• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Correspondence directory
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Officers of administration
 University calendar
 General information
 Fields of instruction
 Index
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00116
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00116
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Correspondence directory
        Correspondence directory
    Title Page
        Page i
        CPage ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Officers of administration
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    University calendar
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Organization and history
            Page 3
        Graduate degrees and programs
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
        Admission to the Graduate School
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
        General regulations and instructions
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Requirements for Master's degrees
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
        Requirements for the degree of Engineer
            Page 28
        Requirements for the Ed.S. and Ed.D.
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
        Requirements for the Ph.D.
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
        Expenses
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Housing
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Financial aid
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
        Special facilities and programs
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        Student services
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
    Fields of instruction
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Course abbreviations
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Accounting
            Page 75
            Page 76
        Agricultural engineering
            Page 77
        Agricultural and extension education
            Page 78
        Agronomy
            Page 79
            Page 80
        Animal science
            Page 81
        Anthropology
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
        Architecture
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
        Art
            Page 88
        Arts and sciences
            Page 89
        Astronomy
            Page 89
            Page 90
        Biochemistry
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
        Botany
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
        Building construction
            Page 98
        Business administration
            Page 99
        Chemical engineering
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
        Chemistry
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Childhood education
            Page 107
            Page 108
        Civil and coastal engineering
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
        Clinical psychology
            Page 114
        Communicative disorders
            Page 115
        Counselor education
            Page 116
            Page 117
        Curriculum and instruction
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
        Dairy science
            Page 122
        Economics
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
        Educational administration and supervision
            Page 128
            Page 129
        Electrical engineering
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
        Engineering
            Page 135
        Engineering science, mechanics, and aerospace engineering
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
        English
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 144
        Environmental engineering sciences
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
        Finance and insurance
            Page 148
            Page 149
        Food and resource economics
            Page 150
            Page 151
        Food science
            Page 152
        Forest resources and conservation
            Page 153
            Page 154
        Foundations of education
            Page 155
            Page 156
        Fruit crops
            Page 157
            Page 158
        Geography
            Page 159
        Geology
            Page 160
            Page 161
        Germanic and slavic languages and literatures
            Page 162
        Health and hospital administration
            Page 163
        Health related professions
            Page 164
        History
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
        Immunology and medical microbiology
            Page 168
            Page 169
        Industrial and systems engineering
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
        Journalism and communications
            Page 173
            Page 174
        Latin American studies
            Page 175
        Linguistics
            Page 176
            Page 177
        Management
            Page 178
        Marketing
            Page 179
        Materials science and engineering
            Page 180
            Page 181
        Mathematics
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
        Mechanical engineering
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
        Medical sciences
            Page 190
        Microbiology
            Page 191
            Page 192
        Music
            Page 193
        Neuroscience
            Page 194
            Page 195
        Nuclear engineering sciences
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
        Nursing
            Page 199
            Page 200
        Occupational therapy
            Page 201
        Ornamental horticulture
            Page 202
        Pathology
            Page 203
            Page 204
        Pharmaceutical chemistry
            Page 205
        Pharmacology
            Page 206
        Pharmacy
            Page 207
            Page 208
        Philosophy
            Page 209
        Physical education, health, and recreation
            Page 210
            Page 211
        Physics
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
        Physiology
            Page 216
        Plant pathology
            Page 217
        Political science
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
        Poultry science
            Page 221
        Psychology
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
        Real estate and urban land studies
            Page 227
        Rehabilitation counseling
            Page 228
        Religion
            Page 229
        Romance languages and literatures
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
        Secondary education
            Page 233
            Page 234
        Sociology
            Page 235
            Page 236
        Soil science
            Page 237
            Page 238
        Special education
            Page 239
            Page 240
        Speech
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
        Statistics
            Page 246
            Page 247
        Taxation
            Page 248
            Page 249
        Urban and regional development studies
            Page 250
        Vegetable crops
            Page 250
        Veterinary science
            Page 251
        Vocational, technical, and adult education
            Page 252
            Page 253
        Zoology
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
    Index
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
    Back Cover
        Page 263
        Page 264
Full Text




Graduate School
Catalog
1974-1975 A











CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY


Graduate School
Harry H. Sisler, Dean
223 Grinter Hall (904) 392-1281
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611
Application for Admission
Admissions Section Office of the Registrar
135 Tigert Hall (904) 392-1361
Assistantships
Chairman of the department in which the student wishes to enroll
Graduate Student Loans
Director, Student Financial Affairs
23 Tigert Hall (904) 392-1275
Housing
University or Off-Campus
Division of Housing
S. W. 13th St. & Museum Road
International Student Advisement
Adviser, International Students
Building AE (904) 392-1345




The University of Florida promotes nondiscrimination in all aspects of its oper-
ations. regardless of race, color, creed, religion, sex, or national origin.


This public document was promulgated at an annual cost of $18.500 (53c per copy)
to provide official information describing the Graduate Program at the University
of Florda, including admission requirements, facilities, fees, fields of instruction
and course listings.


The Record Series includes the Graduate Catalog, the Undergraduate Catalog. the
Schedule of Courses for each quarter, and various bulletins on regulations, policies,
and information which will be sent without charge to all who apply for them. Please
state specifically which document or what information is desired ADDRESS The
Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECORD
Vol L.XIX-Series I. No. I January I. 1974
Published monthlr by the Universtry of Florida. Gainesville. Florida Entered in
the Post Office ai Gaineville. Florida, as second-class matter. under Act of Con-
gress. August 24. 1912. Office of Publications. Gainesville. Florida
MANUFACTURED BY CONVENTION PRESS, INC., JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA















Graduate School

Catalog











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECORD


GAINESVILLE


1974 1975















Contents


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION ................ ...................... V
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR ...................... ........................ ix


GENERAL INFORMATION
ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY ........................................ 3
GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS ............ ...................... 4
ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ................. ................. 8
GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS ............................ 12
REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES ....... .................. ...... 16
REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE OF ENGINEER ............................... 28
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ED.S. AND ED.D. .............................. 29
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. .................. ..................... 32
EXPENSES ............... ................................ ........... 36
H OUSING ............... ................................ ........... 39
FINANCIAL AID .................... ................. ......... 41
SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS ......... .... ...................... 45
STUDENT SERVICES .............. .. .................... ............ 65


FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
COLLEGES AND AREAS, INDEXED BY COLLEGE .......................... 71
COURSE ABBREVIATIONS ...................... ......... ............ 73
FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION, ALPHABETICALLY LISTED ....................... 75
INDEX ..... ......... ................................... ............. 257















Officers of Administration




FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

REUBIN O'D. ASKEW
Governor


RICHARD STONE
Secretary of State
THOMAS D. O'MALLEY, JR.
State Treasurer
FRED O. DICKINSON
Comptroller


ROBERT SHEVIN
Attorney General
RALPH D. TURLINGTON
Commissioner of Education
DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


BOARD OF REGENTS OF FLORIDA

MARSHALL M. CRUISER
Chairman, Palm Beach
JAMES J. GARDNER
Vice Chairman, Fort Lauderdale


J. J. DANIEL
Jacksonville
CHESTER HOWELL FERGUSON
Tampa
E. W. HOPKINS, JR.
Pensacola
D. BURKE KIBLER III
Lakeland


ROBERT B. MAUTZ
Chancellor, Tallahassee
JACK McGRIFF
Gainesville
JULIUS F. PARKER, JR.
Tallahassee
MRS. E. D. PEARCE
Miami








vi / OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ROBERT QUARLES MARSTON, M.D., B.Sc. (Oxonian); D.sc.
President of the University


DON L. ALLEN, D.D.S., Acting Dean, College of Dentistry
CLIFFORD ALLEN BOYD, Ed.D., Dean, College of Physical Education, Health, and
Recreation
CHARLES BENTON BROWNING, Ph.D., Dean for Resident Instruction, Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences
ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN, Ph.D., Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
WILLIAM E. CARTER, Ph.D., Director, Center for Latin American Studies
WAYNE H. CHEN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Engineering and Director, Engineering
and Industrial Experiment Station
CHARLES E. CORNELIUS, Ph.D., Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
GEORGE KELSO DAVIS, Ph.D., Director, Division of Sponsored Research
JOSHUA CLIFTON DICKINSON, JR., Ph.D., Director, Florida State Museum
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S., Vice President for Administrative Affairs
KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER, Ph.D., Dean, College of Pharmacy and Acting Vice
President for Health Affairs
JOHN LEWIS GRAY, D.F., Director, School of Forest Resources and Conservation
HAROLD PALMER HANSON, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs
GUSTAVE ADOLPHUS HARRER, Ph.D., Director, University Libraries
JOHN PAUL JONES, M.A., Dean, College of Journalism and Communications
JOSEPH RICHARD JULIN, J.D., Dean, College of Law
ROBERT FRANKLIN LANZILLOTTI, Ph.D., Dean, College of Business Administration
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs
BERT LAVON SHARP, Ed.D., Dean, College of Education
BETTY LENTZ SIEGEL, Ph.D., Dean for Continuing Education
HARRY HALL SISLER, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate School
JOHN WILBUR SITES, Ph.D., Dean for Research, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
CHANDLER A. STETSON, M.D., Dean, College of Medicine
HOWARD KAZURO SUZUKI, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health Related Professions
KENNETH R. TEFERTILLER, Ph.D., Vice President for Agricultural Affairs
BLANCHE 1. UREY, Ed.D., Dean, College of Nursing
CALVIN ANTHONY VANDERWERF, Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
RICHARD HOLMES WHITEHEAD, B.A., Dean of Admissions and Registrar









OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION / Vii

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


HARRY H. SISLER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Dean, Graduate School and Professor of
Chemistry
LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Dean Emeritus, Graduate School and Professor
of Engineering
F. MICHAEL WAHL, Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Dean, Graduate School and Professor
of Geology
JOHN M. NEWELL, Ph.D. (Texas), Assistant Dean, Graduate School and Professor
of Education
MADELYN L. KAFOGLIS, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Dean, Graduate School,
Associate Research Professor, Bureau of Economic and Business Research,
and Associate Professor of Economics
JIMMY C. PERKINS, B.S., Assistant to the Dean

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
HARRY H. SISLER (Chairman), Ph.D. (Illinois), Dean, Graduate School and Pro-
fessor of Chemistry
EUGENE FOSTER BRIGHAM, Ph.D. (California), Graduate Research Professor of
Finance and Insurance
ARCHIE F. CARR, JR., Ph.D. (Florida), Graduate Research Professor of Zoology
MELVIN FRIED, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of Biochemistry and Assistant Dean for
Graduate Education in the Medical Sciences
RAYMOND GAY-CROSIER, Docteur 6s lettres (Berne), Associate Professor of French
JACQUELIN R. GOLDMAN, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor of Psychology
HARRY H. GRIGGS, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Journalism and Communications
GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Engineering Sci-
ence, Mechanics, and Aerospace Engineering and Assistant Dean, College
of Engineering
WILLIAM MAURICE JONES, Ph.D. (Southern California), Professor of Chemistry and
Chairman, Department of Chemistry
KERRY EDWARDS KILPATRICK, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor of Industrial
and Systems Engineering and Director, Health Systems Research Center
MAX R. LANGHAM, Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Professor of Food and Resource
Economics
O. RUTH MCQUOWN, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
and Associate Professor of Political Science
WILLIAM MENDENHALL III, Ph.D. (North Carolina State), Professor of Statistics
and Chairman, Department of Statistics

















CALENDAR for 1974

JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30

OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31








CALENDAR for 1975

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 1 4 1 1
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
APRIL MAY JUNE
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30

JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30
31
OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 2 3 4 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 31
26 27 28 29 30 30_















University of Florida Calendar*


FALL QUARTER


1974
July 5, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..........



August 9, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .......





September 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .....






September 17-19,
Tuesday-Thursday ..............




September 20, Friday .............



September 20, Friday .............

September 20, Friday .............




September 23, Monday ...........

September 25, Wednesday,
4:00 p.m ................... ...


Last day for currently enrolled students to
file application at Registrar's Office for ad-
mission to Graduate School.

Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for Fall Quarter,
and for those previously in attendance to
apply for registration appointments.

Last day for those whose application was
filed by above deadline to clear admissions.
All credentials must have been received
and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late
registration appointments.


Registration (including payment of fees)
according to assigned appointments. No
one permitted to start regular registration
after 3:00 p.m., Thursday, September 19.

Last day to pay fees, if registration com-
pleted by September 19, without being
subject to $25 late fee.

Drop-Add period begins.

Last day to complete registration for Fall
Quarter. All students registering today
assessed a $25 late fee. No one permitted
to start registration after 3:00 p.m.

Classes begin.


Last day to add courses and to change
sections.


*This Calendar may be subject to change. Should subsequent notices be in conflict with
the dates listed herein, the latest information should be followed. Deadline Dates are
available each quarter from the Graduate School Office.








X / UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


September 25, Wednesday,
4:00 p.m ................... ...


October 1, Tuesday ...............





October 1, Tuesday ...............






October 2, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. ...


October 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ......



October 11, Friday 4:00 p.m. ......



October 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ......



October 25-26, Friday-Saturday,
Homecoming ..................


Last day to withdraw and receive full re-
fund of fees.
Last day for receipt by ETS of Registra-
tion Form for October 26 Graduate
Record Examination. Fees increase $3.50
after this day and up to closing date of
October 8.

Last day for receipt of foreign language
examination fee for reading knowledge ex-
aminations (GSFLT) in French, German
or Spanish on October 26. Fees increase
$3.50 after this day and up to closing date
of October 8.

Last day to drop courses without receiving
a grade of E.
Last day to file application for Admission
to Candidacy for master's degree to be
conferred at end of Fall Quarter.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for
degree to be conferred at end of Fall
Quarter.
Last day for currently enrolled students to
file application at Registrar's Office for ad-
mission to Graduate School.


Classes suspended.


October 26, Saturday, 8:30 a.m. .... Graduate Record Examination.


October 26, Saturday, 1:30 p.m .....



October 29, Tuesday ..............


November 4, Monday .............



November 11, Monday,
Veterans Day .................

November 12, Tuesday ...........


Foreign language reading knowledge ex-
amination (GSFLT) in French, German,
or Spanish.

Midpoint of term for completing doctoral
qualifying examination.

Last day for master's candidates to file ab-
stracts and fee receipt for library hardbind-
ing with the Graduate School.


Classes suspended.

Last day for candidates for doctoral
degrees to file dissertations, fee receipts for
library hardbinding and microfilming, and
all doctoral forms with the Graduate
School.








UNIVERSITY CALENDAR / XI


November 19, Tuesday ............





November 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ....


November 27, Wednesday .........



November 28-30, Thursday-Saturday,
Thanksgiving ..................
December 2, Monday .............



December 6, Friday ..............


Last day for receipt by ETS of Registra-
tion Form for December 14 Graduate
Record Examination. Fees increase $3.50
after this day and up to closing date of
November 26.
Last day to withdraw without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
Last day to submit signed original copies
of master's theses and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.

Classes suspended.
Last day to submit signed original copies
of dissertations and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.

All classes end.


December 9, Monday ............. Final examinations begin.


December 12, Thursday,
10:00 a.m .................. .


December 13, Friday, Noon .......

December 14, Saturday ...........
December 14, Saturday,
8:30 a.m ..................... .
December 16, Monday,
10:00 a.m ................... ..


Grades for degree candidates due in Regis-
trar's Office.
Report of colleges on candidates for
degrees due in Graduate School Office.
Commencement Convocation.

Graduate Record Examination.

All grades for Fall Quarter due in Regis-
trar's Office.


WINTER QUARTER


1974
November 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m ....






December 13, Friday 4:00 p.m. .....


Last day for those not previously in
attendance at the University of Florida to
file application for admission for Winter
Quarter, and for those previously in atten-
dance to apply for registration appoint-
ments.
Last day for those whose application was
filed by above deadline to clear admissions.
All credentials must have been received
and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late
registration appointments.








XII / UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


December 24, Tuesday ............





December 24, Tuesday ............


1975
January 3, Friday ................




January 3, Friday ................



January 6, Monday ...............





January 8, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m ...

January 8, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m ...


January 15, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. ..


January 18, Saturday, 8:30 a.m ....
January 18, Saturday, 1:30 p.m ....



January 24, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ......



January 24, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ......



January 24, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ......


Last day for receipt by ETS of Registra-
tion Form for January 18 Graduate
Record Examination. Fees increase $3.50
after this day and up to closing date of
December 31.
Last day for receipt of foreign language
examination fee for reading knowledge ex-
aminations (GSFLT) in French, German,
or Spanish on January 18. Fees increase
$3.50 after this day and up to closing date
of December 31.



Registration (including payment of fees)
according to assigned appointments. No
one permitted to start registration after
3:00 p.m.
Last day to pay fees, if registration com-
pleted by January 3, without being subject
to $25 late fee.
Classes begin. Last day to complete regis-
tration for Winter Quarter. All students
registering today assessed a $25 late fee.
No one permitted to start registration after
3:00 p.m.
Last day to add courses and to change
sections.
Last day to withdraw and receive full re-
fund of fees.

Last day to drop courses without receiving
a grade of E.
Graduate Record Examination.
Foreign language reading knowledge ex-
aminations (GSFLT) in French, German,
or Spanish.
Last day for currently enrolled students to
file application at Registrar's Office for
admission to Graduate School.
Last day to file application for Admission
to Candidacy for master's degree to be
conferred at end of Winter Quarter.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for
degree to be conferred at end of Winter
Quarter.








UNIVERSITY CALENDAR / XIII


January 28, Tuesday ..............





February 3, Monday ..............



February 4, Tuesday ..............


February 10, Monday .............





February 22, Saturday, 8:30 a.m. ...
February 28, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .....


February 28, Friday ..............



March 3, Monday ................


Last day for receipt by ETS of Registra-
tion Form for February 22 Graduate
Record Examination. Fees increase $3.50
after this day and up to closing date of
February 4.
Last day for master's candidates to file
abstracts and fee receipt for library hard-
binding with the Graduate School.
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral
qualifying examination.
Last day for candidates for doctoral
degrees to file dissertations, fee receipts for
library hardbinding and microfilming, and
all doctoral forms with the Graduate
School.
Graduate Record Examination.
Last day to withdraw without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
Last day to submit signed original copies
of master's theses and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.
Last day to submit signed original copies
of dissertations and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.


March 14, Friday ................ All classes end.
March 17, Monday ............... Final examinations begin.


March 20, Thursday, 10:00 a.m. ....


March 21, Friday, Noon ..........


March 22, Saturday ..............
March 24, Monday, 10:00 a.m. .....


Grades for degree candidates due in Regis-
trar's Office.
Report of colleges on candidates for
degrees due in Graduate School Office.
Commencement Convocation.
All grades for Winter Quarter due in
Registrar's Office.


SPRING QUARTER


1975
February 28, Friday, 4:00 p.m .....


Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for Spring
Quarter, and for those previously in atten-
dance to apply for registration appoint-
ments.








XIV / UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


March 14, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .......






M arch 28, Friday ................




March 31, Monday ...............





April 1, Tuesday .................



April 1, Tuesday .................






April 2, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. .....

April 2, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. .....


April 9, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. .....

April 18, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ........


April 18, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ........



April 18, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ........



April 26, Saturday, 8:30 a.m ......
April 26, Saturday, 1:30 p.m. ......


Last day for those whose application was
filed by the above deadline to clear ad-
missions. All credentials must have been
received and college changes approved.
Those who clear after this date will be
assigned late registration appointments.
Registration (including payment of fees)
according to assigned appointments. No
one permitted to start regular registration
after 3:00 p.m. Last day for paying fees
without being subject to late fee.
Classes begin. Last day for completing
registration for Spring Quarter. All stu-
dents registering today assessed a $25 late
fee. No one permitted to start registration
after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for receipt by ETS of Registra-
tion Form for April 26 Graduate Record
Examination. Fees increase $3.50 after this
day and up to closing date of April 8.
Last day for receipt of foreign language
examination fee for reading knowledge ex-
aminations (GSFLT) in French, German
or Spanish on April 26. Fees increase $3.50
after this date and up to closing date of
April 8.
Last day to add courses and to change
sections.
Last day to withdraw and receive full re-
fund of fees.
Last day to drop courses without receiving
a grade of E.
Last day for currently enrolled students to
file application at Registrar's Office for ad-
mission to Graduate School.
Last day to file application for Admission
to Candidacy for master's degree to be
conferred at end of Spring Quarter.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for
degree to be conferred at end of Spring
Quarter.
Graduate Record Examination.
Foreign language reading knowledge ex-
amination (GSFLT) in French, German,
or Spanish.








UNIVERSITY CALENDAR / XV


April 28, M onday ................



M ay 5, M onday ..................


M ay 5, M onday ..................





May 23, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .........


M ay 23, Friday ..................



May 26, Monday, Memorial Day ...

M ay 27, Tuesday .................




May 27, Tuesday .................





May 27, Tuesday .................


Last day for master's degree candidates to
file abstracts and fee receipt for library
hardbinding with the Graduate School.

Midpoint of term for completing doctoral
qualifying examination.

Last day for candidates for doctoral
degrees to file dissertations, fee receipts for
library hardbinding and microfilming, and
all doctoral forms with the Graduate
School.

Last day to withdraw without receiving
failing grades in all courses.

Last day to submit signed original copies
of master's theses and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.

Classes suspended.

Last day for receipt by ETS of Registra-
tion Form for June 21 Graduate Record
Examination. Fees increase $3.50 after this
day and up to closing date of June 3.

Last day for receipt of foreign language
reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT)
in French, German, or Spanish on June
21. Fees increase $3.50 after this day and
up to closing date of June 3.

Last day to submit signed original copies
of dissertations and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.


June 6, Friday ................... All classes end.

June 9, Monday .................. Final examinations begin.


June 12, Thursday, 10:00 a.m. .....


June 13, Friday, Noon ............


Grades for degree candidates due in Regis-
trar's Office.

Report of colleges on candidates for
degrees due in Graduate School Office.


June 14, Saturday ................ Commencement Convocation.

June 16, Monday, 10:00 a.m. ...... All grades for Spring Quarter due in
Registrar's Office.








XVI / UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


SUMMER QUARTER


1975
May 16, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .........






June 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..........






June 20, Friday ..................





June 21, Saturday, 8:30 a.m. .......

June 21, Saturday, 1:30 p.m. .......



June 23, M onday .................





June 25, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. .....


June 25, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. .....


July 2, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. ......


July 4, Friday,
Independence Day ..............

July 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .........



July 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .........


Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for Summer
Quarter, and for those previously in atten-
dance to apply for registration appoint-
ments.

Last day for those whose application was
filed by the above deadline to clear ad-
missions. All credentials must have been
received and college changes approved.
Those who clear after this date will be
assigned late registration appointments.

Registration (including payment of fees)
according to assigned appointments. No
one permitted to start regular registration
after 3:00 p.m. Last day for paying fees
without being subject to late fee.

Graduate Record Examination.

Foreign language reading knowledge ex-
aminations (GSFLT) in French, German,
or Spanish.

Classes begin. Last day to complete regis-
tration for Summer Quarter. Students
registering today assessed a $25 late fee.
No one permitted to start registration after
3:00 p.m.

Last day to add courses and to change
sections.

Last day to withdraw and receive full
refund of fees.

Last day to drop courses without receiving
a grade of E.


Classes suspended.

Last day for currently enrolled students to
file application at Registrar's Office for ad-
mission to Graduate School.

Last day to file application for Admission
to Candidacy for a master's degree to be
conferred at end of Summer Quarter.









UNIVERSITY CALENDAR / XVII


July 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .........



July 23, W wednesday ..............


August 4, Monday ...............



August 8, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ........


August II, Monday ..............





August 22, Friday ................


August 22, Friday ................


Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for
degree to be conferred at end of Summer
Quarter.
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral
qualifying examination.
Last day for master's candidates to file
abstracts and fee receipt for library hard-
binding with the Graduate School.
Last day to withdraw without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
Last day for candidates for doctoral
degrees to file dissertations, fee receipts for
library hardbinding and microfilming, and
all doctoral forms with the Graduate
School.
All classes end.


Last day to submit signed original copies
of master's theses and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School


August 25, Monday .............. Final examinations begin.


August 25, Monday ..............



August 28, Thursday, 10:00 a.m. ...


August 29, Friday, Noon ..........


Last day to submit signed original copies
of dissertations and Final Examination
Reports to the Graduate School.
Grades for degree candidates due in Regis-
trar's Office.

Report of colleges on candidates for
degrees due in Graduate School Office.


August 30, Saturday .............. Commencement Convocation.


September 2, Tuesday,
10:00 a.m ................... .


All grades for Summer Quarter due in
Registrar's Office.














General Information
































Rules, policies, fees, and courses described in this Catalog are subject to
change without notice.














THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY
The Graduate School consists of the dean, the assistant deans, the Graduate
Council, and the graduate faculty. General policies and standards of the Graduate
School are established by the graduate faculty. The Graduate School is responsible
for the enforcement of minimum general standards of graduate work in the Uni-
versity and for the coordination of the graduate programs of the various colleges
and divisions of the University. The responsibility for the detailed operations of
graduate programs is vested in the individual colleges, divisions, and departments.
In most of the colleges an assistant dean or other official is directly responsible
for graduate study in his college.
The Graduate Council, of which the dean is chairman, assists him in being
the agent of the graduate faculty for execution of policy related to graduate study
and associated research. The Council considers petitions and recommends the
award of graduate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty, who are appointed
by the dean with the approval of the Graduate Council, fall into two categories
in accordance with their function: the Graduate Studies Faculty, who are ap-
pointed to teach graduate courses and to direct master's theses, and the Doctoral
Research Faculty, who are appointed in addition to direct doctoral dissertations.
No staff member is expected to perform any of these functions without having
been appointed to the graduate faculty, though temporary exceptions may be made
in unusual circumstances.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study was very informal. Con-
trol was in the hands of a faculty committee which reported directly to the Presi-
dent. In 1910, however, James N. Anderson, head of the Department of Ancient
Languages, was appointed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Director
of Graduate Work, and in 1930 he became the first dean of the Graduate School.
He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1938 by T. M. Simpson, head of the
Department of Mathematics, who held the position until 1951. C. F. Byers, head
of the Department of Biological Sciences in the University College, served as
acting dean from June, 1951, until August, 1952, when he was succeeded by L.
E. Grinter, who came from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he had
been Vice President, Dean of the Graduate School, and Research Professor. Upon
becoming Acting Executive Vice President in 1969, Dr. Grinter was named dean
emeritus of the Graduate School. He was succeeded by Harold P. Hanson, who
came to Florida from the University of Texas, where he had served as Chairman
of the Department of Physics. In 1971, Dr. Hanson was appointed Vice President
for Academic Affairs. Dr. Alexander G. Smith, of the Department of Physics
and Astronomy and a former assistant dean of the Graduate School, served as
acting dean until the appointment of Dr. Harry H. Sisler. Dr. Sisler served as
Chairman of the Department of Chemistry for twelve years, as Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences, and as Executive Vice President of the University of Florida
until he became Dean of the Graduate School in March, 1973.
Study leading to .graduate degrees has existed at the University of Florida
from the date of the establishment of the University on its present campus. The
first M.A. was awarded in 1906, the major being English, and the first M.S. in









4 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

1908, with a major in entomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D. were
initiated in 1930, and the first degrees were awarded in 1934, one with a major
in chemistry and the other with a major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was awarded
in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal growth at the University of Florida.
In 1930, 33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded
in 16 fields. In 1972-1973 the total number of graduate degrees awarded was 1449
in more than 90 fields. The proportion of doctoral degrees has increased steadily.
In 1950, 18 Ph.D.'s and 5 Ed.D.'s were awarded. In 1972-1973 the total was
211 Ph.D.'s and 50 Ed.D.'s.


GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS



Refer to the section of this Catalog entitled Fields of Instruction for special-
izations in the various approved programs.

NONTHESIS DEGREES
MASTER OF AGRICULTURE (M.AG.), with program in one of the following:
AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION FOOD SCIENCE
EDUCATION FORESTRY
AGRONOMY FRUIT CROPS
ANIMAL SCIENCE GENERAL AGRICULTURE
BOTANY ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
DAIRY SCIENCE PLANT PATHOLOGY
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY POULTRY SCIENCE
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS SOIL SCIENCE
VEGETABLE CROPS

MASTER OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT AND RESOURCE
DEVELOPMENT (M.A.M.R.D.), with program in FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (M.A.T.), with program in one of the following:
ANTHROPOLOGY MATHEMATICS
ENGLISH PHILOSOPHY
FRENCH POLITICAL SCIENCE
GEOGRAPHY POLITICAL SCIENCE-
GERMAN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
HISTORY PSYCHOLOGY
LATIN SOCIOLOGY
LATIN AMERICAN AREA STUDIES SPANISH
LINGUISTICS SPEECH

MASTER OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (M.B.C.)
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.), with departmental
programs in one of the following:
ACCOUNTING FINANCE
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION HEALTH AND HOSPITAL
ECONOMICS ADMINISTRATION









GRADUATE PROGRAMS / 5


INSURANCE REAL ESTATE AND
MANAGEMENT URBAN LAND STUDIES
MARKETING


MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.ED.), with program in one of the following:
BUSINESS EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION
COUNSELOR EDUCATION (available Music EDUCATION
only in conjunction with the Ed.S. SECONDARY EDUCATION
degree) SPECIAL EDUCATION
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL, ADULT
EDUCATION

MASTER OF ENGINEERING (M.E.), with program in one of the following:
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING* ENGINEERING SCIENCE*
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING* ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING* SCIENCES*
CIVIL ENGINEERING* INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS
COASTAL AND OCEANOGRAPHIC ENGINEERING*
ENGINEERING* MECHANICAL ENGINEERING*
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING* METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
ENGINEERING MECHANICS* ENGINEERING*
NUCLEAR ENGINEERING SCIENCES*

MASTER OF HEALTH EDUCATION (M.H.ED.)
MASTER OF LAWS (LL.M.), with program in TAXATION
MASTER OF NURSING (M.NSG.)
MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (M.O.T.)
MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (M.P.E.)
MASTER OF REHABILITATION COUNSELING (M.R.C.)
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING (M.S.T.), with program in one of the
following:
ASTRONOMY MATHEMATICS
BOTANY MICROBIOLOGY
CHEMISTRY PHYSICS
GEOGRAPHY PSYCHOLOGY
GEOLOGY ZOOLOGY

MASTER OF STATISTICS (M.STAT.)

ENGINEER (ENGR.)-A special degree requiring one year of graduate work
beyond the master's degree. For a list of the approved programs, see those
listed above for the Master of Engineering degree. (Thesis optional.)
SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION (ED.S.)-A special degree requiring one year of
graduate work beyond the master's degree. For a list of the approved pro-
grams, see those listed below for the Doctor of Education degree.
*indicates thesis option









6 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

THESIS DEGREES

MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.), with program in one of the following:
ACCOUNTING MARKETING
ANTHROPOLOGYt MATHEMATICSt
ECONOMICS PHILOSOPHYt
ENGLISHt POLITICAL SCIENCEf
FINANCE POLITICAL SCIENCE-
FRENCHt INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
GEOGRAPHY PSYCHOLOGY
GERMAN REAL ESTATE AND
HISTORY URBAN LAND STUDIES
INSURANCE SOCIOLOGY
LATIN SPANISHI
LATIN AMERICAN AREA SPEECH
STUDIES URBAN AND REGIONAL
LINGUISTICS PLANNING
MANAGEMENT

MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE (M.A.ARCH.)
MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (M.A.E.). For a list of the programs, see
those listed above for the Master of Education degree.
MASTER OF ARTS IN HEALTH EDUCATION (M.A.H.ED.)
MASTER OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
(M.A.J.C.), with program in COMMUNICATIONS
MASTER OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (M.A.P.E.)
MASTER OF FINE ARTS (M.F.A.)
MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.), with program in one of the following:
AEROSPACE ENGINEERINGf MATHEMATICS
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING! MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
ASTRONOMYt MEDICAL SCIENCES
BIOCHEMISTRY Anatomical Sciences
BOTANY Immunology and Medical
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING" Microbiology
CHEMISTRY Neuroscience
CIVIL ENGINEERING Pathology
COASTAL AND OCEANOGRAPHIC Pharmacology
ENGINEERING! Physiology
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERINGt METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
ENGINEERING MECHANICSt ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING SCIENCEt MICROBIOLOGY
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY NUCLEAR ENGINEERING SCIENCESt
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING PHYSICSt
SCIENCES PLANT PATHOLOGY
GEOGRAPHY PSYCHOLOGY
GEOLOGY VETERINARY SCIENCES
INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ZOOLOGYt
ENGINEERING!


indicates nonthesis option









GRADUATE PROGRAMS / 7

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE (M.S.A.), with program in one of
the following:
AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION FOOD SCIENCE
EDUCATION FRUIT CROPS
AGRONOMY ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
ANIMAL SCIENCE PLANT PATHOLOGY
DAIRY SCIENCE POULTRY SCIENCE
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY SOIL SCIENCE
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS VEGETABLE CROPS

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (M.S.B.C.)

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY (M.S.F.)

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (M.S.NSG.)

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY (M.S.P.), with program in:
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacy

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN STATISTICS (M.S.STAT.)
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (ED.D.), with program in one of the following:
COUNSELOR EDUCATION EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION
SPECIAL EDUCATION

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PH.D.), with program in one of the following:
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING HISTORY
AGRONOMY INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS
ANIMAL SCIENCE ENGINEERING
ANTHROPOLOGY LINGUISTICS
ASTRONOMY MATHEMATICS
BIOCHEMISTRY MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
BOTANY MEDICAL SCIENCES
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Anatomical Sciences
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Immunology and
CHEMISTRY Medical Microbiology
CIVIL ENGINEERING Neuroscience
COUNSELOR EDUCATION Pathology
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION Pharmacology
ECONOMICS Physiology
EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS MICROBIOLOGY
ENGLISH NUCLEAR ENGINEERING SCIENCES
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Pharmaceutical Chemistry
SCIENCES Pharmacy
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS PHILOSOPHY
FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION PHYSICS
FRUIT CROPS PLANT PATHOLOGY
GEOGRAPHY POLITICAL SCIENCE









8 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

POLITICAL SCIENCE- SOIL SCIENCE
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SPECIAL EDUCATION
PSYCHOLOGY SPEECH
ROMANCE LANGUAGES STATISTICS
SOCIOLOGY VEGETABLE CROPS
ZOOLOGY


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Application for Admission to the Graduate School must be made to the
Director of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at times stipulated
in the University Calendar. The applicant must have a bachelor's degree from
an accredited college or university and should submit a score on the Aptitude
Test of the Graduate Record Examination. Applications which meet minimum
standards for admissions are referred by the Director to the graduate selection
committees of the various colleges and divisions for approval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete official transcripts of
all the applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in the possession of the
Registrar, and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is received directly
from the registrar of the institution in which the work was done. Official supple-
mentary transcripts are required, as soon as they are available, for any work
completed after the application for admission has been made. In general, no stu-
dent who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will be considered for
graduate study in any unit of the University.
The University encourages applications from qualified persons of all cultural,
racial, religious, and ethnic groups.

BOARD OF REGENTS' MINIMUM ADMISSION STANDARDS
The Board of Regents has established the following minimum standards for
first-time admission to a master's or doctoral degree program in the State Univer-
sity System: a grade average of B or better for all upper-division undergraduate
work or a score of 1000 or higher on the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record
Examination.
It must be emphasized that these are minimum standards for the State Univer-
sity System, and that at the University of Florida, the Graduate School and many
colleges and departments have established admission requirements above the mini-
mum. Therefore, satisfaction of the Board of Regents' criteria does not guarantee
approval for admission to graduate study at the University of Florida.
To be admitted to graduate study in a given department, the prospective
student must satisfy the admission requirements of the department as well as those
of the Graduate School. Prospective students should contact the appropriate de-
partment for specific information on admission requirements. In some depart-
ments, the available space and facilities limit the number of students that can
be admitted.

UNDERGRADUATE RECORD
Unqualified admission to the Graduate School is commonly dependent upon
the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or curricu-
lum, with an average grade of B or better for the junior and senior years. In
some units of the Graduate School and in the more advanced levels of graduate








ADMISSION / 9

study, an undergraduate average considerably above B may be required. In some
colleges and departments admission may be considered with an average somewhat
below B. Graduate admission selection committees consider not only the general
grade average, but the distribution of work and the quality and extent of prep-
aration for the graduate program the student proposes to undertake.
In addition, performance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE-see
next section) is used in evaluating an applicant, especially in cases where the
undergraduate average is slightly below B or includes a large number of non-
traditional grades.
Prospective students should contact the department in the field of their
interest to ascertain whether there are exceptions to the general rules above.
While the general admissions requirements described above apply to both
master's and doctoral candidates, it should be noted that doctoral candidates must
meet certain additional requirements which vary according to the programs estab-
lished by the departments and colleges. Furthermore, it is desirable for students
planning to enter certain colleges and departments to have a reading knowledge
of at least one foreign language.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the Aptitude Test of
the GRE, but, either at the request of the department concerned or on his own
volition, the applicant is encouraged to submit in addition ihe scores on one or
more advanced subject matter tests of the GRE. The scores on all tests taken
will be weighed in regard to admission.
The GRE is given six times a year-October, December, January, February,
April, and June-at a great many locations in the United States, including Gaines-
ville, Florida. To determine exact dates and the most convenient locations, stu-
dents should write to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey
08540. Applications are required several weeks prior to the examination, and
scores are received about a month after the examination. Hence, it is necessary
to apply for the GRE in early September for admission in January, in early
December for admission in March, in early January for admission in June, and
in early March for admission in September. Other examinations are given for
which application must be made in November and May, but the ones listed above
are correlated with admissions deadlines.
Postponement of the GRE.-If a student applies for admission too late to
take the GRE before his expected date of entry, particularly for a summer session,
he may apply for admission to the Graduate School with postponement of the
GRE and submit his score on the Miller Analogies Test to be used as a partial
basis for deciding whether tentative admission may be granted. It should be noted,
however, that the Miller Analogies Test is not a substitute for the GRE. In
cases where the GRE has been postponed, it must be taken with satisfactory
results before registration in a second quarter will be permitted.
The Miller Analogies Test, given at about 250 colleges and universities
throughout the country, is administered by the Psychological and Vocational
Counseling Center, Room 311, Little Hall, throughout the calendar year at 2:30
P.M. on Tuesday and Wednesday. Special appointments can be made by contact-
ing the Psychological and Vocational Counseling Center. The cost of the test,
$3, should be paid to Student Accounts, the Hub, and the receipt should be
presented at the time of testing.
Test scores should be presented to the Dean of the Graduate School. No








10 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

student can be considered for postponement of the GRE until after his application
for admission is otherwise complete and all his credentials have been received
in the Office of the Registrar.
Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business.-Students applying for ad-
mission to the Graduate School who wish to pursue degrees in the College of
Business Administration may submit satisfactory scores on the Admission Test
for Graduate Study in Business (ATGSB) as a substitute for the required scores
on the Aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination.
The ATGSB is given five times a year-November, February, April, June,
and August-at many locations in the United States, including Gainesville, Flor-
ida. To determine exact dates and the most convenient locations, students should
write to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.


ADMISSION PROCEDURES FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS
All foreign students whose native tongue is not English making application
for admission to the Graduate School of the University of Florida must present
their scores on TOEFL (Testing of English as a Foreign Language). Each appli-
cant is asked to write TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey
08540, U.S.A., requesting a Bulletin of Information and registration form. A final
consideration cannot be granted a foreign student's application for admission until
his scores on this test are received by Admissions Section, Office of the Regis-
trar, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, U.S.A.
All students are required to submit satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record
Examination for admission to the Graduate School. However, students educated
in foreign countries who apply for admission while residing outside the United
States may be given a postponement of this requirement until the first quarter
of attendance at the University of Florida. Permission to register for a second
quarter will depend upon completion of the examination.
Foreign students who have studied at an American university or college for
one year or more must take the GRE and submit scores before their application
for admission can be approved.


CONDITIONAL ADMISSION
Students may be given conditional admission to the Graduate School for
any of the following reasons: (1) to validate the interpretation of undergraduate
records from nonaccredited and unevaluated colleges, (2) to establish the student's
ability to meet the requirements of the Graduate School in cases where the quan-
tity or quality of his preparation cannot be determined with sufficient certainty
for unconditional admission, (3) to repair deficiencies in an undergraduate program
which does not meet the prerequisites for graduate study set by the student's
major department, and (4) to ascertain the student's ability to pursue graduate
work successfully in cases where his previous grade record or GRE scores are
on the borderline of acceptability.
A student who is conditionally admitted to the Graduate School should be
notified by his major department of the conditions under which he has been ad-
mitted. When those conditions have been satisfied, the department should notify
the student in writing and send a copy of the notification to the Graduate School.









ADMISSION / II
Work taken while a student is in conditional status may be applied toward a
graduate degree.

ADMISSION OF POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
Postbaccalaureate students (classified 6) who have not been admitted to the
Graduate School may take graduate courses, but the work so taken will not
normally be transferred to the student's graduate record if he is subsequently
admitted to the Graduate School. By petition in clearly justified cases, it is possible
to transfer up to ten quarter hours, but in no case will more than ten hours
be transferred.
Students in the College of Education who desire postbaccalaureate classifi-
cation to obtain teacher certification must provide the college with a clear state-
ment of certification goals as part of the requirements for admission. Interested
students should contact the College Counseling Office, 134 Norman Hall, prior
to applying for 6ED admission.

UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION IN GRADUATE COURSES
With the permission of the instructor and of the college concerned, an under-
graduate student at the University of Florida may enroll in 600-level courses if
he has senior standing and an upper-division grade-point average of at least 2.8.
His registration, during any term in which he is enrolled in a graduate course,
may not exceed 17 credits. A 600-level course taken under this provision may
be applied toward a graduate degree at the University of Florida after the student
has been accepted in the Graduate School if credit for the course has not been
used for an undergraduate degree.

INFORMATION FOR VETERANS
The University of Florida is approved for the education and training of veter-
ans under all public laws in effect; i.e., Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code (Dis-
abled Veterans); Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold-War G.I. Bill); and Chapter
35, Title 38, U.S. Code (Children of Deceased or Disabled Veterans).
Students who may be eligible for educational benefits under any Veterans
Administration program are urged to contact the Veterans Affairs Office, 123 Tigert
Hall, or the Veterans Administration Regional Office, P. O. Box 1437, St. Peters-
burg, Florida 33700, well in advance of the date of registration.
Students expecting to receive benefits under one of these programs must file
with the Office of the Registrar their Certificate of Eligibility which is issued by
the Veterans Administration. No certification can be made until the Certificate
is on file. Benefits are determined by the Veterans Administration, and the Uni-
versity certifies according to their rules and regulations.

ADMISSION OF FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS
Members of the faculty of the University of Florida with a rank of instructor
or above (or equivalents), except county agents in the Agricultural Extension
Service, may not receive a graduate degree from this institution. They may, how-
ever, register for work in the Graduate School and apply the credit earned to
graduate degrees to be conferred by other institutions.














GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
It is the responsibility of the student to inform himself concerning, and to
observe, all regulations and procedures required by the program he is pursuing.
In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a student
pleads ignorance of the regulation or asserts that he was not informed of it by
his adviser or other authority. The student should make himself especially familiar
with (1) this section of the Catalog, (2) the section presenting the requirements
for the degree he plans to take, and (3) the offerings and requirements of his
major department.
Consultation with College and Department.-After the student has been ad-
mitted to the Graduate School, but before his first registration, he should consult
the college and/or the graduate coordinator in the department in which he will
do his work concerning course requirements, deficiencies if any, the planning of
a program, and special regulations. Departments may have degree requirements
that are not listed in this Catalog. All registrations require the signature of the
dean of the college (or his representative) in which the degree is to be awarded.



STUDY LOADS
The University of Florida operates on a quarter system consisting of four
10-week periods of instruction and examination. A credit under the quarter system
is equal to 2/3 of a semester credit.
Maximum Registration.-The maximum registration for a graduate student
is 17 credits. This number will be reduced for those students who hold graduate
student appointments in those instances where the work performed by the student
does not contribute to the educational objectives of his degree program. Guide-
lines for adjusting the maximum registration in such instances are provided in
the Graduate Coordinators' Manual, and students should consult the graduate
coordinators in their respective departments.
Minimum Registration.-Graduate students who receive any of the various types
of graduate student stipends must meet certain minimum registration requirements.
Information concerning these minima is available in the Graduate School Office
and in the offices of the graduate coordinators of the various graduate programs.
Any graduate student who is utilizing University facilities and/or faculty time
must register for an appropriate load.
Credit for Residence Requirement.-Most degree programs in the Graduate
School include a requirement that the student must be in residence for a certain
number of quarters on campus. Residence is computed on the basis of the total
number of hours for which a student is registered. A registration of 15 quarter
hours is equivalent to one quarter of residence, with the limitation that no more
than one quarter of residence may be earned in a single quarter regardless of
the number of hours of registration.
For students whose total registration is less than 15 hours in a single quarter,
residence is computed on the basis of the ratio of hours registered to 15 hours.









GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS / 13
For example, registration of 12 hours is computed as 12/15 or 4/5 of a quarter
of residence.

COURSES AND CREDITS
Courses numbered 500-599 are primarily for advanced undergraduate stu-
dents. They may be used for graduate major credit only if they have been approved
for this purpose by the Graduate Council and are listed under the appropriate
department in this Catalog. Courses numbered 600 and above are limited to grad-
uate students, with the exception described above as Undergraduate Registration
in Graduate Courses. Courses numbered 700 and above are graduate courses pri-
marily for advanced graduate students.
Students are allowed to register for the course numbered 697, Supervised Re-
search, or 698, Supervised Teaching, whenever appropriate. These supervised train-
ing experiences, under faculty guidance, are recognized as important and valuable
ingredients of the normal graduate education program.
Undergraduate courses numbered 300 and above are acceptable for minor
credit when taken as a part of an approved graduate program. In any case, at
least 50 percent of the minimum course work for any master's degree must be
in courses numbered 600 or above.
Registration in 699-Master's Research and 799-Doctoral Research may be
from 1 to 15 credits in one quarter. Advisers should assign the number of credits
in these courses appropriate to each student's research plan.
A complete list of approved graduate courses appears in the section of this
Catalog entitled Fields of Instruction. Departments reserve the right to decide
which of these graduate courses shall be given in any quarter. The published
Schedule of Courses does not always include all graduate courses offered; the
departments, therefore, should be consulted concerning available courses.
Correspondence and Extension Work.-No courses may be taken for graduate
credit by correspondence. No extension courses may be used for graduate credit
except in programs for the M.Ag., M.Ed., M.A.E., M.H.Ed., M.P.E., and Ed.S.
For regulations governing the use and limits of off-campus work on these degree
programs, see the requirements for the specific degrees. Extension work taken
at another institution (except through the Board of Regents Office for Continu-
ing Education) may not be transferred to the University of Florida for graduate
credit.
State Centers for Continuing Education.-Course work is available in the
graduate residence centers established in the state. Degree programs to which resi-
dence center work may be applied are Master of Agriculture, Master of Education,
Master of Engineering, Master of Business Administration, Master of Physical
Education, and Master of Health Education. The amount of credit acceptable
for transfer to a degree program varies according to the degree sought. For regu-
lations governing the use of residence center work in the degree programs named,
see below, under requirements for specific degrees.

GRADES
Passing grades for graduate students are A, B, C, and S (satisfactory). Courses
with the grades of D, E, U (unsatisfactory), I (incomplete), X (absent from ex-
amination), EW (dropped for nonattendance or unsatisfactory work), or WF (with-
drew failing) cannot be used to satisfy any of the requirements of a graduate
degree. Grade points are determined by equating the grade for each quarter hour








14 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
as follows: A with 4, B with 3, C with 2, D with 1, and E, 1, X, EW, and
WF with 0. Grade points are not designated for S and U grades. Averages are
computed by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number
of credits attempted at the University of Florida. Hours for grades of S and
U and hours for ASC 641, 642, and 643 are not considered in calculating a grade-
point average.
Grades of S and U are the only grades that can be awarded to students
registered in courses numbered 697 (Supervised Research), 698 (Supervised Teach-
ing), 699 (Master's Research), and 799 (Doctoral Research). Additional courses
for which S and U grades apply are noted in departmental course offerings.
Deferred H Grade: In special situations where it is not possible to assign
regular grades at the end of the term a deferred grade may be assigned. The
symbol for a deferred grade is the letter H. This grade may be assigned only
in special cases such as modular courses, performance-based curriculum, or in
cases where the expected unit of work may be developed over a period of time
greater than a single term. A grade of H may not be used for courses where
S and U grades are awarded. It is expected that as soon as the required unit
of work is completed, the H grade will be changed in the usual manner to a
traditional letter grade. A grade of H will not be computed in a student's grade-
point average. Courses for which H grades are appropriate must be so noted
in their catalog descriptions.
Admission to candidacy for a graduate degree and the award of such a degree
depend (among other requirements) upon maintenance of an average grade of
B (3.0) or higher both for all work attempted and for all 600- and 700-level
work attempted in the major. Any grade of 1 or X must be removed by complet-
ing all required work. Grades of 1 must be removed no later than the last day
of classes of the first term in which the student registers following receipt of the
I grade. If the I grade has not been changed accordingly, the Office of the Registrar
will be requested to record a grade of E for the course. Exceptions to this policy
will be made by the Graduate School only if written justification from the depart-
ment chairman, approved by the college dean, is received by the Graduate Dean
four weeks prior to the last day of classes. All grades of I must be removed
prior to the award of a graduate degree.

UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP
Any graduate student may be denied further registration in the University
or in his graduate major if his progress toward the completion of his planned
program becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory progress has been defined by the
Graduate Council to include failure to maintain an accumulative grade average
of B in all work attempted in the Graduate School at the University of Florida.

CHANGE OF COLLEGE
Graduate students who wish to change from one college to another must
make formal application through the Office of the Registrar.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS
In those degree programs where a foreign language examination is required,
the following principles and procedures apply:
Those students wishing to be certified as proficient in a reading knowledge
of French, German, Russian, or Spanish will take the Graduate School Foreign








GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS / 15

Language Tests administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and given
four times a year on the University of Florida campus. Since the ETS examina-
tions are nationally administered, the Graduate School will accept scores from
the examinations taken at any other authorized location in the United States.
Students submit their applications and fees directly to ETS, Princeton, New Jersey
08540, by the dates listed in the University Calendar.
Each of the ETS examinations requires 100 minutes and consists of two
separately timed parts. Designed to gauge mastery of the basic vocabulary and
structure of the languages, Section 1 contains 60 multiple-choice questions cast
in the foreign language of the test and requires 40 minutes of working time. Section
11 measures the student's ability to read connected material in the broad area
of his specialization with satisfactory comprehension and moderate fluency. It con-
tains sets of passages in the humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sci-
ences. At the time of testing, the student will select the set that encompasses
his particular field of specialization. No dictionaries are allowed. Foreign language
examinations other than those covered by the ETS will be given by special arrange-
ment with the foreign language departments. Information may be obtained at
the office of the Graduate School.

PROCEDURE FOR FINAL QUARTER
It is essential that the student inform himself concerning deadline dates as
set forth in the University Calendar and in the announcements issued by the Dean
of the Graduate School and by the officials of the student's college, school or
department. Regular issues of Deadline Dates are available each quarter.
When his dissertation or thesis is ready to be put in final form, the student
should get instructions from the Graduate School Editorial Office, and should
have the Student Information and Records Office check his student folder to ascer-
tain that all requirements for graduation have been fulfilled.
When a student registers for his last term, he must pay the appropriate fees
for the Library permanent binding of two copies and for microfilming the disser-
tation by the deadline specified in the University Calendar.
A student must be registered for an appropriate load (in no case fewer than
three credits) in the University for the term in which his final examination is
given and at the time he receives a degree.

AWARDING OF DEGREES
The Graduate Council will authorize a candidate to be granted the degree
appropriate to his course of study under the following conditions, the details of
which can be found under the descriptions of the several degrees.
1. The candidate must have met the residence requirement appropriate to
his degree.
2. The candidate must have completed all course requirements, including an
internship or practicum if required, in the major and minor fields, observing the
relevant limitations on transfer of credit, on nonresident work, and on the level
of course work.
3. He must have a grade average of B or above in all work attempted in
his graduate program, and in all 600- and 700-level work in his major. All in-
complete grades in required courses must have been removed from the student's
record prior to the last day of classes of the quarter in which the degree is to
be conferred.








16 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


4. He must have satisfactorily completed all required examinations: qualify-
ing, comprehensive, and final.
5. All time limits must be observed, such as those affecting the date of the
qualifying examination, admission to candidacy, recency of credit, application for
a degree, and payment of fees.
6. The dissertation or, if required, thesis or an equivalent project must have
been approved by the supervisory committee and accepted by the Graduate School.
7. All language requirements, both for foreign languages and for competence
in the use of English, must have been met.
8. The candidate must meet the professional and academic standards and
have the personal qualifications appropriate to his field, as judged by the faculty
of the relevant department.
9. The candidate must be recommended for the degree by his supervisory
committee, his major department, and his college.
10. All requirements for the degree must be met while the student is a
fully registered graduate student (with the classification 7AS, 7ED, etc.) unless
a specific statement to the contrary is made elsewhere in this Catalog.
11. If a student has been in continuous attendance (defined as registration
in the Graduate School at least one quarter during each calendar year), he may
graduate according to the curriculum under which he entered, provided the courses
are still offered by the University.

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT
Graduates who are to receive advanced degrees are urged to attend Com-
mencement in order to accept personally the honor indicated by the appropriate
hood. The student must arrange through the University Bookstore for the proper
academic attire to be worn at Commencement.


REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES
GENERAL REGULATIONS
The following regulations represent those of the Graduate School. Colleges
and departments may have additional regulations in addition to those stated below.
Course Requirements.-At least 50 percent of the minimum course require-
ment for all master's degrees must be 600 level or above.
Residence.-For any master's degree the student in residence must spend at
least three full-time quarters, or equivalent, as a graduate student at the University
of Florida.
Nonresident county agents in the Agricultural Extension Service may use three
three-week summer sessions for the purpose of satisfying the residence require-
ments for the degrees Master of Agriculture or Master of Science in Agriculture,
but only if they have also spent one quarter in full-time resident graduate study
on the campus at the University of Florida.
Supervisory Committee.-The Supervisory Committee for a student who is
writing a thesis as part of his master's program must consist of at least two mem-
bers as described below under Master of Arts and Master of Science. The com-
mittee for a student who is not writing a thesis may consist of one member of
the graduate faculty who advises the student and oversees his program. If a minor
is designated, the committee should include a representative from the Graduate
Studies Faculty in that field.









REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 17

Examination.-A final comprehensive examination, oral, written, or both,
must be passed by the candidate. This examination will cover at least the can-
didate's field of concentration, and in no case may it be scheduled earlier than
six months before the degree is to be conferred.
Admission to Candidacy.-The student should apply for admission to can-
didacy through his department during the first two weeks of the quarter in which
he expects to graduate. The Graduate Council reserves the right to deny degrees
to persons who have failed to comply with this regulation at the proper time.
Admission to candidacy is not automatic. It requires a formal application distinct
from registration. The student must have a B average for all graduate work com-
pleted in order to be admitted to candidacy.
Transfer of Credits.-Courses of full graduate level (600-700 level), to the
extent of 9 quarter credits earned with an A or a B, may be transferred from
an institution approved for this purpose by the Graduate School. Acceptance of
transfer credit requires approval of the student's supervisory committee and the
Graduate Council. Nonresident or extension work taken at another institution
(with the exception of work taken through the Board of Regents Office for Con-
tinuing Education) may not be transferred to the University of Florida for graduate
credit.
University of Florida undergraduates who subsequently enroll in the Graduate
School may transfer a maximum of 10 quarter hours of 500-level courses taken
as an undergraduate only if ALL the following conditions are satisfied: (1) The
500-level courses involved in the transfer must be in excess of undergraduate degree
requirements; (2) the 500-level courses must be approved for graduate major credit;
(3) the courses are taken in the senior year; and (4) a written statement of intent
to transfer such 500-level courses into a specific planned graduate program is
approved by the student's department chairman, college dean, and the Graduate
School prior to the award of the undergraduate degree.
Time Limitation.-All work counted toward the master's degree must be com-
pleted during the seven years immediately preceding the date on which the degree
is to be awarded.

MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE
The requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science also
apply to the following degrees, except as they are individually described hereafter:
Master of Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Fine
Arts, Master of Arts in Health Education, Master of Arts in Journalism and
Communications, Master of Arts in Physical Education, Master of Arts in Teach-
ing, Master of Science in Agriculture, Master of Science in Building Construction,
Master of Science in Forestry, Master of Science in Nursing, Master of Science
in Pharmacy, Master of Science in Statistics, and Master of Science in Teaching.
Course Requirements.-The minimum course work required for the master's
degree with thesis is 45 credits, including no less than 36 credits of regular course
work and up to 9 credits of the research course numbered 699 in all departments.
At least half the required credits of regular course work must be in a single
field of study designated the major. If a minor is chosen, at least 8 credits of
work are required; two 8-credit minors may be taken. Minor work must be in
a department other than the major. In special cases this requirement may be
modified, but only with the written permission of the Dean of the Graduate School.
The work in the major field must be in courses designed strictly for graduates
(numbered 600 and above) or in undergraduate courses designated by the Graduate








18 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Council as available for graduate major credit. For the minor, courses numbered
300 and above may be taken. At least half of the required minimum of regular
course work must be in courses numbered 600 and above.
Thesis.-Candidates for the master's degree with thesis are required to prepare
and present a thesis (or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to their supervisory
committees and the Graduate School. The candidate should consult the Graduate
School Editorial Office for instructions concerning the form of the thesis. The
original copy of the thesis, bound with an abstract and accompanied by four
separate copies of the abstract, must be in the office of the Dean of the Graduate
School on or before the dates specified in the University Calendar. The college
copy should be submitted to the college or department by the specified date. Two
title pages should be inserted in the original and college copies. After the thesis
is accepted, these two copies will be permanently bound and deposited in the
University Libraries.
Language Requirements.-(l) The requirement of a reading knowledge of
a foreign language is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory committee
or college. When a foreign language is required, the examination will be conducted
by Educational Testing Service or by the Department of Foreign Languages; if
an examination has already been passed at another institution, it must be validated
at the University of Florida by the Department of Foreign Languages. If the
student is majoring in a foreign language, that language may not be used to
satisfy this requirement. The foreign language requirement must be satisfied before
the student is admitted to candidacy. (2) The ability to use the English language
correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee, is required of
all candidates.
Supervisory Committee.-Upon the recommendation of the department or
college concerned, a supervisory committee composed of at least two members
selected from the Graduate Studies Faculty will be appointed for each student
by the Dean of the Graduate School. If a minor is designated, it should be repre-
sented by one member of the committee (who has been appointed to the Graduate
Studies Faculty). The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after
the student has been admitted to the Graduate School and, in general, not later
than the end of the second quarter of study. The Dean of the Graduate School
is an ex officio member of all supervisory committees. The duties of the supervisory
committee are to advise the student, to check on his qualifications and progress,
to supervise the preparation of the thesis, and to conduct the final examination.
No fewer than three faculty members must be present at the student's final examina-
tion, but only the members of the official supervisory committee are required
to sign the thesis and the report of the final examination.
Admission to Candidacy.-Attention of students is directed to the fact that
admission to candidacy is not automatic. It requires a formal application distinct
from registration. Application for admission to candidacy for the master's degree
should be made during the first two weeks of the term in which the student plans
to graduate.
The Graduate Council may deny degrees to persons who have failed to comply
with this regulation at the proper time. In order to be admitted to candidacy,
the student must have (1) maintained a grade average of B or above in all work
attempted in his graduate program and for all 600- and 700-level work in his
major, (2) passed a foreign language examination (if it is required in his curricu-
lum), (3) chosen his thesis topic, (4) satisfied his supervisory committee, department
chairman, and college dean that he is qualified to become a candidate for his









REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 19

degree. It is the responsibility of his supervisory committee at this time to make
such investigation as is necessary to determine his eligibility.
Final Examination.-When all the student's course work is completed, or
practically so, and the thesis is in final form, his supervisory committee is required
to examine him orally or in writing on (1) his thesis, (2) his major subjects, (3)
his minor or minors, and (4) matters of a general nature pertaining to his field
of study. A written announcement of the examination must be sent to the Dean
of the Graduate School. Using the form provided for the purpose, the committee
shall report in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School not later than one
week before the time for conferring the degree whether all work has been com-
pleted in a satisfactory manner and whether on the basis of the final examination
the student is recommended for his degree. This examination may not be scheduled
earlier than six months before the degree is to be conferred without special ap-
proval of the Graduate Council.
Nonthesis Option.-In certain majors, the Master of Arts and the Master
of Science degrees may also be earned without the preparation of a thesis. The
minimum requirements for the nonthesis option are identical to those for the
degree with thesis, except that the student need not write a thesis but must suc-
cessfully complete 48 hours of regular course work (excluding credits for which
grades of S and U are given), and, within six months before his degree is awarded,
pass a comprehensive written and/or oral examination on his major field of study
and on his minor if one is designated. Nonthesis degree candidates will be required
to register for no fewer than 3 credits of course work during the term the degree
is awarded. Registration in 697, 698, 699, or 799 may not be used to meet this
requirement. Individual departments may have additional requirements for the
degree. The supervisory committee for a nonthesis student may consist of one
member of the Graduate Studies Faculty if there is no minor. If a minor is desig-
nated, the committee must include a representative selected from the Graduate
Studies Faculty of the minor field. The duties of the committee are to advise
the student, to check on his qualifications and progress, and to conduct or partici-
pate in conducting the comprehensive written and/or oral examination.
Change from Thesis to Nonthesis Option.-A student who wishes to change
from the thesis option to the nonthesis option for the master's degree must obtain
the permission of his supervisory committee to make such a change. This permis-
sion must be forwarded to the Graduate School at least one full quarter prior
to the intended date of graduation. The candidate must meet all the requirements
of the nonthesis option as specified above. A maximum of 5 credits earned in
the course 699-Master's Research can be counted toward the degree requirements
only if converted to credit as Individual Work. The supervisory committee must
indicate that the work was productive in and by itself and warrants credit as
a special problem or special topic course.

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING AND MASTER OF
SCIENCE IN TEACHING

These degrees are designed for graduate students majoring in departments of
the various colleges of the University who intend to teach in junior or four-year
colleges. Requirements for admission are the same as those for the regular M.A.
and M.S. degrees in the various colleges, and programs leading to the M.A.T.
and the M.S.T. may, with proper approval, be incorporated into programs leading
to the Ph.D.








20 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language if required by the student's
major department.
2. Satisfactory completion of at least 54 credits of work while registered as
a graduate student; at least 50 percent of these credits must be 600 level
or above, with work distributed as follows:
a. At least 28 credits in the major and 8 credits in a minor.
b. Nine credits in a departmental internship in teaching. Three years
of successful teaching experience may be substituted for the intern-
ship requirement, and credits thus made available may be used for
further work in the major, the minor, or in education.
c. At least three courses, which may be used as the minor, in educa-
tional psychology, sociology, and curriculum dealing with the junior
college. If any or all of these courses have been satisfactorily com-
pleted before the program is begun, the credits thus made available
may be used for further work in the major, the minor, or in edu-
cation.
3. Off-campus work: A minimum of 12-25 credits (at the department's dis-
cretion), including one full quarter in residence, must be earned in residence
on the Gainesville campus. Beyond that, credits, including those at the
500 and 600 level, earned in courses offered off-campus by the University
of Florida may be accepted provided they are appropriate to the student's
degree program.
4. At the completion of this degree, the student, for certification purposes,
must present from his undergraduate and graduate degree programs no
fewer than 54 quarter credits in his major field.
5. A final comprehensive examination, either oral or written or both, must
be passed by the candidate. This examination will cover the candidate's
field of concentration and his minor.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE
The degree of Master of Arts in Architecture is the professional degree for
those students who wish to qualify for registration as an architect or for the
teaching profession. It is designed to prepare the student in one of the specialized
areas of architectural design, architectural history, architectural structures, urban
design, environmental systems, or historic preservation.
The general requirements for the Master of Arts in Architecture are the
same as those for other Master of Arts degrees with thesis except that the mini-
mum registration required is 76 credits, including no more than 9 credits in 699.
In some study areas, with permission from the departmental graduate faculty,
a terminal project requiring 9 credits in AE 629 may be elected in lieu of a thesis.

MASTER OF AGRICULTURE
The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who wish
additional training before entering business occupations or professions, rather than
for those interested primarily in research. The basic requirements, including those
for admission, residence, supervisory committee, plan of study, and admission
to candidacy, are the same as those outlined for the Master of Science in Agri-








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 21

culture degree, but the work requirements conform to the specific objectives of
the Master of Agriculture degree.
Work Required.-A minimum of 48 credits of course work is required, of
which at least 24 quarter credits shall be at the 600 level or above. If a depart-
mental major is claimed, 18 credits must be in the major department, and consist
of courses strictly for graduates (600 level) or undergraduate courses (500 level)
approved by the Graduate Council for graduate major credit. Each student's pro-
gram is designed to take into account the qualifications and needs of the individual
and is subject to the approval of the supervisory committee. A thesis is not re-
quired but the student must submit reports, term papers, and records of work
accomplished. A comprehensive written qualifying examination, given by the
supervisory committee, is required one quarter prior to graduation. Failure to
qualify in this examination will require either the student's elimination from the
program or additional course work. A final oral examination by the supervisory
committee, covering the candidate's whole field of study, is required.
Limits on Off-Campus Work.-Credit for courses taken through the State
Centers for Continuing Education as applied to the degree of Master of Agricul-
ture is limited to 25 credits. Credit in extension courses (limited to 9 credits)
from the University of Florida and Florida State University and credit transferred
from another accredited institution reduce proportionately the credit accepted from
the graduate residence centers.
For further details, inquire of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

MASTER OF AGRICULTURAL MANAGEMENT AND
RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (M.A.M.R.D.)

The M.A.M.R.D. program provides the opportunity for graduate study, in
Food and Resource Economics, for students who plan to enter management ca-
reers in business firms and government agencies. It is not recommended for those
who plan careers in research or university teaching. Areas of concentration include
farm management, agricultural marketing, and resource planning and economic
development. Admission requirements are the same as those for the Master of
Science in Agriculture.
Work Required.-A minimum of 48 credits of course work is required. At
least 24 quarter credits shall be at the 600 level or above. At least 18 credits
must be earned in Food and Resource Economics courses that carry graduate
major credit. Comprehensive written qualifying and final oral examinations are
required. There are no thesis or foreign language requirements.

MASTER OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

The Master of Building Construction degree is designed for those students
whose needs are better fulfilled by additional course work rather than the prepara-
tion of a thesis.
Work Required.-The student must complete 50 credits of course work, of
which at least 25 must be in the Department of Building Construction at the
600 level. The remainder may be in other departments in courses at the 300 level
or above, or in this department in courses specifically approved for graduate major
credit. This remainder must be distributed in lots of no less than 9 credits in
order to constitute either one or two minor areas. There is no foreign language
requirement.








22 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree have been
designed to give the student broad general preparation for managerial work, with
emphasis upon developing his capacities and skills for business decision making.
A limited amount of specialization in one field is also required.
This degree is awarded upon the completion of a foundation program of
9 courses and a graduate program of at least 51 credits. The foundation program
may be satisfied in whole or in part by appropriate undergraduate courses. A
student having an undergraduate degree in business administration will normally
need a minimum of 51 credits for the degree. He can, therefore, complete the
requirements for the degree in a calendar year.
Foundation Program.-The foundation program must include a minimum
of 8 courses as follows:
Economic Principles 2 courses
Accounting 1 course
Quantitative Methods/Statistics I course
Mathematics for Business Analysis I course
Business Law I course
Business Finance I course
Management I course
Marketing 1 course
(The accounting requirement may be met with ATG 510 (5 credits) or its equiva-
lent. If the student presents the usual two-term sequence of an introductory ac-
counting course, the foundation program will total a minimum of 9 courses.)
The Graduate Program.-Each candidate for the M.B.A. is required to com-
plete required core courses and a concentration in a selected field. The core courses,
which account for between one-half and two-thirds of the student's program, are
designed primarily to equip the student with the analytical concepts and techniques
needed to deal competently with business problems. Also included are a course
in business research and a course integrating the functional areas of business ad-
ministration.
The concentration is selected from the following: Accounting, Finance, Health
and Hospital Administration, Insurance, Management, Marketing, Quantitative
Analysis for Business, and Real Estate and Urban Land Studies. At least 20 credits
including a 2-credit research course must be taken in the concentration. A max-
imum of 9 credits earned as an undergraduate may be counted toward the con-
centration, but credits so used do not count toward the 51 graduate credits re-
quired for the degree. Any elective courses will be selected from approved courses
offered by the College of Business Administration.
Information on specific course requirements as well as on all aspects of the
M.B.A. program may be obtained by contacting the Director of the M.B.A.
Program, College of Business Administration, Matherly Hall, University of
Florida.
Concentration in Health and Hospital Administration.-The Master of Busi-
ness Administration degree with a concentration in Health and Hospital Adminis-
tration is offered by the College of Business Administration. The course work
in the area of concentration is offered by the Colleges of Health Related Profes-
sions, Law, and Engineering.
In addition to meeting the usual requirements for admission to the Graduate
School, students who apply for this concentration must communicate directly with








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 23

the Chairman of the Program in Health and Hospital Administration, who will
arrange for a personal interview with members of a faculty selection committee.
Since the number of students accepted for each class is limited, it may not be
possible to consider applications submitted after April 1. Students are accepted
for the Fall Quarter only.
Foundation course requirements are the same for this concentration as for
all others. The curriculum consists of three phases. The first phase is an academic
period of four quarters. The second phase is a research practicum period of one
quarter. The third phase is an administrative residency period, usually off-campus,
of two quarters.
Comprehensive Examination.-In the latter part of the term in which the
candidate expects to complete his course work, he will take his final comprehensive
written and oral examination covering his entire program. Examinations for all
M.B.A. degrees, including the Health and Hospital Administration concentration,
are administered by an examining committee appointed from the graduate faculty
of the College of Business Administration.


MASTER OF EDUCATION
Purpose.-This degree is designed to meet the need for professional personnel
to serve the variety of functions required in established and emerging educational
activities of modern society.
Description.-The minimum requirement for the M.Ed. degree is 50 credits
in courses numbered 300 and above, with at least 25 of these credits at or above
the 600 level.
Credit Required in Education Courses.-Either (1) a minimum of 32 credits
in the M.Ed. program, of which at least 24 are at or above the 600 level; or
(2) a total of 48 credits in the undergraduate and graduate program, but in no
case fewer than 16 credits at or above the 600 level in the M.Ed. program.
Credit Required in Courses Outside Education.-Eight credits for students
in the Departments of Administration and Supervision, Counselor Education,
Childhood Education, and Special Education; 24 credits for students in Secondary
Education, in Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, and in Foundations
of Education; only 8 credits, however, are required for those entering with de-
ficiencies in education.
Core Courses.-All M.Ed. programs include a core of required courses con-
sisting of at least one course from two of the following four areas: General Cur-
riculum; Psychological Foundations of Education; Social, Philosophical, Historical
or Comparative Foundations of Education; Measurement or Statistics.
Planned Program.-Each student is required to submit a plan of study which
shows acceptable balance and direction. The planned program must be approved
by the student's counselor, the chairman of the student's area of specialization
in education, and the Office of Graduate Studies in Education during the first
term of work or before. After the program has been developed, any change must
be requested in writing and similarly approved.
Residence Requirement.-A minimum of 25 credits must be earned in
residence on the Gainesville campus, including at least one quarter in full-time
residence. Beyond these minimum residence requirements, credits earned in off-
campus courses offered by the University of Florida may be accepted toward de-
gree requirements provided they are appropriate to the program planned for the
degree.








24 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Transfer of Credit.-Nine hours of approved graduate credit may be trans-
ferred from other institutions. This may be nonresidence credit only if earned
in courses offered by institutions in the Florida State University System. No more
than nine hours of credit from any source earned prior to admission to Graduate
School at the University of Florida may be counted toward the Master of Educa-
tion degree.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to candidacy is recommended to the
Graduate Council by the Graduate Committee of the College of Education during
the first two weeks of the quarter in which the student expects to graduate. The
student is responsible for filing application for admission to candidacy with the
Office of Graduate Studies in Education when approximately one-half of the course
work is completed and not later than one quarter prior to the completion of
all requirements for the degree.
Evaluation of an application for admission to candidacy is based not only
upon the student's academic record but also upon personal qualifications ap-
propriate to his professional goals. On the basis of this evaluation a student may
be recommended for admission to candidacy, recommended with special conditions
or revisions of program, or denied admission and further registration as a graduate
student.
With approval for admission to candidacy the student will be recommended
for the degree upon the satisfactory completion of the remainder of his planned
program.

MASTER OF ENGINEERING
A student seeking a master's degree in the field of engineering may become
a candidate for the Master of Engineering degree with or without thesis, provided
such a candidate has a bachelor's degree in engineering from an ECPD-accredited
curriculum or has taken sufficient articulation course work to meet the minimum
requirements specified by ECPD. If a student does not meet these requirements,
he may become a candidate for the Master of Science degree, provided he meets
departmental requirements for admission. The general intent in making this dis-
tinction is to encourage those who are professionally oriented to seek the Master
of Engineering degree, and those who are more scientifically oriented and those
who have science-based backgrounds to seek the Master of Science degree.
Work Required.-The minimum course work required for the master's degree
with thesis is 45 credits, including no less than 36 credits of regular course work
and up to 9 credits of the research course numbered 699 in all departments. A
minimum of 48 credits of course work is required, with at least 24 credits in
the student's major field for both of the above degrees without thesis. At least
50 percent of the required 48 credits must be in courses numbered 600 and above.
If a minor is chosen, at least 8 credits of work are required; two 8-credit minors
may be taken. In addition, a multidisciplinary minor in departments other than
the major may be authorized by the supervisory committee or program adviser.
Major courses must be graduate level (numbered 600 and above) or courses ap-
proved for graduate major credit. Courses numbered 300 and above may be taken
for the minor.
Degree Credit.-In order to qualify for course work toward the Master of
Engineering degree, a student must first be admitted to the Graduate School at
the University of Florida. The amount of course work toward this degree that
may be taken at an off-campus center will depend upon the student's individual
program and the courses provided through the center.









REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 25

Examinations.-A student seeking the Master of Engineering degree with or
without thesis is required to pass a comprehensive oral or written examination
at the completion of his course work. A student who takes less than half his
course work on the Gainesville campus will be required to pass a comprehensive
written examination administered on the University of Florida campus by an ex-
amining committee recommended by the Dean of the College of Engineering and
appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least one member of the
examining committee must be either the student's program adviser or a member
of his supervisory committee. If a minor is taken, another member selected from
the Graduate Studies Faculty must be chosen from outside the major department
to represent the student's minor.
Examination requirements for the Master of Science degree are covered in
the preceding section under Master of Arts and Master of Science.


MASTER OF FINE ARTS
The degree of Master of Fine Arts is designed primarily for those who wish
to prepare themselves as teachers of art in colleges and universities. Specialization
is offered in art history, ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting, print-
making, and sculpture. Two years' residence is normally required for completion
of requirements, and the M.F.A. is generally accepted as the terminal degree in
the studio area.
The requirements for the M.F.A. are the same as those for the Master of
Arts with thesis except as follows:
1. The minimum registration required is 72 credits, including no fewer than
63 credits in regular course work and 9 credits in ART 699-Master's Research.
2. The course work must include ART 500-Methods of Research and Bib-
liography-A credits; ART 611 and ART 621-Seminar: Problems in the History,
Theory, and Criticism of Art-4 credits each; a minimum of 32 credits in the
major and a minimum of 9 credits in a minor. The remaining credits may be
taken in advanced courses in art history, ceramics, creative photography, drawing,
painting, printmaking, sculpture, or a minor.


MASTER OF HEALTH EDUCATION

The program leading to the degree of Master of Health Education is designed
to meet the need for advanced preparation of health educators to serve in positions
of leadership in schools and communities.
Work Required.-A minimum of 51 credits of course work is required, of
which at least 50 percent must be graduate-level courses in health education. Of
the remaining 50 percent at least three courses in health sciences must be taken
outside the College of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation, and courses
from two of the following areas in professional education: curriculum, psycholog-
ical foundations, social foundations, and measurement and statistics.
Off-Campus Work.-The regulations governing the use of off-campus work
are the same as those for the Master of Education degree.
Supervisory Committee.-A committee of the faculty of the College of Phys-
ical Education, Health, and Recreation, with the dean of the college, or some
person designated by him, serving as chairman and the Dean of the Graduate
School as an ex officio member, will supervise the work of students registered
in this program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.









26 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to this program is not a guarantee that
the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The student should
apply for admission to candidacy during the first week of the quarter in which
he expects to graduate.
Final Examination.-The candidate must pass a final examination at the close
of his course work. This written or oral examination is confined largely to the
student's major field of study.

MASTER OF LAWS
The instructional program leading to the degree Master of Laws with major
in Taxation offers advanced instruction in taxation, with emphasis on federal tax-
ation and particularly federal income taxation, for law graduates who plan to
specialize in such matters in the practice of law.
Work Required.-Degree candidates must complete 36 credit hours in courses
numbered 600 or above, 30 of which are in law college courses in taxation, includ-
ing a research course in which the candidate is enrolled for an entire academic
year.

MASTER OF NURSING

The program leading to the degree Master of Nursing is designed to give
students the basic knowledge and profesisonal skills essential to the three areas
of nursing activity: teaching, research and practice. The diversity of roles that
the nurse performs in these three areas necessitates a program that requires prep-
aration in clinical, research, and functional activities. Traineeship grants are avail-
able. See Financial Aid-Nursing.
Work Required.-The minimum requirement of 50 credits is distributed in
the following areas: general nursing, research, the functional area, electives, and
the clinical specialty area. At least 50 percent of the minimum course requirements
must be in courses numbered 600 and above, and at least 50 percent must be
taken in the College of Nursing. There is no thesis or foreign language require-
ment.
Final Examination.-Each student must pass a comprehensive written or oral
final examination during the final quarter of study. The examination will be admin-
istered by a committee of three, with a member of the graduate faculty of the
College of Nursing as chairman. The examination will be confined largely to the
student's major field of study.
For information regarding the Master of Science in Nursing degree, contact
the graduate office in the College of Nursing.

MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
The degree of Master of Occupational Therapy is designed primarily to meet
the need for advanced preparation of registered occupational therapists in areas
of clinical specialties. The present emphasis is on the specialty of pediatric occupa-
tional therapy.
Work Required.-A minimum of 51 credits of course work is required, 27
credits of which must be in occupational therapy courses. There is no thesis or
foreign language requirement. Additional requirements for the degree are listed
under the section General Regulations for all master's degrees.









REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 27

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Work Required.-A minimum of 51 credits of course work is required, of
which at least 50 percent must be graduate-level courses in physical education.
Of the remaining 50 percent, at least three courses must be taken outside the
College of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation.
Off-Campus Work.-The regulations governing the use of off-campus work
are the same as those for the Master of Education degree.
Supervisory Committee.-A committee of the faculty of the College of Phys-
ical Education, Health, and Recreation, with the dean of the college, or some
person designated by him, serving as chairman and the Dean of the Graduate
School as an ex officio member, will supervise the work of students registered
in this program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to this program is not a guarantee that
the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The student should
apply for admission to candidacy during the first week of the quarter in which
he expects to graduate.
Final Examination.-The candidate must pass a final examination at the close
of his course work. This written or oral examination will be confined largely
to the student's major field of study.

MASTER OF REHABILITATION COUNSELING
The degree of Master of Rehabilitation Counseling is designed to provide
students with basic knowledge and professional skills salient to the rehabilitation
of physically, mentally, and emotionally handicapped individuals. The program
includes coverage of counseling, medical, socio-psychological, and vocational ele-
ments relevant to the rehabilitation process. Students interested in concentrating
in the fields of mental retardation, drug abuse, correctional rehabilitation, cultural
or other behavioral problems can utilize elective courses and certain clinical ex-
periences for specialization.
Work Required.-The minimum requirement is 71 credits, of which 47 must
be in rehabilitation counseling courses. An additional minimum of 24 credits,
approved by the major adviser, is required in designated areas. Additional require-
ments for the degree are listed under the section General Regulations for all
master's degrees.
Departmental Study Project.-A thesis is not required, but the candidate must
complete an approved departmental study or research project as part of the degree
requirements.
Final Examination.-Upon the satisfactory completion of all course work
including the practicum and internship, each student must take a final written
or oral departmental examination before the degree will be awarded. The primary
purpose of this examination is to determine the student's ability to relate the
knowledge, skills, and techniques learned in the academic program to practical
applications of working effectively with disabled individuals.

MASTER OF STATISTICS
The minimum registration required for the Master of Statistics degree is 54
credits, including no less than 30 credits in the major field. Courses in the degree
program will be selected in consultation with the major adviser and approved
by the student's supervisory committee. One 9-credit minor is required. The work









28 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

in the major field must be in courses approved for graduate major credit. For
the minor, courses numbered 300 and above may be taken. At least half the
54 credits in regular course work must be in courses numbered 600 and above.
The student will be required to pass, as judged by his supervisory committee,
a comprehensive written examination covering the major and minor subjects. In
addition, he will be examined orally on his major subjects.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF
ENGINEER

Industry has found that engineers holding either the master's or doctor's de-
gree contribute significantly in highly sophisticated operational and developmental
projects and missions which require engineering teams with an unusually high
level of technical competence. Many of the projects and problems require educa-
tion beyond the master's level, especially for those engineers who received their
master's degree several years ago.
For those engineers who need additional technical depth and diversification
in their education beyond the master's degree, the College of Engineering offers
the degree of Engineer.
This degree requires a minimum of 45 quarter hours of graduate work beyond
the master's degree and thus falls midway between the master's and Ph.D. in
the amount of work required. No minimum residence requirement is stipulated.
It is not to be considered as a partial requirement toward the Ph.D. degree. The
student's objective after the master's degree should be the Ph.D. or the Engineer
degree.
Admission to the Program.-To be admitted to the program, students must
have completed a master's degree in engineering at an accredited institution ap-
proved by the Graduate School of the University of Florida. The student must
apply for admission to the Graduate School if he has not previously done so.
The master's degree is regarded as the essential foundation for the Engineer degree.
Course and Residence Requirements.-A total registration in an approved
program of at least 45 quarter credit hours beyond the master's degree is required.
This minimum requirement must be earned through the University of Florida.
These credits may be completed in any graduate program administered by the
College of Engineering. The last 45 quarter credit hours must be completed within
five calendar years.
Supervisory Committee.-Each student admitted to the program will be
advised and counseled by a supervisory committee. The committee consists of
at least three members. At least two members are selected from the major depart-
ment and at least one from a supporting department. All committee members
will be members of the graduate faculty. In addition, every effort should be made
to have a representative from industry on each supervisory committee.
This committee will inform the student of all regulations pertaining to the
program. The committee is nominated by the department chairman, approved
by the Dean of the College of Engineering, and appointed by the Dean of the
Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex officio member of
all supervisory committees and should be notified in writing in advance of all
committee meetings.
This committee will inform the student of all regulations pertaining to the
degree and his situation. If a thesis or report is a requirement in the plan of


____I;








REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ED.S. AND ED.D. / 29

study, then the committee will approve the proposed thesis or report and the
plans for carrying it out. The committee will also conduct the final examination
when the plan of study is completed.
Plan of Study.-The plan of study will permit from 9 to 15 quarter credit
hours of thesis research in a course numbered 699. The thesis is not a requirement,
but the option rests with the department involved and the supervisory committee.
Each plan of study is developed on an individual basis for each student. Thus,
there are no specific requirements for the major or minor; each student is con-
sidered as a separate case.
Admission to Candidacy.-The student must apply for admission to candi-
dacy no later than the beginning of the term in which he is to graduate. If a
thesis is required, the topic must also have been approved by his supervisory
committee.
Thesis.-The thesis should represent performance at a level above that ordi-
narily associated with the master's degree. It should clearly be an original contri-
bution; this may take the form of scientific research, a design project, or an indus-
trial project approved by the supervisory committee. Work on the thesis may
be conducted in an industrial or governmental laboratory under conditions stipu-
lated by the supervisory committee.
Final Examination.-After the student has completed all work on his plan
of study, the supervisory committee conducts a final comprehensive oral or written
examination, which also involves a defense of the thesis if one is included in
the program.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ED.S. AND ED.D.
The Advanced School of the College of Education offers programs leading
to the degrees Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philos-
ophy. These programs are available in five areas: Administration and Supervision,
Curriculum and Instruction, Foundations of Education, Counselor Education, and
Special Education. The Specialist in Education degree is awarded for a two-year
program of graduate study. The Doctor of Education degree requires writing a
doctoral dissertation. Foreign languages are not required. The Doctor of Philos-
ophy degree in the College of Education is described under Requirements for
the Ph.D.
Programs leading to these degrees are administered through the Office of
Graduate Studies in Education, which carries out the policies of the Graduate
School and the graduate committee of the College of Education. Further infor-
mation may be obtained from that office. Students are advised to familiarize them-
selves with the various programs and requirements of their department of
specialization before applying to the Advanced School of Education.
Admission to the Advanced School in Education.-Admission to the Ad-
vanced School will be open only to persons who have:
1. Successfully completed 50 credits of professional course work in education.
Applicants for admission to the Advanced School of the College of Educa-
tion who meet all the requirements except for successfully completing 50
credits of professional education courses may be given provisional admis-
sion, and full admission when they have completed the required 50 credits.
2. Presented a record of successful professional experience, the appropriate-
ness of which will be determined by the instructional department passing








30 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

on the applicant's qualifications for admission. In some instances, depart-
ments may admit students with the understanding that further experience
may be required before the student will be recommended for the degree.
Admission to the Advanced School will be based on the following criteria:
1. High scholastic average for previous graduate work (3.5 grade-point aver-
age or above, as computed at the University of Florida, will be considered
evidence of good scholarship).
2. Satisfactory scores on the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examina-
tion.
The judgment concerning admission of an individual student will be made
according to the above criteria by the department in which he desires to spe-
cialize. The department will certify to the admissions committee that the student
has met the criteria for admission to the Advanced School. In all cases the record,
experience, and personal qualifications of the person applying for admission are
subject to the approval of the admissions committee.
All persons admitted to the Advanced School of Education must also apply
for and be admitted to the Graduate School of the University.

SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION
Primary emphasis in an Ed.S. program is placed on the development of the
competencies needed for a specific job. Programs are available in the various areas
of concentration within the Departments of Administration and Supervision,
Foundations of Education, and Counselor Education, the division of Curriculum
and Instruction, and Special Education. The Florida State Department of Educa-
tion recognizes this degree for purposes of granting Rank IA certification.
To study for this degree, the student must apply for and be admitted to
the Advanced School of the College of Education. The student must also apply
for and be admitted to candidacy for the degree no later than the term prior
to that in which he intends to graduate. All work for the degree must be com-
pleted within seven years of admission to the Advanced School of the College
of Education.
The Ed.S. degree is awarded at the completion of a planned program with
a minimum of 100 credits beyond the bachelor's degree. All credits accepted for
the program must contribute to the unity and the stated objective of the total
program. Students will be examined by a committee selected by the department
chairman to assure that this objective has been achieved. A thesis is not required;
however, each program will include continuing attention to a research component
relevant to the professional role for which the student is preparing.
Students who enter the program with an appropriate master's degree from
another accredited institution must complete a minimum of 50 credits of post
master's study to satisfy the following requirements:
1. 32 credits at the 600 and 700 levels.
2. At least 16 credits in professional education courses at the 600 level or
above.
3. At least 2 quarters of full-time residence on campus in Gainesville.
Eighteen credits for appropriate courses offered off-campus by the University
of Florida may be transferred to the program. Nine credits may be transferred
from another institution of the State University System or from any institution









REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ED.S. AND ED.D. / 31

offering a doctor's degree; however, credit transferred from another institution
reduces proportionately the credit transferred from University of Florida off-
campus courses.
Students who enter the program with a bachelor's degree only must, during
their 100-credit program, satisfy these requirements in addition to the requirements
of the Master of Education degree or its equivalent. A student who enters the
program with a master's degree from another accredited institution may have 45
credits accepted toward the 100-credit minimum provided they are appropriate
for the program he intends to pursue.


DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
A doctoral candidate is expected to achieve understanding of the broad field
of education and competence in the area in which he chooses to specialize. Pro-
grams are available in the various areas of concentration within the Departments
of Administration and Supervision, Foundations of Education and Counselor
Education, the division of Curriculum and Instruction, and Special Education.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of Doctor of Education
requires admission to the Advanced School of the College of Education, described
previously, as well as admission to the Graduate School.
All courses beyond the master's degree taken at another institution, to be
applied toward the Doctor of Education degree, must be taken at an institution
offering the doctor's degree and must be approved for graduate credit by the
Graduate School of the University of Florida.
Minors.-Minor work or work in cognate fields is required. If one minor
is selected, at least 24 credits of work therein will be required; if two minors
are chosen, one must have at least 18 credits of course work, the other at least
8 credits.
Courses in physical education approved by the College of Physical Education,
Health, and Recreation and the Graduate School as subject matter or content
courses may be used in the cognate work or as a minor.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present a suitable program
of no fewer than 24 credits of cognate work in at least two or more departments.
If two fields are included, there shall be no fewer than 8 credits in either field.
If three or more fields are included, the 8-credit requirement for each field does
not apply. This program must have the approval of the student's supervisory com-
mittee. The College of Education faculty will expect the candidate to be prepared
to answer questions, at the time of his oral examination, in any of the areas
chosen.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to candidacy for the degree of Doctor
of Education rests on successful completion of the qualifying examinations and
approval of a dissertation topic. Recommendation to the Graduate School for
admission to candidacy is based on the action of the supervisory committee, sub-
ject to the approval of the graduate committee of the College of Education. The
Florida State Department of Education recognizes this admission to candidacy
for purposes of granting Rank 1A certification.
The Qualifying Examination.-The applicant is recommended for the qualify-
ing examination by his supervisory committee after he has completed sufficient
course work.
The examination administered by the graduate committee of the College of
Education consists of (1) a general section; (2) a field of specialization section;









32 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

(3) examination in the minor or minors, where involved; and (4) an oral examina-
tion conducted by the applicant's supervisory committee.
Re-Examination.-If the student fails in his qualifying examinations, he will
not be given a re-examination unless such an examination is recommended for
special reasons by his supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate
Council. At least one quarter of additional preparation is considered essential
before re-examination.
Research Preparation Requirement.-EDF 760-Methods of Educational Re-
search, or its equivalent, for which a basic course in statistics is a prerequisite,
is a minimum requirement in all programs. Additional requirements will vary
with the department and with the student's plans for doctoral research.
For information relating to Residence, the Supervisory Committee, Time and
Lapse Limitation, the Dissertation, and the Final Examination, the student is
referred to the material presented under the heading Doctor of Philosophy. These
statements are applicable to both degrees.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Doctoral study consists of the independent mastery of a field of knowledge
and the successful prosecution of research. For this reason, doctoral students act,
in large measure, on their own responsibility, and doctoral programs are more
flexible and varied than those leading to lower degrees. The Graduate Council
does not specify just what courses will be required for the Ph.D. degree, or how
many. The basic general requirement is that the program should be unified in
relation to a clear objective and that it should have the considered approval of
the student's entire supervisory committee.
Major.-The student working for the Ph.D. must elect to do his major work
in a department specifically approved for the offering of doctoral courses and
the supervision of dissertations. These departments are listed under Graduate Pro-
grams.
Minor.-With the approval of his supervisory committee, the student may
choose one or more minor fields. Minor work may be completed in any depart-
ment, other than the major department, approved for master's or doctor's
degree programs, as listed in this Catalog.
If one minor is chosen, the representative of the minor department on the
supervisory committee shall suggest from 18 to 36 credits as preparation for a
qualifying examination. Of course, a part of this background may have been
acquired in the master's program. If two minors are chosen, each must include
at least 12 credits. Competence in the minor area may be demonstrated through
a written examination conducted by the minor department or through the oral
qualifying examination.
Course work in the minor at the doctoral level need not be restricted to
the courses of one department, provided that the minor has a clearly stated objec-
tive and that the combination of courses representing the minor shall be approved
by the Graduate School before registration beyond 6 credits of course work appli-
cable to the minor. This procedure is not required for a departmental minor.

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Supervisory committees are nominated by the department chairman, approved
by the dean of the college concerned, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate








REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 33

School. The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student
has begun doctoral work, and in general no later than the end of his third quarter
of equivalent full-time study. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex officio
member of all supervisory committees and should be notified in writing well in
advance of all examinations conducted by such committees.
Duties and Responsibilities.-The duties of the supervisory committee are
as follows:
1. To inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought. It
should be noted, however, that this does not absolve the student from
the responsibility of informing himself concerning these regulations. (See
Student Responsibility.)
2. To meet immediately after appointment to pass on the qualifications of
the student and to discuss and approve a program of study for him.
3. To meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the
plans for carrying it out.
4. To conduct the qualifying examination or, in those cases where the ex-
amination is administered by the department, to take part in it. In either
event, no fewer than five faculty members shall be present for the oral
portion of the examination.
5. To meet when the work on the dissertation is at least one-half completed
to review procedure, progress, and expected results, and to make sugges-
tions for completion.
6. To meet when the dissertation is completed to conduct the final oral ex-
amination and to satisfy itself that the dissertation is a piece of original
research and a contribution to knowledge. No fewer than five faculty mem-
bers shall be present for this examination, but only the members of the
official supervisory committee are required to sign the dissertation.
Membership.-The supervisory committee for a candidate for the doctoral
degree shall consist of no fewer than three members selected from the graduate
faculty. At least two members will usually be from the college or department
recommending the degree, and at least one member will be drawn from a different
educational discipline. The chairman and at least one additional member of the
committee will be members of the resident Doctoral Research Faculty of the Uni-
versity of Florida.
If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee will include at least one
person selected from the graduate faculty from outside the discipline of the major
for the purpose of representing the student's minor. In the event that the student
elects more than one minor, each minor area may, at the discretion of the depart-
ments concerned, be represented on the supervisory committee.
When a minor is not designated, the supervisory committee will include at
least one person from outside the discipline of the major who has been appointed
to the graduate faculty. The Graduate Council desires each supervisory committee
to function as a university committee, as contrasted with a departmental com-
mittee, in order to bring university-wide standards to bear upon the various
doctoral degrees.
In unusual cases the doctoral research may require the guidance of a specialist
from an area of study other than that of the chairman of the supervisory com-
mittee. In such cases the department chairman may recommend appointment of
a chairman and a cochairman, with the latter being a member of the graduate
faculty, but not necessarily of the Doctoral Research Faculty. A cochairman may
also be appointed for the purpose of serving during a planned absence of the








34 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

chairman; in this case both the chairman and the cochairman shall have been
appointed to the Doctoral Research Faculty.

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
A Ph.D. student is required to demonstrate proficiency in a language otner
than his native tongue. This language will normally be French, German, Russian,
or Spanish, the choice to be made by the supervisory committee. A student may
not, however, use a language in which he is majoring to satisfy the language
requirement. Proficiency in the language is to be demonstrated in one of the follow-
ing ways:
1. By satisfactory performance on the nationally administered Graduate
School Foreign Language Test of the Educational Testing Service, which
the student is encouraged to take before entering Graduate School or as
soon as possible thereafter.
2. By completing a fourth quarter of a foreign language with a grade of
A or B at the University of Florida.
3. For students with a native language other than English, by satisfactory
performance on the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
The language requirement must be met before the student can be admitted to
the qualifying examination.
The foreign language departments offer special classes for graduate students
who are beginning the study of a language. See the current Schedule of Courses
for the languages in which this assistance is available.
Some colleges or departments may have language requirements in addition
to the general requirement of the Graduate School. A student should consult
the chairman of his supervisory committee or his departmental adviser about such
requirements.
RESIDENCE
The minimum residence requirement for a doctor's degree is nine quarters
of full-time resident graduate study, or equivalent, at institutions approved by
the Graduate School. Candidates in the College of Agriculture may do their re-
search at certain branch stations of the University of Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station where adequate staff and facilities are available.
In some cases a student may be employed on a sponsored project from which
his thesis or dissertation will be drawn. Upon written recommendation of the
chairman of the supervisory committee, residence credit may be permitted for
the time devoted to such research. This recommendation must be made during
the quarter in which the work is done. All time devoted to routine duties, or
to research not related directly to the dissertation or thesis, should be removed
from consideration.
A quarter of residence is earned for every 15 credits of course, thesis, and
dissertation work, except that no more than one quarter's residence can be earned
in a single quarter. Students holding assistantships or employment of any kind
are required to reduce their study loads and consequently their residence credit,
as indicated under Study Loads.

PERIOD OF CONCENTRATED STUDY
The doctoral program also requires a period of concentrated study on the
Gainesville campus of the University of Florida. Normally this requirement is








REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 35

satisfied by three consecutive quarters of full-time study beyond the master's degree
or an equivalent period of graduate study. Part-time study may be used to satisfy
the concentration requirement if (1) 45 credits are earned in one calendar year,
or (2) 52 credits are earned in six successive registrations (either including or
excluding summer registration).
Fulfilling the requirement for the period of concentrated study does not auto-
matically satisfy the residence requirement. In most cases, additional quarters of
residence credit must be accrued to satisfy this requirement.

QUALIFYING EXAMINATION
The qualifying examination, which is required of all candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy, may be taken during the third term of the second year
of graduate study but cannot be taken before the language requirement has been
met. The examination, conducted by the supervisory committee, with the aid of
the major and minor departments, is both written and oral and covers the major
and minor subjects. At least five faculty members must be present at the oral
portion of this examination. The supervisory committee has the responsibility at
this time of deciding whether the student is qualified to continue his work toward
the Ph.D. degree.
If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not be given a re-
examination unless such an examination is recommended by his supervisory com-
mittee and approved by the Graduate School. At least a quarter of additional
preparation is considered essential before re-examination.
An announcement of the scheduling of each student's qualifying examination
must be submitted in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. If the student
does not file for admission to candidacy immediately after his qualifying examina-
tion, a written report of the result of his examination must be filed with the
Graduate School Office.
Time Lapse.-Between the qualifying examination and the date of the degree,
there must be a minimum of two quarters if the candidate is in full-time residence,
or three quarters if the candidate is on less than a full-time basis. The quarter
in which the qualifying examination is passed is counted, provided that the ex-
amination occurs before the midpoint of the term.
Time Limitation.-All work for the doctor's degree must be completed within
five calendar years after the qualifying examination, or this examination must
be repeated.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
A graduate student does not become an actual candidate for the Ph.D. degree
until he has been formally admitted to candidacy. Such admission requires the
approval of the student's supervisory committee, the chairman of his department,
his college dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The approval must be
based on (1) the academic record of the student, (2) the opinion of his supervisory
committee concerning his overall fitness for candidacy, (3) an approved dissertation
topic, and (4) a qualifying examination as described above. Application for admis-
sion to candidacy is normally made as soon as the qualifying examination has
been passed.

DISSERTATION
Every candidate for a doctoral degree is required to prepare and present
a dissertation that shows independent investigation and is acceptable in form and








36 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

content to his supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. Since all doc-
toral dissertations will be published by microfilm, it is necessary that the work
be of publishable quality and that it be in a form suitable for publication.
The original copy of the dissertation must be presented to the Dean of the
Graduate School on or before the date specified in the University Calendar. It
must contain an abstract and be accompanied by four unpaged separate copies
of the abstract, a letter of transmittal from the supervisory chairman, and all
doctoral forms. After corrections have been made, and no later than the specified
formal submission date, the fully signed copy of the dissertation, together with
the signed Final Examination Report, should be returned to the Graduate School.
The original copy of the dissertation is sent by the Graduate School to the Library
for microfilming and hardbinding. A second signed copy, reproduced on required
thesis paper, should be given the office of the college dean or the graduate co-
ordinator for subsequent delivery to the Library for hardbinding. The supervisory
chairman and the candidate will each need a copy, and, if required, another should
also be provided for the departmental library.
Publication of Dissertation.-All candidates for the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees
are required to pay the sum of $25 to Student Accounts, the Hub, for microfilming
their dissertations, and to sign an agreement authorizing publication by microfilm.
Copyright.-The candidate may choose to copyright his microfilmed disserta-
tion for a charge of $15 payable by a certified or cashier's check or money
order to University Microfilms attached to the signed Microfilm Agreement Form.
To assure receipt of the valuable Copyright Registration Certificate, the candidate
must give a permanent address through which he can always be reached.

FINAL EXAMINATION
After submission of the dissertation and the completion of all other prescribed
work for the degree, but in no case earlier than six months before the conferring
of the degree, the candidate will be given a final examination, oral or written
or both, by his supervisory committee. An announcement of the scheduled ex-
amination must be sent to the Dean of the Graduate School. At least five faculty
members must be present at the oral portion of this examination. At the time
of the defense all committee members should sign the signature pages and all
committee and attending faculty members should sign the Final Examination
Report. These may be retained by the supervisory chairman until acceptable com-
pletion of corrections.
Satisfactory performance on this examination and adherence to all Graduate
School regulations outlined above complete the requirements for the degree.


EXPENSES

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be accompanied by
an application fee of $15. Application fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions
will be found in the Admissions section of this Catalog.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
For the purpose of assessing fees, applicants are classified as Florida or non-
Florida students. A Florida student is a person who has been a citizen of the









EXPENSES /37

United States or a resident alien and who has resided and had his permanent
home in the State of Florida for at least twelve months immediately preceding
his current registration. If the student is an unmarried minor, his parents or legal
guardian must meet the foregoing residence requirements. All other persons are
non-Florida students. A written statement concerning residence must be made
under oath at the time of application for admission.
In determining Florida residence for the purpose of assessing fees, the burden
of proof is on the applicant. Under law an applicant can change his place of
residence from another state to the State of Florida only by actually and physi-
cally coming into the state and establishing his residence with the intention of
permanently residing within the state. The legal residence of the wife is that of
the husband, and the legal residence of a minor is that of his parents or legal
guardian.
Non-Florida students may apply in writing for reclassification after they or,
if minors, their parents have resided in Florida for twelve months, and have filed
a declaration of intent to become residents of the state with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court in the county of permanent residence. In addition, the student must
file with the Registrar's Office a completed Residence Affidavit Form which is
available in the Registrar's Office. An alien must have resided in Florida for twelve
consecutive months and must present U.S. Immigration and Naturalization certifi-
cation that he is a resident alien. Those students who are nonresident aliens or
who are in the United States on a nonimmigration visa will not be entitled to
reclassification. However, for fee-paying purposes, Cuban nationals will be con-
sidered as resident aliens. If the application is supported by evidence satisfactory
to the University that the student qualifies as a Florida student, his classification
will be changed for future registrations.
For more detailed information see the section in the Undergraduate Catalog
entitled Classification of Students.


REGISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL FEES

The University Calendar appearing at the front of this Catalog sets forth
the beginning and ending dates of each quarter.
The following fees and charges are proposed at this time. However, since
the Catalog must be published considerably in advance of its effective date, it
is not always possible to anticipate changes and the fee schedule may be revised.
Every effort will be made to publicize changes for any quarter in advance of
the registration date for that quarter.
Fees are payable on the dates listed in the Catalog or the date given on
the statement sent those participating in advance registration. Payment of fees
is an integral part of the registration process. Registration (including payment
of fees) must be completed on or before the proper due date. Mail payments
must be received at Student Accounts, the Hub, by that date. All payments,
or properly executed authorization for payment in cases where fees are to be paid
by a previously approved loan, scholarship, etc., whether for full- or part-time
students, received after the due date are subject to a $25 late fee. The fees charged
are based on the classification of a student as Florida or non-Florida, full-time
or part-time. Unless otherwise noted, the fees for each quarter include fees for
matriculation, student health services, student activities, and a general building
fee.









38 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Fees are assessed graduate students as follows:
A Full-Time (9 credits or more) Florida Student will pay a fee of $240 for
each quarter for which he is enrolled.
A Full-Time (9 credits or more) Non-Florida Student will pay fees of $590
for each quarter for which he is enrolled. ($240 registration plus $350 non-Florida
fee.)
A Part-Time Florida Student, enrolled for 8 credits or less, will pay, per
quarter, a fee of $20 per credit. He will not be entitled to student activity or
infirmary privileges.
A Part-Time Non-Florida Student, enrolled for 8 credits or less, will pay,
per quarter, a fee of $47 per credit ($20 plus $27). He will not be entitled to
student activity or infirmary privileges.
Any graduate student who is utilizing University facilities and/or faculty time
must register for an appropriate load and in no case for fewer than three credits.

SPECIAL FEES
Audit Fee.-A regularly enrolled full-time student may audit courses without
payment of an additional fee. Other graduate students will pay a fee of $20 per
credit. Auditors' permit forms may be obtained in the Office of the Registrar.
Fees are payable at Student Accounts, the Hub.
Graduate Record Examination.-The Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record
Examination is required for admission to the Graduate School. A fee of $10
covers the cost of this examination. Students who take one of the Advanced
Tests of the Graduate Record Examination in combination with the Aptitude
Test pay a fee of $20. These fees are payable to the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Graduate School Foreign Language Test Fee.-All students wishing to be
certified as proficient in a reading knowledge of French, German, Russian, or
Spanish must take the Educational Testing Service (ETS) Graduate School For-
eign Language Tests. A fee of $10 covers the cost of each examination. This
fee is payable to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Library Permanent Binding Fee.-Each candidate for a degree with a thesis
or dissertation must pay a fee of $8 for the permanent hardbinding of the two
copies of his thesis or dissertation deposited in the University Libraries. This fee
is due by the date specified in the Calendar in the quarter in which the degree
is to be awarded and is payable at Student Accounts, the Hub. A copy of the
receipt for the fee must be presented at the Graduate School Editorial Office.
Microfilm Fee.-A fee of $25 is charged for the publication of the doctoral
dissertation by microfilm. This fee is payable at Student Accounts, the Hub, and
is due by the date specified in the Calendar in the quarter in which the degree
is to be awarded. A copy of the receipt for the fee must be presented at the
Graduate School Editorial Office.

REFUND OF FEES
Fees will be refunded under certain conditions upon presentation at Student
Accounts, the Hub, of a Registration Status form issued by the Registrar and
the current Certificate of Registration. No refund will be made under this policy
except upon proper application.
A full refund of tuition, registration, and instructional fees will be made if
a student withdraws from the University or if his registration is cancelled by the
University on or before the final day of the drop-and-add period.








HOUSING / 39


No refund will be made if the student withdraws after the final day of the
drop-and-add period. For additional information see the section entitled Refund
of Fees in the Undergraduate Catalog.
Commensurate refunds will be made to part-time students.
Deductions will be made from refunds for unpaid accounts due the University.

PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All student accounts are due and payable at Student Accounts, the Hub,
when charges are incurred.
Delinquent accounts will be considered sufficient cause for cancellation of
registration, as University regulations prohibit registration, graduation, granting
of credit, or release of transcript for any student whose account with the Univer-
sity is delinquent.

TRAFFIC AND SAFETY REGULATIONS
All students must register their automobiles or motorcycles at the University
Traffic and Parking Department during their first registration period at the Univer-
sity. There is a fee for registration and a schedule of fines for on-campus vehicle
violations. A complete set of rules governing traffic, parking, and vehicle registra-
tion may be secured at the Traffic and Parking Office, Room 108B, Johnson Hall.
Each student should familiarize himself with these regulations upon registering
at the University.


HOUSING
For Married Graduate Students.-Apartment accommodations on the Uni-
versity campus are available for some married graduate students. Applications
should be made as soon as possible.
For Single Graduate Students.-Two modern, air-conditioned residence halls
are reserved for upper-division and graduate students, one hall for men and one
for women. Housing agreements for all single students are for the agreement year
of four quarters (September to August), if enrolled.

APPLICATIONS

Each student must make personal arrangements for his housing, either by
applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to University
housing facilities or by obtaining accommodations in private housing. All inquiries
concerning University housing facilities should be addressed to the Director of
Housing, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611. Inquiries about private housing
accommodations should be addressed to the Off-Campus Housing Office, Division
of Housing, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611.
An application for housing may be filed at any time after application for
admission to the University. Prospective students are urged to apply as early as
possible because of the housing demand.
Graduate students living in University housing are required to qualify as full-
time students as defined by their college or school, and they must continue to
make normal progress toward a degree as determined by the head of their college
or school.








40 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Roommate requests are honored wherever possible, provided the individuals
wishing to room together submit their applications at the same time, clearly indi-
cate on their respective applications their desire to room together, and are within
similar academic classifications. Any student interested in a room assignment with
a foreign student should indicate this preference on his application.

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
Certain floors of the new Beaty Towers residence halls (one hall for men
and one hall for women) are designated for graduate students. Eight suites ac-
commodating four students each are located on each floor. A suite includes two
bedrooms, a private bath, and a study-kitchenette room. The rooms provide several
study locations so that students studying will not disturb students sleeping. The
kitchenettes, with a refrigerator and range, allow students to prepare light meals.
The Towers are entirely carpeted and air-conditioned. Other special features for
residents include a library, social room, sundry shop, and lounges, as well as
laundry, vending, and seminar rooms. The quarterly rent rate, including utilities
and linen rental, is $195 per student.

FACILITIES FOR FAMILIES
The University operates six apartment villages for married students or di-
vorced or widowed students with dependent children. Because of the demand for
housing and the limited supply, application should be made at least one year
prior to the time housing is needed. To be eligible to apply for and occupy apart-
ment housing on campus, the following requirements must be met:
The married student must meet the requirements for admission to the Uni-
versity of Florida, qualify as a full-time student as defined by his college or school,
and continue to make normal progress toward a degree as determined by the
head of his college or school.
The married student must be part of a family unit, defined as husband and
wife with or without children, or divorced or widowed students with dependent
children. No relatives or housekeepers can be included as part of the family unit.
No pets are allowed. In view of the limited size of on-campus apartments, appli-
cations from families having more than four children cannot be accepted.
The married, widowed, or divorced student must be part of a family with
a combined gross annual income (including grants-in-aid, scholarships, fellowships,
and grants) which does not exceed, during the period of occupancy, the following
maximum income limitations.*
2 persons 3 & 4 persons 5 & 6 persons
Undergraduate $7,440 $8,540 $9,690
Graduate 7,640 8,740 9,890
*For Maguire Village residents, the combined gross annual income for each family
unit is limited to $6,400, $7,500, and $8,650. respectively.
Since on-campus apartments are intended to provide relatively low-cost hous-
ing for married students, a family with a combined gross annual income in excess
of the above scale cannot apply for or occupy an apartment except in unusual
circumstances. Exceptions may be granted only by the Committee on Student
Housing.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens, dishes, rugs, curtains,
and similar items.









FINANCIAL AID / 41

Corry and Schucht Memorial Villages, of brick, concrete, and wood construc-
tion, contain one- and two-bedroom units, 312 total units. There are eight three-
bedroom units in Corry only. These apartments are furnished with basic equip-
ment in living room, kitchen, dining area, and one bedroom. Rent rates (subject
to change) are $70, $80, and $90 per month.
Diamond Memorial Village consists of 208 apartments similar in construction,
furnishings and equipment to those in Corry and Schucht Villages. Special features
include a community building with air-conditioned study-meeting room, and a
study cubicle in each two-bedroom apartment. Rent rates (subject to change) are
$70 and $80 per month for one- and two-bedroom apartments, respectively.
Maguire Memorial Village consists of 220 centrally heated and air-conditioned
one- and two-bedroom apartments. Community facilities include a large meeting
room and a laundromat. With the exception of kitchens equipped with stove and
refrigerator, individual apartments are not furnished. Rent rates (subject to change)
are $80 and $95 for one- and two-bedroom apartments, respectively.
University Village South Apartments contain 128 one- and two-bedroom un-
furnished apartments with central heat and air conditioning, wall-to-wall carpeting,
stove, refrigerator and disposal. Rent rates (subject to change) are $80 and $95
for one- and two-bedroom apartments, respectively.
Tanglewood Manor (currently leased by the University of Florida) consists
of 208 centrally heated and air-conditioned one- and two-bedroom apartments
and two-bedroom townhouses. Each unit is fully carpeted, and most are furnished.
However, a few unfurnished units are available. Special features include two swim-
ming pools, laundry facilities, and a community building. Monthly rent rates (sub-
ject to change) are $135, $155, and $175, furnished, and $125, $140, and $160,
unfurnished.

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING

The Off-Campus Housing Office maintains extensive records on apartments,
houses, rooming units, trailers, and trailer park lots offered for rent to students,
faculty, and staff members. It compiles an annual Comprehensive List of major
apartment developments, rooming houses, and trailer parks accepted by it for
referral. This list will be sent upon request to anyone who has completed a Request
for Assistance with off-campus housing. In addition to the units contained in
the Comprehensive List, the office has on record several hundred units in small
establishments to which referrals are made after notice of availability is received
from the owners.
Since mutually satisfactory rentals can usually be arranged only after personal
inspection of facilities and conference with the owners, persons seeking off-campus
housing are advised to come to Gainesville at an appropriate time in advance
of the term for which they need housing. Such visits should be made on week
days-not on weekends or holidays-and after advance information has been
secured. Appointments may be made for consultation on particular problems.


FINANCIAL AID
Qualified graduate students in every department are eligible for a number
of fellowships, assistantships, and other awards. In general, such awards are avail-
able to students pursuing either a master's or a doctoral degree. Unless otherwise
specified, all applications for financial support should be made to the chairman








42 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

of the appropriate department, University of Florida, by February 15 of each
year.
Fellows and graduate assistants with at least one-fourth-time appointments
will pay registration fees of $240 per quarter. In addition, unless awarded a non-
Florida tuition waiver, non-Florida students will be required to pay the non-
Florida fee of $350 per quarter. Fellows and trainees are expected to devote full
time to their studies, and their stipend is excludablee from income for tax pur-
poses." Graduate assistants, who have part-time teaching or research duties, may
have to register for appropriately reduced study loads where their work assign-
ments do not relate directly to their degree program; income received from their
services is subject to withholding tax, but some students may be eligible to claim
a tax refund under current regulations of the Internal Revenue Service.
Postdoctoral fellowships are also available in many departments.


UNIVERSITY-WIDE AWARDS
Graduate Council Fellowships are available annually to academically superior
students at stipends ranging from $3,000 to $3,900 for 9 months. These awards
require no service and provide full academic residence. All Fellows pay resident
registration fees of $240 per quarter. Those classified as non-Florida students also
pay $350 non-Florida tuition unless awarded a non-Florida tuition waiver.
Non-Florida Tuition Waivers ($350 per quarter) may be available for non-
Florida students who hold fellowships or assistantships of one-third time and
above.
One-Fourth-Time Assistantships provide a stipend from $2,000 to $2,750 for
9 months. Assigned duties in teaching or research amount to 12 hours a week.
One-Third-Time Assistantships provide a stipend from $2,900 to $3,500 for
9 months. An academic year of graduate residence may be completed in 4 quarters.
Fifteen hours a week are devoted to duties in teaching or research.
One-Half-Time Assistantships provide a stipend from $3,800 to $4,400 for
9 months. A year of graduate residence may be completed in 5 quarters. Assigned
duties amount to 20 hours a week.
Interested students should inquire at their department offices concerning the
availability of assistantships and the procedure for making application. Prospective
students should write directly to the chairman of their major departments as well
as to the Admissions Office. Early inquiry is essential in order to be assured of
meeting application deadlines. Appointments are made on the recommendation
of the department chairman, subject to admission to the Graduate School and
to the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. Clear evidence of superior
ability and promise is required. Reappointment to assistantships requires evidence
of continuation of good scholarship.


NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT FELLOWSHIPS
Title VI NDEA Fellowships.-These are available for students whose pro-
posed programs emphasize the learning of Spanish, Portuguese, or Aymara
through courses in the language or, in the case of doctoral candidates working
on the dissertation, through research dealing with the language or research in
which the language is an indispensable tool. Fellows are expected also to study
other fields needed for a fuller understanding of the area, region, or country in
which such language is commonly used. These related studies may include such









FINANCIAL AID / 43

fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, linguistics, literature, polit-
ical science, and sociology.
The basic stipend will comprise the cost of tuition and all required fees, plus
$2,000 for the first academic year of postbaccalaureate study, $2,200 for each
subsequent academic year, and $2,400 for the terminal academic year.

NDEA-RELATED FULBRIGHT-HAYS GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS FOR
STUDY ABROAD

The purpose of this program is to enable graduate students who plan to
teach in U.S. institutions of higher education to undertake non-Western language
and area study and research abroad.
In general, Fellows will be expected to study in the world area of their aca-
demic interests during their periods abroad, and Fellows following a full-time
program of formal study will normally be expected to carry on their studies in
a single country. In certain cases, however, approval may be given for disser-
tation research which would involve (a) visits to several countries, or (b) study
outside the geographic area involved if it is demonstrated that specialized or
superior research facilities exist elsewhere.
Stipends will be individually computed on the basis of the cost of living
in the foreign country. The award will also cover travel expenses, fees for tuition
which the Fellow may need to carry out his approved program, and an allowance
to help him meet the cost of research and incidental expenses.

UNITED STATES STEEL FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS
A two-year fellowship is awarded in even-numbered years by the United States
Steel Foundation to an outstanding student pursuing the doctoral degree. This
fellowship, which provides a total stipend of $4,800, is offered in recognition of
the increased needs for superior leadership in all elements of national life; it pro-
vides for advances in quality scholarship in science and technology, social sciences,
and humanities.

AGRICULTURE

H. Harold Hume Fellowship of the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs.-
This fellowship, established by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, has for
its object the investigation of special problems of ornamental horticulture in Flor-
ida. The work is under the direction of the Department of Ornamental Horticul-
ture. The fellowship carries a stipend of $2,700 annually.

EDUCATION

Many graduate students in education receive financial aid through assistant-
ships and traineeships made available by federal and foundation grants for research
and special programs. The number and nature of these awards vary with each
academic year and during the year. Qualified students interested in financial sup-
port should maintain contact with the Office of Graduate Studies in Education.

ENGINEERING

Financial aid to graduate students in engineering is available through between
250 and 300 research and teaching assistantships requiring one-third-to one-half-









44 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

time work loads with stipends of $286 per month and up. Information regarding
application for these positions may be obtained from the graduate coordinator
of the department of interest or from the Office of the Dean, College of Engineer-
ing.
Shands-Baker Division, Florida Rock Industries, provides $5,000 for a one-
year fellowship for civil engineering students pursuing a Master of Engineering
degree.

LAW
Some part-time assistantships and research positions are available for grad-
uate students who have made outstanding records in their studies leading to the
first degree in law. In addition, a limited number of University of Florida Law
Center Association merit loans of $750 may be awarded to needy entering appli-
cants. Merit loans are not available for nonresidents of Florida who have been
awarded nonresident tuition waivers.

MEDICINE
Predoctoral fellowships and part-time assistantships and research positions
are available for graduate students in the various basic medical science departments
participating in the Ph.D. program. In addition some clinical and basic science
departments offer postdoctoral fellowships to selected recent recipients of the M.D.
or Ph.D. degree who wish extensive research experience in these disciplines.

NURSING
Traineeships are available through the College of Nursing, by grants from
the National Institute of Mental Health and the U.S. Department of Health, Edu-
cation, and Welfare, to applicants admitted to full graduate status. Stipends range
from $2,400 to $3,600, depending upon the amount of experience the candidate
has had in nursing. In addition, non-Florida tuition and registration fees are paid.
Other federal and state agencies, foundations and health groups, as well as
the military services, offer financial assistance. Loan programs with deferred
interest, repayment, and reduction features are also available. A more complete
list including details and requirements will be furnished upon request. Application
should be made to the Assistant Dean for Graduate Education, College of Nursing,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610.

PHARMACY
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowships.-A num-
ber of graduate fellowships are offered by the American Foundation for Pharma-
ceutical Education, which carry stipends up to $3,000 for married Fellows and up
to $2,400 for single Fellows. In addition, allowances up to $800 may be granted
annually for tuition, fees, and academic expenses. Holders of these fellowships
may pursue graduate work at the University of Florida. Application should be
made to the Foundation, 777 14th Street, N.W., Room 330, Washington, D. C.
20005.

PSYCHOLOGY
Financial support is available to assist students to pursue graduate work lead-
ing to the master's or doctor's degree. In addition to University-wide awards,








SPECIAL FACILITIES / 45


current financial assistance includes U.S. Public Health Traineeships, Florida
Mental Health Fellowships, Graduate Teaching and Research Assistantships, and
the Center for Neurobiological Sciences Fellowships. For information write the
Chairman of the Stipend Committee, Department of Psychology.

SPEECH

The Department of Speech administers a number of traineeships, fellowships,
and assistantships from such sources as the National Institutes of Health, Social
Rehabilitative Services Administration, Alachua County Easter Seal Society, and
the University of Florida.
Additional information may be obtained from the Chairman of the Depart-
ment of Speech.

LOANS

Long-term loans are available to graduate students from five sources: United
Student Aid Funds, Federally Insured Loans, University of Florida Long-Term
Loans, Florida Insured Student Loans, and Direct Student Loans. All programs
are basically the same, but each has limiting eligibility requirements such as
residency, family income, etc.
Loan maximums range from $1,000 to $2,500 per academic year, repayable
after termination of enrollment, at interest rates varying from 3 percent to 7 per-
cent annually. The actual amount of each loan award is determined by assessment
of individual need by a uniform formula. Application should be made to the
Office for Student Financial Affairs between November 1 and February 28 for
the following academic year. Applications received after this date will be honored
if sufficient funds remain after processing those arriving during the regular period.
No deadlines exist for the Federally Insured Loan, the United Student Aid
Fund Loan, or the Florida Insured Student Loan. Applications may be obtained
from the Office for Student Financial Affairs, 23 Tigert Hall.


SPECIAL FACILITIES
AND PROGRAMS
RESEARCH AND TEACHING FACILITIES
THE ARTS

The University Center of the Arts is the coordinating facility, administered
by the College of Architecture and Fine Arts, to serve the students, faculty, and
the general public by presenting exhibitions and performances of the best works
in the visual and performing arts. These works include all programs in the Building
Arts and Fine Arts such as those in Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape
Architecture, Building Construction, Art, and Music. Various other programs are
given in cooperation with different departments throughout the University and
the community.

ART GALLERIES
The University Gallery is an integral part of the Architecture and Fine Arts
complex. The Gallery is located on the campus facing S.W. 13th Street (U.S.








46 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

441). An atrium and a reflecting pool are two pleasing features of the Gallery's
distinctive architectural style. The Gallery, with 3000 square feet of display space,
is completely modern, air-conditioned, and maintains a varied exhibition schedule
of the visual arts during the year. The contents of exhibitions displayed in the
University Gallery range from the creations of traditional masters to the latest
and most experimental works by the modern avant-garde. The minor arts of
yesterday and today, along with the creations of oriental and primitive cultures,
form topics for scheduled exhibitions. Each exhibition shows for approximately
a month, and the Gallery's hours are from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. daily except Sunday,
when they are from I P.M. to 5 P.M. The Gallery is closed Saturdays, holidays,
and during the month of September.
The Teaching Gallery of the Department of Art is located adjacent to the
department's office area, on the third floor of the classroom building in the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts complex. As a direct and physical adjunct to the
Art Department's teaching program, this Gallery displays smaller traveling exhibi-
tions of merit, as well as student exhibitions and one-man shows by faculty artists.
The Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9 A.M. to noon and from
1:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M. It is closed Saturdays and Sundays.



COMPUTATIONAL FACILITIES
In addition to numerous small digital computers and at least three hybrid
computers located on the campus, the University of Florida houses the central
facilities of the Northeast Regional Data (Processing) Center (NERDC) of the
State University System of Florida. These facilities-which are available to stu-
dents and faculty at the University-include an IBM System/370-165 computer
with 2 Megabytes of high-speed core, several IBM 3330 disk drives and a 2311
drive, plus a number of 9-track tape drives and a 7-track unit. In addition to
the 165 and its peripheral devices, facilities also include an IBM 1401 and an
offline Calcomp drum plotter.
NERDC supports batch processing and well over a hundred low-speed inter-
active terminals serving almost all areas of the campus. These terminals support
APL, Coursewriter III, FLORTRAN (a locally written interactive FORTRAN
interpreter), BASIC, and ATS, and have an interactive file generation, editing
capability, and the ability to be used for submission of batch jobs. Limited out-
put from batch jobs may also be routed to such terminals. More extensive output
is printed on either of the two centrally located high-speed printers or at one
of several on-campus high-speed remote batch terminals available for submission
of batch jobs. Extensive software support is provided for batch processing, includ-
ing the major high-level languages and a large number of program packages and
special-purpose languages.
The NERDC facilities are used for instructional, research and administrative
computing. In addition to the hardware and software support, they include con-
sulting and programming services by highly qualified applications and systems
programmers. The staff of the NERDC also endeavors to facilitate communication
among users of its facilities and to disseminate to them information from off
campus which may prove valuable to local computational endeavors.
More information about the NERDC is available through its manuals and
its newsletter, / Update.








SPECIAL FACILITIES / 47

LIBRARIES
The library system consists of two central units, Library West and Library
East, and branch libraries in the Colleges of Architecture and Fine Arts, Educa-
tion, Engineering and Law; the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center, the Department of Chemistry, and the P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School. In addition, reading room facilities have been provided for
Journalism and Communications, Health and Physical Education, Music, and the
dormitory areas.
The holdings of the Libraries number over 1,425,000 cataloged volumes and
a large number of uncataloged documents and newspapers.
Library West, opened in 1967, houses 600,000 books, has a seating capacity
of 910, and contains 120 conference rooms and studies.
The main reference and bibliography collection, which includes the basic bibli-
ographies, abstracting and indexing services, and catalogs of other libraries, is
located on the first floor of Library West. Another basic collection of reference
materials is located on the second floor of Library East. In both places librarians
are available for consultation and assistance.
Among the special collections in Library West are the Rare Book Collection,
the Dance-Music-Theater Archives, the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History,
the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Collection, which consists of manuscripts, type-
scripts, and memorabilia of one of America's distinguished novelists, and the
Collection of Creative Writing, which includes work sheets, manuscripts, and other
literary papers of significant contemporary American and British authors. The
Libraries' outstanding Latin American Collection, which has been steadily
strengthened in recent years, especially in the areas of West Indian and Caribbean
materials, is housed in Library East.


MONOGRAPH SERIES
The Graduate School sponsors two monograph series devoted to the publica-
tion of research primarily by present and former members of the scholarly com-
munity of the University. The Social Sciences Monographs are published four
times each year with subjects drawn from anthropology, economics, history, polit-
ical science, sociology, education, geography, law, and psychology. The Humani-
ties Monographs are published three times each year with subjects drawn from
art, language and literature, music, philosophy, and religion.


FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the Legislature in 1917
as a department of the University of Florida. Through its affiliation with the Uni-
versity it carries dual responsibility as the State Museum of Florida and as the
University Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of research in anthropology and natural
history. Its accessory functions as an educational arm of the University are carried
forward through interpretive displays and scientific publications. Under the admin-
istrative control of the director are the three departments of the Museum: Natural
Sciences, staffed by scientists and technicians concerned with the study and ex-
pansion of the research collections of animals; Social Sciences, whose staff mem-









48 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


bers are concerned with the study of historic and prehistoric cultures; Interpre-
tation, staffed by specialists in the interpretation of knowledge through museum
exhibit techniques. Members of the scientific and educational staff of the Museum
hold dual appointments in appropriate teaching departments. Through these ap-
pointments they participate in both the undergraduate and graduate teaching pro-
grams.
Graduate assistantships are available in the Museum in areas emphasized in
its research programs.
The Museum is located at the corner of Museum Road and Newell Drive
in a modern facility completed in 1970. The public halls are open from 9:30 A.M.
until 5 P.M. The Museum is closed on Christmas Day. There is no admission
charge.
The research collections are under the care of curators who encourage the
scientific study of the Museum's holdings. Materials are constantly being added
to the collection both through gifts from friends and as a result of research activi-
ties of the Museum staff. The archaeological and ethnological collections are note-
worthy. There are extensive study collections of birds, mammals, mollusks,
reptiles, amphibians, fish, and invertebrate and vertebrate fossils. Opportunities
are provided for students, staff, and visiting scientists to use the collections. Re-
search and field work are presently sponsored in the archaeological, paleonto-
logical, and zoological fields. Students interested in these specialities should make
application to the appropriate teaching department.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS
The purpose of the University Press is to encourage, seek out, and publish
original and scholarly manuscripts which will aid in developing the University
as a recognized center of research and scholarship.
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and Latin American titles,
the Press publishes books of general interest and five separate series in Flo-
ridiana, gerontology, humanities, Latin American studies, and social sciences. It
is also the publisher of The Handbook of Latin American Studies, sponsored
by the Library of Congress.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and fourteen faculty
experts appointed by the President of the University, determines policies of pub-
lication relating to the acceptance or rejection of manuscripts and the issuance
of author contracts. Each year the board examines numerous manuscripts sub-
mitted not only by the University faculty but by authors from all over the United
States, Europe, and Latin America.
The Press is a member of the Association of American University Presses
and of the Association of American Publishers, Inc.
Students and members of the faculty and staff are cordially invited to visit
the Press offices at 15 N.W. 15th Street, adjacent to the campus.

INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAMS
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
As the leading institution of higher education in the state, the University
of Florida has long been aware of Florida's unique international position. By
the beginning of this century, the University had begun to focus its attention
on the Latin American nations. Advanced degrees were given in Latin American








SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 49

studies as early as 1927, and by the midcentury a School of Inter-American Studies
had been formed.
During the last two decades, the University of Florida's commitment to inter-
national studies has expanded rapidly. This expansion has resulted in the creation
of a Center for Latin American Studies, a Center for African Studies, a Center
for Tropical Agriculture, a program in International Relations, and an English
Language Institute for speakers of other languages. Programs in Asian Studies,
Soviet and East European Studies, and West European Studies have been added
to the undergraduate curriculum. The University of Florida has participated in
programs of assistance and development in many major areas of the world: Africa,
South America, Central America, and Southeast Asia. There has also been a
corresponding increase in the number of faculty members involved in teaching
and in research within the field of international studies.
As evidence of its commitment to international programs, the University
opened, in January, 1971, the $1.6 million federally funded Graduate School and
International Studies Building, now dedicated and named Linton E. Grinter Hall.
The modern four-story building contains 50 faculty offices. 132 study cubicles,
and 10 seminar rooms, as well as the offices of the Graduate School and the
Division of Sponsored Research. In addition, the Secretariat of the Latin American
Studies Association has moved its offices from Washington, D.C., to L. E. Grinter
Hall.
The expansion of efforts in these directions represents a conviction on the
part of the University that today's students must be aware, in more than a super-
ficial way, of developments and trends outside our national boundaries if they
are to live in a world of peace and harmony. International education is essential
for the citizenry and leaders of the twenty-first century-the students of today.
The Center for African Studies, established with financial assistance under
Title VI of the National Defense Education Act, is responsible for the direction
and coordination of interdisciplinary instructional and research activities related
to Africa. It cooperates with departments in administering and staffing a coordi-
nated Certificate Program in African Studies. This program provides a broad
foundation for students preparing for teaching or other professional careers in
which a knowledge of Africa is essential. University fellowships and assistantships
are available on a competitive basis to students in the degree programs described
below. The Center sponsors conferences and visiting lecturers. It supports directly
as well as through the various departments selective library acquisitions to meet
the instructional and research needs of the Center's faculty and students.
Graduate Degree Programs.-The African Studies Center does not offer inter-
disciplinary graduate degrees. With the cooperation of its participating depart-
ments, it offers a Certificate in African Studies in conjunction with the M.A.
and Ph.D. degrees.
Requirements for the Certificate in African Studies with the Master of Arts
degree are (a) at least 24 credits of course work in a departmental major; (b)
12 credits of course work in at least two other departments; (c) a thesis on an
African topic; (d) a structural knowledge of an African language.
Requirements for the Certificate in African Studies with the doctoral degree
are (a) the doctoral requirements of the major department; (b) 27 credits of African
language or area course work in two or more departments outside the major;
(c) 5 credits in an area seminar; (d) a dissertation on an African topic based
on field work in Africa; (e) knowledge of a language appropriate to the area
of specialization.








50 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Inquiries about the various programs and activities of the Center should be
addressed to the Director, Center for African Studies, 470 L. E. Grinter Hall,
University of Florida.
The English Language Institute offers a noncredit, nondegree program in
English as a second language for students with some knowledge of the language
who wish to increase their competence. The program, which may be taken any
quarter of the academic year, emphasizes the oral and written skills needed by
students who plan to attend a university in the United States. In addition to
regular English Language Institute testing, institutional administration of TOEFL
is given near the end of each quarter.
Further information is available from the Director, English Language Insti-
tute, L. E. Grinter Hall, University of Florida.
International Relations, a field of specialization leading to the M.A. and Ph.D.
degrees, is offered in programs through the Department of Political Science. In
addition to the M.A. and Ph.D. with a major in political science which may
emphasize international relations, the University offers an M.A. and Ph.D. with
a major in international relations. For the M.A. the requirements are the same
as for the M.A. in political science. For the Ph.D. the student has the option
of taking either I) four fields of political science and a single or composite minor,
or 2) three fields of political science (plus two graduate courses in a fourth field)
and two minor fields or a composite minor.
The Center for Latin American Studies is responsible for directing and co-
ordinating graduate training, research, and other academic activities related to
the Latin American area. All students who meet the equivalent of a Master of
Arts minor in Latin American Studies are eligible for inclusion in the Latin
American Studies Program. Though requirements for this minor vary with indi-
vidual departments, normally they consist of a minimum of 15 credits of Latin
American language or area courses, or 9 credits of Latin American area courses
and a reading knowledge of a Latin American language which is acceptable to
the department in which the major is taken.
Master of Arts with Major in Latin American Studies.-This is an inter-
disciplinary area degree offered directly by the Center. Requirements are (a) a
major of 21 credits consisting primarily of Latin American language or area
courses in one department, which may be food and resource economics, anthro-
pology, economics, Romance languages (Spanish and Portuguese), geography,
history, political science, and sociology; (b) 18 credits of Latin American language
or area courses in at least two other departments; (c) a thesis on a Latin American
topic for which up to 9 credits are given through registration in LA 699; (d)
a reading, writing, and speaking knowledge of a Latin American language. The
M.A. in Latin American Studies is intended primarily as a terminal degree for
persons who, initially in their graduate program, are not aiming at a teaching
career in traditional academic departments but who require a broad knowledge
of Latin American cultures and appropriate language competence for their career
objectives. It is so structured, however, that students may move directly from
it into departmental Ph.D. programs without interrupting their academic progress.
Master's Degree with Certificate in Latin American Studies.-Through agree-
ment with the Center, the departments named in the preceding paragraph permit
a Latin American concentration in the major and minor fields. A Certificate in
Latin American Studies or in Latin American Demography and Population
Geography may be awarded to students who complete the master's program in
one of the participating departments and meet the following requirements: (a)
30 credits in the major department; (b) a 9-credit minor in another department;








SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 51

(c) a thesis on a Latin American topic for which 9 credits are given; (d) a reading
knowledge of a Latin American language.
A certificate may also be awarded to those students in a department permitting
the master's degree without thesis who meet the following requirements: (a) depart-
mental requirements for the major and minor; (b) 18 hours of Latin American
content courses divided between at least two disciplines; (c) 54 credits of graduate
course work; (d) a reading knowledge of a Latin American language. In choosing
area courses, the student should work closely with the graduate coordinator of
the Center for Latin American Studies. Only those courses specifically approved
by the coordinator will be counted toward the required 18 hours of Latin American
concentration.
The Ph.D. Degree.-The Center does not offer an interdisciplinary Latin
American area degree at the doctoral level. Through agreement with participating
departments, however, it does provide a Certificate in Latin American Studies
which is awarded in conjunction with Ph.D. degrees in food and resource eco-
nomics, anthropology, economics, education, geography, history, political science,
sociology, and Spanish. Requirements for the certificate are (a) Latin American
concentration within the major department; (b) an area minor of at least 30 credits
consisting principally, if not exclusively, of Latin American language and area
courses in two or more departments outside the major and including at least
5 credits of LA 640, Latin American Area Seminar; (c) a dissertation on a Latin
American subject; (d) a reading, speaking, and writing knowledge of one Latin
American language and a reading knowledge of another; (e) residence in Latin
America normally of at least six months' duration and devoted primarily to
dissertation research.
A Certificate in Latin American Demography and Population Geography
may be earned in conjunction with Ph.D. programs in some of the departments
listed above.
Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships.--In addition to University fellow-
ships and assistantships available to students on a competitive basis in the degree
programs described above, Tinker Foundation fellowships are obtainable princi-
pally in population geography and demography (sociology). The Tropical South
American Research and Training Program sponsors fellowships and field grants
for tropical South America and summer fellowships for research and study in
Brazil.
Research.-The Center supports or participates in a number of interdisci-
plinary research programs which, in addition to their primary objectives, provide
opportunities for training and financial support of graduate students.
Library Resources.-The several libraries on the campus of the University
of Florida have Latin American holdings totaling over 125,000 volumes as well
as important manuscript materials in the original, in transcription, and on micro-
film. In terms of subject matter, holdings are strongest in history and the social
sciences, but increasing attention is being given to the environmental sciences and
to literature. In terms of region, they are strongest in the Caribbean and circum-
Caribbean, but Brazilian materials are being augmented rapidly.
Other Activities.-The Center sponsors conferences on Latin American topics
and problems, supports publication of scholarly books, monographs, and papers,
and cooperates with other University units in organizing and conducting develop-
mental programs in Latin America.
Inquiries about the various programs and activities of the Center should be
addressed to the Director, Center for Latin American Studies, L. E. Grinter Hall,
University of Florida.








52 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


The Center for Tropical Agriculture, within the Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences, seeks to stimulate interest in research and curriculum related
to the tropical environment and its development.
Graduate Program.-An interdisciplinary minor in tropical agriculture may
be planned at both the master's and doctoral levels by students majoring in agri-
culture, forestry, and other fields where knowledge of the tropics is relevant. The
minor may include courses treating characteristics of the tropics: its soils, water,
vegetation, climate, agricultural production, and the language and culture of
tropical countries.
Research.-The Center provides research grants to faculty members and their
graduate students and assists in the coordination of interdisciplinary research
funded elsewhere. Development assistance contracts in agriculture and related
fields frequently have research components.
Student Support.-Students within the College of Agriculture and the School
of Forest Resources and Conservation pursuing a minor in tropical agriculture
are eligible for assistantships awarded by the Center through academic depart-
ments.
Other Activities.-The Center seeks a broad dissemination of knowledge
about tropical agriculture through the sponsoring of conferences and seminars
featuring leading authorities on the tropics; publication of books, monographs,
and proceedings; and through acquisition of materials for the library and the
data bank.
The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is a consortium of major educa-
tional and research institutions in the United States and abroad, created to pro-
mote understanding of tropical environments and their intelligent use by man.
The University of Florida is a charter member. Graduate field courses in Central
America are coordinated from the regional office in Costa Rica. Courses with
varying content are offered in the agricultural sciences, earth sciences, forestry,
geography, marine science, meteorology, and terrestrial biology during the winter,
spring, and summer terms. Additional courses are being planned. Students are
selected on a competitive basis from universities throughout the country. OTS
provides round-trip transportation and maintenance in the field. A University of
Florida graduate student may register for 12 credits in an appropriate departmental
course cross-listed with OTS, such as ZY 605 or GPY 690. The University of
Florida does not require tuition for OTS courses. OTS offers pilot-study research
grants to junior faculty and graduate students who have had limited tropical ex-
perience. Further information can be obtained from the OTS campus office located
in the Center for Tropical Agriculture.


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Biophysics is an interdisciplinary program of graduate studies and research
within a number of departments in the Colleges of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences,
Engineering, and Medicine. The Biophysics Council is responsible for directing
and coordinating graduate training and other academic activities related to bio-
physics within the University. Each graduate student must qualify within the par-
ticipating departments. The Council then provides individual guidance for each
student and a biophysics core curriculum. The master's or doctoral degree is of-
fered by the participating department. Certification of biophysical studies is
provided by the Graduate Council at the recommendation of the Biophysics
Council, in conjunction with the Ph.D. degree within each participating depart-








SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 53


ment. This is a newly developing interdisciplinary field, and at present the follow-
ing departments have either approved graduate studies in this area or are partic-
ipating in the program: Biochemistry, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical
Engineering, Entomology, Materials Science and Engineering, Physics, and
Zoology.
For additional information, write the Chairman of the Biophysics Council,
Department of Physics, or the representative of the Biophysics Council in any
of the above departments.
The Division of Biological Sciences is organized within the College of Arts
and Sciences to provide coordination in the biological sciences. The Division,
with a staff from many disciplines, has organized faculties in cellular biology,
molecular biology, developmental biology, parasitology, marine biology, and
radiation biology. Each faculty is responsible for developing and supervising a
core program in its special area. In addition to the cross-department programs,
the Division serves to coordinate biological science wherever it exists in the Uni-
versity, and to operate marine research stations on the east and west coasts of
Florida. The Departments of Zoology, Botany, Microbiology, and Biochemistry
are the units composing the Division of Biological Sciences.
The University of Florida Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key is located
57 miles west of Gainesville on the Gulf Coast, three miles offshore, opposite
Cedar Key. Facilities include a 20x40 ft. research and teaching building, and a
10-room residence, with two kitchens and a dining-lounge, which provides
dormitory accommodations for 24 persons. The laboratory, which owns a 32 ft.
research vessel equipped for offshore work and several smaller outboard-powered
boats for shallow water and inshore work, is used for research by graduate students
from the various departments of the Division of Biological Sciences.
The new University of Florida Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Marine Labora-
tory at Marineland is designed for research and instruction in marine biological
sciences. Facilities will be available for research in all fields of modern biology
encompassing the techniques of biophysics, biochemistry, microbiology, mor-
phological and functional biology, pathology, marine medicine, pharmacology,
and nutrition. Field studies involving ecological and environmental problems will
also be developed. Research opportunities for graduate students will be available
through the faculty members who use this laboratory.

THE CENTER FOR ALLIED HEALTH INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
The Center (CAHIP) is a project jointly sponsored by the Colleges of Edu-
cation and Health Related Professions under the terms of a grant from the W.
K. Kellogg Foundation.
Persons who desire to enroll in graduate programs for the master's or
doctor's degree as preparation for careers in teaching or administration in the
allied health professions should possess (a) a baccalaureate degree, (b) credentials
acceptable for admission to the Graduate School of the University of Florida,
and (c) a stated plan for teaching or leadership positions in the allied health
fields in two-year or four-year colleges or universities.
Students accepted for admission to any advanced degree program will fulfill
the basic requirements of that program and such other courses of study relating
to allied health as may be appropriate for their stated goals. Each individual's
program is planned, insofar as possible, according to his objectives.
Applicants who desire to assume teaching responsibilities should have a mini-
mum of two years of employment experience in a clinical field, and should possess








54 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

appropriate licensure, registration, or certification in that field. Examples of a
few of the clinical fields from which students will be considered include (but are
not limited to): medical technology, nursing, occupational therapy, and physical
therapy. Persons who lack clinical backgrounds but who desire to prepare them-
selves for positions of leadership in the allied health professions may also apply.
Requests for further information should be sent to the Director, Center for
Allied Health Instructional Personnel, Norman Hall, University of Florida.

ENGINEERING: STATE CENTER
The College of Engineering has established an off-campus graduate engineer-
ing education center at Eglin Air Force Base where qualified personnel may enroll
in courses leading to the master's degree. For admission to the graduate program,
the prospective student must file an application with the Graduate School as out-
lined in the Admissions Section of this Catalog.
For additional information, visit the Eglin Air Force Base, or write the Dean,
College of Engineering, University of Florida.

OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES
The University of Florida is one of the sponsors of the Oak Ridge Associated
Universities, Incorporated, located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a non-profit edu-
cational and research corporation of 43 Southern colleges and universities.
Through this sponsorship our graduate research program has at its disposal all
the facilities of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Medical and Special
Training Divisions of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, the Atomic Energy
Commission-University of Tennessee Agricultural Research Laboratory, and the
research staffs of these laboratories. When a candidate has completed one year
(two for the Ph.D.) of his resident work, it is possible, by special arrangement,
for him to go to Oak Ridge to work toward completion of his research problem
and the preparation of his thesis. In addition, it is possible for the staff members
of this University to go to Oak Ridge for varying periods, usually not less than
three months, for advanced study and research in their fields. Both staff and stu-
dents are kept abreast of the most modern and up-to-date developments in atomic
and nuclear research in progress at the Oak Ridge laboratories.
The students who go to Oak Ridge hold Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowships,
which have varying stipends determined by the number of their dependents and
their level of work. Staff members may work at Oak Ridge on stipends com-
mensurate with their present salaries.
A copy of the bulletin and announcement of the Graduate Training Program
of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities is available in the Office of the Graduate
School. Bulletins may also be obtained by writing to the Chairman of the Uni-
versity Programs Office of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P. O. Box 117,
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Interested persons should ask for assistance from
the Chairman of the Department of Nuclear Engineering Sciences, who serves
as the Oak Ridge Associated Universities Counselor at the University of Florida.
All arrangements for these fellowships will be made between the Dean of
the Graduate School and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Graduate work is offered leading to various fields of public employment. Two
training sequences are outlined below.








SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 55

Management Sequence. Adviser for the major field is in the Department
of Political Science. Training in this area leads to positions in city manager govern-
ment and meets state and federal civil service requirements. The major will be
a concentration of public administration courses within the field of political
science. A minor or minors may be taken in economics (concentration in public
finance), accounting, or other areas.
Governmental Planning Sequence.-Adviser is in the Department of Political
Science. Training in this area is offered leading to positions in local, state, and
federal government planning agencies. The curriculum consists of seminars in
planning, public administration, and public law and recommended courses in
statistics, economics, sociology, geography, or food and resource economics.
Supervised summer internships in selected planning agencies in Florida are ar-
ranged by the department as an integral part of the training program.
All sequences will include 45 credits of work and a thesis. The major is 18
to 27 credits and the minor is 8 to 18 credits, at least 8 of which must be in
one field. The thesis normally requires 9 credits of research.

PROGRAMS FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION PERSONNEL
Professional preparatory programs for technical education personnel are of-
fered cooperatively between the College of Education and the Colleges of Agricul-
ture, Architecture and Fine Arts (Department of Architecture and of Building
Construction), Business Administration, Engineering, Health Related Professions,
Dentistry and Nursing. Master's degrees are offered for persons preparing to teach
in one of the many two-year technology programs in community colleges or other
higher education institutions in Florida and other states; specialist's and doctoral
degrees can be earned by individuals aspiring to senior leadership roles in technical
education.
The master's degree program for prospective teachers can be completed in
one calendar year by individuals who have prior degrees in any of the fields listed
above; persons with degrees in related areas can often be equally well scheduled.
Curriculum.-The master's curriculum is a nonthesis program with a mini-
mum requirement of 50 credits; the student must satisfy the degree requirements
of the college from which he expects to receive his degree. The general pattern
of all programs includes from 16 to 32 credits of education coursework and 16
to 32 credits in the technical specialty; a particular program, however, will depend
upon the individual's background and experience. The curricula which lead to
the award of degrees beyond the master's are planned to meet the needs of the
individual student.
Additional information may be obtained from the College of Education, Uni-
versity of Florida. Gainesville 32611.

TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The State University System affords, under the Traveling Scholar Program,
an opportunity for graduate students to take course work or conduct research
activities at any of the universities in the State System. The course work taken
under the auspices of the Traveling Scholar Program at another university in
the System will apply for graduate degree credit at the student's home campus.
The deans of the graduate schools of the state universities are the coordinators
of the program. For details regarding the program and for approval to participate
in it, students must apply to the dean of the graduate school on their home
campus.








56 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER
The Center stimulates and coordinates interdisciplinary graduate training, ap-
plied research and service activities in urban and regional affairs and works closely
with staff and graduate students in any discipline concerned with international,
national, state, and local problems of human settlement.
Graduate Program.-The graduate certificate program in the Urban and
Regional Development Center supplements the student's primary discipline and
provides him with additional training and research opportunities which will be
of assistance to him if he wishes to pursue a career related to urban and regional
urbanization problems. With the cooperation of participating departments and
colleges, the Center offers an interdisciplinary Urban Studies Certificate in conjunc-
tion with master's and doctoral degrees.
Requirements for the Urban Studies Certificate are (a) admission to the
Graduate School and a department as a candidate for a graduate degree; (b)
completion of departmental degree requirements; (c) completion of departmental
requirements to become an urban specialist in the chosen field of study; (d) at
least 24 credits of course work outside the major department in courses principally
concerned with the major social, political, economic, and technological aspects
of contemporary urban growth and planning, including US 600, US 602, and
US 610; (e) a master's thesis or doctoral dissertation presented in partial fulfill-
ment of the degree requirements. Optional field work in an urban setting, available
in several departments and in the Center, is strongly recommended.
Research.-The Center supports or participates in interdisciplinary research
programs involving both faculty and students. These projects provide opportuni-
ties for additional training in urban and regional affairs and for financial support
of graduate students.
Library and Laboratory Resources.-The University Libraries, working with
the Urban and Regional Development Center, have been accumulating a major
collection of volumes and data in all areas related to urban and regional develop-
ment, including urban government, urban social issues, housing, population prob-
lems, environmental issues, and many others. As a major part of the program,
an Urban and Regional Research and Documentation Laboratory has been estab-
lished to serve all facets of the University's educational programs. This laboratory
is also used by public and private research agencies.
Inquiries about the various programs and activities of the Center should be
addressed to the Director, Urban and Regional Development Center, Room 125,
Building E, University of Florida.


URBAN PROBLEMS
A comprehensive curriculum concentrating on urban problems, leading to
the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, is offered through the Department of Political Sci-
ence. The program includes work in two fields in political science for the M.A.
degree and in at least three fields in political science for the Ph.D. degree. A
composite minor is specified for this curriculum and may include both substantive
and methodological courses in urban-related areas of the other social sciences
as well as fields such as statistics, systems engineering, and architecture. All other
requirements, such as the core courses in methodology and the foreign language,
remain the same as those for the regular M:A. and Ph.D. with a major in political
science. Internships have been arranged as part of instruction.








SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 57


RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTERS
The stations are responsible for research leading to the improvement of all
phases of Florida's widely varied agricultural production, processing, and market-
ing. The stations are administered from the University of Florida campus by the
Dean for Research and include main station departments as well as Agricultural
Research and Education Centers operating as an integral administrative unit. As
a statewide agency having agricultural research as its primary objective, each sta-
tion cooperates closely with numerous Florida agricultural agencies and organiza-
tions.
Many members of the research staff of the Agricultural Experiment Stations
are also members of the faculty of the College of Agriculture as are some in
the Cooperative Extension Service and the Center for Tropical Agriculture. These
three agricultural units of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences work cooperatively in many areas under the administration of
the Vice President for Agricultural Affairs.
Funds for graduate assistants are made available to encourage graduate train-
ing and professional scientific improvement.
Research at the main station is conducted within 18 areas Agricultural Engi-
neering, Agronomy, Animal Science, Botany, Dairy Science, Entomology and
Nematology, Food and Resource Economics, Food Science, School of Forest Re-
sources and Conservation, Fruit Crops, Microbiology, Ornamental Horticulture,
Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soil Science, Statistics, Vegetable Crops, and
Veterinary Science. In addition to the above, the main station has four units
vital to its research programs; namely, editorial, library, field services, and business
service.
The Agricultural Research Centers are located at Monticello, Brooksville, Ft.
Pierce, Immokalee, Dover, Ft. Lauderdale, Hastings, Ona, Apopka, Marianna,
Live Oak, Leesburg, Lakeland, Jay, and Ocala.
The locations of the Agricultural Research and Education Centers are at
Homestead, Belle Glade, Bradenton, Lake Alfred, Quincy, Sanford, and Tallahas-
see (Fla. A&M).
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations are cooperating with the
Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory,
in its beef cattle and pasture production and management programs and with
the National Weather Service, Lakeland, in the Federal Frost Warning Service
for fruit and vegetable producers and shippers.

DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH

The Division has two general functions: (1) the administration and promotion
of the Sponsored Research Program and (2) the support of the total research
program of the University in a manner which produces maximum benefit to the
University and the greatest service to the State of Florida. All proposals for the
sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid, or training grants must receive the approval
of the Division Director. Subsequent negotiations with potential contracting
agencies or sponsors of research projects are carried on under the Director's super-
vision.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are intended to stimulate
growth and to assist in expanding a balanced research program throughout the








58 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

University. These activities are intimately related to the support of the graduate
program. They are also intended to relieve principal investigators and departments
of many of the detailed administrative and reporting duties connected with some
sponsored research. The duties and responsibilities of the Division, of course,
are designed to supplement the prerogative of the principal investigator to seek
sponsors for his own projects and the responsibility of the researcher for the
scientific integrity of a project. In direct contacts between a principal investigator
and a potential sponsor, however, prior clearance should be obtained from the
Division to insure a uniformity in contract requirements and to avoid duplication
of negotiations with the same sponsor.
The Division of Sponsored Research is administratively responsible to the
Vice President for Academic Affairs. Policies and procedures for the operation
of the Division are developed by a Board of Directors working with the Division
Director within the general framework of the administrative policies and pro-
cedures of the University. The Research Council serves as adviser on scientific
matters. The Dean of the Graduate School and the Graduate Council serve as
advisers on matters relating to the graduate program.
The law establishing the Division of Sponsored Research enables the utiliza-
tion of some recovered indirect cost funds in the support of innovative research.
The Board of Directors of the Division has the responsibility for the award of
these funds. For information write the Director, Division of Sponsored Research,
219 L. E. Grinter Hall, University of Florida.

FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENT STATION
The Station (EIES) developed from early research activities of the engineer-
ing faculty and was officially established in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral
part of the College of Engineering. Its mandate is "to organize and promote the
prosecution of research projects of engineering and related sciences, with special
reference to such of these problems as are important to the industries of Florida."
The college and the Station are inextricably intertwined-the two activities
cannot be separated functionally; they comprise the two arms of the whole engi-
neering body. This is particularly true at the graduate level. In many instances
a program initiated primarily as a research activity has developed into a full-
fledged academic department of the college, demonstrating the close interlocking
relationship of the research and teaching functions.
Since the fall term of 1967, seven departments of the College of Engineering
and the Experiment Station have moved into some 310,000 sq. ft. in seven modern
new buildings and one remodeled building. These improvements, including equip-
ment, have raised the value of the physical plant of the college to over $13 million.
The laboratories, staff, and facilities of other divisions of the University are
also available to the Station research faculty through many outstanding inter-
disciplinary programs which provide Station support of graduate students in the
physical sciences such as physics and chemistry, as well as in engineering. With
the close relationship that exists between teaching and research, students are ex-
posed to many engineering and industrial problems normally not encompassed
in a college program.
The Station receives only a small portion of its operating revenue from the
state. The major support of its research activities is derived from contracts with
government agencies, foundations, and industrial organizations. Large and small
manufacturers avail themselves of the finest engineering research laboratories in
the Southeast. The Station has superior facilities and staff in such fields as micro-








SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 59

electronics and integrated circuits, power systems, metallurgy, ceramics, coastal
engineering, soil mechanics, transport phenomena and fluid dynamics, energy con-
version, air and water pollution control, electrochemistry, fast neutron physics,
nuclear rocket propulsion, dynamics and vibrations, communications, kinetics,
ionics, gaseous electronics and plasmas, computer and information science, and
systems analysis.
The Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Laboratory, a unit of EIES,
conducts research on problems of the shoreline and of coastal and inland waters,
and renders advisory service to public agencies and industry. Interdisciplinary and
multidisciplinary research and graduate instruction are closely coordinated and
related to applications of the coastal zone. Many graduate students are supported
by research programs of the COE Laboratory which include (1) air-sea interaction
and the generation of surface waves; (2) scale models of inlets and shore structures;
(3) transportation of sediment by waves and currents; (4) wave and current effects
at offshore nuclear power plants; (5) water temperature variations near power-
generating plants; (6) tidal variations in inland waters; (7) littoral transport under
wave action and many others; (8) coastal defense measures.
Laboratory research facilities include (1) a large area for carrying out hydrau-
lic model studies of coastal phenomena; (2) an air-sea interaction facility to investi-
gate wave generation phenomena and wind-generated currents; (3) an internal wave
facility to investigate subsurface wave phenomena; (4) a wave tank in which the
effects of waves on structures, sand motion, etc., can be investigated, and (5)
a hydraulic tilting flume for basic studies of the interaction of flows with sediments.
Field investigations, representing a substantial portion of the research effort, are
supported by a mobile field station, three small boats, and a complete range of
tide recorders, current meters, sounding and other auxiliary equipment.

INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTERS
The following centers, developed at the University of Florida and approved
by the State Board of Regents, function primarily to increase knowledge in specific
fields of study and to apply this knowledge to solve many of the crucial problems
that our society now faces. Each center is listed in alphabetical order by the
first substantive in the title. Where available, a brief description is given, including
the address to which requests for further information may be sent.

CENTER FOR AERONOMY AND OTHER ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES
The Center (ICAAS) is a community of scholars drawn from many disciplines
represented at the University of Florida. Each scholar has an established profes-
sional knowledge and research capability in the atmospheric sciences or in physical,
biological, or societal disciplines that relate closely to our atmospheric environ-
ment. As an interdisciplinary center, ICAAS promotes pure and applied research
in the atmospheric sciences and provides machinery for translating research into
forms relevant to societal needs. The aeronomical research of the Center deals
with physical, chemical, and electrical processes in the upper atmosphere; e.g.,
the stratospheric, ionospheric, and thermospheric regions of the earth. Other
activities include a diverse range of tropospheric and micrometeorological research
as well as biological, ecological, and technological research related to the quality
of the air we breathe. These activities are dispersed widely in the Colleges of
Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Engineering, Medicine, Law, and Business Admin-
istration. Current research deals with ultraviolet radiation levels which might reach








60 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

the earth's surface should our stratospheric ozone layer be depleted by the effluents
from a future supersonic transport fleet. Of specific concern are the potential effects
of changes in UV upon the incidence of skin cancer, agricultural productivity,
cells and insects. A second active area of research encompasses community noise
measurements and abatement projects. With the support of the Florida Depart-
ment of Pollution Control assistance is being given twenty-two counties in North-
ern Florida in the development of noise ordinances and instrumentation for noise
control. The primary function of ICAAS is to provide coordination, direction,
and focus to strengthen existing programs and to expand them in directions that
will help mitigate the socio-technical problems arising from the degradation of
our atmospheric environment. ICAAS will also help the training of able students
at the undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral levels in various pure and applied
aspects of the atmospheric sciences. For information, write the Director, Center
for Aeronomy and Other Atmospheric Sciences, 221 Space Sciences Research
Building, University of Florida.


CENTER FOR APPLIED THERMODYNAMICS AND CORROSION
The Center facilitates cooperation between research teams at the University
of Florida and the Belgian Corrosion Research Center at Brussels. Research is
conducted in electrochemistry, in high temperature oxidation, and in physical and
process metallurgy, with applications in corrosion-related environmental problems,
such as pollution, water desalination, atomic energy, and surgical implants. For
information, write the Director, Center for Applied Thermodynamics and Cor-
rosion, 132 Metallurgical Engineering Building, University of Florida.


CENTER FOR AQUATIC SCIENCES
The Center is responsible for intensive development and coordination of Uni-
versity-wide activities in the freshwater, estuarine, and coastal marine sciences.
With major emphasis on Florida and contiguous waters, the Center provides
leadership for interdisciplinary programs of benefit to the state. The broad spec-
trum of curricula, facilities, and faculty at the University allows students great
latitute in developing their specific interests in the aquatic sciences. Undergraduate
and graduate support is provided by the Center, enabling students in cooperating
departments to investigate problems related to Florida's aquatic resources. Field
research facilities are available at nearby Cedar Key, Welaka, and Marineland.
Interested persons should contact the Director, Center for Aquatic Sciences, 2001
McCarty Hall, University of Florida.


CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER (Director, DR. Dr. D. G. Shand)
COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER
The Center conducts pure and applied research in a variety of fields of mass
communication. It also serves as a resource for college faculty and students in
their own research, assists the media and other organizations in their research
pursuits, and sponsors other programs related to the mass communication needs
of the many communities served by the University. For information, write the
Director, Communication Research Center, 400 Stadium Building, University of
Florida.









SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 61


INSTITUTE FOR DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
The Institute, an agency within the College of Education, conducts research
in (1) classroom behavior of teachers and pupils as it affects pupil achievement,
(2) parent education, from infancy, that may help disadvantaged children function
in school and society and (3) basic and applied research in learning and personality
development. The Institute, with state and federal funding, has been a participant
in Head-Start and Follow-Through programs, day-care programs for migrant
children, training paraprofessionals, and retraining displaced minority teachers.
For information, write the Director, Institute for Development of Human Re-
sources, 513 Weil Hall, University of Florida.

CENTER FOR DYNAMIC PLASTICITY
The Center conducts research and educational programs and disseminates
information on the behavior of materials at high rates of deformation. In addition
to structural materials (such as metals, polymers, and composites), the Center is
concerned with biological materials (bones and soft tissues) and with dynamic
soil mechanics. The Center has established a cooperative arrangement with the
University of Bucharest to enhance international cooperation and exchange of
information and personnel. For information, address the Director, Center for
Dynamic Plasticity, 231 Aero Bldg., University of Florida.

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH

The Bureau is the research division of the College of Business Administration.
A part of the Bureau's work is designed to further understanding of the economy
of Florida and the Southeast. Economic, business, and related research supported
by grant and contract funds is undertaken in subject areas of interest to the faculty.
Graduate students are involved also in these projects.
The Bureau publishes three periodicals, Dimensions, Economic Leaflets, and
Florida Economic Indicators, an annual publication, Florida Statistical Abstract,
and an irregular publication, Population Studies. Through these publications and
through monographs, the Bureau disseminates the results of research and statistical
studies on population, personal income, employment, building construction, and
other subjects. For information, write the Director, Bureau of Economic and Busi-
ness Research, 221 Matherly Hall, University of Florida.

CENTER FOR GERONTOLOGICAL STUDIES AND PROGRAMS
The Center provides an organization through which faculty members from
many disciplines may work effectively both within and outside the University to
study the problems of aging, to develop programs of benefit to the aged and
to disseminate information derived from research in health care, housing, transpor-
tation, and other areas. The Southern Conference on Gerontology is held annually;
the Proceedings are published by the University of Florida Press. For information,
write the Director, Center for Gerontological Studies and Programs, 221 Matherly
Hall, University of Florida.

HEALTH SYSTEMS RESEARCH DIVISION
The Division is an interdisciplinary activity organized within the Office of
the Vice President for Health Affairs, J. Hillis Miller Health Center. Its function








62 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

is to conduct research to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the health
services delivery system and of the health manpower education and training system
and to develop methods for the optimal allocation of health care resources. Re-
search projects are carried out for the academic units of the health center, the
Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics, and other health care facilities within the
University and community. In addition, research is conducted through contracts
and grants for health organizations and agencies at the state and national level.
The staff of the Division consists of faculty, students, and career service em-
ployees representing a diversity of backgrounds and disciplines. Among these are
operations research, industrial and systems engineering, health and hospital admin-
istration, computer science, economics, medicine, dentistry and health related pro-
fessions. Student support is provided through assistantships and fellowships. For
information, write the Director, Health Systems Research Division, Box 210, J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, University of Florida, Gainesville 32610.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT CENTER (Director, Dr. P. L. Adams)
CENTER FOR HUMANISTIC EDUCATION (Director, Dr. Donald Avila)
CENTER FOR INFORMATICS RESEARCH
The Center (CIR) is responsible for directing, coordinating and conducting
advanced study and research activity in computers, information systems, software
engineering, and their applications to multiple disciplines. As an interdisciplinary
center, CIR creates a stimulating environment for basic and applied research to
seek new insights in, and optimal solutions to, engineering, physical, biological,
medical, management, environmental, and social problems. The Center staff is
concerned with solving problems in various disciplines by using modern computing
machines, recent communication sciences, and latest information technology.
The primary functions of CIR are (1) to conduct research in developing the
theory and techniques for the design of computer systems and software for solving
problems of our society; (2) to develop advanced technology for the design of
new information systems for various disciplines; (3) to provide coordination and
initiation of interdisciplinary attack on the complex techno-socio-economic, en-
vironmental as well as health, problems by the systems approach; (4) to provide
internship opportunities for graduate students in information science and related
areas; and (5) to assist industry and government in finding practical and efficient
solutions to information-processing problems.
The research laboratories are equipped with an IBM 7094-11 computer system,
a Graphic-I system, a PIDAC (Pictorial Data Acquisition Computer) system, and
a PDP-5 computer. The Center sponsors the International Symposia on Computer
and Information Science (COINS Symposia), cooperates with other University
units in organizing and conducting conferences, seminars, short courses, and
developmental programs in informatics, and supports publication of scholarly
books, monograph series, and an international journal. Inquiries about the various
programs and activities of the Center should be addressed to the Director, Center
for Informatics Research, 339 Larsen Hall, University of Florida.

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING RESOURCES CENTER
The Center researches techniques by which American firms have successfully
penetrated foreign markets. Inquiries may be addressed to the Director, Interna-
tional Marketing Resources Center, 224 Matherly Hall, University of Florida.









SPECIAL PROGRAMS / 63

CENTER FOR MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCE
The Center is developing a unified research and teaching faculty, drawing
its members from the fields of chemical engineering, chemistry, biochemistry,
microbiology, and environmental engineering. Current research in synthetic poly-
mer chemistry includes originating and reducing to practice the synthesis of new
materials, conducting scale-up operations, and evaluating such materials for a wide
variety of applications. For information, write the Director, Center for Macro-
molecular Science, 420 Space Sciences Research Building, University of Florida.

MANAGEMENT CENTER
The Center develops continuing education programs for various groups of
businessmen. Inquiries may be addressed to the Director, Management Center,
224 Matherly Hall, University of Florida.

CENTER FOR MATHEMATICAL SYSTEM THEORY
(Director, Dr. R. E. Kalman)
CENTER FOR NEUROBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
The Center is the focus for several disciplines desiring a comprehensive view
of the nervous system. The program is conducted through formal courses,
seminars, colloquia, and laboratory research in the neurobiological sciences.
Normally trainees may be affiliated with the Center through a basic science or
clinical department. For information, write the Director, Center for Neuro-
biological Sciences, M-242, Medical Sciences Building, University of Florida.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING SERVICES
The Clearing Service is a research and service adjunct of the Department
of Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences. It carries on a continuous
program of research in public administration, political behavior, and public policy
in Florida; publishes research studies and surveys of administrative and political
problems in both scientific and popular monograph form; and publishes a Civic
Information Series annually for assistance to citizen groups in their study of cur-
rent issues in the state. For information, write the Director, Public Administration
Clearing Services, 8 Peabody Hall, University of Florida.

BUREAU OF RESEARCH
The Bureau is one of the activities of the College of Architecture and Fine
Arts. It fosters and encourages research in all areas of the building arts and fine
arts. It also provides an opportunity for graduate students and faculty members
to engage in research and cooperate effectively in research with other departments
and institutions. For information, write the Director, Bureau of Research, 102
Architecture and Fine Arts Bldg., University of Florida.

CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON HUMAN PROSTHESIS
The Center fosters interchange between the biomedical and engineering sci-
ences in research on the development of prosthetic devices for neurosensory organs
and limbs, particularly for visual prosthesis. For information, write the Director,
Center for Research on Human Prosthesis, Visual Science Laboratory Annex,
Dormitory O, University of Florida.









64 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

SOCIAL SCIENCES INSTITUTE
The Institute seeks to develop the research capability and productivity of
younger faculty at the University of Florida by granting funds for research ex-
penses through competitive awards in all fields of social science. For information,
write the Director, Social Sciences Institute, 107 Peabody Hall, University of
Florida.

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
The Center, 311 Little Hall, provides psychological services to the members
of the student body and consultative services for University staff members who
counsel students. It also provides a practicum for graduate students in the Depart-
ments of Psychology and Counselor Education. It engages in institutional as well
as basic research in the problems of counseling. Specific services include vocational,
personal, marriage, and academic counseling. In these functions the University
Counseling Center works closely with staff in the residence halls and with the
academic advisers in the University College and upper-division colleges. The Cen-
ter works with the University Mental Health Service on a referral basis and with
the director of the early registration program in the orientation of prospective
students to the University.

FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER
The Center, funded by the Department of the Interior, was established in
1964 as the result of the passage of P.L. 88-379-The Water Resources Research
Act of 1964-"to stimulate, sponsor, provide for, and supplement present pro-
grams for conduct of research, investigation, experiments, and the training of
scientists in the fields of water and of resources which affect water."
Under the administration of the Center, current water research projects per-
taining to the achievement of adequate statewide water resource management,
and water quality and quantity are being conducted by staff members in various
departments at the University of Florida and at four other colleges and uni-
versities in the state. For information, write the Director, Florida Water Resources
Research Center, 220 A. P. Black Hall, University of Florida.

CENTER FOR WETLANDS
The Center for Wetlands is an intercollege research division dedicated to wet-
lands, their ecology, problems, management, and effective land use. The Center
advances knowledge through such special research approaches as systems eco-
logical modelling and simulation, energy cost benefit analysis and planning, and
field experiments on vegetation response to water control.
The Center fosters campus and statewide communication through a central
workshop activity, organized research projects of county and state concern, wet-
lands publications, conferences and short courses, research data collections, and
proposals for curricula. Support of faculty and graduate students is provided by
active projects.
Representative research projects are "Cypress Wetlands for Water Manage-
ment, Recycling, and Conservation," funded by The Rockefeller Foundation and
the RANN Division of National Science Foundation, and "Models for Optimiza-
tion of Land and Water Use in South Florida," funded by United States Depart-









STUDENT SERVICES / 65


ment of the Interior with an Interagency agreement with Florida State Division
of State Planning in Tallahassee.
Interested persons should contact the Director, Center for Wetlands, Phelps
Lab., University of Florida.


STUDENT SERVICES
ADVISER TO FOREIGN STUDENTS
The office of the adviser is the center for services performed in behalf of
foreign students from their initial inquiries until their return home. The office
coordinates with other University agencies and is charged with responsibilities
involving admissions, reception, orientation, housing, finances, health, immigra-
tion, academic counseling, petitions, practical training, employment, embassy and
foundation reports, correspondence, legal problems, life counseling, and com-
munity relations. The adviser also serves as Fulbright Program Adviser and assists
foreign faculty members.

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT CENTER
The Center, G-22 J. Wayne Reitz Union, functions as the central placement
agency for the campus, with services available to all students and alumni of the
University, and it works in conjunction with those schools and colleges that give
direct employment assistance to their graduates.
In cooperation with educational and administrative units, counseling and test-
ing services, and other related functions, the Placement Center makes its contri-
bution to the development of the whole individual. Its primary aim is to offer
assistance to students, from the time they enter school until they graduate, in
the development of vocational goals and the attainment of their first career posi-
tion. Assistance is also offered to alumni who have attended graduate school
elsewhere, who are returning to civilian life from the military, or who desire to
make changes in employment.
Functions include (1) serving as liaison between students and business, indus-
trial, governmental, and educational organizations that seek college-trained person-
nel for permanent employment; (2) establishing and maintaining records on regis-
trants, employment opportunities, and placement results; (3) conducting studies
on the employment outlook, salary trends, progress of graduates in the working
world, and related matters; (4) assisting students who leave school before gradua-
tion or who want summer jobs that relate to their fields of study and employment
goals; (5) serving in a public relations capacity in dealing with employers and
the public.
Specific services include career planning and guidance, counseling on the tools
and techniques of the job search, arranging interviews between employers and
students, providing personnel records and faculty ratings on students to employers,
preparing and mailing lists of job opportunities to registrants, distributing recruit-
ment booklets and materials, and administering tests for employers.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
The Health Service provides a spectrum of medical services which includes
primary medical care, preventive medicine, health screening programs and mental









66 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

health consultation and counseling. These services are available to all full-time
students in the University.
The service consists of an out-patient clinic and a 30-bed in-patient unit staffed
by physicians, nurses, psychologists, laboratory and x-ray technicians and support-
ing personnel. It is housed in the Infirmary, which is centrally located on the
campus.
The service is a unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center with its Colleges
of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Related Professions. The facilities of the Health
Center are available by consultation and referral through the Student Health
Service. Specialty clinics are available in the Infirmary in some fields.
The health fee is a part of the tuition fee paid by all students. This fee
covers ordinary out-patient visits, many laboratory tests and some medications.
When more complicated diagnostic study or hospitalization is required, additional
charges are made. For this reason, a supplemental health insurance plan is recom-
mended.
A medical history and physical examination and certain immunizations are
required before registration at the University.

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Clinic, Room 436, Arts and Sciences Building, offers services without
charge to any University student who has a speech or hearing disorder. This
assistance is available at any time during the year and therapy sessions are adjusted
to individual schedules. The student is encouraged to visit the Clinic and to use
this service.

EDITORIAL ASSISTANCE AND INFORMATION
The Graduate School Editorial Office provides a Guide for Preparing Theses
and Dissertations to assist the student in the preparation of his manuscript, and
offers suggestions and advice on such matters as the preparation and reproduction
of illustrative materials, the treatment of special problems, the use of copyrighted
material, and how to secure copyright for a dissertation. The following procedures
apply to the Graduate School's editorial services to students.

I. The responsibility for acceptable English in a thesis or dissertation, as
well as the originality and acceptable quality of the content, lies with the
student and his supervisory committee.
2. The Graduate School editorial staff acts only in an advisory capacity, but
will be glad to answer questions regarding correct grammar, sentence struc-
ture, and acceptable forms of presentation.
3. If the student will bring his final rough draft to the Editorial Office of
the Graduate School, the staff will examine a limited portion and make
recommendations concerning the form of the thesis or dissertation before
the final typing.
4. After the first submission of the dissertation in final form, the Editorial
Office staff checks the format, paper stock, and pagination and scans por-
tions of the text for general usage, references, and bibliographical form.
Master's theses are checked for paper stock, format, and pagination.









STUDENT SERVICES / 67

5. Upon final submission, the signature pages and Final Examination forms
for all theses and dissertations are checked against the Application to Can-
didacy forms for the signatures of the college dean (except for the Colleges
of Arts & Sciences and Business Administration which require a special
statement on the signature page) and all members of the supervisory com-
mittee. It is the responsibility of the student and his supervisory chairman
to notify the Graduate School in writing of any changes which have been
made in the structure of the supervisory committee.
6. The Editorial Office maintains a listing of experienced thesis typists, manu-
script editors, and draftsmen which the student may examine to find the
assistance he needs in the preparation of his manuscript after the super-
visory committee has approved a substantial portion for final typing.

















Fields of Instruction














COLLEGES AND AREAS OF INSTRUCTION


AGRICULTURE
Agricultural & Extension
Education, 78-79
Agronomy, 79-80
Animal Science, 81-82
Dairy Science, 122-123
Entomology & Nematology, 144-145
Food & Resource
Economics, 150-152
Food Science, 152-153
Forest Resources & Conservation,
School of, 153-155
Fruit Crops, 157-158
Ornamental Horticulture, 202-203
Plant Pathology, 217-218
Poultry Science, 221-222
Soil Science, 237-239
Vegetable Crops, 250-251
Veterinary Science, 251-252
ARCHITECTURE & FINE ARTS
Architecture, 85-88
Art, 88-89
Building Construction, 98-99
Music, 193-194
ARTS & SCIENCES (General) ....... 89
Anthropology, 82-85
Astronomy, 89-91
Biochemistry, 91-95
Biological Sciences,
Division of, 94-95
Botany, 95-98
Cellular & Developmental
Biology, 95, 193
Chemistry, 104-107
English, 141-144
Geography, 159-160
Geology, 160-162
Germanic & Slavic Languages &
Literatures, 162-163
History, 165-168
Latin American Studies, 175-176
Linguistics, 176-178
Mathematics, 182-187
Microbiology, 191-193
Philosophy, 209-210


Physics, 212-215
Political Science, 218-221
Psychology, 222-227
Romance Languages &
Literatures, 230-233
French, 230-231
Spanish, 232-233
Sociology, 235-237
Speech, 241-245
Statistics, 246-248
Urban Studies, 250
Zoology, 254-256
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
(General) ................... 99-100
Accounting, 75-76
Economics, 123-127
Finance & Insurance, 148-149
Health & Hospital
Administration, 163-164
Management, 178-179
Marketing, 179-180
Real Estate & Urban Land
Studies, 227-228
EDUCATION
Childhood Education, 107-109
Counselor Education, 116-118
Curriculum & Instruction, 118-122
Foundations of Education, 155-157
Secondary Education, 233-235
Special Education, 239-241
Vocational, Technical, & Adult
Education, 252-254

ENGINEERING (General) ..... 135-136
Aerospace Engineering, 137-138
Agricultural Engineering, 77-78
Chemical Engineering, 100-103
Civil Engineering, 109-112
Coastal & Oceanographic
Engineering, 112-113
Electrical Engineering, 130-134
Engineering Science &
Mechanics, 138-141
Industrial & Systems
Engineering, 170-173








72 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION

Materials Science &
Engineering, 180-182
Mechanical Engineering, 187-190
Nuclear Engineering
Sciences, 196-199

HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS
(General) .................. 164-165
Clinical Psychology, 114-115
Communicative Disorders, 115-116
Health & Hospital
Administration, 163-164
Occupational Therapy, 201-202
Rehabilitation Counseling, 228-229
JOURNALISM &
COMMUNICATIONS .......... 173-175
LAW TAXATION .......... 248-249


MEDICINE Medical Sciences
(General) .................. 190-191
Anatomical Sciences, 204-205
Immunology & Medical
Microbiology, 168-170
Neuroscience, 194-196
Pathology, 203-205
Pharmacology, 206-207
Physiology, 216-217

NURSING .................. 199-201

PHARMACY
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 205-206
Pharmacy, 207-209

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH &
RECREATION ............. 210-212
















COURSE ABBREVIATIONS


ADP
ADV

AE
AED
AGE
AL
APY
ART
ASC
ASE
ATG
ATY
AY
BA
BCH
BCN
BLY
BR

BTY
CE
CHE
CLP
COE


Animal Science-General
Advertising (see Journalism &
Communications)
Architecture
Agricultural & Extension Education
Agricultural Engineering
Animal Science
Anthropology
Art
Arts & Sciences-General
Aerospace Engineering
Accounting
Astronomy
Agronomy
Business Administration-General
Biochemistry
Building Construction
Cellular & Molecular Biology
Broadcasting (see Journalism &
Communications)
Botany
Civil Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Clinical Psychology
Coastal & Oceanographic Engineer-


ing
COM Journalism & Communications
CY Chemistry
DY Dairy Science
ED Education-General
EDA Educational Administration
EDC Counselor Education
EDE Childhood Education
EDF Foundations of Education
EDH Special Education
EDS Secondary Education
EDV Vocational, Technical, & Adult
Education
EE Electrical Engineering
EGC Engineering-General
EH English
ENE Environmental Engineering Sci-
ences
ES Economics
ESM Engineering Science & Mechanics
EY Entomology & Nematology
FC Fruit Crops
FH French (see Romance Languages &
Literatures)
Fl Finance & Insurance


FLE
FRE
FS
FRC
GN

GPY
GY
HA
HRP


Romance Languages & Literatures
Food & Resource Economics
Food Science
Forest Resources & Conservation
Germanic & Slavic Languages &
Literatures
Geography
Geology
Health & Hospital Administration
Health Related Professions-Gen-


eral
HY History
ISE Industrial & Systems Engineering
JM Journalism (see Journalism &
Communications)
LA Latin American Studies
LIN Linguistics
LN Latin (see Romance Languages &
Literatures)
LW Law (see Health & Hospital Admin-
istration; Latin American Stud-
ies)
LWT Law-Taxation
MCY Microbiology
ME Mechanical Engineering
MED Medical Sciences-General; Ana-
tomical Sciences; Immunology &
Medical Microbiology; Neuro-
science; Pathology; Pharmacol-
ogy; Physiology
MGT Management
MKG Marketing
MS Mathematics
MSC Music
MSE Materials Science & Engineering
NES Nuclear Engineering Sciences
NSG Nursing
OCT Occupational Therapy
OH Ornamental Horticulture
PCL Political Science
PCY Pharmaceutical Chemistry
PE Portuguese (see Romance Lan-
guages & Literatures)
PHR Physical Education, Health, & Rec-
reation
PHY Pharmacy
PPY Philosophy
PR Public Relations (see Journalism &
Communications)
PS Physics








74 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION

PSY Psychology
PT Plant Pathology
PY Poultry Science
RC Rehabilitation Counseling
RE Real Estate & Urban Land Studies
RSN Russian (see Germanic & Slavic
Languages & Literatures)
SCH Speech
SH Spanish (see Romance Languages &
Literatures)


Swahili (see Linguistics)
Soil Science
Statistics
Sociology
Urban Studies
Vegetable Crops
Veterinary Science
Zoology


Numbers within parentheses following course titles indicate hours of
credit for the course: (4) = four credit hours.
S/U indicates course is graded as satisfactory/unsatisfactory.
Graduate faculty listing for each department is for the academic year 1973-
74.
Course offerings are subject to change. A complete Schedule of Courses,
listing credit hours and section numbers, is published prior to each registration
period.










ACCOUNTING

(College of Business Administration)

GRADUATE FACULTY 1973-74

W. E. STONE, Chairman; L. J. BENNINGER; D. L. CRUMBLEY; I. N. GLEIM; J. F.
GuY; D. D. RAY; G. L. SALMON; S. C. Yu

Graduate Coordinator: W. E. STONE

Graduate Programs: The Department of Accounting offers graduate work
leading to the degrees Master of Business Administration (with an accounting
concentration); Master of Arts in accounting; and Ph.D. in business administra-
tion with accounting major. The M.B.A. offers a broad business education with
some accounting specialization. It is generally appropriate for students with under-
graduate majors other than accounting. The M.A. is a specialist accounting degree
and can be tailored to the student's career objective: public accounting, taxation,
management accounting or continuation in the Ph.D. program. The Ph.D. ac-
counting major is designed for students who wish to become university account-
ing teachers.
Admission: Students must have been admitted to the Graduate School of
the University of Florida. M.B.A. students with accounting concentrations must
meet the minimal standards of the University of Florida. The M.A. and Ph.D.
accounting programs require admission standards of at least the following: For
the M.A. program, a combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 1100
on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); a combined Graduate Record Ex-
amination score of at least 1200 for the Ph.D. program; or a score of at least
480 for the M.A., and 525 for the Ph.D. program on the Advanced Test for
Graduate Studies in Business (ATGSB). Either the Graduate Record Examination
or the Advanced Test for Graduate Studies in Business scores are acceptable,
but admission to the M.A. or Ph.D. accounting graduate programs cannot be
granted until scores are received. Foreign students must submit a TOEFL test
score of at least 500 and a satisfactory ATGSB or GRE score which may be
lower than the above requirement.
M.B.A. (accounting concentration): Eighteen quarter hours of accounting sub-
jects are required, with a minimum of 9 hours in courses approved for graduate
credit. BA 540 and 610 may be counted as accounting courses in meeting these
requirements. Undergraduate accounting courses (300 or above) can be taken with
permission of the graduate coordinator.
Master of Arts in accounting: Requirements include 18-20 quarter hours of
advanced accounting courses and the balance of a total of 36 hours in one or
two minor fields (finance, operations research, history, etc.). A thesis on an ac-
counting-related topic is required. Admission to advanced courses in accounting
requires that students have, or complete without graduate credit, approximately
the courses required of an undergraduate accounting major. With this background
the M.A. degree can be normally earned in four quarters.
Ph.D. in business administration with accounting major: Requirements in-
clude a core of courses in operations research and the behavioral sciences; a field
of economic theory; a minor in some field selected by the student and a major
field of accounting. Specific details will be supplied upon request to the graduate
coordinator. Knowledge of one foreign language and a dissertation of an account-








76 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ing-related topic are also required. Typically, the program will require two years'
full-time work above the master's degree.
Students preparing for the Ph.D. degree with an accounting major are re-
quired to undertake three quarters of teaching of elementary accounting. During
each of these periods, the student will enroll for 3 credit hours of ATG 698.
Grants-in-aid will be awarded for such teaching.
Course requirements: For admission to graduate-level courses, the student
should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent to the graduate courses
selected; or, where necessary, special arrangements may be made with the approval
of the graduate coordinator. Though no graduate major may be completed without
adequate course work on the 600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses
in accounting are available for graduate credit as a part of a candidate's major
when specifically approved by his adviser.


COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ATG 502-Accounting Theory (4)
ATG 503-Cost Accounting Theory and Application (4)
ATG 504-Federal Income Taxation of Business Organizations (3)
ATG 505-Federal Income Tax Planning (3)


GRADUATE COURSES
ATG 601-Development of Thought in Accounting Theory (5) Inquiry into criteria for
choice among income-determination and asset-valuation rules in the context of public report-
ing.
ATG 602-Accounting Information for External Users (5) Generation of accounting data
for non-management evaluation and control of the processes through which economic re-
sources are administered.
ATG 603-Social and Economic Accounting (5) Same as ES 603. Social accounts and com-
parative economic accounting systems, with emphasis on national income accounting, the
national balance sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds analysis.
ATG 604-Accounting and Analytical Methods (5) Utilization of logic, including mathe-
matics, in the formulation of alternative accounting valuation models and in the clarification
of accounting concepts.
ATG 605-Federal Income Tax: Functional Analysis (5) Prereq: ATG 407. Critical analysis
of federal income tax provisions, especially as related to the use of income concepts. Major
emphasis on the business-tax component of the federal income tax system.
ATG 607-Accounting Theory as Related to Managerial Decision Making (5) Prereq: ATG
305. Theoretical framework of accounting related to decision-making processes of man-
agement.
ATG 608-Interdisciplinary Considerations in Accounting Theory Development (5) De-
velopments in related disciplines, such as economics, law, and behavioral sciences, analyzed
for their contribution to accounting thought.
ATG 630-Individual Work in Accounting (1-5) Prereq: permission of department and ap-
proval of Director of Graduate Studies. Reading and research in areas of accounting as
needed by individual graduate students. May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.
ATG 691-Accounting Research and Reports (2) Prereq: BA 690. Supervised preparation
of report on an accounting topic of current interest. Required of all candidates for the
M.B.A. with an accounting concentration.
ATG 697-Supervised Research (1-5) May be repeated.
ATG 698-Supervised Teaching (1-5) May be repeated.
ATG 699-Master's Research (1-15)
ATG 799-Doctoral Research (1-15)









AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING / 77


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
(College of Engineering)
GRADUATE FACULTY 1973-74

E. T. SMERDON, Chairman; L. O. BAGNALL; D. E. BUFFINGTON; K. L. CAMPBELL;
R. E. CHOATE; R. C. FLUCK; D. S. HARRISON; D. T. KINARD; J. M. MYERS; R. A.
NORDSTEDT; A. R. OVERMAN; L. N. SHAW; T. C. SKINNER; J. D. WHITNEY
Graduate Coordinator: R. C. FLUCK
The degrees Master of Science, Master of Engineering, and Engineer are of-
fered students with graduate objectives in agricultural engineering. Students who
have graduate objectives in mechanized agriculture may take this area of special-
ization under the general agriculture major, Master of Agriculture.
The Master of Science and Master of Engineering degrees are offered in the
following areas of research or course work concentration: Soil and water conserva-
tion engineering, waste management, power and machinery, structures and en-
vironmental, and agricultural processing.
A student with a degree in a related field may enter the graduate program
if adequate articulation courses are included in his program. A normal master's
program may be completed in 5 or 6 quarters. Students interested in graduate
work in agricultural engineering should consult departmental advisers.
Candidates for an engineering master's degree are normally required to take
AGE 601, 602, 603, and at least one of the following: AGE 670, 671, 672, 673,
and 674. Other course work is taken in applicable basic and applied sciences
to meet educational objectives and to comprise an integrated program as approved
by the student's supervisory committee. Courses from other disciplines may be
approved for graduate major credit.
Prerequisite for admission to any agricultural engineering graduate course
is the approval of the instructor.

COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AGE 555-Animal Waste Management (5)

GRADUATE COURSES
AGE 601-Seminar (1) Discussions of research, current trends, and practices in agricultural
engineering. S/U.
AGE 602-Research Methods in Agricultural Engineering (3) Approaches to scientific re-
search, scientific method, design of experiments, research practices and techniques, and
presentation of results.
AGE 603-Instrumentation in Agricultural Engineering Research (4) Principles and appli-
cation of measuring instruments and devices for obtaining experimental data in agricultural
engineering research.
AGE 670-Nonthesis Research in Agricultural Engineering (0-5) Special problems in agri-
cultural engineering. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 10
credits.
AGE 671-Advanced Soil and Water Management Engineering (4) Physical and mathe-
matical analysis of problems in infiltration, drainage, and groundwater hydraulics.
AGE 672-Advanced Farm Machinery (4) Machines and mechanized systems used in
agriculture and related fields, with emphasis on functional design requirements, design pro-
cedures, and performance evaluation.
AGE 673-Advanced Agricultural Structures (4) Design criteria for agricultural structures









78 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


including structural strength and reliability, steady and unsteady heat transfer analysis, ven-
tilation, environmental modification, plant and animal environmental physiology, and struc-
tural systems analysis.
AGE 674-Advanced Agricultural Process Engineering (4) Engineering problems in han-
dling and processing agricultural products.
AGE 691-Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering (1-6) Lectures, laboratory and/or
special projects covering special topics in agricultural engineering. May be repeated with
change of content up to a maximum of 10 credits.
AGE 697-Supervised Research (1-5) May be repeated.
AGE 698-Supervised Teaching (1-5) May be repeated.
AGE 699-Master's Research (1-15)


AGRICULTURAL and EXTENSION EDUCATION

(College of Agriculture)
GRADUATE FACULTY 1973-74
W. T. OFTEN, Chairman; C. E. BEEMAN; H. E. PEIRCE
Graduate Coordinator: W. T. LOFTEN
The Department of Agricultural and Extension Education offers major work
for the degrees of Master of Science in Agriculture and Master of Agriculture.
The Master of Science in Agriculture, primarily for those interested in re-
search, requires a thesis, while the Master of Agriculture does not (see require-
ments for master's degrees). The master's program in agricultural and extension
education is designed for those persons engaged in teaching agriculture (at
all levels) in the public schools of Florida, those in the Cooperative Extension
Service, and others in educational and leadership positions in agriculture who
desire additional professional training.
A prospective graduate student need not have majored in agricultural and
extension education as an undergraduate student. However, students with an
insufficient background in either agricultural and extension education or tech-
nical agriculture will need to include some basic courses in these areas in their
program.

GRADUATE COURSES
AED 601-Advanced Agricultural Leadership (4) Training in leadership opportunities and
responsibilities in agriculture, including small group leadership, program planning, com-
munity organization and development, human relationships, public affairs, and public policy.
AED 604-Agricultural and Extension Education Through Group Action (4) Advanced
techniques in developing programs of agricultural and extension education through group
action.
AED 605-Methodology of Planned Change in Agribusiness (4) Examination of processes
by which professional change agents influence the introduction, adoption and diffusion of
technological change in agriculture. Applicable to those who work closely with people. (Agri-
culture teachers, extension agents, farm credit managers, agribusinessmen, etc.)
AED 620-History and Philosophy of Agricultural Education (4) Historical development
of agricultural education from its beginning in other countries to the present program in
the United States, with attention to changing philosophies.
AED 621-Developing Community Programs in Agriculture (4) Application of basic prin-
ciples and practices in developing community programs in agriculture at high school and
post high school levels.
AED 622-Developing Curricular Materials for Programs in Agriculture (4) Development








AGRONOMY / 79


of appropriate curricular materials for high school and post high school programs in agri-
culture; preparation of materials by class members.
AED 623-Problems in Agricultural and Extension Education (1-12) For students quali-
fied to select and pursue advanced research problems. May be repeated with change of
content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
AED 624-Supervised Occupational Experiences in Agricultural Education (4) Basic prob-
lems in planning and supervising programs of occupational experiences in view of changes
occurring in agricultural occupations.
AED 625-Adult Education in Agriculture (4) Establishment, organization of classes, use
of appropriate teaching procedures, and evaluation of programs of adult education in agri-
culture.
AED 626-Seminar in Agricultural and Extension Education (1) May be repeated with
change of content up to 3 credits.
AED 627-Nonthesis Research in Agricultural and Extension Education (1-5) Library and
workshop related to methods in agricultural and extension education, including study of
research work, review of publications, and development of written reports. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 9 credits.
AED 697-Supervised Research (1-5) May be repeated.
AED 698-Supervised Teaching (1-5) May be repeated.
AED 699-Master's Research (1-15)


AGRONOMY
(College of Agriculture)

GRADUATE FACULTY 1973-74
D. E. MCCLOUD, Chairman; F. CLARK; J. R. EDWARDSON; G. J. FRITZ; L. A.
GARRARD; G. J. GASCHO; R. E. GODDARD; V.E. GREEN, JR.; K. HINSON; G. C. HORN;
E. S. HORNER; G. B KILLINGER; G. O. MOTT; A. J. NORDEN; J. R. ORSENIGO;
P. L. PFAHLER; H. L. POPENOE; G. M. PRINE; E. G. RODGERS; O. C. RUELKE;
S. C. SCHANK; V. N. SCHRODER; R. L. SMITH; R. G. STANLEY; D. L. SUTTON;
H. E. WARMKE; S. H. WEST; E. B. WHITTY; M. WILCOX

Graduate Coordinator: E. G. RODGERS
The Department of Agronomy offers the Doctor of Philosophy and the
Master of Science in Agriculture degrees with specialization in crop ecology and
climatology, crop nutrition and physiology, crop production, weed science, ge-
netics, cytogenetics, or plant breeding. Specializations for the Doctor of Philosophy
degree also include areas of forest science and ornamental horticulture. Also, the
nonthesis degree, Master of Agriculture, is offered with a major in agronomy.
Graduate programs emphasize the development and subsequent application
of basic principles in each specialization to agronomic plants in Florida and
throughout the tropics. The continuing need for increased food supplies is reflected
in departmental research efforts. Some thesis and dissertation research may be
conducted wholly or in part in one or more of several tropical countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathematics, chemistry, botany,
microbiology, and physics is required of new graduate students, or it will be pro-
vided as foundation work early in the student's graduate program. In addition
to graduate courses in agronomy, the following courses in related areas are accept-
able for graduate credit as part of the student's major: AL 602-Quantitative
Genetics; AL 656-Ruminant Physiology and Metabolism; BTY 604-Vegetation
of the Tropics; BTY 615-Plant Growth and Development; FC 621-Environ-









80 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


mental Measurements; SLS 626-Soil Fertility; STA 605-Advanced Methods of
Statistics.


COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AY 505-Rice (4)
AY 509-Sugarcane (4)
AY 513-Oilseed Crops (4)
AY 514-Fiber Crops (4)
AY 536-Tropical Pasture and Forage Science (5)


GRADUATE COURSES
AY 641-Crop Nutrition (4) Prereq: BTY 310. Nutritional influences on differentiation,
composition, growth, and yield of agronomic plants.
AY 642-Biochemistry of Herbicides (4) Prereq: CY 565. Mechanism of action, metabolism,
and structure-activity relationships of herbicides.
AY 644-Physiology of Agronomic Plants (4) Prereq: BTY 515. Yield potentials of crops
as influenced by photosynthetic efficiencies, respiration, translocation, drought, and canopy
architecture.
AY 646-Crop Ecology (5) Prereq: AY 301, 311, or BTY 501, or equivalent. Influence
and interactions of environmental factors such as climate, edaphic, pyric, and biotic on
the development and distribution of crop plants.
AY 647-Crop Plants in Tropical Environments (12) Prereq: approval by Organization
for Tropical Studies. Factors determining growth, development, and production of crop
plants in tropical environments.
AY 658-Population Genetics (3) Prereq: AY 362, STA 602. Application of statistical prin-
ciples to biological populations in relation to gene frequency, zygotic frequency, mating
systems, and the effects of selection, mutation, and migration on equilibrium populations.
AY 660-Cytogenetics (5) Prereq: basic courses in genetics and cytology. Genetic variability
with emphasis on interrelationships of cytologic and genetic concepts. Chromosome structure
and number, chromosomal aberrations, apomixis, and application of cytogenetic principles.
AY 662-Advanced Genetics (4) Prereq: AY 362; AY 465 or ADP 322. Advanced genetic
concepts and modern genetic theory.
AY 664-Topics in Genetics (2-4) Same as AL 664, BTY 696, DY 664, PY 664, ZY 664.
Prereq: AY 362 or ZY 325. Biochemical, bacterial, viral, statistical, radiation, serological,
and human genetics; speciation, history of genetics, genetics of higher plants and animals.
May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
AY 665-Advanced Plant Breeding (4) Prereq: AY 362, 465, STA 603. Genetic basis for
plant breeding procedures.
AY 682-Genetics Seminar (1) Current literature and developments in genetics. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 3 credits.
AY 684-Graduate Agronomy Seminar (1) Current literature and agronomic developments.
Required of all graduate students in agronomy. May be repeated with change of content
up to a maximum of 3 credits.
AY 686-Agronomic Problems (1-6) Prereq: minimum of one undergraduate course in
agronomy or plant science. Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies
of agronomic plants. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12
credits.
AY 688-Topics in Agronomy (2-4) Selected topics in specific agronomic areas critically
reviewed. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
AY 697-Supervised Research (1-5) May be repeated.
AY 698-Supervised Teaching (1-5) May be repeated.
AY 699-Master's Research (1-15)
AY 799-Doctoral Research (1-15)




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