• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Correspondence directory
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Officers of administration
 Critical dates and calendar
 General information
 The graduate school
 Fields of instruction
 Graduate degrees and programs
 Admission to the graduate...
 General regulations
 Requirements for master's...
 Nontraditional programs
 Requirements for the Ph.D.
 Graduate faculty
 Specialized graduate degrees
 Financial information and...
 Financial aid
 Research and teaching services
 Interdisciplinary research...
 Student services
 Index
 University of Florida colleges...
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00060
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00060
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Correspondence directory
        Unnumbered ( 2 )
    Title Page
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    Officers of administration
        Page x
        Page xi
    Critical dates and calendar
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The graduate school
        Page 5
    Fields of instruction
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
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    Graduate degrees and programs
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Admission to the graduate school
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    General regulations
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Requirements for master's degrees
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Nontraditional programs
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Requirements for the Ph.D.
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Graduate faculty
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
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        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
    Specialized graduate degrees
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Financial information and requirements
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Financial aid
        Page 51
    Research and teaching services
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Interdisciplinary research centers
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Student services
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Index
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
    University of Florida colleges and programs
        Unnumbered ( 305 )
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text













the Past


the Future


j4Ad
Vnivca-tly
9? ecer*d


ADUATECATA LOG


2002-


2003


Shaping


I~~l_F~~ IIYII~IIUII~UI


Honoring












Correspondence Directory


Graduate School
P.O. Box I 15500
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 3261 1-5500
(352) 392-4646


Office of the University Registrar-Admissions
202 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114000
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000
(352) 392-1365


Graduate Minority Programs
Graduate School
P.O. Box 115500
University of Florida
(352)392-6444


International Student Advisement
Advisor, International Students
123 Grinter Hall
Univeristy of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611-3225
(352)392-5323


Assistantships
Chair of the department in which the student wishes
to enroll.


Student Financial Affairs (Financial Aid)
103 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114025
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025
(352)392-1275 or (352)392-1210

Division of Housing
SW 13th Street and Museum Road
P.O. Box 112100
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2100
(352)392-2161

University Financial Services (Student
Accounts)
I 13 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114050
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4050
(352)392-0181

Programs & Services for Students with
Disabilities
205 Peabody Hall
P.O. Box 114100
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4100
(352)392-1261 (V), (352)392-3008 (TDD)

Hearing Impaired
For persons with hearing impairments, please use the
Florida Relay Service (FRS) when departments do not
list TDD number. The FRS number is:
I-(800)955-8771 (TDD)


The University of Florida is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools to award the degrees of bachelor, master, specialist, and engineer, as well as doctoral and professional degrees.

The University of Florida does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national or ethnic origin,
religious preference, marital status, disability, or sex, in the administration of educational policies,
admission policies, financial aid, employment, or any other University program or activity.
The University of Florida Title IX Coordinator is Jacquelyn D. Hart, 145 Tigert Hall (352)392-6004.
Upon request, the Graduate Catalog is available on computer disk to
students with print-related disabilities.

For more information, contact the Office of the University Registrar.
The University of Florida Graduate Catalog is available on the World Wide Web at http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu.


I


Editor--Helen N. Martin


Production--Research Publications










Graduate Catalog


2002


-2003


The
University Record


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


VOLUME XCVII I SERIES I I NUMBER 2 I APRIL 2002
The University Record (USPS 652-760) published five times a year in March,April, September,
September, and November by the University of Florida, Office of the University Registrar, Academic
Publications, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000. Periodical postage paid at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to the
OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR, BOX I 14000,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FL 32611 4000.





II


Table of Contents


O FFICERS O F ADM IN ISTRATIO N ............................................... ................ ........... ..... x
,, FLO RIDA STATE CABIN ET .......................................... ..... .. ................. x
...... BOARD OF EDUCATION OF FLORIDA ..................................... ............. x
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOARD OF TRUSTEES ....................................... x
S, U N IVERSITY O F FLO RIDA .............................................................................. xi
A d m in istratio n ................................................................. ................................ x i
G graduate Schoo l ............................................................................................ xi
G graduate C o uncil ................................................................................. ..... xi
CRITICAL DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ................................................ xii
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR ................................................................. xii
G EN ERA L IN FO RM ATIO N ............................................ ...................................................... I
INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE ...................................... .......................... 3
M ISSIO N A N D G O A LS ............................................................................................... 3
TH E G RA D UATE SC H O O L ...................................................................................... 5
M M ISSIO N ........................................ .................. ...... ............ .........................5
V IS IO N ..................... ...................... ............................. ..................................... 5
O*R-.. --O O RG A N IZATIO N ............................................................................................... 5
fjH IST O RY .......................................................................................................................... 5
D EFIN IT IO N S ... .. .................................................................. .. ........ 5
GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS ........................................................ .... 6
N O N T H ESIS D EG REES ............................... ... ...................... ..................... ... 6
T H ESIS D EG R EES ................................................................................................... 7
NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS .............................. ....................................... 10
O CONCURRENT GRADUATE PROGRAMS ......................................... ... I0
.. ... JO INT D EG REE PRO G RAM S ............................................................................ 10
COMBINED BACHELOR'S/MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS ................. II
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM PROGRAMS ................................................... 12
INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE CERTIFICATES AND
-. ^ CONCENTRATIONS ......................................2... 12
A frican Studies .............................. ............ ...... ... ...... ......................... 2
A groforestry ............................. ................. ....................... 2
Animal Molecular and Cell Biology....................................... ..... 3
Bio logical Sciences..... .......................... ............ ............................ 3
i I C hem ical Physics .. .......................... ...... ...... .. ... ....... ..... ........... 14
...-..- w > Ecological Engineering .......................... ... ........ ......... 14
Geographic Information Sciences ..................... ......................................... 14
G erontological Studies ...... ...... .. .. ............. ................................ 14
Health Physics and Medical Physics................................................. 5
H ydrologic Sciences ......................................................... ..................... 5
j' Latin American Studies............................................ ..... 5
Quantum Theory Project (QTP) ........................ ...... 17
Q uantitative Finance ..................................................... ................ 7
"i .. Tox ico logy .................................... ............. ......... ......... ...............7... 7
Tro pical A agriculture .................................................................................... 7
Tropical Studies ............................. ............ ....... ......... ............... 18


ii







V isio n Sciences ......................................................................................... 18
W wetlands .................................................................................................... 18
W om en's and Gender Studies ................................................... ......... 18
ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ................................................. 19
H O W T O A PPLY .................................................................................................... 1 9
A D M ISSIO N S EXAM INATIO N S .................. ................................................... ... 19
M ED IC A L IM M U N IZATIO N ......................... ..................................................... 19
COMPUTER REQUIREMENT .............................. .. .............. 20
Sam ple C om puter C onfigurations.............................................................. 20
Ethernet Recom m endation ......................................................................... 20
W wireless Networking on Cam pus ............................................. .......... ... 20
Backing U p Files ............................................................................................. 20
M ac in to sh ............................. ........................ ............................................ 2 0
Campus Software Standards ....................................................... 20
A bo ut Lapto ps ...................................................................................................... 2
Advice on Acquiring a Computer ........................................................ 2
G ator-Ready Vendors ............. .................. .. ............................................. 2
College Requirements ........................ .. ................... ................. 2
CONDITIONAL ADMISSION ...................................... ............... ........ 2
R E S ID E N C Y ...................................... ....... .............................................................. 2 1
Florida A dm inistrative C ode .................................... ................. ............. 2
H ow to A pply for Residency ........................................................................ .. 23
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ................................................................. 23
STUDENTS W ITH DISABILITIES ............................................................... .. 23
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY
ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS INFORMATION .................................. 24
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS .......................... ........... ........ 24
NONDEGREE REGISTRATION ...................................................... ............. 24
R EA D M ISSIO N ........................................................................................................... 24
FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS....................................... 25
GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS ................................ 25
TU ITIO N PAYM EN TS .......... ..... ... ............................................................ 25
UN IVERSITY-W IDE FELLO W SHIPS ................................................................. 25
A lum ni Fellow ship ............................................ ....... ............. .................... 25
Named Presidential Fellowship .......................... ................................ ....... 25
G printer Fello w ship .............................................................................................. 25
Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship... 26
Title VI-Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship.................... 26
MINORITY SUPPORT PROGRAMS .......................................................... ...... 26
COLLEGE/SCHOOL FINANCIAL AID WEIBSITES ....................................... 27
EXTERNAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ...................... 27
G EN ERA L REG U LAT IO N S .................................................................... ..................... 27
C ATA LO G Y EA R ................................ ............... .. .............. .............................. 27
CLASSIFICATIO N O F STUDENTS ......................................................... ...... 28
CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS ........................................... 28
STUDENT CO N DUCT CO DE ...................... .................................. ............ 28
REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS .............................................................. .. 28
Required Full-Tim e Registration ....... ................................... ........... 29


























I I














pi*






I g


Iv


CHANGE OF GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM ......................................... 29
CO URSES AND CREDITS ....................................... ............. ........................ 29
G R A D E S ........................................................................................................... 3 0
UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP ...................................................... 30
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATION ............................................ ............. 30
EX A M IN AT IO N S ............................................................................................... 30
PREPARATION FOR FINAL SEMESTER .......................................... ...... 3
AWARDING OF DEGREES .................................... ................ 3
ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT .................................................... 3
REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES .......................................... ............. 3
G EN ERA L REG U LATIO N S ........................................................ ........... ........... 3
MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE ................................... 32
REQUIREMENTS FORTHE PH.D. ................................................................. 33
C O U RSE REQ U IREM EN TS.................................................... .......................... 33
LEA V E O F A BSEN C E ................................................................................................. 33
SUPERVISO RY CO MM ITTEE............................................ ................... 33
LANGUAGE REQ UIREMENT ...................................................... .............. 34
CAMPUS RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT ..................................................... 34
Q UALIFYIN G EXAM INATIO N ......................................................................... 34
AD M ISSIO N TO CAN D IDACY ........................................................... ........... 34
D ISSERTA T IO N ................................... ....... ............................. ........................ 34
GUIDELINES FOR RESTRICTION ON
RELEASE O F DISSERTATIO NS ............................................. ............... 35
FIN A L EXA M IN ATIO N ............. .......... .................................... ............ 35
C ERT IFIC A T IO N ........................................................................................................ 35
SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES ...................................................... ........... 35
MASTER O F ACCO UNTING ................................... ...... ....... ............ 36
M ASTER O F A DVERTISIN G ............................................... ................ .......... 36
MASTER OF AGRIBUSINESS .............................................. ........... 36
MASTER O F AG RICULTURE ........................... ...................... .... ........... 36
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE ................................................ ....... 36
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
T EA C H IN G ....................................................... ......................... ................. 36
MASTER OF ARTS IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING ................ 37
MASTER OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ........................................ ........... 37
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ............................................ 37
M A STER O F ED U C AT IO N .................................................... ........................ 39
M ASTER O F EN G IN EERIN G .............................................. ..... .......... 39
MASTER OF EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES AND MASTER OF
SCIENCE IN EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES .................................... 40
M A ST ER O F FIN E A RT S ........................................................ ........................... ........ 40
MASTER OF FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES ..................................... 41

MASTER OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION ................... 41
MASTER OF HEALTH ADMINISTRATION .................................. ........ 41
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE ........................................... 41
MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MASTER OF
SCIENCE IN HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION ..................................... 42







MASTER O F IN TERIO R D ESIG N ................................... ................................... 42
MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT.... 42
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE.............................................. 42
M A ST ER O F LA T IN .................................................... ..... ..................... ....... .. 42
MASTER OF LAWS IN COMPARATIVE LAW ............................................. 43
MASTER OF LAWS IN TAXATION ............................................................. 43
M A ST ER O F M U SIC ......................................... .. ................................................. 43
MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY .................................................. 44
MASTER OF PHYSICAL THERAPY ......................................................................... 44
MASTER O F PUBLIC HEALTH ................................................ ...................... 44
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES ............................ 44
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING ............................ ............................ 44
M A STER O F STATISTIC S ................................... ... ........ ............................... 44
MASTER OF WOMEN'S STUDIES ................................. .............................. 45
E N G IN E E R .................................................... .. .... .......................................... 4 5
DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY ........................................... ......................... 45
ED .S.A N D ED .D ................................. ....... .. .. ...................................... 46
SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION ........................ ........ ........................ 46
DOCTO R O F EDUCATIO N ................................................................................ 47
DOCTOR OF PLANT MEDICINE ......................... ...................................... 47
FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND REQUIREMENTS ....................................... 48
E X P E N S E S ............................................................... ...... ......................................... 4 8
A application Fee ..................... .... .............. ............................................ 48
Enrollm ent and Student Fees ...................................................... ..... ............. 48
Fee Liability ............................ ..... ...... .................................................... 48
A ssessm ent of Fees ....................................... ....................................... 48
Health,Athletic,Activity and Service, and
Material and Supply Fees .............................. ................... .......... 48
Special Fees and Charges ....................... ... ... .................. ........... 49
Paym ent of Fees ............... .............. ................................................... 49
D headlines ......................... ....... .. ............................................ 49
Cancellation and Reinstatement .............................................................. 49
Deferral of Registration and Tuition Fees .......................................... 49
W aiver of Fees ......... .......................................................................... 50
R fund of Fees ........................................... ............. ........................ 50
OTHER GENERAL FISCAL INFORMATION ................................................. 50
PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS ......................... ............................ 50
TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES ........................................... 5
FIN A N C IA L A ID ............................................................. ............. .................... .......... 5
OFFICE FOR STUDENT FINANCIALAFFAIRS ........................................ .. 5
FINANCIAL AID NEXUS TAPES ............................................ ...................... 5
LO A N S .................................... ......... .............................................. ..... 51
PART-TIM E EM PLOYM ENT ............................................. ............................... 5
ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS... 52
RESEARCH AND TEACHING SERVICES ......................... ............................. 52
LIB R A R IES ... ........................ .... ...... ........ ............................................................. 5
CO M PUTER FACILITIES ......................................... ................ ........................ 53







Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC)........................................... 53
Center for Instructional and
Research Computing Activities (CIRCA), Office of Academic
Technology (AT ) ...................................... ...................................... .. 54
A RT G A LLER IES ................................... ......... ....................... ........................ 54
PERFO RM IN G A RTS ...................................... ........................................ .. 54
MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY ........................... ................................ 54
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION ............................................... 55
ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERIMENT STATION ................. 56
FLORIDA ENGINEERING EDUCATION DELIVERY SYSTEM (FEEDS)... 56
OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND GRADUATE PROGRAMS........................... 56
UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA ....................... ............................... 56
INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTERS .................................................. 57
OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES.................................................. 59
ST U D EN T SERV IC ES ............................................ .. ................................................. 60
CAREER RESOURCE CENTER ........................ ................................. 60
C O U N SELIN G C EN T ER .................................................................... .................. 60
ENGLISH SKILLS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS .............................. 60
GRADUATE ASSISTANTS UNITED ......................... ................................ 6
GRADUATE STUDENT E-MAIL LISTSERV ..................................................... 61
G RADUATE N EW SLETTER ................................................................................... 6
GRADUATE MINORITY PROGRAMS ........................ ......................... 6
GRADUATE SCHOOL EDITORIAL OFFICE .................................................. 6
GRADUATE SCHOOL RECORDS OFFICE ................................................ 6
GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL ................................ ....................... 62
GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK ..................................................... ...... 62
H O U SIN G ................................ ................................................................. 6 2
A pplicatio ns ................................. ........... .... ......................................... 6 2
Residence Halls for Single Students ........................ ......................... 62
Cooperative Living Arrangements ........................... ..................... ... 62
Family and Single Graduate Student Housing .......................................... 62
O ff-C am pus H housing .................................................... ......................... 63
O M B U D SM A N .............................................. .............. ........ ........................... 63
READING AND WRITING CENTER ......................... .......................... 63
SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC ................. .................................. 63
STUDENT HEALTH CARE CENTER ............................................................. 63
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL CENTER............................ 64
WORKSHOPS FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS ............................................ 65
FIELDS O F IN STRUCTIO N ..................................... ..................................... 67
A C C O U N T IN G .................................................................. .................................... 72
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, MECHANICS,AND ENGINEERING
S C IE N C E ................................................................................................................ 7 3
A FR IC A N ST U D IES ................................................................................................... 75
AGRICULTURALAND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING .............................. 75
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION .................. 77
A G RIC U LTU RE- G EN ERA L .............................................. ............... ......... 78
A G R O N O M Y ............................................................................................................. 79
ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY ........................... ........... 80







A N IM A L SC IEN C ES ........................................................................................... 80
A N T H RO PO LO G Y ............................................................................................ 82
A RC H IT EC T U RE ................................................................................................. 84
A RT A N D A RT H ISTO RY ...................................................................................... 86
A STRO N O M Y .............................................................................................. 89
BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ............................................. 90
BIO M ED ICA L EN G IN EERIN G ......................................................................... 91
BO TA N Y ................. ...... .......... ..... ............. .......................................... 94
BU ILD IN G C O N STRU CTIO N ........................................................................... 95
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-GENERAL ........................................ ............ 98
C H EM ICA L EN G IN EERIN G ............................................................................. 98
C H EM IST RY ............................................................... ..................................... ......... 99
CIVILAND COASTAL ENGINEERNG ......................................................... 01
CLASSICS ............................................................... 105
CLINICALAND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY ................................................ 106
C LIN IC A L IN V EST IG AT IO N ............................................................................. 108
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS .................................. 08
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS ............................................................... 0
C O M PA RAT IV E LAW ........................................................................................ II
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING I
CO UN SELO R ED UCATIO N ............................................................................ 11 3
DECISION AND INFORMATION SCIENCES ................................................ 114
D EN TA L SC IEN C ES ........................................................................................... 6
EC O N O M IC S ................................................................................................... ... 18
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, POLICY,AND FOUNDATIONS ............ 120
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY ..................................... ............................. 22
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING ...................................... 24
EN G IN EERIN G- G EN ERA L ............................................................................ 27
EN G LISH ... .............. ........................................................ ............................... 127
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY ........................................................ 128
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES ............................................ 129
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES ................................................................ 132
FAMILY,YOUTH,AND COMMUNITY SCIENCES ...................................... 134
FINANCE, INSURANCE,AND REAL ESTATE ................................................ 134
FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES ..................................................... 137
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS ....................................................... 38
FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION ............................................. 39
FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION ............................................. 41
G EO G RA PH Y ........................... ...... .... ................................................... 142
G EO LO G ICAL SCIEN CES ...................................................................... .. 143
GERMANIC AND SLAVIC STUDIES ..................................................... .. 145
G ERO NTO LO G ICAL STUD IES ............................... .................................... 146
HEALTH PROFESSIONS-GENERAL ............................................................. 146
HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION .................................................................... 46
HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION ........................................................ 48
H IST O RY .......................................................................................................... ... 50
HO RTIC U LTU RA L SC IEN C E ........................................................................... 52
INDUSTRIALAND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING ............................................... 54









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INTERDISCIPLINARY ECO LO GY .............................................................. 156
IN T ERIO R D ESIG N ............................................................................................. 56
LAN DSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ........................ ............ ............................ 58
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES ............................................................................ 160
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES-GENERAL ................................................. 160
SLIN G U IST IC S ...................................................................................................... 16 1
M A N A G EM EN T ............................................................................................ ... 1 52
M A R K ET IN G ............................................ .. .. .......... ............................. 164
MASS CO M M UN ICATIO N .................................. .. .................... ..... 166
MATERIALS SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING ................................ ........ 169
M A T H EM A T IC S ................................ .... ......... .... ............... .............. 7 1
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING .......................................... 173
MEDICAL SCIENCES ........................................... .. 175
Interdisciplinary Program (IDP) in Medical Sciences .............................. 175
Advanced Concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology .... 176
Advanced Concentration in Genetics...................................................... 177
Advanced Concentration in Immunology and Microbiology ............... 178
Advanced Concentration in Molecular Cell Biology.............................. 178
Advanced Concentration in Neuroscience ........................................ 179
Advanced Concentration in Physiology and Pharmacology ............... 179
MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY ............................................. 180
MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL SCIENCE................................................ 181
MOLECULAR GENETICS AND MICROBIOLOGY ............................... 182
M U SIC ......................... ........ .. .... ........................... ........................ 182
NEURO SCIENCE ................................................ 185
NUCLEAR AND RADIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.................................... 185
N U R SIN G ................................................................ ........... .................... 187
O CCUPATIO NAL THERAPY ............................... ..... ........................ 189
O RA L BIO LO G Y .. ............................... .................................................................. 190
PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY,AND LABORATORY MEDICINE.......... 191
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES-GENERAL ...................................... .. 193
PHARMACEUTICS ...................................... 193
PHARMACO DYNAM ICS ............................................ ..................... ...... 193
PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS ..................................... 193
PHARMACY HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION ........................................ 194
PH ILO SO PHY ............................................ 1....94
PHYSICALTHERAPY ........................................ .. 195
PH Y SIC S ................................................................. ........... ................ ....... ....... 197
PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS ................................. 199
PLANT MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR BIOLOGY .................................... 199
PLANT PATHOLOGY ................................................ 200
PO LIT IC A L SC IEN C E ...................................... ............... ........................... 20 1
PSY C H O LO G Y ............................... ...... ...................................................... 204
PUBLIC HEALTH ...................................... ......... .. .. 206
RECREATION, PARKS,AND TOURISM ......................................................... 207
REHABILITATIO N CO UNSELING .......................................... .................... 208
REHABILITATIO N SCIENCE ................................... ..... ........................ 209
SR ELIG IO N ........................ .............. .. .... .. ..................... 2 10


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ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES ............................................ 210
SO C IO LO G Y ....................................... ............................................................... 21 3
SOIL AND W ATER SCIENCE ........................................................................ 2 14
SPECIAL EDUCATION ........................................................................................ 21 6
ST A T IST IC S ................................................ ................................................ 2 1 7
T A X A T IO N .......................................................... ....................................... 2 1 9
TEACHING AND LEARNING ............................ .............................. .......... 220
THEATRE AND DANCE ................................................................................. 224
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING ........................................................ 225
VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCES ........................................................... 227
W ILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION ............................................. 228
W OMEN'S STUDIES ............................................................................................. 229
Z O O LO G Y ......................... ..................................... ........................................... 230
SERVICE COURSES ........................................................................................... 23 I
GRADUATE FACULTY ........................................................................................... 233
IN D EX ........................................................... ................................................... ......... 2 8 3








































IX








OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

FLORIDA STATE CABINET

JEB BUSH
Governor

FRANK BROGAN
Lieutenant Governor


KATHERINE HARRIS
Secretary of State


ROBERT A. BUTTERWORTH
Attorney General


TOM GALLAGHER
State Treasurer


CHARLIE CRIST
Commissioner of Education

ROBERT F. MILLIGAN
Comptroller

CHARLES H. BRONSON
Commissioner ofAgriculture


BOARD OF EDUCATION OF FLORIDA

PHILIP HANDY
Chair, Winter Park


LINDA EADS
Miami


TALMADGEW. FAIR
Miami

CHARLES GARCIA
Boca Raton


JULIA JOHNSON
Orlando

WILLIAM PROCTOR
St. Augustine

CAROLYN ROBERTS
Ocala


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOARD OF TRUSTEES

MARSHALL CRISER, JR.
Chair, Jacksonville


CARLOS ALFONSO
Tampa

LOUISE COURTELIS
Micanopy

ROLAND DANIELS
Gainesville

JOHN DASBURG
Miami

MANNY A. FERNANDEZ
Fort Myers

W.A. MCGRIFF III
Jacksonville


JOELEN MERKEL
Miami

DIANNA FULLER MORGAN
Windermere

CYNTHIA O'CONNELL
Tallahassee

ALBERT W.THWEATT SR.
Petersburg, Virginia

ALFRED C.WARRINGTON, IV
Houston, Texas

MARC ADLER
President of Student Government









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ADMINISTRATION
CHARLES E.YOUNG, Ph.D., President of the University
DAVID RICHARD COLBURN, Ph.D., Provost and SeniorVice President
for Academic Affairs
CHARLES E. FRAZIER, Ph.D., Vice Provost forAcademic Affairs
JACQUELYN D. HART, Ph.D., Vice Provost for MinorityAffairs

GAIL F. BAKER, Ph.D., Vice President for University Relations
PAMELA BERNARD,J.D., Vice President, General Counsel
DOUGLAS J. BARRETT, M.D., Vice President for Health Affairs
PATRICK J. BIRD, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health and Human
Performance
DALE CANELAS, M.A., Director, University Libraries
FRANKA. CATALANOTTO, D.M.D., Dean, College of Dentistry
JIMMY GEARY CHEEK, Ph.D., Dean, College ofAgricultural and Life
Sciences
MICHAEL CHEGE, Ph.D., Director, Center for African Studies
JOSEPH ANTHONY DIPIETRO, D.V.M., Ph.D., Dean, College of
Veterinary Medicine
ROBERT G. FRANK, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health Professions
STEPHEN R. HUMPHREY, Ph.D., Dean, College of Natural Resources
and Environment
TERRY HYNES, Ph.D., Dean, College ofjournalism and Communications
DENNIS C.JETT, Ph.D., Dean, International Center
DOUGLAS S.JONES, Ph.D., Director, Florida Museum of Natural History
RICHARD L.JONES, Ph.D., Dean for Research, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences
PRAMOD P. KHARGONEKAR, Ph.D., Dean, College of Engineering
JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D., Dean, Academic Affairs for Continuing
Education
JOHN KRAFT, Ph.D.,Dean,Warrington College of Business Administration
KATHLEEN LONG, Ph.D., Dean, College of Nursing
MICHAEL MARTIN, Ph.D., Vice President forAgriculture and Natural
Resources
DONALD E. MCGLOTHLIN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Fine Arts
JON L. MILLS,J.D., Dean, Levin College of Law
BEN NELMS, Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of Education
LARRY PERKINS, M.F.A., Interim Director, Horn Museum ofArt
WINFRED M. PHILLIPS, D.Sc., Vice President for Research and Dean,
Graduate School
EDWARD J. POPPELL, M.Ed., Vice President for Finance and
Administration
STEPHEN J. PRITZ,JR., B.S. (University of Florida), Interim University
Registrar
WILLIAM RIFFEE, Ph.D., Dean, College of Pharmacy, andAssociate Provost
for Distance/Executive/Continuing Education


PAULA. ROBELL, MA, Vice President for Development andAlumniAffairs
JAMES E. SCOTT, Ph.D., Vice President for StudentAffairs
JAY M. STEIN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Design, Construction, and Planning
NEIL SULLIVAN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
C. CRAIG TISHER, M.D., Interim Dean, College of Medicine
CHRISTIN E TAYLORWADDILL, Ph.D., Dean for Extension, Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences
CHARLES H.WOOD, Ph.D., Director, Center for Latin American Studies

GRADUATE SCHOOL
WINFRED M. PHILLIPS, D.Sc. (University of Virginia), Dean of the
Graduate School and Vice President for Research and Professor of
Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering
KENNETH J. GERHARDT, Ph.D. (Ohio State University), Associate
Dean of the Graduate School, Ombudsman for Graduate Students, and
Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders
DOVIE J. GAMBLE, Ph.D. (NewYork University), Interim Director of
Graduate Minority Programs and Assistant Professor of Recreation, Parks,
and Tourism

GRADUATE COUNCIL
WINFRED M. PHILLIPS (Chair), D.Sc. (University ofVirginia), Dean
of the Graduate School and Vice President for Research and Professor
of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering
JAMES J.ALGINA, Ed.D. (University of Massachusetts), Professor of
Educational Psychology
GIJS BOSMAN, Ph.D. (State University of Utrecht), Professor of
Electrical and Computer Engineering
DAWN BOWERS, Ph.D. (University of Florida),Associate Professor
of Clinical and Health Psychology
WILLIAM C. CALIN, Ph.D. (Yale University), Graduate Research
Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures
LAUREN J. CHAPMAN, Ph.D. (University of Alberta), Associate
Professor of Zoology
RICHARD C. CONDIT, Ph.D.(Yale University), Professor of
Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
KIRK HATFIELD, Ph.D. (University of Massachusetts),Associate
Professor of Civil and Coastal Engineering
MARJORIE A. HOY, Ph.D. (University of California at Berkeley)
Eminent Scholar of Entomology and Nematology
JAMES W. JONES, Ph.D. (North Carolina State University),
Distingulished Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering
ROBERTT. KENNEDY, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill), Professor of Chemistry
STEPHEN J. PEARTON, Ph.D. (University of Tasmania), Professor of
Materials Science and Engineering
JILL E. PETERSON, Ph.D. (Rice University), Associate Professor of
Mechanical Engineering
HENRIA.VAN RINSVELT, Ph.D. (University of Utrecht), Professor of
Physics
JAIMEE PEREZ, Doctoral Student in Psychology, Graduate Student
Council Representative










CRITICAL DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


FALL SEMESTER 2002

University Dates
Admission Application ....................................................... June I*
Registration ....................................................................... August 22-23
C lasses Begin ........................................................................... A ugust 26
Degree Application ............................................................ September 20
Midpoint of Semester ........................................................... O ctober 16
Classes End ................................. ................... ............. D ecem ber I
Commencement ............................................................. December 21'
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of Dissertation ....................................... October 21
Submit Signed Original Thesis and
Final Exam Form .................................... ............................. November 12
Submit Signed Dissertation and
Final Exam Form ................................................................. December 16
Submit Final Thesis......................................................... December 16
Submit Nonthesis Final Exam Reports ........................ December 16
GSFLT Date

GSFLT Examination ............................... .............................. O ctober 19


SPRING SEMESTER 2003

University Dates
Admission Application ..................................................... September 14*
Registration ............................ ...... .......... ............. .. January 3
Classes Begin .............................. ....... ........... ............ January 6
Degree Application .................................................................. January 3 1
Midpoint of Semester ........................................................... February 26
C lasses End ............................... ...... ........ ............. .. April 23
Commencement ............................. ...... ......... ............. May 2-3'
Thesis and Dissertation

First Submission of Dissertation ................................................. March 3
Submit Signed Original Thesis and
Final Exam Form ................................................................................. April 4
Submit Signed Dissertation and
Final Exam Form .............................. ..... ............. .............. April 28
Subm it Final Thesis................................................................. April 28
Submit Nonthesis Final Exam Report....................................... April 28


GSFLT Date
GSFLT Examination ......................................................... February I


SUMMERTERM A & C

University Dates
Terms A & C Admission Application ........................................ March I*
Terms A & C Registration ................................................. May 9
Terms A & C Classes Begin ........................................ May 12
Term C Degree Application ........................................................... May 14
Term A C lasses End ................................. ...................................... June 20


SUMMERTERM B & C

University Dates
Term B Admission Application ....................................... April 5*
Term B Registration ............................... ........................................ June 27
Term B C lasses Begin ...................................................................... June 30
Term B Degree Application .............................................................. July 2
Midpoint of Summer Terms ......................................................... June 30
Terms B & C Classes End ........................................................... August 8
Commencement (B & C) ........................................................ August 9'
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
D issertation (A, B & C) ................................................................... June 30
Submit Signed Original Thesis and
Final Exam Form (A, B & C) ............................................................ July 18
Submit Signed Dissertation and
Final Exam Form (A, B & C) ........................................ August 4
Submit Final Thesis .............................................................. August 4
Submit Nonthesis Fianl Exam Report ..................................... August 4
GSFLT Date


M-.. )I


Examination ................................ ................................ May


*Prospective students should contact the appropriate academic
department for admission application deadlines.
*Tentative date. Notification of dates and times of ceremonies for
colleges and schools will be sent to degree candidates as soon as
plans are finalized. Please do not anticipate exact dates and times
until notification is received.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


Fall Semester 2002
2002

August 9, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to request transfer of credit for fall candidates for de-
grees.

August 22-23,Thursday-Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.

August 24, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students subject to late registration fee.

August 30, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to drop a course or to change sections without fee li-
ability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees.
Last day to complete late registration.


August 28,Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to file address change, if not living in residence halls, to
receive all University correspondence.

September 2, Monday, Labor Day
All classes suspended.

September 6, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full.AII waivers must be established. Stu-
dents who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with
University Financial Services will be subject to a late payment
fee.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency reclassification and
all appropriate documents.

September 20, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees.
Last day to apply at Office of the University Registrar for degree
to be conferred at end of Fall Semester.


SC LT C


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J I









October 16,Wednesday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examination.

October 19, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT) in
French, German, and Spanish.

October 21, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file dissertation,
transmittal letter, fee receipts for library processing and mi-
crofilming, and all doctoral forms with the Graduate School
Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.

November 8-9, Friday-Saturday, Homecoming*
All classes suspended. *Tentative date.

November I I, Monday,Veterans Day
All classes suspended.

November 12,Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed master's theses, Final Examination Re-
ports, and library processing fee receipts to Graduate School
Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.

November 28-29,Thursday-Friday,Thanksgiving
All classes suspended.

December 9, Monday
Last day to submit electronic thesis or dissertation to Graduate
School Editorial Office editorial.html> for review of links and corrections.

December I I,Wednesday
All classes end.

December 12-13,Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days-no classes.

December 14-20, Saturday-Friday
Final examinations.

December 16, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original bond or electronic disserta-
tions, abstracts, and Final Examination Reports to Graduate
School Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.
Last day to submit signed original bond or electronic theses and
abstracts to Graduate School Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.
Last day to submit Final Examination Reports for nonthesis de-
grees to Graduate Student Records Office, 106 Grinter Hall.

December 20, Friday
Last day to drop course with department approval and receive
W on transcript.

December 21, Saturday*
Commencement.

December 23, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Fall Semester due in Office of the University Reg-
istrar.


Spring Semester 2003

2003

December I I,Wednesday
Last day to request transfer of credit for spring candidates for
degrees.

January 3, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.

January 6, Monday
Classes begin.


Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students subject to late registration fee.

January 9,Thursday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to drop a course or to change sections without fee li-
ability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees.
Last day to complete late registration.

January 17, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full.AII waivers must be established. Stu-
dents who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with
University Financial Services will be subject to a late payment
fee.
Deadline for receipt of residency reclassification and all appro-
priate documentation.

January 20, Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day
All classes suspended.

January 31, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to apply to Office of the University Registrar for degree
to be conferred at end of Spring Semester.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees.

February I, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT) in
French, German, and Spanish.

February 26,Wednesday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examinations.

March 3, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file dissertations,
letters of transmittal, fee receipts for library processing and
microfilming, and all doctoral forms with the Graduate School
Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.

March 8-15, Saturday-Saturday, Spring Break
All classes suspended.

April 4, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed master's theses, Final Examination Re-
ports, and library processing fee receipts to Graduate School
Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.

April 21, Monday
Last day to submit electronic thesis or dissertation to Graduate
School Editorial Office editorial.html> for review of links and corrections.

April 23,Wednesday
All classes end.

April 24-25,Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days-no classes.

April 26-May 2, Saturday-Friday
Final examinations.

April 28, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original bond or electronic disserta-
tions, abstracts, and Final Examination Reports to Graduate
School Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.
Last day to submit signed original bond or electronic theses and
abstracts to Graduate School Editorial Office, 160 Grinter
Hall..
Last day to submit Final Examination Reports for nonthesis de-
grees to Graduate Student Records Office, 106 Grinter Hall..

May 2, Friday
Last day to drop course with department approval and receive
W on transcript.









May 2-3, Saturday
Commencement.*

May 5, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Spring Semester due in Office of the University Reg-
istrar.


Summer Terms A, B, And C 2003

Terms A & C

2003

April 23,Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to request transfer of credit for summer candidates for
degrees.

May 9, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.

May 12, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students subject to late registration fee.

May 13,Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to complete late registration for Summer Terms A and
C.
Last day to drop or add a course or to change sections without
fee liability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees.

May 14,Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to apply at Office of the University Registrar for degree
to be conferred at end of Term C.

May 21,Wednesday
Last day student may withdraw from the University for Term A
and receive 25% refund of course fees.

May 23, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full.All waivers must be established. Stu-
dents who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with
University Financial Services by this date will be subject to
a late payment fee.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency reclassification and
all appropriate documentation.

May 26, Monday, Memorial Day Observed
All classes suspended.

May 30, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees for Term C.

May 3 I, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT) in
French, German, and Spanish.

June 20, Friday
Term A classes end.
Term A final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
Last day to drop course with department approval and receive
W on transcript.

June 23, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Term A due in Office of the University Registrar.

Terms B & C


2003

June 27, Friday, 5 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.


June 30, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. Students subject to a
late registration fee.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file dissertations,
transmittal letters, fee receipts for library processing and mi-
crofilming, and all doctoral forms with the Graduate School
Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.

July I,Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to complete late registration for Term B.
Last day to drop or add a course or to change sections without
fee liability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees
for Term B.

July 2,Wednesday
Last day to apply at Office of the University Registrar for degree
to be conferred at end of Term B.

July 4, Friday, Independence Day
All classes suspended.

July 9,Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fee for Term B.

July I I,Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full.All waivers must be established. Stu-
dents who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with
University Financial Services by this date will be subject to
a late payment fee.
Deadline for receipt of residency request and all appropriate
documentation.

July 18, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed master's theses, Final Examination Re-
ports, and library processing fee receipts to Graduate School
Editorial Office.

July 30,Wednesday
Last day to submit electronic thesis or dissertation to Gradu-
ate School Editorial Office editorial.html> for review of links and corrections.

August 4, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original bond or electronic disserta-
tions, abstracts, and Final Examination Reports to Graduate
School Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.
Last day to submit original bond or electronic theses and abstracts
to Graduate School Editorial Office, 160 Grinter Hall.
Last day to submit Final Examination Reports for nonthesis de-
grees to Graduate Student Records Office, 106 Grinter Hall.

August 8, Friday
All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.

August 8, Friday, 10:00 am.
Last day to drop course with department approval and receive
W on transcript.

August 9, Saturday
Commencement.'

August I I,Monday,9:00 a.m.
All grades for Terms B and C due in Registrar's Office.

NOTE: Prospective students should contact the appropriate
academic department for admission application deadlines.
'Tentative date. Notification of dates and times of ceremonies for
colleges and schools will be sent to degree candidates as soon as
plans are finalized. Please do not anticipate exact dates and times
until notification is received.


























Ge0neralt


Ir


i.-'r.
* L




































Rules, policies, fees, and courses described in
this catalog are subject to change without notice.





INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE / 3


UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE

The University of Florida is a public, land-grant research university,
one of the most comprehensive in the United States; it encom-
passes virtually all academic and professional disciplines. It is the
oldest and largest of Florida's ten universities and a member of the
Association ofAmerican Universities. Its faculty and staff are dedicated
to the common pursuit of the University's threefold mission: edu-
cation, research, and service.
Teaching-undergraduate and graduate through the doctorate-
is the fundamental purpose of the University. Research and schol-
arship are integral to the education process and to expanding
humankind's understanding of the natural world, the mind, and
the senses. Service is the University's obligation to share the benefits
of its knowledge for the public good.
These three interlocking elements span all of the University of
Florida's academic disciplines and multidisciplinary centers and
represent the University's obligation to lead and serve the needs
of the nation, all of Florida's citizens, and the public and private
educational systems of Florida, by pursuing and disseminating new
knowledge while building upon the past.
The University of Florida is committed to providing the knowl-
edge, benefits, and services it produces with quality and effectiveness.
It aspires to further national and international recognition for its
initiatives and achievement in promoting human values and
improving the quality of life.


MISSION AND GOALS

The University of Florida belongs to an ancient tradition of great
universities. We participate in an elaborate conversation among
scholars and students that extends over space and time linking the
experiences of Western Europe with the traditions and histories
of all cultures, that explores the limits of the physical and biological
universes, and that nurtures and prepares generations of educated
people to address the problems of our societies. While this uni-
versity recognizes no limits on its intellectual boundaries, and our
faculty and students remain free to teach and learn, to explore
wherever the mind and imagination lead, we live in a world with
limits and constraints. Out of the conflict between intellectual as-
pirations and the limitations of environment comes the definition
of the University's goals.
Teaching.-American colleges and universities share the fun-
damental educational mission of teaching students. The under-
graduate experience, based in the arts and sciences, remains at the
core of higher education in America. The formation of educated
people, the transformation of mind through learning, and the
launching of a lifetime of intellectual growth: these goals remain
central to every university. This undergraduate foundation of
American higher education has grown more complex as the knowl-
edge we teach has grown more complex. Where once we had a single
track through the arts and sciences leading to a degree, we now


have multiple tracks leading to many degrees in arts and sciences
as well as in a variety of professional schools. Yet even with many
degrees, American university undergraduate education still rests
on the fundamental knowledge of the liberal arts and sciences.
In our academic world we recognize two rather imprecisely defined
categories of higher education: colleges and universities. The tra-
ditional American college specializes in a carefully crafted four-
year undergraduate program, generally focused on the arts and
sciences. Universities extend the range of this undergraduate education
to include advanced or graduate study leading to the Ph.D. Most
American universities also include a variety of undergraduate and
graduate professional programs and master's degree programs. The
University of Florida shares these traditions. As an American uni-
versity, we have a major commitment to undergraduate education
as the foundation of our academic organization, and we pursue
graduate education for the Ph.D. and advanced degrees in pro-
fessional fields.
We are, in addition, a major public, comprehensive, land-grant,
research university. Each of these adjectives defines one of our char-
acteristics, and through frequent repetition, this description takes
on the style of a ritual incantation: rhythmic, reverent, and infre-
quently examined. What, then, does each of these key words mean?
Major-Here, at the head of the list, we find one of our most
important aspirations. We will be, we must be, and we are a major
university. We define ourselves in comparison to the best universities
we can find. We need not be the absolutely unambiguously best,
but we must be among the best universities in the world. Exact
ranking of the best universities is a meaningless exercise, but most
of us can name 60 great universities. By whatever indicator of quality
we choose, our university should fall into this group. If we define
a group of universities who share our adjectives (major, public, com-
prehensive, land grant, research), then we fall into a group of perhaps
the best 15 in this country.
Public-We exist thanks to the commitment and investment
of the people of the State of Florida. Generations of tax dollars
constructed the facilities we enjoy and have paid the major por-
tion of our operating budget. The graduates of this institution, edu-
cated with tax dollars, provide the majority of our private fund-
ing. Our state legislators created the conditions that permit our
faculty to educate our students, pursue their research, conduct their
clinical practice, and serve their statewide constituencies. We exist,
then, within the public sector, responsible and responsive to the
needs of the citizens of our state. The obligations we assume as
a public university determine many of our characteristics.
We have many more undergraduates than graduates; we respond
quickly to the needs of the state's economy; we accommodate complex
linkages with other state universities, community colleges, and K-
12 public and private institutions; and we operate in cooperative
symbiosis with our state's media. We also experience an often too-
close interaction with the political process. Private universities, that
have a different profile, do not respond in the same ways to these
issues. We, as a public university, must maintain close, continu-
ous, and effective communication with our many publics.





4 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Comprehensive-This adjective recognizes
the universal reach of our pursuit of knowledge.
As a matter of principle, we exclude no field from
our purview. We believe that our approach to
knowledge and learning, to understanding and
wisdom, requires us to be ready to examine any
field, cultivate any discipline, and explore any
topic. Resource limits, human or financial, may
constrain us from cultivating one or another aca-
demic subspecialty, but we accept, in principle,
no limit on our field of view. Even when we
struggle with budget problems and must reduce
a program or miss an intellectual opportunity,
we do so only to meet the practical constraints
of our current environment. We never relinquish
the commitment to the holistic pursuit of knowl-
edge.
Land-Grant-Florida belongs to the set of
American universities whose mandate includes
a commitment to the development and trans-
mission of practical knowledge. As one of the
land-grant universities identified by the Morrill
Act of 1862, Florida has a special focus on ag-
riculture and engineering and a mandate to de-
liver the practical benefits of university knowledge
to every county in the state. In our university,
the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
and the College of Engineering respond to this
definition most obviously; but over time, the
entire University has to come to recognize its
commitment to translating the benefit of ab-
stract and theoretical knowledge into the mar-
ketplace to sustain the economic growth that
supports us all.
This commitment permeates the institutional
culture and defines us as one of some 72 such
institutions in America. The land-grant university
is, of course, a peculiarly American invention
and captures one of the powerful cultural be-


GRADUATE DEANS
AND
YEARS OF SERVICE

1999-Presetn
Winfred NM. Phillips. Dean

199S- 1999
MN. Jack Ohanian, Interim Dean

199- 1998
Karen A. Holbrook. Dean

July- Scpt,-mb r 1093
Gene W. Hemp. Acting Dean

19SS-1993
NladelYn NM. Lockhart, Dean

10S3- 1'985
Donald R. Price. Acting Dean

September I9S2-Janluarn 1983
Gene W\. Hemp. Acting Dean

1980(- I S2
Francis G. Siehli. Decan

1 99- 9-198
F. Michael Wahl. Airing Dean

19"3- 1'9
Harry H. Sisler, Dean

19- 1-19-3
Alex G. Smith. Acting Dean

1969-19"-1
Harold P. Hanson, Dean

19'2-1969
L. E. Grinter. Dean

19 I -19;2
C. F. Byers. Acting D)an

1038-191
T. NM. Simpson. Dean

1930-1938
James N. Anderson, Dean


liefs of our country: that knowledge passes the
test of utility by remaining vitally connected
to industry and commerce.
Research-Research defines this university.
Our faculty dedicate themselves not only to
the bedrock function of education, not only
to the land-grant function of service, but
equally to the essential activity of research.
By research we mean the effort to expand
our understanding of the natural world, the
world of the mind, and the world of the senses.
We define research to include the theoreti-
cal abstractions of the mathematician, the ex-
perimental discoveries of the geneticist, the
insights of the semiotician, the re-creations
of the historian, or the analysis of the anthro-
pologist. We define research to capture the
business professor's analysis of economic or-
ganization, the architect's design, and the
musician's interpretation or the artist's spe-
cial vision. Research by agronomists improves
crops, and research by engineers enhances ma-
terials. Medical and clinical research cures and
prevents disease. The list of research fields con-
tinues as endlessly as the intellectual concerns
of our faculty and the academic vision of our
colleges.
We must publish university research, what-
ever the field. The musician who never per-
forms, the scientist whose work never appears
for review by colleagues, the historian whose
note cards never become a book may have ac-
complished much, but their accomplishments
remain incomplete. When we say research,
we mean research and creative activity that
contributes to the international public con-
versation about the advancement of knowl-
edge.





THE GRADUATE SCHOOL / 5


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


MISSION

Graduate education is an integral component of a major research
university that impacts education at all levels. The mission of graduate
education at the University of Florida is to produce individuals
with advanced knowledge in their fields, who appreciate learning
and are constant learners, and who are prepared to address cre-
atively issues of significance to the local and global community
for improving the quality of life. Essential to this mission is an en-
vironment that fosters
effective transmission of knowledge for future generations.
inquiry and critical analysis.
acquisition of skills contributing to success and leadership
in academic and creative arenas and in the world of practice.
application of that knowledge in service to Florida, the nation,
and the international community.


VISION

The vision is a university internationally recognized for its gradu-
ates, graduate faculty, and scholarly achievements. This univer-
sity produces intellectually energized individuals who excel at future
careers in diverse settings, and who can provide bold leadership
in new directions. Important signs of this recognition include
graduates recognized for strength of preparation in their
chosen discipline, for abilities to solve problems in new en-
vironments, and for high standards of excellence in scholarly
activity and professional practice.
significant scholarly, creative achievements and service that
contribute to improvement of human society and the natural
environment.
a highly qualified, diverse student population.
strong disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs that prepare
graduates to assume their roles in a changing world.
evidence of service in their disciplines by students and faculty
at state, national, and international levels.


ORGANIZATION

The Graduate School consists of the Dean, who is also Vice Presi-
dent for Research; Associate Dean; the Graduate Council; and the
Graduate Faculty. General policies and standards of the Gradu-
ate School are established by the Graduate Faculty. Any policy change
must be approved by the graduate deans and the Graduate Council.
The Graduate School is responsible for the enforcement of minimum
general standards of graduate work in the University and for the
coordination of the graduate programs of the various colleges and
divisions of the University. The responsibility for the detailed op-
erations of graduate programs is vested in the individual colleges,
schools, divisions, and departments. In most of the colleges an as-
sistant dean or other administrator is directly responsible for graduate
study in that college.
The Graduate Council assists the Dean in being the agent of
the Graduate Faculty for execution of policy related to graduate
study and associated research. The Council, which is chaired by


the graduate dean, considers petitions and policy changes. Members
of the Graduate Faculty are appointed by the academic unit (de-
partment and/or college) in which the graduate program is located
with the approval of the graduate dean.
No faculty member may serve on supervisory committees or direct
master's theses and doctoral dissertations without having been ap-
pointed to the Graduate Faculty. The level of duties for each Graduate
Faculty member is determined by the academic unit.


HISTORY

Graduate study at the University of Florida existed while the
University was still on its Lake City campus. However, the first
graduate degrees, two Master of Arts with a major in English, were
awarded on the Gainesville campus in 1906. The first Master of
Science was awarded in 1908, with a major in entomology. The
first programs leading to the Ph.D. were initiated in 1930, and
the first degrees were awarded in 1934, one with a major in chemistry
and the other with a major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was awarded
in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal growth at the Uni-
versity of Florida. In 1930, 33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields.
In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded in 16 fields. In 2000-01, the
total number of graduate degrees awarded was 3,198 in more than
100 fields. The proportion of Ph.D. degrees, after the initial rapid
growth, remained relatively static during the early 1980s but increased
significantly between 1987-88 and 1993-94, growing from 304
to 424. In 2000-01, the University of Florida awarded 436 Ph.D.
degrees.


DEFINITIONS

Academic Degree-Degree is the title to be conferred by the
University upon completion of the academic program, for example,
Doctor of Philosophy. Some degrees include the name of the field
of study (Master of Architecture, Master of Education). Others
(Master of Arts, Master of Science) do not. Degree names are listed
below in boldface.
Graduate Program-The program is the primary field of study
of a graduate student. This is the student's major. Programs of-
fered at the University of Florida are approved by the Graduate
Council, University Senate, and the Board ofTrustees. The program
name along with the degree appears on the student's transcript.
Programs are enumerated under the degree name in the list be-
low.
Concentration-At the graduate level, the concentration is a
subprogram offered within a graduate major. Each concentration
is approved by the Graduate Council. The concentration, as well
as the degree and program, may appear on the student transcript.
Concentrations are listed in italics below their corresponding pro-
grams.
Minor-A minor is a block of course work completed in any
department, other than the major department, approved for master's
or doctoral programs as listed in this catalog. If a minor is cho-
sen, the supervisory committee must include a representative from
the minor field. The minimum amount of credit required for a












4






68 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


_I Course Prefixes,Titles and Departments


Animal Science-General
Animal Science-General
Asian History
Asian Studies

Astronomy
Astronomy
Astronomy
Aymara Language
Aymara Language
Medicine
Biochemistry (Biophysics)
Biochemistry (Biophysics)
Biochemistry (Biophysics)
Biochemistry (Biophysics)
Building Construction
Biomedical Engineering
Botany
Botany
Botany
Botany
Biological Sciences
Biological Sciences
Business Law
Computer Applications


Art
Animal Sciences-General
Dairy and Poultry Sciences
History
African and Asian Languages and
Literatures
Astronomy
Physics
Zoology
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Medicine-All Departments
Agriculture
Botany
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Building Construction
Biomedical Engineering
Botany
Geological Sciences
Microbiology and Cell Science
Plant Pathology
Health Professions
Medicine-Physiology
Management
Computer and Information Science and
Engineering


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
ABE Agricultural Engineering Agricultural and Biological Engineering
ABT Arabic in Translation African and Asian Languages and
Literatures
ACG Accounting: General Accounting
ADE Adult Education Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Foundations
ADV Advertising Mass Communication
AEB Agricultural Economics and Food and Resource Economics
Business
AEE Agricultural and Extension Agricultural Education and
Education Communication
AFH African History African Studies
AFH African History History
AFS African Studies African Studies
AFS African Studies Anthropology
AGR Agronomy Agronomy
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Agricultural Education and
Communication
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Agricultural and Life Sciences
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Agronomy
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Animal Sciences
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Entomology and Nematology
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Food and Resource Economics
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Horticultural Science
ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences Plant Pathology
AMH American History History
AML American Literature English
AMS American Studies History
ANG Anthropology Graduate Anthropology
ANS Animal Science Animal Sciences
ANS Animal Science Food Science and Human Nutrition
ANT Anthropology Anthropology
AOM Agricultural Operations Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Management
APB Applied Biology Zoology
ARC Architecture Architecture
ARD Architecture-Doctoral Architecture
ARE Art Education Art
ARE Art Education Teaching and Learnng
ARH Art History Art


Clinical and Health Psychology
Psychology
Classics


Religion

Communication Sciences and Disorders
Mass Communication
Computer and Information Science and
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Computer and Information Science and
Engineering
Political Science
English
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Civil and Coastal Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Soil and Water Science
Exercise and Sport Sciences
Theatre and Dance
Theatre and Dance
Theatre and Dance
Dairy and Poultry Sciences
Dental Sciences
Clinical and Health Psychology
Psychology
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Germanic and Slavic Languages and
Literatures
Psychology

Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics and
Engineering Science
Chemical Engineering
Economics
Teaching and Learning


ECP Economics Problems and Policy Health Services Administration
ECS Economic Systems and Economics
Development
ECS Economic Systems and History
Development
EDA Education:Administration Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Foundations


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
CAS Clinical Audiology/Speech Communication Sciences and Disorders
CAS Clinical Audiology/Speech Communicative Disorders
CBH Comparative Psychology and Psychology
Animal Behavior
CCE Civil Construction Engineering Civil and Coastal Engineering
CCJ Criminology and Criminal Sociology
Justice
CDA Computer Design/Architecture Computer and Information Science and
Engineering
CDA Computer Design/Architecture Electrical and Computer Engineering
CEG Civil Geotechnical Engineering Civil and Coastal Engineering
CEN Computer Engineering Computer and Information Science and
Engineering
CES Civil Engineering Structures Civil and Coastal Engineering
CGN Civil Engineering Civil and Coastal Engineering
CGS Computer General Studies Computer and Information Science and
Engineering
CGS Computer General Studies Decision and Information Sciences
CGS Computer General Studies Industrial and Systems Engineering
CHM Chemistry Chemical Engineering
CHM Chemistry Chemistry
CHS Chemistry Specialized Chemistry
CIS Computer and Information Computer and Information Science and
Systems Engineering
CLA Classical and Ancient Studies Classics


CLP Clinical Psychology
CLP Clinical Psychology
CLT Classical Literature in
Translation
CLT Classical Literature in
Translation
COM Communication
COM Communication
COP Computer Programming

COT ComputingTheory
COT ComputingTheory

CPO Comparative Politics
CRW CreativeWriting
CWR Civil Water Resources
CWR Civil Water Resources
CWR Civil Water Resources
CWR Civil Water Resources
DAA Dance Activities
DAA Dance Activities
DAE Dance Education
DAN Dance
DAS Dairy Science
DEN Dentistry
DEP Development Psychology
DEP Development Psychology
DIE Dietetics
DUT Dutch

EAB Experimental Analysis of
Behavior
EAS Aerospace Engineering

ECH Engineering: Chemical
ECO Economics
ECO Economics






COURSE PREFIXES / 69


I Course Prefixes,Titles and Departments


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
EDE Education: Elementary Teaching and Learning
EDF Education: Foundations and Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Policy Studies Foundations
EDF Education: Foundations and Educational Psychology
Policy Studies
EDG Education: General Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Foundations


EDG Education: General
EDH Education: Higher

EDM Education: Middle School
EDS Education: Supervision


Teaching and Learning
Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Foundations
Teaching and Learning
Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Foundations


EEC Education: Early Childhood Teaching and Learning
EED Education: Emotional Disorders Special Education
EEL Engineering: Electrical Electrical and Computer Engineering
EES Environmental Engineering Environmental Engineering Sciences
Science
EES Environmental Engineering Microbiology and Cell Science
Science
EEX Education: Exceptional Child Educational Leadership, Policy, and
Core Comp. Foundations
EEX Education: Exceptional Child Special Education
Core Comp.
EGI Education: Gifted Special Education
EGM Engineering: Mechanics Civil and Coastal Engineering
EGM Engineering: Mechanics Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics and


EGN Engineering: General
EGN Engineering: General


Engineering Science
Civil and Coastal Engineering
Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics and
Engineering Science


EGN Engineering: General Environmental Engineering Sciences
EGN Engineering: General Materials Science and Engineering
EGN Engineering: General Mechanical Engineering
EGN Engineering: General Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
EIA Education: Industrial Arts Art
EIN Engineering: Industrial Industrial and Systems Engineering
ELD Ed: Specific Learning Disabilities Special Education
EMA Materials Engineering Materials Science and Engineering
EME Education:Technology and Teaching and Learning
Media
EML Engineering: Mechanical Mechanical Engineering
EML Engineering: Mechanical Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
EMR Education: Mental Retardation Special Education
ENC English Composition English
ENC English Composition Linguistics
ENG English General English
ENL English Literature English
ENS English for Non-native Speakers English
ENS English for Non-native Speakers Linguistics
ENU Engineering: Nuclear Microbiology and Cell Science
ENU Engineering: Nuclear Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
ENV Engineering: Environmental Civil and Coastal Engineering
ENV Engineering: Environmental Environmental Engineering Sciences
ENV Engineering: Environmental Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
ENY Entomology Entomology and Nematology
EOC Engineering and Oceanography Civil and Coastal Engineering
EPH Ed: Physical and Multiple Special Education
Handicaps
ESE Education: Secondary Teaching and Learning
ESI Industrial Engineering (Systems) Industrial and Systems Engineering
ETI Engineering Tech: Industrial Mechanical Engineering
EUH European History History
EVR Natural Resources Natural Resources and Environment
EVT Ed:VocationalTechnical Educational Leadership, Policy, and


EXP Experimental Psychology
EXP Experimental Psychology
FAS Fisheries and Aquaculture


Foundations
Psychology
Zoology
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
FIL Film Mass Communication
FIL Film Romance Languages and Literatures
FIN Finance Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate
FLE Foreign Language Education Teaching and Learning
FNR Forestry and Natural Resources Forest Resources and Conservation
FOL Foreign and Biblical Languages Germanic and Slavic Studies
FOL Foreign and Biblical Languages Romance Languages and Literatures
FOR Forestry Forest Resources and Conservation
FOS Food Science Food Science and Human Nutrition
FOW Foreign and Biblical Languages Romance Languages and Literatures
FRC Fruit Crops Horticultural Sciences
FRE French Language Romance Languages and Literatures
FRT French Literature in Translation Romance Languages and Literatures
FRW French Literature Romance Languages and Literatures
FYC Family,Youth, and Community Family,Youth, and Community Sciences
Sciences
GEA Geography-Regional (Area) Geography
GEB General Business Business Administration-General
GEB General Business Management
GEO Geography-Systematic Geography
GER German Germanic and Slavic Studies
GET German Literature in Germanic and Slavic Studies
Translation


GEW German Literature Germani
GEY Gerontology Geronto
GLY Geology Geologic
GMS Graduate Med Sciences Medicine
GRE Classical Greek Language Study Classics
GRK Modern Greek Language Classics
GRW Greek Literature Classics
HEE Home Economics Agricult
Comm


ic and Slavic Studies
logy
:al Sciences
e-All Departments




rural Education and
unication


HIS History-General History
HLP Health, Leisure and Physical Exercise and Sport Sciences
Education
HLP Health, Leisure and Physical Health Science Education
Education
HLP Health, Leisure and Physical Recreation, Parks, and Tourism
Education
HOE Home Economics-General Agricultural and Life Sciences
HOE Home Economics-General Agricultural Education and
Communication
HOS Horticultural Sciences Horticultural Sciences
HSA Health Services Administration Health Professions
HSA Health Services Administration Health Services Administration
HSC Health Science Health Professions
HSC Health Science Health Science Education
HSC Health Science PhysicalTherapy
HUM Humanities Art
HUN Human Nutrition Food Science and Human Nutrition
IND Interior Design Interior Design
INR International Relations Political Science
ISM Information Systems Decision and Information Sciences
Management
ITA Italian Language Romance Languages and Literatures
ITT Italian Literature inTranslation Romance Languages and Literatures
ITW Italian Literature Romance Languages and Literatures
JOU Journalism Mass Communication
LAA LandscapeArchitecture LandscapeArchitecture
LAE Language Arts and English Teaching and Learning
Education
LAE Language Arts and English English
Education
LAH Latin American History History
LAS Latin American Studies Latin American Studies
LAT Latin (Language Study) Classics
LAW Law Comparative Law
LAW Law Taxation


d






70 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Course Prefixes,Titles and Departments


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
LEI Leisure Recreation, Parks, and Tourism
LIN Linguistics Communication Sciences and Disorders
LIN Linguistics English
LIN Linguistics Linguistics
LIT Literature English
LIT Literature Religion
LNW Latin Literature Classics
MAA Mathematics-Analysis Mathematics
MAC Mathematics-Calculus Mathematics
MAD Mathematics-Discrete Industrial and Systems Engineering
MAD Mathematics-Discrete Mathematics
MAE Mathematics Education Teaching and Learning
MAE Mathematics Education Mathematics
MAN Management Decision and Information Sciences
MAN Management Management
MAP Mathematics-Applied Mathematics
MAR Marketing Marketing
MAS Mathematics-Algebraic Mathematics
Structure
MAT Mathematics Mathematics
MCB Microbiology Microbiology and Cell Science
MGF Math: General and Finite Mathematics
MHF Math:History and Foundations Mathematics
MHS Education Guidance and Counselor Education
Counseling
MHS Education Guidance and Rehabilitation Counseling
Counseling
MMC Mass Media Communication Mass Communication
MTG Math:Topology and Geometry Mathematics
MUC Music: Composition Music
MUE Music: Education Teaching and Learning
MUE Music: Education Music
MUG Music: Conducting Music
MUH Music: History/Musicology Music
MUL Music: Music Language Music
MUN Music: Music Ensembles Music
MUO Music:Theatre Opera/Musical Music
MUR Music: Church Music Music
MUS Music Music
MUT Music:Theory Music
MVB Music:Applied-Brasses Music
MVK Music:Applied-Keyboard Music
MVO Music:Applied-Other Music


Instruments
Music:Applied-Percussion Music
Music:Applied-Strings Music
Music:Applied-Voice Music
Music:Applied-Voice Theatre and Dance
Music:Applied-Woodwinds Music
Nematology Entomology and Nematology
Nursing-Graduate Nursing
Nursing-Graduate Sociology
Nursing Nursing
Oceanography: Chemical Civil and Coastal Engineering
Oceanography: General Civil and Coastal Engineering
Oceanography: General Geological Sciences
Oceanography: Physical Civil and Coastal Engineering
Ornamental Horticulture Horticultural Sciences
Oral Interpretation Theatre and Dance
Occupational Therapy Occupational Therapy
Public Administration Political Science
Process Biology Botany
Process Biology Forest Resources and Conserv
Process Biology Horticultural Sciences
Process Biology Interdisciplinary Ecology
Process Biology Microbiology and Cell Science
Process Biology Plant Molecular and Cellular B


ration




biology


S


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
PCB Process Biology Zoology
PCO Psychology for Counseling Counselor Education
PCO Psychology for Counseling Psychology
PEL Physical Education Activities- Exercise and Sport Sciences
Object Centered, Land
PEM Physical Education Activities- Exercise and Sport Sciences
Performance Centered
PEN Physical Education Acts Exercise and Sport Sciences
(General) Water
PEO Physical Education Acts Exercise and Sport Sciences
(Professional)- Object
Centered
PEP Physical Education Acts Exercise and Sport Sciences
(Professional) Performance
Centered
PEQ Physical Education Acts Exercise and Sport Sciences
(Professional)-Water
PET Physical Education Theory Exercise and Sport Sciences
PET Physical Education Theory Teaching and Learning
PGY Photography Art
PGY Photography Zoology
PHA Pharmacy Medicine-Pharmacology
PHA Pharmacy Pharmacy-All Departments
PHC Public Health Care Health Science Education
PHC Public Health Care Health Services Administration
PHH Philosophy, History of Philosophy
PHI Philosophy Philosophy
PHI Philosophy Religion
PHM Philosophy of Man and Society Philosophy
PHP Philosophers and Schools Philosophy
PHT PhysicalTherapy PhysicalTherapy
PHY Physics Physics
PHZ Physics Physics
PLP Plant Pathology Botany
PLP Plant Pathology Plant Pathology
PLS Plant Science Agronomy
PLS Plant Science Horticultural Sciences
PLT Polish in Translation Germanic and Slavic Studies
PLW Polish Literature Germanic and Slavic Studies
PMA Pest Management Entomology and Nematology
POL Polish Language Germanic and Slavic Studies
POR Portuguese Language Romance Languages and Literatures
POS Political Science Political Science
POT Political Theory Political Science
POW Portuguese Literature Romance Languages and Literatures
PPE Psychology in Personality Psychology
PPE Psychology in Personality Clinical and Health Psychology
PRT Portuguese in Translation Romance Languages and Literatures
PSB Psychobiology Clinical and Health Psychology
PSB Psychobiology Psychology
PSC Physical Science Geological Sciences
PSE Poultry Science Dairy and Poultry Sciences
PSY Psychology Psychology
PUP Public Policy Political Science
PUR Public Relations Mass Communication
QMB Quantitative Methods in Decision and Information Sciences
Business
QMB Quantitative Methods in Marketing
Business
RCS Education Guidance and Rehabilitation Counseling
Counseling
REA Reading English
RED Reading Education Teaching and Learning
RED Reading Education English
REE Real Estate Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate
REL Religion Philosophy
REL Religion Religion
RMI Risk Management and Insurance Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate





COURSE PREFIXES / 71


I Course Prefixes,Titles and Departments


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
RSD Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Health Professions
RTV Radio-Television Mass Communication
RUS Russian Language Germanic and Slavic Studies
RUT Russian Literature inTranslation Germanic and Slavic Studies
RUW Russian Literature Germanic and Slavic Studiess
SCA Scandinavian Languages Germanic and Slavic Studies
SCE Science Education Teaching and Learning
SCT Scandinavian Literature in Germanic and Slavic Studies
Translation
SDS Education Guidance and Counselor Education
Counseling
SDS Education Guidance and Rehabilitation Counseling
Counseling
SOP Social Psychology Psychology
SOS Soil Science Soil and Water Science
SPA Speech Pathology and Communication Sciences and Disorde
Audiology
SPC Speech Communication Communication Sciences and Disorde
SPC Speech Communication English
SPN Spanish Language Romance Languages and Literatures
SPS School Psychology Counselor Education
SPS School Psychology Foundations of Education
SPS School Psychology Special Education
SPT Spanish Literature inTranslation Romance Languages and Literatures
SPW Spanish Literature Romance Languages and Literatures
SSE Social Studies Education Teaching and Learning
STA Statistics Civil and Coastal Engineering
STA Statistics Statistics
SUR Surveying and Related Areas Civil and Coastal Engineering


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
SYA Sociological Analysis Sociology
SYD Sociology of Demography and Sociology
Area Studies
SYG General Sociology Sociology
SYO Social Organization Religion
SYO Social Organization Sociology
SYP Social Processes Sociology
TAX Taxation Accounting
THE Theatre Administration Theatre and Dance
TPA Theatre Production and Theatre and Dance
Administration
TPP Theatre Performance and Theatre and Dance
Performance Training
TSL Teaching English as a Second Linguistics
Language
TTE Transportation and Traffic Civil and Coastal Engineering
Engineering
URP Urban and Regional Planning Urban and Regional Planning
VEC Vegetable Crops Horticultural Sciences
VME Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Medicine-All Departments
WIS Wildlife Ecology and Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Conservation
WIS Wildlife Science Forest Resources and Conservation
WOH World History History
WST Women's Studies Women's Studies
ZOO Zoology Forest Resources and Conservation
ZOO Zoology Microbiology and Cell Science
ZOO Zoology Zoology


rs

rs




72 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ACCOUNTING
Warrington College of Business Administration

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Director and Graduate Coordinator: J. L. Kramer. Graduate Research Pro-
fessor: A. R. Abdel-khalik. Fisher Eminent Scholar: J. S. Demski. Arthur
Andersen Professor: J. L. Kramer. J. Michael Cook/Deloitte and Touche
Professor: D. A. Snowball. Ernst and Young Professor W. R. Knechel. KPMG
Distinguished Service Professor: J. K. Simmons. Professor: B. B. Ajinkya.
PriceWaterhouse Coopers Associate Professor: G. M. McGill. Associate
Professors: S. K. Asare; J. V. Boyles; K. E. Hackenbrack; S. S. Kramer.
Assistant Professor: N. Stuart.

The Fisher School of Accounting offers graduate work leading to
the Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) degree and the Ph.D. degree with
a major in business administration and an accounting concentration.
The MAcc. degree program offers specialization in each of the three
areas of auditing/financial accounting, accounting systems, and taxa-
tion. A joint program leading to the Juris Doctor and Master of
Accounting degrees also is offered by the Fisher School of Accounting
and College of Law. Specific details for the MAcc., M.Acc./J.D., and
Ph.D. programs will be supplied by the Fisher School of Account-
ing upon request.
The M.Acc. and the Ph.D. accounting programs require admis-
sion standards of at least the following: A combined verbal and quan-
titative score of 1200 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE),
or a score of 550 on the Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT). Admission to the M.Acc. or Ph.D. accounting graduate
programs cannot be granted until scores are received.
Information on minimum GPA standards for admission to the
M.Acc. program may be obtained from the office of the Associate
Director. International students must submit a TOEFL score of at
least 570 with a minimum of 60 on the first section, 55 on the sec-
ond section, and 55 on the third section, and a satisfactory GMAT
or GRE score.
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a professional career
in accounting is the 3/2 five-year program with a joint awarding of
the Bachelor of Science in Accounting and Master of Accounting
degrees upon completion of the 152-hour program. The entry point
into the 3/2 program is the beginning of the senior year.
Students who have already completed an undergraduate degree in
accounting may enter the one-year M.Acc. degree program which
requires satisfactory completion of 34 hours of course work. A mini-
mum of 20 credits must be in graduate level courses; a minimum of
18 credits must be in graduate level accounting courses. The remaining
credits are selected from recommended elective courses that vary by
area of specialization. Students are cautioned to seek early advisement
since many graduate courses are offered only once a year.
Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include a core of courses in
mathematical methods, statistics, and economic theory; one or two
supporting fields selected by the student; and a major field of account-
ing. Students are expected to acquire teaching experience as part of
the Ph.D. degree program. Grants-in-aid will be awarded for this
teaching. International students must submit a Test of Spoken En-
glish (TSE) test score of at least 220 along with satisfactory GMAT/
GRE and TOEFL scores in order to obtain a teaching appointment.
Students are expected to enroll in ACG 6940 for a minimum of three
credits. Program requirements include fulfillment of a research skill
area and a dissertation on an accounting-related topic.
Co-Major-The School offers a new co-major program in con-
junction with the Department of Statistics leading to the Doctor of
Philosophy degree in business administration-accounting and statistics.


For information on this program, consult the School's graduate
coordinator.
ACG 5005-Financial Accounting (2) Introduction for prospective
managers. Primary emphasis on financial reporting and analysis.
ACG 5065-Financial and Managerial Accounting (3) Prereq: Designed
for M.B.A. students. Financial statement analysis including techniques,
cash flow, and impact of accounting principles. Management control
systems: planning, budgeting, reporting, analysis, and performance
evaluation.
ACG 5075-Managerial Accounting (2) Prereq: ACG 5005. Introduc-
tion for prospective managers. Primary emphasis on management control
systems.
ACG 5205-Advanced Financial Accounting (3) Prereq:ACG 4133C;
7ACstanding. Analysis of accounting procedures for consignment and
installment sales, partnerships, branches, consolidations, foreign opera-
tions, governmental accounting and other advanced topics.
ACG 5385-Advanced Accounting Analysis for the Controllership
Function (3) Prereq: ACG 4353C; 7AC standing. A study of planning
and control as they relate to management of organizations. Draws from
cases and journals to integrate managerial accounting concepts.
ACG 5637-Auditing I (4) Prereq: ACG 4133C, ACG 4353C, ACstand-
ing. Introduction to auditing and assurance services. Decision-making
process, research, and auditing standards and procedures, with emphasis
on ethics, legal liability, internal control, audit evidence, testing, and
introduction to statistical sampling and EDP auditing.
ACG 5655-Auditing Theory and Internal Control II (3) Prereq:ACG
5637; 7AC standing. A continuation of ACG 5637 with detailed cov-
erage of field work procedures for internal control and substantive au-
dit testing, statistical sampling, operational auditing, and audit software
packages.
ACG 5816-Professional Research (3) Prereq:ACG5637, TAX5005,
7ACstanding. Case-based. Introduction and examination of professional
literature and technology for problem solving in financial accounting,
auditing, and taxation contexts.
ACG 6135-Accounting Concepts and Financial Reporting Standards
(3) Prereq: ACG 5205, 5816; 7AC standing. Current developments in
accounting concepts and principles and their relevance to the status of
current accounting practices. Special topics in financial accounting and
current reporting problems facing the accounting profession. Review of
current authoritative pronouncements.
ACG 6265-International Accounting and Taxation (2) Prereq:ACG
2021C or 5005; not open to students majoring in accounting. Introduc-
tion to international accounting and tax concepts from a financial state-
ment user's perspective.
ACG 6387-Strategic Costing (2) Prereq: ACG 5075 or 4353C. Not
open to accounting majors. Strategic view of design and use of an
organization's internal accounting system.
ACG 6405-Accounting Database Management Systems (3) Prereq:
ACG3481C; 7ACstanding. Investigation of the design and development.
ACG 6495-Management Information Systems Seminar (3) Prereq:
ACG3481C; 7ACstanding.
ACG 6625-EDP Auditing (3) Prereq:ACG3481C, 5637; 7ACstand-
ing. Concepts related to auditing in computerized data environments.
ACG 6696-Financial Accounting Issues and Cases (3) Prereq: ACG
5205; 7ACstanding. A study of recent and projected developments in
financial reporting and auditing emphasizing cases, journal articles, and
pronouncements.
ACG 6835-Interdisciplinary Considerations in Accounting Theory
Development (3) Developments in related disciplines, such as economics,
law, and behavioral sciences, analyzed for their contribution to accounting
thought.
ACG 6845-Accounting and Analytical Methods (3) Utilization of logic,
including mathematics, in formulation of alternative accounting valu-





AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, MECHANICS, AND ENGINEERING SCIENCE / 73


action models and in clarification of accounting concepts.
ACG 6865-Financial Reporting and Auditing for Specialized Indus-
tries (3) Prereq:ACG5637, 5205; 7ACstanding. Current developments.
ACG 6905-Individual Work in Accounting (1-4; max: 7) Prereq:
approval ofgraduate coordinator. Reading and research in areas of accounting.
ACG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ACG 6935-Special Topics in Accounting (1-4; max: 8) Prereq: con-
sent ofassociate director.
ACG 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ACG 7885-Accounting Research I (4) Prereq: ACG 6135. Market use
of information, properties of accounting information, and market struc-
ture.
ACG 7886-Accounting Research II (4) Theoretical constructs in
accounting, valuation models, information asymmetry and production,
and nonmarket information use.
ACG 7887-Research Analysis in Accounting (3) Prereq: ACG 7886.
Analysis of accounting research and presentation of student research
project results. Financial accounting, managerial accounting, auditing,
taxation, management information systems, and information economics.
ACG 7925-Accounting Research Workshop (1-4; max: 8) Prereq:
completion ofPh.D. core. Analysis of current research topics in accounting
by visiting scholars, faculty, and doctoral students. S/U.
ACG 7939-Theoretical Constructs in Accounting (3) Prereq: ACG
7886 Emerging theoretical issues that directly impact research and
development of thought in accounting. Theory construction and veri-
fication, information economics, and agency theory constitute subsets
of this course.
ACG 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ACG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
TAX 5005-Introduction to Federal Income Taxation (4) Prereq:
minimum Cgrade in ACC 4133C andAC classification. Concepts and
applications for all types of taxpayers. Influence of taxation on economic
decisions, basic statutory provisions relevant to determining taxable gross
income, allowable deductions, tax computations, recognition or non-
recognition of gains and losses on property transactions, and character-
ization of gains and losses.
TAX 5025-Federal Income Tax Accounting II (3) Prereq: ACG 5816;
7AC standing. Not open to persons in tax specialization. Covers basic tax
research, taxation of corporations, partnerships, and other appropriate topics.
TAX 6105-Corporate Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC stand-
ing. Examination of fundamental legal concepts, statutory provisions,
and computational procedures applicable to economic transactions and
events involving formation, operation, and liquidation of corporate entity.
Consideration of acquisitive and divisive changes to the corporate struc-
ture.
TAX 6205-Partnership Taxation (3) Prereq:ACG 5816; 7ACstanding.
Topics include acquisition of partnership interest; reporting of partnership
profits, losses, and distributions; transactions between partners and the
partnership; transfers of partnership interest; and retirement or death
of partner.
TAX 6405-Estate and Gift Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC
standing. Examination of the federal excise tax levied on transfers of
property via gift or from decedents' estates.
TAX 6505-International Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC stand-
ing. Topics include the foreign tax credit, taxation of U.S. citizens abroad,
taxation of nonresident aliens doing business in U.S., tax treaties, taxation
of income from investments abroad, taxation of export operations, foreign
currency translation, intercompany pricing, and boycott and bribe related
income.


AEROSPACE ENGINEERING,
MECHANICS, AND ENGINEERING
SCIENCE
College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: W. Shyy. Graduate Coordinator: C. C. Hsu. Graduate Research
Professor: N. D. Cristescu. Distinguished Professor: R. T. Haftka. Pro-
fessors: I. K. Ebcioglu (Emeritus); M. A. Eisenberg; R. L. Fearn (Emeri-
tus); G. W. Hemp; C. C. Hsu; A. J. Kurdila; U. H. Kurzweg; E. R.
Lindgren (Emeritus); R. Mei; G. E. Nevill, Jr.; E. Partheniades (Emeri-
tus); B. V. Sankar; P. M. Sforza; W. Shyy; C. T. Sun (Emeritus); R. Tran-
Son-Tay; L. Vu-Quoc; E. K. Walsh. Associate Professors: B. F. Carroll;
N. G. Fitz-Coy; P. G. Ifju; D. W. Mikolaitis; C. Segal; P. H. Zipfel.
Associate Engineer: D. A. Jenkins. Assistant Professors: D. M. Belk; L.
N. Cattafesta, III; B. J. Fregly; R. C. Lind; A. J. Rapoff; M. Sheplak.

The Department of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics, and En-
gineering Science offers the Master of Engineering, Master of Sci-
ence, and Engineer degrees in aerospace engineering, in engineering
mechanics, and in engineering science. The Department partici-
pates in the College of Engineering's interdisciplinary Certificate
in Manufacturing Engineering at the master's level. The Doctor
of Philosophy degree is offered in aerospace engineering and in
engineering mechanics, with specialized tracks in the latter disci-
pline in design processes, engineering analysis and applied math-
ematics, and in theoretical and applied mechanics. The Department
also offers interdisciplinary master's and Ph.D. specializations in
offshore structures in cooperation with the Departments of Coastal
and Oceanographic Engineering and Civil Engineering.
Areas of specialization include aerodynamics, applied mathematics,
applied optics, atmospheric science, biomedical engineering, coastal
hydromechanics and ocean wave dynamics, combustion, compos-
ite materials, control theory, creative design, design automation, fluid
mechanics, numerical and finite element methods, offshore struc-
tures, solid mechanics, and structural mechanics and optimization.
With the approval of the supervisory committee, all 5000-, 6000-,
and 7000-level courses offered by the Aerospace Engineering, Me-
chanics, and Engineering Science Department plus the following
courses in related areas are acceptable for graduate major credit for
all degree programs offered by the Department: CAP 6685-Expert
Systems, CAP 6635-Artificial Intelligence Concepts, CAP 6676-
Knowledge Representation, CAP 6610-Machine Learning, EEL
5182-State Variable Methods in Linear Systems, EEL 5631-Digital
Control Systems, EEL 5840-Elements of Machine Intelligence, EEL
6614-Modern Control Theory I, EEL 6615-Modern Control
Theory II, EEL 6841-Machine Intelligence and Synthesis.
Joint Program-The Department also offers a combined
bachelor's/master's degree program. This program allows qualified
students to earn both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree with
a savings of one semester.
ESA 5938-Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-4; max: 8)
EAS 6135-Molecular Theory of Fluid Flows (3) Prereq: EGM 6812
or equivalent. Introduction to molecular dynamics of gases and liquids,
Boltzmann equation, Chapman-Enskog expansion and derivation ofEuler
and Navier-Stokes equations, lattice Boltzmann methods, application
to gas, liquid, and multiphase flows.
EAS 6138-Gasdynamics (3) Prereq: EAS 4103 or EML 5714. Theory
of sound waves, subsonic and supersonic flows, shockwaves, explosions
and implosions.





74 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


EAS 6140-Aeroacoustics (3) Prereq: EGN 3353C, EGM 4313. Basic
theory of acoustics as applied to aerodynamics. Wave theory for sound
generation/radiation, propagation, and scattering. Shear-layer/jet noise,
nacelle acoustics, combustion noise, and structure-borne sound.
EAS 6242-Advanced Structural Composites (3) Prereq: EGM3520.
Micro- and macro-behavior of a lamina. Stress transfer of short fiber
composites. Classical lamination theory, static analysis of laminated plates,
free-edge effect, failure modes.
EAS 6415-Guidance and Control of Aerospace Vehicles (3) Prereq:
EAS 4412 or equivalent. Application of modern control theory to aero-
space vehicles. Parameter identification methods applied to aircraft and
missiles.
EAS 6905-Aerospace Research (1-6; max: 12 including EGM 5905
and EGM 6905)
EAS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EAS 6935-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) S/U option.
EAS 6939-Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-6; max: 12)
Laboratory, lectures, or conferences covering selected topics in space
engineering.
EAS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EAS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EAS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EAS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
EGM 5005-Laser Principles and Applications (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Applications of lasers for lidar aerodynamic and structural
testing and for cutting and welding of materials.
EGM 5111 L-Experimental Stress Analysis (3) Prereq: EGM3520.
Introduction to techniques of experimental stress analysis in static sys-
tems. Lecture and laboratory include applications of electrical resistance
strain gauges, photoelasticity, brittle coatings, moire fringe analysis, and
X-ray stress analysis.
EGM 5121C-Experimental Deduction (4) Prereq: consent ofinstructor.
Fundamentals of dynamics and fluid mechanics. Designed to confront
student with unexpected.
EGM 5421-Modern Techniques of Structural Dynamics (3) Prereq:
EGM 3400; 3311, 3520, and CIS 3020. Modern methods of
elastomechanics and high speed computation. Matrix methods of struc-
tural analysis for multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Modeling of aero-
nautical, civil, and mechanical structural engineering systems.
EGM 5430-Intermediate Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM3400 and3311.
Dynamics of a particle, orbital mechanics, mechanics in non-inertial
frames, dynamics of a system of particles, rigid body dynamics in plane
motion, moments and products of inertia, conservation laws, Lagrange's
equations of motion.
EGM 5533-Applied Elasticity and Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3)
Prereq: EGM 3520. Bars, beams, thin-walled structures, and simple
continue in the elastic and inelastic range. Virtual work approaches, elastic
energy principles, plastic limit theorems, creep deformation procedures,
introduction to instability and fracture mechanics. Design applications.
EGM 5584-Biomechnics of Soft Tissue (3) Prereq: EGN3353Cand
EGM3520. Introduction to solid and fluid mechanics of biological sys-
tems. Rheological behavior of materials subjected to static and dynamic
loading. Mechanics of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal systems.
Mathematical models and analytical techniques used in biosciences.
EGM 5816-Intermediate Fluid Dynamics (4) Prereq: EGN3353C
(or CWR 3201), MAP 2302. Basic laws of fluid dynamics, introduction
to potential flow, viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and turbulence.
EGM 5905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 12 including EGM 6905
and EAS 6905)


EGM 5933-Special Topics in Engineering Science and Mechanics
(1-4; max: 8)
EGM 6215-Theory of Structural Vibrations (3) Prereq: EGM 4200.
Multiple degree-of-freedom systems, lumped parameter procedures;
matrix methods; free and forced motion. Normal mode analysis for
continuous systems. Lagrange equations. Numerical methods.
EGM 6321-Principles of Engineering Analysis I (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 or MAP 4305. Solution of linear and nonlinear ordinary differ-
ential equations. Methods of Frobenius, classification of singularities.
Integral representation of solutions. Treatment of the Bessel, Hermite,
Legendre, hypergeometric, and Mathieu equations. Asymptotic meth-
ods including the WBK and saddle point techniques. Treatment of
nonlinear autonomous equations. Phase plane trajectories and limit cycles.
Thomas-Fermi, Emden, and van der Pol equations.
EGM 6322-Principles of Engineering Analysis II (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 or MAP4341. Partial differential equations of first and second order.
Hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic equations including the wave, dif-
fusion, and Laplace equations. Integral and similiarity transforms. Bound-
ary value problems of the Dirichlet and Neumann type. Green's func-
tions, conformal mapping techniques, and spherical harmonics. Poison,
Helmholtz, and Schroedinger equations.
EGM 6323-Principles of Engineering Analysis III (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 or MAP 4341. Integral equations of Volterra and Fredholm. In-
version of self-adjoint operators via Green's functions. Hilbert-Schmidt
theory and the bilinear formula. The calculus of variations. Geodesics,
Euler-Lagrange equation and the brachistochrone problem. Variational
treatment of Sturm-Liouville problems. Fermat's principle.
EGM 6341-Numerical Methods of Engineering Analysis I (3) Prereq:
EGM 4313 or equivalent. Finite-difference calculus; interpolation and
extrapolation; roots of equations; solution of algebraic equations; eigen-
value problems; least-squares method; quadrature formulas; numerical
solution of ordinary differential equations; methods of weighted residuals.
Use of digital computer.
EGM 6342-Numerical Methods of Engineering Analysis II (3) Prereq:
EGM 6341 or consent of instructor. Finite-difference methods for para-
bolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. Application
to heat conduction, solid and fluid mechanics problems.
EGM 6351-Finite Element Methods (3) Prereq: consent of instruc-
tor. Displacement method formulation; generalization by means of varia-
tional principles and methods of weighted residuals; element shape
functions. Application to heat conduction, solid and fluid mechanics
problems. Use of general purpose computer codes.
EGM 6352-Advanced Finite Element Methods (3) Prereq: EGM 6351.
Discontinuous Galerkin method applied to transient problems. Opti-
mization theory applied to formulation of mixed FEM; treatment of
constraints, e.g., incompressibility. General shape functions.
Electromagnetics, heat, fluids, solids. Other advanced topics.
EGM 6365-Structural Optimization (3) Prereq: optimization course.
Structural optimization via calculus of variations. Application of tech-
niques of numerical optimization to design of trusses, frames, and com-
posite laminates. Calculation of sensitivity of structural response. Ap-
proximation and fast reanalysis techniques. Optimality criteria meth-
ods.
EGM 6444-Advanced Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM5430. The prin-
ciple of least action, conservation laws, integration of the equations of
motion, collision, free and forced linear and nonlinear oscillations, rigid
body motion, the spinning top, motion in non-inertial frames, canonical
equations.
EGM 6570-Principles of Fracture Mechanics (3) Prereq: EGM 6611.
Introduction to the mechanics of fracture of brittle and ductile mate-
rials. Linear elastic fracture mechanics; elastic-plastic fracture; fracture
testing; numerical methods; composite materials; creep and fatigue frac-
ture.








EGM 6595-Bone Mechanics (3) Biology, composition, and mechani-
cal properties of cortical bone tissue, cancellous bone tissue, and carti-
lage. Bone modeled as anisotropic elastic material, as bioviscoelastic
material and as composite material. Adaptation to stress and remodel-
ing; articular cartilage.
EGM 6611-Continuum Mechanics (3) Prereq: EGM3520. Tensors
of stress and deformation. Balance and conservation laws, thermody-
namic considerations. Examples of linear constitutive relations. Field
equations and boundary conditions of fluid flow.
EGM 6671-Inelastic Materials (3) Prereq: EGM6611. Virtual work,
stability, extremum principles. Applications on the microscale, miniscale,
and macroscale. Thermodynamics, internal variables, damage param-
eters, time and temperature effects. Fracture mechanics. Finite
elastoplasticity.
EGM 6812-Fluid Mechanics I (3) Prereq: EGN3353C. Flow kine-
matics. Fundamental laws and equations in integral and differential forms.
Potential flows. Introduction to laminar flows in simple geometries,
laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows. External flows. One-dimen-
sional compressible flows.
EGM 6813-Fluid Mechanics II (3) Prereq: EGM 6812. Mathematical
and physical structures of Navier-Stokes equation. Exact solutions of
Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Low Reynolds number flows.
Incompressible and compressible laminar boundary layer flows. Free shear
flows. Energy equation and heat transfer. Unsteady flows. Instability.
Turbulence.
EGM 6855-Bio-Fluid Mechanics and Bio-Heat Transfer (3) Prereq:
undergraduate fluid mechanics. Biothermal fluid sciences. Emphasis on
physiological processes occurring in human blood circulation and un-
derlying physical mechanisms from engineering perspective.
EGM 6905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 12 including EGM 5905
and EAS 6905)
EGM 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EGM 6934-Special Topics in Engineering Mechanics (1-6; max: 12)
EGM 6936-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Discussions and presen-
tations in the fields of graduate study and research. S/U option.
EGM 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EGM 7819-Computational Fluid Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM 6342
and 6813 or equivalent. Finite difference methods for PDE. Navier-Stokes
equations for incompressible and compressible fluids. Boundary fitted
coordinate transformation, adaptive grid techniques. Numerical methods
and computer codes for fluid flow problems.
EGM 7845-Turbulent Fluid Flow (3) Prereq: EGM 6813 or equivalent.
Definition of turbulence, basic equations of motion. Instability and
transition. Statistical methods, correlation and spectral functions. Ex-
perimental methods, flow visualization. Isotropic homogeneous turbu-
lence. Shear turbulence, similitude, the turbulent boundary layer, rough
turbulent flow. Jets and wakes. Heat convection, thermally driven tur-
bulence.
EGM 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EGM 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
EML 5131-CombustionI (3) Prereq: EML 3101 or consent ofinstructor.
Chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, flame propagation, deto-
nation and explosion, combustion of droplets and spray.
EML 6586-Bioengineering Physiology (3) Prereq: BSC2010/2010L,
CHM2200 or 2210. Comprehensive introduction to human physiol-
ogy for biomedical engineering students. Applications of engineering
principles to physiology.


AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING / 75


AFRICAN STUDIES
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Director M. Chege. Distinguished Professor G. Hyden. Distinguished Service
Professor: C. G. Davis. Professors: C. O. Andrew; H. Armstrong; M. J.
Burridge; B. A. CaillerJ. H. Conrad; T. L Crisman; R. H. Davis; H. Der-
Houssikian; J. K. Dow; B. M. du Toit; E. G. Gibbs; C. F. Gladwin; H.
L. Gholz; L. D. Harris; P. E. Hildebrand; C. F. Kiker; P. Magnarella; E.
L. Matheny; D. McCloud; H. Popenoe; R. E. Poynor; M. Reid; R. Renner,
J. E. Seale; J. Simpson; N. Smith; A. Spring; P. J. van Blokland. Associate
Professors: A. Bamia; S. A. Brandt; L. N. Crook; A. C. Goldman; M. A.
Hill-Lubin; P. A. Kotey. Assistant Professors: K. Buhr; T. Cleavland.

The Center for African Studies offers the Certificate in African Stud-
ies for master's and doctoral students in conjunction with disciplinary
degrees. Graduate courses on Africa or with African content are
available in the Colleges, Schools, or Departments of Agriculture,
Anthropology, Art and Art History, Botany, Economics, Education,
English, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Con-
servation, Geography, History, Journalism and Communications,
Law, Linguistics, Music, Political Science, and Sociology.
A description of the certificate program in African studies may be
found in the section SpecialPrograms. Listings of courses may be found
in individual departmental descriptions or may be obtained from the
Director, 427 Grinter Hall.
AFS 5100-Africana Bibliography (1) Survey of advanced reference,
specialized research tools (including variety of electronic databases,
published paper indexes, and bibliographies), and methods for gradu-
ate-level research in all disciplines of African area studies.
AFS 6060-Research Problems in African Studies (3) Research de-
signs for work on African-based problems. Interdisciplinary in scope.
AFS 6905-Individual Work (1-3; max: 9)



AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL
ENGINEERING

Colleges of Engineering and Agricultural and
Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: C. D. Baird. Graduate Coordinator: K. L. Campbell. Distin-
guished Professor: J. W. Jones. Professors: C. D. Baird; R. A. Bucklin;
K. L. Campbell; K. V. Chau; D. P. Chynoweth; W. D. Graham; D. Z.
Haman; P. H. Jones; W. M. Miller; J. W. Mishoe; R. A. Nordstedt;
A. R. Overman; D. R. Price; M. Salyani; A. A. Teixeira; J. D. Whitney;
F. S. Zazueta. Lecturer: J. D. Leary. Associate Professors: H. W. Beck;
B. J. Boman; J. F. Earle; B. T. French; G. H. Smerage; M. T. Talbot.
Assistant Professors: K. R. Berger; T. R. Burks; M. D. Dukes; J. Judge;
W. S. Lee; C. J. Lehtola; S. Shukla; B. A. Welt. Assistant in: J. D. Jor-
dan.

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Engineering, Doc-
tor of Philosophy, and Engineer are offered with graduate programs
in agricultural and biological engineering through the College of
Engineering. The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy de-
grees in agricultural and biological engineering are offered in the
area of agricultural operations management and applied science
through the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. A combined





76 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


B.S./M.S. program allows up to 12 graduate credits to be double
counted toward fulfillment of both degrees. Please check the Un-
dergraduate Catalog or contact the graduate coordinator for quali-
fications and details.
The Master of Science, Master of Engineering, and Doctor of Phi-
losophy degrees are offered in the following areas of research: land
and water resources engineering, structures and environment modi-
fication systems, resource management and utilization, remote sensing,
biological systems simulation, precision agriculture, robotics, post-
harvest handling and processing, packaging, biological engineering,
food engineering, and agricultural operations management. Students
also may choose to participate in interdisciplinary concentrations in
hydrologic sciences, geographic information sciences, particle science
and technology, and interdisciplinary ecology.
The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the agricul-
tural operations management area of specialization provide for sci-
entific training and research in technical agricultural management.
Typical plans of study focus on advanced training in field produc-
tion management, process and manufacturing management, or tech-
nical sales and product support.
For students with basic science degrees, the Doctor of Philosophy
program with a specialization in applied sciences through the Col-
lege of Agricultural and Life Sciences provides advanced training in
problem-solving capabilities, interdisciplinary research, and meth-
ods for applying science to real-world problems and issues. Typical
emphasis is on (1) the use of engineering methods and approaches,
such as mathematical modeling, optimization, and information tech-
nologies, in application of science to problems of various spatial and
temporal scales, and (2) an interdisciplinary experience in research
at the doctoral level.
Requirements for admission into the Master of Engineering and
Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in the College of Engineer-
ing are the completion of an approved undergraduate program in ag-
ricultural engineering or related engineering discipline. Admission
into the Master of Science program in the College of Engineering
requires completion of a mathematics sequence through differential
equations, 8 credits of general chemistry and 8 credits of general
physics with calculus and laboratory or equivalent. Admission into
the Doctor of Philosophy or the Master of Science program with a
concentration in agricultural operations management in the College
of Agricultural and Life Sciences requires completion of an approved
undergraduate agricultural operations management program or
equivalent and a working knowledge of a computer language. Ad-
mission into the Doctor of Philosophy program with a specializa-
tion in applied sciences requires an undergraduate degree in a basic
science field and a master's degree in a science or engineering field
with courses including analytic geometry, calculus, differential equa-
tions, 8 credits of general physics and 8 credits of general chemis-
try, or equivalent. Students not meeting the stated admissions require-
ments may be accepted into a degree program, providing sufficient
articulation courses are included in the program of study. Students
interested in enrolling in a graduate program should contact the gradu-
ate coordinator.
Candidates for advanced degrees in engineering are required to take
at least 12 credits from an approved list of major courses at the 5000
level or higher, with at least 6 credits of ABE courses at the 6000 level,
exclusive of seminar and thesis research credits. Other courses are taken
in applicable basic sciences and engineering to meet educational ob-
jectives and to comprise an integrated program as approved by the
Department's Graduate Committee. Master's students are required
to complete at least 3 credits of mathematics at the 5000 level or
higher, and doctoral students are required to complete at least 12
credits.


Candidates for the Master of Science concentration in agricultural
operations management are required to complete AOM 5315, at least
12 credits from an approved list of major courses, and at least 3 credits
of statistics at the 6000 level.
ABE 5015-Empirical Models of Crop Growth and Yield Response
(3) Prereq: Permission ofinstructor. Analytical models useful for engineering
design and management decisions, including water reuse. Emphasis on
analytical functions. Modeling strategy based on patterns of data, func-
tional relationships, connections among various factors, consistency
among data sets, and mathematical beauty.
ABE 5152-Advanced Power and Machinery forAgriculture (3) Prereq:
EML 3100, EGM3400, 3520. Functional design requirements, design
procedures, and performance evaluation.
ABE 5332-Advanced Agricultural Structures (3) Design criteria for
agricultural structures including steady and unsteady heat transfer analysis,
environmental modification, plant and animal physiology, and struc-
tural systems analysis.
ABE 5442-Advanced Agricultural Process Engineering (3) Engineer-
ing problems in handling and processing agricultural products.
ABE 5643C-Biological and Agricultural Systems Analysis (3) Prereq:
MAC 2312. Introduction to concepts and methods of process-based
modeling of systems and analysis of system behavior; physiological,
populational, and agricultural applications.
ABE 5646-Biological and Agricultural Systems Simulation (3) Prereq:
MAC2312, CGS3460 or CIS3020. Numerical techniques for continuous
system models using FORTRAN. Introduction to discrete simulation.
Application of simulation and sensitivity analysis with examples relat-
ing to crops, soil, environment, and pests.
ABE 5647-Advances in Microirrigation (3) Prereq: graduate status or
consent ofinstructor. State of the art in microirrigation technology. Sys-
tem evolution; components; soil-water-plant relations; hydraulics; design
criteria; installation; water and chemical interactions; biological interac-
tions; scheduling, operation and maintenance; knowledge-based systems;
automation.
ABE 5653-Rheology and Mechanics of Agricultural and Biological
Materials (3) Prereq: MAC2313, PHY2048, CHM2045, or consent
ofinstructor. Relation of biophysical and biochemical structure to rheo-
logical and mechanical behavior of biological materials in solid, liquid,
and granular form; methods for measuring material properties governing
these behaviors.
ABE 5707C-Agricultural Waste Management (3) Prereq: 4 or higher
classification. Engineering analysis and design of systems for the collection,
storage, treatment, transport, and utilization of livestock and other ag-
ricultural organic wastes and wastewaters. Field trips to operating sys-
tems and laboratory evaluation of materials and processes.
ABE 5815C-Food and Bioprocess Engineering Design (4) Engineer-
ing design of unit process operations employed in agro/food, pharma-
ceutical, and biologicals industries including sterilization/pasteurization,
radiation, freezing, drying, evaporation, fermentation, distillation.
ABE 6xxx-Programming and Interfacing High-Performance
Microcontroller (2) Prereq: experience in programming. Not available
for students with credit in ESI4161 andEEL 4744C. Design of high-
performance, embedded, microcontroller-based control systems with
emphasis on integrating hardware, software, and applications inter-
facing. Hands-on experiments illustrate and reinforce principles.
ABE 6031-Instrumentation in Agricultural Engineering Research (3)
Principles and application of measuring instruments and devices for
obtaining experimental data in agricultural engineering research.
ABE 6035-GIS in Hydrology (3) Prereq: permission ofinstructor. Prin-
ciples and applications of GIS technologies supporting land use/cover
assessment, hydrologic models, and water resources management plan-
ning. Monte Carlo simulation, data acquisition from internet, GIS
software.








ABE 6252-Advanced Soil and Water Management Engineering (3)
Physical and mathematical analysis of problems in infiltration, drain-
age, and groundwater hydraulics.
ABE 6254-Simulation of Agricultural Watershed Systems (3) Prereq:
CWR 4111 and working knowledge ofFORTRAN. Characterization and
simulation of agricultural watershed systems including land and chan-
nel phase hydrologic processes and pollutant transport processes. Inves-
tigation of the structure and capabilities of current agricultural water-
shed computer models.
ABE 6262C-Remote Sensing in Hydrology (3) Applications of sat-
ellites, shuttle imaging radar, ground-penetrating radar, multispectral
scanner, thermal IR, and geographic information system to study rainfall,
evapotranspiration, groundwater, water extent, water quality, soil mois-
ture, and runoff.
ABE 6615-Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer in Biological Systems
(3) Prereq: CGS2425, ABE3612C. Analytical and numerical technique
solutions to problems of heat and mass transfer in biological systems.
Emphasis on nonhomogenous, irregularly shaped products with respi-
ration and transpiration.
ABE 6644-Agricultural Decision Systems (3) Computerized deci-
sion systems for agriculture. Expert systems, decision support systems,
simulations, and types of applications in agriculture.
ABE 6663-Advanced Applied Microbial Biotechnology (3) Prereq:
general biology and organic chemistry or permission ofinstructor. Principles
of microbial biotechnology with emphasis on applications of microor-
ganisms for industrial processes, e.g., energy, environmental, food,
pharmaceutical, and chemical.
ABE 6905-Individual Work in Agricultural and Biological Engineer-
ing (1-4; max: 6) Special problems in agricultural engineering.
ABE 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ABE 6931-Seminar (1; max: 2) Preparation and presentation of re-
ports on specialized aspects of research in agricultural engineering and
agricultural operations management. S/U.
ABE 6933-Special Topics in Agricultural and Biological Engineer-
ing (1-4; max: 6) Lectures, laboratory, and/or special projects.
ABE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ABE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ABE 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ABE 6986-Applied Mathematics in Agricultural and Biological En-
gineering (3) Mathematical methods, including regression analysis, graphi-
cal techniques, and analytical and numerical solution of ordinary and partial
differential equations, relevant to agricultural engineering.
ABE 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ABE 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
AOM 5045-Appropriate Technology for Agricultural Mechanization
(3) Prereq: baccalaureate degree in agriculture or equivalent. Selection,
evaluation, and transfer of appropriate mechanization technology for
agricultural development. Agricultural power sources; field, processing,
transportation, water pumping, and other farmstead equipment and
structures.
AOM 5315-Advanced Agricultural Operations Management (3)
Prereq: AOM 4455; CGS 2531 or equivalent or consent ofinstructor. The
functional and economic applications of machine monitoring and ro-
botics. Analysis of farm machinery systems reliability performance.
Queueing theory, linear programming, and ergonomic considerations
for machine systems optimization.
AOM 5431-GIS and Remote Sensing in Agriculture and Natural Re-
sources (3) Prereq: working knowledge ofcomputer or permission ofinstruc-
tor. Principles and applications of geographic information systems (GIS) and


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION / 77


global positioning system (GPS) technologies supporting land use/cover
assessment, agricultural production, and natural resources conservation.
AOM 5435-Advanced Precision Agriculture (3) Principles and
applications of technologies supporting precision farming and natu-
ral resource data management planning. Global positioning systems
(GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), variable rate technologies
(VRT), data layering of independent variables, automated guidance,
Internet information access, computer software management.
AOM 6905-Individual Work in Agricultural Operations Manage-
ment (1-6; max: 6) Special problems.
AOM 6932-Special Topics in Agricultural Operations Management
(1-6; max: 6) Lectures, laboratory, and /or special projects.
CWR 6536-Stochastic Subsurface Hydrology (3) Prereq: senior-level
course in probability and statistics, calculus through differential equations,
soil physics, and/or subsurface hydrology. Stochastic modeling of subsur-
face flow and transport including geostatistics, time series analysis, Kalman
filtering, and physically based stochastic models.
PKG 5001-Advanced Packaging, Society, and the Environment (3)
Evolution of modern society and its relationship to packaging, technology,
and both real and popular environmental concerns.
PKG 5003-Advanced Distribution and Transport Packaging (3)
Containment, protection, and preservation related to transporting and
distributing packaging products. Methods for efficient scheduling and
directing transport and delivery of packages.
PKG 5006-Advanced Analytical Packaging Methods (3) Prereq:
chemistry, physics, or biology. Modern lab instruments and procedures
employed for packaging used to solve problems from packaging industry.
PKG 5007-Advanced Packaging Materials (3) Major packaging
materials, forms, and strategies. Specific issues related to packaging
composition and form.
PKG 5103-Advanced Consumer Product Packaging (3) Major pack-
aging methods, materials, forms, and strategies used for consumer prod-
ucts. Packaging plan with associated mock-ups for proposed consumer
product prepared as specific team projects.
PKG 5206C-Advanced Package Decoration (3) Major decoration
methods used for packaging. Student teams create original graphic de-
signs and execute designs on 200 containers.
PKG 5256C-Advanced Analytical Packaging Methods (3) Materi-
als, uses, functions, and production processes of packaging. Historical,
societal, and technological drivers of packaging.
PKG 6100-Advanced Computer Tools for Packaging (3) Label de-
sign, bar code technology, spreadsheets, visual basic programming, 3D
package design, and distribution efficiency analysis.
PKG 6905-Individual Work in Packaging (1-6; max: 6) Special
problems in packaging sciences.
PKG 6932-Special Topics in Packaging Sciences (1-6; max: 6) Lec-
tures, laboratory, and/or special projects.



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND
COMMUNICATION

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: E. W. Osborne. Graduate Coordinator: R. D. Rudd. Profes-
sors: L. R. Arrington; J. G. Cheek; G. D. Israel; E. W. Osborne; E. E.
Trotter. Associate Professors: M. H. Breeze; T. S. Hoover; J. M. Nehiley;
R. D. Rudd; R. W. Telg. Assistant Professors: T. A. Irani; N. T. Place.

The Department of Agricultural Education and Communication
offers major work for the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy, Master





78 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


of Science, and Master of Agriculture. The requirements for each
degree are described in the General Information section.
The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare graduates for domes-
tic and international teaching, research, extension, administrative,
and leadership positions in both the public and private sectors. Ar-
eas of specialization include teaching and learning, communication,
leadership and volunteer development, and adult and extension
education. Courses are taught from an agricultural and natural re-
sources context and are broadly applicable in education, business,
government, and agency settings.
For both the Master of Science and Master of Agriculture degrees,
three curriculum options for graduate study are offered. The agri-
cultural extension and education option is for those persons currently
employed or preparing to be employed in the cooperative extension
service, including family and consumer sciences, agriculture, 4-H,
and other related areas. This option is also for persons who are teaching
agricultural education in the public schools and those who wish to
enter the profession and require basic certification. The farming
systems research-extension for sustainable agriculture option provides
technical and social science skills and knowledge for field-level tech-
nicians. Emphasis is on sustainable agriculture in developing tropi-
cal countries. The communication option provides skill and theo-
retical knowledge for students interested in careers in agricultural
communication.
A prospective graduate student need not have majored in agricul-
tural education and communication as an undergraduate. However,
students with an insufficient background in either agricultural edu-
cation or technical agriculture will need to include some basic courses
in these areas in their program.
AEE 5060-Public Opinion and Agricultural and Natural Resource Issues
(3) Public opinion measurement and agenda setting. Media treatment,
public opinion, and public relations/public information activity regard-
ing issues affecting agricultural production and trade.
AEE 5206-Instructional Techniques in Agricultural and Life Sciences
(3) Effective use of instructional materials and methods with emphasis
on application of visual and nonvisual techniques.
AEE 5454-Leadership Development for Extension and Community
Nonprofit Organizations (3) Application of concepts related to devel-
oping leaders for organizing and maintaining extension and community
nonprofit organizations.
AEE 6050-Strategies for Campaigns to Develop Private and Corporate
Support (3) Analysis, planning, implementation, and control of cam-
paigns for support of nonprofit programs based on social needs. Spe-
cific focus on advertising, marketing, and public relations approaches.
AEE 6300-Methodology of Planned Change (3) Processes by which
professional change agents influence the introduction, adoption, and
diffusion of technological changes. Applicable to those who are responsible
for bringing about change.
AEE 6325-History and Philosophy of Agricultural Education (3)
Analysis of evolving concepts and philosophies. Emphasis on history,
legislation, and principles underlining organization and practice. Par-
ticipation in field experience required.
AEE 6426-Development of aVolunteer Leadership Program (3) Iden-
tification, recruitment, training, retention, and supervision of volunteer
leaders.
AEE 6512-Program Development in Extension Education (3) Con-
cepts and processes drawn from the social sciences that are relevant to
the development of extension education programs.
AEE 6541-Instruction and Communication Technologies for Agri-
cultural and Natural Resources (3) Planning and production of writ-
ten and visual instructional and communication materials for programs
in agriculture and natural resources. Major instructional project or com-
munication campaign required.


AEE 6542-Teaching and Learning Theory: Applications in Agricul-
tural Education (3) Prereq:AEE5206. Contemporary and foundational
theory and research on teaching and learning.
AEE 6552-Evaluating Programs in Extension Education (3) Con-
cepts and research drawn from the social sciences relevant to evaluat-
ing youth and adult extension programs.
AEE 6611-Agricultural and Extension Adult Education (3) Concepts
and principles related to design, implementation, and evaluation of
education programs for adults.
AEE 6704-Extension Administration and Supervision (3) Principles
and practices for effective administration and supervision of the coop-
erative extension service program at the county and state levels.
AEE 6767-Research Strategies in Agricultural Education and Com-
munication (3) Application of principles, practices, and strategies for
conducting behavioral research in agricultural and natural resource
professions.
AEE 6905-Problems in Agricultural and Extension Education (1-
3; max: 8) Prereq: approval ofdepartment chairman. For advanced stu-
dents to select and study a problem related to agricultural and/or extension
education.
AEE 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEE 6912-Nonthesis Research in Agricultural and Extension Edu-
cation (1-3; max: 6) Library and workshop related to methods in ag-
ricultural and extension education, including study of research work,
review of publications, development of written reports.
AEE 6933-Seminar in Agricultural Education and Communication
(1; max: 3) Exploration of current topics and trends.
AEE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AEE 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students before
admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's degree in the
field of study or for students who have been accepted for a doctoral pro-
gram. Not open to students who had been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
AEE 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



AGRICULTURE-GENERAL
College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences

Dean: J. G. Cheek.

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers academic pro-
grams and grants advanced degrees in 17 departments and the School
of Forest Resources and Conservation. These academic units are all a
part of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Addi-
tional components of IFAS include 16 research centers located through-
out the state and cooperative extension offices in each of the 67 counties
of the state.
The following courses are offered under the supervision of the office
of the dean by an interdisciplinary faculty and deal with material of
concern to two or more IFAS academic units. The courses are also
open to students of other colleges, with the permission of the course
instructor.
AGG 5364C-Molecular Techniques Laboratory (2) Current proto-
cols in molecular biology techniques.
ALS 5036-Contemporary Issues in Science (2) A study of current
issues in science as it relates to students pursuing scientific careers.
Discussion topics will focus on issues of graduate education, funding
for science, job markets, scientific research ethics, publication, and job
expectations S/U.
ALS 5106-Food and the Environment (3) Relationship between
food production and consumption and environmental quality. Scien-




AGRONOMY / 79


tific merits of controversies about impact of food production on envi-
ronment and of different production strategies and practices. Biodiversity,
water quality, soil resources, ecological economics, and energy use in food
production, taught interactively on Internet.
ALS 5303-Bio/Chemical Patents (1-2; max: 2) Practical protection
of biological and chemical inventions prior to filing patents. Introduc-
tion to patent system in its entirety for future reference. History, theory,
and minimum requirements for patents.
ALS 5813-Farming Systems Research and Extension Methods (3)
Multidisciplinary team approach to technology generation and pro-
motion with emphasis on small farms. Adaptations of anthropological,
agronomic, and economic methods. Field work required.
ALS 5905-Individual Study (1-4; max: 6) Supervised study or research
not covered by other courses.
ALS 5932-Special Topics (1-4; max: 6)
ALS 6046-Grant Writing (2) Prereq: admitted to doctoral program.
Preparation, submission, and management of competitive grants, includ-
ing operations of national review panels and finding sources of extra-
mural funding.
ALS 6930-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 4) Topics in agriculture and/
or natural resources. S/U option.
ALS 6933-Topics in Tropical Managed Ecosystems (2-8; max:
12) Intensive field research in ecology of agricultural production sys-
tems in the tropics. Interactions between human dominated systems,
particularly agricultural systems, and natural ecosystems. Emphasis on
acquiring and applying field research techniques.
BCH 5045-Graduate Survey of Biochemistry (4) Prereq: inorganic
chemistry, organic chemistry, biology. Introduction to plant, animal, and
microbial biochemistry for graduate students who have not had biochem-
istry. Integration and regulation of biochemical processes stressed; limited
discussion of some biochemical techniques.
PCB 5065-Advanced Genetics (4) Prereq: AGR 3303 or PCB 3063
and BCH 4024 or 5045. For graduate students in any life science disci-
pline. Examination of genetic principles including gene and gene function;
recombination and linkage; molecular markers, multipoint linkage analysis
and positional cloning; quantitative, population, developmental and non-
Medalian genetics.
PCB 6555-Introduction to Quantitative Genetics (3) Prereq: STA
6166. Intended for students of all disciplines who are interested in ge-
netic principles and biometric evaluation of characters that exhibit con-
tinuous variation in natural populations or breeding programs. Offered
in spring semester of odd-numbered years.



AGRONOMY
College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman:J. M. Bennett. Graduate Coordinator: D. S. Wofford. Professors:
L. H. Allen, Jr.; R. D. Barnett; J. M. Bennett; K. J. Boote; B. J. Brecke;
P. S. Chourey; D. L. Colvin; C. W. Deren; A. E. Dudeck; R. N. Gallaher;
D. W. Gorbet; W. T. Haller; J. C. Joyce; R. S. Kalmbacher; K. A.
Langeland; J. D. Miller; P. Mislevy III; R. P. Nair; P. L. Pfahler; H. L.
Popenoe; G. M. Prine; K. H. Quesenberry; D. G. Shilling; T. R. Sinclair;
R. L. Smith; L. E. Sollenberger; R. K. Stocker; D. L. Sutton; J. C. V.
Vu; S. H. West; E. B. Whitty; D. S. Wofford; D. L. Wright. Associ-
ate Professors: C. G. Chambliss; M. J. Williams. Assistant Professors: M.
B. Adjei; A. S. Blount; K. L. Buhr; A. M. Fox; M. Gallo-Meagher; G.
E. MacDonald; R. M. Muchovej; J. M. Scholberg; R. G. Shatters.

The Department offers the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy and
Master of Science (thesis and nonthesis option) in agronomy with


specialization in crop ecology, crop nutrition and physiology, crop
production, weed science, genetics, cytogenetics, or plant breeding.
Graduate programs emphasize the development and subsequent
application of basic principles in each specialization to agronomic
plants in Florida and throughout the tropics. The continuing need
for increased food supplies is reflected in departmental research ef-
forts. When compatible with a student's program and permitted by
prevailing circumstances, some thesis and dissertation research may
be conducted wholly or in part in one or more of several tropical
countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathematics, chem-
istry, botany, microbiology, and physics is required of new gradu-
ate students. In addition to graduate courses in agonomy, the fol-
lowing courses in related areas are acceptable for graduate credits as
part of the student's major: ABE 5643C-Biological and Agricul-
tural Systems Analysis; ABE 5646-Biological and Agricultural Sys-
tems Simulation; ANS 6452-Principles of Forage Quality Evalu-
ation; ANS 6715-The Rumen and Its Microbes; BOT 5225C-
Plant Anatomy; BOT 6516-Plant Metabolism; BOT 6566-Plant
Growth and Development; HOS 6201-Breeding Perennial Cul-
tivars; HOS 6231-Biochemical Genetics of Higher Plants; HOS
6242-Genetics and Breeding of Vegetable Crops; HOS 6345-
Environmental Physiology of Horticultural Crops; PCB 5307C-
Limnology; PCB 6356C-Ecosystems of the Tropics; PCB 6555-
Quantitative Genetics; SOS 6136-Soil Fertility.
AGR 5230C-Grassland Agroecosystems (4) Comprehensive overview
of planted and native grassland ecosystems in Florida emphasizing their
growth, species diversity, management, and utilization by ruminant
animals. Offered every spring semester.
AGR 5266C-Field Plot Techniques (3) Techniques and procedures
employed in the design and analysis of field plot, greenhouse, and labo-
ratory research experiments. Application of research methodology, the
analysis and interpretation of research results. Offered every fall semester.
AGR 5277C-Tropical Crop Production (3) The ecology and pro-
duction practices of selected crops grown in the tropics. Offered every
spring semester.
AGR 5307-Molecular Genetics for Crop Improvement (2) Over-
view of molecular genetics and plant transformation methodologies used
in crop improvement. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 5321C-Genetic Improvement of Plants (3) Prereq: AGR 3303.
Genetic basis for crop improvement including methods for improving crop
yield, pest resistance, and adaptability. Emphasis on manipulating genetic
variability in self- and cross-pollinate, annual and perennial crop plants.
AGR 5511-Crop Ecology (3) Relationships of ecological factors and
climatic classifications to agroecosystems, and crop modeling of the major
crops. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
AGR 6233C-Tropical Pasture and Forage Science (4) Potential of
natural grasslands of tropical and subtropical regions. Development of
improved pastures and forages and their utilization in livestock produc-
tion. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6237C-Research Techniques in Forage Evaluation (3) Experi-
mental techniques for field evaluation of forage plants. Design of graz-
ing trials and procedures for estimating yield and botanical composi-
tion in the grazed and ungrazed pasture. Offered summer C semester
in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6311-Population Genetics (2) Application of statistical prin-
ciples to biological populations in relation to gene frequency, zygotic
frequency, mating systems, and the effects of selection, mutation and
migration on equilibrium populations. Offered spring semester in even-
numbered years.
AGR 6323-Advanced Plant Breeding (3) Theory and use ofbiometri-
cal genetic models for analytical evaluation of qualitative and quanti-




80 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


tative characteristics, with procedures applicable to various types of plant
species.
AGR 6325--Plant Breeding Techniques (1; max: 2) Examination of
various breeding techniques used by agronomic and horticultural crop
breeders in Florida. Field and lab visits to active plant breeding programs,
with discussion led by a specific breeder each week. Hands-on experience
in breeding programs. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6353-Cytogenetics (3) Genetic variability with emphasis on
interrelationships of cytologic and genetic concepts. Chromosome struc-
ture and number, chromosomal aberrations, apomixis, and application
of cytogenetic principles. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6422C-Environmental Crop Nutrition (3) Design of cost-ef-
fective and environmentally sound crop nutrient management strate-
gies. Diagnostic nutrient analysis, nutrient uptake, BMPs, and sustainable
agriculture.
AGR 6442C-Physiology of Agronomic Plants (4) Yield potentials
of crops as influenced by photosynthetic efficiencies, respiration, trans-
location, drought, and canopy architecture. Plant response to environ-
mental factors. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
AGR 6905-Agronomic Problems (1-5; max: 8) Special topics for
classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies of agronomic plants.
AGR 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AGR 6932-Topics in Agronomy (1-3; max: 8) Critical review of
selected topics in specific agronomic areas.
AGR 6933-Graduate Agronomy Seminar (1; max: 3) Current lit-
erature and agronomic developments.
AGR 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AGR 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AGR 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
AGR 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
ALS 5303-Bio/Chemical Patents (1-2; max: 2) Practical protection
of biological and chemical inventions prior to filing patents. Introduc-
tion to patent system in its entirety for future reference. History, theory,
and minimum requirements for patents.
PLS 5632C-Integrated Weed Management (3) Overview of weed
science principles and practices, with particular emphasis on strategies for
southeastern cropping systems. Situations unique to the State of Florida.
PLS 5652-Advanced Weed Science (3) Classification, mode of ac-
tion, principles of selectivity, and plant responses to herbicides. Weed,
crop, environmental, and pest management associations in developing
herbicide programs. Focus on practical principles. Offered spring semester
in even-numbered years.
PLS 6623-Weed Ecology (3) Characteristics of weedy species. Eco-
logical principles emphasizing interactions of weeds with their environ-
ment and neighboring plants, in crop and various noncrop habitats.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PLS 6655-Plant/Herbicide Interaction (3) Herbicide activity on plants:
edaphic and environmental influences, absorption and translocation, re-
sponse of specific physiological and biochemical processes as related to
herbicide mode of action. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.



ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY
College of Medicine

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: S. P. Sugrue. Graduate Coordinator: D. Liao. Haskell Hess
Professor: C. Feldherr. Professors: S. Benner; H. Berrey; B. Burke; N.


Chegini; S. Gluck; P. Linser; W. S. May; K. Rarey; L. Romrell; G. Shaw;
S. Sugrue; C.M. West. Associate Professors: J.P. Aris; W. A. Dunn; T.
G. Hollinger; K. Madsen; S. Narayan; K. Selman. Assistant Professors:
L.S. Holliday; D. Liao; L. Xiao.

The Graduate Faculty of the Department of Anatomy and Cell
Biology participates in the interdisciplinary program (IDP) in medical
sciences, leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree, with special-
ization in one of the six advanced concentration areas of the IDP (see
Medical Sciences). Departmental areas of research associated with
the IDP focus on topical problems in cell biology, developmental
biology, and molecular biology. Laboratory research is supported by
funding from the National Institutes of Health, the National Sci-
ence Foundation, state agencies, and private foundations. The De-
partment is committed to provide an excellent intellectual environ-
ment for students who wish to pursue graduate studies. In addition
to courses associated with the IDP, the Department of Anatomy and
Cell Biology offers the courses listed below.
GMS 6061-The Nucleus (1) Prereq: GMS 6002 or consent ofinstructor.
Cell biology of the nucleus.
GMS 6062-Protein Trafficking I (1) Prereq: GMS 6002 or consent
ofinstructor. Movement of proteins in cell.
GMS 6063-Protein Trafficking II (1) Prereq: GMS 6002 or consent
ofinstructor. Movement of proteins in cell.
GMS 6064-Tumor Biology (1) Prereq: GMS 6002 or consent ofin-
structor. Current understanding of molecular basis of cancer. Offered
in odd-numbered years.
GMS 6421-Cell Biology (4) Prereq: undergraduate biochemistry or cell
biology or consent of instructor; taught in conjunction with 1st year IDP
core course. Fundamental mechanisms of cell functions, specializations,
and interactions that account for the organization and activities of ba-
sic tissues.
GMS 6609-Advanced Gross Anatomy (2-4; max: 6) Regional and
specialized anatomy of the human body taught by laboratory dissection,
conferences, and demonstrations.
GMS 6635-Organization of Cells and Tissues (2) Prereq: second-year
IDP student. Structural and functional aspects.
GMS 6642-Morphogenesis: Organ Systems I (2) Prereq: GMS 6635,
second-year IDPstudent. Skin, respiratory, lymphatics, and special sense.
GMS 6643-Morphogenesis: Organ Systems II (2) Prereq: GMS 6642,
second-yearIDPstudent. GI, kidney, endocrine, male and female repro-
duction.
GMS 6644-Apoptosis (1) Prereq: 1st or2ndyear IDPstudent. Mod-
ern view of molecular mechanisms of tumor development.
GMS 6690-Molecular Cell BiologyJournal Club (1; max: 12) Faculty-
student discussion of research papers and topics.
GMS 6691-Special Topics in Cell Biology and Anatomy (1-4; max:
10) Readings in recent research literature of anatomy and/or applied dis-
ciplines including cell, developmental, and reproductive biology.
GMS 6970-Individual Study (1-3; max: 8) Supervised study in ar-
eas not covered by other graduate courses.



ANIMAL SCIENCES
College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: F. G. Hembry. Graduate Coordinator: H. H. Head. Gradu-
ate Research Professors: R. H. Harms. W. W. Thatcher. Professors: J.
H. Brendemuhl; W. E. Brown; W. C. Buhi; M. J. Burridge; P. T.
Cardeilhac; B. L. Damron; M. Drost; M. A. Elzo; M. J. Fields; D. J.
Forrester; K. N. Gelatt; E. P. Gibbs; R. N. Gronwall; P. J. Hansen;





ANIMAL SCIENCES / 81


H. H. Head; D. D. Johnson; W. E. Kunkle; T. T. Marshall; L. R.
McDowell; A. M. Merritt; R. D. Miles; R. P. Natzke; J. T. Neilson; E.
A. Ott; D. C. Sharp III; C. R. Staples; A. L. Webb; D. W. Webb; H.
R. Wilson. Associate Professors: K. C. Bachman; G. D. Butcher; C. C.
Chase; E. L. Johnson; S. Lieb; F. B. Mather; T. A. Olson; R. S. Sand;
D. R. Sloan; S. H. TenBroeck; S. K. Williams. Assistant Professors: A.
Adesogan; J. D. Arthingon; L. Badinga; A. De Vries; M. B. Hall; W.
Herrington; K. Moore; T. Thrift; J. V. Yelich.

The Department of Animal Sciences offers the following degrees:
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philoso-
phy in Animal Sciences with emphasis in beef or dairy cattle, equine,
swine or poultry. The following concentrations are available: breed-
ing and genetics, management, nutrition (nutritional physiology,
nutrient metabolism and feedstuff utilization), physiology (envi-
ronmental, lactational and reproductive), molecular biology (em-
bryology, endocrinology and genetics), meat science (meat process-
ing, meat quality, food safety). Students may also complete the M.S.
or Ph.D. degree through the interdisciplinary concentration in
animal molecular and cell biology. A student may work on a problem
covering more than one area of study. Animal resources (beef cattle,
dairy cattle, horses, swine, poultry, sheep and laboratory animals)
are available for use in various research programs. Nutrition, physi-
ology and meats laboratories are available for detailed chemical and
carcass quality evaluations and excellent computer facilities are
available. Special arrangements may be made to conduct research
at the various branch agricultural experiment stations throughout
Florida.
Departmental and program prerequisites for admission to graduate
study include a sound science background, with basic courses in bacte-
riology, biology, mathematics, botany, and chemistry. All courses in the
animal sciences program area are acceptable for graduate credit as part
of the candidate's major. In addition, the following courses also fulfill
this requirement: AGR 6233C-Tropical Pasture and Forage Science;
AGR 6311-Population Genetics; AGR 6353-Cytogenetics; BCH
6415-Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology; FOS 5225C-Principles
in Food Microbiology; FOS 6126C-Psychophysical Aspect of Foods;
FOS 6315C-Advanced Food Chemistry; FOS 6428C-Advanced
Food Processing; HUN 6245-Advanced Human Nutrition; VME
5162C-Avian Diseases; and VME 5244-Physiology of Mammals:
Organ Systems.
ANS 5446-Animal Nutrition (3) Prereq: ANS 3440, BCH 3023 or
permission of instructor. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals, and
vitamins and their functions in the animal body.
ANS 5935-Reproductive Biology Seminar and Research Studies (1;
max: 4) Prereq: ANS 3319 or equivalent. Invited speakers on wide range
of topics. Student-faculty participation in research projects. S/U
ANS 6281-Dairy Science Research Techniques (3) Prereq: STA 6167.
Methods employed in research in specialized dairy fields; genetics, nu-
trition, and physiology.
ANS 6288-Experimental Techniques and Analytical Procedures in
Meat Research (3) Experimental design, analytical procedures; tech-
niques; carcass measurements and analyses as related to livestock pro-
duction and meats studies.
ANS 6297-Advanced Poultry Management (3) Poultry management
presented on a seminar/short course basis utilizing lecturers currently
working in areas under discussion. Field trips made to a variety of com-
mercial operations.
ANS 6313-Current Concepts in Reproductive Biology (2) Prereq:
ANS 3319 or equivalent; consent ofinstructor. Lectures prepared by students
and discussion of current review articles.
ANS 6386-Advanced Animal Breeding (3) Prereq: permission ofin-
structor. Application of statistical procedures to the genetic evaluation


of animals. Single trait evaluation. Multiple trait evaluation. Multibreed
evaluation.
ANS 6444-Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3) Prereq:ANS3440, 4442.
Current topics in poultry nutrition, research techniques, formulation
of experimental diets, and linear programming procedures and practices.
ANS 6449-Vitamins (3) Prereq: organic chemistry. Historical devel-
opment, properties, assays, and physiological effects. Offered spring
semester in odd-numbered years.
ANS 6452-Principles of Forage Quality Evaluation (2) Prereq: ANS
5446, AGR 4231C. Definition of forage quality in terms of animal
performance, methodology used in forage evaluation, and proper inter-
pretation of forage evaluation data.
ANS 6458-Advanced Methods in Nutrition Technology (3) Prereq:
Forgraduate students butopen to seniors by specialpermission. Demonstrations
and limited performance of procedures used in nutrition research.
ANS 6633-Advanced Poultry Products Technology (3) An inten-
sive study of poultry products technology, including chemical, physi-
cal, microbial, and organoleptic attributes of eggs and poultry meat.
ANS 6636-Meat Technology (3) Chemistry, physics, histology,
bacteriology, and engineering involved in the handling, processing,
manufacturing, preservation, storage, distribution, and utilization of meat.
ANS 6666L-Molecular and Cellular Research Methods (2) Prereq:
enrollment in AMCB concentration. Diversity of research topics and labo-
ratory techniques demonstrated. Short laboratory rotations (3 to 6 weeks)
with 3 scientists. Offered fall and spring semesters.
ANS 6702C-Advanced Physiology of Lactation (2)
ANS 6704-Endocrinology (4) Prereq: BCH 4024.
ANS 6706-Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals (3)
ANS 6709-Avian Physiology (2-4; max: 4) Environmental physiol-
ogy, ovulation cycle and egg formation, reproductive efficiency, experi-
mental physiological techniques.
ANS 6711-Current Topics in Equine Nutrition and Exercise Physi-
ology (2) Equine science with emphasis on current topics of interest.
ANS 6715-The Rumen and Its Microbes (3) Prereq: ANS 5446.
Review and correlation of fundamental biochemical, physiological, and
bacteriological research upon which feeding of ruminants is based.
Experimental methodology of rumen physiology and metabolism.
ANS 6717-Energy Metabolism (3) Prereq: ANS 5446; BCH 4024;
3025, permission of instructor.
ANS 6718-Nutritional Physiology of Domestic Animals (3) Prereq:
ANS 5446; introductory biochemistry course. Integration of endocrine,
biochemical, molecular control of nutritional processes in domestic
animals.
ANS 6723-Mineral Nutrition and Metabolism (3) Physiological effect
of macro- and micro-elements, mineral interrelationships.
ANS 6745-Introduction to Statistical Genetics (2) Prereq: PCB 6555,
STA 6167. Development and application of statistical and quantitative
genetics theory to selection and estimation of genetic
ANS 6751C-Physiology of Reproduction (4) Prereq: ANS 3319 or
permission of instructor. Conceptual relationship of hypothalamus, pi-
tuitary, and reproductive organs during estrous cycle and pregnancy.
Influence of exteroceptive factors and seasonal reproduction.
ANS 6767-Molecular Endocrinology (3) Prereq: BCH4024or equivalent
or permission ofinstructor. Molecular basis of hormone action and regu-
lation, and emerging techniques in endocrine system study; emphasis on
molecular mechanisms of growth, development, and reproduction.
ANS 6905-Problems in Animal Science (1-4; max: 8) H.
ANS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANS 6931-Topics in Poultry Production (2-3; max: 6) Prereq: ANS
3319, 3440. Offered primarily to agricultural extension workers and
vocational agricultural teachers, with one of the following topics speci-
fied: production principles, principles of handling and marketing, or
nutrition.





82 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ANS 6932-Topics in Animal Science (1-3; max: 9) New develop-
ments in animal nutrition and livestock feeding, animal genetics, ani-
mal physiology, and livestock management.
ANS 6933-Graduate Seminar in Animal Science (1; max: 8)
ANS 6936-Graduate Seminar in Animal Molecular and Cell Biol-
ogy (1; max: 2) Seminar attendance and one-hour presentation on
graduate research project.
ANS 6938-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 2)
ANS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ANS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U
ANS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



ANTHROPOLOGY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairperson: A. F. Burns. Graduate Coordinator:J. H. Moore. Graduate
Research Professor: M. Harris (Emeritus). Distinguished Service Profes-
sor P. L. Doughty (Emeritus). Distinguished Research Professor: K. Deagan.
Professors: H. R. Bernard; A. F. Burns; B. M. du Toit; J. D. Early;t C.
F. Gladwin; B. T. Grindal;* M.J. Hardman; W. F. Keegan; P.J. Magnarella;
M. L. Margolis; W. H. Marquardt; J. T. Milanich; J. H. Moore; M.
Moseley; A. R. Oliver-Smith; J. A. Paredes;* M. E. Pohl;* H. I. Safa
(Emerita); M. Schmink; S. Simpson; P. R. Schmidt; A. Spring; A. M.
Stearman; G. Weiss;t E. S. Wing. Associate Professors: S. H. Boinski;
S. A. Brandt; T. Ho;* C. Chapman; A. Falsetti; W. J. Kennedy;t L. S.
Lieberman; I. P. McClaurin; G. F. Murray. Assistant Professors: K.
Sassaman; J. Stansbury. Associate Research Scientist: D. McMillan.

These members of the faculty of Florida State University (') and
Florida Atlantic University (t) are also members of the Graduate
Faculty of the University of Florida and participate in the doctoral
degree program in the University of Florida Department of Anthro-
pology.
The Department of Anthropology offers graduate work leading
to the Master of Arts (thesis or nonthesis option) and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees. Graduate training is offered in applied anthro-
pology, social and cultural anthropology, archeology, anthropological
linguistics, and physical/biological anthropology.
There is a general option and an interdisciplinary one. The gen-
eral option allows students to concentrate at the M.A. level on the
integration of the four subfields of anthropology and to specialize
at the Ph.D. level. The interdisciplinary alternative allows students
to 1) concentrate on one or two subfields of anthropology along with
one or more areas outside of anthropology and 2) begin early spe-
cialization and integration of a subfield of anthropology and an outside
field. More information about these two options is found in the
department publication on graduate programs and policies that may
be obtained by writing directly to the Department.
The Department of Anthropology generally requires a minimum
score of 1100 on the Graduate Record Examination and a 3.2 overall
grade point average based on a 4.0 system.
Candidates for the M.A. are required to take ANT 6038 and ANT
6917. No more than six hours ofANT 6971 will be counted toward
the minimum requirements for the M.A. with thesis. Knowledge of
a foreign language may be required by the student's supervisory com-


mittee. Other requirements for the program are listed in this cata-
log under Requirements for Master's Degrees.
Students enrolled in the M.A. program who wish to continue their
studies for a Ph.D. must apply to the Department for certification.
Minimum requirements will normally include 1) a minimum grade
point average of 3.5 in all graduate anthropology courses and a mini-
mum of 3.2 in other courses, 2) a grade of pass on the comprehen-
sive M.A. examination, and 3) a thesis, report, or paper judged to
be of excellent quality by the student's supervisory committee. In most
cases, candidates for the Ph.D. must achieve competency in a lan-
guage other than English. Entering students who already have earned
a master's degree may apply for direct admission to the doctoral
program.
The deadline for receiving completed applications for admission
into the graduate program is January 5 (for fall semester admission
only). The Department strongly encourages early applications.
ANG 5110-Archeological Theory (3) Prereq: one course in archeol-
ogy; and/or anthropology or permission of the instructor. Survey of the
theoretical and methodological tenets of anthropological archeology;
critical review of archeological theories, past and present; relation of
archeology to anthropology. Not open to students who have taken ANT
4110.
ANG 5126-Zooarcheology (3) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Human
use of animal resources, with emphasis on prehistoric hunting and fishing
practices. Origins of animal domestication.
ANG 5158-Florida Archeology (3) Survey of 12,000 years of human
occupation of Florida, including early hunters and foragers, regional
cultural developments, external relationships with the Southeast and
Caribbean regions, peoples of historic period, and effects of European
conquest. Not open to students who have taken ANT 3157.
ANG 5164-The Inca and Their Ancestors (3) Evolution of the Inca
empire traced archeologically through earlier Andean states and societies
to the beginning of native civilization. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 3164.
ANG 5172-Historical Archeology (3) Prereq: ANT3141 or consent
of instructor. Methods and theoretical foundations of historical arche-
ology as it relates to the disciplines of anthropology, history, historic
preservation, and conservation. Introduction to pertinent aspects of
material culture during the historic period.
ANG 5194-Principles of Archeology (3) Prereq: 1 course in anthro-
pology. Methods of archeological inquiry and interpretation, which in-
clude site identification and evaluation, dating techniques, environmental
reconstructions, subsistence, technology, social and exchange systems,
biological remains, and archeological ethics. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 4185.
ANG 5255-Rural Peoples in the Modern World (3) Historical back-
ground and comparative contemporary study of peasant and other ru-
ral societies. Unique characteristics, institutions, and problems of ru-
ral life stressing agriculture and rural-urban relationships in cross-cul-
tural perspective. Not open to students who have taken ANT 4255.
ANG 5266-Economic Anthropology (3) Anthropological perspec-
tives on economic philosophies and their behavioral bases. Studies of
production, distribution, and consumption; money, savings, credit,
peasant markets; and development in cross-cultural context from per-
spectives of cultural ecology, Marxism, formalism, and substantivism.
Not open to students who have taken ANT 4266.
ANG 5303-Women and Development (3) Influence of development
on women in rural and urban areas. Women's participation in the new
opportunities of modernization.
ANG 5310-The North American Indian (3) The peopling of North
America. The culture areas of North America. Unique characteristics,
institutions, and problems. Not open to students who have taken ANT
4312.





ANTHROPOLOGY /83


ANG 5323-Peoples of Mexico and Central America (3) The settle-
ment and early cultures of the area with an emphasis on the rise of the
major culture centers. The impact of European civilization on surviv-
ing Indians. Not open to students who have taken ANT 4326.
ANG 5327-Maya and Aztec Civilizations (3) Civilizations in
Mesoamerica from the beginnings of agriculture to the time of the coming
of Europeans. Maya and Aztec civilizations as well as the Olmec, Zapotec,
and Teotihuacan cultures. Not open to students who have taken ANT 3325.
ANG 5330-The Tribal Peoples of Lowland South America (3) Survey
of marginal and tropical forest hunters and gatherers and horticulturalists
of the Amazon Basin, Central Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, and other areas
of South America. Social organization, subsistence activities, ecological
adaptations, and other aspects of tribal life. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 4338.
ANG 5331-Peoples of the Andes (3) The area-cotradition. The Spanish
Conquest and shaping and persistence of colonial culture. Twentieth-
century communities-their social land tenure, religious, and value sys-
tems. Modernization, cultural pluralism, and problems of integration.
Not open to students who have taken ANT 4337.
ANG 5336-The Peoples of Brazil (3) Ethnology of Brazil. Histori-
cal, geographic, and socioeconomic materials and representative mono-
graphs from the various regions of Brazil as well as the contribution of
the Indian, Portuguese, and African to modern Brazilian culture. Not
open to students who have taken ANT 4336.
ANG 5340-Anthropology of the Caribbean (3) Transformation of
area through slavery, colonialism, and independence movements. Con-
temporary political, economic, familial, folk-religious, and folk-healing
systems. Migration strategies and future options. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 4346.
ANG 5352-Peoples of Africa (3) Survey of the culture, history, and
ethnographic background of the peoples of Africa. A basis for appreciation
of current problems of acculturation, nationalism, and cultural survival
and change among African peoples. Not open to students who have taken
ANT 4352.
ANG 5354-The Anthropology of Modern Africa (3) Continuity and
change in contemporary African societies, with special reference to cultural
and ethnic factors in modern nations. Not open to students who taken
ANT 4354.
ANG 5395-Visual Anthropology (3) Prereq: basic knowledge ofpho-
tography or permission ofinstructor. Photography and film as tools and
products of social science. Ways of describing, analyzing, and present-
ing behavior and cultural ideas through visual means, student projects,
and laboratory work with visual anthropology. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 3390.
ANG 5426-Kinship and Social Organization (3) Prereq: ANT2402
or 2410. Property concepts, forms, and complexes. Tribal patterns of
government and social control. Not open to students who have taken
ANT 4426.
ANG 5464-Culture and Aging (3) Prereq: two offollowing: ANT2410,
SYG 2000, or introductory psychology course. Cross-cultural perspectives
of adult development and aging in traditional and industrial society.
Comparative assessment of culturally mediated, life-cycle transforma-
tions into old age and health related and human service policy issues.
Not open to students who have taken ANT 4464.
ANG 5467-Culture and Nutrition (3) Prereq: HUN3221. The theory,
methodology, and substantive material of nutritional anthropology.
Emphasis on cross-cultural bio-behavioral patterns.
ANG 5485-Research Design in Anthropology (3) Examination of
empirical and logical basis of anthropological inquiry; analysis of theory
construction, research design, problems of data collection, processing,
and evaluation.
ANG 5486-Computing for Anthropologists (3) Prereq: ANG 5485
or consent ofinstructor. Practical introduction to computer. Collecting,


organizing, processing, and interpreting numerical data on microcom-
puter. Data sets used correspond to participants' subfields.
ANG 5525-Human Osteology and Osteometry (3) Prereq:ANT3514
and consent of instructor. Human skeletal identification for the physi-
cal anthropologist and archeologist. Techniques for estimating age at
death, race, and sex from human skeletal remains. Measurement of human
skeleton for comparative purposes. Not open to students who have taken
ANT 4525.
ANG 5546-Seminar: Human Biology and Behavior (3) Prereq: consent
of instructor. Social behavior among animals from the ethological-bio-
logical viewpoint; the evolution of animal societies; the relevance of the
ethological approach for the study of human development.
ANG 5620-Language and Culture (3) Principles and problems of
anthropological linguistics. The cross-cultural and comparative study
of language. Primarily concerned with the study of non-Indo-European
linguistic problems.
ANG 5700-Applied Anthropology (3) Survey of history, theory and
practice of applying cultural anthropology to human issues and prob-
lems. Applications to international development, peace studies, health,
education, agriculture, ethnic minority and human rights issues. Case
review, including aspects of planning, consultancy work, evaluation
research, and ethics.
ANG 5701-Seminar on Applied Anthropology (3) Prereq: ANG 5700
or instructor's permission. Consideration of planned socio-cultural and
technological change and development in the United States and abroad;
special and cultural problems in the transferral of technologies; commu-
nity development and aid programs. Comparative program evaluation.
ANG 5702-Anthropology and Development (3) An examination of
theories and development and their relevance to the Third World, par-
ticularly Africa or Latin America. After this microanalysis, microlevel
development will be examined with special reference to rural areas.
ANG 5824L-Field Sessions in Archeology (6) Prereq: 6 hours of
anthropology or permission ofinstructor. Excavation of archeological sites,
recording data, laboratory handling and analysis of specimens, and study
of theoretical principles which underlie field methods and artifact analysis.
Not open to students who have taken ANT 4124 or equivalent.
ANG 6034-Seminar in Anthropological History and Theory (3) Theo-
retical principles and background of anthropology and its subfields.
ANG 6091-Research Strategies in Anthropology (3) Prereq:permission
ofinstructor. Survey of techniques for preparing research proposals and
strategies for securing extramural funding for thesis. Review of scien-
tific epistemology, hypothesis specification, and ethics. Proposal and
curriculum vitae preparation.
ANG 6115-Problems in Caribbean Prehistory (3) Theories and
methods for study of prehistoric human societies. Case studies drawn
primarily from Caribbean islands.
ANG 6128-Lithic Technology (3) Flintworking techniques and uses
of stone implements for two million years. Emphasis on stoneworking
technology in prehistoric Florida.
ANG 6186-Seminar in Archeology (3; max: 10) Selected topic.
ANG 6273-Legal Anthropology (3) Prereq: graduate standing. Inter-
relationships between aspects of traditional and modern legal systems
and sociocultural, economic, and political forces that impinge upon them.
Methods of analysis, legal reasoning crossculturally, pre-industrial and
modern sociolegal systems.
ANG 6274-Principles of Political Anthropology (3) Problems of
identifying political behavior. Natural leadership in tribal societies.
Acephalous societies and republican structures. Kingship and early des-
potic states. Theories of bureaucracy. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4274.
ANG 6286-Seminar in Contemporary Theory (3; max: 10) Areas
treated are North America, Central America, South America, Africa,
Oceania.





84 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ANG 6351-Peoples and Culture in Southern Africa (3) Prehistoric
times through first contacts by explorers to settlers; the contact situa-
tion between European, Khoisan, and Bantu-speaking; empirical data
dealing with present political, economic, social, and religious conditions.
ANG 6478-Evolution of Culture (3) Prereq: ANT3141. Theories
of culture growth and evolution from cultural beginnings to dawn of
history. Major inventions of man and their significance.
ANG 6511-Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3; max: 10) Selected
topic.
ANG 6547-Human Adaptation (3) Prereq:ANT2511 or permission
ofinstructor. An examination of adaptive processes(cultural, physiological,
genetic) in past and contemporary populations.
ANG 6552-Primate Behavior (3) Prereq: one course in either physi-
calanthropology or biology. Taxonomy, distribution, and ecology of pri-
mates. Range of primate behavior for each major taxonomic group ex-
plored.
ANG 6589-Behavioral Decisions Among Human and Nonhuman
Primates (3) Survey and synthesis of literature of human and animal
behavioral ecology to address theoretical problems in social and behav-
ioral decision-making. Strategies for data collections and analysis.
ANG 6653-Primate Cognition (3) Evolution of cognition in primate
lineages. Behavioral, social, and phylogenetic influences on cognitive
processes. Theories of learning and imitation and their impact on analysis
of ecological and social decisions.
ANG 6737-Medical Anthropology (3) Prereq: consent ofinstructor.
Theory of anthropology as applied to nursing, medicine, hospital or-
ganization, and the therapeutic environment. Instrument design and
techniques of material collection.
ANG 6801-Ethnographic Field Methods (3) Methods of collecting
ethnographic data. Entry into the field; role and image conflict. Participant
observation, interviewing, content analysis, photography and documents,
data retrieval, analysis of data.
ANG 6823-Laboratory Training in Archeology (3) Prereq: an intro-
ductory level archeology course. Processing of data recovered in field ex-
cavations; cleaning, identification, cataloging, classification, drawing,
analysis, responsibilities of data reporting. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 4123 or equivalent.
ANG 6905-Individual Work (1-3; max: 10) Guided readings on
research in anthropology based on library, laboratory, or field work.
ANG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANG 6915-Research Projects in Social, Cultural, and Applied An-
thropology (1-3; max: 10) Prereq: consent of instructor. For students
undertaking directed research in supplement to regular course work.
ANG 6917-Professions of Anthropology (3) Prereq: Requiredofall
graduate students. Organizations of the anthropological profession in
teaching and research. Relationship between subfields and related dis-
ciplines; the anthropological experience; ethics.
ANG 6930-Special Topics in Anthropology (1-3; max: 9) Prereq:
consent of instructor.
ANG 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANG 6945-Internship in Anthropology (1-8; max: 8) Prereq: per-
mission of graduate coordinator. Required of all students registered in
programs of applied anthropology. Students are expected to complete
4-8 hours.
ANG 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ANG 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ANG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


ARCHITECTURE
College of Design, Construction, and Planning

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Interim Director: G. D. Ridgdill. Graduate Coordinators: G. D. Ridgdill;
L. G. Shaw. Professors: C. B. Constant; A. J. Dasta; R. W. Drummond;
M. T. Foster, H. W. Kemp; R. S. McCarter; G. D. Ridgdill; W. Schueller,
L. G. Shaw; G. W. Siebein; K. Tanzer; K. S. Thorne; B. F. Voichysonk;
T. R. White; I. H. Winarsky. Associate Professors: D. Bitz; F. Cappellari;
N. M. Clark; M. G. Gundersen; O. W. Hill; A. Hofer; S. Luoni; R. M.
MacLeod; A. Malo; R. W. Pohlman; P. E. Prugh; W. L. Tilson. Assis-
tant Professors: M. Gooden; J. Maze; M. Rabens.

Master of Architecture-The School of Architecture offers gradu-
ate work leading to the first professional degree, Master of Archi-
tecture. During graduate studies, each student has the opportunity
to focus on one or more areas, including design, history and theory,
urban design, preservation, structures, and technology. The student's
overall college experience, both undergraduate and graduate pro-
grams, is intended to be a complete unit of professional education
leading to practice in architecture or related fields. Students entering
the program at the University of Florida will matriculate in one of
the following tracks:
Baccalaureate in Architecture Base-For those students who have
a four-year baccalaureate degree from an accredited architectural
program and have completed 6 to 8 architecture studios, two years
in residence (52 credits) are normally required for completion of the
Master of Architecture degree; notification of program length is part
of the letter of acceptance and is determined by portfolio and tran-
script review. ARC 6241, ARC 6355, and ARC 6356 are required
of all graduate students in this track and are prerequisites for the
required thesis or project. Course sequences in history and theory,
technology, structures, and practice must also be completed.
Baccalaureate in Related Degree Base-For those students who have
a baccalaureate degree with an architecture or related major (inte-
rior design, landscape architecture) and who have completed 4 or 6
architecture or design studies, three years of residence (83 credits,
approximately) are normally required for completion of the Master
of Architecture degree; notification of program length is part of the
letter of acceptance and is determined by portfolio and transcript
review. ARC 4073, ARC 4074, ARC 6241, ARC 6355, and ARC
6356 are required of all graduate students in this track and are pre-
requisites for the required thesis or project. (Undergraduate courses-
3000 and 4000 level in the major do not count toward the minimum
requirements for the graduate degree.) Course sequences in history
and theory, materials and methods, technology, structures, and prac-
tice must be completed.
Baccalaureate in Nonrelated Degree Base-For those students who
have a baccalaureate degree in a nonrelated academic area and have
completed less than 4 design studies courses, four years of residence
(112 credits, approximately) are normally required for completion
of the Master of Architecture degree; notification of program length
is part of the letter of acceptance and is determined by portfolio and
transcript review. (Summer introductory courses-such as design
exploration offered by the Architecture School-are strongly recom-
mended.) ARC 4071, ARC 4072, ARC 4073, ARC 4074, ARC 6241,
ARC 6355, and ARC 6356 are required of all graduate students in
this track and are prerequisites for the required thesis or project.
(Undergraduate courses-3000 and 4000 level-in the major do not
count toward the minimum requirements for the graduate degree.)
Course sequences in history and theory, materials and methods,
technology, structures, and practice must be completed.





ARCHITECTURE / 85


Accredited Five-Year Professional Base-For those students hold-
ing a baccalaureate degree in architecture from an accredited five-
year professional degree program, a one-year degree program is avail-
able. In these cases, a specialized curriculum that compliments the
needs of the applicant is developed. The minimum registration is 30
credits; however, it may increase if transcript reviews reveal further
course work is needed to meet registration and curriculum require-
ments. ARC 6356 is required and is prerequisite for the required thesis
or project.
Most states require that an individual intending to become an ar-
chitect hold an accredited degree. Two types of degrees are accredited
by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) the Bachelor of
Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study, and
(2) the Master ofArchitecture, which requires a minimum of three years
of study after an unrelated bachelor's degree or two years after a re-
lated preprofessional bachelor's degree. These professional degrees are
structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure to
practice as architects.
Student Work-The College may retain student work for the pur-
pose of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Master of Science in Architectural Studies- The M.S.A.S. is a
nonprofessional degree for those students who wish to engage in ad-
vanced investigations in specialized areas of architectural history,
theory, technology, design, preservation, or practice. Students with
a bachelor's degree in any discipline from an accredited university
are eligible to apply to this program; the proposed area of focus should
be precisely defined in the application. This is a three-to-four-semester
program (32 hours minimum) that includes a thesis. (No more than
six hours ofARC 6971 may be counted in the minimum credit hours
for the degree.) Interdisciplinary study is encouraged.
The School sponsors special curricula in architecture to enhance
the academic program. Preservation Institute: Caribbean, Preservation
Institute: Nantucket, and Vicenza Institute ofArchitecture (Italy) accept
students, not only from the University of Florida, but from aca-
demic circles throughout the United States and the world for year-
round study. All students in graduate architecture programs at the
University of Florida are offered the opportunity to apply for one
or more of these programs.
Applications-All applications for fall semester graduate admis-
sion, including official transcripts, GRE scores, and TOEFL scores,
if necessary, must be received by the Office of the Registrar by February
15. In addition to satisfying University requirements for admission,
applicants are required to submit to the Graduate Program Assistant,
School of Architecture, 231 ARCH, Box 115702, the following: a
portfolio of their creative work; a scholarly statement of intent and
objectives; and three letters of recommendation. This material must
be received by February 15 to be considered for admission in the
following fall semester. (Portfolio must be accompanied by self-ad-
dressed, stamped envelope.) Students may apply after the February
15 deadline but will only be considered if spaces become available;
scholarships are generally no longer available after this deadline.
(Updates of portfolios are accepted after February 15; however,
applications will not be considered until they are complete.)
The School reserves the right to retain student work for purposes
of record, exhibition, or instruction. Field trips are required of all
students; students should plan to have adequate funds available. It
may be necessary to assess studio fees to defray costs of base maps
and other generally used materials.
Doctor of Philosophy- The College offers a program leading to
the Doctor of Philosophy degree in design, construction, and planning.
Areas of specialization within this program include architecture, build-
ing construction, interior design, landscape architecture, and urban
and regional planning. For information, write to the Director, College


of Design, Construction, and Planning Doctoral Program, 331
ARCH, Box 115701.
The following courses are taught on a periodic schedule or by de-
mand only.
ARC 5791-Topics in Architectural History (3)
ARC 5800-Survey of Architectural Preservation, Restoration, and
Reconstruction (3)
ARC 5810-Techniques ofArchitectural Documentation (3) Docu-
mentation, interpretation, and maintenance issues relating to historic
structures.
ARC 6176-Advanced Computer-Aided Design (3; max: 6) Focus on
available hardware and software and their current and potential usefulness
to the profession. Investigation of future directions in hardware and
software development.
ARC 6241-Advanced Studio I (1-9; max: 9) Architecture as func-
tion of human action program and use) and potentials inherent in con-
struction (structure and material); relationship between ritual and built
form-culminating in a highly resolved spatial order.
ARC 6242-Research Methods (2) Prereq: Required ofall graduate
students as preparation for thesis.
ARC 6280-Advanced Topics in Architectural Practice (3; max: 6)
Contemporary practice models analyzed.
ARC 6281-Professional Practice (3) Principles and processes of of-
fice practice management, investment and financing, project phases, build-
ing cost estimation, contracts.
ARC 6355-Advanced Studio II (6) Relation between the tectonic and
the experience of place; emphasis on the joint, the detail, the tactile reading
of architecture-culminating in a highly resolved tectonic order.
ARC 6356-Advanced Studio III (6) Development of design meth-
ods for synthesizing specialized aspects of architectural practice such as
human behavior and space programming, environmental control and
energy use, structures and materials of construction, project manage-
ment, preservation and reuse of historic structures, theoretical and philo-
sophical areas of inquiry.
ARC 6357-Advanced Topics in Architectural Design (3; max: 6)
Focus on expanding familiar concepts in conception and production of
architecture. Examination of potential for program to generate archi-
tectonic form, bringing multidisciplinary approach to historical mani-
festations.
ARC 6391-Architecture, Energy, and Ecology (3) Integration of
energetic and environmental influences on architectural design.
ARC 6393-Advanced Architectural Connections (3) An analysis of
architectural connections and details relative to selected space, form, and
structural systems.
ARC 6399-Advanced Topics in Urban Design (3; max: 6) Impact
of cultural, sociological, economic, and technological transformations
of both historic urban form and newly developed urban areas, special
emphasis on impact of transportation, particularly the automobile.
ARC 6576-Architectural Structures (3) Analysis and behavior of
reinforced concrete, prestress, masonry, foundations, steel, and suspension
systems.
ARC 6611-Advanced Topics in Architectural Technology (3; max:
6) Focus on structures, materials, construction systems, or environmental
technology. Examination of determination of architectural form by
available technologies and inventions throughout history.
ARC 6633-Thermal Systems (3) Thermal issues in architecture in-
cluding thermal comfort, passive and active thermal control systems, and
energy efficiency.
ARC 6642-Architectural Acoustics Design Laboratory (3) Coreq: ARC
6643. Theory and practice of architectural acoustics in the solution to
design problems.
ARC 6643-Architectural Acoustics (3) Theory, practice, and appli-
cation of acoustics in architecture.





86 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ARC 6685-Life Safety, Sanitation, and Plumbing Systems (3) De-
sign problems investigating the theory, practice, and applications of fire
safety, movement, sanitation, and plumbing systems in architecture.
ARC 6711-Architecture of the Ancient World (3) Key built works
from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Meso-American civilizations. Em-
phasis on understanding both cultural context for these works and con-
struction technologies utilized in their making. Examination of their use
as ruins and their contemporary meanings.
ARC 6750-Architectural History: America (3) Development of
American architecture and the determinants affecting its function, form,
and expression.
ARC 6771-Architectural History: Literature and Criticism (3) In-
dividual research with concentration on writing and architectural criticism.
ARC 6793-Architectural History: Regional (3) Group and individual
studies of architecture unique to specific geographic regions.
ARC 6805-Architectural Conservation (3) A multidisciplinary study,
supervised by an architectural professor and another professor from an
appropriate second discipline, in the science of preserving historic ar-
chitecture, utilizing individual projects.
ARC 6821-Preservation Problems and Processes (3) Preservation in
the larger context. Establishing historic districts; procedures and archi-
tectural guidelines for their protection.
ARC 6822-Preservation Programming and Design (3) Architectural
design focusing on compatibility within the fabric of historic districts
and settings.
ARC 6851-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Methods I (3)
Materials, elements, tools, and personnel of traditional building.
ARC 6852-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Methods II
(3) Prereq: ARC 6851. Preservation of twentieth-century structures.
ARC 6911-Architectural Research (1-6; max: 9) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6912-Architectural Research II (1-6; max: 9) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6913-Architectural Research III (1-6; max: 9) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6932-Advanced Topics in Architectural Methods (3; max: 6)
Exploration of interconnection between architectural design and research
methodology.
ARC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ARC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ARC 6979-Master's Research Project (1-10) H.
ARD 7790-Doctoral Core I (3) Philosophy, theory, and history of
inquiry into the processes of design, urban development, and building
systems.
ARD 7792-Doctoral Core II (3) Prereq: ARG 7790. Urban, environ-
mental, and legal systems in the context of urban development.
ARD 7794-Doctoral Seminar (1; max: 4) Coreq: ARD 7911. For
entering Ph.D. students. Successfully negotiating graduate school and
writing dissertation.
ARD 7911-Advanced Design, Construction, and Planning Research
I (3) Prereq: STA 6167; coreq:ARD 7794. For enteringPh.D. students.
Survey and critical analysis of research in disciplines of design, con-
struction, and planning with emphasis on theory and methods.
ARD 7912-Advanced Design, Construction, and Planning Research
II (3) Prereq: ARD 7911. Conduct of advanced research in architec-
ture, design, landscape, planning, and construction.
ARD 7940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: not open to
students who have taken 6940. Independent student teaching under
supervision of faculty member. S/U.
ARD 7949-Professional Internship (1-5; max: 5) Professional fac-
ulty-supervised practicum.
ARD 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's


degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ARD 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
URP 6272-Advanced Planning Information Systems (3) Prereq:
URP 6271. Theoretical and practical knowledge about the structure,
use, and architecture of georeference data base systems. Discussion
of spatial relationships which exist between network and area-related
systems. Development and maintenance of geographic information
systems as related to urban and regional planning.



ART AND ART HISTORY
College of Fine Arts

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Interim Director M.J. Isaacson. Graduate Program Coordinator: R. Poynor.
Graduate Program Advisers: C. Roland (Art Education); M. Hyde (Art
History); L. Hernandez (Art Studio); G. Willumson (Museum Studies).
Professors: B. A. Barletta; J. L. Cutler; R. C. Heipp; M. J. Isaacson; J. A.
O'Connor; R. E. Poynor; B.J. Revelle; J. F. Scott; R. C. Skelley; N. S. Smith;
J. L. Ward; R. H. Westin. Associate Professors: L.J. Arbuckle; R. Mueller;
C. A. Roberge; D. C. Roland; B. Slawson; D. J. Stanley. Assistant Profes-
sors: A. Alberro; M. Davenport; G. C. Ferrandi; M. L Hyde; R. Janowich;
V. Mendoza; W. D. Pappenheimer; M. Rogal; M. Vanderheijden; S. Vega.

Master of Fine Arts Degree-The School offers the M.F.A. de-
gree in art with concentrations in ceramics, creative photography,
drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, electronic
intermedia, and multi-media. Enrollment is competitive and limited.
Candidates for admission should have adequate undergraduate training
in art. Deficiencies may be corrected before beginning graduate study.
Applicants must submit a portfolio for admission consideration. A
minimum of three years residency is normally required for completion
of the requirements for this degree, which for studio students cul-
minates with an M.F.A. exhibition. The School reserves the right to
retain student work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruc-
tion.
The M.F.A. requires a minimum of 60 credit hours. ART 6897
is required for all M.F.A. majors. Twenty-four hours must be in an
area of specialization. Twelve hours of studio electives outside the
area of specialization, six hours of art history electives; three hours
of aesthetics, theory, or criticism; six hours of electives; and six hours
of individual project or thesis research comprise the normal course
requirements. Although the M.F.A. is a thesis degree, students usually
produce a creative project in lieu of thesis. Students should see the
Graduate Program Adviser for the School's requirements for the
creative project. (If the student elects to write a thesis, he/she must
discuss the reasons with the Graduate Program Adviser and the su-
pervisory committee during the second year and make appropriate
modifications. ARH 5815 is required for all students who select the
written thesis.)
Master of Arts Degree in Art Education-The School offers the
M.A. in art education. In addition to meeting requirements of the
Graduate School for admission, prospective students should (1) hold
a degree in art education or have teaching experience in a k-12 school
art program or alternative art education setting; (2) send up to ten
35mm slides of original works of art and a research paper, article,
or other sample of academic writing; and (3) send up to ten slides
or photographs of student art work and a sample of curriculum
materials if available; and (4) submit three current letters of recom-
mendation. These application materials should be sent to Graduate





ART AND ART HISTORY / 87


Secretary, School of Art and Art History, Box 115801, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-5801.
The M.A. in art education requires a minimum of 36 credit hours.
ARE 6047 and ARE 6148 are required. The basic plan of study in-
cludes three credits of an approved art education elective; nine credits
in studio courses; three credits in art history; six credits in art his-
tory, studio, art education, or education electives; three credits of ARE
6705; and three credits of ARE 6971 or ARE 6973. To be admit-
ted to candidacy, students must pass a comprehensive examination
at the beginning of the second year. The program culminates in an
oral examination on the thesis or project in lieu of thesis.
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees in Art His-
tory-The School offers graduate programs leading to the M.A. and
Ph.D. degrees. For complete details of the M.A. and Ph.D. degree
requirements, see the art history graduate adviser. Art history stu-
dents may participate in courses offered by the State University
System's programs in London and Florence. Other study abroad
programs may be approved by the graduate program adviser.
For the M.A. degree, the School offers areas of emphasis in An-
cient, Medieval, Renaissance/Baroque, Modern, and Non-Western
art history (including African, Native American, Asian, and Oceanic).
A minimum of 36 credit hours is required: ARH 5815 (3 cred-
its), 27 hours with at least one graduate seminar course in four dif-
ferent areas of emphasis, and ARH 6971 (6 credits). Nine credits may
be taken in related areas with the graduate program adviser's approval.
Students must pass a review at the end of the first year and a com-
prehensive art history examination at the beginning of the second
year for admission to candidacy. Failure to pass the review or the ex-
amination will result in adjustments to the student's program or, if
warranted, dismissal from the program.
Reading proficiency in a foreign language appropriate to the major
area of study must be demonstrated before thesis research is begun.
Language courses are not applicable toward degree credit.
For the Ph.D. degree, the School offers the same areas of emphasis
as for the M.A. degree. Up to 30 credits from the M.A. degree may
apply toward the 90 credit Ph.D. degree.
A program of 60 credit hours beyond the M.A. degree is required.
Core courses will consist of a minimum of 30 hours in art history:
18 hours in a primary area (5000-level or above), 9 hours in secondary
area (5000-level or above), and 3 hours of theory/methodology of
art history (ifARH 5815 or its equivalent has not been taken as part
of the M.A.). An additional 12 hours of outside electives taken in
other schools or departments are required in a disciplines) related
to the primary area of study. Finally, 18 hours of dissertation research
and writing is required.
By the end of the second semester of equivalent full-time study,
students should form their supervisory committee that must include
a minimum of four Graduate Faculty members, one of which must
agree to serve as chair of the committee and will be the primary dis-
sertation adviser. The supervisory committee will also act as the
qualifying examination committee.
Normally students will take the qualifying examination during the
spring term of their third year in residence. The examination is both
written and oral. It will cover the major and minor art history areas
of emphasis as well as the student's preliminary formulation of a dis-
sertation topic and provisional statement of the approaches to that
topic as expressed in the dissertation prospectus.
Upon successful completion of the qualifying examination, the ap-
proval by the supervisory committee of the dissertation prospectus,
and fulfilling all other course and language requirements, the stu-
dent makes formal application for a change of status to Ph.D. can-
didacy. Normally, a student will be expected to present the completed


dissertation and defend it at an oral defense conducted by the su-
pervisory committee by the end of the sixth year in the program.
For Ph.D. students, reading knowledge of two research languages
other than English must be demonstrated by the end of the second
year of course work, or by the end of the first semester in the case
of transfer students. Language courses are not applicable toward degree
credit.
Master of Arts Degree in Museology (Museum Studies)-The
School offers this interdisciplinary program that consists of both aca-
demic and practical work. The curriculum allows students to do gradu-
ate work in a disciplinary emphasis (art history, anthropology, his-
tory, education, or the natural sciences) and at the same time com-
plete a concentrated study in professional museum practices. The MA.
degree in museology requires 48 credit hours including 15 credits
of museum studies courses (seminar, 3 credits; collections I, 3 credits;
collections II, 3 credits; exhibitions, 3 credits; elective, 3 credits); 15
graduate credits in a disciplinary focus, 6 credits of internship; 6 credits
of electives, and 6 credits of individual credit.
Several on-campus sites provide the program with laboratories for
training students in museum work, including the University Galleries,
Harn Museum of Art, Florida Museum of Natural History, and the
"gallery" at Reitz Union.
Students must complete a 6-credit internship of at least 300 hours
at an approved museum. In this experience students are assigned to
specific projects in which they will gain first-hand experience in
museum work. The Harn Museum of Art or the Florida Museum
of Natural History may be able to oversee a few interns, but students
are encouraged to apply for internships at other U.S. institutions or
abroad.
Students must pass a comprehensive examination that includes sec-
tions for the academic disciplinary emphasis and for the museum stud-
ies program. The student's supervisory committee creates the exam
which is administered by the program director. The supervisory
committee determines satisfactory or unsatisfactory performance.
A project in lieu of thesis (or thesis) must be selected, research, and
carried out under the direction of a supervisory committee. Students
register for project-in-lieu-of-thesis credits for two semesters. (If a
thesis is chosen, it must be justified through the director and the su-
pervisory committee.)
Master of Arts Degree in Digital Arts and Sciences-The School
offers the Master of Arts degree in digital arts and sciences (DAS).
Students seeking admission to the two-year, interdisciplinary pro-
gram are expected to have an undergraduate background including:
1) a degree in one of the fine arts or liberal arts; 2) a body of work
that demonstrates accomplishment in the intended area; and 3) a body
of work that can clearly be enhanced with skills to be acquired in the
DAS program. Deficiencies may be corrected before beginning gradu-
ate study. Admission into the program requires the submission of a
portfolio with digital representations of work done by the artist. The
medium for this portfolio is digital, either on a CD or as a web page,
preferably both.
The MA. degree in digital arts and sciences requires 36 credit hours,
including studio and computer courses. A creative project in lieu of
thesis must be selected, researched, and carried out under the direction
of a supervisory committee. Students are advised by the graduate
program adviser on the requirements of the creative project. The
School reserves the right to retain student work for purposes of record,
exhibition, or instruction.
ARE 6xxx-Issues in Art Education (3) Exploration of contemporary
issues in art, general education, and society that affect teaching of art
in public schools.
ARE 6049-History of Teaching Art (3) History of the theory and
practice of teaching art.





88 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ARE 6148-Curriculum in Teaching Art (3) Contemporary theories
for development of art teaching curricula.
ARE 6705-Methods of Research in Art Education (3) Study of
qualitative and quantitative research methods. Review of research lit-
erature.
ARE 6905-Individual Study (1-5; max: 12)
ARE 6933-Special Topics in Art Education (1-3; max: 6)
ARE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ARE 6973-Individual Project (1-10; max: 10) Project in lieu of thesis.
S/U.
ARH 5357-French Art of the Ancien Regime: 1680-1780 (3) Prereq:
ARH2051 or permission ofinstructor. Major artists, artistic movements,
works and issues in art theory, and criticism in Europe from late sev-
enteenth century to 1780s. Emphasis on painting in France and reac-
tion against Rococo.
ARH 5440-Beginnings of Modernism (3) Prereq:ARH2051 orper-
mission of instructor. Visual arts in Europe in second half of nineteenth
century, focusing on emergence of avant-garde and formulation of modern
aesthetic with reference to industrialized, urban culture, especially in Paris.
Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.
ARH 5441-Art in the Age of Revolution (3) Prereq: ARH2051 or
permission of instructor. Late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century
European art, including Neo-Classicism and Romanticism. Works con-
sidered in cultural, political, social, and aesthetic contexts in which created.
Emphasis on politics of style during period of revolution and reaction.
ARH 5655-Indigenous American Art (3; max: 9) Prereq:ARH2518
or permission ofinstructor. Examination of native arts of the Americas,
North, Central, or South, from pre-European times.
ARH 5815-Methods of Research and Bibliography (3)
ARH 5877-Gender, Representation, and the Visual Arts: 1600-1900
(3) Prereq: ARH 2051 or permission of instructor. Historical and theo-
retical issues posed for visual media by attention to issues of gender, with
particular emphasis on women artists.
ARH 5905-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12 including ART 5905C)
ARH 6477-Eighteenth-Century European Art-Seminar (3) Prereq:
ARH2051 orpermission ofinstructor. Intersecting ideologies of gender
and representation in French art.
ARH 6694-Nineteenth-Century Art-Seminar (3) Prereq: ARH2050
or permission ofinstructor.
ARH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ARH 6911--Advanced Study (3-4; max: 16) Prereq: major in art.
ARH 6914-Independent Study in Ancient Art History (3-4; max:
12) Prereq: major in art; permission ofgraduate program adviser and in-
structor. Egyptian, Near Eastern, Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, Roman.
ARH 6915-Independent Study in Medieval Art History (3-4; max:
12) Prereq: major in art; permission ofgraduate program adviser and in-
structor. Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic.
ARH 6916-Independent Study in Renaissance and Baroque Art
History (3-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art; permission ofgraduateprogram
adviser and instructor. Renaissance, High Renaissance, Mannerism,
Baroque, Eighteenth Century art.
ARH 6917-Independent Study in Modern Art History (3-4; max:
12) Prereq: major in art; permission ofgraduate program adviser and in-
structor. Major art movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centu-
ries.
ARH 6918-Independent Study in Non-Western Art History (3-4;
max: 12) Prereq: major in art; permission ofgraduate program adviser and
instructor. African, Latin American, American Indian, Asian, and Oceanic.


ARH 6938-Seminar in Museum Studies (3) Prereq: permission of
instructor. History, purposes, functions of museums in general and art
museums in particular.
ARH 6946-Museum Practicum (3) Prereq: permission of graduate
program adviser and prior arrangements with professors. Work under
museum professionals. Readings and periodic discussions with coordi-
nating professor.
ARH 6948-Gallery Practicum (3) Prereq:permission ofgraduate pro-
gram adviser and prior arrangements with coordinating professor. Work
under supervision of gallery professionals. Readings and periodic dis-
cussions with coordinating professor.
ARH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ART 5905C-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12 includingARH 5905)
ART 5930C-Special Topics (3; max: 15) Rotating topics in studio
art and studio practice.
ART 6691-Digital Art Studio (4; max: 12) Prereq: graduate stand-
ing in art or permission of instructor. Investigation of digital art practices
in one or more of the following areas: bit-mapped and object-oriented
graphics, 3-D modeling, computer animation, hypermedia and
interactivity, and image-processing.
ART 6835C-Research in Methods and Materials of the Artist (3-
4; max: 8)
ART 6836-Arts and Public Policy (3) Investigation and analysis of
philosophic and economic issues of funding, arts advocacy, art law, health
hazards, arts and healing, and shaping of public policy.
ART 6897-Seminar: Practice, Theory, and Criticism of Art (3)
ART 6910C-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ART 6926C-Advanced Study I (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art;
permission ofgraduate program adviser and instructor. Application of basic
principles of studio art in one of the following areas: ceramics, creative
photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design,
and multi-media.
ART 6927C-Advanced Study II (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art;
permission of graduate program adviser and instructor. Investigation of
selected problems in one of the following areas: ceramics, creative pho-
tography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, and
multi-media.
ART 6928C-Advanced Study III (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art;
permission ofgraduate program adviser and instructor. Experimentation
in nontraditional approaches to studio art in one of the following ar-
eas: ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking,
sculpture, graphic design, and multi-media.
ART 6929C-Advanced Study IV (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art;
permission ofgraduateprogram adviser and instructor. Stylistic and technical
analysis of contemporary studio practices in one of the following areas:
ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculp-
ture, graphic design, and multi-media.
ART 6933-Special Topics (1-4; max: 12) Prereq:permission ofgraduate
program adviser and instructor. Readings, discussions, and/or studio
exploration of various art issues.
ART 6935-Seminar in Arts Administration (3) Administration and
management of arts organizations and facilities, the functions of lead-
ership, and the history of the arts services movement.
ART 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ART 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ART 6973C-Individual Project (1-10; max: 10) Creative project in
lieu of written thesis. S/U.





ASTRONOMY / 89


ASTRONOMY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: S. F. Dermott. Graduate Coordinator: E. A. Lada. Graduate
Research Professor: A. E. S. Green. Distinguished Service Professor: A.
G. Smith (Emeritus). Professors: J. R. Buchler; T. D. Carr (Emeritus);
K-Y. Chen (Emeritus); S. F. Dermott; R. J. Elston; S. T. Gottesman;
B. A. Gustafson;J. H. Hunter;J. R. Ipser; H. E. Kandrup; C. M. Telesco;
R. E. Wilson. Associate Professors: H. L. Cohen; F. Hamann III; E. A.
Lada; R. J. Leacock; G. R. Lebo; J. P. Oliver; H. C. Smith. Associate
Scientists: F. Giovane; F. J. Reyes; Y.-L. Xu. Assistant Professor: R. K.
Pina.

The Department of Astronomy at the University of Florida,
Gainesville, offers graduate programs leading to the M.S. or Ph.D.
degrees in astronomy. The Astronomy Department currently con-
sists of 19 faculty, 12 research staff, and 28 graduate students, making
it one of the largest departments in the country. Research is an in-
tegral part of the graduate program. Students have opportunities to
work with faculty and staff on a broad range of astronomical prob-
lems using in-house, national and international, ground- and space-
based facilities. Support for graduate studies is available through
fellowships, research assistantships and teaching assistantships.
Instrumentation Programs-Infrared Astrophysics Laboratory
(UFIRAL) is a state-of-the art laboratory for the design and construc-
tion of advanced near-infrared and mid-infrared instrumentation to
be used on major telescopes around the world. Such instruments will
provide support for a broad range of scientific research programs
within the Department. The UFIRAL recently commissioned OSCIR,
its first instrument, a mid-infrared camera and spectrometer system.
Solar System-The planetary science research groups are primarily
concerned with the study of small bodies in the Solar System As-
teroids, comets, meteoroids, and interplanetary dust particles.
Cometary programs include the study of the composition of the comae
and the nuclei of comets. Researchers are also active in studying and
modeling the production and orbital evolution of interplanetary dust
particles in the zodiacal cloud. The properties of cosmic dust and
planetary aerosols are studied in the Laboratory for Astrophysics using
its Microwave Analog-to-Light Scattering facility to simulate accu-
rately the scattering of electromagnetic radiation. The laboratory also
develops hardware for NASA and international space agencies to
measure the optical properties of dust particles in diverse environ-
ments. The planetary radio astronomy group operates the Radio
Observatory (UFRO), one of the two largest observatories in the world
dedicated to the study of decametric radio emission from the giant
planets.
Stellar Astronomy-The stellar astronomy group mainly concen-
trates on the synthesis of observable quantities for interacting bina-
ries and the simultaneous analysis of X-ray pulse delays, light curves,
and radial velocity curves for X-ray binaries. The widely used Wil-
son-Devinney code is maintained and disseminated by the group.
Astrometry programs include improving the accuracy and reliabil-
ity of the statistical analysis of astrometric measurements and evalu-
ating the problems of parameter estimation. The Department main-
tains the International Card Catalog of Photometric Binaries which
consists of references and bibliographic notes for over 3000 eclips-
ing binary stars.
Star Formation-Theoretical studies emphasize the influences of
thermodynamics, velocity fields, and interface instabilities upon star
formation. Observational studies focus on investigating the properties
of giant molecular clouds and the evolution of newly born stars in


isolated and cluster environments in order to understand the origin
of the initial stellar mass distributions and to search for and study
circumstellar, protoplanetary disks.
Structure and Dynamics of Galaxies-Observational and theo-
retical programs include a study of the structure, dynamics, and
modeling of galaxies. The properties of these galaxies are investigated
using N-body and hydrodynamical codes. Ideas and techniques from
nonlinear dynamics are applied to problems in galactic dynamics and
cosmology, including the study of the transient behavior of chaotic
orbits and the processes of nonviolent relaxation. In addition the
properties of dark matter halos are being investigated.
Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology-Observational pro-
grams investigate the formation and evolution of distant galaxies, by
emphasizing stellar populations of high redshift galaxies to determine
how and when the stars that make up normal field galaxies formed.
Stellar populations of nearby galaxies are also used to investigate the
fossil record of the formation of galaxies. Optical and infrared in-
vestigations of the variable properties ofstarburst galaxies, AGNs and
QSOs have been made since 1968. Theoretical investigations focus
on applications of general relativity and particle physics to under-
stand conditions in the very early universe.
Observational Opportunities-Research programs use national
and international ground-and space-based astronomical facilities such
as Arecibo, BIMA, Cassini, CTIO, COBE, Galileo, HST, IRAM,
IRAS, IRTF, ISO, KPNO, La Palma, NRAO, OVRO, SIRTF, and
Ulysses. Students can also use the University of Florida's Rosemary
Hill Observatory which houses 76 cm and 46 cm reflectors.
Computing Facilities-The Astronomy Department maintains
a network of high performance Sun Sparc and DEC work stations,
along with several Pentium PCs. In addition, supercomputer access
is provided to all faculty and graduate students. The local network
is maintained by a full-time systems manager.
AST 5113-Solar System Astrophysics I (3) Prereq: two years ofcol-
legephysics. Survey of the solar system, including its origin and laws of
planetary motion. The earth as a planet: geophysics, aeronomy, geomag-
netism, and the radiation belts. Solar physics and the influence of the
sun on the earth.
AST 5114-Solar System Astrophysics II (3) Prereq: AST5113. The
moon and planets; exploration by ground-based and spacecraft techniques.
The lesser bodies of the solar system, including satellites, asteroids,
meteoroids, comets; the interplanetary medium.
AST 6215-Stellar Astrophysics II: Interior (3) Theoretical approach
to the study of stellar structure.
AST 6309-Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy (3) Prereq: AST
3019. Observations and interpretations of the kinematics, dynamics, and
structure of the Milky Way Galaxy, extragalactic objects, and galaxy
clusters.
AST 6336-Interstellar Matter (3) Prereq: AST 5210. Complex in-
terplay of physical processes that determine the structure of the inter-
stellar medium in our galaxy; emphasis is placed upon a comparison of
observational data with theoretical prediction.
AST 6416-Cosmology (3) Introduction to the observational back-
ground and to the theory of cosmology.
AST 6506-Celestial Mechanics (3) Prereq: AST3019. Dynamics of
solar system, emphasis on role of dissipative forces and resonant gravi-
tational forces in determining structure of system.
AST 6600-Computational Astronomy (3) Prereq: MAS 4107. De-
signed to familiarize the student with the statistical tools of astonomical
data reduction and the empirical establishment of the positional and
kinematical parameters of the bodies in the universe, and the physical
and geometric significance of these parameters. The laboratory consists
of the numerical-and theoretical-solution of relevant problems.





90 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


AST 6725C--Observational Techniques (3) Prereq: graduate student
in astronomy. Overview of techniques associated with observational as-
tronomy.
AST 6905-Individual Work (1-3; max: 6) Supervised study or re-
search in areas not covered by other courses.
AST 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AST 6925-Departmental Colloquium (1) Coreq: AST 6935, 6936
Intended for first-year graduate students. Presentation of topics by visit-
ing and local researchers. S/U.
AST 6935-Frontiers in Astronomy (1; max: 6) Coreq:AST6925, 6936
Recent developments in theoretical and observational astronomy and
astrophysics. S/U.
AST 6936-Journal Club (1) Prereq:AST6925, 6935. Intended for first-
year graduate students. Discussion of journal articles. S/U.
AST 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AST 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AST 7939-Special Topics (2-4; max: 12) Assigned reading, programs,
seminar, or lecture series in a new field of advanced astronomy.
AST 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
AST 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR
BIOLOGY

College of Medicine

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: J. B. Flanegan. Graduate Coordinator: C. M. Allen. IDP Advanced
Concentration Director: M.S. Kilberg. Distinguished Professor: B. M. Dunn.
Professors: C. M. Allen, Jr.; B. D. Cain; P. W. Chun;J. B. Flanegan; S.C.
Frost; M. S. Kilberg; P. J. Laipis; T. W. O'Brien; D. L. Purich; S. M.
Schuster; T. P. Yang. Scientist N. D. Denslow. Associate Professors: R.
J. Cohen; T. H. Mareci; P. M. McGuire. Associate Scientists: R. D. Allison;
M.J. Koroly. Assistant Professors: M. Agbandje-McKenna; L. B. Bloom;
J. Bungert; A. S. Edison; R. McKenna.

The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology faulty men-
tor Ph.D. students in the College of Medicine interdisciplinary pro-
gram (IDP) in medical sciences. Students who are interested in pur-
suing a doctoral degree can view specific features of the biochemistry
and molecular biology concentration at http://
www.med.ufl.edu.biochem and http://idp.med.ufl.edu/. Admission
information is found on the IDP site.
Department faculty also mentor Ph.D. students in other college
programs and participate actively in the research and teaching func-
tions of various centers such as the Center for Mammalian Genet-
ics and the Center for Structural Biology. The Department offers a
wide variety of courses for graduate students studying in the life
sciences.
The research expertise of the faculty spans the areas from cell bi-
ology, metabolism, and molecular biology to physical biochemistry/
structural biology. Current research interests include viral protease
inhibitors, viral RNA replication, bioenergetics and proton translo-
cation, X-chromosome structure and function, cytoskeletal assem-
bly and dynamics, enzyme mechanism and control, chromatin struc-
ture, gene expression and regulation, mitochondrial biogenesis and
evolution, genetics of inherited disease, nutrient membrane trans-


porters, protein site-directed mutagenesis, ribosome structure and
function, signal transduction,, structural biology of macromolecules,
protein-nucleic acid interactions, transgenic animal models, and virus
crystal structure.
Prospective graduate students should have adequate training in
chemistry and biology. Minor deficiencies may be made up imme-
diately after entering graduate school. Previous undergraduate ex-
perience in a research laboratory is highly recommended. Doctoral
students are required to take a core IDP course in the fall of their
first year and beginning in the spring semester students take advanced
classes in areas of interest. Specific advanced level courses may be
recommended by the student's supervisory chair and committee.
The following courses are open to all graduate students and ad-
vanced undergraduates. Additional courses are listed in the Advanced
Concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology section un-
der Medical Sciences.
BCH 5026-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for Pharmacy Stu-
dents (4) Prereq: CHM2211, 3217, or equivalents or consent ofinstruc-
tor. Introduction to physical biochemistry, intermediary metabolism,
and molecular biology. Surveys of structure, functional properties, syn-
thesis and degradation of amino acid, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and
nucleic acids. Clinical biochemistry topics of interest to pharmacy stu-
dents.
BCH 5413-Mammalian Molecular Biology and Genetics (3) Prereq:
BCH3025, 4014, CHM3218, 4207, MCB 4303, or PCB 3063 or consent
of instructor. Biochemical and genetic approaches to understanding
vertebrate and particularly mammalian molecular biology, moving from
basic processes of replication, transcription, and protein synthesis to signal
transduction, cell cycle, cancer, genomics, and developmental genetics.
BCH 6156C-Research Methods in Biochemistry (1-4; max: 8) Coreq:
BCH 6415, 6740. Only by special arrangement. Biochemical research in
which the student refines research techniques in physical biochemistry,
intermediary metabolism, molecular biology, and cell biology under
supervision of faculty member.
BCH 6206-Advanced Metabolism (3) Prereq: BCH4024, CHM4207,
or consent ofinstructor. One ofthree core biochemistry courses. Reactions
of intermediary metabolism with emphasis on their integration, mecha-
nisms, and control. Extensive examples from current literature.
BCH 6207-Advanced Metabolism: Role of Membranes in Signal
Transduction and Metabolic Control (I) Prereq: BCH3025, 4024,
CHM3218, 4207, GMS 6001, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals
of membrane biochemistry. Discussions of membrane structure, nutrient
and ion transport, protein targeting, and signal transduction. Experi-
mental methods and techniques used to gather and analyze data related
to membrane biochemistry and its regulation.
BCH 6208-Advanced Metabolism: Regulation of Key Reactions in
Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism (1) Prereq: BCH3025, 4024, CHM
3218, 4207, GMS 6001, or consent ofinstructor. Key reactions in meta-
bolic pathways of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism with special atten-
tion to exploration of experimental basis for current understanding of these
processes. Understanding of interactions between major metabolic pathways
and control of pathways under different physiological conditions.
BCH 6209-Advanced Metabolism: Regulation of Key Reactions in
Amino Acid and Nucleotide Metabolism (1) Prereq: BCH3025, 4024,
CHM3218, 4207, GMS 6001, or consent ofinstructor. Special attention
to understanding interactions between major metabolic pathways and
control of these pathways under different physiological conditions. Struc-
tural basis of enzyme function and regulation.
BCH 6296-Advanced Topics in Metabolic Control (1; max: 6) Coreq:
BCH 6206 or consent of instructor; see course description under Medical
Sciences-Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Thermodynamic, allos-
teric, hormonal, and genetic control of metabolic reactions.





BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING / 91


BCH 6415-Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology (3) Prereq: BCH
4024, CHM 4207, MCB 4303, or consent ofinstructor. PCB 3063 or a
similar course in genetics recommended. One ofthree core biochemistry courses.
Molecular biology of pro- and eukaryotic organisms, emphasis on un-
derstanding experimental approaches which led to recent developments.
Chromosome structure and organization, advances in recombinant DNA
technology, DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthe-
sis, and selected aspects of molecular regulation of gene expression.
BCH 6740-Physical Biochemistry/Structural Biology (3) Prereq: BCH
4024, CHM 4207, or consent of instructor. Course in physical chemistry
recommended. One ofthree core biochemistry courses. Physical chemistry
of biological molecules and techniques to study their properties. Ap-
proaches to structure determination.
BCH 6741C-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy in
Living Systems (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: BCH 6740 or equivalent or con-
sent ofinstructor. MR imaging methods used to study structure of cells,
tissues, and whole animals. MR spectroscopy methods for monitoring
biochemistry in living animals Sample preparation, operation of in-
strumentation, and data analysis.
BCH 6743-Biochemical Energetics (1) Prereq: undergraduate physical
chemistry and working knowledge ofcalculus and statistics. Molecular and
structural interpretation of energy transformation in biological systems
including protein-protein interaction, protein self-assembly, and pro-
tein-nucleic acid interaction. S/U.
BCH 6744C-Molecular Structure Determination by X-ray Crystal-
lography (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: BCH 6740 or equivalent or consent ofin-
structor. Detailed theoretical and practical instruction on technique ofx-
ray crystallography utilized for three-dimensional structure determination
of macromolecules in studies aimed at structure-function elucidation.
BCH 6745C-Molecular Structure and Dynamics of NMR Spectros-
copy (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: BCH 6740 or equivalent or consent ofinstructor.
Theoretical and practical introduction to macromolecular NMR spec-
troscopy. Basics of multidimensional NMR for structure and dynam-
ics measurements. Hands-on training in modern NMR.
BCH 6746-Structural Biology: Macromolecular Structure Determi-
nation (1; max: 3) Prereq: BCH3025, 4024, CHM 3218, 4207, GMS
6001 or consent of instructor. Experimental approaches to biological
machromolecular structure determination. Emphasis on current under-
standing or protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid structure motifs.
BCH 6747-Structural Biology/Advanced Physical Biochemistry:
Spectroscopy and Hydrodynamics (1) Prereq: BCH3025, 4024, CHM
3218, 4207, GMS 6001, or consent ofinstructor. Application of spectro-
scopic techniques (circular dichroism, fluorescence, nuclear magnetic
resonance) to determine the structure of biological macromolecules.
Hydrodynamic approaches including light scattering, molecular diffusion,
viscosity, and ultracentrifugation.
BCH 6749C-Numerical Methods in Structural Biology (1) Prereq:
BCH 6740 or equivalent or constant ofinstructor. Introduction to math-
ematical and computational methods needed to understand current
structural models, biophysical processes, data acquisition methods, and
analysis of data acquired with current techniques.
BCH 6876-Recent Advances in Membrane Biology (1) Prereq: gen-
eral biochemistry or consent of instructor. Literature presented by students
and faculty, discussed in depth. Emphasis on current developments, data,
interpretation, and critical analysis. S/U.
BCH 6877-Recent Advances in Structural Biology (1; max: 8) Prereq:
general biochemistry or consent ofinstructor. Literature on structural bi-
ology presented by students and faculty, discussed in depth. Current
developments, data interpretation, and critical analysis. S/U.
BCH 6878-Recent Advances in Cytoskeletal Processes (1; max: 8)
Prereq: general biochemistry or consent ofinstructor. Literature on cytoskeletal
processes presented by students and faculty, discussed in depth. Current
developments, data interpretation, and critical analysis. S/U.


BCH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
BCH 6936-Biochemistry Seminar (1; max: 20) Prereq: Required of
graduate students in biochemistry; open to other by special arrangement.
Research reports and discussions of current research literature given by
graduate students, departmental faculty, and invited speakers.
BCH 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
BCH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
BCH 7410-Advanced Gene Regulation (1; max: 3) Prereq: GMS 6001
or consent of instructor. Literature-based assessment of most recent ad-
vances in factors governing eukaryotic gene regulation.
BCH 7515-Structural Biology/Advanced Physical Biochemistry:
Kinetics and Thermodynamics (1) Prereq: BCH 4024, CHM3218,
4207, GMS 6001, or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of chemical
kinetics and thermodynamic analysis of equilibria. Emphasis on appli-
cation of this knowledge to understanding basic enzyme kinetics, pulse-
chase kinetics, protein polymerization, DNA dynamics, protein-nucleic
acid interactions, and cooperative ligand binding.
BCH 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
BCH 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
GMS 6195-Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression Journal
Colloquy (1; max: 12) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Critical presenta-
tions and discussions of recent original articles in literature. S/U.



BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Program Director: C. D. Batich. Graduate Coordinator: A. B. Brennan.
Professors: C. D. Batich; W. E. Bolch; A. B. Brennan; E. P. Goldberg;
J.J. Mecholsky; R.J. Melker, P. M. Pardalos; W. M. Phillips;J. C. Principe;
S. Rajasekaran; C. J. Sackellares; A. A. Seireg; W. G. Tiederman, Jr.;
R. Tran-Son-Tay; B. C. Vemuri; E. K. Walsh. Associate Professors: R.
B. Dickinson; D. R. Gilland;J. G. Harris; D. Hintenlang; T. H. Mareci.
Assistant Professors: B. J. Fregly; L. B. Gower; A. J. Rapoff; K. Reisinger;
J. H. Van Oostrom.

The Biomedical Engineering (BME) program is interdisciplinary,
focusing on three principal areas: biomechanics, biomedical imag-
ing and signal processing, and tissue engineering. Partnering with
engineering in the BME program are several clinical departments in
the College of Medicine.
The mission of the BME program is to educate students with strong
engineering and science backgrounds for master's and/or Ph.D. degrees
so that they can provide solutions to engineering problems in the fields
of medicine, biology, and related fields. The BME program collabo-
rates with departments in the College of Engineering (COE) and
College of Medicine (COM). The program currently focuses on three
principal areas: biomechanics, biomedical imaging and signal pro-
cessing, and tissue engineering. COE participating departments
include Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics, and Engineering Science;
Chemical Engineering; Computer and Information Science and
Engineering; Electrical and Computer Engineering; Materials Sci-
ence and Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; and Nuclear and
Radiological Engineering. The participating departments within
COM are Anesthesiology, Cardiology, Pathology, Radiology, and
Surgery. The COE administers the program with the assistance of
an executive committee consisting of the Deans of the Colleges of





92 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Engineering and Medicine and the Graduate School who provide
program guidance and oversight.
Biomedical engineering students are admitted to the Graduate
School through the BME program academic committee. Each
student's research adviser must be a member of the BME Graduate
Faculty. The Ph.D. supervisory committee must consist of five
members, including at least three BME Graduate Faculty members
whose research interests are within the selected area of specialization.
Supervisory committees normally include one faculty member from
the COM or from another health-related profession outside the COE.
Students are expected to select an area of study by the end of their
first semester.
M.S. students take a total of 30 credit hours in the thesis option
and 32 credit hours in the nonthesis option, which includes 11
(nonthesis) or 9 (thesis) credits of BME courses, 12 credits of BME
courses from their area of specialization, and 9 biomedical engineering
elective credits, that can include up to 6 research credits. Ph.D. stu-
dents are required to fulfill the M.S. course work requirements plus
an additional 18 BME elective credits for a total of 90 hours, which
may include up to 50 research credits. The core courses required of
all BME students include Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
and Physiology I and II, Clinical Shadowing, and Seminar. The
program has major ongoing research in areas such as tissue engineering,
medical imaging, orthopedics, anesthesiology, neuroscience, trans-
plantation, and cardiology. These programs provide strong support
for the academic dimensions. A web page, that is maintained at http:/
/www.bme.ufl.edu, contains additional information on admissions
requirements, faculty and research projects.
Joint Program-Biomedical Engineering also offers a combined
bachelor's/master's degree program in collaboration with the Depart-
ments of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics, and Engineering Sci-
ence and Materials Science and Engineering. This program allows
qualified students to earn both a bachelor's degree and a master's
degree with a savings of one year.
Biomedical Engineering Certificate-The Biomedical Engineering
program offers a BME certificate. Please contact the program office
for additional information.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

BME 5001-Biomedical Engineering and Physiology I (3) Physiol-
ogy of cells, bones, and circulator system from a biomaterials, biome-
chanics, cellular, and tissue engineering perspective. Intellectual prop-
erty and technology transfer included.
BME 5002-Biomedical Engineering and Physiology II (3) Physiology
of human body, imaging techniques and subsequent processing. Vari-
ous imaging modalities discussed along with appropriate processing
methods to reveal details of physiology and diagnosis.
BME 5085-Patents, Product Development, and Technology Transfer
(2) For engineers and scientists. Product discovery and development;
patents and trade secrets; copyright and trademark law; international
intellectual property considerations; regulatory issues; business planning
and market research; and licensing, marketing, negotiation, and tech-
nology transfer.
BME 5937-Special Topics (1-4; max: 6)
BME 6010-Clinical Shadowing for Engineers (2; max: 6) Students
observe clinical faculty and work with engineering faculty to examine
current clinical practice and restraints with goal to propose jointly possible
improvements.
BME 6330-Cell and Tissue Engineering (3) Prereq: GMS 6421, BME
5001, or permission ofinstructor. Application of engineering principles,
combined with molecular cell biology, to develop fundamental under-
standing of property-function relationships in cells and tissues. Exploi-


station of this understanding to manipulate cell and tissue properties
rationally to alter, restore, maintain, or improve cell and tissue functions
as well as to design bioartificial tissue substitutes.
BME 6400-Theory and Instrumentation for Medical Image Acqui-
sition (3) Physics of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation interactions
with biological systems; radiation detection systems utilized in medi-
cal image acquisition; radiation sources for image generation; features
of image quality; applications of these concepts to project radiography,
fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, computer tomography, magnetic reso-
nance imaging, and ultrasound.
BME 6905-Individual Work in Biomedical Engineering (1-4; max: 8)
BME 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
BME 6936-Biomedical Engineering Seminar (1; max: 4)
BME 6938-Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (1-4; max: 6)
BME 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
BME 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
BME 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with master's degree
in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for a doc-
toral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to can-
didacy. S/U.
BME 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.

BIOMECHANICS

EGM 5111L-Experimental Stress Analysis (3) Prereq: EGM3520.
Introduction to techniques of experimental stress analysis in static sys-
tems. Lecture and laboratory include applications of electrical resistance
strain gauges, photoelasticity, brittle coatings, moire fringe analysis, and
X-ray stress analysis.
EGM 5430-Intermediate Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM3400 and3311.
Dynamics of a particle, orbital mechanics, mechanics in non-inertial
frames, dynamics of a system of particles, rigid body dynamics in plane
motion, moments and products of inertia, conservation laws, Lagrange's
equations of motion.
EGM 5533-Applied Elasticity and Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3)
Prereq: EGM3520. Bars, beams, thin-walled structures, and simple continue
in the elastic and inelastic range. Virtual work approaches, elastic energy
principles, plastic limit theorems, creep deformation procedures, intro-
duction to instability and fracture mechanics. Design applications.
EGM 5584-Biomechnics of Soft Tissue (3) Prereq: EGN3353Cand
EGM 3520. Introduction to solid and fluid mechanics of biological
systems. Rheological behavior of materials subjected to static and dy-
namic loading. Mechanics of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal sys-
tems. Mathematical models and analytical techniques used in biosciences.
EGM 6321-Principles of Engineering Analysis I (3) Prereq: EGM4313
or MAP 4305. Solution of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equa-
tions. Methods of Frobenius, classification of singularities. Integral rep-
resentation of solutions. Treatment of the Bessel, Hermite, Legendre,
hypergeometric, and Mathieu equations. Asymptotic methods including
the WBK and saddle point techniques. Treatment of nonlinear autono-
mous equations. Phase plane trajectories and limit cycles. Thomas-Fermi,
Emden, and van der Pol equations.
EGM 6322-Principles of Engineering Analysis II (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 orMAP 4341. Partial differential equations of first and second order.
Hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic equations including the wave, dif-
fusion, and Laplace equations. Integral and similiarity transforms. Bound-
ary value problems of the Dirichlet and Neumann type. Green's func-
tions, conformal mapping techniques, and spherical harmonics. Poison,
Helmholtz, and Schroedinger equations.
EGM 6570-Principles of Fracture Mechanics (3) Prereq: EGM6611.
Introduction to the mechanics of fracture of brittle and ductile mate-
rials. Linear elastic fracture mechanics; elastic-plastic fracture; fracture





BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING / 93


testing; numerical methods; composite materials; creep and fatigue frac-
ture.
EGM 6595-Bone Mechanics (3) Biology, composition, and mechani-
cal properties of cortical bone tissue, cancellous bone tissue, and carti-
lage. Bone modeled as anisotropic elastic material, as bioviscoelastic
material and as composite material. Adaptation to stress and remodel-
ing; articular cartilage.
EGM 6611-Continuum Mechanics (3) Prereq: EGM3520. Tensors
of stress and deformation. Balance and conservation laws, thermody-
namic considerations. Examples of linear constitutive relations. Field
equations and boundary conditions of fluid flow.
EGM 6812-Fluid Mechanics I (3) Prereq: EGN3353C. Flow kine-
matics. Fundamental laws and equations in integral and differential forms.
Potential flows. Introduction to laminar flows in simple geometries,
laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows. External flows. One-dimen-
sional compressible flows.
EGM 6813-Fluid Mechanics II (3) Prereq: EGM6812. Mathematical
and physical structures of Navier-Stokes equation. Exact solutions of
Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Low Reynolds number flows.
Incompressible and compressible laminar boundary layer flows. Free shear
flows. Energy equation and heat transfer. Unsteady flows. Instability.
Turbulence.
EGM 6855-Bio-Fluid Mechanics and Bio-Heat Transfer (3) Prereq:
undergraduate fluid mechanics. Biothermal fluid sciences. Emphasis on
physiological processes occurring in human blood circulation and under-
lying physical mechanisms from engineering perspective.
EMA 6580-Science of Biomaterials I (3) Prereq: undergraduate chem-
istry. Introduction to variables that control compatibility and performance
of biomaterials, including physical and chemical properties, corrosion,
fatigue, and interfacial histochemical changes.
EML 5152-Intermediate Heat Transfer (3) Analytical solution of
conduction, convection, and radiation problems; exact and approximate
solution techniques. Mass transfer in multicomponent fluids.
EML 5504-Mechanical Design I (3) Prereq: EML 4500. Problem for-
mulation for design, design criteria, and structuring of appropriate meth-
odologies for developing and comparing problem solutions. Applications
covering a broad spectrum of mechanical systems.
EML 5591-Biometrics (3) Prereq: EGM2511, EMA 3010, EEL 3003
or3111, EML 3023. Human/machine interface examined. Basic human
anatomy introduced. Physical capabilities and limitations explored in
context of practical design problems. Injury prevention, both acute and
cumulative investigated.
EML 5598-Orthopedic Biomechanics (3) Prereq: mechanics ofma-
terials. Mechanical properties of human body's hard and soft tissues.
Mechanical and biological considerations for repair and replacement of
soft and hard tissues and joints. Fracture fixation, orthopedic implants
for hip and knee, orthotic and prosthetic devices.
EML 6597-Mechanics of Gait (3) Prereq: EML 5595. Concepts,
nomenclature, and control mechanics of normal and pathological bi-
pedal gait.
EML 6716-Advanced Fluid Dynamics (3) Prereq: EML 4702.
Extends the previous fluid flow courses to include a wider range of sub-
ject material and provide a background for convection heat transfer
courses.

BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND SIGNAL PROCESSING

CAP 5416-Computer Vision (3) Prereq: MAC2312, CGN3421 or
C-language. Introduction to image formation and analysis. Monocular
imaging system projections, camera model calibration, and binocular
imaging. Low-level vision techniques, segmentation and representation
techniques, and high-level vision.


CAP 5515-Computational Molecular Biology (3) Algorithms related
to molecular biology. Sequence comparisons, pattern matching, pattern
extraction, graph techniques in phylogeny construction, secondary struc-
ture prediction, multiple sequence alignment, contig search, DNA com-
puting, computational learning theory, and genetic algorithms.
EEL 5701-Foundations of Digital Signal Processing (3) Analysis and
design of digital filters for discrete signal processing; spectral analysis;
fast Fourier transform.
EEL 6502-Adaptive Signal Processing (3) Prereq: EEL 5701, 5544.
Theory of adaptation with stationary signals; performance measures. LMS,
RLS algorithms. Implementation issues and applications.
EEL 6562-Image Processing and Computer Vision (3) Pictorial data
representation; feature encoding; spatial filtering; image enhancement;
image segmentation; cluster seeking; two-dimensional z-transforms; scene
analysis; picture description language; object recognition; pictorial da-
tabase; interactive graphics; picture understanding machine.
EEL 6814-Neural Networks for Signal Processing (3) Prereq: EEL
6502. Optimal filters in vector spaces. Linear machines and discrimi-
nant functions. Gradient descent learning in additive neural model.
Performance measures of multilayer perceptions and Hopfield. Dynamic
neural networks and issues of short term memory; unsupervised learn-
ing; feature extraction, data reduction; potential functions; syntactic
pattern description; recognition grammars; machine intelligence.
EEL 6825-Pattern Recognition and Intelligent Systems (3) Deci-
sion functions; optimum decision criteria; training algorithms; unsu-
pervised learning; feature extraction, data reduction; potential functions;
syntactic pattern description; recognition grammars; machine intelligence.
ENU 5615-Nuclear Radiation Detection and Instrumentation (3)
Interaction of radiation with matter, radiation detector systems, pulse
shaping, amplification, amplitude and time-analyzing circuitry; counting
and measuring devices, and control systems for nuclear reactors.
ENU 5615L-Nuclear Radiation Detection and Instrumentation Lab
(1) Laboratory associated with ENU 5615.
ENU 5626-Radiation Biology (3) Prereq: one year each ofcollege bi-
ology, chemistry, and physics; permission ofinstructor. Effects of radiation
on biological molecules, cells, and man including cancer and mutagenesis;
use of radiation in treatment of disease.
ENU 5658-Image Analysis with Medical Physics Applications (3)
Description and processing of images obtained using X-ray/neutron fields.
Filtering, enhancement, reconstruction of CT and coded aperature
images. Digital and optical methods.
ENU 6051-Radiation Interaction Basics and Applications I (3)
Interaction of X-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, and charged particles with
matter; radioactive decay, nuclear moments, and nuclear transitions.
Application to basic problems in nuclear engineering sciences.
ENU 6052-Radiation Transport Basics and Applications (3) Par-
ticle distribution functions. Elementary transport and statistical descrip-
tion of particulate matter. Development of transport relations and their
solutions. Applications to basic problems in nuclear engineering sciences.
ENU 6627-Therapeutic Radiological Physics (3) Prereq: ENU5615,
EEL 6051, 6053. Introduction to radiation therapy physics: teletherapy,
brachytherapy, interstitial therapy. Production of photons and electrons
for therapeutic use. Radiation measurement and dosimetry clinical ap-
plications. Radiation protection and quality assurance.
ENU 6657-Diagnostic Radiological Physics (3) Prereq: ENU5615,
6051, 6053. X- and gamma-ray production and spectra.
Radiopharmaceuticals. Medical imaging concepts and hardware. Clinical
overview of diagnostic x-ray and nuclear medicine. Application of ra-
diation protection principles.





94 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


TISSUE ENGINEERING

ECH 6126-Thermodynamics of Reaction and Phase Equilibria (3)
Methods of treating chemical and phase equilibria in multi-component
systems through application of thermodynamics and molecular theory.
ECH 6726-Interfacial Phenomena I (2) Air-liquid and liquid-liq-
uid interfaces; surface-active molecules, adsorption at interfaces, foams,
micro- and macro-emulsions, retardation of evaporation and damping
of waves by films, surface chemistry of biological systems.
ECH 6727-Interfacial Phenomena II (2) Prereq: CHM 2046 and
2046L. Solid-gas, solid-liquid, solid-solid interfaces. Adsorption of gases
and surface-active molecules on metal surfaces, contact angle and spread-
ing of liquids, wetting and dewetting, lubrication, biolubrication, flo-
tation, adhesion, biological applications of surfaces.
EMA 6001-Properties of Materials-A Survey (3) Prereq: bachelor's
degree in physics, chemistry or engineering. Review of physical properties
of materials such as mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, and thermal
properties.
EMA 6105-Fundamentals and Applications of Surface Science (3)
Prereq: CHM 2045, MAP 2302, or consent ofinstructor. Fundamental
and experimental description of phenomena occurring at surface of solids,
including structure, composition, atomic and molecular processes, and
electronic properties. Experimental approaches and data used to sup-
port theoretical models.
EMA 6165-Polymer Physical Science (3) Prereq: EMA 3066. Solid
state properties of amorphous and semi-crystalline polymers.
EMA 6166-Polymer Composites (3) Physical and mechanical prop-
erties of polymers and polymer composites as related to preparation and
microstructure.
EMA 6316-Materials Thermodynamics (3) Prereq: EMA 4314.
Thermodynamics of materials systems, surfaces in solids, irreversible
processes.
EMA 6461-Polymer Characterization (3) Prereq: EMA 3066. Use of
broad variety ofspectroscopic and other scattering phenomena in polymer
research.
EMA 6580-Science of Biomaterials I (3) Prereq: undergraduate chem-
istry. Introduction to variables that control compatibility and performance
of biomaterials, including physical and chemical properties, corrosion,
fatigue, and interfacial histochemical changes.
EMA 6581C-Polymeric Biomaterials (4) Prereq: undergraduate chem-
istry and EMA 3066 Biomedical implant and device applications of
synthetic and natural polymers. Biocompatiblity and interfacial prop-
erties of polymers in physiological environment, especially concerning
short-term devices (catheters) and long-term implants (intraocular lenses,
vascular and mammary prostheses, etc.).
GMS 6421-Cell Biology (4) Prereq: undergraduate biochemistry or cell
biology or consent of instructor; taught in conjunction with 1st year IDP
core course. Fundamental mechanisms of cell functions, specializations,
and interactions that account for the organization and activities of ba-
sic tissues.



BOTANY
Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and
Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: G. E. Bowes. Graduate Coordinator: A. C. Harmon. Gradu-
ate Research Professor: D. Dilcher. Professors: H. C. Aldrich; G. E. Bowes;
J. S. Davis; D. A. Jones; W. S. Judd;J. T. Mullins; F. E. Putz; W. L. Stern;
N. H. Williams. Associate Professors: D. R. Gordon; A. C. Harmon;


T. W. Lucansky; S. R. Manchester; S. S. Mulkey. Assistant Professors:
B. A. Hauser; K. Kitajima.

The Department of Botany offers graduate work leading to the
degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture, Master of Sci-
ence in Teaching, and Doctor of Philosophy.
The Department offers studies in the areas of biochemistry, mo-
lecular biology, physiology, ecology, population genetics, systematics,
and evolution. Specific areas of specialization include anatomy/
morphology with emphasis on tropical ferns, aquatic and woody
plants, and orchids; ecology and environmental studies; ecological,
cellular, and molecular genetics; algology with emphasis on algae of
brine ponds; physiology and biochemistry with emphasis on pho-
tosynthesis and photorespiration, growth and development of an-
giosperms and selected fungi, protein phosphorylation and signal
transduction; systematics with emphasis on molecular evolution and
monographic and floristic studies; paleobotany; chemical ecology;
physiological ecology; tropical botany and ecology.
For admission to graduate studies a student should present accept-
able scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the
GRE General Test. Full graduate standing also requires credits equiva-
lent to those required for undergraduate majors in the Department,
namely 24 credits in botany, a course in genetics with laboratory,
mathematics through differential calculus, one year of college physics,
and chemistry through organic. Those admitted without full equiva-
lents of an undergraduate major will be required to make up the
deficiencies by passing appropriate courses early in their graduate
programs. A reading knowledge of a foreign language and credit for
basic courses in zoology and microbiology are desirable. The program
of graduate study for each student will be determined by a supervi-
sory committee. No more than nine credits of BOT 6905 may be
used to satisfy the credit requirements for a master's degree.
There are, in addition to the facilities of the Department for graduate
work, the following special resources that may be utilized in support
of graduate student training and research: (1) Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Stations, (2) the Marine Sciences Center on the Gulf of Mexico
for studies in estuarine and marine habitats, (3) resources of the Welaka
Conservation Reserve, (4) Center for Tropical Agriculture, which can
support studies in tropical and subtropical areas, (5) Center for Latin
American Studies, (6) Center for Aquatic and Invasive PlantsPlants,
(7) Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research, (8) Fairchild
Tropical Garden for research in the systematics, morphology and
anatomy, and economic botany of tropical plants, (9) Marie Selby
Botanical Gardens, Sarasota and (10) Herbarium of the Florida Mu-
seum of Natural History.
BOT 5115-Paleobotany (3) Prereq: upper-level course in botany or
geology or permission ofinstructor. Comparative study of plants through
geologic time with attention to morphology and evolution of major groups
of land plants based on fossil record. Offered spring semester in odd-
numbered years.
BOT 5225C-Plant Anatomy (4) Prereq: BOT2011C or 3303C or
consent of instructor. Origin, structure, and function of principal cells,
tissues, and vegetative and reproductive organs of seed plants. Offered
fall semester.
BOT 5485C-Mosses and Liverworts (3) Prereq: BOT2011C or
3303C. Morphology of the major groups of bryophytes, with empha-
sis on collection, identification, and ecology of these plants in Florida.
Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
BOT 5505C-Intermediate Plant Physiology (4) Prereq: BOT3503/
3503L, and CHM2200/2200L, or equivalent. Fundamental physical and
chemical processes underlying the water relations, nutrition, metabo-
lism, growth, and reproduction of higher plants. Offered fall semester.





BUILDING CONSTRUCTION / 95


BOT 5625-Plant Geography (2) Prereq: BOT3143C or 5725C.
Geography of the floras and types of vegetation throughout the world,
with emphasis on problems in the distribution of taxa, and the main
factors influencing types of vegetation. Offered fall semester in even-
numbered years.
BOT 5646C-Ecology and Physiology of Aquatic Plants (3) Ecological
and physiological principles in freshwater habitats and plant commu-
nities with laboratory and field studies. Offered spring semester in even-
numbered years.
BOT 5655C-Physiological Plant Ecology (3) Prereq: basicplant
physiology or consent of instructor. Traits affecting success in different
environments. Energy balance, carbon balance, water relations, and
nutrient relations emphasized. Introduction to ecophysiological methods
and instrumentation.
BOT 5685C-Tropical Botany (5) Prereq: elementary biology/botany;
consent of instructor. Study of tropical plants utilizing the diverse habi-
tats of South Florida with emphasis on uses, anatomy and morphology,
physiology and ecology, and systematics of these plants. Field trips and
the Fairchild Tropical Garden supplement laboratory experiences. Offered
summer semester.
BOT 5695-Ecosystems of Florida (3) Prereq: basic ecology and con-
sent ofinstructor. Major ecosystems of Florida in relation to environmental
factors and human effects. Emphasis on field trips (Saturdays and some
overnights). Offered spring semester on demand.
BOT 5725C-Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (4) Prereq: BOT2011C
and3303Cor equivalent. Introduction to systematic principles and tech-
niques used in classification; field and herbarium methods. Survey of
vascular plants, their classification, morphology, and evolutionary re-
lationships. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
BOT 6496C-Fungal Physiology (3) Comparative physiology of
growth, development, metabolism, and reproduction of selected fungi.
Offered on demand.
BOT 6516-Plant Metabolism (3) Prereq: BOT5505C, BCH 4024.
Metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and nitrogen compounds in higher
plants; cell structures as related to metabolism; metabolic control mecha-
nisms. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
BOT 6566-Plant Growth and Development (3) Prereq: BOT5505C.
Fundamental concepts of plant growth and development with emphasis
on the molecular biological approach. Offered spring semester.
BOT 6576-Photophysiology of Plant Growth (3) Effects of light on
the physiology and biochemistry of plants. Photosynthesis and photo-
respiration emphasized. Properties of light sources, photochemistry,
phytochrome action, photomorphogenesis, photoperiodism, and pho-
totropism examined. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
BOT 6716C-Advanced Taxonomy (2) Prereq: BOT5725Cor equiva-
lent. Survey of vascular plant families of limited distribution and/or of
phylogenetic significance not covered in BOT 5725C with discussions
of their classification, morphology, and evolutionary relationships.
Published studies reviewed to demonstrate principles and methods in-
volved in classification. Offered on demand.
BOT 6905-Individual Studies in Botany (1-9; max: 9) Prereq: all
credits in excess of3 must be approved by department chairman or gradu-
ate coordinator. Individual nonthesis, research problem in one of the
following areas of botany: ecology, physiology and biochemistry, cryp-
togamic botany, morphology and anatomy of vascular plants, system-
atics, cytology, genetics, and ultrastructure. Topics selected to meet the
interests and needs of students.
BOT 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
BOT 6927-Advances in Botany (1-3; max: 9) Supervised study in
specific areas.
BOT 6935-Special Topics (1-4; max: 9)
BOT 6936-Graduate Student Seminar (1-2; max: 9) Readings and
oral presentation on general topics in botany. S/U.


BOT 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
BOT 6943-Internship in College Teaching (1-6; max: 6) Required
for Master of Science in Teaching candidates but available for students

needing additional practice and direction in college-level teaching.
BOT 6951-Tropical Biology: An Ecological Approach (8) Intensive
field study of ecological concepts in tropical environments. Eight weeks
in different principal kinds of tropical environments. Offered spring and
summer semesters in Costa Rica as part of the program of the Organi-
zation for Tropical Studies.
BOT 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
BOT 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with master's degree
in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for a doc-
toral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to can-
didacy. S/U.
BOT 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
HOS 6116-Developmental Morphology of Flowering Plants (3)
Prereq: BOT3303C. Developmental morphology of the vegetative and
reproductive organs of flowering plants with particular emphasis on form
and function as revealed by recent experimental techniques. Offered odd-
numbered years in spring.
PCB 5046C-Advanced Ecology (3) Prereq: basic ecology and one course
in statistics; physics, chemistry, andphysiology desirable. Plant ecology and
plant-animal interactions with emphasis on design of field studies and
data analysis. Students conduct a series of one-day research projects in
various ecosystems and present results orally and as short research pa-
pers. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
PCB 5575C-Ecological Genetics (3) Prereq: upper-level course in
genetics, evolution, or population biology. Genetic nature, distribution, and
analysis of variation in natural populations of animals and plants. Role
of modern techniques in resolving problems in genetic structure of
populations. Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PCB 6176-Electron Microscopy of Biological Materials (2) Prereq:
MCB 3020 or equivalent. Use of the electron microscope, including
fixation, embedding, sectioning, freeze-etching, negative staining, and
use of vacuum evaporator. Offered spring semester.
PCB 6176L-Laboratory in Electron Microscopy (2) Coreq: PCB 6176
and consent of instructor. Laboratory training in use of electron micro-
scopes, ultramicrotomes, vacuum evaporators, and freeze-etch machines.
Offered spring semester.
PCB 6356C-Ecosystems of the Tropics (3) Prereq: PCB 3043C.
Natural and man-dominated tropical ecosystems, their structure, function,
and relation to man. Offered spring semester.
PCB 6605C-Principles of Systematic Biology (4) Theory of biological
classification and taxonomic practice. Laboratory experience in taxonomic
procedures and techniques, including computer methods. Offered spring
semester in odd-numbered years.



BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
College of Design, Construction, and Planning

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Director: C. Kibert. Graduate Coordinator: R. Issa. Professors: B. Brown,
Jr.; W. E. Dukes; J. W. Hinze; R. Issa; C. Kibert; P. Oppenheim. As-
sociate Professors: S. Chini; R. Cox; 1. Flood; A. Shanker; M. Smith; L.
Wetherington. Assistant Professors: D. Fukai; L. C. Muszynski; B. Sims.
Lecturer: R. Stroh.

Doctor of Philosophy-The College offers the doctoral program
in design, construction, and planning with one option being an em-
phasis in building construction including sustainable construction,





96 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


information systems, facilities management, construction safety,
affordable housing, productivity, and human resource management.
The program prepares students to assume college-level faculty po-
sitions and industry research positions in construction management
and the building sciences. Some courses may be taken via the inter-
national construction management distance education program. For
more information, write to the Director of Graduate and Distance
Education, Rinker School of Building Construction, 101 FAC, P.O.
Box 115703.
The School offers courses leading to the degrees of Master of Science
in Building Construction (thesis), Master of Building Construction
(nonthesis), and Master of International Construction Management
(nonthesis distance education program for experienced profession-
als). An individual plan of study is prepared for each student to in-
sure that the student's goals are achieved within the broad policy
guidelines of the Rinker School. Specialization may be in such ar-
eas as construction management, facilities, management, sustainable
construction, information systems and construction law.
To be eligible for admission to the M.B.C. or M.S.B.C. programs,
a student must hold a four-year undergraduate degree in building
construction or its equivalent in related fields. "Equivalent in related
fields" should include studies in construction materials and meth-
ods, structures, and management. Students with deficiencies in these
related fields may need longer residence for the master's degree, as
they will be required to take specified basic courses to provide a foun-
dation for advanced courses.
There is no foreign language requirement.
No more than three credits of BCN 6934 or BCN 6971 may be
used to satisfy the credit requirements for a master's degree without
written permission of the Director. Candidates are required to take
BCN 5625 and BCN 5715.
The M.I.C.M. prepares students to assume upper-level manage-
ment responsibilities in a multinational company. To be eligible for
admission to the M.I.C.M. program, a student must have a four-year
undergraduate degree; at least five years of meaningful, supervisory-
level construction management experiences, a cumulative verbal and
quantitative GRE score of 1000 or higher; a grade point average of
3.0 on a 4.0 scale; and employer sponsorship. International students
must have a TOEFL score of 565 or higher.
No more than three credits ofICM 6934 may be used to satisfy the
credit requirements for the M.I.C.M. without written permission of
the Director. All candidates are required to take ICM 6930. In addi-
tion to these six research oriented graduate credit hours, the student
selects one or two areas of emphasis and than takes the rest of the re-
quired 33 credit hours from the remaining courses and special elec-
tives. All candidates are required to pass a comprehensive oral and/or
written examination at the completion of the course work and their
master's research report/project.
The School reserves the right to retain student work for purposes
of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Research Facilities-The Center for Affordable Housing, oper-
ating within the School, researches the problems and possible solu-
tions associated with the development and production of affordable
housing. The Center for Construction and Environment conducts
research on the implementation of sustainability in the creation,
operation, and construction of a built environment. The Center for
Safety and Loss Control also has an active research program.
ARD 7790-Doctoral Core I (3) Philosophy, theory, and history of
inquiry into the processes of design, urban development, and building
systems.
ARD 7792-Doctoral Core II (3) Prereq: ARG 7790. Urban, environ-
mental, and legal systems in the context of urban development.


ARD 7794-Doctoral Seminar (1; max: 4) Coreq: ARD 7911. For
entering Ph.D. students. Successfully negotiating graduate school and
writing dissertation.
ARD 7911-Advanced Design, Construction, and Planning Research
I (3) Prereq: STA 6167; coreq: ARD 7794. For entering Ph.D. students.
Survey and critical analysis of research in disciplines of design, construc-
tion, and planning with emphasis on theory and methods.
ARD 7912-Advanced Design, Construction, and Planning Research
II (3) Prereq: ARD 7911. Conduct of advanced research in architec-
ture, design, landscape, planning, and construction.
ARD 7949-Professional Internship (1-5; max: 5) Professional fac-
ulty-supervised practicum.
ARD 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ARD 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
BCN 5285C-Advanced Construction Layout (3) Prereq: BCN3281,
graduate standing. Principles of building component layout, both hori-
zontally and vertically, using state-of-the-art electronic surveying equip-
ment such as total stations, EDMs, and laser levels.
BCN 5463-Advanced Construction Structures (3) Prereq: BCN3224,
3431, graduate standing. Study of soils, dewatering and the temporary
structures that contractors have to build in order to construct the pri-
mary structure.
BCN 5470-Construction Methods Improvements (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Methods of analyzing and evaluating construction techniques
to improve project time and cost control. Work sampling, productiv-
ity ratings, crew balance studies, time lapse photography, and time
management.
BCN 5584-Natural Hazards in Built Environment (3) Prereq:graduate
standing. Effects of natural disasters on design, planning, and construction
including impacts of flood, fire, radon, hurricane, and earthquakes as
well as environmental sustainability issues. Examination of theories,
techniques, and codes.
BCN 5618C-Comprehensive Estimating (3) Prereq: graduate standing.
Classification of work and quantity survey techniques. Analysis and
determination of costs of construction operations including direct and
overhead costs, cost analysis, and preparation of bid proposals.
BCN 5625-Construction Cost Analysis (3) Prereq: BCN4613C, 4720,
graduate standing. Study of cost engineering and cost distribution and
comparative analysis of actual and estimated cost as used for project
control.
BCN 5705C-Project Management for Construction (3) Prereq: BCN
5618, 3700, non-BCNgraduate. Project organization, site planning, and
implementation.
BCN 5715-Advanced Construction Labor Problems (3) Prereq:
graduate standing. Labor problems in the construction industry and
associated legislation. How to work effectively with unionized labor on
construction projects.
BCN 5722-Advanced Construction Planning and Control (3) Prereq:
BCN 4720, graduate standing. Time-cost relationships for various con-
struction operations.
BCN 5737-Advanced Issues in Construction Safety and Health (3)
Prereq: BCN 4735, graduate standing. Current construction safety and
health issues. Development of specific methodology to provide hazard
reduction on job sites.
BCN 5754C-Site Development (3) Principles and practices of land
development including market analysis, site analysis, project program-
ming, and financial feasibility.
BCN 5776-International Construction Business Management (3)
Prereq: BCN3700, graduate standing. Construction contracting, emphasis





BUILDING CONSTRUCTION / 97


on international economics, marketing, contracts, design, and specifi-
cations.
BCN 5779-Facilities Operation and Maintenance (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Facilities management as a specialized professional career; study
of how a facility, its people, equipment, and operations are served and
maintained.
BCN 5789C-Construction Project Delivery (3) Prereq: BCN5618,
4720, 3700, non-BCN graduate. Designing, developing, estimating,
scheduling, contracting, and administering small construction project,
including extensive site and feasibility analysis.
BCN 5905-Special Studies in Construction (1-5; max: 12) Prereq:
graduate standing. For students requiring supplemental work in the
building construction area.
BCN 5949-Graduate Construction Management Internship (1-3;
max: 6) Prereq: approval ofgraduate coordinator. Two-term employment
in construction management position. S/U.
BCN 5957-Advanced International Studies in Construction (1-4;
max: 6) Prereq: graduate standing or supervising instructor's approval;
admission to approvedstudy abroad program. Issues of local construction
techniques, construction marketing, international construction,
sustainability, global economics, and influence on construction of lo-
cal culture, traditions, architecture, history, and political climate. S/U.
BCN 6036-Research Methods in Construction (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Research proposal development process and statistical, com-
putational, visualization, and presentation tools available to researcher.
BCN 6228-High-Rise Construction (3) Prereq: graduate standing.
Systems and subsystems used in conventional building construction with
emphasis on high-rise.
BCN 6585-Sustainable Construction (3) Prereq: graduate standing.
Sustainability principles applied to planning, design, operation, reno-
vation, and deconstruction of built environment. Emphasis on resource
efficiency, environmental protection, and waste minimization.
BCN 6586-Construction Ecology and Metabolism (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Sustainability principles and concepts related to reducing
environmental impacts of creating, operating, and deconstruction built
environment.
BCN 6621-Bidding Strategy (3) Prereq: BCN3700, 4613C, graduate
standing. Strategy of contracting to maximize profit through overhead
distribution, breakeven analysis, probability and statistical technique,
a realistic risk and uncertainty objective, and bid analysis both in theory
and in practice.
BCN 6641-Construction Value Engineering (3) Prereq: BCN4613C,
graduate standing. Principles and applications of value engineering in
construction industry.
BCN 6748-Construction Law (3) Prereq:graduate standing. Formation
of a company, licensing, bid process, contracts, plans and specifications,
mechanics liens, insurance bonds, and remedies as they relate to the
building constructor and construction manager. Case studies.
BCN 6755-Construction Financial Management (3) Prereq: ACG
2021C, graduate standing. Financial management of construction com-
pany using and analyzing income statements and balance sheets, bud-
geting, cash flow, and cost reporting systems.
BCN 6756-Housing Economics and Policy (3) Prereq: graduate stand-
ing. Concepts, terminology, and issues in affordable housing.
BCN 6771-Construction WorkAcquisition (3) Prereq: BCN5618C,
MAR 3023, and graduate standing. Importance of successful strategy to
remain competitive in industry. Marketing strategy developed for com-
mercial construction company in private sector.
BCN 6777-Construction Management Processes (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Existing and emerging systems for designing, planning, and
construction of projects. Changing roles, relationships, and responsi-
bilities of the parties involved.


BCN 6787-Construction Information Systems (3) Prereq: CGS2531
or equivalent, graduate standing. Potential applications of computer and
information systems in construction industry.
BCN 6905-Directed Independent Study in Construction (1-3; max:
3) Prereq: graduate standing.
BCN 6910-Supervised Research (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: graduate stand-
ing. S/U.
BCN 6933-Advanced Construction Management (1-5; max: 12) Prereq:
graduate standing. Financial and technological changes affecting construction
and the management of construction projects. H.
BCN 6934-Construction Research (1-6; max: 12) Prereq: graduate
standing. Research for master's report option. S/U.
BCN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: graduate stand-
ing. S/U.
BCN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) Prereq: graduate
standing. S/U.
ICM 6420-Commercial Management and Cost Control (3) Prereq:
graduate standing. Budgeting and estimating, and principles of cost analysis
for international projects.
ICM 6440-Construction Value Management (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Classical value management/value engineering principles;
practical applications for designers, contractors, suppliers, and other
construction functions. Students conduct full-scale VM/VE studies of
recent international projects.
ICM 6680-Principles of International Sustainable Construction (3)
Prereq: graduate standing. Techniques for creating good indoor and
outdoor environments, renewable resources, conservation, low environ-
mental impact methods, life cycle assessments.
ICM 6710-Construction Human Resource Management (3) Prereq:
graduate standing. Theories of human behavior and influence and lead-
ership, organization, environment, motivation, and culture.
ICM 6750-Managing Construction Information Technology (3)
Prereq: graduate standing. Applications of computer and information
systems in international construction industry. How information tech-
nology develops and how it dramatically affects structure, process, and
performance of projects.
ICM 6751-International Construction Management (3) Prereq:
graduate standing. Principles of overseas marketing and business devel-
opment. International contract documents and management and per-
formance aspects of international construction projects.
ICM 6752-Construction Finance and Investment (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. Aspects of project finance, from funding sources to financial
engineering as well as managerial economics and accounting relevant to
effect project management.
ICM 6761-Advanced Planning, Scheduling, and Logistics (3) Prereq:
graduate standing. Overall schedule, including overall durations and
phasing and review points, principles of logistics planning, and
practicalities of detailed network scheduling.
ICM 6762-Construction Risk Management (3) Prereq: graduate stand-
ing. Overview of what is meant by risk and uncertainty and influences
in international construction industry.
ICM 6770--Advanced Project Safety Management (3) Prereq: graduate
standing. International, governmental, and construction industry require-
ments of safety and loss control regulations. Project responsibilities.
ICM 6772-International Strategic Management (3) Prereq: gradu-
ate standing. Performance measurements and evaluation processes. Stu-
dents assess international business opportunities, formulate business strat-
egy, and learn how project strategy should be developed to best advan-
tage of firm.
ICM 6905-Directed Independent Study in International Construction
(1-3; max: 3)
ICM 6910-Supervised Research (1-3; max: 3) S/U.





98 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ICM 6930-Construction Communication and Research (3) Prereq:
graduate standing. Research proposal development process and statisti-
cal, computational, visual, and presentational tools available to researcher.
ICM 6934-International Construction Research (1-6; max: 12) S/U.



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-GENERAL
Warrington College of Business Administration

Graduate programs offered by the Warrington College of Busi-
ness Administration are the Doctor of Philosophy degree in business
administration; the Doctor of Philosophy degree in economics; the
Master of Arts degree in economics; the Master of Arts degree in
business administration with a concentration in international busi-
ness, the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees in business
administration both with concentrations in decision and informa-
tion sciences, finance, insurance, management, marketing, and real
estate and urban analysis; the Master of Business Administration
(M.B.A.), and the Master ofAccounting (M.Acc.) degrees. Fields of
concentration and requirements for the M.B.A. are given under
Requirementsfor Master's Degrees in the front section of this catalog.
Admission and degree requirements for the Ph.D., M.A., and M.S.
degrees can be found under the descriptions for the respective de-
partments.
The Ph.D. in business administration requires a principal or major
field in one of the following: accounting, decision and information
sciences, finance, insurance, management, marketing, or real estate
and urban analysis. Specific requirements for the various departments
and specialties within the departments are stated in the department
descriptions in this catalog. (The Ph.D. degree in economics require-
ments are described under Economics in this section of the catalog.)
All candidates for the Ph.D. in business administration must satisfy
the following general requirements:
Breadth Requirement-All applicants for the Ph.D. in business ad-
ministration program are expected to have completed prior business-
related course work at either the advanced undergraduate or gradu-
ate level. Students entering without prior work are required to take a
minimum of three graduate courses in at least two fields other than
their chosen area of concentration. Most often, the appropriate courses
will be found in the M.B.A. first-year core; the particular courses to
be taken by a student will be decided in consultation with the student's
academic adviser. After a student enters the Ph.D. program, the courses
taken to satisfy the breadth requirement must be taken in the College
of Business Administration.
Research Foundations Requirement-All students must complete
a six-course research skills sequence that prepares them for scholarly
research in their chosen area of concentration. Research foundations
are defined as essential methodological tools (e.g., statistics, quan-
titative analysis) and/or substantive content domains (e.g., psychology,
economics) outside the student's major field that are considered
essential to conducting high quality research in the chosen field. The
specific research skills required by each area of concentration can be
found in the field descriptions in this Catalog.
Other Requirements-Include satisfactory completion of graduate
course work in the major field of concentration, as well as one or two
supporting fields designed to add depth to the student's research
training. The areas of depth are selected by the student in consul-
tation with his or her advisory committee, and may be within or
outside the College of Business Administration. Other requirements
for the Ph.D. are given in the General Information section of this
catalog.


GEB 5114-Entrepreneurship and Venture Finance (3) Entrepreneurial
processes. Exploration of boom in world economies. Participation in
entrepreneurial culture.
GEB 5214-Professional Writing in Business (1-3; max: 6) Written
structure of memoranda, executive summaries, mission statements,
marketing and SWOT analyses, product and management structure
descriptions, marketing and business plans. Conventions and psycho-
logical principles governing reader preferences and assumptions.
GEB 5215-Professional Communication in Business (1-3; max: 6)
Prereq: GEB 5213. Balance between descriptive information and appli-
cation of organizational communication theories and techniques for
business and professional speaking.
GEB 5929-Foundations Review (1-3; max: 3) Overview of M.B.A.
core courses to be used in working professional programs. S/U.
GEB 6115-Entrepreneurship (2) Prereq: DesignedforM.B.A. students.
Practical, hands-on understanding of stages of entrepreneurial process.
Focus on decision-making process within start-up company.
GEB 6116-Business Plan Formation (2) Prereq: GEB 6115.Designed
for M.BA. students. Professional development and preparation of company
business plan. Full analysis of plan and outside evaluation and ranking.
GEB 6365-International Business (3) Prereq: Designed for M.B.A.
students. Exploration of major characteristics, motivations, interactions,
and structural realities of international economics via functional areas
of business. Development of multinational framework for effective and
efficient firm operation.
GEB 6366-Fundamentals of International Business (2) Prereq:
DesignedforM.B.A. students. Complexities of company to extend reach
to more than single nation/state. Impact on multinational corporation
of different cultures and languages, multiple legal systems, national and
global capital markets, foreign exchange and political issues.
GEB 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 8) Prereq: consent ofAssoci-
ate Dean or MB.A. Director. Reading and/or research in business ad-
ministration.
GEB 6928-Professional Development Module IV (1; max: 2) Prereq:
Designed for M.B.A. students. Covers personal financial planning. S/U.
GEB 6930-Special Topics (1-3; max: 12) Prereq: consent ofinstruc-
tor. Topics not offered in other courses and of special current signifi-
cance. S/U option.
GEB 6941-Internship (1-3; max: 6) Prereq: Open only to graduate
students in business administration. May not be used to meet credit require-
ments in MB.A. program. Applied course work. Several papers and re-
ports. S/U.
GEB 6957-International Studies in Business (1-4; max: 12) Prereq:
admission to approved study abroad program and permission ofdepartment.
S/U.


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: T. J. Anderson. Graduate Coordinator: R. Narayanan. Charles
A. Stokes Professor: M. E. Orazem. Professors: T. J. Anderson; S. S. Block
(Emeritus); A. L. Fricke; G. B. Hoflund; L. E. Johns, Jr.; A. Ladd; R.
Narayanan; C. W. Park; R. Rajagopalan; F. Ren; D. O. Shah; S. A.
Svoronos. Associate Professors: O. D. Crisalle; R. B. Dickinson; D. W.
Kirmse. Assistant Professors: A. Chauhan; A. Narang; J. F. Weaver.

Graduate work for the Ph.D., M.E., and M.S. degrees in chemical
engineering requires course work in three core areas: (1) the basis of
chemical engineering core consisting of four courses in the mathematical,
the experimental, and the continuum basis of chemical engineering






CHEMISTRY / 99


in addition to a classical thermodynamics course; (2) the chemical
engineering science andsystems core consisting of a selection of courses
in such areas as transport phenomena, electrochemical engineering,
thermodynamics, kinetics, reaction engineering, process control, sepa-
ration processes, and heat and mass transfer; and (3) the research spe-
cialty core consisting of courses designed to build depth in a field of
specialization. Courses may be from other departments or chemical
engineering courses such as energy conversion and fuel cells, corrosion,
polymer science, microelectronics, particle science and technology,
process economics, and bioengineering.
Beyond the Graduate School requirements, admission to gradu-
ate work in chemical engineering depends upon the qualifications
of the student, whose record and recommendations are carefully and
individually studied. During registration week each graduate student
registering for the first time is counseled to develop an initial study
program. The program of all students will involve research experi-
ence through the courses ECH 6905, ECH 6971, or ECH 7980.
ECH 5708-Disinfection, Sterilization, and Preservation (2) Descrip-
tion of problems and need for these treatments; causative agents and their
nature; nature and use of chemical and physical antimicrobial agents;
specific problems and solutions.
ECH 5938-Topics in Colloid Science (3) Prereq: PHY2049 and
2056L, CHM2046and2046L, MAC2312 or equivalent. Colloids and
interfacial phenomena, colloid interaction forces, electrokinetic phenom-
ena, transport phenomena influenced by colloidal forces, and electro-
kinetic phenomena. Examples and applications.
ECH 6126-Thermodynamics of Reaction and Phase Equilibria (3)
Methods of treating chemical and phase equilibria in multi-component
systems through application of thermodynamics and molecular theory.
ECH 6207-Polymer Processing (3) Analysis and characterization of
theological systems.
ECH 6270-Continuum Basis of Chemical Engineering (3) Integrated
introduction to transport processes in continuous media with empha-
sis on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer.
ECH 6272-Molecular Basis of Chemical Engineering (3) Statisti-
cal mechanics and microscopic explanation of macroscopic laws of classical
thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and chemical kinetics. Statis-
tical mechanical theories that connect molecular structure to macroscopic
properties.
ECH 6285-Transport Phenomena (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: ECH 6270.
ECH 6326-Computer Control of Processes (3) Introduction to digital
computers, sampled data systems and Z-transforms, control of multiple
input-multiple output systems, optimal control, state estimation and
filtering, self-tuning regulators.
ECH 6506-Chemical Engineering Kinetics (3) Fundamental aspects
of chemical reactors, including collision theory, transition rate theory,
unimolecular rate theory, homogeneous gas and liquid phase kinetics,
and heterogeneous kinetics.
ECH 6526-Reactor Design and Optimization (3) Fundamentals of
heterogeneous reactor design including the characterization of catalytic
reactions and support, the development of global rate of the intrinsic
reaction affected by chemical and physical deactivation of catalyst,
intraphase and interphase mass and heat transfer, and the design and
optimization of various types of heterogeneous reactors.
ECH 6709-Electrochemical Engineering Fundamentals and Design
(3) Fundamentals ofelectrodics and ionics applied to systems of inter-
est in electrochemical engineering.
ECH 6726-Interfacial Phenomena I (2) Air-liquid and liquid-liq-
uid interfaces; surface-active molecules, adsorption at interfaces, foams,
micro- and macro-emulsions, retardation of evaporation and damping
of waves by films, surface chemistry of biological systems.
ECH 6727-Interfacial Phenomena II (2) Prereq: CHM 2046 and
2046L. Solid-gas, solid-liquid, solid-solid interfaces. Adsorption of gases


and surface-active molecules on metal surfaces, contact angle and spread-
ing of liquids, wetting and dewetting, lubrication, biolubrication, flo-
tation, adhesion, biological applications of surfaces.
ECH 6843-Experimental Basis of Chemical Engineering (3) Statistical
design of experiments and treatment of data including regression analysis,
interpolation, and integration. Introduction to analytical techniques
including electron and photon spectroscopes, chromatography, and mass
spectrometry.
ECH 6847-Mathematical Basis of Chemical Engineering (3) Methods
of linear systems, chemical engineering applications in finite and infi-
nite dimensional spaces, concepts of stability, application to transport
phenomena.
ECH 6905-Individual Work (1-6; max: 12) Individual engineering
projects suitable for a nonthesis Master of Engineering degree.
ECH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ECH 6926-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 10)
ECH 6937-Topics in Chemical Engineering I (1-4; max: 9) Sepa-
rations processes, reactor design, applied molecular and kinetic theory,
thermodynamics, particulate systems. Properties of chemical substances,
transport phenomena, non-Newtonian fluid dynamics, turbulence, ap-
plied mathematics, computer science, biochemical and electrochemical
engineering.
ECH 6939-Topics in Chemical Engineering III (1-4; max: 9)
ECH 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ECH 6969-Research Proposal Preparation (1-2; max: 4) H.
ECH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ECH 7938-Advanced Special Chemical Engineering Topics for
Doctoral Candidates (1-4; max: 8)
ECH 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ECH 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



CHEMISTRY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: D. E. Richardson. Graduate CoordinatorJ. A. Deyrup. Graduate
Research Professors: R. J. Bartlett; J. D. Winefordner. Distinguished
Professor: S. A. Benner; Butler Professor: K. Wagener. Drago Professor:
G. Christou. Kenan Professor: A. R. Katritzky. Professors: M. A. Battiste;
T. Bieber;*J. M. Boncella; W. S. Brey, Jr.; S. O. Colgate; J. A. Deyrup;
W. R. Dolbier, Jr.; J. E. Enholm; J. R. Eyler; R.J. Hanrahan; W. W.
Harrison;J. F. Helling; T. Hudlicky; R. T. Kennedy; A. Lombardo;* C.
R. Martin; L. McElwee-White; D. A. Micha; N. Y. Ohrn; G.J. Palenik;
J. R. Perumareddi;* J. R. Reynolds; D. E. Richardson; K. S. Schanze;
P. A. Snyder;* D. R. Talham; M. T. Vala, Jr.; W. Weltner, Jr.; R. A.
Yost; J. A. Zoltewicz. Scientists: K. Abboud; D. H. Powell. Associate
Professors: A. Angerhofer C. R. Bowers; P. J. Brucat; A. Brajter-Toth;
R. Duran; B. Horenstein;J. L. Krause; N. G. Richards;J. D. Stewart;
W. H. Tan; V. Young. Associate Scholar: K. R. Williams. Associate Sci-
entist I. Ghiviriga. Assistant Professors: V. D. Kleiman; M. J. Scott. As-
sistant Scientist: A. F. Roitberg.

*These members of the faculty of Florida Atlantic University are also
members of the Graduate Faculty of the University of Florida and
participate in the doctoral program in the University of Florida
Department of Chemistry.






100 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


The Department offers the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy
degrees with a major in chemistry and specialization in biochemistry and
analytical, organic, inorganic, or physical chemistry. The nonthesis degree
Master of Science in Teaching is also offered with a major in chemis-
try.
New graduate students should have adequate undergraduate training
in inorganic, analytical, organic, and physical chemistry. Normally this
will include as a minimum a year of general chemistry, one semester
of quantitative analysis, one year of organic chemistry, one year of
physical chemistry, and one semester of advanced inorganic chemis-
try. Additional courses in instrumental analysis, biochemistry, and ad-
vanced physical and organic chemistry are desirable. Deficiencies in
any of these areas may be corrected during the first year of graduate
study. Such deficiencies are determined by a series of placement tests
given prior to registration, and the results of these tests are used in
planning the student's program.
Doctoral candidates are required to complete at least 9 semester
credits of courses specified by the division of the Chemistry Depart-
ment in which they choose to specialize, as well as at least 9 semes-
ter credits of out-of-major-division courses. There are some minor
restrictions on courses that may be used to meet this requirement.
Additional courses may be required by the student's supervisory
committee or major professor. Foreign students whose native lan-
guage is not English must achieve a minimum score of 50 on the Test
of Spoken English.
Candidates must serve not less than one year as teaching assistants.
This requirement will be waived only when, in the opinion of the
Department, unusual circumstances justify such action.
A chemical physics option is offered for students who will be do-
ing research in areas of physical chemistry which require a strong back-
ground in physics. For this option, a student meets the departmental
requirements for concentration in physical chemistry, except that only
one out-of-major division course is required. In addition, a minimum
of 14 credits in 4000 level or higher physics courses or a minimum
of 7 such credits in physics and 7 in 4000 level or higher mathemat-
ics courses is required.
Candidates for the master's degree are required to complete any
two core courses. The Master of Science degree in chemistry requires
a thesis. The nonthesis degree Master of Science in Teaching is of-
fered with a major in chemistry and requires a written paper of sub-
stantial length (30 to 50 pages) on an approved topic pertaining to
some phase of chemistry, under the course CHM 6905.
CHM 5224-Basic Principles for Organic Chemistry (3) Prereq: one
year ofundergraduate organic chemistry. A review for those students intending
to enroll in the Advanced Organic Sequence CHM 6225, CHM 6226.
CHM 5235-Organic Spectroscopy (3) Prereq: CHM2211. Advanced
study of characterization and structure proof of organic compounds by
special methods, including IR, UV, NMR, and mass spectrometry.
CHM 5275-The Organic Chemistry of Polymers (2) Prereq: CHM
2200, 2210, or equivalent. Classification of polymerization types and
mechanisms from a mechanistic organic point of view. The structure of
synthetic and natural polymers and polyelectrolytes. Reaction of polymers.
Practical synthetic methods of polymer preparation.
CHM 5305-Chemistry of Biological Molecules (3) Prereq: CHM2211
and 4412. Mechanistic organic biochemistry. Emphasis on model sys-
tems, enzyme active sites, and physical and organic chemistry of
biomacromolecules.
CHM 5413L-Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) Prereq:
CHM 4411L. Techniques used in experimental research; techniques of
design and fabrication of scientific apparatus. Advanced experiments in-
volving optical, electronic, and high vacuum equipment.
CHM 5511-Physical Chemistry of Polymers (2) Prereq: CHM4411
or equivalent. Structure, configuration, conformation, and thermody-


namics of polymer solutions, gels, and solids. Thermal, mechanical,
optical, and theological properties of plastics and rubbers.
CHM 6153-Electrochemical Processes (3) Principles of electrochemi-
cal methods, ionic solutions, and electrochemical kinetics.
CHM 6154-Chemical Separations (3) Theory and practice of modern
separation methods with emphasis on gas and liquid chromatographic
techniques.
CHM 6155-Spectrochemical Methods (3) Principles of atomic and
molecular spectrometric methods; discussion of instrumentation, meth-
odology, applications.
CHM 6158C-Electronics and Instrumentation (1-4; max: 6) Prin-
ciples of operation of instruments, optimization of instrumental con-
ditions, and interpretation of instrumental data for qualitative and
quantitative analysis.
CHM 6159-Mass Spectrometric Methods (3) Modern spectrometry
including fundamentals, instrumentation, and analytical applications.
CHM 6165-Chemometrics (3) Prereq: graduate standing. Analytical
method, information theory, and chemometrics, including statistical data
analysis, heuristic and non-heuristic data analysis (pattern recognition and
artificial intelligence), and experimental design and optimization.
CHM 6180-Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (1-3; max: 9)
Prereq: two courses ofgraduate level analytical chemistry. Lectures or con-
ferences covering selected topics of current interest in analytical chem-
istry.
CHM 6190-Analytical Chemistry Seminar (1; max: 20) Prereq:
Attendance required ofgraduate majors in the analytical area. graduate course
in analytical chemistry. Presentation of one seminar. S/U option.
CHM 6225-Advanced Principles of Organic Chemistry (4) Prereq:
CHM 2211. Principles of organic chemistry and their application to
reaction mechanisms.
CHM 6226-Advanced Synthetic Organic Chemistry (3) Prereq: CHM
6225. Discussion and application of synthetic methodology.
CHM 6227-Topics in Synthetic Organic Chemistry (2) Prereq: CHM
6226 Synthesis of complex organic molecules, with emphasis on recent
developments in approaches and methods.
CHM 6251-Organometallic Compounds (3) Properties oforgano-
metallic compounds, the nature of the carbon-metal bond, compounds
of metals in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, and transition metals.
CHM 6271-The Chemistry of High Polymers (2) Fundamental
polymer chemistry, with emphasis on the mechanisms of polymeriza-
tion reactions and the relationship of physical properties to chemical
constitution.
CHM 6301-Enzyme Mechanisms (3) Principles of enzyme structure;
isolation and purification; physical chemistry of enzyme/substrate in-
teractions; general overview of classes; transition state theory and catalysis;
types of chemical catalysis; survey of cofactors; example mechanisms;
catalytic antibodies; ribozyme structure and catalysis.
CHM 6302-Chemistry and Biology of Nucleic Acids (3) Principles
of nucleic acid structure and function; protein/nucleic acid interactions
with particular emphasis on transcriptional regulators and DNA and RNA
polymerases; chemistry of phosphate hydrolysis and its application to
enzyme mechanisms; evolution of novel RNA molecules capable of
specific binding and catalysis.
CHM 6303-Methods in Computational Biochemistry and Structural
Biology (3) Modeling and protein structures enzyme reaction mecha-
nisms using empirical as well as quantum-mechanical methods.
CHM 6304-Special Topics in Biological Chemistry Mechanisms (3;
max: 9) Molecular evolution, bioinformatics and protein structure pre-
diction, principles of molecular recognition, rational protein design,
biotechnology, reengineered organisms, advanced biophysical techiques,
and computational biology.
CHM 6381-Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3; max: 9)
Prereq: CHM 6225, 6226 Chemistry of selected types of organic com-





CIVIL AND COASTAL ENGINEERING / 101


pounds, such as alkaloids, carbohydrates, natural products, steroids.
CHM 6390-Organic Chemistry Seminar (1; max: 20) Prereq: At-
tendance required ofgraduate majors in the organic area. Presentation of
one seminar. S/U option.
CHM 6430-Chemical Thermodynamics (3) Energetics, properties
of ideal and nonideal systems primarily from the standpoint of classi-
cal thermodynamics.
CHM 6461-Statistical Thermodynamics (3) Prereq: CHM 6430.
Fundamental principles with applications to systems of chemical interest.
CHM 6470-Chemical Bonding and Spectra I (3) Basic methods and
applications of quantum chemistry; atomic structure; chemical bond-
ing in diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Brief introduction to mo-
lecular spectroscopy.
CHM 6471-Chemical Bonding and Spectra II (3) Prereq: CHM6470.
Theory of symmetry and its chemical applications; semi-empirical
molecular orbital treatment of simple inorganic and organic molecules;
further applications to inorganic and organic chemistry.
CHM 6480-Elements of Quantum Chemistry (3) Prereq: CHM6471.
Brief treatment of the Schrodinger equation, followed by a survey of
applications to chemical problems.
CHM 6490-Theory of Molecular Spectroscopy (3) Coreq: CHM
6471. Molecular energy levels, spectroscopic selection rules; rotational,
vibrational, electronic, and magnetic resonance spectra of diatomic and
polyatomic molecules.
CHM 6520-Chemical Physics (3) Prereq: CHM 6470 or permission
of instructor. Identical to PHZ 6247. Topics from the following: inter-
molecular forces; molecular dynamics; electromagnetic properties of
molecular systems; solid surfaces; theoretical and computational methods.
CHM 6580-Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1-3; max: 12)
Lecture or conferences covering selected topics of current interest in
physical chemistry.
CHM 6590-Physical Chemistry Seminar (1; max: 20) Prereq: At-
tendance required ofgraduate majors in physical chemistry. graduate course
in physical chemistry. Presentation of one seminar. S/U.
CHM 6620-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3) Crystalline state;
covalent bonding; acids, bases, and solvents, nonmetallic compounds
of Groups II through VII with emphasis on structure and reactivity.
CHM 6621-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (3) Prereq: CHM 6620.
Electronic structure of metals and transition metal complexes; solution
chemistry and reaction mechanisms at metal centers; redox reactions;
introduction to organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry.
CHM 6626-Applications of Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry
(3) Prereq: graduate standing or consent ofinstructor. Principles and ap-
plications of spectroscopic methods to the solution of inorganic prob-
lems. Those techniques used most extensively in current inorganic re-
search are treated.
CHM 6628-Chemistry of Solid Materials (3) Structure and prop-
erties of solids; semiconductors and superconductors.
CHM 6670-Inorganic Biochemistry (3) Prereq: graduate standing or
consent ofinstructor. Role of elements in biology. Modern spectroscopic
and physical methods for study of Group I and II metals, metalloenzymes,
metal ion transport and storage, functions of nonmetals in biochemi-
cal systems, and biomedical/biotechnical applications of metals.
CHM 6680-Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1-3; max: 12)
Lectures or conferences on selected topics of current research interest
in inorganic chemistry.
CHM 6690-Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (1; max: 20) Prereq: At-
tendance required ofgraduate majors in inorganic chemistry. graduate course
in inorganic chemistry. Presentation of one seminar. S/U option.
CHM 6710-Applied Molecular Spectroscopy (3) Applications and
comparisons of methods in analysis and molecular structure determi-
nation.


CHM 6720-Chemical Dynamics (3) Basic concepts of rate laws,
collision theory, and transition state theory; an introduction to reaction
dynamics, structural dynamics, and quantitative structure-reactivity
correlations.
CHM 6905-Individual Problems, Advanced (1-5; max: 10) Prereq:
consent offaculty member supervising the work. Double registration per-
mitted. Assigned reading program or development of assigned experi-
mental problem. S/U option.
CHM 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
CHM 6934-Advanced Topics in Chemistry (1; max: 8) Prereq: consent
of instructor. Discussion and evaluation of chemical research advances
reported in current chemical literature. S/U
CHM 6935-Chemistry Colloquium (1; max: 7) Topics presented
by visiting scientists and local staff members. S/U.
CHM 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
CHM 6943-Internship in College Teaching (2, 4, 6; max: 6) Prereq:
graduate standing. Required for Master of Science in Teaching students
but available for students needing additional practice and direction in
college-level teaching.
CHM 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
CHM 7485-Special Topics in Theory of Atomic and Molecular
Structure (1-3; max: 9) Prereq: PHZ 6426or equivalent. Mathemati-
cal techniques used in atomic, molecular, and solid-state theory. The
one-electron approximation and the general quantum-mechanical
anybody problems. Selected advanced topics.
CHM 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
CHM 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
CHS 5110 L-Radiochemistry Laboratory (3) Prereq: CHM3120 and
3400 or 4412, or consent ofinstructor. Radioactivity detection, radiochemi-
cal separations and analyses, radiochemistry laboratory techniques, the
practice of radiological safety, and tracer applications of radioisotopes
in chemistry and other fields.



CIVIL AND COASTAL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman:J. W. Tedesco. Director and Graduate Coordinator of Coastal
and Oceanographic Engineering Programs: R. Thieke. Graduate Coordi-
nator of Civil Engineering Programs: F. C. Townsend. Graduate Research
Professor: R. G. Dean. Professors: R. A. Cook; K. G. Courage; J. L.
Davidson; D. U. Deere; D. S. Ellifritt (Emeritus); F. E. Fagundo; D. M.
Hanes; C. O. Hayes (Emeritus); Z. Herbsman; M. I. Hoit; M. C. McVay;
A. J. Mehta; F. T. Najafi; M. K. Ochi (Emeritus); R. Roque; B. E. Ruth
(Emeritus); Y. P. Sheng; D. M. Sheppard; R. Shrestha; M. Tia; F. C.
Townsend. Engineers: J. D. Degner; C. E. Wallace. Associate Profes-
sors: G. Barnes; D. G. Bloomquist; B. A. Dewitt; R. D. Ellis; D. W.
Gibson; C. R. Glagola; H. R. Hamilton; K. Hatfield; G. Long; J. M. Lybas;
L. H. Motz; S. E. Smith. Assistant Professors: B. Birgison; A. J. Boyd;
P.J. Bullock; C. Clark; G. Consolazio; P. S. Green; K. Gurley; J.Jacobs;
A. B. Kennedy; R. E. Minchin, Jr.; W. O'Brien; D. N. Slinn; R. Thieke;
S. Washburn.

The Department offers two distinct graduate programs: civil en-
gineering and coastal and oceanographic engineering. The civil en-
gineering program is offered with the following degrees: Master of
Civil Engineering, Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Engineer,





102 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


and Doctor of Philosophy. The coastal and oceanographic engineer
program is offered for the following degrees: Master of Engineering,
Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degree. All degree
programs include areas of concentration in the specialties of construc-
tion, civil engineering management, geotechnical engineering, wa-
ter resources and hydrology, public works, structures, civil engineering
materials, surveying and mapping, coastal engineering, oceanographic
engineering and offshore structures, and transportation engineering.
All degrees except the Ph.D. are available in a thesis or nonthesis
program. Ph.D. students are required to take a preliminary exami-
nation by the end of their second term of enrollment.
Nonthesis degree students must successfully complete a report of
substantial engineering content for a minimum of two hours credit
in CGN 6974 for civil engineering majors or EOC 6905 for coastal
and oceanographic engineering majors. Minor or supporting work
is encouraged from a variety of related or allied fields of study.
Subject to approval by the supervisory committee, graduate level
courses taken through the Departments of Aerospace Engineering,
Mechanics, and Engineering Science; Environmental Engineering
Sciences; and Geological Sciences are considered as major credit.
In the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering credit hours
graded S/U will not count toward graduation except for 6 hours of
CGN or EOC 6971 for thesis students, 6 to 12 hours of CGN or
EOC 6972 for students electing the Engineer thesis, 2 hours of CGN
6974 for students working on the M.E. or Engineer report, CGN
or EOC 7979, and CGN or EOC 7980.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CCE 5035-Construction Planning and Scheduling (2) Prereq: CCE
4204. Planning, scheduling, organizing, and control of civil engineer-
ing projects with CPM and PERT. Application of optimization tech-
niques.
CCE 5405-Construction Equipment and Procedures (2) Prereq: CCE
4204 or consent of instructor. Design and optimization of equipment
systems for heavy construction.
CCE 6037-Civil Engineering Operations I (2) Prereq: graduate sta-
tus. Advanced construction engineering and management procedures at
the project level to support quantitative decision making.
CCE 6038-Innovative Construction Techniques (2) Prereq: CCE 4204
or consent ofinstructor. Advanced construction engineering techniques
and management coordination procedures for civil engineering projects.
CCE 6505-Computer Applications in Construction Engineering (3)
Prereq: CGS 2425, CCE 5035, or consent of instructor. Application of
computer solutions to construction engineering/civil engineering man-
agement problems; microcomputer use.
CCE 6507-Computer Applications in Construction Engineering II
(3) Prereq: CGS 4161, CCE 6505 or consent ofinstructor. Applications
of advanced computer solutions to construction engineering/civil en-
gineering management problems.
CEG 5105-Geotechnical Engineering (3) Prereq: consent ofinstruc-
tor. Shallow foundations, bearing capacity, settlements, deep founda-
tions, pile testing, earth pressures, excavations, retaining structures, de-
watering.
CEG 5112-Advanced Geotechnical Aspects of Landfill Design (3)
Prereq: CEG 4012 or consent of instructor. Settlement analysis, slope
stability, liner design, and LCRS design.
CEG 5115-Foundation Design (3) Prereq: CEG 4012, CES 4702,
or consent ofinstructor. Investigations, bearing capacity, and the analy-
sis and design of shallow footings, walls, and deep pile foundations.
CEG 5205C-Insitu Measurement of Soil Properties (3) Prereq: CEG
4012. Methods of soil exploration; techniques of soil sampling and insitu
testing; field performance of insitu testing.


CEG 5805-Ground Modification Design (2) Prereq: CEG 4012, CGS
2425. Introduction to design of ground modification techniques for
improvement of marginal construction sites.
CEG 6015-Advanced Soil Mechanics (3) Prereq: CEG 4011, 4012,
or consent ofinstructor. Nature and origin of soil. Stresses within a soil
body. Stress-strain behavior and shear strength of dry, saturated no flow,
saturated transient flow soils.
CEG 6116-Advanced Shallow Foundation Design (3) Prereq: CEG
6015, CES 4702. Application of soil mechanics to design and analysis
of shallow foundations.
CEG 6117-Advanced Deep Foundation Design (3) Prereq: CEG 6015.
Application of soil mechanics to design and analysis of deep foundations.
CEG 6201-Experimental Determination of Soil Properties (3) Prereq:
CEG 4012 or consent of instructor. Advanced laboratory tests, constant
rate of strain consolidation, factors influencing stress-deformation re-
sponse, elastic-plastic constitutive relationships, failure criteria. H.
CEG 6405-Seepage and Drainage Problems in Geotechnical Engi-
neering (2) Prereq: CEG 4011, 4012, or consent of instructor. Darcy's
law, coefficient of permeability, flownets; seepage forces. Engineering
applications-dewatering systems, slope stability, filter design, earth dams,
drainage.
CEG 6505-Numerical Methods of Geomechanics (3) Prereq: CGN
3421, CEG 6015 or consent of instructor. Application of computer so-
lutions to geotechnical engineering problems.
CEG 6506-Geotechnical Engineering Computer Aided Design (3)
Prereq: CEG 4012. Use of geotechnical engineering software for CAD
of deep and shallow foundations and earth retention systems.
CEG 6515-Earth Retaining Systems and Slope Stability (3) Prereq:
CEG 6015. Applications of soil mechanics to design and analysis of earth
retaining systems and slope stability.
CES 5116-Finite Elements in Civil Engineering (3) Prereq: CES 4141.
Introduction to finite elements, use of finite element concepts for struc-
tural analysis. Application of 1-, 2-, and 3-D elements of structural
problems.
CES 5325-Design of Highway Bridges (3) Prereq: CES 4605, 4702.
Analysis by influence lines, slab and girder bridges, composite design,
prestressed concrete, continuity, arch bridges, design details, highway
specifications.
CES 5606-Topics in Steel Design (3) Prereq: CES 4605. Plate girders,
torsion, biaxial bending, frame design, composite beams and columns,
fatigue, monosymmetric members, and moment connections.
CES 5607-Behavior of Steel Structures (3) Prereq: CES 4605. Plas-
tic analysis and designs of beams and frames. Buckling and stability prob-
lems. Shear and torsion.
CES 5715-Prestressed Concrete (3) Prereq: CES 4702. Analysis and
design of prestressed concrete flexural members; pre- and post-tensioned
construction, allowable stress, strength evaluation; design for bending
moments and shear; evaluation of serviceability requirements; design of
simple bridges.
CES 5726-Design of Concrete Systems (3) Prereq: CES 4141 and
4702. Strength design of building systems (frames and shear walls), torsion
floor systems, biaxial moment in columns, load systems.
CES 5801-Design and Construction in Timber (2) Prereq: consent
ofinstructor. Analysis and design in timber. Beams, columns, and con-
nections. Timber structure. Plywood beams, panels, diaphragms. Lami-
nated beams and frames. Formwork.
CES 5835-Design of Reinforced Masonry Structures (3) Prereq: CES
4702. Properties of clay brick, concrete block and mortar, beams and
columns, structural walls, joints and details.
CES 6106-Advanced Structural Analysis I (4) Prereq: CES 4605, 4702.
Traditional methods of analyses for forces and deformations; modern
matrix methods including direct stiffness method.





CIVIL AND COASTAL ENGINEERING / 103


CES 6108-Advanced Structural Analysis II (3) Prereq: EGM3400,
CES 6106 Evaluation of structural response to the effect of dynamic
loads for single-degree and multidegree of freedom systems. Consider-
ation of seismic and wind effects, modal analysis, numerical methods,
structural idealization, response spectra, and design codes.
CES 6165-Computer Methods in Structural Engineering (3) Prereq:
CGS2425, 6106 Modern program development techniques for structural
analysis. Efficiency, databases, modularity, equation solving, and sub-
structure programming concepts.
CES 6526-Nonlinear Structural Analysis and Design (2) Prereq: CES
6108. Sources of nonlinearity. Tangent stiffness method. Beam-columns
on elastic foundations. Discrete methods for soil-structure interaction.
CES 6551-Design of Folded Plates and Shells (3) Prereq: CES 4605,
4702. Bending of systems of plates. Analysis for membrane stresses;
pressure vessels, secondary bending stresses. Design of shell systems and
folded plates. Design details.
CES 6706-Advanced Reinforced Concrete (3) Prereq: CES 4704,
5726C. Torsion in structural members. Ultimate load theories and
application to design. Columns and beam columns. Shear walls, com-
bined shear walls and frames. Research topics.
CGN 5125-Legal Aspects of Civil Engineering (3) Engineer's view
of contracts for design and construction. Legislation and policy affect-
ing labor-management relationships in construction.
CGN 5135-Project Optimization Using Value Engineering and TQM
(3) Total quality management methods applied to traditional value
engineering theory for optimization of engineering projects. Function
analysis systems techniques (FAST), constructability, front-end-plan-
ning, agreement matrix, life cycle costing, and statistical methods for
process control.
CGN 5315-Civil Engineering Systems (3) Civil engineering appli-
cations of operations research techniques, models of scheduling, linear
programming, queueing theory, and simulation.
CGN 5508-Experimentation and Instrumentation in Civil Engineer-
ing Materials Research (3) Fundamentals and applications of testing
and measuring systems commonly used; constitutive models, testing
methods, instrumentation, and error analysis.
CGN 5605-Public Works Planning (3) Functional approach to plan-
ning and implementing public works needs with emphasis on role of
engineer.
CGN 5606-Public Works Management (3) Nature of profession,
duties, and administrative responsibilities. Organization and manage-
ment of operating divisions with emphasis on role of engineer.
CGN 6155-Civil Engineering Practice I (2) Prereq: graduate sta-
tus. Advanced civil engineering management skills and procedures in
support of design and construction practices above the project level.
CGN 6156-Civil Engineering Practice II (2) Prereq: CCE 4204 or
consent of instructor. Advanced construction engineering management
and productivity topics above the project level.
CGN 6505-Properties, Design and Control of Concrete (3) Prereq:
CGN3501. Portland cement and aggregate properties relating to de-
sign, control, and performance of concrete. Concrete forming and con-
struction methods. Laboratory testing and analysis.
CGN 6506-Bituminous Materials (3) Prereq: TTE 4811. Analysis
of strength and deformation mechanism for asphalt concrete, proper-
ties, and their effect on flexible pavement performance. Pavement con-
struction and quality assurance methods, testing and evaluation of as-
phalts and mixture.
CGN 6507-Advanced Bituminous Materials (3) Prereq: CGN 6506.
Effects of asphalt theology, temperature susceptibility, durability, char-
acteristics of mineral filler and additives on performance of asphalt
pavements. Detailed analysis and design of asphalt pavements against
rutting and cracking.


CGN 6905-Special Problems in Civil Engineering (1-6; max: 10)
Studies in areas not covered by other graduate courses.
CGN 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) Credits do not ap-
ply to any graduate degree. S/U.
CGN 6936-Civil Engineering Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Lectures
by graduate students, faculty members, and invited speakers. S/U.
CGN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) Credits do not ap-
ply to any graduate degree. S/U.
CGN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
CGN 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
CGN 6974-Master of Engineering or Engineer Degree Report (1-
6; max: 6) Individual work culminating in a professional practice-ori-
ented report suitable for the requirements of the Master of Engineer-
ing or Engineer degree. Two credits only are applicable toward the re-
quirements of each degree. S/U.
CGN 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
CGN 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
CWR 5125-Groundwater Flow I (3) Prereq: CWR 4202 or consent
of instructor. Porous media flow. Darcy's law. Conservation of mass.
LaPlace equation. Flownets. Well hydraulics.
CWR 5127-Evaluation of Groundwater Quality (3) Prereq: CWR
5125 or 6525, or consent ofinstructor. Characteristics of flow in saturated
and unsaturated zones; solute convection and dispersion; effects of chemi-
cal reactions and adsorption; management of groundwater quality.
CWR 5235-Open Channel Hydraulics (3) Prereq: CWR 4202 or
consent ofinstructor. Classification of flow, Normal depth. Specific en-
ergy and critical depth. Gradually varied flow. Transitions.
CWR 6115-Surface Hydrology (3) Prereq: MAP2302 orEGM3311,
CWR 3201 or EGN3353C Occurrence and distribution of water by
natural processes including atmospheric thermodynamics, precipitation,
runoff, infiltration, water losses, flood routing and catchment charac-
teristics, analysis, and methods of runoff prediction. Current hydrologic
computer models.
CWR 6236-Sediment Transport I (3) Prereq: CWR 5235 or consent
ofinstructor. Introduction to movable bed models. Sediment properties.
Scour initiation. Influence of slope. Stable channels. Bed forms. Transport
as bed load and suspended transport.
CWR 6237-Sediment Transport II (2) Prereq: CWR 6236 or consent
ofinstructor. Review of fundamental laws of scour initiation and sediment
transport. River morphology. Movable bed hydraulic models.
CWR 6255-Diffusive and Dispersive Transport (3) Prereq: CWR 4202
or consent of instructor. Introduction to diffusive and dispersive trans-
port processes in flowing water. Fick's law. Available analytical and
numerical models.
CWR 6275-Hydraulic Laboratory and Field Practice (3) Prereq: CWR
4202 or consent of instructor. Hydraulic model laws and their use in
undistorted and distorted models with movable or fixed beds. Instru-
mentation. Data acquisition system.
CWR 6525-Groundwater Flow II (3) Prereq: CWR 5125 or consent
of instructor. Analytical and computer modeling of groundwater flow
problems by means of finite difference, finite element, and boundary
element methods.
CWR 6537-Contaminant Subsurface Hydrology (3) Prereq: MAP
2302 or 4341 or equivalent; CGS 2420 or equivalent; SOS 4602C orABE
6252 or CWR 5125 or 5127 or equivalent; or EES 6208 or equivalent.
Physical-chemical-biological concepts and modeling of retention and
transport of water and solutes in unsaturated and saturated media.
Applications of environmental aspects of soil and groundwater contami-
nation emphasized.





104 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


SUR 5365-Digital Mapping (3) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Meth-
ods of digital representation of maps, coordinate development, digitizing,
stereocompilation, scanning, remote sensing, hardware and software
systems, file conversion, integration into GIS systems, attribute devel-
opment.
SUR 5385-Remote Sensing Applications (3) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. Review of remote sensing systems, image classification meth-
ods, mapping applications, integration of remotely sensed data into GIS
systems, application of data for variety of land information systems.
SUR 5391C-Geomatics: Spatial Foundations of Geographic Informa-
tion Systems (3) Prereq: graduate standing or permission ofinstructor. Ba-
sic concepts principles and quality control of spatial measurements un-
derlying GIS. Measurement technologies such as GPS.
SUR 5425-Cadastral Information Systems (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Methods of cadastral mapping for tax and/or GIS applica-
tions; interpretation of deed and survey information, the sectional survey
system, conflict resolution, cadastral information.
SUR 5525-Least Squares Adjusted Computations (3) Prereq: pro-
ficiency in computer language and consent ofinstructor. Implementation
of least squares solutions for survey-mapping and GIS applications, time
and storage optimization; error analysis; initial approximation genera-
tion; robust estimation; computer programming.
SUR 5625-Georgraphic Information Systems Analysis (3) Prereq:
introductory GIS course. Analytical tools such as software grid modules,
database query, map algebra, and distance operators; analytical opera-
tions such as database query, derivative mapping, and process model-
ing; sources and nature of uncertainty and error, and project planning
management.
SUR 6375-Terrain Analysis and Mapping (3) Prereq: consent ofin-
structor. Digital and visual methods, interpretative techniques to iden-
tify landforms, soils, and potential site analysis problems from aerial pho-
tography and digital maps.
SUR 6381C-Airborne Sensors and Instrumentation (3) Prereq: SUR
4350, 4531, 3520, or permission ofinstructor. Theoretical and practical
issues associated with application of modern, airborne remote sensing
technologies to precision mapping problems. Navigation, ALSM, SAR,
and hyperspecttral data.
SUR 6388-Radar Remote Sensing (3) Prereq: consent of instructor.
Electromagnetic principles of microwave transmission, propagation, and
reception by remote sensing instruments. Types of radar devices cur-
rently used in applications of radar to remote sensing.
SUR 6395-Topics in Geographic Information Systems (3; max: 6)
Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Data base development, economic impact
of GIS, development of standards, integration of data sets, hardware and
software developments, advances in GIS technology.
SUR 6427-Land Tenure and Administration (3) Prereq: SUR 5425
or consent ofinstructor. Issues and problems. Design of project to address
these problems in developing countries.
TTE 5006-Transportation Systems Planning (4) Prereq: graduate
standing or consent ofinstructor. Analytical techniques for estimating future
travel demands, planning, transportation facilities and locations. Review
of transportation technology and future systems.
TTE 5255-Traffic Signal Operation (1) Traffic control equipment,
MUTCD requirements, HCM procedures, design and analysis of sig-
nal timing plans for simple problems.
TTE 5256-Traffic Engineering (3) Traffic characteristics, studies and
analyses, street operations, level of service analysis, congestion and ac-
cess management, signs and markings, pedestrians, bicycles, parking,
roadway lighting.
TTE 5258-Urban Intersection Operations (3) Prereq: TTE 5255.
Signal and stop sign control, roundabouts, traffic flow theory (interrupted
flow), field studies, analytical intersection models, simulation models,
software for intersection analysis.


TTE 5805-Geometric Design of Transportation Facilities (3) Prereq:
TTE 4004 or consent of instructor. Geometric design criteria and con-
trols of highways and intersections.
TTE 5835-Pavement Design (2) Prereq: TTE 4811 or consent of
instructor. Design of flexible and concrete pavements.
TTE 5837-Pavement Management Systems (3) Prereq: TTE 5835.
Evaluation, analysis, design, performance prediction, planning, and
maintenance of pavements.
TTE 6257-Traffic Management and Control (3) Standards and func-
tions, communication equipment and protocols, traffic detection, cen-
trally controlled signal networks, traffic surveillance, advanced traffic
management systems, traveler information systems.
TTE 6315-Highway Safety Analysis (3) Statistics and characteris-
tics of accidents, accident reconstruction, accident causation and reduc-
tion.
TTE 6606-Urban Transportation Models (4) Prereq: CGN3421 or
consent of instructor. Calibration and application of UTPS computer
models for urban transportation planning; land use and urban activity
models for forecasting and allocation. H.
TTE 6815-Transportation Corridor Operations (3) Prereq: TTE
5258. Freeway, urban arterial, and rural roadway operations, traffic flow
theory (uninterrupted flow), Highway Capacity Manual analysis, arterial
signal timing models, freeway corridor models, simulation of corridor
operations, multimodal corridors.

COASTAL AND OCEANOGRAPHIC ENGINEERING

EGM 5816-Intermediate Fluid Dynamics (4) Prereq: EGN3353C
(or CWR3201), MAP 2302. Basic laws of fluid dynamics, introduction
to potential flow, viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and turbulence.
EOC 5860-Port and Harbor Engineering (3) Prereq: EGN3353C
(or CWR3201), MAP2302 or equivalent. Principles of port design; wave
penetration; harbor oscillations; sediment movement and pollutant
mixing; port structures, port operations; case studies.
EOC 6196-Littoral Processes (3) Prereq: OCP 6165. Shoreline de-
velopments; nearshore hydrodynamics; sediment transport phenomena
by waves and wind; methods of determining littoral transport quanti-
ties; effects of groins, jetties, and other coastal structures on littoral
processes.
EOC 6425-Hydrodynamics of Coastal and Ocean Structures (3)
Prereq: STA 5855. Wave loads on fixed structures; forces on a pile due
to regular and irregular waves, forces on marine structures. Wave loads
on floating structures; inertia, damping and hydrostatic forces, equation
of motions in regular waves, evaluation of loads in random seas.
EOC 6430-Coastal Structures (3) Prereq: OCP 6165. Planning and
design for beach nourishment, breakwaters, jetties, seawalls and coastal
protection structures.
EOC 6431-Offshore Structures (3) Prereq: OCP 6165. Design and
analysis of fixed offshore steel structures including force computations,
foundation design, stress and deformation, member design, and struc-
tural response.
EOC 6850-Numerical Simulation Techniques in Coastal and Ocean
Engineering (3) Numerical treatment of problems in ordinary and partial
differential equations with application to incompressible geophysical fluid
flows.
EOC 6905-Individual Study in Coastal and Oceanographic Engi-
neering (1-4; max: 8)
EOC 6932-Selected Field and Laboratory Problems (3) Prereq: EGN
3353C (or CWR 3201), MAP 2302 or equivalent. Field and/or labora-
tory investigations employing modern research techniques and instru-
mentation.
EOC 6934-Advanced Topics in Coastal and Oceanographic Engi-
neering (1-6; max: 9) Waves; wave-structure interaction; coastal struc-





CLASSICS / 105


tures; ocean structures; sediment transport; instrumentation; advanced
data analysis techniques.
EOC 6939-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Guest lecturers; lectures
by COE faculty and students. S/U.
EOC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EOC 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EOC 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EOC 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
OCP 5293-Coastal Processes (3) Prereq: EGN3353C(or CWR3201),
MAP2302 or equivalent. Coastal wave and water level fluctuations, littoral
transport; tidal inlet dynamics, estuarine hydrodynamics, and sediment
transport; techniques of measurements.
OCP 6050-Physical Oceanography (3) Prereq: MAP 2302, EGN
3353C(or CWR3201). Structure of ocean basins; physical and chemical
properties of sea water; basic physical laws used in oceanography; ocean
current; thermohaline effects; numerical models; heat budget.
OCP 6165-Ocean Waves I: Linear Theory (3) Prereq: MAP 2302,
EGN3353C (or CWR3201). Ocean wave classification, solution of the
linearized boundary value problem; simple harmonic waves; shoaling
effects; internal waves.
OCP 6165L-Ocean Waves Laboratory (1) Laboratory for linear wave
theory. Basic measurement techniques and properties of water waves.
OCP 6167-Ocean Waves II: Nonlinear Theory (3) Prereq: OCP 6165.
Perturbation development of nonlinear water wave theories; regions of
validity of various theories; dynamics and kinematics of nonlinear wave
trains composed of single and multiple fundamental components.
OCP 6168-Data Analysis Techniques for Coastal and Ocean Engi-
neers (3) Data editing, fundamentals of spectral analysis, subsurface and
surface signal analysis, directional spectral analysis.
OCP 6169-Random Sea Analysis (3) Prereq: STA 5855, OCP 6165.
Mathematical presentation of random seas; wave spectral analysis, spectral
formulations; joint prediction of wave height and period, directional-
ity of random seas, bispectral analysis; principle ofhindcasting and fore-
casting seas.
OCP 6295-Estuarine and Shelf Hydrodynamics I (3) Prereq: OCP
6050. Kinematics and dynamics of estuaries, small scale motions, tidal
hydrodynamics, nontidal circulations, shelf waves, estuary and shelf
interactions, mathematical models.
OCP 6297-Coastal Cohesive Sediment Transport (3) Clay properties
including cohesion and flocculation mechanisms; sediment settling
velocity, deposition, and erosion processes; bed properties including
consolidation and theology; behavior and transport of fluid mud; wave-
mud interactions; particle-bound contaminant transport; sedimentation
issues; measurement strategies.
OCP 6655-Coastal Sediment Transport Processes (3) Prereq: CWR
6236, OCP 6165. Physical sedimentation processes, including bound-
ary layer hydrodynamics, suspended sediment dynamics, and bedload
mechanics under wave and current conditions.
STA 5855-Stochastic Processes for Coastal and Ocean Engineers
(3) Prereq: undergraduate calculus. Principles of spectral analysis; cross-
spectral analysis; linear-system; threshold crossing and prediction of
period; prediction of random amplitudes; prediction of extreme val-
ues and its application to coastal and ocean engineering problems.


CLASSICS
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: M. A. Eaverly. Graduate Coordinator: K. V. Hartigan. Distin-
guished Professor: G. L. Schmeling. Professors: K. V. Hartigan; D. G. Miller;
L. A. Sussman; D. C. Young. Associate Professors: S. K. Dickison; M.
A. Eaverly; R. S. Wagman. Assistant Professors: T. Johnson; K. Kapparis;
H. F. Mueller.

The Department offers the following degrees and programs: the
Doctor of Philosophy in classical studies; the Master of Arts degree
in classical studies or Latin; the Master of Latin degree, and the Master
of Arts in Teaching degree in Latin.
Within the Ph.D. program there are three areas of specialization:
1) Latin and Roman studies, 2) classical civilization, and 3) philol-
ogy. The Master of Arts degree with a major in classical studies.
Requirements for the doctoral degree include 60 credit hours after
the M.A. (or a total of 90 credit hours); LNW 6935-Proseminar
in Classics; five additional seminars after the M.A., plus one course
in either Greek or Latin prose composition; a reading knowledge of
two modern Languages, one of which must be German; a reading
list of Greek and Roman authors; a supervised experience in teach-
ing at least one Latin or Greek course and assisting in one or more
civilization courses in translation; sight translation examinations in
Greek and Latin (these must be passed before taking the qualifying
examinations); qualifying examinations; dissertation; and final ex-
amination.
The M.A. degree in classical studies is recommended for students
who plan to continue their studies at the doctoral level. The M.A.
degree in Latin is recommended for students who do not plan to
continue at the doctoral level, but plan to pursue a career in teach-
ing. Both M.A. programs require 30 credit hours include 6 credits
of GRW or LNW 6971, a thesis, and final examination.
The Master of Latin degree is a nonthesis degree, designed for cur-
rently employed and/or certified teaching professionals who wish to
widen their knowledge of Latin, broaden their education in the field
of classics, and enhance their professional qualifications through a
program of summer course work as well as directed independent study
and/or distance learning courses during the regular academic year.
The nonthesis degree, Master of Arts in Teaching, is also offered
with a program in Latin and is intended for students preparing to
teach in community colleges or high schools.
CLA 6125-Augustan Age (3) Prereq: B.A. in classics. In-depth inves-
tigation of history, political organization, literature, and society of
Augustan Rome.
CLA 6515-Roman Dynasty: Nero and the Julio-Claudians (3) Prereq:
B.A. in classics or Latin. In-depth investigation of the history, political
organization, literature, social customs, and architecture of early Imperial
Rome (14-68 A.D.).
CLA 6795-Greek and Roman Archeology (3) Prereq: B.A. in clas-
sics or relatedfield. Grounding in monuments of ancient Greece and Ro-
man, and history and methodology of classical archeology.
CLA 6895-Athenian Law and Society (3) Prereq: B.A. in classics or
related field. Comprehensive assessment of structures of classical Ath-
ens, offering detailed study of Athenian law, constitution, society, gender
relations, and culture. Ancient life linked with modern debate on similar
issues.
CLT 6295-Greek Drama in Translation (3) Prereq: B.A. in classics
or related field. Readings of plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides,
and Aristophanes, and discussion of their context and production within
fifth-century Athenian society.





106 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


GRE 675 5-Epigraphy (3; max: 6) Prereq: reading knowledge ofan-
cient Greek and Latin at advanced level; basic reading knowledge ofFrench
and German. Reading and interpretation of selected inscriptions in Greek
and/or Latin.
GRW 6216-Greek Novel (3; max: 6) Selections from ancient Greek
novels.
GRW 6316-Greek Tragedy (3; max: 9) Prereq: advanced reading ability
in Greek. Reading and analysis of Greek tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles,
or Euripides, whose dramas form cornerstone of western theater. Text
selection varies over 3-year cycle.
GRW 6317-Ancient Greek Comedy (3) Prereq: advanced reading
ability in Greek. Reading and study of ancient Greek comedy, with se-
lected plays by Aristophanes and Menander.
GRW 6345-Greek Lyric Poetry (3; max: 6) Variety and peculiari-
ties of lyric content, style, grammar, structure, dialect, and meter shown
through selected poems.
GRW 6346-Pindar (3; max: 6) Selected poems.
GRW 6347-Homer (3; max: 6) Reading's from Iliadand Odyssey.
GRW 6386-Greek Historians (3; max: 6) Prereq: reading knowledge
ofancient Greek at advanced level. Analysis of Herodotus, Thucydides,
or other major Greek historians.
GRW 6506-Plato (3; max: 6) Reading of Symposium and selected books
of the i/Republic/.
GRW 6795-Hellenistic Literature (3; max: 6) Reading of selections
from poets and prose writers.
GRW 6905-Individual Work (2-4; max: 10) Prereq: graduate standing
or consent ofinstructor. Readings and reports in Greek language and lit-
erature.
GRW 6930-Special Topics in Greek Literature (3; max: 6) Prereq:
graduate standing or consent ofinstructor. Intensive study of particular
author, genre, period, or subject.
GRW 6931-Comparative Study of Greek and Latin Literature (3)
Study of genre types.
GRW 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-3) Prereq: reading knowl-
edge ofancient Greek at advanced level. S/U.
LAT 6425-Latin Prose Composition (3) Translating English into Latin
and imitation of various Latin prose styles.
LNW 5655-Roman Poets: Horace (3; max: 6) Horace's poetry and
metrics.
LNW 5656-Roman Poets: The Republic (3; max: 6) Prereq: read-
ing knowledge ofLatin at advanced level. Readings in poets of period, in-
cluding Catullus, Lucretius, and others.
LNW 5665-Roman Poets: Vergil (3; max: 6) The poetic art of Vergil
and its literary, historical, and political background.
LNW 5675-Roman Poets: Ovid (3; max: 6) Ovid's poetic art against
its literary, historical, and political background.
LNW 5676-Roman Poets: The Silver Age (3; max: 6) Prereq: read-
ing knowledge ofLatin at advanced level Readings from major poets of
period, including Lucan, Statius, and others.
LNW 5931-Comparative Study of Latin and Greek Literature (3;
max: 6) Study by genre types, variable content.
LNW 6225-The Ancient Roman Novel (3; max: 6) Readings from
Petronius and/or Apuleius.
LNW 6335-Roman Oratory and Rhetoric (3; max: 6) Theory and
practice of Roman oratory and rhetoric through Latin readings in Cicero,
Seneca, and Quintilian, and other sources.
LNW 6365-Studies in Roman Satire (3; max: 6) Readings from
Horace, Persius, Petronius, Juvenal, Martial.
LNW 6385-Roman Historians (3; max: 9) Readings from major
historians: Sallust, Caesar, Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius, and others.
LNW 6495-Late Latin Literature (3) Readings from one or more of
the following: Vulgate, Christian Church Fathers, Historia Apollonii,
Peregrinatio Aetheriae, Harrington's Medieval Latin.


LNW 6905-Individual Work (2-4; max: 10) Readings and reports
in language and literature.
LNW 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
LNW 6933-Special Topics in Latin Literature (3; max: 6) Prereq:
graduate standing or consent of instructor. Intensive study of particular
author, genre, period, or subject.
LNW 6935-Proseminar in Classics (3) Introduction to the study of
classical literature, history of scholarship, bibliographies, areas of the
discipline.
LNW 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
LNW 6943-Internship in College Teaching (2,4,6; max: 6) Required
for all Master of Arts in Teaching candidates but available for students
needing additional practice and direction in college-level teaching.
LNW 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.



CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY
College of Health Professions

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: R. H. Rozensky. Graduate Coordinator: R. M. Bauer. Graduate
Research Professor: P.J. Lang. Professors: R. M. Bauer; C. D. Belar; W. K.
Berg; B. A. Crosson; W. R. Cunningham; S. M. Eyberg; E. B. Fennell; I.
S. Fischler; R. G. Frank; J. R. Goldman (Emeritus); J. Graham-Pole; R. L.
Glueckauf; M. Heft; K. Heilman; J. H. Johnson; S. B. Johnson; C. M. Levy;
M. E. Meyer; M. G. Perri; A. L Quittner, M. E. Robinson; R. H. Rozensky;
B. R. Schlenker;J. Silverstein; R. T. Watson. Associate Professors: S. R. Boggs;
D. Bowers; G. R. Geffken; R. K. Hornberger; W.J. Rice; J. R. Rodrigue;
S. F. Sears; R. L West; K. D. White. GinicalAssociate Professors: D. E. Dede;
C. Strauss. Assistant Professors: G. D. Evans; W. M. Perlstein.

The Department of Clinical and Health Psychology is a unit of the
College of Health Professions. The Department's programs are its doctoral
clinical psychology studies leading to the Ph.D. degree in psychology;
the Center for Clinical and Health Psychology, a teaching and service
unit of the Shands Hospital; an American Psychological Association
accredited doctoral internship program; and postdoctoral studies and
research.
The clinical psychology doctoral curriculum adheres to the scientist-
practitioner model. Program strengths include research, education,
and professional training in health care psychology, with organized
areas of concentration in clinical health psychology, clinical child/
pediatric psychology, clinical neuropsychology, and emotion neu-
roscience/psychopathology. Education and training experiences are
also available in rural psychology and the psycho-physiology of
emotion. A minor is offered in health services administration.
Progress in the program is determined by departmental policies
which are consistent with American Psychological Association accredi-
tation standards. The curriculum has been continuously accredited
by the American Psychological Association since 1953.
Admission to the Department is through appropriate applica-
tion to the Department's admission committee. A bachelor's de-
gree is generally adequate preparation for graduate admission. It
should include undergraduate courses in both experimental psy-
chology and statistics, along with at least three courses from the
following psychology areas: developmental, learning, perception,
personality, physiological, and social.
CLP 5135-Psychological Approaches to Behavioral and Physical
Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (3) Prereq: PSY2013 and
1 additionalpsychology course orpermission ofinstructor. Introduction to
theoretical, research, and clinical issues related to children with psycho-
logical and physical disorders.





CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY / 107


CLP 5316-Health Psychology (3) Prereq: PSY2013. Examination
of relationships among health and behavior in the assessment, treatment,
prevention, and rehabilitation of health problems. Review of clinical health
psychology with implications for other disciplines.
CLP 5426-Introduction to Neuropsychology (3) Prereq: PSY2013,
CLP 3144. Overview of clinical and experimental data on brain-cog-
nition relationships in humans.
CLP 6304-Psychological Foundations of Clinical Psychology I (2-
3; max: 3) History and systems of psychology, social psychology, de-
velopmental psychology, and cognitive psychology foundations of clinical
psychology.
CLP 6307-Human Higher Cortical Functioning (3) Models that
explain linkages between brain and behavior. Focus on both functions
and dysfunctions.
CLP 6308-Psychological Foundations of Clinical Psychology II (2-
3; max: 3) Prereq: CLP 6304. Continuation of CLP 6304.
CLP 6309-Psychological Foundations of Clinical Psychology III (2-
3; max: 3) Prereq: CLP 6308. Continuation of CLP 6308.
CLP 6344C-Lifespan Foundations of Behavioral Health and Illness
I (4) Prereq: admission to CLP. Theoretical and research foundations
of behavioral health and illness using lifespan perspective. Integration
of topics of personality, stress and coping, psychopathology, and fun-
damentals of health psychology.
CLP 6345-Lifespan Foundations of Behavioral Health and Illness
II (4) Prereq: CLP 6344. Continuation of CLP 6344.
CLP 6375-Introduction to Clinical Psychology (1-3; max: 3) Prereq:
admission to CLP. Seminar on issues and concepts concurrent with field
observation and participation.
CLP 6407-Psychological Treatment I (3) Prereq: admission to CLP
or consent ofinstructor. Current dynamic and personality theories, practices,
and related research in psychotherapy.
CLP 6417-Psychological Treatment II (3) Prereq: admission to CLP
or consent of instructor. Current behavioral theories, practices, and re-
lated research.
CLP 6425-Seminar in Clinical Neuropsychology (1; max: 6) Prereq:
graduate students only and permission ofdirector. Basic issues and recent
advances. Presentation of research topics, clinical cases, and discussion
of professional issues.
CLP 6434C-Clinical Psychology Assessment I (4) Prereq: CLP 6345.
Lifespan approach to assessment with special focus on cognitive func-
tioning.
CLP 6435C-Clinical PsychologyAssessment II (4) Prereq: CLP 6345.
Lifespan approach to assessment with special focus on personality and
behavior.
CLP 6446C-Psychological Assessment of Children (3) Prereq: admission
to CLP or consent ofinstructor. Developmental, intellectual, visual-motor,
achievement, and personality assessment of children.
CLP 6447C-Psychological Assessment of Adults (3) Prereq: admis-
sion to CLP or consent of instructor. Basic theories, procedures and ad-
ministration experience in assessment of adult intellect and personal-
ity factors.
CLP 6497-Psychopathological Disturbances (3) Prereq: admission
to CLP or PSYor consent ofinstructor. Theories and related research to
etiology, clinical description, and diagnosis with implications for treat-
ment.
CLP 6526-Introduction to Clinical Research and Design (3) Prereq:
admission to CLP or PSYor consent ofinstructor. Survey of laboratory and
clinical experimental design and measurement issues with special em-
phasis on relationship to clinical psychology.
CLP 6527C-Measurement, Research Design, and Statistical Analysis
in Clinical Psychology I (4) Prereq: admission to CLP. Integration and
interaction among research design, tests and measurements, and sta-
tistics.


CLP 6528C-Measurement, Research Design, and Statistical Analysis
in Clinical Psychology II (4) Prereq: CLP 6527C. Continuation of CLP
6527C.
CLP 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 12) Reading or research in
areas in clinical psychology.
CLP 6910-Supervised Research (1-4; max: 5) S/U.
CLP 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
CLP 6943-Practicum in Clinical Psychology (1-4; max: 8) Prereq:
consent ofprogram director. Supervised training in appropriate work
settings. S/U.
CLP 6945-Practicum in Neuropsychology (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: CLP
7427, consent ofarea head andprogram director. Supervised clinical ex-
perience in neuropsychological assessment and cognitive rehabilitation
of patients with neurologic impairments. S/U.
CLP 6946-Practicum in Applied Medical Psychology (1-3; max: 8)
Prereq: consent of area head and program director. Supervised clinical
experience in inpatient and outpatient consultation, assessment and in-
tervention with psychosomatic, stress-related, and somatopsychic dis-
orders. S/U.
CLP 6947-Advanced Practicum in Clinical Psychology (1-4; max:
18) Prereq: consent ofprogram director. Designed for individual with special
interests and needs. S/U.
CLP 6948-Practicum in Clinical Child Psychology (1-3; max: 8)
Prereq: CLP 6943, consent ofarea head andprogram director. Supervised
clinical experiences working with children or adolescents in either in-
patient or outpatient settings. S/U.
CLP 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
CLP 7317-Advanced Health Psychology and Behavior Medicine (3)
Prereq: CLP 7936. Theory, research, and clinical applications related to
core topic areas. Special attention to pathophysiology, research meth-
ods, issues of diversity, and ethical concerns.
CLP 7404C-Special Issues, Methods, and Techniques in Psychological
Treatment (3; max: 12) Prereq: CLP 6407, 6417, or consent ofinstructor.
CLP 7427C-Neuropsychological Assessment of Children (3) Prereq:
PSB 6067 or consent ofinstructor. Research, theory, and basic procedures.
CLP 7428C-Neuropsychological Assessment of Adults (3) Prereq:
PSB 6067 or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and basic proce-
dures.
CLP 7445C-Projective Assessment (3) Prereq: CLP 6446C, 6447C,
6497. Current theory, research, and practice with projective assessment
techniques, primary emphasis on Rorschach.
CLP 7468C-Psychological Treatment with Groups (3) Current theo-
ries and practices of group therapy as a form of psychological treatment.
Exploration of group therapy intervention techniques.
CLP 7934-Special Topics In Clinical Psychology (1-9; max: 15)
Prereq: admission to CLP. Advanced seminar for in-depth examination
of selected issues and topics.
CLP 7936-Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine (3) Prereq:
admission to CLP or consent of instructor. Seminar on the relevance of
psychological research and clinical practice for medical patient popu-
lation.
CLP 7949-Internship (1-2; max: 6) Prereq: admission to candidacy for the
doctorate, successful completion ofthe qualifying examination and consent ofthe
program director. Reading assignments and conferences. Must include 1500
work hours; designed as a two semester sequence. S/U.
CLP 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
CLP 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
DEP 6216-Psychological Disturbances of Children (3) Prereq: ad-
mission to CLP or PSYor consent ofinstructor. Stresses both affective and





108 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


cognitive.
PPE 6055-Theories of Personality and Behavior Change (1-3; max:
3) Theoretical approaches to conceptualizing personality and behavior
change with respect to conceptual foundations, clinical interventions
derived from the theory, and available research on theory's validity and
utility.
PSB 6067-Human Brain Function (3)



CLINICAL INVESTIGATION
College of Medicine

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Director: M. C. Limacher. Eminent Scholar: D. J. Barrett. Professors: P.
J. Laipis; M. C. Limacher; R. G. Marks; S. A. Moyer; S. Roberts; P. W.
Stacpoole; C. Sumners. Associate Professor: W. T. McCormack.

This unique concentration in the Master of Science program in
medical sciences was developed by an interdisciplinary faculty to
provide sound didactic background in the foundations of clinical
research. The core course requirements cover study design, data
analysis, ethical conduct of research, epidemiology, manuscript and
abstract writing, and grant writing. Additional electives in specific
fields may be taken from other concentrations or programs. A research
thesis designed and conducted with a clinical research mentor is
required.
For clinically trained M.D.s and other doctoral-level health pro-
fessionals, the M.S. concentration in clinical investigation may be
part of a more complete training experience in clinical research of-
fered through the College of Medicine as the Advanced Postgradu-
ate Program in Clinical Investigation (APPCI). Contact Dr. Marian
Limacher, program director, for more information, P.O. Box 100277,
Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32610.
In addition to the courses listed below, the following courses are part
of the core curriculum: ALS 6046-Grant Writing; CAS 6630-Evi-
dence-Based Approach to Researh Evaluation, CLP 7934-Scientific
Writing for Publications and Grants; GMS 6181-Science of Clini-
cal Research, GMS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis, HSC 6507-
Epidemiology; STA 6200-Fundamentals of Research Design, STA
6201--Analysis of Research Data, VME 6767-Issues in the Respon-
sible Conduct of Research.
GMS 6903-Manuscript and Abstract Writing for Clinician/Scien-
tists (1) Didactic and interactive sessions to improve quality of manuscript
and abstract writing.
GMS 6931-Ethical and Policy Issues in Clinical Research (2) Ethi-
cal and policy issues related to conduct of clinical research. Basic un-
derstanding of regulations that govern human subject research and in-
troduction to topic of research with animals.



COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND
DISORDERS

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: W. S. Brown, Jr. Graduate Coordinator: S. K. Griffiths. Profes-
sors: W. S. Brown, Jr.; R. H. Carpenter; N. J. Cassissi; M. A. Crary;
K. J. Gerhardt; L. J. Gonzalez-Rothi; H. F. Hollien (Emeritus); F. J.
Kemker; P. B. Kricos; L. J. Lombardino; H. B. Rothman; G. T. Singleton;
D. E. Williams (Emeritus); W. N. Williams; G. Woodson. Associate


Professors: P. J. Antonelli; C. C. Crandell; A. T. Dyson; S. K. Griffiths;
A. E. Holmes; K. J. Logan; C. M. Sapienza. Assistant Professors: D. M.
Blischak; B. W. Johnson; B. P. Vinson. Associate in: L. Henderson.

Graduate programs in the Department lead to Master of Arts and
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in communication sciences and dis-
orders and to the Doctor of Audiology degree. Major areas of em-
phasis include audiology, phonetic science, and speech-language
pathology. Students, in conjunction with their supervisory committees,
develop graduate programs to meet their specific needs and inter-
ests. Graduate specializations and programs in speech-language pa-
thology and audiology are accredited by the Council on Academic
Accreditation/American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
The Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, in
conjunction with the Department of Communicative Disorders in
the College of Health Professions, offers the Doctor of Audiology
(Au.D.) degree. Graduate students take course work in both depart-
ments in theoretical and applied audiologic sciences and research.
Students must contact the graduate coordinator to obtain infor-
mation about specific specialty requirements. Application deadline
for fall admission to the M.A. and Au.D. programs is February 1.
Entering master's students with deficiencies in the major area of study
or with a bachelor's degree in another field of study must fulfill basic
prerequisites during the first year of graduate work.
LIN 6339-Seminar: Applied Phonology (3) Prereq: SPA 5204. Pho-
nological theory in speech-language pathology, audiology, and speech
science.
LIN 6751-Seminar in Language and Literacy (3) Prereq: LIN3010
or consent of instructor. Consideration of the role of literacy in language
acquisition and cognitive development.
SPA 5051-Clinical Observation in Audiology (1) Prereq: For beginning
graduate students in audiology. Opportunity to observe various phases of
audiologic practice and to accumulate minimum of 15 hours of obser-
vation experience.
SPA 5102-Auditory Anatomy and Physiology (2) In-depth cover-
age of anatomy and physiology of auditory system to support understand-
ing of auditory function in persons with healthy auditory mechanisms
and those with specific disorders.
SPA 5106-Neurophysiology of Hearing (3; max: 6) Prereq: SPA 3032.
Neuroanatomy of the auditory system, peripheral and central dynam-
ics of the cochlea, electrophysiological response in the cochlea and in
various levels of the auditory system.
SPA 5128-Speech Perception (2) Understanding speech perception
in hearing-impaired and/or aged listeners. Auditory and cognitive hy-
potheses to explain speech-recognition deficits; and clinical and theo-
retical intervention strategies to alleviate perceptual deficits in these
populations.
SPA 5204-Phonological Disorders (3) Advanced principles of diagnosis
and remediation.
SPA 5211-Voice Disorders (3) Advanced theory and techniques of
diagnosis and remediation.
SPA 5225-Principles of Speech Pathology: Stuttering (3) Advanced
theories and techniques of diagnosis and therapy.
SPA 5245-Communicative Disorders Related to Cleft Palate (3)
Prereq: SPA 5204, 5211, 5403. Lectures and laboratory study of the "team
approach" and interdisciplinary aspects of communicative disorders in
the cleft palate individual.
SPA 5304-Principles of Audiological Evaluation (3) Advanced pro-
cedures in speech audiometry, masking, and audiogram interpretation.
SPA 5315-Peripheral and Central Auditory Disorders (2) Understand-
ing (1) anatomy and physiology of peripheral and central auditory mecha-
nism, (2) etiology and pathology of peripheral and central hearing loss,
and (3) audiological and otologic diagnosis/treatment of hearing loss.








SPA 5347-Amplification I (2) Theoretical and applied understand-
ing of current technology in amplification systems for hearing impaired.
Part in seminar format (2/3) and remainder in context of clinical labo-
ratory activities.
SPA 5404-Language Disorders I (3) Advanced theory and techniques
of diagnosis and remediation of language disorders in infants and
preschoolers.
SPA 5405-Language Disorders II (3) Detailed examination of lan-
guage intervention programs and nonvocal communication systems.
SPA 5553-Instrumentation and Diagnosis in Speech-Language
Pathology (2) Hands-on experience in use of instrumentation in di-
agnosis.
SPA 5563-Psychosocial Aspects of Hearing Loss (2) Psychological
implications of hearing impairment. Specifically psychoeducational/psy-
chosocial and counseling strategies and rehabilitation procedures for pa-
tient and family management.
SPA 5627-Manual Communication with the Hearing Impaired (1;
max: 3) Overview of signing systems, including ASL, Signed English,
and Signing Exact English. Emphasis on signing skills most useful to
audiologist.
SPA 5646-Speech and Language of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
(2) Advanced principles and procedures in the assessment and develop-
ment of speech and language in individuals with hearing loss.
SPA 5933-Seminar: Professional Aspects of Audiology (2) Federal
and state regulations, audiologic jurisprudence, audiological manage-
ment, and interfacing with other professionals.
SPA 6010-Basic Auditory Sciences (3) Nature of sound, structure
and function of auditory system, frequency selectivity, auditory filter-
ing, and psychoacoustics of pure tones and complex sounds.
SPA 6125-Seminar in Speech Production (3) Prereq: SPA 6233, 6410.
Theories and models discussed and analyzed from kinematic, acoustic,
and aerodynamic data.
SPA 6132-Clinical Instrumentation and Calibration (1) Concepts
and applications relevant to audiology instrumentation and calibra-
tion.
SPA 6133L-Hearing Aid Analysis Laboratory (1) Coreq: SPA 6345.
Advanced analysis and description of electroacoustical properties of hear-
ing aids.
SPA 6140-Experimental Phonetics: Laryngeal Function (3) Principles
involved in acoustical and physiological analyses of voice production and
laryngeal function. Major theories, experimental procedures, and research
findings.
SPA 6200-Applied Preschool Language Disorders: Diagnosis and
Treatment (3) Seminar and practicum in diagnoses and treatment of
preschool children with language learning disabilities.
SPA 6207-Applied Phonological Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment
(3) Prereq: majors only. Seminar and practicum.
SPA 6211-Applied Voice Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment (3)
Prereq: majors only. Seminar and practicum.
SPA 6229-Applied Fluency Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment (3)
Prereq: majors only. Seminar and practicum.
SPA 6233-Adult Neurogenic Disorders (3) Consideration of both
development and acquired neurogenic speech disorders and their asso-
ciated neuropathology, etiology, characteristics, assessment practices, and
treatment strategies.
SPA 6270-Auditory Processing Disorders (3) Prereq: SPA 5304, 5102.
Anatomy and physiology of central auditory nervous system and disorders
of auditory processing that occur in humans. Focus on evaluation and
treatment of auditory processing disorders.
SPA 6300-Introduction to Graduate Research (3) Prereq: Required
fall graduate students specializing in speech-language pathology or audi-
ology.
SPA 6305-Pediatric Audiology (3) Prereq: SPA 6313.


COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS / 109


SPA 6312-Applied Audiological Evaluation (3) Prereq: majors only.
Seminar and practicum.
SPA 6313-Peripheral Disorders of Hearing (3) Prereq: SPA 5304.
Techniques for assessment of peripheral auditory disorders. Medical
contributions to hearing loss and test interpretation.
SPA 6314-Assessment of Central Auditory and Vestibular Nervous
System (3) Theoretical and experimental literature and procedures for
differential diagnosis of central auditory and vestibular disorders.
SPA 6316-Clinical Auditory Electrophysiology (3) Auditory elec-
trophysiological measures used in clinical assessment.
SPA 6317-Vestibular Disorders (2) Prereq: graduate status. Mechanics
and physiology of human balance, contribution of inner ear to balance,
disorders of balance, and approaches to diagnostic assessment and re-
habilitation.
SPA 6322-Applied Rehabilitative Audiology (3) Prereq: majors only.
Seminar and practicum.
SPA 6323-Audiologic Rehabilitation for Adults (2) Exploration of
theoretical and clinical literature. Description of assessment and man-
agement strategies.
SPA 6324-Audiologic Rehabilitation for Children (2) Exploration
of theoretical and clinical literature. Assessment and therapy techniques
for children.
SPA 6327-Seminar in Aural Rehabilitation and Psychology of Deaf-
ness (3) Theoretical and clinical literature.
SPA 6345-Seminar in Audiology: Hearing Aids (3) Prereq: SPA 6313;
coreq: SPA 6313.
SPA 6410-Neurophysiology for Speech and Language (3) Nature
of acquired aphasia and related disorders, neuropsychological and
neurolinguistic models. Emphasis on methods of assessment and treat-
ment.
SPA 6416-Applied Neurogenic Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment
(3) Prereq: majors only. Seminar and practicum.
SPA 6430-Applied Developmental Disorders: Diagnosis and Treat-
ment in Speech and Language (3) Prereq: majors only. Seminar and
practicum.
SPA 6506-Clinical Clerkship in Audiology (1; max: 3) Beginning
level audiologic practicum.
SPA 6507-Applied Augmentative and Alternative Communication
(3) Introduction to clinical experience through planning, conducting,
and writing up diagnostic and therapy sessions with individuals who have
little or no functional speech and or writing.
SPA 6521-Practicum in Speech-Language Diagnostics: UFSHC (1-
6; max: 6) Prereq: SPA 5553.
SPA 6524-Practicum in Speech-Language Therapy: UFSHC (1-6;
max: 6)
SPA 6531-Clinical Practice in Hearing Assessment (1-6; max: 6)
SPA 6533-Clinical Practice in Aural Rehabilitation (1-6; max: 6)
SPA 6559-Nonvocal Communication (2) Prereq: SPA 5403, 5405.
Clinical issues in the application of nonvocal communication systems.
SPA 6564-Communication and Aging (3) Characteristics of, and
management approaches for, communication disorders found with some
frequency in elderly. Communication enhancement stressed.
SPA 6565-Seminar in Dysphagia (3) Anatomy, physiology, and
neurology of normal swallow. Review of further diagnostic procedures
and treatment protocols.
SPA 6570-Seminar: Professional Aspects of Speech-Language Pathology
(3) Administration of speech-language pathology services in varied settings
(hospitals, schools, community clinics, private practice, universities) studied
from educational, legal, business, and ethical perspectives.
SPA 6905-Individual Study (1-3; max: 9) Prereq: consent ofinstruc-
tor. Supervised study of specialized topic or research project.
SPA 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: COM 6300,
and instructor's approval. S/U.





110 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


SPA 6920-Amplificiation III (2) Theoretical and applied understand-
ing of current and future technology in amplification systems in (1) recent
advances in programmable and digital hearing aids, (2) hearing aid se-
lection procedures for special populations, (3) assistive learning devices,
and (4) classroom amplification systems.
SPA 6930-Proseminar in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiol-
ogy (1; max: 6) Faculty and graduate student research in speech-lan-
guage pathology, audiology, and related disciplines. S/U.
SPA 6935-Applied Reading Disabilities: Diagnosis and Treatment
(3) Prereq: majors only. Seminar and practicum in diagnosis and treat-
ment of developmental reading disabilities.
SPA 6936-Special Topics (3; max: 9) Prereq: consent of instructor.
Theory and research in communication.
SPA 6938-Seminar: Interdisciplinary Topic in Hearing (3) Current
readings in medical disorders of hearing, maturational processes, and
auditory perception of speech.
SPA 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
SPA 6942-Externship in Speech-Language Pathology (7-12; max: 12)
Full-time supervised clinical experience in speech-language pathology. Stu-
dents provide diagnostic and therapeutic services in clinical setting.
SPA 6943-Externship in Audiology (7-12; max: 12) Full-time ex-
perience in audiology. Students provide diagnostic and rehabilitative
services under supervision of certified audiologists.
SPA 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
SPA 7318-Clinical Auditory Electrophysiology (5) Prereq: Open only
to students in distance learningAu.D. program. Understanding of clini-
cal auditory physiological measures, including auditory-evoked and event-
related potentials, otoacoustic emissions, and common clinical proto-
cols applied to auditory disorders.
SPA 7319-Balance Disorders: Evaluation and Treatment (5) Prereq:
Open only to students in distance learningAu.D. program. Understanding
of how humans maintain balance, contribution of inner ear to balance,
disorders of balance, and approaches to rehabilitation of these disorders.
SPA 7325-Audiologic Rehabilitation (5) Prereq: Open only to students
in distance learningAu.D. program. State-of-the-art information on current
philosophies and practice patterns for audiologic habitation/rehabilitation.
SPA 7348-Principles of Amplification (5) Prereq: Open only to stu-
dents in distance learningAu.D. program. Recent information regarding
amplification systems.
SPA 7353-Environmental Hearing Conservation (5) Prereq: Open
only to students in distance learningAu.D. program. Recent information
regarding causes of hearing loss, prevention strategies, and basic mecha-
nisms underling noise-induced hearing loss.
SPA 7354-Seminar in Audiology: Hearing Conservation and Noise
Control (3)
SPA 7500-Public School Practicum (1-3; max:10) Prereq: majority
ofpreprofessional courses. Experience in partial fulfillment of department's
clinical requirements.
SPA 7523-Practicum in Speech Pathology in a Medical/Dental Setting (1-
6; max: 6) Prereq: SPA 6521, 6524, and consent ofdepartment.
SPA 7536-Practicum in Audiology in a Medical Setting (1-6; max:
6) Prereq: SPA 6531 and consent of department.
SPA 7566-Counseling Individuals with Hearing Losses (5) Prereq:
Open only to students in distance learningAu.D. program. Recent infor-
mation about counseling.
SPA 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
SPA 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS

College of Health Professions

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Acting Chair: J. Hall. Graduate Coordinator: A. E. Holmes. Professors: M.
Crary; F. J. Kemker. Clinical Professor: M. Groher; J. Hall; J. Rosenbek.
Associate Professor: A. E. Holmes.

The Department offers the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) degree
in conjunction with the Department of Communication Sciences
and Disorders in the College of Liberal Arts Sciences. The Depart-
ment of Communicative Disorders also participates in the College
of Health Profession's Ph.D. program in rehabilitation science by
offering a specialization in communication neuroscience. In addi-
tion, the Department offers advanced clinical training for interns and
practicum students through the Speech and Hearing Center, a clinical
service unit of Shands Hospital at the University of Florida.
The Department has academic ties with other colleges and depart-
ments within the University and with the training and service pro-
grams of the Shands Health Care System and the Veterans Admin-
istration Medical Center, including the Brain Rehabilitation Research
Center and the Rehabilitation Outcomes Research Center.
Admission to degree granting programs is via application to the
respective faculty committees. The graduate coordinator may be con-
tacted for further information.
CAS 5348-Amplification II (2) Prereq: SPA 5347. Digital and pro-
grammable technology in hearing aids.
CAS 6191-Medical Audiology (2) differential diagnosis of hearing
impairment.
CAS 6195-Medical Aspects of Speech-Language Pathology (1) Prereq:
CAS 7946. Overview of speech pathologist's role in medical environ-
ment.
CAS 6291-Cochlear Implants (2) Prereq: CAS5348. Principles and
procedures for implant management from pre-candidacy evaluations
through postoperative therapies.
CAS 6294-Advanced Audiology and Neuro-Otology (2) Prereq: CAS
6191. Medical description, case presentation, and management of hearing
loss.
CAS 6295-Communication Disorders in Medically Complex Pediatric
Populations (3) Prereq: CAS 6195. Clinical research.
CAS 6299-Dysphagia Management (3) Prereq: anatomy andphysi-
ology, and basic neuroanatomy. Introductory. Focus on management of
swallowing disorders in adults.
CAS 6390-Professional Issues: Hearing Care Delivery (2) Federal
and state regulations, audiologic jurisprudence, audiological manage-
ment, and interfacing with other professionals.
CAS 6430-Clinical Evaluation in Medical Speech-Language Pathology
(3) Prereq: CAS 6195. Framework for evaluating communication and
swallowing skills of patients at all levels of care across many types of
disorders.
CAS 6437C-Management of Acquired Sensorimotor Communica-
tion Disorders in a Medical Setting (3) Prereq: basic course in neuro-
genic communications disorders and CAS 6195. Review of neuroanatomy,
cognitive and information processing theories of speech/language pro-
duction and impaired processing system. Patient interaction in terms
of theoretically based diagnostic evaluation, treatment plan, and case
presentation.
CAS 6630-Specific Clinical Topics (1-9; max: 12) Advanced study
in specific areas of clinical process.
CAS 6780-Supervised Clinical Research (1-9; max: 9) Research on
clinical topics with intended outcome focused on improved knowledge
of clinical process. S/U.





COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING / 111


CAS 7308-Business and Professional Issues in Audiology (5) Prereq:
Open only to students in distance learning Au.D. program. Overview of
healthcare system, place of audiology in system, current issues facing
profession, ethics of audiologic practice, provision of reimbursement for
services, and personnel management.
CAS 7391-Audiologic Assessment in a Medical Setting (5) Prereq:
Only open to students in distance learningAu.D. program. Information
on audiologic and medically related aspects of hearing disorders.
CAS 7393-Cochlear Implants and Assistive Devices (5) Prereq: Only
open to students in distance learningAu.D. program. Fitting practices and
future directions.
CAS 7435C-Clinical Instrumentation for Evaluation of Upper
Aerodigestive Tract Functions (3; max: 3) Introduction to instrumen-
tation used in clinical evaluation and treatment and clinical research.
Experiential component.
CAS 7770-Audiology Research Project (3-6; max: 6) S/U.
CAS 7780-Advanced Clinical Research (1-12; max: 12) Advanced
clinical research topics in speech-language pathology and audiology. S/U.
CAS 7945-Graduate Practicum in Audiology (3-6; max: 15) Inter-
mediate clinical practicum in for Au.D. students.
CAS 7946-Clinical I: Practicum in Medical Speech Pathology (1-
10; max: 10) Prereq: CAS 7946. S/U.
CAS 7947-Clinical II: Practicum in Advanced Medical Speech-Lan-
guage Pathology (1-10; max: 10) S/U.
CAS 7958-Clinical Residency in Audiology (3-12; max: 36) Prereq:
12 hours of CAS 7945.
CAS 7959-Clinical III: Internship in Medical Speech-Language
Pathology (1-12; max: 24) S/U.
CAS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
HSC 6905-Independent Study (1-3; max: 12)


COMPARATIVE LAW
Fredric G. Levin College of Law

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Director and Graduate Coordinator: D. M. Hudson. Eminent Scholars:
J. H. Israel; L. A. Lokken. Stephen C. O'Connell Professor: W. O.
Weyrauch. Sam T. Dell Research Scholar: F. N. Baldwin. Chesterfield
Smith Professors: M. W. Gordon; J. L. Harrison. Alumni Research Scholar:
J. W. Little. Professors: D. A. Calfee; S. R. Cohn; J. Davis; G. L. Dawson;
N. E. Dowd; A. C. Flournoy; M. K. Friel; D. M. Hudson; T. R. Hurst;
W. P. Nagan; M. A. Oberst; D. Peters; D. M. Richardson; W. E.
Williams; S. J. Willis.

The LL.M. in Comparative Law degree is designed for graduates
of foreign law schools who want to enhance their understanding of
the American legal system and the English common law system from
which it evolved.
The program begins with Introduction to American Law, a six-
credit summer course that gives students a foundation in the American
legal process. It also helps students acclimate to the College of Law
and the University community prior to the start of the academic year.
During the fall and spring semesters, and with the director's approval,
students choose their remaining 24 credits from more than 100 Juris
Doctor and LL.M. in Taxation courses and seminars. A special cur-
riculum for students enrolled in this program can result in the simul-
taneous award of the Certificate of Specialization in International
Tax Studies. For admission information consult the College ofLaw
Prospectus or write to the Comparative Law Office P.O. Box 117643,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7643 USA.


LAW 7906-Directed Research for LL.M. in Comparative Law (1-
2; max: 2) Legal research to be completed under supervision of faculty
member conversant with topic selected and culminating in a paper.
LAW 7932-Introduction to American Law (6) Intensive five-week
introduction to American legal education, the legal system, and legal writing
as well as to the resources in the Legal Information Center.



COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: S. Sahni. Associate Chair: S. M. Thebaut. Graduate Coordinator:
J.-K. Peir. Distinguished Professors: S. K. Sahni; S. Y. W. Su. Professors:
Y. C. Chow; P. A. Fishwick; L. M. Fu; Y. H. Lee; J. C. Principe; S.
Rajasekaran; S. Ranka; G. X. Ritter; R. G. Selfridge; F. J. Taylor; C.
Vemuri. Associate Professors: M. E. Bermudez; T. A. Davis; E. N. Hanson;
J. G. Harris; H. Lam; H. A. Latchman; J.-K. Peir; J. Peters; B. Sand-
ers; M. Sitharam. Assistant Professors: D. D. Dankel; M. P. Frank; J.
Hammer; J. C. L. Liu; P. Livadas; R. E. Newman; S. M. Thebaut; J. N.
Wilson.

The Department of Computer and Information Science and En-
gineering (CISE) offers the Master of Engineering, Master of Sci-
ence, Engineer, and Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering through
the College of Engineering and a Master of Science degree in com-
puter and information sciences through the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences.
Areas of specialization within the programs of CISE cover a wide
range including programming languages, database management,
software engineering, computer graphics, computer vision, operat-
ing systems, compilers, performance measurement, artificial intel-
ligence, architecture, simulation, parallel processing, distributed
computing, computer communication, and theory of computation.
Applications for admission must be approved by both the Depart-
ment and the college in which the student wishes to enroll. Appli-
cants should have a strong computer science background.
Students who wish to obtain a degree from a college other than
the one from which they received their undergraduate degrees and
students with inadequate backgrounds in mathematics and statistics
will be required to do remedial work specified by the department's
graduate coordinator and approved by the new college.
All master's students must satisfy a core requirement by complet-
ing four specified graduate level courses (12 credits) or their ap-
proved equivalents. Students must maintain an average of at least
3.0 on the core courses with no more than one of the courses re-
ceiving a letter grade of C or C+. A grade of D or below in any core
course will necessitate retaking that course. A student is permitted
to repeat one core course once.
Students can select a thesis or nonthesis option for the master's
degree. The thesis option requires a minimum of 30 credit hours and
the nonthesis option a minimum of 33 credit hours. The thesis de-
gree requires an additional 12 credits of course work beyond the core
(a minimum of 6 graduate level credits in CISE and at most 6 credits
in some other department in the student's college), and a written thesis.
A minimum of 6 credit hours must be taken in CIS 6971. The
nonthesis option requires an additional 15 letter-graded credits of
course work in CISE beyond the core and 6 letter-graded credits from
either CISE or some other department in the student's college. Each





112 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


nonthesis master's student is required to pass a written comprehensive
examination.
To be admitted to the Engineer degree program, students must have
completed a master's degree in engineering. To earn the degree of en-
gineer, a student must obtain at least a 3.0 GPA in at least 30 gradu-
ate credit hours beyond the master's degree, within five calendar years
of enrollment. These credit hours may include CIS 6972, Research
for Engineer's Thesis. Both thesis and nonthesis options exist for the
Engineer degree. Note that credits counted toward the degree are not
credited toward any other degree-including the Ph.D. if a Ph.D. is
subsequently pursued.
To demonstrate breadth and proficiency, all Ph.D. students must
take five required core courses plus five optional courses from a pre-
scribed list. Students must maintain an average of at least 3.0 in the
core courses with no more than one of the courses receiving a letter
grade below B.
Ph.D. students are required to take a minimum of 90 credit hours.
Of these, at least 42 hours must be graduate level CISE course work.
A minimum of 15 hours must be taken in CIS 7980. A maximum
of 30 credits may be awarded toward the Ph.D. degree from an ap-
propriate master's degree.
The Database Systems Research and Development Center, the Soft-
ware Engineering Research Center, the Center for Computer Vision
and Visualization Center, and a number of other campus research
centers provide opportunities for students enrolled in the program.
CAP 5416-Computer Vision (3) Prereq: MAC2312, CGN3421 or
C-language. Introduction to image formation and analysis. Monocular
imaging system projections, camera model calibration, and binocular
imaging. Low-level vision techniques, segmentation and representation
techniques, and high-level vision.
CAP 5510-Bioinformatics (3) Prereq: CIS 3020 or equivalent. Ba-
sic concepts of molecular biology and computer science. Sequence com-
parison and assembly, physical mapping of DNA, phylogenetic trees,
genome rearrangements, gene identification, biomolecular cryptology,
and molecular structure prediction.
CAP 5515-Computational Molecular Biology (3) Algorithms related
to molecular biology. Sequence comparisons, pattern matching, pattern
extraction, graph techniques in phylogeny construction, secondary struc-
ture prediction, multiple sequence alignment, contig search, DNA com-
puting, computational learning theory, and genetic algorithms.
CAP 5635-Artificial Intelligence Concepts (3) Prereq: COP 3530.
Heuristic search, game theory, knowledge representation, logic, machine
learning, AI languages and tools. Applications such as planning, natu-
ral language understanding, expert systems, and computer vision.
CAP 5705-Computer Graphics (3) Prereq: COP3530. Display de-
vice characteristics; system considerations, display algorithms. Curve and
surface generation. Lighting models and image rendering.
CAP 5805-Computer Simulation Concepts (3) Prereq: COP3530.
Introduction to concepts in continuous and discrete simulation. Empasis
on fundamental concepts and methodology, using practical examples
from a wide variety of disciplines.
CAP 6516-Medical Image Analysis (3) Image formation, reconstruction
mathematics (Fourier slice theorem, Abel, Hankel and Radon transforms),
PDE-based denoising and segmentation, multidimensional clustering
algorithms, iso-surface extraction, basic differential geometry of curves and
surfaces, multidimensional splines, active 2D/3D models, image match-
ing/registration with application to multimodal co-registration.
CAP 6610-Machine Learning (3) Prereq: CAP 5635. Review of at-
tempts, within the artificial intelligence community, to construct com-
puter programs that learn. Statistical pattern recognition with its appli-
cations to such areas as optical character recognition. Inductive learn-
ing, automated discovery.


CAP 6615-Neural Networks for Computing (3) Prereq: CAP 5635.
Neural network models and algorithms. Adaptive behavior, associative
learning, competitive dynamics and biological mechanisms. Applications
include computer vision, cognitive information processing, control, and
signal analysis.
CAP 6685-Expert Systems (3) Prereq: CAP 5635. Production sys-
tems, meta-knowledge, heuristic discovery, indepth examination of several
expert systems including TEIRESIAS, AM, DENDRAL, MYCIN, IRIS,
CASNET, INTERNIST, BACON, PROSPECTOR.
CAP 6836-Advanced Concepts in Computer Simulation (3) Prereq:
CAP 5805. Elements of simulation modeling and analysis. Discrete and
continuous simulation methodology. Incorporation of computer ani-
mation and physically based modeling techniques.
CDA 5155-Computer Architecture Principles (3) Prereq: CDA 3101,
COP3530, and COP 4600. Fundamental design issues of processor and
computer architecture, a variety of design approaches for CPU, memory,
and system structure.
CDA 6159-High Performance Computer Architecture (3) Prereq:
CDA 5155, COP 5615. Design and evaluation of instruction-level
(superscalar, superpipeline) and task-level (fine and coarse-grained) parallel
architecture. Language and operating system support for instruction and
task scheduling and task synchronization.
CEN 5035-Software Engineering (3) Prereq: CIS3020 and COT3100.
Topics in projects organization, specification techniques, reliability
measurement, documentation.
CEN 5531-Mobile Computing (3) Prereq: CEN 4500C. Emerging
topics of wireless and mobile computing and networking including mobile
computing models, mobile-IP, adhoc networks, Bluetooth, and 802. 1 lb.
Mobile database access and mobile transactions in context of emerging
field ofM-commerce.
CEN 5540-Computer and Network Security (3) Prereq: COP3530,
COT5405; coreq: COP 4600. Issues, analysis, and solutions. Viruses,
worms, logic bombs, network attacks, covert channels, steganography,
cryptology, authentication, digital signatures, electronic commerce.
CEN 6070-Software Testing and Verification (3) Prereq: CEN5035.
Concepts, principles, and methods for software testing and verification.
Topics include human and machine-based testing strategies, formal proofs
of correctness, and software reliability.
CEN 6075-Software Specification (3) Prereq: CEN5035. Concepts,
principles, and methods for practical specification. System modeling,
requirements exploration, validation and prototyping, and documen-
tation techniques.
CEN 6505-Computer Communication Networks (3) Prereq: COP
5615 and5536. Computer network architecture, including topologies,
media, switching, routing, congestion control, protocols, and case studies.
CIS 6905-Individual Study (1-3; max: 6) Prereq: consent offaculty
member supervising the study. S/U option.
CIS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: graduate status
in CIS. S/U.
CIS 6930-Special Topics in CIS (3; max: 9) Prereq: vary depending
on topics.
CIS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: graduate sta-
tus in CIS. S/U.
CIS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
CIS 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
CIS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
CIS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
COP 5255-Concurrent Programming (3) Prereq: COP3100, 3530.
Overview of principles and programming techniques. Reasoning about





COUNSELOR EDUCATION / 113


concurrency, synchronization, program structuring, multi-threaded server
applications.
COP 5536-Advanced Data Structures (3) Prereq: COP 3530. De-
velopment of efficient data structures used to obtain more efficient
solutions to classical problems, such as those based on graph theoreti-
cal models, as well as problems that arise in application areas of contem-
porary interest.
COP 5555-Programming Language Principles (3) Prereq: COP3530.
History of programming languages, formal models for specifying languages,
design goals, run-time structures, and implementation techniques, along
with survey of principal programming language paradigms.
COP 5615-Operating System Principles (3) Prereq: COP 4600. The
concepts and techniques of efficient management of computer system
resources.
COP 5625-Programming Language Translators (3) Prereq: COP
5555. Anatomy of translators for high-level programming languages.
COP 5725-Database Management Systems (3) Prereq: COP3530,
4600, or equivalent. An introduction to systems and procedures for
managing large computerized databases.
COP 6726-Database System Implementation (3) Prereq: COP 4600
and 4720 or 5725. DBMS architecture, query processing and optimi-
zation, transaction processing, index structures, parallel query processing,
object-oriented and object-relational databases, and related topics.
COP 6755-Distributed Database Systems (3) Prereq: COP 5615,
5725, and a course in computer networks. Distributed database systems
including the areas of distributed database design, resource allocation,
access plan selection, and transaction management.
COT 5405-Analysis ofAlgorithms (3) Prereq: COP3530. Introduc-
tion and illustration of basic techniques for designing efficient algorithms
and analyzing algorithm complexity.
COT 6315-Formal Languages and Computation Theory (3) Prereq:
COP 3530 andfamiliarity with discrete mathematics and data structures.
Introduction to theoretical computer science including formal languages,
automata theory, Turing machines, and computability.
COT 6440-Randomization in Computing (3) Prereq: COP 3530.
Primality testing, optimization, protein folding, sorting, hashing, n-body
simulations, matching, flow dynamics, routing, finger printing, early
vision, and data mining.



COUNSELOR EDUCATION
College of Education

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairperson: M. H. Daniels. Graduate Coordinator: P. A. D. Sherrard.
Distinguished Service Professor: P. J. Wittmer. Professors: E. S. Amatea;
J. A. Archer; M. H. Daniels; J. Joiner; L. C. Loesch; R. D. Myrick; W.
M. Parker; J. L. Resnick; J. P. Saxon; P. G. Schauble. Clinical Professor:
M. Fukuyama. Associate Professors: S. Echevarria-Doan; J. H. Pitts; P.
A. D. Sherrard. Clinical Assistant Professor: W. D. Griffin.

Programs leading to the Master of Arts in Education, Master of
Education, Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, and
Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered through this department.
In some programs, the Master of Education degree (identified below
by an asterisk) is awarded only upon completion of the Specialist
in Education degree; however, course work toward the Specialist
in Education degree completed after 60 semester hours is consid-
ered post-master's level work. Program areas include (1) school
counseling and guidance (M.A.E., M.Ed.,' Ed.S., Ed.D., or Ph.D.)
for positions in elementary, middle, and secondary schools; (2)
mental health counseling (M.A.E., M.Ed.,' Ed.S., Ed.D., or Ph.D.);


and (3) marriage and family counseling (M.A.E., M.Ed.,' Ed.S.,
Ed.D., or Ph.D.) for positions in community, private, educational,
or business and industry counseling agencies or settings.
The school counseling and guidance; mental health counseling;
and marriage and family counseling programs are accredited by the
Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational
Programs.
Multicultural perspectives, career development, and research meth-
odology are integral parts of preparation in all programs. A special-
ization in counselor education and supervision is included in all
doctoral programs in the Department.
Candidates for admission are urged to complete a course in ba-
sic statistics before entering a program.
MHS 5005-Introduction to Counseling (3)
MHS 6020-Counseling in Community Settings (3) Prereq: MHS
7800; coreq: current enrollment in mental health counseling practicum or
internship.
MHS 6061-Spiritual Issues in Multicultural Counseling (3) Spiri-
tual/religious/transpersonal issues expressed in counseling from both client
and counselor perspective.
MHS 6071-Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Disorders (3) Prereq:
MHS 6400, 6401.
MHS 6200-Assessment in Counseling and Development (3) Prereq:
course in basic statistics.
MHS 6340-Career Development (3)
MHS 6400-Personality and Mental Health Counseling (3)
MHS 6401-Counseling Theories and Applications (3) Prereq: MHS
5005.
MHS 6421-Play Counseling and Play Process with Children (3)
Prereq: MHS 6401.
MHS 6428-Multicultural Counseling (3) Prereq: MHS 6401.
MHS 6430-Introduction to Family Counseling (3) Prereq: MHS
6401, 7800.
MHS 6440-Marriage Counseling (3)
MHS 6450-Substance Abuse Counseling (3)
MHS 6480-Developmental Counseling Over the Life Span (3)
MHS 6481-Sexuality and Mental Health (3) Prereq: MHS 6400,
6401.
MHS 6500-Group Counseling: Theories and Procedures (3) Prereq:
MHS 6401.
MHS 6602-Educational Mediation (3) Negotiation and mediation
in educational and other settings.
MHS 6705-Professional, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Marriage and
Family Counseling (3)
MHS 6720-Professional Identity and Ethics in Counseling (3)
MHS 6831-Supervision for a Split Internship (3; max: 6) Prereq:
permission of adviser, completion ofpracticum sequence, and written
application to internship coordinator at least six weeks in advance of reg-
istration; coreq: MHS 7804, 7807, SDS 7820, or 7802. Required first
enrollment for students participating in internship over two semesters.
S/U.
MHS 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 12) Prereq: consent ofinstructor
and graduate coordinator; approval ofproposed project.
MHS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
MHS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
MHS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
MHS 6973-Project in Lieu of Thesis (1-9) Development, testing,
and evaluation of original educational technology, curricular materials,
or intervention program. S/U.
MHS 7402-Brief Therapy (3) Prereq: 24 graduate-level credits in
counseling and/or psychology, successful completion ofpracticum. Exami-
nation of contemporary theories of brief counseling and psychotherapy.
Survey of theories with emphasis on application and research.





114 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


MHS 7431-Advanced Family Counseling (4) Prereq: MHS 6430.
MHS 7600-Consultation Procedures (2) Prereq: MHS 7800; coreq:
registration in practicum or internship.
MHS 7730-Seminar in Counseling Research (3) Prereq: satisfactory
completion ofEDF 6403. Issues in designing and implementing coun-
seling and psychotherapy dissertation research.
MHS 7740-Research in Counseling and Development (3) Prereq:
MHS 6200.
MHS 7800-Practicum I in Counseling-150 Hours (3) Prereq: MHS
6401, permission ofadviser, and written application to practicum coordi-
nator at least six weeks in advance of registration. S/U.
MHS 7804-Group Supervision in Agency Counseling (1; max: 5)
Prereq: written application to practicum/internship coordinator at least six
weeks in advance ofregistration; coreq: MHS 7800, 7805, SDS 7830, or
MHS 6831. S/U.
MHS 7805-Practicum II in Agency Counseling (3) Prereq: MHS 7800,
permission ofadviser, and written application to practicum coordinator at least
six weeks in advance ofregistration; coreq: MHS 7804. S/U.
MHS 7806-Practicum II in Marriage and Family Counseling (3)
Prereq: MHS 7800, permission of adviser, and written application to
practicum coordinator at least six weeks in advance of registration; coreq:
MHS 7807. S/U.
MHS 7807-Group Supervision in Marriage and Family Counseling
(1; max: 5) Prereq: written application topracticum/internship coordinator
at least six weeks in advance of registration; coreq: MHS 7800, 7806, SDS
7830, or MHS 6831. S/U.
MHS 7808-Practicum in Counseling Supervision (4; max: 8) Prereq:
MHS 6401, permission of adviser, and written application to practicum
coordinator at least six weeks in advance of registration. Open only to ad-
vanced doctoral students. S/U.
MHS 7830-Internship in Counseling and Development-600 Hours
(5; max: 15) Prereq: permission ofadviser, completion ofall practice re-
quired for M.Ed. or Ed.S degree, and written application to internship
coordinator at least six weeks in advance of registration. S/U.
MHS 7840-Internship in Counselor Education (6; max: 12) Prereq:
written application to internship coordinator at least six weeks in advance
of registration. Open only to advanced doctoral students. S/U.
MHS 7946-Internship in Agency Program Management (6; max:
12) Prereq: written application to internship coordinator at least six weeks
in advance ofregistration. Open only to advanced doctoral students. S/U.
MHS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Prereq: Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been admitted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
MHS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
SDS 6401-Counseling Skills for Non-Counselors (3) Counseling skills
in dyadic communication and in small groups.
SDS 6411--Counseling with Children (3) Prereq or coreq: MHS 6401.
SDS 6413-Counseling Adolescents (3) Prereq: MHS 6401.
SDS 6520-Family, Student Development and Role of Teacher as
Adviser (3) Learning to be advisers to small groups of middle school
students concerning personal and academic development.
SDS 6620-Organization and Administration of Guidance and Per-
sonnel Programs (3) Prereq: SDS 6411.
SDS 6831-Supervision for a Split Internship (3; max: 6) Prereq:
permission ofadviser, completion ofpracticum sequence and written appli-
cation to internship coordinator at least six weeks in advance of registra-
tion; coreq: MHS 7804, 7807, SDS 7820, or 7802. Required first en-
rollment for students participating in internship over two semesters. S/U.
SDS 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 12) Prereq: consentofinstructor
and graduate coordinator; approval ofproposed project.


SDS 6938-Special Topics (1-4; max: 12) Prereq: consent ofdepart-
ment chair.
SDS 7800-Practicum II in School Counseling (3) Prereq: MHS 7800,
SDS 6411; permission of adviser; and written application to practicum co-
ordinator at least six weeks in advance ofregistration; coreq: SDS 7820. S/U.
SDS 7820-Group Supervision in School Counseling (1; max: 5)
Prereq: written application topracticum/internship coordinator at least six
weeks in advance of registration; coreq: MHS 7800, SDS 7800, 7830, or
MHS 6831. S/U.
SDS 7830-Internship in Counseling and Development-600 Hours
(5; max: 15) Prereq: permission ofadviser, completion ofall practice re-
quired for M.Ed. or Ed.S. degree, and written application to internship
coordinator at least six weeks in advance ofregistration; coreq: SDS 7802,
MHS 7804, 7807, or SDS 7820. S/U.



DECISION AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES

Warrington College of Business Administration

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: S. S. Erenguc. Graduate Coordinator: A. J. Vakharia. Gradu-
ate Research Professor: I. Horowitz.John B. Higdon Eminent Scholar: G.
J. Koehler. PriceWaterhouseCoopers Professor: S. S. Erenquc. Beall Pro-
fessor: A. J. Vakharia. Professors: H. P. Benson; R. A. Elnicki. Lecturer:
P. A. Thompson. Assistant Professors: I. Bose; J. E. Carrillo; A. A. Paul.

The Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Department offers
graduate work leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) and the Ph.D.
in business administration, as well as a concentration in the Master
of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program.
The Master of Science degree is designed to provide students with
computing, quantitative, and application skills to be used in a business
problem-solving setting. The primary areas of concentration in the
M.S. program are information technology and supply chain man-
agement. Requirements span traditional academic disciplines to
produce a multiple-discipline major. Typical positions for graduates
include decision support specialist, information systems specialist,
systems analyst, and logistic support specialist.
For a student with a bachelor's degree in business or econom-
ics, the M.S. nonthesis program consists of a minimum of 36 credit
hours, normally requiring three semesters of study, which may
include a summer. Students without the prerequisite course work
may need another semester.
All M.S. candidates must take a set of required courses: CGS 6305-
Computer-Based Business Management; ISM 6128/6129-Advanced
Business Systems Design and Development I and II; ISM 6215-
Business Database Systems I; ISM 6222/6223-Business Telecom
Strategy and Applications I and II; QMB 6358/6359-Statistical
Analysis for Managerial Decisions I and II; QMB 6755/6756-Mana-
gerial Quantitative Analysis I and II.
The required courses total 22 credit hours. In addition, each M.S.
student must take a minimum of 14 additional hours of approved
electives.
Admission requirements for the Ph.D. include (a) a minimum grade
point average of 3.2, (b) a minimum GRE score of 1250 or GMAT
score of 600, and (c) for nonnative speakers of English, a minimum
score of 600 on the TOEFL. Students come from a variety of back-
grounds, with the most common being engineering and business
administration.





DECISION AND INFORMATION SCIENCES / 115


The exact schedule of courses taken by each student is always per-
sonalized to fit the background of the student and is usually devel-
oped in consultation with the Ph.D. program coordinator and/or chair
of the dissertation committee. A typical program of study assuming
that the student has the required background in business, calculus,
linear algebra, and C programming is as follows.
Methodological and substantive course work includes the following
courses: CGS 6305-Computer Based Business Management; ECO
7408-Mathematical Methods and Applications to Economics; MAR
7626-Multivariate Statistical Methods in Marketing; MAS 4105-
Linear Algebra; ESI 6546-Stochastic Model Analysis; ESI 6417-
Linear Programming and Network Optimization; STA 5325-Math-
ematical Methods of Statistics; STA 5328-Mathematical Methods
of Statistics II; and MHF 5207-Foundations of Mathematics.
In addition to these courses, doctoral students are also required
to attend doctoral seminar courses as and when they are offered, attend
the DIS Workshop series, and take any additional courses required
for their dissertation work.
The Department offers a combined B.S.B.A./M.S. program. This
program allows qualified students to earn both the bachelor's and
master's degrees, using up to 16 credit hours of graduate level courses
for both degrees.
CGS 6305-Computer-Based Business Management (4) Prereq: consent
ofinstructor. Principles of data-processing management and the appli-
cation of computers in solving business problems.
ISM 5021-Information Systems in Organizations (3) Prereq: con-
sent ofinstructor. Designed for M.B.A. students. Introduction for gradu-
ate students with minimal microcomputer operation skills. Topics in-
clude the range of computer information technology available, language
types and procedural languages, applications in organizations, manage-
ment of resources, and trends. Students use microcomputers in the
College's computing laboratories.
ISM 6022-Management Information Systems (2) Policy and man-
agement issues surrounding information systems in today's enterprises.
Strategic use, organizational impact, project management, human re-
source issues, and other topics important to understanding information
systems in business.
ISM 6128-Advanced Business Systems Design and Development I
(2) Object-oriented analysis and model specification for business soft-
ware systems. Articulation of key requirements (data, processes, physi-
cal components, deployment) using logical modeling methodologies.
ISM 6129-Advanced Business Systems Design and Development II
(2) Prereq: ISM 6128 or consent ofinstructor. Continuation of ISM 6128.
Focus on object-oriented design of systems. How to translate business
requirements into specific task and component requirements.
ISM 6215-Business Database Systems I (2) Prereq: ISM 6129. Fun-
damentals of data storage and retrieval models for business applications.
Data modeling and database design principles. Theoretical foundations
and exercises presented for relational data model and SQL.
ISM 6216-BusinessDatabase Systems II (2) Prereq: ISM 6215. Con-
tinuation of ISM 6215. Focus on implementation and programming
issues.
ISM 6222-Business Telecom Strategy and Applications I (2) Prereq:
procedural programming language and microcomputer working knowledge.
Survey of networking technologies used in WWW and e-commerce. TC[/
IP networks and related security, networking hardware, and Internet
software standards.
ISM 6223-Business Telecom Strategy and Applications II (2) Prereq:
ISM 6222 or consent of instructor. Both introduction of traditional te-
lephony and discussion of issues companies face upon consolidation of
voice and data networks. Technological developments, product announce-
ments, and market activity, with ultimate focus on strategy ofvoice/data
integration.


ISM 6224-Business Telecom Strategy and Applications III (2) Prereq:
ISM 6223 and 6129. Telecommunications analysis and design. Both
tactical and strategic issues concerning integration.
ISM 6236-Business Objects I (2) Prereq: ISM 6223 and 6216 Over-
view of main tools for business objects in enterprise programming and il-
lustrated with hands-on experiences. Distributed object models, component
architectures, design methodologies and patterns, languages and develop-
ment environments, and databases and repositories.
ISM 6239-Business Objects II (2) Prereq: ISM 6236 Extension of
concepts and tools of ISM 6236 to include practical aspects of using business
objects in enterprise systems. Focus on overview of ERP systems, prox-
ies, wrapping legacy systems with objects and proxy repositories.
ISM 6423-Knowledge Systems for Business (2) Practical issues in
wide range of business situations. Justifying, building, verifying, and using
knowledge systems in business. Case studies.
ISM 6485-Electronic Commerce and Logistics (2) Underlying tech-
nologies that herald innovations. How to capitalize on new electronic
commerce and logistics in business.
ISM 6486-eCommerce Technologies (2) Database management
systems, systems design and Web-page design, human computer interface
issues, artificial intelligence methods (such as data mining and expert
systems), and intelligent software agents.
ISM 6487-Risks and Controls in eCommerce (2) Strategic IT plan-
ning, policies and control; risk assessment, reliability, benchmarking and
monitoring; privacy and security models and technologies; availability,
continuity and compliance testing; and threat monitoring.
ISM 6942-Electronic Commerce Practicum (2) Projects such as de-
veloping e-commerce business plans, constructing e-commerce sites, etc.
ISM 7166-Advanced Business Systems Design and Development III
(2) Prereq: ISM 6129. Continuation of ISM 6129. Focus on software
project management and development. Exploration of object-oriented
project management approach supported by computer-aided software
engineering tool.
MAN 5501-Operations Management (3) Prereq: MAR 5621. Designed
forM.B.A. students. Purpose of course is to introduce the student to the
general class of problems associated with managing production facili-
ties.
MAN 5502-Production and Operations Management (2) Prereq:
MAR 5621. Core course designedfor traditional M.B.A. students. Intro-
duction to POM, which focuses on design and control of productive
systems within organizations.
MAN 6508-Management of Service Operations (2) Case studies and
problems, including systems design, operation, and control; emphasis
on waiting-line systems.
MAN 6511-Production Management Problems (2) Problems in the
management of industrial enterprise; management principles and math-
ematical analysis applied to manufacturing; product development and
production; materials and production control; employee relations.
MAN 6528-Principles of Logistics/Transportation Systems (2)
Logistics management in current business environment.
MAN 6573-Purchasing and Materials Management (2) Industrial/
institutional purchasing cycle for operating supplies, raw materials,
components and capital equipment within context of materials man-
agement organizational concepts. Basic principles, policies, and procedures
involved in requirement determination; procurement decision process;
purchasing function; and materials management concept, organization,
and philosophy.
MAN 6581-Project Management (2) Role of manager in organiza-
tion and ways of structuring project organizations; fundamentals of
scheduling; time/cost tradeoffs, budgeting, and cost estimation; and
monitoring.
MAN 6617-International Operations/Logistics (2) Global delivery/
distribution channels, coordinating production/delivery operations in





116 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


international markets, optimizing use of transportation networks, and
designing information/communications systems that span supply chain.
QMB 6358-Statistical Analysis for Managerial Decisions I (2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Data application techniques with broad application
to managerial problems. Emphasis on difficulties which can arise in the
application of the techniques and in the interpretation of results. Ex-
perience in use of computerized procedures; may require substantial
amount of case analysis.
QMB 6359-Statistical Analysis for Managerial Decisions II (2) Prereq:
QMB 6358 or consent of instructor. Data application techniques with
emphasis placed on relationships that occur over time. Substantial amount
of case analysis, as well as applications programming using industry
standard software products.
QMB 6607-Decision Processes Under Uncertainty I (2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Introduction to statistical decision theory, includ-
ing the vonNeuman-Morgenstern behavioral axioms, forms, techniques
for assessing probabilities, and penalty functions, with managerial and
economic applications.
QMB 6608-Decision Processes Under Uncertainty II (2) Prereq:
QMB 6607 or consent ofinstructor. Statistical decision theory over con-
tinuous decision sets. Bayesian statistical analysis and inference with
emphasis on linear models.
QMB 6693-Quality Management and Control Systems (2) Prereq:
MAR 5621 or equivalent or consent ofinstructor. Philosophy of total quality
management and technical aspects of quality design and measurement
systems.
QMB 6697-Optimization in Simulation Modeling I (2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Use of simulation techniques in managerial deci-
sion problems, including random number generation and search pro-
cedures for determining optimal policies.
QMB 6698-Optimization in Simulation Modeling II (2) Prereq: QMB
6697 or consent ofinstructor. Simulation techniques used in managerial
decision making with emphasis on queuing and other systems. Use of
optimization models emphasized.
QMB 6755-Managerial Quantitative Analysis I (2) Prereq: consent
of instructor. Survey of deterministic models for managerial decision
making; emphasis on mathematical programming.
QMB 6756-Managerial Quantitative Analysis II (2) Prereq: QMB
6755 or consent ofinstructor. Use of deterministic and stochastic mod-
els for decision making. Integer and nonlinear programming, goal pro-
gramming, multiple objective linear programming, and decision theory.
Applied problem solving and case studies, using appropriate software.
QMB 6905-Individual Work in Decision and Information Sciences
(1-5; max: 10) Prereq: consent ofdepartment. Reading and/or research.
QMB 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
QMB 6930-Special Topics in Decision and Information Sciences (1-
4; max: 16) Variable content. In-depth study of topics not offered in
other courses or topics of special current significance.
QMB 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
QMB 6957-International Studies in Quantitative Methods (1-4; max:
12) Prereq: admission to an approved study abroad program and permis-
sion ofdepartment. S/U.
QMB 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
QMB 7808-Markov Decision Processes (3) Prereq: consent ofinstruc-
tor. Application ofMarkov processes for managerial decisions, including prob-
ability estimation problems and transition reward structures.
QMB 7809-Decision Processes Under Conflict (3) Prereq: consent
of instructor. Managerial and economic applications of game theory
models, including conflict resolution, bargaining, risk sharing, and group
decision processes in a managerial context.
QMB 7827-Linear Programming for Management Scientists (3) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Solving a linear programming model and evaluation
of the solution; linear programming computer software and its use.


QMB 7857-Optimization in Static Managerial Models (3) Prereq:
QMB 7827or equivalent or consent ofinstructor. Introduction to the theory
and application of unconstrained and constrained optimization in static
managerial decision models.
QMB 7865-Optimization in Dynamic Managerial Decision Mod-
els (3) Prereq: QMB 7857. Introduction to the theory of dynamic op-
timization in discrete-time and continuous-time models, with managerial
and economic applications.
QMB 7877-Integer Programming and Network Flows (3) Prereq: QMB
7827 or equivalent. Introduction to the theory of discrete optimization,
graphs, and networks. Tools of exact solution methods and of successful
heuristic discussed, with managerial and economic applications.
QMB 7931-Special Topics in Decision and Information Sciences (1-
4; max: 9) Prereq: consent of instructor. Recent literature and state-of-
the-art theory and methods in both the decision and the information
sciences.
QMB 7933-Seminar in Decision and Information Sciences (1-4; max:
9) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Historical foundations and evolutionary
development of concepts in decision and information sciences, emerg-
ing problems and future trends.
QMB 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
QMB 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



DENTAL SCIENCES
College of Dentistry

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Endodontics Chair and Graduate Coordinator: F. J. Vertucci. Orthodon-
tics Chair and Graduate Coordinator: T. T. Wheeler. Periodontology Chair:
H. Towle. Graduate Coordinator J. Gray. Prosthodontics Chair A. Nimmo.
Graduate Coordinator: C. A. Hansen. Eminent Scholar: I. Mjor. Gradu-
ate Research Professor: A. S. Bleiweis. Professors: K. J. Anusavice; R.
A. Baughman; D. Benn; T. A. Brown; A. E. Clark; C. H. Gibbs; M. W.
Heft; J. D. Hillman; N. Javid; S. B. Low; N. I. Magnusson; W. P.
McArthur; R. E. Primosch; A. Progulske-Fox; J. D. Ruskin; K. J.
Soderholm; H. Towle; F. J. Vertucci; C. B. Walker; T. T. Wheeler;
C. G. Widmer; W. N. Williams; R. P. Yezierski. Associate Professors:
C. S. Bates; R. M. Caudle; B. Y. Cooper; J. F. Esquivel; R. B. Fillingim;
J. Gray; N.J. Grimaudo; C. A. Hansen; J. Katz; D. Morton; C. Shen;
G. E. Turner; H. D. Walia. Clinical Associate Professor: F. H. Brown.
Assistant Professors: L. J. Brady; C. Dolce; M. Handfield; J. A. Morris-
Wiman; J. Riley. Assistant Scientist: E. V. Kozarov.

The College of Dentistry offers the Master of Science degree in
dental sciences with specializations in endodontics, orthodontics, pe-
riodontics, and prosthodontics. The program includes a minimum
of 38 hours of appropriate course work and research in topics rel-
evant to each specialization. Satisfactory completion of all course work,
the requirements for clinical certification in the respective dental
specialty, and a thesis based on research are requirements for the
master's degree. Prerequisites for admission, in addition to those of
the Graduate School, include a D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree and comple-
tion of Parts I and II of the American Dental Association's National
Board of Dental Examinations. Application deadline is October 1.
Address applications to Master of Science Program, College of Den-
tistry, P.O. Box 100402, Health Science Center, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32610-0402.





DENTAL SCIENCES / 117


The following courses are part of the core curriculum required for
all specializations: DEN 6674-Oral Pathology/Oral Radiology; GMS
6160 and GMS 6161-Introduction to Oral Biology I and II; GMS
6609-Advanced Gross Anatomy; VME 6767-Issues in the Responsible
Conduct of Research. Those not in Dentistry are given in-department
graduate credit. All students are required to take STA 6200-Funda-
mentals of Research Design and STA 6201-Analysis of Research Design.
GMS 6176 and GMS 6177-Biology of Tooth Supporting Structures
I and II are given in-department graduate credit for students in the
orthodontic specialization.
Registration in the courses listed below is restricted to students cur-
rently admitted to a program in the College of Dentistry.

GENERAL

DEN 6674-Advanced Oral Pathology (1) Survey of clinical charac-
teristics, microscopic features, and treatment and prognosis of diseases
affecting the head and neck, oral mucosa, and jaws.
DEN 6675-Craniofacial Pain (1) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Structure,
function, and pathofunction ofcranio-cervical region and stomatognathic
system emphasizing differential diagnosis and case-specific management.
DEN 6678-Advanced Oral Medicine and Drug Interactions in
Dentistry (2) Prereq: consent of instructor. Designed for dental specialty
andgeneralpractice residents. Emphasis on understanding medications
available to practicing dentists.
DEN 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
DEN 6935-Special Topics in Dentistry (1-3; max: 6)
DEN 6936-Practice Management (1) Fundamental management
principles and practices. Emphasis on establishing dentist in practice
without making major business mistakes. Consideration to selecting
associate, developing association contract, and understanding associate
relationship. S/U.
DEN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
DEN 6941-Clinical Teaching in Dentistry (1) To assess recall fac-
tors that influence learning in clinical situations and to access relevant
learning and factors while in clinical situations thus providing effective
instructional decisions. Designed to aid participant in recalling and using
this information. S/U.
DEN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-6) S/U.

ENDODONTICS

DEN 6642-Introduction to Advanced Endodontics (1) Prereq: consent
ofinstructor. Analysis of principles, philosophies, and treatment procedures
relative to morphology, physiology, and pathology of human dental pulp
and periradicular tissues.
DEN 6643-Treatment Planning/Cases Presentation (1) Prereq: DEN
6642. Seminars to analyze patient treatment plans with regard to dif-
ferential diagnosis and treatment of oral pains of pulpal and/or
periradicular origin, vital pulp therapy, nonsurgical and surgical root canal
therapy, intentional replantation and replantation of avulsed teeth,
endodontic implants, and bleaching of discolored teeth.
DEN 6644-Nonsurgical Endodontic Care I (1) Prereq: DEN 6642.
Supervised clinical experience in comprehensive management of patients'
needs in areas of differential diagnosis of pulp and periradicular disease,
vital pulp therapy, nonsurgical root canal therapy, bleaching of discol-
ored teeth, and procedures related to coronal restorations by means of
post and/or cores involving root canal space.
DEN 6645-Nonsurgical Endodontic Care II (1) Prereq: DEN6644.
Continuation of DEN 6644.
DEN 6646-Surgical Endodontics I (1) Prereq: DEN 6642. Super-
vised clinical experience in comprehensive management of patients' needs
in areas of differential diagnosis of pulp and periradicular disease requiring


surgical intervention, selective removal of pathological tissue resulting
from pulpal pathosis, intentional replantation and replantation ofavulsed
teeth, surgical removal of tooth structure such as in apicoectomy, he-
misection, and root amputation and endodontic implants.
DEN 6647-Surgical Endodontics II (1) Prereq: DEN 6646. Continu-
ation of DEN 6646.

ORTHODONTICS

DEN 6602-Orthodontic Treatment-Appliance Management and
Effect of Treatment Part 1: Class I Treatment (1) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Survey of all methods and techniques utilized to treat vari-
ous malocclusions and their basic biologic principles.
DEN 6603-Orthodontic Treatment-Appliance Management and
Effect of Treatment Part 2: Class II Treatment (1) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Continuation of DEN 6602.
DEN 6604-Orthodontic Treatment-Appliance Management and Effect
of Treatment Part 3: Class II Treatment and Overbite Treatments (1)
Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Continuation of DEN 6603.
DEN 6605-Orthodontic Treatment-Appliance Management and
Effect of Treatment Part 4: Class II Treatment and Overbite Treat-
ments (1) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Continuation of DEN 6604.
DEN 6606-Orthodontic Treatment-Appliance Management and
Effect of Treatment Part 5: Class III and Crossbite Treatments and
Soft Tissue Considerations (1) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Continu-
ation of DEN 6605.
DEN 6607-Orthodontic Treatment-Appliance Management and
Effect of Treatment Part 6: Impactions, Transplantations and Stability
(1) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Continuation of DEN 6606.
DEN 6608-Analysis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning: Part I (1;
max: 2) Prereq: consent of instructor. Information to aid in examining
patient, gathering data, analyzing and manipulating data, diagnosing,
and subsequent treatment plan development.
DEN 6609-Analysis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning: Part II
(1; max: 2) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Information to aid in examin-
ing a patient, gathering data, analyzing and manipulating data, diagnosing,
and subsequent treatment plan development.
DEN 6610-Biology of Tooth Movement: Part I (1; max: 2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Review of literature related to biology of orthodontic
tooth movement.
DEN 661 1-Biology of Tooth Movement: Part II (1; max: 2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Review of literature related to biology of orthodontic
tooth movement.
DEN 6612-Orthodontic Biomechanics: Part I (1; max: 2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Biomechanical principles, biomechanics in certain
treatment approaches, methods of research in biomechanics.
DEN 6613-Orthodontic Biomechanics: Part II (1; max: 2) Prereq:
consent of instructor. Biomechanical principles, biomechanics in certain
treatment approaches, methods of research in biomechanics.
DEN 6614-Ortho-Perio Relationships: Part I (1; max: 2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Understanding effects of orthodontics on periodontal
tissue, treatment ofperiodontally compromised patient, and literature
on various periodontal procedures.
DEN 6615-Ortho-Perio Relationships: Part II (1; max: 2) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Understanding effects of orthodontics on periodontal
tissue, treatment ofperiodontally compromised patient, and literature
on various periodontal procedures.
DEN 6616-Orthognathic Surgery: Part I (1; max: 2) Prereq: con-
sent ofinstructor. Principles involved in correction of skeletal problems
by orthodontics and oral and maxillofacial surgery.
DEN 6617-Orthognathic Surgery: Part II (1; max: 2) Prereq: con-
sent ofinstructor. Principles involved in correction of skeletal problems
by orthodontics and oral and maxillofacial surgery.





118 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


PERIODONTICS

DEN 6652-Review of Periodontics Literature I (1) Periodontal data
collection, etiology of periodontal disease, pathogenesis ofperiodontal diseases,
acute periodontal lesions, and classification of periodontal diseases.
DEN 6653-Review of Periodontics Literature II (1) Prereq: DEN
6652. Diagnosis, prognosis and treatment planning including tooth
mobility and tooth movement, prognosis, plaque control and nonsur-
gical periodontal therapy.
DEN 6654-Review of Periodontics Literature III (1) Prereq: DEN
6653. Principles of periodontal surgery and wound healing.
DEN 6655-Review of Periodontics Literature IV (1) Prereq: DEN
6654. Mucogingival surgery, antibiotic therapy, ultrasonics, irrigation
and maintenance of the periodontal patient. Discussion of restorative
considerations and orthodontics.
DEN 6656-Introduction to Advanced Periodontology (1) Intense
general review of periodontal structure, function and disease pathogenesis.
Tissues of periodontium, cementum, bone, periodontal ligament and
epithelial attachment. Review of etiology of disease process pertaining
to microbial flora and host response.
DEN 6657-Periodontal Histology and Histopathology (1) Survey
of histology and histopathology of periodontium, utilizing light and
electron microscopy.
DEN 6658-Treatment Planning in Periodontal Therapy (1) Inter-
disciplinary seminar. Students present findings of examination of pa-
tients with advanced dental diseases and discuss diagnosis and treatment
planning for these patients.

PROSTHODONTICS

DEN 6622-Principles of Occlusion (2) Chronological history of
gnathology and developing treatment philosophies. In-depth biomechanical
and neuro-physiological study of human dental occlusion. Role sound
occlusion plays in oral health and current methods of treatment.
DEN 6623-Maxillofacial Prosthetics (1) Art and science of anatomic,
functional, and cosmetic reconstruction by means of nonliving substi-
tutes for structures missing as a result of surgical intervention, trauma,
or congenital malformation.
DEN 6624-Dental Implant Restoration (1) Prereq: D.M.D. orD.D.S.
degree. Diagnostic and laboratory principles involved with restoration
of dental implants.
DEN 6625-Fixed Prosthodontic Ceramics (1) Prereq: D.M.D. orD.D.S.
degree. Laboratory and diagnostic principles associated with preparation and
fabrication of metal and ceramic fixed partial prostheses.
DEN 6626-Advanced Removable Partial Dentures (1) Prereq: D.M.D.
orD.D.S. degree. Principles and applications. Survey of supporting tis-
sues, classification systems, biomechanics, treatment planning, materials,
and historical overview of removable partial prosthodontics.
DEN 6627-Treatment Planning Seminar (1) Prereq: D.M.D. or
D.D.S. degree. Format to evaluate treatment planning skills, to present
comprehensive cases in organized and logical manner and to use literature
and experience to defend treatment plans.



ECONOMICS
Warrington College of Business Administration

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman:J. H. Hamilton. Graduate Coordinator: S. M. Slutsky.Jim Walters
Eminent Scholar: T. Lewis. Lanzillotti-McKethan Eminent Scholar: D.
Sappington. Distinguished Service Professors: S. V. Berg; D. Denslow.
Gerald Gunter Professor: R. E. Romano. Huber Hurst Professor: R. D.


Blair. Professors: J. D. Adams; E. Dinopoulos; J. H. Hamilton; L. W.
Kenny; M. Rush; S. M. Slutsky; S. K. Smith; C. T. West. Associate Pro-
fessors: C. Ai; W. A. Bomberger; D. N. Figlio; D. G. Waldo. Assistant
Professors: M. J. Werner; B. Xu.

The Department offers the Master of Arts (thesis and nonthesis
option) and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in economics with spe-
cializations in econometrics, economic theory, industrial organiza-
tion, international economics, monetary economics, and public fi-
nance.
MA. Requirements-A minimum of 36 credits of course work is
required for both the M.A. with and the M.A. without thesis. A maxi-
mum of six credits of the research course ECO 6971 may be included
for a master's degree with thesis. The following core courses are required:
ECO 7408 and ECO 7404 or equivalent, ECO 7415 or equivalent,
ECO 7115, ECO 7206.
Ph.D. Requirements-Admission requirements for the Ph.D. in-
clude (a) a minimum grade point average of 3.0, (b) a minimum GRE
score of 1000, and (c) for nonnative speakers of English, a minimum
score of 550 on the TOEFL. Students in the Ph.D. program must
complete the following core courses: ECO 7113, ECO 7115, ECO
7120, ECO 7206, ECO 7272, ECO 7404, ECO 7406, ECO 7408,
ECO 7415, and ECO 7424. All core courses must be completed in
the first year. In addition, students must complete courses in three
fields of specializations and pass qualifying examinations in two of
those fields.
ECO 5715-Open Economy Macroeconomics (2) Prereq: ECP
5702.Designedprimarily frM.B.A. students. International linkages arising
from capital flows and exchange rates as well as comparison on macro-
economic policies and performance across countries. Effect of macro-
economic events on international business environment.
ECO 6409-Game Theory Applied to Business Decisions (2) Prereq:
ECP 5702 or equivalent. Designed primarily for M.B.A. students. Busi-
ness settings analyzed wherein a few decision makers profoundly affect
one another's well being. Oligopoly competition and coordination,
nonprice choices, entry deterrence, reputation formation, contract de-
sign, and management of work teams.
ECO 6505-Public Economics: Tax Analysis and Policy (3) Prereq:
permission ofinstructor. DesignedprimarilyforM.B.A. students. Introduc-
tion to welfare analysis and its application to tax policy: incidence and
efficiency cost of taxes; overview of federal and state tax systems.
ECO 6705-Managing International Trade and Investment (2) Prereq:
ECP 5702 orpermission ofinstructor. Designedprimarilyfor M.B.A. stu-
dents. Exploiting international competitive advantage in exports and
foreign investment. Managing competition with imports and foreign
investors. Understanding rules and regulations of international trade and
investments implemented by governments and international organiza-
tions.
ECO 6708-International Macroeconomics (3) Prereq: ECP 5705.
Designedprimarily for M.B.A. students. Not designed for doctoral students
in economics. Macroeconomic policies and their effects on the interna-
tional business environment.
ECO 6906-Individual Work in Economics (1-4; max: 8)
ECO 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ECO 6936-Special Topics (1-4; max: 16)
ECO 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ECO 6957-International Studies in Economics (1-4; max: 12) Prereq:
admission to approvedstudy abroadprogram and permission ofdepartment.
S/U.
ECO 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ECO 7113-Information Economics (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: ECO 7115
and 7408; coreq: ECO 7404. Analysis of information problems, rem-





ECONOMICS / 119


edies through contracting or adoption of different procedures and or-
ganization when complete contracting is infeasible.
ECO 7115-Microeconomic Theory I (3) Coreq: ECO 7408 or equiva-
lent. Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neoclassical price and pro-
duction theories. Demand, supply, cost of production, and price deter-
mination under various conditions of the market.
ECO 7119-Information, Incentives, and Agency Theory (3) Prereq: ECO
7113 and 7406 or permission of instructor. Recent theoretical work in lit-
erature on design of incentive schemes in presence of limited information.
Mathematical modeling and proof techniques emphasized.
ECO 7120-General Equilibrium and Welfare Economics (1-2; max:
2) Prereq: ECO 7115; coreq: ECO 7406. Introduction to general equi-
librium analysis, including existence of equilibrium, core convergence,
and fundamental theorems of welfare economics.
ECO 7206-Macroeconomic Theory I (3) Coreq: ECO 7115, 7408.
Classical, Keynesian, and new classical aggregate income and employ-
ment analysis. Demand for money. Inflation and unemployment.
Monetary policy and stabilization. Time series and rational expectations
models.
ECO 7207-Macroeconomic Theory II (3) Prereq: ECO 7415; coreq:
ECO 7406, and permission of the department. Dynamic and stochastic
macroeconomic models and their use in studying economic growth and
business cycles.
ECO 7216-Monetary Economics I (3) Contemporary monetary
theory. The demand for money. Monetary policy and inflation, inter-
est rates, and employment. The role of inflationary finance.
ECO 7217-Monetary Economics II (3) Economic instabilities in
capitalistic society. Emphasis on forces operating to bring about changes
in the general level of prices, including prices of productive agents,
employment and income.
ECO 7272-Economic Growth I (1 or 2) Prereq: ECO 7115 and 7415;
coreq: ECO 7406 Introduction and overview of theoretical and empiri-
cal developments in determinants of long-run standards of living.
ECO 7273-Economic Growth II (1 or 2) Prereq: ECO 7272. Exten-
sions of theory and empirical analysis of growth with emphasis on
microfoundations of growth.
ECO 7404-Game Theory for Economists (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: ECO
7115 and 7408. Introduction to modern game theory as used in eco-
nomics. Emphasis on use of techniques in simple applications.
ECO 7405-Mathematical Economics: Game Theory (3) Prereq: ECO
7404 and 7408 orpermission ofinstructor. Advanced game theory including
incomplete information games with application to economics.
ECO 7406-Dynamic Economics: Theory and Applications (1-2; max:
2) Prereq: ECO 7115 and 7408. Review of techniques and applications
of dynamic optimization and growth with introduction to modern
dynamic techniques to analyze growth, resource management, stabili-
zation policy, capital accumulation, asset pricing, search behavior, and
incentive contracting.
ECO 7408-Mathematical Methods and Applications to Economics
(3) Application of mathematical techniques to economic problems,
including constrained optimization.
ECO 7415-Statistical Methods in Economics (3) Coreq: ECO 7408.
Introduction to fundamental statistical concepts: estimation, hypoth-
esis testing, linear regression, and analysis of variance.
ECO 7424-Econometric Models and Methods (3) Prereq: ECO 7415.
Introduction to econometrics, including survey of classical economet-
ric models as well as scope and method of econometrics.
ECO 7426-Econometric Methods I (3) Prereq: ECO 7424 or per-
mission ofdepartment. Stochastic models. The general linear model and
problems associated with its use in econometric research. Theory of the
simultaneous equation approach, model construction, and estimation
techniques.


ECO 7427-Econometric Methods II (3) Prereq: ECO 7424 orAEB
6571. Advanced econometric theory with applications to topics such as
nonlinear estimation, limited dependent variable models, time-series
analysis, and specification testing.
ECO 7435-Applied Time-Series Analysis and Dynamic Models (3)
Prereq: ECO 7424. Applications in accounting, economics, finance and
marketing.
ECO 7516-Tax Theory and Public Policy (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: ECO
7525. Survey of economics of taxation. Optimal commodity and income
taxation for efficiency and redistribution, tax incidence, capital taxation,
and uncertainty and taxes.
ECO 7525-Welfare Economics and the Second Best (1-2; max: 2)
Prereq: ECO 7115. Introduction and overview to public sector economics.
Basic welfare economics, optimal commodity taxation, and public goods
and welfare.
ECO 7534-Empirical Public Economics (1-2; max: 2) Prereq: ECO
7424 and 7525. Empirical analysis of question in public sector, drawn
from both taxation and expenditure areas. Estimation of costs or ben-
efits in provision of public goods.
ECO 7536-Public Expenditures and Collective Decisions (1-2; max:
2) Prereq: ECO 7115. Mechanisms for efficient allocation of public goods,
with particular emphasis on inducing truthful revelation of preferences
in variety of information settings and Pigovian and Coasian solutions
to externalities.
ECO 7706-Theory of International Trade (3) Historical and eco-
nomic background of foreign trade; theory of international trade; fun-
damentals of international exchange; international commercial policies
and international trade; exchange fluctuations and their control; inter-
national monetary institutions.
ECO 7716-International Economic Relations (3) Capital formation
in the underdeveloped countries, economic integration, balance of pay-
ments and international monetary reform, the economic consequences
of population pressures and economic relations between the advanced
and other nations.
ECO 7925-Research Skills Workshop (3) Prereq: passed written
qualifying exams. Transition from learning about work of others to doing
research. Selecting area of research, surveying literature, narrowing to
specific topic, formulating model, collecting data if appropriate, working
through theoretical or empirical analysis, and writing first draft. S/U.
ECO 7938-Advanced Economics Seminar (1-4; max: 8) Prereq: For
advanced graduate students in economics, student must have completed
graduate core program and have preliminary dissertation topic.
ECO 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ECO 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
ECP 5415-Antitrust Policy and Managerial Decisions (2) Prereq: ECP
5702.Designed primarily for M.B.A. students. Overview of antitrust laws
and review of their implementation. Examination of civil remedies available
to injured persons. Evaluation of specific damage models.
ECP 5702-Managerial Economics (2) Prereq: Designedprimarilyfor
M.B.A. students. Microeconomic forces that influence decisions made
by firms. Cost concepts, pricing strategies, capital investment, human
resource management, innovation, and influence of firm's competitive
environment.
ECP 5705-Economics of Business Decisions (3) Prereq: Designedpri-
marilyfor MB.A. students. Synthesis and application of microeconomic
theory and related business administration principles to managerial de-
cision making through a problem-solving orientation.
ECP 6416-Business Strategies for Regulation (2) Prereq: ECP 5702
or equivalent. Designedprimarily for M.B.A. students. Examination of how





120 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


firms respond to regulation and can influence their regulatory environ-
ment, focusing on environmental, workplace, and product safety regu-
lation
ECP 6417-Public Policy and Social Control (3) Prereq: Designed
primarily for M.B.A. students. Problems in developing and applying con-
cepts of public interest in a market economy. Relationships among in-
dustrial structure, business conduct, and economic performance. Mea-
surement of concentration and evaluation of performance.
ECP 6429-Strategies for Deregulating Industries (2) Prereq: Designed
primarily for M.B.A. students. Cases from the United States and other
countries illustrate sound strategies for managing under economic regu-
lation/deregulation.
ECP 6458-Franchise System of Distribution (2) Prereq: Designedfor
M.BA. students. Evolution of system. Economic characteristics of franchise
relationship, incentives for franchising, franchiser-franchisee tensions
(quality control, encroachment), antitrust problems, and regulation of
system.
ECP 6708-Cases in Competitive Strategy (2) Prereq: ECO 6409.
DesignedforM.B.A. students. Current and recent cases to illustrate practical
principles using strategic analysis. Class discussions of cases comprise
first part; student presentations comprise second part. Practical business
lessons from applying strategic methodology.
ECP 6709-Economics for Managing Information for Electronic
Commerce (2) Special economic issues pertaining to commerce in
information age. Questions relating to pricing of information services,
protection of intellectual property, evaluation of information quality and
accuracy, and design of markets to facilitate information flows.
ECP 7405-Industrial Organization and Social Control (3) Economic
and other characteristics of modern industrial structures. Relationships
between industrial structure, business conduct, and economic perfor-
mance. Measurement of concentration and evaluation of performance.
Public policies toward monopoly, conspiracy, and competition.
ECP 7408-Empirical Industrial Organization (1-2; max: 2) Prereq:
ECO 7424 required; 7426 recommended or permission of instructor.
Empirical examination of current issues. Returns to scale, market struc-
ture, entry and exit, technological progress, and examination of particular
regulated industries.
ECP 7426-Regulatory Principles (1-2; max: 2) Theory and practice
of regulatory institutions, with emphasis on natural monopoly, incen-
tive issues, and pricing across products and over time. Alternatives to
traditional regulations assessed in terms of impact on economic and social
objectives.
ECS 6015-Theory of Economic Development (2) Broad analytical,
nonhistorical framework for examining economic underdevelopment and
possible escape therefrom. Transition to secular economic growth and
principles by which an underdeveloped country can achieve develop-
ment objectives.
ECS 6423-Latin American Business Economics (2) Review of po-
litical, economic and cultural background of region including trade
patterns and policies; direct foreign investment and multinational firms;
determination of foreign exchange rate risk; effects of currency crises and
monetary policies on business environment; corporate strategies relevant
for Latin America; international marketing and finance strategies appro-
priate for region; and role of government policies affecting operations
of firms.


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, POLICY,
AND FOUNDATIONS

College of Education

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman and Graduate Coordinator: J. L. Doud. Distinguished Service
Professor (Emeritus): J. L. Wattenbarger. B. O. Smith Research Profes-
sor: R. C. Wood. Professors: D. F. Campbell; P. A. Clark; J. L. Doud;
J. W. Hensel (Emeritus); D. S. Honeyman; J. V. Lombardi; A.J. Newman;
J. M. Nickens; R. R. Renner; C. A. Sandeen; D. C. Smith; W. L. Smith;
A. O. White; R. C. Wood. Associate Professors: L. S. Behar-Horenstein;
M. F. Howard-Hamilton. Lecturer: B. F. Keener.

The Department offers programs leading to the Master of Edu-
cation (nonthesis) and Master of Arts in Education (thesis) in cur-
riculum and instruction with course concentrations in curriculum
and instructional leadership; in educational leadership, with special-
izations in elementary and secondary administration and in school
business management; in foundations of education; and student
personnel in higher education. The Department also offers the Spe-
cialist in Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philoso-
phy degrees in curriculum and instruction with specializations in
curriculum and instruction theory and research, postsecondary edu-
cation, and supervision and curriculum development; in educational
leadership with specialization in elementary and secondary admin-
istration; in foundations of education with specializations in social,
historical, and philosophical foundations, and comparative and in-
ternational education within social foundations; in higher education
administration with specializations in community college leadership,
university leadership, and vocational-technical administration.; and
in student personnel in higher education.
A candidate for admission to the Department will be judged not
only on the basis of quantitative criteria (listed elsewhere in this catalog)
but also in relation to prior experience, especially as it relates to ca-
reer goals.
Educational Leadership/Law-The Department of Educational
Leadership and the College of Law offer a joint program leading to
the Ph.D. degree in educational leadership and the J.D. in law. Since
interdisciplinary training is stressed, students admitted to the joint degree
program are allowed to count a number of hours toward both degrees.
Applicants must be accepted by both the Graduate School and the
College of Law.
Educational Leadership/Medicine-A joint M.Ed./M.S. program
is also offered with the College of Medicine. Contact the Depart-
ment for further information.
The Center for Community Education and the Institute of Higher
Education provide advanced graduate students with opportunities
for research and study in their respective areas.
EDA 5938-Special Topics (1-3; max: 6) Exploration of current topics
of special interest.
EDA 6061-Educational Organization and Administration (3) Ba-
sic concepts and practices in local, state, and federal organizations and
administration.
EDA 6192-Educational Leadership: The Individual (3) The indi-
vidual as a leader and the role of educational leaders in group develop-
ment.
EDA 6193-Educational Leadership: Instruction (3) Examination and
analysis of role in curriculum change and school improvement.
EDA 6195-Educational Policy Development (3) Contemporary
research on political power in policy decision making and role of edu-
cational leaders in policy development.





EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND FOUNDATIONS / 121


EDA 6205-Educational Planning (3) Cooperative planning of edu-
cational programs. Skills and methodologies associated with develop-
ing annual and long-range comprehensive plans for meeting educational
needs of school districts, colleges, and universities.
EDA 6215-Communications in Educational Leadership (3) School/
community relations and communication implications for educational
leaders.
EDA 6222-Administration of School Personnel (3) Problems of the
professional school staff and administration of staff personnel in pub-
lic schools.
EDA 6225-Labor Relations in Public Education (3) Various aspects
of employee, union, and management relationships in public education.
EDA 6232-Public School Law (3) The law as it affects the public school
operation in America. Religion; desegregation; compulsory attendance;
torts; curriculum; student control and discipline; and teacher freedoms,
employment, and dismissal.
EDA 6242-Public School Finance (3) State, local, and federal financing
of education.
EDA 6271-Utilization of Computers in Educational Leadership (3)
Application of computer technology to leadership and management of
educational enterprise.
EDA 6300-Leadership in Community Education (3) Contemporary
theories and application of basic principles to administration of educa-
tional institutions and community agencies.
EDA 6503-The Principalship (3) Organization and administration
of the school; emphasis on competencies necessary for leadership and
management of the school center, both elementary and secondary.
EDA 6905-Individual Work (1-6; max: 12 including EDG 6905 and
EVT 6905) Students must have approval of proposed project prior to
registration. For advanced students who wish to study individual problems
under faculty guidance.
EDA 6931-Special Topics (1-5; max: 10)
EDA 6935-Problems in School Administration and Supervision (1-
15; max: 15) In-service training through regularly scheduled on-cam-
pus work conferences open only to superintendents and supervisors; or
a problems course, offered through extension or on campus, for super-
intendents, supervisors, principals, junior college administrators, and
trainees for such positions. S/U.
EDA 6948-Supervised Practice in School Administration (1-15; max:
15) Prereq: Only advanced graduate students arepermitted to enroll. Students
are given an opportunity to perform administrative duties under super-
vision. S/U.
EDA 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EDA 7206-Organizational Leadership in Education (3) Prereq: EDA
6192. Development of concepts and refinements of skills associated with
planning and organizing in educational institutions.
EDA 7260-Planning Educational Facilities (3) School plant survey
methods are included. Field experience available.
EDA 7945-Practicum in Supervision and Administration (1-15; max:
15) A seminar and an internship in administration and supervision. S/U.
EDA 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or students who have been accepted for a
doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EDA 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
EDA 7990-Research Design in Educational Administration (3) Prereq:
EDF 7486 or equivalent. Open only to advanced students. Problems in
administration conceptualized and appropriate research procedures
determined.
EDF 5552-Role of School in Democratic Society (3) Common con-
ceptions of democracy, equality, freedom, liberty, and equality and what
these conceptions imply for educational aims and practice.


EDF 6520-History of Education (3) Salient issues in education from
the Reformation to the present.
EDF 6525-Ancient and Medieval Education (3) Pedagogical prac-
tice and thought in China, India, Semitic nations, Greece, Rome, Is-
lam, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe.
EDF 6544-Philosophical Foundations of Education (3) Philosophical
bases for democracy and education.
EDF 6606-Socioeconomic Foundations of Education (3) Sociological
analysis of democratic educational aims, the school as a social system,
interest groups, the teaching profession, and economic stratification in
America.
EDF 6608-School and Society (3) Sociocultural framework for un-
derstanding the relationship between a society and its educational sys-
tem.
EDF 6630-Educational Sociology (3) Sociological theory and research
with direct relevance to the study of education.
EDF 6812-Comparative Education (3) Relationships of school and
society in different cultural areas of the world.
EDF 6820-Education in Latin America (3) Traditions and contem-
porary social, political, and cultural aspects.
EDF 7555-Values and Ethics in Education (3) The conception and
role of values in education, with special emphasis on moral values (ethics).
EDF 7573-Contemporary Education Theories (3) Seminar for post-
master's students. Contemporary philosophical theories of education.
EDF 7584-Educational Classics (3; max: 6) Historical and philosophi-
cal examination of enduring writings on education from ancient to
modern times.
EDF 7934-Seminar in Educational Foundations (3; max: 12) Ad-
vanced study in historical, philosophical, social, and comparative foun-
dations.
EDG 6250-The School Curriculum (3) Prereq: Requiredin allgraduate
programs in curriculum and instruction. Theoretical and research bases
underlying the development of the total school program from kinder-
garten through community college. Basic curriculum course for graduate
students.
EDG 6285-Evaluation in the School Program (3) Procedures and
techniques of evaluation in school programs, with particular emphasis
on needs assessment, school self-study, and course evaluation.
EDG 6905-Individual Work (1-6; max: 12 including EDA 6905 and
EVT 6905) Prereq: Student must have approval ofproposed project prior
to registration in course. For advanced students who wish to study indi-
vidual problems under faculty guidance.
EDG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EDG 6931-Special Topics (1-4; max: 12 including EDA 6905) Prereq:
consent ofdepartment chairman.
EDG 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EDG 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EDG 6973-Project in Lieu of Thesis (1-9) Development, testing, and
evaluation of original educational technology, curricular materials, or
intervention program. S/U.
EDG 7222-Curriculum: Theory and Research (3) Prereq: EDG 6250.
Theories of curriculum organization and a survey of curriculum research
and patterns of curriculum.
EDG 7362-Instruction: Theory and Research (3) Prereq: EDG 6250
or equivalent. Theories of instructional design and improvement, models
of teaching and research on teaching.
EDG 7665-Bases of Curriculum and Instruction Theory (3) Prereq:
EDG 6250 or equivalent. Application of theory and research in the be-
havioral sciences to the development of curriculum and instruction
theory. Topics include social forces, human development, learning theo-
ries.
EDG 7941-Field Experience in Curriculum and Instruction (1-4;
max: 10) Prereq: Admission limited to advancedgraduate students. Super-





122 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


vised experiences appropriate to the student's professional goals.
EDG 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or students who have been accepted for a
doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EDG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
EDH 5102-Applying Technology to Enrollment Management (2)
Prereq: enrollment management in higher education. Exploration of cur-
rent and emerging technologies for enrollment management in higher
education.
EDH 5103-Targeting Marketing Communications in Enrollment
Management (2) Comprehensive analysis of role of targeted commu-
nications in enrollment management.
EDH 5104-Financial Aid in Enrollment Management (2) Nature and
role of financial aid in student recruitment process.
EDH 5105-Student Retention Planning for Enrollment Management
(3) Comprehensive review of essentials of effective student retention in
higher education.
EDH 6046-Diversity Issues in Higher Education (3) Models, theories,
and skills for understanding multicultural students at postsecondary level.
EDH 6051-Educational Outcomes of American Colleges and Uni-
versities (3) Exploration of impact of postsecondary educational insti-
tutions and barriers to student development.
EDH 6053-The Community Junior College in America (3) Programs,
issues, and problems.
EDH 6066-American Higher Education (3) History, philosophy, and
policies, with emphasis on current practices and problems.
EDH 6067-Seminar: International Higher Education (3) Charac-
teristics of selected foreign higher education systems with emphasis on
history and philosophy, access, curriculum and instruction, student and
faculty characteristics, governance, management, and finance.
EDH 6100-Enrollment Management in Higher Education (3) Fun-
damental concepts, practices, and techniques utilized in successful pro-
grams.
EDH 6101-Strategic Enrollment Planning in Higher Education (3)
Exploration of strategic planning practices for enrollment management.
EDH 6305-College and University Teaching (3) Contemporary issues,
problems, and research related to the role of the college faculty mem-
ber and the teaching-learning process.
EDH 6503-Resource Development in Higher Education (3) Explo-
ration of financial resource development in higher education institutions
and organizations.
EDH 6931-Special Topics in Higher Education (1-3; max: 10)
EDH 6935-Seminar in College Student Personnel Administration
(3) Prereq: permission ofinstructor. Culminating seminar integrating core
curriculum and practitioner experience.
EDH 6945-Practicum in College Teaching I (3) Prereq: Prior ar-
rangements must be made with the coordinating professor of the College of
Education. Provision made for the student to teach under the supervi-
sion of a professor at either the community college, four-year college,
or university level. Seminars cover topics related to improvement of college
teaching.
EDH 6946-Practicum in College Teaching II (3) Prereq: Prior ar-
rangements must be made with the coordinatingprofessor of the College of
Education. Provision made for the student to teach under the supervi-
sion of a professor at either the community college, four-year college,
or university level. Seminars cover topics related to improvement of college
teaching.
EDH 6947-Practicum I in Student Development (3) Prereq: MHS
5005, permission ofadviser, and written application to practicum coordi-
nator at least six weeks in advance of registration. S/U.


EDH 7225-Seminar: Curriculum in Higher Education (3) Issues and
problems in college and university curricula. Curriculum planning,
implementation, and evaluation.
EDH 7405-The Law and Higher Education (3) The legal structure
of higher education, religion, academic freedom of faculty, employment,
due process, students' rights of speech and expression, search and sei-
zure, desegregation, and tort liability.
EDH 7505-The Financing of Higher Education (3) Junior college
through university. Theoretical basis for use of tax funds for education,
student fees and tuition, state methods for financing, planning, cost
benefit, budgeting, federal role, and capital outlay.
EDH 7631--Administration of Instruction in Higher Education (3)
Skills and knowledge for current and future college leaders.
EDH 7634-Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education
(3) Major issues. Purposes, structure, program evaluation, and bud-
geting.
EDH 7635-Higher Education Administration (3) Educational poli-
cies, functions, and practices.
EDH 7916-Contemporary Research on Higher Education (3) Ex-
amination and analysis of research related to higher education. Impli-
cations for application of findings for improvement of colleges and
universities.
EDH 7942-Group Supervision in Student Development (1; max:
5) Prereq: written application topracticum/internship coordinator at least
six weeks in advance ofregistration; coreq: EDH 6804, MHS 7800, EDH
7808, 7830, or MHS 6831. S/U.
EDH 7948-Practicum II in Student Development (3) Prereq: EDH
6804 or MHS 7800, permission ofadviser, and written application to
practicum coordinator at least six weeks in advance of registration; coreq:
EDH7802. S/U.
EDS 6140-Supervision of Instruction (3) Systematic approaches to
supervision of instructional personnel including observation and pro-
grams of continuing professional development.
EVT 6905-Individual Work in Vocational, Technical, and Adult
Education (1-6; max: 12 including EDA 6905 and EDG 6905) For
advanced students wishing to study under faculty guidance. Before reg-
istering, a student must have approval of the proposed study.
SDS 7930-Seminar in Higher Education Student Personnel (1-2;
max: .4)



EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
College of Education

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: M. D. Miller. Graduate Coordinator: B. A. Franks. Professors:
J. J. Algina; P. T. Ashton; L. M. Crocker; M. L. Koran; J. H. Kranzler;
M. D. Miller; T. D. Oakland; R. B. Webb. Associate Professors: J. K.
Bengston; B. A. Franks; T. M. Smith-Bonahue; N. L. Waldron. Assis-
tant Professors: J. M. Asmus; H. Davis; R. Penfield; A. E. Seraphine.

The Department offers the Master of Education, the Master of Arts
in Education (with thesis), the Specialist in Education, the Doctor
of Education, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with programs
in educational psychology, research and evaluation methodology, and
school psychology.
Specific areas of specialization include human development, per-
sonality theory, learning theory, and general educational psychology
within the program in educational psychology; and research meth-
odology, education statistics, and measurement and evaluation within
the program in research and evaluation methodlogy.





EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY / 123


EDF 5431-Measurement and Evaluation in Early Childhood (3) Basic
concepts of test construction and interpretation, including norms, re-
liability, and validity. Overview of assessment techniques and problems
in assessing intelligence, language, achievement, socio-emotional, and
perceptual motor development in children from infancy through six years
of age. Students may not receive credit for both EDF 4430 and EDF
5431.
EDF 5441-Assessment in General and Exceptional Student Educa-
tion (3) Prereq: STA 3122. Basic measurement concepts, design of class-
room assessments, and interpretation of results from traditional or al-
ternative assessments, and their application in instructional planning and
evaluating student performance.
EDF 6113-Educational Psychology: Human Development (3)
Current research and theories in the area of human development.
EDF 6189-Psycho-Social-Educational Aspects of Death and Dying
(3) Attitudes toward death, dying process, funeral practices, and grieving.
Role of education for better understanding and coping with death.
EDF 6211-Educational Psychology: General (3) Basic principles,
techniques, and research; designed for graduate students preparing to
teach who have a minimal background in psychology.
EDF 6215-Educational Psychology: Learning Theory (3) Prereq:
consent of instructor. Logic and methodologies of theories of learn-
ing.
EDF 6232-Principles of Learning and Instructional Practice (3)
Topics include transfer of training, reinforcement, forgetting, and problem
solving.
EDF 6355-Educational Psychology: Personality Dynamics (3)
Dynamics of behavior and their implications for education, coun-
seling and guidance, administration, family relationships, and social
action.
EDF 6401-Educational Statistics (3) Prereq: STA 2023. Primarily
for Ed.D. candidates. Application to educational data and problems.
EDF 6403-Quantitative Foundations of Educational Research (6)
Prereq: STA 2023, 2122, or equivalent. Integrated coverage of funda-
mentals in the general field of education research. Includes statistics,
experimental design, and data processing.
EDF 6434-Educational Measurement (3) Prereq: undergraduate sta-
tistics course. Overview of educational measurement and testing with
emphasis on cognitive ability and achievement testing.
EDF 6436-Theory of Measurement (4) Prereq: STA 2023; EDF
4430. Introductory study of true score models, reliability, validity,
norms, scaling, item analysis, and basic elements of instrument con-
struction.
EDF 6471-Survey Design and Analysis in Educational Research (3)
Prereq: EDF 6403. Development and analysis techniques for surveys and
questionnaires. Techniques of protocol development, data collection,
analysis, and reporting.
EDF 6475-Qualitative Foundations of Educational Research (4)
Introduction to philosophical, historical, sociological, and other meth-
odologies as aspects of qualitative educational research.
EDF 6481-Quantitative Research Methods in Education (4) Prereq:
STA 2023, 2122 or equivalent. Design and data analysis for educational
research.
EDF 6905-Individual Study (1-3; max: 12) Prereq: consent ofdepart-
ment chairman. For advanced students who wish to study individual
problems in psychological, social, or philosophical foundations of edu-
cation, or research and measurement under faculty guidance.
EDF 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: consent ofde-
partment chairman. S/U.
EDF 6933-Seminar on Research on Effective Teaching (3) Prereq:
EDF 6403. Analysis of quantitative and qualitative research on teach-
ing; emphasis on implications for educational policy and practice.


EDF 6938-Special Topics (1-3; max: 12) Prereq: consent ofdepart-
ment chairman.
EDF 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: consent of
department chairman. S/U.
EDF 6941-Practicum in Educational Research (2-9; max: 9) Prereq:
EDF 6403. Arrangements must be made with instructor prior to registra-
tion. Experience in conducting various phases of quantitative or quali-
tative educational research under individual supervision.
EDF 6943-Practicum in Educational Psychology (3; max: 9) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. Supervised experience in a practical work situation
dealing with problems and issues appropriate to psychological foundations
and their resolution.
EDF 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EDF 6973-Project in Lieu of Thesis (1-9) Development, testing, and
evaluation of original educational technology, curricular materials, or
intervention program. S/U.
EDF 7117-Affective Development and Education (3) Prereq: EDF
6113 or equivalent. Application of theory and research.
EDF 7146-Educational Psychology: Cognition in the Educative
Process (3) Prereq: EDF 6113. Cognitive development as applied to
curriculum development and teaching procedures.
EDF 7405-Advanced Quantitative Foundations of Educational
Research (4; max: 8) Prereq: EDF6403. Integrated coverage of important
approaches to educational research. Includes application of experimental
design, regression analysis, and computer processing to selected educa-
tional research problems.
EDF 7412-Structural Equation Models (3) Prereq: EDF 6436, EDF
7405. Confirmatory factor analysis and causal models.
EDF 7432-Advanced Psychometric Theory (3; max: 6) Prereq:
EDF 6436 or equivalent. Study of theoretical problems related to test
construction. Current developments in reliability and validity esti-
mation; alternate true-score models; item analysis and scoring tech-
niques, scaling, assessing latent traits, and methods for psychomet-
ric research.
EDF 7435-Rating Scale Design and Analysis in Educational Research
(3) Prereq: EDF 6403 and 6434 or 6436. Development and analysis
techniques for questionnaires and rating scales. Applications of psycho-
metric models to item, scale, and rater evaluation; bias detection; fac-
tor analysis; and measurement of change.
EDF 7439-Item Response Theory (3) Prereq: EDF 6436. Psycho-
metric models for test scores; estimation of ability and item parameters;
applications of and current issues in IRT.
EDF 7474-Multilevel Models (3) Prereq: EDF 6403 or 6481 and7405.
Models and methods for analysis of multilevel data.
EDF 7486-Methods of Educational Research (3) Prereq: STA 2023.
Primarily for Ed.D. candidates. Examination of research methodolo-
gies. Problem identification as well as organization and presentation
of data.
EDF 7491-Evaluation of Educational Products and Systems (3)
Prereq: EDF 6403 or equivalent. Models and methods for formative and
summative evaluation of educational products and programs.
EDF 7639-Research in Educational Sociology (3) Research techniques
in educational sociology, emphasis on ethnography.
EDF 7931-Seminar in Educational Research (3; max: 6) Prereq: EDF
6403. In-depth examination of specific methodological approaches to
educational research.
EDF 7932-Multivariate Analysis in Educational Research (3) Prereq:
EDF 6403. Review of selected studies with focus on methods of data
analysis. Emphasis on use of multivariate techniques.
EDF 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for





124 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EDF 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
SPS 6052-Issues and Problems in School Psychology (3) Coreq: SPS
6941. History and foundations of school psychology; legal, ethical.
Overview of role and functions of school psychologist.
SPS 6191-Psychoeducational Assessment I (3) Coreq: SPS 6941.
Techniques for assessing intelligence, adaptive behavior, and achieve-
ment of children and school-aged adolescents. Emphasis on standard-
ized instruments.
SPS 6192-Psychoeducational Assessment II (3) Prereq: SPS 6191;
coreq: SPS 6941. Techniques for assessing social and emotional func-
tioning of the school-aged child; supervised experience in assessment and
report writing.
SPS 6197-Psychoeducational Assessment III (3) Prereq: SPS 6191;
coreq: SPS 6941. Synthesis of sources and techniques ofpsychoeducational
assessment for school-related application and problems.
SPS 6707-Interventions in School Psychology II: Cognitive Behavioral
Interventions (3) Prereq: Intervention I Theory and practice of cogni-
tive behavior.
SPS 6708-Interventions in School Psychology III: System Level
Interventions for Children and Youths (3) Prereq: Interventions IHTheory,
empirical research, and clinical issues related to primary prevention and
crisis intervention.
SPS 6941-Practicum in School Psychology (1-4; max: 8) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. S/U.
SPS 7205-School Psychology Consultation (3) Coreq: SPS 6941.
Concepts, processes, and issues related to the practice of school-based
consultation as an intervention technique of school psychologists.
SPS 7931-Seminar in School Psychology (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: consent
ofinstructor. Issues pertinent to the professional practice of school psy-
chology.
SPS 7936-Advanced Topics in School Psychology (3; max: 6) Prereq:
consent ofinstructor. In-depth analysis of selected developments in school
psychology.
SPS 7949-Internship in School Psychology (6 [3 Summer A or B];
max: 18) Prereq: consent ofinstructor.



ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER
ENGINEERING

College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: M. A. Uman. Associate Chair (Academic Affairs): L. W. Couch II.
Associate Chair (Student Affairs): G. Bosman. Graduate Coordinator: J.
Hammer. Graduate Research Professor and Pittman Eminent Scholar: C.
T. Sah. BellSouth Eminent Scholar: J. Fortes. Distinguished Professor: S.
Y. W. Su. Professors: G. Bosman; T. E. Bullock; D. P. Carroll (Emeri-
tus); E. R. Chenette (Emeritus, GERC); L. W. Couch II (Emeritus); J.
G. Fossum; J. Hammer; M. E. Law; J. Li; S. S. Li; F. A. Lindholm; A.
Neugroschel; K. K. O; P. Z. Peebles, Jr. (Emeritus); C. Principe; V.
A. Rakov; V. Ramaswamy; M. H. Rashid (UWF); J. R. Smith (Emeri-
tus); R. Srivastava; F. J. Taylor; M. A. Uman; P. Zory. Engineer: J. L.
Kurtz. Associate Professors:J. M. M. Anderson; A. Arroyo; A. Domijan,
Jr.; W. R. Eisenstadt; R. M. Fox; A. D. George; J. G. Harris; H. Lam;
H. Latchman; K. D. T. Ngo; T. Nishida; E. M. Thomson; H. Zmuda
(GERC). Assistant Professors: Y. Fang; J. McNair; M. C. Nechyba; J. M.
Shea; T. F. Wong.


The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers
the Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Engineer, and Doc-
tor of Philosophy degrees. The Department offers graduate study and
research in communications, computer engineering, device and
physical electronics, digital signal processing, electric energy systems,
electromagnetics, electronic circuits, photonics, and systems and con-
trols.
Graduate students in the Department of Electrical and Computer
Engineering have bachelor's degrees from many areas-electrical en-
gineering, other engineering disciplines, mathematics, physics, chem-
istry, and other technical fields. The Department of Electrical and Com-
puter Engineering offers both thesis and nonthesis options for the
master's degrees.
In the thesis option a student shall complete a minimum of 33 se-
mester credit hours with a maximum of 6 semester credit hours of
EEL 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis). While the Graduate School
sets the minimum requirements, the supervisory committee deter-
mines the appropriate number of thesis hours a student shall be re-
quired to take for the thesis. Other course requirements include a
minimum of 12 hours of 6000-level course credit in all fields and a
minimum of 18 hours at the 5000 or 6000 level in electrical and
computer engineering. Excluded from satisfying these course require-
ments are 5905 and 6905 (Individual Work), 6910 (Supervised
Research), 6932 (Graduate Seminar), 6940 (Supervised Teaching),
and 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis). No more than six hours
of Individual Work (5905 or 6905) may be counted toward the degree.
In the nonthesis option a student shall complete a minimum of 33
semester credit hours with a maximum of 6 semester credit hours of
Individual Work (5905 or 6905). The course requirements include
a minimum of 21 semester credit hours of 6000-level course credit
in all fields and a minimum of 18 semester credit hours at the 5000
or 6000 level in electrical and computer engineering. Excluded from
satisfying these course requirements are 5905 and 6905 (Individual
Work), 6910 (Supervised Research), 6932 (Graduate Seminar), 6940
(Supervised Teaching), and 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis).
The Department also offers a combined bachelor's/master's de-
gree program. This program allows qualified students to earn both
a bachelor's degree and master's degree with a savings of one semester.
Qualified students may begin their master's programs while seniors
counting up to 12 hours of specified electrical and computer engi-
neering graduate courses for both bachelor's and master's degree
requirements. Seniors admitted to the combined program will be
eligible for teaching or research assistantships. Bachelor's/master's
program admission requirements are (1) satisfaction of Graduate
School admission requirements for the master's degree, (2) an up-
per-division (undergraduate) GPA of at least 3.3, and (3) comple-
tion of at least 7 EEL core courses and 2 EEL laboratories. Students
with a GPA between 3.3 and 3.59 can double count up to 6 hours,
while students with a GPA of 3.6 or higher can double count up to
12 hours.
All prospective doctoral students must take the written part of the
Ph.D. qualifying examination within the first three semesters, exclud-
ing summer. Other requirements for the doctoral degree, as well as
requirements for master's and engineer degrees, are given in the Elec-
trical and Computer Engineering Department's Graduate Guidelines
(see http://www.ece.ufl.edu/gradinfo/) and in the front section of
this catalog.
The following course listing indicates the major areas of faculty
interest. Special topics courses EEL 5934 and EEL 6935 cover a wide
variety of subjects for which there are no present courses
CDA 6156-Advanced Computer Architecture (3) Prereq: EEL 5764
or CDA 5155. Evaluation, study, and comparison of computer systems.
Development of formal and informal models of computer architecture.








EEL 5182-State Variable Methods in Linear Systems (3) Prereq: EEL
4657. Linear algebra and state variable methods for design and analy-
sis of discrete and continuous linear systems.
EEL 5218-High Voltage DC Transmission Systems (3) Prereq: in-
troductory course in electric power. Line-commutated converter analysis,
rectifier and inverter controls, system protection, harmonics, supplemen-
tary controls, and multiterminal operation.
EEL 5219-Analysis of Power Transmission Lines (3) Prereq: EEL
3211, MAS3114or equivalents. Calculation of multiphase transmission
line parameters for typical power line configurations. Modal analysis of
wave propagation. Line models and computer applications for transient
analysis.
EEL 5225-Principles of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Transducers (3)
Prereq: EEL 3396 or permission ofinstructor. Introduction to principles
of micro-electro-mechanical devices and systems.
EEL 5317C-Introduction to Power Electronics (3) Prereq: EEL 3304,
3396; coreq: EEL 4657. Components and circuits for power applications.
Switched-mode power supplies.
EEL 5320-Bipolar Analog IC Design (3) Prereq: EEL 3304. Amplifier
stages, active loads, output stages, op-amps, feedback, frequency response,
compensation.
EEL 5322-VLSI Circuits and Technology (3) Prereq: EEL 3396 3304.
Introduction to VLSI circuit technology and manufacturing. Fabrica-
tion, device models, layout, parasitics, and simple gate circuits.
EEL 5336L-Solid-State Technology Laboratory (1) Solid-state de-
vice fabrication. Safety issues.
EEL 5370-Applied Electronics (3) Modern communication circuits.
EEL 5441-Fundamentals of Photonics (3) Prereq: EEL 3472 and3396.
Review of electromagnetic fields and waves, energy bands in semicon-
ductors, p-n junctions and optical properties of semiconductors. Fun-
damentals of optical modulators and switches, laser theory, laser char-
acteristics, photodetectors, optical waveguides, and photonic applica-
tions.
EEL 5451 L-Photonics Laboratory (2) Prereq: EEL 4440 or 4445 or
5441. Experiments in wave optics, acousto-optics, lasers, fiber optics,
planar wave guides, and coherent optics.
EEL 5490-Lightning (3) Prereq: EEL 3472. Introduction to light-
ning discharge processes. Electromagnetics relevant to lightning mea-
surements. Applications for determining lightning charge, current, lo-
cation, and characteristics. Lightning protection.
EEL 5544-Noise in Linear Systems (3) Passage of electrical noise and
signals through linear systems. Statistical representation of random signals,
electrical noise, and spectra.
EEL 5547-Introduction to Radar (3) Prereq: EEL 4516or5544. Basic
principles ofcw and pulsed radar; angle, range, and doppler tracking;
accuracy and resolution; signal design.
EEL 5548-Electronic Countermeasures (3) Prereq: EEL 4516or 5544.
Analysis of electronic countermeasures for radar systems. Pulsed and
spread spectrum detection; barrage, incoherent, and coherent jammers;
burn through analysis; autocorrelation receiver structures.
EEL 5631-Digital Control Systems (3) Prereq: EEL 3701C, 4657.
A study of the digital computer as a control element, classical sampled
data control theory, and application with microcomputers.
EEL 5666C-Intelligent Machines Design Laboratory (4) Prereq: EEL
4744C Design simulation, fabrication, assembly, and testing of intel-
ligent robotic machines.
EEL 5701-Foundations of Digital Signal Processing (3) Analysis and
design of digital filters for discrete signal processing; spectral analysis;
fast Fourier transform.
EEL 5717-Fundamentals of Computer Hardware (3) Prereq: EEL
4712C, 4713C, or equivalent. Systematic study of components of a
computer system; organization and realization of arithmetic, control and
data paths.


ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING / 125


EEL 5718-Computer Communications (3) Prereq: EEL 4514. De-
sign of data communication networks: modems, terminals, error con-
trol, multiplexing, message switching, and data concentration.
EEL 5745C-Microcomputer Hardware and Software (4) Prereq: EEL
3701C and 3304 or 3003. Functional behavior of microprocessors,
memory, peripheral support integrated circuit hardware; microcomputer
system and development software; applications.
EEL 5764-Computer Architecture (3) Prereq: EEL 4713C, 4744C, or
equivalents. Fundamentals in design and quantitative analysis of modern
computer architecture and systems, including instruction set architecture,
basic and advanced pipelining, superscalar and VLIW instruction-level
parallelism, memory hierarchy, storage, and interconnects.
EEL 5840-Elements of Machine Intelligence (3) Engineering and hard-
ware concepts pertaining to design of intelligent computer systems.
EEL 5905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 6) Prereq: consent ofadviser.
Selected problems or projects.
EEL 5934-Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (1-3; max: 8)
EEL 6134-Nonlinear Control Systems (3) Prereq: EEL 5182. Intro-
duction to nonlinear control; mathematical foundations of nonlinear
controls. Poincare-Bendixson theory; Liapunov theory; input/output
theory of nonlinear systems; internal stability; topics in modern non-
linear control.
EEL 6171-Advanced System Theory (4) Structural analysis of lin-
ear dynamical systems. Invariance, F and G invariance, constrained
reachability, pole assignment and stability, advanced topics in linear
algebra useful in mathematical system theory.
EEL 6200-Advanced Analysis of Electric Machines (3) Prereq: EEL
3211, MAS 3114 or equivalents. Principles of electromechanical energy
conversion, reference frame theory, analysis and modeling of AC and
DC machines, state variable formulation of systems with electromechani-
cal devices.
EEL 6264-Advanced Electric Energy Systems I (3) Prereq: consent
ofinstructor. Energy systems planning and operation with emphasis on
advanced analysis methodologies and computer simulation.
EEL 6265-Advanced Electric Energy Systems II (3) Prereq: EEL 6264.
Continuation of EEL 6264 with additional emphasis given to the new
electric energy technologies.
EEL 6311-Electronic Circuits I (3) Prereq: required undergraduate
electronics and control sequences. Analysis and design of operational
amplifier circuits, other topics in electronic circuit design.
EEL 6321-MOS Analog IC Design (3) Prereq: EEL 5320 or 6311.
Design of analog circuits in CMOS IC technology. MOS switches, MOS
op amp circuits, circuit simulation using SPICE.
EEL 6323-Advanced VLSI Design (3) Prereq: EEL 5322. Advanced
very large scale integrated circuit design, testability, and performance
evaluation. Use of industrial VLSI software. Building an advanced CMOS
VLSI circuit.
EEL 6324-Silicon Fabrication Processes (3) Prereq: EEL 5322. Ad-
vanced modeling of physics of silicon fabrication. Lithography, depo-
sition, etching, oxidation, implantation, and diffusion. Oriented toward
silicon device fabrication.
EEL 6325-Computer Simulation of Integrated Circuits and De-
vices (3) Prereq: graduate standing. Basic methods of numerical simu-
lation of semiconductor devices and electronic circuits with reference
to PISCES and SPICE. PDE discretization; numerical integration,
Newton/iterative linearization, linearized system solution.
EEL 6328C-Microwave IC Design (3) Fundamentals of microwave
integrated circuit design. Use of computer software to design simple
microwave circuits. Microwave circuit testing.
EEL 6374-Radio Frequency (RF) Integrated Circuits and Technolo-
gies (3) Prereq: EEL 5322, 4306, or equivalent. Requirements for RF
integrated circuits. Design and implementation. Interdependence of RF





126 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


circuit performance wit devices, parasitics, packages, and process tech-
nology.
EEL 6382-Semiconductor Physical Electronics I (3) Crystal struc-
tures; imperfections; statistics; lattice dynamics; energy band theory.
Equilibrium properties of electrons and holes in semiconductors. Elec-
tronic transport phenomena. Boltzmann's equation and transport co-
efficients in semiconductors.
EEL 6383-Semiconductor Physical Electronics II (3) Prereq: EEL
6382. Scattering mechanisms. Recombination-generation and trapping
processes; optical properties. Excess carrier phenomena. Photoelectric
effects in semiconductors. Metal-semiconductor contacts. Opto-electronic
devices. Junction and MOS devices. Superconductors and Josephson
Junction devices.
EEL 6388-Fluctuation Phenomena (3) Noise theory with applica-
tions to electrical engineering. Sources of noise in electronic devices;
statistical and spectral representation. Influence of noise upon the per-
formance of circuits and systems. Limitation of detectors and instruments
due to noise.
EEL 6390-VLSI Device Design (3) Prereq: EEL 3396. Criteria and
tradeoffs involved in design of high-performance semiconductor devices
in scaled (VLSI) Si-based integrated-circuit technologies.
EEL 6397-Semiconductor Device Theory I (3) Prereq: EEL 3396
Semiconductor material properties, equilibrium and nonequilibrium
processes, quasi-Fermi levels, pn junctions; charge-control modeling; high
level injection, heavy doping effects.
EEL 6398-Semiconductor Device Theory II (3) Prereq: EEL 6397.
Basic mechanisms in bipolar junction transistors, low- and high-current
effects; fundamental principles of the MOS system, surface effects on
pn junctions, MOS field-effect transistors.
EEL 6443-Integrated and Fiber Optics (3) Prereq: EEL 5441. Re-
view of electromagnetic waves. Dielectric interfaces, propagation in
graded-index media, slab waveguides, coupled waveguides, waveguide
fabrication and characterization.
EEL 6444-Advanced Guided Wave Devices (3) Prereq: EEL 6443.
Review ofwaveguides. Mode coupling, waveguide branches, polarizers,
filters, multiplexers, modulators/switches, optical filters, optoelectronic
sources, and monolithic integration.
EEL 6447-Laser Electronics (3) Prereq: EEL 3473 and5441 or equiva-
lent. Study of lasers from basic principles to operational characteristics.
EEL 6486-Electromagnetic Field Theory and Applications I (3)
Prereq: undergraduate course infields and waves. Advanced electrostat-
ics, magnetostatics, time-varying electromagnetic fields, wave propagation,
waveguides.
EEL 6487-Electromagnetic Field Theory and Applications II (3)
Prereq: EEL 6486 Electromagnetic radiation, antennas, wave propagation
in anisotropic media.
EEL 6502-Adaptive Signal Processing (3) Prereq: EEL 5701, 5544.
Theory of adaptation with stationary signals; performance measures. LMS,
RLS algorithms. Implementation issues and applications.
EEL 6503-Spread Spectrum (3) Prereq: EEL 5544 and 6535. Tech-
niques and applications; spreading sequence design; code division multiple
access; multi-user detection.
EEL 6507-Queueing Theory and Data Communications (3) Prereq:
EEL 5544. Introduction to basic queueing models; performance analysis
of multiple access protocols; error control strategies.
EEL 6509-Wireless Communication (3) Prereq: EEL 5544. Intro-
duction. Satellite and cellular systems, propagation, modulation tech-
niques, multiple access techniques, channel coding, speech and video
coding, and wireless computer networks.
EEL 6524-Statistical Decision Theory (3) Prereq: EEL 5544. Hy-
pothesis testing of signals in the presence of noise by Bayes, Neyman-
Pearson, minimax criteria; estimation of signal parameters.


EEL 6535-Digital Communications (3) Prereq: EEL 5544. Digital
modulation techniques; analysis of digital communication systems in
presence of noise; optimum principles; synchronization; equalization.
EEL 6537-Spectral Estimation (3) Prereq: EEL 5544, 5701. Mea-
surement and analysis of signals and noise. Digital filtering and spec-
tral analysis; fast Fourier transform.
EEL 6548-Radar I (3) Prereq: EEL 5544. Basic concepts, wave propa-
gation, antennas, radar equation, cross section, radar signals, detection.
EEL 6550-Error Correction Coding (3) Prereq: EEL 5544 or equiva-
lent; coreq: EEL 5544 or 4516. Introduction to abstract algebra, block
coding and decoding, convolutional coding and decoding, trellis coded
modulation, run-length-limited codes.
EEL 6562-Image Processing and Computer Vision (3) Pictorial data
representation; feature encoding; spatial filtering; image enhancement;
image segmentation; cluster seeking; two-dimensional z-transforms; scene
analysis; picture description language; object recognition; pictorial da-
tabase; interactive graphics; picture understanding machine.
EEL 6586-Automatic Speech Processing (3) Prereq: EEL 5701.
Various models of speech production and perception. Operation of speech
synthesizers. Discussion of speech recognition. Mathematical models of
speech signals.
EEL 6614-Modern Control Theory (3) Prereq: EEL 5182. Optimi-
zation of systems using the calculus ofvariations, dynamic programming,
and the maximum principle. Extensive study of the linear plant with a
quadratic performance index. Observers and dynamic compensators.
EEL 6615-Estimation and Optimal Filtering (3) Prereq: EEL 5182
or consent of instructor. Kalman Bucy filters. Discrete and continuous
filtering. Computational techniques. Smoothing and system identification
techniques.
EEL 6616-Adaptive Control (3) Prereq: EEL 5182 or 4610. Model
reference adaptive control. Direct or indirect adaptive control. Self-tuning
regulators. Stability, convergence, and robustness.
EEL 6617-Linear Multivarible Control (3) Prereq: MAS 4105, EEL
5182. Transfer matrix theory of systems, emphasis on feedback, inter-
nal stability, model matching, and assignment of invariant factors.
EEL 6619-Robust Control Systems (3) Prereq: EEL 5182. Analysis
and design of multivariable control systems in presence of uncertain-
ties.
EEL 6667-Kinematics and Dynamics of Robot Manipulators (3)
Algebraic formulation of robot manipulator motion. Homogeneous
matrices. Methods for computing forward and reverse kinematic solu-
tions of robot manipulators. Robot differential displacements and Ja-
cobians. Newton-Euler and Lagrangian derivations of manipulator
dynamics.
EEL 6668-Intelligent Robot Manipulator Systems (3) Prereq: EEL
6667. Trajectory planning and computation for robot manipulators.
Splines. Force compliance and hybrid control. Machine perception and
intelligence: touch, vision, collision avoidance, automatic task planning.
Modeling a robotic manufacturing work cell. Robot computer languages.
EEL 6702-Digital Filtering (3) Prereq: analysis and design ofdigital
filters. Introduction to number transforms, complexity of algorithms,
and finite fields. Development of transforms and digital filter using
algebraic operators and finite fields plus the technological consideration
of DSP system and system integration.
EEL 6706-Fault-Tolerant Computer Architecture (3) Prereq: EEL
5764 or CDA 5155. Design and quantitative analysis of fault-tolerant
architectures and dependable systems including fundamental issues,
redundancy techniques, evaluation methods, design methodology, and
applications.
EEL 6763-Parallel Computer Architecture (3) Prereq: EEL 5764.
Advanced architecture emphasizing design and quantitative analysis of
parallel architecture and systems, including theory, hardware technologies,
parallel and scalable architectures, and software constructs.





ENGINEERING-GENERAL / 127


EEL 6767-Database Engineering (3) Prereq: EEL 4713C. Architec-
ture of database management system, data models and languages, de-
sign, integrity, security, concurrency control, distributed database man-
agement.
EEL 6769-Hardware-Software Interactions: Nonnumeric Process-
ing (3) Prereq: EEL 6767 or COP 5725 or consent ofinstructor. Infor-
mation representations; content and context search methods; associa-
tive memories, retrieval language mapping; parallel processing; hardware
and software garbage collections.
EEL 6785-High-Performance Computer Networks (3) Prereq: EEL
5718 or CEN 6505. Design and quantitative analysis of high-speed
networks and interconnects including protocols, hardware and software
interfaces, switching, light-weight communication layers, flow and er-
ror control, and quality of service.
EEL 6814-Neural Networks for Signal Processing (3) Prereq: EEL
6502. Optimal filters in vector spaces. Linear machines and discrimi-
nant functions. Gradient descent learning in additive neural model.
Performance measures of multilayer perceptions and Hopfield. Dynamic
neural networks and issues of short term memory; unsupervised learn-
ing; feature extraction, data reduction; potential functions; syntactic
pattern description; recognition grammars; machine intelligence.
EEL 6825-Pattern Recognition and Intelligent Systems (3) Deci-
sion functions; optimum decision criteria; training algorithms; unsu-
pervised learning; feature extraction, data reduction; potential functions;
syntactic pattern description; recognition grammars; machine intelligence.
EEL 6841-Machine Intelligence and Synthesis (3) Prereq: EEL 5840.
Theory of machine intelligence applied to general problem of engineering
intelligent computer systems and architecture. Applications emphasized.
EEL 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 6) Prereq: consent ofadviser.
Selected problems or projects.
EEL 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EEL 6935-Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (1-4; max: 12,
including EEL 5905 and EEL 6905)
EEL 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EEL 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EEL 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EEL 7936-Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering (1-4; max: 6)
EEL 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
EEL 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



ENGINEERING-GENERAL
College of Engineering

Dean: P. D. Khargonekar. Associate Dean: W. Viessman, Jr.

EGN 5949-Practicum/Internship/Cooperative Work Experience (1-
6; max: 6) Prereq: graduate student. Practical cooperative engineering work
under approved industrial and faculty supervision. S/U.



ENGLISH
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: J. P. Leavey. Graduate Coordinator S. Hegeman. Graduate Research
Professor: J. Seelye. MarstonlMilbauer Professor of English: N. N. Hol-


land. Distinghished Professor: P. B. Craddock. Professors: D. D. Ault;
R. E. Brantley; A. C. Bredahl, Jr.; R. H. Carpenter; J. O. Cech; I. G.
Clark; A. M. Duckworth; D. Greger; S. R. Homan; R. B. Kershner,
Jr.; J. P. Leavey; D. Leverenz; W. Logan; K. McCarthy; B. McCrea;
M. Nelson; M. New; P. Powell; R. B. Ray; M. A. Reid; P. L. Rudnytsky;
M. J. Schueller; P. Schmidt; R. A. Shoaf; J. Smith; C. G. Snodgrass; M.
C. Turim; J. B. Twitchell; G. L. Ulmer. Associate Professors: M. C. Bryant;
S. Dobrin; J. Douglas; K. L. Emery; P. Gilbert; A. M. Gordon; S.
Hegeman; M. A. Hill-Lubin; A. Jones; D. W. King; W. A. Losano; S.
Nygren; J. Paxson; J. M. Perlette; S. A. Smith; R. M. Thompson; R. S.
Thomson; S. E. Wade; P. E. Wegner. Assistant Professors: T. Hedrick;
M. E. Hines; M. Hofmann; K. B. Kidd; N. B. Reisman; J. B. Scott.

The Department of English offers the Master of Arts degree (thesis
and nonthesis options) and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in English
with the specializations listed below, and the Master of Fine Arts degree
in creative writing.
Specific areas of specialization for the Master of Arts and the Doctor
of Philosophy include literature (Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration
and 18th-century, and 19th-century British literature, American lit-
erature to 1900, contemporary British and American literature), critical
theory, cultural studies, film and media studies, and children's lit-
erature.
New graduate students should have completed an undergraduate
English major of at least 24 semester hours, and doctoral students
should have a Master of Arts degree in English. Full information
concerning courses of study is available from the graduate coordi-
nator.
AML 6017-Studies in American Literature Before 1900 (3; max: 12)
AML 6027-Studies in 20th-Century American Literature (3; max:
12)
CRW 6130-Fiction Writing (3; max: 12)
CRW 6166-Studies in Literary Form (3; max: 12) Prereq:permis-
sion ofinstructor. Formal aspects of literature.
CRW 6331--Verse Writing (3; max: 12)
CRW 6906-Individual Work (1-3; max: 12) Individual study in
reading literature and criticism, required for MFA specialization in creative
writing.
ENC 5236-Advanced Business Writing for Accounting (4) Practice
in and examination of theories of professional writing.
ENC 6428-Digital English (3) Digital technologies, media, and
programs as they relate to discipline of English. Production of work in
such media (web, MOO) as well as scholarship and theory about them.
ENG 6016-Psychological Approaches to Literature (3; max: 6)
ENG 6018-Introductory Studies in Theory (3; max: 12) For new
students without much theory background who want to explore theo-
rists, issues, and forms of theory study.
ENG 6075-Literary Theory: Issues (3; max: 12)
ENG 6076-Literary Theory: Theorists (3; max: 12)
ENG 6077-Literary Theory: Forms (3; max: 12) Forms of theory
studies (e.g., "schools," writing practices, assemblages of theoretical
issues).
ENG 6137-The Language of Film (3)
ENG 6138-Studies in the Movies (3; max: 12)
ENG 6906-Individual Work (1-3; max: 12)
ENG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ENG 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ENG 7939-Seminar in Variable Topics (1-5; max: 12)
ENG 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.





128 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ENG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
ENL 6206-Studies in Old English (3; max: 12)
ENL 6216-Studies in Middle English (3; max: 12)
ENL 6226-Studies in Renaissance Literature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6236-Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century Literature (3;
max: 12)
ENL 6246-Studies in Romantic Literature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6256-Studies in Victorian Literature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6276-Studies in 20th-Century British Literature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6335-Studies in Shakespeare (3)
LAE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
LAE 6947-Writing Theories & Practices (3; max: 6) Prereq: English
major.
LIN 6137-Studies in English Linguistics (3)
LIT 5335-Approaches to Children's and Adolescent Literature (3;
max: 6) Prereq: at least 1 upper-division survey in children's or adolescent
literature. Exploration of controversies, trends, and critical problems.
LIT 6017-Studies in Fiction (3; max: 12)
LIT 6037-Studies in Verse (3; max: 12)
LIT 6047-Studies in Drama (3; max: 12)
LIT 6186-Studies in Irish Literature (3; max: 12)
LIT 6309-Communications and Popular Culture (3) Study of the
origins and qualities of the popular arts in modern society.
LIT 6357-Studies in African American or African Diaspora Litera-
tures and Cultures (3; max: 12)
LIT 6358-Theoretical Approaches to Black Cultural Studies (3; max:
9) Explorations of theory and black writing and the variety of theoretical
approaches.
LIT 6855-Issues in Cultural Studies (3; max: 12)
LIT 6856-Cultural Studies: Interventions (3; max: 12) Praxes, per-
spectives, and limitations of cultural and theoretical studies within the
multiple contexts of their production.
LIT 6857-Cultural Studies: Movements (3; max: 12) Theories and
histories of cultural groups, classification, or communities in various
media.
LIT 6934-Variable Topics (1-5; max: 12) Studies in topics not nor-
mally offered in the regular curriculum, including intensive study of topics
within a literary period, extensive study of motifs crossing several peri-
ods, and studies in various national or ethnic literatures (African, Afro-
American, Jewish, Scots).
SPC 6239-Studies in Rhetorical Theory (3; max: 9) Examination
of ancient, medieval, renaissance, and modern writers who have influ-
enced rhetorical thought, criticism, speaking, and writing.



ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman:J. L Capinera. Graduate Coordinator. G. C. Smart. Fischer, Dovies,
and Eckes Eminent Scholar M. Hoy. Sapp Endowed Professor: P. G. Koehler.
Professors: A. Ali; R. M. Baranowski; C. S. Barfield; D. Borovsky; D. G.
Boucias; H. W. Browning; J. F. Butler; J. L. Capinera; R. H. Cherry; C.
C. Childers; J. F. Day; D. W. Dickson; L. W. Duncan; R. A. Dunn; T.
C. Emmel; R. W. Flowers; J. H. Frank; J. E. Funderburk; C. J. Geden;
E.J. Gerberg; R. Giblin-Davis; P. D. Greany; V. K. Gupta; D. H. Habeck;
D. W. Hall; F. A. Johnson; W. Klassen; J. L. Knapp; P. O. Lawrence;
N. C. Leppla; J. E. Lloyd; L. P. Lounibos; M. S. Mayer; C. W. McCoy,
Jr.; R. McSorley; L. D. Miller; E. R. Mitchell; R. F. Mizell, III; J. L. Na-
tion; J. K. Nayar; H. N. Nigg; J. W. Noling; G. S. Nuessly; J. H. O'Bannon;
H. Oberlander; L. S. Osborne; R. S. Patterson; J. Pena; P. V. Perkins;
M. L. Pescador; J. R. Rey; J. R. Rich; R. H. Scheffrahn; D.J. Schuster;J.


P. Shapiro; F. Slansky, Jr.; P. A. Stansly; G. C. Smart, Jr.; B. J. Smittle;
R. K. Sprenkel; J. L. Stimac; N.-Y. Su; P. E. A. Teal; J. H. Tsai; J. H.
Tumlinson III; V. H. Waddill; T. J. Walker; H. Weems; R. F. Woodruff;
S. J. Yu. Associate Professors: D. R. Barnard; D. A. Carlson; R. P. Esser;
J. L. Foltz; H. G. Hall; F. W. Howard; M. D. Hubbard; D. L. Kline; G.
L. Leibee; J. E. Maruniak; H. J. McAuslane; C. W. O'Brien; J. F. Price;
J. A. Seawright; D. L. Silhacek; L. A. Stange; S. E. Webb. Assistant Pro-
fessors: B. J. Adams; J. J. Becnel; R. J. Brenner; G. R. Buckingham; E. A.
Buss; B.J. Cabrera; W. Crow; J. P. Cuda; G. B. Edwards; D. A. Focks;
A. M. Handler;. J. B. Heppner; J. A. Hogsette; W. H. Kern; O. E. Liburd;
R. Nguyen; F. L. Petitt; S. D. Porter; P. D. Shirk; J. M. Sivinsky; G. J.
Steck; M. C. Thomas; D. F. Williams; D. P. Wojcik.

The Entomology and Nematology Department offers the Master
of Science (thesis and nonthesis option) and Doctor of Philosophy de-
grees in entomology and nematology. Members of the Graduate Faculty
include the department resident faculty, faculty located on University
of Florida campuses away from Gainesville, scientists with other State
of Florida agencies such as the Division of Plant Industry and Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and scientists of
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Graduate Faculty is quali-
fied to direct graduate students in all specialities of entomology, nema-
tology, and acarology.
In addition to the University's admission requirements, the De-
partment requires the GRE Advanced Test in biology. New gradu-
ate students should have backgrounds in biology, chemistry, phys-
ics, and mathematics and knowledge of basic entomology or nema-
tology. Minor deficiencies may be made up after entering graduate
school.
ALS 5136-Agricultural Ecology Principles and Applications (3)
Introduction to agroecosystems. Ecological principles with examples and
applications from agriculture.
ALS 6046-Grant Writing (2) Prereq: admitted to doctoral program.
Preparation, submission, and management of competitive grants, includ-
ing operations of national review panels and finding sources of extra-
mural funding.
ENY 5006C-Graduate Survey of Entomology (3) Insect structure,
function, development, classification, ecological niches, and control of
those harmful to plants and animals.
ENY 5031C-Insect Field Biology (3) Prereq: For nonmajors. Role of
insects in nature. Field exercises and experiments.
ENY 5151C-Techniques in Insect Systematics (2) Prereq: ENY
3005C Procedures and techniques used to study systematics of insects
and related organisms.
ENY 5160C-Survey of Science with Insects (3) Interactions of insects
with man and environment.
ENY 5223C-Biology and Identification of Urban Pests (3) Biology,
behavior, identification. Damage recognition of species that infest houses,
damage structures, and affect pets and humans.
ENY 5226C-Principles of Urban Pest Management (3) Methods of
controlling household, structural, and occasional pests. Chemical and
nonchemical control of cockroaches, termites, and fleas.
ENY 5241-Biological Control of Insects (4) Prereq: ENY3005C.
Principles involved in the natural and biological control of insects.
ENY 5566-Tropical Entomology (3) Prereq: ENY3005C. Natural
history, ecology, behavior, natural ecosystems, and agroecosystems of
tropics.
ENY 5611-Immature Insects (4) Prereq: ENY4161. Structure and
identification of immature forms of insects, especially the Holometabola.
ENY 5810C-Information Techniques in Research (2) Sources of
research information and methods for acquiring, analyzing, storing,
retrieving, and presenting. Effective use of computers and Internet.








ENY 5885C-Extension Entomology and Nematology (2) Extension
philosophy and methodologies related to insect and nematode manage-
ment.
ENY 6166-Insect Classification (3) Prereq: ENY3005C or equiva-
lent. Classification of adult insects to family and of some to species level.
Habitat, niche, and relationship to environment.
ENY 6202C-Quantitative Approaches to Insect Ecology (3) Prereq: ENY
6203 andSTA 6166or equivalent. Quantitative methods for describing and
studying insect populations, computer simulation of insect-plant system
dynamics, applications of modeling to insect ecology.
ENY 6203-Insect Ecology (4) Prereq: PCB 3034C or 4044C. Spe-
cial emphasis on evolutionary and population aspects. Discussions of
primary literature; field projects.
ENY 6205-Nutritional Ecology of Insects (3) Relationships of mor-
phological, physiological, behavioral, ecological, and evolutionary as-
pects of insect nutrition within basic and applied contexts.
ENY 6207C-Insect Population Dynamics (3) Characterization of
insect population dynamics through use of population models.
ENY 6209-Insect Chemical Ecology (3) Prereq: BCH3023 or CHM
2210-2211 and ENY3005C. Analysis of various forms of chemical
communication used by insects for survival; emphasis on use of these
systems to control pest species.
ENY 6261C-Insect Resistance in Crop Plants (3) Principles of plant
resistance to insects.
ENY 6401C-Insect Physiology (4) Physiology and biochemistry of
insect development and adaption for survival.
ENY 6454-Behavioral Ecology and Systematics of Insects (3) Sur-
vey of concepts, theory, and practice ofbiosystematics, teleonomy, and
cladistics.
ENY 6651C-Insect Toxicology (3) Prereq: ENY3005C. Chemistry,
toxicity, mode of action, metabolism, and environmental considerations
of insecticides and related compounds. Mechanisms of resistance to
insecticides.
ENY 6665C-Advanced Medical and Veterinary Entomology (4)
Prereq: ENY3005C Taxonomy, morphology, and biology of arthropods
of medical and veterinary importance. A collection and project proposal
will be required.
ENY 6821-Insect Pathology (4) Prereq: consent of instructor. Inter-
relationship of insects and pathogenic micro-organisms; history, clas-
sification, morphology, mode-of-action, and epidemiology of
entomogenous bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi.
ENY 6822C-Molecular Biology Techniques with Invertebrates and
Their Pathogens (4) Prereq: basic course in genetics, biochemistry, or
molecular biology. Insects, nematodes, bacteria, viruses. Cloning of DNA,
DNA blots, PCR, sequencing and analysis.
ENY 6905-Problems in Entomology (1-4; max: 12) Individual study
under faculty guidance. Student and instructor to agree on problem and
credits prior to registration.
ENY 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ENY 6932-Special Topics in Entomology (1-2; max: 4) Reports and
discussions on selected topics announced in advance. S/U.
ENY 6934-Selected Studies in Entomology (1-4; max: 8) Current
issues. Subject matter variable, may be repeated with different subject
each time.
ENY 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ENY 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ENY 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ENY 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES / 129


NEM 5002C-Graduate Survey of Nematology (3) Morphology,
anatomy, development, feeding habits, life cycles, disease cycles, and
control of nematodes that parasitize plants and animals. Role of plant
parasitic nematodes in disease complexes and as vectors of plant viruses.
"Free-living" nematodes that inhabit oceans, fresh water, and soil.
NEM 5707C-Plant Nematology (3) Identification of plant parasitic
nematodes, diseases they cause, interactions with other plant parasites,
and management schemes to control population densities.
NEM 6101C-Nematode Morphology and Anatomy (2) Prereq: NEM
3002. Morphology, anatomy, and function of structures, organs, and
systems.
NEM 6102C-Nematode Taxonomy and Systematics (3) Prereq: NEM
6101C. Collection, preparation, and identification of plant and soil
nematodes; review of pertinent literature; drawing techniques and prepa-
ration of keys.
NEM 6201-Nematode Ecology (3) Population and community ecol-
ogy of plant-parasitic and other soil-inhabiting nematodes. Mathematical
descriptions and relationships will be emphasized where appropriate.
NEM 6708-Field Plant Nematology (2; max: 4) Field trips to vari-
ous agricultural research stations and production areas in Florida to learn
plant symptoms and current research methods.
NEM 6905-Problems in Nematology (1-4; max: 8)
NEM 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
NEM 6931-Nematology Seminar (1; max: 6) Presentation and dis-
cussion of current research, research topics. S/U option.
NEM 6932-Special Topics in Nematology (1-4; max: 4) Reports and
discussions. S/U.
NEM 6934-Selected Studies in Nematology (1-4; max: 4) Current
issues with subject matter variable.
NEM 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
NEM 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
NEM 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U
NEM 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
PMA 5205-Citrus Pest Management (3) Prereq: ENY3005C. Ar-
thropod and nematode pests of citrus. Ecological principles of host and
pest community relationships. Pest identification, biology, and inter-
actions with citrus. Pest monitoring, diagnosis, and management.
PMA 6228-Field Techniques in Integrated Pest Management (2)
Practical aspects of pest management, emphasizing sampling, diagnos-
tics, decision making processes, and informational resources available
to IPM practitioner.



ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
SCIENCES

College of Engineering

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: J. J. Warwick. Graduate Coordinator: J. J. Delfino. Graduate Re-
search Professor: H. T. Odum (Emeritus). Professors: G. Bitton; W. E.
Bolch; T. L. Crisman; J. J. Delfino; B. Koopman; D. A. Lundgren (Emeri-
tus); W. L. Miller (Emeritus); W. Viessman, Jr.; J. Zoltek, Jr. Associate
Professors: M. D. Annable; P. A. Chadik; C. L. Montague; T. G.
Townsend; W. W. R. Wise. Assistant Professors: J. M. Andino; J.-C.
Bonzongo; M. T. Brown; A. S. Linder; C. Y. Wu.





130 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Graduate study is offered leading to the degrees Master of Engineering,
Master of Science, Engineer, and Doctor of Philosophy in the field of
environmental engineering sciences. The Department has four broadly
defined graduate research and education areas as shown below with
subspecialties shown in parentheses. Cross-fertilization among areas is
encouraged as is the development of crosscutting research initiatives that
involved students and faculty from multiple areas. While students may
focus with an area, each graduate student works with his/her adviser to
develop a unique and rich curriculum to meet personal educational ob-
jectives.
*Air and waste management (air pollution, environmental health,
and solid and hazardous waste).
*Environmental hydrology (contaminant transport and fate, hy-
drologic restoration, surface and subsurface hydrology, water chem-
istry, and water resources management).
*Systems ecology and ecological engineering (ecological engineering,
energy analysis, environmental policy, systems, ecology, and wetlands,
aquatic, and estuarine ecology).
*Water and wastewater science and engineering (biological treat-
ment of potable water and wastewater, nutrient control and water
reuse, physico-chemical treatment of potable water and wastewater,
and water chemistry and biogeochemistry).
A health physics specialty is offered through an interdepartmen-
tal program in cooperation with the Department of Nuclear and
Radiological Engineering. The hydrologic sciences interdisciplinary
concentration is offered through 10 departments in 3 colleges. Both
are described under Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies.
Direct admission into the Master of Science and Doctor of Phi-
losophy programs requires a bachelor's degree in engineering or in
a basic science such as chemistry, geology, physics, biology, or math-
ematics. Persons with a degree in a nontechnical field may also be
admitted into this program upon the completion of appropriate
technical courses.
Direct admission into the Master of Engineering program requires
a bachelor's degree in engineering.
The requirements for a master's degree normally take 16 to 24
months to complete. The length of time required for the Doctor of
Philosophy degree depends, in part, on the research topic.
The following courses in related areas will be acceptable for graduate
credit as part of the candidate's major:
Health Physics: ENU 5005, ENU 5615, ENU 5615L, ENU 5626,
ENU 6627, and ENU 6657. Systems Ecology and Energy Analysis:
CRW 6115, GLY 5827, PCB 5307C, PCB 5317C, PCB 6356C,
PCB 6447C, PCB 6496C, BOT 5695, URP 6231, URP 6821, and
AEB 6453.
Joint Programs-The Department offers a combined bachelor's/
master's degree program. This program allows qualified students to
earn both a bachelor's degree and a master's degree with a savings
of six credits.
The Environmental Engineering Sciences Department, in part-
nership with the Levin College of Law, offers a joint program lead-
ing to the M.S. or M.E. degree in environmental engineering sciences
and the Juris Doctor degree. Twelve credits of appropriate course work
are counted toward both degrees.
CWR 6115-Surface Hydrology (3) Prereq: MAP2302 orEGM3311,
CWR 3201 or EGN3353C. Occurrence and distribution of water by
natural processes including atmospheric thermodynamics, precipitation,
runoff, infiltration, water losses, flood routing and catchment charac-
teristics, analysis, and methods of runoff prediction. Current hydrologic
computer models.
EES 5105-Advanced Wastewater Microbiology (3) Prereq: consent
of instructor. The role of microorganisms and other biota in major en-


vironmental problems, wastewater processes and natural bodies of wa-
ter.
EES 5207-Environmental Chemistry (3) Prereq: CHM2046 Survey
of principles of chemistry with applications to water, emphasizing prop-
erties, composition, redox equilibria, and complexation; environmental
organic chemistry; earth's atmosphere with emphasis on chemical com-
position, gaseous inorganic pollutants and oxides, and photochemical smog.
EES 5245-Water Quality Analysis (3) Prereq: CHM2046, EES 4201,
or 6208, or consent ofinstructor. Principles of analytical chemistry applied
to the determination of chemical composition of natural waters and waste-
waters. Emphasis on methods used in routine determinations of water and
wastewater quality and interpretation of data.
EES 5305C-Ecological and General Systems (3) Prereq: MAP2302
or equivalent. Systems ecology, including examples, languages, theoretical
formulations and models for design, synthesis and prediction of systems
of man and nature.
EES 5306-Energy Analysis (3) Energetics of systems of environment and
economics; energy analysis of environmental systems, agroecosystems, re-
gional and national economies; energy evaluation of public policy.
EES 5307-Ecological Engineering (3) Principles and practices in design
and management of environment with society; systems concepts for
organization of humanity, technology, and nature.
EES 5315-Ecology and the Environment (2) Application of ecological
principles to environmental problems and management.
EES 5415-Environmental Health (3) Effects of environment pollution
upon health. Methods of evaluation, treatment, and prevention of pol-
lutants of health significance.
EES 6007-Advanced Energy and Environment (3) Energy basis for
system of humanity and nature, including principles of systems ecology,
ecological economics, and public policy.
EES 6009-Ecological Economics (2) Consideration of new research
areas; models and mathematical theories common to ecology and eco-
nomics, interfaces between ecology and economics, relationships of energy
and money.
EES 6026C-Environmental Systems Dynamics (3) Prereq: CGS2425
or equivalent. Feedback principles and methods introduced and used to
develop and test hypotheses of causes of dynamics in environmental
systems. Hypotheses tested through computer modeling.
EES 6028-Spatial Modeling Using Geographic Information Systems
(3) Advanced applications of GIS and principles of spatial analysis and
modeling in environmental engineering sciences.
EES 6051-Advanced Environmental Planning and Design (3) Sus-
tainable communities and regions. Quantitative methods for evaluation
of environmental impacts and carrying capacity. Theories of spatial and
temporal organization of systems of humanity and nature.
EES 6135-Aquatic Microbiology (3) Behavior of microorganisms in
freshwater, marine and soil environments. Stress of pollution on micro-
bial communities. Adsorption of microorganisms to surfaces.
EES 6136-Aquatic Autotrophs (3) The function ofalgae and macrophytes
in lake systems. Environmental problems associated with excessive growth of
algae and macrophytes, and methods for their control.
EES 6137-Aquatic Heterotrophs (3) The role ofzooplankton, benthic
invertebrates and fish in freshwater systems. Emphasis is placed on trophic-
level interactions, nutrient cycling and the potential of each group for
predicting water quality.
EES 6140-Biology of Exotic Species (3) Prereq: EES 4103. Exami-
nation of case histories of species' introduction worldwide and the
mechanisms responsible for establishment and dominance of native
communities by exotic taxa.
EES 6145-Environmental Meteorology and Oceanography (3) Prereq:
MAP2302 orEGM3311 andPHY2049. Principles of meteorology and
oceanography and interactions of atmosphere and oceans with human
economy.








EES 6208-Principles of Water Chemistry I (3) Prereq: CHM2046
or consent of instructor. Application of chemical principles to aqueous
reactions; emphasis on thermodynamics, kinetics, and aqueous equilibria
including acid-base, solubility, complexation, precipitation and redox.
EES 6209-Principles of Water Chemistry II (3) Prereq: EES 4201
or 6208, or consent of instructor. Application of chemical principles to
reactions and composition of natural waters; emphasis on organic com-
pounds, chemical models, and fate of organic contaminants.
EES 6225-Atmospheric Chemistry (3) Prereq: ENV4101 or consent of
instructor. Nature, sources, and sinks of fixed and variable constituents of
atmosphere. Chemical changes occurring. Influences and properties of
atmospheric components of natural and anthropogenic origin.
EES 6246-Advanced Water Analysis (3) Prereq: EES 4200, 5245, or
consent ofinstructor. Advanced chemical procedures used in water chem-
istry research. Application of instrumental methods for determination of
trace inorganic and organic natural water constituents.
EES 6301-Comparative Approaches in Systems Ecology (3) Alter-
native approaches for understanding ecological interactions, prediction
after ecosystem perturbations, and optimal design with nature are evalu-
ated within the context of natural selection and thermodynamics. Static,
dynamic, deterministic, and stochastic study of energy flow, element
cycling, and information feedback.
EES 6308C-Wetland Ecology (3) Prereq: BSC 2005 or EES 4103.
Defining and classifying major wetland ecosystems, formation of wet-
lands, wetland functions and values; wetlands ecological engineering and
management; integrating wetlands into developing landscape. Emphasis
on several field trips to natural and altered wetlands.
EES 6356-Estuarine Systems (3) Coastal ecosystems, their compo-
nents, processes, systems, models and management including tropical,
arctic and man-affected types, field trip and literature review.
EES 6405-Environmental Toxicology (3) Prereq: BSC2005 or EES
4102, or consent of instructor. Effects of environmental toxicants on
humans, animals, and the environment.
ENV 5075-Environmental Policy (3) Policy analysis, policy making,
and policy implementation. Analytical methods for evaluating alternative
policies. Legal, social, political, and economic patterns and processes which
shape the climate within which environmental policy is made.
ENV 5105-Foundations of Air Pollution (3) Principal types, sources,
dispersion, effects, and physical, economic and legal aspects of control
of atmospheric pollutants.
ENV 5305-Advanced Solid Waste Treatment Design (3) Review of
solid and hazardous waste treatment processes, including thermal, biologi-
cal, chemical, and mechanical treatment. Analysis of existing operations.
ENV 5306-Municipal Refuse Disposal (3) Quantities and charac-
teristics of municipal refuse and hazardous materials. Collection methods,
transfer stations, equipment and costs. Refuse disposal practices, regional
planning and equipment.
ENV 5518-Field Methods in Environmental Hydrology (3) Prereq:
CWR 5125 or equivalent. Field methods for characterizing sites for en-
vironmental and hydrologic evaluation. Focus on subsurface systems and
ground water interactions.
ENV 5555-Wastewater Treatment (4) Prereq: ENV4514Cor equiva-
lent. In depth study of the physical, chemical and biological processes
utilized in the treatment ofwastewater, with special emphasis on cause
and effect of physical and biological actions.
ENV 5930-Special Topics in Environmental Engineering I (1-4; max:
8) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Laboratory, lectures or conferences covering
specially selected topics.
ENV 6050-Advanced Pollutant Transport (3) Prereq: ENV3040,
4501, or consent ofinstructor. Quantification of physical, biological, and
chemical processes occurring in natural freshwater ecosystems. Math-
ematical analysis of the effects due to conservative and nonconservative


ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES / 131


pollutant loadings to lakes and rivers. Detailed study of dissolved oxy-
gen mass balance modeling and eutrophication.
ENV 6052-Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media (3) Prereq: consent
ofinstructor. Mechanics of immiscible fluids in porous media. Static fluid
distributions, steady and unsteady multiphase flow. Remediation of sites
contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids.
ENV 6116-Air Pollution Sampling and Analysis (3) Prereq: ENV4101
or consent of instructor. Determination of the concentration of normally
encountered ambient pollutants. Practical experience in ambient air and
indoor sampling.
ENV 6126-Air Pollution Control Design (3) Prereq: ENV4101 or
consent ofinstructor. Design, analysis, operational limitations, cost and
performance evaluation of control processes and equipment. Field vis-
its to and inspection of industrial installations.
ENV 6130-Aerosol Mechanics (3) Generation, collection, and mea-
surement of aerosols. Theory of the fluid dynamic, optical, electrical,
inertial and thermal behavior of gas-borne particles.
ENV 6146-Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling (3) Prediction of
downwind pollutant concentrations from point, line, and area sources.
ENV 6215-Health Physics (3) Techniques of hazard evaluation and
radiation control; monitoring methods; survey techniques; biological sam-
pling; instrument calibration; exposure standards and radiation protection
regulation; on-site radiation safety surveys and evaluation.
ENV 6215L-Health Physics Measurements (2) Lectures on applied
measurement techniques in laboratory radiation protection. Air sampling
and monitoring, personnel monitoring, bio-assay and in-vivo counting,
ambient radiation monitoring, environmental radiation surveillance
techniques, radon and radon daughter techniques, and nonionizing
radiation.
ENV 6216-Radioactive Wastes (3) Source, treatment and disposal.
Emphasis on prevention of environmental contamination.
ENV 6301-Advanced Solid Waste Containment Design (3) Current
practice in design of solid and hazardous waste landfills, waste piles,
monofills, surface impoundments. Regulations, siting, sizing, liners,
leachate and gas management, operations, closure, post-closure.
ENV 6335-Hazardous Waste Management (3) Prereq: CHM2046.
Statutory and regulatory basis for hazardous waste management (RCRA).
Development and evaluation of environmental regulation.
ENV 6435C-Advanced Water Treatment Process Design (4) Prereq:
CHM2046, EES 4201 or 6208, ENV4514C. Design of water treatment
processes including air stripping disinfection, activated carbon adsorption,
ion exchange, membrane processes, and ozonation. Predesign labora-
tory studies to select appropriate process parameters.
ENV 6437-Advanced Wastewater System Design (3) Prereq: ENV
4514C or equivalent; coreq: ENV4561 or equivalent. Layout and design
of sanitary sewage systems, pumping stations, force mains, wastewater
treatment plants, and methods of effluent disposal. Emphasis is placed
on the preparation of design drawings and estimating costs.
ENV 6438-Advanced Potable Water Systems Design (3) Prereq: EES
4201, 6208, ENV4514C. Design of water treatment operations, includ-
ing coagulation, flocculation, mixing, sedimentation, filtration, softening,
corrosion control, and sludge management. Design costs.
ENV 6510-Groundwater Restoration (3) Design of water treatment
systems employing aeration, activated carbon, reverse osmosis, and in
situ bioremediation to restore contaminated groundwater.
ENV 6511-Biological Wastewater Treatment (3) Theory and cur-
rent research associated with biological treatment processes.
ENV 6556-Advanced Waste Treatment Operations (3) Prereq: ENV
5555, 6511. Biological, physical, and chemical processes used in the
advanced treatment of domestic and industrial wastewater. Reuse ap-
plication and guidelines.
ENV 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 8) Faculty-supervised indi-
vidual research or study of material not covered in formal courses.





132 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ENV 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ENV 6916-Nonthesis Project (1-2; max: 2)
ENV 6932-Special Problems in Environmental Engineering (1-4;
max: 8)
ENV 6935-Graduate Environmental Engineering Seminar (1; max:
6) S/U option.
ENV 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ENV 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ENV 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ENV 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
ENV 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES
College of Health and Human Performance

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: S. K. Powers. Graduate Coordinator: D. S. Fleming. Distinguished
Service Professor: R. H. Alexander. Professors: P. J. Bird; S. K. Powers;
R. N. Singer; C. S. Williams. Associate Professors: R. W. Braith; J. A.
Cauraugh; J. W. Chow; S. L. Dodd; M. B. Horodyski; M. Murphey;
R. A. Siders; C. B. Stopka; J. Zhang. Assistant Professors: G. R. Bennett;
S. E. Borst; D.P. Connaughton; D.S. Criswell; D. S. Fleming; P. R.
Giacobbi Jr.; H. A. Hausenblas; C. M. Janelle; T. W. Kaminski; C.
Leeuwenburgh; M. E. Powers; M.D. Tillman; J.R. Todorovich; L. J.
White.

Programs leading to the degrees Master of Science in Exercise and
Sport Sciences and Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences are offered
through the Department. Areas of concentration for the master's
program include athletic training/sports medicine, biomechanics,
clinical exercise physiology, exercise and sport pedagogy, exercise
physiology, motor learning/control, special physical education/ex-
ercise therapy, sport and exercise psychology, and sports management.
The Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences degree pro-
gram provides the student with an opportunity to study, conduct
research, and prepare a thesis in an area of special interest. The
Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences degree program offers the
student a specialization in a selected area of study, with additional
work in other areas. A comprehensive written and oral examina-
tion is required for this degree.
The Ph.D. program is offered through the College of Health and
Human Performance with concentrations in athletic training/sport
medicine, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor learning/con-
trol, and sport and exercise psychology. These interdisciplinary con-
centrations blend concentrated course work with research.
Athletic Training/Sport Medicine-This concentration provides
comprehensive academic preparation, research, and clinical experi-
ence in the areas of injury prevention, assessment, treatment, reha-
bilitation, and therapeutic modalities.
Biomechanics-The Ph.D. concentration in biomechanics draws
from the fields of exercise, engineering, medicine, and manufacturing.
The course work and training include kinematics and kinetics of
animal movement. Course work also includes anatomy/kinesiology,
biomechanics, engineering, medicine, physical therapy, and statis-
tics.
Exercise Physiology- This area of concentration is the scientific
study of how the various physiological systems of the human body


respond to physical activity. It is a multidisciplinary field with strong
ties to the basic life sciences and medicine, and application to clini-
cal, normal, and athletic populations.
Motor Learning/Control-This interdisciplinary doctoral con-
centration draws upon experiences and a knowledge base in the move-
ment and sport sciences, cognitive sciences, and physical therapy.
Students are prepared to conduct research and provide expertise in
traditional motor performance and learning settings.
Sport and Exercise Psychology-This area of concentration pro-
vides the basis for understanding and influencing the underlying at-
titudes, cognitions, and behaviors in both sport and exercise settings.
Given the development of sport and exercise psychology as distinct
fields that emphasize both science and practice, course offerings are
relevant to both fields.
Joint Programs-The M.E.S.S./M.B.A. is a three-year joint de-
gree program offered in conjunction with the Warrington College
of Business Administration. The program provides interested students
an opportunity to complete course work from the two colleges with
a residency in sport management. Applicants must apply to both
programs noting on the application the joint nature of the request
and must meet the admission requirements of both colleges. A per-
sonal interview by a joint committee is required.
M.S.E.S.S (M.E.S.S.)/J.D. Joint Program-This 98 credit hour
joint degree program culminates in a Master of Science in Exercise
and Sport Sciences or Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences degree
and the Juris Doctor degree. Applicants must meet the entrance
requirements for both the Exercise and Sport Sciences Department
and the College of Law. Admission to the second degree program
is required no later than the end of the fourth consecutive semester
after beginning one of the degree programs. The student's supervi-
sory committee is comprised of both College of Law and ESS Graduate
Faculty members.
HLP 6515-Evaluation Procedures in Health and Human Performance
(3) Evaluation and interpretation of tests and analysis of research data.
HLP 6535-Research Methods (3) Introduction to research method-
ology and design.
HLP 6911--Research Seminar (1; max: 6) Research presentations by
graduate students and faculty in the College. S/U.
HLP 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
HLP 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
PET 5127-Advanced Instructors of Adapted Aquatics (3) Prereq:per-
mission ofinstructor/adviser. Art and science of effectively teaching aquatics
to special populations. Aquatics teaching methods for individuals with
physical, mental/emotional, sensory, medical, and health disabilities.
PET 5216-Sport Psychology (3) Prereq: permission ofinstructor. Survey
of current research, learning processes, motivation, performance inter-
vention, strategies, group dynamics, history of sport psychology, and other
topics.
PET 5389-Assessment in Exercise Science (3) Prereq: PET3351C
or equivalent. Techniques and methodologies to assess health and physical
fitness.
PET 5465-Sport Finance (2) Financial theories and practical appli-
cation of sport income and expenditures including both private and public
economic influences.
PET 5466-Sport Marketing (2) Marketing information systems,
pricing strategies, media relations, promotional methods, and endorse-
ments as they relate to marketing theories and practical applications and
principles.





EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES / 133


PET 5495-Sport Ethics (3) Self-evaluating, examining, and devel-
oping philosophy on ethical issues related to sport. Major moral/ethi-
cal issues within sport researched and discussed. Ethical decision mak-
ing processes through opportunities of critical analysis.
PET 5646-Advanced Exercise Therapy and Adapted Physical Edu-
cation (3) Prereq: permission of instructor/adviser. Art and science of
effectively teaching exercise therapy and adapted physical education.
Understanding of specific medical health characteristics of common
disabilities to determine best educational implications for exercise set-
ting.
PET 5655C-Medical Aspects of Individuals with Disabilities (3)
Teaching exercise therapy and adapted physical education to individuals
of all ages with physical, mental, and health disabilities.
PET 5936-Current Topics in Exercise and Sport Sciences (1-3; max:
9) Prereq: permission ofdepartment chairman. Offered, upon request of
students, to meet special interests inadequately covered in other courses.
PET 6xxx-Athletic Training Research and Technology I (3) Current
theory and practical application of techniques (cardiovascular testing,
isokinetic strength testing, and EMG testing) for understanding and
design of research projects related to athletic training/sports medicine.
PET 6xxx-Athletic Training Research and Technology II (3) Prereq:
NA TA certified or eligible, or related degree/certification. Current theory
and practical application of techniques (modalities in research, proprio-
ception testing, and force plate and balance testing) for understanding
and design of research projects related to athletic training/sports medicine.
PET 6087-Wellness Programs in Exercise Science (3) Application
of current knowledge in establishment and analysis of hospital-based,
corporate-based, for-profit-based, and agency-based wellness programs.
PET 6136-Modern Olympic Games (3) Contemporary issues such
as commercialism, professionalism, politics, performance enhancement,
cultural influences, and leaders in Olympic movement.
PET 6137-Sport in the Twentieth Century (3) Historical survey of
sport in America during the twentieth century.
PET 6217-Performance Enhancement (3) Prereq: PET5216 Mental
and psychological techniques and strategies to improve performance and
achievement in sport and exercise.
PET 6218-Planning Motor Actions (3) Prereq: permission ofinstructor.
Processes and mechanisms involved in planning voluntary human motor
actions. Variables that influence movement planning and initiation.
PET 6219-Exercise Psychology (3) Overview of specialty. Research
evidence examined for psychological factors associated with adapting and
maintaining exercise program.
PET 6228-Controlling Motor Actions (3) Analysis of human vol-
untary motor actions, including mechanisms and systems involved in
motor control.
PET 6235C-Nature and Bases of Motor Performance (3) Principles
relating to development of motor skill, with emphasis on conditions
affecting its development and retention in physical education activities.
PET 6298-Seminar in Exercise Psychology (3) Prereq: PET 6219 or
consent of instructor. Critical review of literature on selected topic. Stu-
dents design group research project and pilot test.
PET 6326-Clinical Anatomy for the Exercise Sciences (3) Prereq:
PET2320C; 2350C; 3351C. Cadaver dissection and lectures. Appre-
ciation of clinical applications of anatomical knowledge for those pur-
suing careers in exercise science fields.
PET 6346C-Biomechanics of Human Motion (3) Prereq: PET2320C;
MGF 1202 or MAC 1142. Application of principles of statics, kinematics,
and kinetics to kinesiological systems of the human body in movement
and sports skills.
PET 6347-Biomechanical Instrumentation (3) Prereq: PET6346C.
Overview of data collection and analysis tools. Hands-on experience
conducting projects using EMG, videography, and force transducer
technology.


PET 6355C-Physiological Bases of Exercise and Sport Sciences (3)
Application of fundamental concepts of human physiology to programs
of physical education and sports. Recent research developments in sports
physiology.
PET 6356L-Practicum in Exercise Physiology (3) Prereq: PET6355C.
Applied and experimental work emphasizing practical problems.
PET 6369-Cardiopulmonary Pathologies (3) Prereq: PET3350C,
3351C or equivalent. Lecture and laboratory study of anatomy, physi-
ology, and pathophysiology of cardiac and pulmonary systems. Atten-
tion to cardiopulmonary function in diseased and stressed states. Em-
phasis on dysfunction, clinical assessment, and rehabilitation of cardiop-
ulmonary patient.
PET 6387-EKG Interpretation (3) Prereq: PET2350Cand3351C.
Basic and intermediate electrocardiography including cardiac function,
lead systems, rate, axis, infarction, ischemia, hypertrophy, and effects
of cardiovascular drugs and exercise on EKG. Particular attention to EKGs
of diseased populations during exercise.
PET 6397-Neuromuscular Adaptation to Exercise (3) Prereq: PET
6355C Description of neural and muscular function and adaptation to
acute and chronic exercise. Research developments in neuromuscular
adaptations to exercise.
PET 6426-Advanced Curriculum in Movement Pedagogy (3) Ar-
ray of methods used in instruction of and through movement.
PET 6456-Management and Planning of Sport and Fitness Facili-
ties (3) Administrative tasks involved in managing, planning, renovating,
and maintaining facilities and their effect on program selection and
scheduling in sport and fitness.
PET 6476-Management and Leadership in Sport (3) Principles of
leadership and management to sport settings.
PET 6478-Issues in Sport Law (3) Legal effects of regulating and
managing amateur and professional sports and wellness programs: in-
jury liability, risk management, constitutional rights of athletes, and
contract negotiation.
PET 6498-Research Seminar in Sport Management (2) Prereq or coreq:
HLP 6535. Current research literature and research methods applicable
to sport management.
PET 6615-Special Physical Education Assessment and Curriculum
Techniques (3) Evaluating and teaching physical education to excep-
tional, populations and administration of various assessment and cur-
riculum instruments.
PET 6616-Physical Assessment of Athletic Injuries (3) Prereq: De-
signed for students who are NA TA certified trainers. Identification, evalu-
ation, and management of acute athletic injuries.
PET 6627-Rehabilitation and Modalities of Athletic Injuries (3)
Rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities in the field of athletic train-
ing. H.
PET 6636-Human Pathophysiology for the Exercise Sciences (3)
Prereq: PET2320C; 2350C; 3351C. Macrotraumatic and microtraumatic
inflammatory processes, factors affecting inflammation and healing, and
role of exercise in controlling onset or course of inflammatory response.
PET 6706-Research on Teaching Physical Education (3) In-depth
study of research on teaching and application of research-based knowledge
to teaching physical education.
PET 6905-Directed Independent Study (1-5; max: 12) Individual
research projects under faculty guidance.
PET 6910L-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
PET 6933-Seminar in Athletic Training (1-5; max: 5) Prereq:NATA
certification. Research topics or contemporary issues in athletic training.
PET 6934-Seminar in Special Physical Education (3; max: 6) Theory
and practical experience in the field of special physical education.
PET 6937-Seminar in Sport Psychology: Current Topics (3) Prereq:
sport psychology course or permission ofinstructor. Discussion of research
topics, including contemporary issues and interests. In-depth explora-





134 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


tion of research and theory. Citation of practical sport setting applica-
tions where appropriate.
PET 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
PET 6947-Graduate Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences (3-
9; max: 9 [max: 5 to count toward degree credit requirement]) Prereq:
completion of2 semesters ofcourse work applicable to specialization; per-
mission ofadviser, written application, and site approval. On-site full-
time practical experience in field of study. S/U.
PET 6948-Advanced Practicum in Exercise and Sport Sciences (1-
5; max: 10) On-site practical experience in field of study.
PET 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
PET 7077-Free Radicals in Aging, Exercise and Disease (3) Prereq:
CHM2040, PET 6355C or consent ofinstructor. Free radical biology and
biochemistry. Free radical biology and biochemistrydealing with aging,
exercise, antioxidants, and diseases of aging, such as atherosclerosis,
diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases.
PET 7365-Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology (3) Prereq: PET6355C/
6356L or equivalent. Basic mechanisms of cardiovascular dynamics at
rest and in response to exercise.
PET 7366-Pulmonary Function During Exercise (3) Prereq: PET
6355C or equivalent. Regulation of pulmonary gas exchange during
exercise; acute and experimental procedures during exercise.
PET 7368-Exercise Metabolism (3) Prereq: PET 6355C or equiva-
lent. Principles of metabolic regulation during exercise; effects of chronic
exercise on muscle metabolism.
PET 7386-Environmental Stress Exercise Physiology (3) Prereq: PET
6355C/6356L or equivalent. Energetics of environmental stress on car-
diovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and muscle physiology as they pertain
to physical performance.



FAMILY,YOUTH, AND COMMUNITY
SCIENCES

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: N. I. Torres. Graduate Coordinator: M. Swisher. Professors: E.
Bolton; J. Turner. Associate Professors: L. Bobroff; G. Culen; G. Evans;
M. Ferrer; S. Smith; M. Swisher; C. Wilken. Assistant Professors: R.
Barnett; L. Guion; S. Jacob; A. Simmone.

The Department offers the Master of Science (thesis) degree in fam-
ily, youth, and community sciences. It is an applied social science
degree that provides the student with a foundational knowledge of
individual and family development and functioning in the community
and societal context; family life; contemporary problems facing youths,
families, and communities; and organizational policies and programs
designed to address needs and improve quality of life.
The development of knowledge and intervention skills that en-
able professionals to assist youths, families, and communities in
meeting their needs is also emphasized, including interpersonal com-
munication; program planning, management and administration;
social policy; applied research and evaluation; and community based
education. The student may elect to emphasize family, youth, or
community development during the program of study. Graduate
Faculty in the department maintain active research and extension
programs addressing many aspects of the program, including com-
munity economic development, family life, school violence, and
program planning and evaluation, for example. The Department also
offers the nonthesis degree Master of Agriculture.


A prospective graduate student need not have majored in family,
youth and community sciences as an undergraduate. A social science
background in such disciplines as sociology, psychology, and politi-
cal science or a background in adult or youth education is often ap-
propriate. Students with an insufficient background in relevant social
sciences will need to include some basic courses in the appropriate area
of interest in their program of study. Students are encouraged to com-
plete course work outside the Department in areas relevant to their
areas of interest, selecting appropriate courses in close consultation with
their supervisory committees.
FYC 6020-Principles of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences
(3) Prereq:principles ofsociology; generalpsychology. Examination of critical
issues in new century and application of key principles of family, youth,
and community sciences to selected problems.
FYC 6131-Ethics for FYCS Practitioners (3) Basic elements of eth-
ics, professional ethics, and professionals as ethical "agents. "
FYC 6230-Theories of Youth and Family Development (3) Prereq:
SYG 2430 or FYC3101 and3201. Historical and contemporary theo-
ries of youth and family development.
FYC 6302-Sustainable Community Development (3) Focus on re-
lationships among economic, social, and environmental aspects of
sustainability, analytic and professional skills to build sustainable com-
munities. Community study and in-depth analysis.
FYC 6330-Theories of Community Development (3) Sociological
concept of community and its application in public development policies.
FYC 6421-Nonprofit Organizations (3) Community nonprofit or-
ganizations, including governance, policy and decision making, and
planning.
FYC 6660-Public Policy and Human Resource Development (3)
Current policies and laws impacting youths, families, and communities,
and strategies to change these policies and laws.
FYC 6801-Scientific Reasoning and Research Design (3) Scientific
reasoning, scientific method, and quantitative and qualitative research
design.
FYC 6901-Problems in Family, Youth, and Community Sciences (1-
3; max: 6) Advanced students select and study problem related to family,
youth, and community sciences.
FYC 6912-Nonthesis Project in Family, Youth, and Community
Sciences (1-3; max: 6) Development of original applied project such as
program evaluation, policy analysis, or in-depth review of current issue
in human resource development.
FYC 6932-Topics, in Family, Youth, and Community Sciences (1-
3; max: 6) Critical review of selected topics.
FYC 6933-Seminar in Human Resource Development (1) Explo-
ration of current topics, trends, and research findings in human resource
development. S/U option.
FYC 6934-Professional Internship/Practicum in Family, Youth, and
Community Sciences (1-3; max: 6) Directed work experience or intern-
ship in professional capacity.
FYC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-6) S/U.



FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL
ESTATE

Warrington College of Business Administration

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman:J. F. Houston. Graduate Coordinator: M. Nimalendran. Barnett
Banks Eminent Scholar: M. J. Flannery. Joe B. Cordell Eminent Scholar:
J. R. Ritter. SunBank Eminent Scholar: C. M. James. Professors: R. L. Crum;
A. A. Heggestad; J. F. Houston; J. Kraft; D. C. Ling; M. B. Livingston;








W. A. McCollough; M. Nimalendran; D.J. Nye; M. D. Ryngaert. As-
sociate Professors: W. R. Archer; D. T. Brown; A. Naranjo; R. C.
Radcliffe. Lecturer: T. C. Tapley.

The Department of Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate offers
graduate work leading to the Master of Arts in business administration
with a concentration in real estate (nonthesis option), the Master of
Science degree in business administration with a concentration in
finance (nonthesis option), and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in
business administration with a concentration in finance or real es-
tate. Both finance and real estate are also available as concentrations
within the M.B.A program. For information about the M.B.A. pro-
gram, please consult that listing in the General Information section.
The Ph.D. program has a strong emphasis on scholarly research
training. Admission requirements include (a) minimum grade point
average of 3.5 in the last two years of an undergraduate program and
in any previous graduate-level work, (b) minimum GRE score of 1300
or GMAT score of 600 (both verbal and quantitative scores must
exceed the sixtieth percentile), and (c) (for nonnative speakers of
English) a minimum score of 550 on the TOEFL. Generally students
will not be admitted to the Ph.D. program unless they have been
offered financial assistance by the University. Detailed information
about the finance and real estate concentrations is provided below.
Finance-The student pursuing a concentration in finance typically
specializes in corporate finance, financial markets and institutions,
or investments. The Ph.D. curriculum consists of course work of four
types: research foundations, the major field, a minor or supporting
field, and a breadth requirement.
The research foundation requirements are comprised of a set of
six courses: ECO 7115-Microeconomic Theory I, ECO 7206-
Macroeconomic Theory I, ECO 7408-Mathematical Methods and
Applications to Economics, STA 4321 and 4322-Mathematical
Statistics I and II, and at least one econometrics course suitable for
the student's background and proposed thesis research.
The major field in finance consists of at least 16 credit hours in
graduate course work in finance including FIN 7446 and FIN 7447-
Financial Theory I and II. Students may elect to have one "strong"
minor (16 credit hours), two "weak" minors (8 credit hours each),
or a supporting field which is not declared as a minor. If a support-
ing field is chosen, at least 16 hours of course work acceptable to the
student's supervisory committee must be taken. The supporting field
option is selected when a student wishes to take courses across a
number of departments.
The breadth requirement applies only to students with no prior
course work in business and consists of ACG 5005-Financial Ac-
counting and ACG 5075-Managerial Accounting or their equiva-
lents, plus two of the following: ECP 5702-Managerial Econom-
ics, MAN 5502-Production Operations Management, or MAR
5806-Problems and Methods in Marketing Management. Other
requirements are listed in the General Information section of this
catalog.
Real Estate-The research foundations are identical to those listed
above for finance. The major field, minor, and supporting field re-
quirements have the same credit stipulation as those outlined above
for finance, except that the major work is in real estate.
The breadth requirement, as in all concentrations for the business
administration program, applies only to students entering without
prior course work in business. It consists of at least three courses from
the following list (two or more fields must be represented): BUL
581 1-Managers and Legal Environment of Business, FIN 5437 and
FIN 5439-Finance I and II, FIN 6246-Money and Capital, MAR
5806-Problems and Methods of Marketing Management, MAR


FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE / 135


6508-Consumer Behavior, and ACG 5005-Financial Account-
ing and ACG 5075 Managerial Accounting.
The requirements for the M.A. or M.S. degree in business admin-
istration with a concentration in either finance or real estate include
a minimum of 30 credit hours, a minor of at least 6 credits and, a
thesis. No more than 6 hours of FIN or REE 6971 count toward the
30 credit minimum. The Department does not encourage applica-
tion to the M.A. or M.S. (thesis option) program, but unusual situ-
ations will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
The M.A. degree in business administration with a concentration
in real estate, nonthesis option, consists of at least 32 credits of let-
ter-graded courses. It is designed to ensure that each student acquires
a basic knowledge of the various functional areas in real estate-real
estate finance and investment, real estate development, real estate law
and institutions, real estate asset management, and international real
estate-and advanced training in specialized areas. The capstone course
(REE 6948) involves actual projects in which students work in teams
to undertake a real estate problem for real clients. This two-tiered
program of study provides both a firm theoretical foundation for later
professional effectiveness and an applied bridge to professional practice.
The M.S. degree in business administration with a concentration
in finance, nonthesis option, consists of at least 32 credits in letter-
graded courses. It is designed to ensure that each student acquires a
basic knowledge of the major financial economics subject areas:
corporate finance, derivatives, fixed income securities, investments,
international finance, and real estate. Training in financial accounting
and statistics is also part of the program. The program is designed
to prepare students with an undergraduate background in finance
for positions in commercial banking, money management, invest-
ment banking, and securities markets. The program finishes with a
capstone project course where students evaluate a real world prob-
lem provided by an industry partner firm.
FIN 5248-Debt and Money Markets (4) Financial markets; institu-
tions and instruments associated with debt funds; determinants of general
level and structure of interest rates.
FIN 5405-Business Financial Management (3) Prereq: ACG 5065.
Required ofall M.B.A. degree candidates who have had no basic business
finance course. Analysis of business financing and investing decisions.
FIN 5437-Finance I: Asset Valuation, Risk, and Return (2) Prereq:
must be M.B.A. student. Required of all M.B.A. students who lack basic
business finance course. Analysis of business financing and investing de-
cisions. Selected financial tools and concepts. Risk analysis and capital
budgeting.
FIN 5439-Finance II: Capital Structure and Risk Management Is-
sues (2) Prereq: FIN5437. Required ofallM.B.A. students. Continua-
tion of FIN 5437. Focus on corporate financial decision making.
FIN 5505-Equity and Capital Markets (4) Financial markets; insti-
tutions and instruments associated with equity funds; mechanics and
mathematics of stock prices; security analysis and factors influencing stock
values.
FIN 6246-Money and Capital Markets (3) Prereq: FIN5405, col-
lege-level mathematics, and statistics. Financial markets, with emphasis
on flow of funds, interest rate determination, and allocation of resources.
FIN 6306-Investment Banking (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designed for
M.B.A. students. Hands-on approach to various aspects of investment
banking industry. Lectures and guest speakers from investment bank-
ing firms.
FIN 6314-Financial Institutions (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designedfor
M.B.A. students. Description and analysis of management decisions in
a changing economic and regulatory environment.
FIN 6425-Corporation Finance (3) Prereq: FIN5405 or consent of
instructor. DesignedforM.B.A. students. The application of business fi-
nance problems. Students prepare written solutions to case problems.





136 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


FIN 6427-Measuring and Managing Value (2) Prereq: FIN5439.
Designed for M.B.A. Students. Application of basic financial theory to
valuing companies and creating value through sound financial decision
making.
FIN 6429-Financial Decision Making (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designed
for M.B.A. students. Application of basic financial theory to assist man-
agers in determining how to finance their businesses. Optimal debt policy,
distribution of firm cash flow policies, equity issuance strategies, risk
management, and use of hybrid securities in financing business.
FIN 6438-Study in Valuation (2) Independent analysis of firms in
industry. Assessment of relative investment attractiveness of these firms
and industry. Projects presented and critiqued by investment professionals.
FIN 6465-Financial Statement Analysis (2) Examination of funda-
mental analysis of corporate financial statements. Identification of re-
liable estimates of fundamental corporate earning power and earning risks.
FIN 6476-Venture Finance (2) Prereq: FIN5439. DesignedforM.B.A.
students. Capital structure and financing needs of start-up company as
well as valuation of nonpublicly traded companies, intellectual property.
FIN 6518-Investment Concepts (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designed for
M.B.A. students. Survey of current theory and practice. Asset pricing theory
and empirical test, bond and equity valuation, efficient markets, inter-
national management, and valuation and use of derivative securities.
FIN 6526-Portfolio Theory (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designedfor M.B.A.
students. Survey of modern approaches in security portfolio management.
Two levels of examination: (1) management of owner's aggregate portfolio
and (2) security selection strategies, such as mutual funds, followed by
managers.
FIN 6537-Derivative Securities (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designed for
M.B.A. students. Principles of derivatives. Structure and operation of
markets, theoretical foundations and valuation models for various se-
curities, and practical applications in investments and risk management,
and financial engineering.
FIN 6545-Fixed Income Security Valuation (2) Prereq: FIN5439.
Designedfor M.B.A. students. Basics of interest rate determination, for-
ward rates, and effects of interest rate uncertainty on holding period re-
turns. Also pricing of fixed income securities with attached options.
FIN 6547-Interest Rate Risk Management (2) Prereq: FIN 5439.
DesignedforM.B.A. students. Basic tools. Concepts of duration, immu-
nization, and hedging with financial futures..
FIN 6608-Financial Management of the Multinational Corporation
(2) Prereq: FIN5439. DesignedforM.B.A. students. Issues unique to global
operating environment or significantly different from their purely do-
mestic counterparts. Use of different national as well as global capital
markets to manage the finance function.
FIN 6638-International Finance (2) Prereq: FIN5439. Designed for
M.B.A. students. Introduction to markets. Focus on foreign exchange
markets, international bond markets, and international equity markets.
FIN 6642-Global Entrepreneurship (2) Prereq: Designed for master'
students in business. Consideration of global market context in starting
entrepreneurial ventures internationally.
FIN 6727-Economic Organizations and Markets (2) Prereq: FIN
5439. Designed for M.B.A. students. Economics based approach to or-
ganizational issues including compensation, assignment of decision rights,
and assessment of performance.
FIN 6729-Economics Organizations and Markets (3) Economics-
based approach to organizational issues including compensation, assign-
ment of decision rights, and assessment of performance. Examination
of corporate governance issues, i.e., conflicts between stockholders and
managers. .
FIN 6905-Individual Work in Finance (1-4; max: 7) Prereq:permission
ofdepartment andDirector of Graduate Studies. Reading and/or research
in finance as needed by graduate students.


FIN 6930-Special Topics in Finance (1-4; max: 16) Selected top-
ics in financial research, theory, or of special current significance.
FIN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
FIN 6957-International Studies in Finance (1-4; max: 12) Prereq:
admission to approved study abroad program and permission ofdepartment.
S/U.
FIN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
FIN 7446-Financial Theory I (4) The first in a two-course sequence.
Emphasis on the theory of the firm's investment and financing decisions.
FIN 7447-Financial Theory II (4) Emphasis on the theory of the
financial intermediary system.
FIN 7808-Corporate Finance (4) Theory and empirical analyses of
corporate financial decisions in a world of risk with both perfect and
imperfect markets.
FIN 7809-Investments (4) Theory and empirical analyses of secu-
rity investment decisions in a world of risk with both perfect and im-
perfect markets.
FIN 7938-Finance Research Workshop (1-4; max: 7) Analysis of
current research topics. Paper presentation and critiques by doctoral
students, faculty, and visiting scholars.
FIN 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
FIN 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
REE 5105-Real Estate Appraisal (3) Prereq: Designed for beginning
graduate students in real estate. Valuation of all property types and in-
vestment analysis of income-producing properties.
REE 5145-Case Studies in Valuation Analysis and Report Writing
(3) Analysis of various property types and appraisal situations. Case studies
illustrate and teach application of appraisal methodology to typical as-
signment.
REE 6045-Introduction to Real Estate (2) Real estate finance, appraisal,
and law.
REE 6092-Corporate and International Real Estate (2) Prereq: REE
6206or 6705. Role of real estate in corporate settings and relationship
between corporate and real estate objectives. Globalization of real es-
tate markets and increasing importance of international business.
REE 6206-Primary Mortgage Markets and Institutions (2) Intro-
duces firms, institutions, practices, and legal issues involved in housing
finance. Also potential variation in home mortgage product design and
issues that dictate mortgage choice.
REE 6208-Secondary Mortgage Markets and Securitization (2) High-
level overview of secondary markets for mortgage debt and mortgage
securities in U.S. Considers instruments, decisions, problems, and current
issues.
REE 6395-Investment PropertyAnalysis (2) Introduction to major
concepts, principles, analytical methods, and tools useful for investment
and finance decisions regarding real estate assets. Property acquisition
analysis, leasing, effects of debt financing and taxes, risk and return
considerations.
REE 6397-Real Estate Securities and Portfolios (2) Securitized eq-
uity real estate investment topics. Emphasis on multiple property valuation
and decision making.
REE 6705-Geographic Information Systems and Location Analysis
(2) Examines many traditional ways of analyzing and evaluating loca-
tion. Introduces relevant data sources, GIS software and numerical and
statistical techniques for computer-based study of spatial relationships.
REE 6707-Urban Market Research (2) Nonspatial aspects of real estate
market research, focusing on urban property markets. Analysis of market
segmentation, information, dynamics, growth and change, and uncer-





FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES / 137


tainty. Locating and acquiring information relevant to given type of
market through various avenues.
REE 6905-Individual Work in Real Estate (1-6; max: 7) Prereq:
permission ofdepartment and Director of Graduate Studies. Reading and/
or research in real estate.
REE 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
REE 6930-Special Topics in Real Estate (1-4; max: 16) Selected topics
in real estate research, theory, or of special current significance.
REE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
REE 6946-Internship (1-3; max: 10) Prereq: at least one semester of
graduate work in real estate. Work experience in a real estate office for
graduate students who intend to become professional appraisers and
analysts. S/U.
REE 6948-Capstone Seminar and Applied Project (4) Prereq: REE
6092 and 6208. Establishes direct link between concepts developed in
prior courses and current industrial practices. Presentations by profes-
sionals on current issues and industry practices. Development by stu-
dents of applied project case.
REE 6957-International Studies in Real Estate (1-4; max: 12) Prereq:
admission to approvedstudy abroadprogram and permission ofdepartment.
S/U.
REE 6970-Appraisal Demonstration Report (6) A major work re-
quiring students to integrate knowledge and analytical tools developed
through course work and internship. Substantial research effort com-
prising market data collection and analysis undertaken during intern-
ship. Required for nonthesis option. H.
REE 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
REE 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
RMI 6344-Risk Management and Insurance (2) Prereq: FIN5439.
Essentials of organizational risk management with emphasis on corpo-
rations. Application of financial and statistical tools to risk management
decisions.
RMI 6905-Individual Work in Risk Management and Insurance (1-
4; max: 7) Prereq: permission of department and Director of Graduate
Studies.
RMI 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
RMI 6957-International Studies in Insurance (1-4; max: 12) Prereq:
admission to approvedstudy abroadprogram andpermission ofdepartment.
S/U.
RMI 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.



FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: W. J. Lindberg Graduate Coordinator: E.J. Phlips. Professors:
D. E. Canfield, Jr.; E. J. Phlips; W. Seaman, Jr.; J. V. Shireman (Emeri-
tus). Associate Professors: F. A. Chapman; C. E. Cichra; R. Francis-Floyd;
W. J. Lindberg. Assistant Professors: M. S. Allen; S. M. Baker; B. W.
Bowen; M. Brenner; T. K. Frazer; D. J. Murie; R. P. Yanong. Research
Assistant Professor: D. Parkyn.

The Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences conducts re-
search, teaching, and extension programs in three broad areas: (1)
freshwater fisheries and limnology, (2) marine fisheries and ecology,
and (3) aquaculture. The Department offers graduate study leading
to the Master of Science, Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences


(nonthesis), and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Research programs
of faculty encompass water quality and chemistry, fish ecology, marine
and estuarine ecology, paleolimnology, crustacean biology, fish and
shellfish genetics, fish and shellfish reproduction and endocrinology,
fish health management, phycology/microbiology, and aquatic plant
science and management. Research associations exist with the Whitney
Marine Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, National Bio-
logical Survey, National Marine Fisheries Service, Harbor Branch
Oceanographic Institute, and several state agencies.
Graduate study in the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sci-
ences emphasizes the needs and interests of individual students.
Graduate students in the Department work very closely with their
faculty advisers to develop comprehensive programs of study. Ad-
mission to graduate study is based on the individual merits and in-
terests of the applicant, fulfillment of the general admission require-
ments of the Graduate School, and acceptance by a faculty adviser
in the Department. Prospective applicants should request an appli-
cation packet from the Program Assistant, Department of Fisheries
and Aquatic Sciences, University of Florida, 7922 NW 71st St.,
Gainesville, FL 32653-3372.
The following courses in related areas will be acceptable for graduate
credit as part of the candidate's major:
AGR 6353-Cytogenetics; ANS 5446-Animal Nutrition; BCH
6415-Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology; BOT 5405C-Al-
gology; BOT 5505C-Intermediate Plant Physiology; BOT 6566-
Plant Growth and Development; EES 5305C-Ecological and
General Systems; EES 6136-Aquatic Autotrophs; EES 6137-
Aquatic Heterotrophs; EES 6308C-Wetland Ecology; PCB
5046C-Advanced Ecology; PCB 5065-Principles of Genetics; PCB
5307C-Limnology; PCB 5317C-Marine Ecology; PCB 6377C-
Physiological Ecology of Vertebrates; PCB 6447C-Community
Ecology; PCB 6496C-Stream Ecology; PCB 6555-Quantitative
Genetics; ZOO 5405C-Physiology of Marine Animals; ZOO
5458-Fish Physiology; ZOO 6456C-Ichthyology; ZOO 6506C-
Ethology.
FAS 5203C-Biology of Fishes (4) Prereq: BSC2011/2011L or con-
sent ofinstructor. Emphasis on trends in evolution, integrative and sensory
biology, physiology, feeding ecology, reproduction, growth, and popu-
lation dynamics as they relate to fisheries.
FAS 5225-Fish Genetics (3) Prereq:AGR3303, PCB3063, orequiva-
lent; BCH 4024 and STA 3023. Genetic characteristics from popula-
tion and organismic perspectives. Focus on population and evolution-
ary genetics, quantitative genetics, cytogenetics, and molecular genet-
ics of economically important species. Offered spring semester of odd-
numbered years.
FAS 5255C-Diseases of Warmwater Fish (3) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. Intensive, 2-week course (80 contact hours) in methodology of
diagnosis and treatment of parasitic, bacterial, viral, nutritional, and
environmental diseases ofwarmwater food fish and aquarium species.
Offered summer term.
FAS 5265-Reproductive Biology of Fish and Shell Fish (3) Prereq:
courses in ecology and biochemistry, or consent of the instructor. Ecologi-
cal, behavioral, and physiological control mechanisms/models of repro-
duction, and how they may be manipulated in fisheries and aquacul-
ture. Offered spring semester.
FAS 5276C-Field Ecology of Aquatic Organisms (4) Prereq: FAS
4305C or consent of instructor. Understanding principles of fish and
shellfish ecology through field studies. Intensive study in lakes, rivers,
and coastal marshes to gain understanding of how fish and shellfish
interact with their environment. Extensive field trips required. Offered
summer semester.
FAS 5335C-Applied Fisheries Statistics (4) Prereq: FAS 5276C or
consent of instructor. Population sampling and estimation, statistical





138 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


assumptions and robustness, mark-recapture, growth, and empirical
modeling of populations. Offered fall semester of even-numbered years.
FAS 5901-Aquatic Research and Science (2) General philosophical
foundations of science and specific critiques and perspectives found in
ecology and aquatic sciences. Offered spring semester of even-numbered
years.
FAS 6171-Applied Phycology (3) Prereq: undergraduate chemistry or
biochemistry. Ecology, management, utilization, and control of freshwater
and marine algae and aquatic microorganisms. Overview of associated
products, processes, and problems and economic implications. Offered
fall semester of even-numbered years.
FAS 6337C-Fish Population Dynamics (4) Prereq: STA 6166. Analysis
of fish populations for management purposes. Methods for estimating
population parameters (e.g., growth, recruitment, and mortality. Use
of population parameters and computer models to predict yield and catch
composition, and bioenergetics approaches for fisheries management
problems. Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years. )
FAS 6355C-Fisheries Management (4) Prereq: FAS 5276C or con-
sent ofinstructor. Integration of scientific, social, political, and legal factors
in fisheries management. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years.
FAS 6905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 10) Contemporary problem
or topic. H.
FAS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
FAS 6932-Special Topics in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (1-4; max:
10) Fisheries biology, aquaculture, and associated aquatic sciences.
FAS 6933-Seminar (1; max: 3) S/U.
FAS 6935-Contemporary Problems in Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
(2; max: 10) Prereq: graduate student standing. Library research, oral
reports, and discussions of scientific problem or topic announced in
advance. Offered fall and spring semesters.
FAS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
FAS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
FAS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been admitted to
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
FAS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair.J. R. Gordon. Graduate Coordinator: C. O. Andrew. Ben Hill Grif-
fin, Jr., Professor of Agricultural Marketing: A. Schmitz. Distinguished Ser-
vice Professors: C. G. Davis; K. W. Kepner. Professors: C. M. Adams; J.
Alvarez; C. O. Andrew; R. P. Beilock; R. J. Burkhardt; R. R. Carriker;
J. C. Cato; R. L. Clouser; R. L. Degner, J. K. Dow; H. E. Drummond;
R. D. Emerson; G. F. Fairchild; C. H. Gladwin; J. R. Gordon; J.J. Haydu;
T. D. Hewitt; P. E. Hildebrand; C. F. Kiker; R. L. Kilmer; J. Y. Lee; B.
F. Long; C. B. Moss; W. D. Mulkey; M. T. Olexa; J. E. Reynolds; J. L.
Seale; T. H. Spreen; T. G. Taylor; P. J. van Blokland; J. J. VanSickle; R.
W. Ward; L. S. Willett. Associate Professors: M. G. Brown; D. A. Comer;
D. J. Lee; R. N. Weldon; D. A. Zimet. Assistant Professors: L. M. House;
S. L. Larkin; J. A. Sterns; S. D. Thornsbury; A. F. Wysocki.

The degrees of Master ofAgribusiness (nonthesis), Master of Science
(thesis and nonthesis option), and Doctor of Philosophy are offered.
Areas of specialization include agricultural business management, mar-
keting, production, economic development, econometrics, and re-
source and environmental economics. The Department participates


in the programs of the Centers for Latin American Studies, African
Studies, Tropical Agriculture, and the College of Natural Resources
and Environment, and the Florida Sea Grant College Program.
Students who hold a bachelor's degree with their major fields of
study in areas other than food and resource economics should con-
sult with the Graduate Coordinator concerning acceptance for gradu-
ate study.
In addition to the courses listed, there are seminars for organized
discussion of current topics and for review of graduate student re-
search.
AEB 5167-Economic Analysis in Small Farm Livelihood Systems (3)
General analysis techniques used to enhance economic analysis of small-
scale, limited-resource family farm livelihood systems to evaluate im-
pact of proposed technology, infrastructure, and policy changes on family
welfare. Linear programming and regression. Emphasis on tropical ag-
riculture.
AEB 5188-Economics ofAgribusiness Decisions (3) Prereq:AEB3103
or ECO 2023. Comprehensive treatment of microeconomic theory and
its use in managerial decision making.
AEB 5316-Using Futures and Options in Agribusiness (3) Hedg-
ing and speculating in agribusiness. How hedging reduces business risk
of owning commodities. Fundamental and technical tools. Risk and re-
ward relationship in speculating.
AEB 5326-Agribusiness Financial Management (3) Prereq: ACG
2021C. Integration of finance and management decision making tools
to solve advanced financial and other management problems faced by
agricultural firms and agribusinesses.
AEB 5345-Advanced Agribusiness and Food Industry Sales Strate-
gies (3) Prereq: AEB 3341. Specific strategies for each segment of
agribusiness and food distribution industry. Preparation and presenta-
tion of sales prospectus, as well as developing time management opti-
mization model.
AEB 5387-Advanced Agribusiness and Food Marketing Mangement
(3) Prereq: FIN3408, AEB 3343 orMAR3023;AEB 3133 orMAN3025
Advanced decision-making skills for marketing situations, deductive rea-
soning, quantitative analysis, and marketing skills stressed in case studies.
AEB 5515-Mathematics in Food and Resource Economics (3) Re-
view of mathematical techniques. Multivariate calculus and linear al-
gebra with introduction to differential equations and real analysis.
AEB 5516-Quantitative Methods in Agribusiness Decisions (3)
Prereq: STA 2023. Introduction to variety of quantitative methods with
application to business decision-making contexts.
AEB 5757-Strategic Agribusiness Human Resource Management (3)
Issues involved in strategic and effective leadership and management in
agribusiness sector of economy. Emphasis on human resource ideas and
techniques that managers utilize to improve organizational teamwork,
productivity, and performance.
AEB 6106-Microeconomic Principles and Analysis (3) Prereq: ECO
3101 andMAC2311 or equivalents. Economics as a behavioral science
describing actions of consumers and producers interacting in the mar-
ket process; welfare economics; property rights; competition and equi-
librium. Institutional backdrop for market process. Problem solving using
economic principles.
AEB 6145-Agricultural Finance (3) Principles of firm financial
management, financial markets, financial institutions, capital markets,
firm growth, and analysis. Emphasis on markets and application of fi-
nancial principles.
AEB 6182-Agricultural RiskAnalysis and Decision Making (3) Prereq:
AEB 6106or equivalent. Review of conceptual framework and research
methods for analysis of decision-making by agricultural producers.
Expected utility theory, risk programming, stochastic dominance, and
dynamic decision models.








AEB 6184-Economics of Agricultural Production (3) Prereq: AEB
6182. Producer decisions including theoretical and empirical problems
of multi-factor, multi-product, and poly-period cases. Input demand and
product supply functions at commodity and industry levels.
AEB 6225-The U.S. and World Food Systems (3) Economic policy
process at national and international levels. Issues include structure of
food system, food safety, and environmental impacts.
AEB 6240-Macroeconomic Theory in Open Economics II (3) Es-
sential elements of macroeconomic theory and policy in world of inter-
dependent nations.
AEB 6263-Agricultural Policies and Programs (3) Prereq: ECO 3203.
Distributional aspects of economic policy. Effects of policies on output,
prices, and income. Theories of policy formation.
AEB 6299-Benefit-Cost and Social Impact Analysis (3) Prereq: AEB
6106, ECO 7115. Introduction to theory and practice. Application to
agricultural, environmental, and international development problems.
AEB 6301-Food Wholesale and Retail Marketing (3) Wholesale and
retail issues that exist both in U.S. and world markets, such as brand
management, supermarket management, and market research.
AEB 6363-Agricultural Marketing (3) Prereq: ECO 3101. Economic
theory of markets and its use. Development of time, form, space, and
vertical dimensions of market price and factors that facilitate market
operation.
AEB 6373-Consumption and Demand (3) Prereq:AEB 6106, 6363
or ECO 3101. Theory of consumer behavior and its uses in economic
analysis. Development of duality concepts, theory of inverse demand,
separability, aggregation, and household expenditure analysis.
AEB 6383-Industrial Organizations of Agricultural Markets (3)
Prereq: ECO 3100 or 3101. Market structure, conduct, and performance.
Evaluation of current public policy and institutional arrangements.
AEB 6385-Management Strategies for Agribusiness Firms (3) Prereq:
ECO 3101. Planning, organizing, implementing, and evaluating the
agribusiness management functions of strategic planning, finance,
marketing, and personnel.
AEB 6453-Natural Resource and Environmental Economics (3)
Prereq: ECO 3101 and 3203, or consent of instructor. Resource use,
management, development, and conservation. Institutional and mar-
ket performance in providing socially desired outcomes.
AEB 6483-Seminar in Natural Resource and Environmental Econom-
ics (3) Prereq: AEB 6453. Application of economic methods to prob-
lems of environmental and regional development; input-output mod-
els, cost-benefit analysis, economic valuation, and development plan-
ning.
AEB 6533-Static and Dynamic Optimization Models in Agriculture
(3) Prereq: ESI 4567. Classical optimization models with emphasis on
mathematical programming and applications. Introduction to dynamic
optimization models.
AEB 6553-Elements of Econometrics (3) Prereq: AEB 3103, 4511;
STA 3023. Econometric problem solving and determining quantitative
relationships among economic variables in agriculture and related in-
dustries.
AEB 6571-Econometric Methods I (3) Prereq:MAS2103, STA 4322.
Linear and nonlinear econometric models, serial correlation,
heteroscedasticity, errors in variables, qualitative variables, specification
errors, and simultaneous equation models.
AEB 6572-Econometric Methods II (4) Prereq: AEB 6571. Topics
in econometrics including single equation and multiple equation lin-
ear and nonlinear models.
AEB 6592-Mathematical Programming for Economic Analysis (3)
Simplex method and primal-dual relationships in linear programming.
Application of modeling techniques, such as separable, multi-objective,
quadratic, and integer programming, to economic problems.


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION / 139


AEB 6634-Agricultural Development Administration (3) Admin-
istration of public agricultural research and extension systems for de-
veloped and developing countries.
AEB 6645-Economic Development and Agriculture (3) Prereq: ECO
3100 orAEB 3103. Relation of human, capital, and natural resources,
technology, and institutions to income growth and distribution. Devel-
opment strategies in low-income countries.
AEB 6651-Agriculture's Role in Latin America and Africa (3) So-
cioeconomic development and strategies at the national, regional, and
village level. Underdevelopment and cultural ecology.
AEB 6675-International Agribusiness Marketing (3) Prereq: AEB
5188. Principles, issues, barriers, policies, strategies, and decisions in-
volved in global marketing and trade of perishable and storable agricultural
commodities and food products.
AEB 6676-International Agricultural Finance and Policy (3) Prereq:
ECO 3703, AEB 6106. International financial institutions, markets, and
policies; their effects upon the agricultural sector.
AEB 6815-Science and Research Methodology (1-2; max: 3) Role
of science, philosophy, and scientific methods in food and resource
economics research.
AEB 6905-Problems in Food and Resource Economics (1-3; max:
8) Prereq: consent of instructor. Individual study. Problems of interest to
the student and agreeable to the instructor.
AEB 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEB 6921-Workshop in Food and Resource Economics I (1) Prereq:
AEB 6533. Empirical applications of concepts developed in the
microeconomic core.
AEB 6933-Special Topics (1-6; max: 6)
AEB 6934-Workshop in Food and Resource Economics II (1) De-
veloping and understanding how to apply food and resource economic
concepts to agricultural and resource related problems.
AEB 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEB 6942-Advanced Applications in Agribusiness Experience (1-
3; max: 6) Applications of marketing, management, and finance prin-
ciples to workplace station. Applications developed from approved in-
ternship.
AEB 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AEB 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
AEB 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
ALS 5813-Farming Systems Research and Extension Methods (3)
Multidisciplinary team approach to technology generation and promotion
with emphasis on small farms. Adaptations of anthropological, agronomic,
and economic methods. Field work required.



FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION

College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Interim Chair: C. A. Sims. Graduate Coordinator: R. B. Shireman. Bos-
ton Family Professor of Human Nutrition: R. J. Cousins. Professors: D.
L. Archer; L. B. Bailey; M. O. Balaban; R. P. Bates; P. R. Borum; R. J.
Braddock; J. F. Gregory III; M. R. Marshall; O. N. Nesheim; W. S.
Otwell; M. E. Parish; S. S. Percival; G. E. Rodrick; R. L. Rouseff; R.
H. Schmidt; R. B. Shireman; C. A. Sims; H. S. Sitren; A. A. Teixeira;
N. P. Thompson. Associate Professors: L. B. Bobroff; R. D. Brown, Jr.;





140 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


G. P. A. Kauwell; R. J. Langkamp-Henken. Assistant Professors: R. G.
Goodrich; R. J. McMahon; S. T. Talcott; R. E. Turner.

Programs leading to degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of
Philosophy are offered. The M.S. and Ph.D. programs include con-
centrations in either food science or nutritional sciences. The Institute
of Food Technologists and the American Society for Nutritional Sci-
ences recognize these concentrations. Ph.D. programs can also be
arranged with a specialization in toxicology through the interdisci-
plinary toxicology concentration or in food engineering through a
cooperative arrangement with the Agricultural and Biological En-
gineering Department. The Department also offers the American
Dietetics Association Approved Dietetics Internship leading to the
M.S. degree and eligibility for the registration examination
Specific areas of study include nutritional biochemistry/molecu-
lar biology, nutrient function/metabolism, nutritional status assess-
ment and dietetics, food processing/engineering, food chemistry/
biochemistry, and food safety/microbiology/toxicology.
Entering graduate students should have an adequate background in
physical and biological sciences and food science or nutritional sciences.
Students with inadequate backgrounds will be required to take prereq-
uisite subjects.
DIE 6241-Advanced Medical Nutrition Therapy I (2) Prereq: ad-
mission to master's/dietetic internship program. Opportunity to integrate
theories and principles of medical nutrition therapy into clinical prac-
tice.
DIE 6242-Advanced Medical Nutrition Therapy II (4) Prereq: ad-
mission to master's/dietetic internship program. Opportunity to integrate
principles of medical nutrition therapy into clinical practice.
DIE 6905-Problems in Dietetics (1-3; max: 4) Prereq: Not open to
students on probation or conditional admission. Individual study and re-
search carried out in community, hospital, or laboratory settings.
DIE 6938-Advanced Dietetic Seminar (1) Prereq: admission to master's/
dietetic internship program; coreq: enrollment in DIE 6942. Problem-
solving, leadership, and analytical skills.
DIE 6942-Dietetic Internship I (1-12; max: 18) Prereq: DIE 6242/
6938. Internship in dietetics in affiliated institutions offering core rota-
tions in community nutrition, food systems management, and clinical
dietetics. Emphasis on application of theory to practice. S/U.
DIE 6944-Dietetic Internship II (1-12; max: 12) Prereq: DIE 6942.
Internship in affiliated institutions offering elective and/or specialty
rotations, e.g. nutrition support, diabetes, pediatrics, wellness, advanced
food systems, and staff experience. Emphasis on skill development for
entry-level practice. S/U.
FOS 5205-Current Issues in Food Safety and Sanitation (3) Microbial,
chemical, and biological safety of food; principles of sanitation for food
processing and retail food industries.
FOS 5225C--Principles in Food Microbiology (4) Prereq: MCB 3020
or consent ofinstructor. Fundamental aspects of biological contamination
and its control during harvesting, processing, and storage of foods. Analysis
of microbial food fermentation, microbial ecology of foods, selection of
methods to examine foods for microbial content.
FOS 5437C-Food Product Development (3) Prereq: 4000 level food
science course or consent ofinstructor. Value-added food products. Tech-
nology, safety, health/nutrition, legal, quality, and economic/market-
ing considerations.
FOS 5561C-Citrus Processing Technology (3) Prereq: undergraduate
course infoodprocessing. Grading, inspection, sampling, extraction and
concentration of citrus products emphasizing manufacturing and quality
assurance. Taught at Lake Alfred Citrus Research and Education Cen-
ter.


FOS 5732-Current Issues in Food Regulations (3) Prereq: permis-
sion ofinstructor. Governmental laws and regulations affecting the food
industry.
FOS 6126C-Psychophysical Aspects of Foods (3) Prereq:FOS4311C
and 4722C. Physical and chemical stimuli controlling human sensory
perception of texture, color, and flavor of foods.
FOS 6226C-Advanced Food Microbiology (4) Prereq: FOS 4222/
4222L, MCB 4303/4303L and BCH 6415. Selection of laboratory
methods, characterization of food-borne pathogens and spoilage organ-
isms.
FOS 6235-Food Toxicology and Food-Borne Infections (3) Prereq:
BCH 3025 or consent of instructor. Study of the toxic materials occur-
ring in food and the chemical/biological properties of these toxicants.
Study of the food-borne infectious diseases, the mechanisms of disease
transference, and pathogenesis.
FOS 6315C-Advanced Food Chemistry (4) Prereq: BCH 4024 or3025
andFOS 4311C. Functions of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes
and other components in foods and their reactions and interactions during
food processing and storage.
FOS 6317C-Flavor Chemistry and Technology (3) Prereq: basic and
organic chemistry. Psychophysics of taste and aroma, sensory analysis, flavor
extraction, measurement techniques, flavor precursors, off-flavors,
Maillard flavors, bioflavors, flavoring materials, flavor safety and authen-
ticity.
FOS 6355C-Instrumental Analysis and Separations (5) Prereq: CHM
3120, FOS 4311C. Separation of food chemicals; gas, high performance
liquid, thin-layer, ion-exchange and molecular size chromatography;
characterization via UV-visible, IR, NMR, and mass spectrometry.
FOS 6428C-Advanced Food Processing (4) Prereq: FOS 4427C.
Reaction kinetics, heat transfer mechanics, and process design, optimi-
zation and economics.
FOS 6455C-Industrial Food Fermentations (3) Prereq: FOS 4222/
4222L. Microbiological, chemical, and physical principles and practices
in fermentation of foods and constituents.
FOS 6646-Proteins and Enzymes in Food Systems (4) Prereq: FOS
6315C Structure, function, and analytical techniques for proteins and
enzymes in food systems.
FOS 6648-Carbohydrates in Food Systems (2) Prereq: FOS 6315C
or equivalent. Structure, physical and chemical properties of carbo-
hydrates, and their analysis, function, and reactivity in food systems.
FOS 6649-Food Lipids and Flavor Chemistry (2) Prereq: FOS 6315C
or equivalent. Structure, physical and chemical properties of lipids and
flavor components; their analysis, function, and reactivity in food sys-
tems during processing and storage.
FOS 6905-Problems in Food Science (1-3; max: 4) Prereq: Not open
to students on probation or conditional admission. Individual study car-
ried out in laboratory, library, pilot plant, or the food industry.
FOS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
FOS 6915-Research Planning (2) Prereq: Requiredoffirst-yeargraduate
students. Planning and initiating research, experimental techniques,
analysis of data, reporting of results.
FOS 6936-Topics in Food Science (1-4; max: 8) Special aspects or
current developments in food science.
FOS 6938-Food Science Seminar (1; max: 4) Preparation and pre-
sentation of reports on specialized aspects of research and technology
in food science.
FOS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
FOS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
FOS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.








FOS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
HUN 5246-Current Issues in Dietary Supplements (2) Prereq: HUN
2201 or permission ofinstructor. Federal laws and regulations covering
definition, marketing, and labeling of dietary supplements. Discussion
of specific vitamins, minerals, herbs, and ergogenic aids. Review of sci-
entific literature and public information.
HUN 6245-Advanced Human Nutrition (3) Prereq: BCH4024 or
3025, anda nutrition principles course. Ingestion, digestion, absorption,
transport, metabolism, and excretion of nutrients; metabolic and neu-
roendocrine controls.
HUN 6249-Recent Advances in Human Nutrition (1; max: 3) In-
formal critical discussion of selected areas. Current theories and con-
troversies, research approaches, and nutrition policies. S/U option.
HUN 6255-Clinical Nutrition (4) An integrated presentation of
nutritional requirements and metabolism of nutrients in the normal
individual, altered nutritional requirements and metabolism of nutri-
ents in different disease states, and practical aspects of nutritional and
metabolic support of different types of patients.
HUN 6301-Nutritional Aspects of Lipid Metabolism (3) Role of
lipids in nutrition, with emphasis on energy metabolism and derange-
ments in chronic diseases.
HUN 6305-Nutritional Aspects of Carbohydrates (3) Characteris-
tics, absorption, and metabolism of common carbohydrates in the food
chain; carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation; carbohydrate me-
tabolism in disease.
HUN 6321-Proteins and Amino Acids in Nutrition (4) Prereq: BCH
3025. Digestion, absorption, and degradation; emphasis on turnover,
requirements, assessment of quality, and effects of deficiencies, toxici-
ties, and physiological stresses.
HUN 6331-Vitamins in Human Nutrition (3) Prereq: BCH 4024
or3025. Biochemical and physiological functions; nutrient requirements
and interactions; response to deficiencies and excesses.
HUN 6356-Minerals in Nutrition (3) Prereq: BCH 4024 or equivalent.
Biochemical and physiological aspects of mineral absorption, metabo-
lism, and function.
HUN 6812C-Analytical Techniques in Nutritional Biochemistry (1)
Prereq: BCH 4024 or 3025 and permission of instructor. Biochemical
analyses of tissues and fluids, radio-tracer methodology, metabolic studies,
tissue handling, and formulation of experimental animal diets.
HUN 6905-Problems in Nutritional Sciences (1-3; max: 4) Prereq:
Not open to students on probation or conditionaladmission. Individual study
carried out in laboratory, library, pilot plant, or food industry.
HUN 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
HUN 6936-Topics in Nutritional Sciences (1-4; max: 8) Special
aspects or current developments in nutritional sciences.
HUN 6938-Nutritional Sciences Seminar (1; max: 4) Presentation
of reports on research in nutrition.
HUN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
HUN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
HUN 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
HUN 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION / 141



FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION

College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Director: W. H. Smith. Graduate Coordinator and Associate Director: G.
M. Blakeslee. Distinguished Professor. P. K. Nair. Professors: L G. Arvanitis;
G. M. Blakeslee; N. B. Comerford; M. L. Duryea; D. M. Flinchum; H.
L. Gholz; E. J. Jokela; T. Miller; F. Putz; D. L. Rockwood; R. A. Schmidt;
W. H. Smith; E. L Stone; T. L White. Associate Professors: D. R. Carter;
J. M. Davis; A. J. Long; D. J. Zarin. Assistant Professors: J. Alavalapati;
J. Jose; P. E. Linehan; T. A. Martin; M. C. Monroe; J. Nowak; T. V.
Stein. Assistant in: D. A. Huber.

The School offers programs leading to the Master of Science (with
thesis), Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (professional,
nonthesis), and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in forest resources and
conservation.
SPrograms in forest resources and conservation include specializations
in agroforestry, biometrics, biotechnology, ecology, economics,
ecotourism, environmental education and communication, genet-
ics, geographic information systems, hydrology, management, mo-
lecular biology, nutrition, operations, pathology, physiology, policy,
reforestation, silviculture, soils, tropical forestry, and urban forestry
Graduate students should have appropriate undergraduate training
in biological, social, and physical sciences. Students with inadequate
backgrounds may be required to take (without credit at the gradu-
ate level) undergraduate courses to support their fields of interest.
All graduate students are required to develop teaching skills by as-
sisting with one course during their programs.
Joint Programs-Stundets may simultaneously earn a juris doc-
torate from the College of Law and a graduate degree (M.F.R.C., M.S.,
or Ph.D.) in forest resources and conservation. The School also of-
fers a combined bachelor's/master's degree program, which allows
qualified students to earn both a bachelor's degree and a master's
degree with a savings of one semester. The School participates in cross-
campus programs in agroforestry, geographic information systems,
and environmental education. For information on these other pro-
grams, students should contact the graduate coordinator and visit
the School's web page at http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu.
FNR 5335-Agroforestry (3) Biological, ecological, socioeconomic,
and technical-managerial aspects of tree/crop, tree/animal, and tree/crop/
animal systems. Examples of traditional and modern, rotational, and
intercropped systems, and analyses of their structure, functioning, and
potentials, with special reference to the tropics and subtropics. Offered
spring semester.
FNR 5608-Research Planning (3) Prereq: consent of instructor. Re-
quired for all new M.S. students. History and philosophy of science, sci-
entific method, development of a research proposal. Research facilities
and programs are presented. Offered fall semester.
FOR 5161-Forest Productivity and Health (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Silviculture, disease management, and genetic improvement.
Stand development and composition, competition, growth limiting
factors, epidemiology, choice of species and provenance, and tree breeding.
Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years.
FOR 5435-Forest Information Systems (3) Prereq: consent ofinstructor.
Sampling methodology for natural resource inventories, involving re-
mote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), and global posi-
tioning system (GPS). Offered spring semester of even-numbered years.
FOR 5615-Forest Conservation and Management Policies and Is-
sues (3) Current policies in both North America and internationally.





142 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Historical patterns of resource use and policy response reviewed as ba-
sis for evaluating current issues. Offered fall semester.
FOR 5626-Forest Resource Management (3) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. Application of operations research and forest economics and
finance to problems; harvest scheduling; forest manipulation for mul-
tiple objectives; economic decision making. Offered spring semester of
even-numbered years.
FOR 6154-Analysis of Forest Ecosystems (3) Prereq: graduate sta-
tus or consent ofinstructor. Energy, water, carbon and nutrient fluxes in
forests; applications to forest and landscape management. Offered spring
semester of even-numbered years.
FOR 6170-Tropical Forestry (3) Prereq: consent ofinstructor. Climatic
influences, forest types, natural forest and plantation management, poli-
cies, practices, and conservation. Offered spring semester.
FOR 6310-Forest Genetics and Tree Improvement (3) Review of
Mendelian, population, and quantitative genetics as important in natural
forests and breeding programs of forest trees. Principles of tree improve-
ment programs, gene conservation, and breeding strategy development
for wide variety of tree species. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered
years.
FOR 6340-Physiology of Forest Trees (3) Prereq: graduate status or
consent ofinstructor. Growth and development of woody perennial plants
with emphasis on understanding how environmental factors affect their
physiology. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years.
FOR 6543-Forest Resource Economics (3) Prereq: consent ofinstructor.
Extension of microeconomic principles to problems in forest produc-
tion, supply behavior, forest valuation, multiple-use of forest lands.
Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years.
FOR 6642C-Environmental Education Program Development (3)
Comprehensive approach, from needs assessment to evaluation, ap-
plied to youth-based, nonformal environmental education. Required
field trip and group project. Offered fall semester of add-numbered
years.
FOR 6665-Landscape Planning for Ecotourism (3) Planning frame-
works and techniques of large natural areas .
FOR 6905-Research Problems in Forest Resources and Conserva-
tion (1-6; max: 10) Prereq: permission ofinstructor.
FOR 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: permission of
instructor. S/U.
FOR 6933-Seminar (1; max: 2) S/U.
FOR 6934-Topics in Forest Resources and Conservation (1-4; max:
10) Selected topics in forestry and natural resources.
FOR 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) Prereq: permission of
instructor. S/U.
FOR 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
FOR 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
FOR 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
PCB 6528-Plant Molecular Biology (3) Prereq: BCH6415andPCB
5065 or equivalents. Structure, function, and analysis of plant genomes,
genes, and gene products. Lecture format with frequent discussion of
recent papers. Genome structure, transformation, gene tagging, tran-
scription, signal transduction, organelles, protein trafficking. Offered
in spring semester.
PCB 6555-Introduction to Quantitative Genetics (3) Prereq: STA
6166. Intended for students of all disciplines who are interested in ge-
netic principles and biometric evaluation of characters that exhibit con-
tinuous variation in natural populations or breeding programs. Offered
in spring semester of odd-numbered years.


GEOGRAPHY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: N. J. H. Smith. Graduate Coordinator: A. C. Goldman. Pro-
fessors: H. J. Armstrong; M. W. Binford; C. N. Caviedes; S. M. Golant;
H. L. Popenoe; N. J. H. Smith; G. 1. Thrall; P. R. Waylen. Associate
Professors: T. J. Fik; A. C. Goldman; A. J. Lamme III; B. E. McDade; J.
Mossa.

The Department of Geography offers the Master of Arts, Mas-
ter of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Department
provides three main areas of specialization for graduate research:
economic and business geography and policy; resource management
and land use and land cover change; and physical geography. Eco-
nomic and business geography and policy concerns such topics as
technological change; entrepreneurship; spatial economic theory;
historic places; population change and housing patterns; housing
and care of the elderly; behavioral geography; and internal urban
structure. Resource management and land use and land cover change
focus on agricultural change and resource conservation and devel-
opment in the tropics and subtropics, and rural and urban land use
and land cover change in tropical and temperate regions. Africa and
Latin America are the primary areas of regional emphasis. Physi-
cal geography in the Department concentrates on climatology,
coastal management, fluvial geomorphology, and hydrology. The
Department's extensive geographic information system, remote
sensing, and computer cartography teaching and research facilities
contribute to and support all of the areas of research. Faculty from
the Department are also major participants in the new Land Use
and Environmental Change Institute (L.U.E.C.I.), which incor-
porates the major perspectives of geography in a multidisciplinary
international scientific initiative. Prospective students should ex-
amine the research interests of the Graduate Faculty to obtain a more
detailed sense of the Department's specialties (see the department
website: www.geog.ufl.edu).
To ensure the incorporation of relevant interdisciplinary perspec-
tives in each student's program, the Department maintains close ties
with other departments in Literal Arts and Sciences, and with pro-
grams in Latin American studies, urban and regional studies, tropical
agriculture, tropical ecology, gerontological studies, water resources,
the College of Education, and the Warrington College of Business
Administration. Certificates in certain of these fields may be obtained
in addition to graduate degrees in geography.
A graduate student should preferably have an undergraduate major
in geography, but applicants with degrees in one of the social or physi-
cal sciences are accepted into the Department's graduate program.
Deficiencies in undergraduate work in geography must be corrected
concurrently with registration in graduate level courses. All students
in the graduate program are required to take courses in contempo-
rary geographic thought and geographic research skills.
GEA 6109-Tropical Lands and Their Utilization (1-10; max: 10)
Prereq: GEO 4120C Field course emphasizing analytic inquiries into
land use systems in the tropics. Special topics on land utilization types,
environmental influences, settlement, field patterns, market factors, labor
supply, transportation.
GEA 6419-Seminar: South America (3) Cultural, economic, political,
and resource characteristics and development of representative areas.
GEA 6466-Seminar on Geography of Amazonia (3) Exploration of
biophysical basis of natural resource management, cultural diversity, and
economic development in Amazonia.





GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES / 143


GEA 6468-Resource Utilization and Conservation in Latin America
(3) Regional appraisal of human and natural resources. Analysis of role
of resource utilization and conservation in development of Latin American
countries.
GEA 6468L-Resource Utilization and Conservation in Latin America
(3) Regional appraisal of human and natural resources. Analysis of role
or resource utilization and conservation in development of Latin American
countries.
GEO 5102C-Maps and Graphs (4) Prereq: graduate standing. Gen-
eral introduction to principles and techniques of thematic cartography
and cartographic applications.
GEO 5105C-Advanced Cartography (3) Prereq: GEO 4100C; CGS
3460 or consent of instructor. Advanced methods including computer
cartography and elements of cartographic reproduction.
GEO 5122C-Advanced Air Photo Interpretation (3) Prereq: GEO
2200 or consent of instructor. Uses of aerial photographs in geographi-
cal research.
GEO 5134C-Remote Sensing (3) Prereq: GEO 4120C Uses of re-
mote sensing imagery in geographical research.
GEO 5157-Geographic Information Systems in Business (3) Prereq:
GEO 3171 or equivalent, permission ofinstructor. Methods that profes-
sional human economic geographers have used in business community,
starting with William Applebaum and extending through contempo-
rary period. Use of GIS and geographic analysis in business decisions.
Trade zone, geographic market-area analysis, and gravity retail models.
GEO 5159-Geographic Information Systems Applications in Envi-
ronmental Systems (3) Prereq: GEO 3171 or equivalent, permission of
instructor. Advanced study of application of GIS to research problems
in geosciences, landscape ecology, and land management. Concepts,
methods, data, and models for studying physical and ecological spatial
patterns and processes. Not software specific.
GEO 5177C-Geographic Information Systems in Research (4) Prereq:
GEO 3162Cor equivalent. Geographic technology for creation,, modi-
fication,, display, and analysis of spatial information. Geographic analysis
and reasoning, computer software and hardware technology, and research
applications of GIS. Geographic databases.
GEO 5186-Analysis of Thematic Data Quality (3) Prereq: gradu-
ate standing; basic knowledge ofGIS. Evaluation and resolution of quality
problems affecting thematic (non-base map) geographic attribute data.
GEO 5346-Natural Hazards (3) Multidisciplinary analysis of natu-
ral and man-induced environmental catastrophes-their perception and
institutional adjustments.
GEO 5556-Geography of Innovation and Technological Change (3)
Generation, development, and spread of innovations by individuals,
corporations, and organizations. Emphasis on impact of innovations and
technology on regional development and change.
GEO 5567-Industrial Location (3) Prereq: GEO 3502 or consent of
instructor. Emphasis on location theory and its practical applications.
GEO 5605-Advanced Urban Geography (3) Theoretical and plan-
ning literature that examines the locational and environmental issues
confronting contemporary North American urban populations.
GEO 5615-Housing and Environments of the Elderly (3) Exami-
nation of the housing status and needs (social, psychological, economic,
planning) of the U.S. elderly population. Discussion of both policy and
theoretical issues.
GEO 5809-Geography of World Agriculture (3) World distribution
of crops and livestock in relation to natural and cultural conditions;
discussion of problems of agriculture in terms of products, economic
organization, and agricultural regions; significance of world affairs.
GEO 5905-Individual Study: Directed Reading (3; max: 12 including
GEO 6905)
GEO 5920-Geography Colloquium (1; max: 6) Presentation and
discussion of contemporary geographic research. S/U.


GEO 5930-Selected Topics in Geography (1-5; max: 15) Prereq:
graduate standing.
GEO 5945C-Field Course in Geography (3) Methods of geographical
fieldwork. Observation, classification, interpretation, note-taking, tra-
versing, and mapping of data. Aerial analysis; landforms, climate, veg-
etation, soils, resources, settlement patterns, and land use.
GEO 6118-Contemporary Geographic Thought and Research (3)
Prereq: admission to graduate program in geography. A summary of ma-
jor currents of intellectual thought and research orientations in contem-
porary geography.
GEO 6356-Seminar: Land and Water Utilization (3) Prereq: con-
sent of instructor. Selected problems in utilization of land and water
resources.
GEO 6429-Seminar: Cultural Geography (3) A review of literature,
theoretical frameworks, and research design formulation in contemporary
cultural geography.
GEO 6435-Seminar in Population (3) Combination lecture and semi-
nar dealing with social and population problems from spatial perspec-
tive. Major research project required.
GEO 6495-Environment and Behavior (3) Prereq: graduate stand-
ing. Theoretical and empirical analysis of how ordinary environments
are perceived and interpreted by people and influence on their well being.
GEO 6509-Seminar in Business Geography (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Selected problems in geography of economic activity.
GEO 6905-Individual Work (1-5; max: 12 including GEO 5905)
GEO 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
GEO 6938-Selected Topics in Geography (1-5; max: 15) Prereq:
graduate standing in geography or a related field.
GEO 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
GEO 6946-Individual Fieldwork (3; max: 15)
GEO 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
GEO 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
GEO 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chairman: P. A. Mueller. Graduate Coordinator: M. R. Perfit. Graduate
Research Professor: D. L. Dilcher. Distinguished Professor: N. D. Opdyke.
Professors:J. E. T. Channell; D. A. Hodell; D. S. Jones; B. J. MacFadden;
G. H. McClellan; P. A. Mueller; M. R. Perfit; E. C. Pirkle, Jr. (Emeri-
tus); A. F. Randazzo; D. L. Smith; S. D. Webb. Associate Professors: P.
F. Ciesielski;J. L Eades (Emeritus); D. A. Foster; E. E. Martin;J. B. Martin;
D. P. Spangler. Assistant Professors: J. M. Jaeger; E. J. Screaton. Asso-
ciate In: G. D. Shaak.

The Department of Geological Sciences offers programs leading
to the Master of Science (thesis), the Master of Science in Teaching
(nonthesis), and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Department
has identified five primary areas of emphasis in its research and teaching
programs: environmental geology, Earth system science,
tectonophysics, chemical geodynamics, marine geology, and paleon-
tology. These areas involve many specialties including geochemis-
try, geophysics, petrology/mineralogy, hydrogeology, economic ge-
ology, and paleoclimatology. For more detailed information on current
departmental activities, faculty, and research centers, see http://





144 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


web.geology.ufl.edu/. The Department has collaborative, interdis-
ciplinary programs of study and research with teh Florida Museum
of Natural History, the Center for Wetlands Research, the Land Use
and Evironmental Change Institute (L.U.E.C.I.), and the hydrological
sciences cluster.
For admission to graduate status in the Department of Geologi-
cal Sciences, a student must have a baccalaureate degree with a major
in geology or a related field or its equivalent. Deficiencies in under-
graduate preparation can be corrected by completing the undergradu-
ate courses without credit while enrolled as a graduate student.
Applicants for any of the programs in geology must have completed
courses in the areas of physical geology, historical geology, mineral-
ogy, igneous and metamorphic petrology, sedimentary geology, pa-
leontology, and structural geology. In addition, students must have
completed courses in supportive sciences, such as mathematics, physics,
chemistry, computer science, statistics, and biology. A summer field
course is required.
Applicants should take the GRE general test. The scores of this
examination must be reported to the Department of Geological Sci-
ences. Three letters of recommendation are also required for admission
to the doctoral program and for financial aid applications at any level.
A minimum of 33 semester hours of graduate level courses are re-
quired for the Master of Science in geology. At least 24 hours must
be in organized graduate level geology courses (excluding research,
teaching, special projects, etc.). Six hours of thesis research credit are
required. All master's degrees are terminal; a separate and new ap-
plication for admission to the doctoral program is required.
For the Master of Science in Teaching degree, at least 36 hours
are required. Six of these hours must be in GLY 6943 and at least
24 must be in organized graduate-level geology courses. The remaining
six hours must be in approved electives. A minor in education is
required. Passage of a final oral examination is also required of all
candidates.
Of the 90 semester hours required for the Ph.D., 45 must be in
formal, organized graduate-level classwork (excluding individual work,
supervised research and teaching, advanced research, dissertation,
special projects, etc.). Remaining credits will be in GLY 7979, GLY
7980, additional geology courses, or a declared minor in another field.
BOT 5115-Paleobotany (3) Prereq: upper-level course in botany or
geology or permission of instructor. Comparative study of plants through
geologic time with attention to morphology and evolution of major groups
of land plants based on fossil record. Offered spring semester in odd-
numbered years.
GLY 5020-Currrent Topics in Earth Science for Teachers (3) Coreq:
GLY5020L recommended. May not be taken for major credit in earth
sciences. Presentation of basic principles and overview of recent advances
in earth sciences for secondary science teachers.
GLY 5020L-Current Topics in Earth Sciences Laboratory (1) Coreq:
GLY 5020 or equivalent. May not be taken for major credit in earth sci-
ence. Fundamental concepts supplemented with local and virtual field
trips. Extensive use of World Wide Web.
GLY 5075-Global Climate Change: Past, Present, and Future (3)
Prereq: GL Y4552C Evolution of the Earth's climate through geologic
time, including discussion of modern climatology and methods of
paleoclimate interpretations.
GLY 5156-Geologic Evolultion of North America (3) Prereq: GLY
2010 or 2026; 4400C recommended. Key geological features of North
American plate and important aspects of their geological evolution
through time. Current and past plate tectonic setting, major geologi-
cal and geomorphologic provinces, geophysical aspects of North American
lithosphere, and natural resources.
GLY 5230C-Mineralogical Analysis by X-Ray Methods (3) Prereq:
GLY3200C. Theory and practice of X-ray diffraction and emission, with


emphasis on identification of crystalline materials.
GLY 5241C-Geochemistry (3) Prereq: CHM2046, GLY2010C The
abundance and distribution of the elements and their behavior during
various geological processes.
GLY 5245-Hydrogeochemistry (3) Prereq: inorganic chemistry, calculus,
or permission ofinstructor. Geological controls on chemical and isoto-
pic composition of natural waters, including meteoric ground water,
brines, and sea water, emphasis on thermodynamic and kinetic aspects
of fluid-solid reactions.
GLY 5455-Introduction to Geophysics and Tectonics (3) Prereq: GLY
2010C, 2026C, or 4400C and one year of college physics or permission of
instructor. Physics of the Earth. Study of gravity and magnetic fields,
seismic waves, thermal history, orogenic belts, and plate tectonic theory.
GLY 5476-Principles of Exploration Geophysics (3) Prereq: GLY
2010C or 2026C and one year ofcollege physics or permission ofinstruc-
tor. Reflection and refraction seismology, gravitational, magnetic and
electrical methods of exploration; instrumentation, surveying techniques,
data reduction and interpretation.
GLY 5558C-Sedimentology (3) Prereq: GLP 2010 or 2026; 4552.
Lecture and discussion of major sedimentary processes active in coastal
and continental margin settings, focus on relating processes with sedi-
mentary facies. Class work augmented with frequent field trips.
GLY 5640-Vertebrate Paleontology (3) Prereq: ZOO 3713C, GLY
2100C, or3105C Evolutionary history of major vertebrate groups, with
emphasis on principles of prehistoric investigation.
GLY 5705-Geomorphology (3) Prereq: GL Y4400C. Application of
principles of geomorphology to origin and evolution of landscapes.
GLY 5736-Marine Geology (3) Prereq: GLY2010C, or 2026C, or
OCE2005. A detailed introduction to the origin and evolution of ocean
basins, ocean margins, and oceanic sediments and microfossils, including
a paleoceanographic history of the marine realm.
GLY 5786L-Topics in Field Geology (2; max: 6) Prereq: graduate
standing andpermission ofinstructor. Visits to selected sites and regions
of outstanding geologic value and interest.
GLY 5827-Ground Water Geology (3) Prereq: GLY2010C, or 2026C.
Principles of ground water geology, with special reference to the Coastal
Plain and Florida.
GLY 6195-Topics in Paleoclimatology (4; max: 12) Prereq: under-
graduate degree in geology orpermission ofinstructor. Studies of paleoclimates
and interpretation of climate change from rock record.
GLY 6235C-Mineralogy of Clays (3) Prereq: GLY5230C Structure,
composition, properties, origin, and mode of occurrence of clay min-
erals.
GLY 6268C-Isotope Geology (4) Prereq: GLY5241C. Application
of radiogenic and stable isotopes to the solution of geologic problems
such as geochronology, petrogenesis, and paleoclimatology.
GLY 6297-Topics in Geochemistry (4; max: 12) Prereq: GLY5241C.
Problems in igneous and metamorphic petrogenesis, geochronology,
radiogenic isotopes, stable isotopes, and marine geochemistry.
GLY 6346-Sedimentary Petrology and Petrography (3) Prereq: GLY
4552C Origin, composition, and structures of sedimentary rocks, in-
cluding tectonic, paleogeographic, and environmental interpretation.
GLY 635 1-Carbonate Sedimentology (3) Prereq: GLY4552C Lime-
stones and dolostones, their origin, occurrence, and significance; study
of recent and ancient carbonate depositional regimes.
GLY 6424-Tectonics (3) Prereq: GLY4400C Evolution and formation
of mid-ocean ridges, seamounts, hot spots, island arcs, back-arc basins,
passive margins, and mountain chains.
GLY 6519-Modern Stratigraphy (3) Prereq: permission ofinstructor
or undergraduate degree in geology. Integration of classical stratigraphy
including biostratigraphy with modern techniques such as radiometric
dating, magnetic stratigraphy, astrochronology and cyclostratigraphy,
and sequence stratigraphy. High precision stratigraphy to investigate





GERMANIC AND SLAVIC STUDIES / 145


problems in climatology, mammal migration, tectonics, and rates of
geological processes.
GLY 6620C-Micropaleontology (3) Classification and identification
ofbiostratigraphically important microfossil groups and their use in local
and regional correlation.
GLY 6660C--Paleoecology (3) Prereq: GLY3603C. Paleoautecology,
paleosynecology, historical biogeography of marine invertebrates, and
ecological rules as applied to fossil invertebrates.
GLY 6717L-Hydrogeologic Processes (3) Prereq: GLY5827, 6825,
or equivalent. Problem-solving experience in active hydrogeologic pro-
cesses. Ground water and surface/ground water interactions and their
roles in geologic processes, with examples from Floridan Aquifer.
GLY 6817C-Nonmetalic Geologic Materials (3) Prereq: GLY3200C.
The geologic occurrences, properties, and uses of limestone, shales and
other nonmetalic deposits.
GLY 6825-Hydrogeology (3) Prereq: GLY5827. Principles and con-
cepts of ground water flow systems; techniques of flow system delinea-
tion; hydrogeologic problems common to water development.
GLY 6826-Hydrogeologic Modeling (3) Application of computer
modeling to hydrogeologic problems through use of analytical and
numerical solutions.
GLY 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 12) For work beyond that
offered in regular courses.
GLY 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
GLY 6931-Seminar (1; max: 2) Reading in special topics.
GLY 6932-Special Topics in Geology (1-3; max: 9) Lectures, con-
ferences, or laboratory sessions covering selected topics of current in-
terest in modern geology.
GLY 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
GLY 6943-Internship in College Teaching (2,4,6; max: 6) Required for
Master of Science in Teaching candidates but available for students need-
ing additional practice and direction in college-level teaching.
GLY 6949-Cooperative Work Experience (1; max: 7) Practical co-
operative work experience under approved industrial supervision. S/U.
GLY 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
GLY 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral students
before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a master's
degree in the field of study or for students who have been accepted for
a doctoral program. Not open to students who have been admitted to
candidacy. S/U.
GLY 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.



GERMANIC AND SLAVIC STUDIES
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2001-2002
Chair: K. Bullivant. Graduate Coordinator: F. O. Futterknecht. Profes-
sors: E. C. Barksdale; K. Bullivant; F. O. Futterknecht; W. R. Hasty;
O. W. Johnston. Associate Professors: N. M. Alter; S. M. DiFino; H.
H. Rennert.

The Department offers an M.A. (with or without thesis) and a
Ph.D. in German. Prerequisite for admission to graduate work is an
undergraduate major in the field, including advanced courses in both
literature and language. Qualified candidates with B.A. degrees in
related disciplines will be considered. Those students who wish to
enter the Ph.D. program must have an M.A. in German. A good
foundation in a second language is desirable for M.A. candidates.
Ph.D. candidates should consult the Graduate Coordinator for de-
tails on the foreign language requirement. Graduate students nor-
mally teach as a part of their training.


GERMAN LANGUAGE

GER 6060-Beginning German for Graduate Students I (3) For gradu-
ate students from other departments who need to acquire a reading
knowledge of German. Not open to graduate students in German. S/U.
GER 6061-Beginning German for Graduate Students II (3) Prereq:
GER 6060 or its equivalent. For graduate students from other depart-
ments who need to acquire a reading knowledge of German. Not open
to graduate students in German. S/U option.
GER 6505-German Culture (3) Interdisciplinary study of periods
and major aspects of German culture from the Middle Ages to the present.
GER 6845-History of the German Language (3) Major periods and
trends from the beginning to the present.
GER 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: departmen-
talapproval. S/U.

GERMAN LITERATURE AND CINEMA

GET 6295-Weimar Cinema (3) Weimar cinema, and theory and
criticism that surround it. Examination of intersection between formal-
aesthetic and ideological-political aspects as manifest in film text.
GET 6298-Women and German Cinema (3) Women as filmmak-
ers, spectators, and subjects of male filmmakers. Contemporary femi-
nist theories address construction of subject-position in film, both from
point of production and consumption.
GET 6299-New German Cinema and Its legacy (3) "New German
Cinema" as response to Hollywood cinema, Germany's Nazi past and
problems posed to society, and cinema by other mass media and new
imaging technologies. Analytical texts draw from new historicism, cultural
studies, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism.
GEW 6205-Foundations of Literary Study (3) Prereq: Required for
M.A. and Ph.D. candidates in German. Focus on literary criticism and
methodology. Different theoretical approaches to literature and research
techniques. Recent developments.
GEW 6266-History of the German Novel (3) Development of novel
from its beginning in 17th century to its rise in late 18th, 19th, and 20th
centuries as well as history of theories about novels.
GEW 6305-Studies in German Drama and Theater (3) Main trends
in the development of German drama during different literary periods.
Analysis of individual plays and theoretical texts.
GEW 6405-Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3) Courtly and
heroic epic, Volksbiicher, and major genres and trends from the Me-
dieval and Renaissance period.
GEW 6425-From Luther to Lessing: Early Modem German Literature
(3) Analysis of major trends, authors, and texts from Reformation to
Enlightenment.
GEW 6535-German Classical and Romantic Literature (3) Analy-
sis of major authors and texts. Special attention to developments in cul-
ture, aesthetics, and society.
GEW 6558-Young Germany, Biedermeier, Realism, and Natural-
ism (3) Writers of the 19th century including Moerike, Heine, Droste-
Huelshoff, Stifter, Keller, Raabe, Storm, Fontane, Meyer, Hauptmann.
GEW 6725-Culture and Society in the Weimar Republic (3) Intel-
lectual and cultural life between 1918 and 1933. Analysis of literary works
from theater, cabaret, and cinema within context of social and politi-
cal life of the Weimar Republic.
GEW 6726-Literature and Culture in the Third Reich (3) Analy-
sis of major literary and nonliterary works of Nazi period. Appropria-
tion of German literary tradition. Examination of Nazi theater and film.
Literature of the so-called inner emigration.
GEW 6735-Modern German Literature (3) Literary trends and major
works of early twentieth century. Authors may include Mann, Rilke,




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