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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00125
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1955
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00125
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
        Page iii
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        Page v
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    Main
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University


Record


Comprises


Reports


of the President


to the


Board


Control,


Annual


Catalog,


the Schedules


the Bulletin of the Summer


sion, and announcements of special


courses


of instruction.


These bulletins will be sent without


charge to all


persons


who apply for them.


applicant


should


spec


ifically


state


which


bulletin


or what


information


desired.


Address


THE


REGISTRAR,


University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida


I


University of Florida




_C9IATxS


George A.


Smathers Librarie


*I I













STATE


BOARD


EDUCATION


LEROY

R. A.


COLLINS


GRAY


Governor


Secretary of State


J. EDWIN

RICHARD


LARSON


State


ERVIN


Attorney


Treasurer

General


THOMAS D.


BAILEY


, Secretary ..... ...


State Superintendent of Public Ins


truction


BOARD OF CONTROL


LEE BALLARD


Chairman


Banker


St. Petersburg, Florida


MRS. ALFRED


DUPONT


Jacksonville


Florida


ROBERT


GORE .- -.


Publisher


Fort Lauderdale, Florida


FRED


KENT


------.................Jacksonville, FloridaAttorney
Jacksonville, Florida


at Law


RALPH


MILLER


Citrus


Grower


Plymouth, Florida


GLENN


MILLER


Business


Man


Monticello, Florida


HOLLIS


RINEHART


Attorney


at Law


Miami, Florida


J. BROWARD CULPEPPER Executive
Tallahassee,


e Secretary of the Board of Control
Florida









ACADEMIC


AND


ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILS


OF THE UN

Summer


DIVERSITY


1955


JOHN STUART ALLEN


Ph.D.


Acting President of the University


WILLIAM TOBIAS ARNETT, M.A. Arch., A.I.A.
-Dean of the College of Architecture and Allied Arts


GEORGE FECHTIG BAUGHMAN


, LL.B., M.A. ..-


Vice President for Business Affairs


ROBERT COLDER BEAT


M.A.


- -- D eDean


of Men


ALVAH

MARNA


ALDEN


BEECHER, M.M.


VENABLE BRADY,


Ed.D.


1


Director of


Dean


Music


of Women


HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M


HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON


.S.


Vice President for Academic Affairs


M.S.A.


-Director of the Agricultural Extension Service and County


ROLAND BYERLY


Agent Leader


EUTSLER, Ph.D.


-Acting Dean of the College of Business Administration


HENRY ANDERSON FENN


.B.


Dean of the College of Law


WILLARD MERWIN FIFIELD, M.S.-Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station


PERRY


ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.


D. __.__ -__--


Dean of the College of Pharmacy


LINTON


GRINTER,


Ph.D.


-Dean


Graduate


School


Director


Research


HARRY MCNEIL GRIZZARD, B


., Colonel, Infantry


-Professor of Military Science and Tactics


ARNOLD BRAMS GROBMAN


Ph.D. -_--.. Director of the Florida State Museum


LEWIS FRANCIS HAINES


Ph.D.


Director of the


University


Press


GEORGE THOMAS HARRELL, M.D


LELAND


Dean of the College of Medicine


WILBUR HIATT ------ -----.. ......--.....-..--- Director of Alumni Affairs










*WALTER JEFFERIES MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D.
-Dean of the College of Business Administration


JOHN


VREDENBURGH


MCQUITTY


D. - --._-___--__-__


University


Examiner


CLARENCE


VERNON


NOBLE, Ph.D. .------__ Dean of the College of Agriculture


RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D. _._..._ Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

RUSSELL SPURGEON POOR, Ph.D. -...-_._....___ Provost for Health Center


GARLAND WHEELER POWELL --............ -..-......-....-- Director of Radio Station


WRUF


. WAYNE REITZ,


Ph.D.


Provost for


Agriculture


RALPH RHUDY, Colonel,


Air Force


--Professor of Air Science and Coordinator of Military Departments

BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.S.A. --._____--Dean of the General Extension Division


DENNIS


KEITH


STANLEY, M.A.E.


-Dean of the College of Physical Education and Health

JOSEPH WEIL, M.S.
-Dean of the College of Engineering and Director of the Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station


RAE O.


WEIMER


Director of the


hool of Journalism and Communications


STANLEY LEROY WEST, LL.B., B


in L.


S. -.


Director of the University Libraries


JOSEPH BENTON


WHITE, Ph.D.


Dean of the College of Education


A. CURTIS WILGUS, Ph.D.


Director of the School of Inter-American Studies


MAX


*Deceased


WISE, Ed.D.


September 25,


Dean of Student Personnel


1954.









CALENDAR


1955


SUMMER SESSION


1955
May


, Saturday


.La... .. ___Last day for filing preliminary application for
1955 Summer Session.


June 16,


Thursday


..Placement tests for entering students.


June 17, 18, 20, Friday, Saturday,
Monday ..-.....-- registration according to appointment assigned
on receipt of preliminary application.


June 21


June


, Tuesday


, Wednesday


a.m.


-------__._..C


.m. P.


lasses begin.


registration


fees increased


$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.

Last time for completing registration for the


summer session.


No one will be permitted


start


registration


after


p.m.


on this


date.


Last time for adding courses or changing sec
tions.


June 24, Friday,


:30 p.m. ---.-.Last time for


submitting resignation


summer


session


receiving any


refund


fees.


June 27


July


, Monday


Monday


12 Noon


Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for degree to be conferred at
the end of the summer session.


---..- -- Holiday.


Classes suspended.


July 12,


Tuesday, 4 p.m. ._.---.. Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.


July


, Saturday


Noon ....---Last


time


graduate


students


Department of Foreign Langu


ages


to apply to
for reading


knowledge examination on July 30.


July


, Friday


Last day for candidates for degrees to be con-


ferred at end


summer session


to com-


plete correspondence courses.


July


, Monday


4 p.m.


Last time for candidates for Master's


and Doc-


tor's degrees


to be


conferred


at the


the summer session to file theses with the Dean
of the Graduate School.









August 11,


Thursday


4 p.m. -.. Grades


candidates


degrees


conferred at the end of the summer session are


in the Office of the Registrar


(special lists


are sent to the faculty for these reports)


August 12,


Friday


Faculty meetings, at times announced


by the


deans,


August 13, Saturday,


to pass upon candidates for degrees.


12 Noon .--....All grades for the summer session due in the


Office of the Registrar.


August


13, Saturday, 8 p.m. -- -..Summer


Commencement


Convocation.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSIONS


PRELIMINARY


All persons planning to attend the 1955


APPLICATION


Summer Session, whether or not they have previously


attended the


University,


must file the


preliminary


application form to


be considered.


The pre-


liminary


application may be obtained by writing to Office of the Regsistrar.


assured that his admission to the 1955


summer


No applicant can be


Session will be considered unless the preliminary


application has


been received at the


Office of the Registrar on or before Saturday, May 21


1955.


Upon receipt of the preliminary application,


the applicant wi


be notified of the additional


formation (if any) that must be submitted.


Registrar on or before June 1


This additional information must be in the Office of the


1955.


UNCLAS


SIFIED


STUDENTS


For the summer


session only, the University of Florida provides a category for


those persons who may wish to take college courses and:
a. transfer back to the institution they regularly attend in the winter session
b. meet certain specific certification requirements;


are (in the


case


of those who have previously attended college)


unable to


obtain


complete


transcripts from all schools


previously


attended


time


to clear as regular students.


Persons from the groups defined above may enroll
vided they obtain a statement of honorable dismissal


as unclassified students pro-


(eligibility to return)


from


the institution they last attended.


Forms for this purpose may be obtained upon


request from the Office of the Registrar.


is possible,


student


later


necessary


credentials


meets all the requirements for registration


as a regular student, for credit


earned during


one term


as an unclassified student to be counted toward a


degree


program


at the


University


Florida.


Under


no circumstances


credit


for more


than


one


term


in an unclassified


status


applied


toward any degree conferred by the


University.


Thu


s, persons that have


been registered


as unclassified in a


previous summer session should


com-


plete the requirements for admission


as regular students before attending


subsequent summer


sessions


if they anticipate completing work for


a de-


gree at the


University of Florida.


Students entering the University after high school graduation and prior


to college attendance at any


other institution


are never


admitted


as un-


classified students and must qualify for admission
described below.


as regular students as


REGULAR STUDENTS






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

lege credit for advanced standing, he will be considered for admission to
the University College.


If the student
university and


transferring to


University from another college or


presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college


credit


as advanced standing,


considered for


admission


to the


Upper Division school or college of his choice provided his record indicates
the completion of college work in the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences,


English, the Humanities,


and the Biological Sciences,


plus the required pre-


professional courses of the school or college of his choice.

. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated
from a standard college or university, he will be considered for admission
to the Graduate Division.

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION FOR REGULAR STUDENTS

For students who have never attended college:


Graduation


graduate


from


from


high school.


high


Records


school


show that the student who


half


of his class rarely


does
suc-


ceeds


college


work.


University urges


prospective student to


consider this fact carefully before making application.


Non-Florida stu-


dents will not be considered for admission if they do not meet this criterion.


Satisfactory achievement in high school.


University does not specify


high school


units as required,


but the


general


pattern


the units


presented and the student's


achievement will receive careful consideration.


The records reveal that those students who scatter most of their choice


of subjects are those who accomplish least in any of them.
plicants who present a record which shows no unity or Is


Therefore ap-
Lck of essential


subjects cannot be considered.


Satisfactory


scores


on placement


tests.


applicants


must


take


placement tests


before registering in


University College.


Those


plicants who did not graduate from high school in the top half of their class


must take


placement


tests


before


being


admitted


to the


University.


These are achievement tests in the fields of English, mathematics, social


studies,


natural


sciences.


Attainments


these


fields


are possible


without specific


high


school


courses and


are not guaranteed


by the


quiring of certain high school units.


indicate


inadequate


foundation


If the
college


scores on the placement tests


work,


applicant


may


denied admission.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


stitution last attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed
to return to the institution last attended cannot be considered for ad-
mission.


An average of C or better. The
other institutions must be C or
is required for graduation from
has not maintained this average
apply.


average grade for all work attempted at
better. An average grade of C or better
the University of Florida, and one who
before coming to the University need not


For the College of Law:

1. The beginning courses in Law are not offered in the Summer Session,
hence students are not admitted in June unless they have completed
satisfactorily at least one semester of work in an accredited law school.
2. A student wishing to transfer from another accredited law school who,
at the time of beginning his study of law, qualified for admission to this
College under the stated requirements for beginning students (other
than the Law School Admission Test) and who has maintained a schol-
astic average of C or higher on all previous law school work undertaken,
may apply for admission with advanced standing. Courses completed
with a grade of C or higher in other accredited law schools will be ac-
cepted for credit up to but not exceeding a total of thirty hours.


Applicants for admission must
baccalaureate degree from an
the case of veterans, who will
hours of satisfactory work in i
have maintained a scholastic a'
taken.


have received before admission a 4-year
accredited college or university, except in
be admitted after they have completed 94
in accredited college or university if they
average of C or higher on all work under-


For admission to the Graduate Division:


Limitations of space
The records of applican
election committees of thE
be considered for gradual
of a non-accredited inst
However, graduates
In some units of the U
B is required for consider


and staff restrict the
.ts for graduate study
e various colleges and s
ate study in any unit of
;itution.
of accredited institution


enrollment of graduate students.
are reviewed by the graduate se-
ichools. In general, no student will
f the University who is a graduate


,ns are not guaranteed admission.


university, an undergraduate average considerably above
ration. The aneantahilitv of the student's undneraradnate







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


specified by the Admissions Section of the Registrar's office are
on or before the dates specified in the University calendar. In
required by the Admissions Section, the student must furnish
each institution previously attended. These transcripts must
the registrar of the institution where the work was completed
Admissions at the University of Florida.


filed in that office
addition to forms
a transcript from
be transmitted by
to the Director of


In some instances students who do not meet the quantitative or qualitative
requirements for admission for graduate study may pursue a semester or a year's
work classified as a senior in an attempt to meet the qualifications set by the unit
of the University concerned for the program of the student's choice. Upon ap-
proval of the Graduate Council, some work (but in no case all of the work) com-
pleted during this period might be used to reduce the course requirements for a
graduate degree.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR


VETERANS


In addition to the regular requirements for admission set forth in the pre-
ceding sections and the forms incident thereto required by the University of
Florida, any veteran who expects to enroll under provisions of any of the various
federal laws governing education or rehabilitation training of veterans must be
sure that he has cleared the necessary details with the Veterans Administration
and has obtained the necessary documents from them.


For the most part, the benefits of
are not open to any who were not in
terrupted training since that time. T
these benefits are open to the veteran,
with the Veterans Administration.


Public Law 346 (the G. I. Bill of Rights)
training on July 25, 1951 or who have in-
here are some circumstances under which
but each case must be cleared in advance


The government benefits available under Public Laws 16 and 894 (Vocational
Rehabilitation Acts) for veterans who received service connected disabilities are
provided for only after review of each individual case by the Veterans Adminis-
tration.


Many young men and women who have had active duty in


during the period which began with the Kori
benefits under Public Law 550. Veterans i
liminary application with the Veterans A<
date they expect to enter the University.
monthly payments which cover educational
subsistence. As most of the fee and book e:
of the school term it is essential that the v


the armed forces


ean conflict are eligible for educational


n this group ar
administration w
Under this laii
expenses (fees
expense must be
veteran be in a


*e urged to begin pre-
ell in advance of the
r the veteran receives
and books) as well as
paid at the beginning
position to meet these







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER


SESSION


All veterans who believe they are entitled to educational benefits are urged to


contact the appropriate


Veterans Administration office in order that the decision


may be made in their individual case.


Veterans who at the time of registration


do not have the necessary papers showing clear entitlement to government benefits


are required to pay their own fees.


If the proper clearances are subsequently pre-


sented


to the


Office of


Registrar, authorization


for refund


fees


penses appropriate in the individual case will be issued.


COLLEGE


CREDIT


FOR SERVICE


TRAINING


Veterans may


be entitled


to credit for training and


experiences obtained


the armed forces during the war in accordance with the recommendations of the


American


Educational
entering the


Council


on Education as


Experiences


in the


University should


set forth in


Armed


Guide


Services."


to the


veterans


consult the Assistant Director of


Evaluation


entering or re-
Admissions in


the Office of the Registrar.


In many


cases it will be helpful to the student and


his dean in planning a program if this can be done in advance of registration.



EXPENSES

REGISTRATION FEES


Eight


Registration Fee
Registration Fee


(Florida Students) __
(non-Florida Students)


Three
Week
Term


20.00 $
55.00


Term
45.00
145.00


Forest Ranger School Registration Fee


(Florida


Students)


55.00


Forest Ranger School Registration Fee


(Non-Florida


Students)


145.00


Fees


for registration after the regular registration period are increased $5.00.


There are no waivers of the increased fees for any reason.

SPECIAL FEES


Graduation Fee, Bachelor's


Degree ......._-..


10.00


10.00







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EXAMINATION FEES


A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the date
each applicant for a comprehensive examination.
only in case the student is not currently enrolled in t
A comprehensive examination for all entering gra<
(National Teachers Examination or equivalent) is i
charged.


of application, i
Applications are
he course concern
iuate students in
required. A fee c


,s charged
necessary
ed.
Education
f $7.00 is


BREAKAGE FEES


Courses


with


laboratories


which


expendable


equipment


used


usually


require the purchase of breakage books. These books are purchased in the
Cashier's Office (Student Bank). The unused coupons may be redeemed at the
end of the term upon proper clearance and approval.
REFUND OF FEES
If before 3:30 p.m. on Friday of the first week of the Summer Session students
for any reason wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat


fee of $3.00,


will be refunded.


No refunds will be made after this date.


STUDENT BANK
Banking facilities are available for the convenience and protection of students
in the Cashier's Office, Room 1, Administration Building. A service charge of
seventy five cents is made on each account for the Summer Session.

LIVING EXPENSES
Meals may be obtained on campus at reasonable cost. Cafeteria service is
available at several campus locations operated by the Food Service Division of
the University. Several restaurants and cafeterias are located adjacent to the
campus. Lodging is available in University housing facilities, in private rooming
houses off-campus, and in fraternity and sorority houses.


STUDENT


LIFE-SERVICES,


FACILITIES,


ACTIVITIES


REGULATIONS

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT PERSONNEL
The Dean of Student Personnel coordinates the counseling and service activi-
ties which are available to aid the student in solving personal and educational
problems and to help him in selecting a balanced program of social and recrea-
tional activities.
OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN
b


The Dean of Women has broad responsible
dents. She serves as a counselor to students
including personal, academic, financial and s
In cooperation with the Dean of Men al
tions she serves as an adviser to student goi
tions.
The Dean of Women in cooperation with
administrative, supervisory, and counseling
sity residence halls and women's fraternity


nilities for the welfare of w
on a variety of problems ant
social .
nd the Adviser to Student
rernment and other student


'omen stu-
d interests


Organiza-
organiza-


I the Director of Housing, acts in an
capacity with relation to the Univer-
houses.


OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING


The Office of the Director of Housing coordinates the
Flavet programs and operations and compiles off-campus
and listings. See section on "Housing" for details.


residence halls and
housing information


OFFICE OF THE ADVISER


TO FOREIGN


STUDENTS


The Adviser to Foreign Students is the coordinator of arrangements


alien


students


agencies in
The office
foreign stu
gration Ser
and agencil
students on


handling
is primary
dents and
:vice. The
es of the
personal,


in an advisory


capac


i University. His
admissions and fi
ily responsible for
for all of the Uni
Adviser to Foreigr
University in pro'
academic, financial,
dity is provided fo


officee cooperates with other Un
iancial aids for students from
the reception and orientation
ersity's relations with the U. S
Students cooperates with other
iding necessary counseling for
language or social problems. Asl
persons interested in study o0


for all
diversity
abroad.
of new
. Immi-
officials
foreign
distance
travel


abroad and for individuals and organizations concerned with international under-
standing and intercultural exchange.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS OFFICE

The student organizations office is interested in the activities of all organized


student groups on the campus. It maintains
including date of recognition, officers, consti
authorization agency for social activities of
vides information regarding regulations for s
The Assistant Dean of Men is in charge
and should be contacted regarding the formal
organizations and regarding any problems
operation of student organizations.


complete


records of


these


groups,


.tution, etc. This office is also the
all student organizations and pro-
uch activities.
of the student organizations office
tion and recognition of new student
which may arise concerning the







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


The primary objective of the placement system is to assist students in
problem of finding suitable employment following graduation. This is done
supplying students with vocational information, information concerning job
portunities, and also assisting them in the preparation of credentials for ]
sentation to prospective employers.
Representatives from business, industry, and government who visit
campus or write this office are given every opportunity to engage qualified I
versity of Florida graduates.


the
by
op-
pre-


the
Jni-


FLORIDA


CENTER


CLINICAL


SERVICES


The services of the five clinics which operate as a coordinated unit under the
Division of Student Personnel are available to all University students without
charge. Students are urged to seek assistance before their problems or difficulties
become aggravated. The services of the clinics are available to the residents of
the State of Florida for diagnostic purposes, therapy and counseling to the ex-
tent that off-campus subjects are needed in training programs and as personnel
and facilities will permit.


PSYCHOLOGICAL CLINIC

One of the functions of this unit is to aid the student on an individual basis
to plan a vocational objective consistent with his capacities, interests, and tempera-
ment. Approved test and counseling methods are used, and results are sup-
plemented by detailed occupational information. Other services of this unit
include help to students who find their work hampered by worries, adjustment
difficulties, and other troublesome conditions. In addition to the above functions,
the Psychological Clinic works closely with the Department of Psychology in its
program for the training of clinical psychologists and counseling psychologists.


SPEECH AND


HEARING


CLINIC


This clinic conducts a speech and hearing examination during orientation
week of all freshmen and transfer students. The personnel of this unit are
available to all University students who have speech and hearing problems which
are handicapping in nature. In addition to losses in hearing such impairments
include: stuttering, cleft palate speech, articulatory problems, voice abnormalities
and other deviations from acceptability. This clinic operates as a laboratory for
those students in the Speech Department who are training for speech and hearing
therapists, speech pathologists, and audiologists.

READING LABORATORY AND CLINIC


Through the use of interviews and diagnostic tests, this clinic plans a
* 1 I I'l a I IJ *I ....1 ---------


program


a







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADAPTED


AND


CORRECTIVE


EXERCISES


CLINIC


This program assists those stu
necessitate individual consideration
within the limits of their physical i
individual's interests as well as the
Programs of functional exercise are
deviations that can be corrected o:
careful supervision and is based on


.dents who have physical deviations which
in developing a sports program that is
capacity. Due consideration is given to the
social and recreational needs for adult life.
provided for those students having physical
r improved. The work is conducted under
adequate medical diagnosis and information.


MARRIAGE AND FAMILY 4

The Marriage and Family Clinic deals with
adjustment problems. Clients are assisted in ga:
in weighing advantages and disadvantages of
versity students will find understanding and help
and premarital problems.


CLINIC

marital, premarital and family
inning insight into problems and
alternative adjustments. Uni-
in the solution of their marital


OFFICE OF STUDENT PERSONNEL RECORDS


Using various sources, the Office of Student Personnel Records collects and
integrates information concerning social and scholastic activities of each stu-
dent. It makes this information available to qualified counselors who aid the
student in making educational, social, psychological, and vocational adjustment.
The keeping of personnel records is an effort in the understanding of, and service
to, the individual student as he has contact not only with the classroom, but also
with all phases of his university life.


STUDENT EMPLOYMENT


Every effort is made to aid qualified students in obtaining part-time employ-
ment. Opportunities are limited; consequently the number of part-time jobs
available does not approach the number of applicants seeking these jobs. Every
effort is made to place students in work that utilizes their training and ex-
perience.
Each student who is employed by the University must have an honor point
average of C for the semester or term immediately preceding his employment.
The average rate of pay per hour is between 60 cents and $1.00; the average
earnings per month are about $50.
Student employment is directed by the Committee on Student Aid, Scholar-
ships, and Awards, with the Assistant Dean of Men administering the program.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS


For information on scholarships and loans at the University of Florida stu-
dents should refer to the Dean of Men, who is chairman of the Committee on
Student Aid, Scholarships and Awards, and to the regular session catalog or
the special bulletin on Scholarships, Loan Funds and Student Employment for
details on the various types of aid.
HOUSING
GENERAL INFORMATION
Each student must make personal arrangement for his housing either by (1)
applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to the University
Housing Facilities or, (2) in the case of an upperclassman who wishes to do so,
obtaining an accommodation in private housing or in his fraternity house.
All inquiries concerning housing applications, deposits, or rent payments in
University Housing Facilities should be addressed to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville. Checks or money orders for room deposits or
rent payments should be made payable to the University of Florida and mailed
to the Office of the Business Manager, Cashier, together with the application or
rent invoice. Cash should NOT be sent through the mail.
An application for housing space may be filed at any time. Prospective fresh-
men are urged to apply for housing as early as possible.
A deposit payment of ten dollars must accompany the application for housing.
Each applicant is given advance notice of exact assignment and deadline date
for rent payment, if possible. Each applicant should read carefully the terms
and conditions covering housing assignments as stated on the back of the ap-


plication form and on the notification of


Roommate requests are honored
wishing to room together submit the
same date, clearly indicate on their
together. A large number of select
ment as roommates with American


whe:
ir ap
resp
id fos
stude


gauges, trade, and international relations
should indicate this on his application.


assignment.
rever possible, provided the individuals
,plications and pay room deposits at the
active applications their desire to room
reign students are available for assign-
ents who are interested in foreign lan-
; any student interested in the program


RESIDENCE REGULATIONS
All freshman men and all single undergraduate women, with the exception of
those whose residence is Gainesville or vicinity, are required to live in University
Housing Facilities as long as space is available. With University approval under
graduate women students, excepting freshmen, may live in their sorority houses.


HOUSING ADMINISTRATION


AND SERVICES


j*N~ '**f~rf-it-^lly 1l rtinnnA an An +nl\n 4 v a,4 nnImnknrmnl nnK. t^\ >b0 "wa na a k o


ff^-irlAnt9







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


per week are: sheets, 15e each; towels,
pillows, and lamps are 60c per Summer
Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, ]
and showing his assigned room number.
for by the student. The University assu
of reasonable care for any shipment so


7c each; pillow cases
Session.
prepaid, addressed in
Such shipments will
mes no responsibility
received.


6c each.


I


Blankets,


the student's name
be held until called
beyond the exercise


RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
Mallory, Yulee, and Reid Halls


These three halls of modern design and of bric
struction are normally reserved for women students.
room intercommunication system; post-office boxes


lobbies; large lounge for each building; study lour
recreation rooms; laundry and other self-service
rooms only, with the number of single rooms limit
on each floor. Hot water system thermostatically
Fluorescent lighting. Rates per 8-weeks Summer


Single room $46.75 per student


ige
fa
ed.


k,
Fe
for
on
cili
C


concrete, and steel con-
!atures include: office-to-
each room in building
each upper floor; large
ties. Double and single
community bath facilities


controlled for each building.
Session (subject to change):


double room, $40. per student.


Buckman, Thomas, Sledd, and Fletcher Halls
These four halls of modern brick, concrete, and steel construction are normally
reserved for men students. Each hall is divided into separate sections with ac-
commodations for from 30 to 48 students per section. All but a few rooms have
lavatories, and there is a community bath on each floor in each section. There are
lounges, recreation rooms, and laundry facilities in the area. Room types: two-
room suites for two, double rooms for two or three students, and single rooms.
Summer Session rates range from $26.50 to $33. per student per 8-weeks Summer
Session. (Murphree Hall will not be available for use by single students during
the 1955 Summer Session.)

FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES AND
FOR WOMEN WITH CHILDREN
Three Apartment Villages (Flavets), located on-campus, have been provided
through the Public Housing Authority. Applications may be filed at any time and


should be sent as soon as possible. Although applic
non-veterans for assignment, no such assignment


applicants have been p
the space available for
can expect assignme
tains 26 buildings
100 apartment units
to Flavet I in construct
of one. two. or thres h


laced.
the pi


Applicati


ast two


yee


nt for the
of one-story,
of one, two,
;ion, contains 2
Pdironm w. FTln


1


ons from I
irs and it i:
955 Sumn
temporary
or three


nations are being accepted
can be made until all ve
arrivedd veterans have exc
doubtful that any non-ve
er Session. Flavet I
construction, divided


bedrooms.


0 buildings divided i
iPt TTT ranf.tain .54


Flavet


from
teran
needed
teran
con-
into


similar


nto 76 apartment units,
bhildinrs. nf two-story.


*]
*1


1







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Murphree Hall, Sections J and K will be available for assignment to couples
and to women with children. The accommodations consist of two room suites
(study room and bedroom). All suites have lavatories, and there is a community
bath with shower and toilet facilities on each floor in each section. Cooking or
preparation of food is not permitted. Summer Session rates are $59.50 per
suite per eight weeks term.
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
Private homes and privately operated rooming houses and apartments provide
many accommodations for students.
Off-campus listings are maintained in the Housing Office but are not compiled
for mailing since availability changes constantly and a mutually satisfactory
rental arrangement can normally be made by the student only after personal
inspection of facilities and conference with the householder. Students seeking
off-campus housing should come to Gainesville well before the school period to
confer with the Housing Office about accommodations. Advance appointments for
conferences may be made.
Arrangements for the September semester should be completed between the
middle of June and the middle of August, for the February semester, during
January, and for the Summer Session between the middle of April and the end
of May.
COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION
The Cooperative Living Organization, organized and operated by students
to furnish economical living accommodations for its membership, is located at 117
NW 15th St. The qualifications for membership are financial need, scholastic
ability, and references of good character. In order to secure membership in the
CLO, students should apply to the CLO Vice-President at the above address.

SPRINGFIELD HALL
Springfield Hall, organized in September 1951, is the first women's living co-
operative to be established on the campus. It is sponsored by the Wesley Founda-
tion and is open to any student at the University who is interested in Christian
cooperative living. It is organized on a non-profit basis, with each member being
assessed her pro rata share of the actual operating cost.
Application for membership may be made at 1113 West University Avenue,
or at the Wesley Foundation, 1320 West University Avenue.
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Most national fraternity and sorority chapters maintain their own houses
adjacent to the University campus. Freshman women are not permitted to live
in sorority houses. Special regulations apply to freshman men living in their
fraternity houses. University student regulations are in effect for all sorority
and fraternity houses.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


During the Summer Session, under the direction of the Department of Speech,


length


grams


plays,


experimental


are presented.


one-act


University


plays,


provides


interpretative


facilities


high


reading


grade


pro-
per-


formances under competent direction.


Exhibitions


contemporary


work


in the


arts


are brought


to 'the


campus


under the


provide


sponsorship


an opportunity


University


to study


Center


examples


best


Arts.


Such


contemporary


exhibitions


work


painting, industrial
and the other arts.


design, furniture, crafts, community planning, architecture,


RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE


leading


students are


ligion


religious


denominations


welcome at every


in preparing


service.


themselves


have


attractive


Students
religious


places


interested


leadership


worship


in the study


may


take


of re-


courses


offered by the Department of Religion.


the campus lawn or in the Flor
UNIVERSITY


Vesper services are conducted weekly on


Union.


OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES SERVICES


University


Libraries, consisting of


the General


Library


12 college,


school and departmental libraries, contain more than 500,000 volumes and receive
currently approximately 3500 serials.
The larger part of the library holdings are kept in the General Library build-


ing where four reading rooms offer seating space for


1200 readers.


Located on


the first floor is the University College Reading Room which has on open shelves


some 8000 volumes useful to students in the first two years of college.


The Hu-


inanities


Reading


Room


Social


Sciences


Reading


Room


on the


second


floor, are designed primarily as centers of library activity for the upperclassmen


the humanistic


social


studies.


Around


walls on


open shelves


each


these


rooms


are approximately


15,000


volumes


current


issues


learned journals.


On the third floor is the Science Reading Room with books and


complete sets


geology


Browsing


journals


geography.


Room


in psychology,


Additional


recreational


general


services


reading,


science,


in the


Map


mathematics,


General


Alcove


Library


Reading


physics,
are the


Room,


music rooms, seminar rooms, and carrels and study cubicles for faculty members
and graduate students.
The Library collection is particularly strong in Floridiana with research cen-


tered in the P. K.


Yonge Library of Florida History, located on the first floor of


the General Library building. Manuscripts and books by


elected in the Florida Authors Room,


Florida authors are col-


which is the center for activity in creative


writing.


Libraries for


Agriculture, Architecture and Allied Arts, Biology,


Chemistry-


Pharmacy


Education,


Engineering,


Forestry


Law


are


located


or near


buildings housing the corresponding instructional units.


The Library serving the







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Doctor of Medicine and mailed by the doctor directly to Director, Student Health


Department, University of Florida, Gainesville. The medical
examination must be reviewed by a University Physician
is cleared for registration in the University. The type of p
which the applicant is qualified, and the physical eligibility
R.O.T.C. training, is determined on the basis of this pre-e
after conferences and possible further examinations of
physical defects.


history and physical
before the applicant
physical education for
of male students for
entrance examination,
those with reported


The Student Health Department strives to prevent students with communicable


diseases
are give
is made
unaware
annual c
their ch
available
within t


from entering the University. All
n annual chest x-rays by the State
to detect evidence of tuberculosis of
. (Faculty members and employees
thest x-rays). Late registrants will 1
est x-ray if the x-ray units of the
3. Students should have been succe:
he past five years and the Health


a


students enrolled at the University
Health Department and every effort
which the student may be entirely
of the University are also given
be charged a special fee of $2.00 for
State Health Department are not
ssfully vaccinated against smallpox
Department. advises all students to


be immunized to typhoid fever and tetanus before coming to the University.
The University maintains the Student Health Department in the Infirmary
Building on the campus for the protection and medical care of the students in resi-


dence. The Outpatient Clinic is open during the day from 8:00 A.M
to provide all students in need of medical care with consultation and
hospital, of 65 beds, provides the student in need of hospitalization&
four hour general nursing care and patients entering the hospital
constant observation of a University Physician. An emergency si
able to students who become acutely ill or are injured when the
and such students may obtain treatment at any time by reporting to
University Physicians do not make calls outside the Infirmary or a
students in their rooms where the facilities for treatment are ini


. to 10:00 P.M.
treatment. The
n with twenty-
are under the
service is avail-
clinic is closed
the Infirmary.
attempt to treat
adequate. Stu-


dents should be instructed before leaving home to report immediately to the In-
firmary should they become ill. Parents will be notified by a University Physician
whenever a student is believed to be seriously ill.
The Student Health Department gives as complete a diagnostic, treatment and
public health program as possible within the limitations of its personnel and
equipment. It is staffed and organized for treating the acute illnesses which
commonly occur while the student is in residence at the University. Facilities at
the University Infirmary include the services of a competent medical staff, a
psychiatrist, x-ray and clinical laboratories, and a physical therapy unit.
There are no facilities for dental work or eye refractions in the Student
Health Department and therefore students are urged to have defects of vision and
teeth corrected before coming to the TTniversity.


-







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Students receiving severe, multiple or compound fractures will be handled in the
same manner as students in need of emergency surgery.
Competent physicians and surgeons in Gainesville cooperate readily with
the Student Health Department in consultations. Whenever a student is found
to be in need of a consultant, the University Physician will arrange for such a
consultation. Local physicians are also available for medical service to students
at their places of residence at the student's expense.
Health service is available only to those students currently enrolled in the


University who
who are unacq
will be glad to
The Health
These must be
free of charge, 1
of the patient.


have paid the student health fee. In the case of married students,
uainted with local physicians, the Student Health Department


recomm
Fee does
paid by
but any
Diagno


end well qualified physicians to attend their families.
s not include surgery, consultation, or special duty nursing.
rthe patient. Laboratory work done at the Infirmary is
work that has to be referred elsewhere is the responsibility
(stic x-ray service is offered at a very nominal cost. All


x-rays are interpreted by a qualified Radiologist. A charge of $2.20 per day is
made for students admitted to the Infirmary as inpatients.
The University is not responsible for the medical care of students during vaca-


tion. The Infirmary
but in certain instance
of students who were
During epidemics,
so overtaxed that the
In such an emergency


will be closed
es it may mak<
hospitalized b
the facilities
care of all ill
every effort w


during official University
3 special arrangements for
before the vacation period.
of the Student Health DT
students at the Infirmary
ill be made to provide for ti


vacation periods,
the continued care

apartment may be
will be impossible.
he care of students


outside of the Infirmary, but the Student Health Department will not assume pay-
ment for services rendered by outside physicians or other hospitals.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Orange and Blue Bulletin is the official bulletin of the Summer Session.
This mimeographed sheet, published every other day during the Summer Session
and posted on all bulletin boards, carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings,
and other pertinent information. Announcements made in the General Assembly;
notices on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody Hall, and Anderson Hall;
and news items in the Summer Gator serve to keep the Summer Session students
informed concerning student activities.

ORGANIZATIONS

PHI KAPPA PHI


A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the


SJ*


-Aa a


Uni-


mn I- *NLI WA3 aA -? -- T- -- -


I


-Lll~r\L U1.15


-r^, ..L.- ir 11 I 1 IJ







BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


KAPPA DELTA PI

The Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of
Florida in 1923. The purpose of the society is to recognize and promote merit
in educational study and service. Both men and women are admitted to member-
ship. Members are chosen from juniors, seniors, graduate students, faculty, and
alumni. Requirements for membership are, in general, as follows: a scholastic
average of at least B; evidence of abiding interest in educational service; a


good professional attitude; and good personal-social characteristics.
Summer Sessions the chapter holds a meeting each week.


During the


PHI BETA KAPPA


Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the
in 1938. It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded
with the national objectives of the society, the University
stricts election to the College of Arts and Sciences. Not
of the senior class graduating in each semester, including i
the Summer Session is eligible for election.
In addition to conferring membership upon qualified se


University of Florida
in 1776. In conformity
of Florida chapter re-
more than 15 per cent
bhe graduating class of


fniors in the College of


Arts and


Sciences,


the society seeks,


Creative Achievement, to honor each
from all the colleges on the campus w
has distinguished himself throughout
activity as creative writing, dramatics
liberal discipline, and has revealed a


by means of
year not more
ho, irrespective
his undergrad
3, and forensic
decided talent,


an Award in Recognition of
than one graduating senior
e of his honor point average,
luate career in such fields of
s, the fine arts, or any other
, a persistent interest, and a


prospect of mature achievement in later life.

PHI DELTA KAPPA
Beta Xi chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, national professional education fraternity
for men, was installed at the University of Florida early in 1949. Dedicated to
ideals of research, service and leadership, this organization is one of the oldest
and largest professional fraternities. Men are chosen for Phi Delta Kappa on
the basis of scholarship, leadership, potentiality, and qualities of personality con-
sidered as promising for the development of public education in the state and in
the nation.

RECREATION
THE FLORIDA UNION


The Florida Union, the official
marily by student activities fees.


center of student activities, is financed pri-
Some of the facilities and services offered by








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


The Florida


Union Social Board, composed of students interested in planning


student
Some of
ments,
Nautilus
scored b3


activities
the regu
dancing
(the
the Soc


;, sponsors a variety of social programs for the student
liar activities sponsored by the Social Board are bridge to
classes, coffee hours, movies, outings, dances, and
campus night club). Other special activities are


ial


open to all interest(
The University's
tional area for the
nine miles south of
tional building, a ba
badminton, softball.


Board during the year. The committees of this
d students.
Camp Wauburg operated by the Florida Union is
exclusive use of University personnel. This area
the campus. Facilities include a large picnic area,
th house, and a play ground area for volley ball, h
Camp Wauburg has swimming, boating, and fishing


body.
urna-
Club
spon-


board are

a recrea-
is located
a recrea-
orseshoes,
facilities.


INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS

A broad recreational program of athletics will be conducted for the students
and faculty by the College of Physical Education and Health during the Summer
Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will be organized with competition in


- -


- -------- ----------


softball, tennis (
doubles), swimmir
private awards will
A sports' clinic
ball tournaments.
sports through th
formation may be
The athletic an
ming pool and equi
students. Use of
families, faculty,


singles and mixed doubles), shuffleboard singlel
ig, volleyball, table tennis, and handball tournar
be made to winning teams and individuals in all
c will be conducted prior to the tennis, volleyba
Students have the opportunity to learn skills ii
e Department of Required Physical Education.
obtained at Room 134, Florida Gymnasium.
d physical educational facilities, including the us(
ipment room service, will be available to all bona /
these services and facilities will also be extended
employees, and their immediate families, upon


es and
nents, t
sports.
ill, and
n recre:


mixed
Appro-

hand-
ational


Further


3 of
ide
d ti
pay


the swim-
University
o students'
ment of a


fee of $1.00 per individual. The Summer Gator,
and the Florida Intramural Bulletin will carry
ments about various phases of the program.


the Orange and Blue Bulletin,
current notices and announce-


SWIMMING POOL

The swimming pool will be open daily during the Summer Session. Dressing
facilities for women are located in the Women's Gymnasium. The facilities for
men are located in Florida Gymnasium.


THE DIVISION


MUSIC


mtn a 1 .a. a I -- -- UAi-f- .3.-- _- i. Cl- ... . ( _-. -....*-__ -- _-_


k


I


_


__ -- --


""--- L


v -- ,- O __ -- w -


_wm







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ACADEMIC


REGULATIONS


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Several days before


registration students
regarding choice of c'
of the departments in
ation must file, in the
must pay the diploma


should
ourses.


confer with the deans of their respective colleges
Juniors and seniors should confer with the heads


which they expect to
office of the Registrar
fee very early in the


earn
, form
term


the degree. The official calendar shows the latest
Courses can be dropped or changed only with


college in which the


student is registered and


majors.
lal applic
in which
day on w
the apprc


by pr


esen


Candidates for gradu-
ation for a degree and
they expect to receive
ihich this can be done.
)val of the dean of the
ztion of the cards au-


thorizing the change at the office of the Registrar. Unclassified students
secure the approval of the Dean of the University for this purpose.


must


CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one
semester hour.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two
semesters, or one semester and three six-week summer terms, or one semester
and two eight-week summer terms, or five six-week summer terms or four nine-
week summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet this


requiremer
at the Unj
must meet
2. Stud
College of
dence in t
ception to
the faculty


it after entrance to the University. Students who break their residence
diversity by attending another institution for credit toward the degree
this requirement after re-entering the University.
ents are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (except in the
Law) applied toward the baccalaureate degree during regular resi-
he respective colleges from which they expect to be graduated. Ex-
this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by
r of the college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extension


work
a bac
3.
week
have
credit
other
facul
temb<
law s


permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours requi
calaureate degree.
For the degree of Bachelor of Laws, a student must complete at l
s of study in residence in an accredited law school of which at least 6
been in residence in the College of Law, University of Florida. The
ts and the last 30 weeks of study must be in residence in this College
arrangements are made in advance by written petition approved
ty of the College of Law. (In the case of a student admitted prior 1
er, 1953, completion of at least 90 weeks of study in residence at an acc
school is required of which at least 56 weeks must have been in residi


red for

east 96
2 must
last 28
unless
by the
to Sep-
redited
enepA at


t(








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


of the college in which a student is registered. Such authorization must be ob-
tained prior to enrollment in extension work. If authorization is given, no student
is permitted to earn more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours in this manner.
Under no circumstances will a student in residence be permitted to register
for a correspondence course if that course is being offered in the Summer Session.


MAXIMUM AND


The
term ii
hours.
The
tration
which
load to
Studen


s


MINIMUM LOAD


maximum load for which an undergraduate may register in an eight-week
9 semester hours. The maximum load in a six-week term is 6 semester


s minimum load for any student is three semester hours. 0
for less than three hours must be approved by the Dean of
the student is enrolled. After registration, the student ma
less than three hours only with the approval of the Senate I
t Petitions.


original regis-
the college in
Ly reduce his
Committee on


UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS


This


group will


include


who wish to earn credits in the S1
their respective institutions, and
2. In the event any student who
fled student later wishes to become
or schools of the University, he m


the University
quirements (in
to the school or
3. If such a


students from
ummer Session
(b) other stude
has attended a


I


(present all the cre
effect at the time o
college he desires
student is admitt


a candidate foi
ay do so (1) b
Identials require'


other colleges and
to be transferred e
nts not candidates
Summer Session as
r a degree in one of
y regularizing his


ed)


f his application for candid;


enter.
to candidacy


universities
eventually to
for degrees.
an unclassi-
the colleges
admission to


by meeting the re-
acy) for admission


a degree,


credits


earned


while an unclassified student wi
degree requirements (in effect
college or school chosen by the E
a regular student in the college
Bachelor's Degree for at least I
summer terms, and in the Gradu
Master's Degree. The residence
not be waived in any case.


ill
at
5tu


be accepted insofar


the time
dent. A


or school
three six-w<
:ate School


requirement


as they


he is admitted to
student must have
from which he exp
eek summer terms
Eor at least five sun


(see above)


apply toward
candidacy) of
been registered
ects to receive
or two eight-w


nmer terms for the


in the


University will


Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclas-


sified


students


duri


5. Each student
statement of the po
the various college
earned while a stu
.2-- _- a 1 a - -


ing the Summer Session.
registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite
licies governing the application for admission to candidacy, in
s and schools. This statement will make clear that credits
dent is registered as an unclassified student can be applied
A.^_~~~~~~~~~ __i .- _- -* __*i < II *


t







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent that


further enrollment in the class appears to be of little value
mental to the best interest of the class, it shall be the duty of
warn such student in writing that further absences or failure
will cause him to be suspended from the course with a failin
possible this warning will be delivered personally; otherwise,
to the student's last University address by the Registrar. Inst
mediately report all such warnings to the department head or


Should any absences or failure to do class
the student will be suspended from the cla
Registrar upon receipt of notice from
warning.
Should this reduce the load of the student
be suspended from the University.


to him or detri-
the instructor to
to do class work
g grade. Where
it will be mailed
ructors shall im-
course chairman.


work be incurred after this warning,
ss and be given a failing grade by the
the instructor showing the date of


;below the minimum required, he will


B. When a student is suspended from a course under the provisions of A above,
his parents shall be notified in writing by the Registrar.
C. A student who has been warned for absences or unsatisfactory work in any
class should not incur additional absences in that course even though he has
not been absent from the class for nine scholastic days. It is the responsibility
of the student to see that his class work and attendance is satisfactory.

PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND EXCLUSION FOR ACADEMIC REASONS

The University of Florida accepts the responsibility of providing sound higher
education. This includes the obligation to both the public and to the student of
providing good higher education in an economical and efficient manner. In order to
discharge this responsibility, the University must require reasonable academic
progress from its students in return for the opportunity afforded them by a tax
supported state university. To continue the registration of students who have
demonstrated that they do not possess the necessary ability, or preparation, or


industry, or maturity
study is inconsistent
Consequently, the
University regulation
reasons. Any college


to obtain a reasonable benefit from a program of I
with this responsibility.
University of Florida Senate has enacted the
is covering probation, suspension, and exclusion for
of the University may enforce additional academic


University

following
academic
standards


and each student is responsible
to such additional standards.


It is
probation
admitted


for observing the regulations of his college relating


important to note that a student may be placed on various kinds of
for reasons other than those listed below. For example, he may be
to the University on a probationary basis or he may be placed on disci-


plinary probation by reason


of conduct or, in some


cases,


he may be placed on







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ACADEMIC PROBATION
Lower Division Students:


1. A Lower Division student who
for all work attempted in his first or
will be placed on academic probation
2. A Lower Division student on
XV) during his second semester will
University unless he maintains a 1.0
in that semester.
3. A Lower Division student who
who fails to maintain a 1.5 honor pc
mester thereafter will be placed on ac


fails to maintain a 1.0 honor point average
second semester at the University of Florida
for his next semester.
academic probation (Under Article IV or
be ineligible for further registration in the
} honor point average in all work attempted


has attempted more than two semesters and
int average on all work attempted each se-
cademic probation for his next semester.


4. A Lower Division student who has attempted more than two semeste
who is on academic probation (Under Article IV or XV) shall be ineligil
further registration in the University unless he maintains a 1.5 honor poin
age in all work attempted in that semester, or has a 1.5 cumulative honor
average in the total of all work attempted to date.
5. A Lower Division student who has attempted six semesters of work
Lower Division shall be ineligible for further registration in the University


!rs and
ble for
t aver-
r point

in the
unless


he has been admitted to an Upper Division college.
A semester during which a student withdraws after the last date for dropping
courses without a failing grade and any semester in which a student is suspended
for non-attendance or unsatisfactory work shall be considered as a semester at-
tempted in administering these regulations (Sections 1 through 5 above).
Upper Division Students:
6. Any Upper Division student who fails to maintain a 1.8 honor point
average for all work attempted in any semester shall be placed on academic proba-
tion for his next semester.
7. An Upper Division student on academic probation (under Article IV or
XV) will be ineligible for further registration in the University unless he main-
tains a 2.0 honor point average in all work attempted that semester or has 2.0
cumulative honor point average in the total of all work attempted while registered
in his present Upper Division college.


SUSPENSION


All Undergraduate Students:
8. All Undergraduate students,


(all those classified other than 6)


who do not


receive passing
tempted in any
versity for one
semester hours


grades


(A, B,


C, or D)


in more than


one-half of the


hours at-


term or semester shall be suspended immediately from the Uni-
full semester; however, failure in only one course carrying five
credit or less shall not cause the student to be suspended under







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Graduate


Students:


9. Any graduate student may be denied further registration in the University
or in his graduate major when his progress toward completion of his planned
graduate program becomes unsatisfactory.
ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS:
10. All actions taken under these regulations shall be reflected by appropriate
notations on the student's record.
11. A student attending a summer session prior to his probational semester
may satisfy the terms of his probation if he obtains the necessary probation honor
point average as indicated above, computed by taking the grades of his last
semester and summer session together.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must success-
fully pass six or more to complete the program of the University College) are
administered by the Board of University Examiners and are given in January,
May, and August of each year. A student must be familiar with the work of
the various courses and be able to think in the several fields in a comprehensive
way in order to pass these examinations. Standings on the comprehensive ex-
aminations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are not subject to change
by any other agency.
APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the exam-
ination is given need not make application for it. University College students who
are not enrolled in a course at the time an examination is given and who wish
to take the comprehensive examination must apply in writing to the Board of


Examiners for
Applications wi
Upper Division
to furnish the
used to avoid
cepted only for
miners. The
versity College


permission prior to the last date set for filing such applications.


ill not
. Befo
Board
the pa
those
Board


be accepted from students registered in the colleges of the
re the application is accepted the applicant will be required
of Examiners with proof that this privilege has not been
yment of usual University fees. Applications will be ac-
examinations which are administered by the Board of Ex-
of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give Uni-


students examinations by application.


THE


UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE


INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT


In a reorganization
sophomores were placed


at the University of
in one college. The


Florida in 1935, all freshmen and
University College administers all


work of the Lower Division, which includes the pre-professional
Upper Division schools and colleges and a core program of basic


work for
education








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


While


fully


accepting


responsibility toward


professional


training


men who remain four year
as a state institution also
only one or two years at
of all enrolled--are not "ft
and they probably deserve
of only "introductory co
group of comprehensive c
meaning to a beginner's pr
core program are:
1. American Institutio
2. The Physical Scieni
3. Reading, Speaking


s or longer and
accepts its civic
the University.
iilures" because
more from the s


urses.-
ourses
*ogram.


earn degrees, the University
responsibility to help those
These students-more than
they do not continue and ea
state university than an odd


Consequently at
have been worked


the
out


These comprehensive cou


,ns (known hereafter as C-1)
ces (C-2)
and Writing: Freshman English


University of
to give some


of Florida
who spend
two-thirds
rn degrees,
assortment
Florida a
unity and


rses that make up the



(C-3)


4. Practiced Logic: Straight Thinking
Fundamental Mathematics (C-42)
5. The Humanities (C-5)
6. Biological Science (C-6)


(C-41)


GUIDANCE
If a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not
on registration day. His program may be made up largely from
sives which help him direct his thinking toward a desirable obji
with approved electives that may further enable him to explore
needs. But whether the student is decided or undecided about
these comprehensive courses provide basic preparation that every (
should have.
Thus since the purpose of general education is to replace fraj
program absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance. Every st


urged to guess
the comprehen-
ective, together
e interests and
his life's work,
educated person


gmentation, the
object or course


of the University College p:
time that he is making ter
subjects to test aptitudes, i
great areas of human undei
sity College presents materi
which will immediately becc
making correct next steps.
reports, vocational aptitude
the comprehensive courses,
ferences, election privileges,


program is des
itative steps
interests, and
standing and
als which are
)me a part of


signed to guide the
toward a professic
ability, he is also
achievement. The
directly related to


student.


During the


on by taking
studying the
work in the
life experien


the student's thinking to guid


special
several
Univer-
ces and
him to


Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress
tests, basic vocational materials, selected material in
student conferences, adjustments for individual dif-
and comprehensive examinations-all are parts of a


plan designed to guide students.


UPPER DIVISION


COOPERATION


Llf~ln +ho nTio nnoaoyr r n /\yQnrralnn onA iintno+nn ac na+T4Ad n+ 4-1A TTn irnd+r


,








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


student himself must take, but they help in every way possible as he assumes a


greater


greater


share


responsibility


University


education.


counsellors are located in the


University College Office.


Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests to all seniors


in every high school of the state.


Since many high schools are also trying to ac-


quaint the student with


the common


body


of knowledge so


needed


their


records along with the placement test results indicate the variation that may be
made in the general program.


student who


three


or four years of


preparatory


school study in


the subject areas


comprehensive courses,


placement


tests


or progress


tests


indicate


superior


knowledge


understanding


level may consult one of the counsellors for subsequent needed


program adjust-


ment.


THE ASSOCIATE OF


ARTS CERTIFICATE


The Associate of Arts Certificate is awarded in recognition of the successful


completion


of two years of planned work at the


University


of Florida.


In spe-


cific detail, one must pass


at least sixty-four semester


hours


including pre-pro-


fessional work and the comprehensive courses that make up the core program.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NORMAL PROGRAM


Freshman Year


1.-American


2.-The


Institutions


Sciences


Physical


Hours


1.-The


Sophomore
Humanities


2.-Biological


Science


Year


Hours


3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--


4.--Logic


Freshman


English


and Mathematics


3.-Departmental


Military


- - -
- .- -


Science;


Electives


Physical Fitness


16-20
30-84


5.-Departmental


Military


Science;


Electives


Physical Fitness


30-34


At least sixty-four semester hours,


which may include


four hours of Military


Science


, are required to complete the Lower


Program for


Pre-Medical or


Division.


Pre-Dental Students.-The program listed


below


covers


American


member


Medical


schools.


minimum
Associatic


Since


some


pre-medical


or by
schools


or pre-dental
SAmerican E


require


work
)ental


more


prescribed
Association


student


should


write


directly to the medical or dental school he is considering for a catalog and specific
information concerning its requirements.


BASIC


TWO-YEAR


PROGRAM


PRE-MEDICAL


OR PRE-DENTAL


STUDENTS


1.-Americai


Freshman


Year


n Institutions
r.1


Sophomore


1.-The Humanities


Year


one


A


/-*









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


a) For students intending to major in Agricultural Economics-


Freshman Year


1.-C-1, American Institutions
2.-C-6, Biological Science, or
BTY. 101-102 ..---. -
3.--C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English -.--
4.-C-4 or MS. 105-106, Basic
Mathemats ...
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness _.


Hours


Sophomore Year
1.---Cy. 109-110, Elements of
Chemistry ..... ..... .-. -..
2.-ATG. 211-212, Elementary
Accounting .......


3.-C-5,


The Humanities


Hours


4.-AS. 201, Principles of
Agricultural Economics .....
5.-ES. 206, Basic Economics ...._
6.-Electives in Agriculture or Basic


Sciences
7.-Military
Fitness


Science; Physical


30-36

b) For students intending to major in Horticulture (Floriculture and Ornamental Programs)-


Freshman Year
1.-C-l, American Institutions _
2.-BTY. 101-102, General Botany
3.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and


I


- -


Writing: Freshman English ....
4.-Electives in Agriculture or Basic
Sciences -...
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ....


ours
8
6

8

9
2


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-CY. 109-110, Elements of
Chemistry ...... ....___. 6
2.-C-4, Logic and Mathematics ..... 6
3.-C-5, The Humanities _......_....__ 8
4.-HE. 201, Principles of Horticulture_ 3
5.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic Sciences --..-.....- -.-_....-...... 9
6.-Military Science; Physical Fitness 2


c) For students intending to major in Horticulture (Landscape Nursery


Program)--


Freshman Year


]


1.-C-l, American Institutions ......
2.-BTY. 101-102, General Botany ...
3.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English
4.-*MS. 105, Basic Mathematics
5.-AE. 102, Vision and Graphics
6.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic Sciences .... .. ..-... .-.
7.-Military Science; Physical Fitness --


ours
8
6

8


Sophomore Year ]
1.--C-41, Logic ----....-... _____ ....-
2.-C-5, The Humanities -.---
3.-CY. 109-110, Elements of
Chemistry -.- -- ..-....
4.-HE. 201, Principles of Horticulture.-
5.-AE. 203, Basic Design
6.-AE. 204, Organic Planning ......
7.-CE. 223, Surveying _..._..
8.-CE. 301, Forest Surveying ..__..
9.-Military Science; Physical Fitness -.


ours
3
8

6
3
3
3
3
3
2


*Students not qualified for MS. 105 will take C-42 during the freshman year.


d) For students intending to major in Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry
and Nutrition, Botany, Dairy Husbandry, Dairy Manufactures, Entomology, General Agriculture,
Horticulture (Fruit, Vegetable and Food Technology programs), Plant Pathology, Poultry Husbandry,
and Soils-


Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-6, Biological Science, and/or
BTY. 101-102 .-........ 6-12
2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English __. 8
3.-CY. 121-122, General Chemistry ._. 8
4.-Electives in Agriculture or


Basic
5.-Militar


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-1, American Institutions ._.._. 8
2.-C-4, Logic and Mathematics .. 6
3.-C-5, The Humanities ____.. ...._ 8
4.-Electives in Agriculture or
Basic Sciences --_.....--................. 6-12
5.-Military Science; Physical Fitness ___ 2


Sciences -.-- -.-----.--.
y Science; Physical Fitness --


30-36


30-36

e) For students intending to major in Agricultural Chemistry--


Freshman Year
1.-C-l, American Institutions


Hours
_---..... 8


Sophomore Year
1.-C-5, The Humanities ........


Hours









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

f) For students intending to major in Agricultural Education--


Freshman Year


Hours


Sophomore


Year


Hours


1.-C-I,
2.--C-3.
Writi
^****O-0-6


American


Institutions


Reading, Speaking and
ing: Freshman English ...--__


Biological


Science


4.-AY. 221, General Field


Crops ....._.


1.-C-41,
2.-C-42,
3.-C-5,


Practical


Logic


Fundamental


The Humanities


Mathematics


4.-BTY. 101-102, General Botany


5.-CY.


5.-PY. 201, Fundamentals in Poultry
Production -n .. -.... -....- ............ .


6 .-Military


Science;


109-110,


Elements


of Chemistry


6.--DY. 211, Principles of Dairying _._.


7.-HE. 212
3.-Military


Physical Fitness


. Vegetable Gardening


Science:


Physical Fitness


g) For students intending to major in Bacteriology


(Microbiology)-


Freshman


Year


Hours


Sophomore Year


1.--C-i


American


Institutions


2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ._-...-._.. 8
3.-C-6, Biological Science and
BLY. 161-162, Biology Laboratory or
BTY. 101-102, General Botany .. 6-10
4.-*MS. 105-106, Basic Mathematics 8


5.-Military


Science


; Physical Fitness


1.-C-5


The Humanities .......


2.-FH. or GN. 133-134, Language .
3.-PS. 201-202, General Physics _...
4.-CY. 121-122, General Chemistry
or CY. 217-218, General Chemistry
and Qualitative Analysis -
5.-Electives .-- --......--


6.-Military


Science:


Physical Fitness


32-36 32-36

*Students not qualified for MS. 105-106 will take C-4 first.


Some variations


from


these program


The curriculum of the department in


these details.


bandry


mins are desirable in the different curricula of the College.
which the student intends to major should be consulted for


Students planning to major in Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, or Poultry Hus-


are required to take BLY. 161-162


demic hours


which may include 4 hours of Military


as corequisites with C-6 and ACY. 208.


Science


Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two
hours required for an Upper Division degree.


are required


years


may


At least 64


aca-


to complete the Lower


reduce


the number of


desirable


electives


in Agriculture,


students


should


consult


head


the department in


which


they intend


to major.


These electives during the first


two years should be distributed so as to give some acquaintance with the different
phases of Agriculture, and are limited to a single course in any one department.
It is required that all students graduating in Agriculture take at least one course


in each of the following departments: Agricultural Economics, Soils,


omy or Horticulture, and either


either Agron-


Animal Husbandry and Nutrition, Dairy Science


or Poultry
Chemistry


Engineering


year


201.


Husbandry.


All such students


Bacteriology


shall also


Entomology.


J. 306, AL.
the sophomore


, except those majoring in Agricultural


take at least one course in Agricultural


Courses suitable for election


221,


DY.


year these courses may


, EY


also


. 203,


in the freshman


. 313,


be elected, and


in ad-


edition the following:


AG.


301, AS. 201,


306, AY


HE.


321, SLS. 301, and SLS.


Sn /-r mcm nTr


ours









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The University College student who plans to earn a degree in the
of Architecture and Allied Arts has one of the following basic programs
A.-For the degree in Architecture or in Building Construction-


Freshman Year Hours
1.-American Institutions 8----.-.-.-.-..... 8
2.--Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English -......_.-- 8
*3. M s. 105-6 S...... ..... ................................. 8
4.-AE. 101-2 -.-.-.-----....-.-...-.-.....-.---. 6
5.-Military Science or Elective ...........-- 2
6.--Physical Fitness --.... ....--...-.... ......---. 0

32


3.-For the degree in Landscape Arch
Freshman Year Hour
1.-American Institutions -.-.----..-..-. 8
2.-The Physical Sciences ..............-.....-- 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ............. 8
*4.- M S. 105 .......... ................ ....... ... 4
5.- AE. 101-2 .................................. 6
6.-Military Science or Elective .----- 2
7.--Physical Fitness ......----..... ............. 0

34


C.-For the degree in Interior Design-
Freshman Year Hours
1.-American Institutions ....---....--... -- 8
2.-The Physical Sciences .-.....-............ 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English .--....---..... 8
4.-Logic and Mathematics -----.......-... 6
5.- AE. 101-2 ------............... ................... 6
6.-Military Science or Elective ---........... 2
7.-Physical Fitness --....---..............-.. .. 0

36


College


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-The Humanities ...-------------..--....... 8
2.--Biological Science .-....--....--..... ..-........... 6
* 3.-* PS. 201-2 -..-............-....-- ..---.......... ...-..... 6
4.- AE. 203-4 ...- ........... ---..........-....... ..... .. 6
5.-AE. 205-6 ---.------------.....6.......
6.-Military Science or Elective ....--- .. 2
7.--Physical Fitness --.................. ....-. 0

34


itecture-


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-The Humanities .....-.-.-- ---.-... 8
2.-Biological Science --..--.................. 6
3.- CL. 223 ...................................... 3
4.- CY. 109-- ... .............-- .............. .... 3
5. AE. 203-4 ----.. ...........-.. .......... .... 6
6.-AE. 205 ..-.....................--........ 3
7.-Military Science or Elective --.....--- 2
8.--Physical Fitness .--..--..-----......... 0

31


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-The Humanities .-...---..-.................. 8
2.- Biological Science ...............-..---. ...... 6
3.-AE. 203-4 .--.-------......--...........-.-... 6
4.--AE. 2 ..........--------------.......----............... 3
5.-Approved Elective .....-----.......... ..... 3
6.-Military Science or Elective --............ 2
7.- Physical Fitness .--..........-.. ....... ....... 0

28


.-For the degree in Painting and D
Design, or History of Art.-
Freshman Year Hours
1.--American Institutions -....--...........-.. 8
2.-The Physical Sciences ...---..-....-....-.... 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ........-.. 8
4.-Logic and Mathematics ................... 6
5.- ART 121 ..................-...-... .............
6.- ART 123 ----.. .....-...... ......--..- ............ 3
7.-Military Science or Elective ....-... 2
8.-Physical Fitness ... .... --...- ............ 0

36


rawing,


Commercial Art,


Crafts,


Costume


Sophomore Year Hours
1.--The Humanities ............-......-..-......... 8
2.-Biological Science -------.........----............... 6
3.--ART 124 ..... --------------------........._-_.. 3
4-AR-0
4.-ART 222 .-.. -... ..--.-...------.-.----..3..... 3
5.- ART 225-6 -............ ..................... .... 6
6.-Military Science or Elective ---...... 2
7.--Physical Fitness .......-..--.. ......

28


ARTS


AND


SCIENCES


A student who plans to earn a 4-year degree in
should secure credit in all of the comprehensive


the College of Arts and Sciences
areas as indicated by the Uni-


D









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


enter


College


Business


Administration


to register


Curriculum in Business Administration or for the Curriculum in Public Admin-
istration, students are required to complete the curriculum below or the equivalent
thereof in each of the courses or areas of knowledge listed including the following:
ES. 205-206.-Basic Economies
ATG. 211-212.-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics


MS. 208.-Business Mathematics
First Semester
1.-American Institutions
*2.-The Physical Sciences --_-


or Mathematics


*3.-Logic


4.-Reading. Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English


Electives


Science;


Physical Fitness


5.-Approved
Military i


Freshman Year
Hourn


Second Semester


1.-American


*2.-The


Physics


*3.--Mathematics


Institutions
al Sciences
or Logic


Hours


4.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English


5.-Approved
Military


Electives


Science;


Physical Fitness


15-18


15-18


1.-Accounting
2.-Economics


3.---The


Sophomore Year
- 8 1.-Accounting
-8 2.-Economics


Humanities


4.-Biological
5.-Statistics
Military


Science -
or MS. 208


Science:


Physical Fitness -


3.-The


- - - -


Humanities


4.-Biological
5. -Statistics
Military


Science -.
or MS. 208


Science:


Physical Fitness


17-18


At least sixty-four semester hours,
Science are required to complete the L


17-18


which may include four hours of Military
,ower Division.


COURSES OFFERED BY THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
The following courses offered by the College of Business Administration may


be taken by students in the


University College


: ATG. 211-212


Elementary


counting
surance;


271,


205-206,


, Principles
Principles o:
Economics;


f Marketing;
Management;


Consumer


260,


Fundamentals


, Elementary


Economics;


Statistics


291,


Real


Estate Fundamentals; and RE.


295, Housing and Home Ownership.


EDUCATION


University College


students working toward a degree in


the College of Edu-


cation should pursue one of the following programs:
Basic Program


(Except Agricultural Education and Education for the Exceptional Child)


Freshman


1.-American Int
2.-The Physical


Year


stitutions
Sciences


Credits


3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing--
Freshman English
4.-Logic or Mathematics


6.-Military


Science


or Elective


Sophomore Year
1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science --
3.-Logic or Mathematics -


4.-Military
5.-Electives
6.-Physical


Science 4
(from
Fitness


Credits


or Electives
list below)


~









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


basic


programs


in Agricultural


Education


Education


Exceptional Child, consult the Catalog.

ENGINEERING


program for first and second


year


students


expecting to


earn


a degree


in the College of Engineering is as follows


First Semester
1.-C-11, American Institutions


*2.--C-21,


The Physical


Sciences ....


Credits


3.-C-31, Reading, Speaking, and
Writing: Freshman English ..----
*4.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics


5.-MY. 101,


Military


Science ...


6.-PL. 101, Physical Fitness ..


Second Semester


1.-C-12,
*2.-C-22,
3.-0-32,


American Institutions
The Physical Sciences


Credits


Reading, Speaking, and


Writing: Freshman English


*4.-C-41,


Practical


Logic ....


5.-MS. 105, Basic Mathematics .---


6.-MY. 102, Military


Science


7.-PL. 102, Physical Fitness


- - -


Third


Semester


1.-MS. 106, Basic Mathematics -.......-


2.--CY.


Credits


217, General Chemistry and


Qualitative


3.-C-51,


**4.-ML. 181,
5.-MY. 201,


Analysis


The Humanities


Engineering Drawing -......
Military Science .-----


6.-PL. 103, Physical Fitness ..._.--..


Fourth Semester


1.-MS.
2.-CY.


353, Differential Calculus
218, General Chemistry and


Qualitative


3.-C-52


Analysis


The Humanities .. ...............


Credits


**4.-ML. 182, Descriptive Geometry


5.--MY. 202, Military


Science


6.-PL. 104, Physical Fitness


Students


whose records


in the


University


College do


not indicate


that they


are qualified to take the professional courses in Engineering will not be admitted
to the College of Engineering.

JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS


To enter the School of Journalism and


to have completed the


Communications students are required


six comprehensive courses; present credit in pre-professional


work-COM.


ES. 206


, and SCH. 201; have a grade average of C or better


and a working knowledge of typewriting.
Those falling below a 2.0 grade average in


sidered


they


have


admittance


demonstrated


to the


their


School
ability


University College will not be


Journalism


pursue


with


Communications


profit


professional


con-
until


work


in the Upper Division by satisfactorily completing one semester's


work prescribed


by the Director of the School of Journalism and Communications.


least


sixty-four


hours


which


may


include


four


hours


Military


Science,


are required to complete the Lower Division.
Transfer students or those with a special


hour-credit problem


who


have


completed some of the


pre-professional


work in


University College, may


mitted provisionally to the School of Journalism and Communications on approval


of the Director.


They will be expected,


however


, to complete the lower-level work.


LAW


:::::_


.... .. ....
___


1


L I


~ ~~~~ ~~ r t 1 ihr d m PJ I ---








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Although no particular courses are prerequisites, a student preparing for ad-


mission


to the


College


Law


comprehensive courses and should


following


general


fields:


Accounting,


should


obtain


a thorough


mastery


take also at least two courses


Economics,


English,


in each


History


basic
of the


(American


and English)


and Political Science.


Since concepts expressed in words are tools


of the legal profession, it is essential that a student be able to read rapidly and


meaningfully


to write


clearly


concisely.


Courses


requiring


rapid


assimilation and digestion of written materials and courses in expository writing
therefore are recommended.

PHARMACY

In keeping with the requirements of the American Council on Pharmaceutical


Education, all students expecting to earn


the degree of B.S.


be enrolled in one or more Pharmacy courses for a minimum


in Pharmacy must
of three academic


years or


a total


number


twenty-seven


studies


completed


months.
in other


This


fields.


regulation applies


Upon


enrolling


regardless of
in Pharmacy


courses for the first time students


must sign the register in the office of the Dean


College


Pharmacy.


Students


are


advised


pursue


following


program:


Freshman Year and Summer Session


Hours


Sophomore


Year


Hours


C-11-12,
C-31-32,
0-41,


American
Freshman


practicall


C-52,


Institutions
English --


Logic


C-42, Fundamental Mathematics .----


The Humanities


, Biological


CY. 121-2,
PHY. 106


Science


S- - -- ----


General Chemistry ---. ..
Pharmaceutical Calculations


Military Science; Physical Fitness ..


The Humanities -- .--


Biological


PS. 201-2,


Science .


General


Physics


PS. 207-8, General Physics Laboratory
PGY. 221-2, Practical Pharmacognosy


PHY.


223-4,


Galenical


CY. 123, Qualitative


Pharmacy
Analysis -


CY. 331, Quantitative Analysis


Military


Science


Total ---...-.. --41


Phys.
Total


Fitness


-


Only students having an average of C or higher will be


admitted to the Col-


lege of Pharmacy and/or pharmacy courses in


Upper


Division.


In addition


all pre-pharmacy students must have grades of C or higher in each of the following


courses


C-42


PGY


221, PGY


PHY


PHY


PHY


PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND


HEALTH


University


College


students


expecting


earn


a degree


in the


College


Physical Education and Health should pursue one of the following programs:
A.-For men intending to major in Physical Education-









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


B.-For women intending to major in Physical Education-


Freshman Year


C-ll-1
C-31-3
C-41-4
PHA.
PHA.
PHA.
Sp
PHA.
PHA.


Credits


2-American Institutions .........
2-Reading, Speaking and Writing
2-Logic and Mathematics ......
251-Folk, Social and Tap Dance ....
253-Team Sports for Women ....
255-Individual and Dual
orts for Women ........... .....
257-Gymnastics for Women ......
291-Principles of Physical


Education .-- .--.-...
Physical Fitness ........ ................. ........


C-21-2
C-51-5
C-61-6
PHA.
PHA.
PHA.


Sophomore Year C
2-The Physical Sciences ................---
2-The Humanities ...........
2-Biological Science ..............
252-Modern Dance ............... .
254-Team Sports for Women .......
256-Swimming and Diving


for W omen ...... .................. .....
PHA. 258-Tennis and Golf for Women
EDF. 140-141-Aspects of Human


Growth and Development ..........
Physical Fitness .... .....


redits
6
8
6
1
2

1
2

6
0


C.-For men and women intending to major in Health Education-


Freshman Year


Credits


C-l1-12-American Institutions .............
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and Writing
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics .....
EDF. 140-141-Aspects of Human
Growth and Development ....---....._...
Approved Electives .. .......................
Military Science or Electives ...---..........
Physical Fitness .-... -.- .. .. ............... ....


Sophomore Year


C-51-52-The Humanities ...........
C-61-62-Biological Science ......
*CY. 121-122--General Chemistry .........
PHA. 261-Personal Hygiene _..............
SY. 244-Marriage and the Family .......
EDF. 220-Children and Culture ...........
Military Science or Electives ---.-.......
Physical Fitness ... ...... ..~... ......... ...


*Students planning to major in Health Education must take CY. 121-122. Students whose high
school records and placement tests indicate satisfactory preparation may substitute CY. 121-122 for
C-21-22. Others should take C-21, upon satisfactory completion of which they may enter CY. 121.


D.-For men and women intending to major in Recreation-


Freshman Year


C-11-12--American Institutions ..............
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and Writing
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics ........
PHA. 284-Team Games for Men or
PHA. 253-Team Sports for Women
EDF. 140-141-Aspects of Human
Growth and Development _.-_...... ..
Military Science or Electives ..............
Physical Fitness ........ ........... ........


Credits


C-21-22-The
C-51-52-The
C-61-62-Biolo
PHA. 251-Fo
SY. 201-Socii
Modern I
IN. 312-Eler
Approved Ele
Military Scien
Team Spo
Physical Fitni


Sophomore Year


Physical Sciences .........
Humanities .......... .....
>gical Science
ilk, Social and Tap Dance _.
logical Foundations of
eife---- .--....
nentary School Handicrafts
ctives
ce or PHA. 254-
rts for Women
ess.................. .


E.-For men and women intending to major in Physical Therapy-


Freshman Year C
C-11-12-American Institutions .......
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and Writing
C-41-42--Logic and Mathematics .-......
C-61-62-Biological Science
BLY. 161-162-Biology Laboratory


Military Science or


ElectiveP


redits
8
8
6
6
4
2


Sophomore Year C1
*CY. 121-122-General Chemistry
C-51-52-The Humanities ...
PHA. 295-Introduction to Physical
Therapy
PSY. 201-General Psychology .... .....
PRY. 9 n--Snoinal Pveuhnincvv n- yPQV


redits
8
8

2
3


Credits


Credits


Electives








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES OF THE UPPER DIVISION


AGRICULTURE


The College of Agriculture is composed of three
2. Research (Agricultural Experiment Station), i
Extension Service). The Instructional Division
up of departments in the College devoted to the
practical agricultural work. The work of these


and the
service
The
jointly
cultural
College
Botany


Saim of the (
in agriculture
departments
with the Coll
Engineering
of Education)
(including B


Jo]
I.


llege


is to afford


students


units, namely, 1. (Instruction),
and 3. Extension (Agricultural
(The College proper) is made
various phases of technical and
departments is closely related,
the best possible training for


in the College are: Agricultural Chemistry, (administered
ege of Arts and Sciences), Agricultural Economics, Agri-
, Agricultural Education (administered jointly with the
, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry and Nutrition, Bacteriology,
otany and Plant Pathology), Dairy Science, Entomology,


Horticulture, Poultry Husbandry, Soils, and Veterinary Science.


COLLEGE


ARCHITECTURE


AND


ALLIED


ARTS


The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers programs
to appropriate undergraduate degrees in Architecture, Building
terior Design, Landscape Architecture, Painting and Drawing,
Crafts, Costume Design, and History of Art. Programs at the g
offered in Architecture, in Art, in Building Construction, an
Planning.
The College offers courses to students in other colleges of th
wish to broaden their cultural background in the arts. Gener
Department of Architecture and in the Department of Art are
dents in the University, and certain upper division courses in tl
Art and in the Department of Interior Design require no prer


of study leading
Construction, In-
Commercial Art,
Taduate level are
.d in Community


e University who
al courses in the
open to all stu-
le Department of
'equisite training.


During the 1951
graduate courses in
as well as graduate
The University
and Allied Arts, wi
exhibitions of work


1955 SUMMER SESSION
5 Summer Session the College will
Architecture, Art, Building Construc
e courses in Architecture, Art, and I
Center of the Arts, a unit of the
11 continue its regular program of ed
in the arts during the 1955 Summer
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES


offer most of the under-
:tion and Interior Design,
Building Construction.
College of Architecture
ucational and illustrative
Session.


The College of Architecture and Allied Arts offers courses leading
cation in Art for teaching Art in the secondary schools in the State o
T- -1 2 -- -. 2 _- -r .2L ..L: I!- A. -- Af ^--^-- -- -.--Vk1:...L-J Inn. J.1a


to certifi-
f Florida.
Cl4-. 4-i. rt\^


COLLEGE







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COLLEGE OF


ART


AND SCIENCES


The subject matter fields regularly offered to students in the College of Arts
and Sciences and the extent of these offerings is indicated in the table below:


Elective


Subject


Work


Group
Major


Dept.
Major


MA. or M


Ph.D.


Anthropology


Graduate work offered
through College of Ar-
chitecture and Allied
Art


Astronomy
Bacteriology


Graduate work offered


through


College of


Agriculture


Biology
Botany


Graduate work offered


through


College of


Agriculture


Chemistry


Communications


Major


graduate


work


offered


School


Journalism and


Economics


Communications


Graduate work offered


through


College of


Business Administra-
tion


Education


Major and


Graduate work offered


through


the Col-


lege of Education


English
Family


Life


French -.-.-.--.-.
Geography --_.-_.-
Geology --- -------
German ---


Greek


History
Italian


- ---- ----- -


Journalism


Major and Graduate work offered through the School


of Journalism


Latin


Library


Science








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Religion
Russian
Sociology
Spanish
Speech -
Zoology


listed above


For information regarding details of these programs of study and degree re-


quirements,


University


catalog for


1954-55


should


be consulted.


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


The summer session offerings of the College of Business Administration


pro-


vide


basic


courses


several


curricula


groupings,


a selection


advanced


courses to enable students to go ahead with a


normal academic program


and a


selection of graduate cour


ses.


A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Busi-


ness Administration are offered.


complete


information


on the


requirements


for these curricula and for the graduate program,
be consulted.


University Catalog should


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


REQUIREMENTS


ADMISSION


For admission to the College of Education students will present a certificate
of graduation from the University College, or equivalent, and have the approval


of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.


(See General


Catalog


detailed


requirements).


UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS


Students who are preparing to


teach have the opportunity


specializing in


the following


mentary


g teaching areas


agricultural education,


education, English, foreign languages,


health


t, business education
education, industrial


arts


education,


mathematics


, physical


education


sciences


social


General Catalog for curricula. For further information,


studies


consult the


speech.
Under-


graduate Counseling Office,


Yonge 120.)


GRADUATE PROGRAMS


Graduate work in


such


human


areas


growth


Education


as foundations


development)


offers an
education


elementary


opportunity for teachers


(educational


education,


psychology,


secondary


to specialize


philosophy,
education,


- - 1" -_ -__ __ -. l _T_ .





I


m


_ t .


- _ 1 .1


1 _


*_ .1 -_ 1


__


.I. .








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS
The curricula in the College of Education include State certification require-


ments.


Each student should consult his counselor to plan a sequence of courses


to meet requirements for his degree and for certification.
For further information concerning the certification of teachers,


write to the


State


Department


Regulations


Relating


Education,
to Florida


Tallahassee,
Requirements


Florida,


requesting


State


Board


Cer-


tification, April


1951


, revised July 21,


1953.


EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES
The following more important items govern the extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the summer term attended and


at the time formal application for extension is made.


The applicant must pass at least


six semester hours in


which no grade is


below C.
3. Students who desire an extension of certificate should apply for the same


to the Registrar, Room 33, Administration Building prior to July


Name of


students


who


are eligible


an extension


presented


to the


State


apartment of Education.


Students should indicate exactly the name that appears


on the certificate which they wish to have extended.


4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to T


D. Bailey


State Superintendent of Public


Instruction,


Tallahassee, Florida,


within a


year


after the close of the summer term, otherwise extension will not be granted.
EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT OFFICE


Educational


Placement


Office


serves


both


former


students


Uni-


versity and


public


school


officials,


without


charge.


Office


keeps


up-to-date


records


on registrants


for positions


a current list


educational


adminis-


tration and teaching vacancies.


Persons who wish


this service should communi-


cate with the Educational Placement Office,


Yonge 120.


THE P


K. YONGE LABORATORY


The summer term of the Laboratory


SCHOOL


School will extend from June


20 through


July


Children


Summer


Session


students


others


are eligible


enrollment.
The fees are


Classes from the kindergarten through the sixth grade will be


$2.


University registration and $5.


held.


for expendable materials.


Parents will register pupils Monday, June


floor


elementary


wing


Yon


9:00 to
building


10:30


A.M., in the first


Teacher-parent


con-


ferences


will be held on Monday, June 20,


and parents should not be accompanied


by their children.


Application


admission


should


made


at the


Laboratory


School


Office,


218 Yon


ge Building,


as soon


as possible


since the number who may be admitted


Teacher


Education and








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Students entering the University for the first time may find it to their ad-
vantage to enroll in mathematics, freshman English, American Institutions or
General Chemistry and an appropriate engineering prerequisite. Students having
completed one year at the University may take courses in calculus and physics.
For those students who have completed calculus and physics, statics, dynamics
and strength of materials are suggested. Elective subjects in mathematics, physics
and the humanities are recommended to all students.


Students


who


contemplate


registration


in the


College


Engineering


those who are already registered in this college should confer about their sched-
ules with the department heads and the dean as soon as possible.

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY


Courses


Forestry


are offered


during the


Summer


Session.


The required


Summer Camp
vided the neces
registration in
courses which


should be taken between the second and third year's work pro-
;sary prerequisites have been completed. Students who contemplate
the School of Forestry should consult the University Catalog for
are prerequisites or are required in the Forestry curriculum.


SCHOOL OF


JOURNALISM AND


COMMUNICATIONS


A UNIT OF THE COLLEGE OF


ARTS AND SCIENCES


The curricula in the School of Journalism and Communications lead to the
degree Bachelor of Science in Journalism or Bachelor of Science in Communi-
cations.
The programs provide students with a broad background in liberal arts and
sciences-literature, economics, history, political science, sociology, psychology-
which are vital aspects of contemporary life and essential to those entering
professional careers in printed media or audio-visual media of communications.
The general plan of education in this School is arranged so that the student
spends about three-fourths of his time on general background courses. The re-
maining fourth involves the acquisition and practice of professional techniques in
relation to this background knowledge.
Students entering the School of Journalism must choose one of the programs
of study.
Those majoring in the Editorial and Public Relations fields will take the
Journalism program and earn the BSJ degree. Two degrees are offered in the
Advertising program: those interested in printed media will earn the BSJ degree,
and those specializing in audio-visual media will earn the BSC degree. Students
interested in Radio-TV will register for the Communications program and earn
the BSC degree.


COLLEGE


OF LAW


hnoinnino-


pnIi rI~n~


in Taw


a rp nnft AfPrPd


in the


Summer


Session.


. r V -


I 1


I r


_








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


with a


grade of


C or


higher


in other


accredited


schools


cepted for credit up to but not exceeding


a total of thirty hours.


Applicants fc
baccalaureate


admission


degree


must


from an


have


received


accredited


colle


before


admission


ge or university,


a 4-year


except


the case of veterans,


who


will be admitted after they


have completed


hours of


satisfactory work in an accredited college or university


if they


have maintained a


scholastic average of


or higher on


all work under-


taken.


COLLEGE


PHARMACY


Summer


Session


offerings


Colle


Pharmacy,


J. Hillis Miller Health Center, provide three courses in the Lower


a unit ii
Division


sev-


eral courses in the


Upper


Division and two graduate courses.


In addition, grad-


uate students will be given guidance
degrees.


in research leading to the


M.S.


and Ph.D.


For complete description


of the courses and requirements for


admission and


graduation the student should consult the


University Catalog.


COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Physical Education and Health offers programs of instruction


services


under five


departments,


namely,


Health


Service,


Intramural


Ath-


letics and Recreation, Required Physical


Education for


Men, Required


Physical


Education for


Women, and The Professional Curriculum.


THE


PROFESSIONAL


CURRICULUM


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
For admission to the College of Physical Education and Health students must
present a certificate of graduation from the University College, or the equivalent,
and have the approval of the Admissions Committee of the College of Physical


Education


Health.


(Consult


1955-56


University


Catalog


detailed


requirements).
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
The College of Physical Education and Health offers four undergraduate de-


agrees:


The Bachelor of Science in Physical Education,


The Bachelor of Science


in Health Education, The Bachelor of Science in Recreation, and The Bachelor of


Science in Physical


Therapy.


complete


information


concerning the several


curricula


requirements


these


degrees,


University


Catalog


1955-56 should be consulted.


GRADUATE DEGREE


Courses


are offered


College


Graduate


School


leading


degree of Master


Physical


Education


Health


with a


maior in


nhvsical


a'-" ""'' -""" -' -" -- - - - - --~ -~ -. - - .







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


THE


GRADUATE


DIVISION


THE GRADUATE


SCHOOL


ADMINISTRATION


The Graduate School consists of
and the Graduate Faculty. The Grad
of graduate work in the University
programs of the various colleges and
ability for the detailed operation of


respective <
committees.


eges


divisions


the Graduate Dean, the Graduate
uate School is responsible for the s
and for coordination among the
divisions of the University. The
the graduate programs is vested


through


their


deans


established


Council,
standards
graduate
responsi-
d in the
graduate


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Limitations of space and staff restrict the enrollment of graduate students.
The records of applicants for graduate study are reviewed by the graduate se-
lection committees of the various colleges and schools. In general no student will
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the University who is a graduate
of a non-accredited institution.
Members of the faculty of the University of Florida with a rank of assistant
professor (or equivalent) or above cannot receive a graduate degree from this
institution. This does not prohibit such faculty members from registering for
course work in the Graduate School, nor from using such credits upon a graduate
degree conferred by some other institution.
All admissions are granted on the condition that students must be responsible
for becoming informed of all rules, regulations, and requirements; for complying


with all official procedures; and for fulfilling all course and d<
In general, unqualified admission to the Graduate School f<
degrees except those in the College of Education and the College
tion and Health is dependent upon presentation of an undergr
an accredited college or curriculum with an average grade of
and senior years. If the student's undergraduate grades do not
he may be granted qualified admission as a fifth year student


of his choice
15 semester
more than


e. If so accepted by the college
hours involving advanced unde
six semester hours of graduate


gram with an average grade of "B" the s
mission to the Graduate School. Up to 12
credited to his graduate record. The trial p
the original planned period. In some units
average considerably above "B" is required


he will
rgradu:
work.
student
hours
program
of the


be given a
ite courses
Upon comr
will be gi


3gree requirements.
or study toward all
of Physical Educa-
aduate record from
"B" for the junior
meet this standard
through the college
program of about
and including not
?letion of this pro-
ren unqualified ad-


of the trial program may be
i will not be continued beyond
University, an undergraduate


for admission.


E








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


registration


under provision


. Course work taken


concurrently while


obtaining a satisfactory
a graduate program.


NTE


score may be counted where applicable on


Completion


semester


hours


a planned


approved


trial


pro-


gram while registered as a fifth year student at the University of Florida


with an honor point average


of 3.0 or above.


Not more than 9 semester


hours
If the


approval


work


can


taken


student makes an honor


Graduate


in courses


point average


Committee


numbered
of 3.0 or


ege up


above.


above,
to 15


upon


semester


hours of his trial program may be credited to his


graduate record.


Agriculture,


normally


only those


students


who


have


maintained


at least


an honor-point average of 2.5 in their upper division work and


.0 in their major


subject will be considered for admission


to the Graduate


Division.


For students


with an undergraduate major in general agriculture, the minimum upper division


average


is 2.75.


exceptional


cases,


when


a candidate


demonstrated


some


other


achievement


way


since


is fitness
earning


to do


graduate


bachelor


work,


degree,


as for


may


instance


outstanding


considered


mission.


DEGREES OFFERED

Non-thesis Degrees


Master of Agriculture with major studies in any field in Agriculture;
Master of Education, with major studies in any field in Education including Busi-
ness Education and Industrial Arts Education;
Master of Physical Education and Health.
Specialist in Education.


Thesis D


degrees


Master of Business


Administration,


with major studies


one of


following


departments:
Accounting
Business Organization and
Operation
Real Estate
Master of Science in Agriculture,


with major studies in one of the following de-


apartments:


Agricultural Economics
Agricultural Education
Agricultural Engineering
Agronomy


Dairy Science
Entomology
Horticulture
Plant Pathology







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering

Master of Science in Forestry


Master of Science in Pharmacy,


apartments:
Pharmacy


Pharmacognosy


Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering


with major studies in one of the following de-


Pharmacology
Pharmaceutical Chemistry


Master of Science, with major studies in one of the following departments:


Bacteriology


Biology


(Zoology)


Botany
Cancer Research


Entomology
Geography
Mathematics


Physics
Plant Pathology


Chemistry


Master of Fine Arts


Crafts


Painting and Drawing


Master of Arts in Architecture


Architectural Design


Building Construction


Master


Arts


Education


with


major


studies


one


following


apartments:
Education


Business Education


Agricultural Education
Industrial Arts Education


Master of Arts, with major studies in one of the following departments


Economics


Latin


English
French


Mathematics
Philosophy


Geography


Political Science


German
History


Psychology
Sociology


Inter-American Area Studies


Journalism


Spanish
Speech


Doctor of Education


Trwrtor of Philnannht.


with mai in tndiia in nn nf th fnllnwinr dcnartnmentn!








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Economics and Business Admin-
istration, including
Accounting
Business Organization and
Operation
Real Estate
Electrical Engineering
English
History
Horticulture


Plant Pathology
Political Science
Psychology
Sanitary Engineering
Sociology (Latin-American)
Soils
Spanish
Speech


THE


MASTER'S


DEGREE


Maximum Registration.-Nine semester hours is the maximum graduate load
for summer registration. Part-time employment of any kind reduces this load.
Full-time employees may register for 3 semester hours; one-third or one-half time
graduate assistants may register for 6 semester hours; full-time students may reg-
ister for 9 semester hours but candidates for thesis degrees are limited to 7 credit
hours of course work plus registration in 699 or 799.
Time Limit.-All work for the master's degree must be completed within seven
years from the time of first registration.
Residence Requirement.-For any master's degree, the student must spend at
least one full-time academic year at the University or the equivalent thereof,
as a graduate student.


Summer Session Residence.-If the work for the master's
the summer, four eight-week summer sessions will satisfy th<
ment. Transfer of work from another institution or use of
non-resident credit where accepted by the college concerned
Council may be permitted to reduce the full-time residence to
eight-week summer sessions. The candidate must be in reside


degree i1
residence
extension
and the
>ut not be


s done in
e require-
or other
Graduate
low three


nce the term at the


end of which the degree is awarded,
approved by the Graduate Council.


unless other arrangements are


specifically


Transfer of Credits.-Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number
of credits to the University will be allowed, but the final acceptance of credits from
other institutions is subject to the recommendation of the student's supervisory
committee and the approval of the Graduate Council.


Pre-Baccalaureate


Registration


Graduate


Credit.-An


undergraduate


student at the University of Florida who has


course


work for the bachelor's deg]


less than


ree may request in


one semester of
writing through


unfinished
the Dean








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


specific advanced degree the course ^
"A" or "B" and be recommended for
by his supervisory committee after he
Courses beyond the requirement of
without such approval are not eligib
ground work required for a change of
credit.


work taken must be earned with grade of
transfer to the student's graduate record
has been admitted to the Graduate School.
the Baccalaureate Degree that are taken
le for transfer as graduate credit. Back-
emphasis should be taken without graduate


National Teacher Exan
in Education are required
present time the National
examination are two-fold: (
and guiding students, and (
of the student for admission
er Examination is charged er
with other fees at the time


graduate


to undergo a compreh
Teacher Examination is
1) to provide additional
2) to be one of the factc
to the Advanced School.


students


ensive
used
data 1
>rs in
A fee


carrying


pr


Examination.
. The purposes
to be used in cou
determining the
for the National


ach student doing graduate work in Education,


of registration.


ograms
At the
of the
nseling
fitness
Teach-
payable


The fee is $7.00 for full-time students


or $11.00 for part-time students. The examination
master and prompt application is necessary.


is given


early


each


Admission


Candidacy.-Admission


to candidacy


an advanced


degree


and the award of su
maintainance for all
of an average grade o
and minor studies sh
grade point average


ch a
course
,f "B.
Lall b
of 3


courses. Grades in courses
this requirement.


degree shall d
es taken in the
" Any grade oi
e removed by
1.0 is maintain


epend among
fields of the
f "incomplete
completing a
ed including


numbered 699 and 799 are


other requirements upon
e major and minor studies
" in the fields of the major
11 required work unless a
the hours of incomplete
not considered in meeting


MASTER'S


DEGREE


WITHOUT


THESIS


MASTER OF EDUCATION
Description and Purpose.--This degree is designed for the professional prepa-
ration of teachers, rather than for research. The program has been planned to
develop in public school workers a wide range of essential abilities and to give
them a broad background of advanced general education, rather than to en-
courage them to specialize narrowly. While not neglecting to add to the quali-
fications already attained, it further aims to overcome weaknesses in the student's
development.
The Master of Education program seeks to develop the student in:

1. An understanding of the nature of the individual and the learning process;
2. An understanding of the purposes, issues, and trends of education in


ination.-All







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


6. The ability to think and act creatively and adequately within his area of
specialization or field of work, i.e., to see new problems, to work out
solutions, and to communicate the results of his thinking and acting to
others.

Transfer of Credits.-If recommended in advance by the Graduate Committee


and approved by the Dean of the Graduate
to study in other institutions to the extent
hours. No graduate credits earned prior to
transferred without special recommendation
approval of the Graduate Council. No mor


School, a student may be permitted
of (but not to exceed) six semester
admission to the University may be
of the Graduate Committee and the
e than six semester hours of credit


may be thus transferred.

Work Required.-Instead of having a fixed requirement of majors and minors,
each student will be required to submit a plan of study which shows a reasonable
amount of balance and direction. The planned program is approved by the stu-
dent's counselor, with whose assistance, the plan is first developed, then by the
Education department head concerned and the Office of Graduate Studies in Edu-
cation. After the program has been developed, any changes must be requested in
writing and similarly approved.
Minimum course requirement is 36 semester hours, of which not more than
nine may be taken in any summer term (six in six weeks, three in three weeks),
and not more than fifteen in any one semester. Six semester hours of workshop
or extension courses may be allowed and will count as residence credit. At least
50 per cent of the minimum course requirements shall be from courses numbered
600 and above.
Courses designated as field laboratory courses may be taken to the extent of
six semester hours of credit. It should be noted, however, that the University
imposes a limit of 12 hours of credit in the aggregate on work allowed from (a)


off-campus
(c) course
Where
cation he
Education


3 workshops and extends
es transferred from other
the student has had no
must have completed a
including work at the


qualify for this degree. Students
should consult their counselors as
ing this requirement. In general,
the field of Education is required.


lion courses, (b)
:r institutions.


field laboratory courses, and


previous work in professional courses in Edu-
minimum of 36 hours of professional work in
graduate and undergraduate level in order to
planning to take work in closely related fields
to the acceptability of such work toward meet-
a minimum of twelve semester hours outside


A
A
use of


thesis is not required.
reading knowledge of a foreign language is not required, but the
the English language is expected of all candidates. Admission to


effective
the work







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


work at the Univers
by a committee of th


written
The
date, (2
of comp
tion of


examinations
unassembled
) the student
etency in the
personal qua]


sity of Florida. The unassembled examination is
e faculty, which may recommend supplementary o:
for students whose admission to candidacy is in
examination includes: (1) the student's academic
's scores on the National Teacher Examination, (3
use (oral and written) of the English language, (
cities and promise of professional attainment by ]


evaluated
ral and/or
doubt.
record to
) evidence
4) evalua-
persons to


whom the applicant's record is known, (5)
(6) any other appropriate information.
The unassembled examination is administ
Studies in Education for the Graduate Corn
The student's remaining program of stuck
as revealed in the Admission to Candidacy
Graduate Committee, the candidate will be r
satisfactory completion of the designated cou
The candidate must have completed at
taking the last six semester hours of work,
the satisfactory completion of an internship
master hours of student teaching.

The Graduate Committee of the Departme
is appointed for each student in the Master
under the general supervision of the Graduz
Education. The program is administered thl
in Education.


MASTER OF


the student's experience record, and

tered through the Office of Graduate
mittee.
ly will be planned in terms of needs
Examination. On approval of the
recommended for the degree upon the
rse work.
least one year of teaching prior to
or must have included in his record
) program or a minimum of six se-


Education.-A special counselor
education program. His work is
committee in the Department of
L the Office of Graduate Studies


AGRICULTURE


The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who wish


additional
than for
eluding th
admission
degree, as


training before
those interested
ose for admission
to candidacy, are
outlined elsewhe


entering business occupations or professions, rather
primarily in research. The basic requirements, in-
, residence, supervisory committee, plan of study and
the same as for the Master of Science in Agriculture
re, but the work requirements are made to conform


to the specific objectives of this degree.

Work Required.-A minimum of thirty-six semester hours of course work shall


be required, at
Each student's
needs of the in
mittee. A thes


least eighteen of which s.
program is designed to
.dividual and is subject t
;is is not required, but


hall b
take
;o the
the s


e designated strictly for graduates.
into account the qualifications and
approval of the supervisory com-
tudent must submit reports, term








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MASTER


OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION


AND


HEALTH


Work Required.-A minimum of thirty semester hours of course work is re-
quired, at least fifteen of which must be courses in the fields of Physical Education,
Health Education or Recreation designated strictly for graduates or courses
numbered 500 and above if approved for graduate major credit. Of the remaining
fifteen hours, at least nine semester hours must be taken in courses outside the
College of Physical Education and Health. At least 50 per cent of the minimum
course requirements shall be from courses numbered 600 or above.


Superv
College of
person de
School as
program,


4isory Committee.-A committee of five members
Physical Education and Health, with the Dean 4
signaled by him serving as chairman, and the 2
ex-oficio member, will supervise the work of stud
subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.


of the faculty of the
,f the College or some
Dean of the Graduate
lents registered in this


Admission to Candidacy.-Admission
guarantee that the student will be admi
student will be required to pass a written
being recommended by the supervisory
This examination should be taken by the
residence.


to the work of this program is not a
tted to candidacy for the degree. The
and/or oral examination in addition to
committee for admission to candidacy.
i end of the student's first semester of


Final Examination.-A thesis is not required but the candidate must pass a
final examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or oral ex-
amination will be administered by the supervisory committee and will be con-
fined largely to the student's major field of study.


MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS

Work Required.--The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program
with a definite objective, consisting of thirty semester hours of registration, in-


eluding not less than twenty-four h
and Thesis. At least one-half of tl
shall be in a single field of study d
minor, in related subject matter.
minors or one twelve-hour minor
department other than the major
modified upon written authority of
the major field shall be in courses 4


ours of course work plus six hours in Research
he required twenty-four hours of course work
designated as the major and the remainder, or


One six-hour minor


may be
. In spe
the Dean
designed


taken. Min
cial cases,
of the Grac
strictly for


by the Graduate Dean, in courses designed for
,- 1_. - Ja .. -_. -- 1 ... -_.. ....- 2 1 r- /


adva


IS
or
thil
dua
gra
nce
. t-~


required; two six-hour
work must be from a
s requirement may be
te School. The work in
aduates, or if approved
sd undergraduates and
_-t ..... J .... A ll


I








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


form of the thesis. The original
and accompanied by three copies
Dean's office on or before the d
original copy together with the
if the thesis is accepted.


copy of the thesis bound in temporary binding
of a brief abstract of the thesis must be in the
ates specified in the University Calendar. The
first carbon will be deposited in the Library


Language Requirement.--(1) A reading knowledge of a foreign language
is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory committee or the college con-
cerned. When a foreign language is required the examination will be conducted
by the Department of Foreign Languages. This requirement must be satisfied
before the student is admitted to candidacy. A student in the regular session must
pass the language examination by April 20 if he expects to graduate at the end of
the summer term of that year. In case the student is completing all his work in the
summer terms, the foreign language requirement must be satisfied before the be-
ginning of the fourth summer term. If the student is majoring in a foreign lan-
guage, that language cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. (2) The effective
use of the English language as determined by the student's supervisory committee
is required of all candidates for the master's degree.


Supervisory


Committee.-A


special


supervisory


committee


consisting


less than
upon the
should be
general n
Graduate


of the sur


three members will be appointed for each student by the Graduate Dean


recommendation of the college concerned.
appointed as early as possible after the
ot later than the end of the first semester
School is ex-officio member of all supervis
)ervisory committee are given under several


The supervisory committee
student is admitted and in
of study. The Dean of the
ory committees. The duties
of the items relating to the


requirements for master's degrees.

Admission to Candidacy.-Whether an applicant has been provisionally admit-


ted or
review
sion of
vote of
plicant
ments,
Admiss
office.


regularly
his entire
residence
the princ
to candida
and to apj
ion to Can
This is d<


admitted, his supervisory committee or official counselor shall
academic record at the end of his first semester or summer ses-
work. In addition to the approval of the committee, a formal
ipal department concerned will be necessary to admit the ap-
icy, to fix definitely the additional residence and course require-


)rov
ididr
mne


e the
icy m
when


program the applicant has submitted. Application for
ust be made on a special form supplied by the Dean's


candidate


completed


about


one-half


course work. In the College of Education, candidates for advanced
or advanced teaching certificates, should consult the Office of Graduate
in Education for additional information affecting admission to candidacy.


degrees,
Studies


General Examination.-It will


he the duty


of the Snpainal


Sunnarvisnrv Conm-


I


I


I








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


UMMER SESSION


Special


Thesis


Abstract


Required.-At the request of


State


Department


of Education of the State of Florida


, the College of Education requires all candi-


dates for the degree of Master of Arts in Education to prepare a


750 word ab-


stract of the thesis which is forwarded to the State Department for informational
purposes.


THE


ADVANCED


SCHOOL


THE


COLLEGE


EDUCATION


The Advanced School of the College of Education offers two degrees, the degree


Specialist


Education


Doctor


Education


degree.


Work


Advanced School


will be available only to


those who


have shown a high degree


ability in


School


their first


is to develop


year


leadership,


graduate
research


work.


purpose


competency, and


Advanced


specialization.


Admission


Advanced


School.-Admission


Advanced


School


open


only to


persons who


have:


Completed


two school


years


successful


professional


experience;


Successfully completed thirty-six hours in education.


Admission to the Advanced School will


be based on the following criteria


High scholastic average during the fifth year work


age or above as computed at the
evidence of good scholarship);


Results from the National Teacher


Results from the Miller


(3.5 grade point aver-


University of Florida will be considered


Examination;


Analogies Test;


An oral examination administered by the department in which the student
seeks to specialize;
Special interviews for individuals for whom the department of specializa-
tion seeks more data.


The judgment concerning admission of an individual student will be


based on a


consideration of a student's


performance


in all of these areas by the department


in which


student


desires


specialize.


department


certify


to the


Admissions


Committee


that


student


criteria


admission


the Advanced School.
In all cases the record


, experience, and personal


qualifications of the person


applying for admission are subject to the approval of the Admissions Committee.


Where possible, students should


seek admission to the Advanced School before


enrolling in


courses


beyond


master's


degree.


Where


procedure


impossible,


the student will register in


the graduate school and during the first


semester


work


beyond


master's


degree


apply


admission


to the


Advanced School.


If such candidate


found to be eligible the work taken during


j I j C 1 t1 1 --- it "- - --- -.. ...








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


The planned program of specialization must include at least tw
hours in courses open only to graduate students and the remainder i1
open to graduate and undergraduate students. The student may spe
any of the established areas of the College of Education.
A thesis is not required. Emphasis will be placed upon the use of
rather than upon the development of skills in research techniques.
Admission to the Advanced School plus successful completion of one
of work of his planned program will automatically constitute admission
dacy for the Specialist in Education degree.
At the end of the thirty-six hour program the student will be give
examination both written and oral by a committee selected by the he
area of specialization. Upon passing the examination the candidate
awarded the Specialist in Education degree upon the approval of th<
and the Graduate Council.
The Ed.S. is planned as a terminal degree. If at the end of his pro
student wishes to work for the Ed.D he must meet the requirements s
that degree.


Time Limit.-All work for the Specialist in Education
pleted within seven years from the time of first registration.


enty-four
n courses
cialize in

research

semester
to candi-


m a final
ad of his
3 will be
a faculty,


,gram the
stated for


degree must be corn-


DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
The Doctor of Education degree is designed to develop scholarship and leader-
ship in the field of Education. Each doctoral candidate is expected to achieve
competence in the broad field of Education and in an area of specialization in
which adequate supervision is available.
Administration of the program leading to this degree is cared for through
the Office of Graduate Studies in Education, which carries out the policies of
the Graduate School and the Graduate Committee of the College of Education.
This office is located in Room 202, P. K. Yonge Building.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of Doctor of Education
requires admission to the Advanced School of the College of Education, previously
described, as well as admission to the Graduate School of the University of Florida.


Minors.-Minor work, or work in cognate fields is required. If one minor is
selected, at least 18 hours of work therein will be required; if two minors are
chosen, one must have at least 12 hours of course work, the other at least six.
Minors may not be taken in any branch of Education.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present a suitable program
of not fewer than 18 hours of cognate work in fields other than Education. This
program must have the approval of the student's supervisory committee. The








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Qualifying


Examinatio


fying examination by his


n.-The


applicant is


recommended


supervisory committee after he has camnitdsfiin


course work and the research preparation requirements of the College of Educa-
tion.


The examination


consists of


a general-professional


by the Graduate Committee of the College of Education to all applicants
n *w aS -jkJ


administered


field of specialization section administered by the


concerned;


examination


in the


minor


department or faculty


or minors,


an oral examination conducted by the applicant's


where


-. -- I


groups


involved


supervisory committee.


The S&
considered
seminar s
members <


supervisory


eminar.-Each


a general
e faculty


student
doctoral
members


tne supervisory
committee will


is expected


seminar
of the


to develop


in the
college,


committee.


report


thereon


College of Education.


College.


other


a thesis


project


Participants


advanced


conclusion


to the


Graduate


student
semin;


to be
in the
s, and
ar the


Committee


Research Preparation Requirement.-This requirement is satisfied by meeting
the requirements in both Group 1 and Group 2 below:


Group


,-(1)


a course in Educational Research


(EDF 760)


library


usage


with EDF 760 at the


examination


(usually


given


connection


University of Florida)


a basic course in


statistics


(EDF 360, or PSY 211,


at the University of Florida)


Group


or MS 310,


2.-either


a reading knowledge of


student's


one foreign language relevant to the


needs, or


following


measurements,


statistics


or research


courses


EDE


or 670


702;


EDF


650;


EDF 660 or


PSY


PSY


EDS


or 743


605 or


PHA


or 510


There is no language requirement for the Doctor of Education degree.


Courses


taken at other institutions which may be the equivalent of


course


requirements


indicated above may be considered, on recommendation of the applicant's super-
visory committee.

Abstracts.-For the purpose of inclusion in a summary of research studies in


Education, published by the College


of Education, the candidate must supply one


1500-2500 word abstract of his dissertation, in addition to such other abstracts as
may be required by the Dean of the Graduate School.


For information relating to Residence,


Time


Limit, the Supervisory Committee,


one


for the


quali-


oitces n


I









60 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Council does not specify just what courses or how many courses will be required.
Doctoral work is mainly research, and the student is thrown largely upon his own
responsibility.
Candidates in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Horticulture, Plant Pathology,
and Soils may do their research at certain branch stations of the University of
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station where adequate staff and facilities are
available.
Minors.-The student must take at least one and not more than two minors.


Supervisory Com?
doctor's degree should
Faculty. At least thr
mending the degree.
discipline should be
leges or disciplines a
Committees are nomi
approved by the Dea
School. It is recomm
as possible after the


nit
d c<
ee
In


tee.-The Supervisory Comm
insistt of at least five member
members should be from the
addition one or two members


ittee for a candidate for the
's, chosen from the Graduate
college or department recom-
from a different educational


recommended for the purpose of coordination
nd to represent the students minor or minors.
nated by the department head (in no case by
n of the College and appointed by the Dean of
ended that the Supervisory Committee be appo:
student is admitted and in general not later


between col-
Supervisory
the student),
the Graduate
inted as early
than the end


of the first semester of study. The Graduate Dean is an ex offcio member of all
supervisory committees.
Duties of the Supervisory Committee are as follows:


To
To
qua
pro


inform the student of all regulations
meet as a committee immediately
,lifications of the student and to p
gram of study meeting major and n


dence, etc.
To meet at
dissertation


governing the degree sought.
after appointment to pass on the
repare with the student a written
linor requirements, languages, resi-


an appropriate time to approve the proposed subject of the
and to approve a projected program leading to its completion.


4. To meet as a Committee
nation and to conduct th
5. To meet as a committee
half completed to review
to make suggestions for
6. To meet as a committee


of Examination to arrange for the written exami-
te oral qualifying examination.
when the work on the dissertation is at least one-
* the procedure, progress and expected results and
its completion.
when the dissertation is completed to conduct the


final oral examination primarily but not exclusively on the subject of the
dissertation and to satisfy itself that the result is a piece of original re-
search and a contribution to knowledge in the field of research scholarship.


Language Requirement.--(1)


The languages normally required for the Ph.D.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


As an


student, with the
may demonstrate
use of that langu
defined as ability
shall not be the


alternative


a reading knowledge


of two foreign


languages,


approval of the supervisory committee and the college concerned,
a functional knowledge of one foreign language and purposeful


age i
to r
nati'


foreign student whose
major field. In each


in preparation o:
ead, write and s
ve language of
native language
case, a petition


f the dissertation.
peak the language
the student, but it
provides extensive


Graduate


Functional knowledge is
involved. The language
may be English for a
research material in his


Council


must clarify the


points mentioned if alternative


is selected.


(3) As a second alternative within departments individually approved by the
Graduate Council, a study of mathematics may be substituted for a reading
knowledge of one foreign language. When this substitution is chosen, the courses
in mathematics taken for this purpose shall not be considered to be a part of the
major or minor studies. The degree of proficiency in mathematics shall be de-
termined as follows:


For a field in which calculus is not required through the
the student shall take and pass with grade B or higher
nation in MS 354 and any other course in the Department
specified by his Supervisory Committee. Under this provisi
may be substituted for one foreign language in Business
and in Agricultural Economics.
For a field in which calculus is required as a part of tl


Master's degree,
the final exami-
of Mathematics
on, mathematics
Administration


Bachelor's


Master's program, the student shall either pass with grade of B or above or
demonstrate equivalent proficiency by written examination in six semester
hours of work in the Department of Mathematics requiring MS 354 as a
normal prerequisite.
The Department of Foreign Languages will certify to the Graduate School
the competency of each student in the required foreign languages whether estab-
lished by examination on the campus or elsewhere. The language requirement
should be met as early as possible in the student's program and must be satisfied
before the applicant can be admitted to the qualifying examination.

Residence--(1) A minimum of three academic years of graduate work on a
full-time basis beyond the baccalaureate degree completed at institutions approved


by the Graduate School is required for
the second or third academic year of
spent in full-time study on the campus
filling the requirements of resident st
the extent permitted will be evaluated
assuming 15 credit hours of any app


. . ...- ._ .. . a -. ?


the
the
s at
;udy
on
rove
-,A,, 1


11 n.J...n n-'- c4'r


degree of doctor of
three-year program
the University of F
of paragraph (1)


philosophy. Either
shall normally be
lorida. (2) In ful-
part-time study to


the basis of proportionate credit hours
d combination of course work and re-
IAln TS^Tmr n ccr4nrl YiiTIi nia nnn-








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


teacher while fully employed cannot meet this requirement of continuous inten-
sive study, fellowships and assistantships are made available wherever possible
to doctoral candidates. (3) Between the qualifying examination and the con-
ferring of the degree, there must elapse a minimum interval of one academic year
in full-time residence, or one full calendar year if the candidate is on less than
full-time basis.


Qualifying


Examination.-The qualifying


examination,


which


required


all candidates for the degree of Doctor of Ph
second term of the second year of residence.
special supervisory committee is both written
minor subjects. The oral examination coming a
the written part of the qualifying examination j


opportunity to reach a
degree.
If the student fails
opportunity unless for
Supervisory Committee


ilosophy, may be taken during the
The examination conducted by the
and oral and covers the major and
ifter the language examination and
'ives the Supervisory Committee an


conclusion as to the advisability of pursuit of the Ph.D.


in his qualifying examination, he will not be given another
special reasons a re-examination is recommended by his
! and approved by the Graduate Council.


Time Limits.-All work for the Doctor's degree must be completed within
five calendar years after the date of the qualifying examination or the examina-
tion must be repeated.


a doctoral
mittee, the
dean. The
(2) the op
candidacy,
by the maj
end of the
residence.


candid
head
appro
inion 4
and (


Candidacy.-A regular graduate student
late must be approved for candidacy by
of the major department, the college d
val must be based on (1) the academic
of his supervisory committee concerning
3) a qualifying examination, the nature c


who wishes to become
his supervisory corn-
ean and the graduate
record of the student,
his overall fitness for
f which is determined


or and minor departments. This evaluation is to be made toward the
second year or the beginning of the third year of equivalent full-time


Dissertation. -A


satisfactory


dissertation


showing


independent


investigation


and research is
published either
research be of p
for publication.
Graduate Dean
sum of $50.00


required of all candidates.
by microfilm, microcard or
ublishable quality and that
The original copy of the
on or before the date spec
should be deposited with


Since all doctoral dissertations will
as a monograph it is necessary that
the dissertation be in appropriate fo
dissertation must be presented to
;ified in the University Calendar. '1
the Business Manager to cover 1


cost of publication as explained below.


pZLt fnii t 4Jyn fl-oi 4 2. f^ 1 D1 n ..l A nin *a,, 4 s 7Dl fl n 2 i fl T__


Admission to








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


3. The choice may be to request a two ye
for publication by printing. If publication is
in essentially complete form, the Graduate
refund of the entire deposit upon receipt of fi
At the end of the two year period, unless e'
station for such publication has been presented
publication of the dissertation by microfilm i


ar period to investigate possibilities


completed as a book
Council will consider
ve copies of the book c
evidence of acceptance
, the Graduate Council
is indicated under (1)


or monograph
a request for
,r monograph.
of the disser-
will authorize
above.


Final


Examination.-After


acceptance


dissertation


com-


pletion of all other prescribed work of the candidate, but in no case earlier than
six months before the conferring of the degree, the candidate will be given a
final examination, oral or written or both, by his supervisory committee. Satis-
factory performance on this examination completes all requirements for the degree.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS


There are a number of special graduate programs that are described in detail
in the University Catalog. Students interested in the following programs are
referred to the catalog for complete information:
Cancer Research
School of Inter-American Studies.
Graduate Program in Public Administration
Research Program at The Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies
Statistical Laboratory
Graduate Program in Community Planning


SOUTHERN REGIONAL GRADUATE SUMMER SESSIONS IN STATISTICS


At the re


mission on S
and the Con
continuing p
held at each
1954 at the
July 17), at
Each court
credit and ei
summer sess
secutive wor


!quest of the Southern Regional Education Board's Advisory Com-
itatistics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, the University of Florida,
solidated University of North Carolina have agreed to initiate a
program of six-week graduate summer sessions in statistics to be
of the three institutions in rotation, beginning in the summer of
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia (June 9 to
Florida in 1955 and at Raleigh in 1956.
'se offered will carry approximately three semester hours of graduate
ach of the sponsoring institutions will accept credits earned in the


a -


ions as residence credit.
k in successive summers


course work in statistics for a master'
satisfy the remaining requirements fo3


where they have been admitted to ce


The courses are arranged to
so that those who wish can
's degree in three summers; s
r course work and thesis at t


ndidacy.


provide con-
complete the
students must
he institution


The advanced courses may be ac-








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


INSTRUCTIONS


AND


INFORMATION


The requirements for admission to the Graduate School are printed in the
the Admission section of this catalog. Additional requirements may be im-
posed by individual colleges and divisions. (See General Index.)

Correspond with the Head of the Department of the college in which you
propose to do your major work for specific information concerning course
requirements, deficiencies to be completed, etc.


Eligibility for admission to
you have filed all the creden
catalog. The proper forms
of the Office of the Registrar
concerning other credentials
admission to graduate study.


graduate study can be determined only after
tials specified in the Admissions section of the
will be furnished by the Admissions Section
and the prospective student will also be advised
he must submit in order to be considered for


The fees which graduate students must pay are listed in the section of this
catalog dealing with expenses. (See General Index)
At the time designated by the Registrar, register with the dean of the college
or division in which you propose to take your major work. Your registration
form must be signed by the dean or someone designated by him. Either
the head of the department or some other professor in this department will
become the supervisor of your program, and he will suggest courses for
which you should register.


Passing grades for graduate student
in courses numbered below 600 a
numbered 600 and above are A,
numbered 600 and above count to
number of credit hours in courses
grade of A.
No courses may be taken for grace
hours of approved credit may be t
count on the requirements for m
in Education and the Master of E
extension graduate courses may
credit.


tts beginning with the 1954 summer session
re A and B. Passing grades for courses
B, and C; however, C grades in courses
ward a graduate degree only if an equal
numbered 600 and above are earned with


kuate credit by correspondence. Up to six
transferred from accredited institutions to
asters' degrees. For the Master of Arts
educationn degrees, six hours of authorized
be taken for both course and residence


Observe the regulations and dates for satisfying the language requirements
and for applying for admission to candidacy.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Early


your


term


before


graduation,


notify the


Registrar that you


are a candidate for a degree.


Calendar for


Last day for making


plication for a d


egree


When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at the
office of the Dean of the Graduate School.


Caps,


gowns and


hoods are worn


at commencement exercises.


Graduating


students must arrange for proper


sizes


academic


costumes


through


University

Consult the
committee j


Bookstore.


professor of


guidance.


your major


Consult


subject and


office


your special


Dean


supervisory
e Graduate


School if you


wish interpretation of any requirement.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SPECIAL


SIX


WEEK


COURSE


STATISTICS


Enrollment is limited to persons whose applications have been
approved by the Director of the University of Florida Statistical Lab-


oratory


Persons interested in these courses should communicate with


him in advance of the application dates listed in the calendar.


SOUTHERN REGIONAL COOPERATIVE GRADUATE SUMMER SE


SSION.


The University
Institute and tl


Florida,
Southern


North


Regional


Carolina


State


Education


College,


Board


Virginia


are jointly


Polytechnic


sponsoring


series


of cooperative


graduate


summer


sessions


in statistics.


sessions


be of particular interest to


research and professional workers who


want in-


tensive


instruction


basic


statistical


concepts


who


wish


to learn


modern


statistical methodology


teachers of elementary statistical courses who want


some formal training in modern statistics


degrees in statistics; (4
work in statistics; and


(3) prospective candidates for graduate


graduate students in other fields who desire supporting


professional statisticians who wish


to keep informed


of advanced specialized theory and methods.


Students registering in this program


may


register for


more


than


six semester


hours


credit.


Each


course


designated


department


number


title


Florida followed by the title and description of the
for use by the cooperating institutions.

AGRONOMY


as used


at the


University


equivalent course as


adopted


650.-Research Methods.


3 credits.


7:00-8:30 Daily


MIL


MARSHALL, C.


STATISTICAL METHODS


I. Prerequisite:


Interest in Research.


Measures of location and variation;


significance; analysis of


variance


gression; basic experimental designs


observed and


and covariance;


theoretical


frequency


distributions


tests of


linear and non-linear, simple and multiple


factorial experiments; and


goodness


of fit.


651.-Design of Experiments.


credits.


7:00-8:30 Daily


MIL 26


HARSHBARGER, B.


STATISTICAL


METHODS


Prerequisite


course in


basic statistics.


Fundai
designs;
applied fit


mental principle
individual comp


elds.


of designs,


arisons,


randomized


components


blocks,
error, c


Latin


squall


confounding ,


res, split-plot
application to


and factorial
problems in


MATHEMATICS


MS. 551.-Advanced Topics in Calculus.


credits.


10:20-11:50 Daily


MIL 27


SOUTH


MATHEMATICS


FOR STATISTIC


Prerequisite:


Calculus.


Special topics of an advanced nature in mathematics basic to an understanding of mathematical
statistics,


MS. 619.-Theory of Probability and Theory of Sampling.


3 credits.


I









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MS. 690.-Special Topics.


credits.


7:00-8:30


Daily


MIL 27.


SECTION I: THEORY OF
Basic theory of sampling from


sample
Choice


e. Comparison
sampling unit,


Double sampling.


of simp
Subsan


MPLING. Prerequisite:


a finite population.
le random, stratified
ipling. Relative effi


Theory


I, Methods I.


Confidence limits and estimation of optimum
d, quota, purposive, and systematic sample.
ciencies of different methods of estimation.


Discussion of unique applications of sampling theory.


MS. 690.-Special Topics.
10:20-11:50 Daily


credits.


MIL


SMITH,


W. L.


SECTION II: THEORY OF STATISTICAL INFERENCE. Prerequisite: Theory II.


Sufficient


statistics.


tion. Consistent
quential tests and


estima
estim;


Unbiassed estimators with minimum variance. Maxi
dtors. Admissable, Bayes and minimax estimators.
ates. Double sampling.


mum likelihood estima-
Risk functions. Be-


MS. 690.-Special Topics.


3 credits.


8:40-10:10 Daily


SECTION III:


MIL


ANDERSON, R. L.


SPECIAL ADVANCED TOPICS IN


STATISTICAL ANALYSIS.


Prerequisite: Theory II and a course in Design of Experiments.


Regression


analysis


with


errors


in both


variates;


c


struction experimental models; effects of inadequacies i
criminate functions; uses of Chi-square; methods of cc
methods of transforming data to meet specific objectives.


,rthogonal polynomials,
in the models; variance
)mbining data with het


principles of
components;


erogeneous


errors;


EDUCATION


EDF. 660.-Educational Statistics.


3 credits.


10:20-11:50 Daily


MIL 26


RULON, P. J.


STATISTICAL


RESEARCH


EDUCATION


AND


PSYCHOLOGY.


Prerequi-


site:


Courses in statistics.


Statistical problems arising
workers and those interested :
of the recent advances in the f


in education and psychology.
in the teaching of statistics


Designed especially to inform research
in psychology and education of some


SEMINAR.-Recent Advances in Statistics. No credit.


3:00-4:30 Tuesday and Thursday.


LE 207


MEYER, H.


Distinguished speakers will give se
methodology on two or three afternoons


mmxnars
a week.


on recent


developments


in statistical


theory








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SPECIAL


THREE WEEK


COURSES


The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run for


three weeks only


dicated.


. Enrollment is limited to these special groups as in-


Students registering for courses listed in this section follow


the same admission and registration procedures as other students but
are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.


June


to July


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


ADVANCED


UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSE


503.-Advanced Farm and Home Management. 1


credits.


Open to agricul-


tural extension workers only.


10:30 Daily
Laboratory


FLO 10
2:00 to 5


GREENMAN


:20 W F


Principles of production and consumption


FLO 104
economics


J. R.


as applied to farm


plans; general farm management principles; the actual prepare
home development plans for each of four different farm situations.


the proposed plans will be discussed in


class


tion


and with the farm families.


and anal:


home development
ysis of farm and


The farms will be visited, and


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


460.-Supplemental Irrigation. 1


credits.


Open only to agricultural exten-


sion workers who have not received credit for AG. 301.


7:00 Daily
Laboratory:


FLO 210


CHOATE


2:00 to 4:10 Th


R. E.


FLO


The general principles of


requirements,


sources


water,


design of supplemental irrigation


systems


pumps, power and economic evaluations.


with


treatments of water


GRADUATE COURSE


670.-Problems


in Agricultural Engineering.


3 credits.


Open


vocational


agriculture teachers only.


To arran


Special


problems


FLO 210
agricultural


ROGERS, F


engineering.


AGRICULTURAL


EXTENSION


GRADUATE COURSE


AXT.


607.-Principles in the Development of Youth Programs.


1% credits.


Open


to agricultural extension workers only.


0 1:8 D a i ly


K 111


HAMPSON


- -.a* a .


C( M









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GRADUATE COURSES


ED. 625.-Workshop for Rehabilitation Counseling.


3 credits.


Section 1.


8:10-11


:30 Dail


This course will orient students in the theory and principles in
provide an opportunity for the development of skills and techniques
vocational rehabilitation counselors.


evolved


in counseling


necessary


and will


to become effective


ED. 670.-Workshop in Human Relations.


credits.


8:10-11:30


Daily


COMBS


and WILES


Various
form the c


problems in


:ore


human


of the workshop


concerned with techniques and


relations


experiences.


procedures,


ways
Open


with


of working
to teachers,


group


dynamics


with them
principals,
and group


seeking


solutions,


lay leaders, and others
process.


EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY


EDE. 600.-Elementary School


Section


:10-11:30 Daily


Curriculum


I 207


(Formerly
HILLIARD


501)


credits.


EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS


EDF


640.-Problems


in Pupil


Development and


Learning


(Formerly


542).


credits.


Section


:10-11:30


12:50-4:10


Daily


YON


CUNNINGHAM


KNIGHT, J.,


STAFF


EDUCATION-SECONDARY


EDS.


600.-Foundations


Secondary


School


Curriculum


(Formerly


519).


credits.


Section


:10-11:30 Daily


I 103


OLSON


C. M.


EDUCATION-


VOCATIONAL


AGRICULTURE


EDV


671.-Adult Education in Agriculture.


(Formerly


571)


credits.


8:10-11


:30 Dail


I 109


OFTEN


W.T.


Problems of


organizing


and teaching


adult


farmer


classes.


HORTICULTURE


HE. 361.-Landscape Plantings for Florida.


credits.


Open to county and home


demonstration


9:20 Daily


agents


only.


FLO 209


WATKINS


J. V.


Laboratory: 2:00 to 4:10 T.


Elements of landscape planting, identification, maintenance an
commonly used in beautification of homes and schools in Florida.


d landscape


uses of plant materials









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SSION


SPECIAL


THREE WEEK


COURSES


The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run for


three weeks only


dicated.


. Enrollment is limited to these special groups as in-


d s
Students reffisterinr for courses listed in this section follow


the same admission and registration procedures as other students but
are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.


July


- July 29


EDUCATION-GENERAL


ED. 482.-Planning for Improved Daily Living (Formerly EN.


482).


credits.


Section


10-12:40 Daily


YON


INGLE


A study of Florida


appreciation
and other p


resources


and understanding


hases


of esthetic living.


is made applicable to richer living.


of art principles


applied


Attention


to costume


desit


is given to
gn, home


developing
decoration,


GRADUATE COURSES

EDUCATION-GENERAL


ED. 631.-Educational Leadership I. (Formerly


557).


credits.


Section


8:10-11:30 Daily


WILES


EDUCATION--ELEMENTARY


EDE. 670.-Language Arts in the Elementary School-Skills (Formerly EN.


578).


3 credits.


10-11:30 Daily


I 207


THOMPSON, E. M.


Trends and


practices


in the teaching


reading, and oral and written


expression.


EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS


EDF


640.-Problems in


Pupil


Development and


Learnin


g (Formerly


542).


3 credits.


Section 4.


8:10-11:30, 12:50-4:10 Daily


YON


CUNNINGHAM, M. T.,


KNIGHT


and STAFF


EDF


642.-Problems in Educational Psychology


(Formerly


541).


3 credits.


Section


10-11:30 Daily


YON 114


WATKIN


L. E.


EDUCATION-SECONDARY


EDS.


611.-The


Core


Program


Secondary


School


(Formerly


EN.


675).


2 n..nA4fa








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SPECIAL SIX WEEK WORKSHOP


JUNE 21


- JULY


Enrollment


bama,


Georgia,


registration.


limited
South


to 40 selected educators from the states of Ala-


Carolina,


and


Florida.


Not


open


general


EDUCATION-SECONDARY


Family


Financial Security


Workshop


EDS. 600.-Foundations of the Secondary School Curriculum
3 credits.


(Formerly


EN 501).


Section


12:50-3:00


Daily


BRO


MYERS, R.


B., and


RICHARDSON,


J. G.


641.-Economic


Education


Secondary


School


(Formerly


580).


credits.


8:10-11:30


Daily


BRO


MYERS


, R. B., and RICHARDSON,


Workshop


sponsored


Committee on


Family


Financial


Security


Education,


the College of Education, and the College of Business Administration.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SCHEDULE


COURSES


JUNE 21


SUMMER
AUGUST


SESSION


1955


MINIMUM SIZE OF CLASSES


No undergraduate
S *


the regular registrar
semester, the registra
For Freshmen and Sol
courses numbered i


class or section will be continued or offered if, at the end of
ion period, prior to the day classes begin for a term or
tion does not meet the following minimum requirements.
phomore classes or sections (the comprehensive courses and
in the 100's and 200's) the minimum is 12 registrations.


Junior classes or sections


(courses numbered in


the 300's)


the minimum is


8 registrations.


SSenior classes or sections
minimum is 6 registrations.


(courses


numbered


400's


500's)


ABBREVIATIONS
The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:


BUILDING A


ADM

AE

AND
AUD
B
BNX
BEN
C

CRL

DAL
E
ENG

F
FLG
FLI
FLO
FML


(Accounting)
ADMINISTRATION
BUILDING
BUILDING AE
(Family Life)
ANDERSON HALL
AUDITORIUM
BUILDING B
BENTON ANNEX
BENTON HALL
BUILDING C
(Art)
CANCER RESEARCH
LABORATORY
DAIRY LABORATORY
BUILDING E
ENGINEERING AND
INDUSTRIES BUILD
BUILDING F
FLORIDA GYMNASIUM
FLINT HALL
FLOYD HALL
FARM MACHINE


L
LEI
LIB
LAW
MAT
MIL
N


NEW
NUL
OD
OE
OF
PEA
POL
R

REE
ROL
SAL
U

UAN


NG


BUILDING L
LEIGH HALL
LIBRARY
LAW BUILDING
MATHERLY HALL
MILITARY BUILDING
BUILDING N
(Engineering Classrooms
and Laboratories)
NEWELL HALL
NUTRITION LABORATORY
OFFICE D
OFFICE E
OFFICE F
PEABODY HALL
POULTRY LABORATORY
BUILDING R
(Music)
REED LABORATORY
ROLFE HALL
SANITARY LABORATORY
BUILDING U


(Architecture and Art)
UNION ANNEX


I









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COMPREHENSIVE


C-ll.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Studen
discussion


t


registers


one


lecture


digit


section


number)


(3 digit section number).


Lecture Section 11


Discussion


10:30 M W


WAL AUD


Sections:


Section


Section 10


Section
Section


Section 10


Section


7:00
7:00
8:10
8:10
9:20
9:20


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


PEA
PEA
PEA


PEA 208
PEA 206
PEA 208


C-12.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for one lecture
digit section number).


(2 digit section


number)


one discussion


Lecture Section 21


10:30 T Th


WAL AUD


Discussion Sections:


Section 201
Section 202
Section 203


7:00
8:10
9:20


Daily
Daily
Daily


PEA
PEA
PEA


C-11-12:
of the mode


education,


Designed
rn social


in science,


to develop and


world.


The un<


and in religion


stimulate the ability to
equal rates of change in


interpret
economic


are analyzed and interpreted


the interrelated


problems


in government,


to show the need for a more


effective coordination of the factors of our evolving social


is made of the changing functions of


a consciousness


of the


be developed, from which


significant


social


organizations


organization of today. Careful scrutiny
as joint interdependent activities so that


relationships between the individual and social institutions may


consciousness


a greater


degree


of social adjustment may be achieved.


C-21.-The Physical Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 11:
Lecture Section 12:
Discussion Sections:


Section


Section 102
Section 103
Section 104


7:00
8:10
9:20


2:00 M


:00 T


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


BEN 203
BEN 203


BEN
BEN
BEN
BEN


C-22.-The Physical Sciences.


3 credits.


COURSES


L









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

C-3


C-31.--Reading, Speaking, and


(Register for tU
Laboratory Section)
Lecture Section 11:
Discussion Sections:


Writing


Lecture


:10 W


(Freshman English).


Section,


one


Discussion


4 credits.
Section,


WAL AUD


Section 101


Section


Section 103
Section 104


Section
Section


7:00
8:10
9:20
10:30
11:40
12:50


MTThF
MT Th F
MT Th F
MT Th F


MTTh
MT Th


MAT 3


MAT


MAT 3
MAT 3
MAT 3


MAT


Writing Laboratory Sections:


Section 301


Section


Section 303


8:10-10:20
10:30-12:40
12:50-3:00


M Th
M Th
M Th


AND 203


AND


AND 203


C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English).


(Register for tl
Laboratory Section)


Lecture


Section,


one


Discussion


4 credits.


Section,


one


Lecture Section 21


: 9:20


WAL AUD


Discussion Sections:


Section 201
Section 202
Section 203
Section 204


8:10
9:20
10:30
11:40


MT Th F
MT Th F
MT Th F


M T Th


AND 20
AND 20
AND 20
AND 20


Writing Laboratory Sections:


Section


Section 402


8:10-10:20 T F
10:30-12:40 T F


AND 203


AND


C-81-32: Reading, Speaking and W:


and writing


necessary


for the student


will be provided through practice and
in fundamentals of form and style,


writing. Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking,
'a work in college and for his life thereafter. This training
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking,
;n extensinn oP vnoshbilarv and in control of the body and


voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read
interests and increasing their appreciation of literature.


widely


as a means of broadening their


C-41


C-41.-Practical Logic.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


Section 3
Section 4


8:10


9:20
10:30
11:40


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


ADM 208
ADM 208
ADM 208


ADM


one


-- ---


IVVI*~'YIIJ


____VD __


-*ft -JK w.fifje-f


1








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section
Section
Section


10:30
12:50


Daily
Daily
Daily


PEA
PEA
PEA


A practical elementary course


who do not plan


cons


isting of the subject matter considered most useful for students


necessarily to specialize in mathematics.


system, computation with approximate and exact numbers.


tic, practical
simple and
Mathematics,


geometry,
compound


It covers the development of the number
algebra as a generalization of arithme-


functional relationships, logarithms, the simple trigonometry of the triangle,
interest, and annuities. Not open to students who have completed Basic


C-51.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section, and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section


11:40


MW


WAL AUD


Discussion Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


Section 107
Section 108


Section


Section 110


7:00
8:10


Daily
Daily


9:20 Daily
10:30 Daily


12:5


7:00


9:20
10:30
12:50


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND


C-52.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 21:
Discussion Sections:


11:40 T Th


WAL AUD


Section 201
Section 202
Section 203
Section 204
Section 205
Section 206
Section 207


7:00
8:10
9:20
10:30


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


12:50 Daily


9:20


Daily
Daily


AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND
AND


in Western Civilization.


Both our cultural


heritage


and the culture of our own day are studied.


C-5.-The Humanities.
A course designed to acquaint the student with the great literature, philosophy, art and music


Major emphasis is placed upon mature understanding, enlarged appreciation, and a philosophy of
life adequate for the needs of our age.

C-6


S- -


a A. -S S n


__


I


'I ~ r .. L _








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section 105


Section
Section


11:40
8:10


9:20


Daily
Daily
Daily


C-62.-Biological Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 21:
Lecture Section 22:
Discussion Sections:


3:10 M
2:00 T


FLI 101
FLI 101


Section 201
Section 202
Section 203
Section 204
Section 205


7:00
8:10
9:20
10:30
10:30


Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily
Daily


C-61-62: The biological problems and principles associated with the organism's role as: a
living individual, a member of a race, a product of evolutionary processes, and a member of a
socially and economically interrelated complex of living organisms. Under these headings such
topics as the structure and functioning of the human body, the structure and functioning of the
higher plants, methods of reproduction, heredity and variation, the theory of evolution, and ecology
will be studied. The lectures will be devoted to a consideration of biological topics and contributions
of current, social, political and historical interest.


ACCOUNTING


ATG.


211.--Elementary


Accounting.


3 credits.


The first half of the course ATG.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


8:10
10:30


Daily
Daily


MAT


MAT 224


The
records


basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of business
; recording transactions; preparation of financial statements and reports.


papers


ATG. 212.-Elementary


Accounting.


credits.


second


half


course


ATG. 211-212.
(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section


7:00


Daily


8:10 Daily


9:20


Daily


MAT
MAT
MAT


RAY


D. D.


PETERSON


MOORE


ATG. 311.-Accounting Principles.


credits.


Prerequisite: ATG. 212.


8:10 Daily


MAT 224


RAY, D. D.


The mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts; fiscal period
and adjustments; working papers; form and preparation of financial statements; followed by an
intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the preparation of the
balance sheet and income statements.


.C .( e -


A m,'.919 AI ,tnn n:^1n i) F ^ f4*


-_' .A-b nn* f^ <*-6-. w *J*. nurii w* i J rll 'I









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ATG.


411.-Advanced Accounting.


11:40


Daily


MAT


Problems.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ATG. 312.


MOSHIER,


Specialized accounting problems; p
ventures; insurance and other related


partnerships;
subjects.


statement of affairs


; consignments;


installments:


ATG.


412.-Principles of


10:30 Daily


Auditing.


credits.


Prerequisite ATG. 312.


MAT


Auditing theory and current auditing practice; principal kinds of
public accountant; professional and ethical aspects of auditing.


audits


and services


of the


ATG.


414.-Income Tax Accounting.


S credits.


Prerequisite ATG. 311.


9:20 Daily


MAT


DEINZER, H.


A study of the federal income tax law and related accounting problems. Determination of gross
income and of deductions is studied for taxpayers generally. The course emphasizes this process for
individuals. Practice is provided in the preparation of returns for individuals, and in the use of the
loose-leaf income tax service.


ATG. 415.-Corporate Accounting Problems.


credits.


Prerequisite ATG. 411.


8:10 Daily


MAT 119


MOSHIER


W. F.


The corporate accounting problems concerning conso
mergers and voluntary and involuntary liquidations.


lidation,


reorganization,


quasi-reorganization,


ATG.


417.-Governmental


Accounting.


credits.


Prerequisite


or corequisite:


ATG. 311.


7:00 Daily


MAT 119


The basic principles underlying governmental and institutional accounting. Detailed consideration
is given to the operation of recommended types of funds, the budget process, account structure, tax
accounting for cities, and the utilization of accounting in the preparation of significant reports.


GRADUATE COURSES


ATG.


611.-Accounting Theory.


credits.


Prerequisite: ATG. 411.


9:20 Daily


MAT 224


LANHAM


The theory behind accounting functions in their relation to the business enterprise.


ATG. 614.-Federal Income Tax Accounting.


credits. Prerequisite ATG. 414.


11:40 Daily


MAT 119


DEINZER


H.T.


tro'
and
cou


Advanced consideration of corporation income tax accounting; procedure in respect to the con-
versies over income tax liability, including rules of practice before the Treasury Department
I the Tax Court; and federal estate and gift taxes, including their income tax aspects. This
irse requires some original search for the application of income tax standards, and provides for


the preparation of reports and briefs.
ATG. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits*


Directed research and writing for the Master's de
graduate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours


gree,
course


taken toward the end of the student's
e work required for the master's degree.


ATG.


718.-Evolution of Accounting Theory and Practice.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


ATG. 411.


10:30 Daily


MAT 208


LANHAM


Development of accounting principles and


practices


and their relation


to economies,


law and


finance.
-_ fl* a M4 t __-









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


AS. 201.-Principles of Agricultural Economics.


3 credits.


9:20


Daily


FLO


GREENMAN, J. R.


An introduction to the field of agricultural economies; principles of economics as
agriculture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.


AS. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal.


applied to


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


FLO 104


BROKER, M. A.


Volume,


sources


of credit and problems
usually required.


uses
peace


of agricultural credit in Florida and the United
liar to financing farmers and farmers' associ


States.
nations.


The principles
One field trip


AS. 306.-Farm Management.


3 credits.


10:30 Daily


FLO 108


BROKER, M.


Introduction to the principles of farm management. Types of farming in Florida and the United
.tes, and factors which determine types of farming. The causes of success and failure of farms
I farmers. Problems of labor, machinery, layout of farms, farm reorganization, and such.


AS. 308.-Marketing.
9:20 Daily OD


3 credits.


McPHERSON,


W. K.


Basic principles of marketing with emphasis placed on market functions, services, and organi-
ions; elementary theory of demand and prices; commodity exchanges and futures trading;
nsportation; grades and standards; market news; methods of increasing efficiency of markets;


the role of co-o


rps


and government


in marketing.


One field trip required.


AS. 413.-Agricultural Policy.


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


FLO 102


GREENMAN, J. R.


A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to im-
prove the economic and social status of agriculture. The basic problems and concepts involved in
developing and carrying out an agricultural policy. Evaluation of present legislative programs and
policies affecting the farmer.

GRADUATE COURSES


605.-Research Problems in Farm Management.


To arrange


3 credits.


BROKER, M. A.


Designed to train
field of farm manager
with the instructor are
studied, publications re'


students


aent.


Sp-


in collecting
ecial problem


selected for study.


viewed


and written


r


r, analyzing and presenting data on problems in the
ns of interest to the individual student and agreeable
A statement of the problem is prepared, research work
reports developed.


AS. 611.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products.


3 credits.


To arrange


McPHERSON,


W. K.


Individual examinations of segments of the marketing system for Florida products. Emphasis
may be placed on efficiency, market organization, trading arrangements, historical development or
other aspects of the problem of interest to the student and agreeable with the instructor. A compre-
hensive report on the investigations and conclusions of the student is required.


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


HAMILTON, H. G.


799.-Research and Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*


IT A 1UTT FTVn1 TT lf


Sta
anc


zati
tra


I_ _ _


I1 n rn'*n n n









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AG. 401.-Farm Structures. 3 credits.


11:40 MT W Th


FLO 210


Laboratory: 2:00 to 4:10 T


RICHARDSON, J. B.
FLO 210


The functional requirements,


design


and construction of farm buildings.


GRADUATE COURSES


AG. 671.-Research Problems in Irrigation.


To arrange.


credits.


CHOATE, R. E.


AG. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange.


ROGERS, F.


AGRICULTURAL


EXTENSION


GRADUATE COURSE


AXT. 621.-Special Problems in Agricultural Extension Methods.


To arrange


Variable credit.*


HAMPSON, C. M.


Library and workshop relating to agricultural
locations reviewed, written reports developed.


extension


methods.


Research work


is studied, pub-


AGRONOMY
AY. 221.-General Field Crops. 3 credits.


8:10


MTWTh


FLO 302


RODGERS, E. G.


Laboratory: 12:50 to 3:00 Th


AL1


RODGER


a- a -


Grain, fiber, sugar, peanut, tobacco, forage and miscellaneous field crops, with special emphasis
on varieties and practices recommended for southern United States. History, botanical characteristics,
soil and climatic adaptations, fertilization, cultural practices, growing processes, harvesting, uses,
and rotation systems are discussed.


AY. 329.-Genetics.


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


FLO 302


EDWARDSON, J. R.


The fundamentals of inheritance, emphasizing the application of genetics and its
branches of science in the improvement of economic plants and animals and in programs
betterment.


AY. 426.-Individual Problems in Agronomy.


To arrange.


FLO 302


RODGERS, E.


ociated
human


Variable credit.*
G. and SENN, P.:


Individual problems selected from the fields of crop production or weed control.
GRADUATE COURSES


AY.


626.-Agronomic Problems.


To arrange


FLO 302


3 credits.


RODGERS, E. G. and SENN, P.


Library, laboratory, or field studies which relate to crop production and improvement.
ments are studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.


Experi-


AY.


627.-Problems in Genetics and Cytogenetics.


2 credits.


To arrange


FLO 302


Modern methods applied to


specific


EDWARDSON


genetic


J. R.


or cytogenetic


research


problems.


-- -- -- A h *n


*-1- - .-..L. *









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


AND


NUTRITION


309.-General Animal Husbandry.


credits.


7:00 Daily


FLO 104


LOGGINS, P. E.


Types and breeds of farm animals


market classification ;
GRADUATE COURSES


selection


and management.


601.-Special Topics in Animal Science.


3 credits.


To arrange


Reviews


and discussions of scientific literature in


the field of animal


science.


609.-Problems in Animal Husbandry and Nutrition.


To arrange


Variable credit.


DAVIS, G. K. and WALLACE,


AL. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*
To arrange

AL. 799.-Research and Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.


To arrange


ANTHROPOLOGY


APY. 500.-Field


Session


Archeology.


6 credits.


Prerequisite:


hours


anthropology, including APY. 201.
To arrange GOGGIN, J. M.
Excavation of archeological sites, recording of data, laboratory handling and analysis of
specimens, and study of the theoretical culture principles which underlie field methods and artifact
analysis.


APY.


530.-Individual


Work.


credits.


Prerequisite:


hours


anthropology,


including APY.


To arrange


GOGGIN


J. M.


ARCHITECTURE


101.-The Arts of Design.


10:30 Daily


3 credits.


U 108


A survey of the visual arts: Landscape Architecture, Community Planning, Architecture, Building
Construction, Interior Design, Sculpture, Crafts, Industrial Design, Commercial Art and Painting.
A study of the basic nature of each art, its social significance and its relationship to other areas
of the visual arts to provide a broad understanding of the visual arts and to form a basis for the
selection of a career in the arts of design.


102.-Vision and Graphics.


7:00 to 10:20 Daily


credits.


U 107


Functions and limitations of vision. Perception as the medium of our experiences in the visual
arts. Space and light in visual design. Visual and graphic exercises for development of observation,
graphic techniques, imaginative ability, visual design and aesthetic judgment. Study of the elements
of design and principles involved in their use.


a a a A * a


__


I_ _ _









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER


AE. 205.-Building Technology.


4 credits.


11:40 to 1:50 Daily


The analysis
and aesthetic


U 103,


U 109


s of natural and manufactured building materials; their origin, physical,
properties, methods of assembly and their proper use in building Th


elementary framing systems; their methods of construction and architectural
production to hydraulic, mechanical and electrical installations for building


responsibilities in the building field.
AE. 206.-Building Technology.
11:40 to 1:50 Daily U 10


l-Wfr|3 a a


structural


tudy of
An in-


e st


expression.


and professional


4 credits.
18, U 109


The study of types of loads exerted on buildings, their transmission through the building frame
I the forces and stresses produced in the structural framing members. The characteristics of


iic ty]


pes


of structural building frames and their integration in design.


UPPER DIVISION COURSES*


AE. 301-302-303-304-305.-Projects


Architecture,


Group


3 credits


each


group


total,


15 credits.


Maximum


Summer


Session


load


credits.


Pre-


requisite: Completion of Lower Division program in Architecture or equivalent.


To arrange


E 175


AE. 306-307-308-309-310.--Projects


Architecture,


Group


credits


each;--


group


total,


15 credits.


Maximum


Summer


ssion


load


credits.


Pre-


requisite:


To arrange


series
E 179


301-302-303-304-305.


AE. 401-402-403-404-405.-Projects


in Architecture,


Group


credits


each


group


total,


credits.


Maximum


Summer


Session


load


credits.


Pre-


requisite: The


series


306-307


08-30


To arrange


E 126


AE. 406-407-408-409-410.-Projects


Architecture,


Group


3 credits


each


group total,


15 credits.


Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits.


Prerequisite:


series


401-402-40


-404-405.


To arran


E 116


AE. 501-502


-503-504-505.-Projects


in Architecture,


Group


credits


each;-


group total, 15
The series AE.


To arran


credits.


Maximum Summer Session load: 9 credits. Prerequisite:


406-4Q7-408-409-410.


E 157


AE. 506-507-508-509


15 credits.


-510.-Thesis


Maximum Summer


in Architecture.


ssion load: 9 credits.


3 credits each;-group


Prerequisite:


total,


The series


501-502-503-504-505.


To arran


E 189.


GRADUATE COURSES


r *IJ.-


601 -Architectural Desian.


or 6 credits.


Prerequisite: Bachelor's


degree


SESSION


anC
bas


-


1


gs,









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


AE.


603.--Architectural Research.


3 or 6 credits.


Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree


in Architecture.


To arrange


E 127


Detailed investigation of a selected problem for the purpose of providing
standing in some field of fundamental importance in architecture.


insight and


under-


604.-Architectural Research.


3 or 6 credits.


The second half of the course


AE.


603-604.


To arrange


E 127


AE. 605.-Structural Design of Buildings.


3 or 6 credits.


Prerequisite: Bachelor's


degree in Architecture or in Building Construction.


To arrange


E 127


Advanced study of a problem in the structural design of buildings, selected by the student with
the approval of the Faculty.


606.-Structural Design of Buildings.


3 or 6 credits.


The second half of the


course AE. 605-606.


To arrange


E 127


AE. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


For students


course


working


work required for the


for the master's


degree.


degree.


Credits


cannot


be used


to reduce


the total


ART


ART 122.-Materials and Spatial Design.


credits.


10:30-12


:40 Daily


C105


EBERSOLE


R. P.


Organization of three-dimensional forms with


various


materials.


ART 224.-Drawing and Visual Perception.


3 credits.


8:10-10:20 Dail:
Creative drawing will


C 101


MC INTOSH


include the drawing of


still life and


figure objects observed from


standpoint of form and content.


ART 226.-Pictorial Composition.


3 credits.


10:30-12:40 Daily


C 100


MC INTOSH, P


Pictorial composition using the oil medium, employing elements studied in ART 122 and ART 228.


ART 290.-Art Survey.


10:30 Daily


3 credits.
GRISSOM, E. E.


An introduction


to important examples


from 4000 B.C. to contemporary art movements.


of painting,


sculpture,


architecture


and related


UPPER DIVISION COURSES**


ART 301.-Design I.


3 credits.


10:30-1


2:40 Daily


C100


MC INTOSH


Watercolor techniques in a study of color, line, and design.


ART 302.-Design II.


3 credits.


0-12:40 Daily


C 100


MC INTOSH


. i I.


^t_._ _-- A'- _. -_


_ _-. __1.. j. -_


'*.,a,.n tnt'saB ni nnt iyYfn rlnn in n no i my an nnTpicr an on arr rainy


arts


I









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ART


330.-Patternmaking.
10:30-12:40 Daily X


3 credits.


BORGIA, A. P.


Fundamental principles of flat pattern designing by


le


measurements.


use of basic foundation patterns in various


ART


338.-Draping.


3 credits.


8:10-10:20 Daily X
Introduction of principles of


BORGIA, A. P.


designing


patterns by


use of dress


form.


ART 341.-Elementary Photography.


8:10-10:20 Daily


3 credits.


Prerequisite: C-21 and


C-22.


EBERSOLE, R. P.


A course in photographic technique and design for those who have had no previous
with photography.


experience


ART


351.-Landscape and


2:00-4:10 Daily


Figure Painting


3 credits.


C 101


Pictorial


organization


terms


of nature.


ART


352.-Landscape and Figure Painting II.


2:00-4:10


Daily


3 credits.


C 101


Advanced work in the pictorial interpretation of nature.


ART


360.-Layout.


3 credits.


2:00-4:10 Daily


C 105


SUMMERS, M.


The elements of


design


in layout.


ART 361.-Lettering and Instrumental Drawing.


3 credits.


2:00-4:10 Daily


C 105


SUMMERS, M.


The design


of letters


suitable to the


subject.


Instruction in the mechanical aids to drawing.


ART


362.-Advertising Design.


2:00-4:10 Daily


C 105


credits.


SUMMERS, M. D.


The various
spot designs.


media and


techniques


used in commercial


art. Problems include illustrations and


ART


383.-Jewelry


and Metalwork.


3 credits.


2:00-4:10


A creative


Daily


and technical approach to the design problems in jewelry and metal forming.


ART


413.-Freehand Drawing III.


credits.


8:10-10:20


Interpreting


Dai


gestures,


ly C 101
weights, and


MC INTOSH


con tours


P. R.


of the human head and figure.


ART


453.-Figure and Portrait Painting.


6 credits.


2:00-4:10 Daily


C101


12 hours to arrange.


Work from the model with


stress


on pictorial


organization .


ART


454.-Special Problems in Painting.


2:00-4:10


Daily


6 credits.


C 101


12 hours to arrange.
The course is planned to permit the student to follow such problems as are worked out between
himself and his instructor with the purpose of developing a more personal direction in the student's


sca









74 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GRADUATE COURSES
ART 651-652-653-654.-Art Problems in Painting and Drawing. 3 credits.
Hourn's to arrange X 1
Under the guidance of the instructor, the student will plan and execute a series of projects
lated to the field of painting.
ART 655-656-657-658.-Art Research in Painting and Drawing. 3 credits.


Hours to arrange X 1
An opportunity for advanced students in painting to investigate technical
adapted to problems of a varied nature.


processes


that can be


ART 681-682-683-684.-Art Problems in Crafts.


Hours to arrange


3 credits each.


X 14


Under the guidance of
related to the field of crafts.


the instructor,


the student


will plan and execute


a series of


projects


ART 685-686-687-688.-Art Research in Crafts. 3 credits each.


Hours to arrange


X 14


Research in
field of crafts.


native


materials


or technical


processes


can be adapted


to problems


in the


ART 691.-Art of the Twentieth Century.


3 credits.


Hours to arrange X 4
Individual work with occasional conferences. An analysis of the various art movements beginning
with Cezanne, and their relationship to contemporary art expression.


ART 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


For students working for the Master's


Degree.


ASTRONOMY


ATY.


141.-Descriptive


Astronomy.


credits.


Not open


to students


who


have


had any other course in astronomy.


8:10 Daily


WAL 202


An elementary survey of the astronomical universe with a minimum of mathematical work.
Primarily intended as an elective for those not majoring in a physical science or mathematics.
Occasional observing periods with the telescope and demonstrations with the Spitz Planetarium.

BACTERIOLOGY


BCY. 300.-Bacteria in Everyday Life.


credits. Prerequisite: C-61 or equivalent.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory Section)


Lecture Section 1:


8:10 M T W Th


ENG 420


CARROLL,


R., PRATT,


D. B., and TYLER, M. E.


Laboratory Section 11:


9:20 to 11:30 T Th


CARROLL,


,PRATT,


D. B., and TYLER, M. E.


Section 12:


12:50 to 3:00 T Th


CARROLL,


,PRATT,


D. B., and TYLER, M. E.
Bacteria in relation to evolution, higher plants and animals, and particularly man. Their functions
in the cycle of chemical transformations, in food production, in disease, and in general sanitation.
The related activities of some yeasts and molds, and of the filterable disease agents. A terminal
course. not accenntahie for admlnssin tn advfnprd rnonrai in bnptdrf1-nArv. Arsnsilhln for i rnradi /*1t" i









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


eBCY.


600.-Public
To arrange


Health Microbiology.


Jacksonville.**


Variable credit.*


Principles and methods in diagnostic public health microbiology.


OF LABORATORIES


-- .w' -


STAFF


BCY


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


STAFF


BIOLOGY


BLY.


133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Laboratory


Lecture Section 1:


12:50 M W


Laboratory Sections:


FLI 102


WESTFALL


?rerequisite: C-6.
Section)


M.J.


2:00 to


5:20


MW


12: 12:50 to 4:10 T Th FLI 14
Designed to provide a recognition of, and an acquaintance with, some of the more common
animals and plants of Florlda. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question,
What animal--or what plant--is that ?" Individual work in the field and the making of a personal
reference collection of plants and animals is encouraged.


BLY.


161.-Biology


Laboratory.


2 credits.


Prerequisite or corequisite: C-61.


9:20 to 11:30 MT W Th


J 101


KILBY


An introductory laboratory course dealing with cells, the mammalian anatomy, the major groups
of plants, methods of reproduction and germ cell formation.


BLY. 162.-Biology Laboratory.
7:00 to 9:10 MT WTh


2 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-62.


J202


HUSSEY, R. F.


An introductory laboratory course dealing with genetics,
taxonomy, and ecology.
(Bly. 161 and 162 are prerequisites for most of the other course


BLY. 208.-Invertebrate Zoology. 4 credits. Prerequisites:


homology,


embryology,


evolution,


in this department).


BLY 161-162.


10:30


MT Th F


FLI 102


PIERCE, E. L.


Laboratory: 12:50 to 4:10 M T Th F


FLI 2


Structure, function, and evolutionary relationship of a selected


series


of animals without backbones.


BLY. 301.-Biological Laboratory Technique for Teachers. 3 credits.
BLY. 161-162.


Prerequisite:


11:40 T Th


FLI 109A


GRIFFITH, M.


Laboratory: 12:50 to 4:10 T Th


FLI 4


Designed to provide prospective instructors at the high school level with a sounder background
in biology and information regarding methods of preparation of material and sources of supply
for the high school course.


BLY.


302.-The Life of the Inland Waters of Florida.


11:40 M F:
Laboratory:


LI 102


3 credits. Prerequisite: BLY


GOIN, C. J.


2:00 to 5:20 M W


FLI 4


A companion course to BLY. 133 but concerned with the common plants and animal life of our
streams, pools, ponds, lakes and marshes. Particular attention is given to obtaining an acquaintance
with those species and groups of organisms that comprise the more important, more conspicuous, and
4- - - ,- -1 - T-l- .^' -2. _- .- -A lU-:- -t T L.. --- - 4 3.- -I-- .- t A.1 3l - -


BUREAU


3 credits.


I


I


J.D.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GRADUATE COURSES


BLY. 605.-History of Biology.


credits. Required of all graduate majors.


9:20 MT W Th


FLI 109A


JONE


E. R.


A study of the development of biology as a science from the earliest recorded observations of
animal and plant life up to and including the first decades of the twentieth century. The History
of Biology is considered as an integral part of the history of science and of human culture in
general; interrelationships are stressed. The course concludes with a brief survey of the develop-
ment of biology in the United States.


BLY.


630.-Individual


Studies


Animal


Biology.


Hours


credit


arranged.


Prerequisite:


Graduate status and consent of the instructor.


To arrange


STAFF


Studies may be chosen from one or more aspects of the following fields: Comparative anatomy,
cytology, ecology, embryology, experimental biology, fresh water biology, game management,
genetics, herpetology, histology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoology including arachnology and insect
biology, limnology, malacology, mammalogy, marine biology, ornithology, parasitology, general or
comparative physiology, protozoology, vertebrate paleozoology, and zoogeography. Bly. 630 may be
elected for additional credit in subsequent semesters.


BLY. 633.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature.


2 credits.


8:10 M T Th F


FLI 109A


WALLACE, H. K.


A critical study of selected taxonomic synopses, revisions, and monographs with special reference
to the bearing of the principles and concepts of distribution, genetics, and ecology on taxonomic
problems.


BLY. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*

BLY. 799.-Research and Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*

BOTANY


BTY.


101.-General Botany.


3 credits.


8:10 T W Th F


Laboratory:


UAN 120


12:50-3:00


CODY


WF


M. D.


UAN


The form, structure, growth, reproduction, and physiology of plants and their various organs.


BTY.


102.-General Botany.


3 credits.


10:30 MT W Th
Laboratory: 12:5


UAN 120


0-3:00 T Th


GRIFFITH, M.
UAN 113


Representatives of major groups of plants regarding their classification,
vironmental relations.


BTY. 306.-Taxonomy of Higher Plants.


life histories and en-


3 credits.


10:30 T Th


Greenhouse


FORD, E. S.


Laboratory: 12:50-4:10


MW


(2 Saturday field trips).


Biology of ferns and seed


plants


emphasizing


identification of their representatives in our flora.


their classification


and general morphology and


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION**


BCN. 301-302-303-304.-Projects


each;-group


total,


credits.


Building
Maximum


Construction,


Summer


Group


Session


credits


load:


9 credits.


Prerequisite: Completion of Lower Division program in Building Construction








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


BCN. 401-402-40
each;--group


13-404.--Projects


total,


Prerequisite: The
To arrange E


in


credits.


series


BCN


Building
Maximum


Construction,
Summer Se:


11-312-31


Group


load


credits.
credits.


178


BCN.


411-41


each;--group


-413-414.--Projects


total


, 12 credits.


Prerequisite: The series


To arrange


BCN


Building
Maximum


Construction,


Summer


Group


ssion


load


401-402-403-404.


credits
credits.


E 188


GRADUATE COURSES


BCN


601.-Building Construction.


3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite:


in Building Construction or Architecture


To arrange


Bachelor's


degree


, or equivalent.


E 188


Advanced studies in building technology or in specialized
selected by the student and approved by the faculty.


areas


of the building construction field


BCN


602.-Buildin


g Construction. 3 or 6 credits.


BCN. 601-602.


To arrange


The second half of the course


E188


BCN.


603.-Building


Research.


or 6


credits.


Prerequisite:


in Building Construction, Architecture, or equivalent.


Bachelor's


degree


To arrange


E 188


Detailed investigation of a selected problem in the building construction field designed to make
a significant contribution to present knowledge and practices in that field.


BCN


604.-Building Research. 3 or 6 credits.


The second half of the course BCN


603-604.


To arrange


BCN.


E 188


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


For students working for the master's


work required for the


degree.


degree.


Credits cannot be used to reduce the total course


BUSINESS


EDUCATION


BEN.


81.-Introductory Typewriting.


2 credits.


9:20 Daily and 2 hours to arrange


YON 306


CREWS


J. S.


Skill in


typewriting developed through practice on personal and business problems.


BEN.


91.-Introductory Shorthand.


3 credits.


10:30 Daily and 2 hours to arrange


YON 305


DODSON


G.A.


The theory of


Gregg


shorthand


is completed,


using


the functional method.


BEN.


.-A


advanced


Typewriting.


2 credits.


Prerequisite:


BEN.


or 82


permission of


department.


10:30 Daily and 2 hours to arrange
Provides more intensive training in typewriting.


YON 306


CREWS, J


BEN.


191.-Shorthand


Dictation.


credits.


Prerequisite:


BEN.


or 92


permission of department.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BEN.


352.-Office


Machine


Techniques.


credits.


Prerequisite:


BEN. 81


or per-


mission of department.


8:10 Daily


YON 305


CREWS, J.


The voice-writing machines, duplicating m
are studied, both as to techniques and operation.
in the operation of these machines.


machines, adding machines and calculating machines
The student will be given opportunity to develop skill


GRADUATE COURSES


BEN.


652.-Teaching Office Machines. (Formerly BEN 552) 3 credits.


Prerequisite: BEN.


352 or equivalent.


8:10 Daily and 2 hours to arrange


YON 305


CREWS, J.


Methods of teaching the operation of machines commonly used in


business offices.


BEN. 685.-Problems in Business Education (Formerly BEN. 585).


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


YON 43


MOORMAN, J. H.


Areas of interest of students enrolled will be studied intensively. Problems in business education
in Florida schools will be emphasized. Each student will prepare a written report of his study.


BEN. 705.-Seminar in Business Education


(Formerly


BEN. 605).


or 6 credits.


10:30 Daily


YON 43


MOORMAN


J. H.


For advanced graduate students.
business education.


Intensive study of specific problems of paramount importance in


BUSINESS


ORGANIZATION


AND OPERATION


BS. 231.-Principles of Marketing.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


ES. 205-206.


10:30


Daily


MAT 219


The institutions and methods developed for carrying on trade operations; retail and wholesale
agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of marketing; price maintenance; unfair com-
petition; the relation of the government to marketing.


BS. 260.-Fundamentals of


Insurance.


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


MAT 111


SWEENEY


The basic fundamentals underlying the business of insurance as a prerequisite for more advanced
and detailed work in the subject designed to serve two distinct needs: (1) to give students of
economics and commerce a general knowledge of the subject; and (2) to lay a foundation for the
future work of those interested in entering the business.


BS. 271.-Principles of Management.


11:40 Daily


3 credits.


MAT 114


The basic fundamentals of management underlying the solution of problems of organization and
operation of business enterprises. Application of these fundamentals to specific fields of industrial
management such as production, material, personnel, purchasing, etc.


BS. 334.-Sales Management.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: BS. 231.


11:40 Daily


MAT


GOODWIN, F.


The selection and training of salesmen.


BS. 366.-Casualty Insurance.


credits. Prerequisite: BS. 260.


10:30 Daily


MAT 111


SWEENEY,


The principles and personal and business uses of casualty insurance.
workmen's compensation, liability, automobile, aviation, accident and
machinery, plate glass, and credit insurance.


BS. 373.-Personnel Management.


An analysis is made of
health, theft, boiler and


3 credits.


I










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


3 credits.


MAT


Personal Property: Nature; classification; acquisition of title.
termination; pledges and pawns. Carriers: Nature; classifi
Nature; formality; transfer of title; warranties; liabilities; r
Corporations: Nature; creation; classification; powers; stock
Partnership: Nature; creation; duties; rights; remedies; liability


ca
ig
ier


Bailments: Nature; classification ;
ition; duties; liabilities. Sales:
rhts; remedies; conditional sales.
management; rights ; liabilities.
s.


BS. 422.-Investments.


10:30 Daily


3 credits.


MAT 13


Prerequisite: BS. 427.


FLOYD, J. S.


The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities t
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.


427.-Corporation Finance.


3 credits.


9:20


Daily


MAT 111


MATTHEWS, C.


The economics and legal forms of business enterprise; the instruments of business finance;
financial problems as they relate to the ordinary operations of the business involving fixed and
working capital, income, dividend policy, and current borrowing.


437.-Retailing.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: BS. 231.


8:10 Daily


MAT 219


The fundamentals of retailing: problems, policies, trends and procedures in retail distribution.


459.-Field Work in Marketing.


To arrange


MAT 324


GOOD


Variable credit.*
WIN. F.


Up to three credit hours for weekly reports and a final report on problems as they arise in a full
time three months period of work, in Sales, Retailing, Advertising, Wholesaling, Credits and Col-
lections, Market Research, or any other work in Marketing under supervision of an approved em-
ployer. Open only to students majoring in Marketing, Sales, Retailing, or Advertising curricula only
before the last term on the campus, only after completion of a course in the principles of the
subject to be practiced, and only with written permission from a sponsoring professor. Complete
course regulations may be secured from sponsoring professor. All registrations in this course are
subject to these regulations.


BS. 463.-Social Insurance.


credits.


8:10 Daily


MAT 112


GAITANIS


L.A.


An
and n


winner,


analysis of


private


Imsur


sickness,


the meaning a


ind nature of economic


*ance; the basic hazards of
and disability, especially as


methods of eliminating, reducing
Insurance in the United States, the
on Title II (Old Age & Survivors I
ment Compensation and Workmen's


or indemr


existing
Insurance)


security;


unemployment,
they apply to
lifvin these


th


old-age
low inco
hazards;


programs including oper
of the Social Security


ie distinctions between social
, premature death of bread-
me groups; an evaluation of
the development of Social
nations, with special emphasis
Act and Florida's Unemploy-


Compensation programs.

GRADUATE COURSES


BS. 629.-International Finance: Monetary Systems.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


8:10


Daily


LIB 417


MATTHEWS,


C. A.


International monetary


system


is concentrated on the inter-w
financial systems and attempts
national Monetary Fund.


ra


ns with special emphasis on the role of central banks. Attention
.r period, the factors leading to the breakdown of international
at reconstruction culminating in the World Bank and the Inter-


BS. 634.-Problems of Sales Management.


n ar A Ur A A


3 credits.


OflflT1TITTAT W


m ---- * U *S U * 'fly Wr -


BS. 402.-Business Law.


9:20 Daily


V


~


m









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CANCER RESEARCH


GRADUATE


CR. 665.-Cancer Research Seminar.


COURSES


1-3 credits.


Hours to be arranged

CR. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


Hours to be arranged


799.-Research and Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*
Hours to be arranged

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


CG. 347.-Industrial Stoichiometry.


4 credits. Prerequisite: CY


331. Corequisite:


MS. 354, PS 206.


10:30 Daily
Laboratory


ENG 320


HARVIN, R. L.


2:00 to 5:20 M W


N 205


Industrial


processes


vapor pressure, humidity,


and calculations,


weight


balances, gas


calculations,


combustion


processes,


CG. 356.-Principles of Chemical Engineering


3 credits.


Prerequisite: CG 355.


9:20 Daily
The fundamental


ENG 320


chemical


SCHWEYER, H. E.


engineering


humidity and air conditioning and drying.
CG. 361.-Materials of Engineering.


operations:


Flow of fluids,


heat transfer,


evaporation,


3 credits. Prerequisite: CY


ENG


Production, properties and
products, wood and plastics.


uses


;8 SCHWEYER, H. E.
of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, Portland cement, clay


CG. 364.-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I.


354. Corequisites:


3 credits. Prerequisite:


402, CG.


8:10 Daily


ENG 320


HARVIN


R. L.


The first two laws of thermodynamics and their applications to Chemical Engineering.
GRADUATE COURSES
CG. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


799.-Research and Dissertation. 1


to 6 credits.


CHEMISTRY


121-General Chemistry.


9:20 Daily
Laboratory


4 credits.


LEI 207


12:50-4:10 M W


LEI 138


Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry.


and their compounds and


some


of their


uses.


Non-metalic elements and their compounds; metals


122.-General Chemistry.


4 credits.


10:30 Daily









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


217.-General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis.


Upper


percentile


rating


matics or satisfactory


in placement


completion of C


tests


4 credits.


in physical


In general,


evidence that they have had high school chemistry


8:10 Daily
Laboratory


course


in general


Prerequisites:


sciences


mathe-


freshmen should present


Prerequisite or corequisite:


LEI 207


12:50-4:10 T Th


LEI 136


chemistry including the fundamentals of qualitative analysis.


218.-General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis.


10:30 Daily
Laboratory
The second half of 1


4 credits.


LEI 207


12:50-4:10 M W


course


LEI 136


CY. 217-218.


301.-Organic Chemistry.


4 credits.


Prerequisite:


9:20 Daily


LEI 154


Laboratory 12:50-4:10 T Th


Preparation and properties of the


various


aliphatic and aromatic compounds.


331.-Introductory


Quantitative


Analysis.


4 credits. Prerequisite:


or CY. 218.


:10 MTTh F


LEI 142


Laboratory


12:50-4:10 M T W Th


LEI 112


Theoretical principles
terminations include grave


and laboratory


imetry,


technique


involved


in quantitative


acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidimetry and


determinations.


iodimetry.


362.-Organic Chemistry.


credits.


Prerequisite: CY


122 or CY


Corequisite: CY


8:10 Daily
A brief elementary


, except for Physics majors.


LEI 154


course


embracing the


more


important aliphatic and aromatic compounds.


363.-Organic


Chemistry


Laboratory.


2 credits.


Corequisite:


0-4:10 M T Th F


402.-Physical


Chemistry.


credits.


Prerequisite:


.401.


Corequisite:


406, except for Physics majors.


9:20 Daily


LEI 142


Colloids.


electricity


to quantum theory.


as applied in chemistry, chemical kinetics, photochemistry and introduction


406.-Physical Chemistry.
12:50-4:10 W F LEI 20


1 credit.


Corequisite: CY


GRADUATE COURSES


656.-Biochemical Preparations.


3 credits.


To arrange
The techniques of extraction,


separation


and purification of biological compounds.


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6


credits.*


__


w -- --









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Laboratory Sections:


Section 11.


Section


Use of


surveyors


topographic mapping


2:00 to
2:00 to


tape; level


5:20


MW


5:20 T Th


and transit:


land subdivision


traversing


ENG


ENG 432


and balancing


; adjustment of instruments.


KATTERHENRY, A.
KATTERHENHY. A.


surveys;


calculation of


areas;


CL. 226.-Higher Surveying.


2 credits.


Prerequisite: CL.


12:50 M W


ENG 432


WINSOR, A. N.


Laboratory 2:00 to 5:20 T Th


ENG 324


WINSOR


A.N.


Triangulation systems; pre
precise levels; line azimuth by
to photogrammetry; horizontal


cise
Sola


base-line mea
tr and Polaris


curves;


surement;


mar


observations;


projections;
hydrographic


coordinate


surveys


systems;
production


cross-sections.


CL. 326.-Statics of Simple Structures.


4 credits.


Prerequisite: EM 365.


10:30 Daily


ENG 324


OZELL


A.M.


Laboratory 2:00 to 5:20 M W


ENG 324


OZELL


A. M.


Application of the methods of
analytical methods; moments, s
for statically determinate structu


statics


hears
res.


, r


to structural analysis
reactions, resultants,


; a correlation between graphical and
stress diagrams, and influence lines


GRADUATE COURSES


623.-Advanced Concrete Structures.


credits. Prerequisite:


CL. 433.


To arrange.


KLUGE


Study of


research


code requirements;
design problems.


in reinforced
ultimate load


concrete
theories


particularly in connection with development of building
and their application to design; prestressing; special


630.-Problems


Sanitation.


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


CL 429


permission of instructor.


To arrange


JAFFE


Approved problems for


study


or research


CL. 638.-Analysis of Statistically
requisite: CL. 338.


selected from


field of


sanitary


Indeterminate Structures.


specialization.

to 6 credits..


Pre-


To arrange.


OZELL, A.


Frames with variable moment of inertia closed


tinuous


trusses;


columns


; design


problems,


precise


rings:


column


analogy;


moment distribution.


secondary


stresses;


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


COMMUNICATIONS


COM. 311.-Speech


Training for the Radio.


credits. Prerequisite:


SCH.


250 or


SCH. 307.


10:30 Daily


ADM 357


J. C.


WEAVER


Practice in announcing, narrating, and writing.


COMMUNITY


PLANNING


anfl .- 20-.2012 -npi l


OC ,- -j1


n ----


1----------


.. *ME* ** Ul f r ** .* n r n Ur* U Sr WI flm Wv C fl g r /Tn w n n n r**a


con-


r *


_ f . .


ll At^Vdr









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


CPG.


501-


research


502-503-5


04-505.-Projects


h and studio work.


Permission of the faculty.
approved by the faculty.
To arrange X 3


Plannin


hour


credits each; group total, 1


conference,


hours


credits. Prerequisite


Corequisite: A program of electives in related fields
Maximum Summer Session load 9 credits.


Basic concepts,


social,


economic,


preparation and


problems and


practices


and physical problems of


analysis


of community planning.


of tentative plan solutions.


and cities.


Research into the inter-related


metropolitan


areas


and regions


; the


CPG. 699.-Research and Thesis.


For students


working


for the


master's


0 to 6 credits.


degree.


DAIRY


211.-Introduction to Dairy Science.


9:20 MT W Th
Laboratory: 12:


DAL 203


:50-4:10


SCIENCE


credits.


WILKOWSKE, H.


MW


and WING, J


DAL 110


milk


Composition and


common


dairy


properties
processes;


of milk


; sanitary milk production; common methods of analyzing


farm methods of handling milk.


418.-Approved Dairy Practice.
To arrange.


credits.


Practical


experience


on approved


dairies


or in approved


dairy plants.


420.-Problems in Dairy Technology.
To arrange.


3 credits.


Qualified students


may choose


an approved problem


covering


some


of dairy technology.


GRADUATE COURSES


623.-Problems in Dairy Production.
To arrange.


Variable credit.


Research for


majors


in dairy husbandry.


627.-Advanced Dairy Microbiology.


To arrange


4 credits.


WILKOWSKE, H.


Advanced methods of microbiological control of dairy products.
I. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


ECONOMICS


ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics.


4 credits.


Prerequisite:


C-42 or equivalent.


9:20 Daily


MAT 11


KARP


J. R.


Laboratory: 2
The statistical method


:00-4:10 M W


as a tool for


MAT 120


examining


fundamental techniques as find application in busin


sociology,


basic preparation for


more


extensive


and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
ess, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,
work in the field of statistics.


ES. 205.-Basic Economics.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


n n r SW & A n-i .r-


towns


I


"_


" u rl


1_









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section
Section


9:20
10:30


Daily
Daily


MAT
MAT


LOWE, J.
DUNN, E.


This half of the course ES. 205-206, for which separate credit may be earned, emphasizes the
accounting, analytical, and policy aspects of national income and product, along with such
closely related topics as governmental finance, money and banking, and international trade and
finance. Some attention is also given to the problems of industrial relations, monopolies, transpor-
tation and public utilities, and to the leading alternatives to capitalism.


ES. 208.-Economic History of the United States.


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


MAT 102


TUTTLE


The industrial development of America; th4
manufacturing, banking, trade, transportation, e
factors contributing to the growth of the United


e ex
tc.;


ploitation of natural resources; the history of
the evolution of industrial centers; the historical


States.


ES. 321.-Money and Banking.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ES. 205-206.


8:10 Daily


MAT 13


FLOYD, J.


A study of money systems and standards; of the factors determining the size of the money
supply with special emphasis on the role of commercial and central banks and government fiscal
policy; and of the relationship between money, prices, and production and employment.


ES. 327.-Public Finance.


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


ES. 205-206.


9:20 Daily


MAT


DONOVAN, C.


Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.


ES. 347.-Principles of Foreign


Trade.


credits.


Prerequisite:


10:30 Daily


MAT 102


BRADBURY


Fundamental prinm
political influences; c


commerce,
the United


protective
States.


eiples of foreign trade; significance of geographic, economic, social, and
current practices and development in foreign trade; products of international
tariffs and other barriers to world trade; tendencies in the foreign trade of


ES. 372.-Labor Problems.


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


Es. 205-206.


12:50 Daily


MAT


FRISTOE


Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial conflict,
attempts to solve labor problems by employers; personnel management, employee representation,
employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state; protective labor legislation, laws
relating to settlement of industrial disputes.


ES. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems.


3 credits.


Prerequisites: ES. 205-206.


10 Daily


MAT 116


MERCER, N. A.


An advanced


course


price determination,
economic problems.


in economic


theory,


and income distribution


dealing
and the]


especially wil
ir application


t the theories
to a selected


of production,


list of


current


ES. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems.


3 credits.


The second half of the


course ES. 407-408.


8:10 Daily


MAT 114


DUNN, E.


ES. 409.-Comparative Economic Systems.


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


MAT 112


BLODGETT


R. H.


The economics of capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. The theoretical economics of
capitalism, socialism, and communism and the actual economies of the United States, Soviet Russia,
England, Nazi Germany, and Fascist Italy are compared on the basis of such matters as industrial
production, agriculture, exchange, credit and banking, income distribution, the status of labor,
and international trade. Marxian Socialism is also considered briefly.


429.-Introduction to Business Cycles.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ES. 321.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ES. 674.-Labor Economics.
9:20-11:30 M LIB 417


9:20-12:40 Th


3 credits.
FRISTOE, C.


The seminar in wage theory has for its purpose an intensive and advanced study of the various
theories of wage determination and the economic role of wages in the economy.


ES. 677.-Governmental Debt.


To arrange MAT 209
Influences and mechanisms for
governments. Problems of debt us
relations. Emphasizes case studies.


credits.


KILPATRICK, W.
debt incurrence and retirement by federal, state, and local
e and abuse, regulations, area planning, and intergovernmental


ES. 692.-Neo-Classical Economics.
691-692.


2:00-5:20 T
2:00-4:10 F


LIB 417


3 credits.


The second half of the course E


BLODGETT, R. H.


Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-classical theories concerning the distribution of
income. Rent, interest, wages, profits, personal distribution, supplementary distribution, and non-
capitalistic distribution will be considered. The writings of Marshall, Hicks, Cassel, Boulding,
Pigou, Fisher, Douglas, Knight, Stigler and Schumpeter provide the background for the discussion.

ES. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*
Directed research and writing for the Master's degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the 24 hours required for the master's degree.


ES. 799.--


Research and Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*


Directed research and writing for the Ph.D. degree, taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the hours of regular courses required by the candidate's
supervisory committee for the doctor's degree.


EDUCATION-GENERAL


ED. 300.-Principles and Practices for Teaching Handicapped Children


(Formerly


EN. 426).
9:20 Da
Consideration


3 credits. Prerequisite: EDF. 140-141


ily


I101


given


Or equivalent.


SULLIVAN, K.


to exceptional children


students, particularly teachers, will find answers
ferral, and recommended teaching procedures in


of-hearing, speech defective,
emotionally disturbed.


crippled,


mentally


as commonly found in our public schools. All
to incidence, causes, diagnosis, agencies for re-
respect to the blind, partially-seeing, deaf, hard-
retarded, mentally superior, and socially and


418.-Audio-Visual Materials of Instruction


(Formerly


EN. 418.).


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


A general


course


YON 140
for teachers


audio-visual materials of instruction.


MC KAY, J. H.


at all grade


levels.


Presents


sources


and methods


of using


ED. 500.-Materials


Methods


Teaching


Slow


Learners


(Formerly


428).


3 credits.


Prerequisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.


10 Daily


1203


ROSEBROOK,


Programs will be co
Curricular materials wi
handicapped, at various
find this course helpful.


instructed
11 be con


which
sidered


maturation


levels


will correlate skill
which can be used


and in various


subjects
to teach
situations.


with the ce
children w
Classroom


res of interest.
o are mentally
teachers would


ED. 503.-Methods of Teaching Crippled Children


(Formerly


EN. 429).


3 credits.


Prerenuisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.


o1
h.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


600.-Teaching


Exceptional


Children


(Formerly


EN. 539).


3 credits.


Pre-


requisite: ED. 300 or PSY. 312.


10:30


An advanced
handicaps.


Daily


course


I 101
in the


ROSEBROOK,


care,


treatment,


and education


of children


with


problems


610.--Principles of Guidance (Formerly


EN. 562).


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


I 209


PRESTON, A.


An introduction to the field of student personnel work.


611.-Occupational Information


(Formerly


EN. 564).


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


I 107


PRESTON, A.


Methods of studying occupations; sources of information concerning employment conditions,
job requirements, training facilities, occupational trends; evaluation of occupational literature; use
of occupational information in counseling.


612.-Techniques in


Guidance


(Formerly


EN. 563).


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


ED. 610 or equivalent; or approval of instructor.


8:10 Daily


YON


EGAN, E. P.


A survey of the various techniques
reference to tests, records, and counseling.


by teachers


and guidance


specialists,


with


special


613.-Personnel Testing


(Formerly


EN. 534).


credits. Prerequisite:


EDF


450 or permission of instructor.


10:30 Daily


I 209


LANE, D.


A survey of the principal aptitude tests and inventories used in personnel work, with assigned
readings in test literature. Procedures for standardizing and validating tests will be considered,
with emphasis on the evaluation of the various instruments for use in personnel work.


ED. 614.-Case Studies in


Counseling


(Formerly


EN. 514).


credits.


Prerequi-


sites: EDF


450 and ED. 612 or equivalent.


9:20 Daily


1205


EGAN, E. P.


Competency is developed in the appraisal of diag
the application of counseling theory and techniques.
and discussed in class.


nostic
Actui


data obtained from case histories and in
al case records will be prepared, studied,


618.-The Organization and Administration of Guidance Programs (Formerly


EN. 513).


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


I 209


STRIPLING, R.


Methods of


organizing


and administering personnel.


programs


in educational institutions.


630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN. 530).


To arrange


3 credits.


YON 302


For advanced students who wish to study individual problems under faculty guidance. Before
registering, the student must submit in writing to the coordinator of the course a statement of a
proposed problem. Forms for this purpose are available in YON 202.


631.-Educational


Leadership


(Formerly


EN.


557).


3 credits.


(Must


taken with ED. 632).
Section 1. 8:10 Daily


YON 214


JOHNS, R. L., AHRENS, M., and WAT-


TENBARGER, J. L.
This is a basic leadership course recommended for majors in administration
Emphasis is given to the development, initiation, and implementation of program
goal determination; and to human relationships. Research projects will center


and supervision.
s and policies; to
around leadership









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


651.-Audio-


Visual Education (Formerly EN


506).


credits.


Section
Section


9:20
11:40


Daily
Daily


The selection, evaluation and
and sound motion pictures.


YON
YON


GATE, C
MC KAY


use of audio-visual materials,


with emphasis upon projected still


652.-Production and Utilization of Audio-


Visual Materials.


3 credits.


Pre-


requisite:


ED. 651 or consent of instructor.


10:30


Daily


YON 140


GATE


Laboratory: To arrange


Designed to train materials


the production


of materials


supervisors,


by photographic


audio-visual coordinators, and other school


processes,


and the


operation


of materials


person


centers.


nel in


655.-Mental Health in the Classroom


(Formerly


515).


3 credits.


12:50 Daily


YON


LAIRD


To assist


teachers in the personality development of children.


657.-Florida


Workshop:


Bulletin


Series


Division


(Formerly


555).


credits.


9:20-11:30


Daily


YON


MOORMAN


and STAFF


course pr


ovides


organization,


materials, and


the preparation of bulletins for professional


provement of Instruction.


Membership


groups


is limited to


assistance


for a group o


for use in the Florida


a selected group.


f teachers engaged in
Program for the Im-


658.-Florida


Workshop


Bulletin


Series


Division


(Formerly


556)


credits.


A continuation of ED. 657.


9:20-11


0 Daily


YON 4


MOORMAN


J. H


and STAFF


ED. 659.-Laboratory in Corrective Reading


(Formerly


576).


6 credits.


10:30-12


Daily


AND


SPACE


G. D.


Intensive


elementary and


study


of the diagnosis,


secondary


schools


correction,


and prevention


work with children in the application


of reading


difficulties,


of principles under


in both
study.


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


YON 202


FOSTER


C. R.


799.-Research and Dissertation.


1 to 6


credits.


To arrange


YON


FOSTER


C. R.


EDUCATION-ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE COURSES


EDA.


600.-Educational


Organization


Administration


(Formerly


522).


3 credits.


Section
Section


10:30
11:40


Daily
Daily


YON
YON


EDA.
EN


601.-Organization and Administration of Elementary Schools.


524).


3 credits.


vnmT


-^ ~^


rnaT? T


(Formerly


P T.


t on n.:1.,


.


p









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EDA. 609.-Problems


in School Administration and Supervision


(Formerly


590).


credits.


To arrange


YON


JOHNS, R. L.


EDA. 630.-Individual Work


(Formerly


EN. 530).


3 credits.


To arrange


YON 128


JOHNS


R. L.


EDA.


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


YON 130


LEPS


J. M.


EDA.


799.-Research and Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.


To arrange


YON 128


JOHN


R. L.


EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY


EDE.


400.-Problems of Instruction. (Formerly EN. 471).


3 credits.


10.30 Daily


TISON, J. P.


The course in elementary curriculum required for certification to teach in grades 1-12 in certain
specialized fields.


EDE. 550.-The Teaching of Arithmetic.


credits.


9.20 Daily


I 201


DWYER, R. E.


The purpose of the eoul
understanding of arithmetic


rse


is to h


concepts,


lelp teachers of elementary and junior high schools
symbolism, and teaching materials and procedures.


EDE. 560.-Teaching Science in the Elementary School.


(Formerly


EN. 509).


credits.


Prerequisite:


GL. 301


or equivalent, or permission of instructor.


11:40 Daily


YON 150


Content, methods, materials and


PILTZ, A.
approaches to


use in teaching


science


in the elementary school.


EDE. 570.-Teaching


of Reading


(Formerly


EN. 480).


3 credits.


8:10 Daily
A comprehensive


cedures


I 201


survey


DWYER, R. E.


of the problems


for attacking these problems.


of teaching


reading


in all grades


and practical pro-


GRADUATE COURSES


EDE.


600.-Elementary School Curriculum.


(Formerly


EN. 501).


3 credits.


Section 1.


10:30 Daily


YON


NESBITT, M.


a r -


A survey of the content anc
for students who have not taken


experience


in the


elementary


I


methods of the element
a course in elementary


schools.


itary school curriculum. Offered primarily
curriculum and who have not had teaching


EDE. 601.-Practices in Elementary


Education I. (Formerly


EN. 545).


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


Orien
modern


YON 311


station course for maj<
practices in elementary


,rs


GREEN, E. K.
in graduate work in elementary education


education.


with emphasis


upon


EDE.


603.-Early Childhood Education, I


(Formerly


EN. 584).


3 credits.


8:10 Daily


YON


MC CRACKEN, J. M.


To assist


teachers


of children of pre-school and early school


EDE.


630.-Individual Work (Formerly


EN. 530).


3 credits.


To arrange


YON 102


HILLIARD, P.


age.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


EDE.


671.-Language


(Formerly EN.


588).


Arts


Elementary


School-Creative


Expression


credits.


9:20 Daily


NESBITT, M.


Emphasis


upon


literature for


younsr


children


and the arts related


fn it


Illustrations, dramatization, puppetry and other dramatic forms, storytelling,


evaluation


and study of children


n's books in


terms of their interests and needs.


These


creative


arts include
writing, and


EDE.


.-Trends in


Teaching


of Readin


g (Formerly


575).


3 credits.


10:30


Daily


YON


MC CRACKEN


J. M.


Analysis of trends in the teaching


eludes consideration of purposes and


of reading


aims,


skills


as shown


and attitudes


in current methods and research.


, informal and formal


reading


tests.


EDE. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


YON


HILLIARD, P.


EDE.


700.-Problems in Elementary


Education, I


(Formerly


547).


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


YON


HILLIARD


An advanced course in elementary school problems.


EDE. 799.-Research and Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


YON


HILLIARD


EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS


EDF


220.-Children and Culture (Formerly SCL. 205).


8:10 Daily


I 107


3 credits.


HILL


A study of effects upon children of the social, economic, geographic, and other circumstances
of community life.


EDF


221.-Children and Culture (Formerly SCL. 206).


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


HILL, T. J.


EDF


360.-Elementary


Statistical


Methods


Education


(Formerly


316).


3 credits.


2:00 Daily


YON 316


Application of selected techniques to


organization


and interpretation of educational data.


EDF


440.-Child Development


(Formerly


385).


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


YON 138


MC LENDON


I. R.


(Reserve time for observation during the forenoon)
Growth and development of children into mature personalities.


EDF


442.-Educational Psychology


(Formerly EN.


386).


3 credits.


10:30 Daily


YON 138


MC LENDON


I. R.


(Reserve time for observation during


Application of psychological
of learning; transfer of training


principles


to the education


ig; the nature of


reasonmig.


the forenoon)


process


individual differences; principles


EDF


. 450.-Measurement and Evaluation of School Practices (Formerly EN


317).


- a Ta I


TTflXT 100


T" A TnT


* -1 I V 1. | -* I I A I -


.-


S* L*.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EDF


610.-Democracy and Education (Formerly EN


508).


3 credits.


Section 1.


Section


11:40


Daily
Daily


YON
YON


BROUDY, H.


BROUDY


A study of the reciprocal relationships of


democracy


and education.


EDF


620.-Socio-Economic


Foundations


Education


(Formerly


EN.


540).


credits.


Section 1.


Section


8:10
11:40


Daily
Daily


YON
YON


ANDERSON
MUNTYAN.


EDF


socio-economic bases
630.-Individual


for education


Work


are comprehensively surveyed.


(Formerly


530).


3 credits.


To arrange


YON 239


LEWIS


H. G.


This course
faculty guidance


EDF


is provided for


640.-Problems


advanced students


in Pupil


who wish


Development and


to study

Learning


individual problems

(Formerly EN.


under

542).


3 or 6 credits.


credits.


9:20


Daily


YON


CUNNINGHAM


KNIGHT, J
Laboratory:


and STAFF


2:00-3


Daily


YON


Section


6 credits.


9:20-11:40 Daily


YON


CUNNINGHAM, M.


KNIGHT


and STAFF


Laboratory:


2:00-4


:30 Daily


YON


Study
learning.


is made of problems of particular


interest


to students in


the field of pupil growth and


EDF


641.-Educational Implications of Personality Theory.


3 credits.


12:50


Daily


YON


COMBS, A.


An examination


of the dynamics


of behavior


and its implication for education.


EDF


642.-Problems in Educational Psychology


(Formerly


EN.


541).


3 credits.


Section 1.


11:40


Daily


YON


CUMBEE


Individualized study of problems dealing with child development,


areas
EDF


of educational


psychology.


650.-Measurement


Evaluation


(Formerly


adolescence, learning, and other


503).


3 credits.


Pre-


requisite:


EDF


.360.


9:20 Daily


YON 316


SCATE


D. E.


Problems in


EDF


test construction will be studied.


. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.


To arrange


YON 239


LEWIS


EDF


720.-School and Society (Formerly EN.


640).


3 credits.


10:30 Daily


1205


LEWI


H. G.


Provides a social and philosophic frame of reference
in which education takes place, and the implications of this


Conducted on


a seminar


basis.


and candidates for the doctor's


Limited to students in the sixth


degree


in education.


through a rigorous study of the society
society for the functioning of the school.


year


program of teacher education


EDF


730.-World Trends in Education


(Formerly


EN.


617).


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


1205


HETENYI


L. J.


I









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


'SSION


EDUCATION-SECONDARY


EDS. 300.-The
laboratory.


8:10


Daily


Secondary


3 credits.


YON


ED
134


School


Program,


I. (Formerly


301).


Class and


3. 300 and EDS. 301 should be taken concurrently
HOCK, L. E.


The function and


Program


of thP


organized around the problems and


secondary


issues


facing


school, and the role of the
secondary education today.


teacher.


Classwork is


EDS. 301


.--The Secondary School Program, II.


laboratory


9:20


3 credits.


Daily


YON


(Formerly


302).


Class and


EDS. 301 and EDS. 300 should be taken concurrently.
134 HOCK, L. E.


550.-Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School.
credits.


(Formerly


309).


10:30 Daily


YON


Contributions of mathematics to the


mathematics


senior

EDS.


; techniques


high school.


560.-Teaching


of teaching

Science


PHILLIPS


education


basic

in the


of high


mathematical

Secondary


school youth
concepts an

School. (


credits.


trends


in


d skills in

:Formerly


the teaching of
the junior and


10:30 Daily


YON 142


GLENN, E. R.


Content, methods, materials,


and approaches


use in teaching


science


in the


second


school.


GRADUATE COURSES


EDS.


600.-Foundations


Secondary


School


Curriculum


(Formerly


519).


3 credits.


Section


8:10


Daily


YON


PRINDIVILLE


An analysis
day programs


of the


assumptions underlying the


ire based and the


emerging


patterns


secondary


in secondary


school, the


research


school curricula.


on which


present-


EDS. 601.-The Junior High School Curriculum (Formerly EN.


516).


3 credits.


9:20 Daily


YON


PRINDIVILLE


Teachers,


principals, and


curriculum offerings in the


school

EDS.


program to


meet


supervisors


modern


the needs


are given


junior high sci


of early


adolescents.


602.-The Secondary School Curriculum


Section
Section


An analysis


be given
programs.


of the


to criteria for


8:10


12:50
scope,


Daily
Daily


functions,


judging the


YON
YON


and types
secondary s


an opportunity
xool. Emphasis


to analyze


and to evaluate the


will be placed on


(Formerly


527).


developing


3 credits.


FULLAGAR,
FULLAGAR,


of secondary


school curricula.


school curriculum and


ways


Consideration will


existing


of improving


EDS. 603.-Community College Education. (Formerly


585).


credits.


11:40 Daily


YON 214


WATTENBARGER


J. L.


An analysis


of the


program


and problems of the


community


college.


EDS.


605.-Evaluation


Secondary


hool Program


(Formerly


538).


3 credits.


Irll









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EDS. 640.-Social Studies in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 559).


10:30 Daily


3 credits.


1203


Consideration of the problems of teachers, supervisors, and principals in teaching social studies
in grades seven through fourteen. Trends, basic principles, recent improvements in methods and
materials will be emphasized. Each student will be given opportunity to develop understandings
and skills in a special problem in the social studies.


EDS.


650.--Mathematics in the Secondary School (Formerly


EN. 579).


3 credits.


11:40 Daily


YON 316


PHILLIPS


W. B.


Selection and use of
problems in the teaching


re
of


source materials in Junior and
mathematics; laboratory experi


senior
ences


construction of equipment, and examination of films and other


>r high school mathematics; current
in surveying, preparation of displays,
pes of materials.


EDS.


670.-Language Arts in the Secondary School (Formerly EN. 550).


10:30 Daily


YON 214


3 credits.


MC GUIRE


Gives opportunity to principals, supervisors,
on their own problems at the various levels
basic principles, methods, and materials will be


graduate students, and in-service teachers to work
in grades seven through fourteen. Present trends,
considered.


EDS. 690.-Student Activities


the Secondary


School


(Formerly


EN.


552).


credits.


11:40 Daily


I 201


An exploration of the purposes,
activity directors, activity sponsors,


phases, and operations of student activities to assist student
and principals in improving the school activities program.


EDS. 699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


YON 329


WILES, K.


EDS. 799.-Research and Dissertation.


1 to 6 credits.


To arrange


YON 329


WILES, K.


EDUCATION-VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE


EDV. 303.-Methods in


Vocational Agriculture (Formerly


EN. 303).


3 credits.


10:30 Daily


YON 150


GARRIS, E.


General methods of teaching vocational agriculture.


EDV


630.-Individual Work (Formerly EN.


530)


3 credits.


To arrange


YON


GARRI


EDV


699.-Research and Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.*


To arrange


YON


GARRIS, E.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


211.-Introduction


to Electrical


Engineering.


3 credits.


Corequisites:


206, MS. 354.
9:20 Daily


ENG 346


A course to provide sophomore students who are planning to enroll in the Department of Elec-


ty




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