
this
1 to


for a correspondence course if that course is being offered in the Summer


faculty
t be ob-
student
manner.
register
Session.


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD


he maximum load for which an undergraduate may register in an eight-week
is 9 semester hours. The maximum load in a six-week term is 6 semester


hours.
The
tration
which
load to
Studen


minimum load for any student is three semester hours. Original regis-
for less than three hours must be approved by the Dean of the college in
the student is enrolled. After registration, the student may reduce his
less than three hours only with the approval of the Senate Committee on
t Petitions.


UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities
who wish to earn credits in the Summer Session to be transferred eventually to
their respective institutions, and (b) other students not candidates for degrees.


2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as
fled student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of


an unclassi-
the colleges


at least 96


T
term








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Bachelor's Degree for at least three six-week summer terms or two eight-week
summer terms, and in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the
Master's Degree. The residence requirement (see above) in the University will
not be waived in any case.
4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclas-
sified students during the Summer Session.


5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a
statement of the policies governing the application for admission to candi
the various colleges and schools. This statement will make clear that
earned while a student is registered as an unclassified student can be
toward a degree in the college of his choice only if under regular proved
credit will apply toward that degree.


definite
dacy, in
credits
applied
ure this


6. The
Registrar


registration blanks for unclassified
and assistants chosen by him from


students will
the faculty.


approved


ABSENCES OR


UNSATISFACTORY WORK


Absences count from the first meeting of the class rather than from the date
a student registers for a class.
A. If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent that


further enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to hin
mental to the best interest of the class, it shall be the duty of the inm
warn such student in writing that further absences or failure to do
will cause him to be suspended from the course with a failing gra<
possible this warning will be delivered personally; otherwise, it will
to the student's last University address by the Registrar. Instructor
mediately report all such warnings to the department head or course


i or detri-
structor to
class work


i


Should any absences or failure to do class work be incurred after this


the student will be suspended from the cla


Registrar upon re
warning.
Should this reduce
be suspended from


iceipt


notice


from


and be given a failing gra


instructor


showing


e. Where
be mailed
shall im-
chairman.
warning,
ide by the
e date of


the load of the student below the minimum required, he will
the University.


B. When a student is suspended from a course under the provisions of A above,
his parents shall be notified in writing by the Registrar.
C. A student who has been warned for absences or unsatisfactory work in any
class should not incur additional absences in that course even though he has
not been absent from the class for nine scholastic days. It is the responsibility


I

(









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


supported state university. To continue the registration of students who have
demonstrated that they do not possess the necessary ability, or preparation, or
industry, or maturity to obtain a reasonable benefit from a program of University
study is inconsistent with this responsibility.
Consequently, the University of Florida Senate has enacted the following
University regulations covering probation, suspension, and exclusion for academic
reasons. Any college of the University may enforce additional academic standards
and each student is responsible for observing the regulations of his college relating
to such additional standards.
It is important to note that a student may be placed on various kinds of
probation for reasons other than those listed below. For example, he may be
admitted to the University on a probationary basis or he may be placed on disci-
plinary probation by reason of conduct or, in some cases, he may be placed on
probation by the Committee on Student Petitions. In cases such as the foregoing


the individual
he must meel
will require
Inasmuch as
bations only
particular caE


1 student will receive in writing a
b in order to remove the probation.
loads, grades, etc., that are above
such a student will have been plac
because of some previous academic


S

t
e
(


specific set of <
In most cases
he minimums
d on one of th
difficulty or mi


condition
these col
set forth
Lese speci
misconduct


se the specific terms of probation which are set forth for him


the necessary minimum achievement rather than


the conditions set forth


s which
nditions
below.
ific pro-
, in his
become
i below.


ACADEMIC PROBATION

Lower Division Students:

1. A Lower Division student who fails to maintain a 1.0 honor point average
for all work attempted in his first or second semester at the University of Florida
will be placed on academic probation for his next semester.
2. A Lower Division student on academic probation (Under Article IV or
XV) during his second semester will be ineligible for further registration in the
University unless he maintains a 1.0 honor point average in all work attempted
in that semester.
3. A Lower Division student who has attempted more than two semesters and
who fails to maintain a 1.5 honor point average on all work attempted each se-
mester thereafter will be placed on academic probation for his next semester.
4. A Lower Division student who has attempted more than two semesters and
who is on academic probation (Under Article IV or XV) shall be ineligible for
further registration in the University unless he maintains a 1.5 honor point aver-


*


I _








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Upper Division Students:
6. Any Upper Division student who fails to maintain a 1.8 honor point
average for all work attempted in any semester shall be placed on academic proba-
tion for his next semester.
7. An Upper Division student on academic probation (under Article IV or XV)
will be ineligible for further registration in the University unless he maintains
a 2.0 honor point average in all work attempted that semester or has 2.0 cumu-
lative honor point average in the total of all work attempted while registered in
his present Upper Division college.


SUSPENSION


All Undergraduate Students:
8. All Undergraduate students


(all those classified other than 6)


who do not


receive
tempted
versity
semeste:
this pro


passing
in any
for one
r hours
'vision.


excessive
with a loa
A student
placed on
his probat


grades


ter
ful
crei
All


absences
d of less
eligible
academic
ion shall


(A, B,


C, or D)


in more than one-half of


m or semester shall be suspended immediately f
I semester; however, failure in only one course
dit or less shall not cause the student to be sus]
Undergraduate students who are dropped from
or unsatisfactory work and as a result of such


the hours at-
rom the Uni-
carrying five
pended under
a course for
drop are left


than 12 semester hours will be suspended for one full semester.
to return to the University after such a suspension shall be
c probation for his next semester. The terms for satisfying
be those provided above appropriate to the number of semesters


attempted. A second suspension for academic reasons
student will not be eligible for further attendance at the


shall be fina
University.


Graduate Students:
9. Any graduate student may be denied further registration in the University
or in his graduate major when his progress toward completion of his planned
graduate program becomes unsatisfactory.

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS:


10. All actions taken und<
notations on the student's rec
11. A student attending
may satisfy the terms of his
point average as indicated
semester and summer session


er tl
:ord.


these regulations shall be reflected by appropriate


a summer session prior to his probational semester
probation if he obtains the necessary probation honor
above, computed by taking the grades of his last
together.


COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the exam-


nation is given need not make application for it.


University College students who


are not enrolled in a course at the time an examination


is given and


who


wish


to take


comprehensive


examination


must apply


in writing


to the


Board


Examiners for permission prior to the last date set for filing such applications.


Applications will not be accepted from students registered in


Upper Division.


colleges


Before the application is accepted the applicant will be required


to furnish


the Board


of Examiners with


proof


that this


privilege


not been


used


to avoid


payment


usual


University


fees.


Applications


cepted only for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Ex-


amlners.


Board


Examiners


is the


only


agency


authorized


to give


Uni-


versity College students examinations by application.


THE UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE


INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT


a reorganization


at the


University


Florida


1935


freshmen


sophomores


were


work


placed
Lower


one college.


Division


which


University


includes


College


administers all


pre-professional


work


Upper


Division


schools


colleges and a core


program


of basic


education


students.


1944


American


Council


on Education


defined


pro-


gram


"General education refers to those phases of nonspecialized and non-voca-


tional education that should be the common denominator, so to speak, of educated


persons


. . the type of education which the majority of our people must have if


they


are to be good


citizens,


parents,


During


freshman


sophomore years at the


University


a student's


time


is about evenly


divided be-


tween these objectives of general education and those of pre-professional or pro-
fessional preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility toward the professional training of stu-
dents who remain four years or longer and earn degrees, the University of Florida
as a state institution also accepts its civic responsibility to help those who spend


only one or two years at the


University.


These students-more than


two-thirds


of all enrolled--are not "failures" because they do not continue and earn degrees,
and they probably deserve more from the state university than an odd assortment


only


"introductory


courses."


Consequently


at the


University


Florida


group


comprehensive


courses


have


been


worked


out to


give


some


unity


meaning to a beginner's


program.


These comprehensive courses that make up the


workers."








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GUIDANCE


If
on re
sives
with
needs
these
should


a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not
'gistration day. His program may be made up largely from
which help him direct his thinking toward a desirable obj
approved electives that may further enable him to explore
i. But whether the student is decided or undecided about
comprehensive courses provide basic preparation that every
d have.


urged to guess
the comprehen-
ective, together
e interests and
his life's work,
educated person


Thus since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, the
program absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course


of the


University College program is designed to guide the student.


During the


time tha
subjects
great ar
sity Coll
which w
making
reports,


at he is making tentative steps toward a profession by taking special
to test aptitudes, interests, and ability, he is also studying the several
eas of human understanding and achievement. The work in the Univer-
ege presents materials which are directly related to life experiences and
ill immediately become a part of the student's thinking to guide him to
correct next steps. Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress
vocational aptitude tests, basic vocational materials, selected material in


the comprehensive courses, student conferences,
ferences, election privileges, and comprehensive


adjustments for individual
examinations-is a part


dif-
of a


plan designed to guide students.
UPPER DIVISION COOPERATION


While the necessary correlation and unification
College Office, throughout the University College
Division deans and department heads to discuss
month of each school semester these informal conf
scheduled formal conference at which each student
for his prospective Upper Division work.


is attempted at the University
period students consult Upper
future work. During the last
erences are supplemented by a
fills out a pre-registration card


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE COUNSELORS
The University College Counsellors do not assume the responsibility that every


student himself must take,
greater and greater share
counsellors are located in th
Every spring the Univer
in every high school of the


but they help in every way possible as he assumes a
of responsibility in his University education. The
e University College Office.
sity is privileged to give placement tests to all seniors
state. Since many high schools are also trying to ac-


quaint the student
records along with
made in the genera
A student who
any one of the sul


with


the common


body


the placement tests res
1 program.
has had three or four
object areas of the corn


of knowledge


o needed


their


ults indicate the variation that may be


years of preparatory school study in
prehensive courses, and his placement










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NORMAL PROGRAM


Freshman


Year


Credits


1.-American Institutions ...........................
2.-The Physical Sciences ........ ............
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--
Freshman English ....-.-. --.-..--..-..-.._
4.--Logic and Mathematics ..............
5.--Departmental Electives ........ ........
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Sophomore


Year


1.-The Humanities .... .
2.-Biological Science ..........
3.-Departmental Electives ...
Military Science; Physical


Credits


Fitness


8
6
16-20
30-34


30-34


At least sixty-four semester hours,
Science, are required to complete the L


Basic Program for


Pre-Medical or


which may include four hours of Military
lower Division.
Pre-Dental Students.-The program listed


below


member


covers


American


Medical


schools.


minimum
Associatic


Since


some


pre-medical


or by
schools


or pre-dental
American I


require


more,


work


)ental


prescribed
Association


directly to the medical or dental school he is considering for a catalog and specific
information concerning its requirements.


SUGGESTED PROGRAMS FOR


student


should


write


PRE-MEDICAL


PRE-DENTAL


STUDENTS


Normal Program


Freshman


Year


Credits


1.-*C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing,--
Freshman English _--
2.-C-6, Biological Science ....
3.-Chemistry 217-218, General Chemistry &
Qualitative Analysis ....................
4.-Biology 161-162, General Biology
Laboratory .3 .............................._.. .
5.-*Ms. 105-106, Basic Mathematics ..........
6.-Military Science; Physical Fitness .......


*(C-41, Logic, 3 hrs, may be substituted for
Ms. 106. This would reduce the total hours
to 35.)


Sophomore


Year


Credits


1.-C-1, American Institutions .................
2.-C-5, The Humanities .......................
3.-Chemistry 301-302
Organic Chemistry -...............-.....-......
4.-*Biology 209-210, Comparative
Anatomy and Embryology ...... .......
5.--Language or elective ..................... . .. ..
6.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ..


*(Ps 201-202, 207-208, General Physics,
8 hrs, usually taken in the Junior Year,
may be substituted for Bly 209-210 and
these Biology courses may then be taken
in the Junior Year.)


Alternative Program for Students Who Are Deficient in Mathematics or


Science


Freshman Year


1.-C-3, Reading, Speaking & Writing,
Freshman English ..--..-..................._._
2.-C-4, Fundamental Mathematics and
Practical Logic ..-...._............-..........._
3.-C-6. Biological Science ................


Credits


1.--1, l
2. -C-5
3.-Bly


6 4.-*Ms


Sophomore Year


Credits


American Institutions ................
The Humanities .... ... ........ ... :......
209-210, Comparative Anatomy
& Embryology ........................
. 325-327. Advanced General









B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


AGRICULTURE

The program for freshmen and sophomores expecting to earn a degree in the
College of Agriculture should be:

a) For students intending to major in Agricultural Chemistry-


Freshman Year C:
.-C-1, American Institutions ......... ..
.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ....................
.-*MS. 105-106, Basic Mathematics ..........
.-**CY. 217-218, General Chemistry
and Qualitative Analysis.


5.-Military Science;


Physical


Fitness


credits
8

8
8

8
2


1.--C-5.
2.--C-6,
3.--0C-41
4.-EH,
5.--CY.
tive


Sophomore Year C:
The Humanities ...... .....
Biological Science .....
Practical iLogic ....
133, Effective Writing...
331, Introductory Quantita-
Analysis ........................... ....


6.-Approved Electives .............. ...........
7.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ......s


credits
6

3
4
6
2


*Students not qualified for MS. 105-106 will take C-42 and C-41 during the freshman year and
MS, 105-106 in the sophomore year. These students will take CY. 8831 in the Upper Division.
**Students not qualified for CY. 217-218 will take C-21 and C-22.
b) For students intending to major in Agricultural Economics-


Freshman Year Credits
1.-C-1, American institutions ..................... 8
2.-C-6, Biological Science, or
BTY. 101J-102 ..1. ..... ........... -..........--......... 6
3.--C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ... ................. 8
4.-C-4 or MS. 105-106, Basic
Mathematics -.------------- ............... ..... 8
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ........ 2


Sophomore Year Credits
1.-Cy. 109-110, Elements of
Chemistry ........ ... .... .. . .... .............. 6
2.--ATG. 211-212, Elementary
Accounting .. .... .. ................. ................. 6
3. ---C-5, The Hufmanities ..-.. .... .. .. ...... 8
4.-AS. 201, Principles of
Agricultural Economies .............. .. 3
5.-ES. 206, Basic Economics ....-.... 3
6.-Electives in Agriculture or Basic
Sciences .................................... .. 2-8
7.-Military Science; Physical Fitness -..... 2


30-36


For students intending to major in Agricultural Education-


Freshman Year Credits
1.--C-I. American Institutions ................... 8
2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English S....-.. ..... 8
3.-C-6, Biological Science ..........-............. 6
4.-AY. 221, General Field Crops ............... 3
5.-PY, 201, Fundamentals in Poultry
Production ............................... ---------------.. .. 3
6.-Military Science: Physical Fitness ....... 2


Sophomore Year
Practical Logic ......


2.--C-42, Fundamental Mathematics ........
3.- 5 C-5', The Humanities en .... ^. .. . ....
4.-BTY. 101-102, General Botany .......
5.-CY. 109-110, Elements of Chemistry
6.-DY. 211, Principles of Dairying .......
7.-HE. 212, Vegetable Gardening ..........
8.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ....


d) For students intending to major in Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry
and Nutrition, Botany, Dairy Husbandry, Dairy Manufactures, Entomology, General Agriculture,
Horticulture (Fruit, Vegetable and Food Technology programs), Plant Pathology, Poultry Husbandry,
and Soils-


Freshman Year Credits
1.-C-6. Biological Science, and/or
BTY 1 0 1 1 02 ...... .. .. ........ ...... ...... ...------------ ---- 6-1 2
2.-C-8, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English -............ 8
8.-CY. 121-122, General Chemistry -............. 8
4.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic je iences .. .. ... .. ... ------..- ......... ..- 0-6
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ........ 2


Sophomore Year Credits
1.-C-1, American Institutions ........-......... 8
2. --C-4, Logi and Mathematics C....... ....... 6
3. -C-6, The Humanities ....... ................ 8
4.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic S science .......- ...... .. .. ... ... ... 56- 1 2
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ........ 2


80-36


80-86


Credits
-...


....









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Some variations from these programs are desirable in the different curricula of the College.
The curriculum of the department in which the student intends to major should be consulted for
these details. Students planning to major in Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, or Poultry Hus-
bandry are required to take BLY. 161-162 as corequisites with C-6 and ACY. 208. At least 64 aca-
demic hours which may include 4 hours of Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number of
hours required for an Upper Division degree.


desirable


electives


in Agriculture,


students


should


consult


head


the
two
phase
It is
in ea
omy


dei


apartment in


which they intend


to major.


years should be distributed so as to give some
;es of Agriculture, and are limited to a single
required that all students graduating in Agri
ich of the following departments: Agricultural
or Horticulture, and either Animal Husbandr


or Poultry Husbandry.


All such students, except


These elective


during the first


acquaintance with the different
course in any one department.
culture take at least one course
Economics, Soils, either Agron-
y and Nutrition, Dairy Science
those majoring in Agricultural


Chemistry and B
Engineering and
year are AG. 306
In the sophomore
following: AG. 3(
301, and SLS. 302


acteriology, shall also tak
in Entomology. Courses
i, AL. 309, AY. 221, DY.
e year these courses may
)1, AS. 201, AS. 306, AY.
.


:e at
suita
211,
also
324,


least
ble f
EY.
be
CL.


one
or e
203,
elect
223,


course in Agricultt
election in the fresh
FY. 313, and PY.
ed, and in addition
HE. 201, PT. 321, S


aral
nan
201.
the
LS.


FORESTRY


Students planning to
spective outline of courses
the freshman and sophomo
Those students falling
mittance to the School of
to satisfactorily carry on


enter the School of Forestry should complete the re-
listed in the regular University Catalog as required for
)re years for the Forestry curriculum of their choice.
below a 2.0 grade average will be considered for ad-
Forestry only after they have demonstrated the ability
the professional courses in Forestry.


ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS

The University College student who plans to earn a degree in the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts has one of the following basic programs:

A.-For the degree in Architecture or Building Construction-


Freshman Year Credits
1.--American Institutions ..-....-..-...-......-...-...... 8
2.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ................... 8
*3.-MS. 105-6 --.-.-.8........ .......... 8
4.- AE. 101-2 6..--.-...-............ ---................ 6
5.-Military Science or Elective .......-..-....- 2
6.-Physical Fitness ............................0.. O
32


Sophomore Year Credits
1.-The Humanities ..---......--_-.....8
2.--Biological Science .-...._-.......-.. -..... -_ .
**3.- PS. 201-2 -.. .. ...... ...-.. .............. 6
4.--AE. 203-4 ....................._. 6
5.-- A E. 205-6 ......................_. -------------...-............ 6
6.-Military Science or Elective ------.-.-...-.. 2
7.-Physical Fitness ....-......-................ 0
34


R.~--nr d-io darop in Tn.Qnd1aon-no Arn hitarhrn.










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


C.-For the degree in Interior Design-

Freshman Year Credits
1.-American Institutions .. .... ........... 8
2.-The Physical Sciences ..... ............. 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ........... 8
4.-Logic and Mathematics ............ 6
5.--AE. 101-2 6
6.-Military Science or Elective ............. 2
7.-- Ph y sical Fitness .1 ... . .... ...... ....... 0

36


Sophomore Year Credits
1.-The Humanities -m ..it.,.~ - 8
2 .--Biological Science .6 .. ... .. . .. . . 6
3.-AE. 20-4 6
4.-AE. 205 ........... ............ 3
5.- Approved Elective .......... .......-------. 3
6.-Military Science or Elective ............... 2
7.--Physical Fitness -......~........ .....-----------.. 0

28


D.-For the degree in Painting and Drawing, Commercial Art, Crafts, or History
of Art.--


Freshman Year Credits
1.--American Institutions ................ ......... 8
2.---The Physical Sciences ............ 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing : Freshman English ...- --.............. 8
4.-Logic and Mathematics ....... ......... 6
5 ART 1 2 1 . ... .. .... ... .. .... ... ... 3
6.--ART 1 2 3 ......................... ..... ... .... .. 3
7.-Military Science or Elective ............ 2
8. --Physical Fitness ...... ... ............. .......... O0
36

E.-For the degree in Costume Design-


Sophomore Year Credits
1.-The Humanities -.. .... .. ........ -......... 8
2.- Biological Science .-........... ........... 6
3.-ART 124 . .................... ....... 3
4. -ART 222 ........ ........... .. ........ 3
5.--ART 225-6 ...............-~.. .... 6
6.-Military Science or Elective ...... .. 2
7'.--Phyrsical Fitness ... ..... ............ .... 0
28


1.-American
2.-The Phys
3.--Reading,
Freshman
4.--Logic an
5.-ART 121
6.-ART 123
7.- -Military
8.--Physical


Freshman Year C
Institutions .......... ...... .....
ical Sciences .................. . ..
Speaking and Writing:
English .. . ... ...... . .....
d Mathematics ...............

Sciene o r Elective---
F i tness .-.. . .. -------.- ---- .-- -- -


redits
8
6

8
6
3
3
2
O

36


Sophomore Year Credits
1. --TheHumanities ..................... ......... ........ 8
2.- Biological Science ............... ............... 6
3.--ART 124 ....4.... ..... -....... .. .... 3
4 ART 2 22 ......... .. .. ... .-...-. ... 3
5.---A RT 290 .. ... -.. ...... ..... .... .... 3
6.--Approved Elective ..... ................ 3
?.-Military Science or Elective ................ 2
8.--Physical Fitness .. _........... ................. O
28


F.-For the degree in Music-


Freshman Year Credits
1. -- American Institutions ............................. 8
2.--The Physical Sciences ......6................... 6
3.---Freshman English ........... ...... 8
4.--Logic and Mathematics .................... 6
5.-Military Science: Physical Fitness ........ 2
6.-Applied Music .......... .............. *.. ..... -.... ..... 2
7.--Ensemble ................................... ...... 2
34


NOTE


Sophomore Year Credits
l.-The Humanities ...8... .... ... ... ...... 8
2.-Biological Science ............. ...................... 6
3-Military Science: Physical Fitness 2
4.- EDF. 225 ......... .. .... ...... ....-. ........ 3
5.-- E DE F. 245 .............. .... ................ .. ........ 3
6.--MSC. 101-102 ...... ........................ ......... 6
7.-Applied Music in Courses above 100 ...... 4
8.--Ensenmble .... ....... ................................... 2
34


Before a student may be admitted to a Departmental major program in Music in the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts (his junior year), he must pass a proficiency examination in
Piano.


A DPFO A ?Jf QPTPMTOPQ










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

To enter the College of Business Administration students are required to com-
plete the curriculum below or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses or areas
of knowledge listed including the following:

ES. 201-202-Basic Economies
ATG. 211-212.-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics
MS. 208.-Business Mathematics


Fr
First Semester C:
1.-American Institutions ......... .
2.-The Physical Sciences .....................
3.-Mathematics or Logic .............
4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English -.-..---..--_.-
5.-Approved Electives
Military Science: Physical Fitness .... .


eshman
redits
4
3


Sophomore
1.-Accounting ..-.........................-..._ 3 '
2.-Economics ................ 3
3.-The Humanities ---.------------....-.-.-..-. 4
4.- Biological Science ....-.....-..... --......- 3
5.-Statistics or MS. 208 -.-.-.---............. 3-4 1
Military Science; Physical Fitness ---- 1
17-18


Year


Second Semester C:
1.-American Institutions .--..--..---..-..
2.-The Physical Sciences .................
3.-Logic or Mathematics
4.-Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English .....-..............
5.-Approved Electives --..-----........ .
Military Science; Physical Fitness .....


Year
1.-Accounting -.............. ~~.----..---.--..........-.....-
2.- Economics ........ ... .. .. .. .
3.-The Humanities ........ .......
4.--Biological Science ....................
5.-Statistics or MS. 208 ...........
Military Science; Physical Fitness ....


redits
4
3
3
4
3
1
15-18


3
3
4
3
3-4
1
17-18


At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours of Military
Science, are required to complete the Lower Division.

COURSES OFFERED BY THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


The following courses offered by the College of Business Administration may
be taken by students in the University College: ATG. 211-212, Elementary Ac-
counting; BS. 231, Principles of Marketing; BS. 233, Salesmanship; BS. 260, Fun-
damentals of Insurance; BS. 271, Principles of Management; ES. 203, Elemen-
tary Statistics; ES. 201-202, Basic Economics; ES. 208, Economic History of the
United States; RE. 291, Real Estate Fundamentals; and RE. 295, Housing and
Home Ownership.


EDUCATION


University College students working toward a degree in
cation should pursue one of the following programs:


the College of Edu-









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUI-MMER


SESSION


Electives:
Elementary Education: EDF. 245, 225; MSC. 161 (Prerequisite: MSC.
test); PHA. 361; SCA. 253.
*Secondary Education: EDF. 245, 225.
*Business Education: BEN. 81, 91, 181: EDTF. 245, 225: ES. 201-02.
*Industrial Arts Education: EDF. 245, 225: IN. o102.


160 or pass music skills


For the basic programs in Agricultural
Exceptional Child, consult the Catalog.


Education


Education


*For these areas three hours in the Human Adjustment field, other than C-41, are required.
These electives may be taken either in the University College or in the College of Education.

ENGINEERING

The program for the first and second year students expecting to earn a degree
in the College of Engineering is as follows:


First Semester Credits
1.-C-11, American Institutions ............... 4
*2.--C-21, The Physical Sciences ..................... 3
3--C-31, Reading, Speaking, and
Writing: Freshman English ...-....... 4
"4.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics ...... 3
5.--MY. 101, Military Science .............. ... 1
6.--PL. 101, Physical Fitness ............ -. 0
15

Third Semester Credits
1.-MS. 106, Basic Mathematics -.....-.... 4
2.-CY. 217, General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis ...-..4...........-
3.-C-61, The Humanities -... ... .-.. 4
**4.-ML. 181, Engineering Drawing ...... 3
5.--MY. 201, Military Science -..-.-...-........... 1
6.-PL. 103, Physical Fitness .... -....... .......... 0
16


Second Semester Credits
1.--C-12, American Institutions ............ 4
*2.-C-22, The Physical Sciences ................. 3
3.-C-32, Reading, Speaking, and
Writing: Freshman English ................ 4
*4.-C-41, Practical Logic -..... ...........-......- 3
5.-MS. 106, Basic Mathematics -...... ......... 4
6.-MY. 102, Military Science ... ....... .....~~.. 1
7.-PL. 102, Physical Fitness ....-...... .......- 0
19
Fourth Semester Credits
1.-MS. 353, Differential Calculus .....^.... 4
2.-CY. 218, General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis 4.-...............- 4
3.--C-52, The Humanities .-..........-... -. 4
**4.-ML. 182, Descriptive Geometry ....... 3
5.-MY. 202, Military Science .... ... ...... 1
6.--PL. 104, Physical Fitness .................. 0
16


A student interested in the Florida Industries Cooperative Plan should con-
tact the engineering department of his choice or the Dean's office for specific
advice before registering for the first semester.
Students whose records in the University College indicate that they are quali-
fied to take the professional courses in Engineering will be admitted to the College
of Engineering.

JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS

To enter the School of Journalism and Communications students are required
to have completed the six comprehensive courses; present credit in pre-professional
work--COM. 118, ES. 206, and SCH. 201; have a grade average of C or better;


and a working knowledge of typewriting.
Those falling below a 2.0 grade average in University College
sidered for admittance to the School of Journalism and Comm


will not be con-
unications until









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Transfer students or those with a special hour-credit problem who have not
completed some of the pre-professional work in University College, may be ad-
mitted provisionally to the School of Journalism and Communications on approval
of the Director. They will be expected, however, to complete the lower-level work.

LAW


Applicants for admission to the
admission a four-year baccalaureate


College
degree


of Law must have
from an accredited


received
college


before
or uni-


versity except as stated in the description of the College of Law in this Catalog.
No entering law students are admitted to the Summer Session.
Although no particular courses are prerequisites, a student preparing for ad-


mission to the College oj
comprehensive courses an
following general fields:
and English), and Politic
of the legal profession, it
meaningfully and to wri


f Law should obtain a thorough mastery of
4d should take also at least two courses in e
Accounting, Economics, English, History
al Science. Since concepts expressed in word
is essential that a student be able to read r
te clearly and concisely. Courses requiring


the basic
ach of the
(American
s are tools
apidly and
the rapid


assimilation and digestion of written materials and courses in expository writing
therefore are recommended.

PHARMACY

In keeping with' the requirements of the American Council on Pharmaceutical


Education, all students expecting to earn tl
be enrolled in one or more Pharmacy course
years or a total of twenty-seven months.
the number of studies completed in other
courses for the first time students must sign


he degree of B.S. in Pharmacy must
es for a minimum of three academic
This regulation applies regardless of
fields. Upon enrolling in Pharmacy
the register in the office of the Dean


of the College
program:


Pharmacy.


Students


are advised


pursue


following


Freshman Year and Summer Session Credits
C-11-12, American Institutions .---.....-........ 8
C-31-32, Freshman English .-.... ....-..-.-....... 8
C-41, Practical Logic .--....-.... ......--..-...-..-...... 3
C-42, Fundamental Mathematics ------............. 3
C-51, The Humanities ---................--------- 4
C-61, Biological Science -.---..--...--. 3
CY. 121-2, General Chemistry ..-...-...-... 8
PHY. 106, Pharmaceutical Calculations 2
Military Science; Physical Fitness .......... 2
Total ................... 41


Only students


Sophomore Year Credits
C-52, The Humanities ...--............................. 4
C-62, Biological Science ....--......----- 3
PS. 201-2, General Physics -....---........ 6
PS. 207-8, General Physics Laboratory .... 2
PGY. 221-2, Practical Pharmacognosy .... 6
PHY. 223-4, Galenical Pharmacy ............... 6
CY. 123, Qualitative Analysis ..................... 3
CY. 331, Quantitative Analysis ..................------- 4
Military Science; Physical Fitness ............- 2
Total ............ .....--- 36


having an average of C or higher will be admitted to the Col-









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


A.--For men


intending to major in


Freshman Year


Physical


Credits


Education-


Sophomore Year


Credits


C-11-12.--American Institutions ...........
C-31-32.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing _......... ...._
C-41-42.-Logic and Mathematics ................
PHA. 284.-Team Games for Men ..............
PHA. 287.--Gymnastics for Men .............
PHA. 291.-Principles of Physical
Military Sucatience: Physical ..Fitne...................................
Military Science; Physical Fitness ............


C-21-22.-The Physical Sciences ..........
C-561-52.-The Humanities .....................
C-S1-62.-Biological Science .................
PHA. 251.-Folk, Social and Tap Dance ..
PHA. 283.-Track and Baseball ...............
EDF. 245.-Aspects of Human Growth
and Development .................
Militroved Elctives ....; Physical Fitness.............
Military Science; Physical Fitness .........


B.-For women intending to major in Physical Education-


Freshman Year


Credits


Sophomore Year


Credits


C-11-12.-American Institutions ...................
C-31-32.-Reading, Speaking and
r iting .......... ..................... ...... ...
C-41-42.--Logic and Mathematics .. ...... ...
PHA. 251.-Folk, Social and Tap Dance ..
PHA. 253.-Team Sports for Women _...
PHA. 256.-Individual and Dual
Sports for Women ....................
PHA. 257.-Gymnastics for Women .......
PHA. 291.-Principles of Physical
Education .................... ..
Physical Fitness ..........................................


C-21-22.--The Physical Sciences ..............
C-61-52.--The Humanities .........-... .........
C-61-62.-Biological Science ............ ......_...


PHA.
PHA.
PHA.

PHA.
EDF.


262.-Moder n Dance ..........e............
254.-Team Sports for Women ....
256.-Swimming and Diving
for Womenx ........., .-...
258.-Tennis and Golf for Women.,
245.-Aspects of Human Growth
and Development ........ ._...........


Approved Electives ........ ............ ...
Physical Fitness -........... .........-.....-,


C.-For men and women intending to major in Health Education-


Credits


C-11-12.-American Institutions ..................
C-31-32.-Reading, Speaking and
W writing ... ........ ........... .l.......E...... .....
C-41-42.-Logic and Mathematics ...............
EDF. 245.-Aspects of Human Growth
and Development ...... ......... .-..
PHA. 261.-Personal Hygiene _.-....- ....
Approved Electives .. ............ -..... .
Military Science or Electives ........
Physical Fitness ............. ....- ........


Sophomore Year Credits
C-51-52.-The Humanities .................. 8
C-61-62.-Biological Science ................... 6
*CY. 121-122.-General Chemistry ....... 8
SY. 201.-Sociological Foundation
of Modern Life ................... 3
EDF. 225.-Children and Culture ..... 3
SY. 244.-Marriage and the Family .... 3
Military Science or Electives ..-......- 1
Ph[J sical Fitness . .. ... .. .. . ..... . .. ..... - ....-.


*Students planning to major in Health Education must take CY. 121-122. Students whose high
school records and placement tests indicate satisfactory preparation may substitute CY. 121-122 for
C-21-22. Others should take C-21, upon satisfactory completion of which they may enter CY. 121.

D.-For men and women intending to major in Recreation-


Freshman Year


Credits


Sophomore Year


Credits


1-12.-American Institutions..................
1-32.-Reading, Speaking and
"W rating ........>-.. ....... . ..... .. .. ..... .
1-42.-Logic and Mathematics ................
A. 284.-Team Games for Men or
PHA. 253.-Team Sports
foA. r Women255.-Individual and Dual Sports
A, 255,--Individual and Dual Sports


C-21-22.-The Physical Sciences ......
C-51-52.--The Humanities ............ ......
C-61-62.--Biological Science ................
PHA. 251.-Folk, Social and Tap Dance .
SY. 201.-Sociological Foundation of
Modern Life .................... .... ..
IN. 880.-Elementary School Handi-
craf t --J *i i- * r. ... .. -. . .. ..... .........


Freshman Year


C-l
C-3

C-4
PH


PH


I_









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


C-41-42.-Logic and Mathematics ...............


C-61-62.--Biological
BLY. 161-162.-Biol<


Military


Science


Physical Fitness


Science .........................
ogy Laboratory ........


or Electives ........................


PSY.
PSY.


Therapy ..
201.-General
205.-Social :


Psychology
Psychology or


PSY.


202.-Personality Development
or PSY. 211.-Psychological
Measurement ........... ..........
Approved Electives ..........................
Military Science or Electives ......................
Physical Fitness .. ............. ....


*Students planning to major in Physical Therapy must take CY. 121-122.


Students whose high


school


records


for C-21-22.


and placement


tests


Others should take C-21,


indicate satisfactory preparation may substitute CY. 121-122
upon satisfactory completion of which they may enter CY. 121.


SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES OF THE


COLLEGE OF


UPPER DIVISION


AGRICULTURE


The College of Agriculture is composed of three units, namely, 1.


Instruction


Research


(Agricultural Experiment Station)


and 3.


Extension


(Agricultural


Extension


Service)


. The


Instructional


Division


College


proper)


is made


up of departments in the College devoted to the various


phases of technical and


practical


agricultural


work.


work


these


departments


is closely


related


of the


College


to afford


students


best


possible


training for


service in agriculture.


departments


in the


College


are:


Agricultural


Chemistry,


(administered


jointly


cultural


with


College


Engineering,


of Arts


Agricultural


d Sciences)
Education


Agricultural
(administered


Economics,


jointly


Agri-


with


College of Education)


, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry and Nutrition,


Bacteriology


Botany, Dairy Science,


Entomology, Horticulture,


Plant Pathology


Poultry


Hus-


bandry,


Soils


, and Veterinary Science.


COLLEGE


ARCHITECTURE


AND


FINE


ARTS


The College of Architecture and Fine Arts offers


to appropriate


undergraduate


degrees


in Architecture


programs of


, Building


study leading
Construction,


Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Painting and Drawing, Commercial Art,


Crafts,


Costume Design,


History


of Art


level are offered in Architecture, in Art,


and Music.


Programs at


Building Construction,


graduate
in Com-


munity Planning.


The College offers courses to students in other colleges of the
wish to broaden their cultural background in the arts.

1957 SUMMER SESSION


University who








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


dents who expect to be certified familiarize themselves with these regulations.
Applications for certificate should be made immediately after graduation, and
should be addressed to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

For detailed information on admission, undergraduate degrees, graduate de-
grees, and programs of study for the various curricula, see the University Catalog.


COLLEGE


ARTS


AND


SCIENCES


The subject matter fields regularly offered to students in the College of Arts
and Sciences and the extent of these offerings is indicated in the table below:


Subject
Anthropology
A rt ..........- .. -


Elective
Work
I X
X


Group
Major
X
X


Dept.
Major
X
X


MA. or MS.


Ph.D.


Graduate work offered
through College of Ar-
chitecture and Fine
Arts


Astronomy .
Bacteriology


Biology
Botany


Graduate work
through College
Agriculture
X
Graduate work
through College
Agriculture


.f.. 4 L. .... 4^ .^..U ^*^ Af jr-q*1*:-**** J ** W +lt. jy *:.* **.


Chemistry .--..... XC
Communications IC.- X

Economics ..... ........... .. X


Education


X
Major and
Journalism
X


Major and


X X
graduate work offered in 1
and Communications
X Graduate
through C
Business
tion
Graduate work offered thr<


the S<


offered
of

X
offered
of


school


work offered
college of
Administra-


tough


the Col-


lege of Education
X


English ...... ..... .......-
Family Life.........
French ....._._...........
Geography .........
Geology _.............


fir --


TtE








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


lM music ..----....-.-.
Philosophy..
Physics ................
Political Science ...
Psychology _--_-
Religion --
Russian -----
Sociology ....._.........
Spanish ..-...............-------
Speech - --^ _.
Zoology ..--.---..--_


See Biolo


X
X

X
X
X


X
X


For information regarding details of these programs of study and degree re-
quirements, the University catalog for 1957-58 should be consulted.


COLLEGE OF BUSINE


ADMINISTRATION


The summer session offerings of the College of Business Administration pro-
vide basic courses in the several curricula groupings, a selection of advanced
courses to enable students to go ahead with a normal academic program and a
selection of graduate courses.
A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration are offered. For complete information on the requirements for
these curricula and for the graduate program, the University Catalog should
be consulted.


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

For admission to the College of Education students will present a certificate
of graduation from the University College, or equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education. (See General Catalog
for detailed requirements).

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Students who are preparing to teach have the opportunity of specializing in
the following teaching areas: agricultural education, art, business education, ele-
mentary education, English, foreign languages, health education, industrial arts
education, mathematics, physical education, sciences, and social studies. (See
General Catalor for curricula. For further information, consult the Undergradu-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


counseling,


education


exceptional


child.


(See


General


Catalog


requirements.)


NOTE


Orientation Meeting for all graduate students in Education,


Thurs-


day, June


Yonge


Auditorium.


This


meeting will


voted to a discussion of policies and programs for graduate students in the
College of Education.


The curricula in


ments.


CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS

the College of Education include


State certification


Each student should consult his counselor to plan a sequence of


require-
courses


to meet requirements for his degree and for certification.
For further information concerning the certification of teachers,


write to the


State


Department


Regulations


Relating


Education
to Florida


, Tallahassee,
Requirements


Florida,
for Tea


requesting


cher


Educati


State
ion anc


Board
i Cer-


tification,


April 3,


1951


, revised July 21, 1953.
EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES


The following more important items govern the extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the summer term attended and


at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in
below C.


which no grade


Students


who


desire


an extension


certificate


should


obtain


an official


application blank at the Office of Graduate Studies or the Undergraduate Counsel-


Office


should


apply for


a transcript


Summer


School


credits


at the


Office of the Registrar, Room 33, Administration Building, prior to July 10.


4. Certificates to be extended


, together with the Summer School transcript and


completed application


blank, must


sent by


registered mail


to Mr


.D.


Bailey


State


Superintendent of


Public Instruction


, Tallahassee,


Florida


within


a year after the close of the Summer term.

EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT OFFICE


Educational


Placement


Office


serves


both


former


students


Uni-


versity
records


public


school


on registrants


officials,


without


for positions


charge.


a current


Office


keeps


educational


up-to-date


adminis-


tration and


teaching vacancies.


Persons who wish this service should communi-


cate with the Educational Placement Office,


THE P


Yonge 140.


K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL









B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Application


admission


should


made


at the


Laboratory


School


Office,


Yonge Building, as soon as possible since the number who may be admitted


is limited.


EDUCATION CLASS IN EXCEPTIONAL CHILD EDUCATION


Through the cooperation of the Alachua


County public schools and the P.


Yonge Laboratory School, a demonstration class is provided for teachers interested


observing work with


slow


learning children.


Observations


may


scheduled


at Room 120


P. K.


Yonge.


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS


Students


who


contemplate


registration


College


Engineering


those who are already registered in this college should confer about their sched-
ules with the department heads and the dean as soon as possible.


The
session


College


in various


Engineering
departments


offering


so that


several


students


courses


may


during


graduate


Summer


in a minimum


time.


Many other courses included


matics and physics,


are also available.


the engineering curricula, such as mathe-
During the summer months the engineer-


ing student may also take subjects to meet elective requirements.
A student in the College of Engineering desiring to elect the Nuclear Option


must confer with his department head before arranging


his registration.


Students entering the


University for the


first time


may


it to


their


vantage


to enroll


in mathematics and


one of


following


Freshman


English,


American Institutions or


General


Chemistry.


Students


who


have completed


year


at the


University may take


courses


in calculus


physics.


Statics,


namics
pleted


, or strength of materials is suggested for those students who


calculus and


physics.


Elective


subjects


mathematics


have com-


, physics


humanities


are recommended to all students.


GRADUATE PROGRAMS


graduate programs offered


by the College of Engineering are continued


during the summer in order to allow students already enrolled


to complete their


graduate work in a minimum length of time.

FORESTRY


Courses


in Forestry


are offered


during


Summer


Session.


Summer Camp should be taken between the second and third year's


the necessary prerequisites have been completed.


The required
work provided


Students who contemplate reeis-


one








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


The programs provide students with a


broad background


in liberal arts and


sciences-literature, economy
which are vital aspects of c
fessional careers in printed
The general plan of edu
spends about three-fourths
mining fourth involves the
relation to this background


ics, history, political science, sociology, psychology-
ontemporary life and essential to those entering pro-
media or audio-visual media of communications.
cation in this School is arranged so that the student
of his time on general background courses. The re-
acquisition and practice of professional techniques in
knowledge.


Students entering the School of Journalism mi
of study.
Those majoring in the Editorial and Public
Journalism program and earn the BSJ degree.
Advertising program: those interested in printed n
and those specializing in audio-visual media will
dents interested in Radio-TV will register for the
earn the BSCOM degree.


ist choose one of the programs


Relations fields
Two degrees are
nedia will earn th
earn the BSCOM
Communications


will take the
offered in the
e BSJ degree,
degree. Stu-
program and


COLLEGE OF LAW


he
nceE


beginning
Students


tisfactorily at
student wishi
the time of b'
llege under t
an the Law S
tic average of
ay apply for
th a erade of


pte
ppl


courses


in Law


are not offered


are not admitted in June u
least one semester of work i
ng to transfer from another
beginning his study of law, qur
he stated requirements for
school Admission Test) and w


C or higl
I S


aa
C


d for credit up
icants for adn


baccalaureate degrn
the case of veteran


ler o


mission
or high
to but n
mission m
ee from
is, who w


hours of satisfactory work


W11
ir
ot
IUS


n all previo
th advanced
in other ace
exceeding a
t have rece


1


unless tU
n an ac
accredi
alified f
beginni
ho has
aw scho


i standing.
creditedd law
total of thi
ived before


an accredited college or u
till be admitted after the
in an accredited college o


have maintained a scholastic average of C
taken.


or higher


hey


Summer Session,
have completed


*credited law school.
ted law school who,
or admission to this
ng students (other
maintained a schol-
ol work undertaken,
Courses completed
schools will be ac-


rty hours.
admission a 4-year
university, except in
y have completed 94
r university if they
on all work under-


COLLEGE OF NURSING


The College of Nursing has a four-year basic program leading to the de
Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Students in this program are required to take a
the comprehensive courses during their first two years along with begin
courses in nursing. The junior and senior years will consist largely of nur


gree
ll of
ning
sing


Ti
he
sa
A
at
Coc
th
as
mi
wi
cel
A]


T


1









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


ION


courses in the Upper Division, and one graduate course. In addition, graduate stu-


dents will be given guidance in research leading to the M.S.


and Ph.D.


degrees.


For complete description


of the courses and requirements for admission and


graduation the student should consult the University Catalog.

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

GENERAL STATEMENT

The College of Physical Education and Health offers programs of instruction


services


under


departments,


namely,


Health


Service


Intramural


Ath-


letics and


Recreation, Required


Physical


Education


Men


, Required


Physical


Education for


Women


and The Professional Curriculum.


THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

For admission to the College of Physical Education and Health students must
present a certificate of graduation from the University College, or the equivalent,


and have the approval


of the Admissions


Committee of the


College


Physical


Education and Health. (Consult the University Catalog for detailed requirements).

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

The College of Physical Education and Health offers four undergraduate de-


agrees:


The Bachelor of Science in Physical


Education


The Bachelor


Science


in Health Education


, The Bachelor of Science in Recreation, and The Bachelor of


Science


Physical


Therapy.


complete


information


concerning


several


curricula and the requirements for these degrees,
be consulted.


University


Catalog should


GRADUATE DEGREE


Courses


are offered


College


in the


Graduate


School


leading


degree


Master


Physical


Education


Health


with


a major


in physical


education.


Admission


degree


requirements


graduates


accredited


stitutions are described under the Graduate Division section of this Catalog.


THE


GRADUATE


DIVISION








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ADMISSION
Application for admission to the Graduate School must be made to the Director
of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at times stipulated in the Uni-


versity Calendar. Applications are referred by the
election committee of the various colleges and division
No transcript will be accepted as official unless it
registrar of the institution in which the work was (
In general, no student who is a graduate of a x
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the 1
Members of the faculty of the University of Flo


Director
s for appr
is received
lone.
lon-accredi
University.
rida with


to the graduate se-
oval or disapproval.
i directly from the

ited institution will

a rank of assistant


professor or above


(or equivalent)


may not receive a graduate degree from this


institution. They may, however, register for wol
apply the credit earned to graduate degrees to be
Grade Standards.-Except as noted below, unqi
ate School is dependent upon presentation of an
accredited college or curriculum with an average


rk in the Graduate School and
conferred by other institutions.
qualified admission to the Gradu-
undergraduate record from an
e grade of "B" from the junior


and senior years. In some units of the Graduate School and on the mor
levels of graduate study, an undergraduate average considerably
may be required.
If the student's undergraduate grades do not meet the standard for


admi
year
of at
more
with
admi
credit


e advanced
above "B"


unqualified


ssion, he may in exceptional cases be granted qualified admission as a fifth-


student by the college of his choice.


5 semester hours
6 semester hours

average grade of
to the Graduate


to his


consisting o
i of graduate
"B" or bett
School. Up


graduate record.


In this status he will be given a program
f advanced undergraduate courses and no
courses. Upon completion of this program
er, the student will be given unqualified
to 12 hours of the trial program may be


The trial program will not be continued beyond


the originally planned period.
Admission to programs leading to degrees of Ma
Master of Education and Master of Physical Education
of an accredited college) may be granted on either of


ster of Arts in Education,
and Health (for a graduate
the following bases:


A 2.5 honor-point average, as calculated at the University of Florida, for
the last two years of undergraduate work including at least 60 semester
hours, and a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination-


Scholastic
A student
undergrad
fifth-year


Aptitude Test.
with less than a 2.5 honor-point average in his last two years of
uate work may inquire as to the possibility of registering as a
student if he has presented satisfactory scores on the Graduate


Record Examinatiol
semester hours of a
-% a: n 4 a w jnb ar an -S j


is-Scholastic Aptitude Test. Upon complete
planned and approved trial program with


ion of 15
an honor-
j3 w -. .* .. a-j-J


I


I
I
s









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


graduate major in general agriculture, the minimum upper-division average is
2.75. In exceptional cases, where a candidate has demonstrated in some other
way his fitness to do graduate work, as, for instance, outstanding achievement
since earning the bachelor's degree, he may be considered for admission.


Graduate


Record


Examinations


Required


Admission.-Admission


to the


Graduate


School


is dependent


upon


undergraduate


record,


upon


other


dence of ability, and upon the scores
tions. Each applicant for admission
the GRE, but either at the request
volition the applicant may submit the
tests of the GRE. The scores on all
mission. The GRE scores will also i


obtained on the Graduate Record Examina-
must submit scores on the aptitude test of
of the department concerned or on his own
score on one or more advanced subject-matter
tests taken will be weighed in regard to ad-
be given consideration at a later date along


with the graduate scholastic record when the student applies for admission as a
candidate for an advanced degree.


The Graduate Record Examinal
January, May and July at a great
Gainesville, Florida. To determine
the student should write to Educa
Applications are required several
received about a month after the


tions are given four times a year-in November,
many locations in the United States including
i exact dates and the most convenient location,


tional Testing


weeks ahea
examinati'


for the GRE in early October if admission is
for admission to the summer session, and in ea
Undergraduates are advised to take the Gradu


: Service, Princeton, New Jersey.
if the examination and scores are
Hence it is necessary to apply
sired in February, in early April
June for admission in September.
SRecord Examinations in January


or May if admission to the Graduate School is desired for the following September.
Students educated in foreign countries and applying for admission while re-
siding outside the United States may be given a postponement and permitted to
take the GRE after initial registration at the University of Florida.


Undergraduate Regis
at the University of Fl
complete for the bacheic
his college, approval by
eligible for graduate cr
have maintained a "B"


program
hours in
graduate
to one n
graduate


ttration for Graduate Credit.-An undergraduate student


orida who has less th
)r's degree may requc
the Dean of the Gra
edit. Such approval
average in the uppei


does not exceed 15 semester hours
a summer term. Commonly, course
caliber; approval of an advanced une
ot normally a part of the undergra
studies to be undertaken. For appli


the course work taken must be earned with a


ian one semester of course work to
ist, in writing, through the dean of
duate School of course registration
can be given only to students who
division and whose total proposed
in a single regular semester or 6
s to be approved should be of full
lergraduate course will be restricted
rduate program prerequisite to the
cation to a specific advanced degree
erade of "A" or "B" and be recom-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


etc. All registrations require the signature of the dean of the college in which the
degree is to be awarded or of his representative.

GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS


Student Responsibil
self concerning, and to
course he is pursuing.
because a student plead
of it by his adviser or c


ity.-It is the
carry out, all
In no case wil
Is ignorance of
either authority.


responsibility of the student to inform him-
regulations and procedures required by the
11 a rule be waived or an exception granted
the rule or asserts that he was not informed
.


Loads.-The ir
15 semester hours


maximum


full-time registration


the minimum is 12 semester hour


a single regular semester is
rs. Part-time employment of


any kind reduces
assistants with c
maximum of 12
partmental dutie
semester hours.
graduate course <
more than 6 sem


the maximum study load permitted.


1


epartmental duties of 15 hours per w
semester hours. One-half time gradu2
s of 20 hours per week may register
Full-time employees of the University
f no more than 4 semester hours or for


ester hours, if one of the two courses i


time public school personnel a
During the summer session
degree is 6 to 8 semester hours
master's program or an Ed.S.
may not exceed 6 semester hou
or 3 semester hours. These reg
Holders of fellowships and
ate study programs commensu:
and in no case less than 6 sem<


re


normally registered
full-time registration
full-time registration
ogram is 9 semester


(
h


for


for a
for a
hours.


One-third


time


may regis
assistants
a maximn


may


register


gradua
ter for
with d
im of
'for o0


two courses totaling no
s a thesis course. Full-
a single course.


candidate f
student in a
A graduate


rs, and a full-time employee is limited to
ulations apply to the eight-week summer
assistantships are required to register
rate with the study time permitted by th
ester hours.


or a thesis
non-thesis
e assistant
one course
term.
for gradu-
eir awards


Courses and Credits.-(1) Courses numbered 500 and above
or other advanced undergraduate programs. Regulations as to
courses in graduate programs, grading, and minimum class size
as for courses in the 400 category. (2) Courses numbered 600 and
to graduate students. (3) Courses numbered 700 and above are
primarily for advanced graduate students.


are for fifth-year
the use of these
will be the same
above are limited
graduate courses


For the purpose of graduate study, undergraduate courses numbered 300 and
above are acceptable for minor study when taken as a part of an approved gradu-
ate program. Individual undergraduate courses in the 500 category, or corn-


parable courses from 1
study by the Graduate
ever, in such cases, fift
enumrpa depfina.sted for


the 400
Council
y per cee
aradnat


category which ha
, may be used as a
nt of the minimum
SFstandnts only.


ve been approved for graduate
part of the major study. How-
course requirements must be in









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


"A," "B," and "C"; however, "C" grades in courses numbered 600 and above count
toward a graduate degree only if an equal number of credit hours in courses
numbered 600 and above are earned with a grade of "A."


Admission to candidacy


depends (among
"B" for all work
complete) in the
by completing all
trained, including


other requ
attempted
fields of
required
the hours


for a graduate degree and the award of such degree
lirements) upon maintenance of an average grade of
in the major and minor fields. Any grade of "I" (in-
the major and minor (or minors) must be removed
work, unless an honor-point average of 3.0 is main-
of incomplete courses. Grades in courses numbered


699 and 799 are not considered under this requirement.


Chang


Major.-Graduate students already


admitted for work in


one de-


apartment who wish to
through the office of the
proved by the graduate
ment. The Dean of the
writing of the change in
without graduate credit


transfer to another department mus
dean of their college and must have
selection committee having jurisdictic
e Graduate School and the Registrar
i the major field. The student will be
t, any undergraduate deficiencies in


Correspondence and Extension


credit by correspondence<


cation an
credit by
authorize
Florida f
institution


d the Master of
extension. In
d extension gr
:or both course


n


(except


Work.-No courses may b


e, and, except in the case of the Ma:
Education degrees, no courses may b
the case of the degrees mentioned,
aduate course work may be taken
and residence credit; extension wo


Florida


State


University)


may


not be


t apply for transfer
their credentials ap-
>n in the new depart-
must be notified in
required to make up,
the new area.

e taken for graduate
ster of Arts in Edu-
'e taken for graduate
6 semester hours of
in the University of
rk taken at another


transferred


to the


University of Florida for graduate credit of any kind.


Fees.-The fees which graduate students must pay are listed in
of the Catalog entitled Expenses. (See Table of Contents.)


the section


Procedures for Final Semester.-At this stage it is more than usually im-
portant for the student to inform himself concerning deadline dates as set forth
in the University Calendar and in the announcements issued by the Dean of the
Graduate School, and the officials of his college, division, or department.


Early in the last semester the student should make formal ap
Registrar for his degree. When his thesis is ready to be put 11
should get instructions from the office of the Dean of the Gradu
must arrange through the University Bookstore for proper ac.
to be worn at Commencement.
Normally, students in the Graduate School must be registered ii
LS -r il S 1-


iplication to the
n final form he
late School. He
ademic costume

n the University
i I i i








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


DEGREES OFFERED
Non-Thesis Degrees


Master of Agriculture,


with major in any field in Agriculture


Master


of Education


, with major in any field


Education,


including


Business


Education, and Industrial Arts Education
Master of Physical Education and Health
Master of Rehabilitation Counseling
Specialist in Education
Thesis Degrees

Master of Business Administration, with major in one of the following:


Accounting
Business Organization and Operation


Master of Science in Agriculture,


Real Estate


with major in one of the following:


Agricultural


Economics


Agricultural Education


Agricultural
Agronomy


Engineering


Dairy Science
Entomology
Horticulture
Plant Pathology


Animal


Husbandry


Poultry


Husbandry


Bacteriology
Botany
Master of Science in Building Construction
Master of Science in Community Planning


Master of Science in Engineering,


Soils


with major in one of the following:


Aeronautical


Engineering


Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering


Engineering Mechanics
Industrial Engineering


Mechanical


Engineering


Electrical Engineering
Master of Science in Forestry
Master of Science in Pharmacy, with major in one of the following:


Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacognosy


Master of Science


Pharmacology
Pharmacy


, with major in one of the following:


Bacteriology


Geography








B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Master of Arts in Architecture, with major in one of the following:

Architectural Design
Building Construction


Master of Arts in Education, w

Agricultural Education
Business Education
Educational Administration
Elementary Education


Master of Arts,


ith major in one of the following:

Foundations of Education
Guidance
Industrial Arts Education
Secondary Education


with major in one of the following:


Communications
Economics
English
French
Geography
Geology
German
History
Inter-American


Area


Journalism
Latin
Mathematics
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Spanish
Studies Speech


Doctor of Education


with major in one of the following:


Agricultural Economics
Agronomy
Animal Husbandry
Bacteriology
Biology (Zoology)
Cancer Research
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering, including
Sanitary Engineering
Structural Engineering
Economics
Economics and Business Ad-
ministration, including
Accounting, Business Organi-
zation and Operation, Real Estate
T1,. -A,,-,,


Geography
History
Horticulture
Inter-American Area Studies
Mathematics
Pharmacy, including
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacognosy
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology (Latin American)
Soils
CI1~- - -S


Doctor of Philosophy,








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


requirement may be reduced to (but not below) three eight-week summer sessions
by transfer of work from another institution or by use of extension or other non-
resident credit where accepted by the college concerned and by the Graduate
Council.
Transfer of Credits.-Courses of full graduate level to the extent of 6 semester
hours may be transferred from an institution approved for this purpose by the
Graduate School. Acceptance of transfer credit requires approval of the student's
supervisory committee and the Graduate Council. Non-resident or extension
work taken at another institution (with the exception of Florida State Univer-
sity) may not be transferred to the University of Florida for graduate credit.
Time Limit.-All work for the master's degree must be completed within seven
years from the time of first registration.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITHOUT THESIS
MASTER OF EDUCATION

Description and Purpose.-This degree is designed for the professional prepa-


ration
develop
a broai
narrow
trained,
The
1.


d
dj


,f teachers, rather than for research. The program has been planned to
in public school workers a wide range of essential abilities and to give
I background of advanced general education, rather than to encourage
specialization. While not neglecting to add to qualifications already at-
it further aims at overcoming weaknesses in a student's development.
Master of Education program seeks to develop the student in:


An understanding of the nature of the individual and the learning process;


An understanding of
American democracy;


purposes,


issues,


trends


education


An understanding of the social realities of our time and
edition the educative process;


how these con-


A comprehensive, internally
our democratic traditions;
where issues are concerned;


consistent pattern of
a value-system which


values in keeping with
the student can apply


A personal philosophy of education which he can make explicit and which
is consistent with his value patterns;


The ability to think
of specialization or fi
tions, and the ability


and act creatively and adequately within his area
eld of work, to see new problems, to work out solu-
to communicate to others the results of his thinking








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Work Required.-Instead of having a fixed requirement of majors and minors,


each student will be required to
balance and direction. The pi
counselor, with whose assistance
tion department head concerned
If the filing of a plan is delayed
completed may not be accepted


submit a plan o:
anned program
the plan is first
and the Office of
the student faces
toward meeting


f study which sho'
is approved by
developed, then b
Graduate Studies
s the possibility th
Degree requirement


ws acceptable
the student's
y the Educa-
in Education.
at some work
ts. After the


program has b<
similarly approve
The minimum
9 may be taken
more than 15 in
courses may be
At least 50 p
numbered 600 ai


Courses
6 semester
poses a lim


een
red.


developed,


changes


must


requested


in writing


a course requirement is 36 semester hours, of which not more than
in any summer term (6 in six weeks, 3 in three weeks), and not
any one semester. Six semester hours of workshop or extension
allowed and will count as resident credit.
er cent of the minimum course requirements shall be from courses
nd above.


designated as field laboratory courses may be taken to the extent of
hours of credit. It should be noted, however, that the University im-
it of 12 hours of credit in the aggregate on work allowed from (1)


off-campus workshops
(3) courses transfer
Where the student
tion he must complete
including work at the
this degree. Students
suit their counselors
requirement. In gene
Education is required.
A thesis is not req
A reading knowlec
effective use of the E
to the work of this pr
to candidacy for the d


and extension courses, (2) field laboratory courses, and
ed from other institutions.
has had no previous work in professional courses in Educa-
a minimum of 36 hours of professional work in Education,
graduate and undergraduate level, in order to qualify for
planning to take work in closely related fields should con-
as to the acceptability of such work toward meeting this


ral, a

uired.
Ige of
English
ogram
egree.


minimum


12 semester


hours


outside


field


a foreign language is not required, but correct and
language is expected of all candidates. Admission
is not a guarantee that the student will be admitted


Admission to Candidacy.---The faculty makes a determination as
petence of the student at the time of his admission to candidacy. A
candidacy for the Master of Education degree may be recommended to
ate Council by the Graduate Committee of the College of Education c
of an unassembled examination to be given at the end of from 12 to
hours of graduate work at the University of Florida. The unass


amination is evaluated by a com
supplementary oral and/or written


Lmittee


examination


faculty,
s for st


which


;udents


may
whos<


to the com-
dmission to
the Gradu-
)n the basis
18 semester
;embled ex-
recommend
e admission








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


materials early in the term preceding that in which graduation is expected.
The student's remaining program of study will be planned in terms of needs


as revealed in the Admission
Graduate Committee, the cand
satisfactory completion of the
right to review the student's e
The candidate must have


to Candidacy Examination.
idate will be recommended for
designated course work. The
entire record before recommend
completed at least one year


On approval of
the degree upon
faculty reserves
ing graduation.
of teaching (or


equivalent) prior to taking the last 6 semester hours of work, or must have in-
cluded in his record the satisfactory completion of an internship program or a
minimum of 6 semester hours of student teaching.


The Graduate Committee of the College of Education.-A
is appointed for each student in the Master of Education pr
is under the general supervision of the Graduate Committee
Education. The program is administered through the Office of
in Education.


special counselor
ogram. His work
in the College of
Graduate Studies


MASTER OF AGRICULTURE


The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who wish
additional training before entering business occupations or professions, rather
than for those interested primarily in research. The basic requirements, including
those for admission, residence, supervisory committee, plan of study and admission
to candidacy, are the same as for the Master of Science in Agriculture degree,
as outlined elsewhere, but the work requirements are made to conform to the
specific objectives of this degree.


Work


Required.--A


minimum


semester


hours


course


work


quired, at least 18 of which shall be designated strictly
dent's program is designed to take into account the


the indiv
thesis is
records o
given by
semester
student's
final oral
study of


idual and is subject to the approval of the
not required, but the student must submit
f work accomplished. A comprehensive writt
the supervisory committee is required before
of work. Failure to qualify in this examinat
elimination from the program or in taking


examination by the supervisory
the candidate is required.


y for graduates. Each stu-
qualifications and needs of
supervisory committee. A
reports, term papers, and
ten qualifying examination,
the beginning of the second
ion will result either in the
additional course work. A


committee covering the whole field


For further details, inquire of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH


Work


Required.-A


minimum


semester


hours


course


work


quired, at least 15
TT- L aa


of which must be courses in the fields of Physical Education,
-.> l a| a aA. J1 A. A A-1 3 J-








B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Supervisory Committee.-A


committee of


five members of


the faculty


College
person
School
in this


of Physical Education and Health, with the Dean of the College or some
designated by him serving as chairman, and the Dean of the Graduate
as an exofficio member, will supervise the work of students registered
program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.


Admission


Candidacy.-Admission


to the


work


program


is not


guarantee that the student
student will be required to p
being recommended by the
This examination should be
residence.


will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The
ass a written and/or oral examination in addition to
supervisory committee for admission to candidacy.
taken by the end of the student's first semester of


Final Examination.-A thesis is not required but the candidate must pass a
final examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or oral
examination will be administered by the supervisory committee and will be con-
fined largely to the student's major field of study.


MASTER'S


DEGREE


WITH


THESIS


Required Registration.-The minimum registration required for the master's
degree with thesis is 30 semester hours, including no less than 24 semester hours
of regular course work and 6 semester hours of the research and thesis course
numbered 699 in all departments.
A least one-half of the required 24 hours of regular course work must be in
a single field of study designated the major, and the remainder, called the minor,
must be in a different but related subject matter. One 6-hour minor is required;
two 6-hour minors or one 12-hour minor may be taken. Minor work must be in


a department other than
modified, but only with the
The work in the major
ates (numbered 600 and al


the major. In special cases this requirement may be
written permission of the Dean of the Graduate School.
field must be in courses designated strictly for gradu-
bove), or, if approved by the Graduate Dean, in courses


designated
numbered 3
At least
must be in
total of 12


for advanced undergraduates
00 and above may be taken.
50 per cent of the required 2
courses numbered 600 and al
semester hours.


and graduates.


For the minor, courses


4 semester hours of regular course work
above. Registration in 699 is limited to a


Thesis.-All


a thesis


mittees, the
date should
cZ,, ilrf- nm ~ f C


candidates for this degree are required


equivalent in


creative


Dean of the Graduate
consult the office of th
nsT'Mn A ^\-vwr in I //-l ~


prepare


and present


re work) acceptable to their supervisory corn-
School, and the Graduate Council. The candi-
e Dean for instructions concerning the form of
+1% n w-k, n. ,n ALW 4% ,, n t .r n ,n. ni A








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


been passed at another institution, it must be validated at the University of
Florida by the Department of Foreign Languages. If the student is majoring
in a foreign language, that language may not be used to satisfy this requirement.
The foreign language requirement must be satisfied before the student is admitted
to candidacy. (2) The ability to use the English language correctly and effectively,
as judged by the supervisory committee, is required of all candidates for this
degree.

Special Supervisory Committee.-A special supervisory committee of not less
than three members will be appointed for each student by the Graduate Dean upon
the recommendation of the college concerned. This committee should be ap-
pointed as early as possible after the student has been admitted to the Graduate
School and, in general, not later than the end of the first semester of study.
The Dean of the Graduate School is an exofficio member of all supervisory com-
mittees.


Admission


to Candidacy.-When


a student


completed


about one-half


his work for
using the fo
ate School.
maintained
guage exam
curriculum)
department
his degree.


his degree, he should apply for admission to candidacy for that degree,


rms provided
In order to
a "B" average
nation and
, (3) chosen


for
be
re i
a q
his


r the purpose
admitted to
n registered
qualifying exa
thesis topic,


head, and college dean that h
It is the responsibility of his


in the office of
candidacy, the
course work, (2
imination (if th
(4) satisfied his
ie is qualified to
Ssupervisorv col


S. -


the Dean of the Gradu-
student must have (1)
) passed a foreign lan-
ese are required in his
Supervisory committee,
become a candidate for


mmittee at this time to


make such investigation as is necessary to determine his eligibility.


Gen


tically
is requ


eral Examination.-When all of the student's work is completed, or prac-
so, including the regular courses and the thesis, his supervisory committee
ired to examine him orally or in writing or both on (1) his thesis, (2) his


major subject, (
training to his fie
mittee shall repo
one week before
been completed i


examination
examination
conferred,


3) his m
Id of stu4
rt in writ


the time
n a satis
student
scheduled


minor or minors, (4) matters of
dy. Using the form provided for
ting to the Dean of the Graduate
for the conferring of the degree
factory manner and whether on
is recommended for his degree.
earlier than six months before


i general nature


the purpose
School not 1
whether all
the basis of
In no case
the degree


the
ater
work
the
may


*f


per-
tom-
than
has
final
this


is to be


without special approval of the Graduate Council.


Special Thesis Abstract Required.-At the request of the State Department of
Education of the State of Florida, the College of Education requires all candi-
dates for the degree of Master of Arts in Education to prepare a 750 word abstract
of the thesis, which is forwarded to the State Department for informational


I


Y -~ -^--


I


Ik


*n
*n








BULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Admission to the Advanced School in Education.-Admission to the Advanced
School will be open only to persons who have:
1. Successfully completed 36 hours of professional course work in education.
2. Presented a record of successful professional experience, the appropriate-
ness of which will be determined by the instructional department passing
on the applicant's qualifications for admission. In some instances de-
partments may admit students with the understanding that further experi-
ence may be required before the student will be recommended for a degree.
Admission to the Advanced School will be based on the following criteria:
1. High scholastic average during the fifth-year work (3.5 honor-point average
or above, as computed at the University of Florida, will be considered
evidence of good scholarship);
2. Results from the Graduate Record Examinations-Scholastic Aptitude and
Advanced Education Tests;
3. Results from the Miller Analogies Test;
4. An oral examination administered by the department in which the student
seeks to specialize;
5. Special interviews for individuals for whom the department of specializa-
tion seeks more data.


The judgment concerning admission of an i
the consideration of a student's performance
apartment in which the student desires to speci
to the Admissions Committee that the student
to the Advanced School.
In all cases the record, experience, and pe
applying for admission are subject to the apprc
Where possible, students should seek admiss
enrolling in any courses beyond the master's


individual student will be based on
in all of these areas by the de-
alize. The department will certify
has met the criteria for admission

rsonal qualifications of the person
)val of the Admissions Committee.
sion to the Advanced School before
degree. Where this procedure is


impossible, the student
semester of his work be
vanced School. If such
during that term will b
After completion of


will regis
iyond the
candidate
e included
the fifth


ter in the Graduate School and during the first
master's degree apply for admission to the Ad-
is found to be eligible, appropriate work taken
I in the planned program.


year


student approved


by the


Admissions


Committee may register for courses, but admission to the Advanced School must
ha nhni n hcmrln rno irrn r maor ho /rinn'a mr Aarrooa nr ncrf finofna OJi 4nITO +ha








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


3 hours in regular extension courses offered by the General Extemn
the University of Florida and Florida State University may be inc
The planned program of specialization must include at lea:
courses open only to graduate students and the remainder in c
graduate and undergraduate students. The student may special
the established areas of the College of Education.
A thesis is not required. Emphasis will be placed upon the i
rather than upon the development of skills in research techniques.
Admission to the Advanced School, the successful completion (
of work, and the approval of the department of specialization
admission to candidacy for the Specialist in Education degree.
At the end of the 36-hour program the student will be given
and a final oral examination by a committee selected by the he
of specialization. Upon passing the examination the candidate will
Specialist in Education degree upon the approval of the faculty,
ate Council.
The Ed.S. is planned as a terminal degree. If at the end of h
student wishes to work for the Ed.D. he must meet the required
that degree.


sion Division of
:luded.
st 24 hours in
coursess open to
ilize in any of


ise of


research


)f one semester
will constitute

a final written
ad of his area
be awarded the
and the Gradu-


is program the
ents stated for


Time Limit.-All work for the Specialist in Education
pleted within seven years from the time of first registration.


degree must


com-


DOCTOR OF EDUCATION


The Doctor of Education degree is designed to develop scholarship and leader-
ship in the field of Education. Each doctoral candidate is expected to achieve
competence in the broad field of Education and in an area of specialization in
which adequate supervision is available.
Administration of the program leading to this degree is cared for through
the Office of Graduate Studies in Education, which carries out the policies of the
Graduate School and the Graduate Committee of the College of Education.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of Doctor of Education
requires admission to the Advanced School of the College of Education, described
previously, as well as admission to the Graduate School of the University of


Florida.
All courses beyond the
applied toward the Doctor
offering the doctor's degree
the Graduate School of the


master's degree taken at another institution, to
of Education degree, must be taken at an institute
and approved for the transfer of graduate credit
University of Florida.


1 t r 1 9i I j 9*


"'/ --r


~I ~L









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Admission


to Candidacy.-Admission


to candidacy


for the


degree


Doctor


of Education rests on successful completion of the qualifying examination. Recom-
mendation to the Graduate School for admission to candidacy is based on action
of the supervisory committee, subject to the approval of the Graduate Committee
of the College of Education.


Qualifying


Examination.-The applicant is recommended for the qualify-


ing examination by


his supervisory


committee


after


has completed sufficient


course
cation.


work and


research


preparation


requirements of


College of


Edu-


The examination consists of


ate Committee


College


a general
Education


section
to all


, administered by the Gradu-


applicants


a field


specialization


section


administered


department


or faculty


groups


con-


cerned


examination


in the


minor


or minors


where


involved;


oral examination conducted by the applicant's


supervisory committee.


minar.-Each


considered
seminar xi
members <


a general


faculty


student
doctoral
members


supervisory


is expected


seminar


to develop


in the


college,


committee.


College.


other


a thesis


project


to be


Participants


advanced


conclusion


students,
Seminar


supervisory committee will report thereon to the Graduate Committee of the Col-


of Education.


Research Pre


paration Requirement.-This requirement is satisfied by meeting


the requirements in both Group 1 and Group


2 below:


Group


a course in Education Research (EDF


760) and


library


usage


examination


(usually


given


in connection


with EDF


760 at the University of Florida)


a basic course in statistics (EDF
at the University of Florida).


.360


or PSY


.211


or MS.


Group


.-either


a reading knowledge of


one foreign


language


relevant


to the


student's


need, or


following


courses


in measurements,


statistics


, or


research
EDE. 7(
or 510.


547 or 670


EDF


EDF


. 660 or PSY


PSY


, or 743;


EDS. 605 or


PHA.


There


is no language requirement for the Doctor of Education


taken at other institutions which may be the


equivalent of


degree.


course


Courses


requirements


indicated above may be considered, on recommendation of the applicant's


super-


one


.-(1)








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


DOCTOR OF


PHILOSOPHY


Course


of a field
in follow
students
programs
Graduate


Requirements.---Doctoral


of
ng
are
arr
Co


knowledge
out the step
thrown in
e more flexi
uncil does


Ph.D. degree, or how mi
should be unified in rel
considered approval of th


study


the successful


consists


prosecution


independent


research,


mastery


rather than


Is of an established curriculum. For this reason, doctoral
large measure on their own responsibility, and doctoral
ble and varied than those leading to lower degrees. The
not specify just what courses will be required for the
any. The basic general requirement is that the program
ation to a clear objective and that it should have the
ie student's supervisory committee.


At least one and not more than two minors must be taken. The minor or minors
may occupy as much as one third of a student's total time, or, roughly, one-half
of the time devoted to course and seminar work.


Committee.--The supervisory


degree of Doctor of Philosophy should


consist


from the Graduate Faculty. At least three mem
department recommending the degree, and one
from a different educational discipline for t


committee for


of at least I
bers should b
or two memb
he purpose


a candidate for the


five
ie fr
,ers
of


members, chosen
om the college or
should be drawn
representing the


student's minor or minors and furthering the coc
tween colleges and disciplines. Supervisory comr
department head (in on case by the student), apprc
and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate Scl
the supervisory committee be appointed as early
has been admitted to doctoral work and in general
first semester of study. The Graduate Dean is an


,rdination
nittees are
lived by the
iool. It is
as possible


C


e


m this campus be-
nominated by the
dean of the college,
recommended that
after the student


I not later than the end of the
ex officio member of all super-


visory committees.

The duties of the supervisory committee are as follows:


To inform the student of all regulations
should be noted that this does not absol
sibility for informing himself concerning
Responsibility.)


governing the degree sought. It
ve the student from the respon-
these regulations. (See Student


To meet immediately after appointment to pass on the qualifications
the student and to discuss and approve a program of study for him.


To meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the
plans for carrying it out.

Tn onnditlnIt tlintho (niino ovcn'dnntinn n'r hi thnkro iacaoc irlhora +I0 a'roniLt^


Supervisory


,


r









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Language


Requirement.-Except


as noted


below,


a reading


knowledge


two languages other than English is required.
be French and German, but they may be any lan
be of significant use in the field of study in which t
However, a combination of two modern Romance
all cases where the language chosen is other than
will be required to justify his choice and to obtain
committee, his college, and the Graduate Council.


These languages will normally
Lguages which can be shown to
:he student is taking his degree.
languages is not permitted. In
French or German, the student
the approval of his supervisory


Justification


of choice will


accomplished by showing the existence of an acceptably sizable or rapidly growing
body of relevant scholarly material in the language in question.
As an alternative to a reading knowledge of two languages other than English,


a candidate for this degree may substitute a functional knowledge of
language. A functional knowledge of a language is understood to
ability to read, write, and speak that language with reasonable ease and
This alternative is subject to the approval of the student's supervisory <
and college as well as the Graduate Council, and is permitted only
knowledge of the language chosen can be shown to be needed in the pr
of the dissertation. For students in the Latin American Area Studies
special requirements apply.


one such
mean the
accuracy.
committee
when the
eparation
Program


Knowledge of the languages presented will be tested and certified by the De-
partment of Foreign Languages or by individuals or groups approved by this
department. Where it is necessary for the examination to be conducted by in-
dividuals from outside the University, any expense involved will be borne by the
student.
In certain departments individually approved by the Graduate Council (Busi-
ness Administration and Agricultural Economics), a study of mathematics may
be substituted for a reading knowledge of one foreign language. When this
substitution is chosen, the courses in mathematics taken for this purpose may not
be considered a part of the major or minor studies. The degree of proficiency in
mathematics shall be determined as follows:
1. For a field in which calculus is not included through the master's degree,
the student shall take and pass with a "B" or better the final examination


specified
For a fi
master's
demonstl
hours of


354 and any other courses in the I
by his supervisory committee.
eld in which calculus is included as
program, the student shall either pa
rate equivalent proficiency by written


work in


Department of


departmentt


a part of the
ss with a "B"
examination


Mathematics

bachelor's or
or better, or
in 6 semester


Mathematics requiring


a normal prerequisite.












BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


search at certain branch stations of the University of Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station where adequate staff and facilities are available.


(2) In calculating reside
of 15 semester hours as equal to
the year of full-time study sti
the following proportions: (a)
(b) 35 semester hours in four si
ing summer session registration,
be valued as a normal program i


(3) Between
there must elapse
residence, or one
basis.
ak


nce,


part-time


study


evaluated


basis


a full load. Part-time study may be substituted for
pulated in the preceding paragraph in either of
30 semester hours earned in one calendar year;
successive registrations (either including or exclud-
s). An overload program, even when approved, will
in meeting this residence requirement.


the qualifying examination and the conferring of the degree,
a minimum of one academic year if the candidate is in full-time
full calendar year if the candidate is on less than a full-time


Qualifying
all candidates
second term c
by the special
apartments, is
The supervise
the student is
If the stuck
examination u
his supervisor


Examination.-The qualifying examination, which is
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, may be taken


,f the second year of graduate
I supervisory committee, with
both written and oral and co
ry committee has the responsib
qualified to go on with work to
lent fails in his qualifying exa
unless for special reasons such
ry committee and approved by


study.
the aid


vers the
ility at th
ward the
mination,
an exam
r the Gra


required of
during the


The examination, conducted
of the major and minor de-


major
is time
Ph.D.
he wil
nation
duate


and minor subjects.
of deciding whether
degree.
1 not be given a re-
is recommended by


Council.


least


semester of additional preparation is considered


Time
calendar
repeated.


essential before re-examination.


Limit.-All work for the doctor's degree must be completed within five
years after the qualifying examination or this examination must be


Admission to Candidacy.-A graduate student does not become an actual can-
didate for the Ph.D. degree until he has been formally admitted to candidacy.


Such admission requires the approval of
head of his department, his college dean
and the approval must be based on (1)
the opinion of his supervisory committee
dacy, and (3) a qualifying examination
admission to candidacy should be made a
ginning of the third year of graduate st


the student's supervisory committee, the
, and the Dean of the Graduate School,
the academic record of the student, (2)
concerning his over-all fitness for candi-
n as described above. Application for
,t about the end of the second or the be-
udy.


Dissertation. -A
tion and research i:


satisfactory


dissertation


s required of all candidates


showing
3. Since


p
I


independent


investiga-


all doctoral dissertations


I









B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Microfilm publication.


In this case the University will refund $30 of the


deposit as soon as the dissertation
amination passed.


been accepted and


the final


Microcard


publication.


case


University


determine


cost of publication and either return any un-needed portion of the deposit


or bill the student for any


excess


in cost above $50.


Two-year postponement.


The student may request a two-year period to


investigate possibilities of publication by printing.


as a book or monograph in essentially complete form,


If the dissertation is published


the Graduate Council


consider a request for refund of the entire deposit upon receipt of five copies


published


work.


At the


of the


two-year


period,


unless


evidence


ceptance of the dissertation for such publication has been presented,


the Graduate


Council


will authorize publication by microfilm as indicated under


above.


Copyright.-Under (1) above the student may choose to copyright his disserta-


tion before publication.


The charge involved will be deducted from the $50 deposit


before refund can be arranged.


Final


Examination.-After


acceptance


dissertation


conm-


pletion of all other prescribed work for the degree, but in no case earlier than six


months


before the conferring of the


degree,


the candidate


examination, oral or written or both, by his supervisory committee.


given a final
Satisfactory


performance on this examination completes all requirements for the degree.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

There are a number of special graduate programs that are described in detail


University


Catalog.


Students


interested


following


programs


referred to the catalog for complete information
Cancer Research
School of Inter-American Studies.


Graduate


Program in Public Administration


Research Program at The Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies
Statistical Laboratory


Graduate Program in Community


Program in


Planning


Vocational Rehabilitation


FLORIDA POST-GRADUATE CERTIFICATES


For regulations


Post-Graduate


governing the


Certificate


securing o
Advanced


recommendations for


Post-Graduate


Certificate,


Florida
consult


are


__ __ I __









BULLETIN


THE


DIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SPECIAL THREE WEEK COURSES

The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run for


three weeks only


follow


Students registering for courses listed in this section


the same admission


and


registration


procedures as other stu-


dents but are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.


June


18--July


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


670.-Problems


Agricultural


Engineering.


credits.


Open


voca-


tional agriculture teachers.


To arrange


AGE 15


ROGERS


J. and ROGERS


Special problems in agricultural engineering.


AGRICULTURAL


EXTENSION


AXT


601.-Advanced


Rural


Leadership.


credits


session


maximum


credits.


10:30 Daily
Laboratory


PEA 308 GRI
1:00 to 4:00 W


[GSBY


PEA 308


Advanced training


covering


the aspect


of Small


Group Leadership.


AXT


607.-Principles in Development of Youth Programs.


9:20 Daily
Laboratory:


McC


credits.


HAMPSON


1:00 to 4:00 Th


McC 121


Advanced training in conducting 4-H Club work.

EDUCATION-GENERAL


ED. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living.


3 credits.


Section 1.


8:10-1


2:40 Daily


YON


INGLE


A study of Florida resources is made applicable to richer living.
appreciation and understanding of art principles applied tn costu


other phases


of esthetic living.


Attention
me design,


is given to developing
home decoration, and


EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY


EDE.


700.-Problems


Elementary


Education,


credits.


Prerequisite:


Per-


mission of the Head of the Department.


8:10-11:30 Daily


BRO


ZIRBES


Primarily designed for experienced teachers with Master's
active approach to working with children in elementary cla


degrees who are interested in
ssrooms.


a more


rnr'---


er A PVa ,L;- :; :- a4 L b X- .^ en I ,tal


crei


ynrnrfijFl^^c


;I










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SES


SION


EDUCATION-SECONDARY


EDS. 604.-Curriculum Development Laboratory


(Adult Education.)


credits.


Section 1


8:10-11:30 Daily


BRO


Guided


experiences


in developing


resource


units for teachi


ng and the writing of


courses


of study.


EDUCATION-


VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE


EDV


672.-Preparing Course Materials and Community Programs


in Agriculture.


3 credits.


8:10-11:40 Daily


AGE 101


OFTEN


course


ticular


area.


of study


a community p


program


will be planned by


each


student to


suit his


ENGLISH


EH.


133.-Effective


Writing.


credits.


Prerequisite:


, or permission


Course Chairman.


Section 1


8:10-11:30


Daily


D 120


WALKER


Designed to aid the student to


but pleasing and


attractive


to the


present
reader.


his idea
Qualified


in writing which


students


are encouri


is not onl
aged to do


r accurate
imaginative


and clear
e writing.


HORTICULTURE


HE. 650.-Projects in Citrus Production


(Fertilization)


8:10 Daily
Laboratory


MCC 9


ZIEGLER, L.


12:50 to 4:10 T


MCC 105


1 hour, and 4 hours field work.


3 credits per project.


its equivalent and consent of instructor.


classroom


work in summer


Agricultural Extension


course


will be announced in


Scions,


Fertilization,


Stocks and


session.


Offered


Maximum 12


credits.


Pre


Field work during second


No credit until project


is completed.


Workers and Vocational Agriculture Teachers.


the schedule of


Spray


courses


Schedules, or


with


Each til


one of the following


Maturity


and Grade.


requisite:
semester


HE. 341
followed


Offered primarily to
me it is offered, this


projects


specified:


INDUSTRIAL ARTS


IN. 624.-Problems


8:10-11:30 Daily


in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education.


AGE 114


credits.


MORRISON


Seminar


for advanced


students.


SOILS


352.-Soils
8:10 Daily


Laboratory:


Management.


McC


credits.


Prerequisite


EDSON


1:00 to 4:00 T


McC 123


The physical, chemical, and biological nature


of soils


with


special


emphasis


on soil management.


par-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SPECIAL


FOUR


WEEK


COURSE


June


18-July


Enrollment


Florida.
obtained


limited


to selected


educators


Not open to general registration.
by writing the instructor and t]


proved prior to June


1, 1957.


from


certain


counties in


Application forms may be


application


must


PHYSICAL EDUCATION


HEALTH AND


ATHLETICS


PHA.


491.-The operation of Community


Health Education Programs.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.


0-12:00


00-4:00 Daily


FLG 201


HICKS


D.A.


Problems in operating community programs of health education.
dent's local county health agencies, both official and voluntary. The


Field
course


with the College of Education, the State Department of Education and the


experiences


in the stu-


is offered in cooperation


State Board of Health.









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SPECIAL


THREE


WEEK


COURSES


July


8--July


EDUCATION--GENERAL


482.-Planning for Improved Daily


Living.


3 credits.


Section


8:10-12:40 Daily


YON


INGLE, K.


ED. 670.-Workshop in Human Relations in Education.


9:20-12:40 Daily


credits.


BRO


Various problems in human
form the core of the workshop
concerned with techniques and


relations ai
experiences.
procedures,


ways


of working


Open to teachers,
with group dynamics


with them and seeking solutions,
principals, lay leaders, and others


and group


process.


EDUCATION-ADMINISTRATION


EDA. 607.-Administration of Teacher Personnel.


3 credits.


8:10-11:30


BRO


SIMMONS


G.B.


EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY


EDE. 570.-Teaching of Reading.


3 credits.


Section


9:20-12:40 Daily


BRO


HAIMBACH, D.


EDE. 600.-Elementary School Curriculum.


3 credits.


Section 3


8:10-11:30 Daily


BRO


WILSON


EDUCATION--FOUNDATIONS


EDF. 640.-Problems in Pupil Development and Learning.


Section


8:10-11:30,


2:00-4:10


Daily


YON


3 credits.
GORDON


AND


STAFF


EDF. 642.-Educational Psychology-Problems.


Section


8:10-12:20, 12:50- 4:10


BRO


3 credits.
KURTZ, J.


EDUCATIONAL-PERSONNEL SERVICES


EDP. 600.-Teaching


Exceptional Children.


3 credits.


9:20-12:40 Daily


BRO


McCUTCHEN, K., AND MAC CURDY


R. D.


* t *0 t t a . f A . a 'S W .


nd









BULLE TIN


THE


UNI VERSI TY


SUMMER


SESSION


INDUSTRIAL ARTS


630.-Individual Work.


credits.


Section


To arrange


YON 300


BERGENGREN


Problems approved by the instructor.


IN. 635.-Curriculum Symposium in Industrial Education.


credits.


8:10-11:30


Daily


AGE 101


MORRISON, J.


A staff


resea


symposium concernin


the industrial curriculum,


a review


of the


current


situation


rch of a projective nature.









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SPECIAL SIX WEEK COURSE


June


18-July 26


THE COURSE LISTED IN THIS SECTION RUNS


FOR SIX WEEKS


ONLY


STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR THE COURSE BELOW FOLLOW THE SAME


ADMISSION


AND


REGISTRATION


PROCEDURES


OTHER


STUDENTS


BUT


ARE LIMITED TO


A MAXIMUM LOAD OF SIX SEMESTER HOURS.


EDUCATION


FAMILY


FINANCE


WORKSHOP


. Workshop spon-


scored by Committee on Education in Family Finance, the College of Educa-


, and the College of Business Administration.


(See EDS. 604, Section 1


and EDS. 641.)


PHYSICAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP.


This is offered in cooperation


with the State Department of Education, the Florida Athletic Coaches As-


sociation, and


the Florida


High


School


Activities


Association. (


PHA


645.)


WORKSHOP


FOR


JUNIOR


HIGH


SCHOOL


MATHEMATICS


TEACHERS.


Sponsored by the College of Education and the Mathematics


Department of the College of Arts and Sciences, this workshop deals with


the fundamental mathematical concepts and


processes taught in grades 7


8 and 9, such as number concepts, operations with numbers, intuitive geome-


try and elementary


algebra.


Also includes the organization of the


mathe-


matics


curriculum


junior


high


school,


trends


in the teaching


mathematics, construction and use of instructional materials, field work and
laboratory experiences, and guided experiences in the development of plans


for teaching units.


(See EDS. 550 and MS.


325.)


EDUCATION


SECONDARY


550.-The


Teaching


of Junior


High School


Mathematics.


credits.


(Must be taken concurrently with M


8:10-11:30 Daily


WAL 304


KIDD


K. P


., and SADLER,


604.-Curriculum Development Laboratory.


(Formerly


520).


credits.


II - -i


__ Y








BULLET


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


PHYSICAL EDUCATION


HEALTH AND ATHLETICS


PHA.


645.-Physical Education


Workshop Series.


6 credits.


Prerequisite: Permis-


sion of the Instructor.
8:30-12:00, 2:00-4:00 Daily


FLG


CHERRY


and STAFF


MATHEMATICS


MS. 325.-Advanced General Mathematics.


3 credits.


(Must be taken concurrently


with ED


550)


Section


12:50-3:00 Daily


WAL 304


KIDD


, K. P., and SADLER,









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SCHEDULE OF COURSES SUMMER SESSION 1957
JUNE 18 TO AUGUST 10

MINIMUM SIZE OF CLASSES

No undergraduate class or section will be continued or offered if, at the end of
the regular registration period, prior to the day classes begin for a term or se-
mester, the registration does not meet the following minimum requirements.
For Freshmen and Sophomore classes or sections (the comprehensive courses and
courses numbered in the 100's and 200's) the minimum is 12 registrations.
For Junior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 300's) the minimum is 8
registrations.
For Senior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 400's and 500's) the mini-
mum is 6 registrations.

ABBREVIATIONS

The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:


ADM

AE

AGE

ALA
AND
B
BNX
BEN
C


CRL

CIL
DAL
E
ENG

F
FLI


ADMINISTRATION
BUILDING
BUILDING AE
(Family Life)
AGRICULTURAL
ENGINEERING BUILDING
AGRONOMY LABORATORY
ANDERSON HALL
BUILDING B
BENTON ANNEX
BENTON HALL
BUILDING C
(Art)
CANCER RESEARCH
LABORATORY
CITRUS LABORATORY
DAIRY LABORATORY
BUILDING E
ENGINEERING AND
INDUSTRIES BUILDING
BUILDING F
FLINT HALL


K
L
LAW
LEI
LIB
LSP
MCC
MAT
MSB

MIL
MPL

N


NEW
NEA
NUL
OD
OE


BUILDING K
BUILDING L
LAW BUILDING
LEIGH HALL
LIBRARY
LIVESTOCK PAVILION
DAN McCARTY HALL
MATHERLY HALL
MEDICAL SCIENCES
BUILDING
MILITARY BUILDING
MEAT PRODUCTS
LABORATORY
BUILDING N
(Engineering Classrooms
and Laboratories)
NEWELL, Hall
NEWELL ANNEX
NUTRITION LABORATORY
OFFICE D
OFFICE E
4^ - f rF n^ .-.- fTl








BULLETIN


STA
TUL
U

UAN
VEL


THE


UNIVERSITY


STADIUM
TUNG LABORATORY
BUILDING U
(Architecture and Art)
FLORIDA UNION ANNEX
VEGETABLE PROCESSING
LABORATORY


VFH
WAL
WGY
WPL

X
YON


SUMMER


SESSION


VEGETABLE FIELD
WALKER HALL
WOMEN'S GYM
WOOD PRODUCTS
LABORATORY
BUILDING X
YONGE BUILDING


HOUSE


C-11.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for the lecture and one discussion section.)
Lecture Section 11: 10:30 MW WAL AUD 0


scussion
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


Sections:


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


PEA
PEA
PEA
PEA
PEA
PEA


206-
208
206
208
206.
208


C-12.--Am


Lee


lerican Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for the lecture and one discussion section.)
ture Section 21: 10:30 T Th WAL AUD


Discussion Sections:
Section 201 7:00
Section 202 8:10
Section 203 9:20


Daily
Daily
Daily


PEA
PEA
PEA


C-11-12: Designed to develop and stimulate the ability
confronting American institutions. The unequal rates of
in government, in family life, in education, and in religion
the need for a more effective co-ordination of the factors


to interpret the interrelated problems
change in technology, in economic life,
are analyzed and interpreted to show
of our evolving social organizations of


today. Careful scrutiny is made of the changing functions of our institutions as joint interdependent
activities so that a consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social
institutions may be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may
be achieved.
C-2
C-21-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: 2:00 MW BEN 203


Discussion Sections:
Section 101 8:10
Section 102 9:20
Section 103 10:30


Daily
Daily
Daily


BEN
BEN
BEN









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESS


ION


C-31.-Reading,


Speaking,


and Writing


Freshman English.


4 credits.


(Register


Lecture


Section


one


Discussion


Section


Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section 11


: 8:10


WAL AUD


Discussion Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00
8:10
8:10
9:20
10:30
11:40


T Th


MT Th
MT Th
MT Th


T Th


MT Th


AND
AND
MAT
AND
MAT
AND


Writing Laboratory


Section
Section
Section
Section


C-32.-Reading,


8:10-


10:30-1
12:50-


tions
9:30
2:10


10:30-12:10


T F


Speaking, and Writing


AND
AND
AND
AND


Freshman English.


4 credits.


(Register


Lecture


Section,


one


Discussion


Section,


Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section 21.


9:20 W


WAL AUD


Discussion Sections


Section 201


Section
Section
Section


8:10
9:20
9:20
11:40


T Th
T Th
T Th
T Th


MAT
MATr
MAT
MAT


Writing Laboratory Sections


C-31-32:
and writing


Section
Section
Section
Reading,
necessary


8:10-


10:30-12


12:50-


Speaking.


9:50


T F


:10 T


2:30


and Writing.


for the student's work


M Th


AND
AND


AND 209


Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking.
in college and for his life thereafter. This training


will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking,


in fundamentals of form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body and
in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their int
and increasing their understanding of literature.


voice
crests


133.-Effective


Writing.


credits.


Prerequisite:


, or permission


Course Chairman.


one


one









BULLETIN


THE


DIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


C-41


C-41.-Practical Logic.


3 credits


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


8:10
9:20


10:30
11:40


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


ADM


ADM 208


ADM


ADM 208


Both in private life and in vocational life man


course


accuracy


an attempt


is made to stimulate the student (1)


and thoroughness, (2)


ing his own thinking


record both


process


process


to be able to


and product


and product of think


is faced with the


necessity


of thinking.


In this


to develop his ability to think with greater


use objective standards


necessary


in critically evaluat-


as well as the conclusions reached by others, and (3) to
ing in effective language. The material used applies to


actual living and working conditions.


given,


and numerous


exercises


The case method is to insure practice, many illustrations are


are assigned.


C-42


2.-Fundamental Mathematics.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


8:10


9:20
10:30
11:40


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


PEA
PEA
PEA
PEA


A practical elementary


course


consisting of the subject matter considered most useful for students


who do not plan necessarily to specialize in mathematics.
system, computation with approximate and exact numbers
practical geometry, functional relationships, logarithms,


simple and compound
Mathematics.


interest,


and annuities.


S


open


It covers the development of the number
algebra as a generalization of arithmetic,


the simple
to student


trigonometry
ts who have


of the triangle,
completed Basic


C-51.-Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section)


Lecture Section 11


: 11:40 M W


WA AUD.


Discussion Sections:


Section 101


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00


8:10
9:20
10:30
12:50
7:00
8:10


9:20


10:30


9:20


10:30


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND


[' &9 as i0


A a.u a JZN


man on ora n


.alrr v l|









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


C-5.-The Humanities


course


designed to acquaint the student with the


Western Civilization.


emphasis


great literature, philosophy, art and music


Both our cultural heritage and the culture of our


own


is placed upon mature understanding, enlarged appreciation, and


quate for the needs of our


age.


are studied.


B


a philosophy of life


tlajor
ade-


C-61.-Biological Sciences.


credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 11:
Lecture Section 12:
Discussion Sections:


11:40 T
2:00 Th


FLI
FLI


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00
8:10
9:20
10:30
11:40
8:10
9:20


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


C-62.--Biological Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section
Lecture Section


:00 T


FLI 101


11:40 Th


Discussion Sections:


Section 201
Section 202


Section


Section 204
Section 205
Section 206


7:00
8:10
9:20


10:30
8:10
10:30


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


ACCOUNTING


ATG. 211.-Elementary


Accounting.


3 credits.


The first half of the course ATG.


211-212.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


8:10


10:30


Daily
Daily


MAT
MAT


VAULT


J. W.


The basic training in business practice and in accounting.


recording transactions


A study of business papers and records


preparation of financial statements and reports.


ATG. 212.-Elementary


Accounting.


3 credits. The second half of the course ATG.


_1 __









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESS


ION


312.-


ATG.


Accounting Principles.


credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 311.


9:20 Daily


MAT 16


The legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from the legal organization form
used by business: liabilities; proprietorship; corporations; capital stock; surplus; followed by a
study of the financial aspects of accounting as disclosed by an analysis and interpretation of financial


statements


financial ratios and standards.


their preparation, meaning and


ATG.


313.--Cost
10:30 Daily


Accounting.


MAT 224


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


VAULT, J.


The methods of collection, classification,


cost systems,


use of


and interpretation of


cost data in business control.


cost data; special


problems, standard


ATG.


411.-Advanced Accounting.


Problems.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


ATG.


11:40 Daily


MAT 224


Specialized accounting problems


ventures


; partnerships


statement of affairs


consignments


ATG. 412.-Principles of Auditing.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ATG. 312.


9:20


Daily


MAT 119


Auditing


theory


and current auditing


practice;


principal


kinds of


audits


and services


of the


public accountant; professional and ethical aspects of auditing.


ATG.


414.-Income Tax Accounting.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ATG.


8:10 Daily


MAT 119


A study of the federal income tax law and related accounting problems. Determination of gross
income and of deductions is studied for taxpayers generally. The course emphasizes this process


for individuals.


Practice


is provided


use of the loose-leaf income tax


service.


in the preparation


of returns


for individuals,


and in the


ATG.


415.-Corporate Accounting Problems.


credits.


Prerequisite: ATG.


10:30 Daily


MAT 119


ANDERSON


The corporate


mergers


accounting


problems


concerning


consolidation.


and voluntary and involuntary liquidations.


reorganization,


quasi-reorganiza-


ATG.


417.-Governmental Accounting.


credits.


Prerequisite or corequisite: ATG.


11:40 Daily


MAT 225


The basic principles


underlying governmental and


institutional accounting.


tion is given to the operation of recommended types of funds, the budget


tax accounting for cities,


and the utilization of


acco


process,


Detailed considera-
account structure,


hunting in the preparation of significant reports.


GRADUATE COURSES


ATG.


611.-Accounting Theory.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ATG. 411.


9:20


Daily


MAT 224


LANHAM


The theory behind accounting functions in their relations


to the business enterprise.


ATG.


613.-Cost and Budgeting


Accounting.


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


ATG.


ATGC


1 14 a n d ATG 412.


costs,


use.


ATG. 212.


insurance and other related subjects.


installments


tion,


.-I* .- Cl ~ -1


__










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ATG. 699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


Directed research and writing for the Master's deg
graduate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours


ree, taken toward the er
required for the Master's


id of


degree.


the student's


ATG. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


1 to 6 hours credit.'


To arrange


Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken
graduate program for credit in addition to the hours of regular
supervisory committee for the doctor's degree.
*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.


toward
courses


the end of the student's
required by the candidate's


AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING


AN. 286.-Introductory


Aerodynamics.


credits.


Prerequisite:


PS. 205.


Corequi-


sites: PS. 206, EM. 365.


9:20 Daily


N 210


The airplane. The atmosphere. Fundamental
fluid flow. Airfoil theory. Wing theory.


dynamics


and thermodynamics of


Types of


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


201.-Principles of Agricultural Economics.


credits.


11:40 Daily


MCC 44


GREENMAN, J. R.


An introduction to the field of agricultural economics: principles of economics as
culture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.


304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal.


applied to


credits.


8:10 Daily


Volume, sources and
of credit and problems
usually required.


MCC 37


BROOKE, D. L.


uses of agricultural credit in Florida and the United States.
peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations.


The principles
One field trip


AS. 306.-Farm Management.


3 credits.


10:30


Daily


MCC 37


SARLE, C. F.


Not open to freshmen. Introduction to the principles of farm management. Types of farming
in Florida and the United States, and factors which determine types of farming. The causes of
success and failure of farms and farmers. Problems of labor, machinery, layout of farms, farm re-
organization, and such.


308.-Marketing.


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


MCC 44


McPHERSON


Basic principles of marketing with emphasis placed on market functions, services, a
is; elementary theory of demand and prices; commodity exchanges and future trading
i; grades and standards; market news; methods of increasing efficiency of markets


co-ops and government in marketing. One field trip required.


413.-Agricultural Policy.


nd organiza-
; transporta-
: the role of


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


MCC 44


GREENMAN, J. R.


A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to im-
ipra fhtha anQ nn n,,n ond cnnrnti 1 at ati-nc nmf narnl i.n n.knnvnrCi n nit nnnn4nn nna1lraA


tioe
tion


nflVfl


I!









BULLETIN


THE


DIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GRADUATE COURSES


605.-Research Problems in Farm Management.


To arrange.


Designed


to train students in collecting, analyzing and presenting data on problems in the field


of farm management.


Special problems of interest to the individual student and agreeable with the


are selected for study.


A statement of the problem


is prepared.


research


publications reviewed and written reports developed.


611.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products.


To arrange.


Individual
may be place


or other


aspects


prehensive report on the investigations and conclusions of the student is required.


628.-Problems in Statistics.


credits.


examinations
d on efficiency


of segments


market


of the marketing


system


arran


for Florida products.
aements, historical c


Prerequisite
methods, samp
designs.


lir


A graduate
ng methods,


course


in statistics.


Special problems in statistics, in the
:n, theory of sampling and theory


areas


of research


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0-6 credits.


To arrange.


799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


To arrange.


*Credit assigned must be shown on


course


assignment card.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


AG. 302.-Farm Motors.


3 credits.


8:10 MT W Th


AGE 15


CHOATE


R.E.


Laboratory:


2:00 to 4:10 M


AGE 16


The general principles of operation of the various
eludes actual operation and repair of units.


sources


of farm power.


Laboratory work in-


AG. 403.-Agricultural Engineering Investigations.


credits.


4:20 M T W Th


AGE 15


ROGERS, F.


Assigned reading and reports of recent developments in the field of agricultural engineering.

GRADUATE COURSES


AG. 671.-Research Problems in Irrigation.


3 credits.


To arrange


AGE 9


CHOATE


R.E.


AG. 699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


AGE 9


STAFF.


*Credit assigned must be shown on


course


assignment card.


instructor


3 credits.


work studied.


organization,


3 credits.


trading


To arrange.


of the problem of interest to the student and agreeable with the instructor.


Identical with AY


lev


Emphasis


elopment
A corn


experimental desig


of experimental


1-6 credits.*


.- *









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


AGRONOMY


329.-Genetics.


credits.


8:10 Daily


McC. 204


WALLACE


A. T.


The fundamentals of inheritance, emphasizing the application of genetics
branches of science in the improvement of economic plants and animals and in p
betterment.


and its associated


programs


for human


426.-Individual Problems


in Agronomy.


Variable credit.


To arrange.


McC 209


SENN, P. H.


Individual problems selected from the fields of crop production or


weed


control.


436.-Pastures.


credits.


10:30


MT W Th


McC. 204


RUELKE,


0. C.


Laboratory


12:50-3:00 W


McC. 204


RUELKE, O.


The development and


ticular


reference


management for


to Florida


management


conditions.


greater economic


grazing


areas


Importance


of southeastern


pastures


returns.


United


in present


States,


with


day agriculture


GRADUATE COURSES


AY. 626.-Agronomic Problems.


3 credits.


To arrange.


McC. 209


SENN, P. H.


Library, laboratory, or field studies which relate to crop production and improvement.
ments are studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.


AY. 627.-Problems in Genetics and Cytogenetics.


Experi-


Variable credit.


To arrange.


McC. 209


EDWARDSON, J. R.


Modern methods applied to


specific


genetic


or cytogenetic research


problems.


AY. 699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange.


McC. 209


SENN, P. H.


799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


to 6 credits.


To arrange.


McC. 209


SENN, P. H.


*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment


card.


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY


AND


NUTRITION


AL. 309.-General Animal Husbandry.


credits.


7:00 Daily


MCC 44


WAKEMAN, D. L.


Types and breeds of farm animals; market classification


selection and


management.


GRADUATE COURSES


AL. 601.-Special Topics in Animal Science.


credits.


To arrange


fl-^.avp nn A A i cn* J Io iU c


of scientific literature in the field of animal


science.


sid cushions


Reviews and









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ANTHROPOLOGY


APY


500.-Field Session in Archeology.


6 credits.


Prerequisite:


6 hours of


thropology


To arrange


including APY


GOGGIN, J. M.


Excavati
specimens :
analysis.


on of archeological sites, recording of dat
and study of the theoretical culture principles


, laboratory handling and analysis of
which underlie field methods and artifact


APY


530.-Individual


Work.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


hours


anthropology,


including APY.
To arrange


201.
STAFF


ARCHITECTURE


AE. 101.-The Arts of Design.


2:00 Daily


credits.


E 176


A survey of the visual arts: An introduction to the principles of Landscape Architecture, Com-
munity Planning, Architecture, Building Construction, Interior Design, and allied arts. Course
objectives are to lead the student into an understanding and enjoyment of the visual arts and to
enable him to develop a valid basis in the selection of a career in the arts of design.


AE. 102.-Vision and Graphics, I.


9:20-12:40 Daily


Functions and limitations
graphic exercises for develop
design, and aesthetic judgment.


AE. 203.-Vision and Graphics, II.


9:20-12:40 Daily


3 credits.


E 116.


of vision. The interpretation of spatial relationships. Visual and
nent of observation, graphic techniques, imaginative ability, visual
Study of the elements of design and principles involved in their use.


3 credits.


E 174


Prerequisites: AE. 101, AE. 102. Techniques of graphic representation. Projects in Research and
Design. Introduction to the organization of space for human activity. The study of the basic in-
fluences of climate, natural environment, technology, and culture on the design and construction of
shelter.


AE. 204.-Basic Design.


3 credits.


12:50-4:10


Daily


E 126


Prerequisite: AE. 203 or approval of Adviser. Continuation of AE. 203. Projects in Building
Research and Architectural Design. Introduction to the study and application of planning techniques.

AE. 205.-Building Technology. 3 credits.


7:00-9:10 Daily


E 157


The first half of the course AE. 205-206. Corequisite: Ps-201. The materials and methods of
building. The analysis of natural and manufactured building materials; their sources: their physical,
structural, and aesthetic properties. The study of elementary framing systems; their methods of


assembly and


architectural expression.


AE. 206.-Building Technology.


An introdum

3 credits.


:tion to mechanical equipment.


7:00-9:10 Daily


E 176


fl'L.^ -.> 1 1L.1t -t *L. _. At fn n . . .......r...* -- A fn fn ttn


an-


:a


I










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


AE. 506-507-508-509-510.-Thesis in Architecture.


3 credits each;


group


total


credits.


Maximum


Summer


Session


load:


credits.


Prerequisite:


series


. 501-502-50
To arrange


3-504-505.


E 175


GRADUATE


COURSES


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.


For students working for the mas
rk required for the degree.
*Credit assigned must be shown o


ter's degree.
n course as;


Credits


signment


cannot


be used to reduce the total


course


card.


ART


ART 105.-Art Laboratory.


credits.


8:10-10:20 Daily


C 105


An opportunity for students to
and the like. For non-Art majors.


PURSER,
work at vario


us art


processes


such


as painting, modeling, sculpture


ART 123.-Color and Design.


credits.


10:30-12:40 Daily


C 103


KACERE


J. C.


A study of the elements and principles of
a two-dimensional surface.


design


as a


means


of developing


graphic


expression


ART 124.-Drawing and Visual Perception.


credits.


10:30-12:40 Daily


C 101


EBERSOLE, R. P.


Creative drawing with an emphasis on
awareness of media, and individual creativity.


developing


visual


perception,


physical


coordination,


ART. 226.-Pictorial Composition.


credits. Prerequisite: ART 123


8:10-10:20 Daily


C 100


COVINGTON, H.


The use of design principles in


expressing


ideas.


Oil paint


is the principal medium.


ART 290.-Art Survey.


9:20 Daily


3 credits.
GRISSOM, E.


An introduction to important examples of painting, sculpture, architecture and related
4000 B. C. to contemporary art movements.


ART 301.-Design I.


arts from


credits. Prerequisite: ART 226.


8:10-10:20


Daily


C 105


PURSER,


An investigation of color, line and design, and their relationship to pictorial composition.
lems will be based upon organization of the picture plane and will be developed through the
phases of watercolor techniques as media for visual expression.


Prob-
various


ART 302.-Design II.


8:10-10:20 Daily


credits.


C 105


Prerequisite: ART 301.
PURSER, S. R.


A continuation of ART 301,
media.


with emphasis on individual experimentation


in the various


water


ART 311.-Freehand Drawing I.


credits. Prerequisite: ART 124.


WO]


Y









BULLETIN


THE


DIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ART 338.--Draping.


credits.


10:30-1


:40 Daily


BORGIA


Introduction of principles


designing


patterns


use of dress


forms.


ART 341.-Elementary Photography.


8:10-10:20 Daily


credits.


EBERSOLE


Fundamental


course


in camera


operation and dark room technique


with practical applications in


the field of education.


ART 351.-Painting I.


3 credits.


8:10-10:20 Daily


C 100


COVINGTON


H.W.


Various
ferences w


projects


in painting


based on the


needs


of the


individu


students


as ascertained


ith the instructor.


ART 35


2.--Painting II.


3 credits. Prerequisite: ART


8:10-10:20


Daily


C 101


COVINGTON


A continuation of ART


ART


403.-Design


10:30-12:40 Daily


credits.


C 103


Prerequisite


KACERE


J. C.


ART


Exploration of the design problem with
of the individual.


emphasis


upon the development of the


express


ive potential


ART 404.-Design IV


10:30-1


:40 Daily


3 credits.


C 103


Prerequisite


KACERE


ART


J.C.


Continuation of


personal


expression.


ART 403.


A fuller consideration of


select


problems


is used in the search for


ART 413.-Freehand Drawing III.


credits.


Prerequisite: ART 312.


10:30-12


:40 Daily


C 101


EBERSOLE


R. P.


Further study of the human head and figure with emphasis upon


gestures,


weights, and contours of the figure.


creative


interpretation of the


ART


453.-Painting III.


6 credits.


Prerequisite


ART


Daily


COVINGTON


A continuation of ART


352 with emphasis on the


creative


individuality of the students.


ART


454.-Painting


6 credits. Prerequisite: ART


8:10-12


:40 Daily


C 100


COVINGTON


A continuation of ART 453
abilities.


with emphasis on the acquisition of


more


professional attitudes and


ART 494.-Modern Art.


7:00 Daily


3 credits.
GRISSOM


The history of Art from 1850 and the development of Art leading to


Cubism,


futurism,


expressionism,


movements


such


as Fauvism.


GRADUATE COURSES


ART 651-652-653-654.-Art Problems in Painting and Drawing.


w- -


rww a J. n .-


credits.


* -_ __ -. .t It 5I .l'** B Si


con-


**- JA










B ULLE TIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ASTRONOMY


ATY


141.-Descriptive Astronomy.


3 credits. Not open to students who have had


any other course in astronomy.


8:10 Daily


WAL 202


An elementary survey of the astronomical universe with a minimum
Primarily intended as an elective for those not majoring in a physical s,
Occasional observing periods with the telescope and demonstrations with the


of mathematical


elence
Spitz


work.


or mathematics.
Planetarium.


BACTERIOLOGY


BCY


300.-Bacteria in Everyday Life.


credits. Prerequisite: C-61 or equivalent.


8:10 M T W Th
Laboratory 12:d


MCC 166


50 to 3:00 T Th


CARROLL,


MCC 167


R. and TYLER, M. E.


CARROLL,


Bacteria in relation to evolution, higher plants and animals, and particularly man. Their
tions in the cycle of chemical transformations, in food production, in disease, and in general


station. The related activities of some yeasts and molds, and
terminal course, not acceptable for admission to advanced coi
minor credit to graduate students in non-science curricula only.


func-
sani-


of the filterable disease agents. A
.rses in bacteriology. Available for


GRADUATE COURSES


BCY


600.-Public Health Microbiology.


To arrange Jacksonville.**


Variable credit.*


BUREAU


OF LABORATORIES STAFF


Principles and methods in diagnostic public health microbiology.


BCY. 699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0-6 credits.*


BCY. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


1-6 credits.


*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.
**Course given at Bureau of Laboratories, State Board of Health, Jacksonville.


BIOLOGY


BLY. 161.-Biology Laboratory.


2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-61.


8:10 to 10:20 MT W Th


An introductory laboratory course
of plants, methods of reproduction and
BLY. 162.-Biology Laboratory.
10:30 to 12:40 M T W Th


An introductory


laboratory


course


J 101


KILBY


dealing with cells,
germ cell formation


J. D.


mammalian


anatomy,


the major


groups


2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-62.


J 202
dealing


LEAVITT, B. B.


genetics,


homology,


embryology,


taxonomy and ecology.
(BLY. 161 and 162 are prerequisites for most of the other courses in this department).


evolution,


BLY. 210.-Vertebrate


Embryology.


4 credits. Prerequisites:


BLY.


161 and


Lecture: 12:50 M T W Th


FLI 101


Laboratory: 2:00 to 5:20 M T W Th


J201


Lectures on the embryology of the various


tory work dealing chiefly with the


groups


of chordate animals are accompanied by labora-


frog, chick and pig.


J









BULLET


THE


'NIVERSI TY


MMER


fESS


ION


BLY


.303.-Birds of Florida.


3 credits.


Prerequisite


Lecture Section:
Laboratory Secti


Field Work:


12:50 T Th
on: 2:00 to


hours


WESTFALL, M.


5:20 T Th


To arrange


Designed


to acquaint students


with the bird life of Florida.


Particular attention


recognition and identification of the local birds.


is given


to the


BLY


430.-Individual Studies in Animal Biology.


3 credits. Prerequisite: At least


fourteen hours in approved major courses in biology


and consent of instructor.


May be repeated for full credit.


To arrange


STAFF


Qualified students and the instructor concerned


may


choose


a particular topic


or problem for study.


GRADUATE COURSES


BLY


630.-Individual


Studies


in Animal


Biology.


Hours


credits


to be


ranged.


Prerequisite:


Graduate status and consent of the instructor.


To arrange


STAFF


Studies may be chosen from


one or more


aspects


of the following fields: Comparative Anatomy,


Cytology, Ecology, Embryology, Experimental Biology, Fresh Water Biology, Game Management,
Genetics, Herpetology, Histology, Ichthyology, Invertebrate Zoology including Arachnology and Insect
Biology, Limnology, Malacology, Mammalogy, Marine Biology, Ornithology, Parasitology, General or


Comparative Physiology, Protozoology. Vertebrate Paleozoology,
BLY. 630 may be elected for additional credit in subsequent


and Zoogeography.
semesters.


BLY


666.-Biometrics.


credits.


Prerequisite: Ms
To arrange


. 310.
WALLBRUNN


Application of


BLY


standard statistical


690.-Special


Topics


procedures

Biology.


to biological


credits.


problems.


Prerequisite:


Graduate


status


and consent of the instructor.


To arrange


STAFF


Special topics will be studied with small interested groups of students.


Physiological Genetics,


BLY.


Population


Genetics,


The planned topics


Taxonomy and Natural History of Arthropods.


690 may be elected for additional credit repeatedly providing there


is a change of topic.


BLY


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.


BLY


799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


*Credit


assigned must be shown


1 to 6 credits.


on registration blank.


BOTANY


BTY


101.-General Botany.


o.in 'r 1m TI rPt


nfT/ C


credits.
fT/lTflf ET T fl fl


are:










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GRADUATE COURSES


BTY


600.-Problems in Botany.


1-4 credits.*


To arrange


STAFF


Problems in


one or


more


graphy, and morphology and


of the fields of botany,


anatomy,


depending on the


taxonomy,


physiology,


requirements


ecology


of graduate


mil


and plant
lor of gra


geo-
duate


students in botany.


BTY


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0-6 credits.


*Credit


assigned


must be shown on


course


assignment


card.


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


BCN


412-


413-414.-Projects in Building Construction, Group 4.


credits each


group total,


12 credits.


Maximum Summer


Sessi


on load: 9 credits.


Prerequisite:


The series BCN


401-402-403-404-411.


To arran


NOTE:
during the 1
of the Head


A limited amount of remedial work will be offered to permit makeup in


regular


O


semester.


Registration


will be permitted only upon


f the Department.


securing


courses


failed


the written approval


GRADUATE COURSES


BCN


601.-Building Construction.


or 6 credits.


Prerequisite: Bachelor's


degree


in Building


g Construction or equivalent.


To arrange


K 102


Advanced studies in building technology


or in sp


selected by the student and approved by the faculty.


ecialized


areas


of the building


construction


BCN.


603.-Building Research.


3 or 6 credits.


Prerequisite


Bachelor's


gree


in Building Construction or equivalent.


To arrange K 102
Detailed investigation of a selected problem in the building construction field designed to


a significant contribution to


present


knowledge and


practices


in that field.


make


BCN


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.*


For students working for the Master's


work required for the


*Credit


assigned


degree.


must be shown on


degree.


course


Credits cannot be used to reduce the total


assignment


course


card.


BUSINESS


EDUCATION


BEN.


81.-Introductory Typewriting. 2
8:10 Daily and 2 hours to arrange


credits.


YON 306


BABB


E. M.


in typewriting developed through practice on personal and business problems.


BEN.


91.-Introductory Shorthand.


3 credits.


9:20 Daily and 2 hours to arrange


YON 305


BABB


!









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


BEN


291.-Shorthand Dictation and Transcription.


3 credits.


Prerequisites: BEN.


and 191


, or permission of


department.


12:50 Daily and 4 hours to arrange


YON 306


BABB


Dictation and transcription


are emphasized.


GRADUATE COURSES


BEN.


662.-Teaching Secretarial Subjects.


9:20 Daily


YON 306


LOYD


J. W.


3 credits.


The curriculum, materials and methods of teaching


BEN.


secretarial


s


664.-Methods and Materials in General Business.


10:30 Daily Y
The objectives, content,
and senior high school are


ON 305
resource
included.


ubjects are included.
3 credits.


LOYD, J. W.
materials and methods of teaching general business in the junior


BEN


705.-Seminar


Business


Education.


6 credits.


Prerequisite:


permission


of department.


6 hours s
YON 308


seminar and 3
MOORMAN


hours laboratory to arrange.
J. H.


A work experience seminar. The purpose
materials and techniques in the high school.


is to make applications of office


experience to teaching


BEN. 775.-Administration and Supervision of Business Education.


3 credits. Pre-


requisite:


2 years teaching


2:00 Daily


YON 305


experience and permission of department.
LOYD, J. W.


Problems and duties of the sup


ervisor


and department head


are emphasized.


BUSINE


ORGANIZATION


BS. 231.-Principles of Marketing.


credits.


AND OPERATION

Prerequisite: ES. 201.


11:40 Daily


MAT 102


BUTTERWORTH


The institutions and methods developed for carrying on


agencies


tuition


elements of marketing efficiency


trade operations:


the cost of marketing; price mainten


retail and wholesale
lance; unfair compe-


the relation of the government to marketing.


BS. 233.-Salesmanship.


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


MAT


THOMPSON


R. B.


An introduction to selling.


Analysis of


types,


stages


and problems of psychology of Sale situations.


BS. 260.-Fundamentals of Insurance.


9:20 Daily


3 credits.


MAT 113


The basic fundamentals underlying the business of i


and detailed


work


in the subject designed


serve


economics and commerce a general knowledge of the subject
future work of those interested in entering the business.


271.-Principles of Management.


insurance as a prerequisite for more advanced
two distinct needs: (1) to give students of


and (2) to lay a foundation for the


3 credits.


8:10


Daily


MAT


TRAXLER, R. N.


The basic fundamentals of management underlying the solution of problems of organization and
operation of business enterprises. Application of these fundamentals to specific fields of industrial


- ** J










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


BS. 365.-Fire Insurance.


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


MAT 113


CLINE


R. S.


The principles and practices
surable interest; endorsements ;


rates


reserves,


consequential


of the coverage of losses due to fire
settlement and adjustment of losses


losses


reinsurance.


the fire insurance contract; in-
co-insurance; non-concurrence;


BS. 373.-Personnel Management.


3 credits.


10:30 Daily


MAT 111


TRAXLER, R. N.


A comparison of the critical evaluation of public and private personnel practices and techniques
of recruiting, selecting, transferring, promoting, classifying, and training workers. Attention is
centered on the problem of training to fit workers for the different types and levels of duties called
for by the government, by industry and by other types of business enterprises. Consideration of
organization, policies, and procedures of managing men.


BS. 401.-Business Law.


credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


8:10


10:30


Daily
Daily


MAT
MAT


GAITANIS, L. A.


Contracts: Nature


kinds; agree


er


third parties; discharge; remedies. A;
liabilities of third parties; termination.
holders; defenses; discharge.


it; genuineness of assent;
agency: Nature; creation ;
Negotiable Instruments:


consideration; legality; capacity;
principal and agent; rights and
Nature ; kinds ; parties ; transfer ;


BS. 402.-Business Law.


9:20 Daily


3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 401.


MAT


Personal Property: Nature; classification; acquisition of title. Bailments: Nature
termination; pledges and pawns. Carriers: Nature; classification; duties; liabilities.
formality; transfer of title; warranties; liabilities; rights; remedies; conditional sales.
Nature; creation; classification ; powers; stock; management; rights; liabilities.
Nature; creation; duties; rights; remedies; liabilities.


BS. 422.-Investments.


classification
ales: Nature
Corporations
Partnership


3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 427.


9:20 Daily


MAT 219


McFERRIN, J. B.


The nature of investments; investment policies and
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases;
security prices.


BS. 427.-Corporation Finance.


9:20 Daily


types of securities; analysis of securities;
factors influencing general movements of


3 credits.


MAT 216


The economic and legal forms of business enterprise; the instruments of business finance; financial
problems as they relate to the ordinary operations of the business involving fixed and working
capital, income, dividend policy, and current borrowing.


BS. 433.-Advertising.


credits.


10:30


Daily


MAT 105


YODER


A comprehensive guide to the planning and preparation of modern advertising in all of its phases.


BS. 437.-Retailine.


3 credits. Prerequisite: BS. 231.









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


BS. 471.-Principles of Organization.


credits.


11:40


Dail


MAT 111


Includes coo
finally industry


)rdinative, scalar,


whose


ctional


and statf


internal and external problems


phases of


government, military


church and


are considered in their application to leadership.


GRADUATE COURSES


BS. 635.-Advanced Marketing Principles.


3 credits.


2:00-5:00


Th 12


:00-2:00


LIB 417


THOMPSON


An advanced


analysis


of principles,


given to the functional, institutional,
points of view.


675.-Management Problems.


theories


and problems


in marketing.


Consideration


cost, and historical approaches from both the social and firm


credits.


To arrange


Deals with specific current industrial problems in the field of administration, production,


personnel,


zines


labor relations, purchasing and distribution.


in the management fields, and from


Problems are selected from technical


contacts with key operating personnel in industry.


finance,


maga-


BS. 699.-Research and Thesis.
To arrange


0 to 6 credits.


Directed research and


writing for the master


degree,


taken


toward


the end of


graduate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours required for the master's degree.


799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


the student's


to 6 credits.*


To arrange
Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken toward the end of the student's gradu-


ate program for credit in addition to the hours of regular


pervisory committee for the doctor's


degree.


courses


required by the candidate's


su-


*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.

CANCER RESEARCH

GRADUATE COURSES


CR. 666.-Cancer Research Seminar.


8:10-11:30 T


1 to 3 credits.


CRL


Discussion of the work of the Cancer Research Laboratory.
sentation of theses.


Papers on current literature.


CR. 699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


CR. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.


To arrange
*Variable, Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


afni rh ru .A 9 I .


A WI n- y' a a -c .-' U


J ^ I


__


nr * *










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


CG. 361.-Materials of Engineering.


credits.


Prerequisite


10:30 Daily


MIL 24


SCHWEYER, H.


Production, properties and uses of ferrous
clay products, wood and plastics.


and non-ferrous metals and alloys,


Portland


cement,


CG. 364.-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Corequisites:


8:10 Daily


MIL


402, CG.
REED.


356.
T. M.


The first two laws


of thermodynamics and their application


to Chemical Engineering.


GRADUATE COURSES


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.


CG. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.


*Credit assigned must be shown on


course


assignment card.


CHEMISTRY


121.-General Chemistry.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section, and one Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section


7:00


Daily


LEI 207


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section


12:50-4:10
12:50-4:10


MW
MW


Fundamental laws and theories of


and their compounds and


some


of their


chemistry.


uses.


Non-metallic elements and their compounds


metals


122.-General Chemistry


. 4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section,


and one Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section 1: 9:20
Laboratory Sections:


Daily


LEI 207


Section
Section


The second half of the


12:50-4:10 T Th


12:50-4:10


course


T Th


CY. 121-122.


123.-Qualitative Analysis.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section)


Lecture


tion 1


: 10:30 MT Th F


LEI 207


PEARCE


J. M.


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section


12:50-4:10 T Th
12:50-4:10 T Th


Theoretical


principles


and laboratory


common metals and acid radicals.


techniques


involved


in the qualitative


detection


of the









BULLETIN


218.-General


THE


Chemistry


UNIVERSITY


and Qualitative


SUMMER


Analysis.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section 1


: 8:10 Daily


LEI 207


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section


12:50-4:10
12:50-4:10


The second half of the


course


CY. 217-218.


302.-Organic Chemistry.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section 1


: 9:20 Daily


LEI 142


BUTLER, G. B.


Laboratory


Sections:


Section
Section


50-4:10


:50-4:10 T Th


LEI
LEI


second


d half of the


course


CY. 301-302.


331.-Introductory Quantitative Analysis.


4 credits.


Prerequisite: CY


123 or


(Register for the Lecture Section and the Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section:
Laboratory Sectior


8:10 M T W Th
1 12:50-4:10 M T


LEI 142
W Th LEI 112


Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in quantitative determinations.
nations include gravimetry, acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidimetry and iodimetry.


Determin-


. 362.-Organic
requisite: CY.


10 Daily


Chemistry.


3 credits.


Prerequisite


122 or CY


, except for Physics majors.


LEI 118


A brief elementary


course


embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds.


363.-Organic Chemistry
12:50-4:10 T W Th F


Laboratory.


credits.


Corequisite


400.-Chemistry


Teachers.


credits.


Prerequisite:


year


college


chemistry.


12:50 Daily


LEI 207


THOMAS


Other time to arrange


This course


is designed primarily for teachers


who wish to expand either their background in


Chemistry or to refresh themselves with a modern approach. It will consist of a combination of
lecture and laboratory work, reviewing fundamentals of Chemistry and stressing recent developments
and techniques in the field.


402.-Physical Chemistry.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: CY


Corequisite: CY


, except for Physics Majors.


9:20 Daily


REID


C. E.


.I S * * k II S 4 a *- - - -


SESSION










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


ION


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.*


721.-Theory


of Molecular Structure.


credits.


Prerequisites:


623 and


8:10 Daily


LEI 212


BREY


Mathematical treatment of valence
orbital methods.


bonding and molecular structure.


Heitler-London and molecular


799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.*


*Credit


assigned


must be shown on


course


assignment


card.


CIVIL


ENGINEERING


223.-Surveying.


credits.


Prerequisite:


(Register for the


Lecture Section and one


Laboratory


Section)


Lecture Section


8:10 MT W Th


ENG 432


WINSOR, A.


Laboratory Sections:


Use of


areas

CL.


Section
Section
surveyors


2:00 to
2:00 to


tape;


topographic mapping


level


5:20


MW


5:20 T Th


and transit


land subdivision


226.-Higher Surveying.


credits.


ENG
ENG


; traversing


; adjustment


WINSOR
WINSOR


and balancing
of instruments.


surveys


calculation


Prerequisite: CL.


12:50


MW


Laboratory


Triangulation


systems;


ENG 43
2:00 to 5


precise


precise levels; line azimuth by
to photogrammetry; horizontal


WIN


:20 T Th


base-line


Solar
curves


SOR


ENG 324
measurement


and Polaris


cross-sections.


observations


WINSOR, A.


Lap projections
; hydrographic


coordinate


systems


surveys; introduction


326.-Statics of Simple Structures.


4 credits.


Prerequisite: EM.


10:30 Daily
Laboratory


ENG 324


:00 to 5:20 M W


ENG 324


Application of the methods of
analytical methods; moments, sh


statically determinate


statics


ears


to structural


, reactions,


analysis


resultants,


strei


a correlation between graphical and
ss diagrams, and influence lines for


structures.


GRADUATE COURSES


623.-Advanced


Concrete


Structures.


credits.


Prerequisite:


To arrange


KLUGE


code


Study of


research


requirements


design problems.


in reinforced


ultimate


concrete


load theories


particularly in connection with development of building


and their


application


to design


prestressing


special


. 630.-Problems in Sanitation.
permission of instructor.


credits.


Prerequisites:


To arran


GILCREA


Approved problems for study


or research


selected from


any field of


sanitary


specialization.


;









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


COM.


430.-Individual Problems.


credits.


To arrange


GRADUATE


COURSE


COM.


699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


*Credit assigned must be shown on


cou rse


assignment card.


DAIRY SCIENCE

420.-Problems in Dairy Technology. 3 credits.


To arrange
Qualified students may choose an approved problem covering some phase of dairy technology.
GRADUATE COURSES


623.-Problems in Dairy


Production.


Variable credit.


To arrange
Research for majors in dairy husbandry.
r. 627.-Advanced Dairy Microbiology.


4 credits.


To arrange


WILKOWSKE


H. H.


Advanced methods of microbiological control of dairy products.


DY. 699.-Research and Master's
*Credit assigned must be shown on


Thesis.
course as


O to 6 credits.
signment card.


ECONOMICS


201.-Basic Economics.


credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section


8:10


10:30
11:40


Daily
Daily
Daily


MAT
MAT
MAT


KARP, J. R.
SIEVERS, A.


After


a preliminary discussion of


the nature of economics and economic concepts and


institu-


tions, this half of the c(
of national income and


)U


irse, ES. 201-202, emphasizes the accounting, analytical, and policy aspects
product, along with such closely related topics as governmental finance,


money and banking, and international trade and finance.


ES. 202.-Basic Economics.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


7:00
8:10


Daily
Daily


MAT
MAT


SMITH


C. D.


QUALLS, L. L.


This half of the course in Basic Economics, ES. 201-202, deals primarily with the theories of
production, determination of prices and distribution of income in both regulated and unregulated
industries. Some attention is also given to the problems of industrial relations, monopolies, and to


comparative economic


systems.


~U I_










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ES. 246.-Consumer Economics.


3 credits.


8:10


Daily


MAT 219


SHIELDS, M.


A study of consumer buying
the income wisely, consideration


practices, management of
of buying guides and cons


personal


and family


y finances,


umer protection agencies.


spending


ES. 321.-Money and Banking.


credits. Prerequisite: E


8:10 Daily


MAT 102


SMITH, C. D.


A study of


money


systems


supply with special emphasis on
policy; and of the relationship b

ES. 327.-Public Finance.


md standards
the role of
between money


credits.


of the factors


determining


the size of the


commercial and central banks and govern
', prices and production and employment.


money


ment fiscal


Prerequisite:


10:30 Daily


MAT 10


QUALLS, L. L.


Principles governing expenditures of modern government;
principles and methods of taxation and financial administration
leading countries.


sources
as revea


enue ; public
the fiscal sys


credit
items o


ES. 347.-Principles of Foreign


Trade.


credits.


Prerequisite:


ES. 201.


11:40


Daily


MAT 115


KOEFOD, P. E.


Fundamental principles of foreign


litical influences ;


commerce,
the United


protect
States.


trade


significance


of geographic,


econ


current practices and development in foreign trade; prod
ve tariffs, and other barriers to world trade: tendencies in


omic,
ucts
the


social, and po-
of international
foreign trade of


ES. 372.-Labor Problems.


credits.


Prerequisite: ES. 202.


9:20 Daily


MAT 111


FRISTOE, C.


Labor problems


attempts
employer
relating


to solve


; insecurity,


labor


s' associations ;
to settlement of


wages and


income,


hours,


problems by employers: personnel
attempts to solve labor problems by
industrial disputes.


sub-standard


workers,


industrial conflict,


management, employee representation,
state; protective labor legislation, laws


407.-Economic


Principles


Problems.


credits.


Prerequisites:


201-


11:40 Daily


MAT 10


LASSITER, R. L.


An advanced course in economic theory, dealing especially with the theories of production,
determination, and income distribution and their application to a selected list of current eco
problems.


price
)nomic


408.-Economic


Principles


Problems.


credits.


second


half


course ES.


407-408.


9:20 Daily


MAT 10


SIEVERS, A. M.


409.-Comparative Economic Systems.


credits.


10:30


Daily


MAT 213


BLODGETT, R. H.


The economics of capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. The theoretical economics of
capitalism, socialism, and communism, and the actual economics of the United States. Soviet Russia,
England, Nazi Germany, and Fascist Italy are compared on the basis of such matters as industrial
production, agriculture, exchange, credit and banking, income distribution, the status of labor, and
international trade. Marxian Socialism is also considered briefly.


429.-Introduction to Business Cycles.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


ES. 321.


a


;









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ES. 643.-Theory of International Trade.


3 credits.


T 9:30-12:30, Th 9:30-11:30


LIB 417


SHIELDS, M.


The historical and economic background of foreign trade; the theory of international trade: the
fundamentals of international exchange; international commercial policies and international trade;


exchange fluctuations and their control


ES. 674.-Labor Economics.


the international monetary institutions.


3 credits.


10:30-12:30, F 10:30-1:30


LIB 417


FRISTOE, C.


The seminar i


theories of


wage


n wage theory has for its purpose an intensive and advanced study of the various
determination and the economic role of wages in the economy.


677.-Governmental Debt.


3 credits.


To arrange


DONOVAN


C. H.


Influences and mechanisms for debt incurrence and retirement by federal, state, and local govern-
its. Problems of debt use and abuse, regulations, area planning, and intergovernmental relations.


Emphasizes


case studies.


ES. 691.-Neo-Classical Economics.


3 credits.


T 2:00-5:00


Th 2:30-4:30


LIB 417


BLODGETT


R. H.


Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-classical price and production theories. Demand,
supply, cost of production, and price determination under various conditions of the market will be
considered. The writings of Marshall, Hicks, Boulding, Davenport, Stigler, Fellner, J. Robinson, and
Chamberlain provide the background for the discussion.


ES. 699.-Research and Thesis.


0 to 6 credit hours.*


To arrange
Directed research and writing for the M. A. degree, taken toward the end of the student's graduate
program for credit in addition to the 24 hours required for the master's degree.


799.-Research and Dissertation.


to 6 credit hours.


To arrange
Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken toward the end of the student's graduate
program for credit in addition to the hours of regular courses required by the candidate's supervisory
committee for the doctor's degree.
*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.

EDUCATION-GENERAL


418.-Audio-Visual Materials of Instruction.


3 credits.


8:10


A general


Daily
course


YON


Mc KAY


J. H.


for teachers at all grade levels.


visual materials of instruction.


Presents


sources


and methods of using audio-


GRADUATE COURSES


NOTE:


Orientation


Meeting


graduate


students


Education,


Thursday,


June


, 7:00


p.m.,


Yonge


Auditorium.


This


meeting


devoted


discussion of policies and programs for graduate students in the College of Edu-
cation.


mei









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


ION


ED. 632.-Educational Leadership II.


credits.


(Must be taken with ED.


631.)


9:20
J.M.


Daily


YON


WILES


CURRAN


R. L


.,FOX,


LEP


ED. 633.-Methods and Problems of Supervision.


3 credits. Prerequisite: ED.


or ED. 634.


10:30 Daily


YON 236


WILES


An analysis


of supervisory


practices


used in improving


instruction.


ED. 651.-Audio-Visual Education.


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


YON


WINSOR, D.


The selection, evaluation and
and sound motion pictures.


use of audio-visual material


s, with emphasis


upon


projected still


652.-Production and


Utilization of


Audio-Visual Materials.


3 credits. Pre-


requisite


ED. 651 or consent of instructor.


10:30 Daily
Laboratory:


YON


WINSOR


To arrange


Designed to train materials


supervisors,


the production of materials by photographic


audio-visual coordinators, and other school personnel in


processes,


and the operation of materials


centers.


ED. 653.-Organization and Operation of


a Materials-of-Instruction Program.


credits.


Prerequisite


418 or ED. 651.


11:40 Daily


YON


MCKAY


J.H.


A study of the problems of the administration of
ED. 655.--Mental Health in the Classroom.


a materials-of-instruction


program.


credits.


7:00


Daily


YON 138


To assist


teachers in the personality development of children.


ED. 659.-Laboratory in Corrective Reading.


6 credits.


Prerequisite or corequisite:


EDE.


10:30-12:40 Daily


AND


SPACE


Laboratory


experience


in the diagnosis, correction and prevention of reading difficulties.


ED. 699.-Research and Master's


Thesis.


0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


YON 134B


WILES


ED. 799.-Research and Doctoral Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.


To arrange


*Credit


assigned


YON 134B


must be shown on


WILE
course


assignment card.


EDUCATION


-ADMINISTRATION


GRADUATE COURSES


EDA.


600.-Educational Organization and Administration.


credits.


-a *~ a - (- -1 a~ -l~r ~ -C .- -.









BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


EDA.


604.-Legal Phases of Public School Administration.


12:50 Daily


YON 236


3 credits.


LEPS, J. M.


EDA. 609.-Problems in School Administration and Supervision.
To arrange YON 128 JOHNS, R. L.


credits.


EDA.


630.-Individual Work.


To arrange


YON 128


3 credits.


LEPS, J. M.


EDA.


702.-The
2:00 Daily


hool Plant.


YON 226


3 credits.


JOHNS, R. L.


EDA.


704.-College Administration.


11:40 Daily


I 103


credits


HENDERSON


EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY


EDE.


400.-Problems of Instruction.


credits.


10:30


Daily


I 201


MURRAY


The course in elementary
specialized fields.


curriculum required for certification to teach in


grades


1-12 in certain


EDE.


550.-The Teaching of Arithmetic.


9:20 Daily


The purpose of the


I 201
ours


understanding of arithmetic


3 credits.


COOPER, J.


e is to help
concepts, sy:


teachers
mbolism, a


of elementary and junior high schools gain an
mnd teaching materials and procedures.


EDE. 570.-Teaching of Reading.


3 credits.


Section 1


8:10 Daily


I 201


HAIMBACH, D.


A comprehensive survey of the problems of teaching reading in all
for attacking these problems.


grades


and practical procedures


EDE. 600.-Elementary School Curriculum.


3 credits.


Section
Section


10:30


8:10


COOPER


Daily
Daily


MURRAY, L.


A survey of the content and methods of the elementary school curriculum. Offered primarily for
students who have not taken a course in elementary curriculum and who have not had teaching
experience in the elementary schools; also the first course in elementary curriculum for students
majoring in administration.


EDE. 601.-Practices in Elementary


Education, I.


3 credits.


Section
Section


10:30


8:10


Daily
Daily


HAINE


YON


A. C.


GREEN, E. K.


A study of practices in the elementary school in relation to fundamental principles of curriculum
development. This is the basic elementary curriculum course for Master's programs in Elementary
Education.


EDE. 602.-Practices in Elementary


Education. II.


credits.


V




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