• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Introduction
 State administrators
 Academic and administrative councils...
 University calendar
 Admissions
 General information
 The University College
 The Graduate School
 Special three week courses
 Special four week course
 Special six week courses
 Special three week courses
 Schedule of courses
 Registration procedure
 Final examination schedule






Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00078
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00078
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Introduction
        Page i
    State administrators
        Page ii
    Academic and administrative councils of the university
        Page iii
        Page iv
    University calendar
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Admissions
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    General information
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The University College
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The Graduate School
        Page 45
        Graduate programs offered
            Page 46
            Page 47
        Admission to the Graduate School
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        General regulations and instructions
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
        Requirements for Master's degree
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
        The advanced school of the College of Education
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        Requirements for the Ph.D.
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
    Special three week courses
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Special four week course
        Page 79
    Special six week courses
        Page 80
    Special three week courses
        Page 81
    Schedule of courses
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Registration procedure
        Page 143
    Final examination schedule
        Page 144
Full Text


THE UNIVERSITY RECORD
of the
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SESSION


1962
























The University Record Comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Annual Catalog,
the Schedules, the Bulletin of the Summer Session, and announcements of special
courses of instruction.

These bulletins will be sent without charge to all persons who apply for them.
The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is
desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida


Series 1, No. 5


May 1, 1962


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Entered in
the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter, under Act of
Congress, August 24, 1912. Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida.


VOL LVII












UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

State Board of Education

FARRIS BRYANT
Governor

TOM ADAMS
Secretary of State

RICHARD W. ERVIN, JR.
Attorney General

J. EDWIN LARSON
State Treasurer

THOMAS D. BAILEY, Secretary
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Board of Control

BAYA M. HARRISON, JR., Chairman
St. Petersburg

FRANK M. BUCHANAN, Vice Chairman
Miami

JOHN C. PACE
Pensacola

RALPH L. MILLER
Orlando

S. KENDRICK GUERNSEY
Jacksonville

CHARLES R. FORMAN
Ft. Lauderdale

GERT H. W. SCHMIDT
Jacksonville

J. BROWARD CULPEPPER, Executive Director
Tallahassee










Academic and Administrative Councils of the University

J. WAYNE REITZ, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Sc.
77 g President
'-A HARRY MELVIN PHILPOTT, Ph.D.
V. 5 Vice President
ROBERT BARBEAU MAUTZ, LL.B.
'\ 3 S Dean of Academic Affairs

FRANK THOMPSON ADAMS, Ed.D.
Dean of Men

TURPIN CHAMBERS BANNISTER, F.A.I.A., Ph.D., D.F.A.
Dean of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts

JOSEPH RILEY BECKENBACH, Ph.D.
Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station

MARNA VENABLE BRADY, Ed.D.
Dean of Women

MARVIN ADEL BROKER, Ph.D.
'" Dean of the College of Agriculture

JOSHUA CLIFTON DICKINSON, JR., Ph.D.
<' Director of the Florida State Museum

/ WILLARD MERWIN FIFIELD, M.S.
Provost for Agriculture

BILL ALEXANDER FLEMING, B.A.
Acting Director of Alumni Affairs

PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Pharmacy
Director of the Bureau of Professional Relations

THOMAS A. GRAHAM, JR., B.S., Colonel, Artillery
Professor of Army Science

SAMUEL RAY GRAVES, B.A.
Athletic Director and Head Football Coach

LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D.
Dean of the Graduate School and Director of Research

LEWIS FRANCIS HAINES, Ph.D.
Director of the University Press

LESTER LEONARD HALE, Ph.D.
Dean of Student Affairs
GEORGE THOMAS HARRELL, M.D.
Dean of the College of Medicine









DONALD JOHN HART, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Business Administration

RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P.
Registrar

WILLIAM ELLIS JONES, B.S.B.A.
Business Manager

CLEMENS MARCUS KAUFMAN, Ph.D.
Director of the School of Forestry

WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A.
Dean of the University College V L R

FRANK EDWARD MALONEY, LL.B /
Dean of the College of Law

DARRELL JAY MASE, Ph.D. I DUPLICATE
Dean of the College of Health Relate S vices

RALPH EMERSON PAGE, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Arts and Scie s

RUSSELL SURGEON POOR, Ph.D.
Provost for the Health Center

BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.S.A., LL.D.
Dean of the General Extension Division

ALLEN ORRIN SKAGGS, JR., B.A.J.
Director and Editor of the University News Bureau

KENNETH F. SMALL
Director of Radio Station WRUF

VERNON S. SMITH, JR., B.S., Colonel, Air Force
Professor of Air Science and Coordinator of Military Departments

DENNIS KEITH STANLEY, M.A.E.
Dean of the College of Physical Education and Health

MARSHALL OWEN WATKINS, D.P.A.
Director of the Agricultural Extension Service
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., D.Sc.
Dean of the College of Engineering and
Director of the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
RAE O. WEIMER
Director of the School of Journalism and Communications
STANLEY LEROY WEST, LL.B., B.S. in L.S.
Director of the University Libraries

A. CURTIS WILGUS, Ph.D.
Director of the School of Inter-American Studies










SUMMER SESSION 1962


June 1, Friday .........------
r

June 14, Thursday _--__-_----I

June 15. 16, 18, Friday, Saturday
Monday ....-- .----------
s

June 19, Tuesday, 7 a.m. --.. (

C

June 20, Wednesday, 5 p.m. -----

]
s




June 23, Saturday, 12 Noon ----.--




July 4, Wednesday .---.------.------

July 6, Friday _--- -----
1
t


July 9, Monday, 5 p.m.



July 14, Saturday ..-- ---
s


July 20, Friday ------
c



July 23, Monday, 4 p.m. ....-------

t



August 7, Tuesday, 7 a.m. ------


Last day for filing application for 1962 sum-
ner session.

'lacement Tests for entering students.


Registration according to appointments as-
igned on receipt of preliminary application.

Classes begin. All registration fees increased
s5.00 for persons completing registration on
ir after this date.

Last time for completing registration for the
ummer session. No one will be permitted to
tart registration after 3 p.m. on this date.
Last time for adding courses or changing
sections.

Last time for making application at the Office
)f the Registrar for degree to be conferred
tt the end of the summer session.

Holiday. Classes suspended.

Last day of applying to take the foreign
language examination for graduate students
;o be administered on July 14, 1962.

Last time for dropping courses without re-
Sgrade of E.

Foreign language examination for graduate
students, 18 Anderson Hall, 10-12 a.m.

Last day for candidates for degrees to be
conferred at end of the summer session to
completee correspondence courses.

Last time for candidates for Master's and
Doctor's degrees to be conferred at the end of
;he summer session to file thesis with the Dean
if the Graduate School.


Final examination period begins. Fall se-
nester registration begins for students en-
rolled in the summer session.









August 9, Thursday, 4 p.m. ---



August 10, Friday


August 11, Saturday, 12 Noon


August 11, Saturday, 8 p.m.


-Grades for all candidates for degrees to be
conferred at the end of the summer session
are due in the Office of the Registrar.

Faculty meetings, at times announced by the
Deans, to pass upon candidates for degrees.

_All grades for the summer session due in the
Office of the Registrar.

Summer Commencement Convocation.












ADMISSIONS

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Application for admission to any College, School or Division of the University must be made
to the Admissions Section of the Office of the Registrar on the forms prescribed and by the
dates indicated in the University Calendar. It is quite proper to correspond with Deans, Directors
or Department Heads but such contact with University officers does not in any way eliminate
the necessity for filing a formal application in the Office of the Registrar by the dates specified.
HOW TO APPLY: Address the Director of Admissions asking for application forms. As the
forms and directions for completing application vary for each of the categories below (Sections I
thru VII) it will expedite matters to indicate that forms are being requested for application for
admission as a Freshman, an Undergraduate Transfer, Graduate, Medical or Law student as the
case may be.
WHEN TO APPLY: Applications can be made a year in advance of the expected date of
enrollment. A minimum of three months before the beginning of the term is strongly recom-
mended. Applications for the trimester beginning in September must be on file at least five
weeks before the opening date and for the second and third trimesters at least four weeks before
the close of the preceding trimester. (See University Calendar for last date on which applications
will be accepted.)

GENERAL STATEMENT

A brief summary of the requirements for admission to any college or division
of the University, at any level (freshman, undergraduate, graduate) is as follows:
1. a satisfactory academic record
2. satisfactory scores on achievement tests or examinations
3. a satisfactory conduct record.
Variations in the specific requirements under these general categories are set forth
below.

The Admission Requirements have been arrived at after a very careful study
of the experiences of thousands of students over a long period of years. In every
case they are minimum requirements that have evolved from studies of student
performance at the University of Florida. These studies have had as a primary
objective the identification of factors that would indicate a reasonable chance for
successful completion of University work.
The University Admissions Committee is the agency responsible for adminis-
tering all admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first
time will be considered for admission as follows:

Freshmen (those who have never attended any college)

1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not at-
tended college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
(See Section I)

Undergraduate Transfer Students

2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or uni-
versity and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college
credit for advanced standing, he will be considered for admission to the
University College. (See Section II)









2 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or uni-
versity and is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college
credit as advanced standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be con-
sidered for admission to the Upper Division school or college of his choice
providing his record indicates the completion of college work approximately
equivalent to the comprehensive courses offered by the University of Florida
in the areas of Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English, Logic,
Mathematics, the Humanities and the Biological Sciences. (See Section III)
Graduate Students (candidates for Master's or Doctor's Degrees)
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated
from an accredited college or university, he will be considered for admission
to the Graduate Division. (See Section IV)
Medical Students (See Section V)
Law Students (See Section VI)
Special Students (See Section VII)

ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Section I Freshmen (Applicants who have never attended college)
A. Graduates of Florida High Schools:
1. Graduation from an accredited high school with satisfactory grades (at
least a C average) in at least twelve to fourteen units of academic sub-
jects such as English, mathematics, sciences, foreign languages and social
studies, is required. The University of Florida does not require any
specific units for admission. The experiences of hundreds of students over
many years demonstrate clearly that a most important factor in deter-
mining the possibility of success in University work rests in a record
of good grades in the subjects listed.
2. Satisfactory scores on the Florida Twelfth Grade Tests, which are ad-
ministered in all of the high schools in the state each year, are con-
sidered in relation to the high school grades. In general, the applicant will
be expected to be placed in the top forty per cent of the high school
seniors in Florida on these tests. If the high school record shows a good
distribution of academic units with good grades, consideration will be
given to those in the top sixty per cent on the Florida Twelfth Grade
Tests. Persons scoring in the low forty per cent on these tests may re-
quest a review of their cases by the University Admissions Committee, but
the evidence gathered in more than twenty years of the use of these tests
as predictive criteria indicates there is very little chance of successful
University work for persons scoring in the low forty per cent of these
tests.
3. The requirement for a record of good conduct means that, regardless of
high school grades and test scores, an applicant who has experienced
difficulty with school or other authorities because of improper conduct
may find his application disapproved.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


B. Graduates of non-Florida High Schools:
1. Graduation from an accredited high school with satisfactory grades (at
least a C average and rank in the top 40% of the high school class) is
required. Although specific units are not required, the student should have
completed at least 12 to 14 units in academic subjects such as English,
mathematics, science, foreign languages and social studies. The require-
ment of rank in the top 40% of the high school class has been set by The
Board of Control of the State of Florida.

2. Satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), which is ad-
ministered several times a year throughout the world, are a most important
factor in considering applications for admission from students from states
other than Florida. In general, the applicant will be expected to score
at least 500 on each section of the SAT. The writing sample and Achieve-
ment Tests are not required.
3. The requirement for a record of good conduct means that, regardless of
high school grades and test scores, an applicant who has experienced diffi-
culty with school or other authorities because of improper conduct may find
his application disapproved.
Section II Transfer Students*
1. Good Standing. The student must be eligible to return to the institution
last attended. Students who for any reason will not be allowed to return
to the institution last attended cannot be considered for admission.
2. Satisfactory record. All transfer students must have made an average of
C or higher (as computed by the University of Florida grade point system)
on all work attempted at all institutions previously attended to be con-
sidered for admission.

3. Undergraduate transfer students shall be required to make a satisfactory
score on a general ability test.
4. The University of Florida accepts on transfer only those courses completed
at other institutions with grades of C or higher and that are acceptable in
the curriculum for which the applicant enrolls.
*The student who has matriculated at any college or university, regardless
of the amount of time spent in attendance or credit earned, is regarded as a
transfer student.

ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION

From the University College:
See elsewhere in this bulletin the various programs of the University College
and the specific requirements listed under the curricula of the several colleges
and schools.
Section III Transfer Students
1. Good Standing at institutions previously attended. An applicant for ad-









4 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

mission who for any reason is not eligible to return to the institution last
attended cannot be considered for admission.

2. An average of C or better. The average grade for all work attempted at
other institutions must be C or better (as computed by the University of
Florida grade point system). An average grade of C or better is re-
quired for graduation from the University of Florida, and one who has
not maintained this average before coming to the University need not
apply.
3. A minimum of 64 semester hours accepted as transfer credit (only those
courses completed at other institutions with grades of C or higher and
that are acceptable in the curriculum for which the applicant enrolls) not
more than four of which are in Military Science or Physical Education.
4. Specific course requirements for the professional schools of the applicant's
choice. The courses listed as required for admission to the Upper Division
under the various curricula or acceptable substitutes must be offered as
advanced standing to qualify the student for admission to the Upper Divi-
sion. An applicant lacking some of these requirements may be permitted to
enroll in the Upper Division and complete them without reducing the credits
required in the Upper Division for a degree. In some cases the student
may be required to enroll in the University College until these require-
ments are met.

5. Undergraduate transfer students shall be required to make a satisfactory
score on a general ability test.

Section IV-ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Application for Admission to the Graduate School must be made to the Direc-
tor of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at the times stipulated in
the University Calendar. Applications which meet minimum standards for ad-
missions are referred by the Director to the graduate selection committees of
the various colleges and divisions for approval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete official transcripts of all
the applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in the possession of the
Registrar, and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is received
directly from the Registrar of the institution in which the work was done. Official
supplementary transcripts are required, as soon as they are available, for any
work completed after making application.
In general, no student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the University.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Undergraduate Record.-Unqualified admission to the Graduate School is
dependent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an accredited col-
lege or curriculum with an average grade of B for the junior and senior years.
In some units of the Graduate School and on the more advanced levels of graduate
study, an undergraduate average considerably above B may be required. In some









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


units (see the following two paragraphs) admission may be considered with an
undergraduate average slightly below B. College graduate admission selection
committees take into account not only the general grade average, but the distri-
bution of work and the quality and extent of preparation for the graduate
program which the student proposes to undertake.
The minimum undergraduate grade average acceptable for admission to pro-
grams leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in Education, Master of Educa-
tion, Master of Arts in Physical Education and Health, and Master of Physical
Education and Health is 2.5, calculated on a basis of 4.0 as the highest possible
average and covering the last two years of undergraduate work (at least 60
hours).
In the College of Agriculture, admission to graduate study is normally limited
to those students who have maintained at least a 2.75 honor-point average in
their upper-division work and 3.0 in their major subject. For students with an
undergraduate major in general agriculture, the minimum upper-division average
is 2.85. In exceptional cases, where a candidate has demonstrated in some other
way his fitness to do graduate work, as, for instance, outstanding achievement
since earning the bachelor's degree, he may be considered for admission. While
the general admissions requirements described above apply to both master's
and doctoral candidates, it should be noted that doctoral candidates must meet
certain additional requirements which vary according to the programs estab-
lished by the departments and colleges.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION

A satisfactory average score on the Graduate Record Examination is required
for admission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the aptitude
test of the GRE, but either at the request of the department concerned or on his
own volition, the applicant is encouraged to submit in addition the score on one
or more advanced subject-matter tests of the GRE. The scores on all tests taken
will be weighed in regard to admission.
The GRE is given five times a year-in November, January, March, April, and
July-at a great many locations in the United States, including Gainesville,
Florida. To determine exact dates and the most convenient locations, students
should write to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Appli-
cations are required several weeks prior to the examination, and scores are re-
ceived about a month after the examination. Hence, it is necessary to apply for
the GRE in early October for admission in January, in early January for ad-
mission in April, and in early April for admission in September. Other ex-
aminations are given in early March and early July but the ones listed above
are correlated with admissions deadlines.
Students enrolled in the Graduate School prior to establishment of the GRE
requirement for admission (June, 1956) are permitted to complete the degree to
which their work at that time was being applied. However, they must submit
satisfactory GRE scores before admission to study for any other advanced
degree.

Section V-ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE

Personal qualities of a high order-character, responsibility and maturity-
are the primary requirements for admission. The student must have demon-









6 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

strated superior intellectual achievement. A bachelor's degree is strongly
recommended. The quality of the academic background, as well as the perfor-
mance of the student in relation to the load attempted, will be weighed. A gen-
uine interest in human welfare is important. Efficient methods of study and
effective powers of reasoning are essential.
The College admits both men and women. A limited number of out-of-state
students, in proportion to the number in the University as a whole, may be
admitted. Applicants over the age of thirty rarely will be considered. No ap-
plications from persons over thirty-five will be accepted. Students who have
failed academically or are ineligible to continue in another medical school will
not be admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in another medical
school will be considered provided (1) the student is eligible to continue in
his present medical school, and (2) the school he is now attending is a member
of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Applications will also be
considered from students who have successfully completed work at an accredited
two-year medical school.
Prospective applicants should take the Medical College Admissions Test by
the spring preceding the submission of the application. A personal interview
will be required for final acceptance.
Graduate students who are candidates for the Ph.D. degree in medical
sciences should apply through the Graduate School.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Medicine catalog.)

Section VI-ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW

The beginning courses in Law are not offered in the Summer Session, hence
students are not admitted in June unless they have completed satisfactorily at
least one trimester of work in an accredited law school.

Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the College of Law must
have received a 4-year baccalaureate degree from a college or university of ap-
proved standing and achieved a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission
Test.

Beginning in September, 1961, the precise score required on the Law School
Admission Test will be determined on the basis of the overall undergraduate
collegiate average of the applicant (compiled on the basis of all work under-
taken and computed by the system in effect at the University of Florida where the
grade of A equals 4 grade points per semester hour; B equals 3 grade points per
semester hour; C equals 2 grade points per semester hour; D equals 1 grade
point per semester hour). The higher the overall undergraduate average of
the applicant, the lower will be the test score required to qualify for admission;
provided, however, that no test score of less than 340 will be deemed sufficient
to warrant admission regardless of the overall undergraduate collegiate grade
average. An appropriate upward adjustment in the test score will be made in
cases where the score submitted is the result of retaking the test.

For information on admissions to the College of Law with advanced standing
see the Bulletin of the College of Law.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section VII
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS

Special students may be admitted to the various schools and colleges of the
Upper Division only by approval of the University Admissions Committee. Each
case will be considered on an individual basis. Application for admission as a
special student must include: (1) records of previous educational experience
(high school or college transcripts); (2) a statement as to the type of studies
to be pursued; (3) a brief statement of the reason or reasons for selecting a
special program other than a regular one; (4) satisfactory evidence of ability
to pursue these studies-for example, a student to enroll as a special student for
some technical courses and who feels qualified to do so by reason of employment
or other experience should submit a brief description of this experience; (5)
satisfactory scores on such ability or achievement tests as may be prescribed
in individual cases by the University Admissions Committee.

Section VIII
UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

For the summer session only, the University of Florida provides a category
for those persons who may wish to take college courses and:
a. transfer back to the institution they regularly attend in the winter session;
b. meet certain specific certification requirements.
Persons from the groups defined above may enroll as unclassified students
provided there is evidence that they would meet admission requirements as regu-
lar students.
It is possible, if the student later files all necessary credentials and
meets all the requirements for registration as a regular student, for credit
earned during one term as an unclassified student to be counted toward a
degree program at the University of Florida. Under no circumstances
will credit for more than one term in an unclassified status be applied
toward any degree conferred by the University. Thus, persons that have
been registered as unclassified in a previous summer session should com-
plete the requirements for admission as regular students before attending
subsequent summer sessions if they anticipate completing work for a de-
gree at the University of Florida.
Students entering the University after high school graduation and
prior to college attendance at any other institution are never admitted as
unclassified students and must qualify for admission as regular students
as described above.

ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR VETERANS

In addition to the regular requirements for admission set forth in the pre-
ceding sections and the forms incident thereto required by the University of
Florida, any veteran who expects to enroll under provisions of any of the various
federal laws governing education or rehabilitation training of veterans must
be sure that he has cleared the necessary details with the Veterans Administra-
tion and has obtained the necessary documents from them.









8 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The government benefits available under Public Laws 894 (Vocational Re-
habilitation Acts) for veterans who received service connected disabilities are
provided for only after review of each individual case by the Veterans Adminis-
tration.
Many young men and women who have had active duty in the armed forces
during the period which began with the Korean conflict are eligible of educa-
tional benefits under Public Law 550. Veterans in this group are urged to begin
preliminary application with the Veterans Administration well in advance of the
date they expect to enter the University. Under this law the veteran receives
monthly payments which cover educational expenses (fees and books) as well as
subsistence. As most of the fee and book expense must be paid at the beginning
of the school term it is essential that the veteran be in a position to meet these
expenses as they are due which will almost always be before any remittance has
been received from the government. Veterans expecting to attend college under
PL 550 are urged to familiarize themselves with the requirements and restrictions
relative to the benefits of this act. Officials of the Veterans Administration should
be consulted on any points not clear to the student or prospective student. It is
especially important that the student understand the procedures that must be
followed to obtain Veterans Administration approval of original choice or any
change of educational objective.
All veterans who believe they are entitled to educational benefits are urged to
contact the appropriate Veterans Administration office in order that the decision
may be made in their individual case. Veterans who at the time of registration
do not have the necessary papers showing clear entitlement to government bene-
fits are required to pay their own fees. If the proper clearances are subsequently
presented to the Office of the Registrar, authorization for refund of fees and ex-
penses appropriate in the individual case will be issued.

EXPENSES

APPLICATION FEE

Each application for admission to the University must be accompanied by an
application fee of $5.00. This fee is non-refundable. Further instructions will
be found in the Admissions section of this catalog.

GENERAL

Students should bring sufficient funds, other than personal checks, to meet
their immediate needs. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact amount
of fees. Other personal checks may be deposited with the University for col-
lection.
Funds may be placed in a depository maintained by the University Cashier
in Room 1, Tigert Hall. Depository accounts are assessed a fee of $0.75 per
summer term. Withdrawals may be made upon request and presentation of
passbook. Any University fee or deposit may be paid from such an account.
Classification of Students-Florida or Non-Florida
For the purpose of assessing fees, applicants are classified as Florida or
non-Florida students.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Non-Florida students pay a nonresident tuition of $35.00 for a three-week
term, $70.00 for a six-week term, and $100.00 for an eight-week term, in ad-
dition to the fees charged Florida students.
In observing this regulation, "applicant" shall mean a student applying for
admission to the University of Florida if he is 21 years of age or older, or if
he is a minor, it shall mean parents, parent, or guardian of his or her person.
Such applicant will pay the non-Florida tuition and other charges required of
non-Florida students unless he shall be a citizen of the United States and shall
have resided and had his habitation, domicile, home, and permanent abode in
the state of Florida for at least 12 months immediately preceding his registration;
provided, however, that the applicant cannot claim continuous residence in
Florida by enrollment in any college or university in the State of Florida for
the required period.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-
Florida students.
The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents
of the State of Florida by maintaining such residence for twelve consecutive
months. If the status of a student changes from a non-Florida student to a
Florida student, his classification may be changed at the next registration
thereafter.


REGISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL FEES

Fees are payable at the beginning of each term, at the time of registration.
Registration is incomplete until all fees are paid.
The University has three summer terms during the Summer Session. The
University Calendar in the front of this catalog sets forth the beginning and
ending dates of each term. One term is three weeks in length; one, six weeks;
and one, eight weeks. A student may not register for the eight-week term
and any other term concurrently.
The fees charged are based upon the classification of a student as Florida
or non-Florida, and the term in which he is enrolled.
Fees are assessed as follows:

A FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $35.00 for the THREE-WEEK
term; $53.00 for the SIX-WEEK term; or $68.00 for the EIGHT-WEEK term.

A NON-FLORIDA STUDENT will pay a fee of $70.00 for the THREE-
WEEK term; $123.00 for the SIX-WEEK term; and $168.00 for the EIGHT-
WEEK term.

ANY STUDENT, FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA enrolled for THESIS
ONLY, not exceeding four semester hours credit during any term, will pay a
fee of $30.00. He will not be entitled to student activity or infirmary privileges.
Registration fees paid after the conclusion of the regular period are in-
creased $5.00. This increase cannot be waived and is not refundable.









10 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

OTHER INSTRUCTIONAL FEES

Department of Music

Fees for applied music lessons, instrument rental and the rental of practice
rooms are payable at the time of registration.

No refund will be made if lessons are missed. Arrangements may be made
in the department office to make up lessons missed because of serious illness.

Applied music courses are offered only during the eight-week term.

Applied Music Lesson Fee _............------.--- -.. $ 30.00
Practice Room Rental Fee ....... ----------- ---- .5.00
Instrument Rental per instrument ..- ..- -- ..- -- 5.00

SPECIAL FEES


Application Fee for Comprehensive Examination. A non-refundable fee of
$1.00 is payable on the day of application for a comprehensive examination in
one of the basic courses of the University College program. Applications are
necessary only when the student is not currently registered in the course con-
cerned. Forms and instructions may be secured from the Registrar. Fees are
payable to the University Cashier.

Audit Fee. With the approval of the dean of the college administering the
course and the written consent of the instructor, a course may be audited upon
the payment of a fee of $30.00 per course, per session. Auditor's permit forms
may be obtained in the office of the Registrar. Fees are payable to the Uni-
versity Cashier.

Graduate Record Examination. The Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record
Examination is required for admission to the Graduate School. A fee of $7.00
covers the cost of this examination. Students who take one of the Advanced
Tests of the Graduate Record Examination in combination with the Aptitude Test
pay a fee of $12.00. These fees are payable to The Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey. For additional information see the Bulletin of the
Graduate School.

Graduation Fee. Candidates for degrees must make application for the degree
in accordance with the date set forth in the University Calendar. A fee of
$10.00 for a Bachelor's degree or $20.00 for a Master's, Specialist's or Doctor's,
is payable at the time of application.

Transcript Fee. A student is furnished a first copy of his record without
charge regardless of the amount of work completed. Subsequent copies are
charged for at the rate of $1.00 each, except when the order is for more than
one copy. There is a charge of $1.00 for the first copy and 50 cents for each
additional copy on the same order. University transcripts may be obtained
only from the Registrar's Office.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPOSITS

Housing Reservation. Applications for space in University housing facilities
must be accompanied by a reservation deposit of $10.00. See instructions in
the Housing section of this catalog.
Dissertation Deposit. A deposit of $50.00 is made to cover the publication
cost of the dissertation. See the Bulletin of the Graduate School for time of
payment and choice of method of publication, which involves the disposition of
this deposit.

REFUND OF FEES

A refund of fees will be made under certain conditions, upon presentation to
the University Cashier of an authorization issued by the Registrar's Office.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees will be made if
the student's registration is cancelled on or before the first day of classes in
any summer session.
A full refund of tuition, registration and instructional fees less a fixed
charge of $3.00 in a summer session will be made if the student withdraws or
if his registration is cancelled by the University after the first day of classes
but on or before the final day of registration as shown in the University calen-
dar.
A refund of fifty per cent of tuition, registration, and instructional fees will
be made if a student withdraws or if his registration is cancelled by the Uni-
versity after the conclusion of the registration period but on or before the
day which marks the end of the first week of classes.
Deductions from refunds will be made for unpaid accounts due the University.

PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS

All student accounts are due and payable at the office of the University
Cashier at the time such charges are incurred.
A student who owes any money to the University of Florida, other than a
non-delinquent student loan, shall not be permitted to re-register, to receive
credit for work completed, or to receive a transcript of grades until satisfactory
arrangements for the liquidation of his indebtedness have been made with the
University Cashier.

STUDENT LIFE-SERVICES, FACILITIES, ACTIVITIES,
REGULATIONS

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

The Dean of Student Affairs serves as a staff officer, advisory to the Presi-
dent, in all matters pertaining to the educational experiences of students outside
of the classroom and to the general welfare of all students. He serves as a
liason between the office of the president and other administrative offices that
deal with non-classroom activities of students and with the self government pro-
cesses of student groups.









12 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The Office of the Dean of Student Affairs works toward providing on the
campus an academic climate that is favorable to the spirit of serious inquiry
and is concerned with the maintenance of good communication and working
relationships among students, faculty and administrative units as they labor
together for the welfare of students.

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF MEN

The Dean of Men is the counselor to men students. He and the Assistant
Deans of Men are interested in the total life of the student, including his aca-
demic, financial, social, and recreational activities. In cooperation with the
Dean of Women and the Student Organizations Office, his office serves as a
clearing house for all non-classroom activities. The Dean of Men serves as
an adviser to student self-government so that these activities may provide train-
ing in citizenship and leadership. He cooperates with the Director of Housing
and works directly with the Resident Advisers in providing for the welfare
of the men who reside in University living facilities.

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF WOMEN

The Dean of Women has broad responsibility for the welfare of all women
students but works also with men students in a variety of relationships. She
and the Assistant Dean of Women counsel with students on personal, academic,
financial and social problems, working cooperatively with, and referring to other
departments, faculty, or agencies where advisable.

In cooperation with the Director of Housing the Dean of Women acts in
an administrative, supervisory and counseling capacity in relation to Residence
Halls Staff and students. Women's fraternities are also a part of the responsi-
bility of this office. The Dean of Women consults and cooperates with interested
groups outside the University, such as parents, alumni, schools, civic organi-
zations and clergy.
The Dean of Men and Dean of Women work cooperatively with Student
Government and each with specific organizations.

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF HOUSING

The Director of Housing, in cooperation with the Deans of Men and
Women, administers, supervises, and coordinates all programs and operations
in the Residence Halls, the Apartment Villages, and an Off-Campus office. See
section on "Housing" for details.

OFFICE OF THE FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISER

The Foreign Student Adviser is the coordinator of arrangements for all
alien students at the University from the time of their first inquiries until they
return to their home countries. His office cooperates with other University
agencies in processing applications from foreign students for admission and
financial aids. The office is primarily responsible for the reception and orientation









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


of new students from abroad and cooperates with other officials and agencies of
the University in providing necessary counseling for foreign students on
academic, financial, language, social and other problems. The Foreign Student
Adviser is responsible for all of the University's relations with the U. S. Immi-
gration Service and with other governmental and private agencies concerned
with international student exchange. Assistance in an advisory capacity is
provided for individuals and organizations interested in international under-
standing and intercultural exchange.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS

The Department of Speech conducts each summer an institute which is
designed to enable foreign students, for whom English is a second language,
to participate successfully in college courses conducted in English and to ad-
just to an American-English speaking community. The Institute provides nine
weeks of intensive instruction in speaking, understanding, writing and reading
English. The classes meet six hours daily.
Enrollment is limited and preference is given to students who plan to con-
tinue study at the University of Florida. This is a special program which does
not carry University credit.
Address inquiries to the Foreign Student Adviser.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS OFFICE

The student organizations office is interested in the activities of all organized
student groups on campus. It maintains complete records of these groups, in-
cluding date of recognition, officers, constitution, etc. This office is also the
authorization agency for social activities of all student organizations and pro-
vides information regarding regulations for such activities.
The Adviser to Fraternities and Student Organizations is on the staff of
the Dean of Men and is in charge of the student organizations office and should
be contacted regarding the formation and recognition of new student organiza-
tions and regarding any problems which may rise concerning the operation of
student organizations.

UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT SERVICE

The University Placement Service is an agency designed to coordinate the
placement activities of the departments, schools and colleges on campus. This
office cooperates directly with these University units in handling placement
affairs and provides services which supplement their activities. Through its
placement facilities, the University aids students in solving the problem of
postgraduate employment and assists alumni in making suitable changes of
employment.
The University Placement Service functions primarily as a clearing house,
bringing together students, faculty members and representatives of organiza-
tions that are seeking college trained personnel for permanent employment.
Assistance is given students in preparing and making desired contacts for
placement upon graduation by supplying job information informing students of









14 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

job opportunities, arranging interviews between employers and applicants, and
helping the students gather and present their credentials to prospective em-
ployers.
Representatives from business, industry and government are encouraged to
visit the campus or write this office and take the opportunity to engage qualified
University of Florida graduates.

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID

The Student Financial Aid Office is a section of the Student Affairs Office
and functions under the Senate Committee on Student Financial Aid, of which
the Dean of Student Affairs is Secretary. Working in close cooperation with
the offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women, student aid counselors
interview students in all matters pertaining to student employment, scholarships,
grants-in-aid and loans. This office serves as an important part of the academic
and personal counseling and guidance of students. It attempts to weigh a
student's financial and academic position in order to suggest a suitable balance
between self-support, parental help and institutional loans and scholarships.
All inquiries or applications for student financial aid and awards should be
addressed to the Dean of Student Affairs. Explanatory materials, instructions
or bulletins will be supplied upon request.

HOUSING

GENERAL INFORMATION

Each student must make personal arrangements for his housing either by
(1) applying to the Office of the Director of Housing for assignment to the
University Housing Facilities or, (2) in the case of an upperclass man who
wishes to do so, obtaining an accommodation in private housing or in his fratern-
ity house. (See Private Rooming Houses and Fraternities and Sororities).
All inquiries concerning housing applications, deposits, or rent payments in
University Housing Facilities should be addressed to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville. Checks or money orders for room deposits
or rent payments should be made payable to the University of Florida. Cash
should NOT be sent through the mail.
An application for married housing may be filed at any time. An application
for residence hall space may be filed at any time after application for admission
to the University. Prospective students are urged to apply as early as possible.
A deposit payment of ten dollars must accompany the application for
housing. Each applicant is given advance notice of assignment and deadline date
for rent payment, if possible. Each applicant should read carefully the terms
and conditions covering housing assignments as stated on the back of the ap-
plication form and on the notification of assignment.
Roommate requests are honored wherever possible, provided the individuals
wishing to room together submit their applications and pay room deposits at
the same date, clearly indicate on their respective applications their desire to
room together, and are within similar academic classifications. A large number
of selected foreign students are assigned as roommates with American students









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


who are interested in foreign languages, trade, and international relations. It
is the University's policy to encourage American and foreign students to room
together, and any student interested in the program should indicate this on
his application.

RESIDENCE REGULATIONS

All freshman men (less than 28 hours of academic credit with the Uni-
versity of Florida Registrar) and all undergraduate women, with the exception
of those whose residence is Gainesville or vecinity, are required to live in
University Housing Facilities as long as space is available. Undergraduate
women students, excepting freshmen, may live in sorority houses.

HOUSING ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES

Carefully selected and trained personnel are in charge of each area. Stu-
dents with personal problems or questions concerning procedure or policy are
aided by Resident Counselors, Resident Assistants, and Section Advisors.
The rates quoted are subject to change. All facilities are equipped with basic
furnishings of beds, mattresses, dressers, desks, and chairs. Residents are en-
couraged to obtain their own drapes, pictures, bedspreads, rugs, and lamps
after arrival at the University.
Students assigned to University Residence Halls should not purchase or
bring any basic linens. These students will be furnished a basic linen service
which entitles the student to two sheets, one pillowcase, and three towels per
week. The charge is included on the room assignment and is due and payable with
the rent. At a nominal cost, blankets, pillows, desk lamps, and additional linens
may be obtained on a rental basis at any time. Exception: During Summer
Session residents of Murphree suites are not furnished linen service unless
they so request at the Linen Room upon arrival.
Heavy luggage may be sent a week or ten days in advance of the student's
arrival, prepaid, addressed to the student's name and showing his assigned
room number. Such shipments will be held until called for by the student. The
University assumes no responsibility beyond the exercise of reasonable care for
any shipment so received.

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS

Yulee and Mallory Halls
These halls of modern design and of brick, concrete, and steel construction
are normally reserved for undergraduate women students. Features include:
office-to-room intercommunication system; post-office boxes for each room in
building lobbies; large lounge for each building; study lounge on each upper
floor; large recreation rooms; laundry and other self-service facilities. Double
and single rooms only, with the number of single rooms limited. Community
bath facilities on each floor. Rent rates per 8-weeks Summer Session (subject
to change): Single room $48.00 per student; double room $40.00 per student;
double room assigned as single $60.00 per student.









16 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Rawlings Hall

Similar in construction and facilities to those above. To be assigned to
Graduate women students only for Summer Session. Rent rates per 8-weeks
summer session (subject to change) : double room $40.00 per student; double
room assigned as single, $60.00 per student.
Buckman, Thomas, Sledd, and Fletcher Halls
The four halls of modern brick, concrete, and steel construction are normally
reserved for men students. Each hall is divided into separate sections with
accommodations for from 30 to 48 students per section. All rooms have lava-
tories, and there is a community bath on each floor in each section. There are
lounges, recreation rooms, and laundry facilities in the area. Room types: two-
room suites for two, double rooms for two or three students, and single rooms.
Summer Session rent rates range from $33.00 to $40.00 per student per 8-weeks
Summer Session. (Murphree Hall will not be available for use by single students
during the Summer Session.)

FACILITIES FOR MARRIED STUDENTS

Flavet Apartment Villages

These Villages, located on-campus, have been provided through the Public
Housing Authority. Assignments are currently being offered only to married
students. Currently, there is a waiting period of about 6 months between the
date of application and the date an assignment can be made. Flavet I contains
22 buildings of one-story, temporary construction, divided into 83 apartment
units of one, two, or three bedrooms. Flavet II, similar to Flavet I in construc-
tion, contains 20 buildings divided into 76 apartment units, of one, two, or
three bedrooms. Flavet III contains 52 buildings of two-story, temporary con-
struction, divided into 428 apartment units of one or two bedrooms. All apart-
ments are equipped with basic furniture requirements, but residents must fur-
nish their own linens, rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating are by
gas, metered to the individual apartments. Electricity consumption in excess of
the basic minimum is paid on a monthly basis on meter readings. Rent rates
per month (including basic electricity) are: one-bedroom apartment, $26.75;
two-bedroom apartment, $29.50; three-bedroom apartment, $32.25.
Applications may be filed at any time and should be sent as soon as possible.
Corry and Schucht Memorial Villages
These Villages, located on-campus, contain modern two-story buildings con-
structed of brick, concrete, and wood, divided into 296 one, two, and three
bedroom apartment units. Three-bedroom apartments are available only in
Corry Village. Assignments are offered to married students. All apartments are
equipped with basic furniture requirements for the living room, dinette, kitchen,
and one bedroom. Residents must furnish the extra bedrooms and their own
linen, rugs, kitchenware, etc. Cooking and heating is by gas, metered to in-
dividual apartments. Electricity is paid on a monthly basis on meter readings.
Water is paid at a flat rate of $1.50 per month. Rent rates per month are:
one-bedroom apartment, $54.00; two-bedroom apartment, $57.00; three-bedroom
apartment, $60.00.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Applications may be filed at any time and should be sent as soon as possible.
Sections of Murphree Hall will be available for assignment to couples. The
accommodations consist of two room suites (study room and bedroom). All
suites have lavatories, and there is a community bath with shower and toilet
facilities on each floor in each section. Cooking or preparation of food is not
permitted. Summer Session rates are $60.00 per suite per eight weeks terms.

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING

Private homes and privately operated rooming houses and apartments pro-
vide many accommodations for students.
Off-campus listings are maintained in the Off-Campus Section but are not
compiled for mailing since availability changes constantly and a mutually satis-
factory rental arrangement can normally be made by the student only after
personal inspection of facilities and conference with the householder. Students
seeking off-campus housing should come to Gainesville well before the school
period to confer with the Off-Campus Section about accommodations. Advance
appointments for conferences may be made.
Arrangements for the September semester should be completed between the
middle of June and the middle of August, for the February semester, during
January, and for the Summer Session between the middle of April and the end
of May.
Any freshman man student or single undergraduate woman student who
wishes to live off-campus must obtain advance clearance in writing from the
Housing Division. Each single, undergraduate woman student under 21 years
of age, who may be authorized to live off-campus, must file with the Office of
the Dean of Women a form signed by her parents or guardians giving their
approval of her living at a specific address. Such blanks are available from
the Office of the Dean of Women.

COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION

The Cooperative Living Organization, incorporated in 1940, is operated by
and for students with limited means for attending college. The Organization is
located one block from the University campus, and has five residence buildings
with a total capacity of over seventy members. The affairs of the Organization
are administered by a Board of Directors, elected annually from the membership.
Among the qualifications for membership are scholastic ability and reference
of good character. Application for membership should be made to the Vice
President at 117 N.W. 15th Street, Gainesville.

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES

Most national fraternity and sorority chapters maintain their own houses
adjacent to the University campus. Freshman women are not permitted to live
in sorority houses. Special regulations apply to freshman men living in their
fraternity houses. University student regulations are in effect for all sorority
and fraternity houses.









18 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GENERAL INFORMATION

LECTURES, PLAYS AND EXHIBITIONS

The University presents outstanding lectures as part of the general educa-
tional and cultural life of the campus. The speakers are selected with a view to
offering to the University community stimulating presentations in the different
areas of learning.
During the Summer Session, under the direction of the Department of Speech,
full length plays, experimental one-act plays, and interpretative reading pro-
grams are presented. The University provides facilities for high grade per-
formances under competent direction.
Exhibitions of contemporary work in the arts are brought to the campus
under the sponsorship of the University Center of the Arts. Such exhibitions
provide an opportunity to study examples of the best contemporary work in
painting, industrial design, furniture, crafts, community planning, architecture,
and the other arts.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE

The leading religious denominations have attractive places of worship and
students are welcome at every service. Students interested in the study of re-
ligion and in preparing themselves for religious leadership may take courses
offered by the Department of Religion. Vesper services are conducted weekly on
the campus lawn or in the Florida Union.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY SERVICE

The University Libraries, comprising the General Library and 11 school and
college libraries, contained 917,739 volumes and were receiving 9,928 serials as
of June 30, 1961.
The larger part of the resources are housed in the General Library stacks and
the four divisional reading rooms. On the first floor is the University College
Reading Room, with some 8,000 volumes useful to students in the first two years
of college. The Humanities Reading Room and the Social Sciences Reading
Room, which serve as centers of library activity for upper classmen in the
humanistic and the social studies, are on the second floor. In each of these
rooms are approximately 15,000 selected books and the current issues of learned
journals. The Science Reading Room, with materials for psychology, general
science, mathematics, physics, geology and geography, is on the third floor.
For recreational use, facilities in the General Library include the Browsing
Room and six music listening rooms. Seminar rooms, carrells, and study cubicles
are available to faculty members and graduate students. Interlibrary loan and
photoduplication services provide research materials not available on the campus.
The resources of the General Library are particularly strong in Floridiana,
which is centered in P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, and for the
Latin-American area, especially the West Indies and Caribbean. Special Col-
lections of the University Libraries include Rare Books; the Marjorie Kinnan
Rawlings Collection, which consists of manuscripts, typescripts and memorabilia









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


of one of America's most distinguished novelists; the Collection of Creative
Writing, which includes worksheets, manuscripts, and other literary papers of
significant contemporary American and British authors; and the Dance, Music
and Theatre Archives, an extensive collection of pictures, programs, photographs
and other documentary material.
Libraries for Agriculture, Architecture and the Fine Arts, Chemistry, Edu-
cation, Engineering, Forestry, Health and Physical Education, Journalism and
Communications, Law, Medicine, Music, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Physics are
located in or near the buildings which house the respective instructional units.
The book resources serving the extension activities of the University are located
in the Seagle Building. The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library is in Build-
ing F of the Laboratory School.
The regular schedule for the General Library is Monday through Friday,
8:00 A. M. to 10:00 P. M.; Saturday, 8:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M.; Sunday, 2:00
P. M. to 5:00 P. M., and 7:00 P. M. to 10:00 P. M. The departmental libraries,
with some variations, observe a similar schedule.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

A medical history report form is furnished by the Registrar's office to pros-
pective students. One side of this form is to be completed by the student giving
medical history, the other side by a licensed Doctor of Medicine. This form
should be mailed by the examining physician, in the envelope provided, to the
Director, Student Health Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida,
not less than two weeks before entrance to the University and much earlier if
possible. This report is reviewed by an Infirmary physician before the applicant
is cleared for registration. Applicants with chronic illnesses or physical defects
should have their family physician give full history of chronic condition or
physical defect, either in a letter or on the Medical History report in order
that proper evaluation and treatment may be determined. Students are not
prevented from entering the University because of physical defects; however,
where a student has a history of mental illness, an interview with the Uni-
versity psychiatrist may be required before acceptance for registration.
The Student Health Department strives to prevent the entry and spread of
communicable diseases at the University. STUDENTS MUST HAVE BEEN
SUCCESSFULLY VACCINATED AGAINST SMALLPOX WITHIN FIVE
YEARS. THIS IMMUNIZATION SHOULD BE ACCOMPLISHED PRIOR
TO ENTERING THE UNIVERSITY. Immunization for poliomyelitis and
tetanus is strongly recommended.
The Student Health Department maintains a 65 bed hospital, providing 24
hour general nursing care for all students currently enrolled in the University
who have paid the student health fee. The outpatient clinic is open from 8:00
a.m. to 12:00 midnight; after midnight a call bell is provided at the entrance
to summon a nurse. A physician is on 24 hour call for care of emergencies too
severe to be cared for by the nursing staff. Students are urged to report to the
Infirmary at the first sign of illness. In any case where the illness is determined
by the physician to be of more than average severity, parents will be notified
by telephone.
The Student Health Department is staffed with six physicians, a radiologist,
two psychiatrists, twenty registered nurses, x-ray department, clinical laboratory









20 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

and pharmacy. It is designed to give as complete a diagnostic, treatment and
public health program as possible within the limits of its personnel and equip-
ment. It is intended for treating the illnesses which commonly occur while the
student is in residence at the University. When major surgery is required, the
student will be referred to a competent surgeon either at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center on campus or the Alachua General Hospital in Gainesville, both
of which are approved for surgery by the American College of Surgeons and co-
operate fully with the Student Health Department. Families of the students
enrolled are not eligible for Student Health Department facilities, but Infirmary
physicians will gladly recommend well qualified local physicians to attend their
families.
Most of the services and facilities of the Student Health Department are
available to students without charge; however, there is a charge of $3.00 per
day for students admitted as inpatients. A very nominal charge is also made
for x-ray service, as well as special prescriptions.
During epidemics, the facilities of the Student Health Department may be so
overtaxed that the care of all ill students at the Infirmary will be impossible. In
such an emergency, every effort will be made to provide for the care of students
outside the Infirmary. However, the responsibility of payment for services to out-
side physicians or hospitals must be assumed by the student.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Orange and Blue Bulletin is the official bulletin of the Summer Session.
This mimeographed sheet, published every other day during the Summer Ses-
sion and posted on all bulletin boards, carries notices of changes in schedule,
meetings and other pertinent information. Announcements made in the General
Assembly; notices on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody Hall, An-
derson Hall and others; and news items in the Summer Gator serve to keep
the Summer Session students informed concerning student activities.

PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES

There are professional organizations that represent almost every academic
discipline within the University. Membership in these is dependent upon a
student's academic achievement within the fields represented by each organiza-
tion. There are three organizations that are all-University in scope. In order
of the date of establishment at the University they are: Phi Kappa Phi, 1912;
Phi Beta Kappa, 1938; and Sigma Xi, 1938.
Among the professional and honorary organizations active throughout the
regular sessions of the University, Kappa Delta Pi, education honorary, and
Phi Delta Kappa, professional education fraternity for men, maintain special
programs for the summer session.
RECREATION

THE FLORIDA UNION

The Florida Union, the official center of student activities, is financed pri-
marily by student activities fees. Some of the facilities and services offered by
the Union include music listening rooms, a craft and hobby shop, photographic









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


darkrooms, browsing library, game room and lounges where students may spend
leisure hours. Fifteen guest rooms are available for guests of students and
University personnel. The Union also provides a duplicating and poster service,
information desk, Western Union sending service, auditorium and meeting rooms
for student activity groups. Offices for the President of the Student Body, the
Legislative Council, Honor Court and all student publications are located in
the Florida Union.
The Florida Union Board for Student Activities, composed of students in-
terested in planning student activies, sponsors a variety of social programs for
the student body. Some of the regular activities sponsored by the Union Board
are bridge tournaments, dancing classes, coffee hours, movies, outings and
dances. Other special activities are sponsored by the Union Board during the
year. The committees of this board are open to all interested students.
The University's Camp Wauburg, operated by the Florida Union, is a
recreational area for the exclusive use of University personnel. This area is
located nine miles south of the campus. Facilities include a large picnic area,
a recreational building, a bath house and a play ground area for volley ball,
horseshoes, badminton, softball. Camp Wauburg has swimming, boating and
fishing facilities.

INTRAMURAL AND RECREATIONAL ATHLETICS

A broad recreational program of athletics will be conducted for the students
and faculty by the College of Physical Education and Health during the Summer
Session.
A Summer Session all-campus league will be organized with competition in
softball, tennis (singles and mixed doubles), shuffleboard (singles and mixed
doubles), swimming, volleyball, table tennis, and handball tournaments. Ap-
propriate awards will be made to winning teams and individuals in all sports.
A sports' clinic will be conducted prior to the tennis, volleyball, and hand-
ball tournaments. Further information may be obtained at the Intramural Office,
Room 229, Florida Gymnasium.
The athletic and physical educational facilities, including the use of the swim-
ming pool and equipment room service, will be available to all bona fide Uni-
versity students. Use of these services and facilities will also be extended to
students' families, faculty, employees, and their immediate families, upon
payment of a fee. The Summer Gator, the Orange and Blue Bulletin, and the
Florida Intramural Bulletin will carry current notices and announcements about
various phases of the program.

SWIMMING POOL

The swimming pool will be open daily during the Summer Session. Dressing
facilities for women are located in the Women's Gymnasium. The facilities for
men are located in Florida Gymnasium.

THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

The Department of Music offers opportunities during the Summer Session
for those students interested in participating in bands, orchestras and choral
groups.










22 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Several days before
registration students should confer with the deans of their respective colleges
regarding choice of courses. Juniors and seniors should confer with the heads
of the departments in which they expect to earn majors. Candidates for gradu-
ation must file, in the office of the Registrar, formal application for a degree and
must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree. The official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Courses can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the
college in which the student is registered and by presentation of the cards au-
thorizing the change at the office of the Registrar.

CREDITS

The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one
semester hour.

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two
semesters, or one semester and three six-weeks summer terms, or one semester
and two eight-week summer terms, or one semester and two nine-week summer
terms, or five six-week summer terms, or four eight-week summer terms or four
nine-week summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet
this requirement after entrance to the University. Students who break their resi-
dence at the University by attending another institution for credit toward the
degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.

2. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (except in the
College of Law) applied toward the baccalaureate degree during regular resi-
dence in the respective college from which they expect to be graduated. Ex-
ception to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by
the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extension
work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required
for a baccalaureate degree.

3. For the degree of Bachelor of Laws, a student must complete at least 96
weeks of study in residence in an accredited law school of which at least 62 must
have been in residence in the College of Law, University of Florida. The last 28
credits and the last 30 weeks of study must be in residence in this College unless
other arrangements are made in advance by written petition approved by the
faculty of the College of Law. (In the case of a student admitted prior to Sep-
tember, 1953, completion of at least 90 weeks of study in residence at an accred-
ited law school is required of which at least 56 weeks must have been in resi-
dence at this College.)









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


4. For residence requirements for the various graduate degrees see the
Graduate School section of this bulletin.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED

No student will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward
a degree by correspondence study and extension class work. Extension work to
apply on the last thirty hours is authorized only by special action of the faculty
of the college in which a student is registered. Such authorization must be ob-
tained prior to enrollment in extension work. If authorization is given, no stu-
dent is permitted to earn more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours in this
manner. Under no circumstances will a student in residence be permitted to
register for a correspondence course if that course is being offered in Summer
Session.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD

The maximum load for which an undergraduate may register in an eight-week
term is 9 semester hours. The maximum load in a six-week term is 6 semester
hours.
The minimum load for any student is three semester hours. Original regis-
tration for less than three hours must be approved by the Dean of the college in
which the student is enrolled. After registration, the student may reduce his
load to less than three hours only with the approval of the Senate Committee on
Student Petitions.

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities
who wish to earn credits in the Summer Session to be transferred eventually to
their respective institutions, and (b) other students not candidates for degrees.
2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an unclas-
sified student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of the col-
leges or schools of the University, he may do so (1) by regularizing his admis-
sion to the University (present all the credentials required) and (2) by meeting
the requirements (in effect at the time of his application for candidacy) for ad-
mission to the school or college he desires to enter.

3. If such a student is admitted to candidacy for a degree, credits earned
while an unclassified student will be accepted insofar as they apply toward the
degree requirements (in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the
college or school chosen by the student. A student must have been registered as
a regular student in the college or school from which he expects to receive the
Bachelor's Degree for at least three six-week summer terms or two eight-week
summer terms, and in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the
Master's Degree. The residence requirement (see above) in the University will
not be waived in any case.

4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclas-
sified students during the Summer Session.









24 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite
statement of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy in
the various colleges and schools. This statement will make clear that credits
earned while a student is registered as an unclassified student can be applied
toward a degree in the college of his choice only if under regular procedure this
credit will apply toward that degree.
6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will be approved by the
Registrar and assistants chosen by him from the faculty.

ABSENCES OR UNSATISFACTORY WORK

Absences count from the first meeting of the class rather than from the date
a student registers for a class.
A. If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent that
further enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to him or detri-
mental to the best interest of the class, it shall be the duty of the instructor to
warn such student in writing that further absences or failure to do class work
will cause him to be suspended from the course with a failing grade. Where
possible this warning will be delivered personally; otherwise, it will be mailed
to the student's last University address by the Registrar. Instructors shall im-
mediately report all such warnings to the department head or course chairman.
Should any absences or failure to do classwork be incurred after this warning,
the student will be suspended from the class and be given a failing grade by
the Registrar upon receipt of notice from the instructor showing the date of
warning.
Should this reduce the load of the student below the minimum required, he will
be suspended from the University.
B. When a student is suspended from a course under the provisions of A above,
his parents shall be notified in writing by the Registrar.
C. A student who has been warned for absences or unsatisfactory work in any
class should not incur additional absences in that course even though he has
not been absent from the class for nine scholastic days. It is the responsi-
bility of the student to see that his work and attendance are satisfactory.

PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND EXCLUSION FOR
ACADEMIC REASONS
(For information concerning this see the undergraduate catalog.)

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must success-
fully pass six or more to complete the program of the University College) are
administered by the Board of University Examiners and are given in December
April, June, and August of each year. A student must be familiar with the work
of the various courses and be able to think in the several fields in a comprehen-
sive way in order to pass these examinations. Standings on the comprehensive
examinations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are not subject to change
by any other agency.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 25

APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS

University College students who are enrolled in a course at the time the exam-
ination is given need not make application for it. University College students who
are not enrolled in a course at the time an examination is given and who wish
to take the comprehensive examination must apply in writing to the Board of
Examiners for permission prior to the last date set for filing such application.
Applications will not be accepted from students registered in the colleges of the
Upper Division. Before the application is accepted the applicant will be required
to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege has not been
used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Applications will be ac-
cepted only for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Ex-
aminers. The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give Uni-
versity College students examinations by application.









26 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

All freshmen and sophomores who enter the University of Florida, enroll in
the University College. This unit offers a basic General education program
as the foundation of a true liberal education, and administers the pre-professional
work required by the Upper Division schools and colleges. Before a student
makes his tentative choice of an educational goal final, he is given a long hard
look at the great fields of human thought and achievement. There is at the
college level certain fundamental knowledge that is needed by all beginners,
to the end that they develop the attitudes and understandings of desirable human
beings and citizens.
Thus the University of Florida while fully accepting its responsibility for
the professional training of students who remain four years or longer and
earn degrees, as a state institution it also accepts its civic responsibility to help
students who remain only one or two years at the University. These students-
approximately two-thirds of all who enroll-deserve more from their state
university than the usual odd assortment of introductory and pre-professional
courses commonly given to freshmen-fragmentary material at its best.
To meet this challenge the University College faculties have worked out
integrated comprehensive studies in the following areas:
1. American Institutions (their developmental history, problems and processes
-social, governmental and economic.)
2. The Physical Sciences (man's environment in the physical universe-
study of some of the physical forces.)
3. Reading, Speaking and Writing (Freshmen English, language and com-
munication.)

4. Effective Thinking (how to think straight, logic and math.)

5. The Humanities (literature, philosophy, religions and the arts.)
6. The Biological Sciences (the living world-its vast historical sweep in
time and place.)

These comprehensive courses cut across old department lines. Problems,
principles, cases, trends, emerging systems, and other developments are closely
studied as staff judgment indicates significant meanings, and experience deter-
mines effectiveness. Yearly revisions are in order. These comprehensive, or
their equivalents are required of all freshmen and sophomores.

GUIDANCE

If a freshman is still undecided about his life's work, he is not urged to
guess on registration day. His program may be made up largely from the com-
prehensives which help him direct his thinking toward a desirable objective,
together with approved electives that may further enable him to explore interests
and needs. But whether the student is decided or undecided about his life's









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


work, these comprehensive courses provide basic preparation that every educated
person should have.
Thus since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation,
the program absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject
or course of the University College program is designed to guide the student.
During the time that he is making tentative steps toward a profession by taking
special subjects to test aptitudes, interests, and ability, he is also studying the
several great areas of human understanding and achievement. The work in
the University College presents materials which are directly related to life
experiences and which will immediately become a part of the student's thinking
to guide him to making correct next steps. Thus the whole program-place-
ment tests, progress reports, vocational aptitude tests, basic vocational materials,
selected material in the comprehensive courses, student conferences, adjustments
for individual differences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations-
is a part of a plan designed to guide students.

UPPER DIVISION COOPERATION

While the necessary correlation and unification is attempted at the Univer-
sity College Office, throughout the University College period students consult
Upper Division deans and department heads to discuss future work. During
the last month of each school semester these informal conferences are supple-
mented by a scheduled formal conference at which each student fills out a pre-
registration card for his prospective Upper Division work.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE COUNSELORS

The University College Counselors do not assume the responsibility that every-
student himself must take, but they help in every way possible as he assumes
a greater and greater share of responsibility in his University education. The
counselors are located in the University College Office.
Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests to all
seniors in every high school of the state. Since many high schools are also
trying to acquaint the student with the common body of knowledge so needed
by all, their records along with the placement tests results indicate the varia-
tion that may be made in the general program.
A student who has had three or four years of preparatory school study in
any one of the subject areas of the comprehensive courses, and his placement tests
or progress tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at this level
may consult one of the counselors for subsequent needed program adjustment.

THE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATE

The Associate of Arts Certificate is awarded in recognition of the successful
completion of two years of planned work at the University of Florida. In
specific detail, one must pass at least sixty-four semester hours including pre-
professional work and the comprehensive courses that make up the core program.











28 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


PROGRAMS OF STUDY


NORMAL PROGRAM


Freshman Year Hours
1.-American Institutions .-........--- .....---. 8
2.-The Physical Sciences .......-------- 6
3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English --..-___.. 8
4.-Logic and Mathematics ---- 6
5.-Departmental Electives ..- .. 2-6
Military Science; Physical Fitness 2


Sophomore Year
1.-The Humanities -........
2.-Biological Science ....
3.-Departmental Electives .
Military Sciences; Physical


At least sixty-four semester hours, which may include four hours of Military
Science, are required to complete the Lower Division.


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


While in the University College, students planning to enter the College of
Agriculture should take the following program of study. The sequence in which
courses are to be taken will depend upon the department in which a student takes
his major in the upper division and will be determined by the counselors of the
College of Agriculture.


BASIC CURRICULUM-FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS


First Semester
Course Credits
C-11.-American Institutions ..-.. 4
C-31.-Reading, Speaking and Writing -... 4
BTY. 180-Elementary Botany _...-_.. 4
CL. 215-Introductory Chemistry .-. ..._- 3
C-41.-Logic ...-...---------------__---- 3
C-51.-Humanities ---------- ------___- 4
Mil. Sci. & Physical Fitnessi ...... 4
Electives in Agriculture* _-....... .._ 4-5


Total Credits-64


Second Semester
Course Credits
C-12.-American Institutions ..----..... 4
C-32.-Reading, Speaking and Writing 4
BLY. 181-General Zoology ------.. 4
CY. 217-General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis _--....._.- __ 4
C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics 3
C-52.-Humanities -...----........... 4
AS. 201-Principles of Agricultural
Economics .--_..____ -__.. 3
Approved Electives* -......._ 7-8


11 Hour must be taken each semester.
*Elective courses must have the approval of the Dean of the College of Agriculture. The fol-
lowing courses have been approved as suitable electives in Agriculture: AS. 306 or 308, AG. 306,
AY. 221, AL. 209, BCY. 300, BTY. 217, DY. 211, EY. 203 or 307, EDF. 245, FY. 313, FT. 301,
FC. 201, OH. 203 or 217, PT. 321, PY. 201, SLS. 310, VC. 212.


ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS


The University College student who plans to earn a degree in the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts elects one of the following basic programs:

A.-For the degree in Architecture-


Freshman Year
1.-C 11-12-American Institutions _
2.-C 31-32-Reading, Speaking, and
Writing: Freshman English ....
3.-*MS 205-207-Basic Mathematics
4.-AE. 111-112, Graphic Techniques
I, II ..The Bu...i g As --....
5.-AE. 121, The Building Arts ......


Hours
. 8
.... 8
- 8
S6
_- 3


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C 51-52, The Humanities __ 8
2.-C 61-62, Biological Science --... ..__ 6
3.-**PS. 201-202, General Physics 6
4.-PS. 207-208, Physics Laboratory 2
5.-AE. 211, Visual Expression -....---. 3
6.-AE. 242, Materials and Methods of
Construction I ............... 3


Hours
.............. ..... 8
--5---------

..... 16-20
Fitness 2
30-34












BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


6.-MY. 101-102, Military Science or
Elective --- --
7.-PL. 101-102, Physical Fitness


7.-AE. 231-232, Elementary Architectural
2 Design I, II ........-.......-- .- 6
0. 8.-MY. 201-202, Military Science or
-Elective -........................ 2
35 9.-PL. 103-104, Physical Fitness --. .__ 0
36


B.-For the degree in Landscape Architecture-


Freshman Year
1.-C-11-12, American Institutions
2.-C-21, The Physical Sciences .--
3.-C-31-32, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English .-....
4.-AE. 111-112, Graphic Techniques
I, II --
5.-AE. 121, The Building Arts .....
6.-BTY 180-General Botany --_
7.-MY. 101-102, Military ..---
8.-PL. 101-102, Physical Fitness ......


C.-For the degree in Interior Design-

Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-21-21, The Physical Sciences ......... 6
2.-C-31-32, Reading, Speaking, and
Writing: Freshman English _.. .---.. 8
3.-C-41, Practical Logic ...............--- 3
4.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics ..3-- 3
5.-AE. 111-112, Graphic Techniques
I, II ...........................---- 6
6.-AE. 121, The Building Arts I ----... 3
7.-ART 260, Lettering .--- ---.- 3
8.-MY. 101-102, Military ................... 2
9.-PL. 101-102, Physical Fitness ..-...-.. 0


Hours Sophomore Year
S8 1.-C 41, Practical Logic ..............
. 3 2.-C 42, Fundamental Mathematics
3.-C 51-52, The Humanities ..---
.8 4.-C 61, Biological Science ..... ....-.
5.-CY. 215, Introductory Chemistry .
6 6.-AE. 211-Visual Expression -
3 7.-AE. 231-232, Elementary Architee-
.4 tural Design I, II ......... -
2 8.-AE. 242, Materials & Methods of
0 Construction ......---.......-
9.-MY. 201-202, Military .........---
34 10.-PL. 103-104, Physical Fitness


Sophomore Year
1.-C-11-12, American Institutions
2.-C-51-52, The Humanities
3.-C-61-62, The Biological Sciences
4.-AE. 211, Graphic Expression
5.-AE. 231-232, Elementary Interior
Design I, II ...----- -.-
6.-AE. 242, Materials and Methods
of Construction I .........--
7.-MY. 201-202, Military .............-.
9.-PL. 103-104, Physical Fitness ....


34

D.-For the degree in Building Construction-


Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-l, American Institutions -........... 8
2.-C-3, Freshman English .............. 8
3.-*MS. 205-206, Basic Mathematics _._ 8
4.-AE. 121, The Building Arts I -...--.... 3
5.-BCN. 102, Construction Drawing ....... 3
6.-MY. 101-102, Military --........--_---- 2
7.-PL. 101-102, Physical Education .......... 0

32


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-5, The Humanities --............- .... 8
2.-C-6, Biological Science .............--. 6
3.-**PS. 201-202, General Physics ... 6
4.-BCN. 203, Construction Planning .. 3
5.-BCN. 204, History of Building ... 3
6.-BCN. 205, Basic Studies of Materials 3
7.-BCN. 206-Construction Mechanics .. 3
8.-MY. 201-202, Military -.......... .--- 2
9.-PL. 103-104-Physical Education .... 0

34


*Students not qualified for MS. 205-7 will take C-42 first.
**Students not qualified for PS. 201-2 will take C-22 first.

E.-For the degree in Art (Fine Arts, History of Art, Crafts or Advertising
Design)-


Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-ll-12, American Institutions .......--- 8
2.-C-21-22, The Physical Sciences .--6---- 6
3.-C-31-32, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English .--_-..... 8
4.-ART 101-102, Beginning Design ...._ 4
5.-ART 103-104, Beginning Drawing
and Painting --..~....- .. -..----_- -- 4
6.-Military Science or Elective --..----.-. 2
7.-Physical Fitness ........--------------.... 0

32


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-41-42, Logic and Mathematics ...... 6
2.-C-51-52, The Humanities -.-.. --. -- 8
3.-C-61-62, Biological Science -...._..--... 6
4.-ART 205, Intermediate Design -...- .... 2
5.-ART 206, Intermediate Drawing and
Painting _..--- ---... 2
6.-ART 207-208, Intro. to the Principles
and History of Art -.-- -.-------- 6
7.-Military Science or Elective ._----.... 2
8.-Physical Fitness --.--..-------....... 0

32


Hours
S3
3
8
3
... 3
3
3

6

3
2
0

34




Hours
8
8
6
3

6

S2
S2
S0

34












30 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


F.-For the degree in Art Education-


Freshman Year
1.-C-11-12, American Institutions
2.-C-21-22, The Physical Sciences _
3.-C-31-32, Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English ....
4.-ART 101-102, Beginning Design
5.-ART 103-104, Beginning Drawing
and Painting ---... ..
6.-Military Science or Elective .....
7.-Physical Fitness -----


Hours
... 8
. 6

S 8
4

S4
S2
0

32


Sophomore Year
1.-C-41-42, Logic and Mathematics
2.-C-51-52, The Humanities -.
3.-C-61-62., Biological Science ..--.-
4.-ART 205, Intermediate Design --....-.
5.-ART 206, Intermediate Drawing and
Painting .._..--...
6.-SCA. 253, Art Education I ..-...-...-..
7.-EDF. 245, Human Growth & Develop-
ment ---- ....-.. ----
8.-Military Science or Elective --
9.- Physical Fitness ...................-


G.-For the degree in Music Education-


Freshman Year
1.-C-11-12, American Institutions ..
2.-C-31-32, Freshman English ............
3. C-51-52, The Humanities-----
4.-MSC. 101-102, Theory of Music
5.-Applied Music in Courses below
100: Major instrument or Voice
6.-Ensemble: Band, Chorus, or
Orchestra
7.-MY. 101-102, Military Science
or Elective .......
8.-PL. 101-102, Physical Fitness


Hours
.__ 8 1.
8 2.-
1
8 3.-
6 4.
-
5.-
._ 2
2
6.-
S2
7.
S2
0 8.

36 9.


Sophomore Year
-C-21-22, The Physical Sciences ..
-C-41-42, Logic and Mathematics
-C-61-62, Biological Science --
-MSC. 201-202, Theory of Music ....
-Applied Music in Courses above
100: Major Instrument or Voice
-Ensemble: Band, Chorus, or
Orchestra ..-----.. ......
-EDF. 245, Human Growth and
Development ....... -
-MY. 201-202, Military Science or
Elective ...... ... ..................
-PL. 103-104, Physical Fitness....


ARTS AND SCIENCES


A student who plans to earn a Baccalaureate Degree in the College of Arts
and Sciences should secure credit in all of the comprehensive areas as indicated
by the University College. Electives in the first two years should be taken in
introductory courses in possible major fields and in foreign languages. Students
who have selected a major should limit their University College electives in the
major to permit taking introductory and intermediate courses in other liberal
arts areas.
For further information concerning special programs of instruction and the
details of degree requirements the student is referred to the regular University
Catalog.


PRE-MEDICAL OR PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS


Medical schools require at least three years of college work for admission
and many require four. Dental schools usually require one less year of prep-
aration. In either case those who have only the minimum requirements stand
little chance of admission unless they rate well above average.
Certain specific courses are required by all medical and dental schools. These
include:

Biology-8 hours
General Chemistry-8 hours
Organic Chemistry-8 hours
Physics-8 hours
English-6 hours


Hours
S6
8
S6
2

2
3

3
2
S0


Hours
S6
S6
6
6

4

2

3

S2
S0

35










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Although 8 hours is strongly recommended some dental schools will admit
students with only 4 hours of organic chemistry if their chemistry grades are
good.

These specific subjects may be taken as a part of a regular University Col-
lege program. Catalogs of medical schools are kept at the University College
Office and at the Pre-Professional Counselling Office (12-B Flint Hall).

A complete statement of the requirements of the University of Florida College
of Medicine is to be found in the catalog of the College of Medicine.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


To enter the College of Business Administration, students are required to
complete the curriculum below or the equivalent thereof in each of the courses
or areas of knowledge listed including the following:

ES. 201-202-Basic Economics
ATG. 211-212.-Elementary Accounting
ES. 203.-Elementary Statistics
BS. 101.-Business in a Dynamic Society
EH. 212.-Advanced Composition or
EH. 255.-Business Communications
MS. 205.-Basic Mathematics
MS. 207.-Basic Mathematics for the Social Sciences

BASIC CURRICULUM-FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS
Freshman Year Hours Sophomore Year Hours
C-1-American Institutions ......---. ...... 8 ATG. 211-212-Accounting ........-- 6
C-21-The Physical Sciences ---...... 3 ES. 201-202-Basic Economics ....----...... 6
C-3-Reading, Speaking and Writing: C-5-The Humanities .---..........-- 8
Freshman English .-....... 8 C-61-Biological Science ..---- 3
C-41-Effective Thinking ...........-......... 3 C-62 or C-22-Biological or Physical
BS. 101-Business in a Dynamic Society 2 Science ............... ... ........ ......... .... 3
MS. 205-Basic Mathematics ......--- 3 EH. 212 or EH. 255-English Compo-
MS. 207-Basic Mathematics for the sition* ..... --------- 2-3
Social Sciences -- ......._. -- 5 ES. 203-Elementary Statistics ..-.. 3
Military Science; Physical Fitness ..---. 2 Military Science; Physical Fitness .-..... 2
Total 34 Total 33-34
*Students receiving less than a 16.5 percentile score in C-32 writing lab will be required to
satisfactorily complete EH. 133 (Effective Writing) before EH. 212 or EH. 255. Students demon-
strating outstanding achievement may substitute EH. 255 for EH. 212 and C-22 for C-62.
At least sixty-four hours, which may include four hours of Military Science are required to
complete the Lower Division.


COURSES OFFERED BY THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AVAILABLE
TO STUDENTS IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


The following courses offered by the College of Business Administration may
be taken by students in the University College: ATG. 211-212, Elementary
Accounting; BS. 101, Business in a Dynamic Society; ES. 203, Elementary Sta-
tistics; ES. 201-202, Basic Economics; ES. 208, Economic History of the
United States; ES. 246, Consumer Economics; ES. 296, Industry and Trade of
Latin America; MGT. 271, Principles of Management; MKG. 233, Salesmanship;
and RE. 295, Housing and Home Ownership.
Three and four-hundred level courses in this College may be taken with
the approval of the Dean of the College of Business Administration.
It is anticipated that some students who do not plan a four-year program
will elect to take many of these courses or to arrange a program of two years












32 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


or less in length in which many of these courses would be included. Also some
students not headed for the College of Business Administration may wish to elect
one or more of these courses.


EDUCATION


University College students working toward a degree in the College of Edu-
cation should pursue one of the following programs:

(Except Agricultural Education)


Freshman Year
C-1.-American Institutions
C-2.-The Physical Sciences ---
C-3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English
C-4.-Logic or Mathematics
Military Science or Electives
Electives (approved) -
Physical Fitness ---


Credits Sophomore Year
8 C-5.-The Humanities ---
6 C-6.-Biological Science --
C-4.-Logic or Mathematics .....
-.. 8 EDF. 245-Human Growth and
3 Development ...-
2 Military Science or Electives..
6-8 Electives (approved) ---
....-- 0 Physical Fitness ----------.........

33-35


ELECTIVES:
Art Education: ART 101, 102, 103, 104, 205, 206; SCA. 253.
Elementary Education: SCA. 253; PHA. 373; MSC. 160 (or music skills test) ; MSC. 390.
Music Education: MSC. 101, 102 ; 4 credits in ensemble, 4 credits in applied music.
Physical Education for Men: PHA. 251, 283, 284, 287.
Physical Education for Women: PHA. 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258.
Secondary Education: 9 hours of basic courses in the teaching field.

In Secondary Education and Elementary Education, 3 hours in the Human
Adjustment Area, other than C-41, are required in University College. Other
electives may be taken either in the University College or in the College of
Education.

BASIC PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


Freshman Year
C-l.-American Institutions ...----
C-3.-Reading, Speaking and
Writing: Freshman English _
BTY. 180-Elementary Botany _
BLY. 181-General Zoology --
Electives in Agriculture
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Credits
8

........... 8
......... 4
4
6
........... 2
2
32


Sophomore Year Credits
C-41.-Practical Logic ......._- 3
C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics --- 3
C-5.-The Humanities -............ 8
CY. 215.-Introduction to Chemistry 3
CY. 217--General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis --_ -- 4
Electives in Agriculture .....- -_ 6
Approved Electives _-- -----. 3
Military Science; Physical Fitness -...... 2

32


ENGINEERING


The program for the first and second year students expecting to earn a
degree in the College of Engineering is as follows:


Freshman Year Credits
C-1.-American Institutions -.....---. 4
C-3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing:
Freshman English -... ~~~.-.. .....-- 8
*MS. 205-206-Basic Mathematics, Analytic
Geometry and Calculus I -....--...... 8
EGR. 180-Engineering Concepts and
Studies -..... ................- 1
**EGR. 181-Engineering Drawing --......._ 2
**EGR. 182-Descriptive Geometry _--.. 3
MY. 101-102-Military Science __-..--. 2
PL. 101-102-Physical Fitness --- 0
Total 32


Sophomore Year Credits
C-5-The Humanities ..-... .__-----_----- 8
MS. 353-354-Analytic Geometry and
Calculus II and III ......--------.. 8
CY. 217-218-General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis -- _--- 8
PS. 205-General Physics ....- ........ 3
PS. 207-Laboratory for Physics .......-..-.. 1
MY. 201-202-Military Science ............- 2
PL. 103-104-Physical Fitness _--------. 0
Total 30


Credits
8
6
3

3
2
9
0

31











BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


*In cases where students, on the basis of superior placement test grades are allowed to omit
starred courses, they will need to take an equivalent amount of more advanced work in order to
be eligible for admission to the College of Engineering at the end of the fourth trimester.
**Drawing equipment required for EGR. 181, EGR. 182, and subsequent courses cost approxi-
mately thirty dollars.
Students whose records in the University College do not indicate that they are qualified to take
the professional courses in Engineering will not be admitted to the College of Engineering.


FORESTRY


Students planning to enter the School of Forestry should complete the re-
spective outline of courses listed in the regular University Catalog as required
for the freshman and sophomore years for the Forestry curriculum of their
choice.
Those students falling below a 2.0 grade average will be considered for ad-
mittance to the School of Forestry only after they have demonstrated the ability
to satisfactorily carry on the professional courses in Forestry.


HEALTH RELATED SERVICES


The University College student who plans to earn a degree in the College of
Health Related Services elects one of the following programs:


A.-For the degree in Medical Technology-


Freshman Year I
1.-C-l, American Institutions ..........
2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking,and Writing _.
3.-C-41, Effective Thinking .--------.....
*4.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics ...
**5.-CY. 215, Introductory Chemistry ----.-
6.-CY. 217, General Chemistry ....--....--
7.-Military Science and/or Elective _
8.-Physical Fitness .............-..


Hours Sophomore Year
8 1.-C-5, The Humanities ---------.... --
8 2.-BTY. 180, Introductory Botany
3 8.-BLY. 181, General Zoology .....-._..
3 4.-CY. 218, General Chemistry .......
3 5.-CY. 362-363, Organic Chemistry
4 6.-HRS. 201, Introduction to Health
3 Related Services -_.
0 7.-PS. 109-110, Elements of Physics
8.-Military Science and/or Elective
32 9.-Physical Fitness _-. -


B.-For the degree in Occupational Therapy-


Freshman Year
1.-C-l, American Institutions .__.
2.-C-2, The Physical Sciences ...---.....
3.-C-3, Reading, Speaking, and Writing
4.-C-41, Effective Thinking ----..._
*5.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics
6.-ART 101-2, Beginning Design ..---..
7.-Physical Fitness -- -


Hours
. 8
6
8
3
S3
4
0
32


C.-For the degree in Physical Therapy-


Freshman Year Hours
1.-C-l, American Institutions -_. ...-.- 8
2.-C-3, Reading, Speaking, and Writing 8
3.-C-41, Effective Thinking --...- -- 3
*4.-C-42, Fundamental Mathematics --._. 3


Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-5, The Humanities -........---- 8
2.-BTY. 180, Introductory Botany ----..... 4
3.-BLY. 181, General Zoology --..._..... 4
4.-HRS. 201, Introduction to Health
Related Services -- 2
5.-PSY. 201, General Psychology -.....8-... 3
6.-PSY. 202, Personality Development ___ 3
7.-IN. 330, Elementary Handcrafts _. 3
8.-Approved Electives ._____- .... .....-- 5
9.-Physical Fitness .- -- -... .. 0
32





Sophomore Year Hours
1.-C-5, The Humanities --..--_... .. 8
2.-BTY. 180, Introductory Botany _- --__ 4
3.-BLY. 181, General Zoology --......__-- 4
4.-PSY. 201, General Psychology _.._..-. 3


Hours
8
S4
4
4
5
2
4
3
0
34










34 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

5.-CY. 217-218, General Chemistry 5.-PSY. 202, Personality Development 3
and Qualitative Analysis .............- 8 6.-HRS. 201, Introduction to Health
6.-Military Science or Electives -......--.. 4 Related Services _--..2...------.. 2
7.-Physical Fitness .----------.....-.-... -_.-- 0 7.-PS. 109-110, Elements of Physics 4
8.-Military Science or Electives _-..-.... 4
34 9.-Physical Fitness ------ 0
32

The College of Arts and Sciences maintains a Pre-Professional Counseling Office
for medical and allied fields in Room 12, Flint Hall. Students planning to study
medical technology, occupational therapy, or physical therapy should register
with this office during the first week or two of each semester in which they are
in school.
*Students who quality may take an advanced mathematics course instead of C-42. Consult
University College Counselor.
**If required; otherwise CY. 217-218 is taken in Freshman Year, and 4 additional elective credits
are taken in Sophomore Year.

JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS

To enter the School of Journalism and Communications students are required
to have completed the comprehensive courses required in the University College
and these pre-professional courses: JM 118-Survey of Communications; JM
201-Writing for Mass Communications; BS 201-Basic Economics; and LY
201-Uses of Books and Libraries. In addition to the above pre-professional
courses, the Advertising majors will take ART 101-Beginning Design and
SCH 201-Effective Speaking; The Broadcasting majors will take BR 212-
Broadcast Announcing: and the Journalism and Public Relations majors will
take SCH 201-Effective Speaking. A committee on admissions will consider
applications from transfer students and those who do not meet these minimum
requirements.

LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must have received before
admission a four-year bacallaureate degree from a college or university of ap-
proved standing and a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission Test.

Although no particular courses are prerequisites, a student preparing for
admission to the College of Law should obtain a thorough mastery of the basic
comprehensive courses and should take also at least an academic year's work in
each of the following fields: Accounting, Economics, English, American History,
English History and Political Science. Since concepts expressed in words are
tools of the legal profession, it is essential that a student be able to read
rapidly and meaningfully and to write clearly and concisely. Courses requiring
the rapid assimilation and digestion of written materials and courses in exposi-
tory writing therefore are recommended.

PHARMACY

The program of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Pharmacy is divided into two parts-two years of pre-pharmacy in the Uni-
versity College and three years in the College of Pharmacy.












BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


In keeping with the accreditation requirements of the American Council on
Pharmaceutical Education, all students must be enrolled in one or more
pharmacy courses for a minimum of three academic years or a total of twenty-
seven months, regardless of the number of studies completed in other fields.
Upon enrolling in pharmacy courses for the first time students must sign the
register in the office of the Dean of the College of Pharmacy.

The program for the first two years is as follows:


First Year-Freshman Year
Hours
C-11-12-American Institutions -..... 8
C-31-32-Freshman English .........- 8
MS. 109-Elements of Mathematics -.....- 3
MS. 205-Advanced General Mathematics 3
CY. 215-7-General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis ---- 7
Military Science; Physical Fitness 2

Total 31


Second Year-Sophomore Year

C-51-52-The Humanities ........
C-61-62-Biological Science
PS. 201-2-General Physics
PS. 207-8-Physics Laboratory
CY. 218-General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis ...
CY. 301-3-Organic Chemistry* ...
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Total 32
*The second half (CY-302-304) is scheduled in the Upper Division.

Only students having an average of "C" or higher will be admitted to the
College of Pharmacy and/or pharmacy courses.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH


University College students expecting to earn a degree in the College of
Physical Education and Health should pursue one of the following programs.


A.-For men intending to major in Physical Education-


Freshman Year
C-11-12-American Institutions
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and
W writing .............
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics
PHA. 284-Team Games for Men
PHA. 287-Gymnastics for Men ...
Approved Electives
Military Science: Physical Fitness


Credits Sophomore Year
8 C-21-22-The Physical Sciences
C-51-52-The Humanities
8 C-61-62-Biological Science
6 PHA. 251-Square and Social Dance
2 PHA. 283-Track and Baseball
2 EDF. 320-Social Foundations of
4 Education ..
2 EDF. 245-Human Growth and
Development
32 Military Science: Physical Fitness


B.-For women intending to major in Physical Education-


Freshman Year C:
C-11-12-American Institutions ---...
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and Writing
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics .......
PHA. 251-Square and Social Dance .
PHA. 252-Modern Dance..
PHA. 253-Team Sports for Women -_
PHA. 254-Team Sports for Women
Approved Electives -...........
Physical Fitness ----


redits Sophomore Year
8 C-21-22-The Physical Sciences ...
8 C-51-52-The Humanities
6 C-61-62-Biological Science
2 PHA. 255-Individual and Dual Sports
1 for W omen ... ................
2 PHA. 256-Swimming and Diving
2 for Women ............ .....
3 PHA. 257-Gymnastics for Women
0 PHA. 258-Tennis and Golf for Women
EDF. 320-Social Foundations of
32 Education ....... .....
EDF. 245-Human Growth and
Development .....-- ....
Physical Fitness .........-.....-.... .... ..........-


Hours
8
6
6
S2

4
S4
S2


Credits
S6
S 8
6
2
2

3

3
2


Credits
S6
8
6

S2

1
1
2

3

3
S0

32












36 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C.-For men and women intending to major in Health Education-


Freshman Year Credits
C-11-12-American Institutions -------.... 8
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and
Writing --- ---- ------- ----- 8
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics -.......... 6
EDF. 245-Human Growth and
Development ..--------------------- 3
PHA. 261-Personal Hygiene .----.......... 3
Approved Electives -............---------- -- 2
Military Science or Electives ------- 2
Physical Fitness ---............---- --------- 0


Sophomore Year
C-51-52-The Humanities -_......
BLY. 181-General Zoology -.---------..--
BTY. 180-Introductory Botany -.
*CY. 109-110-Elements of Chemistry
EDF. 320-Social Foundations
of Education -...... --.--.---- ---
PHA. 262-Community Hygiene .....
Military Science or Electives -.......---.
Approved Electives-- _-....-
Physical Fitness ....------------------


*Students planning to major in Health Education must take CY 109-110. Students whose high
school records and placement tests indicate satisfactory preparation may substitute CY. 109-110
for C-21-22. Others should take C-21, upon satisfactory completion of which they may enter
CY. 109.


D.-For men and women intending to major in Recreation-


Freshman Year C
C-11-12-American Institutions -.................
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking and
Writing -- ..---------- ------
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics .....-..
PHA. 284-Team Games for Men or
PHA. 253-Team Sports for
Women .--------
EDF. 245-Human Growth and
Development -.-.. -----
Military Science and/or Electives .......--...
Physical Fitness ---......----------------------


re


dits Sophomore Year Credits
8 C-21-22-The Physical Sciences ..-....-----. 6
C-51-52-The Humanities -........------ 8
8 C-61-62-Biological Science .....-----------. 6
6 PHA. 251-Folk, Social and Tap Dance.... 2
SY. 201-Sociological Foundation
of Modern Life ....-.............-....- 3
2 PHA. 283-Track and Baseball or
PHA. 258-Tennis and Golf for
3 W omen -.................----------------- --- 2
5 Military Science or Electives ........-.......--. .. 5
0 Physical Fitness ----.-------........---------.. --.--. --- 0


Credits
S8
.... 4
4
6.

3
--- 3
.-. 2
2
0

32









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES OF THE UPPER DIVISION

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The College of Agriculture is composed of three units, namely, 1. Instruc-
tion, 2. Research (Agricultural Experiment Station), and 3. Extension (Agri-
cultural Extension Service). The Instructional Division (the College proper)
is made up of departments in the College devoted to the various phases of
technical and practical agricultural work. The work of these departments is
closely related, and the aim of the College is to afford students the best possible
training for service in agriculture.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural
Education (administered jointly with the College of Education), Agricultural
Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Science, Bacteriology, Botany, Dairy Science,
Entomology, Food Technology and Nutrition, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horti-
culture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soils, Statistics, Vegetable Crops, and
Veterinary Science.

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND FINE ARTS

The College of Architecture and Fine Arts offers programs of study leading
to appropriate undergraduate degrees in Architecture, Building Construction,
Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Fine Arts (Painting, Printmaking,
Sculpture), Advertising Design, Crafts, History of Art and Music. Programs at
the graduate level are offered in Architecture, in Art, in Building Construction,
and in Community Planning.
The College offers courses to students in other colleges of the University who
wish to broaden their cultural background in the arts.

1962 SUMMER SESSION

During the 1962 Summer Session the College will offer a selected group of
undergraduate courses in Architecture, Art, and Music.

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES

The College of Architecture and Fine Arts offers courses leading to certifica-
tion in Art and Music for teaching in the elementary and secondary schools in
the State of Florida. Regulations describing certification of teachers are pub-
lished by the State Department of Education and it is imperative that all
students who expect to be certified familiarize themselves with these regulations.
Applications for certification should be made immediately after graduation and
should be addressed to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

For detailed information on admission, undergraduate degrees, graduate
degrees, and programs of study for the various curricula, see the University
Catalog.










38 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


The subject matter fields regularly offered
and Sciences and the extent of these offerings
Subject Elective
Work
Anthropology .------- ----------- X
Art -...--------- ------------ --- X


Astronomy
Bacteriology


Biology
Botany


Chemistry
Economics -




Education

English --.-
French --.--
Geography
Geology
German ---
Greek ----
History
Journalism


Latin ---.---.
Library Science
Mathematics ...
Meteorology ---
Music ...-----
Philosophy ---.--
Physics .
Political Science
Psychology ---.-
Religion -----
Russian ..-------
Sociology ----_-.
Spanish ---------
Speech ----
Zoology ---


to students in the College of Arts
is indicated in the table below:
Major Masters Ph.D.
Dept.
X -
X Graduate work offered
through College of
Architecture and Fine
Arts

X Graduate work offered
through College of
Agriculture
X X X
X Graduate work offered
through College of
Agriculture


X Major
through
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X Major a
the Sch


- --------------------- X
_... __------- ---------- X
------------ _----------- X
-----------_-_------------ X
--.----_---------------- X
..........~__........... X
-------_----.----.----- X
..-.......__. .---......._.- X
..- -._------------------ X

------.--------. --- X
-.-..--------_... -- ------_ X
.._...._...._.....__ X
............--- ---.------ X

--........_----.---_-----_- X
~~~~. __~~______~X


X X X
X Graduate work offered
through College of
Business Administra-
tion
and Graduate work offered
the College of Education.
X X X
X X -
X X X
X X -
X X -


X -
X X
nd Graduate work
oool of Journalism


Communications
X X

X X

X
X X
X X
X X
X X
X
X
X -
X X
X X
X X
See Biology listed above


X
offered in
and









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


For information regarding details of these programs of study and degree re-
quirements, the University catalog for 1962-63 should be consulted.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The summer session offerings of the College of Business Administration
provide basic courses in the several curricula groupings, a selection of advanced
courses to enable students to go ahead with a normal academic program and a
selection of graduate courses.
A number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Busi-
ness Administration are offered. For complete information on the requirements
for these curricula and for the graduate program, the University Catalog should
be consulted.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

For admission to the College of Education students will present a certificate
of graduation from the University College, or equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education. (See General Catalog
for detailed requirements.)

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Students who are preparing to teach have the opportunity of specializing in
the following teaching areas: art, biology-chemistry, business education, chemis-
try-mathematics, core, elementary, exceptional children, foreign language, foreign
language-English, language arts, mathematics, mathematics-physics, physical
education, music, social sciences, vocational agriculture. (See General Catalog
for curricula. For further information consult the Undergraduate Counseling
Office, 100 Norman Hall.)

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Graduate work in education offers an opportunity for teachers to specialize
in such areas as audio-visual education, agricultural education, business educa-
tion, curriculum and instruction, early childhood education, educational admin-
istration, elementary education, foundations of education (educational psy-
chology, history and philosophy of education, human growth and development),
guidance and counseling, junior college education, language arts education, mathe-
matics education, research specialist in education, science education, secondary
education, social studies education, supervision, teacher education, teaching ex-
ceptional children, and teaching of reading. (See General Catalog for require-
ments.)
NOTES: Orientation Meeting for all graduate students in Education, Thurs-
day, June 21, 7:00 p.m. in Norman Auditorium. This meeting will be devoted
to a discussion of policies and programs for graduate students in the College
of Education.










40 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS

The curricula in the College of Education include State certification require-
ments. Each student should consult his counselor to plan a sequence of courses
to meet requirements for his degree and for certification.
For further information concerning the certification of teachers, write to
the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting Florida
Teacher Certification Requirements, Adopted April 12, 1960.

THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL

The summer term of the Laboratory School will extend from June 18th through
July 27th. Children of summer session students and all others are eligible for
enrollment. Classes from the kindergarten through the 6th grade will be held.
High school courses will be offered from the following areas: Literature, Ameri-
can History, Geometry, Chemistry, French I, Spanish I, Typing, and Driver's
Training.
Fees of $2.00 for University registration and $5.00 for expendable materials
will be charged. An additional fee is required for those who register for the
swimming program.
Parents will register pupils on Monday, June 18th, from 10:00 a.m. to
12:00 noon in the P. K. Yonge cafeteria. Application for admission should be
made at the administrative office at P. K. Yonge Laboratory School as soon as
possible, since the number that may be admitted is limited.
Information regarding transcripts and transfers of credit for high school
students is provided upon application.

EDUCATION CLASS IN EXCEPTIONAL CHILD EDUCATION

Through the cooperation of the University of Florida Speech and Hearing
Clinic and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, a demonstration class is pro-
vided for teachers interested in observing work with slow learning children.
Observations may be scheduled in 120 Norman Hall.

EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT OFFICE

The Educational Placement Office serves both former students of the Uni-
versity and public school officials, without charge. The office keeps up-to-date
records on registrants for positions and a current list of educational adminis-
tration and teaching vacancies. Persons who wish this service should commu-
nicate with the Educational Placement Office, 100 Norman Hall.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

Students who contemplate registration in the College of Engineering and
those who are already registered in this college should confer about their sched-
ules with the department heads and the dean as soon as possible.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


The College of Engineering is offering several courses during the Summer
Session in various departments so that students may graduate in a minimum
time. Many other courses included in the engineering curricula, such as mathe-
matics and physics, are also available. During the summer months the engi-
neering student may also take subjects to meet elective requirements.
A student in the College of Engineering desiring to elect the Nuclear Option
must confer with his department head before arranging his registration.
Students entering the University for the first time may find it to their
advantage to enroll in mathematics and one of the following: Freshman English,
American Institutions or General Chemistry. Students who have completed one
year at the University may take courses in calculus and physics. Statics, dy-
namics, or strength of materials is suggested for those students who have com-
pleted calculus and physics. Elective subjects in mathematics, physics and the
humanities are recommended to all students.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

The graduate programs offered by the College of Engineering are continued
during the summer in order to allow students already enrolled to complete their
graduate work in a minimum length of time.

FORESTRY

Courses in Forestry are offered during the Summer Session. The required
Summer Camp should be taken between the second and third year's work pro-
vided the necessary prerequisites have been completed. Students who contemplate
registration in the School of Forestry should consult the University Catalog
for courses which are prerequisites or are required in the Forestry curriculum.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED SERVICES

The College of Health Related Services offers three Bachelor of Science de-
grees: Medical Technology, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Therapy. Stu-
dents are required to take the comprehensive courses and some preprofessional
courses during the first two years. During the 1962 Summer Session there will
be no courses offered in any of these specialties by the College of Health Related
Services. Course offerings will be available at the Junior and Senior level in
September 1962. Interested students are invited to confer with the chairman of
the respective curriculum for further details concerning these health careers.
The degree of Master of Rehabilitation Counseling is an interdisciplinary pro-
gram designed to prepare students to assist in the rehabilitation of physically,
emotionally, and mentally handicapped persons. RC. 641, RC. 645 and RC. 646
are offered in the 1962 Summer Session.

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS

The curricula in the School of Journalism and Communications lead to the
Degrees: Bachelor of Science in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in Advertising,
or Bachelor of Science in Broadcasting.










42 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The programs provide students with the broadest possible background in
liberal arts and sciences-literature, economics, history, political science, soc-
iology, psychology-which are vital aspects of contemporary life and essential to
those entering professional careers in printed media or audio-visual media of
communications.
Students entering the School of Journalism and Communications must choose
one of the programs of study.
Those majoring in the News-Editorial and Public Relations fields will take
the Journalism program, with their respective sequence of course work, and
earn the BSJ degree. Students interested in Advertising will take the Adver-
tising program and earn the BSAdv degree, while those interested in Radio
and Television will take the Broadcasting program and earn the BSBr degree.
Students gain practical experience in the University's radio and television
stations, on the School's laboratory newspaper and on student publications.
Summer institutes and workshops in television and for high school journalists
are held in the School's air-conditioned quarters. Two special courses: Journ-
alism for Teachers, and Television for Teachers are offered each summer.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS


The School's graduate programs are continued during the summer session.

COLLEGE OF LAW

1. The beginning courses in law are not offered in the Summer Session hence
students are not admitted in June unless they have completed satisfactorily
at least one semester of work in an accredited law school.

2. A student wishing to transfer from another accredited law school who, at
the time of beginning his study of law, qualified for admission to this
College under the stated requirements for beginning students and who
has maintained a scholastic average of C or higher on all previous law
school work undertaken, may apply for admission with advanced standing.
Courses completed with a grade of C or higher in other accredited law
schools will be acceptable for credit up to but not exceeding a total of
thirty hours.

3. Applicants for admission must have received before admission a 4-year
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university.

NURSING


The College of Nursing offers a program leading to the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Nursing. The program for freshmen and sophomores is as follows:
Freshman Year Credits Sophomore Year Credits
C-11-12-American Institutions -- -- 8 C-51-52-The Humanities -- 8
C-61-62-Biological Science ........-----. -- 6 C-21-22-The Physical Sciences .......- 6
C-31-32-Reading, Speaking, and Writing 8 NSG. 220-221-Nursing Skills
C-41-42-Logic and Mathematics ..-...-. 6 Laboratory -------- 4
NSG. 101*-Introduction to Nursing ..... 3 BCY. 300-Bacteria in Everyday Life 3










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


NSG. 111*-Introduction to Nursing FT. 250-Fundamentals of Human
Functions ....... ......- ........ _.._... 3 Nutrition 2
Physical Education --...............__.. 0 EDF. 245-Human Growth and
Development- ..- .. 3
34 Electives ...- .---- ....- .....---.- 6
Physical Education 0
32
*Half the freshman class will take NSG-101 first trimester and NSG-111 second trimester. The
other half will take NSG-111 first trimester and NSG-101 second trimester.
For admission to the College of Nursing students must complete the requi-
site number of hours in University College and have the approval of the Admis-
sions Committee of the College of Nursing.
Registered nurses who wish to complete requirements for the degree should
apply for admission to the Registrar and send a transcript of courses from the
diploma program to the Registrar for evaluation of transfer credit.
For further information the student is referred to the regular University
Catalog.

Schools and Colleges of the Upper Division

College of Nursing

A Unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center

The curriculum in the College of Nursing prepares students to enter the
nursing profession as practitioners of nursing able to perform the technical and
interpersonal skills involved in the nursing care of patients and families; to
work with nursing team members to plan and achieve optimum nursing care
of patients and families; and to work with allied professional groups to insure
the best over-all health care of patients and families.
The four-year program includes both general education in the University or
Florida and professional preparation in the Health Center. Upon satisfactory
completion of the program, the graduate will be awarded the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Nursing and is then eligible for the State Board of Nursing ex-
amination for state .ensure as a Registered Professional Nurse.
The professional art of the nursing program is taught in the Teaching
Hospital of the J. lllis Miller Health Center.

1962 SUMMER SESSION

During the 1962 Summer Session the College of Nursing will offer a selected
group of undergraduate nursing courses. For complete information on the re-
quirements of the curriculum the student is referred to the University Catalog.
Students who wish to enroll in summer session courses should communicate
with the office of the Dean, H101 Hospital Building, since enrollment will be
limited.

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

The Summer Session offerings of the College of Pharmacy, a unit in the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center, provide several courses in the Upper Division.










44 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Graduate students will be given guidance in research leading to the M.S. and
Ph.D. degrees.
For complete description of the courses and requirements for admission and
graduation the student should consult the University Catalog.

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH

GENERAL STATEMENT

The College of Physical Education and Health offers programs of instruction
and services under five departments, namely, Health Service, Intramural Athletics
and Recreation, Required Physical Education for Men, Required Physical Educa-
tion for Women, and the Professional Curriculum.

THE PROFESSIONAL CURRICULUM

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

For admission to the College of Physical Education and Health students
must present a certificate of graduation from the University College, or the
equivalent, and have the approval of the Admissions Committee of the College
of Physical Education and Health. (Consult the University Catalog for detailed
requirements.)

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

The College of Physical Education and Health offers three undergraduate
degrees: The Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, The Bachelor of Science
in Health Education and The Bachelor of Science in Recreation. For complete
information concerning the several curricula and the requirements for these de-
grees, the University Catalog should be consulted.

GRADUATE DEGREES

The College provides two degree programs with a major in Physical Educa-
tion. The non-thesis degree, Master of Physical Education and Health, consists
of a 36 hour program. The 30 hour thesis program leads to the degree of Master
of Arts in Physical Education and Health. Admission and degree requirements
for graduates of accredited institutions are described under the Graduate
Division section of this catalog.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATE DIVISION

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GENERAL INFORMATION

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The Graduate School consists of the dean, the assistant deans, the Graduate
Council, and the graduate faculty. It is responsible for the establishment and
enforcement of minimum general standards of graduate work in the University
and for the coordination of the graduate programs of the various colleges and
divisions of the University. The responsibility for the detailed operations of
graduate programs is vested in the individual colleges, divisions, and depart-
ments. In most of the colleges an assistant dean or other official is directly
responsible for graduate study in his college.
The Graduate Council, of which the dean is chairman, establishes the basic
policies and procedures of the Graduate School, considers petitions, and recom-
mends the award of graduate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty are
appointed by the dean with the approval of the Graduate Council on the basis
of specific needs and qualifications to meet the needs. Thus members of the
graduate faculty fall into three categories in accordance with their function:
those who are appointed to teach graduate courses, those who are appointed to
direct master's theses, and those who are appointed to direct doctoral disserta-
tions. No staff member is expected to perform any of these functions without
having been appointed to the graduate faculty, though temporary exceptions may
be made in unusual circumstances. Membership on the graduate faculty consti-
tutes recognition of ability to carry out certain scholarly responsibilities, but
nonmembership does not imply the lack of such ability. Since appointments are
made to meet specific needs, the question of qualifications arises only where
the need exists.
Study leading to graduate degrees has existed at the University of Florida
from the date of the establishment of the University on its present campus. The
first M.A. was awarded in 1906, the major being English, and the first M.S.
in 1908, with major in entomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D.
were initiated in 1930, and the first degrees were awarded in 1934, one with
major in chemistry and the other with major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was
awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal growth at the University
of Florida. In 1920 two degrees were awarded in two fields. In 1930, 33 degrees
were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded in 16 fields. In 1961
the total number of degrees awarded was 511 in 61 fields. The proportion of doc-
tor's degrees has increased steadily. In 1950, 18 Ph.D.'s and 5 Ed.D.'s were
awarded. In 1961 the totals were 91 Ph.D.'s and 18 Ed.D.'s.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study was very informal. Con-
trol was in the hands of a faculty committee which reported directly to the
President. In 1910, however, James N. Anderson, head of the Department of
Ancient Languages, was appointed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
and Director of Graduate Work, and in 1930 he became the first dean of the
Graduate School. He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1938 by T. M.
Simpson, head of the Department of Mathematics, who held the position until









46 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

he became dean emeritus in 1951. C. F. Byers, head of the Department of
Biological Sciences in the University College, served as acting dean from June
1951 until August 1952, when he was succeeded by the present Dean, L. E.
Grinter, who came to Florida from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he
had served as Vice President, Dean of the Graduate School, and Research
Professor.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS OFFERED

NON-THESIS DEGREES

Master of Agriculture, with major in any field in agriculture
Master of Business Administration, with major in any field in business ad-
ministration
Master of Education, with major in any field in education, including business
education
Master of Physical Education and Health, with major in physical education
Master of Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Arts in Teaching, with major in appropriate departments in the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences
Master of Science in Teaching with major in appropriate departments in the
College of Arts and Sciences
Specialist in Education-a special degree requiring one year of graduate work
beyond the master's

THESIS DEGREES

Master of Science in Agriculture, with major in one of the following:


Agricultural Economics
Agricultural Education
Agronomy
Animal Science
Dairy Science
Entomology
Food Technology and Nutrition


Fruit Crops
Ornamental Horticulture
Plant Pathology
Poultry Science
Soils
Vegetable Crops


Master of Science in Building Construction

Master of Science in Community Planning

Master of Science in Engineering, with major in one of the following:


Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering

Master of Science in Forestry


Engineering Mechanics
Industrial Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Master of Science in Pharmacy, with major in one of the following:
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Pharmacology
Pharmacognosy Pharmacy

Master of Science, with major in one of the following:
Bacteriology Geography
Biochemistry Geology
Biology (Zoology) Mathematics
Botany Physics
Chemistry Plant Pathology
Entomology Psychology

Master of Fine Arts
Master of Arts in Architecture, with major in one of the following:

Architectural Design Building Construction

Master of Arts in Education, with major in one of the following:
Agricultural Education Foundations of Education
Business Education Personnel Services
Educational Administration Secondary Education
Elementary Education

Masters of Arts in Journalism and Communications

Masters of Arts in Physical Education and Health
Masters of Arts, with major in one of the following:
Accounting Management and Business Law
Economics Marketing
English Mathematics
Finance and Insurance Philosophy
French Political Science
Geography Psychology
German Real Estate
History Sociology
Inter-American Area Studies Spanish
Latin Speech
Doctor of Education, with major in one of the following:
Curriculum and Instruction Foundations of Education
Educational Administration Guidance and Personnel Services

Doctor of Philosophy, with major in one of the following:
Agricultural Economics Mathematics
Agronomy Medical Sciences, including
Animal Science Anatomy
Bacteriology Biochemistry
Biochemistry Microbiology
Biology (Zoology) Physiology









48 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Botany
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering, including
Sanitary Engineering
Structural Engineering
Economics
Economics and Business
Administration
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Mechanics
English
Entomology
Fruit Crops
Geography
History
Inter-American Area Studies


Metallurgical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering
Pharmacy, including
Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Pharmacognosy
Pharmacology
Pharmacy
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology (Latin American)
Soils
Spanish
Speech
Vegetable Crops


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION to the Graduate School must be made to
the Director of Admissions on forms supplied by his office and at times stipulated
in the University Calendar. Applications which meet minimum standards for
admissions are referred by the Director to the graduate selection committees of
the various colleges and divisions for approval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete official transcripts of all
the applicant's undergraduate and graduate work are in the possession of the
Registrar, and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is received
directly from the Registrar of the institution in which the work was done. Official
supplementary transcripts are required, as soon as they are available, for any
work completed after making application.
In general, no student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will
be considered for graduate study in any unit of the University.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

UNDERGRADUATE RECORD.-Unqualified admission to the Graduate
School is dependent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an
accredited college or curriculum with an average grade of B for the junior and
senior years. In some units of the Graduate School and on the more advanced
levels of graduate study, an undergraduate average considerably above B may
be required. In some units (see the following two paragraphs) admission may
be considered with an undergraduate average slightly below B. College graduate
admission selection committees take into account not only the general grade
average, but the distribution of work and the quality and extent of preparation
for the graduate program which the student proposes to undertake.
The minimum undergraduate grade average acceptable for admission to pro-
grams leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in Education, Master of Educa-
tion, Master of Arts in Physical Education and Health, and Master of Physical
Education and Health is 2.5, calculated on a basis of 4.0 as the highest possible









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


average and covering the last two years of undergraduate work (at least 60
credit hours).
In the College of Agriculture, admission to graduate study is normally limited
to those students who have maintained at least a 2.75 honor-point average in
their upper-division work and 3.0 in their major subject. For students with an
undergraduate major in general agriculture, the minimum upper-division average
is 2.85. In exceptional cases, where a candidate has demonstrated in some other
way his fitness to do graduate work, as, for instance, outstanding achievement
since earning the bachelor's degree, he may be considered for admission. While
the general admissions requirements described above apply to both master's
and doctoral candidates, it should be noted that doctoral candidates must meet
certain additional requirements which vary according to the programs established
by the departments and colleges.

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION

A satisfactory average score on the Graduate Record Examination is required
for admission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the aptitude
test of the GRE, but either at the request of the department concerned or on
his own volition, the applicant is encouraged to submit in addition the score on
one or more advanced subject-matter tests of the GRE. The scores on all tests
taken will be weighed in regard to admission.
The GRE is given five times a year-in November, January, March, April,
and July-at a great many locations in the United States, including Gainesville,
Florida. To determine exact dates and the most convenient locations, students
should write to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Appli-
cations are required several weeks prior to the examination, and scores are re-
ceived about a month after the examination. Hence, it is necessary to apply
for the GRE in early October for admission in January, in early January for
admission in April, and in early April for admission in September. Other examin-
ations are given in early March and early July but the ones listed above are
correlated with admissions deadlines.
Students enrolled in the Graduate School prior to establishment of the GRE
requirement for admission (June, 1956) are permitted to complete the degree
to which their work at that time was being applied. However, they must submit
satisfactory GRE scores before admission to study for any other advanced degree.
FOREIGN STUDENTS.-Students educated in foreign countries who apply
for admission while residing outside the United States may be given a postpone-
ment and permitted to take the GRE during the first trimester of attendance at
the University of Florida. Registration for a second trimester will depend upon
completion of the examination. All foreign students whose native language is not
English will be required to take an examination during their first trimester at
the University to test their command of the English language. A student whose
command of English is considered inadequate will be required to take one or more
special courses in English for foreign students. These courses do not carry
graduate credit.
POSTPONEMENT OF THE GRE.-If a student applies for admission too
late to take the GRE before his expected date of entry, he may apply for ad-
mission to the Graduate School with postponement of the GRE and submit his
score on the Miller Analogies Test to be used as a partial basis for deciding









50 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

whether tentative admission may be granted. It should be noted, however, that
the Miller Analogies Test is not a substitute for the GRE. In cases where the
GRE has been postponed it must be taken with satisfactory results before a
second registration will be permitted.
THE MILLER ANALOGIES TEST is given at about 250 colleges and uni-
versities throughout the country, and is administered by the University of
Florida Board of Examiners, Room 405, Seagle Building, throughout the
calendar year at 3:00 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. During the
week prior to the first day of classes the test will also be offered at 10:00 a.m.
on Monday and 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Special appointments can
be made by contacting the Board of Examiners. The cost of the test, $2.00
should be paid to the University Cashier, Room 2, Tigert Hall, and the receipt
should be presented at the time of testing.
Test scores should be sent by the examining official to the Dean of the Gradu-
ate School. No student can be considered for postponement of the GRE until
after his application for admission is complete and all his credentials have been
received in the Office of the Registrar.

TRIAL PROGRAMS

The Graduate School approves two types of trial programs under the fifth-
year under-graduate registration for applicants whose admission for graduate
study is in doubt. These programs are arranged by the major department when
the student has been referred to it for this purpose by the Registrar. Trial
programs shall be strictly reserved for genuinely problematical or borderline
cases.
Type I (partly transferable) : a program of about 15 credit hours consisting
of advanced undergraduate courses and no more than 6 hours of graduate courses.
Upon completion of the program with an average grade of B or better, up to 12
hours may be transferred to the student's graduate record, provided that this
transfer is approved by his major department and college and that all other
requirements for admission to the Graduate School have been met.
Programs of Type I are used where a student's previous grade record or
GRE scores are on the borderline of acceptability.
Type II (nontransferable) : a program of 15 or more hours of undergraduate
work, none of which may be transferred to the student's graduate record.
Programs of Type II are used (1) to validate undergraduate records from
nonaccredited and unevaluated colleges and in cases where the quantity or
quality of the student's preparation cannot be determined with sufficient cer-
tainty for purpose of judging admission; (2) to repair extensive deficiencies
in undergraduate programs which do not meet the prerequisites for graduate
study laid down by the student's proposed major department (minor deficiencies
of less than 12 hours and field transfer requirements covered by this catalog
may be handled on a noncredit basis as part of the graduate program for
students who meet admission standards).
If the trial program of either type is completed with an average grade of B
or better and other admission requirements have been met, the student will
upon recommendation of his major department and college be given unqualified
admission to the Graduate School. To secure this change of status, the student
should apply through his department head and college dean to the Registrar.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


All trial programs must be formally approved by the major department and
college and filed with the Registrar and the Graduate School in order that there
may be no question in either office concerning the termination of the program or
of the courses to be used in calculating the grade average. Neither type of trial
program may be extended.


ADMISSION TO A SECOND GRADUATE PROGRAM


A student who has completed a degree program in the Graduate School may
not undertake an additional degree program without the approval of the head
of the department in which he proposes to do his major work. GRE scores must
be submitted by the student at the time he proposes an additional degree pro-
gram even though they were not required at the time he started his previous
degree work. It is particularly important that these scores and the other ele-
ments in the record and qualifications of the student be carefully weighed before
he is permitted to undertake work for the doctor's degree.


UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATE CREDIT


An undergraduate student at the University of Florida who has less than
one trimester of course work to complete for the bachelor's degree may, prior
to registering, request in writing, through the dean of his college, approval by
the Dean of the Graduate School of course registration eligible for graduate
credit. Such approval can be given only to students who have maintained a B
average in the upper division and whose total proposed program does not exceed
15 credit hours in a single trimester or 6 hours in a summer term. Commonly,
courses to be approved should be of full graduate caliber; approval of an ad-
vanced undergraduate course will be restricted to one not normally a part of
the undergraduate program prerequisite to the graduate studies to be under-
taken. For application to a specific advanced degree the course work taken
must be earned with a grade of A or B with all course work for the trimester
at B average, and be recommended for transfer to the student's graduate record
by his supervisory committee after he has been admitted to the Graduate School.
Courses beyond the requirement of the bachelor's degree which are taken without
such preapproval are not eligible for transfer as graduate credit. Foundation
work required for a change of major must be taken without graduate credit.
Students enrolled in the three-year master's degree program will be permitted
to register in graduate courses when approved by the program advisory com-
mittee and the assistant dean of the Graduate School in charge of the program.


ADMISSION OF FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS.-

Members of the faculty of the University of Florida with a rank of assistant
professor or above (or equivalent), except county agents in the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service, may not receive a graduate degree from this institution. They
may, however, register for work in the Graduate School and apply the credit
earned to graduate degrees to be conferred by other institutions.









52 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GENERAL REGULATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

It is the responsibility of the student to inform himself concerning, and to
observe, all regulations and procedures required by the course he is pursuing.
In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a stu-
dent pleads ignorance of the regulation or asserts that he was not informed of it
by his adviser or other authority. The student should make himself especially
familiar with (1) this section of the catalog, (2) the section presenting the
requirements for the degree which he plans to take, and (3) the offerings and
requirements of his major department.
CONSULTATION WITH COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENT.-After the
student has been admitted to the Graduate School but before his first registration,
he should consult the college and department in which he will do his work con-
cerning course requirements, deficiencies if any, the planning of a program,
special regulations, etc. All registrations require the signature of the dean of
the college in which the degree is to be awarded or of his representative.

LOADS

The University of Florida adopted, beginning with the 1962-63 academic
year, a trimester system of operation which established three 15-week periods
of instruction and examination. The third period runs concurrently with two
seven-week summer sessions. Class schedules will be revised so that a credit
hour under the trimester system will equal one semester hour.
MAXIMUM REGISTRATION.-The maximum registration permitted in a
single trimester is 15 credit hours. Part-time employment of any kind reduces
the maximum study loads to the amounts indicated in the following table:

Fraction Employment Academic Residence Acquired
of Time per Week Load* (fraction of full
Employed (maximum) (maximum) trimester)
1/3-time 15 hrs. 12 credit hrs. 4/5
1/2-time 20 hrs. 10 credit hrs. 2/3
3/4-time 30 hrs. 6-7 credit hrs. 1/2
full-time 40 hrs. 4 hrs. course work 2/5
plus 2 hrs. thesis

The academic loads listed were determined for the semester system. Smaller
academic loads will be necessary for trimester registrations. Reduced loads will
be established by the Graduate Council.
During the summer sessions, full-time registration for a candidate for a
thesis degree is 6 to 8 credit hours; full-time registration for a student in an
Ed.S. program or in any non-thesis master's program except those leading to the
M.A.T. or the M.S.T. is 9 credit hours.t A graduate assistant may not exceed
6 credit hours during the summer session, and a full-time employee is limited
to one course or 3 credit hours. These regulations apply to the 7-week summer
term.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


tThe registration of 9 credit hours was established as a maximum for an
eight-week summer session. In a shorter summer term registration should be
proportionately reduced.
MINIMUM REGISTRATION.-Holders of fellowships and assistantships
are required to register for graduate study programs commensurate with the
study time permitted by their awards-in no case less than 6 credit hours during
the regular trimester. In the summer sessions, holders of fellowships and
assistantships must register for a minimum of one course or 5 credit hours of
thesis.

VETERANS' CERTIFICATION.-Students who are applying for assistance
under Public Law 550 and whose applications are otherwise acceptable to the
Veterans Administration will automatically be certified by the Registrar as
follows:

Trimester Summer Session
Certification Registration Certification Registration
full 14-15 hrs. full 7-9 hrs.
3/4 10-13 hrs. 3/4 5-6 hrs.
1/2 7- 9 hrs. 1/2 4 hrs.
fees only 3- 6 hrs. fees only below 4 hrs.

Students who desire higher certification must submit through the Graduate School
office the form "Certification of Study Load." The University Housing Office also
requires this form for students with less than 9 hours' registration (or 3 hours
in the summer session). Appropriate allowance in "equivalent credit hours" may
be made on this form for preparation for language examinations or qualifying
examinations or for other studies specifically required by the student's super-
visory committee. Certification will be on the basis of the following proportion:

Certification Minimum Maximum
Study Load* Employment
full 12 hrs. 15 hrs. per week (1/3-time)
3/4 9 hrs. 20 hrs. per week (1/2-time)
1/2 6 hrs. 30 hrs. per week (3/4-time)
fees only 3 hrs. full time employee

*The hours indicated were established for the semester system. Appropriate
minimum and maximum loads will be established by the Graduate Council be-
fore registration for the fall trimester, 1962-63.

Certification in the summer sessions will be as follows:

Certification Minimum Maximum
Study Load Employment
full 6 hrs. 15 hrs. per week (1/3-time) or
1/2 3 hrs. 20 hrs. per week (1/2 time)
fees if applicable 3 hrs. 20 hrs. per week (1/2-time) or
30 hrs. per week (3/4-time)
full-time employee










54 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

In cases where the supervisory committee classifies the work load as a contribu-
tion to the student's approved educational program, additional certification will
normally be approved.

RESIDENCE

For work taken at the University of Florida, an academic year of residence
will be granted for two trimesters of full-time registration. The academic year
of the institution issuing a transcript will be used for residence determination
in accepting transfer credits. Specific residence requirements of individual de-
grees will be found in the sections dealing with these degrees.
In equating residence with registration, the ratio of 15 hours as the equivalent
of full residence should be used by students who have part-time employment.
In the case of students who are giving full time to their studies, a registration of
12 hours may be considered to represent full residence.
In some cases a student may be employed on a contract or sponsored project
from which his thesis or dissertation will be drawn. Upon written recommenda-
tion of the supervisory committee, residence credit may be permitted for a por-
tion of the time devoted to such research. All time devoted to routine duties or
to research not related directly to the dissertation or thesis should be removed
from consideration. In no case shall academic credit be allowed for more than
three-quarters of the total time devoted to such project research. This restric-
tion does not apply to research under an unrestricted tax-exempt fellowship.
The written recommendation of the supervisory committee must be made during
the trimester in which the work is done. In no case may a student so employed
be credited with full-time residence.

COURSES AND CREDITS

Courses numbered 500-599 are for fifth-year or other advanced undergraduate
programs. Regulations as to the use of these courses in graduate programs,
grading, and minimum class size will be the same as for courses in the 400
category. Courses numbered 600 and above are limited to graduate students.
Courses numbered 700 and above are graduate courses primarily for advanced
graduate students.

Undergraduate courses numbered 300 and above are acceptable for minor
credit when taken as a part of an approved graduate program. Courses bearing
numbers below 600 may not be used for graduate major credit unless they have
been approved for this purpose by the Graduate Council. In any case, at least
50 per cent of the minimum course work for any master's degree must be in
courses numbered 600 or above.

Registration in the course numbered 699, Master's Thesis, may be from 0
to 6 hours, and in the course numbered 799, Doctoral Dissertation, may be from
1 to 12 hours in one trimester. The total registration in 699 is limited to 12
hours but is unlimited for 799. Advisers should assign to registration in these
courses the number of hours of credit appropriate to the planned work in re-
search. Registration for zero credit hours should be assigned only in exceptional
situations, since the registration should normally reflect the proposed program









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


of research as well as of course work. On the assignment of credit for research
which is a part of a student's employment as well as a contribution to his thesis
or dissertation, see the section on Residence above.

Regulations governing the transfer of credit from other graduate schools will
be found in the sections dealing with requirements for degrees.

A complete list of approved graduate courses appears in the section of this
catalog entitled Departmental Courses. Departments reserve the right to decide
which of these graduate courses shall be given in any trimester or summer ses-
sion. The published Schedule of Courses does not always include all graduate
courses offered; the departments, therefore, should be consulted concerning avail-
able courses.

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK.-No courses may be taken
for graduate credit by correspondence. No extension courses, field laboratory
courses, or workshops may be used for graduate credit except in programs for
the M.Ed., M.A.E., M.P.H., and Ed.S. For regulations governing the use of
such courses in the degree programs named, see below, under requirements for
specific degrees, the limits on off-campus work. Extension work taken at another
institution (except Florida State University) may not be transferred to the
University of Florida for graduate credit.

GRADES

Passing grades for graduate students in courses numbered below 600 are A
and B. Passing grades in courses numbered 600 and above are A, B, and C; how-
ever, C grades in courses numbered 600 and above count toward a graduate
degree only if an equal number of credit hours in courses numbered 600 and
above are earned with a grade of A.

Admission to candidacy for a graduate degree and the award of such degree
depends (among other requirements) upon maintenance of an average grade of
B for all work attempted in the major and minor fields. Any grade of I (in-
complete) in the fields of the major and minor (or minors) must be removed
by completing all required work, unless an honor-point average of 3.0 is main-
tained, including the hours of incomplete courses. Grades in courses numbered
699 and 799 are not considered in calculating these averages.

It is the responsibility of the thesis or dissertation director to submit a grade
in 699 or 799. The grade may be any of the standard letter grades or it may
be I. If the grade of I is recorded, it should be changed to a regular letter grade
as soon as the student has completed the work appropriate to the credit hours
of registration in 699 or 799 and no later than the completion of the thesis or
dissertation.

UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP.-Any graduate student may be denied
further registration in the University or in his graduate major if his progress
toward the completion of his planned program becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatis-
factory progress has been defined by the Graduate Council as failure to maintain
an accumulative grade average of B in all work attempted in the Graduate
School.










56 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CHANGE OF MAJOR

Graduate students already admitted for work in one department who wish to
transfer to another department must apply through the office of the dean of their
college and must have their credentials approved by the graduate selection
committee having jurisdiction in the new department. The Dean of the
Graduate School and the Registrar must be notified in writing, and the notifica-
tion must carry the approval of both department heads and the college dean.
If the change of department involves a change of college, formal application for
change of college must be made through the office of the Registrar.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS

In those degree programs where a foreign language examination is required
the following principles and procedures apply:
Each candidate, at the time of applying for a foreign language examination,
shall present a certificate of admission to the Department of Foreign Languages.
This certificate shall bear the signature of his supervisory chairman (or depart-
ment head if a committee has not been appointed) and shall state that he is
believed to be prepared for the examination.
If he fails to pass a foreign language examination, the student shall present
to the Graduate School, through his supervisory committee chairman, acceptable
evidence that he has made a serious attempt to prepare himself for re-examina-
tion. If the evidence is acceptable, the student will be given a certificate of
admission, which must be presented to the Department of Foreign Languages
before he will be permitted to take his re-examination.
The reading knowledge examination consists of a passage of general material
selected by the Foreign Language Department. The use of a dictionary is per-
mitted. Grading of the regular foreign language examination is handled by the
Foreign Language Department, the objective being that the essential idea of
each part of the passage be translated into acceptable English. The grade of
each student taking an examination is transmitted to the Graduate School,
together with the recommendation of the Foreign Language Department as to
an acceptable grade. The Graduate School will send the result of the examina-
tion to the college dean, the department head, the supervisory committee chair-
man, and the student.

PROCEDURE FOR FINAL TRIMESTER

It is essential that the student inform himself concerning deadline dates as
set forth in the University Calendar and in the announcements issued by the
Dean of the Graduate School and by the officials of his college, school, or de-
partment.
Early in the last term the student should make formal application to the
Registrar for his degree. When his thesis is ready to be put in final form he
should get instructions from the office of the Dean of the Graduate School. He
must arrange through the University Bookstore for proper academic costume
to be worn at Commencement.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Normally, students in the Graduate School must be registered in the Univer-
sity at the time they receive a degree. If, however, a student has completed
all requirements for his degree, including courses, residence, thesis or disser-
tation, and all examinations, at the time of registration for the term in which
his degree is to be awarded, the Graduate Council will consider a petition to
waive this regulation. In brief, a student must be registered for the term in
which his final examination is given.

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT.-Attendance at commencement
exercises is required of those receiving advanced degrees. A request to receive
the degree in absentia may be presented to the Dean of the Graduate School for
referral to the President of the University, but only under extraordinary cir-
cumstances will it be granted. The petition must give full explanation of the
circumstances and must be submitted at least two weeks before commencement.

REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREE

GENERAL REGULATIONS

RESIDENCE.-For any master's degree the student must spend at least one
fulltime academic year, or equivalent, as a graduate student at the University of
Florida.
If the work for the master's degree is done entirely in the summer, full-time
study during four seven-week sessions will satisfy the residence requirement.
This requirement may be reduced to (but not below) three seven-week summer
sessions by transfer of work from another institution or by use of extension or
other nonresident credit where accepted by the college concerned and by the
Graduate Council.
Nonresident county agents in the Agricultural Extension Service may use
three three-week summer sessions for the purpose of satisfying the residence re-
quirement for the degrees Master of Agriculture or Master of Science in Agricul-
ture, but only if they have also spent one regular trimester in full-time resident
graduate study (or two seven-week summes sessions) on the campus at the
University of Florida.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Application for admission to candidacy for
master's degrees should be approved by the Graduate School when course work
is half completed and in no case later than 60 days before the degree is to be
awarded. The student must have a B average for all graduate work completed.
The Graduate Council reserves the right to deny degrees to persons who have
failed to comply with this regulation at the proper time.
TRANSFER OF CREDITS.-Courses of full graduate level to the extent of
6 credit hours may be transferred from an institution approved for this purpose
by the Graduate School. Acceptance of transfer credit requires approval of the
student's supervisory committee and the Graduate Council. Nonresident or
extension work taken at another institution (with the exception of Florida State
University) may not be transferred to the University of Florida for graduate
credit.
TIME LIMIT.-All work for the master's degree must be completed within
seven years from the time of first registration.









58 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

MASTER'S DEGREES WITHOUT THESIS

Master of Agriculture

The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those students who wish
additional training before entering business occupations or professions, rather
than for those interested primarily in research. The basic requirements, in-
cluding those for admission, residence, supervisory committee, plan of study, and
admission to candidacy, are the same as for the Master of Science in Agriculture
degree, as outlined elsewhere, but the work requirements are made to conform to
the specific objectives of this degree.
WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 36 credit hours of course work is re-
quired, at least 18 of which shall be designated strictly for graduates; if a de-
partmental major is claimed, 12 of these 18 hours must be in the major depart-
ment. Each student's program is designed to take into account the qualifications
and needs of the individual and is subject to the approval of the supervisory
committee. A thesis is not required, but the student must submit reports, term
papers, and records of work accomplished. A comprehensive written qualifying
examination, given by the supervisory committee, is required before the be-
ginning of the second trimester of work. Failure to qualify in this examination
will require either the student's elimination from the program or additional course
work. A final oral examination by the supervisory committee covering the whole
field of study of the candidate is required.
For further details, inquire of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

Master of Arts and Master of Science in Teaching

These degrees are designed for graduate students majoring in the departments
of the College of Arts and Sciences who intend to teach in junior or four-year
colleges. Requirements for admission are the same as for the regular M.A. and
M.S. degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences, and, like the work for those
degrees, programs leading to the M.A.T. and the M.S.T. may with proper ap-
provals be incorporated into programs leading to the Ph.D.
The requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language.
2. Completion of the requirements for Florida Junior College Certification.
The plan of certification most appropriate to these degrees is Plan III, which
is stated as follows on page 258 of the State Board Regulations Relating to
Florida Requirements for Teacher Education and Certification (revised and
adopted, October, 1956):
The Applicant must
a. Hold a master's degree or higher.
b. Present work in educational psychology, sociology (education or com-
munity) and curriculum dealing with the junior college totaling at least
9 credit hours.
c. Present an internship of at least 6 credit hours, or present three years
of successful teaching experience.
d. Present 36 credit hours in the subject area in which certification is
sought with at least 12 credit hours at the graduate level.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


3. Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credit hours of work while registered
as a graduate student, this work to be distributed as follows:
21 credit hours in the major and minor (minimum for major: 12 hours; mini-
mum for the minor: 6 hours);
6 credit hours in a departmental internship as described below;
9 credit hours in the studies prescribed in Item b of the state certification
requirements. If any or all of these studies have been satisfactorily com-
pleted before the program is begun, the credit hours thus made available
may be used for further work in the major or minor, in education, or in a
thesis.

The internship will be organized as a total of 6 credit hours over two tri-
mesters (under the direction of the major department) in which the student
will (1) attend a seminar on the problems, methods, and duties of the college
teacher of the student's major subject, (2) assist a professor approved for the
purpose by the department head in conducting a course throughout a trimester,
this assistance to include teaching under observation at least one-third of the
classes in the course, attendance at the remaining classes, preparing and grad-
ing examinations, and participation in all other essential activities which the
organization and administration of the course may entail, (3) attend faculty
meetings, and be given practice in all the essential activities involved in being
a college teacher of his subject.

Master of Business Administration

The requirements for the Master of Business Administration degree have
been designed to give the student broad general preparation for managerial
work with emphasis upon developing his capacities and skills for making business
decisions. Limited specialization in one of two fields is also possible.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS.-Completion of a minimum of 30 credit
hours of undergraduate work in business administration and economics, including
the following:
Economic Principles 6 credit hours
Statistics 3 credit hours
Accounting-Introductory 6 credit hours
Business Law 3 credit hours
ATG 590-Survey of Accounting (3 credit hours) may be taken in lieu of the
6 credit hours of introductory accounting. At least 15 hours of the under-
graduate courses, excluding ATG 590, must be in junior-level courses or higher.
Students who have had no previous work in business administration or eco-
nomics will be required to take a foundation program of at least 30 credit hours
meeting the requirements stated above.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE.-A program of 30 credit hours
of course work is required. This program is a follows:
1. All candidates are required to take
BS 679-Advanced Business Policy 3 credit hours
BS 690-Business Research and Reports 3 credit hours
ES 615-Economics of Business Decisions 3 credit hours
ES 616-Economics Environment of Business 3 credit hours









60 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

2. Unless waived because of acceptable undergraduate courses taken in the
same area, all candidates are required to take
BS 610-Managerial Accounting 3 credit hours
BS 664-Managerial Statistics 3 credit hours
BS 671-Human Relations in Business 3 credit hours
3. All candidates must complete at least one basic course in each of the fields
of marketing, production management, and corporation finance. Such
courses may be taken as a part of either the undergraduate or the gradu-
ate program within the limits noted. Candidates deficient in marketing
will take MKG 531-Marketing Principles and Institutions (3 credit hours).
Candidates deficient in production management will take MGT 575-Pro-
duction Management Problems (3 credit hours). Candidates deficient in
corporation finance will take FI 326-Business Finance (3 credit hours).
Of these three courses, only MGT 575 and one, but not both, of the
other two courses may be used in satisfying the 30-hour requirement for
the degree. Thus, a student who is deficient in all three fields or in both
marketing and corporation finance will have to complete 33 hours for the
degree.
4. Electives: The remaining hours will be selected from graduate and ad-
vanced undergraduate courses in the candidate's field or fields of interest.
A candidate should avoid undue specialization in the selection of his
electives.
EXAMINATIONS.-Each candidate will be required to pass both a written
and an oral examination on his graduate work. The written examination will
be given toward the end of the trimester in which he expects to receive his degree
and will be designed to test his ability to deal with problems normally confront-
ing business administrators. It will consist primarily of the analysis of a business
case requiring the use of the various disciplines included in the curriculum. The
oral examination will be given after the written and will be administered by a
committee of three appointed from the graduate faculty of the College of Busi-
ness Administration.

Master of Education

PURPOSE.-This degree is designed to increase the professional preparation
of school personnel. The program has been planned to give public school workers
a wide range of essential abilities and a background of theory.
DESCRIPTION.-The Master of Education degree is offered under two plans.
Plan I is for the secondary and junior college teachers who seek increased teach-
ing skill and greater depth and scholarship in their teaching field. It is offered
in the departments of Foundations of Education, Secondary Education including
Business Education, and Vocational Agriculture.
The minimum program for the M.Ed. under Plan I is 36 hours of course work
above the 300 level, 18 of which must be at the 600 level or above, with 18 hours
of course work outside the College of Education for students who have graduated
from departments or colleges of education or who hold a regular Florida Gradu-
ate Certificate to teach. (For students who have graduated from colleges other
than education, the total number of hours outside of education may not be less
than 6 hours.) The minimum requirement of course work in education under
Plan I is either (1) 24 hours in the master's program with 18 hours at the 600









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


level or above, or (2) 36 hours at any level in the combined undergraduate and
graduate program. For students with an undergraduate major in education
the minimum number of hours in education is 12.
Plan II is used for specialized school personnel and elementary teachers and
is offered in the departments of Educational Administration, Elementary Edu-
cation, and Personnel Services.
The minimum program for the M.Ed. under Plan II is 36 hours of course
work above the 300 level, 18 hours of which must be at the 600 level or above,
with a minimum of 6 hours of course work outside the College of Education.
The student's undergraduate and graduate program must include a minimum of
36 hours of course work in education.
WORK REQUIRED.-Each student is required to submit a plan of study
which shows acceptable balance and direction. The planned program is approved
by the student's counselor, the department head, and the Office of Graduate
Studies in Education. After the program has been developed, any change must
be requested in writing and similarly approved.
TRANSFER OF CREDITS.-If recommended in advance by the graduate
committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School, a student may be
permitted to study in other institutions to the extent of (but not to exceed) 6 cre-
dit hours. No graduate credits earned prior to admission to the University may be
transferred without special recommendation of the graduate committee and
the approval of the Graduate Council. No more than 6 credit hours of credit
may be thus transferred.
EXTENSION AND FIELD LABORATORY COURSES.-Six hours of ap-
proved extension courses may be included in the student's planned program. Six
additional hours of courses designated as field laboratory courses (ED 682,
EDF 644, and EDF 645) may also be included with the approval of the counselor.
LIMIT ON OFF-CAMPUS WORK.-The University imposes a limit of 12
hours of credit in the aggregate on work allowed from (1) off-campus workshops
and extension courses, (2) field laboratory courses, (3) courses transferred
from other approved institutions, and (4) evening courses at the University of
South Florida. (See separate publication for special joint program between
University of South Florida, Florida State University, and University of Flor-
ida.) A maximum of 6 hours is imposed on each of these categories.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to candidacy for the Master of
Education degree is recommended to the Graduate Council by the Graduate Com-
mittee of the College of Education on the basis of an evaluation of the appli-
cant at the end of from 12 to 18 credit hours of graduate work at the University
of Florida.
This evaluation is based in part on materials which the student submits with
his application and includes consideration of (1) the student's academic record,
(2) the student's GRE scores, (3) evidence of competency in the use (oral and
written) of the English language, (4) evaluation of personal qualities and
promise of professional attainment by persons to whom the applicant's record
is known, (5) the student's experience record, and (6) other appropriate in-
formation.
This process is administered through the Office of Graduate Studies in Educa-
tion for the graduate committee and evaluation is made by a committee of the
faculty, which may recommend supplementary oral and/or written examinations
for students whose admission to candidacy is in doubt.









62 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The student's remaining program of study may be revised if needed after
the Admission to Candidacy Examination. On approval of the graduate com-
mittee, the candidate will be recommended for the degree upon the satisfactory
completion of the designated course work.
The candidate must have completed at least one year of teaching (or the
equivalent) prior to taking the last 6 credit hours of work, or must have in-
cluded in his record the satisfactory completion of an internship program or a
minimum of 6 credit hours of student teaching.
THE GRADUATE COMMITTEE OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION.-
A special counselor is appointed for each student in the Master of Education
program. His work is under general supervision of the Graduate Committee
in the College of Education.

Master of Physical Education and Health

WORK REQUIRED.-A minimum of 36 credit hours of course work is re-
quired, at least 18 of which must be courses in the fields of physical education,
health education, or recreation designated strictly for graduates, or courses
numbered 500 and above if approved for graduate major credit. Of the re-
maining 18 hours, at least 9 credit hours must be taken in courses outside the
College of Physical Education and Health. At least 50 per cent of the minimum
course requirements shall be from courses numbered 600 and above. The major
for the degree is physical education.
All degree candidates must complete Florida teaching certification require-
ments in physical education by the conclusion of the master's degree program.
Certification requirements must be met as part of and/or in addition to degree
requirements, if not already completed before admission to graduate study.
OFF-CAMPUS WORK.-The regulations governing the use of off-campus
work are the same as those stated for the Master of Education degree on page 20.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-A committee of five members of the faculty
of the College of Physical Education and Health, with the dean of the college,
or some person designated by him, serving as chairman and the Dean of the
Graduate School as an ex officio member, will supervise the work of students
registered in this program, subject to the approval of the Graduate Council.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is
not a guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
The student will be required to pass a written and/or oral examination in ad-
dition to being recommended by the supervisory committee for admission to
candidacy. This examination should be taken by the end of the student's first
trimester of residence.
FINAL EXAMINATION.-A thesis is not required but the candidate must
pass a final examination at the close of his course work. This written and/or
oral examination will be administered by the supervisory committee and will be
confined largely to the student's major field of study.

Master of Rehabilitation Counseling

The interdisciplinary program leading to the degree of Master of Rehabilita-
tion Counseling is designed to give students basic knowledge and professional









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


skills essential to the rehabilitation of physically, mentally, and emotionally handi-
capped persons. The diversity of activities performed by individuals who bear
the designation of rehabilitation counselor in the various state, federal, and
private agencies, necessitates a program that permits a basic foundation in
counseling and guidance and, at the same time, allows for a sound preparation
in the medical, socio-psychological and vocational implications of disability. The
fundamental purpose of the program, therefore, is to present a systematic and
integrated study of the basic knowledge and skills needed by the rehabilitation
counselor. Two basic qualifications are necessary for successful completion of
the program: (1) the academic ability to accomplish the course requirements
with satisfactory performance, and (2) the ability to work effectively with dis-
abled people in a counseling relationship. Traineeship grants for selected stu-
dents are available.
WORK REQUIRED.-The minimum requirement is 42 credit hours, of which
24 hours represent required work in rehabilitation courses including an intern-
ship. An additional minimum of 18 hours is selected from designated courses; i.e.,
3-9 hours in each of the following areas: (1) statistics and measurement, (2)
personality development, and (3) counseling. The selection of the 3-9 hours in
each of the three areas is made on the basis of meeting the individual needs
of the student and is subject to the approval of a supervisory committee. At
least 50 per cent of the minimum course requirements shall be from courses
numbered 600 and above.
AREA I-STATISTICS AND MEASUREMENT-3-9 HOURS


CORE OFFERINGS
PSY 503-Essentials of Psychological
Testing
EDF 360-Elementary Statistical
Methods in Education
PSY 311-Introductory to Psycho-
logical Statistics
EDP 613-Personnel Testing
PSY 641-Personality Assessment:
Basic Procedures
PSY 642-Personality Assessment:
Advanced Procedures


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS

PSY 512-Individual and Group Dif-
ferences
PSY 603-Statistical Methods: In-
ference
PSY 604-Statistical Methods: Corre-
lation
PSY 644-College Achievement Test-
ing in Comprehensive
Courses
EDF 450-Measurement and Evalua-
tion in Education
EDF 660-Educational Statistics


AREA II-PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT-3-9 HOURS


CORE OFFERINGS

PSY 410-Abnormal Psychology
PSY 509-Theories of Personality
EDF 641-Educational Psychology:
Personality Dynamics
PSY 615-Survey of Social Psy-
chology
PSY 669-Seminar: Motivation


ELECTIVE OFFERINGS
PSY 308-Developmental Psychology
PSY 610-Seminar in Psychopath-
ology
APY 503-Culture and Personality
SY 621-The Sociology of the Aged
PSY 661-Seminar: Psychological
Problems of Aging
SY 556-Social Factors in Health
and Illness









64 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AREA III-COUNSELING-3-9 HOURS
CORE OFFERINGS ELECTIVE OFFERINGS

PSY 637-Personal Counseling PSY 613-Children's Behavior Dis-
EDP 610-Principles of Guidance and turbances
Personnel Work PSY 651-Practicum in Professional
EDP 611-Occupational and Educa- Psychology
tional Information EDP 616-Practicum in Counseling
EDP 614-Case Studies in Counseling SCH 617-Seminar: Speech Pathology
PSY 614-Vocational Appraisal I
PSY 611-Introduction to Profession-
al Psychology
POLICY COMMITTEE.-A committee of five members of the faculty repre-
senting the College of Health Related Services, Department of Psychology,
College of Medicine, and College of Education, with the professor in charge
of rehabilitation counseling serving as chairman and the Dean of the Graduate
School as an ex officio member, will determine policy, and, in general, supervise
the work of students registered in this program.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to the work of this program is
not a guarantee that the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
When a student has completed 12-15 credit hours of graduate work at the
University of Florida, he is required to apply for admission to candidacy for
the degree, using the forms provided by the office of the Dean of the Graduate
School. Admission to candidacy for the Master of Rehabilitation Counseling de-
gree will be recommended to the Graduate Council by a supervisory committee
of the College of Health Related Services on the basis of a review of his work,
his personal traits, and any other appropriate information to determine his
eligibility to proceed further toward the degree program.
DEPARTMENTAL STUDY PROJECT.-A thesis is not required but the can-
didate must complete an approved departmental study or research project as
part of the degree requirements.

MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS

REQUIRED REGISTRATION.-The minimum registration required for the
master's degree with thesis is 30 credit hours, including no less than 24 credit
hours of regular course work and up to 6 credit hours of the thesis course num-
bered 699 in all departments.
At least one-half of the required 24 hours of regular course work must be in
a single field of study designated the major, and the remainder, called the minor,
must be in a different but related subject matter. One 6-hour minor is required;
two 6-hour minors or one 12-hour minor may be taken. Minor work must be in
a department other than the major. In special cases this requirement may be
modified, but only with the written permission of the Dean of the Graduate
School.
The work in the major field must be in courses designed strictly for graduates
(numbered 600 and above) or in undergraduate courses designated by the Gradu-









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ate Council as available for graduate major credit. For the minor, courses num-
bered 300 and above may be taken.
At least 50 per cent of the required 24 credit hours of regular course work
must be in courses numbered 600 and above. Registration in 699 is limited to a
total of 12 credit hours.
THESIS.-All candidates for this degree are required to prepare and pre-
sent a thesis (or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to their supervisory
committees, and the Graduate School. The candidate should consult the Gradu-
ate School office for instructions concerning the form of the thesis. The original
copy of the thesis, bound in temporary binding, and accompanied by three copies
of a brief abstract must be in the Dean's office on or before the dates specified
in the University Calendar. After the thesis is accepted, the original copy, to-
gether with the first carbon copy, will be deposited in the University Library.
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS.-(1) The requirement of a reading knowl-
edge of a foreign language is left to the discretion of the student's supervisory
committee or college. When a foreign language is required, the examination will
be conducted by the Department of Foreign Languages; if an examination has
already been passed at another institution, it must be validated at the University
of Florida by the Department of Foreign Languages. If the student is majoring
in a foreign language, the language may not be used to satisfy this requirement.
The foreign language requirement must be satisfied before the student is ad-
mitted to candidacy. (2) The ability to use the English language correctly and
effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee, is required of all candidates.
Hence this cannot be substituted for the foreign language requirement.
SPECIAL SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE.-A special supervisory committee
of not fewer than three members will be appointed for each student by the Dean
of the Graduate School upon the recommendation of the college concerned. This
committee should be appointed as early as possible after the student has been
admitted to the Graduate School and, in general, not later than the end of the
first trimester of study. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex officio mem-
ber of all supervisory committees. The duties of the special supervisory com-
mittee are to advise the student, to check on his qualifications and progress, to
supervise the preparation of the thesis, and to conduct the final examination.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-When a student has completed about one-
half of his work for his degree, he should apply for admission to candidacy for
that degree, using the forms provided by the office of the Dean of the Graduate
School. In order to be admitted to candidacy, the student must have (1) main-
tained a B average in registered course work, (2) passed a foreign language ex-
amination and a qualifying examination (if these are required in his curriculum),
(3) chosen his thesis topic, (4) satisfied his supervisory committee, department
head, and college dean that he is qualified to become a candidate for his degree, It
is the responsibility of his supervisory committee at this time to make such inves-
tigation as is necessary to determine his eligibility.
GENERAL EXAMINATION.-When all of the student's work is completed,
or practically so, including the regular courses and the thesis, his supervisory
committee is required to examine him orally or in writing or both on (1) his
thesis, (2) his major subjects, (3) his minor or minors, and (4) matters of a









66 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

general nature pertaining to his field of study. Using the form provided for
the purpose the committee shall report in writing to the Dean of the Graduate
School not later than one week before the time for conferring of the degree
whether all work has been completed in a satisfactory manner and whether on
the basis of the final examination the student is recommended for his degree. In
no case may this examination be scheduled earlier than six months before the
degree is to be conferred, without special approval of the Graduate Council.
SPECIAL THESIS ABSTRACT REQUIRED.-At the request of the State
Department of Education of the State of Florida, the College of Education re-
quires all candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Education to prepare
a 750-word abstract of the thesis, which is forwarded to the State Department
for informational purposes.

Master of Fine Arts

The degree of Master of Fine Arts is designed primarily for those who wish
to prepare themselves as teachers of art in colleges and universities. It is the
highest degree granted in the studio fields of the fine arts. Two years' residence
is normally required for completion of requirements. Specialization is offered in
painting, printmaking, sculpture, and/or creative photography.
The requirements for the M.F.A. are the same as those for other master's
degrees with thesis except as follows:
1. The minimum registration required is 48 credits, including no less than 42
credits in regular course work and 6 credits in ART 699-Master's Thesis.
2. The course work must include ART 500-Methods of Research and Biblio-
graphy (2 credits), a minimum of 6 additional credits in the history and theory
of art, and a minimum of 6 credits in a minor field. The remaining credits will
be in advanced studio courses in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture,
and/or creative photography.

THE ADVANCED SCHOOL OF THE
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE Ed.S. AND Ed.D.

The Advanced School of the College of Education offers the degrees of
Specialist in Education and Doctor of Education. Work in the Advanced School
will be available only to those who have shown a high degree of ability in their
first year of graduate work. The purpose of the Advanced School is to develop
leadership, research competency, and specialization.
ADMISSION TO THE ADVANCED SCHOOL IN EDUCATION.-Admis-
sion to the Advanced School will be open only to persons who have:
1. Successfully completed 36 credit hours of professional course work in edu-
cation. Applicants for admission to the Advanced School of the College of
Education who meet all the requirements except for successfully complet-
ing 36 credit hours of professional education courses may be given pro-









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


visional admission, and full admission when they have completed the re-
quired 36 hours.
2. Presented a record of successful professional experience, the appropriate-
ness of which will be determined by the instructional department passing
on the applicant's qualifications for admission. (In some instances, depart-
ments may admit students with the understanding that further experience
may be required before the student will be recommended for the degree.)
Admission to the Advanced School will be based on the following criteria:

1. High scholastic average during the fifth-year work (3.5 honor-point av-
erage or above, as computed at the University of Florida, will be con-
sidered evidence of good scholarship).
2. Results from the GRE Scholastic Aptitude and Advanced Tests.
3. Results from the Miller Analogies Test.
4. An oral examination administered by the department in which the student
seeks to specialize.

5. Special interviews for individuals for whom the department of speciali-
zation seeks more data.

The judgment concerning admission of an individual student will be based on
the consideration of his performance in all of these areas by the department in
which the student desires to specialize. The department will certify to the ad-
missions committee that the student has met the criteria for admission to the
Advanced School.
In all cases the record, experience, and personal qualifications of the person
applying for admission are subject to the approval of the admissions committee.
Where possible, students should seek admission to the Advanced School before
enrolling in any courses beyond the master's degree. Where this procedure is
impossible, the student will register in the Graduate School, and, during the
first trimester of his work beyond the master's degree, will apply for admission
to the Advanced School. If such candidate is found to be eligible, appropriate
work taken during the term will be included in the planned program.
After completion of the fifth year any student approved by the admissions
committee may register for courses, but admission to the Advanced School must
be obtained before work may be counted for degrees or certificates above the
master's level.

Specialist in Education

The Ed.S. degree is awarded at the completion of a 36-hour planned program
beyond the master's. Primary emphasis in an Ed.S. program is placed on the
development of the competencies needed for a specific job.
Ten types of Ed.S. programs are available in the Advanced School of the
College of Education. They are: administration, agricultural education, audio-
visual, educational psychology and human growth and development, elementary
education, high school teacher, junior college teacher, personnel services, research
specialist in education, and supervision.










68 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

A student who wishes to work for a degree in one of these programs must
be admitted to the Advanced School and be accepted by the appropriate depart-
mental admission committee.
The 36-hour program of each student must include 24 credits of course work
open only to graduate students. Course selection is made by the student and
his counselor from available courses which will contribute to the development
of the competencies needed for the specific position the student seeks.
A maximum of 6 hours of transferred credit may be included. Such work
must have been completed in an institution which offers the doctor's degree.
No extension work may be transferred. Up to 6 hours in appropriate field labora-
tory courses, or 3 hours in field laboratory and 3 hours in regular extension
courses offered by the General Extension Division of the University of Florida
and Florida State University may be included.
A thesis is not required. Emphasis is placed upon the use of research rather
than upon the development of skills in research techniques.
Admission to the Advanced School, the successful completion of one trimester
of work, and the approval of the department of specialization are required for
admission to candidacy for the Specialist in Education degree.
At the end of the 36-hour program the student is given a final written and a
final oral examination by a committee selected by the head of his area of speciali-
zation. After he has passed the examination the candidate is awarded the
Specialist in Education degree upon the approval of the faculty and the Graduate
Council.
The Ed.S. is planned as a terminal degree. If as the end of this program the
student wishes to work for the Ed.D. he must meet the requirements stated for
that degree.
All work for the Specialist in Education degree must be completed within
seven years from the time of first registration.

Doctor of Education

The Doctor of Education degree is offered in administration and supervision,
curriculum and instruction, foundations of education, and guidance and personnel
services. Each doctoral candidate is expected to achieve understanding of the
broad field of education and competencies in the area in which he chooses to
specialize. A limited number of credits in physical education may be used as
part of the major.
The program leading to this degree is administered through the Office of
Graduate Studies in Education, which carries out the policies of the Graduate
School and the graduate committee of the College of Education.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of Doctor of Education
requires admission to the Advanced School of the College of Education, described
previously, as well as admission to the Graduate School.
All courses beyond the master's degree taken at another institution, to be
applied toward the Doctor of Education degree, must be taken at an institution
offering the doctor's degree and approved for the transfer of graduate credit by
the Graduate School of the University of Florida.

MINORS.-Minor work or work in cognate fields is required. If one minor is
selected, at least 18 hours of work therein will be required; if two minors are









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


chosen, one must have at least 12 hours of course work, the other at least 6
hours. Minors may not be taken in any branch of education or in the College of
Physical Education and Health.
Courses in physical education approved by the College of Physical Education
and Health and the Graduate School as subject matter or content courses may be
used in the cognate work.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present a suitable program of
not less than 18 hours of cognate work in at least two or more departments out-
side the College of Education. If two fields are included, there shall be no fewer
than 6 credit hours in each field. If there are three or more fields included, the
6-hour requirement for each field does not apply. This program must have the
approval of the student's supervisory committee. The College of Education
faculty will expect the candidate to be prepared to answer questions, at the time
of his oral examination, in any of the areas chosen.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY.-Admission to candidacy for the degree of
Doctor of Education rests on successful completion of the qualifying examina-
tions. Recommendation to the Graduate School for admission to candidacy is
based on the action of the supervisory committee, subject to the approval of
the graduate committee of the College of Education.
THE QUALIFYING EXAMINATION.-The applicant is recommended for
the qualifying examination by his supervisory committee after he has completed
sufficient course work and the research preparation requirements of the College
of Education.
The examination administered by the graduate committee of the College of
Education consists of (1) a general section; (2) a field of specialization section;
(3) examination in the minor or minors, where involved; and (4) an oral exami-
nation conducted by the applicant's supervisory committee.
RE-EXAMINATION.-If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he
will not be given a re-examination unless such an examination is recommended
for special reasons by his supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate
Council. At least a trimester of additional preparation is considered essential
before re-examination.
THE SEMINAR.-Each student is required to develop a thesis project to be
considered by a general doctoral seminar in the college. Participants in the
seminar will be faculty members of the college, other advanced students, and
members of the supervisory committee. The student must pass the qualifying
examination before scheduling the seminar.

RESEARCH PREPARATION REQUIREMENT.-This requirement is satis-
fied by meeting the requirements in both Groups 1 and 2 below:

Group 1.-(1) a course in education research (EDF 760) and
(2) the library usage examination (usually given in connection
with EDF 760) and
(3) a basic course in statistics (EDF 360, or PSY 211, or MS 310).

Group 2.-either
(1) a reading knowledge of one foreign language relevant to the
student's needs, or










70 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

(2) one of the following courses in measurements, statistics, or
research: SY 547 or SY 670; EDF 660 or PSY 605; EDS
605 or EDE 702; EDF 450; EDP 613; PSY 503, PSY 504,
PSY 626, PSY 632, PSY 633, or PSY 743; PHA 604 or PHA
510.

There is no language requirement for the Doctor of Education degree. Courses
taken at other institutions which may be the equivalent of course requirements
indicated above may be considered on recommendation of the applicant's super-
visory committee.
Abstracts.-For the purpose of inclusion in a summary of research studies in
education, published by the College of Education, the candidate must supply
one 1500-2500-word abstract of his dissertation, in addition to such other abstracts
as may be required by the Dean of the Graduate School.
For information relating to Residence, the Supervisory Committee, Time
Limit, the Dissertation, Publication of the Dissertation, and the Final Ex-
amination, the student is referred to the material presented under the heading
Doctor of Philosophy. These statements are applicable to both degrees.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE Ph.D.

COURSE REQUIREMENT

Doctoral study consists of the independent mastery of a field of knowledge
and the successful prosecution of research. For this reason, doctoral students
act, in large measure, on their own responsibility, and doctoral programs are
more flexible and varied than those leading to lower degrees. The Graduate
Council does not specify just what courses will be required for the Ph.D. degree,
or how many. The basic general requirement is that the program should be
unified in relation to a clear objective and that it should have the considered
approval of the student's supervisory committee.
MAJOR AND MINOR.-The student working for the Ph.D. must elect to do
his major work in a department specifically approved for the offering of
doctoral courses and the supervision of dissertations. These departments are
listed on page 10 of this catalog. In addition, the student must choose one or two
departmental minors. Minor work may be completed in any department approved
for master's or doctor's degree programs, as listed in this catalog.
If one minor is chosen, the representative of the minor department on the
supervisory committee should suggest from one to two trimesters of course
work (12 to 24 credit hours) as preparation for a qualifying examination. Of
course, a part of this background may have been acquired in the master's pro-
gram. The satisfaction of the requirement concerning the minor or minors
should be in terms of an examination conducted by the minor department rather
than in terms of rigorously specified course work.

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

The supervisory committee for a candidate for the degree of Doctor of
Philosophy should consist of at least five members. At least three members









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


should be from the college or department recommending the degree, and one or
two members should be drawn from a different educational discipline for the
purpose of representing the student's minor or minors and furthering the co-
ordination on the campus between colleges and disciplines. The chairman of the
supervisory committee for all doctoral students shall be a member of the
resident graduate faculty of the University of Florida. With the approval of
the department concerned and the Dean of the Graduate School, two members
of the supervisory committee may come from off the campus. Supervisory com-
mittees are nominated by the department head (in no case by the student),
approved by the dean of the college, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School. It is recommended that the supervisory committee be appointed as early
as possible after the student has been admitted to doctoral work and in general
no later than the end of the first trimester of study. The Dean of the Graduate
School is an ex officio member of all supervisory committees.

The duties of the supervisory committee are as follows:
1. To inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought. It
should be noted, however, that this does not absolve the student from the
responsibility for informing himself concerning these regulations. (See
Student Responsibility.)
2. To meet immediately after appointment to pass on the qualifications of
the student and to discuss and approve a program of study for him.
3. To meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the
plans for carrying it out.
4. To conduct the qualifying examination, or, in those cases where the ex-
amination is administered by the department, to take part in it.
5. To meet when the work on the dissertation is at least one-half completed to
review procedure, progress, and expected results, and to make suggestions
for completion.
6. To meet when the dissertation is completed to conduct the final oral
examination and to satisfy itself that the dissertation is a piece of original
research and a contribution to knowledge.

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

LANGUAGE READING EXAMINATIONS.-(1) Except as noted below a
reading knowledge of two languages other than English is required. The pri-
mary language must be German, Russian, or French, the choice to be made by
the supervisory committee on the basis of usefulness of the language in the
student's field of research.
(2) The secondary language, as approved by the supervisory committee,
may be from a list of languages adopted by the Graduate Council in which
reading knowledge examinations are administered by the Department of Foreign
Languages. Currently this list includes Bulgarian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, French,
German, Classical Greek, Modern Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Latin, Norwegian,
Polish, Portuguese, Rumanian, Russian, Slovakian, Spanish, and Swedish. Under
this provision, however, both languages may not be Romance. Proficiency in a
language not listed may be demonstrated by scholarly translation as explained
below.










72 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

All language examinations are given and certified by the Department of
Foreign Languages under policies and procedures stated in this section. If a
student is majoring in a foreign language, he may not use that language to
satisfy this requirement.

FUNCTIONAL EXAMINATION IN LANGUAGE.-A doctoral student, with
the approval of his supervisory committee, shall have the privilege of taking a
functional language examination (reading, writing, and speaking) in French,
German, or Russian as an alternative to the primary and secondary language
reading examinations. For students who are majoring in Sociology (Latin Amer-
ican) and Inter-American Studies the supervisory committee may approve ex-
aminations in any two Romance languages provided that one covers a functional
knowledge.

SUBSTITUTION OF SCHOLARLY TRANSLATION FOR A SECONDARY
LANGUAGE EXAMINATION.-Some languages not listed above as approved
by the Graduate Council for examination as a secondary language may offer
sufficient scholarly material in the special field of the student's major or minor
to be acceptable for substitution. After obtaining formal approval of the
supervisory committee the student may demonstrate proficiency in one of these
languages or in any secondary language by translation from that language
into English one or more published works of scholarly or research value in the
student's major or minor fields in amount equivalent to not less than fifty printed
pages of average book size. This material should form useful background in
relation to a graduate-level course, an assigned problem, or the dissertation;
and its scholarly or research value must be certified by the chairman of the
supervisory committee with the approval of the committee. The acceptability
of the English used in the translation must be certified by the Department of
English. The work of translation shall be supervised by the chairman of the
supervisory committee to the extent that he shall be prepared to certify to
the Graduate Council that the student prepared the translation without linguistic
assistance in either of the languages involved other than that provided by dic-
tionaries, grammars, and other such works of reference. The Graduate Council
shall reject claims for this language option if in its opinion the subject matter
presented is not of a sufficiently high level of scholarship or if the translation is
not presented in clear, grammatical English. If the student's English is at fault,
he may be advised to undertake remedial work. The completed translation shall
be filed in the Graduate School.

SUBSTITUTION OF MATHEMATICS FOR A SECONDARY LANGUAGE
EXAMINATION.-In certain departments individually approved by the Gradu-
ate Council (business administration, agricultural economics, and animal science),
a study of mathematics may be substituted for a reading knowledge of one foreign
language. When this substitution is chosen, the courses in mathematics taken
for this purpose may not be considered a part of the major or minor studies. The
degree of proficiency in mathematics shall be determined as follows:

1. For a field in which calculus is not included through the master's degree,
the student shall take and pass with a B or better the final examination
in MS 354 and any other courses in the Department of Mathematics speci-
fied by his supervisory committee.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


2. For a field in which calculus is included as a part of the bachelor's or
master's program, the student shall either pass with a B or better, or
demonstrate equivalent proficiency by written examination in 6 credit hours
of work in the Department of Mathematics which requires MS 354 as a
normal prerequisite.

DATES FOR COMPLETION OF LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT.-The lan-
guage requirement should be met as early as possible in the student's program
and must be met before the student can be admitted to the qualifying examina-
tion. The Department of Foreign Languages offers special noncredit classes in
the reading of French and German for graduate students (See the Schedule of
Courses.)


RESIDENCE

The minimum residence requirement is three academic years of full-time
resident graduate study, or equivalent, at institutions approved by the Graduate
School. Either the second or third academic year of the three-year program
must be spent in full-time study (except as noted in the following paragraph) on
the campus of the University of Florida. Candidates in agronomy, animal
husbandry, horticulture, plant pathology, and soils may do their research at
certain branch stations of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station where adequate staff and facilities are available.
In calculating residence, part-time study is evaluated on the basis of 15 credit
hours as equal to a full load. Part-time study may be substituted for the year of
full-time study stipulated in the preceding paragraph in either of the following
proportions: (1) 30 credit hours earned in one calendar year; (2) 35 credit
hours in four successive registrations (either including or excluding summer
session registrations). An overload program even when approved, will be valued
as a normal program in meeting this residence requirement.
Between the qualifying examination and the conferring of the degree, there
must elapse a minimum of one academic year if the candidate is in full-time
residence, or one full calendar year if the candidate is on less than a full-time
basis.

QUALIFYING EXAMINATION

The qualifying examination, which is required of all candidates for the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy, may be taken during the second term of the second
year of graduate study. The examination, conducted by the special supervisory
committee, with the aid of the major and minor departments, is both written and
oral and covers the major and minor subjects. The supervisory committee has
the responsibility at this time of deciding whether the student is qualified to
go on with work toward the Ph.D. degree.
If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not be given a re-
examination unless such an examination is recommended for special reasons by
his supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate Council. At least a
trimester of additional preparation is considered essential before re-examination.









74 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

TIME LIMIT.-All work for the doctor's degree must be completed within
five calendar years after the qualifying examination or this examination must be
repeated.

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY


A graduate student does not become an actual candidate for the Ph.D. degree
until he has been formally admitted to candidacy. Such admission requires the
approval of the student's supervisory committee, the head of his department, his
college dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School, and the approval must be
based on (1) the academic record of the student, (2) the opinion of his super-
visory committee concerning his overall fitness for candidacy, and (3) a qualify-
ing examination as described above. Application for admission to candidacy
should be made at about the end of the second or the beginning of the third year
of graduate study.

DISSERTATION


A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation and research
is required of all candidates. Since all doctoral dissertations will be published
by microfilm, microcard, or printing, it is necessary that the work be of publish-
able quality and that it be in form suitable for publication. The original copy
of the dissertation must be presented to the Dean of the Graduate School on or
before the date specified in the University Calendar. The sum of $50 must be
deposited with the Business Manager to cover the cost of publication as explained
below.

PUBLICATION OF DISSERTATION.-Candidates for the Ph.D. and EdD.
degrees may choose one of the following three alternatives in the publication of
their dissertations:

1. Microfilm publication. In this case the University will refund $25 of the
deposit as soon as the dissertation has been accepted and the final exam-
ination passed.
2. Microcard publication. In this case the University will determine the cost
of publication and either return any unneeded portion of the deposit or
bill the student for any excess in cost above $50.
3. Two-year postponement. The student may request a two-year period to
investigate possibilities of publication by printing. If the dissertation is
published as a book or monograph in essentially complete form, the Gradu-
ate Council will consider a request for refund of the entire deposit upon
receipt of five copies of the published work. At the end of the two-
year period, unless evidence of acceptance of the dissertation for such
publication has been presented, the Graduate Council will authorize pub-
lication by microfilm as indicated under (1) above.

COPYRIGHT.-Under (1) above the student may choose to copyright his
thesis before publication. The charge involved will be deducted from the $50
deposit before refund is made.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


FINAL EXAMINATION

After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of all other pre-
scribed work for the degree, but in no case earlier than six months before the
conferring of the degree, the candidate will be given a final examination, oral
or written or both, by his supervisory committee. Satisfactory performance on
this examination completes all requirements for the degree.

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

There are a number of special Graduate programs that are described in detail
in the Graduate School Catalog. Students interested in the following programs
are referred to the catalog for complete information:
Inter-American Area Studies
Graduate Program in Public Administration
Graduate Program in Community Planning
Graduate Program in Statistics
Southern Regional Graduate Summer Session in Statistics
MED Degree for Junior College Teachers of Technology
MED Degree for Junior College Teachers of Nursing
The University of Florida Graduate Residence Center at the University of
South Florida in Tampa
Ford Foundation Three-Year Master's Program
Research Program at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies

SUMMER INSTITUTE
FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL CHEMISTRY TEACHERS

This Summer Institute, conducted under a grant from the National Secience
Foundation, gives qualified chemistry teachers an opportunity to increase their
knowledge and teaching ability in chemistry by an intensive study of the
CHEMS approach to the teaching of chemistry. Stipends are $75 per week
plus $15 for each dependent. Tuition and other required University fees are
paid by the Institute. A maximum $80 round-trip travel allowance, at the
rate of 4 cents per mile, is made to each participant. Applicants must plan to
continue teaching chemistry in high school. Institute credit may apply toward
a graduate program in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the College of
Education. For further information and for application blanks, write to William
A. Gager, Director of Summer Institutes, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.

SUMMER INSTITUTES FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS
OF FRENCH AND SPANISH

In cooperation with the Language Development Program of the United States
Office of Education, the University of Florida will offer an eight week Foreign
Language Institute, June 18-August 11, 1962, for secondary school teachers of
French and Spanish. Under provisions of the National Defense Education Act










76 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

of 1958 each public school teacher who is selected to participate in the institute
will be eligible to apply for a stipend of $75 per week plus $15 per week for
each dependent. Participants must be admitted to the University of Florida.
Applications to the institute should be made to Dr. Irving R. Wershow, Director,
Foreign Language Institute, 3 Anderson Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.

SUMMER INSTITUTE FOR JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS
OF SCIENCE

This Summer Institute, conducted under a grant from the National Science
Foundation, gives qualified junior high school teachers an opportunity to increase
their knowledge and teaching ability in two subject areas of the three-botany,
geology, and physics. Stipends are $75 per week plus $15 for each dependent.
Tuition and other required University fees are paid by the Institute. A maxi-
mum $80 round-trip travel allowance, at the rate of 4 cents per mile, is made
to each participant. Applicants must plan to continue teaching junior high
school science. Institute credit may apply toward a graduate program in the
College of Arts and Sciences or in the College of Education. For further in-
formation and for application blanks, write to William A. Gager, Director of
Summer Institutes, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

FAMILY FINANCE WORKSHOP
June 18-July 27
1962

A workshop designed to help teachers develop competency in teaching skills
and understandings in personal and family finance is to be sponsored jointly by
the College of Education and College of Business Administration. Credit of
three semester hours each will be given for EDS. 604-Curriculum Development
Laboratory, and FI. 324-Investments for Individuals. Open to elementary as
well as secondary teachers and school administrators.
Scholarships including dormitory room, board, and instructional materials
are available. Inquiries should be addressed to Dr. James W. Crews, College of
Education, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SPECIAL THREE WEEK COURSES
The courses listed in this section are for special groups and run for
three weeks only. Students registering for courses listed in this section
follow the same admission and registration procedures as other stu-
dents but are limited to a maximum load of three semester hours.

June 18-July 6

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
AS. 404.-Principles of Farm Business Analysis. 1% credits.
Period 3 daily MCC 148 GREENE, R. E. L.
Laboratory: Periods 6, 7, 8 Th MCC 148
This course is designed to help students understand how basic economic principles can be
applied in the successful management and operation of a farm.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
AXT. 601.-Advanced Rural Leadership. 11/ credits.
Period 4 daily MCC 254 GRIGSBY, S. E. and STAFF
Laboratory: Periods 6-8 M MCC 254
The application of basic theory to principle of the behavioral sciences to program planning,
community organization, public affairs and small groups.
AXT. 604.-Agricultural Extension Through Group Action. 1 credits.
Period 3 daily MCC 254 GRIGSBY, S. E. and STAFF
Laboratory: Periods 6-8 M MCC 254
The development of extension programs through group action.

ANIMAL SCIENCE
AL. 609.-Problems in Animal Science. 3 credits. Open only to vocational agri-
cultural teachers and county agents.
Periods 1-3 Daily WAKEMAN, D. L.

BROADCASTING
BR. 518.-Teaching Through Television. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Senior or gradu-
ate standing.
Period 2-7 Daily BURTON, M. E.
Study of the elements of educational ind informational television-radio programs; planning,
preparation and production.

EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY
EDE. 550.-The Teaching of Arithmetic. 3 credits.
Section 2 Periods 2-4 Daily YON J 310 OLSON, W.
Periods 6-7 Daily YON J 310
The purpose of the course is to help teachers of elementary and junior high schools gain an
understanding of arithmetic concepts, symbolism, and teaching materials and procedures.

EDUCATION-FOUNDATIONS
EDF. 341.-The Young Child. 3 credits.
Periods 2-4 Daily YON J 309 JOHNSON, H. H.
Periods 6-7 Daily YON J 309
Study of growth and development during infancy and early childhood.










78 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

EDUCATION-SECONDARY

EDS. 601.-The Junior High School Curriculum. 3 credits.
Section 1. Periods 2-4 Daily YON J 306 BLACKBURN, J. E.
Periods 6-7 Daily YON J 306
Teachers, principals, and supervisors are given an opportunity to analyze and to evaluate
the curriculum offerings in the modern junior high school. Emphasis will be placed on developing
a school program to meet the needs of early adolescents.
EDS. 604.-Curriculum Development Laboratory. 3 credits.
Section 2 Periods 2-4 Daily YON J 307 TIMMERMAN, E.
Periods 6-7 Daily YON J 307
Planned primarily for teachers in developing resource units for teaching the course "Communism
versus Americanism" as directed by the 1961 Florida Legislature.

EDUCATION-VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE

EDV. 667.-Supervised Farming Problems in Agricultural Education. 3 credits.
Periods 2-4 Daily NRN 150 LOFTEN, W. T.
Periods 6-7 Daily NRN 150
Essential problems in planning and supervising programs of farming as required by the
Smith-Hughes and George-Barden Acts.

FORESTRY

FY. 413.-Forestry for Agriculturists. 3 credits. Prerequisite: B.S. in Agricul-
ture, or permission of the Director. T 1:00-6:00; WThF 7:00-12:00; Th 1:00-
2:00.
Principles and practices of forestry pertinent to the management of Agricultural lands.

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE

OH. 499.-Special Problems in Ornamental Horticulture. 11 credits.
To arrange MCC 121 MC ELWEE, E. W.
Section 2.

SCHOOL ART

SCA. 333.-Art for Elementary Teachers, 1. 3 credits.
Section 2 Periods 2-4 Daily NRN 29 BODNAR, P.
Periods 6-7 Daily NRN 29
A study of various types of school art expression based on an understanding of the needs of
elementary school children. Experiences with many types of art media will be provided.

VEGETABLE CROPS

VC. 607.-Topics in Vegetable Production Principles. (Nutrition of Vegetables).
1 credits per topic. Maximum 6 credits.
Period 2 Daily
Laboratory Period 6-7 T
Permission of Instructor. Offered primarily to Agricultural Extension and Vocational Agri-
cultural teachers. Each time it is offered this course will be announced in the Schedule of Courses
with one of the following topics specified:
Production principles, principles and practices in handling and marketing, nutrition of vege-
tables, role of agricultural chemicals.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 79

SPECIAL FOUR WEEK COURSE
June 18-July 13
Enrollment limited to selected educators from certain counties in
Florida. Not open to general registration. Application forms may be
obtain by writing the instructor and the application must be ap-
proved prior to June 1, 1962.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND ATHLETICS
PHA. 491.-The Operation of Community Health Education Programs. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
To arrange FLG 208 SANDEFUR, W. T., YEATTS, P. P.
Problems in operating community programs in health education. Field experiences in the stu-
dent's local county health agencies, both official and voluntary. The course is offered in cooperation
with the College of Education, the State Department of Education and the State Board of Health.









80 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SPECIAL SIX WEEK COURSES

June 18-July 27
The courses listed in this section run for six weeks only. Stu-
dents registering for the courses below follow the same admission
and registration procedures as other students but are limited to a
maximum load of six semester hours.

EDUCATION-SECONDARY
EDS. 604.-Curriculum Development Laboratory. 3 credits (Must be taken con-
currently with FI. 324.)
Section 1 Periods 6-7 Daily BRO CREWS, J. W. & RICHARDSON, J. G.
Guided experiences in developing resource units for teaching. Topics in personal or family finance.

FINANCE AND INSURANCE
FI. 324.-Investments for Individuals. 3 credits.
Periods 3-4 Daily Broward East Recreation Room RICHARDSON, J. G.
Designed for the non-Business Administration student, this course deals with the principal
investment problems that individuals face. Cannot be used for credit for BSBA degree. Students
registered for this course must register for EDS. 604 concurrently.

FRUIT CROPS
FC. 499.-A Study of Current Citrus Research in Florida. 4 credits. Prerequisites:
FC. 336 or 341.
To arrange
A comprehensive survey of research being conducted in the several areas of citrus production
at the Citrus Experiment Station at Lake Alfred. Students will be in residence at the Citrus
Station for six weeks.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SPECIAL THREE WEEK COURSES

July 9-July 27
EDUCATION-GENERAL

ED. 661.-Problems in Reading. 3 credits.
Periods 2-4 Daily YON J 310
Periods 6-7 Daily YON J 310
Specific reading problems such as those encountered in the classroom situation will be selected
for study. Special focus on individualizing reading.

EDUCATION-SECONDARY

EDS. 604.-Curriculum Development Laboratory. 3 credits.
Section 3 Periods 2-4 Daily YON J 306 BROWNE, E. B.
Periods 6-7 Daily YON J 306
Planned primarily for teachers in developing resource units for teaching the course "Communism
versus Americanism" as directed by the 1961 Florida Legislature.

SCHOOL ART

SCA. 333.-Art for Elementary Teachers, 1. 3 credits.
Section 3 Periods 2-4 Daily NRN 105 FARRIS, M. L.
Periods 6-7 Daily NRN 105
A study of various types of school art expression based on an understanding of the needs of
elementary school children. Experiences with many types of art media will be provided.









82 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SCHEDULE OF COURSES SUMMER SESSION 1962

June 19-August 11
(Registration June 15, 16 and 18)
MINIMUM SIZE OF CLASS
No undergraduate class or section will be continued or offered if, at the end
of the regular registration period, prior to the day classes begin for a term or
semester, the registration does not meet the following requirements.
For Freshmen and Sophomore classes or selections (the comprehensive courses
and courses numbered in the 100's and 200's) the minimum is 15 registrations.
For Junior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 300's) the minimum is 10
registrations.
For Senior classes or sections (courses numbered in the 400's and 500's) the
minimum is 6 registrations.
For Graduate classes or sections (courses numbered in the 600's and 700's) the
minimum is 2 registrations.

ABBREVIATIONS

The following abbreviations have been used to designate buildings:


AGE AGRICULTURAL
ENGINEERING BUILDING
ALA AGRONOMY LABORATORY
AND ANDERSON HALL
AP APIARY
BNX BENTON ANNEX
BEN BENTON HALL
C BUILDING C (Art)
CRL CANCER RESEARCH
LABORATORY
CIL CITRUS LABORATORY
D BUILDING D
DAL DAIRY LABORATORY
E BUILDING E
ENG ENGINEERING AND
INDUSTRIES BUILDING
F BUILDING F
FLI FLINT HALL
FLG FLORIDA GYMNASIUM
FLO FLOYD HALL
FTL FOOD TECHNOLOGY
LABORATORY
HGH HORTICULTURE
GREENHOUSE
I BUILDING I
(Classrooms)
J BUILDING J
(Biology Laboratory)


N BUILDING N
(Engineering Classrooms
and Laboratories)
NEW NEWELL HALL
NRB NUCLEAR RESEARCH
BUILDING
NRN NORMAN HALL
NUL NUTRITION LABORATORY
OA OFFICE A (Foreign
Languages)
OD OFFICE D
OE OFFICE E
OF OFFICE F
PEA PEABODY HALL
PEC PEST CONTROL BUILDING
PHM PHARMACY BUILDING
PHY PHYSICS BUILDING
POL POULTRY LABORATORY
R BUILDING R (Music)
RLA REED LABORATORY
ROL ROLFS HALL
SEA SEAGLE BUILDING
SAL SANITARY LABORATORY
STA STADIUM
THC TEACHING HOSPITAL AND
CLINICS
TIG TIGERT HALL
(Administration Building)









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


K BUILDING K
L BUILDING L
LAW LAW BUILDING
LEI LEIGH HALL
LIB LIBRARY
LSP LIVESTOCK PAVILION
MCC DAN McCARTY HALL
MAT MATHERLY HALL
MSB MEDICAL SCIENCES
BUILDING
MIL MILITARY BUILDING
MPL MEAT PRODUCTS
LABORATORY



C-11.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one section only.)


Section 101 Period 2 Daily
Period 3 T
Section 102 Period 3 Daily
Period 2 T
Section 103 Period 4 Daily
Period 3 Th


TUL TUNG LABORATORY
U BUILDING U
(Architecture and Art)
VEL VEGETABLE PROCESSING
LABORATORY
VFH VEGETABLE FIELD HOUSE
WAL WALKER HALL
WGY WOMEN'S GYM
WPL WOOD PRODUCTS
LABORATORY
X BUILDING X
YON YONGE BUILDING


PEA 102
PEA 102
PEA 1
PEA 1
PEA 102
PEA 102


Exam Group 9M

Exam Group 9M

Exam Group 9M


C-12.-American Institutions. 4 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 201 Period 2 Daily PEA 101 Exam Group 9N
Period 3 T PEA 101
Section 202 Period 4 Daily PEA 101 Exam Group 9N
Period 3 Th PEA 101
C-1 (11-12)-AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS, 8 credits
The course is designed to develop insight into the origins, development, and contemporary trends
of American institutions. Basic concepts in sociology, anthropology, economics and political science,
placed in a historical perspective, are used to analyze American social, political, economic, educa-
tional, and religious belief and behavior; to assess the fundamental values of society; and to discern
the role of the individual in a complex society.

C-2

C-21.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: Period 7 MW BEN 203 Exam Group 7M
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 Period 2 Daily BEN 201
Section 102 Period 3 Daily BEN 201

C-22.-The Physical Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 201 Period 2 Daily BEN 203 Exam Group 7M
Section 202 Period 3 Daily BEN 203 Exam Group 7M
C-2 (21-22)-The Physical Sciences. 6 credits
The primary aims of the course are to give the student a working knowledge of the physical
factors in the environment which affect the development of civilizations and an understanding of
man's role in the development of scientific concepts. The concepts are taken from the fields of
astronomy, physical geography, meteorology and climatology, geology, chemistry and physics.









84 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

C-3
C-31.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 Period 2 Daily AND 20 Exam Group 8A
Section 102 Period 3 Daily MAT 6 Exam Group 8A
Section 103 Period 3 Daily AND 20 Exam Group 8A
Section 104 Period 5 Daily MAT 6 Exam Group 8A
Section 105 Period 6 Daily AND 20 Exam Group 8A

Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 301 Period 1 MWF AND 203
Section 302 Period 3 MWF AND 203
Section 303 Period 4 MWF AND 203
Section 304 Period 5 MWF AND 203

C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing (Freshman English). 4 credits.
(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 Period 2 Daily MAT 4 Exam Group 8A
Section 202 Period 3 Daily MAT 4 Exam Group 8A
Section 203 Period 4 Daily AND 307 Exam Group 8A
Section 204 Period 5 Daily MAT 4 Exam Group 8A

Writing Laboratory Sections:
Section 401 Period 2 MWF AND 203
Section 402 Period 3 MWF AND 209
Section 403 Period 5 MWF AND 209
C-31-32: Reading, Speaking, and Writing. A comprehensive course designed to enlarge the
student's store of ideas and meanings and to make him more proficient in the communication arts-
reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The course provides practice in oral and silent reading,
in thought analysis, in improving written and oral expression, in extending the vocabulary, and
in making effective use of the body and voice in speaking. Students are encouraged to read
widely to broaden their interests and to increase their ability to communicate effectively.
The Reading Laboratory and Clinic, maintained by C-3, offers assistance to students with reading
handicaps. In addition, the Speech and Hearing Clinic serves C-3 students with speech and
hearing difficulties.
EH. 133.-Effective Writing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3
Course Chairman.
Period 6 Daily D 120 Exam Group 7A
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Qualified students are encouraged to do imaginative
writing.

EH. 134.-Contemporary Reading. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of
C-3 Course Chairman.
Period 4 Daily AND 20 Exam Group 9M
Designed to aid the student to plan a well-rounded program in reading, to acquaint him with
the best in contemporary thought, and to introduce him to the writing in his field of professional
interest.

C-41
C-41.-Logic and Effective Thinking. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 Period 2 Daily TIG 207 Exam Group 10M










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Section 2 Period 3 Daily TIG 207 Exam Group 10M
Section 3 Period 4 Daily TIG 207 Exam Group 10M
This course attempts to improve the student's thinking skills in at least five ways. It attempts
to train the student to detect and resist common devices of persuasion used in propaganda and
advertising, to avoid certain common errors in reasoning, to reason accurately from principles, to
apply the methods of science to everyday problems, and to gain an understanding of and a measure
of control over emotional and other psychological factors in thinking. Copious examples of reasoning
both sound and unsound, are examined.

C-42
C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits.
Period 2 Daily WAL AUD Exam Group 8N
A general education course at an elementary level containing the investigation of a mathe-
matical system, the development of the ideas and techniques involved in that system, and the
applications of these ideas and techniques in more general mathematical systems.

C-5
C-51.-Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 11: Period 5 MW WAL AUD Exam Group 8M
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 Period 2 Daily AND 115
Section 102 Period 3 Daily AND 115
Section 103 Period 4 Daily AND 115
Section 104 Period 2 Daily AND 113
Section 105 Period 3 Daily AND 113
Section 106 Period 4 Daily AND 113

C-52.-Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 21: Period 5 TTh WAL AUD Exam Group 9A
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 Period 2 Daily AND 112
Section 202 Period 3 Daily AND 112
Section 203 Period 4 Daily AND 112
Section 204 Period 2 Daily AND 110
Section 205 Period 3 Daily AND 110
C-5.-The Humanities
A course designed to acquaint the student with the great literature, philosophy, art and music
in Western Civilization. Both our cultural heritage and the culture of our own day are studied.
Major emphasis is placed upon mature understanding, enlarged appreciation and a philosophy of
life adequate for the needs of our age.

C-6
C-61.-Biological Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for the lecture section and one discussion section.)
Lecture Section 11: Period 3 MWF WAL AUD Exam Group 7N
Discussion Sections:
Section 101 Period 2 TTh FLI 112
Section 102 Period 3 TTh FLI 112
Section 103 Period 4 TTh FLI 112
Section 104 Period 5 TTh FLI 112
Section 105 Period 4 MW FLI 112
Section 106 Period 5 MW FLI 112










86 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

C-62.-Biological Sciences. 3 credits.
(Register for the lecture section and one discussion section.)
Lecture Section 21: Period 4 MWF WAL AUD Exam Group 1ON
Discussion Sections:
Section 201 Period 2 TTh FLI 110
Section 202 Period 3 TTh FLI 110
Section 203 Period 4 TTh FLI 110
Section 204 Period 5 MW FLI 110
A course designed to develop: (1) an understanding of and interest in the nature of organisms
through a study of important basic biological concepts illustrated and supported by a suitable,
carefully limited, selection of examples: (2) an appreciation of the contributions of the biological
sciences to man's understanding of the world he lives in, his material progress and his apprecia-
tion of the order, harmony and beauty of the world.

ACCOUNTING

ATG. 211.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 1 Period 2 Daily MAT 225 ALMEIDA, JOHN S. Exam Group
8N
Section 2 Period 4 Daily MAT 224 ALMEIDA, JOHN S. Exam Group
9M
The role of accounting in the analysis of business transactions and the preparation and in-
terpretation of financial and operating statements.

ATG. 212.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 211.
Period 2 Daily MAT 16 SCHAEBERLE, F. W. Exam Group 8N
Accounting as a means of cost reporting and control. Analysis of business operations through
internal reports and statements.

ATG. 311.-Intermediate Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG 212.
Period 3 Daily MAT 224 CARSON, M. Exam Group 7N
A study of the assumptions underlying income determination and the theories of matching costs
with revenue. Asset acquisition, valuation and expiration.

ATG. 312.-Intermediate Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG: 311.
Period 5 Daily MAT 16 CARSON, M. Exam Group 8M
Accounting problems resulting from the corporation organization. Special problems of analysis
including those that arise as the result of changing price levels.

ATG. 313.-Industrial Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 212.
Period 4 Daily MAT 16 BENNINGER, L. J. Exam Group 9M
Interpretation and control of costs. Various systems of cost accumulation and organization
for analysis and control. Standards and simple variance analysis.
ATG. 411.-Advanced Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 312
Period 5 Daily MAT 224 RAY, D. D. Exam Group 8M
Several topics including income determination and correction, partnership dissolution, centralized
accounting, consolidation and fund accounting.

ATG. 412.-Auditing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 312.
Period 3 Daily MAT 119 STONE, W. E. Exam Group 7N
The consideration of auditing procedures and standards. Internal control systems and their in-
fluence on auditing practice.

ATG. 414.-Income Tax Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 311.
Period 4 Daily MAT 14 DEINZER, H. T. Exam Group 9M
Federal income tax law and related management and accounting problems.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ATG. 417.-Governmental Accounting. 3 credits. Prerequisite or corequisite:
ATG. 311.
Period 2 Daily MAT 119 RAY, D. D. Exam Group 8N
Fund accounting, the budget process, account structure and utilization of accounting data for
municipal and institutional purposes.
ATG. 611.-Accounting Theory. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ATG. 411.
To arrange DEINZER, H. T.
Study of the contributions of accounting concepts and methodology to business and social goals.
ATG. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.* Maximum 12 credits.
To arrange
Directed research and writing for the M.A. degree. Taken toward the end of the student's
graduate program for credit in addition to the basic 24 hours required for the Master's degree.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

AS. 201.-Principles of Agricultural Economics. 3 credits.
Period 2 Daily MCC 44 ARNOLD, C. J. Exam Group 8N
An introduction to the field of agricultural economics; principles of economics as applied to
agriculture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.
AS. 308.-Marketing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AS. 201 or equivalent.
Period 1 Daily MCC 148 McPHERSON, W. K. Exam Group 9N
Basic principles of marketing with emphasis plaecd on market functions, services, and organiza-
tions; elementary theory of demand and prices; commodity exchanges and futures trading; trans-
portation; grades and standards; market news; methods of increasing efficiency of markets; the
role of co-ops and government in marketing. One field trip required.
AS. 310.-Agricultural Statistics. 3 credits.
Period 5 Daily MCC 148 RIGGAN, W. B. Exam Group 8M
Laboratory: To arrange
Statistical description and inference; an introduction to measures of location and variation,
probability and theoretical distributions, confidence interval, tests of significance, linear regression,
correlation, index numbers and time series data.
AS. 413.-Agricultural Policy. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AS. 201 or equivalent.
Period 4 Daily MCC 148 ARNOLD, C. J. Exam Group 9M
A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. The basic problems and concepts involved
in developing and carrying out agricultural policy. Evaluation of present legislative programs and
policies affecting the farmer.
COURSE FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES

AS. 501.-Research Problems in Land Economics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Con-
sent of instructor.
To arrange
Economic problems created by the continually changing uses of land resources, i.e., water, soil,
timber, climate, situs, will be studied. Each student selects a problem conducts research on that
problem and prepares a written report. Students majoring in other departments, i.e., animal hus-
bandry, agronomy, soils, forestry, community planning, Latin American programs, etc., are en-
couraged to select problems that will help them evaluate the economic and social impact of the
progress in their respective fields on the natural resource base.
GRADUATE COURSES

AS. 605.-Problems in Farm Management. 3 credits.
To arrange
Designed to train students in collecting, analyzing and presenting data on problems in the
field of farm management. Special problems of interest to the individual student and agreeable
with the instructor are selected for study. A statement of the problem is prepared, research work
studied, publications reviewed and written reports developed.

*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.










88 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AS. 611.-Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products. 3 credits.
To arrange
Individual examinations of segments of the marketing system for Florida products. Emphasis
may be placed on efficiency, market organization, trading arrangements, historical development or
other aspects of the problem of interest to the student and agreeable with the instructor. A com-
prehensive report on the investigations and conclusions of the student is required.
AS. 628.-Problems in Statistics. 2 or 3 credits.* Maximum 6 credits. Prerequi-
site: A graduate course in statistics.
To arrange. Identical with AY. 628.
Special problems in statistics, in the areas of research methods, sampling methods, experimental
design, theory of sampling and theory of experimental designs.

AS. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.* Maximum 12 credits.
To arrange

AS. 799.-Doctoral Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*
To arrange


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

AG. 301.-Agricultural Water Management. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Upper di-
vision classification.
Period 2 MTWTH AGE 15 CHOATE, R. E. Exam Group 8N
Laboratory: Periods 8-9 MW AGE 18
The fundamental principles of water management in modern agriculture.

AG. 306.-Farm Machinery. 3 credits.
Period 5 MTWTH AGE 1 RICHARDSON, J. B. Exam Group 8M
Laboratory: Periods 819 TTh AGE 17
The functional requirements, operating principles, economic application and selection of farm
machinery.
GRADUATE COURSES

AG. 602.-Research Methods in Agricultural Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequi-
site: EM. 327. Corequisite: AY 452 or equivalent.
To arrange AGE 9 STAFF
A study of research techniques and methods used in agricultural engineering.

AG. 670.-Non-Thesis Research in Agricultural Engineering. 3 credits. Maximum
6 credits. Prerequisites: Minimum of two undergraduate courses in agricul-
tural engineering.
To arrange AGE 9 STAFF
Special problems in agricultural engineering. Not intended for majors in agricultural engineer-
ing.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION

AXT. 421.-Problems in Agricultural Extension. 1 to 3 credits.* Maximum 6
credits. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
To arrange MCC 203 GRIGSBY, S. E.
Topics and special problems selected from 4-H Club work, demonstrations, farm and home
management, and rural development.

*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATE COURSE
AXT. 621.-Research in Agricultural Extension. 1 to 3 credits.* Maximum 6
credits. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.
To arrange MCC 203 GRIGSBY, S. E.
Library and workshop related to Agricultural Extension. Research work is studied, publications
reviewed, and written reports developed.

AGRONOMY

AY. 329.-Genetics. 3 credits.
Period 2 Daily MCC 305 SCHANK, S. C. Exam Group 8N
The science of inheritance and its application to the improvement of economic plants and
animals and in programs for human betterment.
AY. 426.-Individual Problems in Agronomy. 1 to 3 credits.* Maximum 6 credits.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
To arrange MCC 204 RUELKE, 0. C.
Scientific study of individual problems selected from the fields of crop production, weed control,
genetics, or plant breeding.
GRADUATE COURSES
AY. 626.-Agronomic Problems. 1 to 3 credits.* Maximum 9 credits.
To arrange MCC 210 RODGERS, E. G.
Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies which relate to crop production
and improvement.
AY. 627.-Problems in Genetics and Cytogenetics. 1 to 3 credits.* Maximum 6
credits.
To arrange MCC 203 SCHANK, S. C.
Modern methods applied to specific genetics or cytogenetics research problems.
AY. 628.-Problems in Statistics. 1 to 3 credits.* Maximum 6 credits. Prerequi-
site: A graduate course in statistics.
To arrange MCC 215 ASH, W. O.
Special problems in the areas of research methods, sampling methods, and experimental design.
AY. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.* Maximum 12 credits.

AY. 799.-Doctoral Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*


ANIMAL SCIENCE

AL. 209.-General Animal Science. 3 credits.
Period 1 Daily MCC 254 LOGGINS, P. E.; WAKEMAN, D. L. Exam
Group 9N
Principles of livestock production.
GRADUATE COURSES
AL. 609.-Problems in Animal Science. 1 to 8 credits.*
To arrange

AL. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.* Maximum 12 credits.
To arrange

*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.










90 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AL. 799.-Doctoral Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*
To arrange

ANTHROPOLOGY
APY. 500.-Field Session in Archaeology. 6 credits. Prerequisite: 6 hours of
Anthropology including APY 201 or 301.
To arrange GOGGIN, J. M.
Available for graduate major credit. Excavation of archaeological sites, recording of data,
laboratory handling and analysis of specimens, and study of the theoretical culture principles
which underlie field methods and artifact analysis.

ARCHITECTURE
AE. 112.-Graphic Techniques 2. 2 credits.
Periods 7, 8 MTWTh E 177 Exam Group 7M
Exercises in freehand and instrumental drawing.
AE. 121.-The Building Arts 1. 2 credits.
Period 5 MTWTh E 157 Exam Group 8M
A survey of the building arts with emphasis on the social factors that govern them.
AE. 122.-The Building Arts 2. 3 credits.
Period 2 MWF E 157 Exam Group 8N
Studio: Periods 1, 2 TTh E 177
A survey of the building arts with emphasis on the physical and psychological factors that
influence them.
AE. 211.-Visual Expression 1. 2 credits. Prerequisite: AE 112
Periods 1, 2 TWThF E 179
The representation of spatial relationships using various appropriate media and techniques
with emphasis on the development of interpretive skills.
AE. 212.-Visual Expression 2. 2 credits. Prerequisite: AE 211.
Periods 1, 2 MTWTh E 179
Continuation of AE 211 with advanced analysis of media techniques, and composition.
AE. 231.-Elementary Architectural Design 1. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AE. 112.
Periods 6, 7, 8 MTWThF E 178
A study of the basic elements and principles of two- and three-dimensional design, in con-
junction with basic architectural problems.
AE. 232.-Elementary Architectural Design 2. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AE. 231.
Periods 6, 7, 8 MTWThF E 179
Continuation of Elementary Design 1.
AE. 242.-Materials and Methods of Construction 2. 2 credits. Prerequisite: AE.
241.
Period 4 MW E 157 Exam Group 9M
Studio: Periods 3, 4 TThF E 179
Types, properties, and design of the construction frames of buildings.

ART
ART. 101.-Beginning Design. 2 credits.
Periods 1-2 Daily X-1 MC INTOSH, P. R.
Fundamental principles of visual organization. Emphasis upon two-dimensional design in black
and white. Students who intend to major in art should schedule ART 101 and ART 103 con-
currently.

*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ART. 103.-Beginning Drawing and Painting. 2 credits.
Periods 3-4 Daily C-101 MC INTOSH, P. R.
Exploration of the drawing media. Drawing as a means of formal organization. Study of
still-life, figure and landscape.
ART. 316.-Greek and Roman Art. 3 credits.
Period 1 Daily X-14 GRISSOM, E. E. Exam Group 9N
No prerequisite. The art and architecture of ancient Crete and Rome.
ART. 341.-Photography. 3 credits.
Periods 2-3 Friday, 4 hours to arrange X-12 UELSMANN, J. N.
Prerequisite: ART 101 or consent of instructor.
Fundamentals of photography. Operation of the camera. Developing, printing, enlarging.
Principles of design in photography.
ART. 350.-Intermediate Drawing. 2 credits. Prerequisite: ART 104.
Periods 3-4 Daily C-101 MC INTOSH, P. R.
The function of drawing in art. Pictorial concepts motivated by study of the human figure.
Problems of draftmanship and form.
ART. 351.-Painting 1. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ART. 206.
Periods 1-3 MW and 4 hours to arrange C-100 KERSLAKE, K. A.
The oil medium. Technical and creative problems. Continued emphasis upon pictorial organi-
zation.
ART. 352.-Painting 2. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ART 206.
Periods 1-3 MW and 4 hours to arrange C-100 KERSLAKE, K. A.
Work in one or more of the painting media: oil, watercolor, casein, lacquer, tempera, etc.
ART. 355.-Printmaking 1. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ART 206 or consent of in-
structor.
To arrange C-105 KERSLAKE, K. A.
Basic procedures and processes in printmaking. Formal and expressive characteristics of the
print media.
ART. 356.-Printmaking 2. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ART 355.
To arrange C-105 KERSLAKE, K. A.
A continuation of ART 355.
ART. 551.-Individual Work: Studio. 3 or 6 credits.*
To arrange STAFF
Prerequisite: a major in art and permission of the department head. This course may be
repeated for credit.
ART. 651.-Advanced Projects: Studio. 3, 6 or 9 credits.*
To arrange STAFF

ART. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits..* Maximum 12 credits.
To arrange STAFF

ARTS AND SCIENCES-GENERAL AND CROSS-
DEPARTMENTAL COURSES
ASC. 641.-Internship in College Teaching. 3 credits.
To arrange

ASC. 642.-Internship in College Teaching. 3 credits.
To arrange
*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.










92 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

ASTRONOMY

ATY. 141.-Descriptive Astronomy. 3 credits. Not open to students who have had
any other course in astronomy.
Period 3 daily WAL 102 Exam Group 7N
An elementary survey of the astronomical universe. Primarily intended as an elective for
those not majoring in a physical science or mathematics.

BACTERIOLOGY

BCY. 300.-Bacteria in Everyday Life. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-61 or equivalent.
Period 2 MTWTh MCC 60 CARROLL, W. R., and TYLER, M. E.
Exam Group 8N
Laboratory: Periods 6-7 TTh
Microorganisms in relation to evolution and higher organisms; their functions in chemical
transformations, food, disease, and sanitation. Terminal course, not acceptable for admission to
advanced bacteriology courses.
GRADUATE COURSES
BCY. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.* Maximum 12 credits.

BCY. 799.-Doctoral Dissertation. 1-6 credits.*


BIOCHEMISTRY

BCH. 615.-Research Methods in Biochemistry. 2 to 4 credits.* Prerequisites:
MED. 511 or BCH. 601 and BCH. 603; only by special arrangement.
An introduction to biochemical research in which the student acquires proficiency in research
techniques used in physical biochemistry, intermediary metabolism, radio-isotopes, etc., under direct
supervision of a staff member.
BCH. 617.-Special Topics in Biochemistry. 1 credit (may be repeated). Prere-
quisite or corequisite: BCH 612, 613, or 614, or equivalent.
Supervised study in journals, treatises, and monographs in various subject areas of biochemis-
try, with informal weekly conferences and reports.
BCH. 699.-Master's Thesis. 0 to 6 credits.* Maximum 12 credits.

BCH. 799.-Doctoral Dissertation. 1 to 6 credits.*


BIOLOGY

BLY. 181.-General Zoology. 4 credits.
Period 3 MTWTh FLI 101 JONES, E. R. Exam Group 7N
Laboratory: Periods 7-8 MTWTh J 101
An introductory course dealing with protoplasm, animal cells, the structure, functioning, em-
bryology, and evolutionary relationships of representatives of the major animal phyla
BLY. 307.-Biology of Vertebrates. 4 credits. Prerequisite: An introductory
course in biology with laboratory.
Period 6 MTWTh FLI 104 LAYNE, J. N. Exam Group 7A
Laboratory: Periods 7-9 MTW J 201
Field Trips: To arrange
An introduction to the structure, evolutionary relationships, taxonomy, and natural history of the
vertebrate animals.

*Credit assigned must be shown on course assignment card.




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