• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Revised fee schedule
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 University calendars
 State administrators
 Administrative council of...
 General information
 Colleges, schools, and curricu...
 Instructional departments and description...
 Index






Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00088
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00088
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Revised fee schedule
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    University calendars
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    State administrators
        Page 8
    Administrative council of the university
        Page 9
        Page 10
    General information
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Admissions
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Expenses
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
        Housing
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Student life
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
        Student regulations
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
    Colleges, schools, and curricula
        Page 48
        University College
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
        College of Agriculture
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
        College of Architecture and Fine Arts
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
        College of Arts and Sciences
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
        College of Business Administration
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
        College of Education
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
        College of Engineering
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
        School of Forestry
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
        College of Health Related Professions
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
        School of Journalism and Communications
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
        Center for Latin American Studies
            Page 167
        College of Law
            Page 168
        College of Medicine
            Page 169
        College of Nursing
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
        College of Pharmacy
            Page 174
            Page 175
        College of Physical Education
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
        Military Department
            Page 183
            Page 184
    Instructional departments and description of courses
        Page 185
        University College
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
        Accounting
            Page 188
            Page 189
        Advertising
            Page 190
        Aerospace engineering
            Page 190
            Page 191
        Agricultural economics
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
        Agricultural engineering
            Page 195
        Animal sciences
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
        Anthropology
            Page 199
            Page 200
        Architecture
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
        Art
            Page 204
            Page 205
            Page 206
        Arts and sciences
            Page 207
        Astronomy
            Page 208
        Bacteriology
            Page 209
        Biochemistry
            Page 210
        Botany
            Page 211
            Page 212
        Broadcasting
            Page 213
        Building construction
            Page 214
            Page 215
        Business administration
            Page 216
        Business education
            Page 217
        Chemical engineering
            Page 218
            Page 219
        Chemistry
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
        Civil engineering
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
        Communications
            Page 228
        Economics
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
        Education
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
        Electrical engineering
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
        Engineering graphics
            Page 246
        Engineering science and mechanics
            Page 247
            Page 248
        English
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
        Entomology
            Page 254
            Page 255
        Finance and insurance
            Page 256
            Page 257
        Food science
            Page 258
        Food technology and nutrition
            Page 259
        Foreign language
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
        Forestry
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
        General science
            Page 269
        Geography
            Page 269
            Page 270
        Geology
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
        Health and hospital administration
            Page 274
        Health related professions
            Page 274
        History
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
        Industrial arts education
            Page 280
        Industrial and systems engineering
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
        Interior design
            Page 283
        Journalism
            Page 284
            Page 285
        Landscape architecture
            Page 286
        Latin American studies
            Page 286
        Law
            Page 287
        Library science
            Page 287
        Management and business law
            Page 288
        Marketing
            Page 289
        Mathematics
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
        Mechanical engineering
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
        Mechanized agriculture
            Page 297
        Medical technology
            Page 298
        Metallurgical and materials engineering
            Page 298
            Page 299
        Meteorology
            Page 300
        Military science
            Page 300
            Page 301
        Music
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
        Nuclear engineering
            Page 306
        Nuclear science
            Page 307
        Nursing
            Page 308
            Page 309
        Occupational therapy
            Page 310
        Pharmaceutical chemistry
            Page 311
        Pharmacognosy
            Page 312
        Pharmacology
            Page 313
        Pharmacy
            Page 314
        Philosophy
            Page 315
            Page 316
        Physical education, health and athletics
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
        Required physical education for men
            Page 321
        Required physical education for women
            Page 321
        Physical therapy
            Page 322
        Physics
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
        Plant pathology
            Page 326
        Plant sciences
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
        Political science
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
        Psychology
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
        Real estate and urban land studies
            Page 339
        Rehabilitation counseling
            Page 340
        Religion
            Page 340
            Page 341
        School art
            Page 342
        Social studies
            Page 342
        Sociology
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
        Soils
            Page 346
        Speech
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
        Statistics
            Page 350
            Page 351
        Veterinary science
            Page 352
        Zoology
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
            Page 356
    Index
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
Full Text



















































V. 4c


L~- 4S






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA REVISED FEE SCHEDULE
FALL TRIMESTER, 1965

The following material on Registration and Instruc-
tional Fees and Refund of Fees replaces information appear-
ing on Pages 27, 28 and 30 of the 1965-66 Undergraduate
Catalog and similar sections of the Graduate and Law
School catalogs. All other sections remain unchanged.

The fee schedule shown below was approved by the
1965 Session of the Florida Legislature and becomes
effective with the opening of the Fall Trimester, 1965.
The schedule was not available at the time the catalog
was printed.

THE FOLLOWING FEES ARE EFFECTIVE BEGINNING WITH THE
FALL TRIMESTER, 1965:

Fees are payable at the beginning of each trimester
or term. Payment of fees is an integral part of the
registration process. Registration must be completed
in accordance with the dates shown in the University
Calendar appearing in the front of the catalog. No
fee is assessed a student who withdraws prior to the
first day of classes. Applicable fees will be assessed
any student whose registration remains incomplete after
this date.

The fees charged are based on the classification of
a student as FLorida or Non-Florida, Graduate or Under-
graduate, Full-Time or Part-Time, and the term in which
he is enrolled.

Unless an exception is noted, the fees for each
trimester include fees for matriculation, student health
services, student activities, and a general building
fee.

FEES ARE ASSESSED AS FOLLOWS FOR ALL STUDENTS EXCEPT
THOSE ENROLLED IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OR THE M.D. PROGRAM
OF THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE:

A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $130
for each trimester for which he is enrolled.

-1-









A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of
$330 for each trimester for which he is enrolled.

A PART-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for not more
than four semester hours credit during a regular trimester
will pay a fee of $40 per trimester. He will not be en-
titled to student activity or infirmary privileges.

A PART-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for not
more than four semester hours credit during a regular
trimester, will pay a fee of $100 per trimester. He
will not be entitled to student activity or infirmary
privileges.

A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for a seven
and one-half week term will pay a fee of $65 per term.

A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for a
seven and one-half week term will pay a fee of $165
per term.

THE FOLLOWING FEES ARE ASSESSED STUDENTS ENROLLED
IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL:

A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the GRADUATE
SCHOOL will pay a fee of $150 for each trimester in which
he is enrolled.

A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the
GRADUATE SCHOOL will pay a fee of $350 for each trimester
in which he is enrolled.

A PART-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the GRADUATE
SCHOOL for not more than four semester hours during a
regular trimester will pay a fee of $50 for each registra-
tion. He will not be entitled to student activity or
infirmary privileges.

A PART-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the
GRADUATE SCHOOL for not more than four semester hours


-2-









during a regular trimester will pay a fee of $110 for
each registration. He will not be entitled to student
activity or infirmary privileges.

A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the GRADUATE
SCHOOL for a seven and one-half week term will pay a fee
of $75 per term.

A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the
GRADUATE SCHOOL for a seven and one-half week term will
pay a fee of $175 per term.

A STUDENT, FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA, enrolled in the
GRADUATE SCHOOL for THESIS ONLY, not to exceed four
semester hours credit in any regular trimester or term,
will pay a fee of $50 for each registration. He will
not be entitled to student activity or infirmary privileges.

THERE IS NO CHANGE IN THE FEES ASSESSED STUDENTS ENROLLED
IN THE M.D. PROGRAM OF THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE.

REFUND OF FEES:

A refund of fees will be made under certain conditions
upon presentation to the University Cashier of a certifica-
tion of date of withdrawal issued by the Registrar.

A full refund of tuition, registration and instruction-
al fees will be made if the student's registration is can-
celled before the first day of classes in any trimester or
term.

A full refund of tuition, registration and instruc-
tional fees less a charge of $28 ($5 fixed fee plus $23
building fee) in a trimester or $14.50 ($3 fixed fee plus
$11.50 building fee) in a seven-and-one-half week term
will be made if a student withdraws from the University
or if his registration is cancelled by the University on
or after the first day of classes but on or before the
final day of registration as shown in the University
Calendar.









A refund of 50 per cent of tuition, registration
and instructional fees, after deducting the building
fee ($23 in a regular trimester, $11.50 in a seven
and one-half week term) will be made if a student with-
draws from the University or if his registration is can-
celled by the University after the conclusion of the
registration period but on or before the day which marks
the end of the third week of classes in a regular tri-
mester or the first week of classes in a seven and one-
half week term.

No part of the student activity fee will be refunded
if the student fails to surrender the identification card
(and in the first trimester, the student activity card or
receipt for student picture) at the time the certification
of withdrawal date is presented to the University Cashier.

Deductions from refunds will be made for unpaid
accounts due the University.












The Record


Comprises:

The Graduate Catalog, the Under-
graduate Catalog, the Schedule of
Courses and various bulletins on regu-
lations, policies and information.

These documents will be sent gratui-
tously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifi-
cally state which document or what
information is desired. Address:

THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida


_OF

~C)








TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
University Calendar -.--------..-.-.------..----. 3
Administrative Council of the University ---- 9
General Information -11
Admissions 21
Expenses ---.------------.----....---.. -------- 27
Housing ------.-....---. ----------- ..---- .--- 31
Student Life-Services, Facilities, Activities ---- 34
Student Regulations -----------........ .----------- 42
Colleges, Schools, and Curricula
University College ---------- 48
College of Agriculture ------------------- ------ ---- 64
College of Architecture and Fine Arts -- 79
College of Arts and Sciences ------ 88
College of Business Administration ----- 100
College of Education 109
College of Engineering ---------- 126
School of Forestry _--- ------- -- ---.- 153
College of Health Related Professions ------ 157
School of Journalism and Communications --- 163
Center of Latin-American Studies -.---- 167
College of Law -- ---------- 168
College of Medicine ------------ 169
College of Nursing -.. ------------- 17...... ...... 170
College of Pharmacy --- .----------- 174
College of Physical Education and Health ---- 176
Military Departments ------.........----------_-- 183
Instructional Departments and Description of Courses --------- 185







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR
1965-66
FALL TRIMESTER


August 27, Friday, 5:00 p.m.





August 30, Monday--------------------.
August 30-September 4---- ........
Monday-Saturday

September 6, Monday------- ....---.

September 8, Wednesday, 5:00



September 10, Friday, 5:00 p.m.

September 17, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
September 18, Saturday, 10:00-12
October 4, Monday, 12 Noon-...

October 15-16, Friday-Saturday_
November 1, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
November 25-26, Thursday-Friday
November 29, Monday, 4:00 p.n


November 29, Monday, 5:00 p.n




December 4, Saturday, 10:00-12
December 6-8, Monday-Wednesd;

December 8, Wednesday, 10:05
December 9, Thursday ---------.......
December 17, Friday, 5:00 p.m.-
December 18, Saturday, 12 Noon


1965
July 30, Friday......


.--------. Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Fall Trimester. Students
whose admissions have not been cleared by
August 27 will be assigned Late Registration
appointments and will be subject to the pay-
ment of increased fees for Late Registration.
Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply or clear after this
date will be assigned Late Registration ap-
pointments and will be subject to the payment
of increased fees for Late Registration.
.-----...- Placement tests for entering students.
.-...Orientation and registration according to ap-
pointments assigned. No one permitted to start
registration on Saturday, September 4, after
10:00 a.m.
.--.-----. Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for all persons completing registration
on or after this date.
P.m. Last time for completing registration for Fall
Trimester. No one permitted to start registra-
tion after 3:00 p.m. on this date. Last time
for adding courses and for changing sections
5:00 p.m.
.-----.-_ Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be admin-
istered on September 18.
....--- ... Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.
Noon. Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
----. Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded at
the end of the Fall Trimester.
------... Homecoming. Classes suspended at 11:55
a.m., Friday.
.-..----. Last time for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in the preceding term of attendance.
I --.-- Thanksgiving. Classes suspended.
.-...---. Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Fall Trimester to file theses with the Dean of
the Graduate School.
I...-... Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be admin-
istered on December 4. Last time for making
application at the Office of the Registrar to
change college or division for the next tri-
mester or term.
Noon. Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
ay-.. Classes scheduled for December 6-7-8 will fol-
low a Monday, Thursday and Friday sequence.
p.m. All classes end.
.---- Final examinations begin.
..-..---- All grades for Fall Trimester due in the Office
of the Registrar.
i---......Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.







4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


1965
December


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR
1965-66
WINTER TRIMESTER


13, Monday --..


December 31, Friday, 5:00 p.m.-..-





1966
January 4, Tuesday....-----
anuary 4-8, Tuesday-Saturday ---

January 10, Monday, 7:30 a.m... ----

January 12, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. ---



January 21, Friday, 5:00 p.m.--


January 31, Monday, 12 Noon --.......

February 5, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon-
February 28, Monday, 5:00 p.m. --...

March 25, Friday, 5:00 p.m.---




April 2, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon --.

April 4, Monday, 4:00 p.m.---


April 13, Wednesday, 10:05 p.m...--
April 14, Thursday.. -----....... ---
April 22, Friday, 5:00 p.m.. ----

April 23, Saturday, 12 Noon --

April 24, Sunday... ---------- -
April 25, Monday ..... -------


--.Last day for those not previously in attend-
ance at the University of Florida to file appli-
cation for admission for the Winter Trimester.
Students whose admissions have not been
cleared by December 31 will be assigned Late
Registration appointments and will be subject
to the payment of increased fees for Late Reg-
istration.
-- Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased
fees for Late Registration.

-- Placement tests for entering students.
-Registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration
on Saturday, January 8, after 10:00 a.m.
. Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
-- Last time for completing registration for the
Winter Trimester. No one permitted to start
registration after 3:00 p.m. on this date. Last
time for adding courses and for changing sec-
tions, 5:00 p.m.
Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E. Last day for graduate stu-
dents to apply to take the foreign language
examination to be administered on February 5.
L. Last time for making application at the Offce
of the Registrar for a degree to be conferred at
the end of the Winter Trimester.
--.Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
-- Last time for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in the preceding term of attendance.
Last day for graduate students to apply to take
foreign language examination to be admin-
istered on April 2. Last time for making appli-
cation at the Office of the Registrar to change
college or division for the next trimester or
term.
..Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
-Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Winter Trimester to file theses with the Dean
of the Graduate School.
SAll classes end.
.-.Final examinations begin.
-.All grades for Winter Trimester due in the
Office of the Registrar.
Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.
--- Baccalaureate Convocation.
-- Commencement Convocation.







CATALOG 1965-66 5


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR
1965-66
SPRING TRIMESTER
1966
(See separate calendars for First and Second Terms within the Spring Trimester)
April 11, Monday ..--------------------... Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Spring Trimester. Stu-
dents whose admissions have not been cleared
by April 25 will be assigned Late Registration
appointments and will be subject to the pay-
ment of increased fees for Late Registration.
April 25, Monday, 5:00 p.m. Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will
be assigned Late Registration appointments
and will be subject to the payment of in-
creased fees for Late Registration.
April 27-28, Wednesday-Thursday -..---- Placement tests for entering students.
April 28-30, Thursday-Saturday _....-- Registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration
on Saturday, April 30, after 10:00 a.m.
May 2, Monday, 7:30 a.m. --- Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
May 4, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m ..-----. Last time for completing registration for the
Spring Trimester. No one permitted to start
registration after 3:00 p.m. on this date. Last
time for adding courses and for changing sec-
tions, 5:00 p.m.
May 13, Friday, 5:00 p.m. --- Last time for dropping full Trimester courses
without receiving a grade of E.
May 16, Monday, 12 Noon --- Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded at
the end of the Spring Trimester.
May 30, Monday .--------- Holiday (Memorial Day).
June 15, Wednesday, 10:20 p.I.--- Recess in full Trimester courses begins.
June 20, Monday, 7:30 pri._-J YV.\--'-- Recess in full Trimester courses ends.
July 4, Monday----- Holiday (Independence Day).
July 5, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.-- Last time for full Trimester students to re-
move grades of I or X received in preceding
term of attendance.
July 7, Thursday, 5:00 p.m. .- Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be admin-
istered on July 16.
July 16, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon .-Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
July 22, Friday, 5:00 p.m. ----- Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
July 25, Monday, 4:00 p.m. ----Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Spring Trimester to file theses with the Dean
of the Graduate School.
August 3, Wednesday, 10:20 p.m. -----All classes end.
August 4, Thursday ---- --Final examinations begin.
August 12, Friday, 5:00 p.m.--------All grades for Spring Trimester due in the
Office of the Registrar.
August 13, Saturday, 12 Noon -- --. Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.







6 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR
1965-66
SPRING TRIMESTER-TERM A


1966
April 11, Monday---------






April 25, Monday, open 5:00 p.m.





April 27-28, Wednesday-Thursday -
April 28-30, Thursday-Saturday --.-


May 2, Monday, 7:30 a.m...----


May 4, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.. ---




May 13, Friday, 5:00 p.m.--

May 16, Monday, 12 Noon... ----



May 25, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. --

May 30, Monday.. --------
June 6, Monday, 5:00 p.m.. --...


June 9, Thursday-



June 15, Wednesday, 10:20 p.m. -
June 16, Thursday..--------
June 20, Monday, 5:00 p.m.--

June 21, Tuesday, 12 Noon---


Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the First Term of the Spring
Trimester. Students who admissions have not
been cleared by April 25 will be assigned Late
Registration appointments and will be subject
to the payment of increased fees for Late Reg-
istration.
Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased
fees for Late Registration.
-Placement tests for entering students.
-Registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration
on Saturday, April 30, after 10:00 a.m.
._Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
Last time for completing registration for the
First Term of the Spring Trimester. No one
permitted to start registration after 3:00 p.m.
on this date. Last time for adding courses and
for changing sections, 5:00 p.m.
Last time for dropping First Term courses
without receiving a grade of E.
.--Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded at
the end of the First Term of the Spring
Trimester.
.-Last time for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in preceding term of attendance.
.- holiday (Memorial Day).
- Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
_-Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
First Term of the Spring Trimester to file
theses with the Dean of the Graduate School.
- Classes end.
-Final examinations begin.
Grades for First Term of the Spring Trimester
due in the Office of the Registrar.
-Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.







CATALOG 1965-66 7


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR
1965-66
SPRING TRIMESTER-TERM B


1966
June 6, Monday ----------






June 15, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m....





June 16-17, Thursday-Friday--
June 17-18, Friday-Saturday


June 20, Monday, 7:30 a.m.--


June 22, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.-.



June 29, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.__


July 4, Monday_----------
July 7, Thursday, 5:00 p.m.-------


July 11, Monday, 12 Noon .....


July 16, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon.

July 20, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.---

July 22, Friday, 5:00 p.m.. ------

July 25, Monday, 4:00 p.m.---..


August 3, Wednesday, 10:20 p.m..
August 4, Thursday..---...-------
August 12, Friday, 5:00 p.m.------

August 13, Saturday, 12 Noon ---


_Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Second Term of the
Spring Trimester. Students who admissions
have not been cleared by June 15 will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased
fees for Late Registration.
.- Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased
fees for Late Registration.
Placement tests for entering students.
-Registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration
on Saturday, June 18, after 10:00 a.m.
-Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
.-- Last time for completing registration for the
Second Term of the Spring Trimester. No one
permitted to start registration after 3:00 p.m.
on this date. Last time for adding courses and
for changing sections, 5:00 p.m.
- Last time for dropping courses in the Second
Term of the Spring Trimester without receiv-
ing a grade of E.
-- Holiday (Independence Day).
.-Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be admin-
istered on July 16.
.Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded at
the end of the Second Term of the Spring
Trimester.
.Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
.- Last time for removing grade of I or X re-
ceived in preceding term of attendance.
..-Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
- Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Second Term of the Spring Trimester to file
theses with the Dean of the Graduate School.
.- All classes end.
.-Final examinations begin.
.All grades for Second Term of the Spring
Trimester due in the Office of the Registrar.
.--Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.







8 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


HAYDON BURNS
Governor

TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State

WILLIAM EARL FAIRCLOTH
Attorney General

BROWARD WILLIAMS
State Treasurer

THOMAS D. BAILEY, Secretary
State Superintendent of Public Instruction




BOARD OF REGENTS


BAYA M. HARRISON, JR., Chairman
St. Petersburg

MARSHALL M. CRISER
Palm Beach

SAM T. DELL
Gainesville

WAYNE C. McCALL
Ocala

PAYNE H. MIDYETTE, SR.
Tallahassee

ROBERT M. MORGAN
Miami

JOHN C. PACE
Pensacola

FLETCHER G. RUSH
Orlando

GERT H. W. SCHMIDT
Jacksonville
J. BROWARD CULPEPPER, Executive Director
Tallahassee







ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 9


ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY


J. WAYNE REITZ, PH.D., LL.D., D.Sc.
President
HARRY MELVIN PHILPOTT, PH.D.
Vice-President
ROBERT BARBEAU MAUTZ, LL.B.
Vice-President for Academic Affairs
FRANK THOMPSON ADAMS, ED.D.
Dean of Men
TURPIN CHAMBERS BANNISTER, F.A.I.A., PH.D., D.F.A.
Dean of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts
JOSEPH RILEY BECKENBACH, PH.D.
Director of the Argricultural Experiment Station
WILLIAM NELSON BOAZ, JR., M.B.A., COLONEL, AIR FORCE
Professor of Aerospace Studies and Coordinator of Military Departments
MARNA VENABLE BRADY, ED.D.
Dean of Women
MARVIN ADEL BROKER, PH.D.
Dean of the College of Agriculture
GEORGE WESLEY CORRICK, B.S.
Director of Development Services
GEORGE KELSO DAVIS, PH.D.
Director of Nuclear Sciences
JOSHUA CLIFTON DICKINSON, JR., PH.D.
Director of the Florida State Museum
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S., C.P.A.
Associate Business Manager
BILL ALEXANDER FLEMING, B.A.
Director of Alumni Affairs
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, PH.D.
Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Director of the Bureau of Professional Relations
SAMUEL RAY GRAVES, B.A.
Athletic Director and Head Football Coach
JOHN LEWIS GRAY, M.S.F.
Director of the School of Forestry
LINTON E. PRINTER, Pu.D., LL.D.
Dean of the Graduate School
LEWIS FRANCIS HAINES, PH.D.
Director of the University Press
LESTER LEONARD HALE, PH.D.
Dean .of-.Student Affairs
DONALD JOHN HART, PH.D.
Dean of the College of Business Administration
JAMES THOMAS HENNESSEY, M.A., COLONEL ARTILLERY
Professor of Army Science






10 ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL


ELLWOOD ROBERT HENDRICKSON, PH.D.
Director of the Office of Sponsored Research
BYRON SHARPE HOLLINSHEAD, L.H.D.
Dean of the University College
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.
Registrar
WILLIAM ELLIS JONES, B.S.B.A.
Business Manager
LEMUEL RUSSELL JORDAN, M.A.
Director of University Hospital and Clinics
WILLIAM HOLCOMB KERNS, B.Sc.
Director of Informational Services
FRANK EDWARD MALONEY, LL.B.
Dean of the College of Law
SAMUEL P. MARTIN, M.D.
Provost for the Health Center
THOMAS LYLE MARTIN, JR., PH.D.
Dean of the College of Engineering and
Director of the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
DARREL JAY MASE, PH.D.
Dean of the College of Health Related Services
LYLE NELSON McALISTER, PH.D.
Director of the Center for Latin American Studies
RALPH EMERSON PAGE, PH.D.
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
ALAN J. ROBERTSON, M.A.
Dean of University Relations and Development
KENNETH F. SMALL
Director of Radio Station WRUF
DOROTHY MARY SMITH, M.ED.
Dean of the College of Nursing
DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.A.E.
Dean of the College of Physical Education and Health
EMANUEL SUTER, M.D.
Acting Dean of the College of Medicine
MARSHALL OWEN WATKINS, D.P.A
Director of the Agricultural Extension Service
RAE O. WEIMER
Director of the School of Journalism and Communications
STANLEY LeROY WEST, LL.B., B.S. in L.S.
Director of the University Libraries
KIMBALL WILES, PH.D.
Dean of the College of Education
E. T. YORK, JR., PH.D.
Provost for Agriculture






GENERAL INFORMATION 11


General Information

HISTORICAL NOTE
The University of Florida is a combined state University and land-grant college
located in the northern center of the State. While its beginnings go back to the days
previous to Florida's admission to the Union in 1845, its first college--the College
of Arts and Sciences-did not open until 1853. A few years later the passage of
the Morrill Act provided lands for state institutions of higher learning which would
promote agriculture, mechanical arts and military science, resulting in the beginnings
of the College of Agriculture, the College of Engineering, and the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station.
By 1905 there were a half-dozen state-supported institutions of higher learning
in Florida, located in various parts of the State and struggling for existence. At that
time the Florida Legislature took a step unprecedented in the history of education
in any state by passing the Buckman Act which abolished the six State Colleges and
provided for the establishment of two new institutions, of which the University of
Florida was one. It was established for men, at Gainesville and placed under the
direction of the Board of Control, a body created by the Buckman Act. The seven
members of the board represented the seven geographical sections of the State, and
served without compensation, except for travel and incidental expense incurred in
the performance of duty. Under the Constitution of Florida all responsibility for the
State educational institutions is vested in the State Board of Education, an ex-officio
body composed of the Governor, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the
Secretary of State, the Attorney General, and the State Treasurer. In 1947 the Univer-
sity was made co-educational.

SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT
The University of Florida is located in Gainesville, a city of approximately
50,000, excluding University of Florida students. Situated in north central Florida,
midway between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico, the city is known as
an agricultural and small industrial center.
In addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville offers many other advantages to
students of the University. A golf course is within easy reach of the campus, and
swimming and boating accommodations are available at nearby springs and rivers.
The lakes in the vicinity abound in fresh water fish, while the Atlantic Ocean and
the Gulf of Mexico are within a two hours' drive. As the seat of Alachua County,
the city is the focal point of diversified industrial and farming activities.
Practically every religious denomination is represented in the Gainesville area.
Churches that are active include the Presbyterian, Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist,
Catholic, Episcopal, Christian, Seven Day Adventist, Church of Christ Scientist,
Church of Christ, Christian and Missionary Alliance, Advent Christian, B'nai Israel,
Church of Latter Day Saints, Church of the Nazarene, Assembly of God, Apostolic
Church of Jesus Christ, Church of God, Diciples of Christ, Pentecostal Holiness,
and several of these denominations maintain chapels adjacent to the campus. These
include St. Augustine Chapel (Catholic Student Center), The Baptist Student Union,
Wesley Foundation (Methodist Student Center), Chapel of the Incarnation (Episcopal
Student Center), Westminster Fellowship (Presbyterian Student Center), The Church
of Christ, B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation (Jewish), the Lutheran Student Association,
The Latter Day Saints (Mormon) and the Society of Friends (Quaker). All of the
chapels carry on extensive programs of vital interest to University students.

TRANSPORTATION
The city is served by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and the Seaboard Air Line
Railway. A schedule of daily bus service, with connections to all points in the United
States, is maintained by Southeastern Greyhound Lines and Trailways Bus System.
Eastern Air Lines serves Gainesville with daily flights with connections to all parts
of the U. S.






12 GENERAL INFORMATION


ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY
GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY
Direct supervision over the University of Florida, its policies and affairs, is vested
in the Board of Regents, a body composed of nine citizens from different regions of
the state who are appointed by the Governor for a nine-year term. All actions of the
Board of Regents are subject to the final approval by the State Board of Education,
composed of the Governor, who is chairman, the Secretary of State, the Treasurer,
the Attorney General and the Superintendent of Public Instruction, secretary.
University affairs are administered by the president with the advice and assistance
of the Administrative Council. The legislative body of the University is the University
Senate.
TRIMESTER OPERATION
The University of Florida operates on a trimester basis. In a twelve month year
there are three full semesters of operation running from September to early June,
with selected courses being available in an eight weeks summer session. For the 1965-66
academic year, the first trimester will start in September and end in December. The
second trimester will start in January, 1966 and end in April. The third trimester will
start in April and end in August. This third trimester provides courses available for a
special term which will start in April and end in June. Another term will start in
June and end in August.
UNDERGRADUATE INSTRUCTION
THE LOWER DIVISION
THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE administers all of the work for the freshman
and sophomore years, offering a program which includes the basic comprehensive
courses in the major areas of knowledge and the courses prerequisite to the advanced
work in the colleges and schools in the Upper Division. Upon the successful completion
of the University College program, a student is eligible for the Certificate of Associate
of Arts.
THE UPPER DIVISION
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE offers curricula in all of the major fields
of agriculture and grants the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS offers curricula
in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, building construction, fine arts,
history of arts, crafts, advertising design, art education and music, and confers the
degrees of Bachelor of Architecture, Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Landscape
Architecture, Bachelor of Building Construction, Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Bachelor
of Design in Art Education.
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES offers curricula leading to degrees
of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, Bachelor
of Science in Mathematics, Bachelor of Science in Biology and Bachelor of Science in
Geology with opportunities for specializing in all science and liberal arts fields. It
gives the courses in mathematics, science, social sciences and humanities required in
the curricula of the professional colleges.
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION offers curricular pro-
grams leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. It
also offers a specialized program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Advanced
Accountancy.
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION has curricula in elementary and secondary
school instruction leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Education or
Bachelor of Arts in Education. It also provides an in-service program for the teachers
of the state through the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies. The
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, a unit of the College of Education, enrolls pupils
from the kindergarten through the secondary school.
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING offers curricula leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural
Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Civil Engineer-







GENERAL INFORMATION 13


ing, Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Engineering Sciences. Bachelor of Science in
Industrial Engineering, Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in
Mechanical Engineering, and Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical Engineering.
THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY is a unit of the Institute of Food and Animal
Sciences, offering professional majors in Forestry, Wildlife and Forest Products
Technology leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Forestry.
THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS, a unit of the J.
Ilillis Miller Health Center, offers curricula leading to a Bachelor of Science in Medical
Technology, a Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy, and a Bachelor of Science
in Physical Therapy.
THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS offers cur-
ricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Journalism, Bachelor of Science
in Advertising, and Bachelor of Science in Broadcasting.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor
of Laws.
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
offers a curriculum leading to the professional degree of Doctor of Medicine. Ph.D.
degrees in basic medical sciences are offered through the Graduate School.
TIE COLLEGE OF NURSING, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree.
THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy.
THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH offers services
and training through the Department of Student Health; the Departments of Re-
quired Physical Education for Men and Women; the Department of Intramural
Athletics and Recreation; and the Department of the Professional Curriculum. The
degrees offered in this department are: Bachelor of Science in Physical Education;
Bachelor of Science in Health Education; and Bachelor of Science in Recreation.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL UNITS SERVING
ALL COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC has the responsibility for such musical organ-
izations as the University Bands, Orchestras, Choruses, and Glee Clubs, and offers
courses in the following areas: (1) Theory of Music, (2) History, Literature and appre-
ciation, (3) Applied Music, (4) Music Education, and (5) Ensemble Music.
THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE offers the four year program of
the Army R.O.T.C. Completion of this program by a student leads to his being com-
missioned in one of the branches of the United States Army Reserve or the Regular
Army. Flight (Pilot) training is available for selected Senior Cadets.
THE DIVISION OF AIR SCIENCES offers the four year program of the Air
Force ROTC. Completion of this program by a student leads to his being com-
missioned in the Air Force. Flight training is given to the selected, qualified Senior
Cadets electing a pilot career in the Air Force.
THE DEPARTMENTS OF REQUIRED PHYSICAL EDUCATION administer
the programs in physical fitness and sports, required of all students.

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL offers programs leading to the degrees of Doctor
of Philosophy in more than forty fields: Doctor of Education, Specialist in Education,
Master of Agriculture, Master of Business Administration, Master of Education, Master
of Physical Education and Health, Master of Rehabilitation Counseling, Master of
Engineering, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Science in Agriculture, Master of
Science in Building Construction, Master of Science in Engineering, Master of Science
in Forestry, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science, Master of Fine Arts,
Master of Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in Journal-
ism and Communications, Master of Arts in Physical Education and Health, Master of
Arts, Master of Nursing, Master of Statistics, and Master of Science in Statistics. All
instruction is carried on by the faculties of the colleges and schools listed above.






14 GENERAL INFORMATION


STUDENT LIFE
Description of the various services, facilities and activities concerned with student
life will be found elsewhere in the catalog. The Office of the Dean of Student Affairs
has responsibility of coordinating a majority of these factors affecting non-instructional
aspects of student life.

INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS serves as staff officer,
advisor to the President, and on orders from the President, or in the absence of the
President and the Vice President of the University performs the duties of the Presi-
dent. He assists in the improvement of instruction, the correlating of instructional
activities, and in establishing policy with respect to selection and promotion of the
academic staff. The Vice President of Academic Affairs normally is the first point
of contact between all instructional units and the Office of the President.
THE BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS is responsible for admission
and placement testing and for the measurement of achievement in the comprehensive
courses in the University College.
THE BUSINESS MANAGER is responsible for all business activities and finan-
cial operations. His responsibilities include the collection and disbursement of funds,
purchasing, management of the auxiliary services, control of property, non-academic
personnel, auditing and maintenance of the physical plant and grounds of the
University.
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR has charge of the admission and registra-
tion of students, the maintenance of academic records, and the issuance of transcripts
of student records.
THE COUNSELOR TO LATIN AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL STU-
DENTS aids Latin American students to integrate their American education more
completely with actual conditions in their homelands; also, the office gives information
to all students interested in Latin American agricultural problems and careers in the
tropics. The Counselor is located in Dan McCarty Hall, Room 120.

THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
In 1963 the Center for Latin American Studies was created to provide a broader
organizational framework for the University's expanded Latin American Program. Its
primary functions are to encourage and coordinate research and graduate training in
the Latin American field and to cooperate with other university units in overseas
training and developmental programs related to Latin America.
The Center is a budgeted unit within the University and is administered by a
director immediately responsible to the President of the University.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY SERVICE
The University Libraries, comprising the General Library and ten college libraries,
contained 1,039,117 volumes and were receiving 11,038 serials as of July 1, 1964.
The larger part of the resources are housed in the General Library stacks and
the four divisional reading rooms. On the first floor is the University College Reading
Room, with some 8,000 volumes useful to students in the first two years of college.
The Humanities Reading Room and the Social Sciences Reading Room, which serve
as centers of library activity for upperclassmen and graduate students in the human-
istic and social studies, are on the second floor. In each of these rooms are approx-
imately 15,000 selected books and current issues of learned journals. The Science
Reading Room, with materials for psychology, general science, mathematics, physics,
geology and geography, is on the third floor.
Facilities in the General Library include the Browsing Room and six music
listening rooms. Seminar rooms, carrels, and study cubicles are available to faculty
members and graduate students. Inter-library loan and photoduplication services
provide research materials not available on the campus.
The resources of the General Library are particularly strong in Floridiana be-
cause of the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, which is located on the first
floor. In recent years, special emphasis has been placed upon strengthening the







GENERAL INFORMATION 15


holdings for the Latin American Area Studies Program, especially for the West
Indies and Caribbean areas. Special collections of the University Libraries include
Rare Books; the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Collection, which consists of manu-
scripts, typescripts, and memorabilia of one of America's distinguished novelists; the
Collection of Creative Writing, which includes work sheets, manuscripts, and other
literary papers of significant contemporary American and British authors; and the
Dance Music and Theatre Archives, which is an extensive collection of pictures,
programs, photographs, and other documentary material relating to the lyric theater.
Libraries for the Colleges of Agriculture, Architecture and Fine Arts, Education,
Engineering, Law, the units comprising the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and the
Department of Chemistry are located in the buildings which house the respective
instructional units. Reading rooms are maintained for the College of Physical Educa-
tion and Health and the School of Journalism and Communications. The Mead Li-
brary of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School is in Building F of the Laboratory School.
The regular schedule for the General Library is Monday through Saturday,
8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.; Sunday, 2:00 P.M. to 11:00 P.M. The college libraries,
with some variations, observe a similar schedule.

THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the Legislature in 1917 as a
Department of the University of Florida.
The Museum resembles other university-affiliated museums in that it operates as
a research center as well as a center for the diffusion of knowledge through exhibits
and publications. In addition to the general administrative section of the Museum,
headed by the director, there are three departments within the organization: A De-
partment of Natural Sciences, staffed by scientists who are concerned with studying and
expanding the research collections in natural science; a Department of Social Science,
staffed by anthropologists who study history and prehistoric cultures; a Department
of Exhibits, staffed by specialists in the interpretation of knowledge through museum
exhibit techniques. Members of the professional staff participate in teaching through
the appropriate department.
The Museum exhibition halls occupy the first two floors of the Seagle Building,
a ten-story office building located in downtown Gaincsville about a mile from the
campus. These halls are open to the public from nine-thirty until five o'clock every
day except Sundays and major holidays when they are open from one to five o'clock.
There is no admission charge. The Museum is frequently used by University and
public school classes and is visited by over 75,000 persons annually.
The basement, the third and ninth floors, and some space in Flint and Floyd
Halls are used for offices and for the housing of the research collections. These col-
lections are under the care of curators who participate in and encourage the scientific
study of the Museum's holdings. Materials are constantly being added to the collec-
tions both through gifts from friends and collecting by staff members. The archaeo-
logical collections are excellent and in 1963 the L. M. Pearsall Collection of North
American Indian artifacts gave the Museum a major collection of ethnological
material.
There are also outstanding study collections of birds, mammals, insects, mollusks,
reptiles, amphibians, fish and vertebrate fossils. The latter seven collections are
cooperatively maintained by the Museum and Department of Biology. Opportunities
are provided for students, staff, and visiting scientists to use the collections. Faculty
members with strong interests in the research collections, holding dual appointment
in the Museum help to promote the proper utilization of Museum materials. Field
work is presently sponsored in the archaeological, paleontological and zoological fields.
The Exhibits department has also been constructing site museums for State parks
in Florida. The Museum lends scientific specimens to other investigators; exchanges
exhibit materials with other institutions; and carries on other functions normally
associated with a public and university museum.

GENERAL STATE AND UNIVERSITY AGENCIES
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE is the field arm of the Uni-
versity of Florida and the United States Department of Agriculture in educational
work relating to agriculture and home economics. It is one of four major divisions







16 GENERAL INFORMATION


of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Florida, the
other two being research and teaching.
The Agricultural Extension Service works with both adults and youth, the latter
primarily through 4-H Clubs.
In cooperation with Boards of County Commissioners, the Agricultural Extension
Service jointly employs agricultural agents in 66 counties. These agents work with local
people to determine their educational needs. Programs are developed based on these
needs and teach the practical application of agricultural and home economics research
information. The agents are academic staff members of the University of Florida,
appointees of the United States Department of Agriculture and employees of their
respective counties.
Educational assistance is given the people of Florida on many agricultural prob-
lems such as commercial crop and livestock production and marketing. Some programs
focus on home surroundings, furnishings and equipment, foods and nutrition, health
and safety, clothing and family life. Efforts are also directed to many other areas
such as farm and home business management, consumer education, community de-
velopment, leadership development and public affairs.
The Agricultural Extension Service has a staff of agricultural specialists office at
the University of Florida and home economics specialists at Florida State University.
These specialists keep in touch with the latest observations and findings by the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Stations, the United States Department of Agriculture and other
pertinent sources of information. They analyze and interpret this information in terms
of its application to given areas and problems, and keep the agents in each county
informed on research of concern to the people in that county. Cooperative efforts with
organizations and other agencies arc vital parts of the programs over the state.
Information is disseminated by the Agricultural Extension Service through many
methods such as demonstrations, meetings, tours, visits to farms and homes where
individual attention is given to problems, and personal contacts in offices or by tele-
phone. Wide use is made of radio, television, news articles, and publications.
Short courses, institutes and conferences are held throughout the state and on
the campus in cooperation with agricultural and home economics groups.
THE DIVISION OF INFORMATIONAL SERVICES is responsible for inter-
preting the University's programs, policies and objectives through all mass communica-
tions media, such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, motion pictures, special
brochures and publications, photographs, displays, and exhibits. In fulfilling such
responsibilities, the Division of Informational Services operates as an administrative
coordinating unit to help create a climate for better public understanding of higher
education and, specifically, the University of Florida.
THE DIVISION OF ALUMNI SERVICES maintains contact with alumni of
the University of Florida and coordinates the activities of the various alumni clubs.
It is also the headquarters office of the University of Florida Alumni Association,
working closely with that organization in fund raising, promotion of alumni reunions,
publication of the FLORIDA ALUMNUS, a quarterly magazine, and other periodicals
of interest to alumni. It aids in the promotion of the University of Florida Founda-
tion and many other activities for the benefit of the University of Florida and its
student body.
THE DIVISION OF DEVELOPMENT SERVICES is responsible for the
coordination and supervision of all development and fund raising activities at the
University. It also serves as the headquarters of the University of Florida Foundation,
Inc., a non-profit corporation established to aid the University in seeking private
financial support.
THE UNIVERSITY CENTER OF THE ARTS serves students, faculty, and
the general public by presenting exhibitions of the best contemporary work in archi-
tecture, community planning, crafts, furniture, industrial design, painting, sculpture,
prints, and other visual arts.
WRUF, STATE AND UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RADIO STATION
operates on 850 Kilocycles with a power of 5,000 watts. WRUF-FM operates on
103.7 megacycles on a radiated power of 27,000 watts. They are both affiliated with
the National Broadcasting Company and originate the University of Florida Football
Network. WRUF has one of the largest recorded libraries of any radio station in the
country, and has UPI news service.


I







GENERAL INFORMATION 17


One of WRUF's more important functions is that of furnishing practical exper-
ience to students enrolled in the radio programs of the University. The extent to
which this policy is applied is demonstrated by the fact that the operating personnel
of WRUF consists almost entirely of University students specializing in radio work,
and the effectiveness of this training is demonstrated by the nationwide reputation
which WRUF has achieved for the developing of some of this country's leading an-
nouncers and radio executives. The various radio curricula in addition to proving this
practical operating experience requires a selection of courses from many of the depart-
ments of instruction of the University. The student is taught an awareness of the
social obligations placed on any medium whose purposes include public entertainment,
information, education, and cultural advancement. He is given the broadest possible
background, to the end that the social implications of radio as a medium for influenc-
ing the public may be recognized and acted upon. These are important aspects of the
program and should be the beginning of the building of a breadth of viewpoint on the
part of the student which he will continue to cultivate by reading and study after
he has completed the training program.
WRUF and WRUF-FM employ approximately twenty to thirty students in their
operations which give these students commercial operation experience as WRUF is
a commercial non-tax supported auxiliary of the University of Florida.
All student personnel used by Stations WRUF and WRUF-FM are selected and
hired on the basis of necessity on the part of the Stations, and talent, attitude,
scholarship requirements (2.0), fitness for job and future college program on the part
of the students as determined by personal interviews and/or open auditions with and
for the Station's executive personnel. Open auditions are announced publicly; how-
ever, preference is given those applying who plan future activity in broadcasting.
WUFT, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA EDUCATION TELEVISION STA-
TION, operates on Channel 5. It is affiliated with National Educational Television
(NET), the National Association of Educational Broadcasters, and it is a unit of the
Florida Educational Television Network.
\UFT'S function is four-fold: (1) to provide an educational and cultural service
to the community so that as many persons as possible may share in higher education
and its attendant cultural environment; (2) to assist in the instructional role of the
University through broadcast of curricular offerings; (3) to help advance the tech-
niques of teaching through television; (4) to provide University students with prac-
tical training in television broadcasting to supplement their broad academic background.
With the exception of those persons in executive positions, WUFT is operated
entirely by students.
WUFT's modem studios are located in the School of Journalism and Com-
munications. The transmitter is located north of Gainesville.
RADIO CENTER is a unit for teaching broadcast majors in the School of
Journalism and Communications. It produces and distributes informational and public
service programs used by commercial radio stations in the state.
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS. The purpose of the University
Press is to encourage, promote, and publish original and scholarly manuscripts which
will aid in developing the University as a recognized center of research and scholarship.
The Press is a member of the Association of American University Presses.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and nine faculty experts
appointed by the President of the University, determines policies relating to the
issuance of author contracts and the acceptance or rejection of the numerous manu-
scripts submitted by the University faculty and by authors throughout the United
States, Europe and Latin America.
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and inter-American titles, the
Press publishes books of general interest and nine series (biological sciences, Caribbean
conferences, dance literature, Floridiana fascimile and reprint, gerontology, humanities,
Latin American, medical sciences, and social sciences). It is also the publisher of the
Handbook of Latin American Studies, sponsored by the Library of Congress, and is the
distributor throughout the United States and Canada of the publications of the Carib-
bean Commission and of the Inter-American Bibliographical and Library Association.
Faculty members are cordially invited to visit the Press offices at 15 N. W. 15th
Street, adjacent to the campus. An annual Catalog of Books is available upon request.







18 GENERAL INFORMATION

THE FLORIDA INSTITUTE FOR CONTINUING UNIVERSITY STUDIES
is the off-campus instructional unit of the State University System. Through its Divi-
sion of General Extension the Institute offers both formal and informal non-credit
short courses, conferences, institutes, and seminars with and through established groups
and organizations. Address: P. O. Box 1562, Tallahassee, Fla.
The Division of Radio and Television is particularly concerned with instruction
made available to individuals through independent study, including the use of resource
media such as radio, television, microfilm and kinescope; programmed and correspon-
dence instruction; home study of all types. Address: 7th Floor, Seagle Building,
Gainesville, Florida.
The Division of Advanced Studies offers through the various Florida state-
supported institutions of higher learning, college courses, both graduate and under-
graduate for professional advancement and/or toward approved degree programs in
off-campus centers and extension classes. Address: P. O. Box 1562, Tallahassee, Florida.

ORGANIZED RESEARCH

THE DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH has as its general function the
administration and promotion of the Sponsored Research Program and the support of
the total research program of the University in a manner which produces maximum
benefit to the University and the greatest service to the state of Florida. All proposals
for the sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid, or training grants must receive the
approval of the Director of Research. Subsequent negotiations with potential con-
tracting agencies or sponsors of research projects are carried on under the director's
supervision. The director acts as the principal advisor to the administration regarding
the direction of the overall research effort of the University particularly with regard
to new areas of competence and interdisciplinary programs. It is intended that balance
be provided in the total research endeavor to the end that it will aid the University
in fulfilling its assigned role. The Division provides interim support for local research
projects for a limited period of time in order that the principal investigator may
develop a sound basis for requesting support from an outside agency. All research
contracts are accepted by the president of the University acting in behalf of the
Board of Control.
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS, a division of the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, are responsible for extensive organized research
leading to the improvement of all phases of Florida's widely varied agricultural pro-
duction, processing and marketing. The Stations are administered by the Director
located on the University of Florida campus and include Main station departments as
well as branch stations and field laboratories operating as an integral administrative
unit.
Many members of the research staff of the Agricultural Experiment Stations are
also members of the faculty of the College of Agriculture as are some in the Agri-
cultural Extension Service. These three agricultural divisions of the University work
cooperatively in many areas under the administration of the Provost for Agriculture.
While agricultural research is the primary objective of the Agricultural Experiment
Stations, funds for Research Assistants are made available to encourage graduate train-
ing and professional scientific improvement.
Results of the research of the Agricultural Experiment Stations are published in
scientific journals, bulletins, circulars, mimeographed reports and the Sunshine State
Agricultural Research Report and are available to Florida residents without charge
upon request to the Editorial Department of the Agricultural Experiment Station at
Gainesville. The Agricultural Experiment Station cooperates closely with the Agricul-
tural Extension Service in providing research findings for prompt dissemination.
Research at the Main Station is conducted within 17 departments-agricultural
economics, agricultural engineering, agronogy, animal science and nutrition, botany,
dairy science, entomology, food technology and nutrition, forestry, fruit crops, orna-
mental horticulture, plant pathology, poultry science, soils, statistics, vegetable crops
and veterinary science. In addition to the above the Main station has five units vital
to its research programs, namely: editorial, library, field operations, plant science sec-
tion and business service.
In order to best serve the varied needs of Florida's diversified agriculture, branch
stations and field laboratories are located at numerous locations having different climatic







GENERAL INFORMATION 19


conditions, soil types and crops. Intensive research is conducted in all fields of agri-
culture such as citrus, vegetables, field crops, livestock, pastures, and many others.
The branch stations and field laboratories, and their locations, are as follows:
Central Florida Station, Sanford; Citrus Station, Lake Alfred; Everglades Station,
Belle Glade; Gulf Coast Station, Bradenton; North Florida Station, Quincy; Range
Cattle Station, Ona; Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead; Suwanee Valley Station, Live
Oak; West Florida Station, Jay; West Central Florida Station, Brooksville; Indian
River Field Laboratory, Fort Pierce; Plantation Field Laboratory, Fort Lauderdale;
South Florida Field Laboratory, Immokalee; Potato Investigations Laboratory, Hastings;
Big Bend Horticultural Laboratory, Monticello; Strawberry and Vegetable Investiga-
tions Laboratory, Plant City; Watermelon and Grape Investigations Laboratory,
Leesburg; and the Federal-State Frost Warning Service, Lakeland.
Certain phases of the research program are cooperative with the United States
Department of Agriculture and other Federal departments as well as cooperative with
numerous Florida Agricultural agencies and organizations.
THE FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENT STA-
TION is not only the research division of the College of Engineering but it is also
the research and development laboratory for the industries of the State. It was officially
established in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral part of the College of Engineer-
ing "to organize and promote the prosecution of research projects of engineering and
related sciences, with special reference to such of these problems as are important to
the industries of Florida."
The facilities of the Station include all the equipment of the College of Engineer-
ing, now valued at more than $3,000,000, not including government owned equipment.
The station also has available for its use the laboratories, staff and facilities of other
divisions of the University. Because of the close relations that exist between teaching
and research activities, students secure much practical information about engineering
and industrial problems which would normally not be encompassed in a university
educational program.
The graduate program of the College is closely coordinated with the research con-
ducted in the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station.
Many of the undergraduate and graduate students are able to participate in the
research and utilize this in meeting the research requirement for advanced degrees.
The Station receives only a small portion of its operating revenue from the State.
The remainder is derived from contracts with federal agencies and industrial organiza-
tions. Large and small manufacturers avail themselves of some of the finest research
laboratories in the Southeast.
THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH is the Re-
search Division of the College of Business Administration. A part of the work of the
Bureau is to provide economic and business information about Florida. By published
reports of special research and through the monthly Economic Leaflets (sent free to
any resident of Florida upon request) the results of research work are available to
all residents of Florida. Consultant Services are rendered the business community, civic
groups, and government. The Bureau makes it possible for teaching professors to
engage in organized research and provides research training for graduate students.
THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING SERVICE is a research, pub-
lication, and service adjunct of the Department of Political Science in the College of
Arts and Sciences. It carries on a continuous program of research on public administra-
tion and public policy in Florida; it publishes research and surveys of governmental
and administrative problems in both scientific and popular monograph form. In broad
areas of public policy and public service training, it works in cooperation with other
units of the University.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION OF THE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND
COMMUNICATIONS conducts research in the news media, in broadcasting, adver-
tising, and public opinion.

COMPUTING CENTER
The Computing Center of the University provides the services of IBM 709 and
1401 electronic computers and other subsidiary equipment.
The principal functions of the center are:







20 GENERAL INFORMATION


1. To aid research by furnishing consulting services for the faculty, staff,
graduate students, and others.
2. To provide computing support for undergraduate and graduate classes.
3. To maintain a library of computer programs for the benefit of users.
4. To carry on investigations in the theory and application of numerical
analysis.
5. To conduct research under contract or other arrangements for university,
federal, state, and other government agencies, as well as for foundations
and individuals.
6. To assist in coordinating and developing University research programs in
which the computer may be involved.
7. To provide machine computation and tabulating facilities for other educa-
tional and research units of the University.
The Computing Center is primarily a research unit, though members of the
staff may teach courses in other departments. Thesis work may be carried on in the
Center.

THE J. HILLIS MILLER HEALTH CENTER
THE HEALTH CENTER, an integral part of the University of Florida, is
located on the south side of the Gainesville campus and is generally regarded as one of
the most modern centers of health and medical education and patient care in the
nation.
The center includes the College of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Health Related
Professions and the University Hospital and Clinics. Students from the various disci-
plines all train together in the Health Center environment for the philosophy of the
Health Center's educational program is the concept that students who are trained
together will work better together in their professional careers.
The physical plant includes the Medical Sciences Building, opened in 1956, the
University Hospital and Clinics, activated in 1958, and the Pharmacy-Research Wing,
opened in 1961.
The Health Center was named for Dr. J. Hillis Miller, late president of the
University of Florida. Its faculty was carefully recruited over a period of years and
includes many noted teachers, researchers, administrators and physicians.

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
The Institute was organized early in 1964 and approved by the Board of Control.
It included all of the University's agricultural programs-the College of Agriculture,
the Agricultural Experiment Stations, the Agricultural Extension Service, and the
School of Forestry.
The provost of the Institute coordinates the function of the vast, state-wide
agricultural education complex that serves the state's $3 billion agribusiness industry.
The College of Agriculture and the office of the provost is located near the center of
the campus in McCarty Hall. Administrative offices of the Experiment Stations, the
Extension Service and the School of Forestry are located in Rolfs Hall.
On-campus teaching and research are carried out on 1,110 acres of farm land
adjacent to the main campus; 1,170 acres in the dairy research unit at Hague; 640
acres in the Beef Research Unit north of the Gainesville airport; 520 acres in the
Horticultural Research Unit beyond the Devil's Millhopper, and the 2,083-acre Austin
Cary Memorial Forest near Waldo. In addition, there are some 20 other research
units located from Pensacola to Homestead.
County and home demonstration agents located in 66 counties are members of
the faculty of the University of Florida and are leaders in both young and adult
educational programs in practically every community in the state.
The Institute provides opportunities for more efficient operation of the agricultural
activities within the University system and provides for a greater flexibility in meeting
the state's ever-increasing needs for food and fiber.


-- I ------ I -







ADMISSIONS 21


Admissions

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Application for admission to any College, School or Division of the University
must be made to the Admissions Section of the Office of the Registrar on the forms
prescribed and by the dates indicated below. It is quite proper to correspond with
Deans, Directors or Department Heads but such contact with University officers does
not in any way eliminate the necessity for filing a formal application in the Office of
the Registrar by the dates specified.
How to Apply: Address the Office of Admissions asking for application forms. As the
forms and directions for completing application vary for each of the categories below it
will expedite matters to indicate that forms are being requested for admission as a Fresh-
man, an Undergraduate Transfer, Graduate, Medical or Law student as the case may be.

GENERAL STATEMENT

A brief summary of the requirements for admission to any college or division of
the University, at any level (freshman, undergraduate, graduate) is as follows:
1. a satisfactory academic record
2. satisfactory scores on achievement tests or examinations
3. a satisfactory conduct record.
Variations in the specific requirements under these general categories are set forth below.
The admission requirements have been arrived at after a very careful study of the
experiences of thousands of students over a long period of years. In every case there are
minimum requirements that have evolved from studies of student performance at the
University of Florida. These studies have had as a primary objective the identification
of factors that would indicate a reasonable chance for successful completion of
University work.
The University Admissions Committee is the agency responsible for administering
all admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time will
be considered for admission as follows:
Freshmen (those who have never attended any college)
1. If the student is entering the University from a secondary school and has not
attended college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
(See Section I).
Undergraduate Transfer Students
2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or univer-
sity and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college credit
for advanced standing, he will be considered for admission to the University
College. (See Section II).
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or univer-
sity and is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college credit
as advanced standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be considered for
admission to the Upper Division school or college of his choice providing his
record indicates the completion of college work approximately equivalent to
the comprehensive courses offered by the University of Florida in the areas of
the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English, Logic, Mathematics, the
Humanities and the Biological Sciences. (See Section III.)
Graduate Students (candidates for Master's or Doctor's Degrees)
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated from
an accredited college or university, he will be considered for admission to the
Graduate School.
Medical Students (See Section on Admission to the College of Medicine).
Law Students (See Section on Admission to the College of Law).
Special Students (See Section on Special Students).







22 ADMISSIONS


ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
SECTION I-FRESHMEN
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NEVER ATTENDED COLLEGE)
When to Apply The University of Florida cannot consider applications for the
Freshman Class more than a year in advance. The best time to apply is the
early part of the senior year in secondary school. While we do not have a fixed
cut-off date for applications, we do have to refuse applications after our capacity
has been reached. It is therefore advisable, if seeking September entrance, to
file applications before February 1.
A. Graduates of Florida secondary Schools:
1. Graduation from an accredited secondary school with satisfactory grades (at least
a C average) in at least twelve to fourteen units of academic subjects such as
English, mathematics, sciences, foreign language and social studies, is required.
The University of Florida does not require any specific units for admission.
The experiences of hundreds of students over many years demonstrate clearly
that a most important factor in determining the possibility of success in
University work rests in a record of good grades in the subjects listed.
2. Satisfactory scores on the Florida Twelfth .Grade tests, which are administered
in all of the high schools in the State each year, are considered in relation
to the high school grades. In general, the applicant will be expected to be
placed in the top forty per cent (total score of at least 300) of the high
school seniors in Florida on these tests.
3. The requirement for a record of good conduct means that regardless of high
school grades and test scores, an applicant who has experienced difficulty
with school or other authorities because of improper conduct may find his
application disapproved.
B. Graduates of Secondary Schools in States Other Than Florida:
1. Graduation from an accredited secondary school with satisfactory grades
(approximately a B average and rank in the top forty per cent of the high
school class) is required. Although specific units are not required, the student
should present at least twelve to fourteen units in academic subjects such as
English, mathematics, science, foreign languages and social studies.
2. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College
Entrance Examination Board, which is administered several times a year
throughout the world, are a most important factor in considering applications
for admission from students from states other than Florida. In general, the
applicant will be expected to score at least 500 on each of the verbal and
mathematics tests of the SAT. The writing sample and the Achievement Tests
are not required.
3. The requirement for a record of good conduct means that, regardless of
secondary school grades and test scores, an applicant who has experienced
difficulty with school or other authorities because of improper conduct may
find his application disapproved.

SECTION II-TRANSFER STUDENTS
When to Apply For students in attendance at other colleges who contemplate
transferring to the University of Florida, applications should be made in the last
quarter or semester of attendance at the other institution. Applications can be
accepted as late as, but not later than, the dates specified in the Calendar. An
application before the student has completed any work at the institution he is
currently attending does not give us sufficient information upon which to base a
judgment. An application filed on the last possible date may result in our in-
ability to approve it because our capacity has already been reached. A student
planning to graduate from a junior college before transferring is urged to
apply during his fourth semester.
1. Good Standing. The student must be eligible to return to any institution
previously attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed to
return to any institution attended cannot be considered for admission.
2. Satisfactory record. All transfer students must have an average of C or higher
(as computed by The University of Florida grade point system) on all work







ADMISSIONS 23


attempted at all institutions previously attended to be considered for admis-
sion. Regardless of average, the courses completed at other institutions must
reasonably parellel the curriculum of the University of Florida.
3. Undergraduate transfer students shall be required to make a satisfactory score
on a general ability test.
4. The University of Florida accepts on transfer only those courses completed at
other institutions with grades of C or higher and that are acceptable in the
curriculum for which the applicant enrolls.
The student who has attended any college or university, regardless of the amount
of time spent in attendance or credit earned, is regarded as a transfer student.
ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION
FROM THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the University College and
the specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools.
SECTION III-TRANSFER STUDENTS
1. Good standing at all institutions previously attended. An applicant for admis-
sion who for any reason is not in good standing at any institution previously
attended is not eligible for admission.
2. An average of C or better. The average grade for all work attempted at other
institutions must be C or better (as computed by the University of Florida
grade point system). Note as above, an average grade of C or better is required
for graduation from the University of Florida, and one who has not main-
tained this average before coming to the University need not apply.
3. A minimum of 64 semester hours accepted as transfer credits (only those
courses completed at other institutions with grades of C or higher and are
acceptable in the curriculum for which the applicant enrolls) not more than
four of which are in Military Science or Physical Education. Graduates of a
junior college who have completed a college parallel program may be admitted
to the Upper Division lacking a total of 64 semester hours with grades of C
or higher if all other admission requirements in this section are met.
4. Specific course requirements for the professional school of the applicant's
choice. The courses listed as required for admission to the Upper Division
under the various curricula or acceptable substitutes must be offered as
advanced standing to qualify the student for admission to the Upper Division.
An applicant lacking some of these requirements may be permitted to enroll
in the Upper Division and complete them without reducing the credits
required in the Upper Division for a degree.
5. Undergraduate transfer students may be required to make a satisfactory score
on a general ability test.
ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
When to Apply Applications can be accepted as late as the final date listed in
the University Calendar. Because the final decision on admission to Graduate
study has to be made by the Graduate Selections Committee of the various
colleges and time is required to prepare the materials for their consideration,
it is strongly urged that applications be made well in advance of this final date.
An applicant planning to enter Graduate School immediately following receipt
of his bachelor's degree is urged to file application at the beginning of, or
during, his last quarter or semester.
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION to the Graduate School must be made to
the Director of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at the times stipulated
in the University Calendar. Applications which meet minimum standards for admission
are referred by the Director to the graduate selection committees of the various
colleges and divisions for approval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete official transcripts of all
the applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in the possession of the Registrar
and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is received directly from the
Registrar of the institution in which the work was done. Official supplementary tran-
scripts are required, as soon as they are available, for any work completed after making
application.






24 ADMISSIONS


In general, no student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will be
considered for graduate study in any unit of the University.

GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
UNDERGRADUATE RECORD-Unqualified admission to the Graduate School
is dependent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited
college or curriculum with an average of B for the junior and senior years. In some
units of the Graduate School and on the more advanced levels of graduate study, an
undergraduate average considerably above B may be required. In some units (see the
following two paragraphs) admission may be considered with an undergraduate average
slightly below B. College graduate admission selection committees take into account
not only the general grade average, but the distribution of work and the quality and
extent of preparation for the graduate program which the student proposes to
undertake.
The minimum undergraduate grade average acceptable for admission to programs
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in Education, Master of Education, Master
of Arts in Physical Education and Health, and Master of Physical Education and
Health is 2.5, calculated on a basis of 4.0 as the highest possible average and covering
the last two years of undergraduate work (at least 60 credit hours).
In the College of Agriculture, admission to graduate study is normally limited to
those students who have maintained at least a 2.75 grade-point average in their upper-
division work and 3.0 in their major subject. For students with an undergraduate major
in general agriculture, the minimum upper-division average is 2.85. In exceptional
cases, where a candidate has demonstrated in some other way his fitness to do gradu-
ate work, as, for instance, outstanding achievement since earning the bachelor's degree,
he may be considered for admission. While the general admissions requirements
described above apply to both master's and doctoral candidates, it should be noted that
doctoral candidates must meet certain additional requirements which vary according to
the programs established by the departments and colleges. Furthermore, it is desirable
for students planning to enter certain colleges and departments to have a reading
knowledge of one foreign language.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
A satisfactory average score on the Graduate Record Examination is required for
admission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the aptitude test of the
GRE, but either at the request of the department concerned or on his own violation,
the applicant is encouraged to submit in addition the score on one or more advanced
subject-matter tests of the GRE. The scores on all tests taken will be weighed in
regard to admission.
The GRE is given five times a year-in November, January, March, April, and
July-at a great many locations in the United States, including Gainesville, Florida. To
determine exact dates and the most convenient locations, students should write to the
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Applications are required several
weeks prior to the examination, and scores are received about a month after the exami-
nation. Hence, it is necessary to apply for the GRE in early October for admission in
January, in early January for admission in April, and in early April for admission in
September. Other examinations are given in early March and early July but the ones
listed above are correlated with admission deadlines.
Students enrolled in the Graduate School prior to establishment of the GRE
requirement for admission (June, 1956) are permitted to complete the degree on
which they were working. However, if the student has not been registered for graduate
work at the University for seven years, or if he wishes to work toward a second
graduate degree, he must submit satisfactory GRE scores before readmission.

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
When to Apply Because the number of places in the first year class of the
College of Medicine is limited, it is important that a candidate make application
before October 15 of the year preceding his intended date of entry.
Personal qualities of high order-character, responsibility and maturity-are the
primary requirements for admission. The student must have demonstrated superior
intellectual achievement. A bachelor's degree is strongly recommended. The quality of
the academic background, as well as the performance of the student in relation to the


-- I ------ 1 i -r -T







ADMISSIONS 25


load attempted, will be weighed. A genuine interest in human welfare is important.
Efficient methods of study and effective powers of reasoning are essential.
The College admits both men and women. A limited number of out-of-state
students, in proportion to the number in the University as a whole. may be admitted.
Applicants over the age of thirty rarely will be considered. No applications from per-
sons over thirty-five will be accepted. Students who have failed academically or are
ineligible to continue in another medical school will not be admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in another medical school
will be considered provided (1) the student is eligible to continue in his present
medical school, and (2) the school he is now attending is a member of the Association
of American Medical Colleges. Applications will also be considered from students who
have successfully completed work at an accredited two-year medical school.
Prospective applicants should take the Medical College Admissions Test by the
spring preceding the submission of the application. A personal interview will be
required for final acceptance.
Graduate students who are candidates for the Ph.D. degree in medical sciences
should apply through the Graduate School.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Medicine catalog.)
ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW
When to Apply Applications can be accepted as late as the final date listed
in the University Calendar. Since time is required to assemble the transcripts
and tests scores necessary, it is strongly urged that the applicant file his appli-
cation at the beginning of, or during, the last quarter or semester of his
program for the Bachelor's degree.
Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the College of Law must have
received a 4-year baccalaureate degree from a college or university of approved standing
and achieved a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission Test.
The precise score required on the Law School Admission Test is determined on
the basis of the overall undergraduate collegiate average of the applicant (compiled on
the basis of all work undertaken and computed by the system in effect at the
University of Florida where the grade of A equals 4 grade points per semester hour;
B equals 3 grade points per semester hour; C equals 2 grade points per semester hour;
D equals 1 grade point per semester hour). The higher the overall undergraduate
average of the applicant, the lower will be the test score required to qualify for
admission; provided, however, that no test of less than 400 will be deemed
sufficient to warrant admission regardless of the overall undergraduate collegiate grade
average. An appropriate upward adjustment in the test score will be made in cases
where the score submitted is the result of retaking the test.
For information on admission to the College of Law with advanced standing see
the Bulletin of the College of Law.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
When to Apply Each application for admission as a special student has to be
reviewed by the University Admissions Committee. Applications cannot be con-
sidered if they are received after the dates specified in the Catalog; and it would
be desirable for a person considering application as a special student to initiate
such an application at least three months in advance of the term he wishes to
enter, in order to allow time for additional evidence to be presented if it should
be requested by the Admissions Committee.
Special students may be admitted to the various schools and colleges of the Upper
Division only by approval of the University Admissions Committee. Each case will be
considered on an individual basis. Application for admission as a special student must
include: (1) records of previous educational experience (high school or college tran-
scripts); (2) a statement as to the type of studies to be pursued; (3) a brief statement
of the reason or reasons for selecting a special program other than a regular one; (4)
satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies-for example, a student to enroll
as a special student for some technical courses and who feels qualified to do so by
reason of employment or other experience should submit a brief description of this
experience; (5) satisfactory scores on such ability or achievement tests as may be
prescribed in individual cases by the University Admissions Committee.







26 ADMISSIONS


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE ENGINEERING
EDUCATION SYSTEM (GENESYS)
When to Apply The Graduate Engineering System (GENESYS) is a part of the
College of Engineering and as such follows the regular University Calendar.
Applications can be accepted as late as the final date listed in the University
Calendar, however since the record of all applicants for GENESYS must be
reviewed by the College of Engineering and time is required to assemble the
necessary transcripts and test scores, it is strongly urged that application be
made well in advance of the final date.
GENESYS ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: All applicants seeking to enroll
for credit in courses through GENESYS must secure admission to the University of
Florida. Application for admission must be made to the Admissions Section, Office
of the Registrar, University of Florida on forms obtained from the System Director of
GENESYS, Cape Kennedy, Florida. No application will be considered unless com-
plete official transcripts of all the applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in
the possession of the Registrar and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it
is received directly from the Registrar of the institution in which the work was done.
Applicants for GENESYS may be admitted initially to the Graduate School or
to the College of Engineering as post-graduate students depending upon the applicant's
qualifications and objectives. In order to be admitted to the Graduate School the
GENESYS applicant must satisfy all admission requirements established by the
Graduate School (see Admission to the Graduate School section of this catalog).
Briefly stated these requirements include the presentation of a baccalaureate degree
from an accredited college or curriculum with an average grade of "B" for the junior
and senior years; a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examinations; and the
recommendation of the Graduate Selection Committee of the College of Engineering.
Applicants for GENESYS who either fail to fully meet the requirements for
admission to the Graduate School or who do not desire to work for a graduate degree
may be admitted to the College of Engineering as post-graduate students. Such
students may subsequently be admitted to the Graduate School by removing deficien-
cies, if any, in their qualifications. Applications will be considered individually on the
basis of the applicant's overall record. The basic requirement for admission to
GENESYS as a post-graduate student in the College of Engineering is the possession
of the baccalaureate degree in engineering or science from an accrdited college or
curriculum. Although test scores from the Graduate Record Examinations are not
required, applicants are strongly advised to submit scores on both the aptitude test
and the appropriate advanced subject-matter sections of the GRE as evidence of their
qualification for admission. Satisfactory scores on the GRE will be required for subse-
quent admission to the Graduate School.


rT --- I --- I







EXPENSES 27


Expenses

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be accompanied by an
application fee of $10.00. Application fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions will
be found in the Admissions section of this catalog and in the College of Medicine
catalog.
GENERAL
Students should bring sufficient funds, other than personal checks, to meet their
immediate needs. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact amount of fees.
Other personal checks may be deposited with the University for collection.
Funds may be placed in a depository located in the Student Service Center.
Depository accounts are assessed a fee of $1.00 per trimester or portion thereof. With-
drawals may be made upon request and presentation of passbook. Any University fee
or deposit may be paid from such an account.
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS -FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
For the purpose of assessing registration fees, applicants shall be classified as
Florida or non-Florida students. A Florida student is a person who shall be a citizen
of the United States or shall have filed a written intent as required by law and shall
have resided and had his habitation, domicile, home and permanent abode in the
State of Florida for at least 12 months immediately preceding his registration; provided,
however, that the applicant cannot claim residence in Florida by virtue of enrollment
or attendance only in any college or university in the State of Florida for the required
period. In applying this regulation "applicant" shall mean a student applying for
admission to the institution if he is 21 years of age, or if he is a minor, it shall mean
parents, parent, or guardian of his or her person.
In the determining of a Florida student for purposes of assessing fees, the burden
of proof is on the applicant. Under the law an applicant can change his place of
residence from another state to the State of Florida only by actually and physically
coming into the State and establishing his residence with the intention of permanently
residing within the State. Except in extreme cases, where husband and wife are living
together, the domicile or legal residence of the wife is that of the husband, and the
legal residence of a minor is that of the parents, parent, or legal guardian of his person.
If at any registration subsequent to the student's first registration, he can qualify
as a Florida student, he may apply in writing to the Registrar for a change in classi-
fication. If the application is supported by evidence satisfactory to the Registrar that
the student then qualifies as a Florida student, his classification will be changed for
future registrations.
REGISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL FEES
The University has five terms a year, three trimesters and two terms of seven and
one-half weeks each, which run concurrently with the third trimester. The University
Calendar in the front of this catalog sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each
trimester and term.
The following fees and charges are now in effect. However, since the catalog
must be published considerably in advance of its effective date it is not always possible
to anticipate changes and the fee schedule may be revised. Every effort will be made
to publicize changes for any trimester or term in advance of the registration date for
such trimester or term.
Fees are payable at the beginning of each trimester or term. Payment of fees is
an integral part of the registration process. Registration must be completed in ac-
cordance with the dates shown in the University Calendar appearing in the front of
this catalog. No fee is assessed a student who withdraws prior to the first day of
classes. Applicable fees will be assessed any student whose registration remains incom-
plete after this date.
The fees charged are based on the classification of a student as Florida or Non-
Florida, Full-Time or Part-Time and the term in which he is enrolled.







28 EXPENSES


Unless an exception is noted, the fees for each trimester or term include fees for
matriculation, student health services, student activities, and a general building fee.
Fees are assessed as follows:
A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $113.00 for each tri-
mester for which he is enrolled.
A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $288.00 for each
trimester for which he is enrolled.
A PART-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for not more than four semester
hours credit during a regular trimester will pay a fee of $30.00 per trimester. lie will
not be entitled to student activity or infirmary privileges.
A PART-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for not more than four
semester hours credit during a regular trimester, will pay a fee of $80.00 per trimester.
He will not be entitled to student activity or infirmary privileges.
ANY STUDENT, FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA, enrolled for RESEARCH
ONLY, not exceeding four semester hours credit during a regular trimester or term,
will pay a fee of $30.00 for each registration. He will not be entitled to student ac-
tivity or infirmary privileges.
A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for a seven-and-one-half week
term will pay a fee of $60.00 per term.
A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for a seven-and-one-half
week term will pay a fee of $150.00 per term.
In any trimester or term, registration fees should be paid by the end of the day
which precedes the beginning of classes. Mail payments must be received by the Uni-
versity Cashier by this date. All payments received on or after the first day of classes
including fees for additional courses are subject to a $5.00 late fee. This fee cannot
be set aside, nor is it refundable. Refer to the University Calendar at the front of
this catalog for the dates classes begin.
Summary of Expenses for One Trimester for Full-Time Florida Students not Enrolled
in the College of Medicine.
Low Median High
Total Expenses $ 446.12 $ 592.00 $ 76f00
Fees 113.00 113.00 113.00
Books and Training Supplies 33.00 40.00 55.00
Food 128.62 195.00 270.00
Rent 100.00 125.00 125.00
Laundry and Dry Cleaning 10.00 15.00 30.00
Incidental Expenses 61.50 104.00 171.00

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
Application Fee. An application fee of $10.00 must accompany each application
for admission to the College of Medicine.
Acceptance Deposit. A deposit of $50.00 must be forwarded to the College of
Medicine within two weeks of the receipt of notice of acceptance for admission. This
deposit will be credited toward payment of course fees for the first trimester to which
the applicant is admitted. It cannot be credited toward a subsequent admission. It
is refundable only until January 15 of the year in which that trimester begins. The
College of Medicine Acceptance Deposit is deducted from any registration and course
fees refunded to medical students.
A FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the MD program of the College of Medi-
cine will pay a fee of $600.00 per year. First and second year students will make
three payments, $250.00 each in September and January, and $100.00 in April. Third
and fourth year students will also make three payments, $100.00 in June and $250.00
each in September and January.
A NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled in the MD program of the College of
Medicine will pay a fee of $1,200 a year. First and second year students will make
three payments, $500.00 each in September and January, and $200.00 in April. Third
and fourth year students will also make three payments, $200.00 in June, and $500.00
each in September and January.
The fees shown are due and payable during the regularly scheduled registration







EXPENSES 29


periods in the months shown above. See the University Calendar at the front of this
catalog for applicable dates.
For further information see the College of Medicine catalog.
GRADUATE ENGINEERING EDUCATION SYSTEM (GENESYS)
Registration Fee. A fee of $5.00 applies to every registration, regardless of the
number of credit hours. This fee is in addition to the course fee.
Course Fee. All students will pay a course fee of $30.00 per credit hour of
registration.
Students enrolled in the GENESYS program are not entitled to student activity
or infirmary privileges.
University policies concerning application and late fees also apply to the
GENESYS program.
OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL FEES
Department of Music. Fees for applied music lessons arc payable at the time of
registration. No refund is made for lessons missed. The student should make arrange-
ments with his instructor to make up lessons missed because of illness.
Applied Music Fee per course, including practice room privileges $35.00 per tri-
mester or term.
Instrument Rental. University owned brass, woodwind and string instruments may
be rented by students at a rate per instrument of $5.00 per trimester or term.
See "General Policy on Applied Music Courses" under the section on the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts in this catalog.
SPECIAL FEES
Application Fee for Comprehensive Examination. A nonrefundable fee of $1.00
is payable on the day of application for a comprehensive examination in one of the
basic courses of the University College program. Applications are necessary only when
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned. Forms and instructions
may be secured from the Registrar. Fees are payable to the University Cashier.
Audit Fee. A regularly enrolled full-time student may audit courses without pay-
ment of an additional fee. Others must pay a fee of $30 per course per trimester or
term. Auditor's permit forms may be obtained in the Office of the Registrar. Fees are
payable to the University Cashier.
Graduate Record Examination. The Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Ex-
amination is required for admission to the Graduate School. A fee of $7.00 covers the
cost of this examination. Students who take one of the Advanced Tests of the Gradu-
ate Record Examination in combination with the Aptitude Test pay a fee of $12.00.
These fees are payable to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. For
additional information see the Graduate School Catalog.
College of Law Admission Test. A fee of $10.00 paid to the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New Jersey, covers the cost of the Law School Admission Test. For
details see the College of Law Catalog.
Graduation Fee. Each candidate for a Bachelor's degree must make application
for the degree in accordance with the date set forth in the University Calendar. The
graduation fee of $10.00, is payable at the time of application. If the candidate applies
for two Bachelor's degrees at the same commencement, the fee will be $15.00. In the
event that the applicant does not meet the requirements for graduation at the time
specified in the original application for the degree, he shall be charged a fee of $5.00
for each subsequent application for the same degree.
Each candidate for a graduate degree (Master's, Specialist's or Doctor's), must
make application for the degree in accordance with the date set forth in the University
Calendar and pay, at the time of application, a fee of $20.00. The candidate will be
given the hood representative of his degree. In the event that the applicant does not
meet the requirements for graduation at the time specified in the original application
he shall be charged a fee of $5.00 for each subsequent application for the same degree.
Transcript Fee. A student is furnished a first copy of his record without charge
regardless of the amount of work completed. Subsequent copies are charged for at the







30 EXPENSES


rate of $1.00 each, except when the order is for more than one copy. There is a charge
of $1.00 for the first copy and 50 cents for each additional copy on the same order.
University transcripts may be obtained only from the Registrar's Office.
Library Fines. A fine of 5 cents a day is charged for each book in general circula-
tion which is not returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be
checked out overnight, but a fine of 25 cents is charged for each hour or part of an
hour such a book is kept overdue. There is no maximum for fines and no partial
remission of fines when books are returned.

PREPAYMENTS UNIVERSITY HOUSING
Beginning freshmen receive housing contracts automatically when admission is
approved. They are required to prepay the first trimester's rent at that time. This
rental prepayment is refundable under certain conditions as set forth in the housing
contract.
Applications for assignment to University housing facilities for single students
other than beginning freshmen must be accompanied by a payment of $10.00. This
payment is nonrefundable. It will be credited against the first rental payment.
Applications for assignment to University housing facilities for married students
must be accompanied by a payment of $10.00. This payment is nonrefundable. It
will be credited against the first rental payment.

DEPOSITS
ROTC Deposit. A deposit of $20.00 is required at the time of registration of
any student enrolling in any course in Military or Air Science. The deposit will be
refunded upon the return of all Government property in satisfactory condition.
Dissertation Deposit. A deposit of $50.00 is made to cover the publication cost
of the dissertation. See the Graduate School Catalog for time of payment and choice
of method of publication, which involves the disposition of this deposit.

REFUND OF FEES
A refund of fees will be made under certain conditions upon presentation to the
University Cashier of a certification issued by the Registrar's office.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees will be made if the
student's registration is cancelled before the first day of classes in any trimester or term.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees less a charge of $25.50
($5.00 fixed fee plus $20.50 building fee) in a trimester or $14.00 ($3.00 fixed fee
plus $11.00 building fee) in a seven and one-half week term will be made if a student
withdraws or if his registration is cancelled by the University on or after the first day
of classes but on or before the final day of registration as shown in the University
Calendar.
A refund of 50 per cent of tuition, registration and instructional fees, after
deducting the building fee ($20.50 in a regular trimester, $11.00 in a seven-and-one-
half week term) will be made if a student withdraws or if his registration is cancelled
by the University after the conclusion of the registration period but on or before the
day which marks the end of the third week of classes in a regular trimester or the first
week of classes in a seven-and-one-half week term.
No part of the student activity fee will be refunded if the student fails to sur-
render the identification card (and in the first trimeser, the student activity card or
receipt for student picture) at the time certification for a refund is presented to the
University Cashier.
Deductions from refunds will be made for unpaid accounts due the University.

PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All student accounts are due and payable at the office of the University Cashier
at the time such charges are incurred.
Delinquent accounts will be considered sufficient cause for cancellation of registra-
tion, as University regulations prohibit registration, graduation, granting of credit or
release of transcript for any student whose account with the University is delinquent.







HOUSING 31


Housing

GENERAL INFORMATION
Beginning freshmen who apply for admission to the University will receive Housing
Contracts upon approval of admission. No application for housing is made by a begin-
ning freshman.
All other students must make personal arrangements for housing either by (1)
applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to University Housing
Facilities, or (2) in the case of male upperclassmen who wish to do so, obtaining ac-
comodations in private housing. (See Off-Campus Housing Section.)
All correspondence concerning housing applications in University Housing should
be addressed to the Director of Housing, University of Florida, Gainesville. An applica-
tion for residence hall space for students other than beginning freshmen may be filed at
any time after an application for admission to the University has been made. However,
prospective students are urged to apply as early as possible because of the housing
demand.
Roommate requests can be considered if the individuals wishing to room together
submit their applications on the same date, clearly indicate on their respective applica-
tions their desire to room together, and are within similar academic classifications. Any
American student interested in rooming with a foreign student should so indicate on
his application.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
ALL BEGINNING SINGLE FRESHMEN (MEN AND WOMEN) are required
to live in University Housing. ALL SINGLE UNDERGRADUATE WOMEN STU-
DENTS are required to live in University Housing as long as space is available. Upon
written request, exceptions are made for students who commute, live in Gainesville with
their parents, or are 21 years of age or older. Undergraduate women other than freshmen
may live at their sorority houses.
Graduate women students and undergraduate women students who are married,
divorced, or 25 years of age or older may apply for housing for the Third Trimester or
either session of the Third Trimester. For other periods, assistance is given to locate
off-campus accommodations.
Undergraduate men students who are 25 years of age or older may apply for
designated sections, if space is available.
Note: Acceptance of an assignment to room space in University Housing obligates
the student for on-campus housing for the entire academic year of three trimesters
(September to August) if enrolled.
HOUSING ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF
ORGANIZATION -University residence halls have been designed and organized
to emphasize the importance of the individual student in small-size living groups. Each
hall provides opportunities for formal and informal educational programs, together with
social and recreational activities. Many residents find their hall the center of their out-of-
class interests. What you will find depends largely upon your own contribution to the
life of your hall. Programs and activities vary from hall to hall and from year to year,
since they are based on the needs and interests of the students themselves.
In general, each hall is assigned about equally to freshmen and upperclassmen to
encourage the exchange of ideas and experiences. Policies regarding activities and conduct
are established for the mutual benefit of all residents.
STAFF In all residence halls or housing areas professionally trained counselors
and part-time resident assistants are well-qualified to assist with group and individual
activities, as well as with matters of personal concern to student residents. In the men's
halls, student section advisers provide group leadership and guidance; in the women's
halls, floor representatives serve in a similar way.
SELF-GOVERNMENT All students in the residence halls are automatically
entitled to participate in organizational activities which play a significant part in the
educational, social, and recreational life of students. Officers and representatives are
elected to hall and area councils which govern group activities and establish standards
for group living. There is full opportunity for participation in the procedures of demo-
cratic self-government and for living under the principles of the Honor Code.







32 HOUSING


In all women's halls, and in most of the men's halls, a small social fee is collected
each trimester and controlled by the hall organization to meet expenses of activities and
programs.
ROOM FURNISHINGS Rooms are equipped with mattresses, mattress pads,
waste baskets, desks, chairs, closets, chests-of-drawers and venetian blinds. Residents are
encouraged to obtain their own drapes, pictures, bedspreads, rugs, and lamps after arrival
at the University.
LINEN SERVICE All students assigned to residence halls are furnished a basic
linen service. The charge is included in the room rent. This service entitles you to two
sheets, one pillowcase, and three towels per week. Extra linens or additional items such
as blankets, pillows, and desk lamps may be rented at a nominal cost.
RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
RESIDENCE HALLS FOR WOMEN These halls are organized in four areas:
Yulee (Mallory, Yulee and Reid Halls); Broward (Broward and Rawlings Halls);
lennings (Jennings Hall); and Graham Hall. In all the halls there are main lounges and
recreation rooms; some halls include a library, meeting rooms, and cafeteria or snack-bar.
On each floor are a centrally-located bathroom and a study room. Some study areas are
air-conditioned.
RESIDENCE HALLS FOR MEN--These halls are organized in four areas:
Murphree (Murphree, Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher, Buckman Halls); Tolbert (Tolbert,
North, South, Weaver, East Halls); Graham (Simpson and Trusler Halls); and Hume
(Hume Hall). In Tolbert, Graham, and Hume Areas, there are main lounges and rec-
reation rooms; some halls include a library, meeting rooms, and cafeteria or snack-bar.
Some study areas are air-conditioned.
Buckman Hall and sections of Fletcher Hall are for GRADUATE MEN, includ-
ing those studying law or medicine.
In all residential areas except the Murphree Area, most rooms are assigned for
double occupancy. In the Murphree Area, a number of the accommodations are suites for
three.
Rent rates are subject to change. Currently they average about $125.00 per student
per trimester.
APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS
The University operates five apartment villages for married students. An eligible
applicant is the male member of the family (no female student is eligible to apply for
married housing) who is registered for at least 12 credit hours as an undergraduate or 9
credit hours as a graduate or law student during a trimester. Exceptions may be granted
only by the Committee on Student Housing.
Application should be filed as early as possible after application for admission to the
University since there is currently a ten-month waiting period between application and
assignment.
Flavet Villages, I, II, and III, of temporary frame construction, include one, two,
and three-bedroom units which currently rent for $26.75, $29.50, and $32.25 per month
respectively. These units are equipped with basic furniture, but residents may request
that this be stored if they have their own furniture. Refrigerators are available on a
monthly rental basis.
CORRY AND SCHUCHT MEMORIAL VILLAGES, of modern brick, concrete,
and wood construction, contain almost an equal number of one and two-bedroom apart-
ments, with a few three-bedroom units in Corry Village only. These apartments are
furnished with basic equipment in living room, kitchen, dining area, and one bedroom.
No furniture may be removed from apartments in Corry and Schucht. Rent rates (sub-
ject to change) are currently $54.00, $57.00, and $60.00 per month according to size.
NEW APARTMENT VILLAGE, now under construction, is scheduled for occu-
pancy by September 1965. These 208 apartments will be similar in construction, fur-
nishings, and equipment to those in Corry and Schucht Villages. Special features will
include a community building with air-conditioned study-meeting room, and a study
cubicle in each two-bedroom apartment. Rental rates will be announced in the late
spring, 1965.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens, dishes, rugs, curtains, etc.
Utilities, except for an allowable minimum electricity charge in the Flavet Villages, are
an extra expense.


1 1 ~I







HOUSING 33


OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
Private homes and privately operated rooming houses and apartments provide many
accommodations for students. University student regulations are in effect for all students
living off-campus.
These regulations include the special provisions that (1) all undergraduate women
students must obtain from the University Housing Office permission to live off-campus
before making any rental arrangements; (2) all students under 21 years of age can live
only in accommodations listed by the Off-Campus Section of the Housing Office; and
(3) all students must give their exact residence address at the time of registration,
recording any address changes at the Off-Campus Section of the Housing Office within 7
days after the change is made.
Off-Campus listings are maintained in the Off-Campus Section, 1504 West Univer-
sity Avenue, but are not compiled for mailing since availability changes frequently. Stu-
dents seeking off-campus housing should come to Gainesville one to three months before
the school period to confer with the Off-Campus Section about accommodations. By
writing to this section, students may obtain in advance information brochures and hous-
ing request forms.
COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION AND
GEORGIA SEAGLE COOPERATIVE
These cooperative living groups are not administered by the University but are each
governed by their own Board. Among the qualifications for membership are scholastic
ability and reference of good character. Facilities of both organizations are located con-
veniently to the campus.
Application for membership in the C.L.O. should be made to the Vice President at
117 N. W. 15th Street, Gainesville. Application for Georgia Seagle is made by personal
interview early in July, November, and March at 1002 West University Avenue.
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Most national fraternal groups with chapters at the University maintain their own
houses adjacent to or on the campus. Freshmen are not permitted to live in fraternity or
sorority houses. University student regulations are in effect for all sorority and fraternity
houses.







34 STUDENT LIFE


Student Life -Services, Facilities

Activities

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS
The Dean of Student Affairs serves as a staff officer, advisory to the President, in all
matters pertaining to the educational experiences of students outside of the classroom
and to the general welfare of all students. He serves as a liaison between the office of the
president and other administrative offices that deal with non-classroom activities of stu-
dents and with the self government processes of student groups.
The Office of the Dean of Student Affairs works toward providing on the campus
an academic climate that is favorable to the spirit of serious inquiry and is concerned
with the maintenance of good communication and working relationships among stu-
dents, faculty and administrative units as they labor together for the welfare of students.
OFFICES OF DEAN OF MEN AND DEAN OF WOMEN
The Dean of Men and Dean of Women have overall responsibility for the general
welfare of all students. Together with their Assistant Deans, they counsel with students
on personal, academic, financial and social problems, working cooperatively with, and
referring to, other departments, faculty or agencies where advisable. They serve as
advisers to student self government so that these activities may provide educational
experiences and will develop individual and group responsibility.
In cooperation with the Director of Housing, the Deans act in an administrative,
supervisory and counselling capacity in relation to residence halls staff and students in
providing for living and study conditions within the residence halls. Fraternities, sororities
and other student organizations come also within the administrative and advisement
responsibility of the Dean of Men and Dean of Women.
The Deans consult and cooperate with interested groups and individuals outside of
the University such as parents, alumni, schools, civic organizations and clergy.
OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING
The Director of Housing, in cooperation with the Deans of Men and Women,
administers, supervises, and coordinates all programs and operations in the Residence
Halls, the Apartment Villages, and an Off-Campus Office. See section of "Housing" for
details.
OFFICE OF THE FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISER
The Foreign Student Office assists international students seeking general informa-
tion concerning the University and its various educational programs; assists in clearing
such students for admission, with particular reference to language facility and financial
arrangements; arranges for the reception and orientation of newly admitted international
students; in cooperation with other University agencies, provides necessary counseling
and financial aids for foreign students; is responsible for relations with the U. S. Immi-
gration and Naturalization Service and with other governmental and private agencies
concerned with international student exchange.
The Foreign Student Adviser also serves as Campus Contact Officer for the Peace
Corps and as a Fulbright Program Adviser.
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
The Student Financial Aid Office is a section of the Student Affairs Office and
functions under the Senate Committee on Student Financial Aid, of which the Student
Financial Aid Officer is secretary. Working in close cooperation with the offices of the
Dean of Men and the Dean of Women, student aid counselors interview students in all
matters pertaining to student employment, scholarships, grants-in-aid and loans. This
office serves as an important part of the academic and personal counseling and guidance
of students. It attempts to weigh a student's financial and academic position in order to
suggest a suitable balance between self-support, parental help and institutional loans and
scholarships. In order to assess need of applicants on an equitable basis the University of
Florida participates in the College Scholarship Service of the College Entrance Examina-
tion Board. Inquiries or applications for student financial aid and awards should be
addressed to the Student Financial Aid Officer in the Office of the Dean of Student
Affairs. Explanatory materials, instructions or bulletins will be supplied upon request.
Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid are available to students who qualify. A scholarship
is a monetary award given to an applicant on the basis of academic excellence, good
character and a record of leadership. Financial need and service to the school may also







STUDENT LIFE 35

be a consideration. A grant-in-aid is a sum of money given to an applicant based on
financial need in the presence of satisfactory academic standing. In either case, the stu-
dent's ability to profit from college training and his possible future contribution to soci-
ety are determining considerations. Many awards are made by the University Committee,
but others are selected directly by the donors and administered through the University.
While most scholarships and grants-in-aid are in amounts equivalent to the University
registration fees, there are others for larger amounts. (Prospective students are also urged
to consult the resources of their home communities. Many civic clubs and community
organizations are interested in providing means whereby students may attend college
when they are convinced the investment will be worthwhile.)
Student Employment is available to qualified students on a part-time basis while
they are in school. Opportunities are limited; consequently, the number of part-time jobs
available does not approach the number of applicants seeking jobs. Every attempt is
made to place students in work that utilizes their training and experience. In general,
students are discouraged from seeking employment while attending school as Frshmen.
Loans available at the University of Florida may be divided into two classes: (1)
the long-term loan (including the federal and state loan programs) which allows the
student to complete his college education and repay the loan after graduation in install-
ments over a period of years; and (2) the short-term emergency loan which aims to meet
the needs of unforeseen emergencies that arise in the financing of college expenses. As a
rule, the short-term loans are for small amounts and are repayable within the trimester
in which they are received.
Prizes and Awards are made to students in recognition of exceptional achievement
in various fields of student life at the University of Florida. In some instances, these are
cash grants; in others, medals, certificates or keys.
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT SERVICE
The University Placement Service functions as the central placement agency for the
campus with services available to all students and alumni of the University; and works
in conjunction with the schools and colleges who give direct assistance to their graduates.
In cooperation with educational and administrative units, counseling and testing
services and other related functions, the placement service makes its contribution to the
development of the whole individual.
Its primary aim is to offer assistance to students from the time they enter school
until they graduate, in the development of vocational goals and attainment of their first
career position. Assistance is also offered to alumni who have attended graduate school
elsewhere, who are returning to civilian life from the military, or those desiring to make
changes in employment.
Functions include: To serve as liaison between students and business and industrial,
governmental and educational organizations that are seeking college trained personnel for
permanent employment. To establish and maintain records on registrants, employment
opportunities and placement results. To conduct studies on the employment outlook,
salary trends, progress of graduates in the working world, and related matters. To assist
students who leave school before graduation and, also, assist students in finding summer
jobs which relate to their fields of study and employment goals. To serve in a public
relation capacity in dealing with employers and the public.
Specific services include: career planning and guidance; counseling on the tools and
techniques of the job search; arranging interviews between employers and students; pro-
viding personnel records and faculty ratings on students to employers; preparing and
mailing lists of job opportunities to registrants; distributing recruitment booklets and
materials; and administering tests for employers.
These services are available to any student or alumni without charge.
FLORIDA UNION
The Florida Union is the official center of student activities. The provision of
facilities, services, and a varied program of activities available to all persons of the
University "community" serves as the basic purpose of the Union. The Union is
governed by a Board of Managers, consisting of eight students and six faculty members.
The Union is open daily from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Among the facilities and
services offered are music listening rooms, craft and hobby shop, photographic dark
rooms, browsing library, a game room for billiards and table tennis, public telephones,
information desk, passenger and ride wanted bulletin boards, display cases, talent and
band file, travel-study program consulting services, Western Union sending service,







36 STUDENT LIFE


auditorium and meeting rooms for all University organizations. Air-conditioned guest
rooms are available for official guests of the University, guests of students, faculty, staff,
and alumni.
Offices for Student Government, Honor Court, Traffic Court, Florida Blue Key,
Mortar Board and all student publications are located in the Union building.
The Union Board for Student Activities, composed of students interested in plan-
ning student activities, is employed by the Board of Managers, to plan and promote all
social, cultural, and recreational activities in the Union. This Board and its committees
are open to any student interested in participating. The committees are Dance, Films
Forums, Fine Arts, Hostess, Gator Gras, International, Public Relations, Recreations,
Secretaries, and Special Projects.
Among the weekly activities sponsored by the Union Board and open to all students
are art exhibits, bridge lessons and tournaments, dancing classes, current and cultural
movies, special activities such as receptions, dances, intracampus and intercollegiate
bridge, billiard and bowling tournaments, music appreciation listening hours, forums and
book reviews, outings to scenic spots in the state and abroad, fashion shows, international
activities, picnics and special holiday parties are all a part of the Union program.
The University's Camp Wauburg, operated by the Florida Union, is a recreational
area for the exclusive use of students, faculty, and staff of the University. This area, over-
looking a beautiful lake, is located nine miles south of the campus. Facilities include a
large picnic area, a recreation building, bath house, a dock with a diving board, many
small outdoor fireplaces for cooking, and a playground area and equipment for volleyball,
horseshoes, badminton, and other games. Other activities include swimming, boating,
skiing, and fishing.
A new five million dollar Florida Union building is presently under construction
with an anticipated completion date of April, 1966. The new building will offer addi-
tional and improved facilities and will permit and encourage a more meaningful program
of education and cultural activities.
UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE
Food service is made available by the University at several campus locations. Stu-
dents are offered high quality food at reasonable prices. Meals are carefully planned and
attractively served. It is the policy of the University to provide well-prepared food at the
lowest possible cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value of $5.00
are available for the convenience of students.
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES
A medical history report form is furnished by the Registrar's office to prospective
students. Part of this form is to be completed by the student, giving medical history, the
other side by a licensed Doctor of Medicine. This form should be mailed by the exam-
ining physician, in the envelope provided, to the Director, Student Health Department,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, not less than two weeks before entrance to
the University and earlier if possible. This report is reviewed by an Infirmary physician
before the applicant is cleared for registration and the type of physical education pro-
gram is determined for all freshmen and sophomore students on the basis of this exam-
ination. Applicants with chronic illnesses or physical defects should have their family
physician give a full history of the illness, either in a letter or on the Medical History
report, in order that proper evaluation and treatment may be determined. Students are
not prevented from entering the University because of physical defects; however, where
a student has a history of mental illness, an interview with the University psychiatrist
may be required before acceptance for registration.
THE BOARD OF REGENTS REQUIRES CERTAIN IMMUNIZATIONS
BEFORE REGISTRATION. THESE ARE: A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION
FOR SMALLPOX WITHIN 5 YEARS; A TETANUS TOXOID SERIES OR
BOOSTER INFECTION FOLLOWING AN EARLIER SERIES WITHIN 2
YEARS; IMMUNIZATION FOR POLIOMYELITIS (Immunization for Poliomyelitis,
either oral or injectable, with a booster injection within one year).
The Student Health Department maintains a 65 bed hospital, providing 24 hours
general nursing care for all students currently enrolled in the University who have paid
registration fees. The Outpatient Clinic is open from 8:00 .a.m to 12:00 midnight; after
midnight a call bell is provided at the entrance to summon a nurse. A physician is on 24
hour call for care of emergencies. Students are urged to report to the Infirmary at the
first sign of illness. In any case where the illness is determined by the physician to be
more than average severity, parents will be notified by telephone.


I







STUDENT LIFE 37


The Student Health Department is taffed with nine (9) physicians, a radiologist,
three (3) psychiatrists, twenty registered nurses, x-ray department, clinical laboratory,
and pharmacy. It is designed to give as complete diagnostic, treatment and public
health program as possible, within the limits of its personnel and equipment.
The health program is designed to treat the physical illnesses which commonly
occur while the student is in residency at the University. If major surgery is required, the
student will be referred to the J. Hillis Miller Health Center on campus or to the
Alachua General Hospital in Gainesville. Both of these institutions are approved for sur-
gery by the American College of Surgeons. Families of students enrolled are not eligible
to use Student Health Department facilities. Infirmary physicians will gladly recommend
well qualified physicians to attend student families.
Evaluation and treatment of students with emotional problems is performed by the
Mental Health Service of the Infirmary. If the emotional problem is of such nature that
the needed treatment is beyond the scope of the Mental Health Service, assistance is
then offered to the student for making arrangements elsewhere for proper treatment.
The student fee for health service does not provide for referrals to other hospitals or
physicians.
Most of the service and facilities of the Student Health Department are available to
students without charge; however, there is a charge of $5.00 per day for students admit-
ted as inpatients. Charges are made for x-ray services and perscriptions.
An excellent group health insurance program, sponsored by the Student Govern-
ment and highly recommended by the Student Health Service, is available to students at
reasonable cost.
The University is not responsible for medical care of students during vacation. In
certain instances, it may make special arrangements for continued care of students who
are hospitalized before the vacation period begins.
During epidemics, the facilities of the Student Health Department may be so over-
taxed that the care of all ill students at the Infirmary will be impossible. In such an
emergency, every effort will be made to provide for the care of the students outside the
Infirmary. However, the responsibility of payment for services to outside physicians or
hospitals must be assumed by the student.

SPEECH AND HEARING
The Speech and Hearing Clinic, Room 321, Tigert Hall, offers its services without
charge to any university student who has an impairment in speech or hearing. This assist-
ance is available at any time during the year and therapy sessions are adjusted to the
schedule of the student. Professional referrals are not necessary. The student is encour-
aged to visit the Clinic and take advantage of its services.

STUDENT ACTIVITIES
ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
Student Government. Student government in the University of Florida is a coop-
erative organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the
faculty. Considerable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation
and conduct of student affairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body
has been the disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the
authority granted them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regula-
tion of extra-curricular affairs and the administration of the Honor System.
Every enrolled student, having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student
Body and has equal vote in its government.
The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth
of the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic, occupying its
franchise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval.
Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, but
adapted to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Legislative Council; (2) judicial,
which is embodied in the Honor Court with penal and civil jurisdiction of all judicial
matters; (3) executive, embodied in the President and shared with the Vice-President
and the Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three branches are elected
directly by the Student Body.







38 STUDENT LIFE


Freshman Council. The Freshman Council is composed of officers elected by the
incoming Freshman Class at an election held in September of each year and of repre-
sentatives chosen later from fraternities and the On-Campus Living Areas.
Its purpose is to act as advisor to Student Government on Freshman Affairs and
as a general spokesman for the Freshman Class. It also serves as a training ground for
leadership, develops initiative and a constructive spirit among Freshmen on campus.
Women Students' Association. The Women Students' Association of the University
is subsidiary to the student body. Its purposes are:
1. To promote the welfare of women students in cooperation with the administra-
tion, the student body, and the Dean of Women.
2. To deepen the sense of individual and collective responsibility.
3. To promote loyalty to all college activities and organizations and to uphold high
social and academic standards among University women students.
All single undergraduate women students upon registering in this University auto-
matically become members of the Women Students' Association of the University of
Florida.
The business of the association is conducted by a council composed of an executive
committee (consisting of officers), voting representatives from the residence halls, sor-
orities and women off-campus. Any recognized women' organization may send nonvoting
representatives to council meetings.
Men's Interhall Council. The purpose of the Men's Interhall Council is to provide
an organization which will further serve as a channel of communication between the
Area Councils and Student Government, as well as coordinating individual Area Council
activities and representing the collective interests of all male residents.
The voting membership of the Men's Interhall Council consists of two representa-
tives from each of the Men's Area Councils. The Secretary of Men's Affairs in Student
Government acts as a non-voting advisory member of the Council, as do the Director of
Housing and the Dean of Men or their appointed representatives.
Debating. Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the
varsity and University College debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the
Debate Club, is under the direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an
extensive schedule of intercollegiate debates.
Dramatics. Any student has an opportunity to participate in several plays which are
presented each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under the direction of the
Department of Speech.
Legislative Council. The Legislative Council is composed of representatives elected
from the colleges and living areas on the campus and in general acts as the Legislative
Branch of Student Government. The Athletic Council and Lyceum Council have
jurisdiction over their respective fields.
Publications. The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The Flor-
ida Alligator, the student newspaper; and The New Orange Peel, the campus literary
magazine.
Religious Activities. A broad program of inter-denominational religious activities is
sponsored on the campus by the University Religious Association. Composed of repre-
sentatives of all denominational student religious groups and of the student body and
faculty at large, the Association brings outstanding lecturers in the field of religion to the
University, holds group discussions and seminars, and enlists students in a program of
service to the University and the state. A faculty committee on religion appointed by
the President of the University, assists the University Religious Association in its pro-
gram and work.
Denominational centers adjacent to the campus and full-time student pastors are
provided by the following religious groups: Baptist, Episcopal, Jewish, Methodist. Pres-
byterian, and Roman Catholic. Other denominations, most of which have churches in
Gainesville, offer special programs and services through the local groups.
SOCIAL FRATERNITIES
Twenty-six national social fraternities have established chapters at the University;
most of them have already built chapter houses and others have leased homes. The
general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Interfraternity Council, composed of
one delegate from each of the national fraternities. The national fraternities at Florida
are Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi,
Delta Chi, Delta Sigma Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Upsilon, Kappa Alpha, Kappa







STUDENT LIFE 39


Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Epsilon Pi, Phi
Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon and
Theta Chi.
Thirteen national women's social fraternities have established chapters at the Uni-
versity. The thirteen chapters are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi,
Alpha Omicron Pi, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Phi Epsilon,
Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta, Phi Mu, Sigma Kappa and Zeta Tau Alpha.

PROFESSIONAL AND HONORARY FRATERNITIES

Alpha Chi Sigma, chemistry; Alpha Delta Sigma, men in advertising; Alpha Epsilon
Delta, premedical; Alpha Epsilon Rho, broadcasting; Alpha Kappa Delta, sociology;
Alpha Kappa Psi, business; Alpha Lambda Delta, women's freshman scholastic; Alpha
Omega Alpha, medicine; Alpha Phi Omega, service; Alpha Tau Alpha, agricultural edu-
cation; Alpha Zeta, agriculture; Arnold Air Society, military; Beta Alpha Psi, accounting;
Beta Gamma Sigma, commerce; Block and Bridle, animal husbandry; Delta Pi Epsilon,
graduate business education; Delta Sigma Pi, business; Delta Theta Phi, law; Florida
Blue Key, men's leadership; Gamma Sigma Delta, agriculture; Gamma Sigma Epsilon,
chemistry; Gargoyle, architecture and allied arts; Kappa Delta Pi, education; Kappa
Epsilon, pharmacy; Kappa Psi, professional pharmacy; Kappa Kappa Psi, band; Kappa
Tau Alpha, honorary journalism; Mortar Board, national women's leadership; Mortar
and Pestle, pharmacy; Order of the Coif, law; Phi Alpha Delta, law; Phi Alpha Theta,
history; Phi Beta Kappa, scholarship; Phi Chi Theta, women's business; Phi Delta Delta,
women's legal; Phi Delta Kappa, education; Phi Delta Phi, law; Phi Eta Sigma, men's
freshman scholastic; Phi Kappa Phi, scholarship; Phi Mu Alpha, music; Phi Sigma,
biology; Pi Lambda Theta, education; Pi Mu, premedical; Pi Sigma Alpha, political sci-
ence; Pi Sigma Epsilon, professional sales; Propeller Club of the University of Florida,
business; Psi Chi, psychology; Rho Chi, pharmacy; Rho Pi Phi, pharmacy; Scabbard and
Blade, military; Sigma Alpha Eta, speech and hearing; Sigma Alpha Iota, music; Sigma
Delta Chi, men in journalism; Sigma Delta Psi, athletics; Sigma Gamma Epsilon, honor-
arv earth sciences; Sigma Lambda Chi, building construction; Sigma Pi Sigma, physics;
Sigma Tau, engineering; Sigma Theta Tau, nursing; Sigma Xi, scientific; Tau Beta Pi,
engineering; Tau Beta Sigma, band (women); Tau Kappa Alpha, debating; Theta Sigma
Phi, women in journalism; Xi Sigma Pi, forestry; Zeta Phi Eta, speech (women).

CLUBS AND SOCIETIES
There are more than one hundred and fifty student clubs and organizations on the
campus representing varied interests and activities. These include academic interest clubs,
dance and social organizations, hobby groups, publications, religious groups and others.

HONOR SYSTEM
THE HONOR SYSTEM.-One of the finest tributes to the character of the stu-
dents at the University of Florida is the fact the Student Body is a self-governing group.
The details of the system by which this result is reached are explained to all freshmen
during the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent, as well
as each prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor Sys-
tem, as this phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system.
In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members
of the Student Body, execution of the laws passed, and the expenditure of student
funds, the governing system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disci-
plining themselves through the Honor System. Inaugurated by some of our greatest edu-
cators in higher institutions of the nation and early adopted in some departments of the
University of Florida, the Honor System was finally established in the entire University
in 1914 as the result of student initiative. This plan, having met with the approval of all
officials of the University, was given the sanction of the Board of Control, and student
representatives were selected by the students to administer the system.
Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the conviction that self-discipline
is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-respect, and
that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the University and
the Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should be assumed
to be honest and worthy of trust, and they display this confidence by means of an Honor
System.







40 STUDENT LIFE


The success of the system is dependent upon the honor of each individual member
of the student body in that: (1) he is duty-bound to abide by the principles of the
Honor Code, and (2) he is further pledged to report to the Honor Court such violations
of the Code as he may observe.
Many men and women coming to the University for the first time feel hesitant
about assuming this responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created feelings
of antipathy toward one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor
System adequately overcomes this natural reactoin, however, when it is realized that this
system is a student institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline,
and that to be worthy of the advantages of the Honor System each student must be
strong enough to do his duty in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each stu-
dent's conduct is placed where it must eventually rest-on himself.
The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity; yet it embodies
the fundamentals of sound character. Each student is pledged to refrain from:
(a) cheating, (b) stealing, (c) obtaining money or credit for worthless checks.
On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the
basic right of students of Honor. There are no proctors in the examination rooms, each
student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Secondly,
fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that each stu-
dent will pay for any he may take. This system makes each student the keeper of his
own conscience until he has proved to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the
trust placed in him.
A breach of the System may be flagrant and serious, or it may be extenuated by
circumstances. It may need only mild corrective measures to help the violator obtain a
finer conception of right and wrong; it may need strong measures. To enforce the System
equitably the students have established the Honor Court.
The Court is composed completely of students. The Chancellor sits in judgment of
each case and is responsible for maintaining and enforcing the Honor System. Records of
all proceedings are kept by the Clerk. The Attorney General and his staff of Presenting
Counsel prosecute the cases before the Court and the Chief Defense Counsel and his
staff of Defense Counsel defend the student before the Court. There are Justices, elected
from the various colleges on the campus, who are responsible for investigations, and
maintaining the Honor System. A jury is empaneled at random from the student body
to decide the guilt or innocence of the student. The Chancellor and Vice Chancellor
determine the penalty which can range from severe reprimand, penalty hours, suspension
or expulsion.
Any student convicted by this Court has the right of appeal from its ruling to the
Faculty Discipline Committee. A tribute to the efficiency of the Honor Court in its
existence on the Florida Campus is realized in the fact that, since its establishment, a
surprisingly insignificant number of the Court's decisions have been altered upon appeal.
The penal purpose of the Honor Court should receive less stress, perhaps, than its
educational purpose, which is its most important function. The responsibility of
acquainting every member of the Student Body with the purpose, advantages, and prin-
ciples of the Honor System is placed upon members of the Court. In line with this work,
members of the Honor Court participate in the orientation programs each year during
Orientation Week. In addition to a series of explanatory talks at that time, special pro-
grams are conducted by the Honor Court during the school year. Honor System talks are
delivered in the high schools of the State upon request and at regularly scheduled times
each spring, and radio programs are broadcast especially for the high schools from
Station WRUF in Gainesville.
Talks are also given to fraternities, sororities, and other organizations on the cam-
pus. A brochure is printed and distributed to each student and posters are placed in the
classrooms and dormitories to explain the Honor System.
In this way the Honor Court has endeavored to fulfill its responsibility to the stu-
dents who undertake the problem of self-government and self-discipline at the University
of Florida.
The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to
stress the paramount importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son or daughter
while in attendance at the University of Florida. Dishonest action brings sorrow both to
parent and student.
Because University students have proved worthy of the trust and responsibility
involved in administering an Honor System, this feature of student government has
become the greatest tradition at the University of Florida. It must be remembered that


I







STUDENT LIFE 41


inasmuch as it is primarily a student responsibility, the future of the system rests with
each new class of students entering the University.
The University faculty and administration pledge their support to the Honor
System. Each student must support it or in failing to support it, contribute to the loss
not only of a cherished tradition but the right of self-government. We at the University
of Florida are fully cognizant that by fostering and supporting the ideals of self-
government as reflected in student government, the support of American Democracy will
be more thoroughly imbedded in the hearts of tomorrow's leaders.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
The University of Florida Intercollegiate Athletic Program is among the best in the
South and compares favorably with the programs of leading institutions throughout the
nation. As a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the South-
eastern Athletic Conference, the University guides its intercollegiate program by the
policies and regulations of those organizations. Major sports are football, basketball, base-
ball, swimming, and track. Minor sports are golf, tennis, and cross country.
Physical facilities for intercollegiate athletics comprise Florida Field Stadium seating
approximately 48,260 spectators, a completely equipped varsity tennis stadium, two base-
ball diamonds, swimming pool, two running tracks, and an 18 hole golf course. In
addition, large practice areas are available. The Florida Gymnasium of the College of
Physical Education and Health provides spacious dressing and training quarters. Basket-
ball facilities include four practice courts and the 7,000 capacity indoor stadium.
In addition, an 18 hole golf course and club house have just been acquired and are
available for student and faculty play.

INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS AND RECREATION
Development of wholesome competition through enjoyable participation in physical
activities is an essential aspect of a well-rounded college education. A successful intra-
mural program depends primarily upon student interest in planning and executing the
program as well as in actual participation in various contests and recreational activities.
Widespread student participation in intramural sports and recreation is a tradition
of long standing at the University of Florida. The extensive offering of activities provides
every student an opportunity to take part as an individual or as a member of a group in
sports of a competitive nature.
The Student Intramural Boards conduct the details of an Intramural program com-
prising twenty sports ranging from such individual and dual activities as archery, tennis,
and golf to such team sports as volleyball, basketball, and softball. There are four leagues
of competition included in the program: (1) Sorority; (2) Fraternity; (3) Dormitory-
Independent; (4) Off-Campus.
The Department of Intramural Athletics and Recreation maintains a Recreational
Sports Service which provides other leisure time activities for students and faculty. This
service also provides complete information and guidance for sports club activities. Where
there is sufficient interest, additional sports clubs are formed and individuals with special
ability in those areas are encouraged to act as leaders.
Equipment is furnished for most activities and is made available to any regularly
enrolled student of the University of Florida upon request.
Every student at the University of Florida is urged to participate in Intramural
activities as interest and time permits.







42 STUDENT REGULATIONS


Student Regulations

For full information relative to graduation, failure in studies, conduct, social activi-
ties, etc., the student should consult The Gator Guide and the sections of the Catalog
containing regulations of the separate Colleges and Schools. Each student is held
responsible for observance of the rules and regulations of the University insofar as
they affect him. Some regulations and interpretations supplementing The Gator Guide
are given here.
CREDITS
The term credit as used in this catalog in reference to courses is equal to one
semester hour.
DEGREES AND GRADUATION
The Board of Regents will confer the degree appropriate to the course pursued
under the following conditions:
1. Curriculum requirements.-Certification by the Registrar and the Dean of the
college concerned that all requirements of the course of study as outlined in
the college announcement, or its equivalent as determined by the faculty of
the college offering the course, have been completed.
2. Recommendation of the faculty of the college awarding the degree.
3. Residence requirements.-(a) The minimum residence requirement for the
baccalaureate degree (except the Bachelor of Laws degree) is two trimesters, or
one trimester and two seven and one-half week terms, two semesters, or one
semester and three six-week summer terms, or one semester and two eight-week
summer terms, or one semester and two nine-week summer terms, or five six-
week summer terms, or four eight-week summer terms, or four nine-week sum-
mer terms. (b) For the Bachelor of Laws degree ninety weeks of study in an
accredited law school, of which at least sixty-two must be in the College of
Law at this University. (c) Students are required to complete the last thirty
credit hours (fifty-five in the College of Law) applied toward the baccalaure-
ate degree during regular residence in the college from which the student is to
be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made only upon written
petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may
the amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last
thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate degree. (d) For residence require-
ments for the various graduate degrees see the Graduate School Catalog.
4. Average required.-In order to secure a degree, a student must have a "C"
average or better in all credits required in the Upper Division toward that
degree.
5. Two degrees.-Two degrees of the same rank, e.g., A.B. and B.S. will not be
conferred upon the same individual unless the second degree represents at least
thirty semester hours of additional work, with the necessary qualitative and
residence requirements.
6. Continuous attendance.-If a student's attendance is continuous, he will be
permitted to be graduated according to the curriculum under which he entered,
provided the courses required are offered by the University. If some or all of
the required courses are no longer offered, the faculty of the college concerned
will make such adjustments for the individual student as is appropriate for the
curriculum involved. As long as a student attends the University as much as
one trimester, or one term of the spring trimester during any year, his resi-
dence is continuous.
7. Application for degrees.-Students who expect to be graduated must file appli
cation for the degree in the Registrar's Office on or before the time indicated
in the current University Calendar. Students must make application in the
term in which they expect to be graduated, regardless of previous applications
made.
8. Time limit.-To receive a degree a candidate must have completed: (a) all
residence work required for graduation at least 24 hours prior to the scheduled
meeting of the College Faculty voting on the candidates for degrees; (b) all


i ---- I ---







STUDENT REGULATIONS 43


extension work at least two weeks prior to the scheduled meeting of the
College Faculty voting on the candidates for degrees.
9. Extension work permitted.-(Note: Extension work as used below refers to
both extension classes and correspondence study).
a. Students will not be permitted to take more than twelve semester hours of
extension work during any academic year.
b. Students will not be permitted to take more than nine semester hours of
extension work during the summer vacation period.
c. The amount of extension work for which students will be allowed credit
toward a degree at the University shall not exceed one-fourth of the amount
required for the degree. For additional regulations peculiar to the various
colleges see the appropriate section of this Catalog or consult the dean of
the college concerned.
d. Students will not be permitted to take by extension work more than twelve
of the last thirty-six semester hours necessary for a baccalaureate degree.
e. Simultaneous registration in residence and extension work is permitted only
upon approval of the dean of the college in which the student is registered
and the Registrar.
10. Registration of Graduate Students.-Normally students in the Graduate School
must be registered in the University at the time they receive a degree. If, how-
ever, a student has completed all requirements for his degree including courses,
residence, thesis or dissertation, and all examinations at the time of registration
for the term in which the degree is to be awarded, the Graduate Council will
consider a petition to waive this regulation. In brief, the student must be
registered for the term in which his final examination is given.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
Some colleges have a maximum load regulation which is stated in the Catalog. In
the absence of such statement the general University regulation is followed. This regu-
lation allows in a regular trimester a maximum load of 17 hours for an average below
"C" made during preceding term of attendance and 21 hours for an average above
"C" during the preceding term of attendance. The minimum load in a regular Tri-
mester is 12 hours.
Correspondence or extension work, if the student is registered for such courses, is
counted in computing the maximum load; but it cannot be counted to achieve the
minimum load.
At the time of registration, a student, with the approval of his dean, may register
for less than the minimum load. After the regular registration period has closed, no
student will be permitted to continue with less than the minimum load unless he
successfully petitions the Committee on Student Petitions.

GRADES
Results of students' work are recorded in the Registrar's Office as follows:
1. Undergraduate students: Passing grades are A, B, C, D, in order of excellence.
Failing grades are E-Failure, I-Incomplete, X-Absent from examination. Ew-
Dropped for non-attendance or unsatisfactory work.
Grades of I and X are considered as failing grades and they must be changed to
passing grades in accordance with the dates set in the University Calendar, or be con-
sidered as grades of E in considering a student's record for graduation or in calculating
averages. Students registered in the University College in courses for which the Board
of University Examiners gives comprehensive examinations may receive the grade of H
(which is neither passing nor failing), if the student files with the Board a request in
writing to defer the examination. This request must be filed before the scheduled time
for the examination concerned. An undergraduate who re-registers for a course in which
he has received a grade of I or X will automatically have the original grade changed
to E.
2. Graduate students: Passing grades for graduate students are A, B, and C.
Grades of C in courses below 600-level are acceptable for credit toward graduate
degrees only if the total program meets the B-average requirement. C grades in 600-
and 700-level courses count toward a graduate degree only if an equal number of credit
hours in courses numbered 600 or above have been earned with a grade of A.






44 STUDENT REGULATIONS


AVERAGES
1. Definition: The term, average, as used in any University regulations concern-
ing probation or suspension, always refers to average on work attempted at the Univer-
sity of Florida. Grades received at other institutions are not averaged with grades
received at the University of Florida for the purpose of meeting any average require-
ment which is a part of probation or suspension regulations. Most honorary societies
take into consideration the quality of the work done at other institutions in meeting
any average requirement they may have.
2. How computed: Averages are determined by computing the ratio of honor
points to semester hours recorded as attempted. The student receives honor points
according to the following scale: A equals 4 honor points per semester hour; B equals
3 honor points per semester hour; C equals 2 honor points per semester hour; D equals
1 honor point per semester hour; E equals 0 honor point per semester hour; Ew equals
0 honor point per semester hour; H equals 0 honor point per semester hour; I equals
0 honor point per semester hour; X equals 0 honor point per semester hour. In com-
puting averages, a course repeated is counted as many times as grades for it are
recorded.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must successfully
pass six or more to complete the program of the University College) are administered
by the Board of University Examiners and are given in December, April, June, and
August of each year. A student must be familiar with the work of the various courses
and be able to think in the several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these
examinations. Standings on the comprehensive examinations are issued by the Board of
Examiners and are not subject to change by any other agency.
APPLICATION FOR
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the examina-
tion is given need not make application for it. University College students who are not
enrolled in a course at the time an examination is given, and who wish to take the
comprehensive examination, must apply in writing to the Board of Examiners for per-
mission prior to the last date set for filing such applications. Applications will not be
accepted from students registered in the colleges of the Upper Division. Before the
application is accepted the applicant will be required to furnish the Board of Exam-
iners with proof that this privilege has not been used to avoid the payment of usual
University fees. Applications will be accepted only for those examinations which are
administered by the Board of Examiners. The Board of Examiners is the only agency
authorized to give University College students eaxmination by application.
As a general policy the Board of Examiners will not approve applications for
comprehensive examinations if any of the following conditions prevail:
1. The student has been dropped from the course for excessive absences or
unsatisfactory work.
2. The student has previously taken the examination in the course.
3. The student has completed other courses in the same general field (e.g., the
student who has had courses in history, economics, etc., will not have an
application for the comprehensive course in the social sciences, CSS 111 or
CSS 112, approved).

PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND EXCLUSION FOR
ACADEMIC REASONS
The University of Florida accepts the responsibility for providing the best possible
higher education in an economical and efficient manner. In order to discharge this
responsibility, the University must require reasonable academic progress from its stu-
dents in return for the opportunity afforded them by a tax supported University. To
continue the registration of students who have demonstrated that they do not possess
the necessary ability, or preparation, or industry, or maturity to obtain a reasonable
benefit from a program of University study is inconsistent with this responsibility.
The University of Florida Senate has enacted the following University regulations
covering probation, suspension and exclusion for academic reasons. The minimum grade






STUDENT REGULATIONS 45


point averages given below have been arrived at by the analysis of hundreds of records
of University students. These studies show that if the student is to have a reasonable
chance of satisfactory completion of the University program, his achievement record,
as indicated by his grade point average, cannot consistently fall below the averages
required to avoid probation for academic reasons. Any college of the University may
enforce additional academic standards and each student is responsible to his college for
observing the regulations relating to such additional standards.
Functions of the minimum grade standards are: (1) to identify students in
academic difficulty in time to permit effective counseling, and (2) to remove from the
University those students who would not meet the University of Florida grade point
requirements for graduation if allowed to remain enrolled in the University.
These functions are performed through the imposition of academic probation,
through suspension from the University, through exclusion from the University and
through application of admission requirements by Upper Division Colleges.
It is important to note that a student may be placed on various kinds of proba-
tion. For example, he may be admitted to the University on a probationary basis or he
may be placed on disciplinary probation by reason of misconduct or, in some cases, he
may be placed on probation by the Committee on Student Petitions. The term admis-
sion probation is used when the student is admitted after attendance at some other
institution with an achievement record at the other institution which does not meet
the minimum standards of the University of Florida. Disciplinary probation is the term
used when a student is placed on probation by reason of misconduct. Academic proba-
tion is a term used to indicate a specific probation which results from an action of the
Committee on Student Petitions. In cases such as the foregoing the individual student
will receive in writing a specific set of conditions which he must meet in order to
remove the probation. In most cases, these conditions will require loads, grades, et
cetera, that are above the minimums given below. Inasmuch as such a student will
have been placed on one of these specific probations only because of some previous
academic difficulty or misconduct, in his particular case the specific terms of probations
which are set for him become the necessary minimum achievement rather than the
conditions set forth below. When the student is placed on probation as a result of
failure to meet minimum grade point averages described below or by reason of with-
drawal, the term scholarship probation is used.
These different terms are for identification of category only, and do not imply
varying degrees of unsatisfactory academic achievement.
To give a brief summary, the general objective of the probation and suspension rules
might be stated as follows: A student cannot continue at the University of Florida if
there are two successive trimesters of unsatisfactory academic achievement. It is
therefore most important to the student to seriously review his record and educational
objectives with the appropriate counselors immediately after his unsatisfactory
trimester which has resulted in his being placed on probation.
PROBATION BECAUSE OF UNSATISFACTORY
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
The purpose of academic probation is to recognize formally the fact that a
student is making unsatisfactory progress thereby providing occasion for counsel.
The conditions of academic probation are intended to: (1) Relate to quality of
achievement below standards required for ultimate graduation; (2) Recognize unsatis-
factory work at an early date; (3) Be sufficiently significant to make clear to the stu-
dent, his parents, and the administration, the shortcomings of the student's perform-
ance; (4) Provide occasion for counseling; (5) Give students whose ultimate success is
doubtful further opportunity to demonstrate adequate performance.
All Undergraduate Students:
Any undergraduate student not on probation, who withdraws from the University
after the end of the 6th week of any trimester will be placed on scholarship probation
unless he has achieved a "C" (2.0) average for all work attempted at the University
of Florida.
Any student who is eligible to return to the University after a suspension because
of academic reasons (failure to receive passing grades in more than one-half of his
work or having his load reduced to less than twelve hours), will be placed on scholar-
ship probation for his next trimester.
Lower Division Students:
A Lower Division student not on probation, who fails to maintain a 1.5 grade






46 STUDENT REGULATIONS


average for all work attempted during any trimester at the University of Florida will be
placed on scholarship probation for his next trimester.
A Lower Division student who withdraws from the University while on scholar-
ship probation will be continued on scholarship probation for his next trimester.
Upper Division Students:
An Upper Division student not on probation, who fails to maintain a "C" (2.0)
average for all work attempted in any trimester will be placed on scholarship probation
for his next trimester.

SUSPENSION AND EXCLUSION

The purpose of suspensions from the University for academic reasons is to remove
from the University those students who would not ultimately meet requirements for
graduation if they continue at their current level of progress.
The conditions of academic suspensions are intended to: (1) Select students whose
performance indicates that they will not fulfill the requirements for graduation; (2)
Encourage students to leave the University as soon as a high probability of failure is
evident.
All Undergraduate Students:
All undergraduate students (classified other than 7) who do not receive passing
grades (A,B,C,D,) in more than one-half of the hours attempted in any term or tri-
mester shall be suspended immediately from the University. If such a student was not
on probation for academic reasons and had not been previously suspended for academic
reasons, the suspension shall be for one full trimester. If the student was on probation
for academic reasons or had previously been suspended for academic reasons, he shall
be excluded from the University without the opportunity to re-enroll. (In applying the
preceding, failure in only one course carrying five semester hours or less shall not cause
the student to be suspended under this provision.)
All undergraduate students who are dropped from a course because of excessive
absences or unsatisfactory work, and as a result of such drop are left with an academic
load of less than twelve semester hours, shall be suspended immediately. If such a
student was on probation or had been previously suspended for academic reasons, he
shall be excluded from the University without the opportunity to re-enroll. If the
student was not on probation or had not been previously suspended for academic
reasons, the suspension shall be for one full trimester.
Lower Division Students:
A Lower Division student who is on scholarship probation shall be ineligible
for further registration at the University of Florida unless he achieves a grade point
average of 1.7 or higher for all work attempted during the trimester that he is on
scholarship probation or has a 2.0 average for all work attempted at the University of
Florida.
A Lower Division student who has received a grade in as many as 48 semester
hours at all colleges and universities attended and who has failed to earn a "C" (2.0)
average on all work attempted at the University of Florida shall be ineligible for fur-
ther registration at the University unless (1) he is recommended for continuation by
the Dean of the Upper Division college into which he expects to enter, or (2) in the
event that he has not chosen an Upper Division college, he is recommended for con-
tinuation by the Appeals Committee of the University College.
A Lower Division student who has attempted 86 semester hours (this includes
all work accepted by transfer and all work attempted at the University of Florida)
shall be ineligible for further registration at the University unless he is admitted to the
Upper Division.
Upper Division Students:
An Upper Division student on scholarship probation will be ineligible for further
registration in the University unless he maintains an average of "C" (2.0) in all work
attempted that trimester or has an average of "C" (2.0) in all work attempted while
registered in his present Upper Division college.
An Upper Division student on scholarship probation will be ineligible for further
registration in the University if he withdraws from the University after the end of the
6th week of any trimester, unless he has a "C" (2.0) average in all work attempted
while registered in his present Upper Division college.






STUDENT REGULATIONS 47


Graduate Students:
Any graduate student may be denied further registration in the University or in
his graduate major when his progress toward completion of his planned graduate pro-
gram becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory progress has been defined by the Graduate
Council as failure to maintain an accumulative grade average of B in all work attempted
in the Graduate School.
ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
All actions taken under these regulations shall be reflected by appropriate notations
on the student's record.
ABSENCES OR UNSATISFACTORY WORK
Absences count from the first meeting of the class rather than from the date the
student first registers for a class.
A. If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent
that, in the opinion of the instructor, further enrollment appears to be of
insufficient value for him to continue or detrimental to the best interests of
the class, it shall be the responsibility of the instructor to warn such student
in writing that further absence or poor class work will cause him to be
dropped from the class with a failing grade. Where possible this warning
should be delivered personally; in addition to this procedure, a notification
should be given to the Office of the Registrar for mailing to the proper
address. All such warnings should be reported immediately to the depart-
ment head or course chairman.
Should any subsequent absences or failure to do classwork occur the
student shall be dropped from the class with a failing grade. The instructor
should initiate this procedure by giving the Registrar a written notice.
Should this reduce the load of the student below the minimum required
he shall be suspended from the University.
If the instructor is using a system whereby a given number of
absences is allowed, he is authorized to give double "cuts" for any ab-
sence incurred during the last class meeting before an official University
holiday and the first class meeting following an official University
holiday.
If he does not use such a system, he is, after verbally warning the
class, either at the beginning of the course or several periods in advance
of the forthcoming holiday, authorized to drop the offending students)
at once. When a student is dropped after a verbal class warning the
notice to the Registrar must so state.
B. When a student is suspended from a course under the provisions of A above,
his parents shall be notified in writing by the Registrar.
C. NINE-DAY RULE: No student shall absent himself from the University for
more than nine scholastic days per trimester in order to participate in athletic
or in extracurricular activities.
The Nine-Day Rule applies to individual members of the group rather
than to the group as a whole. Consequently, a schedule of more than nine
days for any activity is not prohibited, provided the personnel of the group
is so rotated that no student is absent from the campus for more than nine
"scholastic" days (a scholastic day is any day on which regular class work is
scheduled).
A student who has been warned for absences or unsatisfactory work in any
class should not incur additional absences in that course, even though he has
not been absent from the class for nine scholastic days. It is the responsibility
of the student to see that his class work and attendance is satisfactory.






48 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


The Lower Division

University College

When the student enters the University, he is enrolled in the University College,
which offers comprehensive courses described by a committee of experts as "one of the
two or three leading two-year general education programs in America." The purpose
of the comprehensive courses is to improve the communication skills of students, to
acquaint them with the principal concepts in the biological and physical sciences, and
to give them a knowledge of the history and culture of western man. Providing students
with such a broad background should enable students to make a wise choice of an
upper division school or college.
The basic comprehensive courses are:
CSS 111-112 American Institutions (their developmental history, problems and
processes-social, political and economic).
CPS 121-122 The Physical Sciences (the nature of the physical universe).
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English (freshman English, language and communi-
cation).
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking.
CMS 171 Fundamental Mathematics
CHN 251-252 The Humanities (literature, philosophy, religion, and art).
CBS 261-262 The Biological Sciences (the life sciences).
At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours of Military
Science, are required to complete the Lower Division.

TRANSFER CREDIT
At the time a transfer student registers, his counselor will indicate which transfer
courses will serve to fulfill comprehensive course requirements. No prior consultation
is needed except in the case of U.C. students who plan to attend summer school
elsewhere.
ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING
The Educational Testing Service sponsors the Advanced Placement Program, in
which the University of Florida is a participant. Under this system a student entering
the University offers a nationally graded examination as evidence of his completion of
a college level course taken in high school. When the results of the examination
meet the minimum requirements, the student may receive University credit for courses
covering similar material. In some cases only exemption from a course, not credit, is
available. In either case, students are assured that the University takes full cognizance
of the advanced work done prior to their entrance. For further details, see Dr. G. E.
Wollf, Director of Invitational Honors.

EXAMINATIONS BY APPLICATION
Students with grade point averages of 3.5 or higher may apply to take the final
examinations in certain courses without registering for the course. If the application
is approved, the final grade is based entirely on the final examination. In most courses
the student may attend classes as needed. Students wishing to take a course by appli-
cation should report to the University College and the appropriate department early
in the trimester.

COUNSELING
A variety of counseling services are available to help the student achieve maximum
educational development. Every student sees an academic counselor each time he
registers. The Reading Laboratory and Clinic provides diagnostic testing and remedial
exercises for students whose verbal skills are inadequate. The instructor is responsible
for helping students with study techniques and problems in a particular course. A
staff of experienced counselors helps students in choosing educational and career goals
and in planning course programs. Counselors are available in the University College






48 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


The Lower Division

University College

When the student enters the University, he is enrolled in the University College,
which offers comprehensive courses described by a committee of experts as "one of the
two or three leading two-year general education programs in America." The purpose
of the comprehensive courses is to improve the communication skills of students, to
acquaint them with the principal concepts in the biological and physical sciences, and
to give them a knowledge of the history and culture of western man. Providing students
with such a broad background should enable students to make a wise choice of an
upper division school or college.
The basic comprehensive courses are:
CSS 111-112 American Institutions (their developmental history, problems and
processes-social, political and economic).
CPS 121-122 The Physical Sciences (the nature of the physical universe).
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English (freshman English, language and communi-
cation).
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking.
CMS 171 Fundamental Mathematics
CHN 251-252 The Humanities (literature, philosophy, religion, and art).
CBS 261-262 The Biological Sciences (the life sciences).
At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours of Military
Science, are required to complete the Lower Division.

TRANSFER CREDIT
At the time a transfer student registers, his counselor will indicate which transfer
courses will serve to fulfill comprehensive course requirements. No prior consultation
is needed except in the case of U.C. students who plan to attend summer school
elsewhere.
ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING
The Educational Testing Service sponsors the Advanced Placement Program, in
which the University of Florida is a participant. Under this system a student entering
the University offers a nationally graded examination as evidence of his completion of
a college level course taken in high school. When the results of the examination
meet the minimum requirements, the student may receive University credit for courses
covering similar material. In some cases only exemption from a course, not credit, is
available. In either case, students are assured that the University takes full cognizance
of the advanced work done prior to their entrance. For further details, see Dr. G. E.
Wollf, Director of Invitational Honors.

EXAMINATIONS BY APPLICATION
Students with grade point averages of 3.5 or higher may apply to take the final
examinations in certain courses without registering for the course. If the application
is approved, the final grade is based entirely on the final examination. In most courses
the student may attend classes as needed. Students wishing to take a course by appli-
cation should report to the University College and the appropriate department early
in the trimester.

COUNSELING
A variety of counseling services are available to help the student achieve maximum
educational development. Every student sees an academic counselor each time he
registers. The Reading Laboratory and Clinic provides diagnostic testing and remedial
exercises for students whose verbal skills are inadequate. The instructor is responsible
for helping students with study techniques and problems in a particular course. A
staff of experienced counselors helps students in choosing educational and career goals
and in planning course programs. Counselors are available in the University College







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 49


office for consultation on any problem relating to educational progress. When the
need is evident, these counselors refer students to advisers in the upper division schools
and colleges or to specialized counseling services, such as the University Counseling
Center.

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
The University Counseling Center provides professional psychological services to
students. These include vocational guidance, career information, assistance with
academic problems, specialized testing, and personal counseling. The student may
apply in person for such services as he deems necessary. No charge is made.
The Counseling Center also offers consultative services to University faculty and
staff who are engaged in counseling students. Close relationships are maintained with
deans, University College Counselors, housing personnel, the Student Health Service,
and religious centers, for the purpose of expediting both counseling and consultative
services.

THE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATE
The Associate of Arts Certificate serves to recognize the completion of a Uni-
versity College program of general education designed to broaden each student's
intellectual life and to provide perspective for later specialization in an Upper Division
college. It will include those comprehensive courses and specialized courses which best
serve this purpose. Plans of Study specified in later sections are set forth with this
in mind.
The certificate is awarded at the end of a student's last term in the University
College, when the student has completed 64 or more credits, at least twenty of which
must be obtained at the University of Florida.
The certificate will be awarded with honors or high honors to those who success-
fully complete work in the honors program as indicated below. Students who do not
engage in the honors program may receive honors or high honors upon the recom-
mendation of the Dean of the College to whom they may apply if their average on
all work is 3.5 or better.
Students who wish to receive the certificate must so indicate on their application
to enter Upper Division. This application must be made in the Office of the Registrar
one month prior to the end of the last trimester of attendance in the University College
Students who plan to leave the University upon completion of 64 credits may apply
in the University College office.

HONOR PROGRAMS
The University College provides two avenues for honors work. Participation in
either is voluntary and limited to those who maintain an average of 3.0 (B) in all
work.
Students in the Honors Programs in their third or final undergraduate year are
eligible for awards provided by the Ford Foundation. Program fellowships up to
$1800 and cancellation of non-Florida fees (but not registration fees) for the first
year of graduate study will be possible. For further details, see Dr. Robert A. Bryan,
Assistant Dean of the Graduate School, 238A Tigert Hall.

INVITATIONAL HONORS
This program is limited to students from each entering class who are issued
special invitations to participate. These students become members of small tutorial
classes. The small size of the classes and the high quality of the students make possible
depth penetration into course materials and encourage independent work on the
students' part. The students develop their critical faculties through extensive reading,
work on research papers, and oral performance in class.
The Associate of Arts with Honors is given to students in the Invitational Pro-
gram if they complete at least four courses in the program and have an overall 3.0
average. The Associate of Arts with High Honors is given to students in the Invita-
tional Program if they complete at least six courses in the program and have an
overall 3.0 average.






50 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


The following Invitational Honors courses are offered:
CSS 118-119 CET 148-149
CPS 128-129 CHN 258-259
CEH 138-139 CBS 268-269
CY 217-218
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS
In the comprehensive courses certain sections are restricted to superior students
who wish to delve more deeply into the subject matter of the course. A qualified
student may enroll in one or more of such sections each semester with the approval
of his counselor.
The Associate of Arts with Honors or High Honors will be awarded to students
who fulfill the following criteria:
1. with honors: honors ratings by the instructors in at least three
courses in one group and in two in the other.
2. with high honors: honors ratings by the instructors in four
courses in one group and in two in the other
group.
Group I Group 11*
Humanities and
Social Sciences Sciences
CSS 111-112 CPS 121-122
CEH 131-132 CET 141-142
CET 141-142 CBS 261-262
CHN 251-252
*Certain science majors may count courses in chemistry, physics, mathematics and
biology toward Group II if they obtain a final grade of "A" in such courses.

PLANS OF STUDY

GENERAL EDUCATION
The following program satisfies the requirement for the Associate of Arts for
those who wish to leave the University upon the completion of 64 credits.
GROUP A
Course No. Title Credit
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English 6
CHN 251-252 Humanities 8

20
GROUP B
(In Group B a student elects to take 6 of the 7 trimesters)
CPS 121-122 Physical Sciences 6
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking 4
CMS 171 Fundamental Mathematics 3
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences 6

16 or 17
Other Courses 28 or 29

Total 64
AGRICULTURE
Students planning to enter the College of Agriculture should take, while in the
University College, the following program of study. The sequence in which courses
are to be taken will depend upon the department in which a student takes his major
in the upper division and will be determined by the counselors of the College of
Agriculture.






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 51


BASIC CURRICULUM-FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS
Course
CSS 111-112 American Institutions .------- ---------- -- 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English ---------- 6
BTY 180 Elementary Botany ....---------------- 4
ZY 181 General Zoology----- --- 4
CY 215 Introductory Chemistry--- ------------- 3
CY 219 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis .--. 4 4
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking ------- ----- -- 4
MS 205 Basic Mathematics ....-----.---------------- 3
CHN 251-252 Humanities .------------ 8
AS 201 Principles of Agricultural Economics ------- 3
Military Science & Physical Fitness' .---------------- -- 4
Electives in Agriculture* ---------------------------- 3-4
Approved Electives* .- ----------------------------------- 11-12
Total Credits 64
'One hour must be taken each of 4 trimesters.
*Elective courses must have the approval of the Dean of the College of Agri-
culture. Vo-Ag majors should elect EDF 345 and EY 301, SCH 201, PS 109-10 in
the lower division.
The following courses have been approved as suitable electives in Agriculture:
AS 306 or 308, AG 306, AY 321, AL 309, BCY 300, EY 301, 307. EDF 345,
FY 413, FS 201, PT 321, SLS 310, PLS 201, ADP 211.
VETERINARY TRAINING UNDER REGIONAL PLAN
In accordance with the Regional Plan for Veterinary Education a limited number
of bona fide residents of Florida are admitted each fall to the School of Veterinary
Medicine, Auburn University.
The minimum educational entrance requirement is the satisfactory completion
of two years of study in an approved, accredited college or university. A total of
60 semester hours of college work must be completed with no grade less than C
and a grade point average of at least 2.25. Required courses include general chemistry
and qualitative analysis, organic chemistry, mathematics, physics, English, American
Institutions, botany, zoology, medical vocabulary or a foreign language, certain animal
husbandry courses, and electives. In addition, applicants must meet military and
physical fitness requirements in effect at the institution attended.
Because of the rigid course requirements, most students require somewhat more
than two years to complete this curriculum. Also, since certification and admission
to Veterinary School is competitive, based on a quota under the Regional Education
Plan, students usually need to make considerably more than the minimum grade
point average of 2.25.
Pre-veterinary students should consult the Dean of the College of Agriculture
before registering for the pre-veterinary curriculum.
Residents of Florida who will have completed the pre-veterinary requirements
in June of the year entrance into the School of Veterinary Medicine is desired in
the fall, and who wish to be included in the State's list of eligibles, should see the
Dean of the College of Agriculture or address inquiries to:
Executive Director, Board of Regents for Regional Education, Tallahassee, Florida.






52 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS
Students planning to enter the College of Architecture and Fine Arts should take,
while in the University College, one of the following programs of study. The sequence
in which courses are to be taken will depend upon the department in which a student
takes his major in the upper division and will be determined by the counselors of the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts. For upper division programs see section of
catalog entitled the College of Architecture and Fine Arts.
BASIC CURRICULUM- FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS
Group A General Requirement
Course Credits
CSS 111-112 American Institutions --_--....------...------.._--.. ...-.... 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English --.....- -- --------------- -. ...... 6
CHN 251-252 Humanities ------------------ ...... ----... ............. 8
Military Science and Physical Fitness' _.----------- .------.------_--------- 4
'One hour must be taken each of 4 trimesters.
Group B General Requirement
except as noted below for AE, LAE and BCN
CPS 121-122 Physical Sciences ----..-.........--------------...... 6
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking .-.....--..- ---------.......................... 4
CMS 171 Fundamental Mathematics ---.--------------.---3 -...-__ -.. 3
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences .---------------------------------......... ........ 6
In Group B a student elects 6 of the above courses.
AE: CET 141-142, CBS 261, MS 205-208, PS 201-203 and PS 202-204.
LAE: CPS 121, CET 141-142, CMS 171, CBS 261, CY 215 and BTY 180.
BCN: CET 141-142, CBS 261, MS 205-208, PS 201-203 and PS 202-204.
Group C- Introductory Professional Courses
AE, IR, LAE: AE 111-112, 121, 211, 231-232, 242 plus ART 260 for IR.
BCN: AE 121, BCN 102, 103, 233, and 241.
ART: ART 101-102, 103-104, 205, 206, and 207-208.
ART ED: ART 101-102, 103-104, 205, 206, SCA 253 and EDF 345.
MSC ED: MSC 101-102, 201-202, Ensemble 4 credits, Applied Music 6 Credits, and
Instrumental Skills 4 Credits. Piano Skills MSC 71, must be taken each trimester until
piano proficiency examination is passed.
Minimum Total 64
ARTS AND SCIENCES
University College students who plan to enter the College of Arts and Sciences
should:
1. Complete with satisfactory grades, normally "C" or better, each of the com-
prehensive courses of the lower division or acceptable equivalent courses. The Uni-
versity College counselor can explain what are acceptable equivalent courses. Students
whose overall average is above 2.0 but who have one or more "D" grades in compre-
hensive courses may be admitted.
2. During their first trimester or as soon as they have selected a major field, they
should consult with the adviser for the proposed major department. (The name, office
address, and counseling hours of these advisers are available in the Arts and Sciences
College office, 103 Anderson Hall.)
3. Begin their foreign language requirement while registered in the University
College.
4. Use the balance of their elective opportunities in the lower division in taking
a selection of 100 and 200 level courses in several Arts and Sciences departments.
Arts and Sciences courses numbered 300 or above are not available to lower division
students except with written permission from the department offering such courses.
5. Study the material on admission, advisement panel, and requirements for
degrees under the Arts and Sciences section of this catalog.

TEACHER PREPARATION IN ARTS AND SCIENCES
Students may earn their degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, and complete







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 53


requirements for certification as a high school teacher in one or more academic subjects
by following one of the Arts and Sciences-Education Programs described in the
College of Education section in this catalog.
Further information may be obtained in the College of Arts and Sciences, office,
103 Anderson Hall.
SUGGESTED PREMEDICAL-PREDENTAL PROGRAM
I.

Recommended for students who have taken a college preparatory course in high
school, including at least 1 year of chemistry and 3 years of mathematics, and who
have a percentile rank of 85 or higher on the Mathematics section, the Natural Science
section, and the Verbal section, and a total percentile rank of 425 or better on the
Florida 12th Grade Testing Program.
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American CHN 251-252 The Humanities ..- 8
Institutions ----------------- 6 CY 301-302, 303, 304 Organic
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive Chemistry ----- ---.--- 8
English --------- 6 ZY 309-310 Comparative
*BTY 180, ZY 181 -- 8 Anatomy & Embryology ----- 8
CY 217-218 General Chemistry MS 206, 353 Analytic Geometry
and Qualitative Analysis _-- 8 and Calculus -------- 10
Military Science; Physical Fitness 2 Military Science; Physical Fitness __ 2
30 36
*Note also that students who have a score of 450 or better, are registered for CY 217
and have had high school biology may take the honors course ZY 217 instead of
BTY 180 and ZY 181.
II.
For students who do not qualify for program I.
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American CHN 251-252 The Humanities -. 8
Institutions --------------- -- 6 CY 301-302, 303-304 Organic
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive Chemistry ---...... ------- 8
English .-- -- 6 CY 331 and/or Electives -------- 6-8
**MS 206, 353 Analytic Geometry BTY 180, ZY 181 Intro. Bty. and
and Calculus -.......- --- 10 General Zoology 8....._..----- 8
CY 215-219 General Chemistry- 7 Foreign Language --- 6
CET 141 Effective Thinking ---- 2 Military Science; Physical Fitness 2
Military Science; Physical Fitness __ 2
34-36
31
**Students whose background in Mathematics is very poor may take MS 109 and/or
MS 205 before going into MS 206.
All students interested in medical and allied fields should register at the beginning
of each trimester in the preprofessional counseling office, 107 Anderson.
Individual programs for the junior and senior years are made out in consultation
with a premedical adviser.
NOTE: Under either program, General Physics (PS 201-202, 203-204) and under
Program II, Organic Chemistry (CY 301-302, 303-304) would normally be
taken in the junior year. However, any student who wishes to take physics
sooner, to start his major earlier, or to continue a foreign language already
begun in high school may do so by making appropriate substitutions in the
freshman and/or sophomore year and postponing some of the sciences until
later. Premedical students should carry at least 16-17 hours and pre-dental
students at least 15-16 hours each trimester, especially in the upper division.







54 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
To enter the College of Business Administration, students are required to com-
plete the curriculum below or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses or areas
of knowledge listed including the following:
BASIC CURRICULUM-FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS


Course
CSS 111-112 American Institutions' --
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English' ------------..--..... ----
CPS 121 Physical Sciences -- -
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking -. .-.---- ------
CHN 251-252 Humanities -------------------..-----..-.
CBS 261 Biological Sciences --------
CPS 122 or CBS 262 Physical Sciences or Biological Sciences
BS 101 Business in a Dynamic Society' ---------------_.
MS 205 Basic Mathematics' ------------
MS 207-208 Basic Math. for the Social Sciences --------------------
ATG 211-212 Elementary Accounting ------------......_._. ..---.
ES 201-202 Basic Economics ----------...........
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics ----------.-- ---------------------
EH 212 or EH 255 Advanced Composition Business Comml
Military Science; Physical Fitness -- -------
Electives ......--- .. ------------- ...


uL


Credits
-..-- 6
------------- ------------ 6
.--_ --- 3
---. -- 4


---- 3
.---- 6
----- 6
---- 6
-----------. 3
nications* -. 2-3
------ 0-4
------.. 3-0

64-66


'Should be taken in freshman year.
*Students receiving less than a 16.5 percentile score in CEH 132 Writing La-
boratory will be required to complete satisfactorily CEH 133 (Effective Writing) before
taking EH 212 or EH 255. Students demonstrating outstanding achievement will be
excused from EH 212 and EHI 255, and may insert electives at this point with the
approval of the College of Business Administration.
COURSES OFFERED BY THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
The following courses offered by the College of Business Administration may be
taken by students in the University College: ATG 211-212, Elementary Accounting;
BS 101, Business in a Dynamic Society; ES 201-202, Basic Economics; STA 320,
Introduction to Statistics; ES 208, Economic History of the United States; ES 246,
Consumer Economics; ES 296, Industry and Trade of Latin America; MGT 371,
Principles of Management; MKG 341, Salesmanship, and RE 295, Housing and Home
Ownership.
It is anticipated that some students who do not plan a four-year program will elect
to take many of these courses or to arrange a program of two years or less in length in
which many of these courses would be included. Also some students not headed for the
College of Business Administration may wish to elect one or more of these courses.
EDUCATION
University College students working toward a degree in the College of Education
should pursue one of the following programs:
BASIC PROGRAM
(Except Agricultural and Science Education)


Freshman Year
CSS 111-112 American
Institutions ------ ...
CPS 121-122 The Physical
Sciences -- -----
CEII 131-132 Comprehensive
English -.------- ........
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking
Military Science ---- -- .---
Electives (approved) ------
Physical Fitness --------....... -.....


Credits Sophomore Year Credits
CHN 251-252 The Humanities .... 8
6 CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences. 6
CMS 171 Mathematics ----- 3
6 Military Science -------- -- 2
Electives (approved) ....------ 9-12
S6 Physical Fitness ..--- .----------- 0
4 EDF 345 Human Growth and
2 Development _.......__-___ -- 3
9
0 31-34


31-33







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 55


ELECTIVES
It is recommended that all students working toward a degree in the College of
Education take additional electives in the social sciences and English.
Art Education: ART 101, 102, 103, 104, 205, 206; SCA 253.
Elementary Education: SCA 253; PHA 373; MSC 160 (or music skills test);
MSC 390.
Music Education: MSC 101, 102; 4 credits in ensemble, 4 credits in applied
music.
Physical Education for Men: PHA 283, 284, 285, 286, 287.
Physical Education for Women: PHA 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 257, 305, 307, 308.
Secondary Education: 9 hours of basic courses in the teaching field.
BASIC PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND EXTENSION


Freshman Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American
Institutions -- .--- 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive
English ---- -- 6
BTY 180 Elementary Botany ... 4
ZY 181 General Zoology ......--- 4
CMS 171 or MS 109 Mathematics 3
SCH 201 Effective Speaking ------ 3
Military Science 2
Electives (approved) --- 4
Physical Fitness .- ....--------. -. 0

32



BASIC PROGRAM FOR
Freshman Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive
English ----- 6
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking 4
CPS 121-122 The Physical Sciences
or CY 215, 219, 220 ------- 6-8
Military Science ..------ 2
Electives (approved) ------- 9
Physical Fitness ------- 0

33-35


Sophomore Year Credits
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking 4
CHN 251-252 The Humanities -- 8
CY 215 Introduction to
Chemistry -------- 3
CY 219 General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis -_- 4
AS 201 Principles of Agricultural
Economics 3
EDF 345 Human Growth and
Development -------- 3
EY 301 Economic Entomology 3
Electives in Agriculture --- 3
Military Science --------- 2
Physical Fitness ----- 0

33
SCIENCE EDUCATION
Sophomore Year Credits
CHN 251-252 The Humanities -- 8
CMS 171 or MS 205 Mathematics 3
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences
or BTY 180 and ZY 181 -- 6-8
Military Science 2
Electives (approved) ------ 5-9
EDF 345 Human Growth and
Development ---- 3
Physical Fitness ...------------------ 0

27-33






56 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


ENGINEERING
BASIC CURRICULUM-FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS
Essential Preparation: Modem engineering education probably demands more in the
way of specific high school preparation than any other college program. It is abso-
lutely essential that the beginning engineering student have a good understanding of
the basic physical sciences, a highly developed ability in mathematics, and the compe-
tence to read rapidly and well. Many high school graduates who meet the minimum
admission requirements of the University of Florida could find themselves inadequately
prepared for the study of engineering. To avoid misunderstanding about what the
University of Florida means by adequate preparation, the following statements are made:
(1) The high school program should include the following subjects:
Essentials
English 4 years or 3 years of English and 2 years in
one foreign language
Elementary algebra 1 year
Intermediate and
advanced algebra 1 year
Plane geometry 1 year
Trigonometry /2 year
Chemistry 1 year
Physics 1 year
American History and
Social Studies 2 years
Desirable
Solid Geometry V2 year
Foreign language 2 years
Electives
Subjects which place emphasis on reading, mathematics and/or science.
(2) The quality of the high school record:
Mere completion of the subjects listed above is not enough. The student
entering engineering must have superior understanding in all these areas.
Such a level of comprehension could be indicated by grades of B or higher
for all of the work he has completed in high school.
(3) Standing on tests:
While the University of Florida will approve for admission a Florida high
school graduate with a C average for his high school work and a total score
of 300 or above on the Florida Twelfth Grade Tests and will admit graduates
of high schools in states other than Florida in the top 40 per cent of their
classes, an average of approximately B or higher and scores of at least 500 on
each of the Verbal and Mathematics portions of the Scholastic Aptitude Test
are minimum requirements; and a student who attempts the study of enginer-
ing with these minimums could find himself in a most difficult competitive
position. Therefore, it will be expected that the engineering student will
have a score of not less than 410 on the Florida Twelfth Grade Tests. The
chances for successful completion of the curriculum in engineering will be
measurably improved if the student achieves a score of 450 or better, or if he
is from some other state, scores exceeding 600 for each of the Verbal and
Mathematics portions of the Scholastic Aptitude Test.
The following program is for those students having the above qualifications. Students
who do not meet these qualifications should ask for a review of their high school
preparation with a qualified counselor. It may be necessary for them to take MS 205;
Engineering Graphics 183 and 184 instead of EGR 181; and the Chemistry Series
215, 219, and 220 in lieu of CY 217 and CY 218.







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 57


PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM


Trimesters


First
CSS 111 American Institutions --
CEH 131 Comprehensive English -
MS 206 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus ------ ---
EGR 181 Engineering Graphics --
EGR 180 Engineering Concepts and
Studies ---.----
MY 101 Military Science ----_--. ..
PL 101 Physical Fitness ---------


Third
112 American Institutions --
354 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus ------- ..-- --
218 General Chemistry ...---
206 General Physics ---------
208 Physics Laboratory ------
201 Military Science ..-...--..
Physical Fitness ---


Fifth*
CHN 252 The Humanities _
EM 366 Dynamics -..-......-
IG 350 Digital Computer
Programming _..-----_..
Departmental Courses -.. ---


Second
CEH 132 Comprehensive English
MS 353 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus -----------
PS 205 General Physics --.-----
PS 207 Physics Laboratory --.---
CY 217 General Chemistry --..-
MY 102 Military Science .--..----
PL 102 Physical Fitness --------

Fourth
CHN 251 The Humanities .------
PS 303 General and Modem
Physics -...--------------.....
Mathematics or Statistics Elective _
EM 365 Statics --------
MY 202 Military Science ..------
PL 104 Physical Fitness --------
Departmental Course -----


4
..... 4
.. 3

1
8-10

16-18


*The fifth trimester is shown for each department in the Engineering portion of this
catalog.
The mathematics or statistics elective should be selected in consultation with the
faculty advisor of the major degree granting department. The usual courses prescribed
are MS 521 or STA 440, although others may be approved upon request.
Students who plan to enter Chemical Engineering will take CG 341 in place of
EM 365 in the 4th trimester, and EM 365 in place of EM 366 in the 5th trimester.
Students in the Professional Practice Option in Civil Engineering will take GY 210
in place of PS 303. Students in the Professional Practice Option in Mechanical
Engineering will take ML 377 in place of PS 303 in the 4th trimester and advance
the Humanities courses in place of CY 218 in the third trimester.
Department Course in
4th Trimester
Aerospace Engineering -...---... .___...--------. .-- -.. AN 391
Agricultural Engineering --..- -- ..... ..CL 226
Chemical Engineering -------------... EL 311
Civil Engineering -.. ....----------------------- CL 226
Civil Engineering (Professional Practice Option) C---- L 226
Electrical Engineering ..... --------... --- .EL 311
Engineering Sciences _---------------- EL 311
Industrial Engineering .. .... ...-----------. ---- ---IG 311
Mechanical Engineering ----------CG 361
Mechanical Engineering (Professional Practice Option) .....-- ML 383
Metallurgical Engineering ----------EL 311
A student who has completed 64 trimester hours of acceptable course work, including
CSS 111, CSS 112, CEH 131, CEH 132, CHN 251, and CHN 252 is eligible to
apply for Admission to the College of Engineering.







58 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


FORESTRY


The University College student who
elect one of the following programs.*
A. FORESTRY OR WILDLIFE
First Trimester Credits
CSS 111 American Institutions 3
CEH 131Comprehensive English 3
FY 220 Introduction to Forestry 2
FY 222 Forest Drawing -------- 1
**MS 205 Basic Math. -- 3
CET 141 Effective Thinking 2--- 2
Military Science 1
Physical Fitness -0


Third Trimester
CHN 251 Humanities -
CY 219 Chemistry --
BTY 180 Intro. Botany -.-
ES 201 Basic Economics
Military Science ------
Physical Fitness --------


Credits
4
4
S4
3
1
0

16


plans to earn a degree in Forestry should


Second Trimester
CSS 112 American Institutions
CEH 132 Comprehensive English
MS 206 Anal. Geometry and
Calculus I --------
**CY 215 Intro. Chemistry ------
Military Science ---------.------...
Physical Fitness


Fourth Trimester
CHN 252 Humanities -
CY 220 Chemistery or
BTY 320 Bio-Chemistry
ES 202 Economics or
AS 201 Agri. Economics
ZY 181 General Zoology ---
FY 226 Dendrology --
Military Science -----------------
Physical Fitness


B. FOREST PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY


First Trimester Credits
CSS 111 American Institutions 3
CEII 131Comprehensive English_ 3
FY 220 Introduction to Forestry 2
CY 217 General Chemistry ----- 4
CET 141 Effective Thinking ---- 2
Military Science 1
Physical Fitness -- 0

15


Third Trimester
CHN 251 Humanities
BTY 180 Intro. Botany -
MS 206 Anal. Geometry and
Calculus I ------
ES 201 Basic Economics ..--
Military Science ---
Physical Fitness --------


Credits
4
4

5
3-
1
0

17


Second Trimester Credits
CSS 112 American Institutions 3
CEH 132 Comprehensive English. 3
**MS 205 Basic Math. ... 3
CY 218 General Chemistry ---- 4
Electives 2
Military Science 1
Physical Fitness --------- 0

16
Fourth Trimester Credits
CHN 252 Humanities -- 4
FY 226 Dendrology -- 2
EGR 181 Engineering Graphics -- 4
MS 353 Anal. Geometry and
Calculus II -------- 5
Military Science 1
Physical Fitness --------- 0

16


*Students planning to major in Forestry should contact the Director of the School of
Forestry at the earliest possible date for assignment to a counselor.
**Students with adequate preparation in mathematics and/or chemistry may, upon
approval of the counselor, omit these courses and substitute additional work in
these or other fundamental fields.


Credits
3
3

5
3
1
0

15

Credits
4

4

3
4
2
1
0

18







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 59


HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS
The University College student who plans to earn a degree in the College of
Health Related Professions elects one of the following programs:
A-For the degree in Medical Technology-
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American CHN 251-252 The Humanities 8
Institutions ------ 6 ****BTY 180 Introductory Botany 4
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive ZY 181 General Zoology 4
English --------- 6 CY 220 General Chemistry
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking 4 and Qualitative
*CMS 171 Fundamental Analysis --------- 4
Mathematics -..- ----- 3 CY 362-363 Organic
**CY 215 Introductory Chemistry ---- 5
Chemistry -------- 3 IIRP 201 Introduction to
CY 219 General Chemistry and Health Related
Qualitative Analysis ------- 4 Professions --- 2
Military Science and/or Electives 6 PS 109-110 Elements of
Physical Fitness .--------- 0 Physics ---------. 4
Military Science and/or Electives 3
32 Physical Fitness ------- 0


B.-For the degree in Occupational Therapy-
Freshman Year Credits So
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6 *
CPS 121 The Physical Sciences -. 3
PS 109 Elements of Physics --.- 3 C
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive 2
English 6 C
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking 4 P
HRP 201 Introduction to Health P
Related Professions ...------- 2
IN 102 Elementary Woodwork 3 A
Approved Electives -- 5 I
Physical Fitness -- 0 A
PI
32

C.-For the degree in Physical Therapy-
Freshman Year Credits So
CSS 111-112 American
Institutions --- 6
CEII 131-132 Comprehensive
English ------- 6
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking 4
*CMS 171 Fundamental
Mathematics 3
**CY 215 Introductory Chemistry 3
CY 219 General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis .---- 4
Military Science and/or Electives -.. 6
Physical Fitness .---------- 0


phomore Year
'MNS 171 Fundamental
Mathematics
:HN 251-252 The Humanities --
Y 181 General Zoology ---.--
BBS 262 Biological Sciences --
'SY 201 General Psychology ---
'SY 202 Personality
Development ---
,R'I 210 Studio for Non-Majors
N 330 Elementary Handcrafts
approved Electives
ivsical Fitness ----



'phomore Year
CHN 251-252 The Humanitite,
BTY 180 Introductory Botany
ZY 181 General Zoology --
CY 220 General Chemistry
and Qualitative Analysis.
PSY 201 General Psychology-
PSY 202 Personality
Development -----.
HRP 201 Introduction to


Health Related
Professions ----
*PS 109-110 Elements of


Credits

3
8
4
3
3

3
2
3
3
0

32

Credits
s 8
4
4

_ 4
3

3


- Physics --------
32 Military Science and/or Electives
Physical Fitness


Students planning to major in one of the curricula offered in the College of Health
Related Professions should contact the Chairman of the curriculum they expect to
enter, at the earliest possible date by letter and/or personal interview.
*Students who qualify may take an advanced mathematics course instead of
CMS 171. Consult University College counselor.





I ________ ____ _







60 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


**If required; otherwise CY 217-218 is taken in Freshman Year, and 4 additional
elective credits are taken in Sophomore Year.
***Eligible students should take PS 201-203 and PS 202-204. Consult University
College counselor.
****ZY 308, 309, or 310 may be substituted for BTY 180.
JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
The program for students expecting to enter the School of Journalism and Com-
munications is as follows:
GROUP A
First through fourth trimesters Credits
CSS 111 American Institutions .. ------------------- 3
CSS 112 American Institutions _. -------------- 3
CEH 131 Comprehensive English --.-_ ----- .- ---- 3
CEH 132 Comprehensive English ----------- 3
CHN 251 Humanities -------...----------------- 4
CHN 252 Humanities --------------------- 4
GROUP B
CPS 121 Physical Sciences ----------- 3
CPS 122 Physical Sciences -
CET 141 Effective Thinking ..-------------------------.---- 2
CET 142 Effective Thinking ...........------------- ------.- 2
CMS 171 Fundamental Mathematics ----------- 3
CBS 261 Biological Sciences .-...--.... ....... .....------------- ------- -- 3
CBS 262 Biological Sciences .--...................................-----...- 3
All students must complete all of Group A; they must complete any 6 of the 7
subjects in Group B. Students also must complete the following courses
(M 118 Survey of Communications --._---_--.. -- ---....------.----. 3
JM 201 Writing for Mass Communications -------- 3
SCH 201 Effective Speaking 3-----------
ES 201 Basic Economics .........----------------- ....-... 3
LY 201 Use of Books and Libraries .1-_......------------ .....-...------ 1
Military Science and electives -. ..................------------ -- 14-15
64
LAW
The College of Law offers a program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws.
Admission is limited to those with a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or
university who have satisfactory undergraduate records and have attained a satisfactory
score on the Law School Admission Test. For detailed information on admission require-
ments, course and programs, see the College of Law Catalog.
MEDICINE
The College of Medicine, a unit of the University of Florida's I. Hillis Miller
Health Center, is located on the main campus of the University in Gainesville. Other
units of the Health Center are the College of Nursing, Pharmacy, Health Related
Professions and the Teaching Hospital and Clinics.
Educationally the program of the College of Medicine is designed to provide the
very finest education possible in the scientific aspects of medicine. The proximity of the
College to the University proper also offers an unusual opportunity for many of the
varied resources of the University to be applied not only to the training of physicians
but to the training of basic medical scientists as well. While modern practice in patient
care is the central theme of the educational program, considerable stress is placed on
research and teaching in all fields related to health.
Design of the Health Center's educational program and physical plant is such that
students in the College of Medicine join students of the other health professions,
utilizing cooperatively the many resources and facilities of the Health Center and a great
University, in order that they might work better together later in their professional
careers.
For information on admission requirements and courses for the program leading to
the degree of Doctor of Medicine, see the Bulletin of the College of Medicine. For
information on graduate programs in medical sciences leading to the degree of Doctor
of Philosophy, see the Graduate School Catalog.







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 61


NURSING


Freshman Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive
English ....-.--- 6---_. 6
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking __ 4
CMS 171 Fundamental
Mathematics ......--- __3........ 3
NSG 101* Introduction to Nursing 3
NSG 111* Introduction to Nursing
Functions ......-----.. ---...... 3
Physical Education--------------- 0


Sophomore Year Credits
CHN251-252 The Humanities ---- 8
CPS 121-122 The Physical
Sciences ........ -----.......... ._ 6
NSG 220-221** Nursing Skills
Laboratory -----..._ 4
BCY 300 Bacteria in Everyday
Life --------- -----.-................. 3
FT 250 Fundamentals of Human
Nutrition ----- 2
EDF 345 Human Growth and
Development ---- 3
Electives --------_____. --.... ............ __ 6-7
Physical Education ___----.......- 0


32-33
*Half of the class will take NSG 101 1st trimester and NSG 111 2nd trimester.
The other half will take NSG 111 1st trimester and NSG 101 2nd trimester.
**In order to safeguard patient care and student learning within the Teaching Hos-
ital, enrollment in Nursing 220 is limited to the 60 students who have achieved the
highest overall grade point averages. An overall grade point average of at least "C" is
required for applying for admission to Nursing 220 and a grade of "C" in Nursing 220
is required for admission to Nursing 221. All students need to make application for
admission to the Nursing 220 course through the Office of the Dean of the College of
Nursing. The Committee on Admissions to the course makes the selection of students
in May and August. Transfer students are cautioned not to make application to nursing
courses until they have been notified by the Registrar of their admission to the Uni-
versity. Students who have transferable credit for the Nursing Skills Laboratory courses
will need to make application for nursing courses numbered 300 and above. Admission
to the College of Nursing does not insure registration for nursing courses until the
student has been notified by the Committee on Admission of her acceptance to such
courses.

PHARMACY
The program of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
is divided into two parts-two years of pre-pharmacy in the University College and
three years in the College of Pharmacy.
In keeping with the accreditation requirements of the American Council on
Pharmaceutical Education, all students must be enrolled in one or more pharmacy
courses for a minimum of six trimesters, regardless of the number of studies completed
in other fields. Upon enrolling in pharmacy courses for the first time students must
sign the register in the office of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy.
The program for the first two years is as follows:
CSS 111-112 American Institutions ....------...-------...-...-----. 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive English --..-.........------- ... .-. 6
MS 109 Elements of Mathematics ..........----------------..... 3
MS 205 Basic Mathematics ----_ ----------_.. 3
CY 215-219-220 or General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis (See
CY 217-218 department requirement) -------- 11 or 8
CHN 251-252 The Humanities .------------------- ... .....----- 8
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences -------.. 6
PS 201-202 General Physics --....._-----------...--.- ------- ... 6
PS 203-204 Physics Laboratory ----..--..- --------....-............. 2
CY 301-303 Organic Chemistry* -..-......... ............... 4
Military Science; Physical Fitness ..----_ --._ --_.- ---------------.....-........ 4
Electives** --------------- --..-.----------.......-----.. 5 or 8

Total Credits 64
*The second half (CY 302-304) is scheduled in the upper division.
**Elective courses must have the approval of the College of Pharmacy's counselor
who is on duty at the University College during registration periods.







62 UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


Only students having an average of C or higher will be admitted to the College of
Pharmacy and/or pharmacy courses.
As of September, 1966, the professional sequence of courses will be on an annual
basis only beginning in September each year. Students transferring to pharmacy and
planning to enter at times other than September should contact the Admissions Com-
mittee, College of Pharmacy, I. Hillis Miller Health Center, for a program of study.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH
University College students expecting to earn a degree in the College of Physical
Education and Health should pursue one of the following programs.
A. For Men intending to major in Physical Education
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6 CHN 251-252 Humanities -- 8
CPS 121 Physical Sciences 3 CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences 6
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive CMS 171 Fundamental
English 6 Mathematics ----- 3
CET 141 Effective Thinking .--- 2 CET 142 or CPS 122 --- 2-3
PHA 261 Personal Hygiene ..------ 3 PHA 283 Track and Baseball -..-- 2
PHA 284 Team Games _-- 2 PHA 286 Aquatics ---- 2
PHA 285 Individual & Dual Sports 2 EDF 345 Human Growth &
PHA 287 Gymnastics for Men ----- 2 Development ---- 3
Military Science 2 EDF 320 Social Foundations of
Second Teaching Field Electives --. 4 Education ----- ------------ 3
PL 101-102 Physical Fitness ----- 0 Military Science ---- 2
Second Teaching Field Electives -- 1-0
32 PL 103-104 Physical Fitness -- 0


B. For Women intending to major in Physical Education


Freshman Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6
CPS 121 Physical Sciences -------- 3
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive
English ----- 6
CET 141 Effective Thinking --..- 2
PHA 251 Square and Social Dance 2
PHA 253 Team Sports for Women 2
PHA 254 Team Sports for Women 2
PHA 257 Gymnastics for Women 1
PHA 261 Personal Hygiene -------- 3
Second Teaching Field Electives -- 5
PL 151-152 Physical Education
for Women -- 0

32


Sophomore Year C
CHN 251-252 Humanities --------
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences
CMS 171 Fundamental
Mathematics ----
CET 142 or CPS 122
PHA 252 Modern Dance --
PHA 255 Recreational Sports --
PHA 305 Team Sports for Women
PHA 307 Teaching Folk, Social &
Tap Dancing
PHA 308 Teaching Modern Dance
EDF 345 Human Growth &
Development ----
Second Teaching Field Electives --
PL 151-152 Physical Education
for Women --


C. For Men and Women intending to major in IHealth Education
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6 CHN 251-252 Humanities -..
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive *CY 109-110 Elements of
English ------6 Chemistry ---
CET 141-142 Effective Thinking- 4 ZY 181 General Zoology -
CMS 171 Fundamental BTY 180 Introductory Botany
Mathematics ------ 3 EDF 320 Social Foundations ot
EDF 345 Human Growth & Education --------
Development --- 3 PHA 262 Community Hygiene
PHA 261 Personal Hygiene ----- 3 Military Science or Elective .---..
Military Science or Elective -------- 2 Approved Electives ------.
Approved Electives 5 Physical Fitness ----
Physical Fitness 0-------


C


redits
8
6

3
2-3
1
2
2
2
2
3
1-0

0

32

creditss
8

6
4
4
3
3
2
2
0

32







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 63

*Students planning to major in Health Education must take CY 109-110. Students
whose high school records and placement tests indicate satisfactory preparation may
substitute CY 109-110 for CPS 121-122. Others should take CPS 121, upon satis-
factory completion of which they may enter CY 109.
D. For Men and Women intending to major in Recreation


Freshman Year Credits
CSS 111-112 American Institutions 6
CPS 121 Physical Sciences -----.-- 3
CEH 131-132 Comprehensive
English _------ ___-- 6
CET 141 Effective Thinking --.... 2
PHA 284 Team Games for Men,
or PHA 253, Team Sports
Women -..-- 2
PHA 255 Recreation Sports -......- 2
Military Science or Elective --....- 2
Approved Electives ------ 9
Physical Fitness ..---------------- 0


Sophomore Year Credits
CHN 251-252 Humanities -.....-- 8
CBS 261-262 Biological Sciences_ 6
CMS 171 Fundamental
Mathematics ..---- 3
CET 142 or CPS 122 -- .. 2-3
PHA 251 Square and Social Dance 2
SY 201 Sociological Foundations
of Modern Life ----- 3
EDF 345 Human Growth &
Development -------- 3
PHA 283 Track & Baseball (Men)
or Electives (Women) ------ 2
Military Science or Electives ------- 2
Electives ------ ---- 1-0







64 AGRICULTURE


The Upper Division


College of Agriculture

The aim of the College of Agriculture is to provide students with the best training
possible for service in Agricultural business, technology, and science.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Edu-
cation and Extension (administered jointly with the College of Education), Agricultural
Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Science, Bacteriology, Botany, Dairy Science, Ento-
mology, Food Technology and Nutrition, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture, Plant
Pathology, Poultry Science, Soils, Statistics, Vegetable Crops, and Veterinary Science.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
To enter the College of Agriculture students are required to present a certificate
of graduation from the University College, or its equivalent in credits from other
institutions. Students should have completed the course indicated in the program for
freshman and sophomore years in the University College. Curricula of the various
departments of the College of Agriculture should be referred to for some special
requirements.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
BASIC CURRICULUM
In addition to the basic curriculum of 64 credits required in the University College
for entrance to the College of Agriculture, 68 credits must be earned in the College of
Agriculture curriculum for a combined total of 132 credits required for the Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture degree. A minimum of 15 and a maximum of 26 credits of courses
in the student's major department shall be permitted for this degree. The following
curriculum common to all areas of Agriculture designates specific requirements and
electives for the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
CURRICULUM-COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE-68 CREDITS
CORE REQUIREMENTS-14 CREDITS
AREAS OF STUDY COURSES CREDITS
Communications and/or Social Sciences ....6.---------------------- ------- -------- 6
Electives-SCH 201, EH 255, IM 420, EDX 301, SY 201,
PSY 203, ES 201, Mod. Lang. or equivalent
Physics -- 4------------------------------ -
Electives-PS 109-110, or 201-203, or equivalent
Chemistry* ---------- --------------------------------- 4
Electives-CY 220, BTY 320, or equivalent
OTHER REQUIREMENTS AND ELECTIVES-54 CREDITS
Requirements and Electives in Student Major Department --... ..-----.min. 15-max. 26
Requirements or Electives selected from at least five
Agricultural departments other than student's major _........----- -- -- 15
Free and Approved electives ...---------.--------------- ----- 13-24
Total 68 credits


*Substitutions for chemistry may be from the Biological, Physical and Social Sciences
or Mathematics areas for students majoring in Agricultural Economics (AS), Me-
chanized Agricultural (AG), or Agricultural Business Specialization. Students who
have previously completed the minimum requirements listed for a specific area of the
curriculum core may make appropriate substitutions within the areas or they may
substitute other electives approved by their counselors.







AGRICULTURE 65


AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION
Students in Agriculture may specialize in one of three broad areas of knowledge-
Agriculture Science, Agricultural Technology, and Agricultural Business, all within the
framework of 132 credits required for the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
For a specialization in Agricultural Science at least 12 credits of the 132 total are
required in one or more of the areas of the Physical (CY, GY, PS) and Biological
Sciences (BCY, BTY, EY, PT, AY 329) and Mathematics (MS); in addition to those
required in the University College and those in the Agricultural College curriculum
core.
For a program in Agricultural Technology a choice of courses in applied Agri-
culture is planned by the separate departments of the College of Agriculture in areas
of the student's special interest.
For Agricultural Business Specialization at least 15 credits of the 132 total required
must be completed from the areas of Agricultural Economics (AS) and Business Admin-
istration (ATG, ES, FI, MGT, MKG), in addition to those required in the University
College and those in the Agricultural College curriculum core, plus a departmental
major.
The head of the department in which the student majors (or his appointee) will
act as the student's advisor, assist the student in arranging his course of study, and
make necessary recommendations to the Dean. The student's courses for each trimester
are subject to the approval of the Dean and the department head.
It is required that all students graduating in Agriculture take at least 15 credits in
five Agricultural departments other than student's major.
The Department of Veterinary Science offers service courses, but no curriculum
leading to the D.V.M. or baccalaureate degree. Students interested in a degree in this
field should consult with the Dean regarding courses which are acceptable substitutes
for requirements in certain schools of veterinary medicine.
CREDIT FOR PRACTICAL WORK
By previous arrangement with the head of the department and the Dean, students
may, during their course of study, do practical work under competent supervision in
any recognized Agricultural or related pursuit, and upon returning to the College and
rendering a satisfactory written report showing faithful service, will be entitled to one
credit for each month of such work. Such credits may not total more than three.
Practical work is especially important for students who have no farm experience. Even
though they cannot procure employment under such competent supervision as will give
college credit, they should secure work along the line in which they are majoring. Faculty
members will assist as much as possible in securing such vacation employment.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
Students completing the requirements for the B.S. degree in Agriculture are eligible
to be considered for graduation with Honors or High Honors.
To graduate with Honors a student must have completed at least 30 hours in the
College of Agriculture with a grade point average of 3.3 or above and be recommended
by the head of the department in which he is majoring and by the Awards and Honors
Committee of the College of Agriculture.
To graduate with High Honors the same requirements apply as for Honors except
that the grade point average must be 3.6 or above.
GRADUATE TRAINING IN AGRICULTURE
The College of Agriculture offers five advanced degrees: Master of Agriculture and
Master of Statistics (Non-theses), Master of Science in Agriculture, Master of Science,
and Doctor of Philosophy.
Students contemplating graduate study should consult with their counselor as early
as possible to insure proper program planning.
Admission to graduate study is normally limited to those students who have main-
tained at least a 2.75 grade point average in their Upper Division work and 3.0 in their
major subject. For majors in General Agriculture, the minimum is 2.85. For majors in
Statistics, the minimum is 3.0. Also, a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Exam-
ination is required.
PROGRAM IN TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
A curriculum has been developed in the College of Agriculture which offers the
student an opportunity to major in Tropical Agriculture. The curriculum gives training







66 AGRICULTURE


in the important phases of Agriculture as encountered in tropical areas of the world.
The student may orient his program toward Animal Science, Plant Science, Farm
Management and Agricultural Marketing, or General Agriculture.
CURRICULA
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
Four curricula are offered by the Department of Agricultural Economics. The
curriculum selected by the student will depend upon the nature of his interest in the
field. Students should consult the head of the department or the departmental coun-
selor for guidance in making their choice of a curriculum and for approval of electives.
CURRICULUM I-AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for those students interested primarily in training as
professional agricultural economists or in preparing for graduate study.
Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits
ES 201 Basic Economics* .. ...---------------- 3
ES 407 Economics Principles and Problems* ---------------------- ----- 3
Other Core Requirements .....-----------.-------- 8
Departmental Requirements- Other Requirements and Electives-
18 Credits** 36 Credits
AS 306 Farm Management ----. 3 STA 320 Introduction to
AS 308 Marketing ------ 3 Statistics 3
AS 405 Agricultural Prices ..---- 3 Free and Approved
AS 412 Land Economics or Electives** ----- 33
AS 413 Agricultural Policy -------- 3
Electives in Agricultural
Economics ------ 6
*ES 201 and ES 407 are substituted for the 4 hour chemistry requirement in the
core curriculum of the College of Agriculture.
**AS 201, Principles of Agricultural Economics, required during second year.
***The following are suggested electives: EH 356, ES 325, ES 208, ES 409, MS 207,
MS 353, FI 326, SY 201, PSY 201. A total of 15 credit hours in agriculture are
required outside the Department of Agriculture Economics.
CURRICULUM II-AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for those students interested in administrative and
service aspects of agriculture or related businesses.
Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits
(Same as for Curriculum I-Agricultural Economics)
Departmental Requirements- Other Requirements and Electives-
12 Credits* 42 Credits
AS 306 Farm Management .--- 3 STA 320 Introduction to
AS 308 Marketing .--. --- 3 Statistics ----- 3
AS 405 Agricultural Prices .----- 3 AS 303 Farm Records (or
AS 409 Cooperative Marketing or Equivalent) --.----- 3
AS 413 Agricultural Policy ----.... 3 ES 325 Public Financial Policy __ 3
Free and Approved
Electives** -- 33
*AS 201, Principles of Agricultural Economics, required during second year.
**The following are suggested electives: AS 311, MGT 401, FI 326, MGT 371,
MGT 373, SY 201, PSY 201, MKG 341. A total of 15 credit hours in agriculture
are required outside the Department of Agricultural Economics.
CURRICULUM III-COMAIOR WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Students majoring in other departments who feel the need for a better under-
standing of the economics of agriculture and the relationship of agriculture to the
general economy can also take a Co-Major in Agricultural Economics. The curriculum
for such Co-Majors includes 9 semester hours of required courses in Agricultural
Economics, 3 elective hours in Agricultural Economics, and 36 hours to meet the re-
quirements of other participating departments and for electives. Elective courses will
be selected to fit the needs and interests of the student.







AGRICULTURE 67


Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits


Departmental Requirements-
12 Credits*
306 Farm Management ...-
308 Marketing --
405 Agricultural Prices --
Electives in Agricultural
Economics .-


Other Requirements and Electives-
42 Credits
STA 320 Introduction to
Statistics** -------- 3
ES 201 Basic Economics* -...- 3
Free and Approved
Electives*** _------ 36


*AS 201, Principles of Agricultural Economics, required during second year.
**ES 201 and STA 320 can be elected by the student to meet the 4 hour chemistry
requirement in the curriculum core requirements of the College of Agriculture.
***Students taking a Co-Major in Agricultural Economics and graduating in some
other college will not be required to meet the curriculum core requirements of the
College of Agriculture nor will they be required to take 15 credit hours in other
departments of the College of Agriculture which is required for students graduating
in the College of Agriculture.
CURRICULUM IV-RURAL SOCIOLOGY
This curriculum is designed to train rural sociologists for teaching, research, and
as consultants because of rapid social and economic changes on the national and inter-
national levels.
Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits
(Same as for Curriculum I-Agricultural Economics)


Departmental Requirements-
12 Credits*
306 Farm Management --
308 Marketing
412 Land Economics ----..----
413 Agricultural Policy


Other Requirements and Electives-
42 Credits**
STA 320 Introduction to
Statistics --- 3
SY 321 Rural Sociology -....- 3
SY 547 Social Research and
Investigation 3
SY 550 Population and Public
Affairs 3
SY 551 Comparative Sociology -- 5
Free and Approved
Electives*** -- 27


*AS 201, Principles of Agricultural Economics, required during second year.
**SY 201, Sociology Foundations of Modern Life, required during second year.
***A total of 15 credit hours in agriculture are required outside the Department of
Agricultural Economics. All elective courses must have the approval of the Dean
of the College of Agriculture. Several suggested electives, outside of majors, are:
EDX 301, EDX 407, EDX 421.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND EXTENSION

The curriculum in Agricultural Education and Extension is designed to offer the
student a combination of technical Agriculture courses and professional education and
extension courses. Students majoring in this department must take a core of professional
courses in addition to the agriculture core curriculum and also fulfill certain agricultural
and technological specialization requirements. Each student will be counseled to be sure
the courses in his program meet the requirements for future employment and advanced
study in Agricultural Education, Agricultural Extension or a combination of both.
Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits
SCII 201 Effective Speaking or equivalent .... ------- 3
PS 109-110 Elements of Physics or equivalent 4
BTY 320 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry or equivalent 4
Substitutions permitted* ........ ------------ 3
*See Head of Department for appropriate courses.







68 AGRICULTURE


Professional Courses*
EDS 400 The Secondary
School Today ---..
EDX 301 Agricultural
Leadership --
EDV 303 General Methods
in Agriculture ..-....
EDV 306 Vocational Education
EDX 407 Agricultural Youth
Programs ----
**EDV 411 Adult Education
in Agriculture __----
**EDV 412 Course Organization
in Vocational
Agriculture ----.....----
***EDV 409 Internship: Course
Materials & Methods
in Vocational
Agriculture ------...
***EDV 410 Internship: Teaching
Vocational
Agriculture in the
Secondary Schools ..-
EDX 430 Individual Work in
Agricultural
Education and
Extension --- ---


Agricultural Science
AS 306 Farm Management .-
SLS 310 Soils .- ---
***AG 407 Agricultural
Mechanics 2 ....--------
Electives in
Agriculture --


*Students electing an option in Agricultural Extension only will take EDX 301, 407,
and 430.
**EDV 411 and 412 must be registered for concurrently during Fall Trimester of
Senior Year.
***EDV 409, 410 and AG 407 must be registered for concurrently during Winter
Trimester of Senior Year. These are the only courses that can be taken during this
trimester.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering
The curriculum in agricultural engineering is offered cooperatively by the College
of Agriculture and the College of Engineering. This program gives students basic
training in engineering with additional courses in agriculture, agricultural engineering,
and other fields as preparation for careers involving the application of engineering
science in agriculture. Students wishing to take this curriculum will register in the
College of Engineering. See College of Engineering for curriculum.

AGRONOMY
(See Plant Science)

ANIMAL SCIENCE

Curricula in Animal Science meet the educational requirements for those interested
in options in Animal Science, Dairy Science-Production, Poultry Science and Labora-
tory Animal Science. The curricula are designed to give students a foundation in the
basic sciences while permitting them to select an option of concentrated study in one
of these four areas. The curriculum in Animal Science gives fundamental training in the
various phases of the production of beef cattle, dairy cattle, poultry, turkeys, swine,
horses and sheep. Consideration is given to the packing house industry and the grading
and marketing of meat and poultry products. Training is also given for those con-
templating going into the feed industry. The Laboratory Animal Science curriculum is
designed to train students for jobs managing small animal colonies in medical, pharma-
ceutical, feed industry, and other laboratories. Early in their college careers, students
should contact the Head of the Department of his preferred option for advice on the
curriculum available.







AGRICULTURE 69


College of Agriculture Core Requirements ..---__.._ .. ...... 14 credits
Animal Science Core Requirements
ADP 211 Introduction to Animal Science -. .... ..... 4
ADP 322 Animal Breeding .-.. _........ ... ___---... 3
ADP 312 Feeds and Feeding -------_ -----_____-- -__ --... --- 4
ADP 421 Seminar ----......- __------....... ... ....... 1
VY 301 Anatomy and Physiology -_--___--... ____--...-. 4
AY 329 Genetics _---------_...... ------_-----.-.----- 3
BCY 305-307 Basic Introductory Bacteriology ------ -----_..-.--- 4
AS 303 or 306 Farm Records or Farm Management -- .. 3
26
Requirements for options in Animal Science ....-- ...............------- 9
Free and approved electives .. -_--- -------_ 19
The student will, with the advice of the subject matter Department Head or
Advisor, select a minimum of 9 credits of courses in his special field of interest. These,
along with approved electives in supporting work, will constitute a departmental option.
Animal Science
Students selecting the Animal Science option are required to take AL 411, AL 413,
AL 415 and AL 423.
Dairy Science-Production
Students selecting the Dairy Science option are required to take DY 311, DY 522
and either DY 410 or DY 416.
Laboratory Animal Science
Students selecting the Laboratory Animal Science option are required to take
AL 431, AL 533 and VY 548.
Poultry Science
Students selecting the Poultry Science option are required to take 9 hours from the
following courses: PY 312, PY 317, PY 415, ADP 420 and PY 514.
Furthermore, it is the prerogative of the student to select additional courses which
will satisfy a specialization in Science, Technology or Business in his field of major
interest.
BACTERIOLOGY
The curriculum in bacteriology is designed to give students fundamental training
in the field of microbiology, particularly emphasizing the bacteria, but including the
viruses, rickettsiae, yeasts, and molds. It provides basic grounding for those wishing to
pursue graduate work. The departmental major may lead to a degree in either the Col-
lege of Agriculture or the College of Arts and Sciences. In Agriculture, the major in
Bacteriology will meet the College requirements for specialization in Agricultural Science.
All interested students should consult a departmental advisor about specific courses
as early in the freshman or sophomore year as possible. The following prerequisites to
upper division courses should be completed prior to entering the upper division: CY
218 or equivalent, CY 301, MS 205, and 1 semester of a foreign language. These
courses may be taken in place of CET 142 and the approved electives listed in the
lower division agriculture curriculum; equivalent elective credits will be available in the
upper division curriculum (see below).
For a major in Bacteriology, in either Arts and Sciences or in the Agricultural
Science Specialization, the following minimum program is offered:







70 AGRICULTURE


Requirements in Arts and Sciences or Agricultural Core


Arts and Sciences required courses
Agricultural Core required courses .
Departmental Requirements
305 Basic Introductory
Bacteriology ----- 3
306 Basic Bacteriology
Laboratory ----_ --- 2
509 Bacterial Pathogens
and Basic Immunology -- 6
513 Microbial Physiology ---- 4


------ 28 credits
------ ------ 14 credits
Other Requirements and Electives
Required courses
Arts and Sciences majors --------- 8
Agriculture majors _----- 12
Free and approved electives
Arts and Sciences majors -_----.- 13
Agricultural majors ------- 27
21 or 39


BOTANY
The curriculum in botany is designed for students both in Agriculture and in Arts
and Sciences and leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in either College. It emphasizes
training in basic plant science which will prepare the student interested in advanced
work in botany and other biological sciences, as well as the student interested in the
applied or technical aspects of botany.
While in the University College or Junior College students who plan to major in
botany are advised to take BTY 180, ZY 181 or ZY 217, a year of chemistry and a
year of mathematics or their equivalents. Those students planning a degree in Arts
and Sciences should in addition begin a foreign language. All interested students should
consult with the department advisor about specific courses as early as possible in the
freshman or sophomore year.
For a major in Botany, in either Arts and Sciences or in the Agricultural Science
Specialization, the following minimum program is offered:
Requirements in Arts and Sciences or Agricultural Core


Arts and Sciences required courses
Agricultural Core required courses


S24 credits
S14 credits


Departmental Requirements
BTY 310 Elementary Plant
Physiology _
or
BTY 405 Experimental Botany __-
BTY 406 Descriptive Botany -------
BTY Electives in Botany ---------


Other Requirements and Electives
Required Courses
4 Arts and Sciences majors ----------
Agriculture majors -- 1:
4 Free and approved electives
4 Arts and Sciences majors .----- 1(
8 Agriculture majors _---- 21


DAIRY SCIENCE
(For Dairy Production See Animal Science)
(For Dairy Manufacturing See Food Science)

ENTOMOLOGY
Entomology is a biological science dealing with insect life. These animals impinge
upon all human activities. Students may receive training in the following: industrial
entomology; structural pest control; horticultural entomology; forest entomology; medi-
cal and public health entomology; veterinary entomology; and plant quarantine, inspec-
tion and control. The student may obtain proper departmental guidance as well as
copies of specialized curricula at the Department of Entomology.
Entomology-Science Curriculum
The science curriculum is designed to give the student broad basic training in the
biological sciences, and thereby prepare him for advanced degree studies, especially in
the academic phases of the science.


BCY

BCY
BCY
BCY







AGRICULTURE 71


Requirements in Agricultural College Curriculum Core-14 Credits
PS 109-110 Physics .. .-- ..-.... 4
FH 133 orGN 133 French or German ....-----------...._. ............. 3
CY 220 or BTY 320 Chemistry ---. ---... --._ _....-.............. .. 4
Communications or Social Sciences ___-----_..--- 3


Departmental Requirements-23 Credits
*EY 307 General Entomology --.._ 3
EY 311-312-313-314 Seminar ---- 2
EY 408 Insect Morphology and
Physiology ---- 4
EY 460 Insect Identification ...... 3
*EY 470 The Experimental
Methods --.----- .-- 2
Entomology Electives ------- 9


Other Requirements and Electives
31 Credits
Electives in Agriculture ----____...... 9
Electives in Biological Sciences .--- 9
Free and Approved Electives ----... 13


*It is recommended that this course be taken while the student is in the University
College.
Entomology-Business Curriculum*
The business curriculum has flexibility, thereby permitting students to train for
industrial entomology or structural pest control.
Requirements in Agricultural College Curriculum Core-14 Credits


Departmental Requirements-16
**EY 307 General Entomology
EY 311-312-313-314 Seminar -
EY 405 Insect Control --
EY 408 Insect Morphology and
Physiology ----
EY 460 Insect Identification -.-
Entomology Electives ----..--.-


Credits
3
2
3

4
S3
1


Other Requirements and Electives
38 Credits
AS 308 Marketing ---
AS 311 Rural Law
ATG 211-212 Elementary
Accounting -------
MGT 371 Principles of
Management --- --
AL 309 General Animal Science
SLS 310 Soils -
AY 321 Field Crop Science _---
Free Electives ----------- 1


*Students majoring in Structural Pest Control should make the following substitu-
tions: MGT 401 for AS 311; MKG 231 for AS 308; OH 420 for SLS 310; OH 362
for AL 309; and PLS 442 for AY 321.
**It is recommended that this course be taken while the student is in the University
College.
Entomology-Technical Curriculum
The technology curriculum in entomology is designed to give the student a strong
training in economic entomology together with the necessary basic training in related
aspects of agriculture.
Requirements in Agricultural College Curriculum Core-I14 Credits
Other requirements same as Entomology-Business Curriculum.
Departmental Requirements-21 Credits


*EY 307 General Entomology
EY 311-312-313-314 Seminar
EY 303 Introductory Economic
Nematology ---
EY 405 Insect Control ---.
EY 408 Insect Morphology and
Physiology --------
EY 432 Florida Fruit and
Vegetable Insects -
EY 460 Insect Identification _


33 Credits
Electives in Agriculture
Recommended Electives: AG 306, AL
309, AY 321, ADP 211, PLS 201, FC
335, PT 321, SLS 310, VY 401.


*It is recommended that this course be taken while the student is in the University
College.







72 AGRICULTURE


FOOD SCIENCE
The Food Science Curriculum is designed to give students training in the appli-
cation of the basic sciences to the handling, storage, processing, marketing and
utilization of foods. Opportunity is offered for electing courses which will strengthen
the students' training in special interests. Students may specialize in a Science,
Technology, or Business option. Early in their college careers, students should con-
sult with the Food Science counselors.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 14 Credits
(Food Science Majors take PS 201-203)
Food Science Core Requirements (Science Option*)
CY 301-302-303-304 Organic Chemistry _.--.--. --- ....- 8
BCY 305-307 Introductory Bacteriology --_ ------- ----- 4
MS 206 Analytical Geometry and Calculus ------------ 5
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics --.. ------.. ----------- 3
FS 401 Food Preservation ---.._-------------_---- 4
FS 402 Food Chemistry --..--.-.- 4
FS 412 Food Regulations ---...--...._ ...--. ------------ 3
FS 423 Food Microbiology __..._ ~__-----------------__._--- 3
FS 405 Systems for Processing Agricultural Products ------ 3
Electives -..... --_-... ..---...........- ........ ... ....----- ... .. 17
*For the Technology and Business options, counselors may recommend the substitu-
tion of CY 362-363 for CY 301-2-3- and 4 and MS 207 for MS 206.

FRUIT CROPS
(See Plant Science)

GENERAL AGRICULTURE
The curriculum in General Agriculture is designed to give broad basic training in
many fields of Agricultural Science, Technology, and Business. It also includes training
in methods of advancing better agricultural practices.
Students interested in the General Agriculture curriculum should consult the
Agronomy Department for assistance in program planning to include courses that
will satisfy the 14 credits required in the College of Agriculture Core, appropriate
electives, and the following courses.
Credits
AY 321 Field Crop Science ---.3-------------.....----------- ---------- ---.... 3
ADP 312 Feeds and Feeding ----------. ..-------- ...... --- 4
AG 306 Farm Machinery ------------------....-----------.... 3
AS 306 Farm Management -.-- --... .........-----------.. 3
EY 301 Economic Entomology ------------...--... ------------. 3
FY 413 Forestry for Agriculturists -....--3-----------.- -------- 3
PLS 201 Fundamentals of Crop Production --.....------___ .. ..__ 3
PT 321 Plant Pathology --------......--------------.. ---. ---------- 3
SLS 310 Soils --------------------------------.----------.-- 4
VY 401 Farm Sanitation and Disease Prevention _..------ 3
Electives -------------------..--- ... ------- .. 22

LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE
(See Animal Science)

MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE
The curriculum in mechanized agriculture provides major work in agriculture with
special attention being given to the function and management of machines, structures,
and mechanical operations and processes as used in modem agriculture. Students
electing this program are prepared for work involving sales, service, and management
as related to the mechanization of agricultural production. Students should confer
with counselors in the Department of Agricultural Engineering in their selection of
electives to assure that the total program best meets their educational objectives.







AGRICULTURE 73


For a major in mechanized agriculture the following program is offered.
Requirements in the College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits
(Mechanized Agriculture Majors take *PS 201-203)
Requirements in Mechanized Agriculture-1 7 Credits


MCA

MCA
MCA


301 Agricultural Water
Management ----- 3
303 Agricultural Mechanics I 3
306 Farm Machinery --..--.... 3


MCA 401 Farm Buildings .---.---
AG 403 Special Topics -------
MCA 405 Systems for Processing
Agricultural Products -..-.


Other Requirements and Electives-37 Credits
*MS 206 Analytic Geometry and *PS 202-204 General Physics .
Calculus I 5 AS 306 Farm Management .
EY 301 Economic Entomology -- 3 **Free and Approved Electives.
SLS 310 Soils .---..- ---------- 4


. 3
2

3


4
- 4
... 3
___ 18


*These courses should be taken as electives during the first two years.
**Approved electives, within the 132 credits required, include the following courses:
AL 309, MKG 341, MGT 371, MGT 401, FC 341, PLS 201 and others.

ORNAMENTAL AGRICULTURE
(See Plant Science)


PLANT PATHOLOGY

The curriculum in Plant Pathology is designed to permit students to learn the
principles of the Plant Pathology and their applications in agriculture.
1. For a major in Plant Pathology with specialization in Agricultural Science, the
following program is offered.


Requirements in the College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-
Departmental requirements --.......-- .. --------. ..----------.
PT 321 Basic Plant Pathology -----
PT 432 Applied Plant Pathology ---------------------
PT 434 Introductory Mycology -----------.---------
*Electives in Plant Pathology or related areas
Other requirements and electives -----------------
BCY 305-307 Basic Bacteriology ----------...._.......
BTY 310 Elementary Plant Physiology -------
EY 303 Introductory Economic Nematology --
EY 307 General Entomology --....-....-..----___- ----..
AY 329 Genetics --------
SLS 310 Soils ....----- ..... --------------
PLS 301 Plant Propagation ---------
*Electives -----------


Credits
...------ ..-- 14
-----------------------------. 18
3
3
4
---------- ------------- 4
--------------- 8
--------------- 36


3



3
.......------- 3

.. .. .. .. .. .. 3
--- -------------- 4
--------- --- 3
----- 12


*Students should elect courses agreed upon with faculty advisers.
2. For a major in Plant Pathology with specialization in Agricultural Technology,
the required courses are the same as those required for specialization in Agricultural
Science.

PLANT SCIENCE

(Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture, Vegetable Crops)

In addition to the departmental options in Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Ornamental
Horticulture and Vegetable Crops, a curriculum is available for students interested in
majoring in the broad area of Plant Science. The curriculum is designed to give an
adequate foundation in both the basic and applied plant sciences.
Students desiring to major in Plant Science must take the core requirements of
the College of Agriculture and Plant Science and a minimum of 15 hours of approved


.
.
..







74 AGRICULTURE


electives in the applied plant sciences. These electives should be selected
advice and approval of the Chairman of the Plant Science curriculum.


Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture -- .-
Core Requirements of Plant Science ------
EY 301 Economic Entomology ---------
PT 321 Plant Pathology -----------
SLS 310 Soils -------
AY 329 Genetics -------------------
BTY 310 Elementary Plant Physiology
BTY 320 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry
PLS 201 Beginning Plant Science --
PLS 301 Plant Propagation --------
Approved Electives: PLS, AY, FC, OH, VC -
Free Electives -------------


with the

Credits
S14
- 27
3
3
4
3
4
4
3
3
15


AGRONOMY
Plant Science students who select an option in Agronomy receive scientific and
technical training in field and forage crop production and utilization, genetics, and
plant breeding. Strong training is included in supporting areas of the basic sciences.
Each student interested in Agronomy should consult the Agronomy Department as
early as possible in his university career for assistance in program planning.
Credits
Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture and of Plant Science ..------. .. 41
Departmental Requirements ------------- 10
AY 321 Field Crop Science 3
AY 492 Agronomy Seminar 1
Electives in Agronomy 6
Other Requirements ------------------17
*PLS 452 Field Plot Techniques --------------- ------ 3
**STA 320 Introduction to Statistics ------- 3
Approved Electives --...------------------------------------------ 14
Science Specialization: BCH 402-404; BCY 305-307; BTY 405;
BTY 521; BTY 532; CY 302-304; CY 331; EII 356; MS 206;
MS 353; PS 202-204.
Technology Specialization: AY 436; ADP 312; AG 306; AS 306;
EY 303; SLS 406; PLS 442; VY 401.
Business Specialization: AS 303; AS 306; AS 308; AS 405; ATG
211; FI 326; MGT 371; MGT 401; MKG 341; PSY 201.
*Technology and Business Specializations
**Science Specialization
Each student has the prerogative of choosing approved electives from the re-
spective group of courses listed above to meet the requirements of a specialization in
Science, Technology, or Business in Agronomy.

FRUIT CROPS
Plant Science majors selecting an option in Fruit Crops receive a broad founda-
tion in the science and technology of fruit production, handling and marketing, with
emphasis on citrus and tropical fruits. Programs of study leading to specializations in
technology, science and business are available. It is important that students consult
with the departmental counselor as early in their university careers as possible.
Credits
Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture and of Plant Science..----.---- 14
Departmental Requirements .. .......... ... ------------- ----- 11
FC 335 Introduction to Citrus Culture ----... ------.. - -.... 2
FC 403 Physiology of Fruit Production -..-----------.-....... 3
FC 437 Citrus Maturity and Parkinghouse Procedure 3
FC 441 Citrus Production ..----..... -----..----------------- -. 3
Approved Electives -------- -----------------.-..--------.. 16


------------
..----------






AGRICULTURE 75


For the Agricultural Technology Specialization students must select appropriate
electives in technical agriculture and related courses to give them the proper back-
ground for careers in fruit production.
Those choosing the Agricultural Science Specialization will select electives in
mathematics, physics, chemistry and biology as a background for graduate work and
careers in research, teaching and extension.
For the Agricultural Business Specialization students will select approved electives
in the fields of business, economics and management.


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
Plant Science majors selecting an option in Ornamental Horticulture receive
scientific or technical training in the production of flower, foliage, nursery and turf
crops. Students should consult a departmental counselor as early in their university
career as possible.
Credits
Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture and of Plant Science ----------- 41
Departmental Requirements ..--------- ----- 13
OH 331 Plant Materials ..-- --------- -. 3
OH 362 Turf Management --------------- 3
OH 403 Seminar ----------------- 1
OH 441 Floriculture .......----...------ 3
OH 499 Special Problems ... ....-----------------.---.---- 3
Approved Electives .. .... ...------------------ ---------- -------- 14
Emphasis on science, technology or business training on the basis of student career
interest is possible by proper selection of electives under supervision of the depart-
mental counselor.

VEGETABLE CROPS
The option in Vegetable Crops is designed to give the student an adequate foun-
dation of basic plant science which, together with specific courses in the principles of
production and marketing of vegetables, will prepare them for primary employment in
any phase of the specialized vegetable industry.
Credits
Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture and of Plant Science --..--- 41
Departmental Requirements ....- --------------------------- 12
VC 405 Physiology of Herbaceous Crops ----------- 3
VC 411 Commercial Vegetable Crops .. --------- 3
VC 412 Commercial Vegetable Crops --..........---------------- 3
Electives in Vegetable Crops or Plant Science -- 3
Approved Electives ------------------------- ---- ------ 15
Sufficient elective hours enable students to study in agricultural science or busi-
ness specialization.

POULTRY SCIENCE
(See Animal Science)


SOILS

The Department of Soils offers two curricula, each of which is designed to meet
the specific needs of the individual. Students should consult the head of the department
or the departmental counselor for approval of electives in the field of specialization.
SOIL SCIENCE
This program of study emphasizes the basic sciences. Students can qualify for
graduate study and research in Soil Fertility, Soil Chemistry, Soil Mircobiology, Soil
Physics, or Soil Genesis and Classification by careful selection of elective courses.






76 AGRICULTURE


Soil Physics:
Soil Genesis and


CY 362, CY 363.
MS 353, PS 205-206 instead of PS 201-202.


Classification: BTY 501, GPY 330, GY 408, GY 418.
SOIL TECHNOLOGY
This program of study enables the student majoring in soils to obtain broad training
in related phases of Agriculture. By careful selection of electives, one may choose ade-
quate courses in business and economics to prepare for careers in agricultural chemicals
and fertilizers.
Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Cerdits
AS 306 Farm Management ....--__..--.....__ ------ --- --- 3
Other Core requirements -______. -..... -......... .- .. -----.-- 11


Departmental Requirements-
20 Credits
SLS 310 Soils ----_ ..
SLS 402 Advanced Soil Fertility ---
SLS 404 Soil Surveying ..-.............
SLS 405 Soil Microbiology -.. ..
SLS 406 Soils & Fertilizers --------
Electives in Soils --------------------.....


Other Requirements and Electives-
28 Credits
AG 301 Agricultural Water
Management ------ __ 3
AY 324 Forage Crop Science -- 3
FC 341 Citrus Growing ..----.... 3
BCY 300 Bacteria in Everyday
Life -----.-- .... 3
Free and Approved Electives* -...-... 16


*Suggested electives: ADP 211, CL 223, CY 331, EH 356, ES 201, PLS 201, GPY
330, GY 203, PT 321, SLS 311, SLS 400, SLS 308, SLS 420.

STATISTICS
The curriculum in statistics is presented in the College of Agriculture and the
College of Arts and Sciences. Departmental requirements are identical for both Colleges.
Students majoring in statistics should consult the departmental advisor early in their
sophomore year.
In preparation for a major in statistics, a student should take the following courses
during the freshman and sophomore years: MS 206-353-354.
A student interested in a degree within the College of Arts and Sciences may refer
to pages --...
The student working toward a B.S.A. degree in the College of Agriculture may find
it convenient to take AS 201 and BTY 180 in the University College to partially satisfy
B.S.A. degree requirements.


Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core-14 Credits
(Soil Science Majors take PS 201-203)
Departmental Requirements- Other Requirements and Electives-
15 Credits 33 Credits
SLS 310 Soils -- ---______----- 4 GY 203 Elements of Physical
SLS 402 Advanced Soil Geology ---..- 3
Fertility ..--------------_ 3 BCY 300 Bacteria in
SLS 401 Soil Morphology Everyday Life 3
and Classification _____--- 3 BTY 310 Elementary Plant
Elective in Soils --------------- 5 Physiology 4
MS 206 or 207-208 Basic
Mathematics .-- 5-6
PS 202-204 General Physics
& Lab. .------- ---------- 4
CY 331 Introductry Quantitative
Analysis __----__ 4
Approved Electives in Agriculture .- 5
Free and Approved Electives* ---_-__ 4-5
*Suggested electives in preparation for graduate study in specific major fields of Soil
Science:
Soil Fertility: BTY 310, EY 301, PT 321, CY 362-363.
Soil Chemistry: CY 318 or CY 401, GY 408, CY 362-363.
Soil Microbiology: EY 303, PT 321, BCY 305, 306 or 307 instead of BCY 300,






AGRICULTURE 77


College of Agriculture Core Requirements-14
(Statistics Majors Take PS 201-203)
Departmental Requirements
STA 440 Mathematical Statistics .......--- ---.. ---------......-...-----------------. 3
STA 520 Methods of Statistics 1 ------- ----- ------ ..-----. 3
STA 521 Methods of Statistics 2 ........-----------..---------------- 3
STA 540 Introduction to Theoretical Statistics 1 --.....----.....-....------------- 3
STA 541 Introduction to Theoretical Statistics 2 .....-------. ........------------ 3
*Electives in Mathematics and Statistics ..-----_---.-- .------.... -..-..-.. 9
24
Other Requirements and Electives
**Electives from the College of Agriculture ---.-..- --_--........---.---9.. 9
Free and Approved Electives -___ _..._ ______-- ---------- 21
30
*Electives must be approved by the departmental adviser.
**It is assumed that the student has taken AS 201 and BTY 180 in the Lower Division.
If not, these courses would be required in addition to the nine hours indicated.

TROPICAL AGRICULTURE

The curriculum is designed to give broad basic training in the important phases of
agriculture as related to tropical areas of the world. Students may plan a program of
study oriented toward Animal Science, Plant Science, Farm Management and Agricul-
tural Marketing, or General Agriculture.
A counselor, representing the area selected, will assist the student in choosing
elective courses that will afford him the best program of study. Students electing this
major should contact the Dean of the College prior to registration for counselor
assignment.
The following program outline will be followed in qualifying for a major in
Tropical Agriculture.
Credits
Requirements in College of Agriculture Curriculum Core ..---_.._-------....- ....----- 14
(Students will attain proficiency in English and one other approved language)
Foundation in Agriculture -----...... ....------------------ -------- 15-16
ADP 211 Introduction to Animal Science, or
PLS 210 Fundamentals of Crop Science _-- --- 3-4
AG 301 Agricultural Water Management -- ----_ ----------- 3
EY 301 Economic Entomology -- --.__---- 3
FT 250 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition -..--_....--- ---2--..... .. 2
SLS 310 Soils --------......----- ....----------------- 4
Tropical Agriculture Major Requirements ..-----. -----_.__--- --. ----.. 26
(1) Animal Science oriented will take:
ADP 312 Feeds and Feeding ...----------------..-___ ----- 4
ADP 322 Animal Breeding ..------ -------------- ---- 3
AY 329 Genetics .--------....---------...- ------ 3
VY 301 Anatomy and Physiology --....- -----.---.... ..--..-- 4
Electives, select from list designated* -..--.------_-__ ------ ..---... 12
(2) Plant Science oriented will take:
AY 329 Genetics --------- ------------ 3
BTY 310 Plant Physiology -.-.----------------------.- -. 4
PLS 301 Plant Propgation -..----.... ----------------.... 3
PT 321 Plant Pathology ..--------------- 3
Electives, select from list designated** -..-.....------.... -..----- 13
(3) Farm Management and Agricultural Marketing oriented wil take:
AS 412 Land Economics .- ----------- -- 3
AS 430 Management of Farms in Tropical Areas .-------- 3
AS 431 Agricultural Marketing in the Tropics ..--------- 3
AS 409 Cooperative Marketing .....----. ..__....--------.--..----- 3
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics ....... ........-------.-----_--------- 3






78 AGRICULTURE

Electives, select from list designated*** .---.. 11
(4) General Agriculture oriented will take:
AS 430 Management of Farms in Tropical Areas ___----------.... ---- 3
AG 303 Agricultural Mechanics --.... .---------...- ------.. 3
ADP 211 Introduction to Animal Science, or
PLS 201 Fundementals of Crop Science _-_--- -------------- 3-4
PT 321 Plant Pathology ---- .-............. 3
Electives, select from list designated**** _-__ ....--------..-... .... .._ 13-14
General Electives ..-...-._.. ._--_____ --_ --------------- ....12-13
Designated and General Electives:
*AL 316, AL 411, AL 413, AY 536, DY 311, PY 312, PY 415.
**AY 536, FC 335, FC 523, FC 524, OH 362, OH 441, OH 511, PLS 442, VC
411, VC 412, VC 506.
***AS 408, AS 420, ES 246, ES 347, SLS 400.
****AS 431, AY 536, EDX 301, FC 341, FC 523, PLS 301, PT 432, VC 411.

VEGETABLE CROPS
(See Plant Science)







ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS 79


College of Architecture and Fine Arts

GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Architecture and Fine Arts provides instruction for students who
seek professional careers in the Building Arts and the Fine Arts; it offers to other stu-
dents of the University creative and cultural opportunities in these arts; and it performs
appropriate related services for the citizens of Florida. The College has developed from
the School of Architecture established in 1925. Its organization now includes-the
Division of Building Arts, with Departments of Architecture and Building Construction,
and the Bureau of Architectural and Community Research; the Division of Fine Arts,
with Departments of Art and Music; and the University Center of the Arts.

PROGRAMS
Professional Instruction-The College offers professional curricula leading to ap-
propriate undergraduate degrees in:
Architecture Fine Arts (Painting, Printmaking,
Interior Design Sculpture)
Landscape Architecture I history of Art
Building Construction Crafts
Music Advertising Design
Art Education
The College also offers at the Graduate level professional programs in Architec-
ture, Art, and Building Construction. Each undergraduate and graduate program
stresses thorough mastery of the principles underlying its field and the development of
professional skill in their creative application to practice.
Instruction for Majors.-Major programs of study in Art and Music, leading to
the degree of Bachelor of Arts, are offered by the departments of this College. Require-
ments for this degree are described under the College of Arts and Sciences.
General Courses.-The College offers courses open to all students of the Univer-
sity who wish to broaden their cultural background in the arts.
Public Programs.-The College sponsors each year numerous public lectures, con-
certs, festivals, special conferences, and clinics in which faculty and eminent visiting
scholars and practitioners participate. The University Center of the Arts administered
by the College, presents public exhibitions of outstanding works in the visual arts, both
fine and applied.
Bureau of Architectural and Community Research.-The Bureau was established
to conduct and coordinate research in the design, construction, and maintenance of
buildings, particularly under conditions existing in Florida, and the design and develop-
ment of Florida communities. The Bureau provides opportunity for graduate students
and faculty members to engage in such research and to cooperate effectively in research
with other departments of the University.

LIBRARY FACILITIES
The University Library and the College Library together provide an important
working collection of publications and audio-visual materials for undergraduate and
graduate studies. These resources include books, leading American and foreign periodi-
cals, color prints, and slides. There is an extensive collection of published and recorded
music of all types. Music listening rooms allow convenient use of these materials.

COUNSELING
The counseling program of the College is designed to make available to all stu-
dents at the Lower and Upper Division and the graduate levels, the services of faculty
members highly qualified in their respective professions who can assist in the selection
of a field of study, give understanding and sympathetic counsel regarding the student's
personal or academic problems, and advise on the selection of employment after gradu-
ation and problems arising in these several fields.







80 ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS


STUDENT AID
Students interested in part-time employment, assistantships, scholarships, fellow-
ships, loans, prizes, and awards are referred to the special bulletin distributed by the
Dean of Student Personnel Office, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
Students are urged to obtain before graduation some experience in the employ of
practicing professionals in their particular field, or in some allied work which will give
an insight into the problems of professional practice. Such employment provides an
introduction to the methods of actual practice, and enables the student to derive
increased benefit from advanced work in school. Students should seek the counsel of
their faculty advisor as to the type of practical experience best suited to their individual
needs.
FIELD TRIPS
Each year a number of field trips are arranged to give students an opportunity to
broaden and extend their educational experience through study of construction projects
of unusual interest or of outstanding works of architecture and art. Students frequently
combine such studies with attendance at state and national meetings of the professional
organizations in their respective fields.

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATE
The College offers courses leading to certification for teaching Art or Music in the
public schools in grades K through 12 in the State of Florida. Regulations describing
certification of teachers are published by the State Department of Education and it is
imperative that all students who expect to be certified familiarize themselves with these
regulations. Application for certification should be made immediately after graduation,
and should be addressed to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee,
Florida,
STUDENT WORK
The College reserves the right to retain student work for the purposes of record,
exhibition, or instruction.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Student organizations take an active part in the educational program of the Col-
lege. Included in these organizations are the Florida Art Society, the Gargoyle Society,
Sigma Lambda Chi, the Students' Contractors and Builders Association, the student
chapter of the American Institute of Architects, the Music Educators National Con-
ference student member Chapter No. 257, Kappa Kappa Psi, Tau Beta, and Phi Mu
Alpha-Sinfonia. The College encourages and assists students in promoting close rela-
tions with professional groups and societies in the several fields.

GRADUATE DEGREES
The Graduate School offers the degrees of Master of Arts in Architecture, Master
of Science in Building Construction, and Master of Fine Arts. To meet the needs and
goals of each student, graduate programs are prepared individually in consultation with
a designated member of the Graduate Faculty of the College of Architecture and Fine
Arts. For further information see the Graduate School Catalog.
Architecture.-The area of specialization may be in architectural design, architec-
tural research, building construction, or structural design of buildings. Holders of the
five-year undergraduate degree in Architecture may normally complete the requirements
for the master's degree in one academic year.
Art.-The major is in Fine Arts. Although holders of the Bachelor of Fine Arts
degree may technically complete the requirements in one academic year, two years are
normally required.






ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS 81


Building Construction.-The area of specialization may be in building construc-
tion, building research, or structural design of buildings. Holders of the four-year under-
graduate degree in Building Construction or its equivalent may normally complete the
requirements for the master's degree in one academic year.

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA ADMISSION
Admission Requirements.-To be eligible for admission to the College of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts, the student is required to have at least a 2.0 (C) average in all
Lower Division courses required for the curriculum he desires to enter. Additionally, he
must have at least a 2.0 (C) average in all professional and pre-professional courses
within that Lower Division curriculum.
The Committee on Admissions of the College will consider requests for admission
from students who do not meet the conditions stated above. However, students whose
records in the Lower Division do not indicate that they are qualified to pursue with
profit the professional work of the Upper Division will not be admitted to the College.
Transfer Students.-Transfer students who wish to enter the College of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts are referred to the Board of University Examiners in accordance
with provisions of the section of this catalog entitled Admissions.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOADS
Fifteen to eighteen semester-hours in any regular trimester shall be considered a
normal load. A student may be permitted to register for more than eighteen semester-
hours when, in the opinion of his adviser, the quality of his record justifies this. The
minimum load for a full-time student in the University during a regular trimester is 12
hours. At the time of registration a student, with the approval of the Dean, may
register for less than twelve semester hours. If a student wishes to drop courses during
the trimester, thereby reducing his load below twelve semester hours, he must have the
approval of the College Committee on Student Petitions.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To be eligible for graduation, the student must present a minimum grade point
average of 2.0 (C) for all work attempted in the Upper Division.
Students planning to enter the Graduate School must maintain a 3.0 (B) average
in all Upper Division work.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS AND HIGH HONORS
For graduation WITH HONORS, a student must earn an overall honor point
average of 3.0 or higher in all course work required for that degree-both Lower Divi-
sion and Upper Division. In addition, a student must earn an honor point average of
3.2 or higher in all course work accepted for the degree as Upper Division credit.
For graduation WITH HIGH HONORS, a student must, in addition to the
minimum 3.0 overall honor point average as stated above, earn an honor point average
of 3.5 or higher in all course work accepted for the degree as Upper Division credit
and be recommended by the faculty of the department concerned to the Dean. The
recommendation is to be based on: (a) honor point average, (b) distribution and
quality of subject matter studies, (c) evaluation of the student by his instructors, and
(d) other important aspects or outstanding qualities of the student.
In calculating requirements for graduation WITH HONORS and WITH HIGH
HONORS, transfer credits will be excluded but the student must earn at this Univer-
city a minimum of 45 semester hours credit in Upper Division courses required for the
appropriate degree. These credits translated to honor points will be averaged as stated
above for HONORS and HIGH HONORS.
I. CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
J. T. Lendrum, Head; W. Raymond, Advisor, Upper Division; J. J. Sabatella, Advisor,
Lower Division.
This curriculum is for students who desire to become architects or to enter some
related field in which utility and beauty are combined objectives. The course prepares







82 ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS


students to become draftsmen, designers, inspectors, and superintendents of construc-
tion, specification writers, teachers or ultimately to become practicing architects or
specialists in their chosen fields.
The curriculum is accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board,
established by the American Institute of Architects, the National Council of Architec-
tural Registration Boards, and the Association of Collegiate School of Architecture.
For Freshman and Sophomore programs of study consult section of catalog entitled


Lower Division.
THIRD YEAR
Credits
AE 311-312 Presentation
Methods 1, 2 ------ 4
AE 331-332 Intermediate
Architectural Design 1, 2 6
AE 341-342 Materials and Methods
of Construction 2, 3 ---- 6
AE 351-352 Architectural
Structures 1, 2 6
AE 362 Mechanical Equipment 1 3
AE 371 Ancient Architecture -...-. 3
AE 372 Medieval Architecture -... 3
AE 381 Survey and Site Analysis 3


FOURTHII YEAR
Credits
AE 431-432 Advanced
Architectural Design 1, 2 10
AE 441 Working Drawings --...... 3
AE 442 Specifications and
Estimating ---- 3
AE 451-452 Architectural
Structures 3, 4 6
AE 461 Mechanical Equipment 2 3
AE 471 Renaissance and
Baroque Architecture -- 3
AE 472 Modern Architecture 3
AE 482 Community Planning 3

34


FIFTH YEAR
Credits
AE 522 Professional Seminar 2---- 2
AE 531-532 Advanced
Architectural Design 3, 4 16
AE 541 Professional Administration 3
AE 551 Architectural Structures 5 3
Department Electives -- 3
College Electives* ---- 6


*Electives shall be chosen from College of Architecture and Fine Arts with the ap-
proval of the faculty advisor.
II. CURRICULUM IN INTERIOR DESIGN
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design
J. T. Lendrum, Iead; G. D. Everett, Advisor
This curriculum is for students who desire to become professional interior design-
ers in the domestic, commercial, and institutional fields, or who desire to engage in the
merchandising, design, or manufacture of furniture and accessories.
For Freshman and Sophomore programs of study consult section of catalog entitled
Lower Division.


JUNIOR YEAR

AE 311-312 Presentation
Methods 1, 2 ------
IR 331-332 Intermediate Interior
Design 1, 2 -------
IR 341-342 Interior
Furnishings 1, 2 ---
IR 371-372 History 1, 2 ----..
IR 375 Textiles
AE 341 Materials and Methods of
Construction 2 ----


SENIOR YEAR
Credits
IR 431-432 Advanced Interior
4 Design 1, 2 ---.
IR 442 Practice of Interior
12 Decorating
ES 201 Basic Economics -
6 ATG 211 Elementary Acctg. .--
6 ART 280 Ceramics 1 ----
3 College Electives* .. ----


34
*Electives shall be chosen from College of Architecture and Fine Arts with the approval
of the faculty advisor.


Credits

.. 16

3
3
3
3
6
34
34







ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS 83


III. CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture
J. T. Lendrum, Iead; H. R. Sebold, Advisor
This curriculum is designed to fit students for work in the arrangement and preser-
vation of land areas for use and beauty. The aim is to prepare graduates for private
practice in the field of landscape architecture and for employment as landscape archi-
tects in city park departments and in the National Park Service. Also, due to intensive
training in site planning, graduates find ready employment in city and regional planning
offices.
For Freshman and Sophomore programs of study consult section of catalog entitled
Lower Division.
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR
Credits Credits
LAE 301-302-303-304-311-313- LAE 401-402-403-404-411-412-413-
314 Projects in Landscape 414 Projects in Landscape
Architecture, Groups I, II Architecture, Groups III,
consisting of 8 three-credit IV, consisting of 8 three-
units .------- 24 credit units ------ -- 24
OH 331 Woody Plant Materials 3 SLS 300 Forest Soils ---- 3
AE 381 Surveying and Site AE 482 Community Planning 3
Analysis --- 3 Approved Electives ...------- 6
Approved Electives 6
36
36

IV. CURRICULUM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Building Construction
L. A. Johnson, Chairman; J. M. Trimmer, Advisor, Upper Division; C. D. Zeigler,
Advisor, Lower Division.
The construction industry represents America's largest and most important segment
of the national economy with an annual volume of more than 80 billion dollars-an
amount approximately equal to one-sixth of the Cross National Product. In Florida
the annual construction volume is approaching 2 billion dollars. This industry and its
related fields are in dire need of young men educated in the arts of communications
and inter-personal relations and in the technical and professional areas of construction
management, techniques and operations.
Young men are especially attracted to construction because of the creative excite-
ment, the challenging and rewarding opportunities offered and the sense of tangible
accomplishment. Opportunities for advancement and increasing responsibilities are
unlimited in all areas of the industry, a few of which include land development; home
building; public building; commercial, industrial, marine and heavy construction; under-
water and space age facilities; material and equipment distribution, sales and installa-
tions; construction product research, development, sales and applications.
This four year, eight trimester, curriculum is for students who are interested in
preparing for professional careers in this construction industry and related fields.
Qualified instructors, all of whom have had years of actual experience in various areas
of the construction industry, assure authoritative treatment of all course material.
The Department includes a chapter of Sigma Lambda Chi, National Honorary
Construction Fraternity, and the Student Contractors and Builders Association. This
association is the largest affiliated Student Chapter of the National Association of Ilome
Builders and is also an Associate Member and Ilonorary Member of the Florida West
Coast and the Florida East Coast Chapters, respectively, of the Associated General
Contractors of America.
Cooperative on-the-job LEmploymient.-- An informal cooperative program for a
combination of on-the-job employment and academic education may sometimes be
arranged with the assistance of the Department for students in the Upper Division.
Agreements concerning employment will be the responsibility of the student and em-
ployer and all payment for work will be by the employer. Contacts made during such
periods of employment may lead to permanent employment.







84 ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS


For the Freshman and Sophomore program of study consult the section of the
catalog entitled Lower Division.
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR


Credits
BCN 351 Construction Mechanics 2 3
BCN 352 Water Supply and
Sanitation -_ --- 3
BCN 353 Construction
Techniques 2 --- ... 3
BCN 354 History of Building --.-- 3
BCN 355 Construction Surveying -_ 3
BCN 361 Structural Design 1 .--- 3
BCN 362 Air Conditioning and
Heating 3
BCN 363 Construction
Techniques 3 -....--- 3
BCN 364 History of Building
Construction -- 3
IG 321 Work Simplification and
Standardization ---.. 3
Cultural Elective _- ----- -_--_ 3


L
BCN 471 Structural Design 2 _-------
BCN 472 Electrical Service and
Installations ---.------
BCN 473 Construction Estimates 1
ATG 211 Elementary Accounting__
MTG 401 Business Law ..------------
BCN 481 Structural Design 3 --------
BCN 483 Construction Estimates 2
BCN 484 Senior Seminar .--.-------
BCN 486 Construction
Management ...----
BCN 487 Construction Finance _
Professional or Technical Electives


reatrs
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
1

3
2
6

33


V. CURRICULA IN ART
E. E. Grissom, Head
The Department of Art offers undergraduate majors in the College of Architecture
and Fine Arts leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Design, and
Bachelor of Design in Art Education. Upper Division course requirements in the cur-
ricula are given below.
For the freshman and sophomore programs of study, consult the section of the
catalog entitled The Lower Division. For further information concerning any of these
curricula see the Head of the Department of Art.
In addition, the Department of Art offers a major in art in the College of Arts
and Sciences leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Requirements for this program
are given in the listing of the College of Arts and Sciences.
The curricula in the College of Architecture and Fine Arts are intended for stu-
dents who plan (1) to enter professional careers in fine arts or design, (2) to teach
art in the public schools or in the universities and colleges, or (3) to enter the gradu-
ate program of study in art at the University of Florida.
The major in art in the College of Arts and Sciences should be chosen by those
students whose interest is in a liberal education with emphasis upon the visual arts.
1. Curricula in Fine Arts
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts
The curricula in Fine Arts provide for majors in (a) Fine Arts-painting, print-
making and sculpture, (b) the History of Art, and (c) Crafts-ceramics, jewelry and
metalwork. Students who plan to enter a program of graduate study in art after receiv-
ing the baccalaureate degree are advised to register in one of these curricula. Upon
completion of graduate work students entering these fields are qualified for positions in
museums and art galleries, as instructors of art on the college or university level, or for
independent activity as creative artists.


" "'







ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS 85


(a) Major in Fine Arts
JUNIOR YEAR
Credits
ART 303 Methods and Materials
of the Artist ...------ 3
ART 309 Criticism of Art ....--3- 3
ART 350 Intermediate Drawing -- 2
ART 351-352 Painting 1 and 2 -- 6
ART 355 Printmaking 1 ------- 3
ART 357 Sculpture 1 ..--- 3------. 3
History of Art ---- 6
*Electives _...-------.. ... 9


SENIOR YEAR

ART 341 Photography --
ART 408 Senior Seminar ---.-
ART 451 Advanced Drawing
Advanced Painting,
Printmaking or Sculpture
History of Art -----_.-
*Electives -- --


*Electives must include a minimum of nine credits outside the Department of Art.


(b) Major in the History of Art
JUNIOR YEAR
Credits
ART 303 Methods and Materials
of the Artist .--------- 3
ART 309 Criticism of Art ...---.... 3
HY 201-202 History of World
Civilizations -------- 6
PPY 201 Problems of Philosophy 3
Foreign Language ...--.---_. 6
History of Art ..-- ----- 12

33


(c) Major in Crafts
JUNIOR YEAR


ART
ART

ART
ART
ART
ART


C


280 Beginning Ceramics -..-
303 Methods and Materials
of the Artist ---------
S309 Criticism of Art ---....-
357 Sculpture 1 ----
382 Intermediate Ceramics _
S383-384 Jewelry and
Metalwork 1 and 2 .--.......
History of Art -------
* Electives ----------


redits
3

3


SENIOR YEAR

ART 408 Senior Seminar .--.--
PPY 324 Aesthetics ---
Foreign Language --
History of Art -----
*Electives ---------






SENIOR YEAR

ART 341 Photography ---.
ART 358 Sculpture 2 --
ART 408 Senior Seminar --.--
Advanced Ceramics or
Jewelry and Metalwork
History of Art -----
*Electives -


6
6
6


33
*Electives must include a minimum of nine credits outside the Department of Art.
2. Curriculum in Advertising Design.
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Design
The curriculum in Advertising Design is a professional program for students with
serious professional intentions. Included in the curriculum are a series of courses in
design, drawing and painting; the history and theory of art; and, in the professional
field, lettering, layout, graphic design, advertising design, photography and illustration.
Students receiving the Bachelor of Design degree in this curriculum are well qualified
for professional careers in advertising design and related fields.


Credits
S 3
... 2
S4

-... 12
S 3
8

32


Credits
2
3
6
12
11

34





Credits
3
3
2

S12
3
11

34







86 ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS

JUNIOR YEAR
Credits
*ART 260 Lettering ---- 3
ART 303 Methods and Materials
of the Artist ---- 3
ART 309 Criticism of Art ----- 3
ART 341 Photography---__ 3
ART 350 Intermediate Drawing 2
ART 360 Layout -----__ 3
ART 362 Advertising Design ----- 3
History of Art --- --- 6
**Electives ------ ---.------- 7


SENIOR YEAR

ART 351 Painting 1 ..-----
ART 408 Senior Seminar --..-.
ART 460 Advanced Advertising
Design ---..---------------------
ART 467 Projects in Advertising
Design----------
ART 468 Projects in Advertising
Design -----------------------------
History of Art -------------
*Electives --. .-------- -----


33 34
*ART 260-should, if possible, be completed in the Sophomore Year.
**Electives must include a minimum of nine credits outside the Department of Art.
3. Curriculum in Art Education (College of Architecture and Fine Arts-College
of Education).
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design in Art Education
The curriculum in Art Education is designed for students who plan to teach art
in the public schools. Students completing this curriculum, which is offered in coopera-
tion with the College of Education, are qualified for certification as teachers of art in
the State of Florida.
JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR


Credits
ART 207-208 Introduction to the
Principles and History of Art 6
ART 260 Lettering or ART 360-
Layout ----------- 3
ART 280 Beginning Ceramics 3
ART 350 Sculpture 1 --- 3
*ART Electives -----.- 5
EDE 400 Elementary School Today 3
EDS 400 The Secondary School
Today --------............ 3
SCA 353 Art Education Workshop 3
SCA 453 The Teaching of Art 3
General Elective ------ 3


ART 408 Senior Seminar -----
ART 355 Printmaking
*ART Electives
EDF 300, 320 or 410
EDE 405 The Practicum: K-12
General Elective ----


Credits
S2
3
6
3
15
3


35
*Art electives must include such advanced courses as are necessary to complete state
certification requirements and must include a minimum of three closely related studio
courses in a single advanced area (fine arts, crafts, advertising design, etc.).
VI. CURRICULUM IN MUSIC
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts
James P. Hale, Advisor
The purpose of this curriculum is to prepare students to become musicians and
music teachers both in private life and in the public schools. It is offered in coopera-
tion with the College of Education and is based on a broad foundation in music. It
includes work in theory of music, music literature, music education, applied music,
and ensemble.
A piano proficiency examination is required of all music majors. Should the stu-
dent be unable to pass the proficiency examination in piano prior to his admission to a
Departmental Major Program in Music in the College of Architecture and Fine Arts,
he must then study piano each semester until he has met this requirement.
For further information see the Head of the Department of Music.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Fine
Arts a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the faculty.
For Freshman and Sophomore programs of study consult section of catalog entitled
Lower Division University College.


Credits
3
2

S3

6

9
S3
S8









JUNIOR YEAR
Credits
MSC 271 Voice Skills or
MSC 471 Language and Diction
for Singers 1--- -
MSC 367 Music Education in the
Elementary School --------- 3
MSC 370 Music Seminar -------- 0
MSC 405 Conducting -- 3
MSC 412-413 Survey of Music
History -------- 4
Applied Music in Courses above 100:
Major Instrument or Voice 4
Ensemble:
Band, Chorus, or Orchestra 2
EDF 345 Human Growth and
Development ---- 3
EDF 300 or 320 or 410 ---------- 3
Elective ----.......... 9


ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS 87

SENIOR YEAR
Credits
MSC 369 Music Education in the
Secondary School .3--.. 3
MSC 370 Music Seminar -- 0
MSC 460, 461 or 462 Materials 3
Applied Music in Courses above 300:
Major Instrument or Voice 2
Ensemble:
Band, Chorus, or Orchestra 1
EDS 400 Secondary School Today 3
EDE 400 Elementary School
Today ----------- 3
EDE The Practicum:
K-12 Music-- 15
Elective ---------- 2

32


MUSIC SEMINAR:-AIl students majoring in music are required to register for
MSC 370 MUSIC SEMINAR, 0 credit, each semester.
ENSEMBLE-Membership in ensemble music groups is open to all students of
the University by permission of the Conductor. One credit per semester is offered in
each group. A maximum of 6 semester hours credit in Ensemble (MSC 170-182) may
be applied toward the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. 4 Ensemble credit hours may
be applied toward most other Bachelor degrees.
The following courses are offered: University Band, University Choir, Choral
Union, Men's Glee Club, Women's Glee Club, University Orchestra, Choral Ensemble,
and Instrumental Ensemble. These groups are organized to study and perform the
standard repertoire written for the various vocal and instrumental combinations. En-
semble participation is a musical experience of inestimable worth.

GENERAL POLICIES ON APPLIED MUSIC COURSES
Applied Music is defined as lessons in voice and music instruments. Courses are
offered in voice, piano, organ, violin, viola, violincello, string bass, flute, oboe, clarinet,
bassoon, French horn, cornet, trombone, tuba, percussion, saxophone, harp, and
harpsichord.
The student registering for the first time for courses in Applied Music reports to
the Head of the Department of Music, who designates a staff member to audition
and/or consult with the student and assign the student to the proper applied music
course number.
Applied music courses beneath the college-level of applied music major study, on
any instrument, carry one hour credit, are designated by numbers carrying two digits in
the course designation, and are taught in classes. All two-digit applied music courses
are within a range of advancement from beginner to the beginning of college level
major applied music study. These courses are MSC 21, 25, 27, 35, 43, and 51. They
may normally be taken for several semesters.
The first two years of college level study in major applied music are designated
as "intermediate" study, and by course numbers carrying three digits, MSC 121 to 157.
Each course carries two credits. The student normally takes one of these courses for
four semesters.
The third and fourth years of college-level major applied music study are desig-
nated as "advanced" study and by course numbers carrying three digits, MSC 321
through 357. Each course may be taken normally for four semesters and carries two
credits each semester.
A minimum of 6 hours weekly practice is required in applied music courses.
FEES-The fees charged for Applied Music, instrument rental and practice room
rental are listed elsewhere in this Catalog under EXPENSES.






88 ARTS AND SCIENCES


The College of Arts and Sciences

GENERAL STATEMENT
Culturally and historically the programs of the College of Arts and Sciences repre-
sent the core of all higher education. The College grants its graduates the traditional
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees. This College makes its contribution
to the work of the world not only through the many facts and skills it imparts but
also by providing the student with the fundamental knowledge upon which the pro-
fessional colleges build.
A major aim of the College is liberal education. To this end it insists on evalua-
tions of ideas and actions according to their impact on society. Intellectual inquiry is
emphasized as a preparation for more competent living and the development of human
leadership.
SUBJECT-MATTER FIELDS
The subject-matter fields regularly offered to students in the College of Arts and
Sciences and the extent of these offerings are indicated in the table below:


Subject
Anthropology
Art -...........


Electives Major Masters
X X X


Ph.D.


X X Graduate work offered
through College of
Architecture and
Fine Arts


Astronomy ---___.-. --_-------- X -
***Bacteriology -- ------. -- X X Graduate work offered
through College of
Agriculture


Botany ............-- ..--._.-_


**Chemistry --... ---.. -----
Economics ..--- ..-..- ...---


*Education ----..............-...


English
French


*Credit which may be offered for degree is
obtained at the Office of the Dean.


--- X X Graduate work offered
through College of
Agriculture
X X X X
-- X X Graduate work offered
through College of
Business Administration
.. X Graduate work offered


through College of
Education
-...-----..- X X X X
----....... X X X X


limited. Detailed information may be


*Also see the section below on requirements for the degrees Bachelor of Science in
Zoology; Bachelor of Science in Chemistry; Bachelor of Science in Geology and
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics.
***For undergraduate specialization in bacteriology see the material on BACTERI-
OLOGY in the section of this Catalog for the College of Agriculture.








ARTS AND SCIENCES 89


Subject

Geography --...--
**Geology -------
German ---
Greek
History -.....
Journalism -----


Latin --
Library Science
**Mathematics ..--
Meteorology --
*Music
Philosophy ---
Physics --------
Political Science -
Portuguese -
Psychology..
Religion -------
Russian ---
Sociology .-----
Spanish
Speech .--------
Statistics -...
Zoology -----


Electives Major Masters


X-
- ...-- ..X--
-----------..-.--------x
----------.---------x
---. X
X
X
------- --..-...............-- X















X
X
X
X
X
---- --------------- x
I-------------------x
----------------- -- x
--------------- -- -- x
--------------.-----x
-................... ..-- ..- ..- X
-----------------------.. .-- .. X
--------------------- --- ... X
-------------------- x
-------------------x
-......................--- ..- X
------------..--------x
--------------- ---. x
------------------ -- x
...............-- ............- X
- ---------- X
-- -- -- -- -- -- x


Ph.D.


X X X
X X -
X X -
X -
X X X
Major and Graduate work offered
through the School of Journalism
and Communications
X X -
X -
X X X
x -
X X -
X X X
X X X

X X X
X -
X -
X X X
X X X
X X X
X -
X X X


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE PROGRAM

University College students who plan to enter the College of Arts and Sciences should:
1. Complete with grades of "C" or better each of the comprehensive courses of
the lower division or acceptable equivalent courses. This should be the first concern of
future Arts and Sciences students.
2. Consult with the proposed major department as soon as they have chosen their
major field.
3. Begin their foreign language requirements while registered in the University
College.
4. Use the balance of their elective opportunities in the lower division in taking a
selection of one and two hundred level courses in several Arts and Sciences departments.
Arts and Sciences courses numbered three hundred or above are not available to lower
division students except with written permission from the department offering them.
5. Study the following sections on Admissions, Advisement Panel, and Require-
ment for Degrees.

ADMISSION

To be eligible for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, students are
required to have earned 64 semester hours of acceptable college credit, to have a 2.0
(C) average in all work attempted in the lower division, and to have demonstrated
academic competency in all major areas of knowledge as presented in the work of the
Comprehensive Courses of the University College or their equivalents.
A student who has completed the work of the University College and has an
academic record which does not fully meet these admission requirements but shows
such improvement as to provide a reasonable basis for predicting success in a degree
program in this College, may register in the University College for an admission pro-
bation program of courses arranged for him in the Office of the Dean of Arts and
Sciences. If at the end of the probationary period he has met the terms of the proba-
tion, he will be admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences. If his work in this
trial program is unsatisfactory, his admission will be finally denied.







90 ARTS AND SCIENCES


ADVISEMENT PANEL
The College of Arts and Sciences maintains an Advisement Panel composed of
faculty members representing each area of specialization offered by the College. Mem-
bers of this panel are available for student conferences at regular hours each week.
Each student registered in the College is given at least one regular appointment with
his adviser each trimester for the purpose of arranging his program for the next tri-
mester. However, students may see their advisers as often as necessary. University
College students planning to graduate from the College of Arts an'd Sciences should
request the assignment of an adviser as early as possible in their university programs.
Information regarding the advisement panel is available at the office of the Dean.
Preprofessional Counseling Office: The College of Arts and Sciences maintains a
Preprofessional Counseling office for medical and allied fields in Room 107, Anderson
IHall. The purpose of this office is to provide advice, information and assistance for
students in preparing themselves for professional work in the health sciences. The
office obtains data, chiefly from instructors, on each student who registers as a pre-
professional student, and on request supplies recommendations to professional schools
for any applicant whose file is sufficiently complete. This system of recommending
students has been in operation at the University for a number of years and professional
schools expect to receive information from this office. It is essential, therefore, that
each premedical and predental student register with the Preprofessional Counseling
Office during the first few weeks of every trimester so that sufficient data will be
available for his recommendations.
Other services provided by the Preprofessional Office include: a reference file of
catalogs of the Medical and Dental Colleges of the United States and Canada; a
bulletin board for posting current information, not only on the Professional schools,
but also on related matters such as the "Regional Plan," the Medical College Admis-
sions Tests, the Dental Aptitude Testing Program; and brochures and other material
for students interested in Osteopathy, Optometry, Nursing, Medical Technology, Nu-
trition, Physical Therapy, Public Health, and Sanitary Science. Students are encouraged
to make use of these services.
The various types of professional training which are offered in the Health Sciences
have different prerequisites, both as to specific courses and as to the number of hours
required for admission to the professional program. Students should, therefore, obtain
information on the requirements of the particular field or fields in which they are
interested so as to pursue a satisfactory program of preprofessional preparation.

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES
BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The programs which lead to the degrees Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
are alike in all basic requirements. The requirements for graduation with either of
these degrees are as follows:
A minimum of sixty-four semester hours credit with an average of C in all work
transferred to or completed in the College is required. In this work must be included
(1) completion of a departmental Major as described below, (2) satisfaction of the
Language requirements as described below, and (3) at least twelve semester hours of
approved electives as described below in the statement of the elective requirement. It
is further required that in the entire program of studies of the student he shall have
earned grades of "C" or better in each of the following:
Two courses in social sciences
Two courses in English
Two courses in humanities
Two courses each in physical and biological sciences. This work must include a
minimum of one course in laboratory science.
Two courses in mathematics.
It is also required that each student qualifying for a degree from the College shall
possess facility in the oral and written use of the English language. This requirement
will be considered satisfied when the department of the student's major has certified
such facility.
The degree Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the require-


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ARTS AND SCIENCES 91


ments for degrees with majors in one of the fields of Anthropology, Art, Economics,
English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Library Science, Music, Philosophy,
Political Science, Religion, Russian, Sociology, Spanish, and Speech.
The degree Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon those who fulfill the re-
quirements for degrees with majors in one of the fields of Bacteriology, Botany,
Chemistry, Geology, Physics, and Zoology.
The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon
those who fulfill the requirements for the degree with a major in Geography, Mathe-
matics, Psychology or Statistics. A major in one of these subjects will lead to the
Bachelor of Arts degree if the majority of subsidiary and elective credits in the student's
entire program are earned in the humanities and/or social sciences, and will lead to the
Bachelor of Science degree if such subsidiary and elective credits are science credits.
The Departmental Major: A departmental major consists of two parts, as follows:
(1) Concentration consisting of not less than twenty-four and not more than thirty-
two semester hours in one subject-matter field. This field is called the student's major
field. Work in this field taken in the University College or transferred to the University
from another institution is included in evaluating the student's record for this require-
ment. However, all transfer credit in the major field must be approved by the major
department and any such credit which is not approved as a part of the major will not
apply toward the total credit requirement for the degree. No courses in the major
field in whichh the grade earned is below C will be counted toward the fulfillment of
the major requirement. (2) Such subsidiary courses from subject-matter fields other
than the major field as are essential.
Foreign Language Requirement: All candidates for degrees awarded by the College
of Arts and Sciences are required to have at least a minimum proficiency in some
foreign language. This requirement may be satisfied by examination or by the suc-
cessful completion of a course numbered 202 or higher at the University of Florida.
Students majoring in foreign language must satisfy this requirement by complet-
ing FLE 351-352 and six credits in a foreign language other than the major.
In preparing to meet the foreign language requirement students are advised to
complete the necessary courses in the University College, where such courses may be
taken as electives.
Elective Requirement: The viewpoint of the College of Arts and Sciences stresses
the importance of an informed acquaintance with the major areas of human knowledge
as well as a specialized preparation in one of these areas. In addition, therefore, to
prescribing a major field, the College also requires that as a part of his Upper Division
program each student complete at least twelve semester hours exclusive of his Foreign
Language Requirement in courses unrelated to the area of his specialization. For the
interpretation of this requirement, these major areas are regarded as (1) the biological
sciences; (2) the humanities; (3) the physical sciences, including mathematics; and (4)
the social sciences. Students are advised to regard this requirement as a minimum and
to plan a broad program in the College as a liberal background for their specialization.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY
In addition to a departmental major in zoology, botany or bacteriology, a special
curriculum is offered leading to the degree, "Bachelor of Science in Biology." This is
designed for students who wish rigorous preparation in the area of biology as a founda-
tion for later specialization in any particular field of basic or applied biology.
The requirements for this degree are:







92 ARTS AND SCIENCES


(1). a. Credit must be presented with grades of "C" or above in each of the following
courses:
ZY 181 or ZY 217 Zoology 4
BTY 180 and BTY 406 Botany .------- --- 8
BCY 305-306 Basic Introductory Bacteriology ------- 5
ZY 308 Invertebrate Zoology --- 4
ZY 505 Ecology ___-------- 3
ZY 325 Genetics and Speciation ------ 4
ZY 573 General Physiology (Cellular) _------- 4
BTY, BCY and/or ZY Approved Electives -------- 12
b. Credit must be presented in each of the following courses:
CY 217-218 or 219-220 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis --- 8
CY 331 Quantitative Analysis -------- 4
CY 301-302, CY 303-304 Organic Chemistry -------- 8
PS 201-202, 203-204 General Physics ------- 8
MS 206 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics ------ 3
(2) A total of 78 semester hours must be earned in the Upper Division.
(3) At least twenty-five semester hours of Arts and Sciences courses, exclusive of any
course listed in (1) above, any course offered in departments listed in (1)a, or
any course used in meeting the foreign language requirement, must be presented
in the total degree program. Twelve or more of these twenty-five must be earned
in the Upper Division in the areas of the Humanities and/or Social Sciences.
(4) The foreign language requirement must be met in German or Russian.
(5) All other requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree must be satisfied.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY
In addition to a departmental major in chemistry, a special curriculum is offered
leading to the degree "Bachelor of Science in Chemistry." This curriculum is designed
for students who desire to make chemistry their vocation.
The requirements for this degree are:
(1) a. Credit must be presented with grade of "C" or above in each of the following
courses:
CY 217-218 or 219-220 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis -..- 8
CY 301-302 Organic Chemistry ------ 6
CY 303-304 Organic Chemistry Laboratory ---- 2
CY 331 Introductory Quantitative Analysis --- 4
CY 401-402 Physical Chemistry ----- 6
CY 403 Physical Chemistry Laboratory ----- 2
CY 432 Advanced Quantitative Analysis ----- 4
CY 481 Chemical Literature 1
CY 511 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry --- 3
CY 305 or 514 Organic Chemistry -- ---- 2 or 3
A minimum of 7 or 8 credit hours* selected from the following courses:
CY 305 Organic Chemistry 2
BCH 402 Biochemistry 3
CY 512 Advanced Physical Chemistry ----- 3
CY 514 Advanced Organic Chemistry ---- 3
CY 498 Senior Research 2
CY 499 Senior Research 3
CY 550 Nuclear Chemistry 3
*Upon approval of the major adviser in Chemistry the student may substitute up
to 6 credit hours in advanced mathematics or physics courses in meeting this requirement.
b. Credit must be presented in each of the following courses:
PS 205, 206, 207-208 General Physics ---- 8
MS 206, 353-354 Analytic Geometry and Calculus ------ 15
EH 356 Report Writing ----- 3
(2) A total of 78 semester hours must be earned in the Upper Division.
(3) At least twenty-five semester hours of Arts and Sciences courses, exclusive of any
course listed in (1) above, any course offered in chemistry or any course used in meet-


I -






ARTS AND SCIENCES 93


ing the foreign language requirement, must be presented in the total degree program.
Twelve or more of these twenty-five must be earned in the Upper Division in the areas
of the Humanities, Social Sciences and/or Biological Sciences.
(4) The foreign language requirement must be met in German or Russian.
(5) All other requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree must be satisfied.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY
In addition to a departmental major, a special curriculum is offered leading to the
degree of "Bachelor of Science in Geology." This curriculum is designed for students
who desire to make geology their vocation.
The requirements for this degree are:
(1) a. Credit must be presented with grade of "C" or above in each of the following
courses:
GY 203-205 Physical Geology ....----- --- --... .------- 4
GY 304 Historical Geology --------- 4
GY 408-418 Mineralogy and Petrology ----------------------- 6
GY 409 Structural Geology ...----- ---------------4- 4
GY 421 Invertebrate Paleontology -------------------------- 3
GY 401-402 Physiography of Eastern and Western North America 4
GY 411 Principles of Economic Geology .-------.. -------. 3
GY 417 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy _---- --.---------- 4
GY 440 Geologic Field Methods -------------------------- 2
GY 500 Advanced Studies in Geology ---------------------- 3
GY 501 Geomorphology ..-- .-..------------- 3
GY 518 Optical Crystallography
or ----------- 3
GY 522 Micropaleontology
GY 430 Individual Work-to follow either GY 518 or
GY 522 -....------ ---- --------------------- 3
b. Credit must be presented in each of the following courses:
CY 217-218 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis ----- 8
PS 201-202, 203-204 General Physics -.-.--- ----- 8
MS 206, 353-354 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 15
EH 356 Report Writing ---.--------- -------- ------- 3
(2) A total of 78 semester hours must be earned in the Upper Division.
(3) At least twenty-five semester hours of Arts and Sciences courses, exclusive of any
course listed in (1) above, any course offered in geology, or any course used in
meeting the foreign language requirement, must be presented in the total degree
program. Twelve or more of these twenty-five must be earned in the Upper
Division in the areas of the Humanities, Social Sciences and/or Biological Sciences.
(4) The foreign language requirement must be met in French, German or Russian.
(5) All other requirements for Bachelor of Science degree must be satisfied.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS
In addition to a departmental major in mathematics, a special curriculum is offered
leading to the degree "Bachelor of Science in Mathematics." This curriculum is de-
signed for students who desire to make mathematics their vocation.
The requirements for this degree are:
(1) a. Credit must be presented with grade of "C" or above in each of the following
courses:
MS 301 Introduction to Modern Algebra ---- 3
MS 302 Modem Algebra --------- 5
MS 361 Set Theory and Limit Theory 3-- ..--------------- 3
MS 362 Point Set and Analytic Topology ------ --- 5
MS 355-356, 454 Real Analysis 1, 2, 3 .....---------------- .---- 9
MS 420 Differential Equations 3
MS 455 Introduction to Complex Variables ................. 3
Plus 15 credits in advanced mathematics courses selected by the adviser.
b. Credit must be presented in
PPY 320 Symbolic Logic ---.....---..-... ....-.----------------------..------- 3






94 ARTS AND SCIENCES


(2) A total of 78 semester hours must be earned in the Upper Division.
(3) At least twenty-five semester hours of Arts and Sciences courses, exclusive of
any course offered in (1) above, any course offered in mathematics or any course
used in meeting the foreign language requirement, must be presented in the total
degree program. Twelve or more of these twenty-five must be earned in the Upper
Division in the areas of the Humanities, Social Sciences and/or Biological Sciences.
(4) The foreign language requirement must be met in German, Russian, or French.
(5) All other requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree must be satisfied.

ARTS AND SCIENCES HONORS PROGRAMS
Consistent with its view that higher education should result in the development of
each student as an intellectual individual, this college gives its students individually
tailored degree programs of formal courses. In addition, the College offers a variety of
opportunities for independent and seminar honors work to those of its undergraduates
who have demonstrated appropriate qualifications.
The Senior Seminar: This seminar is concerned with an evaluation of human
achievement in all areas of knowledge. It is conducted by a committee of four faculty
members. Many other lecturers contribute on a more limited basis. It extends through
the Fall and Winter Trimesters and carries 6 hours credit. Selection for the Senior
Seminar is at the discretion of the Seminar Committee. The College Office will receive
applications for this seminar from students who 1) will have completed at least one
trimester of work in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences before entering the
seminar, 2) have earned a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in all of their college
work (or have earned the Associate of Arts degree from the University College with
High Honors), and 3) are recommended by their major department for admission to
the Senior Seminar.
Honors Work in the Major Field: Each department provides an opportunity to take
6 credits of the major in special honors work. The minimum qualification to be selected
for major honors work is a 3.0 average in all major work attempted and the completion
of at least 15 credits in the major. Applications for selection should be made at the
departmental office after discussion with the student's academic adviser.
DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR HONORS
To qualify for departmental major honors, the student must complete 6 credits of
honors work in his major field (see above), complete all work attempted in his major
field with at least a 3.0 average, and be recommended for this distinction by his major
department. A graduate who qualifies will receive a certificate from the College stating
that the baccalaureate degree has been completed with "Honors in "
(name of major subject), and a note of this distinction will be recorded in the stu-
dent's college academic record.
BACCALAUREATE WITI HONORS
To receive his degrees With Honors, the student must qualify for departmental
majors honors (see above) and earn a grade point average of 3.2 or higher in the work
of the Upper Division.
BACCALAUREATE WITH HIGH HONORS
To receive his degree, With High Honors, the student must qualify for his degree
with honors (see above), must have completed the "Senior Seminar" and must be
recommended for high honors by the Senior Seminar Committee.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
Student Responsibility: Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for
the proper courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Office of the Registrar and
must pay the graduation fee early in the trimester in which they expect to receive the
degree. The official calendar shows the latest date on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for completing all courses for which he is registered.
Courses can be dropped or changed without penalty only through the offices of the
Dean of the College and the Registrar.
The student's program of studies is subject to the approval of his adviser and
the Dean.




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