• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Enhancing the undergraduate...
 Title Page
 Useful web addresses
 Table of Contents
 Introductory information
 Student information
 Colleges, schools, and their...
 Centers, divisions and professional...
 Course descriptions and catalog...
 UF points of pride
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00065
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00065
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Enhancing the undergraduate experience
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page i-a
    Useful web addresses
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introductory information
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    UF points of pride
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text


THE UNIVERSITY RECORD
f UNIVERSITY OF
S'FLORIDA






University of Florida
ENHANCING the

UNDERGRADUATE EXPERIETI APcHIs


.attheUniversity of Florid. o Smur
at thel iV Sity of Florid George A. Smathers Librarie
The University of Florida seeks to prepare students for life: intellectually, academically, anc a
fundamental part of this process, we are making every effort to create a model community .
education is valued, individual and group differences are respected, and a commitment to service and the responsibilities of citizenship
are embraced and appreciated. To assist our students in these efforts, the University of Florida will encourage all undergraduates
beginning in Fall 2001 to pursue at least two of the following opportunities during their four years of study:
T'
1. 4 nternships with Government Agencies, Non-Profit Organizations,
and Businesses
The University of Florida offers academic credit for internships that enable students to explore opportunities in government, non-profit
organizations and business. Whether the internship is with the state legislature, an interest group, businesses, the Governor's office, the
federal government, a lobbying organization, law firms, media companies or in another career-related position, an internship can provide
basic work experience and an understanding of the public and private sectors.
Career Resource Center in the Reitz Union: www.crc.ufl.edu


2. j l research with Faculty
The University of Florida offers numerous opportunities to pursue research under the direction of a faculty member.
This intensive research opportunity is one of our ways to personalize the academic experience but also to challenge
students academically in ways that will allow them to strengthen their writing and analytical skills. Undergraduates
have the opportunity to pursue a senior thesis or project under the direction of a faculty member in each of our
departments. In addition, the University Scholars Program offers students, on a competitive basis, a chance to obtain
one of 175 research awards of $2,500 each to study with a faculty member as a University Scholar and to present their
research at the Undergraduate Research Symposium, and an additional $500 for travel related to the research.
University Scholars Program: www.scholars.ufl.edu


3. Volunteer Service to the Community, State and Nation
In an effort to promote community involvement and a volunteer spirit, the University of Florida provides a variety of volunteer
opportunities to students. These opportunities are available through government and charitable organizations in Gainesville and other
communities and at the state and national level. Students may also participate in the Florida Alternative Break program in which
students travel to another community to perform service during one of the breaks during the academic year.
Office of Community Service at the Reitz Union: www.union.ufl.edulocs/aboutus.asp


4. L tudy Abroad
Regardless of what students may do after graduation, they will be making their way in a society that is increasingly
global in it perspective. To help students develop an awareness and understanding of the world, the University of
Florida offers more than 70 international programs in which a student can study for two weeks, two months, or an entire
academic year. Students are urged to take part in at least one of these programs during their undergraduate career.
UF International Center: www.ufic.ufl.edu


5. Leadership
There is a wide variety of leadership opportunities at the University of Florida in any of the more than 500 student organizations
connected to academic majors and programs, as well as ethnic, professional, social and other special interests. Students can also take
courses about leadership, as well as attend student conferences, programs, and workshops about leadership, such as the Art of Leadership,
sponsored by the Division of Student Affairs. Overall, leadership includes endeavors by the student to work with others to make the
university community a better place.
Student Activities Center in the Reitz Union: www.union.ufl.edu/sac/

For additional information on campus resources on enhancing the undergraduate experience, please go to:
www.aa.ufl.edu/forstud.htm













The University Record




i UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA




UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG
2004-2005


Volume XCVIV Series 1 Number 1 March 2004
The University Record (USPS 652-760) published four times a year in March, April, September and September
by the University of Florida, Office of the University Registrar, Academic Publications, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000.
Periodical postage paid at Gainesville, FL 32601.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR, P. O. BOX 114000,
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-4000.






UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG


Useful Web addresses:

UF Home Page www.ufl.edu

* Colleges, Schools, Units and Offices (alpha index, computing, libraries, UF phone book, UF Web sites and more)
* Student Information (admission, financial aid, catalogs, housing, study abroad and more)
* Campus Information (facts, homecoming, maps, news, sports, virtual tour and more)
* A Student's View (interviews with students regarding academic programs and support, benefits of enrollment at UF, campus
involvement, the multicultural experiences and more)


Office of the University Registrar and the Office of Admission Home Page www.reg.ufl.edu
* Admission and Online Applications
* Commencement Information, by term
* Critical Dates
* Financial Aid
* Housing
* Schedule of Courses
* Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs
* Virtual Tour of Campus

ISIS (Integrated Student Information System) www.isis.ufl.edu

Online Undergraduate Catalog www.reg.ufl.edulcatalog.html

Upon request, the University Record, the undergraduate catalog, is available on computer disk to students with print-oriented dis-
abilities. For more information, contact the Dean of Students Office. For persons with hearing impairments, please use the Florida Re-
lay Service (FRS) when offices and departments on campus do not list a TDD number. The FRS number is 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).

The University Record, the undergraduate catalog, has been adopted as a rule of the university pursuant to the provision of Chapter
120 of the Florida Statutes. Addenda to the University Record series, if any, are available from the Office of the University Registrar,
222 Criser Hall. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented in the undergraduate catalog. How-
ever, all courses, course descriptions, degree requirements and fees are subject to change. Consult the online catalog for the most cur-
rent information at www.reg.ufl.edu/catalog.html.

The university encourages applications from qualified applicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious and ethnic groups.
UF is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to race, creed, religion, age, disability, color, sex, sexual orientation, marital status,
national origin, political opinions or affiliations, or veteran status in the administration of education policies, financial aid, employment
or in any program or activity. Refer to the Office for Affirmative Action and Minority Affairs, 145 Tigert Hall, P. O. Box 113050, Gaines-
ville, FL 32611-3050, 352-392-6004.

Software Copyright Policy: The principles for using and managing software derive from U.S. copyright law, the Florida Computer
Crimes Act and legal agreements in the form of licenses and purchase agreements. That foundation makes the basic policy governing
software clear: All faculty, staff and students of the university are required and expected to obey the laws and legal agreements gov-
erning software use. Failure to do so can lead to monetary damages and/or criminal penalties for the individual violator. Because such
violations are also against university policies and rules, disciplinary action will be taken as appropriate.


Front cover: Two icons on the University of Florida campus are Century Tower, built in 1953, and the University Auditorium, com-
pleted in the mid-1920s. Century Tower was built to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the university and was dedicated to UF
students killed in World Wars I and II. In 1979, a cast-bells carillon was installed in the Tower and is played daily. The carillon has 61
bells and is the largest in the state. The University Auditorium, suitable for concerts, convocations and lectures, is one of several uni-
versity buildings included in the National Register of Historic Places.

Back cover: The arched south entrance of Sledd Hall, which opened in 1929, and is named for Andrew Sledd, UF's first president.
This residence hall is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


University of Florida






INTRODUCTION

TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Introductory Inform action ....................................................................................................................... ..... .......... -
A. Florida Board of Education, Florida Board of Governors, UF Board of Trustees,
A dm inistrative O officers of the U university ............................................................................................ -3
B. U university of Florida Purpose and M mission ............................................................................................. 1-7
C D irectory..................................................................................................................... ............................... -10
D Index to M ajors and T heir C olleges/Schools ......................................................................................... 12
E. Index to M inors and T heir C olleges/Schools........................................... ........................................... 1-14
F. Index to Certificate Programs and Their Colleges/Schools............................................................... 1-15
G. Combined-Degree Programs (Bachelor's/Master's)............................................................................. -16
H C critical D ates and D headlines 2004-2005 .............................................................................. .............. 7
I. A application D eadlines.......................................................................................................... .................... 1 18
2. Student Inform action ....................................................................................................................................................... 2-1
A G lossary of Term s................................................................................................................. ..................... 2-3
B. A dm mission .............................................................................................................................................................. 2-5
a. G general Requirem ents for A dm mission ............................................................................................................. 2-5
b. Residency for Tuition Purposes ........................................................................................................................ 2-5
c. Proof of Im m unization ................................................................................................................. ....................... 2-5
d. C om puter Requirem ent.............................................................................................................. ....................... 2-5
e. A dm mission as a Freshm an ............................................................................................................. ...................... 2-5
f. A dm mission as a Transfer Student....................................................................................................................... 2-7
g. Veterans A dm inistration and Social Security Benefits .............................................................................. 2-8
h. Readm ission......................................................................................................... ..................... .................... 2-8
i. Fresh Start Program ...................................................................................................................... ...................... 2-9
j. Adm mission as an International Student............................................................................................................ 2-9
C A cadem ic Regulations....................................................................................................................................... 2-1 I
a. C classification of Students ................................................................................................................................. 2- I
b. C confidentiality of Student Records ................................................................................................................ 2-1 I
c. Student Records and Transcripts................................................................................................................. 2- I
d. Registration Policies ........................................................................................................................................... 2-12
e. Attendance Policies .......................................................................................................................................... 2-13
f. Exam nation Policies .................................................................................................................................. ......... 2-14
g. G rades and G reading Policies .......................................................................................................................... 2-14
h. A cadem ic Progress Policies .............................................................................................................................. 2-16
i. D degrees and G radiation ................................................................................................................................... 2-17
D A cadem ic A advising ....................................................................................................................... ........... ......... 2-19
a. U F's A advising M ission......................................................................................................................................... 2-19
b. W here to G o for A cadem ic H elp................................................................................................................... 2-19
c. D declaring a M ajor................................................................................................................................................ 2-19
d. U universal Tracking .............................................................................................................................................. 2-20
e. A accelerated Program s, Com bined D degrees ................................................................................................. 2-20
f. C credit by Exam nation ....................................................................................................................................... 2-20
g. College Level A cadem ic Skills Test (C LAST) ........................................................................................ 2-21
h. W writing and M ath Requirem ent ..................................................................................................................... 2-22
i. G general Education Requirem ent..................................................................................................................... 2-22
j. Foreign Language Requirem ent ...................................................................................................................... 2-23
k. Placem ent................................................................................................................................. ............................ 2-23
I. Preprofessional Program s ........................................................................................................................ ......... 2-24
m Correspondence Study............................................................................................................................. ......... 2-25
n. H honors Program ................................................................................................................................................. 2-25
o. Study A broad ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 2-26

2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog iii






UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG
TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)
p. Frequently Asked Questions about Universal Tracking ........................................................................2-27
q. Credit by Examination (AICE, AP, IB and CLEP Course Equivalency Charts) .....................................2-28
r. SAT II Examinations for Placement....................................................................... ..................................2-33
E. Residency ............................................................................................................................................................ 2-35
F. Fees and other Fiscal Information ................................................................................................................. 2-37
G. Campus Life and Student Support.............................................................................................................. 2-41
3. Colleges, Schools and Their Curricula........................................................................................................................ 3-1
A. Fisher School of Accounting .................................................. 3-3
B. College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.................................................. ..................................... 3-9
C. M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction .......................................................... ............. 3-49
D. W arrington College of Business Administration ................................... .......... 3-55
E. College of Design, Construction and Planning ......................................... 3-67
F. College of Education ...................................................................................................................................... 3-75
G. College of Engineering ............................. .................................................................................................3-83
H. College of Fine Arts...................................................................................................... ........................... 3-113
I. School of Forest Resources and Conservation .................................................................... ..... 3-143
J. College of Health and Human Performance ................................................... .... ............................... 3-149
K. College of Journalism and Communications ....................................... 3-163
L. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .......................................................................................................... 3-173
M. School of Natural Resources and Environment............................................................. ...................3-229
N. College of Nursing .................................................................................................... ...............................3-237
0 College of Pharmacy....................................................................................................................................... 3-243
P. College of Public Health and Health Professions.................................... .......................................... 3-249
4. Centers, Divisions and Professional Programs ........................................................................................................ 4-I
A. Center for Latin American Studies ........................................................................................... .......... 4-3
B. Division of Military Science............................................................................................................................... 4-5
C. College of Dentistry ........................................................................................................................................... 4-9
D. College of Law ................................................................................................................................................... 4-11
E. College of Medicine ..................................................................................... .............................................. 4-13
F. College of Veterinary Medicine ...................................................................................... ........................ 4-15
5. Course Descriptions and Catalog Index...................................................................................... ........................ 5-1
A. Index of Course Descriptions .......................................................................................................................... 5-3
B. Index to Course Prefixes .................................................................................................................................. 5-4
C. Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System ....................................... 5-8
D. Reading a Course Description Entry .............................................................................................................. 5-9
E. Description of Courses ................................................................................................................................... 5-1 I
F. Index to the Undergraduate Catalog ..................................................................................... ............ 5-125












University of Florida







I Introductoruy~ Inom atio~ nm


* University Administration
* University Purpose and Mission
* Directory
* Index to Majors, Minors and
Certificate Programs
* Combined-Degree Programs
* Critical Dates and Deadlines
* Application Deadlines





INTRODUCTION

Florida State Board of Education


James W. Home
Secretary of Education
Orange Park

F. Phillip Handy
Chairman
Winter Park


James W. Home
Secretary of Education
Orange Park

Carolyn K. Roberts
Chairman
Ocala

John Dasburg
Vice Chairman
Miami

Pamela "Pam" Bilbrey
Pensacola

Dr. Castell V. Bryant
Miami


Linda J. Eads
Miami

T. Willard Fair
Miami


Charles Patrick Garcia
Boca Raton

Florida Board of Governors


Miguel De Grandy
Miami

Rolland Heiser
Sarasota

Gerri Moll
Naples

Joan Wellhouse Newton
Orange Park


Ava L. Parker
Jacksonville

Howard Rock
Miami


Julia L. Johnson
Orlando

William "Bill" Proctor
St. Augustine


Peter S. Rummell
Jacksonville

Chris Sullivan
Tampa

Patrick Sullivan
Gainesville

John W. Temple
Boca Raton


Steven Uhlfelder
Tallahassee

Zachariah P. Zachariah
Sea Ranch Lakes


Board of Trustees of the University


Manny Fernandez
Chairman
Ft. Myers

Carlos Alfonso
Tampa

Anthony Brennan
Gainesville

C. David Brown II
Orlando


Roland Daniels
Gainesville

Kyle Jones
Student Trustee
Gainesville

W.A. "Mac" McGriff III
Jacksonville

Joelen Merkel
Boca Raton


Cynthia O'Connell
Tallahassee

Earl Powell
Miami

Albert Thweatt Sr.
Petersburg, Virginia

Alfred C. Warrington IV
Houston, Texas


Dianna F. Morgan
Windermere


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

President and Vice Presidents of the University


J. Bernard Machen
President

David R. Colburn
Provost and Senior Vice President

Gail F. Baker
Vice President
Public Relations

Douglas J. Barrett
Vice President
Health Affairs


Larry Arrington
Dean for Extension
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences

Melda Bassett
Assistant Vice President
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences Development

Carter Boydstun
Senior Associate Vice President
Development & Alumni Affairs,
Development

Leslie D. Bram
Associate Vice President
Development & Alumni Affairs,
Administration

Dale Canelas
Director
University Libraries

Fred H. Cantrell Jr.
Associate Vice President
Finance and Administration

Jimmy G. Cheek
Dean
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences


Pamela Bernard
Vice President
General Counsel

Richard Bucciarelli
Vice President
Government Relations

Jeremy Foley
Athletic Director
University Athletic Association

Michael V. Martin
Vice President
Agriculture and Natural Resources


Other Administrators

Bruce DeLaney
Assistant Vice President
Development and Alumni Affairs
Administration/Real Estate

Sheila K. Dickison
Associate Provost, Academic Affairs
and
Director, University Honors Program

Joseph A. DiPietro
Dean
College of Veterinary Medicine

Teresa Dolan
Dean
College of Dentistry

Catherine Emihovich
Dean
College of Education

Robert G. Frank
Dean
College of Public Health
and Health Professions

Charles E. Frazier
Vice Provost and
Senior Associate Vice President
Information Technology
Academic Affairs


Winfred M. Phillips
Vice President for Research

Ed Poppell
Vice President
Finance and Administration

Paul A. Robell
Vice President
Development and Alumni Affairs

J. Michael Rollo
Interim Vice President
Student Affairs


Paula V. Fussell
Associate Vice President
Finance and Administration

Kenneth Gerhardt
Interim Dean
Graduate School

Joseph Glover
Associate Provost
Academic Affairs

Tom V. Harris
Associate Vice President
Administration
Health Affairs

Marion Hoffmann
Associate Vice President
Government Relations

Jancy L. Houck
Associate Vice President
Development and Alumni Affairs

Tommie C. Howard Jr.
University Ombudsman

Terry Hynes
Dean
College of Journalism and
Communications


University of Florida






INTRODUCTION

Other Administrators (continued)


Robert H. Jerry II
Dean
Levin College of Law

Dennis Jett
Dean
International Center

Douglas S. Jones
Director
Florida Museum of Natural History

Richard L. Jones
Dean for Research
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences

Joseph C. Joyce
Executive Associate Vice President
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences

Pramod Khargonekar
Dean
College of Engineering

Gerald R. Kidney
Assistant Vice President
Administrative Support, Health Affairs

Debra W. King
Associate Provost
Academic Affairs

James W. Knight
Dean of Continuing Education

John Kraft
Dean
Warrington College of
Business Administration


Kathleen A. Long
Dean
College of Nursing

R. Wayne McDaniel
Assistant Vice President
Development and Alumni Affairs
Alumni Affairs

Donald E. McGlothlin
Dean
College of Fine Arts

Michael McKee
University Controller

Robert W. Miller
Associate Vice President
Finance and Administration

Rebecca Nagy
Director
Harn Museum

Robert C. Nuss
Associate Vice President
Health Affairs,
Clinic Programs/Jacksonville

Christopher Needles
Assistant Vice President
Development and Alumni Affairs
Corporate and Foundation Relations

Stephen J. Pritz Jr.
Registrar

William H. Riffee
Associate Provost
Distance/Executive/Continuing
Education
and Dean, College of Pharmacy


Jay M. Stein
Dean
College of Design, Construction
and Planning

Neil Sullivan
Dean
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

C. Craig Tisher
Dean
College of Medicine

Jill W. Varnes
Interim Dean
College of Health and
Human Performance

W. Wayne Tharp
Assistant Vice President
Finance, Health Affairs

Paul Wharton
Associate Vice President
Government Relations

David B. Woodall
Assistant Vice President
Development and Alumni Affairs,
Major Gifts

Victor M. Yellen
Assistant Provost
Academic Affairs

Eugene L. Zdziarski II
Dean of Students


Officers of the University Student Body


Jamal Sowell
President of the Student Body

George Pfafendorf
Chief Justice of the Traffic Court


Jennifer Puckett
Vice President of the Student Body

Dennis Ngin
Treasurer of the Student Body


Scott Kennelly
President of the Student Senate

Brent Gordon
Chancellor of the Honor Court


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






INTRODUCTION


University of Florida

Purpose and Mission
www.ufl.edu

Institutional Purpose
The University of Florida is a public,
land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant re-
search university, one of the most compre-
hensive in the United States. The university
encompasses virtually all academic and
professional disciplines. It is the largest
and oldest of Florida's 11 universities and
is a member of the Association of Ameri-
can Universities (AAU). Its faculty and
staff are dedicated to the common pursuit
of the university's threefold mission:
teaching, research and service.

Mission
The University of Florida belongs to a
tradition of great universities. Together
with our undergraduate and graduate
students, UF faculty participate in an edu-
cational process that links the history of
Western Europe with the traditions and
cultures of all societies, explores the physi-
cal and biological universes, and nurtures
generations of young people from diverse
backgrounds to address the needs of our
societies. The university welcomes the full
exploration of its intellectual boundaries
and supports its faculty and students in
the creation of new knowledge and the
pursuit of new ideas.
Teaching is a fundamental purpose of
this university at both the undergraduate
and graduate levels. Research and schol-
arship are integral to the education process
and to the expansion of our understanding
of the natural world, the intellect and the
senses. Service reflects the university's
obligation to share the benefits of its re-
search and knowledge for the public good.
These three interlocking elements span
all of the university's academic disciplines
and represent the university's commitment
to lead and serve the State of Florida, the
nation, and the world by pursuing and
disseminating new knowledge while
building upon the experiences of the past.
The University of Florida aspires to ad-
vance by strengthening the human condi-
tion and improving the quality of life.

Commitment to Diversity
The University of Florida is committed
to creating a community that reflects the
rich racial, cultural and ethnic diversity of
the state and nation. No challenge that
exists in higher education has greater im-
portance than the challenge of enrolling
students and hiring faculty and staff who


are members of diverse racial, cultural or
ethnic minority groups. This pluralism
enriches the university community, offers
opportunity for robust academic dialogue
and contributes to better teaching and re-
search. The university and its components
benefit from the richness of a multicultural
student body, faculty and staff who can
learn from one another. Such diversity will
empower and inspire respect and under-
standing among us. The university does
not tolerate the actions of anyone who
violates the rights of another person.
Through policy and practice, the uni-
versity strives to embody a diverse com-
munity. Our collective efforts will lead to a
university that is truly diverse and reflects
the state and nation.

History
The University of Florida traces its be-
ginnings to 1853 when the state-funded East
Florida Seminary acquired the private
Kingsbury Academy in Ocala. After the
Civil War, the seminary was moved to
Gainesville. It was consolidated with the
state's land-grant Florida Agricultural Col-
lege, then in Lake City, to become the Uni-
versity of Florida in 1906. Until 1947, UF
enrolled men only and was one of only three
state universities. The others were Florida
State College for Women (now FSU) and
Florida A&M. In 1947, the student body
numbered 8,177 men and 601 women.
Today, UF is the fourth largest univer-
sity in the nation.

Government of the University
A 13-member Board of Trustees gov-
erns the University of Florida. The gover-
nor appoints six of the trustees, and five
are appointed by the 17-member Florida
Board of Governors, which governs the
State University System as a whole. The
university's student body president and
faculty senate chair also serve on the Board
of Trustees as ex officio members. Trustees
are appointed for staggered five-year terms.
The University of Florida Board of
Trustees is a public body corporate with all
the powers and duties set forth by law and
by the Board of Governors. The University
of Florida president serves as the executive
officer and corporate secretary of the
Board of Trustees and is responsible to the
board for all operations of the university.
University affairs are administered by the
president through the university admini-
stration, with the advice and assistance of
the Faculty Senate, various committees
appointed by the president, and other
groups or individuals as requested by
the president.


Students
University of Florida students, number-
ing more than 48,850 in Fall 2003, come
from more than 100 countries, all 50 states,
and each of the 67 counties in Florida. The
ratio of men to women is 48/52. Seventy-
one percent of UF students are under-
graduates (33,982), 22 percent are graduate
students (10,348) and 7 percent (3,528) are
in the professional programs of dentistry,
law, medicine, pharmacy and veterinary
medicine.
Approximately 3,574 African-American
students, 5,021 Hispanic students and
3,185 Asian-American students attend UF.
More than 90 percent of entering freshmen
rank above the national mean of scores on
standard entrance exams taken by college-
bound students. UF consistently ranks
among the top five public universities in
the nation in the number of enrolled Na-
tional Merit Scholars, Achievement Schol-
ars, International Baccalaureate graduates
and Advance Placement score recipients.
Faculty
The university has approximately 4,000
distinguished faculty members with out-
standing reputations for teaching, research
and service. The faculty attracted $458.1
million in research and training grants in
2002-03.
UF currently has 62 eminent scholar
chairs, positions funded at more than
$1 million each to attract nationally and
internationally recognized scholars. A va-
riety of other endowed professorships help
attract prominent faculty. More than two
dozen faculty are members of the National
Academies of Science and/or Engineering,
the Institute of Medicine or a counterpart
in another nation. Also, in a national rank-
ing of total Fulbright Awards for 2001-02,
UF ranks 9th among AAU public universi-
ties, with 10 visiting scholars and three
American scholars.
A very small sampling of honored fac-
ulty and alumni includes a Nobel Laure-
ate, Pulitzer Prize winners in editorial
writing and poetry, inventors of Gatorade
and Bioglass (a man-made material that
bonds with human tissue), one of the four
charter members of the Solar Hall of Fame,
and an art faculty with 80 percent of its
members in Who's Who in American Art.

Programs
The University of Florida is among the
nation's 151 leading research universities
as categorized in 2000 by the Carnegie
Commission on Higher Education. UF is
one of 62 members of the Association of
American Universities, the nation's most


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG


prestigious higher education organization.
The University of Florida is accredited by
the Commission on Colleges of the South-
ern Association of Colleges and Schools
(1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia
30033-4097; 404-679-4501) to award bachelor,
master, specialist and engineer, as well as
doctoral and professional degrees. It has 21
colleges and schools and more than 150 in-
terdisciplinary research and education cen-
ters, bureaus, and institutes. Almost 100
undergraduate degree programs are offered.
The Graduate School coordinates more than
200 graduate programs throughout the uni-
versity's colleges and schools. Professional
postbaccalaureate degrees are offered in
dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy and vet-
erinary medicine.
Last year, more than 32,000 people took
advantage of the many university-
sponsored opportunities made available
through the Division of Continuing Educa-
tion. More than 25,000 people participated
in non-credit conferences, workshops, in-
stitutes, and seminars. More than 7,500
students are enrolled in Independent
Study by Correspondence courses for
credit and non-credit.

Semester System
UF operates on a semester system. The
academic year begins and ends in August.
There are two semesters averaging 15
weeks of instruction, plus a week of final
examinations and two six-week summer
terms. Semesters begin in August, January,
and May, with summer term offered as a
whole as Term C, or in two sessions as half
terms, with Term A beginning in May and
Term B beginning in June.

Facilities
On 2,000 acres, most of it within the limits
of a 100,000-population urban area, the uni-
versity operates out of 940 buildings, 183 of
them equipped with classrooms and labora-
tories. Facilities are valued at more than $1
billion. Notable among these are the Brain
Institute, the physics building, University
Art Gallery, a microkelvin laboratory capa-
ble of producing some of the coldest tem-
peratures in the universe, a 100-kilowatt
training and research nuclear reactor, the
second largest academic computing center in
the South, and a self-contained intensive-
care hyperbaric chamber for treating near-
drowning victims.
The Florida Museum of Natural History
is the largest natural history/anthropology
museum in the Southeast and one of the top
10 in the nation. Its research collections con-
tain nearly 6.5 million specimens.


The Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art, with
18,000 square feet of exhibit space, is one of
the largest museums in the Southeast. The
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing
Arts attracts world-class symphony orches-
tras, Broadway plays, operas, and large-scale
ballet productions to Gainesville.
The Stephen C. O'Connell Center and
the J. Wayne Reitz Union provide space for
a myriad of student and faculty activities.
One thousand persons can participate si-
multaneously in eight recreational activi-
ties in the O'Connell Center, which is
home to the Gator basketball, volleyball,
swimming and gymnastics teams. More
than 20,000 use the Reitz Union daily for
various activities.

Campus Safety and Security
The University of Florida is one of the
largest institutions of higher education in
the nation. The university community is
not unlike many other municipalities, and
as such, has the same safety and security
concerns as "any-town" USA.
The University of Florida Police De-
partment (UFPD) recognizes that it must
maintain the safest and most secure envi-
ronment possible for all students, faculty
and staff, and campus visitors. The UFPD
has the utmost concern for personal and
property safety, but with an open campus
environment, safety becomes a shared re-
sponsibility.
The UFPD is a State of Florida and Na-
tionally Accredited Law Enforcement
Agency. There are more than 90 fully certi-
fied and sworn officers who patrol the UF
campus and its surrounding properties 24
hours per day, every day. The department
has its own Criminal Investigations Division
employing highly trained detectives to in-
vestigate any reported crime on campus.
The officers of the Uniformed Patrol Division
are highly trained campus law enforcement
professionals who are equipped with the
most contemporary crime-fighting tech-
niques and tools. The Community Services
Division is proactive in providing everyone
in the campus community with the very
latest information regarding personal and
property protection through classes, pro-
grams and documents.
For more information, contact Lt. Joe
Sharkey, public information officer, at 352-
392-1114, or visit www.police.ufl.edu.

Standard of Ethical Conduct
Honesty, integrity and caring are essen-
tial qualities of an educational institution,
and the concern for values and ethics is
important to the whole educational experi-
ence. Individual students, faculty and staff


UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG


University of Florida


members, as well as the university's for-
mal organizations, must assume responsi-
bility for these qualities. The concern for
values and ethics should be expressed in
classes, seminars, laboratories and in all
aspects of university life. By definition, the
university community includes members
of the faculty, staff and administration as
well as students.
Education at the University of Florida is
not an ethically neutral experience. The
university stands for, and seeks to incul-
cate, high standards. Moreover, the con-
cern for values goes well beyond the
observance of rules.
A university is a place where self-
expression, voicing disagreement and chal-
lenging outmoded customs and beliefs are
prized and honored. However, all such
expressions need to be civil, manifesting
respect for others.
As a major sector in the community,
students are expected to follow the univer-
sity's rules and regulations that, by design,
promote an atmosphere of learning.
Faculty, staff and administrators are ex-
pected to provide encouragement, leader-
ship and example.
While the university seeks to educate
and encourage, it also must restrict behav-
ior that adversely affects others. The Stan-
dard of Ethical Conduct summarizes what
is expected of the members of the univer-
sity community.

Academic Honesty
In 1995 the UF student body enacted a
new honor code and voluntarily committed
itself to the highest standards of honesty and
integrity. When students enroll at the uni-
versity, they commit themselves to the stan-
dard drafted and enacted by students.
Preamble: In adopting this honor code,
the students of the University of Florida
recognize that academic honesty and in-
tegrity are fundamental values of the uni-
versity community. Students who enroll at
the university commit to holding them-
selves and their peers to the high standard
of honor required by the honor code. Any
individual who becomes aware of a viola-
tion of the honor code is bound by honor
to take corrective action. The quality of a
University of Florida education is depend-
ent upon community acceptance and en-
forcement of the honor code.
The Honor Code: We, the members of
the University of Florida community, pledge
to hold ourselves and our peers to the high-
est standards of honesty and integrity.
On all work submitted for credit by stu-
dents at the university, the following pledge
is either required or implied:






INTRODUCTION


"On my honor, I have neither given nor
received unauthorized aid in doing this
assignment."
The university requires all members of
its community to be honest in all endeav-
ors. A fundamental principle is that the
whole process of learning and pursuit of
knowledge is diminished by cheating, pla-
giarism and other acts of academic dishon-
esty. In addition, every dishonest act in the
academic environment affects other stu-
dents adversely, from the skewing of the
grading curve to giving unfair advantage
for honors or for professional or graduate
school admission. Therefore, the university
will take severe action against dishonest
students. Similarly, measures will be taken
against faculty, staff and administrators
who practice dishonest or demeaning be-
havior.
Student Responsibility. Students should
report any condition that facilitates dishon-
esty to the instructor, department chair, col-
lege dean or Student Honor Court.
Faculty Responsibility. Faculty mem-
bers have a duty to promote honest behav-
ior and to avoid practices and
environments that foster cheating in their
classes. Teachers should encourage stu-
dents to bring negative conditions or inci-
dents of dishonesty to their attention. In
their own work, teachers should practice
the same high standards they expect from
their students.
Administration Responsibility. As
highly visible members of our academic
community, administrators should be ever
vigilant to promote academic honesty
and conduct their lives in an ethically
exemplary manner.
Information on procedures is in the Stu-
dent Guide at www.dso.ufl.edu/stg/ and is set
forth in Florida Administrative Code.


Student Conduct Code
www.dso.ufl.edu/judicial
Students enjoy the rights and privileges
that accrue to membership in a university
community and are subject to the respon-
sibilities that accompany that membership.
In order to have a system of effective cam-
pus governance, it is incumbent upon all
members of the campus community to
notify appropriate officials of any viola-
tions of regulations and to assist in their
enforcement. The university's conduct
regulations are available to all students at
the Web address above and are set forth in
Florida Administrative Code. Questions can
be directed to the Dean of Students Office,
Peabody Hall, Room 202,352-392-1261.

Alcohol and Drugs
The use of alcohol and other drugs can
have a negative impact on judgments and
reactions, health and safety, and may lead
to legal complications as well.
The University's Role. The univer-
sity's principal role is to engage in educa-
tion that leads to high standards and
respectful conduct. When those are com-
promised, the university will take discipli-
nary action against organizations and
individuals violating either the law or the
unreasonable use of alcohol. It also must
provide help for students who are alcohol-
dependent. The university will deal se-
verely with students convicted of the ille-
gal possession, use, or sale of drugs.


What the University Community Can
Do to Prevent Alcohol Abuse and Drug
Use: Students can help control substance
abuse by declining to use or to condone
the use of drugs and by insisting that or-
ganizations and individuals use alcohol
within the bounds of the law and reason-
able conduct. Students should make an
effort to prevent persons who have abused
alcohol or used drugs from harming them-
selves or others, especially while driving a
motor vehicle. They should encourage those
needing professional help to seek it. The
same standards and regulations apply
equally to faculty, staff and administration.

Relations Between People and
Groups
One of the major benefits of higher
education and membership in the univer-
sity community is greater knowledge of
and respect for other religious, racial and
cultural groups. Indeed, genuine apprecia-
tion for individual differences and cultural
diversity is essential to the environment of
learning.
Another major aspect of university life
involves sexual relationships. Sexual atti-
tudes or actions that are intimidating, har-
assing, coercive or abusive, or that invade
the right to privacy of the individual are
not acceptable. Organizations or individu-
als that adversely upset the balance of
communal living are subject to university
disciplinary action. Only in an atmosphere
of equality and respect can all members of
the university community grow.

Service to Others
An important outcome of a University
of Florida education should be a commit-
ment to serving other people. This sense of
service should be encouraged throughout
the institution by faculty, administration,
staff and students. Through experience in
helping individuals and the community,
students can put into practice the values
they learn in the classroom.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog








UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG


Academic Advising Center
100 Academic Advising, 100 Fletcher Dr.
P.O. Box 112015, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2015
352-392-1521 www.advising.ufl.edu
ADA Compliance Office
354 North/South Drive
P. O. Box 115055, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-5055
352-392-7056, TDD 352- 846-1046
www.ada.ufl.edu
Career Resource Center
First floor, J. Wayne Reitz Union
P.O. Box 118507, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8507
352-392-1601 www.crc.ufl.edu
Center for Latin American Studies
319 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 115530, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-5530
352-392-0375 www.latam.ufl.edu
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
2014 D McCarty Hall
P.O. Box 110270, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-0270
352-392-2251 www.cals.ufl.edu
College of Dentistry
D3-11 Health Science Center
P.O. Box 100405, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0405
352-392-2949 www.dental.ufl.edu
College of Design, Construction and Planning
331 Architecture Building
P.O. Box 115701, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-5701
352-273-1150 www.dcp.ufl.edu
College of Education
G416 Norman Hall
P.O. Box 117042, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7042
352-392-0721 www.coe.ufl.edu
College of Engineering
312 Well Hall
P.O. Box 116550, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-6550
352-392-2177 www.eng.ufl.edu
College of Fine Arts
101 Fine Arts Building A
P.O. Box 115800, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-5800
352- 392-0207 www.arts.ufl.edu
College of Health and Human Performance
201 Florida Gym
P.O. Box 118200, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8200
352-392-0578 www.hhp.ufl.edu
College of Journalism and Communications
1000 Weimer Hall
P.O. Box 118400, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8400
352-392-1124 www.jou.ufl.edu
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
100 Academic Advising Center
P.O. Box 112015, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2015
352-392-1521 www.clas.ufl.edu
College of Medicine
M-125, Health Science Center
P.O. Box 100216, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0216
352-392-3071 www.med.ufl.edu


Directory

College of Medicine-Physician Assistant
1329 SW 16h Street, Suite 1160,
P.O. Box 100176, Health Science Center
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0176
352-265-7955 www.medinfo.ufl.edu/pa/index.html
College of Nursing
G-205 HPNP Complex
P.O. Box 100197, Health Science Center
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0197
352-273-6400 con.ufl.edu
College of Pharmacy
G-232 HPNP Complex
P.O. Box 100495, Health Science Center
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0495
352-273-6217 www.cop.ufl.edu
College of Public Health and Health Professions
G-205 HPNP Complex
P.O. Box 100185, Health Science Center
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0185
352-273-6379 www.phhp.ufl.edu
College of Veterinary Medicine
2015 SW 16" Ave.
P.O. Box 100125, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610-0125
352-392-4871 www.vetmed.ufl.edu
Counseling Center
301 Peabody Hall
P.O. Box 114100, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4100
352-392-1575 www.counsel.ufl.edu
Dean of Students Office
202 Peabody Hall
P.O. Box 114075, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4075
352- 392-1261 www.dso.ufl.edu
Department of Housing & Residence Education
SW 13th St. and Museum Rd.
P.O. Box 112100, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2100
352-392-2161 www.housing.ufl.edu
Disability Resources Program
202 Peabody Hall
P.O. Box 114075, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4075
352-392-1261 V, 352-392-3008 TDD
www.dso.ufl.edu/drp
Division of Continuing Education
Department of Independent Study
by Correspondence
2209 NW 13th St., Suite D
Gainesville, FL 32609-3498
352-392-1711, ext. 200
www.correspondencestudy.ufl.edu
Division of Military Science
Air Force
204 Van Fleet Hall
P.O. Box 118535, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8535
352-392-1355 www.afrotc.ufl.edu
Army
103 Van Fleet Hall
P.O. Box 118536, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8536
352-392-1395 www.armyrotc.ufl.edu
Navy
20 Van Fleet Hall
P.O. Box 118537, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8537
352-392-0973 nrotc.ufl.edu


Fisher School of Accounting
210 Gerson Hall
P.O. Box 117166, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7166
352-273-0200 www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa
Graduate School
280 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 115515, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-5515
352-392-4646 gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu
Honors Program
140 Tigert Hall
P.O. Box 113260, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-3260
352-392-1519 www.honors.ufl.edu
J. Wayne Reitz Union
Museum Road
P. O. Box 118505, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8505
352-392-1649 www.union.ufl.edu
Levin College of Law
164 Holland Hall
P.O. Box 117621, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7621
352-392-0421 www.law.ufl.edu
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
304 Rinker Hall
P.O. Box 115703, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-5703
352-273-1150 www.bcn.ufl.edu
Office of Admission
201 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114000, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000
352-392-1365 www.reg.ufl.edu/regadmi.htm
Office of the President
226 Tigert Hall
P. O. Box 113150
Gainesville, FL 32611-3150
352-392-1311 www.president.ufl.edu
Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President
235 Tigert Hall
P.O. Box 113175
Gainesville, FL 32611-3175
352-392-2404 www.aa.ufl.edu
Office of the University Registrar
222 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114000, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000
352-392-1374 www.reg.ufl.edu
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
118 Newins-Ziegler Hall
P.O. Box 110410, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-0410
352-846-0850 www.sfrc.ufl.edu
School of Natural Resources and Environment
103 Black Hall
P.O. Box 118100, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-8100
352-392-9230 www.cnre.ufl.edu
Student Financial Affairs (Financial Aid)
107 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114025, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025
352- 392-1275 www.ufsa.ufl.edu/sfa/
Student Health Care Center (Infirmary)
1 Fletcher Dr.
P.O. Box 117500, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7500
352-392-1161 www.health.ufl.edu/shcc
Transportation and Parking
Customer Service
Building 112 North/South Drive
P. O. Box 112325, Gainesville, FL 32611-2400
352-392-2241 www.parking.ufl.edu


University of Florida







INTRODUCTION

Directory


UF Bookstores and Welcome Center
Museum Road and Reitz Union Drive
P. O. Box 118450 (Bookstore)
Gainesville, FL 32611-8450
352-392-0194 www.ufl.bkstr.com (Bookstore)
352-392-1365, Ext. 3304 (Welcome Center)
UF International Center
123 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 113225, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-3225
352-392-5323 www.ufic.ufl.edu
University Athletic Association
Ticket Office
352-375-4683, ext. 6800 www.uaa.ufl.edu


University Financial Services (Student Accounts)
113 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114050, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4050
352-392-0181 fa.ufl.edu/ufs
University Libraries
P. O. Box 117001, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7001
Library West closed until 2006
Library East (Smathers) 352-392-0361
Marston Science Library 352-392-2851
Architecture & Fine Arts Library -352-392-0222
Education Library 352-392-0707
Health Science Center Library 352-392-4011
Journalism Library 352-392-0455
Judaica Library (Price Library) 352-392-0308
Legal Information Center 352-392-0417
Music Library- 352-392-6678
Vet Med Reading Room 352-3924700, Ext. 5445


University Police
Building 51, Museum Road
P.O. Box 112150, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2150
352-392-1111 police.ufl.edu
Warrington College of Business Administration
267 Stuzin Hall
P.O. Box 117160, University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7160
352- 392-0165 www.cba.ufl.edu/upo


For persons with hearing impairments, please use the Florida Relay Service FRS when offices and
departments on campus do not list a TDD number.


The FRS number is 1-800-955-8771 TDD.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

Index to Majors and Their Colleges/Schools


Accounting
Fisher School of Accounting ........ .................... .....3-5
Advertising
College of Journalism and Communications.................. 3-171
Aerospace Engineering
College of Engineering ......................... .......... .....3-92
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..... ........... .. 3-14
College of Engineering .............. ..................... .....3-93
Agricultural Education and Communication
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences............... ..................3-14
Agricultural Operations Management
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences........ ...............3-17
Animal Sciences
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..................... .............3-20
Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-188
Architecture
College of Design, Construction and Planning............................. 3-73
Art
College of Fine Arts.....................................................................3-120
Art Education
College of Fine Arts............................................3-124
Art History
College of Fine Arts............................................. .....3-125
African and Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences................................................3-186
Astronomy
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ...............................................3-190
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .........................................3-190
Botany
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences........................... 3-22
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .......................... 3-192
Building Construction
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction ..............................3-53
Business Administration, General Studies
Warrington College of Business Administration.......................... 3-66
Chemical Engineering
College of Engineering ............................. ...........................3-95
Chemistry
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ...............................................3-190
Civil Engineering
College of Engineering ............................ ......................................3-97
Classical Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ......................................... 3-196
Communication Sciences and Disorders
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .................. ................3-197
Computer and Information Sciences
Warrington College of Business Administration........................3-62
Computer Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .........................................3-198
Computer Engineering
College of Engineering ............................................3-91
Creative Photography
College of Fine Arts................................. ......................... 3-127
Criminology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............ .............. 3-199
Dance
College of Fine Arts............................... ........................3-139


Decision and Information Sciences
Warrington College of Business Administration........................ 3-62
Digital Arts and Sciences
College of Engineering........................................................ ....... 3-102
College of Fine Arts............................ .. .......... ....... .... .. 3-125
Economics
Warrington College of Business Administration.............................3-63
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................................3-200
Education, Early Childhood/Pre-K Handicapped
College of Education.......................... ...................... ...............3-83
Education, Elementary
College of Education...................................................3-82
Electrical Engineering
College of Engineering........................... .................... .................3-102
English
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences................................... 3-201
Entomology and Nematology
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences ..................................... 3-23
Environmental Engineering
College of Engineering....................... .............. ..................3-104
Environmental Science
School of Natural Resources and Environment .............................3-28
Exercise and Sport Science
College of Health and Human Performance .................................3-153
Family, Youth and Community Sciences
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences ..................................... 3-28
Finance
Warrington College of Business Administration............................3-64
Fire and Emergency Services
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction.............................3-55
Food and Resource Economics
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences ..................................... 3-29
Food Science and Human Nutrition
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences .......................................3-32
Forest Resources and Conservation
School of Forest Resources and Conservation..............................3-147
French
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................ .............. 3-222
Geography
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences......................................3-203
Geological Sciences
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................................3-62
Geomatics
College of Engineering ............................ .............. ................3-106
German
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................ .............. 3-206
Graphic Design
College of Fine Arts ................................... ........................... 3-127
Health Science
College of Public Health and Health Professions..........................3-260
Health Education and Behavior
College of Health & Human Performance ............ ..... ..........3-157
History
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences...................... ..............3-208
Horticultural Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences......................................3-34
Industrial and Systems Engineering
College of Engineering........................... ............................ 3-102


University of Florida







INTRODUCTION

Index to Majors and Their Colleges/Schools


Interdisciplinary Studies
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences........ Refer to college section
College of Engineering ..................................... Refer to college section
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................ Refer to college section
Interior Design
College of Design, Construction and Planning............................... 3-74
Jewish Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..........................................3-209
Journalism
College of Journalism and Communications ................................. 3-172
Landscape Architecture
College of Design, Construction and Planning.................................... 3-75
Linguistics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..........................................3-210
Management
Warrington College of Business Administration..............................3-65
Marketing
Warrington College of Business Administration............................ 3-65
Materials Science and Engineering
College of Engineering...................................... .......................... 3-109
Mathematics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..............................................3-211
Mechanical Engineering
College of Engineering.................................................................. 3-111
Microbiology and Cell Science
College of Agricultural and Life Science .........................................3-40
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .........................................3-214
Music
College of Fine Arts................................. ................... 3-128
Music Education
College of Fine Arts................................. ................... 3-133
Natural Resource Conservation
School of Forest Resources and Conservation ................................3-149
Nuclear Engineering
College of Engineering...................................... .......................... 3-112
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
College of Engineering ... .. ....................... .................................. 3-113
Nursing
College of Nursing .......................................... ................ 3-245
Packaging Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..........................................3-41
Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ...........................................3-215
Physics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..............................................3-216
Plant Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences........................................ 3-42
Political Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................3-218
Portuguese
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..............................................3-223
Pre-Occupational Therapy
College of Public Health and Health Professions......................... 3-262
Pre-Pharmacy
College of Pharmacy ............................... ............................3-252
Pre-Physical Therapy
College of Public Health and Health Professions........................3- 263


Psychology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................ .............. 3-219
Public Relations
College of Journalism and Communications............................. 3-173
Recreation, Parks and Tourism
College of Health and Human Performance ................................3-161
Rehabilitative Services
College of Public Health and Health Professions.........................3-264
Religion
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences......................... .............. 3-220
Russian
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............................ ..............3-207
Sociology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............................................3-225
Soil and Water Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..........................................3-44
Spanish
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.................................................3-224
Statistics
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences........................................ 3-45
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..............................................3-226
Telecommunication
College of Journalism and Communications...................................3-174
Theatre Performance
College of Fine Arts.............................. .. ........... ............... 3-140
Theatre Production
College of Fine Arts................................. ...........................3-141
Turfgrass Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences................................3-38
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences................................3-45
Women's Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............................ ..............3-227
Zoology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............................................3-229


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

Index to Minors and Their CollegeslSchools


Actuarial Science
Warrington College of Business Administration.........................3-68
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.................. ...........3-214
Aerospace Leadership
Division of Military Science ................... .......... ....4-7
African Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............... .....3-188
Agricultural & Natural Resource Ethics & Policy
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences....................... 3-31
Agricultural Communication
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences............................... 3-17
Agricultural Information Technology
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences ............................. 3-19
Agricultural Law
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.......... ............. 3-13
Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............ .. ........3-188
Applied and Professional Ethics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences................................ ...........3-216
Arabic Language and Literature
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................ 3-188
Art History
College of Fine Arts........................... ............................. 3-121
Asian Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.........................3-189
Astronomy
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........... ........ .....3-190
Biomechanics
College of Engineering........................................3-111
Botany
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.........................3-192
Business Administration
Warrington College of Business Administration ...........................3-68
Chemistry
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences................................ ...........3-195
Classical Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences..............................................3-196
Communication Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............... ........ 3-229
Computer & Info Science & Engineering
College of Engineering............................. ......... ..... 3-99
Dance
College of Fine Arts ..................................... ......................... 3-118
East Asian Languages and Literatures
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences......... ....... ....... 3-186
Economics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences................................ ...........3-200
Education, General
College of Education...................................... ....... ..... 3-82
Education, Pathways to Teaching
College of Education ...................................... ....... .... 3-82
Education, Secondary
College of Education.......................................... ..... 3-82
English
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences...................... ............3-201
Entomology & Nematology
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences .................................3-23
Entrepreneurship
Warrington College of Business Administration.......................... 3-68
Environmental Horticulture
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences...... ................. 3-13
Environmental Science
School of Natural Resources and Environment ..........................3-239
Environmental Studies
School of Natural Resources and Environment.........................3-241
European Union Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences......................................3-175
Extension Education
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..................... 3-16
Family, Youth and Community Sciences
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.................................. 3-29
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..........................................3-29
Food & Resource Economics
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.......... ............... 3-32
Food Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences...................................3-33
Forest Resources and Conservation
School of Forest Resources and Conservation ............................ 3-149


French
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ........................ ........... 3-222
Geography
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-203
Geological Sciences
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-205
German
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................3-206
Gerontology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-208
Greek Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ...........................................3-175
Health Science
College of Public Health and Health Professions.........................3-258
Health Education
College of Health and Human Performance .................................3-160
Hebrew
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................. ........... .3-188
History
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ......................... .............. 3-208
Horticultural Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences................................3-35
International Studies in Agricultural and Life Sciences
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences......................................3-13
Information Technologies
College of Engineering............................................ ............3-93
Italian Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ......................................... 3-222
Jewish Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ........................................3-209
Landscape Architecture
College of Design, Construction and Planning........................... 3-76
Latin American Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ........................................ 3-210
Linguistics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..............................................3-210
Management and Sales in Agribusiness
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences................................3-31
Mass Communication Studies
College of Journalism and Communications.............................3-175
Materials Science & Engineering
College of Engineering....................... ..... ........... .... 3-109
Mathematics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................... ..........3-214
Medieval and Early Moder Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................. 3-201
Military Science
Division of Military Science............................. ........ ....4-5
Music
College of Fine Arts............................. ...... ..................... 3-118
Nutritional Sciences
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.............................. .....3-34
Organizational Leadership for Nonprofits
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences .................................3-29
Packaging Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences...................................3-20
Philosophy
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............... .................................3-216
Physics
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............... ....................... 3-217
Plant Molecular and Cell Biology
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences................................3-43
Plant Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences...................................3-43
Portuguese
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ..............................3-223
Precision Agriculture
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences ................................... 3-20
Rehabilitative Services
College of Public Health and Health Professions........................ 3-258
Religion
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ......................................... 3-221
Russian
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences............................... 3-207
Sales Engineering
College Engineering ................................ ....... .....3-92
Soil and Water Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences............. ..........3-44
Spanish
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............... .........................3-224
University of Florida







INTRODUCTION

Index to Minors and Their Colleges/Schools
Statistics Urban and Regional Planning
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ........................................3-227 College of Design, Construction and Planning................................3-76
Teaching of English as a Second Language Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-211 College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.........................3-49
Theatre Women's Studies
College of Fine Arts...........................................................3-118 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences........................................ 3-229
Theories and Policies of Sexuality Zoology
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-229 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................3-230
Turfgrass Science
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences..........................................3-39 Refer to the departmental Web sites for complete information
on minors.


Index to Certificate Programs and Their Colleges/Schools

African American Studies International Relations
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................... 3-230 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ....................................... 3-218
Dance and Healing Jewish Studies
College of Fine Arts................................ ...... .............3-149 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................3-209
Environmental Studies Latin American Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................... 3-230 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................3-231
European Union Studies Public Affairs
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................... 3-230 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................3-218
Gerontological Studies Russian and East European Area Studies
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................................3-231 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ............................... 3-231


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs
Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in graduate-level courses for a master's degree have an opportunity to do so through
UF's combined-degree program. Students, with approval, can apply 12 credit hours of graduate course work toward the completion of
their undergraduate degree. The combined-degree program reduces the cost of both degrees and may enhance the student's market-
ability for career advancement.

Students who meet the combined-degree application requirements can enroll in 12 credits of graduate courses during their junior and
senior years. These credits will satisfy the undergraduate degree requirements and, if the student is admitted to graduate school at UF,
the 12 credits also will satisfy graduate degree requirements. The program's minimum admission requirement is a 3.2 GPA (may be
higher for some programs). Admission to the corresponding graduate program requires an 1100 GRE score (may be higher for some
programs). For more information, see page 2-20 and the Web site www.isis.ufl.edu/cdpl.html.

This program provides two special opportunities:
1. The Master of Agribusiness (MAB) degree is for students who desire careers in marketing and management in agriculture, food
processing/ distribution, forest products and related industry where there has been strong demand for MAB graduates. Offered
by the Department of Food and Resource Economics (FRE), the MAB can be completed in three semesters (fall, spring and sum-
mer). A bachelor's degree in economics or business is not required. For more information: www.fred.ifas.ufl.edu/.

2. The Master of Science in Business Administration, Concentration in Management (MSM) is for non-business majors who wish to
pursue an advanced degree in a professional field. Students have the opportunity, for example, to combine expertise in liberal
arts and other academic disciplines with functional business applications to create a dynamic skill set that is in demand with em-
ployers. For additional information: www.cba.ufl.edu/.

Other combined-degree programs are available in these colleges and departments:
Accounting French
Advertising Geography
Aerospace Engineering Geology
Agricultural and Biological Engineering, AG/ABE Health Science Education
Agricultural and Biological Engineering, EG/ABE History
Agricultural Education and Communication Industrial and Systems Engineering


Agronomy
Animal Science
Art Digital Arts and Sciences
Biomedical Engineering
Building Construction
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Engineering-Digital Arts and Sciences
Computer and Information Sciences
Decision and Information Sciences
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Engineering Science
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Environmental Science/Interdisciplinary Ecology
Exercise and Sport Sciences
Family, Youth and Community Sciences
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Food and Resource Economics
Forest Resources and Conservation


Interdisciplinary Studies: Landscape and Nursery Horticulture
Interdisciplinary Studies: Turfgrass Science
Interior Design
Materials Science
Mathematics
Microbiology and Cell Science (College of Agriculture)
Natural Resource Conservation
Nuclear Engineering Science
Nursing
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Political Science International Relations
Recreation, Parks and Tourism
Religion
Sociology
Soil and Water Science
Spanish
Statistics
Telecommunication


Other Accelerated Programs:

Junior Honors Medical Program www.med.ufl.edu/oealadmiss/sitelindex.shtml

College of Dentistry's Early Admission Program: Microbiology and Cell Science, and Food Science and Human Nutrition, taught
through collaboration with the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences www.cals.ufl.edu/prepro/accelerated/


University of Florida







INTRODUCTION

Critical Dates and Deadlines 2004-2005
Paperwork and approvals for the academic deadlines cited below should be turned in to the appropriate
office, generally the Ofice of the University Registrar, by 5:00 p.m., unless indicated otherwise.


Critical Dates By Term
2004 Summer B 2004 Summer C 2004 Fall 2005 Spring 2005 Summer A
Registration June 25 May 7 August 19-20 January 3 May 6
Classes Begin June 28 May 10 August 23 January 4 May 9
Drop/Add (by 11:59 p.m. on last day) June 28-29 May 10-11 August 23-26 January 4-7 May 9-10
Late Registration (by 11:59 p.m. on last day) June 28-29 May 10-11 August 23-26 January 4-7 May 9-10
Deadline to Withdraw With no Fee Liability June 29 May 11 August 26 January 7 May 10
(by 11:59 p.m. on last day)
Degree Application Deadline June 30 May 12 September 17 January 28 May 11
Fee Payment Deadline, 3:30 p.m., University July 9 May 21 September 3 January 14 May 20
Financial Services, 113 Criser Hall
Deadline for Residency Reclassification, July 9 May 21 September 3 January 14 May 20
201 Criser Hall
S/U Option Deadline July 7 May 28 September 10 January 21 May 18
Deadline to Withdraw With 25 percent July 7 May 28 September 17 January 28 May 18
refund- W symbol assigned
CLAST NA June 5 October 2 February 19 June 4
Deadline to Drop and Add a Course By July 30 July 30 November 22 April 8 June 10
College Petition
Deadline to Withdraw from the university July 30 July 30 November 22 April 8 June 10
Classes End August 6 August 6 December 8 April 20 June 17
Honors Thesis due in College Advising August 6 August 6 December 8 April 20 June 17
offices
Reading Days no classes NA NA December 9-10 April 21-22 NA
Final Examinations In class In class December 11-17 April 23-29 In class
Commencement Ceremony notification of August 7 August 7 December 17-19 April 29-Mayl NA
dates and times of ceremonies for Projected date Projected date Projected dates Projected dates
colleges and schools will be sent to
degree candidates as soon as plans are
finalized. Please do not anticipate exact
dates and times until notification is
received.
Final Grades Available in Evening from August 9 August 9 December 20 May 2 June 20
ISIS
Holidays no classes July 5 May 31- September 6 January 17- May 30 -
Independence Memorial Labor Day Martin Luther Memorial Day
Day observed Day November 11 King Jr. Day
June 21-June 25 Veterans Day February 26-
Summer November 12- March 5
Break 13 (tent.) Spring Break
July 5 Homecoming
Independence November 25-26
Day observed Thanksgiving


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

Application Deadlines

Application Deadlines
The application deadlines indicated below apply to former University of Florida students and students seeking admission to the
university for the first time. This calendar identifies deadlines for the 2004-2005 academic year, which begins with the Summer B term.
The deadlines indicate completion dates for all application procedures, including receipt of all credentials and completion of
department requirements, if any. Applications received after the deadline may be returned unprocessed or they may be processed on a
space-available basis.


Freshmen, Sophomores and
Former Students:
Beginning Freshmen (Early Decision)
Beginning Freshmen (Regular Decision I)
Beginning Freshmen
Freshman & Sophomore Transfers
Readmission for Former Students
Juniors, Seniors and
Postbaccalaureates:
Accounting
Agriculture
Architecture
Art History
Building Construction
Business Administration
Education
Engineering
Fire and Emergency Services
Fine Arts/all other majors not listed here
Forestry
Graphic Design/Digital Arts
Health & Human Performance
Health Science (HES)
Health Science (Rehabilitative Services)
Interior Design
Journalism & Communications
Landscape Architecture
Liberal Arts and Sciences
Music/Music Education
Natural Resources and Environment
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy (Pharm.D.)
Theatre/Dance


International Students


2004 SUMMER
TERM B


October 1
October 15
January 12
January 12
March 1



March 1
March 1
N/A
March 1
N/A
N/A
N/A
March 1
N/A
March 1
March 1
March 1
N/A
March 1
March 1
N/A
March 1
N/A
March 1
N/A
March 1
N/A
March 1
N/A
March 1

November 5


2004 FALL



October 1
October 15
January 12
January 12
March 1



March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
June 7
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1

January 12


2005 SPRING



N/A
N/A
September 15
September 15
September 15



September 15
September 15
N/A
September 15
September 15
September 15
September 15
September 15
September 15
N/A
September 15
N/A
September 15
N/A
September 15
N/A
September 15
September 15
September 15
September 15
September 15
N/A
N/A
N/A
September 15

September 15


2005 SUMMER
TERMS A & C


N/A
N/A
January 12
January 12
February 1



February 1
February 1
February 1
N/A
N/A
February 27
N/A
February 1
February 1
N/A
February 1
N/A
February 1
February 1
February 1
February 1
February 1
February 1
February 1
N/A
February 1
N/A
March 1
N/A
February 1

November 5


University of Florida








- Sudnt Informatio


* Glossary of Terms

* Admission

* Academic Regulations

* Academic Advising

* Residency Information

* Fees and Other Fiscal Information

* Campus Life and Student Support










Help in using this section:
Table of C ontents ....................................................................................... iii
Index to Majors and Their Colleges and Schools.................................... 1-12
Index to Minors and Their Colleges and Schools .................................. 1-14
Index to Certificates and Their Colleges and Schools .......................... 1-15
Combined Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs ................................ 1-16
Index to the Undergraduate Catalog ............................................... 5-125







GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Glossary of Terms


A.A. Certificate Associate of Arts certifi-
cate, awarded upon satisfactory com-
pletion, with an overall C average, of
60 credits (at least 36 at UF), including
general education requirements, writ-
ing and math requirements (Gordon
Rule), and College Level Academic
Skills Test (CLAST) requirement.

Academic Year The traditional annual
cycle of academic terms: Summer B,
Fall, Spring, Summer A, Summer C.

Admitted Students who have applied
and have been accepted to the univer-
sity in a degree-seeking status. Admis-
sion is not validated until the student
registers for and attends classes.

Audit Permission to attend and to par-
ticipate in a course without benefit of a
grade or credit. CEUs (continuing
education units) may be awarded at
the discretion of the instructor.

Baccalaureate Bachelor's degree, the
traditional undergraduate degree.

Calendar, University An annual publica-
tion listing all official dates and dead-
lines for the academic year.

Catalog Year The year during which the
regulations published in a specific edi-
tion of the Undergraduate Catalog ap-
ply. A student's academic year, which
begins when the catalog takes effect in
the Summer B term, is governed by
the regulations for academic require-
ments published in the catalog in ef-
fect at the time the student begins
undergraduate studies.

Certificate Program an organized con-
centration of study in an approved
subject area. These programs are not
recognized on a student transcript.

Classification/College A code indicating
a student's academic level (year) and
college affiliation.

CLAST College Level Academic Skills
Test required by Florida statutes and
designed to test communication and
computation skills.

Combined Degrees An accelerated pro-
gram that allows students to count 12
graduate credits toward their under-
graduate degree.


Common Course Numbering System A
statewide system of course prefixes
and numbers developed to facilitate
the transfer of credit by identifying
equivalent courses.

Continuous Enrollment Undergraduate
students who register for and com-
plete at least one course in one term in
an academic year are continuously en-
rolled.

Corequisite Two courses that must be
taken concurrently.

Correspondence/Extension Work Divi-
sion of Continuing Education course
offerings. Consult your college dean's
office for restrictions and limitations.

Credit One semester hour, generally
representing one hour per week of lec-
ture or two or more hours per week of
laboratory work.

Cum Laude Graduating "with honors."

Deficit Points The number of grade
points below a C average on hours at-
tempted at the university. If the grade
point average is less than a 2.0, there is
a grade point deficit. Refer to "Grade
Point Averaging and Deficits" in the
academic regulations section of this
catalog.

Dismissal Students with a grade point
deficit of 15 or more will be placed on
academic dismissal and will not be
permitted further registration at UF.

Drop To drop a single course from a
given term.

Drop/Add A period of time beginning
the first day of classes when students
can adjust schedules by dropping or
adding courses or changing sections of
a course. Courses dropped during the
official drop/add period are not sub-
ject to fees.

Dual Enrollment Simultaneous registra-
tion at two educational institutions.

Early Admission Admission as a fresh-
man following completion of the jun-
ior year of high school.

Early Decision The application process
in which the student makes a com-
mitment to the university, that, if ad-
mitted, the student will enroll.


Enrollment Registration for course work
and payment of fees constitutes official
enrollment.

GatorLink A student's computer identity
at UF, usually in the format of a user-
name@ufl.edu. All students are required
to sign up for a GatorLink account, since
official university communications are
sent to this e-mail address.

Gator 1 Card UF's official university photo
identification. All enrolled students must
have a university ID card.

General Education Requirement Univer-
sitywide requirement of the basic stud-
ies that form the foundation of all
undergraduate degree programs.

Good Standing Eligible to continue to
register for university course work.

Grade Point Average (GPA) The ratio of
grade points earned to semester hours
carried. The UF GPA is computed on
University of Florida course work
only.

Grade Points The number of points at-
tributed to a grade (A=4, B=3, etc.)
times the number of credit hours in
the course.

Graduate Student A student who has
earned a baccalaureate degree and
who has been admitted to the Gradu-
ate School to pursue a graduate degree
program (master's, specialist, engi-
neer, doctorate).

ISIS (Integrated Student Information
System) Web-based system for stu-
dents to access their records at
www.isis.ufl.edu.

Magna Cum Laude Graduating with
"high honors."

Major A subject of academic study
chosen as a field of specialization.

Matriculation Enrollment as an admit-
ted, degree-seeking student.

Medical Withdrawal Student drops all
courses in a given term based on
medical documentation. Fees for the
semester are refunded.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION

Glossary of Terms (continued)


Minor An officially recognized secon-
dary concentration of study in an ap-
proved subject area, consisting of at
least 15 credits of appropriate course
work.

Permanent Academic Record The com-
plete list of a student's courses at-
tempted, grades and credit earned,
degrees awarded, and any other perti-
nent academic information.

Petition A written request seeking a
waiver of or an exception to a univer-
sity regulation, policy or deadline.

Postbaccalaureate A student who has
earned a baccalaureate degree and
been admitted for continued study but
who has not been admitted as a
graduate or professional student.

Prerequisite A condition that must be
met to establish eligibility to enroll in a
program or course.

Probation, Academic Any undergradu-
ate with less than a 2.0 cumulative UF
GPA shall be placed on academic pro-
bation while a grade point deficit ex-
ists. Refer to "deficit points."

Professional Student A student who is
admitted to pursue a Doctor of Dental
Medicine, Juris Doctor, Doctor of
Medicine, Doctor of Pharmacy or Doc-
tor of Veterinary Medicine degree.

Readmission The procedure for a previ-
ously admitted/enrolled UF student
to re-enroll in a degree-seeking status
after a break in enrollment of more
than one term.

Registration The process by which a
student officially selects and enrolls in
university course work. Registration is
not complete until appropriate fees are
paid.


Regular Decision I The Office of Admis-
sion receives a prospective student's
application, fee, transcript and test
scores by October 15; admission deci-
sion is mailed in February.

Regular Decision II The Office of Ad-
mission receives a prospective stu-
dent's application, fee, transcript and
test scores by January 12 for the sum-
mer and fall terms only; admission de-
cision is mailed in late March.

Residence A student's tenure within the
university and/or a specific college or
school.

Residency Classification of students as
Florida residents or non-Florida resi-
dents for tuition purposes.

Schedule Adjustment A period of time
following advance registration before
the beginning of classes when students
can adjust their course schedules.

Schedule of Courses Registration infor-
mation provided each term with aca-
demic regulations and a listing of all
courses offered.

Semester A standard academic term (fall
or spring) of approximately 16 weeks
of instruction. Refer to "term."

Summa Cum Laude Graduating with
"highest honors."

S-U Option A provision by which a stu-
dent may elect, with college approval,
to enroll in a course, the grade for
which is not computed in the grade
point average. Grades awarded are
S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory).

S.U.S. The State University System of
Florida. The University of Florida is
one of 11 state-supported universities
in the S.U.S.


Term A period of instruction. During the
fall and spring, the term is a standard
16-week semester. During the sum-
mer, various shorter length periods of
instruction are offered: Summer A and
Summer B are six-week terms; Sum-
mer C is a 12-week term.

Transcript An official copy of the stu-
dent's complete course work, grades,
credit and degrees earned at the Uni-
versity of Florida.

Transfer Credit Course work completed
at another institution that is accepted
at the University of Florida and which
may be applicable toward a specific
major, minor or degree.

Transient Student A student of another
accredited institution who receives
permission to register (for one term) as
a nondegree-seeking student to earn
credit to transfer back to his or her
parent institution.

Universal Tracking System and Audits -
A computerized academic advising
and tracking program that provides an
assessment of progress toward degree
requirements.

Withdraw To drop all courses for a given
term.

Writing and Math Requirement (Gordon
Rule) A state law requiring that all
students complete 24,000 words of
designated writing courses and six
hours of designated math courses
prior to earning 60 credits. Courses
are identified by category in the Sched-
ule of Courses.


University of Florida






ADMISSION


Admission
www.reg.ufl.edu/regadmi.htm
In this section:
* General Requirements
* Residency for Tuition Purposes
* Proof of Immunization
* Computer Requirement
* Student Classification for Admission
* Admission Requirements
Freshman Students
Transfer Students
Veterans and Social Security Benefits
Readmission
Fresh Start
International Students


General Requirements
The general requirements for admission
or readmission to any college or division
of the university include the following:
* An application for admission to the
UF Office of Admission by the dead-
line specified.
* A non-refundable processing fee of $30.
* A satisfactory academic record. Each
applicant must furnish a complete
chronological record of educational
institutions previously attended. Offi-
cial transcripts must be submitted in
accordance with the instructions on
the application. Failure to declare at-
tendance at another institution could
cause invalidation of admission and
any credits or degrees earned.
* Satisfactory scores on achievement or
aptitude tests.
* A satisfactory conduct record.
* An application for admission must be
filed for the specific term the student
wishes to enter the university and will
be considered for that term ONLY.
Applicants who wish to change their
entry date should contact the Office of
Admission for application instruc-
tions. An approval for admission is
valid ONLY for the term specified in
the admission notice.
* Admission to on-campus degree pro-
grams must be validated by taking
one or more on-campus courses in the
specific semester for which the stu-
dent is accepted. Correspondence
and/or Web courses cannot be used to
fulfill this requirement. This does not
refer to Web-based degree programs.
* All junior-level transfer and postbacca-
laureate international students whose
native language is not English must
submit TOEFL (Test of English as a For-
eign Language) scores, in addition to
other required test scores.
2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


The specific requirements for admission
to the university for the first time as a
freshman, undergraduate transfer, or in-
ternational student can be found in the
appropriate sections that follow. The spe-
cific requirements for readmission (at the
same or a different level) to the university
also can be found in the appropriate sec-
tions that follow.
It should be understood, however, that
minimum requirements are given and ad-
mission to the university is selective. The
satisfaction of minimum requirements
does not automatically guarantee admis-
sion. Under Board of Education policy, a
limited number of students can be admit-
ted as exceptions.
Any student who is admitted condi-
tionally may enroll subject to verification
that the conditions of admission have been
satisfied. If the final credentials fail to con-
firm the conditions for admission, the ad-
mission will be revoked, the student's
classification will be changed to non-
degree status and continued enrollment
will be denied.

Furnishing false or fraudulent state-
ments or information in connection with
an application for admission or residence
affidavit can result in disciplinary action,
denial of admission and invalidation of
credits or degrees earned.

Residency for Tuition
Purposes
Requests for in-state residency for tui-
tion purposes are not granted to students
who appear to have entered the state
solely for educational purposes. For more
details regarding residency classifications
for tuition purposes, refer to the residency
section.

Proof of Immunization
Before registration, each student ac-
cepted for admission must submit proof of
immunization. When the application for
admission is approved, a form to complete
and return is forwarded to the student. No
student is allowed to register until the
Student Health Care Center has received
and approved the form.

Computer Requirement
Access to and ongoing use of a computer
will be required for all students to com-
plete their degree programs. The univer-
sity expects each student entering the
university and continuing students to ac-
quire computer hardware and software
appropriate to the degree program. Com-


petency in the basic use of a computer is a
requirement for graduation. Class assign-
ments may require use of a computer, and
academic advising and registration can be
completed by computer. In addition, offi-
cial university correspondence is sent via
e-mail.
While the university offers limited access
to computers through its computer labs,
most students will be expected to purchase
or lease a computer that is capable of dial-
up or network connection to the Internet,
graphical access to the World Wide Web,
and productivity functions such as word
processing and spreadsheet calculation.
The cost of meeting this requirement will
be included in financial aid considerations.
Individual colleges will provide additional
requirements. Consult the appropriate col-
lege's Web site or the university Web page
regarding student computer needs at
www.circa.ufl.edu/computers.

Student Classification for
Admission
Students who plan to enter the university
for the first time will be classified as follows:
Beginning Freshmen: Students who have
earned fewer than 12 semester hours follow-
ing graduation from high school. (See ad-
mission as a freshman.)
Undergraduate Transfers: Students who
have earned at least 12 semester hours fol-
lowing graduation from high school and
who have not received a bachelor's degree.
(See admission as a transfer student.)

Admission as a Freshman
Composite pictures of the SAT results of
recent freshman classes at the university
indicate that the middle 50 percent of ad-
mitted fall freshmen score between 1190-
1360 on the SAT. In addition, more than 50
percent of each entering class has earned a
B+ or better average in high school aca-
demic subjects. While there is no minimum
grade average or test score to ensure ad-
mission or success in college, prospective
applicants are urged to discuss these data
with their school counselors before apply-
ing.
How to Apply: Freshman applicants are
encouraged to apply online at
www.reg.ufl.edu/on-line/.
When to Apply: The best time to apply is
early in the senior year of secondary school.
Freshman priority is provided to qualified
applicants whose applications and support-
ing records are received by the Office of
Admission before January 12, 2004. Early
Decision applicants for the 2005 term (those
willing to commit to UF if admitted) must






STUDENT INFORMATION


apply no later than October 1, 2004. Admis-
sion to the University of Florida is a selective
process. For Fall 2003, UF admitted slightly
more than half of its 22,000 applicants for
freshman admission. Although the admis-
sion staff encourages all interested students
to apply, it is important to be aware of the
competition for admission spaces. The ap-
plication process should be taken seriously,
and individuals should provide the strong-
est application possible.
The selection process for the University of
Florida allows a freshman to be admitted
based on the applicant's academic credentials
as well as a holistic review of academic and
personal information contained in the appli-
cation.
It is important for the applicant to know
that many factors are considered in the
admission process. It is very difficult to
predict the admissibility of any applicant
without considering all the information
contained in the application file and the
size and strength of the applicant pool.
Admission for Florida Residents
Any Florida student who meets the
minimum admission requirements and
who is interested in attending the univer-
sity is urged to submit an application. Ap-
plicants should be aware, however, that
admission is highly competitive when the
number of qualified applicants exceeds the
number that the university is permitted to
enroll. Minimum admission requirements
include:
* Graduation from a regionally accredited
or state-approved secondary school or
the equivalent (G.E.D., etc.).
Fifteen academic units, distributed as
follows:
English (with substantial writing require-
m ents).................................. .............. 4
Mathematics (Algebra 1, Formal
Geometry, Algebra 2)........................... 3
Natural Science (2 units of which include
substantial laboratory requirements)... 3
Social Science............................................ 3
Foreign Language (must be sequential) .... 2
An overall C average, as computed by
the university, is also required at each
collegiate institution attended. College
deficiencies earned through high
school dual-enrollment programs will
be reviewed individually.
A record of good conduct. Major or
continuing difficulty with school or
other officials may render an appli-
cant ineligible regardless of academic
qualifications.


PlI,'asc inoti: Applicants iho present
scores on the G.E.D. also must present
records from secondary schools attended
and standardized test scores. The appli-
cant'_ overall academic background will be
considered.
* A total score of at least 950 on the SAT
with a minimum verbal score of 440
and a minimum quantitative score of
440. On the ACT, a composite score of
19 is required with a minimum of 17
on the English subsection, a minimum
of 19 on the math subsection and a
minimum of 18 on the reading subsec-
tion.
State University System
Minimum Freshman Eligibility Index
for Admission Consideration
Academic ACT SAT
GPA Composite Total
2.9 20 970
2.8 21 980
2.7 21 990
2.6 21 1000
2.5 21 1010
2.4 22 1030
2.3 23 1060
2.2 24 1090
2.1 24 1110
2.0 25 1140
Meeting this index alone does not guarantee
admission to the university.

Any student who does not graduate
from a regionally accredited secondary
school must provide, in addition to a tran-
script and SAT or ACT results, the results
of the following SAT II examinations: writ-
ing, mathematics (Level II-C), foreign lan-
guage, science and social science.
The Office of Admission considers an
applicant's total high school record includ-
ing grades, test scores, educational objec-
tive and pattern of courses completed, plus
school recommendation and personal
background.

Early Admission
The admissions committee considers on
an individual basis applications for early
admission (i.e., admission following com-
pletion of the junior year of high school).
Applications should be submitted in ac-
cordance with university deadlines.
In addition to the application, the follow-
ing items are needed:
A written statement by the student
explaining reasons for requesting
early admission.


* An official transcript of the applicant's
secondary school record covering
grades 9, 10 and 11. An overall aca-
demic average of 3.9 as computed by
UF is expected.
* Results of either the SAT or ACT. An
SAT total score of 1380 or a composite
score of 32 on the Enhanced ACT is
required.
* A letter from the student's high school
principal or guidance counselor stat-
ing specific reasons why the applicant
would profit more from early admis-
sion than by completion of the senior
year of high school.

Eligible early admission students from
Florida high schools may be funded
through dual-credit enrollment. Dual en-
rollment refers to a student taking on-
campus courses simultaneously at both the
University of Florida and another institu-
tion. If the parent institution is a Florida
high school, the student may qualify for
tuition-exempt, dual-enrollment credit and
may receive textbooks/materials on a
lend-return basis. There must be an articu-
lation agreement between the university
and the home county school board, devel-
opmental research school or other secon-
dary school.
Qualified high school students will be
enrolled as non-degree students and cred-
its earned before high school graduation
may be accepted subsequently for ad-
vanced standing and degree credit when
the student is admitted to the university.
For more, information, refer to the aca-
demic regulations section (especially the
information on dual enrollment and non-
degree registration).
The university provides numerous op-
portunities other than early admission to
accelerate graduation. For additional in-
formation, please refer to the academic
advising section.

Tuition Deposit
Freshmen admitted in Regular Decision I
and II plans are required to submit a $200
non-refundable tuition deposit no later
than May 1, 2004, to secure their place in
the class. Those admitted under the Early
Decision plan are required to submit the
deposit within two weeks of their notice of
admission.
The tuition deposit will be credited to
the student's account and applied toward
the first-semester tuition. If, at the end of
the drop-add period, there is a credit bal-
ance on the student's account, the balance
will be refunded to the student.


University of Florida







ADMISSION


The admission deposit will not be reim-
bursed to an individual who does not en-
roll in the term offered for admission.
The deposit is waived for those students
who have qualified for an SAT or ACT fee-
application waiver. By means of appeal,
students who qualify for Pell Grants may
receive a reduction in the amount of the
deposit.

Advance Housing Payment
Entering freshmen are required to make
a housing deposit within 30 days of accep-
tance if they desire to live in university
housing. The housing deposit, less a $25
service charge, is refundable until May 1
for applicants accepted for admission to
the fall freshman class.

Admission with Advanced Standing
The university participates in the Ad-
vanced Placement (AP) program, the Col-
lege Level Examination Program (CLEP),
the International Baccalaureate (IB) pro-
gram and the Advanced International Cer-
tificate of Education (AICE). The student
may receive university credit or exemption
from such courses without credit, depend-
ing on the results. (refer to the academic
advising section).
Dual-enrollment credit earned at Florida
public institutions transfers to the Univer-
sity of Florida. However, college credit
earned through dual enrollment at other
institutions will not transfer to UF if the
courses) completed through dual enroll-
ment were used to meet high school
graduation requirements. Students must
provide a letter from their high school stat-
ing that the courses completed through
dual enrollment were not used to fulfill
secondary graduation requirements in
order for their credit to be eligible for
transfer to the university.

Admission with Outstanding
Credentials
Offers of admission with course work
currently in progress are tentative, pend-
ing review of final transcripts. Admission
offers are subject to cancellation if final
course work does not meet admission re-
quirements.

Admission as a Transfer
Student
This section lists the general admission re-
quirements for transfer students. It should be
noted, however, that admission to the univer-
sity is selective and satisfaction of these
general requirements does not guarantee
admission. The colleges of the university have
limited enrollment. Transfer applicants who meet


the minimum admission requirements will be
referred to the appropriate college for enrollment
consideration. Some colleges may require addi-
tional application materials. Refer to the appro-
priate college's section of this catalog for further
information.
Applicants who have earned at least 12
semester hours of credit following gradua-
tion from high school are considered transfer
applicants.
How to Apply: Transfer applicants are
encouraged to apply online at
www.reg.ufl.edu/on-line/.
When to Apply: Applications can be
submitted up to one year in advance of the
entering term. Applicants should apply at
least six months before the term they plan
to enter. They should refer to the applica-
tion deadlines in the university calendar
and consult the college to which they in-
tend to apply. (Note: In a number of pro-
grams, the sequence of professional
courses begins ONLY in the fall term of
the junior year.) An applicant who delays
filing an application may not be able to
furnish the necessary records in time for
admission to the term desired.

Florida Public Community College
Graduates
This section applies ONLY to new students
seeking to transfer directly from a Florida pub-
lic community college with the Associate of
Arts degree. All other community college ap-
plicants, undergraduate transfer applicants
from four-year colleges or universities and
applicants for readmission should consult the
appropriate sections that follow.
The University of Florida subscribes to
the articulation agreement between the
state universities and public community
colleges of Florida: Any graduate of a
state-approved Florida public community
college is eligible for admission to a uni-
versity if the student has completed a uni-
versity parallel program and received the
Associate of Arts degree, provided the
degree has been awarded on the basis of
the following:
At least 60 semester hours of academic
work exclusive of occupational courses;
* An approved general education pro-
gram of at least 36 semester hours;
* A grade point average of at least 2.0
on a 4.0 scale on all college-level aca-
demic courses.
Applicants must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language in
secondary school or 8-10 sequential semes-
ter hours at the postsecondary level or
documentation of an equivalent level of
proficiency.


A transcript must be furnished from
each institution attended regardless of
length of attendance or credit earned. Ad-
ditional transcripts are required as soon as
they are available for any work completed
after an application. Any student who has
failed to maintain a minimum C average at
another institution after completing the
A.A. degree is not eligible for admission.
Regardless of the average earned, courses
completed at other institutions must paral-
lel the curriculum at UF.
An undergraduate-transfer applicant en-
tering the university with junior class stand-
ing (A.A. degree from a Florida public
community college or 60 semester hours of
acceptable transfer credit) must have passed
the College Level Academic Skills Test
(CLAST) or an approved alternative to be
admitted as a degree-seeking student.
Applicants seeking admission to a pro-
gram in teacher education must submit
SAT or ACT scores. These scores should be
forwarded to the Office of Admission as
soon as possible after submitting an appli-
cation for admission. Some colleges with
enrollment limitations require applicants to
submit test scores. When test scores are re-
quired, the college will contact the applicant.
Within space and fiscal limitations, ap-
plicants who have satisfied the above
minimum requirements will be considered
for admission at the junior level. Transfer
students may be required to take addi-
tional pre-professional courses not com-
pleted at the junior college. However, such
courses will not reduce the number of
credits required at this university.
Other Transfer Applicants
This section applies to students seeking to
transfer from a Florida public community col-
lege without an Associate of Arts degree in a
university parallel program and to all under-
graduate transfer applicants from other colleges
or universities.
Admission as a Freshman or Sophomore:
The number of spaces available for stu-
dents transferring with fewer than 60
credit hours is extremely limited with few
students accepted. Students are encour-
aged to remain at their Florida community
college until completion of the Associate of
Arts degree or to transfer to a Florida
community college to complete the A.A.
degree. For consideration, the following
guidelines apply:
* An applicant must have been eligible
for admission to the University of
Florida as a beginning freshman to be
considered for admission as a transfer
student (refer to the admission as a
freshman section).


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







STUDENT INFORMATION


* An applicant must be in good stand-
ing and eligible to return to any insti-
tution previously attended. A student
who for any reason would not be al-
lowed to return to an institution pre-
viously attended cannot be considered
for admission to UF.
* An applicant must have a C average
or higher (as computed by the univer-
sity) on all work attempted at each in-
stitution previously attended. No
application can be considered until
the Office of Admission receives com-
plete official transcripts of all under-
graduate work.
* An applicant must present a satisfac-
tory conduct record. Regardless of
other qualifications, an applicant who
has experienced serious or continuing
difficulty with school or other authori-
ties because of improper conduct may
find his or her application denied.

Admission as a Junior or Senior: Transfer
applicants with 60 credit hours or more
must satisfy the requirements listed above
(with the exception of the first item ad-
missibility as a freshman) for admission as
a junior or senior transfer. In addition, the
following requirements must be satisfied:
An applicant must present a minimum
of 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter
hours) of acceptable college courses.
An applicant must present transcripts
verifying completion of the courses
(or acceptable substitutes) required for
admission by the college. (See appro-
priate college section of this catalog.)
If recommended by the college, an
applicant lacking some requirements
may be permitted to enroll in that col-
lege and to complete those courses if
all other requirements for admission
are met; however, 1000- to 2000-level
courses will not reduce the number of
credits required for a degree.
Applicants admitted in a degree-
seeking status who have had the oppor-
tunity to take the College Level Aca-
demic Skills Test (CLAST) must have
completed it (or its approved alterna-
tive) satisfactorily. Students with fewer
than 96 semester hours who are trans-
ferring from private colleges in Florida
or from out-of-state colleges who have
not taken the test must have satisfied
the CLAST requirement by the end of
the first term of enrollment. Applicants
with 96 or more hours of transferable
credit must have satisfied the CLAST
requirement before admission.


An applicant must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language
in secondary school or 8-10 sequential
semester hours at the postsecondary
level or document an equivalent level of
proficiency.

Admission Information for
Veterans Administration and
Social Security Benefits
The University of Florida is approved for
the education and training of veterans,
spouses or dependents of veterans (100 per-
cent disabled or deceased service con-
nected), by the Florida Department of
Veterans Affairs.
Ten federal public laws currently provide
education/job-training programs for De-
partment of Veterans Affairs (DVA) eligible
students. The four programs serving most
students are Chapter 30 for U.S. Military
Veterans, Chapter 31 for Disabled U.S. Mili-
tary Veterans, Chapter 35 for Spouse and
Children of Deceased or 100 percent Dis-
abled Veterans (service connected), and
Chapter 1606 for personnel in the National
Guard or U.S. Military Reserves. Students
can contact the Office of the University Reg-
istrar or the DVA counseling center for spe-
cific program information such as terms of
payment, months of eligibility and an addi-
tional allowance under the DVA work-study
program.
University of Florida students who may
be eligible for a particular DVA educa-
tional program must obtain and submit a
completed Application for Educational
Benefits to the Office of the University
Registrar. This office will then certify the
student for full-time (undergraduate 12
hours, graduate 9 hours) or part-time edu-
cational benefits in accordance with DVA
rules and regulations.
The Atlanta Regional Processing Office of
the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs will
make a determination of eligibility based on
official service records, evidence submitted
by the student, and applicable laws for vet-
erans. Students who have already estab-
lished their DVA program eligibility at
another college or university must submit
a completed Change of Program or Place
of Training form to the University Regis-
trar, as well as a University of Florida Cer-
tification of Enrollment Request. All forms
are available at the University of Florida
Registrar Information Counter in 222
Criser Hall. This office also can provide
confirmation of student status for DVA
health care or other benefits.
At the end of the term, if an undergradu-
ate student's cumulative grade point aver-


age falls below a 2.0 (C) average, the student
is warned. At the end of the next term of
enrollment, if the cumulative grade point
average remains below a 2.0 (C) average, the
DVA is notified of termination for unsatis-
factory progress for DVA pay purposes.
Students must meet the conditions of the
University of Florida readmission standards
to become eligible for DVA educational pro-
grams.
Inquiries relating to Social Security bene-
fits should be directed to the student's
local Social Security Office. The Office of
the University Registrar will submit en-
rollment certificates issued by the Social
Security Administration for students eligi-
ble to receive educational benefits under
the Social Security Act, providing the un-
dergraduate student registers for 12 credit
hours or more.
A full-time undergraduate load for DVA
or Social Security benefits is 12 credit hours
per semester.

Readmission
Readmission applies to students who
have been previously admitted and who
have attended the university.
Undergraduate students who do not en-
roll at the university for two consecutive
terms, including any summer term, must
apply for readmission. Readmission, how-
ever, is not guaranteed and is subject to
availability at the appropriate level, college
or major. Students who skip a single term
will be scheduled automatically for a regis-
tration appointment for one additional term.
How to Apply: Applications are available
from the Office of Admission, P. O. Box
114000, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611-4000, or online at www.reg.ufl.edu/
readmission-app.html. Forms and direc-
tions vary with the level of readmission.
Applicants should indicate the college and
the level of last enrollment at the univer-
sity as well as the college and level to
which they wish to apply. Applications
must be received in the Office of Admis-
sion by the deadline published in the uni-
versity calendar. A $30 application fee is
required.

Satisfactory Academic Record
Applicants must be eligible to return to
the university. If applicants have attended
any college or university since last enrolled
at the University of Florida, they also must
have a C or higher average (as computed
by UF) on all work attempted at each insti-
tution. (Note: Grades received at other
institutions are not averaged with grades
received at UF for the purpose of meeting


University of Florida






ADMISSION


university grade-point average require-
ments.)
Students must list all institutions at-
tended and provide complete official tran-
scripts from each. Failure to declare
attendance at another institution could
invalidate admission and any credits or
degrees earned. Applicants also must be in
good standing and eligible to return to
each institution previously attended.
All readmission applicants must meet
the current admission requirements of the
college or school they expect to enter. Re-
admission is not guaranteed and is subject
to availability at the level, college or major.
(Consult the appropriate college section in
this catalog for admission requirements.)
Readmission is for a specific term. If a
student is unable to enroll for the term
indicated, he or she must apply for read-
mission to a different term.

Satisfactory Conduct Record
Applicants must present a satisfactory
record of conduct. Regardless of other
qualifications, applicants who have experi-
enced major or continuing difficulties with
school or other authorities since their last
enrollment at the University of Florida
may find their application for readmission
denied.

Fresh Start Program
Former undergraduate degree-seeking
students who have been dismissed and
who wish to return to the University of
Florida after an absence of no fewer than
five calendar years (during which they
have engaged predominantly in nonaca-
demic activities) may petition for under-
graduate readmission under the Fresh
Start Program.
If a student is readmitted, credit for previ-
ous UF courses in which a grade of C or
better was earned will be calculated in UF
hours earned and may be applied toward a
degree. No grades previously earned in UF
courses will be included in the UF grade
point average. All previous course attempts
and grades received will remain on the stu-
dent's academic record and transcript.
Students cannot apply for the Fresh Start
Program subsequent to readmission to the
university. Students who have been read-
mitted under Fresh Start cannot petition
subsequently for any retroactive change to
their academic records. Students admitted
under Fresh Start who do not enroll must
reapply for a future term.


For additional information on policy and
procedures, former students who wish to
petition for readmission under the Fresh
Start Program should contact the dean of
the college into which they seek readmis-
sion.
Each student is responsible for becoming
familiar with the rules and regulations of
the university and for applying them as
appropriate. Additional information rela-
tive to academic rules, conduct, gradua-
tion, social activities, and failure in studies
can be found in the sections containing
regulations of the colleges and schools.

Admission for International
Students
www.reg.ufl.edu/interational-
admissions.html
When to Apply: See application dead-
lines on page 1-18.
How to Apply: The Admission Office
classifies an applicant as an undergraduate if
he or she has not earned a university degree
equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree. Ap-
plicants should supply the following:
* All international applicants must
complete the international application,
which is available online at
www.reg.ufl.edulinterational-
admissions.html. An applicant can
also address a request to: Office of
Admission, P.O. Box 114000, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000,
U.S.A.
* Submit a nonrefundable application
fee of $30 (U.S. currency drawn on a
U.S. bank). An application will not be
considered without the required ap-
plication fee.
* Submit test scores. (See test score re-
quirements.)
* Complete a confidential financial
statement.

Academic Records
Applications cannot be considered until
the Office of Admission receives ALL re-
quired credentials. All documents must be
accompanied by official English transla-
tions and become the property of the uni-
versity. Credentials of applicants cannot be
returned or forwarded.
* Undergraduate applicants must sub-
mit official transcripts (or certificates)
of all academic records in the native
language for all secondary and/or


postsecondary course work attempted.
All documents must be accompanied
by official English translations.
Postbaccalaureate applicants must
submit official transcripts of academic
records in the native language, includ-
ing degree statements for all univer-
sity-level work. These documents
must be accompanied by official Eng-
lish translations.

Test Score Requirements
Students who enter the university as
freshmen or sophomores (less than two
years of university course work) must
submit official scores for SAT or ACT as-
sessments before their application for ad-
mission will be considered.
International students whose native
tongue is English or who have completed
at least one academic year of university or
college course work in a country where
English is the official language (this ex-
cludes intensive English language pro-
grams) are not required to submit TOEFL
scores but must submit satisfactory scores
on an appropriate admissions test.
TOEFL and SAT information is available
online at www.ets.org or by writing to the
Educational Testing Service, Rosedale
Road, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. 08541. ACT
information is available online at
www.act.org or by writing to the Ameri-
can College Testing Program, 500 ACT
Drive, P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, IA, U.S.A.
52243. Test information also is available at
U.S. embassies and consulates.

Notice of Admission
When an application for admission is
approved, the university will send an offi-
cial notice. Admission is for a specific
term. If a student is unable to enroll for the
term indicated, the Office of Admission
should be informed immediately. If the
student wishes to be considered for en-
trance to a different term, the Office of
Admission must be advised.
Under no circumstances should an appli-
cant make plans to depart for Gainesville
until the university has provided official
notification. A student who comes to cam-
pus without a notice of admission does so
entirely at his or her own risk. The stu-
dent's presence on campus will not influ-
ence the decision for admission.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Academic Regulations
www.reg.ufl.edu
In this section:
* Classification of Students
* Confidentiality of Student Records
* Student Records and Transcripts
* Registration Policies
Course Load Requirements
Dropping Courses
Withdrawals
Transfer Credit Policy
Non-Degree Registration
Auditing Courses
UF Students Attending Other
Schools
Visiting Students Attending UF
Attendance Policies
Absences
Religious Holidays
Illness Policy
Twelve-Day Rule
Reading Days
Examination Policies
Grades/Grading Policies
Passing, Non-Punitive, Failing
Grades
Grade Point Averaging and Deficits
Calculating Grade point Average
Repeat Course Work
Grade Change Policy
Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory (S-U)
Grade Option
* Academic Progress Policies
Good Standing
Regulation of Academic Standards
Petitions
Probation
Dismissal
Ombudsman
* Degrees and Graduation
Associate of Arts Certificate
Application for Degree
Catalog Year
Continuous Enrollment
College Dean's Certification
Completion Deadline to Receive a
Degree
Curriculum Requirements
Foreign Language Requirement
Residence Requirements
Academic Dishonesty
Summer Term Enrollment
Diploma Replacement Fee
Dual Degrees and Multiple Majors

Each student is responsible for becoming
familiar with the rules and regulations of
the university and for applying them as
appropriate. Additional information rela-
tive to academic rules, conduct, gradua-
tion, social activities, and failure in studies
can be found in the sections containing
regulations of the colleges and schools.


Classification of Students
The Office of the University Registrar
classifies students at the following levels
each semester:
Classification Explanation
Special transient
students, qualified high
school students and
0 other non-degree
students who have been
permitted to register at
the University of Florida
S Students with fewer than
30 credits earned
Students who have
2 earned 30 credits, but
fewer than 60 credits
Students who have
3 earned 60 credits, but
fewer than 90 credits
Students who have
earned 90 credits or more
Students who are
candidates for a degree
in a program that
5 normally requires 10
semesters and who have
earned 120 credits or
more
Postbaccalaureate
students: degree-holding
6 students who have been
admitted to
postbaccalaureate status

Confidentiality of Student
Records
The university ensures the confidentiality
of student educational records in accordance
with State University System rules, state stat-
utes and the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, known as
the Buckley Amendment.
Student directory information that can
be released to the public is limited to
name, class, college and major; dates of
attendance; degrees) earned; honors and
awards received; local, permanent and
e-mail addresses; telephone number; most
recent previous educational institution
attended; participation in officially recog-
nized activities and sports; and the weight
and height of members of athletic teams.
Currently enrolled students must contact
the appropriate agency/agencies to restrict
release of directory information. The Office
of the University Registrar, the Depart-
ment of Housing and Residence Educa-
tion, and the Division of Human Resources
routinely release directory information to
the public. In addition to requesting this
restriction from the Office of the Univer-


sity Registrar, students who live on cam-
pus also must request this restriction from
the Department of Housing and Residence
Education (next to Beaty Towers). Students
who are university employees also must
request this restriction from the Division of
Human Resources.
Student educational records may be re-
leased without a student's consent to
school officials who have a legitimate edu-
cational interest in accessing the records.
"School officials" shall include:
An employee, agent or officer of the
university or State University System
of Florida in an administrative, super-
visory, academic, research, or support
staff position;
Persons serving on university commit-
tees, boards, and/or councils; and
Persons employed by or under con-
tract to the university to perform a
special task, such as an attorney or an
auditor.
"Legitimate educational interest" shall
mean any authorized interest or activity
undertaken in the name of the university
for which access to an educational record
is necessary or appropriate to the opera-
tion of the university or to the proper per-
formance of the educational mission of the
university.
The university also may disclose informa-
tion from a student's educational record
without a student's consent to either indi-
viduals or entities permitted such access
under applicable federal and state law.
Students have the right to review their
own educational records for information
and to determine accuracy. A photo I.D.,
other equivalent documentation or per-
sonal recognition by the custodian of the
record will be required before access is
granted. Parents of dependent students, as
defined by the Internal Revenue Service,
have these same rights upon presentation
of proof of a student's dependent status.
If a student believes the educational re-
cord contains information that is inaccu-
rate, misleading, or in violation of his or
her rights, the student can ask the institu-
tion to amend the record. The UF Student
Guide outlines the procedures for chal-
lenging the content of a student record, as
well as the policies governing access to
and maintenance of student records.
Student Records and
Transcripts
Records: The Office of the University
Registrar maintains students' academic
records. At the end of each term of enroll-
ment, students' grades, cumulative hours


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







STUDENT INFORMATION


earned, grade points, probationary status
and degrees earned, if any, are available
by accessing ISIS at www.isis.ufl.edu.
Transcripts: Upon written request, the
university will provide academic tran-
scripts for any student who has attended
this university. Students may be charged
for each transcript. The university main-
tains the right to withhold release of a
transcript if the student has an outstanding
financial obligation to the university. To
reflect a complete academic record for un-
dergraduate, graduate and professional
students, the university will only issue
complete transcripts.

Registration Policies

Course Load Requirements
The minimum full-time load for under-
graduate students is 12* credits. The mini-
mum full-time load for a six-week summer
term is 6 credits and for the twelve-week
summer term is 12 credits. Postbaccalaure-
ate students are considered undergradu-
ates.
The minimum load for full-time under-
graduate student benefits from the Veter-
ans Administration or Social Security
Administration is 12 credits for fall and
spring, eight credits for Summer C and
four credits for the six-week summer
terms. Refer to the Campus Life and Stu-
dent Support section of the catalog for
enrollment requirements for students re-
ceiving financial aid and students with
disabilities.
University regulations allow a maximum
load of 15 credits for a student whose pre-
vious term average was below a C. Some
colleges have differing maximum loads
that are stated in the college sections of
this catalog.
Students with college approval may reg-
ister for less than the minimum or more
than the maximum load. After late regis-
tration, no student may drop below the
minimum load without successfully peti-
tioning his or her college dean.
Simultaneous enrollment in correspon-
dence courses or extension work at an-
other college or university is counted
when computing the maximum course
load but not the minimum course load.
*Students with disabilities, registered with the
Disability Resources Program (Dean of Stu-
dents Office), are eligible for full-time status
and all the benefits thereof at or below 12 credit
hours. For more information, contact the Dis-
ability Resources Program in the Dean of Stu-
dents Office.


Dropping Courses
Courses may be dropped or added dur-
ing the drop/add period without penalty.
Classes that meet for the first time after the
drop/add period may be dropped without
academic penalty or fee liability by the end
of the next business day after the first
meeting. This does not apply to laboratory
sections.
After drop/add, a course may be
dropped up to the date established in the
university calendar. A grade of W will
appear on the transcript, and students will
be held liable for course fees. All drops
after the drop/add period must be submit-
ted to the Office of the University Registrar
by the deadline and are subject to the fol-
lowing restrictions:
* Students get two drops in their first 60
credit hours attempted at UF (hours
carried plus S/U credits, not counting
full-term withdrawals from all
courses).
Students get two more drops begin-
ning the term after the first 60 hours
attempted.
Students with disabilities who need to
drop a course due to disability-related
reasons are allowed to petition for ad-
ditional drops. For more information,
contact the Disability Resources Pro-
gram in the Dean of Students Office.
Students transferring to UF with an
A.A. degree from a Florida public
community college or with 60 or more
transfer credits earned from another
college or university get only two
drops.
Students who can document extenuat-
ing circumstances may petition their
college for additional drops.
Approval to drop a course must be
obtained from the student's college.
After the deadline, students may peti-
tion to drop provided they can docu-
ment sufficient reason to drop, usually
hardship or medical condition occur-
ring after the deadline.
Failure to attend a class does not consti-
tute a drop.
Withdrawals
The Dean of Students Office coordinates
withdrawal procedures. Withdrawal for-
mally drops all courses in a term. Stu-
dents who withdraw after drop/add and
before the deadline for withdrawal will
receive a grade of W for all courses. Any
student who withdraws after the deadline
will receive WF grades in all courses and
will be subject to dismissal. Students who


leave UF without withdrawing normally
receive failing grades.
Students on academic probation who
withdraw from UF before the deadline will
continue on probation until their grade
point deficit is reduced to zero. Students
on Admissions Committee probation must
meet the terms of their probation.
Withdrawal Due to Military Service
Per Florida Statute 1004.07, any student
enrolled in a postsecondary course or
courses at a state university shall not incur
academic or financial penalties by virtue of
performing military service on behalf of
our country. Such student shall be permit-
ted the option of either completing the
course or courses at a later date without
penalty or withdrawing from the course or
courses with a full refund of fees paid (see
refund of fees information in fees and fis-
cal section). If the student chooses to with-
draw, the student's record shall reflect that
the withdrawal is due to active military
service.
National Guard Troops
Ordered into Active Service
Per Florida Statute 250.482, if a member
of the Florida National Guard is ordered
into active service, no private or public
employer, and no employing or appoint-
ing authority of this state, its counties,
municipalities, political subdivisions,
community colleges, or universities, shall
discharge, reprimand, or in any other way
penalize such member because of his or
her absence by reason of state active duty.
Transfer Credit Policy
In general, students may transfer 60
credit hours from community colleges as
part of the hours needed for their UF de-
grees, regardless of when these hours are
earned, subject to university and college
degree requirements.
Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree recipi-
ents from Florida public community col-
leges who continue enrollment at the
school that awarded the A.A. may be
granted additional transfer credit for one
or more courses that satisfy their UF de-
gree requirements.
Junior-/senior-level (courses numbered
3000-4000) course requirements for the
major must be completed at UF or, with
permission of the student's college, at an-
other baccalaureate degree-granting insti-
tution. At least 25 percent of semester
credit hours must be earned through in-
struction at the University of Florida.
Accreditation by the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools states, "an adequate
number of hours with appropriate prerequi-
sites must be required in courses above the
University of Florida






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


elementary level." The University of Florida
interprets this, based on commonly ac-
cepted good practice, to mean 30 credits in
3000-/4000-level courses.
Courses completed with grades of D or
higher at other regionally accredited de-
gree-granting institutions that reasonably
parallel the curriculum at this university
will be accepted for transfer credit as hours
earned. It is the prerogative of the stu-
dent's college to determine how transfer
credit satisfies the specific degree's course
requirements. Students are required to
submit final official transcripts from all
institutions attended before or during their
enrollment at UF. Failure to declare atten-
dance at another institution can invali-
date admission to UF and any credits or
degrees earned.
Non-Degree Registration
Non-degree enrollment is restricted to par-
ticipants in special programs, off-campus
programs, university-affiliated exchange
programs, those participants with non-
degree educational objectives at the univer-
sity, and high school/college dual-credit
enrollment. (Special regulations govern high
school/college dual enrollment for academi-
cally advanced students in Florida high
schools.)
Undergraduate students who have been
denied admission to UF for any term are
not eligible for non-degree registration.
Students who have previously attended
UF in a degree-seeking status who did not
subsequently earn a bachelor's degree are
not eligible for non-degree registration.
Auditing Courses
Auditing courses may be approved on a
space-available basis. In addition to paying
tuition and fees, the student must obtain
approvals of the instructor and dean of the
college offering the course. Immunizations
also are required. Audited courses are not
reflected on the academic transcript. In-
formation on procedures for auditing
courses is available from the Office of the
University Registrar. Students auditing a
course to complete course requirements
should refer to the Grades/Grading Poli-
cies section.
UF Students Attending Other
Schools
Normally, UF students are not permitted
to register at another institution for a course
or its equivalent that is offered at UF.
Visiting Students Attending UF
Undergraduate students in good stand-
ing at another accredited collegiate institu-
tion can enroll full time at UF as non-
degree transient students to complete


work to transfer back to the parent institu-
tion. The university has limited space for
transient students during the regular aca-
demic year (fall and spring semesters).
UF will not evaluate work previously
completed, and it is the student's respon-
sibility to secure approvals required by the
parent institution. Certification to Social
Security and Veterans Administration
programs also is the responsibility of the
student, who must request each institution
to furnish records. Non-degree enrollment
is subject to the availability of faculty,
space and facilities. No application for
admission is required; the non-degree reg-
istration form is available from the Office
of the University Registrar.
Non-degree students are subject to the
following restrictions:
Non-degree students must meet State of
Florida immunization requirements.
* Course enrollment requires the ap-
proval of the college at the beginning of
each term. The college of enrollment has
the authority to terminate a non-degree
enrollment before registration for any
term. Generally, nondegree registration
is for one term only.
* Registration is not permitted until the
last two days of the drop/add period
and must be completed by the last day
of late registration; failure to register
by that deadline will result in a late
registration fee.
* The same grading system is applicable
to degree and non-degree students.
Non-degree credit is not applicable to a
UF degree except by subsequent admis-
sion to degree status and successful pe-
tition for application of such credit.
Authorization to enroll as a non-degree
student in no way implies future ap-
proval for admission as a degree-
seeking student.
* Non-degree enrollment status will be
denied to any student under suspen-
sion/dismissal from a postsecondary
institution or not in good standing at
any institution previously enrolled,
including UF, even if the student has
subsequently attended another insti-
tution. Non-degree students are subject
to other regulations and restrictions im-
posed by the college or department in
which they wish to enroll.
* Non-degree students taking courses at
the university will be required to reg-
ister for and to attend classes under
the university calendar. Non-degree
students must pay appropriate UF
fees based on course level, number of
credits and residency status.


Attendance Policies
Absences
Students are responsible for satisfying all
academic objectives as defined by the in-
structor. Absences count from the first
class meeting.
In general,-acceptable reasons for absence
from class include illness, serious family
emergencies, special curricular requirements
(e.g., judging trips, field trips, professional
conferences), military obligation, severe
weather conditions, religious holidays and
participation in official university activities
such as music performances, athletic compe-
tition or debate. Absences from class for
court-imposed legal obligations (e.g., jury
duty or subpoena) must be excused. Other
reasons also may be approved.
Students may not attend classes unless
they are registered officially or approved
to audit with evidence of having paid au-
dit fees. The Office of the University Regis-
trar makes official class rolls available
online through the administrative menu in
the MYUFL portal (my.ufl.edu).
Students who do not attend at least one
of the first two class meetings of a course
or laboratory in which they are registered,
and who have not contacted the depart-
ment to indicate their intent, may be
dropped from the course. Students must
not assume that they will be dropped if
they fail to attend the first few days of
class. The department will notify students
dropped from courses or laboratories by
posting a notice in the department office.
Students may request reinstatement on a
space-available basis if documented evi-
dence is presented.
The university recognizes the right of the
individual professor to make attendance
mandatory. After due warning, professors
may prohibit further attendance and sub-
sequently assign a failing grade for exces-
sive absences.
Religious Holidays
The Florida Board of Education and state
law govern university policy regarding
observance of religious holidays. The fol-
lowing guidelines apply:
* Students, upon prior notification to
their instructors, shall be excused
from class or other scheduled aca-
demic activity to observe a religious
holy day of their faith.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION


* Students shall be permitted a reason-
able amount of time to make up the
material or activities covered in their
absence.
* Students shall not be penalized due to
absence from class or other scheduled
academic activity because of religious
observances.
If a faculty member is informed of or is
aware that a significant number of stu-
dents are likely to be absent from his or her
classroom because of a religious obser-
vance, the faculty member should not
schedule a major exam or other academic
event at that time.
A student who is to be excused from
class for a religious observance is not re-
quired to provide a second party certifica-
tion of the reason for the absence.
Furthermore, a student who believes that
he or she has been unreasonably denied an
education benefit due to religious beliefs
or practices may seek redress through the
student grievance procedure.
Illness Policy
Students who are absent from.classes or
examinations because of illness should
contact their professors. The student
should contact his or her college by the
deadline to drop a course for medical rea-
sons. After the college petition deadline,
students may petition the Faculty Senate
Committee on Student Petitions to drop a
course for medical reasons. The Univer-
sity's policy regarding medical excuse
notes is located in the information on the
Student Health Care Center in this catalog.
Twelve-Day Rule
Students who participate in athletic or ex-
tracurricular activities are permitted to be
absent 12 scholastic days per semester with-
out penalty. (A scholastic day is any day on
which regular class work is scheduled.) In-
structors must be flexible when scheduling
exams or other class assignments.
The 12-day rule applies to individual
students participating on an athletic or
scholastic team. Consequently, a group's
schedule that requires absence of more
than 12 days should be adjusted so that no
student is absent from campus more than
12 scholastic days.
Students who previously have been
warned for absences or unsatisfactory
work should not incur additional absences,
even if they have not been absent 12 scho-
lastic days. It is the student's responsibility
to maintain satisfactory academic per-
formance and attendance.


Examination Policies
Final examinations are determined by
course meeting times, except for certain
large courses. No student is required to
take more than three final exams in one
day. The University Curriculum Commit-
tee must approve all changes in the pub-
lished examination schedule.
During-term examinations may be held
during the regular class time or assembly
exams may be held Monday-Friday from
7:00-9:45 p.m. (periods E1-E2) for the sum-
mer terms and Monday-Friday from 8:20-
10:10 p.m. (periods E2-E3) for the fall and
spring terms. If other classes are scheduled
during an exam time, instructors must pro-
vide make-up class work for students who
miss class because of an assembly exam.
If two exams are scheduled at the same
time, assembly exams take priority over
time-of-class exams. When two assembly
exams or two time-of-class exams conflict,
the course with the higher number will take
priority. Instructors giving make-up exams
will make the necessary adjustments.
Reading Days
The two days before the start of exami-
nations in the fall and spring semesters,
generally a Thursday and Friday, are des-
ignated reading days. No classes or exams
are held on these days. Instead, students
are encouraged to use these days for study
and review. There are no reading days in
the summer terms because examinations
are given during regular class periods.

Grades/Grading

Policies

Passing, Non-Punitive and Failing
Grades
The Office of the University Registrar re-
cords student grades.
The word "credit" refers to one semester
hour, generally representing one hour per
week of lecture or two or more hours per
week of laboratory work.

Passing Grades and Grade Points
A 4.0
B+ 3.5
B 3.0
C+ 2.5
C 2.0
D+ 1.5
D 1.0
S 0.0/Satisfactory

NOTE: The degree-granting college may
require a minimum grade of C in particu-
lar courses.


Non-Punitive Grades and Symbols No
Grade Points
W Withdrew
H Deferred grade assigned only in
approved sequential courses.
N* No grade reported not in GPA
I* Incomplete not in GPA

Failing Grades No Grade Points
E Failure in GPA
U Unsatisfactory
WF Withdrew failing in GPA
NG No grade reported in GPA
I Incomplete in GPA

Note: I* or N* grades recorded on the
student record indicate the non-punitive
initial-term receipt of an I or NG. A grade
of I* or N* is not considered a failing grade
for the term in which it is received, and it
is not computed in the grade point aver-
age. However, if the I* or N* has not been
changed by the end of the next term for
which the student is enrolled, it will be
counted as a failing grade and used in
computation of the grade point average.
For purposes of determining grade point
average after the initial receipt of an I* or
N* grade, the three summer terms are con-
sidered collectively as a single term. I* and
N* grades are not assigned to graduating
students; they receive grades of I or NG.
An incomplete grade may be assigned at
the discretion of the instructor as an in-
terim grade for a course in which the stu-
dent has completed a major portion of the
course with a passing grade, been unable
to complete course requirements before the
end of the term because of extenuating
circumstances, and obtained agreement
from the instructor and arranged for reso-
lution of the incomplete grade. Instructors
are not required to assign grades of In-
complete.
If make-up work requires classroom or
laboratory attendance in a subsequent
term, the students should not register for
the course again. Instead, the student must
audit the course and pay course fees.
If the make-up work does not require
classroom or laboratory attendance, the
instructor and student should decide on an
appropriate plan and deadline for com-
pleting the course.
When the course is completed, the in-
structor will submit a change of grade to
the Office of the University Registrar.
These procedures cannot be used to repeat
a course for a different grade. An I grade
should not be assigned to a student who
never attended class; instead, instructors
may assign a failing grade, or no grade at
all, which will result in assignment of N*.


University of Florida






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Grade Point Averaging and Deficits
The term "average" refers to the grade
point average (GPA) for work completed
at the university. Grades received at other
institutions are NOT averaged with grades
received at the University of Florida for the
purpose of meeting university average
requirements. Other agencies and honor-
ary societies will compute averages in ac-
cordance with their own standards and
policies.
Averages are determined by computing
the ratio of grade points to semester hours
attempted. For the grade point average
computation formula, please refer to the
example below.
A grade point deficit is defined as the
number of grade points below a C average
on hours attempted at UF. If the grade point
average is less than 2.0, there is a grade point
deficit.
Only grades higher than C will lower a
deficit. Every credit of C+ earned removes
.5 (one-half point or point five) from a
deficit (a C+ in a three-credit course re-
moves one and one-half or 1.5 deficit
points); every credit of B removes 1 deficit
point; and every credit of A removes 2
deficit points.
Computation of a grade point deficit is
dependent upon first calculating the grade
point average. Multiply the total UF hours
carried for a grade by 2 (for 2.0 GPA) and
subtract the total grade points earned to
determine the deficit. For instance, if a
student has taken 100 hours for a grade,
then 200 grade points are needed for a
2.0 GPA. If there are 196 grade points,
there is a 4-point deficit.
Calculating Your Grade Point
Average
Multiply grade value times the number
of credit hours for total grade points.
Then divide the total number of grade
points by the number of hours carried.
(Exclude hours carried under the S-U Op-
tion.)


Calculating Your GPA and Deficit Points



U U u > U U(

AML2020 D 1.0 x 3 =3.0
PSY2013 S NA x NA =NA
SPN1110 C 2.0 x 5 =10.0
PSC1420 D 1.0 x 3 =3.0
11 16.0
16.0 divided by 11 = 1.45 GPA


Since the GPA is less than 2.0, figure the
grade point deficit as follows:
11 total credit hours multiplied by 2.0
= 22 grade points necessary for 2.0 GPA

22 minus 16 (total grade points earned)
= 6 deficit points


Grade Values
A = 4.0
B+= 3.5
B =3.0
C+= 2.5


C =2.0
D+= 1.5
D = 1.0
E = 0.0


WF =
I =
NG =
S-U =


Repeat Course Work
University of Florida course work that is
repeated is counted in the computation of
a student's UF grade point average as
many times as grades for that course are
recorded, although credit hours will be
awarded only once. However, when a stu-
dent earns a C or higher in a course, re-
peats that course and earns a C or higher
on the subsequent enrollment, the new
grade is neither computed into the UF
grade point average nor awarded addi-
tional credits.
Students who entered UF with credit for
Advanced Placement (AP) or International
Baccalaureate (IB) courses who then repeat
the equivalent course at UF will receive a
grade for the UF course and no credit for
the prior work.

Outcomes when repeated course work
involves only University of Florida
course work:
Grades Earned GPA/Credit
Computation
First grade lower Each grade
than a C computed in grade
Second grade of C point average;
or higher credit earned only
once.
First grade lower Each grade
than a C computed in grade
Second grade point average;
lower than a C credit earned only
once.
First grade of Each grade
C or higher computed in grade
Second grade point average;
lower than a C credit earned only
once.
First grade of C Only first grade
or higher computed in GPA;
Second grade of C credit earned only
or higher for first attempt

Grades received at other institutions will
not be averaged with grades received at
the University of Florida. Repeat course
work taken at the University of Florida
will result in calculation of only the UF


grade in the UF grade point average, with
credit earned only once.

Outcomes when repeat course work in-
volves transfer course work and UF
course work are as follows:
Grades Earned: Any grade combina-
tion for first and second courses, as
illustrated in the table.
Course work taken at another institu-
tion, then repeated at UF: Only UF
grade computed in grade point aver-
age; credit earned only once.
Course work taken at UF, then re-
peated at another institution: Only
UF grade computed in grade point
average; credit earned only once.
In the case where all repeated course
work was taken at other institutions, no
grades will be calculated into the UF grade
point average and credit is awarded only
once.
Repeat course equivalencies are identi-
fied based on the state's common course
taxonomy. Refer to the statewide course
numbering system in the course descrip-
tion section for the definition of course
equivalencies.
Colleges may not accept grade points
and hours earned from lower level courses
if they are taken after the student has re-
ceived credit/grades for advanced courses
or exam credit in the same field.

Grade Change Policy
Grade changes will be accepted and
processed by the Office of the University
Registrar for one calendar year after the
term in which the course was attempted.
This policy does not apply to grades of I or
I*, which designate a grade of incomplete.
Any grade changes submitted after the
deadline must be accompanied by addi-
tional supporting information or docu-
mentation justifying the extension and
submitted to the appropriate college dean.
If the dean approves the exception, he or
she will forward an authorized grade
change form to the Office of the University
Registrar.
One calendar year is specified as the
published grades due date of the same
semester in the following year.

Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory (S-U)
Grade Option
Subject to college degree program and
department guidelines, students may take
elective course work and earn grades of S
(Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). A
grade of S is equal to a C or better. Grades
earned under the S-U option do not carry
grade point values and are not computed
in the University of Florida grade point


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION


average. Such grades are included in a
student's permanent academic record and
are reflected on the transcript. Once the
S-U option is approved, students may not
revert to a letter grade.
Students should note that other aca-
demic institutions and agencies may inter-
pret a grade of "U" as a failing grade.
Students choosing the S-U option must
be in good standing and may not be on
university academic probation. To elect the
S-U option, students must obtain the ap-
provals indicated on the form. They may
elect the S-U option for only one course
each term; this option is in addition to
courses that are taught only on an S-U
basis. Courses taken to fulfill the General
Education Requirement and Writing and
Math Requirement (Gordon Rule) may not
be taken S-U.
For fall, spring and Summer C terms, the
S-U option deadline is Friday of the third
week of classes. For Summer A and Sum-
mer B terms, the deadline is Wednesday of
the second week of classes.

Academic Progress
Policies

Good Standing
The University of Florida considers a
student in good standing if he or she is
eligible to continue or to re-enroll at the
university, even if on probation.
Colleges may choose not to consider
students for admission and may deny con-
tinuation in a degree program if the stu-
dents fail to maintain reasonable academic
progress, as specified by the college or
department.
Policies on academic standing, probation
and dismissal are based on the possibility
that a student can overcome academic dif-
ficulty and make appropriate progress
toward a degree.

Regulation of Academic Standards
Regulations for academic probation and
dismissal follow the academic standards of
the university and require the maintenance
of grade point averages and reasonable
conformance to a program of study. Any
college may specify additional academic
standards and students are responsible for
observing these regulations.
The probation and dismissal regulations
that apply to undergraduate students also
apply to postbaccalaureate students. Nota-
tions on the student's academic record
shall reflect all actions taken to enforce
these regulations; some of these notations
can be permanent.


Petitions
When an academic regulation appears to
result in undue hardship, students may
petition for waiver of the regulation.
In general, petitions for waiver of an
academic regulation for the current term
should be directed to the school or college
in which the student is enrolled. For ex-
ample, petitions to drop or add after the
drop/add period should be presented to
the school or college. Exceptions to the
course load regulation are to be presented
to the school or college. Petitions approved
by the school or college must be reported
to the Office of the University Registrar
before the action is official.
All other petitions should be presented
to the Office of the University Registrar,
which will refer them to the Faculty Senate
Committee on Student Petitions. Petitions
approved by the committee will be re-
flected on the student's transcript.
Detailed information on petition proce-
dures is available from the student's col-
lege or from the Office of the University
Registrar.
The student seeking a waiver of a regula-
tion through petition must remember that
no committee on petitions can direct an
instructor to change a student's grade, nor
can the Senate Committee require any col-
lege or school to grant a degree by waiving
any regulation.


Probation
The intent of academic probation is to
serve notice formally that a student may
not be making satisfactory progress. The
conditions of academic probation are in-
tended to specify the achievement stan-
dards required to graduate, to identify
unsatisfactory academic performance at an
early date, to provide occasion for counsel-
ing, and to give students whose ultimate
success is in question further opportunity
to demonstrate their ability to meet aca-
demic expectations. Academic probation
can occur for the following reasons:
Students may be placed on probation
by their college for failure to maintain
normal academic progress in their de-
gree program. College probation will
be removed when the college deter-
mines that satisfactory academic pro-
gress has been demonstrated.
Undergraduate students with less
than a 2.0 cumulative grade point av-
erage for University of Florida course
work and a grade point deficit of
fewer than 15 shall be placed on aca-
demic probation.


* Academic probation will be continued
for all undergraduate students as long
as they have a grade point deficit of
fewer than 15. It will be removed
when the grade point deficit has been
reduced to zero. Should the grade
point deficit increase to 15 or more,
the student will be dismissed from the
university.
Dismissal
Academic dismissal from the university
denies registration privileges to students
who have a grade point deficit of 15 or
more in their UF course work. The stu-
dents will be dismissed from the univer-
sity and their advance registrations) will
be cancelled.
* Students who are dismissed will not
be permitted to enroll again unless
they complete an application for re-
admission by the application deadline
and the college approves readmission.
A student who is readmitted after
academic dismissal will be dismissed
again if his or her grade point deficit
is 15 or more at the end of any term.
Any courses, including extension,
correspondence and courses taken at
another institution while dismissed
from the University of Florida for aca-
demic reasons, will not be counted as
credit earned toward a University of
Florida degree. However, upon ap-
proved readmission, transfer credit
earned elsewhere by a student dis-
missed from UF for academic reasons
may be accepted upon recommenda-
tion of the college and approval of the
Faculty Senate Committee on Student
Petitions.

Ombudsman
The state legislature established the Of-
fice of the Ombudsman to help students
resolve problems and conflicts. The office
provides an informal avenue of redress for
students' problems and grievances that
arise in the course of interacting with the
university. By considering problems in an
unbiased way, the ombudsman works to
achieve a fair resolution and to protect the
rights of all parties involved.
When an academic regulation appears to
result in undue hardship, students may
petition for waiver of the regulation. If a
student wishes to appeal a decision of the
Faculty Senate Committee on Student Peti-
tions, the student may do so to the Univer-
sity Ombudsman in Tigert Hall, Room 31.


University of Florida






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Degrees and

Graduation

Associate of Arts Certificate
Although not required, students may re-
ceive an Associate of Arts (A.A.) certifi-
cate. The Associate of Arts must be
awarded before the bachelor's degree. The
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
awards the A.A. certificate for the univer-
sity. This certificate will be awarded upon
satisfactory completion of the following:
* 60 credits (at least 36 of the credits
must have been completed at UF).
* General education requirements.
* An overall C average.
* College Level Academic Skills Test
(CLAST) requirement.
* Required courses in the Writing and
Math Requirement.
* Students in the Honors Program who
have completed four honors courses
with at least a GPA of 3.0 will receive
the certificate cum laude or magna cum
laude, depending on their GPA.

Application forms for the A.A. certificate
are available from and should be returned
to the Office of the University Registrar by
the deadline.
Application for Degree
Undergraduates must file an Application
for Degree with the Office of the Univer-
sity Registrar by the deadline. Students
must apply in the term in which they ex-
pect to graduate, regardless of applications
in previous terms. All requirements for the
degree must be completed as of the date of
certification.
Catalog Year
Catalog year determines the set of aca-
demic requirements (general education
and the major) that must be fulfilled for
graduation. Students graduate under the
catalog in effect at the time of their initial
undergraduate enrollment as a degree-
seeking student at UF, a Florida public
community college or other Florida state
institution, provided they maintain con-
tinuous enrollment (registration for and
completion of at least one course for one
term in an academic year).
Students who do not maintain continuous
enrollment will be assigned the catalog in
effect at the time they resume enrollment.
Students with the approval of their college
dean's office may choose to graduate under
the requirements of a later catalog, but they


must fulfill all graduation requirements
from that alternative catalog year.
The university will make every reason-
able effort to honor the curriculum re-
quirements appropriate to each student's
catalog year. However, courses and pro-
grams will sometimes be discontinued and
requirements may change as a result of
curricular review or actions by accrediting
associations and other agencies.

Continuous Enrollment
Undergraduate students who register for
and complete at least one course for one
term in an academic year are continuously
enrolled.

College Dean's Certification
The dean certifies that all requirements
have been completed and that the student
has been recommended for graduation by
the faculty.

Completion Deadline To Receive a
Degree
* All residence work required for
graduation must be completed at least
24 hours before the scheduled meeting
of the college faculty voting on the
candidates for degrees.
* All extension work must be completed
at least two weeks before the sched-
uled meeting of the college faculty
voting on the candidates for degrees.

Curriculum Requirements
Students must complete all program re-
quirements established by the university,
their college, major department and minor
program of study (if applicable). Minors
are awarded only in conjunction with the
receipt of a baccalaureate degree. To de-
termine program requirements, see "Uni-
versity Requirements" in the academic
advising section of this catalog, as well as
the "Degree Requirements and Program of
Study" in the college/major section.

Foreign Language Requirement
Students must complete two sequential
courses of a foreign language in secondary
school, 8-10 semester hours at the postsec-
ondary level, or document an equivalent
level of proficiency. Students seeking a
degree must satisfy the university and
department or college (if any) foreign lan-
guage requirements. In addition, if re-
quired, they must fulfill the language
requirements of their major.


Residence Requirements
The minimum residence requirement for
the baccalaureate degree is two semesters.
At least 25 percent of the credit hours
applied toward a degree must be
earned while in residence at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
Students are required to complete the
last 30 credits toward the baccalaure-
ate degree in residence at the college
from which they will graduate.

Pending Charge of Academic
Dishonesty or Student Conduct
Violation
No degree will be conferred if a charge of
academic dishonesty or conduct violation is
pending if the penalty could be dismissal,
expulsion, failing grade or any combination
of the above, until the charge is resolved and
degree requirements are met.
Summer Term Enrollment
Students who enter a state university in
Florida with fewer than 60 credits must earn
at least nine credits before graduation dur-
ing summer terms at State University Sys-
tem institutions. Credit earned through any
of the study-abroad programs approved by
UF during a summer term counts toward
satisfaction of the summer term enrollment
requirement.
Students entering UF beginning with
Summer B 2002 are EXEMPT from the
summer requirement under the following
condition: they have earned nine hours of
credit from accelerated mechanisms, such
as the Advanced International Certificate
of Education Program, Advanced Place-
ment, International Baccalaureate or ap-
proved dual enrollment.

Diploma Replacement Fee
Each diploma ordered subsequent to a
student's initial degree application can
result in a diploma replacement charge.
Dual Degrees and Multiple Majors
Colleges, at their discretion, may permit
students to pursue dual degrees or multiple
majors. A student completing major and
college requirements in two different col-
leges will receive two degrees. The tran-
script will list each degree and the
appropriate majors. A student completing
major and college requirements in one col-
lege and only major requirements in another
college, will receive a degree from the first
college. The transcript will list the degree
and each major. A student completing mul-
tiple majors that have the same degree, i.e.,
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, will
receive a single degree. The transcript will
list the degree and each major.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






ACADEMIC ADVISING


Academic Advising
www.advising.ufl.edu
In this section:
* Academic Advising
University Responsibilities
College/School and Departmental
Responsibilities
Student Responsibilities
Progression to Graduation
Declaring a Major
Universal Tracking
Minimum Progress
Where to Go for Academic Assistance
Accelerated Programs
Combined-degree programs
Advanced Standing
Credit by Examination
AICE
Advanced Placement
International Baccalaureate
CLEP
Dual Enrollment
* University Requirements
College Level Academic Skills Test
Writing and Math Requirement
General Education Requirement
Foreign Language Requirement
* Placement
* Preprofessional Information
Pre-Law
Pre-Health
* Honors Program
* President's Honor Roll
* Study Abroad
* FAQs about Universal Tracking
* Equivalency Charts
AICE, AP, IB, CLEP credit
* Placement Charts


Academic Advising
The University of Florida is committed
to quality academic advising for all stu-
dents. The academic advising mission is to
assist students in the attainment of their
educational goals.
University Responsibilities: The Office
of the Provost is responsible for providing
students, faculty and other advising staff
with accurate information in the catalog,
Schedule of Courses, other publications and
ISIS. The faculty, administration and staff
share a responsibility to provide accurate
information and effective advice.
The Academic Advising Center (100 AAC)
is responsible for acting as an information
and referral center to provide faculty advis-
ers and undergraduate students with timely
and accurate information. In addition, the
AAC provides advice for students interested


in post-baccalaureate professional programs
such as medicine, dentistry and law.
College/School and Department Re-
sponsibilities: The dean of each college or
school ultimately is responsible for ensur-
ing that academic advice is available and
accessible to all students within the college
or school.
Student Responsibilities: Students are
responsible for knowing and fulfilling all
university, college and major requirements
for graduation. In order to meet that goal,
they are responsible for:
* attending the Preview or other orien-
tation program to receive advisement
before their first term of enrollment;
* maintaining a GatorLink e-mail ad-
dress and reading official university
correspondence sent to this address;
* meeting with an adviser in the appro-
priate college/major upon entrance to
a major;
* conferring with an adviser on a regu-
lar basis about major options if the
student is undecided about a major;
* reviewing the degree audit each se-
mester to ensure they fully understand
the remaining degree requirements;
* seeking advisement when in academic
difficulty (e.g., below a 2.0 GPA, doing
poorly in a critical-tracking course);
* maintaining their own personal aca-
demic records, including the catalog
of their year of admission to UF, tran-
scripts, degree audits, evaluation of
transfer work, and notes from previ-
ous advising sessions.
Students who at any time are confused
about academic requirements or their pro-
gress toward a degree are encouraged and
expected to meet with an adviser.


Progress to Graduation
www.advising.ufl.edu/undecided
www.isis.ufl.edu
Declaring a Major
It is the university's goal to help stu-
dents find majors that match their talents
and interests. Students are encouraged to
declare a major upon entering UF as fresh-
men. Entering students who are consider-
ing several majors should declare the
major they feel they are most likely to pur-
sue. Even if students feel confident about
their initial choice of major, they are en-
couraged to explore other majors by taking
courses in other areas of interest.
Students are affiliated with the college
that offers their desired major, allowing
UF to provide the most appropriate advis-
ing toward the chosen degree. First-year
students with no major preference can
declare one of three exploratory categories:
Humanities and Letters, Social and Behav-
ioral Sciences, or Science and Engineering
for their first three fall/spring terms. Ex-
ploratory students are affiliated with the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Students may change majors provided
they have college approval. Most of the
courses taken early in students' academic
careers meet general requirements that all
students must complete. Therefore, stu-
dents who change majors in the first year
usually progress toward graduation in a
timely fashion. The "degree shopping" fea-
ture on ISIS (www.isis.ufl.edu) allows stu-
dents to match their academic records to
the degree requirements of other majors so
that they can consider other degree op-
tions and determine what courses they
would have to take if they were to change
majors.


Drop a class The stuAdent's collegeA
Drop a class ]The student's college


Add a class The student's college
Admission to a major The college of the student's new major
Confused about a major 100 Academic Advising Center, the student's
college, or Career Resource Center
Transient status The student's college
General Education Requirement The student's college
A.A. certification 100 Academic Advising Center or the stu-
dent's college
Degree certification The student's college
Withdrawal from the university Dean of Student's Office, Peabody Hall
Correspondence Study The student's college


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


Drop a class after the deadline


The student's college






STUDENT INFORMATION


Universal Tracking
Universal Tracking (UT) is the Univer-
sity of Florida academic monitoring sys-
tem that provides students with a
recommended semester-by-semester plan
for each major to guide them toward
graduation. The recommended plan is the
optimal path for completing the degree in
four years. The recommended semester-
by-semester plan for each major appears in
the college sections of this catalog.
Students' progress toward their degree
is monitored each semester to ensure that
they are on track and to provide feedback
on their academic progress (summer terms
are not included in tracking and may be
used by students to 'catch up' and get back
on track). Each fall and spring semester,
students are reminded (via their GatorLink
e-mail account) to review their degree au-
dit on ISIS before advance registration for
the next term. The audit fits the student's
courses and grades into the degree re-
quirements to show the student which
requirements have been met and which
requirements the student still needs to
complete.
Minimum Progress
Students do not have to complete all of
the recommended courses to remain on
track; they simply have to meet certain
minimum requirements (known as critical-
tracking criteria). The critical-tracking
criteria usually include a minimum GPA
(UF or overall, depending on the college),
completion of certain courses toward the
major (critical-tracking or preprofessional
courses), and a minimum GPA in the criti-
cal-tracking courses (tracking or prepro-
fessional GPA). The minimum critical
tracking criteria for each major appear just
before the semester-by-semester plan in
the college sections. For many majors criti-
cal-tracking courses are bolded in the se-
mester-by-semester plan. In the degree
audit, critical-tracking courses are usually
preceded by the "<<" or "##" symbols.
All incoming freshmen are monitored
for Semester 1 critical-tracking criteria,
regardless of the number of hours earned
by the student through dual enrollment
and credit by examination.
Exploratory students must declare a ma-
jor before they can register for their fourth
fall/spring semester. In their first three
terms, such students should explore poten-
tial majors by taking one or more critical-
tracking courses for those majors.
A student who is off-track (fails to meet
the minimum criteria for a specific term)
is notified by the university. An academic
hold is placed on the student's record, and


the student must meet with an adviser
before registering for the next term in or-
der to 1) determine what is necessary to
get back on track by the end of the next
term, or 2) change to a more appropriate
major.
If the student is off-track for two con-
secutive terms, the student must change to
a major more appropriate to the student's
goals and performance. Once the student
selects a new major, he or she should con-
tact the college offering that major to
schedule an appointment with an adviser to
discuss changing the major. The Academic
Advising Center (100 AAC) can help stu-
dents identify potential majors and refer
students to the appropriate colleges) for
information about specific majors.

Accelerated Programs
Combined Bachelor's and Master's
Degrees
www.isis.ufl.edu/cdpl.html
UF has developed a program for under-
graduate students that allows those who
qualify academically to obtain both a
bachelor's and master's degree. Minimum
qualifications for many programs include
a 3.2 GPA and an 1100 GRE for admission
to Graduate School.
Combined-degree programs allow stu-
dents to get a head start on their graduate
education by taking graduate courses
throughout the junior and senior under-
graduate years. In most programs, 12
credit hours of graduate work will also
count toward an undergraduate degree,
thus reducing the time it takes to get both
degrees. Able students should consult
their departmental adviser to determine
whether the department offers combined
degree programs and whether they qual-
ify.
The following list provides some advan-
tages of a combined-degree program:
Qualified students can obtain an un-
dergraduate and a graduate degree in
much less time than two separate de-
grees.
The cost of both degrees is reduced,
since at least 12 credits apply toward
both degrees.
Students have time to decide whether
to pursue further graduate or profes-
sional study.
Students' marketability is greatly en-
hanced; many professions now re-
quire a master's degree for entry-level
positions.
Program provides continuity between
undergraduate and graduate studies.


There are a number of financial consid-
erations students should keep in mind.
The Bright Futures Scholarship Program
will fund graduate tuition at the under-
graduate level students are responsible
for paying the difference between under-
graduate and graduate tuitions.
Florida PrePaid College Tuition Program
participants will receive funding for the
first 120 credit hours. The program will
fund graduate courses taken toward the
undergraduate degree at the undergradu-
ate level. Financial aid may be available to
assist with the graduate degree portion of
the program.
The Graduate Catalog can provide addi-
tional information. A list of combined-degree
programs is available on ISIS, which also
provides a timeline and an application form
(www.isis.ufl.edu/cdpl.html).
New programs are being developed; re-
fer to department Web sites for additional
combined degrees.

Advanced Standing
Credit by Examination
A student may participate in several
credit-by-examination programs to earn
credit toward a degree. The following
guidelines apply to all credit by examina-
tion:
A maximum of 30 semester hours may
be granted by combining AICE, AP, IB
and CLEP credit.
Students beginning in the fall or
spring term must have taken the ex-
ams (AICE, AP, IB, CLEP) and have
their scores reported to the university
before enrolling or, at the latest, before
the end of the first term of enrollment
at UF.
Students who begin in the summer
must have taken the exam(s) and had
the scores reported before the end of
their first fall term.
If the student submits appropriate scores,
UF will grant credit and post approximate
course equivalencies to the student's UF
transcript (course equivalency charts for
AICE, AP, IB and CLEP scores are pub-
lished at the end of this section. Equivalent
courses earned by examination generally
fulfill the same requirements that the UF
course fulfills.
Information on General Education and
the Writing and Math Requirement
(Gordon Rule) credit is listed in the course
equivalency charts published at the end of
this section.


University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING


* Advanced International
Certificate of Education Program
(AICE)
Students completing AICE examinations
should submit to UF official scores as evi-
dence of completion of a college-level course
taken in high school. Students' scores will be
evaluated and, if they meet minimum re-
quirements, the student will receive credit
for approximate UF course equivalencies
that will appear on the student's UF tran-
script. The AICE Score-Course Equivalency
Chart at the end of this section indicates the
approximate UF course equivalencies that
will appear on the student's UF transcript,
and the appropriate General Education and
Writing and Math requirement credit stu-
dents will earn.
Advanced Placement Program
(AP)
Students completing AP examinations
should submit to UF official scores as evi-
dence of completion of a college-level course
taken in high school. The AP Score-Course
Equivalency chart at the end of this section
indicates the approximate UF course equiva-
lencies that will appear on the student's UF
transcript, and the appropriate General
Education and Writing and Math require-
ment credit students will earn.
Scores of 3 or higher on AP French,
German, Latin and Spanish fulfill the for-
eign language proficiency requirement of
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the
College of Journalism, and B.A. programs
in the College of Fine Arts.
International Baccalaureate
Program (IB)
Students completing IB examinations
should submit to UF official scores as evi-
dence of completion of a college-level
course taken in high school. Students re-
ceiving the IB diploma may receive credit
for scores of 4 or higher on both higher-
level and standard-level examinations.
Students who do not receive the IB di-
ploma will receive credit for scores of 5 or
higher on higher- level examinations only.
The IB Score-Course Equivalency chart at
the end of this section indicates the ap-
proximate UF course equivalencies that
will appear on the student's UF transcript,
and the appropriate General Education
and Writing and Math requirement credit
students will earn.
Scores of 4 or higher in IB French B,
German B, Classical Latin and Spanish B
fulfill the foreign language proficiency
requirement of the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences, the College of Journalism
and B.A. programs in the College of Fine


Arts, regardless of whether the student has
earned the IB diploma.
* College Level Examination
Program (CLEP)
CLEP examinations cover material that
is taught in introductory-level courses at
many colleges and universities. For a list
of CLEP examinations, credit earned and
UF course equivalencies, refer to the charts
at the end of this section. The CLEP Web
site provides information on the examina-
tions: www.collegeboard.com/clep.

Credit will be awarded only once for the
same subject, whether from credit by examina-
tion, dual enrollment, transfer credit, or UF
course credit. UF course credit takes prece-
dence over all other forms of credit for the same
course. Credit awarded for acceptable dual-
enrollment or transfer courses takes precedence
over credit by examination. If duplicate credit
exists among AICE, AP, IB or CLEP, the exam
yielding the most credit will be awarded.

Dual Enrollment
Consult the Academic Regulations sec-
tion of this catalog for complete informa-
tion on transfer credit. In general, students
may transfer up to 60 credit hours from
community colleges as part of the hours
needed for their UF degrees, regardless of
when these hours are earned, but subject
to university and college degree require-
ments. It is the prerogative of the student's
college to determine how transfer credit
satisfies the specific degree's course re-
quirements. Students are required to sub-
mit to the Office of Admission final official
transcripts from all institutions attended
before or during their enrollment at UF.

Credit from Florida public community
colleges and state universities:
Courses from Florida public community
colleges and State University System
schools generally adhere to the Statewide
Course Numbering System. If the prefix
(first three letters) and the last three digits
of the course number are the same, then
the course is considered equivalent (refer
to Florida's Statewide Course Numbering
System in the course description section of
this catalog for more details).
Equivalent courses will generally fulfill
the same requirements (e.g. General Educa-
tion) that the UF course fulfills. However,
whether a course fulfills the Writing and
Math Requirement is determined by specific
criteria, not course number equivalency.


Courses from private or out-of-state
institutions:
College credit from private or out-of-
state institutions earned through a dual-
enrollment program will no longer transfer
to UF if the courses) completed through
dual enrollment were used to meet high
school graduation requirements. In order
for their credit to be eligible for transfer to
the university, students must provide a let-
ter from their high school stating that the
courses they completed through dual en-
rollment were not used to fulfill secondary
graduation requirements.
Courses taken at private and out-of-state
institutions need to be evaluated by the
student's college to determine if they will
fulfill specific requirements.

University Requirements
College Level Academic Skills Test
(CLAST)
CLAST is designed to test the communica-
tion and computation skills judged by state
university and community college faculty as
necessary for successful performance and
progression through the baccalaureate level.
Passing scores on the test, or satisfaction
through approved alternatives, are required
by Florida statutes and the State Board of
Education. Students can determine whether
they have satisfied this requirement by look-
ing at their degree audit on ISIS at
www.isis.ufl.edu.
The test is administered three times a
year to university students as well as to
community college students who are com-
pleting either Associate of Arts or Associ-
ate of Science degrees and are seeking
admission to programs in state universities
in Florida. Transfer students who do not
satisfactorily complete the test (or its ap-
proved alternatives) will not be admitted.
CLAST also applies to students transfer-
ring to Florida state universities from Flor-
ida private colleges and out-of-state
colleges.
Transfer students with fewer than 96
semester hours must satisfy the CLAST
requirement by the end of the first term of
enrollment. Transfer applicants with more
than 96 hours must have satisfied the
CLAST requirement before admission to
the university.
The Office of Academic Technology in
Turlington Hall, Room 1012, coordinates
information and registration for CLAST
(www.at.ufl.edu). Registration for UF
course work and awarding of the A.A.
certificate after earning 60 hours are con-
tingent upon satisfaction of CLAST.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION


Writing and Math Requirement
(Gordon Rule)
The State of Florida requires that all stu-
dents complete the Writing and Math Re-
quirement as described below. Students
must earn a grade of C or higher in courses
taken to fulfill the Writing and Math Re-
quirement. Such courses may not be taken
S-U.
AICE, AP, IB and CLEP examination
credit may count toward the Writing and
Math Requirement. Consult the charts at the
end of this section for more information.
Writing
To graduate, students must complete
courses that involve substantial writing for
a total of 24,000 words. Courses that count
toward this requirement will be in one of
three categories:
* course work with at least 2,000 words.
* course work with at least 4,000 words.
* course work with at least 6,000 words.
The Schedule of Courses identifies the
courses, sections and amount of writing
credit awarded.
The writing in such courses will be
evaluated on effectiveness, organization,
clarity and coherence as well as the gram-
mar, punctuation and usage of standard
written English.
Math
Each student must complete six credits
of course work in mathematics, at or above
the level of college algebra:
three credits in mathematics, and
an additional three credits in mathe-
matics, statistics, computer science, or
the logic courses PHI 2100 or PHI
3130. Acceptable course prefixes in-
clude: CAP, CDA, CEN, CGS, CIS,
COP, COT, MAA, MAC, MAD, MAP,
MAS, MAT, MGF, MHF, MTG, and
STA.
Students should verify that a course
meets the math requirement by checking
for the M code in the "CC" column of the
Schedule of Courses. CGS 3063 may not be
used to satisfy this requirement.
General Education Requirement
All undergraduate students (except
those transferring to UF with an A.A. de-
gree from a Florida public community
college or an A.A. degree from a Florida
public state university) are required to
complete the 36-hour General Education
requirement to graduate.
Common collective knowledge about the
world enables us to communicate, to make
informed decisions about many aspects of
our lives, to understand and to participate


fully as informed citizens in local, national
and global matters.
By attaining competency in composition,
the humanities, physical and biological
sciences, mathematics and social and be-
havioral sciences, we can better under-
stand ourselves, our neighbors, other
cultures and times, and the principles gov-
erning the natural world and the universe.
In general education courses, students gain
fresh perspectives, methods and tools for
understanding the traditional and the
newly discovered.
The general education program requires
courses in the following areas shown on the
next page. Courses for the General Educa-
tion requirement may not be taken S-U.
Area Credits
Com position (C) .......................................... 3
Mathematical Sciences (M) *........................6
Humanities (H) ......................................9
Social and Behavioral Sciences (S) .............9
Physical (P) and Biological (B) Sciences ....9
International /Diversity Focus (I)-
Six credits taken in conjunction with H, S,
P or B
Total Credit Requirements: ................36

Three of the six credits must be ap-
proved mathematics courses.
Certain classes offer general education
credit in more than one category (the same
class may count as a "C" or an "H", for
example). In these classes, a student may
CHOOSE which ONE category he or she
wants the class to count for. One class
may not count for multiple general educa-
tion categories, except for "I" credits,
which may be earned concurrently with
other credits. For example, a student may
earn both a "C" and an "I" credit or both
an "H" and an "I" credit for a single class,
but not both a "C" and an "H" credit.
Composition
Writing is one of the most important
skills students need to communicate effec-
tively during their professional careers and
lives. Composition courses focus on meth-
ods of writing, conventions of standard
written English, reading and comprehen-
sion skills, and techniques in production of
effective texts for readers in varied situa-
tions. "C" designated courses are writing-
intensive, require multiple drafts submit-
ted to the instructor for feedback prior to
final submission, and fulfill 6,000 of the
university's 24,000-word writing require-
ment.
Mathematical Sciences
Courses in mathematical sciences help
students acquire concepts and skills in
logic, inductive and deductive reasoning,


and abstract and quantitative thinking.
Students also learn to reason critically,
solve problems creatively, assess statistical
evidence, use technology effectively and
form conclusions.
Students must take at least three hours
of approved mathematics courses; the
other three credits can be from approved
courses such as statistics and computer
science courses outside the math depart-
ment.
Humanities
The humanities requirement enables
students to think critically about what art-
ists and thinkers (past and present) have to
teach us about the non-material qualities
of human beings and human values. In
courses in the arts and humanities, stu-
dents become acquainted with the endur-
ing products-in words, sounds, paint,
stone, metal and many other media-in
which thoughtful and gifted human beings
have attempted to meet our individual and
collective needs for emotional, spiritual
and intellectual fulfillment.
Arts and humanities courses address
major intellectual, cultural and aesthetic
achievements. Students consider questions
of ultimate meaning and study human
activities, artifacts and values in the con-
text of the ages in which they were pro-
duced.
Social and Behavioral Sciences
In the social and behavioral sciences,
students investigate human behavior in its
social context. Students analyze the charac-
teristics and structure of individuals, fami-
lies, groups and institutions to develop an
understanding of the human species. Often
using scientific and quantitative methods,
students examine the processes and means
by which participants in society make per-
sonal and group decisions.
Natural Sciences -
Physical and Biological Sciences
Courses in the natural sciences introduce
students to the basic concepts of science
and the scientific method and enhance
awareness of scientific developments and
their impact on society and the environ-
ment. This area provides students with an
understanding of scientific terms, concepts
and theories, and the ability to formulate
empirically testable hypotheses derived
from the study of physical processes and
living things.
International/Diversity Focus
The United States is part of the global
community and is increasingly diverse as a
nation. The international and diversity
requirement provides basic concepts and
tools to help students understand and ap-


University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING


preciate diversity among people. Courses
focus on diversity among nations (the in-
ternational component) and within a na-
tion (including the United States). This
includes differences such as gender, class,
race, ethnicity, sexuality or culture.
Courses meeting this requirement may
make students aware of non-Western in-
fluences or they may immerse students in
a culture quite different from mainstream
U.S. culture. These courses give students
new lenses through which to view, and
thereby understand, people and world
events.
Six credits of course work must have an
international or diversity focus. Courses in
this category will always fulfill another
Gen Ed category as well.
Study abroad courses can apply toward
this six-hour requirement, in addition to
fulfilling credit in other categories. Such
courses must be approved in advance by a
department adviser, certified by the UF
International Center (UFIC) and taken in a
foreign setting.
SIdentifying General Education
Courses
All general education courses are identi-
fied at the back of the catalog under de-
partment course listings. General Education
courses have a letter designations) after the
course entry, which corresponds to the first
letter of the Gen Ed category. For example:
AMH 2010, United States to 1877, fulfills
three credits in the Humanities (H) category.
In addition, the Schedule of Courses in-
cludes a list of all courses that fulfill each
category as well as the department that
teaches the course. General Education
courses are also designated by code in the
Course Listings section of the Schedule of
Courses (consult the "G.E." column).
SSelecting General Education
Courses
Students should choose general educa-
tion courses appropriate to their particular
major. Some majors require or recom-
mend specific general education courses.
Refer to the major's semester-by-semester
plan in the college section of this catalog
for specific information. In addition, stu-
dents in some colleges may increase their
hours in humanities, social and behavioral
sciences, or physical and biological sci-
ences by three hours (for a total of 12 hours
in that category) and take only six hours in
either of the other two categories. Again,
students should refer to the major informa-
tion in the college section to determine if
this option is available to them.
Students can take courses at the 1000 to
4000 level; in most colleges, students can


complete the General Education require-
ments throughout their undergraduate
experience. First-year students generally
take introductory classes to complete area
requirements. Those who have the aca-
demic background and the interest can
take more advanced classes, but they
should first consult an academic adviser.
Requirements M (mathematical sci-
ences), P (physical sciences) and B (bio-
logical sciences) include the study of pure
science (e.g., physics, chemistry and calcu-
lus) and their technological applications
(e.g., nuclear energy, environmental sci-
ence and computer theory). Students
should pursue a balanced program of pure
and applied sciences to complete these
requirements. Students should remember
that three of the six credits for the mathe-
matical sciences requirement must be in
approved mathematics courses.
* How Incoming Credits Apply to
General Education
AICE, AP, IB or CLEP credit counts to-
ward completion of the General Education
requirement as indicated in the course
equivalency charts at the end of this sec-
tion.
Acceptable dual enrollment and other
transfer credit will fulfill the General Edu-
cation requirements that the same UF
course fulfills if the course is equivalent.
Courses from Florida public community
colleges and State University System
schools generally adhere to the Statewide
Course Numbering System. If the prefix
(first three letters) and the last three digits
of the course number are the same, then
the course is considered equivalent (refer
to Florida's Statewide Course Numbering
System in the course description section of
this catalog for more details).
If the course does not have a common-
numbered equivalent at UF (either because
UF does not offer the course or because the
transfer course was not taken in the state
system), then the student's college needs
to evaluate the course to determine
whether it fulfills a General Education area
requirement.
Foreign Language Requirement
Students must complete two sequential
courses of a foreign language in secondary
school, 8-10 semester hours at the postsec-
ondary level, or document an equivalent
level of proficiency. Some degrees have
specific foreign language requirements.
Students must meet major and college
requirements in addition to the University
Foreign Language requirement in order to
earn a degree.


Placement
Placement is an assessment of a stu-
dent's level of preparation in a subject. The
purpose of placement is to help students
enroll in the courses in which they are
most likely to be successful. The following
courses commonly taken by incoming stu-
dents require placement. They include:
* Calculus 1 (MAC 2311 and MAC 2233)
* General Chemistry (CHM 2045)
* French, German, Latin and Spanish (if
the student has studied them previ-
ously)

Who needs to check placement require-
ments for these courses?
* Calculus and Chemistry. Students
who are pre-health or intend to pursue
a science or engineering major probably
need to take these courses. Students
should check the semester-by-semester
plan for each major of interest in the
college section of this catalog.
* College-level foreign language is
required by several colleges: Liberal
arts and sciences and B.A. programs in
fine arts have a proficiency require-
ment; students in journalism may
choose language proficiency as an op-
tion.

What are placement requirements for
each of these areas?
1. Calculus 1 (MAC 2233 and MAC 2311)
www.math.ufl.edu/courses/advising
The Mathematics Department offers two
calculus 1 courses: MAC 2233 (Survey of
Calculus 1) and MAC 2311 (Analytical
Geometry and Calculus 1). To find out if a
Calculus 1 course (and which course is
required for the major), students should
check the semester-by-semester plan for
that major in the college section of this
catalog.
Students who need to take a Calculus 1
course are required to take the online
Calculus Readiness Assessment BEFORE
registering in Calculus 1 unless they have
one of the backgrounds listed below. The
Calculus Readiness Assessment is de-
signed to help determine which UF
course a student should start with. Stu-
dents can find the Calculus Readiness
Assessment on the ISIS homepage
(www.isis.ufl.edu, click on "Calculus
Readiness Assessment" under "Hot
Links").
Students with the following back-
grounds do not need to complete the Cal-
culus Readiness Assessment.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION


* A score of 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Calcu-
lus AB or BC exam,
* A score 6 or 7 on the IB Math Meth-
ods exam,
* A score of 4, 5, 6, or 7 on the IB
higher-level mathematics exam.
Students who have received AP or IB
credit for calculus should consult the
Mathematics Department's Web site at
www.math.ufl.edu/courses/advising for
information about continuing in the calcu-
lus sequence. Information about calculus
placement for students with AP credit also
appears at the end of this section.
For students who need to enroll in MAC
2233, college credit for the following
courses is also acceptable as placement
into MAC 2233:
* Credit with a grade of C or better in
MAC 1147 (Pre-Calculus Algebra and
Trigonometry), OR
* Credit with a C or better in MAC 1140
(Pre-Calculus Algebra).
For students who need to enroll in MAC
2311, college credit for the following
courses is also acceptable as placement
into MAC 2311:
* Credit with a C or better in MAC 1147
(Pre-Calculus Algebra and Trigo-
nometry), OR
* Credit with a C or better in both MAC
1140 (Pre-Calculus Algebra) AND
MAC 1114 (Trigonometry).
Students will be advised about selecting
an appropriate mathematics course based
on their Calculus Readiness Assessment
along with other factors such as high
school math background and SAT or ACT
quantitative scores. The sole purpose of
the assessment is to help students and ad-
visers plan a course of study that will op-
timize each student's likelihood of success
in calculus. The assessment score will NOT
become a permanent record on a student's
transcript.
Although a low assessment score will
not prevent a student from registering for
calculus, students who enroll in a course
beyond that indicated by their assessment
results are much more likely to withdraw
from the course or earn below a C grade.
The Mathematics Department strongly
urges students to heed the recommenda-
tion of their adviser.

2. General Chemistry
The general chemistry sequence meets
the preprofessional requirements for a
broad range of science and engineering
majors. The general chemistry sequence is
CHM 2045 and 2045L; 2046 and 2046L.
Students who enroll in general chemistry


courses must have a functional command
of high school chemistry and Algebra 2.
Students with weak backgrounds should
enroll in CHM 1025, Introduction to
Chemistry, to prepare for CHM 2045,
General Chemistry. Students who enroll
in, and successfully complete, CHM 1025
can enroll in CHM 2045 the next semester.
To assess their background and determine
whether to take CHM 1025 or CHM 2045:
* Students must complete the online
Chemistry Readiness Exam (ChRA)
(www.isis.ufl.edu) to determine
whether they should enroll in CHM
1025, Introduction to Chemistry, or
may enroll in CHM 2045, General
Chemistry.
* Students will be advised which course
to take based on their Chemistry
Readiness Exam score along with fac-
tors such as high school math and
chemistry background and SAT or
ACT Quantitative exam scores. The
students' intended majors may also be
a factor in determining the appropri-
ate chemistry course (based on the
background recommended for that
major/program).
AP and IB scores may also be used for
placement. Students with AP or IB
scores in chemistry should consult
the course equivalency charts that fol-
low and then discuss their next chem-
istry course with an adviser.
Although a low-assessment score will not
prevent a student from registering for CHM
2045, General Chemistry, students who en-
roll in a course beyond that indicated by
their ChRA assessment results are much
more likely to withdraw from the course or
earn below a C grade. The Chemistry De-
partment strongly urges students to heed
the placement recommendations.
Students wishing to enroll in CHM 2047,
one semester General Chemistry, and the
co-requisite CHM 2047L must meet all
three of the following conditions:
AP or IB credit in chemistry or a very
strong high school background in
chemistry,
a high score on the AP, IB or SAT II
chemistry test, and
the approval of the Honors Program
Office or the Chemistry Department.

3. Foreign Languages: French, German,
Latin, Spanish
Students who have previous back-
ground in one of these languages and who
wish to enroll in the same language at UF
must demonstrate placement. Such stu-


dents should take the SAT II placement
exam for the appropriate language (unless
the student has AICE, AP, or IB scores for
that subject). A schedule of SAT II
placement exams is online at
www.at.ufl.edu/testing/placement.html.
Consult the charts at the end of this section
to determine placement based on SAT II,
AICE, AP, or IB scores.
In general, language placement is de-
termined by a combination of placement
scores and high school background in the
language.

Preprofessional Information
Pre-Law
www.advising.ufl.edu/prelaw
Although there is no pre-law major at
the University of Florida, most law schools
agree that a broad, liberal, diverse, and
challenging education is the best prepara-
tion for law school. Taking difficult
courses from demanding instructors is the
best generic preparation for legal educa-
tion. Pre-law students must develop ana-
lytic and problem-solving skills, critical
reading abilities, writing skills, oral com-
munication and listening abilities, research
skills, and organization and priority man-
agement skills. In short, pre-law students
should register for demanding courses that
challenge them to read, write, and think
critically.
Pre-law students are encouraged to con-
sult the pre-law Web site. After reviewing
the Web site, students should attend a pre-
law workshop and make individual advis-
ing appointments with a pre-law adviser
in the Academic Advising Center.
Pre-law students are encouraged to care-
fully assess their interest in and motivation
for attending law school. The pre-law
timeline, featured on the web site, encour-
ages students to "shadow" attorneys, con-
duct informational interviews, complete
internships, and speak to admission offi-
cers to learn about law schools and the
legal profession. Students should also con-
sider studying overseas, writing an honors
thesis, and getting involved in leadership
opportunities. These activities will en-
hance the depth and value of their under-
graduate education and may also
distinguish them from other top law
school applicants.
Pre-Health
www.advising.ufl.edu/prehealth
Students intending to go to medical,
dental, veterinary medical, optometry,
podiatry or chiropractic school may choose
almost any major; however, these students
should not pursue majors that prepare


University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING


them for specific health professions such
as therapeutic recreation, physical therapy,
occupational therapy, nursing or phar-
macy.
All students considering medical, dental,
veterinary medical, optometry, podiatry or
chiropractic school should review the Health
Professions Handbook, available online at
www.advising.ufl.edu/prehealth.
Students also are encouraged to attend
workshops offered by the Academic Ad-
vising Center. Health profession work-
shops for first- and second-year students
are offered in the fall semester. Application
workshops are offered in the spring for
students who are in the process of apply-
ing to a professional school. An interview
workshop is offered early in the fall for
those who have already applied. For more
information on workshops or to meet with
a pre-health professions adviser, contact
the Academic Advising Center.
Pre-health students should plan to
complete the following courses. It is im-
portant to note that some health profes-
sions do not require all of these courses,
and some require more. Also, require-
ments vary from program to program, so
students should carefully investigate the
requirements of the institutions to which
they plan to apply.
Mathematics: At least two semesters of
college-level mathematics; one semester of
calculus (MAC 2311 or 3472) is recom-
mended. Some medical schools stipulate
additional calculus courses.
General Chemistry: CHM 2045-2046 and
2045L-2046L; or CHM 2045-2051 and CHM
2045L-2046L; or CHM 2047 and 2047L.
Organic Chemistry: CHM 2210-2211 and
2211L; CHM 3217-3218 and CHM 2211L.
Biochemistry: One semester is recom-
mended by most professional schools and
required by many medical schools. BCH
4024 or CHM 4207.
Physics: PHY 2053-2054 and PHY 2053L-
2054L; or PHY 2048-2049 and PHY 2048L-
2049L or PHY 2060-2061 and PHY 2048L-
2049L.
Biology: BSC 2010-2011 and BSC 2010L-
2011L.
English: At least two semesters at the
college level. Some medical schools require
three courses in English with emphasis on
composition. Many medical schools do not
stipulate whether their English require-
ments are for composition or literature
courses, but composition courses are rec-
ommended to strengthen communication
skills and help prepare for admission tests.


Additional Course Requirements:
Pre-veterinary students should take:
ANS 3006C Introduction to Animal Sci-
ence
ANS 3440 Principles of Animal Nutrition
PCB 3063 Genetics or AGR 3303
MCB 3020-3020L Basic Biology of Micro-
organisms and Lab
STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics
Pre-optometry students should take:
PSY 2012 General Psychology, plus an
additional psychology course
MCB 3020-3020L Basic Biology of
Microorganisms and Lab
STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics
Also recommended are:
PET 2320C Applied Human Anatomy
PET 2350C Applied Human Physiology
Pre-dental students must take (if plan-
ning on applying to UF's College of Den-
tistry):
BCH 4024 or CHM 4207
MCB 3020-3020L Microbiology
PSY 2012 General Psychology
PCB 3063 Genetics or AGR 3303
Also recommended:
PCB 5235 Immunology and courses in
other social and behavioral sciences

Correspondence Study at the
University of Florida
www.CorrespondenceStudy.ufl.edu
Undergraduate courses are offered for
college credit through Correspondence
Study at the Division of Continuing Edu-
cation (DCE). The Division of Continuing
Education at the University of Florida pro-
vides flexible educational opportunities for
students who have the following:
* conflicting schedules,
* need to meet general education or
writing and math requirements,
* need to meet course prerequisites,
* a desire for professional development
or personal enrichment.
Students attending UF must have prior
approval from their academic adviser in
their college before enrolling in a corre-
spondence study course. To seek approval,
meet with your academic adviser.
Students may not apply more than six
semester hours of correspondence credit
toward a UF degree.
Students can enroll for courses by mail,
fax, in person, or online. Registering for
courses via correspondence study does not
require a transcript of previous academic
work, nor does the student need to apply


or be admitted to the University of Florida
to earn college credit. Correspondence
study has continuous enrollment and does
not follow the academic calendar.
Once enrolled, students have 16 weeks
from the date of enrollment (the equivalent
of one semester) to complete their course
work. If the course work has not been
completed after 16 weeks, a grade of "H"
(deferred) will be assigned. If more time is
needed to complete the course, an addi-
tional 16 weeks will be allowed. Should
the course remain incomplete at the end of
the second 16-week period, an "I" (Incom-
plete) will be assigned. After an "I" has
been recorded on the student transcript, it
can be changed only with special permis-
sion from the instructor. If the "I" is not
changed, it will be calculated in the stu-
dent's GPA as an "E" (failing) in compli-
ance with university policy.
Courses are available in print or online,
and often include an interactive CD-Rom.
For a free catalog, contact UF/DCE, 2209
NW 13th Street, Gainesville, FL 32611,
352-392-1711, e-mail: leam@dce.ufl.edu.

Honors Program
www.honors.ufl.edu
This is an invitation-only program for
students who have shown potential for
superior academic performance. After ad-
mission to the university, invitations are
sent to all students who have scored 1380
or above on the SAT or 32 composite on
the ACT. Honors program candidates also
must have an academic high school grade
point average of 3.9 or higher, as com-
puted by the university. Honors program
students are eligible for special honors
classes and housing in the Honors Resi-
dential College at Hume Hall, which
opened in Fall 2002.
To remain in the program, students must
enroll in at least one honors course each
semester until they achieve junior standing
(60 or more earned hours) or complete
four semesters and maintain an overall
grade point average of 3.0. For more in-
formation, explore the Honors' Web site.
Students who do not qualify may apply
for the program after demonstrating their
academic capabilities during the fall se-
mester of their first year. Honors require-
ments are not in addition to general
education requirements, but may be used
to satisfy these requirements. The small
classes and the academic ability of the stu-
dents make possible more thorough in-
quiry into course materials and more
independent work. Students enhance their
.skills through extensive reading, writing
and oral presentations.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION


Students who satisfy the Honors Pro-
gram requirements with a 3.0 overall aver-
age, complete the General Education
requirement, and earn 60 semester hours
will receive the Associate of Arts certificate
with cum laude recognition. Those with a
3.5 overall grade point average will receive
the certificate with magna cum laude recog-
nition. Students may also apply to receive
a certificate of completion of the program.
After the sophomore year, the honors
program becomes the responsibility of the
department in which the student pursues a
major. Honors programs within each col-
lege lead to a baccalaureate degree with
cum laude, magna cum laude or summa cum
laude recognition.

President's Honor Roll
Students who achieve a perfect 4.0 GPA
with full time enrollment of graded aca-
demic work (no S-U) in the fall or spring
semesters will receive recognition on the
President's Honor Roll. Each student so
honored will receive the President's Honor
Roll certificate.


Study Abroad
www.ufic.ufl.edu
Overseas Studies, within the UF Interna-
tional Center (UFIC), offers UF students
the opportunity to study in a wide range
of academic and cultural settings. The of-
fice coordinates 32 semester- and year-long
programs, and 28 summer programs in 24
countries. Subject areas include language,
culture and history; marine, forest and
tropical ecology; environmental engineer-
ing; business and public relations; fine arts;
journalism; architecture; and wildlife man-
agement. Study abroad programs satisfy
the general education international studies
and diversity requirement and also may
fulfill requirements for a major or minor,
as well as general education area require-
ments and UF summer residency.


UFIC coordinates with government and
university agencies to provide an evalua-
tion of international student financial
statements, assistance in immigration mat-
ters, the issuance of IAP-66s and I-20s and
counseling on academic, financial and cul-
tural issues (including mental health coun-
seling). UFIC also sponsors community
relations programs, orientation programs
and cross-cultural workshops. UFIC is the
liaison with foreign and domestic embas-
sies, consulates, foundations and U.S. gov-
ernment agencies.
UFIC is located in Grinter Hall, Room
123. For more information, contact Univer-
sity of Florida International Center, P.O.
Box 113225, Gainesville, FL 32611-3225;
352-392-5323; fax 352-392-5575; e-mail:
ossrecp@nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu.


University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING

Frequently Asked Questions About Universal Tracking
What is Universal Tracking?
* Universal Tracking (UT) is the University of Florida's academic monitoring system. The system requires students to complete
courses designated as critical-tracking courses with the required GPA in the semester or semesters in which the course is indicated
in order to be on track for the designated major.
* Critical-tracking courses are designated on the degree audit for each major in ISIS (www.isis.ufl.edu) by the <<< or ### symbols.

What is the purpose of monitoring Universal Tracking?
* The purpose of universal tracking is to allow students the freedom to explore majors and to receive feedback on their progress in the
major in order to find the best academic path to complete their degree.

How does UT help students find the best major?
* Each fall and spring semester, prior to advance registration, the UT system reviews the academic progress of each student and
places an academic HOLD on students not meeting minimum academic standards for their chosen major.
* UT HOLDS impede registration and require students to consult with an adviser before registering.
* Advisers assist students in finding majors appropriate to their talents and interests.

How does a student stay ON Track for his/her chosen major?
* Complete the critical-tracking courses indicated by <<< or ### for each semester on your ISIS Degree Audit and listed in the catalog.

How are students notified if they are OFF Track for their major?
* The Office of the University Registrar notifies students. Students also may review their HOLDS on ISIS (www.isis.ufl.edu).

How can a student find out what the tracking criteria are for other majors?
* Access ISIS (www.isis.ufl.edu) to explore the requirements for different majors.
* Speak with an adviser in the college that offers the majors.
* Speak with an adviser in the Academic Advising Center (AAC).
* View the semester-by-semester plans for each major in the college section of the undergraduate catalog.

How does the UT hold affect students?
* UT HOLDS applied prior to advance registration prevent a student from registering without first consulting with an adviser to de-
velop an academic plan to complete the critical-tracking courses for the current major.
* UT HOLDS applied at the end of the semester for poor academic performance for two consecutive semesters require the student to
see an adviser prior to the next term of enrollment to select a new major and avoid cancellation of enrollment.

How many terms can a student be off track for the same major?
* A student off track for two consecutive fall and spring semesters must see an adviser to select a more appropriate major.

How does a student change majors?
* Contact the advising office of the college that offers the major in which you wish to reclassify.

What other resources are available to assist students in selecting a new major?
* Academic Advising Center advisers will discuss with you the various majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, as well as
in other colleges.
* The Counseling Center, located in Peabody Hall, Room 301, 392-1575, www.counsel.ufl.edu
* The Career Resource Center, located in the Reitz Union (www.crc.ufl.edu), offers workshops or other assistance to help you find a
new major.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION





More information about AICE, including recent test information guides, can be found at http://ntisOl.ets.org/onyx/cbtguide.htm.
For advising on AICE, go to www.advising.ufl.edu/aice.
E\am Title Equivalencies General Education Credit
Art and Design A Level ART 2305C and 0301(6 credits)
Art and Design AS Level ART 2305C (3 credits)
Biology A Level BSC 2007, 2009L and 2010, 2010L (8 credits) B
Biology AS Level BSC 2007, 2009L (4 credits) B
Chemistry A Level CHM 1020, 0301L and 2045, 2045L (8 credits) P
Chemistry AS Level CHM 1020, 0301L (4 credits) P
Computing A Level CGS 0301 and CIS 0301 (6 credits) M
Computing AS Level CGS 0301 (3 credits) M
Economics A Level* ECO 2013 and 2023 (6 credits) S
Economics AS Level* ECO 0301 (3 credits) S
English Language A Level* ENC 1101 and 1102 (6 credits) (ENC 1101, C only) C or H
English Language AS Level* ENC 1101 (3 credits) C
English Literature A Level* AML 2070 and ENL 2022 (6 credits) C or H
English Literature AS Level* AML 2070 (3 credits) C or H
Environmental Science AS Level EES 3000 (3 credits) B
French A Level FRE 2200 and 2201 (6 credits)
French AS Level FRE 2200 (3 credits)
Further Math A Level** MAC 2311 and 2312 (8 credits) M
Further Math AS Level** MAC 2311 (4 credits) M
Geography A Level* GEO 2200 and GEO 0301(6 credits) GEO 0301:S or I GEO 2200:P
Geography AS Level* GEA 0301 (3 credits) S or I
German A Level GER 2200 and 2240 (6 credits)
German AS Level GER 2200 (3 credits)
History A Level* WOH 0301 and HIS 0301(6 credits) H or I
History AS Level* WOH 0301 (3 credits) H or I
Latin Language AS Level LAT 0301(6 credits)
Latin Literature A Level LNW 0301 (3 credits)
Mathematics A Level** MAC 1114 and 2311 (6 credits) M
Mathematics AS Level** MAC 1147 (4 credits) M
Physics A Level PHY 2053, 2053L and 2054, 2054L (8 credits) P
Physics AS Level PHY 2020, 0301L (4 credits) P
Psychology A Level* PSY 2012 and 0301 (6 credits) S
Psychology AS Level* PSY 0301 (3 credits) S
Sociology A Level* SYG 2000 and 0301 (6 credits) S
Sociology AS Level* SYG 0301(3 credits) S
Spanish A Level SPN 2200 and 2201 (6 credits)
Spanish AS Level SPN 2200 (3 credits)
Statistics AS Level** STA 2023 (3 credits) M

Please note: Scores of A-E are passing. Anything lower does not earn credit.

Writing Requirement (6000 words)
** Mathematics Requirement
Please note: The 0301 course number has no UF course equivalent. 0301 courses provide credit toward the General Education require-
ment but may not count toward a student's major.


University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING


More information about Advanced Placement, including descriptions of courses and sample examination questions is available at
www.collegeboard.com/ap.
General Education
Exams 3 4 5 Credit
Art History ARH 2002 (3 credits) ARH 2050 and 2051 ARH 2050 and 2051 H & I
(6 credits) (6 credits)
Biology BSC 2007/2009L BSC 2007/2009L BSC 2010/2010L and B
(4 credits) (4 credits) BSC 2011/2011L
(8 credits)
Calculus AB ** MAC 2311 (4 credits) MAC 2311 (4 credits) MAC 2311 (4 credits) M
Calculus BC ** MAC 2311 (4 credits) MAC 2311 and 2312 MAC 2311 and 2312 M
(8 credits) (8 credits)
Chemistry CHM 1020 /0301L CHM 2045/2045L CHM 2045/2045L and P
(4 credits) (4 credits) CHM 2046/2046L
(8 credits)
Computer Science A ** CGS 0301 (3 credits) CGS 0301 (3 credits) CGS 0301 (3 credits) M
Computer Science AB CIS 0301 (3 credits) CIS 0301 (3 credits) CIS 0301 (3 credits) M
Economics: Macro* ECO 2013 (3 credits) ECO 2013 (3 credits) ECO 2013 (3 credits) S
Economics: Macro* ECO 2013 (3 credits) ECO 2013 (3 credits) ECO 2013 (3 credits) S
Economics: Micro* ECO 2023 (3 credits) ECO 2023 (3 credits) ECO 2023 (3 credits) S
English Language and ENC 1101 (3 credits) ENC 1101 and 1102 ENC 1101 and 1102 (ENC 1101, C only) C
Composition (6 credits) (6 credits) or H
English Literature and AML 2070 (3 credits) AML 2070 and ENL 2022 AML 2070 and ENL 2022 C or H
Composition (6 credits) (6 credits)
Environmental Science EES 3000 (3 credits) EES 3000 (3 credits) EES 3000 (3 credits) B
European History EUH 0301 (3 credits) EUH 2000 and 2001 EUH 2000 and 2001 H, I
(6 credits) (6 credits)
French Language/ FRE 2200 (3 credits) FRE 2200 (3 credits) FRE FRE 2200 (3 credits)
Literature 2240 (2 credits) FRE 0301 FRE 2240 (2 credits)
(1 credit) FRE 2201 (3 credits)
German Language GER 2200 (3 credits) GER 2200 (3 credits) GER 2200 (3 credits)
GER 0301 (3 credits) GER 0301 (3 credits)
Government and CPO 2001 (3 credits) CPO 2001 (3 credits) CPO 2001 (3 credits) S, I
Politics: Comparative *
Government and POS 2041 (3 credits) POS 2041 (3 credits) POS 2041 (3 credits) S
Politics: United States
*
Human Geography GEO 2420 (3 credits) GEO 2420 (3 credits) GEO 2420 (3 credits) S, I
Latin Literature LNW 0301 (3 credits) LNW 0301 (3 credits) LNW 0301 (3 credits) H
Latin Vergil LNW 2321 (3 credits) LNW 2321 (3 credits) LNW 2321 (3 credits) H
Music Theory MUT 1001 if composite MUT 1001 if composite MUT 1001 if composite
score is 3 or higher. MUT score is 3 or higher. MUT score is 3 or higher. MUT
1211 if both aural and 1211 if both aural and 1211 if both aural and
non-aural subscores are 3 non-aural subscores are 3 non-aural subscores are 3
or higher. (3 credits) or higher. (3 credits) or higher. (3 credits)
Physics B PHY 2053/2053L (5 cred- PHY 2053/2053L and PHY 2053/2053L and P
its) PHY 2054/2054L PHY 2054/2054L
(10 credits) (10 credits)
Physics C: Electricity/ PHY 2054/2054L PHY 2049/2049L PHY 2049/2049L P
Magnetism (5 credits) (4 credits) (4 credits)


the General Education


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


* Writing Requirement (6000 words)
Mathematics Requirement
Please note: The 0301 course number has no UF course equivalent. 0301 courses provide credit toward
requirement but may not count toward a student's major.






STUDENT INFORMATION


F va. ms


General Ldui
Credit


Physics C: Mechanics PHY 2053/2053L PHY 2048/2048L PHY 2048/2048L P
(4 credits) (4 credits) (4 credits)
Psychology PSY 2012 (3 credits) PSY 2012 (3 credits) PSY 2012 (3 credits) S

Spanish Language/ SPN 2200 (3 credits) SPN 2200 (3 credits) SPN 2200 (3 credits)
Literature SPN 2201 (3 credits) SPN 2201(3 credits)
Statistics ** STA 2023 (3 credits) STA 2023 (3 credits) STA 2023 (3 credits) M
Studio Art: Drawing ART 2305C (3 credits) ART 2305C (3 credits) ART 2305C (3 credits)
Portfolio
Studio Art: 2-D Design ART 0301 (3 credits) ART 0301 (3 credits) ART 0301 (3 credits)
Portfolio
Studio Art: 3-D Design ART 0301 (3 credits) ART 0301 (3 credits) ART 0301 (3 credits)
Portfolio
United States History AMH 0301 (3 credits) AMH 2010 and 2020 AMH 2010 and 2020 H
(6 credits) (6 credits)
World History WOH 0301 (3 credits) WOH 0301 (3 credits) WOH 0301 (3 credits) H, I
* Writing Requirement (6000 words)
** Mathematics Requirement
Please note: The 0301 course number has no UF course equivalent. 0301 courses provide credit toward the General Education
requirement but may not count toward a student's major.


University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING

I B a a U s E uvln
More information about the IB program is available at www.ibo.org.
5 (Higher-Level only for 6-7 (Higher-Level only for
4 (Diploma holders non-diploma holders; non-diploma holders; either General
only) either Standard or Higher Standard or Higher Level for Education
3 credits per exam Level for diploma holders) diploma holders) Credit
6 credits per exam 6 credits per exam
Biology BSC 2007/2009L BSC 2007/2009L and BSC 2007/2009L and B
BSC 2010/2010L BSC 2010/2010L
Chemistry CHM 1020/0301L CHM 1020/0301L and CHM 1020/0301and CHM P
CHM 2045/2045L 2045/2045L
Computer Science ** CIS 3020 (3 credits) CIS 3020 and CIS 0301 CIS 3020 and CIS 0301 M
(6 credits) (6 credits)
Design Engineering ETI 0301 (3 credits) ETI 0301 (6 credits) ETI 0301 (6 credits)
Economics* ECO 0301 ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 S
English Al ENC 1101 ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 (ENC 1101, C
only) C or H
Environmental Systems EES 3000 (3 credits) EES 3000 and 0301 EES 3000 and 0301 (6 credits) B
(6 credits)
French B FRE 2200 (3 credits) FRE 2200 (3 credits) FRE 2200 (3 credits)
FRE 2240 (2 credits) FRE 2240 (2 credits)
FRE 0301 (1 credit) FRE 2201 (3 credits)
Further Mathematics MHF 3202 MHF 3202 and MHF 0301 MHF 3202 and MHF 0301 M
(Advanced
Mathematics) **
Geography GEA 0301 GEO 2200 and GEO 0301 GEO 2200 and GEO 0301 GEA/GEO
0301: S,I
GEO 2200: P
German B GER 2200 (3 credits) GER 2200 (3 credits) GER 2200 (3 credits)
GER 2240 (3 credits) GER 2240 (3 credits)
History of Americas* AMH 2020 AMH 2010 and AMH 2020 AMH 2010 and AMH 2020. H
History of Europe* EUH 2002 EUH 2001 and EUH 2002 EUH 2001 and EUH 2002 H, I
World History* WOH 0301 WOH 0301 and WOH 3220 WOH 0301 and WHO 3220 H, I
Latin LNW 2321 LNW 2321 and LNW 0301 LNW 2321 and LNW 0301 H
Math Methods** MAC 0301 MAC 0301 and MAC 1140 MAC 1140 and MAC 2233 M
Math Studies** MAT 0301 MAT 0301 and MGF 1106 MAT 0301 and MGF 1106 M
Mathematics** MAC 1147 MAC 1147 and MAC 2233 MAC 2233 and MAC 2311 M
Music* MUL 2010 (3 credits) MUL 2010 and MUT 0301 MUL 2010 and MUT 0301 H, I
(6 credits) (6 credits)
Music/Group MUS 0301 (3 credits) MUS 0301 (6 credits) MUS 0301 (6 credits) H
Performance
Philosophy PHI 2010 (3 credits) PHI 2010 and PHI 0301 PHI 2010 and PHI 0301 H
Physics PHY 2020 PHY 2020/0301L and PHY PHY 2053/2053L and PHY P
0301 2054/2054L
Psychology PSY 2012 PSY 2012 and PSY 0301 PSY 2012 and PSY 0301 S
Social Anthropology ANT 2410 ANT 2410 and ANT 0301 ANT 2410 and ANT 0301 S, I
Spanish B SPN 2200 (3 credits) SPN 2200 (3 credits) SPN 2200 (3 credits) SPN 2201
SPN 2201 (3 credits) (3 credits) SPN 2240 (3 credits)
Theatre Arts THE 2000 THE 2000 and TPP 2100 THE 2000 and TPP 2100 THE 2000: H,
I; TPP: H
Visual Arts ART 2305C ART 2305C and ART 0301 ART 2305C and ART 0301
Writing Requirement (6000 words)
** Mathematics Requirement
Please note: The 0301 course number has no UF course equivalent. 0301 courses provide credit toward the General Education
requirement but may not count toward a student's major.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION



More information about CLEP, including recent test information guides, can be found www.collegeboard.com/clep/.
C Pass B Pass General
Exam Title Education
Score Equivalencies Score Equivalencies Credit
Accounting, Principles of 50 ACG 0301 (3 credits) 53 ACG 0301 (3 credits)
Algebra, College ** 50 MAC 1140 (3 credits) 54 MAC 1140 (3 credits) M
Algebra-Trigonometry, College ** 50 MAC 1147 (4 credits) 58 MAC 1147 (4 credits) M
American Government 50 POS 2041 (3 credits) 65 POS 2041 (3 credits) S
American Literature 50 AML 0301 (3 credits) 55 AML 2070 (3 credits) C or H
AML 2410 (3 credits)
Analyzing/Interpreting Literature None None
Biology, General 50 BSC 2007 (3 credits) 57 BSC 2007 (3 credits) B
Business Law, Introduction to 50 BUL 0301 (3 credits) 60 BUL 0301 (3 credits)
Calculus with Elementary Functions ** 50 MAC 2233 (3 credits) 61 MAC 2233 (3 credits) M
Chemistry, General 50 CHM 1020 (3 credits) 63 CHM 1020 (3 credits) P
Educational Psychology, Introduction to 50 EDP 0301 (3 credits) 55 EDP 0301 (3 credits) S
English Composition with Essay 50 ENC 1101 (3 credits) ENC 1101 (3 credits) C
English Literature 50 ENL 0301 (3 credits) 55 ENL 2012 (3 credits) C or H
ENL 2022 (3 credits)
French Language 50 FRE 1115 (3 credits) 52 FRE 1115 (3 credits)
FRE 0301 (3 credits)
French Language 62 FRE 0301 (4 credits)
FRE 1131 (5 credits)
Freshman Comp 50 None 54 None
German Language 50 GER 1120 (4 credits) 63 GER 1120 (4 credits)
GER 0301 (2 credits)
History of the United States 1: Early 50 None 54 AMH 2010 (3 credits) H
Colonizations to 1877
History of the United States 2:1865 to 50 None 55 AMH 2020 (3 credits) H
Present
Human Growth and Development 50 63 DEP 0301 (3 credits) S
Humanities None None
Information Systems and Computer 50 CGS 0301 (3 credits) 60 CGS 0301 (3 credits) M
Applications **
Macroeconomics, Principles of 50 None 54 ECO 2013 (3 credits) S
Management, Principles of 50 MAN 0301 (3 credits) 56 MAN 0301 (3 credits) S
Marketing, Principles of 50 MAR 0301 (3 credits) 62 MAR 0301 (3 credits) S
Mathematics, College ** 50 MGF 1106 (3 credits) MGF 1106 (3 credits) M
Microeconomics, Principles of 50 None 54 ECO 2023 (3 credits) S
Natural Science None None
Psychology, Introductory 50 54 PSY 2012 (3 credits) S
Soc. Science and History 50 None None
Sociology, Introductory 50 SYG 2000 (3 credits) 59 SYG 2000 (3 credits) S
Spanish Language 50 SPN 1115 (3 credits) 54 SPN 1115 (3 credits)
SPN 0301 (3 credits)
Spanish Language 66 SPN 0301 (3 credits)
SPN 1115 (3 credits)
SPN 1116 (3 credits)
Trigonometry ** 50 MAC 1114 (2 credits) 58 MAC 1114 (2 credits) M
Western Civilization 1: Ancient Near 50 None 57 EUH 2000 (3 credits) H, I
East to 1648
Western Civilization 2: 1648 to 50 None 56 EUH 2001 (3 credits) H, I
Present
Writing Requirement (6000 words)
** Mathematics Requirement
Please note: The 0301 course number has no UF course equivalent. 0301 courses provide credit toward the General Education
requirement but may not count toward a student's major.
2-32 University of Florida






ACADEMIC ADVISING


UF offers two Calculus I courses: MAC2233 (Survey of Calculus) and NIAC2311 (Analytic Geometrv and Calculus 1). Consult
the college/major section of the Catalog to determine which Calculus 1 course is required for your major.
AP Score Register in Additional Information
Calculus AB or BC
1 or 2 MAC 1147 Students may take the on-line Calculus Readiness Assessment for direct placement into MAC 2233
or MAC 2311. Students who need to take MAC 2233 may choose to take MAC 1140 instead of
MAC 1147 as preparation for MAC2233.___ _
Calculus AB
3 MAC 2311 Students with an AP score of 3 will receive credit for MAC2311. If the student plans to continue in
the Analytic Geometry and Calculus sequence, it is highly recommended that he or she retake
MAC2311.
4 MAC 3512 Take MAC 3512 if Calculus 2 is needed for major. Alternatively, students may choose to enroll in
MAC 2312.
5 MAC 2312 Take MAC 2312 if Calculus 2 is needed for major. Alternatively, students may choose to enroll in
MAC 3512.
Calculus BC
3 MAC 2312 Take MAC 2312 if Calculus 2 is needed for major. Alternatively, students may choose to enroll in
MAC 3512.
4 or 5 MAC 2313 Take MAC 2313 if Calculus 3 is needed for major.


SAT II Score Register in Additional Information


French
390 & Below
400-420

430-470
480-510
520-600

610-690


FRE 1130 Students with three years of high school French cannot take FRE 1130; must take FRE 1115.
FRE 1115 Students with four years of high school French cannot take FRE 1115 or 1130; must take FRE 1131 or
FRE 1116.


FRE 1131
FRE 1116
FRE 2200
and 2240
FRE 2201
and 2241


Successful completion of FRE 1116 satisfies the LAS language requirement.
LAS language requirement complete. Can choose to continue study of French.

LAS language requirement complete. Can choose to continue of study of French.


700 & above 3000-level For placement in 3000-level courses, contact Romance Languages in 170 Dauer (392-2017).
Note: minimum score on French SAT II to meet LAS language requirement is 520.
German
470 & below GER 1121
480-560 GER 1122
570-690 GER 2200 LAS language requirement complete. Can choose to continue study of German.
700 & above 3000-level For placement in 3000-level courses, contact the Germanic & Slavic Languages Office in 263 Dauer
(392-2101).
Note: minimum score on German SAT II to meet LAS language requirement is 570.
Latin
430 & below LAT 1120 Only for students with one year or less or no high school Latin.
440-460 LAT 1121 Only for students with one or two years of high school Latin.
470-530 LAT 1122 Only for students with two or three years of high school Latin. Students with four years cannot take
LAT 1122; must take LNW 2321 or 2560 or a 3000-level course.
540 & above 2000-level LAS language requirement complete. Can choose a 2000-level Latin course.__
Note: minimum score on Latin SAT II to meet LAS language requirement is 540.
Spanish
Students who have studied Spanish 2 in grades 9-12 MUST have an SAT II, AP or IB score to enroll in any SPN 1000-level course.
340 & below SPN 1130 Only for students with two years or less of Spanish, or Spanish 2, in grades 9-12.
350-360 SPN 1115 Only for students with three years or less of Spanish, or Spanish 3, in grades 9-12.
370-400 SPN 1131 Only for students with three years or less of Spanish, or Spanish 3, in grades 9-12.
410-420 SPN 1116 Successful completion of SPN 1116 satisfies the LAS language requirement.
430-560 SPN 2200 LAS language requirement completed. May choose to continue study of Spanish.
570-690 SPN 2201 LAS language requirement completed. May choose to continue study of Spanish.
700 & above SPN 2240 For placement in these courses, contact the Spanish undergraduate coordinator in 170 Dauer
SPN 2340 (392-2017).
SPN 3300
Note: minimum score on Spanish SAT II to meet LAS language requirement is 430.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






RESIDENCY


Residency

Classification of Students-
Florida or Non-Florida
(Section 6A- 10.044, Florida
Administrative Code)

The deadline for applying for a change in
residency status, including receipt of all
documentation, is 5 p.m. on the second
Friday following the fee payment dead-
line. See Critical Dates on page 1-17 for
fee payment deadlines per term.

The State Board of Community Colleges
and the Board of Education shall maintain
consistent policies and practices for the
classification of students as residents for
tuition purposes to facilitate the transfer of
students among institutions. The policies
and practices may vary to accommodate
differences in governance, but the deter-
mination of classification shall be consis-
tent to assure students of being classified
the same regardless of the institution de-
termining the classification.
(1) The classification of a student as a
Florida resident for tuition purposes by a
public Florida community college or uni-
versity shall be recognized by other public
postsecondary institutions to which the
student may later seek admission, unless
the classification was erroneous or the stu-
dent did not then qualify as a resident for
tuition purposes.
(2) Once a student has been classified by
a public institution, institutions to which
the student may transfer are not required
to re-evaluate the classification unless in-
consistent information suggests that an
erroneous classification was made or the
student's situation has changed.
(3) Changes the State Board of Commu-
nity Colleges and the Board of Education
intend to make in the policies and prac-
tices for the classification of students as
residents for tuition purposes shall be filed
with the Articulation Coordinating Com-
mittee.
(4) Non-U.S. citizens such as permanent
residents, parolees, asylees, refugees, or
other permanent status persons (e.g., con-
ditional permanent residents and tempo-
rary residents), who have applied to and
have been approved by the U.S. Immigra-
tion and Naturalization Service with no
date certain for departure shall be consid-
ered eligible to establish Florida residency
for tuition purposes. In addition, nonim-
migrants holding one of the following vi-
sas shall be considered eligible to establish


Florida residency for tuition purposes.
Persons in visa categories not listed herin
shall be considered ineligible to establish
Florida residency for tuition purposes.
(a)Visa category A Government
official.
(b)Visa category E Treaty trader or in-
vestor.
(c)Visa category G Representative of
international organization.
(d)Visa category H-1 Temporary
worker performing professional nursing
services or in a specialty occupation.
(e)Visa category H-4 Only if spouse or
child of alien classified H-1.
(f)Visa category I Foreign information
media representative.
(g)Visa category K Fiance, fiancee, or a
child of United States citizenss.
(h)Visa category L Intracompany trans-
feree (including spouse or child).
(i)Visa category N Parent or child of
alien accorded special immigrant status.
(j)Visa category 0-1 Workers of "ex-
traordinary" ability in the sciences, arts,
education, business, or athletics.
(k)Visa category 0-3 Only if spouse or
child of 0-1 alien.
(1)Visa category R Religious workers.
(m)Visa category NATO-1-7 Represen-
tatives and employees of NATO and their
families.
(5) Non-U.S. citizens who fall within the
following categories shall also be consid-
ered eligible to establish Florida residency
for tuition purposes.
(a)Citizens of Micronesia.
(b)Citizens of the Marshall Islands.
(c)Beneficiaries of the Family Unity Pro-
gram.
(d)Individuals granted temporary pro-
tected status.
(e)Individuals granted withholding of
deportation status.
(f)Individuals granted suspension of de-
portation status or cancellation of removal.
(g)Individuals granted a stay of deporta-
tion status.
(h)Individuals granted deferred action
status.
(i)Individuals granted deferred enforced
departure status.
(j)Applicants for adjustment of status.
(k)Asylum applicants with INS receipt
or Immigration Court stamp.
Specific 229.053(1) 240.325 FS., Law Im-
plemented 240.1201 FS. History-New 10-6-
92, Amended 10-17-2000.

Student Residency, Section 6C-7.005
Florida Administrative Code
(1) For the purpose of assessing tuition,
residency and nonresidency status shall be


determined as provided in Section
240.1201, Florida Statutes, and the Florida
State University System Residency Policy
and Procedure Manual [Revised Effective
October 17, 2000], incorporated by refer-
ence herein.
(2) An individual shall not be classified
as a resident for tuition purposes and,
thus, shall not be eligible to receive the
resident tuition rate, until the individual
has provided satisfactory evidence as to
his or her legal residence and domicile to
appropriate university officials. In deter-
mining residency, the university shall re-
quire evidence such as a voter registration,
driver's license, automobile registration, or
any other relevant materials as evidence
that the applicant has maintained 12
months residence immediately prior to
qualification as a bona fide domicile,
rather than for the purpose of maintaining
a mere temporary residence or abode inci-
dent to enrollment in an institution of
higher learning. To determine if the stu-
dent is a dependent child, the university
shall require evidence such as copies of the
aforementioned documents. In addition,
the university may require a notarized
copy of the parent's IRS return. "Resident
student" for tuition purposes classification
shall also be construed to include students
to whom an Immigration Parolee card or a
Form 1-94 (Parole Edition) was issued at
least one year prior to the first day of
classes for which resident student status is
sought, or who have had their resident
alien status approved by the United States
Immigration and Naturalization Service,
or who hold an Immigration and Naturali-
zation Form 1-151, 1-551 or a notice of an
approved adjustment of status application,
or Cuban Nationals or Vietnamese Refu-
gees or other refugees or asylees so desig-
nated by the United States Immigration
and Naturalization Service who are con-
sidered as Resident Aliens, or other legal
aliens, provided such students meet the
residency requirements stated above and
comply with subsection (4) below. The
burden of establishing facts, which justify
classification of a student as a resident and
domiciliary entitled to "resident for tuition
purposes" registration rates, is on the ap-
plicant for such classification.
(3) In applying this policy:
(a)"Student" shall mean a person admit-
ted to the institution, or a person allowed
to register at the institution on a space
available basis.
(b)"Domicile" shall denote a person's
true, fixed, and permanent home, and to
which whenever the person is absent the
person has the intention of returning.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






STUDENT INFORMATION


(4) In all applications for admission or
registration at the institution on a space
available basis a "resident for tuition pur-
poses" applicant, or, if a dependent child,
the parent of the applicant, shall make and
file with such application a written state-
ment, under oath, that the applicant is a
bona fide resident and domiciliary of the
State of Florida. All claims to "resident for
tuition purposes" classification must be
supported by evidence as stated in Rule
6C-7.005(1),(2) if requested by the register-
ing authority.
(5) A "nonresident" or, if a dependent
child, the individual's parent, after main-
taining a legal residence and being a bona
fide domiciliary of Florida for twelve (12)
months, immediately prior to enrollment
and qualification as a resident, rather than
for the purpose of maintaining a mere
temporary residence or abode incident to
enrollment in an institution of higher edu-
cation, may apply for and be granted clas-
sification as a "resident for tuition
purposes"; provided, however, that those
students who are nonresident aliens or


who are in the United States on a non-
immigration visa will not be entitled to
reclassification. An application for reclassi-
fication as a "resident for tuition pur-
poses" shall comply with provisions of
subsection (4) above. An applicant who
has been classified as a "nonresident for
tuition purposes" at time of original en-
rollment shall furnish evidence as stated in
Rule 6C-7.005(1) to the satisfaction of the
registering authority that the applicant has
maintained residency in the state for the
twelve months immediately prior to quali-
fication required to establish residence for
tuition purposes. In the absence of such
evidence, the applicant shall not be reclas-
sified as a "resident for tuition purposes."
It is recommended that the application for
reclassification be accompanied by a certi-
fied copy of a declaration of intent to es-
tablish legal domicile in the state, which
intent must have been filed with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, as provided by Sec-
tion 222.17, Florida Statutes. If the request
for reclassification and the necessary docu-
mentation is not received by the registrar


prior to the last day of registration for the
term in which the student intends to be
reclassified, the student will not be reclas-
sified for that term.
(6) Appeal from a determination deny-
ing "resident for tuition purposes" status
to applicant therefore may be initiated
after appropriate administrative remedies
are exhausted by the filing of a petition for
review pursuant to Section 120.68 F.S.
(7) Any student granted status as a "resi-
dent for tuition purposes," which status is
based on a sworn statement that is false
shall, upon determination of such falsity,
be subject to such disciplinary sanctions as
may be imposed by the president of the
university.
Specific 240.209(1), (3)(r) FS. Law Im-
plemented 120.53(1)(a), 240.209(1), (3)(e),
240.233, 240.235, 240.1201 FS. History-
Formerly 6C-2.51, 11-18-70, Amended 8-
20-71, 6-5-73, 3-4-74, Amended and Re-
numbered 12-17-74, Amended 1-13-76, 12-
13-77, 8-11-81, 6-21-83, 12-13-83, 6-10-84,
10-7-85, 12-31-85, Formerly 6C-7.05,
Amended 11-9-92, 4-16-96.


University of Florida






FEES AND OTHER FISCAL INFORMATION


Fees and Other Fiscal
Information
In this section:
* Application Fee
* Non-refundable Admission Deposit
* Enrollment and Student Fees
Fee Liability
Assessment of Fees
* Other Student Fees
Health Fee
Athletic Fee
Activity and Service Fee
Transportation Access Fee
Material and Supply Fee
Audit Fee
Diploma Replacement Fee
Transcript Fee
Registration for Zero Hours
Off-Campus Educational Activities
* Late Registration Fees
Waiver of Late Fees
Repeat Course Fee
* Payment of Fees
Deadlines
Cancellation and Reinstatement
Deferral of Registration & Tuition
Fees
Waiver of Fees
* Refund of Fees
* General Fiscal Information
Past-Due Student Accounts


Application Fee
An individual who applies for admission
to the University of Florida shall pay a
non-refundable application fee of $30.
Non-refundable Admission Deposit
Pursuant to 6C1-3.0376(11) University of
Florida Rules, the $200 admission deposit
paid by an individual shall be applied to-
ward payment of that individual's tuition
upon enrollment. The admission deposit
shall not be reimbursed to an individual
who does not enroll in the term offered for
admission. The deposit is waived for those
individuals who have provided documen-
tation that they have received an applica-
tion fee waiver because of economic need
as determined by the College Board and
American Testing Program.
Enrollment and Student Fees
Pursuant to Section 6C1-3.037(1) Univer-
sity of Florida Rules, registration shall be
defined as consisting of two components: a)
formal selection of one or more credit
courses approved and scheduled by the
university; and b) fee payment, or other
appropriate arrangements for fee payment
(deferment or third-party billing) for the

2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


courses in which the student is enrolled as of
the end of the drop/add period.
Registration must be completed on or be-
fore the date specified in the university cal-
endar. Students are not authorized to attend
class unless they are on the class roll or have
been approved to audit. Unauthorized class
attendance will result in fee liability.
Fee Liability-Pursuant to Section 6C1-
3.037 (2) University of Florida Rules, a
student is liable for all fees associated with
all courses for which the student is regis-
tered at the end of the drop/add period or
for which the student attends after that
deadline. The fee payment deadline is 3:30
p.m. at the end of the second week of
classes.
Assessment of Fees-Pursuant to Section
6C1-3.0375(1) University of Florida Rules,
resident and nonresident tuition shall be
assessed on the basis of course classification:
tuition for courses numbered through 4999
shall be assessed at the undergraduate level,
courses numbered 5000 and above shall be
assessed at the graduate level. Students
must assess and pay their own fees. Lack of
written notification of the tuition fee debt
does not negate the student's responsibility
to pay by the published deadline. Univer-
sity personnel will not be held accountable
for assessment or accuracy of calculations.
Tuition fee rates are available from Uni-
versity Financial Services.
Other Student Fees
Health Fee (6C1-3.0372(1) University of
Florida Rules) all students must pay a
health fee that is assessed on a per credit
hour basis and is included in the basic rate
per credit hour. The health fee maintains
the university's Student Health Service
and is not part of any health insurance a
student may purchase.
Athletic Fee (6C1.3.3072(1) University of
Florida Rules) -all students must pay an
athletic fee per credit hour each term and
is included in the basic rate per credit
hour. Graduate research and teaching as-
sistants enrolled for six or more credit
hours during the fall or spring semesters
and all other students enrolled for 12 or
more credits can purchase athletic tickets
at the student rate.
Activity and Service Fee (6C1-3.3072(1)
University of Florida Rules) -all students
must pay an activity and service fee that is
assessed per credit hour and is included in
the hourly tuition rate.
Transportation Access Fee (6C1-3.009(2)
University of Florida Rules -all students
must pay a transportation access fee that is
assessed per credit hour and is included in
the hourly tuition rate.


Material and Supply Fee (6C1-3.0374 (1)
University of Florida Rules)-material and
supply fees are assessed for certain courses
to offset the cost of materials or supply items
consumed in the course of instruction. Mate-
rial and supply fee information is available
from the academic departments or Univer-
sity Financial Services.
Audit Fee 6C1-3.0376(17) University of
Florida Rules, fees for audited courses are
assessed at the applicable resident or non-
resident cost as set forth in Rule 6C1-
3.0375, F.A.C.
Diploma Replacement Fee 6C1-
3.0376(13) University of Florida rules, each
diploma ordered after a student's initial
degree application will result in a diploma
replacement charge.
Transcript Fee 6C1-3.0376(12) University
of Florida Rules, upon written request, a
complete transcript for undergraduate,
graduate and professional students can be
purchased for a fee not to exceed $10. The
university releases only complete aca-
demic records.
Registration for Zero hours 6C1-
3.0376(16) University of Florida Rules, the
student is assessed the applicable resident
or non-resident cost as set forth in Rule
6C1.0375, F.A.C., for one credit hour.
Off-campus educational activities 6C1-
3.3076 (18) The president of the University
of Florida or the president's designee will
establish fees for off-campus course offer-
ings when the location results in specific
identifiable increased costs to the univer-
sity. These fees will be in addition to the
regular tuition and fees charged to stu-
dents enrolling in these courses on cam-
pus. As used herein, "off campus" refers to
locations other than regular main campus,
brain campuses and centers.
All charges may be subject to change without
notice.

Late RegistrationlPayment Fees
Late Registration Fee (6C1-3.0376(2)
University of Florida Rules)-Any student
who fails to initiate registration during the
regular registration period will be subject
to the late registration fee of $100.
Late Payment Fee (6C1-3.037(4) Univer-
sity of Florida Rules) -Any student who
fails to pay all fees due or to make appro-
priate arrangements for fee payment (de-
ferment or third party billing) by the fee-
payment deadline will be subject to a late
payment fee of $100.
Waiver of Late Fees-A student who be-
lieves that a late charge should not be as-
sessed because of university error or
extraordinary circumstances that pre-
vented all conceivable means of compli-






STUDENT INFORMATION


ance by the deadline may petition for a
waiver.
* Late Registration Fee: University Reg-
istrar
* Late Payment Fee: University Finan-
cial Services
* The university reserves the right to
require documentation to substantiate
these circumstances.

Repeat Course Fee
Beginning Fall 1997, any undergraduate
course numbered 1000-4999 at the univer-
sity (excluding individual study, courses
numbered X900-X999, courses dropped or
withdrawn without fee liability, coopera-
tive education courses, military science
courses with prefixes AFR, MLS and NSC
and courses approved for multiple regis-
trations) for which a student registers
three or more times will be subject to a
repeat course fee at 100 percent of the full
cost of instruction, calculated annually. All
students, regardless of classification or
residency status, will be assessed the fee.
Any courses taken before fall 1997 are ex-
cluded.

Payment of Fees
Fees are payable on the dates listed in
the university calendar. Payments are
processed by University Financial Services.
Checks, cashier's checks and money orders
written in excess of the assessed fees will
be processed and the difference refunded
at a later date, according to university pol-
icy. Checks from foreign countries must be
payable through a United States bank in
U.S. dollars. The university can refuse
three-party checks, altered checks and
checks that will not photocopy.
Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) pay-
ments can be made directly from a stu-
dent's checking account by enrolling for
"EFT Sign Up" at www.isis.ufl.edu.
Payments can be made via debit cards at
the university cashier's office. A personal
identification number (PIN) is required to
access the student's bank account. Cash
withdrawals against debit cards will not be
processed.
Credit card payments by MasterCard,
American Express or Visa may be made
via the Internet at www.isis.ufl.edu.
Returned checks and returned EFT pay-
ments must be paid in cash, money order
or cashier's check. A minimum $25 service
fee will be charged; $30 will be charged if
the check is $50.01-$299.99 and $40 will be
charged for returned checks of $300 or
more.


The university also may impose addi-
tional requirements, including advance
payment or security deposit. All financial
obligations to the university will be ap-
plied on the basis of age of the debt. The
oldest debt will be paid first.
Deadlines-Deadlines are enforced. The
university does not have the authority to
waive late fees unless the university pri-
marily is responsible for the delinquency
or extraordinary circumstances warrant
such waiver.
Cancellation and Reinstatement-The
university shall cancel the registration of
any student who has not paid any portion
of the fee liability by the deadline and has
not attended class after the drop/add
deadline. The university shall suspend
further academic progress by placing a
financial hold on the student's record to
prevent the release of grades, schedules,
transcripts, registration, diplomas, loans,
the use of UF facilities and/or services,
and admission to UF functions and athletic
events until the debt has been satisfied.
Reinstatement shall require the approval
of the university and payment of all delin-
quent liabilities, including the late registra-
tion and late payment fees. Upon payment
of fees, it is the student's responsibility to
ensure that his or her registration is up-
dated.
Deferral of Registration and Tuition
Fees-A fee deferment allows students to
pay fees after the deadline without cancel-
lation of registration or late payment fee.
The university may award fee deferments
in the following circumstances:
* Students whose state or federal finan-
cial assistance is delayed due to cir-
cumstances beyond the control of the
student.
* Students receiving veterans' or other
benefits under Chapter 32, Chapter 34,
or Chapter 35 of Title 38 U.S.C., and
whose benefits are delayed; or
* Students for whom formal arrange-
ments have been made with the uni-
versity for payment by an acceptable
third-party donor.
Deferment covers tuition fee payments
only and must be established by the fee
payment deadline. Fee deferments are
granted based on information from the
Office for Student Financial Affairs (finan-
cial aid deferments) or the Office of the
University Registrar (veterans). Refer
questions on eligibility to the appropriate
office.
Waiver of Fees-UF may waive fees as
follows:


* Participants in sponsored institutes
and programs where the sponsoring
agent pays direct costs.
* Any dependent child of a special risk
member killed in the line of duty is
entitled to a full waiver of under-
graduate fees, per Sections 112.19 and
112.191, Florida Statutes.
* Intern supervisors for institutions
within the State University System
may be given one nontransferable cer-
tificate (fee waiver) for each full aca-
demic term during which the person
serves as an intern supervisor. The
certificate is valid for three years from
the date of issuance. The maximum
hours allowed during a single semes-
ter will be six hours of instruction (in-
cluding credit through continuing
education). The certificate will waive
the matriculation fee; the student
must pay the balance of the fees by the
deadline.
* Florida public high school students
who earn credit in courses toward a
high school diploma and baccalaure-
ate degree, as provided by dual-credit
enrollment or early admission, are en-
titled to a full waiver of undergradu-
ate fees. Books and instructional
materials may be provided on a lend-
return basis.
* Persons 60 years of age or older are
entitled to a waiver of fees for audited
courses (up to six credit hours), as
provided by Section 240.235(3), Flor-
ida Statutes.
* Any student for whom the state is
paying foster care board payment or
any student adopted from the De-
partment of Children and Family Ser-
vices after December 31, 1997, is
entitled to a waiver of fees pursuant to
Sections 409.145(3) and 240.235(5),
Florida Statutes.
* Certain members of the active Florida
National Guard are entitled to a
waiver of fees pursuant to Section
250.10(7), Florida Statutes.
* A student enrolled through the Flor-
ida Linkage Institutes Program is enti-
tled to a waiver of fees pursuant to
Section 288.8175(6), Florida Statutes.
* The non-Florida student financial aid
fee may not be waived for students
receiving an out-of-state fee waiver.

Refund of Fees
Tuition fees will be refunded in full in
the circumstances noted below:


University of Florida






FEES AND OTHER FISCAL INFORMATION


* Approved withdrawal from the uni-
versity before the end of drop/add,
with written documentation from the
student.
* Credit hours dropped during drop/add.
* Courses cancelled by the university.
* Involuntary call to active military
duty.
* Death of the student or member of the
immediate family (parent, spouse,
child, sibling).
* Illness of the student of such severity
or duration, as confirmed in writing
by a physician, that completion of the
semester is precluded.
* Exceptional circumstances, upon ap-
proval of the university president or
his designee(s).

A refund of 25 percent of the total fees
paid (less late fees) is available if notice of
withdrawal of enrollment from the univer-
sity with written documentation is re-
ceived from the student and approved
prior to the end of the fourth week of
classes for full semesters or a proportion-
ately shorter period of time for the shorter
terms.
Refunds must be requested at University
Financial Services. Proper documentation
must be presented when a refund is re-
quested. A waiting period may be re-
quired. Refunds will be applied against
any university debts. The university re-
serves the right to set minimum amounts
for which refunds will be produced for
overpayments on student accounts.


Tuition refunds due to cancellation,
withdrawal or termination of attendance
for students receiving financial aid will
first be refunded to the appropriate finan-
cial aid programs. If the student is a re-
cipient of federal financial aid (Pell Grant,
Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grant (SEOG), Perkins Loan, Federal Di-
rect Stafford Loans or PLUS loans), federal
rules require that any unearned portion of
the federal aid must be returned to the U.S.
Department of Education. The amount the
student has earned is based on the number
of days the student attended classes as
compared to the number of days in the
entire term (first day of classes to the end
of finals week). Any remaining refund
then will be returned according to univer-
sity policy.

General Fiscal Information
Students should bring sufficient funds,
other than personal checks, to meet their
immediate needs. Personal checks will be
accepted at University Financial Services
for the exact amount of fees and/or other
amounts owed the university. Payments
on all financial obligations to the univer-
sity will be applied on the basis of age of
the debt. The oldest debt will be paid first.
University Financial Services does not
cash checks or make cash refunds. Checks
written in excess of assessed fees or other
amounts paid the university will be ac-
cepted and processed, but the excess will
be refunded to the student at a later date,
according to university policy.


It is the student's responsibility to file a
correct current address with the Office of
the University Registrar in Criser Hall,
Room 222.
Past-Due Student Accounts: All stu-
dents' accounts are payable at University
Financial Services at the time such charges
are incurred. Graduating students with
outstanding financial obligations will have
a hold placed on their records withholding
release of a diploma, transcript and other
university services until the debt is satis-
fied.
University regulations prohibit the fol-
lowing for any student whose account
with the university is delinquent until the
debt has been satisfied:
* Registration
* Graduation
* Granting of credit
* Release of transcript, diploma, grades
and schedules
* Loans
* The use of UF facilities and/or ser-
vices
* Admission to UF functions and ath-
letic events.
Delinquent accounts, including those
debts for which the students' records have a
financial hold, may require payment by cash,
cashier's check or money order.
Delinquent debts may be reported to a
credit bureau and can result in placement
with a collection agency without further
notice, at which time additional collection
costs will be assessed for the collection
agency fees.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






CAMPUS LIFE AND STUDENT SUPPORT


Campus Life and

Student Support
In this section:
* Division of Student Affairs
Dean of Students Office
Department of Housing and
Residence Education
Student Financial Affairs
J. Wayne Reitz Union
Career Resource Center
GatorLink
Gator 1 Card
UFID Number
Transportation and Parking
Gator Dining
UF Bookstores
Academic Support Services
University Writing Program
Reading & Writing Center
Teaching Center
UF International Center
Office of Academic Technology
Office for Academic Support and
Institutional Services (OASIS)
Cycles of Success
University Minority Mentor Program
Office of Graduate Minority Programs
Special Support Services
Counseling Center
Student Health Center
Dental Care
Speech and Hearing Clinic
Student Legal Services
Other Special Support Services
Activities and Organizations
Intercollegiate Athletics
Student Fitness & Recreation Centers


Division of Student Affairs
www.ufsa.ufl.edu/
The goals of the Division of Student Af-
fairs include developing effective and effi-
cient services and programs for students
through the various departments within
Student Affairs, integrating student affairs
and academic affairs, directly involving
students in the affairs of the institution,
encouraging a sense of community among
students, faculty and administration and
increasing the accessibility to and attrac-
tiveness of the University of Florida.
The Office of the Vice President for Stu-
dent Affairs is located in Tigert Hall, Room
155, and has administrative responsibility
for the following offices and programs:
Dean of Students Office, Department of
Housing and Residence Education, Office
for Student Financial Affairs, J. Wayne


Reitz Union, Career Resource Center, and
the Counseling Center.

Dean of Students Office
www.dso.ufl.edu
The Dean of Students Office is commit-
ted to the total development of students.
The office is located in Peabody Hall,
Room 202, and staff members are respon-
sible for planning, coordinating and im-
plementing programs and services for the
university's students.
Major objectives include making students
aware of and encouraging the use of univer-
sity resources, interpreting the goals, objec-
tives and actions of the university to
students, and encouraging a sense of com-
munity among students, faculty and staff.
The Dean of Students Office provides
the following:
individual and group advising, pro-
grams and services for new students,
including orientation;
assistance and advising to minority
students and organizations;
coordination of student conduct and
discipline;
services and programs for students
with disabilities;
programs and services for women
students;
student leadership development and
recognition;
committee responsibility for student
medical petitions;
exit interviews for students withdraw-
ing from the university;
fraternity and sorority advising and
coordination;
* liaison with and advice to Student
Government and other student or-
ganizations;
* special programs to personalize student
experiences within the university;
* programs and services regarding is-
sues of gender.
Institute of Black Culture: The Insti-
tute of Black Culture (IBC) was established
in 1971. As a unit of the Dean of Students
Office, the IBC provides an educational,
social and cultural support system for stu-
dents of African descent. Its mission is to
enhance the UF experience by sharing the
history and culture of black people. IBC
programs promote a sense of awareness
and appreciation for the different cultures
of the African Diaspora. The IBC houses a
growing collection of African, African-
American and Caribbean art and literature.
The institute is located at 1510 West Uni-
versity Avenue.


Institute of Hispanic-Latino Cultures:
The Institute of Hispanic-Latino Cultures
offers a variety of workshops, seminars,
activities, programs and services for stu-
dents with Hispanic and Latino heritage,
including the Hispanic Student Assembly
and the Florida Hispanic Latino Collegiate
Forum. The institute serves as a resource
for the university and provides a facility to
help students and student organizations
interested in Hispanic and Latino issues.
The institute is located at 1504 West Uni-
versity Avenue.
Services for Students with Disabilities:
The Dean of Students Office provides in-
dividual assistance to students with
documented disabilities based upon the
need and impact of the specific disability.
There is no requirement for a student to
disclose his or her disability. However,
students requesting classroom accommo-
dations must register with the Dean of
Students Office and provide documenta-
tion to verify the disability.
Support services may include special
campus orientations, helping with registra-
tion, approving reduced course loads for
full-time status, providing classroom and
examination accommodations, identifying
course substitutions, supporting course
drops when disability related, procuring
auxiliary learning aids and helping with
university activities. The coordinator for
compliance (Section 504 of the Rehabilita-
tion Act of 1973) is housed in the Dean of
Students Office, Peabody Hall, Room 202,
(Voice) 352-392-1261, (TDD) 352-392-3008.
Students with disabilities are encouraged
to contact the Dean of Students Office for
more information.
Upon request, the Undergraduate Catalog
is available on computer disk to students
with print disabilities. For more informa-
tion, contact the Dean of Students Office at
352-392-1261 or 352-392-3008 (TDD).

Department of Housing and
Residence Education
www.housing.ufl.edu
Mission: The Department of Housing
and Residence Education's mission is to
provide well-maintained, community-
oriented facilities where residents and staff
are empowered to learn, innovate and suc-
ceed. More than 7,300 students live in sin-
gle-student residence halls. Nearly 2,100
married students, graduate students,
spouses and children live in 980 apartments
in graduate and family housing villages.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







STUDENT INFORMATION


Contact Information: University Hous-
ing Office, PO Box 112100, Gainesville, FL,
32611-2100. Phone: 352- 392-2161, Fax: 352-
392-6819. E-mail houinfo@housing.ufl.edu.
Residency Requirements: Campus hous-
ing is available to full time students as de-
fined by respective academic colleges.
Students may choose to live on or off cam-
pus. Freshmen entering the university dur-
ing the summer terms) must live on
campus during the summer to be eligible
for academic year housing. Campus hous-
ing contracts in residence halls are avail-
able for the academic year (fall/spring
semesters), spring semester only, and the
summer terms.
Application Process for Beginning
Freshmen: After beginning freshmen
complete application for admission to UF,
the Department of Housing and Residence
Education will send the student on-
campus housing application information.
The student must complete the application
(online or paper) and return it with a $25
non-refundable application fee to establish
a housing priority date. Applying for cam-
pus housing does not guarantee an offer of
residence hall space. If the student is ad-
mitted to UF and based on the housing
priority date, Housing and Residence Edu-
cation will send a residence hall agree-
ment, if space is available. To secure
campus housing, the student must return
the agreement and advance rent payment
by the due date specified.
Application Process for Transfer Stu-
dents: Students must apply to UF and
have a UFID before applying for campus
housing. Students need to apply as early as
possible because of the demand for hous-
ing. Transfer students must return the
completed application with a $25 non-
refundable application fee. If the student is
admitted to UF and housing space is avail-
able, an agreement will be sent based on
the date the housing application and fee
are received.
Application Process for Village Com-
munities: Students must apply to UF and
have a UFID before applying for housing.
To be eligible to live in Village Communi-
ties, the following qualifications must be
met:
A married student, student in a do-
mestic partnership, or a student par-
ent without a spouse who has legal
custody of minor children must meet
the requirements for admission to the
University of Florida and continue to
make normal progress toward a de-
gree as determined by the college.


* Applications must be completed and
signed by the applicant and his/her
spouse or fiance, if applicable, and
submitted with all the necessary sup-
porting papers and non-refundable
$10 application fee.
* Supporting papers include a copy of
the applicant's marriage certificate
and/or children's birth certificates.
* Single parents must provide a copy of
legal documents (adoption papers, di-
vorce decrees, etc.) showing full cus-
tody of minor dependent children
before being offered an assignment.
* Maguire Village applicants also must
include a statement of income. Contact
the Village Communities Office, PO
Box 112100, Gainesville, FL, 32611-2100.
Students with Disabilities: A variety of
facilities and services are available for stu-
dents with disabilities. Students with dis-
abilities who require adapted facilities or
services need to contact the Assignments
Office in writing as soon as possible to
document disabilities, needs and requests.
Students with disabilities must meet the
standard guidelines used to determine
housing eligibility. Students with print-
related disabilities may request housing
publications in an alternate format. Stu-
dents with hearing disabilities may request
assistance from the Florida Relay Service,
352-392-3008 (Voice/TDD).
Facilities: Twenty-four single student
residence halls offer a wide variety of
room styles: single rooms (limited), double
rooms, triple rooms, suites for 2/3/4/5
residents and apartments. The most com-
mon room is a standard air-conditioned
double room that accommodates two resi-
dents. All rooms have beds, mattresses,
study desks, chairs, dressers, closets, and
window coverings. Rental rates include
cable television service, local telephone
service, fiber optic computer service and
utilities. (Utility rates are limited in the
Keys Residential Complex and Lakeside
Residential Complex.) Rental rates vary
depending on features such as air condi-
tioning, floor space, private baths, and
kitchen facilities. In Village Communities
(graduate and family housing), studio
apartments, townhouses, and one-, two-
and three-bedroom apartments are avail-
able.
Residence Hall Staff: The Department
of Housing and Residence Education em-
ploys nearly 700 full-time and part-time
staff. Staff includes custodial staff, mainte-
nance staff, clerical staff, administrators
and student staff, including graduate hall


directors, resident assistants, desk assis-
tants and security assistants.
Staff and student leaders plan social, rec-
reational, cultural and educational oppor-
tunities. The staff is trained in crisis
intervention, personal and fire safety, and
security procedures.
Students' main contact with staff is with
resident assistants (RAs), graduate hall
directors (GHDs), residence directors
(RDs), residence life coordinators (RLCs)
and assistant directors of housing for resi-
dence life (ADHs). An undergraduate RA
lives on each floor or section to serve as a
peer adviser. Graduate staff, who super-
vise RAs, help to promote a learning envi-
ronment and coordinate area activities.
The ADH, a full-time university adminis-
trator, is responsible for the overall admin-
istrative and educational functions within
each residence area.
Inter-Residence Hall Association: All
students are encouraged to participate in
organizational activities that play a signifi-
cant part in their educational, cultural, social
and recreational life. The Inter-Residence
Hall Association (IRHA) represents the col-
lective interests of all resident students and
serves as a channel of communication be-
tween residence area government councils,
the university community and outside inter-
ests. This self-goverance program at the
hall and area levels offers residents the op-
portunity to establish guidelines for group
living and a chance to help plan social and
educational activities.
Local Telephone Service: A telephone
jack that provides 24-hour service is lo-
cated in each room. Students must provide
their own touch-tone telephones. Cost of
local service is included in the housing
rental rate and includes call waiting, speed
calling, three-way calling, anonymous call
rejection, call tracing, repeat dialing, and
call return.
Convenience Stores and Vending Ma-
chines: Beaty Market, Graham Oasis and
the Little Hall Express -- three convenience
stores operated by Gator Dining Services --
are located in or near Beaty, Graham, and
Little Halls, respectively. Students may
purchase convenience items such as
snacks, milk, bread, soda, pens, paper,
candy, etc., using their Gator Dining de-
clining balance account or cash. Vending
machines are located conveniently in all
residence halls.
Food Service: All residents have the op-
portunity to purchase meal plans or declin-
ing balance accounts on an optional basis
from Gator Dining Services. Space is limited
in the meal plan program. Students with
meal plans eat most meals in Gator Comer
University of Florida






CAMPUS LIFE AND STUDENT SUPPORT


Dining Center, the large multi-purpose din-
ing facility located by Tolbert, North, Riker,
East, Weaver, Graham, Simpson, and
Trusler halls on the west side of campus or
at the Broward Dining Center featuring the
Fresh Food Co. located next to Broward
Hall. Call Gator Dining Services at 352-392-
2491 or visit www.gatordining.com for
more information.
Custodial Service: All the residence
halls have custodial staff to clean public
areas, bathrooms, lounges and hallways.
Individual room cleaning is the responsi-
bility of each resident.
Security: Security is a shared responsi-
bility of the university, residence hall staff
and residents. Residents must take precau-
tions to protect themselves and their per-
sonal property. Residence hall staff and the
University Police Department provide
campus safety education and awareness
programs. The residence hall staff moni-
tors residence hall security; external build-
ing security generally is the responsibility
of the University Police Department.
Housing security assistants patrol the ar-
eas immediately next to the residence halls
from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. when classes
are in session.
Laundry Facilities: Washers and dryers
that are coin-operated or will function
with a Gator 1 debit card are provided in
each residence area.
Cable T.V.: A 40-channel residence hall
closed-cable television system is provided.
Charges for basic cable service are in-
cluded in the housing rent. Channel 8, The
Residence Information Channel, broad-
casts bulletin board messages, movies and
other copyright-secured videos.
Electronic Card Access: The conversion
of outside entrance doors to electronic card
access is an on-going project. Residents
living in halls that have been converted
will be issued plastic cards for access to
these halls in addition to keys.
Computer Services: Students are re-
sponsible for the security of their computer
systems. Students may access university
computer services in residence facilities
through DHNet, the Department of Hous-
ing and Residence Education ethemet fiber
optic computer network, or by modem.
DHNet provides computer services via
fiber optic lines, not phone lines. Modems
are not needed, data is transferred more
quickly and students may send and re-
ceive phone calls while using their com-
puters. DHNet service is available in all
residence facilities and is included in the
rent charge.


Special Housing Areas
Lakeside Residential Complex: Four
students share an apartment with four
single bedrooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen
and a living room. Bathrooms are cleaned
by housing custodial staff.
Hume Honors Housing: Freshmen may
be invited to live in Honors housing (Hon-
ors Residential College at Hume Hall) to
participate in an accelerated academic pro-
gram. Residents agree to abide by the guide-
lines and expectations of honors housing.
Single and double-room suites with bath-
rooms surround a floor lounge. Housing
custodial staff cleans the bathrooms. Visit
www.honors.ufl.edu for more information.
Career Exploration Community at
Graham Hall: Two floors in Graham Hall
(one male, one female) have a programmatic
focus to help undecided students who need
assistance with the major and career deci-
sion-making process. Staff from the UF Ca-
reer Resource Center and Department of
Housing and Residence Education are in-
strumental in helping residents explore their
personality traits, interests, passions, skills,
abilities, academic fields of student and po-
tential careers. Sections of SLS 2301: Career
and Lifestyle Planning are taught on site for
residents of the Career Exploration Com-
munity.
Leader/Scholar Program: Incoming
first-year students can request assignment
to the Leader/Scholar Program in Trusler
Hall. This program offers additional pro-
gramming and support services in aca-
demic and life skills areas. Sections of
First-Year Florida are taught in Trusler
Hall for students in the Leader/Scholar
Program. The program is available on a
first-come, first-served basis, as there are
less than 200 available spaces. For more
information about Academic Initiatives, visit
www.housing.ufl.edu/AIE/index.htm, or
contact the assistant director of housing for
academic initiatives at 352-392-3164.
Beaty Towers: Four residents share an
apartment with two bedrooms, complete
kitchen, and bathroom. Housing custodial
staff cleans the bathrooms.
Springs Residential Complex: Single
and double-room suites with bathrooms
surround a floor lounge. Housing custodial
staff cleans bathrooms. It is the home of
"Wellness at the Springs," a satellite Gator-
Well program from the Student Health Care
Center that offers programs and activities
that promote a healthy lifestyle.
Faculty-in-Residence Program: The
Faculty-in-Residence Programs in Lakeside
Residential Complex and the Honors Resi-
dential College at Hume Hall promote inter-
action between students and the resident


faculty members. Faculty members live in
apartments within the residence hall com-
munities and share the campus living ex-
perience with students. Resident faculty
members provide academic advising and
help plan and implement programs.
Keys Residential Complex: Continuing
students with more than 30 hours of com-
pleted course work share an apartment
with four single bedrooms, two baths, a
kitchen and a living room. Housing custo-
dial staff cleans the bathrooms.
Wellness Program: Jennings Hall resi-
dents are encouraged to take advantage of
the additional programming and support
services that promote personal wellness and
focus on improving body, mind and spirit.
Community Service Section: Students
interested in volunteering and leadership
can apply to live in the Community Ser-
vice Section in Fletcher Hall. The goal of
the section is to provide an understanding
and supportive environment for residents
who are interested in volunteer endeavors.
International House at Weaver Hall:
The University of Florida hosts interna-
tional exchange students from all five con-
tinents. The International House is home
to exchange students and UF degree-
seeking students who desire to take part in
a cross-cultural living/learning environ-
ment. The International House encourages
and supports the acquisition of interna-
tional perspectives and multiculturalism as
well as the recognition of intercultural
issues.
Off-Campus Housing: The Housing Of-
fice maintains listings of apartments, houses
and rooming units offered for rent to stu-
dents, faculty and staff. Each spring, the office
compiles a list of apartment and rooming unit
developments available online at
www.housing.ufl.edu/housing/facilities_off
campus.htm. The Housing Office cannot
recommend any off-campus facility.
The student should make a personal in-
spection of the rental facility and have a
conference with the owner (or agent) be-
fore making a deposit or signing a lease.
Persons seeking off-campus housing
should plan to arrive in Gainesville well in
advance of the semester in which housing
is needed. Fall arrangements are possible
as early as April, spring semester after
mid-November. For best results, visit dur-
ing the week-not weekends-after pre-
liminary information on available rentals
has been obtained.

Student Financial Affairs
www.ufsa.ufl.edu/sfa/
The Office for Student Financial Affairs
(SFA), in Criser Hall, Room 107, coordi-


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







STUDENT INFORMATION


nates and administers student financial aid
programs and provides financial assistance
and counseling at UF.
SFA awards aid to students according
to financial need-the difference between
current educational costs and what indi-
vidual students can pay toward these
costs. The university evaluates financial
need for UF students from data provided
by the federal need-analysis processor,
after the processor has analyzed the in-
formation students and their families have
supplied on the student's Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
Customer Service: SFA is open from
8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday through Fri-
day. For financial aid information, applica-
tions and advising, students can go to
Criser Hall, Room 107, or call 392-1275.
What is Financial Aid? Financial aid is
money provided to students and their
families as either gift aid or self-help to
help pay college costs. Gift aid is free
money, such as scholarships and grants.
Students do not have to repay these
awards. Self-help programs include loans
and employment and are named "self-
help" because students must repay loans
and work for money awarded through
employment programs. Awards consist of
scholarships, grants, loans and/or work,
singly or as a package.
Types of Aid: Scholarships are awarded
based on academic performance and finan-
cial need. SFA awards a limited number of
scholarships to academically outstanding
undergraduates with documented need.
Most academic scholarships are awarded
through the Office of Admission. Individ-
ual colleges also offer scholarships. For
information, students should contact their
college.
Grants are awarded to undergraduates
with financial need. The largest grant pro-
gram is the Federal Pell Grant.
The following undergraduate loan pro-
grams are available at UF: Federal Direct
Stafford Loans, Federal Direct Unsubsi-
dized Stafford Loans, UF Institutional
Loans, and Federal Perkins Loans. Parents
of dependent undergraduates also can take
out educational loans through the Federal
Direct PLUS Loan program. These pro-
grams offer long-term, low-interest loans
that must be repaid when the borrower
graduates, withdraws, or drops to less
than half-time enrollment.
The amount of each loan, except for Fed-
eral Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
and Federal Direct PLUS loans, is based on
financial need as determined from infor-
mation the borrower provides on the
FAFSA.


The university also has a short-term
loan program to help students meet emer-
gency financial needs related to educa-
tional expenses. Students may borrow up
to $1,000 or the amount of in-state tuition
if they have an acceptable repayment
source. Interest is 1 percent per month, and
these loans must be repaid by the first day
of the last month in the semester in which
the money is borrowed.
Part-time employment through the uni-
versity is offered to about 7,000 students
each year. Students normally work 15-20
hours a week and earn at least minimum
wage. Most departments arrange work
hours around the students' academic
schedules.
When to Apply: Applications are avail-
able January 1 each year. Students are con-
sidered for aid according to the date their aid
file is complete. A few programs such as
Federal Pell Grants, Federal Direct Stafford
Loan, and OPS employment are open for
application throughout the year (refer to
important deadlines below).
Although SFA cannot award financial
aid to students until they have been admit-
ted to the university, students should ap-
ply for aid as soon as possible after
January 1 each year.
Important Deadlines: Financial aid ap-
plications should be completed and sent to
the appropriate processor as soon as pos-
sible after January 1. March 15 is the "on-
time" deadline for SFA to receive students'
information from the need analysis
agency. Students who wish to be consid-
ered for campus-based and institutional
programs (such as Federal Work-Study,
Federal Perkins loans, Turner Grant, and
university loans) should apply by this date
since these funds are limited.
Federal Direct Loan Program deadlines are
set by semester. The fall deadline for apply-
ing for Federal Direct Stafford, Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford, and Federal Direct
PLUS loans is October 15. Individual colleges
within the university and private organiza-
tions have their own deadlines for applying
for aid.
How to Apply: Financial aid applica-
tions are not sent automatically when stu-
dents apply for admission. Students may
obtain a Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) and a UF Gator Aid Application
Guide from any Florida community college
or high school guidance office. Students also
can request these forms from the Office for
Student Financial Affairs, P 0 Box 114025,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025, or by calling 352-
392-1275. FAFSAs also are available from the
federal government by calling toll-free: 1-
800-433-3243. Students also can apply elec-


ironically using "FAFSA on the Web," an
online application available as a link
through SFA's Web site.
Students must complete and submit a
Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) to the Federal Student Aid Pro-
grams processor at the address indicated
on the form. Students' financial data must
reach us from the processor by March 15
for their application to be considered "on-
time." Allow a minimum of three weeks
for processing.
Confidentiality of Student Records:
The university ensures the confidentiality
of student records in accordance with State
University System statutes and the Family
Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974,
known as the Buckley Amendment. Students'
family financial information and the type
and amount of their aid are held in confi-
dence. Information is released only with
the student's written consent.
Student Employment Office: The SFA
Student Employment Office is a clearing-
house for part-time employment and co-
ordinates three employment programs:
Federal Work Study, OPS and off-campus
jobs. Student Employment maintains an
online job list on the SFA Web site.
Satellite Offices: SFA has satellite of-
fices located at: College of Dentistry: D3-
#17A Health Science Center, 352-846-1384;
Colleges of Health Professions, Nursing,
Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine, HPNP
Building, G208, 352 273-6202; College of
Law, Holland Hall, Room 164, 352-392-0421;
and College of Medicine, Health Science
Center, Room M-128, 352-392-7800.
ISIS: Using ISIS, students can access in-
formation about their personal financial
aid files and can complete financial aid
processing transactions such as Federal Di-
rect Loan confirmation and first-time bor-
rowers entrance counseling via the Internet.
The ISIS Web site is www.isis.ufl.edul.

Enrollment Requirements for Financial Aid
UF students must enroll at least half time
to receive most types of financial aid. For
undergraduate students, full-time enroll-
ment for financial aid eligibility is 12 credit
hours per term, and half time is six credit
hours per term.
The sum of all credit hours in Summer A,
B and/or C will determine a student's en-
rollment status for summer. Pell Grants are
prorated according to enrollment status.

Academic Progress Requirements for
Financial Aid
UF students receiving financial aid are
required to be in good standing and to
maintain satisfactory academic progress.
University of Florida






CAMPUS LIFE AND STUDENT SUPPORT


While a general summary of the academic
progress requirements is presented here,
for specific details please see the UF Web
site at www.ufsa.ufl.edu/sfa/receiving/
academicprogress.html.
Each student must meet three measures
of satisfactory academic progress that are
determined by the student's class and col-
lege: a qualitative component (grade point
average), a time-frame component (maxi-
mum credit hours carried for degree com-
pletion), and a measure of progress within
that time frame (percentage of credit hours
earned each term). Students who fail to
meet these standards are suspended from
receiving financial aid until they meet the
requirements.
Students who fail to meet the require-
ments for satisfactory progress may appeal
to have their financial aid reinstated.
Please visit the SFA Web site for complete
instructions on the petition process at
www.ufsa.ufl.edu/sfa/receiving/petition.
html#progress.
Postbaccalaureate Students: Students
enrolled in postbaccalaureate studies must
petition the Academic Progress Appeals
Committee to receive financial aid. The types
of financial aid available to postbaccalaureate
students depend on the student's degree-
seeking status.

J. Wayne Reitz Union
www.union.ufl.edu
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the commu-
nity center of the university, providing a
variety of facilities, services and programs
for all members of the university commu-
nity. The union's primary emphasis is
serving the nonacademic needs of stu-
dents. Policy for the Reitz Union is estab-
lished by the Board of Managers, which
consists of eight students and six faculty
members, with a student chair. Student
Government funds the Reitz Union.
The Reitz Union opened May 1, 1967,
and was named in honor of Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz, president of the university from
1955 to 1967. Facilities and services offered
at the Reitz Union include the following:
Student Activities Center: Located on
the third floor, the center houses Student
Government, Student Honor Court, Stu-
dent Legal Services and other student or-
ganizations.
Office of Student Activities: The Reitz
Union sponsors a continuing program of
activities and services, including an arts
series, lectures, live concerts, a leisure
course program, arts and crafts sales, Col-
lege Bowl and numerous leadership and
volunteer programs.


Dining and Food Facilities: Choices in-
clude the Reitz Union Food Court that
features Wendy's, Subway@, Home
Zone@, Sushi & Noodle Bar@, Java City@
and Capeesh@. Also located in the Reitz
Union are the Arrendondo dining room,
Orange and Brew, Freshens@, and Taco
Bell@. Complete catering services are
available.
Meeting/Hotel Facilities: Two large
ballrooms, two auditoriums, three lounges
and thirty conference and meeting rooms
are available for students and university
organizations. A 36-room hotel is also avail-
able.
Services: ATMs, an information desk,
lost and found, and a passenger and ride-
wanted bulletin boards are provided. Free
notary public service is provided by Stu-
dent Legal Services. A computer lab also is
available for UF students.
University Box Office: Students, fac-
ulty and staff can purchase tickets for
campus concerts at TicketMaster outlet;
tickets also are available for major enter-
tainment events throughout the Southeast
United States.
Retail Stores: Located on the ground
floor and outside around the terrace, the
retail stores include Wachovia Bank, STA
Travel, the Reitz Union Hair Company, Do
it Reitz! Copy Center, the Outfitter, Lange
Eye Care, Talking Walls, Kaplan Test Prep
and Comp USA.
Recreation & Entertainment: The Arts
and Crafts Center offers studio space,
classes and hands-on instruction in ceram-
ics, jewelry making and screen printing.
The Game Room features 16 bowling lanes
with black lights and automatic scoring, 17
billiard tables, a snooker table, football
and video games. Camping and outdoor
equipment rentals and trip-planning in-
formation are available from The Outfitter.
The Reitz Union Cinema features first-run
movies, avant-garde classics and foreign
and animated films. The gallery and art
gallery areas display works by students
and faculty.
UF Bookstore and Welcome Center: The
Bookstore is connected to the Reitz Union
and sells textbooks, supplies, gifts and
clothing.
The Welcome Center provides a "front
door" for the university, featuring an in-
formation desk, university displays, and
information about university programs
and entrance requirements. Walking tours
of the campus depart Monday-Friday (ex-
cept holidays) from the Welcome Center.
The Gator 1 Card Services Office also is
located in the Welcome Center.


Career Resource Center
www.crc.ufl.edu/
The Career Resource Center (CRC), on
the first floor of the J. Wayne Reitz Union,
provides career planning, cooperative
education/internship, externship work
experience opportunities and employment
assistance at the University of Florida.
The CRC helps students develop and
explore career plans, acquire career-related
work experiences and develop personal
strategies that ensure employment.
The center's services focus upon the stu-
dent, from freshmen exploring careers to
graduate students seeking employment.
Students can use the center at any time dur-
ing their college careers. Most services are
free and include counseling for students
seeking career planning, career changes,
work experience and job search campaigns.
The Career Workshop Program offers
seminar sessions on a wide variety of top-
ics each semester. Sessions are 50 minutes
long and are taught in the CRC's career
development laboratory, and many are
available through the Internet site. Topics
include career planning, cooperative edu-
cation, job search correspondence, resume
preparation, interview techniques, over-
seas jobs and many more.
The Cooperative Education and Intern-
ship Programs enable students to gain pro-
fessional work experience related to
classroom education. They also provide a
source of income and enable students to
become more competitive for the job market.
Hundreds of recruiters visit the CRC
each semester and conduct nearly 10,000 on-
campus job interviews each year, the largest
such program in the state. The center uses a
web-based resume referral and interview
management database called Gator Career-
Link@. Students who wish to participate in
the on-campus interview process for full-
time, co-op or internship positions must first
register with the CRC at
www.crc.ufl.edu/CareerLink/index.php.
Career Days: The center sponsors a
number of these events each semester.
Career Showcase, traditionally held in
September and January, offers all students
an opportunity to discuss career and em-
ployment opportunities with hundreds of
national companies. Several smaller career
events provide a more specialized recruit-
ing environment for specific colleges and
career fields.
The Career Resource Library contains
information to help students make career
choices: facts on several thousand employ-
ers; employer contact lists; directories for
business, industry, education and gov-
ernment; lists of American firms operating


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







STUDENT INFORMATION


overseas and reference material and in-
formation on graduate and special studies
programs such as fellowships, assistant-
ships and other resource materials.
Research data also is available on job
trends, outlook and economic forecasts;
labor market statistics; manpower bulletins
for various career fields; special directories
and publications rating most employers.
More than 250 slide/tape, video and audio
programs provide career choices, em-
ployer information, job search and inter-
view techniques.
A Credentials and Referral Service is
available to students and alumni. Copies
of credentials are sent upon request to po-
tential employers. In addition, the center
refers qualified persons on file to inter-
ested employers requesting candidates to
fill job vacancies.
The World Wide Web: The Career Re-
source Center's list of jobs and career infor-
mation is available at www.crc.ufl.edu. This
site contains a full spectrum of information
services and direct Web links.

GatorLink
www.gatorlink.ufl.edu
GatorLink is a student's computer iden-
tity at the University of Florida. A GatorLink
account provides a short userame@ufl.edu
e-mail address. Official university commu-
nications are sent to this e-mail address.
GatorLink also offers access to a variety of
campus computing services at no cost, in
addition to fee-based services. Free Gator-
Link services include e-mail, a monthly
dialup quota and Web space. Many cam-
pus services require a GatorLink signon,
including computer lab and network con-
nections, print services, online training and
the download of university-licensed soft-
ware. No-cost GatorLink services are sup-
ported by the university's central
administration.
Using the GatorLink Web site, a student
can create and manage a GatorLink account.
The Office of Academic Technology's UF
Computing Help Desk is ready to help stu-
dents create and use GatorLink services, as
well as computer connections, computer use
or problems. Call 392-HELP (4357), stop by
CSE E214 or CSE E520, or e-mail help-
desk@ufl.edu to speak to a consultant. The
Help Desk's Web site, helpdesk.ufl.edu,
provides service hours and self-help infor-
mation.
Undergraduate students receive weekly
e-mail from the University of Florida
called the University of Florida Wednes-
day Update. These e-mails are sent to all
the GatorLink e-mail addresses of regis-
tered undergraduate students. The content


of the e-mails includes administrative in-
formation, such as deadlines and require-
ments, and educational enhancement
opportunities for undergraduates.
The University of Florida Wednesday Up-
date is a service of the Office of the Associate
Provost for Undergraduate Education to en-
hance the undergraduate experience. Ar-
chives of these e-mails can be found at
lists.ufl.edularchives/wednesday-update.html.

Gator I Card
www.bsd.ufl.edu
The official university photo ID is
known as the Gator 1 card. All enrolled
students, faculty and staff must have a
university ID card. The Gator 1 card is
used for the following:
* to gain access to CIRCA computer
labs, university libraries, student rec-
reation and fitness centers, all univer-
sity recreation facilities and
intramural sports activities and the in-
firmary.
to participate in the Gator 1 textbook
deferment program at the UF Book-
stores, which enables students to defer
the payment for necessary textbooks
and supplies until financial aid is dis-
bursed.
to purchase tickets to any university
athletic or extracurricular events and
to vote in student government elec-
tions.
to purchase food at any campus loca-
tion if the student has a Gator Dining
account and/or to purchase items
from select vending machines if the
student has a prepaid vending account.
to use laundry facilities in some resi-
dence halls with a prepaid account.
to double as an ATM/debit card when
activated through Wachovia Bank.
Please visit www.bsd.ufl.edu for
more information.
The ID Card Services Office is located on
the ground-floor level of the UF Bookstore
and Welcome Center Complex on Mu-
seum Road. Office hours are 7:30 a.m. -
6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, exclud-
ing university holidays. Call 352-392-UFID
(8343) for further information.
To process a request for a Gator 1 card,
follow these instructions:
Visit the ID Card Services Office lo-
cated in the UF Bookstore and Wel-
come Center Complex on Museum
Road.
Present a photo ID (driver's license,
military ID or passport) and provide


your UF ID number and a copy of
your social security card.
Pay the $10 fee required at the time
the card is processed (cash, check or
debit card only).

NOTE: Access to university facilities and
privileges may be denied if your account is
on hold by University Financial Services.

Student Spouse ID Cards: To obtain a
student spouse card, the spouse should
bring the student's UFID card, marriage
certificate, his or her photo identification
(driver's license or passport) and social
security card, and $10 to the ID Card Ser-
vices Office. ID Card Services will assign a
UFID number if needed.

UFID Number
ufid.ufl.edu
UFID is an eight-digit number (#### -
####) that serves as the primary way to
identify students in all university records
and transactions. Similar to a Social Secu-
rity Number, no two people will have the
same number, and each person has only
one number. The number is pre-assigned
by the university, not chosen as you would
a PIN. All students, employees and others
associated with the university have a UFID
number. If a student has a valid Gator 1
card, the student has a UFID number. Ob-
tain your UFID number online at the Web
site indicated above. Additional informa-
tion is provided at www.it.ufl.edulufid/
faq-students.html.

Transportation and Parking
Regulations
www.parking.ufl.edu
Students may ride all Gainesville Re-
gional Transit System (RTS ) buses fare-
free upon presentation of a Gator 1 card.
Students of the university may operate
a motor vehicle on campus and register a
vehicle for parking. All vehicles parked on
campus on weekdays between 7:30 a.m. -
4:30 p.m. must display a valid UF parking
decal or permit, or must be parked at a
metered space or approved pay facility
with payment of the appropriate fee.
Student parking eligibility is deter-
mined by local address and academic clas-
sification. Rules and regulations are
available online at the Web site above and
are provided also at the time of vehicle
registration. All registrants should become
familiar with them before operating or
parking a motor vehicle on campus.
Special disabled student decals are
available to students with state-issued dis-


University of Florida







CAMPUS LIFE AND STUDENT SUPPORT


abled persons' parking placards with prior
approval by the university's ADA office.
Illegal parking or moving violations
may result in the issuance of citations.
Failure to respond to citations within the
prescribed time and/or accumulation of
citations may result in additional costs,
vehicle impoundment, suspension of park-
ing privileges, and delays in registering for
classes and receiving grades or transcripts.
For more information, visit the Web site
listed above or contact Transportation and
Parking Services, 352-392-2241.

Gator Dining Service
www.bsd.ufl.edu
Gator Dining Service is the official food
service provider of the University of Flor-
ida. There are more than 25 dining loca-
tions on campus, including many favorite
national franchisees like Burger King,
Wendy's, Subway, Taco Bell, Blimpie,
Chick-fil-A, Einstein's Bagels, Freshens,
Java City, and more. Gator Dining Services
offers two types of meal plans: 1) The All
Campus Meal Plan providing 19, 14, or 10
meals per week at discounts of almost half
off retail price; and 2) the Regular Declin-
ing Balance Account that is accepted at all
locations on campus and can be opened
with as little as $1.

UF Bookstores
www.bsd.ufl.edu
The University of Florida Bookstores are
the university's official bookstores offering
new and used textbooks, and other school
supplies. The Gator 1 Deferment Program
allows students who have financial aid to
defer the payment for textbooks and other
course materials until financial aid is re-
ceived. The Gator 1 Card is used as a debit
card to facilitate the purchases. Other UF
Bookstores' programs include Textbook
Reservations, which allows students to re-
serve books before the term begins, and
Guaranteed Buyback, guaranteeing 50 per-
cent buyback when the textbook is sold back
to the bookstore. These books are designated
with a GBB sticker.
A UF Bookstore is located in the UF Book-
store and Welcome Center Complex on Mu-
seum Road south of the J. Wayne Reitz
Student Union. Additional bookstores are
located in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
and the College of Veterinary Medicine.
For more information, contact the UF
Bookstores at 352-392-0194, toll free 800-
226-3015, or refer to the UF Bookstore's
link at the Web site listed above.


Academic Support Services
University Writing Program
www.writing.ufl.edu
The University Writing Program offers
writing-intensive courses, workshops and
support to students and faculty at the uni-
versity. Courses are based on the premise
that writing is a transferable skill neces-
sary for success in all academic and pro-
fessional fields. Courses taught by Writing
Program faculty include ENC 1101, Intro-
duction to College Writing, and ENC 1102,
Introduction to Argument and Persuasion.
Reading and Writing Center
www.at.ufl.edu/r&w/
The University Reading and Writing
Center, located within the Teaching Center
in SW Broward Hall, offers free services to
staff and students. The center's office is
open 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday (392-2010).
The center provides noncredit individual
instruction in reading and writing. The
reading program is designed to improve
comprehension, vocabulary and study
skills. The writing program helps students
with the organization and development of
papers and with grammar and mechanics.
Through individual conferences, students
may receive limited help in writing papers.
The center offers workshops on CLAST
and GRE preparation and on writing dis-
sertations and theses. Materials also are
available for the MCAT, LSAT, TOEFL or
GMAT exams.
Teaching Center
www.teachingcenter.ufl.edu
The Office of Academic Technology
Teaching Center, located on the ground
level of SW Broward Hall, offers free tutor-
ing in a variety of subject areas: account-
ing, astronomy, biology, chemistry,
computer science, engineering, economics,
mathematics, physics, and statistics courses.
Students may prepare for the mathematics
portion of the GRE or CLAST by working
individually with a tutor, attending work-
shops, or using the center's computer/print
resources. Study skills/learning strategies
help is provided individually and through
workshops. Videos on time management,
learning strategies, test taking, etc., are also
available. Visit the Teaching Center in Bro-
ward Hall, call 392-2010, or access their Web
site for hours of operation and further infor-
mation.
UF International Center
www.ufic.ufl.edu
The University of Florida International
Center (UFIC) in Grinter Hall, Room 123,
promotes the international work of col-


leges, departments, faculty and students.
UFIC supports teaching, research and ser-
vice, and the enhancement of international
education and training throughout the
university and the state. For more informa-
tion, contact UFIC at 352-392-5323; fax,
352-392-5575.
Study Abroad Services (SAS) offers sum-
mer, semester, and academic year programs
that provide students the opportunity to live
and study abroad while fulfilling degree
requirements. Exchange programs allow
students to pay UF tuition yet study over-
seas. Scholarships and financial aid can help
to finance the international academic ex-
perience. SAS program assistants advise
applicants, tailoring the program to the
individual needs of the students. Visit the
UFIC library or the UFIC Web site for pro-
gram details.
International Student Services (ISS) pro-
vides orientation, immigration services
and practical workshops to students from
abroad coming to study at UF. Services
are provided to international students
immediately upon their arrival at the Uni-
versity of Florida and continue until they
return to their home country.
Office of Academic Technology
www.at.ufl.edu
The Office of Academic Technology (AT)
provides academic and technology re-
sources and assistance to students. Testing
services are offered to students, including
the CLEP, CLAST, GRE and other stan-
dardized tests. The Reading and Writing
Center and Teaching Center provide indi-
vidual instruction and tutoring for stu-
dents.
AT's Center for Instructional and Re-
search Computing (CIRCA) provides com-
puting labs and work areas for use by all
UF students, connectivity and utility soft-
ware, instructions on the UF Software CD,
training in computer skills and consulting
support for students' computer accounts.
Their Web address is www.circa.ufl.edu.
For more information about services of-
fered by the Office of Academic Technol-
ogy, refer to their Web site.
Office for Academic Support and
Institutional Services (OASIS)
www.oasis.ufl.edu
The Office for Academic Support and
Institutional Services (OASIS) in 200
Walker Hall coordinates and directs sup-
port and enrichment services for all regu-
larly and specially admitted minority
students (African-American, Asian Ameri-
can, Hispanic American and Native
American). This includes participants in
the Upward Bound Program, the Student


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog







STUDENT INFORMATION


Enrichment Services Program and other
regularly admitted students in the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This office
works closely with the Office of Admission
and counselors in high schools and com-
munity colleges to facilitate the admission
of minority students.
Once students are admitted, OASIS con-
tinues to help their retention by providing
academic counseling, tutoring, referrals
and advocacy. OASIS works closely with
the Academic Advising Center to provide
training for and information about its spe-
cial programs.
OASIS strives to enhance academic pro-
gress. Tutors are provided in math, Eng-
lish, biological sciences, statistics,
economics, chemistry and physics. Refer-
rals are made and tutoring arranged in
other areas through the Teaching Center,
SW Broward Hall, the Reading and Writ-
ing Center and other campus wide offices.
OASIS helps students develop coping and
social adjustment skills by providing suc-
cessful peers and role models. Enrichment
services include recruitment, retention
workshops and seminars, academic pro-
gress monitoring, orientation programs,
research and evaluation activities, and
educational and social activities.
Cycles of Success League for
Scholars
www.aa.ufl.edu/aa/affact/
The Cycles of Success League provides a
yearlong program for the University's Na-
tional Achievement, Golden, Platinum Op-
portunity and Presidential scholars. The
program helps to enhance the students' aca-
demic excellence through planned programs
encouraging them to develop leadership
skills for career development and academic
success.
Student-led study groups meet weekly
in small groups to encourage excellent
study habits. Monthly STEPS (Success to
Every Presidential Scholars) meetings are
scheduled to provide a forum with key
people in the university family to address
the needs of scholars. Students who need
additional academic counseling may meet
on a weekly basis with the program coor-
dinator to plan and set goals for success.
The Office of the Vice Provost, under the
direction of Dr. Jacquelyn D. Hart, admin-
isters the program.
University Minority Mentor
Program
www.aa.ufl.edu/aa/affact/
The University Minority Mentor Pro-
gram (UMMP) is open to all first-year mi-
nority students. The yearlong program
provides an opportunity for each partici-


pating student to be mentored by a faculty
member who supports, guides and facili-
tates the realization of each student's
dream. Many planned activities are held
each semester to enhance the protege-
mentor relationship. The effects of mentor-
ing are dramatic, having a positive impact
on student retention, graduation rates and
faculty-student relations. This program is
administered by the Office of the Vice Pro-
vost for Equal Opportunity Programs and
assisted by a council of faculty and staff.
Office of Graduate Minority
Programs
The University of Florida is a member of
the National Name Exchange Consortium.
This consortium matches undergraduate
minority students who are interested in
graduate education with graduate schools.
The name exchange program seeks to in-
crease the number of qualified minority
students accepted into graduate school,
improve student access to information on
graduate school opportunities, and assist
graduate schools in identifying qualified
minority candidates for graduate study.
For additional information, contact Re-
cruitment and Retention, Office of Graduate
Minority Programs, Grinter Hall, Room 115,
392-6444, E-mail: ogmp@ufl.edu. The Na-
tional Name Exchange Web site: www.grad.
washington.edu/nameexch/national/stu-
dent.html.
Ronald E. McNair Scholars
The Ronald E. McNair Scholars Achieve-
ment Program at UF encourages qualified
undergraduate students to pursue their
educational studies through graduate edu-
cation. This high-quality, intense academic
research program, which is one of the most
prestigious in the country, is designed for
first-generation and low-income college
students, as well as students from groups
underrepresented at the graduate level.
New scholars begin the program at the
Summer B term with a six-week manda-
tory Summer Research Institute. The
scholars are enrolled in a three-credit hour
Scholarly Writing (ENC) course, along
with three other specialized McNair work-
shops; the Research Process, Statistics for
Academic Research, and GRE Preparation.
Scholars are required to partner with a
faculty mentor and conduct research, as
well as attend program workshops and
activities.
McNair scholars receive a research sti-
pend of $2,400 that is paid throughout the
program year. Applications are available
in mid October, and the deadline to submit
an application is the last day of February.


For more information about additional
criteria for the program, call 352-846-2575.

Special Support Services
The Counseling Center
www.counsel.ufl.edu
The Counseling Center offers counseling
services to enrolled students for personal,
career and educational concerns. Profes-
sional psychologists and counselors pro-
vide short-term individual, couples and
group counseling. There is no charge for
the center's confidential counseling ser-
vices. Appointments may be made in per-
son during office hours (8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday). Students
in need of immediate assistance are seen
on an emergency non-appointment basis.
The center is located in Peabody Hall,
Room 301.
Counseling Center faculty members also
provide a range of consultation and out-
reach programs to the campus community.
Telephone or in-person consultation is
available for students, parents, faculty and
staff regarding any issues related to stu-
dent development. The center's faculty
members serve as program resources for a
variety of student organizations and aca-
demic departments. The center has an ex-
tensive training program for selected
students. Faculty teach undergraduate and
graduate courses in the departments of
psychology and counselor education.
Special groups offered by the center ad-
dress topics such as academic success,
math/science/technology confidence, per-
sonal and family relationships, and sub-
stance abuse. The center also provides
various support groups for identified stu-
dent populations. Help with career deci-
sion making and choosing a major occurs
through individual and group counseling,
as well as through use of DISCOVER, a
computerized career guidance program.
All center activities are conducted with
sensitivity to diversity of the students on a
large, multicultural campus. For more in-
formation please call at 352-392-1575 or
visit the center's Web site.
Student Health Care Center
www.health.ufl.edu/shcc
The Student Health Care Center (SHCC)
provides outpatient medical services that
include primary medical care, health
screening programs, health education,
sexual assault recovery services and men-
tal health counseling. The Accreditation
Association for Ambulatory Health Care
Inc. accredits the SHCC.
Hours: The fall and spring SHCC hours
for medical care are 8:00 a.m. 6:30 p.m. on


University of Florida







CAMPUS LIFE AND STUDENT SUPPORT


weekdays and noon 4:00 p.m. on week-
ends and some holidays. Student Mental
Health hours are 8 a.m. 5 p.m., Monday
and Friday and 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
Pharmacy hours are 8 a.m. 5:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday and noon 4 p.m.
on weekends/holidays. Clinic hours vary
during semester breaks and holidays.
Summer hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., Monday through Friday. A medical
provider and mental health counselor are
available by phone for urgent questions
that require advice after hours.
Cost: There is no charge for an office
visit with SHCC clinical staff, health edu-
cation or mental health services. Fee-for-
service charges are assessed for laboratory
tests, X-rays, medical procedures, medica-
tions, physical therapy, massage therapy
and consultation with health care special-
ists. CPR and first-aid classes also are
available for a fee.
Location: All the services are located in
the Infirmary building, which is located on
Fletcher Drive on campus. Limited SHCC
services also are available at SHCC at
Shands Satellite Clinic and Corry Village.
Appointments: The SHCC has a con-
venient, appointment-based system de-
signed to encourage continuity of care.
Students are assigned a medical provider
in a team. This provider will see the stu-
dent throughout his/her educational ca-
reer at UF. Students should first phone to
receive an appointment with their pro-
vider within 24 hours.
Eligibility for service: All students regis-
tered for classes at the university are eligible
for service. Spouses, postdoctoral students
and semester-off students who plan to re-
turn the following semester may receive
services if they pay an optional health fee. A
Student Government-sponsored health in-
surance plan is available.
Services: Health services available for
university students include immuniza-
tions, foreign travel consultation, women's
health care, specialized programs for stu-
dents with eating disorders and alcohol
and substance abuse, an acute care clinic
and a sports medicine clinic. A current
description of all services, hours and spe-
cial events is listed on the SHCC Web site.
Clinical staff: Physicians, physician as-
sistants, nurse practitioners, registered
nurses, dietitians, psychiatrists, psycholo-
gists and mental health counselors staff the
SHCC. Each team has a registered nurse
whom a student can phone and discuss
medical concerns and questions. The
health education staff provides counseling
and an extensive campus outreach includ-

2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


ing the GatorWell program. In addition,
the SHCC also provides a pharmacy, clini-
cal laboratory and radiology services.
HIV Infection: The university's policy
is to assess the needs of students, faculty
or employees with HIV infection on a case-
by-case basis. With permission of the af-
fected individual, the director of the Stu-
dent Health Care Center will help
coordinate resources and services.
The confidentiality of the individual's
HIV status, as well as the individual's wel-
fare, is respected. Breach of confidentiality
of information obtained by a university
employee in an official university capacity
may result in disciplinary action.
Based on current medical information
concerning risk of infection, the university
does not isolate persons with HIV infec-
tion or AIDS from other individuals in the
educational or work setting. Furthermore,
the university supports the continued par-
ticipation, to the fullest extent reasonably
possible, of these individuals in the cam-
pus educational/work environment.
It is also the policy of the university to
provide education that seeks to prevent
the spread of HIV infection. Those at risk
for HIV infection are encouraged to get
tested; those who are infected are urged to
seek treatment. With current advances in
HIV /AIDS treatment, early intervention is
crucial to maintain well-being and delay
complications of the illness.
In keeping with the Americans with
Disabilities Act, the university considers
HIV/AIDS to be a disability. Students or
employees who are disabled by HIV infec-
tion or AIDS can use existing support ser-
vices.
Medical Excuse Note Policy: The Stu-
dent Health Care Center can provide a
medical excuse note only if our providers
are involved in the medical care of a stu-
dent who must be absent from class for
three or more days for medical reasons. A
student who has a medical reason that
results in fewer than three days of absence
from class should talk with his/her profes-
sor rather than ask for an excuse note from
the SHCC. If a professor subsequently re-
quires a note for a medical absence of
fewer than three days, then the professor
must provide the SHCC with a written
request on UF department letterhead.
Dental Care
www.dental.ufl.edu
The College of Dentistry provides a
broad range of dental services at reduced
fees through its student clinics. For infor-
mation or scheduling of appointments, call
352- 392-4261.


Emergency dental care is available on a
walk-in basis at 8:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
weekdays. Entry to the College of Den-
tistry clinics (the blue zone on the first
floor) is via the west entrance to the Health
Science Center on Center Drive. Parking is
available in the visitor's parking garage
with access from Mowry Road.
Speech and Hearing Clinic
web.csd.ufl.edu/speech.html
The Department of Communication Sci-
ences and Disorders offers services to per-
sons who have speech, hearing, language
or reading disorders.
The clinic operates from 8:00 a.m. 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday when the
university is in session. Contact the clinic
at 352-392-2041 (voice & TDD) or visit
Dauer Hall, Room 435, for information
regarding fees and services or to schedule
an appointment.
Student Legal Services
www.sg.ufl.edu/organizations/sls
Student Legal Services, funded by the
activity and service fee, provides legal
advice and counseling to university stu-
dents. Full-time students may receive ad-
vice on landlord-tenant problems,
consumer law, criminal charges, traffic
citations, divorce, adoption, name change
and other family matters. In some land-
lord-tenant and family law matters, Stu-
dent Legal Services provides free
representation in court in Alachua County.
Certain restrictions and limitations may
apply. Appointments usually are required
for one-on-one counseling with the staff
attorneys. All staff attorneys are licensed
members of the Florida Bar.
Notary services, including preparation
of powers of attorney, are available with-
out appointment during normal business
hours, 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
For more information on the services of-
fered or to make an appointment to speak
to a staff attorney, call Student Legal Ser-
vices at 392-1665, Ext. 368. Student Legal
Services is located in the J. Wayne Reitz
Union, Room 368.
Other Special Support Services
Committee on Sexism and Homophobia
352-392-1261, Peabody Hall, Room 202,
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., Mon. Fri.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Concerns Com-
mittee 352-392-9191; Hours: 8 a.m. 5 p.m.,
Monday Friday; Chairperson: Linda
Lamme, P.O. Box 117048
Rape and Crime Victim Advocate Pro-
gram 352-334-0827, open 24 hours a day,
7 days a week







STUDENT INFORMATION


Center for Sexual Assault/Abuse
Recovery Education: 352-392-1161, ext. 231,
Student Health Care Center, Room 326.
Hours: 8 a.m. 5 p.m., Monday Friday
Center for Women's Studies and
Gender Research: 352-392-3365, Turlington
Hall, Room 3324, Hours: 8 a.m. 5 p.m.,
Monday Friday

Activities and Organizations
sg.ufl.edu
Student Government: Student Gov-
ernment at the University of Florida is a
cooperative organization that advances
student interests and is based on mutual
confidence among the student body, the
faculty and the administration. Consider-
able authority has been granted the stu-
dent body for the regulation and conduct
of student affairs. Student Government
accepts responsibility commensurate with
the resources at its disposal to fulfill its
mission, including the allocation of more
than ten million dollars annually in stu-
dent activity and service fees, substantial
authority in the regulation of co-curricular
activities and administration of the Stu-
dent Honor Court. The university feels
that training in and responsibility for the
conduct of student affairs is a valuable
part of educational growth and develop-
ment.
Student Government is the governing
organization and representative of the
student body. Student Government func-
tions under a constitution and by-laws that
have been accepted by the university as
expressing the will of the students, al-
though ultimate authority for university
affairs rests with university administra-
tion. Powers are distributed into the three
branches: legislative, which is embodied in
the Student Senate; judicial, which is em-
bodied in the Student Honor Court; and
executive, embodied in the president, vice-
president and the treasurer of the student
body. Members of all three branches are
elected directly by the student body. In
addition to elected offices, many ap-
pointed positions have been established,
including Cabinet and sub-Cabinet, Stu-
dent Honor Court and Traffic Court posts.
Student Government, recognizing its
limitations as a true "government," at-
tempts to exercise influence on govern-
ments at all levels through conferences,
lobbying, research and the advancement of
proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions
within the student government structure by


contacting the Student Government offices
on the third floor of the J. Wayne Reitz Un-
ion.
Religious Activities: The churches, cen-
ters and organizations associated with the
university offer a variety of programs and
ministries. There also are interdenomina-
tional and nondenominational activities
fostered by the Department of Religion
and the Campus Ministries Cooperative.
Social Fraternities: The Interfraternity
Council, National Pan-Hellenic Council,
Panhellenic Council, and Multicultural
Greek Council are the governing bodies
for all UF Greek organizations. The Inter-
fraternity Council supervises the activities
of the NIC fraternities and is composed of
an executive board and the president of
each fraternity.
The National Pan-Hellenic Council is
the umbrella organization for the tradi-
tionally African-American fraternities and
sororities at the university. The NPHC is
composed of an executive board and the
president of each group.
Primary jurisdiction in sorority matters
is vested in the Panhellenic Council. The
Panhellenic Council is composed of an
executive board and the president and
Panhellenic delegate of each of the univer-
sity's National Panhellenic Conference
sororities. The Multicultural Greek Council
serves as the governing body for sororities
and fraternities who have an ethnic, multi-
cultural as well as a non-traditional focus.
For a full listing of the chapters currently
recognized at the University of Florida,
visit the Dean of Students Office Web site
at www.dso.ufl.edu/greek/.
In addition to the social fraternities and
sororities, there are approximately 220
honorary and professional organizations
and approximately 200 other special inter-
est groups.

Intercollegiate Athletics
www.gatorzone.com
For the past 20 years the University of
Florida has ranked among the nation's 10
best collegiate athletic programs based on
research conducted by USA Today and the
National Association of Collegiate Direc-
tors of Athletics. UF and UCLA are the
only schools to finish in the top 10 in na-
tional all-sports rankings every year since
1983-84.
UF is a member of the National Colle-
giate Association of Athletics (NCAA) and
the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and


competes in Division I for all 18 athletic
teams.
The Gators field eight men's teams and
10 women's sports. The men compete in
baseball, basketball, cross-country, foot-
ball, golf, swimming & diving, tennis, and
track & field. The women participate in
basketball, cross-country, golf, gymnastics,
swimming & diving, soccer, softball, ten-
nis, track & field and volleyball.
UF also was successful away from the
athletic arena in 2002-03, earning a school
record 193 Southeastern Conference aca-
demic honor roll accolades. UF has had
1,621 Academic All-SEC honorees since
1980, tops in the league. Four UF student-
athletes also earned spots on Verizon Aca-
demic All-America teams in 2002-03, giv-
ing the Gators 51 academic All-Americans
since 1992, the fourth highest among Divi-
sion I schools.

Student Recreation &
Fitness Centers
www.hhp.ufl.edu/recsport/
The Student Recreation and Fitness Cen-
ter (SRFC) is located off Fletcher Drive,
behind the Florida Gym, and has racquet-
ball and squash courts, two aerobics
rooms, and a strength and conditioning
room with cardiovascular, Nautilus, and
free-weight equipment. A multipurpose
area accommodates volleyball, basketball
and martial arts activities. The Lifestyle
Appraisal Center, Room 103 of the SRFC,
offers fitness assessments and wellness
information.
The Southwest Recreation Center
(SWRC) is located across from the Ham
Museum on Hull Road. It contains racquet-
ball, basketball and volleyball courts, an
aerobics room, and a strength and condi-
tioning room with free weights, Med-X and
cardiovascular equipment. For more infor-
mation, please refer to the Web site.
Lake Wauburg: UF students, faculty
and staff have their own private lakefront
parks located eight miles south on U.S.
Highway 441. Lake Wauburg North and
South are outdoor recreation facilities
owned and operated year round by the
university. Each facility offers quiet places
to relax or picnic. Park entry fees are free
with your Gator 1 card. The north park
opens at noon and the south park at 1:00
p.m. Tuesday through Friday. On Satur-
day and Sunday, the parks open at 10:00
a.m. Both parks close at 6:00 p.m.


University of Florida


















Colleges/Schools and Their Curricula

* Fisher School of Accounting
* College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
* M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
* Warrington College of Business Administration
* College of Design, Construction and Planning
* College of Education
* College of Engineering
* College of Fine Arts
* School of Forest Resources and Conservation
* College of Health and Human Performance
* College of Journalism and Communications
* College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
* College of Natural Resources and Environment
* College of Nursing
* College of Pharmacy
* College of Public Health and Health Professions







Help in using this section:
Table of Contents .................................................... ............................... iii
Index to Majors and Their Colleges and Schools.................................... 1-12
Index to Minors and Their Colleges and Schools ................................... 1-14
Index to Certificates and Their Colleges and Schools .......................... -15
Combined Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs .................................. 1-16
Index to the Undergraduate Catalog ............................................... 5-125


3. Curricula

























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........FISHER SCHOOL OF AC OUNTIN


Overview
Established: 1933, endowed in 1985
through a gift from alumnus Frederick E.
Fisher
Location: Gerson Hall, Room 210
Phone: 352-273-0200
Rankings: Public Accounting Report (2003)
ranks the graduate program 12h in the na-
tion and the undergraduate program 14''.
Accredited: American Assembly of Colle-
giate Schools of Business (AACSB); Euro-
pean Quality Improvement System (EQUIS)
Programs: Four-year undergraduate pro-
gram, five-year 3/2 program with joint
award of bachelor's and master's degrees
in accounting
Degrees: Bachelor of Science in Account-
ing (B.S.Ac.), Master of Science in Account-
ing (M.Acc.)
Academic Advising: Undergraduate ad-
visers are available, by appointment, in
Gerson Hall, Room 210.
Scholarships: Fifth-year accounting stu-
dents should obtain scholarship applica-
tions from the Fisher School and complete
them early in the spring term of their
fourth year. General financial aid informa-
tion can be obtained from the Office of
Student Financial Affairs.
Computer Requirement: Information is
online at www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa.
Internships and Career Guidance: Refer
to www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa/practices.html.
Student Organizations:
www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa/organiz.html
Certified Public Accountants Examina-
tion: www.state.fl.us/dbpr/cpa/index.shtml

Academic Policies and

Procedures
The information provided in this catalog is
necessarily brief. In addition to the informa-
tion described herein, students are responsi-
ble for compliance with the policies and
procedures described in the Fisher School of
Accounting Student Handbook which can be
found at www.cba.ufl.edulfsoalforms.html.

Admission Requirements
Submitting an Undergraduate
,Application
The Fisher School of Accounting applies
the same admission standards to students
currently enrolled at the university (natives)
and those seeking entry to the Fisher School
from another academic institution (trans-
fers).
Native students who have selected ac-
counting as their major upon entering the


university will automatically be classified
as accounting students. This classification
will remain as long as the student meets
the continuation requirements described
below.
All other natives who want to change
their major to accounting should apply at
the Fisher School office. Transfer students
apply through the university's Office of
Admission.
Continuation Policies for Native
Students
Students majoring in accounting must
comply with the following requirements to
remain in the program:
Students must complete ACG 2021C
with a minimum grade of B.
Students are allowed two attempts,
including drops and withdrawals, to
achieve a grade of B in ACG 2021C.
Students must comply with all uni-
versal-tracking provisions.
Students must maintain a minimum
3.0 GPA in all attempts of preprofes-
sional course work.
Students must maintain a minimum
3.0 overall GPA.*
Upon satisfactory completion of all
freshman and sophomore year re-
quirements, including General Educa-
tion, preprofessional, CLAST, an A.A.
degree and a 3.0 minimum GPA, the
student will shift from continuation
status to retention status (2.0 GPA re-
quired).
Undergraduate Transfer Applicant
Pool
The Fisher School of Accounting uses an
applicant pool for undergraduate admis-
sion. All applicants who meet minimum
standards are placed into a pool from
which the most qualified are selected for
admission each term. Because of this proc-
ess, most admission decisions are not
made until well after the application dead-
line.
It is unlikely that all students who meet
the minimum standards will be admitted.
Admission is selective and subject to en-
rollment capacity. A Fisher School of Ac-
counting faculty committee is responsible
for admission decisions, which are not
based solely on GPA. Other factors, such
as performance in any accounting courses
completed before application and the
overall quality of the academic record, are
considered for admission.
Minimum Standards for the Transfer
Applicant Pool
A student will be considered for admis-
sion to the Fisher School of Accounting if
the following standards are met:


Completion of, or in the process of
completing, at least 60 semester hours
of course work at an accredited insti-
tution. Students transferring from a
Florida community college must have
their Associate of Arts degree before
enrollment in the Fisher School.
A 3.0 cumulative GPA calculated on
all attempts of all college-level course
work. If a student has attended the
University of Florida and another in-
stitution, the GPA calculation will be
based only on the UF course work.
A 3.0 cumulative GPA calculated on
all attempts of preprofessional course
work.
Satisfactory completion of the College
Level Academic Skills Tests (CLAST).
Completion of 19 semester hours of
preprofessional course work. CLEP
credit is not acceptable to replace pre-
professional course work. Although a
student will be considered for admis-
sion upon completion of the 12 pre-
professional credit hours described
below, all preprofessional courses are
prerequisites for the 3000-/4000-level
courses. Students who have not com-
pleted all 19 hours upon admission
will delay progress toward gradua-
tion.
Preprofessional Course
Requirements
The following preprofessional courses
must be completed at the time of applica-
tion:
ACG 2021C, Introduction to Financial
Accounting, or equivalent, with a
minimum grade of B. If a series of
courses is completed as equivalent to
ACG 2021C, then a B must be
achieved in each course. Students are
allowed a maximum of two attempts,
including drops, to achieve a grade of
B in ACG 2021C.
* MAC 2233, Survey of Calculus 1, or
equivalent.
* Two of the following four preprofes-
sional courses may be in process at the
time of application, but two courses
must have been completed success-
fully before enrollment:
* ECO 2013, Principles of Macroeco-
nomics, or equivalent.
* ECO 2023, Principles of Microeconom-
ics, or equivalent.
* CGS 2531, Introduction to Computer
Software, or equivalent.
* STA 2023, Introduction to Statistics 1,
or equivalent.
Undergraduate (B.S.Ac.) Admission
Policies
Admission requirements for the Fisher
School are subject to change. Please check


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa


FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOIINTIN~







COLLEGES


the Fisher School office (Gerson Hall,
Room 210) for the current standards.
Admission to the university does not
guarantee admission to the Fisher School.
Admission to the Fisher School does not
constitute admission to the 3/2 program.
This requires a separate application to the
Graduate School.
The Office of the University Registrar
determines the transferability of credit
earned at other institutions. Credit for vo-
cational or technical courses, repeats of
previous courses taken or credits from
non-accredited institutions will not trans-
fer to UF for degree credit.
Community college transfers are cau-
tioned that ACG 2071 or its equivalent will
count toward the B.S.Ac. degree only as
elective credit.
Courses Taken at Other Institutions
Before Admission to the University
of Florida
Professional course work that is required
as part of the third, fourth or fifth year
should be taken only at the University of
Florida.
Community college transfer students
should avoid such courses as Business Law,
Principles of Marketing, Principles of Fi-
nance, Principles of Management and ac-
counting courses beyond the introductory
level. A maximum of four semester credits
may be allowed for courses taken during the
first two years that are available only as
third- and fourth-year professional courses
in the Warrington College of Business. Any
credit granted for such work will be granted
only in the form of elective credit. In no case
may such courses be in accounting.
Students transferring from four-year col-
leges and universities and have previously
completed professional course work must
submit substitution forms to establish
equivalency. A maximum of one 3000-4000
level approved business core course may
count toward the student's undergraduate
degree. Accounting course work taken
elsewhere cannot be substituted for the
accounting courses required for the B.S.Ac.
degree.
In a case where a student wishes to
waive a core course and substitute a course
completed before admission to the Univer-
sity of Florida, waivers may be granted on
an individual basis, but the student will be
required to take another course in the area
waived. The department will identify the
substitute course.


Courses Taken at Other Institutions
After Admission to the University of
Florida
Once admitted to the Fisher School of
Accounting, a student may not take any
preprofessional, accounting or business
core course work required as part of the
Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree
at any other institution.
Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory Grade
Option
An undergraduate student may only re-
quest the S-U option for elective courses.
Courses taken to satisfy preparatory
course, General Education, or degree re-
quirements for the M.Acc. program may
not be taken S-U.
Unsatisfactory Performance
Students who do not make satisfactory
academic progress will be dropped from
the accounting program. In addition to
university regulations concerning unsatis-
factory performance, the school will ex-
clude students from further registration
for the following reasons:
Freshmen and Sophomores:
The student does not comply with the
minimum universal-tracking requirements.
The student has not earned a B grade
in ACG 2021C after two attempts (in-
cluding drop or withdrawal).
The student's cumulative GPA falls
below 3.0 and remains there after one
subsequent term of enrollment.
The student's cumulative GPA on all
attempts of preprofessional course
work falls below the minimum 3.0 re-
quired and remains there after one
subsequent term of enrollment.
The student withdraws from the uni-
versity three times while classified as
an AC student.
Juniors and Seniors:
The student earns two grades below C in
accounting courses numbered above 3000
regardless of whether the student was in
the Fisher School at the time they earned
those grades. Students not in the Fisher
School who register for 3000-/4000- level
accounting courses must comply with the
following items, or they will be denied
further registration in accounting courses:
The student's accounting GPA, calcu-
lated on all attempts of all required
accounting courses numbered 3000
and above, falls below 2.0 and re-
mains there after one term of enroll-
ment.
The student's cumulative GPA falls
below 2.0 and remains there after one
subsequent term of enrollment.


* The student withdraws from the uni-
versity three times after admission to
the Fisher School of Accounting.
* The student fails to register for a re-
quired 3000-4000 level accounting
course for two consecutive semesters
of enrollment.
For purposes of the above policies, the
following rules apply to the definition of a
term:
* Any term for which a student regis-
ters for courses at the university
counts as a term of enrollment, even if
the student subsequently withdraws
from the term (after drop/add).
* Summer registration is viewed as reg-
istration for one term (e.g., whether a
student registers for Summer A alone
or a combination of Summer A, B or
C, the student is considered registered
for one term).
Undergraduate Drop Policies I
During a student's first two years (1AC
or 2AC classification), a total of two drops
are permitted. Two additional drops are
provided for the student's last two years
(3AC or 4AC classification). Unused drops
from the student's first two years are not
available to use for the student's last two
years of study. Withdrawal in any term
(fall, spring or summer) is counted as one
drop for the purpose of applying the two-
drop policy.
The associate director, as advised by the
Professional Program Committee, must act
upon all other drop requests. The commit-
tee is very strict when considering such
requests and will not approve drops for
reasons that are not clearly beyond the
student's control.
This policy applies to drop requests
made after drop/add and before the pe-
riod governed by the Faculty Senate
Committee on Student Petitions.
Correspondence Courses and
Registration at Other Institutions
Courses may not be taken by correspon-
dence. Required courses (in preprofes-
sional, accounting and supporting fields)
may not be taken outside the university.
No exceptions are permitted.
Elective and General Education courses
may be taken outside the university only if:
the student will have more than 30
hours left to graduate from the Fisher'
School upon completion of such
courses.
the student obtains the advance ap-
proval of the associate director.
Dean's List
For the fall and spring semesters, stu-
dents who have earned a 3.5 or better grade
point average, based on a minimum of 14

University of Florida






www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa


FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


semester hours taken for letter grades, are
eligible for the dean's list. Students receive
a certificate to recognize their achievement.
S-U option hours are not counted toward
the 14 hours required.

Degree Requirements
Application for Graduation
Each student should plan to see an ad-
viser in the semester before the term of
planned graduation to confirm that all
degree requirements will be met pending
successful completion of the remaining
degree requirements. Graduation checks
will not be done during the week of
drop/add.
It is the student's responsibility to apply
for graduation at the Office of the Univer-
sity Registrar. The deadline for submitting
applications is published in the Schedule of
Courses. Failure to submit a timely applica-
tion may prevent graduation.
Requirements for Degree
Certification
To graduate with a B.S.Ac. degree, a stu-
dent must have satisfactorily completed
120 semester hours of prescribed course
work. A student must also complete the
following requirements:
A minimum of 60 hours of course
work for the B.S.Ac. degree must be at
the 3000 or above course level.
The last 30 hours of course work must
have been completed in residence at
the Fisher School with an AC classifi-
cation.
* The student must have completed at
least 16 semester credit hours of 3000-
/5000-level accounting courses at the
Fisher School.
* The waiving of any required course
does not reduce the hours required for
graduation.
* Graduation credits will not be given
for repeated courses.
In addition, the degree candidate must
have the following requirements::
* A minimum 2.0 GPA on all UF course
work.
* A minimum 2.0 GPA on all courses
taken in excess of 60 hours.
* A minimum 2.0 GPA on all attempts
of all required accounting courses
numbered 3000 and above.
Graduating with Honors
Outstanding performance is recognized
by the designation of cum laude, magna cum
laude and summa cum laude. The require-
ments for such honors are as follows:
* Cum laude- Minimum 3.2 GPA in all
attempts of major course work. In ad-
dition, the student must earn a mini-


mum 3.2 GPA in all attempts of
upper-division course work.
Magna cum laude- Minimum 3.6 GPA
in all attempts of major course work.
In addition, the student must earn a
minimum 3.6 GPA in all attempts of
upper-division course work.
Summa cum laude- Minimum 3.8 GPA
in all attempts of major course work.
In addition, the student must earn a
minimum 3.8 GPA in all attempts of
upper-division course work.
Only course work taken at UF will be
included in these computations. Major
course work shall include the six re-
quired accounting courses. Upper di-
vision course work shall include all
course work in excess of 60 semester
hours.
To receive magna cum laude or summa
cum laude recognition, the student must
register for and complete ACG 4970, Hon-
ors Thesis, under the supervision of the
Fisher School. The thesis must be accom-
panied by an abstract. These are available
at the Fisher School of Accounting. Post-
baccalaureate students are not eligible to
receive honors recognition.

Programs of Study


To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. The critical-tracking
courses appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* Complete 1 of the 6 critical-tracking
courses (ECO 2013, ECO 2023, MAC
2233, ACG 2021C, STA 2023, CGS
2531)
* 3.0 UF GPA required for semesters 1-6
* 3.0 GPA required for all attempts of
preprofessional course work for se-
mester 1-4
Semester 2:
* Complete 2 additional courses of the 6
critical-tracking courses (1 of the 3
courses must be MAC 2233 or equiva-
lent)
Semester 3:
* Complete 1 additional course of the 6
critical-tracking courses (1 of the 4
courses must be ACG 2021C with a
minimum grade of B)
Semester 4:
* Complete all 6 critical-tracking
courses
* Complete General Education and
Writing and Math Requirement
course work
Semester 5:
* Complete ACG 3481 and ACG 3482C


eS mester 1


Crdrlitf


ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics
(G E-S)...................................... .............. 3
STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics 1 (GE-M) 3
Physical or Biological Science (GE-P/B)............ 3
Composition (GE-C).............................................. 3
Elective .......................... ............ ................ 3
Total 15
Semester 2 Credits
MAC 2233 Survey of Calculus 1 (GE-M)......... 3
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics
(G E-S)...................................... .............. 3
Physical or Biological Science (GE-P/B)............ 3
Humanities (GE-H) ............................................... 3
Elective ........................... ........... ................ 3
Total 15
Semester 3 Credits
ACG 2021C Introduction to Financial
Accounting.................................. ............. 4
CGS 2531 Introduction to Computers Soft-
ware (GE-M) ............................................ 3
Humanities (GE-H) ................................... 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)................... 3
Electives..................... ..................... 2
Total 15
Semester 4 Credits
MAC 2234 Survey of Calculus 2 (GE-M)............ 3
Physical or Biological Science (GE-P/B)............ 3
Humanities (GE-H) ............................................... 3
Second English class required for 3/2 program 3
Elective .......................... ............ ................ 3
Total 15
Additional information regarding Gen-
eral Education:
* Students may vary the hours in hu-
manities, social and behavioral sci-
ence, and physical and biological
sciences: no fewer than six hours and
no more than 12 hours in each cate-
gory with a total of 27 hours among
the three categories.
* 2000 level and above foreign language
courses qualify as interna-
tional/diversity courses IF they also
qualify as one of the four General
Education categories.
* General Education requirements may
be fulfilled with credit from AP, IB or
dual-enrollment courses. Additional
exemptions may occur from SAT II
scores, if deemed appropriate. The
3000-/4000-level business core courses
will not satisfy General Education re-
quirements (for example, MAN 3025
and MAR 3023).
See below for the course sequencing for
the junior and senior years in the 3/2 pro-
gram.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


Semester 1 CradifeLI







COLLEGES


Semester 5 Credits
ACG 3481 Accounting Information and
Business Processes I.................................... 3
ACG 3482C Accounting Information and
Business Processes 2 ................................... 4
FIN 3403 Business Finance..................................4
QMB 3250 Statistics for Business Decisions .......4
Total 15
Semester 6 Credits
ACG 4133C Financial Accounting ................ 4
ECP 3703 Managerial Economics..................4
MAN 3025 Principles of Management................4
Elective (greater than or equal to 3000 level).....3
Total 15
Critical-tracking Criteria:
* Completed ACG 4133C or 4352C
* Completed a total of two 3000-14000-
level accounting courses
Semester 7 Credits
ACG 4352C Cost & Managerial Accounting... 4
TAX 5005 Federal Income Tax......................... 3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing ..................4.
Elective (greater than or equal to 3000 level).....4
Total 15
Critical-tracking Criteria:
Maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA
Completed ACG 5637 or TAX 5005


* Completed a total of four 3000-/5000-
level accounting courses
Semester 8 Credits
ACG 5637 Auditing 1........................................ 3
MAN 4504 Operations Management.................4
BUL 4310 Legal Environment of Business .........4
Elective (greater than or equal to 3000 level).....4
Total 15
Critical-tracking Criteria:
* Maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA
Total Required for Degree...........120


The 3/2 program requires the same
freshman and sophomore course require-
ments as the B.S.Ac. program. The junior
and senior year courses vary, as follows:
Semester 5 Credits
ACG 3481 Accounting Information and
Business Processes I.................................... 3
ACG 3482C Accounting Information and
Business Processes 2 ................................... 4
FIN 3403 Business Finance ...............................4.
QMB 3250 Statistics for Business Decisions....... 4
Total 15


Semester 6 Credits
ACG 4133C Financial Accounting .................... 4
ACG 4352C Cost and Managerial Accounting .4
ECP 3703 Managerial Economics...................... 4
MAN 3025 Principles of Management ............... 4
Total 16
Semester 7* Credits
TAX 5005 Federal Income Tax........................... 3
ACG 5637 Auditing 1............................................ 3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing..................... 4
BUL 4310 Legal Environment of Business......... 4
Total 14
* Admitted to Graduate School 7AC
standing
Semester 8 Credits
TAX 5065 Tax Professional Research ................. 2
ACG 5815 Accounting Institutions and Profes-
sional Literature............................................ 2
ACG 5226 Mergers and Acquisitions .................2
SPC 2600 Public Speaking .................................. 3
ENC 5236 Writing for Accountants.................... 2
MAN 4504 Operations Management.................. 4
Total 15

Fifth Year Courses ...................... 30
Total Hours for 3/2 Degree.......... 150


University of Florida



































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www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


Overview
Established: 1870
Location: McCarty Hall, Room 2014D
Phone: 352-392-2251. Department phone
numbers are available on the college Web
site.
Academic Advising: Each major has an
undergraduate coordinator and faculty
advisers. Adviser information is available
on the college Web site.
Scholarships: The college provides more
than $200,000 annually in undergraduate
scholarships. Applications are available
December 1 in McCarty Hall, Room 2002.
College scholarships and letters of rec-
ommendation are due on or before Febru-
ary 15. For more information, contact the
college's associate dean.
~Internships and Career Guidance: A col-
lege career resource center placement
liaison helps students prepare for inter-
views and find employment. The college
also sponsors the Agriculture and Natural
Resources Career Day in February.
Student Organizations: www.cals.ufl.edu


Academic Policies and

Procedures

Admission
Freshmen
First-semester freshmen at the univer-
sity will be admitted to the college when
they declare a major. At that time, their
college classification will become AG (Ag-
ricultural and Life Sciences), FY (Forestry)
or NE (Natural Resources and Environ-
ment). Students will maintain the AG, FY
or NE classification as long as they con-
tinue to meet or to exceed the tracking
criteria for the major.
Students who fall below the minimum
progression standards will not be allowed
to continue in the major. These students
must meet with an academic adviser
within the college to determine an alterna-
tive major.
Students Other Than Freshmen
All UF students other than first-
semester freshmen must apply to a major
in this college. Students will be admitted
to the major if they meet or exceed the
universal-tracking criteria. Performance in
and completion of courses in math, biol-
ogy, chemistry and physics during the
first four semesters are the primary crite-
ria for admission to a major. Other admis-
sion requirements vary by major.
All applicants must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language in
secondary school or 8-10 semester hours
2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


Majors 120 hours Specializations
Agricultural and Biological Engineering Refer to College of Engineering
Agricultural Education and Agricultural Education
Communication Agricultural Leadership
Agricultural Communication
Extension Education
Agricultural Operations Management Production Management
Manufacturing and Process Management
Technical Sales and Product Support
Biological Systems Management
Environmental Systems Management
Animal Sciences Animal Biology
Animal Industry
(Beef Cattle, Dairy, Equine and
Safety and Processing of Meat and Poultry)
Botany Basic Botany
Preprofessional Botany
Entomology and Nematology Preprofessional and Basic Science
Biology Education
Ecotourism
Plant Protection
Urban Pest Management
Environmental Science (BS) Environmental Science
Natural Resource Management
Environmental Science (BA) Environmental Education
Environmental Policy
Environmental Policy and Business
Family, Youth and Community Sciences
Food and Resource Economics Food and Agribusiness Marketing and
Management
Natural Resource, Environmental
Economics and Policy
International Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition Food Science
Dietetics
Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and Conservation Forest Resource Management
Urban Forestry
International and Agroforestry
Forest Science
Horticultural Science General Horticultural Science
Fruit and Vegetable Crops
Interdisciplinary Studies Economics and Policy
Environmental Management in Land and Water Management
Agriculture Waste Management and Utilization
(three specializations)


Landscape and Nursery Horticulture Environmental Horticulture Operations
(three specializations) Landscape and Nursery Management
Public Garden Management
Turfgrass Science
Microbiology and Cell Science
Natural Resource Conservation
Packaging Science
Plant Science Agronomy -
Science and Technology
Sustainable Crop Production/Management

Plant Pathology -
Biotechnology
Agricultural Technology
Soil and Water Science
Statistics
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Biology Education
Preprofessional Studies
Wildlife Conservation
Wildlife Ecology







COLLEGES


at the postsecondary level, or document an
equivalent level of proficiency.
Because of the diversity of degree pro-
grams offered by the college, specific re-
quirements for each major are listed
separately on the following pages. Stu-
dents should contact the undergraduate
adviser for their major when they are ad-
mitted to the college. They should com-
plete the course requirements for the major
in the semester designated in the catalog
and on their degree-tracking audits. Un-
dergraduate advisers can make any ad-
justments.
Juniors and seniors should have com-
pleted all courses listed for the first four
semesters of their curriculum. Any student
who has not completed these courses must
do so the first semester of the junior year.
College policy requires each student to
consult a faculty adviser each term before
registering to ensure that appropriate
courses are taken in the appropriate se-
quence. The college monitors this policy by
examining each student's schedule after
registration. Students who do not enroll in
appropriate courses will not be allowed to
register the following term.
Readmission to the College
CALS students who have been dis-
missed from the university for poor aca-
demic performance can petition UF and
the college for readmission after one se-
mester.
Transfers
A transfer student from a Florida public
community college must have an Associate
of Arts degree and satisfy the admission
requirements for the intended major to be
eligible for admission to the college.
Community college students should con-
sult an adviser to ensure completion of the
required courses for admission to UF, the
college and the major.
Transfer students from other universi-
ties and non-Florida public community
colleges should complete the first two
years' requirements for the major before
transferring to UF and to this college.

Student Responsibility
Students are expected to assume full aca-
demic responsibility for registering for and
completing the proper courses and for
fulfilling all requirements for the degree.
Students must consult their advisers each
semester to plan and to get approval for
their courses.
College Probation
A student whose overall grade point av-
erage falls below 2.0 is placed on college


probation. The associate dean will notify
the student that he/she is on probation
and must remove all deficit points in two
semesters or face college suspension.
During college suspension, a student
cannot register as a College of Agricultural
and Life Sciences student.
College Retention Program
The College of Agricultural and Life Sci-
ences works individually with students on
college probation to provide them an op-
portunity for academic success at the uni-
versity. The retention program identifies
obstacles that could prevent academic suc-
cess, provides structure and mechanisms
for success and connects students to ad-
ministrators, faculty and staff who are
committed to helping them.
Critical-Tracking Criteria
Students who do not complete the ap-
propriate number of tracking courses each
semester will have a hold placed on their
record to prevent advance registration.
They must meet with an adviser and agree
to enroll in the appropriate tracking
courses the following semester.
Drop Policy
Students can drop courses during the
drop/add period without penalty. There-
after, courses can be dropped only by col-
lege petition in accordance with the
deadlines. Drops requiring college petition
are subject to the following rules:
After the university's drop deadline,
students must petition the associate
dean of the college.
Students who withdraw from UF
(drop all courses) must go to the Dean
of Students Office, Peabody Hall,
Room 202, to meet with an adviser.
General Education
Courses that satisfy General Education
requirements are listed by category. In
some cases, the courses listed do not com-
plete the General Education requirement
and students must take another course.
The courses listed represent the most ex-
pedient way to fulfill graduation require-
ments. However, students can satisfy
degree requirements with alternative
course sequences.
A short, online Chemistry Readiness As-
sessment (CHRA) is available at
www.isis.ufl.edu. Students should evalu-
ate their current chemistry skills before
registering for chemistry courses.
A Calculus Readiness Assessment (CRA)
is available on the same Web site for stu-
dents to evaluate their math skills.
The college requires all students to com-
plete an oral and written communication


requirement in addition to the General
Education requirements. In majors where
an equivalency is permitted, students
should see their advisers for approved
alternative courses. When majors list spe-
cific courses, students must select courses
from the list.
Internships
By prior arrangement with an adviser
and with supervision, a student may re-
ceive credit for practical work experience
relevant to the major. Credit is earned at
the rate of one credit per month of full-
time work and cannot exceed three credits
in any combination of work experience. A
written report must be submitted before a
grade (S-U) will be issued. Academic units
offering this option list the course number
4941. Minimum criteria and general guide-
lines are available from the undergraduate
coordinator for the major.
Honors
College Honors Program
The CALS honors program is for stu-
dents who have completed 60 or more
hours and have a 3.5 or higher overall
GPA.
The honors program builds upon exist-
ing courses in the required curriculum.
Courses on the transcript are identified
with an honors designation. Students who
complete the program successfully are
designated college honors scholars.
All participants must complete the Hon-
ors Colloquium, ALS 4921, a college-wide
course that satisfies the writing component
required by the college (AEE 3033C, ENC
2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 3312 or
MMC 2100). The colloquium is offered
each semester.
In addition, two classes approved in the
major must carry an honors designation.
These courses can be current honors
courses or regular courses enhanced by an
honors contract. With approval of the
honors program coordinator, graduate-level
courses can also qualify as honors courses.
Students in the program who have the
necessary grade point average and a desire
to graduate magna cum laude or summa cum
laude must complete a research project or
creative work. Honors projects encompass
teaching, research and extension activities
and can include any creative activity with
an objective and an expected outcome.
Students who are not in the CALS hon-
ors program still can graduate with honors
recognition. For additional information,
contact the honors program coordinator or
visit the college Web site.


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


Dean's List
A CALS student who carries a minimum
of 12 hours in the spring or fall semester
with a grade point average of 3.5 or better
and no grade of U in any course will be
placed on the dean's list for that semester.

Degree Requirements
A Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts
degree requires a minimum of 120 credits.
In addition, students must have university
and junior-/senior-level GPAs of 2.0 or
Higher.
Students must complete the General
Education and major requirements in ef-
fect at the time of their initial enrollment at
UF.
t Seniors must file an application for de-
Wgree in the Office of the University Regis-
tirar early in the semester in which they
expect to graduate. Deadlines for degree
Applications are listed on UF's application
( deadlines calendar in this catalog.
Graduating with Honors
Graduation Cum Laude
To graduate with honors, a student must
have a UF minimum grade point average
of 3.5 on all courses taken at the university
after earning 60 credits.
Postbaccalaureate students are not eligi-
ble for honors recognition.
Graduation Magna Cum Laude or Summa
Cum Laude
To graduate magna cum laude or summa
cum laude, the grade point average re-
quired is 3.75 and 3.85, respectively. In
addition, each academic unit requires
completion of an approved research pro-
ject or creative work. Students seeking
magna cum laude or summa cum laude rec-
ognition should contact their adviser and
the dean's office for specific requirements.
Residence
The College of Agricultural and Life Sci-
ences, the School of Natural Resources and
Environment and the School of Forest Re-
sources and Conservation require comple-
tion of 60 semester hours or more of 3000-
level or above course work at the univer-
sity for award of a baccalaureate degree.
Some course work can be taken at other
accredited four-year institutions, with ap-
proval of the associate dean.
The last 30 semester hours applied to-
ward a degree must be completed in resi-
dence in the college. In special cases, the
associate dean can waive this requirement.
Students can complete six of the re-
quired 30 credits of residence work by
correspondence, but each course must be
approved in advance by the undergradu-


ate coordinator for the major and the asso-
ciate dean. The college will not accept
correspondence credit unless a student has
a minimum junior-/senior-level GPA of
2.0 in all work attempted in residence.


Programs of Study
Majors
All majors offered by the College of Ag-
ricultural and Life Sciences require 120
credit hours. More than one department
coordinates some majors and there are
interdisciplinary studies majors as well.
Refer to a specific major's section for de-
gree requirements.

Minors
Minors are available to students in any
college who complete the application,
available in the associate dean's office.
* Agricultural and Natural Resource
Ethics and Policy
* Agricultural Communication
* Agricultural Information Technology
* Agricultural Law
* Entomology and Nematology
* Environmental Horticulture
* Environmental Science
* Environmental Studies
* Extension Education
* Family, Youth and Community Sciences
* Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
* Food and Resource Economics
* Food Science
* Forest Resources and Conservation
* Horticultural Science
* International Studies in Agricultural
and Life Sciences
* Management & Sales in Agribusiness
* Nutritional Sciences
* Organizational Leadership for Non-Profits
* Packaging Science
* Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology
* Plant Science
* Precision Agriculture
* Soil and Water Science
* Turfgrass Science
* Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Minor in International Studies -
Agricultural and Life Sciences
www.cals.ufl.edu/GlobalGators
This minor requires 15 credits approved
by the associate dean of the college. The
minor has three components:
* At least six weeks abroad on an ap-
proved study abroad program, coop-
erative work experience, internship or
senior thesis project.


* 9-12 credits in the college in courses
with an international focus, selected
from the list of approved courses or
completed abroad as part of an ap-
proved study program.
3-6 credits that focus on the history,
social organization, culture or lan-
guage of the nation or region abroad.
These courses can also be completed
abroad as part of an approved study
program.

Off-campus Academic Programs
Recognizing the needs of nontraditional
students, the university established Bache-
lor of Science degree programs that are
available off campus in Apopka, Fort
Lauderdale, Fort Pierce, Homestead, Mil-
ton and Plant City.
As a unit of the University of Florida's
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS), the college offers several off-
campus degree programs. Please refer to
the Web sites indicated for additional in-
formation.
Apopka Landscape and nursery
horticulture
www.mrec.ifas.ufl.edu
* Fort Lauderdale Landscape and
nursery horticulture, turfgrass science,
and entomology and nematology
www.ftld.ufl.edu
* Fort Pierce Horticultural sciences
and agribusiness management
irrec.ifas.ufl.edu
* Homestead Landscape and nursery
horticulture
trecdisted.ifas.ufl.edu
* Milton Landscape and nursery hor-
ticulture, turfgrass science, and natu-
ral resource conservation
wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu
* Plant City -Landscape and nursery
horticulture, turfgrass science, and
natural resource conservation
mrec.ifas.ufl.edu/pcc/
Students must first earn an A.A. degree
from a Florida public community college
or other accredited institution, complete
specific prerequisite courses, meet a spe-
cific GPA and apply for admission to UF.
Once accepted, students can pursue a
Bachelor of Science without moving to
Gainesville. Students also are eligible for
UF and CALS scholarships.
UF faculty members teach and advise all
students. Upon completion of the program
requirements, UF confers the degree.
These programs also are available to the
general public as continuing education
courses.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






COLLEGES


Preprofessional Programs
Several CALS majors have specializa-
tions that help students complete the pre-
professional requirements for admission to
the colleges of Dentistry, Law, Medicine,
Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine.
The specializations in agricultural opera-
tions management, animal sciences, bot-
any, entomology and nematology, food
science and human nutrition, microbiology
and cell science, and wildlife ecology and
conservation prepare students for the pro-
grams in medicine, dentistry or veterinary
medicine.
Food science and human nutrition ma-
jors are eligible for the Junior Honors
Medical Program.
Students preparing for law careers can
select any major in the college.
Qualified students can be admitted to
the early admission dental program after
one semester of their freshman year at UF.
This program helps highly motivated stu-
dents complete the bachelor's degree and
D.M.D. in a shorter time than the two tra-
ditional programs. Participants major in
microbiology and cell science or food sci-
ence and human nutrition's nutritional
sciences specialization. Both majors pro-
vide the science foundation required for
dental school. Additional information is
available from the associate dean.

Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
www.agen.ufl.edu
The Agricultural and Biological Engi-
neering (ABE) curriculum is offered coop-
eratively by the colleges of Agricultural
and Life Sciences and Engineering.
Agricultural and biological engineers ap-
ply engineering principles to biological sci-
ences to produce food, feed, fiber and other
bio-based products from renewable bio-
resources, while protecting the environment
and conserving natural resources.
ABE links the engineering sciences and
life sciences. Majors receive training to
solve the specialized engineering problems
of agriculture and biological systems.
Course work in engineering, agriculture
and biology is required. Electives allow
students to focus on particular academic or
career interests.
Three specialization options are avail-
able: land and water resources, which
deals with all aspects of water and natural
resource management such as irrigation,
drainage, water quality protection and
ecosystem preservation; agrisystems,
which applies robotics, computer model-
ing and instrumentation technology to


food and fiber production; and biological
engineering, which provides an excellent
background for pre-med, pharmaceuticals
and advanced studies in biomedical fields.
Students register in the College of Engi-
neering and will receive the Bachelor of
Science in Engineering with a major in
agricultural and biological engineering.
Refer to that college for the curriculum.

Agricultural Education and
Communication
http://aec.ifas.ufl.edu
This major prepares students for careers
in agricultural education, agricultural
communication and agricultural leader-
ship and training positions in extension,
community and government agencies.
Four specializations are offered: teach-
ing, agricultural communication, agricul-
tural leadership and extension education.
Each requires a common core of courses in
technical agriculture and preprofessional
education. Departmental advisers will help
students select electives.


The agricultural education specialization
provides the basic courses for agricultural
teacher certification in Florida. Students
must have a passing score on the CLAST
and a minimum GPA of 2.5 to enter the
teacher education specialization. In addi-
tion, graduates must apply to the state's
Department of Education for certification.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following criteria.
Critical-tracking courses appear in bold.
Semester 1:
2.5 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
Complete 1 of 7 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 1083 or higher
(not CHM 1025), MAC 1147, BSC
2007, BSC 2009L, AEB 3103 and EDF
3110 (or equivalent)
Semester 2:
Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 3:
Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 5:
Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
Com position (GE-S)............................................... 3
PSY 2012 General Psychology (GE-S) ............3.


AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4) or
ECO 2013 or ECO 2023 (3) .........................3-4
BSC 2007 Biological Sciences 1 (GE-B)............ 3
BSC 2009L Biological Sciences Lab (GE-B)..... 1
AEE 4905 Intro Seminar................................ 1
Total 14-15
Semester 2 Credits
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra and Trig (4)
(GE-M) OR MAC 1114 & 1140 (2+3)........4-5
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication....... 3
PHI 2010 Intro to Philosophy........................ 3
TSL 3526 ESOL Foundations (or equiv)............. 3
Science elective................................ ............... 3
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
CHM 1083 or higher chemistry course
(not CHM 1025).............................................. 3
Literature (GE-H)................................. .... 3
M mathematics (GE-M ).............................................
EDG 2701 Teaching Diverse Populations ..........
American history elective (GE-H)....................... 3
Total 15
Semester 4 Credits
EDF 3110 Human Growth and Development
(or equiv.) ...... .................. 3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources ..................................... ............. 3
RED 3312 Classroom Reading............................. 3
Fine arts elective ................. ................................... 3
Mathematics* or elective (GE-M)...................... 3
Total 14
Semester 5 Credits
AEE 3323 Development and Philosophy
of Agricultural Education......................... 3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agricultural
Business Management ................................. 3
ANS 3006C Introduction to Animal Science ..... 4
Horticulture or plant science elective.............. 3
Agricultural and natural resources elective...... 3
Total 16
Semester 6 Credits
AEE 4202 Emerging Technologies ..................... 3
SOS 3022 Intro to Soils in the Environment....... 3
SOS 3022L Introduction to Soils in the
Environm ent Lab........................................ 1
ENY 3005C Intro to Entomology OR
PMA 3010 Principles of Pest Mgmt OR
ENY 3030C Insect Field Biology................ 3
Agriculture and natural resource elective......... 3
Agricultural and natural resource elective...... ..3
Total 16
Semester 7 Credits
AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in Agricul-
tural Education................... ....... 3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and
M aintenance..................................... ............ 3
EEX 3616 Core Classroom Management
Strategies..................................... 3
Science or Ag. and Natural Resources elective. 4
Total 13


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


Semester 8 Credits
AEE 4504 Program Planning in Ag Ed ...............3
AEE 4224 Special Methods in Teaching Ag and
Natural Resources .......................................... 3
AEE 4227 Laboratory Practices in Teaching
Agricultural Education..................................3
AEE 4942 Agricultural Education Internship ....6
Total 15
Total Required for Degree..........120
* Total math required is nine hours.


Agricultural leadership prepares students
for entry into agribusiness positions related
to human resource management, corporate
training and development, agricultural liter-
acy, political interests and commodity service
organizations. Course work focuses on a core
of agricultural courses plus department
courses on leadership theory and strategies,
educational/training programs design, pro-
fessional presentation delivery and interper-
sonal communication.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.5 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 7 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 1083 or higher
(not CHM 1025), MAC 1147, BSC
2007, BSC 2009L, BSC 2008, AEB 3103
and PSY 2012
Semester 2:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
Composition (GE-C) ............................................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H, I)........................................... 3
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4)
OR ECO 2013 (3) or ECO 2023 (3).............3-4
BSC 2007 Biological Sciences 1 (GE-B)............ 3
BSC 2009L Biological Sciences Lab (GE-B).....1
Total 13-14

Semester 2 Credits
BSC 2008 Biological Sciences 2 (GE-B)............ 3
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra and Trig (4)
(GE-M) OR MAC 1114 and 1140 (2+3) ....4-5
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication........3


Hum anities (GE-H) .............................................. 3
Elective........................ ............................. 3
Total 16-17

Semester 3 Credits
CHM 1083 or higher chemistry course
(not CHM 1025) (GE-P) ............................... 3
Humanities (GE-H)............................ ............ 3
M them atics (GE-M ) ........................................... 3
Elective..................... ..................... 3
Elective.............................................. 4
Total 16

Semester 4 Credits
PSY 2012 Psychology (GE-S) (or equiv.).......... 3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources............................................3
American history or political science (GE-S)
elective ............................................ .... 3
Electives........................... .......... ............... 6
Total 15

Semester 5 Credits
AEE 3209 Instructional and Event Planning for
Agriculture and Natural Resources ..............3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development .................3.
AEB 3341 Selling Strategically ...........................3
AEB 4424 Human Resource Management in
Agribusiness....................................... ............. 3
Approved elective*...................................... 3
Total 15

Semester 6 Credits
EDF 3210 Ed Psychology (GR-E and GE-S) .......3
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food Marketing..... 3
AEE 3073 Intercultural Communication
(GE-S, I)........................................... .................. 3
AEE 4905 Personal Leadership Development... 3
Approved elective*............................................ 3
Total 15
Summer Credits
AEE 4943 Leadership Education Internship...... 4
Total 4
Semester 7 Credits
AEE 4905 Personal Leadership Development... 3
AEE 4052 Campaign Strategies............... ............. 3
Approved elective*......................................... 4
Approved elective*.............................. ....3..
Total 13
Semester 8 Credits
AEB 4123 Agricultural Law..................................3
AEE 4500 Program Development and
Evaluation ....................................... ...... 3
AEE 5415 Critical Thinking and Decision
M making ..................................................3
Approved elective*................... .......................... 3
Total 13
Total Required for Degree...........120
* Approved electives see adviser.


The agricultural communication spe-
cialization prepares agricultural communi-
cation professionals. Media skills include
publications, electronic media, graphic
arts, advertising and public relations.
Students must meet department and col-
lege requirements and have a minimum
overall UF GPA of 2.5. Students also must
complete MMC 2100, Writing for Mass
Communication, with a C or higher.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.5 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete lof 7 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 1083, MAC 1147,
BSC 2007, BSC 2009L, BSC 2008, AEB
3103, MMC 2100
Semester 2:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
Com position (GE-C)............................................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H, I) ......................................... 3
AEB 3103 Food & Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2013 (3) or ECO 2023 (3)..................3-4
BSC 2007 Biological Sciences 1 (GE-B)............ 3
BSC 2009L Biological Sciences Lab (GE-B).....1
Total 13-14
Semester 2 Credits
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra and Trig (4)
(GE-M) OR MAC 1114 and 1140 (2+3) ....4-5
BSC 2008 Biological Sciences 2 (GE-B)............ 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication....... 3
Humanities (GE-H) ............................................ 3
Elective ............................ ....... ... ................ 3
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
MMC 2100 Writing for Mass Communication
(G R-E)...................................... .............. 3
Humanities (GE-H) .................. ..................... 3
M them atics (GE-M )........................................... 2
Elective ........................... ... ................ 3
Elective ............................ ....... ... ................ 3
Total 15


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






COLLEGES


Semester 4 Credits
CHM 1083 Consumer Chemistry (GE-P)......... 3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources.................................. ..............3
AEE 3073 Intercultural Communications ..........3
American history or political science elective
(GE-S) ............................................ ........ .......3
Elective........................ ................. .............3
Total 15
Semester 5 Credits
AEE 3070C Electronic Media Production in
Agriculture and Natural Resources...............3
AEE 3209 Instructional and Event Planning
for Agriculture and Natural Resources ........3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development in
Agriculture and Natural Resources...............3
JOU 3101 Reporting (GR-E) .............................3.
PGY 3610 Survey of Photography ...................2.
Total 14
Semester 6 Credits
AEE 4035 Advanced Agricultural Communica-
tion W writing (GR-E)........................................3
AEE 4036 Advanced Agricultural Communica-
tion Production............................................. 3
AEB 4123 Agricultural Law ..............................3....
AEE 4905 Personal Leadership Development ...3
Journalism elective........................ ...............3
Total 15
Summer Credits
AEE 4948 Agriculture and Natural
Resources Communication Internship..........6
Total 6
Semester 7 Credits
AEE 4052 Campaign Strategies........................3.
PUR 3000 Principles of Public Relations.............3
Food and resource economics elective (AEB)....3
Approved elective** ..............................................3
Total 12
Semester 8 Credits
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food Marketing OR
AEB 3341 Selling Strategically.......................3
Journalism elective........................ ............. 3
Approved elective**..............................................4
Approved elective ** ........................................... 4
Total 14
Total Required for Degree ..........120
** Approved electives see adviser.


The extension education specialization
prepares students for positions in the co-
operative extension service. Course work
in the major will focus on a core of agricul-
tural courses along with emphasis in non-
formal education, designing
educational/training programs and pro-
fessional presentations, leadership devel-
opment, teaching/training methods and
interpersonal communication. A four-


credit, six-week internship with the Coop-
erative Extension Service is required.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following criteria. Critical
tracking courses appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.5 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 7 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 1083 or higher
(not CHM 1025), MAC 1147, BSC
2007, BSC 2009L, BSC 2008, AEB 3103,
SYG 2000
Semester 2:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester I Credits
Composition (GE-S)........................... ............ 3
Hum anities (GE-H)................... ................... ...3
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4)
OR ECO 2013 (3) OR ECO 2023 (3).........3-4
BSC 2007 Biological Sciences 1 (GE-B)............ 3
BSC 2009L Biological Sciences Lab (GE-B).....1
Total 13-14
Semester 2 Credits
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra and Trig (4)
(GE-M) OR MAC 1114 and 1140 (2+3) ....4-5
BSC 2008 Biological Sciences 2 (GE-B)............ 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication .......3
Humanities (GE-H)............................ ............. 3
Elective............................ .......... .................. 3
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
CHM 1083 or higher chemistry course
(not CHM 1025) (GE-P)............................ 3
H um anities (GE-H )...............................................3
M mathematics (GE-M ) ............................................. 2
Elective........................... .......... .................. 3
Elective........................... ............................. 4
Total 15
Semester 4 Credits
SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology (GE-S) ....... 3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources..................... ....................... 3
AEE 3073 Intercultural Communications ..........3
American history or political science elective
(G E-S)......................................................... ... .3
Elective............................ .............................. 3
Total 15


Semester 5 Credits
AEE 3209 Instructional and Event Planning for
Agriculture and Natural Resources.............. 3
AEE 3313 Development and Role of Extension
Education....................... ......... ................ 3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development in
Agriculture and Natural Resources.............. 3
AEB 4424 Human Resource Management in
Agribusiness....................... ............... 3
Approved elective............................................. 3
Total 15
Semester 6 Credits
AEE 4905 Advanced Extension Methods........... 3
EDF 3210 Educational Psychology.................... 3
AEB 4123 Agricultural Law ................................. 4
AEE 4905 Personal Leadership Development... 3
Approved elective**............................................ 3
Total 16
Summer Credits
AEE 4944 Cooperative Extension Internship.... 4
Total 4
Semester 7 Credits
AEE 4052 Campaign Strategies......................... 3
Approved elective**.......................... .............. 3
Approved elective**.......................... .............. 3
Approved elective**...................... .............. 4
Total 13
Semester 8 Credits
AEE 5415 Critical Thinking and Decision
M making ........................................ ............. 3
AEE 4500 Program Dev. and Evaluation in
Human Resource Programs......................... 3
Approved elective**...................... .............. 3
Approved elective**............................................ 4
Total 13
Total Required for Degree.......... 120
** Approved electives see adviser.
Extension Education Minor
The extension education minor supple-
ments the major and prepares students for
careers in the cooperative extension ser-
vice. The minor offers course work in non-
formal and formal educational methods,
adult education, leadership, youth pro-
grams, communication methods and field
experience.
With adviser approval, all undergradu-
ates in the college are eligible for this mi-
nor. Students in other colleges can also
enroll with Department of Agricultural Edu-
cation and Communication approval.
Courses Credits
AEE 3209 Instructional and Event Planning for
Agriculture and Natural Resources.............. 3
AEE 3313 Development and Role of Extension
Education............................................ .............. 3


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


AEE 3414 Leadership Development in Agricul-
ture and Natural Resources ..........................3.
AEE 4506 Advanced Extension Methods ...........3
AEE 4943 Leadership Education Internship ......4
Total 16
Agricultural Communication Minor
This minor provides basic understand-
ing of the communication techniques used
in agriculture and natural resources. The
minor is open to all students at the univer-
sity. A cumulative GPA of 2.5 for courses
in the minor is required. Students com-
plete five courses for a minimum of 15
credits:
Courses Credits
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication........3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources ..................................................... 3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development in Agricul-
ture and Natural Resources.........................3.
AEE 3070 Electronic Media Production in Agri-
culture and Natural Resources.....................3
AEE 3073 Intercultural Communication.............3
AEE 4052 Campaign Strategies............................3
AEE 4035 Advanced Agricultural Communica-
tion W riting.......................................... ......3
AEE 4036 Advanced Agricultural Communica-
tion Production.................................................3

Agricultural Operations
Management
www.agen.ufl.edu
Agricultural operations management in-
corporates emerging technologies with
business principles to improve the envi-
ronment, agricultural production, manu-
facturing, worker safety, processing, food
safety and technical sales.
Students gain technical experience in
systems management, environmental qual-
ity, machinery, structures, information
technology, safety, irrigation, power sys-
tems, water control, construction food
processing, electric circuits and controls.
The curriculum supports students who
want to seek career opportunities in agri-
cultural business operations and manage-
ment. Students receive training in
economics, accounting, business, finance,
salesmanship, business management, tech-
nical writing and public speaking. Elec-
tives let students focus on academic and
career interests.
Five specializations are available: pro-
duction management, manufacturing and
process management, technical sales and
product support, biological systems man-
agement and environmental systems man-
agement.
The department also offers a combined
degree program. Contact a departmental
adviser for guidance.
2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog


To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete lof 6 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, MAC 1147 or MAC 2233, BSC
2007, BSC 2009L, ACG 2021C, STA
2023, PHY 2004
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
CHM 2045 General Chemistry and Qualitative
Analysis 1 (GE-P) ......................................... 3
CHM 2045L General Chemistry Lab (GE-P)... 1
BSC 2007 Biological Sciences 1 (GE-B)............ 3
BSC 2009L Biological Sciences Lab (GE-B)......
Com position (GE-C)............................................ 3
Humanities (GE-H, I) ............................................ 3
Total 14
Semester 2 Credits
MAC 2233 Survey of Calculus (GE-M) (3) OR
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra & Trig..3-4
ACG 2021C Intro to Accounting ....................... 4
Humanities (GE-H, I) .......................................... 3
BSC 2008 Biological Sciences 2........................3.
Technical elective ............................................... 3
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
PHY 2004 Applied Physics (GE-P) OR PHY
2020 Intro to Physics..................................... 3
STA 2023 Statistics (GE-M).............................. 3
PSY 2012 General Psychology (GE-S) .............3.3
ECO 2013 Macroeconomics (GE-S) ...............3.
Technical elective............................. .. ............ 3
Total 15
Semester 4 Credits
Physical science course (GE-P) (approved)........ 3
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (GE-S) ..................3.
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources................................. ................ 3
AEE 3030C Oral Communication OR
SPC 2600 Public Speaking ..............................3
Technical elective ................................ ....3....
Total 15


Note: Use summer terms to make up Gen-
eral Education requirements or first- and
second-year prerequisites for the major.


This specialization focuses on the man-
agement of everything required to feed or
clothe humans, including vegetables, cit-
rus, cattle, aquaculture, fish, mining phos-
phates and timber harvest and production.
Semester 5 Credits
AOM 3220 Ag. Construction and Maintenance 3
AOM 4444C Electrical Power and Instrumenta-
tion in Agriculture......................................... 3
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application...................... 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Mgmt OR
ENY 3005C Prin. of Entomology (GE-B)...... 3
Ag science elective (adviser approved).............. 3
Total 15
Semester 6 Credits
AOM 4455 Ag. Operations and Systems............ 3
SOS 3022 Intro to Soils in the Environment....... 3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt OR
MAN 3025 Principles of Management (4) 3-4
ALS 3133 Ag and Environmental Quality......... 3
AOM 3734 Principles of Irrigation .................... 3
Total 15-16
Semester 7 Credits
AOM 4314C Power and Machinery Mgmt........ 3
AOM 4434 Precision Agriculture...................... 3
AOM 4643 Environmental Hydrology OR
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Mgmt.......... 3
AOM 4642 Envir. Systems for Ag Structures.... 3
AOM 4933 Professional Practices...................... 1
Plan A technical elective (adviser approved).... 2
Total 15
Semester 8 Credits
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing OR
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing (4) .....3-4
AEB 4424 Human Resource Mgmt ................. 3
AOM 3073 Safety in Agriculture....................... 3
Ag science elective (adviser approved).............. 3
Plan A technical elective (adviser approved).... 3
Total 15-16
Total Required for Degree.......... 120



This specialization provides training for
careers in technical sales, sales manage-
ment, service, product planning, general
management and parts and inventory con-
trol.
Semester 5 Credits
ADV 3000 Elements of Advertising.................... 3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt OR
MAN 3025 Prin of Management (4)...........3-4
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application...................... 3
AOM 4314C Power and Machinery Mgmt........ 3
AOM 4434 Precision Agriculture...................... 3
Total 15-16






COLLEGES


Semester 6 Credits
AEB 4123 Agricultural Law ................................3.
AEB 4424 Human Resource Management .........3
ALS 3133 Ag and Environmental Quality..........3
AOM 4455 Ag Operations and Systems .............3
AOM 4643 Environmental Hydrology OR
AOM 3734 Principles of Irrigation OR
AOM 3732 Ag Water Mgmt..........................3
Total 15
Semester 7 Credits
AEB 3341 Selling Strategically..............................3
AOM 4444C Electric Power Instrumentation ....3
AOM 4642 Envir. Systems for Ag Structures.....3
AOM 4933 Professional Practices .....................1.
Ag science elective (adviser approved) ..............3
Plan C technical elective (adviser approved).....2
Total 15
Semester 8 Credits
AOM 3073 Safety in Agriculture.........................3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing OR
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing (4)...... 3-4
PKG 2001 Principles of Packaging OR AOM
4062 Prin of Food Engineering (4) ............. 3-4
Ag science elective (adviser approved) ..............3
Plan C technical elective (adviser approved).....3
Total 15-17
Total Required for Degree..........120



This specialization prepares students for
technical management careers in food
processing, citrus processing, fertilizer
manufacturing, agricultural manufactur-
ing and animal feed production and han-
dling.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete lof 6 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, MAC 1147 or MAC 2233, BSC
2007, BSC 2009L, ACG 2021C, STA
2023, PHY 2004
Semester 2:
Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 5:
Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs


Semester 1 Credits
CHM 2045 & 2045L Chemistry (3) & Lab (1)... 4
BSC 2007 Biological Science 1......................... 3
BSC 2009L Biological Science Lab.................... 1
Com position (GE-C)............................................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H, I) .......................................... 3
Total 14
Semester 2 Credits
MAC 2233 Survey of Calculus (GE-M) (3) OR
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra & Trig..3-4
BSC 2008 Biological Science 2......................... 3
ACG 2021C Intro to Financial Accounting..... 4
Humanities (GE-H,I) ........................................ 3
Technical elective .............................. ............ 2
Total 15-16
Semester 3 Credits
PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1.......................... 3
PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1 Lab.................... 1
STA 2023 Intro to Statistics................................ 3
PSY 2012 General Psychology............................ 3
ECO 2013 Macroeconomics................................ 3
Technical elective.............................................. 3
Total 16
Semester 4 Credits
PHY 2005 Applied Physics 2............................ 3
ECO 2023 Microeconomics................................... 3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources............................................ 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
OR SPC 2600 Public Speaking........................ 3
Technical elective....................................... ............ 3
Total 15
Semester 5 Credits
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and
M aintenance............................ ................ 3
AOM 4444C Electrical Power and Instrumenta-
tion in Agriculture ......................................... 3
AOM 4455 Ag Operations and Systems............. 3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt OR
MAN 3025 Principles of Management (4).3-4
FOS 3042 Introduction to Food Science.............. 3
Total 15-16
Semester 6 Credits
ALS 3133 Ag and Environmental Quality.......... 3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing OR
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing (4) ......3-4
AEB 3341 Selling Strategically ........................... 3
PKG 2001 Principles of Packaging ....................3.
AEB 4309 Food Wholesale and Retail OR
PKG 3103 Food Packaging .........................3
Total 15-16
Semester 7 Credits
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering ....... 4
AOM 4314C Power & Machinery Mgmt............ 3
AOM 4642 Environmental Systems for Ag
Structures ............................................ .............. 3
AEB 3510 Quantitative Methods in FRE ............2
Ag science elective (adviser approved).............. 3
Total 15


Semester 8 Credits
AOM 3073 Safety in Agriculture....................... 3
AEB 4424 Human Resource Mgmt ................... 3
AOM 4933 Professional Practices........................ 1
Ag science elective (adviser approved).............. 3
Plan B technical electives (adviser approved)... 5
Total 15
Total Required for Degree.......... 120


This science-based specialization is for
students seeking dental, medical and vet-
erinary careers or careers in biotechnology
management, food safety, food quality and
biological system management. Preprofes-
sional students should contact the college
to which they plan to apply to ensure
completion of all requirements.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 6 critical courses -
excluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, MAC 2311, BSC 2010, BSC
2010L, STA 2023, PHY
2053/2055L/2054 or PHY 2048/
2048L/2049
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester I Credits
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)....................................... 4
MAC 2311 Analytical Geometry & Calculus 1
(G E-M ) .................................... ............... 4
Composition (GE-C)........................................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H, I).......................................... 3
Total 14
Semester 2 Credits
STA 2023 Statistics (GE-M)............................ 3
SPC 2600 Public Speaking OR AEE 3030C Effec-
tive Oral Communication............................... 3
Humanities (GE-H, I).......................................... 3
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Elective ........................... ......... ................ 3
Total 16


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


Semester 3 Credits
PHY 2053 and 2053L Applied Physics (4)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 5
BSC 2010 and 2010L Biological Science (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ..................................... 4
ECO 2013 Macroeconomics (GE-S)** ..................3
PSY 2012 General Psychology (GE-S)..............3.
Total 15
Semester 4 Credits
PHY 2054 and 2054L Applied Physics 2 (4)
and Lab (1).................................. .............. 5
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources...................................................... .... 3
BSC 2011 and 2011L Biological Sciences 2 (3)
and Lab (1)............................... ............. ..
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (GE-S)**................. 3
Total 15
Note: Use summer terms to make up Gen-
eral Education requirements and prerequi-
sites for the major.
** Grade of C is required as prerequisite
for other required courses.
Semester 5 Credits
AGR 3303 (3) OR PCB 3063 (4) Genetics......... 3-4
PKG 2001 Principles of Packaging OR AOM
4444C Electrical Power & Instrumentation..3
AOM 4455 Ag Operations and Systems .............3
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry.............................3
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering........4
Total 16-17
Semester 6 Credits
CHM 2211 and 2211L Organic Chemistry (3)
and Lab (2)............................... ............... 5
ALS 3133 Ag and Environmental Quality ..........3
AOM 3073 Safety in Agriculture.................... ....3
FOS 3042 Introduction to Food Science ..............3
Total 14
Semester 7 Credits
BCH 3025 Fundamentals of Biochemistry OR
BCH 4024 Intro to Biochemistry ..................4.
MCB 3020 and 3020L Basic Biology of
Microorganisms (3) and Lab (2) .................5.
AOM 4933 Professional Practices ........................1
Ag science electives (adviser approved).............3
Plan D technical elective (adviser approved).....2
Total 15
Semester 8 Credits
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt OR
MAN 3025 Principles of Mgmt (4) ............ 3-4
ABE 3652C Physical and Rheological Properties
of Biological M materials ........................ .........
ABE 4660 Applied Microbiological Biotech .......3
Ag science elective (adviser approved) ..............3
Plan D technical electives (adviser approved)...3
Total 15-16
Total Required for Degree.......... 120


This specialization is for careers in envi-
ronmental management in industry, in a
regulatory agency or in a consulting firm.
These careers play a dynamic role in con-
serving the environment, human safety
issues, regulations and permitting re-
quirements.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-tracking
criteria. Critical-tracking courses are bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 7 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM 2045L,
MAC 2311, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC
2011, BSC 2011L, STA 2023, PHY
2004/2004L/2005 or PHY 2048/2048L/
2049
Semester 2:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)................................... 4
MAC 2311 Geometry & Calculus 1 (GE-M) ....4
Composition (GE-C)............................................ 3
Humanities (GE-H, I) .......................................... 3
Elective............................ ..........................
Total 15
Semester 2 Credits
STA 2023 Statistics (GE-M).............................. 3
SPC 2600 Public Speaking OR
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication.3
Hum anities (GE-H, I) .......................................... 3
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P) ........................................ 4
Elective..................... ..................... 3
Total 16
Semester 3 Credits
PHY 2004 and 2004L Applied Physics 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
BSC 2010 and 2010L Biological Science 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
ECO 2013 Macroeconomics (GE-S) .....................3
PSY 2012 General Psychology (GE-S) .................3
Elective........................................................... 2
Total 16


Semester 4 Credits
PHY 2005 and 2005L Applied Physics 2 (3)
and Lab (1) ....................................................... 4
BSC 2011 and 2011L Biology 2 (3) & Lab (1) ... 4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources ....................................... .............. 3
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (GE-S)...................... 3
Technical elective........................................ 3
Total 17
Semester 5 Credits
ALS 3135 Agricultural Ecology (3) OR
PCB 3034C Intro to Ecology (4) OR
EES 4103 Applied Ecology (2) ....................2-4
AOM 4455 Ag Operations and Systems............. 3
AOM 4434 Precision Agriculture........................ 3
AOM 4643 Environmental Hydrology .............. 3
MCB 2000 & 2000L Microbiology (3) & Lab (1) 4
Total 15-17
Semester 6 Credits
AEB 4123 Agricultural Law ................................. 3
AOM 3073 Safety in Agriculture......................... 3
AOM 3734 Principles of Irrigation OR
AOM 3732 Ag Water Mgmt........................... 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals Plant-Pest Mgmt....... 3
ALS 3133 Ag and Environmental Quality......... 3
Total 15
Semester 7 Credits
AEB 4424 Human Resource Mgmt (3) OR
ALS 4085 Ag Risk Mgmt and the Law...... 2-3
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application Techniques... 3
GLY 2030C Envir/Engineer Geology (3) OR
AOM 4062 Principles Food Engineering...3-4
AOM 4933 Professional Practices........................ 1
Ag science elective (adviser approved).............. 3
Total 12-14
Semester 8 Credits
AEB 3133 Prin of Agribusiness Mgmt (3) OR
MAN 3025 Principles of Management...... 3-4
ABE 4660 Applied Microbiological Biotech OR
EES 4102 Wastewater Microbiology (2) ....2-3
SOS 3022 Intro to Soils in the Environment....... 3
Ag science elective (adviser approved).............. 3
Plan E technical elective (adviser approved)..... 3
Total 14-16
Total Required for Degree .......................120
Agricultural Information
Technologies Minor
Students learn basic skills to develop
software applications in agriculture and
natural resources using visual program-
ming tools. This tools include expert sys-
tems, database systems, multimedia, and
statistical and optimization techniques to
analyze and solve problems in agriculture
and natural resources. Students explore
the use of sensors in physical and biologi-
cal systems and in networked computer
control and data acquisition systems.
Students work in multidisciplinary
teams that focus on the use and develop-


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






COLLEGES


ment of IT products for industry, research,
teaching and extension.
This minor requires 15 credit hours from
the following courses:
Courses 15 Credits
AOM 4932 Computers in Ag and Nat Res .........3
AOM 4443 Agricultural Software Application
Development............................. ................3
AEE 3070C Electronic Media Production...........3
Electives (complete six hours):
AOM 4434 Precision Agriculture......................3
AOM 4433 Networking, Instrumentation and
Control in Ag and Natural Resources...........3
FOR 3434C Forest Resources Info Systems ........3
AOM 4510 Agricultural and Natural Resources
Decision Support System Development .......3
AOM 5431 GIS and Remote Sensing................3.
Precision Agriculture Minor
The precision agriculture minor is a mul-
tidisciplinary minor. Students use satellite
imagery, aerial photography, field sensors
and the Global Positioning System to ac-
quire information about field conditions.
This information is organized and ana-
lyzed using a digital mapping system
called Geographical Information System.
Once analyzed, this data can help make
effective management decisions (refer to
Agricultural and Biological Engineering).
The minor requires 15-credit hours from
the following categories:
Precision Agriculture (6 credits)
Take AOM 4455first.
AOM 4455 Ag Operations and Systems .............3
AOM 4434 Precision Agriculture........................3
Remote Sensing (3 credits)
AOM 5431 GIS and Remote Sensing in Ag ........3
SUR 4380 Remote Sensing..................................... 3
SUR 5385 Remote Sensing Applications.............3
SUR 3331 Photogrammetry ................................3.
Geographic Information Systems (3
credits)
SUR 3393 Geographic Information Systems ......3
URP 4273 Survey of Planning Info Systems.......3
EES 4027 Spatial Analysis Using Geographic
Information Systems........................................ 3
FOR 3434 Forest Resources Info Systems ...........3
SUR 5365 Digital Mapping .................................3.
GEO 3151 Foundations of Geographic
Information Systems........................................ 3
LAA 4381C Environmental Methods & GIS ......3
Crop Management and Field Techniques
(3 credits)
AGR 3005 Principles of Crop Science.................
AGR 4214c Applied Field Crop Production.......3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture and
Production............. ........... ................. 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Mgmt .............3
PLP 3103C Control of Plant Diseases .............3.
PLS 4601C Weed Science..................................... 3
SOS 4231 Soils and Land Use ............................3.
AGR 4231C Forage Science and Range Mgmt...3


PLS 4613 Aquatic Weed Control.......................... 3
FAS 4305 Introduction to Fishery Science.......... 3
FNR 4623 Integrated Natural Resource Mgmt.. 3
FNR 3410 Natural Resource Sampling............... 3
SOS 4715 Environmental Pedology.................. 3
SUR 3520 Measurement Science.......................... 3
ENV 4042 Environmental Data Analysis........... 3
GEO 3162 Introduction to Quantitative
Analysis for Geographers............................... 3
SOS 3023 Soil Judging ........................................... 3
STA 4222 Sample Survey Design......................... 3
WIS 4945 Wildlife Techniques............................. 3
Packaging Science Minor
A minor in packaging science provides
an understanding of packaging science
and develops skills for numerous careers.
This minor incorporates useful tools for
commerce with courses in real-world is-
sues facing the packaging industry. The
minor is useful to students who will work
in the many industries that involve pack-
aging (refer to packaging science).

Agronomy
(see Plant Science)
agronomy.ifas.ufl.edu
The Department of Agronomy adminis-
ters the undergraduate plant science major
with an agronomy specialization. Students
should contact the department early in
their academic careers.

Animal Sciences
www.animal.ufl.edu
The animal sciences major offers two
specializations: animal biology and animal
industry. There are four options in the
animal industry specialization: beef cattle,
dairy, equine, and safety and processing of
meat and poultry. The department also
offers a combined-degree program. Con-
sult a departmental adviser for guidance.
Potential careers for animal sciences ma-
jors include various aspects of livestock
production (beef cattle, dairy cattle, and
horses), livestock processing and utiliza-
tion (meat, milk, performance and recrea-
tion), allied service industries (feed, health
care, genetics, equipment, supplies, mar-
keting, promotion, finance and education)
and preparation for graduate school or the
College of Veterinary Medicine. Students
should meet with the animal sciences co-
ordinator to select a specialization/option
and academic adviser.


This specialization is for students who
want to be veterinarians working with
species other than livestock or livestock
veterinarians who want a strong basic sci-
ence orientation in their undergraduate


program. It also is excellent preparation
for graduate programs in basic animal
research. Students select courses in animal
sciences, zoology, microbiology, wildlife
and veterinary science.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, MAC
1147, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011,
BSC 2011L
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester I Credits
English Composition (GE-C)............................. 3
MAC 1147 Precalc: Algebra & Trig (GE-M).... 4
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE)*..... 3
Total 14
Semester 2 Credits
ENC 1102 Introduction to Argument and
Persuasion (GE-C,H)...................................... 3
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE)*..... 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication....... 3
Elective ................................... ... ............... 1
Total 14
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2010 and 2010L Biology 1 (3) and
Lab (1) (GE-B)..................................... ...... 4
AEB 3103 Food & Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (GE-S)............. 3-4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources ............................................. ............. 3
Electives................................ ........... ............ 6
Total 16-17
Semester 4 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Principles of Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B)....................................... 4
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)*.............. 3
Electives.......................... .............................. 8
Total 15
Semester 5 Credits
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry 1....................... 3
ANS 3006C Introduction to Animal Science..... 4


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


ANS 3440 Principles of Animal Nutrition ..........4
ANS 3043C Growth and Development of
Farm Anim als ...............................................
Total 14
Semester 6 Credits
CHM 2211 and 22111, Organic Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (2).............................. ...... .......5
ANS 3319 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals ............3
ANS 3317L Techniques in Swine Reproduction
M AC 2311 Calculus 1............................................. 4
VME 4103 Livestock Health and Disease
Prevention ......................................... ..............2
Total 15
Semester 7 Credits
BCH 4024 Intro Biochem/Molec Biology OR
BCH 3025 Fund. f Biochemistry OR
CHM 4207 Intro Biochem/Molec Biology....4
STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics 1.................. 3
Approved electives*........................... ...............8
Total 15
Semester 8 Credits
MCB 3020 and 3020L Basic Biology of Micro-
organisms (3) and Lab (2) .............................5
ANS 3384 Genetic Imprv of Farm Animals........4
Approved electives*........................... ...............8
Total 17
Total Required for Degree ..........120
Consider taking pre-vet requirements:
AGR 3303 Genetics (GE-B).............................. ......3
PHY 2053 and 2053L Physics 1 (GE-P)................5
PHY 2054 and 2054L Physics 2 (GE-P)................5


Industry options include beef cattle,
dairy, equine, and safety and processing of
meat and poultry. Career preparation can
be strengthened through electives.
Students who plan to apply to the UF
College of Veterinary Medicine in the
equine, food animal or mixed practice
tracks must choose the appropriate indus-
try option.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, MCB 2000, MCB 2000L, MAC
1147, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011,
BSC 2011L
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs


Semester 4:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
English Composition (GE-C).............................3.
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra and Trig
(G E-M )......................................................... 4
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Humanities (GE-H) or Social/Behav Sciences ..3
Total 14
Semester 2 Credits
ENC 1102 Introduction to Argument
and Persuasion (GE-C, H).............................. 3
M them atics (GE-M ) ........................................... 3
BSC 2010 and 2010L Principles of Biology 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)....................................... 4
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE-S).... 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication....... 3
Total 16
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Principles of Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
AEB 3103 Food & Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (GE-S) .............3-4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources................................. ................ 3
Electives......................... ............................. 6
Total 16-17
Semester 4 Credits
MCB 2000 and 2000L Microbiology (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)* ..............3
Electives......................... .............................. 8
Total 15
Beef Cattle Option
Semester 5 Credits
ANS 3006C Intro to Animal Science ...................4
ANS 3440 Principles of Animal Nutrition.......... 4
ANS 3634C M eats ............................................. 3
ANS 3934 Careers in Livestock Industry ........... 1
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt...... 3
AEB 3114L Intro to Ag Computer Apps.............1
Total 16
Semester 6 Credits
ANS 3404C Food Animal Feed/Nutrition.........3
ANS 3613L Livestock/Meat Evaluation............. 2
AGR 4231C Forage Science Range Mgmt...........4
ANS 3384 Genetic Improvement of Farm
A nim als ................................... .............. 3
ANS 3383L Application of Genetic Evaluation
to Livestock ..................................................... 1
ANS 3319 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals............3
ANS 3316L Techniques in Ruminant
Reproduction .............................................. 1
Total 17


Summer Credits
ANS 4941 Practical Work Experience................ 3
Total 3
Semester 7 Credits
AEB 4424 Human Resource Mgmt in Ag OR
AEE 3414 Leadership Development............. 3
ANS 4243C Beef Cow/Calf Management ......... 3
Course in food and resource economics ............ 3
Approved elective*....................... .............. 3
Total 12
Semester 8 Credits
ANS 4931 Senior Seminar................................... 1
ANS 4245C Beef Stocker/Feedyard Mgmt ....... 2
Course in food and resource economics ............ 3
Approved electives*............................................ 6
Total 12
Total Required for Degree.......... 120
Dairy Option
Semester 5 Credits
ANS 3006C Intro to Animal Science................. 4
ANS 3440 Principles of Animal Nutrition......... 4
AEB 3114L Intro to Ag Computer Apps............ 1
Approved electives*............................................ 5
Total 14
Semester 6 Credits
AEB 3133 Intro to Agribusiness Management.. 3
ANS 3251 Dairy Cattle Management ................. 2
ANS 3250L Dairy Cattle Mgmt Lab .................. 2
ANS 3319 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology of Domestic Animals............ 3
ANS 3316L Techniques in Ruminant
Reproduction............................ ........... ... 1
Approved electives* ............................................ 4
Total 15
Summer Credits
ANS 4941 Practical Work Experience.................3
Total 3
Semester 7 Credits
ANS 4441 Dairy Cattle Nutrition...................... 3
ANS 4441L Dairy Cattle Nutrition Lab.............. 2
AEB 4424 Human Resources Mgmt in Ag......... 3
Approved electives*...................... .............. 6
Total 14
Semester 8 Credits
ANS 4252C Dairy Management Systems........... 4
ANS 4931 Senior Seminar................................... 1
ANS 3384 Genetic Improvement of Farm
A nim als .................................... ............. 3
ANS 3383L Application of Genetic Evaluation
to Livestock............ ............. ................ 1
Approved electives*............................................ 6
Total 15
Total Required for Degree.......... 120
Equine Option
Semester 5 Credits
ANS 3006C Intro to Animal Science................. 4
ANS 3440 Principles of Animal Nutrition......... 4


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






COLLEGES


ANS 3230 Survey of Equine/Allied Industry....1
ANS 3043 Growth and Development of Farm
Anim als..................... ........... ................ 3
AEB 3114L Intro to Ag Computer Apps.............1
Total 13
Semester 6 Credits
AGR 4231C Forage Science and Range Mgmt...4
ANS 3319 Reproductive Physiology
and Endocrinology of Farm Animals............3
ANS 3315L Tech in Horse Reproduction............1
ANS 3384 Genetic Improvement
of Farm Anim als.......................... ............. 3
ANS 3079L Form to Function in Horses.............2
Total 13
Summer Credits
ANS 4941 Practical Work Experience........... .... 3
Total 3
Semester 7 Credits
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt ......3
ANS 3237C Equine Health Management ...........2
ANS 3405 Equine Nutrition & Feeding Mgmt...2
AEB 4424 Human Resources Mgmt in Ag OR
AEE 3414 Leadership Development..............3
Course in food and resource economics......... 1-3
Approved electives*.......................... ............... 4
Total 15-16
Semester 8 Credits
ANS 4234 Horse Enterprise Management..........2
ANS 4931 Senior Seminar ................................1
Course in food and resource economics......... 2-3
Approved electives* ......................................... 10
Total 16-17
Total Required for Degree..........120
Safety and Processing of Meat and
Poultry Option
Semester 5 Credits
ANS 3006C Intro to Animal Science..................4.
ANS 3634C M eats............................. ............ 3
ANS 3934 Careers in Livestock Industry............1
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt ......3
FOS 4204 Food Safety and Sanitation.................2
AEB 3114L Intro to Ag Computer Apps.............1
Total 14
Semester 6 Credits
FOS 4222 Food Microbiology ..........................3.
FOS 4222L Food Microbiology Lab ..................2.
ALS 4932 Special Topics HACCP......................2
ANS 3613L Livestock and Meat Evaluation.......2
ANS 4635C Meat Processing ............................
Approved elective*......................................... 3
Total 15
Summer Credits
ANS 4941 Practical Work Experience .............. 3
Total 3
Semester 7 Credits
STA 2023 Introduction to Statistics.................. ..3
Approved electives*..........................................12
Total 15


Semester 8 Credits
ANS 4931 Senior Seminar..................................... 1
ANS 4905 Special Problems Meat Processing....3
AEB 3300 Ag and Food Marketing................... 3
FOS 4722C Quality Control, Food Systems .......3
ANS 4631C Processing Poultry, Meat, Eggs...... 3
Total 13
Total Required for Degree...........120
* By choosing appropriate electives, stu-
dents can earn a minor or a dual major in
agribusiness management, extension edu-
cation or ag operations management while
completing the degree requirements for
the animal industry option.

Botany
www.botany.ufl.edu
Students should consult the under-
graduate coordinator as soon as possible.
Academic progress of freshmen and
sophomores is monitored each semester
based on critical-tracking criteria estab-
lished by the college faculty.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria the first fall or spring term
enrolled and each fall or spring term af-
terward for five total semesters. Students
can pursue one of two specializations
listed in the next column.


This option is designed for students who
do not plan to attend graduate school.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 5 critical-tracking
courses excluding labs CHM 2045,
CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L,
MAC 1147, BSC 2010/2010L or BOT
2010C, BSC 2011/2011L or MCB 2000
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs with 2.5 GPA on all
critical-tracking courses
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs with a 2.5 GPA
Note: Students must achieve a grade of
C or better in all courses (other than elec-
tives) required for the major in botany.


Semester 1 Credits
BSC 2010 & 2010L Biology 1 & Lab (4) (GE-B)
OR BOT 2010C Intro. Botany (GE-B)...... 3-4
Composition (GE-C)........................................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H) ............................................. 3
M mathematics (GE-M )........................................... 4
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)................ 3
Total 16-17
Semester 2 Credits
BSC 2011 & 2011L Biology 2 & Lab (4) (GE-B)
OR MCB 2000 Microbiology (GE-B) .......3-4
ENC 1102 Introduction to Argument and
Persuasion (GE-C, H)................................. 3
MAC 1147 Precalc: Algebra and Trig (GE-M) 4
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P).............................. 4
Elective ..... ................ ...... 2
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
H um anities (GE-H ) ............................................ 3
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy (GE-B)...... 3
Humanities or Social and Behav Sciences (GE) 3
Elective ................................................................... 7
Total 16
Semester 4 Credits
CHM 2046 & 2046L Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity (GE-B).................... 4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag &Natural Resources3
Elective ............................ ........... ............... 6
Total 17
Semester 5 Credits
BCH 3023 Elem. Organic Chemistry (3) OR
CHM 2200 and 2200L Organic Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1)..................................................... 3-4
PCB 3034C Introduction to Ecology ................... 4
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3)(GE-S) ........3-4
Elective in botany or science........................... 3-4
Total 13-16
Semester 6 Credits
PHY 2004 and 2004L Applied Physics I (3)
and Lab (1).................................. .............. 4
BOT 3503 Physiology and Molecular Biology
of Plants................................... ................ 3
BOT 3503L Physiology and Molecular Biology
of Plants Lab.................................. ............. 2
Elective in botany or science.............................. 4
Total 13
Semester 7 Credits
BOT 5225C Plant Anatomy* ................................ 4
AGR 3303 (3) OR PCB 3063 (4) Genetics......... 3-4
Elective in botany or science ............................. 3-4
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication....... 3
Total 13-15
Semester 8 Credits
Approved elective**............................................ 3
Approved elective**............................................ 4
Approved elective**............................................ 3


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


Approved elective**.............................. ..... 3
Approved elective in botany or science..............3
Total 16
Total Required for Degree ..........120
* BOT 3303C, Introductory Vascular Plant
Morphology, is offered Summer A (even
years) and can substitute for BOT 5225C.
** Approved electives for the balance of
120 credit hours required for graduation.

This option requires a strong back-
ground in the basic sciences and is in-
tended for students who plan to attend
graduate or professional school.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* Complete 1 of 7 critical-tracking
courses excluding labs CHM 2045,
CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L,
MAC 2311, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC
2011, BSC 2011L, BOT 2011C, PHY
2053
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 2 additional critical courses
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete 1 additional tracking course
excluding labs with 2.5 GPA on all
critical-tracking courses
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs with a 2.5 GPA
Note: Students must achieve a grade of
C or better in all courses (other than elec-
tives) required for the major in botany.

Semester 1 Credits
BSC 2010 and 2010L Integrated Principles of
Biology 1 (3) and Lab (1) (GE-B).................. 4
Composition (GE-C) .............................................. 3
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE) .......3
M them atics (GE-M ).......................................... 3-4
Total 13-14
Semester 2 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
ENC 1102 Introduction to Argument and
Persuasion (GE-C, H)...............................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S) ...............3
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Total 14


Semester 3 Credits
Hum anities (GE-H)............................ ............ 3
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy (GE-B)......3
MAC 2311 Geometry and Calculus 1 (GE-M)*4
Electives........................ ......................... 6-7
Total 16-17
Semester 4 Credits
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)......................................... 4
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity (GE-B)................... 4
PHY 2053 and 2053L Physics 1 (4)
and Lab (1) (GE-P) ................................... 5
Hum anities (GE-H )................................................3
Total 16
Semester 5 Credits
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry........................ 3
PCB 3034C Introduction to Ecology.................... 4
PHY 2054 and 2054L Physics 2 (4)
and Lab (1) .................................. .............. 5
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3) (GE-S)........3-4
Total 15-16
Semester 6 Credits
CHM 2211 and 2211L Organic Chemistry (3)
an d L ab (2) .......................................................5
BOT 3503 and 3503L Physiology and Molecular
Biology of Plants (3) and Lab (2) ..............5.
AEE 3030C Oral Communication.......................3
Elective........................ ............................ 3
Total 16
Note: Students who take CHM 4207 Bio-
chemistry and Molecular Biology and its
lab CHM 4302L should register for these
courses in the senior year and be prepared
to take other courses suggested for the
specialization in biochemistry and molecu-
lar biology.
Semester 7 Credits
BOT 5225C Plant Anatomy*................................. 4
AGR 3303 (3) or PCB 3063 (4) Genetics............3-4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources............................ ...... .... 3
Elective in botany .......... .............................3-4
Total 13-15
Semester 8 Credits
Computer course or approved elective ..............3
Approved elective** .............................................. 4
Approved elective**............................................ 4
Approved electives**............................................ 6
Total 17
Total Required for Degree........... 120

* BOT 3303C, Introductory Vascular Plant
Morphology, is offered Summer A (even
years) and can substitute for BOT 5225C.
** Approved electives for the balance of
120 credit hours required for graduation.


Biology Education Program
Students who plan to teach biology in
secondary education programs can major
in botany and should see the undergradu-
ate coordinator for information.
Honors in Botany: To graduate cum
laude, a student must have a minimum
GPA of 3.5 in 3000-/4000-level courses. To
graduate magna cum laude or summa cum
laude requires a minimum grade point av-
erage of 3.75 and 3.85, respectively, en-
rollment in BOT 4905 for one or two
semesters, respectively, and a thesis based
upon independent research. Students carry
out the research under the direction of a
botany faculty memberss.
The thesis is submitted to and approved
by the student's research adviser and the
dean's office. The undergraduate coordina-
tor and the dean's office must approve
honors work before a student can register
for BOT 4905.

Entomology and Nematology
entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu
Entomology and nematology are bio-
logical sciences dealing with insects, mites,
ticks, spiders and nematodes. The De-
partment of Entomology and Nematology
offers the major and participates in the
plant protection specialization of the plant
sciences major offered in conjunction with
the departments of Agronomy and Plant
Pathology.
There are five specializations: basic sci-
ence/preprofessional, plant protection,
biology education, ecotourism and urban
pest management. The department also
offers a combined-degree program. Inter-
ested students should contact the under-
graduate coordinator.
A grade of C or better is required for all
courses in the major.
Preprofessional and Basic Sciences
This specialization offers a strong back-
ground in the basic sciences. A minimum
2.5 GPA is required in science and math
courses. There are two options.


This option provides preparation for
programs in medicine, dentistry, optome-
try, veterinary, chiropractic, osteopathy
and podiatry. Students should refer to the
preprofessional information in the col-
lege's admission section and they should
contact the Office of Health and Legal Pro-
fessions Advising in the Academic Advis-
ing Center.
An off-campus degree program is avail-
able through the Fort Lauderdale Research
and Education Center.


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog






COLLEGES


To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* 2.5 GPA on math and science courses
semesters 1-5
* Complete 2 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, MAC
2311, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L OR BOT
2010C and BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete the other critical courses -
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
Composition (GE-C) ............................ .. ......3
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)..................................... 4
Hum anities (GE-H) ................................................3
MAC 2311 Geometry & Calculus 1 (GE-M).... 4
Total 14
Semester 2 Credits
CHM 2046 and 2046LGeneral Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)...................................... 4
Humanities (GE-H)................................................3
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3) OR AEB 2014
Eco Issues Food and You (3)..................... 3-4
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication........3
STA 2023 Intro to Statistics 1 OR STA 2122
Statistics for Social Science (GEM)................ 3
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2010 and 2010L Biology 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry 1 (3) OR
CHM 3218 Bio-organic Chemistry (4) ...... 3-4
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE) .......3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag & Natural Resources.3
Elective................. .. .......... ................
Total 16-17
Semester 4 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ......................................... 4
CHM 2211 and 2211L Organic Chemistry (3)
and Lab (2)................................................ ......5
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S) ...............3
Elective........................... ............................3
Total 15


Semester 5 Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics .............................................. 3
PHY 2053 & 2053L Physics 1 (4) & Lab (1)......... 5
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ............ 3
Approved elective.................................... ..... 3
Total 14
Semester 6 Credits
ENY 4455C Social Insects (3) OR
ZOO 2203C Invertebrate Zoology (4) ........3-4
MCB 3020 and 3020L Basic Biology of Microor-
ganisms (3) and Lab (2)...........................
PHY 2054 and 2054L Physics 2 (4)
and Lab (1) ....................................... ............... 5
Approved elective.................................... ......3
Total 16-17
Semester 7 Credits
Biochem istry.......................................... ............... 4
ENY 4161 Insect Classification (GE-B)................ 3
ENY 4660C Medical and Vet Entomology......... 3
Approved electives...................................... 4
Total 14
Semester 8 Credits
ENY 4453 Behav Ecology & Systematics (3) OR
PCB 4044C General Ecology (4) OR
ALS 3153 Agricultural Ecology (3).............3-4
ZOO 2303C Vertebrate Zoology.......................... 4
Approved electives....................................... 8
Total 15-16
Total Required for Degree...........120


This option prepares students for entry to
entomological careers and to graduate
school.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
* 2.5 GPA on math and science courses
semesters 1-5
* Complete 2 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, MAC
2233, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L OR BOT
2010C and BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete the other critical courses -
excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs


Semester 1 Credits
Composition (GE-C)............................................ 3
CHM 2045 & 2045L Chemistry 1 & Lab (GE-P)4
Hum anities (GE-H) ............................................. 3
MAC 2233 Survey of Calculus (GE-M)............ 3
Elective ........................... ........... ................ 3
Total 16
Semester 2 Credits
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3) (GE-S) OR
AEB 3103 Focd&RemouiEconomics (4) OR
AEB 2014 Eco Issues Food and You (3)... 3-4
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)................ 3
STA 2023 Statistics I (GE-M).............................. 3
Elective ............................... ................. 3
Total 16-17
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2010 and 2010L Principles of Biology 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B)....................................... 4
Hum anities (GE-H) ............................................. 3
PHY 2004 & 2004L Physics 1 & Lab (GE-P)....... 4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
R sources ........................................ ............ 3
Total 14
Semester 4 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Principles of Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B)....................................... 4
PHY 2005 and 2005L Applied Physics 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P) .................................... 4
Humanities or Social & Behav.Sciences (GE-S). 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication*..... 3
Total 14
Semester 5 Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics.............................................. 3
CHM 2200 and 2200L Organic Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) OR
CHM 3218 Bioorganic Chemistry ............... 4
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology................ 3
Approved electives............................ .............. 6
Total 16
Semester 6 Credits
MCB 3020 and 3020L Basic Biology of
Microorganisms (3) & Lab (2) OR MCB 2000
& 2000L Microbiology (3) & Lab (1) ........4-5
ALS 3153 Agricultural Ecology (3) OR
PCB 3034C Intro to Ecology (4) OR
PCB 4044C General Ecology (4)................ 3-4
Approved electives*...................... .............. 7
Total 14-16
Semester 7 Credits
ENY 4161 Insect Classification.......................... 3
ENY 4660C Medical and Vet Entomology......... 3
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology ............... 3
Approved electives*............................................ 6
Total 15
Semester 8 Credits
ENY 4453 Behav Ecology & Systematics (3) OR
PCB 4044C General Ecology (4) OR


University of Florida






www.cals.ufl.edu


AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES


ALS 3153 Agricultural Ecology (3)............ 3-4
ENY 4455C Social Insects (3) OR
ZOO 2203C Invertebrate Zoology (4)........ 3-4
Approved electives*.............................. .............9
Total 15-17
Total Required for Degree ..........120
Pre-vet majors need appropriate animal
science requirements as electives.
** Six hours international/diversity focus.


Students will receive instruction in the
pest science areas of entomology, nema-
tology, plant pathology and weed science.
Emphasis is placed on understanding the
crop/plant ecosystem and the need for
managing pests. The curriculum focuses
on the theory and application of biological,
chemical and integrated management pro-
grams for quality environments.
Students find employment in agribusi-
ness or government agencies concerned
with pest management, crop production
and environmental protection. The spe-
cialization is excellent preparation for
graduate study.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
Complete 2 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM
2045L, CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, MAC
1147, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011
and BSC 2011L
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete other critical courses ex-
cluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
Com position (GE-H) ............................................ 3
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Hum anities (GE-H ).............................................. 3
MAC 1147 Precalculus: Algebra and Trig
(G E-M )......................................................... 4
Elective........................... ........... ........... 2
Total 16


Semester 2 Credits
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3) OR
AEB 3103 Food & Res Economics (4) OR
AEB 2014 Eco Issues Food and You (3)...3-4
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)* ..............3
STA 2023 Statistics I (GE-M).............................3.
Total 13-14
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2010 and 2010L Principles of Biology (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
Hum anities (GE-H) .............................................. 3
PHY 2004 and 2004L Applied Physics 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P) ......................................... 4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources................................................3
Total 14
Semester 4 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Principles of Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE-S).... 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication .......3
E lectives.......................................................... .. 6
Total 16
Semester 5 Credits
AGR 3005 Principles of Crop Science (3) OR
HOS 3020C General Horticulture...............3-4
BCH 3023 Organic Biochemistry (3) OR
CHM 2200 & 2200L Organic Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) OR
CHM 3218 Bioorganic Chemistry (4).........3-4
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ............... 3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals Plant Pathology........ 4
Total 13-15
Semester 6 Credits
BOT 3503/3503L Plant Physiology & Lab (5) OR
HOS 4304 Horticulture Physiology (3)......3-5
PLP 3103C Plant Disease Control OR
PMA 4242 Landscape IPM: Ornamentals ....3
Approved electives................................................ 6
Total 12-14
Summer Credits
AGR 4214C App. Field Crop Production OR
ORH 4236C Landscape/Turfgrass Mgmt....3
ENY 4161 Insect Classification...........................3
PMA 4570C Field Techniques in Pest Mgmt.....2
Total 8
Semester 7 Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics.............................................. 3
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology.................. 3
PLS 4601C W eed Science ...................................... 3
Approved electives.............................................. 6
Total 15


Semester 8 Credits
SOS 3022 and 3022L Introduction to Soils in the
Environment (3) and Lab (1) ....................... 4
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Mgmt............. 3
Approved electives....................... .............. 6
Total 13
Total Required for Degree.......... 120
Required and Approved Electives
Other courses require adviser approval.
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness Mgmt...... 3
AGR 4321C Plant Breeding........................... 3
AOM 3073 Safety in Agriculture....................... 3
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application...................... 3
ALS 3133 Ag and Environmental Quality......... 3
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management.... 3
BOT 3143C Local Flora .............. ................... 3
ENY 3222C Biology and ID of Urban Pests....... 3
ENY 3225C Principles of Urban Pest Mgmt...... 2
ENY 3521C Tree and Shrub Insects .................. 3
ENY 3565 Tropical Horticultural Entomology.. 2
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture........... 4
MCB 2000/2000L Microbiology and Lab........... 4
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture........................ 4
ORH 3513C Ornamental Plant Identification 1.3
ORH 3514C Ornamental Plant Identification 2. 3
ORH 4242 Arboriculture................................ 3
ORH 4321 Palm Production and Culture........... 3
ORH 4932 Plant Nutrition.................................. 3
PCB 3034C Introduction to Ecology ............... 4
PLP 3151 Biocontrol of Plant Disease/Weeds... 3
PLP 3653C Introductory Mycology .................. 4
PLP 4222C Introductory Plant Virology ............ 4
PLP 4242C Introduction to Plant Bacteriology.. 3
PLP 4260C Intro to Plant Pathogenic Fungi...... 4
PLP 4290C Prin. of Plant Disease Diagnosis...... 2
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation........................... 3
PLS 4343 Culture and Production of
Aquatic Plants.............................................. 3
PLS 4353 Identification and Ecology of
Aquatic Plants.............................................. 3
SOS 4116 Enviro. Nutrient Management .......... 3
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of
Warm Season Vegetables ............................. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables...................................... 3
WIS 3401 Wildlife Ecology and Management... 3


This specialization provides teaching
certification in biological sciences. State
certification requirements change so stu-
dents should keep in close contact with
entomology and education advisers to be
sure courses and sequences apply.
An overall minimum 2.6 GPA is re-
quired for the specialization.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
* 2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5


2004-2005 Undergraduate Catalog





Semester I Credits
CHM 2045 and 2045L General Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)...................................... 4
MAC 2233 Survey of Calculus (GE-M)............ 3
Composition (GE-C) ............................................ 3
Humanities (GE-H)................................................ 3
Elective........................... ............... .............3.
Total 16
Semester 2 Credits
H um anities (GE).............................. ............. 3
CHM 2046 and 2046L General Chemistry 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)...................................... 4
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication........3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S) ............3.
STA 2122 Statistics for Social Science OR
STA 2023 Intro to Statistics (GE-M) ...............3
Total 16
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2010 and 2010L Principles of Biology (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B) ....................................... 4
AEB 3103 Prin of Food& Res Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3) OR
AEB 2014 Eco Issues Food and You (3).. 3-4
PHY 2004 and 2004L Applied Physics 1 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)........................................ 4
Elective........................ ........................... 3
Total 14-15
Semester 4 Credits
BSC 2011 and 2011L Principles of Biology 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-B)....................................... 4
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag and Natural
Resources..................... ....................... 3
Humanities or Social/Behav Sciences (GE-B)*..3
PHY 2005 and 2005L Applied Physics 2 (3)
and Lab (1) (GE-P)................................ ............ 4
Total 14
Semester 5 Credits
BOT 3143C Local Flora ........................................ 3
CHM 2200 and 2200L Organic Chemistry (3)
and Lab (1)............................ ..... ............. 4


COLLEGES
* 2.5 GPA on math and science courses
semesters 1-5
* Complete 2 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, CHM 045L,
CHM 2046, CHM 2046L, MAC 2233,
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L or BOT 2010C,
BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete other critical-tracking
courses excluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs


EDF 3135 The Adolescent................................... 3
EME 4406 Integrating Technology into
the Classroom ................................................... 3
Total 13
Semester 6 Credits
ZOO 2203C Invertebrate Zoology ..................... 4
PCB 4044C General Ecology............................... 4
SCE 4342 Environmental Education Methods
and M aterials....................................................3
EEX 3070 Teachers and Learners in the
Inclusive School.................................. ..... 3
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ............ 3
Total 17
Summer Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics .............................................. 3
MCB 3020 and 3020L Basic Biology of
Microorganisms (3) and Lab (2) OR
MCB 2000 and 2000L Microbiology (3)
and Lab (1) .......................................... ...........4-5
Total 7-8
Semester 7 Credits
ENY 4161 Insect Classification...................... 3
ENY 4660C Medical and Vet Entomology......... 3
EDF 3609 Sociological and Historical
Foundations of Education .............................. 3
PET 2350C Applied Human Physiology OR
PET 2320C Applied Human Anatomy......... 4
Total 13
Semester 8 Credits
TSL 5143 Secondary ESOL Teaching
Strategies .................................................. 3
ZOO 2303C Vertebrate Zoology.......................... 4
Approved electives................................................ 3
Total 10
Total Required for Degree...........120


This specialization prepares students for
professional careers in the ecotourism in-
dustry and is appropriate for employment
with nature preserves, nature-based theme
parks and in natural history education or
nature-based recreation.
The program emphasizes the nature in-
terpretation component of ecotourism,
while including a core of recreation and
tourism, management, economics and
human ecology courses. A nature-based
internship also is required.
To remain 'on track' for this major, a stu-
dent must meet the following critical-
tracking criteria. Critical-tracking courses
appear in bold.
Semester 1:
2.0 UF GPA required semesters 1-5
Complete 2 of 5 critical courses ex-
cluding labs CHM 2045, MAC 1147,
PHY 2020 or 2004, BSC 2010, BSC
2010L or 2010C, and BSC 2011 and
BSC 2011L


University of Florida


Semester 2:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 3:
* Complete 1 additional critical course -
excluding labs
Semester 4:
* Complete other critical courses ex-
cluding labs
Semester 5:
* Complete all critical-tracking courses
including labs
Semester 1 Credits
CHM 2045 General Chemistry (GE-P)............. 3
Com position (GE-C)........................................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H) ............................................. 3
MAC 1147 Precalc: Algebra & Trig (GE-M).....4
Total 13
Semester 2 Credits
BSC 2010 Principles of Biology 1 (GE-B)........ 3
BSC 2010L Biology 1 Lab (GE-B).................. 1
ALS 3203 PC Use in Agriculture ....................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE-S)................ 3
Hum anities (GE-H) ............................................. 3
Total 13
Semester 3 Credits
BSC 2011 Principles of Biology 2 (GE-B)........ 3
BSC 2011L Biology 2 Lab (GE-B).................. 1
Humanities (GE-H) .................... ........... 3
PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 (GE-P) OR
PHY 2020 Intro to Physics (GE-P)............... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GE)................... 3
Total 13
Semester 4 Credits
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics (4) OR
ECO 2023 Microeconomics (3) OR
AEB 2014 Eco Issues Food and You (3)... 3-4
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication....... 3
AEE 3033C Writing for Ag & Natural Resources. 3
Electives............................ ............................ 5
Total 13-15
Summer Credits
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology................ 3
Invertebrate animal elective*............................ 3-4
Elective ........................... ........... ................ 3
Total 9-10
Semester 5 Credits
ENY 4161 Insect Classification..................... 3
Human ecology elective*............................... 3
Plant identification elective* ........................... 3-4
Elective ........................... ........... ................ 3
Total 12-13
Semester 6 Credits
Vertebrate animal elective*............................. 3-4
Ecology elective*.............................................3-4
Physical science elective*................................... 3-4
Recreation and tourism elective*...................... 3
Total 12-15




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