• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Correspondence directory
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Officers of administration
 Critical dates for graduate students...
 General information
 Fields of instruction
 Graduate faculty
 Index
 Notes
 University of Florida colleges...
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00055
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00055
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Correspondence directory
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page i-a
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    Officers of administration
        Page x
        Page xi
    Critical dates for graduate students and calendar
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Fields of instruction
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
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        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
    Graduate faculty
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
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        Page 233
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        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
    Index
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
    Notes
        Page 271
        Page 272
    University of Florida colleges and programs
        Page 273
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text















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I CORSPODEC DIRETR I'


Graduate School
223 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 115500
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611-5500
(352) 392-4646

Office of the University Registrar-Admissions
202 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114000
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000
(352) 392-1365

Graduate Minority Programs
Graduate School
235 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 115500
University of Florida
(352)392-6444

International Student Advisement
Adviser, International Students
123 Grinter Hall
Univeristy of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611-3225
(352)392-5323

Assistantships
Chair of the department in which the student wishes to
enroll.


Student Financial Affairs (Financial Aid)
103 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114025
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025
(352)392-1275 or (352)392-1210

Division of Housing
SW 13th Street and Museum Road
P.O. Box 112100
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-2100
(352)392-2161

University Financial Services (Student Accounts)
113 Criser Hall
P.O. Box 114050
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4050
(352)392-0181

Programs & Services for Students with Disabilities
205 Peabody Hall
P.O. Box 114100
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-4100
(352)392-1261 (V), (352)392-3008 (TDD)

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For persons with hearing impairments, please use the
Florida Relay Service (FRS) when departments do not list
a TDD number. The FRS number is 1-(800)955-8771 (TDD)


The University of Florida is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
to award the degrees of bachelor, master, specialist, and engineer, as well as doctoral and professional degrees.

The University of Florida does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national or ethnic origin, religious preference,
marital status, disability, or sex, in the administration of educational policies, admission policies, financial aid, employment,
or any other University program or activity. The University of Florida Title IX Coordinator is Jacquelyn D. Hart, 145 Tigert
Hall (352)392-6004.

Upon request, the Graduate Catalog is available on computer disk to students with print-related disabilities. For more
information, contact the Office of the University Registrar.

The University of Florida Graduate Catalog is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.rgp.ufl.edu.


Production-Research Publications


Editor--Helen N. Martin

















Graduate Catalog


The
University Record


$" UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA













VOLUME XCIV I SERIES 1 I NUMBER 2 I APRIL 2000
The University Record (USPS 652-760) published five times a year in March, April, September, Septem-
ber and November by the University of Florida, Office of the University Registrar, Academic Publications,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000. Periodical postage paid at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR, BOX 114000,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-4000.














OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION ...................................................................................... x
BOARD OF REGENTS OF FLORIDA ......................................................................... ................ x
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM ........................................................................................................ x
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
A D M IN ISTRATIO N ................................................................... .. ...............................................
G RAD UATE SCH O O L ..................... .................................................................................. xi
G RAD U ATE CO U N C IL .................. ................... .................... ............................................... xi

CRITICAL DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ........................................ ............... xii
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR ............................................. ....................... xii




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
INSTITUTIO NAL PU RPO SE .......................................................... .............................. ............ 3
M ISSIO N A N D G O A LS .............................................. .................................................................... 3
GRADUATE DEANS AND YEARS OF SERVICE ....................................................... 4

GRADUATE SCHOOL
M ISSIO N .................................. ........................................................................................................... 5
V ISIO N .................................................... ................ .................................... 5
O RG A N IZATIO N ......................................... ........................................................................................ 5
HISTORY ................................................ ........ 5
D EFIN IT IO N S ...................................................................................................................................... 6

GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
N O N TH ESIS DEGREES ......................................................................................................................... 6
T H ESIS D EG R EES ................................................................................................................................. 7

NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
CONCURRENT GRADUATE PROGRAMS ........................................................... 8
JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS .......................................... ..... -........ 9
COMBINED BACHELOR'S MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS ........................................................ 9
STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM PROGRAMS .................................................................... ................. 10
INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE CERTIFICATES AND CONCENTRATIONS 10
A frican Studies .................................. ......................................................................... ...... 10
A grofo restry ........... ......................... .............................................................................. 11
A nim al M molecular and Cell Biology ...................................... .... ................................................... 11
B io logical Sciences ........................................................................................................................... 11
C hem ical Physics ............................................................................................... ......................... 12
Eco logical Engineering ...................................................................................................................... 12
G geographic Inform action Sciences ............................................................................. ................... 12
G erontological Studies ...................................................................................................................... 13
Health Physics and Medical Physics..................................................... .......... ......... 13
Hydrologic Sciences.......................................................................................... 13
Latin Am erican Studies ........................ ................ ..... ............... ............................. 14
Q uantum Theory Project ................................................................. ...................................... 15










Toxicology ........................................................................................................................................ 15
Tropical Agriculture .......................................................................................................................... 15
Tropical Studies ................................................................................................................................. 16
Vision Sciences ........................................................................................................... ................. 16
W wetlands ........................................................................................................................................... 16
W omen's/Gender Studies .................................................................................................................. 16


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL....................................................... ........ 17
APPLICATIO N FO R ADM ISSIO N ......................................................................................................... 17
GENERAL REQ UIREM ENTS .................................................................................................................. 17
COM PUTER REQ UIREM ENT................................................................................................................ 17
ADM ISSIO NS EXAM INATIO NS ............................................................................................................ 18
Graduate Record Exam nation ........................................................................................................... 18
Graduate Study in Business Adm inistration ................................................................................. 18
Graduate Study in Law ...................................................................................................................... 18
M EDICAL IM M UNIZATIO N ................................................................................................................. 18
RESIDENCY .......................................................................................................................................... 18
INTERNATIO NAL STUDENTS .............................................................................................................. 20
STUDENTS W ITH DISABILITIES ........................................................................................................... 21
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY
ADM INISTRATIO N BENEFITS INFO RM ATIO N ................................................. ................... 20
CO NDITIO NAL ADM ISSIO N ............................................................................................................... 21
PO STBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS ............................................................................................... 21
NO NDEGREE REGISTRATIO N ............................................................................................................. 21
READM ISSIO N ..................................................................................................................................... 21
FACULTY M EM BERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS ...................................................... ................... 21
GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOW SHIPS..................................................................... 21
TUITIO N PAYM ENTS ........................................................................................................................... 22
UNIVERSITY-W IDE FELLOW SHIPS ...................................................................................................... 22
Alum ni Graduate Fellowship ............................................................................................................. 22
Named Presidential Fellow ship .............. ................................................................................ 22
Grinter Fellowship ............................................................................................................................ 22
Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation
Research Abroad Fellowship ........................................................................................................... 22
Title VI-Foreign Language and Area
Studies Fellowship .......................................................................................................................... 23
MINORITY SUPPORT
BO R Summer Program ...................................................................................................................... 23
FAM U Feeder Program ...................................................................................................................... 23
Graduate M minority Fellowships .......................................................................................................... 23
M cKnight Doctoral Fellowships ......................................................................................................... 23
SFCC/UF Black Faculty Development Project.............................................................................. 23
CO LLEGE/SCHO O L FINANCIAL AID W EBSITES ......................................................................... 23
EXTERNAL FELLOW SHIPS FO R GRADUATE STUDENTS ................................................ ............ 24


G EN ERA L REG U LATIO N S .................................................................................. ............ 24
CATALO G YEAR .................................................................................................................................. 24
CLASSIFICATIO N O F STUDENTS ................................................................................................... 24
CO NFIDENTIALITY O F STUDENT RECO RDS ..................................................................................... 24
STUDENT CO NDUCT CO DE ......................................................................................................... 25
REGISTRATIO N REQ UIREM ENTS ........................................................................................................ 25
Graduate Students on Appointment .............................................. ................................................ 25
M minimum Full-Time Registration .................................................................................................. 25
Graduate Students Not on Appointment ............................................................... ........................ 25










Undergraduate Registration in Graduate Courses ............................................... ............... .. 25
Final Term Registration ................................................................................... ............................. 25
Cleared Prior ........................................................ ................. .. .......................... 25
Dropped Courses ............................................................................................................................ 26

CHANG E O F M AJO R O R CO LLEG E ...... ... ...................................................................................... 26
CO URSES AN D CRED ITS ..... ......................................... .......... 26
G RADES ............................................................................................................................. 26
U NSATISFACTO RY SCHO LARSHIP ...................................................................................... ......... 26
FO REIG N LANG UAG E EXAM INATIO N ........................................................ ................................. 27
EXAM INATIO NS .......................................................................................... .................................. 27
PREPARATIO N FO R FINAL SEM ESTER ......................................... .................................................. 27
AW ARDING O F DEG REES ...................................................... ....................................................... 27
ATTENDANCE AT CO M M ENCEM ENT........................................ .................................................... 27

REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES................................................ ............. 27
G ENERAL REG ULATIO NS ............................................................... ............................................... 27
Course Requirem ents ......................................................................................... ......................... 27
Degree Requirem ents ............ ......................................................... ................................................ 28
Transfer of Credit................................................................................................... ....................... 28
Supervisory Com m ittee ................................................... ............................................................ 28
Language Requirem ents .................................................................. ............................................ 28
Exam nation .................................................................................................................................... 28
Tim e Lim station ......... .................................................................................................................. 28
Leave of Absences............................................................................................................................. 28

MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF SCIENCE .................................. .................. 28
Course Requirem ents ...................................................................................................................... 28
Theses ................ ........................................ ............ 29
Electronic Theses............................................................................................................................... 29
Change from Thesis to Nonthesis O option .......................................................... .......................... 29
Supervisory Com m ittee ............................. ................................................................. ........... 29
Final Exam nation ..................................................................................... ...................................... 29
Final Com prehensive Exam nation .............................................................................................. 29

REQ U IREM EN TS FO R TH E PH .D ............................................... ............................................... 29
CO URSE REQ U IREM ENTS ....................................................................... ...................................... 29
Transfer of Credit............................................................................................................................... 29
M major ............................................................................................................................................... 29
M inor ............................................................ .......... 29
LEAVE O F ABSENCE ........................................................................................................................ 30
SUPERVISO RY CO M M ITTEE ...................................................................... .................................... 30
Duties and Responsibilities .................................................................................................. ........... 30
M em bership ............................................................... .................................. ........................30
LANG UAG E REQ UIREM ENT ..................................................................... .................................... 30
CAM PUS RESIDENCE REQ U IREM ENT ................................................................ ........................... 30
Q UALIFYING EXAM INATIO N ................................................................. ...................................... 31
ADM ISSIO N TO CAN DIDACY ..................................................................... .................................. 31
DISSERTATIO N ........................................................................................ .......................................... 31
Publication of Dissertation ...................... .......................................................... .......................... 31
Copyright .............................................................-.......---...... ........................................ 31
Electronic Dissertation ........................................................................................................ ..... .. 31
GUIDELINES FOR RESTRICTION ON RELEASE OF DISSERTATION .................. ..................... 31
FINAL EXAM INATIO N ................................................................................................................... 32
CERTIFICATIO N ....................... ............................................................................................ 32









SPECIA LIZED G RA D UATE D EG REES ........................................................................... 32
MASTER O F ACCO UNTING .................................................................................................. .......... 32
MASTER OF AGRIBUSINESS .................................................................... ............................... 32
MASTER O F AGRICULTURE ................................................................................................... ..... .... 32
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE ................................................................ ......................................... 32
MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING ................................ 33
MASTER O F ARTS IN URBAN AND REGIO NAL PLANNING ..................................................... ....... 33
MASTER OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ......................................................................................... 33
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADM INISTRATION ................................................................................... 34
MASTER O F EDUCATIO N ................................................................................................................... 35
MASTER O F ENGINEERING ...................................................................................... .................. 35
MASTER O F FINE ARTS ....................................................................................................................... 36
MASTER O F FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES........................................................................ 37
MASTER O F FO REST RESOURCES AND CO NSERVATIO N ............................................................. 37
MASTER O F HEALTH ADM INISTRATION ........................................................................................... 37
MASTER O F HEALTH SCIENCE ............................................................................................................ 37
MASTER O F HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATIO N .................................................................................. 38
MASTER O F INTERIOR DESIGN .......................................................................................................... 38
MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT .....................................................38
MASTER O F LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ......................................................................................... 38
MASTER O F LATIN .............................................................................................................................. 38
MASTER O F LAW S IN COM PARATIVE LAW ................................................................................. 39
MASTER O F LAW S IN TAXATION ................................................................................................. 39
MASTER OF M USIC ............................................................................................................................. 39
MASTER O F PHYSICAL THERAPY................................................................................. ...................... 40
MASTER O F PUBLIC HEALTH .............................................................................................................. 40
MASTER O F SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES ........................................... ............... 40
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES AND
M ASTER O F EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES ................................... .................................... 40
MASTER O F SCIENCE IN NURSING .............................................................................................. 41
MASTER OF STATISTICS ...................................................................................................................... 41
ENGINEER ...................................................................................................................................... 41
DOCTO R O F AUDIO LOGY ................................................................................................................. 41
ED.S. AND ED.D ........................................................................................................................... 42
SPECIALIST IN EDUCATIO N ................................................................................................................ 42
DOCTOR OF EDUCATIO N .............................................................................................................. 43


FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND REQUIREMENTS ...................................... ........... 44
EXPENSES ............................................................................................................................................. 44
APPLICATION FEE ............................................................................................................................ 44
ENRO LLM ENT AND STUDENT FEES ................................................................................................ 44
FEE LIABILITY .................................................................................................................................... 44
ASSESSM ENT OF FEES ...................................................................................................................... 44
Resident and Nonresident Tuition ............................................................................................ 44
Health, Athletic, Activity and Service, and M material and Supply Fees ............................................ 44
Late Registration/Payment Fees ................................................................................................. 44
Special Fees and Charges ............................................................................................................... 45
PAYM ENT OF FEES ........................................................................................................................... 45
Deadlines ....................................................................................................................................... 45
Cancellation and Reinstatement ............................................................................................... 45
Deferral of Registration and Tuition Fees ................................................................. ............ 45
W aiver of Fees ......................................................................................................................... 46
Refund of Fees ........................................................................................................................ 46
OTHER GENERAL FISCAL INFORMATIO N ....................................................................................... 46


v










PAST DUE STUDENT ACCO UNTS ................................................................................................... 46
TRANSPORTATIO N AND PARKING SERVICES ................................................................................ 46

FINANCIAL AID .............................................................................. ............................................... 47
O FFICE FOR STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ................................................ ........................... 47
FINANCIAL AID NEXUS TAPES ....................................................................................................... 47
LOANS ................................................................................... ..................................................... 47
PART-TIM E EM PLOYM ENT .............................................................................................................. 47
ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS................................ ... 47

RESEA RCH A N D TEACH ING SERVICES..................................... ............... ................48
LIBRARIES ............................................................................................................................................ 48
COM PUTER FACILITIES ..................................................................................................................... 49
Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC) ............................................................ 49
Center for Instructional and Research Computing Activities (CIRCA) ................................................ 50
ART GALLERIES ............................................................................................................ .................. 50
PERFORM ING ARTS ........................................................... ......................................... .................. 50
M USEUM O F NATURAL HISTO RY ...................................................................................................... 51
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIM ENT STATION ........................................................................ .............. 51
ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERIM ENT STATION ........................................... .......... 52
FLO RIDA ENGINEERING EDUCATION DELIVERY SYSTEM .............................................. ............... 52
OFFICE O F RESEARCH AND GRADUATE PROGRAM S..................................................... 52
UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLO RIDA .................................................................................................... 52

INTERD ISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTERS ................................................................... 53

STU D ENT SERV ICES ................................................................................................... 55
CAREER RESO URCE CENTER .............................................................. .......................................... 55
COUNSELING CENTER .................................................................................................... .............. 55
ENGLISH SKILLS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ................................................ ..................... 56
GRADUATE ASSISTANTS UNITED ...................................................................................................... 56
GRADUATE EXAM INER ...................................................................................................................... 56
GRADUATE M INORITY PROGRAM S .................................................................................................. 56
GRADUATE SCHOOL EDITORIAL OFFICE .............................. .................... ............................... 56
GRADUATE SCHOOL RECORDS OFFICE ............................................................................................ 57
GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL ....................................................................................................... 57
GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK .................................................................................................. 57
HO USING ............................................................................................................................................ 57
Applications .................................................................................................................................... 57
Residence Halls for Single Students ................................................................................................... 57
Cooperative Living Arrangements ............................................................................................... 58
Family and Single Graduate Student Housing ......................................................................... ....... 58
Off-Campus Housing ................................................................................................................... 58
OM BUDSMAN ............................................................................... 58
SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC ...................................................................... .............................. 59
STUDENT HEALTH CARE CENTER ...................................................................................................... 59
UNIVERSITY O F FLORIDA INTERNATIO NAL CENTER ...................................................... 59
International Student Services ............................................................................................................ 59
International Faculty and Scholar Services.................................................... ............................. 60
Overseas Studies Services ............................................................................................................ 60
Program Development ........................................ ................................................................... ..... 60
W ORKSHOP FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS ........................................................................................ 60














COURSE PREFIXES........................................................ ................................ ... ................ ...... 62
ACCOUNTING ............................ ............................... .......................................................................... 66
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, MECHANICS, AND ENGINEERING SCIENCE........................... ........... 67
AFRICAN STUDIES ......................................... ......................................................................... 69
AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING............ ...................... .......... ......... 69
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION ................................................ 71
AGRICULTURE-GENERAL ......................................................... ........................................................... 72
AGRONOMY ............................................................................................................... ...... ..... ........ ... 73
ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY ................................. ................. 74
ANIMAL SCIENCE ..................................................... ...................................... .................................. 75
ANIMAL SCIENCES-GENERAL ......................................................................................... ............. 75
ANTHROPOLOGY .............................................................................................................. .............. 76
ARCHITECTURE ........................................ ................................................ ....................................... 78
ART AND ART HISTORY ............................................................................................ ..... ....... 80
ASTRONOMY ................................................. ....... .......................................................... ......... 82
BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ..................................................................................... 83
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING .................................................................................................................... 85
Biomedical Engineering .............................................. ....................................................................... 85
Biomaterials ........................................................................................................................................ 85
Biomechanics ....................................................................................................................................... 86
Biomedical Imaging and Signal Processing ...................................................................................... 86
Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering .................................................................................... 87
B O TA N Y .............................................................................................................................. ...................... 8 7
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ....................................................................... ............................. ............ 89
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-GENERAL ............................................................................................ 90
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING ............................................................................ .............. 91
CHEMISTRY ......................................................................................................................................... 92
CIVIL AND COASTAL ENGINEERING ..................................................................................... ................... 94
Civil Engineering .................................................................................................................................. 95
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering ......................................................................................... 97
CLASSICS ........................ ................................................................. .............................................. 98
CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY ............................................................................................... 99
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS .................................................................................. 100
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS ................................................................................................................ 102
COMPARATIVE LAW ............................................................................................................................ 103
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING .......................................................... 103
COUNSELOR EDUCATION ...................................................................................................................... 105
DAIRY AND POULTRY SCIENCES ............................................................................................................... 106
Dairy .................................................................................................................................................. 107
Poultry ................................................................................................................................................ 107
DECISION AND INFORMATION SCIENCES ................................................... .................................... 107
DENTAL SCIENCES ................................................................................................................................... 109
Endodontics ........................................................................................................................................ 109
Orthodontics ............................................................................................................................. 110
Periodontics ....................................................................................................................................... 110
Prosthodontics .................................................................................................................................... 110
ECONOMICS ..................................................................................................................... ............. 111
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, POLICY, AND FOUNDATIONS ......................................................... 113










Curriculum and Instruction Leadership ......................................................................... .................. 113
Educational Adm inistration .................................... ...................................... .................................. 114
Foundations of Education ..................................................................................................................... 114
H higher Education ......................................-------................... ...................................................... 114
Student Personnel in H higher Education ........................................................................................... 115
Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education ..................................................................................... 115
EDUCATIO NAL PSYCHO LO GY .......................................... .... ............................ ............................. 115
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING.................................................................................... 116
EN G IN EERIN G-G EN ERAL ..................................................................................... ...... 120
EN G LISH ................................... -- --..................................................................... 120
ENTOMO LOGY AND NEMATOLOGY ........ .................. ............................ ...................................... 121
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES ............... ..... ...................... 122
EXERCISE AND SPO RT SCIENCES ...................................................................................... .............. 124
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ................................................................ ........................ 126
FISHERIES AND AQ UATIC SCIENCES .................................................................................. ................ 129
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS ......................................................................................... 130
FOO D SCIENCE AND HUM AN NUTRITION ..................................................................... .................. 131
FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION ...................................................................................... 132
G EO G RA PHY ........ ............................ ................. ......................... .. ..................... 133
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES ............................................................................................ 135
G ERM ANIC AND SLAVIC STUDIES ...................................................................... ................................ 136
G ERO NTO LO G ICA L STU D IES ................................................................................................................... 137
HEALTH PRO FESSIO NS-GENERAL ........................................................ ........................................ 137
HEALTH SCIENCE EDUCATION .................. .................................................. ............................. 137
HEALTH SERVICES ADM INISTRATIO N .............................................................................. .................. 139
HISTORY .................................................................... 140
H O RTICU LTU RAL SCIENCE .. ..................... .......................... .......................................................... 143
INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEM S ENGINEERING ............................................. .......................................... 145
INTERDISCIPLINARY ECO LO GY .................................................................................. ........................ 146
IN T ERIO R D ESIG N .................................................. .............................................................................. 147
LAN DSCAPE ARCH ITECTU RE ................................................................ ............................................. 149
LATIN AM ERICAN STUDIES ................ .. .......................................................... ......................... 151
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES-GENERAL ............................................... ........................... ................. 151
LING U ISTICS ................................................................................................... 151
M A N A G EM EN T ....................................................................................................................................... 153
M ARKETING ............................................................................. 155
M ASS CO M M U N ICATIO N .................................................. ..... ................... .................................. 157
MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ............................................ ............... 159
M A T H EM A TIC S ......................................................................................................................... 161
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ......................................... ........... 163
M EDICAL SCIENCES ........................................................ ...... 165
Interdisciplinary Program (IDP) in Medical Sciences......................... ................. 165
Advanced Concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ........................ .... ............ 166
Advanced Concentration in Genetics ................................................ ............................................. 167
Advanced Concentration in Immunology and Microbiology........................................ 167
Advanced Concentration in Molecular Cell Biology ......................................... 168
Advanced Concentration in Neuroscience.......................................................... ............................ 168
Advanced Concentration in Physiology and Pharmacology ............................. .. .............. 169
M ED IC INA L C H EM ISTRY ..................................................................... ...................... .......................... 170
M ICRO BIO LO GY AND CELL SCIENCE ..................................................................... ............................ 170
MOLECULAR GENETICS AND MICROBIOLOGY ....................................................... .......................... 171
M U SIC .................................................................. .. .................................................... 172
N EU RO SC IEN C E.............................................................................................................. 174
NUCLEAR AND RADIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING ........................................................... ..................... 174



viii









NURSING ................................................................................................................................................... 176
OCCUPATIO NAL THERAPY ....................................................................................................................... 178
O RAL BIO LO GY ......................................................................................................................................... 179
PATHO LO GY, IM M UNO LO GY, AND LABO RATO RY M EDICINE ............................................................ 179
PHARM ACEUTICAL SCIENCES-GENERAL ............................................................................................... 180 0
PHARM ACEUTICS ...................................................................................................................................... 180
PHARM ACO DYNAM ICS ........................................................................................................................... 181
PHARM ACO LO GY AND THERAPEUTICS ............................................................................................... 181
PHARM ACY HEALTH CARE ADM INISTRATIO N ....................................................................................... 182
PHILOSO PHY ............................................................................................................................................. 182
PHYSICAL THERAPY ................................................................................................................. .. 183
PHYSICS ................................................................................................. . . ........................................ 184
PHYSIO LO GY .......................................................................................................................................... 186
PLANT M O LECULAR AND CELLULAR BIO LO GY .................................................................................. 186
PLANT PATHO LO GY ................................................................................................................................. 187
PO LITICAL SCIENCE .................................................................................................................................. 188
PSYCHO LO GY .......................................................................................................................................... 191
RECREATIO N, PARKS, AND TO URISM ..................................................................................................... 193
REHABILITATIO N CO UNSELING ............................................................................................................... 194
REHABILITATIO N SCIENCE ....................................................................................................................... 195
RELIGIO N .................................................................................................................................................. 195
ROM ANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES ........................................................................................... 196
French .................................................................................................................................................. 197
Portuguese ............................................................................................................................................ 197
Spanish ................................................................................................................................................ 197
SOCIO LO GY .............................................................................................................................................. 199
SO IL AND W ATER SCIENCE....................................................................................................................... 200
SPECIAL EDUCATIO N ............................................................................................................................... 201
STATISTICS ................................................................................................................... 202
TAXATIO N ................................................................................................................................................. 204
TEACHING AND LEARNING ..................................................................................................................... 205
Early Childhood Education .................................... ............................................................................ 205
Educational M edia and Instructional Design ......................................................................................... 206
Elementary Education ...................................................................................................................... 206
English Education ................................................................................................................................. 143
Foreign Language Education ................................................................................................................. 207
M mathematics Education ....................................................................................................................... 207
M middle School Education ...................................................................................................................... 207
Reading Education ................................................................................................................................ 207
Science Education ................................................................................................................................ 208
Secondary Education ....................................................................................................................... 208
Social Studies Education .......................................... ............................................... ............................ 208
THEATRE AND DANCE .............................................................................................................................. 208
URBAN AND REGIO NAL PLANNING ........................................................................................................ 209
VETERINARY M EDICAL SCIENCES .............................................................................................................. 211
W ILDLIFE ECO LO GY AND CO NSERVATIO N ............................................................................................ 213
W OM EN'S STUDIES .................................................................................................................................. 213
ZOO LO GY ................................................................................................................................................. 214
SERVICE CO URSES ..................................................................................................................................... 215


G RA D U ATE FA C U LTY .................................................................................................. 216
IN D EX ............................................................................................................................. 267
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGES AND PROGRAMS ........................................... cover













FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

JEB BUSH
Governor

FRANK BROGAN
Lieutenant Governor


KATHERINE HARRIS
Secretary of State

ROBERT A. BUTTERWORTH
Attorney General

C. WILLIAM NELSON
State Treasurer


TOM GALLAGHER
Commissioner of Education

ROBERT F. MILLIGAN
Comptroller

ROBERT B. CRAWFORD
Commissioner of Agriculture


BOARD OF REGENTS OF FLORIDA

THOMAS F. PETWAY
Chair, Jacksonville

GWENDOLYN F. MCLIN
Vice Chair, Okahumpka


JAMES D. CORBIN
Chattahoochee

JULIAN BENNETT, JR.
Panama City

C. B. DANIEL,
Gainesville

TOM GALLAGHER
Commissioner of Education

JAMES F. HEEKIN, JR.
Orlando

ADOLFO HENRIQUES
Coral Gables


PHILIP D. LEWIS
Riviera Beach


ASHLEY B. MOODY
Student


ELIZABETH G. LINDSAY
Sarasota

J. COLLIER MERRILL
Pensacola

JON C. MOYLE
West Palm Beach

STEVE UHLFELDER
Sarasota

WELCOME H. WATSON
Fort Lauderdale


STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM

ADAM W. HERBERT
Chancellor










UN II O IS IA


CHARLES E. YOUNG, Ph.D., Interim President of the
University
DAVID RICHARD COLBURN, Ph.D., Interim Provost and
Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs
JACQUELYN D. HART, Ph.D., ViceProvost, MinorityAffairs


KENNETH BERNS, M.D., Ph.D., Vice President for Health
Affairs and Dean, College of Medicine
PATRICKJ. BIRD, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health and Human
Performance
DALE CANELAS, M.A., Director, University Libraries
FRANK A. CATALANOTTO, D.M.D., Dean, College of
Dentistry
JIMMY GEARY CHEEK, Ph.D., Dean, Academic Programs,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
MICHAEL CHEGE, Ph.D., Director, Center forAfrican Studies
JOSEPH ANTHONY DIPIETRO, D.V.M., Ph.D., Dean,
College of Veterinary Medicine
ROBERT G. FRANK, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health
Professions
GERARDOM. GONZALEZ, Ph.D., Interim Dean, Collegeof
Education
WILLARD W. HARRISON, Ph.D., Dean, College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences
STEPHEN R. HUMPHREY, Ph.D., Dean, College of Natural
Resources and Environment
TERRY HYNES, Ph.D., Dean, College of Journalism and
Communications
DOUGLAS S. JONES, Ph.D., Director, Florida Museum of
Natural History
RICHARD L. JONES, Ph.D., Dean for Research, Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
CHARLES J. KIBERT, Ph.D., Interim Director, M.E. Rinker
School of Building Construction
JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D., Dean, Academic Affairs for
Continuing Education
JOHN KRAFT, Ph.D., Dean, Warrington College of Business
Administration
JOHN L. KRAMER, Ph.D., Director, Fisher School of
Accounting
KATHLEEN LONG, Ph.D., Dean, College of Nursing
MICHAEL MARTIN, Ph.D., Vice President for Agriculture
and Natural Resources
DONALD E. MCGLOTHLIN, Ph.D., Dean, CollegeofFineArts
JON L. MILLS, J.D., Interim Dean, Fredric G. Levin College
of Law
M. JACK OHANIAN, Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of
Engineering, and Associate Vice President, Engineering
and Industrial Experiment Station
WINFRED M. PHILLIPS, D.Sc., Vice President for Research
and Dean, Graduate School
WILLIAM RIFFEE, Ph.D., Dean, College of Pharmacy
PAUL A. ROBELL, M.A., Vice President for Development
and Alumni Affairs


JAMES E. SCOTT, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs
GERALD SCHAFFER, B.S.B.A., Vice President for
Administrative Affairs
WAYNE H. SMITH, Ph.D., Director, Forest Resources and
Conservation
JAY M. STEIN, Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of Architecture
BARBARA TALMADGE, A.M., University Registrar
CHRISTINE TAYLOR WADDILL, Ph.D., Dean for Extension,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
CHARLES H. WOOD, Ph.D., Director, Center for Latin
American Studies



WINFRED M. PHILLIPS, D.Sc. (Universityof Virginia), Dean
of the Graduate School and Vice President for Research
and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical
Engineering
KENNETH J. GERHARDT, Ph.D. (Ohio State University),
Associate Dean of the Graduate School, Ombudsman for
Graduate Students, and Professor of Communication
Sciences and Disorders
DOVIE J. GAMBLE, Ph.D. (New York University), Interim
Director of Graduate Minority Programs and Assistant
Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism



WINFREDM. PHILLIPS (Chair), D.Sc. (UniversityofVirginia),
Dean of the Graduate School and Vice President for
Research and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and
Mechanical Engineering
CAROLE REED ASH, Ed.D. (Columbia University), Kirbo
Eminent Scholar of Nursing
GIJS BOSMAN, Ph.D. (State University of Utrecht), Professor
of Electrical and Computer Engineering
DAWN BOWERS, Ph.D. (University of Florida), Associate
Professor of Clinical and Health Psychology
STEVE M. DORMAN, Ph.D. (University of Tennessee),
Associate Professor of Health Science Education
FREDERICK GREGORY, Ph.D. (Harvard University), Professor
of History
PUSHPA S. KALRA, Ph.D. (University of Delhi), Professor of
Physiology and Pharmacology
ROBERT T. KENNEDY, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill), Professor of Chemistry
FRANK G. NORDLIE, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota),
Professor of Zoology
MICHAEL R. PERFIT, Ph.D. (Columbia University), Professor
of Geology
JILL E. PETERSON, Ph.D. (Rice University), Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering
HUGH L. POPENOE, Ph.D. (University of Florida), Professor
of Soil and Water Science
JERRY L. STIMAC, Ph.D. (Oregon State University), Professor
of Entomology and Nematology
WESLEY E. WILSON, Doctoral Candidatein HigherEducation
Administration, Graduate Student Council Representative












ITA A O G AT


DEADLINE DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


FALL SEMESTER 2000

University Dates
Admission Application ........................................ June 2
Registration .................................................. August 21-22
Classes Begin ............... ....................... August 23
Degree Application ....................... .......... September 15
Midpoint of Semester .................................. October 16
Classes End ................................. .......... December 6
Commencement ........................................... December 16

Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation............................. .......... October 16
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ........................... November 13
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form ........................... December 11

GSFLT Date
GSFLT Examination...................................... October 14


SPRING SEMESTER 2001

University Dates
Admission Application ................ ...... September 29
Registration ..................... ........................ January 5
Classes Begin .......... .................. .....January 8
Degree Application ...............................February 2
Midpoint of Semester .... ........................ February 27
Classes End ........... .......................... April 25
Commencement ................................................. May 5

Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation........................ ...... .. February 26


Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form .....................................April 2
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form ............................ ...... April 30

GSFLT Date
GSFLT Examination............................................ February 3


SUMMER TERM A & C

University Dates
Admission Application ................................. February 23
Registration ................................... .......... May 11
Classes Begin ....................................................... May 14
Degree Application C ......................................... May 16
Classes End ......................................................... June 22


SUMMER TERM B & C

University Dates
Admission Application ...........................................April 6
Registration ............................................... June 29
Classes Begin ............................................... July 2
Degree Application B .............................................. July 5
Midpoint of Summer Terms............................ ........ July 3
Classes End ................................................August 10
Commencement (B & C) ...................................August 11

Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation (A, B & C) ........................................ July 2
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form (A, B & C)...................... July 20
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form (A, B & C)...................... August 6

GSFLT Date
GSFLT Examination........................................ June 16


NIVERSI O FR A I CA DAI


FALL SEMESTER 2000
1999
December 1, Wednesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials, for graduate program in
Department of Clinical and Health Psychology.
2000
january 5, Wednesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs in
anthropology.
January 18, Tuesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs in
counseling psychology, English, and occupational therapy.
February 1, Tuesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs in
architecture communication sciences and disorders, counselor edu-
cation, and history.
February 29, Tuesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate program in
landscape architecture.


March 1, Wednesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs
in the College of Nursing.
March 15, Wednesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs
in building construction and decision and information sciences.

April 18, Tuesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs
in political science.

May 1, Monday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for Master of Business
Administration (MBA) program.

June 1, Thursday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate program
leading to the Master of Laws in Taxation.
June 2, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs
except those listed with an earlier deadline.










August 11, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to request transfer of credit for fall candidates for degrees.

August 21-22, Monday-Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.

August 23, Wednesday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.

Late registration begins. Students subject to late registration fee.

August 28, Monday, 5:00 p.m.

Last day to drop a course or to change sections without fee liability.

Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees.

Last day to complete late registration.

August 29, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.

Last day to file address change, if not living in residence halls, to receive
all University correspondence.

September 1, Friday, 3:30 p.m.

Fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be established. Students
who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with University
Financial Services will be subject to a late payment fee.

Deadline for receipt of request for residency reclassification and all
appropriate documents.

September 4, Monday, Labor Day

All classes suspended.

September 15, Friday, 4:00 p.m.

Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive 25%
refund of course fees.

Last day to apply at Office of the University Registrar for degree to be
conferred at end of Fall Semester.

October 14, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.

Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT) in French,
German, and Spanish.

October 16, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file dissertation, fee
receipts for library processing and microfilming, and all doctoral
forms with the Graduate School Editorial Office.
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examination.

November 10, Friday, Veterans Day Observed
All classes suspended.


November 10-11, Friday-Saturday*
Homecoming. All classes suspended Friday. *This date subject to
change.

November 13, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed master's theses, Final Examination Reports, and
binding fee receipts to Graduate School Graduate School Editorial
Office.


November 22, Wednesday
Last day to withdraw from the University without receiving failing grades
in all courses.
Last day to drop a course by college petition without receiving WF grade.


November 23-24, Thursday-Friday, Thanksgiving
All classes suspended.

December 6, Wednesday
All classes end.

December 7-8, Thursday-Friday

Examination reading days-no classes.

December 9-15, Saturday-Friday

Final examinations.

December 11, Monday, 4:00 p.m.

Last day to submit signed original bond dissertations, abstracts, and Final
Examination Reports to Graduate School Editorial Office.

Last day to submit signed original bond theses and abstracts to Graduate
School Editorial Office.

Last day to submit Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees to
Graduate Student Records Office.

December 14, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.

Grades for degree candidates due in Office of the Univeristy Registrar.

December 15, Friday, 10:00 a.m.

Reports of colleges on candidates for degrees due in Graduate School
Records Office.

December 16, Saturday

Commencement.

December 18, Monday, 9:00 a.m.

All grades for Fall Semester due in Office of the University Registrar.



SPRING SEMESTER 2001
2000

September 29, Friday
Deadlineforreceiptof all application materialsfor all graduate programs,
except those listed with other deadlines.
October 16, Monday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs in
building construction.
November 15, Wednesday
Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs in
political science.
December 6, Wednesday
Last day to request transfer of credit for spring candidates for degrees.


2001

January 5, Friday, 5 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.

January 8, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students subject to late registration fee.
January 11, Thursday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to drop a course or to change sections without fee liability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees.
Last day to complete late registration.











January 12, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to file address change, if not living in residence halls, to receive
all University correspondence.
All classes suspended.

January 15, Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Classes begin.

January 19, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be established. Students
who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with University
Financial Services will be subject to a late payment fee.

Deadline for receipt of residency reclassification and all appropriate
documentation.

February 2, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to apply to Office of the University Registrar for degree to be
conferred at end of Spring Semester.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive 25%
refund of course fees.

February 3, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT) in French,
German, and Spanish.

February 26, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file dissertations, fee
receipts for library hardbinding and microfilming, and all doctoral
forms with the Graduate School Editorial Office.

February 27, Tuesday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examinations.

March 3-10, Saturday-Saturday, Spring Break
All classes suspended.

April 2, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed master's theses, Final Examination Reports,
and binding fee receipts to Graduate School Editorial Office.

April 13, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Lastdayto withdrawfrom the University without receiving failing grades
in all courses.
Last day to drop a course by college petition, without receiving WF
grades.
April 25, Wednesday
All classes end.

April 26-27, Thursday-Friday

Examination reading days-no classes.

April 28-May 4, Saturday-Friday
Final examinations.

April 30, Monday, 5:00 p.m.

Last dayto submit signed original bond dissertations, abstracts, and Final
Examination Reports to Graduate School Editorial Office.
Last day to submit signed original bond theses and abstracts to Graduate
School Editorial Office.
Last day to submit Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees to
Graduate Student Records Office.

May 3, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Grades for degree candidates due in Office of the University Registrar.


May 4, Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Reports of colleges on candidates for degrees due in Graduate Student
Records Office.

May 5, Saturday
Commencement.

May 7, Monday, 9:00 a.m.

All grades for Spring Semester due in Office of the University Registrar.




SUMMER TERMS A, B, AND C 2001

TERMS A & C


2001

February 15, Thursday

Deadline for receipt of all application materials for Master of Arts through
Decision and Information Sciences.

February 23, Friday, 5:00 p.m.

Deadline for receipt of all application materials for all graduate programs,
except those listed with other deadline dates.

February 27, Tuesday

Deadline for receipt of all application materialsfor all graduate programs,
in political science.


March 1, Thursday

Deadline for receipt of all application materials for graduate programs in
building construction.

April 25, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Last day to request transfer of credit for summer candidates for degrees.

May 11, Friday, 5 p.m.

Registration according to appointments.

May 14, Monday

Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students subject to late registration fee.

May 15, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to complete late registration for Summer Terms A and C.
Last day to drop or add a course or to change sections without fee liability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees.

May 16, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to file address change, if not living in residence halls, to receive
all University correspondence.
Last day to apply at Office of the University Registrar for degree to be
conferred at end of Term C.

May 23, Wednesday
Last day student may withdraw from the University for Term A and
receive 25% refund of course fees.











May 25, Friday, 3:30 p.m.

Fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be established. Students
who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with University
Financial Services by this date will be subject to a late payment fee.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency reclassification and all
appropriate documentation.

May 28, Monday, Memorial Day

All classes suspended.

June 1, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive 25%
refund of course fees for Term C.

June 15, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day to withdraw from the University without receiving failing grades
in all courses for Term A.
Last dayto drop a course by college petition without receiving WF grades.

June 16, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT) in French,
German, and Spanish.

June 22, Friday
All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.

June 25, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Term A due in Office of the University Registrar.




TERMS B & C


2001

March 14, Wednesday
Deadline for Term B receipt of application and completion of all
application materials for graduate programs in building construction.

April 6, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all application
materials for all graduate programs, except those listed with other
deadline dates.

June 29, Friday, 5 p.m.
Registration according to appointments.

July 2, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. Students subject to a late
registration fee.
Midpoint of summer terms for completing doctoral qualifying examina-
tions.

July 2, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file dissertations, fee
receipts for library hardbinding and microfilming, and all doctoral
forms with the Graduate School Editorial Office.


July 3, Wednesday, 5 p.m.

Last day to complete late registration for Term B.
Lastdaytodropor add a course orto change sectionswithout fee liability.
Last day to withdraw from the University with full refund of fees for Term B.

July 5, Thursday
Last day to file address change, if not living in residence halls, to receive
all University correspondence.
Last day to apply at Office of the University Registrar for degree to be
conferred at end of Term B.

July 11, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive 25%
refund of course fee for Term B.
July 13, Friday, 3:30 p.m.

Fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be established. Students
who have not paid fees or arranged to pay fees with University
Financial Services by this date will be subject to a late payment fee.

Deadline for receipt of residency request and all appropriate documen-
tation.

July 20, Friday, 5:00 p.m.

Last day to submit signed master's theses, Final Examination Reports, and
binding fee receipts to Graduate School Editorial Office.

August 3, Friday, 5 p.m.

Last day to withdraw from the University without receiving failing grades
in all courses.
Lastdaytodrop a course bycollege petition without receivingWF grades.

August 6, Monday, 5:00 p.m.

Last day to submit signed original bond dissertations, abstracts, and Final
Examination Reports to Graduate School Editorial Office.
Last day to submit original bond theses and abstracts to Graduate School
Editorial Office.
Last day to submit Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees to
Graduate Student Records Office.

August 9, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.

Grades for degree candidates due in Office of the University Registrar.

August 10, Friday

All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.

August 10, Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Reports of colleges on degree candidates due in Graduate School
Records Office.

August 11, Saturday
Commencement.

August 13, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Terms B and C due in Registrar's Office.

NOTE: For some departments, deadlines for receipt of admission
applications may be earlier than those stated in the current
University Calendar.






:I7 Y


-J
w


~














General Information


































Rules, policies, fees, and courses described in
this catalog are subject to change without notice.

















INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE


The University of Florida is a public, land-grant re-
search university, one of the most comprehensive in the
United States; it encompasses virtually all academic and
professional disciplines. It is the oldest and largest of
Florida's ten universities and a member of the Association
of American Universities. Its faculty and staff are dedi-
cated to the common pursuit of the University's threefold
mission: education, research, and service.
Teaching-undergraduate and graduate through the
doctorate-is the fundamental purpose of the University.
Research and scholarship are integral to the education
process and to expanding humankind's understanding of
the natural world, the mind, and the senses. Service is the
University's obligation to share the benefits of its knowl-
edge for the public good.
These three interlocking elements span all of the Uni-
versity of Florida's academic disciplines and
multidisciplinary centers and represent the University's
obligation to lead and serve the needs of the nation, all of
Florida's citizens, and the public and private educational
systems of Florida, by pursuing and disseminating new
knowledge while building upon the past.
The University of Florida is committed to providing the
knowledge, benefits, and services it produces with quality
and effectiveness. It aspires to further national and inter-
national recognition for its initiatives and achievement in
promoting human values and improving the quality of
life.

MISSION AND GOALS

The University of Florida belongsto an ancient tradition
of great universities. We participate in an elaborate
conversation among scholars and students that extends
over space and time linking the experiences of Western
Europe with the traditions and histories of all cultures, that
explores the limits of the physical and biological uni-
verses, and that nurtures and prepares generations of
educated people to address the problems of our societies.
While this university recognizes no limits on its intellec-
tual boundaries, and our faculty and students remain free
to teach and learn, to explore wherever the mind and
imagination lead, we live in a world with limits and
constraints. Out of the conflict between intellectual
aspirations and the limitations of environment comes the
definition of the University's goals.
Teaching.-American colleges and universities share
the fundamental educational mission of teaching stu-
dents. The undergraduate experience, based in the arts
and sciences, remains at the core of higher education in
America. The formation of educated people, the transfor-
mation of mind through learning, and the launching of a


lifetime of intellectual growth: these goals remain central
to every university. This undergraduate foundation of
American higher education has grown more complex as
the knowledge we teach has grown more complex. Where
once we had a single track through the arts and sciences
leading to a degree, we now have multiple tracks leading
to many degrees in arts and sciences as well as in a variety
of professional schools. Yet even with many degrees,
American university undergraduate education still rests
on the fundamental knowledge of the liberal arts and
sciences.
In our academic world we recognize two rather impre-
cisely defined categories of higher education: colleges
and universities. The traditional American college spe-
cializes in a carefully crafted four-year undergraduate
program, generally focused on the arts and sciences.
Universities extend the range of this undergraduate edu-
cation to include advanced or graduate study leading to
the Ph.D. Most American universities also include a
variety of undergraduate and graduate professional pro-
grams and master's degree programs. The University of
Florida shares these traditions. As an American university,
we have a major commitment to undergraduate educa-
tion as the foundation of our academic organization, and
we pursue graduate education for the Ph.D. and ad-
vanced degrees in professional fields.
We are, in addition, a major public, comprehensive,
land-grant, research university. Each of these adjectives
defines one of our characteristics, and through frequent
repetition, this description takes on the style of a ritual
incantation: rhythmic, reverent, and infrequently exam-
ined. What, then, does each of these key words mean?
Major.-Here, at the head of the list, we find one of our
most important aspirations. We will be, we must be, and
we are a major university. We define ourselves in
comparison to the best universities we can find. We need
not be the absolutely unambiguously best, but we must be
among the best universities in the world. Exact ranking of
the best universities is a meaningless exercise, but most of
us can name 60 great universities. By whatever indicator
of quality we choose, our university should fall into this
group. If we define a group of universities who share our
adjectives (major, public, comprehensive, land grant,
research), then we fall into a group of perhaps the best 15
in this country.
Public.-We exist thanks to the commitment and in-
vestment of the people of the State of Florida. Generations
of tax dollars constructed the facilities we enjoy and have
paid the major portion of our operating budget. The
graduates of this institution, educated with tax dollars,
provide the majority of our private funding. Our state
legislators created the conditions that permitour facultyto
educate our students, pursue their research, conduct their
clinical practice, and serve their statewide constituencies.
3





4/GENERAL INFORMATION


We exist, then, within the public sector, responsible and
responsive to the needs of the citizens of our state. The
obligations we assume as a public university determine
many of our characteristics.
We have many more undergraduates than graduates;
we respond quickly to the needs of the state's economy;
we accommodate complex linkages with other state
universities, community colleges, and K-12 public and
private institutions; and we operate in cooperative sym-
biosis with our state's media. We also experience an often
too-close interaction with the political process. Private
universities, that have a different profile, do not respond
in the same ways to these issues. We, as a public
university, must maintain close, continuous, and effective
communication with our many publics.

Comprehensive.-This adjective recognizes the uni-
versal reach of our pursuit of knowledge. As a matter of
principle, we exclude no field from our purview. We
believe that our approach to knowledge and learning, to
understanding and wisdom, requires us to be ready to
examine any field, cultivate any discipline, and explore
any topic. Resource limits, human or financial, may
constrain us from cultivating one or another academic
subspecialty, but we accept, in principle, no limit on our
field of view. Even when we struggle with budget prob-
lems and must reduce a program or miss an intellectual
opportunity, we do so only to meet the practical con-
straints of our current environment. We never relinquish
the commitment to the holistic pursuit of knowledge.

Land-Grant.-Florida belongs to the set of American
universities whose mandate includes a commitment to
the development and transmission of practical knowl-
edge. As one of the land-grant universities identified by
the Morrill Act of 1862, Florida has a special focus on
agriculture and engineering and a mandate to deliver the
practical benefits of university knowledge to every county
in the state. In our university, the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences and the College of Engineering


respond to this definition most obviously; but over time,
the entire University has to come to recognize its commit-
ment to translating the benefit of abstract and theoretical
knowledge into the marketplace to sustain the economic
growth that supports us all.
This commitment permeates the institutional culture
and defines us as one of some 72 such institutions in
America. The land-grant university is, of course, a pecu-
liarly American invention and captures one of the power-
ful cultural beliefs of our country: that knowledge passes
the test of utility by remaining vitally connected to indus-
try and commerce.
Research.-Research defines this university. Our fac-
ulty dedicate themselves not only to the bedrock function
of education, not only to the land-grant function of
service, but equally to the essential activity of research.
By research we mean the effort to expand our under-
standing of the natural world, the world of the mind, and
the world of the senses. We define research to include the
theoretical abstractions of the mathematician, the experi-
mental discoveries of the geneticist, the insights of the
semiotician, the re-creations of the historian, or the analy-
sis of the anthropologist. We define research to capture
the business professor's analysis of economic organiza-
tion, the architect's design, and the musician's interpreta-
tion orthe artist's special vision. Research by agronomists
improves crops, and research by engineers enhances
materials. Medical and clinical research cures and pre-
vents disease. The list of research fields continues as
endlessly as the intellectual concerns of our faculty and
the academic vision of our colleges.
We must publish university research, whatever the
field. The musician who never performs, the scientist
whose work never appears for review by colleagues, the
historian whose note cards never become a book may
have accomplished much, but their accomplishments
remain incomplete. When we say research, we mean
research and creative activity that contributes to the
international public conversation about the advancement
of knowledge.


GRAUAT DEN AN YER OF SRIC


1999 Present
Winfred M. Phillips, Dean

1998-1999
M. Jack Ohanian, Interim Dean

1993-1998
Karen A. Holbrook, Dean

July-September 1993
Gene W. Hemp, Acting Dean

1985-1993
Madelyn M. Lockhart, Dean


1983-1985
Donald R. Price, Acting Dean

1980-1982
Francis G. Stehli, Dean

1979-1980
F. Michael Wahl, Acting Dean

1973-1979
Harry H. Sisler, Dean

1971-1973
Alex G. Smith, Acting Dean


1969-1971
Harold P. Hanson, Dean

1952-1969
L. E. Grinter, Dean

1951-1952
C. F. Byers, Acting Dean

1938-1951
T. M. Simpson, Dean

1930-1938
James N. Anderson, Dean





THE GRADUATE SCHOOL/5


Graduate education is an integral component of a major
research university that impacts education at all levels.
The mission of graduate education at the University of
Florida isto produce individuals with advanced knowledge
in their fields, who appreciate learning and are constant
learners, and who are prepared to address creatively issues
of significance to the local and global community for
improving the quality of life. Essential to this mission is an
environment that fosters

4 effective transmission of knowledge for future
generations.

4 inquiry and critical analysis.

4 acquisition of skills contributing to success and
leadership in academic and creative arenas and in
the world of practice.

4 application ofthat knowledge in service to Florida,
the nation, and the international community.


VISION

The vision is a university internationally recognized for
its graduates, graduate faculty, and scholarly achievements.
This university produces intellectually energized individu-
als who excel at future careers in diverse settings, and who
can provide bold leadership in new directions. Important
signs of this recognition include

1 graduates recognized for strength of preparation in
their chosen discipline, for abilities to solve prob-
lems in new environments, and for high standards
of excellence in scholarly activity and profes-
sional practice.

1 significant scholarly, creative achievements and
service that contribute to improvement of human
society and the natural environment.

4 a highly qualified, diverse student population.

/ strong disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs
that prepare graduates to assume their roles in a
changing world.

4 evidence of service in their disciplines by students
and faculty at state, national, and international
levels.


The Graduate School consists of the Dean, who is also
Vice President for Research; Senior Associate Dean; the
Graduate Council; and the Graduate Faculty. General
policies and standards of the Graduate School are estab-
lished by the Graduate Faculty. Any policy change must be
approved by the graduate deans and the Graduate Coun-
cil. The Graduate School is responsible for the enforce-
ment of minimum general standards of graduate work in
the University and for the coordination of the graduate
programs of the various colleges and divisions of the
University. The responsibility for the detailed operations
of graduate programs is vested in the individual colleges,
schools, divisions, and departments. In most of the col-
leges an assistant dean or other administrator is directly
responsible for graduate study in that college.
The Graduate Council assists the Dean in being the
agent of the Graduate Faculty for execution of policy
related to graduate study and associated research. The
Council, which is chaired by the graduate dean, considers
petitions and policy changes. Members of the Graduate
Faculty are appointed by the academic unit (department
and/or college) in which the graduate program is located
with the approval of the graduate dean.
No faculty member may serve on supervisory commit-
tees or direct master's theses and doctoral dissertations
without having been appointed to the Graduate Faculty.
The level of duties for each Graduate Faculty member is
determined by the academic unit.


HISTORY
Graduate study atthe University of Florida existed while
the University was still on its Lake City campus. However,
the first graduate degrees, two Master of Arts with a major
in English, were awarded on the Gainesville campus in
1906. The first Master of Science was awarded in 1908,
with a major in entomology. The first programs leading to
the Ph.D. were initiated in 1930, and the first degrees were
awarded in 1934, one with a major in chemistry and the
other with a major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was
awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phenomenal
growth at the University of Florida. In 1930, 33 degrees
were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were
awarded in 16 fields. In 1998-99, the total number of
graduate degrees awarded was 2,513 in more than 100
fields. The proportion of Ph.D. degrees, after the initial
rapid growth, remained relatively static during the early
1980s but increased significantly between 1987-88 and
1993-94, growing from 304 to 424. In 1998-99, the
University of Florida awarded 434 Ph.D. degrees.


MISSION


ORGANIZATION


THE GRDAESHO





6/ GENERAL INFORMATION


DEFINITIONS

Academic Degree.-Degree is the title to be conferred by
the University upon completion of the academic program, for
example, Doctor of Philosophy. Some degrees include the
name of the field of study (Master of Architecture, Master of
Education). Others (Master of Arts, Master of Science) do not.
Degree names are listed below in boldface.
Graduate Program.-The program is the primary field of
study of a graduate student. This is the student's major.
Programs offered at the University of Florida are approved by
the Graduate Council, University Senate, and the Board of
Regents. The program name along with the degree appears
on the student's transcript. Programs are enumerated under
the degree name in the list below.
Concentration.-At the graduate level, the concentration
is a subprogram offered within a graduate major. Each
concentration is approved by the Graduate Council. The
concentration, as well as the degree and program, may
appear on the student transcript. Concentrations are listed
in italics below their corresponding programs.
Minor.-A minor is a block of course work completed in
any department, other than the major department, approved
for master's or doctoral programs as listed in this catalog. If a
minor is chosen, the supervisory committee must include a
representative from the minor field. The minimum amount of
credit required for a minor varies from 6 to 15 credits
according to the program. The minor appears on the student's
transcript along with the program name and the degree
awarded.
Specialization.-Specialization is an informal designation
used by departments to indicate areas of research or scholarly
strength, and has no formal significance. Track and emphasis
are similar unofficial terms. No tracks, emphases, or special-
izations appear in official lists in this catalog or on the student
transcript.
Graduate Certificate.-A department or similar adminis-
trative unit may offer a graduate certificate along with a
graduate degree. The certificate indicates that the student
took a required number of courses in a special area. It
requires Graduate Council approval but is not listed on the
student transcript.
Multi-College Programs.-When one degree program is
offered through more than one college, it is referred to as a
multi-college program.
Combined Degree Program.--This is a combined
bachelor's and master's degree program of study which
allows an undergraduate student to take graduate level
courses prior to completion of the bachelor's degree and to
count the graduate hours (6 to 21) toward both degrees.
Students admitted into a combined program normally have
at least a 3.2 grade point average and a score of at least 1100
on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE. Each
program must be approved by the Graduate Council and the
University Senate.
Catalog Year.-The set of academic requirements a stu-
dent must fulfill is based on the rules in force in the academic
year of initial enrollment in a degree seeking status or, if the
studenttakes time off, the academic year of readmission. This
is known as the catalog year.


Joint Degree Program.-A course of study leading to a
graduate degree and a professional degree or two graduate
degrees in different programs is called a joint degree pro-
gram. The program must be approved by the Graduate
Council and normally 6 to 12 credit hours of graduate level
courses are counted toward both degrees. Joint degree pro-
grams are listed in this catalog.
Concurrent Degree Program.-Concurrent study on an
individualized basis leading to two graduate degrees in two
graduate programs or two master's degrees in the same major
is called a concurrent degree program. Such a program is
initiated by the student and requires prior approval of each
department and the Graduate School. If the student is
approved to pursue two master's degrees, no more than 6
hours of course work from one degree program may be
applied toward meeting the requirements for the second
master's degree.


GRADUATE DEGREES

AND PROGRAMS

Refer to the section of this catalog entitled Fields of Instruc-
tion for specializations in the approved programs.

NONTHESIS DEGREES
(Asterisk (*) indicates thesis option)
Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)

Master of Agribusiness (M.Ag.B.) with program in Food
and Resource Economics.

Master of Agriculture (M.Ag.) with program in one of the
following:
Agricultural Education Botany
Communication Food and Resource
Animal Sciences: Economics
Animal Science Human Resource Development
Dairy and Poultry Microbiology and Cell Science
Sciences Soil and Water Science

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) with program in one of the
following:
Anthropology Philosophy
French Political Science
Geography Political Science-
Latin International Relations
Latin American Studies Psychology
Linguistics Spanish
Mathematics

Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.)

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) with a program in
Business Administration and a concentration in one of the
following:
Arts Administration Human Resources Management
Competitive Strategy International Studies
Decision and Information Latin American Business
Sciences Management
Entrepreneurship Marketing
Finance Private Enterprise and Public
Global Management Policy
Graham-Buffett Security Analysis Real Estate
Health Administration Sports Administration

Master of Civil Engineering (M.C.E.)*





THE GRADUATE SCHOOL/ 7


Master of Education (M.Ed.) with program in one of the
following:
Curriculum and Instruction Mental Health Counseling
Early Childhood Education Reading Education
Educational Leadership Research and Evaluation Methodology
Educational Psychology School Counseling Guidance
Elementary Education School Psychology
English Education Science Education
Foreign Language Education Social Studies Education
Foundations of Education Special Education
Marriage and Family Counseling Student Personnel in
Mathematics Education Higher Education

Master of Engineering (M.E.) with program in one of the following:
Aerospace Engineering* Electrical and Computer
Agricultural and Biological Engineering*
Engineering* Engineering Mechanics*
Biomedical Engineering* Engineering Science*
Chemical Engineering* Environmental Engineering Sciences*
Civil Engineering* Industrial and Systems Engineering*
Coastal and Oceanographic Materials Science and Engineering*
Engineering* Mechanical Engineering*
Computer Engineering* Nuclear Engineering Sciences*

Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences (M.E.S.S.)

Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.)

Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.)

Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.)

Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) with program in one of the
following:
Occupational Therapy* Rehabilitation Counseling*
Physical Therapy*

Master of Health Science Education (M.H.S.E.)

Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.)

Master of Latin (M.L.)

Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law)

Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.Tax.)

Master of Physical Therapy (M.P.T.)

Master of Public Health (M.P.H.)

Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) with program in one of
the following:
Astronomy Mathematics
Botany Physics
Chemistry Psychology
Geography Zoology
Geology

Master of Statistics (M.Stat.)

Engineer (Engr.)-A special degree requiring one year of graduate work
beyond the master's degree. For a list of the approved programs, see those
listed above for the Master of Engineering degree (thesis optional).

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)-A special degree requiring one year of
graduate work beyond the master's degree. For a list of the approved
programs, see those listed below, for the Doctor of Education degree.


THESIS DEGREES
(Dagger (f) indicates nonthesis option)

Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)

Master of Arts (M.A.) with program in one of the following:
Anthropology Geography
Art Education Applications of Geographic
Art History Technologies
Business Administration: Germant
Decision and Information Historyt
Sciences Latin
Finance Latin American Studies
Insurance Linguisticst
International Business Mathematicst
Management Museology
Marketing Philosophyt
Real Estate and Urban Political Sciencet
Analysis Political Science-
Classical Studies International
Communication Sciences Relationst
and Disorderst Psychologyt
Economics Religion
English Sociology!
Frencht Spanisht

Master of Arts in Education-For a list of the programs, see
those listed for the Master of Education degree.

Master of Arts in Mass Communication (M.A.M.C.)t

Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.)

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) with program in one of the following:
Art
Creative Writing
Theatre

Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.)

Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.)

Master of Music (M.M.) with program in one of the following:
Music
Music Education

Master of Science (M.S.) with program in one of the following:
Aerospace Engineeringt Coastal and Oceanographic
Agricultural Education and Engineeringt
Communication Computer and Information
Farming Systems Sciencest
Agricultural and Biological Computer Engineeringt
Engineering Dental Sciences:
Agronomyt Endontics
Animal Sciences: Orthodontics
Animal Science Periodontics
Dairy and Poultry Sciences Prosthodontics
Astronomy Electric and Computer
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Engineeringt
Biomedical Engineeringt Engineering Mechanicst
Botany Engineering Sciencet
Business Administration: Entomology and Nemotologyt
Decision and Environmental Engineering
Information Sciences' Sciencest
Finance Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Insurance Food and Resource Economicst
Management Food Science and
Marketing Human Nutrition:t
Real Estate and Urban Analysist Food Science
Chemical Engineeringf Nutritional Sciences
Chemistry Forest Resources
Civil Engineeringt and Conservation


Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.)






8/GENERAL INFORMATION


Master of Science (M.S.) with program in one of the following
(con't):


Geography
Geology
Horticultural Science:
Environmental Horticulture
Horticultural Sciencest
Human Resource Development
Industrial and Systems
Engineering
Interdisciplinary Ecologyt
Materials Science
and Engineeringt
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineeringt
Medical Sciences
Clinical Investigation


Microbiology and Cell Science
Nuclear Engineering Sciencest
Physics
Plant Molecular and
Cellular Biology
Plant Pathologyt
Psychology:t
Clinical and Health
Psychology
Psychology
Soil and Water Sciencet
Veterinary Medical Sciences
Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation
Zoologyt


Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.)

Master of Science in Building Construction (M.S.B.C.)

Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences (M.S.E.S.S.)
Biomechanics
Motor Learning/Control
Special Physical Education

Master of Science in Health Science Education (M.S.H.S.E.)

Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.)t

Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S.P.) with program in
Pharmaceutical Sciences:
Medicinal Chemistry Pharmacy Health Care
Pharmacodynamics Administration
Pharmacy

Master of Science in Recreational Studies (M.S.R.S.)t

Master of Science in Statistics (M.S.Stat.)

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) with program in one of the following:
Curriculum and Instruction Mental Health Counseling
Educational Leadership School Counseling and
Educational Psychology Guidance
Foundations of Education Research and Evaluation
Higher Education Methodology
Administration School Psychology
Marriage and Family Special Education
Counseling Student Personnel in Higher
Education

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with program in one of the following:
Aerospace Engineering Chemical Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Chemistry
Engineering Civil Engineering
Agricultural Education Coastal and Oceanographic
and Communication Engineering
Agronomy Communication Sciences
Animal Sciences and Disorders
Anthropology Computer Engineering
Architecture Counseling Psychology
Astronomy Curriculum and Instruction
Biochemistry and Molecular Economics
Biology Educational Leadership
Biomedical Engineering Educational Psychology
Botany Electrical and Computer
Business Administration: Engineering
Accounting Engineering Mechanics
Decision and Information Sciences English
Finance Entomology and Nematology
Insurance Environmental Engineering
Management Sciences
Marketing Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Real Estate and Urban Analysis Food and Resource Economics


Food Science and Human
Nutrition:
Food Science
Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and
Conservation
Foundations of Education
Geography
Geology
German
Health and Human
Performance
Athletic Training/Sport Medicine
Biomechanics
Exercise Physiology
Health Behavior
Motor Learning/Control
Natural Resource Recreation
Sport and Exercise Physiology
Therapeutic Recreation
Tourism
Health Services Research
Higher Education Administration
History
Horticultural Science:
Environmental Horticulture
Horticultural Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Linguistics
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mass Communication
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medical Sciences:
Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology
Genetics
Immunology and Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Physiology and Pharmacology


Mental Health Counseling
Microbiology and Cell Science
Music
Music Education
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Nursing Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences:
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmacy Health Care
Administration
Philosophy
Physics
Plant Molecular and
Cellular Biology
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Political Science-
International Relations
Psychology:
Clinical and Health
Psychology
Psychology
Rehabilitation Science
Research and Evaluation
Methodology
Romance Languages:
French
Spanish
School Counseling and
Guidance
School Psychology
Sociology
Soil and Water Science
Special Education
Statistics
Student Personnel in
Higher Education
Veterinary Medical Sciences
Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation
Zoology


NONTRADITIONAL

PROGRAMS


CONCURRENT GRADUATE PROGRAMS

A graduate student who wishes to pursue two graduate
degrees in two graduate programs or two master's degrees
within the same program concurrently must have the
written approval of the representative of each department
involved and the Dean of the Graduate School. Any student
interested in pursuing concurrent degrees should discuss
the proposed study with the Graduate School's Student
Records staff prior to applying for the programs. If the
request is approved, the student must be officially admitted
to both programs through regular procedures. If the student
is approved to pursuetwo master's programs, no morethan
six hours of course work from one degree program may be
applied toward meeting the requirements for the second
master's degree. These six hours must be by petition to the
Dean of the Graduate School.






NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS /9


JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS

Any graduate student wishing to participate in a joint
program must be admitted to both programs. Enrollment
in one program may precede enrollment in the other
according to time lines set by the approved program
proposal. A minimum of three semester hours registration
in the Graduate School in the fall or spring is required in the
term in which a student intends to graduate (minimum of
two semester hours in summer); this course work must be
credit that will apply toward the degree requirements.
The departments, schools, and colleges listed below are
approved to offer programs lead ngto the concurrent award
of advanced degrees. See the departmental graduate
coordinator for details.


Academic Units


Business Administration/
Exercise and Sport Sciences

Business Administration/
Industrial and Systems
Engineering

Business Administration/
Law

Business Administration/
Medicine

Business Administration/
Pharmacy

Business Administration-
Real Estate/Law

Accounting/Law

Anthropology

Building Construction


Educational Leadership/
Law

Environmental Engineering
Sciences /Law


Exercise and Sport
Sciences/Law

Forest Resources and
Conservation/Law


History/Law


Journalism and
Communications/Law

Latin American Studies/
Law


Degrees


M.B.A./M.E.S.S.


M.B.A./B.S.I.S.E.



M.B.A./J.D.


M.B.A./M.S. or
Ph.D.

M.B.A./Pharm.D.


M.A./J.D.


M.Acc./J.D.

M.A. or Ph.D./J.D.

M.B.C. or M.S.B.C./
J.D.

Ph.D./J.D.


M.S. or M.E./J.D.


M.E.S.S. or
M.S.E.S.S./J.D.

M.F.R.C., M.S,
or Ph.D./Law

M.A. or Ph.D./J.D.

M.A.M.C. or Ph.D.
J.D.

M.A./J.D.


Medical Sciences/Law

Political Science/Law

Political Science-Public
Affairs/Law

Psychology/Law

Sociology/Law

Urban and Regional
Planning/Law

Medical Sciences/
Educational Leadership

Medical Sciences/Medicine

Pharmaceutical Sciences/
Pharmacy


M.S. or Ph.D./J.D.

Ph.D./J.D.

M.A./J.D.


Ph.D./J.D.

M.A:/J.D.

M.A.U.R.P./J.D.


M.S./M.Ed.


Ph.D./M.D.

Ph.D.Pharm.D.


COMBINED BACHELOR'S/MASTER'S DEGREE
PROGRAMS

The University of Florida offers a number of bachelor's/
master's programs for superior students in which 6 to 21
hours of graduate-level courses are counted for both de-
grees. Courses that dual count must satisfy the transfer of
credit requirements. The listing below is current at the time
of printing. However, since new programs are being
approved each month, interested students should consult
with their graduate coordinators about the availability of
programs in that area and admission requirements.


Academic Unit


Accounting

Aerospace Engineering

Agricultural and Biological
Engineering

Animal Science

Art with Concentration in
Digital Arts and Sciences

Biomedical Engineering

Business Administration-
Decision and Information
Sciences

Computer and Information
Science

Computer Engineering


Degree


B.S.Ac./M.Acc.

M.S./M.E. or M.S.

B.S./M.S.* or M.E.


B.S./M.Ag. or M.S.


B.F.A./M.A.


B.S./M.E. or M.S.

B.S.B.A./M.A.



B.S./M.S.


B.S./M.S. or M.E.






10/GENERAL INFORMATION


Computer Engineering with
Concentration in Digital
Arts and Sciences

Electrical and Computer
Engineering

Engineering Science

Environmental Engineering
Sciences

Exercise and Sport
Sciences

Forest Resources and
Conservation


Geography


Geology


Health Science Education

History

Interdisciplinary Ecology

Materials Science and
Engineering


Mathematics


Nuclear and Radiological
Engineering


Nursing


Physical Therapy

Plant Pathology

Political Science

Recreation, Parks, and
Tourism

Sociology

Statistics


B.S./M.S.



B.S./M.E. or M.S.


B.S./M.E. or M.S.

B.S./M.E. or M.S.


B.S.E.S.S./M.S.E.S.S.
or M.E.S.S.

B.S./M.S. or
M.F.R.C.

B.S. or B.A./M.S.

B.A./M.S.T. or
B.S./M.S. or M.S.T


B.S./M.H.S.E.

B.A./M.A.

B.S./M.S.


B.S./M.E. or M.S.


B.S. or B.A./M.S.

B.S./M.E. or M.S.


B.S.N./M.S.Nsg.

B.H.S./M.P.T.

B.S./M.S.

B.A./M.A.

B.S./M.S.R.S.


B.A./M.A.

B.A. or
B.S./M.Stat.


*May be earned through either College of Agriculture or
College of Engineering



STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM PROGRAMS

Traveling Scholar Program.-A traveling scholar is a
graduate student who, by mutual agreement of the appro-
priate academic authorities in both the sponsoring and


credits by the sponsoring institutions. The program will
enable a graduate student to take advantage of the special
resources available on another campus but not available on
his/her own campus. The student must obtain prior ap-
proval by the graduate coordinator from the supervisory
committee chair and the Dean of the Graduate School.
Traveling scholars are normally limited to one term on the
campus of the host university. Participation cannot be
scheduled for the final term. Interested students should
contact the Graduate Student Records Office, 304 Walker
Hall.
Cooperative Degree Programs.-In certain degree pro-
grams, faculty from other universities in the State University
System hold Graduate Faculty status at the University of
Florida. In those approved areas, the intellectual resources
of these Graduate Faculty members are available to stu-
dents at the University of Florida.


INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE CERTIFICATES
AND CONCENTRATIONS

A number of graduate programs offer interdisciplinary
enhancements in the form of concentrations, field research,
or graduate certificates. Those approved by the Graduate
Council are summarized on the following pages.

African Studies

The Center for African Studies, a National Resource
Center on Africa, funded, in part, under Title VI of the
Higher Education Act, directs and coordinates interdiscipli-
nary instruction, research, and outreach related to Africa. In
cooperation with participating departments throughout the
University, the Center offers a Certificate in African Studies
at both the master's and doctoral levels. The curriculum
provides a broad foundation for students preparing for
teaching or other professional careers in which a knowl-
edge of Africa is essential.
Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships.-Students ad-
mitted to the Graduate School in pursuit of degrees offered
by participating departments are eligible to compete for
graduate assistantships and Title VI Foreign Language and
Area Studies fellowships.
Extracurricular Activities.-The Center sponsors an an-
nual conference on an African topic, a weekly colloquium
series-BARAZA-with invited speakers, and a biweekly
film series. The Carter Lectures on Africa are held through-
out the academic year. The Center also directs an extensive
out-reach program addressed to public schools, commu-
nity colleges, and universities nationwide.
Library Resources.-The Center for African Studies pro-
vides direct support for African library acquisitions to meet
the instructional and research needs of its faculty and
students. The Africana Collection numbers over 80,000
volumes. The Map Library contains 360,000 maps and
165,000 serial photographs and satellite images and is
among the top five academic African map libraries in the U.S.
Graduate Certificate Program.-The Center for African
Studies, in cooperation with participating departments,
offers a Certificate in African Studies in conjunction with
the master's and doctoral degrees.









Requirements for the Certificate in African Studies with a
master's degree are (a) at least 18 credits of course work in
a departmental major, 15 of which should relate to Africa;
(b) 9 credits of course work related to Africa and distributed
in at least two other departments; and (c) a thesis on an
African topic.
Requirements for the Certificate in African Studies with
the doctoral degree are (a) the doctoral requirements of the
major department; (b) 18 credits of course work related to
Africa in two or more other departments; (c) a dissertation
on an African topic based on field work in Africa; and (d)
knowledge of a language appropriate to the area of special-
ization.
Inquiries about the various programs and activities of the
Center should be addressed to the Director, Center for
African Studies, 427 Grinter Hall.

Agroforestry

The agroforestry interdisciplinary specialization is ad-
ministered through the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation. It offers facilities for interdisciplinary gradu-
ate education (M.S., Ph.D.) by combining course work and
research around a thematic field focusing on agroforestry,
especially in the context of tropical land use. Students
seeking admission to the specialization should have a
degree in one of the relevant fields such as agronomy,
forestry, horticulture, soil science, or social sciences. They
should apply to the School of Forest Resources and Conser-
vation or another department that closely represents their
background and interest. Students have the flexibility to
plan their course work, with focus on agroforestry, out of a
wide range of courses from several related disciplines.
Thesis research can be undertaken in Florida or overseas.
Degrees will be awarded through the departments in which
the candidates are enrolled.
In conjunction with the graduate degree; a student can
earn a specialization or minor in agroforestry by fulfilling
certain requirements. Students who have a primary interest
in agroforestry and undertake graduate research on an
agroforestry topic can seek the specialization. Those who
have an active interest and some training in agroforestry,
but do not conduct graduate research on an agroforestry
topic, can earn a minor. Candidates who fulfill the appli-
cable requirements can have their transcripts inscribed,
upon request, with the citation Specialization in Agroforestry
or Minor in Agroforestry.
Requirements for either option include completion of
FNR 5335-Agroforestry and an appropriate number of
approved supporting courses. These courses should be
distributed over at least two departments other than the
candidate's major department to provide the student with
the background necessary to function in multidisciplinary
teams and in association with professionals from other
disciplines. Individuals with a strong biological back-
ground are encouraged to take courses in the social sci-
ences, and vice versa.
Candidates for the specialization or minor in agroforestry
should include on the graduate committees at least one
faculty member representing the agroforestry interest. This
faculty member, as designated by the Agroforestry Program
Advisory Committee, will counsel the student on the selec-


INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES/ 11


tion of courses and the research topic.
Further information may be obtained from the Agrofor-
estry Program Leader at 118 Newins-Ziegler Hall, (352)
846-0880, fax (352) 846-1277, and e-mail
pkn@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu.


Animal Molecular and Cell Biology

The interdisciplinary concentration in Animal Molecular
and Cell Biology (AMCB) provides graduate students in the
animal and veterinary sciences with an understanding of
principles of molecular and cell biology and their applica-
tion to animal health and production. Emphasis is placed
on participation in molecular and cell biology research and
on providing an intellectual environment in which cross-
fertilization between disciplines can flourish. Graduate
faculty from the Departments of Animal Science, Dairy and
Poultry Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
and Zoology and the College of Veterinary Medicine par-
ticipate in the program. The AMCB affords graduate
students access to diverse research facilities required for
studies in cellular and molecular biology, reproductive
biology, virology, immunology, and endocrinology. Facili-
ties include those for recombinant DNA research, experi-
mental surgery, in vitro culture of cells, tissue and organ
explants, manipulation of embryos, vaccine production,
and recombinant protein engineering.
Ph.D. degrees are awarded through participating depart-
ments with the interdisciplinary concentration in animal
molecular and cell biology. Typical entering students will
have a strong background in the animal or veterinary
sciences. Graduate degree programs are designed by each
student's faculty advisory committee, headed by the major
adviser who is affiliated with the AMCB. All students are
required to complete a core curriculum, obtain cross-
disciplinary training through rotations in laboratories of
participating faculty, participate in the recombinant DNA
workshop offered by the Interdisciplinary Center for Bio-
technology Research, and participate in theAMCB seminar
series.
Requirements for admission into the AMCB are the same
as for the faculty adviser's home department and college.
Financial assistance for graduate study is available through
assistantships and fellowships from departmental sources
and the AMCB. Contact the Director (D. C. Sharp, Depart-
ment of Animal Science) or Codirector (F. A. Simmen,
Department of Dairy and Poultry Sciences) for more infor-
mation.


Biological Sciences

The Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research con-
ducts research on all aspects of the biology of sea turtles.
Researchers at the Center, in collaboration with students
and faculty of various departments, take an interdiscipli-
nary approach to address the complex problems of sea
turtle biology and conservation. Scientists from the Center
have investigated questions of sea turtle biology around the
world, from the molecular level to the global level, from
studies of population structure based on mitochondrial
DNA to the effects of ocean circulation patterns on the






12/GENERAL INFORMATION


movements and distribution of sea turtles. Long-term field
studies of the Center are primarily conducted at two re-
search stations in the Bahamas and the Azores. For further
information, contact the Director, Archie Carr Center for
Sea Turtle Research, 223 Bartram.
The Whitney Laboratory (WL) is the institute for marine
biomedical research and biotechnology of the University of
Florida. Since its founding in 1974, the Whitney Labora-
tory, near St. Augustine, has been dedicated to the use of
marine organisms for solving fundamental problems in
experimental marine biology.
The academic staff of the Laboratory consists of 10
permanent faculty members, with 30 to 40 associates,
students, and visiting scientists. Dr. Peter A.V. Anderson is
the interim director.
Fields of research at the WL include chemosensory and
visual physiology and biochemistry, control of electrical
excitability, developmental and cell biology, molecular
biology, toxicology, and peptide pharmacology. Research
animals range phylogenetically from jellyfish to aquatic
vertebrates. The common theme unifying this diversity is a
focus on communication between cells and tissues, i.e., the
interactions of cell membranes with signaling molecules.
Research at the Whitney Laboratory attracts graduate
students and visiting scientists from across the U.S. and
from abroad. Students enroll in the graduate programs of
the College of Medicine and the Departments of Fisheries
and Aquatic Sciences, Zoology. Their course work (in
Gainesville) and their dissertation research (at the Whitney
Lab) are guided by scientists from the WL who are graduate
faculty members of University of Florida teaching depart-
ments. An undergraduate research training program at the
Laboratory is sponsored by both private and governmental
agencies.
The Laboratory is situated on a narrow barrier island,
with both the Atlantic Ocean and the Intercoastal Water-
way within a few hundred feet of the facility. The campus
is in the town of Marineland, about 18 miles south of St.
Augustine, and 80 miles east of Gainesville.
For further information, write the Scientific Director,
Whitney Laboratory, 9505 Ocean Shore Blvd., St. August-
ine, FL 32086-8623, telephone (904)461-4000, fax
(904)461-4008.
The University of Florida Marine Laboratory at Seahorse
Key is a field station committed to providing (a) support for
research by students, faculty, and visiting scientists, (b) an
outstanding teaching program in marine related subjects,
and (c) support from public education related to marine,
estuarine, and coastal resources of Florida. Seahorse Key is
57 miles west of Gainesville on the Gulf Coast, 3 miles
offshore and opposite Cedar Key. Facilities include a
research vessel, several smaller outboard-powered boats
for shallow water and inshore work, a 20 x 40 foot research
and teaching building, and a 10-room residence, with two
kitchens, a dining lounge, and dormitory accommodations
for 24 persons.


Chemical Physics

The Center for Chemical Physics, with the participation
ofthe faculty ofthe Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and


Chemical Engineering, is concerned with graduate educa-
tion and research in the theoretical, experimental, and
computational aspects of problems in the borderline be-
tween chemistry and physics. Graduate students join one of
the above departments and follow a special curriculum.
The student receives, in addition to the Ph.D. degree, a
Certificate in Chemical Physics. For information, contact
the Director, New Physics Building.


Ecological Engineering

The Graduate Certificate in Ecological Engineering is for
graduate engineering students wishing to develop expertise
in ecological solutions to engineering problems. Students
interested in the certificate must apply for admission to the
program through The Department of Environmental Engi-
neering Sciences. The program is open to individuals in any
graduate program who hold an undergraduate engineering
degree, or who complete additional undergraduate engi-
neering articulation courses. This additional course work
is required to bring the student's background to the mini-
mum level required for engineers by the Accreditation
Board for Engineering and Technology.
The program consists of a minimum of 15 semester hours
of course credit, and a research project with content
materially related to some aspect of ecological engineering.
If appropriate, the 15 semester hours of graduate course
credit may count toward the minimum requirements for the
graduate degree. The student's terminal project, master's
thesis, or an individual studies project may serve to satisfy
the ecological engineering project requirement. For more
information, contact the graduate coordinator in the De-
partment of Environmental Engineering Sciences, P.O. Box
116450, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 or
call (352)392-9377.


Geographic Information Sciences

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have revolution-
ized the way that land features are located, measured,
inventoried, managed, planned, and studied. GIS provides
the theories and methods for original measurements of
location and topography, physical and biological attributes,
and distribution of cultural components through data stor-
age, analysis, modeling, mapping, and data display. GIS
applications are diverse. They include determining the
suitability of land for different uses, planning future land
uses for different objectives, setting cadastral boundaries
for the purpose of property recognition and taxation and
regulation, analyzing land and land-cover properties for
both resource inventories and scientific studies, and siting
commercial enterprises.
Users and producers of GIS include engineers, geogra-
phers, urban and regional planners, biologists and ecolo-
gists, land resource managers, anthropologists and archae-
ologists, sociologists, public health professionals and medi-
cal researchers; county land-management and property tax
assessors, law enforcement officers, land-development
companies, utility companies, retail stores, and others.









Undergraduate and graduate students who learn to use GIS
technology are in high demand and so start at higher
salaries than their non-GIS peers. As a result the GIS
community at the University of Florida has developed the
Interdisciplinary Concentration for Geographic Informa-
tion Sciences (ICGIS).
The ICGIS is designed to integrate existing GIS resources
on campus, for graduate students, as a response to changing
regulatory environments in institutions and governments at
all levels. This new concentration has established a stan-
dard set of courses and activities that would allow graduate
students to become experts in the creation, study, and use
of geographic information. Such graduates would be in
strong positions to meet future regulatory requirements for
certification as professionals. Structurally, the ICGIS has
established a five-category curriculum that would add
several courses to the standard M.S., M.A., M.E., or Ph.D.
requirements and would result in official recognition of
having completed the GIS concentration by statements on
transcripts and a certificate
For more information, Dr. Michael Binford, University of
Florida, P.O. Box 117315, Gainesville, FL 32611 or call
(352)392-4652.


Gerontological Studies

Through the Center for Gerontological Studies, students
and faculty from diverse disciplines may study or conduct
research in gerontology.
Programs are developed both within and outside the
University to benefit older persons and to develop career-
related experiences for graduate and professional students.
The Center for Gerontological Studies offers the minor in
gerontology and the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology
for master's, specialist, and doctoral students in conjunc-
tion with graduate programs in a variety of disciplines and
professions. Forthe minor, students must complete 6 (at the
master's level) or 12 (at the doctoral level) hours of ap-
proved aging courses outside their major department, in-
cluding GEY 6646,the required graduate-level corecourse.
Certificate requirements include a minimum of 12 hours in
approved gerontology courses and an approved interdisci-
plinary research project in gerontology or a topic related to
geriatrics. A limited number of graduate assistantships for
students accepted into the Graduate Certificate in Geron-
tology program are available from the Center.
The Center disseminates information derived from re-
search on gerontology-related aspects of anthropology,
architecture, education, exercise science, geography, health
administration, humanities, law, medicine, nursing, nutri-
tion, occupational therapy, psychology, recreation, sociol-
ogy, and other fields. Courses in gerontology are available
in the above areas.
The Center sponsors special conferences on gerontology
and several in-service training workshops and seminars for
academic and continuing education credit.
For information about the Center's Graduate Certificate
Program, write the Associate Director, Center for Geronto-
logical Studies, 2326 Turlington Hall or visit our web page
at http://www.geron.ufl.edu.


INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES / 13


Health Physics and Medical Physics

Two allied interdisciplinary options, health physics and
medical physics, are offered as a cooperative effort of the
Departments of Environmental Engineering Sciences and
Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, College of Engi-
neering, and the College of Medicine. Degrees are granted
by the College of Engineering and include Master of Sci-
ence, Master of Engineering, Engineer, and Doctor of
Philosophy.
Health Physics is the science devoted to protecting man
and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation
while advancing its beneficial use. Students may seek
admission to either the Department of Environmental Engi-
neering Sciences or the Department of Nuclear and Radio-
logical Engineering. The study program includes depart-
mental requirements, common health physics courses, and
additional courses permitting specialization in radioactive
waste management, medical health physics, or power
reactor health physics. Opportunities for research and
practical training are available through cooperation with
departments in the health sciences, with the University's
Division of Environmental Health and Safety, and with
industry. The University of Florida is approved for partici-
pation in a variety of Department of Energy Fellowship
Programs, including health physics, radioactive waste, and
environmental restoration. Prospective students are eli-
gible for National Academy of Nuclear Training fellow-
ships, Health Physics Society fellowships, and numerous
research supported assistantships. For additional informa-
tion, contact either the Department of Environmental Engi-
neering Sciences or the Department of Nuclear and Radio-
logical Engineering.
Medical Physics is concerned with the applications of
physical energy concepts and methods to the diagnosis and
treatment of human disease. Students enroll in the Depart-
ment of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering. Students
interested in the radiation protection aspects of the applica-
tion of radioactivity or radiation in the healing arts may
enroll in either the Department of Environmental Engineer-
ing Sciences or the Department of Nuclear and Radiologi-
cal Engineering in the medical health physics option.
Formal courses include department core requirements, a
radiation biology course, a blockof medical physics courses
taught by Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Radiol-
ogy, and Radiation Oncology faculty, and one or more
health physics courses. In addition, the program includes
clinical internships in the Departments of Radiology and
Radiation Oncology. Research opportunities and financial
support exist in the form of faculty research and projects
related to patient care.


Hydrologic Sciences

Interdisciplinary graduate studies in hydrologic sciences
are designed for science and engineering students who are
seeking advanced training in diverse aspects of water
quantity, water quality, and water use issues. The emphasis
is on providing (1) a thorough understanding of the physi-
cal, chemical, and biological processes occurring over






14 / GENERAL INFORMATION


broad spatial and temporal scales; and (2) the skills in
hydrologic policy and management based on a strong
background in natural and social sciences and engineering.
Graduate Faculty from 10 departments in three colleges
contribute tothis interdisciplinary specialization. Depend-
ing on academic background and research interests, stu-
dents may opt to receive the graduate degree in any one of
the following departments: Agricultural and Biological
Engineering, Civil Engineering, Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Food
and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Conserva-
tion, Geography, Geology, Horticultural Sciences, and Soil
and Water Science.
M.S. (thesis and nonthesis option) and Ph.D. studies are
available. The interdisciplinary graduate requirements
were developed recognizing the diversity in the academic
backgrounds and professional goals of the students. A core
curriculum (12 credits for M.S.; 18 credits for Ph.D.) pro-
vides broad training in five topics: hydrologic systems,
hydrologic chemistry, hydrologic biology, hydrologic tech-
niques and analysis, and hydrologic policy and manage-
ment. Additional elective courses (11 to 14 credits for M.S.;
30 credits for Ph.D.) allow specialization in one or more of
these topics. Research projects involving faculty from
several departments can provide the basis for thesis and
dissertation research topics.
Assistantships supported by extramural grants are avail-
able. Tuition waivers may be available to students who
qualify. Students with B.S. or M.S. degrees in any of the
following disciplines are encouraged to consider this spe-
cialization within their graduate programs: engineering
(agricultural, chemical, civil, environmental); natural sci-
ences (physics, biology, chemistry); social sciences (agri-
cultural and resource economics); forestry; and earth sci-
ences (geography, geology, soil and water science).
For more information, contact Professor Wendy Graham,
110 Rogers Hall, P.O. Box 110570, telephone (352) 392-
9113, or e-mail graham@agen.ufl.edu.

Latin American Studies

The Center for Latin American Studies coordinates teach-
ing, research, and service activities related to Latin America
and the Caribbean.
Master of Arts Degree in Latin American Studies. -The
master's degree offered through the Center is available in
two versions, both of which require a 15-credit major
concentration. The disciplinary concentration emphasizes
training and research in area and language studies, which
develop a greater understanding of Latin America's cultures
and societies. Students concentrate in one department,
which may be Anthropology, Economics, Food and Re-
source Economics, Geography, History, Political Science,
Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish), or Sociol-
ogy. This option is especially suited to the needs of students
who wish to obtain a well-rounded background in Latin
American Studies before pursuing the Ph.D. in a special-
ized discipline.
The topical concentration clusters course work and
research around thematic field focusing on contemporary
Latin American problems. Students may concentrate in
Andean studies, Brazilian studies, Caribbean studies, inter-


national communications, religion and society, and tropi-
cal conservation and development. This option builds on
prior professional or administrative experiences and pre-
pares students for technical and professional work related
to Latin America and the Caribbean.
Other requirements, common to both options, are (1) 15
credits of Latin American area and language courses in two
other departments, including one semester of LAS 6938; (2)
a reading, writing, and speaking knowledge of one Latin
American language (Spanish, Portuguese, or Haitian Creole);
and (3) a thesis on an interdisciplinary Latin American topic.
Although the M.A. in Latin American studies is a terminal
degree, many past recipients have entered the Ph.D. pro-
grams in related disciplines from which they prepare for
university teaching careers. Other graduates are employed
in the foreign service, educational and research institutions,
international organizations, government agencies, non-
profit corporations, and private companies in the United
States and Latin America.
Requirements for admission to the program are (1) a
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or univer-
sity; (2) a grade average of at least 3.2 for all upper-division
undergraduate work; (3) a combined verbal-quantitative
score of at least 1000 on the Graduate Record Examination;
(4) a TOEFL score of 550 for nonnative speakers of English;
(5) a basic knowledge of either Spanish or Portuguese; some
Latin American course work.
Juris Doctor/Master of Arts Program.-This joint degree
culminates in the Juris Doctor degree awarded by the
College of Law and the Master of Arts degree in Latin
American studies awarded by the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences. Participating students can earn both degrees
in approximately one year less than if the degrees were
pursued consecutively. The joint program provides an
opportunity for students to develop their area and topical
expertise in combination with the study of law.
Candidates for the joint program must meet entrance
requirements for and be admitted to both academic units.
Admission criteria for the M.A. program are detailed in the
Requirements for Master's Degrees section of this catalog.
For the J.D requirements, see the College of Law Catalog.
General features of the joint program are as follows: (1)
selection of a disciplinary or topic major concentration as
described above, (2) submission of a thesis on a topic
relating to law and Latin America, (3) completion of the
College of Law's advanced writing requirement (the thesis
will satisfy this requirement if certified by a member of the
law faculty), and (4) a reciprocal arrangement between the
College of Law and the Center for Latin American Studies
that enables participating students, with approval, to count
up to 12 credits toward both programs.
Graduate Certificates in Latin American Studies.-
Master's students may earn a Certificate in Latin American
Studies along with a degree in agriculture, architecture,
business administration, education, fine arts, journalism
and communications, and liberal arts and sciences.
Thesis degree candidates must have at least 12 credits of
Latin American course work distributed as follows: (1) Latin
American concentration within the major department (to
extent possible); (2) at least 3 credits of Latin American
course work in one department outside the major; (3) 3
credits of LAS 6938; (4) intermediate-mid proficiency in a









Latin American language (language courses at the 3000
level or higher will count toward the certificate); and (5) a
thesis on a Latin American topic.
Nonthesis master's degree candidates must have at least
15 credit hours of Latin American course work distributed
as follows: (1) Latin American concentration within the
major department (to extent possible); (2) at least 6 credits
of Latin American courses in two other departments; (3) 3
credits of LAS 6938; and (4) intermediate-mid proficiency
in a Latin American language (language courses atthe 3000
level or higher will count toward the certificate).
Advanced Graduate Certificate in Latin American Stud-
ies.-The Center offers the Certificate in Latin American
Studies to Ph.D. candidates in the Colleges of Agriculture,
Architecture, Business Administration, Education, Fine Arts,
Journalism and Communications, and Liberal Arts and
Sciences. Candidates for the Advanced Graduate Certifi-
cate must have at least 18 credit hours of Latin American
course work distributed as follows: (1) Latin American
concentration within the major department (to extent pos-
sible), (2) 9 credits of Latin American courses in two other
departments; (3) 3 credits of LAS 6938; (4) intermediate-
plus proficiency in one Latin American language (language
courses at the 3000 level or higher will count toward the
certificate); (5) research experience in Latin America; and
(6) a dissertation on a Latin American topic.
Certificate for J.D. Students.--Law students may earn
the Certificate in Latin American Studies in conjunction
with the J.D. degree. The curriculum consists of participa-
tion in the College of Law's summer program in Mexico or
a similar program; 6 credits of Latin American courses
outside the College of Law (including LAS 6938); a major
research paper on a Latin American topic; intermediate
mid-proficiency in a Latin American language.
Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships.-In addition
to University fellowships and assistantships, the Center for
Latin American Studies administers financial assistance
from outside sources, including Title VI fellowships and
private endowments.
Research.-The Center supports several research and
training programs that provide research opportunities and
financial support for graduate students, especially in the
Amazonian, Andean, and Caribbean regions.
Library Resources.-The University of Florida libraries
contain more than 300,000 volumes of printed works as
well as manuscripts, maps, and microforms dealing with
Latin America. Approximately 80 percent of the Latin
American collection is in Spanish, Portuguese, and French.
Holdings represent all disciplines and areas of Latin America
but are strongest in the social sciences, history, and litera-
ture, and in the Caribbean, circum-Caribbean, and Brazil-
ian areas, with increasing strength in the Andean and
Southern Cone regions.
Other Activities.-The Center sponsors conferences,
colloquia, and cultural events; supports publication of
scholarly works; provides educational outreach service;
and cooperates with other campus units in overseas re-
search and training activities. The Center also administers
summer programs in Brazil and Mexico.
For further information on the Center's programs and
activities, please contact the Director of the Center for Latin
American Studies, 319 Grinter Hall.


INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES / 15


Quantum Theory Project (QTP)

QTP (officially the Institute for Theory and Computation
in Molecular and Materials Sciences) is an interdisciplinary
group of 11 faculty plus graduate students, postdoctoral
associates, and staff in the Departments of Physics and
Chemistry. Members do theoretical research in the elec-
tronic structure, spectroscopy, and dynamics of molecules
and materials. The research engages large areas of modern
chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and materials sci-
ences. QTP operates the J. C. Slater Computational
Laboratory to support large-scale computing for precise
numerical solutions and simulations of new theoretical
models, plus graphics and visualization. The Institute also
organizes a major international meeting, the annual Sanibel
Symposium, in Florida.
Graduate students in chemistry and in physics are eli-
gible for this specialization and follow a special curricu-
lum. For further information, contact the Director, Quan-
tum Theory Project, P.O. Box 118435 (New Physics Build-
ing), or visit the QTP website (http://www.qtp.ufl.edu).

Toxicology

The Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology
serves as the focal point for activities concerning the effects
of chemicals on human and animal health. The Center's
affiliated faculty is composed of approximately 20 to 30
scientists and clinicians interested in elucidating the mecha-
nisms of chemical-induced toxicity, and is drawn from the
Colleges of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, and Pharmacy,
and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The
broadly based, interdisciplinary expertise provided by this
faculty is also used to address complex issues related to the
protection of public health and the environment.
Students who wish to receive graduate training in inter-
disciplinary toxicology leading to a Ph.D. enroll through
one of the participating graduate programs, such as the IDP
in the College of Medicine, Medicinal Chemistry, Pharma-
ceutics, Pharmacodynamics, Veterinary Medical Sciences,
or Food Science and Human Nutrition. The number of
graduate programs involved in interdisciplinary toxicol-
ogy, as well as the variety of perspectives provided by their
disciplines, allows a great deal of flexibility in providing a
plan of graduate study to meet an individual student's
interests and goals in toxicology. Student course work and
dissertation research are guided by the Center's researchers
and affiliated faculty who are also members of the graduate
faculty of the student's major department. Dissertation
research may be conducted either in the student's depart-
ment, or at the Toxicology Laboratory facilities located at
the Center. For additional information, please write to the
Director, Center for Environmental and Human Toxicol-
ogy, P.O. Box 110885, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL 32606.

Tropical Agriculture

The Center for Tropical Agriculture, within the Instituteof
Food and Agricultural Sciences, seeks to stimulate interest
in research and curriculum related to the tropical environ-
ment and its development.






16 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Research.-International agricultural development as-
sistance contracts frequently have research components.
The Center assists in the coordination of this research.
Minor in Tropical Agriculture.-An interdisciplinary
minor in tropical agriculture is available at both the master's
and doctoral levels for students majoring in agriculture,
forestry, and other fields where knowledge of the tropics is
relevant. The minor may include courses treating specific
aspects of thetropics such as natural resource management
(e.g., soils, water, biodiversity), climate, agricultural pro-
duction, and the languages and cultures of those who live
in tropical countries.
Certificate in Tropical Agriculture (CTA).-A program
emphasizing breadth in topics relevant to tropical agricul-
ture (with certificate) for graduate students is available
through the College of Agriculture. The CTA is designed to
prepare students for work in situations requiring knowledge
of both the biological and social aspects of tropical agricul-
ture. Students entering the program will receive guidance
from members of the CTA Steering Committee regarding
course work appropriate for careers in international agri-
cultural development.
The CTA requires a minimum of 12 credit hours. The
"typical" certificate program will consist of 12 to 24 credits.
These hours may, with approval from supervisory commit-
tees, also count toward the M.S. or Ph.D. While foreign
language abilities and work experience in a foreign country
are strongly encouraged, they are not requisites for the CTA.
Application brochures are available from the Office of
the Dean for Academic Programs (College of Agriculture),
2014 McCarty Hall.
Other Activities.-The Center seeks a broad dissemina-
tion of knowledge about tropical agriculture through the
sponsoring of conferences, short courses, and seminars
featuring leading authorities on the tropics; publication of
books, monographs, and proceedings; and through acqui-
sition of materials for the library and the data bank.


Tropical Studies

The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is a consor-
tium of 50 major educational and research institutions in
the United States and abroad, created to promote under-
standing of tropical environments and their intelligent use
by people. The University of Florida is a charter member.
Graduate field courses in tropical biology and ecology,
agricultural ecology, population biology, and forestry are
offered in Costa Rica and Brazil during the spring and
summer terms. Students are selected on a competitive basis
from all OTS member institutions.
A University of Florida graduate student may register for
eight credits in an appropriate departmental course cross-
listed with OTS, e.g., BOT 6951, PCB 6357C, or AGG
6933. The University of Florida does not require tuition for
OTS courses. Registration is on the host campus. However,
students on Graduate Assistantships must be registered at
the University of Florida as well. Research grants are
available through OTS. Further information may be ob-
tained from University of Florida representatives to the OTS
board of directors, located in 321 Carr Hall and 3028
McCarty Hall.


Vision Sciences

An interdisciplinary specialization in vision sciences is
available through the College of Medicine. The Depart-
ment of Ophthalmology serves as the administrative and
logistical center. However, most of the faculty are from the
IDP advanced concentrations. Current interests include
retinal gene therapy, gene expression in the mammalian
retina and lens, especially during fetal development, bio-
chemistry of vision in vertebrates and invertebrates, bio-
chemistry and neurobiology of wound healing and neural
tissue degeneration, and molecular and cell biology of
animal model retinal regeneration. Further information
may be obtained from the program director, Dr. William W.
Hauswirth, P.O. Box 100266, College of Medicine,
Gainesville, FL 32610 or call (352)392-0679.

Wetlands
The Center for Wetlands, a component of the Depart-
ment of Environmental Engineering Sciences, prepares
scientists and engineers to address today's state, national,
and international environmental issues. Student and faculty
researchers at the Center study wetland ecosystems and
water resource issues in an effort to integrate humanity and
nature in our developing landscape.
The Center works to provide solutions to Florida's wet-
lands and water resource issues and problems through
education and research. Federal and state sources, as well
as private industry, fund research and the dissemination of
research results. The Center provides valuable research
experience to undergraduate and graduate students. Stu-
dents receive professional training through participation in
Center research projects and leave the Center prepared for
environmental, wetlands and/or water resource careers
with federal, state, and local agencies, academic and
research institutions, consulting firms, and industries.
Graduate Certificate in Wetlands.-Any graduate stu-
dent at the University of Florida may earn a Certificate in
Wetlands. The certificate helps prepare students for careers
related to wetland science and management. The certifi-
cate requires 18 credit hours, including wetlands research
experience. Course work includes an introductory wetland
course and courses selected from several related categories
including hydrology, biology, environmental policy and
law, water chemistry, and soils. With planning early in a
student's program, courses forthe certificate can be blended
with the graduate program of study. For more information,
please contact the Center for Wetlands, P.O. Box 116350
or call (352) 392-2424.

Women's/Gender Studies
The doctoral-level interdisciplinary concentration in
women's/gender studies provides graduate students an
opportunity to develop a thorough grounding in the new
scholarship produced through the intersection of women's
studies and other academic fields. The concentration facili-
tates the analysis and assessment of theories about the role
of gender in cultural systems and its intersections with other
categories of differences, such as race, ethnicity, religion,
class, sexuality, physical and mental ability, age, economic






ADMISSION /17


and civil status. Emphasis is on participating in women's/
gender studies research and on providing an intellectual
environment in which cross-fertilization between disci-
plines can flourish. Women's/gender studies critically ex-
plores the role and status of women and men, past and
present.
Graduate faculty from several departments and colleges,
campuswide, participate. Among the areas represented are
anthropology, history, economics, philosophy, political
science, psychology, and English, German, and Romance
languages and literatures.
Ph.D. degrees are awarded through participating depart-
ments with the interdisciplinary concentration in women's/
gender studies. Graduate degree programs are designed by
each student's committee, headed by the supervisory chair
who is affiliated with women's/gender studies.
Requirements for admission are the same as for the
student's home department and college. After admission to
the degree granting department, the application is sent by
the department of the Director of Women's/Gender Studies
who will chair an admissions committee.
The Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies is de-
scribed in the Fields of Instruction section of this catalog.
For further information contact the Director, Center for
Women's Studies and Gender Research, 115 Anderson
Hall, telephone (352) 392-3365.



ADMISSION TO THE

GRAD UATE SCHOOL

Application for Admission.-Admission forms and infor-
mation concerning admission procedures should be ob-
tained from the department of interest. This includes the on-
line application, the HTML application to download and
mail, or the regular application by mail. Prospective
students are urged to apply for admission as early as
possible and to utilize the on-line application. For some
departments deadlines for receipt of admission applica-
tions may be earlier than those stated in the current Univer-
sity Calendar; prospective students should check with the
appropriate department. Applications that meet minimum
standards are referred to the graduate selection committees
of the various colleges and departments for approval or
disapproval.
To be admitted to graduate study in a given department,
the prospective student must satisfy the requirements of the
department as well as those of the Graduate School. Admis-
sion to some programs is limited by the resources available.
General Requirements.-The Graduate School, Univer-
sity of Florida, requires both a minimum grade average of B
for all upper-division undergraduate work anda minimum
Verbal-Quantitative total score of 1000 on the General Test
of the Graduate Record Examination (or satisfactory scores
on the Graduate Management Admission Test for students
applying to the Warrington College of Business Administra-
tion) for students with an earned bachelor's degreeonly. For
some departments, and in more advanced levels of gradu-
ate study, undergraduate averages or Graduate Record
Examination scores above those stated for the Graduate


School may be required. Applicants with a previous gradu-
ate or professional degree or equivalent from a regionally
accredited U.S. institution may be exempt from the Gradu-
ate Record Examination and undergraduate G.P.A. require-
ments. Inquiries about specific requirements should be
addressed to the department in question. Some colleges
and departments require a reading knowledge of at least
one foreign language. Exceptions to the above require-
ments are made only when these and other criteria, includ-
ing letters of recommendation, are reviewed by the depart-
ment, recommended by the department, and approved by
the Dean of the Graduate School.
Direct admission to the Graduate School is dependent
upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an
accredited college or university. Two copies of the official
undergraduate transcript should accompany all applica-
tions-one for the department and one for the Registrar.
These transcripts must be received directly from the regis-
trar of the institution in which the work was done. Official
supplementary transcripts are required as soon as they are
available for any work completed after application for
admission has been made.
The Board of Regents has also ruled that, in admitting
students for a given academic year, up to 10% may be
admitted as exceptions. Students admitted as exceptions
under the 10% waiver rule must present both an upper-
division grade point average and Graduate Record Exami-
nation General Test score with their applications and meet
other criteria required by the University, including excel-,
lent letters of recommendation from colleagues, satisfac-
tory performance in a specified number of graduate courses
taken as postbaccalaureate students, and/or practical expe-
rience in the discipline for a specified period of time.
The University encourages applications from qualified
applicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious,
and ethnic groups. The University does not discriminate on
the basis of marital status, disability, or age in admission or
access to its programs and activities. The Title IX Coordina-
tor is Dr. Jacquelyn D. Hart, 145 Tigert Hall, (352)392-
6004.

COMPUTER REQUIREMENT

Access to and on-going use of a computer are required of
all students to complete their degree programs successfully.
The University expects each student entering the University
and continuing students to acquire computer hardware and
software appropriate to the degree program. Competency
in the basic use of a computer is a requirement for gradua-
tion; class assignments may require use of a computer,
academic advising and registration can be done by com-
puter, and University correspondence is often sent via e-
mail.
While the University offers limited access to computers
through its computer labs, most students are expected to
purchase or lease a computer that is capable of dial-up or
network connection to the Internet, graphical access to the
World Wide Web, and productivity functions such as word
processing and spreadsheet calculation. Sample minimum
computer configurations are provided below.
Individual colleges will provide additional requirements
and recommendations. Consult the appropriate college at






18/GENERAL INFORMATION


their web pages or the University web page at http://
www.circa.ufl.edu/computers.

Basic Windows Configurations -
* 233 MHz or faster cpu MMX Pentium, Pentium II
or III, Celeron, etc.)
32 MB SDRAM
S. 4 GB hard drive
10x or faster CD-ROM
high resolution graphics adapter with 2 MB
video RAM
high resolution color display with viewable
area of 15" or larger; laptops should be 12" active
matrix with PCMCIA or PC-card slots
Sound with speakers or headphones
56 kbps V.90(avoid"winmodem" or "modem
for Windows")
a high quality printer (ink jet or laser); limited
printing facilities are available in campus labs
bundled software should include either Corel
or Microsoft office suite

Students with notebook computers and students who live on
campus will need ethernet card (10 base T connection with
interface drivers by Microsoft for Windows 95 such as 3.Com,
Intel, and SMC) to connect to the campus network. Refer to the
websites cited earlier for a detailed recommendation.

ADMISSIONS EXAMINATIONS

Graduate Record Examination.-In addition to the Gen-
eral Test of the Graduate Record Examination which is
required of all applicants, some departments encourage the
applicant to submit scores on one or more advanced
subject tests of the Graduate Record Examination. The
scores on all tests taken will be considered in regard to
admission.
Graduate Study in Business Administration.-Students
applying for admission to the Graduate School for study in
the Warrington College of Business Administration may
substitute satisfactory scores on the Graduate Management
Admission Test (GMAT) for the Graduate Record Examina-
tion. Students applying for admission to the Master of
Business Administration (M.B.A.) program must submit
satisfactory scores on the GMATUniversity of Florida
minimum requirements are 465. Applicants should contact
the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08540, for
additional information.
Graduate Study in Law.-Students applying to the gradu-
ate program leading to the degree Master of Laws in
Taxation must hold the Juris Doctor or equivalent degree
and must submit satisfactory scores on the Law School
Admission Test (LSAT).

MEDICAL IMMUNIZATION

Prior to registration, each student accepted for admission
must submit proof of immunization. When the application
is approved for admission, a form to complete and return is
forwarded to the student. No student is allowed to
register until the Health Care Center has received
and approved the form.


RESIDENCY

Classification of Students Florida or Non-Florida (Section
6C-7.005, Florida Administrative Code) 6A-10.044 Resi-
dency for Tuition Purposes.
The State Board of Community Colleges and the Board of
Regents shall maintain consistent policies and practices for
the classification of students as residents for tuition pur-
poses to facilitate the transfer of students among institu-
tions. The policies and practices may varyto accommodate
differences in governance, but the determinations of clas-
sification shall be consistent to assure students of being
classified the same regardless of the institution determining
the classification.
(1) The classification of a student as a Florida resident for
tuition purposes by a public Florida community college or
university shall be recognized bother public postsecondary
institutions to which the student may later seek admission,
unless the classification was erroneous or the student did
not then qualify as a resident for tuition purposes.
(2) Once a student has been classified by a public
institution, institutions to which the student may transfer are
not required to re-evaluate the classification unless incon-
sistent information suggests that an erroneous classification
was made or the student's situation has changed.
(3) Changes the State Board of Community Colleges and
the Board of Regents intend to make in the policies and
practices for the classification of students as residents for
tuition purposes, shall be filed with the Articulation Coor-
dinating Committee.
(4) Non-U.S. citizens such as resident aliens, parolees,
asylees, refugees, temporary permanent residents), who
have applied to and have been approved by the U.S.
Immigration and Naturalization Service for indefinite stay
and employment shall be considered eligible to establish
Florida residency for tuition purposes. In addition,
nonimmigrants holding one of the following visas shall be
considered eligible to establish Florida residency for tuition
purposes. Persons in visa categories not listed herein shall
be considered ineligible to establish Florida residency for
tuition purposes.
(a) Visa category A Government official.
(b) Visa category E Treaty trader or investor.
(c) Visa category G Representative of international
organization.
(d) Visa category I Foreign information media represent
tative.
(e) Visa category K Fiance, fiancee, or a child of United
States citizenss.

Specific 229.053(1) FS.
Law Implemented 240.1201 FS.
History-New 10-6-92.

Tit6 Chp6C-7 Sec6C-7.005 6 6C-7 6C-7.005 6C-
7.005 Student Residency.
(1) For the purpose of assessing tuition, residency and
nonresidency status shall be determined as provided in
Section 240.1201, Florida Statutes, and the Florida State
University System Residency Policy and Procedure Manual
(Revised Effective March 5, 1993), incorporated by refer-
ence herein.





ADMISSION /19


(2) An individual shall not be classified as a resident for
tuition purposes and, thus, shall not be eligible to receive
the resident tuition rate, until the individual has provided
satisfactory evidence as to his or her legal residence and
domicile to appropriate university officials. In determining
residency, the university shall require evidence such as a
voter registration, driver's license, automobile registration,
location of bank account, rent receipts or any other relevant
materials as evidence that the applicant has maintained 12
months residence immediately prior to qualification as a
bona fide domicile, rather than for the purpose of maintain-
ing a mere temporary residence or abode incident to
enrollment in an institution of higher learning. To deter-
mine if the student is a dependent child, the university shall
require evidence such as copies of the aforementioned
documents. In addition, the university may require a nota-
rized copy of the parent's IRS return. "Resident student" for
tuition purposes classification shall also be construed to
include students to whom an Immigration Parolee card or
a Form 1-94 (Parole Edition) was issued at least one year
prior to the first day of classes for which resident student
status is sought, or who have had their resident alien status
approved bythe United States Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service, or who hold an Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Form 1-151, 1-551 or a notice of an approved adjust-
ment of status application, or Cuban Nationals or Vietnam-
ese Refugees or other refugees or asylees so designated by
the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service
who are considered as Resident Aliens, or other legal aliens,
provided such students meet the residency requirements
stated above and comply with subsection (4) below. The
burden of establishing facts which justify classification of a
student as a resident and domiciliary entitled to "resident
for tuition purposes" registration rates is on the applicant for
such classification.
(3) In applying this policy:
(a) "Student" shall mean a person admitted to the institu-
tion, or a person allowed to register at the institution on a
space available basis.
(b) "Domicile" shall denote a person's true, fixed, and
permanent home, and to which whenever the person is
absent the person has the intention of returning.
(4) In all applications for admission or registration at the
institution on a space available basis a "resident for tuition
purposes" applicant, or, if a dependent child, the parent of
the applicant, shall make and file with such application a
written statement, under oath, that the applicant is a bona
fide resident and domiciliary of the State of
Florida, entitled as such to classification as a "resident for
tuition purposes" under the terms and conditions pre-
scribed for residents and domiciliaries of the State of
Florida. All claims to "resident for tuition purposes" classi-
fication must be supported by evidence as stated in Rule
6C-7.005(1),(2) if requested by the registering authority.
(5) A "nonresident" or, if a dependent child, the
individual's parent, after maintaining a legal residence and
being a bona fide domiciliary of Florida for twelve (12)
months, immediately prior to enrollment and qualification
as a resident, rather than for the purpose of maintaining a
mere temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment
in an institution of higher education, may apply for and be
granted classification as a "resident for tuition purposes";


provided, however, that those students who are nonresi-
dent aliens or who are in the United States on a non-
immigration visa will not be entitled to reclassification. An
application for reclassification as a "resident for tuition
purposes" shall comply with provisions of subsection (4)
above. An applicant who has been classified as a "nonresi-
dent for tuition purposes" at time of original enrollment
shall furnish evidence as stated in Rule 6C-7.005(1) to the
satisfaction of the registering authority that the applicant
has maintained residency in the state for the twelve months
immediately prior to qualification required to establish
residence for tuition purposes. In the absence of such
evidence, the applicant shall not be reclassified as a "resi-
dent for tuition purposes." It is recommended that the
application for reclassification be accompanied by a certi-
fied copy of a declaration of intent to establish legal
domicile in the state, which intent must have been filed
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, as provided by Section
222.17, Florida Statutes. If the request for reclassification
and the necessary documentation is not received by the
registrar prior to the last day of registration for the term in
which the student intends to be reclassified, the student will
not be reclassified for that term.
(6) Appeal from a determination denying "resident for
tuition purposes" status to applicant therefore may be initi-
ated after appropriate administrative remedies are exhausted
by the filing of a petition for review pursuant to Section
120.68 F.S.
(7) Any student granted status as a "resident for tuition
purposes," which status is based on a sworn statement
which is false shall, upon determination of such falsity, be
subjectto such disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by
the president of the university.
Specific 240.209(1), (3)(r) FS. Law Implemented
120.53(1)(a), 240.209(1), (3)(e), 240.233, 240.235,
240.1201 FS. History-Formerly 6C-2.51, 11-18-70,
Amended 8-20-71,6-5-73, 3-4-74, Amended and Renum-
bered 12-17-74, Amended 1-13-76, 12-13-77, 8-11-81, 6-
21-83, 12-13-83, 6-10-84, 10-7-85, 12-31-85, Formerly
6C-7.05, Amended 11-9-92, 4-16-96.

All U.S. citizens and resident aliens are eligible to apply
for Florida residency. Although Florida residency normally
cannot be obtained until the student has resided in the state
for approximately one year, the application process should
be initiated immediately.
Residency for tuition purposes is controlled exclusively
by laws enacted by the Florida Legislature. Forthe purpose
of assessing tuition, residency and nonresidesidency status
shall be determined as provided in Classification of Stu-
dents Florida or Non-Florida (Section 6C-7.005, Florida
Administrative Code), Section 240.1201, Florida Statutes,
and the Florida State University System Residency Policy
and Procedure manual. It may be found in its entirety on
line at http://www.leg.state.fl.us/citizen/documents/statutes/
. The residency review staff members in the Office of the
University Registrar are not authorized to provide guidance
on methods of obtaining residency. Their role is to review
applications for Florida resident status, together with sup-
portive documentation, and to render a decision based on
the documentation and the requirements of Florida law.
These laws presume that students who are initially classified





20/ GENERAL INFORMATION


as nonresident will not be reclassified as residents merely
by being enrolled for one year. Physical residence in
Florida merely incidental to enrollment in a college is not
sufficient, under Florida law, to obtain reclassification. It is
the sole responsibility of the applicant to provide all appro-
priate documentation. On arrival in Gainesville, a student
wishing to establish residency should pick up the Request
for Change in Residency Status from the Office of the
University Registrar, S222 Criser Hall, to review the infor-
mation and items that will be requested when the student
files for residency after being in the state for 12 months.
Also, the student should file the Declaration of Domicile
form at the Alachua CountyAdministrative Building (corner
of University Avenue and Main Street), Official Records
Office, Room 101, on arrival i Gainesville, and should keep
the receipt, to be attached later to the request for change
form. The student should obtain a Florida driver's license
or I.D., Florida voter's I.D., Florida vehicle registration, or
other applicable documents as soon as possible. It is also
advisable to close bank accounts and relinquish driver's
licenses in other states. Receipts of utility deposits, rental
agreements, and other documents proving residence should
also be kept, as well as proof of any employment, particu-
larly employment unrelated to the University.
In most cases, application for reclassification cannot be
made to the Office of the University Registrar until after 12
months of residency. However, there are cases based on
spousal relationship that may allow for an earlier applica-
tion. Students who believe that they may qualify under
these circumstances should check with the Registrar's
office on arrival.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
All international students seeking admission tothe Gradu-
ate School are required to submit satisfactory scores on the
GRE General Test and a score of at least 550 on the paper-
based and 213 on the computer-based TOEFL (Test of
English as a Foreign Language) with the following excep-
tions:
1. International students whose native tongue is English
or who have studied at a United States college or university
for one year or more need not submit TOEFL scores but must
submit satisfactory scores on the General Test of the Gradu-
ate Record Examination before their applications for admis-
sion can be considered.
2. All international students applying for admission for
the Masterof Business Administration program must submit
satisfactory scores from the Graduate Management Admis-
sion Test before their applications for admission will be
considered.
International students whose scores on the TOEFL and
verbal portion of the GRE are not indicative of adequate
writing skills are required to write a short essay for exami-
nation. If the skills demonstrated in the essay are not
acceptable for pursuing graduate work, the examination
will be used as a diagnostic tool for placement in appropri-
ate courses which will not count toward a graduate degree.
Graduate students whose native language is not English
must submit satisfactory scores on the Test of Spoken
English (TSE) or the SPEAK Test to be eligible for teaching
assignments. Students who score 55 or above are allowed


to teach in the classroom, laboratory, or other appropriate
instructional activity. Those who score 45 to 50 are
allowed to teach on the condition that they enroll concur-
rently in ENS 5502, a course designed to help their interper-
sonal and public speaking communication skills. Students
who fail to score 45 points may not be appointed to teach.
To raise their scores on the TSE, they are advisedtotake ENS
4501, a course to improve general oral language skills.
They must subsequently submit a TSE or SPEAK score of 45
or higher to be appointed to teach, and they come underthe
guidelines described above.
Applicants should write tothe Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ 08540, for registration forms and other informa-
tion concerning TOEFL, TSE, GMAT, and GRE. Students may
register for the locally administered SPEAK test with the
Academic Spoken English Office, 1349 Norman Hall.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

The University of Florida does not discriminate on the
basis of disability in the recruitment and admission of
students, in the recruitment and employment of faculty and
staff, or in the operation of any of its programs and activities,
as specified by federal laws and regulations. The designated
coordinator for compliance with Section 504 of the Reha-
bilitation Act of 1973, as amended, is Deborah Casey-
Powell, Assistant Dean for Student Services, 202 Peabody
Hall, (352)392-1261. The designated coordinator for the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is Kenneth J. Osfield,
Assistant in the Office of Academic Affairs, 232 Stadium,
(352)392-7056, (352)846-1046 (TDD).
The Office of Student Services provides assistance for
students with disabilities. Services are varied depending on
individual needs and include, but are not limited to, special
campus orientation, registration assistance, help in secur-
ing auxiliary learning aids, and assistance in general Uni-
versity activities. Students with disabilities are encouraged
to contact this office.

VETERANS ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL
SECURITY ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS
INFORMATION

The University of Florida is approved for the education
and training of veterans under all public laws now in effect,
i.e., Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code (Disabled Veterans),
Chapter 32, Title 38, U.S. Code (Veterans Educational
Assistance Program), Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold
War G.I. Bill), and Chapter 35, Title38, U.S. Code (Children
of Deceased or Disabled Veterans). Students who may be
eligible for educational benefits under any Veterans Ad-
ministration (VA) program are urged to contact their local
VA representative as soon as they are accepted. Students
expecting to receive benefits under one of these program
must file an application for benefits with the Office of the
University Registrar. No certification can be made until the
application is on file. Benefits are determined by the
Veterans Administration; the University certifies according
to VA rules and regulations.
Inquiries relating to Social Security benefits should be
directed to the student's local Social Security Office. The





ADMISSION /21


Office of the University Registrar will submit enrollment
certificates issued by the Social Security Administration for
students eligible to receive educational benefits under the
Social Security Act, providing the graduate student registers
for 9 semester hours or more during fall or spring semester
or 8 semester hours during summer term C.
A full-time graduate load for VA or Social Security
benefits is 9 hours per semester.


CONDITIONAL ADMISSION
Students who are not eligible for direct admission may be
granted conditional admission to the Graduate School.
Students may be granted conditional admission to defer
final admission decisions until requisite examination scores
or final grade records are available. Students may also be
granted conditional admission to ascertain their abilities to
pursue graduate work at the University of Florida if previous
grade records or Graduate Record Examination scores are
on the borderline of acceptability or when specific prereq-
uisite courses are required.
Students granted conditional admission should be noti-
fied by the department of the conditions under which they
are admitted. When these conditions have been satisfied,
the department must notify the student in writing, sending
a copy to the Graduate School. Eligible course work taken
while a student is in conditional status is applicable toward
a graduate degree.
Students failing to meet any condition of admission will
be barred from further registration.


POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
Students who have received a bachelor's degree but have
not been admitted to the Graduate School are classified as
postbaccalaureate students. The admission requirements
for postbaccalaureate enrollment are a 2.0 grade point
average and a score of 550 on the Test of English as a
Foreign Language if the applicant is from a non-English
speaking country. Postbaccalaureate enrollment is offered
forthe following reasons: (1) to provide a means for students
not seeking a graduate degree to enroll in courses-in-
cluded in this category would be students who change their
professional goals or wish to expand their academic back-
grounds and (2) to accommodate students who do intendto
enter a graduate program at some future date, but need a
substantial number of prerequisite courses.
Postbaccalaureate students may enroll in graduate courses
but the work taken will not normally be transferred to the
graduate record if the student is subsequently admitted to
the Graduate School. By petition in clearly justified cases
and in conformance with regulations on courses and credit,
it is possible to transfer up to 15 semester hours of course
work earned with a grade of A, B+, or B.
Students who wish to enter the College of Education to
obtain teacher certification may not complete a program as
postbaccalaureate students. A department may accept
students in postbaccalaureate status for a limited time to
meet admission requirements for a master's degree. Inter-
ested students should write to 134 Norman Hall or call
(352) 392-0721 ext. 400 for further information.


NONDEGREE REGISTRATION

Nondegree enrollment is restricted to participants in
special programs, off-campus programs, University-affili-
ated exchange programs, and those participants with non-
degree educational objectives at the University of Florida.
Students who have been denied admission to UF for any
term are not eligible for nondegree registration. Students
must receive prior approval from the departments) to take
courses in a nondegree status. Work taken will not nor-
mally be transferred to the graduate record if the student is
subsequently admitted to the Graduate School. By petition
in clearly justified cases and in conformance with regula-
tions on courses and credit, it is possible to transfer up to 15
semester hours of course work earned with the grade of A,
B+, or B.

READMISSION

This information applies only to students who have been
admitted to a graduate program and attended the Univer-
sity. Former graduate students who do not enroll at the
University for two consecutive terms, including any sum-
mer term, must reapply for admission. Readmission, how-
ever, is not guaranteed and is subject to the availability of
space at the appropriate level, college or major. Therefore,
it is strongly advised that students who wish to take a leave
of absence for two or more consecutive terms obtain prior
written approval from their departments. Students who skip
a single term will be scheduled automatically for a registra-
tion appointment for one additional term. Readmission
applications are available from the Office of Admissions,
P.O. Box 114000, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611-4000.

FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE
STUDENTS
University of Florida faculty in tenured or tenure-accru-
ing lines, as designated by the Florida Administrative Code,
normally may not pursue graduate degrees from this insti-
tution. Exceptions are made for the Florida Cooperative
Extension Service (IFAS) county personnel, the faculty of
the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, and University Libraries
faculty.
Under certain restrictions established by the Graduate
Council, persons holding nontenure- or nonpermanent-
status-accruing titles may pursue graduate degrees at the
University of Florida. Any other exceptions to this policy
must be approved by the Graduate Council. Such excep-
tions, if given, are rare and will only be approved when it
is determined to be in the best interest of the University.

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Graduate Assistantships are available through individual
departments. Stipend rates paid are determined by the
employing department or unit.
Interested students should inquire at their department
offices concerning the availability of assistantships and the





22 / GENERAL INFORMATION


procedure for making application. Prospective students
should write directly to their major departments. Early
inquiry is essential in order to be assured of meeting
application deadlines. Appointments are made on the
recommendation of the department chairperson, subject to
admission to the Graduate School and to the approval of the
Dean of the Graduate School. Clear evidence of superior
ability and promise is required. Reappointment to assistant-
ships requires evidence of continuation of good scholarship.
Unless otherwise specified, applications forthese awards
should be made to the appropriate department chair,
University of Florida, on or before February 15 of each year.
Fellows and graduate assistants must pay appropriate in-
state and out-of-state tuition. Fellows receiving semester
stipends of $3150.00 or greater and trainees are expected
to devote full time to their studies. Graduate assistants who
have part-time teaching or research duties register for
reduced study loads according to the schedule for mini-
mum full-time registration given above.

TUITION PAYMENTS

In-State Matriculation Fee Payments are available to
graduate assistants and fellows who meet the eligibility
requirements. Any change in the student's academic or
employment status after processing a tuition payment will
result in the original payment being updated, reduced, or
voided as appropriate.
Non-Florida Tuition Payments are available to out-of-
state students who hold graduate assistantships or fellow-
ships and who meet the eligibility requirements. Any
change in the student's academic or employment status
after processing a tuition payment will result in the original
payment being updated, reduced, or voided as appropriate.

UNIVERSITY-WIDE FELLOWSHIPS

Alumni Graduate Fellowship
These fellowships, funded at nationally competitive lev-
els, represent the highest graduate student award available
atthe University. These prestigious awards support students
in all programs and departments awarding the Ph.D. or
M.F.A.
The University offers 100 of these fellowships for stu-
dents each year. To ensure that Alumni Fellows receive
every opportunity to succeed, these fellowships provide a
full four years of support for qualifying students. Most
fellows will receive a minimum of two years of fully funded
fellowships, and they will receive another two years of
research or teaching assistantships. The University expects
Alumni Fellowsto demonstrate high standards of academic
achievement and participation in university life.
Prospective candidates should apply through their major
departments or colleges. Successful applicants must have
outstanding undergraduate preparation, a strong commit-
ment to their field of study, and demonstrated potential in
research and creative activities.

Named Presidential Fellowship
The Graduate School awards fellowships named for
former University of Florida presidents. They represent a


four-year commitment to the student, assuming satisfactory
progress toward the degree.
The first and fourth years are funded by the Graduate
School. The second and third years are funded by the
student's department or college as either an assistantship or
a fellowship at the same stipend level as the Graduate
School funding. Because nationally competitive stipend
levels vary widely across disciplines, the academic units set
the stipend level. The lower bound of the stipend is
$10,000 annually.
The fellowships are limited to U.S. citizens or permanent
residents who are pursuing a terminal degree (i.e., Ph.D.,
Ed.D., or M.F.A.). The program is intended primarily to
attract outstanding students from across the nation. Appli-
cations for students from traditionally underrepresented
groups are encouraged.
Potential applicants should contact their major depart-
ments for complete application information.

Grinter Fellowship
Grinter Fellowships are named in honor of Dr. Linton E.
Grinter, Dean of the Graduate School from 1952 to 1969.
The intent of this fellowship is to facilitate recruitment of
truly exceptional graduate students. Currently enrolled
graduate students are not eligible, except in the particular
case in which they are entering a Ph.D. (or other terminal
degree) program.
Stipends are normally in the $2000 to 4000 range.
Continuation of the Grinter beyond the first year is contin-
gent upon satisfactory student progress.
Interested students should contact their major depart-
ments for complete information. Students in the Colleges
of Agriculture, Engineering, and Law are not eligible for
Grinter Fellowships.

Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research
Abroad Fellowship
Through the U.S. Department of Education's Center for
International Education, graduate students who are Ameri-
can citizens can apply for one of approximately 87 awards.
The Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship
Program provides opportunities for graduate students to
engage in full-time dissertation research abroad in modern
foreign languages and area studies. Preference is given to
applications that meet the following priority: Research that
focuses on Africa, East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific,
South Asia, the Near East, East Central and Eastern Europe
and Eurasia, and the Western Hemisphere (Central and
South America, Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean). Ap-
plications that propose projects focused on Western Europe
will not be funded.
Applications are available for the next academic year in
September, with an October deadline for transmittal. The
project period may be from 6 to 12 months. The estimated
average award is $23,800. For application information
contact Karla Ver Bryck Block, U.S. Department of Educa-
tion, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Suite 600, Portals Bldg.,
Washington DC 20202-5331, telephone (202) 401-9774,
e-mail karla_verbryckblock@ed.gov, or, locally, the Office
of Program Information, 256 Grinter Hall.






ADMISSION / 23


Title VI-Foreign Language and Area
Studies Fellowship
Title VI fellowships are available to graduate students
whose academic programs are either Latin America or
Africa oriented. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or perma-
nent residents and must be registered for a full-time course
load including a language relevant to the area of their
choice, specifically, Portuguese or Haitian Creole for re-
cipients through the Center for Latin American Studies;
Akan, Arabic, Shona, Swahili, or Yoruba for recipients
through the Center for African Studies.
Applicants may choose to major in any discipline or
department where a Latin American or African emphasis is
possible. Remuneration will consist of a $10,000 stipend
for the academic year and $2,400 for the summer plus
payment of all tuition and fees.
For further information, please contact the Director of
either the Center for Latin American Studies (319 Grinter
Hall) or the Center for African Studies (427 Grinter Hall),
University of Florida.

MINORITY SUPPORT
The Board of Regents (BOR) Summer Program for
African-American Graduate Students is an orientation
program in Summer B designed to prepare eligible African-
American students (newly admitted into a graduate level
program for the fall who have not previously attended the
University of Florida) for graduate education. The stipend
is approximately $1,500 with payment of 4 hours of tuition
(excluding fees). Participants must enroll as full-time
graduate students for the following academic year and are
eligible for other minority fellowships. The program is
limited to African-American students who are U.S. citizens
or permanent residents. All eligible admitted students are
invited to participate.
The FAMU Feeder Program is designed to increase the
number of FAMU African-American students enrolled in
graduate programs at the 28 participating universities.
Through this program, FAMU nominates minority students
with a minimum 3.0 GPA to the participating feeder insti-
tutions for admission into their graduate programs. The
OGMP is the University of Florida's contact office for the
feeder program. As a commitment to the feeder program,
the University of Florida provides three to five fellowships
annually to qualified FAMU African-American students
who are admitted into graduate programs. The application
deadline is February 15 of each year.
Graduate Minority Fellowships (GMF) stipends are
$12,000 for 12 months. The fellowship may be funded for
either 3-year plan, which includes 2 years of fellowship and
1 year of assistantship, or a 4-year plan which includes a 2-
year fellowship and 2-year assistantship, depending on the
degree sought. Recipients receive tuition payments.
The Florida Education Fund (FEF) awards McKnight
Doctoral Fellowships to African-American students newly
admitted into selected doctoral degree programs at univer-
sities in the state. The FEF provides a stipend of $11,000 for
12 months and an allowance for fees, health insurance,
computer equipment, books, and supplies, funded for a
maximum of 3 years. The University provides payment of
12 hours tuition fall and spring and 8 hours summer and will


provide continued support for upto two more years, subject
to satisfactory progress and availability of funds. African-
American U.S. citizens are eligible to receive McKnight
Fellowships. Forfurther information and application forms,
contact the FEF, 201 E. Kennedy Blvd., Suite 1525, Tampa,
FL 33602 (813) 272-2772. The application deadline is
January 15 of each year.
Santa Fe Community College/University of Florida Black
Faculty Development Project is a joint program designed
to increase the number of African-American faculty mem-
bers at SFCC while increasing the number of African-
American doctoral students at the University of Florida.
Participants are required to teach 3 courses per yearat SFCC
and assist SFCC in recruitment and retention of minority
students. The stipend is $9,000 for 10 months, funded for
a maximum of 4 years, and includes payment of up to 12
hours tuition and fees fall and spring. African-American
U.S. citizens who have a master's degree in one of the
approved areas are eligible. The application deadline is
March 15 of each year.
For additional information, contact the Office of Gradu-
ate Minority Programs, P.O. Box 115515, Gainesville, FL
32611-5515, telephone (352)392-6444), World WideWeb
http://www.rgp.ufl.edu/ogmp.

COLLEGE/SCHOOL FINANCIAL AID WEBSITES
In addition to the university-wide fellowship and assis-
tantship opportunities, there are numerous awards that are
specific to a particular field of study, which are available
through the various colleges, schools, and departments.
The websites listed below will provide information about
financial aid available in each discipline.
Fisher School of Accounting
http://www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa/
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
http:/www.acprog.ifas.ufl.edu/
College of Architecture
http://www.arch.ufl.edu/
M. E. Rinker School of Building Construction
http://bcn.arch.ufl.edu/
Warrington College of Business Administration
http://cba.ufl.edu/
College of Dentistry
http://www.dental.ufl.edu/
College of Education
http://www.coe.ufl.edu/
College of Engineering
http://www.eng.ufl.edu/
College of Fine Arts
http://www.arts.ufl.edu/
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
http://aris.sfrc.ufl.edu/Welcome.html
College of Health and Human Performance
http://hhp.ufl.edu/
College of Health Professions
http://hp.ufl.edu/
College of Journalism and Communications
http://www.jou.ufl.edu/
Levin College of Law
http://nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu/-lawinfo/
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences






24/ GENERAL INFORMATION


http://web.clas.ufl.edu/
College of Medicine
http:www.med.ufl.edu/
College of Natural Resources and Environment
http://web.cnre.ufl.edu/
College of Nursing
http://con.ufl.edu/
College of Pharmacy
http://www.cop.ufl.edu/
College of Veterinary Medicine
http://www.vetmed.ufl.edu/


EXTERNAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
Information on external fellowships, small grants, and
other funding opportunities is available on the Research
and Graduate Programs (RGP) website: http://
www,rgp.ufl.edu/research/funding.html. The Community
of Science Funding Opportunities Database and the Grants
Databaseare keyword searchable and highly recommended
as information resources by RGP Program Information staff.



GENERAL REGULATIONS

It is the responsibility of the graduate student to become
informed and to observe all regulations and procedures
required by the program he/she is pursuing. The student
must be familiar with those sections of the Graduate Cata-
log that outline general regulations and requirements,
specific degree program requirements, and the offerings
and requirements of the major department. Ignorance of a
rule does not constitute a basis for waiving that rule. Any
exceptions to the policies stated in the Graduate Catalog
must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.
After admission to the Graduate School, but before the
first registration, the student should consu It the college and/
or the graduate coordinator in the major department con-
cerning courses and degree requirements, deficiencies if
any, and special regulations of the department. The dean of
the college in which the degree program is located or a
representative must approve all registrations. Once a super-
visory committee has been appointed, registration approval
should be the responsibility of the committee chair.


CATALOG YEAR

Catalog year determines the set of academic require-
ments that must be fulfilled for graduation. Students
graduate underthe catalog in effect atthetime oftheir initial
enrollment as a degree-seeking students at the University of
Florida provided they maintain continuous enrollment.
Students who do not maintain continuous enrollment (two
or more consecutive terms) must reapply for admission and
will be assigned the catalog in effect at the time enrollment
is resumed. Students with the approval of their college
dean's office may optto graduate under the requirements of
a later catalog, but they must fulfill all graduation require-
ments from that alternative year. The University will make


every reasonable effort to honor the curriculum require-
ments appropriate to each student's catalog year. How-
ever, courses and programs will sometimes be discontin-
ued and requirements may change as a result of curricular
review or actions by accrediting associations and other
agencies.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS


Classification

6


Explanation

Postbaccalaureate students:
degree holding students who
have been admitted to
postbaccalaureate hours.
Graduate students seeking a
first master's degree.
Graduate students who have
earned a master's degree, or
who have earned 36 or more
credits while seeking a
graduate degree, but who
have not been admitted to
doctoral candidacy.
Graduate students who have
been admitted to doctoral
candidacy.


CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS
The University of Florida assures the confidentiality of
student educational records in accordance with the State
University System rules, state statutes, and the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (known as the
Buckley Amendment).
Directory information for a student that can be released to
the public is limited to name, class, college and major; dates
of attendance; degrees) earned; honorsand awards received;
local, permanent, and e-mail addresses; telephone number;
most recent previous educational institution attended; par-
ticipation in officially recognized activities and sports; and
the weight and height of members of athletic teams.
Currently enrolled students must contact the appropriate
agency(ies) to restrict release of directory information. The
Office of the University Registrar, the Division of Housing,
and University Personnel Services routinely release direc-
tory information to the public. In addition to requesting this
restriction from the Office of the University Registrar,
students who live on campus must also request this restric-
tion for the Division of Housing (next to Beaty Towers).
Students who are University employees also must request
this restriction from University Personnel Services.
Student educational records may be released without a
student's consent to school officials who have a legitimate
educational interesttoaccessthe records. "School official"
shall include
An employee, agent, or officer of the
University or State University System of
Florida in an administrative, supervisory,
academic or research, or support staff position;





GENERAL REGULATIONS/ 25


Persons serving on university committees,
boards, and/or councils; and
Persons employed by or under contract to
the University to perform a special task,
such as an attorney or an auditor.
"Legitimate educational interest" shall mean any autho-
rized interest or activity undertaken in the name of the
University for which access to an educational record is
necessary or appropriate to the operation of the University
or to the proper performance of the educational mission of
the University.
The University may also disclose information from a
student's educational records without a student's consent
to either individuals or entities permitted such access under
applicable federal and state law.
Students have the right to review their own educational
records for information and to determine accuracy. A
photo I.D. or other equivalent documentation or personal
recognition by the custodian of record will be required
before access is granted. Parents of a dependent student, as
defined by the Internal Revenue Service, have these same
rights upon presentation of proof of the student's dependent
status.
If a student believes the educational record contains
information that is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of
his or her rights, the student may ask the institution to
amend the record. The UF Student Guide, available at
http://www.dso.ufl.edu, outlines the procedures for chal-
lenging the content of a student record as well as the
policies governing access to and maintenance of student
records.

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
Students enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to
membership in a university community and are subject to
the responsibilities that accompany that membership. In
order to have a system of effective campus governance, it
is incumbent upon all members of the campus community
to notify appropriate officials of any violations of regula-
tions and to assist in their enforcement. The University's
conduct regulations are available to all students on the
Internet at http://oss.ufl.edu/stg/ and are set forth in Florida
Administrative Code. Questions should be directed to the
Dean of Students Office in 202 Peabody Hall, (352)392-
1261.

REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS
The University of Florida operates on a semester system
consisting of two 16-week periods and two 6-week summer
terms. A credit under the semester system is equal to 1.5
quarter credits.
Graduate Students on Appointment.-Minimum regis-
tration for trainees and fellows with stipends of $3,150 or
greater, is 12 credits. The minimum full-time registration
requirement is reduced forthose students who are graduate
assistants. For students on appointment for the full summer,
minimum registration must total that specified for C term.
Registration may be in any combination of A, B, or C terms.
However, courses must be distributed so that the student is
registered during each term that he/she is on appointment.


Students on appointment registering for any summer term
must register at the beginning of A term. Students who do
not register properly (according to the table below) in each
semester in which they hold graduate assistantships will not
be permitted to remain on assistantship and will have any
tuition payments voided for that semester.


Minimum Full-Time Registration
Fall and
Spring
Full-Time Graduate Students
Not on Appointments 12
Assistants on .01-.24 FTE and/or
Fellows Receiving $3150 or More
Per Semester, and Trainees 12
Assistants on .25-.74 FTE 9
Assistants on .75-.99 FTE 6
Full-Time Assistants:
1.00 Fall & Spring 3
1.00 Summer A
1.00 Summer B
1.00 Summer C


Summer
A B orC
4 4 8


2 or 2
2 or 2
1 &1 or 2


NOTE: Registration requirements listed here do not apply to eligibility for
financial aid programs administered by the Office for Student
Financial Affairs. Check with Student Financial Affairs in S-107
Criser Hall for financial aid registration requirements.

Graduate Students Not on Appointment.-Full-time
students, not on appointment, must register for a minimum
of 12 credits. Part-time status may be approved by the
graduate coordinator or student's adviser for students who
are not pursuing a degree on a full-time basis. The minimum
study load for part-time students not on assistantship,
including fellows whose stipends are less than $3,150, is
three credits during fall and spring semesters and two for
summer.
Undergraduate Registration in Graduate Courses.-
Upper-division undergraduate students may enroll in 5000-
level courses with the permission of the instructor. Nor-
mally, a student must have a grade point average of at least
3.0. To enroll in 6000-level courses, a student must have
senior standing, permission of the instructor, and an upper-
division grade point average of at least 3.0.
After a student has been accepted in the Graduate
School, up to 15 hours of graduate-level courses earned
with a grade of A, B+, or B taken under this provision may
be applied toward a graduate degree at the University of
Florida provided credit for the course has not been used for
an undergraduate degree and provided the transfer is
approved by the department and made as soon as the
student is admitted to a graduate program.
Final Term Registration.-During the term in which the
final examination is given and during the term the degree is
received, a student must be registered for at least three hours
that count toward his/her graduate degree. Thesis students
must be registered for three hours of 6971 and doctoral
students for three hours of 7980. Minimum registration for
students taking their final examinations or graduating dur-
ing the summer terms is two hours of appropriate credit as
outlined above.
Cleared Prior.-Students exempt from final term registra-
tion must meet all of the following conditions before the
start of the first day of classes: 1) correctly registered in the
preceding term, 2) completed all degree requirements,
including final submission of the dissertation, thesis, or





26/ GENERAL INFORMATION


project and the final examination report, 3) submitted the
final examination form forthe nonthesis degrees, 4) cleared
all incomplete or other unresolved grades, and 5) filed
degree application with Office of the University Registrar.
Dropped Courses.-Courses may be dropped or added
during the drop/add period without penalty. After drop/
add, a course may be dropped and a W will appear on the
transcript. Any course added or dropped after the deadline
will result in a registration fee liability, even for students
with fee waivers.

CHANGE OF MAJOR OR COLLEGE
A graduate student who wishes to change colleges must
make formal application through the Office of the Univer-
sity Registrar and receive approval of the appropriate
department chairperson, college dean, and the Dean of the
Graduate School. Deadline dates for such changes as
specified in the current University Calendar must be met. A
graduate student who wishes to change major within a
college must submit a Change of Major form to the Gradu-
ate School. The change must be approved by the current
department, the new department, and the college.

COURSES AND CREDITS
Undergraduate courses (1000-2999) may not be used as
any part of the graduate degree requirements. Al 11000- and
2000-level courses may be taken on a satisfactory/unsatis-
factory basis (S/U).
Six hoursof undergraduate courses (3000-4999), outside
the major department, may be used for support course work
when taken as part of an approved graduate program..
Courses numbered 5000 and above are limited to gradu-
ate students, with the exception described under Under-
graduate Registration in Graduate Courses. Courses num-
bered 7000 and above are designed primarily for advanced
graduate students.
No more than five hours each of 6910 (Supervised
Research) and 6940 (Supervised Teaching) may be taken by
a graduate student at the University of Florida. Students
who have taken five hours of 6910 cannot take 6910; the
rule also applies to 6940 and 7940.
A complete list of approved graduate courses appears in
the section of this catalog entitled Fields of Instruction.
Departments reserve the right to decide which of these
graduate courses will be offered in a given semester and the
departments should be consulted concerning available
courses.
Generally graduate courses may not be repeated for
credit. However, there is no limit on courses numbered
6971,6972, 6979, 7979, and 7980. Other courses that may
be repeated for credit are designated by max: immediately
following the semester credit designation.
Graduate students must conform to the Office of the
University Registrar's deadline for drops. However, under
certain circumstances, substitutions of courses, if approved
by the Graduate School, are permitted after the Registrar's
deadline.
Professional Work.-Graduate students may receive
credit toward their degrees for courses in professional
programs (e.g. J.D., D.V.M., or M.D.) when their advisers
and graduate coordinators certify that the course work is


appropriate for their programs and when the students
receive permission from the departments and colleges
offering the courses. A list of such courses for each student
must be filed with the Graduate School Records Office.

GRADES
The only passing grades for graduate students are A, B+,
B, C+, C, and S. C+ and C grades count toward a graduate
degree if an equal number of credit hours in courses
numbered 5000 or higher have been earned with grades of
B+ and A, respectively. Grade points are not designated for
S and U grades; these grades are not used in calculating the
grade-point average.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.-Grades of S and U are the
only grades awarded in courses numbered 6910 (Super-
vised Research), 6940 (Supervised Teaching), 6971 (Master's
Research), 6972 (Engineer's Research), 7979 (Advanced
Research), and 7980 (Doctoral Research). Additional
courses for which S and U grades apply are noted in the
departmental offerings.
All language courses regardless of level may be taken S/
U ifthe student'smajor is not a language and the courses are
not used to satisfy a minor. Approval is required from the
student's supervisory committee chair and the instructor of
the course. S/U approval should be made by the date
stipulated in the Schedule of Courses. All 1000 and 2000
level courses may be taken S/U. No other courses-
graduate, undergraduate, or professional-may be taken
for an S/U grade.
Deferred Grade H.-The grade of H is nota substitute for
a grade of S, U, or I. Courses for which H grades are
appropriate must be so noted in their catalog descriptions,
and must be approved by the Graduate Curriculum Commit-
tee and the Graduate School. This grade may be used only in
special situations where the expected unit of work may be
developed over a period of time greater than a single term.
Incomplete Grades.-Grades of I (incomplete) received
during the preceding semester should be removed as soon
as possible. Grades of I carry no quality points and lowerthe
overall grade-point average. Students with less than a 3.0
GPA may not hold an assistantship or fellowship; the use of
I grades may put that employment or fellowship in jeop-
ardy. Under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, the
Graduate School cannot continue beyond one probation-
ary semester to approve students to continue assistantships
and receive fee payments unless they have an overall 3.0 or
better GPA.
All grades of H and I must be removed prior to the award
of a graduate degree.

UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP

Any graduate student may be denied further registration
in the University or in a graduate program should scholastic
performance or progress toward completion of the planned
program become unsatisfactory to the department, college,
or Dean of the Graduate School. Failure to maintain a B
average (3.0) in all work attempted is, by definition, unsat-
isfactory scholarship. In addition to an overall GPA of 3.0,
a graduate student must also have a 3.0 GPA in his/her
major (as well as in a minor if a minor is declared) atthe time
of graduation.









FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATION
A foreign language examination is not required for all
degree programs and the student should contact the graduate
coordinator in the appropriate department for specific infor-
mation regarding any requirement of a foreign language.
If a department requires that a student meet the foreign
language requirement by satisfactory performance on the
Graduate School Foreign Language Tests (GSFLT) in French,
Spanish, or German, the student should contact the Office
of Instructional Resources, 1012 Turlington Hall, for an
application and payment of fees. The examination times
and dates are listed in the University Calendar. Educational
Testing Service (ETS) no longer administers this examina-
tion and does not accept application fees or issue tickets of
admission for these tests.

EXAMINATIONS
The student must be registered for an appropriate load
during the semester in which any examination is taken. The
student's supervisory committee is responsible for the ad-
ministration of the written and oral qualifyingexaminations
as well as the final oral examination for the defense of the
thesis, project, or dissertation. All members of the supervi-
sory committee must sign the appropriate forms, including
the signature pages of the thesis or dissertation, in order for
the student to satisfy the requirements of the examination.
The written comprehensive examination forthe nonthesis
master's degree may be taken at a remote cite. All other
qualifying and final examinations for graduate students are
to be held on the University of Florida campus. Exceptions
to this policy are made only for certain graduate students
whose examinations are administered at the Agricultural
Research and Educational Centers or on the campuses of
the universities in the State University System.
With the approval of all members of the supervisory
committee, one committee member may be off-site at a
qualifying oral examination or at the final oral defense of the
dissertation or thesis, using modern communication technol-
ogy to participate rather than being physically present.

PREPARATION FOR FINAL SEMESTER
It is the student's responsibility to ascertain that all
requirements have been met and that every deadline is
observed. Deadline dates are set forth in the University
Calendar and by the college, school, or department. Regu-
lar issues of Deadline Dates are distributed to the depart-
ments each semester and available on the Web at http://
www.rgp.ufl.edu/education/student.
When the dissertation or thesis is ready to be put in final
form, the student should obtain the Guide for Preparing
Theses and Dissertations from the Graduate School Edito-
rial Office (availableon the Web at http://www.rgp.ufl.edu/
education/student) and should request a records check in
the Graduate Records Office to make certain that all
requirements for graduation have been fulfilled.
Students must also file a degree application with the
Office of the University Registrar (S222 Criser Hall) at the
beginning of the final term and meet minimum registration
requirements. See Cleared Prior in this catalog.


REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 27


AWARDING OF DEGREES
The Graduate School will authorize a candidate to be
-awarded the degree appropriate to the course of study
under the following conditions (the details of which can be
found under the descriptions of the several degrees):
1. The candidate must have completed all course re-
quirements, including an internship or practicum if re-
quired, in the major and minor fields, observing time limits,
limitations on transfer credit, on nonresident work, and on
level of course work.
2. The candidate must have agrade average of B or higher
in the major and in all work attempted in the graduate
program. All grades of I, H, and X must be resolved. Grades
of I, X, D, E, and U require a written petition to the Dean of
the Graduate School.
3. The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all
required examinations, qualifying, comprehensive, and
final, and be recommended for the degree by the supervi-
sory committee, major department, and college.
4. The dissertation or, if required, thesis or equivalent
project must have been approved by the supervisory com-
mittee and accepted by the Graduate School. Recommen-
dations for the awarding of a degree include meeting all
academic and professional qualifications as judged by the
faculty of the appropriate department.
5. All requirements for the degree must be met while the
candidate is a registered graduate student.

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT
Graduates who are to receive advanced degrees are
urged to attend Commencement in order to accept person-
ally the honor indicated by the appropriate hood. The
student may arrange through the University Bookstore for
the proper academic attire to be worn at Commencement.



REQUIREMENTS FOR

MASTER'S DEGREES


GENERAL REGULATIONS
The following regulations represent those of the Gradu-
ate School. Colleges and departments may have additional
regulations beyond those stated below. Unless otherwise
indicated in the following sections concerning master's
degrees, these general regulations apply to all master's
degree programs at the University.
Course Requirements.-Graduate credit is awarded for
courses numbered 5000 and above. The program of course
work for a master's degree must be approved by the
student's adviser, supervisory committee, or faculty repre-
sentativeofthedepartment. No more than ninecredits from
a previous master's degree program may be applied toward
a second master's degree. These credits are applied only
with the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate
School.
If a minor is chosen, at least six credits of work are
required in the minor field. Two six-credit minors may be






28/ GENERAL INFORMATION


taken with department permission. Minor work must be in
a department other than the major; in special cases this
requirement may be modified, but only with the written
permission of the Dean of the Graduate School. A GPA of
3.0 is required for minor credit.
The work in the major field must be in courses numbered
5000 or above. For work outside the major, 6 hours of
courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken provided
they are part of an approved plan of study.
Degree Requirements.-Unless otherwise specified, for
any master's degree, the student mustearn a minimum of 30
credits as a graduate student at the University of Florida, of
which no more than nine hours, earned with a grade of A,
B+, or B, may be transferred from institutions approved for
this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least
half ofthe required credits, exclusiveof 6971, must be inthe
field of study designated the major.
Transfer of Credit.-Only graduate (5000-7999) level
work to the extent of 9 semester hours, earned with a grade
of A, B+, or B, may be transferred from an institution
approved by the Graduate School or 15 semester hours
from postbaccalaureate work at the University of Florida.
Credits transferred from other universities will be applied
toward meeting the degree requirements but the grades
earned will not be computed in the student's grade-point
average. Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval
of the student's supervisory committee and the Dean of the
Graduate School.
Petitions for transfer of credit for a master's degree must
be made duringthe student's firstterm of enrollment in the
Graduate School.
The responsibility rests with the supervisory committee to
base acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established
criteria for ensuring the academic integrity of course work.
Supervisory Committee.-The student's supervisorycom-
mittee should be appointed as soon as possible after the
student has been admitted to the Graduate School but in no
case later than the second semester of graduate study.
Supervisory committees for graduate degree programs
are nominated by the respective department chair, ap-
proved by the college dean, and appointed by the Dean of
the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School is
an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees. Only
those members of the faculty who have been appointed to
the Graduate Faculty may serve as members of a supervi-
sory committee. If a student takes less than 12 hours in the
first term, the deadline date to appoint a supervisory com-
mittee is at the end of the term in which he/she has
accumulated 12 or more credit hours or at the end of the
second semester. If a minor is designated for any degree,
the committee must include one member as the represen-
tative forthat proposed minor. Iftwo minors aredesignated,
two representatives must be appointed to the committee.
The supervisory committee for a master's degree with a
thesis must consist of at least two members selected from
the Graduate Faculty. The supervisory committee for a
master's degree without thesis may consist of one member
of the Graduate Faculty who advises the student and
oversees the program. If a minor is designated, the commit-
tee must include one Graduate Faculty member from the
minor department.
Language Requirements.-(1) The requirement of a read-


ing knowledge of a foreign language is at the discretion of
the department. The foreign language requirement varies
from department to department and the student should
check with the appropriate department for specific infor-
mation. (2) The ability to use the English language correctly
and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee, is
required of all candidates.
Examination.-A final comprehensive examination must
be passed by the candidate. This examination must cover
at least the candidate's field of concentration and, in no
case, may it be schedule earlier than the term preceding the
semester in which the degree is to be awarded. The written
comprehensive examination for the nonthesis master's
degree may be taken at a remote site. All other examina-
tions must be held on campus with all participants.
Time Limitation.-All work, including transferred credit,
counted toward the master's degree must be completed
during the seven years immediately preceding the date on
which the degree is awarded.
Leave of Absence.-A master's student who will not be
registered at the University of Florida for a period of two or
more semesters should obtain prior written approval from
his/her faculty adviser for a leave of absence for a desig-
nated period of time. The student will be required to
reapply for admission upon his/her return. See Readmis-
sion in this catalog.


MASTER OF ARTS AND
MASTER OF SCIENCE
The requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of
Science degrees also apply to the following degrees, except
as they are individually described hereafter: Master of Arts
in Education, Master of Arts in Mass Communication,
Master of Science in Building Construction, Master of
Science in Health Science Education, Master of Science in
Pharmacy, Master of Science in Recreational Studies, and
Master of Science in Statistics.
Course Requirements.-The minimum course work re-
quired for a master's degree with thesis is 30 credits'
including up to 6 hours of the research course numbered
6971. All students seeking a master's degree with thesis
must register for an appropriate number of hours in 6971.
The Graduate School requirement for a Master of Arts or
Master of Science degree taken with a nonthesis option is
at least 32 credits. No more than 6 credits of S/U-graded
courses may be counted in meeting the minimum require-
ments for a nonthesis option. Students pursuing the nonthe-
sis option may not use the course numbered 6971.
For both nonthesis option and thesis programs, at least
half the required credits, exclusive of 6971, must be in a
field of study designated the major. One or two minors of
at least six credits each may be taken, but a minor is not
required by the Graduate School. Minor work must be in a
department other than the major.
Engineering students, working at off-campus centers,
who are pursuing a nonthesis option Master of Science
degree, must take half the course work from full-time
University of Florida faculty members and are required to
pass a comprehensive written examination by an examin-
ing committee recommended by the Dean of the College of






REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 29


Engineering and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School. This written comprehensive examination may be
taken at an off-campus site.
Theses.-Candidates for the master's degree with thesis
must prepare and present theses (or equivalent in creative
work) acceptable to their supervisory committees and the
Graduate School. The candidate should consult the Gradu-
ate School Editorial Office for instructions concerning the
form of the thesis. The University Calendar specifies final
dates for submitting the original copy of the thesis to the
Graduate School. The college copy should also be submit-
ted to the college orto the library by the specified date. After
the thesis is accepted, these two copies will be permanently
bound and deposited in the University Libraries.
Electronic Theses.-The University of Florida is con-
ducting a pilot project in which the final submission of the
thesis is electronic: This is part of a national electronic
thesis and dissertation (ETD) initiative which will make
University of Florida graduate research available on the
World Wide Web. More information is available at http://
www.circa.ufl.edu/etd/or from the Graduate School Edito-
rial Office.
Change from Thesis to Nonthesis Option.-A student
who wishes to change from the thesis to the nonthesis
option for the master's degree must obtain the permission
of the supervisory committee to make such a change. This
permission must be forwarded to the Graduate School at
least one full semester prior to the intended date of gradu-
ation. The candidate must meet all the requirements of the
nonthesis option as specified above. A maximum of three.
credits earned with a grade of S in 6971 (Master's Research)
can be counted toward the degree requirements only if
converted to credit as A, B+, or B in Individual Work. The
supervisory committee must indicate that the work was
productive in and by itself and warrants credit as a special
problem or special topic course.
Supervisory Committee.-The student's supervisory com-
mittee should be appointed as soon as possible after the
student has been admitted to the Graduate School but in no
case later than the end of the second semester of study. The
duties of the supervisory .committee are to advise the
student, to checkon the student's qualifications and progress,
to supervise the preparation ofthethesis, and to conductthe
final examination.
Final Examination.-When the student's course work is
substantially completed, and the thesis is in final form, the
supervisory committee is required to examine the student
orally or in writing on (1) the thesis, (2) the major subjects,
(3) the minor or minors, and (4) matters of a general nature
pertaining to the field of study.
All supervisory committee members and the candidate
must be present at the final examination. At the time of the
examination, all committee members should sign the signa-
ture pages and the Final Examination Report. These may be
retained by the supervisory chair until acceptable comple-
tion of corrections. This examination may not be scheduled
earlier than the semester preceding the term the degree is to
be conferred.
Final Comprehensive Examination.-The student who
elects the nonthesis option must pass a comprehensive
written or oral examination on the major field of study and
on the minor if a minor is designated. This comprehensive


examination must be taken within six months ofthe date the
degree is to be awarded.



REQUIREMENTS FOR

THE PH.D.

Doctoral study consists of the independent mastery of a
field of knowledge and the successful pursuit of research.
Consequently, doctoral programs are more flexible and
varied than those leading to other graduate degrees. The
Graduate Council does not specify what courses will be
required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The general
requirement is that the program should be unified in
relation to a clear objective, that it should have the consid-
ered approval of the student's entire supervisory commit-
tee, and that it should include an appropriate number of
credit hours of doctoral research.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The course requirements for doctoral degrees vary from
field to field and from student to student. A minimum of 90
credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree is required for
the Ph.D. degree in all fields. All master's degrees counted
in the minimum must have been earned in the last seven
years.
Transfer of Credit.-No more than 30 hours of a master's
degree from another institution will be transferred to a
doctoral program. If a student holds a master's degree in a
discipline different from the doctoral program, the master's
work will not be counted in the program unless the depart-
ment petitions the Dean of the Graduate School. All
courses beyond the master's degree taken at another uni-
versity, to be applied to the Ph.D. degree, must be taken at
an institution offering the doctoral degree and must be
approved for graduate credit by the Graduate School of the
University of Florida. All courses to be transferred must be
letter graded with a grade of B or better and must be
demonstrated to relate directly to the degree being sought.
All such transfer requests must be made by petition of the
supervisory committee. The total number of credits (includ-
ing 30 for a prior master's degree) that may be transferred
cannot exceed 45, and in all cases the student must
complete the qualifying examination at the University of
Florida. In addition, any prior graduate-level credits earned
at the University of Florida (e.g., a master's degree in the
same or a different discipline) may be transferred into the
doctoral program at the discretion of the supervisory com-
mittee and by petition to the Graduate School. In such
cases, it is essential that the petition demonstrate the
relevance of the prior course work to the degree presently
being sought.
Major.-The student working for the Ph.D. must elect to
do the major work in a department or interdisciplinary unit
specifically approved for the offering of doctoral courses
and the supervision of dissertations. These fields are listed
under Graduate Programs.
Minor.-With the approval of the supervisory commit-
tee, the student may choose one or more minor fields.






30/ GENERAL INFORMATION


Minor work may be completed in any department, other
than the major department, approved for master's or doc-
toral degree programs as listed in this catalog. The collec-
tive grade for courses included in a minor must be B or
higher.
If one minor is chosen, the representative of the minor
department on the supervisory committee shall suggest
from 12 to 24 credits as preparation for a qualifying
examination. A part of this background may have been
acquired in the master's program. If two minors are chosen,
each must include at least 8 credits. Competence in the
minor area may be demonstrated through a written exami-
nation conducted by the minor department or through the
oral qualifying examination.
Course work in the minor at the doctoral level need not
be restricted to the courses of one department, provided
that the minor has a clearly stated objective and that the
combination of courses representing the minor shall be
approved by the Graduate School. This procedure is not
required for a departmental minor.


LEAVE OF ABSENCE

A doctoral student who will not be registered at the
University of Florida for a period of more than one semester
should obtain prior written approval from his/her faculty
adviser for a leave of absence for a designated period of
time. The student will be required to reapply for admission
upon his/her return. See Readmission in this catalog.


SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

Supervisory committees are nominated by the depart-
ment chairperson, approved by the dean of the college
concerned, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School. The committee should be appointed as soon as
possible after the student has begun doctoral work and in
general no later than the end of the second semester of
equivalent full-time study. The Dean of the Graduate
School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory commit-
tees.
Duties and Responsibilities.-Duties of the supervisory
committee follow:
1. To inform the student of all regulations governing the
degree sought. It should be noted, however, that this does
not absolve the student from the responsibility of inform-
ing himself/herself concerning these regulations. (See Stu-
dent Responsibility.)
2. To meet immediately after appointment to review the
qualifications of the student and to discuss and approve a
program of study.
3. To meet to discuss and approve the proposed disser-
tation project and the plans for carrying it out.
4. To give the student a yearly letter of evaluation in
addition to the S/U grades awarded for the research courses
7979 and 7980. The chair should write this letter after
consultation with the supervisory committee.
5. To conduct the qualifying examination or, in those
cases where the examination is administered bythe depart-
ment, to take part in it. In either event, no fewer than five


faculty members shall be present with the student for the
oral portion of the examination. This examination must be
given on campus. (See Examinations in the General Regu-
lations section of this catalog for variation in procedure.)
6. To meet when the work on the dissertation is at least
one-half completed to review procedure, progress, and
expected results and to make suggestions for completion.
7. To meeton campus when the dissertation is completed
and conduct the final oral examination to assure that the
dissertation is a piece of original research and a contribu-
tion to knowledge. No fewer than four faculty members,
including all members of the supervisory committee shall
be present with the candidate for this examination. Only
members of the official supervisory committee may sign the
dissertation and they must approve the dissertation unani-
mously. (See Examinations in the General Regulations
section of this catalog for variation in procedure.)
Membership.-The supervisory committee for a candi-
date for the doctoral degree shall consist of no fewer than
four members selected from the Graduate Faculty. At least
two members, including the chairperson, will be from the
department recommending the degree, and at least one
member will be drawn from a different educational disci-
pline.
If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee will
include at least one person selected from the Graduate
Faculty from outside the discipline of the major for the
purpose of representing the student's minor. In the event
that the student elects more than one minor, each minor
area must be represented on the supervisory committee.
The Graduate Council desires each supervisory commit-
tee to function as a University committee, as contrasted
with a departmental committee, in order to bring Univer-
sity-wide standards to bear upon the various doctoral
degrees.
A cochairperson may be appointed to serve during a
planned absence of the chairperson.


LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
Any foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. is estab-
lished by the major department with approval of the col-
lege. The student should check with the graduate coordina-
tor of the appropriate department for specific information.
The foreign language departments offer special classes for
graduate students who are beginning the study of a lan-
guage. See the current Schedule of Courses for the lan-
guages in which this assistance is available.
The ability to use the English language correctly and
effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee, is
required of all candidates.


CAMPUS RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT
Beyond the first 30 hours counted toward the doctoral
degree, students must complete 30 hours in residence at the
University of Florida campus or at an approved branch
station of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment
Stations or the Graduate Engineering and Research Center.
A department or college may establish and monitor its own
more stringent requirement as desired.





REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 31


QUALIFYING EXAMINATION
The qualifying examination, which is required of all
candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, may be
taken during the third semester of graduate study beyond
the bachelor's degree.
The student must be registered in the term in which the
qualifying examination is given.
The examination, prepared and evaluated by the full
supervisory committee or the major and minor depart-
ments, is both written and oral and covers the major and
minor subjects. All members of the supervisory committee,
must be present with the student at the oral portion. The
supervisory committee has the responsibility at this time of
deciding whether the student is qualified to continue work
toward a Ph.D. degree.
If a student fails the qualifying examination, the Graduate
School must be notified. A re-examination may be re-
quested, but it must be recommended by the supervisory
committee and approved by the Graduate School. At least
one semester of additional preparation is considered essen-
tial before re-examination.
Time Lapse.-Between the oral portion of the qualifying
examination and the date of the degree there must be a
minimum of two semesters. The semester in which the
qualifying examination is passed is counted, provided that
the examination occurs before the midpoint of the term.


ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY

A graduate student does not become a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree until granted formal admission to candidacy.
Such admission requires the approval of the student's
supervisory committee, the department chairperson, the
college dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The
approval must be based on (1) the academic record of the
student, (2) the opinion of the supervisory committee
concerning overall fitness for candidacy, (3) an approved
dissertation topic, and (4) a qualifying examination as
described above. Application for admission to candidacy
should be made as soon as the qualifying examination has
been passed and a dissertation topic has been approved by
the student's supervisory committee. A student may regis-
ter for 7980 (Research for Dissertation) in the term he or she
is admitted to candidacy for a doctoral degree.


DISSERTATION

Every candidate for a doctoral degree is required to
prepare and present a dissertation that shows independent
investigation and is acceptable in form and content to the
supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. Disser-
tations must be written in English, except for students
pursing degrees in Romance or German languages and
literatures. Students in these disciplines, with the approval
of their supervisory committees, may write in the topic
language. A copy of each approval should be forwarded to
the Graduate School.
Since all doctoral dissertations will be published by
microfilm, it is necessary that the work be of publishable
quality and that it be in a form suitable for publication.


The original copy of the dissertation must be presented to
the Editorial Office of the Graduate School on or before the
date specified in the University Calendar. It must contain an
abstract and be accompanied by a letter of transmittal from
the supervisory chairperson, and all doctoral forms. After
corrections have been made, and no laterthan the specified
formal submission date, the fully signed copy of the disser-
tation, together with the signed Final Examination Report
and five copies of the abstract, should be returned to the
Graduate School. The original copy of the dissertation is
sent by the Graduate School to the Library for microfilming
and hardbinding. A second copy, reproduced on required
thesis paper, should be delivered to the Library or college
for hardbinding. The supervisory chairperson and the can-
didate will each need a copy and, if required, another
should also be provided for the departmental library.
Publication of Dissertation.-All candidates forthe Ph.D.
and Ed.D. degrees are required to pay the sum of $55 to
University Financial Services, S113 Criser Hall, for micro-
filming their dissertations, and to sign an agreement autho-
rizing publication by microfilm.
Copyright.-The candidate may choose to copyright the
microfilmed dissertation for a charge of $45 payable by a
certified or cashier's checkor money order to UMI attached
to the signed microfilm agreement form. To assure receipt
of the valuable Copyright Registration Certificate, candi-
dates must give permanent addresses through which they
can always be reached.
Electronic Dissertation.-The University of Florida is
conducting a pilot project in which the final submission of
the dissertation is electronic. This is part of a national
electronic thesis and dissertation (ETD) initiative which will
make University of Florida graduate research available on
the World Wide Web. More information is available at
http://www.circa.ufl.edu/~etd/orfromtheGraduateSchool
Editorial Office.


GUIDELINES FOR RESTRICTION ON RELEASE OF
DISSERTATIONS
Research performed at the University can effectively con-
tribute to the education of our students and to the body of
knowledge that is our heritage only if the results of the research
are published freely and openly. Conflicts can develop when
it is in the interests of sponsors of university research to restrict
such publication. When such conflicts arise, the University
must decide what compromises it is willing to accept, taking
into account the relevant circumstances. The AAU guidelines
contained herein were adopted by the University of Florida
Graduate Council on January 19, 1989.
1. The recommendations of sponsors, which result from
prepublication reviews of research results and which affect
subsequent publication of these results, should be consid-
ered advisory rather than mandatory.
2. The maximum delay in publication allowed for pre-
reviews should not exceed three months.
3. There should be no additional delays in publication
beyond the pre-review. Timely submission of any patent or
copyright applications should be the result of effective
communication between investigators and sponsors
throughout the course of the project.





32 / GENERAL INFORMATION


4. There should be no restriction on participation in
nonclassified sponsored research programs on the basis of
citizenship.
5. Students should not be delayed in the final defense of
their dissertations by agreements involving publication
delays.

FINAL EXAMINATION
After submission of the dissertation and the completion
of all other prescribed work for the degree, but no earlier
than the term preceding the semester in which the degree
is conferred, the candidate will be given a final examina-
tion, oral or written or both, by the supervisory committee
meeting on campus. All supervisory committee members
must be present with the candidate atthe oral portion of this
examination. At the time of the defense all committee
members should sign the signature pages and all committee
and attending faculty members should sign the Final Exami-
nation Report. These may be retained by the supervisory
chair until acceptable completion of corrections.
Satisfactory performance on this examination and adher-
ence to all Graduate School regulations outlined above
complete the requirements for the degree.
Time Limitation.-All work for the doctorate must be
completed within five calendar years after the qualifying
examination, or this examination must be repeated.

CERTIFICATION
Doctoral candidates who have completed all require-
ments for the degree, including satisfactory defense and
final acceptance of the dissertation, may request certifica-
tion to that effect prior to receipt of the degree. Certification
request forms, available in the Graduate School Editorial
Office, should be filled out by the candidate, signed by the
supervisory chair and college dean, and returned to the
Graduate School for verification and processing.


SPECIALIZED GRADUATE

DEGREES

The Graduate School monitors the degree criteria stipu-
lated below. See departmental program descriptions in this
catalog for additional requirements.

MASTER OF ACCOUNTING

The Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) is.the professional
degree for students seeking careers in public accounting,
business organizations, and government. The M.Acc. pro-
gram offers specializations in auditing/financial account-
ing, accounting systems, and taxation.
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a profes-
sional career in accounting is the 3/2 five-year program
with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science in Ac-
counting and the Master of Accounting degrees upon
satisfactory completion of the 152-hour program. The entry


point into the 3/2 is the beginning of the senior year.
Students who have already completed an undergraduate
degree in accounting may enter the one-year M.Acc. pro-
gram which requires satisfactory completion of 34 hours of
course work, a minimum of 18 semester credits must be in
graduate level accounting, excluding preparatory courses.
A final comprehensive examination is required of all stu-
dents. Additional requirements are listed underthe General
Regulations section for all master's degrees.
M.Acc./J.D. Program.-This joint program culminates
in both the Juris Doctor degree awarded by the College of
Law and the Master of Accounting degree awarded by the
Graduate School. The program is designed for students who
have an undergraduate degree in accounting and who are
interested in advanced studies in both accounting and law.
The joint program requires 20 fewer credits than would be
required if the two degrees were earned separately. Thetwo
degrees are awarded after completion of the curriculum
requirements for both degrees. Students must take both the
GMAT (or the GRE) and the LSAT prior to admission, and
must meet the admission requirements for the College of
Law (J.D.) and the Fisher School of Accounting (M. Acc.).


MASTER OF AGRIBUSINESS

The Master of Agribusiness (M.Ag.B.) degree program
provides an opportunity for advanced study for students
seeking careers with private firms in the agribusiness sector.
It is not recommended for those who seek careers in
research and university teaching.
The core program is comprised of 21 credits which cover
finance, marketing, decision-making, and quantitative
methods relevantto agribusiness. Students must participate
in an internship program. Twelve hours of electives are
available, part of which can be used in an agricultural
science department.
The supervisory committee and examination require-
ments are the same as those for the Master of Agriculture
degree below.


MASTER OF AGRICULTURE

The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for those
students whose primary interests are other than research..
The general requirements are the same as those for the
Master of Science degree without thesis except that 12
credits of graduate courses in a department constitute a
major. The student's supervisory committee must consist of
at leastone memberofthe Graduate Faculty. A comprehen-
sive written or oral examination is required in the final term
of study.


MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

The degree of Master of Architecture is an accredited
professional degree meeting the requirements of the Na-
tional Architectural Accrediting Board, for those students





SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES /33


who wish to qualify for registration and practice as archi-
tects. Candidates are admitted from architectural, related,
and unrelated undergraduate backgrounds; professional
experience is encouraged but not required.
The general requirements are the same as those for the
Master of Arts degrees with thesis except that the minimum
registration required is 52 credits, including no more than
6 credits in ARC 6971 or 6979. Course sequences in design
history and theory, materials and methods, structures,
technology, and practice must be completed. Students are
encouraged to propose individual programs of study (out-
side of required courses), and interdisciplinary work is
encouraged.


MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING AND
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING

These degrees are designed for graduate students who
intend.to teach in junior/community colleges. Require-
ments for admission are the same as those for the regular
M.A. and M.S. degrees in the various colleges, and pro-
grams leading to the M.A.T. and M.S.T. may, with proper
approval, be incorporated into programs leading to the
Ph.D.
The requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language if
required by the student's major department.
2. Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits while
registered as a graduate student, with work distributed as
follows:
a. At least 18 credits in the major and 6 credits in the
minor.
b. Six credits in a departmental internship in teaching
(6943-Internship in College Teaching). Threeyears
of successful teaching experience in a state certified
school may be substituted forthe internship require-
ment, and credits thus made available may be used
for further work in the major, the minor, or in
education.
c. At least one course in each of the following: social
foundations of education, psychological founda-
tions of education, and community college curricu-
lum. These courses may be used to comprise a
minor.
3. Off-Campus Work: A minimum of 8-16 credits (at the
department's discretion), including registration for at least
6 credit hours in a single semester, must be earned on the
Gainesville campus. Beyond that, credits earned in courses
offered off-campus by the University of Florida which have
been approved by the Graduate School shall be accepted,
provided they are appropriate to the student's degree
program as determined by the supervisory committee.
4. At the completion of this degree, the student, for
certification purposes, must present from the undergradu-
ate and graduate degree programs no fewer than 36 semes-
ter credits in the major field.
5. A final comprehensive examination, either written,
oral, or both, must be passed by the candidate. This
examination, will cover the field of concentration and the
minor.


MASTER OF ARTS IN URBAN AND
REGIONAL PLANNING

The degree of Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning is a professional degree for students who wish to
practice urban and regional planning and meet the educa-
tional requirements for the American Institute of Certified
Planners. The program is accredited by the Planning Ac-
creditation Board.
The general requirements are the same as those for other
Master of Arts degrees with thesis except that the minimum
registration required is 52 credits including no more than 6
credits in URP 6971 or 6979. In some study areas, with
permission from the departmental Graduate Faculty, a
terminal project requiring 6 credits may be elected in lieu
of a thesis.
M.A.U.R.P./J.D. Joint Program.-A four-year program
leading to the Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Urban and.
Regional Planning degrees is offered under the joint aus-
pices of the College of Law and the College of Architecture,
Department of Urban and Regional Planning. The program
provides students interested in the legal problems of urban
and regional planning with an opportunity to blend law
studies with relevant course work in the planning curricu-
lum. The students receive both degrees at the end of a four-
year course of study whereas separate programs would
require five years. Students must take the GRE and the LSAT
prior to admission, must be admitted to both programs, and
must complete the first year of law school course work
before commingling law and planning courses. A thesis is
required upon completion of the course work.
Interested students should applyto both the Holland Law
Center and the Graduate School, noting on the application
the joint nature of their admission requests. Further infor-
mation on the program is available from the Holland Law
Center and from the Department of Urban and Regional
Planning.


MASTER OF BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION

The degree of Master of Building Construction is de-
signed for those students who wish to pursue advanced
work in management of construction, construction tech-
niques, and research problems in the construction field.
The general requirements are the same as those for
Master of Science degrees except that a minimum of 33
graduate level credits is required. At least 18 credits must
be in the School of Building Construction in graduate level
courses. Nine credits must be earned at the 6000 level in
building construction courses. The remaining 15 credits
may be earned in other departments. A thesis is not re-
quired, but an independent research study (BCN 6934) of
at least three credits is required.
When the student's course work is completed, or practi-
cally so, and the independent research report is complete,
the supervisory committee is required to examine the
student orally on (1 )the independent research report, (2)the
major subjects, (3) the minor or minors, and (4) matters of
a general nature pertaining to the field of study.





34 / GENERAL INFORMATION


MASTER OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION

The Master of Business Administration degree is de-
signed to give students (1) the conceptual knowledge for
understanding the functions and behaviors common to all
organizations and (2) the analytical, problem-solving, and
decision-making skills essential for effective management.
The emphasis is on developing the student's capacities and
skills for business decision making.
The curriculum is structured so that students may extend
their knowledge in a specialized field. Included are college
certificate programs in decision and information sciences,
e-commerce, entrepreneurship and technology manage-
ment, financial services, global management, and supply
chair management, as well as concentrations in arts admin-
istration, business strategy and public policy, competitive
strategy, decision and information sciences, entrepreneur-
ship, finance, global management, international studies,
human resource management, Latin American business,
management, marketing, real estate, security analysis, and
sports administration.
Admission.-Applicants for admission must submit scores
from the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) as
well as transcripts for all previous academic work. Two
years of professional work experience is required, along
with written essays and personal recommendations. In
addition some applicants are asked to interview. Applicants
whose native language is not English are required to submit
scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
A heterogeneous student body is seen as an important
asset of the program. Accordingly, the backgrounds of
students include a wide range of disciplines and cultures.
The curriculum assumes no previous academic work in
managerial disciplines or business administration. How-
ever, enrolling students find introductory course work in
statistics, calculus, and financial accounting beneficial.
Recommended application deadlines are June 1 for the
traditional and executive program options, November 1 for
the managers, weekend, and flexible program options, and
March 1 for the accelerated and flexible program options.
For more specific information on admission as well as other
aspects of the program, contact the Director of Admissions,
M.B.A. Program, 134 Bryan hall, P.O. Box 117152, Gaines-
ville, FL 32611-7152, or the website, http://
www.floridamba.ufl.edu.

Course Work Required.-A minimum of 48 credits of
course work is required for the traditional two-year; 32
credits for the 11-month accelerated and managers pro-
gram options.
Options.
Traditional Two-Year M.B.A. Program.-The traditional
M.B.A. program requires four semesters of full-time study.
Entering in the fall only, most students spend the summer as
an intern or on an international exchange program.
AcceleratedM.B.A. Program.-Designed for undergradu-
ate business majors, this program begins in May. Two to
five years of postgraduate work experience is required.
Executive M.B.A. Program.-A 20-month program de-
signed for working professionals, students attend one class


once a month for a long weekend Friday-Sunday). The
program is divided into five terms and begins in August.
Managers M.B.A. Program.-The "executive version" of
the accelerated program, students begin in January and
complete the degree by the following December. Students
attend class once a month for a long weekend (Friday-
Sunday). The January session is 1 week in length to include
a foundations review of basic course work. To apply,
students must have a business undergraduate degree and
more than 2 years but less than 7 years of full-time profes-
sional work experience.
Flexible M.B.A. Program.-This 33-month program be-
gins in January and is designed to allow students with a
computer and Internet access to "attend" classes and inter-
act with faculty and classmates via such technology as e-
mail, CD-ROM, streaming video, synchronous group dis-
cussion software, asynchronous class presentation soft-
ware, and multimedia courseware. At least two years of
professional work experience are required.
Weekend M.B.A. Program.-This 30-month program
begins in January and is designed for professionals who
wish to continue working full time while pursing their
degrees on a part-time basis. While the structure is similar
to that of the executive option, this program option is better
suited to individuals at earlier stages in their careers or who
face other constraints that would make it difficult to partici-
pate in a full-time program.
M.B.A./M.S. in Medical Sciences (Biotechnology) Pro-
gram.-A program of concurrent studies leading to the
Master of Business Administration and Master of Science
degrees is offered in cooperation with the College of
Medicine. This joint program was established in response
to the needs of businesses engaged in biotechnological
sciences. Both degrees can be obtained in three years. The
program requires one year of science courses, one year of
business courses, and a year devoted to research and
electives in business and science. Research is done in one
of the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research
core laboratories. Students must take both the GMAT and
GRE prior to admission and meet the curriculum require-
ments of both degrees.
M.B.A./Ph.D. in Medical Sciences Program.-A pro-
gram of concurrent studies leadingto the Masterof Business
Administration and Doctor of Philosophy degrees offered in
cooperation with the College of Medicine, this 120-hour
program is designed to train research scientists to assume
responsibilities as managers ofbiotechnical industries. The
estimated time to complete both degrees is five to seven
years. Students must take both the GMAT and GRE prior to
admission and meet the admission and curriculum require-
ments of both programs.
M.B.A./M.E.S.S.(M.S.E.S.S.).-In three years, students
earn both the Master of Business Administration and Master
of Exercise and Sport Sciences (or Master of Science in
Exercise and Sport Sciences) degrees through this 66-hour
program of study. This joint program prepares student for
administration and management of sports. Sports and its
affiliated businesses are the 22nd largest industry in the
United States. Course topics include sport finance and
marketing, issues in sport law, and facilities management.
M.B.A./J.D. Program.-A program of concurrent studies
leading to the Master of Business Administration and Juris






SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES / 35


Doctor degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the
Warrington College of Business Administration and the
College of Law. Current M.B.A. or J.D. students must
declare their intent to apply for the second degree within
their first year. Applications are then due according to
admission schedules forthatyear. Both degrees are awarded
after a four-year course of study. Students musttake both the
LSAT and the GMAT prior to admission and meet the
curriculum requirements of both degrees.
M.B.A./Pharm.D. Program in Management and Phar-
macy Administration.-A program of concurrent studies
culminating in both the Master of Business Administration
and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees allows students interested
in both management and pharmacy administration to ob-
tain the appropriate education in both areas. Candidates
must meet the entrance requirements and follow the en-
trance procedures of both the Warrington College of Busi-
ness Administration and the College of Pharmacy, and
admission to the two programs must be simultaneous. The
degrees may be granted after five years of study.
M.B.A./M.I.B. Program in International Business Ad-
ministration.-A joint program which will culminate in the
Master of Business Administration (conferred by the War-
rington College of Business Administration, University of
Florida) and the Master of International Business (awarded
by Nijenrode, The Netherlands School of Business) allows
students interested in both management and international
business to obtain the appropriate education in both areas.
Both degrees may be granted after two years of study;
applicants must be simultaneously accepted by both col-
leges and satisfy the curriculum requirements of each
degree. Apply to the Director of M.B.A. Admissions for
criteria and current information.
M.B.A./M.I.M. Program in International Management.-
A dual degree program between the University of Florida
and the American Graduate School of International Man-
agement (Thunderbird) makes it possible to earn both
degrees after three years of study. Students begin the
program at the University of Florida and apply to Thunder-
bird in their first year.
M.B.A./B.S.I.S.E.-A joint program culminating in the
Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering
and Master of Business Administration degrees is offered
under the auspices of the College of Engineering and
Warrington College of Business Administration. The two
degrees may be granted after approximately six years of
course work. An applicant for the combined curriculum
must first be admitted to the Department of Industrial and
Systems Engineering for study toward the BSISE degree.
After completing a minimum of 80 semester hours of course
work and with the endorsement of the Department of
Industrial and Systems Engineering, the student should
apply to the M.B.A. program. To be eligible for the joint
program, a student should have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and
a competitive GMAT score. Foreign students must also
submit TOEFL scores. Further information on the joint
program may be obtained from the chairman's office,
Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering.
Exchange Programs.-The M.B.A. program offers sec-
ond-year students exchange opportunities at numerous
international universities. Currently, exchange programs
exist with the Manchester Business School in England, SDA


Bocconi University in Italy, Hong Kong University of Sci-
ence and Technology, Mannheim University in Germany,
Norwegian School of Management in Norway, Escuela
Superior de Administracion y Direccion de Empresas
(ESADE) in Spain, Odense University in Denmark, Asolo
University in Italy, WHU Koblenz in Germany, Group ESC
Lyon, ESC Rouen and ESC Toulouse in France, Helsinki
School of Economics and Business Administration in Fin-
land, International University of Japan, and Instiututo de
EstudiosSuperioresde Administracion (IESA)in Venezuela.
Since the M.B.A. program is continually exploring new
international study opportunities, interested applicants
should contact the program office (134 Bryan Hall) for
additional exchange opportunities.

MASTER OF EDUCATION

The degree of Master of Education is a professional
degree designed to meet the need for professional person-
nel to serve a variety of functions required in established
and emerging educational activities of modern society. A
thesis is not required.
A minimum of 36 credits is required in all master's
programs with at least half of these credits earned in courses
in the College of Education. No more than 6 credits earned
from 3000- and 4000-level courses taken out side the
College may be counted toward the minimum require-
ments for the degree. (See also General Requirements for
Master's Degrees.)
At least 16 credits must be earned while the student is
enrolled as a graduate student in courses offered on the
Gainesville campus of the University of Florida, including
registration for at least 6 credits in a single semester.

MASTER OF ENGINEERING

A student seeking a master's degree in the field of
engineering may become a candidate for the Master of
Engineering degree with or without thesis, provided such a
candidate has a bachelor's degree in engineering from an
ABET-accredited curriculum or has taken sufficient articu-
lation course work to meet the minimum requirements
specified by ABET. Students who do not meet this require-
ment may become candidates for the Master of Science
degree, provided they meet departmental requirements for
admission. The general intent in making this distinction is
to encourage those who are professionally oriented to seek
the Master of Engineering degree, and those who are more
scientifically oriented and those who have science-based
backgrounds to seek the Master of Science degree.
Also, the Master of Civil Engineering degree has been
approved as a variant of the Master of Engineering degree.
The M.C.E. is oriented specifically to the design and pro-
fessional practice in civil engineering. The degree require-
ments include a minimum number of hours of design and
professional practice instruction at the graduate level, six
months' full-time civil engineering related experience or its
equivalent obtained after the student has achieved junior
status, and completion of the Engineer Intern Examination.
Thethesis or report required for all master's degrees must be
design-related. Further details on this degree program may






36 / GENERAL INFORMATION


be obtained from the Chair, Department of Civil Engineer-
ing.
Work Required.-The minimum course work required
for the master's degree with thesis is 30 credits which may
include up to 6 credits of research numbered 6971 in all
departments. At least 12 credits, excluding 6971, must be
in the student's major field of study. A minimum of 32
credits of course work is required, with at least 16 credits in
the student's major field for the master's degree without
thesis. At least 30 of the 32 credits must be taken for a letter
grade. The Department of Mechanical Engineering re-
quires a minimum of 33 credits of course work while
Environmental Engineering Sciences requires a minimum
of 34 credits of course work for degrees without a thesis. At
least 50% of the required credits must be in graduate level
courses, excluding those graded S/U. Courses in the major
must be graduate level. If a minor is chosen, at least six
credits of work are required: two six-credit minors may be
taken. In addition, a multidisciplinary minor in depart-
ments other than the major may be authorized by the
supervisory committee or program adviser.
Degree Credit.-In order to qualify for course work
toward the Master of Engineering degree, a student must
first be admitted to the Graduate School at the University of
Florida. The amount of course work toward this degree that
may be taken at an off-campus center will depend upon the
student's individual program and the courses provided
through the center.
Examinations.-A student seeking the Master of Engi-
neering degree with or without thesis is required to pass a
comprehensive oral and/or written examination at the
completion of the course work. An off-campus student who
is a candidate for a nonthesis degree must take half the
course work from full-time University of Florida faculty
members and is required to pass a comprehensive written
examination administered by a committee recommended
by the Dean of the College of Engineering and appointed by
the Dean of the Graduate School. At least one member of
the examining committee must be either the student's
program adviseror a memberof the supervisory committee.
If a minor is taken, another member selected from the
Graduate Faculty must be chosen from outside the major
department to represent the student's minor.
A Certificate Program in Manufacturing Systems Engi-
neering has been established as an option for

MASTER OF FINE ARTS
The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered with majors in
art, creative writing, and theatre. The requirements for this
degree are the same as those for the Master of Arts with
thesis except that a minimum of 60 credits (48 for creative
writing) is required, including 6 to 10 credits in 6971
(Research for Master's Thesis). Students in art and theatre
may elect to substitute 6973 (Individual Project), creative
work in lieu of the written thesis. Students intending to
pursue this option should follow the general procedures
below:
1. Using the college form, the student must obtain
approval of a proposed project from the supervisory com-
mittee.
2. The student should include in the proposal a descrip-


tion of the nature of the project, the method and sources of
research material, and how the project will be recorded-
e.g., slides, tapes, scripts, program notes, etc.
3. Project must conform to school formats. To insure
future accessibility and for record keeping purposes, a copy
of the results must be deposited in a designated library.
Admission.-Applicants requesting admission to any of
the programs should have an earned baccalaureate degree
in the same or a closely related field from an accredited
institution.
Students must fulfill the requirements of their discipline,
as well as the Graduate School admission criteria. In cases
where the undergraduate degree is not in the area chosen
for graduate study, the student must demonstrate a level of
achievement fully equivalent to the bachelor's degree in
the graduate field concerned. A candidate found deficient
in certain areas will be required to remove the deficiencies
by successful completion of appropriate courses.
In addition, candidates in art or theatre are required to
submit slides and/or a portfolio of the creative work, or to
audition, prior to being accepted into the program. In
creative writing, the candidate must submit 2 short stories,
2 chapters of a novel, or 6 to 10 poems.
Three years of work in residence (two for creative writing)
are usually necessary to complete degree requirements. If
deficiencies must be removed, the residency could be
longer.
See additional information listed under the Fields of
Instruction section of this catalog for Art, English, and
Theatre.
Art.-The M.F.A. degree with a major in art is designed
for those who wish to prepare themselves as teachers of art
in colleges and universities and for those who wish to attain
a professional level of proficiency in studio work. Special-
ization is offered in the studio areas of ceramics, creative
photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture,
graphic design, and electronic intermedia. The M.F.A. is
generally accepted as the terminal degree in the studio area.
In addition to the general requirements above, students
are required to take a minimum of 60 credit hours. Require-
ments include 42 hours in studio courses (24 in specializa-
tion, 12 in electives, and 6 in ART 6971 or 6973C); 6 hours
in art history; 3 hours in seminar; 3 hours in aesthetics,
criticism, or art law; and 6 hours of electives.
The College reserves the right to retain student work for
purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Creative Writing.-The M.F.A. in creative writing helps
talented men and women develop as writers and critics
through a diverse selection of workshops and literary
studies. Students work continually and closely with the
writing faculty. Students are expected to produce a manu-
script of publishable work at the end of the program.
The program includes nine courses (four workshops,
three literature courses, and two electives), three reading
tutorials, and a thesis: 48 credits in all. Students take one
workshop each semester. All of the literature courses
cannot be in the same century. One elective may be taken
outside the Department; electives may also be taken as
independent study projects or additional literature courses.
The thesis is an original manuscript of fiction or poetry.
Theatre.-The M.F.A. degree with a major in theatre is
designed primarily for those interested in production-






SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES /37


oriented theatrical careers and teaching. Specialization is
offered in the areas of performance and design. The craft
skills encompassed in the program are given subsequent
application in public and studio productions.
Course work includes 18 hours of core classes, 17 hours
of specialty training, an internship, and a project in lieu of
thesis. The program totals 60 hours.


MASTER OF FISHERIES AND AQUATIC
SCIENCES
The nonthesis M.F.A.S. program is designed to train
students in the technical aspects of fisheries and aquatic
sciences with emphasis on written and oral communication
of scientific information. Requirements are the same as for
the Master of Science degree with the nonthesis option plus
a technical paper: A minimum of 32 graduate-credit hours
is required. At least 16 hours of the 32 credits must be in the
major. A technical paper in an appropriate professional
area is required. The final draft of this paper must be
submitted to all supervisory committee members for ap-
proval at least three weeks priorto the scheduled date of the
oral and written final examination.


MASTER OF FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION

The Master of Forest Resources and Conservation pro-
gram is designed for those students who wish additional
professional preparation, rather than for those interested
primarily in research. This nonthesis degree is offered in the
same areas as the Master of Science degree. The basic
requirements, including those for admission, supervisory
committee, and plan of study, are the same as those
indicated under General Regulations for master's degrees
in this catalog.
Work Required.-A minimum of 32 letter-graded cred-
its of course work is required with at least 16 credits in
graduate level courses in the major. A thesis is not re-
quired, but the student must submit a technical paper in an
appropriate field. A comprehensive written qualifying
examination, given by the supervisory committee, is re-
quired one semester prior to graduation. A final oral
examination, covering the candidate's entire field of study,
is required.


MASTER OF HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

The Master of Health Administration is designed to train
qualified individuals to become managers and leaders of
health care organizations. The degree provides a core of
business and analytical skills, concepts and knowledge
specific to health administration, opportunities for applica-
tion and synthesis, and exposuretothefield of practice. The
M.H.A. program, which admits students only in the fall
semester, requires full-time study for two years, plus a
summer internship between the first and second years. the
program requires a total of 54 credit hours.


Executive M.H.A. Program.-An option leading to the
Master of Health Administration degree is designed for
working health professionals who wish to remain em-
ployed while pursuing graduate study. Because students
may live and work at some distance from campus, this
program option uses a combination of traditional class-
room sessions and various distance learning techniques.
The program consists of 12 courses of 3 credits each (36-
hour total). Students take 1 course at a time, with each
course lasting approximately 8 weeks. On-campus class-
room sessions are held Friday-Sunday every 2 months, with
1 Saturday session in the intervening month. Other course
requirements are completed via distance learning.


MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE

The Master of Health Science degree is designed to
provide clinical training, exposure to health research, and
to meet the need for leadership personnel and in estab-
lished and emerging health care programs. There are master's
programs through the College of Health Professions in
occupational therapy, physical therapy, and rehabilitation
counseling.
There are three paths in occupational therapy for attaining
the Master of Health Science degree. The four-semester
thesis option emphasizes research and is the appropriate
route for, but not limited to, those students seeking admission
to the College of Health Profession's Ph.D. program in
rehabilitation science. Two nonthesis paths are offered: a
three-semester option for qualified occupational therapists
and a seven-semester option for applicants whose goal is to
enterthe occupational therapy field atthe graduate level. All
options are designed to prepare leaders in the profession.
In physical therapy the program requires satisfactory
completion of 32 semester credits which include a core
curriculum. These courses involve research design, re-
search instrumentation, and theoretical investigation of
movement dysfunction, physical therapy assessment and
treatment. Elective course work and a research project are
required components of the curriculum. A clinical intern-
ship with a recognized clinician is optional. The course
work applied toward the degree must include at least 24
credits of letter-graded courses. No more than 6 research
credits can be applied toward the degree. All candidates
must pass a written comprehensive examination. The non-
thesis curriculum is designed with flexibility to permit each
student to pursue and develop his or her expertise.
The rehabilitation counseling program is designed to
meet the need for professional personnel to serve in a
variety of rehabilitation counseling areas. The Department
requires a minimum of 52 academic credits forthe majority
of students including a minimum of 49 credits in the major
area. Some exceptionally well-qualified students may be
requiredtotake a minimum of 43 credits. Work in the major
area includes two semesters of practicum experiences and
a full-time internship. Elective courses may be selected
which complement the major courses and relate to the
career plans of the student. All candidates must pass a
comprehensive examination.
Additional requirements are listed under the General
Regulations section for all master's degrees.






38/ GENERAL INFORMATION


MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE
EDUCATION

The program leading to the degree of Master of Health
Science Education is designed to meet the need for ad-
vanced preparation of health educators to serve in positions
of leadership in community, business, health care delivery,
and community college and school settings.
Work Required.-A minimum of 36 credits of course
work is required, of which at least 50% must be graduate
courses in health science education. Course approval must
be obtained from the student's academic adviser.
Supervisory Committee.-A committee of at least two
members, including a chairperson and at least one other
member from the department Graduate Faculty, will super-
vise the work of students registered in this program.
Final Examination.-The candidate must pass a final
written examination covering the student's knowledge of course
work and research. The examination is taken in the semester in
which the candidate plans to complete the degree.


MASTER OF INTERIOR DESIGN

The Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) provides opportu-
nities for students to direct their attention toward a variety
of topics, including historic preservation and restoration of
interior spaces; design for special populations, for example
the disabled, elderly and children; investigation and appli-
cation of design technology, materials, and lighting; design
education; issues of indoor air quality and sustainability;
environment and behavior research, theory, and applica-
tions in interior design.
Work Required.-Candidates must complete a minimum
of 36 credit hours, including no more than 6 credit hours of
thesis or project. Required preparatory courses are in
addition to the minimum credits for graduate work.


MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

The Master of International Construction Management
(M.I.C.M.) is a nonthesis, distance education, advanced
degree program with a research report/project requirement
offered through the Rinker School of Building Construction.
The M.I.C.M. is designed to allow students with a computer
and Internet access to attend classes at any time, any place
and interact with faculty and classmates via such technol-
ogy as e-mail, CD-ROM, streaming video, synchronous
group discussion software, asynchronous class presenta-
tion software, and multimedia courseware. The program
incorporates leading-edge interactive technology and proc-
tored course final examinations twice a year.
Admissions.-It is required that applicants for admission
have 1) any undergraduate degree, 2) at least 5 years of
meaningful, supervisory level construction management
experience, 3) cumulative verbal and quantitative GRE
scores of 1000 or higher, 4) a grade point average of 3.0 on
a 4.0 scale, 5) if an international student, a TOEFL score of
565 or higher, and 6) sponsorship by the employer.
Work Required.-The M.I.C.M. has three major con-


struction areas of core emphasis: 1) corporate/strategic
management, 2) project management, 3) construction man-
agement. The M.I.C.M. prepares students to assume upper
level construction management responsibilities in a multi-
national construction company. In addition to 9 research
oriented graduate credit hours, the student selects one or
two areas of emphasis and then takes the remained of the
required 33 credit hours from the remaining courses and special
electives. Students are required to pass a comprehensive oral
and/or written examination atthe completion of the course work
and their master's research report/project.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE

The degree of Master of Landscape Architecture is the
advanced professional degree for graduates with baccalau-
reate credentials in landscape architecture and is a first
professional degree for the graduate from a nonlandscape
architectural background. Candidates are admitted from
related and unrelated fields and backgrounds. An advanced
professional life experience track is available for eligible
candidates.
Work Required.-Candidates must complete a mini-
mum of 52 credit hours, including no more than 6 credit
hours of thesis or project. For students without baccalaure-
ate credentials in landscape architecture, required prepara-
tory courses are in addition to the minimum credits for
graduate work. For advanced professional life experience
candidates, the minimum requirement is 30 credit hours,
including thesis. At least 50% of all course work must be
graduate courses in landscape architecture. For some study
areas, candidates may select a terminal project requiring six
credits in lieu of a thesis.

MASTER OF LATIN

The Classics Department of the University of Florida
offers the nonthesis Master of Latin degree, a 30 credit,
program designed primarily for currently employed, and/or
certified teaching professionals who wish to widen their
knowledge of Latin, broaden their education in the field of
classics, and enhance their professional qualifications.
This degree can be attained through a program of summer
course work at the University of Florida as well as through
directed independent study and/or distance learning courses
duringthe regular academic year. Students inthe Gainesville
area may also enroll in regular graduate courses if their
schedules permit.
Students can completethe degree within fouryears byearning
six graduate credits each summer (total= 24), plus justtwothree-
credit independent study or distance learning courses during the
intervening academic years. Those who already have some
graduate credit in Latin, or who can take more credits during the
year, can complete the degree more quickly.
This program of study is different from the M.A. degree in
Latin since it has no thesis requirement, does not prepare
students for Ph.D. level studies, and is aimed specifically at
currently employed and certified Latin teachers.
Admission.-Prospective students are advised to contact
the Department's Graduate Coordinator before making





SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES /39


application. Required for the admissions process are (1) an
application form for entrance to the University of Florida
Graduate School, (2) acceptable GRE scores, and (3) tran-
scripts recording undergraduate courses (and graduate
courses, if any; students must demonstrate the ability to take
Latin course work at the graduate
level). Candidates for this degree normally should be expe-
rienced Latin teachers, although this can be waived.
Degree Requirements.-This nonthesis degree requires
a minimum of 30 credits as a graduate student at the
University of Florida, of which no more than 8 hours,
earned with a grade of A, B+, or B, may be transferred from
institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the
Graduate School. The student will take at least half the
required credits in the Latin language and literature courses
(LAT or LNW courses at the 5000 level or above). UF
courses taken at the graduate level prior to admission to the
Graduate School (e.g., in the Latin Summer Institutes) may
be applied to the 30 credits upon approval by the Graduate
School. The Department will work closely with individual
students to determine how many previous graduate credits
at UF or other institutions may be applied to this program.
The student may elect minor work in a department other
than classics (e.g., history, philosophy, art history, religion),
although there is no requirement to do so. If a minor is
chosen, at least six credits are required in the minor field.
Two six-credit minors may be taken with departmental
permission. A GPAof 3.0 is required for minor credit as well
as for all work counted toward the degree. All work in a
minor must be approved by the supervisory committee.
Examination.-The supervisory committee will adminis-
ter a final oral handwritten comprehensive examination at
the completion of the course work. This examination will
consist of (1) an oral part: a one hour examination on the
general field of Latin literature, and (2) a written part,
consisting of one houreach on (a) Latin sight translation and
grammar, (b) Roman history and civilization and, only if
applicable, (c) the minor, or minors. As preparation for this
examination, the student should read the required reading
list of secondary works in English.
Language Requirement.-The Department does not re-
quire, but strongly recommends, the acquisition of at least
a reading knowledge of one (or more) of the following:
German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Such study will facili-
tate reading important secondary works not translated into
English, enhance travel to the classical lands, and perhaps
lead to teaching opportunities in the chosen language at the
secondary school level.


MASTER OF LAWS IN COMPARATIVE
LAW

The Masterof Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law)
degree is designed for graduates of foreign law schools who
want to enhance their understanding of the American legal
system and the English common law system from which it
evolved.
The program begins with "Introduction to American
Law," a six-credit summer course that gives students a
foundation in the American legal process. It also helps
students acclimate to the College of Law and the University


community prior to the start of the academic year. During
the fall and spring semesters, and with the director's ap-
proval, students choose their remaining 24 credits from
more than 100 Juris Doctor and LL.M. in Taxation courses
and seminars. A special curriculum for students in this
program can result in the simultaneous award of the Certifi-
cate of Specialization in International Tax Studies. For
admission information consult the College of Law Catalog
or write to the Comparative Law Office, P.O. Box 117643,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7643 USA.


MASTER OF LAWS IN TAXATION

The instructional program leading to the degree Master of
Laws in Taxation (LL.M.Tax.) offers advanced instruction
with emphasis on federal taxation and particularly federal
income taxation, for law graduates who plan to specialize
in such matter in the practice of law.
Degree candidates must complete 26 credit hours, 22 of
which must be in graduate level tax courses, including a
research and writing course.


MASTER OF MUSIC

The Master of Music degree is offered with programs in
music and music education. The music program includes
the following areas of emphasis: performance, music theory,
composition, music history and literature, sacred music,
organ pedagogy, piano pedagogy, voice pedagogy, string
pedagogy, string development, choral conducting, and
instrumental conducting. The Master of Music is designed
for those who wish to prepare for careers as teachers in
studios, schools, and universities; performers; music histo-
rians; music critics; church musicians; composers; conduc-
tors; and accompanists.
Admission.-Applicants should have a baccalaureate
degree in music or a closely related area from an accredited
institution and must meet the admission requirements of the
Graduate School and the College of Fine Arts. In cases
where the undergraduate degree is not in the area chosen
for graduate study, the student must demonstrate a level of
achievement fully acceptable for master's level work. In no
case will an applicant be accepted with less than 16
semester credits in music theory, 6 semester credits in
music history, and 12 semester credits in performance. A
candidate found deficient in certain undergraduate areas
will be required to remove the deficiencies by successful
completion of appropriate courses. If remedial work is
required, the residency-usually two to three semesters of
full-time study-may be longer. An audition is required for
all students.
Work Required.-A minimum of 32 credits of course
work is required, exclusive of prerequisite or deficiency
courses, including a core of 9 credits. The core in all
emphases includes MUS 6716 (MUE 6785 in the music
education program), MUT 6629, and one graduate course in
the MUH or MUL category. Athesis or creative project in lieu
of a written thesis is required.
The College of Fine Arts reserves the right to retain student
work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.






40/ GENERAL INFORMATION


Additional information is given in the Fields of Instruc-
tion section.


MASTER OF PHYSICAL THERAPY

This professional degree program is offered to students
who do not have a physical therapy degree. The program
is atwo-year plan of graduate study which incorporates four
semesters of classroom study and slightly greater than 1.5
semesters (22 weeks) of clinical internship. Students enter
the program after completing a bachelor's degree. The
students are awarded the MPT degree after completing 76
credit hours of graduate course work. A master's thesis is
not required but students must achieve a B average in all
course work, receive a positive evaluation on the clinical
internship, and successfully complete a final examination
which involves preparing and defending a case study. The
faculty adviser serves as the student's supervisory committee.


MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH

The program leading to the Master of Public Health
degree prepares students to contribute to the health of the
local and national community through disease prevention
and health promotion activities. Students have the oppor-
tunity to develop specialization skills in one or more public
health areas including (1) developing externally funded,
independent programs of public health research reflective
of community needs and epidemiological trends, (2) imple-
menting cutting edge community health education, and
intervention programs, and (3) providing leadership in
public health administration and policy. Because the
program is coordinated collaboratively by the Colleges of
Health Professions, Health and Human Performance, and
Medicine, it provides an opportunity for interdisciplinary
learning, which can be incorporated into disease preven-
tion and health promotion activities. The overall program
goal isto prepare students to become effective public health
educators, researchers, and service leaders.
All students are required to take a minimum of 36
graduate credit hours, including 15 hours of core require-
ments, 9 hours in one of three areas of emphasis (epidemi-
ology, community health education, or public health man-
agement and policy) 6 hours of electives, and 6 hours of a
special project, which can include research or other schol-
arlyworkor an internship, determined bytheemphasis area
selected and the specific career goals of the student. Upon
successful completion of all requirements, the student is
awarded the Master of Public Health degree.


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES

Admission.-The Master of Science in Architectural Stud-
ies is a nonprofessional, research degree for students with
undergraduate degrees in any field of study who wish to
undertake advanced studies and research in architectural
specialties. Areas of specialization include environmental


technology, architectural preservation, design, urban de-
sign, history, and theory. Enrollment is limited.
Work Required.-A minimum of 32 credits of course
work is required, including up to 6 hours of ARC 6971
(Research for Master's Thesis). While a majority of the
course work should be within the Department of Architec-
ture, multidisciplinary electives in planning, history, law,
engineering, art history, and real estate are encouraged. It
is also anticipated that students will enroll in one or more
of the Department's off-campus programs, in Nantucket, in
Miami Beach, in the Caribbean, or in Italy. A thesis is
required.
The requirements for level and distribution of credits,
supervisory committee, and final examination are the same
as stated for the Master of Arts and Master of Science with
thesis.


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EXERCISE AND
SPORT SCIENCES AND MASTER OF
EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES

The Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences offers the
Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences and the
Master of Exercise and Sport Sciences degrees with special-
izations in pedagogy, sport management, exercise physiol-
ogy, athletic training, motor learning/control, sport and
exercise psychology, biomechanics, special physical edu-
cation, and clinical exercise physiology. Candidates forthe
Masterof Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences (M.S.E.S.S.)
must (1) complete a minimum of 30 semester hours includ-
ing 24 credits of course work and 6 thesis credits, (2)
develop programs of study and research that are congruent
with their professional goals and that have the approval of
three member supervisory committees composed of two
Graduate Facu Ity members from within the department and
one from either Exercise and Sport Sciences or an outside
department, and (3) prepare and orally defend written
theses.
Requirements for the Master of Exercise and Sport Sci-
ences (M.E.S.S.) degree include (1) completing a minimum
of 34 credits in approved course work, (2) working with a
three member supervisory committee from the department's
Graduate Faculty to develop an individualized program
designed to facilitate professional goals, and (3) passing
written and oral comprehensive examinations in the area of
specialization and concomitant areas of study. All work
must be approved by the chairperson of the supervisory
committee. If knowledge deficiencies are identified, addi-
tional course work may be required.
M.S.E.S.S.(M.E.S.S.)/J.D. Program.-This98-credit-hour
joint degree program culminates in the Master of Science in
Exercise and Sport Sciences or Master of Exercise and Sport
Sciences and the Juris Doctor degrees. Applicants must
meet the entrance requirements for both the Department of
Exercise and Sport Sciences and the Col lege of Law. Admis-
sion to the second program is required no later than the end
of the fourth consecutive semester after beginning one of
the degree programs. The student's supervisory committee
is comprised of both College of Law and Exercise and Sport
Sciences Graduate Faculty members.






SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES / 41


M.S.E.S.S.(M.E.S.S.)/M.B.A. Program.-A three year, 66
credit joint degree program leadingto the Master of Science
in Exercise and Sport Sciences or the Master of Exercise and
Sport Sciences with a concentration in sport management
and the Master of Business Administration degrees is of-
fered in conjunction with the Warrington College of Busi-
ness Administration. Applicants must meet the entrance
requirements and be accepted by both programs., The joint
nature of the request should be noted on the application.
The student's supervisory committee is comprised of three
Graduate Faculty members representing both departments.
In addition to completion of course work for both programs,
a residency in sport management is required.


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING
The College of Nursing offers the Master of Science in
Nursing degree (thesis and nonthesis option) with ad-
vanced practice preparation for administration and nurse
midwifery and the roles of the nurse practitioner in adult,
family, neonatal, pediatric, psychiatric/mental health,
women's health, and midwifery nursing. Nurse practitio-
ner roles in adult and family health include options in
oncology and gerontology.
Work Required.-A minimum of 48 semester hours is
required for graduation. Candidates for the Master of Sci-
ence in Nursing degree (thesis) must prepare and present
theses acceptable to their supervisory committees and the
Graduate School. An oral presentation of the thesis and a
comprehensive examination in the major field of study are
also required. Each thesis is published by microfilm.
Candidates who choose the nonthesis option are required
to pass a comprehensive written examination in the major
field of study.


MASTER OF STATISTICS

The minimum credits required for the Master of Statistics
degree are 36, including no fewer than 32 graduate credits
in the major field. Courses in the degree program will be
selected in consultation with the major adviser and ap-
proved by the student's supervisory committee. The student
will be requiredto pass two examinations: (1) a comprehen-
sive written examination, given by a committee designated
for the purpose, on material covered in statistics courses for
first year graduate students and (2) a final oral examination
given by the student's supervisory committee, covering the
entire field of study.


ENGINEER

Forthose engineers who need additional technical depth and
diversification in their education beyond the master's degree, the
College of Engineering offers the degree of Engineer.
This degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of
graduate work beyond the master's degree. It is not to be
considered as a partial requirement toward the Ph.D.
degree. The student's objective after the master's degree
should be the Ph.D. or the Engineer degree.


Admission to the Program.-To be admitted to the
program, students must have completed a master's degree
in engineering and apply for admission to the Graduate
School of the University of Florida. The master's degree is
regarded as the foundation for the degree of Engineer. The
master's degree must be based on the candidate having a
bachelor's degree in engineering from an ABET-accredited
curriculum or having taken sufficient articulation course
work to meet the minimum requirements specified by ABET.
Course and Residence Requirements.-A total registra-
tion in an approved program of at least 30 graduate credit
hours beyond the master's degree is required. This mini-
mum requirement must be earned through the University of
Florida. The last 30 semester credit hours must be com-
pleted within five calendar years.
Supervisory Committee.-Each student admitted to the
program will be advised by a supervisory committee con-
sisting of at least three members of the Graduate Faculty.
Two members are selected from the major department and
at least one from a supporting department. In addition,

every effort should be made to have a representative from
industry as an external adviser for the student's program.
This committee should be appointed as soon as possible after
the student has been admitted to the Graduate School but, in no
case, later than the end of the second semester of study.
This committee will inform the student of all regulations
pertaining to the degree program. The committee is nomi-
nated by the department chairperson, approved by the
Dean of the College of Engineering, and appointed by the
Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate
School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory commit-
tees. If a thesis or report is a requirement in the plan of study,
the committee will approve the proposed thesis or report
and the plans for carrying it out. The thesis must be
submitted to the Graduate School. The committee will also
conduct the final examination on campus when the plan of
study is completed.
Plan of Study.-Each plan of study is developed on an
individual basis for each student. Thus, there are no specific
requirements forthe majoror minor; each student is consid-
ered individually. If the plan of study includes a thesis, the
student may register for from 6 to 12 semester credit hours
of thesis research in a course numbered 6972.
Thesis.-The thesis should represent performance at a
level above that ordinarily associated with the master's
degree. It should clearly be an original contribution; this
may take the form of scientific research, a design project, or
an industrial project approved by the supervisory commit-
tee. Work on the thesis may be conducted in an industrial
or governmental laboratory under conditions stipulated by
the supervisory committee.
Final Examination.-After the student has completed all
work on the plan of study, the supervisory committee
conducts a final comprehensive oral and/or written exami-
nation, which also involves a defense of the thesis if one is
included in the program. This examination must be taken
on campus with all participants present.


DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY

The Colleges of Health Professions and Liberal Arts and






42 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Sciences offer a program leading to the degree of Doctor of
Audiology. The Au.D. degree is awarded after a four-year
program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not
required. The program leading to the Au.D. degree is
administered through the Departments of Communicative
Disorders and Communication Sciences and Disorders,
their respective colleges, and the Graduate School.
Admission.-To be considered for the Au.D. program,
students must meet the following minimum requirements:
a) achieved a 3.0 junior-senior undergraduate grade point
average and a combined verbal and quantitative score of
1000 on the GRE General Test, b) provided evidence of
good potential for academic success in a minimum of three
letters of recommendation, and c) provided evidence of
acceptable skills in written expression through a personal
statement describing the motivation and skills applicableto
graduate study and the profession of audiology.
Course Requirements.-The course requirements en-
compass 125 semester credit hours for students entering the
program with a bachelor's degree awarded by an accred-
ited institution. This includes a minimum of 70 hours of
didactic instruction, 45 credits of applied practicum, and 3
credit hours of audiology research.
A 70-semester-hour program leading to the Au.D. is
offered for applicants holding an earned master's degree in
audiology from an accredited institution.
A 45-credit-hour program leading to the Au.D. is offered
for applicants holding an earned master's from an accredited
institution and certification and/or licensure in audiology.
Supervisory Committees.-Supervisory committees are
nominated by the chairs of the Departments of Communi-
cation Sciences and Disorders and Communicative Disor-
ders, approved by the deans of their respective colleges,
and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.
The committee should be appointed as soon as possible
after the student begins the program and, in general, no later
than the end of the second semester of equivalent full-time
study. The supervisory committee shall consist of no fewer
than two members of the audiology Graduate Faculty.
Duties of the supervisory committee include curriculum
planning for the student, annual evaluation of the student's
progress in the program including administration of the oral
and written comprehensive examination in the third year of
study, and determination of successful completion of the
audiology research project.
Comprehensive Examination.-The comprehensive ex-
amination, which is required of all candidates for the
degree of Doctor of Audiology, may be taken during the
eighth semester of study beyondthe bachelor's degree. The
examination, prepared and evaluated by the supervisory
committee, is both written and oral. The committee has the
responsibility at this time of determining whether the stu-
dent is qualified to continue work toward the degree
through completion of the clinical residency.


ED.S. AND ED.D.

The College of Education offers programs leading to the
degrees Specialist in Education and Doctor of Education.


The Specialist in Education degree is awarded for a two-
year program of graduate study. The Doctor of Education
degree requires writing a doctoral dissertation. Foreign
languages are not required. The Doctor of Philosophy
degree in the College of Education is described under
Requirements for the Ph.D.
In cooperation with the Graduate Studies Office, College
of Education, programs leading to these degrees are admin-
istered through the individual departments or school in the
College of Education. It is the responsibility of the
department's chair or school's director to carry out the
policies of the Graduate School and the graduate commit-
tee of the College of Education. More specific information
aboutthe various programs and departmental requirements
may be obtained from the individual departments. General
information or assistance is available through the Office of
Graduate Studies in Education, 146 Norman Hall.
Admission to the Ed.S. and Ed.D. programs is open only
to persons who have met the following requirements:
1. Achieved at least the minimum upper-division under-
graduate grade average and verbal-quantitative total score
on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination
necessary for admission to the Graduate School, University
of Florida.
2. Provided evidence of good scholarship for previous
graduate work (a 3.5 grade-point average or above, as
computed by the University of Florida, will be considered
satisfactory).
3. Successfully completed 36 credits of professional
course work in education. Applicants for admission to
advanced degree programs in the Collegeof Education who
meet all the requirements except for successfully complet-
ing 36 credits of professional education courses may be
given provisional admission and full admission when they
have completed the required 36 credits.
4. Presented a record of successful professional experi-
ence, the appropriateness of which will be determined by
the instructional department passing on the applicant's
qualifications for admission. In some instances, depart-
ments may admit students with the understanding that
further experience may be required before the student will
be recommended for the degree.
The judgment about admission of an individual is made
by the major department, the College of Education, and the
Graduate School, University of Florida.


SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION

Primary emphasis in an Ed.S. program is placed on the
development of the competencies needed for a specific
type of employment. Programs are available in the various
areas of concentration within the School of Teaching and
Learning and the Departments of Counselor Education,
Educational Leadership, Policy, and Foundations, and Spe-
cial Education.
To study for this degree, the student must apply and
be admitted to the Graduate School of the University
of Florida. All work for the degree, including trans-
ferred credit, must be completed during the seven





DOCTOR OF EDUCATION / 43


years immediately preceding the date on which the
degree is awarded.
The Ed.S. degree is awarded at the completion of a
planned program with a minimum of 72 credits beyond the
bachelor's degree or a minimum of 36 credits beyond the
master's degree. All credits accepted for the program must
contribute to the unity and the stated objective of the total
program. Students are tested (in no case earlier than six
months prior to receipt of degree) in both a written and an
oral examination, given on campus by a committee se-
lected by the school director or department chair. A thesis
is not required; however, each program will include con-
tinuing attention to a research component relevant to the
professional role for which the student is preparing.
With school/departmental approval course work taken
as part of the specialist program may be counted toward a
doctoral degree.
Students who enter the program with an appropriate
master's degree from another accredited institution must
complete a minimum of 36 credits of post-master's study to
satisfy the following requirements.
1. At least 33 credits in graduate level courses.
2. At least 12 credits in graduate level professional
education courses.
3. Registration on the Gainesville campus of the Univer-
sity of Florida for at least 6 credits in a single semester.
Twelve credits for appropriate courses offered off-cam-
pus by the University of Florida may be transferred to the
program. Six credits may be transferred from another institu-
tion of the State University System or from any institution
offering a doctoral degree; however, credit transferred from
another institution reduces proportionately the credit trans-
ferred from University of Florida off-campus courses.
Students who enter the program with a bachelor's degree
only must, during the 72-credit program, satisfy these
requirements in addition to the requirements of the Master
of Education degree or its equivalent.


DOCTOR OF EDUCATION

A doctoral candidate is expected to achieve understand-
ing of the broad field of education and competence in an
area of specialization. Programs are available in the various
areas of concentration within the School of Teaching and
Learning or the Departments of Counselor Education, Edu-
cational Leadership, Policy, and Foundations, and Special
Education.
Admission to a program of work leading to the degree of
Doctor of Education requires admission to the Graduate
School.
A minimum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor's degree
is required for the doctoral degree. Master's degrees outside
the major require school/departmental petition to the Dean
of the Graduate School. All master's degrees counted in the
90-hour minimum must have been earned within the last
seven years. No more than 30 hours of a master's degree
from another institution will be transferred to a doctoral
program. All courses beyond the master's degree taken at
another institution, to be applied toward the Doctor of
Education degree, must be taken at an institution offering


the doctoral degree and must be approved for graduate
credit by the Graduate School of the University of Florida.
Minors.-Minor work or work in cognate fields is re-
quired. Minor work may be completed in any department,
other than the major department, approved for master's or
doctoral degree programs as listed in this catalog. If one
minor is selected, at least 15 credits of work therein will be
required; iftwo minors are chosen, one minor must include
at least 12 credits of course work, the other at least 5 credits.
Courses in physical education approved by the College
of Health and Human Performance and the Graduate
School as subject matter or content courses may be used in
the cognate work or as a minor.
In lieu of a minor or minors, the candidate may present
a suitable program of no fewer than 15 credits of cognate
work in at least two departments. If two fields are included,
there shall be no fewer than 5 credits in each field. If three
or more fields are included, the 5 credit requirement for
each field does not apply. This program must have the
approval of the student's supervisory committee. The Col-
lege of Education Graduate Faculty will expect the candi-
date to be prepared to answer questions, at the time of the
oral examination, in any of the areas chosen.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to candidacy for
the degree of Doctor of Education requires successful
completion of the qualifying examinations and approval of
a dissertation topic. Recommendation to the Graduate
School for admission to candidacy is based on the action of
the supervisory committee. Application for admission to
candidacy should be made as soon as the qualifying
examination has been passed and a dissertation topic has
been approved by the student's supervisory committee.
Qualifying Examination.-The applicant is recommended
for the qualifying examination by the supervisory commit-
tee after completion of sufficient course work.
The examination, administered on campus bythe student's
major department or school, consists of (1) a general
section; (2) a field of specialization section; (3) examination
in the minor or minors, where involved; and (4) an oral examina-
tion conducted by the applicant's supervisory committee.
All supervisory committee members must be present for
the oral portion of the examination and are required to sign
the Admission to Candidacy form.
If the student fails the qualifying examination, a re-
examination will not be given unless recommended for
special reasons by the supervisory committee and ap-
proved by the Graduate School. At least one semester of
additional preparation is considered essential before re-
examination.
Research Preparation Requirement.-EDF 7486 (Meth-
ods of Educational Research) or its equivalent, for which a
basic course in statistics is a prerequisite, and one other
approved course are minimum requirements in all pro-
grams. Additional requirements vary with the department
and with the student's plans for doctoral research.
For information relating to Campus Residence Require-
ment, the Supervisory Committee, Time Lapse, the Disser-
tation, and the Final Examination, the student is referred to
the material presented under the heading Requirements for
the Ph.D. These statements are applicable to both degrees.





44 / GENERAL INFORMATION


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

AND REQUIREMENTS


EXPENSES

APPLICATION FEE

Each application for admission to the University must be
accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $20.

ENROLLMENT AND STUDENT FEES

Pursuant to Section 6C-7.001 (2) Florida Administrative
Code, registration shall be defined as consisting of two
components: a) formal selection of one or more credit
courses approved and scheduled by the University; and b)
tuition payment, partial or otherwise, or other appropriate
arrangements for tuition payment (installment payment,
deferment, or third-party billing) for the courses in which
the student is enrolled as of the end of the drop/add period.
Registration must be completed on or before the date
specified in the University Calendar. Students are not
authorized to attend class unless they are on the class roll
or have been approved to audit. Unauthorized class atten-
dance will result in fee liability.
A student must be registered during the terms of the
qualifying examination and the final examination, and
during the term in which the degree is awarded.

FEE LIABILITY

A student is liable for all fees associated with all courses
in which he/she is registered at the end of the drop/add
period or which he/she attends after that deadline. The fee
payment deadline is 3:30 p.m. at the end of the second
week of classes.

ASSESSMENT OF FEES

Pursuant to Section 6C-7.002(5), Florida Administrative
Code: resident and nonresident tuition shall be assessed on
the basis of course classification: tuition for courses num-
bered through 4999 shall be assessed at the undergraduate
level, courses numbered 5000 and above shall be assessed
at the graduate level.
Students must assess and pay their own fees. Lack of
written notification of the tuition fee debt does not negate
the student's responsibility to pay be the published dead-
line. University personnel will not be held accountable for
assessment or accuracy of calculations. Tuition fee rates
are available from University Financial Services.
Shown below isthetuition and fee schedule forthe 1999/
2000 academic year. The tuition and fees for the 2000-
2001 academic year have not been established at the time
of printing of this catalog, but some adjustments are likely.
Generally tuition and fees are established some time in July
for the next academic year. In some instances, tuition
waivers accompanying assistantships or fellowships in-


clude only the matriculation fee and where applicable the
nonresident fee. All other fees must be paid by the student.


Resident Tuition:
Matriculation Fee
Building Fee
Capital Improvement Trust
Fund Fee
Student Financial Aid Fee
Activity and Service Fee
Athletic Fee
Health Fee
Resident Tuition per Credit Hour
Nonresident Tuition:
Nonresident Fee
Nonresident Student Financial
Aid Fee
Nonresident Tuition per Credit Hour


$118.68
2.32

2.44
5.93
7.27
1.70
5.70
$144.20

343.56

17.17
$504.93


Health, Athletic, Activity and Service, and Material and
Supply Fees
Health Fee.-AII students pay a health fee that is assessed
on a per credit hour basis and is included in the basic rate
per credit hour. The health fee maintains the University's
Student Health Service and is not part of any health insur-
ance a student may purchase.
Athletic Fee.-AII students pay an athletic fee per credit
hour each term. Half-time graduate research and teaching
assistants enrolled for eight or more credit hours during the
fall or spring semesters and all other students enrolled for
nine or more credits can purchase athletic tickets at the
student rate.
Activity and Service Fee.-AII students pay an activity and
service fee that is assessed per credit hour and is included
in the hourly tuition rate.
Material and Supply Fee.-Material and supply fees are
assessed for certain courses to offset the cost of materials or
supply items consumed in the course of instruction. Infor-
mation may be obtained from the academic departments or
University Financial Services.

Late Registration/Payment Fees

Late Registration Fee (6C-7.003(4), Florida Administra-
tive Code).-Any student who fails to initiate registration
during the regular registration period will be subject to the
late registration fee of $100.
Late Payment Fee (6C-7.003(5), Florida Administrative
Code).-Any student who fails to pay all fees or to make
appropriate arrangements for fee payment (deferment or
third party billing) by the deadline will pay a late payment
fee of $100.
Waiver of Late Fees.-A student who believes that a late
charge should not be assessed because of University error
or extraordinary circumstances that prevented compliance
by the deadline may petition for a waiver.

Late Registration Fee: University Registrar
Late Payment Fee: Financial Services
The University may require documentation.








Special Fees and Charges

Audit Fee.-Fees for audited courses are the same as the
credit hour fee charged to Florida residents for tuition.
Diploma Replacement Fee (6C-7.003(26), Florida Ad-
ministrative Code).-Each diploma ordered after a student's
initial degree application will result in a diploma replace-
ment charge.
Graduate Record Examination.-The General Test of the
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for admis-
sion to the Graduate School and is offered through a
computer. Please consult the ETS website at http://
www.gre.org for the nearest testing location. The website
also provides information on the subject tests that are not
offered through a computer.
Graduate School Foreign Language Test.-AII students
wishing to be certified as proficient in reading French,
German or Spanish must take the Educational Testing
Service (ETS) Graduate School Foreign Language Tests.
Each examination is $5. Register and pay for this examina-
tion in the Office of Instructional Resources, 1012 Turling-
ton Hall.
Library Processing Fee.-Candidates for a graduate de-
gree with thesis or dissertation pay $12.80 for the perma-
nent binding of the two copies deposited in the University
Libraries or for the administrative costs of processing an
electronic thesis or dissertation; architecture students pay
$20. This charge is payable at University Financial Services
by the date specified in this catalog. A copy of the receipt
must be presented to 168 Grinter Hall.
Microfilm Fee.-$55 is charged forthe microfi Im publica-
tion of the doctoral dissertation. This fee is payable at
University Financial Services. A copy of the receipt must be
presented to 168 Grinter Hall.
Nursing master's students who write a thesis must pay
$45 for publication. This fee is payable at University
Financial Services, and a copy of the receipt must be
presented to 168 Grinter Hall.
Transcript Fee (6C-7.003 (28), Florida Administrative
Code).-Upon written request, a complete transcript for
undergraduate, graduate, and professional students can be
purchased. The University releases only complete aca-
demic records.
All charges may be subject to change without notice.


PAYMENT OF FEES

Fees are payable on the dates listed in the University
Calendar appearing in the front of this catalog. Payments
are processed by University Financial Services. Checks,
cashier's checks, and money orders written in excess of the
assessed fees will be processed and the difference refunded
at a later date, according to University policy. Checks from
foreign countries must be payable through a United States
bank in U.S. dollars. The University can refuse three-party
checks, altered checks, and checks that will not photocopy.
Payments can be made via debit cards on the HONOR
system at the University Cashier's office. Payments with a debit
card must be made in person because a personal identification
number (PIN) is required to access the bank account. Cash
withdrawals against debit cards will not be processed.


FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND REQUIREMENTS /45


Credit card payments by MasterCard or Visa may be
made at kiosks around campus or by calling TeleGator or
over the Internet at httpV//www.isis.ufl.edu. A nonrefund-
able convenience fee of $24 per semester will be assessed
when payment is made by credit card. This fee will be added
to the student's university account the next business day.
Returned checks must be paid in cash, money order, or
cashier's check.Aminimum $25 service feewill becharged;
$30 will be charged if the check is $50.01-$299.99 and $40
will be charged for returned checks of $300 or more.
The University also may impose additional require-
ments, including advance payment or security deposit. All
financial obligationstothe University will be applied on the
basis of age of the debt. The oldest debt will be paid first.


Deadlines

Deadlines are enforced. The University does not have the
authority to waive late fees unless the University primarily
is responsible for the delinquency or that extraordinary
circumstances warrant such waiver.


Cancellation and Reinstatement

The University may cancel the registration of any student who
has not paid any portion of his/herfee liability bythedeadline and
has not attended class after the drop/add deadline.
Reinstatement shall requirethe approval of the Universityand
paymentofalldelinquent liabilities, includingthe late registration
and late payment fees. Upon payment of fees, it is the student's
responsibility to ensure that his or her registration is updated.
In the event a student has not paid the entire balance of his/her
fee liability by the deadline, the University will suspend further
academic progress by placing a financial hold on the student's
record to prevent the release of grades, schedules, transcripts,
registration, diplomas, loans, the use of UF facilities and/or
services, and admission to UF functions and athletic events, until
the account has been settled in full.


Deferral of Registration and Tuition Fees

A fee deferment allows students to pay fees after the
deadline without cancellation of registration or late pay-
ment fee. The University may award fee deferments in the
following circumstances:
Students whose state or federal financial assistance is
delayed due to circumstances beyond the student's
control.
Students receiving veterans educational assistance
benefits.
Students for whom formal arrangements have been
made with the University for payment by an accept-
able third-party donor.
Deferment covers tuition fee payments only and must be
established by the fee payment deadline. Fee deferments
are granted based on information from the Office for
Student Financial Affairs (financial aid deferments) or the
Officeofthe University Registrar (veterans). Refer questions
on eligibility to the appropriate office.






46 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Waiver of Fees


The University may waive fees as follows:
* Participants in sponsored institutes and programs where
direct costs are paid by the sponsoring agent.
* State employees employed on a permanent, full-time
basis may be permitted to waive fees up to a maximum of
six credit hours per term on a space-available basis.
Enrollment is limited to coursesthatdo not increase direct
costs to the University. Courses that increase direct costs
can include TBA (to be arranged), computer courses,
laboratory courses, individualized courses, internships,
and dissertation and master's thesis courses.
Intern supervisors for institutions within the State Univer-
sity System may be given one nontransferable certificate
(fee waiver) for each full academic term during which the
person serves as an intern supervisor. The certificate is
valid for three years from the date of issuance. The
maximum hours allowed during a single semester will be
six hours of instruction (including creditthrough continu-
ing education). The certificate will waive the matricula-
tion fee; the student must pay the balance of the fees by
the deadline.
Persons 60 years of age or older are entitled to a waiver
of fees for audited courses (up to 6 credit hours), as
provided by Section 240.235(4), Florida Statutes.

The non-Florida student financial aid fee may not be
waived for students receiving an out-of-state fee waiver.


Refund of Fees
Tuition fees will be refunded in full in the circumstances
noted below:
Approved withdrawal from the University before the end
of drop/add, with written documentation from the stu-
dent.
Credit hours dropped during drop/add.
Courses canceled by the University.
Involuntary call to active military duty.
Death of the student or member of the immediate family
(parent, spouse, child, sibling).
Illness of the student of such severity or duration, as
confirmed in writing by a physician, that completion of
the semester is precluded.
Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the Uni-
versity President or his designee(s).

A refund of 25 percent of the total fees paid (less late fees)
is available if notice of withdrawal from the University with
written documentation is received from the student and
approved prior to the end of the fourth week of classes for
full semesters or a proportionately shorter period of time for
the summer terms.
Refunds must be requested at University Financial Ser-
vices. Proper documentation must be presented when a
refund is requested. A waiting period may be required.
Refunds will be applied against any University debts.
Tuition refunds due to cancellation, withdrawal, or ter-
mination of attendance for students receiving financial aid
will first be refunded to the appropriate federal Title IV


program. Any remaining refund then will be returned to
the student.

OTHER GENERAL FISCAL INFORMATION
Students should bring sufficient funds, other than per-
sonal checks, to meet their immediate needs. Personal
checks will be accepted at University Financial Services for
the exact amount of fees and/or other amounts owed the
University. Payments on all financial obligations to the
University will be applied on the basis of age of the debt.
The oldest debt will be paid first. University Financial
Services does not cash checks or make cash refunds.
Checks written in excess of assessed fees or other amounts
paid the University will be accepted and processed, but the
excess will be refunded to the student at a later date,
according to University policy.
Photo ID.-A valid Gator One card must be presented to
transact business at University Financial Services, to pick
up tickets for athletic events, to use Gator dining accounts,
to use the CIRCA computer labs, to use the University
Libraries, and to use all recreational facilities.
The Gator One card can be obtained at the ID Card
Services office. A driver's license, Social Security card, and
$10 for new cards or replacement cards are required. Call
392-UFID for more information.
Local Address.-It is the student's responsibility to file a
correct local address with the Office of the University
Registrar in 222 Criser Hall.


PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All students' accounts are payable at University Financial
Services at the time such charges are incurred. Graduating
students with outstanding financial obligations will have a
hold placed on their records withholding release of a
diploma, transcript, and other university services until the
debt is satisfied.
University regulations prohibit registration, graduation,
granting of credit, release of transcript or diploma for any
student whose account with the University is delinquent.
Delinquent accounts, including those debts for which the
students' records have a financial hold, may require pay-
ment by cash, cashier's check, or money order.
Delinquent debts can result in placement with a collec-
tion agency without further notice, at which time additional
collection costs will be assessed.


TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES
All students must register their automobiles, mopeds, or
motorcycles at the University Transportation and Parking
Services Decal Office during their first week of registration
at the University. Decal eligibility is determined by the
student's local address and student classification. There is
a fee for registration and schedule of fees for on-campus
parkingviolations. A complete setof rules governingtraffic,
parking, and vehicle registration may be secured at the
Parking Decal Office, 354 North-South Drive. Each student
should become familiar with these regulations upon regis-
tering at the University.






FINANCIAL AID /47


FINANCIAL AID

OFFICE FOR STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS

Financial assistance is also availableto graduate students
through the Office for Student Financial Affairs in Criser
Hall (see Part-Time Employment and Loans). Students who
wish to apply for work or loan programs administered by
Student Financial Affairs must follow the instructions in the
Gator Aid Application Guide. Graduate students who re-
ceive assistance through Student Financial Affairs must be
registered for a minimum of nine credit hours to receive aid
from all programs administered by that office except Fed-
eral Direct Stafford/Ford Loans (FDSL), Federal Direct Un-
subsidized Stafford/Ford Loans (FDUSL), and Federal Work-
Study. To receive FDSL, FDUSL, or Federal Work-Study
during the summer, graduate students must register for at
least four credit hours for the entire summer session (stu-
dents who enroll for fewer than four credit hours during
Summer A/C can not be paid until Summer B).
The University of Florida Office for Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) has initiated two services for students: partici-
pation in the World Wide Web Internet information service
and SFA TIPS-a touchtone dial-in service which provides
students up-to-date information about the status of their
financial aid file. Student Financial Affairs home page
location on the Web is http://www.ufsa.ufl.edu/SFA/
SFA.html. To access SFATIPS, students should dial (352)846-
1183 and follow the instructions given by the system.
Before calling, students should have their University of
Florida PIN and their social security number on hand.


FINANCIAL AID NEXUS TAPES

The Office for Student Financial Affairs has prepared a
series of brief tapes for the NEXUS telephone tape series to
provide current information on financial aid programs. To
use this service, students should call (352) 392-1683 and
request the tape they wish to hear: 402-A-Applying for
Financial Aid; 402-B-Student Loans; 402-C-Federal Di-
rect Loans; 402-D-Student Budgets; 402-E-Financial
Aid for Graduate Students; 402-F-Student Employment;
402-G-Grants; 402-H-Scholarships; 402-I-Loans and
Debt Management; 402-J-Financial Aid Phone Numbers;
402-K-How Financial Aid Is Disbursed; 402-L-Registra-
tion Period Update; and 402-M-Financial Aid for Students
with Disabilities. These tapes are available on the Web at
httpV//www.ufsa.ufl.edu/reitz/nexus/index.htm.


LOANS
At the University of Florida, graduate students may apply
forthefollowing student loans: Federal Direct Stafford/Ford
Loans, Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loans,
University of Florida Institutional Loans, and Federal Per-
kins Loans. These programs offer long-term, low-interest
loans that must be repaid when the borrower graduates,
withdraws, or drops to less than half-time enrollment.
In general, students may borrow up to the cost of atten-
dance minus any other financial aid per academic year at


interest rates from 5% to 8.25% annually. Some loans are
based on financial need; other are not. The actual amount of
each loan is based on financial need and/or program limits.
To apply, students should pick up a GatorAidApplica-
tion Guide and a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) from the Office for Student Financial Affairs in S-
107 Criser Hall. On-line FAFSAs are availablethrough links
on SFA's home page (http://www.ufsa.ufl.edu/SFA/
SFA.html). Students should not wait until they have been
admitted to apply foraid. Forfall loans, applications should
be submitted as soon as possible after January 1. Although
students may apply for Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loans
throughout the year, they must observe the deadlines set
each semester for applying for loans for the following
semester and should always apply as early as possible. The
deadlines are printed in the Gator Aid Application Guide.
The University also has an emergency short-term loan
program to help students meet temporary financial needs
related to educational expenses. Graduate students may
borrow up to $400 or the amount of in-state tuition if they
have an acceptable repayment source. Interest is 1% per
month and these loans must be repaid by the first day of the
last month in the semester in which the money is borrowed.
Processing time is approximately 48 hours. Applications
are available in Student Financial Affairs.

PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT
The University of Florida Office of Student Financial
Affairs (SFA) in S-107 Criser Hall coordinates part-time on-
and off-campus employment through the following three
employment programs: Federal Work-Study, including the
Federal Community Service component; Other Personnel
Services (OPS); and off-campus jobs. Federal Work-Study
jobs are based on financial need. To apply for Federal
Work-Study, students should pick up a GatorAidApplica-
tion Guide and a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) from S-107 Criser Hall. OPS Jobs are not based on
financial need. To apply, students should go to the Student
Employment Office. Off-campus jobs lists are posted on the
job bulletin boards, and students simply need to contactthe
employers.
SFA maintains job bulletin boards for all three programs
on the Web at http://www.ufsa.ufl.edu/SFA/SFA.html and
at the following locations: on the south wall of the Criser
courtyard, in room 305 of the J. Wayne Reitz Union on the
student government bulletin board, McCarty Hall first floor,
Norman Hall first floor, and the Medical Sciences Building
lobby. The job board at Criser Hall is updated daily. Job
boards at the other locations are updated twice weekly.

ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR FINANCIAL
AID RECIPIENTS
Students receiving financial aid must be in good standing
at the University of Florida and maintain satisfactory aca-
demic progress. The University of Florida's financial aid
academic progress requirements are available in the UF
Undergraduate Catalog and the Gator Aid Handbook and
are available as a handout from Student Financial Affairs in
S-107 Criser Hall.






48 / GENERAL INFORMATION


RESEARCH AND TEACHING

SERVICES

LIBRARIES

The Libraries of the University of Florida form the largest
information resource system in the state of Florida. While'
the collections are extensive, they are not comprehensive
and graduate students will find it useful to supplement them
through a variety of services and cooperative programs
drawing upon the resources of many other libraries. The
following entry describes the UF libraries, local collection
strengths and the physical distribution of collections among
campus libraries as well as the services available to assist
students and faculty in locating needed information.
The Libraries of the University of Florida consist of eight
libraries. Six are in the system known as the George A.
Smathers Libraries of the University of Florida and two
(Health Sciences and Law) are attached to their respective
administrative units. All of the libraries serve all the
University's faculty and students, but each has a special
mission to be the primary support of specific colleges and
degree programs. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of
research, scholars may find collections built in one library
to serve a specific discipline or constituency to be of great
importance to their own research in another discipline. It
most likely will be necessary to use more than one library to
discover all of the resources pertinent to a particular research
interest. All students and faculty are provided library service
upon presentation of the University of Florida Gator One
Card. This card is used to circulate books, to borrow reserves,
and to establish identity for other library services such as
Interlibrary Loan and remote access to databases.
The library home page (http://web.uflib.ufl.edu) pro-
vides a wealth of information about the Libraries as well as
links to a vast array of resources. The Libraries are integrat-
ing electronic collections and services with traditional
offerings. From the home page it is possible to connect to
the full text of articles in hundreds of journals as well as
increasing numbers of books. Indexes, abstracts, and other
reference resources-including more than 60 FirstSearch
databases, the Lexis-Nexus Universe, and the Web of
Science-are available.
Subject guides websites provide guides to subject litera-
ture and links to key resources and pertinent websites. The
library home page provides links to the pages of individual
campus libraries, lists library training opportunities, and
provides a great deal of information on services and poli-
cies. Also available are electronic forms which allow
students to make suggestions, renew materials, initiate
interlibrary loan requests, and recall materials charged to
other borrowers.
The library home page provides a linkto WebLUISwhich
contains the University of Florida library catalog. The on-
line catalog includes virtually all of the collections except
for some special archival, map, and document collections
that must still be accessed through catalogs and finding aids
atthe collection location. WebLUIS list materials currently
on course reserve and provides links to a growing number
of these materials that are available in electronic form.


WebLUIS also contains the catalogs of the other State
University System libraries and the Center for Research
Libraries and provides access to the catalogs of libraries in
other states and foreign nations.
The home page, WebLUIS, and access to the resources
contained in them are available at any workstation with a
University of Florida IP address and remotely by keying in
the Gator One library card number.
Owing to disciplinary variation in research methods, the
policies enforced and the services offered may differ from
library to library. Most of the libraries have an advisory
board consisting of faculty and students who advise on the
policies and services relating to their library. Information
on local policies is available atthe circulation and reference
desks in each library and on the specific library's home page.
As is common in research libraries, library materials are
housed in a variety of locations depending upon discipline.
*Library West holds most of the humanities and social
science collections, as well as professional collections in
support of business, health and human performance, and
journalism. The Documents Collections are major hold-
ings of all federal documents (except the science-related
holdings in Marston), many state and local documents, and
selected holdings of international and foreign documents.
eSmathers Library holds the Latin American Collection
and the Special Collections-rare books and manuscripts,
P. K. Yonge Library of Florida History, and University
Archives.
*Marston Science Library holds most of the agriculture,
science, and technology collections as well as the Map
Library. It also houses the federal documents published by
the USDA, NASA, Patent Office, and USGS.
eArchitecture/Fine Arts Library (201 Fine Arts Building A)
holds visual arts, architecture, and building construction
materials.
*Education Library (1500 Norman Hall) holds mostof the
education collections and temporarily houses the Judaica
Collection.
*Music Library (231 Music Building) holds most music
materials and a collection of recordings.
journalismm Reading Room holds a small collection of
materials relating to journalism and mass communication.
*Health Science Center Library holds major resources for
the medical sciences, related life sciences, and veterinary
medicine.
*Legal Information Center holds major resources for law
and related social sciences.
Together the Libraries hold over 3,400,000 cataloged
volumes, 6,300,000 microforms, 1,200,000 documents,
700,000 maps and geographic images, and 16,000 com-
puter datasets. The Libraries have built a number of
nationally significant research collections primarily in sup-
port of graduate research programs. Among them are the
Baldwin Library of Children's Literature which is among
the world's greatest collections of literature for children
(Smathers Library, Special Collections); the Map and Imag-
ery Library which is an extensive repository of maps,
atlases, aerial photographs, and remote sensing imagery
with particular collection strengths for the southeastern
United States, Florida, Latin America, and Africa south of
the Sahara (Marston Science Library, Level One); the Isser
and Ray Price Library of Judaica which is the largest





RESEARCH AND TEACHING SERVICES /49


collection of its kind in the Southeast (Education Library);
and the P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, which is the
state's preeminent Floridiana collection and holds the
largest North American collection of Spanish colonial
documents concerning the southeastern United States as
well as rich archives of prominent Florida politicians
(Smathers Library, Special Collections).
The Libraries also have particularly strong holdings in
architectural preservation and 18th-century American
architecture (AFA), late 19th- and early-20th-century Ger-
man state documents from 1850-1940 (Library West), Latin
American art and architecture (AFA and Smathers Library),
national bibliographies (Library West, Reference), U.S.
Census information, especially in electronic format (Li-
brary West, Documents), the rural sociology of Florida and
tropical and subtropical agriculture collections (Marston
Science Library), English and American literature (Library
West), and U.S. documents (Library West, Documents).
Reference service is provided to library users in each
library and is also available via telephone and e-mail. All
of the libraries provide special services to assist students
and faculty with disabilities in their use of the libraries;
information is available at all circulation desks. At the
beginning of each semester, the Libraries offer orientation
programs designed to teach those new to campus what
services are available and how to use them. Schedules are
posted in each library at the beginning of each term and are
available under the training sessions portion of the library
home page. Individual assistance is available at the refer-
ence desk in each library. In addition, instructional librar-
ians will work with faculty and teaching assistants to
develop and present course specific library instruction
sessions. Instruction coordinators are available in Humani-
ties and Social Science Reference in Library West, in
Marston Science Library, and in the branches.
Subject specialists, who work closely with faculty and
graduate students to select materials for the collections,
also advise graduate students and other researchers who
need specialized bibliographic knowledge to define what
information resources are available locally and nationally
to support specific research. A good time to consult the
subject specialists is when beginning work on a major
research project or developing a working knowledge of
another discipline. A list of subject specialists is available
at reference desks and viathe library home page. Users may
schedule a meeting with the appropriate specialist.
The Libraries memberships in the Research Libraries
Group and the Center for Research Libraries give faculty
and students access to many major scholarly collections. In
addition, the libraries are linked to major national and
international databases. Many materials that are not held
on campus can be quickly located and borrowed through
one of the cooperative programs to which the Libraries
belong. Consult with a reference librarian to take advan-
tage of these services. Publications describing specialized
services are available at reference and circulation desks
throughout the Libraries.
Current information regarding library hours may be
obtained by selecting Library Hours and Phone Numbers
from the home page (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu) or calling
the desired library-(352)392-0341 for Library West and
Smathers, (352)392-2758 for Marston Science Library.


COMPUTER FACILITIES

Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC)
The University of Florida is the host campus for the
Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC) of the State
University System of Florida. NERDC's facilities are used for
instructional, administrative, and research computing for
the University of Florida and for other state educational
institutions and agencies in northern Florida. The organiza-
tions directly responsible for supporting computing activi-
ties at the University of Florida are
Office of Instructional Resources (OIR),
University of Florida Administrative Computing
Services,
Shands Hospital, Inc., Data Processing Division,
J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
Network Access.--Networks available through NERDC
include
SUS Computer Network, which provides access to
the Northwest Regional Data Center in Tallahassee,
Florida State University Computing Center in Talla-
hassee, Central Florida Regional Data Center at the
University of South Florida in Tampa, and the
Southeast Regional Data Center at Florida Interna
tional University in Miami,
Florida Information Resource Network (FIRN), a
Florida Department of Education network,
Internet, and
Internet 2.
Hardware.-NERDC facilities availableto students, fac-
ulty, and staff include an IBM 9672-R55 central processor
with 4 gigabytes of main memory. Operating systems
include OS/390 with JES2. NERDC also has an IBM RS
6000/SP with 12 silver nodes. The operating system is AIX/
6000, IBM's version of the UNIX operating system. Other
hardware includes
IBM 9392 RAMAC volumes, providing more
than 934 gigabytes
IBM 3480 cartridge tape drives and IBM 3422 9-track
reel tape drives
IBM 3745 communications controllers for telecom
munication services. Terminal Servers provide dial-
up services for ASCII workstations to emulate full-
screen, 3270-type terminals, and to provide SLIP/
PPP access to the Internet.
Input and Output.-NERDC provides input and output
facilities in the form of magnetic tapes and disks, impact
and laser printers, graphics, and computer output micro-
fiche (COM). IBM 4245 high-speed printers, IBM 3130
laser printers, and HP Laser Jet printers provide printed
output. Graphics output is also available through a Versatec
Electrostatic Color Plotter. NERDC supports job submis-
sion/retrieval and interactive processing through several
thousand interactive terminals and microcomputers that
emulateterminals. These workstations can access NERDC's
timesharing systems (TSO, AIX/6000, and CICS) for editing,
interactive program execution, and batch job submission.
Software.-The major production languages include
ASSEMBLER, COBOL, C, Fortran, Pascal, and PL/I. Student-
oriented languages supported in selected environments





50/ GENERAL INFORMATION


include ASSIST, PL/C, and Waterloo PASCAL. File manage-
ment systems and report generators include EASYTRIEVE
and MARK IV. IBM's DB2 is NERDC's primary database
management system. TPX allows concurrent interactive
sessions from one terminal. Other primary software in-
cludes statistical packages (BMDP, SAS, SPSSX, and
MATLAB), text-formatting programs (TeX; and IBM DCF
and Waterloo SCRIPT, both with spell-checking and for-
mula-formatting capabilities), libraries of scientific and
mathematical routines (ESSL, MATLAB, OSL, and IMSL),
graphics programs (GDDM, Versatec plotting software,
SAS/GRAPH, and SURFACE II), mini- and microcomputer
support via file-transfer capabilities, local and IBM utilities,
and special-purpose languages.
Research Computing Initiative and Numerically Inten-
sive Computing Support.-NERDC and IBM offer a signifi-
cant but limited amount of free computing time to UF and
SUS faculty members to develop programs that use the
high-performance features of the RS 6000/SP. The Faculty
Research Computing Initiative Allocation Committee re-
ceives and evaluates proposals for computing support.
NERDC supports numerically intensive computing with
periodic workshops, aid in converting programs to use
parallel facilities, and advice on the design of new NIC
software, and more.
Applied Parallel Technologies Institute.-The APTI is a
cooperative venture among the Florida Center for Library
Automation (FCLA), UF, NERDC, and IBM to promote
applications of heterogeneous, parallel processing systems.
These types of applications include the management, re-
trieval, and storage of large amounts of data in a complex,
statewide enterprise; and the use of parallel, very large
servers in an open, networked environment.
LUIS.-LUIS (Library User Information Service) istheon-
line card catalog of the SUS libraries. There are LUIS
catalogs for each state university system library. The state
legislature has funded access to LUIS through the Florida
Center for Library Automation (FCLA). Call (352)392-9020
for information about obtaining free identification numbers
for using LUIS.
Additional Information.-More information is available
through NERDC's annual Guidebook, NERDC's newslet-
ter,/Update, NERDC documentation, and NERDC Informa-
tion Services at 112 SSRB, (352) 392-2061. NERDC docu-
ments are also available via the World Wide Web at http:/
/www.nerdc.ufl.edu.

Center for Instructional and Research Computing
Activities (CIRCA), Office of Instructional Resources
(OIR)

Services available to graduate students include elec-
tronic thesis and dissertation computing support, phone
and walk-in consulting, noncredit computer courses,
GatorLink mail, web and dialup services, Unix and NERDC
(Northeast Regional Data Center) computing accounts,
software distribution, and the use of microcomputer class-
rooms, multimedia equipment, and laboratories. Unix and
IBM computers offer programming languages and packages
for mathematical and statistical analysis. The CIRCA micro-
computer laboratories are available for personal and aca-


demic use. They are equipped with IBM-compatible and
Macintosh computers, laser printers, plotters and scanners.
The CIRCA network offers applications for word process-
ing, spreadsheets, data analysis, graphics, and the Internet.
Instructors whose courses require the use of Unix or IBM
mainframe computing may apply for class computing ac-
counts. Applications for these instructional accounts are
available in E520 Computer Sciences and Engineering
(CSE). Instructors may reserve CIRCA computer classrooms
or multimedia lecture classrooms for class sessions. Instruc-
tors may also use site-licensed WebCT (Web Course Tools)
software to provide a framework for developing course
resources.
Additional information about CIRCA and NERDC ser-
vices is available from the UF Computing Help Desk in
E520 CSE, helpdesk@ufl.edu, (352)392-HELP, or on the
World Wide Web at http://www.circa.ufl.edu.

ART GALLERIES
Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art provides the most
advanced facilities for the exhibition, study, and preserva-
tion of works of art. The Har offers approximately 15
changing exhibitions per year. The Museum's collection
includes the arts of the Americas, Africa, and Asia as well
as contemporary international works of art. Exciting perfor-
mance art, lectures, and films are also featured. Museum
hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Friday; 10
a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday; and 1 to 5 p.m., Sunday. The Har
Museum is accredited by the American Association of
Museums.
The University Gallery is an integral part of the Fine Arts
complex. The Gallery is located on the campus facing S.W.
13th Street (U.S. 441). An atrium and sculptural fountain are
two pleasing features of the Gallery's distinctive architec-
tural style. The University Gallery exhibits contemporary
local, national, and international art of the highest quality.
Each exhibit shows for approximately four weeks; Gallery
hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Wednesday through Friday; and 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday.
The University Gallery is closed on Sundays, Mondays, and
holidays and for three weeks in August. Summer hours are
Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The Department of Art's gallery, Focus, is located adja-
cent to the Department's office area, on the third floorof the
classroom building in the Fine Arts complex. Focus Gallery
exhibits one-person and small-group exhibitions of merit,
as well as student exhibitions. The Gallery is open Monday
through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 4:30 p.m.
It is closed Saturday and Sunday.

PERFORMING ARTS
The Center for the Performing Arts hosts a broad range of
events each season including Broadway shows, dance
troupes, and world famous entertainers. The 1700 seat
theatre features computerized lighting and sound systems.
In addition to the main stage, the facility features a black
box theatre that is used for experimental or small musical
productions, recitals, and receptions. For additional infor-
mation, call the Administrative Offices (352)392-1900 or
the Box Office (352)392-2787 or visit the World Wide Web
page at http://www.cpa.ufl.edu.





RESEARCH AND TEACHING SERVICES /51


MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
The Florida Museum of Natural History was created by
an act of the Legislature in 1917 as a department of the
University of Florida. Through its affiliation with the Uni-
versity, it carries dual responsibility as the Florida museum
and the University museum.
The research and collections museum is located in
Dickinson Hall at the corner of Museum Road and Newell
Drive. The public education and exhibits division of the
Museum is in Powell Hall, on Hull Road at the western edge
of campus, situated between the Harn Museum of Art and
the Center for the Performing Arts. Completed in 1997,
Powell Hall is devoted exclusively to permanent and trav-
eling exhibits, educational programs, and special events.
Powell Hall is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and holidays. The
Museum is closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas. There
is no admission charge.
The Museum operates as a center of research in anthro-
pology and natural science. Under the director are three
administrative units: Office of the Director, responsible for
administrative oversight as well as fund-raising and devel-
opment; Department of Natural History, houses the state's
natural history collections and is staffed by scientists and
support personnel concerned with the study of modern and
fossil plants and animals, and historic and prehistoric
people and their cultures; Exhibits and Public Programs in
Powell Hall, staffed by specialists in the interpretation of
natural history through exhibits and educational programs.
The scientific and educational faculty (curators) hold ap-
pointments in appropriate University of Florida academic
departments. Through these appointments, they participate
in both undergraduate and graduate teaching programs.
The Allyn Museum of Entomology, Sarasota, is part of the
Department of Natural History of the Florida Museum of
Natural History. The combined Sarasota and Gainesville
holdings in Lepidoptera rank the Allyn Museum of Ento-
mology as the largest in the western hemisphere and the
premier Lepidoptera research center in the world. The Allyn
Museum publishes the Bulletin of the Allyn Museum of
Entomology and sponsors the Karl Jordan Medal. The Allyn
Collection serves as a major source for taxonomic and
biogeographic research by a number of Museum and
Department of Zoology faculty and students, as well as a
great many visiting entomologists from around the world.
The Swisher Memorial Sanctuary and the Ordway Pre-
serve are adjacent pieces of land totalling some 9,300
acres. The land includes an array of habitats including
marsh, lakes, sandhills, and mesic hammocks. Jointly ad-
ministered by the School of Forest Resources and Conser-
vation and the Florida Museum of Natural History, this area
supports several research activities centering on the ecol-
ogy of threatened species and the restoration of the native
longleaf pine growth in the sandhills. Thesis and disserta-
tion research projects consistent with the aims of the
preserve are actively encouraged.
The Randell Research Center at the Pineland archeologi-
cal site near Fort Myers, Florida, is dedicatedto learning and
teaching the archeology, history, and ecology of Southwest
Florida.
The herbarium of the University of Florida is also a part


of the Museum. It contains over 150,000 specimens of
vascular plants and 170,000 specimens of nonvascular
plants. In addition, the herbarium operates a modern gas
chromatographic/mass spectrometer laboratory forthe study
and identification of natural plant products.
The research collections are under the care of curators
who encourage the scientific study of the Museum's hold-
ings. Materials are constantly being added to the collec-
tions both through gifts from friends and as a result of
research activities of the Museum staff. The archaeological
and ethnological collections are noteworthy, particularly
in the aboriginal and Spanish colonial material remains
from the southeastern United States and the Caribbean.
There are extensive study collections of birds, mammals,
mollusks, reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrate and verte-
brate fossils, plant fossils, and a bioacoustic archive consist-
ing of original recordings of animal sounds. Opportunities
are provided for students, staff, and visiting scientists to use
the collections. Research and field work are presently
sponsored in the archaeological, paleontological, and zoo-
logical fields. Students interested in these specialties should
make application to the appropriate teaching department.
Graduate assistantships are available in the Museum in
areas emphasized in its research programs.

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station conducts a
statewide program in food, agriculture, natural resources,
and the environment. Research deals with agricultural
production, processing, marketing, human nutrition, vet-
erinary medicine, renewable natural resources, and envi-
ronmental issues. This research program includes activities
by departments located on the Gainesville campus as well
as on the campuses of Research and Education Centers
throughout the state. Close cooperation with numerous
Florida agricultural and natural resource related agencies
and organizations is maintained to provide research sup-
port for Florida's broad variety of crops, commodities, and
natural resources.
The land-grant philosophy of research, extension, and
teaching is strongly supported and administered by the Vice
President for Agriculture and Natural Resources. The Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, under his leader-
ship, comprisesthe Florida Agricultural Experiment Station,
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service, the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences, and elements of the College
of Veterinary Medicine, each functioning under a dean.
Many of the IFAS faculty have joint appointments among
areas.
Funds for graduate assistants are made available to
encourage graduate training and professional scientific
improvement.
Research at the main station is conducted within 18
departments-Agricultural Education and Communication,
Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Agronomy, Ani-
mal Science, Dairy and Poultry Sciences, Entomology and
Nematology, Environmental Horticulture, Food and Re-
source Economics, Food Science and Human Nutrition,
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Forest Resources and
Conservation, Family, Youth and Community Sciences,





52 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Horticultural Sciences, Microbiology and Cell Science,
Plant Pathology, Soil and Water Science, Statistics, Veteri-
nary Medicine, and Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. In
addition to the above, there are support units vital to
research programs, namely, Educational Media and Ser-
vices, Facilities Planning and Operations, Planning and
Business Affairs, Sponsored Programs, Personnel, and Fed-
eral Affairs.
The locations of the Research and Education Centers are
Belle Glade, Bradenton, Fort Lauderdale, Homestead, Lake
Alfred, Quincy, Sanford, Monticello, Brooksville, Fort Pierce,
Immokalee, Dover, Hastings, Ona, Apopka, Marianna,
Live Oak, Leesburg, Vero Beach, and Jay. A Center for
Cooperative Agricultural Programs (CCAP) in Tallahassee
is jointly supported with Florida A&M University.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is cooperat-
ing with the Brooksville Subtropical Research Station,
Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its beef cattle and
pasture production and management programs and with
the National Weather Service, Ruskin, in the agricultural
weather service for Florida.
In addition to the above, research is conducted through
the IFAS International Programs Office, the Centers for
Natural Resources Programs and for Biomass Programs, the
Center for Environmental Toxicology, and the Center for
Aquatic and Invasive Plants.

ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL
EXPERIMENT STATION
The internationally recognized Engineering and Indus-
trial Experiment Station (EIES) is the research arm of the
Collegeof Engineering. Itwasofficially established in 1941
by the Florida Legislature. Its primary purpose is to perform
research that benefits the state's industries, health, welfare,
and public services. EIES also works to enhance our
nation's global competitive posture by developing new
materials, devices, and processes. In addition, EIES pro-
vides undergraduate and graduate engineering students
with significant opportunities to participate in hands-on,
cutting-edge research.
EIES addresses a wide variety of state and national
research issues through the college's academic depart-
ments and engineering research centers. It takes an inter-
disciplinary approach to research by involving talents from
diverse areas of the College and the University. Particle
science and technology, materials, intelligent machines,
biomedical engineering, computer technologies and sys-
tems, energy systems, robotics, construction and manufac-
turing technologies, computer-aided design, process sys-
tems, a broad spectrum of research related to the "public
sector"-agricultural, civil, coastal, and environmental-rep-
resent some of the EIES broad-based research programs

FLORIDA ENGINEERING EDUCATION
DELIVERY SYSTEM (FEEDS)
The Florida Engineering Education Delivery System
(FEEDS) is a cooperative effort to deliver graduate engineer-
ing courses and degree programs via videotape to engineers
throughout Florida. Along with the University of Florida,
participating universities include the colleges of engineer-


ing at Florida State University/Florida A&M University,
Florida Atlantic University, Florida International Univer-
sity, the University of Central Florida, and the University of
South Florida and the cooperating centers at the Florida
Gulf Coast University, University of North Florida and the
University of West Florida. Graduate students associated
with any of these universities have access to the graduate
engineering courses offered via the FEEDS throughout the
state during the school term. Students wishing to be admit-
ted to the FEEDS program or wishing to register for classes
at the University of Florida should do so by contacting the
FEEDS Coordinator, 117 CSE Building. Students pursuing a
degree through the College of Engineering at the University
of Florida are governed by its requirements, the department
to which they have been admitted, and the Graduate School.

OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND GRADUATE
PROGRAMS
The Office of Research and Graduate Programs (RGP)
includes the Division of Sponsored Research, the Office of
Technology Licensing, the University of Florida Research
Foundation, andthe Graduate School. RGP is administered by
the Vice President for Research/Dean of the Graduate School.
The primary missions of RGP are to stimulate the growth
of research and graduate education throughout the Univer-
sity; to help create significant relationships between gov-
ernment, industry, other research sponsors and the Univer-
sity; and to promote economic development in Alachua
County, the State of Florida, and the nation through tech-
nology transfer opportunities.
The Division of Sponsored Research (DSR) has two
general goals: to promote and administer the sponsored
research program and to assist the faculty, staff, and stu-
dents in developing their research activities.
All research, grant-in-aid, training, or educational ser-
vice agreement proposals require the approval of the Direc-
tor of Sponsored Research before submission. Subsequent
negotiations of sponsored awards are also the responsibility
of the Division. DSR assists researchers in identifying
possible sponsors for their projects. DSR also disseminates
program information and University policies and proce-
dures for the conduct of research, as well as proposal
deadlines.
The University of Florida Research Foundation is the
steward for the technology transfer process and through the
Office of Technology Licensing handles all intellectual
property at the University.
The Office of Technology Licensing (OTL) handles the
patenting, marketing, and licensing of intellectual property.
OTLworks closely with UF inventors in the identification and
protection of new inventions. All patents, copyrights, and
trademarks are processed and managed by OTL. In addition
OTL assists researchers in the development of confidential-
ity, mutual secrecy, and material transfer agreements.
For more information, write to RGP, P.O. Box 115500 or
visit the website at http://www.rgp.ufl.edu.

UNIVERSITY PRESS OF FLORIDA
The University Press of Florida is the official scholarly
publishing agency of the State University System of Florida.








The Press, which is located just off the University of
Florida campus at 15 NW 15th Street, reports to the
President of the University, who supervises the Press on
behalf of the 10 state universities. The statewide Council of
Presidents is the governing board for the Press.
An editorial committee, consisting of representatives
from each of the 10 state universities, determines whether
manuscripts submitted to it reflect appropriate academic,
scholarly, and programmatic standards of the Press.
The Press publishes scholarly works of intellectual dis-
tinction and significance, books that contribute to improv-
ing the quality of higher education in Florida, and books of
general and regional interest and usefulness to the people
of Florida, reflecting their rich historical, cultural, and
intellectual heritage and resources. The Press publishes
works in the following fields: the Caribbean and Latin
America; the Middle East; southern archaeology, history,
and culture; Native Americans; literary theory; medieval
studies; women's studies; ethnicity; natural history; conser-
vation biology; the fine arts; Floridiana.
Manuscripts may be submitted to the Editor-in-Chief,
University Press of Florida, 15 NW 15th Street, Gainesville,
FL 32611.


INTERDISCIPLINARY

RESEARCH CENTERS

Accounting Research & Professional Education, Center
for
Advanced Study of the Communication Processes,
Institute for
Aeronomy & Other Atmospheric Sciences, Interdiscipli-
nary Center for Affordable Housing, Shimberg Center for sl 4.cfaa.ufl.edu/centers/shimberg/>
Agricultural Law, Center for
Alcohol Research, Center for Dept/Faculty/Walker.html>
Ambulatory Studies, Center for
Applied Mathematics, Center for www.math.ufl.edu/~dcw/CAM/cam.html>
Applied Optimization, Center for www.math.ufl.edu/~hager/cao/cao.html>
Aquatic & Invasive Plants, Center for aquat.1 .ifas.ufl.edu/>
Archaeology & Paleoenvironmental Studies, Institute of
Architectural Preservation/Conservation, Research &
Education Center for academics/center.html>
Arts and Public Policy, Center for the www.arts.ufl.edu/centers.html>
Autism and Related Disabilities, Center for < neurosci90.health.ufl.edu/card.html>
Automated Information Research, International Center
for
Bioglass Research Center brc.html>
Biological Conservation, Center for darwin.wec.ufl.edu/Entities/CBC/CBC.html>


INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH CENTERS /53


Biomass Programs, Center for
Biostatistics & Epidemiology, Center for
Biotechnology Research, Interdisciplinary Center for

Brain Institute
Brechner Center for Freedom of Information www.jou.ufl.edu/brechner/brochure.htm>
Business Ethics Education & Research Center www.cba.ufl.edu/centers/beer.htm>
Cancer Center, Florida Shands centers/cancer/cancer.htm>
Catalysis, Center for
Chemical Physics Center
Child Health Policy, Institute for www.ichp.ufl.edu/institute/index.html>
Childhood Cancer Research, International
Center for
Children's Literature, Florida Center for
the Study of
Clinical Research Center
Clinical Trials Research, Center for
Community Education, Stewart Mott Davis Center for

Computer Vision & Visualization, Center for cise.ufl.edu/-jnw/CCW/>
Construction & Environment, Center for www.arch.ufl.edu/arc/academics/center.html>
Construction Safety & Loss Control, Center for www.bcn.ufl.edu/e_menu/Safety/pagel.htm>
Consumer Research, Center for www.cba.ufl.edu/centers/consumer.htm>
Cooperative Learning in Health Science Education,
Center for
Criminology & Law, Center for Studies in web.crim.ufledu/>
Craniofacial Center Bulletin.htm>
Database Systems Research and Development Center

Dental Biomaterials, Center for www.dental.ufl.edu/Bulletin.htm>
Dental Occlusion & Facial Pain, Parker E. Mahan Center
on
Diabetes Research, Education, & Treatment Center
Drug Discovery, Center for
Early Contact Period Studies, Institute for
Economic & Business Research, Bureau of www.cba.ufl.edu/bebr/index.html>
Economic Education, Center for www.coe.ufl.edu/CEE/CEE.html>
Engineering Research Center for Particle Science &
Technology
Entrepreneurship & Innovation, Center for
Environmental & Human Toxicology, Center for www.ufbiufl.edu/physdept/tox.htm>
Environmental Education, Center for
Environmental Policy, Center for www.eng.ufl.edu/#centers>
Exercise Science, Center for ESS/CES/INDEX.HTM>
Film and Media Studies, Center for web.english.ufl.edu/film/>





54 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Fire Testing & Research Center e menu/fire/fire.htm>
Florida Brazil Linkage Institute
Florida Insurance Research Center www.cba.ufl.edu/centers/hrrc.htm>
Florida Sea Grant College Program gnv.ifas.ufl.edu.%7eseaweb/homepage/fsg.htm>
Florida Studies in the Humanities & Social Sciences,
Center for
Florida Survey Research Center
Fundamental Theory, Institute for www.phys.ufl.edu/!ift/
Gene Therapy Center
Geoplan Center index .html>
Geriatric Education Center med/gec/
Gerontological Studies, Center for web.geron.ufl.edu/>
Governmental Responsibility, Center for nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu/-lawinfo/cl lege/CGR/>
Greek Studies, Center for
Health Policy Research, Institute for
Health Promotion, Florida Center for www.hhp.ufl.edu/hse/main/flcntrhp.htm>
Hearing Research Center
Heterocyclic Compounds, Florida Center for ufarkl 2.chem.ufl.edu/>
Higher Education, Institute for ihe/ihe.html>
Human Resources Research Center www.cba.ufl.edu/centers/hrrc.htm>
Hypertension Center
Immunology & Transplantation, Center for
Innovative Nuclear Space Power & Propulsion Institute

Integrated Electronics Center Intelligent Machines & Robotics, Center for www.me.ufl.edu/CIMAR/>
International Agricultural Trade & Development Center

International Economic & Business Studies, Center for

Jewish Studies, Center for
Legal Technology Institute -lawinfo/lit/>
Library Automation, Florida Center for www.fcla.edu/fcla.html>
Lithiasis & Pathological Calcification, Center for Study of
Machine Tool Research Center
Macromolecular Science & Engineering, Center for
Major Analytical Instrumentation Center www.mse.ufl.edu/maic.html>
Mammalian Genetics Center
Marine Laboratory, Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney /whitney.ufl.edu/>
Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key
Mineral Resources Research Center www.mse.ufl.edu/>
Modern German Studies, Center for
Multidisciplinary Diagnostic Training Program www.coe.ufl.edu/MDTP/mdtp.html>


Musculoskeletal Injury Research, Center for
Natural Resources, Center for ~cnr_web/index.htm>
Neurobiological Sciences, Center for www.ufbi.ufl.edu/CNS/CNS.html>
Neurobiology of Aging, Center for edu/>
Neuropsychological Studies, Center for
Nutritional Sciences, Center for
Oral Health in Aging, Claude Denson Pepper Center for

Orphaned Autoimmune Disorders, Center for www.dental.ufl.edu/Bulletin.htm>
Periodontal Disease Research Center www.dental.ufl.edu/Bulletin.htm>
Pharmaceutical Care, Dubow Family Center for Research
in< Politics & Society, Reubin Askew Center on web.clas.ufl.edu/askew/
Psychological Study of the Arts, Institute for www.clas.ufl.edu/ipsa/intro.htm>
Psychophysiology, Center for Research in uf3t.health.ufl.edu/csea/>
Public Policy Research, Center for bear.cba.ufl.edu/centers/prc/index.html>
Public Utilities Research Center www.cba.ufl.edu/eco/pure/index.html>
Race Relations, Center for the Study of
Real Estate Research Center crer/
Rehabilitation Research & Resource Center
Remote Sensing, Center for
Research on Elections, Florida Institute for
Resources & the Environment, Florida Institute for /www.clas.ufl.edu/users/guerry/fire/future.htm>
Retailing Education & Research, Center for www.cba.ufl.edu/CRER/>
School Improvement, Center for www.coe.ufl.edu/Faculty/CSI/CSI.html>
School Service Center
Science and Health Policy, Institute for
Sea Turtle Research, Archie Carr Center for nervm.nerdc.ufl.edu/~accstr/accstr.html>
Smell & Taste, Center for
Solid & Hazardous Waste Management, Florida Center
for
Southeastern Indians, Center for Study of
Southern Technology Applications Center www.state.fl.us/stac/>
Structural Biology, Center for csbnmr.health.ufl.edu/>
Theory and Computation in Molecular and Materials
Sciences, Institute for
Tourism Research & Development, Center for www.hhp.ufl.edu/rpt/ctrd/>
Transportation Research Center uftrc.ce.ufl.edu/index.htm>
Tropical Agriculture, Center for
Tropical & Subtropical Architecture, Planning, &
Construction, Center for indexl.html>
Ultralow Temperature Research, Center for





STUDENT SERVICES /55


Veterinary Sports Medicine, Center for vetsports.shtml>
Vision Research, Center for cenvissc.htm>
Water Resources Research #centers>
Wetlands, Center for
Women's Health, Center for Research on www.medinfo.ufl.edu/other/crwh/
Women's Studies & Gender Research, Center for web.wst.ufl.edu/>
World Arts, Center for centers.html>
Wound Research, Institute for obgyn/iwr/index.html>
Written & Oral Communication, William & Grace Dial
Center


STUDENT SERVICES

CAREER RESOURCE CENTER

The Career Resource Center (CRC), located on the west
side of the J. Wayne Reitz Union at the first floor level, is the
central agency for career planning, employment assistance,
and cooperative education internships for University of
Florida students. The Center provides a range of services for
all graduate students and alumni seeking employment
opportunities. The CRC also works closely with the Aca-
demic Advising Center.
Graduate students wishing to explore career interests,
gain experience through cooperative education assign-
ments or internship, organize their job search campaign, or
gain skills in resume and interview techniques are invited
to visit the Center and utilize its services. The Center has an
extensive career library, with employer recruiting materi-
als, directories of employers, and other career skills infor-
mation, and its "immediate job openings" section averages
over 600 possible openings a week. For those graduate
students seeking individual assistance in resolving career
and academic problems, the Center has a number of career
counselors and advisers available for personal appoint-
ments.
The World Wide Web.-The Career Resource Center and
the world of jobs and career information can be accessed via
CRC's World Wide Web page at http://www.crc.ufl.edu/.
This website is as near as the closest UF computer lab,
through terminals in the CRC library, or if Web access is
available, from a personal computer. It contains a full
spectrum of information, services and direct Web links,
including details about the Career Resource Center, its mis-
sion, location and hours of operation, descriptions of CRC
programs and services for students, career fairs and Career
Expo (including a current list of employers attending), a
schedule of CRC events and programs, job listings and
interviewing/on-campus recruiting (including signing up for
interviews), and information for alumni. For those in the
immediate job market, there are direct links to such job
posting services asJOBTRAK, and registering with the Grad
System enables participation in on-campus interviews and
resume referral via the Gator Locator resume database.


A significant on-campus job interview program with
representatives from business, industry, government, and
education is conducted by the Center. These major em-
ployers come to campus seeking graduating students in
most career fields. Graduate students are encouraged to
register early and to participate in the on-campus interview
program. The Center also sponsors a number of Career
Days and Expos during the academic year, which bring
employers to campus to talk to students about careers and
jobs. These sessions are open to all majors and are an ideal
way for graduate students to make contact with potential
employers.
The Center also hosts Graduate and Professional School
Day in the fall, bringing to campus representatives from 40
to 50 colleges and universities around the country. Stu-
dents may gather information and ask questions about
various graduate and professional education programs
offered by these institutions.
The Center also provides reproduction and distribution
services of professional placementfiles (qualifications records,
vitae, resumes, and personal references). A modest charge is
assessed to cover labor and materials for copy services and
mailing of these credential packages to employers.

COUNSELING CENTER
The University Counseling Center offers a variety of
counseling services to currently enrolled students and their
spouses/partners. The Center is staffed by psychologists and
counselors to aid in the growth and development of each
student and to assist students in getting the most out of their
college experience. Services offered at the Center include
the following:
Counseling.-Individual, couples, or group counseling
is available to help students with personal, career, and
academic concerns. Appointments to see a counselor may
be made in person at 301 Peabody Hall. There is an initial
interview in which the student and the counselor make
decisions about the type of help needed. Students requiring
immediate help are seen on a non-appointment emergency
basis. Counseling interviews are confidential. Call (352)
392-1575 for more information.
Consulting.-Center psychologists are available for con-
sulting with students, staff, professionals, and faculty. These
consultations often focus on working with individual stu-
dents, special programs, organizational problems, ways of
improving student environments, and other issues that may
have important psychological dimensions.
Career Development.-In addition to careercounseling,
the Center offers vocational interest testing and career
workshops. The Center also provides referral information to
students seeking specific career information.
Group and Workshop Program.-The Center offers a
wide variety of groups and workshops. A number of them,
such as the women's support group and the graduate
student support group, are designed for special popula-
tions. Others such as the math confidence groups and stress
management workshops are formed to help participants
deal with common problems and learn specific skills. A list
of available groups and workshops is published at the
beginning of each term and is listed on the World Wide
Web at http://www.counsel.ufl.edu.





56/ GENERAL INFORMATION


Teaching/Training.-The Center provides a variety of
practicum and internship training experiences for students
in counseling psychology, clinical psychology, counselor
education, and rehabilitation counseling. Center faculty
also teach undergraduate and graduate courses in some of
these departments.
Confidentiality.-The Center adheres to very strict con-
fidentiality standards. Any information provided is strictly
confidential except in life threatening situations, cases of
suspected child orelder abuse, orwhen release isotherwise
required by law.
For further information on the Counseling Center and its
services, please visit http://www.counsel.ufl.edu.

ENGLISH SKILLS FOR INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS

The University of Florida makes available three English
language programs to help international graduate students
improve their proficiency in English. These programs are
(1)the English Language Institute, (2) Scholarly Writing, and
(3) Academic Spoken English.
Applicants whose command of English is not as good as
expected may be required by their departments to attend
the English Language Institute (ELI), an intensive English
program designed to provide rapid gain in English profi-
ciency. An ELI student may require one, two, or exception-
ally, three semesters of full-time English study before enter-
ing Graduate School. Information about ELI is available in
315 Norman Hall.
The Scholarly Writing (SW) program is designed to help
foreign graduate students improve their writing ability.
Applicants whose verbal GRE scores are below 320 or who
have been admitted provisionally with a TOEFL score lower
than 550 are given a writing test. Those demonstrating a
lower proficiency than needed for successful performance
in written tasks at the graduate level are required to take ENS
4449. Another course, ENS 5450-Research Writing, is
offered to those who wish to learn to write in their fields of
study. Information about the SW program is available atthe
coordinator's office, 116 Anderson Hall, telephone (352)
392-0639 or 377-2189.
The Academic Spoken English (ASE) program is designed
to help those who expect to be Graduate Teaching Assis-
tants at the University of Florida but who cannot demon-
strate a high enough proficiency in English. Students who
must raiseTSE scores are advised to take ENS 4501, a course
to improve general oral language skills. Another course,
ENS 5502, is offered to students whose proficiency is good
enough to begin teaching but who still need help learning
to use English in an American classroom. Teachers are
videotaped and their class work discussed constructively
by the ASE staff. The third course, ENS 5503, is a tutorial.

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS UNITED

Graduate Assistants United (GAU) represents graduate
assistants in collective bargaining with respect to wages,
hours, and other conditions of employment. GAU also
serves as advocate for graduate assistants with employment
grievances, publishes a newsletter, provides an e-mail list,


and organizes social events. The GAU also includes the
GAU Women's Council. Call 392-0274 or visit the website
at http://web.nwe.ufl.edu/GAU/.

GRADUATE EXAMINER
The Graduate Examiner, a Graduate School publication,
is distributed monthly through the departments to each
graduate student. The Examiner, which is written by a
graduate student, contains information about important
deadlines, grants and fellowships, workshops and travel
opportunities, and other items of immediate interest to
graduate students. It also recognizes graduate student
accomplishments. For more information, or to place an
announcement, e-mail gsnews@ufl.edu or call the Gradu-
ate School at 392-4646. This newsletter is available at http:/
/www.rgp.ufl.edu/examiner.

GRADUATE MINORITY PROGRAMS

The Graduate School's Office of Graduate Minority
Programs (OGMP) offers a variety of activities for incoming
and continuing minority graduate students. The OGMP

provides individual counseling and sponsors receptions,
forums, and a Graduate School open house to help students
meet faculty and administrators they will need to know
during the graduate matriculation process.
The OGMP coordinates the Board of Regents Summer
Program, a six-weekorientation program forAfrican Ameri-
can graduate students admitted for fall semester. The
OGMP maintains a close working relationship with the
Office of Student Services and supports the efforts of all
minority student organizations, and frequently assists other
academic units with their on-going recruitment and reten-
tion efforts. For currently enrolled minority graduate stu-
dents, writing support and individual statistics tutoring are
arranged as needed.
The OGMP administers fellowships such as the McKnight
Doctoral Fellowship and the UF/SFCC African American
Faculty Development Project for incoming graduate stu-
dents. In a continuing commitment to provide support for
minority graduate students, the OGMP has developed a
database of funding sources for submission of proposals
and grants to support minority initiatives.
The Office services as a liaison between departments and
the Graduate School for all African American/Black, His-
panic American, American Indian/Native American, and
Pacific Islander (Micronesian and Polynesian) graduate
students. The OGMP has a website at http://
www.rgp.ufl.edu/ogmp/.

GRADUATE SCHOOL EDITORIAL OFFICE
The Graduate School Editorial Office provides a Guide for
Preparing Theses and Dissertationsto assist the student in the
preparation of the manuscript and offers suggestions and
advice on such matters as the preparation and reproduction
of illustrative materials, the treatmentof special programs, the
useof copyrighted material, and howto secure a copyright for
a dissertation. The following procedures apply to the Gradu-
ate School's editorial services to students.






STUDENT SERVICES / 57


1. The responsibility for acceptable English in a thesis
or dissertation, as well as the originality and accept-
able quality of the content, lies with the student and
the supervisory committee.
2. The Graduate School editorial staff act only in an
advisory capacity but will answer questions regard-
ing correct grammar, sentence structure, and accept-
able forms of presentation.
3. The editorial staff will examine a limited portion of
the final rough draft and make recommendations
concerning the form of the thesis or dissertation
before the final typing.
4. After the initial submission of the dissertation in
final form, the Editorial Office staff check the format,
paper stock, and pagination and read portions of the
text for general usage, references, and bibliographi-
cal form. Master'stheses are checked for paper stock,
format, reference style, pagination, and signatures.
It is the responsibility of the student and the
supervisory chairman to notify the Graduate School
in writing of any changes which have been made in
the structure of the supervisory committee.
5. The Editorial Office maintains a file of experienced
thesis typists and manuscript editors that the student
may consult to find assistance in the mechanical
preparation of the manuscript.
For more information, come by 168 Grinter Hall or call
(352)392-1282, fax (352)846-1855, e-mail hmartin@ufl.edu.
The Guide, Deadline Dates, and other information for
graduate students is available on the World Wide Web at
http://www.rgp.ufl.edu/education.


GRADUATE SCHOOL RECORDS OFFICE

The Records Office works, one on one, with students at
all phases of their graduate careers, from application through
degree certification and graduation. In addition to provid-
ing individual advisement, the office's record-keeping sys-
tem is structured so that a record can be accessed at the
stroke of a computer key. Printouts are provided automati-
cally to notify the student and the department when a
problem arises, so that prompt action can be taken.


GRADUATE STUDENT COUNCIL
The Graduate Student Council was formed in 1989 to
foster interaction among graduate students on campus and
to provide an agency for the coordination of graduate
student activities and programs. The GSC seeks the im-
provement of graduate student education through active
and permanent communication with the Graduate School,
the University administration, and the Florida Board of
Regents. It also represents the interests of graduate students
at the student government, administration, local, state, and
national levels.

GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK

The Graduate School makes available to all students a
summary of useful information in the Graduate Student
Handbook. Copies are distributed to new students by the


graduate dean's office. It is available on the World Wide
Web at http://www.rgp.ufl.edu.


HOUSING

For Graduate and Undergraduate Students with Fami-
lies.-Apartment accommodations on the University cam-
pus are available for students with families. Application
may be made prior to being admitted to the University.
For Single Graduate Students.-Village apartments are
available to single graduate students. Graduate students
are housed within family housing villages or in the Apart-
ment Residence Facility. The Apartment Residence Facil-
ity, part of the single student residence hall system, is
available to graduate and upper-division students. Gradu-
ate students are given priority; however, there sometimes is
a waiting list. To be considered for assignment to the
Apartment Residence Facility, a residence hall housing
application must be completed which is a separate and
different process from applying for Village housing.

Applications
Each student must make personal arrangements for hous-
ing, either by applying to the Division of Housing Office for
assignment to University housing facilities or by obtaining
accommodations off campus. Inquiries concerning Univer-
sity Family and Single Graduate Student Housing facilities
should be addressed to the Village Communities Office,
Division of Housing, University of Florida, (352)392-2161.
Off-campus housing information is available from the
Division of Housing website, http://www.housing.ufl.edu.
Application to Family Housing and Single Graduate
Student Housing may be filed prior to being admitted to the
University. Students are urged to apply as early as possible
because of the demand for housing.
Graduate students livingin University housing are required
to qualify as full-time students as defined by the University,
and they must continue to make normal progress toward a
degree as determined by their supervisory committees.

Residence Halls For Single Students
Various types of accommodations are provided by the
University. The double room for two students is the most
common type. Several of the larger rooms or suites are
designated as permanent triple rooms. Suites for two stu-
dents consist of two connected rooms-a bedroom and a
study room. Carpeted and air-conditioned suites for four,
available in Beaty Towers, include two bedrooms, a private
bath, and a study-kitchenette.
Carpeted and air-conditioned apartments for four are
available in the Apartment Residence Facility and the
Residence Hall 2000. They include four single bedrooms,
two baths, a kitchen, and a living room. The 1995 Resi-
dence Hall offers single room suites and double room suites
with central heating and air-conditioning and shared baths.
Yulee Scholarship Hall contains air-conditioned single
rooms. For information on rental rates, contact the Assign-
ments Section, Division of Housing, University of Florida,
(352)392-2161.






58 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Cooperative Living Arrangements
There are four different cooperative living groups at the
University of Florida. Two of these groups are located on
campus and are operated by the University of Florida,
Division of Housing.
Among the qualifications for membership are scholastic
ability and reference of good character. These cooperative
living groups are specifically operated by and for students
with limited financial means for attending the University.
Inquiries pertaining to cooperative living on campus are
made to the Division of Housing, Assignments Section,
University of Florida, (352)392-2161. The cooperative
living organizations on campus currently are the North
Hall Co-op and the Buckman Co-op. Off-campus co-ops
are the Collegiate Living Organization (coed), 117 NW
15th Street, and Georgia Seagle Hall (men), 1002 West
University Avenue. Inquiries should be made to these
addresses.

Family and Single Graduate Student Housing
The University operates five apartment villages for eli-
gible students. To be eligibleto apply for apartment housing
on campus, the following qualifications must be met:
A married student or student parent without spouse who
has legal custody of minor children must meet the require-
ments for admission to the University of Florida, qualify as
a full-time student as defined by the University, and con-
tinue to make normal progress toward a degree as deter-
mined by the supervisory committee.
The student must be a part of a family unit defined as (1)
husband and wife with or without one or more children or
(2) single parent who has legal custody of one or more
minor children who reside with the parent on an ongoing
basis. Married couples without children can apply for a
two-bedroom apartment in any village.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens,
dishes, rugs, curtains, orother similar items. Utilities are an
additional expense and are billed with the rent.
Single graduate students may apply for any one-bedroom
apartment in any village. Single graduate students assigned
to Maguire Village are subject to maximum income limita-
tions as established by the Department of Housing and
Urban Development. Maximum income for one person is
$28,400. Documentation of income is required prior to
taking occupancy in Maguire Village.
Corry Memorial Village (216 units) of brick, concrete,
and wood construction contains almost an equal numberof
one- and two-bedroom apartments, with a few three-
bedroom units. Some apartments are furnished. Commu-
nity facilities include a meeting room and a laundry.
Diamond Memorial Village consists of 208 apartments
similar in construction to those in Corry Village. All Dia-
mond apartments are unfurnished. Special features include
a community building and air-conditioned study-meeting
room, laundry facilities, and a study cubicle in each two-
bedroom apartment.
Tanglewood Village Apartments, located approximately
1.3 miles south of the central campus, consist of 208
unfurnished efficiency, one- and two-bedroom townhouse
units. All units have disposals and two-bedroom units have


dishwashers. All one- and two-bedroom units have 1-1/2
baths. Community facilities include a large recreation hall,
laundry facilities, and two swimming pools.
University Village South and Maguire Village consist of
348 centrally heated and air-conditioned one- and two-
bedroom unfurnished apartments. Community facilities
include a pool, laundry, and meeting room. The kitchens
are equipped with stoves and refrigerators.
For Maguire Village Only, the student must be part of a
family with a combined gross annual income (including
grants-in-aid, VA benefits, scholarships, fellowships, and
child support payments) which does not exceed, during the
period of occupancy, the following maximum income
limitations: one person, $28,400; two persons, $32,450;
three persons, $36,500; four persons, $40,550; five per-
sons, $43,800; and six persons, $47,050.
For more information contactthe Village Housing Office.

Off-Campus Housing

The purpose of the Off-Campus Housing Service is to
assist University of Florida students, faculty, and staff in
obtaining adequate off-campus housing accommodations.
The Off-Campus Housing Service is a listing and referral
agency for rental housing of all types. It is not an enforce-
ment agency. It does not make rental reservations.
The off-campus housing information packet is available
on-line at http://www.housing.ufl.edu.
This packet contains a list of major apartment housing
developments in the Gainesville area with a zone locator
map. Also in the packet is some informational flyers. The
Housing Office maintains rental listings for reference dur-
ing housing business hours, Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. After hours, listings are posted outside the west main
entrance to the Housing Office.

OMBUDSMAN

The Office of the University Ombudsman was estab-
lished by the state legislature and reports directly to the
President. The.purpose of the office is to assist students in
resolving problems and conflicts. The office provides an
informal avenue of redress for students' problems and
grievances, which arise in the course of interacting with the
institution. By considering the problems in an unbiased
way, the Ombudsman works to achieve a fair resolution
and works to protect the rights of all involved properties.
The Office of the Ombudsman deals with student con-
cerns of an academic nature. Such problems may be related
to grades, differences of opinion with instructors, or any
academic matter that needs resolution. Students are ad-
vised to first contact the instructor, the department chair,
and/or the college dean before seeking assistance from the
Ombudsman, although instances do exist where contact
with the University Ombudsman first is beneficial.
In many instances, nonacademic issues can be easily and
readily resolved for students merely by providing an oppor-
tunity for direct communication and effective listening. For
other problems not related to academic issues, the Office of
the Ombudsman assists students in making contact with the
appropriate campus office for dealing with their problems.





STUDENT SERVICES /59


The Ombudsman for graduate students is the Associate
Dean of the Graduate School, 302 Walker Hall, telephone
(352)392-6622.


SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC

The University of Florida Speech and Hearing Clinic,
located on the fourth floor of Dauer Hall, offers therapeutic
and diagnostic services to persons with speech, language,
and hearing disorders as well as to persons with learning
disabilities. These services are available to the University
faculty and students. Therapy is scheduled between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, with the Clinic being open in
accordance with the University Calendar. Students are
encouraged to visit the Clinic office at 435 Dauer Hall or
call (352) 392-2041 for additional information or to sched-
ule an appointment.


STUDENT HEALTH CARE CENTER

The Student Health Care Center (SHCC) provides outpa-
tient medical services that include primary medical care,
health screening programs, health education, sexual as-
sault recover services, and mental health counseling. Phy-
sicians are board-eligible or certified and all clinical staff
are experienced in the care of university students. SHCC is
accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambula-
tory Health Care, Inc..
The SHCC is staffed by physicians, physician assistants,
nurse practitioners, registered nurses, dietitians, health
educators, psychiatrists, psychologists, and mental health
counselors. Health education staff provide counseling and
an extensive campus outreach includingthe new GatorWell
program.
SHCC also provides a pharmacy, clinical laboratory, and
radiology services. Health services available for UF stu-
dents include immunizations, foreign travel consultation,
women's health care, specialized programs for students
with eating disorders and alcohol and substance abuse, a
telephone medical advice nurse, an acute care clinic, and
a sports medicine clinic. An up-to-date description of all
services, hours, and special events is listed on the SHCC
website, http://www.health.ufl.edu.shcc.
There is no charge for an office visit with SHCC clinical
staff, health education, or mental health services. Fee-for-
service charges are assessed for laboratory tests, x-rays,
medical procedures, medications, physical therapy, massage
therapy, and consultation with health care specialists. CPR
and first-aid classes are also available for a fee. All services
are available through the Infirmary, which is located on
Fletcher Drive on campus. Limited SHCC services are also
available at SHCC at Shands Satellite Clinic.
The fall and spring SHCC hours for medical care are 8
a.m. to 8 p.m. on weekdays and noon to 4 p.m. on
weekends and most holidays. Student Mental Health hours
are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Pharmacy hours
are 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Clinic
hours vary during semester breaks and holidays. Summer
hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. A


medical provider and mental health counselor are avail-
able by phone for urgent questions which require advice
after hours.
Please call for general information at (352)392-11 61, ext.
4309. A Medical Advice Nurse is available at 392-1161,
ext. 4300, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. For appointments call 392-
1161, ext. 4224, or Mental Health at 392-1171. All
students registered for classes at the University are eligible
for service. Spouses, postdoctoral fellows, and semester-off
students who plan to return the following semester may
receive services if they pay an optional health fee.
A Student Government-sponsored health insurance plan
is available.
HIV/AIDS Policy.-The University's policy isto assess the
needs of students, faculty, or employees with HIV infection
on a case-by-case basis. With permission of the affected
individual, the Director of the Student Health Care Center
will assist in the coordination of resources and services.
The confidentiality of the individual's HIV status as well as
the individual's welfare are respected. Breach of confidenti-
ality of information obtained by a University employee in an
official capacity may result in disciplinary action.
Based on current medical information concerning risk of
infection, the University does not isolate persons with HIV
infection or AIDS from other individuals in the educational
or work setting. Furthermore, the University supports the
continued participation, to the fullest extent reasonably
possible, of these individuals in the campus educational/
work environment.
It is also the policy of the University to provide education
that seeks to prevent the spread of HIV infection. Those at
risk for HIV infection are encouraged to get tested; those
who are infected are urged to seek treatment. With current
advances in HIV/AIDS treatment, early intervention is
crucial to maintaining well being and delaying complica-
tions of the illness.
In keeping with the Americans with Disabilities Act, the
University considers HIV/AIDS to be a disability. Existing
support services can be utilized by students or employees
who are disabled by HIV infection or AIDS.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL
CENTER

The University of Florida International Center (UFIC),
located in 123 Grinter Hall, support and promotes teach-
ing, research, service, and the enhancement of interna-
tional education. UFIC coordinates with government and
university agencies to providethe following services: evalu-
ation of international student financial statements, the
issuance of IAP-66s and 120s, and study abroad opportuni-
ties. UFIC is the University of Florida liaison with foreign
and domestic embassies and consulates. For more informa-
tion, contact UFIC: telephone (352)392-5323, fax
(352)5575, e-mail ufic@ufic.ufl.edu,orvisittheUFICwebsite
at http://www.ufic.ufl.edu.
International Student Services (ISS).-ISS provides ori-
entation, immigration services, and cross-cultural work-
shops to students from abroad coming to study at UF.
Services are provided to international students immediately
upon their arrival at the University of Florida and continue





60/ GENERAL INFORMATION


until they return to their home countries. ISS provides
counseling on academic, financial, cultural, and personal
issues to all international students.
International Faculty and Scholar Services (IFSS).-IFSS
delivers administrative and support services to interna-
tional faculty, scholars, and their families. Services are
provided to faculty and scholars immediately upon their
arrival on campus and continue until they return home. All
international faculty and scholars as well as Fulbright
fellows check in with IFSS to verify visa status and insurance
coverage.
Overseas Studies Services (OSS).-OSS offers summer,
semester, and academic year programs that provide stu-
dents the opportunity to live and study abroad while
fulfilling degree requirements. A range of scholarships and
financial aid can helpto finance the international academic
experience. University of Florida exchange programs
enable students to pay UF tuition while studying overseas.
OSS program assistants advise applicants, tailoring the
programs to the individual needs of the students. Program
details are available in the UFIC library or on the UFIC
website.
Program Development.-UFIC promotes and assists in
the development of new international education and pro-
gram initiatives. UFIC has received funding for the World
Citizenship Program, an international internship program,


underwritten by the Coca-Cola Foundation. The pilot
program for Summer 2000 funds approximately 10 gradu-
ate students for internships with CARE and UNICEF. In
addition to the World Citizenship Program, UFIC, in coop-
eration with the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences,
also houses the Peace Corps office.

WORKSHOPS FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS
The Graduate School and the Office of Instructional
Resources (OIR) offer an orientation and a series of work-
shops for teaching assistants to improve their instructional
skills. The orientation and "getting started" workshop are
mandatory for all graduate students who are beginning
teaching assignments. Topics include presentation skills,
course and lecture planning, techniques for improving stu-
dent attention and motivation, group dynamics, testing and
grading, and how to elicit and interpret feedback. Partici-
pants may request videotaping of their classroom presenta-
tions and student feedback on strengths and weaknesses. To
sign up or for more information, call Dr. Winifred Cooke at
the OIR Teaching Center, 392-2010, ordrop by the office on
the ground level, Southwest Broward Hall.
Teaching at the University of Florida: A Handbook for
TeachingAssistantsisavailableon line at http://grove.ufl.edu/
-teachctr/main.html.














Fields of Instruction






62/ FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION

Fields of Instruction

Course Prefixes, Titles and Departments


PREFIX TITLE

ABE Agricultural Engineering
ABT Arabic in Translation
ACG Accounting: General
ADE Adult Education
ADV Advertising
AEB Agr. Economics & Bus.
AEE Agr. & Ext. Education
AFH African History
AFH African History
AFS African Studies
AFS African Studies
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGG Agriculture General
AGR Agronomy
AMH American History
AML American Literature
AMS American Studies
ANS Animal Science
ANS Animal Science
ANG Anthropology Graduate
ANT Anthropology
AOM Agricultural Operations
Management
APB Applied Biology
ARC Architecture
ARD Architecture Doctoral
ARE Art Education
ARE Art Education
ARH Art History


ART
ASG
ASG
ASH
ASN
AST
AST
AST
AYM
AYM
BCC
BCH
BCH
BCH
BCH
BCN
BME
BOT
BOT
BOT
BOT
BSC
BSC
BUL
CAP


Animal Science-General
Animal Science-General
Asian History
Asian Studies
Astronomy
Astronomy
Astronomy
Aymara Language
Aymara Language
Medicine
Biochemistry(Biophysics)
Biochemistry(Biophysics)
Biochemistry(Biophysics)
Biochemistry (Biophysics)
Building Construction
Biomedical Engineering
Botany
Botany
Botany
Botany
Biological Sciences
Biological Sciences
Business Law
Computer Applications


CAS Clinical Audiology/
Speech
CBH Comp. Psy. & Animal
Behavior
CCE Civil Construction
Engineering


TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF

Agricultural & Biological Engineering
African & Asian Languages & Literatures
Accounting
Educational Leadership
Mass Communication
Food & Resource Economics
Agricultural Education & Communication
African Studies
History
African Studies
Anthropology
Agricultural Education & Communication
Agriculture
Agronomy
Animal Science
Entomology & Nematology
Food & Resource Economics
Horticultural Science
Plant Pathology
Agronomy
History
English
History
Animal Science
Food Science & Human Nutrition
Anthropology
Anthropology
Agricultural & Biological Engineering

Zoology
Architecture
Architecture
Art
Instruction & Curriculum
Art
Art
Animal Sciences-General
Dairy & Poultry Sciences
History
African & Asian Languages & Literatures
Astronomy
Physics
Zoology
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Medicine-All Departments
Agriculture
Botany
Food Science & Human Nutrition
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
BuildingConstruction
Biomedical Engineering
Botany
Geology
Microbiology & Cell Science
Plant Pathology
Health Professions
Medicine-Physiology
Management
Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Communicative Disorders

Psychology

Civil Engineering


PREFIX TITLE

CCJ Criminology & Criminal
Justice
CDA Computer Design/Arch.

CDA Computer Design/Arch.
CEG Civil Geotechnical
Engineering
CEN Computer Engineering

CES Civil Engineering Structures
CGN Civil Engineering
CGS Computer General Studies

CGS Computer General Studies
CGS Computer General Studies
CHM Chemistry
CHM Chemistry
CHS Chemistry Specialized
CIS Computer & Info. Systems

CLA Classical & Ancient Studies
CLP Clinical Psychology
CLP Clinical Psychology
CLT Classical Literature
in Translation
CLT Classical Literature
in Translation
COM Communication
COM Communication
COP Computer Programming

COT ComputingTheory
COT ComputingTheory

CPO Comparative Politics
CRW Creative Writing
CWR Civil Water Resources
CWR Civil Water Resources
CWR Civil Water Resources
CWR Civil Water Resources
DAA Dance Activities
DAA Dance Activities
DAE Dance Education
DAN Dance
DAS Dairy Science
DEN Dentistry
DEP Development Psychology
DEP Development Psychology
DIE Dietetics
DUT Dutch
EAB Experimental Analysis
of Behavior
EAS Aerospace Engineering

ECH Engineering: Chemical
ECO Economics
ECO Economics
ECP Economics Problems &
Policy
ECS Economic Systems &
Development
ECS Economic Systems &
Development
EDA Education: Admin.
EDE Education: Elementary
EDF Education: Foundations
& Policy Studies


TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF

Sociology

Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Civil Engineering

Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Decision & Information Sciences
Industrial & Systems Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Chemistry
Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Classics
Clinical & Health Psychology
Psychology
Classics

Religion

Communication Sciences & Disorders
Mass Communication
Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Computer & Information Science &
Engineering
Political Science
English
Agricultural & Biological Engineering
Civil Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Soil & Water Science
Exercise & Sport Sciences
Theatre & Dance
Theatre & Dance
Theatre & Dance
Dairy & Poultry Sciences
Dental Sciences
Clinical & Health Psychology
Psychology
Food Science & Human Nutrition
Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures
Psychology

Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics &
Engineering Science
Chemical Engineering
Economics
Instruction & Curriculum
Health Services Administration

Economics

History

Educational Leadership
Instruction & Curriculum
Foundations of Education






COURSE PREFIXES/ 63


Course Prefixes, Titles and Departments


PREFIX TITLE
EDF Education: Foundations
& Policy Studies
EDG Education: General
EDG Education: General
EDG Education: General
EDH Education: Higher
EDM Education: Middle School
EDS Education: Supervision
EEC Education: Early
Childhood
EED Education: Emotional
Disorders
EEL Engineering: Electrical
EES Environ. Engineering
Science
EES Environ. Engineering
Science
EEX Education: Except. Child -
Core Comp.
EEX Education: Except. Child -
Core Comp.
EGI Education: Gifted
EGM Engineering: Mechanics
EGM Engineering: Mechanics

EGN Engineering: General
EGN Engineering: General

EGN Engineering: General
EGN Engineering: General
EGN Engineering: General
EGN Engineering: General
EIA Education: Industrial Arts
EIN Engineering: Industrial
ELD Ed: Specific Learning
Disabilities
EMA Materials Engineering
EME Education: Technology
& Media
EML Engineering: Mechanical
EML Engineering: Mechanical
EMR Education: Mental
Retardation
ENC English Composition
ENC English Composition
ENG English General
ENL English Literature
ENS English for Non-native
Speakers
ENS English for Non-native
Speakers
ENU Engineering: Nuclear
ENU Engineering: Nuclear
ENV Engineering: Environ.
ENV Engineering: Environ.
ENV Engineering: Environ.
ENY Entomology
EOC Engineering &
Oceanography
EPH Ed: Physical & Multiple
Handicaps
ESE Education: Secondary
ESI Industrial Engineering
(Systems)
ETI Engineering Tech:
Industrial
EUH European History
EVS Natural Resources
EVT Ed: Vocational/Technical
EXP Experimental Psychology
EXP Experimental Psychology


TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
Instruction & Curriculum

Educational Leadership
Foundations of Education
Instruction & Curriculum
Educational Leadership
Instruction & Curriculum
Educational Leadership
Instruction & Curriculum

Special Education

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences

Microbiology & Cell Science

Educational Leadership

Special Education

Special Education
Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering
Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics &
Engineering Science
Civil Engineering
Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics &
Engineering Science
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Materials Science & Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear & Radiological Engineering
Art
Industrial & Systems Engineering
Special Education

Materials Science & Engineering
Instruction & Curriculum

Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear & Radiological Engineering
Special Education

English
Linguistics
English
English
English

Linguistics

Microbiology & Cell Science
Nuclear & Radiological Engineering
Civil Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Nuclear & Radiological Engineering
Entomology & Nematology
Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering

Special Education

Instruction & Curriculum
Industrial & Systems Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

History
.Natural Resources & Environment
Educational Leadership
Psychology
Zoology


PREF
FAS
FIL
FIL
FIL
FIN
FLE
FNR
FNR


IX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF
Fisheries & Aquaculture Forest Resources & Conservation
Film Mass Communication
Film Romance Languages & Literatures
Film Telecommunication
Finance Finance, Insurance & Real Estate
Foreign Language Ed. Instruction & Curriculum
Forestry & Natural Resources Forest Resources & Conservation
Forestry & Natural Resources Wildlife Ecology & Conservation


FOL Foreign & Biblical
Languages
FOL Foreign & Biblical
Languages
FOR Forestry
FOS Food Science
FOW Foreign & Biblical
Languages
FRC Fruit Crops
FRE French Language
FRT French Lit. in Translation
FRW French Literature
GEA Geography Regional (Area)
GEB General Business
GEB General Business
GEO Geography Systematic
GER German

GET German Literature in
Translation
GEW German Literature

GEY Gerontology
GLY Geology
GMS Graduate Med Sciences
GRE Classical Greek Language
Study
GRK Modern Greek Language
GRW Greek Literature
HEE Home Economics
HIS History-General
HIS History-General
HLP Health, Leisure & Ph. Ed.
HLP Health, Leisure & Ph. Ed.
HLP Health, Leisure & Ph. Ed.
HOE Home Economics General
HOE Home Economics General
HOS Horticultural Sciences
HSA Health Services Admin.
HSA Health Services Admin.
HSC Health Science
HSC Health Science
HSC Health Science
HSC Health Science
HUM Humanities
HUN Human Nutrition
IND Interior Design
INR International Relations
ISM Information Systems
Management
ITA Italian Language
ITT Italian Literature in
in Translation
ITW Italian Literature
JOU Journalism
LAA Landscape Architecture
LAE Lang. Arts & English Ed.
LAE Lang. Arts & English Ed.
LAH Latin American History
LAS Latin American Studies
LAT Latin (Language Study)


Germanic & Slavic Languages &
Literatures
Romance Languages & Literatures

Forest Resources & Conservation
Food Science & Human Nutrition
Romance Languages & Literatures

Horticultural Sciences
Romance Languages & Literatures
Romance Languages & Literatures
Romance Languages & Literatures
Geography
Business Administration-General
Management
Geography
Germanic & Slavic Languages &
Literatures
Germanic & Slavic Languages &
Literatures
Germanic & Slavic Languages &
Literatures
Gerontology
Geology
Medicine-All Departments
Classics

Classics
Classics
Agricultural Education & Communication
Civil Engineering
History
Exercise & Sport Sciences
Health Science Education
Recreation, Parks & Tourism
Agriculture
Agricultural Education & Communication
Horticultural Sciences
Health Professions
Health Services Administration
Instruction & Curriculum
Health Professions
Health Science Education
Physical Therapy
Art
Food Science & Human Nutrition
Interior Design
Political Science
Decision & Information Sciences

Romance Languages & Literatures
Romance Languages & Literatures

Romance Languages & Literatures
Mass Communication
Landscape Architecture
Instruction & Curriculum
English
History
Latin American Studies
Classics







64/ FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Course Prefixes, Titles and Departments


PREFIX TITLE

LEI Leisure
LIN Linguistics
LIN Linguistics
LIN Linguistics
LIS Library Science
LIT Literature
LIT Literature
LNW Latin Literature
MAA Mathematics-Analysis
MAC Math: Calculus &
Precalculus
MAD Mathematics-Discrete
MAD Mathematics-Discrete
MAE Mathematics Education
MAE Mathematics Education
MAN Management
MAN Management
MAP Mathematics-Applied
MAR Marketing
MAS Mathematics-Algebraic
Structure
MAT Mathematics
MCB Microbiology
MGF Math: General & Finite
MHF Math: History &
Foundations
MHS Education Guidance
& Counseling
MHS Education Guidance
& Counseling
MMC Mass Media Commun.
MTG Math: Topology &
Geometry
MUC Music:
MUE Music:


MVP
MVS
MW


MW
MVW
NEM
NGR
NGR
NUR
OCC
OCE
OCE
OCP
ORH
ORI
OTH
PAD


Music:
Music:
Music:
Music:
Music:
Music: Theatre
Music:
Music
Music:
Music:
Music:
Music:
Instruments
Music:
Music:
Music: Applied-Voice


Music:
Music:
Nematology
Nursing-Graduate
Nursing-Graduate
Nursing
Oceanography: Chemical
Oceanography: General
Oceanography: General
Oceanography: Physical
Ornamental Horticulture
Oral Interpretation
Occupational Therapy
Public Administration


TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF

Recreation, Parks & Tourism
Communication Sciences & Disorders
English
Linguistics
English
English
Religion
Classics
Mathematics
Mathematics

Industrial & Systems Engineering
Mathematics
Instruction & Curriculum
Mathematics
Decision & Information Sciences
Management
Mathematics
Marketing
Mathematics

Mathematics
Microbiology & Cell Science
Mathematics
Mathematics

Counselor Education

Rehabilitation Counseling

Mass Communication
Mathematics


Composition
Education

Education Music
Conducting
History/Musicology
Music Language
Music Ensembles
Opera/Musical
Church Music
Music
Theory Music
Applied-Brasses
Applied-Keyboard
Applied-Other


Music
Instruction &
Curriculum

Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music



Music
Music
Music


Applied-Percussion Music
Applied-Strings Music
Music
Applied-Voice Theatre & Danc
Applied-Woodwinds Music
Entomology & Nematology
Nursing
Sociology
Nursing
Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering
Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering
Geology
Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering
Horticultural Sciences
Theatre & Dance
Occupational Therapy
Political Science


PREFIX TITLE

PCB Process Biology
PCB Process Biology
PCB Process Biology
PCB Process Biology
PCB Process Biology
PCB Process Biology
PCB Process Biology
PCO PsychologyforCounseling
PCO PsychologyforCounseling
PEL Phys. Ed. Activities-
Object Centered, Land
PEM Phys. Ed. Activities-
Performance Centered
PEN Phys. Ed. Acts (General)
Water
PEO Phys. Ed. Acts (Prof.)-
Object Centered
PEP Phys. Ed. Acts (Prof.)
PerformanceCentered
PEQ Phys. Ed. Acts (Prof.)-
Water
PET Phys. Ed..Theory
PET Phys. Ed. Theory
PGY Photography
PGY Photography
PHA Pharmacy
PHA Pharmacy
PHC Public Health Care
PHC Public Health Care
PHH Philosophy, History of
PHI Philosophy
PHI Philosophy
PHM Philosophy of Man &
Society
PHP Philosophers & Schools
PHT PhysicalTherapy
PHY Physics
PHZ Physics
PLP Plant Pathology
PLP Plant Pathology
PLS Plant Science
PLS Plant Science
PLT Polish in Translation
PLW Polish Literature
PMA Pest Management
POL Polish Language
POR Portuguese Language
POS Political Science
POT Political Theory
POW Portuguese Literature
PPE Psychology in Personality
PPE Psychology in Personality
PRT Portuguese in Translation
PSB Psychobiology
PSB Psychobiology
PSC Physical Science
PSE Poultry Science
PSY Psychology
PUP Public Policy
PUR Public Relations
QMB Quantitative Methods in
Business
QMB Quantitative Methods in
Business
RCS Education Guidance
& Counseling
REA Reading


TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF

Botany
Forest Resources & Conservation
Horticultural Sciences
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Microbiology & Cell Science
Plant Molecular& Cellular Biology
Zoology
Counselor Education
Psychology
Exercise & Sport Sciences

Exercise & Sport Sciences

Exercise & Sport Sciences

Exercise & Sport Sciences

Exercise & Sport Sciences

Exercise & Sport Sciences

Instruction & Curriculum
Exercise & Sport Sciences
Art
Zoology
Medicine-Pharmacology
Pharmacy-All Departments
Health Science Education
Health Services Administration
Philosophy
Philosophy
Religion
Philosophy

Philosophy
Physical Therapy
Physics
Physics
Botany
Plant Pathology
Agronomy
Horticultural Sciences
Germanic & Slavic Studies
Germanic & Slavic Studies
Entomology & Nematology
Germanic & Slavic Studies
Romance Languages & Literatures
Political Science
Political Science
Romance Languages & Literatures
Psychology
Clinical & Health Psychology
Romance Languages & Literatures
Clinical & Health Psychology
Psychology
Geology
Dairy & Poultry Sciences
Psychology
Political Science
Mass Communication
Decision & Information Sciences

Marketing

Rehabilitation Counseling

English







COURSE PREFIXES/ 65


Course Prefixes, Titles and Departments
1~


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF

RED Reading Education Instruction & Curriculum
RED Reading Education English
REE Real Estate Finance, Insurance & Real Estate
REL Religion Philosophy
REL Religion Religion
RMI Risk Management & Finance, Insurance & Real Estate


Insurance
RSD Rehabilitation Science
Doctoral
RTV Radio-Television
RUS Russian Language
RUT Russian Lit. in Translation
RUW Russian Literature
SCA Scandinavian Languages
SCE Science Education
SCT Scandinavian Lit. in
Translation
SDS Education Guidance
& Counseling
SDS Education Guidance
& Counseling
SOP Social Psychology
SOS Soil Science
SPA Speech Pathology &
Audiology
SPC Speech Communication
SPC Speech Communication
SPN Spanish Language
SPS School Psychology
SPS School Psychology
SPS School Psychology
SPT Spanish Lit. in Translation
SPW Spanish Literature
SSA Sub-Saharan African
Languages


Health Professions

Mass Communication
Germanic & Slavic Studies
Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures
Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures
Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures
Instruction & Curriculum
Germanic & Slavic Languages & Literatures

Counselor Education

Rehabilitation Counseling

Psychology
Soil & Water Science
Communication Sciences & Disorders

Communication Sciences & Disorders
English
Romance Languages & Literatures
Counselor Education
Foundations of Education
Special Education
Romance Languages & Literatures
Romance Languages & Literatures
African Studies


PREFIX TITLE TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF

SSE Social Studies Education Instruction & Curriculum
STA Statistics Coastal & Oceanographic Engineering
STA Statistics Statistics
SUR Surveying & Related Areas Civil Engineering
SYA Sociological Analysis Sociology
SYD Sociology of Demography Sociology
& Area Studies
SYG General Sociology Agriculture
SYG General Sociology Sociology
SYO Social Organization Religion
SYO Social Organization Sociology
SYP Social Processes Sociology
TAX Taxation Accounting
THE Theatre Theatre & Dance
Administration
TPA Theatre Production & Theatre & Dance
Administration
TPP Theatre Performance & Theatre & Dance
Performance Training
TSL Teaching English as a Linguistics
Second Language
TTE Transportation & Traffic Civil Engineering


Engineering
URP Urban & Regional
Planning
VEC Vegetable Crops
VME Veterinary Medicine
WIS Wildlife Ecology &
Conservation
WIS Wildlife Science
WOH World History
WST Women's Studies
ZOO Zoology
ZOO Zoology
ZOO Zoology


Urban & Regional Planning

Horticultural Sciences
Veterinary Medicine-All Departments
Wildlife Ecology & Conservation

Forest Resources & Conservation
History
Women's Studies
Forest Resources & Conservation
Microbiology & Cell Science
Zoology






66 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ACCOUNTING
Warrington College of Business
Administration

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Director & Graduate Coordinator: J. K. Kramer. Graduate
Research Professor: A. R. Abdel-khalik. Fisher Eminent
Scholar: J. S. Demski. Arthur Andersen Professor: J. K.
Kramer. J. Michael Cook/Deloitte & Touche Professor: D.
A. Snowball. Ernst & Young Professor: W. R. Knechel.
KPMG Distinguished Service Professor: J. K. Simmons.
Professor: B. B. Ajinkya. PriceWaterhouse Coopers Asso-
ciate Professor: G. M. McGill. Associate Professors: S. K.
Asare; J. V. Boyles; K. E. Hackenbrack; S. S. Kramer.

The Fisher School of Accounting offers graduate work
leading to the Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) degree and
the Ph.D. degree with a major in business administration
and an accounting concentration. The M.Acc. degree
program offers specialization in each of the three areas of
auditing/financial accounting, accounting systems, and
taxation. A joint program leading to the Juris Doctor and
Master of Accounting degrees also is offered by the Fisher
School of Accounting and College of Law. Specific details
for the M.Acc., M.Acc./J.D., and Ph.D. programs will be
supplied by the Fisher School of Accounting upon request.
The M.Acc. and the Ph.D. accounting programs require
admission standards of at least the following: A combined
verbal and quantitative score of 1200 on the Graduate
Record Examination (GRE), or a score of 550 on the
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Admis-
sion to the M.Acc. or Ph.D. accounting graduate programs
cannot be granted until scores are received.
Information on minimum GPA standards for admission
to the M.Acc. program may be obtained from the office of
the Associate Director. International students must submit
a TOEFL score of at least 570 with a minimum of 60 on the
first section, 55 on the second section, and 55 on the third
section, and a satisfactory GMAT or GRE score.
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a profes-
sional career in accounting is the 3/2 five-year program
with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science in Ac-
counting and Master of Accounting degrees upon comple-
tion of the 152-hour program. The entry point into the 3/2
program is the beginning of the senior year.
Students who have already completed an undergraduate
degree in accounting may enter the one-year M.Acc.
degree program which requires satisfactory completion of
34 hours of course work. A minimum of 20 credits must be
in graduate level courses; a minimum of 18 credits must be
in graduate level accounting courses. The remaining cred-
its are selected from recommended elective courses that
vary by area of specialization. Students are cautioned to
seek early advisement since many graduate courses are
offered only once a year.
Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include a core of
courses in mathematical methods, statistics, and economic
theory; one ortwo supporting fields selected bythe student;
and a major field of accounting. Students are expected to
acquire teaching experience as part of the Ph.D. degree
program. Grants-in-aid will be awarded for this teaching.
International students must submit a Test of Spoken English
(TSE) test score of at least 220 along with satisfactory


GMAT/GRE and TOEFL scores in order to obtain a teaching
appointment. Students are expected to enroll in ACG 6940
for a minimum of three credits. Program requirements
include fulfillment ofa research skill area and a dissertation
on an accounting-related topic.
Co-Major.-The School offers a new co-major program in
conjunction with the Department of Statistics leading to the
Doctor of Philosophy degree in business administration-
accounting and statistics. For information on this program,
consult the School's graduate coordinator.

ACG 5005-Financial Accounting (2) Introduction for prospective
managers. Primary emphasis on financial reporting and analysis.
ACG 5065-Financial and Managerial Accounting (3) Designed
for MBA students. Financial statement analysis including tech-
niques, cash flow, and impact of accounting principles. Manage-
ment control systems: planning, budgeting, reporting, analysis,
and performance evaluation.
ACG 5075-Managerial Accounting (2) Prereq: ACG 5005. In-
troduction for prospective managers. Primary emphasis on man-
agement control systems.
ACG 5205-Advanced Financial Accounting (3) Prereq: ACG
4133C; 7AC standing. Analysis of accounting procedures for
consignment and installment sales, partnerships, branches, con-
solidations, foreign operations, governmental accounting and
other advanced topics.
ACG 5385-Advanced Accounting Analysis for the Controller-
ship Function (3) Prereq: ACC 4353C; 7AC standing. A study of
planning and control as they relate to management of organiza-
tions. Draws from cases and journals to integrate managerial
accounting concepts.
ACG 5637-Auditing I (4) Prereq: ACG 4133C, 4353C, AC
standing. Introduction to auditing and assurance services. Deci-
sion-making process, research, and auditing standards and proce-
dures. Emphasis on ethics, legal liability, internal control, audit
evidence, testing, and introduction to statistical sampling and EDP
auditing.
ACG 5655-Auditing Theory and Internal Control II (3) Prereq:
ACG 5637; 7AC standing. A continuation of ACG 5637 with
detailed coverage of field work procedures for internal control and
substantive audit testing, statistical sampling, operational audit-
ing, and audit software packages.
ACG 5816-Professional Research (3) Prereq: ACG 5637, 7AC
standing. Case-based. Introduction and examination of profes-
sional literature and technology for problem solving in financial
accounting, auditing, and taxation contexts.
ACG 6135-Accounting Concepts and Financial Reporting Stan-
dards (3) Prereq: ACG 5205, 5816; 7AC standing. Current devel-
opments in accounting concepts and principles and their rel-
evance to the status of current accounting practices. Special topics
in financial accounting and current reporting problems facing the
accounting profession. Review of current authoritative pronounce-
ments.
ACG 6265-International Accounting and Taxation (2) Prereq:
ACG 2021C or 5005; not open to students majoring in account-
ing. Introduction to international accounting and taxation issues.
ACG 6387-Strategic Costing (2) Prereq: ACG 5075 or 4353C.
Strategic view of design and use of an organization's internal
accounting system.
ACG 6405-Accounting Database Management Systems (3)
Prereq: ACG 3481C; 7AC standing. Investigation of the design
and development.
ACG 6495-Management Information Systems Seminar (3) Prereq:
ACG 3481 C; 7AC standing.
ACG 6625-EDP Auditing (3) Prereq: ACG 3481C, 5637; 7AC
standing. Concepts related to auditing in computerized data
environments.
ACG 6695-Advanced Auditing Topics (3) Prereq: ACG 5655;
7AC standing. Current technical issues and review of audit research.
ACG 6696-Financial Accounting Issues and Cases (3) Prereq:





AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, MECHANICS, AND ENGINEERING SCIENCE / 67


ACG 5205; 7AC standing. A study of recent and projected devel-
opments in financial reporting and auditing emphasizing cases,
journal articles, and pronouncements.
ACG 6835-Interdisciplinary Considerations in Accounting
Theory Development (3) Developments in related disciplines,
such as economics, law, and behavioral sciences, analyzed for
their contribution to accounting thought.
ACG 6845-Accounting and Analytical Methods (3) Utilization
of logic, including mathematics, in formulation of alternative
accounting valuation models and in clarification of accounting
concepts.
ACG 6865-Financial Reporting and Auditing for Specialized
Industries (3) Prereq: ACG 5637, 5205; 7AC standing. Current
developments.
ACG 6905-Individual Work in Accounting (1-4; max: 7) Prereq:
approval of graduate coordinator. Reading and research in areas
of accounting.
ACG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ACG 6935-Special Topics in Accounting (1-4; max: 8) Prereq:
consent of associate director.
ACG 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ACG 7886-Accounting Research II (4) Theoretical constructs in
accounting, valuation models, information asymmetry and pro-
duction, and nonmarket information use.
ACG 7887-Research Analysis in Accounting (3) Prereq: ACG
7886. Analysis of accounting research and presentation of student
research project results. Financial accounting, managerial ac-
counting, auditing, taxation, management information systems,
and information economics.
ACG 7925-Accounting Research Workshop (1-4; max: 8) Prereq:
completion of Ph.D. core. Analysis of current research topics in
accounting by visiting scholars, faculty, and doctoral students. S/U.
ACG 7939-Theoretical Constructs in Accounting (3) Prereq:
ACG 7886. Emerging theoretical issues that directly impact re-
search and development of thought in accounting. Theory con-
struction and verification, information economics, and agency
theory constitute subsets of this course.
ACG 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ACG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
TAX 5005-Introduction to Federal Income Taxation (4) Prereq:
minimum Cgrade in ACC4133C andAC classification. Concepts
and applications. Influence of taxation on economic decisions,
basic statutory provisions relevant to determining taxable gross
income, allowable deductions, tax computations, recognition or
nonrecognition of gains and losses on property transactions, and
characterization of gains and losses.
TAX 5025-Federal Income Tax Accounting II (3) Prereq: TAX
5005, ACG 5816; 7AC standing. Not open to persons in the tax
concentration. Covers basic tax research, taxation of corpora-
tions, partnerships, and other appropriate topics.
TAX 6105-Corporate Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC
standing. Examination of fundamental legal concepts, statutory
provisions, and computational procedures applicable to eco-
nomic transactions and events involving formation, operation,
and liquidation of corporate entity. Consideration of acquisitive
and divisive changes to the corporate structure.
TAX 6205-Partnership Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC
standing. Topics include acquisition of partnership interest;
reporting of partnership profits, losses, and distributions; transac-
tions between partners and the partnership; transfers of partner-
ship interest; and retirement or death of partner.
TAX 6405-Estate and Gift Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC
standing. Examination of the federal excise tax levied on transfers
of property via gift or from decedents' estates.
TAX 6505-International Taxation (3) Prereq: ACG 5816; 7AC
standing. Topics include the foreign tax credit, taxation of U.S.
citizens abroad, taxation of nonresident aliens doing business in


U.S., tax treaties, taxation of income from investments abroad,
taxation of export operations, foreign currency translation, inter-
company pricing, and boycott and bribe related income.


AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, MECHANICS,
AND ENGINEERING SCIENCE
College of Engineering

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman: W. Shyy. Graduate Coordinator: C. C. Hsu.
Graduate Research Professors: N. D. Cristescu; D. C.
Drucker (Emeritus). Distinguished Professor: R. T. Haftka.
Professors: I. K. Ebcioglu (Emeritus); M. A. Eisenberg; R. L.
Fearn (Emeritus); G. W. Hemp; C. C. Hsu; A. J. Kurdila; U.
H. Kurzweg; E. R. Lindgren (Emeritus); G. E. Nevill, Jr.; E.
Partheniades (Emeritus); B. V. Sankar; P. M. Sforza; W.
Shyy; C. T. Sun (Emeritus); R. Tran-Son-Tay; L. Vu-Quoc; E.
K. Walsh. Associate Professors: B. F. Carroll; N. G. Fitz-
Coy; P. Ifju; R. Mei; D. W. Mikolaitis; C. Segal; P. H. Zipfel.
Associate Engineer: D. A. Jenkins. Assistant Professors: D.
M. Belk; L. N. Cattafesta, III; B. J. Fregly; A.J. Rapoff; M.
Sheplak.

The Department of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics,
and Engineering Science offers the Master of Engineering,
Master of Science, and Engineer degrees in aerospace engi-
neering, in engineering mechanics, and in engineering sci-
ence. The Department participates in the College of
Engineering's interdisciplinary Certificate in Manufacturing
Engineering at the master's level. The Doctor of Philosophy
degree is offered in aerospace engineering and in engineering
mechanics, with specialized tracks in the latter discipline in
design processes, engineering analysis and applied math-
ematics, and in theoretical and applied mechanics. The
Department also offers interdisciplinary master's and Ph.D.
specializations in offshore structures in cooperation with the
Departments of Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering and
Civil Engineering.
Areas of specialization include aerodynamics, applied
mathematics, applied optics, atmospheric science, biomedi-
cal engineering, coastal hydromechanics and ocean wave
dynamics, combustion, composite materials, control theory,
creative design, design automation, fluid mechanics, numeri-
cal and finite element methods, offshore structures, solid
mechanics, and structural mechanics and optimization.
With the approval of the supervisory committee, all
5000-, 6000-, and 7000-level courses offered by the Aero-
space Engineering, Mechanics, and Engineering Science
Department plus the following courses in related areas are
acceptable for graduate major credit for all degree pro-
grams offered by the Department: CAP 6685-Expert
Systems, CAP 6635-Artificial Intelligence Concepts, CAP
6676-Knowledge Representation; CAP 6610-Machine
Learning, EEL 5182-State Variable Methods in Linear
Systems, EEL 5631-Digital Control Systems, EEL 5840-
Elements of Machine Intelligence, EEL 6614-Modern
Control Theory I, EEL 6615-Modern Control Theory II, EEL
6841-Machine Intelligence and Synthesis.
Joint Program.-The Department also offers a combined
bachelor's/master's degree program. This program allows
qualified students to earn both a bachelor's degree and a
master's degree with a savings of one semester.






68 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


EAS 5938-Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-4; max: 8)
EAS 6138--Gasdynamics (3) Prereq: EAS 4112, 4112L. Theory of
sound waves, subsonic and supersonic flows, shockwaves, explo-
sions and implosions.
EAS 6242-Advanced Structural Composites I (3) Prereq: EGM
3520. Micro- and macro-behavior of a lamina. Stress transfer of
short fiber composites. Classical lamination theory, static analysis of
laminated plates, free-edge effect, failure modes.
EAS 6243-Advanced Structural Composites II (3) Prereq: EAS
6242 or equivalent. Fracture behavior of composites, interlaminar
stresses, internal damping in composites.
EAS 6415-Guidance and Control of Aerospace Vehicles (3)
Prereq: EAS 4412 or equivalent. Application of modern control
theory to aerospace vehicles. Parameter identification methods
applied to aircraft and missiles.
EAS 6905-Aerospace Research (1-6; max: 12 including EGM
5905 and 6905)
EAS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EAS 6935-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) S/U option.
EAS 6939-Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-6; max: 12)
Laboratory, lectures, or conferences covering selected topics in
space engineering.
EAS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EAS 6971--Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EAS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral stu-
dents before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with a
master's degree in the field of study or for students who have been
accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who have
been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
EAS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
EGM 5005-Laser Principles and Applications (3) Prereq: consent
of instructor. Operating principles of solid, electric discharge, gas
dynamic and chemical lasers. Applications of lasers of lidar aerody-
namic and structural testing and for cutting and welding of materi-
als.
EGM 5111 L-Experimental Stress Analysis (3) Prereq: EGM 3520.
Introduction to techniques of experimental stress analysis in static
systems. Lecture and laboratory include applications of electrical
resistance strain gauges, photoelasticity, brittle coatings, moire
fringe analysis, and X-ray stress analysis.
EGM 5121C-Experimental Deduction (4) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Fundamentals of dynamics and fluid mechanics. De-
signed to confront the student with the unexpected.
EGM 5421 -Modern Techniquesof Structural Dynamics (3) Prereq:
EGM 3400; 3311, 3520, and CIS 3020. Modern methods of
elastomechanics and high speed computation. Matrix methods of
structural analysis for multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Modeling
of aeronautical, civil, and mechanical structural engineering sys-
tems.
EGM 5430-Intermediate Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM 3400 and
3311. Dynamics of a particle, orbital mechanics, mechanics in non-
inertial frames, dynamics of a system of particles, rigid body
dynamics in plane motion, moments and products of inertia,
conservation laws, Lagrange's equations of motion.
EGM 5533-Advanced Mechanics of Solids and Structures (3)
Prereq: EGM 3520. Bars, beams, thin-walled structures, and simple
continue in the elastic and inelastic range. Virtual work approaches,
elastic energy principles, plastic limit theorems, creep deformation
procedures, introduction to instability and fracture mechanics.
Design applications.
EGM 5584-Biomechnics of Soft Tissue (3) Prereq: EGN 3353C
and EGM 3520. Introduction to solid and fluid mechanics of
biological systems. Rheological behavior of materials subjected to
static and dynamic loading. Mechanics of cardiovascular, pulmo-
nary, and renal systems. Mathematical models and analytical
techniques used in biosciences.
EGM 5816-Intermediate Fluid Dynamics (4) Prereq: EGN3353C,
MAP 2302. Basic laws of fluid dynamics, introduction to potential
flow, viscous flow, boundary layer theory, and turbulence.
EGM 5905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 12 including EGM 6905
and EAS 6905)


EGM 5933-Special Topics in Engineering Science and Mechanics
(1-4; max: 8)
EGM 6215-Theory of Structural Vibrations (3) Prereq: EGM
4200. Multiple degree-of-freedom systems, lumped parameter pro-
cedures; matrix methods; free and forced motion. Normal mode
analysis for continuous systems. Lagrange equations. Numerical
methods.
EGM 6321-Principles of Engineering Analysis I (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 or MAP 4305. Solution of linear and nonlinear ordinary
differential equations. Methods of Frobenius, classification of
singularities. Integral representation of solutions. Treatment of the
Bessel, Hermite, Legendre, hypergeometric, and Mathieu equa-
tions. Asymptotic methods including the WBK and saddle point
techniques. Treatment of nonlinear autonomous equations. Phase
plane trajectories and limit cycles. Thomas-Fermi, Emden, and van
der Pol equations.
EGM 6322-Principles of Engineering Analysis 11 (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 orMAP 4341. Partial differential equations of first and second
order. Hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic equations including the
wave, diffusion, and Laplace equations. Integral and similarity
transforms. Boundaryvalue problems of the Dirichletand Neumann
type. Green's functions, conformal mapping techniques, and spheri-
cal harmonics. Poison, Helmholtz, and Schroedinger equations.
EGM 6323-Principles of Engineering Analysis III (3) Prereq: EGM
4313 or MAP 4341. Integral equations of Volterra and Fredholm.
Inversion of self-adjoint operators via Green's functions. Hilbert-
Schmidt theory and the bilinear formula. The calculus of variations.
Geodesics, Euler-Lagrange equation and the brachistochrone prob-
lem. Variational treatment of Sturm-Liouville problems. Fermat's
principle.
EGM 6341-Numerical Methods of Engineering Analysis I (3)
Prereq: EGM 4313 or equivalent. Finite-difference calculus; inter-
polation and extrapolation; roots of equations; solution of algebraic
equations; eigenvalue problems; least-squares method; quadrature
formulas; numerical solution of ordinary differential equations;
methods of weighted residuals. Use of digital computer.
EGM 6342-Numerical Methods of Engineering Analysis II (3)
Prereq: EGM 6341 or consent of instructor. Finite-difference meth-
ods for parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equa-
tions. Application to heat conduction, solid and fluid mechanics
problems.
EGM 6351-Finite Element Methods (3) Prereq: consent of instruc-
tor. Displacement method formulation; generalization by means of
variational principles and methods of weighted residuals; element
shape functions. Application to heat conduction, solid and fluid
mechanics problems. Use of general purpose computer codes.
EGM 6352-Advanced Finite Element Methods (3) Prereq: EGM
6351. Discontinuous Galerkin method applied to transient prob-
lems. Optimization theory applied to formulation of mixed FEM;
treatment of constraints, e.g., incompressibility. General shape
functions. Electromagnetics, heat, fluids, solids. Other advanced
topics.
EGM 6365-Structural Optimization (3) Prereq: optimization
course. Structural optimization via calculus of variations. Applica-
tion of techniques of numerical optimization to design of trusses,
frames, and composite laminates. Calculation of sensitivity of
structural response. Approximation and fast reanalysis techniques.
Optimality criteria methods.
EGM 6444-Advanced Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM 5430. The
principle of least action, conservation laws, integration of the
equations of motion, collision, free and forced linear and nonlinear
oscillations, rigid body motion, the spinning top, motion in non-
inertial frames, canonical equations.
EGM 6570-Principles of Fracture Mechanics (3) Prereq: EGM
6611. Introduction to the mechanics of fracture of brittle and ductile
materials. Linear elastic fracture mechanics; elastic-plastic fracture;
fracture testing; numerical methods; composite materials; creep
and fatigue fracture.
EGM 6595-Bone Mechanics (3) Biology, composition, and me-
chanical properties of cortical bone tissue, cancellous bone tissue,
and cartilage. Bone modeled as anisotropic elastic material, as








bioviscoelastic material and as composite material. Adaptation to
stress and remodeling; articular cartilage.
EGM 6611 -Continuum Mechanics 1 (3) Prereq: EGM 3520. Ten-
sors of stress and deformation. Balance and conservation laws,
thermodynamic considerations. Examples of linear constitutive
relations. Field equations and boundary conditions of fluid flow.
EGM 6612-Continuum Mechanics II (3) Prereq: EGM 6611. Polar
decomposition. Constitutive theory: frame indifference, material
symmetry, continuum thermodynamics. Topics selected from wave
propagation, mixture theory, director theories, non-orthogonal
coordinates.
EGM6652-Elasticity(3) Prereq: EGM 6611. Equationsof elasticity
and strain energy concepts. Uniqueness theorems and solution of
two- and three-dimensional problems for smal deformations. Con-
sideration of multiply connected domains and complex variable
methods.
EGM 6671-Plasticity (3) Prereq: EGM 6611. Virtual work, stabil-
ity, extremum principles. Applications on the microscale, miniscale,
and macroscale. Thermodynamics, internal variables, damage pa-
rameters, time and temperature effects. Fracture mechanics. Finite
elastoplasticity.
EGM 6682-Viscoelasticity (3) Prereq: EGM 6611. Theories of
solid and fluid materials which exhibit history dependence. Devel-
opment from Boltzmann linear viscoelasticity to general thermody-
namic theories of materials with memory; application to initial
boundary value problems.
EGM 6812-Fluid Mechanics I (3) Prereq: EGN 3353C. Flow
kinematics. Fundamental laws and equations in integral and
differential forms. Potential flows. Introduction to laminar flows in
simple geometries, laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows.
External flows. One-dimensional compressible flows.
EGM 6813-Fluid Mechanics II (3) Prereq: EGM 6812. Mathemati-
cal and physical structures of Navier-Stokes equation. Exact solu-
tions of Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Low Reynolds
number flows. Incompressible and compressible laminar boundary
layer flows. Free shear flows. Energy equation and heat transfer.
Unsteady flows. Instability. Turbulence.
EGM 6855-Bio-Fluid Mechanics and Bio-HeatTransfer(3) Prereq:
undergraduate fluid mechanics. Biotherma I fluid sciences. Empha-
sis on physiological processes occurring in human blood circula-
tion and underlying physical mechanisms from engineering per-
spective.
EGM 6905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 12 including EGM 5905
and EAS 6905)
EGM 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EGM 6934-Special Topics in Engineering Mechanics (1-6; max:
12)
EGM 6936-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Discussions and pre-
sentations in the fields of graduate study and research S/U option.
EGM 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
EGM 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
EGM 7819-Computational Fluid Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM 6342
and 6813 or equivalent. Finite difference methods for PDE. Navier-
Stokes equations for incompressible and compressiblefluids. Bound-
ary fitted coordinate transformation, adaptive grid techniques.
Numerical methods and computer codes for fluid flow problems.
EGM 7845-Turbulent Fluid Flow (3) Prereq: EGM 6813 orequiva-
lent. Definition of turbulence, basic equations of motion. Instability
and transition. Statistical methods, correlation and spectral func-
tions. Experimental methods, flow visualization. Isotropic homoge-
neousturbulence. Shear turbulence, similitude, theturbulentbound-
ary layer, rough turbulent flow. Jets and wakes. Heat convection,
thermally driven turbulence.
EGM 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students with
a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have been
accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who have
been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
EGM 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
EML 5131-Combustion I (3) Prereq: EML 3101 or consent of
instructor. Chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, flame


AGRICULTURALAND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING /69


propagation, detonation and explosion, combustion of droplets and
spray.
EML 6586-Bioengineering Physiology (3) Prereq: BSC 2010,
2010L, CHM2200or2210. Comprehensive introduction to human
physiology for biomedical engineering students. Applications of
engineering principles to physiology.


AFRICAN STUDIES
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Director: M. Chege. Distinguished Professor: G. Hyden.
Distinguished Service Professor: C. G. Davis. Professors: C.
O. Andrew; H. Armstrong; M. J. Burridge; B. A. Cailler; J. H.
Conrad; T. L. Crisman; R. H. Davis; H. Der-Houssikian; J. K.
Dow; B. M. du Toit; E. G. Gibbs; C. F. Gladwin; H. L. Gholz;
L. D. Harris; P. E. Hildebrand; C. F. Kiker; M. Lockhart; P.
Magnarella; E. L. Matheny; D. McCloud; A. Nanji; H.
Popenoe; R. E. Poynor; R. Renner; J. E. Seale; J. Simpson; N.
Smith; A. Spring; P. J. van Blokland. Associate Professors:A.
Bamia; S. A. Brandt; L. N. Crook; A. C. Goldman; M. A. Hill-
Lubin; P. A. Kotey; M. Reid. Assistant Professors: K. Buhr; R.
D. Rudd.

The Center for African Studies offers the Certificate in
African Studies for master's and doctoral students in con-
junction with disciplinary degrees. Graduate courses on
Africa or with African content are available in the Colleges,
Schools, or Departments of Agriculture, Anthropology, Art
and Art History, Botany, Economics, Education, English,
Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and Con-
servation, Geography, History, Journalism and Communi-
cations, Law, Linguistics, Music, Political Science, and
Sociology.
A description of the certificate program in African studies
may be found in the section Special Programs. Listings of
courses may be found in individual departmental descrip-
tions or may beobtained from the Director, 427 Grinter Hall.
AFS 6060-Research Problems in African Studies (3) Research
designs for work on African-based problems. Interdisciplinary in
scope.
AFS 6905-Individual Work (1-3; max: 9).


AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL
ENGINEERING
Colleges of EngineeringandAgricultural and
Life Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman: C. D. Baird. Graduate Coordinator: K. L.
Campbell. Distinguished Professor:J. W. Jones. Professors:
L. O. Bagnall; C. D. Baird; R. A. Bucklin; K. L. Campbell; K.
V. Chau; D. P. Chynoweth; W. D. Graham; D. Z. Haman;
F. T. Izuno; P. H. Jones; W. M. Miller; J. W. Mishoe; R. A.
Nordstedt; A. R. Overman; D. R. Price; S. F. Shih; A. A.
Teixeira; J. D. Whitney; F. S. Zazueta. Associate Professors:
H. W. Beck; B. J. Boman; J. F. Earle; B. T. French; E. P.
Lincoln; M. Salyani; G. H. Smerage; M. T. Talbot. Assistant
Professors: K. R. Berger; C.J. Lehtola. Lecturer:J. D. Leary.
Assistant in: D. Jordan.






70 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


The degrees of Master of Science, Masterof Engineering,
Doctor of Philosophy, and Engineer are offered with gradu-
ate programs in agricultural and biological engineering
through the College of Engineering. The Master of Science
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in agricultural and
biological engineering are offered inthe area of agricultural
operations management and applied science through the
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. A combined
B.S./M.S. program allows up to 12 graduate credits to be
double counted toward fulfillment of both degrees. Please
check the Undergraduate Catalog or contact the graduate
coordinator for qualifications and details.
The Master of Science, Master of Engineering, and Doc-
tor of Philosophy degrees are offered in the following areas.
of research: soil and water conservation engineering, water
resource management, waste management, power and
machinery, structures and environment, agricultural robot-
ics, crop postharvest technology, remote sensing, decision
support systems, food and bioprocess engineering, biom-
ass production, biological system simulation, and energy
conversion systems. Students can pursue a graduate spe-
cialization in food engineering through a cooperative pro-
gram jointly administered with the Department of Food
Science and Human Nutrition. Similar programs may be
developed with other departments within the University.
The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the
agricultural operations management area of specialization
provide for scientific training and research in technical
agricultural management. Typical plans of study focus on
advanced training in field production management, pro-
cess and manufacturing management, or technical sales
and product support.
For students with basic science degrees, the applied
science Doctor of Philosophy through the College of Agri-
cultural and Life Sciences provides advanced training in
problem-solving capabilities, interdisciplinary research,
and methods for applying science to real-world problems
and issues. Typical emphasis is on (1) the use of engineer-
ing methods and approaches, such as mathematical mod-
eling, optimization, and information technologies, in ap-
plication of science to problems of various spatial and
temporal scales, and (2) an interdisciplinary experience in
research at the doctoral level.
Requirements for admission into the Master of Engineer-
ing and Doctor of Philosophy degree programs in the
College of Engineering are the completion of an approved
undergraduate program in agricultural engineering or re-
lated engineering discipline. Admission into the Master of
Science program in the College of Engineering requires
completion of a mathematics sequence through differential
equations, 8 credits of general chemistry and 8 credits of
general physics with calculus and laboratory or equivalent.
Admission into the Doctor of Philosophy or the Master of
Science program with a concentration in agricultural op-
erations management in the College of Agricultural and
Life Sciences requires completion of an approved under-
graduate agricultural operations management program or
equivalent and a working knowledge of a computer lan-
guage. Admission into the Doctor of Philosophy program
with a specialization in applied sciences requires an
undergraduate degree in a basic science field and a master's
degree in a science or engineering field with courses
including analytic geometry, calculus, differential equa-


tions, 8 credits of general physics and 8 credits of general
chemistry, or equivalent. Students not meeting the stated
admissions requirements may be accepted into a degree
program, providing sufficient articulation courses are in-
cluded in the program of study. Students interested in
enrolling in a graduate program should contact the gradu-
ate coordinator.
Candidates for advanced degrees in engineering are
required to take at least 12 credits from an approved list of
major courses at the 5000 level or higher, with at least 6
credits of ABE courses at the 6000 level, exclusive of
seminar and thesis research credits. Other courses are
taken in applicable basic sciences and engineering to meet
educational objectives and to comprise an integrated pro-
gram as approved by the Department's Graduate Commit-
tee. Master's students are required to complete at least 3
credits of mathematics at the 5000 level or higher, and
doctoral students are required to complete at least 12
credits.
Candidates for the Master of Science concentration in
agricultural operations management are required to com-
plete AOM 5315, at least 12 credits from an approved list
of major courses, and at least 3 credits of statistics at the
6000 level.

ABE 5015-Empirical Models of Crop Growth and Yield Response
(3) Permission of instructor. Analytical models useful for engineer-
ing design and management decisions, including water reuse.
Emphasis on analytical functions. Modeling strategy based on
patterns of data, functional relationships, connections among vari-
ous factors, consistency among data sets, and mathematical beauty.
ABE 5152-Advanced Power and Machinery for Agriculture (3)
Prereq: EML 3100, EGM 3400, 3520. Functional design require-
ments, design procedures, and performance evaluation.
ABE 5332-Advanced Agricultural Structures (3) Design criteria
for agricultural structures including steady and unsteady heat
transfer analysis, environmental modification, plant and animal
physiology, and structural systems analysis.
ABE 5442-Advanced Agricultural Process Engineering (3) Engi-
neering problems in handling and processing agricultural prod-
ucts.
ABE 5643C-Biological and Agricultural Systems Analysis (3)
Prereq: MAC 2312. Introduction to concepts and methods of
process-based modeling of systems and analysis of system behav-
ior; physiological, populational, and agricultural applications.
ABE 5646-Biological and Agricultural Systems Simulation (3)
Prereq: MAC2312, CGS 3460orCIS3020. Numerical techniques
for continuous system models using FORTRAN. Introduction to
discrete simulation. Application of simulation and sensitivity
analysis with examples relating to crops, soil, environment, and
pests.
ABE 5647-Advances in Microirrigation (3) Prereq: graduate
status or consent of instructor. State of the art in microirrigation
technology. System evolution; components; soil-water-plant rela-
tions; hydraulics; design criteria; installation; water and chemical
interactions; biological interactions; scheduling, operation and
maintenance; knowledge-based systems; automation.
ABE 5653-Rheologyand Mechanics of Agricultural and Biologi-
cal Materials (3) Prereq: MAC 2313, PHY 2048, CHM 2045, or
consent of instructor. Relation of biophysical and biochemical
structure to theological and mechanical behavior of biological
materials in solid, liquid, and granular form; methods for measur-
ing material properties governing these behaviors.
ABE 5707C-Agricultural Waste Management (3) Prereq: 4 or
higher classification. Engineering analysis and design of systems
for the collection, storage, treatment, transport, and utilization of
livestock and other agricultural organic wastes and wastewaters.






AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION / 71


Field trips to operating systems and laboratory evaluation of
materials and processes.
ABE 5815C-Food and Bioprocess Engineering Design (4) Engi-
neering design of unit process operations employed in agro/food,
pharmaceutical, and biologicals industries including sterilization/
pasteurization, radiation, freezing, drying, evaporation, fermenta-
tion, distillation.
ABE 6031-Instrumentation in Agricultural Engineering Research
(3) Principles and application of measuring instruments and
devices for obtaining experimental data in agricultural engineer-
ing research.
ABE 6035-GIS in Hydrology (3) Prereq: permission of instructor.
Principles and applications of GIS technologies supporting land
use/cover assessment, hydrologic models, and water resources
management planning. Monte Carlo simulation, data acquisition
from internet, GIS software.
ABE 6252-Advanced Soil and Water Management Engineering
(3) Physical and mathematical analysis of problems in infiltration,
drainage, and groundwater hydraulics.
ABE 6254-Simulation of Agricultural Watershed Systems (3)
Prereq: CWR 4111 and working knowledge of FORTRAN. Char-
acterization and simulation of agricultural watershed systems
including land and channel phase hydrologic processes and
pollutant transport processes. Investigation of the structure and
capabilities of current agricultural watershed computer models.
ABE 6262C-Remote Sensing in Hydrology (3) Applications of
satellites, shuttle imaging radar, ground-penetrating radar, multi-
spectral scanner, thermal IR, and geographic information system
to study rainfall, evapotranspiration, groundwater, water extent,
water quality, soil moisture, and runoff.
ABE 6615-Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer in Biological
Systems (3) Prereq: CGS 2425, ABE 3612C. Analytical and nu-
merical technique solutions to problems of heat and mass transfer
in biological systems. Emphasis on nonhomogenous, irregularly
shaped products with respiration and transpiration.
ABE 6644-Agricultural Decision Systems (3) Computerized
decision systems for agriculture. Expert systems, decision support
systems, simulations, and types of applications in agriculture.
ABE 6663-Advanced Applied Microbial Biotechnology (3)
Prereq: general biology and organic chemistry or permission of
instructor. Principles of microbial biotechnology with emphasis
on applications of microorganisms for industrial processes, e.g.,
energy, environmental, food, pharmaceutical, and chemical.
ABE 6905-Individual Work in Agricultural Engineering (1-4;
max: 6) Special problems in agricultural engineering.
ABE 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ABE 6931-Seminar (1; max: 2) Preparation and presentation of
reports on specialized aspects of research in agricultural engineer-
ing and agricultural operations management. S/U.
ABE 6933-Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering (1-4; max:
6) Lectures, laboratory, and/or special projects.
ABE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ABE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ABE 6972-Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ABE 6986-Applied Mathematics in Agricultural Engineering (3)
Mathematical methods, including regression analysis, graphical
techniques, and analytical and numerical solution of ordinary and
partial differential equations, relevant to agricultural engineering.
ABE 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ABE 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
AOM 5045-Appropriate Technology for Agricultural Mechani-
zation (3) Prereq: baccalaureate degree in agriculture or equiva-
lent. Selection, evaluation, and transfer of appropriate mechani-
zation technologyfor agricultural development. Agricultural power
sources; field, processing, transportation, water pumping, and
other farmstead equipment and structures.
AOM 5315-Advanced Agricultural Operations Management


(3) Prereq: AOM 4455; CGS 2531 or equivalent or consent of
instructor. The functional and economic applications of machine
monitoring and robotics. Analysis of farm machinery systems
reliability performance. Queueing theory, linear programming,
and ergonomic considerations for machine systems optimization.
AOM 5431-GIS and Remote Sensing in Agriculture and Natural
Resources 93) Prereq: working knowledge of computer orpermis-
sion of instructor. Principles and applications of geographic infor-
mation systems (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS) technolo-
gies supporting land use/cover assessment, agricultural production,
and natural resources conservation.
AOM 5435-Advanced Precision Agriculture (3) Principles and
applications of technologies supporting precision farming and
natural resource data management planning. Global positioning
systems (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), variable rate
technologies (VRT), data layering of independent variables, auto-
mated guidance, Internet information access, computer software
management.
AOM 5512C-Advanced Package Permeation (2) Prereq: chemis-
try, physics, or biology. Modern methods employed for measuring
oxygen, moisture, and organic compound barrier properties of
packaging materials applied to packaging industry problems.
AOM 5513C-Advanced Package Decoration (3) Major decora-
tion methods used for packaging. Student teams create original
graphic designs and execute designs on 200 containers.
AOM 5514-Advanced Packaging Principles (3) Materials, uses,
functions, and production processes of packaging. Historical,
societal, and technological drivers of packaging.
AOM 6905-Individual Work in Agricultural Operations Manage-
ment (1-6; max: 6) Special problems.
AOM 6932-Special Topics in Agricultural Operations Manage-
ment (1-6; max: 6) Lectures, laboratory, and /or special projects.
CWR 6536-Stochastic Subsurface Hydrology (3) Prereq: senior-
level course in probability and statistics, calculus through differ-
ential equations, soil physics, and/or subsurface hydrology. Sto-
chastic modeling of subsurface flow and transport including
geostatistics, time series analysis, Kalman filtering, and physically
based stochastic models.



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
AND COMMUNICATION
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman: E. W. Osborne. Graduate Coordinator: M. T.
Baker. Professors:J. L. App; L. R. Arrington; J. G. Cheek; G.
D. Israel; E. W. Osborne; E. E. Trotter. Associate Professors:
M. T. Baker; M. H. Breeze; T. S. Hoover; J. M. Nehiley.
Assistant Professors: S. G.Jacob; D. F. Perkins; R. D. Rudd;
R. W. Telg.

The Department of Agricultural Education and Commu-
nication offers major work for the degrees of Doctor of
Philosophy, Master of Science, and Master of Agriculture.
The requirements for each degree are described in the
General Information section. Applicants for the Ph.D. must
also submit scores on the GRE Writing Assessment Test.
The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare graduates for
domestic and international teaching, research, extension,
administrative, and leadership positions in both the public
and private sectors. Areas of specialization include teach-
ing and learning, communication, leadership and volun-
teer development, and adult and extension education.
Courses are taught from an agricultural and natural resources







72 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


sources context and are broadly applicable in education,
business, government, and agency settings.
For both the Master of Science and Master of Agriculture
degrees, three curriculum options for graduate study are
offered. The agricultural extension and education option is
for those persons currently employed or preparing to be
employed in the cooperative extension service, including
family and consumer sciences, agriculture, 4-H, and other
related areas. This option is also for persons who are
teaching agricultural education in the public schools and
those who wish to enter the profession and require basic
certification. The farming systems research-extension for
sustainable agriculture option provides technical and so-
cial science skills and knowledge for field-level techni-
cians. Emphasis is on sustainable agriculture in develop-
ing tropical countries. The communication option pro-
vides skill and theoretical knowledge for students inter-
ested in careers in agricultural communication.
A prospective graduate student need not have majored in
agricultural education and communication as an under-
graduate. However, students with an insufficient back-
ground in either agricultural education or technical agri-
culture will need to include some basic courses in these
areas in their program.
AEE 5037-Agricultural Development Communication (3) Com-
parative studies of communication and extension education in
developing countries, emphasis on planning and implementing
change programs in international agricultural development.
AEE 5060-Public Opinion and Agricultural and Natural Re-
source Issues (3) Public opinion measurement and agenda
setting. Media treatment, public opinion, and public relations/
public information activity regarding issues affecting agricultural
production and trade.
AEE 5206-Instructional Techniques in Agricultural and Life
Sciences (3) Effective use of instructional materials and methods
with emphasis on application of visual and nonvisual techniques.
AEE 5454-Leadership Development for Extension and Commu-
nity Nonprofit Organizations (3) Application of concepts related
to developing leaders for organizing and maintaining extension
and community nonprofit organizations.
AEE 6050-Strategies for Campaigns to Develop Private and
Corporate Support (3) Analysis, planning, implementation, and
control of campaigns for support of nonprofit programs based on
social needs. Specific focus on advertising, marketing, and public
relations approaches.
AEE 6300-Methodology of Planned Change (3) Processes by
which professional change agents influence the introduction,
adoption, and diffusion of technological changes. Applicable to
those who are responsible for bringing about change.
AEE 6325-History and Philosophy of Agricultural Education (3)
Analysis of evolving concepts and philosophies. Emphasis on
history, legislation, and principles underlining organization and
practice. Participation in field experience required.
AEE 6426-Development of a Volunteer Leadership Program (3)
Identification, recruitment, training, retention, and supervision of
volunteer leaders.
AEE 6511-Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs (3)
Basic problems in planning and supervising programs of occupa-
tional experiences in view of changes occurring in agricultural
education.
AEE 6512-Program Development in Extension Education (3)
Concepts and processes drawn from the social sciences that are
relevant to the development of extension education programs.
AEE 6541C-Instruction and Communication Technologies for
Agricultural and Natural Resources (3) Planning and production
of written and visual instructional and communication materials
for programs in agriculture and natural resources. Major instruc-


tional project or communication campaign required.
AEE 6542-Teaching and Learning Theory: Applications in Agri-
cultural Education (3) Prereq: AEE 6206. Contemporary and
foundational theory and research on teaching and learning.
AEE 6552-Evaluating Programs in Extension Education (3) Con-
cepts and research drawn from the social sciences relevant to
evaluating youth and adult extension programs.
AEE 6611-Agricultural and Extension Adult Education (3) Con-
cepts and principles related to design, implementation, and evalu-
ation of education programs for adults.
AEE 6704-Extension Administration and Supervision (3) Prin-
ciples and practices for effective administration and supervision of
the cooperative extension service program at the county and state
levels.
AEE 6767C-Research Strategies in Agricultural Education and
Communication (3) Application of principles, practices, and
strategies for conducting behavioral research in agricultural and
natural resource professions.
AEE 6905-Problems in Agricultural and Extension Education (1-
3; max: 8) Prereq: approval of department chairman. For ad-
vanced students to select and study a problem related to agricul-
tural and/or extension education.
AEE 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEE 6912-Nonthesis Research in Agricultural and Extension
Education (1-3; max: 6) Library and workshop related to methods
in agricultural and extension education, including study of re-
search work, review of publications, development of written
reports.
AEE 6933-Seminar in Agricultural Education and Communica-
tion (1; max: 3) Exploration of current topics and trends.
AEE 6935-Topics in Agricultural and Extension Education (1-3;
max: 6)
AEE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AEE 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
had been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
AEE 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
HEE 5540-Contemporary Perspectives in Home Economics (3)
Intensive analysis of current definitions of home economics,
organizational perspectives, budget/legislative decisions affecting
home economics programs, accountability issues, and future
perspectives for extension and secondary school systems.
HOE 5555-Women and Households in Agricultural Develop-
ment (3) Women's roles in agricultural households, emphasis on
farming systems in developing countries.


AGRICULTURE-GENERAL
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Dean: J. G. Cheek.
The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers
academic programs and grants advanced degrees in 17
departments and the School of Forest Resources and Con-
servation. These academic units are all a part of the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Additional com-
ponents of IFAS include 16 research centers located through-
out the state and cooperative extension offices in each of
the 67 counties of the state.
The following courses are offered under the supervision
of the office of the dean by an interdisciplinary faculty and
deal with material of concern to two or more IFAS aca-
demic units. The courses are also open to students of other
colleges, with the permission of the course instructor.





AGRONOMY /73


AGG 5050-Contemporary Issues in Science (2) Teaching vs.
research, grants and grantsmanship, funding of science, commer-
cial applications of discoveries, and ethics in research and impact
of scientific progress on society. S/U.
AGG 5353-Bio/Chemical Patents (1-2; max: 2) Practical protec-
tion of biological and chemical inventions prior to filing patents.
Introduction to patent system in its entirety for future reference.
History, theory, and minimum requirements for patents.
AGG 5425-Food and the Environment (3) Relationship between
food production and consumption and environmental quality.
Scientific merits of controversies about impact of food production
on environment and of different production strategies and prac-
tices. Biodiversity, water quality, soil resources, ecological eco-
nomics, and energy use in food production. taught interactively
on Internet.
AGG 5505-Plant Protection in Tropical Ecosystems (4) Con-
cepts of farming systems, integrated pest management and the
design of viable plant protection strategies in human and agricul-
tural systems of the worldwide tropics. Comparison of acceptable
methods of managing pest organisms.
AGG 5813-Farming Systems Research and Extension Methods
(3) Multidisciplinary team approach to technology generation and
promotion with emphasis on small farms. Adaptations of anthro-
pological, agronomic, and economic methods. Field work re-
quired.
AGG 5905-Individual Study (1-4; max: 6) Supervised study or
research not covered by other courses.
AGG 5932-Special Topics (1-4; max: 6)
AGG 6830-Grant Writing (2) Prereq: admitted to doctoral
program. Preparation, submission, and management of competi-
tive grants, including operations of national review panels and
finding sources of extramural funding.
AGG 6930-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 4) Topics in agriculture
and/or natural resources. S/U option.
AGG 6933-Topics in Tropical Managed Ecosystems (2-8; max:
12) Intensive field research in ecology of agricultural production
systems in the tropics. Interactions between human dominated
systems, particularly agricultural systems, and natural ecosystems.
Emphasis on acquiring and applying field research techniques.
BCH 5045-Graduate Survey of Biochemistry (4) Prereq: inor-
ganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biology. Introduction to
plant, animal, and microbial biochemistry for graduate students
who have not had biochemistry. Integration and regulation of
biochemical processes stressed; limited discussion of some bio-
chemical techniques.
HOE 5555-Women and Households in Agricultural Develop-
ment (3) Women's roles in agricultural households, emphasis on
farming systems in developing countries.
PCB 5065-Advanced Genetics (4) Prereq: AGR 3303 or PCB
3063 and BCH 4024 or 5045. Lectures, classroom discussion,
readings from classical and current literature; problem-oriented
take-home exams. Topics: definition, regulation, and mutation of
genes; linkage, recombination, and mapping; non-Mendelian
population, quantitative and developmental genetics. Offered fall
semester.
PCB 6555-Introduction to Quantitative Genetics (3) Prereq:
STA 6166. Intended for students of all disciplines who are
interested in genetic principles and biometric evaluation of char-
acters that exhibit continuous variation in natural populations or
breeding programs. Offered in spring semester of odd-numbered
years.


AGRONOMY
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman: J. M. Bennett. Graduate Coordinator: D. S.
Wofford. Professors: L. H. Allen, Jr.; R. D. Barnett; J. M.
Bennett; K. J. Boote; B. J. Brecke; P. S. Chourey; D. L.


Colvin; C. W. Deren; A. E. Dudeck; R. N. Gallaher; D. W.
Gorbet; W. T. Haller; J. C. Joyce; R. S. Kalmbacher; K. A.
Langeland; J. D. Miller; P. Mislevy III; P. L. Pfahler; H. L.
Popenoe; G. M. Prine; K. H. Quesenberry; D. G. Shilling;
T. R. Sinclair; R. L. Smith; L. E. Sollenberger; R. K. Stocker;
D. L. Sutton; J. C. V. Vu; S. H. West; D. S. Wofford; D. L.
Wright. Associate Professors:C. G. Chambliss; L. S. Dunavin;
C. K. Hiebsch; R. L. Stanley; M. J. Williams. Assistant
Professors: M. B. Adjei; A. S. Blount;K. L. Buhr; A. M. Fox;
M. Gallo-Meagher; G. E. MacDonald; R. M. Muchovej; R.
G. Shatters; J. A. Tredaway.

The Department offers the degrees of Doctor of Philoso-
phy and Master of Science (thesis and nonthesis option) in
agronomy with specialization in crop ecology, crop nutri-
tion and physiology, crop production, weed science, ge-
netics, cytogenetics, or plant breeding.
Graduate programs emphasize the development and
subsequent application of basic principles in each special-
ization to agronomic plants in Florida and throughout the
tropics. The continuing need for increased food supplies is
reflected in departmental research efforts. When compat-
ible with a student's program and permitted by prevailing
circumstances, some thesis and dissertation research may
be conducted wholly or in part in one or more of several
tropical countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathemat-
ics, chemistry, botany, microbiology, and physics is re-
quired of new graduate students. In addition to graduate
courses in agonomy, the following courses in related areas
are acceptable for graduate credits as part of the student's
major: ABE 5643C- Biological and Agricultural Systems
Analysis; ABE 5646-Biological and Agricultural Systems
Simulation; ANS 6452-Principles of Forage Quality Evalu-
ation; ANS 6715-The Rumen and Its Microbes; BOT
5225C-Plant Anatomy; BOT 6516-Plant Metabolism;
BOT 6526-Plant Nutrition; BOT 6566-Plant Growth
and Development; HOS 6201-Breeding Perennial Culti-
vars; HOS 6231-Biochemical Genetics of Higher Plants;
HOS 6242-Genetics and Breeding of Vegetable Crops;
HOS 6345-Environmental Physiology of Horticultural
Crops; PCB 5307C-Limnology; PCB 6356C-Ecosystems
of the Tropics; PCB 6555-Quantitative Genetics; SOS
6136-Soil Fertility.

AGG 5353-Bio/Chemical Patents (1-2; max: 2) Practical protec-
tion of biological and chemical inventions prior to filing patents.
Introduction to patent system in its entirety for future reference.
History, theory, and minimum requirements for patents.
AGR 5230C-Grassland Agroecosystems (4) Comprehensive
overview of planted and native grassland ecosystems in Florida
emphasizing their growth, species diversity, management, and
utilization by ruminant animals. Offered every spring semester.
AGR 5266C-Field Plot Techniques (3) Prereq: STA 3023. Tech-
niques and procedures employed in the design and analysis of
field plot, greenhouse, and laboratory research experiments. Ap-
plication of research methodology, the analysis and interpretation
of research results. Offered every fall semester.
AGR 5277C-Tropical Crop Production (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. The ecology and production practices of selected crops
grown in the tropics. Offered every spring semester.
AGR 5307-Molecular Genetics for Crop Improvement (2) Prereq:
AGR 3303. Overview of molecular genetics and plant transforma-
tion methodologies used in crop improvement. Offered spring
semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 5511 -Crop Ecology (3) Prereq: AGR 4210, BOT3503, PCB






74 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


3043C, or equivalent. Relationships of ecological factors and
climatic classifications to agroecosystems, and crop modeling of
the major crops. Offered ever fall semester.
AGR 6233C-Tropical Pasture and Forage Science (4) Prereq:
AGR 423 1C and ANS 5446, or consent of instructor. Potential of
natural grasslands of tropical and subtropical regions. Develop-
ment of improved pastures and forages and their utilization in
livestock production. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered
years.
AGR 6237C-Research Techniques in Forage Evaluation (3)
Prereq or coreq: STA 6166. Experimental techniques for field
evaluation of forage plants. Design of grazing trials and proce-
dures for estimating yield and botanical composition in the grazed
and ungrazed pasture. Offered summer C semester in odd-
numbered years.
AGR 6311-Population Genetics (2) Prereq: AGR 3303, STA
6166. Application of statistical principles to biological popula-
tions in relation to gene frequency, zygotic frequency, mating
systems, and the effects of selection, mutation and migration on
equilibrium populations. Offered spring semester in even-num-
bered years.
AGR 6323-Advanced Plant Breeding (3) Prereq: AGR 3303,
4321, 6311, and STA 6167. Theory and use of biometrical genetic
models for analytical evaluation of qualitative and quantitative
characteristics, with procedures applicable to various types of
plant species.
AGR 6325L-Plant Breeding Techniques (1; max: 2) Prereq: AGR
3303 or equivalent; coreq: AGR 6323 or equivalent. Examination
of various breeding techniques used by agronomic and horticul-
tural crop breeders in Florida. Field and lab visits to active plant
breeding programs, with discussion led by a specific breeder each
week. Hands-on experience in breeding programs. Offered spring
semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6353-Cytogenetics (3) Prereq: AGR 3303. Genetic vari-
ability with emphasis on interrelationships of cytologic and ge-
netic concepts. Chromosome structure and number, chromo-
somal aberrations, apomixis, and application of cytogenetic prin-
ciples. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6422C-Crop Nutrition (3) Preq: BOT 3503. Nutritional
influences on differentiation, composition, growth, and yield of
agronomic plants. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
AGR 6442C-Physiology of Agronomic Plants (4) Prereq: BOT
3503. Yield potentials of crops as influenced by photosynthetic
efficiencies, respiration, translocation, drought, and canopy ar-
chitecture. Plant response to environmental factors. Offered ever
fall semester.
AGR 6905-Agronomic Problems (1-5; max: 8) Prereq: minimum
of one undergraduate course in agronomy or plant science.
Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies of
agronomic plants.
AGR 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AGR 6932-Topics in Agronomy (1-3; max: 8) Critical review of
selected topics in specific agronomic areas.
AGR 6933-Graduate Agronomy Seminar (1; max: 3) Requiredof
all graduate students in agronomy. Current literature and agro-
nomic developments.
AGR 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AGR 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AGR 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
AGR 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
PLS 5632C-Integrated Weed Management (3) Overview of weed
science principles and practices, with particular emphasis on
strategies for southeastern cropping systems. Situations unique to
the State of Florida.
PLS 5652-Advanced Weed Science (3) Prereq: PLS 4601. Clas-
sification, mode of action, principles of selectivity, and plant
responses to herbicides. Weed, crop, environmental, and pest


management associations in developing herbicide programs. Fo-
cus on practical principles. Offered spring semester in even-
numbered years.
PLS 6623-Weed Ecology (3) Prereq: PCB 3043C or PLS 4601 or
equivalent. Characteristics of weedy species. Ecological prin-
ciples emphasizing interactions of weeds with their environment
and neighboring plants, in crop and various noncrop habitats.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PLS 6655-Plant/Herbicide Interaction (3) Prereq: PLS 4601 and
BOT3503. Herbicide activity on plants: edaphic and environmen-
tal influences, absorption and translocation, response of specific
physiological and biochemical processes as related to herbicide
mode of action. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.



ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY
College of Medicine

Chairman: S.P. Sugrue. Graduate Coordinator:G.S. Bennett.

The Graduate Faculty of the Department of Anatomy and
Cell Biology participates in the interdisciplinary program
(IDP) in medical sciences, leadingtothe Doctor of Philoso-
phy degree, with specialization in one of the six advanced
concentration areas of the IDP (see Medical Sciences).
Departmental areas of research associated with the IDP
focus on topical problems in cell biology, developmental
biology, and molecular biology. Laboratory research is
supported by funding from the National Institutesof Health,
the National Science Foundation, State agencies, and pri-
vate foundations. The Department is committed to provide
an excellent intellectual environment for students who
wish to pursue graduate studies. In addition to courses
associated with the IDP, the Department of Anatomy and
Cell Biology offers the courses listed below.

GMS 5621-Cell Biology (4) Prereq: undergraduate biochemistry
or cell biology or consent of instructor. Fundamental mechanisms
of cell functions, specializations, and interactions that account for
the organization and activities of basic tissues.
GMS 5641-Advanced Developmental Biology (4) Prereq: de-
velopmental biology (or embryology), cell biology, and biochem-
istry, or consent of instructor; coreq: molecular biology or consent
of instructor. Examination of developmental mechanisms in con-
temporary model systems, emphasis on experimental basis of
knowledge. Exploration of development from differential gene
expression to cellular mechanisms of pattern formation and mor-
phogenesis.
GMS 6609-Advanced Gross Anatomy (2-4; max: 6) Regional
and specialized anatomy of the human body taught by laboratory
dissection, conferences, and demonstrations.
GMS 6611-Research Methods in Cell Biology and Anatomy (1-
4; max: 6) Research under supervision of staff member; students
exposed to various research techniques available within the
department.
GMS 6631-Advanced Tissue Biology (4) Prereq: GMS 5621 or
consent of instructor. Microscopic anatomy, cell biology, and
embryology of mammalian (mainly human) cells, tissues, and
organs. Structure-function relationships and experimental ap-
proaches stressed: Histology laboratory included.
GMS 6690-Molecular Cell Biology journal Club (1; max: 12)
Faculty-student discussion of research papers and topics.
GMS 6691-Special Topics in Cell Biology and Anatomy (1-4);
max: 10) Readings in recent research literature of anatomy and/or
allied disciplines including cell, developmental, and reproductive
biology.
GMS 6970-Individual Study (1-3; max: 8) Supervised study in
areas not covered by other graduate courses.






ANIMAL SCIENCE / 75


ANIMAL SCIENCE
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman: F. G. Hembry. Graduate Coordinator: H. H.
Head. Graduate Research Professors: R. H. Harms; W. W.
Thatcher. Professors: C. B. Ammerman; J. H. Brendemuhl;
W. E. Brown; M. J. Burridge; P. T. Cardeilhac; C. H.
Courtney; B. L. Damron; M. Drost; M. A. Elzo; M. J. Fields;
D. J. Forrester; K. N. Gelatt; E. P. Gibbs; R. R. Gronwall; P.
J. Hansen; H. H. Head; D D. Johnson; W. E. Kunkle; L. R.
McDowell; A. M. Merritt; R. D. Miles; R. P. Natzke; J. T.
Neilson; E. A. Ott; F. M. Pate; D. C. Sharp, III; F. A. Simmen;
R. C. Simmen; C. R. Staples; H. H. Van Horn, Jr.; A. I. Webb;
R. L. West; C. J. Wilcox; H. R. Wilson. Associate Professors:
D. B. Bates; G. D. Butcher; C. C. Chase; E. L. Johnson; F. W.
Leak; S. Lieb; T. T. Marshall; F. B. Mather; R. O. Myer; T. A.
Olson; P. J. Prichard; R. S. Sand; S. H. Tenbroeck; C. E.
White; S. K. Williamssign. Assistant Professors: B.A. Reiling;
J. V. Yelich.

The Department of Animal Science offers the degrees of
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, and Doctor of
Philosophy in animal sciences in the following concentra-
tions: (1) animal nutrition, (2) meats, (3) animal breeding
and genetics, and (4) animal physiology. A student may
work on a problem covering more than one area of study.
Large animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, poultry, and
sheep) and laboratory animals are available for various
research problems. Adequate nutrition and meats laborato-
ries are available for detailed chemical and carcass quality
evaluations. Special arrangements may be made to con-
duct research problems at the various branch agricultural
experiment stations throughout Florida. A Ph.D. degree
may be obtained in animal sciences, with dissertation
research under the direction of members of the Depart-
ments of Animal Science or Dairy and Poultry Sciences, or
the College of Veterinary Medicine who have been ap-
pointed to the animal science Graduate Faculty.
Departmental and program prerequisites for admission
to graduate study include a sound science background,
with basic courses in bacteriology, biology, mathematics,
botany, and chemistry.
All courses in the animal sciences program area are
acceptable for graduate credit as part of the candidate's
major. In addition, the following courses fulfill this require-
ment: AGR 6233C-Tropical Pastures and Forage Science;
AGR 6311-Population Genetics; AGR 6353-Cytogenet-
ics; BCH 6415-Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology;
FOS 5225C-Principles of Food Microbiology; FOS
6315C-Food Chemistry; MCB 6456-Transcriptional
Regulation.
ANS 5446-Animal Nutrition (3) Prereq:ASG3402, BCH 3023 or
permission of instructor. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals,
and vitamins and their functions in the animal body.
ANS 5935-Reproductive Biology Seminar and Research Studies
(1; max: 4) Prereq: ASG 3334 or equivalent. Invited speakers on
wide range of topics. Student-faculty participation in research
projects. S/U.
ANS 6288-Experimental Technics and Analytical Procedures in
Meat Research (3) Experimental design, analytical procedures;
technics; carcass measurements and analyses as related to live-
stock production and meats studies.
ANS 6386-Advanced Animal Breeding (3) Prereq: permission of


instructor. Application of statistical procedures to the genetic
evaluation of animals. Single trait evaluation. Multiple trait evalu-
ation. Multibreed evaluation.
ANS 6452-Principles of Forage Quality Evaluation (2) Prereq:
ANS 5446, AGR 4231C. Definition of forage quality in terms of
animal performance, methodology used in forage evaluation, and
proper interpretation of forage evaluation data.
ANS 6458-Advanced Methods in Nutrition Technology (3) For
graduate students but open to seniors by special permission.
Demonstrations and limited performance of procedures used in
nutrition research.
ANS 6472-Vitamins (3) Prereq: organic chemistry. Historical
development, properties, assays, and physiological effects. Of-
fered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ANS 6636-Meat Technology (3) Chemistry, physics, histology,
bacteriology, and engineering involved in the handling, process-
ing, manufacturing, preservation, storage, distribution, and utili-
zation of meat.
ANS 6711-Current Topics in Equine Nutrition and Exercise
Physiology (2) Exploration and discussion of topics of current
interest.
ANS 6723-Mineral Nutrition and Metabolism (3) Physiological
effect of macro- and micro-elements, mineral interrelationships.
ANS 6751 C-Physiology of Reproduction (4) Prereq: ASG 3334
orpermission of instructor. Conceptual relationship of hypothala-
mus, pituitary, and reproductive organs during estrous cycle and
pregnancy. Influence of exteroceptive factors and seasonal repro-
duction.
ANS 6767-Molecular Endocrinology (3) Prereq:4024 orequiva-
lent or permission of instructor. Molecular basis of hormone
action and regulation, and emerging techniques in endocrine
system study; emphasis on molecular mechanisms of growth,
development, and reproduction.
ANS 6905-Problems in Animal Science (1-4; max: 8) H.
ANS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANS 6932-Topics in Animal Science (1-3; max: 9) New devel-
opments in animal nutrition and livestock feeding, animal genet-
ics, animal physiology, and livestock management.
ANS 6933-Graduate Seminar in Animal Science (1; max: 8)
ANS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ANS 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ANS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


ANIMAL SCIENCES-GENERAL
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

The Departments of Animal Science and Dairy and
Poultry Sciences have combined their curricula into an
animal sciences curriculum. ASG 5221, 6666L, and 6936
are cross-departmental courses taught by the faculty of the
two departments.
ASG 5221-Animal Production in the Tropics (3) Prereq: ANS
4264C, DAS 3211, or permission of the instructor. Management
and environment factors which affect animal production in the
tropics.
ASG 6666L-Molecular and Cellular Research Methods (2) Prereq:
enrollment in AMCB concentration. Diversity of research topics
and laboratory techniques demonstrated. Short laboratory rota-
tions (3 to 6 weeks) with 3 scientists. Offered fall and spring
semesters.
ASG 6936-Graduate Seminar in Animal Molecular and Cell
Biology (1; max: 2) Seminar attendance and one-hour presenta-
tion on graduate research project.






76 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ANTHROPOLOGY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairperson: A. F. Burns. Graduate Coordinator: S. A.
Brandt. Graduate Research Professor: M. Harris. Distin-
guished Service Professor: P. L. Doughty (Emeritus). Distin-
guished Research Professor: K. Deagan. Professors: H. R.
Bernard; A. F. Burns; B. M. du Toit; J. D. Early;+ C. F.
Gladwin; B. T. Grindal;* M. J. Hardman; M. Y. Iscan;t P. J.
Magnarella; M. L. Margolis; W. H. Marquardt; J. T. Milanich;
J. H. Moore; M. Moseley; A. R. Oliver-Smith; J. A. Paredes;*
M. E. Pohl;* B. A. Purdy (Emeritus); H. I. Safa (Emeritus); M.
Schmink; A. Spring; A. M. Stearman; G. Weiss;t E. S. Wing.
Associate Professors: S. H. Boinski; S. A. Brandt; T. Ho;* W.
F. Keegan; W. J. Kennedy;t L. S. Lieberman; G. F. Murray;
P. R. Schmidt. Assistant Professors: S. C. Anton; A. Falsetti;
I. P. McClaurin; L. Norr; K. Sassaman; J. Stansbury. Assis-
tant Research Scientist: D.. McMillan.
These members of the faculty of Florida State University (*) and
Florida Atlantic University (f) are also members of the Graduate
Faculty of the University of Florida and participate in the doctoral
degree program in the University of Florida Department ofAnthro-
pology.

The Department of Anthropology offers graduate work
leading to the Master of Arts (thesis or nonthesis option) and
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate training is offered
in applied anthropology, social and cultural anthropology,
archeology, anthropological linguistics, and physical/bio-
logical anthropology.
There is a general option and an interdisciplinary one.
The general option allows students to concentrate at the
M.A. level on the integration of the four subfields of
anthropology and to specialize at the Ph.D. level. The
interdisciplinary alternative allows students to 1) concen-
trate on one or two subfields of anthropology along with
one or more areas outside of anthropology and 2) begin
early specialization and integration of a subfield of anthro-
pology and an outside field. More information about these
two options is found in the department publication on
graduate programs and policies that may be obtained by
writing directly to the Department.
The Department of Anthropology generally requires a
minimum score of 1100 on the Graduate Record Examina-
tion and a 3.2 overall grade point average based on a 4.0
system.
Candidates for the M.A. are required to take ANT 6038
and 6917. No more than six hours of ANT 6971 will be
counted toward the minimum requirements for the M.A.
with thesis. Knowledge of a foreign language may be
required by the student's supervisory committee. Other
requirements for the program are listed in this catalog
under Requirements for Master's Degrees.
Students enrolled in the M.A. program who wish to
continue their studies for a Ph.D. must apply to the Depart-
ment for certification. Minimum requirements will nor-
mally include 1) a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in
all graduate anthropology courses and a minimum of 3.2 in
other courses, 2) a grade of pass on the comprehensive
M.A. examination, and 3) a thesis, report, or paper judged
to be of excellent quality by the student's supervisory
committee. In most cases, candidates for the Ph.D. must


achieve competency in a language other than English.
Entering students who already have earned a master's
degree may apply for direct admission to the doctoral
program.
The deadline for receiving completed applications for
admission into the graduate program is January 5 (for fall
semester admission only). The Department strongly en-
courages early applications.

ANG 5110-Archeological Theory (3) Prereq: one course in
archeology; and/or anthropology or permission of the instructor.
Survey of the theoretical and methodological tenets of anthropo-
logical archeology; critical review of archeological theories, past
and present; relation of archeology to anthropology. Not open to
students who have taken ANT 4110.
ANG 5156-Southeastern United States Archeology (3) Survey
of archeological materials relating to aboriginal occupation of the
Southeastern United States from the Paleo-lndian period to the
historic horizon. Sites, artifacts, and cultural adaptations in the
Southeast.
ANG 5158-Florida Archeology (3) Survey of 12,000 years of
human occupation of Florida, including early hunters and forag-
ers, regional cultural developments, external relationships with
the Southeast and Caribbean regions, peoples of historic period,
and effects of European conquest. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 3157.
ANG 5164-The Inca and Their Ancestors (3) Evolution of the
Inca empire traced archeologically through earlier Andean states
and societies to the beginning of native civilization. Not open to
students who have taken ANT 3164.
ANG 5172-Historical Archeology (3) Prereq: ANT 3141 or
consent of instructor. Methods and theoretical foundations of
historical archeology as it relates to the disciplines of anthropol-
ogy, history, historic preservation, and conservation. Introduction
to pertinent aspects of material culture during the historic period.
ANG 5188-Conservation and Archaeometry (3) Prereq: ANT
4185 or equivalent. Treatment of artifacts from time of excavation
until permanent storage including field preservation, precaution
processing storage, and preparation for inclusion in exhibits.
Treatment of fragile artifacts.
ANG 5189-Principles of Archeology (3) Prereq: 1 course in
anthropology. Methods of archeological inquiry and interpreta-
tion, which include site identification and evaluation, dating
techniques, environmental reconstructions, subsistence, technol-
ogy, social and exchange systems, biological remains, and ar-
cheological ethics. Not open to students who have taken ANT
4185.
ANG 5195-Zooarcheology (3) Prereq: consent of instructor.
Human use of animal resources, with emphasis on prehistoric
hunting and fishing practices. Origins of animal domestication.
ANG 5255-Rural Peoples in the Modern World (3) Historical
background and comparative contemporary study of peasant and
other rural societies. Unique characteristics, institutions, and
problems of rural life stressing agriculture and rural-urban rela-
tionships in cross-cultural perspective. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 4255.
ANG 5266-Economic Anthropology (3) Anthropological per-
spectives on economic philosophies and their behavioral bases.
Studies of production, distribution, and consumption; money,
savings, credit, peasant markets; and development in cross-cul-
tural context from perspectives of cultural ecology, Marxism,
formalism, and substantivism. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4266.
ANG 5303-Women and Development (3) Influence of develop-
ment on women in rural.and urban areas. Women's participation
in the new opportunities of modernization.
ANG 5310-The North American Indian (3) The peopling of
North America. The culture areas of North America. Unique
characteristics, institutions, and problems. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 4312.






ANTHROPOLOGY / 77


ANG 5323-Peoples of Mexico and Central America (3) The
settlement and early cultures of the area with an emphasis on the
rise of the major culture centers. The impact of European civiliza-
tion on surviving Indians. Not open to students who have taken
ANT 4326.
ANG 5327-Maya and Aztec Civilizations (3) Civilizations in
Mesoamerica from the beginnings of agriculture to the time of the
coming of Europeans. Maya and Aztec civilizations as well as the
Olmec, Zapotec, and Teotihuacan cultures. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 3325.
ANG 5330-The Tribal Peoples of Lowland South America (3)
Survey of marginal and tropical forest hunters and gatherers and
horticulturalists of the Amazon Basin, Central Brazil, Paraguay,
Argentina, and other areas of South America. Social organization,
subsistence activities, ecological adaptations, and other aspects of
tribal life. Not open to students who have taken ANT 4338.
ANG 5331-Peoples of the Andes (3) The area-cotradition. The
Spanish Conquest and shaping and persistence of colonial culture.
Twentieth-century communities-their social land tenure, reli-
gious, and value systems. Modernization, cultural pluralism, and
problems of integration. Not open to students who have taken
ANT 4337.
ANG 5336-The Peoples of Brazil (3) Ethnology of Brazil. Histori-
cal, geographic, and socioeconomic materials and representative
monographs from the various regions of Brazil as well as the
contribution of the Indian, Portuguese, and African to modern
Brazilian culture. Not open to students who have taken ANT4336.
ANG 5340-Anthropology of the Caribbean (3) Transformation
of area through slavery, colonialism, and independence move-
ments. Contemporary political, economic, familial, folk-religious,
and folk-healing systems. Migration strategies and future options.
Not open to students who have taken ANT 4346.
ANG 5352-Peoples of Africa (3) Survey of the culture, history,
and ethnographic background of the peoples of Africa. A basis for
appreciation of current problems of acculturation, nationalism,
and cultural survival and change among African peoples. Not
open to students who have taken ANT 4352.
ANG 5354-The Anthropology of Modern Africa (3) Continuity
and change in contemporary African societies, with special refer-
ence to cultural and ethnic factors in modern nations. Not open to
students who taken ANT 4354.
ANG 5395-Visual Anthropology (3) Prereq: basic knowledge of
photography orpermission of instructor. Photography and film as
tools and products of social science. Ways of describing, analyz-
ing, and presenting behavior and cultural ideas through visual
means, student projects, and laboratory work with visual anthro-
pology. Not open to students who have taken ANT 3390.
ANG 5426-Kinship and Social Organization (3) Prereq: ANT
2402 or 2410. Property concepts, forms, and complexes. Tribal
patterns of government and social control. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 4426.
ANG 5464-Culture and Aging (3) Prereq: two offollowing:ANT
2410, SYG 2000, or introductory psychology course. Cross-
cultural perspectives of adultdevelopment and aging in traditional
and industrial society. Comparative assessment of culturally me-
diated, life-cycle transformations into old age and health related
and human service policy issues. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4464.
ANG 5467-Culture and Nutrition (3) Prereq: HUN 3221. The
theory, methodology, and substantive material of nutritional an-
thropology. Emphasis on cross-cultural bio-behavioral patterns.
ANG 5485-Research Design in Anthropology (3) Examination
of empirical and logical basis of anthropological inquiry; analysis
of theory construction, research design, problems of data collec-
tion, processing, and evaluation.
ANG 5486-Computing for Anthropologists (3) Prereq: ANG
5485 or consent of instructor. Practical introduction to computer.
Collecting, organizing, processing, and interpreting numerical
data on microcomputer. Data sets used correspond to partici-
pants' subfields.
ANG 5525-Human Osteology and Osteometry (3) Prereq: ANT


3514 and consent of instructor. Human skeletal identification for
the physical anthropologist and archeologist. Techniques for
estimating age at death, race, and sex from human skeletal
remains. Measurement of human skeleton for comparative pur-
poses. Not open to students who have taken ANT 4525.
ANG 5546-Seminar: Human Biology and Behavior (3) Prereq:
consent of instructor. Social behavior among animals from the
ethological-biological viewpoint; the evolution of animal societ-
ies; the relevance of the ethological approach for the study of
human development.
ANG 5620-Language and Culture (3) Principles and problems of
anthropological linguistics. The cross-cultural and comparative
study of language. Primarily concerned with the study of non-
Indo-European linguistic problems.
ANG 5700-Applied Anthropology (3) Survey of history, theory
and practice of applying cultural anthropology to human issues
and problems. Applications to international development, peace
studies, health, education, agriculture, ethnic minority and human
rights issues. Case review, including aspects of planning,
consultancy work, evaluation research, and ethics.
ANG 5701-Seminar on Applied Anthropology (3) Prereq: ANG
5700 or instructor's permission. Consideration of planned socio-
cultural and technological change and development in the United
States and abroad; special and cultural problems in the transferral
of technologies; community development and aid programs.
Comparative program evaluation.
ANG 5702-Anthropology and Development (3) An examination
of theories and development and their relevance to the Third
World, particularly Africa or Latin America. After this microanaly-
sis, microlevel development will be examined with special refer-
ence to rural areas.
ANG 5824L-Field Sessions in Archeology (6) Prereq: 6 hours of
anthropology or permission of instructor. Excavation of archeo-
logical sites, recording data, laboratory handling and analysis of
specimens, and study of theoretical principles which underlie
field methods and artifact analysis. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4124 or equivalent.
ANG 6034-Seminar in Anthropological History and Theory (3)
Theoretical principles and background of anthropology and its
subfields.
ANG 6115-Problems in Caribbean Prehistory (3) Theories and
methods for study of prehistoric human societies. Case studies
drawn primarily from Caribbean islands.
ANG 6128-Lithic Technology (3) Flintworking techniques and
uses of stone implements for two million years. Emphasis on
stoneworking technology in prehistoric Florida.
ANG 6186-Seminar in Archeology (3; max: 10) Selected topic.
ANG 6273-Legal Anthropology (3) Prereq: graduate standing.
Interrelationships between aspects of traditional and modern legal
systems and sociocultural, economic, and political forces that
impinge upon them. Methods of analysis, legal reasoning
crossculturally, pre-industrial and modern sociolegal systems.
ANG 6274-Principles of Political Anthropology (3) Problems of
identifying political behavior. Natural leadership in tribal societ-
ies. Acephalous societies and republican structures. Kingship and
early despotic states. Theories of bureaucracy. Not open to stu-
dents who have taken ANT 4274.
ANG 6286-Seminar in Contemporary Theory (3; max: 10) Areas
treated are North America, Central America, South America,
Africa, Oceania.
ANG 6351-Peoples and Culture in Southern Africa (3) Prehis-
tpric times through first contacts by explorers to settlers; the
contact situation between European, Khoisan, and Bantu-speak-
ing; empirical data dealing with present political, economic,
social, and religious conditions.
ANG 6478-Evolution of Culture (3) Prereq: ANT3141. Theories
of culture growth and evolution from cultural beginnings to dawn
of history. Major inventions of man and their significance.
ANG 6511-Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3; max: 10)
Selected topic.
ANG 6547-Human Adaptation (3) Prereq: ANT2511 or permission






78 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


of instructor. An examination of adaptive processes-cultural, physi-
ological, genetic-in past and contemporary populations.
ANG 6552-Primate Behavior (3) Prereq: one course in either
physical anthropology or biology. Taxonomy, distribution, and
ecology of primates. Range of primate behavior for each major
taxonomic group explored.
ANG 6589-Seminar in Evolutionary Theory, Human Evolution,
and Primate Behavior (3) Theory of evolution as a framework to
explore primate behavior and human micro- and macroevolution.
ANG 6737-Medical Anthropology (3) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. Theory of anthropology as applied to nursing, medicine,
hospital organization, and the therapeutic environment. Instru-
ment design and techniques of material collection.
ANG 6801-Ethnographic Field Methods (3) Methods of collect-
ing ethnographic data. Entry into the field; role and image conflict.
Participant observation, interviewing, content analysis, photogra-
phy and documents, data retrieval, analysis of data.
ANG 6823-Laboratory Training in Archeology (3) Prereq: an
introductory level archeology course. Processing of data recov-
ered in field excavations; cleaning, identification, cataloging,
classification, drawing, analysis, responsibilities of data reporting.
Not open to students who have taken ANT 4123 or equivalent.
ANG 6905-Individual Work (1-3; max: 10) Guided readings on
research in anthropology based on library, laboratory, or field
work.
ANG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANG 6915-Research Projects in Social, Cultural, and Applied
Anthropology (1-3; max: 10) Prereq: consent of instructor. For
students undertaking directed research in supplement to regular
course work.
ANG 6917-The Profession of Anthropology (3) Required of all
graduate students. Organizations of the anthropological profes-
sion in teaching and research. Relationship between subfields and
related disciplines; the anthropological experience; ethics. S/U.
ANG 6930-Special Topics in Anthropology (1-3; max: 9) Prereq:
consent of instructor.
ANG 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANG 6945-Internship in Applied Anthropology (1-8; max: 8)
Prereq: permission of graduate coordinator. Required of all stu-
dents registered in programs of applied anthropology. Students are
expected to complete 4-8 hours.
ANG 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ANG 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ANG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


ARCHITECTURE
College of Architecture

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman: R. S. McCarter. Graduate Coordinators: G. D.
Ridgdill; L. G. Shaw. Professors: C. B. Constant; A. J. Dasta;
R. W. Drummond; M. T. Foster; H. W. Kemp; R. S. McCarter;
G. D. Ridgdill; W. Schueller; L. G. Shaw; G. W. Siebein; K.
S. Thorne; B. F. Voichysonk; T. R. White; I. H. Winarsky.
Associate Professors: D. Bitz; F. Cappellari; M. G.
Gundersen; O. W. Hill; A. Hofer; S. Luoni; R. M. MacLeod;
A. Malo; C. F. Morgan; R. W. Pohlman; P. E. Prugh; K.
Tanzer; W. L. Tilson. Assistant Professors: M. Gooden; M.
Rabens.
Master of Architecture.-The Department of Architec-
ture offers graduate work leading to the first professional
degree, Master of Architecture. During graduate studies,


each student has the opportunity to focus on one or more
areas, including design, history and theory, urban design,
preservation, structures, and technology. The student's
overall college experience, both undergraduate and gradu-
ate programs, is intended to be a complete unit of profes-
sional education leading to practice in architecture or
related fields. Students entering the program at the Univer-
sity of Florida will matriculate in one of the following
tracks:
Baccalaureate in Architecture Base.-For those students
who have a four-year baccalaureate degree from an ac-
credited architectural program and have completed 6 to 8
architecture studios, two years in residence (52 credits) are
normally required for completion of the Master of Architec-
ture degree; notification of program length is part of the
letter of acceptance and is determined by portfolio and
transcript review. ARC 6241, 6355, and 6356 are required
of all graduate students in this track and are prerequisites
for the required thesis or project. Course sequences in
history and theory, technology, structures, and practice
must also be completed.
Baccalaureate in Related Degree Base.-For those stu-
dents who have a baccalaureate degree with an architec-
ture or related major (interior design, landscape architec-
ture) and who have completed 4 or 6 architecture or design
studies, three years of residence (83 credits, approximately)
are normally required for completion of the Master of
Architecture degree; notification of program length is part
of the letter of acceptance and is determined by portfolio
and transcript review. ARC 4073, 4074, 6241, 6355, and
6356 are required of all graduate students in this track and
are prerequisites for the required thesis or project. (Under-
graduate courses-3000 and 4000 level in the major do not
count toward the minimum requirements for the graduate
degree.) Course sequences in history and theory, materials
and methods, technology, structures, and practice must be
completed.
Baccalaureate in Nonrelated Degree Base.-For those
students who have a baccalaureate degree in a nonrelated
academic area and have completed less that 4 design
studies courses, four years of residence (112 credits, ap-
proximately) are normally required for completion of the
Master of Architecture degree; notification of program
length is part of the letter of acceptance and is determined
by portfolio and transcript review. (Summer introductory
courses-such as design exploration offered by the Archi-
tecture Department-are strongly recommended.) ARC
4071, 4072, 4073, 4074, 6241, 6355, and 6356 are
required of all graduate students in this track and are
prerequisites for the required thesis or project. (Under-
graduate courses-3000 and 4000 level-in the major do
not count toward the minimum requirements for the gradu-
ate degree.) Course sequences in history and theory, mate-
rials and methods, technology, structures, and practice
must be completed.
Accredited Five-Year Professional Base.-For those stu-
dents holding a baccalaureate degree in architecture from
an accredited five-year professional degree program, a
one-year degree program is available. In these cases, a
specialized curriculum which compliments the needs of
the applicant is developed. The minimum registration is 30
credits; however, it may increase if transcript reviews
reveal further course work is needed to meet registration





ARCHITECTURE /79


and curriculum requirements. ARC 6356 is required and is
prerequisite for the required thesis or project.
Most states require that an individual intending to be-
come an architect hold an accredited degree. There are
two types of degrees that are accredited by the National
Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) the Bachelor of Archi-
tecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study,
and (2) the Master of Architecture, which requires a mini-
mum of three years of study following an unrelated
bachelor's degree or two years following a related
preprofessional bachelor's degree. These professional
degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to
registration and licensure to practice as architects.
Student Work.-The college can retain student work for
the purpose of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Master of Science in Architectural Studies.-The M.S.A.S.
is a nonprofessional degree for those students who wish to
engage in advanced investigations in specialized areas of
architectural history, theory, technology, design, preserva-
tion, or practice. Students with a bachelor's degree in any
discipline from an accredited university are eligible to apply
to this program; the proposed area of focus should be
precisely defined in the application. This is a three-to-four-
semester program (32 hours minimum) which includes a
thesis. (No more than six hours of ARC 6971 may be
counted in the minimum credit hours for the degree.)
Interdisciplinary study is encouraged.
The College of Architecture sponsors special curricula in
architecture to enhance the academic program. Preserva-
tion Institute: Caribbean, Preservation Institute: Nantucket,
Miami Beach Education and Research Center, and Vicenza
Institute ofArchitecture (Italy) accept students, not only from
the Universityof Florida, but from academic circles through-
out the United States and the world for year-round study. All
students in graduate architecture programs at the University
of Florida are offered the opportunity to apply for one or
more of these programs.
Applications.--All applications for fall semester graduate
admission, including official transcripts, GRE scores, and
TOEFL scores, if necessary, must be received by the Office
of the Registrar by February 15. In addition to satisfying
University requirements for admission, applicants are re-
quired to submit tothe Graduate Program Assistant, Depart-
ment of Architecture, 231 ARCH, P.O. Box 115702, the
following: a portfolio of their creative work; a scholarly
statement of intent and objectives; and three letters of
recommendation. This material must be received by Febru-
ary 15 to be considered for admission in the following fall
semester. (Portfolio must be accompanied by self-ad-
dressed, stamped envelope.) Students may apply after the
February 15 deadline but will only be considered if spaces
become available; scholarships are generally no longer
available after this deadline. (Updates of portfolios are
accepted after February 15; however, applications will not
be considered until they are complete.)
The Department reserves the right to retain student work
for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction. Field trips
are required of all students; students should plan to have
adequate funds available. It may be necessary to assess
studio fees to defray costs of base maps and other generally
used materials.
Doctor of Philosophy.-The College of Architecture of-
fers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosop~,igree in
(k


architecture. Areas of specialization within this program
include architecture, building construction, interior design,
landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning.
For information, write to the Director, College of Architec-
ture Doctoral Program, 331 ARCH, P.O. Box 115701.
The following courses are taught on a periodic schedule
or by demand only.

ARC 5791-Topics in Architectural History (3)
ARC 5800-Survey of Architectural Preservation, Restoration,
and Reconstruction (3)
ARC 581 0-Techniques of Architectural Documentation (3) Docu-
mentation, interpretation, and maintenance issues relating to his-
toric structures.
ARC 5811 -Historic Preservation and Restoration (3) Preservation
of individual structures, with emphasis on architectural design for
restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive-use.
ARC 6176-Advanced Computer-Aided Design (3; max: 6) Focus
on available hardware and software and their current and potential
usefulness to the profession. Investigation of future directions in
hardware and software development.
ARC 6241-Advanced Studio I (1-9; max: 9) Architecture as
function of human action (program and use) and potentials inherent
in construction (structure and material); relationship between ritual
and built form-culminating in a highly resolved spatial order.
ARC 6242-Research Methods (2) Required of all graduate stu-
dents as preparation for thesis.
ARC 6280-Advanced Topics in Architectural Practice (3; max: 6)
Contemporary practice models analyzed.
ARC 6281-Professional Practice (3) Principles and processes of
office practice management, investment and financing, project
phases, building cost estimation, contracts.
ARC 6355-Advanced Studio II (6) Relation between the tectonic
and the experience of place; emphasis on the joint, the detail, the
tactile reading of architecture-culminating in a highly resolved
tectonic order.
ARC 6356-Advanced Studio III (6) Development of design meth-
ods for synthesizing specialized aspects of architectural practice
such as human behavior and space programming, environmental
control and energy use, structures and materials of construction,
project management, preservation and reuse of historic structures,
theoretical and philosophical areas of inquiry.
ARC 6357-Advanced Topics in Architectural Design (3; max: 6)
Focus on expanding familiar concepts in conception and produc-
tion of architecture. Examination of potential for program to gener-
ate architectonic form, bringing multidisciplinary approach to
historical manifestations.
ARC 6391-Architecture, Energy, and Ecology (3) Integration of
energetic and environmental influences on architectural design.
ARC 6393-Advanced Architectural Connections (3) An analysis
of architectural connections and details relative to selected space,
form, and structural systems.
ARC 6399-Advanced Topics in Urban Design (3; max: 6) Impact
of cultural, sociological, economic, and technological transforma-
tions of both historic urban form and newly developed urban areas,
special emphasis on impact of transportation, particularly the
automobile.
ARC 6571-Advanced Architectural Structures III (3) Design and
applications of precast and/or prestressed concrete elements in
architecture.
ARC 6576-Architectural Structures (3) Analysis and behavior of
reinforced concrete, prestress, masonry, foundations, steel, and
suspension systems.
ARC 6578-Advanced Architectural Structures II (3) Theory and
behavior of structural steel systems and their responses to the
solution of architectural problems.
ARC 6611-Advanced Topics in Architectural Technology (3;
max: 6) Focus on structures, materials, construction systems, or environ-
mental technology. Examination ofdetermination ofarchitectural form by
available technologies and inventions throughout history.






80 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ARC 6633-Thermal Systems (3) Thermal issues in architecture
including thermal comfort, passive and active thermal control
systems, and energy efficiency.
ARC 6642-Architectural Acoustics Design Laboratory (3) Coreq:
ARC 6643. Theory and practice of architectural acoustics in the
solution to design problems.
ARC 6643-Architectural Acoustics (3) Theory, practice, and
application of acoustics in architecture.
ARC 6653-Modeling Techniques in Architectural Acoustics (3)
Theory and practice of ultrasonic, computer, and other techniques
used to model human subjective response to sound and their
application in the design of buildings.
ARC 6685-Life Safety, Sanitation, and Plumbing Systems (3)
Design problems investigating the theory, practice, and applica-
tions of fire safety, movement, sanitation, and plumbing systems in
architecture.
ARC 6711-Architecture of the Ancient World (3) Key built works
from Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Meso-American civilizations.
Emphasis on understanding both cultural context for these works
and construction technologies utilized in their making. Examina-
tion of their use as ruins and their contemporary meanings.
ARC 6716-Architecture of the Romanesque and Gothic (3)
Selected monuments from the Romanesque, Byzantine, and Gothic
periods. Emphasis on cultural context, technology of construc-
tion, and experiential and spatial qualities. Relationship between
religious aspirations and technical means, as captured in indi-
vidual work.
ARC 6750-Architectural History: America (3) Development of
American architecture and the determinants affecting its function,
form, and expression.
ARC 6771-Architectural History: Literature and Criticism (3)
Individual research with concentration on writing and architec-
tural criticism.
ARC 6793-Architectural History: Regional (3) Group and indi-
vidual studies of architecture unique to specific geographic re-
gions.
ARC 6805-Architectural Conservation (3) A multidisciplinary
study, supervised by an architectural professor and another profes-
sor from an appropriate second discipline, in the science of
preserving historic architecture, utilizing individual projects.
ARC 6821-Preservation Problems and Processes (3) Preserva-
tion in the larger context. Establishing historic districts; procedures
and architectural guidelines for their protection.
ARC 6822-Preservation Programming and Design (3) Architec-
tural design focusing on compatibility within the fabric of historic
districts and settings.
ARC 6851-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Methods
I (3) Materials, elements, tools, and personnel of traditional
building.
ARC 6852-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Methods
II (3) Prereq: ARC 6851. Preservation of twentieth-century struc-
tures.
ARC 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ARC 6911-Architectural Research (1-6; max: 9) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6912-Architectural Research II (1-6; max: 9) Special
studies adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6913-Architectural Research III (1-6; max: 9) Special
studies adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6932-Advanced Topics in Architectural Methods (3; max:
6) Exploration of interconnection between architectural design
and research methodology.
ARC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ARC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ARC 6979-Master's Research Project (1-10) H.
ARD 7790-Doctoral Core I (3) Philosophy, theory, and history
of inquiry into the processes of design, urban development, and
building systems.
ARD 7792-Doctoral Core II (3) Prereq: ARG 7790. Urban,
environmental, and legal systems in the context of urban develop-
ment.


ARD 7794-Doctoral Seminar (1; max: 4) Current planning,
architecture, design development, and construction theories.
ARD 7911-Advanced Architectural Research 1 (3) Prereq: STA
6167. Architecture, planning, design, and construction research
design with relevant mathematical and computer methods.
ARD 7912-Advanced Architectural Research 11 (3) Prereq: ARC
7911. Conduct of research in architecture, planning, and con-
struction.
ARD 7940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) Not open to
students who have taken 6940. Independent student teaching
under supervision of faculty member. S/U.
ARD 7949-Professional Internship (1-5; max 5) Professional
faculty-supervised practicum.
ARD 7979-Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who have
been accepted for a doctoral program. Not open to students who
have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ARD 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
URP 6272-Advanced Planning Information Systems (3) Prereq:
URP 6271. Theoretical and practical knowledge about the struc-
ture, use, and architecture of georeference data base systems.
Discussion of spatial relationships which exist between network
and area-related systems. Development and maintenance of geo-
graphic information systems as related to urban and regional
planning.



ART AND ART HISTORY
College of Fine Arts


GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Director: B. J. Revelle. Graduate Program Coordinator: R.
C. Heipp. Graduate Program Advisers: C. Roland (Art
Education); R. H. Westin (Art History); L. J. Arbuckle (Art
Studio). Professors:J. L. Cutler; R. C. Heipp; M. J. Isaacson;
J. A. O'Connor; R. E. Poynor; B. J. Revelle; J. F. Scott; R. C.
Skelley; N. S. Smith; E. Y. Streetman; J. L. Ward; R. H.
Westin. Associate Professors: L. J. Arbuckle; B. A. Barletta;
D. A. Kremgold; R. Mueller; C. A. Roberge; D. C. Roland;
B. Slawson; D. J. Stanley. Assistant Professors: A. Alberro;
G. C. Ferrandi; M. L. Hyde; R. Janowich; M. C. Lidman; W.
D. Pappenheimer; M. K. Rogal.

Master of Fine Arts Degree.-The School offers the
M.F.A. degree in art with concentrations in ceramics,
creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking,
sculpture, graphic design, electronic intermedia, and multi-
media. Enrollment is competitive and limited. Candidates
for admission should have adequate undergraduate train-
ing in art. Deficiencies may be corrected before beginning
graduate study. Applicants must submit a portfolio for
admission consideration. A minimum of three years resi-
dency is normally required for completion of the require-
ments for this degree, which for studio students culminates
with an M.F.A. exhibition. The School reserves the right to
retain student work for purposes of record, exhibition, or
instruction.
The M.F.A. requires a minimum of 60 credit hours. ART
6897 is required for all M.F.A. majors. Twenty-four hours
must be in an area of specialization which will be taken in
the following sequence: ART 6926C, 6927C, 6928C, 6929C.
Each class will be repeated as needed to achieve the
appropriate number of credits. Twelve hours of studio






ART AND ART HISTORY / 81


electives, six hours of art history electives; three hours of
aesthetics, theory, or criticism; six hours of electives; and
six hours of individual project or thesis research comprise
the normal course requirements. Although the M.F.A. is a
thesis degree, students usually produce a creative project in
lieu of thesis. Students should see the Graduate Program
Adviser for the School's requirements for the creative
project. (If the student elects to write a thesis, he/she must
discuss the reasons with the Graduate Program Adviser and
the supervisory committee during the second year and
make appropriate modifications. ARH 5805 is required for
all students who select the written thesis.)
Master of Arts Degree in Art Education.-The School
offers the M.A. in art education. In addition to meeting
requirements of the Graduate School for admission, pro-
spective students should (1) hold a degree in art, art history,
or art education; (2) send a portfolio, which includes 35mm
slides of works of art and a successful research paper, tothe
School; (3) submit three letters of recommendation.
The M.A. in art education requires a minimum of 36
credit hours. ARE 6047, 6141, and 6148 are required. The
basic plan of study includesthree credits of an approved art
education elective; nine credits in studio courses; three
credits in art history; six credits in art history, studio, art
education, or education electives; three credits of ARE
6705; and three credits of ARE 6971 or 6973. To be
admitted to candidacy, students must pass a comprehen-
sive examination at the beginning of the second year. The
program culminates in an oral examination on the thesis or
project in lieu of thesis.
Master of Arts Degree in Art History.-The School offers
the Master of Arts with emphasis in areas of Ancient,
Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, and Non-West-
ern art history, including African, American Indian, Asian,
Latin American, and Oceanic, and in museum studies.
A minimum of 37 credit hours is required: ARH 5805 (3
credits), 28 hours with at least one course in four areas of
emphasis, and ARH 6971 (6 credits). Nine credits may be
taken in related areas with the Graduate Program Adviser's
approval. Students with a museum studies emphasis will
take 9 credits in the following areas: Seminar in Museum
Studies, Museum Practicum, and Gallery Practicum.
Students must pass a comprehensive art history examina-
tion at the beginning of the second year for admission to
candidacy. Failure to pass the examination will result in
adjustments to the student's program or, if warranted,
dismissal from the program. Reading proficiency in a
foreign language appropriate to the major area of study
must be demonstrated before thesis research is begun.
Language courses are not applicable toward degree credit.
Art history students may participate in courses offered by
the State University System's programs in London and
Florence. Other study abroad may be approved by the
Graduate Program Adviser.

ARE 5315-Teaching Art in Elementary School I (3)
ARE 6049-History of Teaching Art (3) History of the theory and
practice of teaching art.
ARE 6141-Aesthetic Experience (3) Studies in vision, motion,
sound, and synaesthesia designed to build greater awareness of
immediate experience. Relationship between aesthetic and artis-
tic creation.
ARE 6148-Curriculum in Teaching Art (3) Contemporary theo-
ries for development of art teaching curricula.


ARE 6648-Philosophy and Psychology of Teaching Art (3)
Philosophical and psychological theories on nature of art, artistic
creation, and art teaching. Relationship between artist and audi-
ence.
ARE 6705-Methods of Research in Art Education (3) Study of
qualitative and quantitative research methods. Review of research
literature.
ARE 6905-Individual Study (1-5; max: 12)
ARE 6933-Special Topics in Art Education (1-3; max: 6)
ARE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ARE 6973-Individual Project (1-10; max: 10) Project in lieu of
thesis. S/U.
ARH 5357-French Art of the Ancien Regime: 1680-1780 (3)
Prereq: ARH 2051 orpermission of instructor. Major artists, artistic
movements, works and issues in art theory, and criticism in Europe
from late seventeenth century to 1780s. Emphasis on painting in
France and reaction against Rococo.
ARH 5430-Art in the Age of Revolution (3) Prereq: ARH 2051 or
permission of instructor. Late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth
century European art, including Neo-Classicism and Romanticism.
Works considered in cultural, political, social, and aesthetic con-
texts in which created. Emphasis on politics of style during period
of revolution and reaction.
ARH 5440-Beginnings of Modernism (3) Prereq: ARH 2051 or
permission of instructor. Visual arts in Europe in second half of
nineteenth century, focusing on emergence of avant-garde and
formulation of modern aesthetic with reference to industrialized,
urban culture, especially in Paris. Realism, Impressionism, and
Post-Impressionism.
ARH 5655-Indigenous American Art (3; max: 9) Prereq: ARH
2518 or permission of instructor. Examination of native arts of the
Americas, North, Central, or South;, from pre-Europeant times.
ARH 5815-Methods of Research and Bibliography (3)
ARH 5893-Gender, Representation, and the Visual Arts: 1600-
1900 (3) Prereq: ARH 2051 or permission of instructor. Historical
and theoretical issues posed for visual media by attention to issues
of gender, with particular emphasis on women artists.
ARH 5905-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12 including ART 5905C)
ARH 6693-Eighteenth-Century European Art (Seminar) (3) Prereq:
ARH 2051 or permission of instructor. Intersecting ideologies of
gender and representation in French art.
ARH 6694-Nineteenth-Century Art (Seminar) (3) Prereq: ARH
2050 or permission of instructor.
ARH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ARH 6911-Advanced Study (3-4; max: 16) Prereq: major in art.
ARH 6914-Independent Study in Ancient Art History (3-4; max:
12) Prereq: major in art and permission of graduate program
adviser. Egyptian, Near Eastern, Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, Roman.
ARH 6915-Independent Study in Medieval Art History (3-4;
max: 12) Prereq: major in art andpermission of graduate program
adviser. Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque,
Gothic.
ARH 6916-Independent Study in Renaissance and Baroque Art
History (3-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art and permission of
graduate program adviser. Renaissance, High Renaissance, Man-
nerism, Baroque, Eighteenth Century art.
ARH 6917-Independent Study in Modern Art History (3-4; max:
12) Prereq: major in art and permission of graduate program
adviser. Major art movements of the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries.
ARH 6918-Independent Study in Non-Western Art History (3-
4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art and permission of graduate
program adviser. African, Latin American, American Indian, Asian,
and Oceanic.
ARH 6938-Seminar in Museum Studies (3) Prereq: permission of
instructor. History, purposes, functions of museums in general and
art museums in particular.
ARH 6946-Museum Practicum (3) Prereq: permission of gradu-
ate program adviser and prior arrangements with professors.
Work under museum professionals. Readings and periodic discus-
sions with coordinating professor.






82 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ARH 6948-Gallery Practicum (3) Prereq: permission ofgraduate
program adviser andprior arrangements with coordinatingprofes-
sor. Work under supervision of gallery professionals. Readings
and periodic discussions with coordinating professor.
ARH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ART 5905C-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12 including ARH
5905)
ART 5930C-Special Topics (3; max: 15) Rotating topics in
studio art and studio practice.
ART 6688-Digital Art Studio (4; max: 12) Prereq: graduate
standing in art or permission of instructor. Investigation of digital
art practices in one or more of the following areas: bit-mapped and
object-oriented graphics, 3-D modeling, computer animation,
hypermedia and interactivity, and image-processing.
ART 6835C-Research in Methods and Materials of the Artist (3-
4; max: 8)
ART 6836-Arts and Public Policy (3) Investigation and analysis of
philosophic and economic issues of funding, arts advocacy, art law,
health hazards, arts and healing, and shaping of public policy.
ART 6897-Seminar: Practice, Theory, and Criticism of Art (3)
ART 6910C-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ART 6926C-Advanced Study I (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in art
and permission of graduate program adviser. Application of basic
principles of studio art in one of the following areas: ceramics,
creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture,
graphic design, and multi-media.
ART 6927C-Advanced Study II (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in
art and permission of graduate program adviser. Investigation of
selected problems in one of the following areas: ceramics, creative
photography, drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, graphic
design, and multi-media.
ART 6928C-Advanced Study III (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in
art and permission of graduate program adviser. Experimentation
in nontraditional approaches to studio art in one of the following
areas: ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, and multi-media.
ART 6929C-Advanced Study IV (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: major in
art and permission of graduate program adviser. Stylistic and
technical analysis of contemporary studio practices in one of the
following areas: ceramics, creative photography, drawing, paint-
ing, printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, and multi-media.
ART 6933-Special Topics (1-4; max: 12) Prereq: permission of
graduate program adviser. Readings, discussions, and/or studio
exploration of various art issues.
ART 6935-Seminar in Arts Administration (3) Administration
and management of arts organizations and facilities, the functions
of leadership, and the history of the arts services movement.
ART 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ART 6944-Arts Administration Practicum (1-3; max: 3) Prereq:
permission of arts administration director and prior arrangements
with organization or facility. Part-time field experiences under
supervision of arts professional. Reading and periodic discussions
with coordinating instructor. S/U.
ART 6947-Professional Internship (1-3; max: 3) Prereq: permission
of arts administration director and prior arrangements with organiza-
tion or facility and ART 6944. Training in approved regional or
national arts organization, institution, or facility. Instructor and on-
site supervision provided. Full-time internship. S/U.
ART 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ART 6973C-Individual Project (1-10; max: 10) Creative project
in lieu of written thesis. S/U.


ASTRONOMY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

GRADUATE FACULTY 1999-2000
Chairman:S. F. Dermott. Graduate Coordinator: E. A. Lada.
Graduate Research Professor: A. E. S. Green. Distinguished
Service Professor: A. G. Smith (Emeritus). Professors: J. R.


Buchler; T. D. Carr (Emeritus); K-Y. Chen (Emeritus); S. F.
Dermott; S. T. Gottesman; J. H. Hunter; J. R. Ipser; H. E.
Kandrup; C. M. Telesco; R. E. Wilson. Associate Professors:
H. L. Cohen; R. J. Elston; B. A. Gustafson; F. Hamann III; E.
A. Lada;R. J. Leacock; G. R. Lebo; J. P. Oliver; H. C. Smith.
Associate Scientists: F. Giovane; F. J. Reyes; Y.-L. Xu.
Assistant Professor: R. K. Pina.

The Department of Astronomy atthe UniversityofFlorida,
Gainesville, offers graduate programs leading to the M.S. or
Ph.D. degrees in astronomy. The Astronomy Department
currently consists of 19 faculty, 12 research staff, and 28
graduate students, making it one of the largest departments
in the country. Research is an integral part of the graduate
program. Students have opportunities to work with faculty
and staff on a broad range of astronomical problems using
in-house, national and international, ground- and space-
based facilities. Support for graduate studies is available
through fellowships, research assistantships and teaching
assistantships.
Instrumentation Programs.-Infrared Astrophysics Labo-
ratory (UFIRAL) is a state-of-the art laboratory for the design
and construction of advanced near-infrared and mid-infra-
red instrumentation to be used on major telescopes around
the world. Such instruments will provide support for a
broad range of scientific research programs within the
Department. The UFIRAL recently commissioned OSCIR,
its first instrument, a mid-infrared camera and spectrometer
system.
Solar System.-The planetary science research groups
are primarily concerned with the study of small bodies in
the Solar System Asteroids, comets, meteoroids, and
interplanetary dust particles. Cometary programs include
the study of the composition of the comae and the nuclei
of comets. Researchers are also active in studying and
modelingthe production and orbital evolution of interplan-
etary dust particles in the zodiacal cloud. The properties of
cosmic dust and planetary aerosols are studied in the
Laboratory for Astrophysics using its Microwave Analog-
to-Light Scattering facility to simulate accurately the scat-
tering of electromagnetic radiation. The laboratory also
develops hardware for NASA and international space agen-
cies to measure the optical properties of dust particles in
diverse environments. The planetary radio astronomy
group operates the Radio Observatory (UFRO), one of the
two largest observatories in the world dedicated to the
study of decametric radio emission from the giant planets.
Stellar Astronomy.-The stellar astronomy group mainly
concentrates on the synthesis of observable quantities for
interacting binaries and the simultaneous analysis of X-ray
pulse delays, light curves, and radial velocity curves for X-
ray binaries. The widely used Wilson-Devinney code is
maintained and disseminated by the group. Astrometry
programs include improving the accuracy and reliability of
the statistical analysis of astrometric measurements and
evaluating the problems of parameter estimation. The
Department maintains the International Card Catalog of
Photometric Binaries which consists of references and
bibliographic notes for over 3000 eclipsing binary stars.
Star Formation.-Theoretical studies emphasize the in-
fluences of thermodynamics, velocity fields, and interface
instabilities upon star formation. Observational studies
focus on investigating the properties of giant molecular
clouds and the evolution of newly born stars in isolated and




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