• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 University of Florida equal opportunity...
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Student government charge...
 Student rights and responsibil...
 Student conduct code
 Housing policies and regulatio...
 Drug policy for the University...
 Judicial structure and appeals...
 Academic regulations
 Administrative regulations
 Freedom of assembly - demonstration...
 Freedom of expression - speaker...
 Freedom of expression - distribution...
 Organization policies
 Public functions and lectures policies...
 Social regulations
 Traffic safety regulations
 Fire safety policites
 Student body constitution
 Florida Board of Regents polic...
 Federal and state laws
 Index
 Problem solving help services














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00111
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00111
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    University of Florida equal opportunity policy
        Page i
    Foreword
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Student government charge for excellence
        Page 1
    Student rights and responsibilities
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Student conduct code
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Housing policies and regulations
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Drug policy for the University of Florida
        Page 13
    Judicial structure and appeals procedure
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Academic regulations
        Page 21
    Administrative regulations
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Freedom of assembly - demonstration policy
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Freedom of expression - speaker policy
        Page 29
    Freedom of expression - distribution of printed material policy
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Organization policies
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Public functions and lectures policies - political campaigns
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Social regulations
        Page 44
    Traffic safety regulations
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Fire safety policites
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Student body constitution
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Florida Board of Regents policies
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Federal and state laws
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Index
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Problem solving help services
        Page 71
Full Text












































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Student Rights, Responsibilities,

Regulations


THE UNIVERSITY RECORD
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Statement of Mailing Privilege
VOLUME LXVI SERIES 1 NUMBER 8 AUGUST 1, 1971

Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida. Entered in the Post Office in Gainesville, Florida as second-class
matter, under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912.
Office of Publications, Gainesville, Florida.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY


The University of Florida shall provide equal opportunities without
regard to race, color, creed, sex, age or national origin in all phases
of the following activities affecting faculty, staff or students:

1. Recruitment, staffing, admissions, dismissals or suspensions;

2. Compensation, terms, conditions or privileges of employment;

3. Classification, assignment or promotion of staff, or in the
use of facilities;

4. Classification, grading or placement of students;

5. Training.

Any person staff member, student, applicant, or other interested
person who believes the University of Florida's Equal Opportunity Policy
has been violated or is in danger of violation should contact the Equal
Opportunity Officer.* The complaint must be in writing and signed by the
complainant giving complete identification as to status, home address and
telephone number.

This policy implements the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Executive Orders
11246, 10925 and 11114; Board of Regents Policy 12.0 dated February 2, 1970,
Equal Rights (2-77 BOR Operating Manual).









*Mr. John E. McAvoy, Employment Officer, Personnel Division

















FOREWORD


This book includes the minimum regulations which students, faculty,
and the administration have found essential to define and protect the
rights of all members of the University Community, and to maintain that
degree of order needed for the achievement of common educational goals.

To do this requires the definition of responsibilities that all
students share for safeguarding the rights of others while exercising
their own rights in a large and complex academic community.

Achievement of these aims requires that everyone in the University
be familiar with these regulations and policies, and that assigned
responsibilities be accepted.

It is hoped that these guidelines including the cross references to
Catalogs will help our students enjoy many successful and rewarding
experiences in the course of personal development and growth and in
the attainment of each one's personal objectives at the University of
Florida.

Opportunities are available for each student to participate in the
continuing improvement and updating of regulations and policies to
reflect changes in laws and conditions affecting various activities of
the community. Interested students are encouraged to make their contri-
butions to this effort through the normal channels of Student Government
involvement, or directly to Presidential Committees and other University
agencies concerned.

Student Affairs offices will be pleased to assist any who require
advice as to ways in which their suggestions or support can best be
used.











TABLE OF CONTENTS


1. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY ii

2. FOREWORD iii

3. STUDENT GOVERNMENT CHARGE FOR EXCELLENCE 1

4. STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 2

I PRIVILEGE OF ATTENDANCE 2
II STUDENT RIGHTS 2
III STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES 2
IV HONOR SYSTEM 4
V CONFIDENTIALITY OF RECORDS 5

5. STUDENT CONDUCT CODE 6

6. HOUSING POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 11

7. DRUG POLICY FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 13

8. JUDICIAL STRUCTURE AND APPEALS PROCEDURE 14

I HONOR COURT 15
II STUDENT TRAFFIC COURT 16
III RESIDENCE CONDUCT BOARDS 16
IV FRATERNITY AND SORORITY ENFORCEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES 17
V COMMITTEE ON STUDENT CONDUCT 17
VI OFFICE FOR STUDENT CONDUCT 20
VII PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY 20

9. ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 21

10. ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 22

11. FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY DEMONSTRATION POLICY 25

12. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION SPEAKER POLICY 29

13. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION DISTRIBUTION OF PRINTED MATERIAL POLICY 30

14. ORGANIZATION POLICIES 32

15. PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND LECTURES POLICIES POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS 36

16. SOCIAL REGULATIONS 44

17. TRAFFIC-SAFETY REGULATIONS 45

18. FIRE SAFETY POLICIES 47

APPENDIXES: A. STUDENT BODY CONSTITUTION 49

B. FLORIDA BOARD OF REGENTS POLICIES 61

C. FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS 65









A CHARGE FOR EXCELLENCE*


In recent years the role and importance of higher education has been
recognized as a necessary element of the orderly growth of the state and
the nation. The members of university communities have traditionally
recognized their individual responsibilities in the development of a mature
and sophisticated society.

Recognizing that the University of Florida is a center of academic,
mental, and cultural development of great importance to the state and
nation, it is imperative that each member of the University Community
understand his role in the fulfillment of the responsibilities of the
University to the society of which it is a part.

Although the primary goal of any university community is to foster
an atmosphere of academic excellence, the Student Body of the University
of Florida has come to expect from all members of the University Community
a standard of excellence in areas other than, but correlative to, academic
development. The University of Florida cannot adequately discharge the
mandate of the society which it serves unless high standards of excellence
in academic and personal development, civic responsibility, and inter-
personal relationships are adhered to by each of its citizens.

To this end the Student Body of the University of Florida charges
each and every member of the University Community to:

A. Display the high level of maturity and good judgment requisite
to the maintenance of an orderly academic community;

B. Recognize the civic responsibilities incumbent upon them in a
society which looks to its universities for leadership;

C. Recognize, above all else, the individuality of every member of
society and, in interpersonal relationships, conduct themselves
in a manner commensurate with and responsive to, such individuality.




*Adopted by a resolution of the Legislative Council of the University of
Florida Student Government on December 5, 1967.









STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES


I. UNIVERSITY ATTENDANCE A PRIVILEGED OPPORTUNITY

The State of Florida legally extends the privileges of admission
to the University of Florida to those persons who meet the academic
qualifications, and the standards of health, character, and prior conduct.
This admission presents privileges beyond those available to all citizens,
at the partial expense of the State. Commensurate with these additional
privileges are additional responsibilities. Among these responsibilities
are found requirements to abide by certain regulations which have been
found essential to provide a climate of order within which all members of
the University Community may exercise their rights as citizens of the
Nation, State, and local communities.

The rights and corresponding responsibilies of University member-
ship are summarized in the following sections, and cross referenced to
the more detailed guidelines contained in other parts of this publication.


II. STUDENT RIGHTS

A. The right of respect for
personal feelings; the right of free-
dom from indignity of any type; the
right to expect an education of the
highest quality; and the right to
make the best use of time and talents
toward the objective which brought
him to the University.




B. The right to inquire
about and to recommend improvements
in policies, regulations, and pro-
cedures affecting the welfare of
students. The right to participate
in Student Government, and other
student self-governing bodies which
provide channels of communication
and means for using democratic pro-
cesses to solve problems, and better
prepare the student for functional
citizenship.






C. The right of freedom
of expression as defined by the
Constitution of the United States
and the State of Florida, and as
determined by a court of competent
jurisdiction to be applicable to the
State University System of Florida,
shall not be in any way prohibited
or abridged; and the right of free-
dom of assembly will be recognized.


III. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

A. The responsibility of
assuming the consequences of one's
own actions, and of avoiding con-
duct detrimental in its effect upon
fellow students and the University.
The student is expected to conform
at all times to a standard of conduct
both on and off campus which will
reflect credit upon himself, the
University and the student body.
See Student Conduct Code.

B. The responsibility for
knowledge and observance of those
policies not herein enumerated
which have been established and
promulgated by appropriate University
boards, designated University Com-
mittees, i.e., Social Rules, Resi-
dence Standards, Traffic Regulations,
and civil laws, particularly Florida
Statutes currently in force. The
responsibility for taking the initi-
ative in utilizing the services of
self-governing activities to include
volunteering for service on committees
for which qualified. See Appendix A.
Student Body Constitution; Appendix C
Federal and State Laws.

C. The responsibility for
seeing that the essential order of
the University is preserved. There
can be no assembly or gathering which
interferes with the educational pro-
grams of the University, or violates
statutes governing unlawful assembly,
See Freedom of Assembly-Demonstration
Policy; and Appendix B, BOR 7.42 C.











D. The right of freedom to
hear and participate in a vital dia-
logue during public discussions
which provide a diversity of content
and a balance of opinion; and to
examine views and ideas both popular
and unpopular, orthodox and unortho-
dox.




E. The right of freedom to
write and distribute printed mater-
ial, free or sold on the campus for
reasons that are not commercial,
without the exercise of prior re-
straint on such materials by the
University. The circulation of
literature identified by author-
ship and sponsorship, and consonant
with University regulations will be
allowed.

F. The constitutional right
of freedom of the press is recognized
for all student publications, to in-
clude allowance of the widest degree
of latitude to student editors for
the free discussion of current issues
and problems.

G. The right to join uni-
versity-approved organizations for
educational, political, social, re-
ligious, and cultural purposes,
within the limits imposed by their
responsibility to each other and to
the structural life of the University.
All officially recognized organizations
will be allowed to meet on campus and
use appropriate University facilities.



H. The right of due process
in disciplinary procedures, when
individual or group behavior comes
under review by the University; in
accordance with rules of procedure
which shall insure basic procedural
fairness as prescribed in the Student
Conduct Code.


D. The responsibility that
such free discussions be accompanied
by peaceful conditions consistent
with the scholarly nature of an
academic community, and accounta-
bility on the part of speakers and
sponsors to campus and civil author-
ity under existing laws and regu-
lations. See Freedom of Expression-
Speaker Policy; and University Public
Functions Policy.

E. The responsibility for
filing a statement of intent to make
such distribution and the acknow-
ledgement by the filer that he(she)
is subject to the Student Conduct
Code, and all laws of the City, State,
and Nation governing such freedom
of expression. See Freedom of
Expression-Distribution of Printed
Material Policy; and Appendix B, BOR
7.42 B.

F. The responsibility of
student editors for the exercise
of journalistic ethics and the
maintenance of high standards of
literary merit. See Policies per-
taining to Organization, IX Student
Publication; Appendix B, BOR 7.42 D.

G. The responsibility to
insure that no recognized organiza-
tion has as a purpose either in
name or in fact, the advocacy of
overthrow of the government by force
or other unlawful means; and that
no student organization constitution,
or other organizational document,
may include discriminary clauses
pertaining to race, creed, color,
or national origin. See Policies
Pertaining to Organizations.

H. The responsibility for
becoming fully acquainted with the
University Catalogue, Student Hand-
book, this document and other
published policies for guidance to
students; and living up to the
agreement to abide by these regula-
tions, which each student has signed
upon application for admission to
the University. See Appendix C,
Chapter 69-279, House Bill 590.











IV. HONOR SYSTEM

A. The Honor Code of the Student Body encompasses the fundamentals
of sound character. The Code pledges the student to refrain from cheating,
stealing, passing worthless checks and ticket scalping. It makes each
student the keeper of his own conscience during examinations and on the
campus until he shows he does not deserve the trust placed in him.

B. During Orientation new students are asked to take the following
oath as administered by the Chancellor of the Honor Court:

"I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully fulfill the
responsibilities of a Florida Student; that I will live on
my honor, and will, to the best of my ability preserve,
protect, and defend the Constitution of the Student Body
of the University of Florida."

C. The Honor System has been a time-honored tradition at the Uni-
versity of Florida since 1914. It was a respected practice in some campus
quarters even before then, but student initiative established it as a
campus-wide system in that year.

D. The success of the system is inherently dependent upon the
honor of each member of the Student Body. The student, alone, must decide
to abide by the principles of the Honor Code. He is pledged to report
to the Honor Court any violation of honor that he observes. The basic
principles of the honor system are that self-discipline is the greatest
builder of character; that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-
respect; and that these are essential to the highest type of education.

E. To be worthy of the Honor System's advantages, each student
must be strong enough to perform his duty in upholding the Honor System.
The responsibility for each student's conduct is placed where it must
eventually rest upon himself.

F. Specifically, the Honor Code presently encompasses four areas:

1. Cheating: the GIVING or TAKING of any information or
material with the intent of wrongfully aiding yourself or someone else on
any academic work which is considered in any way in the determination of
the final grade.

2. Stealing: the taking of the property of another without
the consent of the owner and with the intent of depriving the owner of
the use of the property.

3. Bad Checks: knowingly negotiating a worthless check of
your own or of another, or failure to make good a returned check within
a reasonable period of time.

4. Ticket Scalping: selling tickets to any University of
Florida function for more than the original price paid for the tickets.










V. CONFIDENTIALITY OF RECORDS


A. Student Development Records.

A student's personnel record on file in the Office for Student
Development is considered of confidential nature and the contents will
not be disclosed without prior approval of the student involved to any
individual or agency except the professional staff of Student Affairs.
However, factual information contained in student files that can normally
be obtained from open public records such as classification, place
of residence, location and periods of employment is not considered
confidential.

B. Academic/Personnel Records

1. Action authorized by the Vice President for Student Affairs
resulting in loss of good standing (expulsion, suspension, probation)
will be transmitted to the Registrar by the Dean for Student Development
with a copy to the student involved, the college dean, and the parents
of those students under 21 years of age. The Registrar will then place
a "Hold" on the permanent record card indicating the action that has been
imposed and maintain the "Hold"as long as the action is in force.

2. If a transcript of the record card is requested while the
"Hold" is in force, a statement will be superimposed over and photographed
along with the permanent record to the effect: "This transcript reflects
only the academic record of the student; this student currently is not in
good standing and further information should be requested from the Office
for Student Development."

3. Requests to the Registrar to place a "Hold" on a student's
record card are the responsibility of the Dean for Student Development
and the Coordinator for Student Conduct. The responsibility rests with
the student who has satisfactorily completed the terms of his disciplinary
punishment to initiate, through the Dean for Student Development, the
clearance of his records.

4. If the requesting agency desires to know from the Dean for
Student Development why a "Hold" was placed on the student's record, the
Dean may state the general category of the "Hold" but will not divulge the
details of the punishment without written permission of the student to
release such information.











STUDENT CONDUCT CODE


I. INTRODUCTION. As members of the academic community, students
enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to such membership, in-
cluding, but not limited to, academic freedom and participation in
the decision-making processes of the University. Additionally,
students are subject to the obligations and duties which accompany
this membership and are responsible for compliance with the require-
ments of law and with all regulations of the University.

In order to have effective campus governance by students, faculty and
staff, it is incumbent upon members of the campus community to notify
the appropriate judicial body or official of violation of these regu-
lations, to encourage all to comply with them, and assist in their
enforcement by testifying as witnesses when called upon to do so.

All conduct regulations of the University shall be printed in a form
or forms which make them available to all students and shall be appli-
cable only upon publication in the Alligator, the Student Handbook,
or other reasonable means of notification.

II. UNIVERSITY AUTHORITY. Under the authority of the Board of
Regents (Florida Statutes, Sec. 240.001, 240.042, and 240.045), the
President has been delegated the responsibility for establishing and
enforcing regulations governing student life (Board of Regents Operating
Manual Section 2, paragraphs 7.2 and 7.3). See Appendix B.

The regulations are designed to enable the University to protect itself
and its members against the conduct of those who by their actions impair
or infringe on the rights of others or interfere with the orderly oper-
ations of the University. Discipline may be imposed for offenses
against the Code occurring at any of the following locations or activities:

A. University campus;

B. University owned or controlled property;

C. Property or other housing units assigned for responsibility
to the University, including, but not limited to, fraternity and
sorority property;

D. Activities sponsored by the University wherever they may occur;

E. Activities officially approved by the University which are
conducted by University chartered organizations wherever they may occur;

F. Activities occurring off-campus as provided in paragraph VI.

III. RULES OF PROCEDURE. The primary judicial bodies authorized by
the President and charged with the administration and enforcement of
this Code shall formulate and furnish to students charged with an of-
fense, rules of procedure which shall insure basic procedural fairness.
Basic procedural fairness shall be afforded to any student charged with
an offense; this shall include, but not be limited to:

A. The right to be notified in writing of the charges against
him with sufficient particularity and in sufficient time to insure the
opportunity to prepare for the hearing;










B. The right to a prompt hearing before an appropriate official,
committee, or court;

C. The right to know the nature and source of the evidence
which will be used against him;

D. The right to present evidence in his own behalf;

E. The right to freedom against compulsory self-incrimination;

F. The right to appear with an advisor at the hearing.

IV. SUSPENSION PENDING HEARING. Certain situations under Board of
Regents Policy, this Code, the University Demonstration Policy and
the University Policy on Possession and Use of Firearms on Campus call
for immediate suspension in the event of violation of said policies.
If a student is suspended under such policies without hearing, he shall,
upon request, be entitled to a preliminary hearing at the earliest
practical time from the demand for same; such hearing shall be solely
to determine if the suspending official acted within the scope of his
authority and that there is probable cause to believe that the student
has violated a University Policy. The hearing board shall be appointed
by the President, and shall report its determinations to the President
for whatever action he deems appropriate. This presidential action
shall be interim until the Student Conduct Committee shall hear the
matter and make recommendations to the President.

V. VIOLATION OF THE CODE OF CONDUCT.

A. The Committee on Student Conduct may recommend to the Presi-
dent expulsion or any lesser penalty for the following offenses:

1. Furnishing false information to the University with
intent to deceive.

2. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University documents,
records, or identification cards (including but not limited to identi-
fication cards used for admission to or issued by the Rathskeller or the
University of Florida Athletic Association.)

3. Destruction, damage or misuse of public property, including
library materials, or of private property on campus by intentional acts
or acts committed with reckless disregard of possible harm to said public
or private property.

4. Actions or statements which by design or consequence
amount to intimidation or hazing.

5. Continued attendance at, after warning to disperse by
an official of the University, or participation in, a raid on a Uni-
versity living unit.

6. Disorderly conduct; or, disrupting the orderly operation
of the University as defined in Section 2, paragraph 3.18 of the Board
of Regents Operating Manual and the Demonstration Policy of the University.

7. Failure to comply with a University regulation or rule.

8. Repeated violations of Housing, Interhall, and Area Council
regulations when the student has been found guilty by the Hall or Area
Conduct Board of a previous related violation.










9. Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the State
of Florida or law of the United States.

10. Violation of conduct probation.

11. Unauthorized use or taking of public or private property.

12. Possession of a firearm on the University campus except
as specifically authorized by University policy on the Possession and
Use of Firearms on the University campus.

13. Actions or conduct which hinder or obstruct or otherwise
interfere with the implementation or enforcement of the Student Conduct
Code.

14. Failure to appear before the Student Conduct Committee
or the Coordinator for Student Conduct and to testify as a witness when
reasonably notified to do so by the Coordinator for Student Conduct.
Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to compel self-incrimination.

B. The Honor Court may expel a student or impose any lesser
penalty for violations of the Honor Code as defined by the Student Body
Constitution, and other offenses against the Student Body defined by
proper enactments of Student Government, with jurisdiction assigned to
the Honor Court, and approved by the President of the University. See
Appendix A.

C. Hall and Area Conduct Board may impose such penalty as set
forth by the University Housing Committee for the following: Violation
of Housing, Interhall, and Area Council regulations.

D. Traffic Court may impose authorized penalties for the
following: Violations of University traffic, parking and registration
regulations.

E. Such other judicial bodies as may be established and vested
with jurisdiction by appropriate authority.

VI. OFF-CAMPUS CONDUCT. When a student violates Section V-A-9 of
this Code of Conduct by an offense committed off the campus and which
is not associated with a university-connected activity, the disciplinary
authority of the University will not be used merely to duplicate the
penalty awarded for such an act under applicable ordinances and laws.
The University will take disciplinary action against a student for such
an off-campus offense only when it is required by law to do so or when
the nature of the offense is such that in the judgment of the Coordinator
for Student Conduct:

A. The continued presence of the student on campus is likely
to create interference with the educational process and the orderly
operation of the University; or

B. The continued presence of the student on campus is likely to
endanger the health, safety or welfare of the members of the University
community or their property or that of the University; or

C. The offense committed by the student is of such a serious,
heinous or repulsive nature, as to adversely affect the student's suit-
ability as a member of the academic community.










If the Coordinator for Student Conduct determines that the offense
affects the University as stated above, then the Committee on Student
Conduct shall hold a prompt hearing.

In considering matters referred to it under this section of the Student
Conduct Code, the Committee on Student Conduct shall consider whether
the offense is of such nature as set out in A, B,or C above, if it, in
fact, was committed by the student, in addition to its consideration
of whether or not the student committed the offense and its recommenda-
tions for penalty.

The action of the Committee on Student Conduct shall be made without
regard to actions, pending or completed, by any off-campus official
or body.

VII. POSTPONEMENT OF HEARING DUE TO PENDING OR POSSIBLE CRIMINAL OR
CIVIL CHARGES. If the student charged with a violation of the Student
Conduct Code, regardless of which primary judicial body may hear the
matter, wishes to have the hearing postponed because there is pending
or possible civil or criminal litigation which he feels might be
prejudiced by the findings of the hearing, such postponement may be
granted provided the student requests it and agrees to accept conduct
probation or suspension, depending upon the gravity of the offense.
Such probation or suspension will be determined and activated by the
Coordinator for Student Conduct and will remain in force until such
time as the student requests a hearing before the appropriate primary
judicial body and the hearing is held. The student shall be informed
whether he would be placed on probation or would be suspended prior
to his making a decision to postpone the hearing.

VIII. STUDENT WAIVER OF RIGHT TO HEARING. In the event a student charged
with an offense, under Section V-A above, wishes to waive in writing
his right to a hearing by the appropriate official or hearing body and
the Coordinator for Student Conduct wishes to accept jurisdiction, the
Coordinator for Student Conduct may make a determination of facts and,
if the student is found guilty of the offense, make a recommendation
of penalty.

IX. SUMMARY HEARING. When a student is accused of a violation of
Section V of this Code which, in the opinion of the Coordinator for
Student Conduct, if proven, would not warrant a penalty in excess of
two quarters probation, then the Coordinator for Student Conduct may
require such hearing to be held before the Chairman of the Committee
on Student Conduct or his designated representative.

The hearing shall be held in accordance with Section III of this Code.

X. CONFLICT OF JURISDICTION. In the event that the offense charged
is within the jurisdiction of more than one primary judicial body, the
Coordinator for Student Conduct shall determine which primary judicial
body shall hear the charge.

XI. PENALTIES. A student adjudged guilty of violations under Section
V above, may receive, except where specific penalties are provided for
any or all of the following penalties:

A. Reprimand Formal rebuke and official recognition of mis-
conduct as charged by the University.










B. Conduct Probation A student on conduct probation is deemed
not to be in good standing with the University; conditions may be im-
posed at the time the student is placed on conduct probation. If the
student is found in violation of the probation by subsequent violation
of this Code prior to the completion of the probationary period, he
will be either suspended or expelled from the University. The duration
of the probation period and conditions imposed will be in direct pro-
portion of the degree of seriousness attached to the misconduct.

C. Suspension The duration of the period of suspension shall
be in direct proportion to the degree of seriousness attached to the
misconduct. A suspension may be imposed for an indefinite period of
time or for a given period.

D. Expulsion A student shall be deprived of his opportunity
to continue as a member of the University Community.

E. Payment of Damages In addition to the penalties described
above, a student may be required to pay compensation for damage to
University property provided, however, that such compensation shall be
limited to the actual cost of repair or replacement of such property.










HOUSING POLICIES AND REGULATIONS


I. HOUSING POLICIES

A. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS: All single freshmen and sophomore
students (men and women) are required to live on campus in University
housing. Upon written request to the Director of Housing, exceptions
to these requirements are made for such students as those who commute,
live in Gainesville with their parents, or are married. Undergraduate
men and women other than freshmen may live at their fraternity or
sorority houses.

B. University agreements for all residents are for the contract
year of four quarters (September to August), if the student is enrolled.
When a student withdraws from the University he should cancel his present
housing assignment or his future housing request in writing, at his area
office.

C. To avoid misunderstandings or misinterpretations of the housing
agreement and conditions of room assignment, each resident should review
his housing agreement. For further clarification of either agreement
provisions or housing procedures, contact the Area Director for the housing
area in which you live.

II. OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING

A. Single freshmen and sophomore students must have permission
in advance from the University Housing Office for off-campus residence
for any given period of school.

B. For use for essential communications or in case of an emerg-
ency, a student living off-campus should report his exact residence
address at the time of registration and should promptly notify the Regis-
trar's office of any subsequent change in address.

III. STUDENT HOUSING REGULATIONS

A. To safeguard each student's health and welfare as well as to
protect University and personal property, the following procedures are in
effect in all residence halls. All residents are expected to be familiar
with and follow these regulations and policies as well as eleven (11)
other rules and regulations affecting student welfare at the University
of Florida.

B. For the privacy of all residents.

1. To combat noise pollution and for the best sleeping and
studying conditions, reasonable quiet and consideration for others is
necessary at all times.

2. For security of personal property, it is recommended that
residents lock their doors whenever they leave their rooms.

3. To protect the privacy and possible defrauding of residents,
commercial soliciting (in person or with advertising circulars) is not
permitted in the residence halls.

C. For the safety of all residents.

1. Because of potential fire hazards and because the residence










hall electrical wiring is not specifically designed for cooking devices
and air conditioners, residents are not permitted to use these appliances
in student rooms. However, there are designated areas for the use of
cooking devices in most residence halls.

2. Because of the dangers involved and state law, firearms,
ammunition, weapons, explosives, dangerous chemicals, and fireworks may
not be kept or used in the residence halls or residence areas. Combusti-
ble materials may not be ignited at any time within the residence halls.

3. For reasons of health and sanitation, no animals are
allowed in the residence halls, except that aquarium fish and small
turtles may be kept if they are maintained properly.

4. For insect control, as well as safety reasons, screens
should not be opened or removed from student room windows. Screens must
be kept on windows in public areas. For reasons of safety during electrical
storms, residents are not allowed to set up outside antenna systems.

5. For safety reasons, ledges are off-limits. To prevent
injury to other people and to preserve the appearance of the grounds,
nothing is to be thrown from the residence halls. Experience has shown
that these actions lead to personal injury and are not worth the minimal
amount of amusement derived.

6. Fire alarms and fire equipment may be used only in cases
of need or emergency. The building is to be evacuated if an alarm sounds.

D. For reasonable care of facilities.

1. Each resident is responsible for the proper care of his
room and university property. Individual charges are assessed for property
damage that occurs for reasons other than normal usage. Thus, in decorating,
permanently damaging items such as nails, staples, tape, and decals should
be avoided. Rooms, if decorated, must be returned to their original
condition when the occupant leaves.

2. Residents jointly share responsibility for the condition
of the public areas (public kitchens, lounges, corridor baths). Students
responsible for creating unclean conditions personally correct them.
Individual or group charges may be assessed for property damage or ex-
cessively unclean conditions that occur for reasons other than normal usage.

3. Lock repair is handled by University personnel, and resi-
dents may not add locks to doors or other University equipment.

E. Additional information and laws affecting residents.

1. Residents are required to be familiar and comply with
open house procedures administered through student governing bodies in
the residence halls.

2. State law makes illegal the possession or consumption of
alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age.

3. The possession or use of illegal, harmful, or habit forming
drugs is not only inappropriate on the University campus but it is a
violation of the Student Conduct Code. It is also unlawful by State
and/or Federal laws. (Appendix C, Senate Bill 959, Chapter 69-140).










DRUG POLICY FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


I. The University recognizes the fact that the use, possession and
sale of the psychedelic, hallucenogenic and/or narcotic drugs is not only
illegal, but is unacceptable within the University of Florida community.
In addition, the abuse of stimulants, depressants, non-prescription drugs
is likewise inappropriate. Therefore, it shall be the University's
policy to:

A. Enforce the applicable Florida statutes and United States
government code, and University Regulations. Personnel employed by
agencies under the jurisdiction of the Vice President for Student Affairs
are instructed as follows:

1. All personnel are to enforce our drug policy.

2. All personnel who have knowledge of students who are using
or selling unlawful drugs, narcotics, or hallucinogenics are to report
the names of these students and information concerning any alleged inci-
dent to their department head who will contact the Coordinator for Student
Conduct.

3. The only exceptions to point 2 above are those students
who have voluntarily contacted staff members expressing a desire to "get
out of the drug scene," and have stopped using unlawful drugs.

B. Provide to the fullest extent, all University personnel, facili-
ties and efforts to insure that help may be available for University students
who are experiencing drug difficulties and desiring help.

II. While the University will enforce the law, it recognizes that en-
forcement of statutes alone is not the most effective method of curtailing
the use of harmful and inappropriate drugs on campus. Therefore the
University will:

A. Through the personnel and facilities of the Office for Student
Development, give help to students wishing to avail themselves of this
assistance. Individuals will be made available for crisis counseling,
personal help, individual and group sensitivity instruction, and referral
to other agencies involved with medical and mental health;

B. Insure that a group of interested students, faculty, adminis-
trators, and staff members will present symposium on drugs and the drug
problem. Available to interested groups, these symposia will be educa-
tional as well as catalysts to discussion and interaction among the members
of the groups. In addition, other educational programs and aids will be
made available by the University to students and student groups.

C. Afford University personnel the opportunity to offer suspected
drug users the choice of assistance in lieu of possible disciplinary action,
except when the individual is suspected of sale, manufacture, or other
purposeful involvement of others.

D. Encourage maintaining the confidentiality of all persons involved
in these self-help programs who are not continuing to violate applicable
statutes.










JUDICIAL STRUCTURE AND APPEALS PROCEDURE


APPEALS PROCEDURE Any decision affecting student status at the Uni-
versity of Florida may be appealed through the office of the Vice
President for Student Affairs who is responsible for seeing that
appropriate authorities take action on such appeal, including routing
to the President of the University, and to the Board of Regents if
necessary.

A. Regulations governing students may be questioned or decisions
appealed by addressing inquiries or stating objections to the Vice
President for Student Affairs. He will see that the objections or
appeals are considered by the appropriate committee or authority. The
Committee on Student Affairs, which is composed of students, teaching
faculty and administrative faculty, is charged with the responsibility
to update matters that pertain to student welfare, and will be the
committee ordinarily used as a channel for all protests or challenges
of existing student regulations.

B. When circumstances warrant, disciplinary actions taken by
any judiciary agency may be appealed to the President of the University
by contacting the Vice President for Student Affairs.

C. 1. If after a hearing before the institution officials, a
student still believes a decision is unfair, he may request a review
by the Board of Regents for the purpose of determining whether the
student has been provided adequate administrative due process. The
request to the Board shall be in writing and shall be submitted to the
Chancellor through the President of the institution within thirty (30)
days after the decision is rendered by the institution and shall cite
all reasons for dissatisfaction with the previous decision (Section
240.001 and 240.042, Florida Statutes).

2. The Board will not hear the case de novo. It shall be
the responsibility of the institution to provide the Board with a
transcript of the hearings held in the case. The Board will then review
the procedures and testimony to determine whether administrative due
process was provided. In the event the Board of Regents determines
that adequate administrative due process has not been provided, the case
will be returned to the institution for reconsideration.










I. THE HONOR COURT


A. The Honor Court has within its jurisdiction the offenses of
cheating, stealing, passing worthless checks, and selling tickets to a
University of Florida function for more than the original price paid
for the tickets. Every Florida student suspected of an offense in
these categories is subject to prosecution by the Honor Court.

B. Possible violations are reported to the Honor Court by the
students, faculty, or administrators. The student named in the accusa-
tion is immediately notified by registered mail. A member of the
Attorney General's staff (composed of upper-class law students) is
appointed to investigate and prosecute the case before the Court; the
Chief Defense Counsel's staff (also composed of upper-class law students)
is notified to contact the student to arrange for his defense. The
Prosecuting Counsel has sixty (60) school days from the day of the
violation to file a formal charge or to recommend dismissal of the case
because of insufficient evidence.

C. If formal charges are brought, the student is formally ar-
raigned before the Chancellor. At this time, the student enters his
plea. If he enters a plea of guilty, the Chancellor sets the date of
a summary hearing held before the Chancellor and two Honor Court Justices
to determine the penalty. If he enters a plea of not guilty, the Chan-
cellor sets the date of a pre-trial conference and a formal trial.

D. If a jury has not been requested, the formal trial is held
before the Chancellor. If the student has requested a jury trial,a six-
man jury is selected at random from a panel of upperclassmen from all
undergraduate colleges. The jury decides the guilt or innocence of the
accused. If the student is found guilty, then the penalty is determined
by the Chancellor and two Justices.

E. In all cases a convicted student may receive any or all of
the following penalties:

1. A severe reprimand;

2. Penalty hours, not to exceed 20;

3. Suspension from the University for a period not to exceed
one year;

4. Under extraordinary circumstances, expulsion from the
University.

In all cases of academic cheating, a convicted student may be
awarded a failing grade in the course involved instead of, or in addition
to, the penalties.

F. Penalties for contempt of court shall not exceed nine (9)
penalty hours per offense.

G. In the event that a student wishes to appeal the decision of
the Honor Court, he must file a notice of appeal with the Office for
Student Conduct within 48 hours after judgment is rendered.










II. THE STUDENT TRAFFIC COURT


A. The Student Traffic Court consists of a Chief Justice, a
Clerk, and a number of justices. The Chief Justice must be a full-
time student and is elected by the student body for a term of one
year. The Clerk and the justices are appointed by the Chief Justice.
The appointments are approved by a majority vote of the Student Senate.
There are between three and seven justices, the exact number being
determined under the Laws of the Student Body.

B. The Student Traffic Court is established to hear and dispose
of all traffic and parking violations falling within its jurisdiction.
The Court is responsible for the collection of all fines and for the
proper trial of all cases being contested.

C. The decision of this Court may be appealed in writing to
the Committee on Parking and Transportation, a body composed of eleven
faculty members and two student members. The decision of this Committee
is final.

D. The Student Traffic Court holds open hearings as necessary
to insure proper handling of all cases and to protect the defendant's
right to a speedy trial. All money taken in the Court is deposited for
use by the Gator Loan Fund.

III. RESIDENCE CONDUCT BOARDS

A. Community living requires mutual respect, understanding, and
consideration among its members. The primary objective of residence
Conduct Boards is to provide a means for the development and maintenance
of a living environment that supports and enhances the educational goals
of the University of Florida. Thus, Conduct Boards provide an educational
rather than a legal service for students. Their task is to support estab-
lished guidelines for meaningful and congenial interpersonal relationships;
to facilitate an awareness among residents regarding community responsi-
bilities; and to mediate, counsel, and arrive at a just conclusion when
a situation suggests that individual or group responsibilities have not
been fulfilled.

B. Residence Conduct Boards work in cooperative way with the
Housing Area Directors, the Office for Student Conduct, and campus-wide
judiciaries to reach a solution for any problem situation that is brought
to their attention.

C. Jurisdiction.

1. Violations of Housing, Interhall, and Area Council
regulations.

2. The Hall or Area Judiciary will have original jurisdiction
in disturbances which disrupt the area, hall, floor or individual
residents.

3. Assessment of property damages through University Billing
system.

4. Publicize the various conduct regulations and the privi-
leges and responsibilities that they entail.

5. Handle referrals and appeals from lower bodies.

6. All offenses shall be considered in the area in which they
are committed.









D. Possible Actions


1. Suspend the privileges of a resident for a given period
of time (for example, Open House privileges or curfew).

2. Bill, through proper University channels, an individual
for property damages.

3. Conduct Warning (letter in Area office file until student
moves off-campus, and/or letter to the parents from the Area Director).

4. Disciplinary room transfer through Division of Housing.

5. Refer to a higher body.

6. At any point in the judicial process the deliberating body
has the right to refer the student to an appropriate counselor (Housing
Staff, Dean's office, etc.), and may upon the recommendation of that
counselor, drop all punitive consideration of that individual if counseling
is not appropriate.

7. (a) Code of Conduct Offenses. Such offenses will be
governed by the Code of Conduct.

(b) Violations of Interhall or Area Council regulations.
In the event the student wishes to waive his right to a hearing and
provided the Area Director wishes to accept jurisdiction, the Area Director
may impose the penalty of conduct warning or any lesser penalty.

IV. FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES ENFORCEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

A. The Interfraternity Council is responsible for enforcing its
constitution and by-laws and hears matters referred by its members or
the Dean for Student Development. The Executive Committee of the I.F.C.
is the judicial body.

B. The Judiciary Committee of the Panhellenic Council adjudicates
all violations of Panhellenic rush regulations and enforces regulations
of the Panhellenie Constitution and by-laws.

V. COMMITTEE ON STUDENT CONDUCT

A. The Committee on Student Conduct is appointed by the President
of the University for the purpose of hearing cases concerning student
misconduct as referred to it by the Coordinator for Student Conduct or
other appropriate University officials. It also serves as a committee
to hear appeals from Honor Court decisions.

B. The Committee is composed of three regular student members and
four faculty members. Recommendations for the appointment of the student
members are made by the President of the Student Body, faculty members,
administrators, and others to the President of the University. The faculty
members are actively engaged in teaching or otherwise closely associated
with students. The Chairman of the Committee is appointed by the President
and is a voting member. Alternate members are appointed to serve in the
absence or incapacity to hear a case of one or more regular members.










C. When a student is informed that charges against him are
being referred to the Committee, it is the responsibility of a member
of the staff of the Office for Student Conduct to make certain that
the student is aware of his rights and privileges before, during, and
after the hearing. These rights and privileges have been formulated
with the aid of various legal authorities and have been approved by
the appointing authority, the President of the University. They are
fully consistent with the requirements of basic procedural fairness
included in the Student Conduct Code.

D. Committee Rules.

1. A written charge will be made known to the student at
least five days prior to a Committee hearing. The charge will relate
to the sections of the Code of Conduct which are relevant to the
specific act of misconduct. The act of alleged misconduct will be
specified as a part of the written charge.

2. Prior to the hearing, the student will be given all
pertinent written statements and documents to be used during the hearing.

3. The accused student will have the opportunity to use the
services of a personal adviser of his choosing (this may be a legal
adviser), and the student will make known the name of his adviser and
witnesses to the Office of Student Conduct prior to the hearing. Also
prior to the hearing, the Office of Student Conduct will make known to
the adviser the procedures under which the Committee operates.

4. Testimony relating specifically to the alleged act of
misconduct will be taken first, after which a determination of guilt
or innocence will be made by the Committee. If there is a finding of
guilt, the student will be recalled before the Committee and testimony
will be taken relating to the penalty.

5. The student will be given an opportunity to testify in
writing and in person, an opportunity to present witnesses of his choosing,
and an opportunity to be present during the taking of all testimony
relating to the charge.

6. The student will be given an opportunity to raise any
and all questions he and/or his adviser wish concerning statements made
by complainants and witnesses. He or his adviser will ask his questions
of witnesses and complainants through the Chairman of the Committee, who
will pose the questions to the satisfaction of the student or his adviser.
The adviser will not be permitted to answer questions for the accused,
but will be permitted to make a statement in his behalf.

7. Only evidence presented during the hearing will be used
by the Committee in its determination of guilt or innocence.

8. The burden of proof of misconduct will be on the officials
bringing the charge before the Committee.

9. Normally the hearings are closed sessions, but upon
request of the accused, the hearing shall be a public hearing unless it
shall be determined by a vote of the majority of the Committee that the
meeting should be closed. (Additional procedural rules relating to
public hearings are set forth in a following section).

10. A tape recording of the hearing of testimony will be made
and preserved for fourteen days from the date on which the student
receives notification of the decision. During this period the accused,










with or without the company of legal counsel, and/or faculty member,
and/or his parents, will be granted permission to listen to the
recorded testimony in the privacy of some place to be determined by
the Office of Student Conduct with the express understanding that the
content of the tape is to remain confidential. If, by the end of this
fourteen day period, the accused does not appeal the decision, the tape
will be destroyed. If he chooses to appeal, then a tape recording of
the hearing will be made available to the accused and President, and/or
the Board of Regents.

11. Initial questions of all witnesses will be asked by the
representative of the Office of Student Conduct.

E. Rules Relating to Open Hearings

In the event of an open hearing, the following rules will apply:

1. A request by an accused student for an open hearing shall
be made a) at the time the charges are placed against him by the Office
of Student Conduct, or b) far enough in advance of the scheduled hearing
to permit all necessary arrangements to be made.

2. The decision whether to grant an open hearing will be
made in accordance with the provisions of the Rules of Procedure,
paragraph 9, above.

3. The Chairman of the Committee has the responsibility to
maintain order during the hearing. If it appears necessary he should
request security be supplied by the Campus Police for this purpose.

4. The Committee believes that the requirements of an "open"
and "public" hearing are met when representatives of the public news
media are present. The meetings are routinely held in Room 284 Holland
Law Center. Insofar as the physical capacity of the hearing room allows,
additional spectators may be permitted to attend at the discretion of
the Chairman.

5. It shall be made known to all persons present at the
hearing that they are present only on the assumption of good behavior.
Anyone disrupting the orderly procedure of the hearing will be removed
from the room upon order of the Committee Chairman (affirmed, if necessary,
by a majority vote of the Committee members present). At the discretion
of the Committee, punitive measures may be taken against those mis-
behaving during the hearing.

F. Quorum and Voting Rules.

1. At least five members of the Committee must be present
during the entire hearing, after successful challenges.

2. Members may be challenged for cause only. A majority
vote of the Committee (the challenged member not voting) will determine
whether the challenged member is to be excused. The accused student
and/or his adviser should make known to the Office of Student Conduct
or the Committee Chairman, prior to the hearing, the members who will
be challenged.

3. On a vote for determination of innocence or guilty, those
voting "guilty" must exceed those voting "not guilty" by two or more
votes. If there is not at least a two-vote difference in favor of
guilt, the accused will be declared innocent.










4. On a vote for recommendation of penalty, a majority vote
will prevail.

5. Members absent during any part of the hearing will not
be permitted to vote.

VI. OFFICE FOR STUDENT CONDUCT

A. The Coordinator for Student Conduct is responsible for
insuring a student is afforded due fairness in all disciplinary matters.

B. The Coordinator is responsible for the judicial aspects of
the enforcement of the Code of Conduct but does not determine facts of
an alleged violation without a specific request by the student concerned.
Unless the student requests a summary hearing before the Coordinator,
it is the responsibility of the Coordinator to refer the matter to the
appropriate hearing agency.

C. The Coordinator also serves as appellate hearing official
for hall and area conduct actions in the event that the student believes
he has been aggrieved a hearing body or official.

D. All hearings before the Committee on Student Conduct are
initiated by the Coordinator, including appeals from decisions of the
Honor Court.

VII. PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY

The President of the University has the authority to suspend or
to expel a student.* This authority has been delegated to the Honor Court
for enforcement of the Honor Code, and in certain cases the President may
delegate his authority to other University officials, as in the case of
the University Demonstration Policy, and Policy on Possession and Use of
Firearms on Campus.








*See Board of Regents Policy 7.2 Appendix B.










ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


I. SOURCE DOCUMENTS

A. Information relating to degrees and graduation, admissions,
absences, academic appeals and petitions, maximum loads, grades, compre-
hensive examinations, expenses, fees, financial aid, probation, suspension,
withdrawals, readmission, classification of students, career planning and
placement, etc., is set forth in the Student Academic Regulations section
of the University of Florida Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. These
catalogs may be obtained in the Office of the Registrar, Room 33 Tigert Hall.

B. Information on scheduling changes, adding, dropping, section
changes, credit changes, is provided on forms available in the Office of
the Registrar, Room 33 Tigert Hall.

II. ELIGIBILITY FOR EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

A. To hold any elected or appointed office in student self-
government or in any extracurricular activity, a student must be free of
disciplinary, scholarship, academic, or admissions probation. He also
must be classified as a full-time student enrolled in a minimum of twelve
(12) hours. Upon appeal, the dean of a college may, at his discretion,
allow the Student Body President, the Vice President, the Treasurer, or
the Chancellor of the Honor Court to enroll for no less than nine (9)
credits. If the activity involved has higher requirements for membership,
a designated official of the activity is responsible for enforcing these
requirements.

B. Included in this classification are all athletic teams repre-
senting the University of Florida in regularly scheduled contests and
practices, debate and forensic groups participating in contests or meets,
dramatic and musical groups participating in and presenting productions
on or off campus, and representatives of the student body and chartered
organizations.

C. In the case of athletics, the scholarship requirements for
participation shall be the same as those set forth in the Eligibility Rules
of the Southeastern Conference.

D. A student, not eligible to hold an elected or appointed office,
may obtain information on seeking a waiver by contacting the Dean for
Student Development.

III. STUDENT-FACULTY RELATIONSHIPS IN THE CLASSROOM

A. Students are responsible for learning the content of any course
of study for which they are enrolled. The professor is responsible for
making honest professional judgments of students and for making clear to
students the bases of academic evaluation used in his classes.

B. A student alleging unfair evaluation should appeal first to
the professor and then, if necessary, to his advisor, to the department
head, and then to the College Dean. Beyond this the student may appeal
to the University Ombudsman, the Office of Academic Affairs, or to the
President.










ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS


I. IDENTIFICATION CARD

At the time of first registration as a student at the University
of Florida, each student is authorized to have a photo-identification
card made free of charge, which he(she) keeps until graduation, unless
dismissed for administrative or disciplinary reasons. This ID card is
validated when presented with a current Certificate of Registration. It
is used for many activities and privileges, including admission to athletic
events, check-out of library materials, etc.; and it should be carried at
all times. Only one ID card is issued free of charge to a student within
a specified time following first registration. Late requests for the
first card or requests for replacement of a lost or stolen card will be
filled only upon payment of a charge of $5.00.

II. FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS AND DEADLINES

Students are responsible for meeting University financial obli-
gations and deadlines for registration and payment of fees. Failure to
meet deadlines subjects one to requirement to pay a $25 late registration
fee, which can only be waived when the registration would have been timely
but was delayed by default of the institution or some circumstances which
justified the waiver. Failure to meet other financial obligations gener-
ally results not only in suspension of registration, and the withholding
of transcripts of credits and grades, but also in the institution of
appropriate legal action to recover all sums which may be due.

III. STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE REQUIREMENTS

A medical history and physical examination and certain immunizations
are required in order to secure the spectrum of medical services provided
by Student Health Services and maintain registration at the University.

IV. SELLING OF MERCHANDISE

A. The Board of Regents Policy concerning the sale of merchandise
on campus is very restrictive. Generally speaking, sale of merchandise
is limited to university budgetary units and those vendors under contract
with the institution.

B. The University reaffirms its policy regarding the commercial
sale of any goods or printed matter as originally established in Miller
Memo #81, issued by the President and approved by the Board of Control in
1949. This policy requires that there shall be no such sale on the campus
of merchandise except for the state newspapers provided in vending racks
and the traditional Honor apples. These exceptions and other requests for
exceptions may be approved only by special permission from the Business
Manager and/or authorities indicated in the sub-paragraphs describing
special exceptions which may be made.

1. Recognized student organizations may engage in commercial
sales on campus (except in residence halls) provided the proceeds
from such sales are used entirely for charitable or philanthropical
purposes. Clearance for such sales must be obtained from the
Assistant Director, JWRU, (Student Activities) Room 300, JWRU.










2. Students, faculty, staff members, and recognized student
organizations may distribute and/or sell printed material provided
the university policy is adhered to in this respect. Registration
of printed material to be sold or distributed is accomplished in
Room 300, JWRU. Any students' request for a permit to sell liter-
ature advocating his personal view on a single subject which is
denied because it is declared to be a sales enterprise rather
than an exercise in free speech, would be referred to the Business
Manager, for decision on approval of such an enterprise, or re-
consideration of such decision could be appealed to the Vice
President for Student Affairs.

3. Approval for sale of merchandise in Married Housing Areas
must be obtained from the appropriate Mayor and Resident Manager
of the Housing Area involved as well as the Manager of Married
Housing, located in the Central Housing Office.

4. Honor apples and fruit are permitted to be sold from vendor
bins provided approval is obtained from the Business Manager,
University of Florida.

5. Newspapers are permitted to be sold from vending racks
provided approval is obtained from the Business Manager, University
of Florida.

6. Solicitation for sale of Florida newspapers is permitted
in the Housing area offices only by means of complementary news-
papers and subscriber cards which serve as authority for the
appropriate newspapers to be delivered daily to the door of the
subscriber in the residence hall. Payment for delivery of news-
papers is an arrangement between the newspaper business office and
the customer. Approval to participate in the complementary news-
paper arrangement must be obtained from the Director, Housing.
Under no circumstances will door-to-door solicitation in the
residence halls be permitted.

7. Gainesville licensed food vendors may receive and fill
specific short order food requests from students, faculty, and
staff members for direct delivery to campus addresses. Delivery
to women residents must be done through contact at the Area Office.
NO DELIVERIES DIRECTLY TO WOMEN'S ROOMS. Permission to deliver
food items on campus must be obtained from the Business Manager,
University of Florida.

8. Married Housing Area commissary stores are permitted to
engage in sales of staple items of merchandise for members of the
married housing areas.

C. Merchandise which is not permitted to be sold on campus includes:

1. Alcoholic beverages;

2. Food prepared and sold by other than licensed vendor;

3. Those sales items which are in direct competition with
contract vendors or university budgetary agencies.










V. STUDENT-ADMINISTRATION RELATIONS


A. Students may expect to inquire about, recommend changes, and
participate in an orderly process of formulation and alteration of poli-
cies, regulations, and procedures affecting the welfare of students. It
is expected that such a process will occur within the appropriate Student
Government agencies and University offices.

B. Each student at the University of Florida is a part of one of
the great traditions on campus student self-government.

C. Student Government leaders as elected representatives of the
Student Body have maintained close cooperation with the administration
and faculty. In return the administration and faculty have shown their
support and respect for Student Government. As a result, the University
of Florida Student Body has one of the strongest student governments in
the nation.

D. While student self-governing activities serve as a learning
experience and training ground for future leaders, the primary purpose of
Student Government is to provide for the necessities of the campus com-
munity. Officials of Student Government serve on many university com-
mittees and provide representation through which all students may express
their needs, suggestions or grievances to the University administration.
Therefore, Student Government is more than an organization of students
presiding over the entire student body. It is a series of governments
very similar in relationship to our federal, state, and local governments.

VI. THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS

The Vice President for Student Affairs serves as a staff officer,
advisory to the President, and is responsible for the administration of
all matters pertaining to students outside of the formal classroom and
curriculum. He serves as a liaison between the Office of the President
and other university offices and professional units as they seek to help
students, and with the self-government processes of student groups.

VII. ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL

A. The University provides many offices and units whose adminis-
trative and professional personnel are dedicated to promoting the growth
and development of the individual student. They also work toward pro-
viding an academic and cultural climate and worthy relationships that
contribute favorably to the spirit of serious inquiry.

B. Many of these units are formalized to function within the
Student Affairs structure. Others are services or units of institutional
departments or colleges. All are related and designed to help the student
achieve his individual goals and potentiality and to adapt the institution
more nearly to the individual needs of the students. Thus, it is hoped
that the University may be kept personal and student oriented.

C. Personnel in these units observe the concept that all spon-
sored student activities, guided and executed within the confines of
good taste, can be learning experiences which motivate and promote new
cultural and academic interests, and encourage the development of personal
attributes essential to successful and enlightened classroom performance.










FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY DEMONSTRATION POLICY


I. It is agreed that no one has the right to disrupt the operation
of the University or to interfere with the ordinary rights of other members
of the University Community. It is also agreed that the legal rights of
students or other members of the University body, as of any citizens,
must not be abridged; that this policy statement shall not be used in any
way to infringe upon the legitimate freedoms of any person or group of
persons; that this policy will be impartially enforced, with due process
afforded to all. In order, then, to underscore the rights and responsi-
bilities of all individuals concerned with University activities, to
ensure freedom of expression, to maintain normal operation of the Uni-
versity and to protect the rights of all members of the University Com-
munity, the following policy regarding demonstrations is adopted.
(Approved, University Senate February 20, 1969; Ratified, Student Senate,
February 24, 1969).

II. POLICY

A. Demonstrations may be held anywhere on the campus, so long as
they do not disrupt the normal operation of the University or infringe on
the rights of other members of the University Community, except that no
demonstrations (including mass protests, parades or picketing) are per-
mitted inside University buildings. Although no specific areas on the
campus are designated for the purpose of demonstrations or impromptu
speeches, exclusive use of the Plaza of the Americas for this purpose may
be obtained by prior clearance through the Public Functions Office. Any
use of PA equipment or sound amplification anywhere on the campus must
have prior clearance through this same office.

B. In order that demonstrators not interfere with the operation
of the University or the rights of others, they shall not, for example:

1. Obstruct vehicular, bicycle, pedestrian or other traffic;

2. Obstruct entrances or exits to buildings or driveways;

3. Interfere with educational activities inside or outside
any building;

4. Harass passersby or otherwise disrupt normal activities;

5. Interfere with or preclude a scheduled speaker from being
heard;

6. Interfere with scheduled University ceremonies or events;

7. Damage property, including lawns, shrubs or trees.

C. In the event of disruptive action*, University members involved
in demonstrations shall identify themselves by presenting appropriate
documents such as ID cards when requested to do so by the President or
his designated representative, and such representative will identify
himself when making this request. Demonstrators not officially related
to the University of Florida will be directed to leave the campus im-
mediately or be subject to arrest for a violation of the law.


*See Board of Regents definition of disruptive conduct, Appendix B, 3.18










D. If, in the opinion of the President or his designated
representative, a demonstration is disrupting normal University oper-
ations or infringing on the rights of other members of the University
Community, the President or his representative may:

1. Identify himself to the demonstrators, giving his name
and official position;

2. Inform the demonstrators that they are in violation of
the University policy and/or in violation of the law and specify the
nature of the violation;

3. Request that the violation cease.

In the event of non-compliance with this request, the President
or his representative can enlist the assistance of the Campus Police in
restoring order and enforcing the law.

E. The Campus Police have a responsibility to:

1. If circumstances warrant, declare a demonstration to be
in violation of law and request all demonstrators to cease and desist
and to disperse and clear the area or be subject to arrest and/or
University disciplinary action;

2. To arrest any demonstrators observed to be in violation
of the law;

3. Enlist the assistance of outside law enforcement agencies,
if necessary.

III. IMPLEMENTATION

A. All members of the University Community faculty, staff and
students have the responsibility to assist in maintaining an academic
atmosphere which will allow the University to conduct without interruption
its normal operation. To accomplish the successful implementation of the
foregoing policy on campus demonstrations, it is essential that the Presi-
dent delegate authority consistent with the responsibility for maintaining
the security of University property and ensuring continuance of the normal
operation of the University as well as providing for the safety of the
members of the University Community.

B. Therefore, each Vice President, Provost, Dean, Director,
Department Chairman, Faculty and Staff Member, and each Student Government
Official hereby is delegated and vested with the authority of the President
to act in enforcing the demonstration policy and maintaining order on this
campus whenever such action shall be necessary to be taken by them in
University facilities or areas under their permanent or temporary control.
For example, each Faculty member has this authority and responsibility in
his classroom, office, or laboratory; a Staff member has it in a facility
or area assigned to him; and a Student Government Official has it in his
office, meeting room, or area assigned to or being used temporarily or
permanently by Student Government.

C. The Campus Police are vested with the authority and responsi-
bility to maintain order anywhere on the grounds of the campus and in
any campus building or structure.










D. Faculty advisors and administrative officers responsible
for a facility or area have the responsibility and authority of enforcing
compliance with this policy at meetings of student organizations in
which they are participants. Faculty or Staff members including the
Public Functions Manager who are responsible for scheduling or approving
public events also have the responsibility and authority to ensure
compliance with this policy.

E. Vice Presidents, Provosts, Deans, and Assistants to the
President have the responsibility and authority to ensure compliance with
the demonstration policy in any facility or on any property under the
control of this University.

IV. PROCEDURE

A. In the event the action of any individual or group of indi-
viduals shall threaten to or shall disrupt the normal operation of the
University, the representative of the President, defined as the Adminis-
trator, Faculty member, Staff member or Student Government Official who
is in authority and responsible for the area or structure involved, shall
request that those creating the disturbance cease, desist, and remove
themselves from the immediate premises and shall immediately notify the
Campus Police. The Campus Police will immediately inform either the
Office of the President or one of the University Vice Presidents, as
the circumstances require.

B. If the disruptors do not cease, desist, and remove themselves,
an academic or administrative official, defined as a Vice President,
Provost, Dean, Director, Assistant Dean or Director, Department Chairman
or Faculty member, has the authority and responsibility to advise them
that any student who has refused to obey the request is then and there
suspended from the University, subject to a hearing on charges of vio-
lation of this policy which shall be filed with the President or the Uni-
versity Student Conduct Committee. Upon announcement of the order of
suspension, the administrative or academic official issuing the order of
suspension shall request the disruptors to identify themselves by pre-
senting appropriate documents such as ID cards.

When an academic or administrative official is not present to
issue the order of suspension, the disruptors shall thereafter be suspended
by the President upon presentation to him of credible evidence which would
have justified suspension had the President or one of his representatives
witnessed the action. Where no such academic or administrative person is
present to issue the order of suspension and the disruptors do not cease
upon the warning given by a staff member, Student Government Official, or
the police, they shall be arrested as provided in "C" below without prior
suspension.

C. After lapse of a reasonable time following the request to cease,
desist and remove themselves from the premises, the representative of
the President shall request a campus policeman to inform any disruptors
remaining on the premises that they are in violation of law, and that if
they fail to cease, desist and remove themselves, they will be arrested.
Any persons failing to heed this warning shall be forthwith arrested
and charged in the proper court for violation of the appropriate law.










D. This policy on campus demonstrations specifically prohibits
demonstrations inside campus buildings. In event a threatened disruption
can be averted by giving the warnings above provided such shall be done.
However, if the actions of any group or individual inside a University
building shall have become disruptive before such warnings can be given
then such persons shall without further warning be suspended for vio-
lation of University regulation and arrested for violation of law. This
policy is itself the necessary warning.

E. Participation by any faculty member or employee of this Uni-
versity in any action or disruption which would warrant suspension of a
student shall also constitute grounds for suspension of the faculty
member or employee, pending hearing on charges to be immediately filed
under the pertinent provision of applicable rule, regulation, University
Constitution or statute.










FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION SPEAKER POLICY


I. CAMPUS OPEN TO FREE DISCUSSION

A. The University of Florida takes pride in the fact that its
campus is open to free discussion and the examination of views and ideas
both popular and unpopular, orthodox and unorthodox, with the stipulation
that discussion be accompanied by peaceful conditions consistent with
the scholarly nature of an academic community.

B. In keeping with this policy, the University permits and encour-
ages bringing to the campus a forum of competent speakers for the dis-
semination, analysis, and evaluation of significant ideas. These ideas
may be academic or part of the larger cultural, economic, and political
life of the nation and the world.

II. RESPONSIBILITY OF SPEAKERS AND SPONSORS

A. Any person sponsored by an officially recognized campus organi-
zation is free to speak on campus, but this openness of forum does not
release speakers and sponsors from accountability to campus and civil
authority under existing laws and regulations. Nor does it countenance
disruption of the University, injury to person or property, obscene
behavior, or riot.

B. An "officially recognized campus organization" is defined as
being one of the following: an officially approved student organization;
officially constituted colleges, divisions, schools, departments, and
agencies of the University; honor societies and religious associations
officially recognized by the University; and organizations comprised
entirely of faculty or their wives.

C. Sponsoring organizations shall be responsible for informing
speakers that the University campus is not to be used as a platform for
the organization of or the incitement to lawlessness or violence, and for
obtaining the speaker's agreement not to violate this policy, and to the
extent possible, shall prevent the speaker's using the event for such
purpose if he attempts to do so. Sponsoring organizations are responsible
and accountable for the actions of the speakers they sponsor. Violations
of University policy by a sponsored speaker may be considered as violationE
by the sponsoring organization.

D. It shall be the responsibility of all organizations to provide
speakers with a copy of this policy statement at the time of invitation.

III. PROCEDURE

Any group sponsoring a speaker must supply information to the
Public Functions Office as to its prior arrangements to meet financial
obligations involved in bringing a speaker to the University. It must
also undertake within reasonable time the arrangement of meeting facili-
ties, and supply the University with information concerning scheduled
program.











FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION -
DISTRIBUTION OF PRINTED MATERIAL POLICY

I. PROVISIONS REGULATING FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

A. The University recognizes the rights of students to the
freedom of expression within constitutional and statutory limitations
and regulatory measures of the University established under authority
delegated to it by the Board of Regents. See Board of Regents Policy
7.42, Appendix B.

B. Included in this section are policies pertinent to distribution
of printed material and use of campus bulletin boards.

II. DISTRIBUTION OF PRINTED MATERIAL POLICY*

A. Printed materials may be distributed free, or sold on the
campus for reasons that are not commercial, by students, faculty and
staff (all hereinafter referred to as University Personnel) and prior
restraint of such materials will not be exercised by the University of
Florida. Sale on the campus of commercial printed material, except for
the state newspapers, is precluded by Board of Regents policy.

B. Where repeated distributions requiring filing are contemplated
by the same person for the same general classifications of material, i.e.,
entertainment, speakers, meeting announcements, newspapers, etc., one
filing is sufficient for the current academic year. The filer should
indicate on the certificate that the filing is for the current academic
year. Notices regarding changes and times and locations of entertainment,
speakers, meetings, etc., do not require filing. Current academic filing
does not relieve filer from assumption of responsibilities contained
herein below.

C. University Personnel desiring to distribute printed material,
must file a STATEMENT OF INTENT AND ACCEPTANCE OF RESPONSIBILITY prior to
such distribution at the Student Activities Desk in the J. Wayne Reitz
Union. The STATEMENT OF INTENT AND ACCEPTANCE OF RESPONSIBILITY is not
a restriction on the right to distribute printed material, but an acknow-
ledgement by the filer of his assumption of the following responsibilities:

1. The filer is subject to the Student Code of Conduct and to
all laws or regulations of the City, State or nation that govern a person
as a citizen in the exercise of his right of expression, including, but
not limited to, those relating to defamation, obscenity, pornography,
violent overthrow of the Government or of the existing authority, inciting
to riot or any other law validly limiting the exercise of free speech.

2. To avoid littering the campus, literature may not be left
in stacks unattended. Equipment used in the dissemination of printed
material may not be left unattended and must be removed after its use;
except in those instances where prior approval has been granted to dis-
tribute at specific sites newspapers and other literature by means of
vending machines or distribution boxes.

3. There must be no interference with normal operations of
the University, including classroom instruction, or infringement on the
rights of others as pertaining to office and student living privacy, study
conditions, free movement of pedestrian and vehicular traffic, and restricted
use of departmental bulletin boards.

*Approved by President Stephen C. O'Connell on May 1, 1969.











4. Distribution of printed material may not take place
within University buildings except in those residence halls or other
campus living areas which have approved such distribution by prior
approval from their governing bodies. The governing bodies of resi-
dence halls or other campus living units approving the distribution
of printed material will file a written approval at the Student
Activities Desk in the J. Wayne Reitz Union.

5. All printed material, except for buttons, badges, and
bumper stickers, distributed in accordance with the above, must contain
therein an identification of both the author and the publisher. The
printing of such identification must be of a size which does not obscure
said identity. Any printed material, except buttons, badges and bumper
stickers, which identifies the author and/or publisher as University
Personnel, or has subject matter, including photographs, which might imply
to the reader that such publication is University or University Personnel-
sponsored, must contain the following statement prominently exhibited
in the first three pages: "This publication is solely the expression
of the author and/or publisher and it is not an official publication of
the University of Florida, nor is it in any way intended to express any
policies or opinions of the University of Florida, or its personnel."

6. Distribution of material, except for subsequent distribu-
tion under academic year filing, must be completed within 30 days of the
filing of the STATEMENT OF INTENT AND ACCEPTANCE OF RESPONSIBILITY.

7. Additional regulatory measures should be observed where
such regulations are necessary for special areas of the campus. The fol-
lowing are considered special areas:

P. K. Yonge Laboratory School campus, Florida Field and the
area immediately adjacent thereto. Distribution of literature in these
areas requires prior permission of the Director, P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School, and the Chairman, Athletic Association, respectively. The filer
of the STATEMENT OF INTENT AND ACCEPTANCE OF RESPONSIBILITY must check
for special regulations at each special area prior to the distribution
of any printed material within those areas.

D. The above filing does not apply to official materials of the
University and its immediate budgetary units.

III. USE OF CAMPUS BULLETIN BOARDS POLICY

The University of Florida Student Government maintains public bul-
letin boards throughout the campus for the use and benefit of students,
faculty, and staff. Listings on these boards include information regarding
campus events and activities, general information, and classified ads.
Such listings are limited to public bulletin boards and will not be
displayed, for example, on departmental bulletin boards, trees, building,
or road signs.










POLICIES PERTAINING TO ORGANIZATIONS


I. BOARD OF REGENTS POLICY

A. Students shall be free to join university organizations.
Student organizations may be officially recognized by the university
when approved by Student Governments or appropriate student-faculty-
committees on campus. An officially recognized organization must not
have as a purpose, either in name or in fact, the advocacy of the
overthrow of the government by force or other unlawful means. Other
limitations may be placed on their continued recognition by the Uni-
versity agencies concerned.

B. Student organizations are encouraged to attract advisers
from faculty, professional staff, or administration as provided by the
policy of the several respective institutions. All organizations of-
ficially recognized by the University shall be allowed to meet on campus
and use appropriate university facilities. In addition to normally
required audits, Student Government shall make periodic audits of the
financial records of student organizations which receive funds from
student fees allocated by Student Government.

II. RECOGNITION OF ORGANIZATIONS

A. The University recognizes the value of student organizations
in campus life and provides opportunity for new groups to be recognized.
The organization should have some relationship to the main educational
mission of the University.

B. Although frequently referred to as "extra curricular," student
organizations and activities are not considered "extra to the curriculum"
by the University, but instead are regarded as a part of the total edu-
cational program.

C. Therefore, to warrant existence and recognition, campus organ-
izations and activities must contribute to the academic, recreational,
or cultural climate of the University. It is for this reason that the
University reserves the right to charter all organizations and requires
that they function in accordance with their charters.

D. Full-time students interested and willing to work in the
development of a new organization may petition for its recognition by
the Committee on Student Organizations provided scholastic requirements
and social conduct are maintained by the petitioning student; and, the
financial program, constitution, statement of goals or purposes, and
faculty adviser are approved by the Committee. Applications for official
recognition may be obtained from the Assistant Director, Student Activi-
ties, J. Wayne Reitz Union.

E. An organization must be recognized as a local organization
before it may request permission from the Committee on Student Organiza-
tions to petition a national body.

III. NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

In order to comply with the University's total commitment to non-
discrimination, no student organization constitution or other organizational
document may include discriminatory clauses pertaining to race, creed,
color, or national origin.











IV. FRATERNITIES

A. A minimum of 15 full-time students interested in establishing
a new fraternity must first seek the approval of an Expansion Committee
of the Interfraternity Council. The recommendation of the Expansion
Committee and the Interfraternity Council is then forwarded to the Office
for Student Development for consideration. The recommendation of the
Office for Student Development is finally presented to the Committee on
Student Organizations for formal approval.

B. The organization must be recognized as a local organization
before it may request permission from the Committee on Student Organi-
zations to petition a national body.

C. A new fraternity will be classified as an approved colony
of a national fraternity for a maximum of two years in which time the
approved colony must meet the stated requirements in the Interfraternity
Council Constitution. At any time within the two years the approved
colony may have its classification changed to that of a regular member
of the Interfraternity Council.

V. SORORITIES

A. A minimum of 15 full-time students interested in establishing
a new sorority must first seek the approval of the Panhellenic Council
and the Office of the Dean for Student Development. These recommendations
are then forwarded to the Committee on Student Organizations for formal
approval.

B. The organization must be recognized as a local organization
before it may request permission from the Committee on Student Organi-
zations to petition a national body.

C. A new sorority will be classified as an approved colony of a
national sorority for a maximum of two years in which time the approved
colony must meet the stated requirements of the Panhellenic Council Con-
stitution and Bylaws.

VI. ORGANIZATIONAL REVISIONS

All revisions, such as alterations in an organization's name or
constitution, must be submitted to the Student Organizations Committee
for approval. Accompanying a constitutional change must be an affidavit
stating there are no changes that are contrary to University regulations.

VII. REPORTS AND FINANCIAL RECORDS

A. All recognized student government organizations which require
initiation fees, or which collect and disburse monies obtained from
students, or have monies which are spent by members, are subject to audit.

B. Financial statements must be prepared and submitted as
requested, and as the various presidents of the organizations receive
instruction for such reports. Insofar as it is practical to do so,
University auditors review these financial statements. Where certified
public accountants are retained by an organization, copies of the audi-
tor's report shall be filed along with summary statements from the
organizations.










C. All recognized student organizations must also submit to
the Assistant Director of the Reitz Union annual reports of their
activities and the names of their officers for the coming year.

D. Forms for this report are sent to presidents of student
organizations in advance of this due date.

E. Since each organization is held accountable for the expenses
involved in functions under its sponsorship, the cost of such functions
must be kept within reasonable limits.

VIII. BUILDING AND PROPERTIES

A. Any recognized student organization which plans to build or
to make important additions to buildings which house its chapter, is
required to submit plans, specifications, approximate costs, and pro-
posed methods of financing to the Fraternity and Sorority House Plans
and Construction Committee. They must be approved by this Committee
before any contracts may be signed.

B. Plans for rental or purchase of any building by any recog-
nized University organization must also receive the approval of the
Fraternity and Sorority House Plans and Construction Committee before
any contracts are made. The Committee on Organizations has the authority
to require that this be done.

IX. STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

A. Student publications and the student press are a valuable aid
in establishing and maintaining an atmosphere of free and responsible
discussion and of intellectual exploration on the campus. The university,
as owner of all student publications, will allow for the development of
such free discussion of current issues and problems. Authorized student
publications will maintain high standards of literary merit and journal-
istic responsibility. The President of the University, as publisher, has
final authority and responsibility in matters relating to student publi-
cations, however, he may exercise this authority and responsibility through
a professional person or a board.

B. Because the University of Florida is publisher of all official
student publications, the Board of Student Publications exercises control
over general interest publications upon the authority of the Board of
Regents and the President of the University.

C. Unless specific advanced approval is granted, no student organ-
ization will be permitted to accept donations or contributions from
outside sources in order to fund the publication of newspapers or maga-
zines. The circulation of literature that has been identified will be
allowed provided steps have been taken to preserve the orderliness of
the campus. The distribution of literature and the circulation of
petitions will not be allowed to captive audiences such as in classrooms,
at registration, in study halls, or in residence halls.

D. The constitutional right of freedom of the press is recognized
for all student publications. Consistent with this right is the exercise
of journalistic ethics and responsibility. Within the realm of this
responsibility, the University believes that the widest degree of latitude
should be allowed student editors for the free discussion of current
issues and problems.











X. SOLICITING


A. No student organization may sponsor money-making schemes such
as auctions, raffles, etc., on or off-campus except by special permission
from the Assistant Director of the Reitz Union who serves as adviser to
student organizations. Permission will only be granted for those events
from which the proceeds go entirely to charity or some philanthropy.

B. No student organization is permitted to accept donations or
contributions from outside sources in order to fund publications.
Resources must be confined to money received through advertising, dues
or costs of student memberships or associate memberships of other
University personnel.

C. No off-campus individuals or groups will be permitted to
solicit on the campus.

D. See Administrative Regulations, Selling of Merchandise.










UNIVERSITY PUBLIC FUNCTIONS POLICY*


I. PURPOSE OF PUBLIC FUNCTIONS POLICY

This memorandum is adopted and published to express the policy
of the University on use of its facilities for events other than the
normal academic functions of teaching, research, service and adminis-
tration; to define the authority and responsibility of the Public
Functions Committee and the Public Functions Manager; to define the
term Public and Private Function; and to reaffirm that the University
of Florida is a forum for open and free discussions between and for
the benefit of its members.

II. DEFINITIONS

A. A Public Function is an event that is held on the University
campus and is open to attendance by all members of the University Com-
munity and/or to the general public either with or without charge for
admission.

B. A Private Function is defined as one held on the University
campus and is open to attendance only by members and invited guests of
the sponsoring organization.

C. An officially recognized campus organization is defined as
being one of the following: An officially approved student organization;
officially constituted colleges, divisions, schools, departments and
agencies of the University; honor societies and religious associations
officially recognized by the University; and organizations comprised
entirely of faculty or their wives, such as the American Association of
University Professors and the University Women's Club.

III. UNIVERSITY RESPONSIBILITY FOR SPONSORING, ENCOURAGING AND
COORDINATING PUBLIC EVENTS

The University of Florida recognizes its responsibility to
supplement the regular academic programs of the university by sponsoring
for its members as many special programs of cultural and intellectual
value as its resources will permit and to encourage and assist Uni-
versity agencies and recognized student and faculty groups to sponsor
such events, as well as speakers and performances for entertainment.
It also recognizes its responsibility to control and allocate the use
of its limited facilities to insure that their use is consistent with
the purpose for which they are provided and to see that conflicts in use
do not arise, or are equitably resolved and that applicable safety regu-
lations and proper crowd control measures are observed and practiced.

IV. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION: OBLIGATIONS OF SPEAKERS AND SPONSORING GROUPS

A. The University of Florida takes pride in the fact that its
campus is open to free discussion and the examination of views and ideas
both popular and unpopular, orthodox and unorthodox, with the stipulation
that such discussion be accompanied by peaceful methods and under peace-
ful conditions consistent with the scholarly nature of an academic com-
munity.

*Presidential memorandum Number 17, September 1, 1970.










B. Consistent with this policy, the University of Florida
permits and encourages bringing to the campus a forum of competent
speakers for the dissemination, analysis and evaluation of significant
ideas. These ideas may be academic or part of the larger cultural,
economic and political life of the nation or the world.

C. Any person sponsored by an officially recognized campus organ-
ization is free to speak on campus, but this openness of forum does not
release speakers and sponsors from accountability to campus and civil
authority under existing laws and regulations. Nor does it countenance
disruption of the University, injury to person or property, obscene
behavior, or riot.

D. Sponsoring organizations shall be responsible for informing
speakers that the University campus is not to be used as a platform for
the organization of or the incitement to lawlessness or violence, and
for obtaining the speaker's agreement not to violate this policy, and
to the extent possible, shall prevent the speaker's using the event for
such purpose if he attempts to do so. Sponsoring organizations are
responsible and accountable for the actions of the speakers they sponsor
and violations of University Policy by a sponsored speaker may be con-
sidered as violations by the sponsoring organizations.

V. USE OF FACILITIES

A. Outdoor Areas.

1. Outdoor areas of the campus have been classified as
follows and are scheduled and supervised by the indicated University
agency or student organization:

a. Academic areas: Areas near classrooms, libraries,
laboratories, hospitals, auditoriums, and research facilities. Non-
academic use of such areas is to be scheduled through the Public Functions
Office. The Plaza and the Mall are among the outdoor areas designated as
academic.

b. Union areas: Outdoor areas adjacent to the J. Wayne
Reitz Union building. The Director of the Union is supervisor for these
areas. To avoid conflicts with other major University events, the Union
Director is expected to coordinate scheduling of Union areas with the
Public Functions Office.

c. Residential areas: Outdoor areas in the vicinity of
residence halls, fraternities, sororities and villages. Events in each
of these areas is scheduled and supervised by the student council governing
the area as listed in Paragraph D. 1 of this section.

To avoid conflicts with other major university events,
each council is expected to coordinate its schedule with the Student
Government Public Functions Authority and the Public Functions Office.

d. Other areas which may be established for special uses:
Camp Wauberg, farm areas, etc. The Public Functions Office may be con-
tacted for information concerning the authorizing agency for these other
areas.










2. Informal Use of Outdoor Areas.


Outdoor areas on the campus which are not committed to a
specific use or assigned to a specific University agency are free to be
used for informal, unscheduled and unamplified expressions of opinion
or musical events by members of the University Community, participating
as individuals without registration or approval. These impromptu
speakers or musical performers will be held responsible for orderly
behavior and for no disruption of academic routine or scheduled public
functions. Information about scheduled events is available from the
Public Functions Office.

3. Formal Use of Outdoor Areas.

Events using public address systems or other electrical
amplification and events involving a substantial outdoor area of the
campus are defined as formal events. These are permissible when scheduled
in advance with the Public Functions Office, provided:

a. They are sponsored by a recognized campus organization.

b. They do not interfere with academic processes,
previously scheduled events or other campus activities.

c. They follow the scheduling procedural guidelines
established by the PubliO Functions Policy and Lectures Committee for
particular areas. These guidelines may be obtained from the Public
Functions Office.

4. Use of Outdoor Areas by Non-University Persons.

Persons who are not members of the University Community
are permitted to use the outdoor areas of the University to speak, perform
or for any public event only when sponsored by a recognized campus organ-
ization as specified in Paragraph V. C of this policy.

5. Control of Sound in Outdoor Areas.

A reasonable sound level is defined as meeting the com-
munication needs of the event without excessive penetration to the
adjacent areas. A recommended procedure for monitoring the sound level
is the designation of an individual by the sponsoring organization to
visit the peripheral buildings, render a value judgment and adjust the
amplifiers if necessary.

No electrically am -ified concert shall be of more than
four hours duration.

a. Academic Areas.

As a general policy, the use of electrically ampli-
fied instruments will not be approved on class days Monday through
Friday. Approval on weekends and holidays will be in compliance with
guidelines established by the Public Functions Office and approved by
the Public Functions Committee. Information detailing these guidelines
which specify hours by day and area where public address systems and
electrically amplified instruments may be approved may be obtained from
the Public Functions Office. Public address systems are permitted when
scheduled in advance and when a reasonable sound level is maintained.
The sponsoring organization is responsible for maintaining a reasonable
sound level.










b. Union Areas.


Control of sound in these areas is the responsibility
of the Director of the J. Wayne Reitz Union in keeping with policies
established by the Union Board of Managers.

c. Residential Areas.

The control of sound in these areas is the responsi-
bility of the appropriate student governing council.

d. Other Areas.

The authorizing agency or agent is responsible for
determining guidelines for use of sound equipment in the area for which
the agency or agent has responsibility.

B. Buildings and Structures.

1. Facilities Available for Scheduling of Public Events:

a. University facilities suitable for public events are
few in number, are used to capacity and in some instances are used for
academic as well as non-academic public events, e.g. the gymnasium. This
fact, the necessity of compliance with safety regulations and crowd control
measures and the cost of their use, requires that use of these facilities,
except by the academic unit to which the facility is assigned for academic
use, be scheduled through the Public Functions Office either directly or
through the appropriate student governing council as listed in Paragraph
V. D. 1 of this policy.

b. The principal facilities suitable for public functions
are as follows:

The Florida Gymnasium
The University Auditorium
The Constans Theater
The Reitz Union Auditorium
The Health Center Auditorium
McCarty Auditorium
The Reitz Union Ballroom
Florida Field

c. The names of those from whom approval must be
received in order to use these facilities and a complete list of facili-
ties may be obtained from the Public Functions Office. The Public
Functions Office will also provide assistance in scheduling.

2. Instructional Space.

a. All instructional space such as seminar rooms,
classrooms, teaching auditoria, and other instructional space, is under
the assignment and control of the office of the Registrar. Such facili-
ties may be used for non-public meetings of students, faculty and guests
for uses related to the academic mission of the University. Permission
for use must be obtained from the office of the Registrar following
authorization of the Dean of the College or Director of the Division
to which the instructional space has been assigned.










b. Public meetings of recognized campus organizations
may also be held in instructional facilities when other facilities are
unavailable and when such use has been authorized by the Public Functions
Committee as well as the Registrar and responsible dean or director.

C. Organizations and Agencies Entitled to Use University
Facilities for Public or Private Events:

1. Recognized campus organizations and academic and admin-
istrative units of the University may use University facilities for the
purpose of hosting public or private events.

2. Recognized campus organizations and academic or adminis-
trative units may sponsor public or private events of off-campus
organizations when the events are related to or in furtherance of the
mission of the sponsoring unit. Other off-campus organizations which
may not have a direct relationship to an academic or administrative unit
may request sponsorship from the Dean of University Relations and Devel-
opment in seeking approval for use of University facilities from the
Public Functions Committee. The Dean of University Relations and Devel-
opment is to determine if the hosting of an off-campus organization is
in the best interest of the University and in keeping with the University's
mission.

3. No recognized campus organization, including Student
Government, and no academic or administrative unit, may sponsor an event,
public or private, for a campus group which has not sought or has been
refused recognition on campus. This policy complies with Board of
Regents policy which specifies that "no person or non-university associ-
ation or entity shall use for his or its own benefit or pleasure any
property of the University system, real or personal, except books from
the library and other such items of well established usage, unless
sponsored by a recognized University organization or activity."

D. Registration and Scheduling:

1. Registration of Events.

All public events, including conferences, conventions,
short courses, institutes, musical events, lectures, forums, dramatic
productions, departments and/or organizational "weeks" and "days," fair,
carnival show, open houses, fraternity, sorority, and other living area
special attractions, entertainment and the like must be registered with
the Public Functions Office either directly or, when an event is scheduled
in a residential area or building, through the appropriate student govern-
ing council as shown below:

a. Residence Halls and Dormitories: Interhall Council
b. Fraternities: Interfraternity Council
c. Sororities: Panhellenic Council
d. Villages: Mayors' Council

2. To avoid conflicts with other major university events,
each council should coordinate its schedule with the Student Government
Public Functions Authority, and the Public Functions Office.

3. Events designed primarily for organizational membership
or small interest groups, such as business meetings, social events,
dinners, banquets, initiations, departmental lectures, symposia work-
shops, and the like should be registered.










4. The purpose of registration is to provide a single
office on the campus with scheduling information which can be provided
to the University Community and campus visitors upon inquiry.

5. To register an individual event, a Public Functions
Information form should be submitted in advance to the Public Functions
Office, J. Wayne Reitz Union, Campus, or for residential areas, to the
appropriate student governing council. Departments and similar organ-
izations scheduling a large number of events may register them by
submitting their schedules monthly in advance to the Public Functions
Office.

E. Approval of Major Public Events:

Public events in the following categories must be approved
by the Public Functions Committee. No contracts should be signed or
final commitment made until this approval has been received by the
organization.

1. Public events which require the use of a major facility,
such as the Florida Gym, the University Auditorium, the Union Ballroom
(when used as other than a banquet facility), Florida Field (football
games excluded), or a substantial outdoor area of the campus.

2. Public events which necessitate the use of contracts and
financial guarantees.

3. All public events planning to use a major facility should
be scheduled at least one quarter in advance. Events planned after that
date will be approved only when they do not interfere with previously
scheduled events, either in facility or type of event.

4. The Public Functions Committee may require the sponsoring
organization to furnish evidence satisfactory to it to show the financial
ability of the sponsoring organization to host the requested event.

F. Procedural Requirements for Use of Facilities:

All public events must be conducted in compliance with the
procedures established by the Public Functions Committee and with the
regulations established by the authority controlling the facility and
any other University authority concerned with public events.

G. Fees and Admission Charges to Students:

1. Campus organizations may charge a legitimate fee for
campus events. However, the taking of any offering by passing of a plate
or hat is not permitted, including the outside functions such as those
held on the Plaza of the Americas.

2. Providing an opportunity for persons to give as they
enter or leave the building is permitted with the approval of the Public
Functions Committee (for example, Gator Loan Fund).

H. Political Campaigns Other Than Campus Elections:

1. The use of University facilities in political campaigns
other than campus elections will be governed by the policy of the Board
of Regents, as follows:










"The President of each institution may authorize the
use of University property for political (campaign) speeches, and
these shall be limited to meetings sponsored by recognized organizations
of the University and shall be held only at the J. Wayne Reitz
Union, the University Auditorium and the Plaza of the Americas."

2. This authorization is to be requested through the
Public Functions Office.

VI. RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY OF THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS COMMITTEE

The Committee shall consist of seven faculty members and four
student members appointed annually by the President. The President
shall designate a chairman and vice chairman and the Public Functions
Manager shall serve as ex-officio (non-voting) secretary. The Committee
shall report to the President through the Dean of University Relations
and Development.

The Public Functions Committee is given the responsibility to:

A. Recommend the adoption of policies and procedures necessary
to accomplish sponsorship, coordination and execution of the broadest
possible program of cultural, intellectual and entertainment events for
members of the University Community.

B. Sponsor the University lecture series each year. If funds
are available, the committee shall present in each academic term at
least one major lecture by an outstanding and recognized authority in
a field of knowledge and public interest. Colleges and departments are
allocated funds in their regular budgets for lectures and speakers on
subjects of particular interest to their faculty and students. It is
intended that the Public Functions Committee use its resources for
programs of broader interest and appeal. If deemed necessary by the
Committee, a small admission fee may be charged to assist in defraying
the cost of these events.

C. Select the Faculty Lecturer of the Year to be honored for
excellence in teaching and research and arrange and conduct the public
event at which the lecture is presented and the award given.

D. Recommend to the President the names of speakers to be con-
sidered for commencement exercises.

E. Advise and assist the Public Functions Manager in performance
of duties assigned to that office.

F. Hear appeals from decisions of the Public Functions Manager
and recommend to the President through the Dean of University Relations
and Development the action to be taken on such appeal.

G. Encourage campus organizations and agencies of the University
to sponsor programs of speakers and events, cultural, intellectual and
entertainment, that offer the greatest variety and least repetition and
assist the sponsoring groups in successful execution of the presentations

The contact point for all matters relating to this committee is
the Public Functions Office in the Reitz Union. See also paragraph VIII.










VII. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE PUBLIC FUNCTIONS MANAGER

A. To implement the Public Functions policy of the University
and to carry out regulations, procedures, and directives of the Public
Functions Committee.

B. To serve as secretary of the Public Functions Committee and
to inform that Committee as to the need for policy and regulations.

C. To administer the practical details of space allotment,
calendar publications, publicity, technical arrangements and safety.

D. To ascertain with the assistance of the University Attorney
that all contractual agreements obligating the University are in order.

E. To assist and advise student and faculty groups concerning
the hosting of public functions.

VIII. PUBLIC FUNCTIONS OFFICE

A. The Public Functions Office is a service and coordinating
center for scheduling and arranging non-academic campus activities.
Other purposes of the Office are to avoid conflicts and disseminate
information about activities. Services of this office are available to
all members of the University Community.

B. This office also maintains the University Activities Calendar.
All events except those which are academic or athletic must be scheduled
on this calendar.

C. In addition, there are four published calendars: a quarterly
University Activities Calendar, listing all major public events; a bi-
weekly calendar listing all events open to the public; the Page of
Record, published twice weekly in the Alligator which lists official
notices, public events and private meetings, and the Student Government
Information Services provided through the "Campus Crier" published
Monday in the Alligator.

D. Material for the Friday Campus Calendar must reach the Public
Functions Office the preceding Tuesday before the date of publication.
Notices may be submitted to the Calendar Secretary in the Public Functions
Office. General notices for the Page of Record should be sent directly
to the Office of Informational Services.

E. The Union Box Office, operated by the Public Functions Office,
is located in the Constans Theater and sells tickets to most major
University events. The Box Office is open from noon until 4:30 P.M.
Monday through Friday. Tickets for most events may also be purchased
at the door.

F. A booking service for all types of attractions is also available
through the Public Functions Office. Information and prices on all kinds
of entertainment from bands to symphony orchestras are maintained.
Public Functions will initiate and process contracts for any campus
organization upon request.

G. Organizations sponsoring events on campus may consult with
the Public Functions Office for information about space, facilities,
and other production requirements.










SOCIAL REGULATIONS


I. AUTHORIZATION FOR PLANNED EVENTS

A. Procedure to Secure Authorizations.

1. Organizations in the College of Law Authorization must
be obtained through the Dean of the College of Law.

2. Fraternities Social events must be registered with the
Office for Student Development.

3. Sororities Social events must be registered with the
Office for Student Development.

4. All other organizations Authorization must be obtained
from the Dean of the College, as for College of Law in paragraph 1, or
from the Assistant Director of the J. Wayne Reitz Union,who serves as
adviser to student organizations.

B. Chaperones.

Two chaperones are required for all planned, mixed social
events. In the case of collegiate fraternities and sororities, chaper-
ones other than the housemother are not required for casual, informal
activities, nor for closed parties, which are limited to members of the
fraternity and specifically invited guests.

C. Hours.

1. All social activities must be confined to Friday and
Saturday afternoons and evenings except teas, suppers, and similar
functions.

2. Closing hours for all social affairs are 2:00 A.M. on
Friday and Saturday night. Midweek teas, suppers and similar socials
must be held between 4:00 P.M. and 7:30 P.M.

II. OFF-CAMPUS TRIPS

A. Out-of-town, one-day picnics and the like are to be registered
in the Office for Student Development. These requests are to be submitted
one week in advance of the event.

B. Overnight off-campus events for mixed groups scheduled by a
student organization must be registered with the Office for Student
Development at least two weeks prior to the event. The registration
of the event must be accompanied by a "Statement of Responsibility"
agreed to by the organization president, the faculty or chapter adviser,
and/or the house corporation chairman.










TRAFFIC SAFETY REGULATIONS


I. AUTOMOBILES

A. Any student of the University of Florida, with the exceptions
noted below, is eligible to register an automobile for use as authorized
on campus and to operate a registered automobile on the University of
Florida campus:

1. No student classified as 1UC or 2UC is eligible either
to register a vehicle or to operate a registered vehicle on the campus
unless:

a. Such student is married and does not live within the
off-campus border zone, or

b. Such student is 21 years of age or older and does not
live within the off-campus border zone.

c. Such student does not live on the campus or within
the border zone.

2. Before a vehicle may be registered, the person in whose
name it is being registered must present a current title or motor vehicle
registration certificate, issued to himself, his guardian, or some person
in his immediate family. He must also present evidence as required to
determine his proper eligibility category under these regulations.

B. Any student having a physical disability sufficiently impairing
locomotion, and who is not otherwise eligible, will become eligible upon
submission of a medical authorization issued by the University of Florida
Health Service. Medical authorizations will be either permanent or temp-
orary depending upon the nature of the disability. Temporary disability
registrations will be valid only for a stated duration.

C. Any student having a valid operator's license and who is not
otherwise under University suspension may operate a registered automobile
on the campus during unrestricted hours. Restricted hours are from 7:30 A.M.
to 3:30 P.M. Monday through Friday. Visitor's parking permits do not con-
stitute registration for the purpose of this paragraph.

D. An appropriate student registration decal will be issued to
any eligible student upon payment of a $10.00 registration fee authorizing
parking at all times (except as noted) in designated areas only and the
use of the shuttle bus system.

1. An eligible student living off-campus and beyond the border
zone will be issued a perimeter decal authorizing parking in perimeter
areas only.

2. An eligible student living in a dormitory or in a fraternity
house on Fraternity Row or in a married students' village will be issued
a decal authorizing parking in a designated housing area only.

3. A full-time resident counselor, or administrator, living
in a dormitory will be issued a decal authorizing parking in an assigned
parking space only.










4. If the disability is severe enough in the determination
of the chief medical officer, a physically disabled student will be
eligible for a Restricted Area permit during the period of disability
without paying an additional fee.

II. OTHER VEHICLES

A. Bicycles.

Any person is eligible to operate a registered bicycle on
the University of Florida campus. Bicycles must be registered in
accordance with the regulations of the City of Gainesville.

B. Motorcycles and Motor Scooters.

Any student, faculty member or staff member, having a valid
operator's license, is eligible to register and to operate a registered
motorcycle or motor scooter on campus. A decal will be issued upon
payment of a $2.00 fee authorizing parking in any designated motorcycle
parking space on campus.










FIRE SAFETY


I. WHY IMPORTANT

A. Fire Safety is of vital importance at the University of
Florida. Trained personnel work with architects, engineers, tech-
nicians, and city-state Fire Marshalls to give our University the
safest buildings possible.

B. Yet, even though the University attempts to eliminate unsafe
conditions through the use of Fire Codes and inspection of buildings,
the safety of any individual cannot be absolutely guaranteed unless
each person becomes alert to fire hazards.

C. A building which has met all Fire Codes perfectly could
become the victim of a careless person.

D. One of the major objectives of the Safety Department at the
University is the prevention of fire and the protection of lives in the
case of fire.

E. Every individual at the University of Florida should be aware
of existing and potential fire hazards and know how to react in case of
fire.

II. WHAT PREVENTS FIRE

A. What can you do as a student to prevent fire?

B. There are many rules and regulations covering the subject of
fire, but most of them involve the use of common sense and concern for
the other person:

1. Upon entering into an unfamiliar building, be sure to
look around and find the nearest exit in case an emergency arises.

2. Exit signs are placed so that people will be able to find
their way out of an unfamiliar building do not remove them.

3. Alarm systems and fire extinguishers exist for the pro-
tection of everyone do not tamper with or use them except in case of
fire.

4. Take the time to read the operating instructions for a
fire extinguisher before you have cause to use one.

5. Fire doors and smoke doors prevent fire and smoke from
moving from one corridor or floor to another never block or leave them
open.

6. Bed mattresses as well as trash containers and flammable
liquids are easy bait for a small spark never smoke in bed or near
these fire hazards.

7. Faulty electrical cords and sockets are excellent places
for a fire to break out always check all of your electrical equipment.

8. Hotplates are not authorized for use in residence halls.
In other cases, hotplates and similar items should never be left unattended.









9. Storage in halls and passageways could not only generate
a fire but also block passage for those trying to escape fire or smoke -
never leave luggage or trash in the halls.

10. A fire started intentionally in a trash container or
trash chute could easily result in a major fire and arrest for those
who started it.

III. WHAT TO DO ONCE FIRE STARTS

A. Whenever a fire occurs, immediately pull the nearest alarm
and/or report it to the Campus Police Station, Tel: 2-1111. The Campus
Police will notify the Fire Department.

B. If the fire is small, you may attempt to put it out using a
fire extinguisher or the cabinet fire hose and isolate it by closing
doors in the vicinity.

C. In the case of ELECTRICAL fire NEVER use a water type exting-
uisher. Use only a carbon dioxide (CO2) or dry chemical extinguisher.
Turn off the electricity if you can do it without harming yourself.

D. If the fire is large or if there is a lot of smoke evacuate
immediately. Smoke is the greatest killer in practically all fires.

E. If you are in your room, check for smoke seepage around door
cracks. Feel the inside door surface. If you detect smoke or heat, do
not open the door, but open your window, try an alternate escape route
or wait for rescue by the Fire Department.









CONSTITUTION FOR THE STUDENT BODY
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA *



We, the members of the Student Body of the University of Florida,
desiring to:

Provide a form of government for the supervision of student activities;
Provide a forum for the expression of student views and interests;
Maintain academic freedom, academic responsibility, and student rights;
Improve student cultural, social, and physical welfare;
Develop better educational standards, facilities, and teaching methods;
Help promote national and international understanding and fellowship
at the student level, and
Foster the recognition of the rights and responsibilities of students
to the school, the community and humanity;

do hereby establish this Constitution.


ARTICLE I


Section 1. Every full-time student, so defined by the regulations of
this University, shall be a member of the Student Body and shall have an
equal voice and vote therein with his fellow students. Every student
shall be subject to this Constitution, its By-laws and the laws of the
Student Body.

Section 2. The governing organization of the Student Body of the Uni-
versity of Florida shall be known as the Student Government of the Uni-
versity of Florida. Student Government shall be recognized as the repre-
sentative of the Student Body and as such its actions, not limited herein,
supercede those of all other student organizations.

Section 3. This Student Government shall be divided into three branches:
the executive, the legislative, and the judicial.

ARTICLE II


Section 1. All legislative powers of the Student Body shall be vested
in the Student Senate.

Section 2. Composition. The Student Senate shall be composed of:

A. Forty (40) members elected in the Fall Election from on-campus
living areas and from off-campus as apportioned by law. Apportionment
shall be on the basis of population, as nearly equal as practicable, and
shall provide that each on-campus living area with a minimum of three
hundred (300) students elect at least one (1) representative, provided
Diamond-Schucht, Corry and Flavet III villages and any other future village
shall have one seat. Transferring from a living area, except when such
transfer shall have been made unavoidable by the temporary closing there-
of, shall constitute de facto resignation from any seat filled by election
from that living area with the successor to be chosen as provided by the
Student Senate.

*Revised through March 20, 1970. Also includes amendments,Spring Election 1971.









B. Forty (40) members elected from the Colleges and Schools of
the University in Spring Elections as apportioned by law. Such ap-
portionment shall be on the basis of enrollment, and shall provide that
each college or school shall elect at least one representative. The
freshman and sophomore classes shall each be considered a college within
the meaning of this section. Transferring from a college with the ex-
ception of the freshman and sophomore classes, shall constitute de facto
resignation from a seat elected by the college with the successor to
be chosen as provided for by the Student Senate.

C. The Student Senate of the Summer Session, as defined by the
Student Senate, shall be composed of the following:

1. Those duly elected members of the Student Senate attending
the Summer Session, and

2. The replacements, nominated by those duly elected members
who will not be attending Summer Session, provided such replacements are
nominated and approved by a majority of the Student Senate before the
Summer Session begins. These replacements shall serve for the Summer
Session only.

3. Those elected by a majority of the Student Senate to
Living-area or College vacancies not filled by the above procedures.
These replacements shall serve for the Summer Session only.

Section 3. Powers. The Student Senate shall have the power to:

A. Determine its rules and procedures, compel the attendance of
absent members, censure or expel a member by a two-thirds vote of its
membership upon prior written notice to him, elect its officers except
those designated herein and fix the time and place of its meetings pro-
vided that there be regular meetings with fixed time and place at least
once every two (2) weeks;

B. Provide for the elections of the Student Body, canvass all
Student Body elections within 14 days and be the sole judge of the validity
thereof and the qualifications of the officers elected therein;

C. Decide all tie elections at its first meeting following can-
vassing;

D. Enter into contracts and agreements in behalf of the Student
Body provided such documents be Laws of the Student Body;

E. The Student Senate shall have power to charter such sub-
sidiary organizations as it may deem necessary to the proper functioning
of the government or the general well-being of the Student Body, such
charters to be considered Bills of Law and enacted accordingly;

F. The Student Senate shall have power to initiate, grant, amend
and revoke amendments to charters through the same process as amending
any other Bill of Law and under regulations of the Rules of Procedure of
the Student Senate, Student Body Laws and Student Body Constitution, and
no amendment to a charter shall be valid unless it has been approved by
the Student Senate under said procedure;

G. Approve appointments and recommendations of the President of
the Student Body to student government administrative positions, Presi-
dential or University committees and office in subsidiary organizations;










H. Provide for the control and disbursement of Student Body funds;

I. Provide for the succession to those offices of the Student Body
not otherwise herein;

J. Require reports from any officer of the Student Body and any
chartered or subsidiary organization;

K. Impeach any officer of the Student Body at a meeting of the
Student Senate by three-fourths vote of the total membership. In the
case that the Vice President of the Student Body is being impeached, the
President of the Student Senate shall preside.

L. Approve affiliations between the University of Florida Student
Government and any other university, regional, or national organization
by a two-thirds vote;

M. Enact all laws necessary and proper for the general well being
of the Student Body.

Section 4. Prohibitions. The Student Senate shall not:

A. Enact any law abridging any of its powers delegated by the
Constitution;

B. Appropriate funds for a period of over one year;

C. Increase the grant-in-aid of any officer of the Student Body
effective to the incumbent at the time of the increase;

D. Infringe the secrecy of the ballot in general Student Body
elections;

E. Deny floor privileges in the Student Senate to elected general
officers of the Student Body, heads of executive departments, deans of
colleges or schools of the University administrative officers; and,

F. Meet in executive session.

Section 5. Procedures.

A. No bill shall become law unless it shall be introduced by a
member of the Student Senate, read and passed by majority vote at two
meetings of the Student Senate, and submitted to the Florida Alligator
in the interim.

B. No Bill shall become law without the signature of the President
of the Student Body provided that withholding of his signature shall
constitute a veto and that the President of the Student Body must notify
the President of the Senate within ten (10) days after Senate passage,
giving reasons for his veto.

C. The President of the University may veto a proposed Bill of
Law. The President of the Student Body shall notify the President of the
Senate within ten (10) days after the President of the University exercises
such veto.









D. The Treasurer of the Student Body shall have veto equal with
that of the President of the Student Body in all matters concerning Budget
Approval and revisions to said Budget. The Treasurer of the Student Body
shall have exclusive veto in matters concerning appropriations from Special
Request Funds. The Treasurer must notify the President of the Student
Senate of his veto within ten (10) days after Senate passage, giving reasons
for his veto.

E. Any Bill which the President of the Student Body and the
Treasurer of the Student Body both shall choose to veto, shall be con-
sidered as having been vetoed once.

F. If a Bill of Law has not been vetoed within ten (10) days
following its passage, it shall automatically take effect.

G. A vetoed Bill may be enacted notwithstanding the veto of the
President or Treasurer of the Student Body if it is read a third time in
full and passed by a two-thirds vote of the members of the Student Senate
present and voting at a regular meeting.

H. The quorum for the conduct of business shall be forty (40)
members.

I. All Legislation of the Student Senate shall be categorized as
follows:

1. Bills of Law: Laws, the Budget and Organizations Charters,
which are subject to veto as provided for above.

2. Authorizations: Advising, ordering, or prescribing the
method for and officer to fulfill some duty provided for in this Consti-
tution, appropriations from Special Request Funds and such appropriations
shall be the only Authorizations subject to veto, as provided for above.

3. Resolutions: Expression of the sentiments of the Student
Senate and not subject to veto.

ARTICLE III

Section 1. All executive powers of the Student Body shall be vested in
a President of the Student Body, assisted by a Vice-President and a
Treasurer.

Section 2. Election of Executive Officers. The President, Vice-President
and Treasurer of the Student Body shall be chosen in the Spring Election
by a majority vote of the Student Body voting in the election and shall
serve for one year. The President, Vice-President, and Treasurer shall
be required to enroll as students for all terms of said year. Enrollment
shall be defined as completing registration for classes and paying of
required enrollment fees. In the event that no candidate receives a
majority there will be a run-off according to the elections laws. Nothing
in this amendment shall effect the results of the spring election, 1971.

Section 3. Vacancies. If the office of President becomes vacant, such
vacancy shall be filled by a succession of the Vice-President to that
office and afterward succession shall be as provided by law.

Section 4. Powers and Duties of the President.

A. The President shall be the chief executive of the Student Body;

B. Take care that all provisions of this Constitution, its By-Laws
and the laws of the Student Body are faithfully executed;










C. Present to the Student Senate each University term a State
of the Campus Message;

D. Appoint all committees or commissions not provided tn this
Constitution which he may deem necessary;

E. Call Special Meetings of the Student Senate;

F. Require the written interpretation of the Honor Court of
any provision of the Constitution, its By-Laws, or of any Charter, law
of the Student Body, or Student Senate Act;

G. Appoint staff assistants or aides not provided for in this
Constitution, its By-Laws or laws of the Student Body;

H{. Any other power or duty provided for in this Constitution.

Section 5. Executive Cabinet. The President shall appoint, with con-
currence of a majority of the Student Senate's members, the officers of
the Executive Cabinet who shall be responsible to him for the execution
of their duties and subject to removal from office by him. The officers
of the Executive Cabinet shall be established by law.

Section 6. Powers and Duties of the Vice-President. The Vice-President
shall exercise the powers and duties of the President in his absence, and
assist the President in the conduct of the government. The Vice-President
shall have the power to appoint staff aides and shall have any other
Vice-Presidential powers or duties provided in this Constitution.

Section 7. Powers and Duties of the Treasurer. The Treasurer shall
keep complete and accurate accounts of all student body funds on deposit
with the Cashier of the University; sign all requisitions on said funds
on order of the Student Senate, and assist the President in the conduct
of government. The Treasurer shall have the power to appoint staff aides,
and any other Treasurer's powers or duties provided in this Constitution.

ARTICLE IV

The Judiciary

Section 1. Judicial Powers. All judicial power of the Student Body
shall be vested in the Honor Court and such other tribunals as are estab-
lished by law.

Section 2. "The Honor Code""Offenses Against the Student Body." Every
student shall be bound by the Honor Code and the laws of the Student Body
enacted in accordance with this constitution. The "Honor Code" shall
prohibit academic dishonesty, and offenses against the Student Body which
are stealing, and passing bad checks and such other offenses as may be
defined by the Student Senate by law.

Section 3. Officers and Members.

A. The Honor Court shall be composed of a Chancellor, a Clerk,
one Justice from each college, including one Justice from the School of
Forestry, and two Justices each from the Freshman and Sophomore Classes,
an Attorney General, Chief Defense Counsel, and Bailiff and such lesser
officers as are necessary.









B. The Chancellor shall be elected by a majority of those voting
in the spring general election. At the time of election, the Chancellor
shall be a full-time law student having completed or presently be taking
the Law School course in evidence and shall be a member in good standing
of the Honor Court Bar Association. The Chancellor shall sit as judge
in all Honor Court Proceedings and perform all duties incumbent upon such
office; in his absence the Vice-Chancellor shall sit as Chancellor. In
the event no candidate receives a majority there shall be a run-off ac-
cording to the election laws. Nothing in this amendment shall effect the
results of the spring election, 1971.

C. The Justices shall be elected from the College or School in
which they are enrolled by a plurality of those voting in the Spring
general elections. At the time of election, each Justice must be a full-
time student enrolled in the College or School from which he is elected.

D. The Clerk of the Honor Court shall be appointed by the Chan-
cellor following the spring general election. The Clerk shall be a full-
time undergraduate student. The Clerk shall be the Chief Administrative
officer of the Court and he shall assist the Chancellor in the performance
of his duties.

E. In addition, the Chancellor shall appoint an Attorney General,
a Chief Defense Counsel, and a Bailiff; the Attorney General and Chief
Defense Counsel shall have the same qualifications as the Chancellor; the
Bailiff shall be a full-time student.

There shall be a Board of Masters composed of:

1. The Chancellor of the Honor Court, who shall be the
presiding officer;

2. The Vice-Chancellor of the Honor Court, to be appointed
jointly by the President of the Student Body and the Chancellor of the
Honor Court with the approval of two-thirds of the members of the Student
Senate present and voting at a regular meeting. The Vice-Chancellor must
have completed, or be presently taking the course in evidence.

3. Three (3) members appointed jointly by the President of
the Student Body and the Chancellor of the Honor Court with the approval
by two-thirds of the members of the Student Senate present and voting at
a regular meeting. They shall have completed the Freshman year of Law
School and shall serve for as long as they are members of the Student
Body.

Section 4. Vacancy in Office.

A. A vacancy shall exist when any officer of the Court ceases to
be a full-time student or when he resigns, is impeached, removed, or
otherwise disqualified from holding office in Student Government;

B. If a vacancy occurs in the Office of Chancellor, the President
of the Student Body, with majority consent of the Justices, shall appoint
a successor who at the time of his appointment shall be a full-time law
student having completed the course in evidence, and shall be a member in
good standing of the Honor Court Bar Association.

C. If a vacancy occurs in the office of Justice, the Chancellor
with majority consent of the Justices, shall appoint a successor who, at
the time of his appointment, is a full-time student enrolled in the Col-
lege or School of his predecessor.










D. Officers appointed under this section shall serve until
their elected or appointed successor takes office.

Section 5. Jurisdiction of the Honor Court.

A. The Honor Court shall have original jurisdiction over vio-
lations of the Honor Code and "Offenses Against the Student Body," as
defined in Article IV, Section 2.

B. Board of Masters, shall, upon written request of the Presi-
dent of the Student Body or upon written petition of twenty (20) members
of the Student Body, interpret any part of this Constitution or any laws
or charter enacted or granted by the Student Senate.

C. The Board of Masters, shall, upon written request of any
student and for good cause shown, order any officer of the Student Govern-
ment or of any subsidiary organization, to perform any lawful act or
refrain or desist from any action unlawful and such order shall be
published in the Florida Alligator for four (4) consecutive publication
days within the week following the rendition of the order.

D. The Honor Court shall maintain a permanent file of official
election results for every General Student Body Election.

E. The Honor Court shall have power to punish for contempt of
Court.

Section 6. Procedures.

A. The Honor Court by majority vote of the Justices shall make
and publish its rules of procedures.

B. The accused shall have the right to a speedy and public trial
in accordance with the Courts Rules of Procedure in all cases presented
by the Attorney General. In all cases where a right to trial by jury
is not expressly waived, the accused shall not be found guilty, unless
by unanimous vote of six (6) jurors.

C. In all cases where the accused cannot or will not appear for
trial within a reasonable time, the Honor Court shall have the power to
enter a plea of not guilty and conduct a trial by jury in absentia,
provided however, that the accused shall be represented by counsel and
shall have been afforded reasonable notice of the circumstances of the
offense and date of the trial.

D. The Chancellor in conjunction with two justices shall determine
the penalty imposed upon every student adjudged guilty of a violation of
the "Honor Code," or of an "offense against the Student Body."

E. All final judgments of the Honor Court may be appealed to the
Student Appeals Court, which shall consist of the three appointed members
of the Board of Masters, in accordance with the Honor Court Rules of
Procedure.

F. No action shall be brought unless an information is filed
within sixty (60) school days from the date of the violation or offense.

G. All information concerning the identity of the accused shall
be held in confidence and shall be disclosed only to the extent necessary
for the performance of the official functions of the Honor Court as herein
described. The Honor Court shall have subpeona power over the person and
effects of any student.










H. Where a student is found not guilty of the charge or charges
brought against him, all records of such charge or charges shall be
destroyed. Where a student is found guilty of the charge or charges
brought against him, all records of such offense shall be kept by the
Honor Court and a notice of such Honor Code violations shall be placed
in the Student's permanent record file.

I. The Honor Court shall be empowered to secure such information
from the Dean for Student Development, Registrar or other University
personnel as shall be necessary in effectuating the purpose of the Honor
Court. Such information shall be held in confidence.

Section 7. Penalties.

A. A student adjudged guilty of an "Honor Code" violation or an
"Offense Against the Student Body" may be awarded any or all of the
following penalties:

1. A severe reprimand;

2. Penalty hours, not to exceed twenty (20); such penalty
hours shall be in addition to the number of hours otherwise required for
graduation. Hours earned prior to the end of the term in which the
penalty is imposed will not satisfy the penalty requirement;

3. Suspension from the University for a period designated by
the Honor Court;

4. Expulsion from the University; and

5. Honor Court Probation.

B. Penalties for contempt shall not exceed nine (9) hours for
each offense.

ARTICLE V

Section 1. There shall be a Traffic Court whose jurisdiction, duties
and procedures shall be as provided for by law.

Section 2. Presiding Officer. There shall be a Chief Justice of Traffic
Court who shall be the presiding judge in all Traffic Court proceedings
and shall perform all duties incumbent upon such office as provided by
law. The Chief Justice of the Traffic Court shall be elected by a majority
vote of the Student Body voting in the spring election. In the event that
no candidate receives a majority there shall be a runoff according to the
election laws. Nothing in this amendment shall effect the results of the
spring election, 1971.

Section 3. Members. The members of the Traffic Court shall be as pro-
vided for by law.

ARTICLE VI

Section 1. The Florida Alligator, the Student Yearbook and any other student
publications provided for by the Student Senate or the Board of Student
Publications shall be free from any censorship or pressure aimed at con-
trolling editorial policy or staff appointments and removal, by Student
Government or its officers and members.

Section 2. The Board of Student Publications shall be responsible for the
administrative and editorial policy of all student publications, and for the
appointment to or removal from elective positions of all student publications.










ARTICLE VII


Section 1. Qualifications for Voting. Only members of the Student
Body, as defined in Article 1, shall be entitled to vote in student
body elections.

Section 2. Two general elections will be held each year: Fall elections
shall be held on the fourth Wednesday after Fall term classes commence.
Spring elections shall be held on the third Wednesday after classes
commence for the first term beginning after March each year. In cases
of conflict of the above with school holidays, the Student Senate shall
designate, by a two-thirds vote of its members present at a regular
meeting, another date. In the event that the University Academic Terms
shall be changed from the quarter system, the Student Senate shall pro-
vide for election dates by a two-thirds vote of its members present and
voting at a regular meeting. Nothing in this amendment shall effect
the results of the spring election, 1971.

Section 3. Time of Assuming Office. The elective officers of the Student
Body shall assume the duties of their offices ten (10) days after can-
vassing of elections by the Student Senate.

Section 4. Qualifications for Office. To be eligible for an office of
the Student Government a student must be eligible to vote and have a 2.0
or better average for his total period as a member of the Student Body.
Candidates for the offices of President, Vice-President, and Treasurer
shall have enrolled and completed at least three (3) terms at the Uni-
versity of Florida.

ARTICLE VIII

Section 1. The Student Senate may establish By-Laws to this Constitution
provided that such by-laws shall not conflict with the provisions herein,
and further provided that such by-laws shall be introduced by a member of
the Student Senate, read and passed by a two-thirds vote at two meetings
of the Senate, and submitted to the Florida Alligator in the interim.

Section 2. The President may veto a proposed by-law provided that he
notify the President of the Student Senate within ten (10) days after
passage, giving reasons for his veto.

Section 3. The Treasurer may veto a proposed by-law if the by-law concerns
financial affairs of the Student Body, provided that he notify the Presi-
dent of the Student Senate within ten (10) days after passage, giving
reasons for his veto.

Section 4. The President of the University may veto a proposed by-law.
The President of the Student Body shall notify the President of the Senate
within ten (10) days after the President of the University exercises such
veto.

Section 5. Any proposed by-law which the President of the Student Body
and the Treasurer of the Student Body both shall choose to veto, shall be
considered as having been vetoed once.

Section 6. If a proposed by-law has not been vetoed within ten (10) days
following its passage, it shall automatically take effect.

Section 7. A proposed by-law that has been vetoed by the Student Body
President and/or Treasurer may be enacted notwithstanding the veto of the
President or Treasurer if it is read a third time in full and passed by
a three-fourths vote of the Student Senate at a regular meeting.










ARTICLE IX


Section 1. Amendments to the Constitution. This Constitution may
be amended by a two-thirds of the Student Body voting thereon at a
special or general election, providing twenty-five percent of the
Student Body casts ballots at that election and providing the amend-
ment has been proposed by:

A. Two-thirds of the Student Senate present and voting at two
regular meetings of that body, or

B. Ten (10) percent of the Student Body by petition filed with
the Chancellor of the Honor Court not less than fourteen days prior to
the regular elections.

Section 2. Publication. The proposed amendment shall be published
in the Florida Alligator not less than one nor more than three weeks
prior to the election at which it is considered.

ARTICLE X

Section 1. This Constitution shall be in full effect on February 14, 1968,
except that Part D, Section 3 of Article IV and Section 2 of Article V
shall be suspended until the day of the Spring general election in 1969
at which time it shall take full effect and that Section 3 of Article VII
shall be suspended until August 1, 1968, at which time it shall be in
full effect.

Section 2. All laws established under the procedures of the Constitution
of the Student Body and not contrary to the provisions of this Constitution,
shall have full effect until they may be amended as provided herein.










STUDENT BODY BY-LAW NO. 1


President's Cabinet By-Law.

I. It is recognized that the Student Body President is the head of
the executive branch of the Student Government and is the highest indi-
vidual representative and administrator of the Student Body.

II. It is also recognized that the numerous duties and responsibilities
of the Student Body in Student Government require the division and dele-
gation of these duties and responsibilities to several executive depart-
ments known as the "Cabinet."

III. The Cabinet is directly responsible to the Student Body President
in whose name the Cabinet functions.

IV. In addition, the Cabinet is responsible to the Student Senate
which, in certain cases, relies upon the Cabinet for certain administra-
tive and communicative functions.

V. It is further recognized that it is desirable that the number of
Cabinet officers be kept to a minimum in order to concentrate effective
responsibility and administration, facilitate communication, and increase
prestige and pride in one's work as an encouragement toward maximum
performance. It is highly undesirable that these qualities be lost with
an increase in the number of Cabinet positions delegating little indi-
vidual responsibility to numerous persons and creating positions for
mainly political purposes.

VI. Each executive department comprising the Cabinet shall be under
the authority of a "Secretary" who shall be responsible for all functions
delegated to that department. In addition the Secretary shall be re-
sponsible for keeping the Student Body President, and, when necessary
the Student Senate advised of its activities and operations.

VII. Each Secretary of the Cabinet shall be appointed by the President
of the Student Body with the approval of a major vote of the Student
Senate present and voting at a regular meeting.

VIII. Each Secretary of the Cabinet may be removed from office by the
Student Body President.

IX. In addition to the Secretaries of the Cabinet, each executive
department may have as many "Under-Secretaries" as needed, but the number
of Under-Secretaries in each executive department shall not exceed four.
Under-Secretaries shall oversee different aspects of the department and
shall be directly responsible to the Secretary of the department. Under-
Secretaries shall be appointed by the Secretary of the department with
the approval of the Student Body President. Under-Secretaries may be
removed by the Secretary of the department or the Student Body President.










X. The Cabinet shall consist of the following executive offices.
Each headed by a Secretary:

(A) Academic Affairs
(B) Athletics
(C) Consumer Affairs
(D) Finance
(E) Health & Insurance
(F) Interior
(G) Legislative Affairs
(H) Married Student Affairs
(I) Minority Group Affairs
(J) Public Functions
(K) Student Affairs
(L) Student Organizations
(M) Student Services

XI. No additional executive officer of the Cabinet may be established
without amending this by-law.

XII. The Student Body President or other elected officer of the Student
Body may appoint administrative aides to assist outside of the Cabinet.

XIII. The Student Body President may appoint without the approval of the
Student Senate an Administrative Assistant to his office.

XIV. The Secretaries of the Cabinet shall have speaker's privileges
in the Student Senate as an officer of the Student Body and shall be
recognized as an official representative of the Student Body in relation
to the function of his executive department.

XV. This by-law shall become effective upon the assumption of office
by the officers of the Student Body elected in the Spring, 1969 election.










BOARD OF REGENTS OPERATING MANUAL EXTRACTS


The Board of Regents has the jurisdiction to govern, regulate,
coordinate, and oversee the institutions and agencies in the State
University System. The Board is primarily a policy-making board which
makes the rules and regulations for the University System and also
gives authority to the Chancellor and to the heads of these institutions
and agencies, therefore, making them fully responsible for the manage-
ment of the institution.

The Board of Regents Manual is available to students in the Student
Government offices on the third floor of the University Union. The
following is from the Board of Regents Manual:

3.18 Disruptive Conduct.

Faculty, students, and all other personnel who intentionally act
to impair, interfere with, or obstruct the orderly conduct, processes,
and functions of a state university shall be subject to appropriate
disciplinary action by the university authorities.

Disruptive conduct shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

a. Violence against any member or guest of the University Community.

b. Theft or willful destruction of university property or of the
property of members of the university.

c. Interference with the freedom of movement of any member or guest
of the university.

d. Deliberately impeding or interfering with the rights of others
to enter, use, or leave any university facility, service, or scheduled
activity, or in carrying out their normal functions or duties.

e. Deliberate interference with academic freedom and freedom of
speech of any member or guest of the university.

3.21 B Academic Freedom and Responsibility

The Board of Regents, as the legally constituted agency for policy
making and supervision of the state universities, believes that academic
freedom and responsibility are essential to the full development of a
true university and apply to teaching, research, and creativity. In the
development of knowledge, research endeavors, and creative activities, a
university faculty and student body must be free to cultivate a spirit
of inquiry and scholarly criticism and to examine ideas in an atmosphere
of freedom and confidence. A similar atmosphere is required for univer-
sity teaching. Consistent with the exercise of academic responsibility,
a teacher must have freedom in the classroom in discussing his subject.
The university student must likewise have the opportunity to study a
full spectrum of ideas, opinions, and beliefs, so that he may acquire
maturity for analysis and judgment. Objective and skillful exposition
of such matters is the duty of every teacher.

3.21 C Morals and Influence

(a) Citizenship and Conduct: Each institution shall continue to
examine carefully the qualifications and records of those individuals
who are to be employed by it, not only with regard to their professional










and academic competency, but also with regard to their general character
and their moral conduct. Furthermore, the Board directs the institutions
under its control to continue to exercise due care in the selection of
students, taking into account, not only their academic ability to perform
satisfactorily, but also their character and moral behavior. The Board
of Regents also enjoins the administration in each of the institutions
to continue to guard against activities subversive to the American demo-
cratic process and against immoral behavior, such as sex deviation.

7.2 Student Affairs.
Section 240.001 and 240.042 Florida Statutes

A. The Board of Regents has full power and authority to prescribe
rules and regulations to govern student life and faculty-staff-student
relationships at institutions in the State University System.

B. The President of each institution has responsibility for student
conduct and discipline, which responsibility shall be exercised through
established procedures as prescribed or approved by the President except
when such procedures are fixed by the Board.

C. Every student is subject to federal and state law, respective
county and city ordinances and all Board of Regents and University rules
and regulations.

D. Violations of these published laws, ordinances or rules and
regulations, may subject the violator to appropriate action by the uni-
versity authorities.

E. Each President in the State University System shall have the
authority after notice to the student of the charges and a hearing thereon
to expel or otherwise discipline any student who shall be found to have
violated a rule or regulation of the Board of Regents or the University
or any law or ordinance.

The President or his designated representative of the institution
shall have the power and discretion to order any student to cease and
desist any activity which in his or their judgment disrupts the orderly
operation of the institution. Any student failing to abide by the cease
and desist order shall be subject to suspension pending a hearing.

The conviction of a student for a criminal offense of a kind which
interferes with the educational or orderly operation of the University or
of a kind which, if the student were allowed to remain enrolled would
endanger the health, safety or property of members of the academic com-
munity shall be sufficient grounds for expulsion or other disciplinary
action against such student.

F. Except as provided in Section 7.2 E paragraph 2, in any and all
proceedings which involve student violations of non-academic rules and
regulations of the universities, before final action is taken a student
shall be afforded adequate notice of charges, a reasonable time to answer,
a fair and impartial hearing and a decision. The above due process
guarantees shall prevail in student or student-faculty-administrative
hearings with a channel of appeal available for the student to the Presi-
dent of the university. The final administrative appeal shall be to the
President who may make or accept determination of punishment.










G. Any student expelled pursuant to Chapter 69-366, Florida
Statutes, for unlawful possession of narcotic drugs, central nervous
system stimulants, hallucinogenic drugs, or barbiturates as identified
in Chapter 398 or 404, Florida Statutes, will be ineligible for re-
admission to any state-supported university for a period of two (2)
years.

7.3 Institutional Responsibility for Student Life.

A. Each institution shall develop, publish and enforce appropriate
rules and regulations governing student life. The Student Government
should have clear and defined means to participate in the formulation
of institutional policy affecting academic and student affairs.

B. The Board requires that the penalty for serious violations of
university regulations shall be recorded in the record of the individual
concerned. The administration of discipline should provide, whenever
possible, for the correction and positive guidance of students who have
violated such standards.

7.32 Right of Appeal.

The President shall provide the procedure for student appeals
within the respective institutions on all matters in which the student
feels he has been aggrieved.

7.4 Student Freedom and Responsibility.

Student Government shall be the representative of all students and
is encouraged to function on campus, with the recognition that ultimate
authority for university affairs rests with the administration of each
university.

Student Government may propose to the President a written recommenda-
tion covering the allocation of that portion of the university fees fixed
by law or designated by the Board of Regents for student activities.

Student Government is authorized to propose student social regulations.

7.41 Student Organizations.

A. Students shall be free to join university organizations. Student
organizations may be officially recognized by the university when approved
by the Student Governments of appropriate student-faculty-committees on
campus. An officially recognized organization must not have as a purpose,
either in name or in fact, the advocacy of the overthrow of the government
by force or other unlawful means. Other limitations may be placed on
their continued recognition by the university agencies concerned.

B. Student organizations are encouraged to attract advisers from
faculty, professional staff, or administration as provided by the policy
of the several respective institutions. All organizations officially
recognized by the university shall be allowed to meet on campus and use
appropriate university facilities. In addition to normally required
audits, Student Government shall make periodic audits of the financial
records of student organizations which reserve funds from student fees
allocated by Student Government.










7.42 Freedom of Expression.

Freedom of expression, as defined by the Constitution of the United
States and the State of Florida and as determined by a court of competent
jurisdiction to be applicable to institutions in the State University
System of Florida, shall not be in any way prohibited or abridged. The
existing laws, state and federal, insofar as they are applicable to such
institutions, shall be observed on each campus in the system. Freedom of
expression carries with it the responsibility for seeing that the es-
sential order of the university is preserved.

7.42 Public Forums.

A. One of the responsibilities of the university is to maintain a
vital dialogue for the stimulation and intellectual development of the
student body. An effective platform of public discussion is usually pro-
vided by a diversity of content and a balance of opinion. It should be
emphasized that the views expressed by a speaker on campus do not neces-
sarily reflect the opinion of the students, faculty, university, or the
Board of Regents. All officially recognized campus organizations may
sponsor a speaker or other types of public presentations. Each institu-
tion shall establish its own procedures as guidelines for assisting in
the development of an effective public forum.

7.42 Pamphlets and Petitions.

B. The basic freedom of students to hear, write, distribute, and
act upon a variety of thoughts and beliefs must be respected. The circu-
lation of literature identified by authorship and sponsorship, within
the policy of "Freedom of Expression" stated above and consonant with
university regulations, will be allowed. There will be university regu-
lations to prevent distribution to captive audiences and to preserve the
orderliness of the campus.

7.42 Right of Assembly.

C. The right of freedom of assembly will be recognized. Student
gatherings must not disrupt or interfere with the orderly educational
operation of the institution, nor be in violation of state or local
statutes or university organizations governing unlawful assembly.

7.42 Student Publications.

D. Student Publications and the student press are a valuable aid in
establishing and maintaining an atmosphere of free and responsible dis-
cussion and of intellectual exploration on the campus. The university,
as owner of all student publications, will allow for the development of
such free discussion of current issues and problems. Authorized student
publications will maintain high standards of literary merit and journal-
istic responsibility. The President of the university, as publisher, has
final authority and responsibility in matters relating to student publi-
cations; however, he may exercise this authority and responsibility through
a professional person or a board.










A SUMMARY OF RECENT FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS
PERTAINING TO STUDENTS ENROLLED IN
INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING



UNITED STATES PUBLIC LAW 90-575: This law provides that students
or employees at an institution of higher learning who, after notice and
a hearing are found guilty of substantial disruption, will not be eli-
gible for financial assistance provided by the federal government.

FLORIDA LEGISLATURE GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS BILL: In addition, the
Florida Legislature wrote the General Appropriations Bill with a provision
that no state funds can be used for financial aid to pay the salaries
of students, faculty or other employees who advocate the overthrow of the
U.S. or state governments or college administrations by force or violence,
or who advocate with clear intent the disruption of the College.

FLORIDA STATUTES 877.12, Chapter 69-274: This law makes it unlawful
for any person to intentionally act to disrupt or interfere with the lawful
administration or functions of any educational institution in this state.
Any person who violates the provisions of this section is guilty of a
misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be subject to a fine of
not more than five hundred dollars or imprisonment not to exceed six months
or both.

CHAPTER 70-362 (239.582 1970 Supplement to Florida Statutes 1969)
Any person enrolled as a student in any state supported university or
junior college who is formally charged by a proper prosecuting attorney
for the unlawful possession or sale of any narcotic drug, central nervous
system stimulant, hallucinogenic drug or barbiturate, as identified or
defined in either chapter 398 or 404, shall, following an administrative
hearing provided by the president of the institution pursuant to rules
promulgated by the State Board of Education or Board of Regents, if such
suspension is recommended, be suspended from all classes of instruction
until the determination of his guilt by a court of competent jurisdiction.
If adjudicated guilty, the student shall be automatically expelled.
No student expelled pursuant to this section may be readmitted to
any state supported university or junior college for a period of one year.
Any student subject to discipline or expulsion from a state university
or junior college for unlawful possession or use of any narcotic drug,
central nervous system stimulant, hallucinogenic drug, or barbiturate, as
identified or defined in either chapter 398 or 404, may be entitled to a
waiver of the discipline or expulsion if he divulges information leading
to the arrest and conviction of the person who supplied such drug, stimulant,
or barbiturate to him, or if he voluntarily discloses his unlawful pos-
session of such drug, stimulant, or barbiturate prior to his arrest.
Upon suspension from classes as authorized above (1) the administra-
tion shall notify the parents or parent, or other person or persons in
loco parents, of the suspension and the reason therefore.

CHAPTER 69-279: HOUSE BILL 590: Any person who shall accept the
privilege extended by the laws of this state of attendance or employment
at any state college, state junior college or state university shall, by
so attending or working at such institutions, be deemed to have given his
consent to the policies of that institution, the Board of Regents, and
the laws of this state. Such policies shall include prohibition against
disruptive activities at state institutions of higher learning.










If after it has been determined that a student or employee of
a state institution of higher learning has participated in disruptive
activities, the following penalties may be imposed against such
person: (1) Immediate termination of contract of such employee of
the state institution of higher learning, and thereafter such person
shall not be employed by any state public school or state college,
state junior college or state university; (2) Immediate expulsion of
such student from the institution of higher learning for a minimum of
two years.

FLORIDA STATUTE 228.21: In any case in which a person who is not
a student, officer, or employee of a junior college, state university,
or public school and who is not required by his employment by the insti-
tution involved to be on the campus or any other facility owned, operated,
or controlled by the governing board of any such junior college, state
university, or public school enters the campus of such junior college or
state university and is committing any act tending to interfere with the
normal, orderly, peaceful, or efficient conduct of the activities of
such campus or facility, the chief administrative officer or employee
designated by him to maintain order on such campus or facility may direct
such person to leave such campus or facility. If such person fails to
do so, such person shall be guilty of trespass upon state lands as pro-
hibited by 821.19 and shall be punished accordingly.

FLORIDA STATUTE 790.161: Throwing, placing or discharging any
destructive device or attempt so to do, felony; penalties -

It is unlawful for any person to throw, place, discharge, or attempt
to discharge any destructive device with intent to do bodily harm to any
person or with intent to do damage to the property of any person, and
any person convicted thereof shall be guilty of a felony and punished in
the following manner:

(1) When such action, or attempt at such action, results in the
death of the person intended, or any person, the person so convicted of
such felony shall be punished by death, unless a majority of the jurors
trying said cause shall request mercy, in which event the penalty shall
be changed from death to life imprisonment in the state penitentiary.

FLORIDA STATUTE 790.162: Threat to throw, place, or discharge any
destructive device, felony; penalty -

It is unlawful for any person to threaten to throw, place, or dis-
charge any destructive device with intent to do bodily harm to any person
or with intent to do damage to any property of any person, and any person
convicted thereof shall be guilty of a felony and punished by imprisonment
in the state penitentiary for not more than twenty (20) years.

FLORIDA STATUTE 832.05: Knowingly making, issuing, etc., worthless
checks, drafts; obtaining property in return for worthless checks, etc.;
penalty; duty of drawee; evidence

(2) Worthless checks; penalty -

(a) It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to
draw, make, utter, issue or deliver to another any check, draft, or other
written order on any bank or depository for the payment of money or its
equivalent, knowing at the time of the drawing, making, uttering, issuing
or delivering such check or draft that the maker or drawer thereof has not










sufficient funds on deposit in or credit with such bank or depository
with which to pay the same on presentation; provided, that this section
shall not apply to any check where the payee or holder knows or has been
expressly notified prior to the drawing or uttering of same or has reason
to believe that the drawer did not have on deposit or to his credit with
the drawee sufficient funds to insure payment as aforesaid, nor shall
this section apply to any post-dated check.

(b) Violation of the provisions of this subsection shall
constitute a misdemeanor and shall be punishable by imprisonment in the
county jail not exceeding six months or by fine not exceeding $300.00,
unless the check, draft or other written order drawn, made, uttered,
issued, or delivered be in the amount of fifty dollars or its equivalent,
or more and the payee or a subsequent holder thereof receives something
of value therefore. In that event the violation shall constitute a
felony and shall be punishable by imprisonment in the state penitentiary
not exceeding five years, or in the county jail not exceeding twelve
months, or by fine not exceeding $1,000.00.

FLORIDA STATUTE 870.01: Affrays and Riots.

(1) All persons guilty of an affray shall be punished by imprison-
ment not exceeding twelve (12) months, or by fine not exceeding five
hundred dollars ($500.00).

(2) All persons guilty of a riot, or of inciting or encouraging
a riot, shall be punished by imprisonment not exceeding two (2) years
in the state penitentiary, or by imprisonment not exceeding twelve (12)
months in the county jail, or by fine not exceeding five hundred dollars
($500.00), or by both fine and imprisonment.









INDEX


Academic Areas, Sound Control-38
Academic Cheating-15
Academic Evaluation-Bases-21
Academic Freedom, Policy
Board of Regents-61
Academic Records, See Records
Confidentiality-5
Academic Regulations-21
Activities, Eligibility for Extra-
curricular-21
Administrative Regulations-22
Admissions Charges
Fees for Public Events-41
Affrays, Riots-67
Agencies Entitled to Use University
Facilities-40
Appeals
Alleging Unfair Evaluation-21
Procedure-14,15,63
Traffic Court-16
Approval of Major or Public
Events-41
Athletics, Scholarship Require-
ments-21
Automobile Regulations-45
Bicycle Registration-46
Board of Regents Policies
Academic Freedom and
Responsibility-61
Appeals to-14
Definition of Disruptive Action-61
Institutional Responsibility-63
Morals and Influence-61
Organizations-32
Selection of Students-61,62
Student Affairs-62
Student Freedom and
Responsibility-63
Buildings
Demonstrations Inside Prohibited-28
Suitable for Public Functions-39
Bulletin Board Policy-31
Campus Elections-57
Student Body Constitution-57
Change of Address-ll
Chaperones-44
Charge for Excellence-1
Cheating, Academic-4,15
Civil Rights, See Equal Opportunity
Policy-ii, 32
Classroom-Student-Faculty
Relationships-21
Committee on Student Conduct-17
Organization-17
Rules-18
Committees
Public Functions-40
Student Affairs-14
Student Conduct-17
Complaints on Violations of Equal Oppor-
tunity Policy-ii


Conduct Boards-Residence
Halls-8,16
Cooperation with Area
Directors-16
Office of Student Conduct-16
Jurisdiction-16
Possible Actions-17
Conduct Code-6
Authority of University-6
Conflict of Jurisdiction-9
Fairness, Procedural-6
Jurisdiction of:
Hall and area Conduct
Board-8,16
Honor Court-8
Student Conduct
Committee-17,20
Traffic Court-16
Penalties-9
Conduct Probation-10
Expulsion-10
Payment of Damages-10
Reprimand-9
Suspension-7,10,20
Confidentiality of Records-5
Constitution of the Student Body
Actions-By-Laws-57,59-60
Amendments-58
Governing Organization-49
Executive-52
Executive Cabinet, By-Law
No. 1-53, 59-60
Organization-52
Powers and Duties-52
President-52
Treasurer-52,53
Vice President-52,53
Judiciary-53
Jurisdiction-55
Officers and Members-53
Penalties-56
Procedures-55
Legislative-Student Senate-49
Organization-49
Powers-50
Procedures-51
Student Publications-56
Traffic Court-56
Voting Qualifications,
Elections-57
Contempt of Court, Honor System-15
Control of Sound-38
Deadlines-Fee Payment-22
Definitions
Disruptive Action-61,25
Officially Recognized Campus
Organizations-36
Public Functions-36
Demonstrations Policy-25
Authority to Suspend-27,7
Implementation Procedure-26











Demonstrations Policy, cont.
Responsibilities of
Campus Police-26
Faculty, Staff, Students-26,27
Destructive Devices, Use/Threats-66
Disruption Policy-25,65
Faculty Participation-28
Student Participation-26-28
Distribution of Printed
Material-23,30,31
Drug Policy-13,65
Educational Privileges-2
Elections, Campus
See Student Body Constitution-57
Eligibility for Extracurricular
Activities-21
Equal Opportunity Policy-ii
Evaluation-Academic Appeals Alleging
Unfairness-21
Expulsion
Conduct Code Penalties-10
Fees and Admission Charges for
Public Events-41
Financial Obligations
Deadlines-Fee Payment-22
Fire Safety
Importance-47
Prevention-47
Reaction-48
Fraternities, Social
Conduct Responsibilities-17
Organizational Policies-33
Freedoms
Academic-61
Assembly-25,64
Demonstration-25
Distribution of Materials-23,30,31
Expression-29,30,64
Public Forums-64
Speaker's Policy-29
Health Services-22
Hearing Testimony Tape-18
Honor Code-4
Honor Court-8,15
Appeals of Decisions-15
Jurisdiction-15
Procedures-15
Housing Regulations-ll
Facilities Care Regulations-12
Laws Affecting Residences-12
Off-Campus Housing-11
Privacy Regulations-ll
Residence Requirements-ll
Safety Regulations-ll
Identification Card-22
Instructional Space, Use-39
Judicial Structure-14
Area Director-16
Committee on Student Conduct-17-20
Coordinator of Student Conduct-20
Honor Court-15
President of University-20
Residence Conduct Boards-16
Traffic Court-16


Merchandise, Selling-22,30
Motorcycles and Motor Scooters
See Traffic Regulations-46
Non-Discrimination Policy-ii-32
Equal Opportunity Policy-ii
Organizational Policy-32
Obligations of Students
Adherance to University Regu-
lations-2,3
Financial-22
Health-22
Off-Campus Housing
See Housing Regulations-11
Off-Campus Trips-44
See Social Regulations-44
Off-Campus Conduct-8
Student Conduct Code-8
Offenses, Conduct Code-7
Honor Code-4
Organizations Policy-32,63
Buildings and Properties-34
Control of Sound-38
Eligible to Use University
Facilities-40
Fraternities-33
Non-Discrimination Policy-32
Publications-33,34
Recognition of-32
Reports and Financial Records-33
Responsibilities-33,37
Revisions of Organizations-33
Soliciting
See Selling of Merchandise-30
Sororities-33
Student Publications-34
Outdoor Areas, Use of-37
Payment of Damages-10
Conduct Code Penalties-10
Payment of Fees-22
Financial Obligations-22
Penalties, Conduct Code-9
Honor Court-15
Penalty Hours-15
Honor Court Penalties-15
Personal Records,
Confidentiality-5
Pet Regulations-12
Police, Campus-26
Political Campaigns
Other than Campus Elections-41
Postponement of Hearing-9
Printed Material
Distribution Policy-23,31
Responsibilities-30,31
Privileges, Educational-2
Publications, Student-34
Public Events
Approval of-41
Public Functions
Committee-40,42
Facilities-37
Indoor-39








Public Functions, cont.
Facilities, cont.
Outdoor-37
Manager-43
Office-43
Policy-36
Responsibility-42
Public Laws-See Statutes-65-67
Recognition of Organizations-32
Records, Confidentiality of-5
Organizational, Financial-33
Regents, Board of
Policies, Appendix B-61-63
Registration of Events-40
Registration of Vehicles-45
Regulations
Academic-21
Administrative-22
Fire-47,48
Housing-ll
Social-44
Traffic Safety-45
Reports and Financial Records of
Organizations-33
Reports of Violations
Drug Use Policy-13
Honor Code-4
Reprimand Conduct Code
Penalties-9
Residence Requirements-ll
Residence Conduct Boards-16
Resolution, Legislative Council
UF Student Government-1
Responsibilities and Rights
Student-2
Responsibilities for Learning
Course Content-21
Revisions of Organizations-33
Rights and Responsibilities
Student-2,6-7
Riots, Affrays-67
Role of Higher Education-1
Charge for Excellence-1
Rules of Procedure, Fairness-6
Scheduling of Public Events-40
Scholarship Requirements-21
Selling of Merchandise-22
Social Fraternities-17
Social Regulations-44
Authorizations for Planned Events-44
Chaperones-44
Hours-44
Off-Campus Trips-44
Soliciting, See Selling of
Merchandise-35
Sororities
Conduct Responsibilities-17
Organizations Policies-33
Sound Control in Outdoor Areas-38
Speaker
Policies-29
Responsibilities-29,36
Sponsorship-29
Sponsorship of Speakers-29,36
Responsibilities of
Organizations-29,36


Standards of Excellence Expected by
Student Government-1
Statutes, National and State-65-67
Student-Administration Relation-
ships-24
Student Affairs, Vice President
for-24
Student Conduct Code-6-10
Student Conduct Committee-17-20
Student Constitution, See Consti-
tution
Student-Faculty Relationships-21
Student Freedom and Responsi-
bility-63
Board of Regents Responsi-
bility-61
See Rights and Responsibility-2-3
Student Government
Academic Eligibility-21
Charge for Excellence-1
Constitution-49-61
Functions-24
Information Services-43
Responsibilities for -2
Rights to Act-2,63
Student Health Service-22
Student Participation-
Administrative Relation-
ships-23,24
Responsibility for Student
Government-2
Student Privilege-2
Student Publications-34,64
Summary Hearing, Conduct Code-9
Suspension-7,10
Authority-7
Conduct Code-7
Disruption-7,10
Firearms Possession-7
Penalties-7
Ticket Scalping, Honor Code
Offense-4,15
Traffic Court Procedures-8,16
Traffic and Vehicle Safety Regula-
tions-45,46
Eligibility to Register Auto-
mobile-45
Motorcycles and Motor Scooters-46
Operating Restrictions-45
Physical Disability Entitlements-45
Visitors Parking Permits-45
University Authority, Student
Conduct-6
University Drug Policy-13
University Responsibility, Public
Events-36
Vehicle Safety, See Traffic and
Vehicle Safety Regu-
lations-45,46
Vice President for Student Affairs-24
Waivers of Eligibility Requirements
for Extracurricular
Activities-21
Waiver of Right to Hearing-9
Worthless Checks, Honor Code Viola-
tion-4,15,66







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