• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 University calendar
 State administrators
 Officers of administration
 General information
 Departmental courses
 Index






Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00081
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00081
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Introduction
        Introduction
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    University calendar
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    State administrators
        Page 6
    Officers of administration
        Page 7
        Page 8
    General information
        Page 9
        Graduate programs offered
            Page 9
            Page 10
        Admission to the Graduate School
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
        General regulations and instructions
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
        Requirements for Master's degrees
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
        The advanced school of the College of Education
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Requirements for the Ph.D.
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Expenses
            Page 30
            Page 31
        Housing
            Page 32
        Financial aid
            Page 33
            Page 34
        Special programs and facilities
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
        Organized research
            Page 42
        Student services
            Page 43
            Page 44
    Departmental courses
        Page 45
        Accounting
            Page 45
        Aerospace engineering
            Page 45
        Agricultural economics
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Agricultural engineering
            Page 48
        Agronomy
            Page 49
        Animal science
            Page 50
        Anthropology
            Page 51
        Architecture
            Page 52
        Art
            Page 52
        Arts and sciences--general and cross departmental courses
            Page 53
        Astronomy
            Page 53
        Bacteriology
            Page 54
        Biochemistry
            Page 55
        Biology
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Botany
            Page 58
        Building construction
            Page 59
        Business administration--general
            Page 60
        Chemical engineering
            Page 60
            Page 61
        Chemistry
            Page 62
            Page 63
        Civil engineering
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Communications
            Page 67
        Dairy science
            Page 68
        Economics
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
        Education--general and cross-departmental courses
            Page 71
            Page 72
        Education--administration and supervision
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Education--elementary
            Page 75
        Education--foundations
            Page 76
        Education--personnel services
            Page 77
        Education--secondary
            Page 78
            Page 79
        Education--vocational agriculture
            Page 80
        Electrical engineering
            Page 80
            Page 81
        Engineering mechanics
            Page 82
            Page 83
        English
            Page 84
            Page 85
        Entomology
            Page 86
        Finance and insurance
            Page 87
        Food technology and nutrition
            Page 88
        Foreign languages
            Page 89
        Forestry
            Page 89
        French
            Page 90
        Fruit crops
            Page 91
        Geography
            Page 91
            Page 92
        Geology
            Page 93
        German
            Page 94
        History
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Industrial engineering
            Page 96
        Inter-American studies
            Page 97
        Journalism
            Page 97
        Latin
            Page 98
        Law
            Page 98
        Management and business law
            Page 99
        Marketing
            Page 99
        Mathematics
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Mechanical engineering
            Page 102
        Medical sciences--general
            Page 103
        Medical sciences--anatomy
            Page 104
        Medical sciences--biochemistry
            Page 105
        Medical sciences--microbiology
            Page 106
        Medical sciences--physiology
            Page 107
        Medical sciences--radiology
            Page 108
        Metallurgical engineering
            Page 108
        Nuclear engineering
            Page 109
            Page 110
        Ornamental horticulture
            Page 111
        Pharmaceutical chemistry
            Page 111
        Pharmacognosy
            Page 112
        Pharmacology
            Page 113
        Pharmacy
            Page 113
        Philosophy
            Page 114
        Physical education, health and athletics
            Page 115
        Physics
            Page 116
            Page 117
        Plant pathology
            Page 118
        Political science
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Portuguese
            Page 121
        Poultry science
            Page 121
        Psychology
            Page 122
            Page 123
        Real estate
            Page 124
        Rehabilitation counseling
            Page 125
        Sociology
            Page 126
        Soils
            Page 127
        Spanish
            Page 128
        Speech
            Page 129
        Statistics
            Page 130
        Vegetable crops
            Page 131
        Veterinary science
            Page 131
            Page 132
    Index
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
Full Text

i. OF LBRl A

THE UNIVERSITY RECORD

OF THE


UNIVERSITY OF





1963


1964


Lrvaduate


Catal 4


378
FHu
v.58
no.1
1963


^r66Le
























'E3 LIBHPIS
UNIVERSITYY of FLOP!DAJ















.
S.~ ~















The Record
Comprises:

The Graduate Catalog, the Under-
graduate Catalog, the Bulletin of the
Summer Sessions, the Schedule of
Courses for each trimester, and various
bulletins on regulations and policies.
These bulletins will be sent gratui-
tously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifi-
cally state which bulletins or what in-
formation is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida









VOL. LVIII SERIES 1, NO. 1 JANUARY 1, 1963
PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINES-
VILLE, FLORIDA e ENTERED IN THE POST OFFICE IN GAINESVILLE,
FLORIDA, AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER, UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS,
AUGUST 24. 1912, OFFICE OF PUBLICATION, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA.








TABLE OF CONTENTS

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR ........................ ...... ........................-...--- 1
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION ...................... .................... ..... ... 7

GENERAL INFORMATION 378'
ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY .................... .............. ... .. .-... ... ...- .. 9
GRADUATE PROGRAMS OFFERED .................. ...... .. .................. 9
ADM ISSION ........ .....--.- ..-. ... ... ............ ... .. .... ... ..11
GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS .... ..- 14
REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES ..........-..----.......-........ 17
REQUIREMENTS FOR Ed.S. AND Ed.D. ---...........----- --*:. ... 24
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE Ph.D. ............... -......... 27
EXPENSES ............ ... .. 30
HOUSING ................... .-- ----- --- .- 32
FIN AN CIAL AID S ..............................................- --------------- ---- 33
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES ..-.. .. ................................. 35
ORGANIZED RESEARCH .... ...................... ...... 42
STUDENT SERVICES .. ......... ... .. --...... ..- ...................... .......- 43


DEPARTMENTAL COURSES


Accounting --------- ....... 45
Aerospace Engineering .....---------45
Agricultural Economics .-............ 46
Agricultural Engineering ................-... 48
Agricultural Extension .................. 49
Agronomy ............................ ..... ----- 49
Animal Science .................. .. -...... 50
Anthropology ..-..........-- -----.. 51
Architecture ................... ...---- ....... 52
Art .........--.......... -----............. 52
Arts and Sciences-General .... 53
A stronom y .................--- -....---- .... .... 53
Bacteriology ..............-............. 54
Biochemistry ............ -- -------........ 55
Biology .-.......-...-------....-...---.. .... 56
Botany .--------..........--......- ..-------.. 58
Building Construction ..........---- ...- 59
Business Administration-General ....60
Chemical Engineering ........ ......... 60
Chemistry .............-........... ................. 62
Civil Engineering -..---........--- ............ 64
Communications ........ ................... 67
Dairy Science -................................ 68
Econom ics ...................................... ...... 68
Education ..............................-- .............. 71
General and Cross-Departmental ....... 71
Administration and Supervision -..... 73
Elementary .......----..........- ....-- ....-...-. 75
Foundations .-----......---...................... .. 76
Personnel Services ......................... 77
Secondary ........................----- ....-..... .. 78
Vocational Agriculture ............ .......... 80
Electrical Engineering ..--.........-.......-.... 80
Engineering Mechanics .......-................. 82
English .-...............................-...-...-----.. 84
Entomology .....----......................... ..... 86
Finance and Insurance .................... ...... 87
Food Technology and Nutrition .......... 88
Foreign Languages ................................. 89
Forestry .--..----------. ---.......................... 89
French ...........................---........... ...... 90
Fruit Crops .............................................. 91
Geography ..-..................-- ....-........-..... 91
G eology .................... ................... 93


German -.......... .......... -..- .... 94
H history .. .. ............................. .. 94
Industrial Engineering ........- 96
Inter-American Studies ................. 97
Journalism ..---...... ..-- .. ..------- 97
Latin ---..................... 98
Lawin------------------------------------ _------ 98
L aw ............................. ............................ 98
Management and Business Law ........... 99
Marketing .........---.............---.........--- ... 99
M mathematics -- --.......... --.........- ...........-100
Mechanical Engineering .............. ......102
Medical Sciences ...-..............-....-......103
General -...---...-.......... --- ... ...103
Anatom y ....... .............. ........ .... 104
Biochemistry ... ............ .. ... ...-- ... 105
M icrobiology ..................... ........ ...... 106
Physiology ..-...... ............. ....... --- 107
Radiology ----..............................108
Metallurgical Engineering ..... .......108
Nuclear Engineering ......... .... .... ... 109
Ornamental Horticulture -..............111
Pharmaceutical Chemistry --.............111
Pharmacognosy ..---- -- ........112
Pharmacology --.....-............ .. ....... .... 113
Pharmacy .........----...... .................. 113
Philosophy ...............................---- 114
Physical Education, Health, and
Athletics .............. ......... ..... 115
Physics ......... ..--.. .......... .116
Plant Pathology ......... ........ ...... ...118
Political Science ..-.....-..- ... ................ 118
Portuguese .........................---- 121
Poultry Science ............. .................. 121
Psychology ....... -- .. .....- .... ...122
Real Estate .....-------............--- .. 124
Rehabilitation Counseling ...............1..125
Sociology ............. -.... .. .... ..... 126
Soils ....... .... ......-....... ...... 127
Spanish .................. .. ........ ... ... .. 128
Speech .....-... ----....... -....... .....129
Statistics .....-------- -- --.. ...................130
Vegetable Crops .....-............................131
Veterinary Science ...-............................131







UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

1963-1964

FALL TRIMESTER
1963
August 1, Thursday............ ...........Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Fall Trimester.
August 30, Friday, 5:00 p.m....................Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to apply for regis-
tration appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased
fees for Late Registration.
September 3, Tuesday...................................Placement tests for entering students.
September 3-7, Tuesday-Saturday.................Orientation and registration according to ap-
pointments assigned. No one permitted to start
registration on Saturday, September 7, after
10:00 a.m.
September 9, Monday, 7:30 a.m..................Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.
September 11, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m............Last time for completing registration for Fall
Trimester. No one permitted to start registra-
tion after 3:00 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses and changing
sections, 5:00 p.m.
September 13, Friday, 5:00 p.m................Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be ad-
ministered on September 21.
September 20, Friday, 5:00 p.m--.....---- ....Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.
September 21, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon.......Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
October 7, Monday, 12 Noon.......................Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for degree to be awarded at
the end of the Fall Trimester.
October 25-26, Friday-Saturday...................Homecoming. Classes suspended at 11:55 a.m.,
Friday.
November 4, Monday, 5:00 p.m...............Last time for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in preceding term of attendance.
November 28-29, Thursday-Friday...............Thanksgiving. Classes suspended.
November 29, Friday, 5:00 p.m....................Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be ad-
ministered on December 7.
Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
December 2, Monday, 4:00 p.m...............Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Fall Trimester to file theses with the Dean of
Graduate School.
December 7, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon.......Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
December 12, Thursday, 7:30 p.m..........Comprehensive final examinations begin.
December 13, Friday, 3:30 p.m...................Non-comprehensive final examinations begin
and take precedence over any conflicting
classes.
December 13, Friday, 5:45 p.m..................All classes end.
December 20, Friday, 5:00 p.m............... .All grades for Fall Trimester due in the Office
of the Registrar.
December 21, Saturday, 12 Noon..... ......Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.







2 UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

1963-64

WINTER TRIMESTER

December 16, Monday........................Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Winter Trimester.
December 31, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m...............Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased fees
for Late Registration.

1964
January 2, Thursday...............................Placement tests for entering students.
January 2-4, Thursday-Saturday ... ........ Registration according to appointments assign-
ed. No one permitted to start registration on
Saturday, January 4, after 10:00 a.m.
January 6, Monday, 7:30 a.m.........................Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
January 8, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m..................Last time for completing registration for the
Winter Trimester. No one permitted to start
registration after 3:00 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses and for changing
sections, 5:00 p.m.
January 17, Friday, 5:00 p.m.....................--Last time for dropping courses without receiv-
ing a grade of E.
Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be ad-
ministered on January 25.
January 25, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon...........Foreign language examination for graduate stu-
dents.
February 3, Monday, 12 Noon...................Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be conferred
at the end of the Winter Trimester.
March 2, Monday 5:00 p.m......................Last time for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in the preceding term of attendance.
March 27, Friday, 5:00 p.m........................Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be ad-
ministered on April 4.
Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
March 30, Monday, 4:00 p.m.......................Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Winter Trimester to file theses with the Dean
of the Graduate School.
April 4, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon..............Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
April 9, Thursday, 7:30 p.m ........................Comprehensive final examinations begin.
April 10, Friday, 3:30 p.m...... ---........Non-comprehensive final examinations begin
and take precedence over any conflicting
classes.
April 10, Friday, 5:45 p.m................----............All classes end.
April 17, Friday, 5:00 p.m.......... .......All grades for Winter Trimester due in the
Office of the Registrar.
April 18, Saturday, 12 Noon........................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.







UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 3


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

1963-64

SPRING TRIMESTER

(See separate calendars for First and Second Terms within the Spring Trimester)
1964
April 6, Monday-.....-- ..-..---- -.....----.Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Spring Trimester.
April 21, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m...................Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased fees
for Late Registration.
April 22-23, Wednesday-Thursday..............-Placement tests for entering students.
April 22-25, Wednesday-Saturday.................Registration according to appointments assign-
ed. No one permitted to start registration on
Saturday, April 25, after 10:00 a.m.
April 27, Monday, 7:30 a.m.......................Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.
April 29, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m...................Last time for completing registration for the
Spring Trimester. No one permitted to start
registration after 3:00 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses and for changing
sections, 5:00 p.m.
May 2, Saturday.......................----- .....Commencement Convocation.
May 8, Friday, 5:00 p.m......-................... Last time for dropping full Trimester courses
without receiving a grade of E.
May 11, Monday, 12 Noon....................Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded at
the end of the Spring Trimester.
June 13, Saturday, 7:30 p.m....................... Recess in full Trimester courses begins.
June 17, Wednesday, 7:30 a.m......................Recess in full Trimester courses ends.
June 29, Monday, 5:00 p.m........-................Last time for full Trimester students to remove
grades of I or X received in preceding term of
attendance.
July 2, Thursday, 5:00 p.m .............. Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be ad-
ministered on July 11.
July 4, Saturday........... ....................H...oliday. Classes suspended.
July 11, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon....-........Foreign language examination for graduate
students.
July 17, Friday, 5:00 p.m....... ..-........Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next Trimester or term.
July 20, Monday, 4:00 p.m................. .........Last time for candidates for Master's and
Doctor's degrees to be awarded at the end of
the Spring Trimester to file theses with the
Dean of the Graduate School.
July 30, Thursday, 7:30 p.m.......--...............Comprehensive final examinations begin.
July 31, Friday, 3:30 p.m....--...------.........Non-comprehensive final examinations begin
and take precedence over any conflicting
classes.







4 UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


July 31, Friday, 5:45 p.m............................All classes end.
August 7, Friday, 5:00 p.m......................... All grades for Spring Trimester due in the
Office of the Registrar.
August 8, Saturday, 12 Noon.....................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

1963-64

FIRST TERM -SPRING SEMESTER

1964
April 6, Monday......... ............. .....Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the First Term of the Spring
Trimester.
April 21, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.....................Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased
fees for Late Registration.
April 22-23, Wednesday-Thursday................Placement tests for entering students.
April 22-25, Wednesday-Saturday.................Registration according to appointments assign-
ed. No one permitted to start registration on
Saturday, April 25, after 10:00 a.m.
April 27, Monday, 7:30 a.m...................Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.
April 29, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m................Last time for completing registration for the
First Term of the Spring Trimester. No one
permitted to start registration after 3:00 p.m.
on this date.
Last time for adding courses and for changing
sections, 5:00 p.m.
May 8, Friday, 5:00 p.m........................Last time for dropping First Term courses
without receiving a grade of E.
May 11, Monday, 12 Noon...........-----.... Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded
at the end of the First Term of the Spring
Trimester.
May 20, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m....................Last time for removing grades of I or X re-
ceived in preceding term of attendance.
May 29, Friday, 5:00 p.m.......................Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
June 1, Monday........ ..................Last time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
First Term of the Spring Trimester to file
theses with the Dean of the Graduate School.
June 12, Friday, 5:45 p.m...---......... ........Classes end.
Final examinations begin.
June 17, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m..................Grades for First Term of the Spring Trimester
due in the Office of the Registrar.
June 18, Thursday, 12 Noon......................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.








UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 5


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

1963-64

SECOND TERM SPRING TRIMESTER

1964
June 1, Monday...........-......--..--...... Last day for those not previously in attendance
at the University of Florida to file application
for admission for the Second Term of the
Spring Trimester.
June 12, Friday, 5:45 p.m.. ...........-.......- Last days for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida to apply for registra-
tion appointments in the Regular Registration
period. Those who apply after this date will be
assigned Late Registration appointments and
will be subject to the payment of increased fees
for Late Registration.
June 15-16, Monday-Tuesday.......................Placement tests for entering students.
Registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration
on Tuesday, June 16, after 3:00 p.m.
June 17, Wednesday, 7:30 a.m....................Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on or
after this date.
June 19, Friday, 5:00 p.m.....--... .....---- Last time for completing registration for the
Second Term of the Spring Trimester. No one
permitted to start registration after 3:00 p.m.
on this date.
Last time for adding courses and for changing
sections, 5:00 p.m.
Tune 26, Friday, 5:00 p.m..........-..............-- Last time for dropping courses in the Second
Term of the Spring Trimester without receiving
a grade of E.
Tuly 2, Thursday, 5:00 p.m....---- .......-Last day for graduate students to apply to take
the foreign language examination to be ad-
ministered on July 11.
July 4, Saturday...........-----............................Holiday. Classes suspended.
July 6, Monday, 12 Noon...................Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be awarded at
the end of the Second Term of the Spring Tri-
mester.
July 11, Saturday, 10:00-12 Noon...............oreign language examination for graduate
students.
July 15, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m...................Last time for removing grade I or X received
in preceding term of attendance.
July 17, Friday, 5:00 p.m.....---. ---.....--- Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar to change college or division
for the next trimester or term.
July 20, Monday, 4:00 p.m.----~~..-----....L-ast time for candidates for Master's and Doc-
tor's degrees to be awarded at the end of the
Second Term of the Spring Trimester to file
theses with the Dean of the Graduate School.
July 30, Thursday, 7:30 p.m.......-.................Comprehensive final examinations begin.
July 31, Friday, 3:30 p.m....-----------....-Non-comprehensive final examinations begin
and take precedence over any conflicting
classes.
July 31, Friday, 5:45 p.m....---. .........------------All classes end.
August 7, Friday, 5:00 p.m........................All grades for Second Term of the Spring Tri-
mester due in the Office of the Registrar.
August 8, Saturday, 12 Noon.....................Report of colleges on candidates for degrees
due in the Office of the Registrar.








Florida State Board of Education

C. FARRIS BRYANT ......................- ...........- .... .................-...........Governor

TOM ADAMS ........... ........ ...........................................Secretary of State

J. EDWIN LARSON .................... ............- .......................-........State Treasurer

RICHARD ERVIN .......-.....- ........... ......................-....-Attorney General

THOMAS D. BAILEY, Secretary................................State Superintendent of Public Instruction




Board of Control of Florida

BAYA M. HARRISON, JR., Chairman .......................................................... Attorney at Law
St. Petersburg, Florida

FRANK M. BUCHANAN ...................... ................... ..................Businessman
Miami, Florida

CHARLES R. FORMAN .............. ................. ... ..................... .............Veterinarian
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

S. KENDRICK GUERNSEY ...................... .................... ...........................Businessman
Jacksonville, Florida

W AYNE C. M CCALL .......... ..................................................... ...... ......................Dentist
Ocala, Florida

JOHN C. PACE ................. ... ....... ......... ...................................Businessman
Pensacola, Florida

GERT H. W. SCHMIDT ..... .................. ............................Businessman
Jacksonville, Florida

J. BROWARD CULPEPPER .................................................. ........................Executive Director
Tallahassee, Florida








Officers of Adminirtration

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
J. WAYNE RErrZ, Ph.D, LL.D------..................... .......................---President of the University

HARRY MELVIN PHILPOTT, Ph.D.........................................Vice President of the University
TURPIN CHAMBERS BANNISTER, F.A.I.A., Ph.D., D.F.A......................Dean of the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts

JOSEPH RILEY BECKENBACH, Ph.D................... ..................Director of the Agricultural
Experiment Station

MARVIN ADEL BROOKER, Ph.D.......................................Dean of the College of Agriculture
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D.........................Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Director
of the Bureau of Professional Relations

LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D............................................... Dean of the Graduate School and
Director of Research

LESTER LEONARD HALE, Ph.D.................- ...... ..............Dean of Student Affairs
GEORGE THOMAS HARRELL, M.D............... ..... ....... Dean of the College of Medicine
DONALD JOHN HART, Ph.D...................Dean of the College of Business Administration
BYRON S. HOLLINSHEAD, M.A., LL.D., L.H.D.....................Dean of the University College
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P................- ... .. .....................Registrar

WILLIAM ELLIS JONES, B.S.B.A..............--..........................Business Manager
JAMES WESLEY WILLINGHAM, Ph.D...................Acting Director of the School of Forestry
FRANK EDWARD MALONEY, LL.B........ ...............................Dean of the College of Law
SAMUEL P. MARTIN, M.D............... .........................Provost for the Health Center
DARREL JAY MASE, Ph.D......................Dean of the College of Health Related Services
ROBERT BABREAU MAUTZ, LL.B....................................................Dean of Academic Affairs
RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D......................-..... Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

DOROTHY MARY SMITH, M.Ed............................---.....Dean of the College of Nursing

DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.A.E...................-............. Dean of the College of Physical
Education and Health

MARSHALL OWEN WATKINS, D.P.A.......... .......................Director of the Agricultural
Extension Service

JOSEPH WEIL, M.S..-........ ....-Dean of the College of Engineering and Director of the
Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station

RAE O. WEIMER.........................Director of the School of Journalism and Communications

STANLEY LEROY WEST, LL.B., B.S. in L.S.................Director of the University Libraries

JOSEPH BENTON WHITE, Ph.D ...... .................---Dean of the College of Education

A. CURTIS WILGUS, Ph.D...........................Director of the School of Inter-American Studies







8 ADMINISTRATION


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Dean of the Graduate School; Director of Research
and Research Professor
ALEXANDER G. SMITH, Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Dean of the Graduate School, Professor
of Physics, Professor and Head of Department of Astronomy
E. RUFFIN JONES, JR., Ph.D. (Virginia), Assistant Dean of the Graduate School for the
Three-Year Master's Degree Program and Professor of Biology
ROBERT A. BRYAN, Ph.D. (Kentucky), Assistant to the Dean and Assistant Professor
of English
JIMMY C. PERKINS, B.S., Administrative Assistant to the Dean


THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Dean of the Graduate School; Director of Research
and Research Professor, Chairman
JAMES RICHARD ANDERSON, Ph.D. (Maryland), Professor of Geography and Head of
Department
CLEMENT H. DONOVAN, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of Economics and Head of
Department
ARMIN HENRY GROPP, Ph.D. (Oregon), Professor of Chemistry and Assistant Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences
VYNCE ALBERT HINES, Ed.D. (Illinois), Professor of Education
E. RUFFIN JONES, JR., Ph.D. (Virginia), Assistant Dean of the Graduate School and
Professor of Biology
BILLIE K. STEVENS, M.A., Professor of Professional Physical Education
ROBERT E. UHRIG, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Head of
Department
REMBERT WALLACE PATRICK, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Graduate Research Professor of
History
ALEXANDER G. SMITH, Ph.D. (Duke), Assistant Dean of the Graduate School, Professor
of Physics, Professor and Head of Department of Astronomy
MAx EzRA TYLER, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Professor of Bacteriology and Head of Department









General Information

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
The Graduate School consists of the dean, the assistant deans, the Graduate Council,
and the graduate faculty. It is responsible for the establishment and enforcement of mini-
mum general standards of graduate work in the University and for the coordination of the
graduate programs of the various colleges and divisions of the University. The responsi-
bility for the detailed operations of graduate programs is vested in the individual colleges,
divisions, and departments. In most of the colleges an assistant dean or other official is
directly responsible for graduate study in his college.
The Graduate Council, of which the dean is chairman, establishes the basic policies
and procedures of the Graduate School, considers petitions, and recommends the award
of graduate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty are appointed by the dean with the
approval of the Graduate Council on the basis of specific needs and qualifications to meet
the needs. Thus members of the graduate faculty fall into three categories in accordance
with their function: those who are appointed to teach graduate courses, those appointed
to direct master's theses, and those appointed to direct doctoral dissertations. No staff
member is expected to perform any of these functions without having been appointed to
the graduate faculty, though temporary exceptions may be made in unusual circumstances.
Membership on the graduate faculty constitutes recognition of ability to carry out certain
scholarly responsibilities, but nonmembership does not imply the lack of such ability.
Since appointments are made to meet specific needs, the question of qualifications arises
only where the need exists.
Study leading to graduate degrees has existed at the University of Florida from the
date of the establishment of the University on its present campus. The first M.A. was
awarded in 1906, the major being English, and the first M.S. in 1908, with major in ento-
mology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D. were initiated in 1930, and the first de-
grees were awarded in 1934, one with major in chemistry and the other with major in
pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal
growth at the University of Florida. In 1920 two degrees were awarded in two fields. In
1930, 33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded in 16
fields. In 1962 the total number of degrees awarded was 424 in 61 fields. The proportion
of doctor's degrees has increased steadily. In 1950, 18 Ph.D.'s and 5 Ed.D.'s were
awarded. In 1962 the totals were 89 Ph.D.'s and 32 Ed.D.'s.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study was very informal. Control was
in the hands of a faculty committee which reported directly to the President. In 1910,
however, James N. Anderson, head of the Department of Ancient Languages, was appoint-
ed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of Graduate Work, and in 1930
he became the first dean of the Graduate School. He was succeeded upon his retirement
in 1938 by T. M. Simpson, head of the Department of Mathematics, who held the posi-
tion until he became dean emeritus in 1951. C. F. Byers, head of the Department of
Biological Sciences in the University College, served as acting dean from June 1951 until
August 1952, when he was succeeded by the present Dean, L. E. Grinter, who came to
Florida from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he had served as Vice President,
Dean of the Graduate School, and Research Professor.


Graduate Programs Offered
NON-THESIS DEGREES
Master of Agriculture, with major in any field in agriculture
Master of Business Administration, with major in any field in business administration
Master of Education, with major in any field in education, including business education
Master of Engineering
Master of Physical Education and Health, with major in physical education
Master of Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Arts in Teaching, with major in appropriate departments in the College of Arts
and Sciences
Master of Science in Teaching, with major in appropriate departments in the College of
Arts and Sciences
Specialist in Education-a special degree requiring one year of graduate work beyond the
master's









General Information

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
The Graduate School consists of the dean, the assistant deans, the Graduate Council,
and the graduate faculty. It is responsible for the establishment and enforcement of mini-
mum general standards of graduate work in the University and for the coordination of the
graduate programs of the various colleges and divisions of the University. The responsi-
bility for the detailed operations of graduate programs is vested in the individual colleges,
divisions, and departments. In most of the colleges an assistant dean or other official is
directly responsible for graduate study in his college.
The Graduate Council, of which the dean is chairman, establishes the basic policies
and procedures of the Graduate School, considers petitions, and recommends the award
of graduate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty are appointed by the dean with the
approval of the Graduate Council on the basis of specific needs and qualifications to meet
the needs. Thus members of the graduate faculty fall into three categories in accordance
with their function: those who are appointed to teach graduate courses, those appointed
to direct master's theses, and those appointed to direct doctoral dissertations. No staff
member is expected to perform any of these functions without having been appointed to
the graduate faculty, though temporary exceptions may be made in unusual circumstances.
Membership on the graduate faculty constitutes recognition of ability to carry out certain
scholarly responsibilities, but nonmembership does not imply the lack of such ability.
Since appointments are made to meet specific needs, the question of qualifications arises
only where the need exists.
Study leading to graduate degrees has existed at the University of Florida from the
date of the establishment of the University on its present campus. The first M.A. was
awarded in 1906, the major being English, and the first M.S. in 1908, with major in ento-
mology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D. were initiated in 1930, and the first de-
grees were awarded in 1934, one with major in chemistry and the other with major in
pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal
growth at the University of Florida. In 1920 two degrees were awarded in two fields. In
1930, 33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded in 16
fields. In 1962 the total number of degrees awarded was 424 in 61 fields. The proportion
of doctor's degrees has increased steadily. In 1950, 18 Ph.D.'s and 5 Ed.D.'s were
awarded. In 1962 the totals were 89 Ph.D.'s and 32 Ed.D.'s.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study was very informal. Control was
in the hands of a faculty committee which reported directly to the President. In 1910,
however, James N. Anderson, head of the Department of Ancient Languages, was appoint-
ed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Director of Graduate Work, and in 1930
he became the first dean of the Graduate School. He was succeeded upon his retirement
in 1938 by T. M. Simpson, head of the Department of Mathematics, who held the posi-
tion until he became dean emeritus in 1951. C. F. Byers, head of the Department of
Biological Sciences in the University College, served as acting dean from June 1951 until
August 1952, when he was succeeded by the present Dean, L. E. Grinter, who came to
Florida from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he had served as Vice President,
Dean of the Graduate School, and Research Professor.


Graduate Programs Offered
NON-THESIS DEGREES
Master of Agriculture, with major in any field in agriculture
Master of Business Administration, with major in any field in business administration
Master of Education, with major in any field in education, including business education
Master of Engineering
Master of Physical Education and Health, with major in physical education
Master of Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Arts in Teaching, with major in appropriate departments in the College of Arts
and Sciences
Master of Science in Teaching, with major in appropriate departments in the College of
Arts and Sciences
Specialist in Education-a special degree requiring one year of graduate work beyond the
master's








10 DEGREES


THESIS DEGREES
Master of Science in Agriculture, with major in one of the following:
Agricultural Economics Fruit Crops
Agricultural Education Ornamental Horticulture
Agronomy Plant Pathology
Animal Science Poultry Science
Dairy Science Soils
Entomology Vegetable Crops
Food Technology and Nutrition

Master of Science in Building Construction

Master of Science in Engineering, with major in one of the following:
Aerospace Engineering Engineering Mechanics
Agricultural Engineering Industrial Engineering
Chemical Engineering Mechanical Engineering
Civil Engineering Metallurgical Engineering
Electrical Engineering Nuclear Engineering

Master of Science in Forestry
Master of Science in Pharmacy, with major in one of the following:
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Pharmacology
Pharmacognosy Pharmacy

Master of Science, with major in one of the following:
Bacteriology Geology
Biochemistry Mathematics
Biology (Zoology) Physics
Botany Plant Pathology
Chemistry Psychology
Entomology Radiation Biophysics
Geography
Master of Fine Arts

Master of Arts in Architecture, with major in one of the following:
Architectural Design Building Construction
Master of Arts in Education, with major in one of the following:
Agricultural Education Foundations of Education
Business Education Personnel Services
Educational Administration Secondary Education
Elementary Education
Master of Arts in Journalism and Communications

Master of Arts in Physical Education and Health

Master of Arts, with major in one of the following:
Accounting Management and Business Law
Economics Marketing
English Mathematics
Finance and Insurance Philosophy
French Political Science
Geography Psychology
German Real Estate
History Sociology
Inter-American Area Studies Spanish
Latin Speech

Doctor of Education, with major in one of the following:
Curriculum and Instruction Foundations of Education
Educational Administration Guidance and Personnel Services








ADMISSION 11


Doctor of Philosophy, with major in one of
Agricultural Economics
Agronomy
Animal Science
Bacteriology
Biochemistry
Biology (Zoology)
Botany
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering, including
Sanitary Engineering
Structural Engineering
Economics
Economics and Business
Administration
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Mechanics
English
Entomology
Fruit Crops
Geography
History
Inter-American Area Studies


the following:
Mathematics
Medical Sciences, including
Anatomy
Biochemistry
Microbiology
Physiology
Metallurgical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
Pharmacy, including
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacognosy
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Soils
Spanish
Speech
Vegetable Crops


Admission to the Graduate School

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION to the Graduate School must be made to the
Director of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at times stipulated in the
University Calendar. Applications which meet minimum standards for admissions are
referred by the Director to the graduate selection committees of the various colleges and
divisions for approval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete official transcripts of all the
applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in the possession of the Registrar, and
no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is received directly from the Registrar
of the institution in which the work was done. Official supplementary transcripts are re-
quired, as soon as they are available, for any work completed after making application.
In general, no student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will be con-
sidered for graduate study in any unit of the University.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

UNDERGRADUATE RECORD.-Unqualified admission to the Graduate School is
dependent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or
curriculum with an average grade of B for the junior and senior years. In some units of
the Graduate School and on the more advanced levels of graduate study, an undergraduate
average considerably above B may be required. In some units (see the following two para-
graphs) admission may be considered with an undergraduate average slightly below B.
College graduate admission selection committees take into account not only the general
grade average, but the distribution of work and the quality and extent of preparation for
the graduate program which the student proposes to undertake.
The minimum undergraduate grade average acceptable for admission to programs lead-
ing to the degrees of Master of Arts in Education, Master of Education, Master of Arts in
Physical Education and Health, and Master of Physical Education and Health is 2.5, calcu-
lated on a basis of 4.0 as the highest possible average and covering the last two years of
undergraduate work (at least 60 credit hours).
In the College of Agriculture, admission to graduate study is normally limited to
those students who have maintained at least a 2.75 grade-point average in their upper-
division work and 3.0 in their major subject. For students with an undergraduate major
in general agriculture, the minimum upper-division average is 2.85. In exceptional cases,
where a candidate has demonstrated in some other way his fitness to do graduate work, as,
for instance, outstanding achievement since earning the bachelor's degree, he may be con-
sidered for admission.
While the general admissions requirements described above apply to both master's and








12 ADMISSION


doctoral candidates, it should be noted that doctoral candidates must meet certain addition-
al requirements which vary according to the programs established by the departments and
colleges. Furthermore, it is desirable for students planning to enter certain colleges and
and departments to have a reading knowledge of one foreign language.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
A satisfactory average score on the Graduate Record Examination is required for ad-
mission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the aptitude test of the GRE,
but either at the request of the department concerned or on his own volition, the applicant
is encouraged to submit in addition the score on one or more advanced subject matter tests
of the GRE. The scores on all tests taken will be weighed in regard to admission.
The GRE is given five times a year-in November, January, March, April, and July
-at a great many locations in the United States, including Gainesville, Florida. To deter-
mine exact dates and the most convenient locations, students should write to the Educa-
tional Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Applications are required several weeks prior
to the examination, and scores are received about a month after the examination. Hence,
it is necessary to apply for the GRE in early October for admission in January, in early
January for admission in April, and in early April for admission in September. Other ex-
aminations are given in early March and early July but the ones listed above are corre-
lated with admissions deadlines.
Students enrolled in the Graduate School prior to establishment of the GRE require-
ment for admission (June, 1956) are permitted to complete the degree on which they
were working. However, if the student has not been registered for graduate work at the
University for seven years, or if he wishes to work toward a second graduate degree, he
must submit satisfactory GRE scores before readmission.
FOREIGN STUDENTS.-Students educated in foreign countries who apply for ad-
mission while residing outside the United States may be given a postponement and per-
mitted to take the GRE during the first trimester of attendance at the University of Flor-
ida. Registration for a second trimester will depend upon completion of the examination.
All foreign students whose native language is not English will be required to take an ex-
amination during their first trimester at the University to test their command of the Eng-
lish language. A student whose command of English is considered inadequate will be re-
quired to take one or more special courses in English for foreign students. These courses
do not carry graduate credit and are not considered in calculating grade-point averages.
POSTPONEMENT OF THE GRE.-If a student applies for admission too late to
take the GRE before his expected date of entry, he may apply for admission to the Gradu-
ate School with postponement of the GRE and submit his score on the Miller Analogies
Test to be used as a partial basis for deciding whether tentative admission may be granted.
It should be noted, however, that the Miller Analogies Test is not a substitute for the
GRE. In cases where the GRE has been postponed it must be taken with satisfactory re-
sults before a second registration will be permitted.
THE MILLER ANALOGIES TEST is given at about 250 colleges and universities
throughout the country, and is administered by the University of Florida Board of Exam-
iners, Room 405, Seagle Building, throughout the calendar year at 3:00 p.m. on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday. During the week prior to the first day of classes the test will also
be offered at 10:00 a.m. on Monday and 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Special ap-
pointments can be made by contacting the Board of Examiners. The cost of the test, $2.00,
should be paid to the University Cashier, Room 2, Tigert Hall, and the receipt should be
presented at the time of testing.
Test scores should be sent by the examining official to the Dean of the Graduate
School. No student can be considered for postponement of the GRE until after his appli-
cation for admission is complete and all his credentials have been received in the Office of
the Registrar.

TRIAL PROGRAMS
The Graduate School approves two types of trial programs under the fifth-year under-
graduate registration for applicants whose admission for graduate study is in doubt. These
programs are arranged by the major department when the student has been referred to it
for this purpose by the Registrar. Trial programs shall be strictly reserved for genuinely
problematical or borderline cases.
Type I (partly transferable): a program of about 15 credit hours consisting of ad-
vanced undergraduate courses and no more than 6 hours of graduate courses. Upon com-







ADMISSION 13


pletion of the program with an average grade of B or better, up to 12 hours may be trans-
ferred to the student's graduate record, provided that this transfer is approved by his major
department and college and that all other requirements for admission to the Graduate
School have been met.
Programs of Type I are used where a student's previous grade record or GRE scores
are on the borderline of acceptability.
Type II (nontransferable): a program of 15 or more hours of undergraduate work,
none of which may be transferred to the student's graduate record.
Programs of Type II are used (1) to validate undergraduate records from nonac-
credited and unevaluated colleges and in cases where the quantity or quality of the stu-
dent's preparation cannot be determined with sufficient certainty for purpose of judging ad-
mission: (2) to repair extensive deficiencies in undergraduate programs which do not meet
the prerequisites for graduate study laid down by the student's proposed major department
(minor deficiencies of less than 12 hours and field transfer requirements covered by this
catalog may be handled on a noncredit basis as part of the graduate program for students
who meet admission standards).
If the trial program of either type is completed with an average grade of B or better
and other admission requirements have been met, the student will upon recommendation
of his major department and college be given unqualified admission to the Graduate
School. To secure this change of status, the student should apply through his department
head and college dean to the Registrar.
All trial programs must be formally approved by the major department and college
and filed with the Registrar and the Graduate School in order that there may be no ques-
tion in either office concerning the termination of the program or of the courses to be
used in calculating the grade average. Neither type of trial program may be extended.

ADMISSION TO A SECOND GRADUATE PROGRAM
A student who has completed a degree program in the Graduate School may not
undertake an additional degree program without the approval of the head of the depart-
ment in which he proposes to do his major work. GRE scores must be submitted by the
student at the time he proposes an additional degree program even though they were not
required at the time he started his previous degree work. It is particularly important that
these scores and the other elements in the record and qualifications of the student be care-
fully weighed before he is permitted to undertake work for the doctor's degree.

UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION
FOR GRADUATE CREDIT

An undergraduate student at the University of Florida who has less than one trimester
of course work to complete for the bachelor's degree may, prior to registering, request
in writing, through the dean of his college, approval by the Dean of the Graduate School
of course registration eligible for graduate credit. Such approval can be given only to stu-
dents who have maintained a B average in the upper division and whose total proposed
program does not exceed 15 credit hours in a single trimester or 6 hours in a summer
term. Commonly, courses to be approved should be of full graduate caliber; approval of
an advanced undergraduate course will be restricted to one not normally a part of the
undergraduate program prerequisite to the graduate studies to be undertaken. For appli-
cation to a specific advanced degree the course work taken must be earned with a grade
of A or B with all course work for the trimester at B average, and be recommended for
transfer to the student's graduate record by his supervisory committee after he has been
admitted to the Graduate School. Courses beyond the requirement of the bachelor's degree
which are taken without such approval are not eligible for transfer as graduate credit.
Foundation work required for a change of major must be taken without graduate credit.
Students enrolled in the three-year master's degree program will be permitted to register
in graduate courses when approved by the program advisory committee and the assistant
dean of the Graduate School in charge of the program.
ADMISSION OF FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS.-Members
of the faculty of the University of Florida with a rank of assistant professor or above (or
equivalent), except county agents in the Agricultural Extension Service, may not receive a
graduate degree from this institution. They may, however, register for work in the Gradu-
ate School and apply the credit earned to graduate degrees to be conferred by other insti-
tutions.








14 GENERAL REGULATIONS


General Regulations and Instructions

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
It is the responsibility of the student to inform himself concerning, and to observe, all
regulations and procedures required by the course he is pursuing. In no case will a regu-
lation be waived or an exception granted because a student pleads ignorance of the regula-
tion or asserts that he was not informed of it by his adviser or other authority. The stu-
dent should make himself especially familiar with (1) this section of the catalog, (2) the
section presenting the requirements for the degree which he plans to take, and (3) the of-
ferings and requirements of his major department.
CONSULTATION WITH COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENT.-After the student has
been admitted to the Graduate School but before his first registration, he should consult
the college and department in which he will do his work concerning course requirements,
deficiencies if any, the planning of a program, special regulations, etc. Departments may
have degree requirements that are not listed in this catalog. All registrations require the
signature of the dean of the college (or his representative) in which the degree is to be
awarded.

LOADS
The University of Florida adopted, beginning in September of 1962, a trimester sys-
tem of operation consisting of three 15-week periods of instruction and examination. The
third period runs concurrently with two seven and one-half week summer sessions. Class
schedules have been revised so that a credit hour under the trimester system is equal to
one semester hour.
MAXIMUM REGISTRATION.-The maximum graduate registration permitted in
any trimester is 15 credit hours. Students who attend one or both of the seven and one-
half week summer sessions may register for up to 9 hours in either session, but the total
for the two seven and one-half week sessions should not exceed 15 hours. Part-time em-
ployment of any kind, either within or without the University, reduces the maximum
study load as indicated by the following table:
Fraction of Maximum Hours Maximum Academic Residence
Time Employed Per Week Employed Load Permitted Acquired
None None 15 credit hours 1 trimester
1/3-time 15 12 credit hours 4/5 trimester
1/2-time 20 10 credit hours 2/3 trimester
3/4-time 30 7 credit hours 1/2 trimester
Fully employed 40 4 hours course work plus 2/5 trimester
2 hrs. of thesis research
During either of the seven and one-half week summer sessions a part-time employee
may register for a maximum of 6 credit hours, while a full-time employee is limited to
one course or 3 credit hours.
MINIMUM REGISTRATION.-Holders of fellowships or assistantships and part-
time interim instructors who are working for a graduate degree must register for graduate
study programs commensurate with the study time permitted by their awards, and in no
case for less than 6 credit hours for a trimester. Holders of fellowships or assistantships
and part-time interim instructors who attend a seven and one-half week summer session
must register for not less than 3 credit hours of course work or 5 credit hours of thesis
or dissertation research, or a combination of these.
VETERAN'S CERTIFICATION.-Students who are applying for assistance under
Public Law 550 and whose applications are otherwise acceptable to the Veterans Admin-
istration will automatically be certified by the Registrar as follows:
Trimester Summer Session
Certification Registration Certification Registration
full 14-15 hrs. full 7-9 hrs.
3/4 10-13 hrs. 3/4 5-6 hrs.
1/2 7- 9 hrs. 1/2 4 hrs.
fees only 3- 6 hrs. fees only below 4 hrs.
Students who desire higher certification must submit through the Graduate School office
the form "Certification of Study Load." The University Housing Office also requires this
form for students with less than 9 hours' registration (or 3 hours in the summer session).








GENERAL REGULATIONS 15


Appropriate allowance in "equivalent credit hours" may be made on this form for prepa-
ration for language examinations or qualifying examinations or for other studies specifical-
ly required by the student's supervisory committee. Certification will be on the basis of
the following proportion:
Certification Minimum Maximum
Study Load Employment
full 12 hrs. 15 hrs. per week (1/3-time)
3/4 9 hrs. 20 hrs. per week (1/2-time)
1/2 6 hrs. 30 hrs. per week (3/4-time)
fees only 3 hrs. full-time employee
Certification in the summer sessions will be as follows:
Certification Minimum Maximum
Study Load Employment
full 6 hrs. 15 hrs. per week (1/3-time) or
20 hrs. per week (1/2-time)
1/2 3 hrs. 20 hrs. per week (1/2-time) or
30 hrs. per week (3/4-time)
fees if applicable 3 hrs. full time employee
In cases where the supervisory committee classifies the work load as a contribution to the
student's approved educational program, additional certification will normally be approved.

RESIDENCE
For work taken at the University of Florida, an academic year of residence will be
granted for two trimesters of full-time registration. The academic year of the institution
issuing a transcript will be used for residence determination in accepting transfer credits.
Specific residence requirements of doctoral degrees will be found in the section dealing
with the Ph.D. degree.

COURSES AND CREDITS
Courses numbered 500-599 are for fifth-year or other advanced undergraduate pro-
grams. Regulations as to the use of these courses in graduate programs, grading, and mini-
mum class size will be the same as for courses in the 400 category. Courses numbered
600 and above are limited to graduate students. Courses numbered 700 and above are
graduate courses primarily for advanced graduate students.
Undergraduate courses numbered 300 and above are acceptable for minor credit when
taken as a part of an approved graduate program. Courses bearing numbers below 600
may not be used for graduate major credit unless they have been approved for this pur-
pose by the Graduate Council. In any case, at least 50 per cent of the minimum course
work for any master's degree must be in courses numbered 600 or above.
Registration in the course numbered 699, Master's Research, may be from 0 to 6
hours, and in the course numbered 799, Doctoral Research, may be from 1 to 12 hours
in one trimester. The total registration in 699 is limited to 12 hours but is unlimited for
799. Advisers should assign to registration in these courses the number of hours of credit
appropriate to the planned work in research. Registration for zero credit hours should be
assigned only in exceptional situations, since the registration should normally reflect the
proposed program of research as well as of course work. On the assignment of credit for
research which is a part of a student's employment as well as a contribution to his thesis
or dissertation, see the section on Residence for the Ph.D. degree.
A complete list of approved graduate courses appears in the section of this catalog
entitled Departmental Courses. Departments reserve the right to decide which of these
graduate courses shall be given in any trimester or summer session. The published
Schedule of Courses does not always include all graduate courses offered; the departments,
therefore, should be consulted concerning available courses.
CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK.-No courses may be taken for
graduate credit by correspondence. No extension courses, field laboratory courses, or work-
shops may be used for graduate credit except in programs for the M.Ed., M.A.E., M.P.H.,
and Ed.S. For regulations governing the use of such courses in the degree programs
named, see below, under requirements for specific degrees, the limits on off-campus work.
Extension work taken at another institution (except Florida State University) may not
be transferred to the University of Florida for graduate credit.








16 GENERAL REGULATIONS


GRADES

Passing grades for graduate students in courses numbered below 600 are A and B.
Passing grades in courses numbered 600 and above are A, B, and C; however C grades
in courses numbered 600 and above count toward a graduate degree only if an equal
number of credit hours in courses numbered 600 and above are earned with a grade of A.
Admission to candidacy for a graduate degree and the award of such degree depends
(among other requirements) upon maintenance of an average grade of B for all work
attempted in the major and minor fields. Any grade of I (incomplete) in the fields of the
major and minor (or minors) must be removed by completing all required work, unless
a grade point average of 3.0 is maintained, including the hours of incomplete courses.
Grades in courses numbered 699 and 799 are not considered in calculating these averages.
It is the responsibility of the thesis or dissertation director to submit a grade in 699
or 799. The grade may be any of the standard letter grades or it may be I. If the grade
of I is recorded, it should be changed to a regular letter grade as soon as the student
has completed the work appropriate to the credit hours of registration in 699 or 799 and
no later than the completion of the thesis or dissertation.
UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP.-Any graduate student may be denied fur-
ther registration in the University or in his graduate major if his progress toward the
completion of his planned program becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory progress has
been defined by the Graduate Council as failure to maintain an accumulative grade aver-
age of B in all work attempted in the Graduate School.

CHANGE OF MAJOR

Graduate students already admitted for work in one department who wish to transfer
to another department must apply through the office of the dean of their college and must
have their credentials approved by the graduate selection committee having jurisdiction in
the new department. The Dean of the Graduate School and the Registrar must be notified
in writing, and the notification must carry the approval of both department heads and the
college dean. If the change of department involves a change of college, formal application
for change of college must be made through the office of the Registrar.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS
In those degree programs where a foreign language examination is required, the fol-
lowing principles and procedures apply:
Each candidate, at the time of applying for a foreign language examination, shall
present a certificate of admission to the Department of Foreign Languages. This certificate
shall bear the signature of his supervisory chairman (or department head if a committee
has not been appointed) and shall state that he is believed to be prepared for the exami-
nation.
If he fails to pass a foreign language examination, the student shall present to the
Graduate School, through his supervisory committee chairman, acceptable evidence that
he has made a serious attempt to prepare himself for re-examination. If the evidence is
acceptable, the student will be given a certificate of admission which must be presented
to the Department of Foreign Languages before he will be permitted to take his re-
examination.
The reading knowledge examination consists of a passage of general material selected
by the Foreign Language Department. The use of a dictionary is permitted. Grading of
the regular foreign language examination is handled by the Foreign Language Depart-
ment, the objective being that the essential idea of each part of the passage be translated
into acceptable English. The grade of each student taking an examination is transmitted
to the Graduate School, together with the recommendation of the Foreign Langauge
Department as to an acceptable grade. The Graduate School will send the result of the
examination to the college dean, the department head, the supervisory committee chair-
man, and the student.

PROCEDURE FOR FINAL TRIMESTER
It is essential that the student inform himself concerning deadline dates as set forth
in the University Calendar and in the announcements issued by the Dean of the Gradu-
ate School and by the officials of his college, school, or department.
Early in the last term the student should make formal application to the Registrar
for his degree. When his thesis is ready to be put in final form he should get instructions








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES 17


from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School. He must arrange through the Uni-
versity Bookstore for proper academic costume to be worn at Commencement.
Normally, students in the Graduate School must be registered in the University at
the time they receive a degree. If, however, a student has completed all requirements for
his degree, including courses, residence, thesis or dissertation, and all examinations, at the
time of registration for the term in which his degree is to be awarded, the Graduate
Council will consider a petition to waive this regulation. In brief, a student must be
registered for the term in which his final examination is given.

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT
Only one commencement ceremony is scheduled annually. Graduates who are to re-
ceive advanced degrees are urged to attend commencement in order to personally accept
the honor indicated by the appropriate hood. Diplomas will be given at the end of each
trimester and hoods will be mailed immediately after commencement to advanced degree
graduates who were unable to attend.


Requirements for Master's Degrees

GENERAL REGULATIONS
RESIDENCE.-For any master's degree the student must spend at least two full-
time trimesters, or equivalent, as a graduate student at the University of Florida.
If the work for the master's degree is done entirely in the summer, full-time study
during four seven and one-half week sessions will satisfy the residence requirement. This
requirement may be reduced to (but not below) three seven and one-half week summer
sessions by transfer of work from another institution or by use of extension or other non-
resident credit where accepted by the college concerned and by the Graduate Council.
Nonresident county agents in the Agricultural Extension Service may use three three-
week summer sessions for the purpose of satisfying the residence requirement for the
degrees Master of Agriculture or Master of Science in Agriculture, but only if they have
also spent one regular trimester in full-time resident graduate study (or two seven and one-
half week summer sessions) on the campus at the University of Florida.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Application for admission to candidacy for mas-
ter's degrees should be approved by the Graduate School when course work is half com-
pleted and in no case later than 60 days before the degree is to be awarded. The student
must have a B average for all graduate work completed. The Graduate Council reserves
the right to deny degrees to persons who have failed to comply with this regulation at
the proper time.
TRANSFER OF CREDITS.-Courses of full graduate level to the extent of 6 credit
hours may be transferred from an institution approved for this purpose by the Graduate
School. Acceptance of transfer credit requires approval of the student's supervisory com-
mittee and the Graduate Council. Nonresident or extension work taken at another institu-
tion (with the exception of Florida State University) may not be transferred to the
University of Florida for graduate credit.
TIME LIMIT.-AII work for the master's degree must be completed within seven
years from the time of first registration.

MASTER'S DEGREES WITHOUT THESIS
Master of Agriculture
The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who wish addi-
tional training before entering business occupations or professions, rather than for those
interested primarily in research. The basic requirements, including those for admission,
residence, supervisory committee, plan of study, and admission to candidacy, are the same
as for the Master of Science in Agriculture degree, as outlined elsewhere, but the work
requirements are made to conform to the specific objectives of this degree.
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 36 credit hours of course work is required,
at least 18 of which shall be designated strictly for graduates; if a departmental major is
claimed, 12 of these 18 hours must be in the major department. Each student's program
is designed to take into account the qualifications and needs of the individual and is sub-
ject to the approval of the supervisory committee. A thesis is not required, but the stu-
dent must submit reports, term papers, and records of work accomplished. A comprehen-








18 REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES


sive written qualifying examination, given by the supervisory committee, is required before
the beginning of the second trimester of work. Failure to qualify in this examination will
require either the student's elimination from the program or additional course work. A
final oral examination by the supervisory committee covering the whole field of study of
the candidate is required.
For further details, inquire of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

Master of Arts and Master of Science in Teaching
These degrees are designed for graduate students majoring in the departments of the
College of Arts and Sciences who intend to teach in junior or four-year colleges. Require-
ments for admission are the same as for the regular M.A. and M.S. degrees in the College
of Arts and Sciences, and, like the work for those degrees, programs leading to the M.A.T.
and the M.S.T. may with proper approvals be incorporated into programs leading to the
Ph.D.
The requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language.
2. Completion of the requirements for Florida Junior College Certification.
The plan of certification most appropriate to these degrees is Plan II, which is stated as
follows on page 33 of the "Florida Teacher Certification Requirements" adopted by the
State Board of Education, April 12, 1960.
The Applicant must
a. Hold a master's degree or higher from an accredited institution.
b. Present work in educational psychology, sociology (education or community)
and curriculum dealing with the junior college totaling at least 9 credit hours.
c. Present an internship of at least 6 credit hours, or present three years of suc-
cessful teaching experience.
d. Present 36 credit hours in the subject area in which certification is sought
with at least 12 credit hours at the graduate level.
3. Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credit hours of work while registered as a
graduate student, this work to be distributed as follows:
21 credit hours in the major and minor (minimum for major: 12 hours; minimum
for the minor: 6 hours);
6 credit hours in a departmental internship as described below;
9 credit hours in the studies prescribed in Item b of the state certification require-
ments. If any or all of these studies have been satisfactorily completed before the
program is begun, the credit hours thus made available may be used for further
work in the major or minor, in education, or in a thesis.
The internship is organized as a total of 6 credit hours over two trimesters (under
the direction of the major department) in which the student will (1) attend a seminar on
the problems, methods, and duties of the college teacher of the student's major subject,
(2) assist a professor approved for the purpose by the department head in conducting a
course throughout a trimester, this assistance to include teaching under observation at least
one-third of the classes in the course, attendance at the remaining classes, preparing and
grading examinations, and participation in all other essential activities which the organiza-
tion and administration of the course may entail, (3) attend faculty meetings, and be given
practice in all the essential activities involved in being a college teacher of his subject.

Master of Business Administration
The requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree have been de-
signed to give the student broad general preparation for managerial work with emphasis
upon developing his capacities and skills for making business decisions. Limited speciali-
zation in one or two fields is also possible.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS.-Completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours of
undergraduate work in business administration and economics, including the following:
Economic Principles 6 credit hours
Statistics 3 credit hours
Accounting-Introductory 6 credit hours
Business Law 3 credit hours
ATG 590-Survey of Accounting (3 credit hours) may be taken in lieu of the 6 credit








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES 19


hours of introductory accounting. At least 15 hours of the undergraduate courses, exclud-
ing ATG 590, must be in junior-level courses or higher.
Students who have had no previous work in business administration or economics
will be required to take a foundation program of at least 30 credit hours meeting the re-
quirements stated above.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE.-A program of 30 credit hours of
course work is required. This program is as follows:
1. All candidates are required to take
BS 679-Advanced Business Policy 3 credit hours
BS 690-Business Research and Reports 3 credit hours
ES 615-Economics of Business Decisions 3 credit hours
ES 616-Economics Environment of Business 3 credit hours
2. Unless waived because of acceptable undergraduate courses taken in the same area,
all candidates are required to take
BS 610-Managerial Accounting 3 credit hours
BS 664-Managerial Statistics 3 credit hours
BS 671-Human Relations in Business 3 credit hours
3. All candidates must complete at least one basic course in each of the fields of
marketing, production management, and corporation finance. Such courses may be
taken as a part of either the undergraduate or the graduate program within the
limits noted. Candidates deficient in marketing will take MKG 531-Marketing
Principles and Institutions (3 credit hours). Candidates deficient in production
management will take MGT 575-Production Management Problems (3 credit
hours). Candidates deficient in corporation finance will take FI 326- Business
Finance (3 credit hours). Of these three courses, only MGT 575 and one, but not
both, of the other two courses may be used in satisfying the 30-hour requirement
for the degree. Thus, a student who is deficient in all three fields or in both
marketing and corporation finance will have to complete 33 hours for the degree.
4. Electives: The remaining hours will be selected from graduate and advanced un-
dergraduate courses in the candidate's field or fields of interest. A candidate
should avoid undue specialization in the selection of his electives.
EXAMINATIONS.-Each candidate will be required to pass both a written and an
oral examination on his graduate work. The written examination will be given toward the
end of the trimester in which he expects to receive his degree and will be designed to test
his ability to deal with the problems normally confronting business administrators. It will
consist primarily of the analysis of a business case requiring the use of the various disci-
plines included in the curriculum. The oral examination will be given after the written
and will be administered by a committee of three appointed from the graduate faculty of
the College of Business Administration.

Master of Education
PURPOSE.-This degree is designed to increase the professional preparation of school
personnel. The program has been planned to give public school workers a wide range of
essential abilities and a background of theory.
DESCRIPTION.-The Master of Education degree is offered under two plans. Plan
I is for the secondary and junior college teachers who seek increased teaching skill and
greater depth and scholarship in their teaching field. It is offered in the departments of
Foundations of Education, Secondary Education including Business Education, and Voca-
tional Agriculture.
The minimum program for the M.Ed. under Plan I is 36 hours in courses numbered
300 and above, 18 hours of which must be at the 600 level and above, with 18 hours of
course work outside the College of Education for students who have graduated from de-
partments or colleges of education or who hold a regular Florida Graduate Certificate to
teach. (For students who have graduated from colleges other than education, the total
number of hours outside of education may not be less than 6 hours.) The minimum re-
quirement of course work in education under Plan I is either (1) 24 hours in the master's
program with 18 hours at the 600 level and above, or (2) 36 hours at any level in the
combined undergraduate and graduate program. For students with an undergraduate major
in education the minimum number of hours in education is 12.
Plan II is used for specialized school personnel and elementary teachers and is of-
fered in the departments of Educational Administration, Elementary Education, and Per-
sonnel Services.
The minimum program for the M.Ed. under Plan II is 36 hours in courses numbered








20 REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES


300 ani above, 18 hours of which must be at the 600 level and above, with a minimum
of 6 hours of course work outside the College of Education. The student's undergraduate
and graduate program must include a minimum of 36 hours of course work in education.
Each student is required to submit a plan of study which shows acceptable balance and di-
rection. The planned program is to be approved by the student's counselor, the department
head, and the Office of Graduate Studies in Education during the first term of work or be-
fore. After the program has been developed, any change must be requested in writing and
similarly approved.
TRANSFER OF CREDITS.-If recommended in advance by the graduate committee
and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student may be permitted to study in
other institutions to the extent of (but not to exceed) 6 credit hours. No graduate credits
earned prior to admission to the University may be transferred without special recommen-
dation of the graduate committee and the approval of the Graduate Council. No more
than 6 credit hours may be thus transferred.
EXTENSION AND FIELD LABORATORY COURSES.-Six hours of approved ex-
tension courses may be included in the student's planned program. Six additional hours
of courses designated as field laboratory courses (ED 682, EDF 644, and EDF 645) may
also be included with the approval of the counselor.
LIMIT ON OFF-CAMPUS WORK.-The University imposes a limit of 12 hours of
credit in the aggregate on work allowed from (1) off-campus workshops and extension
courses, (2) field laboratory courses, (3) courses transferred from other approved institu-
tions, and (4) evening courses at the University of South Florida. (See separate publica-
tion for special joint program between University of South Florida, Florida State Universi-
ty, and University of Florida.) A maximum of 6 hours is imposed on each of these cate-
gories.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to candidacy for the Master of Educa-
tion degree is recommended to the Graduate Council by the Graduate Committee of the
College of Education on the basis of an evaluation of the applicant at the end of from 12
to 18 credit hours of graduate work at the University of Florida.
This evaluation is based in part on materials which the student submits with his ap-
plication and includes consideration of (1) the student's academic record, (2) the student's
GRE scores, (3) evidence of competency in the use (oral and written) of the English
language, (4) evaluation of personal qualities and promise of professional attainment by
persons to whom the applicant's record is known, (5) the student's experience record, and
(6) other appropriate information.
This process is administered through the Office of Graduate Studies in Education for
the graduate committee and evaluation is made by a committee of the faculty which may
recommend supplementary oral and/or written examinations for students whose admission
to candidacy is in doubt.
The student's remaining program of study may be revised if needed after the Admis-
sion to Candidacy Examination. On approval of the graduate committee, the candidate
will be recommended for the degree upon the satisfactory completion of the designated
course work.
The candidate must have completed at least one year of teaching (or the equivalent)
prior to taking the last 6 credit hours of work, or must have included in his record the
satisfactory completion of an internship program or a minimum of 6 credit hours of stu-
dent teaching.
THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION.-A spe-
cial counselor is appointed for each student in the Master of Education program. His
work is under general supervision of the Graduate Committee in the College of Education.

Master of Physical Education and Health
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 36 credit hours of course work is required, at
least 18 of which must be in courses in the fields of physical education, health education,
or recreation designated strictly for graduates, or in courses numbered 500 and above if ap-
proved for graduate major credit. Of the remaining 18 hours, at least 9 credit hours must
be taken in courses outside the College of Physical Education and Health. At least 50 per
cent of the minimum course requirements shall be from courses numbered 600 and above.
The major for the degree is physical education.
All degree candidates must complete Florida teaching certification requirements in
physical education by the conclusion of the master's degree program. Certification require-
ments must be met as part of and/or in addition to degree requirements, if not already
completed before admission to graduate study.
OFF-CAMPUS WORK.-The regulations governing the use of off-campus work are
the same as those stated for the Master of Education degree above.








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES 21


SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-A committee of five members of the faculty of the
College of Physical Education and Health, with the dean of the college, or some person
designated by him, serving as chairman and the Dean of the Graduate School as an ex of-
ficio member, will supervise the work of students registered in this program, subject to
the approval of the Graduate Council.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is not a
guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. The student will
be required to pass a written and/or oral examination in addition to being recommended
by the supervisory committee for admission to candidacy. This examination should be taken
by the end of the student's first trimester of residence.
FINAL EXAMINATION.-A thesis is not required but the candidate must pass a fi-
nal examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or oral examination
will be administered by the supervisory committee and will be confined largely to the stu-
dent's major field of study.

Master of Engineering
The Master of Engineering degree is designed to meet the need for advanced technical
training by the employees in Florida industry and those students who wish additional tech-
nical training before entering industry rather than those interested primarily in research or
teaching. Requirements for admission are the same as for regular M.S.E. degrees in the
College of Engineering.
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 30 hours of course work shall be required of
which at least 18 hours must be in the student's major field. The minor field may be di-
vided in several ways: one six-hour minor is required; two six-hour minors or one 12-hour
minor may be taken. Major courses must be graduate level (numbered 600 and above) or
courses approved for graduate major credit. Courses numbered 300 and above may be
taken for the minor. At least 50 per cent of the required 30 hours must be in courses
numbered 600 and above.
DEGREE CREDIT.-In order to qualify for course work toward the Master of Engi-
neering degree, a student must first be admitted to the Graduate School at the University
of Florida. The amount of course work toward this degree that may be taken at an off-
campus center will depend upon the student's individual program and the courses pro-
vided through the center.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-For students taking courses in an approved off-
campus program, a supervisory committee shall be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School upon the recommendation of the Dean.of the College of Engineering. Generally
speaking, the committee will consist of one member recommended by the head of the de-
partment involved, one recommended by a local Industrial Advisory Committee for the off-
campus program, and a resident faculty member of the College of Engineering at the off-
campus location.
The supervisory committee for those students in residence at the University of Flor-
ida shall be the same as that shown under Master's degree with thesis.
EXAMINATIONS.-Each student must pass a comprehensive written and/or oral fi-
nal examination at the completion of his course work. This examination will be conducted
on the University of Florida campus at Gainesville by an examining committee recom-
mended by the Dean of the College of Engineering and appointed by the Graduate School.
At least one member of the examining committee shall also be a member of the student's
supervisory committee.

Master of Rehabilitation Counseling
The interdisciplinary program leading to the degree of Master of Rehabilitation Coun-
seling is designed to give students basic knowledge and professional skills essential to the
rehabilitation of physically, mentally, and emotionally handicapped persons. The diversity
of activities performed by individuals who bear the designation of rehabilitation counselor
in the various state, federal, and private agencies, necessitates a program that permits a
basic foundation in counseling and guidance and, at the same time, allows for a sound
preparation in the medical, socio-psychological and vocational implications of disability.
Two basic qualifications are necessary for successful completion of the program: (1) the
academic ability to accomplish the course requirements with satisfactory performance, and
(2) the ability to work effectively with disabled people in a counseling relationship.
Traineeship grants for selected students are available. See page 34 for more detailed in-
formation regarding these grants.
WORK REQUIRED.-The minimum requirement is 42 credit hours, of which 24








22 REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES


hours represent required work in rehabilitation courses including an internship. An addi-
tional minimum of 18 hours is selected from designated courses; i.e., 3-9 hours in each
of the following areas: (1) statistics and measurement, (2) personality development, and
(3) counseling. The selection of the 3-9 hours in each of the three areas is made on the
basis of meeting the individual needs of the student and is subject to the approval of a
supervisory committee. At least 50 per cent of the minimum course requirements shall be
from courses numbered 600 and above.
AREA I-Statistics and Measurement-3-9 hours


CORE OFFERINGS
PSY 503-Essentials of Psychological Test-
ing
EDF 360-Elementary Statistical Methods
in Education
PSY 311-Introductory Psychological Sta-
tistics
EDP 613-Personnel Testing
PSY 641-Personality Assessment: Basic
Procedures
PSY 642-Personality Assessment: Ad-
vanced Procedures
AREA II--Personality Development-3-9 hours
CORE OFFERINGS
PSY 410-Abnormal Psychology
PSY 509-Theories of Personality
EDF 641-Educational Psychology: Per-
sonality Dynamics
PSY 615-Survey of Social Psychology
PSY 669-Seminar: Motivation


AREA III-Counseling-3-9 hours
CORE OFFERINGS
PSY 637-Personal Counseling
EDP 610-Principles of Guidance and
Personnel Work
EDP 611-Occupational and Educational
Information
EDP 614-Case Studies in Counseling
PSY 614-Vocational Appraisal
PSY 611-Introduction to Professional Psy-
chology


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
PSY 512-Individual and Group Differ-
ences
PSY 603-Statistical Methods: Inference
PSY 604-Statistical Methods: Correla-
tion
PSY 644-College Achievement Testing
in Comprehensive Courses
EDF 450-Measurement and Evaluation
in Education
EDF 660-Educational Statistics



ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
PSY 308-Developmental Psychology
PSY 610-Seminar in Psychopathology
APY 503-Culture and Personality
SY 621-The Sociology of the Aged
PSY 661-Seminar: Psychological Prob-
lems of Aging
SY 556-Social Factors in Health and
Illness


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
PSY 613-Children's Behavior Disturb-
ances
PSY 651-Practicum in Professional Psy-
chology
EDP 616-Practicum in Counseling
SCH 617-Seminar: Speech Pathology I


POLICY COMMITTEE.-A committee of five members of the faculty representing
the College of Health Related Services, Department of Psychology, College of Medicine,
and College of Education, with the professor in charge of rehabilitation counseling serving
as chairman and the Dean of the Graduate School as an ex officio member, will determine
policy, and, in general, supervise the work of students registered in this program.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is not a
guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree. When a student
has completed 12-15 credit hours of graduate work at the University of Florida, he is re-
quired to apply for admission to candidacy for the degree, using the forms provided by the
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. Admission to candidacy for the Master of Re-
habilitation Counseling degree will be recommended to the Graduate Council by a super-
visory committee of the College of Health Related Services on the basis of a review of his
work, his personal traits, and any other appropriate information to determine his eligibili-
ty to proceed further toward the degree program.
DEPARTMENTAL STUDY PROJECT.-A thesis is not required but the candidate
must complete an approved departmental study or research project as part of the degree
requirements.
FINAL WRITTEN AND/OR ORAL EXAMINATION.-Upon the satisfactory com-
pletion of all course work including the Practicum and Internship, each student must take
a final written and/or oral departmental examination before the degree will be awarded.








REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DERGEES 23


The primary purpose of this examination is to determine the student's ability to relate the
knowledge, skills and techniques learned in the academic program to the more practical
applications of working effectively with disabled individuals.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS
REQUIRED REGISTRATION.-The minimum registration required for the master's
degree with thesis is 30 credit hours, including no less than 24 credit hours of regular
course work and up to 6 credit hours of the research course numbered 699 in all depart-
ments.
At least one-half of the required 24 hours of regular course work must be in a single
field of study designated the major, and the remainder, called the minor, must be in a dif-
ferent but related subject matter. One 6-hour minor is required; two 6-hour minors or
one 12-hour minor may be taken. Minor work must be in a department other than the ma-
jor. In special cases this requirement may be modified, but only with the written permis-
sion of the Dean of the Graduate School.
The work in the major field must be in courses designed strictly for graduates (num-
bered 600 and above) or in undergraduate courses designated by the Graduate Council as
available for graduate major credit. For the minor, courses numbered 300 and above may
be taken.
At least 50 per cent of the required 24 credit hours of regular course work must be
in courses numbered 600 and above. Registration in 699 is limited to a total of 12 credit
hours.
THESIS.-All candidates for this degree are required to prepare and present a thesis
(or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to their supervisory committees and the Gradu-
ate School. The candidate should consult the Graduate School office for instructions con-
cerning the form of the thesis. The original copy of the thesis, bound in temporary bind-
ing, and accompanied by three copies of a brief abstract must be in the Dean's office on or
before the dates specified in the University Calendar. After the thesis is accepted, the
original copy, together with the first carbon copy, will be deposited in the University
Library.
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS.-(1) The requirement of a reading knowledge of
a foreign language is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory committee or col-
lege. When a foreign language is required, the examination will be conducted by the De-
partment of Foreign Languages; if an examination has already been passed at another insti-
tution, it must be validated at the University of Florida by the Department of Foreign
Languages. If the student is majoring in a foreign language, the language may not be
used to satisfy this requirement. The foreign language requirement must be satisfied before
the student is admitted to candidacy. (2) The ability to use the English language cor-
rectly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee, is required of all candidates.
Hence this cannot be substituted for the foreign language requirement.
SPECIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-A special supervisory committee of not
fewer than three members will be appointed for each student by the Dean of the Graduate
School upon the recommendation of the college concerned. If the student claims a minor,
it should be represented by one member of the committee. This committee should be ap-
pointed as early as possible after the student has been admitted to the Graduate School
and, in general, not later than the end of the first trimester of study. The Dean of the
Graduate School is an ex officio member of all supervisory committees. The duties of the
special supervisory committee are to advise the student, to check on his qualifications and
progress, to supervise the preparation of the thesis, and to conduct the final examination.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-When a student has completed about one-half of
his work for his degree, he should apply for admission to candidacy for that degree, using
the forms provided by the office of the Dean of the Graduate School. In order to be ad-
mitted to candidacy, the student must have (1) maintained a B average in registered
course work, (2) passed a foreign language examination and a qualifying examination (if
these are required in his curriculum), (3) chosen his thesis topic, (4) satisfied his super-
visory committee, department head, and college dean that he is qualified to become a can-
didate for his degree. It is the responsibility of his supervisory committee at this time to
make such investigation as is necessary to determine his eligibility.
FINAL EXAMINATION.-When all of the student's course work is completed, or
practically so, and the thesis is in final form, his supervisory committee is required to
examine him orally or in writing or both on (1) his thesis, (2) his major subjects, (3)
his minor or minors, and (4) matters of a general nature pertaining to his field of study.
An announcement of the scheduled examination must be sent to the Dean of the Graduate







24 REQUIREMENTS FOR Ed.S. AND Ed.D.


School. Using the form provided for the purpose the committee shall report in writing to
the Dean of the Graduate School not later than one week before the time for conferring of
the degree whether all work has been completed in a satisfactory manner and whether on
the basis of the final examination the student is recommended for his degree. In no case
may this examination be scheduled earlier than six months before the degree is to be con-
ferred, without special approval of the Graduate Council.
SPECIAL THESIS ABSTRACT REQUIRED.-At the request of the State Depart-
ment of Education of the State of Florida, the College of Education requires all candidates
for the degree of Master of Arts in Education to prepare a 750-word abstract of the thesis,
which is forwarded to the State Department for informational purposes.

Master of Fine Arts

The degree of Master of Fine Arts is designed primarily for those who wish to pre-
pare themselves as teachers of art in colleges and universities. It is the highest degree
granted in the studio fields of the fine arts. Two years' residence is normally required for
completion of requirements. Specialization is offered in painting, printmaking, sculpture,
and/or creative photography.
The requirements for the M.F.A. are the same as those for other master's degrees
with thesis except as follows:
1. The minimum registration required is 48 credits, including no less than 42 credits
in regular course work and 6 credits in ART 699-Master's Research.
2. The course work must include ART 500-Methods of Research and Bibliography
(2 credits), a minimum of 6 additional credits in the history and theory of art, and a
minimum of 6 credits in a minor field. The remaining credits will be advanced studio
courses in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and/or creative photography.


The Advanced School of the College of Education
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE Ed.S. AND Ed.D.
The advanced School of the College of Education offers the degrees of Specialist in
Education and Doctor of Education. Work in the Advanced School will be available only
to those who have shown a high degree of ability in their first year of graduate work. The
purpose of the Advanced School is to develop leadership, research competency, and spe-
cialization.
ADMISSION TO THE ADVANCED SCHOOL IN EDUCATION.-Admission to
the Advanced School will be open only to persons who have:
1. Successfully completed 36 credit hours of professional course work in education.
Applicants for admission to the Advanced School of the College of Education
who meet all the requirements except for successfully completing 36 credit hours
of professional education courses may be given provisional admission, and full ad-
mission when they have completed the required 36 hours.
2. Presented a record of successful professional experience, the appropriateness of
which will be determined by the instructional department passing on the appli-
cant's qualifications for admission. (In some instances, departments may admit
students with the understanding that further experience may be required before
the student will be recommended for the degree.)
Admission to the Advanced School will be based on the following criteria:
1. High scholastic average for previous graduate work (3.5 honor-point average
or above, as computed at the University of Florida, will be considered evidence
of good scholarship).
2. Results from the Graduate Record Examinations Aptitude Test and any one
of the Advanced Tests.
3. Results from the Miller Analogies Test.
4. An oral examination administered by the department in which the student seeks
to specialize.
5. Special interviews for individuals for whom the department of specialization
seeks more data.
The judgment concerning admission of an individual student will be based on the
consideration of his performance in all of these areas by the department in which the stu-







REQUIREMENTS FOR Ed.S. AND Ed.D. 25


dent desires to specialize. The department will certify to the admissions committee that the
student has met the criteria for admission to the Advanced School.
In all cases the record, experience, and personal qualifications of the person applying
for admission are subject to the approval of the admissions committee.
Where possible, students should seek admission to the Advanced School before enroll-
ing in any courses beyond the master's degree. Where this procedure is impossible, the
student will register in the Graduate School, and, during the first trimester of his work
beyond the master's degree, will apply for admission to the Advanced School. If such
candidate is found to be eligible, appropriate work taken during that term will be included
in the planned program.
After completion of the master's degree any student approved by the admissions com-
mittee may register for courses, but admission to the Advanced School must be obtained
before work may be counted for degrees or certificates above the master's level.


Specialist in Education
The Ed.S. degree is awarded at the completion of a 36-hour planned program beyond
the master's. Primary emphasis in an Ed.S. program is placed on the development of the
competencies needed for a specific job.
Ten types of Ed.S. programs are available in the Advanced School of the College of
Education. They are: administration, agricultural education, audio-visual, educational
psychology and human growth and development, elementary education, high school teacher,
junior college teacher, personnel services, research specialist in education, and supervision.
A student who wishes to work for a degree in one of these programs must be ad-
mitted to the Advanced School and be accepted by the appropriate departmental admis-
sion committee.
The 36-hour program of each student must include 24 credits of course work open
only to graduate students. Course selection is made by the student and his counselor from
available courses which will contribute to the development of the competencies needed for
the specific position the student seeks. (For students in Educational Administration, spe-
cial requirements involving residence and work in cognate fields are required.)
A maximum of 6 hours of transferred credit may be included. Such work must have
been completed in an institution which offers the doctor's degree. No extension work may
be transferred. Up to 6 hours in appropriate field laboratory courses, or 3 hours in field
laboratory and 3 hours in regular extension courses offered by the University of Florida
and Florida State University may be included.
A thesis is not required. Emphasis is placed upon the use of research rather than upon
the development of skills in research techniques.
Admission to the Advanced School, the successful completion of one trimester of
work, and the approval of the department of specialization are required for admission to
candidacy for the Specialist in Education degree.
Toward the end of the 36-hour program the student is given a final written and a final
oral examination by a committee selected by the head of his area of specialization. After
he has passed the examination the candidate is awarded the Specialist in Education degree
upon the approval of the faculty and the Graduate Council.
The Ed.S. is planned as a terminal degree. If at the end of this program the student
wishes to work for the Ed.D. he must meet the requirements stated for that degree.
All work for the Specialist in Education degree must be completed within seven years
from the time of first registration.

Doctor of Education
The Doctor of Education degree is offered in administration and supervision, curricu-
lum and instruction, foundations of education, and guidance and personnel services. Each
doctoral candidate is expected to achieve understanding of the broad field of education
and competencies in the area in which he chooses to specialize. A limited number of
credits in physical education may be used as part of the major.
The program leading to this degree is administered through the Office of Graduate
Studies in Education, which carries out the policies of the Graduate School and the
graduate committee of the College of Education.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of Doctor of Education







26 REQUIREMENTS FOR Ed.S. AND Ed.D.


requires admission to the Advanced School of the College of Education, described previ
ously, as well as admission to the Graduate School.
All courses beyond the master's degree taken at another institution, to be applied
toward the Doctor of Education degree, must be taken at an institution offering the
doctor's degree and approved for the transfer of graduate credit by the Graduate School of
the University of Florida.
MINORS.-Minor work or work in cognate fields is required. If one minor is select-
ed, at least 18 hours of work therein will be required; if two minors are chosen, one must
have at least 12 hours of course work, the other at least 6 hours. Minors may not be taken
in any branch of education or in the College of Physical Education and Health.
Courses in physical education approved by the College of Physical Education and
Health and the Graduate School as subject matter or content courses may be used in the
cognate work.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present a suitable program of not
less than 18 hours of cognate work in at least two or more departments outside the
College of Education. If two fields are included, there shall be no fewer than 6 credit
hours in each field. If there are three or more fields included, the 6-hour requirement for
each field does not apply. This program must have the approval of the student's super-
visory committee. The College of Education faculty will expect the candidate to be
prepared to answer questions, at the time of his oral examination, in any of the areas
chosen.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to candidacy for the degree of Doctor
of Education rests on successful completion of the qualifying examinations. Recommenda-
tion to the Graduate School for admission to candidacy is based on the action of the
supervisory committee, subject to the approval of the graduate committee of the College
of Education.
THE QUALIFYING EXAMINATION.-The applicant is recommended for the
qualifying examination by his supervisory committee after he has completed sufficient
course work and the research preparation requirements of the College of Education.
The examination administered by the graduate committee of the College of Education
consists of (1) a general section; (2) a field of specialization section; (3) examination in
the minor or minors, where involved; and (4) an oral examination conducted by the
applicant's supervisory committee.
RE-EXAMINATION.-If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not
be given a re-examination unless such an examination is recommended for special reasons
by his supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate Council. At least a trimester
of additional preparation is considered essential before re-examination.
THE SEMINAR.-Each student is required to develop a thesis project to be consid-
ered by a general doctoral seminar in the college. Participants in the seminar will be
faculty members of the college, other advanced students, and members of the supervisory
committee. The student must pass the qualifying examination before scheduling the
seminar.
RESEARCH PREPARATION REQUIREMENT.-This requirement is satisfied by
meeting the requirements in both Groups 1 and 2 below:
Group 1.-(1) a course in education research (EDF 760) and
(2) the library usage examination (usually given in connection with
.EDF 760) and
(3) a basic course in statistics (EDF 360, or PSY 311, or MS 310).
Group 2.-either
(1) a reading knowledge of one foreign language relevant to the stu-
dent's needs, or
(2) one of the following courses in measurements, statistics, or research:
SY 547 or SY 670; EDF 660 or PSY 605; EDS 605 or EDE 702;
EDF 450; EDP 613; PSY 503, PSY 504, PSY 626, PSY 632, PSY
633, or PSY 743; PHA 604 or PHA 510.
There is no language requirement for the Doctor of Education degree. Courses taken at
other institutions which may be the equivalent of course requirements indicated above
may be considered on recommendation of the applicant's supervisory committee.
For information relating to Residence, the Supervisory Committee, Time Limit, the
Dissertation, Publication of the Dissertation, and the Final Examination, the student is
referred to the material presented under the heading Doctor of Philosophy. These state-
ments are applicable to both degrees.







REQUIREMENTS FOR Ph.D. 27


Requirements for the Ph.D.
COURSE REQUIREMENT
Doctoral study consists of the independent mastery of a field of knowledge and the
successful prosecution of research. For this reason, doctoral students act, in large measure,
on their own responsibility, and doctoral programs are more flexible and varied than those
leading to lower degrees. The Graduate Council does not specify just what courses will
be required for the Ph.D. degree, or how many. The basic general requirement is that the
program should be unified in relation to a clear objective and that it should have the
considered approval of the student's supervisory committee.
MAJOR AND MINOR.-The student working for the Ph.D must elect to do his
major work in a department specifically approved for the offering of doctoral courses and
the supervision of dissertations. These departments are listed on page 11 of this catalog. In
addition, the student must choose one or two department minors. Minor work may be
completed in any department approved for master's or doctor's degree programs, as listed
in this catalog.
If one minor is chosen, the representative of the minor department on the supervisory
committee should suggest from one to two trimesters of course work (12 to 24 credit
hours) as preparation for a qualifying examination. Of course, a part of this background
may have been acquired in the master's program. The satisfaction of the requirement con-
cerning the minor or minors should be in terms of an examination conducted by the
minor department rather than in terms of rigorously specified course work.

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
The supervisory committee for a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
should consist of at least five members. At least three members should be from the college
or department recommending the degree, and one or two members should be drawn from
a different educational discipline for the purpose of representing the student's minor or
minors and furthering the coordination on the campus between colleges and disciplines.
The chairman of the supervisory committee for all doctoral students shall be a member
of the resident graduate faculty of the University of Florida. With the approval of the
department concerned and the Dean of the Graduate School, two members of the super-
visory committee may come from off the campus. Supervisory committees are nominated
by the department head (in no case by the student), approved by the dean of the college,
and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. It is recommended that the super-
visory committee be appointed as early as possible after the student has been admitted to
doctoral work and in general no later than the end of the first trimester of study. The
Dean of the Graduate School is an ex officio member of all supervisory committees.
The duties of the supervisory committee are as follows:
1. To inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought. It should
be noted, however, that this does not absolve the student from the responsibility
for informing himself concerning these regulations. (See Student Responsibility.)
2. To meet immediately after appointment to pass on the qualifications of the student
and to discuss and approve a program of study for him.
3. To meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the plans
for carrying it out.
4. To conduct the qualifying examination, or, in those cases where the examination is
administered by the department, to take part in it.
5. To meet when the work on the dissertation is at least one-half completed to review
procedure, progress, and expected results, and to make suggestions for completion.
6. To meet when the dissertation is completed to conduct the final oral examination
and to satisfy itself that the dissertation is a piece of original research and a con-
tribution to knowledge.

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
LANGUAGE READING EXAMINATIONS.-(1) Except as noted below a read-
ing knowledge of two languages other than English is required. The primary language
must be German, Russian, or French, the choice to be made by the supervisory committee
on the basis of the usefulness of the language in the student's field of research.
(2) The secondary language, as approved by the supervisory committee, may be
from a list of languages adopted by the Graduate Council in which reading knowledge







28 REQUIREMENTS FOR Ph.D.


examinations are administered by the Department of Foreign Languages. Currently this
list includes Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, French, German, Classical Greek, Modem
Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Latin, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Rumanian, Russian,
Slovakian, Spanish, and Swedish. Under this provision, however, both languages may not
be Romance. Proficiency in a language not listed here may be demonstrated by scholarly
translation as explained below.
All language examinations are given and certified by the Department of Foreign
Languages under policies and procedures as stated on page 16. If a student is majoring in
a foreign language, he may not use that language to satisfy this requirement.
FUNCTIONAL EXAMINATION IN LANGUAGE.-A doctoral student, with the
approval of his supervisory committee, shall have the privilege of taking a functional
language examination (reading, writing, and speaking) in French, German, or Russian as
an alternative to the primary and secondary language reading examinations.
SUBSTITUTION OF SCHOLARLY TRANSLATION FOR A SECONDARY
LANGUAGE EXAMINATION.-After obtaining formal approval of the supervisory
committee the student may demonstrate proficiency in a secondary language by trans-
lation from that language into English one or more published works of scholarly or
research value in the student's major or minor fields in amount equivalent to not less than
fifty printed pages of average book size. This material should form useful background in
relation to a graduate-level course, an assigned problem, or the dissertation; and its
scholarly or research value must be certified by the chairman of the supervisory committee
with the approval of the committee. The acceptability of the English used in the transla-
tion must be certified by the Department of English. The work of translation shall be
supervised by the chairman of the supervisory committee to the extent that he shall be
prepared to certify to the Graduate Council that the student prepared the translation with-
out linguistic assistance in either of the languages involved other than that provided by
dictionaries, grammars, and other such works of reference. The Graduate Council shall
reject claims for this language option if in its opinion the subject matter presented
is not of a sufficiently high level of scholarship or if the translation is not presented in
clear, grammatical English. If the student's English is at fault, he may be advised to under-
take remedial work. The completed translation shall be filed in the Graduate School.
SUBSTITUTION OF MATHEMATICS FOR A SECONDARY LANGUAGE EX-
AMINATION.-In certain departments individually approved by the Graduate Council
(business administration, agricultural economics, and animal science), a study of mathe-
matics may be substituted for a reading knowledge of one foreign language. When this
substitution is chosen, the courses in mathematics taken for this purpose may not be
considered a part of the major or minor studies. The degree of proficiency in mathematics
shall be determined as follows:
1. For a field in which calculus is not included through the master's degree, the
student shall take and pass with a B or better the final examination in MS 354
and any other courses in the Department of Mathematics specified by his super-
visory committee.
2. For a field in which calculus is included as a part of the bachelor's or master's
program, the student shall either pass with a B or better, or demonstrate equiva-
lent proficiency by written examination in 6 credit hours of work in the Depart-
ment of Mathematics which requires MS 354 as a normal prerequisite.
ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT.-For the additional language re-
quirements for the programs of Inter-American Studies and Latin American Language and
Area Center see page 36.
DATES FOR COMPLETION OF LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS.-The language
requirement should be met as early as possible in the student's program and must be met
before the student can be admitted to the qualifying examination. The Department of
Foreign Languages offers special noncredit classes in the reading of French and German
for graduate students. (See Schedule of Courses.)

RESIDENCE
The minimum residence requirement for the doctor's degree is six trimesters of full-
time resident graduate study, or equivalent, at institutions approved by the Graduate
School. Beyond the master's degree or an equivalent period of graduate study, two
consecutive trimesters must be spent in full-time study (except as noted in the following
paragraph) on the campus of the University of Florida. Candidates in agronomy, animal
husbandry, ornamental horticulture, plant pathology, or soils may do their research at







REQUIREMENTS FOR Ph.D. 29


certain branch stations of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
where adequate staff and facilities are available.
Part-time study may be substituted for the two consecutive trimesters of full-time
study stipulated in the preceding paragraph in either of the following proportions: (1)
30 credit hours earned in one calendar year; or (2) 35 credit hours in four successive
registrations (either including or excluding summer session registrations). An overload
program, even when approved, will be valued as a normal program in meeting this resi-
dence requirement.
For a student who has no employment and is devoting full time to his studies, a
registration of 12 to 15 hours entitles him to full residence credit. Part-time study is
evaluated on the basis that 15 credit hours represent a full load (e.g., a student who is
employed half-time and is registered for 10 hours acquires 10/15 or 2/3 of a trimester
of residence credit for each trimester of such registration).
In some cases a student may be employed on a sponsored project from which his
thesis or dissertation will be drawn. Upon written recommendation of the chairman of
the supervisory committee, residence credit may be permitted for a portion of the time
devoted to such research. This recommendation must be made during the trimester in
which the work is done. All time devoted to routine duties or to research not related
directly to the dissertation or thesis should be removed from consideration. Hence, in no
case shall academic credit be allowed for more than three quarters of the total time of
employment on such project research. This does not apply to research under an unre-
stricted tax-exempt fellowship.
Between the qualifying examination and the date of the degree, there must elapse
a minimum of two trimesters if the candidate is in full-time residence, or one full
calendar year if the candidate is on less than a full-time basis. The trimester in which
the qualifying examination is passed is counted, provided that the examination occurs
before the midpoint of the term.

QUALIFYING EXAMINATION
The qualifying examination which is required of all candidates for the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy, may be taken during the second term of the second year of grad-
uate study. The examination, conducted by the special supervisory committee, with the
aid of the major and minor departments, is both written and oral and covers the major
and minor subjects. The supervisory committee has the responsibility at this time of
deciding whether the student is qualified to go on with work toward the Ph.D. degree.
If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not be given a re-examina-
tion unless such an examination is recommended for special reasons by his supervisory
committee and approved by the Graduate School. At least a trimester of additional
preparation is considered essential before re-examination.
TIME LIMIT.-AII work for the doctor's degree must be completed within five
calendar years after the qualifying examination or this examination must be repeated.

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
A graduate student does not become an actual candidate for the Ph.D degree until
he has been formally admitted to candidacy. Such admission requires the approval of the
student's supervisory committee, the head of his department, his college dean, and the
Dean of the Graduate School, and the approval must be based on (1) the academic
record of the student, (2) the opinion of his supervisory committee concerning his over-
all fitness for candidacy, and (3) a qualifying examination as described above. Application
for admission to candidacy should be made at about the end of the fourth or the beginning
of the fifth trimester of graduate study.

DISSERTATION
A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation and research is required
of all candidates. Since all doctoral dissertations will be published by microfilm, microcard,
or printing, it is necessary that the work be of publishable quality and that it be in form
suitable for publication. The original copy of the dissertation must be presented to the
Dean of the Graduate School on or before the date specified in the University Calendar.
The sum of $50 must be deposited with the Business Manager to cover the cost of publi-
cation as explained below.
PUBLICATION OF DISSERTATION.-Candidates for the Ph.D and Ed.D degrees
may choose one of the following three alternatives in the publication of their dissertations:







30 EXPENSES


1. Microfilm publication. In this case the University will refund $25 of the deposit
as soon as the dissertation has been accepted and the final examination passed.
2. Microcard publication. In this case the University will determine the cost of
publication and either return any unneeded portion of the deposit or bill the
student for any excess in cost above $50.
3. Two-year postponement. The student may request a two-year period to investigate
possibilities of publication by printing. If the dissertation is published as a book
or monograph in essentially complete form, the Graduate Council will consider
a request for refund of the entire deposit upon receipt of five copies of the pub-
lished work. At the end of the two-year period, unless evidence of acceptance of
the dissertation for such publication has been presented, the Graduate Council
will authorize publication by microfilm as indicated under (1) above.
COPYRIGHT.-Under (1) above the student may choose to copyright his disser-
tation before publication. The charge for copyright is $11.75.

FINAL EXAMINATION
After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of all other prescribed
work for the degree, but in no case earlier than six months before the conferring of the
degree, the candidate will be given a final examination, oral or written or both, by his
supervisory committee. An announcement of the scheduled examination must be sent to
the Dean of the Graduate School. Satisfactory performance on this examination completes
all requirements for the degree.


Expenses

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be accompanied by an appli-
cation fee. For applications for admission to the College of Medicine, the fee is $10.00,
for all other applications, $5.00. Application fees are nonrefundable.

GENERAL
Students should bring sufficient funds, other than personal checks, to meet their im-
mediate needs. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact amount of fees. Other per-
sonal checks may be deposited with the University for collection.
Funds may be placed in a depository maintained by the University Cashier in Room 1,
Tigert Hall. Depository accounts are assessed a fee of $1.00 per trimester, and $0.75 per
seven and one-half week term. Withdrawals may be made upon request and presentation
of passbook. Any University fee or deposit may be paid from such an account.
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
For the purpose of assessing fees, applicants are classified as Florida or Non-Florida
students.
Non-Florida students pay a nonresident tuition of $175.00 a trimester and $90.00 a
seven and one-half week term in addition to the fees charged Florida students.
In observing this regulation, "applicant" shall mean a student applying for admission
to the University of Florida if he is 21 years of age or older, or, if he is a minor, it shall
mean parents, parent, or guardian of his or her person. Such applicant will pay the Non-
Florida tuition and other charges required of Non-Florida students unless he shall be a
citizen of the United States and shall have resided and had his habitation, domicile, home,
and permanent abode in the State of Florida for at least 12 months immediately preceding
his registration; provided, however, that the applicant cannot claim continuous residence in
Florida by enrollment in any college or university in the State of Florida for the required
period.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as Non-Florida
students.
The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his first regis-
tration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless in the case of
a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of the State of Florida by main-







EXPENSES 31


training such residence for twelve consecutive months. If the status of a student changes
from a Non-Florida student to a Florida student, his classification may be changed at the
next registration thereafter.

REGISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL FEES
Fees are payable at the beginning of each trimester or term, at the time of registration.
Registration is incomplete until all fees are paid.
The University has five terms a year, three trimesters and two terms of seven and one-
half weeks each, which run concurrently with the third trimester. The University Calendar
in the front of this catalog sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each trimester
and term.
The fees charged are based upon the classification of a student as Florida or Non-
Florida, Full-Time or Part-Time, and the term in which he is enrolled.
Fees are assessed as follows:
A FULL-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $113.00 for each trimester
for which he is enrolled.
A FULL-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $288.00 for each tri-
mester for which he is enrolled.
A PART-TIME FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for only one course not exceeding
four credit hours during a regular trimester, will pay a fee of $30.00 per trimester.
He will not be entitled to student activity or infirmary privileges.
A PART-TIME NON-FLORIDA STUDENT, enrolled for only one course not ex-
ceeding four credit hours during a regular trimester, will pay a fee of $205.00 per
trimester. He will not be entitled to student activity or infirmary privileges.
ANY STUDENT, FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA, enrolled for RESEARCH ONLY,
not exceeding four credit hours during a regular trimester or seven and one-half week
term, will pay a fee of $30.00 for each registration. He will not be entitled to student
activity or infirmary privileges.
A FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for a seven and one-half week term will pay a fee
of $60.00 per term.
A NON-FLORIDA STUDENT enrolled for a seven and one-half week term will pay
a fee of $150.00 per term.
Registration fees paid after the conclusion of the regular registration period are in-
creased $5.00. This increase cannot be waived and is not refundable.

SPECIAL FEES
AUDIT FEE.-With the approval of the dean of the college administering the course
and the written consent of the instructor, a course may be audited upon the payment of a
fee of $30.00 per course per trimester or term. Auditor's permit forms may be obtained in
the Office of the Registrar. Fees are payable to the University Cashier.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION.-The Aptitude Test of the Graduate Rec-
ord Examination is required for admission to the Graduate School. A fee of $7.00 covers
the cost of this examination. Students who take one of the Advanced Tests of the Gradu-
ate Record Examination in combination with the Aptitude Test pay a fee of $12.00.
These fees are payable to The Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. For
additional information see page 12.
GRADUATION FEE.-Each candidate for a graduate degree must make application
for the degree in accordance with the date set forth in the University Calendar and pay, at
the time of application, a fee of $20.00. In the event that the applicant does not meet the
requirements for graduation at the time specified in the original application he shall be
charged a fee of $5.00 for each subsequent application for the same degree.
TRANSCRIPT FEE.-A student is furnished a first copy of his record without charge
regardless of the amount of work completed. Subsequent copies are charged for at the rate
of $1.00 each, except when the order is for more than one copy. There is a charge of
$1.00 for the first copy and 50 cents for each additional copy on the same order. Uni-
versity transcripts may be obtained only from the Registrar's Office.
LIBRARY FINES.-A fine of 5 cents a day is charged for each book in general circu-
lation which is not returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books, may be
checked out overnight, but a fine of 25 cents is charged for each hour or part of an hour
such a book is kept overdue. There is no maximum for fines and no partial remission of
fines when books are returned.







32 HOUSING


DEPOSITS
DISSERTATION DEPOSIT.-A deposit of $50.00 is made to cover the publication of
the dissertation. See page 29 for time of payment and choice of method of publication,
which involves the disposition of this deposit.
BREAKAGE BOOKS.-A student may be required to purchase from the University
Cashier a breakage book costing $3.00 or $5.00 for any course requiring locker and labo-
ratory apparatus or special University equipment or supplies. A refund will be made to
the purchaser of any undetached coupons after the apparatus has been checked in at the
conclusion of the course.
REFUND OF FEES
A refund of fees will be made under certain conditions upon presentation to the Uni-
versity Cashier of an authorization issued by the Registrar's Office.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees will be made if the stu-
dent's registration is cancelled on or before the first day of classes in any trimester or
term.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees less a fixed charge of $5.00
in a trimester or $3.00 in a seven and one-half week term will be made if a student with-
draws or if his registration is cancelled by the University after the first day of classes but
on or before the final day of registration as shown in the University Calendar.
A refund of 50 per cent of tuition, registration and instructional fees will be made
if a student withdraws or if his registration is cancelled by the University after the con-
clusion of the registration period but on or before the day which marks the end of the
third week of classes in a regular trimester or the first week of classes in a seven and
one-half week term.
No part of the student activity fee will be refunded if the student fails to surrender
the identification card (and in the first trimester, the student activity card or receipt for
student picture) at the time authorization for a refund is presented to the University
Cashier.
Deductions from refunds will be made for unpaid accounts due the University.

HOUSING
APPLICATIONS
Each student must make personal arrangement for his housing either by applying
to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to the University housing facilities
or by securing private housing. To aid students in securing private housing, the Housing
Division maintains an Off-Campus Section at 1504 West University Avenue.
All inquiries concerning housing applications, deposits, or rent payment in Uni-
versity housing facilities should be addressed to the Director of Housing, University of
Florida, Gainesville.
An application from married couples for housing may be filed at any time. An
application for residence hall space may be filed at any time after application for admis-
sion to the University. Prospective students are urged to apply as early as possible, since
initial fall term assignments are made during the spring and early summer.
Roommate requests are honored wherever possible, provided the individuals wishing
to room together submit their applications and pay room deposits at the same time, clearly
indicate on their respective applications their desire to room together, and are within
similar academic classifications. A large number of selected foreign students are assigned
as roommates of students who are interested in foreign languages, trade, and international
relations. It is the University's policy to encourage this relationship, and any student in-
terested in the program should indicate this on his application.
Off-campus listings are maintained in the Off-Campus Section but are not compiled
for mailing, since availability changes constantly and a mutually satisfactory rental ar-
rangement can normally be made by the student only after personal inspection of facilities
and conferences with the householder. Students seeking off-campus housing should come
to Gainesville well before the school period to confer with the Off-Campus Section about
accommodations. Advance appointments for conferences may be made.

RESIDENCE HALL FOR SINGLE MEN
One of the University residences, Buckman Hall, is generally designated for graduate
male students. It is divided into separate sections with accommodations for from 30 to 60







FINANCIAL AIDS 33


students per section. All but a few rooms have lavatories, and there is a community bath
on each floor in each section. There are lounges and laundry facilities in the area. Double
rooms for two students rent for $98.00 per student per term. Single rooms rent for $118.00
per term. These rates, which include linen rental, are subject to change.
Students living in University housing are required to carry a load of at least 9 hours
or the equivalent. If a student's registration is below 9 hours, his load must be certified
to the housing office by the Graduate School.

FACILITIES FOR MARRIED COUPLES
FLAVET APARTMENT VILLAGES.-These Villages, located on campus, are of
temporary construction. All apartments are equipped with basic furniture requirements,
but residents must furnish their own linens, rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating
are by gas, metered to the individual apartments. Electricity consumption in excess of the
basic minimum is paid on a monthly basis on meter readings. Rental rates per month
(including basic electricity) are: one-bedroom apartment, $26.75; two-bedroom apartment,
$29.50; three-bedroom apartment, $32.25.
Applications may be filed at any time and should be sent as soon as possible. Cur-
rently, there is a waiting period of about 6 months between the date of application and
the date an assignment can be made.
CORRY AND SCHUCHT MEMORIAL VILLAGES.-Assignments are offered to
married students. These Villages are modern, two-story buildings constructed of brick,
concrete, and wood, divided into 296 one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartment units. All
apartments are equipped with basic furniture requirements for the living room, dinette,
kitchen, and one bedroom. Residents must furnish the extra bedrooms and their own lin-
ens, rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating are by gas, metered to the individual
apartments. Electricity is paid on a monthly basis on meter readings. Water is paid at a
flat rate of $1.50 per month. Rental rates per month (subject to change )are: one-bedroom
apartment, $54.00; two-bedroom apartment, $57.00; three-bedroom apartment, $60.00.
Applications may be filed at any time and should be sent as soon as possible.

FINANCIAL AID
FELLOWSHIPS, ASSISTANTSHIPS, AWARDS, AND LOANS
FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS.-To assist able students to pursue postgraduate
studies leading to a master's or doctor's degree, a number of fellowships and assistantships
are available. Non-Florida fees, unless paid by the sponsor, are waived for recipients of
these awards. Unless otherwise specified, application may be made to the head of the ap-
propriate department, University of Florida.

AGRICULTURE
H. HAROLD HUME FELLOWSHIP OF THE FLORIDA FEDERATION OF GARDEN CLUBS.-
This fellowship, established by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs, has for its object
the investigation of special problems of ornamental horticulture in Florida. The work is
under the direction of the Department of Ornamental Horticulture. The fellowship carries
a stipend of $1,800 annually.
CHEMISTRY
DUPONT POSTGRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIP AWARD.-A $1,200 additional
stipend is awarded to an advanced graduate student holding a graduate teaching assistant-
ship and who is interested in teaching as a career. The holder assists with undergraduate
instruction in chemistry and has a total stipend of from $4,200 to $4,700.
TENNESSEE EASTMAN FELLOWSHIP.-One fellowship is available at an annual stipend
of $2,000. The choice of research area is optional.
TEXACO RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP.-This fellowship is available at an annual stipend
of $3,000. The choice of research area is optional.
Several fellowships or assistantships are available supported by contract or grant funds.

MEDICINE
Several predoctoral fellowships are available for graduate students in the basic medical
sciences. Research positions are available part time on general research projects. Postdoc-
toral fellowships are available for exceptionally well-qualified recent graduates who wish







34 FINANCIAL AIDS


additional research experience. Public Health Service traineeships, which require no serv-
ice, are available.
ENGINEERING
Various industrial assistantships and fellowships are available from year to year.
These vary in amounts from $2,400 upward. Application should be made to the Director,
Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station, College of Engineering.

PHARMACY
AMERICAN FOUNDATION FOR PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION FELLOWSHIPS.-A num-
ber of graduate scholarships are offered by the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical
Education which carry stipends up to $2,400. In addition allowances up to $600 may be
granted annually for academic expense. Holders of these scholarships may pursue graduate
work at the University of Florida. Application should be made to the Foundation, 777
14th Street, N.W., No. 630, Washington 5, D. C.

REHABILITATION COUNSELING
TRAINEESHIP GRANTS.-The U. S. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation has allotted
the University of Florida a substantial number of traineeships for full-time students prepar-
ing to become rehabilitation counselors. The traineeship grants for work toward the mas-
ter's degree carry a stipend of $1,800 for the first year of graduate study and $2,000 for
the second year. In addition to these stipends, non-Florida fees and registration fees are
paid. A limited number of grants are available for work beyond the master's level and
carry larger stipends. Traineeships are awarded for a full calendar year and may be re-
newed for a second year.
For further information regarding the degree program and traineeship grants contact:
Chairman of Curriculum in Rehabilitation Counseling, College of Health Related Services,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

SPEECH
In addition to the regular University fellowships and assistantships, a number of
Traineeship Grants from the U. S. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation are available to stu-
dents in the Department of Speech working toward the M.A. or Ph.D. degree in speech
pathology and audiology. The stipends range from $2,400 to $3,400 for the full calendar
year, depending on the level of training, and may be renewed for a second year. The train-
eeship recipient also receives a waiver of his non-Florida tuition fee.
For additional information concerning traineeship grants and degree programs write
to: Dr. Paul Moore, Chairman, Department of Speech.
UNIVERSITY-WIDE AWARDS
A number of graduate fellowships, research fellowships, and part-time research and
teaching assistantships are available annually to meritorious students at stipends ranging
from $2,000 to $3,600 for a ten-month period. These are open to candidates in any field of
graduate study or research. Postdoctoral fellowships are available. Graduate assistantships
are available in many departments of the University.
NON-FLORIDA FEE SCHOLARSHIPS (these do not take care of registration fees) are
available to a limited number of graduate students. Awards are made on the basis of
scholarship achievement.
ONE-THIRD-TIME ASSISTANTSHIPS provide a stipend of $2,250 for ten months plus
waiver of out-of-state fees of $440. An academic year of graduate residence may be com-
pleted in two trimesters plus a summer term. Fifteen hours per week are devoted to duties
in teaching or research. Registration is limited to 12 hours. Assistants may be employed
for either ten or twelve months.
ONE-HALF-TIME ASSISTANTSHIPS provide a stipend of $3,000 for ten months plus
waiver of out-of-state fees of $440. A year of graduate residence may be completed in
three trimesters without summer school attendance. Assigned duties may amount to 20
hours per week. Registration is limited to 10 hours.
Interested students should inquire at their departmental offices concerning the availa-
bility of assistantships and the procedure for making application. Prospective students
should write directly to the heads of their major departments as well as to the Admissions
Office. Early inquiry is essential in order to be assured of meeting application deadlines.
Appointments are made on the recommendation of the department head, subject to ad-
mission to the Graduate School and to the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.







SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES 35


Clear evidence of superior ability and promise is required. Reappointment to assistantship
requires evidence of continuation of good scholarship.
UNITED STATES STEEL FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP
One two-year fellowship with stipend of $6,000 plus dependency allotment of $1,200
for study in an approved area.
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION
NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION COOPERATIVE GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP AND SUM-
MER FELLOWSHIP FOR GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANT.- Cooperative fellows receive an
annual stipend of $2,400 plus maximum institutional supplement of $1,000 for limited
teaching responsibilities, tuition and registration fees of about $740, to total approximately
$4,140 for study in the mathematical, physical, medical, biological, engineering, and other
sciences including anthropology, economics (excluding business administration), geogra-
phy, the history and philosophy of science, psychology (excluding clinical psychology),
and sociology (not including social work). Also included are interdisciplinary areas which
are comprised of overlapping fields among two or more sciences (for example, geochemis-
try, meteorology, and oceanography). The fields or research and study covered by these
awards are limited to those which conform to accepted standards of scientific inquiry by
fulfilling the requirements of the basic scientific method as to objectivity, verifiability, and
generality. Summer fellows for graduate teaching assistants receive a stipend of $75 per
week for 8 to 12 weeks plus tuition and fees. Application should be made to the Gradu-
ate School, University of Florida.
NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT FELLOWSHIPS
TITLE IV NDEA FELLOWSHIPS.-These are available in Biology, Botany, Chemistry,
English, Entomology, Foreign Languages, Junior College Science Education, Physics, and
Political Science (Urban Problems) with stipend of $2,000 to $2,400 plus an additional
allowance of $400 a year for each dependent for three consecutive years. Apply to ap-
propriate department by February 15.
TITLE VI NDEA FELLOWSHIPS, PROGRAM B.-These are available for students whose
proposed programs emphasize the learning of either Spanish or Portuguese through
courses in the language or, in the case of doctoral candidates working on the dissertation,
through research dealing with the language or research in which the language is an indis-
pensable tool. Fellows are expected also to study other fields needed for a fuller understand-
ing of the area, region, or country in which such language is commonly used. These related
studies may include such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, linguistics,
literature, political science and sociology.
The basic stipend will comprise the cost of tuition and all required fees, plus $450
for summer study only, or $2,250 for the academic year, or $2,700 for summer and aca-
demic year. A candidate may apply for an allowance for up to four dependents. The al-
lowance for each dependent is $600 for two and one-half trimesters.
LOANS
NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM.-The National Defense Student Loan
program provides loans up to $1,000 per year, with interest at 3 per cent beginning one
year after graduation and repayable over a period as long as ten years. Application should
be made to the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs, University of Florida.
UNIVERSITY LOANS.-Other university loans are also available to graduate students
who are within two years of their terminal degree.


Special Programs and Facilities
PROGRAMS
INTER-AMERICAN AREA STUDIES
The School of Inter-American Studies, headed by a director who acts as chairman of
the special graduate faculty in Inter-American Studies, operates at the graduate level in
accordance with the rules of the Graduate School and Graduate Council of the University.
Its director and members of its faculty advise students at the graduate level in conformity
with the regulations of the Graduate School.
The general Inter-American program of the University embraces many phases of Uni-
versity work and is carried out cooperatively with existing academic units in the various
areas. A special Inter-American Area Studies Program is offered to qualified students at
the master's and doctor's levels. (For further details regarding the School of Inter-American
Studies, see Undergraduate Catalog.)







36 SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES


The School of Inter-American Studies has available annually graduate fellowships,
assistantships, and scholarships.
Among the departments or colleges offering courses with Inter-American content or
application are: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal
Science, Anthropology and Archeology, Architecture, Art, Bacteriology, Biology, Botany,
Business Administration, Civil Engineering, Communications and Journalism, Dairy Science,
Economics and Foreign Trade, Education-Foundations, Education-Vocational Agriculture,
English, Entomology, Finance and Insurance, Food Technology and Nutrition, Forestry,
French, Fruit Crops, Geography and Geology, History, Industrial Engineering, Inter.
American Area Studies, Law, Library Science, Marketing, Mechanical Engineering, Medi-
cine, Music, Nuclear Engineering, Philosophy, Plant Pathology, Political Science and Inter-
national Relations, Portuguese, Sociology, Soils, Spanish, Speech, Vegetable Crops, and
Veterinary Science.
INTER-AMERICAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM LEADING TO MASTER OF
ARTS DEGREE.-The purpose of this program is to give the student a broad understand-
ing of Inter-American affairs. With this objective in mind, a graduate supervisory commit-
tee counsels the individual student on the selection of his courses.
Prerequisites for the Master of Arts degree in this area include the completion of at
least 12 credit hours of undergraduate courses in Inter-American subjects. (For area study
majors in arts and sciences, and in business administration, see Undergraduate Catalog.)
Requirements for graduation include:
1. The completion of a major of at least 12 credit hours of graduate courses in one
of the above-listed departments and colleges.
2. The completion of 12 credit hours of related studies which meet the minimum re-
quirement for a minor in the Graduate School and are approved by the student's
supervisory committee.
3. The completion of a satisfactory thesis on an Inter-American topic in the field of
the major department, for which six hours of credit are given through registration
in IA 699.
4. Students in this program must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Spanish, Portu-
guese, or French.
INTER-AMERICAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM LEADING TO THE DEGREE
OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY.-For students approved for registration in courses lead-
ing to a degree of Doctor of Philosophy, a carefully integrated sequence of academic
work to meet the specific needs of the individual student will be outlined by a special
supervisory committee. Before the appointment of the supervisory committee, the selection
of a program of study must be initiated by the student in consultation with the director of
the School of Inter-American Studies. In every case the final program must be approved by
the student's supervisory committee acting under the policies established by the special
graduate faculty for Inter-American Area Studies as approved by the Graduate Council.
The language requirements for the doctorate are: a functional knowledge of the lan-
guage other than English needed for research for the dissertation and a reading knowledge
of another supporting language. These languages are usually Spanish, Portuguese, or
French. Exceptions in the supporting language may be made in special cases.

LATIN AMERICAN LANGUAGE AND AREA CENTER
The Latin American Language and Area Center began operation in February of 1962
with a grant from the U. S. Office of Education under the provisions of Title VI of the
National Defense Education Act. Its purpose is to stimulate and coordinate research and
instruction in the Latin American area at the graduate level. The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees
with a Latin American specialization may be earned in the following departments under
the auspices of the Center: Agricultural Economics, Economics, Geography, History,
Political Science, Sociology, and Spanish. Latin American content courses are also
available in Anthropology, Portuguese, and Law. NDEA Modern Foreign Language Fel-
lowships (Title VI) are administered through the Center.
Language Requirements
Students pursuing degrees at the M.A. level under the auspices of the Latin Ameri-
can Language and Area Center are required to have a reading knowledge of either Span-
ish or Portuguese. At the Ph.D. level a functional knowledge of either Spanish or Portu-
guese plus a reading knowledge of the other language is required. Students majoring in a
language should consult page 89.
Residence in Latin America
In addition to the regular Graduate School residence requirements (see p. 28), resi-







SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES 37


dence in Latin America is necessary for students pursuing the Ph.D. degree under Center
auspices. Such residence will normally occur after the completion of course work for the
Ph.D. and successful completion of the language requirements and qualifying examinations.
It will normally be of six months' duration or more and will be devoted to the conduct
of research for the dissertation. Financial aid for such field research can usually be
arranged.
Latin American Specialization
Latin American specialization will consist of the following: (a) completion of Latin
American content coursework in the major field as deemed necessary by the student's
supervisory committee; (b) a double minor to consist principally, if not exclusively, of
Latin American content courses, in two additional disciplines; if the major is not in lan-
guage, one minor normally will be in Spanish or Portuguese; (c) Latin American thesis
and dissertation topics; (d) language requirements as set forth above; and (e) residence
requirements as set forth above. The above requirements incorporate the distinctive fea-
tures of the course of studies pursued by a student desiring to specialize in Latin America
within his discipline.

OFF-CAMPUS GRADUATE CENTERS IN ENGINEERING
The Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies in cooperation with the Col-
lege of Engineering has established off-campus centers to offer course work applicable to
the Master of Engineering degree (see p. 21) and the Professional Degree in Engineering
(see Undergraduate Catalog). Centers are presently located in Orange County, Palm Beach
County, and Pinellas County. Additional centers may be established by the Institute as the
need develops.
Students who have been admitted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida
may enroll in courses offered at these Graduate Centers as part of a planned program to-
ward the Master of Engineering degree. Other students may take the courses offered at
these centers provided they are admitted to the University of Florida under the Professional
Degree Program of the College of Engineering.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
Graduate work is offered leading to various fields of public employment. Three train-
ing sequences are outlined herein:
Management Sequence.-Adviser for the major field is in the Department of Political
Science. Training in this area leads to positions in city manager government and meets
state and federal civil service requirements. The major will be a concentration of public
administration courses within the field of political science. A minor or minors may be
taken in economics (concentration in public finance), accounting, or other areas.
Governmental Planning Sequence.-Adviser is in the Department of Political Science.
Training in this area is offered leading to positions in local, state, and federal government
planning agencies. The curriculum consists of seminars in planning, public administration
and public law and recommended courses in statistics, economics, sociology, geography, or
agricultural economics. Supervised summer internships in selected planning agencies in
Florida are arranged by the department as an integral part of the training program.
Finance Sequence.-Adviser of the major field is the graduate adviser for the College
of Business Administration. Courses in this sequence include public finance courses appli-
cable toward a major. Accounting courses are also recommended. Training is designed for
those applying for positions in fiscal departments of state, county, and federal government.
Public Management and the Public Schools.-Advisers are those for graduate students
in business administration, educational administration, and public administration (political
science).
This sequence is designed to train only business managers in the public schools.
Those interested in principalships, supervisory positions, etc., should follow the regular
sequence for majors in education. Business managers of public schools are concerned with
purchasing, contracting, reporting of fiscal procedures and forms to the state educational
officials, etc. Major and minor sequences in economics (public finance and accounting),
educational administration, and public administration (political science) are offered. Stu-
dents with undergraduate sequences in accounting and business are encouraged to consider
this program.
All sequences will include 30 credit hours of work including a thesis. The major is
12 to 18 credit hours and the minor is 6 to 12 hours, at least 6 of which must be in one
field. The thesis normally covers 6 credit hours of research.







38 SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES


INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
For specialization in international relations leading toward the M.A. and Ph.D., this
program is offered through the Department of Political Science. See page 118 of this cata-
log for details.

SOUTHERN REGIONAL GRADUATE SUMMER SESSION IN STATISTICS
At the request of the Southern Regional Education Board's Advisory Commission on
Statistics, the University of Florida, the North Carolina State College, Virginia Polytechnic
Institute, and Oklahoma State University initiated a continuing program of graduate sum-
mer sessions in statistics to be held at each of the four institutions in rotation beginning
in the summer of 1954. The 1962 session was held at Oklahoma State University; the
1963 session will be held at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and the 1964 session will be
held at the University of Florida. Each of the sponsoring institutions will accept the cred-
its earned by students in the session as residence credit. The courses are arranged to pro-
vide consecutive work in successive summers and are of six weeks' duration. Information
regarding these courses may be obtained from any of the cooperating statistical departments
or the deans of the Graduate Schools concerned.

M.Ed. DEGREE FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHERS OF TECHNOLOGY
The degree program is a joint effort between the College of Engineering and the
College of Education, University of Florida. Its intent is to supply competent teachers for
the many terminal two-year technology programs being offered both in this state and in
other states.
Generally speaking, a person with a prior degree who has a working knowledge of
calculus and college-level physics can complete this degree program in one calendar year.
If the prospective student is uncertain of his proficiency in these areas, proficiency can be
regained either through enrollment in a summer session or regular trimester prior to his
embarking upon the master's degree program.
Admission Requirements.-Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the
Graduate School and the College of Education. Generally speaking, applicants must have
a baccalaureate degree from an approved college or university and must have a grade point
average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 system during their junior and senior years. The aptitude
test of the Graduate Record Examination is used as a basis for selection. Applicants begin
classes in the fall trimester of each year and terminate their work after completing the
summer session unless prior preparatory work is necessary.
Curriculum.-The curriculum is a non-thesis program with a minimum requirement
of 36 credit hours. Eighteen credit hours of this work must be in graduate level courses
taken in the College of Education to meet certification requirements. The remaining 18
hours are comprised of 12 credit hours of technical course work, together with 6 credit
hours of internship, spent in the teaching classrooms and laboratories of the College of
Engineering.

M.Ed. DEGREE FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHERS OF NURSING
Admission Requirements.-Applicants are required to have a baccalaureate degree
from an approved college or university. A grade point average of 2.5 must be maintained
in the junior and senior years. Public health nursing and psychiatric nursing are required
for admission. The aptitude test of the Graduate Record Examination is used as a basis
of selection. Applicants begin classes in the summer or fall of each year.
Curriculum.-The curriculum is a non-thesis program with a minimum requirement
of 36 credit hours, 18 of which must be at the 600 level or above. The emphasis will be
on gaining understandings of the junior college curriculum and teaching, increased skills
in interpersonal relations, specialized knowledge and practice in clinical nursing, and
practice teaching in a basic nursing program. The requirements for a credential in junior
college teaching will be met.
Courses to a maximum of 6 credit hours may be accepted through the General
Extension Division of Florida. Courses of full graduate level may be transferred from an
institution approved for this purpose by the Graduate School to the extent of 6 credit
hours.
The program can normally be completed in three trimesters. It is not designed to be
completed exclusively during summer sessions. The following courses in nursing are a
required part of the program:








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES 39


NSG 511--SEMINAR IN GENERAL NURSING. 3 credits
NSG 512-AREA SEMINAR IN CLINICAL NURSING. 3 to 6 credits
NSG 561-NURSING PRACTICUM. 3 credits
NSG 562-NURSING PRACTICUM. 3 to 6 credits

THE GRADUATE RESIDENCE CENTER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA IN TAMPA
The Graduate Residence Center is administered by The Florida Institute for Continu-
ing University Studies in cooperation with the State University System. The basic purpose
of the Center is to provide an especially designed program for the Master of Education
degree for students who have been fully admitted to the Graduate School of the Universi-
ty of Florida.
Admission to the Program.-Students who have been admitted to the Graduate School
of the University of Florida with a Graduate Record Examination aptitude score of 430 or
above may take 18 credit hours in the Graduate Residence Center toward a Master of
Education degree, if the program has been planned with a counselor in the College of
Education. Students who choose this program must spend at least two full-time summer
sessions or one full-time trimester on the University of Florida campus in addition to the
18 credit hours taken at the Graduate Residence Center. Not more than 6 hours in the
aggregate taken in extension courses, field laboratory courses, or in other institutions can
be counted as part of the 18 hours taken away from the University of Florida campus.
Students who have been admitted to the Graduate School of the University of Florida
under regulations other than those stated above may enroll in courses offered at the
Graduate Residence Center and use a maximum of 6 credit hours in a planned program
in accordance with the following limitations: not more than 12 hours of credit in the ag-
gregate can be counted in a Master of Education program in off-campus workshops and
extension courses (limit 6 hours) ; field laboratory courses (limit 6 hours) ; courses trans-
ferred from other institutions (limit 6 hours); and courses taken at the Graduate Resi-
dence Center at the University of South Florida (limit 6 hours).
Registration.-The time of registration, courses offered, credits, etc. are covered by the
announcement of the Florida Institute for Continuing University Studies.

FORD FOUNDATION THREE-YEAR MASTER'S PROGRAM
Ford Foundation Undergraduate-Graduate Program.-The Foundation has made a fel-
lowship grant to the University of Florida for the initiation of a three-year master's de-
gree program in the Graduate School. The program will begin with the junior year and
continue through the first year of graduate study. Students who maintain satisfactory prog-
ress will be awarded a fellowship or assistantship for the third or final year, and will re-
ceive both the bachelor's and master's degree. Program fellowships up to $200 per month
and cancellation of non-Florida fees (but not registration fees) for the first year of gradu-
ate study will be available. For further details, contact Dean E. Ruffin Jones, 12B Flint
Hall.
RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE INSTITUTE
OF NUCLEAR STUDIES
The University of Florida is one of the sponsoring universities of the Oak Ridge In-
stitute of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through this cooperative as-
sociation with the Institute, our Graduate Research Program has at its disposal all the fa-
cilities of the national laboratories in Oak Ridge and of the research staffs of these labora-
tories. When a master's or doctor's candidate has completed his resident work, it is possi-
ble, by special arrangement for him to go to Oak Ridge to complete his research problem
and prepare a thesis. In addition, it is possible for the staff members of this University to
go to Oak Ridge for varying periods, usually not less than three months, for advanced
study in their particular field. Both staff and students may keep abreast of the most mod-
ern and up-to-date developments in atomic and nuclear research in progress at the Oak
Ridge laboratories.
The students go to Oak Ridge on Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowships, which have vary-
ing stipends determined by the number of their dependents and their level of work. Staff
members may work at Oak Ridge on stipends commensurate with their present salary and
rank.
A copy of the bulletin and announcement of the Graduate Training Program of the
Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies is available in the office of the Graduate School.







40 SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES


Bulletins may also be obtained by writing to the chairman of the University Relations
Division of the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Interested persons should ask for assistance from Dr. George K. Davis, University Rela-
tions Division Counselor at the University of Florida.
All arrangements for these fellowships will be made between the Dean of the Gradu-
ate School and the Institute of Nuclear Studies.


FACILITIES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY SERVICE
The University Libraries, comprising the General Library and 11 departmental li-
braries, contained 970,429 volumes and were receiving 10,000 serials as of June 30, 1962.
The larger part of the resources are housed in the General Library stacks and the
four divisional reading rooms. On the first floor is the University College Reading Room,
with some 8,000 volumes useful to students in the first two years of college. The Humani-
ties Reading Room and the Social Sciences Reading Room, which serve as centers of library
activity for upperclassmen and graduate students in the humanistic and the social studies,
are on the second floor. In each of these rooms are approximately 15,000 selected books
and the current issues of learned journals. The Science Reading Room, with materials for
psychology, general science, mathematics, physics, geology, and geography, is on the third
floor.
Facilities in the General Library include the Browsing Room and six music listening
rooms. Seminar rooms, carrels, and study cubicles are available to faculty members and
graduate students. Interlibrary loan and photoduplication services provide research materi-
als not available on the campus.
The resources of the General Library are particularly strong in Floridiana because of
the P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, which is located on the first floor. In recent
years, special emphasis has been placed upon strengthening the holdings for the Latin
American Area Studies Program, especially for the West Indies and Caribbean areas. Spe-
cial collections of the University Libraries include rare books, the Marjorie Kinnan Raw-
lings Collection, which consists of manuscripts, typescripts, and memorabilia of one of
America's distinguished novelists; the Collection of Creative Writing, which includes work-
sheets, manuscripts, and other literary papers of significant contemporary American and
British authors; and the Dance and Music Archives, which is an extensive collection of
pictures, programs, photographs, and other documentary material relating to the lyric
theater.
Libraries for the colleges of Agriculture, Architecture and Fine Arts, Pharmacy, Edu-
cation, Engineering, Forestry, Journalism and Communications, Law, Medicine, Nursing,
and Physical Education and Health, and the Department of Chemistry are located in or near
the buildings which house the respective instructional units. The book resources serving
the extension activities of the University are located in the Seagle Building. The P. K.
Yonge Laboratory School Library is in Building F of the Laboratory School.
The regular schedule for the General Library is Monday through Saturday, 8:00 A.M.
to 11:00 P.M.; Sunday, 2:00 P.M. to 11:00 P.M. The departmental libraries, with some
variations, observe a similar schedule.

FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the Legislature in 1917 as a de-
partment of the University of Florida.
The Museum resembles other university-affiliated museums in that it operates as a re-
search center as well as a center for the diffusion of knowledge through exhibits. In ad-
dition to the general administrative section of the Museum, headed by the director, there
are three departments of the organization: Natural Sciences, staffed by scientists who are
concerned with studying and expanding the research collections in natural science; Social
Science, staffed by anthropologists who study historic and prehistoric cultures; Exhibits,
staffed by specialists in the interpretation of knowledge through museum exhibit tech-
niques.
The Museum exhibition halls occupy the first two floors of the Seagle Building, a ten-
story office building located in downtown Gainesville about a mile from the campus. These
halls are open to the public from nine-thirty until five o'clock every day except Sundays
and major holidays when they are open from one to five o'clock. There is no admission








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES 41


charge. The Museum is frequently used by University and public school classes and is visi-
ted by over 75,000 persons annually.
The research collections now total approximately one-half million items. These col-
lections are under the care of curators who encourage the scientific study of the Museum's
holdings. Materials are constantly being added to the collection both through gifts from
friends and through collecting by staff members. The archeological collections are especial-
ly noteworthy. There are also excellent study collections of birds, mammals, insects, mol-
lusks, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and vertebrate fossils. The latter seven collections are co-
operatively maintained by the Museum and Department of Biology. Opportunities are
provided for students, staff, and visiting scientists to use the collections. Field work is
presently sponsored in the archeological, paleontological, and zoological fields.
The Exhibits department has been constructing site museums for state parks in Flor-
ida. The Museum lends scientific specimens to other investigators, exchanges exhibit ma-
terials with other institutions, and carries on most other functions normally associated with
a public and university museum.

COMPUTING CENTER
The Computing Center of the University provides the services of an IBM 709 elec-
tronic computer and other subsidiary equipment.
The principal functions of the center are:
1. To aid research by furnishing consulting services for the faculty, staff, gradu-
ate students, and others.
2. To maintain a library of computer programs for the benefit of users.
3. To carry on investigations in the theory and application of numerical analysis.
4. To conduct research under contract or other arrangements for university, fed-
eral, state, and other government agencies, as well as for foundations and in-
dividuals.
5. To assist in coordinating and developing University research programs in
which the computer may be involved.
6. To provide machine computation and tabulating facilities for other education-
al and research units of the University.
The Computing Center will be primarily a research unit, though members of the
staff may teach courses in other departments. Thesis work may be carried on in the Center.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS
The purpose of the University Press is to encourage, seek out, and publish original
and scholarly manuscripts which will aid in developing the University as a recognized
center of research and scholarship.
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and Inter-American titles, the Press
publishes books of general interest, and eight separate series: biological sciences, Caribbean
conferences, dance literature, gerontology, humanities, Latin American, medical sciences,
and social sciences. It is also the publisher of The Handbook of Latin American Studies,
sponsored by the Library of Congress, and is the distributor throughout the United States
and Canada of the publications of the Caribbean Commission and of the Inter-American
Bibliographical and Library Association.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and nine faculty experts appoint-
ed by the President of the University, determines policies of publication relating to the
acceptance or rejection of manuscripts and the issuance of author contracts. Each year the
board examines numerous manuscripts submitted not only by the University faculty but
by authors from all over the United States, Europe, and Latin America.
The Press is a member of the Association of American University Presses.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MONOGRAPH SERIES
The Graduate School sponsors two monograph series devoted to the publication of
research primarily by present and former members of the scholarly community of the
University. The Social Sciences Monographs are published four times each year with
subjects drawn from anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology, educa-
tion, geography, law, and psychology. The Humanities Monographs are published three
times each year with subjects drawn from art, history, language and literature, music,
philosophy, and religion.







42 ORGANIZED RESEARCH


Organized Research
The Ofice of Contract Research has been established to coordinate the relationships
of the University with outside agencies interested in the sponsorship of fundamental and
applied research. All proposals for the sponsorship of research or grants-in-aid must receive
the approval of the Director of Research. Subsequent negotiations with potential contract-
ing agencies or sponsors of research projects are carried on under the director's supervision.
All contracts are subject to the final approval of the Board of Control.
The Agricultural Experiment Stations are responsible for extensive organized research
leading to the improvement of all phases of Florida's widely varied agricultural produc-
tion, processing, and marketing. The Stations are administered by the director located on
the University of Florida campus and include main station departments as well as branch
stations and field laboratories operating as an integral administrative unit. Certain phases
of the research program are in cooperation with the United States Department of Agricul-
ture and other federal departments as well as with numerous Florida agricultural agencies
and organizations.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is cooperating with the West Central
Florida Station, Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its beef cattle and pasture pro-
duction and management programs; and with the United States Weather Bureau, Lakeland,
in the Federal Frost Warning Service for fruit and vegetable producers and shippers.
Many members of the research staff of the Agricultural Experiment Stations are also
members of the faculty of the College of Agriculture as are some in the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service. These three agricultural units of the University work cooperatively in
many areas under the administration of the Provost for Agriculture. Agricultural research
is the primary objective of the Agricultural Experiment Stations. Funds for research assist-
ants are made available to encourage graduate training and professional scientific improve-
ment.
Results of the research of the Agricultural Experiment Stations are published in
scientific journals, bulletins, circulars, mimeographed reports, and the Sunshine State Agri-
cultural Research Report, and are available to Florida residents without charge upon
request to the Editorial Department of the Agricultural Experiment Station at Gainesville.
The Agricultural Experiment Station cooperates closely with the Agricultural Extension
Service in providing research findings for prompt dissemination.
Research at the main station is conducted within 17 departments-agricultural eco-
nomics, agricultural engineering, agronomy, animal science, botany, dairy science, ento-
mology, food technology and nutrition, forestry, fruit crops, ornamental horticulture, plant
pathology, poultry science, soils, statistics, vegetable crops, and veterinary science. In
addition to the above the main station has five units vital to its research programs; namely,
business section, editorial, field operations, library, and plant science section.
To serve the varied needs of Florida's diversified agriculture, branch stations and field
laboratories are situated at numerous locations having different climatic conditions, soil
types, and crops. Intensive research is conducted in all fields of agriculture, such as citrus,
vegetables, field crops, livestock, pastures, and many others.
The branch stations and field laboratories, and their locations, are as follows: Central
Florida Station, Sanford; Citrus Station, Lake Alfred; Everglades Station, Belle Glade;
Gulf Coast Station, Bradenton; North Florida Station, Quincy; Range Cattle Station, Ona;
Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead; Suwannee Valley Station, Live Oak; West Florida Sta-
tion, Jay; Indian River Field Laboratory, Fort Pierce; Plantation Field Laboratory, Fort
Lauderdale; South Florida Field Laboratory, Immokalee; Potato Investigations Laboratory,
Hastings; Pecan Investigations Laboratory, Monticello; Strawberry Investigations Labora-
tory, Plant City; and the Watermelon and Grape Investigations Laboratory, Leesburg.
The Florida Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station is not only the research
division of the College of Engineering but it is also the developmental laboratory for the
industries of the state. It was officially established in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral
part of the College of Engineering "to organize and promote the prosecution of research
projects of engineering and related sciences, with special reference to such of these prob-
lems as are important to the industries of Florida."
The facilities of the Station include all the equipment of the College of Engineering,
now valued at more than $3,000,000, not including government-owned equipment. The
Station also has available for its use the laboratories, staff, and facilities of other divisions
of the University. Because of the close relationship between teaching and research activi-
ties, students secure much information about engineering and industrial problems normally
not encompassed in a collegiate program.
The Station receives only a small portion of its operating revenue from the state. The
remainder is derived from contracts with federal agencies and industrial organizations.
Large and small manufacturers avail themselves of the finest research laboratories in the








STUDENT SERVICES 43


Southeast. Among the outstanding laboratories, in addition to a well-equipped shop, are
those in public health engineering; electronics; ionics; metallurgy; chemical engineering;
air conditioning; soil mechanics; electrical machinery; paper, pulp, and wood products
utilization; farm mechanization; corrosion; aircraft model wind tunnel; reinforced and prei
stressed concrete; coastal engineering laboratory; and nuclear engineering facilities in-
cluding reactor, sub-critical assembly, pulse neutron source, linear accelerator and cobalt
source.
The Bureau of Architectural and Community Research is one of the activities of the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts.
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research is the research division of the College
of Business Administration. A major part of the Bureau's work is designed to further
understanding of the economy of Florida and the Southeast. Contract research is under-
taken for federal and state agencies.
In recent years the Bureau has developed Florida data in the form of statistical series
dealing with annual estimates of personal income and of population by counties, monthly
analyses of building permit activity by communities and by local areas, and annual and
quarterly estimates of retail sales by counties.
The results of research are made public through the monthly Economic Leaflets,
annual publications, occasional papers, and the monthly Florida Construction Rcview. The
Economic Leaflets are sent free to any resident of Florida upon request.
The Public Administration Clearing Service is a research and service adjunct of the
Department of Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences. It carries on a con-
tinuous program of research on public administration, political behavior, and public policy
in Florida; it provides consulting services on a contract basis to state and local govern-
ments in Florida; it publishes research studies and surveys of administrative and political
problems in both scientific and popular monograph form and it publishes a Civic Infor-
mation Series annually for assistance to citizen groups in their study of current issues in the
state.
The Research Division of the School of Journalism and Communications conducts re-
search in the news media, in broadcasting, advertising, and public opinion.


Student Services
The Adviser to Foreign Students is the coordinator of arrangements for all alien
students at the University from the time of their first inquiries until they return to their
home countries. His office cooperates with other University agencies in processing applica-
tions from foreign students for admission and financial aids. The office is primarily re-
sponsible for the reception and orientation of new students from abroad and cooperates
with other officials and agencies of the University in providing necessary counseling for
foreign students on academic, financial, language, social, or other problems. The Adviser
to Foreign Students is responsible for all the University's relations with the U. S. Immigra-
tion Service and, he serves as contact officer in matters relating to federal agency pro-
grams. In this capacity he cooperates with the various colleges and schools of the Uni-
versity in developing estimates of the numbers of participants that may be programmed
at the University and the fields in which these services will be offered. He provides
liaison with two major overseas programs for students, i.e., the Peace Corps, and the
Fulbright Act.
The University Placement Service is an agency designed to coordinate the placement
activities of the departments, schools, and colleges on campus. This office cooperates direct-
ly with these University units in handling placement affairs and provides services which
supplement their activities. Through its placement facilities, the University aids students
in solving the problem of postgraduate employment and assists alumni in making suitable
changes of employment.
The University Placement Service functions primarily as a clearing house, bringing
together students, faculty members, and representatives of organizations seeking college-
trained personnel for permanent employment. Assistance is given students in preparing
and making desired contacts for placement upon graduation by supplying job information,
informing students of job opportunities, arranging interviews between employers and ap-
plicants, and helping the students gather and present their credentials to prospective em-
ployers.
Representatives from business, industry, and government are encouraged to visit the
campus or write this office and to take the opportunity to engage qualified University of
Florida graduates.
The University Counseling Center provides psychological services to the members of
the student body. It also provides practicum experience for graduate students in the








44 STUDENT SERVICES


departments of Psychology, Personnel Services, and in Rehabilitation Counseling, and
engages in institutional as well as basic research in the problems of counseling. Specific
services include vocational guidance and clarifying vocational choice, personal counseling,
problems of the under-achiever and in-service training and consultative service for other
University staff members who are engaged in counseling relationships with University
students. In these functions the University Counseling Center works closely with the
Speech and Hearing Clinic and the Reading Laboratory and Clinic. It works closely also
with the academic counseling staff in the University College and the Upper Division
colleges. The Center works with the office of the University psychiatrist on a referral basis
and with the director of the early registration program in the orientation of prospective
students to the academic program of the University.
The Student Health Department strives to prevent the entry and spread of communi-
cable diseases at the University. Students must have been successfully vaccinated against
smallpox within the past five years. No exceptions are made to this ruling. Vaccination
should be accomplished prior to entry at the University. Immunization for poliomyelitis
and tetanus is strongly recommended.
Applicants for admission to the University receive a form for medical history and
physical examination from the Registrar's Office. The history should be completed by the
applicant before he goes to his physician for physical examination. The physical examina-
tion portion must be completed by a licensed doctor of medicine (M.D.) and the form
mailed by the doctor directly to the Director, Student Health Department, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, in the envelope supplied for that purpose. The medical
history and physical examination information is then reviewed by a physician before the
applicant is cleared for registration at the University. (For additional information see the
Undergraduate Catalog.)
Graduate School Editorial Service aids in the preparation of the thesis which is
one aspect of the training in the mature and responsible scholarship expected of a
candidate. Time devoted to careful attention to form, style, and mechanics should not be
regarded as time wasted in mechanical compliance with administrative regulations. The
thesis is a public and permanent record of the candidate's professional attainment and
reveals the quality and standards of his workmanship.
The Graduate School Office offers assistance in the preparation of the following:
1. Form of thesis (paper, margins, pagination, etc.).
2. General mechanics of punctuation and accepted usage.
3. Headings and subheadings.
4. Plates, figures, charts, and tables.
5. Material for reproduction and fold in.
6. Footnotes and bibliography.
The Graduate School Office will also
1. Check rough draft of manuscript prior to its final typing.
2. Assist the candidate in securing editorial service when necessary.
3. Assist the candidate in locating a recommended typist.
4. Consult with typist and candidate on problems relating to the final typing of the
manuscript.










Departmental Courses

Accounting
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Stone, W. E., Head; Benninger, L. J.; Blough, C. G.; DaVault, J. W.; Deinzer, H. T.;
Peterson, E. G.; Ray, D. -D.
For admission to graduate-level courses, the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected; or, where necessary, special arrangements may be made
with the approval of the department head.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in accounting are available for graduate
credit as a part of a candidate's major when specifically approved by the candidate's
adviser. Under appropriate conditions ATG 414-Income Tax Accounting, and ATG
419-Controllership may be approved for graduate credit.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ATG 511-ACCOUNTING THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS. 3 credits
ATG 516-ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS AND DATA PROCESSING. 3 credits
ATG 519-ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS. 3 credits
ATG 593-COST ACCOUNTING THEORY AND APPLICATION. 3 credits
ATG 594-INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING AND RESEARCH. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ATG 601-ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
Conceptual bases for accounting standards, especially in the areas of the business entity
and income measurement.
ATG 602-ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
The second half of 601-602, with emphasis on the problems of profit determination and
capital maintenance.
ATG 603-SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ACCOUNTING. 3 credits
Identical with ES 603. Prerequisite: ATG 601. Social accounts and comparative economic
accounting systems, with emphasis upon national income accounting, the national balance
sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds analysis.
ATG 605-THE FEDERAL INCOME TAX: CRITICAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 414. Essentials of the tax pattern in relation to social objectives and
the relation of income tax provisions to public purposes. Shaping of critical standards for
appraising proposals to modify the federal income tax laws.
ATG 607-COST ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 313. The evolution and latest developments in the basic principles of
cost accounting, including absorption and direct costing, and actual and statistical costs.
ATG 630- INDIVIDUAL WORK IN ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of department and approval of Director of Graduate Studies. A
reading and research course in several areas of accounting as needed by individual gradu-
ate students. May be elected for full credit in subsequent trimesters with change of content.
ATG 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
ATG 718-EVOLUTION OF ACCOUNTING THEORY AND PRACTICE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 411. Development of accounting principles and practices. Relation of
accounting to economics, law. and finance.

Aerospace Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Clarkson, M. H., Head; Hoover, J. W.; Miller, W. H.; Williams, D. T.

45










Departmental Courses

Accounting
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Stone, W. E., Head; Benninger, L. J.; Blough, C. G.; DaVault, J. W.; Deinzer, H. T.;
Peterson, E. G.; Ray, D. -D.
For admission to graduate-level courses, the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected; or, where necessary, special arrangements may be made
with the approval of the department head.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in accounting are available for graduate
credit as a part of a candidate's major when specifically approved by the candidate's
adviser. Under appropriate conditions ATG 414-Income Tax Accounting, and ATG
419-Controllership may be approved for graduate credit.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ATG 511-ACCOUNTING THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS. 3 credits
ATG 516-ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS AND DATA PROCESSING. 3 credits
ATG 519-ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS. 3 credits
ATG 593-COST ACCOUNTING THEORY AND APPLICATION. 3 credits
ATG 594-INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING AND RESEARCH. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ATG 601-ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
Conceptual bases for accounting standards, especially in the areas of the business entity
and income measurement.
ATG 602-ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
The second half of 601-602, with emphasis on the problems of profit determination and
capital maintenance.
ATG 603-SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ACCOUNTING. 3 credits
Identical with ES 603. Prerequisite: ATG 601. Social accounts and comparative economic
accounting systems, with emphasis upon national income accounting, the national balance
sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds analysis.
ATG 605-THE FEDERAL INCOME TAX: CRITICAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 414. Essentials of the tax pattern in relation to social objectives and
the relation of income tax provisions to public purposes. Shaping of critical standards for
appraising proposals to modify the federal income tax laws.
ATG 607-COST ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 313. The evolution and latest developments in the basic principles of
cost accounting, including absorption and direct costing, and actual and statistical costs.
ATG 630- INDIVIDUAL WORK IN ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of department and approval of Director of Graduate Studies. A
reading and research course in several areas of accounting as needed by individual gradu-
ate students. May be elected for full credit in subsequent trimesters with change of content.
ATG 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
ATG 718-EVOLUTION OF ACCOUNTING THEORY AND PRACTICE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 411. Development of accounting principles and practices. Relation of
accounting to economics, law. and finance.

Aerospace Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Clarkson, M. H., Head; Hoover, J. W.; Miller, W. H.; Williams, D. T.

45










Departmental Courses

Accounting
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Stone, W. E., Head; Benninger, L. J.; Blough, C. G.; DaVault, J. W.; Deinzer, H. T.;
Peterson, E. G.; Ray, D. -D.
For admission to graduate-level courses, the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected; or, where necessary, special arrangements may be made
with the approval of the department head.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in accounting are available for graduate
credit as a part of a candidate's major when specifically approved by the candidate's
adviser. Under appropriate conditions ATG 414-Income Tax Accounting, and ATG
419-Controllership may be approved for graduate credit.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ATG 511-ACCOUNTING THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS. 3 credits
ATG 516-ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS AND DATA PROCESSING. 3 credits
ATG 519-ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS. 3 credits
ATG 593-COST ACCOUNTING THEORY AND APPLICATION. 3 credits
ATG 594-INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING AND RESEARCH. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ATG 601-ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
Conceptual bases for accounting standards, especially in the areas of the business entity
and income measurement.
ATG 602-ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
The second half of 601-602, with emphasis on the problems of profit determination and
capital maintenance.
ATG 603-SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ACCOUNTING. 3 credits
Identical with ES 603. Prerequisite: ATG 601. Social accounts and comparative economic
accounting systems, with emphasis upon national income accounting, the national balance
sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds analysis.
ATG 605-THE FEDERAL INCOME TAX: CRITICAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 414. Essentials of the tax pattern in relation to social objectives and
the relation of income tax provisions to public purposes. Shaping of critical standards for
appraising proposals to modify the federal income tax laws.
ATG 607-COST ACCOUNTING THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 313. The evolution and latest developments in the basic principles of
cost accounting, including absorption and direct costing, and actual and statistical costs.
ATG 630- INDIVIDUAL WORK IN ACCOUNTING 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of department and approval of Director of Graduate Studies. A
reading and research course in several areas of accounting as needed by individual gradu-
ate students. May be elected for full credit in subsequent trimesters with change of content.
ATG 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
ATG 718-EVOLUTION OF ACCOUNTING THEORY AND PRACTICE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ATG 411. Development of accounting principles and practices. Relation of
accounting to economics, law. and finance.

Aerospace Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Clarkson, M. H., Head; Hoover, J. W.; Miller, W. H.; Williams, D. T.

45








46 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


General prerequisites are one year of engineering physics or its equivalent, mathe-
matics through differential equations, and a minimum of 36 credits in the general field
of engineering, encompassing dynamics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, and strength
of materials. In addition, permission of instructor is required for each course.

COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AN 570-PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE AND CONTROL. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
AN 606-RE-ENTRY AERODYNAMICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AN 403. Re-entry trajectories. Deceleration. Aerodynamic heating during
re-entry. Heat protection.
AN 607-MAGNETO-FLUID DYNAMICS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: PS 502 or equivalent, AN 403 or equivalent. Fundamentals of the motion
of a conducting fluid. Applications to aeronautics and astronautics.
AN 608-MOLECULAR FLOW OF GASES. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AN 403 or consent of instructor. Determination of the characteristics of
a gas flow from a molecular point of view. Consideration of isentropic and nonisentropic
flows.
AN 631-AEROELASTICITY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AN 431. Corequisite: EM 636 or equivalent. Divergence of a lifting surface.
Steady state aeroelastic problems. Flutter analysis. Transient loads, stall flutter. Nonstation-
ary air-foil theory. Oscillating air-foils in incompressible flow. Experiments. Use of
digital and analogue computers.
AN 632-AEROELASTICITY. 3 credits
Second half of AN 631-632. Prerequisite: AN 631.
AN 661-ASTRONAUTICAL MECHANICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AN 461. Newtonian orbits, perturbation theory. Motion of satellite about
an oblate earth. Translunar and interplanetary orbits. Re-entry orbits with and without
lift.
AN 681-ADVANCED AEROSPACE DESIGN. Variable credit
Advanced aerospace design projects.
AN 684-AEROSPACE RESEARCH. Variable credit
AN 685-ADVANCED AERODYNAMICS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AN 403 and AN 413. Advanced study of subsonic, supersonic, and hy-
personic aerodynamic theory with applications.
AN 686-ADVANCED AERODYNAMICS. 3 credits
Second half of AN 685-686. Prerequisite: AN 685.
AN 691-SPECIAL TOPICS IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING. Variable credit
Laboratory, lectures, or conferences covering specially selected topics in aerospace engi-
neering.
AN 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Agricultural Economics
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Hamilton, H. G., Head; Alleger, D. E.; Arnold, C. J.; Brooke, D. L.; Cake, E. W.; Clark,
H. B.; Godwin, M. R.; Greene, R. E. L.; Greenman, J. R.; Langham, M. R.; McPherson,
W. K.; McPherson, W. W.; Riggan, W. B.; Savage, Zach; Smith, C. N.; Spurlock, A. H.
The student as a rule will have received his B.S. degree in agriculture from a college
of recognized standing. A graduate student who has not completed the agricultural eco-
nomics curriculum for undergraduates, or the equivalent thereof, will be required to take
without credit the courses necessary for completing the curriculum. A student working
for his Ph.D. degree who has not already taken ES 409, MS 205, and MS 207, or their
equivalents will be required to take these courses.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
AS 501-RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN LAND ECONOMICS. 3 credits








AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 47


AS 503-ADVANCED FARM MANAGEMENT. 3 credits
AS 513-SUCCESSFUL MARKETING FIRMS. 3 credits
AS 520-SAMPLING METHODS. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
AS 601-AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS SEMINAR. 0 credit
Weekly discussions of major economic problems existing in agriculture and proposed
research work by staff members and graduate students. Leaders in the fields of industry,
government, and education frequently participate.
AS 602-AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS SEMINAR. 0 credit
Second half of AS 601-602.
AS 603-ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AS 503 or equivalent, and ES 407 or equivalent. A study of economic
principles in relation to agricultural production and resource use problems treated from
the standpoint of both the individual farmer and society.
AS 604-ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 603. Second half of AS 603-604.
AS 605-PROBLEMS IN FARM MANAGEMENT. 3 credits
Designed to train students in collecting, analyzing, and presenting data on problems
in the field of farm management. Special problems of interest to the individual student
and agreeable to the instructor are selected for study.
AS 608-LAND ECONOMICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 412 or equivalent. A seminar examination of the alternative uses of
land, with special emphasis on identifying the nature of the capital investments and in-
stitutional arrangements that will bring about the increase in the production of agricultural
commodities needed to satisfy the demands of increasing populations. Primary emphasis
is placed on the uses that can be made of the tropical and semitropical lands of Florida
and Latin America.
AS 611-PROBLEMS IN MARKETING AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 2 or 3 credits
Individual study in areas concerned with the marketing of Florida agricultural products.
Emphasis may be placed on any aspect of the total problem of interest to the student
and agreeable to the instructor.
AS 614-ADVANCED MARKETING OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 3 credits
Economic evaluation of state and federal regulatory marketing laws, particularly with
reference to agricultural products of Florida.
AS 615-NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS.
3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Economic evaluation of domestic, foreign, and inter-
governmental programs on the agricultural welfare of the nation.
AS 616-RESEARCH METHODS AND TECHNIQUES IN AGRICULTURAL ECO-
NOMICS. 3 credits
Concepts of research dealing largely with the application of the scientific method in
planning and conducting research in the field of agricultural economics.
AS 617-FARM TENURE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 412 or equivalent. Tenure patterns, operation of farms under various de-
grees of tenure, leasing arrangements, landlord-tenant relationships, legal aspects of tenure,
tenure and public policy, the effect of industrialization and mechanization on tenure, pub-
lic ownership and control of land, methods of land acquisition, and effect of variations
in physical resources on farm tenure.
AS 618-RESEARCH METHODS IN MARKETING FARM PRODUCTS. 2 credits
Prerequisite: AS 616. An examination of the theoretical and practical aspects of research
in the field of marketing, with particular emphasis on the applicability of alternative re-
search approaches to different types of problem situations.
AS 619-RESEARCH METHODS IN FARM MANAGEMENT. 2 credits
A discussion of research problems in farm management; review of the literature; applica-
tion of findings; and planning of research projects.
AS 621-SAMPLING THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AS 411, AS 520; or consent of instructor. A theoretical treatment of the
topics presented in AS 520.
AS 622-MARKET DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH. 3 credits
Corequisite: AS 520 or consent of instructor. Application of social psychological, eco-
nomic, and sampling principles to marketing survey research for decision-making purposes
in advertising, promoting, and merchandizing goods and services.
AS 628-PROBLEMS IN STATISTICS. 2 or 3 credits. Maximum 6 credits
Prerequisite: A graduate course in statistics. Special problems in econometrics.








48 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


AS 629-DESIGN OF SAMPLE SURVEYS. 3 credits
Continuation of AS 520. Principles of sound questionnaire design; operational design,
including selection, training, and supervision of field and office personnel; and sampling
design and applications thereof in U. S. and in less-developed countries.
AS 630-AGRICULTURE'S ROLE IN THE GROWTH OF LATIN-AMERICAN
NATIONS. 3 credits
The seminar presents agricultural developments in Latin America as related to selected
concepts, facts and theories applied (1) to national growth, (2) to international rela-
tionships, and (3) to hemispheric understanding and cooperation.
AS 631-AGRICULTURAL POLICY FOR LOW-INCOME AREAS. 3 credits
A special study of agricultural policy matters that pertain to low-income areas.
AS 632-ECONOMIC GROWTH OF THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR OF UN-
DERDEVELOPED AREAS. 3 credits
AS 650-STATISTICAL METHODS IN RESEARCH. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AS 411 and consent of instructor. Linear stochastic models, their assump-
tions, computational requirements, and applications to economic problems. Least squares
and maximum likelihood estimators reviewed, problems of model construction, and esti-
mation of simultaneous economic relationships.
AS 651-ECONOMETRIC METHODS IN AGRICULTURE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AS 650 or consent of instructor. A discussion of the use of statistics and
economic theory in quantitative research. Special attention is given to the construction of
econometric models, to the estimation of the parameters involved, to specification error,
and to assaying the usefulness of the models.
AS 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
AS 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Agricultural Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63

Kinard, D. T., Head; Choate, R. E.; Ross, I. J.; Skinner, T. C.
Prerequisite for admission to graduate study in agricultural engineering is a bachelor's
degree from a curriculum essentially equivalent to the undergraduate curriculum in
agricultural engineering at the University of Florida. Students planning to take graduate
work in this field should consult departmental advisers prior to registration.
Candidates for the master's degree normally will be required to take AG 601,
AG 602, and AG 603 and at least one course from the list AG 671, AG 672, AG 673,
or AG 674, in addition to the thesis.

GRADUATE COURSES

AG 601-SEMINAR. 0 credit
Discussions on research and current trends and practices in agricultural engineering.
AG 602-RESEARCH METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 327. Corequisite: AY 452 or equivalent. A study of research techniques
and methods used in agricultural engineering.
AG 603-INSTRUMENTATION IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH.
3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: AG 602. The principles and application of measuring instru-
ments and devices for obtaining experimental data as applied to agricultural engineering
research.
AG 670-NON-THESIS RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Maximum 6 credits
Prerequisites: Minimum of two undergraduate courses in agricultural engineering. Special
problems in agricultural engineering. Not intended for majors in agricultural engineering.
AG 671-ADVANCED SOIL AND WATER MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING.
3 credits
Prerequisite: AG 415. Analysis and solution of selected problems dealing with land im-
provement and the control and use of water for agricultural production.
AG 672-ADVANCED FARM MACHINERY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AG 412. Analysis of agricultural machines, power units, and mechanized
systems with emphasis on functional design requirements, and evaluation of performance
of those machines and systems.








AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION, AGRONOMY 49


AG 673-ADVANCED FARM BUILDINGS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AG 418. Analysis of selected problems dealing with design criteria for
farm structures, particularly as related to efficient production systems.
AG 674-ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL PROCESS ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: AG 435. Analytical study of engineering problems dealing with the handling
and processing of agricultural products.
AG 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Agricultural Extension
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Hull, F. H., Head; Grigsby, S. E.; Watkins, M. O.
Students may undertake graduate programs with emphasis on agricultural extension
leading to the degree of Master of Agriculture.

GRADUATE COURSES
AXT 601-ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP. 11/2 credits.
Maximum 6 credits
Advanced training in leadership opportunities and responsibilities in agriculture in-
cluding emphasis upon small group leadership, program planning, community organization
and development, human relationships, public affairs, and public policy.
AXT 604-AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION THROUGH GROUP ACTION. 11/2 credits
Advanced techniques in developing extension programs through group action.
AXT 621-RESEARCH IN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum
6 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Library and workshop related to agricultural exten-
sion methods. Research work is studied, publications reviewed, and written reports de-
veloped.

Agronomy
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Hull, F. H., Head; Carver, W. A.; Edwardson, J. R.; Harris, H. C.; Horner, E. S.;
Killinger, G. B.; Rodgers, E. G.; Ruelke, O. C.; Schank, S. C.; Wallace, A. T.
The Department of Agronomy offers major work for the degrees of Master of
Agriculture, Master of Science in Agriculture, and Doctor of Philosophy. Areas of speciali-
zation are crop production, crop ecology, crop nutrition, weed control, cytogenetics, gene-
tics, and plant breeding. Minor work is offered students taking major work in other
departments. Students wishing to take either major or minor work in agronomy should
consult departmental advisers.

GRADUATE COURSES
AY 626-AGRONOMIC PROBLEMS. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies which relate to crop pro-
duction and improvement.
AY 627-PROBLEMS IN GENETICS AND CYTOGENETICS. 1 to 3 credits. Maxi-
mum 6 credits
Modern methods applied to specific genetics or cytogenetics research problems.
AY 635-CROP ECOLOGY. 3 credits
Influence of environmental factors, such as climatic, edaphic, and biotic, on growth and
distribution of agronomic crops.
AY 641-CROP NUTRITION. 2 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Nutritional influences on differentiation, composition,
growth, and yield of crop plants. Deficiency symptoms and diagnostic techniques are
studied.








50 ANIMAL SCIENCE


AY 646-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Identical with BCY 646, BLY 646, BTY 646, PY 646. Prerequisites: AY 329 or BLY
425 and consent of instructor. Population, statistical, chemical, virus and bacteriological,
serological and human genetics; sex determination, position effect, polyploidy, cytoplas-
mic and quantitative inheritance; speciation and radiation genetics.
AY 660-CYTOGENETICS. 2 credits
Prerequisites: Basic courses in genetics and microtechnique and consent of instructor.
Physical basis of genetic variation with emphasis on the co-relation of cytological and
genetic concepts.
AY 662-ADVANCED GENETICS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AY 329 and AY 422 or AL 322. Advanced genetic concepts with empha-
sis on the genetic basis for breeding procedures.
AY 665-ADVANCED PLANT BREEDING. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AY 329, AY 422, and consent of instructor. An advanced study of prin-
ciples and concepts of inheritance with methods of application to plant breeding.
AY 682-GENETICS SEMINAR. 1 credit. Maximum 3 credits
Review and discussion of current literature and developments in the field of genetics.
AY 692-GRADUATE AGRONOMY SEMINAR. 1 credit. Maximum 3 credits
Review and discussion of current literature and studies of agronomic problems. Required
of all students registered in agronomy each trimester it is offered.
AY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
AY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits

Animal Science
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63

Cunha, T. J., Head; Ammerman, C. B.; Arrington, L. R.; Carpenter, J. W.; Chapman,
H. L.; Combs, G. E., Jr.; Crockett, J. R.; Davis, G. K.; Feaster, J. P.; Hentges, J. F., Jr.;
Koger, M.; Moore, J. E.; Palmer, A. Z.; Shirley, R. L.; Wallace, H. D.; Warnick, A. C.
The Department of Animal Science offers the M.S.A. or Ph.D. degree in the fol-
lowing areas: (1) animal nutrition, (2) meats, (3) animal breeding and genetics, and
(4) animal physiology. A student may work on a problem covering more than one area
of study. Large animals (beef cattle, swine, and sheep) and laboratory animals are
available for various research problems. Adequate nutrition and meats laboratories are
available for detailed chemical and carcass quality evaluations. Special arrangements can
be made for conduction of research problems at the various branch agricultural experiment
stations throughout Florida.
Departmental prerequisites for admission to graduate study include a sound science
background, with basic courses in bacteriology, biology, botany, and chemistry.

GRADUATE COURSES
AL 603-ANIMAL NUTRITION. 3 credits
Relative composition, digestion, and utilization of foodstuffs; protein, energy, vitamin,
and mineral elements in nutrition.
AL 604-MEAT TECHNOLOGY. 3 credits
The chemistry, physics, histology, bacteriology, and engineering involved in the handling,
processing, manufacturing, preservation, storage, distribution, and utilization of meat.
AL 605-EXPERIMENTAL TECHNICS AND ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES IN
MEAT RESEARCH. 3 credits
Experimental design, analytical procedures; technics; carcass measurements and analysis
as related to livestock production and meat studies.
AL 607-PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION. 3 credits
Anatomy, histology, and physiology of genital organs. Estrous cycle changes in the female.
Semen production in the male and artificial insemination.
AL 608-GENETICS OF ANIMAL IMPROVEMENT. 3 credits
Prerequisites: AL 322 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Genetic structure of
population. Factors governing gene and zygotic frequencies.
AL 609-PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. 1 to 8 credits
AL 610-HORMONES IN REPRODUCTION OF FARM ANIMALS. 3 credits
The embryology, anatomy, histology, and physiology of endocrine glands. Various inter-
relationships of endocrine glands and target tissue.








ANTHROPOLOGY 51


AL 646-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Identical with AY 646, BCY 646, BLY 646, PY 646. See AY 646.
AL 650-ADVANCED METHODS IN NUTRITION TECHNOLOGY. 3 credits
For graduate students but open to seniors by special permission. Demonstrations and
limited performance of procedures used in nutrition research.
AL 651-ADVANCED ANIMAL NUTRITION. 3 credits
Proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and enzymes.
AL 652-ADVANCED ANIMAL NUTRITION LABORATORY. 2 credits
Accompanying laboratory course for AL 651.
AL 653-VITAMINS. 3 credits
Historical development, properties, assays, and physiological effects.
AL 654-LABORATORY IN VITAMINS. 2 credits
Chemical determination and assay procedures. Accompanying laboratory course for AL 653.
AL 655-MINERAL NUTRITION AND METABOLISM. 3 credits
Physiological effect of macro- and micro-elements, mineral interrelationships.
AL 656-RUMINANT PHYSIOLOGY AND METABOLISM. 2 credits
A review and correlation of the fundamental biochemical, physiological, and bacteriologi-
cal research upon which the feeding of ruminants is based. Emphasis is placed on experi-
mental methodology of rumen physiology and metabolism.
AL 657-NON-RUMINANT METABOLISM. 2 credits
Basic principles affecting absorption and assimilation of nutrients required for growth,
reproduction, and lactation of swine and small laboratory animals.
AL 660-GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. 1 credit
AL 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
AL 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits



Anthropology
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Goggin, J. M., Acting Head; Gavan, J. A.; Hutchinson, H. W.; Massey, W. C.; Sears,
W. H.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
APY 500-FIELD SESSIONS IN ARCHEOLOGY. 6 credits
APY 501-PRINCIPLES OF ARCHEOLOGY. 3 credits
APY 502-NORTH AMERICAN ARCHEOLOGY. 3 credits
APY 504-SOCIAL ORGANIZATION. 3 credits
APY 505-PRIMITIVE ECONOMICS. 3 credits
APY 539-NATIVE PEOPLES OF SOUTH AMERICA. 3 credits
APY 541-NATIVE PEOPLES OF MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, AND THE
CARIBBEAN. 3 credits
APY 580-ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
APY 601-PRINCIPLES OF ANTHROPOLOGY. 3 credits
Advanced study of the four major fields of anthropology: physical anthropology, anthro-
pological linguistics, archeology and ethnology. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical
orientations of each division and their interrelationships.
APY 610-MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: SY 556 or consent of instructor. The theory of anthropology as applied to:
Nursing, Medicine, Hospital Organization and the Therapeutic Environment. Course to
include instrument design and techniques of material collection.
APY 621-SEMINAR IN ARCHEOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: APY 501. A seminar in a selected archaeological topic. May be repeated for
credit with a different topic.
APY 622-SEMINAR IN ETHNOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: APY 504. A seminar in a selected ethnological topic. May be repeated for
credit with a different topic.








52 ARCHITECTURE, ART


APY 650-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
Guided readings on research in Anthropology based on library, laboratory, or fieldwork.
May be elected for additional credit in subsequent trimesters.
APY 655-CULTURE CHANGE. 3 credits
Prerequisites: APY 201 or 301. A study of those factors and forces which precipitate
change through the contact of different cultures or in the systems and institutions of a
single culture.


Architecture
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63

Lendrum, J. T., Head; Arnett, W. T.; Bannister, T. C.; Grand, J. L. R.; Larrick, T.;
Sebold, H. R.; Torraca, P. M.
The Department of Architecture offers graduate work leading to the degree of Master
of Arts in Architecture. Graduation from an accredited school of architecture is prerequi-
site to admission. Applicants for admission must submit a portfolio.
Specialization may be in architectural design, structural design, building construction,
or architectural research. Minors may be in any of these or in architectural history.
Holders of the five-year undergraduate degree in architecture may normally complete
the requirements for master's degree in one academic year.
All graduate courses may be repeated for credit with change of content. Some of the
courses listed are offered regularly, while others are offered only as needed. For the listing
of graduate courses for a given trimester, consult the Schedule of Courses for that trimester.

GRADUATE COURSES

AE 601-ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN. 3 or 6 credits
First half of AE 601-602. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in architecture. Research on a
special phase of architectural design, selected by students with approval of faculty.
AE 602-ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of AE 601-602.
AE 603-ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
First half of AE 603-604. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in architecture. Detailed in-
vestigation of a selected problem for the purpose of providing insight and understanding
in some field of fundamental importance in architecture.
AE 604-ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of AE 603-604.
AE 605-STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF BUILDINGS. 3 or 6 credits
First half of AE 605-606. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in architecture or in building
construction. Advanced study of a problem in the structural design of buildings, selected
by the student with the approval of the faculty.
AE 606-STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF BUILDINGS. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of AE 605-606.
AE 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Art
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Grissom, E. E., Acting Head; Holbrook, H. H.; McIntosh, P. R.; Purser, S. R.; Williams,
H. D.
Master of Fine Arts Degree: The Department of Art offers graduate work leading to
the degree of Master of Fine Arts. An undergraduate major in art with adequate prepara-
tion in studio courses in fine arts and in the history and theory of art is prerequisite to ad-
mission. Applicants for admission must submit a portfolio. Graduate work is divided be-
tween studio courses in drawing, painting, printmaking, creative photography, and/or
sculpture, and advanced study in the history of art. Two years of residence are normally
required for completion of the requirements for this degree.








52 ARCHITECTURE, ART


APY 650-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
Guided readings on research in Anthropology based on library, laboratory, or fieldwork.
May be elected for additional credit in subsequent trimesters.
APY 655-CULTURE CHANGE. 3 credits
Prerequisites: APY 201 or 301. A study of those factors and forces which precipitate
change through the contact of different cultures or in the systems and institutions of a
single culture.


Architecture
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63

Lendrum, J. T., Head; Arnett, W. T.; Bannister, T. C.; Grand, J. L. R.; Larrick, T.;
Sebold, H. R.; Torraca, P. M.
The Department of Architecture offers graduate work leading to the degree of Master
of Arts in Architecture. Graduation from an accredited school of architecture is prerequi-
site to admission. Applicants for admission must submit a portfolio.
Specialization may be in architectural design, structural design, building construction,
or architectural research. Minors may be in any of these or in architectural history.
Holders of the five-year undergraduate degree in architecture may normally complete
the requirements for master's degree in one academic year.
All graduate courses may be repeated for credit with change of content. Some of the
courses listed are offered regularly, while others are offered only as needed. For the listing
of graduate courses for a given trimester, consult the Schedule of Courses for that trimester.

GRADUATE COURSES

AE 601-ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN. 3 or 6 credits
First half of AE 601-602. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in architecture. Research on a
special phase of architectural design, selected by students with approval of faculty.
AE 602-ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of AE 601-602.
AE 603-ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
First half of AE 603-604. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in architecture. Detailed in-
vestigation of a selected problem for the purpose of providing insight and understanding
in some field of fundamental importance in architecture.
AE 604-ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of AE 603-604.
AE 605-STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF BUILDINGS. 3 or 6 credits
First half of AE 605-606. Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in architecture or in building
construction. Advanced study of a problem in the structural design of buildings, selected
by the student with the approval of the faculty.
AE 606-STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF BUILDINGS. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of AE 605-606.
AE 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Art
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Grissom, E. E., Acting Head; Holbrook, H. H.; McIntosh, P. R.; Purser, S. R.; Williams,
H. D.
Master of Fine Arts Degree: The Department of Art offers graduate work leading to
the degree of Master of Fine Arts. An undergraduate major in art with adequate prepara-
tion in studio courses in fine arts and in the history and theory of art is prerequisite to ad-
mission. Applicants for admission must submit a portfolio. Graduate work is divided be-
tween studio courses in drawing, painting, printmaking, creative photography, and/or
sculpture, and advanced study in the history of art. Two years of residence are normally
required for completion of the requirements for this degree.








ARTS AND SCIENCES, ASTRONOMY 53


ART 500 is required of all graduate majors. All graduate courses may be repeated
for credit with change of content. Some of the courses listed are offered regularly, while
others are offered only as needed. For the listing of graduate courses for a given trimester,
consult the Schedule of Courses for that trimester.
Graduate Minors in the History of Art: The graduate seminars are open to students
minoring in the history of art, provided that suitable prerequisites have been completed.
Courses in history, philosophy, or literature may often be substituted for prerequisites in
art.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ART 500-METHODS OF RESEARCH AND BIBLIOGRAPHY. 2 credits
ART 551-INDIVIDUAL WORK: STUDIO. 3 or 6 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ART 611-SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ART. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ART 309 and one undergraduate course in Renaissance or baroque are, or
the equivalent.
ART 621-SEMINAR PROBLEMS IN 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY ART. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ART 309 and one undergraduate course in 19th or 20th century art, or the
equivalent.
ART 650-ADVANCED DRAWING. 2 credits
Prerequisite: ART 451 or its equivalent.
ART 651-ADVANCED PROJECTS: STUDIO. 3, 6, or 9 credits
Prerequisite: A major in fine arts. Advanced projects in drawing, painting, printmaking
creative photography, and/or sculpture.
ART 655-RESEARCH IN METHODS AND MATERIALS OF THE ARTIST. 3 or 6
credits
Prerequisite: ART 303 or its equivalent. Research in the history, use and characteristics
of the artist's materials.
ART 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Arts and Sciences-General and Cross

Departmental Courses
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE COURSES
ASC 640-LATIN AMERICAN AREA SEMINAR. 1 credit
Prerequisites: Latin American area concentration and permission of the Instructor. An
inter-disciplinary study of selected Latin American topics for the departments of Agricul-
tural Economics, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Portuguese, Spanish,
and Sociology. May be repeated for credit.
ASC 641-INTERNSHIP IN COLLEGE TEACHING 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate major department. Required of all candidates for
the Master of Arts in Teaching and the Master of Science in Teaching degrees.
ASC 642-INTERNSHIP IN COLLEGE TEACHING. 3 credits
Second half of ASC 641-642. May be taken concurrently with ASC 641.


Astronomy

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Smith, A. G., Head; Carr, T. D.; Omer, G. C.
Although graduate degrees in Astronomy per se are not awarded at present, work in astro-
physics at both the master's and the doctoral level is offered through the Department of
Physics and Astronomy, with specialization in radio astronomy or cosmology.








ARTS AND SCIENCES, ASTRONOMY 53


ART 500 is required of all graduate majors. All graduate courses may be repeated
for credit with change of content. Some of the courses listed are offered regularly, while
others are offered only as needed. For the listing of graduate courses for a given trimester,
consult the Schedule of Courses for that trimester.
Graduate Minors in the History of Art: The graduate seminars are open to students
minoring in the history of art, provided that suitable prerequisites have been completed.
Courses in history, philosophy, or literature may often be substituted for prerequisites in
art.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ART 500-METHODS OF RESEARCH AND BIBLIOGRAPHY. 2 credits
ART 551-INDIVIDUAL WORK: STUDIO. 3 or 6 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ART 611-SEMINAR: PROBLEMS IN RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ART. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ART 309 and one undergraduate course in Renaissance or baroque are, or
the equivalent.
ART 621-SEMINAR PROBLEMS IN 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY ART. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ART 309 and one undergraduate course in 19th or 20th century art, or the
equivalent.
ART 650-ADVANCED DRAWING. 2 credits
Prerequisite: ART 451 or its equivalent.
ART 651-ADVANCED PROJECTS: STUDIO. 3, 6, or 9 credits
Prerequisite: A major in fine arts. Advanced projects in drawing, painting, printmaking
creative photography, and/or sculpture.
ART 655-RESEARCH IN METHODS AND MATERIALS OF THE ARTIST. 3 or 6
credits
Prerequisite: ART 303 or its equivalent. Research in the history, use and characteristics
of the artist's materials.
ART 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Arts and Sciences-General and Cross

Departmental Courses
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE COURSES
ASC 640-LATIN AMERICAN AREA SEMINAR. 1 credit
Prerequisites: Latin American area concentration and permission of the Instructor. An
inter-disciplinary study of selected Latin American topics for the departments of Agricul-
tural Economics, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Portuguese, Spanish,
and Sociology. May be repeated for credit.
ASC 641-INTERNSHIP IN COLLEGE TEACHING 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate major department. Required of all candidates for
the Master of Arts in Teaching and the Master of Science in Teaching degrees.
ASC 642-INTERNSHIP IN COLLEGE TEACHING. 3 credits
Second half of ASC 641-642. May be taken concurrently with ASC 641.


Astronomy

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Smith, A. G., Head; Carr, T. D.; Omer, G. C.
Although graduate degrees in Astronomy per se are not awarded at present, work in astro-
physics at both the master's and the doctoral level is offered through the Department of
Physics and Astronomy, with specialization in radio astronomy or cosmology.








54 BACTERIOLOGY


COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ATY 510-ASTROPHYSICS. 3 credits
ATY 514-RADIO ASTRONOMY. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ATY 630-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
Supervised study or research in areas not covered by other graduate courses. May be re-
peated with change of content.
ATY 631-EXTRAGALACTIC ASTRONOMY AND COSMOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: PS 629. A survey of the methods of modern cosmology; cosmological models.


Bacteriology
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Tyler, M. E., Head; Carroll, W. R.; Herzberg, M.; Jeffries, M. B.; Pratt, D. B.; Schnei-
der, N. J.; Silver, W. S.; Smith, P. H.
Graduate study is offered leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in bacteriology. Close
collaboration with the Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, in joint teach-
ing of graduate courses provides a broad basis of contact with significant developments in
microbiology. Special arrangements with the Bureau of Laboratories, State Board of
Health, extend the potential area of research to the public health laboratory.
Prerequisites for admission to graduate study, in addition to those of the Graduate
School are a broad educational base including mathematics, physics and chemistry through
organic and analytical; basic courses in botany and zoology; and preferably at least one
course in bacteriology. An undergraduate major in a physical science, engineering, or
general biology is usually acceptable. Receipt of an advanced degree requires detailed
knowledge in biology, microbiology, and chemistry; undergraduate deficiencies may require
additional study prior to completion of graduate work.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
BCY 509-BACTERIAL PATHOGENS AND BASIC IMMUNOLOGY. 6 credits
BCY 513-MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY. 4 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
BCY 646-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Identical with AY 646, BLY 646, BTY 646, PY 646. See AY 646.
BCY 650-PUBLIC HEALTH MICROBIOLOGY. 1 to 6 credits. Maximum 18 credits
Identical with MED 650. Prerequisites: Permission of head of department and director of
Bureau of Laboratories. Reference study and laboratory practice of diagnostic techniques in
residence at the Bureau of Laboratories, State Department of Health, Jacksonville.
BCY 651-BACTERIAL METABOLISM. 6 credits
Identical with MED 651. Prerequisites: BCY 513 and BCH 601 or their equivalents. In-
tensive study of intermediary metabolism of microorganisms, emphasizing pathways of ca-
tabolism and synthesis, energy relations, induction and repression, and comparative me-
tabolism.
BCY 652-VIROLOGY. 4 credits
Identical with MED 652. Selected topics on modern concepts of the nature of viruses and
the mechanism of viral infections, chosen from the field of animal, bacterial, and plant
viruses, will be discussed.
BCY 653-PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNITY AND IMMUNOCHEMISTRY. 4 credits
Identical with MED 653. Prerequisites: BCY 509 or MED 551, or their equivalent. A
study of biological and biochemical aspects of host resistance and immunity with special
emphasis on the chemical and physicochemical properties of the proteins of immune re-
actions.
BCY 654-RESEARCH METHODS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 2 credits
Identical with MED 654. Prerequisite: 20 credits in progressive study of microbiology.
An outline of the processes involved in scientific research including initiating a problem,








BIOCHEMISTRY 55


experimental techniques, analyses and evaluation of data, and reporting, illustrated by bac-
teriological examples.
BCY 655-SEMINAR. 1 credit
Identical with MED 655. Attendance is required of all graduate majors at one student and
one non-student presentation each week as scheduled. Jointly with Department of Micro-
biology. May be repeated for credit.
BCY 656-PARASITIC DISEASES OF MAN AND ANIMALS. 4 credits
Identical with MED 656. A course in animal parasitology covering the mechanisms of
parasitic infections, the physiology of parasites, and the immune responses of the host.
BCY 657-SPECIAL TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY 1. 2 to 4 credits
Identical with MED 657. Prerequisite: 6 credits in graduate major courses. Organized
study of contemporary research in a particular aspect of general microbiology: e.g., taxono-
my, physiology, genetics of microorganisms, ecological groups.
BCY 658-SPECIAL TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY 2. 2 to 4 credits
Identical with MED 658. Prerequisite: 6 credits in graduate major courses. Organized
study of contemporary research in a particular aspect of host-parasite interrelationships:
e.g., immunochemistry, chemotherapy, special disease agents, mycology.
BCY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
BCY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Biochemistry
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Putnam, F. W., Head; Fried, M.; Graves, J. L.; Koch, A. L.; Olson, J. A.
Prerequisites: Since biochemistry is a multi-disciplinary field, the undergraduate ma-
jor may be in related biological and physical sciences. Required courses include general,
organic, quantitative, and physical chemistry and at least 8 credit hours in physics and in
biology. Calculus is recommended. Pre-baccalaureate courses in biochemistry are not ac-
credited for the graduate program. Any deficiency in the prerequisites must be satisfied as
soon as possible after entering Graduate School.
Doctoral candidates are required to take a core of biochemistry courses including BCH
601, BCH 603 (or MED 511), and BCH 612, BCH 613, BCH 614, BCH 615, BCH 616,
and BCH 617. The minor will generally be chemistry but may also be taken in such re-
lated fields as physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, and physics. The graduate program
should include advanced physical and organic chemistry, human physiology, and micro-
biology.
GRADUATE COURSES*
BCH 601-PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. Corequisite: BCH 603 (except by special arrangement).
The chemistry, metabolism, and regulation of cellular constituents. Introduction to pro-
teins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes, and problems of energy transfer and intermediary me-
tabolism.
BCH 603-LABORATORY METHODS OF BIOCHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Corequisite: BCH 601. Introduction to laboratory methods including colorimetry, spectro-
photometry, chromatography, cellular fractionation, and techniques of enzymology. Experi-
ments in intermediary metabolism, and introduction to isotopic methods.
BCH 612-PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: MED 511 or BCH 601 and BCH 603; physical chemistry (may be taken
concurrently with permission). The physical chemistry and molecular structure of pro-
teins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and metabolites. Biochemical methods, tracer techniques,
and bioenergetics.
BCH 613-CHEMICAL BIOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: MED 511 or BCH 601 and BCH 603. A survey of chemical and physio-
chemical aspects of gene replication, mutation, and heredity, of embryological development,
growth, and senescence, and the comparative biochemistry and metabolism of living organ-
isms.

*BCH courses numbered 612 through 617 are identical with MED courses of the
same number.







56 BIOLOGY


BCH 614-ADVANCED INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM. 3 credits
Prerequisites: MED 511 or BCH 601 and BCH 603. Current aspects of the intermediary
metabolism of nitrogen, carbohydrate, and fat. Bio-organic mechanisms of enzyme action,
the endocrines, and metabolic balance.
BCH 615-RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. 2 to 4 credits
Prerequisites: MED 511 or BCH 601 and BCH 603; only by special arrangement. An in-
troduction to biochemical research in which the student acquires proficiency in research
techniques used in physical biochemistry, intermediary metabolism, radio-isotopes, etc.,
under direct supervision of a staff member.
BCH 616-BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR. 1 credit
Required of graduate students in biochemistry; open to others by special arrangement. Re-
search reports and discussions of current research literature are given by the departmental
staff, invited speakers, and graduate students.
BCH 617-SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. 1 credit
Prerequisite or corequisite: BCH 612, 613, or 614, or equivalent. Supervised study in
journals, treatises, and monographs in various subject areas of biochemistry, with informal
weekly conferences and reports. May be repeated for credit.
BCH 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
BCH 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Biology

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Wallace, H. K., Head; Berner, Lewis; Bovee, E. C.; Brodkorb, P.; Brookbank, J. W.;
Carr, A. F.; Conger, A. D.; DeWitt, R. M.; Dickinson, J. C., Jr.; Goin, C. J.; Gregg,
J. H.; Hussey, R. F.; Jones, E. R.; Kilby, J. D.; Laessle, A. M.; Layne, J. N.; Leavitt, B.
B.; McNab, B. K.; Maturo, F. J. S.; Nation, J. L.; Nordlie, F. G.; Pierce, E. L.; Ray,
C. E.; Riemer, W. J.; Sauer, E. G. F.; Wallbrunn, H. M.; Westfall, M. J.
The fields of graduate work offered in biology are determined by the interests of the
staff and available facilities, and are outlined under BLY 630. Research collections of all
classes of vertebrates and some groups of invertebrates are maintained jointly by the de-
partment and the Florida State Museum. Emphasis is on the southeastern states and the
Caribbean region.
Students applying for admission should submit a list of the instructors in biology
under whom they have studied and indicate the three who have been asked to write letters
of evaluation.
Undergraduate preparation in zoology: It is desirable that the prospective graduate
student take as many of the following courses as possible as an undergraduate: compara-
tive vertebrate anatomy, embryology, invertebrate and vertebrate zoology, physiology,
ecology, and genetics. Any of these courses not taken as an undergraduate may have to be
made up early in the graduate program.
It is desirable that the student have completed, as an undergraduate, a minimum of
a year's work in mathematics and in physics, two years of chemistry including organic,
and a year of botany or geology.
All Ph.D. applicants are required to pass, at a satisfactory level, a written examination
as part of the qualifying examination. This examination is to be taken near the conclu-
sion of the formal course work and prior to the oral portion of the qualifying examination.
The material will be equivalent to that ordinarily covered in the following basic courses:
general biology, invertebrate biology, vertebrate biology, embryology, organ and cell physi-
ology, genetics, cytology, ecology, systematics and evolution, literature, and biometrics (sta-
tistics). Applicants will also be expected to have acquired, through reading and study, an
acquaintance with the history of biology and to be thoroughly familiar with the tools,
methods, and literature in their particular area of specialization.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
BLY 516-ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY. 4 credits
BLY 531--CYTOLOGY. 4 credits
BLY 560-RADIATION EFFECTS AND RADIATION BIOLOGY. 4 credits
BLY 573-GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY. 4 credits
BLY 574-GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY. 4 credits









BIOLOGY 57


GRADUATE COURSES
BLY 606-BIOLOGICAL LITERATURE AND INSTITUTIONS. 2 credits
BLY 607-VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY. 4 credits
Identical with GY 607. Prerequisites: BLY 309, GY 204, GY 206. The origin, distribu-
tion, morphology, phylogeny, and paleoecology of fossil vertebrates.
BLY 609-ZOOGEOGRAPHY. 2 credits
BLY 610-EXPERIMENTAL EMBRYOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisites: BLY 310, BLY 573. Biochemistry or organic chemistry desirable. A study
of the problems of embryonic development and the experimental approach to their solution.
The laboratory is designed to give experience in both surgical and chemical methods of
analyzing developmental processes.
BLY 612-MARINE ECOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisites: BLY 308 and CY 218.
BLY 625-PROTOZOOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 308.
BLY 626-ADVANCED ANIMAL ECOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 305. A study of selected animal habitats, their occupants and organiza-
tion. Classroom work is an evaluation of the community concept and an appraisal of the
role of ecology in evolution.
BLY 628-LIMNOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisites: BLY 181 and BLY 305, BTY 180, CY 217-218. A study of the biological,
chemical, and physical dynamics of inland waters, with special emphasis on their produc-
tivities.
BLY 629-SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTAL ZOOLOGY. 2 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 573 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Topics include cell physi-
ology, comparative physiology, cytology, developmental biology, ethnology, functional
anatomy, physiological analysis, physiological ecology, population genetics and radiation
biology. May be elected for additional credit with change of topic.
BLY 630-INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN ANIMAL BIOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Studies may be chosen from one or more aspects of
the following fields: comparative anatomy, cytology, ecology, embryology, fresh water bi-
ology, game management, genetics, herpetology, histology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoolo-
gy including arachnology and insect biology, limnology, malacology, mammalogy, marine
biology, ornithology, parasitology, general or comparative physiology, protozoology, verte-
brate paleozoology, animal behavior, and zoogeography. BLY 630 may be elected for ad-
ditional credit in subsequent trimesters.
BLY 632-ADVANCED INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 308. An advanced study of the invertebrates with special emphasis on
morphology, phylogeny, ecology, and life histories.
BLY 633-PRINCIPLES OF SYSTEMATIC ZOOLOGY. 2 credits
A critical study of selected taxonomic synopses, revisions, and monographs with special
reference to the bearing of the principles and concepts of distribution, genetics, and ecolo-
gy on taxonomic problems.
BLY 641-COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 573 or equivalent.
BLY 642-PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY OF VERTEBRATES. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 573 or equivalent. The physiological mechanisms that influence the dis-
tribution and ecology of (predominately terrestrial) vertebrates are studied with special
emphasis on temperature relations, water conservation, and energy exchange.
BLY 645-PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: Courses in genetics and biochemistry, and consent of instructor. Recent work
on the chemical and physical nature of genetic material. Examples of genetic control of
physiological processes.
BLY 646-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Identical with AY 646, BCY 646, BTY 646, PY 646. See AY 646.
BLY 651-ICHTHYOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 307.
BLY 652-HERPETOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 307.
BLY 653-MAMMALOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 307.
BLY 654-ORNITHOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BLY 307.
BLY 660-RADIATION BIOLOGY. 4 credits
Identical with BTY 660. Prerequisites: Graduate standing; one year each of college phy-








58 BOTANY


sics, mathematics, and biology or botany; chemistry through organic. General survey of
biological effects of radiations with emphasis on cellular effects and mechanisms.
BLY 666-BIOMETRICS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: MS 310 and 20 hours in biology. Application of standard statistical pro-
cedures to biological problems.
BLY 671-ETHOLOGY. 4 credits
Prerequisite: Thorough knowledge of biological principles, ecology, neuro-, and sensory
physiology. This comparative study of animal and human behavior deals with concepts,
methods, and advancements of modern ethnology, emphasizing the analysis of genetically
controlled and learned behavior, orientation, and communication.
BLY 690-SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOLOGY. 3 credits
Special topics will be studied with small, interested groups of students. Among the topics
offered are: wildlife conservation, fishery biology, cytogenetics, taxonomy, and natural his-
tory of arthropods. BLY 690 may be elected for additional credit repeatedly, providing
there is a change of topic.
BLY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
BLY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Botany
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Noggle, G. R., Head; Anthony, D. S.; Conger, A. D.; Davis, J. H., Jr.; Ford, E. S.; Fritz,
G. J.; Griffith, Mildred M.; Humphreys, T. E.; Monk, C. D.; Mullins, J. T.; Powell,
R. D.; Sagawa, Y.; Ward, D. B.
The Department of Botany offers graduate work leading toward the degrees of Mas-
ter of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Through the cooperation of the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station and its branch stations, arrangements can be made for students
to carry out some or all of their research work at one of these branch stations.
The department has strong programs in physiology, radiation biology, cytology of
cultivated subtropical plants, and field studies (particularly for those interested in sub-
tropical and tropical botany).
For admission to full graduate standing a student must present credits in courses
equivalent to those required of undergraduate majors in the department and enough addi-
tional courses in botany or related plant sciences to total about 24 credit hours. Somewhat
less credit in plant sciences may be required of students with 20 or more credits in chem-
istry, physics, and mathematics. It is desirable that the student complete as an under-
graduate a minimum of one year's work in mathematics and in physics, two years of a
foreign language, two years of chemistry including organic, and basic courses in zoology
and bacteriology.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
BTY 500-PLANT GEOGRAPHY. 3 credits
BTY 501-PLANT ECOLOGY. 3 credits
BTY 521-COMPARATIVE SURVEY OF THE NON-VASCULAR PLANTS. 4 credits
BTY 531-CYTOLOGY. 4 credits
BTY 532-PLANT ANATOMY. 3 credits
BTY 542-TAXONOMY OF VASCULAR PLANTS. 4 credits
BTY 560--RADIATION EFFECTS AND RADIATION BIOLOGY. 4 credits
BTY 565-RADIOISOTOPE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
BTY 600-PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 6 credits
Prerequisites: Approval of head of department and consent of instructor. Problems in one
or more of the following fields of botany: cytology, ecology, morphology and anatomy,
physiology, radiation biology, and taxonomy.
BTY 601-VEGETATION OF FLORIDA. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 501 or equivalent. All types of vegetation in Florida in relation to
soils, climate, physiographic and geologic conditions.
BTY 602-ECOLOGY OF AQUATIC PLANTS. 3 credits







BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 59


Prerequisite: BTY 501 or equivalent. Desirable prerequisite: BLY 628. Aquatic plant
communities of lakes, ponds, rivers, and marshes.
BTY 604-VEGETATION OF THE TROPICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 501. An ecological and geographical study of the important types of
vegetation in the American and other tropical regions, with emphasis on their relation to
man.
BTY 605-PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 405 or equivalent. A detailed study of how environmental factors in-
fluence plant growth and development.
BTY 606-PLANT NUTRITION. 2 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 405 or equivalent. Fundamental aspects of plant nutrition, including
such topics as the essentiality of elements, absorption of ions, utilization and role of nu-
trients, redistribution of minerals in plants, and water metabolism.
BTY 607-PLANT METABOLISM. 2 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 405, BCH 402, and permission of instructor. A detailed discussion of
the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and nitrogen compounds in higher plants. Discus-
sions of cell structure as related to metabolism and of metabolic control mechanisms are
included.
BTY 608-RADIATION AND PLANT GROWTH. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 405 or equivalent. The effects of radiant energy on the physiology of
plants. Topics covered include generation, control, and measurement of radiant energy;
photosynthesis; phototropism; photoperiodism; effect of the color of the light.
BTY 610-TOPICS IN PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 2 credits. Maximum 4 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 405 and consent of instructor. Selected topics in plant physiology are
critically studied. Topics include plant biophysics, plant growth regulators, chromatogra-
phy, and water relations.
BTY 631-MORPHOLOGY OF VASCULAR PLANTS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: BTY 532 and BTY 542. Observations, readings, and discussions on the
anatomy and histology of the organs of representative modem and fossil plants, empha-
sizing form, vascular systems, types of branching, and reproduction structures from phyletic
and descriptive viewpoints.
BTY 635-PLANT CYTOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 531 or equivalent. Detailed studies of fundamental structures of plant
cells, their functions, reproduction, and relation to inheritance. Extensive consideration of
recent research and techniques.
BTY 636-CYTOCHEMISTRY. 3 credits
A systematic survey of cellular organization, cell function, and of cytochemical technique.
BTY 642-ADVANCED TAXONOMY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BTY 542 or equivalent. Problems in the classification of vascular plants.
Published taxonomic studies will be reviewed as a demonstration of the techniques and
principles involved in classification, and intensive individual work will be required in the
field and herbarium application of these procedures.
BTY 646-TOPICS IN GENETICS. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Identical with AY 646, BCY 646, BLY 646, PY 646. See AY 646.
BTY 655-BOTANY SEMINAR. 1 credit.
Graduate majors are expected to participate regularly in the seminar. They will register
for one credit during the last trimester of a degree program. Not available for graduate
minor credit except by special permission of the head of the department.
BTY 660-RADIATION BIOLOGY. 4 credits
Identical with BLY 660. Prerequisites: Graduate standing; one year each of college phy-
sics, mathematics, and biology or botany; chemistry through organic. General survey of bi-
ological effects of radiations, with emphasis on cellular effects and mechanisms.
BTY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
BTY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Building Construction
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Block, H. H., Head.
Courses are offered leading to the degree of Master of Science in Building Construc-
tion. Specialization may be in building construction, building research, or structural design
of buildings. Holders of the four-year undergraduate degree in building construction or its







60 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

equivalent may normally complete the requirements of the master's degree in one academic
year.

GRADUATE COURSES

BCN 601-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 3 or 6 credits
First half of BCN 601-602. Advanced studies in building technology or in specialized
areas of the building construction field selected by the student and approved by the faculty.
BCN 602-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of BCN 601-602.
BCN 603-BUILDING RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
First half of BCN 603-604. Detailed investigation of a selected problem in the building
construction field designed to make a significant contribution to present knowledge and
practices in that field.
BCN 604-BUILDING RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of BCN 603-604.
BCN 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits, Maximum 12 credits


Business Administration General
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
For admission to courses listed below, the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected. Where necessary, special arrangements may be made with
the approval of the dean.

GRADUATE COURSES

BS 610-MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ATG 211 and ATG 212 or ATG 590. Designed for M.B.A. students. Em-
phasizes periodic income measurement and relation of accounting techniques to control of
business operations. Includes a brief survey of relations of management to public ac-
counting and effect of federal income taxes on management decisions.
BS 664-MANAGERIAL STATISTICS. 3 credits
Course designed to prepare the future executive to utilize statistical methods in decision
making. Emphasizes statistical inference as an approach to solving business problems.
BS 671-HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS. 3 credits
A study of the relationships between the individual business administrator and his su-
periors, the employees whom he supervises, and his associates at his own level in the com-
pany organization.
BS 679-BUSINESS POLICY. 3 credits
Cutting across the whole field of business administration, this course approaches the fields
of business policy making and administration from the top management point of view.
Using the case method, it is designed to integrate the knowledge which the student has
acquired in specialized course work. Required of all candidates for the M.B.A. degree.
BS 690-BUSINESS RESEARCH AND REPORTS. 3 credits
This course deals with the discovery and utilization of available information relating to in-
dividual business prc'-lems. Several reports will be required for the development of skills
in the presentation a:-d interpretation of research findings. Required of all candidates for
the M.B.A. degree.
BS 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits

Chemical Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Beisler, W. H., Head; Bennett, R. B.; Block, S. S.; Huckaba, C. E.; May, F. P.; Nolan,
W. J.; Reed, T. M.; Schweyer, H. E.; Simons, J. H.; Tyner, M.; Walker, R. D., Jr.







60 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

equivalent may normally complete the requirements of the master's degree in one academic
year.

GRADUATE COURSES

BCN 601-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 3 or 6 credits
First half of BCN 601-602. Advanced studies in building technology or in specialized
areas of the building construction field selected by the student and approved by the faculty.
BCN 602-BUILDING CONSTRUCTION. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of BCN 601-602.
BCN 603-BUILDING RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
First half of BCN 603-604. Detailed investigation of a selected problem in the building
construction field designed to make a significant contribution to present knowledge and
practices in that field.
BCN 604-BUILDING RESEARCH. 3 or 6 credits
Second half of BCN 603-604.
BCN 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits, Maximum 12 credits


Business Administration General
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
For admission to courses listed below, the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected. Where necessary, special arrangements may be made with
the approval of the dean.

GRADUATE COURSES

BS 610-MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ATG 211 and ATG 212 or ATG 590. Designed for M.B.A. students. Em-
phasizes periodic income measurement and relation of accounting techniques to control of
business operations. Includes a brief survey of relations of management to public ac-
counting and effect of federal income taxes on management decisions.
BS 664-MANAGERIAL STATISTICS. 3 credits
Course designed to prepare the future executive to utilize statistical methods in decision
making. Emphasizes statistical inference as an approach to solving business problems.
BS 671-HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS. 3 credits
A study of the relationships between the individual business administrator and his su-
periors, the employees whom he supervises, and his associates at his own level in the com-
pany organization.
BS 679-BUSINESS POLICY. 3 credits
Cutting across the whole field of business administration, this course approaches the fields
of business policy making and administration from the top management point of view.
Using the case method, it is designed to integrate the knowledge which the student has
acquired in specialized course work. Required of all candidates for the M.B.A. degree.
BS 690-BUSINESS RESEARCH AND REPORTS. 3 credits
This course deals with the discovery and utilization of available information relating to in-
dividual business prc'-lems. Several reports will be required for the development of skills
in the presentation a:-d interpretation of research findings. Required of all candidates for
the M.B.A. degree.
BS 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits

Chemical Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Beisler, W. H., Head; Bennett, R. B.; Block, S. S.; Huckaba, C. E.; May, F. P.; Nolan,
W. J.; Reed, T. M.; Schweyer, H. E.; Simons, J. H.; Tyner, M.; Walker, R. D., Jr.







CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 61


Requirements for admission to graduate work for students who desire to major in
chemical engineering:
1. Bachelor's degree in chemical engineering or its equivalent.
2. Each graduate student registering for the first time must take a comprehensive ex-
amination during registration week over the field of chemical engineering. Al-
though this examination does not affect the student's admission status, the results
are utilized by the Graduate Committee in arranging the student's study program,
which may include some undergraduate courses where his training has been found
inadequate.
Although no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 level, the 500-level courses listed below and CG 401 are acceptable as a limited part
of a candidate's major. Graduate students who plan to either major or to minor in chemi-
cal engineering should secure information regarding requirements from the head of the
department.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES

CG 511-ORGANIC CHEMICAL PROCESSING. 3 credits
CG 530-NUCLEAR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3 credits
CG 532-CHEMICAL PROCESS ECONOMICS. 3 credits
CG 540-ELECTROCHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3 credits
CG 563-PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY. 3 credits
CG 571-TECHNOLOGY OF PULP AND PAPER. 3 credits
CG 572-TECHNOLOGY OF PULP AND PAPER. 3 credits
CG 581-TECHNOLOGY OF RESINS, PLASTICS, AND ELASTOMERS. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES

CG 601-GRADUATE SEMINAR. 0 credit
Required regularly of all graduate students.
CG 612-SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Selected advanced level topics in the areas of mass, momentum, and heat transfer, process
design and control.
CG 613-CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CALCULATIONS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: MS 420 or MS 521. The application of mathematics to chemical engineering
calculations including dimensional analysis, correlation of data, ordinary and partial differ-
ential equations, numerical, graphical, and machine computations.
CG 614-PROCESS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Applications of principals of systems engineering to the study of complex chemical process-
ing systems with the view of optimizing the production process.
CG 621-DIFFUSIONAL OPERATIONS 1. 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: CG 631. A unified treatment of the theory of the mass transfer
operations including distillation, gas absorption, solvent extraction, adsorption, and drying.
CG 622-CHEMICAL ENGINEERING KINETICS. 3 credits
Rates of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and catalytic reactions in gaseous and condensed
systems. Both theoretical and practical studies of rates are applied to the design of chemi-
cal processes and equipment.
CG 623-DIFFUSIONAL OPERATIONS 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CG 621. The process design of equipment for diffusional operations based
on performance and economic optima.
CG 631-ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 1. 3 credits
Advanced problems in the application of thermodynamics to industrial processes.
CG 632-ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 2. 3 credits
Continuation of CG 631.
CG 641-RATE AND TRANSPORT PHENOMENA. 3 credits
A unified treatment of rate and transport phenomena including momentum, heat, and mass
transfer.
CG 648-MICROMERITICS. 3 credits
Study of the properties of fine particles and their effect in engineering problems relating to
soils, flow of materials, filtration, separating operations and catalytic reactions.
CG 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
CG 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits







62 CHEMISTRY


Chemistry
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Sisler, H. H., Head; Battiste, M. A.; Baxter, J. F.; Black, A. P.; Brey, W. S., Jr.; Brown,
H. C.; Butler, G. B.; Colgate, S. O.; Dresdner, R. D.; Gropp, A. H.; Hanrahan, R. J.;
Jones, W. M.; L6wdin, P. O.; Muga, M. L.; Muschlitz, E. E., Jr.; Reid, C. E.; Ryschke-
witsch, G. E.; Simons, J. H.; Smith, D. W.; Stearns, T. W.; Stoufer, R. C.; Tarrant, P.;
Westman, T. L.; Winfordner, J. D.
New graduate students should have adequate undergraduate training in inorganic, ana-
lytical, organic, and physical chemistry. Normally this will include as a minimum a year
of general chemistry which may include qualitative analysis, one trimester of quantitative
analysis, one year of organic chemistry, one year of physical chemistry, and one trimester
of advanced inorganic chemistry. Additional courses in advanced physical and organic
chemistry are desirable. Deficiencies in any of these areas may be corrected during the first
year of graduate study. Such deficiencies are determined by a series of placement tests
given prior to registration, and the results of these tests are used in planning the student's
program.
Courses for the M.S. degree are chosen in terms of the student's interest with the ap-
proval of his supervisory committee. These courses usually include some of those listed
in the next paragraph which are the first courses in the indicated fields. The M.S. degree
in chemistry requires a thesis. The degree M.S. in Teaching is offered with specialization
in chemistry.
All doctoral candidates are required to take a series of basic courses in at least three
of the four areas of chemistry indicated below. The areas and the required courses in each
area are as follows: Physical Chemistry, CY 621 and another 600-level course in physical
chemistry; Organic Chemistry, CY 661 and CY 662; Analytical Chemistry, CY 633; and
Inorganic Chemistry, CY 611 and CY 612.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
CY 511-INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
CY 512-PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
CY 514-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
CY 515-INDUSTRIAL WATER TREATMENT. 3 credits
CY 550-NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
CY 601-ORGANIC PREPARATIONS. 3 credits
Lectures and laboratory to acquaint the student with the reactions and techniques used in
synthesis of organic compounds.
CY 603-SPECIAL TOPICS IN NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 550 or consent of instructor. Advanced topics in nuclear chemistry and
radiation chemistry for specialists in the field. CY 603 may be elected for additional credit
repeatedly, provided there is a change in topic.
CY 604-INORGANIC PREPARATIONS. 3 credits
CY 609-THEORY OF SOLUTIONS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 622 or equivalent. The theoretical treatment of nonelectrolytic solutions
by lattice, cell, and other methods; the Debye-Hiickel and Onsager treatments of electro-
lytic solutions.
CY 611-STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 credits
First half of CY 611-612. Modern theory of atomic and molecular structure as applied
to inorganic systems, acid-base theory, nonaqueous solvents, oxidation-reduction phenom-
ena, and introduction to complex compounds and ions.
CY 612-STRUCTURAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 credits
Second half of CY 611-612.
CY 613-COLLOIDS. 3 credits
The preparation and study of the behavior of various types of colloid systems; the phe-
nomenon of adsorption; applications.
CY 615-ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 612. A systematic study of the nonmetals, with emphasis on the relation
of properties to atomic, molecular, and crystal structures.








CHEMISTRY 63


CY 616-ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 612. A systematic study of the metals, with emphasis on the relation of
properties to atomic, molecular, and crystal structures. Special attention will be given to
the nuclear fission product elements.
CY 617-SPECIAL TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Lectures or conferences pertaining to selected topics of current research interest in inor-
ganic chemistry. CY 617 may be elected for additional credit repeatedly, providing there
is a change of topic.
CY 620-ELEMENTS OF QUANTUM CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
A brief treatment of the Schr6dinger equation followed by a survey of applications to
chemical problems. Primarily intended for students not concentrating in physical chemistry.
CY 621-CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS. 3 credits
Energetics, properties of ideal and nonideal systems primarily from the standpoint of classi-
cal thermodynamics.
CY 622-CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 621. A treatment of statistical thermodynamics.
CY 623-ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 621 or consent of instructor. The topics covered will include: electronic
structure of the atom; theory of valence; molecular structure, crystals; kinetic molecular
treatment of gases and liquids; phase rule; chemical kinetics; nuclear reactions.
CY 624-CHEMICAL KINETICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: One trimester of graduate physical chemistry or consent of instructor. Rates
and mechanism; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.
CY 626-RADIATION CHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CY 401-402 and either CY 550 or CY 623. Photochemistry. Chemical and
physical effects caused by ionizing radiations. Kinetics and mechanisms of radiation in-
duced reactions.
CY 628-CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS. 3 credits
A fundamental approach to the chemistry of high polymers, with special emphasis upon
the mechanisms of polymerization reactions, and the relationship of physical properties to
chemical constitution.
CY 629-WATER SUPPLY AND TREATMENT. 3 credits
A survey of Florida hydrology and a discussion of the most recent developments in the
treatment and stabilization of municipal and industrial water supplies.
CY 630-PHYSICAL-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
The theory and application of physical methods in the study of the behavior of organic
compounds.
CY 633-INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
An introduction to optical and electrochemical methods as applied to the analysis of solu-
tions.
CY 634-INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 633. Infrared and ultra-violet spectrophotometry; polarography.
CY 635-ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 402 or equivalent. The fundamental principles underlying 'chemical
methods of analysis. Emphasis is placed on equilibria, kinetics, and mechanisms of im-
portant chemical reactions (precipitation, acid-base, complex formation, redox) involved
in chemical analysis and on methods of separation (precipitation, electrodeposition, distilla-
tion, extraction, chromatography).
CY 636-SPECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CY 633. Analytical applications of atomic and molecular emission spectro-
Scopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and selected methods in molecular absorption spec-
troscopy.
CY 641-ORGANIC FLUORINE CHEMISTRY. 3 credits
The preparation and properties of compounds containing fluorine, with particular reference
to carbon compounds.
CY 661-ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 credits
Prerequisites: CY 301, CY 302, CY 514 or the equivalent. A course in advanced organic
chemistry intended to present a useful interpretation of descriptive fact and unifying
theory.
CY 662-ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 credits
Second half of CY 661-662.
CY 663-ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS. 2 credits
Prerequisites: CY 661, CY 662. Factors influencing the properties of organometallic com-
pounds, the nature of the carbon-metal bond, compounds of the alkali metals, compounds
of group II metals, compounds of group III elements, silanes, and compounds of tin and
lead.







64 CIVIL ENGINEERING


CY 664-FREE RADICAL REACTIONS. 2 credits
Prerequisites: CY 661, CY 662. A course in the development and correlation of experi-
mental methods, fact, and theory of reactions involving organic free radicals.
CY 665-THE CHEMISTRY OF HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS. 2 credits
Prerequisites: CY 661, CY 662. A survey of the chemistry of the more common hetero-
cyclic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur as the hetero atom.
CY 666-ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CY 661, CY 662. An integrated study of ionic reaction mechanisms with
special emphasis on transition state theory, electronic effects, and stereochemical conse-
quences of these reactions.
CY 667-SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 2 credits
Prerequisites: CY 661, CY 662. The chemistry of selected types of organic compounds,
such as alkaloids, carbohydrates, natural products, steroids.
CY 678-ADVANCED PHASE DIAGRAMS. 3 credits
Identical with ML 678. Prerequisites: CY 401-402. An advanced course in the principles
of phase diagrams considering systems with as many as four components, with emphasis
on pressure-temperature-concentration diagrams.
CY 691-SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 1 to 3 credits
Lectures or conferences covering specially selected topics of current interest in physical
chemistry. CY 691 may be elected for additional credit repeatedly, providing there is a
change in topic.
CY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
CY 721-THEORY OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE 1. 3 credits
Identical with PS 721. Prerequisite: PS 612 or equivalent. Mathematical techniques used
in molecular and solid-state theory. Discussion of the one-electron approximation.
CY 722-THEORY OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE 2. 3 credits
Identical with PS 722. Prerequisite: CY 721 or PS 721. The general quantum-mechanical
many-body problem, with applications to molecular and solid-state systems.
CY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits

Civil Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Kluge, R. W., Head; Black, A. P.; Bovee, E. C. (on leave); Bruun, P.; Calaway, W.
T.; Furman, T. deS.; Gilcreas, F. W.; Hendrickson, E. R.; Kiker, J. E., Jr.; Lackey, J.
B.; Manohar, M.; Morgan, G. B.; Sawyer, D. A.; Sawyer, H. A., Jr.; Schmertmann,
J. H. (on leave); Spangler, B. D.; Zimpfer, W. H.
For the Master of Science in Engineering degree, and for the Master of Engineering
degree, graduate students may pursue major work in highway, structural, or sanitary
engineering or a combination thereof. Minor work may be taken in engineering mechanics,
mathematics, or in other basic sciences related to the field of study.
Ph.D. with major in structural engineering. Taken in the field of structural engineer-
ing with most of the course work in the Department of Civil Engineering. Minor work is
usually taken in mathematics and engineering mechanics. The specific curriculum for each
doctoral candidate is prepared by the supervisory committee. Each program consists of a
core program including advanced structural theory, theories of elasticity and elastic sta-
bility, and advanced properties of materials. Beyond this, the individual program is ar-
ranged according to the student's need and particular interest.
Ph.D. with major in sanitary engineering. Sanitary engineering graduate students
usually study in one of the following areas of specialization recognized by the American
Sanitary Engineering Intersociety Board: (1) water supply and waste water disposal;
(2) air pollution control; or (3) radiation hygiene and hazard control.
Minor work is taken in one or two departments other than that of the major. If a
single minor is chosen it must be in a basic science (e g., chemistry, bacteriology, biology,
physics, and mathematics or statistics). If two minors, are chosen, one may be in an
applied science, such as hydraulics, structural engineering, etc. The specific program for
each graduate student must be approved by his supervisory committee.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
CL 522-SANITARY ENGINEERING. 3 credits
CL 525--SEWAGE TREATMENT. 3 credits







CIVIL ENGINEERING 65


CL 526-INDUSTRIAL WASTE TREATMENT. 3 credits
CL 527-SANITARY ENGINEERING LABORATORY. 3 credits
CL 533-DESIGN IN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE. 3 credits
CL 540-HIGHWAY DESIGN. 3 credits
CL 543-SEDIMENT TRANSPORT TECHNOLOGY. 3 credits
CL 544-COASTAL HYDRAULICS 1. 3 credits
CL 545-COASTAL HYDRAULICS 2. 3 credits
CL 546-HIGHWAY BRIDGES. 3 credits
CL 548-INDUSTRIAL AND MILL BUILDINGS. 3 credits
CL 562-TRAFFIC ENGINEERING. 3 credits.
CL 580-HIGH SPEED COMPUTATION. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES

CL 612-PROBLEMS OF NUCLEAR RADIATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SANITA-
TION. 3 credits
Prerequisites: PS 303 or PS 320, and consent of instructor. Introduction to nuclear
radiation. Special problems in sanitary engineering resulting from nuclear radiation.
Sources of radiation exposure.
CL 613-RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION.
3 credits
Prerequisite: CL 612. The application of radiological techniques to sanitary engineering.
The theory and operation of the principal detection instruments. Laboratory experiments
concerning the measurement and control of radioisotopes in the environment.
CL 614-RADIOACTIVE WASTES, THEIR TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 525 and CL 612. The source, treatment, and the disposal of radio-
active wastes. Major emphasis is placed upon the prevention of environmental contamination.
CL 621-ADVANCED METAL STRUCTURES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of the behavior of structures under static,
dynamic, and repeated loads. Effects of temperature. Problems in design of structural
details. Plastic design of structures.
CL 623-ADVANCED REINFORCED CONCRETE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CL 433. Study of research in reinforced concrete, particularly in connection
with development of building code requirements; ultimate load theories and their applica-
tion to design; special design problems.
CL 627-ADVANCED SANITARY ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 329 and CL 429. An advanced study of the biological, chemical, and
physical principles utilized in water, sewage, and industrial waste treatment processes.
CL 630-PROBLEMS IN SANITATION. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 329, CL 429, and permission of instructor. Approved problems for study
or research selected from any field of sanitary specialization.
CL 638-ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURES. 1 to 6
credits
Prerequisite: CL 338. Frames with variable moment of inertia; closed rings; column
analogy; secondary stresses; continuous trusses; columns; design problems; moment
distribution.
CL 640-EVALUATION OF ENGINEERING DATA. 3 credits
Prerequisite: MS 354. Principles of statistics as applied to the collection and study of
vital statistics and other engineering data. Design of experiments and investigations.
CL 641-ADVANCED PUBLIC HEALTH ENGINEERING. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: CL 522. An advanced study of various integrants of public health engineer-
ing with special emphasis on selected problems to meet the needs of professional engineers
practicing in public health or dealing with health agencies.
CL 642-STREAM SANITATION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CL 525 or consent of instructor. The principles of environmental sanitation
applied to streams, lakes, and underground and tidal waters. The influence and effects of
municipal and industrial wastes on public water supplies, shellfish, storage, recreational
uses, industrial uses, and wildlife.
CL 644-PORTS AND COASTAL STRUCTURES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CL 443. Prerequisite or corequisite: CL 545. Planning and construction of
ports and harbors, including harbors on littoral drift coasts, and coastal protection struc-
tures. Harbor equipment, port planning, and port management. Navigation requirements.
Docking and mooring facilities.
CL 645-HARBOR HYDRAULICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Wave action in harbors, including harbor surge. Flow







66 CIVIL ENGINEERING


and sediment transport in open channels with special reference to inlets and waterways.
Sediment problems at harbors.
CL 647-ADVANCED HIGHWAY ENGINEERING. 3 or 6 credits
Prerequisites: CL 439 and CL 450. Special problems in highway planning, design, con-
struction, economics, and administration.
CL 648-ADVANCED SOIL MECHANICS. 3 to 6 credits
Prerequisite: CL 424. Special problems in the application of soil mechanics to the design
and construction of buildings, foundations, dams, levees, and highways.
CL 649-ADVANCED FOUNDATION AND HARBOR STRUCTURES. 3 to 6 credits
Prerequisites: CL 443, CL 638, and CL 648 or consent of instructor. Study of special
foundations and harbor structures using the most recent information from soil mechanics
and structural analysis. Treatment of pile foundations, mats, retaining walls, and such
maritime structures as piers, wharves, and offshore towers.
CL 650-HYDROLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 327. Occurrence and distribution of water by natural processes, including
precipitation, run-off, infiltration, and water losses. Frequency and intensity of storms and
floods and effects of reservoirs in reducing them.
CL 651-STRUCTURE AND ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF SOILS. 3 to 6 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Factors influencing mechanical properties of soils;
effective stress, cohesion and friction, shear-consolidation interaction, pore pressures,
creep, and dynamic effects. Emphasis on research and laboratory instruction.
CL 652-GRADUATE CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. 1 credit
Discussions and reports pertaining to the literature and development in the civil engineer-
ing field.
CL 662-ADVANCED STRUCTURAL LABORATORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: CL 338. Model studies and analysis. Applications to static and dynamic
loadings. Mechanics of similitude and dimensional analysis. Vibration of beams and
research studies.
CL 664-ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 338 and EM 366. Approximate methods of analysis for structural mem-
bers of variable section modulus. Vibrations of beams, including effects of axial loads and
elastic supports. Evaluation of differential equations and simultaneous linear equations.
Application of approximate procedures to vibrations, impact, and damping.
CL 665-ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN 1. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 664, CL 623, CL 638, and EM 565, or equivalents. Design studies in
selected topics such as: continuous trusses, rigid frames, multi-story frames, and arches.
CL 666-ADVANCED STRUCTURAL DESIGN 2. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 664, CL 623, CL 638, and EM 565 or equivalents. Design studies in se-
lected topics such as: cable supported structures, thin shell roofs, and tanks.
CL 667-TOPICS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS. Variable credit. Maximum 6 credits
Prerequisite: CL 664 or consent of instructor. Analysis and design studies in selected
topics such as: dynamic response of structures, design for blast loads, and design for
seismic forces.
CL 668-ADVANCED STRUCTURAL PROBLEMS. 1 to 6 credits
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Analytical and laboratory studies on selected topics
in structural engineering.
CL 677-MICROBIOLOGY OF WASTE TREATMENT AND RECEIVING WATERS.
3 credits
A study of the role of microorganisms, including bacteria, protozoa, algae, fungi, and cer-
tain higher organisms in various waste treatment processes, as well as in streams, lakes, or
ocean waters which receive wastes or are used as public water supplies.
CL 678-ADVANCED SANITARY ENGINEERING PRACTICE. 3 credits
Special problems in the application of sanitary examinations of water, milk, food, wastes,
and air. Field exercises demonstrating the principles of water and waste treatment, and
advanced problems in the interpretation of laboratory results.
CL 679-ADVANCED SANITARY ENGINEERING PRACTICE. 3 credits
Second half of CL 678-679.
CL 682-ADVANCED SANITARY ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CL 329, CL 429, and CL 433. Complete problems in the layout and design
of water, sewage and industrial waste systems, and treatment plants.
CL 683-ADVANCED SANITARY ENGINEERING DESIGN. 3 credits
Second half of CL 682-683.
CL 684-ATMOSPHERIC POLLUTION. 3 credits
A study of the atmosphere as a place of disposal of certain industrial and community
effluents. Effect of air pollution, classification of wastes, evaluation of data.
CL 685-AIR POLLUTION SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS. 3 credits







COMMUNICATIONS 67


Theory and practice of sampling. Study of the theory, methods, and instruments for de-
termining the concentration of biological, chemical, and radiological pollutants.
CL 686-MICROMETEOROLOGY OF POLLUTANT DISPERSION. 3 credits
A comprehensive review of meteorology and the physics of the atmosphere as they affect
dispersion of gases and aerosols. Study of diffusion theories and empirical approaches.
Meteorological techniques and their use in air pollution problems.
CL 687-AIR POLLUTION CONTROL MEASURES. 3 credits
Theory and application of equipment and methods for the control of pollution by air-
borne materials.
CL 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
CL 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Communications
SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Weimer, R. O., Director; Burton, M. E.; Christiansen, K. A.; Griggs, H. H.; Weaver,
J. C.
The degree Master of Arts in Journalism and Communications with a major in com-
munications is offered. Specialization may be in radio, television, and educational broad-
casting.
Admission requirements are a bachelor's degree in broadcasting or some allied field,
or satisfactory completion at the undergraduate level of one course each in radio writing,
radio programing and production, television production, and in radio-TV news. Adequate
preparation in the social sciences and humanities is required of each student.
The minor field or fields will be selected, in consultation with the major adviser,
from any area in Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Fine Arts, and Education,
depending on the special needs of the student. A 6-hour minor may be taken only if the
student already has a minimum of 12 undergraduate credits within the same minor field.
Otherwise a 12-hour minor must be taken.
JM 601-Research Methods in Mass Communications is required of all candidates.
BR 518-Teaching Through Television will be accepted as major credit in a master's
degree program in communications.

GRADUATE COURSES

COM 603-BROADCAST STATION MANAGEMENT. 3 credits
A study of station organization, operational policies, market research, programing policy,
network affiliation, federal and state regulations governing the broadcasting industry,
FCC procedures.
COM 618-RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM WRITING. 3 credits
An advanced study of the forms, techniques, and types of writing as they apply to radio,
television, and film.
COM 623-RADIO PROGRAMING AND PRODUCTION. 3 credits
A lecture-laboratory course in producing and programing complex program types, with
student participation in the broadcasting activities.
COM 625-TELEVISION STAGING AND LIGHTING. 3 credits
A study of staging and lighting problems, with emphasis on the creative aspects of staging
and lighting production.
COM 628-RADIO AND TELEVISION IN EDUCATION. 3 credits
The role of the broadcast media in public school education and adult education. Study
of the current usages in direct and indirect teaching and continuing education.
COM 630-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
A reading or research course in such areas of broadcasting as are needed by graduate
students. May be elected for full credit in subsequent sessions with change of content.
COM 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits







68 DAIRY SCIENCE, ECONOMICS


Dairy Science
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Fouts, E. L., Head; Becker, R. B.; Krienke, W. A.; Marshall, S. P.; Mull, L. E.; Smith,
K. L.; Wilcox, C. J.; Wing, J. M.
The Department of Dairy Science offers work for the Master of Science in Agricul-
ture and Master of Agriculture degrees. Major courses may be chosen from the fields
of dairy husbandry or dairy manufacturing. Areas of interest include genetics, nutrition,
management, physiology, microbiology, milk chemistry, and the processing of milk and
milk products.
A departmental prerequisite for admission to graduate study in dairy husbandry is a
sound background in the biological sciences. Students interested in graduate study in
dairy manufacturing should have had a strong undergraduate program in the physical
and biological sciences.
GRADUATE COURSES
DY 609-DAIRY SCIENCE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. 3 credits
Methods employed in research in the various specialized dairy fields: genetics, nutrition,
physiology, microbiology, chemistry or dairy technology. Work covers use of equipment,
materials and methods, experimental designs and statistical analysis.
DY 622-ADVANCED DAIRY CATTLE BREEDING. 4 credits
Modern concepts of qualitative and quantitative inheritance. Repeatability, heritability,
environmental and genetic correlations, and selection for various characteristics.
DY 623-PROBLEMS IN DAIRY SCIENCE. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Selected research problems in the field of dairy husbandry or manufacturing.
DY 625-ADVANCED DAIRY TECHNOLOGY. 4 credits
Theories associated with chemical and physical changes of milk constituents in the manu-
facture of dairy products and special tests used in measuring these changes during process-
ing.
DY 626-ADVANCED DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING. 4 credits
Advanced methods of processing dairy products.
DY 627-ADVANCED DAIRY MICROBIOLOGY. 4 credits
Advanced methods of microbiological control of dairy products, with emphasis on
physiological chemistry of dairy microorganisms and metabolic pathways in important
dairy fermentations.
DY 628-GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DAIRY SCIENCE. 1 credit
DY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Economics
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Donovan, C. H., Head; Blodgett, R. H.; Bradbury, R. W.; Dunn, E. S.; Eutsler, R. B.;
Fristoe, C. W.; Goffman, I. J.; Hurff, G. B.; Jackson, E. L.; Kafoglis, M. Z.; Koefod,
P. E.; Lassiter, R. L.; Shields, M. W.; Sievers, A. M.; Tuttle, F. W.; Webb, J. N.;
Wells, J. D.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in economics are available for graduate
credit as a part of a candidate's major. These are: ES 404-Government Control of Busi-
ness; ES 410 and ES 411-Development of Modern Western Economy; ES 453-Trans-
port Regulations; ES 469-Business Cycles; and ES 476-Government in Relation to
Labor.
For admission to courses 600 and above the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School, and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected; or where necessary, special arrangements may be made
with the approval of the department head.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ES 521-ADVANCED MONEY AND BANKING. 3 credits







68 DAIRY SCIENCE, ECONOMICS


Dairy Science
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Fouts, E. L., Head; Becker, R. B.; Krienke, W. A.; Marshall, S. P.; Mull, L. E.; Smith,
K. L.; Wilcox, C. J.; Wing, J. M.
The Department of Dairy Science offers work for the Master of Science in Agricul-
ture and Master of Agriculture degrees. Major courses may be chosen from the fields
of dairy husbandry or dairy manufacturing. Areas of interest include genetics, nutrition,
management, physiology, microbiology, milk chemistry, and the processing of milk and
milk products.
A departmental prerequisite for admission to graduate study in dairy husbandry is a
sound background in the biological sciences. Students interested in graduate study in
dairy manufacturing should have had a strong undergraduate program in the physical
and biological sciences.
GRADUATE COURSES
DY 609-DAIRY SCIENCE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES. 3 credits
Methods employed in research in the various specialized dairy fields: genetics, nutrition,
physiology, microbiology, chemistry or dairy technology. Work covers use of equipment,
materials and methods, experimental designs and statistical analysis.
DY 622-ADVANCED DAIRY CATTLE BREEDING. 4 credits
Modern concepts of qualitative and quantitative inheritance. Repeatability, heritability,
environmental and genetic correlations, and selection for various characteristics.
DY 623-PROBLEMS IN DAIRY SCIENCE. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 9 credits
Selected research problems in the field of dairy husbandry or manufacturing.
DY 625-ADVANCED DAIRY TECHNOLOGY. 4 credits
Theories associated with chemical and physical changes of milk constituents in the manu-
facture of dairy products and special tests used in measuring these changes during process-
ing.
DY 626-ADVANCED DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING. 4 credits
Advanced methods of processing dairy products.
DY 627-ADVANCED DAIRY MICROBIOLOGY. 4 credits
Advanced methods of microbiological control of dairy products, with emphasis on
physiological chemistry of dairy microorganisms and metabolic pathways in important
dairy fermentations.
DY 628-GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DAIRY SCIENCE. 1 credit
DY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Economics
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Donovan, C. H., Head; Blodgett, R. H.; Bradbury, R. W.; Dunn, E. S.; Eutsler, R. B.;
Fristoe, C. W.; Goffman, I. J.; Hurff, G. B.; Jackson, E. L.; Kafoglis, M. Z.; Koefod,
P. E.; Lassiter, R. L.; Shields, M. W.; Sievers, A. M.; Tuttle, F. W.; Webb, J. N.;
Wells, J. D.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in economics are available for graduate
credit as a part of a candidate's major. These are: ES 404-Government Control of Busi-
ness; ES 410 and ES 411-Development of Modern Western Economy; ES 453-Trans-
port Regulations; ES 469-Business Cycles; and ES 476-Government in Relation to
Labor.
For admission to courses 600 and above the student must have been admitted to the
Graduate School, and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields pertinent
to the graduate courses selected; or where necessary, special arrangements may be made
with the approval of the department head.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
ES 521-ADVANCED MONEY AND BANKING. 3 credits








ECONOMICS 69


ES 541-FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND FISCAL POLICIES OF SELECTED
LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES. 3 credits
ES 549-INTERNATIONAL FINANCE: FOREIGN EXCHANGE. 3 credits
ES 577-PROBLEMS IN FEDERAL FINANCE. 3 credits
ES 578-PROBLEMS IN STATE AND LOCAL FINANCE. 3 credits
ES 591-MASTERPIECES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. 3 credits
ES 592-MASTERPIECES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
ES 602-COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. 3 credits
A critical analysis of the economic theories, problems, policies, and accomplishments of
capitalism, socialism, the Soviet Russian economy, the British economy under partial
socialism, and the fascist economies of Germany and Italy.
ES 603-SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC ACCOUNTING. 3 credits
Identical with ATG 603. A critical examination of social accounts and comparative
economic accounting systems. Emphasis will be placed upon national income accounting,
the national balance sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds. analysis.
ES 605-THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. 3 credits
Analysis of the two chief approaches in economic thought, with emphasis upon
philosophical outlook and methodology. The analytical approach is presented and the
role of mathematics stressed; the calculus is surveyed and related to neo-classical theory.
The institutional approach is explained and related to history and the other social sciences;
the approach is illustrated by a cultural theory of capitalist evolution. The development
and interaction of the two approaches are stressed as a foundation for ES 606.
ES 606-THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. 3 credits
Second half of ES 605-606. Development of economic thought chronologically from
Greek to contemporary times-including the chief schools in Great Britain, the Continent,
and the United States. Marx and the socialists, nonorthodox thinkers, and critics of the
classical school are treated equally with the main tradition.
ES 608-PRESENT-DAY SCHOOLS OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 1. 3 credits
The purpose of this course is to examine the main currents of contemporary American
and English economic thinking with particular reference to the developments occurring
between the two World Wars. The writings of Hansen, Mitchell, Clark, and Commons
in the United States, and of Keynes, Cole, Robinson, and Hobson in England will be
examined.
ES 609-PRESENT-DAY SCHOOLS OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 2. 3 credits
Continuation of the study initiated in Part 1.
ES 610-THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY TO 1860. 3 credits
A functional approach to the study of the economic development of the United States.
World economic conditions that led to the settlement of America; the colonial period;
the period of economic transition; the westward movement and the rise of a national
economy; and economic causes of the Civil War.
ES 611-THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY SINCE 1860.
3 credits
The development of the westward movement and the closing of the economic frontier.
The development of a capitalistic economy and the trend toward economic and financial
imperialism. Economic problems of the wars 1914-18 and 1939-45, and postwar economic
adjustments, domestic and foreign.
ES 615-ECONOMICS OF BUSINESS DECISIONS. 3 credits
Designed primarily for candidates for the degree Master of Business Administration. A
study of economic principles directly related to managerial decisions. An attempt is made
to synthesize the student's training in economic theory and in the fields of applied business
practice.
ES 616-ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS. 3 credits
Designed primarily for candidates for the degree Master of Business Administration, this
course will give the student a better grasp of the politico-economic environment in which
he will be operating his business. A history and analysis of modem economic perform-
ance and policy in the United States, with special emphasis upon current economic prob-
lems and their significance for business decision making.
ES 621-MONETARY THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ES 321, or an undergraduate major in economics. A course in both the evo-
lutionary and contemporary aspects of monetary theory. It covers theoretical topics dealing
with the qualities and characteristics of money, the rate of interest, the effectiveness of
monetary policy, the flow of funds between the various sectors of the economy and the








70 ECONOMICS


financial markets, and the relationships between saving, investment, employment, price-
level changes, and capital formation.
ES 622-MONEY, PRICES, AND BUSINESS CYCLES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ES 321. An analytical survey of the economic instabilities in capitalistic
society, with emphasis upon forces operating to bring about changes in the general
level of prices, including prices of productive agents, employment, and income.
ES 632-LOCATION OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITY. 3 credits
Conventional economic theory is extended by considering space as an explicit variable.
This theory is applied to two problems: (1) the principle governing the location of agri-
cultural and manufacturing industries; (2) the problem of the optimum spatial distribu-
tion of social production. Case studies in industrial location and problem areas in regional
and national development will receive careful attention. Special emphasis will be placed
upon empirical research techniques.
ES 637-IMPERFECT COMPETITION. 3 credits
A comprehensive review of recent attempts to reconstruct economic theory in terms of
"imperfect" or "monopolistic" competition.
ES 643-THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE. 3 credits
The historical and economic background of foreign trade; the theory of international
trade; the fundamentals of international exchange; international commercial policies and
international trade; exchange fluctuations and their control; the international monetary
institutions.
ES 645-THE ECONOMY OF SPANISH LATIN AMERICA. 3 credits
A study of contemporary economic and commercial problems in Spanish Latin America.
Attention will be given to current developments in production, transportation, and trade
of the various countries.
ES 646-THE ECONOMY OF BRAZIL. 3 credits
A study of the economic development and contemporary economic and commercial
problems of Brazil. Attention will be given to production, transportation, and trade
both from a national and regional point of view.
ES 650-POLICIES OF FEDERAL TRANSPORTATION COMMISSIONS. 3 credits
Critical consideration of the policies of the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Civil
Aeronautics Board.
ES 651-TRANSPORTATION POLICY. 3 credits
Critical examination of the development, effects, and proposed improvements of general
transportation policy, including regulation, promotion, taxation, and labor.
ES 656-PROBLEMS IN PUBLIC UTILITIES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ES 454. An intensive study of problems in the field of public utility
industries, including types and techniques of public control, the problems of public
utility rates, regulation of public service industries, public ownerships, and public power
projects.
ES 660-SECURITY AND DEFENSE POLICIES SEMINAR 1. 3 credits
An inter-disciplinary seminar which examines the problems of American security and
defense policies in the space age.
ES 661-SECURITY AND DEFENSE POLICIES SEMINAR 2. 3 credits
The second half of ES 660-661.
ES 669-PROBLEMS IN STATISTICS AND BUSINESS FORECASTING. 3 credits
A critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
ES 670-MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 1. 3 credits
This course is a mathematical treatment of the theory of static equilibrium in economics.
It is based upon the works of Walras, Pareto, Schultz, Hicks, and others.
ES 671-MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 2. 3 credits
Continuation of the study initiated in Part 1.
ES 672-ORGANIZED LABOR IN THE UNITED STATES. 3 credits
A study of the problems connected with the relationship of organized labor with itself,
management, government, and the public-labor policy and public welfare.
ES 674-LABOR ECONOMICS. 3 credits
Advanced study of the various theories of wage determination and the role of wages in
the economy. An intensive analysis of the effects of collective bargaining on wages,
prices, and employment.
ES 677-GOVERNMENTAL DEBT. 3 credits
Influences and mechanisms of debt incurrence and retirement by federal, state, and local
governments. Problems of debt use and abuse, regulations, area planning, and intergov-
ernmental relations. Emphasizes case studies.
ES 678-GOVERNMENTAL FINANCE ADMINISTRATION. 3 credits
Governmental finance critically examined according to administrative processes within and
among governments; compares operating behavior of governments in managing revenue,







EDUCATION 71


expenditure, debt, budgets, records, and reports; appraises methods by policies implicit in
administration.
ES 679-FISCAL POLICY. 3 credits
Fiscal policy in relation to other means of control; opposing viewpoints as to proper
scope of fiscal policy; the case for deficit spending; tax policy and economic stability;
debt management; budgetary theory and practice.
ES 685-INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS. 3 credits
An historical study of the development of international economic policies; geographic,
economic, social, and political factors underlying contemporary international problems;
economic and political methods employed by the leading commercial nations to expand
their economic interests.
ES 691-NEO-CLASSICAL ECONOMICS. 3 credits
Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-classical price and production theories. Demand,
supply, cost of production, and price determination under various conditions of the
market will be considered. The writings of Marshall, Hicks, Boulding, Davenport, Stigler,
Fellner, J. Robinson, and Chamberlain provide the background for the discussion.
ES 692-NEO-CLASSICAL ECONOMICS. 3 credits
Second half of ES 691-692. Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-classical theories
concerning the distribution of income. Rent, interest, wages, profits, personal distribu-
tion, supplementary distribution, and noncapitalistic distribution will be considered. The
writings of Marshall, Hicks, Cassel, Boulding, Pigou, Fisher, Douglas, Knight, Stigler,
and Schumpeter provide the background for the discussion.
ES 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
ES 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Education General and Cross-Departmental

Courses
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Ahrens, M. R., Head; Bingham, N. E. (on leave); Cate, C. A.; Combs, A. W.; Cooper,
J.; Durrance, C. L.; Green, E. K. (on leave); Haines, A. C.; Hass, C. G.; Hilliard, F.
P.; LaVire, W. A.; Oliva, P. F.; Spache, G. D.; Wiegman, R. R.; Wiles, K.

CROSS-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES FOR SPECIAL AREAS
College and Community
College Teaching Curriculum and Instruction
ED 640 ED 600
ED 641 ED 700
ED 642 ED 701
ED 740 ED 750
ED 741
ED 742
ED 743

GRADUATE COURSES
ED 600-THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 3 credits
An analysis of philosophic and research bases underlying the development of the total
school program from kindergarten through community college. Basic curriculum course
for all graduate students.
ED 630-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
For advanced students who wish to study individual problems under faculty guidance.
Before registering in this course, a student must have approval of the proposed project.
ED 634-GROUP PROCESS IN EDUCATION. 3 credits
A study of group organization and operation, with opportunity to develop skills in group
leadership and interpretation of group interaction.
ED 640-COLLEGE CURRICULUM AND TEACHING. 3 credits
Development, functions, and problems of colleges in the American society. Emphasis
on curriculum, learning process and teaching procedures, instructional aids, and evaluation.







72 EDUCATION


ED 641-PRACTICUM IN COLLEGE TEACHING 1. 3 credits
Prior arrangements must be made with instructor. Provision is made for the student to
teach under the supervision of a professor in his academic field.
ED 642-PRACTICUM IN COLLEGE TEACHING 2. 3 credits
Continuation of ED 641.
ED 649-SUBJECT-AREA PLANNING FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS. (Formerly
ED 559.) 3 credits
Offered only by extension. A workshop for the development of individual, city-wide or
county-wide plans for improving programs in language arts, social studies, mathematics,
health, art, music, science, etc.
ED 650-PROBLEMS IN CLASSROOM TEACHING: THE CLASSROOM TEACH-
ERS' WORK CONFERENCE. 3 credits
Open only to selected currently employed classroom teachers. Planned meetings during the
first and second trimesters and individual study under faculty guidance to promote the
professional growth of classroom teachers. Teachers may register for three conferences
and earn a maximum of 9 credits.
ED 651-AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
The selection, evaluation, and use of audio-visual materials, with emphasis upon projected
still and sound motion pictures.
ED 652-PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION OF AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS.
3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 651 or consent of instructor. Designed to train materials supervisors,
audio-visual coordinators, and other school personnel in the production of materials by
photographic processes.
ED 653-ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF A MATERIALS-OF-INSTRUC-
TION PROGRAM. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 418 or ED 651. The administration of a school or county materials-
of-instruction program, including arrangement of materials and equipment, organization
and operation, financial report, standards, physical plant functions, and evaluation.
ED 655-MENTAL HEALTH IN THE CLASSROOM. 3 credits
Designed to assist teachers, principals, and supervisors in developing sound principles for
creating a healthful classroom environment.
ED 657-FLORIDA WORKSHOP: BULLETIN SERIES DIVISION. 6 credits
Assistance for principals and teachers engaged in the preparation of curriculum bulletins.
Registration limited to selected personnel.
ED 659-LABORATORY IN CORRECTIVE READING. 6 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: EDE 675. Intensive study of the diagnosis, correction, and
prevention of reading difficulties in both elementary and secondary schools: work with
children in the application of principles under study.
ED 660-SUBJECT-AREA PLANNING FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS. (Formerly
ED 560.) 3 credits
Offered only by extension. A workshop for the development of individual, city-wide, or
county-wide plans for improving instruction in secondary school subjects.
ED 661-PROBLEMS IN READING. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EDE 675 and ED 659, or equivalents. Specific reading problems such as
those encountered in the classroom situation will be selected for exhaustive study by
individuals or small groups, the teaching of reading on any grade level.
ED 663-MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 2 credits
Offered only by extension. An in-service training course open to elementary school teach-
ers. The purpose is to give graduate in-service training to persons actually engaged in
music teaching by doing research work under the supervision of the head of the Depart-
ment of Music.
ED 664-VOCAL MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 2 credits
Offered only by extension. An in-service training course open only to vocal music teachers.
The purpose is to give graduate in-service training to persons actually engaged in vocal
music teaching by doing research work under the supervision of the head of the Depart-
ment of Music.
ED 665-ORCHESTRA MUSIC IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 2 credits
Offered only by extension. An in-service training course open only to instrumental music
teachers. The purpose is to give graduate in-service training to persons actually engaged
in instrumental music teaching by doing research work under the supervision of the
head of the Department of Music.
ED 666-BAND MUSIC IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 2 credits
Offered only by extension. An in-service training course open only to instrumental music
teachers. The purpose is to give graduate in-service training to persons actually engaged
in instrumental music teaching by doing research work under the supervision of the
head of the Department of Music.








EDUCATION-ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 73


ED 670-WORKSHOP IN HUMAN RELATIONS IN EDUCATION. 3 credits
Exploration of principles and practices in the field of human relations and their implica-
tions for interpersonal and intergroup problems in the family, school, and community.
ED 682-FIELD LABORATORY FOR FACULTY STUDY OF SPECIAL PROBLEMS.
3 or 6 credits
Offered only by extension. To assist teachers in single schools, groups of schools, or
county systems in improving certain subject areas or in working on special problems within
the system.
ED 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
ED 700-INSTRUCTION: THEORY AND RESEARCH. 3 credits
Investigation of theories of instruction and research in the learning process, mental
health, creativity, the thought process, human relations, group dynamics, communication
and other fields contributing to a theory of instruction.
ED 701-CURRICULUM: THEORY AND RESEARCH. 3 credits
Investigation of theories of curriculum and organization and a survey of curriculum
research and patterns of curriculum.
ED 740-PROGRAMS OF TEACHER EDUCATION. 3 credits
An analysis of the organization and problems of teacher education institutions; types of
students, patterns of curricula, functions of staff, significant organizations and agencies,
and special studies.
ED 741-INTERNSHIP IN TEACHER EDUCATION 1. 3 credits
Study of the problems of pre-service teacher education and participation in the planning
and teaching of pre-service courses.
ED 742-INTERNSHIP IN TEACHER EDUCATION 2. 3 credits
Continuation of ED 741.
ED 743-SEMINAR: GENERAL EDUCATION FOR COLLEGES. 3 credits
Investigation of the forces contributing to the general education movement; objectives of
general education; types of courses and programs, content of courses, and instructional
approaches.
ED 750-SEMINAR: EDUCATION FOR TODAY. 3 credits
An analysis of the operation of education in present-day society and the relationships
among the various phases of education from early childhood through adulthood.
ED 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits

Education -Administration and Supervision
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Johns, R. L., Head; Ahrens, M. R.; Eggert, C. L.; Hass, C. G.; Kimbrough, R. B.; LaVire,
W. A.; Leps, J. M.; Meyer, H. K.; Simmons, G. B.; Wiegman, R. R.; Wiles, K.

GRADUATE COURSES
EDA 600-EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 3 credits
The foundation course in school administration. Basic concepts, principles, and practices
in local, state, and federal organization and administration.
EDA 601-ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ELEMENTARY
SCHOOLS. 3 credits
The organization and administration of elementary schools are studied in the light of
purposes and functions. Special emphasis is given to the skills and competencies desirable
for leadership at a school center.
EDA 602-ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF SECONDARY
SCHOOLS. 3 credits
The various duties and responsibilities of the school principal are comprehensively studied.
Competencies necessary for leadership in organizing, administering, supervising, and
evaluating the secondary school center are investigated.
EDA 603-PUBLIC SCHOOL FINANCE. 3 credits
State, local, and federal financing of education; the foundation program of school financ-
ing; principles and criteria of taxation for education; education and the national economy.
EDA 604-LEGAL PHASES OF PUBLIC SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. 3 credits
The legal status of the schools in the United States will be studied. Special emphasis
will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions, judicial deci-
sions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education.








74 EDUCATION-ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION


EDA 605-PUBLIC SCHOOL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. 3 credits
School financial accounting; the preparation and administration of budgets; purchasing
procedures; the issuance of school securities; central services of public school business
administration.
EDA 606-SUPERVISED PRACTICE IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. 3 credits.
Maximum 6 credits
Only advanced graduate students are permitted to enroll for the course. Students are given
opportunity to perform administrative duties under supervision.
EDA 607-ADMINISTRATION OF TEACHER PERSONNEL. 3 credits
This course deals with problems of the professional school staff and with the various
aspects of administering staff personnel in the public schools.
EDA 608-ADMINISTRATION OF PUPIL PERSONNEL. 3 credits
This course acquaints the student with pupil personnel services including accounting,
reporting, classification, attendance, and problems of pupils' adjustment to the school
situation.
EDA 609-PROBLEMS IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION.
3 credits. Maximum 6 credits
An in-service training course through regularly scheduled campus work conferences open
only to superintendents and supervisors; or an in-service training course offered through
extension for superintendents, supervisors, principals, junior college administrators, and
trainees for such positions.
EDA 610-ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF ADULT EDUCATION.
3 credits
Overview of adult education in the United States, the role of administration in adult
education, the job of the local director of adult education, and Florida law and regulations
relating to adult education in the public schools.
EDA 630-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
This course is provided for advanced students who wish to undertake an individual
research project which is directly related to administration and supervision.
EDA 631-EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 1. 3 credits
The basic leadership course for majors in administration and supervision. Emphasis is
given to the role of official leadership in group development, improving group structure,
and program improvement.
EDA 632-EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 2. 3 credits
Continuation of EDA 631. Prerequisite: EDA 631 or ED 634.
EDA 633-METHODS AND PROBLEMS OF SUPERVISION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDA 631 or ED 634. Critical study of methods of improving instruction.
EDA 700-SCHOOL SURVEY. 3 credits
Study is made of school survey techniques and their application. Long-term planning of
educational programs is emphasized. Field experience in school surveys will be made
available to students taking the course.
EDA 702-THE SCHOOL PLANT. 3 credits
Planning of building programs and the planning of school buildings in relation to in-
structional needs are studied. Special attention is given to the maintenance, operation, and
utilization of school plants.
EDA 704-COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION. 3 credits
Educational policies, functions, and practices in the administration of higher institutions.
EDA 706-SEMINAR: THEORIES OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION.
3 credits
Prerequisite: One year of graduate study. Basic theories of the organization and adminis-
tration of public education; historical origins of theories; assumptions underlying current
concepts of administration and theory development.
EDA 730-PRACTICUM IN SUPERVISION. Variable credit. 1 to 12 credits
A seminar and an internship in administration and supervision.
EDA 731-WORK OF THE DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM. 3 credits
Admission by permission of the instructor. The duties of the director of curriculum are
examined from the standpoint of their administrative, coordinative, supervisory, and
research aspects.








EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY 75


Education Elementary
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63

Hilliard, F. P., Head; Ahrens, M. R.; Ambrose, E.; Cooper, J.; Green, E. K. (on leave);
Haines, A. C.; McCracken, J. M.; Olson, W.; Sheckles, M.; Spache, G. D.; Tison, J. P.;
Wenzel, E.; White, J. B.; Young, G. M.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES

EDE 500--SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION I. 3 credits
EDE 550-THE TEACHING OF ARITHMETIC. 3 credits
EDE 560-TEACHING OF SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 3 credits
EDE 570-TEACHING OF READING. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES

EDE 600-ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 600. A survey of the content and methods of the elementary school cur-
riculum. Offered primarily for students who have not taken a course in elementary cur-
riculum and who have not had teaching experience in the elementary schools.
EDE 601-PRACTICES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 1. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ED 600 and either course background in elementary curriculum or teaching
experience in the elementary school. Practices in the elementary school in relation to
fundamental principles of curriculum development. Emphasis is placed upon selection,
organization, and development of effective teaching-learning situations.
EDE 602-PRACTICES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 2. SOCIAL EDUCATION.
3 credits
Prerequisite: SCL 301 or equivalent. Practices in the total elementary school program with
emphasis upon the social education of children. Includes an analysis of the contributions
of the social studies to children's social learning.
EDE 603-EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 1. 3 credits
Study of curriculum for nursery school and kindergarten. Helps meet certification in Early
Childhood Education.
EDE 604-EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 2. 3 credits
Permission of instructor required. Continuation of study of curriculum for nursery school
and kindergarten. Includes observation and participation. Helps meet certification in Early
Childhood Education.
EDE 635-SUPERVISION OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS 1. 3 credits
Open to graduate students with certification and background in elementary education, or
with permission of instructor. Problems and issues of pre-service teacher education, with
particular emphasis on procedures of supervising interns.
EDE 636-SUPERVISION OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDE 635. Continuation of EDE 635.
EDE 660-SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Prerequisite: GL 301 or EDE 560 or equivalent. Current problems and approaches in
teaching science in elementary schools. New materials and techniques of teaching. Research
and recent developments in the sciences and their implication.
EDE 670-LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDE 301 or equivalent. Creative and skill aspects of the language arts in
the elementary school, including oral expression, listening, usage, vocabulary building,
reading, writing, and handwriting.
EDE 671-LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDE 670 or equivalent. Speaking, listening, reading, and writing: their
place in the total school program and current interests, issues, and trends in teaching in
the light of current research.
EDE 675-TRENDS IN THE TEACHING OF READING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDE 570 or equivalent. Analysis of trends in the teaching of reading as
shown in current methods and research. Includes consideration of controversial issues and
future trends in classroom organization, methods, and materials.
EDE 700-PROBLEMS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 1. 3 credits
Advanced course in elementary school curriculum.








76 EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS


EDE 701-PROBLEMS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 2. 3 credits
Second half of EDE 700.
EDE 702-EVALUATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Emphasis will be placed upon point of view and methods and techniques used in apprais-
ing the behavioral growth of pupils. Consideration will also be given to evaluation of the
objectives of the total elementary school program.
EDE 703-SEMINAR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 2. 3 or 6 credits
Open to advanced graduate students only upon consent of the staff of elementary educa-
tion. Critical examination of current research and an overview of the total program in
elementary education.


Education -Foundations
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Lewis, H. G., Head; Baker, M. C.; Combs, A. W.; Cumbee, C. F.; Curran, R. L.; Gordon,
I. J.; Guertin, Wilson; Hines, V. A.; Laird, D. S.; McLendon, I. R.; Muntyan, Bozidar;
Potter, R. E.; Scates, D. E.; Watkins, L. J.

GRADUATE COURSES
EDF 600-HISTORY OF EDUCATION. 3 credits
Designed to help the teacher participate in solving professional problems through a per-
spective gained from a survey of education from primitive times to the present.
EDF 610-PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION. 3 credits
A study of the philosophical bases for democracy and education.
EDF 620-SOCIO-ECONOMIC FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION. 3 credits
The socio-economic bases for education are comprehensively surveyed.
EDF 631-COMPARATIVE EDUCATION. 3 credits
A study of the relationships of school and society in different cultural areas of the world.
EDF 640-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. 3 credits
Intensive study of current research and theories in the area of human development.
EDF 641-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: PERSONALITY DYNAMICS. 3 credits
An examination of the dynamics of behavior and its implications for education, counseling
and guidance, administration, family relationships, and social action.
EDF 642-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: PROBLEMS. 3 credits
Individualized study of problems dealing with child development, adolescence, learning, and
other areas of educational psychology.
EDF 643-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: LEARNING THEORY. 3 credits
An advanced course in professional education giving particular attention to the logic and
methodologies of theories of learning.
EDF 644-LABORATORY IN CHILD STUDY 1. 3 credits
Offered only by extension. This is an in-the-field laboratory course in child study open
to teachers working with children at the time of enrollment in the course.
EDF 645-LABORATORY IN CHILD STUDY 2. 3 credits
Offered only by extension. Prerequisite: EDF 644. Continuation of EDF 644.
EDF 650-MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION. 3 credits
Open only to teachers in service. An investigation of classroom procedures for measure-
ment and evaluation designed to help teachers interpret results of tests and other evalua-
tive devices used in their classes.
EDF 660--EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDF 360 or an equivalent, or approval of instructor. Statistical methods as
applied to educational data and problems are systematically studied.
EDF 710-EDUCATION AND MORAL AND SPIRITUAL IDEAS. 3 credits
A consideration of types of moral ideas, of the relation of moral values to schools sub-
jects, and of the question of direction and systematic moral and spiritual instruction in
the schools.
EDF 711-THEORIES OF MIND. 3 credits
This course covers conceptions of mind and thinking processes, with implications for
curriculum organization and classroom practice.
EDF 712-CONTEMPORARY EDUCATIONAL THEORIES. 3 credits
A seminar for post-master's students. A critical study of contemporary philosophical
theories of education.







EDUCATION-PERSONNEL SERVICES 77


EDF 720-SCHOOL AND SOCIETY. 3 credits
Open only to candidates for the Ed.S. or Ed.D. degrees. Provides a social and philosophic
frame of reference through a rigorous study of the society in which education takes place
and the implication of this society for the functioning of the school.
EDF 740-EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: COGNITION IN THE EDUCATIVE
PROCESS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EDF 640 and permission of the instructor. A thorough understanding of
the field of cognitive development as it is being applied to curriculum development and
teaching procedures.
EDF 741-EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF PERCEPTUAL PSYCHOLOGY.
3 credits
Prerequisites: EDF 641 and permission of the instructor. Intensive exploration of the
research literature and other literature on human behavior and its implications for educa-
tional theory and practice.
EDF 760-TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH. 3 credits
A required course for Ed.D. degree candidates. Training is given in identifying research
problems, in organizing useful means for research, and in interpreting and reporting
observed phenomena.
EDF 780-SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS. 3 credits
A seminar for the study of issues in the historical, philosophical, social, psychological,
aesthetic, and comparative foundations of education. With different content, duplicate
registration is permitted.


Education Personnel Services
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63

Stripling, R. O., Head; Benton, H. D.; Bristol, L. R.; Combs, A. W.; Cunningham,
M. A.; Foster, C. R.; Humphreys, J. A.; Laird, D. S.; Landsman, T.; Lane, D.; Lister,
J. L.; Melton, C. Y.; Smith, R. M.; Spache, G. D.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
EDP 500-MATERIALS AND METHODS FOR TEACHING SLOW LEARNERS.
3 credits
EDP 503-METHODS OF TEACHING CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 3 credits
EDP 504-THERAPEUTIC CARE OF CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES

EDP 600-TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 300 or PSY 312. An advanced course in the care, treatment, and
education of children with problems and handicaps.
EDP 603-EDUCATION OF THE GIFTED CHILD. 3 credits
Definitions of giftedness, characteristics of gifted children, and outside of school influ-
ences which affect the achievement of gifted children.
EDP 610-PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE: THE HELPING RELATIONSHIP. 3 credits
Prerequisite or corequisite: EDF 641. The theoretical bases of guidance and personnel
work, with emphasis on the helping relationship and its application to human interaction.
EDP 611-OCCUPATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION. 3 credits
Studying occupations, sources of information concerning employment conditions, job
requirements, training facilities, occupational trends; evaluation of occupational literature;
use of educational and occupational information in counseling.
EDP 612-TECHNIQUES OF GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL WORK. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDF 440 or EDF 442 or equivalent. A survey of guidance practices for
teachers, supervisors, administrators, and other school personnel not majoring in guidance
and personnel work.
EDP 613-PERSONNEL TESTING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDF 360 or EDF 450 or permission of instructor. A study of typical psycho-
logical tests used in guidance and personnel work, with emphasis on evaluating these
instruments and on their construction, standardization, and application.







78 EDUCATION-SECONDARY


EDP 614-CASE STUDIES IN COUNSELING. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EDF 641, EDP 610, and EDF 450 or equivalent. Permission of instructor
is required. Competency is developed in the application of counseling theory and tech-
niques.
EDP 616-PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING. 3 credits
Advanced written application for admission to the course is required at least six weeks
in advance of registration. Experience in individual counseling will be provided under
supervision.
EDP 617-PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING. 3 credits
Continuation of EDP 616.
EDP 618-THE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GUIDANCE AND
PERSONNEL PROGRAMS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EDP 610, EDF 641, and EDF 450. Methods of organizing and administer-
ing guidance and personnel programs in educational institutions and allied agencies.
EDP 640-STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES IN HIGHER EDUCATION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDP 610 or consent of instructor. Overview of student personnel services
in junior colleges, colleges and universities. Study of philosophy, organization, and
administration of personnel program at this level, and of specific services provided.
EDP 656-VISITING TEACHER SERVICE. 3 credits
A study of the visiting teacher services in the public school program.
EDP 660-PROBLEMS IN STUDENT PERSONNEL WORK. 1 to 6 credits
An in-service education course open only to persons engaged in personnel work in educa-
tion or closely allied areas.
EDP 715-SEMINAR IN PERSONNEL WORK. 3 credits
Admission limited to advanced students working for either the degree of Specialist in
Education or of Doctor of Education. Admission by consent of instructor.
EDP 716-INTERNSHIP IN PERSONNEL WORK 1. 3 credits
Opportunity will be provided to selected students for supervised field work. Advanced
written application for admission to the course is required at least six weeks before regis-
tration.
EDP 717-INTERNSHIP IN PERSONNEL WORK 2. 3 credits
Continuation of EDP 716.


Education Secondary
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Durrance, C. L., Jr., Head; Arnold, L. A.; Bingham, N. E. (on leave); Browne, E. B.;
Carr, G. D.; Cate, C. A.; Crews, J. W.; Davis, E. A.; Hass, C. G.; Kidd, K. P.; Mc-
Guire, V.; Mason, J. M.; Meyer, H. K.; Moorman, J. H.; Oliva, P. F.; Scrafford, R. A.;
Timmerman, M. E.; Wiegman, R. R.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on
the 600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in secondary education are avail-
able for graduate credit for students whose baccalaureate degree was in a college other
than education. These courses are: EDS 403-Internship: Secondary School Curriculum
and Organization; EDS 404-Internship: Methods and Materials for Classroom Use;
EDS 405-Internship: Teaching in the Secondary School; and the 500-level courses listed
below.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
EDS 521-PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS EDUCATION. 3 credits
EDS 550-TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 3 credits
EDS 560-TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
EDS 580-TEACHING IN ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAMS. 3 credits
EDS 590-STUDENT ACTIVITIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
EDS 601-THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 600 or permission of instructor. An analysis of the scope and function
of the modern junior high school as a school program to meet the needs of early
adolescents.








EDUCATION-SECONDARY 79


EDS 602-THE SECONDARY SCHOOL CURRICULUM. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 600 or permission of instructor. An analysis of the scope, function, and
types of secondary school curricula and ways of improving existing programs.
EDS 603-COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION. 3 credits
An analysis of the program and problems of the community college.
EDS 604-CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: ED 600. Guided experiences in developing resource units for teaching and
the writing of courses of study.
EDS 605-EVALUATION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL PROGRAM. 3 credits
A study of procedures and of techniques of evaluation in secondary schools.
EDS 611-THE CORE PROGRAM IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
A study of the organization, the methods, and the materials used in core classes.
EDS 620-TEACHING OFFICE MACHINES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: BEN 352 or equivalent. Functions of machines, their suitabilities for various
office functions, and methods of teaching operation of machines commonly used in offices.
EDS 622-TEACHING SECRETARIAL STUDIES. 3 credits
For teachers of business subjects. Curriculum, materials, and methods of teaching secre-
tarial subjects are studied.
EDS 623-TEACHING BOOKKEEPING AND CONSUMER BUSINESS SUBJECTS.
3 credits
Curriculum, materials, and methods of teaching bookkeeping, economics of business,
business law, business arithmetic, economic geography, and business correspondence are
studied.
EDS 624-MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING GENERAL BUSINESS.
3 credits
Objectives, content, resource materials, and methods of teaching general business in the
junior and senior high schools are studied.
EDS 625-PROBLEMS IN BUSINESS EDUCATION. 3 credits
Offered by extension only. Areas of interest of students enrolled will be studied inten-
sively. Problems in business education in Florida schools will be emphasized.
EDS 635-SUPERVISION OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS I. 3 credits
A study of the function of the directing teacher in the internship program and the prob-
lems and procedures of supervising the work of interns.
EDS 640-SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Preparation in the subject area equivalent to requirements for high school
certification, or permission of instructor. Consideration of the problems in teaching social
studies.
EDS 641-ECONOMIC EDUCATION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Offered by extension only. A workshop designed (1) to increase understanding of our
national economy by a study of fundamental principles and concepts; (2) to make plans
for more and better teaching of economic understandings.
EDS 650-MATHEMATICS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Preparation in subject area equivalent to requirements for high school
certification, or permission of instructor. Patterns of mathematics curriculum in the sec-
ondary school; practices in teaching mathematics; preparation, selection, and use of
instructional materials; laboratory experiences in field work as well as in classroom
teaching.
EDS 660-SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Preparation in subject area equivalent to requirements for high school cer-
tification or permission of instructor. Current problems in teaching science in secondary
schools and junior college.
EDS 670-LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Preparation in subject area equivalent to requirements for high school
certification or permission of instructor. Trends, basic principles, methods, and materials
will be considered.
EDS 675-COOPERATIVE EDUCATION. 3 credits
The organization and coordination of diversified cooperative training, distributive educa-
tion, and cooperative business education programs.
EDS 677-TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN THE JUNIOR COLLEGE. 3 credits
An analysis of technical education in modern society, with particular emphasis upon
community junior college programs leading to Associate of Science or similar two-year
degrees.
EDS 700-SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. 3 credits
An analysis of the issues and research in the field of secondary education.
EDS 701-PARTICIPATION IN CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS.
3 credits








80 VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE, ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


Participation in field work in curriculum development and a study of methods and pro-
cedures of curriculum change.
EDS 705-ADULT EDUCATION IN THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (JUNIOR COL-
LEGE). 3 credits
An examination into the various types of community college programs in adult education.
Methods of community survey and ways of identifying and defining educational needs of
adults.
EDS 725-ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF BUSINESS EDUCATION.
3 credits
Prerequisite: Two years of teaching experience and approval of the head of the depart-
ment. Problems and duties of administrators and supervisors of business education are
studied. Study is made of departmental organization, rendering services to administrative
offices and other school departments.
EDS 760-SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS IN AMERICAN SECONDARY SCHOOLS.
(FORMERLY ED 760). 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDS 650 or EDS 660 or permission of instructor. An investigation of re-
search findings regarding science and mathematics and their place in grades seven through
fourteen.

Education-Vocational Agriculture
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Loften, W. T., Head.
GRADUATE COURSES
EDV 611-HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.
3 credits
History and development of agricultural education will be traced from its beginning in
other countries to the present program in the United States.
EDV 612-PHILOSOPHY AND ADMINISTRATION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCA-
TION. 3 credits
Basic principles for administering a program of vocational education on a national, state,
and local level will be considered.
EDV 665-PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
For students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced research problems.
EDV 666-PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
Second half of EDV 665-666.
EDV 667-SUPERVISED FARMING PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCA-
TION. 3 credits
Covers essential problems in planning and supervising programs of farming as required in
the text of the Smith-Hughes and George-Barden acts.
EDV 671-ADULT EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE. 3 credits
Adult education in agriculture will form the core of this course. The problems will involve
the organization of classes, procedures in teaching, and evaluation.
EDV 672-PREPARING COURSE MATERIALS AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
IN AGRICULTURE. 3 credits
Basic principles will be considered in preparing a course of study in vocational agriculture.
Consideration will also be given to the preparation of community agricultural programs.
EDV 673-THE SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
Designed to acquaint the student with the various national, state, and local supervisory
problems.

Electrical Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Larsen, M. J., Head; Bailey, T. L.; Chen, W. H.; Donaldson, M. R.; Elgerd, O. I;
Fagen, W. F.; George, T. S.; Johnson, R. C., Jr.; Lear, W. E.; Muschlitz, E. E.; Peter-
son, W. W.; Sashoff, S. P.; Sutherland, A. D.; Wing, A. H.








80 VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE, ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


Participation in field work in curriculum development and a study of methods and pro-
cedures of curriculum change.
EDS 705-ADULT EDUCATION IN THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (JUNIOR COL-
LEGE). 3 credits
An examination into the various types of community college programs in adult education.
Methods of community survey and ways of identifying and defining educational needs of
adults.
EDS 725-ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF BUSINESS EDUCATION.
3 credits
Prerequisite: Two years of teaching experience and approval of the head of the depart-
ment. Problems and duties of administrators and supervisors of business education are
studied. Study is made of departmental organization, rendering services to administrative
offices and other school departments.
EDS 760-SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS IN AMERICAN SECONDARY SCHOOLS.
(FORMERLY ED 760). 3 credits
Prerequisite: EDS 650 or EDS 660 or permission of instructor. An investigation of re-
search findings regarding science and mathematics and their place in grades seven through
fourteen.

Education-Vocational Agriculture
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Loften, W. T., Head.
GRADUATE COURSES
EDV 611-HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.
3 credits
History and development of agricultural education will be traced from its beginning in
other countries to the present program in the United States.
EDV 612-PHILOSOPHY AND ADMINISTRATION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCA-
TION. 3 credits
Basic principles for administering a program of vocational education on a national, state,
and local level will be considered.
EDV 665-PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
For students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced research problems.
EDV 666-PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
Second half of EDV 665-666.
EDV 667-SUPERVISED FARMING PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCA-
TION. 3 credits
Covers essential problems in planning and supervising programs of farming as required in
the text of the Smith-Hughes and George-Barden acts.
EDV 671-ADULT EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE. 3 credits
Adult education in agriculture will form the core of this course. The problems will involve
the organization of classes, procedures in teaching, and evaluation.
EDV 672-PREPARING COURSE MATERIALS AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS
IN AGRICULTURE. 3 credits
Basic principles will be considered in preparing a course of study in vocational agriculture.
Consideration will also be given to the preparation of community agricultural programs.
EDV 673-THE SUPERVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 3 credits
Designed to acquaint the student with the various national, state, and local supervisory
problems.

Electrical Engineering
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Larsen, M. J., Head; Bailey, T. L.; Chen, W. H.; Donaldson, M. R.; Elgerd, O. I;
Fagen, W. F.; George, T. S.; Johnson, R. C., Jr.; Lear, W. E.; Muschlitz, E. E.; Peter-
son, W. W.; Sashoff, S. P.; Sutherland, A. D.; Wing, A. H.








ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 81


Prerequisites: A college course in physics, differential and integral calculus, differential
equations with Laplace transform emphasis, and a minimum of 36 credits, or the equiva-
lent, in courses in the general field of electrical engineering, together with special prerequi-
sites stated for individual courses.
In order to help formulate a Ph.D program, the Department of Electrical Engineer-
ing gives a preliminary examination over the basic undergraduate subjects and some of the
graduate subjects already taken by the student. This examination will be administered by
the student's supervisory committee and will be given, in general, during the first trimester
of attendance after the completion of his master's program.
The following 400-level courses may be taken for graduate major credit: EL 452-
Pulse Circuity or EL 462-Microwave Techniques with their corresponding laboratories,
EL 415 and EL 416.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES

EL 503-TRANSISTOR ELECTRONICS LABORATORY. 1 credit
EL 520-NUCLEAR ENGINEERING INSTRUMENTATION. 3 credits
EL 550-TRANSISTOR ELECTRONICS. 2 credits
EL 580-DIGITAL COMPUTER PRINCIPLES. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES

EL 608-BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS. 3 credits
Identical with PS 608. Prerequisites: MS 521, MS 522, MS 523. Methods of solution of
the partial differential equations of electrical engineering and mathematical physics. La-
place, Poisson, wave equations, heat equations, with various boundary conditions and by
various techniques.
EL 609-BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS. 3 credits
Identical with PS 609. Prerequisite: EL 608. Second half of EL 608-609.
EL 631-ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS. 3 credits
Theory and practice of electrical measurements at extremes of voltage, current, power,
and frequency.
EL 635-NETWORK SYNTHESIS. 3 credits
Network functions;physical realizability; 2-terminal network synthesis methods; image-
parameter synthesis; frequency transformation; potential analogy; approximation prob-
lems; insertion-loss and transfer function synthesis.
EL 636-NETWORK SYNTHESIS. 3 credits
Second half of EL 635-636.
EL 637-TRANSIENTS IN LINEAR SYSTEMS. 3 credits
Transient analysis of electrical and mechanical systems stressing Laplace transform
methods.
EL 641-NONLINEAR CIRCUITS. 3 credits
Analytical and topological approaches to nonlinear circuits; nonlinear resonance; relaxa-
tion oscillations.
EL 645-ADVANCED CIRCUIT THEORY. 3 credits
Network fundamentals; network characterization; frequency analysis; some network
topology; superposition integrals; some stability problems; real-and-imaginary relations of
system functions.
EL 646-ADVANCED CIRCUIT THEORY. 3 credits
Second half of EL 645-646.
EL 650-PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: PS 508 or equivalent as approved by instructor. Theory of operation and
application of solid-state devices. Principles of transistor action. Oxide-coated cathodes.
Electroluminescence. Applications of ferroelectrics and ferrites. Piezoelectric devices.
EL 652-THEORY OF VACUUM TUBES. 3 credits
Fundamental principles of electronic motion, space charge effects, and interactions of
electrons with electromagnetic fields; analysis of vacuum tube operation.
EL 653-THEORY OF MICROWAVE VACUUM TUBES. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EL 652 and EL 655. Second half of EL 652-653. More detailed analysis of
klystrons, magnetrons, traveling-wave tubes, and other microwaves vacuum tubes.
EL 654-THEORY OF COMMUNICATION. 3 credits
Prerequisite: MS 510 or equivalent. Physical basis and statistical representation of electrical
noise; filtering, modulation, and de-modulation of signals corrupted by noise; correlation
techniques and linear prediction.








82 ENGINEERING MECHANICS


EL 655-ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EL 464 or equivalent. Electromagnetic theory from the engineering point of
view, propagation and reflection of waves, guided waves, resonant cavities, antennas and
radiation.
EL 656-ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES. 3 credits
Second half of EL 655-656.
EL 658-STATISTICAL DECISION THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EL 654 and MS 510. Hypothesis testing of signals in the presence of noise
by Bayes, Neyman-Pearson, minimax criteria; statistical estimation of signal parameters;
optimum filters and receivers; ambiguity functions and inverse probability.
EL 659-STATISTICAL COMMUNICATION THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: MS 510. Quantitative measure of information and its properties; information
sources, noiseless channels, and information compression; noise channels and channel
capacity; an introduction to error-correcting codes.
EL 660-SPACE COMMUNICATIONS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EL 654. Telemetering system, space communications links, satellite com-
munications systems, space tracking and navigation systems.
EL 661-LOGIC AND DESIGN OF DIGITAL CONTROL CIRCUITS. 3 credits
Boolean algebra; propositional logic; switching devices; combinational circuits; se-
quential circuits; systems design.
EL 671-ADVANCED ELECTRICAL MACHINERY. 3 credits
Electrical and mechanical theory of rotating machinery and electrical apparatus.
EL 673-CONTROL SYSTEM THEORY 1. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Analysis and synthesis techniques of linear and non-
linear control systems. Computer as a control component.
EL 674-CONTROL SYSTEM THEORY 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EL 673. Second half of 673-674.
EL 675-SIMULATION TECHNIQUES. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Theory of simulation of systems characterized by
lumped and/or distributed parameters.
EL 676-INERTIAL GUIDANCE AND CONTROL. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EL 673. Modern navigational and vehicle guidance and control techniques
based upon usage of inertial reference.
EL 681-ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS. 3 credits
Steady-state and transient analysis of interconnected power systems; power circuit pro-
tection; transient characteristics of apparatus.
EL 682-ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS. 3 credits
Second half of EL 681-682.
EL 691-SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. Variable credit
Laboratory, lectures, or conferences covering specially selected topics in electrical engineer-
ing.
EL 692-SPECIAL TOPICS IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. Variable credit
Second half of EL 691- 692.
EL 695-GRADUATE SEMINAR. 1 credit
Discussions on topics in fields of graduate study and research. May be repeated for
additional credit to 3 hours maximum.
EL 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
EL 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Engineering Mechanics
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Sawyer, W. L., Head; Nash, W. A., Head, Advanced Mechanics Research Section; Ebcio-
glu, I. K.; Edson, C. G.; Hill, C. C.; Jahanshahi, A.; Lu, S. Y.; Neff, T. O.; Sciammarel-
la, C. A.; Siekmann, J.; Trubert, M.
In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School, prerequisite for admission
to graduate study in engineering mechanics for either the M.S.E. or Ph.D. degree is an
engineering degree from an accredited college or curriculum. Depending on their back-
ground, students with degrees in applied mathematics or physics may be admitted to grad-
uate study in engineering mechanics either by completing the undergraduate mechanics
courses or by demonstrating a thorough knowledge of the material covered in these courses.
Students beginning studies for the Ph.D. must have had work in mathematics at least
equivalent to MS 521 and MS 522.








ENGINEERING MECHANICS 83


Special requirements of degree programs: A minor in mathematics is required for
both M.S.E. and Ph.D. programs. A reading knowledge of German and Russian is required
for the Ph.D. EM 601-Introduction To Continuum Mechanics is required for all stu-
dents at the time they begin graduate study.
Students taking 500-level courses for graduate major credit will be required to do
additional reading, problems, and reports.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
EM 536-INTERMEDIATE DYNAMICS. 3 credits
EM 546-FUNDAMENTAL VIBRATION ANALYSIS. 3 credits
EM 547-ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN MECHANICS. 2 credits
EM 564-ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3 credits
EM 565-ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
EM 601-INTRODUCTION TO CONTINUUM MECHANICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 367. Tensor properties of stress and strain. General discussion of
Cartesian tensors. Equations of motion and compatibility. Relations between stress, strain,
and strain rate for elastic, plastic, and viscous solids; for compressible and viscous fluids.
EM 633-ADVANCED HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 313 or EM 327. Groundwater and hydraulic uplift. Design of gravity
dam. Spillway design. Specific energy head and channel conveyance. Gradually varied flow
and local phenomena. Limiting velocities and economics. Backwater and reservoir routing.
EM 634-HYDRAULIC MEASUREMENTS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 313 or EM 327. Fluid properties. Sonic velocity and water hammer.
Vapor pressure, condensation, and precipitation. Manometry. Metering in closed and open
conduits. Winds and dynamic loading. Stage-discharge relationship. Evaluation of rough-
ness by backwater.
EM 636-THEORY OF INVISCID FLUID FLOW. 3 credits
Prerequisite: MS 521, EM 313, or EM 327 or consent of instructor. The differential equa-
tions of motion, continuity, and state. Concepts of velocity potential, stream function, and
irrotationality. Practical solutions for two- and three-dimensional flow. Application of con-
formal transformations to two-dimensional flow.
EM 637-THEORY OF VISCOUS FLUID FLOW. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 636. Continuation of EM 636. The differential equations of motion,
continuity, energy, and state and their exact and approximate solutions for viscous fluid
flow. Laminar and turbulent flows. Theories of turbulence. Introduction to magneto hydro-
dynamics.
EM 638-BOUNDARY LAYER THEORY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 636 or EM 637 and consent of instructor. Prandtl boundary layer equa-
tions. Approximate and exact solutions for multi-dimensional flows. Laminar and turbulent
boundary layers. Thermal boundary layers. Steady and unsteady state applications.
EM 639-HIGH SPEED GAS DYNAMICS 1. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 636 and knowledge of compressible flow based on one-dimensional con-
cepts. Subsonic flow, linear and nonlinear theories. Hodograph, integral, series, and re-
laxation methods. Two-dimensional supersonic flow; method of characteristics.
EM 640-HIGH SPEED GAS DYNAMICS 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 639. Oblique shocks. Axially symmetric supersonic flow, linear and non-
linear theories. Multi-dimensional hypersonic flow. Mixed subsonic and supersonic flows.
Transonic flow.
EM 641-NONLINEAR MECHANICS. 3 credits
Analytical and topological approaches to nonlinear mechanics; nonlinear resonance,
relaxation oscillations.
EM 644-ADVANCED DYNAMICS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 366. Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies applied to advanced engi-
neering problems utilizing variational and transformation principles. Lagrangian equations.
Hamilton-Jacobi theory.
EM 646-ADVANCED VIBRATION ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 546 and MS 521. Longitudinal and torsional vibration of bars; lateral
vibrations of bars, membranes, plates, and shells. Generalized coordinates and Lagrange's
equations. Application of the Rayleigh-Ritz and various approximation methods.
EM 649-EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 1. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 367 or EM 377. Theory and application of experimental techniques
to problems of elasticity and plasticity.







84 ENGLISH


EM 650-EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 649. General optical theory of propagation of light in anisotropic
media. Three-dimensional photoelasticity, theory and applications. Moire method,, two-
and three-dimensional applications. Mathematical theory of similitude and model analysis.
EM 651-THEORY OF ELASTICITY 1. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 367 or EM 377, and MS 521. The linear theory of homogeneous,
isotropic, elastic media. Analysis of stress and strain. Tensor development of stress-strain
laws and basic equations. Two-dimensional problems. Energy and variational methods.
EM 652-THEORY OF ELASTICITY 2. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 651. Continuation of EM 651. Complex variable methods; approxi-
mate methods oL solution. Three-dimensional problems including torsion, bending, stress
concentration, thermal stress, and stress wave propagation.
EM 660-PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. 3 credits
Corequisite or prerequisite: EM 651. Mechanical and thermodynamic analysis of the
properties of materials. Physico-chemical foundations, electrical properties, mechanical
properties.
EM 667-THEORY OF ELASTIC STABILITY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 367 and MS 521. Lateral buckling of beams; bending and buckling of
thin plates and shells; shear buckling; general failure of columns by bending, twisting, or
shear; buckling at stresses above elastic range. Application to practical problems.
EM 671-THEORY OF PLASTICITY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 367 and MS 521. A study of stress and strain in inelastic media. Ideal-
ly plastic media, incremental theory of flow with applications. Flow in strain hardening
materials and metal forming processes.
EM 672-THEORY OF PLATES. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 367 and MS 521. Fundamental equations for the bending of thin plates
with small deformations. Large deformations of plates. Energy methods applied to plate
problems.
EM 673-THEORY OF SHELLS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 367, MS 521, and MS 522 or MS 639. General theory of deformation
of thin shells with small deflections. Large deformation theories for shells. Vibration of
cylindrical shells.
EM 675-NUMERICAL METHODS OF ENGINEERING ANALYSIS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EM 651. Relaxation methods, method of minimum potential energy. Varia-
tional principles, Rayleigh-Ritz method, Galerkin's method, Trefftz's procedure, Prager's
function space concept. Perturbation and collocation procedures.
EM 688-MECHANICS OF CONTINUOUS MEDIA. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EM 652 and MS 522. A comprehensive, unified treatment of the mathemati-
cal theories of solid and fluid mechanics, including gases.
EM 692-SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING MECHANICS. Variable credit
Topics vary from trimester to trimester and will include such topics as the following: me-
chanical properties of materials; ballistics; operations analysis; application of solid-state
physics principles to engineering problems.
EM 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
EM 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


English
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Robertson, C. A., Head; Baughan, D. E.; Bigelow, G. E.; Boone, L. P.; Bowers, R. H., Jr.;
Bryan, R. A.; Cox, E. H.; Fain, J. T.; Fogle, S. F. (on leave); Herbert, T. W.; Kirkland,
E. C. (on leave); Morris, A. C.; Murphee, A. A.; Oras, A.; Pyles, T.; Ruff, W.; Starr,
N. C.; Stryker, D.; Warfel, H. R.; Williams, A. L.; Wise, J. H.
Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in English or its equivalent. Such a major
must present at least 24 credit hours of English, including courses in important periods
of English literary history, American literature, and the history of the English language.
Adequate preparation in such closely related fields as history, philosophy, and foreign
language is presupposed.
EH 600 is required of all graduate majors. In addition to a reading knowledge of
French and German, normally required for doctoral candidates, the candidate for the
Ph.D. in English must also on entrance or before his qualifying examination offer evidence
of elementary study of either Latin or Greek.







ENGLISH 85


The Department of English offers work leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in
Teaching, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy. With the approval of the depart-
mental adviser, graduate study in the field of folklore may be made available by registra-
tion in EH 630. Students wishing to take graduate work should consult the departmental
graduate advisers. A booklet descriptive of the doctoral program is available upon applica-
tion to the department.
Candidates for the Master of Arts in Teaching will take courses entitled ASC
641 and ASC 642. These courses are also available to candidates for the M.A. and the
Ph.D. who may need teaching experience as part of their preparation.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
EH 503--THE CLASSICAL PERIOD IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 3 credits
EH 506-HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 3 credits
EH 509-CHAUCER. 3 credits
EH 530-INDIVIDUAL WORK IN CREATIVE WRITING. 3 credits
EH 599-SPECIAL STUDY IN ENGLISH. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
EH 600-BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS OF RESEARCH. 0 credit
EH 605-DRAMA OF THE RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY. 3 credits
A survey of the English stage from Dryden to Sheridan.
EH 610-CHAUCER. 3 credits
Reading and critical study of 'roilus and Criseyde and the minor poems.
EH 611-OLD ENGLISH. 3 credits
Old English grammar and reading from selected monuments.
EH 612-MIDDLE ENGLISH. 3 credits
Middle English grammar and reading from selected monuments.
EH 613-THE RENAISSANCE IN ENGLAND. 3 credits
The origin of the movement in Italy and its spread in England; the 16th-century poets
and prose writers.
EH 614-THE RENAISSANCE IN ENGLAND. 3 credits
Poetry and prose of the 17th century through Milton.
EH 615-MILTON. 3 credits
EH 617-SPENSER. 3 credits
EH 619-ELIZABETHAN DRAMA. 3 credits
EH 627-THE CRAFT OF WRITING. 3 credits
This course is intended for students interested in writing fiction as an art. Conducted by
the laboratory method and private conference, with the aim of developing the student's
writing talent and critical sense. Novels and short stories of the students and of authors
of established reputation will be read, analyzed, and discussed.
EH 628-THE CRAFT OF WRITING. 3 credits
A continuation of the work of EH 627, with the aim of providing further experience for
practitioners of the short story or the novel under the guidance of a writer in residence.
EH 630-INDIVIDUAL WORK. 3 credits
Prerequisite: 24 hours of English and approval of department head. Designed for grad-
uate students majoring in English and needing work in subjects not available in currently
offered courses. With change of content EH 630 may be repeated for credit.
EH 633-ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE 18TH CENTURY. 3 credits
A study of English prose and poetry from Dryden through Pope.
EH 634-ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE 18TH CENTURY. 3 credits
The Age of Johnson.
EH 641-BEOWULF. 3 credits
EH 643-THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD. 3 credits
Chief emphasis on the work of Burns, Blake, Coleridge, and Wordsworth.
EH 644-THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC PERIOD. 3 credits
Chief emphasis on the work of Byron, Keats, and Shelley.
EH 653-ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD. 3 credits
The Victorian prose writers.
EH 654-ENGLISH LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD. 3 credits
The Victorian poets.
EH 665-LITERARY CRITICISM, HISTORICAL AND ANALYTICAL. 3 credits
Classical, medieval, and renaissance criticism.
EH 666-LITERARY CRITICISM, HISTORICAL AND ANALYTICAL. 3 credits
Criticism from the eighteenth century to the present.








86 ENTOMOLOGY


EH 669-ENGLISH PROSODY. 3 credits
An historical and descriptive survey, including the European background.
EH 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
EH 735-SEMINAR IN RESTORATION AND 18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE.
3 credits
EH 736-SEMINAR IN ENGLISH DRAMA. 3 credits
Topics offered on rotating basis in various aspects of English drama from 1475 to present.
EH 737-SEMINAR IN ENGLISH SATIRE. 3 credits
Topics offered on rotating basis in various aspects of English satire from the Age of
Chaucer to the present.
EH 745-SEMINAR IN ROMANTICISM. 3 credits
EH 750-THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE SINCE 1400. 3 credits
EH 753-SEMINAR IN LINGUISTICS. 3 credits
EH 755-SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. 3 credits
Topics embrace Old English literature and Middle English literature, including Chaucer.
EH 761-SEMINAR IN SHAKESPEARE. 3 credits
EH 763-SEMINAR IN ENGLISH RENAISSANCE LITERATURE. 3 credits
EH 771-SEMINAR IN VICTORIAN LITERATURE. 3 credits
EH 781-SEMINAR IN NEW ENGLAND TRANSCENDENTALISM. 3 credits
EH 783-SEMINAR IN AMERICAN PROSE. 3 credits
EH 787-SEMINAR IN AMERICAN POETRY. 3 credits
EH 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Entomology

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Creighton, J. T., Head; Blanton, F. S.; Hetrick, L. A.; Hussey, R. F.; Kuitert, L. C.;
Muma, M. H.; Murphey, M.; Perry, V. G.; Simanton, W. A.; Smith, W. W.; Tissot, A.
N.; Walker, T. J.; Westfall, M. J., Jr.; Wilson, J. W.
Prerequisite: A Bachelor of Science degree or its equivalent. The student should have
30 credit hours in the biological sciences, with 12 or more hours in the field of ento-
mology. Should he be deficient in this respect, the student will be expected to fulfill these
requirements during the time he is pursuing work that will lead to an advanced degree.
This work will be taken as foundation work with no graduate credit.
Students are required to take a qualifying examination for all master's degrees. Those
seeking a Master of Science in Agriculture degree must complete a course in statistics; the
Master of Science degree student must complete a course in statistics and organic chemistry.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
EY 501-PLANT-PARASITIC NEMATODES. 3 credits
EY 515-BIOLOGICAL AND NATURAL CONTROL. 3 credits
EY 516-INSECT ECOLOGY. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
EY 601-METHODS OF RESEARCH IN ENTOMOLOGY. 3 credits
Special laboratory, insectary, and field methods in research dealing with the several phases
of entomology. A study of the leading research problems of the state and nation, with
careful consideration of the more complicated ones. Research problem required.
EY 603-PROBLEMS IN ENTOMOLOGY. 1 to 3 credits. Maximum 6 credits
A problem for study which may be selected in any field of entomological specialization, in-
cluding histology, morphology, physiology, taxonomy, embryology, biological control, ecolo-
gy, toxicology, plant quarantine, commercial entomology, life history and habits, biology,
and medical and veterinary entomology.
EY 607-ADVANCED INSECT TAXONOMY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EY 408, EY 460, and EY 608. An advanced study of the various systems
of classification, the basis of systematic entomology, and rules of nomenclature. Practice in
the identification of immature and adult insects in the field and in the laboratory.








FINANCE AND INSURANCE 87


EY 608-COMPARATIVE INSECT MORPHOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EY 408. A comparative study of the external and internal anatomy and phys-
iology of representative insects found in each insect order.
EY 610-INSECT EMBRYOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EY 408. The principles of insect embryology. Textbook: Embryology of In-
sects and Myriapods by Johannsen.
EY 611-CONFERENCE IN ENTOMOLOGY. 1 to 4 credits
Readings and class presentations of published research in the following fields of speciali-
zation: (1) morphology, (2) physiology, (3) systematics, (4) ecology, (5) medical ento-
mology, (6) economic entomology. Emphasis is placed upon methodology.
EY 612-INSECT PHYSIOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisite: EY 608 or its equivalent. A detailed physiological study of the various sys-
tems of insects.
EY 617-PRINCIPLES OF INSECT PATHOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: EY 408, EY 515, and BCY 300. A study of the diseases of insects which
are caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoa, nematodes, and nutritional disturbances.
EY 618-CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY OF INSECTICIDES. 3 credits
Prerequisites: CY 217-218 and EY 405. A study of the chemistry of insecticides and their
toxicity to insects.
EY 620-ADVANCED MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ,EY 408, EY 420, and EY 460. An advanced study of the insects affecting
the health and comfort of man.
EY 631-MORPHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF NEMATODES. 2 credits
Prerequisite: EY 303 or its equivalent. A detailed anatomical study of the organs of nema-
todes and their vital functions.
EY 632-TAXONOMY OF NEMATODES. 2 credits
Prerequisite: EY 631 or its equivalent. A study of the taxonomy and identification of mem-
bers of the Phylum Nematoda.
EY 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits
EY 799-DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 1 to 12 credits


Finance and Insurance
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Matthews, C. A., Head; Athearn, J. L.; Cline, R. S.; Howard, W. M.; McFerrin, J. B.;
Richardson, J. G.
Though no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work on the
600 or higher level, certain undergraduate courses in finance and insurance are available
for graduate credit as a part of a candidate's major. These are: FI 420-Management of
Bank Funds; FI 462-Group Insurance and Pension Plans; FI 463-Social Insurance; and
the 500-level courses listed below.
For admission to 600-level courses and above, the student must have been admitted to
the Graduate School and normally should have had undergraduate courses in fields perti-
nent to the graduate courses selected; or, where necessary, special arrangements may be
made with the approval of the department head.

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES
FI 524-INVESTMENT ANALYSIS. 3 credits
FI 528-CORPORATION FINANCE. 3 credits
FI 584-LEGAL ASPECTS OF INSURANCE. 3 credits
FI 586-ESTATES, TRUSTS, AND INSURANCE. 3 credits

GRADUATE COURSES
FI 620--PROBLEMS IN COMMERCIAL BANKING. 3 credits
Prerequisite: FI 420 or equivalent. The theory of monopoly and competition as applied to
banking; bank organization in both inter- and intra-industry competition, the adequacy of
bank capital, banking facilities, and bank services; problems of asset management and of
providing successor management.







88 FOOD TECHNOLOGY AND NUTRITION


FI 622-SEMINAR IN INVESTMENTS. 3 credits
Prerequisite: FI 524 or equivalent. Individual research and group discussion employing
various materials available from publications and reports by governmental agencies and
groups in the industry.
FI 627-PROBLEMS IN CORPORATION FINANCE. 3 credits
Prerequisites: FI 326 and FI 528 or equivalent. Some of the leading problems of corporate
finance, including valuation, long-term financing, economic aspects of corporate financing,
financial problems of the small business, reorganization, and social problems arising from
corporate financial practices.
FI 628-CENTRAL BANKING POLICIES AND PROBLEMS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ES 321, FI 325 or equivalent. The functions, powers, and policies of central
banks, the changing role of central banks in the economy, with special emphasis on the
place of central banks in a "free" economy and in a "state" economy.
FI 629-INTERNATIONAL FINANCE: MONETARY SYSTEMS. 3 credits
Prerequisites: ES 321, FI 325 or the equivalent. Attention is concentrated on factors lead-
ing to the breakdown of international monetary systems in the inter-war period, Post World
War II international monetary problems, and attempts at reconstruction.
FI 630-INDIVIDUAL WORK IN FINANCE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: Permission of the department and of the Director of Graduate Studies. A
reading and/or research course in the several areas of finance and/or insurance as needed
by graduate students. May be elected for full credit in subsequent trimesters with change
of content.
FI 622-SEMINAR IN LIFE INSURANCE. 3 credits
Prerequisite: FI 462 or equivalent. Investigation of selected problems in life insurance
and related fields.
FI 665-SEMINAR IN PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE. 3 credits
Prerequisites: FI 365 and FI 366, or permission of instructor. A course designed to analyze
the meaning, economic influences, social values, principles and practices of property, and
liability insurance.
FI 668-PROBLEMS IN RISK MANAGEMENT. 3 credits
An examination into the insurance hazards of business concerns and governmental units
with consideration of insurance protection available.
FI 699-MASTER'S RESEARCH. 0 to 6 credits. Maximum 12 credits


Food Technology and Nutrition
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
GRADUATE FACULTY 1962-63
Dennison, R. A., Head; Hall, C. B.; Knapp, F. W.; Kuhn, G. D.; Robbins, R. C.; Sho-
walter, R. K.; Van Middelem, C. H.; Wenzel, F. W.
Prerequisite for admission to graduate study, in addition to the requirements of the
Graduate School, is a good scientific background. Students with insufficient background in
chemistry, physics, mathematics, or bacteriology will be required to take these prerequisite
subjects without graduate credit.

GRADUATE COURSES
FT 602-FOOD CHEMISTRY. 4 credits
Prerequisites: CY 317 and BCH 402 or their equivalents. The chemistry of the chief com-
ponents of human food and the ways in which they are affected by processing and storage.
FT 621-FOOD ANALYSIS. 4 credits
Prerequisites: PS 202, CY 317, and BCH 402 or their equivalents. The principles of mod-
em physical and chemical methods used in the analysis of foods and their application to
the examination of raw processed foods.
FT 630-ADVANCED FOOD TECHNOLOGY 1. 4 credits
Prerequisites: CY 317, BCH 402, PS 202, and BCY 410 or permission of instructor. Ap-
plications of the fundamental sciences to food conservation. Theory of food refrigeration,
freezing, thermal processing, fermentation, and pickling.
FT 632-ADVANCED FOOD TECHNOLOGY 2. 4 credits
Prerequisite: FT 630. Application of the fundamental sciences to food conservation. Theo-
ry and principles of food irradiation and dehydration, chemical additives, sugar and sugar
concentrates, spices and condiments, coloring matters, food poisoning, fats and oils, and
food packaging.




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