• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Officers of administration
 University calendar
 General information
 Fields of instruction
 Index
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00101
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00101
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Copyright
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Officers of administration
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    University calendar
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
    General information
        Page 1
        Graduate programs
            Page 2
            Page 3
        Admission to the graduate school
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        General regulations and instructions
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
        Requirements for Master's degrees
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        The advanced school of the College of Education
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Requirements for the Ph.D.
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Expenses
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
        Housing
            Page 44
            Page 45
        Financial aid
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Special programs and facilities
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
        Organized research
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
        Student services
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
    Fields of instruction
        Page 67
        Page 68
        College of Agriculture
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
        Architecture
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        College of Arts and Sciences
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
        College of Business Administration
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
        College of Education
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
        College of Engineering
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
        College of Health Related Professions
            Page 224
        College of Journalism and Communications
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
        College of Medicine
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
        College of Nursing
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
        College of Pharmacy
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
        College of Physical Education and Health
            Page 247
            Page 248
    Index
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
    Back Cover
        Page 253
        Page 254
Full Text





Graduate


School


Catalog
1968-1969










































The University of Florida Record includes the Graduate Catalog, the
Undergraduate Catalog, the Schedule of Courses for each quarter, and
various bulletins on regulations, policies, and information.
These publications will be sent without charge to all persons who
apply for them. The applicant should state specifically which document or
what information is desired. ADDRESS: The Registrar, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida, .?2601




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECORD
Vol. LXIII--Series 1, No. 1 January 1, 1968
Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Entered
in the Post Office at Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, under Act
of Congress, August 24, 1912, )tlice of Publications, Gainesville, Florida.
MANUFACTURED BY ROSE PRINTING COMPANY, INC., TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA















Graduate School

Catalog


UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE


RECORD
1968-1969















Contents


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION ................................................................ V
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR .................................................................................. iX

GENERAL INFORMATION

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY .............................--....................... ....... 1
GRADUATE PROGRAMS .............................. .......................... 2
A DM ISSION ............................................ .............................................. 4
GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS ............................................ 10
REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES ...........................-----.........---- .... 15
REQUIREMENTS FOR ENGINEER'S DEGREE .........................................- 28
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ED.S. AND ED.D. .......-------...........--..................... 30
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. ...........--- ................................. 34
EXPENSES .............................------------------------ .......................-- 39
HOUSING .........................................------------------ ......-- ..-- ......- .. 44
FINANCIAL A ID ...................................... ........ .......................... 46
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES ............................... ................... 51
ORGANIZED RESEARCH .................................. ------ ----- .----.--- 61
STUDENT SERVICES ........................................ ................................ ...... 64

FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES ........................................... ........ ..... 67
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE ......................................................................... 69
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY ........................................................... 95
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS ............................................ 98
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES .................................... ---- ... 102
DIVISION OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES ........................................................ 152
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ............................................... 154
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION .......................... ........ .......--------...... 166
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ......................................................- ------... 185
COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS ........................................ 224
COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS ...................................... 225
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE .................................................. ...................... 228
COLLEGE OF NURSING ........................................... .------------.. .. .. 241
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY ......................................................................--------------... 244
COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH .................................... 247

INDEX ........................ ............--------.................. -------------........ 249
iii

















Officers of Administration



FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

CLAUDE R. KIRK, Jr.
Governor


TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State
BROWARD WILLIAMS
State Treasurer


EARL FAIRCLOTH
Attorney General
FLOYD T. CHRISTIAN
Superintendent of Public Instruction


BOARD OF REGENTS OF FLORIDA

1967-1968

CHESTER HOWELL FERGUSON
Chairman
Tampa
WAYNE C. McCALL
Vice Chairman
Ocala


MRS. JOHN C. BEHRINGER
Ft. Lauderdale
D. BURKE KIBLER III
Lakeland
HENRY KRAMER
Jacksonville
CLARENCE L. MENSER
Vero Beach


LOUIS C. MURRAY
Orlando
JOHN C. PACE
Pensacola
MRS. E. D. PEARCE
Miami
J. BROWARD CULPEPPER
Chancellor, Tallahassee









Vi / OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL, LL.B.
President of the University
FREDERICK WILLIAM CONNER, Ph.D.
Vice President of the University
ROBERT STEPHEN BOLLES, Ed.D., Dean, College of Architecture and Fine Arts
MARVIN ADEL BROOKER, Ph.D., Dean, College of Agriculture
GEORGE K. DAVIS, Ph.D., Director, Division of Biological Sciences
FRANKLIN A. DOTY, Ph.D., Dean, University College
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S., Vice President for Business Affairs

MARGARET KNOX GOGGIN, Ph.D., Acting Director, University Libraries
JOHN LEWIS GRAY, M.S.F., Director, School of Forestry
LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D., LL.D., Dean, Graduate School
LESTER LEONARD HALE, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs

DONALD JOHN HART, Ph.D., Dean, College of Business Administration
FRANK EDWARD MALONEY, LL.B., Dean, College of Law
SAMUEL P. MARTIN, M.D., Provost, Health Center
DARREL JAY MASE, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health Related Professions
ROBERT BABREAU MAUTZ, LL.B., Vice President for Academic Affairs
JOHN ANDREW NATTRESS, M.S.I.E., Acting Dean, College of Engineering and
Director, Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D., Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
DOROTHY MARY SMITH, M.Ed., Dean, College of Nursing
DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.A.E., Dean, College of Physical Education and
Health
EMANUEL SUTER, M.D., Dean, College of Medicine

MARSHALL OWEN WATKINS, D.P.A., Dean, Continuing Education and Director,
Agricultural Extension Service

RAE O. WEIMER, Dean, College of Journalism and Communications

RICHARD H. WHITEHEAD, B.A., Director of Admissions and Registrar
KIMBALL WILES, Ph.D., Dean, College of Education
E. T. YORK, JR., Ph.D., Provost, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science








OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION / vii

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), LL.D. (Arizona State University at
Tempe), Dean of the Graduate School and Research Professor
ALEXANDER G. SMITH, Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Dean of the Graduate School,
Professor of Physics and Astronomy, and Chairman for Astronomy
ROBERT A. BRYAN, Ph.D. (Kentucky), Assistant Dean of the Graduate School
and Associate Professor of English
JIMMY C. PERKINS, B.S., Administrative Assistant to the Dean

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL

LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), LL.D. (Arizona State University at
Tempe), Dean of the Graduate School and Research Professor, Chairman
ERNEST R. BARTLEY, Ph.D. (California), Professor of Political Science
J. WAYNE CONNER, Ph.D. (Princeton), Professor of Foreign Languages and
Chairman of Department
RAY W. FAHIEN, Ph.D. (Purdue), Professor of Chemical Engineering and Chair-
man of Department
MELVIN J. FREGLY, Ph.D. (Rochester), Assistant Dean, College of Medicine and
Professor of Physiology
VYNCE ALBERT HINES, Ed.D. (Illinois), Professor of Education
WILLIAM M. JONES, Ph.D. (Southern California), Professor of Chemistry
LYLE NELSON McALISTER, Ph.D. (California), Professor of History
GEORGE PAUL MOORE, Ph.D. (Northwestern), Professor of Speech, Chairman
of Department, and Director, Communication Sciences Laboratory
LELAND SHANOR, Ph.D. (North Carolina), D. Sc. (Illinois Wesleyan), Professor
of Botany and Chairman of Department
ALLEN M. SIEVERS, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Economics
WILLIARD E. STONE, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of Accounting and Chair-
man of Department
ALVIN T. WALLACE, Ph.D. (North Carolina State), Professor of Agronomy and
Geneticist in Charge of Plant Science Unit, Agricultural Experiment Station



















1968

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
SM TWT FS SM TWT F S SMTWT FS SM TWT F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 910111213 4 5 6 7 8 910 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 910111213
14151617181920 11121314151617 10111213141516 14151617181920
21222324252627 18192021222324 17181920212223 21222324252627
28293031 2526272829 24252627282930 282930
31
MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
SMTWT F S SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3
5 6 7 8 91011 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 910111213 4 5 6 7 8 910
12131415161718 9101112131415 14151617181920 11121314151617
19202122232425 16171819202122 21222324252627 18192021222324
262728293031 23242526272829 28293031 25262728293031
30
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
SM TWT F S SM TWT F S SM TWT F S SM TWT F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 91011121314 6 7 8 9101112 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 91011121314
15161718192021 13141516171819 10111213141516 15161718192021
22232425262728 20212223242526 17181920212223 22232425262728
2930 2728293031 24252627282930 293031



1969

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
SM TWT F S S M TWT F S SM TWT F S S MTWT F S
1234 1 1 12345
5 6 7 8 91011 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9101112
12131415161718 9101112131415 9101112131415 13141516171819
19202122232425 16171819202122 16171819202122 20212223242526
262728293031 232425262728 23242526272829 27282930
3031
MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST
SMTWTF S S M TWT F S SM TWT F S S MTWT F S
1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 1 2
4 5 6 7 8 910 8 91011121314 6 7 8 9101112 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
11121314151617 15161718192021 13141516171819 10111213141516
18192021222324 22232425262728 20212223242526 17181920212223
25262728293031 2930 2728293031 2425 2627282930
31
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M TWT F S SM TWT F S S M TWT F S S MTWT F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 910111213 5 6 7 8 91011 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 910111213
14151617181920 12131415161718 9101112131415 14115617181920
21222324252627 19202122232425 16171819202122 21222324252627
282930 262728293031 23242526272829 28293031
_30















University of Florida Calendar, 1968-69

FALL QUARTER
1968
July 19, Friday..... ...........................Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for the Fall Quar-
ter.
July 19, Friday, 4:00 p.m.........................Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to apply for
registration appointments in the regular reg-
istration period.
September 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m................Last day for clearing admissions (including
credentials and college change approval) for
the Fall Quarter. Those who clear after this
date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
September 16-21 Monday-Saturday..........Orientation and registration (including pay-
ment of fees) according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration
on Saturday, September 21, after 10:00 a.m.
September 23, Monday............................Classes begin. Last day for completing reg-
istration for Fall Quarter (including pay-
ment of fees). All registration fees increased
$25.00 for full-time students (7 hours or
more), $15.00 for part-time students (6
hours or less). No one permitted to start
registration on Monday, September 23, after
3:00 p.m.
September 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m..............Last day for adding courses and for chang-
ing sections.
September 30, Monday, 5:00 p.m...........Last time for paying examination fee at the
Cashier's Office for ETS foreign language
reading knowledge examinations in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish on Octo-
ber 26.
October 4, Friday, 4:00 p.m....................Last day for dropping courses without re-
ceiving a grade of E.
October 18, Friday, 3:00 p.m................Last day for paying degree application fee
at the Cashier's Office for a degree to be
conferred at the end of the Fall Quarter.
October 25, Friday, 4:00 p.m................Last day for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in the preceding term of attendance.
October 25, Friday .....................................Last day for graduate students to apply to
take the foreign language functional knowl-
edge examinations to be administered on
November 2.
October 25, Friday, 4:00 p.m................Last day for filing application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or divi-
sion for the next quarter.
October 26, Saturday, 9:45 a.m............ETS foreign language reading knowledge
examinations in French, German, Russian,
and Spanish, Leigh 207.
ix








X / UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


November 1-2, Friday-Saturday...............Homecoming-Classes suspended 12:05 p.m.
November 1.
November 2, Saturday, 10:00-12 noon......Foreign language functional knowledge ex-
aminations for graduate students, Walker
Auditorium.
November 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m ..........Last day for withdrawing without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
November 25, Monday, 4:00 p.m...........Last day for candidates for master's and
doctor's degrees to be awarded at the
end of the quarter to file theses with the
Dean of the Graduate School.
November 28-30, Thursday-Saturday........Thanksgiving. Classes suspended 10:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 27.
December 7, Saturday...............................All classes end.
December 9, Monday ..............................Final examinations begin.
December 16, Monday, noon ...................All grades for Fall Quarter due in the Office
of the Registrar.
December 17, Tuesday, noon................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Graduate School Office.


WINTER QUARTER
1968
November 22, Friday .............................Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for the Winter
Quarter.
November 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m...............Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to apply for
registration appointments in the regular reg-
istration period.
December 20, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..........Last day for clearing admissions (including
credentials and college change approval) for
the Winter Quarter. Those who clear after
this date will be assigned late registration
appointments.
1969
January 2-4, Thursday-Saturday ..... .....Registration according to appointments as-
signed (including payment of fees). No one
permitted to start registration on Saturday,
January 4, after 10:00 a.m.
January 6, Monday .................................Last day for paying examination fee at the
Cashier's Office for ETS foreign language
reading knowledge examinations in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish on February 1.
January 6, Monday ..................................Classes begin. Last day for completing reg-
istration for Winter Quarter (including pay-
ment of fees.) All registration fees increased
$25.00 for full-time students (7 hours or
more), $15.00 for part-time students (6
hours or less). No one permitted to start
registration on Monday, January 6, after
3:00 p.m.
January 10, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ...............Last day for adding courses and for chang-
ing sections.
January 17, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ................Last day for dropping courses without re-
ceiving a grade of E.









UNIVERSITY CALENDAR / xi


January 31, Friday ............................... ast day for graduate students to apply to
take the foreign language functional knowl-
edge examinations to be administered on
February 8.
January 31, Friday, 3:00 p.m. ..............Last day for paying degree application fee at
the Cashier's Office for a degree to be con-
ferred at the end of the Winter Quarter.
February 1, Saturday, 9:45 a.m. ...........ETS foreign language reading knowledge ex-
aminations in French, German, Russian, and
Spanish, Leigh 207.
February 7, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..............Last day for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in the preceding term of attendance.
February 7, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ...............Last day for filing application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next quarter.
February 8, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon ....Foreign language functional knowledge ex-
aminations for graduate students, Walker
Auditorium.
February 28, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .............Last day for withdrawing without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
March 3, Monday, 4:00 p.m.....................Last day for candidates for master's and
doctor's degrees to be awarded at the
end of the quarter to file theses with the
Dean of the Graduate School.
March 15, Saturday ..............................All classes end.
March 17, Monday ..............................Final examinations begin.
March 24, Monday, noon ......................All grades for Winter Quarter due in the
Office of the Registrar.
March 25, Tuesday, noon ....................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Graduate School Office.



SPRING QUARTER
1969
February 21, Friday .............................Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for the Spring
Quarter.
February 21, Friday, 4:00 p.m...............Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to apply for
registration appointments in the regular reg-
istration period.
March 14, Friday, 4:00 p.m .................Last day for clearing admissions (including
credentials and college change approval) for
the Spring Quarter. Those who clear after
this date will be assigned late registration
appointments.
March 21, Friday ..................................Last day for paying examination fee at the
Cashier's Office for ETS foreign language
reading knowledge examinations in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish, on April 19.
March 27-29, Thursday-Saturday ............Registration according to appointments as-
signed (including payment of fees). No one
permitted to start registration on Saturday,
March 29, after 10:00 a.m.









xii / UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

March 31, Monday ..............................Classes begin. Last day for completing reg-
istration for Spring Quarter (including pay-
ment of fees). All registration fees increased
$25.00 for full-time students (7 hours or
more), $15.00 for part-time students (6
hours or less). No one permitted to start
registration on Monday, March 31, after
3:00 p.m.
April 4, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..................... Last day for adding courses and for chang-
ing sections.
April 6, Saturday, 10:00-12 noon ............Foreign language functional knowledge ex-
aminations for graduate students, Walker
Auditorium.
April 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..................Last day for dropping courses without re-
ceiving a grade of E.
April 18, Friday ...................................Last day for graduate students to apply to
take foreign language functional knowledge
examinations to be administered on April 26.
April 19, Saturday, 9:45 a.m. ..............ETS foreign language reading knowledge ex-
aminations in French, German, Russian, and
Spanish, Leigh 207.
April 25, Friday, 3:00 p.m. ..................Last day for paying degree application fee at
the Cashier's Office for a degree to be
conferred at the end of the Spring Quarter.
April 25, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .................ast day for filing application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or divi-
sion for the next quarter.
April 25, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ....................Last day for students to remove grades of I
or X received in preceding term of atten-
dance.
May 23, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ....................Last day for withdrawing without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
May 26, Monday, 4:00 p.m. ................Last day for candidates for master's and
doctor's degrees to be awarded at the
end of the quarter to file theses with the
Dean of the Graduate School.
June 7, Saturday .................................... All classes end.
June 9, Monday ........................................Final examinations begin.
June 9, Monday ......................................Preliminary report of colleges on candidates
for degrees due in the Office of the Registrar.
June 15, Sunday .................................Commencement Convocation.
All graduates who have received ad-
vanced degrees after June 11, 1968, and
all candidates for advanced degrees on
June 17, 1969, are invited to attend. The
award of degrees to candidates is subject
to completion of all requirements for such
degrees.
June 16, Monday, noon ............... All grades for Spring Quarter due in the
Office of the Registrar.
June 17, Tuesday, noon ........................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Graduate School Office.

SUMMER QUARTER
1969
May 2, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .......................Last day for those not previously in atten-
dance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for the Summer
Quarter.









UNIVERSITY CALENDAR / Xiii

May 2, Friday, 4:00 p.m.........................Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to apply for
registration appointments in the regular reg-
istration period.
May 30, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .................Last day for clearing admissions (including
credentials and college change approval) for
the Summer Quarter. Those who clear after
this date will be assigned late registration
appointments.
June 13-14, Friday-Saturday ................Registration according to appointments as-
signed (including payment of fees). No one
permitted to start registration on Saturday,
June 14, after 10:00 a.m.
June 16, Monday ..................................Classes begin. Last day for completing reg-
istration for Summer Quarter (including
payment of fees). All registration fees in-
creased $25.00 for full-time students (7
hours or more), $15.00 for part-time stu-
dents (6 hours or less). No one permitted
to start registration on Monday, June 16,
after 3:00 p.m.
June 20, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ....................Last day for adding courses and for chang-
ing sections.
June 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m. .................ast day for dropping courses without re-
ceiving a grade of E.
July 7, Monday .................................ast time for paying examination fee at the
Cashier's Office for ETS foreign language
reading knowledge examinations in French,
German, Russian, and Spanish, on August 2.
July 11, Friday, 3:00 p.m. .-..................Last day for paying degree application fee at
the Cashier's Office for a degree to be
conferred at the end of the Summer Quarter.
July 11, Friday .......................................Last day for graduate students to apply to
take the foreign language functional knowl-
edge examinations to be administered on
July 19.
July 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ....................Last day for filing application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or divi-
sion for the next quarter.
July 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ....................Last day for students to remove grades of I
or X received in preceding term of atten-
dance.
July 19, Saturday, 10:00-12 noon ..........Foreign language functional knowledge ex-
aminations for graduate students, Walker
Auditorium.
August 2, Saturday, 9:45 a.m. ................ETS foreign language reading knowledge ex-
aminations in French, German, Russian, and
Spanish, Leigh 207.
August 8, Friday, 4:00 p.m. ..................Last day for withdrawing without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
August 11, Monday, 4:00 p.m. ............Last day for candidates for master's and
doctor's degrees to be awarded at the
end of the quarter to file theses with the
Dean of the Graduate School.
August 23, Saturday ..............................All classes end.
August 25, Monday ..............................Final examinations begin.
September 2, Tuesday, noon ................All grades for Summer Quarter due in the
Office of the Registrar.
September 3, Wednesday, noon ...........Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Graduate School Office.













General Information


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL consists of the dean, the assistant deans, the
Graduate Council, and the graduate faculty. General policies and standards
of the Graduate School are established by the graduate faculty. The Gradu-
ate School is responsible for the enforcement of minimum general
standards of graduate work in the University and for the coordination of the
graduate programs of the various colleges and divisions of the University. The
responsibility for the detailed operations of graduate programs is vested in the
individual colleges, divisions, and departments. In most of the colleges an
assistant dean or other official is directly responsible for graduate study in his
college.
The Graduate Council, of which the dean is chairman, assists him in
being the agent of the graduate faculty for execution of policy related to
graduate study and associated research. The Council considers petitions and
recommends the award of graduate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty
are appointed by the dean with the approval of the Graduate Council on the
basis of specific needs and qualifications to meet the needs. Thus members of
the graduate faculty fall into three categories in accordance with their func-
tion: those who are appointed to teach graduate courses, those appointed to
direct the master's theses, and those appointed to direct doctoral dissertations.
No staff member is expected to perform any of these functions without having
been appointed to the graduate faculty, though temporary exceptions may be
made in unusual circumstances. Membership on the graduate faculty is based
upon departmental need and ability to carry out certain responsibilities relative
to the instruction of graduate students, but nonmembership does not imply the
lack of such ability.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study was very informal.
Control was in the hands of a faculty committee which reported directly to
the President. In 1910, however, James N. Anderson, head of the Department
of Ancient Languages, was appointed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
and Director of Graduate Work, and in 1930 he became the first dean of
the Graduate School. He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1938 by T. M.
Simpson, head of the Department of Mathematics, who held the position until
he became dean emeritus in 1951. C. F. Byers, head of the Department of
Biological Sciences in the University College, served as acting dean from June
1951 until August 1952, when he was succeeded by the present dean, L. E.
Grinter, who came to Florida from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where
he had served as Vice President, Dean of the Graduate School, and Research
Professor.








2 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Study leading to graduate degrees has existed at the University of Florida
from the date of the establishment of the University on its present campus. The
first M.A. was awarded in 1906, the major being English, and the first M.S.
in 1908, with major in entomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D.
were initiated in 1930, and the first degrees were awarded in 1934, one with
major in chemistry and the other with major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was
awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal growth at the Uni-
versity of Florida. In 1920 two degrees were awarded in two fields. In 1930,
33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded in
16 fields. In 1966-67 the total number of degrees awarded was 1,139 in 83
fields. The proportion of doctor's degrees has increased steadily. In 1950,
18 Ph.D.'s and 5 Ed.D.'s were awarded. In 1966-67 the totals were 156
Ph.D.'s and 38 Ed.D.'s.


GRADUATE PROGRAMS

NON-THESIS DEGREES
MASTER OF AGRICULTURE, with major in any field in agriculture
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, with major in any field in business
administration and in health and hospital administration
MASTER OF EDUCATION, with major in any field in education, including busi-
ness education and music education
MASTER OF ENGINEERING
MASTER OF NURSING
MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH, with major in physical educa-
tion
MASTER OF REHABILITATION COUNSELING
MASTER OF STATISTICS
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING, with major in appropriate departments in
the various colleges
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING, with major in appropriate departments
in the various colleges
SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION-a special degree requiring one year of graduate
work beyond the master's degree
ENGINEER-a special degree requiring one year of graduate work beyond the
master's degree

THESIS DEGREES
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE, with major in one of the following:
Agricultural Economics Fruit Crops
Agricultural Education Ornamental Horticulture
Agronomy Plant Pathology
Animal Science Poultry Science
Dairy Science Soils
Entomology and Nematology Vegetable Crops
Food Science
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION








GRADUATE PROGRAMS / 3

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING, with major in one of the following:
Aerospace Engineering Environmental Engineering Sciences
Agricultural Engineering Industrial and Systems Engineering
Chemical Engineering Mechanical Engineering
Civil Engineering Metallurgical and Materials
Electrical Engineering Engineering
Engineering Science Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Engineering Science and
Mechanics
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN STATISTICS
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY, with major in one of the following:
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Pharmacy
Pharmacognosy
MASTER OF SCIENCE, with major in one of the following:
Astronomy Mathematics
Bacteriology Pathology
Biochemistry Physics
Botany Plant Pathology
Chemistry Psychology
Entomology and Nematology Radiation Biophysics
Geography Veterinary Science
Geology Zoology
MASTER OF FINE ARTS
MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE, with major in one of the following:
Architectural Design Building Construction
MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION, with major in one of the following:
Agricultural Education Foundations of Education
Business Education Personnel Services
Educational Administration Secondary Education
Elementary Education
MASTER OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
MASTER OF ARTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
MASTER OF ARTS, with major in one of the following:
Accounting Management and Business Law
Anthropology Marketing
Economics Mathematics
English Philosophy
Finance and Insurance Political Science
French Psychology
Geography Real Estate
German Sociology
History Spanish
Latin Speech
Latin American Area Studies
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION, with major in one of the following:
Curriculum and Instruction Foundations of Education
Educational Administration Personnel Services








4 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY, with major in one of the following:


Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural Economics
Agronomy
Animal Science
Anthropology
Astronomy
Bacteriology
Biochemistry
Botany
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Economics
Economics and Business Ad-
ministration
Education, including
Curriculum and Instruction
Educational Administration
Foundations of Education
Personnel Services
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Science and Mechanics
English
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Engineering
Sciences
French
Fruit Crops
Geography


History
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medical Sciences, including
Anatomical Sciences
Biochemistry
Microbiology
Pathology
Pharmacology
Physiology
Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacognosy
Pharmacy
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science, including
International Relations
Psychology
Sociology
Soils
Spanish
Speech
Systems Engineering
(Operations Research)
Vegetable Crops
Zoology


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION to the Graduate School must be made to
the Director of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at times stipu-
lated in the University Calendar. Applications which meet minimum standards
for admissions are referred by the Director to the graduate selection commit-
tees of the various colleges and divisions for approval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete official transcripts
of all the applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in the possession
of the Registrar, and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is
received directly from the Registrar of the institution in which the work was
done. Official supplementary transcripts are required, as soon as they are
available, for any work completed after making application.
In general, no student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the University.







ADMISSION / 5


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
UNDERGRADUATE REcoRD-Unqualified admission to the Graduate School
is commonly dependent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from
an accredited college or curriculum with an average grade of B for the junior
and senior years. In some units of the Graduate School and on the more ad-
vanced levels of graduate study, an undergraduate average considerably above
B may be required. In some units (see the following two paragraphs) admis-
sion may be considered with an undergraduate average somewhat below B.
College graduate admission selection committees take into account not only
the general grade average, but the distribution of work and the quality and
extent of preparation for the graduate program the student proposes to under-
take.
In the College of Education, admission to programs leading to the degrees
of Master of Arts in Education or Master of Education is normally limited
to those students who have maintained at least a 2.75 grade point average
in their upper division work.
The minimum undergraduate grade average acceptable for admission to
programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in Physical Education and
Health, and Master of Physical Education and Health is 2.5, calculated on a
basis of 4.0 as the highest possible average and covering the last two years
of undergraduate work (at least 90 credits).
In the College of Agriculture, admission to graduate study is normally
limited to those students who have maintained at least a 2.75 grade point
average in their upper-division work and 3.0 in their major subject. For stu-
dents with an undergraduate major in general agriculture, the minimum upper-
division average is 2.85. In exceptional cases, where a candidate has demon-
strated in some other way his fitness to do graduate work, as, for instance,
outstanding achievement since earning the bachelor's degree, he may be con-
sidered for admission.
While the general admissions requirements described above apply to both
master's and doctoral candidates, it should be noted that doctoral candidates
must meet certain additional requirements which vary according to the pro-
grams established by the departments and colleges. Furthermore, it is desirable
for students planning to enter certain colleges and departments to have a
reading knowledge of at least one foreign language.

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE ENGINEERING
EDUCATION SYSTEM (GENESYS)
The Graduate Engineering Education System (GENESYS) is a part of the
College of Engineering and as such follows the regular University Calendar.
Applications can be accepted as late as the final date listed in the University
Calendar; however, since the records of all applicants for GENESYS must be
reviewed by the College of Engineering and time is required to assemble the
necessary transcripts and test scores, it is strongly urged that application be
made well in advance of the final date.








6 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

All applicants seeking to enroll for credit in courses through GENESYS
must secure admission to the University of Florida. Application for admission
must be made to the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, University
of Florida, on forms obtained from the Resident Director of GENESYS at
Cape Kennedy, Orlando, or Daytona Beach. No application will be considered
unless complete official transcripts of all the applicant's undergraduate and
graduate work are in the possession of the Registrar and no transcript will
be accepted as official unless it is received directly from the Registrar of the
institution in which the work was done.
Applicants for GENESYS may be admitted initially to the Graduate
School, or to the College of Engineering as postgraduate students, depending
upon the applicant's qualifications and objectives. In order to be admitted to
the Graduate School the GENESYS applicant must satisfy all admission re-
quirements established by the Graduate School. Briefly stated these require-
ments include the presentation of a baccalaureate degree in engineering or
science from an accredited college or curriculum with an average grade of B
for the junior and senior years; a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record
Examinations; and the recommendation of the Graduate Selection Com-
mittee of the College of Engineering.
Applicants for GENESYS who do not fully meet the requirements for
admission to the Graduate School or who do not desire to work for a graduate
degree may be admitted to the College of Engineering as postgraduate stu-
dents. Such students may subsequently be admitted to the Graduate School by
removing deficiencies, if any, in their qualifications. Applications will be con-
sidered individually on the basis of the applicant's overall record. The basic
requirement for admission to GENESYS as a postgraduate student in the
College of Engineering is the possession of the baccalaureate degree in engi-
neering or science from an accredited college or curriculum. Although test
scores from the Graduate Record Examinations are not required, applicants
are strongly advised to submit scores on both the aptitude test and the ad-
vanced test in engineering of the GRE as evidence of their qualification for
admission. Satisfactory scores on the GRE will be required for subsequent
admission to the Graduate School.

ADMISSION PROCEDURES FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS
All foreign students whose native tongue is not English making application
for admission to the Graduate School of the University of Florida must present
their scores on TOEFL (Testing of English as a Foreign Language). Each
applicant is asked to write TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Princeton,
New Jersey, U.S.A., requesting a Bulletin of Information and registration
form. It is important to remember that final consideration cannot be granted
a foreign student's application for admission until his scores on this test are
received by: Admission Section, Office of the Registrar, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601, U. S. A.








ADMISSION / 7

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION REQUIREMENT
All students are required to submit satisfactory scores on the Graduate
Record Examination for admission to the Graduate School. However, students
educated in foreign countries who apply for admission while residing outside
the United States may be given a postponement of this requirement until the
first quarter of attendance at the University of Florida. Permission to register for
a second quarter will depend upon completion of the examination.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
A satisfactory average score on the Graduate Record Examination is re-
quired for admission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the
aptitude test of the GRE, but either at the request of the department concerned
or on his own volition, the applicant is encouraged to submit in addition the
score on one or more advanced subject matter tests of the GRE. The scores
on all tests taken will be weighed in regard to admission.
The GRE is given six times a year-in October, December, January,
February, April, and July-at a great many locations in the United States,
including Gainesville, Florida. To determine exact dates and the most con-
venient locations, students should write to the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey. Applications are required several weeks prior to the
examination, and scores are received about a month after the examination.
Hence, it is necessary to apply for the GRE in early September for admission
in January, in early January for admission in March, and in early March for
admission in September. Other examinations are given in early February and
early July but the ones listed above are correlated with admissions deadlines.
Students enrolled in the Graduate School prior to establishment of the
GRE requirement for admission (June, 1956) are permitted to complete the
degree on which they were working. However, if the student has not been
registered for graduate work at the University for seven years, or if he wishes
to work toward a second graduate degree, he must submit satisfactory GRE
scores before readmission.
POSTPONEMENT OF THE GRE.-If a student applies for admission too
late to take the GRE before his expected date of entry, particularly for a
summer session, he may apply for admission to the Graduate School with
postponement of the GRE and submit his score on the Miller Analogies Test
to be used as a partial basis for deciding whether tentative admission may be
granted. It should be noted, however, that the Miller Analogies Test is not a
substitute for the GRE. In cases where the GRE has been postponed it must
be taken with satisfactory results before a second registration will be per-
mitted.
THE MILLER ANALOGIES TEST is given at about 250 colleges and uni-
versities throughout the country, and is administered by the University Counsel-
ing Center, Winston W. Little Hall, Room 311, throughout the calendar year
at 3:00 P.M. on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday. During the week prior








8 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
to the first day of classes the test will also be offered at 10:00 A.M. on Monday
and 3:00 P.M. on Tuesday and Friday. Special appointments can be made by
contacting the Counseling Center. The cost of the test, $3.00, should be paid
to Student Accounts, the Hub, and the receipt should be presented at the time
of testing.
Test scores should be presented to the Dean of the Graduate School. No
student can be considered for postponement of the GRE until after his applica-
tion for admission is complete and all his credentials have been received in the
Office of the Registrar.
ADMISSION TEST FOR GRADUATE STUDY IN BUSINESS.-Students applying
for admission to the Graduate School who wish to pursue degrees in the
College of Business Administration may submit satisfactory scores on the Ad-
mission Test for Graduate Study in Business (ATGSB) as a substitute for the
required scores on the Aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination.
The Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business (ATGSB) is given
five times a year-in November, February, April, July, and August-at a great
many locations in the United States, including Gainesville, Florida. To deter-
mine exact dates and the most convenient locations, students should write to
the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey.

TRIAL PROGRAMS
The Graduate School approves two types of trial programs under the
fifth-year undergraduate registration for applicants whose admission for grad-
uate study is in doubt. These programs are arranged by the major department
when the student has been referred to it for this purpose by the Registrar.
Trial programs are reserved strictly for genuinely problematical or border-
line cases.
TYPE I (partly transferable): a program of about 15 quarter credits con-
sisting of advanced undergraduate courses and no more than 5 credits of
graduate courses. Upon completion of the program with an average of B or
better, appropriate credits may be transferred to the student's graduate
record, provided that this transfer is approved by his major department, his
college, and the Graduate School, and that all other requirements for admis-
sion to the Graduate School have been met.
Programs of Type I are used where a student's previous grade record or
GRE scores are on the borderline of acceptability.
TYPE II (nontransferable): a program of 15 or more credits of under-
graduate work, none of which may be transferred to the student's graduate
record.
Programs of Type II are used (1) to validate undergraduate records from
nonaccredited and unevaluated colleges; (2) in cases where the quantity or
quality of the student's preparation cannot be determined with sufficient cer-
tainty for judging admission; (3) to repair extensive deficiencies in undergrad-
uate programs which do not meet the prerequisites for graduate study laid
down by the student's proposed major department (minor deficiencies of less








ADMISSION / 9

than 15 credits and change of field requirements covered by this Catalog may
be handled on a non-credit basis as part of the graduate program for students
who meet admission standards).
If the trial program of either type is completed with an average grade of B
or better and other admission requirements have been met, the student will,
upon recommendation of his major department and college, be given unquali-
fied admission to the Graduate School. To secure this change of status, the
student should apply through his department chairman and college dean to the
Registrar. Students who fail to achieve a B average in their trial programs will
be terminated.
All trial programs must be formally approved by the major department
and college and filed with the Registrar and the Graduate School in order
that there may be no question in either office concerning the termination of
the program or of the courses to be used in calculating the grade average.

ADMISSION TO A SECOND GRADUATE PROGRAM
A student who has completed a degree program in the Graduate School
may not undertake an additional degree program without the approval of the
chairman of the department in which he proposes to do his major work. GRE
scores must be submitted by the student at the time he proposes an additional
degree program even though they were not required at the time he started his
previous degree work. It is particularly important that the qualifications of the
student be carefully weighed before he is permitted to undertake work for the
doctor's degree.

UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION IN GRADUATE COURSES
An undergraduate student at the University of Florida may enroll in 600-
level courses if he has senior standing and an upper division grade point aver-
age of at least 3.0. His total registration, during any term in which he is en-
rolled in a graduate course, may not exceed 15 credits. If a graduate course
taken under this provision is to be applied toward a graduate degree at the
University of Florida, the student must obtain written approval of his college
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School prior to registering for the course.
Undergraduate students enrolled in the three-year master's degree program
may register in graduate courses after obtaining the approval of the program
advisory committee and the assistant dean of the Graduate School in charge of
the program.

ADMISSION OF FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS
Members of the faculty of the University of Florida with a rank of assistant
professor or above (or equivalent), except county agents in the Agricultural
Extension Service, may not receive a graduate degree from this institution.
They may, however, register for work in the Graduate School and apply the
credit earned to graduate degrees to be conferred by other institutions.








10 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
It is the responsibility of the student to inform himself concerning, and to
observe, all regulations and procedures required by the course he is pursuing.
In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a
student pleads ignorance of the regulation or asserts that he was not informed
of it by his adviser or other authority. The student should make himself
especially familiar with (1) this section of the Catalog, (2) the section pre-
senting the requirements for the degree he plans to take, and (3) the offerings
and requirements of his major department.
CONSULTATION WITH COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENT.-After the student
has been admitted to the Graduate School but before his first registration, he
should consult the college and department in which he will do his work con-
cerning course requirements, deficiencies if any, the planning of a program,
special regulations, etc. Departments may have degree requirements that are
not listed in this Catalog. All registrations require the signature of the dean
of the college (or his representative) in which the degree is to be awarded.

LOADS
The University of Florida adopted, beginning in September of 1967, a
quarter system of operation consisting of four 10-week periods of instruction
and examination. Class schedules have been revised so that a credit under the
quarter system is equal to 2/3 of a semester credit.
MAXIMUM REGISTRATION.-The maximum graduate registration sug-
gested in any quarter is 15 credits. Where 4- or 5-credit courses or 1-credit
seminars are included in registration, a 17-credit load is acceptable. Part-time
employment of any kind, either within or without the University, reduces the
maximum study load as indicated by the following table:

Range of
Fraction of Maximum Hours Registration Residence
Time Employed Per Week Employed Quarter Credits Acquired
Min. Max.
none none 15 17 1 quarter
%-time 15 12 14 % quarter
Y2-time 20 9 11 % quarter
%-time 30 7 8 % quarter
fully employed 40 Up to 6 credits, in- % quarter
eluding registration
in one course plus
thesis research.

MINIMUM REGISTRATION.-Holders of fellowships or assistantships and
part-time interim instructors who are working for a graduate degree must








GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS / 11

register for graduate study programs commensurate with the study time per-
mitted by their awards, and must pay full fees.
VETERAN'S CERTIFICATION.-Students who are applying for assistance
under the Veterans' Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966 (Public Law 89-358),
and whose applications are otherwise acceptable to the Veterans Administra-
tion, will automatically be certified by the Registrar as follows:
Quarter Registration
Certification
full 14 or more credits
3 10-13 credits
7- 9 credits
fees only 6 credits
Students who desire higher certification must submit through the Graduate
School office the form "Certification of Study Load." Appropriate allowance
in "equivalent credits" may be made on this form for preparation for language
examinations or qualifying examinations, or for other studies specifically re-
quired by the student's supervisory committee. Where the supervisory com-
mittee classifies the student's employment as research and as a contribution to
the student's approved educational program, additional certification will norm-
ally be approved. Certification will be on the basis of the following proportion:
Certification Minimum Maximum
Study Load Employment
full 12 credits 15 hrs. per week (%-time)
% 9 credits 20 hrs. per week (%-time)
% 7 credits 30 hrs. per week (%-time)
fees only 1 credit full-time employee
HOUSING CERTIFICATION.-The University Housing Office requires the "Cer-
tification of Study Load" form for students with less than a full-time load
(as defined by their college or school).

RESIDENCE
Residence at the University of Florida is determined on a quarter basis.
The University of Florida will grant residence credit of three quarters for full-
time registration for an academic year of work done at another institution.
Specific residence requirements of doctoral degrees will be found in the section
of this Catalog dealing with the Ph.D. degree.

COURSES AND CREDITS
Courses numbered 500-599 are for fifth-year or other advanced under-
graduate programs. Regulations as to the use of these courses in graduate
programs, grading, and minimum class size will be the same as for courses
in the 400 category. Courses numbered 600 and above are limited to graduate
students. Courses numbered 700 and above are graduate courses primarily for
advanced graduate students.








12 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Undergraduate courses numbered 300 and above are acceptable for
minor credit when taken as a part of an approved graduate program. Courses
bearing numbers below 600 may not be used for graduate major credit unless
they have been approved for this purpose by the Graduate Council. In any
case, at least 50 per cent of the minimum course work for any master's degree
must be in courses numbered 600 or above.
Registration in the course numbered 699, Master's Research, may be from
0 to 9 credits, and in the course numbered 799, Doctoral Research, may be
from 1 to 15 credits in one quarter. The total registration in 699 is limited to
24 credits. Advisers should assign to registration in these courses the number
of credits appropriate to the planned work in research. Registration for zero
credit should be assigned only in exceptional situations, since the registration
should normally reflect the proposed program of research. On the assign-
ment of credit for research which is a part of a student's employment, as
well as a contribution to his thesis or dissertation, see the section on Residence
for the Ph.D. degree.
A complete list of approved graduate courses appears in the section of this
Catalog entitled Departmental Courses. Departments reserve the right to de-
cide which of these graduate courses shall be given in any quarter. The pub-
lished Schedule of Courses does not always include all graduate courses offered;
the departments, therefore, should be consulted concerning available courses.
CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK.-No courses may be taken
for graduate credit by correspondence. No extension courses may be used for
graduate credit except in programs for the M.Ag., M.Ed., M.A.E., M.P.H.,
and Ed.S. For regulations governing the use of such courses in the degree
programs named, see below, under requirements for specific degrees, the limits
on off-campus work. Extension work taken at another institution (except
through the Board of Regents Office for Continuing Education) may not be
transferred to the University of Florida for graduate credit.
STATE CENTERS FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION.-Course work is available
in the graduate residence centers established in the state. Degree programs
to which residence center work may be applied are Master of Agriculture,
Master of Education, Master of Engineering, Master of Business Administra-
tion and, Master of Physical Education and Health. The amount of credit
acceptable for transfer to a degree program varies according to the degree
sought. For regulations governing the use of residence center work in the
degree programs named, see below, under requirements for specific degrees.

GRADES
Passing grades for graduate students are A, B, and C. Grades of C in
courses below 600-level are acceptable for credit toward graduate degrees
only if the total program meets the B-average requirement. C grades in 600-
and 700-level courses count toward a graduate degree only if an equal number
of credits in courses numbered 600 or above have been earned with a grade
ofA.
Admission to candidacy for a graduate degree and the award of such








GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS / 13

degrees depend (among other requirements) upon maintenance of an average
grade of B for all work attempted in the major and minor fields. Any grade
of I (incomplete) in the fields of the major and minor (or minors) must
be removed by completing all required work, unless a grade point average of
3.0 is maintained, including incomplete courses. Grades in courses numbered
699 and 799 are not considered in calculating these averages.
It is the responsibility of the thesis or dissertation director to submit a
grade in 699 or 799. The grade may be any of the standard letter grades or
it may be I. If the grade of I is recorded, it should be changed to a regular
letter grade as soon as the student has completed the work appropriate to the
credits of registration in 699 or 799 and no later than the completion of the
thesis or dissertation.

UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP
Any graduate student may be denied further registration in the Univer-
sity or in his graduate major if his progress toward the completion of his
planned program becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory progress has been
defined by the Graduate Council as failure to maintain an accumulative
grade average of B in all work attempted in the Graduate School.

CHANGE OF MAJOR
Graduate students already admitted for work in one department who wish
to transfer to another department within the same college, or students who
wish to change from one college to another, must make formal application
through the Office of the Registrar.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS
In those degree programs where a foreign language examination is re-
quired, the following principles and procedures apply:
Each candidate, at the time of applying for a functional knowledge ex-
amination, must present a certificate of admission to the Department of For-
eign Languages. This certificate must bear the signature of his supervisory
chairman or departmental adviser and must state that he is believed to be
prepared for the examination.
If he fails to pass a foreign language reading knowledge examination
or a functional knowledge examination, the student must present to the
Graduate School, through his supervisory committee chairman, acceptable
evidence that he has made a serious attempt to prepare himself for
re-examination. If the evidence is acceptable, the student will be given a certifi-
cate of admission to a second examination.
Those students wishing to be certified as proficient in a reading knowledge
of French, German, Russian, or Spanish will take the Graduate School For-
eign Language Tests administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS)
and given four times a year on the University of Florida campus. Since the
ETS examinations are nationally administered, the Graduate School will ac-








14 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
cept scores from the examinations taken at any other authorized location in
the United States.
Students apply for these examinations by paying an examination fee of
$6.25 to Student Accounts, the Hub, and then presenting a receipt to the
Graduate School office in exchange for an admission ticket to the examination.
Each of the ETS examinations requires 80 minutes and consists of two
separately timed parts. Designed to gauge mastery of the basic vocabulary
and structure of the languages, Section I contains 40 multiple-choice ques-
tions cast in the foreign language of the test and requires 40 minutes of
working time. Section II of the test consists of four alternate parts, each a
sample of the literature of one of the following broad fields: biological sciences,
humanities, physical sciences, or social sciences. The student selects one of the
four fields and answers the questions in English to reveal his understanding
of the passage. No dictionaries are allowed. Foreign language examinations
other than those covered by the ETS will be given by the Foreign Language
Department. Information may be obtained at the office of the Graduate
School. For testing dates, see the University Calendar in this Catalog.

PROCEDURE FOR FINAL QUARTER
It is essential that the student inform himself concerning deadline dates
as set forth in the University Calendar and in the announcements issued by
the Dean of the Graduate School and by the officials of the student's college,
school, or department. Regular issues of Deadline Dates are available each
quarter.
When a student registers for his last term, he will receive notice of fees
due to cover cost of diploma and hood. He must take this notice to Student
Accounts, the Hub, for payment by the deadline specified in the University
Calendar.
When his thesis is ready to be put in final form he should get instruc-
tions from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School.
Normally, students in the Graduate School must be registered in the
University at the time they receive a degree. If, however, a student has com-
pleted all requirements for his degree, including courses, residence, thesis or
dissertation, and all examinations, at the time of registration for the term in
which his degree is to be awarded, the Graduate Council will consider a pe-
tition to waive this regulation. In brief, a student must be registered for the
term in which his final examination is given.

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT
Only one commencement ceremony is scheduled annually. Graduates who
are to receive advanced degrees are urged to attend Commencement in order
to accept personally the honor indicated by the appropriate hood. The student
must arrange through the University Bookstore for proper academic costume
to be worn at Commencement.
Diplomas will be given at the end of each quarter, and hoods will be








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 15

mailed immediately after Commencement to graduates who were unable to
attend.


REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES
GENERAL REGULATIONS
COURSE REQUIREMENTS.-At least 50 per cent of the minimum course
requirement for all master's degrees must be 600-level or above.
RESIDENCE.-For any master's degree the student in residence must spend
at least three full-time quarters, or equivalent, as a graduate student at the
University of Florida.
Nonresident county agents in the Agricultural Extension Service may use
three three-week summer sessions for the purpose of satisfying the residence
requirements for the degrees Master of Agriculture or Master of Science in
Agriculture, but only if they have also spent one quarter in full-time resident
graduate study on the campus at the University of Florida.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION.-A comprehensive examination, oral,
written, or both, must be passed by the candidate. (For the M.Ed.
degree see below for special requirement.) This examination will cover at least
the candidate's field of concentration, and in no case may it be scheduled earlier
than six months before the degree is to be conferred.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-The student should apply for admission to
candidacy through his department when approximately one-half of the re-
quired course work is completed and not later than two quarters prior to
the date of completion of requirements for the degree. The Graduate Coun-
cil reserves the right to deny degrees to persons who have failed to comply
with this regulation at the proper time. Admission to candidacy is not auto-
matic. It requires a formal application distinct from registration. The stu-
dent must have a B average for all graduate work completed in order to
be admitted to candidacy.
TRANSFER OF CREDITS.-Courses of full graduate level to the extent of
9 quarter credits earned with an A or a B may be transferred from an
institution approved for this purpose by the Graduate School. Acceptance
of transfer credit requires approval of the student's supervisory committee
and the Graduate Council. Non-resident or extension work taken at another
institution (with the exception of work taken through the Board of Regents
Office for Continuing Education) may not be transferred to the University
of Florida for graduate credit.
TIME LIMIT.-All work for the master's degree must be completed within
seven years from the time of first registration.

MASTER'S DEGREES WITHOUT THESIS
MASTER OF AGRICULTURE
The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who
wish additional training before entering business occupations or professions,








16 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
rather than for those interested primarily in research. The basic requirements,
including those for admission, residence, supervisory committee, plan of study,
and admission to candidacy, are the same as those outlined for the Master
of Science in Agriculture degree, but the work requirements conform to the
specific objectives of the Master of Agriculture degree.
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 50 credits of course work is required,
of which at least 25 quarter credits shall be at the 600-level or above. If
a departmental major is claimed, 18 credits must be in the major depart-
ment, and consist of courses strictly for graduates (600-level) or under-
graduate courses (500-level) approved by the Graduate Council for grad-
uate major credit. Each student's program is designed to take into account
the qualifications and needs of the individual and is subject to the approval
of the supervisory committee. A thesis is not required, but the student must
submit reports, term papers, and records of work accomplished. A compre-
hensive written qualifying examination, given by the supervisory committee,
is required two quarters prior to graduation. Failure to qualify in this exam-
ination will require either the student's elimination from the program or addi-
tional course work. A final oral examination by the supervisory committee
covering the whole field of study of the candidate is required.
LIMITS ON OFF-CAMPUS WoRK.--Credit for courses taken through the
State Centers for Continuing Education as applied to the degree of Master
of Agriculture is limited to 25 credits. Credit in extension courses (limited to
9 credits) from the University of Florida and Florida State University and
credit transferred from another accredited institution reduce proportionately
the credit accepted from the graduate residence centers.
For further details, inquire of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING
These degrees are designed for graduate students majoring in departments
of the various colleges of the University who intend to teach in junior or
four-year colleges. Requirements for admission are the same as those for the
regular M.A. and M.S. degrees in the various colleges, and programs lead-
ing to the M.A.T. and the M.S.T. may, with proper approval, be incor-
porated into programs leading to the Ph.D.
The requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language.
2. Satisfactory completion of at least 54 credits of work while registered
as a graduate student; at least 50 per cent of these credits must be
600-level or above, with work distributed as follows:
a. At least 27 credits in the major and 9 credits in a minor.
b. Nine credits in a departmental internship in teaching. Three years of
successful teaching experience may be substituted for the internship
requirement.
c. At least three courses, which may be used as the minor, in educa-
tional psychology, sociology (education or community) and curricu-
lum dealing with the junior college. If any or all of these courses








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 17

have been satisfactorily completed before the program is begun, the
credits thus made available may be used for further work in the
major, the minor, or in education.
3. At the completion of this degree, the student, for certification pur-
poses, must present from his undergraduate and graduate degree pro-
grams no fewer than 36 hours in his major field.
4. A final comprehensive examination, either oral or written or both, must
be passed by the candidate. This examination will cover at least the
candidate's field of concentration.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree have
been designed to give the student broad general preparation for managerial
work with emphasis upon developing his capacities and skills for business
decision-making. A limited amount of specialization in one field is also re-
quired.
This degree is awarded upon the completion of a foundation program of
8 courses and a graduate program of 51 credits. The foundation program
may be satisfied in whole or in part by appropriate undergraduate courses.
A student having an undergraduate degree in business administration will
normally need only 51 credits for the degree. He can, therefore, complete the
requirements for the degree in a calendar year.
FOUNDATION PROGRAM.-The foundation program must include a mini-
mum of 8 courses as follows:
Economic Principles 2 courses
Accounting 1 course
Quantitative Methods/Statistics 1 course
Business Law 1 course
Business Finance 1 course
Management 1 course
Marketing 1 course
(The accounting requirement may be met with ATG 510-Survey of Ac-
counting-(5 credits) or equivalent. If the student presents the usual two-
term introductory accounting course, the foundation program will total a mini-
mum of 9 courses.)
THE GRADUATE PROGRAM.-Each candidate for the M.B.A. will take the
following courses:
BS 679-Business Policy 4 credits
BS 690-Business Research and Reports 2 credits
BS 691-Business Research and Reports 2 credits
ES 615-Economics of Business Decisions 5 credits
ES 616-Economic Environment of Business 4 credits
The following courses are required of each candidate unless waived be-
cause of adequate course work (graduate or undergraduate) taken in the same
area:








18 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
BS 610-Managerial Accounting 4 credits
BS 664-Managerial Statistics 4 credits
BS 671-Human Relations in Business 4 credits
MGT 570-Production Management Problems 5 credits
A candidate whose undergraduate work in quantitative methods does not
meet the level of competence necessary for effective work in some of the
required courses will be required to remedy this deficiency. At least 5 credits
taken for this purpose may be counted for graduate credit.
CONCENTRATION.-Each candidate will select one field of concentration
from the following: Accounting, Finance, Foreign Trade, Health and Hos-
pital Administration, Insurance, Management, Marketing, Quantitative Analysis
for Business, Real Estate and Urban Land Studies, and Transportation.
In all areas except Health and Hospital Administration, the concentration
consists of a minimum of 18 credits in approved courses. Of these 18 credits,
at least 9 must be completed as a part of the graduate program and must be
in courses approved for graduate major credit. When feasible at least
one 4-credit course on the 600-level should be included in the concentration. A
maximum of 9 credits in the concentration may have been completed for
undergraduate credit or as a part of the foundation program. The required
basic courses in accounting may not be used as a part of the concentration in
accounting. The required basic courses in business finance, marketing, and
production management may be used as a part of the concentration in each
of these fields.
ELECTIVES.-Any elective courses will be selected from approved courses
offered by the College of Business Administration.
CONCENTRATION IN HEALTH AND HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION.-The
Master of Business Administration degree with a concentration in Health and
Hospital Administration is offered by the College of Business Administration.
The course work in the area of concentration is offered by the colleges of
Health Related Professions, Law, and Engineering.
In addition to meeting the usual requirements for admission to the Grad-
uate School, students who expect to enroll in this concentration must com-
municate directly with the Chairman of the Program in Health and Hospital
Administration, who will arrange for a personal interview with the applicant.
Since 22 credits are required for this concentration, certain courses normally
required may be waived when necessary to allow the student to complete the
graduate program with 51 credits. Foundation course requirements are the
same for this concentration as for all others. The following courses are re-
quired:
HA 600-Perspectives in Health 4 credits
HA 601-Hospital Organization, the
Community and Patient Care 3 credits
HA 602-Financial Administration of Health
and Hospital Care 3 credits
HA 610-Seminar in Health and Hospital
Administration 4 credits








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 19

HA 611-Seminar in Health and Hospital
Administration 2 credits
IG 698--Special Problems 4 credits
LW 696-Hospital and Health Law Seminar 2 credits

In addition to the courses listed above, a research and practicum period
of one quarter and an administrative residency of two quarters are required
of all candidates in this concentration.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION.-In the latter part of the term in which
the candidate expects to complete his course work, he will take his final
comprehensive written and oral examination covering his entire program.
Examinations for all M.B.A. degrees, including the Health and Hospital Ad-
ministration concentration, are administered by an examining committee ap-
pointed from the graduate faculty of the College of Business Administration.

MASTER OF EDUCATION
PURPOSE.-This degree is designed to meet the need for professional per-
sonnel to serve the variety of functions required in established and emerging
educational activities of modern society.
DESCRIPTION.-The minimum requirement for the M.Ed. degree is 50
credits in courses numbered 300 and above, with at least 25 of these credits
at or above the 600 level.
CREDIT REQUIRED IN EDUCATION COURSEs.-Either (A) a minimum of
32 credits in the M.Ed. program, of which at least 24 are at or above the 600
level; or (B) 48 credits in the undergraduate and graduate program, but in no
case less that 16 credits at or above the 600 level in the M.Ed. program.
CREDIT REQUIRED IN COURSES OUTSIDE OF EDUCATION.-Nine credits
for students in the departments of Administration and Supervision, Elementary
Education and Personnel Services; 25 credits for students in Secondary Educa-
tion and Foundations of Education, except only 9 credits required for those
entering with deficiencies in Education.
All M.Ed. programs include a core of required courses consisting of at least
one course from two of the following four areas: General Curriculum; Psycho-
logical Foundations of Education; Social, Philosophical, Historical or Com-
parative Foundations of Education; Measurement or Statistics.
Each student is required to submit a plan of study which shows acceptable
balance and direction. The planned program is to be approved by the student's
counselor, the chairman of the student's area of specialization in Education,
and the Office of Graduate Studies in Education during the first term of work
or before. After the program has been developed, any change must be re-
quested in writing and similarly approved.
TRANSFER OF CREDITS.-If recommended in advance by the graduate
committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student may
be permitted to study in other institutions to the extent of (but not to exceed)
9 credits. No graduate credits earned prior to admission to the University
may be transferred without special recommendation of the graduate committee








20 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
and the approval of the Graduate Council. No more than 9 credits may be
thus transferred.
STATE CENTERS FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION.-Students may study for
the Master of Education degree in State Centers for Continuing Education
provided they have been fully admitted to the Graduate School of the University
of Florida (7 ED classification), or if they are in the process of applying for
admission. If admitted during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a course,
the credit received may apply toward the degree provided it is appropriate to a
planned program. Degree credits earned in a center are subject to the limit
on off-campus work given below.
Students not working toward a degree in the University System may also
register for courses at these centers provided they have been admitted to the
University of Florida for post-baccalaureate study (6 ED classification), or
are in the process of applying for admission. Except for students holding a
master's degree, enrollment in this status is limited to two courses.
LIMITS ON OFF-CAMPUS WORK.-The University limits off-campus work
taken in extension, in other institutions, and in the Florida State Centers for
Continuing Education. The limits imposed are as follows: (1) extension credit-
9 credits; (2) residence credit transferred from another accredited institution-
9 credits; (3) residence credit earned in a Florida State Center for Continuing
Education-25 credits. Any credits offered from (1) or (2) above reduce by
the same amount the credit accepted from (3). Acceptance of credit toward
the M.Ed. degree from any of these sources is contingent upon the appro-
priateness of the work in the program planned by the student and his counselor.
ON-CAMPUS RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS.-25 credits must be taken on
the Gainesville campus including at least one quarter in full-time residence.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to candidacy for the Master of
Education degree is recommended to the Graduate Council by the Graduate
Committee of the College of Education on the basis of an evaluation of the
applicant at the end of from 16 to 25 credits of graduate work at the Uni-
versity of Florida. The student is responsible for filing the application no later
than the quarter prior to that in which he plans to graduate.
This evaluation is based in part on (1) the student's academic record,
(2) the student's GRE scores, (3) evidence of competency in the use (oral
or written) of the English language, (4) evaluation of personal qualities and
promise of professional attainment by persons to whom the applicant's record
is known, (5) the student's experience record, and (6) other appropriate in-
formation.
This process is administered through the Office of Graduate Studies in Edu-
cation for the graduate committee which may recommend supplementary oral
and/or written examinations for students whose admission to candidacy is in
doubt.
The student's remaining program of study may be revised if needed after
the Admission to Candidacy Examination. On approval of the graduate com-
mittee, the candidate will be recommended for the degree upon the satisfactory
completion of the designated course work.








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 21
The candidate must have completed at least one year of teaching (or the
equivalent) prior to taking the last 9 credits of work, or must have included
in his record the satisfactory completion of an internship program or a mini-
mum of 8 credits of student teaching.
THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION.-A special
counselor is appointed for each student in the Master of Education program.
His work is under general supervision of the Graduate Committee in the
College of Education.
MASTER OF ENGINEERING
The Master of Engineering degree is designed for those students whose
needs are better fulfilled by additional course work rather than the prepara-
tion of a thesis. Requirements for admission are the same as those for the
regular M.S.E. degree in the College of Engineering.
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 50 credits of course work is re-
quired of which at least 27 credits must be in the student's major field.
The minor field may be divided in several ways: one 9-credit minor, two
9-credit minors, or one 18-credit minor. In addition, a multidisciplinary
minor in departments other than the major may be authorized by the super-
visory committee or program adviser. Major courses must be graduate level
(numbered 600 and above) or courses approved for graduate major credit.
Courses numbered 300 and above may be taken for the minor. At least
50 per cent of the required 50 credits must be in courses numbered 600
and above.
DEGREE CREDIT.-In order to qualify for course work toward the Master
of Engineering degree, a student must first be admitted to the Graduate School
at the University of Florida. The amount of course work toward this degree
that may be taken at an off-campus center will depend upon the student's
individual program and the courses provided through the center.
The composition of the supervisory committee for those students in resi-
dence at the Gainesville campus of the University of Florida shall be the
same as that shown under Master's Degree with Thesis.
At the option of the department involved, a student whose program does
not include 27 credits of study taken on the Gainesville campus may be
supervised by a single program adviser appointed by the Dean of the Grad-
uate School upon the recommendation of the Dean of the College of Engi-
neering.
EXAMINATIONS.-Each student must pass a comprehensive written
and/or oral final examination at the completion of his course work. For the
student whose program includes 27 credits of study taken on the Gaines-
ville campus, this examination will be administered by the supervisory com-
mittee.
Other candidates must take a comprehensive written examination admin-
istered on the University of Florida campus by an examining committee rec-
ommended by the Dean of the College of Engineering and appointed by the
Graduate School. At least one member of the examining committee must








22 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
be either the student's program adviser or a member of his supervisory
committee. Another member must be chosen from outside the major depart-
ment for the purpose of representing the student's minor.

MASTER OF NURSING
The program leading to the degree Master of Nursing is designed to give
students basic knowledge and professional skills essential to the three areas of
nursing activity: teaching, research, and practice. The diversity of roles that
the nurse performs in these three areas necessitates a program that requires
preparation in clinical, research, and functional activities. Two basic qualifica-
tions necessary for completion of the program are: (1) academic ability to
perform satisfactorily in the course requirements; (2) ability to work effectively
as a professional nursing practitioner. Traineeship grants and graduate assistant-
ships for selected students are available. See Financial Aid-Nursing for more
detailed information.
WORK REQUIRED.-The minimum requirement of 50 credits is distributed
in the following areas: 8 credits in general nursing; 4 credits in research;
8 credits in the functional area; 9 credits of electives; and at least 16 credits
in the clinical specialty areas, although additional credits may be required
depending on the clinical area of choice. A minimum of 8 credits shall be
taken outside the College of Nursing. At least 50 per cent of the minimum
course requirements must be in courses numbered 600 and above. There is no
thesis or foreign language requirement.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is not
a guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
When a student has completed 18 to 24 credits of graduate work at the
University of Florida, he is required to apply for admission to candidacy for
the degree, using the forms provided by the office of the Dean of the Graduate
School. Admission to candidacy for the Master of Nursing degree will be
recommended to the Graduate Council by the graduate committee of the
College of Nursing on the basis of a review of the student's work and any
other appropriate information to determine his eligibility to proceed further
toward the degree program.
FINAL EXAMINATION.-Each student must pass a comprehensive written
and/or oral final examination toward the end of the final quarter of study.
The examination will be administered by an examining committee of three
members of the graduate faculty of the College of Nursing recommended
by the College Dean and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.
The examinations) will be confined largely to the student's major field of
study.

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 51 credits of course work is required,
of which at least 50 per cent must be graduate-level courses in physical educa-
tion. Of the remaining 50 per cent, at least three courses must be taken outside








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 23

the College of Physical Education and Health. The major for the degree is
physical education.
All degree candidates must complete Florida teaching certification require-
ments in physical education by the conclusion of the master's degree program.
Certification requirements must be met as part of and/or in addition to degree
requirements, if not already completed before admission to graduate study.
OFF-CAMPUS WORK.-The regulations governing the use of off-campus
work are the same as those for the Master of Education above.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-A committee of five members of the faculty of
the College of Physical Education and Health, with the dean of the college,
or some person designated by him, serving as chairman and the Dean of the
Graduate School as an ex officio member, will supervise the work of students
registered in this program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is not
a guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
The student will be required to pass a written and/or oral examination in
addition to being recommended by the supervisory committee for admission
to candidacy. The student should normally apply for admission to candidacy
at approximately the mid-point of his total program, but not later than two
quarters before his expected date of graduation.
FINAL EXAMINATION.-A thesis is not required, but the candidate must
pass a final examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or
oral examination will be administered by the supervisory committee and will
be confined largely to the student's major field of study.

MASTER OF REHABILITATION COUNSELING
The interdisciplinary program leading to the degree of Master of Re-
habilitation Counseling is designed to give students basic knowledge and pro-
fessional skills essential to the rehabilitation of physically, mentally, and emo-
tionally handicapped persons. The diversity of activities performed by indi-
viduals who bear the designation of rehabilitation counselor in the various
state, federal, and private agencies, necessitates a program that permits a basic
foundation in counseling and guidance and, at the same time, allows for a
sound preparation in the medical, socio-psychological and vocational implica-
tions of disability. Two basic qualifications are necessary for successful com-
pletion of the program: (1) the academic ability to accomplish the course
requirements with satisfactory performance, and (2) the ability to work ef-
fectively with disabled people in a counseling relationship. Students interested
in counseling the mentally retarded will be encouraged to specialize in this
area through the utilization of certain elective course offerings and through
the internship stage of their educational program. Traineeship grants for se-
lected students are available. See Financial Aid for information regarding these
grants.
WORK REQUIRED.-The minimum requirement is 63 credits, of which 39
credits represent required work in rehabilitation courses including an intern-
ship. An additional minimum of 24 credits is selected from designated









24 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

courses; i.e., 1 to 3 courses in each of the following areas: (1) statistics and
measurement, (2) personality development, and (3) counseling. The selection
of the courses in each of the three areas is made on the basis of meeting the
individual needs of the student and is subject to the approval of a supervisory
committee. At least 50 per cent of the minimum course requirements must be
from courses numbered 600 and above.

AREA I-STATISTICS AND MEASUREMENT-1 to 3 courses


CORE OFFERINGS
PSY 503-Essentials of Psychologi-
cal Testing 1
PSY 504-Essentials of Psychologi-
cal Testing 2
PSY 641-Personality Assessment 1
EDF 360-Elementary Statistical
Methods in Education
EDF 450-Measurement and Evalua-
tion in Education
EDP 613-Personnel Testing
STA 320-Introduction to Statistics


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
PSY 512-Individual and Group Dif-
ferences
PSY 603-Psychometric Methods
PSY 604-Statistical Methods in
Psychology-Inference
PSY 605-Statistical Methods in
Psychology-Correlations
PSY 614-Development and Ap-
praisal of Vocational
Choice
PSY 632-Test Construction


AREA II-PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT-1 to 3 courses


OFFERINGS
410-Abnormal Psychology
509-Current Theories of Per-
sonality
641-Educational Psychology-
Personality Dynamics
615-Survey of Social
Psychology
669-Seminar: Motivation 1
670-Seminar: Motivation 2


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
PSY 307-Developmental Psychol-
ogy 1
PSY 308-Developmental Psychol-
ogy 2
EDF 440-Dynamics of Human De-
velopment
EDF 640-Educational Psychology:
Human Development
EDF 643-Educational Psychology:
Learning Theory
PSY 610-Seminar in Psychopathol-


ogy
SY 514-Social Factors in Health
and Illness
AREA III-COUNSELING-1 to 3 courses


CORE OFFERINGS
PSY 637-Personal Counseling
EDP 610-Principles of Guidance:
The Helping Relationship
EDP 614-Individual and Group
Counseling Theory
EDP 620-Laboratory in Individual
and Group Counseling
(Must accompany EDP
614)


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
EDP 611-Vocational Development
PSY 613-Children's Behavior Dis-
turbances
EDP 622-Counseling with Children


CORE
PSY
PSY

EDF

PSY

PSY
PSY








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 25


GENERAL ELECTIVES
Students who desire to work in specific areas or to specialize in mental
retardation at the internship level may elect to take one or more of the
following courses.
SCH 340-Survey of Communication Disorders
SCH 341-Introduction to Speech and Hearing Disorders
SCH 654-Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology: Mental Retardation
SCH 655-Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology: Cerebral Palsy
SCH 656-Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology: Aphasia
SCH 657-Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology: Cleft Palate
SCH 671-Seminar in Audiology: Problems of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
EDP 501-Teaching the Mentally Retarded
EDP 504-Teaching the Emotionally Disturbed and Socially Maladjusted
Children
EDP 601-Education of the Mentally Retarded
PSY 661-Seminar: Psychological Problems of Aging
SY 615-Comparative Studies of Health Systems in Human Societies
SY 616-Hospital and Related Facilities in the Modern Community
SY 617-Health Professions in the Modern Community
SY 618-The Sociology of the Aged
INTERNSHIP IN MENTAL RETARDATION.-Students who are particularly
interested in working with the mentally retarded may take a specialized in-
ternship at the Field Instructional Unit in Mental Retardation at MacDonald
Training Center. Prior to this internship, students may elect to take one or
more of the EDP course sequence in general electives listed above.
POLICY COMMITTEE.-A committee of five members of the faculty repre-
senting the College of Health Related Professions, Department of Psychology,
College of Medicine, and College of Education, with the professor in charge
of rehabilitation counseling serving as chairman and the Dean of the Grad-
uate School as an ex officio member, will determine policy, and, in general,
supervise the work of students registered in this program.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is not
a guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
When a student has completed 36 credits of graduate work at the University
of Florida (but not less than two quarters before he plans to graduate), he is
required to apply for admission to candidacy for the degree, using the forms
provided by the office of the Dean of the Graduate School. Admission to
candidacy for the Master of Rehabilitation Counseling degree will be recom-
mended to the Graduate Council by a supervisory committee of the College
of Health Related Professions on the basis of a review of his work, his personal
traits, and any other appropriate information to determine his eligibility to pro-
ceed further toward the degree.
DEPARTMENTAL STUDY PROJECT.-A thesis is not required, but the candi-
date must complete an approved departmental study or research project as
part of the degree requirements.








26 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

FINAL WRITTEN AND/OR ORAL EXAMINATION.-Upon the satisfactory
completion of all course work including the practicum and internship, each
student must take a final written and/or oral departmental examination be-
fore the degree will be awarded. The primary purpose of this examination is
to determine the student's ability to relate the knowledge, skills and techniques
learned in the academic program to the more practical applications of working
effectively with disabled individuals.

MASTER OF STATISTICS
The basic requirement for admission to the graduate program for the
Master of Statistics degree is an A.B. or B.S. degree from a recognized college
or university. The normal admission requirements will be a B-average under-
graduate record for the upper division studies and satisfactory scores on the
Graduate Record Examination.
WORK REQUIRED.-The minimum registration required for the Master of
Statistics degree is 54 credits including no less than 30 credits in the major
field. Courses in the degree program will be selected in consultation with the
major adviser and approved by the student's supervisory committee. One 9-
credit minor is required. The work in the major field must be in courses
approved for graduate major credit. For the minor, courses numbered 300
and above may be taken. At least one-half of the 54 credits in regular course
work must be in courses numbered 600 and above. The student will be re-
quired to pass, as judged by his supervisory committee, a comprehensive writ-
ten examination covering the major and minor subjects. In addition, he will
be examined orally on his major subjects.
For further details, inquire Chairman, Department of Statistics or Dean,
College of Agriculture.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS
COURSE REQUIREMENT.-The minimum course work required for the
master's degree with thesis is 45 credits, including no less than 36 credits of
regular course work and up to 9 credits of the research course numbered 699
in all departments.
At least one-half of the required credits of regular course work must be in
a single field of study designated the major. If a minor is chosen, at least 9
credits of work are required; two 9 credit minors may be taken. Minor work
must be in a department other than the major. In special cases this require-
ment may be modified, but only with the written permission of the Dean of the
Graduate School.
The work in the major field must be in courses designed strictly for grad-
uates (numbered 600 and above) or in undergraduate courses designated by
the Graduate Council as available for graduate major credit. For the minor,
courses numbered 300 and above may be taken. At least 18 of the required
36 credits of regular course work must be in courses numbered 600 and above.
Registration in 699 is limited to a total of 24 credits.









REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 27
THESIs.-All candidates for this degree are required to prepare and pre-
sent a thesis (or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to their supervisory
committees and the Graduate School. The candidate should consult the Grad-
uate School office for instructions concerning the form of the thesis. The
original copy of the bound thesis accompanied by three copies of a brief
abstract must be in the Dean's office on or before the dates specified in the
University Calendar. After the thesis is accepted, two copies will be perma-
nently bound and deposited in the University Library.
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS.-(1) The requirement of a reading knowl-
edge of a foreign language is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory
committee or college. When a foreign language is required, the examination
will be conducted by Educational Testing Service or by the Department of
Foreign Languages; if an examination has already been passed at another
institution, it must be validated at the University of Florida by the Department
of Foreign Languages. If the student is majoring in a foreign language, that
language may not be used to satisfy this requirement. The foreign language
requirement must be satisfied before the student is admitted to candidacy.
(2) The ability to use the English language correctly and effectively, as judged
by the supervisory committee, is required of all candidates. Hence this cannot
be substituted for a foreign language requirement.
SPECIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-A special supervisory committee com-
posed of two (or more) members selected from the Graduate Faculty
will be appointed for each student by the Dean of the Graduate School upon
the recommendation of the college concerned. The chairman of the committee
must be a member of the Graduate Faculty appointed for this purpose. The
minor should be represented by one member of the committee. The super-
visory committee recommended for the master's degree without a designated
minor shall include at least one person outside the department of the major
who has been appointed to the Graduate Faculty for directing master's
theses. The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the
student has been admitted to the Graduate School and, in general, not later
than the end of the first quarter of study. The Dean of the Graduate School
is an ex officio member of all supervisory committees. The duties of the
special supervisory committee are to advise the student, to check on his quali-
fications and progress, to supervise the preparation of the thesis, and to con-
duct the final examination. No fewer than three faculty members must be
present at the student's final examination, but only the members of the
official supervisory committee are required to sign the thesis and the report
of the final examination.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Attention of students is directed to the fact
that admission to candidacy is not automatic. It requires a formal application
distinct from registration. Applications for admission to candidacy for master's
degrees should be approved by the Graduate School when course work is half
completed and in no case later than two quarters prior to the date for com-
pletion of all requirements for the degree.
The Graduate Council may deny degrees to persons who have failed to









28 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
comply with this regulation at the proper time. In order to be admitted to
candidacy, the student must have (1) maintained a B average in registered
course work, (2) passed a foreign language examination and a comprehensive
examination (if these are required in his curriculum), (3) chosen his thesis
topic, (4) satisfied his supervisory committee, department chairman, and col-
lege dean that he is qualified to become a candidate for his degree. It is the
responsibility of his supervisory committee at this time to make such investi-
gation as is necessary to determine his eligibility.
FINAL EXAMINATION.- When all of the student's course work is com-
pleted, or practically so, and the thesis is in final form, his supervisory com-
mittee is required to examine him orally or in writing or both on (1) his
thesis, (2) his major subjects, (3) his minor or minors, and (4) matters of a
general nature pertaining to his field of study. A written announcement of
the examination must be sent to the Dean of the Graduate School. Using the
form provided for the purpose the committee shall report in writing to the
Dean of the Graduate School not later than one week before the time for
conferring of the degree whether all work has been completed in a satisfactory
manner and whether on the basis of the final examination the student is recom-
mended for his degree. This examination may not be scheduled earlier than
six months before the degree is to be conferred without special approval of
the Graduate Council.

MASTER OF FINE ARTS
The degree of Master of Fine Arts is designed primarily for those who
wish to prepare themselves as teachers of art in colleges and universities. It is
the highest degree granted in the studio fields of the fine arts. Two years'
residence is normally required for completion of requirements. Specialization
is offered in ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking,
and/or sculpture.
The requirements of the M.F.A. are the same as those for other master's
degrees with thesis except as follows:
1. The minimum registration required is 72 credits, including no fewer
than 63 credits in regular course work and 9 credits in ART 699-Master's
Research.
2. The course work must include ART 500-Methods of Research and
Bibliography (3 credits), a minimum of 9 additional credits in the history and
theory of art, and a minimum of 9 credits in a minor field. The remaining
credits will be advanced studio courses in ceramics, creative photography,
drawing, painting, printmaking, and/or sculpture.

ENGINEER DEGREE
Industry has found that engineers holding either the master's degree or
doctor's degree contribute significantly in highly sophisticated operational and
developmental projects and missions which require engineering teams with an
unusually high level of technical competence. Many of the projects and prob-








ENGINEER DEGREE / 29
lems require education beyond the master's level, especially for those engi-
neers who received their master's degree several years ago.
For those engineers who need additional technical depth and diversification
in their education beyond the master's degree, the College of Engineering of-
fers the degree of Engineer.
This degree requires a minimum of 45 quarter hours of graduate work
beyond the master's degree and thus falls midway between the master's and
Ph.D. in the amount of work required. No minimum residence requirement is
stipulated. It is not to be considered as a partial requirement toward the
Ph.D. degree. The student's objective after the master's degree should be the
Ph.D. or the Engineer degree.
ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM.-To be admitted to the program students
must complete a master's degree in engineering at an accredited institution
approved by the Graduate School of the University of Florida. The student
must apply for admission to the Graduate School if he has not previously
done so. The master's degree is regarded as the essential foundation for the
Engineer degree.
COURSE AND RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS.-A total registration in an ap-
proved program of at least 45 quarter credit hours beyond the master's degree
is required. This minimum requirement must be earned through the University
of Florida. These credits may be completed in any graduate program ad-
ministered by the College of Engineering, either in Gainesville or through
GENESYS.
The approved program must be completed with an over-all grade point
average of 3.0 or higher. The last 45 quarter credit hours must be completed
within five calendar years.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-Each student admitted to the program will be
advised and counseled by a supervisory committee. The committee consists
of at least three members. At least two members are selected from the major
department and at least one from a supporting department. All committee
members will be members of the graduate faculty. As a desirable addition,
every effort should be made to have a representative from industry on each
supervisory committee.
This committee should be appointed immediately after the student is ad-
mitted to the program. The committee is nominated by the department chair-
man, with the recommendation of the Resident Director as appropriate, ap-
proved by the Dean of Engineering, and appointed by the Dean of the Gradu-
ate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex officio member of all
supervisory committees and should be notified in writing in advance of all
committee meetings.
This committee will inform the student of all regulations pertaining to
the degree and his situation. If a thesis or report is a requirement in the plan
of study then the committee will approve the proposed thesis or report and
the plans for carrying it out. The committee will also conduct the final exami-
nation when the plan of study is completed.
PLAN OF STUDY.-The plan of study will permit from 9 to 15 quarter








30 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
hour credits for a thesis. The thesis is not a requirement, but the option rests
with the department involved and the supervisory committee. Each plan of
study is developed on an individual basis for each student.
Thus, there are no specific requirements on the major or minor; each
student is considered as a separate case. The plan of study must be completed
with an over-all grade point average of 3.0 or higher.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-The student must apply for admission to
candidacy when he has completed at least 21 credits of his approved plan of
study with an over-all grade point average of at least 3.0 and his thesis topic,
where required, has been approved by his supervisory committee.
THESIs.-The thesis should represent performance at a level above that
ordinarily associated with the master's degree. It should clearly be an original
contribution; this may take the form of scientific research, a design project,
or an industrial project approved by the supervisory committee. Work on
the thesis may be conducted in an industrial or government laboratory under
conditions stipulated by the supervisory committee.
FINAL EXAMINATION.-After the acceptance of the thesis and the com-
pletion of all other work on the plan of study with an over-all grade point
average of 3.0 or higher, the supervisory committee conducts a final examina-
tion of the student. This is a comprehensive examination, either oral, written,
or both, and also involves a defense of the thesis if it is included in the
program.

THE ADVANCED SCHOOL OF THE
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
The Advanced School of the College of Education offers programs leading
to the degrees Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of
Philosophy. These programs are available in four areas: Administration and
Supervision, Curriculum and Instruction, Foundations of Education, and Per-
sonnel Services. The Specialist in Education degree is awarded for a two-year
program of graduate study. The Doctor of Education degree requires the writing
of a doctoral dissertation. Foreign languages are not required. The Doctor of
Philosophy degree in the College of Education is described under the Re-
quirements for the Ph.D.
Programs leading to these degrees are administered through the Office of
Graduate Studies in Education, which carries out the policies of the Graduate
School and the graduate committee of the College of Education.
ADMISSION TO THE ADVANCED SCHOOL IN EDUCATION.-Admission to
the Advanced School will be open only to persons who have:
1. Successfully completed 50 credits of professional course work in educa-
tion. Applicants for admission to the Advanced School of the College of
Education who meet all the requirements except for successfully com-
pleting 50 credits of professional education courses may be given pro-
visional admission, and full admission when they have completed the
required 50 credits.








THE ADVANCED SCHOOL OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION / 31
2. Presented a record of successful professional experience, the appro-
priateness of which will be determined by the instructional department
passing on the applicant's qualifications for admission. (In some in-
stances, departments may admit students with the understanding that
further experience may be required before the student will be recom-
mended for the degree.)
Admission to the Advanced School will be based on the following criteria:
1. High scholastic average for previous graduate work (3.5 grade-point
average or above, as computed at the University of Florida, will be
considered evidence of good scholarship).
2. Satisfactory scores on the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Ex-
amination.
3. An oral examination administered by the department or division in
which the student seeks to specialize.
4. Special interviews for individuals for whom the department of specializa-
tion seeks more data.
The judgment concerning admission of an individual student will be based
on consideration of his performance in all of these areas by the department
in which the student desires to specialize. The department will certify to the
admissions committee that the student has met the criteria for admission to
the Advanced School.
In all cases the record, experience, and personal qualifications of the per-
son applying for admission are subject to the approval of the admissions com-
mittee.
Where possible, students should seek admission to the Advanced School
before enrolling in any courses beyond the master's degree. Where this pro-
cedure is impossible, the student will register in the Graduate School, and,
during the first quarter of his work beyond the master's degree, will apply for
admission to the Advanced School. If the candidate is found to be eligible,
appropriate work taken during that term will be included in the planned pro-
gram.
After completion of the master's degree any student approved by the ad-
missions committee may register for courses, but admission to the Advanced
School must be obtained before work may be counted for degrees or certifi-
cates above the master's level.

SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION
Primary emphasis in an Ed.S. program is placed on the development of
the competencies needed for a specific job. Programs are available in the
various areas of concentration within the departments of Administration and
Supervision, Foundations of Education, and Personnel Services, and the
division of Curriculum and Instruction.
To study for this degree, the student must apply for and be admitted to
the Advanced School of the College of Education. The student must also apply
for and be admitted to candidacy for the degree no later than the term prior








32 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
to that in which he intends to graduate. All work for the degree must be
completed within seven years of admission to the Advanced School of the
College of Education.
The Ed.S. degree is awarded at the completion of a 100-credit planned
program beyond the bachelor's degree. Within the 100-credit program, the
requirements of a Master of Education degree or its equivalent must be satis-
fied. Within the last 50 hours of the program the following requirements
must be met:
1. 32 credits at the 600 and 700 levels
2. At least 16 credits in professional education courses at the 600 level or
above
3. At least 2 quarters of full-time residence on campus in Gainesville
4. One learning experience designed to unify the program shall be provided
by an internship, a practicum, a project and report, a field experience, a
research study, or other suitable activity as determined by the department
5. One course in research shall be included
6. Near the end of the program, the student is given a final written and
oral examination by a committee selected by the department chairman.
A thesis is not required.
A maximum of 9 credits on campus at an institution offering a doctor's de-
gree may be transferred, and a maximum of 8 credits of graduate residence
credit from a Florida State Center for Continuing Education may be included
in the program.


DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
The Doctor of Education degree is offered in administration and super-
vision, curriculum and instruction, foundations of education, and personnel
services. Each doctoral candidate is expected to achieve understanding of the
broad field of education and competencies in the area in which he chooses
to specialize.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of Doctor of
Education requires admission to the Advanced School of the College of Edu-
cation, described previously, as well as admission to the Graduate School.
All courses beyond the master's degree taken at another institution, to be
applied toward the Doctor of Education degree, must be taken at an institution
offering the doctor's degree and must be approved for graduate credit by the
Graduate School of the University of Florida.
MINORs.-Minor work or work in cognate fields is required. If one minor
is selected, at least 25 credits of work therein will be required; if two minors
are chosen, one must have at least 18 credits of course work, the other at least
8 credits. Minors may not be taken in any branch of education.
Courses in physical education approved by the College of Physical Educa-
tion and Health and the Graduate School as subject matter or content courses
may be used in the cognate work or as a minor.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present a suitable program









DOCTOR OF EDUCATION / 33
of not less than 25 credits of cognate work in at least two or more depart-
ments outside the College of Education. If two fields are included, there shall
be no fewer than 8 credits in either field. If three or more fields are included,
the 8-credit requirement for each field does not apply. This program must
have the approval of the student's supervisory committee. The College of Edu-
cation faculty will expect the candidate to be prepared to answer questions,
at the time of his oral examination, in any of the areas chosen.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to candidacy for the degree of
Doctor of Education rests on successful completion of the qualifying examina-
tions. Recommendation to the Graduate School for admission to candidacy is
based on the action of the supervisory committee, subject to the approval of
the graduate committee of the College of Education.
THE QUALIFYING EXAMINATION.-The applicant is recommended for the
qualifying examination by his supervisory committee after he has completed
sufficient course work.
The examination administered by the graduate committee of the College
of Education consists of (1) a general section; (2) a field of specialization
section; (3) examination in the minor or minors, where involved; and (4) an
oral examination conducted by the applicant's supervisory committee.
RE-EXAMINATION.-If the student fails in his qualifying examinations
he will not be given a re-examination unless such an examination is recom-
mended for special reasons by his supervisory committee and approved by
the Graduate Council. At least one quarter of additional preparation is con-
sidered essential before re-examination.
THE SEMINAR.-Each student is required to develop a thesis project to
be considered by a general doctoral seminar in the college. Participants in the
seminar will be faculty members of the college, other advanced students, and
members of the supervisory committee. The student must pass the qualifying
examination before scheduling the seminar.
RESEARCH PREPARATION REQUIREMENT.-This requirement is satisfied
by meeting the requirements in both Groups 1 and 2 below:
Group 1.-(1) a course in education research (EDF 760) and
(2) the library usage examination (usually given in connection
with EDF 760) and
(3) a basic course in statistics.
Group 2.-Either
(1) a reading knowledge of one foreign language relevant to
the student's needs, or
(2) an appropriate course in measurement, advanced statistics,
or research approved by the student's supervisory committee
and by the Graduate Committee of the College of Education.
There is no language requirement for the Doctor of Education degree.
For information relating to Residence, the Supervisory Committee, Time
Limit, the Dissertation, Publication of the Dissertation, and the Final Examina-
tion, the student is referred to the material presented under the heading Doctor
of Philosophy. These statements are applicable to both degrees.








34 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Doctoral study consists of the independent mastery of a field of knowledge
and the successful prosecution of research. For this reason, doctoral students
act, in large measure, on their own responsibility, and doctoral programs are
more flexible and varied than those leading to lower degrees. The Graduate
Council does not specify just what courses will be required for the Ph.D.
degree, or how many. The basic general requirement is that the program
should be unified in relation to a clear objective and that it should have the
considered approval of the student's entire supervisory committee.
MAJOR.-The student working for the Ph.D. must elect to do his major work
in a department specifically approved for the offering of doctoral courses and
the supervision of dissertations. These departments are listed under Graduate
Programs.
MINOR.-With the approval of his supervisory committee, the student may
choose one or more minor fields. Minor work may be completed in any de-
partment, other than the major department, approved for master's or doctor's
degree programs, as listed in this Catalog.
If one minor is chosen, the representative of the minor department on the
supervisory committee shall suggest from 18 to 36 credits as preparation
for a qualifying examination. Of course, a part of this background may have
been acquired in the master's program. If two minors are chosen, each must
include at least 12 credits. The satisfaction of the requirement concerning the
minor or minors may be in terms of a written examination conducted by the
minor department or departments and/or through the oral qualifying examina-
tion.
Course work in the minor at the doctoral level need not be restricted to
the courses of one department, provided that the minor has a clearly
stated objective and that the combination of courses representing the minor
shall be approved by the Graduate School before registration beyond 6 credits
of course work applicable to the minor. This procedure is not required for a
departmental minor. The supervisory committee may include a representative
from each subject-matter area included in the minor, and each department so
involved must express its wishes in the matter.

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.-Supervisory committees are nominated
by the department chairman, approved by the dean of the college concerned,
and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The committee should be
appointed as soon as possible after the student has begun doctoral work, and
in general no later than the end of his third quarter of equivalent full-time
study. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex officio member of all su-
pervisory committees and should be notified in writing well in advance of all
examinations conducted by such committees.








REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 35
The duties of the supervisory committee are as follows:
1. To inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought.
It should be noted, however, that this does not absolve the student from
the responsibility of informing himself concerning these regulations.
(See Student Responsibility.)
2. To meet immediately after appointment to pass on the qualifications
of the student and to discuss and approve a program of study for him.
3. To meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and
the plans for carrying it out.
4. To conduct the qualifying examination or, in those cases where the
examination is administered by the department, to take part in it. In
either event, no fewer than five faculty members shall be present for the
oral portion of the examination.
5. To meet when the work on the dissertation is at least one-half com-
pleted to review procedure, progress, and expected results, and to make
suggestions for completion.
6. To meet when the dissertation is completed to conduct the final oral
examination and to satisfy itself that the dissertation is a piece of original
research and a contribution to knowledge. No fewer than five faculty
members shall be present for this examination, but only the members
of the official supervisory committee are required to sign the dissertation.
MEMBERSHIP.-The supervisory committee for a candidate for the doc-
toral degree shall consist of no fewer than three members selected from the
Graduate Faculty. At least two members will usually be from the college or
department recommending the degree, and at least one member will be drawn
from a different educational discipline. The chairman, and at least one addi-
tional member of the committee will be members of the resident Graduate
Faculty of the University of Florida who have been approved for the direc-
tion of doctoral dissertations.
If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee will include at least one
person from outside the discipline of the major for the purpose of represent-
ing the student's minor. In the event that the student elects more than one
minor, each minor area may, at the discretion of the departments concerned,
be represented on the supervisory committee.
When a minor is not designated the supervisory committee will include at
least one person from outside the discipline of the major, who normally has
been appointed to the Graduate Faculty for directing doctoral dissertations.
The Graduate Council desires each supervisory committee to function as a
university committee, as contrasted to a departmental committee, with the ob-
jective of bringing university-wide standards to bear upon the various doctoral
degrees.
In unusual cases the doctoral research may require the guidance of a spe-
cialist from an area of study other than that of the chairman of the super-
visory committee. In such cases the department chairman may recommend ap-
pointment of a chairman and a co-chairman, with the latter being a mem-
ber of the Graduate Faculty, but not necessarily having been approved for the







36 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
direction of doctoral dissertations. A co-chairman may also be appointed for
the purpose of serving during a planned absence of the chairman; in this case
both the chairman and the co-chairman shall have been appointed to the Grad-
uate Faculty for the purpose of directing doctoral dissertations.

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
LANGUAGE READING EXAMINATIONS.-(1) Except as noted below a read-
ing knowledge of two languages other than English is required. The primary
language must be French, German, Russian, or Spanish, the choice to be made
by the supervisory committee on the basis of the usefulness of the language
in the student's field of research.
(2) The secondary language, as approved by the supervisory committee,
may be from a list of languages adopted by the Graduate Council, in which
reading knowledge examinations are administered by the Department of For-
eign Languages. Under this provision, however, both languages may not be
Romance.
If a student is majoring in a foreign language he may not use that language
to satisfy the foreign language requirement.
FUNCTIONAL EXAMINATION IN LANGUAGE.-A doctoral student, with
the approval of his supervisory committee, shall have the privilege of taking a
functional language examination (reading, writing, and speaking) in French,
German, Russian, or Spanish as an alternative to the primary and secondary
language reading examinations. A student may not fulfill the foreign language
requirement by taking a functional knowledge examination in his native tongue.
A student who makes an A or B in the final course of the second-year
sequence of a foreign language (e.g., German 202, Spanish 202) will be
certified as having fulfilled the requirement for a functional knowledge of that
language if he takes this final course during his period of graduate study at
the University of Florida. Otherwise, he may demonstrate this level of pro-
ficiency by examination (given only at announced times) during his period of
graduate study. Students in Latin American Studies (see Special Program)
must demonstrate proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese equivalent to a grade
of A or B in Spanish 306 or Portuguese 305.

SUBSTITUTION OF MATHEMATICS
FOR A SECONDARY LANGUAGE EXAMINATION.-In order to strengthen the
mathematics background of students in certain departments individually ap-
proved by the Graduate Council (agricultural economics, agronomy, animal
science, business administration, entomology, and soils), where junior-level
mathematics is not required in the department's undergraduate curriculum, a
mathematics examination may be substituted for a reading knowledge examina-
tion of the secondary foreign language. To meet the required degree of por-
ficiency in mathematics, the student, while enrolled in the University of Flor-
ida, must make a grade of B on the final examination of MS 304, or a
B in the course MS 304, or a grade of C in any mathematics course which
requires MS 304 as a prerequisite. The Department of Mathematics of the








REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 37

University of Florida will certify the level of courses taken by a student out-
side the University of Florida who is applying for the privilege of substitution,
and the Department of Mathematics will determine by written or oral test
whether the student meets the level of achievement stated above, and will cer-
tify the result to the Graduate School.
Students pursuing the Ph.D. in medical sciences may substitute for the
second foreign language requirement the following three courses earned with
the grades of B or better: MS 410, STA 440, and STA 441. These courses
must be taken while the student is enrolled in the Graduate School of the
University of Florida. An entering graduate student who has had these courses
or their equivalent as an undergraduate is ineligible to elect this option.
DATES FOR COMPLETION OF LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS.-The language
requirement should be met as early as possible in the student's program and
must be met before the student can be admitted to the qualifying examination.
The Department of Foreign Languages offers special noncredit classes in the
reading of French and German for graduate students. (See Schedule of
Courses.)

RESIDENCE
The minimum residence requirement for a doctor's degree is nine quarters
of full-time resident graduate study, or equivalent, at institutions approved by
the Graduate School. Beyond the master's degree or an equivalent period of
graduate study, three consecutive quarters must be spent in full-time study
(except as noted in the following paragraph) on the campus of the University
of Florida. Candidates in the College of Agriculture may do their research at
certain branch stations of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station where adequate staff and facilities are available.
Part-time study may be substituted for the three consecutive quarters of
full-time study stipulated in the preceding paragraph in either of the following
proportions: (1) 45 credits earned in one calendar year; or (2) 52 credits in
six successive registrations (either including or excluding summer registration).
An overload program, even when approved, will be valued as a normal
program in meeting all residence requirements.
For a student who has no employment and is devoting full time to his
studies, a registration of 12 to 15 credits entitles him to full residence credit.
Part-time study is evaluated on the basis that 15 credits represent a full load
(e.g., a student who is employed half-time and is registered for 10 credits ac-
quires 1%A or % of a quarter of residence credit for each quarter of such
registration).
In some cases a student may be employed on a sponsored project from
which his thesis or dissertation will be drawn. Upon written recommendation
of the chairman of the supervisory committee, residence credit may be per-
mitted for the time devoted to such research. This recommendation must be
made during the quarter in which the work is done. All time devoted to routine
duties, or to research not related directly to the dissertation or thesis, should
be removed from consideration.








38 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Between the qualifying examination and the date of the degree, there must
elapse a minimum of two quarters if the candidate is in full-time residence,
or three quarters if the candidate is on less than a full-time basis. The quarter
in which the qualifying examination is passed is counted, provided that the
examination occurs before the midpoint of the term.
QUALIFYING EXAMINATION
The qualifying examination which is required of all candidates for the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy may be taken during the third term of the
second year of graduate study. The examination, conducted by the special
supervisory committee, with the aid of the major and minor departments, is
both written and oral and covers the major and minor subjects. At least five
faculty members must be present at the oral portion of this examination. The
supervisory committee has the responsibility at this time of deciding whether
the student is qualified to continue his work toward the Ph.D. degree.
If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not be given a re-
examination unless such an examination is recommended by his supervisory
committee and approved by the Graduate School. At least a quarter of addi-
tional preparation is considered essential before re-examination.
An announcement of the scheduling of each student's qualifying examina-
tion must be submitted in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. If the
student does not file for admission to candidacy immediately after his qualify-
ing examination, a written report of the result of his examination must be filed
with the Graduate School Office.
TIME LIMIT.-All work for the doctor's degree must be completed within
five calendar years after the qualifying examination, or this examination must
be repeated.

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
A graduate student does not become an actual candidate for the Ph.D.
degree until he has been formally admitted to candidacy. Such admission re-
quires the approval of the student's supervisory committee, the chairman of his
department, his college dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The ap-
proval must be based on (1) the academic record of the student, (2) the
opinion of his supervisory committee concerning his overall fitness for candi-
dacy, (3) an approved dissertation topic, and (4) a qualifying examination as
described above. Application for admission to candidacy is normally made as
soon as the qualifying examination has been passed.

DISSERTATION
A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation and research
is required of all candidates. Since all doctoral dissertations will be pub-
lished by microfilm, microcard, or printing, it is necessary that the work be of
publishable quality and that it be in a form suitable for publication. The original
copy of the dissertation must be presented to the Dean of the Graduate School
on or before the date specified in the University Calendar. The sum of $25








EXPENSES / 39

must be deposited with Student Accounts, the Hub, to cover cost of publication
as explained below.
PUBLICATION OF DISSERTATION.-Candidates for the Ph.D. and Ed.D.
degrees may choose one of the following three alternatives in the publication
of their dissertations:
1. Microfilm. A deposit of $25 is required.
2. Microcard. The University Library will determine the cost of publica-
tion. The student will deposit the required amount at Student Accounts,
the Hub.
3. Book or Monograph. If publication is completed as a book or mono-
graph in essentially complete form within two years,* the Graduate
Council will consider a request for refund of the entire deposit upon
receipt of five copies. (Proper reference to the dissertation must be given
in the publication.) Unless evidence of acceptance of the dissertation
for such publication has been presented by the end of the two-year
period, the Graduate Council will authorize publication of the disserta-
tion by microfilm as indicated under (1) above.
COPYRIGHT.-Under (1) above the student may choose to copyright his
microfilmed dissertation before publication. The charge for copyright is $12.75.


FINAL EXAMINATION
After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of all other
prescribed work for the degree, but in no case earlier than six months before
the conferring of the degree, the candidate will be given a final examination,
oral or written or both, by his supervisory committee. At least five faculty
members must be present at the oral portion of this examination. An announce-
ment of the scheduled examination must be sent to the Dean of the Gradu-
ate School. Satisfactory performance on this examination completes all re-
quirements for the degree.


EXPENSES
APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be accompanied
by an application fee of $10.00. Application fees are nonrefundable. Admission
application to any college, school or division of the University must be made
to the Admissions Section of the Office of the Registrar. Further instructions
will be found in the Admissions section of this Catalog.

A monograph is defined by the Graduate School as a small book devoted
to one subject, published under its own cover, listed in either the Cumulative
Book Index or the Publisher's Weekly, and cataloged in accordance with
standard American library practices as a separate book. Reprints of articles
do not fulfill this definition.








40 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GENERAL
STUDENTS SHOULD BRING SUFFICIENT FUNDS, OTHER THAN PERSONAL
CHECKS, TO MEET THEIR IMMEDIATE NEEDS. PERSONAL CHECKS WILL
BE ACCEPTED FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT OF FEES.


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
For the purpose of assessing fees, applicants shall be classified as Florida
or non-Florida students. A Florida student is a person who shall be a citizen
of the United States or a resident alien and who shall have resided and had
his habitation, domicile, home and permanent abode in the State of Florida
for at least twelve (12) months immediately preceding his current registration.
In applying this regulation, "applicant" shall mean a student applying for ad-
mission to the institution if he is married or 21 years of age, or, if he is a
minor, it shall mean parents, parent, or legal guardian of his or her person.
In all applications for admission by students as citizens of the State, the
applicant, if married or 21 years of age, or, if a minor, his parents or
legal guardian shall make and file with such application a written statement
under oath that such applicant is a bona fide citizen and resident of the State
and entitled as such to admission upon the terms and conditions prescribed for
citizens and residents of the State.
In the determining of a Florida resident for purposes of assessing fees,
the burden of proof is on the applicant. Under the law an applicant can
change his place of residence from another state to the State of Florida only
by actually and physically coming into the State and establishing his residence
with the intention of permanently residing within the State. The domicile or
legal residence of the wife is that of the husband, and the legal residence of a
minor is that of the parents, parent, or legal guardian of his person.
A non-Florida student may apply in writing for reclassification prior to
any subsequent registration under the provisions set forth below. To qualify
for reclassification as a Florida student, a person (or if a minor, his parents)
shall have resided in Florida for twelve (12) months, shall have filed a
declaration of intent to become a resident of the State, and shall be registered
to vote in the State. An alien shall have resided in Florida for twelve (12)
months and must present U.S. Immigration and Naturalization certification that
he is a resident alien. If the application is supported by evidence satisfactory
to the University that the student then qualifies as a Florida student, his classi-
fication will be changed for future registrations.


REGISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL FEES
The University Calendar appearing at the front of this Catalog sets forth
the beginning and ending dates of each quarter.
The following fees and charges are proposed at this time. However, since
the catalog must be published considerably in advance of its effective date it is








EXPENSES / 41
not always possible to anticipate changes and the fee schedule may be revised.
Every effort will be made to publicize changes for any quarter in advance
of the registration date for that quarter.
Fees are payable on the dates listed in the Catalog or the date given on
the statement sent those participating in Privileged Registration. Payment of
fees is an integral part of the registration process. Registration (including pay-
ment of fees) must be completed on or before the proper due date. The
fees charged are based on the classification of a student as Florida or
Non-Florida, Full-Time or Part-Time.
Unless otherwise noted, the fees for each quarter include fees for Matricu-
lation, Student Health Services, Student Activities, and a general Building
Fee.
FEES ARE ASSESSED AS FOLLOWS FOR ALL STUDENTS EXCEPT THOSE EN-
ROLLED IN THE M.D. PROGRAM OF THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE:
A FULL-TIME (seven credits or more) FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of
$125 for each quarter for which he is enrolled.
A FULL-TIME (seven credits or more) NON-FLORIDA STUDENT will pay
fees of $325 for each quarter for which he is enrolled. ($125 Registration plus
$200 Non-Florida Fee).
A PART-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for six credits or less, will pay,
per quarter, a fee of $10 per credit. He will not be entitled to Student Ac-
tivity or Infirmary privileges.
A PART-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for six credits or less will
pay, per quarter, a fee of $24 per credit ($10 plus $14). He will not be
entitled to Student Activity or Infirmary privileges.
A student, FLORIDA or NON-FLORIDA, enrolled in the GRADUATE SCHOOL
for THESIS ONLY, not to exceed six credits, will pay a fee of $10 per credit.
(The minimum fee is $10.) He will not be entitled to Student Activity or
Infirmary privileges.
In any quarter, registration fees should be paid by the end of the day
which precedes the beginning of classes, or the due date on statements ren-
dered. Mail payments must be RECEIVED at Student Accounts, the Hub, by this
date. All payments received on or after the first day of classes are subject to a
$25 late fee for full-time students, $15 for part-time students.
Refer to the University Calendar at the front of the Catalog for the dates
classes begin.

GRADUATE ENGINEERING EDUCATION SYSTEM (GENESYS)
Students enrolled in GENESYS will pay a fee of $30 per credit, with a
maximum fee of $210.
Students enrolled in GENESYS are not entitled to student activity or in-
firmary privileges.
University policies concerning application and late fees also apply to
GENESYS, except that the $25 late fee will not be assessed during the first
week of classes.








42 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

SPECIAL FEES
AUDIT FEE.-A regularly enrolled full-time student may audit courses
without payment of an additional fee. Others must pay a fee of $25 per course
per quarter. Auditor's permit forms may be obtained in the Office of the
Registrar. Fees are payable to Student Accounts, the Hub.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION.-The Aptitude Test of the Graduate
Record Examination is required for admission to the Graduate School. A fee of
$7.00 covers the cost of this examination. Students who take one of the Ad-
vanced Tests of the Graduate Record Examination in combination with the
Aptitude Test pay a fee of $12. These fees are payable to the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. For additional information see page
7 of this Catalog.
GRADUATE SCHOOL FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEST FEE.-All students wishing
to be certified as proficient in a reading knowledge of French, German, or
Russian must take the Educational Testing Service (ETS) Graduate School
Foreign Language Tests. A fee of $6.25 covers the cost of each examination.
The fee is payable to Student Accounts, the Hub.
GRADUATION FEE.-Each candidate for a graduate degree must make
application for the degree in accordance with the date set forth in the University
Calendar and pay, at the time of application, a fee of $20. In the event
that the applicant does not meet the requirements for graduation at the time
specified in the original application he shall be charged a fee of $5 for each
subsequent application for the same degree.
TRANSCRIPT FEE.-A student is furnished a first copy of his record with-
out charge regardless of the amount of work completed. Subsequent copies
are charged for at the rate of $1.00 each, except when the order is for more
than one copy. There is a charge of $1.00 for the first copy and 50 cents
for each additional copy on the same order. University transcripts may be ob-
tained only from the Registrar's Office.
LIBRARY FINES.-A fine of 5 cents a day is charged for each book in gen-
eral circulation which is not returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve"
books may be checked out overnight, but a fine of 25 cents is charged for
each hour or part of an hour such a book is overdue. There is no maximum
for fines and no partial remission of fines when books are returned.

DEPOSITS

DISSERTATION DEPOSIT.-A deposit of $25 is made to cover the publica-
tion of the dissertation. See Dissertation for time of payment and choice of
method of publication, which involves the disposition of this deposit.

PREPAYMENTS-UNIVERSITY HOUSING

Applications for assignment to University housing facilities for single or
married students must be accompanied by a payment of $10. This payment is
nonrefundable. It will be credited against the first rental payment.








EXPENSES / 43


REFUND OF FEES
Fees will be refunded under certain conditions upon presentation at Student
Accounts, the Hub, of a Certificate of Date of Withdrawal issued by the
Registrar and the current Certificate of Registration.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees will be made if
the student's registration is cancelled before the first day of classes in any
quarter, and in the Fourth Quarter, after classes begin but within the first
week of classes, upon presentation of the proper certification from the Regis-
trar.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees, less a charge of
$30, will be made if a student withdraws from the University or if his reg-
istration is cancelled by the University (except if cancelled in the Fourth Quar-
ter*) on or after the first day of classes but on or before the final day of
the first week of classes.
No refund will be made if the student withdraws after the final day of
the first week of classes.
No part of the student activity fee will be refunded if the student fails
to surrender the Certificate of Registration at the time the Certificate of With-
drawal is presented at Student Accounts, the Hub.
Deductions will be made from refunds for unpaid accounts due the Uni-
versity.

PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All student accounts are due and payable at Student Accounts, the Hub, at
the time such charges are incurred.
Delinquent accounts will be considered sufficient cause for cancellation of
registration, as University regulations prohibit registration, graduation, granting
of credit or release of transcript for any student whose account with the
University is delinquent.

BOOKSTORE DISCOUNTS
Graduate Assistants, Teaching and Research Assistants, and Teaching and
Research Associates who wish to obtain discounts at the University Campus
Shop and Bookstore should get their ID cards stamped at the Graduate School
office, Room 235, Tigert Hall.

TRAFFIC AND SAFETY REGULATIONS
All students must register their automobiles or motorcycles at the Uni-
versity Police Department during their first registration period at the Uni-
versity. Certain entrances are reserved for specific areas. Further, there is a
system for fines and a point system for on-campus vehicle violations. A com-
plete set of the Traffic and Safety Rules will be found in the offices of the

In the Fourth Quarter, a student whose registration is cancelled because
of grade deficiency will receive a full refund of fees if he applies for it im-
mediately.








44 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Dean of Men, Campus Police Station, and Student Traffic Court located in
the Florida Union. Each student should familiarize himself with these regula-
tions upon registering at the University.

HOUSING
FOR MARRIED GRADUATE STUDENTS.-Apartment accommodations on the
University campus are available for some married graduate students, but there
is currently a four- to ten-month waiting period between application and as-
signment, depending on the assignment period requested.
FOR SINGLE GRADUATE STUDENTS.-Two modern, air-conditioned resi-
dence halls are reserved exclusively for upper-division and graduate students,
one hall for men and one for women. Sections of an additional residence hall
for graduate men are also available.
Housing contracts for all single students are for the contract year of four
quarters (September to August), if enrolled.

APPLICATIONS
Each student must make personal arrangements for his housing, either by
applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to University
housing facilities or by obtaining accommodations in private housing. All in-
quiries concerning University housing facilities should be addressed to the
Director of Housing, University of Florida, Gainesville 32601.
An application for housing may be filed at any time after application for
admission to the University. Prospective students are urged to apply as early
as possible because of the housing demand.
Graduate students living in University housing are required to qualify as
full-time students as defined by their college or school, and they must continue
to make normal progress toward a degree as determined by the head of their
college or school.
Roommate requests are honored wherever possible, provided the indi-
viduals wishing to room together submit their applications at the same time,
clearly indicate on their respective applications their desire to room together,
and are within similar academic classifications. Any student interested in a room
assignment with a foreign student should indicate this preference on his ap-
plication.

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
Certain floors of the new Twin Towers residence hall (one hall for men
and one hall for women) are designated for graduate students. Eight suites ac-
commodating four students each are located on each floor. A suite includes two
bedrooms, a private bath, and a study-kitchenette room. The rooms provide
several study locations so that students studying will not disturb students sleep-
ing. The kitchenettes, with a refrigerator and range, allow students to prepare
light meals. The Towers are entirely carpeted and air-conditioned. Other special
features for residents include a library, social room, sundry shop, and lounges,
as well as laundry, vending, and seminar rooms. The quarterly rent rate, in-









HOUSING / 45
eluding utilities and linen rental, is $155 per student. This rate is subject to
change.
In addition to the Towers, certain sections of Buckman Hall are designated
for male graduate students. These sections have room accommodations for ap-
proximately twenty-five students. All rooms have lavatories, and there is a com-
munity bath on each floor of each section. Coin-operated laundry facilities and
study lounges are located in adjacent halls. The quarterly rent rate, including
linen rental, for a double room is $110 per student; single rooms rent for
$120. These rates are subject to change. The number of single rooms is lim-
ited. Buckman Hall is not air-conditioned and is one of the oldest, most
traditional residence halls on campus. It is centrally located on campus, how-
ever, and near the new graduate research library.

FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES
The University operates four apartment villages for married students. To
be eligible to apply for and occupy apartment housing on-campus, the fol-
lowing requirements must be met:
The married student must meet the requirements for admission to the
University of Florida, qualify as a full-time student as defined by his college
or school, and continue to make normal progress toward a degree as
determined by the head of his college or school.
The married student must be part of a family unit, defined as husband
and wife with or without children. No relatives or housekeepers can be
included as part of the family unit. In view of the limited size of on-
campus apartments, applications from families having more than four chil-
dren cannot be accepted.
The married student must be part of a family with a combined annual
income which does not exceed $4,800 or $400 per month during the period
of occupancy (including grants-in-aid, scholarships, fellowships, and grants).
Since on-campus apartments are intended to provide relatively low-cost
housing for married students, a family with a combined annual income in
excess of $4,800 cannot apply for or occupy an apartment except in un-
usual circumstances. Exceptions may be granted only by the Committee on
Student Housing.
FLAVET VILLAGE III, of temporary frame construction, includes one- and
two-bedroom units, which currently rent for $26.75 and $29.50 per month, re-
spectively. These rates are subject to change. These units are equipped with
basic furniture, but residents may request that it be stored if they have their
own furniture. Refrigerators are available on a monthly rental basis.
CORRY AND SCHUCHT MEMORIAL VILLAGES, of modern brick, concrete,
and wood construction, contain almost an equal number of one- and two-
bedroom apartments, with a few three-bedroom units in Corry Village only.
These apartments are furnished with basic equipment in living room, kitchen,
dining area, and one bedroom. No furniture may be removed from apart-
ments in Corry and Schucht. Rent rates (subject to change) are currently
$60, $65 and $75 per month. Applications for the three-bedroom units may
be made only by current residents.









46 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
DIAMOND MEMORIAL VILLAGE consists of 208 apartments similar in con-
struction, furnishings and equipment to those in Corry and Schucht Villages.
Special features include a community building with air-conditioned study-
meeting room, and a study cubicle in each two-bedroom apartment. Rent rates
(subject to change) are currently $60 and $70 per month for one- and two-
bedroom apartments, respectively.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens, dishes, rugs, curtains,
etc. Utilities, except for an allowable minimum electricity charge in the Flavet
Village, are an extra expense.

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
To aid students in obtaining private rental housing, the Housing Division
maintains an Off-Campus Section. All inquiries about off-campus housing should
be mailed to the Head of Off-Campus Housing, Division of Housing, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville 32601.
Off-campus listings are maintained in the Off-Campus Section but are not
compiled for mailing, since availability changes frequently and a mutually sat-
isfactory rental arrangement can usually be made by the student only after
personal inspection of facilities and a conference with the householder. Stu-
dents seeking off-campus housing should come to Gainesville well before the
school period to confer with the Off-Campus Section about accommodations.
Advance office appointments may be made.

FINANCIAL AID
FELLOWSHIPS, ASSISTANTSHIPS, AWARDS, AND LOANS
FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS.-To assist able students to pursue
postgraduate studies leading to a master's or doctor's degree, a number of fel-
lowships and assistantships are available. Recipients must obtain validation
covering the non-Florida tuition fee from the head of their major department
unless these fees are paid by the sponsor.
Applications for fellowships should be received by the chairman of the
student's major department by February 15th of each year.
Unless otherwise specified, application for financial support may be made
to the chairman of the appropriate department, University of Florida.

AGRICULTURE
H. HAROLD HUME FELLOWSHIP OF THE FLORIDA FEDERATION OF GARDEN
CLUBS.-This fellowship, established by the Florida Federation of Garden
Clubs, has for its object the investigation of special problems of ornamental
horticulture in Florida. The work is under the direction of the Department of
Ornamental Horticulture. The fellowship carries a stipend of $2,700 annually.
CHEMISTRY
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SCIENCE DEVELOPMENT GRANT.-
Graduate research assistantships supported by the National Science Foundation








FINANCIAL AID / 47
Science Development Grant are available at a stipend of $3,960 each for
twelve months.
TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS.-A considerable
number of these assistantships is available.

ENGINEERING
Financial aid to graduate students in engineering is available in nearly 200
graduate assistantships in research and teaching requiring one-third to three-
quarter work loads with stipends varying from $250 per month and up. Ap-
proximately 100 traineeships and fellowships are available with stipends rang-
ing from $2400 to $2800 plus tuition. These are supported by the National
Science Foundation, the Atomic Energy Commission, the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration, the National Institutes of Health, the National De-
fense Education Act Title IV, the University of Florida Graduate School, and
the College of Engineering. The University and the College have received
grants from the National Science Foundation Center of Excellence program,
and the Department of Defense THEMIS program, both of which provide re-
search assistantships. Information regarding application for these positions may
be obtained from the Director, Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station,
College of Engineering.

HEALTH AND HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION
TRAINEESHIP GRANTS.-The U. S. Vocational Rehabilitation Adminis-
tration provides the Graduate Program in Health and Hospital Administration
with traineeships for students interested in Rehabilitation Facility Administra-
tion. The traineeship grants provide an annual stipend of $2,400 plus payment
of tuition and fees.
For further information regarding these traineeship grants contact:
CHAIRMAN, Graduate Program in Health and Hospital Administration, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.

MEDICINE
Predoctoral fellowships and part-time assistantships and research positions
are available for graduate students in the various basic medical sciences par-
ticipating in the Ph.D. program. In addition some clinical and basic science de-
partments offer postdoctoral fellowships to a selected number of recent gradu-
ates of the M.D. or Ph.D. program who wish extensive research experience in
these disciplines.

NURSING
Traineeships are available through the College of Nursing, by grants from
the National Institute of Mental Health and U. S. Department of Health, Edu-
cation and Welfare, to applicants admitted to full graduate status. Stipends
are in the amount of $2,400. In addition, non-Florida fees and registration fees
are paid.
Other federal and state agencies, foundations and health groups, as well as








48 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

the military services, offer financial assistance. Loan programs with deferred
interest, repayment and reduction features are also available. A more complete
list including details and requirements will be furnished upon request.
A number of graduate assistantships are also available through various
project grants received by the College of Nursing. Application should be made
to the Coordinator of Post-Baccalaureate Nursing Programs, College of Nurs-
ing, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.

PHARMACY
AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION FELLOWSHIPS.-
A number of graduate fellowships are offered by the American Foundation
for Pharmaceutical Education which carry stipends up to $2,400. In addition,
allowances up to $600 may be granted annually for academic expenses. Holders
of these fellowships may pursue graduate work at the University of Florida.
Application should be made to the Foundation, 777 14th Street, N.W., No.
630, Washington, D.C.

REHABILITATION COUNSELING
TRAINEESHIP GRANTS.-The U. S. Rehabilitation Services Administration
has allotted the University of Florida a substantial number of traineeships
for full-time students preparing to become rehabilitation counselors. In
addition a small number of traineeship grants are available for selected students
who wish a greater emphasis on problems associated with counseling the
mentally retarded. The traineeship grants for work toward the master's de-
gree carry a stipend of $1,800 for the first year of graduate study and $2,000
for the second year. In addition to these stipends, non-Florida fees and regis-
tration fees are paid. A limited number of grants is available for work be-
yond the master's level and carries larger stipends. Traineeships are awarded
for a full calendar year and may be renewed for a second year.
For further information regarding the degree program and traineeship
grants contact: CHAIRMAN, Department of Rehabilitation Counseling, College
of Health Related Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32601.

SPEECH
The Department of Speech administers a number of traineeships, fellow-
ships and assistantships from such sources as the National Institutes of Health;
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration; NDEA Title IV; Office of Educa-
tion; North Florida Crippled Children's Association; and the University of
Florida.
Additional information may be obtained from the chairman of the De-
partment of Speech.

UNIVERSITY-WIDE AWARDS
A number of graduate fellowships, research fellowships, and part-time re-
search and teaching assistantships are available annually to meritorious stu-








FINANCIAL AID / 49

dents at stipends ranging from $2,250 to $3,600 for a nine-month period.
These are open to candidates in any field of graduate study or research. Post-
doctoral fellowships are available. Graduate assistantships are available in many
departments of the University.
NON-FLORIDA FEE SCHOLARSHIPS (these do not take care of registration
fees) are available to a limited number of graduate students. Awards are
made on the basis of scholarship achievement.
ONE-THIRD-TIME ASSISTANTSHIPS provide a stipend from $2,250 to $2,-
610 for nine months plus waiver upon request of out-of-state fees of $600.
An academic year of graduate residence may be completed in 4 quarters.
Fifteen hours per week are devoted to duties in teaching or research. Registra-
tion is limited to 12 credits. Assistants may be employed for either nine or
twelve months.
ONE-HALF-TIME ASSISTANTSHIPS provide a stipend from $2,970 to $3,-
330 for nine months plus waiver upon request of out-of-state fees of $600. A
year of graduate residence may be completed in 5 quarters. Assigned duties
may amount to 20 hours per week. Registration is limited to 10 credits.
Interested students should inquire at their departmental offices concerning
the availability of assistantships and the procedure for making application.
Prospective students should write directly to the chairmen of their major de-
partments as well as to the Admissions Office. Early inquiry is essential in
order to be assured of meeting application deadlines. Appointments are made
on the recommendation of the department chairman, subject to admission to
the Graduate School and to the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.
Clear evidence of superior ability and promise is required. Reappointment to
assistantships requires evidence of continuation of good scholarship.

UNITED STATES STEEL FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS
One two-year fellowship with stipend of $4,800 for study in business ad-
ministration and economics is available.

NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT FELLOWSHIP
TITLE IV NDEA FELLOWSHIPS.-The University was approved in 1967
for the award of NDEA Title IV Fellowships through a large number of de-
partments in the colleges of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Business Adminis-
tration, Education, Engineering, and Medicine. These are three-year doctoral
fellowships with stipends ranging from $2,000 to $2,400 for nine months and
with $400 dependency allowances. Apply to the appropriate department by
February 15th. Summer stipends of $400 are also available.
TITLE VI NDEA FELLOWSHIPS.-These are available for students whose
proposed programs emphasize the learning of either Spanish or Portuguese
through courses in the language or, in the case of doctoral candidates working
on the dissertation, through research dealing with the language or research in
which the language is an indispensable tool. Fellows are expected also to study
other fields needed for a fuller understanding of the area, region, or country
in which such language is commonly used. These related studies may include








50 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
such fields as anthropology, economiLs, geography, history, linguistics, litera-
ture, political science, and sociology.
The basic stipend will comprise the cost of tuition and all required fees,
plus $450 for summer study only, or $2,250 for the academic year, or $2,700
for summer and academic year. A candidate may apply for an allowance for
up to four dependents. The allowance for each dependent is $600 for three
quarters.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GRADUATE TRAINEESHIPS

Doctoral Programs: NSF Graduate Traineeships were awarded in 1967 in
the following fields: Aerospace Engineering, Anthropology, Astronomy, Bot-
any, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Economics, Electrical
Engineering, Engineering Science and Mechanics Pnvironmental Engineering,
Geography, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Mathematics, Mathematical
Statistics, Mechanical Engineering, Medical Sciences, Metallurgical Engineer-
ing, Nuclear Engineering Sciences, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, So-
ciology, and Zoology. Trainees are eligible for reappointment for a second
year for the master's degree and for up to four years for the doctorate.
Stipends include $2,400 to $2,800 plus out-of-state tuition of $600 and
registration fees of $500 for 12 months plus $500 for a dependent spouse and
each dependent child.

NASA PREDOCTORAL TRAINEESHIPS IN SPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Doctoral Programs: NASA Traineeships were awarded in 1967 in the fol-
lowing space-related fields: Aerospace Engineering, Animal Science, Astron-
omy, Bacteriology, Botany, Chemical Engineerine, Chemistry, Civil Engineer-
ing, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Science a-.: Mechanics, Environmental
Engineering, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medical Sciences, Metal-
lurgical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Sciences, Physics and Astronomy,
Psychology, and Zoology. Trainees are assured of three years of support if
they maintain normal progress toward a degree.
Stipends include $2400 plus out-of-state tuition of $600 and registration
fees of $500 for 12 months plus $400 per dependent with maximum depend-
ency allowance of $1000.

NDEA-RELATED FULBRIGHT-HAYS GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS FOR
STUDY ABROAD

The purpose of this program is to enable graduate students who plan to
teach in U. S. institutions of higher education to undertake non-Western lan-
guage and area study and research abroad.
In general, fellows will be expected to study in the world area of their
academic interests during their periods abroad, and fellows following a full-
time program of formal study will normally be expected to carry on their
studies in a single country. In certain cases, however, approval may be given








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES / 51
for dissertation research which would-involve (a) visits to several countries,
or (b) study outside the geographic area involved if it is demonstrated that
specialized or superior research facilities exist elsewhere.
Stipends will be individually computed. The minimum amount allowed for
maintenance will be $225 per month; this may be adjusted upward, depending
on the local cost of living. The award will also cover fees for tuition which
the fellow may need to carry out his approved program; and an allowance
may be made to help the fellow meet the cost of research and incidental ex-
penses.
Dependency allowances will be provided for up to four dependents and
will vary according to the length of the award. For awards of 6 months or less,
the allowance will be $60 per month for each dependent; for awards of more
than 6 months, the allowance for the first dependent will be at the rate of
$150 per month; allowan- ,for up to three additional dependents will be at the
rate of $100 each per month.

PEACE CORPS AWARDS
In encouraging Peace Corps returnees to pursue an advanced degree, the
Graduate Council has designated two fellowships for 1968-69 which will be
held for Peace Corps applicants until it is clear that well-qualified applicants
from the Corps are not likely to become available.

LOANS
NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM.-The National Defense
Student Loan program provides loans up to $1,000 per year, with interest at 3
per cent beginning ten months after graduation and repayable over a period as
long as ten years. Application should be made to the Director of Student Fi-
nancial Aid, University of, iorida.
UNIVERSITY LOANS.-Other university loans are also available to gradu-
ate students who are within two years of their terminal degree.
Application for financial aid must be submitted between November 1 and
February 28 for the following academic year.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES

PROGRAMS
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
The Center for Latin American Studies is the University agency responsible
for directing or coordinating graduate training, research and other academic
activities related to the Latin American area.

GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
MASTER OF ARTS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES.-This is an interdisci-
plinary area degree offered directly by the Center. Requirements are: (a) a








52 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
major of at least 21 credits consisting primarily, if not exclusively, of Latin
American language or area courses in one department, which may be agri-
cultural economics, anthropology, economics, foreign languages (Spanish and
Portuguese), geography, history, library science, political science and sociol-
ogy; (b) at least 18 credits of Latin American language and/or area courses
in at least two other departments; (c) a thesis on a Latin American topic
for which up to 9 credits are given through registration in LA 699; (d) a
reading, writing and speaking knowledge of a Latin American language. The
M.A. in Latin American Studies is intended primarily as a terminal degree for
persons who initially in their graduate program are not aiming at a teaching
career in traditional academic departments but who require a broad knowledge
of Latin American cultures and appropriate language competence for their ca-
reer objectives. It is so structured, however, that students may move directly
from it into departmental Ph.D. programs without interrupting or slowing
down their academic progress.
Departmental M.A. degrees. Requirements are: (a) at least 30 credits of
work in the major department; (b) a 9-credit minor in another department; (c)
a thesis for which 9 credits are given; (d) a reading knowledge of a foreign
language. Through agreement with the Center, the departments named in the
preceding paragraph permit a Latin American concentration in the major and
minor fields, a thesis on a Latin American topic, and the use of a Latin Ameri-
can language to satisfy the language requirement.
The Ph.D. degree. The Center does not offer an interdisciplinary Latin
American area degree at the doctoral level. Through agreement with participat-
ing departments, however, it does provide a Certificate in Latin American
Studies which is awarded in conjunction with Ph.D. degrees in agricultural
economics, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology and
Spanish. Requirements for the certificate are: (a) Latin American concen-
tration within the major department; (b) an area minor of at least 30 credits
consisting principally, if not exclusively, of Latin American language and area
courses in two or more departments outside the major and including at least 5
credits of LA 640, LATIN AMERICAN AREA SEMINAR; (c) a dissertation on a
Latin American subject; (d) a reading, speaking and writing knowledge of one
Latin American language and a reading knowledge of another; (e) residence
in Latin America normally of at least six months' duration and devoted pri-
marily to dissertation research.
Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships. N.D.E.A. Title VI Latin American
Language and Area fellowships, N.D.E.A. Title IV fellowships (in Agricul-
tural Economics, History, Political Science, and Spanish), and University fel-
lowships and assistantships are available on a competitive basis to students in
the degree programs described above.

RESEARCH
The Center supports or participates in a number of interdisciplinary re-
search programs which, in addition to their primary objectives, provide op-
portunities for training and financial support of graduate students.








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES / 53
LIBRARY RESOURCES
The several libraries on the campus of the University of Florida have Latin
American holdings totaling over 90,000 volumes as well as important manu-
script materials in the original, in transcription or on microfilm. In terms of
subject, holdings are strongest in history and the social sciences but increasing
attention is being given to the environmental sciences and to literature. In
terms of region, they are strongest in the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean
but Brazilian materials are being augmented rapidly.

OTHER ACTIVITIES
The Center sponsors conferences on Latin American topics and problems;
supports publication of scholarly books, monographs and papers; and coop-
erates with other University units in organizing and conducting developmental
type programs in Latin America.
INQUIRIES ABOUT THE VARIOUS PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE CENTER
SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: THE DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN
STUDIES, 450 LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32601.

CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
The Center for Tropical Agriculture, within the Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences, is responsible for stimulating research and curriculum devel-
opment oriented toward the tropics.
Graduate Degree Programs. Graduate programs with a minor in Tropical
Agriculture may be planned within the existing framework for graduate study
in the College of Agriculture and the School of Forestry leading to appropriate
advanced degrees. The student may choose from among more than thirty
courses dealing with tropical agriculture.
Those students working toward Master of Science in Agriculture, Master of
Science, or Doctor of Philosophy degrees are expected to carry out thesis re-
search related to a tropical problem. Students are encouraged to include in
their curriculum regional and tropical courses offered in other colleges which
would help prepare them for careers in their chosen area of the tropics.
The Centers for Latin American and African Studies offer many courses useful
to the student interested in tropical agriculture. Students are also eligible for
field courses in tropical countries which are offered by the Organization for
Tropical Studies. Foreign language proficiency is a valuable talent for those
training for international agricultural work. Language study is encouraged at
the master's level and may be required by the supervisory committee when it
is considered to be in the best interest of the student's program.
Research. The Center provides grants to faculty members and their gradu-
ate students for field research in the tropics. Interdisciplinary research by stu-
dents in disciplines with interests allied to tropical agriculture is encouraged.
Basic research either directly or indirectly provides support in depth to the
international technical assistance commitments of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Science.








54 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Student Support. The Center awards assistantships to qualified graduate
students in the College of Agriculture and School of Forestry pursuing tropi-
cally oriented training and research programs.
Other Activities. The Center enriches educational opportunities by bringing
to the campus recognized authorities on tropical agriculture for seminars and
symposia. Proceedings of symposia and other works are published. The Cen-
ter has an active acquisition program to build library resources in tropical agri-
culture.

ORGANIZATION FOR TROPICAL STUDIES
The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) was created by a consortium
of institutions to promote understanding of tropical environments and their
intelligent use by man. The University of Florida is a charter member. Gradu-
ate courses are normally offered in Costa Rica or other tropical areas. Enroll-
ment in these courses is limited, and selection of students is competitive among
applicants from member universities. Living expenses and round trip transpor-
tation between the place of residence and Costa Rica are provided participants
by OTS. Funds are also available from OTS for support of research in tropi-
cal areas. Financial support for OTS is provided by the member institutions,
National Science Foundation, Agency for International Development and the
Ford Foundation. Graduate courses are now offered in Zoology, Botany, Geog-
raphy, Agriculture and Forestry. Additional courses are under consideration.
Interested students should consult their department chairman for additional in-
formation.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
The Division of Biological Sciences is organized on a cross-college basis to
provide stimulation and coordination in the Biological Sciences. The Division
has organized faculties, with staff from many disciplines in the several colleges,
in Cellular and Molecular Biology, Genetics, Developmental Biology, Para-
sitology, Marine Biology and Radiation Biology. Each faculty is responsible for
developing and supervising a core program in its special area. In addition to
the cross-college programs, the Division serves to coordinate biological science
wherever it exists in the University. The departments of Zoology and Marine
Science in Arts and Sciences, Botany and Bacteriology in Agriculture, and
Biological Science in the University College are specifically designated as
administratively responsible to the Division of Biological Sciences.

STATE CENTERS FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION IN ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering through its continuing education program has
established off-campus centers to offer course work applicable to the Master of
Engineering degree. Centers are presently located in Duval County, Escambia
County, Broward County, and Palm Beach County.
Students who have been admitted to the Graduate School of the University
of Florida may enroll in courses offered at these State Centers as part of a








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES / 55
planned program toward the Master of Engineering degree. Other students may
take the courses offered at these centers provided they are admitted to the
University of Florida.

GENESYS
This is an acronym for Graduate Engineering Education System. It consists
of a closed-circuit television system, provided with a talk-back feature for stu-
dent questions. There are both northbound and southbound channels presently
connecting satellite campuses at Daytona Beach, Orlando and Port Canaveral.
Full-scale courses are offered and lectures may emanate from any of the
above geographic points. Although primarily designed to meet the need of engi-
neers in industry who could not attend courses in Gainesville, graduate stu-
dents pursuing advanced degrees in residence in Gainesville enroll in many of
these courses. A detailed brochure on this system and its offerings may be ob-
tained by writing the Dean of Engineering.

TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The State University System affords, under the Traveling Scholar Program,
an opportunity for graduate students to take course work or conduct research
activities at any of the universities in the State System. The course work taken
under the auspices of the Traveling Scholar Program at another university in the
System will apply for graduate degree credit at the student's home campus. The
deans of the graduate schools of the State universities are the coordinators of
the Program. For details regarding the Program and for approval to participate
in it, students must apply to the dean of the graduate school on their home
campus.
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Graduate work is offered leading to various fields of public employment.
Three training sequences are outlined herein:
Management Sequence.-Adviser for the major field is in the Department of
Political Science. Training in this area leads to positions in city manager govern-
ment and meets state and federal civil service requirements. The major will be
a concentration of public administration courses within the field of political
science. A minor or minors may be taken in economics (concentration in pub-
lic finance), accounting, or other areas.
Governmental Planning Sequence.-Adviser is in the Department of Politi-
cal Science. Training in this area is offered leading to positions in local, state,
and federal government planning agencies. The curriculum consists of semi-
nars in planning, public administration and public law and recommended
courses in statistics, economics, sociology, geography, or agricultural economics.
Supervised summer internships in selected planning agencies in Florida are
arranged by the department as an integral part of the training program.
All sequences will include 45 credits of work and a thesis. The major is 18
to 27 credits and the minor is 8 to 18 credits, at least 8 of which must be in one
field. The thesis normally covers 9 credits of research.








56 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


URBAN PROBLEMS
A comprehensive curriculum concentrating on urban problems, leading to
the Ph.D. degree, is offered through the Department of Political Science. Four
fields in political science are specified for this curriculum: public administra-
tion, American government (including national as well as local government,
parties, and political behavior), public law, and either political theory and
methodology or comparative government. The fifth field is in the minor and
may be taken in either economics or sociology. Certain courses in method-
ology are required, such as PCL 613 and statistics. All other requirements, such
as languages, remain the same as those for the regular Ph.D. with major in
political science.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Specialization in international relations leading to the M.A. and Ph.D.
degrees is offered in programs through the Department of Political Science. In
addition to the M.A. and Ph.D. with major in political science which may
emphasize international relations, the University offers an M.A. and Ph.D. with
a major in international relations. For the M.A. the requirements are the same
as for the M.A. in political science. For the Ph.D. three fields of political
science (plus two graduate courses in a fourth field) and two minor fields are
required. All other requirements, such as language, remain the same.

MASTER'S DEGREES FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHERS OF TECHNOLOGY
Programs are offered cooperatively between the College of Education and
the College of Engineering, and between the College of Education and the
departments of Architecture and of Building Construction in the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts. Their intent is to supply competent teachers for
the many terminal two-year technology programs being offered both in this
state and in other states.
Generally speaking, a person with a prior degree who has a working knowl-
edge of calculus and college-level physics can complete this degree program in
one calendar year. If the prospective student is uncertain of his proficiency in
these areas, proficiency can be regained through enrollment in a quarter prior
to his embarking upon the master's degree program.
Admission Requirements.-Applicants must meet the admission require-
ments of the Graduate School and the College of Education. Generally speak-
ing, applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from an approved college or
university and must have a grade point average of at least 2.75 on a 4.0 sys-
tem during their junior and senior years. The Aptitude Test of the Graduate
Record Examination is used as a basis for selection.
Curriculum.-The curriculum is a non-thesis program with a minimum
requirement of 50 credits. The student must satisfy the master's degree require-
ments of the college from which he expects to receive the degree. The general
pattern of all programs includes from 16 to 32 credits of education and 16 to








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES / 57

32 credits of work in the technical specialty. An individual program will
depend upon previous background and experience.

FORD FOUNDATION THREE-YEAR MASTER'S PROGRAM
Ford Foundation Undergraduate-Graduate Program.-Originally supported
by a grant from the Ford Foundation, a three-year master's degree program
in the Graduate School is now conducted by the University of Florida. The
program begins with the junior year and normally continues through the first
year of graduate study. Students who maintain satisfactory progress are
awarded a fellowship or assistantship for the third or final year, and receive
both the bachelor's and master's degrees. Program fellowships up to $250 per
month and cancellation of non-Florida fees (but not registration fees) for the
first year of graduate study are available. For further details, contact Dean
Robert A. Bryan, 235 Tigert Hall.

RESEARCH PROGRAM THROUGH THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES
The University of Florida is one of the sponsors of the Oak Ridge Asso-
ciated Universities (formerly the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies) lo-
cated at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through this sponsorship our graduate research
program has at its disposal all the facilities of the Oak Ridge National Labora-
tory, the Medical and Special Training Divisions of the Oak Ridge Associated
Universities, the Atomic Energy Commission-University of Tennessee Agri-
cultural Research Laboratory, and the research staffs of these laboratories.
When a candidate has completed one year (two for the Ph.D.) of his resi-
dent work, it is possible, by special arrangement, for him to go to Oak
Ridge to work towards completion of his research problem and the preparation
of his thesis. In addition, it is possible for the staff members of this Univer-
sity to go to Oak Ridge for varying periods, usually not less than three
months, for advanced study in their particular field. Both staff and students are
kept abreast of the most modern and up-to-date developments in atomic and
nuclear research in progress at the Oak Ridge laboratories.
The students who go to Oak Ridge hold Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowships,
which have varying stipends determined by the number of their dependents
and their level of work. Staff members may work at Oak Ridge on stipends
commensurate with their present salaries.
A copy of the bulletin and announcement of the Graduate Training Pro-
gram of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities is available in the Office of the
Graduate School. Bulletins may also be obtained by writing to the Chairman of
the University Relations Division of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities,
P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Interested persons should ask for
assistance from Dr. Billy G. Dunavant, Director of the University's Nuclear
Sciences Program, who serves as the Oak Ridge Associated Universities Coun-
selor at the University of Florida.
All arrangements for these fellowships will be made between the Dean of
the Graduate School and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities.








58 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY SERVICE
The library system consists of two major central units, the Research Library
and the College Library. There are, also, several libraries serving the various
academic colleges and schools. The holdings of the libraries number over
1,213,855 cataloged volumes and a large number of uncataloged documents
and newspapers.
The reference and bibliography collection, which includes the basic bibli-
ographies, abstracting and indexing services, and catalogs of other libraries,
is located on the first floor of the Research Library, where there are librarians
available for consultation and assistance. Among the special collections in the
Research Library are the Rare Book Collection, the Dance-Music-Theatre Ar-
chives, the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, the Marjorie Kinnan
Rawlings Collection, which consists of manuscripts, typescripts, and memora-
bilia of one of America's distinguished novelists, and the Collection of Creative
Writing, which includes work sheets, manuscripts, and other literary papers
of significant contemporary American and British authors. In recent years,
special emphasis has been placed upon strengthening the holdings for the Latin
American Area Studies Program, especially for the West Indies and the
Caribbean areas.
A new Graduate Research Library was opened in 1966. This modern, six-
story building is designed to provide service for faculty and graduate students.
It houses 600,000 books, has a seating capacity of 910, and contains 120 con-
ference and seminar rooms.
The system also includes libraries for the Colleges of Architecture and
Fine Arts, Education; Engineering; Physics and Astronomy; Law; the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Science; the units comprising the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center; Chemistry; and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School. In addi-
tion, reading room facilities have been provided in Journalism and Communica-
tions, in Health and Physical Education and in the dormitory areas.
The Library Handbook provides helpful information on hours, loan peri-
ods, and special services.

FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the Legislature in 1917
as a department of the University of Florida. Through its affiliation with the
University it carries the dual responsibility of the State and University Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of research in anthropology and natural
history. Its accessory functions as an educational arm of the University are
carried forward through interpretive displays and scientific publications. Under
the administrative control of the director are the three departments of the
Museum: Natural Sciences, staffed by scientists and technicians concerned
with the study and expansion of the research collections of animals; Social
Sciences, whose staff members are concerned with the study of historic and








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES / 59

prehistoric cultures; Interpretation, staffed by specialists in the interpretation of
knowledge through museum exhibit techniques.
The Museum exhibition halls occupy the first two floors of the Seagle
Building, a ten-story office building located in downtown Gainesville, nine
blocks from the campus. These halls are open to the public from nine-thirty
until five o'clock every day except Sundays and major holidays, when they
are open from one to five o'clock. There is no admission charge. The Museum
is frequently used by University and public school classes and is visited by
over 75,000 persons annually.
Occupying three additional floors in the Seagle Building and other space
on campus, the research collections now total approximately one million items.
These collections are under the care of curators who encourage the scientific
study of the Museum's holdings. Materials are constantly being added to the
collection both through gifts from friends and through collecting by staff
members. The archaeological collections are noteworthy. There are extensive
study collections of birds, mammals, insects, mollusks, reptiles, amphibians,
fish, and vertebrate fossils. The latter seven collections are cooperatively main-
tained by the Museum and Department of Zoology. The collection of inverte-
brate fossils is maintained in cooperation with the Department of Geology.
Opportunities are provided for students, staff, and visiting scientists to use the
collections. Research and field work are presently sponsored in the archaeo-
logical, paleontological and zoological fields. Students interested in these spe-
cialties should make application to the appropriate teaching department.

THE UNIVERSITY CENTER OF THE ARTS
The University Center of the Arts serves students, faculty, and the gen-
eral public by presenting exhibitions and performances of the best works in the
visual and performing arts.

THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY
The University Gallery is an integral part of the new Architecture and
Fine Arts complex, which opened in January, 1965. The Gallery is located on
the campus facing south 13th Street (or U. S. 441). An atrium and a reflecting
pool are two pleasing features of the Gallery's distinctive architectural style.
The Gallery, with 3000 square feet of display space, is completely modern,
air-conditioned, and maintains a varied exhibition schedule of the visual arts
during the year. The contents of exhibitions displayed in the University Gallery
range from the creations of traditional masters to the latest and most experi-
mental works by the modern avant garde. The minor arts of yesterday and
today, along with the creations of oriental and primitive cultures, form topics
for scheduled exhibitions. The Gallery originates one or two of the major
exhibitions during the year. Each exhibition shows for approximately a month,
and the Gallery's hours are from 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. daily except Sunday,
when they are from 1 P.M. to 5 P.M. The Gallery is closed on Mondays, holi-
days and during the month of August.








60 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


THE TEACHING GALLERY
The Teaching Gallery of the Department of Art is located adjacent to the
department's office area, on the third floor of the new Classroom Building in
the College of Architecture and Fine Arts complex. As a direct and physical
adjunct to the Art Department's teaching program, this Gallery displays
smaller traveling exhibitions of merit, as well as one-man shows by faculty
artists and student exhibitions. The Gallery is open Monday through Friday
from 9 A.M. to noon and from 1:30 P.M. to 5 P.M. It is closed Saturdays
and Sundays.

COMPUTING CENTER
The Computing Center of the University provides the services of IBM
System/360 Model 50 and 1401 electronic computers, a 563 Calcomp Plotter,
and other subsidiary equipment.
The principal functions of the center are:
1. To aid research by furnishing consulting services and computing sup-
port for the faculty, staff, graduate students, and others.
2. To provide computing support for undergraduate and graduate classes.
3. To maintain a library of computer programs for the benefit of users.
4. To carry on investigations in the theory and application of numerical
analysis.
5. To conduct research under contract or other arrangements for uni-
versity, federal, state, and other government agencies, as well as for
foundations and individuals.
6. To assist in coordinating and developing University research programs
in which the computer may be involved.
7. To provide machine computation and tabulating facilities for other edu-
cational and research units of the University.
The Computing Center is primarily a research unit, though members of
the staff may teach courses in other departments. Thesis work may be carried
on in the Center.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS
The purpose of the University Press is to encourage, seek out, and publish
original and scholarly manuscripts which will aid in developing the University
as a recognized center of research and scholarship.
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and Latin American titles,
the Press publishes books of general interest, and seven separate series: Ca-
ribbean conferences, Floridiana facsimile and reprint, Latin American gateway,
geronotology, humanities, Latin American, and social sciences. It is also the
publisher of The Handbook of Latin American Studies, sponsored by the Li-
brary of Congress, and is the distributor throughout the United States and Can-
ada of the publications of the Caribbean Commission and of the Inter-American
Bibliographical and Library Association.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and fourteen faculty
experts appointed by the President of the University, determines policies of








ORGANIZED RESEARCH / 61
publication relating to the acceptance or rejection of manuscripts and the is-
suance of author contracts. Each year the board examines numerous manu-
scripts submitted not only by the University faculty but by authors from all
over the United States, Europe, and Latin America.
The Press is a member of the Association of American University Presses.
Students and members of the faculty and staff are cordially invited to
visit the Press offices at 15 N.W. 15th Street, adjacent to the campus.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MONOGRAPH SERIES
The Graduate School sponsors two monograph series devoted to the pub-
lication of research primarily by present and former members of the scholarly
community of the University. The Social Sciences Monographs are published
four times each year with subjects drawn from anthropology, economics, his-
tory, political science, sociology, education, geography, law, and psychology.
The Humanities Monographs are published three times each year with subjects
drawn from art, history, language and literature, music, philosophy, and re-
ligion.

ORGANIZED RESEARCH
The Division of Sponsored Research has two general functions: (1) the
administration and promotion of the Sponsored Research Program and (2) the
support of the total research program of the University in a manner which
produces maximum benefit to the University and the greatest service to the
State of Florida. All proposals for the sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid, or
training grants must receive the approval of the Director of Research. Subse-
quent negotiations with potential contracting agencies or sponsors of research
projects are carried on under the Director's supervision.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are intended to
stimulate growth and to assist in expanding a balanced research program
throughout the University. These activities are intimately related to the support
of the graduate program. They are also intended to relieve principal investiga-
tors and departments of many of the detailed administrative and reporting
duties connected with some sponsored research. The duties and responsibilities
of the Division, of course, do not infringe upon the prerogative of the principal
investigator to seek sponsors for his own projects nor upon the responsibility
of the researcher for the scientific integrity of a project. In direct contacts
between a principal investigator and a potential sponsor, however, prior clear-
ance should be obtained from the Division to insure a uniformity in contract
requirements and to avoid duplication of negotiations with the same sponsor.
The Division of Sponsored Research is administratively responsible to the
Vice President for Academic Affairs. Policies and procedures for the opera-
tion of the Division are developed by a Board of Directors working with the
Director of Research within the general framework of the administration,
policies, and procedures of the University. The Research Council serves as
adviser on scientific matters. The Dean of the Graduate School and the Grad-
uate Council serve as advisers on matters relating to the graduate program.





A








62 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The Agricultural Experimental Stations are responsible for research lead-
ing to the improvement of all phases of Florida's widely varied agricultural
production, processing, and marketing. The stations are administered by the
director located on the University of Florida campus and include main station
departments as well as branch stations and field laboratories operating as an
integral administrative unit. As a statewide agency having agricultural research
as its primary objective, the stations cooperate closely with numerous Florida
agricultural agencies and organizations.
Many members of the research staff of the Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tions are also members of the faculty of the College of Agriculture as are
some in the Agricultural Extension Service. These three agricultural units of
the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences work
cooperatively in many areas under the administration of the Provost for Agri-
culture.
Funds for research assistants are made available to encourage graduate
training and professional scientific improvement.
Research at the main station is conducted within 17 departments-Agri-
cultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Science,
Botany, Dairy Science, Entomology, Food Science, Forestry, Fruit Crops,
Ornamental Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soils, Statistics,
Vegetable Crops, and Veterinary Science. In addition to the above, the main
station has three units vital to its research programs; namely, Editorial, Field
Services, and Plant Science Section.
The branch stations and field laboratories, and their locations, are as
follows: Central Florida Station, Sanford; Citrus Station, Lake Alfred; Ever-
glades Station, Belle Glade; Gulf Coast Station, Bradenton; North Florida
Station, Quincy; Range Cattle Station, Ona; Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead;
Suwannee Valley Station, Live Oak; West Florida Station, Jay; Indian River
Field Laboratory, Fort Pierce; Plantation Field Laboratory, Fort Lauderdale;
South Florida Field Laboratory, Immokalee; Potato Investigations Labora-
tory, Hastings; Big Bend Horticultural Laboratory, Monticello; Strawberry
and Vegetable Field Laboratory, Plant City; and the Watermelon and Grape
Investigations Laboratory, Leesburg; West Florida Dairy Unit, Chipley; and
Marianna Unit, Marianna.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is cooperating with the
Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, Brooksville, a USDA field labora-
tory, in its beef cattle and pasture production and management programs;
and with the United States Weather Bureau, Lakeland, in the Federal Frost
Warning Service for fruit and vegetable producers and shippers.
The Florida Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station developed from
early research activities of the engineering faculty and was officially established
in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral part of the College of Engineering.
Its mandate is "to organize and promote the prosecution of research projects
of engineering and related sciences, with special reference to such of these
problems as are important to the industries of Florida."







ORGANIZED RESEARCH / 63

The College and the Station are inextricably intertwined-the two activi-
ties cannot be separated functionally; they comprise the two arms of the whole
engineering body. This is particularly true at the graduate level. In many in-
stances a program initiated primarily as a research activity has developed into
a full-fledged academic department of the College, demonstrating the close
interlocking relationship of the research and teaching functions.
Early in the Fall term of 1967, five departments of the College of Engi-
neering and the Experiment Station moved into some 235,000 sq. ft. provided
by six new modern buildings located on the South Campus. Soon to be com-
pleted is 42,000 sq. ft. of remodeled space for the Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering Department. These improvements, including equipment other than
government-owned, have raised the value of the plant to more than $13 mil-
lion. The laboratories, staff, and facilities of other divisions of the University are
also available to the Station research faculty through many outstanding inter-
disciplinary programs, which provide Station support of graduate students in
the physical sciences such as physics and chemistry, as well as in engineering.
With the close relationship that exists between teaching and research, students
are exposed to many engineering and industrial problems normally not encom-
passed in a college program.
The Station receives only a small portion of its operating revenue from the
state. The major support of its research activities is derived from contracts with
government agencies, foundations, and industrial organizations. Large and small
manufacturers avail themselves of the finest engineering research laboratories
in the Southeast. The Station has superior facilities and staff in such fields as
microelectronics and integrated circuits; power systems; metallurgy; ceramics;
coastal engineering; soil mechanics; transport phenomena and fluid dynamics;
energy conversion; air and water pollution control; electrochemistry; fast neu-
tron physics; nuclear rocket propulsion; dynamics and vibrations; communica-
tions; kinetics; ionics; gaseous electronics and plasmas, and systems analysis, to
name a few.
These capabilities are reflected in the quality of the graduate student body,
which is deeply involved in these and other areas of research.
The Bureau of Research is one of the activities of the College of Archi-
tecture and Fine Arts. It fosters and encourages research in all areas of the
building arts and fine arts. It also provides an opportunity for graduate stu-
dents and faculty members to engage in research and cooperate effectively in
research with other University departments.
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research is the research division
of the College of Business Administration. A part of the Bureau's work is
designed to further understanding of the economy of Florida and the South-
east. Economic, business, and related research supported by grant and contract
funds is undertaken in subject areas of interest to the faculty. Graduate students
are involved also in these projects.
The Bureau publishes two monthly periodicals: Dimensions and Economic
Leaflets. Through these publications and monographs, the Bureau disseminates







1








64 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
the results of research and information gained from continuing statistical
series on personal income, population, construction, retail sales, employment,
and the activities of commercial banks and savings and loan associations.
The Public Administration Clearing Service is a research and service ad-
junct of the Department of Political Science in the College of Arts and
Sciences. It carries on a continuous program of research on public administra-
tion, political behavior, and public policy in Florida; it provides consulting
services on a contract basis to state and local governments in Florida; it
publishes research studies and surveys of administrative and political problems
in both scientific and popular monograph form and it publishes a Civic In-
formation Series annually for assistance to citizen groups in their study of
current issues in the state.
The Institute of International Relations is a research agency administered
through the Department of Political Science to conduct studies in international
relations.
The Research Division of the College of Journalism and Communications
conducts research in the news media, in broadcasting, advertising, and public
opinion.

STUDENT SERVICES
The Office (International Center) of the Foreign Student Adviser is the
center of services performed in behalf of the foreign students from the time
of receiving their initial inquiries until they return home. The office coordinates
action with other university agencies and is charged with responsibilities in-
volving admissions, reception, orientation, housing, finances, health, immigra-
tion, academic counseling, petitions, practical training, employment, embassy
and foundation reports, correspondence, legal problems, life counseling and
community relations. The adviser also serves as Fulbright Program Adviser
and Peace Corps and VISTA contact for volunteers. Foreign faculty members
receive assistance also.
The University Placement Center functions as the central placement
agency for the campus with services available to all students and alumni of the
University; and it works in conjunction with the schools and colleges who give
direct assistance to their graduates.
In cooperation with educational and administrative units, counseling and
testing services, and other related functions, the placement service makes its
contribution to the development of the whole individual. Its primary aim is to
offer assistance to students, from the time they enter school until they graduate,
in the development of vocational goals and attainment of their first career
position. Assistance is also offered to alumni who have attended graduate
school elsewhere, who are returning to civilian life from the military, or those
desiring to make changes in employment.
Functions include: (1) serving as liaison between students and business,
industrial, governmental, and educational organizations that are seeking col-
lege trained personnel for permanent employment; (2) establishing and main-








STUDENT SERVICES / 65


training records on registrants, employment opportunities, and placement results;
(3) conducting studies on the employment outlook, salary trends, progress
of graduates in the working world, and related matters; (4) assisting students
who leave school before graduation and, also, assisting students in finding
summer jobs which relate to their fields of study and employment goals;
(5) serving in a public relations capacity in dealing with employers and the
public.
Specific services include: career planning and guidance; counseling on the
tools and techniques of the job search; arranging interviews between em-
ployers and students; providing personnel records and faculty ratings on stu-
dents to employers; preparing and mailing lists of job opportunities to regis-
trants; distributing recruitment booklets and materials; and administering tests
for employers.
These services are available to any student or alumnus without charge.
The University Counseling Center provides psychological services to the
members of the student body and consultative services for the University
staff members who are engaged in counseling relationships with University
students. It also provides practicum experience for graduate students in the
departments of Psychology and Personnel Services. It engages in institutional
as well as basic research in the problems of counseling. Specific services in-
clude vocational counseling, personal counseling, marriage counseling and prob-
lems of the underachiever. In these functions the University Counseling Center
works closely with staff in the residence halls and with the academic advisers
in the University College and upper division colleges. The Center works with
the University Mental Health Service on a referral basis and with the director
of the early registration program in the orientation of prospective students to
the program of the University.
The Student Health Service provides medical care, health maintenance pro-
grams and mental health consultation to all full-time students in the University.
The student health fee is a part of the tuition fee. A student Health Insur-
ance Policy which is designed to provide additional compensation for costs of
hospitalization, referral services and diagnostic procedures is available and
highly recommended, but is not mandatory. Several immunization innoculations
are required prior to registration. Applicants for admission to the University
receive a form for medical history and physical examination. The history should
be completed by the applicant before he goes to his physician for physical
examination. The examination portion and the immunizations must be com-
pleted by a licensed doctor of medicine (M.D.) and the form mailed by the
doctor to the Director, Student Health Service. This health record is then re-
viewed by a physician before the applicant is cleared for registration at the
University. (For additional information see the Undergraduate Catalog.)
The Speech and Hearing Clinics, Room 321 Tigert Hall, offer their services
without charge to any University student who has a speech or hearing disorder.
This assistance is available at any time during the year and therapy sessions
are adjusted to the schedule of the student. The student is encouraged to visit
the Clinics and to take advantage of this service.








66 / THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Graduate School Editorial Service aids in the preparation of the thesis or
dissertation which is one aspect of the training in the mature and responsible
scholarship expected of a candidate. The following policies and procedures
apply to the Graduate School's editorial services for students:
1. The responsibility for acceptable English in a thesis is principally the
Supervisory Committee's.
2. The Graduate School staff acts in an advisory capacity. It informs the
student concerning acceptable form (not content) for a thesis. The staff
spot checks each thesis for typographical errors, proper footnote form,
pagination, and general mechanics.
3. The Graduate School staff can advise a student concerning proper
grammar, sentence structure, and correct word usage only to the extent
of correcting a few pages.
4. If the student will appear in the Graduate School Office with his rough
draft, the staff will examine a limited portion of it; and, if it appears
that the student is not in control of the English language, the student's
supervisory committee chairman will be so notified by letter. The chair-
man then may elect to help correct the student's English; or, if the stu-
dent is foreign, the chairman may advise the student to seek expert ad-
vice concerning English.















Fields of Instruction


DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

A accounting ............................................ ........................... ......... .................. 154
Aerospace Engineering ................................................................................................ 187
Agricultural Econom ics ................................................-........................ 69
Agricultural Engineering ......... ...... ............................................................. 188
A gronom y ..................................... ....... ................ .... .. 71
Anim al Science- General ........................................ .. .... .......................... 72
Anim al Science .......................................... ..... ..................... 72
Anthropology .......................................... ............... ........ 102
A architecture ........................................ ........................ ........................... 98
Art ..............................-...... ------------------------ --- ----.... ..... 99
Arts and Sciences- General ............................................---- --........... 102
Astronom y ...... ............................ ---..... -................ ........... ....... .. 104
Bacteriology ...........................-----.....---- -- .. ................... .... 75
Biochemistry ............................ ----------- ---.. .--- --........................ 228
Biological Sciences, Division of ............................................................... 152
Botany ........----..........................- ........................- ............. ... 77
Building Construction ........................................ ..... ... ........................... 100
Business Administration- General ............................................ ....................... 154
Chem ical Engineering ................................................................... .......... 189
Chemistry .......................................------------------------...... ..... 106
Civil Engineering .......................................------ ----------------- 194
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering ................................. ...... ............... 198
D airy Science .................................... ...... .................. ... 80
Economy ics .......................................... .... .... ....................................... 156
Education- General .............................................. .................. 166
Administration and Supervision ............................................. ..................... 169
Elem entry ............................................ ............ ......... 171
Foundations ....................... ......... ..... ....................................... 172
Music ...............------------------........................--- 175
Personnel Services ............................................................... 176
Secondary ..............................------ --------------- .. .. --- 179
Vocational, Technical and Adult ...................... ............. ........... 181
Electrical Engineering ................................ ........ ................................... ...... 198
Engineering-General (Common Courses) .................--- ---. --...... -- ......-.-- 185
Engineering Science and M echanics ................................................ ....................... 204
English ............................................................................ ...................... 110
Entomology and Nematology ........................................ .................. ....... 81
Environmental Engineering .......................... ..................................... 207
Finance and Insurance ..................... ........ ........................... 160
Food Science ............................................ .................... .......................................... 83
Foreign Languages ............ ........... ......... .......................... ..... 113
French ....................................... ... ...... .. ............................. 113
G erm an ..................................... ....... ........................... ...... .................... 114
Latin .................................... ...... ...... ......... ................ 115
Portuguese ........................................ ............................ ................ 115
Spanish ................-........ .............................. ........... ....................... 116
67









68 / DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

Forestry, School of ....................................... ......................... .....-----...-- -... 95
Fruit Crops ............................................................. ................... ------.......... 84
Geography .................................................................................................................... 116
Geology ............................. ..................................................................................... 118
H health and H hospital Adm inistration ........................................................................ 161
H history ..............................................120............................................ ................... 120
Industrial and Systems Engineering
(Operations Research) .......................... .............................. ......... ...---... 210
Journalism and Communications .............................................................................. 225
Latin American Studies .............................................................................................. 123
Library Science ........................................................................... -----------..... 123
M management and Business Law ................................................................................ 162
M marketing ...................................................................................................................... 163
M them atics ................................-............-- .. .....-- ........ .----- --...... ......-. 124
M mechanical Engineering .............................................................................................. 214
M medical Sciences--General ...................................... ............................................... 229
Anatom ical Sciences .......................................................................................... 230
Biochemistry ........................................................................................................ 231
M icrobiology ............................................................................ ........... 233
Pathology ............................................................................................................. 235
Pharm acology ................................................................................................... 236
Physiology ............................................................................................................ 237
Radiology .............................................................................................................. 239
M etallurgical and M materials Engineering .................................................................. 218
Nuclear Engineering Sciences ............. ...... ............................. .......................... 220
N using ....................................... ........ ........................ ..... ................ ...... 241
Ornamental Horticulture ... ..... ............................................. ........................ 86
Pharm aceutical Chemistry ...................................... ................................................. 244
Pharm acognosy ................................ ............................................................ 245
Pharm acology ....... ..................................................................-....................... 239
Pharm acy ....... .................... .......................................................................... 245
Philosophy .......................................................................... ...... ......................... 128
Physical Education, Health and Athletics .... .................................. 247
Physics ......................... .............................. ....... ..... .. ..... ........... 129
Plant Pathology ....... ............... .......................................................................... 86
Political Science ... .............................-. .................................................. ......... .... 133
Poultry Science ............................................... ..................................................... 8
Psychology ...........................................-............................................................... 137
Real Estate and Urban Land Studies .................................................................. 164
Rehabilitation Counseling ................... ............. ....................................... ......... 224
Sociology ............................................................. ............................................. 141
Soils ... .........................................................--....................................... 89
Speech ...............................................................................................- ................... 144
Statistics ..................................................................................................................... 90
Vegetable Crops ...................................................................................................... 93
Veterinary Science .................................................................................................... 94
Zoologyy ....... .............. .. ............. ....... ...... ..............148........... 148












College of Agriculture

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
TEFERTILLER, K. R., Chairman; ALLEGER, D. E.; BROOKE, D. L.; CAKE, E. W.;
CLARK, H. B.; EDDLEMAN, B. R.; GREENE, R. E. L.; GREENMAN, J. R.;
LANGHAM, M. R.; MCPHERSON, W. K.; MCPHERSON, W. W.; MURPHREE, C. E.;
POLOPOLUS, LEO; SAVAGE, ZACH; SMITH, C. N.; SPURLOCK, A. H.; WIL-
LIAMS, F. W.
Graduate study is offered leading to the degrees of Master of Agriculture,
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Fields of study include farm
economics and supply, demand and marketing, natural resources and factor
markets, policy and economic development, world agriculture and trade, and
econometrics. The department participates in the programs of the Center for
Latin American Studies and the Center for Tropical Agriculture. Students who
hold the bachelor's degree with their major field of study in an area other than
agricultural economics should consult with the department chairman concern-
ing acceptance for graduate study. In addition to the courses outlined, there
are seminars for organized discussion of current topics and for review of
graduate students' research.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AS 501-SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS. 1 to 3 credits
Maximum 6 credits
AS 510--EcoNOMICS OF FARM, GROVE AND RANCH MANAGEMENT. 3 credits
AS 520-MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETING FIRMS. 3 credits
AS 521-CASE STUDIES OF AGRICULTURAL MARKETING FIRMS. 3 credits
AS 522-ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL HANDLING AND PROCESSING FIRMS.
3 credits
AS 530-ECONOMICS OF LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT PLANNING. 5 credits
AS 550-COMPARATIVE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
AS 600-PHILOSOPHY OF INQUIRY IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS. 3 credits
Choice and formulation of problems; role of basic elements of inquiry in devel-
opment of knowledge. Logic, observation, imagination, judgment; relation of ideas
of leading philosophers to development of agricultural economics as a discipline.
AS 601-PROCEDURES IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING RESEARCH. 3 credits
Concepts of research and the application of scientific methods in planning and
conducting research in agricultural economics.
AS 602-PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS. 1 to 3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Individual study in selected problem areas
in agricultural economics. Emphasis on aspects of problems of interest to the stu-
dent and agreeable to the instructor. May be repeated with change in content up
to a maximum of 6 credits.









70 / AGRICULTURE


AS 610-EcoNoMIcs OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ES 302, MS 301 or MS 208. Economic theory related to prob-
lems of producer choice at the firm level. Principles are generalized to the "n"
input, "m" product and "t" time period case for various factor and product mar-
ket structures. Estimation of production function and cost structures at the tech-
nical unit and firm level.
AS 611-EcoNOMICS OF AGGREGATE OUTPUT IN AGRICULTURE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 610. Producer choices and consequences at the industry level.
Supply of individual commodities and total agricultural output resulting from the
aggregate behavior of producers and the relation of the production process to the
welfare of society.
AS 612-DYNAMICS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND FIRM GROWTH.
3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 610. Dynamics of production and problems of firm growth.
Effects of risk and uncertainty on the production process. Systems analysis and ef-
fect of adjustment restraints and time delays on producer behavior.
AS 620-ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION AND DEMAND FOR FARM PRODUCTS
AND MARKETING SERVICES. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ES 302, MS 301 or MS 208. Application of theories of price,
income and location to economics of consumption, household behavior and ag-
gregate demand for agricultural products and related marketing services. Research
applications and empirical models.
AS 621-STRUCTURE, PERFORMANCE AND INTERDEPENDENCIES IN AGRICUL-
TURAL PRODUCT MARKETS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ES 301, AS 620 or consent of instructor. Application of economic
theory to analysis of market structure and its impact on conduct and performance
of the industry in relation to other sectors of the economy. Evaluation of effects of
current public policy and institutional arrangements under which the marketing
system operates.
AS 630-AGRICULTURAL FACTOR MARKETS. 4 credits
Prerequisites: ES 301, consent of instructor. Economic analysis of the aggregate
supply and demand for the factors used in the farm sector of agriculture. Relation
of demand for agricultural products to demand for factors of production; effects
of technological change; allocation of factor returns and efficiency of factor
markets.
AS 631-LAND TENURE AND TAXATION IN AGRICULTURE. 4 credits
Prerequisites: AS 430, consent of instructor. Philosophy and history of property
rights and taxation. Effects of property rights and taxes on factor employment,
land use, output, land values, income distribution and social welfare.
AS 640-FOUNDATIONS OF AGRICULTURAL POLICIES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 440 or consent of instructor. Analysis of policy-making proc-
esses. Interrelationships among economic, political and social goals, and actions
which shape the institutional arrangements of the agricultural economy and its
relations with other sectors.
AS 641-AGRICULTURAL POLICIES AND PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES.
3 credits
Prerequisites: AS 440, ES 202. Theoretical and empirical treatment of relation
between goals and programs. Effects of policies on volume and location of output,
prices and income in the U. S. economy.








AGRONOMY / 71

AS 642-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND AGRICULTURE IN LOW-INCOME
ECONOMIES. 3 credits
Prerequisites, ES 301, ES 302. Differential growth rates; structural interdepen-
dencies and relation of technology, knowledge, capital, population, natural re-
sources, and institutional arrangements to economic growth and income distribu-
tion. Agriculture in low-income areas, especially Latin America, Asia and Africa.
AS 643-DEVELOPMENT PLANNING AND POLICIES IN LOW-INCOME RURAL
ECONOMIES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 642. Institutional development in relation to factors affecting
growth of the agricultural sector of low-income economies. Experiences in local,
regional and national development planning in low-income economies.
AS 644-REGIONAL ECONOMICS FOR RURAL AREAS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ES 301, ES 302, MS 301 or MS 208, consent of instructor.
Location economics and models for regional economic analysis. Input-output, linear
programming, and simulation techniques in regional economics; the role of plan-
ning in social accounting.
AS 646-AGRICULTURE'S ROLE IN THE GROWTH OF LATIN AMERICAN NA-
TIONS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Agricultural developments in Latin America
in relation to facts and theories of national growth, international relations and
hemispheric understanding and cooperation.
AS 650-INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL POLICY AND TRADE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ES 321. Trade theory applied to international movement of agri-
cultural products, inputs, and prices. Analysis of international policies and programs
affecting agriculture.
AS 660-NONSTOCHASTIC ECONOMETRIC MODELS. 3 credits
Identical with ES 660. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Spatial equilibrium,
input-output and game theory models. A review of the general linear programming
model and its basic theorems, integer, and nonlinear programming.
AS 661-ECONOMETRIC METHODS 1. 3 credits
Identical with ES 661. Prerequisites: STA 441, consent of instructor. Stochastic
models. The general linear model and problems associated with its use in econo-
metric research. Errors in variables, autocorrelation and miscellaneous single-
equation problems.
AS 662-ECONOMETRIC METHODS 2. 3 credits
Identical with ES 662. Prerequisite: AS 661 or ES 661. Continuation of AS 661.
The theory of the simultaneous equation approach, model construction, and esti-
mating techniques.
AS 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
AS 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits


AGRONOMY

GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68

MCCLOUD, D. E., Chairman; CLARK, F.; EDWARDSON, J. R.; GODDARD, R. E.;
HARRIS, H. C.; HINSON, K.; HORNER, E. S.; KILLINGER, G. B.; PFAHLER, P. L.;
RODGERS, E. G.; RUELKE, O. C.; SCHANK, S. C.; SCHRODER, V. N.; WALLACE,
A. T.; WARMKE, H. E.; WEST, S. H.; WILCOX, M.








72 / AGRICULTURE

The Department of Agronomy offers major work for the degrees of Master
of Agriculture, Master of Science in Agriculture, and Doctor of Philosophy.
Areas of specialization are crop ecology, crop nutrition and physiology, forages
and pastures, weed science, cytogenetics, genetics, and plant breeding. Minor
work is offered students taking major work in other departments. Students
wishing to take work in agronomy should consult departmental advisers. Pre-
requisites include a background in science, with basic courses in mathematics,
chemistry, physics, botany, and bacteriology.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AY 513-OILSEED CROPS. 3 credits
AY 514-FIBER CROPS. 3 credits
AY 536-TROPICAL PASTURE AND FORAGE SCIENCE. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
AY 641-CROP NUTRITION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 310. Nutritional influences on differentiation, composition,
growth, and yield of agronomic plants.
AY 642-BIOCHEMISTRY OF HERBICIDES. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CY 451, CY 564, BTY 617, or consent of instructor. Mechanism
of action, metabolism, and structure-activity relationships of herbicides.
AY 644-PHYSIOLOGY OF AGRONOMIC PLANTS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 310, or consent of instructor. The chemical organization, cel-
lular constituents and organization, and carbohydrate, lipid, protein, and nucleic
acid metabolism of agronomic plants.
AY 647-CROP PLANTS IN TROPICAL ENVIRONMENTS. 12 credits
Prerequisite: Approval by Organization for Tropical Studies. Factors determining
growth, development, and production of crop plants in tropical environments.
AY 648-CROP ECOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AY 311, BTY 310, or consent of instructor. Influence and inter-
action of environmental factors, such as climatic, edaphic, and biotic factors, on
the growth and development of crops.
AY 649-CROP ADAPTATION AND DISTRIBUTION. 2 credits
Adaptation of crop plants to the environment as related to the intensive crop
production belts of the world.
AY 658-POPULATION GENETICS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AY 362, STA 520, or consent of instructor. Application of statis-
tical principles to biological populations in relation to gene frequency, zygotic
frequency, mating systems and the effects of selection, mutation, and migration on
equilibrium populations.
AY 660-CYTOGENETICS. 5 credits
Prerequisites: Basic courses in genetics and cytology, and consent of instructor.
Genetic variability with emphasis on interrelationships of cytologic and genetic
concepts. Chromosome structure and number, chromosomal aberrations, apomixis,
and application of cytogenetic principles.
AY 662-ADVANCED GENETICS. 4 credits
Prerequisites: AY 362, AY 465, or ADP 322. Advanced genetic concepts and
modern genetic theory.
AY 664-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 2 to 4 credits
Identical with AL 664, BTY 696, DY 664, PY 664, ZY 664. Prerequisites:








ANIMAL SCIENCE / 73
AY 362 or ZY 325, or consent of instructor. Biochemical, bacterial, viral, sta-
tistical, radiation, serological, and human genetics; speciation, history of genetics,
genetics of higher plants and animals. May be repeated with change of content
up to a maximum of 12 credits.
AY 665-ADVANCED PLANT BREEDING. 4 credits
Prerequisites: AY 362, AY 465, STA 521, or consent of instructor. The
genetic basis for plant breeding procedures.
AY 682-GENETICS SEMINAR. 1 credit
Current literature and developments in genetics. May be repeated with change
of content up to a maximum of 3 credits.
AY 684-GRADUATE AGRONOMY SEMINAR. 1 credit
Current literature and agronomic developments. Required of all graduate students
in Agronomy. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 3 credits.
AY 686-AGRONOMIC PROBLEMS. 1 to 3 credits
Prerequisite: Minimum of one undergraduate course in agronomy or plant
science. Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies of agro-
nomic plants. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 9
credits.
AY 688-TOPICS IN AGRONOMY. 2 to 4 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Selected topics in specific agronomic areas
will be critically reviewed. May be repeated with change of content up to a max-
imum of 12 credits.
AY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
AY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits


ANIMAL SCIENCE-GENERAL
The three Departments of Animal, Poultry and Dairy Sciences have com-
bined their curricula into an Animal Science Ctirriculum. ADP 535 is a cross-
departmental course taught by the staff of the three Departments.

COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ADP 535-ANIMAL PRODUCTION IN THE TROPICS. 4 credits


ANIMAL SCIENCE

GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
CUNHA, T. J., Chairman; AMMERMAN, C. B.; ARRINGTON, L. R.; BROWNING,
C. B.; CARPENTER, J. W.; CHAPMAN, H. L.; COMBS, G. E., JR.; CROCKETT,
J. R.; DAVIS, G. K.; EDDS, G. T.; FEASTER, J. P.; FRY, J. L.; HARMS, R. H.;
HEAD, H. H.; HENTGES, J. F., JR.; KOGER, M.; MARSHALL, S. P.; MOORE, J. E.;
PALMER, A. Z.; SHIRLEY, R. L.; WALLACE, H. D.; WARNICK, A. C.; WILCOX,
C. J.; WILSON, H. R.; WING, J. M.
The Department of Animal Science offers the degrees of Master of Science
in Agriculture or Doctor of Philosophy in the following areas: (1) animal
nutrition, (2) meats, (3) animal breeding and genetics, and (4) animal physi-
ology. A student may work on a problem covering more than one area of









74 / AGRICULTURE


study. Large animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, poultry and sheep) and
laboratory animals are available for various research problems. Adequate
nutrition and meats laboratories are available for detailed chemical and carcass
quality evaluations. Special arrangements can be made for conduction of re-
search problems at the various branch agricultural experiment stations through-
out Florida. A Ph.D. degree may be obtained in Animal Science with dis-
sertation research under the direction of members of the Departments of Dairy
Science, Poultry Science, Veterinary Science and Animal Science.
Departmental prerequisites for admission to graduate study include a sound
science background, with basic courses in bacteriology, biology, botany and
chemistry.

COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AL 527-ANIMAL NUTRITION. 5 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
AL 602-QUANTITATIVE GENETICS. 5 credits
Prerequisites: STA 320, AY 362. Genetic and biometric principles underlying
genetic characters that exhibit continuous variation.
AL 604-MEAT TECHNOLOGY. 4 credits
The chemistry, physics, histology, bacteriology and engineering involved in the
handling, processing, manufacturing, preservation, storage, distribution and utili-
zation of meat.
AL 605-EXPERIMENTAL TECHNICS AND ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES IN MEAT
RESEARCH. 4 credits
Experimental design, analytical procedures; technics; carcass measurements and
analyses as related to livestock production and meat studies.
AL 607-PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION. 4 credits
Anatomy, histology and physiology of genital organs. Estrous cycle changes in
the female. Semen production in the male and artificial insemination.
AL 609-PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. 1 to 6 credits
May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
AL 650-ADVANCED METHODS IN NUTRITION TECHNOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: CY 220. For graduate students but open to seniors by special
permission. Demonstrations and limited performance of procedures used in nutri-
tion research.
AL 651-ADVANCED ANIMAL NUTRITION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 301. Proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins and enzymes.
AL 652-ADVANCED ANIMAL NUTRITION LABORATORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 301. Accompanying laboratory course for AL 651.
AL 653-VITAMINS. 4 credits
Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry. Historical development, properties, assays and
physiological effects.
AL 654-LABORATORY IN VITAMINS. 2 credits
Chemical determination and assay procedures. Accompanying laboratory course
for AL 653.
AL 655-MINERAL NUTRITION AND METABOLISM. 4 credits
Physiological effort of macro- and micro-elements, mineral interrelationships.








BACTERIOLOGY / 75

AL 656--RUMINANT PHYSIOLOGY AND METABOLISM. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AL 527. A review and correlation of the fundamental biochemical,
physiological, and bacteriological research upon which the feeding of ruminants is
based. Emphasis is placed on experimental methodology of rumen physiology and
metabolism.
AL 657-NON-RUMINANT METABOLISM. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AL 527. Basic principles affecting absorption and assimilation of
nutrients required for growth, reproduction and lactation of swine and small lab-
oratory animals.
AL 659-GENETICS OF ANIMAL IMPROVEMENT. 4 credits
Prerequisite: AL 602. Continuation of AL 602. Application of statistical tech-
niques and design in animal breeding research.
AL 660-GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. 1 credit
AL 664-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 2 to 4 credits
Identical with AY 664, BTY 696, DY 664, PY 664, ZY 664. May be re-
peated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
AL 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
AL 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits


BACTERIOLOGY

GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
TYLER, M. E., Chairman; BLAYLOCK, B. A.; BLEIWEIS, A. S.; DUGGAN, D. E.;
JEFFERIES, M. B.; NASSER, D. S.; SCHNEIDER, N. J.; SMITH, K. L.; SMITH, P. H.
Graduate study is offered leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of
Philosophy degrees in bacteriology. Close collaboration with the Department
of Microbiology, College of Medicine, in joint teaching of graduate courses,
provides a broad basis of contact with significant developments in micro-
biology. Special arrangements with the Bureau of Laboratories, State Board
of Health, extend the potential area of research to the public health laboratory.
Specialization in dairy microbiology for the Ph.D. may be taken in this de-
partment in collaboration with the Department of Dairy Science.
Prerequisites for admission to graduate study, in addition to those of the
Graduate School, are a broad educational base including mathematics, physics,
and chemistry through organic and analytical; basic courses in botany and
zoology; and preferably at least one course in bacteriology. An undergraduate
major in a physical science, engineering, or general biology is usually accepta-
ble. Receipt of an advanced degree requires detailed knowledge in biology,
microbiology, and chemistry; undergraduate deficiencies may require additional
study prior to completion of graduate work.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
BCY 505-BASIC IMMUNOLOGY. 4 credits
BCY 506-BACTERIAL PATHOGENS. 5 credits
BCY 520-PHYSICOCHEMICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 5 credits
BCY 521-PHYSICOCHEMICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 5 credits








76 / AGRICULTURE


GRADUATE COURSES
BCY 650-PUBLIC HEALTH MICROBIOLOGY. 1 to 6 credits
Identical with MED 650. Prerequisites: Consent of chairman of department
and director of laboratories. Reference study and laboratory practice of diagnostic
techniques in the Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory of the Shands Teaching
Hospital of the University of Florida Health Center or in residence at the Bureau
of Laboratories, State Department of Health, Jacksonville, Florida. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 18 credits.
BCY 651-SPECIAL TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 3 credits
Identical with MED 651. Prerequisite: 6 credits in graduate major courses.
Organized study of contemporary research in a particular aspect of general micro-
biology. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 6 credits.
BCY 652-VIROLOGY. 3 credits
Identical with MED 652. Selected topics on modern concepts of the nature of
viruses and mechanism of viral infection, chosen from the field of animal, bacte-
rial and plant viruses.
BCY 653-VIROLOGY LABORATORY. 3 credits
Identical with MED 653. Prerequisite or corequisite: BCY 652. Selected lab-
oratory experiments concerned with the nature of viruses and mechanisms of
viral replication, as well as other consequences of viral infections.
BCY 654-RESEARCH PLANNING. 3 credits
Identical with MED 654. Prerequisite: 20 credits in progressive study of
microbiology. An outline of the processes involved in scientific research including
initiating a problem, experimental techniques, analyses and evaluation of data, and
reporting, illustrated by bacteriological examples.
BCY 655-EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2 to 5 credits
Identical with MED 655. Prerequisites: 12 credits of microbiology, consent of
instructor. Application of physical, chemical and biological techniques to experi-
mental problems in microbiology. Individual laboratory study. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 8 credits.
BCY 656-THE LITERATURE OF MICROBIOLOGY. 3 credits
Identical with MED 656. Prerequisites: 12 credits of microbiology, consent of
instructor. Bibliographic method in searching the literature. Intensive study of the
literature of specified areas of the discipline.
BCY 657-MICROBIAL METABOLISM. 5 credits
Identical with MED 657. Prerequisite: BCH 601, BCH 603. Intermediary me-
tabolism of microorganisms emphasizing those metabolic pathways that are unique
or characteristic primarily of microorganisms.
BCY 658-MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY. 5 credits
Identical with MED 658. Prerequisites: Microbial Metabolism, BCY 657 or
consent of instructor. Structural and functional elements of microorganisms and
mechanics of their regulatory systems. Mechanisms of control of microbial DNA
replication, cell division, ribosome and cell-wall formation, kinetic studies of normal
and abnormal growth.
BCY 659-PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY. 3 credits
Identical with MED 659. Prerequisite: BCY 505 or MED 551. Biological and
biochemical aspects of host resistance and immunity, with emphasis on the chemical
and physicochemical properties of the proteins of immune reactions.
BCY 660-IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY. 3 credits
Identical with MED 660. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. Corequisite: BCY








BOTANY / 77

BCY 661-BIOLOGY OF UNCOMMON MICROORGANISMS. 5 credits
Identical with MED 661. Prerequisites: BCY 312, consent of instructor. Nat-
ural distribution, metabolic activities, isolation and culture of selected groups of
microorganisms.
BCY 662-MICROBIAL GENETICS. 5 credits
Identical with MED 662. Prerequisites: BCY 521, general genetics. Microbial
genetics including mutation, selection, transformation, transduction, conjugation and
episomal factors; molecular structure and function of genes.
BCY 663-PARASITIC DISEASES OF THE TROPICS AND SUBTROPICS. 5 credits
Identical with MED 663, VY 663, ZY 663. Animal parasitology covering mech-
anisms of parasitic infections, physiology of parasites, and immune responses of
the host.
BCY 669-SEMINAR. 1 credit
Identical with MED 669. Attendance required of all graduate majors at one
student and one non-student presentation each week as scheduled. Jointly with
Department of Microbiology. May be repeated with change of content.
BCY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
BCY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits

BOTANY
GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
SHANOR, L., Chairman; ALDRICH, H. C.; ANTHONY, D. S.; DAVIS, J. H., JR.;
DAVIS, J. S.; FORD, E. S.; FRITZ, G. J.; GRIFFITH, MILDRED M.; HUMPHREYS,
T. E.; KIMBROUGH, J. W.; MULLINS, J. T.; POPENOE, H. L.; SMITH, RICHARD
C.; STANLEY, R. G.; VASIL, I. K.; WARD, D. B.
The Department of Botany offers graduate work leading to the degrees
of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture, Master of Science in Teaching,
and Doctor of Philosophy.
For admission to graduate standing a student should present credits equiva-
lent to those required of undergraduate majors in the department. Under-
graduate major requirements include: 36 credits in botany, a course with
laboratory in genetics, mathematics through differential calculus, one year of
college physics and chemistry through organic. Those admitted without full
equivalents of an undergraduate major will be required to make up deficiencies
by passing appropriate courses early in their graduate programs. A reading
knowledge of a foreign language and credit for basic courses in zoology and
bacteriology are desirable. The program of graduate study for each student
will be determined by a supervisory committee.
For advisory purposes all graduate students will be given an examination
covering the broad general field of botany by the department during or soon
after their first quarter of residence. The results of this examination will be
used by the supervisory committee in planning the student's program. Each
student pursuing the Ph.D. degree will be required to pass a written depart-
mental examination on designated major areas in botany prior to the qualifying
examination.
There are in addition to the facilities of the department for graduate work,
the following special resources that may be utilized in support of graduate








78 / AGRICULTURE


student training and research: (1) The Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion and its branch stations, (2) the specialized facilities for radiation biology
in the Nuclear Sciences Building, (3) The Marine Sciences Center on the Gulf
of Mexico for studies in estuarine and marine habitats, (4) the resources of the
Welaka Conservation Reserve, and (5) the Center for Tropical Agriculture
which can support studies in tropical and subtropical areas.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
BTY 500-PLANT GEOGRAPHY. 4 credits
BTY 501-PLANT ECOLOGY. 5 credits
BTY 515-INTERMEDIATE PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 5 credits
BTY 521-INTRODUCTORY MYCOLOGY. 5 credits
BTY 522-PHYCOLOGY. 3 credits
BTY 523-MOSSES AND LIVERWORTS. 3 credits
BTY 524-LOWER VASCULAR PLANTS. 3 credits
BTY 532-PLANT ANATOMY. 5 credits
BTY 542-TAXONOMY OF SEED PLANTS. 5 credits
BTY 551-CYTOLOGY. 5 credits
GRADUATE COURSES
BTY 601-VEGETATION OF FLORIDA. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 501. All types of vegetation in Florida in relation to soils,
climate, physiographic and geologic conditions.
BTY 602-ECOLOGY OF AQUATIC PLANTS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 501. Desirable preprequisite: ZY 628. Aquatic plant com-
munities of lakes, ponds, rivers and marshes.
BTY 604-VEGETATION OF THE TROPICS. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 501. An ecological and geographical study of the important
types of vegetation in the American and other tropical regions, with emphasis on
their relation to man.
BTY 605-TROPICAL BIOLOGY: AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH. 12 credits
Identical with BLY 605 and ZY 605. Intensive field study of ecological con-
cepts in tropical environments. Eight weeks in different principal kinds of tropical
environments. Offered summer quarter in Costa Rica as part of the program of
the Organization for Tropical Studies.
BTY 607-ADVANCED TROPICAL BOTANY.
Identical with BLY 607. Prerequisites: BTY 310, BTY 501 or BTY 542. Limit:
10 participants. Offered summer quarter in Costa Rica as a part of the program
of the Organization for Tropical Studies. Topics are changed each year.
BTY 615-PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 515. A detailed study of how environmental factors influence
plant growth and development.
BTY 616-PLANT NUTRITION. 2 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 515. Fundamental aspects of plant nutrition, including such
topics as the essentiality of elements, absorption of ions, utilization and role of
nutrients, redistribution of minerals in plants and water metabolism.
BTY 617-PLANT METABOLISM. 3 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 515, BCH 402, consent of instructor. The metabolism of
carbohydrates, fats and nitrogen compounds in higher plants; cell structure as
related to metabolism; metabolic control mechanisms.








BOTANY / 79
BTY 618-RADIATION AND PLANT GROWTH. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 515. The effects of radiant energy on the physiology of
plants. Topics covered include generation, control and measurement of radiant
energy; photosynthesis; phototropism; photoperiodism; effect of the color of the
light.
BTY 621-ADVANCED MYCOLOGY 1. 4 credits
Identical with PT 631. Prerequisites: BTY 521, consent of the instructor. First
part of a three-course sequence designed for students whose major or minor is
mycology, botany or plant pathology. Morphology and taxonomy of fungi and
identification of specimens. Emphasizes basidiomycetes and fungi imperfecti. Field
work is required.
BTY 622-ADVANCED MYCOLOGY 2. 4 credits
Identical with PT 632. Prerequisites: BTY 621, consent of the instructor.
Emphasizes myxomycetes and phycomycetes. Continuation of BTY 621.
BTY 623-ADVANCED MYCOLOGY 3. 4 credits
Identical with PT 633. Prerequisites: BTY 622, consent of instructor. Empha-
sizes ascomycetes and lichens. Continuation of BTY 622.
BTY 631-MORPHOLOGY OF SEED PLANTS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 532, BTY 542. Anatomy and histology of the organs of
representative modern and fossil seed plants, emphasizing form, vascular systems
and reproduction structures from phyletic and descriptive viewpoints.
BTY 642-ADVANCED TAXONOMY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 542. Problems in the classification of vascular plants. Pub-
lished taxonomic studies reviewed as a demonstration of the techniques and prin-
ciples involved in classification; intensive individual work required in field and her-
barium application of these procedures.
BTY 655-PLANT CYTOLOGY. 5 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 551. Fundamental structures of plant cells, their functions,
reproduction and relation to inheritance; recent research and techniques.
BTY 656-CYTOCHEMISTRY. 3 credits
A systematic survey of cellular organization, cell function and cytochemical
technique.
BTY 690-PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. 2 to 5 credits
Prerequisites: Approval of chairman of department and consent of instructor.
Problems in one or more of the following fields of botany: cytology, ecology,
morphology and anatomy, physiology, radiation biology and taxonomy. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 9 credits.
BTY 692-BOTANY SEMINAR. 1 credit
Graduate majors expected to participate regularly. They will register for 1
credit during the last quarter of a degree program. Not available for graduate
minor credit except by special permission of the chairman of the department
BTY 695-TOPICS IN BOTANY. 2 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Available topics include plant biophysics,
growth regulators, chromatography, water relations, ultrastructure cytology, plant
morphogenesis and biosystematics.
BTY 696-ToPIcs IN GENETICS. 2 to 4 credits
Identical with AL 664, AY 664, DY 664, PY 664, ZY 664. See AY 664.
May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
BTY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
BTY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits








80 / AGRICULTURE

DAIRY SCIENCE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
BROWNING, C. B., Chairman; FOUTS, E. L.; HEAD, H. H.; KRIENKE, W. A.;
MARSHALL, S. P.; MULL, L. E.; SMITH, K. L.; WILCOX, C. J.; WING, J. M.
The Department of Dairy Science offers work for the Master of Science in
Agriculture and the Master of Agriculture degrees. Major courses may be
chosen from the fields of dairy husbandry or dairy manufacturing. Areas of
interest include animal breeding and genetics, nutrition, physiology, manage-
ment, microbiology, milk chemistry, and the processing of milk and milk
products.
Programs leading to the degree Doctor of Philosophy with emphasis on
problems related to dairy science may be obtained through the departments
of Animal Science or Bacteriology with staff members from Dairy Science
directing the program.
A departmental prerequisite for admission to graduate study in dairy hus-
bandry is a sound background in the biological sciences. Students interested
in graduate study in dairy manufacturing should have had a strong under-
graduate program in the physical and biological sciences.

COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
DY 501-PHYSIOLOGY OF LACTATION. 5 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
DY 601-DAIRY SCIENCE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. 3 credits
Methods employed in research in various specialized dairy fields: genetics,
nutrition, physiology, microbiology, chemistry or dairy technology. Covers use of
equipment, materials and methods, experimental designs and statistical analysis.
DY 602-PROBLEMS IN DAIRY SCIENCE. 1 to 5 credits
Selected research problems in dairy husbandry or dairy manufacturing. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
DY 603-GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DAIRY SCIENCE. 1 credit
DY 604-ENDOCRINOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisites: BCH 402, VY 522, VY 523. The function of the endocrine sys-
tem, including anatomy, physiology and chemistry of hormones. Relationship of the
endocrine glands to growth, production and reproduction is emphasized.
DY 610-ADVANCED DAIRY TECHNOLOGY. 5 credits
Theories associated with chemical and physical changes of milk constituents
during processing and/or storage of dairy products. Special tests and quality
measurements essential in identifying and measuring degrees of these changes.
DY 611-ADVANCED DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING. 5 credits
Advanced methods of processing, and approaches to new product development
through rearranged operations and adaptations of specialized types of equipment
and their functions.
DY 612-ADVANCED DAIRY MICROBIOLOGY. 5 credits
Methods of microbiological control of dairy products, with emphasis on phys-
iological chemistry of dairy microorganisms and metabolic pathways in dairy prod-
uct fermentations.







ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY / 81


DY 664-ToPIcs IN GENETICS. 2 to 4 credits
Identical with AL 664, AY 664, BTY 696, PY 664, ZY 664. May be re-
peated with change of content up to maximum of 12 credits.
DY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits


ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY

GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
EDEN, W. G., Chairman; BARANOWSKI, R. M.; BLANTON, F. S.; BROOKS, R. F.;
CREIGHTON, J. T.; CROMROY, H. L.; GAHAN, J. B.; GILBERT, I. H.; HABECK,
D. H.; HETRICK, L. A.; KERR, S. H.; KRAMER, S.; KUITERT, L. C.; LABRECQUE,
G. C.; LLOYD, J. E.; MORGAN, P. B.; MUMA, M. H.; MURPHY, M.; NATION,
J. L.; PERRY, V. G.; RHOADES, H. L.; ROBINSON, F. A.; SIMANTON, W. A.;
SMART, G. C., JR.; SMITH, C. N.; SMITH, W. W.; SMITTLE, B. J.; TURNER,
R. B.; WAITES, R. E.; WALKER, T, J.; WESTFALL, M. J.; WILKINSON, R. C.;
WINCHESTER, J. A.; WOLFENBARGER, D. O.
The Department of Entomology offers major work leading to the Mas-
ter of Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in
entomology and nematology. The staff is qualified to direct graduate study in
all of the principal areas of entomology and nematology; however, it is particu-
larly strong in economic and taxonomic nematology and in economic, tax-
onomic, forest and medical entomology, structural pest control, apiculture and
physiology, ecology and behavior. Minor work is offered to students taking
major work in other departments.
Prerequisites to graduate training in entomology include a B.S. degree from
a recognized institution and background in biology, chemistry, physics and
mathematics.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
EY 518-TROPICAL ENTOMOLOGY. 4 credits
EY 522-TROPICAL NEMATOLOGY. 5 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
EY 603-PROBLEMS IN ENTOMOLOGY. 1 to 5 credits
A problem for study may be selected in any field of entomological or nema-
tological specialization, including histology, morphology, physiology, taxonomy, em-
bryology, biological control, ecology, toxicology, plant quarantine, commercial ento-
mology, life history and habits, biology and medical and veterinary entomology.
May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 9 credits.
EY 607-INSECT TAXONOMY. 5 credits
Prerequisites: EY 408, EY 460, EY 608. Advanced study of systems of clas-
sification, the basis of systematic entomology and rules of nomenclature. Practice
in identification of immature and adult insects in the field and laboratory.
EY 608-COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE HEXAPODA. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 408. A comparative study of the external and internal anat-
omy of representative insects in each insect order.








82 / AGRICULTURE


EY 611-SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY. 1 credit
Reports and discussions pertaining to selected topics announced in advance.
May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 4 credits.
EY 612-INSECT PHYSIOLOGY. 5 credits
Prerequisites: EY 608, BCH 402, BCH 404, or consent of instructor. A detailed
physiological study of the various organs and tissues of insects.
EY 615-INSECT BEHAVIOR. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 612 or consent of instructor. Principles of animal behavior as
they apply to insects. Consideration of reproductive, feeding, defensive, migratory
and social behavior of insects. Field and laboratory techniques.
EY 616-INSECT ECOLOGY. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 612 or consent of instructor. The interrelations of insects and
their physical and biotic environment. Population dynamics and control of popula-
tion size. Field and laboratory techniques.
EY 618-INSECT TOXICOLOGY. 5 credits
Prerequisites: EY 405, CY 362, CY 363. Insecticides and acaricides: structure,
toxic action, metabolism, hazards, residues in relation to health. Acquired resistance
to pesticides. Research methods in toxicology.
EY 620-MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 420. Arthropods (except mosquitoes) parasitic on man: col-
lection, identification and bionomics of local species.
EY 621-MOSQUITOES. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 420. Mosquitoes: collection, identification, bionomics and
relationship to the health of man.
EY 622-BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INSECTS. 4 credits
Prerequisite: EY 301. The fundamental principles involved in the natural and
biological control of insects.
EY 623-IMMATURE INSECTS. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 460 or consent of instructor. The structure and identification
of immature forms of insects with emphasis on the Holometabola. An insect col-
lection determined to family will be required.
EY 624-ACAROLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: EY 301. Morphology, phylogeny, taxonomy, and economic im-
portance of mites.
EY 625-TECHNIQUES IN MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY. 5 credits
Demonstration and use of modern techniques, equipment, and procedures in
research on insects of medical importance. Conducted principally in the U.S.D.A.
Entomology Research Laboratory.
EY 630-PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODES. 5 credits
Identical with PT 630. Prerequisite: EY 303. Morphology, taxonomy, life cy-
cles, pathogenicity, and control of the plant parasitic nematodes.
EY 631-MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF NEMATODES. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 303. A detailed anatomical study of the organs of nematodes
and their vital functions.
EY 632-TAXONOMY OF NEMATODES. 5 credits
Prerequisite: EY 631. The taxonomy and identification of members of the
Phylum Nematoda.
EY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
EY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits








FOOD SCIENCE / 83

FOOD SCIENCE

GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
DENNISON, R. A., Chairman; AHMED, E. M.; BATES, R. P.; HALL, C. B.;
JOHNSON, J. H.; KNAPP, F. W.; ROBBINS, R. C.; SHOWALTER, R. K.; THOMPSON,
N. P.; VANMIDDELEM, C. H.; WENZEL, F. W.; WOLFORD, R. W.

Prerequisite for admission to graduate study, in addition to the require-
ments of the Graduate School, is a good scientific background. Students with
insufficient background in chemistry, physics, mathematics, or bacteriology will
be required to take these prerequisite subjects without graduate credit.

GRADUATE COURSES
FS 601-THERMAL PROCESSING OF FOODS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: MS 302, BCY 313 and 9 credits of undergraduate food science.
Thermodynamics of foods and food constituents; thermal resistance of enzymes and
microorganisms; derivation of processing requirements for pasteurization, stabili-
zation and sterilization.
FS 602-FooD REFRIGERATION AND FREEZING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: 9 credits of undergraduate food science. Chemical, physical and
microbiological principles and technology of preserving food by refrigeration and
freezing.
FS 603-FOOD CONCENTRATION AND DEHYDRATION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: 9 credits of undergraduate food science. Chemical, physical and
microbiological principles and technology of concentration and dehydration of foods
by atmospheric, pressure differential, vacuum, sublimation and dielectric systems.
FS 604-FOOD IRRADIATION. 3 credits
Prerequisites: FS 401, FS 402. Principles and applications of ionizing radiations
for the preservation of foods.
FS 605-INDUSTRIAL FOOD FERMENTATION. 3 credits
Prerequisites: BCY 312 or 313 and 9 credits of undergraduate food science.
Microbiological, chemical and physical principles in controlled fermentations of
foods and food constituents.
FS 611-CARBOHYDRATES OF FOODS. 4 credits
Prerequisite: FS 402. Chemistry and technology of sugars, starch, pectin and
other carbohydrates and their applications in food products.
FS 612-PROTEINS AND ENZYMES OF FOODS. 4 credits
Prerequisites: FS 402, BCH 402. Chemical and physical aspects of food proteins.
Enzyme problems and utilization in food preservation.
FS 613-LIPIDS OF FOODS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: FS 402. Chemistry, technology and uses of edible fats and oils.
Stability problems.
FS 614-FLAVOR CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CY 362; FS 401 or FS 402. Physical, physiological and chemical
aspects of flavor perception. Flavor chemistry and control of flavor in representative
foods.
FS 621-FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT. 3 credits
Prerequisite: 9 graduate credits in food science. Theoretical and technological
considerations of food product development.








84 / AGRICULTURE

FS 631-FOOD TEXTURE AND COLOR. 3 credits
Physical and chemical properties of food texture, pigments and color; methods
of measurement and influence of processing on texture and color.
FS 641-ADVANCED HUMAN NUTRITION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BCH 402 or AL 527.
FS 642-PROTEINS AND AMINO ACIDS IN NUTRITION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BCH 402. Nutritional aspects of proteins and amino acids with
emphasis on requirements, evaluation and formulation of diets for various physi-
ological functions.
FS 643-NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS OF CARBOHYDRATES AND LIPIDS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BCH 402. The role of carbohydrates and lipids in nutrition, with
emphasis on energy metabolism.
FS 651-TOPICS IN FOOD SCIENCE. 2 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Selected topics in food science critically
studied include color in foods, nutritional studies of processed foods, food additives,
food lipids, food enzymology, flavor chemistry and sensory evaluations. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 6 credits.
FS 661-FOOD SCIENCE SEMINAR. 1 credit
Preparation and presentation of reports on specialized aspects of research in
food science.
FS 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits


FRUIT CROPS

GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
KREZDORN, A. H., Chairman; ATTAWAY, J. A.; BIGGS, R. H.; BUCHANAN, D. W.;
CAMPBELL, C. W.; FORD, H. W.; GERBER, J. F.; GRIERSON, W.; LAWRENCE,
F. P.; LEONARD, C. D.; REITZ, H. J.; SHARPE, R. H.; SHERMAN, W. B.; SITES,
J. W.; SOULE, J.; STEWART, I.; ZIEGLER, L. W.

The Department of Fruit Crops offers work leading to the degrees of
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science in Agriculture and Doctor of Phi-
losophy.
The interest of the student and the guidance and facilities available will
determine the field for the thesis problem when required. Through cooperation
of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station and its branch stations, it is
possible for thesis research for the Master of Science in Agriculture and Doctor
of Philosophy degrees in certain fields to be conducted at these stations.
Prerequisites for admission to graduate study in addition to those of the
Graduate School are a sound background in horticulture, botany, mathematics,
chemistry, entomology, soils and plant pathology. The student will be held
responsible for such basic undergraduate courses as are deemed necessary for
the pursuit of his thesis work.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
FC 523-MAJOR TROPICAL FRUITS. 4 credits
FC 524-MINOR TROPICAL AND SUBTROPICAL FRUITS. 4 credits








FRUIT CROPS / 85

GRADUATE COURSES
FC 601-FRUIT CROPS SEMINAR. 1 credit
Required of all graduate students each quarter it is offered. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 2 credits.
FC 602-PHYSIOLOGY OF FRUIT CROPS. 5 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 310. Physiology of the growth and development of fruit
crops, with emphasis on fruit trees.
FC 603-MORPHOLOGY OF FRUIT CROPS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 532. The morphological features of both tropical and tem-
perate zone fruit crops, their modification by environment and their relation to
cultural practices and production problems.
FC 604-TAXONOMY OF FRUIT CROPS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 380. The nomenclature, classification and identification of
tropical and temperate zone fruit crops, with emphasis on the scientific basis and
utility of the various systems.
FC 605-BREEDING OF FRUIT CROPS. 4 credits
Prerequisite: AY 362. Principles of fruit crop breeding and varietal improve-
ment, including patterns of evolution, mechanisms of heredity and genetic param-
eters. Specific breeding problems in tropical and deciduous fruit crops.
FC 606-ROOTSTOCK-SCIoN RELATIONSHIPS. 4 credits
Rootstock-scion relationships in their influence on disease susceptibilities, soil and
climatic adaptions, bud-union incompatibilities and fruit production.
FC 610-CITRICULTURE. 5 credits
An advanced course in citrus growing, emphasizing the problems offered by
varying sites, soils, climates, stocks and varieties.
FC 611-CITRUS PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. 5 credits
Methods of tabulating and evaluating the functions of citrus trees in relation
to fruit production. Actual field recognition of the various factors and the means
of properly organizing field management.
FC 615-AGRICULTURAL METEOROLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The climate and meteorology of the bio-
sphere with special reference to fruit crops. Covers heat budget of the plant-
soil surface, turbulent transport, evapotranspiration, frost protection and agricul-
tural climatology.
FC 620-RESEARCH METHODS IN FRUIT CROPS. 4 credits
Research methods, including literature survey, collecting, analyzing, interpreting
and presenting data; methods of measurement of plot responses; use of instruments
useful in plant analysis.
FC 621-ENVIRONMENTAL MEASUREMENTS. 4 credits
Prerequisites: MS 301, PS 202. Methods and techniques employed in the char-
acterization of the biosphere. Includes sensor selection, measuring and record-
ing equipment for light, wind, temperature, humidity and heat flow.
FC 640-TOPICS IN FRUIT CROPS. 2 to 4 credits
An organized study of contemporary research in fruit crops. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 8 credits.
FC 670--NON-THESIS RESEARCH METHODS IN FRUIT CROPS. 1 to 9 credits
Maximum 9 credits
FC 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits
FC 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 15 credits








86 / AGRICULTURE

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
ROBERTS, E. C., Chairman; DICKEY, R. D.; HORN, G. C.; JOINER, J. N.;
MCELWEE, E. W.; SHEEHAN, T. J.

Graduate majors in ornamental horticulture should have 24 undergraduate
credits in horticulture or ornamental horticulture. The student is advised to
have completed 30 credits in basic courses in botany, chemistry, soils, en-
tomology, plant pathology and related subjects.

COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
OH 511-ORCHIDOLOGY. 4 credits
GRADUATE COURSES
OH 603-GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1 credit
May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 2 credits.
OH 612-NUTRITION OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS. 4 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 310, OH 441. Methods used for determining needs and con-
trol of the nutrition of horticultural plants grown in containers, beds, hydroponics
and in the field, and the resulting effect on plant growth and quality.
OH 620-ADVANCED NURSERY MANAGEMENT. 4 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 310, PLS 301, OH 420. A study of literature and the
application of research to the problems of commercial production of woody orna-
mental plants.
OH 630---RESEARCH METHODS IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE. 4 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Research methods, procedures, and litera-
ture; outlining problems; assembling and analyzing data; presenting results.
OH 641-ADVANCED FLORICULTURE. 4 credits
Prerequisite: OH 442 or OH 443. Physiological and biochemical factors affecting
growth and yield of floricultural crops; use and effects of growth-regulating com-
pounds and herbicides and techniques of breeding these crops; post-harvest phys-
iology, storage and marketing problems.
OH 662-RESEARCH METHODS AND ADVANCED TURF TECHNOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: OH 463. Principles and problems of turfgrass improvement and
management, including propagation, nutrition, physiology, soil management and
experimental methods applied to turf research.
OH 670-NON-THESIS RESEARCH IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE.
1 to 9 credits
OH 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 9 credits. Maximum 24 credits

PLANT PATHOLOGY
GRADUATE FACULTY 1967-68
PURDY, L. H., Chairman; COOK, A. A.; DECKER, P.; FREEMAN, T. E.;
KIMBROUGH, J. W.; LUKE, H. H.; MILLER, C. R.; MILLER, H. N.; PURCIFULL,
D. E.; ROBERTS, D. A.; SCHMIDT, R. A.; STALL, R. E.; ZETTLER, F. W.

The Department of Plant Pathology offers graduate studies leading to the
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees.




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