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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00070
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: June 1960
Copyright Date: 1960
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00070
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text








THE UNIVERSE


of the


UNIVERSITY OF


BULLETIN OF


COLLEGE OF


LAW


1960-61


Series 1, No. 6


June 1, 1960


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida


Vol. LV












COLLEGE OF LAW

Faculty 1959-60.

Clifford Waldorf Crandall, LL.B. .................................... ...... Professor of Law, Emeritus
Dean Slagle, LL.B. ......................... ........... ... Professor of Law, Emeritus
Clarence John TeSelle, B.A., M.A., LL.B. ........................................ Professor of Law, Emeritus




Frank Edward Maloney, B.A., LL.B. .............. ............................. Dean 6 Professor of Law
Henry Anderson Fenn, B.A., LL.B. ............................. Dean, Emeritus, and Professor of Law
Kenneth Leroy Black. B.A.. LL.B. ........................................................ Professor of Law
Vernon Wilmot Clark, B.A.E., M.A.. LL.B. ............................................ Professor of Law
Harold Bryan Crosby, LL.B. ........................................ ............................ Professor of Law
James Westbay Day. B.A., B.S. in Educ., M.A., J.D. .................................. Professor of Law
Dexter Delony, B.S.. LL.B., LL.M. .......................... ............................ Professor of Law
Hayford Octavius Enwall B.A., LL.B. ............ ............ ..... ................. Professor of Law
Mandell Glicksberg, B.A.. LLB., LL.M. ..................................... Professor of Law
Ernest McClain Jones, B.A., LL.B. ........................ ...................... Professor of Law
Karl Krastin. B.A., LL.B., J.S.D. ............................................................... Professor of Law
William Dickson Macdonald, B.A., LL.B., LL.M.. S.J.D. ....................... Professor of Law
Robert Barbeau Mautz, B.A., LL.B. ........... .................................... Professor of Law
Charles Patterson Nash, Jr., B.S., LL.B. .......................................... Visiting Professor of Law
Leonard Stewart Powers. B.A., J.D., LL.M. ................. ......... ............ Professor of Law
*Richard Badenoch Stephens, B.A., LL.B. ............................. ...... ......... Professor of Law
*Philip Keyes Yonge, B.A., LL.B. ...................................................................... Professor of Law
Walter Probert. B.S.. J.D., J.S.D ................................................... Associate Professor of Law
Walter Otto Weyrauch. LL.B., LL.M., J.U.D. ................................ Associate Professor of Law
John Richard Farrell B.A., LL.B. ................................. ... Assistant Professor of Law
James Jackson Freeland. B.A., LL.B. .............................................. Assistant Professor of Law
Brooks P. Hoyt, B.S., LL.B. ......................................................... Assistant Professor of Law
Joshua Okun, B.A., LL.B. ............................................................... Assistant Professor of Law
*Sheldon J. Plager, B.A., LL.B. ..................................................... Assistant Professor of Law
Sidney Erwin Lewis. B.S.B.A., LL.B. .............................................. Interim Instructor of Law
Maurice Mitchell Paul, B.S.B.A., LL.B. .......................................... Interim Instructor of Law




Stanley LeRoy West, LL.B.. B.S. in L.S. ............................... Director of University Libraries
Francis Tyrone McCoy, B.A., M.A., LLB. ........................................................ Law Librarian
Grace Elizabeth Taylor, B.A., M.A. ...................................................... Assistant Law Librarian

* On leave of absence 1959-60











University Calender


1960-61

REGULAR SESSION SEPTEMBER 1960-JUNE 1961


1960-
August 1, Monday ....................................Last day for those not previously in attend-
ance at the University of Florida to file ap-
plication for admission for the first semester.
September 13-17, Tuesday-Saturday.........Orientation and registration according to ap-
pointments assigned on receipt of preliminary
application. No one permitted to start regis-
tration on Saturday, September 17, after
10 a.m.
September 19, Monday, 7:40 a.m.............Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
September 22, Thursday, 10:40 a.m.........Scholarship Convocation.
September 24, Saturday, 12 Noon.............Last time for completing registration for first
semester. No one permitted to start registra-
tion after 10 a.m. on this date. Last time for
adding courses and for changing sections.
October 24, Monday, 12 Noon............ Last time for making application at the Office
of the Registrar for degree to be conferred at
end of first semester.
October 31, Monday, 4 p.m.......................Last time for dropping courses without re-
ceiving grade of E.
November 5, Saturday.........................Georgia-Florida football game in Jackson-
ville. Classes suspended.
November 11, 12, Friday, Saturday............Homecoming. Classes suspended at 12:30
p.m. Friday.
November 21, Monday, 5 p.m.................Last time for removing grades of I or X
received in preceding semester or term of
attendance.
November 23, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.........Thanksgiving recess begins.
November 28, Monday, 7:40 a.m...............Thanksgiving recess ends.
December 21, Wednesday, 6:30 p.m..........Christmas recess begins.
December 30, Friday, 5:00 p.m...............Last day for those not previously in attend-
ance at the University of Florida to file ap-
plication for admission for the second semes-
ter.

1961-
January 4, Wednesday, 7:40 a.m..............Christmas recess ends.
January 14, Saturday..............................Final examination period begins.
January 26, Thursday, 4 p.m.....................Grades for all candidates for degrees to be
conferred at end of first semester due in
the Office of the Registrar (special lists are
sent to the faculty for this report).
January 28, Saturday, 12 Noon..................All grades for first semester due in the Office
of the Registrar.
January 28, Saturday, 8 p.m.......................First semester Commencement Convocation.
Second Semester






















SECOND SEMESTER

January 31-Feb. 3, Tues.-Fri....................Orientation for beginning law students.
February 3, 4, Friday, Saturday.................Registration according to appointments as-
signed on receipts of preliminary applica-
tion. No one permitted to start registration
on Saturday, February 4, after 10 a.m.
February 6, Monday, 7:40 a.m..................Classes begin. All registration fees increased
$5.00 for persons completing registration on
or after this date.
February 11, Saturday, 12 Noon...............Last time for completing registration for the
second semester. No one permitted to start
registration after 10 a.m. on this date. Last
time for adding courses and for changing
sections.
March 13, Monday, 12 Noon.....................Last time for making application at the Of-
fice of the Registrar for a degree to be con-
ferred at the end of the second semester.
March 20, Monday, 4 p.m.........................Last time for dropping courses without re-
ceiving a grade of E.
March 30, Thursday, 6:30 p.m...............Spring recess begins.
April 4, Tuesday, 7:40 a.m.......................Spring recess ends.
April 7, Friday, 5:00 p.m.........................Last time for removing grades of I or X
received in preceding semester or term of at-
tendance.
May 20, Saturday..................................Final Examination period begins.
June 1, Thursday, 4 p.m.................... ..Grades for all candidates for degrees to be
conferred at the end of the second semester
due in the Office of the Registrar (special
lists are sent to the faculty for this report.)
June 3, Saturday, 12 Noon......................... All grades for second semester due in the
Office of the Registrar.
June 4, Sunday.......................... Baccaleaureate Service.
June 5, Monday.................... ...Commencement Convocation.













College of Law


GENERAL INFORMATION
THE COLLEGE OF LAW, founded in 1909, began its work in the Thomas Hall
Dormitory for men under the deanship of Albert J. Farrah, a graduate of the Uni-
versity of Michigan, who served from 1909 until 1912.
Following the administration of Dean Farrah, Thomas W. Hughes served as
Dean from 1912 until 1915. The Law Building, erected in 1914, was one of the first
permanent units on the campus.
Harry R. Trusler, also a graduate of the University of Michigan, was appointed
to the deanship in 1915 and served in that capacity until 1947. During his administra-
tion the College of Law was accredited by the New York State Board of Regents in
1917, admitted to membership in the Association of American Law Schools in 1920,
and recognized as an approved school by the American Bar Association in 1925.
The College of Law was opened to women students in 1925, and in 1933 the
requirements for admission were increased to require an academic degree.
In September of 1941, the entire plant of the College of Law was dedicated and
named in the memory of Nathan Philemon Bryan, Chairman of the Board of Con-
trol at the time of the founding of the College of Law, and former United States
Senator and United States Circuit Judge. Also in 1941 the Law Library was built.
In 1950, a courtroom-auditorium wing was added with a seating capacity of approxi-
mately two hundred and fifty, and a suite of offices for the University of Florida Law
Review.
Henry A. Fenn, a former Professor of Law and Assistant Dean of the Yale Law
School, became Dean in 1948 and served in that capacity until 1958. During his dean-
ship a specialized orientation program, and an individualized program of research,
writing and instruction were inaugurated, as well as a seminar program in Legal
Ethics which received national recognition. In 1955, the College was granted a charter
by the Order of the Coif, a national legal scholarship society, in recognition of its high
academic standards.
Dean Fenn stepped down as head in the fall of 1958 to devote full time to teach-
ing. Frank E. Maloney, who at that time was named acting dean, was subsequently
appointed as dean in May of 1959.
The goal of the college is to impart a thorough, scientific and practical knowledge
of the law, together with an understanding of its role in a democratic society. It aims
to develop keen, efficient lawyers who will respect the ideals and traditions of the pro-
fession. The policy of the college places emphasis upon practical skills as well as legal
theory; problems of the modern world as well as historical perspective; the creative
aspects in the drafting of documents as well as in the body of legal doctrines.


FACULTY GRANTS
Nothing is more important for the maintenance of a law school than a faculty
composed of capable, experienced and industrious scholars, and a program of salary
supplementation is a factor of considerable significance in retaining men of eminence.












Lawyers' Title Guaranty Fund Grant.-The Lawyers' Title Guaranty Fund, a
business trust of Florida lawyers, closely affiliated with The Florida Bar, has estab-
lished an annual grant of $1,000 to supplement the salary of a distinguished professor
in the field of real property. The first incumbent is Professor James W. Day.

PREPARATION FOR THE STUDY OF LAW

A lawyer's education may be divided into his pre-legal training, his law school
career, and his post legal education. Pre-legal training involving a set undergraduate
program has deliberately not been prescribed by the College of Law. The faculty feels
that in view of the diverse nature of the lawyer's tasks, the best program is similarly
one of broad diversification in which the student gains a knowledge of the formative
processes of our civilization, the nature of men and their institutions, and something
of the technology of our age; the capacity for understanding, independent and chal-
lenging thinking; and, finally, the ability to clearly and forcefully express himself
in the English language.
Since concepts expressed in words are the primary tools of the legal profession,
it cannot be emphasized too strongly that the beginning law student must bring into
legal education the fundamental skills necessary for effective oral and written com-
munication.

ADMISSIONS

Students without previous law school study are admitted at the beginning of the first
and second semesters, but are not admitted to the summer sessions.

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION

Applicants for admission to the College of Law are required to file a preliminary
application with the University Registrar on or before August 1 for the first semester,
December 30, for the second semester. It will be impossible to consider applications
received after these dates.
Upon receipt of the preliminary application, the Registrar will furnish final ap-
plication forms. No applicant will be admitted until he has filed a complete transcript
of his record from each law school, college or university attended (other than the Uni-
versity of Florida), and his Law School Admission Test score has been received from
the Educational Testing Service. A written statement must also be filed concerning
previous attendance at other law schools and, if the applicant has attended another
law school, a certificate from the Dean thereof that he is in good standing at that in-
stitution.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the College of Law must
have received a 4-year baccalaureate degree from a college or university of approved
standing. Requests for admission to the College in a semester prior to the fall semester
of 1961 will be governed by existing entrance requirements under which an applicant
must have achieved a minimum score of 340 on the Law School Admission Test (or a
minimum of 375 if the Test is retaken).












Beginning in September, 1961, the precise score required on the Law School
Admission Test will be determined on the basis of the overall undergraduate collegiate
average of the applicant (compiled on the basis of all work undertaken and computed
by the system in effect at the University of Florida where the grade of A equals 4
grade points per semester hour; B equals 3 grade points per semester hour; C equals
2 grade points per semester hour; D equals 1 grade point per semester hour). The
higher the overall undergraduate average of the applicant, the lower will be the test
score required to qualify for admission; provided, however, that no test score of less than
340 will be deemed sufficient to warrant admission regardless of the overall undergrad-
uate collegiate grade average. An appropriate upward adjustment in the test score will
be made in cases where the score submitted is the result of retaking the test.

The foregoing revision of the admission standards of the College has been made
in conformance with the policy of the Association of American Law Schools that "a
sound educational program is advanced by limiting admissions to students whose
previous college records, aptitude tests, and other relevant information indicate a rea-
sonable prospect for success in law studies." It was adopted pursuant to the findings
of a study of achievement of students in the College recently completed by the faculty
with statistical assistance from the Board of University Examiners.

Law School Admission Test: The Law School Admission Test is given by the
Educational Testing Service in cooperation with leading law schools throughout the
country and may be taken prior to filing application for admission to law school. A
fee of $10.00 is charged by the Educational Testing Service and applications to take
the test must be sent direct to the Educational Testing Service, 20 Nassau Street,
Princeton, New Jersey. The Test Score will be used to determine eligibility for admis-
sion and to aid in counseling the applicant when he becomes a student. Tests are
normally given in February, April, August and November, and are scheduled at the
University of Florida and other centers throughout the United States and foreign
countries. Requests for the form of application to take the test should be sent to the
Educational Testing Service four or five weeks in advance of the date of testing so
that the completed application and fee will be received in Princeton no later than ten
days prior to the testing date which the candidate has chosen.
Advanced Standing: A student wishing to transfer from another accredited law
school, who at the time of beginning his study of law, qualified for admission to this
College under the above stated requirements for beginning students, and who has
maintained a scholastic average of C or higher on all previous law school work under-
taken, may apply for admission with advanced standing. Courses completed with a
grade of C or higher in other accredited law schools will be acceptable for credit
up to but not exceeding a total of thirty hours. Such courses will be accepted for credit
toward the course hour requirement for graduation, but the class standing and gradu-
ation average of a transfer student will be determined solely on the basis of work
undertaken at the College of Law of the University of Florida. Eligibility of a transfer
student for graduation with honors or high honors will be determined by the faculty
on the basis of the complete record of the student after all credits necessary for gradu-
ation from the College have been received.
In no case will credit be given for correspondence courses or other work not done
in residence at an accredited law school.
In no case will a person who has received a law degree from an accredited law
school be admitted as a candidate for the LL.B. degree.












INTRODUCTORY PROGRAM
FOR BEGINNING STUDENTS

A program designed to acquaint beginning students with basic information con-
cerning the profession to which they aspire and to assist them in the study of law is
offered by members of the law faculty, the bench and the bar during the week preceding
the opening of classes. The program introduces students to the traditions, ethics, and
activities of the legal profession and to the objectives, materials, and methods of law
study. Assigned readings are supplemented by lectures, illustrative demonstrations, and
practice sessions.
Beginning students are required to report for registration and the Introductory
Program in accordance with instructions given to them at the time they are admitted.
Failure to report in accordance with such instructions may prevent registration.


FEES AND EXPENSES

Although expenses vary considerably with individual students, an unmarried
Florida student attending the College of Law should anticipate expenses of at least
$565.00 per semester estimated as follows: Registration Fee $90.00; books and sup-
plies $50.00; laundry and cleaning $35.00; room $90.00; board $200.00; incidental
expenses $100.00. Non-Florida students are charged a registration fee of $250.00 per
semester instead of the $90.00 fee charged Florida students. (Consult the University
Catalog for details as to the classification of students as Florida or non-Florida students.)
Late registration increases the registration fee $5.00; this increased fee will not be
waived for any reason.
A graduation fee of $10.00 to cover the cost of the candidate's diploma and rental
of cap and gown, is payable at the time of the filing of the candidate's application for
graduation.
Consult the University Catalog for the time and place of the payment of fees
and expenses.


HOUSING

All communications or inquiries concerning housing, applications, deposit fees,
and rent payments in University Housing facilities should be sent to the Director of
Housing, University of Florida, Gainesville. A student may make his own arrange-
ments directly with the property-owner for off-campus accommodations in private
housing.


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Student Employment.-Standard VIII-1 of the Articles of Association of the
Association of American Law Schools defines a full-time law school as one "whose
curriculum and schedule of work are so arranged as to require substantially the full
working time of its students." This standard contemplates that the level of academic
achievement required of candidates for degrees in full-time schools should be high
enough that the student of reasonable ability must devote substantially his full work-












ing time to the study of law. The faculty of the College of Law strongly recommends
that students refrain from taking part-time employment during the first two semesters
of study except in cases of absolute necessity, and that advanced students keep the
above Standard in mind when considering part-time employment.
Scholarships.-The following scholarship funds are available for law students
(forms of application for these scholarships can be obtained from the Chairman of the
Scholarships and Awards Committee, College of Law):
Neil Beckley Memorial Award.-Phi Delta Theta fraternity, in memory of Neil
Beckley, a former law student, provides the sum of $75.00 to be awarded in the fall
and spring semester of each year to the outstanding applicant in the entering fresh-
man law class. Applications are considered on the basis of their undergraduate scholastic
and extra-curricula records, and their aptitude for legal study as evidenced by per-
formance on the Law School Admission Test.
Trial Court Scholarships.-The firm of Nichols, Gaither, Green, Frates and
Beckham of Miami provides the sum of $350.00 annually for one or more scholarships
for needy third year students. Preference is given to students who have shown a par-
ticular interest in and aptitude for trial court work.
Loan Funds.-The following loan funds are available for law students (Forms
of application can be obtained from the Chairman of the Scholarships and Awards
Committee, College of Law):
C. J. TeSelle Scholarship Loan Fund.-An anonymous donor provides $500.00
annually for one or more loans for needy law students with good academic records.
Preference is given to third year law students. The loan is to be repaid without interest
within five years from date of graduation from Law School.
James W. Day Scholarship Loan Fund.-An anonymous donor provides $500.00
annually for one or more loans for needy law students with good academic records.
Preference is given to third year law students. The loan is to be repaid without interest
within five years from date of graduation from Law School.
The Leroy Franklin Lewis Memorial Loan Fund.-This fund was established
through the will of the late Mrs. Catherine L. Thomas, of Pensacola, Florida, in memory
of her father, the late LeRoy Franklin Lewis, formerly a practicing attorney in New
York City. The loan fund is to be made available to upperclass students to assist them
in completing their legal, medical and theological training. First priority for loans will
be given to law students.
The Senior Law Loan Fund.-This fund, available to needy seniors in the Col-
lege of Law, was established by the Law Class of 1938 and has been increased by sub-
sequent gifts. Application should be made to the Dean of the College of Law.
Consult the University Catalog for information as to other loan funds which may
be made available to law students.

SUMMER SESSIONS

The College of Law conducts a summer session for students who have had one
or more semesters of law study. Beginning students are not admitted to the summer
session. Detailed information as to dates and courses is given in the Bulletin of the Sum-
mer Session which is usually published in April.












REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES

All degrees are conferred by the Board of Control at regular commencement ex-
ercises. All candidates for degrees are required to be present at commencement exercises
(Baccalaureate Sermon and Commencement Convocation). A student who fails to
attend without being excused by the University will not have his degree conferred until
he makes another application and complies with this requirement.

The faculty of the College of Law will recommend for the degree of Bachelor of
Laws (LL.B.) candidates who have complied with the following requirements:

1. Completion with a passing grade of courses totalling at least 85 credits,
of which at least 55 must have been completed in this College.

2. Maintenance of a 2.0 honor point average on all work attempted in this
College.

3. Fulfillment of course requirements as set forth hereafter under "Cur-
riculum and Grades."

4. Completion of at least 96 weeks of study in residence in an accredited
law school of which at least 62 must have been in residence in this
College.

5. Completion of the last 28 credits and the last 30 weeks of study in resi-
dence in this College, unless other arrangements are made in advance
by written petition approved by the faculty of the College of Law.
In cases of superior scholarship and intellectual attainments the Bachelor of Laws
degree may be recommended With Honors or With High Honors. Ordinarily to be
eligible for consideration for the degree of Bachelor of Laws With Honors the candi-
date must have maintained an honor point average of 3.0 on all work attempted, and
to be eligible for consideration for the degree of Bachelor of Laws With High Honors
the candidate must have maintained an honor point average of 3.5 on all work at-
tempted.


STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN
BAR ASSOCIATION

The Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar
Association requests that attention be called to the Standards of the American Bar
Association adopted in 1921 and by it recommended for enactment by all states. These
Standards as amended provide in effect that every candidate for admission to the bar,
in addition to taking a public examination, shall give evidence of graduation from a
law school which shall require at least three years of acceptable college work as a con-
dition of admission, and three years of law study (or longer if not full-time course),
which shall have an adequate library and a sufficient number of teachers giving their
entire time to the school to ensure actual personal acquaintance and influence with the
whole student body, and which shall not be operated as a commercial enterprise.












LIBRARY

The Law Library contains over 55,000 volumes and adds about 2,500 volumes
a year. Its statutory material includes Federal statutes, statutes from all American
states, and some foreign statutes. Its collection of published court reports includes
those of the U. S. Supreme Court, the courts of last resort in all American states, se-
lected state lower court reports, complete British reports, and many Canadian and
other foreign reports. It subscribes to all leading American legal periodicals and to
selected foreign ones. It has numerous American and British legal encyclopedias, digests,
texts, treatises, and other legal materials. In addition to the collection in the law library,
the University Library, located in an adjoining building, contains an additional col-
lection of over 10,000 volumes of law books relating to specialized legal fields.


ORDER OF COIF

The College of Law has a chapter of The Order of the Coif, a legal scholarship
society with chapters at the leading law schools of the country. The purpose of Coif
is to foster a spirit of careful study and to mark in a suitable manner those who have
attained a high level of scholarship. Election to the society is based on scholarship
and character. To be eligible for consideration, a student must be in the upper ten
per cent of his graduating class and be eligible for graduation with Honors.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LAW REVIEW

The University of Florida Law Review is published quarterly by the student Edi-
torial Board assisted by the faculty advisors. Approximately half of the publication is
written by the students, and the remainder, written by specialists in various fields, is
selected and edited by the Editorial Board. Emphasis as to subject-matter is on Florida
and federal law. The work furnishes intensive training in research, organization, analysis
and style. Members of the Editorial Board are elected on the basis of scholarship and
past performance of law review work. After the third semester, hour credit towards
graduation can be obtained for work satisfactory to the faculty advisors, but no letter
grades are given for this work.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

The John Marshall Bar Association is the student bar association affiliated with
The Florida Bar and open to all members of the student body. It arranges for promi-
nent members of the Bar to address the law students, and has committees which advise
with the faculty on matters of common interest.
Delta Theta Phi, Phi Alpha Delta, and Phi Delta Phi, national legal fraternities,
and Phi Delta Delta, national legal sorority, have active chapters at the College.


PRIZES AND AWARDS

American Jurisprudence Awards.-The publishers of American Jurisprudence
award a bound volume of an appropriate title from American Jurisprudence to the












student making the highest grade in each class in the following courses: Business Or-
ganization, Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law I, Conflict of Laws, Contracts II,
Creditors' Rights, Estates and Trusts I, Evidence, Fiduciary Administration I, Insur-
ance, Labor Law, Mortgages, Municipal Corporations, Negotiable Instruments, Private
Corporations, Property I, Public Utilities, Remedies, Sales and Sales Financing, State
and Local Taxation.

Appellate Moot Court Prizes.-The firm of Nichols, Gaither, Green, Frates and
Beckham of Miami provides the sum of $150 annually to be distributed as prizes for
students in this College who show the greatest aptitude in the appellate moot court
program of the College.

Barnett National Bank of Jacksonville Will Drafting Contest.-The Barnett Na-
tional Bank of Jacksonville sponsors a will drafting contest open to advanced law
students. Prizes of $150, $100, and $50, respectively, are offered for the three best
wills submitted in the contest.

Corpus Juris Secundum Awards.-The publishers of Corpus Juris Secundum
award a bound volume of an appropriate title from Corpus Juris Secundum to the
student making the highest grade in each of the following courses: Property II, Con-
tracts I, and Federal Taxation Seminar.

Foundation Press Awards.-The Foundation Press awards a volume annually to
the student making the highest grade in each of the following courses: Jurisprudence,
Torts I, Torts II.

Gertrude Brick Law Review Apprentice Prize.-Alumnus Albert Brick, in memory
of his mother, has established a trust fund providing a prize of $25 to the University
of Florida Law Review apprentice doing the best work in each of the regular semesters.

Bureau of National Affairs Award.-A prize of one year's subscription to Law
Week is offered annually by the Bureau of National Affairs to the graduating student
with a satisfactory law school record who makes the most significant scholastic progress
in his senior year.

The Harrison Company First Year Award.-The Harrison Company annually
awards Adkins, Florida Criminal Law and Procedure, to the student making the high-
est average in his first twenty-nine hours of law.

The Harrison Company Senior Award.-The Harrison Company annually awards
Adkins, Florida Criminal Law and Procedure, to the senior law student doing all his
work in this law school who makes the highest record during his law course.

Lawyers' Title Guaranty Fund Prize.-The Lawyers' Title Guaranty Fund, a
business trust of Florida lawyers closely affiliated with The Florida Bar, annually
awards cash prizes of $300, $200, and $100 to law students in the law schools of Flori-
da for work in the field of real property law. Not more than one prize is awarded
at one school in a single year.











Lopez Law Review Contributor Award.-Alumnus Aquilino Lopez, Jr., Judge of
the Circuit Court for the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit of Florida, provides an award of
$50 each year to the outstanding contributor to University of Florida Law Review,
based on work done otherwise than as a member of the Editorial Board.

Nathan Burkan Memorial Prize.-The American Society of Composers, Authors
and Publishers each year awards cash prizes to students at this law school submitting
the best essays on the subject of copyright law.

Phi Alpha Delta Award.-The Duncan U. Fletcher Chapter of Phi Alpha Delta
Law Fraternity annually recognizes the senior law student or recent law graduate who
during his stay at the law school has been most outstanding in service and leadership
in law school activities. The award, known as The J. Hillis Miller Memorial Award,
consists of a certificate given to the winner and the inscription of his name on an ap-
propriate plaque.

Phi Delta Phi Award.-Cockrell Inn of Phi Delta Phi International Legal Fra-
ternity annually recognizes the student who makes the highest average in his first two
semesters at law school by inscribing his name on a scholarship plaque.

Redfearn Prize.-The Honorable D. H. Redfearn of Miami has offered a prize
of $50 for the best essay by a law student on some topic of legal reform.


CHANGES OF RULES-OFFICIAL NOTICES

The privilege is reserved to modify, amend or revoke any rules or regulations set
forth herein upon due notice posted upon the official bulletin board of the College of
Law.
All students are held responsible for knowledge of all matters posted on the of-
ficial bulletin board.


ATTENDANCE-RULES OF DISCIPLINE

Satisfactory law study cannot be done without regular class attendance. When a
student has been absent from a course twice as many class hours as the number of
credit hours assigned to the course, an absence warning notice will be sent to the
student. A student will be dropped from a course with a failing grade after two un-
excused additional absences following such a warning notice.
All students are admitted subject to the rules of the University of Florida relating
to discipline and any amendments thereof.


REGISTRATION

Registration dates for other than beginning students are set forth in the Uni-
versity Calendar. Registration dates for beginning students will be established in ac-
cordance with the procedure set forth under the heading Introductory Program for
Beginning Students. Dates for summer session registration are listed in the Summer

























Session Bulletin. Students are responsible for registering on these specified dates. Late
registration fees will be charged for students registering any time after the specified
registration period.
All students must adhere to the registration procedure as announced by the Office
of the Registrar. This includes not only filing the prescribed forms at the designated
places, but also payment of all fees.

Change of Registration.-A student is not permitted to drop a course, add a
course, exchange one course for another, or change sections in the same course with-
out the approval of the Dean and the presentation at the Office of the Registrar of the
cards authorizing the change. An instructor will not admit a student to or drop him
from any class except after notification on the proper form from the Registrar's Office.
No student will receive credit for any course for which he is not properly registered.
Dates within which courses may be dropped or added are set forth in the University
Calendar. No changes can be made after these dates except by permission of the Uni-
versity Senate Committee on Student Petitions after formal petition.

Maximum and Minimum Load.-The minimum load during the first two semes-
ters is as prescribed under the heading Curriculum and Grades. Thereafter no student
may register for less than 12 credits without permission from the Dean. No student
may register in any semester for more than 16 credits without permission from the
Dean.

Repeating Courses.-A student who has passed a course cannot repeat it. A
student who has failed a course (with the exception of LW 591, Introduction to Legal
Research and Writing) cannot repeat it, except that in exceptional circumstances, the
Dean, in his discretion, may permit repetition of a failed course.











13


CURRICULUM AND GRADES

Program of Study.-The program of study contemplates six regular semesters of
work beginning in the Fall semester of the academic year, although efforts are made
to adjust the program to meet the needs of students entering in the Spring semester
and those attending the Summer Session.
For students entering in February, 1960, and thereafter, the following program of
study is prescribed:

FIRST YEAR
First Semester Credits Second Semester Credits
LW 501-Contracts I ........................................ 3 LW 502-Contracts II ..................................................... 2
LW 511-Legal Method .................................. 2 LW 522-Civil Procedure ................................ 4
LW 531-Property I ......................................... 3 LW 532-Property II ........................................ 2
LW 551-Constitutional Law I ...................... 2 LW 552-Constitutional Law II .................. 2
LW 581-Torts I ......................................... 2 LW 582-Torts II .............................................. 3
LW 585-Criminal Law & Procedure I ...... 2 LW 586-Criminal Law & Procedure II...... 2

14 15

ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES
Third Semester Credits Senior Year Credits
LW 591-Introduction to Legal Research LW 599-Legal Ethics ..................................... 1
and Writing ............................... 2
Thereafter, each student will be required to undertake and offer for graduation
as a minimum the number of credit hours shown as required from each of the groups
set forth below:


COMMERCIAL LAW
(6 hours required)
Credits
LW 600-Sales & Sales Financing ..................... .................... 3
LW 601-Negotiable Instruments ...................................................... 3
LW 602- Business Organizations ..... ...................... ............................ 3
LW 603- C corporations ............ ......... ............ ............................ 3
LW 604- Insurance .................... ... ............... ........................... ........... 2
LW 605- C creditors' Rights ....................................................................... 3
LW 607-Corporate Problems Seminar .................................................. 2

PERSPECTIVE
(3 hours required)
Credits
LW 610- Jurisprudence .................................................. ......................... 3
LW 611-International Law ................................................................... 3
LW 613-Comparative Law ................................................................. 3
LW 615-Legal History Seminar ....................... ......................... 2
LW 616-Law & Society Seminar ......................... ......................... 2


PROCEDURE
(5 hours required)
Credits
LW 620- Florida Pleading & Practice .................................................... 2
LW 621- Appellate Practice ..................................................................... 2
LW 622- Evidence ........................................................................................ 4
LW 623-Federal Practice ....................................................................... 3
LW 624-Practice Court ......................................................................... 2
*LW 627-Pretrial and Trial Procedure ............................................. 2

* Course will be discontinued at the end of the 1960-61 academic year.














PROPERTY
(6 hours required)
Credits
LW 630-Estates and Trusts I....................................... ......... 3
LW 631-Estates and Trusts II ... ................... ........................ 2
LW 632-Fiduciary Administration I ........................................ ......... 2
LW 633-Fiduciary Administration II ................................................. 2
LW 634-Future Interests ........... ........ 3
LW 635- M mortgages .................................................................................. 2
LW 636-Abstracts ............................................ ......... ........... 2
LW 637-Advanced Property Seminar .................................................. 2


PUBLIC LAW
(4 hours required)
Credits
LW 650-Administrative Law ...................................................... 2
LW 651-Municipal Corporations ........................................ ........ 2
LW 652-Trade Regulations .............................. .......................... 2
LW 653-Unfair Trade Practices .................. ................. ............ 2
LW 654--Labor Law ....... ....................................... ........... ........2 or 3
LW 655- Public Utilities ............................... .................................... 2
LW 656-Patents and Copyrights ......................................................... 2
LW 657-Labor Law Seminar ..... ......................................... ...... 2
LW 658-Administrative Law Seminar ................................................ 2


TAXATION
(3 hours required)
Credits
LW 670-Income Taxation ....................................................................... 3
LW 671-State and Local Taxation ............................................ ............ 2
LW 672-Estate and Gift Taxation ........................................................ 2
LW 673--Corporate Taxation .................................................................. 2
LW 674-Partnership Taxation .......................... ......................... 2
LW 675-Federal Taxation Seminar ........................... ........... 2
The balance of the courses in the curriculum are carried in an unclassified group for
which no group requirements exist and are as follows:


UNCLASSIFIED
Credits
*LW 606-U.S. & Florida Constitutional Law ........................................ 3
*LW 639-Acquisition of Real Property ................... ........................... 3
LW 680- Remedies ..................................................... ....................... 3
LW 681-Domestic Relations ................................................................... 2
LW 682-Conflict of Laws ....................................................................... 3
LW 683-Admiralty ........................................................................... 2
LW 684-Legal Accounting .................................................................... 2
LW 685-Advanced Equitable Remedies ............................................. 2
LW 686-Legislation .............................................. .................... 2
LW 687-Military Jurisprudence ............................................................ 2
LW 690-Law Review ...................................... .......................... 1
LW 691-Estates Planning Seminar ................... ............... ........ 2
LW 692-Crime & Criminology Seminar ................................ ......... 2
LW 693-Medicolegal Seminar ............................................................. 2
LW 694-Current Legal Problems Seminar .......................................... 2

Group requirements should be fulfilled at the earliest opportunity. The taking of
individual courses within any group is subject to such prerequisites as are designated.

* Courses will be discontinued at the end of the 1960-61 academic year.












Legal Research and Writing Requirements: LW 591, Introduction to Legal Re-
search and Writing, is required to be completed satisfactorily by all students in their
third semester.
In addition, each student is required to accomplish a major finished piece of
writing as a result of individual research. This advanced writing requirement may be
satisfied by either of the following methods:

1. The writing of a paper in a seminar or course in which the student's
major contribution is the production of a finished piece of writing as the
result of his individual research, or

2. A Law Review note prepared for publication and approved by a faculty
Law Review advisor as being of publishable quality.

No more than fifteen students will be permitted in any particular seminar except
upon approval of the Dean and the professor of the course. Any course of not over twenty
students can be counted for advanced writing credit, if a writing of seminar quality is
accomplished either as required work or as voluntary additional work. The effect of
this advanced writing program is to require every student as a condition to graduation
to complete one difficult research project.

Legal Ethics Requirement.-All students are required to satisfactorily complete
LW 599, Legal Ethics, in their senior year. One hour of course credit toward graduation
is allowed for successful completion of the course, but letter grades are not given.

Deviations, Prerequisites, and Course Cancellation.-In exceptional cases the Dean
may authorize deviations from the prescribed program of study.
Prerequisites for particular courses may be prescribed and the privilege is reserved
by each member of the faculty to limit the number and prescribe special qualifications
for students in his courses and seminars.
The privilege is reserved to cancel any course or seminar when the registration
for it does not warrant its being given in a particular semester.

Transition from Former Curriculum (Course Requirements) to New Curriculum
(Group Requirements):-

1. Students who, as of September, 1960, will be properly classified as third
year students, i.e., who normally would graduate in February or June of
1961, will be offered the opportunity to elect to graduate under the
previously prescribed curriculum as set forth in the catalog issue of the
1959-60 University of Florida Record, or to graduate under the new
curriculum (with the exception of newly required first year courses).
All such students must take LW 606, United States and Florida Constitu-
tional Law, regardless of which curriculum they elect.


2. All other students will be deemed to be under the new curriculum and
subject to all of its requirements; with the additional requirement as to
students who entered the College in September of 1959 that they take
LW 639, Acquisition of Real Property, and LW 522, Civil Procedure, at
their earliest opportunity. In addition, all students who have not taken
Constitutional Law as a freshman course, must take LW 606, United States
and Florida Constitutional Law, no later than the fall semester of 1960.












3. Group credit will be allowed for the following courses and seminars, if
satisfactorily completed, for the number of credit hours shown:
COMMERCIAL LAW PROCEDURE
Credits Credits
LW 501--Commercial Transactions I............ 3 LW 407-Intro. to Judicial Adm. ................ 2
LW 502-Commercial Transactions II ........ 2 LW 627-Pretrial & Trial Procedure............ 2
PERSPECTIVE LW 641-Judgments & Appeals .................... 2
LW 692-Legal Philosphy Seminar .............. 1 LW 642-Federal Jurisdiction ................... 2
LW 698-Comp. Comm. Law Seminar ........ 2 LW 644-Trial Techniques .............................. 2
PUBLIC LAW TAXATION
LW 406-Introduction to Public Law ............ 3 LW 684-Federal Taxation Seminar ............ 2

4. Former courses of the same name as new courses will be accepted in ful-
fillment of group requirements, if currently in a required group, to the
extent of the credit hours allotted for the former course.

Examinations.-In first semester courses mid-semester examinations are given pri-
marily for the purpose of acquainting students with law school examinations. Examina-
tions are given at the end of each semester in most courses; in seminars and other
advanced courses individual written work may be required in lieu of an examination.

Grading Scale.-Grades are given at the end of each Semester in all work, unless
otherwise indicated in this bulletin. Students' work is graded according to the following
scale: A-excellent; B-Good; C-satisfactory; D-poor and E-failure. No numerical grades
are given. Grades of I (incomplete) and X (absent from Examination) are temporary
grades, which must be changed to passing grades within the dates set in the University
Calendar or be treated as grades of E in considering a student's record for graduation
or in calculating averages. The grade of Ew is given when a student is dropped for
non-attendance or unsatisfactory work.

Determination of Honor Point Average.-The honor point average is determined
by computing the ratio of honor points to semester hours of work attempted in courses
in which letter grades are assigned. The student receives honor points according to the
following scale: A equals 4 honor points per semester hour; B equals 3 honor points
per semester hour; C equals 2 honor points per semester hour; D equals 1 honor point
per semester hour; E (failure), or Ew (dropped for non-attendance or unsatisfactory
work), or I (incomplete), or X (absent from examination) equals 0 honor point per
semester hour.

Probation and Exclusion Rules.-The following probation and exclusion rules are
applicable to all students attending the College of Law:
A student who fails to maintain a 1.8 honor point average for all work attempted
in any semester will be placed on probation for the next semester in which he is in
attendance. A student on probation will be excluded at the end of the semester unless
he maintains a 2.0 honor point average in all work attempted in that semester, or has
a 2.0 cumulative honor point average in the total of all work attempted in the College.
A student excluded under this rule will not be readmitted except by special action of
the faculty of the College of Law.
Grades of I and X will be considered as grades of E for the purpose of computing
the honor point average under this provision until such time as they are changed to
passing grades, at which time the honor point average will be recomputed on the basis
of the permanent grades and the student restored to good standing, continued on
probation, or immediately excluded as the application of the foregoing provision may
require.
For the purpose of this provision a semester means either (1) the regular fall
semester, or (2) the regular spring semester, or (3) if summer session is attended, such
session and the following regular semester attended, as a unit.












Law

Instructional Staf 1959-60

Maloney, Frank E., Dean; Black, Kenneth L.; Clark, Vernon W.; Crosby, Harold B.;
Day, James W.; Delony, Dexter; Enwall, Hayford O.; Farrell, John R.; Fenn, Henry
A.; Freeland, James J.; Glicksberg, Mandell; Hoyt, Brooks P.; Jones, Ernest M.; Jones,
T. Brooks; Krastin, Karl; McCoy, Francis T.; Macdonald, William D.; Mautz, Robert
B.; Nash, Charles P.; Okun, Joshua; Plager, Sheldon J.;* Powers, Leonard S.; Probert,
Walter; Stephens, Richard B.;* Weyrauch, Walter O.; Yonge, Phillip K.*


LW 501 (Formerly LW 401)-CONTRACTS I. 3 credits
An introduction to the law of business agreements; enforceability of promises; considera-
tion; formation and discharge of contracts.

LW 502 (Formerly LW 402)-CONTRACTS II. 2 credits
The effect of various types of non-performance on the rights and duties of the parties
to a business agreement; assignability of contracts; rights of third-party beneficiaries.

LW 511-LEGAL METHOD. 2 credits
The nature of law, its concepts, and the legal process; the language of the lawyer and
judge; steps in the evolution of a decision and its effect as a precedent.

LW 522-CIVIL PROCEDURE. 4 credits
The judicial system and the function of procedure in that system for the adjudication
of civil cases.

LW 531-PROPERTY I. 3 credits
Problems in possession; the bona fide purchaser of personal property; introduction to
the law of real property: types of estates, origin and development of methods of creating
and transferring estates; landlord and tenant.

LW 532-PROPERTY II. 2 credits
The modem land transaction: land contract, mortgage, deed, recording acts, methods
of title assurance; easements and licenses; rights incident to ownership of land.

LW 551-CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I. 2 credits
Principles and operation of judicial review; inter-governmental relationships in the
federal system's powers of Congress, the President and the states; restrictions on the
states.

LW 552-CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II. 2 credits
Individual procedural rights; impediments to legislative regulations; the impairment of
contracts; personal liberties-general, speech, press assembly, religion; the Fourteenth
Amendment; federal powers as to civil rights; citizenship.

on leave of absence 1959-60.












LW 581 (Formerly LW 411)-TORTS I. 2 credits
Theories of civil liability for harms to persons and harm to property, interference with
various relationships, and appropriation of items of value. Study of various tort doctrines
as they are used in the judicial process to settle these problems.


LW 582 (Formerly LW 412)-TORTS II. 3 credits
Analysis of the judicial and legislative processes as they affect the "law of torts;"
history, current developments, trends, and predictions of the future.


LW 585 (Formerly LW 403)-CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE I. 2 credits
Sources of state and federal criminal law; parties to crimes; nature of crime; elements
of particular crimes at common law and in Florida; Florida statutes on criminal pro-
cedure.


LW 586 (Formerly LW 404)-CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE II. 2 credits
A continuation of LW 585. Also: defenses in criminal prosecutions; Federal Rules of
Criminal Procedure and their construction.


LW 591 (Formerly LW 408)-INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH AND
WRITING. 2 credits
Instruction and practical work in the use of books of law, periodicals, encyclopedias,
and other legal research materials. Written work will emphasize advocacy. Individual
conferences on papers turned in.


LW 599 (Formerly LW 612)-LEGAL ETHICS. 1 credit
Responsibilities of the legal profession; Canons of Ethics of the Florida and American
Bar Associations; organization of the bar; current problems and activities of the legal
profession.


LW 600 (Formerly LW 501)-SALES AND SALES FINANCING. 3 credits
Sales law, with emphasis on the distribution of goods, and the means by which com-
mercial transactions including inventory financing are secured, such as conditional
sales, chattel mortgages, and assignments.


LW 601 (Formerly LW 502)-NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS. 3 credits
A study of negotiable bills, notes and other commercial paper, banking law relating to
the collection of checks, and suretyship in the negotiable paper context.


LW 602 (Formerly LW 503)-BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS. 3 credits
Creation of business associations; the relationship of master-servant and principal-agent;
partnership property and rights of partnership creditors; termination and dissolution.












LW 603 (Formerly LW 504)-CORPORATIONS. 3 credits
The modern law of business corporations, with emphasis on legal duties of officers,
directors, and stockholders, issuance of stock, changes in capital structure, and declara-
tion of dividends.


LW 604 (Formerly LW 631)-INSURANCE. 2 credits
Historical background; construction of contracts; the modern insurance code; insurance
practice and litigation; employee benefit plans; business insurance.


LW 605 (Formerly LW 632)-CREDITORS' RIGHTS. 3 credits
Alternative remedies available to the unsecured creditor; conveyances in fraud of
creditors; state insolvency proceedings and adjustment by agreement between debtor
and creditors; the Federal Bankruptcy Act.


LW 606-UNITED STATES AND FLORIDA CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. 3 credits
Federal powers; the bill of rights, impairment of the obligations of contracts; eminent
domain; amendments; problems of overlap in state and federal control; composition,
role and operation of the Supreme Court.


LW 607-CORPORATE PROBLEMS SEMINAR. 2 credits
Consideration of the more difficult problems in the Law of Corporations, e.g. corporate
reorganizations, corporate finance and security regulations. Open to only fifth and
sixth semester students.


LW 610-JURISPRUDENCE. 3 credits
Legal theory through the ages, with emphasis on the contemporary perspectives; the
role in the law-in-society of theories and practices of science, philosophy, psychology,
general semantics, sociology, etc.


LW 611-INTERNATIONAL LAW. 3 credits
An introduction to international law as applied between nations and in American courts.
Includes individual work on selected problems.


LW 613-COMPARATIVE LAW. 3 credits
A comparison of methods in American law and the civil law. The emphasis is on prob-
lems in doing business abroad. Includes individual work.


LW 615-LEGAL HISTORY SEMINAR. 2 credits
A study of the development of our legal institutions, with individual research on a
selected topic.


LW 616-LAW & SOCIETY SEMINAR. 2 credits
Advanced work in Jurisprudence, International Law, or Comparative Law.












LW 620-FLORIDA PLEADING & PRACTICE. 2 credits
Analysis of the development of Florida procedural law with special emphasis on the
present Florida rules of civil procedure, venue, pleading, joinder and splitting of
causes of action and parties.


LW 621-APPELLATE PRACTICE. 2 credits
Methods of review in Florida appellate courts, including review of trial courts and
administrative bodies. Details of procedure as well as preparation of the record, assign-
ments of error, briefing, oral argument.


LW 622 (Formerly LW 508)-EVIDENCE. 4 credits
Rules governing admission and exclusion of evidence; judicial notice; presumptions;
demonstrative, circumstantial, illegal evidence; the hearsay and best evidence rules;
the competency, examination, impeachment, and privilege of witnesses; burden of proof.


LW 623-FEDERAL PRACTICE. 3 credits
Analysis of the federal judicial system; original and removal jurisdiction; other distinc-
tive features including venue, conflicts between systems, appellate jurisdiction, etc.


LW 624 (Formerly LW 688)-PRACTICE COURT. 2 credits
The preparation for and trial of a criminal and a civil jury case, including the drafting
of pleadings, jury selection, examination of witnesses, arguments, preparation of in-
structions and trial briefs.


LW 627 (Formerly LW 607)-PRETRIAL & TRIAL PROCEDURE. 2 credits
Pretrial procedure; depositions; discovery; trials; trials by court or by jury; dismissal of
actions; motions for directed verdict; new trials.


LW 630 (Formerly LW 410)-ESTATES AND TRUSTS I. 3 credits
The substantive law of intestate succession, execution of wills, making of gifts inter
vivos and causa mortis, and creation of non-commercial trusts.


LW 631 (Formerly LW 554)-ESTATES & TRUSTS II. 2 credits
A continuation of LW 630. Protection of the family of the transferor; admissibility and
effect of extrinsic evidence; ademption, lapse and satisfaction; revocation of wills;
termination of trusts.


LW 632 (Formerly LW 510)-FIDUCIARY ADMINISTRATION I. 2 credits
Administration of decedents' estates and noncommercial trusts; steps in the administra-
tion of a decedent's estate, whether testate or intestate; powers of the executor, the
administrator, and the trustee.












LW 633 (Formerly LW 651)-FIDUCIARY ADMINISTRATION II. 2 credits
Problems of the fiduciary in the allocation of receipts and disbursements between prin-
cipal and income in the administration of trusts and estates; the Uniform Principal and
Income Act; apportionment of estate taxes.


LW 634 (Formerly LW 609)-FUTURE INTERESTS. 3 credits
A study of interests created by deed or will entitling the holder to enjoyment of real or
personal property at a future time: conditional estates; gifts to classes; rule against
perpetuities; powers of appointment.


LW 635 (Formerly LW 653)-MORTGAGES. 2 credits
Real property mortgages: problems of creation; assignment; priorities; rights and
duties of the parties; merger; foreclosures.


LW 636 (Formerly LW 552)-ABSTRACTS. 2 credits
Abstracts of title; description of land; records of title in Florida; curative acts and
limitations acts; conveyances in Florida; conveyances by married women and corpora-
tions; conveyances of homestead; the lien of state and federal judgments; federal
tax liens.


LW 637-ADVANCED PROPERTY SEMINAR. 2 credits
Exploration of current legal problems in the area of property law leading to creative
work on the part of the student in the form of a term paper.


LW 639 (Formerly LW 509)-ACQUISITION OF REAL PROPERTY. 3 credits
The real estate contract, adverse possession, adverse user; recording acts; deeds and
their execution; covenants for title; after-acquired titles; covenants running with the
land; creation of easements and profits; licenses.


LW 650 (Formerly LW 661)-ADMINISTRATIVE LAW. 2 credits
Analysis of the administrative process, with emphasis on the opportunity to be heard,
compulsory process to obtain information, elements of fair procedure, and the process
of decision.


LW 651 (Formerly LW 665)-MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS. 2 credits
A consideration of local governmental problems with special emphasis on the structure,
organization, powers, personnel, procedure, financing and community planning of mu-
nicipal corporations.


LW 652 (Formerly LW 667)-TRADE REGULATIONS. 2 credits
Common law and statutory regulation of trade and industry; the restraint of trade and
anti-trust laws.












LW 653 (Formerly LW 668)-UNFAIR TRADE PRACTICES. 2 credits
Unfair business practices at common law and under state and federal statutes; trade
marks and trade names; false advertising; price discrimination; miscellaneous business
torts.


LW 654 (Formerly LW 663)-LABOR LAW. 3 credits
Occasionally offered with 2 hours and 2 credits. The law relating to labor organization,
collective bargaining, the collective agreement and its administration. On occasion study
will be devoted to other legislation affecting the employment relation, such as wage and
hour control.

LW 655 (Formerly LW 662)-PUBLIC UTILITIES. 2 credits
Businesses affected with public interest; extent of duty to serve; abandonment of service;
regulation of rates; preferences to classes and localities; discrimination in rates; extent
of federal and state regulatory powers.


LW 656 (Formerly LW 677)-PATENTS AND COPYRIGHTS. 2 credits
Patentability; patent proceedings; construction of letters patent; transfers, assignments,
licenses and contracts; infringement. Rights in literary property; preserving and re-
newing copyright; transfers and infringement.

LW 657 (Formerly LW 686)-LABOR LAW SEMINAR. 2 credits
Selected problems in the law of labor and management relations, varying among areas
such as special labor legislation, labor organization, collective bargaining, and arbitra-
tion. LW 654 is a prerequisite.

LW 658-ADMINISTRATIVE LAW SEMINAR. 2 credits
This course will have variable content by dealing in detail with the operations of a
different regulatory agency at various times.


LW 670-INCOME TAXATION. 3 credits
Basic elements of federal tax procedure; fundamentals of federal income taxation;
techniques of federal tax research.

LW 671 (Formerly LW 505)-STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION. 2 credits
Nature and purpose of state taxation; comparison of property and excise taxes; tax
jurisdiction; assessment procedures; methods of collecting taxes; remedies of taxpay-
ers for illegal taxation.

LW 672 (Formerly LW 506)-ESTATE AND GIFT TAXATION. 2 credits
Fundamentals of federal estate and gift taxation; techniques of federal tax research.

LW 673-CORPORATE TAXATION. 2 credits
The tax meaning of "cooperation". Corporate formation; basic problems; the capital
structure. Operating problems; dividends; "Section 306 Stock"; accumulated earnings
tax; personal holding companies. Termination problems; collapsible corporations.












LW 674-PARTNERSHIP TAXATION. 2 credits
The tax meaning of "partnership"; problems attending formation transactions be-
tween partner and partnership; determination and treatment of partnership income;
sale or exchange of partnership interest; distributions; retirement, death of a partner;
drafting the partnership agreement.


LW 675 (Formerly LW 684)-FEDERAL TAXATION SEMINAR. 2 credits
Advanced problems in federal taxation.


LW 680-REMEDIES. 3 credits
Legal and equitable remedies available to an injured party, including compensatory,
restitutionary and exemplary damages, injunctions, and specific relief (excluding land
contract transactions), with emphasis on comparison of these remedies.


LW 681 (Formerly LW 572)-DOMESTIC RELATIONS. 2 credits
Nature of contract to marry and of marriage; requisites for validity; annulment doc-
trines; divorce: causes, grounds, defenses, jurisdiction; economic and tort relations
between spouses and parent and child.


LW 682 (Formerly LW 608)-CONFLICT OF LAWS. 3 credits
Problems arising whenever at least one of the operative facts of the case is connected
with a state other than the forum; jurisdiction of courts; enforcement of foreign
judgments.


LW 683 (Formerly LW 671)-ADMIRALTY. 2 credits
Jurisdiction; maritime affairs; sovereign immunity; maritime liens; seamen's rights;
carriage of goods; charter parties; towage; pilotage; salvage; general average; col-
lisions; navigation rules; marine insurance.


LW 684 (Formerly LW 524)-LEGAL ACCOUNTING. 2 credits
Basic patterns of business and tax accounting statements. Commercial practice and
procedure related to legal requirements. Designed for students with no previous ac-
counting background.


LW 685 (Formerly LW 574)-ADVANCED EQUITABLE REMEDIES. 2 credits
Specific performance: nature of jurisdiction, the statute of frauds, part performance,
equitable conversion; substitutional redress in equity; other equitable remedies, in-
cluding bills to quiet title, interpleader and class suits.


LW 686 (Formerly LW 696)-LEGISLATION. 2 credits
Forms of legislative expression; relation of the statute to other types of law; types of
statutes and requisites to passage; techniques of bill-drafting.






















LW 687 (Formerly LW 673)-MILITARY JURISPRUDENCE. 2 credits
Military Justice: relation of military to civilian authority; Military Affairs; boards
of officers; claims; legal assistance; concepts of international law as applied to land
and aerial warfare.


LW 690-LAW REVIEW. 1 credit per semester
Research, writing and editorial work in connection with the publication of University
of Florida Law Review. Limited to students whose scholastic average meets the re-
quirements for law review work.


LW 691 (Formerly LW 682)-ESTATES PLANNING SEMINAR. 2 credits
Objectives of lifetime and testamentary planning of estates; procedures for analysis
of small and large estates; the elimination, mitigation and offsetting of adverse factors;
corrective procedures and their implementation. Prerequisites: LW 601, LW 602, LW
630, LW 632, and LW 672.


LW 692 (Formerly LW 681)-CRIME AND CRIMINOLOGY SEMINAR. 2 credits
Physical, psychological and social aspects of criminology; searches and seizures; police
methods; extradition; the sentence; probation; parole; pardon; civil rights; penology;
recidivism; juvenile delinquency; model penal code; reforms and trends.


LW 693-MEDICOLEGAL JURISPRUDENCE. 2 credits
The relationship between law and the medical sciences, with particular emphasis on
medical proof in litigation. Open only to students in their 5th and 6th semesters.


LW 694-CURRENT LEGAL PROBLEMS SEMINAR. 2 credits
Exploration of various legal problems of current significance leading to creative work
on the part of the student in the form of a term paper.




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