• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Message from Dean Matasar
 Table of Contents
 Highlights
 Broad curriculum supports career...
 Innovative and dedicated facul...
 Diverse and accomplished student...
 Meeting students' needs
 The University of Florida
 Welcome to Gainesville
 Academic calendar 1996-97
 Admissions information
 Application
 Administration
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00046
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00046
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Message from Dean Matasar
        Message from Dean Matasar
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Highlights
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Broad curriculum supports career choices
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Innovative and dedicated faculty
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Diverse and accomplished student body
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Meeting students' needs
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The University of Florida
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Welcome to Gainesville
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Academic calendar 1996-97
        Page 44
    Admissions information
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Application
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Administration
        Page 63
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text












i-f


378
Fhu
no.5
1996/97








.... the quality, size and

dlveMliy of the

law facelty allows

Florlda to offer one of the

nation's richest curriclums,

supporting tradtilonal

and contemporary

practice areas."



















A


University of Florida






George A. Smathers Librarie


Excitement. Opportunity. The chance to
move with an institution of innovation and
ambition. That's what attracted me to the
University of Florida College of Law. Like so
many of our applicants, I had to choose
between Florida and other schools. Thus, I feel
well-qualified, as a newcomer to the law
school, to share with you my reasons for
joining the faculty of Florida's premier law
school and for becoming a Gator.
First, Florida is among the select group of
U.S. law schools that offer academic
excellence across the board. Florida has the
breadth of the finest private schools, combined
with the student and faculty diversity,
comprehensive offerings, innovation and
affordability of the better public law schools.
Students make critical investment decisions in
choosing a law school. To me, that choice
necessitates getting a quality, broad-based
legal education, while not incurring back-


breaking debt. Florida meets both require-
ments better than most U.S. law schools.
Second, Florida has the good fortune to be
located, well, in Florida. The state's economy
is one of the fastest growing in the country,
and the College of Law contributes to and
benefits from that growth. Alumni are
leaders throughout the state in law, govern-
ment, education and business. Faculty
members are involved in such diverse areas
as state and national law reform, international
trade, environmental protection and
sustainable development. For students, that
means fresh perspectives in the classroom,
opportunities to develop contacts, and a
variety of career options.
Third, the law school is a major interna-
tional center. The practice of law, business and
government is global, and law schools are
measured by their worldwide involvement
and reputation.







Florida has the advantage of geographical
location, combined with decades of inter-
national involvement by faculty. Professors have
been consultants on political reforms in South
Africa, Uganda, and Central and Eastern Europe,
environmental reforms in South and Central
America, and trade issues such as NAFTA. The
college was the first in American legal education
to establish a program of Foreign Enrichment
Courses, which bring to campus preeminent law
professors and practitioners from around the
world to teach courses dealing with international
or comparative law topics. Students can reap
the benefits of international study without the cost
of studying abroad.
Fourth, the quality, size and diversity of the
law faculty allow Florida to offer one of the
nation's richest curriculums, supporting tradi-
tional and contemporary practice areas. The
practice of law in the next century will require
every lawyer to know the breadth of the law, but
will reward those who have developed depth as
well. Florida provides students with a wide array
of knowledge and experience plus opportunities
to develop areas of individual interest.
Fifth, the law school has a diverse student and
faculty population in terms of race, ethnicity,
gender and interest. Students come from
colleges and universities around the nation and
enter traditional and non-traditional careers in
Florida, throughout the Southeast and the nation,
and abroad.
And finally, Gainesville is a great place to live.
Money magazine's #1 ranking of the city in 1995
barely does justice to its beauty and wonderful
cultural life.
For me, the University of Florida College of
Law is a wonderful new home. I urge you to read
this prospectus carefully. It will familiarize you
with some of the many strengths, services and
rich traditions that make Florida a great place to
study law. I hope you will visit the campus and
learn more about why so many students (and
new deans!) have decided that Florida offers the
best combination of quality, opportunity and
affordability.



/ i, I' i d A. Matasar
Dean
Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor of Law


CONTENTS



2 Highlights

4 Broad Curriculum Supports Career Choices
SA Global Approach to Legal Education
A National Leader in Tax Law
Skills Training
Making an Impact on Social and Environmental Concerns
Comprehensive Library Resources Facilitate Learning

16 A Faculty of Innovative & Dedicated
Scholars

25 Diverse & Accomplished Student Body

29 Meeting Students' Needs
SStudent Affairs
SCareer Services
SFinancial Aid

40 The University of Florida

42 Welcome to Gainesville
SVisiting the Law School

44 Academic Calendar

45 Admissions Information & Application







The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color,
iiq ,,r, d,sjt ,ll ,q.ei, d.- iijl .l u ji rar.,i-i.* i r l.. r, ir, 1:..-.iicic l Oi:,-,ii r.. *r
affiliations, and veteran status.

Upor, i.4u- .c .:..: ,: jljb I ,r, I.: rr,i1. form at.
Please call the College of Law Admissions Office at (352) 392-2087.
ifu ,ni TDD phone access, call the Florida Relay Service at (800) 955-8771 (TDD).


College of Law Prospectus
The University Record
Volume XCI Series I Number 5 September 1996
The University Record (USPS 652-760) published six times a year in
March, April, August, September, September and November by the
University of Florida, Office of the University FPg-i; r.ar cad m i i u bl;. Iconr
Gainesville, Florida 32611-4000.
Second class postage paid at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Postmaster send address changes to:
Office of the University Registrar, Box 114000,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-4000.
The College of Law Prospectus has been adopted as a rule of the university pursuant to the provision of
Chapter 120 of the Florida Statutes. Addenda to the University Record Series, if any, are available from the
Office of the University Registrar Box 114000 University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611-4000.





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2 1996-97Prospectus


An Extraordinary Faculty. At
Florida, you have the opportunity to
study under the best. For example, you
can study Florida constitutional law under
one of the most successful former
l-c. kers of the state House of
Kcli-resentatives; international law under
the former chairman of Amnesty
International USA and alongside
lawyers from around the world
enrolled in Florida's graduate
program in comparative law. You
can study criminal law under the
author of the leading treatise on
L the subject; and environmental
law, women's and children's law,
and mediation under scholars on the
cutting edge of those specializations. A
faculty larger and more diverse than
those of most U.S. law schools gives you
unparalleled advantages for study,
research and career preparation.


Experts. You will interact with
experts whom state and national news
media turn to for commentary on a
variety of cases, including issues before
the U.S. Supreme Court, the U.S. Tax
Court, and the International Court of
Justice. Florida faculty are quoted in
major Florida newspapers and in leading
national media, such as National Public
Radio, The New York Times, The Wall
Street Journal, and CNN.
A Network of Mentors. Florida
law students benefit from one-on-one
contact with alumni mentors around the
state and nation, plus other opportuni-
ties to launch a career off the
accomplishments of distinguished
alumni and faculty. Together, Florida
alumni and faculty have helped build
the legal profession and, in fact, the State
of i l. iJ.,. through leadership in law,







government, education and business.
Each year, Florida graduates are featured
in publications recognizing the nation's
best lawyers, including The National Law
Journal and Best Lawyers in America.
Career Opportunities and
Contacts. A professional and highly
successful Career Services staff has
connections with employers throughout
Florida, the Southeast, and Washington,
D.C. Approximately 120 of those
employers among them law firms,
government agencies and corporations
- recruit on campus each fall and spring.
Graduates are employed in all 50 states
and in more than a dozen foreign
countries and U.S. territories.
First-Rate Communication
Training. The law school's nationally
recognized legal writing program hones
the skills that are most critical to success
in the legal profession. Unlike some other
schools, Florida develops students'
writing skills through writing
requirements in each year of law school.
Florida also was the first to develop a
required Legal Drafting program, which
has become a model at other schools.
Skills training in trial and appellate
advocacy also is first-rate, with many of
Florida's best practicing lawyers and
judges giving students hands-on training.
A Comprehensive Curriculum.
At Florida, you will gain knowledge of
the broad principles of American law,
plus exposure to popular areas of
specialization, such as sports law, media
law, children's law, intellectual
property law, tax law, and international
and comparative law. Florida's
comprehensive curriculum exposes
students to traditional and contempo-
rary practice areas, and provides the


SMART.
CIouce


flexibility to develop a niche in a
specialized area through electives and
advanced courses.
Friends for a Lifetime. You
will join a talented and ambitious student
body with diverse interests, ethnic
backgrounds, ages and experience.
Students have attended colleges and
universities throughout the nation and the
world. You will develop not only the
knowledge and skills you will need in
today's rapidly changing world, but the
friendships, professional colleagues, and
intellectual soul-mates that make law
study one of life's most rewarding and
empowering experiences. The network
of Gator lawyers truly is unique!


An Outstanding Community.
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The Untivereity of Florida

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1996-97Prospectus











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Academic Honors
The Juris Doctor degree is
awarded With Honors' to
students earning a 3.1 GPA
(or a 3.0 for students who
entered the college prior to
August 19951 on all work
attempted in the college.The
degree will be awarded "With
High Honors to students
who achieve a 3.5 GPA on all
work attempted in the col-
lege.
Order of the Coif. Florida is
one of a select group of law
schools with a chapter of the
Order of the Coif, the national
academic honor society for
law Students meeting the
requirements are eligible for
election at the conclusion of
their studies


One of the nation's richest J.D.
curriculums prepares students for a
broad range of traditional and
non-traditional legal careers. Since its
establishment in 1909, with an
emphasis on teaching excellence,
Florida has been educating the
leadership of the state in law,
business, education and govern-
ment. The college is accredited by
the American Bar Association and is
a member of the Association of
American Law Schools.
Florida's more than 100 courses
and 30 seminars offered each year
support a variety of practice areas
including:
* Administrative Law
* Business Law
* Criminal Law
* Entertainment, Art and Sports
Law
a Environmental and Land Use Law
Family Law
a Government Law
Health Law
Intellectual Property Law
International Law
Labor and Employment Law
Media Law
Mediation
Public Interest Law
Real Property Law
Probate and Trust Law
a Securities Law
Tax Law


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The three-year curriculum develops
students' analytical ability, knowledge of the
theory and practice of law, communications
skills, and an understanding of the codes of
responsibility and ethics that are central to the
practice of law. Students experience a
variety of teaching methods, including the
traditional "case" and "Socratic" methods, as
well as problems, simulations, role-playing,
videotaping, and computer-assisted
instruction.
After completing first-year requirements,
students can tailor their course load to their
interests and career plans.


Uni Hig;r [ fWitdu
1996-97 Pispectus
4


~





BROulumAD
urrkculum


Advanced Courses and Seminars.
Advanced courses in legal research, writing
and appellate advocacy, labor arbitration,
bankruptcy and debtor-creditor law create
opportunities for sequential learning, complex
problem solving, and development of
writing and drafting skills in small-group
settings.
Seminars (LAW 6936) allow close study
and research of a topic under the supervision
of a faculty member. Enrollment is limited to
15 students. Generally, students in a seminar
produce a "senior paper" to satisfy the senior
writing requirement. Approximately 35
seminars are offered each year on a broad
spectrum of topics.
Joint Degrees. A credit-sharing
agreement between the College of Law and
the Graduate School allows qualified J.D.
students to combine their legal studies with
graduate work, resulting in two degrees
earned in a reduced amount of time. Students
can earn both a J.D. and a master's degree
in accounting, business administration, mass
communications, political science/public
administration, sociology, or urban and
regional planning, or a Ph.D. in history or
psychology. Other degree combinations may
be developed. Joint degree students are not
eligible for the graduate course option.
Candidates must take both the LSAT and
the GRE or GMAT, and gain admission to both
the College of Law and the Graduate School.
Application deadlines vary among programs.
Contact the College of Law Student Affairs
Office and/or the Graduate School depart-
mental coordinator for deadline information.
After completing each first-year curriculum
separately, students complete the remaining
course work and writing requirements for
both degrees simultaneously. Students must
achieve a grade of "B" or higher in graduate


courses for credit toward the J.D., and a
grade of "C" or better in law courses for
credit toward the graduate degree. Only
credits, and not actual letter grades, can be
applied from one program to the other.
Students v ill earn a separate grade point
average for each degree, and must graduate
with both degrees in the same term.



J.D. Degree Requirements
Completion with a passing grade of courses
totaling at least 88 semester credit hours of which
at least 59 must have been completed in this law
school. No more than four of these credits can be
earned through co-curricular activities.With
permission of the Associate Dean for Students,
upon good cause shown, work not to exceed 29
semester hours taken at another ABA/AALS
accredited law school may be counted toward this
requirement.

Completion of the following courses with a grade
of"S"or better: Legal Research and Writing (LAW
5792), and Appellate Advocacy (LAW 5793).

Completion of the following courses with a passing
grade: Professional Responsibility and the Legal
Profession (LAW 6750) and Legal Drafting (LAW
6955).

Achievement of a 2.0 cumulative grade point aver-
age on all graded work attempted in the college.

a Fulfillment of prescribed course requirements.

Satisfaction of a residency requirement. ABA
Standard 305 requires a full-time course of study
extending over at least three academic years, with
a minimum of 10 credit hours per semester.
Students may earn no more than one semester of
residency credit by taking two summer sessions of
at least five credit hours each.

Completion of a seminar or advanced course.

Satisfaction of the senior writing requirement,
typically through enrollment in a seminar or
advanced course.


1996-97 Prospectus
5











Class Progression Schedule


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fehitth-& Wrig (2
I;nl.~PI


Id Semester (I
Required:
Civil Procedure (41
Constitutional Lay
Property (4)
Appellate Advocac-


[no re u




S egi strotion Pfi,,
Estates & Trusts,$i)' i
Evidence (4)

S4th Semester (7 credits)
Required:
Legal Drafting (2)
Professional Responsibility &
The Legal Professiorr(2)
Registration Priority:
-L-Corporations (3)
:4;- 1,'


L~gl-Research & Writing.(2)
Introduction to Law (1) ,.

Summer (6 out of)
Required:
CivxJProcedur
Constitutional i
Property (4) .

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3rd ster (10,; ,


Oistr'ation
mi ates & ~ Yi
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, ... Required: :&Eairr'Fl
a Legal Drafting (2)
". Professional Responsibility &
ThLgaProfession (--
.


* Students entering in the fall are not required to attend a summer term. However, a substantial curriculum,
which may include parts of the required course of study, is offered each summer. Typically, one-half of each
fall entering class attends the summer term.

** Registration priority courses are not required, but the faculty recommends them for the designated term.
Registration for these courses in any other term is subject to space availability.

** Students in the spring entering class are required to attend the first summer term following enrollment, and
to enroll in six credits of required courses. The particular courses will be all or part of three courses (Civil
Procedure, Constitutional Law, and Property), as determined each summer by the College of Law. The
remaining six credits of these courses not taken in the summer will be part of the students'required curriculum
in the following fall semester.


Uni9 7 Prospectusda
1996-97 Prospectus


I, ; -





BRFAOI


Second -and Third-year Electives


Administrative Law (3 credits)
.i Admiralty 12)
S Advanced Course in Labor Arbitration
S (2 or 3)
Advanced Legal Research I2)
Advanced Problems in Bankruptcy &
Debtor-Creditor Law (21
S Advanced Research,Writing &
Appellate Advocacy I 11
Advanced Research,Writing &
Appellate Advocacy II 2)
American Legal History 12 or 31
S Antitrust Law (31
S Business Organizations (2 or 3)
S Children's Law 12)
CivilClinic 19 fall/spring;6 summer)
lr Collective Bargaining & Labor
S Arbitration (2 or 3)
Commercial Paper 12 or 3)
Comparative Law (2 or 3)
S Conflict of Laws (31
S Constitutional Law II 12 or 31
S Constitutional Theory i2 or 3)
Corporate Finance &
Reorganization 13)
Corporate Taxation 13)
Corporations 131
Creditors' Remedies &
Bankruptcy 13 or 4)
Criminal Law Clinic 16)
Criminal Procedure: Adversary
System (31
Criminal Procedure Police &
Police Practices (3)
Criminal Procedure Survey (3)
Employment Discrimination 12 or 31
English Legal History 12)
Environmental Law: Control of Toxics.
Hazardous Waste & Governmental
Action 13 or 4)
Environmental Law.Water, Wetlands
& Wildlife 13 or 41
Estate Planning (2)
Estates & Trusts (3)
Evidence (14
Family Law 13)
Federal Courts (3)
Fiduciary Administration I (3)


Florida Constitutional Law 12)
Florida Administrative Law (2 or 31
Future Interests 12 or 3)
Immigration & Nationality Law
12 or 3)
Income Taxation 13 or 41
Income Taxation of Estates &
Trusts 12)
Independent Study I1 to 3)
Insurance 12 or 31
Intellectual Property Law 12 or 3)
International Business Law 12 or 3)
International Human Rights Law (3)
International Law (3)
International Law Journal 11
International Litigation &
Arbitration 12 or 3)
Interviewing & Counseling (2 or 3i
Interviewing, Counseling, &
Mediation 13 or 41
Interviewing, Counseling, &
Negotiation (3 or41
Journal of Law & Public Policy 11)
Labor Law 13 or 4)
Land Finance (3)
Land Use Planning & Control (3 or 41
Law & Psychiatry 12)
Law Review (11
Legal Accounting (21
Legal Counseling 121
Legal History Other Than
Common Law 12)
Legal Problems of Mass
Communication (2i
Local Government Law.Taxation
& Finance 12 or 3)
Media Law (2 or 31
Mediation & Other Dispute
Resolution Processes (2 or 31
Moot Court 11l
Negotiation (2 or 3)
Negotiation, Mediation & Other
Dispute Resolution Processes (3 or 4)
Partnership Taxation t2)
Political & Civil Rights (2 or 3)
Poverty Law 13)
Products Liability Law (2)


Public Sector Labor Relations (2 or 31
Race & Race Relations Law 12)
Remedies (2 or 3)
Sales (2 or 3)
Secured Transactions in Personal
Property 131
Securities Regulation 13)
Sports Law 13)
State & Local Taxation 12)
Taxation of Gratuitous Transfers 12 or 3)
Techniques of Growth Management (2)
Torts II (21
Trial Advocacy (31
Trial Practice (4)
Trial Team (1 or 2)
White Collar Crime (2 or 3)
Women & the Law (2 or 31
Workers'Compensation & Other
Employment Rights 2 or 31


Recent Seminars
(Law 6936)
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Art Law
Autonomouslnformal Lawmaking
Civil Rights of Children
Comparative Law: Introduction to
the Civil Code
Computers & the Law
Estates &Trusts
Federal Tax Law
Forensic Psychiatry & the Law
Franchise Enterprises
Growth Management
Historic Preservation Law
International Business Transactions
International Environmental Law
Law & Society ILaw & Morality)
Law, Ethics & Public Policy
National Security & Human Rights
Law
Police Brutality
Torts & Justice
Women & the Criminal Justice System


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A Global Approach to Legal Education


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Through programs offered on campus
and abroad, Florida law students gain
international experience and exposure and a
distinguishing edge in today's competitive
job market. Students benefit from decades of
international experience and involvement by
faculty in the areas of constitutional reform,
international trade, environmental protec-
tion, and human rights.
Florida was the first American law school
to provide J.D. students with international
experience and exposure without costly
travel through an innovative program of
Foreign Enrichment Courses offered on
campus. Each year, a dozen or more leading
professors, judges, attorneys and government
officials from around the world teach
courses dealing with timely international and
comparative law issues, such as government
reform in South Africa and international
financial crime. In recent years, visitors from


South Africa, Poland, Germany, Mexico,
England, Brazil, China and Guatemala have
shared their perspectives and experiences in
courses such as:
International Financial Crimes &
Asset Forfeiture
Commercial Law in Nations in
Transition
Current Issues & Developments in
the Law in South Africa
Comparative Criminal Law &
Criminal Procedure
Transboundary Environmental Issues
in the Americas
Comparative/International Land Use
& Environmental Law
Socialist Legal Systems in Transition
Comparative Private International
Law
Structuring Joint Ventures Abroad
Students and faculty also benefit from
faculty exchange programs with renowned
international institutions of law study,
including Johann Wolfgang Goethe University
in Frankfurt, Germany, the University of
British Columbia in Vancouver, British
Columbia, Canada, the University of
Montpellier in France, and the University of
Stellenbosch in South Africa.
The law school also offers ABA-approved
student exchanges with Leiden University,
Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, and the
University of Montpellier. The programs give
students the opportunity to enrich their
studies with legal and cultural experiences
abroad, while enriching the academic
atmosphere of the College of Law by
bringing international students to campus.


Uni ersff jgpida
1996-97 Prospectus
8


wn~~


* -
DE DRW


II





DRpuADI


Exploring Distant
Ports of Caffll

\\ 1-1c in V 1 l tic. ', n k .1.c1.-kcnjS ,>t 1 1' -' tr nlliii i .j [IJ J\ u -.11 IL IJ .pp, ItLiniit1c-', Y',tl pinC -)I'
n c rin- I l ,. -tuilcni_ -inc hi .ii Ic in Lt ilL-. CIC.ti' Cr'c
stud\ .ihr.id pri- .iti', in im !'re rcmi te point'.,
ai tLlidn h l ,-i i)lIbh hii .1,' B.ingmk.k, Thk ill._i Ainnm in lord.i n.
and K.iz.ikhli.in
Tile liniJd\ udial LItud. Ahbrid Prgram a:llho.i -'uidtcnl-,
u;cler 1nieriLain Bar ,i i-iri (n i idieline,. ii t i. n i I li,- Jui P
edtlLi._ilr ,n.il expi icn,- [ r- ti'ir n-nal_. and intcrcrie '.c icn I[-d_. ani
studv for uip iot) 1 ear'J it Ro rrn I.ar,, t ,h-,ol in th.it .ounr\ ,k
n is i l '.inica a iind p,-,',,ih s gMl .e- c cll.tah 11 inL u nl .LI .id n_1-1 iL s.i\v 1- T i
the -.kill, I nd w x cx-cri:nitc_ iaine llo .ire "\,.el 't.rh t i-e rl(rti i,:. m">Z. o
ddcliop t i In. ,r-m :n. c pnri ter.im nh ni.
lh : Coll::- e It' laI "+V I 0)'! .. '_)t 't,_,dt.1nt A1t.1n1" a.,.- t...I i ""-"
stLiidcni-, int de\ clri-.pin" in(tp n. l-n, [i k"r.i- i "t[id'. pro...r'-ic.i'. ai. inl
vaell j.a \\ ith enr bollmert ine ABs Pipr-,\ e i.d unimnier inud\ abio.hl t ,tIiei
pr. c, raini -. Ini'n r- \ oiherii r I '1, i, ., 11, ,)'k
Destination: Bangkok
For second-year student Ron Parks, studying at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok
is a step toward achieving his goal of becoming an Asian legal specialist. Fluent in Japanese, Ron Parks'independent
Parks studied and worked in Japan prior to law school. studies in Bangkok included
"This is a way to combine my hobbies and interests with my professional goals in inter- research into human rights
national law and business," Parks said. "I don't know about long term, but I'm excited about violations against ethnic
the prospect of working one or two years in Thailand. The individual study abroad Burmese military, including
program will push me back a semester, but with so many good lawyers in Florida, I need children he photographed at
to set myself apart." a refugee camp at the Thai-
At Florida, Parks said he was able to find support for his interests from faculty "who are Burmese border.
sympathetic and interested. I am amazed that so many UF professors have taught overseas,
and not just the international law professors."
Destination: Cairo and Amman
Karen Holland plans to spend her third year of law school at the \kcmtriec.,n i- i\ erit;,
in Cairo, Egypt, and at the University of Jordan in Amman, in preparation for a career with
the U.S. State Department or the Foreign Service.
"Government and private firms look for people with language skills and experience
overseas because they understand how things operate," Holland said.
In pursuing her interests, Holland says she is "constantly balancing the pressure to go
the traditional route versus going abroad. But travel abroad means gaining first-hand
knowledge of the region. I would take more tax courses if I were not going overseas, but
hopefully what I learn over there will compensate. Going abroad is a skills course for
international lawyers."
Uni of EJ da
1996-97 Prospectus
In pusuin her ntersts, ollad say sheis "onstat__ _______ __ ______fl_ g

















Master of Laws
in Comparative Law
The LL.M. in Comparative Law Program is
designed exclusively for graduates of foreign
law schools who want to enhance their
understanding of the American legal system.
The one-year program, which begins with an
"Introduction to American Law" course, builds
on the university's renowned international
studies programs and decades of
involvement by College of Law faculty in
international legal issues, including trade,
human rights, law revision, and constitutional
reform.
The LL.M. program allows a course of
study tailored to the needs and objectives of
each student, with individualized
counseling by the director and members of
the faculty and staff. For more information,
contact Distinguished Service Professor Roy
Hunt, LL.M. in Comparative Law Program,
University of Florida College of Law, 319
Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117643, Gainesville,
FL 32611-7643; telephone: (352)392-0082;
fax: (352)392-3005.
,.,.',&


Summer Study Abroad
in Montpellier, France
Recognizing the importance of providing
students with an education that transcends
state and national boundaries, Florida joint-
ly sponsors the only American summer law
program with the University of Montpellier in
France. Approved by the American Bar
Association, the program provides a dual
focus on comparative and international law,
and exploration of the law of the European
Community and the French Civil Law system.
Students study at France's oldest law college,
dating back to 1160, in classes taught in
English by UF and Montpellier professors.
Students experience a rich culture and can
take advantage of unique travel opportunities
throughout France and the European
Community.


Lawyers from around the
world enrolled in Florida's
LL.M. in Comparative Law
program add a global
perspective to J.D. classes.













1996-97 Prospectus
10


BRADiI,,





BR ulOAD.
.urrlmculum


A National Leader in Tax Law


Widely recognized as -
one of the nation's two --
best programs for the
advanced study of tax
law, Florida's Graduate
Tax Program is an inten-
sive one-year course of
study leading to the
degree of Master of Laws
(LL.M.) in Taxation.
Unlike many LL.M.
programs, Florida's tax
program is staffed almost Richard B. Stephens
exclusively by full-time
faculty and designed for
full-time degree candidates who are lawyers
planning to specialize in tax law. A full-time
faculty means a greater time commitment to
teaching and scholarly research, and greater
accessibility for students.
Florida's tax program attracts outstanding
students from throughout the United States,
and its graduates are employed by law firms,
accounting firms, industry and government
throughout the nation and abroad. Both fac-
ulty and students benefit from the
comprehensive tax collection housed in The
Richard B. Stephens Tax Research Center.


Tax Research Center

The Graduate Tax Program produces the
Florida Tax Review, an innovative scholarly
journal allowing timely publication of articles
dealing with contemporary federal and state
tax law and policy issues. LL.M. students
selected to work as student editors of the
Tax Review may receive graduate
assistantships. Additional assistantships are
available based on the needs of faculty.
Graduate assistants work an average of 10
hours per week on assigned projects and
receive compensation plus a partial tuition
waiver.
For more information,
contact the Graduate Tax
Program, University of Florida
College of Law, 320 Holland
Hall, P.O. Box 117627,
Gainesville, FL 32611-7627; L '
(352) 392-1081.


Lawrence Lokken, one of the nation's most respected
tax law scholars, holds Florida's Hugh F. Culverhouse
Eminent Scholar Chair in Taxation.


Uni&j da
1996-97Prospeldus











Student performances are videotaped for
critique in a number of skills courses.


Skills Training


The state of Florida is home to many of the
most prominent, active and skilled lawyers in
America, and a number of those lawyers and
judges are actively involved in the teaching and
practical skills training of UF law students
through a variety of courses.
Approximately 15 courses offer all students
opportunities to experience aspects of law
practice through various teaching methods,
including role playing, simulated trials, and
interaction with actual clients. Observation
and critique by lawyers, judges, professors
and classmates helps develop students'
lawyering and interpersonal skills and
improves their ability to "think on their feet."
Florida's skills courses include:
Appellate Advocacy
Civil Clinic
Collective Bargaining & Labor Arbitration
Criminal Law Clinic
Interviewing & Counseling
Interviewing, Counseling & Mediation
Interviewing, Counseling & Negotiation
Legal Counseling
Legal Drafting
Legal Research & Writing
Mediation & Other Dispute Resolution
Processes
Negotiation
a Negotiation, Mediation & Other Dispute
Resolution Processes
I Trial Advocacy
w Trial Practice


Because writing skills are of critical impor-
tance to success in the legal profession,
Florida develops those skills through required
courses in Legal Research and "\ ainl _
Appellate Advocacy, and a nationally
acclaimed Legal Drafting program. Students
further develop their research and writing
skills through a major writing requirement in
the third year.
Additional skills developed through
various courses include interviewing,
counseling, and alternative dispute resolution
skills.
Florida's clinical program, which includes
the Virgil Hawkins Civil Clinic and the
Criminal Clinic, allows students to gain
experience through representation of actual
clients within an academic framework.
Interns, who have completed at least 48
semester credit hours, are certified by the
Florida Supreme Court to practice law under
a supervising attorney. Both clinics include
a substantial classroom component.
Enrollment is limited to ensure close super-
vision, so students are encouraged to take
advantage of the many other opportunities for
practical experience.
Many students also experience aspects of
law practice through pro bono work for
organizations and agencies of their choice
around the state and nation and through
part-time jobs and summer internships.


1996-97 Prospectus
12


"Trial Practice was one of
the most positive experi-
ences I've had. Professor
Bennett and Judge Morris
offered advice and were
very encouraging. Also, I
don't think many students
realize the importance of
the Legal Research and
Writing program during
the firstyear. Those skills
are so important in clerk-
ing and for students who
want to practice law."

Geraldine L. Hogan
Class of'95





BRuADI


Making an Impact on Social
and Environmental Concerns

Florida students have opportunities to impact state, national and
international environmental and social policy by assisting in research
conducted by the Florida Center for Governmental Responsibility (CGR), housed
at the law school. Directed by former speaker of the Florida House of
Representatives Jon Mills, and staffed by eight lawyer-researchers, the
center has influenced more public policy decisions during the past 20 years than
any other organization of its nature and scope in the nation.
Research assistants and fellows have improved the lives of children and senior
citizens in Florida through state and privately funded projects on guardianship
training, health policy, juvenile justice, children's health, and poverty law. They
have participated in projects leading to the enactment of state environmental
policy relating to the Everglades and other sensitive areas. Internationally, CGR
has assisted local government officials in emerging democracies in Central
Europe, environmental organizations in Central America, and legal profession-
als, state officials and technical experts in Brazil.
A one-year fellowship, funded by The Florida Bar Interest on Trust Accounts,
provides qualified third-year law students with valuable clinical experience
through CGR. Fellows serve as interns in legal services and environmental
agencies.



Pro Bone Project
Representing an abused child in court, educating a family in need
about its legal rights, helping teenagers realize the consequences of
crime these are some of the ways Florida law students help the com-
munity while gaining hands-on experience.The Pro Bono Project match-
es the interests of student volunteers with the needs of a variety of local
services.
Experiences gained through the Pro Bono Project range from
researching, interviewing and legal drafting, to interacting with clients
and lawyers, and testifying in court. Students who complete 35 hours or
more of approved pro bono work receive recognition from the law
school.

Law student Chris Whitney, a volunteer with the
8th Judicial Circuit Teen Court program, helps
teen prosecutors prepare for an actual
misdemeanor trial involving their peers. The
program is one of many local pro bono
opportunities that help Florida law students
gain practical experience before graduation.


Center for Governmental
Responsibility
(352) 392-2237

Jon L. Mills
Professor of Law and
Director of Center for Governmental
Responsibility
B.A., Stetson University;
J.D., University of Florida

John Tucker
Associate Director
B.S., Stetson University;
J.D., University of Florida

Thomas T. Ankersen
StaffAttorney, Environmental Division
B.A., M.A., University of South Florida;
J.D., University of Florida

Richard Grayson
StaffAttorney, Social Policy Division
B.A., M.F.A., Brooklyn College, CUNY;
M.A., College of Staten Island, CUNY;
J.D., University of Florida


Richard Hamann
Associate in Law, Environmental Division
B.A., J.D. University of Florida

JoAnn Klein
Development Director
B.S., M.S., University of Southern Mississippi

Elizabeth McCulloch
Director, Social Policy Division
B.G.S., University of Michigan;
J.D., Duke University

Timothy E. McLendon
StaffAttorney, State and Local Government
A.B., Duke University;
J.D., University of Florida

Jeff Wade
Director, Environmental Division
B.A., University of Alabama;
M.Ed., J.D., University of Florida




1996-97 Prospectus
13





BRDI


Comprehensive Library Resources Facilitate Learning


Florida law students conduct research and
study in one of the three largest law libraries
in the Southeastern United States. The Legal
Information Center houses more than 560,000
volumes and extensive computer and
audio-visual resources. Teaching and serving
students is an extensive staff of law
librarians expert in the latest technological
advances in legal research.
The center has been a model since the
advent of computer-assisted legal research
and library automation. It was the first law
school library to acquire WESTLAW, the first
to offer both WESTLAW and LEXIS, and the
first to order LEGAL-TRAC, INFOTRAC and
WESTLAW's CD ROM service.
Among the earliest law libraries to join
OCLC, a national computer network, the
center offers access to 32 million titles held


by libraries throughout the world. The
center's legal and general databases provide
users with access to federal and state laws,
cases, periodicals, articles in the news media,
and background and peripheral material to
supplement most legal research. Eleven
professional staff members assist users with
legal research.
Computer services available to students
include a personal computer lab, plus
research areas with 62 WESTLAW and LEXIS
units, as well as a multi-station computer
hub in the library's reference area. Students
also have access to a collection of more than
90 CD ROMs containing a variety of infor-
mation. Additionally, law students, faculty
and staff may apply for individual WESTLAW
and LEXIS passwords for system use at the
law school or local residences.


Uni SMJSC~ofpida
1996-97 Pmospectus
144


"As a lawyer, most of your life
will be spent going to books
and researching material and
cases. Florida's law librarians
are invaluable because they
understand the library inside
and out. They help you find
information and understand
it, and they're always willing
to help."
Mario Perez
Student





BRuAD.u
Lurrlculum


The center's Media Services Department
provides academic support and maintains an
extensive videotape and optical disk library
of instructional programs. Videotape is used
widely in simulation courses to help students
develop and refine lawyering skills.
The Legal Information Center spans three
floors in Holland Hall. A separate Richard B.
Stephens Tax Research Center, which hous-
es the college's comprehensive tax collection
and another computer lab, is devoted to tax
research by students and faculty.
In addition, students and faculty are
encouraged to take advantage of the univer-
sity libraries' more than 3 millii' n volumes.


Several computer labs offer
students word processing
and on-line legal research
capabilities.


Legal Information Center
Circulation: (352) 392-0417 Service: (352) 392-0425


Grace W."Betty"Taylor
Clarence J. TeSelle Professor of
Law and Director of Legal
Information Center
A.B., M.A., Florida State
University;
J.D., University of Florida

Arthur R. Donnelly
Associate Director & Associate
Librarian
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia;
M.L.S., Ed.D.,Vanderbilt
University

Mark A. Bergeron
Assistant in Computer
Instruction and Operation
B.S.E.E., Auburn University

Margaret "Jean" Griffin
Bostwick
Associate Librarian & Head
Cataloger
B.S., University of Florida;
M.L.S., Florida State University


Brian T. Burns
Assistant in Media Instruction
B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University
of Pennsylvania

Mae M. Clark
University Librarian & Assistant
Director, Technical Services
B.A., Randolph-Macon
Women's College;
M.S., Simmons College

James W. Flavin
Assistant in Law Media
B.S.Br., M.Ed., University of
Florida;
M.L.S., Florida State University

Robert J. Munro
Librarian
A.B., Lynchburg College;
M.A., J.D., University of Iowa;
M.L.S., Louisiana State
University;
Ph.D., University of Florida


Susy Potter
Associate Librarian
B.A., University of Florida;
M.L.S., Florida State University

Rosalie M. Sanderson
University Librarian & Assistant
Director
for Computer Information
B.S.E., University of Central
Arkansas;
M.A., University of Arkansas,
Fayetteville;
M.L.S., University of California,
Berkeley;
J.D., University of Florida

Pamela D.Williams
Associate Librarian and
Assistant Director for Public
Services
B.A., J.D., University of Florida;
M.L.S., Florida State University


Uni Mj k /da
1996-97 Prospectus
15











Innovative and Dedicated


A larger and more diverse faculty than
those of most U.S. law schools gives Florida
students unparalleled advantages for study,
research and career preparation. Endowed
chairs and professorships have allowed
Florida to recruit and retain some of the
nation's leading law teachers. Additionally,
institutional recruitment practices have
produced an ethnically and racially diverse
faculty and student body.
Students study under nationally recog-
nized scholars in areas including mediation,
environmental law, socioeconomics, criminal
law, taxation, international law, state and
U.S. constitutional law, and family law.
Students benefit from the practical and
scholarly experiences of faculty, which carry
over to the classroom and to interactions
with individual students and student
organizations.
Professors frequently are sought after as
visiting scholars and consultants around the
nation and worldwide on issues ranging from
constitutional development and law reform,
to international trade, labor relations,
sustainable development of communities,


human rights, and historic preservation. They
are authors of some of the most widely used
legal textbooks and practitioners' manuals,
scholarly articles in leading U.S. legal journals,
and book chapters. During the past two years
alone, faculty published more than 100
articles, chapters and reviews, and more than
40 new or revised books.
Faculty members have been leaders of
the major organizations in American legal
education the Association of American
Law Schools (AALS), the American Bar
Association Section on Legal Education and
Admission to the Bar, and the Law School
Admission Council and are active in The
Florida Bar and myriad state, national and
international organizations. Faculty currently
or recently served as chair of Amnesty
International USA, co-founders of the Human
Rights and Peace Institute at Makerere
University in Uganda, director of the American
Section of the International Association of
Legal and Social Philosophy, vice president
of the Centre Internationale de Droit Compare
de L'Environment in Limoges, France, and
executive member of the International Society
for Labor Law and Social Security. State and
local service includes chairing the Florida
Supreme Court Rules Committee, service on
the Florida Bar Ethics Committee, and
serving as president of Florida Defenders of
the Environment.
The law faculty numbers 62, plus approx-
imately 30 lawyers working as legal writing
and clinical instructors, social policy and
environmental researchers, and law librarians.
Additionally, dozens of Florida's best known
trial lawyers and judges teach, lecture and
critique students in various courses.


16 1996-97Prospectus


"Discussing topics with
professors outside of class
has helped me feel part of
the college. I have found the
faculty to be approachable
and they have given me
positive feedback about my
ideas, which has helped build
my confidence."

-Alison Warren
Class of'95





DEDICfTED
Faculty


Faculty


Fletcher N. Baldwin Jr.
Sam T Dell Research Scholar, Professor of Law,
Director of UF Summer Law Program in
Montpellier, France
* A.B., J.D., University of Georgia; LL.M.,
University of Illinois; LL.M., Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Constitutional Law,
Political & Civil Rights, Criminal Procedure,
International Financial Crimes
* Florida faculty since 1962
Gerald T. Bennett
Professor of Law
* B.A., St. Bernard's College; M.A., Barry
College; J.D., University of Florida
* Teaching & Scholarship: Corporate & Securities
Law, Jurisprudence
* Florida faculty since 1977
Dennis A. Calfee
Professor of Law
* B.B.A., J.D., Gonzaga University; LL.M.,
University of Florida
* Teaching & Scholarship: Taxation
" Florida faculty since 1975
Bill F.Chamberlin
Joseph L. Brechner Eminent Scholar of Journalism,
Director of the Joseph L. Brechner Center for Freedom
of Information & Affiliate Professor of Law
* B.A., Ph.D., University of Washington; M.A.,
University of Wisconsin, Madison
* Teaching & Scholarship: Mass Media Law, First
Amendment Theory, Media Law Research
* Florida faculty since 1987
Stuart R.Cohn
Professor of Law
* B.A., University of Illinois; B.A., Oxford
University; LL.B., Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Corporate & Securities
Law, Jurisprudence
* Florida faculty since 1977
Charles W. Collier
Professor of Law & Affiliate Professor of Philosophy
* B.A., Reed College; M.A., M.Phil.,
Ph.D.,Yale University; J.D., Stanford University
a Teaching & Scholarship: Constitutional Law,
Jurisprudence, Legal Theory
* Florida faculty since 1986
Thomas F. Cotter
Assistant Professor of Law
* B.S., M.S, J.D., University of Wisconsin-
Madison
* Teaching & Scholarship: Civil Procedure,
Evidence, Intellectual Property, Law &
Economics
* Florida faculty since 1994
Phyliss Craig-Taylor
Assistant Professor of Law
* B.S., J.D., University of Alabama; LL.M.,
Columbia University
* Teaching& Scholarship:Property, Professional
Responsibility
* Florida faculty since 1995


Jeffrey Davis
Professor of Law
* B.S., University of California, Los Angeles; J.D.,
Loyola University, Los Angeles; LL.M.,
University of Michigan
* Teaching & Scholarship: Contracts, Bankruptcy
* Florida faculty since 1981
George L. Dawson
Associate Dean forAcademic Affairs &
Professor of Law
* A.B., Princeton University; J.D., University of
Chicago
* Teaching& Scholarship: Commercial
Paper, Contracts, Estates & Trusts
* Florida faculty since 1981
Nancy E. Dowd
Professor of Law
* B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A.,
University of Illinois; J.D., Loyola University of
Chicago
* Teaching& Scholarship: Contracts, Family Law,
Employment Discrimination, Women & the
Law, Torts
* Florida faculty since 1989
Wendy A. Fitzgerald
Associate Professor of Law
* B.A., Reed College; M.A., University of
Virginia; J.D., University of Montana
* Teaching & Scholarship: Corporate Law, Family
Law, Children's Law
* Florida faculty since 1991
Alyson Craig Flournoy
Professor of Law
SB.A., Princeton University; J.D., Harvard
University
" Teaching & Scholarship: Environmental Law,
Property
* Florida faculty since 1988
Michael K. Friel
Associate Dean, Director of Graduate Tax Program &
Professor of Law
* B.A., J.D., Harvard University; LL.M., New York
University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Taxation
* Florida faculty since 1986
Mandell Glicksberg
Professor of Law Emeritus
* B.A., J.D., University of Florida; LL.M., New
York University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Property
* Florida faculty since 1953
Michael W. Gordon
Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law
* B.S., LL.B., University of Connecticut; M.A.,
Trinity College; Maestria en Derecho,
Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico
* Teaching & Scholarship: Corporate Law,
International Business Transactions,
Comparative Law, International Litigation
* Florida faculty since 1968


"Everyone has this image
that they're going to be
belittled in class if their

answer isn't right on target.
But it seems most profes-
sors try to lead you to the
answer."
-Jerry Duignan
Student


Uni ONE gjjida
1996-97 Prospectus 17






















Visiting Professors/Scholars

Florida faculty members have served as visiting professors and scholars
at U.S.and foreign law schools, including those with which Florida has
established foreign exchange programs (*).


U.S. Law Schools
American University
Arizona State University
University of Baltimore
Brigham Young University
University of California,
Berkeley
University of California, Davis
University of California, Hastings
California Western
University of Colorado
Cornell University
University of Denver
Duke University
Emory University
George Washington University
Harvard University
University of Hawaii
Urni' crril of Illinois
University of Kansas
Louisiana State University
University of Michigan
University of Minnesota
Lni-. r-ir\ of Nebraska
New York University
Uini'. cl-i[ of North Carolina
Northwestern University
Rutgers University
University of San Diego
[.infc rd University
Stetson University
The University of Texas
University of Virginia
University of Washington
West Virginia University


Foreign Law Schools
Australia: Monash University,
Murdoch University, University
of Western Australia
Belgium: University of Louvain
Canada: University of British
Columbia*
China: Peking University
Costa Rica: National University
of Costa Rica
England: Cambridge University,
University of London, Oxford
University
Ethiopia: Haile Sellassie I
University
France: University of Limoges,
University of Montpellier,*
University of Strasbourg
Germany: Johann Wolfgang
Goethe University,* University
of G6ttingen, University of
Konstanz
Italy: Bellagio Institute
Malaysia: University of Malaya
Netherlands: Leiden University
New Zealand: University of
Aukland
Poland: Polish Academy of
Sciences, University of Warsaw
South Africa: University of
Capetown, University of Natal,
University of Stellenbosch*
South Korea: Seoul National
University
Uganda: Makerere University
Ukraine: Kiev University


Jeffrey L. Harrison
Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law
* B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D.,University of Florida; J.D.,
University of North Carolina
* Teaching &Scholarship: Antitrust, Contracts
* Florida faculty since 1983
Richard H. Hiers
Professor of Religion & Affiliate Professor of Law
" B.A., B.D., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D.,
University of Florida
* Teaching & Scholarship:Law, Ethics &
Public Policy
* Florida faculty since 1961
David M. Hudson
Professor of Law
* B.S., Wake Forest University; J.D., Florida State
University; LL.M., University of Florida; LL.M.,
University of London
* Teaching & Scholarship: Taxation,
Immigration Law
* Florida faculty since 1976
Roy Hunt
Distinguished Service Professor of Law
& Director of LL.M. in Comparative Law
* B.A., Vanderbilt University; J.D., University of
Mississippi; LL.M., Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: International Law,
Conflict of Laws, Intellectual Property, Historic
Preservation, Art Law
* Florida faculty since 1962
Thomas R. Hurst
Professor of Law
* A.B., University of Wisconsin; J.D., Harvard
University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Corporate Law,
Contracts, Corporate Finance
* Florida faculty since 1974
Jerold H.Israel
Ed Rood Eminent Scholar
in Trial Advocacy & Procedure
* B.B.A., Western Reserve University; LL.B., Yale
University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Criminal Procedure
* Florida faculty since 1992
Michelle S. Jacobs
Associate Professor of Law
* A.B., Princeton University; J.D., Rutgers
University
* Teaching &Scholarship: Criminal Law, Criminal
Litigation, Criminal Clinic
" Florida faculty since 1993


1996-97 Prospectus
ia


~


DEDICIIED






















"The ability to write well is extremely important to
a law student and in the practice of law. I am
pleased that Florida has been a leader in
formulating and implementing extensive
writing programs."
Professor Joseph W. Little



Julian C.Juergensmeyer
Gerald Sohn Research Scholar, Professor of Law &
Affiliate Professor of Urban &
Regional Planning
* A.B., J.D., Duke University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Land Use Planning Law,
Property, International Environmental Law
* Florida faculty since 1969
Elizabeth T. Lear
Professor of Law
* B.A., University of North Carolina; J.D.,
University of Michigan
* Teaching & Scholarship: Criminal Law, Federal
Practice, Civil Procedure
* Florida faculty since 1990
Jeffrey E. Lewis
Dean Emeritus & Professor of Law
* B.A., J.D., Duke University
* Teaching& Scholarship: Civil Procedure,
Evidence, Remedies
* Florida faculty since 1972
Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky
Assistant Professor of Law
* B.A., Texas A&M University; J.D., University of
Texas
* Teaching& Scholarship: Torts, Professional
Responsibility, Jurisprudence
* Florida faculty since 1994
Stephen A. Lind
Professor of Law
* A.B., J.D., University of California, Berkeley;
LL.M., New York University
* Teaching& Scholarship: Taxation
* Florida faculty since 1970
Joseph W. Little
Professor of Law & Alumni Research Scholar
* B.S.M.E., Duke University; M.S.M.E., Worcester
Polytechnic Institute; J.D., University of
Michigan
* Teaching & Scholarship: Local Government Law,
Workers' Compensation, Torts, U.S. & Florida
Constitutional Law
* Florida faculty since 1967


Lawrence Lokken
Hugh F. Culverhouse Eminent Scholar in Taxation
* B.A., Augsburg College; J.D., University of
Minnesota
* Teaching & Scholarship: Taxation
* Florida faculty from 1974-82 and since 1994
Pedro A. Malavet
Assistant Professor of Law
* B.B.A., Emory University; J.D., LL.M.,
Georgetown University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Comparative Law, Civil
Law, Civil Procedure, European Union
* Florida faculty since 1995
Amy R. Mashburn
Professor of Law
* B.A., Eckerd College; J.D., University of Florida
* Teaching& Scholarship: Civil Procedure,
Professional Responsibility, Administrative Law
* Florida faculty since 1990
Richard A. Matasar
Dean and Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor of Law
* B.A., J.D., University of Pennsylvania
* Teaching & Scholarship: Civil Procedure,
Constitutional Litigation, Federal Jurisdiction,
Trial Advocacy
* Florida faculty since 1996
Diane H. Mazur
Assistant Professor of Law
* B.A., State University of New York at
Binghamton; M.S., Pennsylvania State
University; J.D., University of Texas
* Teaching &Scholarship: Evidence, Corporations
* Florida faculty since 1994
Francis T. McCoy
Professor of Law
* A.B., M.A., J.D., University of Florida
* Teaching &Scholarship: Admiralty, Legal
History, Family Law
* Florida faculty since 1956
Michael J. Millender
Assistant Professor of Law & History
* Education: B.A., Duke University; B.A., Oxford
University; Ph.D. Princeton University
* Teaching& Scholarship: American
Legal history
* Florida faculty since 1996
C. Douglas Miller
Professor of Law
* B.S., J.D., University of Kansas; LL.M., New
York University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Estates & Trusts, Estate
Planning, Sports Law, Taxation
" Florida faculty since 1973


DEDICIEDy
Faculty


1996-97Prospectus 19





DEDICfIED


Jon L. Mills
Professor of Law & Director of Center for
Governmental Responsibility
* B.A., Stetson University; J.D., University of
Florida
* Teaching & Scholarship: Florida Constitutional
Law, Environmental Law, Legislative Drafting
* Florida faculty from 1973-80 and since 1988
Robert B. Moberly
Professor of Law
* B.S., J.D., University of Wisconsin
* Teaching & Scholarship: Labor Law, Negotiation,
Mediation, Collective Bargaining & Arbitration
* Florida faculty since 1977
Robert C.L. Moffat
Professor of Law
* B.A., M.A., LL.B., Southern Methodist
University; LL.M., University of Sydney,
Australia
* Teaching & Scholarship: Jurisprudence, Criminal
Law, Law & Society, Law & Public Policy
* Florida faculty since 1966
Winston P. Nagan
Professor of Law & Affiliate Professor of Anthropology
* B.A., University of South Africa; B.A., M.A.,
Oxford University; LL.M., M.C.L., Duke
University; J.S.D., Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Conflict of Laws,
International Law, Human Rights,
Jurisprudence
* Florida faculty since 1975
James C. Nicholas
Professor of Urban & Regional Planning &Affiliate
Professor of Law
* B.B.A., M.A., University of Miami; Ph.D..
University of Illinois
* Teaching & Scholarship: Growth Management
* Florida faculty since 1985
Lars Noah
Assistant Professor of Law
* A.B., J.D., Harvard University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Administrative Law,
Conflict of Laws. Food & Drug Law, Products
Liability, Torts
* Florida faculty since 1994
Kenneth B. Nunn
Professor of Law
* A.B., Stanford University; J.D., University of
California, Berkeley
* Teaching & Scholarship: Criminal Law &
Procedure, Race Relations
* Florida faculty since 1990
Michael A. Oberst
Professor of Law
* B.S.B.A., J.D., University of Florida
* Teaching& Scholarship: Taxation
* Florida faculty since 1979


Richard N. Pearson
Cone, Wagner, Nugent, Johnson, Hazouri & Roth
Professor of Law Emeritus
* B.B.A., University of Michigan; LL.B., Boston
University; LL.M., Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Torts, Insurance,
Remedies, Products Liability
* Florida faculty since 1981
Juan F. Perea
Professor of Law
* B.A., University of Maryland; J.D., Boston
College
* Teaching& Scholarship: Constitutional Law,
Employment Law
* Florida faculty since 1990
Don Peters
Professor of Law
* B.A., University of Northern Iowa: J.D.,
University of Iowa
* Teaching& Scholarship: Virgil Hawkins Civil
Clinic, Mediation, Negotiation, Interviewing,
Counseling, Civil Procedure, Civil Litigation
* Florida faculty since 1973
James R. Pierce
Professor of Law
* B.A., J.D., University of Florida
* Teaching & Scholarship: Trial Practice, Trial
Advocacy, Evidence, Criminal Clinic
* Florida faculty since 1968
Charles R.P. Pouncy
Assistant Professor of Law
* B.A., Fordham University; J.D., Cornell
University; LL.M., Temple University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Banking Law,
Corporations, Professional Responsibility
* Florida faculty since 1995

Walter Probert
Cone, Wagner, Nugent, Johnson, Hazouri & Roth
Professor of Law Emeritus
* B.S., J.D., University of Oregon; J.S.D., Yale
University
" Teaching& Scholarship: Torts, Jurisprudence
* Florida faculty since 1959
James C. Quarles
Professor of Law
* B.A., J.D., University of Virginia
* Teaching & Scholarship: Constitutional Law,
Criminal Law
* Florida faculty since 1969
David M. Richardson
Professor of Law
* B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; LL.B.,
Columbia University; LL.M., New York
University
* Teaching & Scholarship:: Taxation
* Florida faculty since 1984


Uni & fda
1996-97 Prospectus
20































"The law school is more than just classrooms. We are
a community composed of students, faculty, admin-
istrators and staff Professors are a valuable mentor-
ing resource for students, because we have been
through most of the same experiences students are
going through."
-Professor Stuart R. Cohn


Sharon E. Rush
Professor of Law
* B.A., J.D., Cornell University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Constitutional Law,
Civil Procedure, Federal Courts, Feminist
Jurisprudence, Fourteenth Amendment
* Florida faculty since 1985
Michael L.Seigel
Professor of Law
* A.B., Princeton University; J.D., Harvard
University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Evidence, Criminal Law,
Professional Responsibility, Federal Criminal
Law
* Florida faculty since 1990
Christopher Slobogin
Associate Dean for Faculty Development,
Alumni Research Scholar, Professor of Law
& Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry
* A.B., Princeton University; J.D., LL.M.,
University of Virginia
* Teaching & Scholarship: Law & Psychiatry,
Criminal Law & Procedure, Evidence,
Professional Responsibility, Social Science
& Law
* Florida faculty since 1982
David T. Smith
Professor of Law
* B.A., Yale University; J.D., Boston University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Fiduciary
Administration, Future Interests
* Florida faculty since 1968


Grace W."Betty"Taylor
Clarence J. TeSelle Professor of Law & Director of
Legal Information Center
* A.B., M.A., Florida State University; J.D.,
University of Florida
* Teaching & Scholarship: Computers & the Law
* Florida faculty since 1962
Mary Poe Twitchell
Professor of Law
* B.A., Hollins College; M.A., University of North
Carolina, Chapel Hill; J.D., University of
Florida; LL.M., Yale Law School
* Teaching & Scholarship: Civil Procedure, Federal
Practice
* Florida faculty since 1982
Walter O.Weyrauch
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair & Professor of Law
* Musterschule, German Gymnasium, Frankfurt,
Germany, Abitur; Universities of Freiburg &
Frankfurt, Germany, First Examination in Law
(Referendar); Second Examination in Law
(Assessor Capacity for Judicial Office); Dr.
Jur., University of Frankfurt; LL.B., Georgetown
University; LL.M., Harvard University; J.S.D.,
Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Business Organizations,
Comparative Law, Family Law, Legal
Counseling
* Florida faculty since 1957
Winton E.Williams
Professor of Law
* B.B.A., Tulane University; LL.B., University of
Mississippi; LL.M., Yale University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Creditors' Remedies &
Bankruptcy, Secured Transactions in Personal
Property, Sales
* Florida faculty since 1969
Steven J.Willis
Professor of Law
* B.S., J.D., Louisiana State University;
LL.M., New York University
* Teaching & Scholarship: Taxation
* Florida faculty since 1981


UniW&Wda
1996-97Prospectus
21


DEDICATED
-Faculty





DEDICJIED,


Criminal Clinic
& Virgil Hawkins Civil Clinic
Gregg A. Anderson
Adjunct Lecturer & Assistant Public Defender, 8th
Judicial Circuit
B.S., Ferris State College; J.D., University of
Florida
Gerald T. Bennett
Professor of Law
B.A., St. Bernard's College; M.A., Barry College;
J.D., University of Florida
Iris A. Burke
Clinical Lecturer
B.A., Brooklyn College; J.D., Brooklyn Law
School
Jeff Grater
Clinical Lecturer
B.A., J.D., University of Florida
Michelle S.Jacobs
Associate Professor of Law
A.B., Princeton University; J.D., Rutgers
University
Stacey L. Myers
Clinical Lecturer & Assistant State Attorney,
8th Judicial Circuit
B.S., J.D., University of Florida
Don Peters
Professor of Law
B.A., University of Northern Iowa;
J.D., University of Iowa
James R. Pierce
Professor of Law
B.A., J.D., University of Florida

Peggy Schrieber
Clinical Lecturer
B.A., J.D., University of Florida


Legal Research
and Writing
Instructor
Betsy Ruff


Legal Research & Writing
HenryT.Wihnyk
Director of Research & Writing & Appellate Advocacy
B.A., Florida Atlantic University; J.D., Nova
University; LL.M., Columbia University
Alison Eckles Gerencser
Assistant Director & Lecturer
B.A., Purdue University; M.A., J.D., University of
Florida

Leanne J. Pflaum
Assistant Director & Lecturer
B.D., University of Florida; J.D., Florida State
University
Teresa J. Rambo
Assistant Director & Lecturer
B.A., University of Florida; J.D., University of
Santa Clara
Betsy L. Ruff
Assistant Director & Lecturer
B.A., J.D., University of Florida
Nancy T. Savage
Assistant Director & Lecturer
A.B., Princeton University: M.A., Graduate
Theological Union, Berkeley; J.D., Western New
England College
Patricia A.Thomson
Assistant Director& Lecturer
B.A., Hollins College; J.D., University of Florida


Legal Drafting
Anne Rutledge
Director
B.S., Bucknell University; Ed.M., M.C.R.P., J.D.,
Rutgers University
Margaret Emanuel-McLaughlin
Lecturer
B.A., J.D., Wake Forest University
Joseph S.Jackson
Lecturer
A.B., Princeton University; J.D., University of
Florida
Lynn McGilvray-Saltzman
Lecturer
B.A., George Mason University; J.D., University
of Florida


Uni WWda
1996-97Prospectus
22





DEDICTEDy
-aculty


Internationally renowned legal scholar
Walter O. Weyrauch holds Florida's
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair


Adjunct Faculty
Kenneth G. Anderson
Private Practice, Jacksonville
Stephan P. Mickle
Judge, 1st District Court of Appeal, Tallahassee
Robert P. Smith
Private Practice, Tallahassee
Former ChiefJudge, 1st District Court ofAppeal


Trial Practice Instructors
Robert P. Cates
Circuit Judge, 8th Judicial Circuit
William P.Cervone
Assistant State Attorney, 8th Judicial Circuit
Chester B. Chance
Circuit Judge, 8th Judicial Circuit
Craig DeThomasis
Private Practice, Gainesville
Thomas J. Farkash
Private Practice, Gainesville
Jack J. Fine
Private Practice, Gainesville
Robert S.Griscti
Private Practice, Gainesville
John J.Kearns
Chief Assistant Public Defender, 8th Judicial Circuit
Bradley E. King
State Attorney, 5th Judicial Circuit
Phyllis D. Kotey
Assistant State Attorney, 8th Judicial Circuit
Gregory P. McMahon
Assistant State Attorney, 8th Judicial Circuit
Stan Morris
Circuit Judge, 8th Judicial Circuit
James P. Nilon
Assistant State Attorney, 8th Judicial Circuit
Carl B. Schwait
Private Practice, Gainesville
Peter K.Seig
Alachua County Judge, 8th Judicial Circuit
Jeanne M. Singer
Assistant State Attorney, 8th Judicial Circuit
Rodney W. Smith
State Attorney, 8th Judicial Circuit


Endowed Chain and
Prof sonhlps
Endowed chairs and professorships have
allowed Florida to recruit and retain some
of the nation's leading legal scholars.
Through the generous support of alumni
and friends, the following endowments have
been established.
Chairs
George J."Duke"Baya Fund
Hugh F.Culverhouse Eminent Scholar Chair
in Taxation
Huber C. Hurst Eminent Scholar Chair
Richard E. Nelson Eminent Scholar Chair in
Local Government Law
Stephen C.O'Connell Chair
Ed Rood Eminent Scholar Chair in Trial
Advocacy & Procedure

Professorships
Michael A. Bedke Professorship
Warren M.& Dorothy C. Cason Professorship
Cone,Wagner, Nugent, Johnson, Hazouri &
Roth Professorship
Sam T. Dell Research Scholar
Levin, Mabie & Levin Professorships
R.W. Payne Jr. Research Scholar
Marcus Aurel Rosin Memorial Professorship
T.Terrell Sessums Sr. Research Scholar
Chesterfield Smith Professorships
William Reece Smith Jr. Professorships
William Reece Smith Jr. Professorship of
Legal Ethics & Professional Responsibility
Gerald Sohn Research Scholar
Clarence J.TeSelle Professorship
Stephen N.Zack Research Scholar
in Legal Ethics


Uni NO' 4 da
1996-97 Prospectus
23





DED'CiLaD,


Visiting Faculty and Lecturers
Following is a partial list for 1996-97:
Donna Adler
University of Mississippi
Neil Andrews
Churchill College, Cambridge, England
Ellen Margrethe Basse
University of Aarhus, Arhus, Denmark
Patricia Dilley
Seattle University
H.J. Erasmus
University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa
Thomas Kadner
Humboldt-Universitat, Berlin, Germany
Bruce A. McGovern
Graduate Tax Program
Jerzy Modrzejewski
Warsaw University, Warsaw, Poland
Diane Tomlinson
Private Practice, Gainesville
Claudia Wright
Private Practice, Jacksonville
Raymond Young
Private Practice, Vancouver, Canada


Emeritus
Francis A. Allen
Huber C. Hurst Eminent Scholar Emeritus

Gertrude Block
Lecturer Emeritus
Marshall M. Criser
University of Florida President Emeritus & Professor of
Law Emeritus
Dexter Delony
Professor of Law Emeritus
James J. Freeland
Distinguished Service Professor of Law Emeritus
Kenneth B. Hughes
Professor of Law Emeritus
Ernest M. Jones
Professor of Law Emeritus
Robert T.Mann
Professor of Law Emeritus
Michael J. Moorhead
Professor of Law Emeritus
FrankT. Read
Dean Emeritus
Anne L. Spitzer
Associate Professor of Law Emeritus
W. Scott Van Alstyne Jr.
Professor of Law Emeritus
Peter Ward
Professor of Law Emeritus






Associate Professor
Michelle Jacobs is one of
nine lawyers teaching and
supervising students
enrolled in Florida's
Criminal and Civil Clinics,
where students gain
experience through work
on actual classes.


1996-97 Prospectus
24

















Florida law students inherit a distinguished
legacy of alumni leadership in the bar, the
judiciary, state and federal legislatures,
business and education. No other state or law
school has produced as many presidents of
the American Bar Association in the past 20
years. In Florida, approximately one-fourth of
all practicing lawyers are graduates of the
College of Law. The college also has
graduated 29 of 47 Florida Bar presidents
and dozens of state and federal judges.
With approximately six candidates
applying per available seat, the College of Law
maintains a diverse and well-qualified student
body. Florida law students come from
throughout Florida, the United States and
many foreign countries, from all social and
economic sectors, and with a wide array of
experience and interest. The median LSAT
score and undergraduate grade point average
of a traditional fall class are approximately
159-160 and 3.5 (4.00 scale) respectively;
and approximately 156 and 3.4 for the spring
entering class.
The student body numbers approximately
1,200 full-time J.D. students, plus about 60


lawyers enrolled in the Graduate Tax
Program, and up to 20 foreign lawyers in the
LL.M. in Comparative Law program. The
student body is approximately 15 percent
black and more than six percent Hispanic.
Women comprise nearly half of the student
population.
Florida law students make a positive
difference on campus and in the local com-
munity. They establish, and participate in, a
variety of law school organizations, while
developing valuable skills that will serve
them well after graduation.


"The Small Group Adviser Program allowed
me to meet some people right away and it
was nice to see familiar faces when I'd come
to school in the morning."
Jerry Duignan
Student


1Uni9967 P s jd
1996-97 Pro spectus 25



























Co-curricular Organizations
Students earn credit and gain experience
with a variety of legal skills through work in
the following organizations. Participation is
based on academic achievement, writing
skills and/or open competitions.
Florida Law Review. The student-edited
Florida Law Review contains articles by legal
scholars expert in various areas of the law,
and works by student members.
Florida Journal of International Law. The
student-edited Florida Journal of Inter-
national Law publishes scholarly works by
students, professors and practitioners on
public and private international law topics.
University of Florida Journal of Law &
Public Policy. Published by law and business
students, the Journal ofLaw & Public Policy
is devoted to considering the public policy
implications of legal issues. Outside experts
read and evaluate manuscripts.
Justice Campbell Thornal Moot CourtTeam.
The Moot Court Team, named in honor of the
late Florida Supreme Court justice and
devoted alumnus, participates in intramural,
state and national appellate competitions
sponsored by organizations and law firms.
Trial Competition Team. The Trial Team
competes in intramural, state, regional and
national competitions sponsored by
individuals, groups and law firms.


The American Bar Association Law Student Division
selected Florida's student bar groups as the best in the
nation at its 1996 national conference in Orlando.
Florida's student-produced newsletter, The Docket, and
its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program also were
named the best in the country. Florida students
accepting the awards were Jim Nolan, right, student bar
association president; Fred Mundie, national VITA
chairman; andABA Chapter President Tammie Rattray.


Extracurricular Organizations
ABLE (Association for a Barrier-Free
Legal Environment)
American Bar Association/Law Student
Division
Asian- and Pacific-American Law
Student Association
Association for Public Interest Law
Association of Trial Lawyers of America
Black Law Student Association
Christian Legal Society
Corporate Law Society
Council of Ten
Criminal Law Association
Entertainment, Art and Sports Law
Society
Environmental Law Society
The Federalist Society
Florida Intellectual Property Group
Health and Law Association
Information Highway and Computer
Law
Intellectual Property Group
International Law Society
Jewish Law Students Association
John Marshall Bar Association
Journal of Technology Law & Policy
Law Association for Women
Law College Council
Law School Democrats
Law School Republicans
Mediation and Negotiation Association
Outlaw
Peer Counselors
Phi Alpha Delta
Phi Delta Phi
Real Property Group
Spanish American Law Students
Association
UMOJA Law Journal
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance


Uni 7Prospec dus
206 1996-97 Prospectus






TALEFflfJD.ts


Book Awards
Individuals and law firms have established book awards in the fol-
lowing courses to honor outstanding students:


Administrative Law
Cummings, Lawrence &
Vezina
Admiralty
N Fowler, White, Gillen,
Boggs, Villareal & Banke
Antitrust Law
G. Hunter Gibbons
Business Organizations
Emmanuel, Sheppard &
Condon
Civil Clinic
Patrick S. Cousins & Turhan
E. Robinson
Civil Procedure
Akerman, Senterfitt &
Eidson
Roy B. "Skip" Dalton Jr.
Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell
Warner, Fox, Seeley,
Dungey & Sweet
Commercial Paper
C. Randolph Coleman
Constitutional Lawr
Patrick E. Geraghty
Kenneth R. Johnson &
Kimberly L. Johnson
Bill Sadowski Memorial
(Established by the Class of
1969)
Consumer Law
J. Gordon Blau (Established
by J. Gordon & Leslie A.
Blau)
Contracts
Andrew C. Hall & James A.
Hauser
Hartley & Wall
Robert L. Trohn
Corporate Finance &
Reorganization
Jeffrey W. Warren
Corporations
Foley & Lardner
Gray, Harris & Robinson
Rosin, Abel & Band
Criminal Law'
Turner & Griscti
Environmental Law
Coll, Davidson, Carter,
Smith, Salter & Barkett
Environmental Law
Evan J. Yegelwel in Honor
of Professor Roy Hunt


Estate Planning
* Jones, Foster, Johnston &
Stubbs
Estates & Trusts
* Dean Henry A. Fenn
Memorial (Established by
Thomas C. Cobb)
Ralph H. Martin
(Established by an
Anonymous Donor)
James G. Pressly Jr.
Evidence
* Gray, Harris & Robinson
* Samuel J. Powers Jr.
Memorial (Established by
Blackwell & Walker)
Family Law
* James P. O'Flarity
Federal Courts
* Mathews, Smith & Railey
Fiduciary Administration
* James G. Pressly Jr.
Florida Constitutional Law
E Governor C. Farris Bryant
(Established by Bryant,
Miller & Olive)
Income Taxation
King & Spalding
Insurance
Pyszka, Kessler, Massey,
Weldon, Catri,
Holton & Douberley
Intellectual Property Law
Lott & Friedland
International Business Law
John C. Bierley (Endowed)
Land Finance
University of Florida Law
Review (Established by
Linda Ebin)
Land Use Planning & Control
Cummings & Lockwood
Legal Counseling
Earl Drayton Farr Jr.
(Established by Farr, Farr,
Emerich, Sifrit, Hackett &
Carr)
Local Government Law,
Taxation & Finance
John C. Dent Jr.
Mediation & Other Dispute
Resolution Processes
Cobb Cole & Bell


Negotiation & Dispute
Settlement
* Roy R. Watson II
Professional i... -,.. .,;. i./,a, &
The Legal Profession
* Robert J. Beckham
* Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault
& Pillans
Hill, Ward & Henderson
Orlando Alumni Council
Property
Russell W. Divine
(Established by Russell W.
and Janice Jolly Divine)
Professor Emeritus Mandell
Glicksberg (Established by
Andrew C. Hall and James
A. Hauser; Endowed by
Alumni)
: Gunster, Yoakley, Valdes-
Fauli & Stewart
Ruden, Barnett, McClosky,
Smith, Schuster & Russell
Remedies
Hillarey A. McCall
Securities Regulation
Glenn W. Sturm
Taxation
Barnett, Bolt, Kirkwood &
Long
Taxation of Gratuitous
Transfers
Richard B. Stephens
Memorial (Established by
an Anonymous Donor)
Torts
Ronald A. David
Gunn, Ogden & Sullivan
Paul R. Linder
Rossman & Baumberger
Trial Advocacy
Bill Bone
Trial Practice
Professor Emeritus Hayford
O. Enwall Memorial
(Endowed by Peter C.K.
Enwall)
Workers' Compensation &
Other Employment Rights
Florida Workers'
Compensation Institute, Inc.


Other Awards

* American Jurisprudence
Awards
* Attorneys' Title Insurance
Fund
* Gertrude Gibbs Brick Law
Review Prize
* Bureau of National Affairs
Inc. Award
* Nathan Burkan Memorial
Competition Awards
" Tom A. Cole Memorial
Award
* Florida Bar Local
Government Section Award
* William C. Gaither
Memorial Award
* William M. Hicks Award
* W.D. Macdonald Prize
* Frank E. Maloney Memorial
Award
* Frank E. Maloney
Environmental Law Writing
Contest
* Mead Data Central Award
* George W. Milam Law
Review Case Comment
Award
* J. Hillis Miller Memorial
Award
* Claude Pepper Award
" Phi Delta Phi Award
* Phi Delta Phi Graduate of
the Year
* Prentice-Hall Prize
* Jonathan Norton Roth
Memorial Award in
Law and Medicine
* Society of International Law
Essay Award
* West Publishing Company
Award















1""Uni697PeWd
1996-97 Prospectus 2






TEIffIEAI~ s


The annual
Dunwody Lecture
brings to campus
prominent legal figures
who discuss their current
research. The lecture
series is endowed by the
law firm of Mershon.
Sawyer,Johnston,
Dunwody & Cole
and the U.S. Sugar Corp.


U.S. Colleges and Universities Represented
Among Florida Law Students


"Our students are incredibly
capable, and I am not sure
that a lot of them have ever
been challenged up to their
capabilities. That's what they
find both exciting and unset-
tling about law school. For
the first time, they're not sure
that with ease they're going
to be at the top of the class or
understand everything.

Professor Amy Mashburn
Class of'87












a 1996-9" Prospectus


Florida
Eckerd College
Florida A&M University
Florida Atlantic University
Florida International University
Florida State University
Jacksonville University
New College
Nova University
Rollins College
Stetson University
University of Central Florida
University of Florida
University of Miami
University of North Florida
University of South Florida
University of Tampa
University of West Florida


Out-Of-State
American University
Auburn University
Appalachian State University
Bates College
Boston University
Brandeis University
California State University
The Citadel
Claremont McKenna College
College of William & Mary
Columbia University
Davidson College
Delaware State College
Drew University
Duke University
Emory University
Fisk University
Franklin Pierce College
Georgetown University


Georgia Institute of
Technology
GMI Engineering &
Management Institute
Hampton Institute
Haverford College
Howard University
James Madison University
Lafayette College
Louisiana State University
Loyola University
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
Methodist College
Michigan State University
Morehouse College
New Hampshire College
New York University
Oberlin College
Pacific Union College
Pennsylvania State University
Providence College
Purdue University
San Francisco State University
Smith College
Southern Illinois University
Spelman College
Spring Hill College
Stanford University
State University of New York,
Stony Brook
State University of New York,
Brockport
Tennessee State University
Troy State University
Tulane University of Louisiana
Tuskegee Institute
U.S. Military Academy
U.S. Naval Academy
University of Alabama


University of California,
Berkeley
University of California,
Riverside
University of California,
Santa Barbara
University of Dayton
University of Houston
University of Illinois
University of Iowa
University of Maryland,
College Park
University of Michigan
University of Mississippi
University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill
University of Notre Dame
University of Oklahoma
University of Pennsylvania
University of South Alabama
University of Southern
California
University of Tennessee,
Knoxville
University of Texas, Austin
University of Wisconsin,
Madison
University of Virginia
Vanderbilt University
Virginia Polytechnic Institute &
State University
Washington University
Wellesley College
West Georgia College
Western Carolina University
Whitman College
Yeshiva University









Meeting


Success in law school is not just a
reflection of intelligence and hard work. It also
is about being organized, handling stress,
interacting effectively with faculty and peers,
and making use of available services and
opportunities.
From the outset, Florida equips students for
successful law study through a four-day
orientation program before first-semester
classes begin. The program introduces
students to legal education, basic legal
structures, and the roles and responsibilities
of lawyers, as well as to resources at the
College of Law and the university.
Throughout their law studies, students are
provided comprehensive services through the
Office of Student Affairs. Assistance with
financial aid, academic and educational
counseling, and career planning is available
on the law school campus.
Student Affairs also provides tutoring for
first-year law classes, and assigns each new
student to a Small Group Peer Adviser for the
first several weeks of school. Students also
have access to individual counseling, as well
as workshops throughout the semester on
preparing for exams and developing time and
stress management skills, communication
skills, and personalized study methods.
"We give students the tools to make the
most of their law school experience," said
Educational Counselor Martha Peters.
"The organizational and interpersonal skills
they learn help them become better profes-
sionals."


Student Affairs also coordinates a compre-
hensive minority recruitment program and
provides support and counseling for
minority students.
Services for students with disabilities range
from assistance with campus orientation and
class registration to securing auxiliary
learning aids, reader services, and exam
accommodations. Students seeking ADA
accommodations must first register with the
Assistant Dean for Disabled Students at 205
Peabody Hall, (352) 392-1261, or through the
Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).
Student Affairs also offers the following
services:
a Telegator on-line registration
* On-line information through the College
of Law's World Wide Web site
(http://nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu/-lawinfo/)
Peer Counselors
Advisement for student organizations
Graduation checks
Multicultural programming
Transfer and transient student services
Academic correspondence and
documentation
Assistance with exchange and study
abroad programs
Student petitions
Notary
Florida Bar application information


Office of Student
Affairs
(352) 392-0421
Gail E. Sasnett
Associate Dean for Students
B.A., University of West Florida;
M.S., Florida State University;
J.D., Stetson University
Rahim Reed
Associate Dean for Students
and Minority Affairs
B.S., M.P.A./M.S.W.,
University of Pittsburgh;
J.D., Rutgers University
Patrick Shannon
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
B.A., Kentucky Christian College;
M.A., M.A., Abilene Christian
University; Ed.D., J.D., University
of Louisville
Kathi R.Kitner
Student Services Coordinator
B.A., Kent State University;
M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida
Martha M. Peters
Educational Counselor
B.A., Mary Baldwin College;
M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Florida

Financial Aid
(352) 392-0421
Patricia A.Varnes
Director
B.S.B.A., University of Florida
Career Services
(352) 392-0499
An L. Skalaski
Assistant Dean
B.A., University of Florida;
M.A., University of South Florida
Karen R. Kirsch
Acting Assistant Dean
B.S., J.D., University of Florida
Shirley Clark Ayers
Assistant Director
B.A., Elmhurst College;
M.A., Ohio State University;
J.D., University of Florida


Uni -97PeJ
1996-97 Prospectus 29
_____29






MESients' Needs


Career Services


The key to preparing for and securing
employment after graduation is to start early.
Students are encouraged to register with the
Career Services Office in their second
semester to take advantage of the full range
of services .I., -.,nl ik.
"Students who have come to us as early
as their second semester have found jobs by
the time bar results are in, and they have not
been the top students," said Ann Skalaski,
assistant dean for Career Services. "An early
start allows students to explore summer jobs,
clerkships, co-curricular activities, and vari-
ous skills courses that help them qualify for
the jobs they want."
With ongoing guidance from experienced
career counselors, students define career
goals, develop professional networks, and
identify and pursue opportunities that
distinguish them in the job market. Florida law
alumni enter a variety of employment areas,
from large commercial and corporate practices
to small town firms, judicial clerkships,
academia, government agencies, and public
interest positions.


--... ......0 ..

Each year dozens of Florida graduates have been selected to fill highly
sought-after clerkships with federal and statejudges. Pictured are clerks
James H. Taylor, Class of'93, and Karen Fingar, Class of'95, with Judge
Susan Black, Class of'67, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1 1th Circuit.


The following information pertains to gradu-
ates of the May, July and December 1995
classes. Statistics are based on 353 responses
out of 392 graduates surveyed by the Career
Services Office, reflecting employment within
six months of graduation.


Employment Categories
Private Practice
Judicial Clerkships
Legal Business
Government
Other

Employment Locations
Florida
Southeast
Northeast
West
Unreported
Average Starting Salary
Law Firms
Judicial Clerkships
Government


54%
5%
3%
16%
22%


56%
6%
3%
1%
34%


$43,646
33,067
31,621


Most Florida graduates choose to remain
in Florida and the Southeast, while many
others live and work throughout the U.S.
and abroad. In 1995, Florida graduates ranked
6th in the number of job placements with the
top 10 Atlanta law firms.
Besides employment with law firms and
corporations throughout the state and nation,
some of the positions graduates have taken
recently have been in consulting, legal
publishing, the Military JAG Corps, the Peace
Corps (in Europe and Africa), various
committees of the Florida House of
Representatives, the National Association of
Professional Baseball and the PGA Tour.
On-campus interviewing, which brings
more than 120 Florida and out-of-state
employers to campus each year, is just one
of the many available services and resources


_ 1996-97Prospectus






M ents'J Needs ts




Connecting With Practitioners
SFlorida's opportunities for mentoring include a week on the job with local
lawyers and judges during a job shadowing program, sponsored by the
Gainesville chapter of the Florida Association of Women Lawyers, the 8th
Circuit Bar Association, and the College of Law.
"The job shadowing program allowed me to see the life of a senior partner
for a week, something I probably won't see again for a long time," said
student Matt O'Keefe."This experience has reaffirmed my decision to
attend law school and my interest in pursuing aviation law."
Students also can forge long-term associations through the Alumni
Mentor Program, coordinated by the Office of Development and Alumni
Affairs. Alumni and students are matched based on areas of interest.
"My mentor was helpful in providing information about the law, what to
expect on the bar exam, how to find the right job, techniques for
interviewing and how to find contacts," said Gaila Anderson, Class of 1995.
"She was receptive and approachable.That's the way the program is
..... .. .. structured.You take an attorney who really wants to help students and a
Pre-trial hearings were on Judge Martha student who is eager to learn and prepare themselves, and that
Ann Lotts calendar as law student Kendall combination generates incredible excitement and enthusiasm."
Mills-Conrad observed during the job
shadowing program.


offered through Career Services. Others a Alumni placement bulletin
include: a Pro Bono Project
* Ongoing career counseling and a Graduate Tax Interview Program
curriculum planning
Workshops on career development, job
search strategies,
interviewing and resume writing
SPrograms/panels featuring
attorneys, judges and legal
recruitment professionals
esume or oer eer re 1995-96 Florida Bar Passage Data
SResume wor cover letter review (As reported by the Florida Board of Bar Examiners)
service with 24-hour turn-around
Resume books on J.D. and LL.M.
students 97.64% 97.61%
92.44% 95.89% 92.97%
Career fairs throughout Florida and E 85.48%
in Atlanta and Washington, D.C. 82.11%
Job shadowing with local
attorneys and judges
Job listings and employer A
directories
Bibliography of career resources
On-line databases, such as Martindale- '
Hubbell and National Association for
Law Placement, available through the
Legal Information Center
a Resume forwarding Summer 1996 Winter 1995
Mock interviews

Uni6 sesda
1996-97Prospectus 31
31






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'i:





MEItlents' Needs


Financial Aid


Financial aid is available through federal
and institutional sources, including more than
70 scholarships administered by the College
of Law. Students selected for more than one
scholarship receive the award of the greatest
value. To increase the likelihood of receiving
financial aid, students should apply for
federal assistance whether or not they
qualify for College of Law funds. Transfer
students are eligible for federal aid, but not
for College of Law aid until they have been
evaluated at Florida for at least one
semester.
Federal Loans
All students applying for federal aid must
complete a Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) or a yearly Renewal
Application. Completion of this process qual-
ifies the student for consideration in federal
loan and employment programs. Applications
are available from the College of Law Financial
Aid Office, 164 Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117621,
Gainesville, FL 32611-7621, (352) 392-0421.
The application period begins January 1.
Application results received after March 15 are
processed as late applications. Of the loans
available through the Federal Direct Student
Loan Program (FDSLP), law students are eli-
gible to apply for both Federal Direct Stafford
Loans and Federal Direct Unsubsidized
Stafford Loans.
Merit-Based Scholarships
Merit-based scholarships are awarded to
both fall and spring entrants, with priority
given to Florida residents. Awards for enter-
ing students are based on undergraduate
grade point average and LSAT score, which
is obtained from the admissions application.
No other application is required. Fall merit
scholarship decisions are made in April and
early May; spring decisions are made in July
and early August. Recipients and alternates are
notified by letter.


For Entering Students
Airth, Sisler, Clayton & Warren Tuition
Scholarship: Gifts from the estates of Alfred T.
Airth, Mary Sisler and Sally Warren, and a memo-
rial gift from family and friends of Erwin A. Clayton
generate an annual award of $7,500.
American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers
Florida Chapter Tuition Scholarship: This endow-
ment generates an annual award of approximate-
ly $1,500.
GuyW.Botts Memorial Scholarship: Established
by the 1937 alumnus and former CEO of Barnett
Banks, this endowment awards a $7,500 scholar-
ship annually.
Frank E. Bryant Memorial Scholarship:
Established by Mary Brigham Bryant, Class of
1947, in memory of her husband and classmate,
this endowment provides $7,500 annually with
preference given to Floridians.
Carlton, Fields,Ward, Emmanuel, Smith & Cutler
Scholarship:This endowment generates an annu-
al award of $7,500.
George C.Carr Memorial Scholarship: Established
by family and friends of the late U.S. District Judge,
a 1954 alumnus, this endowment provides an
annual award of $7,500.
Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation Scholarship:
This endowment generates an award of $7,500
annually.
Florida Workers' Compensation Institute
Scholarship: When fully funded, this scholarship
will generate an annual $7,500 award. Currently,
a $2,500 scholarship is awarded annually.


1996-97 Prospectus 33






ME ents' Needs


Trial Team participation develops students'litigation skills and courtroom etiquette. Florida's team is
coached by nationally prominent trial lawyers.


Gray, Harris & Robinson Scholarship: This
endowment generates an annual $7,500 award.
Holland & Knight Scholarship: Established by
alumni practicing with Holland & Knight, the
state's largest law firm, this endowment will fund
three full scholarships of $7,500 each year.
Jacksonville Law Alumni Tuition Scholarship:
Established by 21 individuals and a law firm in
Jacksonville, this endowment generates annual
awards of $3,750, with preference given to students
from Jacksonville.
Lane, Trohn, Clarke, Bertrand, Vreeland &
Jacobsen Scholarship: The first scholarship endow-
ment established by a law firm at the College of
Law, this fund provides an annual $7,500 award.
Macfarlane Ferguson Allison & Kelly Scholarship:
Established by the law firm of Macfarlane Ferguson
Allison & Kelly (now Macfarlane Ausley Ferguson
& McMullen), this endowment generates an annu-
al $7,500 award.
Phillip J. MacLennan Memorial Scholarship:
Established by Margaret MacLennan and her hus-
band, Dr. Emanuel Mendelson, in memory of her
son, a 1986 alumnus, this endowment provides an
annual 57,500 award.
Robert E."Jeff" McNeill Scholarship: One $750
scholarship is awarded to a top spring entrant.


John C. Pinkerton Scholarship: Established by
the 1939 alumnus and Sarasota lawyer, this endow-
ment generates a $7,500 award annually.
Justus W. Reid Scholarship: This endowment
generates an annual award of $7,500.
Johnson S. Savary Scholarship Fund: This fund
generates an annual $2,000 scholarship.
W. Paul and Erin C. Shelley Scholarship: This
endowment, established by the 1939 alumnus and
his wife, awards $7,500 annually.
Shutts & Bowen Eric B. Meyers/William P.
Simmons Jr./Thomas L. Wolfe Memorial Tuition
Scholarship: Established by the law firm of Shutts
& Bowen, this endowment provides an annual
award of $2,500.
Benedict A. Silverman Minority Tuition
Scholarship: This endowment, established by the
1952 alumnus and New York banker, provides an
annual $3,500 award.
UF Law Center Association Merit Scholarships:
Renewable awards of $2,500 are granted each fall
and spring. Florida residents receive first priority.
UF Law Faculty Scholarship: This endowment,
funded by Florida law professors, supports a full
scholarship of $7,500 per year.


'n 1996-7 Pos da
1996-97Prospectus





ME Slents' Needs


For Advanced Students
Gertrude Gibbs Brick Law Review Scholarship:
The late Washington, D.C., lawyer Albert Brick
established this endowment through a bequest in
memory of his mother to benefit Law Review
members.

Barnett, Bolt, Kirkwood & Long Award: The
Tampa law firm provides an annual award to ben-
efit graduate tax students.

Coker, Myers, Schickel, Cooper & Sorenson Trial
Team Scholarship: Established by the law firm,
this endowment provides scholarships for Trial
Team members.

Irving Cypen Freshman Scholastic Achievement
Award:This endowment, established by the 1943
alumnus, provides $3,000 awards to students who
earn the highest grade point average during the
first year of law study.
Darrey A. Davis Memorial Scholarship:
Established by the law firm of Steel Hector &
Davis and Mr. Davis' children, John W. Davis and
Susan Logan, in memory of the 1934 alumnus, this
endowment provides $6,000 awards to high-rank-
ing students with a demonstrated interest in pub-
lic service.


Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano
& Bozarth Scholarship: Established by the law firm,
this endowment generates up to $7,500 annually
for awards to one or more graduate tax students.

Dorini Family Graduate Tax Scholarship:
Established by the Fort Lauderdale businessman,
this endowment generates up to $7,500 annually
for awards to one or more graduate tax students.

Florida Bar Foundation Public Service Law
Fellowships: The Florida Bar Foundation's Interest
on Trust Accounts Program funds fellowships for
third-year students. Fellows work part-time in
agencies, providing legal services to the poor or
in environmental agencies, and take a course in
poverty law. The college's Center for Governmental
Responsibility selects recipients based on
demonstrated interest in community service,
experience, and academic achievement.
Florida Bar Labor and Employment Law Section
Scholarship: An annual award of $250 benefits an
outstanding student in labor and employment
law.

Florida BarTax Section Scholarship:This schol-
arship supports tax-related student studies.

James J.Freeland Graduate Tax Scholarship:An
anonymous donor established the scholarship to
honor Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus
Freeland and to provide $3,750 for selected tax stu-
dents.

Joseph J. Gersten Key: This $500 award was
established by the former chairman of the
Florida Board of Bar Examiners to benefit the
outstanding senior based on academic achievement
and leadership.

Graduate Minority Fellowships: These fellow-
ships may be awarded by the Graduate School to
minority LL.M. students admitted to UF master's or
doctoral programs and nominated for the
fellowship by the admitting academic unit. The
fellowship provides an $8,000 stipend and a tuition
waiver, and is limited to minority students who are
citizens and permanent U.S. residents. The appli-
cation deadline is February 15. Contact the Office
of Student Affairs.
Law Review Fellowships: The UF Law Center
Association Inc. provides scholarships to Law
Review senior editors and editor in chief.


Student Fees
and Expenses
The semester credit hour fee is
approximately $129 for Florida
residents and $411 for
non-Florida residents, as defined
in the UF Undergraduate
Catalog.Though expenses vary
considerably among individuals,
a student attending the College
of Law could anticipate expenses
in addition to tuition of at least
$8,890 per year, estimated
as follows:


*Books/Supplies $620
*Clothing/Maintenance $680
" Personal/Insurance $670
. Room/Board $3,830
*Transportation $790
*Food $2,300


1996-97 Prospectus
35






MEIJnts' Needs


Maguire, Voorhis & Wells Moot Court
Fellowships: Established by the law firm, this
endowment supports the Moot Court Team's spring
competition.
Julius F.Parker Scholarship: Established by the
Parker family in honor of this past president of The
Florida State Bar Association, this $500 scholarship
benefits a senior with high academic standing.
Phi Alpha Delta Scholarship: Phi Alpha Delta
Law Fraternity makes ten cash awards nationally
each year. Members of the fraternity who have
completed two years of law school may be
eligible. Applications and information are available
from the faculty adviser or the chapter justice.

Phi Delta Phi Scholarship: Annual cash awards
are granted to two members of Cockrell Inn for
scholastic achievement and service to the Inn and
the College of Law.
Harry H. Sisler Phi Kappa Phi Graduate
Scholarship: An annual $1,000 award is given to
an outstanding student in a graduate or profes-
sional program.
Richard B.Stephens Award: Established in honor
of the late law professor and first director of the
Graduate Tax Program, this fund awards $1,000 to
the overall outstanding graduate tax student as
determined by the graduate tax faculty.

John W.Thatcher Graduate Tax Scholarship: The
Miami businessman and his shipping companies
established this endowment to benefit graduate tax
students.

Ronnie H. Walker Trial Team Scholarship: This
endowment, established by the 1968 alumnus,
provides scholarships for Trial Team members.
Judge James B. Whitfield Constitutional Law
Scholarship: This $1,000 scholarship is awarded to
a senior with a high proficiency and interest in con-
stitutional law.

Zimmerman, Shuffield, Kiser & Sutcliffe Moot
Court Fellowships: Established by the law firm,
this endowment provides scholarships for Moot
Court team members.

Merit/Need-Based Scholarships
To qualify for merit/need-based awards, an
applicant must be a Florida resident, have a min-
imum UGPA of 3.2/4.0 as determined by the Law
School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS), and have
a single or average LSAT score of 158 or higher
(old scale LSAT scores must be 36 or higher). The


application deadline for merit/need-based schol-
arships is April 1 for fall entrants, July 1 for spring
entrants whether or not an admissions decision
has been made. Applications are available from the
College of Law Financial Aid Office.

For Entering Students:

Ralph R. Bailey Scholarship: This endowment
provides renewable awards of $2,500 each fall and
spring.
Dan Bradley Memorial Scholarship:This schol-
arship provides two awards of $1,000 each.

Chester H. Ferguson Scholarships: Eight schol-
arships of $1,000 are awarded in the fall and two
in the spring.

Florida Bar Foundation Minority Scholarship:
Scholarships of $2,500 to $7,500 are provided to
African-American students.

Florida Minority Participation in Legal Education
(MPLE) Scholarship: Sponsored by the Florida
Legislature and administered by the Florida
Education Fund, the MPLE Scholarship provides
students with annual awards of $13,972 for up to
three years. An applicant must be a U.S. citizen and
a member of an historically disadvantaged minor-
ity group that is underrepresented in the mem-
bership of The Florida Bar. Upon graduating,
recipients must take The Florida Bar Exam and
practice one year in Florida for each year of their
award. Contact the College of Law or the Florida
Education Fund MPLE Office, 18350 NW Second
Ave., 3rd Floor, Miami, FL 33169, ( 1:. 654-7133.

Virgil Hawkins Fellowships & Summer Program:
Established by the Florida Legislature, fellowships
of $14,732 are awarded to African-American stu-
dents who are U.S. citizens or permanent resident
aliens. Recipients are encouraged to attend the
College of Law Virgil Hawkins Summer Program
as an introduction to law study prior to their first
semester. Summer program participants receive a
$1,300 stipend for the first academic year.
Icard, Merrill, Cullis, Timm, Furen & Ginsburg
Tuition Scholarship: This endowment, established
by the law firm, provides an annual award of
$3,750, with preference given to students from
Sarasota County.

William A. Jacob Scholarship: Established by
The Florida Bar General Practice Section in mem-
ory of one its former chairmen, this fund provides
a $500 scholarship with preference given to an
older student.


Uni A 19997 da
36 1996-97 Prospectus






MElu ,nts' Needs


James W. Locke Scholarship: Up to five $800
scholarships are awarded to male members of the
fall class.

Terrye Coggin Proctor Memorial Scholarship:
Established by Luther W. and Blanche Coggin,
Mark Proctor, Class of 1975, and other family
members and friends of the late Terrye Coggin
Proctor, Class of 1976, this endowment supports
three full scholarships per year.

Terrye Coggin Proctor Tuition Scholarship: This
fund provides awards of $3,500 per year.
Clifford A. & Michele W. Schulman Tuition
Scholarship: This fund provides a student with
$2,500 per year for up to three years.

For Advanced Students
Alumni Minority Fellowships: Alumni contri-
butions provide a $1.000 scholarship which may
be awarded by the tax faculty to a minority appli-
cant.

Clifford W. Crandall Memorial Scholarship:
Established by Kathleen B. Crandall in memory of
her husband, a faculty member from 1913-38, two
scholarships with an annual $1,250 stipend are
awarded to students who have completed two to
three semesters.

Atwood Dunwody Scholarship: In honor of the
1933 alumnus, a $750 scholarship is awarded each
fall to a second-year student.

Justice Richard W. Ervin Scholarship Fund:
Established by the law firm of Ervin, Varn, Jacobs
and Odom in honor of the former Florida Supreme
Court Justice and 1928 alumnus, a $500 scholar-
ship is awarded each fall to a graduating senior.

Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship: This fund
provides one-year scholarships of $750-$1,000,
awarded to minority students in the spring semes-
ter.

Mitchell S. Magid Sr. Scholarship: Established
by the Steiner-Liff Foundation in honor of the
1941 alumnus, this scholarship provides an annu-
al $500 award.
Mark A. Rentenbach Memorial Fund: Established
in memory of the 1983 alumnus by his mother,
Elizabeth H. Rentenbach, class members, and the
graduate tax faculty, this endowment provides
annual awards to graduate tax students.


Walter L."Bud"Robison III Memorial Scholarship:
Established by family members, classmates and
friends of the past JMBA president and 1966 alum-
nus, an annual award of $1,000 benefits a second-
or third-year student.
Johnson S.Savary Scholarship Fund: This fund
generates two $1,000 awards annually.

I.C. Spoto Memorial Fund: Established by fam-
ily and friends of Judge Spoto, Class of 1928, this
fund provides a $400 annual award for students
who have completed two to three semesters of law
school. Preference is given to spring entrants.

Future Scholarships
E.G."Dan"and Freda Boone Scholarship:When
realized, this endowment established by the 1954
alumnus and his wife will support a full scholar-
ship each year.
Ernest B. & Estelle Pierce Bowles Memorial
Scholarship: Rebecca Bowles Hawkins, Class of
1935, established in honor of her parents the col-
lege's first endowed scholarship for women.
Broad & Cassel Florida Law Review Scholarship:
Established and endowed by the law firm in honor
of its founding partner, Alvin Cassel, this scholar-
ship will provide summer stipends for Law Review
senior editors.

Alvin & Ethel Cassel Scholarship: When real-
ized, this endowment will generate an annual
award of $7,500.


"nistd1996-97Pr
1996-97Prospectus






MEIJ cents' Needs


Timothy A. Curran Memorial Scholarship: A
bequest from Marion B. Curran will endow a
scholarship in memory of her husband, a 1957
alumnus.

John W. Donahoo Scholarship: When realized,
this endowment, established by Jeanne R. Donahoo
in memory of her husband, a 1931 alumnus, will
generate an annual $7,500 award.


Informal lunchtime
talks by faculty, alumni
and visitors provide
opportunities for
interaction outside
the classroom.


Floyd Pearson Richman Greer Weil Brumbaugh
& Russomanno Tuition Scholarship: This endow-
ment was established by the law firm in honor of
senior partner Robert L. Floyd. When realized,
the fund will pay the tuition of one student each
year.
Judge Wm. Terrell Hodges Tuition Scholarship:
This endowment was established by Scott, Class
of '76, and Lynda Whitaker in honor of Judge
Hodges. When realized, the fund will provide a
three-year scholarship of $2,500 per year.
Joseph R. Julin Memorial Scholarship: Friends,
family and colleagues of the former College of Law
dean established this endowment in his memory.
When realized, the fund will provide three-year
scholarships of $3,750 per year.

T. Paine Kelly Jr. and Jean B. Kelly Scholarship:
Established through a bequest from the 1936 alum-
nus and his wife, this endowment will support a
full scholarship each year.


William F. & Elizabeth R. Leonard Tuition
Scholarship:This endowment from the 1951 alum-
nus and his wife vA.ll support a tuition scholarship.

Lake Lytal Jr. African-American Student
Scholarship:When realized, this endowment estab-
lished by the 1965 alumnus for outstanding African-
American students will generate an annual award
of $7,500.
Esther Guthery Mautz & Robert Barbeau Mautz
Law Review Scholarship: This endowment was
established by the former law professor and State
University System chancellor and his wife to ben-
efit future editors in chief of Law Review.

Nestor & Virginia Morales Tuition Scholarship:
An estate gift will generate awards of $3,750 per
year.
Frank & Louise Reed Memorial Scholarship:
When realized, this endowment established by
the retired businessman will provide an annual
award of $7,500.
Hervey and Patricia Yancey Scholarship: When
realized, this endowment established by the 1931
alumnus and his wife will support a full scholar-
ship.

Institutional Short-Term Loans
The following funds can be available within a
day or two of application to provide short-term
relief for unexpected occurrences. Terms vary.

Ralph Blowers Memorial Fund: Established by
friends of Mr. Blowers.

Martha B. Culpepper Memorial Loan Fund:
Established in memory of the first administrative
assistant of the Florida Law Review.

The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division- JMBA
Emergency Loan Fund: Funds are available to JMBA
for emergency loans of up to $200.
Harriett-Horner Memorial Loan Fund:Established
in memory of George Harriett and Jack Horner to
benefit second- and third-year law students.

Laura T. Plum Loan Fund:Established through the
will of Laura T. Plum.

Phi Alpha Delta Loans Endowment Fund: Loans
are available to minority students.
Randolph Ross Thomas Jr. Memorial Loan Fund:
Loans are provided to graduate tax students in
memory of the 1973 alumnus.


3Uni & 99
S1996-97Prospectus






MEETIs Needs
Sfu cents' Needs


Florida's Moot Court Team garnered
three national victories and a bevy of
individual and team awards during
the 1996 season. The team travels
to competitions throughout the
state and nation, arguing
mock cases before judges and
lawyers. Each fall,justices of the
Florida Supreme Court preside over
the team's Final Four competition at
the law school, sponsored by the
Orlando law firm ofZimmerman,
Shuffield, Kiser & Sutcliffe.


Institutional Long-Term Loans
Applications for long-term loans are available
in Student Affairs at the end of the fall and spring
semesters only.
Karl B. Block Jr. Memorial Loan Fund: Established
by friends in memory of the 1967 alumnus, this
fund provides loans of $900 per academic year to
a beginning student in the fall entering class who
are bona fide residents of Dade County.

Brevard County Bar Association Fund: Loans of
up to $1,000 are available to Brevard County res-
idents.

James W.Day Memorial Loan Fund: Created by
admirers of former UF law Professor Day; prefer-
ence is given to third-year students.
Eldridge Hart Loan Fund: Loans of $900 are
available through the will of Mrs.Marion Houghtelin
Hart. Loans for the first academic year (two semes-
ters) are renewable for the second and third years,
provided the student remains in good standing.

Emergency Loans
The following loans are given on an emergency
basis. Eligible students may be granted $300-500
per academic year if they:

" demonstrate financial need;

* complete at least one semester;

* have a GPA of 2.0 or higher;

* are registered for at least 12 semester hours;
and

have a validated fee card before processing the
loan.


Mark Hulsey Student Loan Fund: Established
by this 1948 alumnus.

Leroy Franklin Lewis Memorial Loan Fund:
Established through the will of Catherine L. Thomas
in memory of her father; first priority given to sec-
ond- and third-year students.
L. David Llewelyn Loan Fund: Established by
friends and family of Mr. Llewelyn, Class of 1975.

Giddings E. Mabry Loan Fund: Established by
Mrs. William J. Dann Jr. in honor of her father.

Frank E. Maloney Memorial Loan Fund:
Established by students, alumni and friends of
Mr. Maloney, dean of the College of Law from 1958
to 1970.
Miami Beach Bar Association Fund: Preference
goes to former or current Dade County residents.
Michael C. Murphy Loan Fund: Created by the
Columbia County Bar Association in memory of
the 1973 alumnus.
Phi Alpha Delta Loans: Provides loans of up to
$1,500 for members of Phi Alpha Delta Law
Fraternity International.
Dean Slagle Memorial Loan Fund: Established by
an anonymous donor in memory of UF law
Professor Dean Slagle; preference is given to third-
year students.
Clarence J.TeSelle Memorial Fund: Established
by an anonymous donor in memory of UF law
Professor Clarence J. TeSelle; preference is given
to third-year students.


1996-97 Prospectus
39








-C.
'* f


Florida is one 4,f
the nation's mo-i
comprehensi, L
centers of study and
research. The university is a member of the pres-
tigious Association of American Universities,
comprised of the top 58 public and private
higher education institutions in North America.
Founded in 1853 and with more than 4,000
faculty members and an enrollment of approx-
imately 39,000, Florida comprises 21 colleges
and schools and 100 interdisciplinary research
and education centers, bureaus and institutes
Florida's more than 54 Eminent Scholar
Chairs attract leading scholars in all disciplines.
A sampling of honored faculty includes: a Nobel
Laureate, Pulitzer Prize winners in editorial
writing and poetry, 20 Fulbright Scholars, inven-
tor of Gatorade, co-inventor of the jet engine,
and one of the four charter members of the Solar
Hall of Fame. In addition, more than 30 facul-
ty members have been selected to the National
Academies of Science and/or Engineering, the
Institute of Medicine, or a counterpart in a for-
eign nation.
UF consistently ranks among the top
public universities in the nation in the number
of enrolled National Merit Scholars, Achievement
Scholars, International Baccalaureate graduates
and Advance Placement score recipients. Ninety
percent of entering freshmen rank above the
national mean of scores on standard entrance
exams taken by college-bound students.

Mission and Goals
The University of Florida belongs to an
ancient tradition of great universities. We
participate in an elaborate conversation among
scholars and students that extends over space
and time, linking the experiences of Western
Europe with the traditions and histories of all
cultures, that explores the limits of the
physical and biological universes, and that
nurtures and prepares generations of educated
people to address the problems of our societies.


While this university recognizes no limits on its
intellectual boundaries, and our faculty and
students remain free to teach and learn, to
explore wherever the mind and imagination
lead, we live in a real world whose constraints
limit what we can do. Out of the conflict
between our universal intellectual aspirations
and the limitations of our environment comes
the definition of the university's goals.
Each of the adjectives used to describe the
University of Florida defines an important
characteristic of the institution.
Teaching. American colleges and
universities share the fundamental educational
mission of teaching students. The undergradu-
ate experience, based in the arts and sciences,
remains at the core of higher education in
America. The formation of educated people, the
transformation of mind through learning, and
the launching of a lifetime of intellectual growth:
these goals remain central to every university.
This undergraduate foundation of American
higher education has grown more complex as
the knowledge we teach has grown more
complex. Where once we had a single track
through the arts and sciences leading to a
degree, we now have multiple tracks leading
to many degrees in arts and sciences as well as
in a variety of professional schools. The
University of Florida has a major commitment
to undergraduate education as the foundation
of our academic organization, and we pursue
graduate education for the Ph.D. as well as
many other advanced degrees in professional
fields.
Public. The University of Florida exists
thanks to the commitment and investment of the
people of the state of Florida. Generations of
tax dollars constructed the facilities we enjoy and
have paid the major portion of our operating


U"ni- rsfW du
1996-97 Prospectus
an






UFj"EAyssoVNeNo,


educated with tax dollars, provide the majority of our
private funding. Our state legislators created the conditions
that permit our faculty to educate our students, pursue their
research, conduct their clinical practice, and serve their
statewide constituencies. We exist, then, within the public
sector, responsible and responsive to the needs of the
citizens of our state. The obligations we assume as a public
university determine many of our characteristics.
We have many more undergraduates than graduates;
we respond quickly to the needs of the state's economy; we
accommodate complex link-
ages with other state
universities, community i
colleges, and K-12 public and 3
private institutions; and we '
operate in cooperative
symbiosis with our state's
media. We also experience an
often too-close interaction with
the political process. Private
universities, that have a
different profile, do not
respond in the same ways to
these issues. We, as a public
university, must maintain close,
continuous, and effective com-
munication with our many
publics.
Comprehensive. The
University of Florida acknowl-
edges and supports the
universal reach of our pursuit
of knowledge. As a matter of
principle, we exclude no field from our purview. We believe
that our approach to knowledge and learning, to under-
standing and wisdom, requires us to be ready to examine any
field, cultivate any discipline, and explore any topic that offers
insight or intellectual tools. Resource limits, human or
financial, may constrain us from cultivating one or another
academic subspecialty, but we accept, in principle, no limit
on our field of view. Even when we struggle with budget
problems and must reduce a program or miss an intellectual
opportunity, we do so only to meet the practical constraints
of our current environment. We never relinquish commitment
to the holistic pursuit of knowledge.
Land-Grant. Florida belongs to the set of American
universities whose mandate includes a commitment to the


development and transmission of practical knowledge. As one
of the land-grant universities identified by the Morrill Act of
1862, Florida has a special focus on agriculture and
engineering and a mandate to deliver the practical benefits
of university knowledge to every county in the state. In our
university, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and
the College of Engineering respond to this definition most
obviously; but over time, the entire university has come to
recognize its commitment to translating the benefits of
abstract and theoretical knowledge into the marketplace to

that supports us all.
This commitment perme-
ates the institutional culture
and defines us as one of some
S72 such institutions in America.
The land-grant university is, of
course, a peculiarly American
invention and captures one of
the powerful cultural beliefs of
our country: that knowledge
passes the test of utility by
remaining vitally connected to
industry and commerce.
Research. Research
defines this university. Our
faculty dedicate themselves not
only to the bedrock function of
education, not only to the land-
grant function of service, but
equally to the essential
activity of research.
By research we mean the
effort to expand our understanding of the natural world,
the world of the mind, and the world of the senses. We define
research to include the theoretical abstractions of the
mathematician, the experimental discoveries of the
geneticist, the insights of the semiotician, the recreations of
the historian, or the analysis of the anthropologist. We define
research to capture the business professor's analysis of
economic organization, the architect's design, and the
musician's interpretation or the artist's special vision. Research
by agronomists improves crops, and research by engineers
enhances materials. Medical and clinical research cures and
prevents disease. The list of research fields continues as
endlessly as the intellectual concerns of our faculty and the
academic vision of our colleges.


UniE f&4gfda
1996-97 Prospectus
AllJ
































Residents understand why Gainesville
consistently ranks as one of the nation's most
livable cities. Gainesville provides myriad
opportunities to satisfy recreational and
cultural appetites and an abundance of
natural beauty.


TALLAHASSEE I--
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JACKSONVILLE


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GAINESVILLE

SDAYTONA
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Gainesville also is home to one of the top
collegiate athletic programs in the country.
With a population of approximately 100,000,
CG.,ii -' il li is located between the Atlantic and
Gulf coasts, and is approximately two hours
by car from major cities, including Orlando,
Tampa, Jacksonville, and the state capital of
Tallahassee.


We Invite You To Visit Our Campus
See first-hand what the Florida law
Smunpus has to offer. Student-guided
[ours are available through the Phi
Alpha Delta Florida Law Guide


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ilc.l pi ,l r-


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[1L- 1 `l',, !llng
'nt.d l-lkinri TheL
Center for the


Performing Arts
features Broadway
touring productions,
operas, the ballet,
symphony orchestras
and world famous
performers. Museums
and local historical
sites provide additional
leisure-time activities.


I,

TAMPA/
Sr.PETERSBURG
J- -


ORLANDO
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LAUDERDALE /

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S,. Service. Tours begin in the Office
S of Student Affairs at 3 p.m. during
.,. class days (or at 10 a.m. with 72
hours notice). Reservations are
required for groups of 10 or more.
S. Parking passes are available
through the University of Florida
Police Department.


For reservations or more
information, contact Student
Affairs at (352) 392-0421. To
schedule a tour other than
during the times listed above,
contact the Admissions Office
at (352) 392-2087.


Va .aisit the Colalee fL 's evloing
World Wide Web si teat
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Directions to Campus
MFrom I- 75
Go east approximately 2 3/4 miles on SR 26 (aka: Newberry
Road and University Avenue) to SR 26A (SW 2nd Avenue).
Continue east to SW 25th Street. Holland Hall is located at SW
2nd Avenue and 25th Street.

iFrom US 441 (13th Street)
Go west approximately 1 3/4 miles on SR 26 (University
Avenue) to SW 2nd Avenue (26A). Continue to SW 25th Street.
Holland Hall is located at SW 2nd Avenue and 25th Street.


WEfCIME .11ie


Uni & du
1996-97 Prospectus
43




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Fall Sen

Aug. 15-1

Auc


Spring Semester

Jan.6-9 Introduction to Law for entering class

Jan.8-10 Schedule changes using Telegator &
Media Center

Jan 9 Classes begin

Jan. 10 Class rolls fixed; fee liability attaches

Jan. 17 Fees due

Jan. 20 Martin Luther King Jr. Day, classes can-
celed


nester

6,19-20 Introduction to Law for entering class

g. 19-21 Schedule changes using Telegator &
Media Center

Aug.20 Classes begin

Aug 21 Class rolls fixed;fee liability attaches

Sept. 2 Labor Day, classes canceled

Sept.6 Fees due

Sept. 20 Deadline to withdraw with 250. refund
of course fees

Oct 28 Spring 1997 independent study course
deadline

ov.4-22 Advance registration for spring 1997

Nov. 11 Veterans Day, classes canceled

Nov. 15 Deadline to withdraw without failing
grade

Nov.27 Classes end

v.28-29 Thanksgiving, classes canceled

Dec.2 Reading'final exam period begins

Dec.17 Exams end

Dec.21 Graduation


0nivM/jjj.JF/W
1996-51"flm~sPertis


Jan. 31 Deadline to withdraw with 25'o refund
of course fees

Feb.24 Summer 1997 independent study course
deadline

Mar. 3-28 Advance registration for summer 1997

Mar. 10-14 Spring Break

Mar. 24 Fall 1997 independent study course
deadline

Mar 31. April 18 Advance registration for fall 1997

April 10 Deadline to withdraw without failing
grade

April 24 Classes end

April 25 Reading-final exam period begins

May 10 Exams end

May 17 Graduation



Summer Term

May 19-20 Schedule changes using Telegator &
Media Center

May 20 Classes begin

May 21 Class rolls fixed; fee liability attaches

May 23 Fees due

May 26 Memorial Day, classes canceled

May 30 Deadline to withdraw with 250o refund
of course fees

July 2 Last day to withdraw without failing
grade

July 4 Independence Day. classes canceled

July 9 Classes end

July 10 Reading/final exam period begins

July 17 Exams end

Aug.2 Graduation


<











1997-98 ADMISSIONS INFORMATION


PREPARATION FOR THE STUDY OF LAW
In view of the all-encompassing nature of
lawyering, the best pre-law program is a diversi-
fied course of study. Beginning law students are
expected to possess the skills necessary for effec-
tive written and oral communication, and critical
thinking.
For additional information about pre-law study,
law school and the legal profession, refer to the
Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools, published annual-
ly by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC)
and the Association of American Law Schools. The
guide is available from Law Services during regis-
tration for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
and through most college book stores.

ADMISSIONS POLICY
Applicants are evaluated and compared to one
another to allocate the limited number (approxi-
mately 200) of positions available each August and
January. Many applicants who may be qualified
cannot be accommodated.
The law faculty and administration have adopt-
ed a policy to accomplish the difficult task of
admitting students fairly, efficiently, and in a man-
ner that results in a talented and diverse student
body one that well serves the needs of the state
of Florida and the legal profession.

Selection Methods
The college uses two selection methods.
Approximately 50 percent of each entering class is
automatically admitted based on LSAT scores and
undergraduate grade point averages, in the
absence of disciplinary problems. An applicant's
multiple LSAT scores are averaged and the GPA of
only the first bachelor's degree earned is consid-
ered. The remaining 50 percent of each class is
selected by the college's Admissions Committee,
which evaluates academic credentials and consid-
ers discretionary criteria including:
* the flow of effort in undergraduate or other
academic performance;
* the colleges or universities where, and the
disciplines in which, the degrees) was earned;
* academic accomplishment following the first
bachelor's degree;


* leadership and other relevant activities;
* evaluations by persons who can objectively
judge the applicant's potential for law study
and practice (e.g., undergraduate professors or
employers);
* maturing experience (employment, military
service, etc.); and
* racial, ethnic and economic background, and
geographical origin.
Since precise measures of these additional fac-
tors are impossible, the Admissions Committee
exercises reasonable discretion in applying them to
the candidate's standing. Consistent application of
these criteria, as well as active recruitment of
minority candidates, has produced a diverse stu-
dent body.
The Florida Board of Regents also has ruled that
the State University System will accept non-Florida
residents in numbers not to exceed 10 percent of
the total system-wide enrollment. Consequently,
admissions standards for non-residents are signifi-
cantly higher than those for residents.

Ineligibility for Admission
A student who has received a law degree, or
bachelor's degree combined with a law program,
from a U.S. institution, is not eligible for admission
to the College of Law. Credit is not given for corre-
spondence courses or other work not done in resi-
dence at an ABA/AALS accredited law school.

Previous Law Students
Applicants who have attended another law
school must submit a written statement concerning
their attendance, a complete transcript, and a state-
ment from their dean indicating class rank and cer-
tifying that they are in good standing and eligible
to return to the institution. Those not in good
standing nor eligible to return are not eligible to
apply to the UF College of Law. (Transfer students,
see Admissions Procedures, #11.)


ADA MISSIONS

J. MchauIl l'atrlk

,- h :. h *',l*l
B.S.E., M.S.E.,
Specialist Ed., Drake
University
Tel (352) 392-2t1S
F,-x (352) 392-672-


APPLICATION
DEADLINES
Feb. 1, 1997
for Fall 1997
Mar, 1'. 19l-
for S"I: "9','


LSAT
L ,.4FT
DEADLINES
Dec. for Fall Entry
Feb. for Spring Entry
0










ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES

1. Take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
and, if applicable, the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL)
The LSAT is administered four times a year by Law
Services in cooperation with leading law schools through-
out the country. College students should take the LSAT at
the end of their junior year. Candidates for fall entry must
take the LSAT no later than December, however, earlier
testing is strongly recommended. Applicants for spring
entry must take the LSAT no later than February. LSAT
scores are valid for up to five years. In the absence of doc-
umentation that a candidate was ill, or that some other
unusual condition occurred during one of the tests, multi-
ple LSAT scores are averaged.
The niedian LSAT score and undergraduate grade point
average of a traditional fall class are approximately 159-
160 and 3.5 (4.00 scale) respectively. The median LSAT
score and GPA of the spring entering class are approxi-
mately 156 and 3.4 respectively.
Information concerning the LSAT and LSDAS is con-
tained in the LSAT/LSDAS Registration and Information
Book, which may be obtained at most colleges or by writ-
ing Law Services, Box 2000, 661 Penn Street, Newtown, PA
18940-0998, (215) 968-1001.
Applicants whose native language is not English must
also take the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL).

2. Register with Law School Data Assembly Service
(LSDAS)
Applicants are required to register with the LSDAS.
Registration is valid for one year from the date the
LSAT/LSDAS registration form is processed. Applicants
must ensure that undergraduate transcripts from each col-
lege, university or high school dual enrollment program
attended are on file at LSDAS, and that the LSDAS Law
School Report is received by the College of Law. Do not
send transcripts to the College of Law.
Normally, if the LSDAS file is complete, an LSDAS Law
School Report will arrive at the College of Law two to
three weeks after the date on the law school application
acknowledgment postcard.
To update your LSDAS Law School Report, send an
updated transcript to LSDAS (see page 25 of the current
LSAT/LSDAS Registration and Information Book). All LSDAS
updates must be received by the deadline for completion
of your file.


3. Complete the Enclosed Admissions Forms
Carefully read the enclosed forms before writing on
them. The forms include: Application, Information for
Residency Classification, File Log, Cover Letter for
Evaluation of Applicant, and Pre-addressed Postcards. The
College of Law notifies applicants upon receipt of the
application. Please do not include an audio cassette or
videotape as part of the application.
The College of Law participates in the Misconduct and
Irregularities Procedures set forth by LSAC. For more
information on that policy, please refer to page 6 of the
LSAT/LSDAS Registration and Information Book. Failure to
accurately disclose information may result in the candi-
date being cited for misconduct in the admissions process.

4. Submit the Application Fee
A non-refundable $20 fee is due with the admissions
application. UF students and graduates are not required to
pay the fee.

5. Meet the Application/File Completion Deadlines
Feb. 1, 1997 for Fall 1997 Entering Class
May 15, 1997 for Spring 1998 Entering Class
Candidates should apply no earlier than one year
before the intended month of entry, and no later than the
application deadline. All other required documents must
be received within 30 days of the deadline. Action on an
application is taken once the LSDAS report is received,
whether or not the personal statement and letters of evalu-
ation requested by the college are on file.

6. Report Academic (and Other) Disciplinary
Information
Questions Dl, D2 and D3 on the admissions application
require candidates to report any academic probation
and/or disciplinary action taken against them at any col-
lege or university. If answering "yes," attach an explana-
tion to the application and provide official documentation
from the institution explaining the outcome of the situa-
tion. Current and former UF students need not provide
official documentation; it is automatically provided by the
UF Office of Student Judicial Affairs. Those uncertain
about their academic or disciplinary history at UF should
contact Student Judicial Affairs at 202 Peabody Hall, P.O.
Box 114075, Gainesville, FL 32611 (352) 392-1261.

7. Include Personal Statement and Letters of
Evaluation
Applicants are requested, but not required, to submit a
personal statement and at least three letters of evaluation
at the time of application, or prior to receipt of the LSDAS
Law School Report. A resume is an acceptable addendum.
The personal statement two to three typed,
single-spaced pages should function as an "interview


2 1997-98 UF College of Law Admissions Information










on paper." The letters of evaluation should be objective,
first-hand evaluations of the applicant's performance (e.g.,
academic, employment, community service), and not per-
sonal recommendations. Personal interviews are not part
of the admission process.
Letters of evaluation should come in standard business
letter format on letterhead accompanied by the attached
cover form. Packets from career planning offices are
acceptable in lieu of individually submitted letters.

8. Fill Out Pre-addressed Postcards
Fill out both sides of the three pages of postcards and
return the pages intact with the application. Do not tear
the perforations. Submit all subsequent address changes
in writing to the College of Law.
Acknowledgment/Trouble Cards are used to acknowledge
receipt of the application and to notify candidates of prob-
lems with applications. Apply early to allow time to cor-
rect possible problems. Thank You Cards are sent to evalua-
tors. Address these cards to your evaluators and write
your name on the reverse side. Receipt Notices To
Candidate, one per evaluator, inform candidates that eval-
uation letters have been received.

9. Send Final Transcripts
The bachelor's degree must be completed at an accred-
ited institution prior to enrollment at the College of Law.
A final transcript showing receipt of the bachelor's degree
must be sent to the Office of the Registrar, University of
Florida, 222 Criser Hall, P.O. Box 114000, Gainesville, FL
32611. Transcripts are automatically provided for UF
graduates.

10. Joint Degree Candidates
Candidates for a Joint Degree Program take both the
LSAT and the GRE or GMAT, and apply for admission to
both the College of Law and the Graduate School.
Application deadlines vary among programs. Contact the
College of Law Student Affairs Office and/or the
Graduate School departmental coordinator for deadline
information. See the curriculum section of the Prospectus
for more information. This program is not open to stu-
dents who already have earned one of the degrees.

11. Transfer Students
Application and File Completion Deadlines: July 1 for
Fall; October 1 for Spring; and March 1 for Summer
If space is available, an applicant may be considered
for transfer from a law school that is accredited by both
the American Bar Association and the Association of
American Law Schools. A student who has received a law
degree, or a bachelor's degree combined with a law pro-
gram, is not eligible for admission. Credit is not given for


correspondence courses or other work not done in resi-
dence at an ABA/AALS accredited law school.
If eligible to apply, the following information must be
submitted by the deadline listed above:
* a full first year's academic record;
* a letter from the dean of the applicant's law school
indicating class rank in the top third or higher, certify-
ing the applicant is in good standing and eligible to
continue study, and that the applicant has completed
the required first year of study;
* UF College of Law application;
* a copy of the LSDAS Law School Report on file at the
current law school; and
* a statement to the UF College of Law Admissions
Committee relating reasons for wanting to attend the
College of Law.

12. Foreign Lawyer Candidates
A foreign lawyer a member of a foreign bar who
holds a law degree from an institution outside of the
United States must follow Admissions Procedures #1-9,
and, if applicable, #10. For potential visa purposes, foreign
lawyers must submit the Certification of Financial
Responsibility Form, which they will receive along with
other instructions after submitting the application.
Applicants whose native language is not English must
take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
Foreign lawyers are not eligible for scholarships or other
financial aid.

13. Visitors From Other Schools
Application Deadlines: July 20, 1997 for Fall 1997; Dec. 10,
1997 for Spring 1998; April 20, 1998 for Summer 1998
Except for good cause shown, only students who have
completed two years of law school and rank at or above
the top third of their class at an ABA/AALS accredited
law school are eligible to enroll as a visitor. Visitors may
attend the College of Law for up to two academic terms.
Candidates must:
* complete the enclosed admission forms and submit all
requested materials on or before the deadline listed
above;
* submit a non-refundable $20 fee;
* submit a copy of the current law school transcript,
statement of class rank, and a copy of the LSDAS Law
School Report on file at the current law school;
* provide written permission from the current school to
attend UF; and
* provide a written statement to the Admissions
Committee with reasons for wanting to attend UE


1997-98 UF College of Law Admissions Information 3










ADMISSIONS INQUIRIES
Applicants are encouraged to contact the
Assistant Dean for Admissions regarding the
progress of their candidacy. Counseling appoint-
ments (mornings only) should be made in
advance. The Admissions Office staff can answer
questions regarding receipt of required documents
and can respond to most questions about the
status of a file.

ADMISSIONS DECISION
The Admissions Committee makes final deci-
sions by the end of April for fall candidates, and in
July for spring candidates. Applicants are immedi-
ately notified in writing upon final decision. The
college begins notifying applicants from the time
the first decision is made until the class is filled.
The process is based on credentials, not on the date
the application is received.

Deferring or Declining an Offer
Faculty policy does not permit the deferment of
an admission offer, except for students admitted to
a joint degree program. Other accepted candidates
wishing to delay admission must reapply and
compete with new applicants. Accepted applicants
who decide to delay or decline entrance are asked
to promptly notify the Admissions Office.


Petitioning for Reconsideration
Only in cases where the applicant has learned
(after applying to the law school) significant
information that existed prior to the file comple-
tion deadline, can the applicant request reconsider-
ation. Information about events, such as grades or
awards, occurring after the file completion dead-
line cannot be considered. Reconsideration must
be requested within 30 days of denial.
A written request must include explanation of
the new information as well as valid reasons war-
ranting reconsideration, and should be submitted
to the Assistant Dean for Admissions, University
of Florida College of Law, 325 Holland Hall, P.O.
Box 117622, Gainesville, FL 32611. The top of the
document should be plainly marked "Request for
Reconsideration."

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
As a full-time law school, the College of Law
adheres to American Bar Association policy requir-
ing students to devote substantially all of their
working hours to the study of law. Academic
schedules and minimum load requirements are
designed to reflect this policy. First-year students
are prohibited from employment. Other students
are restricted to no more than 20 hours per week of
employment.


HONOR CODE SYSTEM
The College of Law Honor System sets the highest standards of
integrity and professionalism, and provides procedures for handling
academic honesty violations. Each student is given a copy of
the Honor Code upon enrollment and is bound to follow it.


4 1997-98 UF College of Law Admissions Information


Note: .\1t/00n 1.o0 lil

once the LSDAS4
report c i i;'I V
whether: ir not1 thcl
personal statement
and letters of
evaluation are on file.
*






REMOVE FORMS BEFORE WRITING ON THEM


la
L, UNIVERSITY OF
') FLORIDA APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION: FALL '97 OR SPRING '98
COLLEGE OF LAW APPLICATION FOR TRANSFER: SPRING, SUMMER OR FALL '98

325 Holland H.ll. PO. Bo'\ 11522 .\pplicant-.. dJ not %nt.r in thi- bo\
Gaines\ille, FL 32,11-,"n22 Rs.Jetinc C Florid. '1 Non--lorna


INSTRUCTIONS: Please read the enclosed "Admissions Information" before completing this form. You are responsible for
knowing the information it contains. Should data entered on this application change prior to matriculation, promptly notify the
College of Law. Omissions and inaccuracies in completing this form may be grounds for a misconduct and irregularities
investigation. If you apply for bar admission, the enclosed information may be made available to bar examiners. New students,
as defined below, submit a non-refundable $20 application fee. Type or print in ink.

A. PERSONAL INFORMATION

1. Name:
Last First Middle (Jr., III, etc.)
Other names under which credentials (transcripts, test scores, etc.) may arrive:


2. Social Security number: -(This is your official student number. If you do not have one, obtain yours from the
nearest Social Security Office prior to completing this application.)
3. Applicant Status:
Entering Student (check only one): 3 Fall '97 O Spring '98
Transferring Student (check only one): L Spring '98 O Summer '98 LO Fall '98 (Transfer students, see Admissions Procedures, #11)
Q New UF Student: non-matriculated or not previously enrolled at UF in an admitted status. Enclose non-refundable $20 fee payable to
the University of Florida.
O Current or Former UF Student: currently or previously enrolled at UF in an admitted status. No fee required.
4. Current address (until__ /__ / ):


Home Phone: ( ) Work Phone: (__
Permanent Address:
Home Phone: ( ) County:

5. Date and Place of Birth: Age:
Mo/Dy/Yr City State Country
6. Name of next of kin:
Relationship to you:
Address:
If next of kin is a Florida resident, give inclusive dates of residency:
7. Your country of citizenship_ If not U.S. born, how long have you lived in the U.S.?
8. Non-U.S. citizen: are you a Permanent Resident Alien? O Yes O No
(If yes, attach copy, front/back, of your Permanent Resident Alien Card.)
9. If you have served in the armed forces, indicate branch, dates of service, and type of discharge below. (If other than honorable,
attach to this form a full statement of relevant facts).
10. Date(s) you took or will take the LSAT:


11. If applicable, specify Joint Degree Program:






REMOVE FORMS BEFORE WRITING ON THEM


lb


12. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act requires the following two items:
Gender: L Male U Female
Predominant Racial or Ethnic Background:
Q African-American/Black (non-Hispanic)
O American Indian or Alaskan Native
L Asian or Pacific Islander
O Hispanic/Black
O Hispanic/White
L White (non-Hispanic)
O Other (describe)

B. PROFESSIONAL INFORMATION


1. List work experience and indicate current occupation. Attach a separate sheet for additional space.


From To
(Mo/Yr-Mo/Yr)


Occupation


City/State


From To
(Mo/Yr-Mo/Yr)


1. Have you previously applied for admission to the UF College of Law? __
results?


If yes, for what entering class and with what


2. Are you currently, or have you ever been, enrolled in a law school course or courses seeking a Juris Doctor degree?
(Answer yes even if you received no credit in the coursess, you received credit that was applied to another degree or in another program, or you
attended a summer conditional program.) If yes, list law schools in question #3 below.

3. Please list, in order of attendance, all colleges/universities and high school dual enrollment programs in which you have been
or are currently enrolled, including those where credit was not received, credit was applied to another degree, or you were
attending a summer conditional program. Applicants must have earned a bachelor's degree from a qualified institution prior
to entry.


School Name, City, State


Inclusive Dates of Attendance


Degrees and Dates Earned/Expected


Check Law Schools
Li


Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
____a
____


Occupation


City/State


C. ACADEMIC INFORMATION






REMOVE FORMS BEFORE WRITING ON THEM


Ic




D. REPORTING ACADEMIC (OR OTHER) DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION

Before responding to questions 1, 2 and 3, read Admissions Procedures, #6. If your answer to either question is yes, attach to this
form a full statement of relevant facts for all incidents and furnish the College of Law with copies of all official documents
explaining the final disposition of all proceedings. If your records have been expunged pursuant to applicable law, you are not
required to answer yes to questions 1, 2 or 3. If you are unsure whether to answer yes, we strongly recommend answering yes
and fully disclosing all incidents. By doing so, you can avoid risk of disciplinary action, revocation of admission offer, and inves-
tigation by the state Board of Bar Examiners.
1. Have you ever been charged with or subject to disciplinary action at any institution of higher education? L Yes O No
2. Have you ever been subject to academic probation(s), including warnings, suspensionss, and/or dismissal at any institution
of higher education? O Yes L No
3. Have you ever been charged with a violation of law resulting in probation, community service, a jail sentence, or revocation
or suspension of your driver's license (include traffic violations resulting in a fine of $200 or more)? O Yes L No

E. APPLICATION CERTIFICATION (Read each item before signing below)

* I understand that this application is valid only for the term indicated on page 1.
* I certify that the enclosed information is complete and accurate and that I will immediately notify the College of Law of any
changes prior to entry.
* I understand that I will be bound by the application deadlines and admission requirements published in the 1996-97
College of Law Prospectus.
* If admitted, I will abide by the policies of the Board of Regents and the University of Florida.
* I have read the enclosed explanation of the College of Law Honor System and, if admitted, I will participate in the
Honor System.
* I authorize release of information concerning my academic progress to educational institutions for research study purposes.
* I authorize the release of information from my admissions application file to the Law School Admission Council regarding
misconduct or irregularities in the admission process.



Applicant's Signature Date


F. APPLICATION CHECKLIST

HAVE YOU: J signed and dated the three-page Application for Admission and one-page Information for Residency
Classification forms?

D enclosed the File Log form and three pages of postcards?
L enclosed your personal statement?
O enclosed the application fee, if required?
O sent cover letters to evaluators and instructed them to send letters of evaluation to the College of Law?


Return both copies of this form, the Information for Residency form, and other materials to:
University of Florida College of Law Admissions Office
325 Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117622, Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


Lawap Rev. 9/96







Information for Residency Classification
A Florida "resident for tuition purposes" is a person who has, or a dependent person whose parent or legal guardian has, established and maintained legal residence in
Florida for at least 12 months. Residence in Florida must be as a bonafide domicile rather than for the purpose of maintaining a residence incident to enrollment at an
institution of higher education. To qualify as a Florida resident for tuition purposes you must be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident alien, or legal alien granted
indefinite stay by the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Other persons not meeting the 12-month legal residence requirement may be classified as Florida
residents for tuition purposes only if they fall within one of the limited special categories authorized by the Florida Legislature and Board of Regents. All other persons
are ineligible for classification as a Florida "resident for tuition purposes." Living in or attending school in Florida will not, in itself, establish legal residence.
Students who depend on out-of-state parents for support are presumed to be legal residents of the same state as their parents.

NON-FLORIDA RESIDENTS: I understand that I do not qualify as a Florida resident for tuition purposes for the term for which this application is submitted
and that if I should qualify for some future term it will be necessary for me to file the required documentation prior to the beginning of the term in order to be considered
for Florida residency classification.

Signature (in ink) Date

FLORIDA RESIDENTS: This section must be completed in full if you claim Florida residency for tuition purposes.
ATTACH COPIES (IF ANY) OF REQUIRED DOCUMENTATION
* A notarized copy of your and/or your parents' most recent tax return or other documentation may be requested to establish dependence/
independence. Dependent: a person for whom 50% or more of his/her support is provided by another as defined by the Internal Revenue Service.
Independent: a person who provides more than 50% of his/her own support.
A copy of marriage certificate is required in all cases of spouse claiming partner's residency.

1 A. I am an independent person and have maintained legal residence in Florida for at least 12 months.
L B. I am a dependent person and my parent or legal guardian has maintained legal residence in Florida for at least 12 months. (Required: Copy of most recent
tax return on which you were claimed as a dependent or other proof of dependency may be requested.)
O C. I am a dependent person who has resided for five years with an adult relative other than my parent or legal guardian, and my relative has maintained legal
residence in Florida for at least 12 months. (Required: Copy of most recent tax return on which you were claimed as a dependent or other proof of dependency.)
" D. I am married to a person who has maintained legal residence in Florida for at least 12 months. I now have established legal residence and intend to make Florida
my permanent home. (Required: Copy of marriage certificate, claimant's voter registration, driver license, vehicle registration.)
O E. I was previously enrolled at a Florida state institution and classified as a Florida resident for tuition purposes. I abandoned my Florida domicile less than 12
months ago, and am now re-establishing Florida legal residence.
O F. According to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, I am a permanent resident alien or other legal alien granted indefinite stay and I have established
and maintained domicile in Florida for at least 12 months. (Required: INS documentation with proof of residency status.)
O G. I am a member of the armed services of the U.S. and am stationed in Florida on active military duty pursuant to military orders, or whose home of record is Florida,
or I am the member's spouse or dependent child. (Required: Copy of military orders or DD2058 showing home of record.)
O H. I am a full-time instructional or administrative employee employed by a Florida public school, community college, or institution of higher education or I am
the employee's spouse or dependent child. (Required: Copy of employment verification.)
O I. I am part of the Latin American/Caribbean scholarship program. (Required: Copy of scholarship papers.)
O J. I am a qualified beneficiary under the terms of the Florida Pre-Paid Postsecondary Expense Program, S. 240.551, F.S. (Required: Copy of card.)
O K. I am living on the Isthmus of Panama and have completed 12 consecutive months of college work at the F.S.U. Panama Canal Branch, or I am the student's spouse
or dependent child. (Required: Copy of marriage certificate or proof of dependency.)
U L. I am a Southern Regional Education Board's Academic Common Market graduate student (Required: Certification letter from state coordinator.)
O M. I am an employee of a state agency or political subdivision of the state whose student fees are paid by the state agency or political subdivision for the purpose
of job-related law enforcement or corrections training.
O N. I am a McKnight Fellowship recipient. (Required: Verification from graduate studies.)

Person claiming residency should complete this section in full.
* Documents supporting the establishment of legal residence must be dated, issued, or filed 12 months before the first day of classes of the term for
which a Florida resident classification is sought. All documentation is subject to verification. Additional documentation may be requested.

1. Name of Student: 2. Student SSN: / /

3. Name of person claiming Florida residency: 4. Claimant's relationship to student:

5. Claimant's permanent legal address:
Street /P.O. Number/Apartment Number
6. ( )
Claimant's telephone number city State Zip
7. Date claimant began establishing legal Florida residence and domicile: __ /__ /

8. Claimant's voter registration State: Number: County: Issue Date: / /

9. Claimant's driver's license State: Number: Issue Date: / /

10. Claimant's vehicle registration State: Tag Number: Issue Date: / /

11. Non-U.S. Citizen only. Resident alien number: Issue Date: / /
(Copy of both sides of card required)
I do hereby swear or affirm that the above-named student meets all the requirements indicated in the checked category above for classification as a Florida resident for tuition
purposes. I understand that a false statement in this affidavit will subject me to penalties for making a false statement pursuant to 837.06, Florida Statutes, and to BOR Rule
6C-6.001(6), F.A.C.


Signature (in ink) of person claiming Florida residency as listed on Item #3 above Date
Rev.5/95











. UNIVERSITY OF
,)FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF LAW


325 Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


FILE ACTIVITY

CLASS OF: /
APP. RECVD: / /
P.S. RECVD: / /
ACK. SENT: / /
LSAT RECVD: /


STATUS DATES

ADMIT
DENY
HOLD
DH WAIT
CANCEL


QUESTION C2 CIRCLE
Attended another law school Yes No
If yes, which one
Transcript on file
In good standing letter on file
OK to process Yes No


QUESTIONS Dl, D2 & D3
D1
If ves:


Expl. o
Docur


D2
If yes:
Expl. o
Docun

D3
If yes:
Expl. o
Docurr


CIRCLE
Yes No


APPLIED BEFORE:
DATE LSAT/LSDAS REQ:


CONTACT LOG
DATE PERSON


LSDAS MISSING
TRANS PENDING
SCORE MISC
POSTCARD SENT:


LETTERS OF EVALUATION










NOTES


n file:
i. on file:

Yes No


n file:
i. on file:

Yes No


n file:
i. on file:


FILE LOG


COMMENT


CIRCLE
O P
O P
O P
O P
O P


_~~









4a


: UNIVERSITY OF
F FLORIDA
COLLEGE OF LAW


COVER LETTER FOR
EVALUATION OF APPLICANT


325 Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


TO THE APPLICANT

Read the entire form and complete the sections pertaining to you before giving it to your evaluator. The evaluator will complete
and sign the form, and attach it to the evaluation. (Print or Type)
Name of Applicant
Last First Middle

Social Security Number

WAIVER OF ACCESS
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, provides an applicant with the right of access to the contents
of this evaluation once enrolled in the College of Law. The Act also allows an applicant to waive the right of access, but prohibits
a school from requiring an applicant to waive this right as condition of admission. By signing one of the statements below, the
applicant acknowledges having read and understood the statement of federal law governing the right of access to the evaluation.
After reading the following statements, sign and date only one of them.
1. I hereby waive my right of access to the contents of this evaluation letter and I authorize my evaluator to provide the College
of Law with a candid evaluation of me and other relevant information that may be required to support my application.


Signature


Date


2. I do not waive my right of access to the contents of this evaluation letter and I authorize my evaluator to provide the College of
Law with a candid evaluation of me and other relevant information that may be required to support my application.


Signature


Date


A- a membi r ot tihe Li\\ School .\dmnussiion Council, the UF Coll..ge of Law is obliged to report ini-condtuct and irregularities
ob-ler\icd in tile appli,:ation and admi--.ion proLc-.. PI:iase read the "MisiconducLIt and lrregtiliariti:-, in the Admi-l.ionrs Proce-.-'
-ection of the I l..IT/LL D.-O S R,,iti alioli ,and hiii 1ii niailt iu o ..



TO THE EVALUATOR

Please complete and attach this form to your evaluation of the applicant named above and mail it to the College of Law address
listed above. The purpose of your letter is to provide an objective, first-hand evaluation of the applicant's qualifications for enter-
ing law school, based on the candidate's performance in such areas as academia, employment and community service. If the
applicant has not waived access, the applicant may review the evaluation after enrolling at the College of Law. Otherwise, only
members of the College of Law Admissions Committee will review the evaluation. (Print or Type)


Name of Evaluator


Position/Title


Address


Date


Signature
Eval Rev. 9/96









4b


. UNIVERSITY OF
'.)F LORIDA
COLLEGE OF LAW


COVER LETTER FOR
EVALUATION OF APPLICANT


325 Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


TO THE APPLICANT

Read the entire form and complete the sections pertaining to you before giving it to your evaluator. The evaluator will complete
and sign the form, and attach it to the evaluation. (Print or Type)
Name of Applicant
Last First Middle

Social Security Number

WAIVER OF ACCESS
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, provides an applicant with the right of access to the contents
of this evaluation once enrolled in the College of Law. The Act also allows an applicant to waive the right of access, but prohibits
a school from requiring an applicant to waive this right as condition of admission. By signing one of the statements below, the
applicant acknowledges having read and understood the statement of federal law governing the right of access to the evaluation.
After reading the following statements, sign and date only one of them.
1. I hereby waive my right of access to the contents of this evaluation letter and I authorize my evaluator to provide the College
of Law with a candid evaluation of me and other relevant information that may be required to support my application.


Signature


Date


2. I do not waive my right of access to the contents of this evaluation letter and I authorize my evaluator to provide the College of
Law with a candid evaluation of me and other relevant information that may be required to support my application.
Signature Date__



A-. a memb'.r of the Law School .A\d ni--ioins Council. the LiF College ot L.aw. i obhlteed 1 report mi.condi Lit dlad IrrIgularil.tles
(obl-.-r\td in the application ond .adimiJ n procet~ Ple.a-e iead the "MiciL'nduct aind Irrtzulritu.-. in the. Admi ;ion- Proce-.-
action of the LSAT/LSDAS Rci titit..,'i ,ir liitrmiiil, n ,..i .,'



TO THE EVALUATOR

Please complete and attach this form to your evaluation of the applicant named above and mail it to the College of Law address
listed above. The purpose of your letter is to provide an objective, first-hand evaluation of the applicant's qualifications for enter-
ing law school, based on the candidate's performance in such areas as academia, employment and community service. If the
applicant has not waived access, the applicant may review the evaluation after enrolling at the College of Law. Otherwise, only
members of the College of Law Admissions Committee will review the evaluation. (Print or Type)


Name of Evaluator


Position/Title


Address


Date


Signature
Eval Rev. 9/96









4c
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA COVER LETTER FOR
COLLEGE OF LAW EVALUATION OF APPLICANT

325 Holland Hall, P.O. Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


TO THE APPLICANT

Read the entire form and complete the sections pertaining to you before giving it to your evaluator. The evaluator will complete
and sign the form, and attach it to the evaluation. (Print or Type)
Name of Applicant
Last First Middle

Social Security Number

WAIVER OF ACCESS
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, provides an applicant with the right of access to the contents
of this evaluation once enrolled in the College of Law. The Act also allows an applicant to waive the right of access, but prohibits
a school from requiring an applicant to waive this right as condition of admission. By signing one of the statements below, the
applicant acknowledges having read and understood the statement of federal law governing the right of access to the evaluation.
After reading the following statements, sign and date only one of them.
1. I hereby waive my right of access to the contents of this evaluation letter and I authorize my evaluator to provide the College
of Law with a candid evaluation of me and other relevant information that may be required to support my application.
Signature Date

2. I do not waive my right of access to the contents of this evaluation letter and I authorize my evaluator to provide the College of
Law with a candid evaluation of me and other relevant information that may be required to support my application.
Signature Date


A i a member of the La\\ School Admink.ionC Council, the LUF Collkge ot LaW is obliged to report rmi-conduct and irrctgulariti-e
ob-;rved in their application and admi--sion proce-;.. Plas.e read the "Mi.(condLct and Irregulahrities in the A..dmis;ion. Proctis-
.section ot the LSA5..1/LSDAS R11-',. ,,iii 'ii ,'tl i t.' LatiaIt F1 ,IIk.



TO THE EVALUATOR

Please complete and attach this form to your evaluation of the applicant named above and mail it to the College of Law address
listed above. The purpose of your letter is to provide an objective, first-hand evaluation of the applicant's qualifications for enter-
ing law school, based on the candidate's performance in such areas as academia, employment and community service. If the
applicant has not waived access, the applicant may review the evaluation after enrolling at the College of Law. Otherwise, only
members of the College of Law Admissions Committee will review the evaluation. (Print or Type)

Name of Evaluator Position/Title

Address

Signature Date
Eval Rev. 9/96








I Tear Along This Line Only. Do Not Tear Apart the Cards. I


Evaluation Letters

Thank You Cards

(Please Print)
Address these cards to the three persons
who are writing your evaluation letters.
Return this page of postcards with your application.
(More directions on other side.)


-. UNIVERSITY OF
'FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


(Evaluator Name)


(Evaluator Address)


DO NOT TEAR
APART THE
CARDS


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


(Evaluator Name)


(Evaluator Address)


(Evaluator Name)


(Evaluator Address)








1 Tear Along This Line Only. Do Not Tear Apart the Cards. I


Dear Evaluator:


Your letter of evaluation on behalf of:


(Applicant Name)
has been received by the University of Florida College of Law. We thank
you for your time and helpful comments regarding this candidate's
potential for law study.

J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions


Dear Evaluator:


Evaluation Letters

Thank You Cards

Please print your name clearly
in the space provided.
(More directions on other side.)



DO NOT TEAR
APART THE
CARDS


Dear Evaluator:


Your letter of evaluation on behalf of:


(Applicant Name)
has been received by the University of Florida College of Law. We thank
you for your time and helpful comments regarding this candidate's
potential for law study.

J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions


Your letter of evaluation on behalf of:


(Applicant Name)
has been received by the University of Florida College of Law. We thank
you for your time and helpful comments regarding this candidate's
potential for law study.

J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions








STear Along This Line Only. Do Not Tear Apart the Cards.


UNIVERSITY OF
SFLORIDA


Evaluation Letters

Receipt Notices To Candidate

(Please Print)
Address these cards to yourself.
(More directions on other side.)


College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


(Applicant Name)


(Applicant Address)


DO NOT TEAR
APART THE
CARDS


a UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


.t UNIVERSITY OF
^ FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


(Applicant Name)


(Applicant Address)


(Applicant Name)

(Applicant Address)








I Tear Along This Line Only. Do Not Tear Apart the Cards. I


Dear Candidate for Admission:


Please be advised that the letter of evaluation from:


Evaluation Letters


(Evaluator Name)
has been received by the College of Law and is now
part of your admission file.

J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions





Dear Candidate for Admission:


Please be advised that the letter of evaluation from:


Receipt Notices To Candidate

Using one card per evaluator, please print the
names of your evaluators in the space provided.
Return this page of postcards with your application.
(More directions on other side.)


DO NOT TEAR
APART THE
/ CARDS


Dear Candidate for Admission:


Please be advised that the letter of evaluation from:


(Evaluator Name)
has been received by the College of Law and is now
part of your admission file.


J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions


(Evaluator Name)
has been received by the College of Law and is now
part of your admission file.


J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions





Acknowledgment/Trouble Cards

Please print your name and address in the space provided, and return this page of postcards with your application.

1 Tear Along This Line Only. Do Not Tear Apart the Cards. I


UNIVERSITY OF
r- FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


(Applicant Name)


(Applicant Name)

(Applicant Address)


(Applicant Address)


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


UNIVERSITY OF
4 FLORIDA
College of Law
325 Holland Hall
PO Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


(Applicant Name)


(Applicant Address)


(Applicant Name)

(Applicant Address)


1









I Tear Along This Line Only. Do Not Tear Apart the Cards. I


Date Mailed:


Date Mailed:


This card acknowledges receipt of your application to the University of Your prompt attention to these missing items will ensure the timely
Florida College of Law. If you have not already done so, please submit processing of your application. Thank you.
ALL supporting materials within two to three weeks from the date of
this card. If your LSDAS file is complete, your LSAT/LSDAS Law School LSAT/LSDAS Law School Report
Report should arrive within that time period. Once that report is on file,
Explanation/Documents regarding Questions D1, D2 or D3
the process of evaluating your application will begin.
Other:
Although this office will attempt to notify you of missing materials, the
ultimate responsibility to ensure timely completion of the application is
yours.

Thank you, Receipt Deadline:
J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions




Date Mailed: Date Mailed:
Date Mailed:--------


Your prompt attention to these missing items will ensure the timely
processing of your application. Thank you.

LSAT/LSDAS Law School Report

Explanation/Documents regarding Questions Dl, D2 or D3


Your prompt attention to these missing items will ensure the timely
processing of your application. Thank you.

LSAT/LSDAS Law School Report

Explanation/Documents regarding Questions Dl, D2 or D3


Other:


Other:


Receipt Deadline:


Receipt Deadline: ___






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


College of Law University of FlorL-.3 1262 05933 8888
Administration Senior Administration .


Senior Academic Administrators
Richard A. Matasar
Dean and Levin, Mabie
& Levin Professor of Law

George L. Dawson
Associate Deanfor Academic Affairs
& Professor of Law

Christopher Slobogin
Associate Dean for Faculty Development,
Alumni Research Scholar, Professor of Law
& Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry

Program Administration
Michael K. Friel
Associate Dean, Director of LL.M. in Taxation
& Professor of Law

Roy Hunt
Director of LL.M. in Comparative Law
& Distinguished Service Professor

Jon L. Mills
Director of Centerfor Governmental Responsibility
& Professor of law

Anne Rutledge
Director of Legal Drafting

Grace W. "Betty" Taylor
Director of Legal Information Center
& ClarenceJ. TeSelle Professor ofLaw

Henry Wihnyk
Director ofLegal Research
& Writing/Appellate Advocacy

Admissions
J. Michael Patrick
Assistant Dean for Admissions

Student Affairs
Gail E. Sasnett
Associate Deanfor Students

Karen R. Kirsch
Acting Assistant Dean for Career Services

Rahim Reed
Assistant Dean for Student & Minority Affairs

Patrick Shannon
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

Administrative Services
Martina Pelley
Coordinator

Development & Alumni Affairs
Jeffrey A. Ulmer
Director of Development & Alumni Affairs

Public Affairs
Denise L.B. Stobbie
Director of Communications


John V. Lombardi
President

Elizabeth D. Capaldi
Provost

Gene W. Hemp
Vice Provost

David R. Challoner
Vice President for Health Affairs

James M. Davidson
Vice President for Agriculture
& Natural Resources

Karen A. Holbrook
Vice President for Research
& Dean of Graduate School

Paul A. Robell
Vice President for Development
& Alumni Affairs

C. Arthur Sandeen
Vice President for Student Affairs

Gerald Shaffer
Vice President forAdministrative Affairs




State University System

Board of Regents
Elizabeth G. Lindsay
Chair
Steven J. Uhlfelder (J.D. 1971)
Vice Chair
Audrea I. Anderson
R. Julian Bennett Jr.
Frank Brogan
Paul L. Cejas
C.B. Daniel
James F. Heekin Jr.
Cornelia S. James
Philip D. Lewis
Gwendolyn F. McLin
Jon C. Moyle (J.D. 1961)
Dennis M. Ross
Welcom H. Watson

Chancellor
Charles B. Reed


Produced by the UF College of Law Communications Office Designed by ComQuest Designs, Inc.
Printed by StorterChilds Printing Co., Inc. Principal photography by UF News & Public Affairs


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UNIVERSITY
FLORIA

S 5 G OF AW 0..o1 2 Gansvle FL21172




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