• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Using your undergraduate catal...
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendars
 Administration
 Florida's first university
 Admissions
 Residency
 Expenses
 Student affairs
 Student life
 Academic regulations
 Time-shortened degree opportun...
 Academic advisement
 Lower division requirements
 Colleges
 Description of courses
 Staff and faculty
 Florida's statewide course numbering...
 Course prefixes listing
 Departments of instruction
 Glossary of terms
 Index
 Correspondence directory
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00043
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00043
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Using your undergraduate catalog
        Using your undergraduate catalog
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Calendars
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Administration
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Florida's first university
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Admissions
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Residency
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Expenses
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Student affairs
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Student life
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Academic regulations
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Time-shortened degree opportunities
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Academic advisement
        Page 43
    Lower division requirements
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Colleges
        Page 48
        Fisher school of accounting
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        College of agriculture
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
        College of architecture
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        M.E. Rinker, Sr. school of building construction
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
        College of business administration
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
        College of dentistry
            Page 99
        College of education
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
        College of engineering
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
        College of fine arts
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
        School of forest resources and conservation
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
        College of health and human performance
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
        College of health related professions
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
        College of journalism and communications
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
        Center for Latin American studies
            Page 160
        College of law
            Page 161
        College of liberal arts and sciences
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
        College of medicine
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
        College of natural resources and environment
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
        College of nursing
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
        College of pharmacy
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
            Page 188
        College of veterinary medicine
            Page 189
            Page 190
        Military science
            Page 191
            Page 192
    Description of courses
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
    Staff and faculty
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
    Florida's statewide course numbering system
        Page 356
    Course prefixes listing
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
    Departments of instruction
        Page 361
    Glossary of terms
        Page 362
    Index
        Page 363
        Page 364
    Correspondence directory
        Page 365
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text












rrl


A j









UNIVRS~
T7T T,2









Using Your Undergraduate Catalog
This Undergraduate Catalog is organized into three main sections: The first section explains university administration as it relates to the student; the second
section presents a description of the academic units; and the third section lists the course descriptions. Other information is provided, including a calendar of
critical dates at the front and a listing of faculty and staff at the back. An index is placed at the end of the catalog for reference purposes.
Each college of the University of Florida campus is represented in the Undergraduate Catalog. A typical college section describes programs offered by
the college, requirements for admission into that college and information on other topics such as the drop policy, student responsibility, normal course
loads and other college regulations.
If you are interested in a brief description of an undergraduate course, first consult the Course Prefixes listing for the name of the department that offers
the course. For example, a course with the prefix ADV is taught by the departments of Advertising and Telecommunication. NOTE: Because some courses
are offered by more than one department, you may have to look in several departments' course descriptions sections to find course information.

Course Prefixes listing
The following table lists the statewide course prefixes, their titles, and the University of Florida departments which teach courses having this prefix. A
page index of the departments of instruction appears at the back of the catalog.


PREFIX TITLE
ACG Accounting
ADE Adult Education
ADV Advertising

AEB Agr. Economics & Business
AEE Agr. & Ext. Education
AFA Afro-American Studies
SLS Student Development
SSE Social Studies Education
STA Statistics


SUR Surveying


TAUGHT BY DEPTS. OF:
Accounting
Education-Educational Leadership
Advertising
Telecommunication
Food & Resource Economics
Agricultural Education & Communication
Afro-American Studies
Career Development Program
Education Instruction & Curriculum
Business Admin. General
Industrial & Systems Engineering
Statistics
Civil Engineering


After determining which department offers the course, refer to the Departments of Instruction index. The index will direct you to the department you
seek, the Department of Advertising in the example below.
You will find a short description of each undergraduate course listed by course prefix and number within the department's course description section.
Course descriptions typically have six parts. ADV 4200 is shown below:






ADV 4200 Advertising Graphics and Production. F,S. 5
(4 Credits: 3; Prereq: minimum grade of C in ADV 3000.
Designed to acquaint students with the terminology and production
techniques of the advertising business. Lectures will cover such sub-
jects as typography, printing, engraving, photography, silk screen-
ing, direct mail, exibitis, displays, packaging. ()


1. Course prefix and number.
2. Course title.
3. Term(s) in which course is offered:
F=fall term
S=spring term
SS=summer term


4. Semester credits obtained upon successful completion of course.
5. Prerequisites or corequisites, if any.
6. Brief description.
7. Identification of the General Education Requirement categories this
course satisfies, if any.








The
University Record
of the
University
of
Florida


VOLUME XC SERIES 1 NUMBER 2 MARCH 1995
The University Record (USPS 652-760) published quarterly by the University of Florida, Office of the University Registrar, Academic
Publications, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000. Second class postage paid at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to OFFICE OF THE UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-4000.


u % '71Y CT FLORIDRA LA=j!IES


































n o.


EDUCATION
&IBRARY









The university encourages applications from qualified applicants of both sexes from
all cultural, racial, religious and ethnic groups. The university is committed to non-
discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, marital
status, national origin, political affiliations or opinions, and veteran status in the
administration of education policies, financial aid, employment or in any program or
activity.



The Undergraduate Catalog has been adopted as a rule of the university pursuant to the provision of Chapter 120 of the Florida
Statutes. Addenda to the University Record Series, if any, are available from the Office of the University Registrar, 222 Criser Hall.
Upon request, the undergraduate catalog is available on computer disk to students with print-oriented disabilities. For more informa-
tion, contact the Office of the University Registrar. For persons with hearing impairments, please use the Florida Relay Service (FRS)
when offices and departments on campus do not list a TDD number. The FRS number is 1-800-955-8771 (TDD).
Software Copyright Policy: The principles for using and managing software derive from U.S. copyright law, the Florida Computer
Crimes Act and legal agreements in the form of licenses and purchase agreements. That foundation makes the basic policy governing
software clear:
"All faculty, staff and students of the university are required and expected to obey the laws and legal agreements governing
software use. Failure to do so can lead to monetary damages and/or criminal penalties for the individual violator. Because such
violations are also against university policies and rules, disciplinary action will be taken as appropriate."








TABLE OF CONTENTS
University Critical Dates and Deadlines 1995-96.............................1-4
University Calendar At-a-Glance 1995-96 ............................................ 5
Board of Education................................. ................. .........................6
Senior Administrative Officers of the University .............................7
University of Florida: Purpose, Mission and Goals..........................9
A dm missions ...................................................................................... 12
Residency ........................................................................................ 19
Expenses ......................................................................................... 21
Student Affairs .................................................................................... 23
Student Life ..................................................................................... 31
Academic Regulations ......................................................................35
Administrative Provisions ..................................... .............. 35
Registration Policies...................................................................36
Attendance Policies ......................................................................37
Grades and Grading Policies ............................................... ...37
Academic Progress Regulations ........................................... .. 39
Degrees and Graduation .................................................... .....40
Time-Shortened Degree Opportunities................................... ....41
Academic Advisement..... ..............................................................43
Lower Division.. .............................................................................. 44
Colleges, Schools and Curricula
Fisher School of Accounting ................................................ ... 48
College of Agriculture ................................................................51
College of Architecture ................................................................77
M. E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction.....................83
College of Business Administration .............................................. 87
College of Dentistry ....................... .............. ..........................99
College of Education................................................................100
College of Engineering..............................................................106
College of Fine Arts ...................................................................124
School of Forest Resources and Conservation....................... 140
College of Health and Human Performance .............................. 144
College of Health Related Professions ........................................ 150
College of Journalism and Communications.............................. 154
Center for Latin American Studies ..............................................160
College of Law .................................... .......................................161
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.................................. ..162
College of Medicine ................................................................172
College of Natural Resources and Environment ....................... 175
College of Nursing .....................................................................180
College of Pharmacy ..................................................................184
College of Veterinary Medicine................................. ......189
Division of Military Science .................................... ............. 191
Description of Courses........................ ............ ..........................193
Staff and Faculty .................................... ..........................................314
Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System..............................356
Course Prefixes ................................................................. ........... 357
Departments of Instruction ............................................................. 361
Glossary of Terms................................................ .................362
Index ..................................................... ................... ..................... 363


Rules, policies, fees, dates and courses described in this catalog are subject to change without notice.























































































iv









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR 1995-96

APPLICATION DEADLINES
The application deadlines indicated below apply to former University of Florida students, students seeking admission to the University of Florida for
the first time and currently enrolled students submitting an Upper Division College Referral.
The application deadlines refer to completion of all application procedures, including receipt of all required credentials and the completion of depart-
mental requirements, if any. Applications for admission to limited access programs received after the deadline may be returned unprocessed. Applications
for admission to other programs received after the deadline will be processed on a space-available basis. Applications for admission to certain programs
will be considered only for the terms) indicated below.


LOWER DIVISION
Beginning Freshmen
Freshman & Sophomore Transfers
UPPER DIVISION
Juniors, Seniors & Postbaccalaureates
Accounting
Architecture
Building Construction
Business Administration
Graphic Design
Health Professions Postbaccalaureate
Interior Design
Journalism
Landscape Architecture
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
Physician Assistant
All Other Undergraduate Programs
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Anthropology
Architecture
Building Construction
Business Administration (M.A., M.S., Ph.D.)
Clinical Psychology
Counseling Psychology
Counselor Education
English
Master of Business Administration
Master of Laws in Taxation
Nursing
*All Other Graduate Programs


1995 FALL

February 1
February 1


June 9
February 15
March 1
June 9
April 1
May 1
June 9
April 1
May 11
June 9
February 15
February 1
NA
NA
June 9


March 11
February 15
March 15
February 15
December 1 ('94)
February 15
March 1
February 28
March 31
July 3
June 9
June 9


1996 SPRING

November 1
November 1


November 1
October 6
September 1
November 1
NA
October 2
November 1
November 1
November 1
November 1
NA
NA
NA
NA
November 1

November 1
NA
October 16
November 1
NA
NA
September 29
November 1
September 1
NA
November 1
November 1


1996 SUMMER
TERMS A & C
February 1
February 1


March 1
March 1
NA
March 1
NA
February 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
March 1
NA
NA
NA
NA
March 1


March 11
NA
March 1
April 1
NA
NA
NA
NA
'NA
NA
March 1
March 1


1996 SUMMER
TERMB
February 1
February 1


NA
April 12
NA
NA
NA
March 11
April 12
April 12
April 12
NA
NA
NA
February 15
December 1 ('95)
April 12


March 11
NA
March 1
April 1
NA
NA
NA
NA
March 1
NA
NA
April 15


*NOTE: Some departments have found it necessary to establish earlier deadlines for receipt of applications and all supporting records. All graduate appli-
cants should contact the appropriate department regarding application deadlines.
PROFESSIONAL COLLEGES
Applicants for admission to the professional colleges of Law, Dentistry, Medicine or Veterinary Medicine are advised to contact the college directly regard-
ing application deadlines and requirements.

OTHER IMPORTANT DATES


Registration
Classes Begin
Drop/Add
Add Only
Degree Application Deadline
Deadline to Drop a Course by
College Petition
Deadline to Withdraw from
the University
Classes End
Final Examinations
Commencement


1996 SPRING
January 3
January 4
January 4-5, & 8
January 9
January 26

April 12

April 12
April 24
April 27-May 3
May 4


1996 SUMMER
TERM A
May 10
May 13
May 13,14
None
May 15

June 14

June 14
June 21
In Class
None


1996 SUMMER
TERM B
June 28
July 1
July 1,2
None
July 3

August 2

August 2
August 9
In Class
August 10


1996 SUMMER
TERM C
May 10
May 13
May 13,14
None
May 15

August 2

August 2
August 9
In Class
August 10


1995 FALL
August 21-22
August 23
August 23-25
August 28
September 15

November 22

November 22
December 6
December 9-16
December 16






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


CRITICAL DATES AND
DEADLINES
FALL 1995
1995
February 1, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for beginning freshmen, lower divi-
sion transfers and the undergraduate
program in Pharmacy.
February 15, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate programs in Architec-
ture, Business Administration and
Counseling Psychology.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate programs in
Architecture and Occupational Therapy.
February 18, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
February 28, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in English.
March 1, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate program in
Building Construction and graduate pro-
gram in Counselor Education.
March 11, Saturday
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in Anthro-
pology.
March 15, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in Building
Construction.
March 31, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate MBA program.
April 1, Saturday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate programs in
Graphic Design and Journalism.
May 11, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate program in
Landscape Architecture.
June 3, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
June 9, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for all programs except those listed
with other deadlines.
July 3, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for Master of Laws in Taxation pro-
gram.


August 21-22, Monday-Tuesday
Registration (tentative) according to
appointments.
August 23, Wednesday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students registering
late subject to late registration fee of at
least $50 and no more than $100.
August 25, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to drop a course and to change sec-
tions without fee liability.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with full refund of fees.
August 28, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to complete late registration and to
add a course (no drops permitted).
August 29, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file address change to receive all
university correspondence, if not living
in residence halls.
September 1, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full. All waivers
must be established. Students who have
not paid fees or arranged to pay fees
with University Financial Services will be
fined a late payment fee of at least $50
and no more than $100.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency
reclassification and all appropriate docu-
mentation.
September 4, Monday-Labor Day
Classes suspended.
September 8, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file S-U Option application.
September 15, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
and receive 25% refund of course fees.
Deadline to apply for a current term degree
application.
Deadline to apply for a current term
Associate of Arts certificate.
October 7, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
November 3-4, Friday & Saturday
Homecoming Classes suspended Friday.
November 10, Friday-Veterans Day (observed)
Classes suspended.
November 22, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
without receiving failing grades.
Deadline to drop a course by college petition
without receiving WF grade.
November 23-24, Thursday &
Friday-Thanksgiving
Classes suspended.
December 6, Wednesday
Classes end.


December 7-8, Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days no classes.
December 9, Saturday, 7:30 a.m.-December 16,
.Saturday.
Final Examinations.
December 14, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidate grades due to Registrar.
December 15, Friday
Tentative degree candidate grades available
for student pick up.
December 16, Saturday
Commencement.
December 18, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Deadline to submit grades for fall semester.
A grade of I* or N* assigned for Fall 1995
will not be calculated as a failing grade in
the grade point average until the end of
the next term of enrollment. I* and N*
are not assigned to graduating students.

CRITICAL DATES AND
DEADLINES
SPRING 1996
1995
September 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate program in
Building Construction and for graduate
MBA program.
September 29, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in Counselor
Education.
October 2, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for Health Professions postbaccalau-
reate.
October 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate program in
Architecture.
October 16, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all applications mater-
ials for graduate program in Building
Construction.
November 1, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for beginning freshmen and lower
division transfer students.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for all programs except those listed
with other deadlines.

1996
January 3, Wednesday
Registration (tentative) according to
appointments.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


January 4, Thursday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students registering
late subject to late registration fee of at
least $50 and no more than $100.
January 8, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to drop a course and to change sec-
tions without fee liability.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with full refund of fees.
January 9, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to complete late registration and to
add a course (no drops permitted).
January 10, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file address change to receive all
university correspondence, if not living
in residence halls.
January 15, Monday-Martin Luther King Jr.'s
birthday observed.
Classes suspended.
January 19, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full. All waivers
must be established. Students who have
not paid fees or arranged to pay fees
with University Financial Services will be
fined a late payment fee of at least $50
and no more than $100.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency
reclassification, and all appropriate docu-
mentation.
January 19, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file S-U Option application.
January 26, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to apply for a current term degree
application.
Deadline to apply for a current term
Associate of Arts certificate.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with 25% refund of course fees.
February 17, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
March 11-15, Monday-Friday-Spring Break.
Classes suspended.
April 12, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
without receiving failing grades.
Deadline to drop a course by college petition
without receiving WF grade.
April 24, Wednesday
Classes end.
April 25-26, Thursday & Friday
Examination reading days no classes.
April 27, Saturday, 7:30 a.m.-May 3, Friday
Final examinations.
May 2, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidate grades due to Registrar.


May 3, Friday
Tentative degree candidate grades available
for student pick up.
May 4, Saturday
Commencement.
May 6, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Deadline to submit grades for spring
semester.
A grade of I* or N* assigned for Spring 1996
will not be calculated as a failing grade in
the grade point average until the end of
the next term of enrollment. I* and N*
are not assigned to graduating students.


CRITICAL DATES AND
DEADLINES
SUMMER A 1996
1996
February 1, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mate-
rials for beginning freshmen and for
Health Professions postbaccalaureate.
March 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for all programs except those listed
with other deadlines.
March 11, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in Anthro-
pology.
April 1, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mate-
rials for graduate programs in Business
(M.A., M.S., Ph.D.)
May 10, Friday
Registration (tentative) according to
appointments.
May 13, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students registering
late subject to late registration fee of at
least $50 and no more than $100.
May 14, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to complete late registration.
Deadline to drop or add a course and to
change sections without fee liability.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with full refund of fees.
May 15, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file address change to receive all
university correspondence, if not living
in residence halls.
Deadline to apply for a current term degree
application.
Deadline to apply for a current term
Associate of Arts certificate.


May 22, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
and receive 25% refund of course fees.
Deadline to file S-U Option application.
May 24, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full. All waivers
must be established. Students who have
not paid fees or arranged to pay fees
with University Financial Services will be
fined a late payment fee of at least $50
and no more than $100.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency
reclassification, and all appropriate docu-
mentation.
May 27, Monday-Memorial Day observed
Classes suspended.
June 1, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
June 14, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
without receiving failing grades.
Deadline to drop a course by college petition
without receiving WF grade.
June 21, Friday
Classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular
class periods.
June 22, Saturday
Graduation. No commencement ceremony.
June 24, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Deadline to submit grades for Summer A.
A grade of I* or N* assigned for Summer A
1996 will not be calculated as a failing
grade in the grade point average until the
end of the next term of enrollment. The
three summer terms are considered con-
secutively as a single term. I* and N* are
not assigned to graduating students.
June 25, Tuesday
Tentative degree candidate grades available
for student pick up.


CRITICAL DATES AND
DEADLINES
SUMMER B 1996
1995
December 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for undergraduate Physician Assis-
tant Program.

1996
February 1, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for beginning freshmen.
February 15, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for program in Physical Therapy.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


March 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate MBA program and
Building Construction.
March 11, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in Anthro-
pology and for Health Professions post-
baccalaureate.
April 12, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for all undergraduate programs
except those listed with other deadlines.
April 15, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for all graduate programs except
those listed with other deadlines.
June 28, Friday
Registration (tentative) according to
appointments.
July 1, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students registering
late subject to late registration fee of at
least $50 and no more than $100.
July 2, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to complete late registration.
Deadline to drop or add a course and to
change sections without fee liability.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with full refund of fees.
July 3, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file address change to receive
university correspondence, if not living
in residence halls.
Deadline to apply for a current term degree
application.
Deadline to apply for a current term
Associate of Arts certificate.
July 4, Thursday-Independence Day.
Classes suspended.
July 10, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with 25% refund of course fees.
Deadline to file S-U Option application.
July 12, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full. All waivers
must be established. Students who have
not paid fees or arranged to pay fees
with University Financial Services will be
fined a late payment fee of at least $50
and no more than $100.
Deadline for receipt of residency request and
all appropriate documentation.
August 2, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw front the university
without receiving failing grades.
Deadline to drop a course by college petition
without receiving WF grade.


August 8, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidate grades due.
August 9, Friday
Classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular
class periods.
Tentative degree candidate grades available
for student pick up.
August 10, Saturday
Commencement.
August 12, Monday, 9:00 a.m..
Deadline to submit grades for Summer B.
A grade of I* or N* assigned for Summer B
1996 will not be calculated as a failing
grade in the grade point average until the
end of the next term of enrollment. I*
and N* are not assigned to graduating
students.


CRITICAL DATES AND
DEADLINES
SUMMER C 1996

1996
February 1, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for beginning freshmen and for
Health Professions postbaccalaureate.
March 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for all programs except those listed
with other deadlines.
March 11, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate program in Anthro-
pology.
April 1, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of all application mater-
ials for graduate programs in Business
(M.A., M.S., Ph.D.)
May 10, Friday
Registration (tentative) according to
appointments.
May 13, Monday
Classes begin.
Drop/Add begins.
Late registration begins. Students registering
late will be fined a late payment fee of at
least $50 and no more than $100.
May 14, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to complete late registration.
Deadline to drop or add a course and to
change sections without fee liability.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with full refund of fees.


May 15, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to file address change to receive all
university correspondence, if not living
in residence halls.
Deadline to apply for a current term degree
application.
Deadline to apply for a current term
Associate of Arts certificate.
May 24, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payments are due in full. All waivers
must be established. Students who have
not paid fees or arranged to pay fees
with University Financial Services will be
fined a late payment fee of at least $50
and no more than $100.
Deadline for receipt of request for residency
reclassification and all appropriate docu-
mentation.
May 27, Monday-Memorial Day observed.
Classes suspended.
May 31, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
with 25% refund of course fees.
Deadline to file S-U Option application.
June 1, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
June 24-28, Monday-Friday Summer C break.
Classes suspended.
July 4, Thursday-Independence Day
Classes suspended.
August 2, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw from the university
without receiving failing grades.
Deadline to drop a course by college petition
without receiving WF grade.
August 8, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidate grades due.
August 9, Friday
Classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular
class periods.
Tentative degree candidate grades available
for student pick up.
August 10, Saturday
Commencement.
August 12, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Deadline to submit grades for Summer C.
A grade of I* or N* assigned for Summer C
1996 will not be calculated as a failing
grade in the grade point average until the
end of the next term of enrollment. I*
and N* are not assigned to graduating
students




UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA


Saturday Classes Added

Approved Calendar 1995-96 Academic Year


FALL SEMESTER 1995
S M T W T F S
-Registration- --Drop Add--
Aug. 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
.dd Only
27 28 z 29 30 31


Sept. I 1 2
3 "' 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Oct. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 I


Nov.







Dec.


S 2 I Homecomin
1 2 |3 4
5 6 7 8 9 lI"Ha
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 Ho"a24 25
26 27 28 29 30


3 4 5 6 'Readin [9
1 ,,617 s [931

G F- des 12 Q Grd. Co ence-
10 1 4 12 13 iCra 14 e t
17 Craj ~De19 20 21" 22 23


SPRING SEMESTER 1996
S M T W T F S
Holiday Registration -Dmp/Add-- 1
Jan. 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 dd Ad only10 11 12 13
Holiday
14 15a 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31


Feb.


Mar.


1 2 31
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 Ci'Ns
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29

1 2]
31 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
10 11 2----- Sprig Break- --- ------- i--
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30


April 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 .s"d"'"6 L27J
28 C29 0 ]


May


Grades Due
5 6 7


SDeg. Grades ommence-
8 9 103 41 meant
8 9 10 11


Number of traditional Monday, Wednesday, Friday
class days per semester = 44.
Proposed number of M, W, F class days per semester:
Fall = 42; Spring = 44
Examination days are counted as full instructional days.


SUMMER SEMESTER 1996
S M T W T F S
Registration
May 5 6 7 8 9 0 Regit11
-"Dro Add -
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
2Holiday 28 29 30 31
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
26C27ST


June


LAST
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
GradesDue D Cert Registration
23 24 5--s 262Brea 28 29
........ .... -Summ rbra .......


July -fropAd- 3 Holl i] 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1


Aug. L 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 Deg. rades Commence-
4 5 6 7 9 10 ment
Grades Due
11 12 13 14 15 16 17


IDENTIFICATIONSYMBOL:
Classes I I

Exams C

TOTAL DAYS CLASSES & EXAMS
Fall Semester 1995 83 Days
Spring Semester 1996 87 Days
SummerTermA 1996 29 Days
Summer Term B 1996 29 Days
Total: 228 Days
NOTE: A Saturday class day is calculated as a half day. Rev. 1/95


O:calendar:95-96sat.pm5








FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
LAWTON CHILES
Governor
State of Florida

SANDRA MORTHAM
Secretary of State
State of Florida

ROBERT BUTTERWORTH
Attorney General
State of Florida

ROBERT F. MILLIGAN
Comptroller
State of Florida

C. WILLIAM NELSON
State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner
State of Florida

BOB CRAWFORD
Commissioner of Agriculture
State of Florida

FRANK BROGAN
Commissioner of Education
State of Florida




BOARD OF REGENTS


JON C. MOYLE, J.D.
Chairman
West Palm Beach, Florida

JAMES F. HEEKIN, JR., J.D.
Vice Chairman
Orlando, Florida

JASON J. ROSENBERG
Student Regent
Gainesville, Florida

AUDREA I. ANDERSON, M.A.
Ft. Myers, Florida

JULIAN BENNETT, JR., J.D.
Panama City, Florida

FRANK BROGAN, M.A.
Stuart, Florida


PAUL L. CEJAS
Miami, Florida
C.B. DANIEL, B.S.
Gainesville, Florida
PERLA HANTMAN, Ph.D.
Miami Lakes, Florida
ELIZABETH G. LINDSAY, M.B.A.
Sarasota, Florida
GWENDOLYN F. McLIN, Ph.D.
Okahumpka, Florida
DENNIS M. ROSS, B.A.
Tampa, Florida
STEVEN J. UHLFELDER, J.D.
Tallahassee, Florida
WELCOME H. WATSON, J.D.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
CHARLES B. REED, Ph.D.
Chancellor
State University System








SENIOR ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


JOHN V. LOMBARDI, Ph.D.
President
ANDREW A. SORENSEN, Ph.D.
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
GENE W. HEMP, Ph.D.
Vice Provost and Senior Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
DAVID R. CHALLONER, M.D.
Vice President for Health Affairs
JAMES M. DAVIDSON, Ph.D.
Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources


KAREN A. HOLBROOK, Ph.D.
Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School
PAUL A. ROBELL, M.A.
Interim Vice President for Development and Alumni Affairs
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D.
Vice President for Student Affairs

GERALD SCHAFFER, B.S.B.A.
Vice President for Administrative Affairs


ACADEMIC DEANS OF THE UNIVERSITY


PATRICK J. BIRD, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Health and Human Performance
FRANK A. CATALANOTTO, D.M.D.
Dean of the College of Dentistry
LARRY J. CONNOR, Ph.D.
Dean of Academic Programs, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
RICHARD E. DIERKS, D.V.M.
Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine
R. WAYNE DRUMMOND, M.ARCH.
Dean of the College of Architecture
ROBERT G. FRANK, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Health Related Professions
WILLARD W. HARRISON, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
STEPHEN R. HUMPHREY, Ph.D.
Interim Dean, Proposed College of Natural Resources and Environment


TERRY HYNES, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Journalism and Communications
JOHN KRAFT, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Business Administration
JEFFREY E. LEWIS, J.D.
Dean of the College of Law
KATHLEEN A. LONG, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Nursing
RODERICK J. McDAVIS, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Education
DONALD F. McGLOTHLIN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Fine Arts
ALLEN H. NEIMS, M.D.
Dean of the College of Medicine
WINFRED M. PHILLIPS, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Engineering
MICHAEL A. SCHWARTZ, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Pharmacy


SCHOOL DIRECTORS OF THE UNIVERSITY

LOUKAS G. ARVANITIS, Ph.D.
Interim Director, School of Forest Resources and Conservation
WEILIN P. CHANG, Ph.D.
Director, M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Building Construction
DOUGLAS A. SNOWBALL, Ph.D.
Director, Fisher School of Accounting


CHAIRS OF THE ACADEMIC COUNCILS


LEIGHTON E. CLUFF, M.D.
Special Assistant to the Provost
CAROLYN J. HENDERSON, M.S.
Chair, Council on Faculty Enhancement Acti
E. PAUL GIBBS, Ph.D.
Director, Office of International Studies and Pr


)


RAHIM REED, J.D.
Chair, Council on Affirmative Action
JEANINNE N. WEBB, Ed.D.
Chair, Council on Information Technologies and Services
KEITH R. LEGG, Ph.D.
Chair, Council on Undergraduate Academic Support Services


ELIZABETH D. CAPALDI, Ph.D.
Chair, Council on Enrollment Management








ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


MELDA BASSETT, B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, Development
JOHN BATTENFIELD, M.A.
Associate Vice President for University Relations
T. PETER BENNETT, Ph.D.
Director of the Florida Museum of Natural History
PAMELA BERNARD, J.D.
General Counsel
BUDD HARRIS BISHOP, M.F.A.
Director of the Harn Museum of Art

DALE CANELAS, M.A.
Director, Smathers Libraries
RITA M. CLARE, M.A.
Assistant Vice President for Health Affairs,
Business Services
JEREMY FOLEY, M. Ed.
Director, Intercollegiate Athletics
PAMELA F. GARCIA, B.S.
Assistant Vice President for Administrative Affairs
ROBERT G. GARRIGUES, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs, Finance and Operations

LINDA GRAY, M.A.
Assistant Vice President for News and Public Affairs
JACQUELYN D. HART, Ph.D.
Assistant Vice President for Minority Affairs

THOMAS L. HILL, Ph.D.
Dean for Student Services
OTIS P. JONES, JR., B.S.
Assistant Vice President for Administrative Affairs
RICHARD L. JONES, Ph.D.
Dean for Research, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
JOSEPH C. JOYCE, Ph.D.
Interim Dean for Research, Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences

BARBARA J. KEENER, Ed.D.
Dean of Academic Affairs for Community College Relations
and University Ombudsman
GERALD R. KIDNEY, JR., M.P.A.
Assistant Vice President for Health Affairs,
Health Center Affiliations and Contracts


JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D.
Dean of Academic Affairs for Continuing Education

JOHN P. KRUCZEK, M.S.
University Comptroller
KEITH R. LEGG, Ph.D.
Director, University Honors Program
CATHERINE ARCHIBALD LONGSTRETH, Ed.D.
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
HELEN L. MAMARCHEV, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Student Affairs

JEROME H. MODELL, M.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs,
Health Center Affiliations
MILTON E. MORRIS, Ph.D.
Director of Government Relations
CARL M. MOYER, M.S.E.D.
Assistant Vice President for Health Science Center
Development and Alumni Affairs
M. PETER PEVONKA, M.S.P.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs, Research and Academic Support

J. EDWARD POPPELL, M.Ed.
Associate Vice President for Administrative Affairs
WARREN E. ROSS, M.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs
LOUIS S. RUSSO, JR., M.D.
Assistant Vice President for Health Affairs,
Clinical Programs in Jacksonville
GEROLD L. SCHIEBLER, M.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs, External Relations

RALPH SWAIN, Ph.D.
Assistant Vice President for Health Affairs, Facilities
BARBARA TALMADGE, A.M.
University Registrar
PATRICIA U. WINNING, M.B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Health Affairs, Strategic Planning

JOHN T. WOESTE, Ph.D.
Dean for Extension,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
DAVID B. WOODALL, B.A.
Assistant Vice President for Development, Major Gifts


OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY STUDENT BODY


CHRIS TOMPKINS
President of the Student Body

KEVIN MAYEUX
President of the Student Senate

BOBBY DUBOSE
Vice President of the Student Body


BRIAN SIEMIENAS
Treasurer of the Student Body

ANTON HOPEN
Chancellor of the Honor Court

BRIAN BURGOON
Chief Justice of the Traffic Court









Florida's First University


Institutional Purpose

The University of Florida is a public, land-
grant research university, one of the most com-
prehensive in the United States; it encompasses
virtually all academic and professional disci-
plines. It is the oldest and largest of Florida's
nine universities and is a member of the
American Association of Universities. Its fac-
ulty and staff are dedicated to the common
pursuit of the university's threefold mission:
education, research and service.
Teaching undergraduate and graduate
through the doctorate is the fundamental
purpose of the university. Research and schol-
arship are integral to the education process and
to expanding humankind's understanding of
the natural world, the mind and the senses.
Service is the university's obligation to share the
benefits of its knowledge for the public good.
These three interlocking elements span all of
the University of Florida's academic disciplines
and multidisciplinary centers and represent the
university's obligation to lead and serve the
needs of the nation, all of Florida's citizens, as
well as the public and private educational sys-
tem of Florida by pursuing and disseminating
new knowledge while building upon the past.
The University of Florida is committed to
providing the knowledge, benefits and services
it produces with quality and effectiveness. It
aspires to further national and international
recognition for its initiatives and achievement in
promoting human values and improving the
quality of life.


Mission and Goals

The university belongs to an ancient tradi-
tion of great universities. We participate in an
elaborate conversation among scholars and stu-
dents that extends over space and time, linking
the experiences of Western Europe with the tra-
ditions and histories of all cultures, that
explores the limits of the physical and biological
universes, and that nurtures and prepares gen-
erations of educated people to address the prob-
lems of our societies. While this university rec-
ognizes no limits on its intellectual boundaries,
and our faculty and students remain free to
teach and learn, to explore wherever the mind
and imagination lead, we live in a world with
limits and restraints. Out of the conflict
between intellectual aspirations and the limita-
tions of environment comes the definition of the
university's goals.
Teaching. American colleges and universi-
ties share the fundamental educational mission
of teaching students. The undergraduate expe-
rience, based in the arts and sciences, remains at
the core of higher education in America. The


formation of educated people, the transforma-
tion of mind through learning and the launch-
ing of a lifetime of intellectual growth: these
goals remain central to every university. This
undergraduate foundation of American higher
education has grown more complex as the
knowledge we teach has grown more complex.
Where once we had a single track through the
arts and sciences leading to a degree, we now
have multiple tracks leading to many degrees in
arts and sciences as well as in a variety of pro-
fessional schools. Yet even with many degrees,
American university undergraduate education
still rests on the fundamental knowledge of the
liberal arts and sciences.
In our academic world we recognize two
rather imprecisely defined categories of higher
education: colleges and universities. The tradi-
tional American college specializes in a carefully
crafted four-year undergraduate program, gen-
erally focused on the arts and sciences.
Universities extend the range of this undergrad-
uate education to include advanced or graduate
study leading to the Ph.D. Most American uni-
versities also include a variety of undergraduate
and graduate professional programs and mas-
ter's degree programs. The University of
Florida shares these traditions. As an American
university, we have a major commitment to
undergraduate education as the foundation of
our academic organization, and we pursue
graduate education for the Ph.D. and advanced
degrees in professional fields.
We are, in addition, a major, public, compre-
hensive, land-grant, research university. Each
of these adjectives defines one of our character-
istics, and, through frequent repetition, this
description takes on the style of a ritual incanta-
tion: rhythmic, reverent and infrequently exam-
ined. What, then, does each of these key words
mean?
Major. Here, at the head of the list, we find
one of our most important aspirations. We will
be, we must be, and we are a major university.
We define ourselves in comparison to the best
universities we can find. We need not be the
absolutely unambiguously best, but we must be
among the best universities in the world. Exact
ranking of the best universities is a meaningless
exercise, but most of us can name 60 great uni-
versities. By whatever indicator of quality we
choose, our university should fall into this
group. If we define a group of universities that
shares our adjectives (major, public, comprehen-
sive, land-grant, research), then we fall into a
group of perhaps the best 15 in this country.
Public. We exist thanks to the commitment
and investment of the people of the state of
Florida. Generations of tax dollars constructed
the facilities we enjoy and have paid the major
portion of our operating budget. The graduates
of this institution, educated with tax dollars, pro-


vide the majority of our private funding. Our
state legislators created the conditions that per-
mit our faculty to educate our students, pursue
their research, conduct their clinical practice, and
serve their statewide constituencies. We exist,
then, within the public sector, responsible and
responsive to the needs of the citizens of our
state. The obligations we assume as a public uni-
versity determine many of our characteristics.
We have many more undergraduates than
graduates; we respond quickly to the needs of
the state's economy; we accommodate complex
linkages with other state universities, commu-
nity colleges and K-12 public and private insti-
tutions; and we operate in cooperative symbio-
sis with our state's media. We also experience
an often too-close interaction with the political
process. Private universities, which have a dif-
ferent profile, do not respond in the same ways
to these issues. We, as a public university, must
maintain close, continuous and effective com-
munication with our many publics.
Comprehensive. This adjective recognizes
the universal reach of our pursuit of knowledge.
As a matter of principle, we exclude no field
from our purview. We believe that our
approach to knowledge and learning, to under-
standing and wisdom, requires us to be ready to
examine any field, cultivate any discipline, and
explore any topic. Resource limits, human or
financial, may constrain us from cultivating one
or another academic subspecialty, but we
accept, in principle, no limit on our field of
view. Even when we struggle with budget
problems and must reduce a program or miss
an intellectual opportunity, we do so only to
meet the practical constraints of our current
environment. We never relinquish commitment
to the holistic pursuit of knowledge.
Land-grant. Florida belongs to the set of
American universities whose mandate includes
a commitment to the development and trans-
mission of practical knowledge. As one of the
land-grant universities identified by the Morrill
Act of 1862, Florida has a special focus on agri-
culture and engineering and a mandate to
deliver the practical benefits of university
knowledge to every county in the state. In our
university, the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences and the College of
Engineering respond to this definition most
obviously; but over time, the entire university
has come to recognize its commitment to trans-
lating the benefits of abstract and theoretical
knowledge into the marketplace to sustain the
economic growth that supports us all.
This commitment permeates the institutional
culture and defines us as one of some 72 such
institutions in America. The land-grant univer-
sity is, of course, a peculiarly American inven-
tion and captures one of the powerful cultural
beliefs of our country: that knowledge passes






GENERAL INFORMATION


the test of utility by remaining vitally connected
to industry and commerce.
Research. Research defines this university.
Our faculty dedicate themselves not only to the
bedrock function of education, not only to the
land-grant function of service, but equally to the
essential activity of research.
By research we mean the effort to expand
our understanding of the natural world, the
world of the mind and the world of the senses.
We define research to include the theoretical
abstractions of the mathematician, the experi-
mental discoveries of the geneticist, the insights
of the semiotician, the re-creations of the histo-
rian or the analysis of the anthropologist. We
define research to capture the business profes-
sor's analysis of economic organization, the
architect's design, and the musician's interpreta-
tion or the artist's special vision. Research by
agronomists improves crops, and research by
engineers enhances materials. Medical and clin-
ical research cures and prevents diseases. The
list of research fields continues as endlessly as
the intellectual concerns of our faculty and the
academic vision of our colleges.
We must publish university research, what-
ever the field. The musician who never per-
forms, the scientist whose work never appears
for review by colleagues, the historian whose
note cards never become a book may have
accomplished much, but their accomplishments
remain incomplete. When we say research, we
mean research and creative activity that con-
tribute to the international public conversation
about the advancement of knowledge.

History
Florida's oldest and largest university, the
University of Florida traces its beginnings to
1853 when the state-funded East Florida
Seminary acquired the private Kingsbury
Academy in Ocala. After the Civil War, the sem-
inary was moved to Gainesville. It was consoli-
dated with the state's land-grant Florida
Agricultural College, then in Lake City, to
become the University of Florida in 1906. Until
1947, UF enrolled men only and was one of only
three state universities. The others were Florida
State College for Women (now FSU) and Florida
A&M. In 1947, the student body numbered
8,177 men and 601 women. Today UF is among
the 10 largest universities in the nation and is
ranked in the top seven among public AAU uni-
versities.

Government of the University
Direct supervision over the University of
Florida, its policies, and affairs is vested in the
Board of Regents, a body composed of 12 citi-
zens who are appointed by the governor for six-
year terms, one student appointed for one year,
and the State Commissioner of Education.
University affairs are administered by the presi-
dent with the advice and assistance of the uni-
versity administration, the University Senate,
and various committees elected by the Senate
and appointed by the president.


Students
University of Florida students-numbering
almost 38,000 in Fall 1994-come from more than
100 countries (1,755 international students), all
50 states, and every one of the 67 counties in
Florida. The ratio of men to women is 54/46.
Thirty-two percent are freshmen and sopho-
mores and 43 percent, juniors and seniors. More
than 7,575, or 19 percent, of the student body are
graduate students, and 2,220, or 6 percent, are in
the professional programs of dentistry, law,
medicine, pharmacy and veterinary medicine.
Approximately 2,100 African-American stu-
dents, 3,005 Hispanic students and 2,045 Asian-
American students attend UF. Ninety percent of
entering freshmen rank above the national
mean of scores on standard entrance exams
taken by college-bound students. UF consis-
tently ranks among the top public universities
in the nation in the number of enrolled National
Merit Scholars, Achievement Scholars,
International Baccalaureate graduates and
Advance Placement score recipients.

Faculty
A distinguished faculty of more than 4,000
annually attracts approximately $200 million in
research and training grants. UF now has 54
eminent scholar chairs, more than all of the
other state universities in Florida combined.
More than 30 faculty members have been
selected to the National Academies of Science
and/or Engineering, the Institute of Medicine,
or a counterpart in a foreign nation.
A very small sampling of honored faculty
includes: a Nobel Laureate, Pulitzer Prize win-
ners in editorial writing and poetry, 20
Fulbright Scholars, inventor of Gatorade, co-
inventor of the jet engine, one of the four charter
members of the Solar Hall of Fame, and an art
faculty with 80 percent of its members in Who's
Who in American Art.

Programs
The University of Florida is among the
nation's 88 leading research universities as
categorized in 1994 by the Carnegie Commis-
sion on Higher Education. UF is a member of
the Association of American Universities, the
nation's most prestigious higher education
organization. The University of Florida is
accredited by the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools-Commission on Colleges
to award the degrees of bachelor, master, spe-
cialist and engineer, as well as doctoral and pro-
fessional degrees. UF is one of the nation's top
three universities offering more academic pro-
grams on a single campus than any of the
nation's other universities. It has 21 colleges and
schools and over 100 interdisciplinary research
and education centers, bureaus and institutes.
Almost 100 undergraduate degree programs
are offered. The Graduate School coordinates
200 graduate programs throughout the universi-
ty's colleges and schools. Professional postbac-


calaureate degrees are offered in dentistry, law,
medicine, pharmacy and veterinary medicine.
During the last year, more than 32,000 people
took advantage of the many university-spon-
sored opportunities made available through the
Division of Continuing Education. More than
25,000 people participated in non-credit confer-
ences, workshops, institutes, and seminars. And
more than 7,500 students enrolled in
Independent Study by Correspondence courses,
both credit and non-credit.

Semester System
The university operates on a semester sys-
tem. The academic year begins and ends in
August. There are two semesters averaging 15
weeks of instruction, plus a week of final exami-
nations and two six-week summer terms.
Semesters begin in August, January, and May,
with summer term offered as a whole as Term
C, or in two sessions as half terms, with Term A
beginning in May and Term B beginning in
June. In most of UF's colleges, courses are
scheduled in such a way that a student may
enter in any term and proceed normally
through an appropriate sequence of courses.
Consult the individual college sections of the
catalog to determine programs that begin only
in designated terms.

Facilities
On 2,000 acres, most of it within the limits of
a 90,000-population urban area, the university
operates out of more than 875 buildings, 158 of
them equipped with classrooms and laborato-
ries. Facilities are valued at more than $550 mil-
lion. Notable among these are the University Art
Gallery, a microkelvin laboratory capable of pro-
ducing some of the coldest temperatures in the
universe, a 100-kilowatt training and research
nuclear reactor, the second largest academic
computing center in the South, and a self-con-
tained intensive-care hyperbaric chamber for
treating near-drowning victims.
The Florida Museum of Natural History is
the largest natural history/anthropology
museum in the Southeast, and one of the top 10
in the nation. Its research collections contain
nearly 6.5 million specimens.
The Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, with
18,000 square feet of exhibit space, is one of the
largest museums in the Southeast.
The Center for the Performing Arts attracts
world-class symphony orchestras, Broadway
plays, opera, and large-scale ballet productions
to Gainesville.
The Stephen C. O'Connell Center and the J.
Wayne Reitz Union provide space for a myriad
of student and faculty activities. One thousand
persons can participate simultaneously in eight
different recreational activities in the O'Connell
Center, which is home to the Gator basketball,
swimming, and gymnastics teams. More than
20,000 use the student union daily for dining,
meeting, bowling, pool and other table games,
arts and crafts, music listening, and TV viewing.





GENERAL INFORMATION


Athletics
The university has one of the top intercolle-
giate athletic programs in the country, finishing
fourth in the 1993-94 Sears Directors' Cup
National all-sports competition, conducted by
the National Association of Collegiate Directors
of Athletics. The Gators captured five SEC
championships in 1993-94 and for the sixth time
in the last seven years, UF ranked as the top
program in the SEC.
An estimated 90 percent of all students take
part in some form of organized or informal
recreation. There are 89 courts and outdoor play-
ing fields available on campus, as well as the
O'Connell Center for indoor activities. In all, UF
offers more than 60 intramural or club sports,
ranging from archery to weightlifting. UF's cam-
pus is also located near the university-owned
Lake Wauburg, and the Gulf and Atlantic
beaches, which are just a short drive away.

Campus Safety and Security
The University of Florida is an open campus
and can rightly be considered a city within a
city. As such, the campus is not immune to the
same security issues that affect other parts of the
Gainesville community.
The university recognizes that an institution
of higher learning must develop and maintain a
safe and secure environment for its students, fac-
ulty and staff.
The university has the utmost concern for the
safety of each student and it strives to give each
student maximum freedom. With this freedom,
however, comes the responsibility to exercise
personal safety.
No community's security plan can attain
maximum effectiveness unless everyone in the
community contributes to making it work.
Safety and security are personal and shared
responsibilities. Only by accepting this responsi-
bility can members of the university community
maintain a safe and secure campus environment.
The University Police Department has more
than 90 sworn officers, with the addition of a
dozen new officers since 1990. UF also has insti-
tuted a voluntary apartment safety program, in
cooperation with local law enforcement, to
advise students of those apartment complexes
that have been inspected by police for safety.

Standard of Ethical Conduct
Honesty,4ntegrity and caring are essential
qualities of an educational institution, and the
concern for values and ethics is important to the
whole educational experience. Individual stu-
dents, faculty and staff members, as well as the
university's formal organizations, must assume
responsibility for these qualities. The concern for
values and ethics should be expressed in classes,
seminars, laboratories, and, in fact, in all aspects
of university life. By definition, the university
community includes members of the faculty,
staff and administration as well as students.


Education at the University of Florida is not
an ethically neutral experience. The university
stands for, and seeks to inculcate, high stan-
dards. Moreover, the concern for values goes
well beyond the observance of rules.
,A university is a place where self-expres-
sion, voicing disagreement and challenging out-
moded customs and beliefs are prized and hon-
ored. However, all such expressions need to be
civil, manifesting respect for others.
As a major sector in the community, stu-
dents are expected to follow the university's
rules and regulations that, by design, seek to
promote an atmosphere of learning. Faculty,
staff and administration are expected to pro-
vide encouragement and leadership as well as
example.
While the university seeks to educate and
encourage, it also must restrict behavior that
adversely affects others. The Standard of
Ethical Conduct summarizes what is expected
of the members of the university community.
ACADEMIC HONESTY
The university requires all members of its
community to be honest in all endeavors.
Students are required to commit themselves to
academic honesty by signing a prescribed basic
statement, including the Student Honor Code,
as part of registration. A fundamental principle
is that the whole process of learning and pursuit
of knowledge are diminished by cheating, pla-
giarism and other acts of academic dishonesty.
In addition, every dishonest act in the academic
environment affects other students adversely,
from the skewing of the grading curve to giving
unfair advantage for honors or for professional
or graduate school admission. Therefore, the
university will take severe action against dis-
honest students. Similarly, measures will be
taken against faculty, staff and administration
members who practice dishonest or demeaning
behavior.
Student Responsibility. A commitment is
made in writing at the time of admission to
be honest in all academic work, and abide by
the Student Honor Code. In addition, stu-
dents should report any condition that facili-
tates dishonesty to the class instructor, the
department chair, the dean of the college, or
the Student Honor Court.
Faculty Responsibility. Faculty members
have a duty to promote honest behavior and
to avoid practices and environments that
foster cheating in their classes. Teachers
should encourage students to bring negative
conditions or incidents of dishonesty to their
attention. In their own work, teachers
should practice the same high standards
they expect from their students.
Administration Responsibility. As highly
visible members of our academic commu-
nity, administrators should be ever vigilant
to promote academic honesty and conduct
their lives in an ethically exemplary manner.
ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
The use of alcohol and other drugs can have
a negative impact on judgments and reaction,


health and safety, and may lead to legal compli-
cations as well.
* The University's Role. The university's
principal role is to engage in education
which leads toward high standards and
respectful conduct. When those are compro-
mised, it will take disciplinary action against
organizations and individuals violating
either the law or reasonable conduct in the
use of alcohol. It must also provide help for
students who are alcohol-dependent. The
university will deal severely with students
convicted of the illegal possession, use, or
sale of drugs.
What the University Community Can Do to
Prevent Alcohol Abuse and Drug Use.
Students can help control substance abuse
by declining to use or condone the use of
drugs and by insisting that organizations
and individuals use alcohol within the
bounds of the law and reasonable conduct.
Students should make an effort to prevent
persons who have abused alcohol or used
drugs from harming themselves or others,
especially in driving a motor vehicle. They
should encourage those needing profes-
sional help to seek it. The same standards
and regulations apply equally to faculty,
staff and administration.

RELATIONS BETWEEN PEOPLE AND
GROUPS
One of the major benefits of higher educa-
tion and membership in the university commu-
nity is greater knowledge of and respect for
other groups, religious, racial and cultural.
Indeed, genuine appreciation for individual dif-
ferences and cultural diversity is essential to the
environment of learning.
Another major aspect of university life
involves sexual relationships. Sexual attitudes
or actions which are intimidating, harassing,
coercive, or abusive, or that invade the right to
privacy of the individual, are not acceptable.
Organizations or individuals that adversely
upset the balance of communal living will be
subject to university disciplinary action. Only
in an atmosphere of equality and respect can all
members of the university community grow.

SERVICE TO OTHERS
An important outcome of a University of
Florida education should be a commitment to
serving other people. This sense of service
should be encouraged throughout the institu-
tion by faculty, administration, staff and stu-
dents. Through experience in helping individu-
als and the community, students can put into
practice the values they learn in the classroom.
Education at the University of Florida is not
an ethically neutral experience. The entire uni-
versity community should dedicate itself to real-
izing the vision that a center of learning is a bea-
con that, by directing itself to the highest values,
guides and encourages society to do the same.








Admissions
The University of Florida Title IX coordina-
tor is Jacquelyn D. Hart, 352 Tigert Hall, (904)
392-6004. The university, when appropriate,
provides substitution of courses upon request
for disabled individuals. Both the Educational
Testing Service (SAT) and the American College
Testing Program (ACT) have brochures describ-
ing special testing arrangements for disabled
applicants. There are alternative admissions
procedures for disabled applicants who are
unable to take the required tests.

Applications For Admission
Application for admission to any undergrad-
uate college, school or division of the university
must be made to the Office of Admissions on the
forms prescribed and by the dates indicated. It is
quite proper to correspond with deans, directors
or department chairs, but contact with univer-
sity officers does not eliminate the necessity for
filing an application by the dates specified.
How to Apply: An applicant should address
a request to Office of Admissions, Box 114000,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611-
4000, asking for application forms for freshman,
undergraduate transfer or postbaccalaureate
admission. Requests for graduate, dental, law,
medicine and veterinary medicine applications
should be directed to the department. Forms
and directions vary with the level of entry. The
applicant should indicate on the request the
level of admission.
IMPORTANT NOTE: An application for
admission must be filed for the specific term
that the student wishes to enter the university
and will be considered for entrance in that term
ONLY. Applicants wishing to change their
planned entry date should contact the Office of
Admissions for application instructions. An
approval for admission is valid ONLY for
entrance in the term specified in the admission
notice and does not imply approval for entrance
in any other term.

Admission Information
A summary of the general requirements for
admission or readmission to any college or divi-
sion of the university is given below:
* A satisfactory academic record. Each appli-
cant must furnish a complete chronological
record of educational institutions previously
attended. Official transcripts must be submit-
ted in accordance with instructions which
accompany the application form. Failure to
declare attendance at another institution
could cause invalidation of admission and
any credits or degrees earned.
Satisfactory scores on achievement tests or
aptitude tests as noted in the application
instructions.
A satisfactory conduct record.
All upper division international students
whose native language is not English must
submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign
Language) scores, in addition to other
required test scores.


NOTE: Board of Regents regulations pro-
vide that furnishing false or fraudulent state-
ments on information in connection with an
application for admission or residence affidavit
may result in disciplinary action, denial of
admission and invalidation of credits or degrees
earned.
The specific requirements for admission to
the university for the first time as a freshman,
undergraduate transfer, postbaccalaureate,
graduate, dental, law, medical or veterinary
medicine student may be found in the appropri-
ate sections which follow.
The specific requirements for readmission (at
the same or a different level) of a student previ-
ously enrolled at the university also may be
found in the appropriate sections which follow.
It should be understood, however, that mini-
mum requirements are given and that admis-
sion to the university is a selective process. The
satisfaction of minimum requirements does not
automatically guarantee admission. Under
Board of Regents policy, a limited number of
students may be admitted as exceptions to the
minimum requirements. The University
Admissions Committee is the agency at the
University of Florida that is responsible for the
admission of undergraduate students under this
exception policy.

Any student who is admitted conditionally
to the university may enroll subject to verifica-
tion that the conditions of admission have been
satisfied. Receipt of final official credentials for a
student which fail to confirm that the conditions
for admission have been met will result in revo-
cation of admission, reclassification to nonde-
gree status and denial of continued enrollment.
Minimum requirements evolved from stud-
ies of student performance at the university.
These studies identified primary factors which
indicate a reasonable chance for successful com-
pletion of an academic degree at the University
of Florida.
The University Admissions Committee is
responsible for administering all admissions to
the university, including applicants approved as
exceptions to the minimum admission require-
ments.
Students who plan to enter the university for
the first time will be considered for admission
as follows.
* Beginning Freshmen: Students who have
earned fewer than 30 semester hours of col-
lege credit or who have earned fewer than
12 semester hours following graduation
from high school. (See following section,
Admission as a Freshman)
Undergraduate Transfers: Students who have
attended any college or university previ-
ously and earned 30 credits or more, and
those who have earned at least 12 semester
hours following graduation from high
school, but who have not received a bache-
lor's degree. (See following section,
Admission as a Transfer Student to
Undergraduate Colleges and Schools)


Postbaccalaureate Students: Students who
have received a bachelor's degree but who
do not wish to be admitted to graduate
study. (See following section, Admission as
a Postbaccalaureate Student)
Graduate Students: Candidates for master's,
specialist, or doctoral degrees. (See following
section, Admission to Graduate School)
Dental Students: Candidates for admission to
the College of Dentistry. (See following sec-
tion, Admission to the College of Dentistry)
Law Students: Candidates for admission to
the Juris Doctor program in the College of
Law. (See following section, Admission to
the College of Law)
Medical Students: Candidates for admission
to the College of Medicine. (See following
section, Admission to the College of
Medicine)
Veterinary Medicine Students: Candidates for
admission to the College of Veterinary
Medicine. (See following section, Admission
to the College of Veterinary Medicine)

Residency Classification for
Tuition Purposes
In-state residency requests for tuition pur-
poses are not granted to students who appear to
have entered the state for educational purposes.
For more details regarding residency classifica-
tions for tuition purposes, refer to the residency
section in this catalog.

Medical Immunizations
Requirement
Prior to registration, each student accepted
for admission must submit proof of immuniza-
tion. When the application for admission is
approved, a form to complete and return is for-
warded to the student. No student is allowed to
register until the Student Health Care Center
has received and approved the form.

Admission as a Freshman
Applicants who have never attended college -
Please note: Students who have enrolled in an
early admission program at other postsecondary
institutions and/or earned 30 or more semester
hours of college credit are not considered fresh-
men and must apply to the university as transfer
students.
When to Apply: The best time to apply is
early in the senior year of secondary school. Fall
term priority is provided to qualified applicants
whose applications and supporting records are
received in the Office of Admissions prior to
February 1. Applications for the fall class
received February 1 and after are considered on-
a space-available basis only. The deadlines for
receipt of applications for other terms are listed
in the university calendar.
Admission is selective. Because of commu-
nity colleges and other state universities in
Florida, the University of Florida must limit the





ADMISSIONS


number of entering freshmen. Students may
apply for admission after attending community
colleges or other universities by transferring to
the university's upper division colleges in accor-
dance with admissions standards.
The requirements for admission set forth
below give priority to those applicants whose
total record indicates the greatest likelihood of
success in the lower division program.
Admission for Florida Residents
For consideration a student must meet the
following minimum standards:
* Graduation from a regionally accredited or
state approved secondary school or the
equivalent (G.E.D., etc.).
Fifteen (15) academic units in college
preparatory courses. The following distribu-
tion of the 15 academic units is required:
English (with substantial
writing requirements)..............................4.
Mathematics (Algebra 1, Formal
Geometry, Algebra II)..............................3.
Natural Science (2 units of which include
substantial laboratory requirements) .......3
Social Science ................................................ 3
Foreign Language (must be sequential).......2
An overall C average in academic courses as
computed by the University of Florida.
A total score of at least 840 on the SAT with
a minimum verbal score of 340, a minimum
quantitative score of 400, and a minimum
score of 31 on the Test of Standard Written
English (TSWE). On the ACT, a composite
score of 19 is required with a minimum of 16
on the English subsection, a minimum of 16
on the math subsection, and a minimum of
16 on the reading subsection.
State University System Freshman Eligibility


Index
Academic
GPA
2.9
2.8
2.7
2.6
2.5
2.4
2.3
2.2
2.1
2.0


ACT
Composite
20
20
20
21
21
21
22
23
24
25


SAT
Total
860
870
880
890
900
930
960
990
1020
1050


The university will incorporate into its
admissions criteria the recentered SAT
scores. A new table will be used to deter-
mine scores required for freshman admis-
sion, once it has been approved by The
Board of Regents. At the time of printing,
however, these scores were not available.
* A record of good conduct. Major or continu-
ing difficulty with school or other officials
may make an applicant ineligible regardless
of academic qualifications.
* An overall C average, as computed by the
University of Florida, at each collegiate insti-


tution attended. College deficiencies earned
through high school dual-enrollment pro-
grams will be reviewed on an individual
basis by the admissions committee.
Please note: Applicants who present scores
on the G.E.D. also must present records from
secondary schools attended and standardized
test scores. The applicant's overall academic
background will be considered.
Any Florida student who meets the above
minimum admission requirements and who is
interested in attending the University of Florida
is urged to submit an application. If the number
of qualified applicants exceeds the number that
the university is permitted to enroll, admission
will be selective. An applicant's total high
school record including grades, test scores, edu-
cational objective and pattern of courses com-
pleted, rank in class, school recommendation
and personal background and record will be
considered.
Any student who does not graduate from a
regionally accredited secondary school must
provide, in addition to a transcript and SAT or
ACT results, the results of the following SAT II
examinations:
Writing A science
Mathematics, Level I-C A social science
A foreign language
The SAT 1 examinations will be considered
with all other information provided to assess
the applicants' overall academic background.
Composite pictures of the SAT results of
recent freshman classes at the University of
Florida indicate that the middle 50 percent of
admitted freshmen score between 1070 and 1260
on the SAT. In addition, more than 50 percent of
each entering class has earned a B+ or better
average in high school academic subjects. While
there is no minimum grade average or test score
which will assure admission or success in col-
lege, prospective applicants are urged to discuss
these data with their school counselors before
applying to the university.
Admission for Non-Florida Residents
Because of the limited number of entering
freshmen in the fall class, only a small number
of highly-qualified students from states other
than Florida may be admitted.

Other Information for Prospective
Freshman Applicants
Early Admission
Applications for early admission (i.e.,
admission following completion of the junior
year of high school) from superior students will
be considered on an individual basis by the uni-
versity's admissions committee. Applications
should be submitted in accordance with dead-
lines published in the university calendar.
In addition to the application, the following
items are needed:
A written statement by the student setting
forth reasons for requesting early admission.


* An official transcript of the applicant's sec-
ondary school record covering grades 9, 10,
11. An overall academic average of 3.60 is
expected.
Results of either the SAT or ACT. Generally,
an SAT total score of 1280 is required (with
both verbal and quantitative subscores of
600 or higher) or a composite score of 30 on
the Enhanced ACT is required.
A letter from the student's high school prin-
cipal or guidance counselor stating specific
reasons why the applicant would profit
more from early admission than by comple-
tion of the senior year of high school.
Eligible early admission students from
Florida high schools may be funded through
Dual Credit Enrollment.
The university provides numerous opportu-
nities other than early admission to accelerate
graduation. For additional information, please
refer to the Time-Shortened Degree Opportuni-
ties section of this catalog.
SAT II Placement Examinations
Scores on the SAT II are the basic criteria for
placement in English composition, calculus,
chemistry, Spanish, French, German and Latin.
Prior to registration for Summer B 1995 and
thereafter, all freshmen will be required to pre-
sent an SAT II Writing Achievement test score.
Scores also must be submitted by students who
plan to enroll in chemistry, calculus or one of the
foreign languages listed below. Students may
substitute Advanced Placement or International
Baccalaureate credit for any of the SAT 1 exami-
nations. Consult the AP scores and university
course equivalents chart in the Time-Shortened
Degrees section of this catalog.
Newly admitted students must take SAT II
tests by June of the senior year in high school.
For information on appropriate course selec-
tions based on student scores, students should
consult the Schedule of Courses, the University
Advising Center or individual departments.
Superior results allow students to enter
advanced courses at the beginning of their col-
lege careers, to fulfill some requirements by
examination rather than by course work, and in
some instances, to earn credit toward the degree.
UF freshmen who wish to enroll in any of the
following courses must provide scores from
the following SAT II subject examinations:
UF Course Required SAT II Exam
ANY English course Writing
Calculus or higher Mathematics, Level I-C
French 2 or higher French (reading only)
German 2 or higher German (reading only)
Latin 2 or higher Latin
Spanish 2 or higher Spanish (reading only)
Students who have taken foreign language
courses in high school who want to continue
study of that same language on the univer-
sity level must take the appropriate SAT II
language exam.
Additionally, freshmen heading toward a
pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-veterinary
medicine, engineering or hard science col-






ADMISSIONS


lege curriculum will be required to submit
chemistry and/or mathematics SAT II scores
prior to registering for UF courses.
SAT II scores will be used strictly for place-
ment purposes; they are not part of the
admissions process. Students may substitute
Advanced Placement or International
Baccalaureate credit for any SAT II exams.
Advance Housing Payment. Entering fresh-
men are required to make a housing deposit
within 30 days of acceptance, if they desire to
live in university housing. The housing deposit,
less a $20 service charge, is refundable until
May 1st for applicants accepted for admission to
the fall freshman class.
Admission with Advanced Standing. The
university is a participant in the Advanced
Placement (AP) program and the College Level
Examination Program (CLEP) of the College
Entrance Examination Board and the Inter-
national Baccalaureate (IB) program. Under the
advanced placement program, a student enter-
ing the university offers a nationally-graded
examination as evidence of completion of a col-
lege-level course taken in high school. Depend-
ing on the results of the examination, the stu-
dent may receive university credit for courses
covering similar material or exemption from
such courses without credit.
Admission Offers with Outstanding
Credentials. Offers of admission with course
work currently in progress are tentative offers,
pending review of final outstanding transcripts.
Admission offers are subject to cancellation if
final course work does not meet admission
requirements.

Admission as a Transfer Student
Applicants who have attended any college
or university, and who have earned at least 12
semester hours of credit following graduation
from high school or attended another postsec-
ondary institution through an early admission
program, are considered transfer students.
When to Apply: Applications may be sub-
mitted up to one year in advance. Applicants
are urged to apply at least six months prior to
the term they plan to enter. Applicants should
refer to the application deadlines section of the
university calendar and consult the individual
college to which they intend to apply for specific
program information. (NOTE: In a number of
undergraduate programs, the sequence of pro-
fessional courses begins ONLY in the fall term of
the junior year.) An applicant who delays filing
an application may find it impossible to furnish
the necessary supporting records in time to per-
mit an admission decision for the term desired.
This section lists the general admission
requirements for transfer students. It should be
noted, however, that admission to the univer-
sity is selective and satisfaction of these gen-
eral requirements does not guarantee accep-
tance. Upper division colleges of the university
have established enrollment quotas because of


enrollment limitations. Upper division transfer
applicants who meet the minimum admission
requirements will be referred to the selection
committee of the appropriate college for enroll-
ment consideration.
A transfer applicant should refer to the gen-
eral information and colleges sections of this
catalog for an explanation of the academic orga-
nization of the university. (See the Table of
Contents.)
Transfer Credit Policy
Students may transfer a total of 64 credit
hours from community colleges as part of the
hours needed for their UF degrees, regardless of
when these hours are earned, but subject to uni-
versity and college degree requirements. How-
ever, junior and senior level course requirements
for the major must be completed at UF or, with
permission of the student's college, at another
baccalaureate degree-granting institution.
The courses represented by such credit
hours will be recorded on the student's
University of Florida record and may be used to
satisfy various requirements, but such courses
may not reduce the number of credit hours
required in the upper division at UF to earn a
degree. Failure to declare attendance at another
institution can invalidate admission to UF and
any credits or degrees earned.
Courses completed with grades of D or
higher at other regionally-accredited institutions
which reasonably parallel the curriculum at this
university will be accepted for transfer credit as
hours earned. It is the prerogative of the studen-
t's upper division college to determine how
transfer credit satisfies the specific degree's
course requirements. In some cases, colleges
require grades of C or higher in some courses.
University of Florida degree-seeking stu-
dents who wish to enroll in another institution
as a transient or non-degree seeking student
and who wish to transfer such credit back to the
UF must first secure the approval of the dean of
their college. Transient student forms to be used
for pre-approval of transfer credit within the
State University System of Florida (SUS) are
available from the Office of the University
Registrar in Criser Hall.
Florida Public Community College Graduates
This section applies ONLY to new students seek-
ing to transfer directly from a Florida public commu-
nity college with the Associate of Arts degree in a
university parallel program. All other community
college applicants, undergraduate transfer applicants
from four-year colleges or universities and applicants
for readmission should consult the appropriate sec-
tions which follow.
The University of Florida subscribes to the
articulation agreement between the state univer-
sities and public community colleges of Florida.
Under this agreement, any graduate of a state-
approved Florida public community college is
eligible for admission to the university if the
student has completed the university parallel
program and received the Associate of Arts


degree, provided the degree has been awarded
on the basis of the following:
At least 60 semester hours of academic work
exclusive of occupational courses;
An approved general education program of
at least 36 semester hours;
A grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0
scale on all college-level academic courses.
All applicants must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language in
secondary school or 8-10 semester hours at
the postsecondary level, or document an
equivalent level of proficiency.
An official transcript must be furnished from
each institution attended regardless of
length of attendance or credit earned.
Official supplementary transcripts are
required, as soon as they are available, for
any work completed after making applica-
tion. Since an average of C or higher is
required for graduation from the University
of Florida, a student who has failed to main-
tain this average at another institution after
completing the A.A. degree is not eligible for
admission. Regardless of the average earned,
courses completed at other institutions must
parallel reasonably the curriculum at the
University of Florida.
All applicants seeking admission to a pro-
gram in teacher education must submit
scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
or the American College Test (ACT). These
scores should be forwarded to the Office of
Admissions as soon as possible after submit-
ting an application for admission. Some col-
leges with enrollment quotas may require
applicants to submit test scores as a part of
their selection process. When test scores are
required by an upper division college, the
applicants will be advised directly by that
college.
An undergraduate transfer applicant who
will enter the University of Florida with
junior class standing (AA degree from a
Florida public community college or 60
semester hours of acceptable transfer credit)
must have completed satisfactorily the
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST)
to be admitted in a degree-seeking status.
Within space and fiscal limitations, appli-
cants who have satisfied the above minimum
requirements will be considered for admission
at the junior level to an upper division college.
Such students may be required to take addi-
tional preprofessional courses not completed at
the junior college. However, such courses will
not reduce the number of credits required in the
upper division for a degree.
Other Transfer Applicants
This section applies to students seeking to trans-
fer from a Florida public community college without
an Associate of Arts degree in a university parallel
program and to all undergraduate transfer appli-
cants from other colleges or universities.






ADMISSIONS


Requirements for Admission to Lower
Division
* Eligible for admission as a beginning fresh-
man: An applicant must have been eligible
for admission to the University of Florida as
a beginning freshman to be considered for
admission to the lower division as a transfer
student. The number of spaces available for
lower division transfers is extremely limited,
so limited that very few are accepted.
Students are encouraged to remain at their
Florida community college until completion
of the Associate of Arts degree or to transfer
to a Florida community college to complete
the A.A. degree. (See section, Admission as
a Freshman.)
Good standing: An applicant must be in
good standing and eligible to return to any
institution previously attended. A student
who for any reason would not be allowed to
return to an institution previously attended
cannot be considered for admission to the
university.
Satisfactory record: An applicant must have
an average of C or higher (as computed by
the University of Florida) on all work
attempted at each institution previously
attended. No application can be considered
until complete official transcripts of all the
applicant's undergraduate work are in the
possession of the Office of Admissions.
Satisfactory conduct record: An applicant
must present a satisfactory conduct record.
Regardless of other qualifications, an appli-
cant who has experienced serious or contin-
uing difficulty with school or other authori-
ties because of improper conduct may find
his or her application disapproved.
Requirements for Admission to an Upper
Division College
With the exception of beginning freshman
eligibility, an applicant for admission to an
upper division college must satisfy the require-
ments listed above for admission to the lower
division. By law, all applicants seeking admis-
sion to a program in teacher education must
submit scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT) or the American College Test (ACT).
These scores should be forwarded to the Office
of Admissions as soon as possible after submit-
ting an application for admission. Some colleges
with enrollment quotas may require applicants
to submit test scores as a part of their selection
process. When test scores are required by an
upper division college, the applicant will be
advised directly by that college. In addition, the
following requirements also must be satisfied:
Advanced standing credit: An applicant
must present a minimum of 60 semester
hours (or 90 quarter hours) of acceptable col-
lege courses, not more than four semester
hours of which are in military science
and/or basic required physical education, as
credit for advanced standing.


* Specific course requirements: An applicant
must present the courses listed (or accept-
able substitutes) as required for admission
by the upper division college of his or her
choice as part of the courses offered for
advanced standing credit. (See appropriate
college section of this catalog.) Upon recom-
mendation by the upper division college, an
applicant lacking some of the specific course
requirements may be permitted to enroll in
that college and to complete those courses if
all other requirements for admission are
met; however, such lower division courses
will not reduce the number of credits
required in the upper division for a degree.
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST):
By law, all applicants admitted in a degree-
seeking status to an upper division college at
an institution in the State University System
of Florida who have had the opportunity to
take the test, MUST have completed it satis-
factorily. Students transferring to upper
division programs from private colleges in
Florida or from out-of-state colleges who
have not had the opportunity to take the
test, MUST pass the test by the end of the
first term in which it is available to them.
Applicants with 96 or more hours of trans-
ferable credit must provide passing CLAST
scores before they can submit an application.
All applicants must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language in
secondary school or 8-10 semester hours at
the postsecondary level, or document an
equivalent level of proficiency.

Admission as a Postbaccalaureate
Student
When to Apply: Applications may be sub-
mitted up to one year in advance and applicants
are urged to apply as early as possible. Applica-
tions MUST BE SUBMITTED by the DEADLINE
established for the term. Some departments
have found it necessary to establish deadlines
for the receipt of applications and their support-
ing records that are earlier than the deadlines
established for the university and published in
the catalog. All applicants are advised to refer to
the application deadlines section of the univer-
sity calendar published in this catalog and to
verify departmental deadlines with the appro-
priate department.
Postbaccalaureate students may wish to
enroll in courses for any of the following rea-
sons:
* To expand their academic background;
* To complete prerequisite courses for admis-
sion to graduate or professional study at
some future date.
To earn a second bachelor's degree.
Application for admission as a postbaccalau-
reate student must be made to Office of
Admissions, Box 114000, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, 32611-4000, on forms supplied
by that office. Applications are referred to the


department for the admission decision. No
application will be considered unless complete
official transcripts) of all the applicant's prior
collegiate work are in the possession of the
Office of Admissions. No transcript will be con-
sidered official unless it is received directly
from the registrar of the institution at which the
work was performed. Official supplementary
transcripts) are required, as soon as they are
available, for any work completed after the
application was filed.
A student who applies for admission as a
postbaccalaureate student and whose native
language is not English must submit acceptable
scores on Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL). A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is
required for admission.

Admission to the Graduate School
Application for Admission: Admission
forms and information concerning admission
procedures may be obtained from the appropri-
ate department. Prospective students are urged
to apply for admission as early as possible. For
some departments, deadlines for receipt of
admission applications may be earlier than
those stated in the current university calendar;
prospective students should consult the appro-
priate department. Applications which meet
minimum standards are referred for admission
decisions to the graduate selection committees.
To be admitted to graduate study in a given
department, the applicant must satisfy the
requirements of the college and department as
well as those of the Graduate School. In some
departments, available resources limit the num-
ber of students who can be admitted. For com-
plete information, consult the Graduate Catalog.
General Requirements: The Graduate
School requires both a minimum grade average
of B for all upper division undergraduate work
and acceptable scores on the verbal, quantita-
tive, and analytical sections of the Graduate
Record Examination (GRE). For some colleges
and departments, and in more advanced levels
of graduate study, an undergraduate grade
point average or GRE score above those stated
for the Graduate School may be required. These
criteria are on file in the office of the Graduate
School. Some colleges and departments require
a reading knowledge of at least one foreign lan-
guage. Exceptions to the above requirements are
made only when these and other criteria are
reviewed and recommended by the department
and approved by the college and the dean of the
Graduate School.
Admission to the Graduate School is depen-
dent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate
degree from an accredited college or university.
The departments will make admission decisions
when they have received test scores, official
transcripts and letters of recommendation.
Applicants must provide two copies of com-
plete, official transcripts for all undergraduate
and graduate course work. One copy must be
sent to the Office of the University Registrar and






ADMISSIONS


one copy to the intended department. No tran-
script will be accepted as official unless it is
received directly from the registrar of the insti-
tution in which the work was done. Official sup-
plementary transcripts are required as soon as
they are available for any work completed after
application for admission has been made. In
general, no student who is a graduate of a
nonaccredited institution will be considered for
graduate study in any college or department of
the university.
The Board of Regents also has ruled that in
admitting students for a given academic year,
up to ten percent may be admitted as excep-
tions. Students admitted as exceptions under
the ten-percent waiver rule must present both
an upper division grade point average and GRE
score with their application and meet other cri-
teria required by the university.
Admissions Examinations
Graduate Record Examination: In addition
to the GRE required of all applicants, some
departments encourage the applicant to submit
scores on one or more advanced subject tests of
the GRE. The scores on all tests taken will be
considered.
Graduate Study in Business Administra-
tion: Students applying for admission to the
Graduate School for study in the College of
Business Administration or the Fisher School of
Accounting may substitute satisfactory scores
on the Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT) for the GRE. Students applying for
admission to the Master of Business Adminis-
tration (MBA) program must submit satisfac-
tory scores on the GMAT. Applicants should
contact the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ 08540, for additional information.
Graduate Study in Law: Students applying
to the graduate program leading to the degree
Master of'Laws in Taxation must submit satis-
factory scores on the Law School Admissions
Test (LSAT).
Conditional Admission
Students who are not eligible for direct
admission may be granted conditional admis-
sion to the Graduate School. Students may be
granted conditional admission to defer final
admission decisions until requisite examination
scores or final grade records are available.
Students also may be granted conditional
admission to ascertain their ability to pursue
graduate work at the university if previous
grade records or GRE scores are on the border-
line of acceptability or when specific prerequi-
site courses are required.
Students granted conditional admission
should be notified by the department of the con-
ditions under which they are admitted. When
these conditions have been satisfied, the depart-
ment notifies the student in writing, and sends a
copy to the Graduate School. Eligible course
work taken while a student is in conditional sta-
tus is applicable toward a graduate degree.


Students failing to meet any condition of
admission will be barred from further registra-
tion.

International Students
All international students seeking admission
to the Graduate School are required to submit
satisfactory scores on the GRE and on the
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
with the following exceptions:
International students whose native lan-
guage is English or who have studied at a
United States college or university for one
year or more do not need to submit TOEFL
scores, but they must submit satisfactory
scores on the GRE before their application
for admission can be considered.
All international students applying for
admission to the Master of Business Admin-
istration program must submit satisfactory
scores from the GMAT before their applica-
tion for admission will be considered.
International students are required to hold
health and accident insurance as a condition
of enrollment. Such insurance must be
payable in U.S. dollars and should not be'
limited in use to a particular hospital, clinic,
agency, or institution delivering health care.
Failure to comply may result in cancellation
of registration.
International students, whose scores on the
TOEFL and verbal portion of the GRE are not
indicative of adequate writing skills, are
required to write a short essay for examination.
If the skills demonstrated in the essay are not
acceptable for pursuing graduate work, the
examination will be used as a diagnostic tool for
placement in appropriate courses which will not
count toward a graduate degree.
Graduate students whose native language is
not English may be asked to submit satisfactory
scores on the Test of Spoken English (TSE) to be
eligible for teaching assistantships.
Applicants should write the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, for reg-
istration forms and other information concern-
ing TOEFL, TSE, GMAT and GRE.

Admission to the College of
Dentistry
When to Apply: The Application Request
Card for the American Association of Dental
Schools Application Service (AADSAS) may be
obtained after May 15 from the Office of
Admissions, College of Dentistry, University of
Florida, Box 100445, Gainesville, Florida, 32611-
0445. The request card should be sent directly
to the AADSAS, 1625 Massachusetts Avenue
Northwest, Suite 101, Washington, D.C. 20036.
Upon receiving the application materials from
the AADSAS, the completed forms and support-
ing documents must be returned directly to the
AADSAS no later than October 15 of the year
prior to anticipated enrollment in dental school.
Failure to meet this deadline will prevent the


Dental Admissions Committee from evaluating
your record.
The data compiled by the AADSAS will be
evaluated carefully by the Dental Admissions
Committee and promising applicants will be
sent formal application forms which request
additional information. The submission of a pre-
professional committee evaluation or letters of
recommendation from people in academics are
not necessary until the formal application forms
are filed. The formal application forms and sup-
porting materials must be submitted as
requested by the College of Dentistry.
The college aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its programs. High stan-
dards of scholastic achievement, moral charac-
ter, and motivation are expected of the appli-
cant. The student of dentistry must possess a
high basic aptitude supplemented by an acade-
mic preparation of the highest order because of
the vast area of science which must be mastered
by the dentist. The highly personal relationship
between patient and dentist places the latter in a
position of trust, which demands maturity,
integrity, intellectual honesty, and a sense of
responsibility. A broad representation of the
ethnic mixture of the state is sought in the stu-
dent body through an active recruitment pro-
gram. The college strictly adheres to the princi-
ple of ethnic, racial, religious, and social equal-
ity among its student body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission
should plan to complete the requirements for a
bachelor's degree. However, qualified students
may be accepted without fulfilling the degree
requirements, provided they show evidence of
sufficient preparation for the study of dentistry.
Applicants with an overall B average will
receive strongest consideration for admission to
the college.
All applicants must take the Dental
Admission Test, preferably in the spring preced-
ing the submission of their initial application or,
at the latest, during the fall testing period. The
test is given twice a year at many college and
university testing centers. Following a review of
all application materials and Dental Admission
Test scores by the Dental Admissions Commit-
tee, interviews with members of this committee
will be arranged for competitive applicants.
(Refer to the more detailed description in the
College of Dentistry bulletin.)

Admission to the College of Law
When to Apply: Applications can be accept-
ed as indicated in the College of Law catalog.
Beginning Students: All applicants for
admission to the college must have received a
baccalaureate degree from a regionally-accred-
ited college or university and achieved a satis-
factory score on the Law School Admission Test.
The minimum acceptable score on the Law
School Admission Test required for admission
varies with the total grade point average
achieved by the applicant on all college work
attempted prior to receipt of the bachelor's






ADMISSIONS


degree. The lower the grade point average, the
higher the Law School Admission Test score
must be to qualify for admission. All applicants
(including present and former University of
Florida students) must register with the Law
School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS) in lieu
of requesting transcripts from each institution of
higher education attended. For more detailed
information on admission to the College of Law,
please see the college catalog.
Advanced Standing Students: For informa-
tion on admission to the college with advanced
standing, refer to the College of Law catalog.

Admission to the College of
Medicine
When to Apply: Because the number of
places in the first-year class of the College of
Medicine is limited, candidates should make
application as early as possible during the sum-
mer or fall of the year preceding their intended
date of entry.
Personal qualities of high order-character,
responsibility and maturity-are the primary
requirements for admission. The student must
have demonstrated superior intellectual
achievement. A bachelor's degree is recom-
mended. The quality of the academic back-
ground as well as the performance of the stu-
dent in relation to the load attempted will be
weighed. A genuine interest in human welfare
is important. Efficient methods of study and
effective powers of reasoning are essential.
A limited number of out-of-state students, in
proportion to the number in the university as a
whole, may be admitted. Students who have
failed academically or are ineligible to continue
in another medical school will not be admitted.
Applications from students who are enrolled
presently in another medical school will be con-
sidered provided students are eligible to con-
tinue in their present medical school, the school
they are now attending is a member of the
Association of American Medical Colleges, and
space is available.
Prospective applicants must take the Medi-
cal College Admissions Test, preferably by the
spring preceding the submission of the applica-
tion. A personal interview will be required for
final acceptance.
Graduate students who are candidates for
the Ph.D. degree in medical sciences should
apply through the Graduate School.
(Refer to the more detailed description in the
College of Medicine catalog.)

Admission to the College of
Veterinary Medicine
When to Apply: Application forms are
available between September 1 and December 1
from the Office of the Dean for Student Services,
College of Veterinary Medicine. The application
package (residency status, application forms,
fees, letters of recommendation, GRE scores,
etc.) must be received by the Office of


Admissions by 4:30 p.m., December 1, for the
applicant to be considered for admission.
Candidates seeking admission to programs
leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of
Philosophy degree with emphasis on animal
disease problems should apply through the
Graduate School.
(Refer to the College of Veterinary Medicine
in the colleges section of this catalog.)

Admission Information for
Veterans Administration and
Social Security Benefits
The University of Florida is approved for the
education and training of veterans under all
public laws now in effect, i.e., Chapter 31, Title
38, U.S. Code (Disabled Veterans), Chapter 32,
Title 38, U.S. Code (Veterans Educational
Assistance Program), Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S.
Code (Cold War G.I. Bill), and Chapter 35, Title
38, U.S. Code (Children of Deceased or Disabled
Veterans). Students who may be eligible for edu-
cational benefits under any Veterans Adminis-
tration (VA) program are urged to contact their
local VA representative as soon as they are
accepted by the university. Students expecting to
receive benefits under one of these programs
must file an application for benefits with the
Office of the University Registrar. No certifica-
tion can be made until the application is on file.
Benefits are determined by the Veterans Admin-
istration; the university certifies according to VA
rules and regulations.
Inquiries relating to social security benefits
should be directed to the student's local Social
Security Office. The Office of the University
Registrar will submit enrollment certificates
issued by the Social Security Administration for
students eligible to receive educational benefits
under the Social Security Act, providing the
undergraduate student registers for 12 semester
hours or more.
A full-time load for VA or social security ben-
efits is 12 hours per semester for undergraduates.

Admission Information for
International Students
Application Deadline
The university receives a large number of
applications from international students each
year. Because of the time required to complete
processing of the application and for the stu-
dent to make visa and financial arrangements,
deadlines have been established after which
applications cannot be processed. The follow-
ing schedule should be noted carefully in sub-
mitting an application for admission:
Application
Desired Date Must Be Received
of Entrance Prior to this Date


August (Fall)
January (Spring)
May (Summer A/C)
June (Summer B)


February 1
July 1
November 1
January 1


Applying for Admission
International students seeking to enter the
university are considered for admission as fol-
lows:
Undergraduate Student: An applicant who
has not earned a university degree equivalent to
a U.S. bachelor's degree.
Postbaccalaureate Student: An applicant
who has earned a university degree equivalent
to a U.S. bachelor's degree, but who is not seek-
ing admission to graduate study.
Graduate Student: An applicant who has
earned a university degree equivalent to a U.S.
bachelor's degree and who is seeking admission
to graduate study.
The following items must be submitted by
an international student seeking admission to
the university.
All International Applicants
* Complete an International Student Applica-
tion for Admission.
Submit a nonrefundable application fee of
$20 (U.S. currency drawn on a U.S. bank).
An application will not be considered with-
out the required application fee.
Submit test scores. (See Test Score Require-
ments.)
Complete a Confidential Financial
Statement. This document will be kept confi-
dential.
Hold health and accident insurance as a con-
dition of enrollment. Such insurance must be
payable in U.S. dollars and should not be
limited to use in a particular hospital, clinic,
agency, or institution delivering health care.
Failure to comply may result in cancellation
of registration.
Undergraduate Applicants
* Submit certified transcripts (or certificates)
of all academic records or examination
results for each year of study from the first
year of secondary school and for all postsec-
ondary or university-level work attempted.
All documents must be accompanied by cer-
tified English translations.
Postbaccalaureate Applicants
* Submit certified transcripts of academic
records covering all university-level work.
These documents must be accompanied by
certified English translations.
Graduate Applicants
* Submit certified transcripts of academic
records covering all university-level work.
These documents must be accompanied by
certified English translations.
Test Score Requirements
Except as noted below, all international stu-
dents seeking admission to this university are
required to submit satisfactory scores of 550 or
higher on the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL).






ADMISSIONS


International students whose native lan-
guage is English or who have studied at a
United States high school, college, or univer-
sity for one year or more are not required to
submit TOEFL scores, but must submit satis-
factory scores on an appropriate admissions
test.
Students who enter the university as fresh-
men or sophomores (less than 60 hours of
credit) must submit Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT) or American College Test (ACT)
scores before their application for admission
will be considered.
Graduate applicants must submit scores on
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
All international students applying for
admission to the Master of Business Admin-
istration (MBA) program must submit satis-
factory scores on the Graduate Management
Admission Test (GMAT) before their appli-
cation for admission can be considered.
TOEFL information and registration forms
are available in many locations outside the
United States; usually at U.S. embassies and
consulates, at offices of the United States
Information Agency, from U.S. educational
commissions and foundations, at Binational
Centers, and from many private organizations
such as the Institute of International Education
(IIE), America-Mideast Education and Training
Services, Inc. (AMIDEAST), African American
Institute (AAI), and the American-Korean
Foundation. Candidates who cannot obtain
information locally on TOEFL, GRE, GMAT or
SAT should write: Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ 08540, U.S.A.
Application Fee
Each application for admission must be
accompanied by a nonrefundable application
fee of $20 (U.S. currency and drawn on a U.S.
bank). An application will not be processed
without the application fee. If you find it diffi-
cult to submit the application fee because of cur-
rency restrictions in your country, we suggest
that you request a friend or relative in the
United States to submit the fee on your behalf.
Academic Records
Consideration of an application for admis-
sion cannot be given until ALL required creden-
tials as indicated in the section Apply for
Admission are received by the Office of
Admissions. All documents must be accompa-
nied by certified English translations and
become the property of the university.
Credentials of applicants who do not enroll will
be destroyed and cannot be returned or for-
warded elsewhere.
IMPORTANT: Send all applications and
credentials to the Office of Admissions, P. 0.
Box 2946, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32602-2946, U.S.A.


Notice of Admission
If a student's application for admission to
the university is approved, an official notice of
acceptance will be sent by the university.
Admission is for a SPECIFIC term. If a student
is unable to enroll for the term indicated in the
notice of acceptance, the Office of Admissions
should be informed immediately. If the student
wishes to be considered for entrance to a differ-
ent term, the Office of Admissions must be
advised. Under no circumstances should an
applicant make definite plans to depart for
Gainesville until officially notified by the uni-
versity that approval has been given to the
application for admission. A student who comes
to campus without first receiving an official
notice of acceptance does so entirely at his or
her own risk. The student's presence on campus
will not influence the decision on an application
for admission. Because of the limited resources
available in terms of faculty, staff, and physical
facilities, only those international students who
submit superior academic records can be
approved for admission.

Readmissions
Application for Readmission
The information contained in this section
applies only to students who have been previ-
ously admitted and who have attended the uni-
versity.
Former undergraduate students who do not
enroll at the university for two consecutive
terms, including summer, must apply for read-
mission. Readmission, however, is not guaran-
teed and is subject to the availability of space at
the appropriate level in the desired college or
major. Students who skip a single term will be
scheduled automatically for a registration
appointment for one additional term only.
How to Apply for Readmission: An appli-
cant should request application forms from the
Office of Admissions, Box 114000, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611-4000. Forms and
directions vary with the level of readmission. In
the request, applicants should indicate the col-
lege and the level of last enrollment at the uni-
versity as well as the college and level to which
they wish to apply. Applications must be
received in the Office of Admissions by the
deadline for the term as published in the univer-
sity calendar.
Satisfactory Academic Record
* Applicants must be eligible to return to the
university. If applicants have attended any
college or university since last enrolled at the
University of Florida, they also must have an
average of C or higher (as computed by UF)
on all work attempted at each institution.
(Note: Grades received at other institutions
are not averaged with grades received at the
University of Florida for the purpose of meet-


ing university grade-point average require
ments.) Students must list all institution
attended and provide complete official tran
scripts from each. Failure to declare atten
dance at another institution could invalidat
admission and any credits or degrees earned
Applicants also must be in good standing anm
eligible to return to each institution previ
ously attended.
Applicants for readmission must meet th,
current admission requirements of the col
lege or school they expect to enter. Readmis
sion is not guaranteed and is subject to thi
availability of space at the appropriate leve
in the desired college or major. (Consult thi
appropriate college section of the catalog fo
specific admission requirements.)
While grades earned at other institution
may be considered when readmission deci
sions are made, such grades are not aver
aged with grades received at the Universiti
Sof Florida for purposes of meeting gradi
point average requirements.

Satisfactory Conduct Record
* Applicants must present a satisfactory!
record of conduct. Regardless of other quali
fications, applicants who have experience
major or continuing difficulties with school
or other authorities since the last enrollmen
at the University of Florida may find their
application for readmission denied.

Fresh Start Program
Former undergraduate students who havE
been suspended and who wish to return to the
University of Florida after an absence of nc
fewer than five calendar years (during whict
they have engaged predominantly in non-acad
emic activities) may petition for readmissior
under the Fresh Start Program. If admitted
credit for previous UF courses in which a grad(
of C or better was earned will be calculated ir
UF hours earned and may be applied toward z
degree. No grades previously earned in UI
courses will be included in the UF grade poini
average. All previous courses attempted and
grades received will remain on the student's
official academic record and transcript.
Students may not apply for the Fresh Start
Program subsequent to readmission to the uni.
versity. Students who have been readmitted
under Fresh Start may not petition subsequently
for any retroactive change to their academic
records. Students admitted under Fresh Start
who do not enroll must reapply for a future
term.
For additional information on policy and
procedures, former students who wish to peti-
tion for readmission under the Fresh Start
Program should contact the dean of the college
into which they seek readmission.








Residency:
Classification of Students-
Florida or Non-Florida
(Section 6C-7.005, Florida Administrative Code)
The deadline for applying for a change in resi-
dency status with all documentation is each
term's fee payment deadline.
(1) For the purpose of assessing registration
and tuition fees, a student shall be classi-
fied as a resident or a nonresident. A
"resident for tuition purposes" is a per-
son who qualifies for the in-state tuition
rate; a "nonresident for tuition purposes"
is a person who does not qualify for the
in-state tuition rate.
(a) To be classified as a "resident for
tuition purposes," a person, or, if a depen-
dent child, the child's parent or parents,
shall have established legal residence in
Florida and shall have maintained legal
residence in Florida for at least twelve
(12) months immediately prior to his or
her qualification. A dependent child is a
person who may be claimed by his or her
parent as a dependent under the Federal
Income Tax Code. Every applicant for
admission to a university shall be
required to make a statement as to the
length of residence in the state and, also
shall establish his or her presence, or, if a
dependent child, the presence of his or
her parent or parents, in the state for the
purpose of maintaining a bona fide domi-
cile in accordance with the provisions of
Section 240.1201(2)(b), Florida Statutes.
(b) With respect to a dependent child, the
legal residence of such individual's par-
ent or parents shall be prima facie evi-
dence of the individual's legal residence
in accordance with the provisions of
Section 240.1201(4), Florida Statutes.
Prima facie evidence may be reinforced
or rebutted by evidence of residency,
age, and the general circumstances of the
individual in accordance with the provi-
sions of Rule 6C-7.005(2).
(c) In making domiciliary determinations
related to the classification of persons as
residents or nonresidents for tuition pur-
poses, the domicile of a married person,
irrespective of sex, shall be determined in
accordance with the provisions of Section
240.1201(5), Florida Statutes.
(d) Any nonresident person, irrespective
of sex, who marries a legal resident of
this state or marries a person who later
becomes a legal resident, may, upon
becoming a legal resident of this state,
accede to the benefit of the spouse's
immediately precedent duration as a
legal resident for purposes of satisfying
the 12-month durational requirement.
(e) No person shall lose his or her resident
status for tuition purposes solely by rea-


son of serving, or, if a dependent child, by
reason of the parent or parents serving, in
the Armed Forces outside this state.
(f) A person who has been properly clas-
sified as a resident for tuition purposes,
but who, while enrolled in an institution
of higher education in this state, loses res-
ident tuition status because the person,
or, if a dependent child, the parent or par-
ents, establish domicile or legal residence
elsewhere, shall continue to enjoy the res-
ident tuition rate for a statutory grace
period. This grace period shall be mea-
sured in accordance with the provisions
of Section 240.1201(8), Florida Statutes.
(g) The legal residence of a dependent
child whose parents are divorced, sepa-
rated, or otherwise living apart shall be
deemed to be Florida if either parent is a
legal resident of Florida, regardless of
which parent is entitled to claim, and in
fact does claim, the minor as a dependent
pursuant to federal individual income
tax provisions.
(h) Any person who ceases to be enrolled
at or graduates from an institution of
higher education while classified as a res-
ident for tuition purposes and who sub-
sequently abandons Florida domicile
shall be permitted to reenroll at an insti-
tution of higher education in this state as
a resident for tuition purposes in accor-
dance with the provisions of Section
240.1201(9), Florida Statutes.
(i) A member of the Armed Forces on
active duty stationed in Florida, and the
spouse and dependents of such member,
shall be classified as residents for tuition
purposes.
(j) Full-time instructional and adminis-
trative personnel employed by state
public schools, community colleges, and
institutions of higher education, and the
spouses and dependent children of such
individuals, shall be classified as resi-
dents for tuition purposes.
(k) A student enrolled through the
Florida Linkage Institutes program shall
be assessed resident tuition for the credit
hours approved by the applicable
Linkage Institute and non-resident
tuition for all other credit hours.
(1) A full-time student from Latin
America or the Caribbean who receives a
scholarship from the federal or state gov-
ernment shall be classified as a resident
for tuition purposes.
(m) Southern Regional Education Board's
Academic Common Market graduate
students shall be classified as residents
for tuition purposes.
(n) A full-time employee of a state
agency or political subdivision of the
state shall be classified as a resident for
tuition purposes when the student's
tuition is paid by the state agency or
political subdivision for the purpose of


job-related law enforcement or correc-
tions training.
(o) United States citizens, their spouses,
and dependent children living on the
Isthmus of Panama, who have completed
12 consecutive months of college work at
the Florida State University Panama
Canal Branch shall be classified as resi-
dents for tuition purposes.
(p) McKnight Doctoral Fellows who are
United States citizens shall be classified
as residents for tuition purposes.
(2) An individual shall not be classified as a
resident for tuition purposes and, thus,
shall not be eligible to receive the resi-
dent tuition rate, until the individual has
provided satisfactory evidence as to his
or her legal residence and domicile to
appropriate university officials. In deter-
mining residency, the university shall
require evidence such as a voter registra-
tion, driver's license, automobile registra-
tion, declaration of domicile, location of
bank account, rent receipts and any other
relevant materials as evidence that the
applicant has maintained 12-months resi-
dence immediately prior to qualification.
To determine if the student is a depen-
dent child, the university shall require
evidence such as copies of the aforemen-
tioned documents from parents and/or
legal guardians. In addition, the univer-
sity may require a copy of the parent's
IRS return. If a nonresident wishes to
qualify for resident tuition status in
accordance with Section (1)(d) above, the
applicant must present evidence of the
spouse's legal residence with certified
copies of the aforementioned documents.
"Resident student" classification also
shall be construed to include students to
whom an Immigration Parolee card or a
Form 1-94 (Parole Edition) was issued at
least one year prior to the first day of
classes for which resident student status
is sought, or who have had their resident
alien status approved by the United
States Immigration and Naturalization
Service, or who hold an Immigration and
Naturalization Form 1-151, 1-551 or a
notice of an approved adjustment of sta-
tus application, or Cuban Nationals or
Vietnamese Refugees or other refugees or
asylees so designated by the United
States Immigration and Naturalization
Service who are considered as Resident
Aliens, or other legal aliens, provided
such students meet the residence require-
ments stated above and comply with
subsection (4) below. The burden of
establishing facts which justify classifica-
tion of a student as a resident and domi-
ciliary entitled to "resident for tuition
purposes" registration rates is on the
applicant for such classification.
(3) In applying this policy:
(a) "Student" shall mean a person admit-
ted to the institution, or a person allowed






RESIDENCY


to register at the institution on a space-
available basis.
(b) "Domicile" shall denote a person's
true, fixed, and permanent home, and to
which whenever the person is absent the
person has the intention of returning.
(c) "Parent" shall mean an individual's
father or mother, or if there is a court-
appointed guardian or legal custodian of
the individual, other than the father or
mother, it shall mean the guardian or
legal custodian.
(d) The term "dependent child," as used
in this rule, is the same as a dependent as
defined in the Internal Revenue Code of
1954.
(4) In all applications for admission or regis-
tration at the institution on a space-avail-
able basis a "resident for tuition pur-
poses" applicant, or, if a dependent child,
the parent of the applicant, shall make
and file with such application a written
statement that the applicant is a bona
fide resident and domiciliary of the state
of Florida, entitled as such to classifica-
tion as a "resident for tuition purposes"
under the terms and conditions pre-
scribed for residents and domiciliaries of
the state of Florida. All claims to "resi-
dent for tuition purposes" classification
must be supported by evidence as stated
in Rule 6C-7.005(1), (2) if requested by
the registering authority.


(5) A "nonresident" or, if a dependent child,
the individual's parent, after maintaining
a legal residence and being a bona fide
domiciliary of Florida for twelve (12)
months, immediately prior to enrollment
and qualification as a resident, rather than
for the purpose of maintaining a mere
temporary residence of abode incident to
enrollment in an institution for higher
education, may apply for and be granted
classification as a "resident for tuition
purposes," provided, however, that those
students who are nonresident aliens or
who are in the United States on a nonim-
migration visa will not be entitled to
reclassification. An application for reclas-
sification as a "resident for tuition pur-
poses" shall comply with provisions of
subsection (4) above. An applicant who
has been classified as a "nonresident for
tuition purposes" at time of original
enrollment shall furnish evidence as
stated in 6C-7.005(1) to the satisfaction of
the registering authority that the appli-
cant has maintained legal residency in the
state for the twelve months immediately
prior to qualification required to establish
residence for tuition purposes. In the
absence of such evidence, the applicant
shall not be reclassified as a "resident for
tuition purposes." It is recommended that
the application for reclassification be
accompanied by a certified copy of a dec-


laration of intent to establish legal domi-
cile in the state, which intent must have
been filed with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, as provided by Section 222.17,
Florida Statutes. If the request for reclassi-
fication and the necessary documentation
are not received by the fee payment dead-
line for the term, the student will not be
reclassified for that term. Students who
receive extensions to the fee payment
deadline are not excused from the resi-
dency application deadline.
(6) An appeal to a determination that denied
"residency for tuition purposes" may be
initiated by filing a petition for review,
pursuant to Section 120.68 Florida
Statutes.
(7) Any student granted status as a "resident
for tuition purposes," which status is
based on a sworn statement which is
false shall be subject, upon determination
of such falsity, to such disciplinary sanc-
tions as may be imposed by the president
of the university.
Specific Authority 240.209(1), (3)(g) FS. Law
Implemented 120.53(1)(a), 240.209(1), (3)(d), (g),
240.233, 240.235, 240.1201, 240.137(5) FS. History
- Formerly 6C-2.51, 11-18-70, Amended 8-20-
71, 6-5-73, 3-4-74, Amended and Renumbered
12-17-74, Amended 1-13-76, 12-13-77, 8-11-81, 6-
21-83, 12-13-83, 6-10-84, 10-7-85, 12-31-85,
Formerly 60.7.05, Amended 11-9-92.









Expenses

Application Fee
Each application for admission to the uni-
versity must be accompanied by an application
fee of $20. Application fees are nonrefundable.

Enrollment and Student Fees
Pursuant to Section 6C- 7.002 (10) Florida
Administrative Code, enrollment is defined as a
student's registration for one or more courses)
and full payment of tuition and material and
supply fees for the courses) without a refund.
The university calendar in this catalog sets
forth the beginning and ending dates of each
semester. Registration must be completed on or
before the proper due date as specified in the
calendar. Students are not authorized to attend
class unless they are on the class roll or have
been approved to audit and have paid the audit
fees. Unauthorized class attendance will result
in fee liability.

Fee Liablility-A student is liable for all fees
associated with all courses in which he/she is
registered at the end of the drop/add period or
which he/she attends after that deadline. The
fee payment deadline is 3:30 p.m. at the end of
the second week of classes.

Assessment of Fees-Pursuant to Section 6C-
7.002(5), Florida Administrative Code: resident
and non-resident tuition shall be assessed on the
basis of course classification: tuition for courses
numbered through 4999 shall be assessed at the
undergraduate level, courses numbered 5000
and above shall be assessed at the graduate
level. Students must assess and pay their own
fees. University personnel will not be held
accountable for proper assessment or mathe-
matical accuracy of calculations. A schedule of
tuition fees for all programs can be obtained
by contacting University Financial Services.

Health, Athletic, Activity and Service and
Material and Supply fees.
Health Fee-All students must pay a specified
health fee which is assessed on a per credit hour
basis and is included in the basic hourly rate per
credit hour. The health fee is for the purpose of
maintaining the university's Student Health
Service and for the student's privilege of utiliz-
ing said service. This fee is not part of any
health insurance a student may purchase.
Athletic Fee-All students must pay a speci-
fied athletic fee per credit hour each term. Half-
time graduate research and teaching assistants
enrolled for eight (8) or more credit hours dur-
ing the fall or spring semesters and all other
students enrolled for nine (9) or more credits
are eligible to purchase athletic tickets at the
student rate.


Activity and Service Fee-All students must
pay a specified activity and service fee which is
assessed on a per credit hour basis and is
included in the basic hourly rate per credit hour.
Material and Supply Fee-Material and supply
fees are assessed for certain courses to offset the
cost of materials or supply items which are con-
sumed in the course of the student's instruc-
tional activities. Specific information on material
and supply fees may be obtained from the
academic departments or University Financial
Services.

Late Registration/Payment Fee
Late Registration Fee (6C-7.003(4), Florida
Administrative Code)-Any student who fails to
initiate registration during the regular registra-
tion period will be subject to the late registration
fee of at least $50 and no more than $100.
Late Payment Fee (6C-7.003(5), Florida
Administrative Code)-Any student who fails to
pay all fees due or to make appropriate arrange-
ments for fee payment (deferment or third party
billing) by the fee payment deadline will be sub-
ject to a late payment fee of at least $50 and no
more than $100.
Waiver of Late Fees-A student who believes
that any of the late charges should not be
assessed, because of university error or because
extraordinary circumstances prevented all con-
ceivable means of complying with established
deadlines, may petition for a waiver of the late
fees by submitting a petition for the waiver with
the appropriate office as follows:
Late Registration Fee: Office of the University
Registrar
Late Payment Fee: University Financial
Services
The university reserves the right to require
documentation to substantiate the extraordinary
circumstances.

Special Fees and Charges
Audit Fee-Fees for audited courses are the
same as the credit hour fee charged for Florida
students. The audit fee is the same for Florida
and non-Florida students.
College Level Examination Programs-Exami-
nations are administered on campus on the
third Saturday of every month except February
and December. Applications should be com-
pleted in the Office of Instructional Resources,
1012 Turlington Hall, 15 working days before
the day a test is to be given. The fee for the first
examination is $40 (made payable to College
Level Examination Program) plus a non-refund-
able $10 administrative fee (no personal checks).
Graduate Record Examination-The General
Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
is required for admission to the Graduate
School. The fee is $56. Students who take one of
the advanced tests of the GRE in combination
with the general test pay a total of $112. These
fees are payable to the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.


Graduate School Foreign Language Test-All
students wishing to be certified as proficient in
a reading knowledge of French, German, or
Spanish must take the Educational Testing Ser-
vice (ETS) Graduate School Foreign Language
Tests. A fee of $5 covers the cost of each exami-
nation. Administrative arrangements to register
and pay for this examination will be made
through the Office of Instructional Resources,
1012 Turlington Hall.
Library Binding Charge-Candidates for a
graduate degree with a thesis or dissertation
pay a $13.90 charge for the permanent binding
of the two copies deposited in the University of
Florida Library. This charge is payable at
University Financial Services, by the date speci-
fied in the graduate catalog. A copy of the
receipt must be presented at the Graduate
School Editorial Office, 168 Grinter Hall.
Microfilm Fee-A fee of $50 is charged for the
publication of the doctoral dissertation by
microfilm. This fee is payable at University
Financial Services. A copy of the receipt for this
fee must be presented at the Graduate School
Editorial Office, 168 Grinter Hall.
Nursing students must pay a fee of $40 for
publication of their thesis. This fee is payable at
University Financial Services, and a copy of the
fee receipt must be presented to the Graduate
School Editorial Office, 168 Grinter Hall.
The above charges may be subject to change
without notice.
Payment of Fees-Fee payment is an integral
part of the registration procedure. Fees are
payable on the dates listed in the university cal-
endar appearing at the front of this catalog.
Payments are processed by the university
cashier at University Financial Services. Checks,
cashier's checks, and money orders written in
excess of the assessed fees will be processed and
the difference refunded at a later date, accord-
ing to university policy. Checks from foreign
countries must be payable through a United
States bank in United States dollars. The univer-
sity reserves the right to refuse three-party
checks, altered checks, and checks that will not
photocopy.
Payments can be made via ATM cards on
the HONOR system at the university cashier's
office. Payments with an ATM card must be
made in person because a personal identifica-
tion number (PIN) is required to access the stu-
dent's bank account. Cash withdrawals against
ATM cards will not be processed.
Returned checks must be paid in cash,
money order, or cashier's check. There is a ser-
vice fee of $20 or five percent of the face amount
of the check, draft, or money order, whichever
is greater.
In collecting fees, the university may impose
additional requirements as deemed appropriate,
including advance payment or security deposit
for the services to be provided by the university.
Payments on all financial obligations to the
university will be applied on the basis of age of
the debt. The oldest debt will be paid first.







EXPENSES


Deadlines-Students are reminded that dead-
lines are enforced strictly. The university does
not have the authority to waive late fees unless
it has been determined that the university pri-
marily is responsible for the delinquency or that
extraordinary circumstances warrant such
waiver.
Cancellation and Reinstatement-The univer-
sity shall cancel the registration of any student
who has not paid any portion of his/her fee
liability by the published deadlines.
Reinstatement shall require the approval of
the university and payment of all delinquent lia-
bilities including the $50 late registration and
$50 late payment fees. Upon payment of fees, it
is the student's responsibility to ensure that his
or her registration is updated.
In the event a student has not paid the entire
balance of his/her fee liability by the published
deadlines, the university temporarily shall sus-
pend further academic progress of the student.
This will be accomplished by flagging the stu-
dent's record which prevents the release of
grades, schedules and transcripts, registration,
the awarding of diplomas, the granting of loans,
the use of university facilities and/or services,
and admission to university functions, includ-
ing Athletic Association events, until the
account has been settled in full.
Deferral of Registration and Tuition Fees-A
fee deferment allows students to pay fees after
the fee payment deadline without being subject
to either cancellation of registration for nonpay-
ment of fees prior to the established deadline, or
the late payment fee. The university may award
fee deferments to students in the following cir-
cumstances:
Students whose state or federal financial
assistance is delayed due to circumstances
beyond the control of the student.
Students receiving veterans educational
assistance benefits.
Students for whom formal arrangements
have been made with the university for pay-
ment by an acceptable third-party donor.
This deferment covers tuition fee payments
only and must be established by the fee pay-
ment deadline. Fee deferments are granted
based on information from the Office for
Student Financial Affairs (financial aid defer-
ments) or the Office of the University Registrar
(veterans). Questions on eligibility for a fee
deferment should be referred to the appropriate
office.
Waiver of Fees-The university may waive fees
as follows:
Participants in sponsored institutes and pro-
grams where substantially all direct costs are
paid by the sponsoring agent may have all
fees waived.
Any dependent child of a special risk mem-
ber killed in the line of duty is entitled to a
full waiver of undergraduate fees as pro-
vided in Section 240.235(3), Fees, Florida
Statutes.


* State employees employed on a permanent,
full-time basis may be permitted to waive
fees up to a maximum of six credit hours per
term on a space-available basis only.
Intern supervisors for institutions within the
State University System may be given one
nontransferrable certificate (fee waiver) for
each full academic term during which the
person serves as an intern supervisor. All
fees are waived.
Florida public high school students who earn
credit in courses toward a high school
diploma and baccalaureate degree, as pro-
vided by dual credit enrollment or early
admission, Florida Statutes, are entitled, to a
full waiver of undergraduate fees. Books and
instructional materials may be provided on a
lend-return basis if all requirements are met.
Persons 60 years of age or older are entitled
to a waiver of fees for audited courses (up to
6 credit hours), as provided by Section
240.235(4), Florida Statutes.
The non-Florida student financial aid fee
may not be waived for students receiving
an out-of-state fee waiver.

Refund of Fees
Tuition fees will be refunded in full in the
circumstances noted below:
* If notice of withdrawal from the university is
approved prior to the end of the drop/add
period and written documentation is
received from the student.
Credit hours dropped during the drop/add
period.
Courses cancelled by the university.
Involuntary call to active military duty.
Death of the student or member of his/her
immediate family (parent, spouse, child, sib-
ling).
Illness of the student of such severity or
duration, as confirmed in writing by a physi-
cian, that completion of the semester is pre-
cluded.
Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of
the university president or his designee(s).
A refund of 25 percent of the total fees paid
(less late fees) is available if notice of with-
drawal from the university with written docu-
mentation is received from the student and
approved prior to the end of the fourth week of
classes for full semesters or a proportionately
shorter period of time for shorter terms.
First-time students at the university who
withdraw are eligible to receive a pro-rata
refund of all tuition and fees, including housing
charges, for up to 60 percent of their first term.
An administrative fee of five percent or $100
(whichever is lower) will be assessed upon the
amount of the total charges assessed to the stu-
dent. The administrative fee will be deducted
from the amount to be refunded.
Refunds must be requested at University
Financial Services. Proper documentation must
be presented when a refund is requested. A


waiting period for processing may be required.
Refunds will be applied against any university
debts.
Tuition refunds due to cancellation, with-
drawal or termination of attendance for stu-
dents receiving financial aid will first be
refunded to the appropriate federal Title IV pro-
gram. Any remaining refund will then be
returned to the student.
Other General Fiscal Information
Students should bring sufficient funds, other
than personal checks, to meet their immediate
needs. Personal checks will be accepted at
University Financial Services for the exact
amount of fees and/or other amounts owed the
university. Payments on all financial obligations
to the university will be applied on the basis of
age of the debt. The oldest debt will be paid
first. University Financial Services does not cash
checks or make cash refunds. Checks written in
excess of assessed fees or other amounts paid
the university will be accepted and processed,
but the excess will be refunded to the student at
a later date, according to university policy.
Cashing of Checks-Students may cash checks
at the Reitz Union and the University of Florida
Bookstore. There are separate check cashing
policies for each area. Generally, students must
have a University of Florida photo ID.
Students who have three or more returned
checks forfeit the privilege of cashing checks on
campus and jeopardize their ability to receive
certain types of financial aid.
Photo ID-A current valid Gator One ID card
must be presented in order to transact busi-
ness at the Office of University Financial
Services, to cash checks at the Reitz Union and
University Bookstores, to pick up tickets for
athletic events, to use Gator dining accounts,
to use the CIRCA computer labs, to use uni-
versity libraries, and to use all recreational
facilities.
The official ID card can be obtained at the
ID Card Services office at the southeast
entrance to the HUB. A driver's license, social
security card, and $10 for new cards or $15 for
replacement cards are required. Call 392-UFID
for more information.
Local Address-It is the responsibility of the
student to be sure that a correct local address is
on file with Office of the University Registrar
at all times. Change of address forms may be
obtained from 222 Criser Hall.
Past Due Student Accounts-All students'
accounts are due and payable at University
Financial Services, at the time such charges are
incurred.
University regulations prohibit registration,
graduation, granting of credit, release of tran-
script or diploma for any student whose
account with the university is delinquent.
Delinquent accounts, including those debts for
which the students' records are flagged, may
require payment by cash, cashier's check, or
money order.









Student Affairs
The following information describes the
responsibilities of the various offices charged
with assistance to students at the University of
Florida. Additional information may be found
in THE STUDENT GUIDE and THE CAMPUS
DIRECTORY.

Vice President For Student Affairs
The goals of the Division of Student Affairs
include developing effective and efficient ser-
vices and programs for students through the
various departments within Student Affairs;
integrating student affairs and academic affairs;
directly involving students in the affairs of the
institution; encouraging a sense of community
among students, faculty, and administration;
and increasing accessibility to and attractiveness
of the University of Florida to a wide variety of
persons.
The Office of the Vice President for Student
Affairs is located in 129 Tigert Hall and is open
to assist individual students and groups in mat-
ters concerning them. All students are encour-
aged to share in the responsibility of enabling
the various divisions of the university commu-
nity to meet the needs of the students.
The Office of the Vice President for Student
Affairs has administrative responsibility for the
following offices and programs: Office for
Student Services, Student Housing Office, Office
for Student Financial Affairs, Career Resource
Center, J. Wayne Reitz Union, and University
Counseling Center.

Office For Student Services
The Office for Student Services is committed
to the total development of students. The major
purpose of this department's programs, ser-
vices, and activities is to facilitate and enhance
the intellectual, psychological, personal, and
social development of students.
The Office for Student Services is located in
202 Peabody Hall. The staff, which includes
deans and directors, are responsible for plan-
ning, coordinating, and implementing programs
and services which are designed to provide stu-
dents with the opportunity to reach their full
potential academically and personally.
Other major objectives include making stu-
dents aware of and encouraging the use of the
resources of the university; interpreting the
goals, objectives, and actions of the university to
students; and encouraging a sense of commu-
nity among students, faculty and staff.
A number of program functions emerge
from these overall purposes and are carried out
by the Office for Student Services. These pro-
grams include:
individual and group advising
planning and carrying out programs and
services for new students, including orienta-
tion to the university
assisting and advising minority students
student conduct and discipline


assisting veteran students and coordinating
VA benefits with the Veterans Administra-
tion
coordinating services and programs for stu-
dents with disabilities
programs and services for older students
programs and services for women students
student leadership development and recog-
nition programs
alcohol and drug education programs
committee responsibility for student peti-
tions
providing exit interviews for students with-
drawing from the university
fraternity and sorority advising and coordi-
nation
liaison and advising Student Government
and other student organizations
planning and implementing special pro-
grams to personalize student experiences
within the university
programs and services regarding issues of
gender.
INSTITUTE OF BLACK CULTURE
The Institute of Black Culture is an opera-
tional unit of the Office for Student Services and
is an educational tool for students at the univer-
sity. It is a facility for enlightenment and black
awareness where African Americans can focus
on their history, literature, art, culture and
lifestyle. It is also a place where all ethnic groups
can develop an understanding and appreciation
of contributions African Americans have made
to American society. The institute sponsors pro-
grams, exhibits and related activities.
INSTITUTE OF HISPANIC-LATINO
CULTURES
The Institute of Hispanic-Latino Cultures is
the newest addition to the Office for Student
Services. Located at 1504 W. University Avenue,
the IHLC offers a variety of workshops, semi-
nars, activities, programs and services for stu-
dents with Hispanic and Latino heritage. Still in
its formative stages, the Institute will serve as a
resource for the University of Florida and pro-
vide a facility to assist students and student
organizations interested in Hispanic and Latino
issues.
SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH
DISABILITIES
The Office for Student Services provides
assistance for students with disabilities. Services
are varied dependent on individual needs, and
include but are not limited to: special campus
orientation, registration assistance, securing
auxiliary learning aids and assistance in general
university activities. The designated coordinator
for compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabili-
tation Act of 1973, as amended, and the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is
James J. Costello, Assistant Dean for Student
Services, 202 Peabody Hall, 392-1261 (Voice)/
392-3008 (TDD). Students with disabilities are
encouraged to contact this office to obtain any
needed assistance.


Upon request, the Undergraduate Catalog is
available on computer disk to students with
print-oriented disabilities. For more informa-
tion, please contact the Office of the Univer-
sity Registrar at 392-1374 [FRS 1-800-955-8771
(TDD)].
STUDENT ID CARDS
The official university picture ID is known
as the Gator One Card. All enrolled students,
faculty, and staff must have a university ID
card.
The Gator One Card is used for access to
CIRCA computer labs, university libraries
(except the Health Science Center Library),
Student Recreation and Fitness Center, and all
university recreation facilities and intramural
sports activities. The card also is required for
purchasing tickets to any university athletic or
extracurricular event such as Gator Growl and
concerts. Students with Gator Dining accounts
can use the card to purchase food at any cam-
pus location; the card also can be used in a sepa-
rate prepaid vending account for select vending
machines. Gator One Card also can be used to
cash checks on campus. The card now functions
as an honor/debit card when activated at
Barnett Bank.
The ID Card Services Office is located at the
southeast entrance of the HUB. Office hours are
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday,
excluding university holidays. Gator One Card
office hours will be extended the first two weeks
of each term. Call 392-UFID for further informa-
tion.
To process a request for a Gator One Card:
Come to the ID Card Services building at the
southeast entrance of the HUB.
Bring a photo ID (driver's license, military
ID, or passport) and a social security card
(staff card, infirmary card, selective service
card, or printed documentation of your
social security number.) If you lack a picture
ID, go to the Registrar Information Counter,
station 2, in 222 Criser Hall, for a notarized
statement of identity.
A $10 fee is required at the time the card is
processed (cash, checks or honor card only).
Replacement card fee is $15.
NOTE: Only the latest version of the card is
valid. Access to university facilities and privi-
leges may be denied if your account has been
flagged by University Financial Services.
For more information about receiving a
Gator One Card, or to report a lost or stolen
card, call 392-UFID, or go to the Gator One Card
office behind the HUB.
STUDENT SPOUSE ID CARDS
To obtain a form to authorize issuance of a
student spouse card, go to the information desk
in Peabody Hall with the student's UF ID card,
your marriage certificate or a copy of it, and the
spouse's social security number. The spouse
must bring this form, a driver's license or pass-
port, and $12.50 to the ID Card Services build-
ing at the southeast entrance of the HUB,
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.







STUDENT AFFAIRS


Student Housing
The University of Florida offers resident
students a unique and exciting residence hall
program. Living on campus is a profitable
educational experience that students long will
remember. The Division of Housing provides
accommodations and programs to meet the
needs of students while promoting the overall
educational goals and objectives of the univer-
sity.
The University of Florida has a large resi-
dent population of both in-state and out-of-state
students, as well as students from 100 different
foreign countries. Since students come from dif-
fering environmental backgrounds and social
experiences, they bring with them varying
needs and expectations. Because of this diver-
sity in the student body, it would be a disservice
to students to take a unilateral approach in
developing the residence hall program.
Therefore, the Division of Housing has devel-
oped a program based upon alternatives and
choices. Students may select from housing
accommodations and environments that best fit
their needs.
GENERAL INFORMATION
All freshmen who are admitted to the univer-
sity receive a housing application card with their
formal letter of admission from the Office of
Admissions until housing facilities are full.
The University of Florida has no residency
requirement for freshmen attending the univer-
sity for the first time during the fall semester.
Freshmen entering the university during the
summer terms) must live on campus during the
summer to be eligible for fall semester on-cam-
pus housing. Entering students are free to
choose either on-campus or off-campus accom-
modations. Students who voluntarily contract
for on-campus housing normally must do so for
the entire academic year (August to May), if
enrolled. However, residents should be full-
time students to be eligible to reside in the resi-
dence halls. Full-time enrollment for residence
is defined as being enrolled in 12 semester
credit hours if an undergraduate and 9 semester
credit hours if a graduate student.
All students other than beginning freshmen
must initiate their own arrangements for hous-
ing either by (1) applying to: Assignments
Office, University Housing Office, Box 112100,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-
2100, or (2) obtaining accommodations in pri-
vate housing. (See Off-Campus Housing later in
this section.)
An application for residence hall space for
students other than beginning freshmen may be
filled out twelve months prior to the semester or
summer term for which admission is being
sought. Prospective students are urged to apply
as early as possible because of the demand for
housing. Application requests are considered
first-come, first-served, on a space-available
basis.
Roommate requests will be considered if the
individuals wishing to room together submit
their housing agreements clearly indicating
their desire to room together and elect the same
visitation choice and assignment options.


Disabled students also are offered housing
on a first-come, first-served, space-available
basis. Accessible housing is available for dis-
abled students once they are offered housing.
Students with special needs should indicate
these needs on their housing agreement.
ROOM STYLES
A wide range of room styles is available to
meet the varying needs of students: single
rooms, double rooms, triple rooms, suites for
2/3/4/5/6 and apartments. The most prevalent
room style is the double room which accommo-
dates two residents.
All rooms have closet(s), storage space,
dresser(s), bed(s) and mattress(es), study
desk(s) and chairss. Rental rates include cable
television service, local telephone service and
utilities (limited utilities in The Apartment
Facility). Rental rates vary depending on such
features as air conditioning, floor space, private
baths and kitchen facilities.

RESIDENCE HALL STAFF
The Division of Housing employs over 450
full-time and part-time staff. Staff include custo-
dians, maintenance technicians and tradesmen,
clerical staff, administrators, and student staff
including hall directors, assistant residence
directors, resident assistants, desk assistants,
and security assistants.
One of the housing staff's primary goals is to
provide an environment that supports the edu-
cational mission of the university. Staff are com-
mitted to going beyond merely providing a
place for students to eat, sleep, and study. Staff
and student leaders plan social, recreational,
cultural, and educational opportunities.
Students' main contact with staff is with res-
ident assistants (RAs), co-op officers, hall direc-
tors (HDs), assistant residence directors (ARDs),
residence directors (RDs), and assistant direc-
tors of housing for residence life (ADHs). An
undergraduate RA or co-op officer lives on each
floor or section to serve as a peer adviser aiding
students in their transition to the university
experience. Each building additionally has one
graduate HD or a graduate ARD and one full-
time professional RD who supervises the RAs,
helps to promote a learning environment, and
coordinates area activities. The ADH, a full-time
university administrator, is responsible for the
overall administrative and educational func-
tions within each residence area.
Residence hall staff members act as referral
agents to acquaint students with the many
resources of the university and the community.
Staff also are trained in crisis intervention and in
personal and fire safety and security procedures.

INTER-RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION
All students in the residence halls are
encouraged to participate in organizational
activities which can play a significant part in
their educational, cultural, social, and recre-
ational life. The Inter-Residence Hall Associa-
tion was established to help stimulate this partic-
ipation. IRHA represents the collective interests
of all resident students. This organization also


serves as a channel of communication between
residence area government councils, the univer-
sity community, and other outside interests. This
self-government program at both the hall and
area levels offers residents the opportunity to
help establish guidelines for group living and to
assist in the planning of social and educational
activities for their fellow students.
GENERAL SERVICES
LOCAL TELEPHONE SERVICE: A tele-
phone jack that provides 24-hour service on
campus and within the Gainesville area is
located in each student room. Students provide
their own touchtone telephones. Cost of local
service is included in the rental rate. Local ser-
vice includes these features: call waiting, speed
calling, and 3-way calling.
CONVENIENCE STORES: Beaty Breadbas-
ket, Graham Cracker, two convenience stores
owned and operated by Gator Dining Service,
are located in Beaty and Graham respectively.
Students may purchase convenience items like
snacks, milk, bread, soda, pens, paper, candy,
etc., from these stores using their Gator Dining
Cards or cash.
FOOD SERVICE: Although meals are not
included in the housing rent payment, a food
service program is available on campus. Gator
Dining Service, a division of DAKA Restaurants,
maintains cafeteria and snack bars on campus
and offers meal plans. Broward Hall has a cafe-
teria. Snack bars are located in Tolbert Hall and
Graham Hall. Cafeterias are also located in the
Reitz Union and the Medical Center. For further
information, please contact the Gator Dining
Service Office, 160 Reitz Union.
REFRIGERATOR RENTAL: Students may
choose to rent a refrigerator or to bring their
own. University Programs Incorporated (UPI), a
privately-owned rental company and autho-
rized university vendor, rents refrigerators to
on-campus residents. It is usually best to make
arrangements for a refrigerator after arriving
on-campus when roommates can share the cost
and decide on available space in the room. The
cost of refrigerators is not included in the room
rent (except Beaty Towers, apartments, and
selected suites for four). Refrigerators may be 12
cubic feet or less.
CUSTODIAL SERVICE: All the residence
halls (except the co-ops) have a staff of trained
custodians assigned to do general cleaning of
public areas, bathrooms, lounges, and hallways.
Other specific tasks are done in order to main-
tain good housekeeping throughout the halls.
Individual room cleaning is the responsibility of
each resident.
SECURITY: Security is a shared responsibil-
ity of the university, residence hall staff and res-
idents. Residents must take precautions to pro-
tect themselves and their personal property.
Residence hall staff and the University Police
Department provide information and plan pro-
grams about security education. Residence hall
security is monitored by the residence hall staff;
external building security generally is the
responsibility of the University Police
Department. Division of Housing security assis-






STUDENT AFFAIRS


tants patrol the areas immediately adjacent to
the residence halls from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.
when classes are in session.
The university offers many education and
awareness programs for students concerning
campus safety. Security policies and programs
continuously are reviewed and monitored for
possible revisions and/or upgrades.
VENDING: Vending machines are located
conveniently in all residence halls.
LAUNDRY FACILITIES: Coin-operated
washers and dryers are provided in each resi-
dence area. Most students provide their own
irons; however, there are some area student
government irons provided for check-out.
Please be aware that the university does not
provide linen service.
CABLE T.V.: A 21-channel residence hall
closed cable television system is provided to
student rooms. Charges for basic cable service
are included in the rent. Channel 8-The Student
Information Channel-provides bulletin board
messages, videotaped movies, and videotaped
academic classes.
SPECIAL HOUSING AREAS
QUIET/STUDY FLOORS: Students wishing
to live on a "Quiet/Study Floor" should request
Tolbert Area (male and female spaces) or Hume
Hall (male spaces). These spaces have been
established to provide a living arrangement for
students who desire an environment in which
all members have signed a community contract
agreeing to a special level of quiet. Quiet/Study
floor policies are in effect 7 days a week, 24
hours per day. Consideration of the rights of
others and cooperation of the floor residents are
necessary in providing the guaranteed lifestyle.
HONORS HOUSING: Qualifying freshmen
may be invited to live in honors housing (East
and Weaver Halls in Tolbert area) to participate
in an accelerated academic program. Special
forms available from the Office of Admissions
must be completed and returned in order to be
assigned to the honors area. Students assigned
to honors housing are required to sign a sepa-
rate community contract agreeing to abide by
the guidelines and expectations for this special
housing area. Contact: Admissions Officer for
Superior Students, Office of Admissions,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611-4000 (904) 392-1365.
YULEE SCHOLARSHIP HALL: Yulee
Scholarship Hall provides single rooms for
those students who qualify with a required min-
imum grade point average of 3.0 and have
sophomore or above classifications. Students
who are 21 years of age or older are eligible
regardless of their class rank, if they have an
established 3.0 grade point average. Students
assigned to Yulee Scholarship Hall are required
to sign a separate community contract agreeing
to abide by the guidelines and expectations of
this special housing area.
COMPUTER INTEREST SECTION:
Computer majors or students with an interest in
computers can request to live in the Computer
Interest Section of Fletcher Hall. Each room in


the section has direct access to the programming
and printing facilities of the university's central
computer. Residents with their own computers
must furnish connecting cables, plugs, adapters,
etc. A university terminal and a printer are pro-
vided in the section lounge for residents who do
not have their own terminals or microcomput-
ers. Students assigned to the computer interest
section are required to sign a separate commu-
nity contract agreeing to abide by the guidelines
and expectations of this special housing area.
BEATY TOWERS: Four residents share an
apartment with two bedrooms, complete
kitchen, and private bath.
FACULTY IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM: The
faculty in residence program in Hume Hall is a
structured program that promotes interaction
between students and a selected faculty member
through out-of-classroom experiences. The fac-
ulty member and his/her family live in an
apartment in Hume Hall and share the resi-
dence hall living experience with students.
He/She helps to plan and implement educa-
tional, recreational, social, and cultural pro-
grams while serving as a role model of adult
behavior and academic commitment.
FACULTY INVOLVEMENT PROGRAMS:
Various faculty involvement programs are
planned in each residence hall area throughout
the year. Faculty academic advisers keep office
hours in Hume and Jennings. A future expansion
of this program is planned for all residence areas.
COUNSELOR-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM:
The counselor-in-residence program in Broward
Hall is a structured program that promotes inter-
action between students and a selected coun-
selor. He/She helps to plan and implement edu-
cational programming and serves as a contact or
referral for crisis situations in residence halls.
COMMUNITY COLLEGE HONORS
TRANSFER HOUSING PROGRAM (CCHTHP):
Qualifying community college transfer students
(3.5 or higher GPA upon transfer) are invited to
participate in the Transfer Honors Program
located in the Apartment Residence Facility. This
honors program is structured to assist transfer
students in the successful transition to UF and to
provide increased faculty interaction with stu-
dents. Students assigned to CCHTHP are
required to sign a separate community contract
agreeing to abide by the guidelines and expecta-
tions of this special housing area. Contact: Dr.
Barbara Keener, 239 Tigert Hall, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (904) 392-1308.
APARTMENT RESIDENCE FACILITY: Four
upper division residents share an apartment
with four single bedrooms, two baths, a com-
plete kitchen and living room.
1995 FACILITY: Single room suites and
double room suites with shared baths surround
a shared floor lounge to provide privacy within
community.
CO-OPS: Buckman and North co-ops are
Division of Housing facilities operated by
elected students. Rent rates have been reduced
in exchange for residents completing minor cus-
todial or maintenance details. Students must
apply separately and be interviewed by a co-op
representative to be eligible for consideration in
these unique communities.


SCHUCHT VILLAGE: Apartments in
Schucht Village are available to graduate stu-
dents with priority being given to students in
medical, dental, or veterinary school. To receive
application materials, write or call Family
Housing Office, Box 112100, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2100, telephone
(904) 392-2161.
DISABLED STUDENT HOUSING: A variety
of facilities in the residence halls are available for
disabled students. Broward, Jennings, Mallory,
and Yulee Halls as well as the Apartment
Residence Facility each have easily accessible
rooms. The Quiet Floor areas in Tolbert Hall for
men and South Hall for women also are accessi-
ble. In most cases, only specially-modified cen-
tral bath facilities are available. Building ramps
are provided and reserved parking is available.
While additional remodeling is continuing, facil-
ities are limited. In order that proper arrange-
ments may be made, early contact should be
made with the Division of Housing.
Disabled students need to explain the nature
of their disability in detail when they write.
Disabled students, as all students, must meet
the standard guidelines used in determining
housing eligibility.
FAMILY HOUSING: A student may apply
for on-campus student family housing prior to
admittance to the university. However he/she
must be registered as a full-time student as
defined by his/her college or school during the
semester in which housing is desired in order to
qualify for a family housing apartment assign-
ment. In order to maintain occupancy, the stu-
dent must make normal progress toward a
degree as determined by his/her college or
school as well as abide by the conditions of the
rental agreement. As applicable, proof of mar-
riage or the necessary documents to support that
a minor children) is in the legal care of a student
parent without a spouse will be required.
Family housing apartments are reserved for
married students and their children (if any), and
student parents without spouses who have
dependent minor children under their legal care
or who qualify under the provisions of Federal
Regulations, Title IX.
Family housing facilities consist of one- and
two-bedroom apartments, a few townhouses,
and efficiencies. Most units are unfurnished
except for 45 apartments in Corry Village.
Apartments are available with and without cen-
tral air conditioning. Almost all family housing
villages are located on campus.
Family income limits are set by the Depart-
ment of Housing and Urban Development for
Maguire Village only. There are no income lim-
its for Corry, Diamond, Tanglewood, or
University Village South.
To receive application materials, write or call
Family Housing Office, Box 112100, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2100, telephone
(904) 392-2161.
OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
The Housing Office functions as a listing
and referral agency for privately-owned rental
housing of all types listed with the university
for referral to students, faculty and staff.






STUDENT AFFAIRS


This office maintains extensive listings of
apartments, houses and rooming units offered
for rent to students, faculty and staff. Each
spring, the office compiles a comprehensive list
of major apartment and rooming unit develop-
ments. This list is available to anyone who
requests it in person or by mail from the Off-
Campus Housing Office.
It is recommended that the student make a
personal inspection of the rental facility and
have a conference with the owner (or agent)
prior to making a deposit or signing a lease
agreement. Persons seeking off-campus housing
should plan to arrive in Gainesville well in
advance of the semester in which housing is
needed. For example, fall semester arrange-
ments are possible as early as April, spring
semester after mid-November, etc. For best
results, visit during the week not weekends -
after preliminary information on available
rentals has been obtained.
Inquiries about off-campus housing should
be directed to the Off-Campus Housing Office,
Box 112100, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL 32611-2100, telephone (904) 392-2161.

Student Financial Affairs
The Office for Student Financial Affairs
(SFA) coordinates and administers most student
financial aid programs at the University of
Florida and provides financial assistance and
counseling to university students.
SFA awards aid to students according to
financial need the difference between current
educational costs and what individual students
can pay toward these costs. The university uses
data provided by the federal need analysis
processor to evaluate financial need for UF stu-
dents from information they and their families
supply on their Free Applications for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA).
WHAT IS FINANCIAL AID?
Financial aid is money provided to students
and their families as either "gift aid" or "self-
help" to help pay college costs. "Gift aid," as the
name implies, is free money such as scholar-
ships and grants. Students do not have to repay
these awards. "Self-help" programs include
loans and employment and are so named
because students must repay loans and must
work for money awarded through employment
programs. Awards to students consist of schol-
arships, grants, loans and/or work, singly or as
a package.
WHEN TO APPLY
Applications are available January 1 each
year. Students need to send their forms to the
appropriate processor as soon as possible after
that date. Students are considered for aid
according to the date their aid file becomes com-
plete (all required application data received) at
Student Financial Affairs. Most campus-based
money is awarded early, so to be considered for
this assistance students should apply as soon as
possible after January 1. A few programs such
as the Federal Pell Grant program, Federal
Direct Student Loans, and OPS employment are


open for application throughout the year (see
Important Deadlines below).
Although SFA cannot award financial aid to
students until they have been admitted to the
university officially. Students should not wait to
be admitted to apply for aid but should apply as
soon as possible after January 1 each year.
HOW TO APPLY
Financial aid applications are not sent to stu-
dents automatically when they apply for admis-
sion. University of Florida financial aid applica-
tion packets are available from most Florida
community colleges and high school guidance
offices. Students also may request financial aid
applications by contacting the University of
Florida's Office for Student Financial Affairs,
P.O. Box 114025, 103 Criser Hall, Gainesville,
Florida 32611-4025, or by calling (904) 392-1275.
Students must complete and submit a
University of Florida Application for Financial Aid
to the Office for Student Financial Affairs and a
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
to the Federal Student Aid Programs processor
at the address indicated on the form. For your
application to be considered on time, your
financial data must reach us from the processor
no later than March 15. Be sure to allow at least
three weeks processing time at the need analysis
agency. A Financial Aid Transcript from all previ-
ously attended institutions covering all periods
of attendance is required for all transfer stu-
dents for their files to be considered complete.
When completing 1995-1996 forms, students
should provide accurate financial figures, taken
directly from completed 1994 income tax forms.
To comply with federal financial aid require-
ments, the Office for Student Financial Affairs
must verify information students and parents
supply on their application forms. Incorrect
information or incorrectly completed applica-
tion forms can cause aid to be delayed or
denied. Students should keep copies of all their
financial aid documents.
IMPORTANT DEADLINES
Financial aid applications should be com-
pleted and sent to the appropriate processor as
soon as possible after January 1. March 15 is the
on-time deadline for Student Financial Affairs
to receive your information from the need
analysis agency. Students who wish to be con-
sidered for campus-based and institutional pro-
grams (such as Federal Work-Study, Federal
Perkins Loans, Turner Grants, and University
Loans) must be sure to apply early, since these
funds are limited. To be considered for a
Florida Student Assistance Grant, students must
make sure that the Federal Student Aid
Programs need-analysis processor receives their
application by May 15. Federal Direct Student
Loan on-time deadlines are set by semester. The
on-time deadline for applying for Federal Direct
Stafford and Federal Direct PLUS loans for Fall
1995 is June 1. Individual colleges within the
university and private organizations have their
own deadlines for applying for aid.


GRADUATE AID
Graduate students at the University of
Florida may be eligible for part-time employ-
ment and loans through SFA and/or for assist-
antships and fellowships through their colleges.
To apply for work study and loans, graduate
students must follow the procedures in HOW
TO APPLY, including applying as early as possi-
ble. Off-campus jobs and the state-funded OPS
job program are not based on need and are avail-
able through the Student Employment Office.
For other graduate aid such as fellowships and
assistantships, students should apply through
the Graduate School and the dean's office of
their colleges.
TYPES OF AID
SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded based on aca-
demic performance and financial need. SFA
awards a limited number of scholarships to aca-
demically outstanding undergraduates with
documented need. Most academic achievement
scholarships are awarded through the Office of
Admissions. Individual colleges within the uni-
versity also offer scholarships to undergradu-
ates. For information on these, students should
contact the dean of their college. Many private
donors offer scholarships, selecting the recipi-
ent(s) directly; students should contact civic
clubs, service organizations, private corpora-
tions, and other resources in their home com-
munities.
GRANTS are awarded to undergraduate
students with financial need. The two largest
grant programs available at the university are
the Federal Pell Grant and the state-funded
Florida Student Assistance Grant. Awards
range from $100 to $4,000.
LOANS. At the University of Florida, under-
graduate students can apply for the following
student loans:
Federal Family Education Loans which
include the following: unsubsidized and subsi-
dized Federal Stafford Loans, University of
Florida Institutional Loans, Federal Perkins
Loans, and Federal Supplemental Loans for
Students (FSLS). Parents of dependent under-
graduates also can take out educational loans for
their son or daughter through the Federal PLUS
loan program. These programs offer long-term,
low-interest loans that must be repaid when the
borrower graduates, withdraws, or drops to less
than half-time enrollment.
Loans range upward from $500 per academic
year at interest rates from 0 percent to 11 per-
cent annually. The actual amount of each loan,
except for unsubsidized Federal Direct Stafford
Loans and Federal PLUS loans, is based on
financial need as determined from information
the borrower provides on the FAFSA.
The university also has a Short-Term Loan
program to help students meet emergency
financial needs related to educational expenses.
Students may borrow up to $400 or the amount
of in-state tuition if they have an acceptable
repayment source. Interest is 1 percent per
month and these loans must be repaid by the
first day of the last month in the semester in






STUDENT AFFAIRS


which the money is borrowed. Short-Term Loan
applications are available at the short-term loan
counter in 107 Criser Hall.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT through the
university is offered to about 7,500 students
each year. In addition, many students work off-
campus in the Gainesville community. Students
normally work 15-20 hours a week, four or five
days a week, and earn at least minimum wage.
Most hiring departments help students arrange
their working hours around their academic
schedules.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
The SFA Student Employment Office is a
clearinghouse for part-time employment and
coordinates three employment programs: the
Federal Work-Study Program, including the fed-
eral community service component; Other
Personnel Services (OPS); and off-campus jobs.
Federal work study is a federal program based
on need and is awarded to students as part of
their overall financial aid package. OPS jobs are
state-funded and are not based on need. Student
employment maintains job bulletin boards for all
three programs at the following locations: Criser
Hall courtyard, McCarty Hall first floor,
Norman Hall first floor, outside 305 Reitz Union,
and outside H101 Shands Medical Center. The
Criser Hall job board is updated daily, and
weekly updates are posted at the other locations.
INFORMATION AND COUNSELING
Student Financial Affairs is open for student
service from Monday through Friday. For
financial aid information, applications and
counseling, students can go to the Criser Hall
offices or call 392-1275. A telephone counselor
also is available daily.
Another resource for financial aid informa-
tion is the NEXUS telephone tape series. Tapes
402-A through 402-L contain current informa-
tion on financial aid programs at the university.
The telephone number for the NEXUS system is
392-1683; tape 402 provides a listing of financial
aid tapes.

Enrollment Requirements
At the University of Florida, students must
enroll at least half time as indicated below to
receive most types of financial aid benefits.
To receive funds during summer semester
through some programs (Federal Direct
Stafford, Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford,
or Federal Direct PLUS Loan programs), stu-
dents must preregister for at least half-time
hours for the entire (May through August) ses-
sion, with at least 3 credit hours in Summer A
for undergraduates and at least 2.5 credit hours
in Summer A for graduate students.
FULL-TIME
Classification Fall/Spring Summer
A B C
Undergraduate 12 6 6 12
Graduate/Law 9 4.5 4.5 9


Professional

Undergraduate
Graduate/Law


1 or more
HALF-TIME
6 3 3 6
5 2.5 2.5 5


Academic Progress Requirements
For Financial Aid
University of Florida students receiving
financial aid are required to be in good standing
with the university and to maintain satisfactory
academic progress. To be eligible to receive
financial aid, students must comply with condi-
tions listed below.
UNDERGRADUATES
Students must have a 2.0 cumulative grade
point average by the achievement of 60 acade-
mic credit hours and must maintain a 2.0 cumu-
lative grade point average for the duration of
their undergraduate enrollment. Students fail-
ing to meet this requirement are ineligible to
receive financial aid.
Until the completion of 60 academic credit
hours, students' progress for financial aid pur-
poses will be evaluated under the standards
approved by the University Senate for deter-
mining eligibility for continued enrollment.
Students who have from .5 to 14.5 grade
points less than a 2.0 cumulative GPA will be
placed on financial aid probation;
Students who have 15 or more grade
points less than a 2.0 cumulative GPA will be
suspended from financial aid for one term;
Students who do not reduce their grade
point deficit to fewer than 15 deficit grade
points the following term of enrollment will be
terminated from financial aid; and
Students who reduce their grade point
deficit to fewer than 15 grade points below a 2.0
cumulative GPA will return to financial aid pro-
bation status.
Any action taken by the University Senate
Committee on Student Petitions regarding stu-
dents' appeals of their suspended enrollment
because of grade point deficit (for students who
have not yet earned 60 credit hours) will also
apply to the financial aid component of the aca-
demic progress policy.
Students will not be eligible for aid if they
do not earn a baccalaureate degree after carry-
ing 150 credit hours (whether or not they
received aid for all terms), with the following
exception: Students may carry up to 160 credit
hours for programs that regularly require more
than 130 earned hours to achieve a baccalaure-
ate'degree.
Freshmen must earn 75 percent of their
hours carried and achieve sophomore status (30
earned hours) after carrying a maximum of 40
credit hours;
Sophomores must earn 78 percent of their
total credit hours carried and achieve junior sta-
tus (60 earned hours) after carrying a maximum
of 77 credit hours;
Juniors (including 3LS) must earn 82 per-
cent of their total credit hours carried and
achieve senior status (90 earned hours) after car-
rying a maximum of 110 credit hours;
Seniors must earn 87 percent of their total
hours carried and must have earned a baccalau-
reate degree after carrying a maximum of 150
credit hours with the following exception:


Students who have earned more than 130 credit
hours and are enrolled in a program requiring
more than 130 earned credit hours for a bac-
calaureate degree must earn 91 percent of their
hours carried and must earn a baccalaureate
degree after carrying a maximum of 160 credit
hours; and
Students who do not earn the minimum
percentage of credit hours specified will be
placed on financial aid probation for one term.
During the following term of enrollment these
students must increase their credit hours to the
minimum. If they do not, they will be sus-
pended from aid until they meet this standard.
Students may receive up-to-ten full-time
terms of aid (or the equivalent) with the follow-
ing exceptions:
Students admitted under the Board of
Regents 10 percent admissions policy may
receive up-to-eleven full-time terms (or the
equivalent) of aid;
Students in programs requiring more
than 130 credit hours to earn a baccalaureate
degree may receive up-to-eleven full-time terms
(or the equivalent) of aid; and
Students admitted under the Board of
Regents 10 percent admissions policy in a pro-
gram requiring more than 130 credit hours may
receive up-to-twelve full-time terms (or the
equivalent) of aid.
The maximum number of terms students
transferring to the university may receive aid is
prorated based on their entering enrollment sta-
tus. For example, a student enrolling as a junior
may receive a maximum of five terms of aid to
earn a baccalaureate degree. Aid received at
another institution is not included in this limit.
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
Students enrolled in postbaccalaureate stud-
ies must petition the Academic Progress
Appeals Committee to receive financial aid.
Postbaccalaureate students must meet the same
academic requirements as undergraduates, as
specified above. The types of financial aid avail-
able to postbaccalaureate students depend on
the student's degree-seeking status.
GRADUATE STUDENTS
Students must maintain a 2.0 minimum
cumulative grade point average or meet the aca-
demic standards required by their departments,
whichever is higher.
Students will be ineligible for aid if they do
not attain their degree objectives after carrying
the maximum number of credit hours listed
below (whether or not they have received aid
for all terms):
70 credit hours at the graduate level for a
master's degree program.
200 credit hours at the graduate level for
a Doctor of Pharmacy degree (including under-
graduate hours).
100 credit hours at the graduate level for
a specialist's degree program (including mas-
ter's degree hours).
120 credit hours at the graduate level for
a doctoral degree program (including master's
degree hours).







STUDENT AFFAIRS


Students must earn 75 percent of their credit
hours carried at the graduate level. If they do
not, they will be on financial aid probation for
one term. During the following term of enroll-
ment these students must increase their credit
hours to the minimum. If they do not, they will
be suspended from receiving aid until they meet
the standard.

LAW STUDENTS
Students must maintain a 2.0 minimum
cumulative grade point average, or meet acade-
mic standards required by the College of Law,
whichever is higher. They will be ineligible for
aid if they do not attain their degree objective
after carrying the maximum credit hours listed
below (whether or not they received aid for
those terms):
45 credit hours at the graduate level for
students enrolled in the Master of Laws in
Taxation program; and
100 credit hours at the graduate level for
students enrolled in the Juris Doctor program.
Students will be evaluated each term for eli-
gibility to enroll for the following term.

PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS IN THE
COLLEGES OF MEDICINE, DENTISTRY,
AND VETERINARY MEDICINE
Since professional schools use a non-tradi-
tional grading system (one not based upon
GPA) to assess satisfactory completion of course
work, the same policy (a similar non-traditional
approach) will be used to measure qualitative
progress for continuing financial aid eligibility.
Students must earn their degrees within four
years. They will be evaluated annually in
September to determine advancement to the
next class level. If they do not advance to the
next class level but are still eligible for enroll-
ment they will be on financial aid probation the
following year. Students who have not
advanced to the next class level by the end of
the probationary period will no longer be eligi-
ble for financial aid.

ADDITIONAL POLICIES WHICH APPLY TO
ALL STUDENTS
Students who withdraw from school once
while receiving financial aid will be on financial
aid warning;
Students who withdraw from school more
than once while receiving financial aid will no
longer be eligible for financial aid;
Withdrawal from a Summer A or B term
will constitute one-half of a withdrawal;
Course withdrawals, incomplete and
course repetitions will conform to the academic
standards used by the university for determin-
ing grade point average;
Remedial courses are not offered at the
university; and
Students who think they have extenuating
circumstances that have contributed to their fail-
ure to maintain satisfactory academic progress
may petition the Academic Progress Appeals
Committee for reassessment of their status.


Students who enroll in curricula not specif-
ically addressed in this policy must petition
the academic progress appeals committee to
continue to receive financial aid.

Career Resource Center
The Career Resource Center in the J. Wayne
Reitz Union provides career planning, coopera-
tive education/work experience opportunities,
and employment assistance to all University of
Florida students and alumni.
The center's mission is to assist students in:
developing and exploring career plans
related to academic interests,
acquiring career-related work experiences,
developing personal strategies that ensure
successful employment upon graduation and
placing students in an interview environ-
ment which leads to securing future employ-
ment.
The center's services focus upon the student,
from freshmen exploring careers to seniors
seeking employment. Students can use the ser-
vices of the center at any point in their college
careers. Services are free to students and
include:
Individual Counseling for students seeking
career planning, career changes, work experi-
ence programs and job search campaigns. Nine
professional counselors are available to aid stu-
dents personally.
CHOICES, a computerized career explo-
ration and occupational information system is
available free to students. CHOICES helps
match career interests with occupations and
provides each student a personal printout for
review.
A career mini-school offers 16-18 different
seminar sessions on a weekly basis. Sessions are
usually 50 minutes each. Topics include career
planning, cooperative education, summer jobs
and internships, liberal arts careers, job search
correspondence, resume preparation, and inter-
view techniques, among others.
A Cooperative Education Program and
Internship enables students to gain professional
work experience related to classroom education.
It also provides a source of income to pay col-
lege expenses and enables students to become
more competitive when entering the job market.
On-Campus Interview Program, the largest
in the state, welcomes hundreds of employers to
campus each semester to interview graduating
students. Last year, hundreds of employers
interviewed more than 9,000 students for jobs
nationwide.
The CRC recently transitioned to 1st Place!, a
revolutionary new career center management
system which will provide an increased level of
services in a more efficient and timely manner
for employers and students alike. The students'
access to the system is via G.R.A.D., the Gator
Resume Action Disc. This is a self-contained PC-
compatible computer disc, which combines a
professional-quality resume preparation pro-


gram with a demographic information or regis-
tration section. Students purchase the disc at the
CRC's Student Service Counter and, following
the simple instructions contained with the disc,
complete both the information and resume sec-
tions on their own PC or at one of the many
computer labs on campus. They then must bring
the disc back to the Center, where the informa-
tion is downloaded to the CRC's system and the
disc is returned to the student. The student
should keep the information current and bring
the updated disc back to the CRC on a regular
basis the resume can also be used for the stu-
dent's personal job search process. Once the
information is in the CRC system, the student is
now registered with the Center and may partici-
pate in the on-campus interview process for full
-time, co-op and internship positions. In addi-
tion, the Center uses the information and the
resume to provide direct referrals to employers
who have requested candidates for positions, or
to provide resume data to employers prior to on-
campus interviews.
Career Days. The center sponsors a number
of these special events each semester. Career
Expo offers all UF students an informal oppor-
tunity to meet and discuss career and employ-
ment opportunities with hundreds of national
corporations.
A Career Resources Library containing
information to aid students in making career
choices; facts on several thousand employers
and related occupations; employer contact lists;
directories for business, industry, education, and
government; lists of American firms operating
overseas; reference material and information on
graduate and special studies programs including
fellowships, assistantships and other materials
and resource data. Research data is available on
job trends, outlook and economic forecasts, labor
market statistics, manpower bulletins for various
career fields, special directories and publications
giving reports and ratings on most employers.
An Audiovisual Library with study carrels
and a library of 200 slide/tape, video, and audio
programs provides career choices, employer
information, selection of academic programs,
and job search and interview techniques.
A Credentials Repository and Referral
Service is available to students and alumni.
Copies of credentials are sent upon request of
the students and alumni to potential employers.
In addition, the center refers qualified persons
who are on file and seeking employment to
interested employers requesting candidates to
fill job vacancies.
Gator Jobline is an automated job listing
service available to university students through
a touch-tone phone. There are more than 80 cat-
egories of immediate job openings available for
review in which positions have been listed by
telephone by employers and have been posted
in their own words and voices. Students need
only review the listings; when they find a poten-
tial position to their liking, they follow the
employer's instructions. The phone number for
this service is 392-JOBS (or 392-5627). Students








must obtain an access password in advance
from the Career Resource Center, Room B-1
Reitz Union.
A branch of the CRC, the Liberal Arts and
Sciences Career Planning and Placement Office,
is located in 358 Little Hall. There is also a part-
time CRC Office in the College of Agriculture
in 2014 McCarty Hall. These offices provide
individual counseling regarding career deci-
sion-making/planning, experiential learning
programs, and job placement focused specifi-
cally on the students in the respective colleges.
For additional information, students,
alumni, and faculty are invited to visit the cen-
ter located in the basement and on the ground
floor of the Reitz Union. Staff members are
available to discuss ideas, concerns and needs
for individuals or groups.

J. Wayne Reitz Union
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the "community
center" of the university, providing a wide vari-
ety of facilities, services and programs for all
members of the university community, but with
primary emphasis on serving the non-academic
needs of students. Policy for the Reitz Union is
established by the Board of Managers, which
consists of eight students and six faculty mem-
bers, with a student chair. The Reitz Union is
partially funded by Student Government.
The Reitz Union was opened May 1, 1967,
and was named by the Board of Regents in
honor of Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, president of the
university from 1955 to 1967. The many facili-
ties and services offered at the Reitz Union
include:
Student Activities Center. Located on the
third floor, the center offers a distinctive
arrangement of offices and work space for
Student Government, Student Honor Court,
Student Legal Services, and many other student
organizations.
Office of Student Activities: The Reitz
Union sponsors a continuing program of activi-
ties and services for the campus community,
including an arts series, lectures, live concerts, a
leisure course program, arts & crafts sales and
College Bowl. The organizations providing
these programs are Gators Involved in
Voluntary Endeavors (G.I.V.E.), a community
service organization, Leadership Education and
Development (LEAD) seminar series, and the
Reitz Union Program Council (RUPC). The
Office of Student Activities received the
National Association for Campus Activities
Excellence in Programming Award in 1994 as the
top programming office in the United States for
campuses over 15,000 students.
Dining and Food Facilities: There is a wide
variety of dining choices including a cafeteria,
snack bar, the Arrendondo dining room, the
Orange & Brew, I Can't Believe It's Yogurt,
Dunkin' Donuts, and Little Caesar's Pizza.
Complete catering service can be arranged for
receptions and small or large banquets.
Meeting/Hotel Facilities: A large ballroom,
two auditoriums, three lounges, and thirty con-
ference and meeting rooms are available for use
by students and university organizations. A 36-


room hotel is also available for use by official
guests of the university, students, and guests of
students, faculty and staff.
University Box Office: Students, faculty and
staff can purchase tickets for campus concerts
and CIRCA computer classes. As a Ticket-
Master outlet, tickets are also available for
major entertainment events throughout the
southeast United States.
Retail Stores: Located on the ground floor
and outside around the terrace, the retail stores
include: Blockbuster Video, the Reitz Union
Barber and Style Shop, a quick copy service,
Gator Executive Travel and a branch of the
University of Florida Bookstore.
Recreation & Entertainment: The Arts and
Crafts Center offers studio space, classes, and
hands-on instruction in a variety of crafts
including ceramics, weaving, jewelry making,
photography and screen printing. Photographic
darkrooms are also available for student use.
The Game Room features 16 bowling lanes, 17
billiard tables, a snooker table, table tennis,
football and video games. The Game Room
sponsors the intercollegiate men's and women's
bowling teams and campus and intercollegiate
tournaments in bowling, billiards, table tennis,
video games, bridge, chess and football.
Camping and outdoor equipment rentals, as
well as trip planning information can be
obtained from The Outfitter. The Reitz Union
Cinema, a 367-seat movie theater, features first-
run movies, avant garde classics, and foreign
and animated films. A new facility "the gallery"
and art gallery areas throughout the building
display works by students and faculty.
Services: Check cashing, ATM's, an informa-
tion desk, lost and found, passenger and ride-
wanted bulletin boards and voter registration
are provided to meet the various needs of stu-
dents, faculty and staff. Free notary public ser-
vice for University of Florida students is pro-
vided by Student Legal Services on the third
floor. A computer lab featuring Macintosh and
IBM personal computers is available for the
computing needs of University students.

University Counseling Center
The University Counseling Center offers
counseling and student development services
to students and their partners. The center is
staffed by counselors and psychologists whose
primary interests are to facilitate the growth
and development of each student and to assist
students in securing the greatest benefit from
their college experience. Services offered at the
center include the following:
Counseling: Individual, couples and group
counseling sessions are available to help stu-
dents with personal, career and academic con-
cerns. Appointments to see a counselor may be
made by calling the center at (904) 392-1575 or in
person at 301 Peabody Hall, adjacent to Criser
Hall. Students initially have an intake interview
in which the student and the counselor make
decisions about the type of help needed.
Students requiring immediate help are seen on a
non-appointment emergency basis. Information
concerning counseling interviews is confidential.


STUDENT AFFAIRS


Consulting: Center psychologists are avail-
able for consulting with students, staff, profes-
sionals and faculty. These consultations often
focus on working with individual students, spe-
cial programs, organizational problems, ways of
improving student environments or other issues
that may have important psychological dimen-
sions.
Career Development: In addition to career
counseling, the center offers vocational interest
testing, career workshops and the Discover pro-
gram. The center also provides referral informa-
tion to students seeking specific career informa-
tion.
Group and Workshop Program: The center
offers a wide variety of groups and workshops.
A number of them, such as the women's support
group and the African American support group,
are designed to serve special populations.
Others, such as the math confidence groups,
stress management workshops and counseling
groups, are formed to help participants deal
with common problems and to learn specific
skills. A list of available groups and workshops
is published at the beginning of each term.
Peer Counselors: Peer counselors, under-
graduate students who are trained and super-
vised professionally, provide career advisement,
the program Discover (computer-assisted voca-
tional guidance) and self-help workshops.
Teaching/Training: The center provides a
variety of practicum and internship training
experience for students in psychology and
counselor education. Center psychologists also
teach undergraduate and graduate courses in
these departments.
CounseLine: A self-help tape program
designed to provide information on how to cope
with the problems of daily living is sponsored
by the center. Students may call (904) 392-1683
and ask for any of the 34 available tapes. A list of
the tapes is published periodically in the student
newspaper and also is available at the center.

Gator Dining Service
Gator Dining Service is proud to offer an
exciting and innovative solution to the question
of where and how to eat on campus. Over 10,000
students are already members of the club.
Everything is on campus.There is an endless
variety of popular foods from soup and salad
bars, deli bars, made-to-order sandwiches,
baked goods, delicious hot entrees and nutri-
tious vegetables. Also, our newest addition to
campus is the HUB which features KFC, Taco
Bell" and I Can't Believe It's Yogurt.
Funds deposited in your account can be
used at all 18 locations. Present your Gator One
Card to the cashier for payment; the register
will deduct the purchase from your account and
display the remaining balance. Running low?
Additions to your account may be made during
business hours or through the mail in any
amount of $25 or more. In a hurry? You may
add money to your account over the phone dur-
ing business hours with your Visa or
MasterCard. Your account balance rolls over
from semester to semester, year to year. For
more information, call 392-2491.






STUDENT AFFAIRS


Student Health Care Center
Student Health Care Center (SHCC) pro-
vides a spectrum of out-patient medical services
including primary medical care, health screen-
ing programs, health education, sexual assault
recovery services and mental.health consulta-
tion and counseling. Clinical staff are board-cer-
tified and experienced in the care of university
students. SHCC is accredited by the Joint
Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare
Organizations.
The SHCC is staffed by physicians, physi-
cian assistants, nurse practitioners, registered
nurses, psychiatrists, and psychologists. Health
education staff provide counseling on a variety
of health topics and an extensive campus out-
reach program. SHCC also provides a phar-
macy, clinical laboratory and radiology services.
There is no charge for an office visit with SHCC
clinical staff, health education or mental health
services. Reduced fee-for-service charges are
assessed for laboratory tests, X-ray procedures,
medications, special clinic services and consul-
tation with health care specialists. All the ser-
vices are located in the Infirmary Building
which is located centrally on campus.
The SHCC hours are 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
on weekdays and 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. on
weekends aid holidays. Appointments are
encouraged and walk-ins are welcome. Clinic
hours vary during semester breaks and holidays.
Business hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. A physician and men-
tal health counselor are available by phone after
hours. Please call for information at 392-1161,
extension 309. For appointments call 392-1161
extension 224, or mental health at 392-1171.
All students registered for classes at the
university are eligible for service. Spouses,
postdoctoral students and semester-off students
who plan to return the following semester may
receive services if they pay a special health fee.
A student government sponsored health
insurance plan is available to help cover other
medical costs. Students should compare this,
policy with any others of their choice and enroll
in an insurance program that is most appropri-
ate to their needs.

University of Florida AIDS
Policy
The policy of the university is to treat cases
of HIV infection on a case-by-case basis. When a
case of HIV infection or full-blown AIDS comes
to the attention of the university, whether stu-
dent, faculty or staff member, the director of the
Student Health Care Center, with the permis-
sion of the affected individual, will review the
case, advise the university, and assist in the
coordination of resources and services.
The confidentiality and welfare of the indi-
vidual are respected. Breach of confidentiality of
information obtained by a university employee
in an official university capacity may result in
disciplinary action. Based on current medical
information concerning risk of infection, the
university does not isolate persons with AIDS
or HIV infection from other individuals in edu-
cational or work settings.


Further, it is the policy of the university to
provide education which seeks to prevent the
spread of HIV infection, and to encourage those
who are infected or wish to know whether they
are infected to seek early diagnosis and inter-
vention.
The university considers AIDS to be a dis-
ability. Existing support services can be utilized
by students or employees who are disabled by
AIDS or HIV infection.

Dental Care
The College of Dentistry provides a broad
range of dental services at reduced fees through
its student clinics. For information or schedul-
ing of appointments, call (904) 392-4261.
Emergency dental care is available on a
walk-in basis at 8:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. week-
days. Entry to the College of Dentistry clinics
(the blue zone on the first floor) is via the west
entrance to the Health Science Center on Center
Drive. Parking is available in the visitor's park-
ing garage with access from Mowry Road.

Speech and Hearing Clinic
The Program in Communication Sciences
and Disorders, Department of Communication
Processes and Disorders, offers services to per-
sons who have speech, hearing, language or
reading disorders.
The clinic operates from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday when the univer-
sity is in session. The clinic is a donation-based
service. Those interested are encouraged to call
the clinic (904) 392-2041 (Voice & TDD) or to
stop by 435 Dauer Hall, for information and to
schedule an appointment for services.

Reading and Writing Center
The University Reading and Writing Center,
located in 2109 Turlington Hall, offers free ser-
vices to staff and students at all levels. The
center can be contacted between 8:00 a.m. and
12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday (392-0791).
The center provides credit classes for fresh-
men [RED 1343] (SS,F), as well as noncredit,
individual instruction based on a diagnosis of
each student's needs. The reading program is
designed to improve comprehension, vocabu-
lary and study skills. The writing program is
designed to aid students with the organization
and development of papers and with grammar
and mechanics. Through individual confer-
ences, students may receive limited help in
writing papers for their courses. In addition,
the center offers workshops on preparing for
the CLAST or the GRE, or on writing disserta-
tions and theses. Materials also are available for
such exams as the MCAT, LSAT or GMAT.

Student Legal Services
Student Legal Services provides university
students with free legal advice and counseling.
Full-time students may receive advice on land-
lord-tenant problems, consumer law, criminal
charges, traffic citations, divorce, adoption,


name change, and other family matters. In some
landlord-tenant and family law matters, Student
Legal Services provides free representation in
court in Alachua County. Certain restrictions
and limitations may apply. Appointments usu-
ally are required for one-on-one counseling with
the staff attorneys. All staff attorneys are
licensed members of the Florida Bar.
Free notary services, including preparation
of powers of attorney, are available without
appointment during normal business hours,
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
For more information on the services offered
or to make an appointment to speak to a staff
attorney, call Student Legal Services at 392-1665,
Ext. 368. Student Legal Services is located in
Room 368, J. Wayne Reitz Union.

Guide to Specialized Services
Committee on Sexism and Homophobia
392-1261, 202 Peabody Hall
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday
Co-Chairpersons: Phyllis Meek, Associate Dean
for Student Services, and Irene Stevens,
Assistant Dean for Student Services.
Committee on the Status of Women
392-0201, Ext.3826
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday
Chairperson: Karen Valdes, Associate Professor
College of Fine Arts.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Concerns Committee
392-6800, 2121C Turlington Hall
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday
Chairperson: Sheila Dickison, Associate Dean,
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Student Union
392-1665, Ext. 310, 300 J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Rape and Crime Victim Advocate Program
377-7273, Open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
C.A.R.E. (Center for Sexual Assault/Abuse
Recovery Education)
392-1161, Ext. 231, 203 Student Health
Care Center.
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday Friday
Women's Affairs Cabinet
392-1665, Ext. 305, 305 J. Wayne Reitz Union
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Monday Friday.
Women's Leadership Program
392-1261, Hours: 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Contact Person: Shelli Herman, Assistant Dean
for Student Services.
Center for Women's Studies and Gender
Research
392-3365,15 Anderson Hall
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., Monday Friday
Contact Person: Helga Kraft, Director and
Associate Professor, Germanic and Slavic
Languages.








Student Life

Student Activities and
Organizations
Student Government: Student Government at
the University of Florida is a cooperative organi-
zation for advancing student interests and is
based on mutual confidence among the student
body, the faculty and the administration.
Considerable authority has been granted the stu-
dent body for the regulation and conduct of stu-
dent affairs. The criterion in granting authority
to the Student Government has been the disposi-
tion of UF students to accept responsibility com-
mensurate with the resources at their disposal to
fulfill its mission, including the allocation of
approximately four-and-one-half million dollars
annually in student activity and service fees,
substantial authority in the regulation of co-cur-
ricular activities and administration of the
Student Honor and Traffic Courts. University
administration, faculty and staff feel that train-
ing in acceptance of responsibility for the con-
duct of student affairs is a valuable part of the
educational growth and development of the
individual student.
Student Government is a body politic, occu-
pying its franchise under grant from the Board
of Regents and subject to its continued
approval. Student Government is patterned on
the state and national form of government but
adapted to the local needs of the student body.
Powers are distributed into the three branches:
legislative, which is embodied in the Student
Senate; judicial, which is embodied in the
Student Honor Court and the Traffic Court; and
executive, embodied in the president and the
treasurer of the student body. Members of all
three branches are elected directly by the stu-
dent body, of which all UF students are mem-
bers. In addition to elected offices, many
appointed positions have been established in
Student Government, including Cabinet and
sub-Cabinet, Student Honor Court and the
Traffic Court posts.
Student Government, recognizing its limita-
tions as a true "government," attempts to exer-
cise influence on governments at all levels
through conferences, lobbying, research and the
advancement of proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions
within the student government structure by
contacting the Student Government offices on
the third floor of the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Student Senate: The Student Senate is com-
posed of representatives selected from the col-
leges and living areas on and off the campus
and, in general, acts as the legislative branch of
Student Government.
Religious Activities: The university welcomes
the contributions of religious traditions to the
campus community. The churches, centers, and
organizations associated with the university
offer a rich variety of programs and ministries.
There are also interdenominational and non-
denominational activities fostered by the
Department of Religion and the Campus
Ministries Cooperative.


Social Fraternities: twenty-nine national social
fraternities have established chapters at the uni-
versity. The general work of the fraternities is
supervised by the Interfraternity Council, com-
posed of the president of each fraternity. The
national fraternities at the university are Alpha
Epsilon Pi, Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi
Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi
Phi, Delta Chi, Pi Kappa Phi, Omega Psi Phi,
Delta Upsilon, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi,
Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Gamma
Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi
Kappa Sigma, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi,
Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Tau
Epsilon Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi and
Zeta Beta Tau.
Eighteen women's sororities have established
chapters at the university. Sixteen have built
chapter houses and two live in other housing
arrangements. These living quarters serve as the
center of the activities of the individual sorori-
ties. Primary jurisdiction in sorority matters is
vested in the Panhellenic Council. The chapters
at the university are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha
Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Xi Delta,
Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Omicron Pi, Chi
Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta
Phi Epsilon, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta,
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Phi Mu, Pi Beta Phi,
Sigma Gamma Rho, Sigma Kappa and Zeta Tau
Alpha.
In addition to the above listed social fraterni-
ties and sororities, there are approximately 170
honorary or professional organizations and
approximately 200 special interest (non-acade-
mic) organizations.

Academic Honesty
The university expects students to be honest
in all of their university classwork. Therefore,
students are required to commit themselves to
academic honesty by signing the following
statement as part of the admissions process.
"I understand that the University of Florida
expects its students to be honest in all of their
academic work. I agree to adhere to this com-
mitment to academic honesty, and understand
that my failure to comply with this commitment
may result in disciplinary action, up to and
including expulsion from the university."
This statement serves to remind students of
the obligations they assume as students at the
university. Matters of violations of academic
honesty are adjudicated by the Student Honor
Court, the Health Center Student Conduct
Standards Committee, the Student Conduct
Committee and faculty.

Academic Honesty Guidelines
CHEATING: The taking or tendering of any
information or material which shall be used to
determine academic credit. Taking of informa-
tion includes, but is not limited to, copying
graded homework assignments from another
student; working together with another individ-
ual(s) on a take-home test or homework when
not specifically permitted by the teacher; looking


or attempting to look at another student's paper
during an examination; looking or attempting to
look at text or notes during an examination
when not permitted. Tendering of information
includes, but is not limited to, giving your work
to another student to be used or copied; giving
someone answers to exam questions either when
the exam is being given or after taking an exam;
giving or selling a term paper or other written
materials to another student; sharing informa-
tion on a graded assignment.
PLAGIARISM: The attempt to represent
the work of another as the product of one's own
thought, whether the other's work is published
or unpublished, or simply the work of a fellow
student. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited
to, quoting text or written materials without
citation on an exam, term paper, homework, or
other written materials submitted to a teacher;
handing in a paper as your own work which
was purchased from a term paper service; hand-
ing in anyone else's paper as your own work.
BRIBERY: The offering, giving, receiving or
soliciting of money or anything of value to gain
academic advantage for yourself or another.
MISREPRESENTATION: Any act or omis-
sion with intent to deceive a teacher for acade-
mic advantage. Misrepresentation includes, but
is not limited to, using computer programs gen-
erated by another and handing it in as your own
work unless expressly allowed by the teacher;
lying to a teacher to increase your grade; lying
or misrepresenting facts when confronted with
an allegation of academic dishonesty.
CONSPIRACY: The planning or acting
with one or more persons to commit any form
of academic dishonesty. ,

Student Conduct Code
I. Introduction: Students enjoy the rights and
privileges that accrue to membership in a uni-
versity community and are subject to the
responsibilities which accompany that member-
ship. In order to have a system of effective cam-
pus governance, it is incumbent upon all mem-
bers of the campus community to notify appro-
priate officials of any violations of regulations
and to assist in their enforcement. All conduct
regulations of the university are printed and
made available to all students and are applica-
ble upon publication in the Independent Florida
Alligator, the Undergraduate Catalog, the UF
Student Guide or other reasonable means of
notification.
II. Authority: The president is charged with
responsibility for establishing and enforcing
regulations governing student life. Regulations
are designed to enable the university to protect
against the conduct of those who, by their
actions, impair or infringe on the rights of oth-
ers or interfere with the orderly operations of
the university. Discipline may be imposed for
offenses against the Student Conduct Code
occurring at any of the following locations or
activities:






STUDENT LIFE


A. University campus;
B. University owned or controlled property;
C. Property or housing units assigned for
responsibility to the university, includ-
ing, but not limited to, fraternity and
sorority property;
D. Activities sponsored by the university;
E. Activities officially approved by the uni-
versity which are conducted by univer-
sity chartered organizations; and
F. Activities occurring off campus.
III. Rules of Procedure: The primary judicial
bodies authorized by the president and charged
with the administration and enforcement of this
code shall formulate and furnish to students
charged with an offense the rules of procedure
which shall ensure basic procedural fairness
including, but not limited to:
A. The right to be notified in writing of the
charges against him/her.
B. The right to know the nature and source
of the evidence which will be used
against him/her.
C. The right to present evidence and wit-
nesses in his/her own defense, except in
informal proceedings.
D. The right to freedom against self-incrimi-
nation.
E. The right to appear with an advisor at
the hearing.
F. The right to question adverse witnesses,
except in an informal proceeding.
IV. Suspension of Student Pending Hearing:
Violations of the Student Conduct Code, Section
V.A. L. and V.A. R., may result in immediate
suspension. If in the determination of the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs, the student
poses a significant danger of imminent and seri-
ous physical harm to himself/herself or others
at the university, or immediate suspension is
necessary to protect the health, safety or welfare
of the student or others at the university, the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs, with
approval of the Vice President for Student
Affairs, may suspend the student pending a
hearing before the appropriate hearing body.
The hearing will take place within a reasonable
time after notification of the suspension.
V. Violations of the Code of Conduct:
1. The following are violations of the
Student Conduct Code and may result in
expulsion or any lesser sanction:
A. Furnishing false information to the
university.
B. Forgery, alteration or misuse of uni-
versity documents, records or identi-
fication cards.
C. Unauthorized use, taking possession
or destruction of public or private
property on campus or acts commit-
ted with disregard of possible harm
to such property.
D. Actions or statements which amount
to intimidation, harassment or hazing.
E. Participation in or continued atten-
dance at a raid on a university living
unit, after warning to disperse has
been issued by a university official or
any law enforcement officer.


F. Disorderly conduct as defined in
Florida Statute 877.03.
G. Disrupting the orderly operation of
the university as defined in Florida
Statutes and the Demonstration
Policy of the university.
H. Failure to comply with any university
rule or regulation, including, but not
limited to, the Alcoholic Beverages
Rule, 6C1-2.019, and the Academic
Honesty Guidelines.
I. Violations of Housing, Inter-
Residence Hall Association and area
government regulations.
J. Violation of any discipline sanction,
including, but not limited to, conduct
probation.
K. Possession, use or delivery of con-
trolled substances as defined in
Florida Statutes.
L. Possession or use of a firearm on the
university campus except as specifi-
cally authorized in writing by the
university.
M. Action(s) or conduct which hinders,
obstructs or otherwise interferes with
the implementation or enforcement of
the Student Conduct Code.
N. Failure to appear before any of the
disciplinary authorities and to testify
as a witness when reasonably notified
to do so. Nothing in this subsection
shall be construed to compel self-
incrimination.
O. Violation of any municipal ordinance,
law of the State of Florida, law of the
United States, or rule promulgated by
the Florida Board of Regents.
P. Ticket scalping, i.e., selling tickets to
any University of Florida function or
event, or any event being held or to
be held on the University of Florida
campus, for more than $1 over the
original price.
Q. Possession or use of fireworks, explo-
sives, dangerous chemicals, ammuni-
tion or weapons (including, but not
limited to, bows and arrows or
switch-blade knives).
R. Actions which are committed with
disregard of the possible harm to an
individual or group, or which result
in injury to an individual or group.
S. Any actions, including those of a sex-
ual nature or involving sexual activi-
ties, which are intimidating, harass-
ing, coercive or abusive to another
person, or which invade the right to
privacy of another person.
T. Any action without university autho-
rization which accesses, uses, modi-
fies, destroys, discloses or takes data,
programs or supporting documenta-
tion residing in or relating to a com-
puter, computer systems or computer
network, or causes the denial of com-
puter system services to an autho-
rized user.
2. The Student Conduct Committee may
recommend expulsion or any lesser


penalty for a violation of the Student
Conduct Code. Recommendations of
guilt or innocence and sanctions, if
appropriate, are made to the Dean for
Student Services for final action.
3. The Student Honor Court may recom-
mend expulsion or any lesser penalty for
academic dishonesty as defined by the
Student Conduct Code and Academic
Honesty Guidelines. Conflicts in jurisdic-
tion will be resolved by the Director of
Student Judicial Affairs.
4. Residence Hall Conduct Boards and the
Coordinator for Residential Judicial
Programs may recommend penalties as
set forth by the Office for Student
Services for violation of the Student
Conduct Code, Inter-Residence Hall
Association, and/or area government
regulations.
5. Student Traffic Court may impose autho-
rized penalties for violation of university
traffic, parking, and vehicle registration
regulations.
6. The Health Center Student Conduct
Standards Committee hears cases of
alleged academic dishonesty by students
of the health center colleges. The commit-
tee is comprised of faculty and students
from the health center, appointed by the
president. Recommendations of guilt or
innocence and sanctions, if appropriate,
are made to the Dean for Student
Services for final action.
7. The College of Law Honor Committee
hears cases of alleged academic dishon-
esty by students in the College of Law.
Recommendations of guilt or innocence
and sanctions, if appropriate, are made to
the Appelate Board for final action.
8. Other judicial bodies may be established
and vested with jurisdiction by appropri-
ate authority.
VI. Off-Campus Conduct: When a student vio-
lates city, state or federal law by an offense com-
mitted off campus which is not associated with
a university-connected activity, the disciplinary
authority of the university will not be used
merely to duplicate the penalty awarded for
such an act under applicable ordinances and
laws. The university will take disciplinary
action against a student for such an off-campus
offense only when it is required by law to do so
or when the nature of the offense is such that in
the judgment of the Director of Student Judicial
Affairs, the continued presence of the student
on campus is likely to interfere with the educa-
tional process or the orderly operation of the
university; or the continued presence of the stu-
dent on campus is likely to endanger the health,
safety, or welfare of the university community
or its property. If the Director of Student
Judicial Affairs determines that disciplinary
action is warranted, the Director of Student
Judicial Affairs shall notify the student in accor-
dance with Rule 6C1-4.16(5). The action of the
university with respect to any off-campus con-
duct shall be made independent of any off-cam-
pus authority.






STUDENT LIFE


VII. Postponement of Hearing Due to Pending
or Possible Criminal or Civil Charges: If the
student charged with a violation of the Student
Conduct Code, regardless of which primary
judicial body may hear the matter, wishes to
have the hearing postponed because there is
pending or possible civil or criminal litigation
which he/she feels might be prejudiced by the
findings of the hearing, such postponement may
be granted provided the student agrees to
accept conduct probation or suspension,
depending upon the gravity of the offense. Such
probation or suspension will be determined and
activated by the Director of Student Judicial
Affairs and will remain in force until such time
as the student requests a hearing before the
appropriate primary judicial body and the hear-
ing is held. The student shall be informed
whether he/she would be placed on probation
or suspended prior to making a decision to
postpone the hearing.
VIII. Student Waiver of Right to Hearing: In the
event a student charged with a violation of the
Student Conduct Code desires to waive the right
to a hearing by the appropriate official or hear-
ing body, and the student so indicates in writing,
the Director of Student Judicial Affairs, provided
he/she agrees to accept jurisdiction, may make a
determination of fact and take appropriate action
concerning the alleged violation.
IX. Summary Hearing: In the event a student
charged with a violation of the Student Conduct
Code, which in the opinion of the Director of
Student Judicial Affairs, if proven, would not
warrant a penalty in excess of two semesters
probation, and the student does not waive his or
her right to a hearing before the appropriate
official or hearing body, the Director of Student
Judicial Affairs may require a hearing to be held
before the chairperson of the Committee on
Student Conduct or the chairperson's desig-
nated representative rather than before the full
committee.
X. Conflict of Jurisdiction: In the event that the
offense is within the jurisdiction of more than
one primary judicial body, the Director of
Student Judicial Affairs shall determine which
judicial body shall hear the charge.
XI. Sanctions: A student adjudicated responsi-
ble of violations of the Student Conduct Code
shall be subject to sanctions commensurate with
the offense and any aggravating and mitigating
circumstances, which may include one or more
of the following penalties, unless otherwise
expressly provided:
A. Reprimand-The student is given formal
written notice and official recognition is
taken of the offense committed.
B. Conduct Probation-The student is
deemed not in good standing and cannot
represent the university on any athletic
team other than intramurals or hold an
office in any student organization regis-
tered with the university. In the event a
student on conduct probation is found in
violation of the terms of such probation


or of the Student Conduct Code which
includes the Academic Honesty Guide-
lines prior to the completion of the pro-
bation period, he/she may receive expul-
sion or any other lesser penalty. The
duration of any probation period or any
conditions or penalty(ies) imposed for
the violation shall be in proportion to the
seriousness of the violation.
C. Suspension-The student is required to
leave the university for a given or indefi-
nite period of time, the termination of
which shall depend upon specified acts
of the student's own volition related to
mitigation of the offense committed.
D. Expulsion-The student is permanently
deprived of his/her opportunity to con-
tinue at the university in any status.
E. Payment of Damages-The student is
required to pay for damages to univer-
sity property, provided that such pay-
ment shall be limited to the actual cost of
repair or replacement of such property.
F. Reduced or Failing Grade-The student is
given a reduced or failing grade for the
class in which the offense occurred for
violations of the Academic Honesty
Guidelines, but only by the faculty mem-
ber involved and upon recommendation
thereto.
G. Community service, counseling, or other
appropriate requirements-The student is
required to complete a specified amount
of community service, meet with a coun-
selor for a specified period of time
and/or complete some other requirement
considered appropriate by the hearing
body based on the nature of the offense.
XII. Appeals: The Student Honor Court makes a
recommendation to the Director of Student
Judicial Affairs concerning findings and sanc-
tions to be imposed, if appropriate. The
Residence Hall Conduct Board makes a recom-
mendation to the Coordinator for Residential
Judicial Programs concerning findings and sanc-
tions to be imposed, if appropriate. The Student
Conduct Committee and the Health Center
Student Conduct Standards Committee makes a
recommendation to the Dean for Student
Services concerning findings and sanctions to be
imposed, if appropriate. The College of Law
Honor Committee makes a recommendation to
the Appellate Board, composed of the Dean for
Student Services, Dean of the College of Law,
and the Chancellor of the Honor Committee,
concerning findings and sanctions to be
imposed, if appropriate.
Decisions of the Coordinator for Residential
Judicial programs, Assistant Director for Student
Judicial Affairs can be appealed to the Dean for
Student Services. Decisions by the Dean for
Student Services and College of Law Appellate
Committee can be appealed to the Vice President
for Student Affairs.
All appeals must be made in writing to the
appropriate official within five days after notice
of the last action taken unless otherwise agreed
upon in writing by the appellant and the person
to whom the appeal is directed.


Intercollegiate Athletics
For each of the last 11 years, the University
of Florida's intercollegiate athletic program has
ranked among the nation's 10 best, based on
research conducted by USA TODAY and the
National Association of Collegiate Directors of
Athletics.
The Gators field eight men's teams and eight
women's teams. Men compete in baseball, bas-
ketball, cross country, football, golf, swimming,
tennis and track & field, while women compete
in basketball, cross country, golf, gymnastics;
swimming, tennis, track & field and volleyball.
UF will also field a women's soccer team for the
first time beginning in the fall of 1995.
Some of the nation's best athletes don the
orange and blue, as Gator student-athletes have
earned a combined 1,493 All-America honors
since 1980. In addition, 74 Gator student-ath-
letes have represented 14 countries in Olympic
competition, including 25 athletes in the 1992
Summer Games in Barcelona, Spain. In fact, if
the University of Florida were a country, the
Gators would have finished tied for 19th in the
medal standings with its 12 medals (seven gold)
won in Spain. Gator athletes have won 49
Olympic medals since 1968, including 24 golds.
Florida competes in the Southeastern Confer-
ence (SEC) along with Alabama, Arkansas,
Auburn, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana State,
Mississippi, Missilsippi State, South Carolina,
Tennessee and Vanderbilt. Florida was a charter
member of the SEC in 1933. The 1993-94 acade-
mic year was a banner year for Florida, as the
Gators claimed five SEC Championships and
nine Gator teams finished their respective sea-
sons ranked among the nation's top 10. In addi-
tion, Florida has ranked as the best combined
men's and women's athletic program in each of
the last three years. Over the last three years, 19
of Florida's coaches have been named SEC
Coach-of-the-Year.
The university athletic program stretches far
beyond the playing fields, however, as a school
and SEC record 145 Gator student-athletes were
recognized for being named to the SEC's acade-
mic Honor Roll in the last two years. Since 1980-
81, 583 Gator student-athletes have earned SEC
academic honors, the top total for a school in the
league over that span.
In addition, the Gator athletic program sup-
ports university academic programs. In an era
when the National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) estimates that 70 percent of
Division I schools are losing money on intercolle-
giate athletics, the University of Florida Athletic
Association contributed more than $5 million
since 1991 to help fund University academic
endeavors.
The University athletic program also serves
as a community focal point. In the three-year
period (1991-92/1992-93/1993-94), Florida drew
a total of 2,281,317 combined fans to its athletic
events. It is estimated by the Gainesville Area
Chamber of Commerce that more than $30 mil-
lion is generated annually for the community for
a six-game home football schedule. Florida also
hosted the NCAA Women's Tennis Champion-






STUDENT LIFE


ships. In addition, UF has been the site of
NCAA or SEC championships/regional events
in baseball, gymnastics, swimming, track & field
and volleyball, along with hosting basketball
games in the National Invitational Tournament.
When talk turns to facilities, the University
of Florida's centrally-located athletic complex is
among the nation's best.
Ben Hill Griffin Stadium at Florida Field (the
football stadium) serves as a hub for the athletic
complex. With the crowning jewel of Ben Hill
Griffin Stadium at Florida Field the north end-
zone expansion project completed just prior to
the 1991 season, capacity now stands at 83,000,
making Florida Field one of the eight largest on-
campus football stadiums in the nation. With the
addition of the 10,000 seats, the 1991, 1992 and
1993 seasons saw UF draw the top 18 crowds in
school history and the No. 1 football crowd in
state history, college or professional (85,507 Nov.
27, 1993 vs. Florida State).
For the north end zone expansion, the Uni-
versity Athletic Association was honored with
a first place award by the City of Gainesville
Beautification Board. The award takes into
account the contribution a structure makes to a
city, its design, the overall improvement of an
area, and the structure's visibility and land-
scaping.
Since 1986, Florida has had numerous capital
improvements, including the major expansion of
the football stadium and the new tennis, track &
field, baseball, golf and swimming facilities. No
state funding was involved in the university's
recent $17 million football stadium expansion.
Another sign of Florida's commitment to
athletic excellence is the 12,000-seat Stephen C.
O'Connell Center an air-inflated dome which
houses Gator basketball and transforms into an
indoor track facility while also being home to
national powerhouse swimming and gymnastics
teams.
Gators just love their sports, as there are 70
courts and outdoor playing fields on the Univer-
sity of Florida campus and the O'Connell Center
and Florida Gymnasium are available for indoor
sports. In all, Florida offers more than 60 intra-
mural and clubs sports and the campus is located
near many recreational lakes and rivers. The
beaches of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean
are just a short drive away, as well as many of
the attractions which Florida has to offer.

Intramural-Recreational Sports
The Recreational Sports Program is a signifi-
cant part of the total educational community at
the University of Florida. All students, faculty,
and staff are encouraged to participate volun-
tarily in the program which has become an
important phase of extracurricular activities on
the campus and offers opportunity for exercise,
recreation, social contacts and friendly competi-
tion.
Student administration is a tradition in the
recreation program at the university. Students
officiate the games, manage the leagues and act
as student directors in the Recreational Sports
Office.


The checkout of equipment and the use of all
facilities are free to enrolled students, faculty
and staff, and competition between groups and
clubs is encouraged. Friendship, new games,
skills and good times are guaranteed. For more
information contact the Recreational Sports
Office, 200 Student Recreation Fitness Center, at
392-0581. The Gator One card is needed for par-
ticipation be sure to bring it with you.

INTRAMURAL LEAGUES
For structured competitive play, intramural
leagues and tournaments are scheduled for trad-
tional as well as non-traditional activities.
Specific leagues available for the sports of flag
football, volleyball, soccer, basketball, and soft-
ball are Women's Independent, Co-Ed,
Recreational, Men's Independent, A and B,
Graduate, Residence Hall, and Sorority.
Individuals also may compete in activities, such
as swimming, bowling, golf, track, tennis, rack-
etball, squash and wallyball. T-shirts are
awarded to winners in each division.

SPORTS CLUBS
The Sports Club program provides struc-
tured, competitive athletic opportunities
among institutions in non-varsity sports. The
program offers instruction, recreation, and
competition in approximately 35 different
clubs. Individual sports clubs that represent
the University of Florida are assisted by the
Sports Club coordinator to organize, utilize
facilities, check out equipment, and allocate
general resources for participation.

LAKE WAUBURG
The Lake Wauburg recreational activities
are located eight miles south of the university
on U.S. 441, and are available for use by stu-
dents, faculty, staff and their guests. The specific
activities and facilities available at Lake
Wauburg North include sailing, boardsailing,
canoeing, crewing, fishing boats, sunbathing,
picnic facilities such as tables and grills, and
sporting equipment and swimming.
The south end of the lake, located one mile
farther south on U.S. 441, offers 60 acres of land
in its natural state. For your relaxation, there are
sunbathing decks overlooking the lake and a
playing field which can accommodate most
field sports. A frisbee golf course encompasses
the park for your playing pleasure.
In addition, three areas are available for
reservation to university groups. The lodge and
pavilions can house approximately 100 persons
each, and each of these areas is provided with
barbecue grills and tables to accommodate park
guests. Call (904) 466-4112 for reservations.
All activities are free and open year-round
from noon to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday
and 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday and
Sunday. Both facilities are closed on Mondays.

SOUTHWEST RECREATION PARK
The newest addition to the growing recre-
ational facility complex on the campus is located
in the southwest part of the university at the


corner of Hull Road and Bledsoe Drive. The
new 26-acre park offers much-needed program
facilities.
The Southwest Recreation Center contains
sports areas for basketball, volleyball, bad-
minton, aerobics, club activities, a large strength
and conditioning room, as well as six racquetball
courts. Shower facilities and lockers also are pro-
vided. There is an equipment room and appro-
priate office space.
The outdoor areas consist of a new quad-
softball complex, three basketball courts, ten ten-
nis courts and a small utility field. All outdoor
facilities are lighted for evening use.
The new facility is scheduled to be available
for use in Fall 1994. Students, faculty and staff
should be reminded to bring their Gator One
card when using the park. Memberships for use
of the Southwest Recreation Center are available
to faculty and staff.
Student Recreation &
Fitness Center
The Student Recreation & Fitness Center
(SRFC) is located behind Florida Gym, off
Fletcher Drive. The center includes facilities for
racquetball, squash, aerobics, weightlifting and
other fitness activities. A multipurpose area
accommodates volleyball, basketball and mar-
tial arts activities. The recreational sports office
is located on the second floor of the center.
Lifestyle and fitness assessment programs
are offered in the facility's Lifestyle Appraisal
Center. Ongoing wellness programs, as well as
special health and fitness promotion activities
are available to University of Florida students in
this new facility.
A UF I.D. card is required to participate in
any activities, or use any SRFC facilities. A
towel is also required of each individual using
the strength and conditioning room or partici-
pating in aerobics.
Racquet courts can be reserved one day in
advance by calling 392-4110. For further infor-
mation call the fitness center office at 392-3461.
Parking and Traffic Regulations
Any student of the University of Florida is
eligible to register and operate a vehicle on cam-
pus. Parking eligibility is determined by the stu-
dent's local address and academic classification.
Students desiring to register a vehicle on
campus must be registered for class and pre-
sent their vehicle registration to the Parking
Administrative Services Decal Office. Rules and
regulations are available at the time of the vehi-
cle registration, and all registrants should
familiarize themselves thoroughly with the
rules and regulations before operating or park-
ing a motorized vehicle on campus.
Illegally operated or parked vehicles will be
issued a citation. Failure to respond to a citation
within the prescribed time will result in addi-
tional costs, failure to receive transcripts, failure
to register for classes and the towing of the
vehicle.
Any questions regarding the use of vehicles
on campus should be directed to the Parking
Administrative Services Decal Office (392-2241).








Academic Regulations

Each student is responsible for becoming familiar
with the rules and regulations of the university and
for applying them as appropriate. Additional infor-
mation relative to academic rules, conduct, gradua-
tion, social activities, failure in studies, etc., may be
found in the sections of this catalog containing regu-
lations of the separate colleges and schools and in the
Schedule of Courses.





Classification of Students
Students are classified by the Office of the
University Registrar each semester:

Classification Explanation

0 Special transient students,
qualified high school stu-
dents and other nondegree-
students who have been per-
mitted to register at the
University of Florida.

1 Students with fewer than 30
credits earned.

2 Students who have earned 30
credits or more, but fewer
than 60 credits.

3 Students who have earned 60
credits or more, but fewer
than 90 credits.

4 Students who have earned 90
credits or more.

5 Students who are candidates
for a degree in a program
which normally requires 10
semesters and who have
earned 120 credits or more.

6 Postbaccalaureate students:
Degree-holding students who
have been admitted to post-
baccalaureate status.

7 Graduate students seeking a
first master's degree.

8 Graduate students who have
earned a master's degree, or
who have earned 36 or more
credits while seeking a grad-
uate degree, but who have
not been admitted to doctoral
candidacy.

9 Graduate students who have
been admitted to doctoral
candidacy.


College Level Academic Skills Test
The state of Florida has developed a test of
college-level communication and computation
skills called the College Level Academic Skills
Test (CLAST).
CLAST is designed to test the communica-
tion and computation skills judged by state uni-
versity and community college faculty as neces-
sary for successful performance and progression
through the baccalaureate level. The test is
required by Florida statutes and rules of the
State Board of Education.
CLAST is administered three times a year to
university students as well as to community col-
lege students who are completing either
Associate of Arts degree programs or Associate
of Science degree programs and are seeking
admission to upper division programs in state
universities in Florida. Students who do not
complete the test satisfactorily will not be
awarded the Associate of Arts nor will they be .
admitted to upper division status in state uni-
versities in Florida. CLAST requirements also
apply to students transferring to upper division
programs in Florida state universities from
Florida private colleges and to those students
transferring from out-of-state colleges who have
not had the opportunity to take the test. Such
students must pass the test by the end of the
next term in which it is available to them.
The Office of Instructional Resources located
at 1012 Turlington Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, 32611-7345, phone (904) 392-
1715, can tell you how and when to apply to
take the CLAST.
The University Advising Center located
at 358 Little Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL, 32611-8135, phone (904) 392-.
1521, can provide you with a list of CLAST skills
and can tell you where the communication and
computation skills are taught in the curriculum.

Confidentiality of Student Records
The university assures the confidentiality of
student educational records in accordance with
State University System rules, state statutes and
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
of 1974, known as the Buckley Amendment.
Directory information is that information
which can be released to the public on any stu-
dent. It is limited to: name, class, college and
major; dates of attendance; degrees) earned;
honors and awards received; local and perma-
nent addresses; telephone number; participation
in officially-recognized activities and sports; and
the weight and height of members of athletics
teams.
Currently enrolled students who wish to
withhold information in these categories should
complete a Restriction of Directory Information
form, available through the Office of the
University Registrar.
In general, present or former students have
the right to review their own educational
records for information and to determine accu-


racy. A photo I.D. or other equivalent docu-
mentation or personal recognition by the custo-
dian of record will be required before access is
granted. Parents of dependent students, as
defined by the Internal Revenue Service, have
these same rights upon presentation of proof of
the student's dependent status.

Gordon Rule (Communication and
Computation Requirement)
Students must complete with grades of C or
higher, 12 credits in designated courses that
involve substantial writing (a total of 24,000
words). Students select at least 12 credits from
among those Composition, Literature and the
Arts, Historical and Philosophical Studies,
International Studies and Diversity, and Social
and Behavioral Sciences general education
courses which are listed in each term's Schedule
of Courses. College Level Examination Program
(CLEP) credit cannot be used to satisfy the writ-
ing requirement.
In addition, each student must complete
with grades of C or higher, 6 credits of course
work in mathematics, at or above the level of
college algebra, OR 3 credits in mathematics
and an additional 3 credits in statistics, com-
puter science or the logic courses PHI 2100 or
PHI 3130.
Acceptable mathematics course prefixes
include: MAA, MAC, MAD, MAP, MAS, MAT,
MGF, MHF or MTG. Courses fulfilling this
requirement are identified with an "M" in the
"CC" field by the section number.
The following courses may NOT be used to
satisfy the mathematical sciences or computa-
tion requirement: CGS 3063 and CRM 4121.
The Communication-Computation course
work must be completed satisfactorily prior to
earning 60 credits. The courses acceptable for
the computation requirement are identical to
those authorized for the General Education
mathematical sciences requirement (refer to the
Lower Division section of this catalog). Any stu-
dent satisfying College Level Examination
Program (CLEP) requirements in mathematics
shall be allowed to exempt three (3) credits of
mathematics required by this rule.

Maintenance of Student Records
The Office of the University Registrar main-
tains students' academic records. A progress
report is sent to students at the end of each term
of enrollment indicating grades, cumulative
hours earned, and grade points. Probationary
status and degrees awarded, if any, also are
indicated.
Transcripts: Upon written request, the uni-
versity will provide complete academic tran-
scripts for any student who has attended the
University of Florida. To reflect a true and com-
plete academic record for undergraduate, grad-
uate and professional students, the university
will issue only complete transcripts.






ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS


Transfer Credit Policy
Students may transfer a total of 64 credit
hours from community colleges as part of the
hours needed for their UF degrees, regardless of
when these hours are earned, but subject to uni-
versity and college degree requirements.
However, junior and senior level course
requirements for the major must be completed
at UF or, with permission of the student's col-
lege, at another baccalaureate degree-granting
institution.
The courses represented by such credit
hours will be recorded on the student's
University of Florida record and may be used to
satisfy various requirements, but such courses
may not reduce the number of credit hours
required in the upper division at UF to earn a
degree.
Courses completed with grades of D or
higher at other regionally accredited institutions
which reasonably parallel the curriculum at this
university will be accepted for transfer credit as
hours earned. It is the prerogative of the studen-
t's upper division college to determine how
transfer credit satisfies the specific degree's
course requirements. Students are required to
submit final official transcripts from all institu-
tions attended prior to or during their enroll-
ment at UF. Failure to' declare attendance at
another institution can invalidate admission to
UF and any credits or degrees earned.
UF Students Attending Other Schools
Under normal circumstances, UF students
are not permitted to register at another institu-
tion for a course or its equivalent which is
offered at UF.


I S *

Auditing Courses
Auditing may be approved on a space-avail-
able basis. In addition to the payment of course
fees, the approvals of the instructor and dean of
the college offering the course are required.
Courses which are audited are not reflected on
the University of Florida academic transcript.
Florida residents who are sixty years of age or
older are eligible to receive a fee waiver.
Procedures for auditing courses are available
from the Office of the University Registrar.

Course Load Requirements
The minimum full-time load for all under-
graduate students is 12 credits. The minimum
full-time load for a six-week summer term is 6
credits and the twelve-week summer term is 12
credits. Postbaccalaureate students are consid-
ered undergraduates.
The minimum load for full-time undergrad-
uate student benefits from the Veterans
Administration or Social Security Administra-
tion is 12 credits for fall, spring and Summer C
and 6 credits for the six-week summer terms.
Refer to the Student Affairs section of the cata-
log for enrollment requirements for students
receiving financial aid.


University regulation allows a maximum
load of 15 credits for a student whose previous
term average was below a C. Some colleges
have differing maximum loads which are stated
in the college sections of this catalog.
Students with college approval may register
for less than the minimum or more than the
maximum load. After late registration, no stu-
dents will be permitted to drop below the mini-
mum load without successfully petitioning their
college dean.
Simultaneous enrollment in correspondence
courses or extension work at another college or
university is counted when computing the max-
imum but not the minimum course load.
Dropping Courses
Students dropping courses after the pub-
lished deadline which are not approved for
exception through the petitions process will be
assigned grades of WF (withdrew failing). These
grades will be calculated as failing grades.
Students seeking an exception to this policy
must follow the appropriate petitions process.
Nondegree Registration
Visiting Students Attending UF:
Nondegree enrollment is restricted to partici-
pants in special programs, off-campus programs,
university-affiliated exchange programs, those
participants with nondegree educational objec-
tives at the university, and high school/college
dual-credit enrollment. (Special regulations gov-
ern high school/college dual enrollment for aca-
demically-advanced students in Florida high
schools. Refer to Time-Shortened Degree
Opportunities for additional information.)
Students who have been denied admission to
UF are not eligible for nondegree registration. In
addition, students who have previously
attended UF in a degree seeking status who did
not subsequently earn a bachelor's degree are
not eligible for nondegree registration.
Regular undergraduate students in good
standing at another accredited collegiate institu-
tion may be permitted to enroll fulltime at the
university as nondegree transient students to
complete work to transfer back to the parent
institution. No evaluation will be made of work
previously completed, and it is the student's
responsibility to secure such approval as may be
required by the parent institution. Certification
to Social Security and Veterans Administration
programs also is the responsibility of the stu-
dent, who must request each institution to fur-
nish records.
Nondegree enrollment is subject to the avail-
ability of faculty, space and facilities. No appli-
cation for admission is required; the appropriate
forms for nondegree enrollment should be
requested from the Office of the University
Registrar in Criser Hall. Priority for nondegree
enrollment is given to University of Florida
employees and to permanent residents of the
Gainesville area whose nondegree educational
objectives cannot be met at another institution.
Nondegree students are subject to the fol-
lowing restrictions:


Course enrollment requires the approval of
the college at the beginning of each term. The
college of enrollment has the authority to ter-
minate a continuing nondegree student's
enrollment prior to registration for any term.
As a general rule; a student may register as a
nondegree student for one term only.
Nondegree students are ineligible for
advance registration.
Registration for the fall or spring term is not
permitted until the third day of classes in the
term for which the student wishes to enroll.
Nondegree registration must be completed
before 4:00 p.m. on the last day of late regis-
tration; failure to register by that deadline
will result in a late registration fee.
The same grading system is applicable to
degree and nondegree students. Credit
earned while in a nondegree status will not
be applicable to a University of Florida
degree except by subsequent admission to
degree status and successful petition for
application of such credit to the degree.
Authorization to enroll as a nondegree stu-
dent in no way implies future approval for
admission as a degree-seeking student at the
university. To be considered for degree-
seeking enrollment, nondegree students
must apply for admission.
Nondegree enrollment status will be denied
any student under suspension from a post-
secondary institution or not in good stand-
ing at any institution previously enrolled,
including the University of Florida, even if
the student has subsequently attended
another institution. Nondegree students are
subject to other regulations and restrictions
which may be imposed by the college or
department in which they wish to enroll.
Nondegree students taking courses at the
university will be required to register for and
to attend classes under the university calen-
dar. Nondegree students will pay appropri-
ate UF fees based on course level and num-
ber of credits for which they are registered.

Petitions
When an academic regulation appears to
result in undue hardship, students may petition
for waiver of the regulation.
In general, petitions for waiver of an acade-
mic regulation for the current term should be
directed to the school or college in which the
student is enrolled. For example, petitions to
drop or add after the official drop/add period
should be presented to the school or college.
Exceptions to the course load regulation are to
be presented to the school or college for deci-
sion. Petitions approved by the school or college
must be reported to the Office of the University
Registrar before the action is official.
All other petitions, including waiver of aca-
demic regulations for prior terms, should be
presented to the Office of the University
Registrar which will refer them to the
University Senate Committee on Student
Petitions. Actions approved by petition will
become part of the student's permanent record.






ATTENDANCE POLICIES


Detailed information on procedures to peti-
tion is available from the student's college or
from the Office of the University Registrar.
The student seeking waiver of a regulation
through petition must remember that no com-
mittee on petitions can direct an instructor to
change a student's grade, nor can the Senate
Committee require any college or school to grant
a degree by waiving any of these regulations.
Withdrawals
Withdrawal is the formal process of drop-
ping all courses in a term. Any student who
withdraws after the published deadline shall be
assigned grades of WF in all courses and will be
subject to suspension and exclusion regulations.
Students who absent themselves from UF with-
out official withdrawal normally will receive
failing grades at the end of the term.
Students on academic probation who with-
draw from UF prior to the deadline will continue
on probation until their grade point deficit is
reduced to zero.
Students on University Admissions
Committee probation must meet the terms of
their probation.
Students should contact the Office for
Student Services to begin withdrawal proce-
dures.




Administrative Provisions
Students are not authorized to attend class
unless they are registered officially or approved
to audit with evidence of having paid audit fees.
Following the end of the drop/add period, the
Office of the University Registrar provides evi-
dence of proper registration to instructors
through distribution of class rolls and class roll
addenda.
Students who do not attend at least one of the
first two class meetings of a course or laboratory
in which they are registered, and who have not
contacted the department which offers the course
to indicate their intent, may be dropped from the
course if the department chair deems this action
necessary to provide space for other students.
The department will notify students dropped
from courses or laboratories under this provision
by posting a notice in the department office.
Students may request reinstatement on a space-
available basis if documented evidence excusing
the absences is presented to the department
chair.
NOTE: Students must not assume that they
are dropped automatically if they fail to attend
the first few days of class.

Attendance Policy
Students are responsible for satisfying the
entire range of academic objectives as defined
by the instructor. For students whose names
appear on the class roll, absences count from the
first class meeting.


In general, reasons which may be acceptable
for absence from class include: illness, serious
family emergencies, special curricular require-
ments (e.g., judging trips, field trips, profes-
sional conferences), military obligation, severe
weather conditions, religious holidays and
participation in official university sponsored
activities such as music performances, athletic
competition, or debate. Absences from class for
court-imposed legal obligations (e.g., jury duty
or subpoena) must be excused. Other sound rea-
sons may be offered by the student.
Twelve-Day Rule
Students who participate in athletic or
extracurricular activities are permitted without
penalty 12 scholastic day absences per semester
from the university. (A scholastic day is any
day on which regular class work is scheduled.)
Instructors must be flexible when scheduling
exams or other class assignments.
The 12-day rule applies to individual stu-
dents participating on an athletic or scholastic
team, for example. Consequently, a schedule
which requires absence of more than 12 days for
any group should be adjusted so that no indi-
vidual student is absent from campus for more
than 12 scholastic days.
Students who previously have been warned
for absences or unsatisfactory work in any
course should not incur additional absences,
even if they have not been absent from the uni-
versity for 12 scholastic days. It is the student's
responsibility to maintain satisfactory academic
performance and attendance.
Reading Days
The two days prior to the start of examina-
tions in the fall and spring semesters, generally
a Thursday and Friday, are designated reading
days. There will be no classes held on these
days; instead, students are encouraged to use
these days for study and review. There are no
reading days in the summer terms because
examinations are given during regular class
periods.
Illness Policy
Students who are absent from classes or
examinations because of illness should contact
their professors. The student should contact his
or her college by the published deadline to drop
a course for medical reasons. After the college
petition deadline, students may petition the
University Senate Committee on Student Peti-
tions to drop a course for medical reasons. A
student should contact the Office for Student
Services, Division of Student Affairs, for proce-
dural information to withdraw for medical rea-
sons.

Last Week of Classes
No final or comprehensive examinations,
projects, or term papers may be scheduled or be
assigned during the final week of class. Written
papers and/or oral presentations and periodic
testing announced at the beginning of the term
and in the course syllabus may be collected or


presented, provided they do not serve as a final
examination. Weekly or daily tests, if scheduled
in the syllabus, are permitted; hourly or major
exams are not. A major test is one which exceeds
half of a class period. Take-home examinations
assigned as final examinations can be due no ear-
lier than the regularly scheduled final examina-
tion. Laboratory sections are exempt from this
policy.
Religious Holidays
The Board of Regents policy statement gov-
erns university policy regarding observance of
religious holidays:
Students shall be excused from class to
observe a religious holy day of their faith,
upon notifying their instructor.
While students will be held responsible for
material covered in their absence, each stu-
dent shall be permitted a reasonable amount
of time.
No major test, major class event, or major
university activity shall be scheduled on a
major religious holiday.
Professors and university administration
shall not penalize students who are absent
from academic or social activities because of
religious observance.
The University of Florida urges faculty and
administrators not to schedule exams or major
events on evenings or days that will be
observed as holy days by a significant number
of students. Students who ask to be excused
from class for religious reasons will not be
required to provide second-party certification.






Student grades are recorded permanently by
the Office of the University Registrar.
Credit: The word credit as it is used in this
catalog refers to one semester hour, generally
representing one hour per week of lecture or
two or more hours per week of laboratory work.
Passing Grades and Grade Points (1)
A 4.0
B+ 3.5
B 3.0
C+ 2.5
C 2.0
D+ 1.5
D 1.0
S 0.0/Satisfactory
(1) The degree-granting college may require
a minimum grade of C on particular courses.
Non-Punitive Grades and Symbols -No
Grade Points
W Withdrew
H Deferred grade assigned only in
approved sequential courses.
N* No grade reported: not in GPA
I* Incomplete: not in GPA






GRADES AND GRADING POLICY


Failing Grades No Grade Points
E Failure
U Unsatisfactory
WF Withdrew failing
NG No grade reported
I Incomplete
Note: I* or N* grades recorded on the stu-
dent record indicate the non-punitive initial-
term receipt of an I or NG. A grade of I* or N* is
not considered a failing grade for the term in
which it is received, and it is not computed in
the grade point average; however, if the I* or N*
has not been changed by the end of the next
term for which the student is enrolled, it will be
counted as a failing grade and used in computa-
tion of the grade point average. For purposes of
determining grade point average after the initial
receipt of an 1* or N* grade, the three summer
terms are considered collectively as a single
term. I* and N* grades are not assigned to grad-
uating students; they receive grades of I or NG.
An incomplete grade may be assigned at the
discretion of the instructor as an interim grade
for a course in which the student has (1) com-
pleted a major portion of the course with a pass-
ing grade, (2) been unable to complete course
requirements prior to the end of the term
because of extenuating circumstances, and (3)
obtained agreement from the instructor and
arranged for resolution of the incomplete grade.
Instructors are not required to assign incom-
plete grades.

Grade Point Averaging
and Deficits
The term "average," as used in any univer-
sity regulation, refers to the grade point average
for work completed at the University of Florida.
Grades received at other institutions are NOT
averaged with grades received at the University
of Florida for the purpose of meeting university
average requirements. Other agencies and hon-
orary societies will compute averages in accor-
dance with their own standards and policies.
Averages are determined by computing the
ratio of grade points to semester hours
attempted. For the grade point average compu-
tation formula, please refer to the example
below.
A grade point deficit is defined as the num-
ber of grade points below a C average on hours
attempted at the University of Florida. If the
grade point average is less than 2.0, there is a
grade point deficit.
Only grades higher than C will lower a
deficit. Every credit of C+ earned removes .5
from a deficit (a C+ in a three-credit course
removes 1.5 deficit points); every credit of B
removes 1 deficit point; and every credit of A
removes 2 deficit points.
Computation of a grade point deficit is
dependent upon first calculating the grade point
average. Multiply the total UF hours carried for
a grade by 2 (for 2.0 GPA) and subtract the total
grade points earned to determine the deficit.
For instance, if a student has taken 100 hours for
a grade, then 200 grade points are needed for a
2.0 GPA. If there are 196 grade points, there is a
4 point deficit.


Calculating Your Grade Point Average
Multiply grade value times the number of
credit hours for total grade points. Then
divide the total number of grade points by the
number of hours attempted. (Exclude hours
attempted under the S/U option.)
Calculating Your GPA and Deficit Points


A = 4.0
B+= 3.5
B = 3.0
C+= 2.5
Sample:


C = 2.0
D+= 1.5
D =1.0
E = 0.0


Course Grade
AML 2020 D
PSY 2013 S
SPN 1110 C
PSC 1420 D


WF = 0.0 points
I = 0.0 points
NG = 0.0 points
S or U= 0.0 points


Grade
Value
1.0
NA
2.0
1.0


Credit
Hrs.
3
NA
5
3
11


Grade
Points
3.0
NA
10.00
3.0
16.0


16.0 divided by 11= 1.45 grade point average
Since the GPA is less than 2.0, to figure the
grade point deficit:
11 total credit hours X 2.0 = 22 grade points
necessary for 2.0 GPA
22 -16 (total grade points earned) = 6 deficit
points

Repeat Course Work
University of Florida course work which is
repeated is counted in the computation of a stu-
dent's U grade point average as many times as
grades for that course are recorded, although
credit hours will be awarded only once.
However, when a student earns a C or higher in
a course, repeats that course and earns a C or
higher on the subsequent enrollment, the new
grade is not computed into the UF grade point
average nor are additional credits awarded.
Outcomes when repeated course work
involves only University of Florida course
work:
Grades Earned GPA/Credit
Computation
First grade lower Each grade computed
than a C in grade point aver-
Second grade of C age; credit earned
or higher only once.

First grade lower Each grade computed
than a C in grade point aver-
Second grade lower age; credit earned
than a C only once.

First grade of C Each grade computed
or higher in grade point aver-
Second grade lower age; credit earned
than a C only once.

First grade of C Only first grade
or higher computed in GPA;
Second grade of C credit earned only
or higher for first attempt.

Grades received at other institutions will not
be averaged with grades received for course
work taken at the University of Florida. Repeat


course work taken at the University of Florida
will result in calculation of only the UF grade in
the UF grade point average, with credit earned
only once.
Outcomes when repeated course work
involves transfer course work and UF course
work:

Course work Course work taken
taken at another at UF then repeat-
institution then ed at another
Grades Earned repeated at UF institution.
Any grade Only UFgrade Only UFgrade
combination computed in computed in
for first and grade point grade point
second average; average;
courses, as credit earned credit earned
illustrated only once. only once.
above.

In the case where all repeated course work
was taken at other institutions, no grades will
be calculated into the UF grade point average
and credit is awarded only once.
Upper division colleges may choose not to
accept grade points and hours earned from
lower-level courses, if they are taken after the
student has received credit and grades for
advanced courses or exam credit in the same
field.
Repeat course equivalencies are identified
based on the state's common course taxonomy.
Refer to the statewide course numbering sys-
tem page at the back of this catalog for the defi-
nition of course equivalencies.

Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory
Grade Option
Subject to college degree program and
department guidelines, students may take elec-
tive course work and earn grades of S
(Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). Grades
earned under the S-U Option do not carry grade
point values and are not computed in the
University of Florida grade point average. Such
grades are included in a student's permanent
academic record and are reflected on the tran-
script. Students should note that other academic
institutions and agencies may interpret a grade
of "U" as a failing grade in their grade point
average computation.
Students choosing the S-U Option must be in
good standing and may not be on university aca-
demic probation. To elect the S-U Option, stu-
dents must obtain approvals from the instructor
and department offering the course, as well as
the dean of their own college. They may elect the
S-U Option for only one course each term; this
option is in addition to courses which are taught
only on a S-U basis. Courses taken to fulfill com-
munication or computation requirements
(Gordon Rule) may not be taken S-U.
For fall, spring and Summer C terms, the
deadline for electing the S-U Option is 4:00 p.m.,
Friday, during the third week of classes. For
Summer A and Summer B terms, the deadline is
4:00 p.m., Wednesday, during the second week
of classes. Once the S-U Option is approved, stu-
dents may not elect to convert to a letter grade.






ACADEMIC PROGRESS REGULATIONS


Academic Progress Policy
The University of Florida has a goal, the
graduation of every student who enters the uni-
versity as a freshman and every eligible student
transferring from a Florida community college.
To meet this goal, the number of places available
in upper division programs must be increased,
either through expansion or through more lim-
ited admissions of transfer students not covered
by the articulation agreement. The criteria for
admission to upper division academic programs
will be the same for native students and for eligi-
ble community college transfer students.
At their option, colleges may early affiliate
native (first-time-in-college, FTIC) freshman and
sophomore students. Such students will carry
college designations and major designations.
Students seeking majors in colleges which do
not admit freshmen or sophomores will carry an
LS designation along with the designation of
their probable major. Students undecided about
their majors can choose an undecided category.
These categories represent the broad fields of
science and engineering (USE), humanities and
letters (UHL), and social and behavioral (USB).
\ Every college will delineate upper and lower
level performance standards at 30, 45 and 60
hours for each academic program or group of
academic programs. Students who meet the
upper level performance standards will be on
track for entrance into their academic program
of choice. These published performance stan-
dards may include grade point averages, grades
in required prerequisite or preprofessional
courses, auditions, interviews, portfolios, etc.,
and for teacher education curricula, SAT or
ACT scores. The performance standard set for
60 hours assures acceptance into major pro-
grams for native (FTIC) students who have
passed all CLAST subtests and for community
college transfer students with A.A. degrees who
have passed all CLAST subtests. Community
college transfer students claiming completion of
the A.A. degree with CLAST who are admitted
and subsequently are found to be without the
degree and CLAST will revert to a nondegree-
seeking category. They will be required to reap-
ply for admission to their college of choice.
Students falling between the upper and
lower level standards at the 30- and 45-hour
benchmarks may seek advisement from the
University Advising Center or their department.
Students whose academic performance falls
below the lower benchmark levels at 30 or 45
hours will be returned automatically to the LS
"change" designation through action of the
Office of the University Registrar. These stu-
dents will be notified by their college and/or
the University Advising Center that they are not
on track for the academic program of their
choice. They should seek advisement for alter-
native programs for which their grade point


averages and courses might qualify them. The
University Advising Center will endeavor to
match the performance of such students with
other major programs.
A student may not initiate a registration
while in the "change" classification.
Students who fall below lower level perfor-
mance standards at 60 hours and those students
whose performance falls between the upper and
lower performance levels who cannot be accom-
modated by the major of their choice also will
be placed in the LS "change" designation. Such
students will be given one semester to find
acceptance into a major program. In exceptional
cases, the director of advising may authorize an
additional semester.

Good Standing
The University of Florida has determined
that a student is in good standing if he or she is
eligible to continue or to re-enroll in the univer-
sity, even if on probation.
The University of Florida policies on acade-
mic standing, probation and suspension are
based on the possibility that a student can over-
come academic difficulty and make appropriate
progress toward a degree.

Regulation of Academic Standards
The University of Florida's Senate estab-
lishes regulations for academic probation and
suspension to enforce the academic standards of
the university and to require both the mainte-
nance of grade point averages and reasonable
conformance to a program of study. Any col-
lege of the university may specify additional
academic standards and students are responsi-
ble for observing the regulations pertaining to
these standards.
The probation, suspension and exclusion
regulations that apply to undergraduate stu-
dents also apply to postbaccalaureate students.
All actions taken under these regulations shall
be reflected by appropriate notations on the stu-
dent's academic record; some of these notations
can be permanent.

Probation
The intent of academic probation is to serve
notice formally that a student may not be mak-
ing satisfactory progress. The conditions of aca-
demic probation are intended to specify the
achievement standards required to graduate; to
identify unsatisfactory academic performance at
an early date; to provide occasion for counseling;
and to give students whose ultimate success is in
question further opportunity to demonstrate
their ability to meet academic expectations.
Students may be placed on probation by
their college for failure to maintain normal
academic progress in their degree program.
College probation will be removed when the
college determines that satisfactory acade-
mic progress has been demonstrated.


* Undergraduate students with less than a 2.0
cumulative grade point average for
University of Florida course work and a
grade point deficit of fewer than 15 shall be
placed on academic probation.
Academic probation shall be continued for
all undergraduate students as long as they
have a grade point deficit of fewer than 15. It
will be removed when the grade point deficit
has been reduced to zero. Should the grade
point deficit increase to 15 or more, the stu-
dent will be suspended from the university.

Suspension
Academic suspension from the university
denies registration privileges to students who
ultimately will not graduate if they continue at
their current level of academic achievement.
Academic suspensions identify students whose
performance indicates that they will not fulfill
graduation requirements and encourages stu-
dents to leave the university to investigate their
alternatives as soon as a high probability of fail-
ure is evident.
* Students with a grade point deficit of 15 or
more in their University of Florida course
work shall be suspended from the university
for a minimum of one term and their advance
registration is canceled. Students who are
suspended will not be scheduled to register
for a future term until they have filed an
application for readmission by the published
deadline and been approved for readmission.
Students re-enrolling after an initial suspen-
sion will be placed on final scholarship pro-
bation. If the grade point deficit is still 15 or
more at the end of the term, students will be
suspended permanently without possibility
of registering, except by decision of the
University Senate Committee on Student
Petitions or by successful petition to re-
enroll under the Fresh Start Program.
Any courses taken at another institution
while on suspension from the University of
Florida, including extension or correspon-
dence courses, will not be counted as credit
earned toward a degree at the University of
Florida. However, a student suspended for
academic reasons who subsequently earns an
Associate of Arts degree from an accredited
Florida public community college may, upon
approved readmission, appeal to the
University Committee on Student Petitions
for acceptance of transfer credit earned. The
petitions committee may, upon the recom-
mendation of the college, approve transfer of
that credit.

Exclusion
Students who have not been admitted to an
upper division degree program by 60 hours
earned will be given one additional semester to
be admitted into an upper division college
major. Subsequent registration in the LS
"change" classification will not be permitted. In
exceptional cases, the director of advising may
authorize an additional semester.






ACADEMIC PROGRESS REGULATIONS


Students whose academic performance falls
below the lower benchmark level for their major
at 30 or 45 hours earned will be assigned the LS
"change" classification for one term. Such stu-
dents who have not qualified for a major by the
end of that term will be excluded from further
registration.
Students who have not successfully com-
pleted the College Level Academic Skills Test
(CLAST) or the Communication-Computation
Requirements (Gordon Rule) by the comple-
tion of 60 semester hours of credit are ineligible
for admission into an upper division degree
program until those requirements have been
satisfied.
Upper division colleges may choose not to
consider students for admission to and may
deny continuation in a degree program if they
fail to maintain reasonable academic progress,
as specified by the college or department.





The following requirements apply to under-
graduate degrees. Requirements for graduate
and professional degrees in the Graduate School
and the colleges of Dentistry, Law, Medicine
and Veterinary Medicine are listed in the indi-
vidual graduate or professional catalogs.
Application for Degree: Students must file an
application for degree with the Office of the
University Registrar by the deadline. Students
must apply in the term in which they expect to
graduate, regardless of applications in previous
terms. All requirements for the degree must be
completed as of the date of commencement.
Catalog Year: Catalog year determines the set of
academic requirements (general education and
the major) which must be fulfilled for gradua-
-tion. Students graduate under the catalog in
effect at the time of their initial undergraduate
enrollment as a degree-seeking student at UF, a
Florida public community college, or other
Florida state institution, provided they maintain
continuous enrollment (registration for and com-
pletion of at least one course for one term in an
academic year) Students who do not maintain
continuous enrollment will be assigned the cata-
log in effect at the time enrollment is resumed.
Students with the approval of their college
dean's office may opt to graduate under the
requirements of a later catalog, but they must
fulfill all graduation requirements from that
alternate catalog year.
The university will make every reasonable
effort to honor the statement of curricular
requirements appropriate to each student's cata-
log year. However, courses and programs will


sometimes be discontinued and requirements
may change as a result of curricular review or
actions by accrediting associations and other
agencies.
College Dean's Certification: The dean of the col-
lege certifies that all requirements have been
completed and that the student is recommended
by the faculty.
College Level Academic Skills Test: Students seek-
ing admission to upper division must satisfacto-
rily complete the College Level Academic Skills
Test (CLAST). Refer to the College Level Aca-
demic Skills Test section for further information.
Completion Deadline To Receive a Degree:
* All residence work required for graduation
must be completed at least 24 hours prior to
the scheduled meeting of the college faculty
voting on the candidates for degrees.
All extension work must be completed at
least two weeks prior to the scheduled meet-
ing of the college faculty voting on the can-
didates for degrees.
Continuous Enrollment: Undergraduate students
who register for and complete at least one
course for one term in an academic year are con-
tinuously enrolled.
Curriculum Requirements: Students must com-
plete all program requirements established by
their college, major department and minor pro-
gram of study (if applicable). NOTE: Minors are
awarded only in conjunction with the receipt of
a baccalaureate degree.
Extension Work Restrictions: (Note: Extension
work as referenced below includes both exten-
sion classes and correspondence study.)
* Students may take a maximum of 12 exten-
sion credits during any academic year.
Students may not take more than 9 extension
credits during a semester.
No more than 12 of the last 36 credits neces-
sary for a baccalaureate degree may be
extension work.
Simultaneous registration in on-campus and
extension work requires approval of the
dean of the college.
No more than one-fourth of the total credit
required for a degree may be extension work.
Consult the appropriate section of this cata-
log or consult with the dean of the college
concerned for further information.
Gordon Rule (Communication and Computation
Requirement): Students must complete with
grades of C or higher and prior to earning 60
semester credits, 12 credits in designated
courses that involve substantial writing (a total
of 24,000 words) and 6 credits of course work
that involve numerical analyses. Refer to the
Gordon Rule (Communication and Computation
Requirement) section for further information.


Grade Point Average: To graduate, students must
have a C average (2.0) or better in all credits
required toward that degree and a C average
(2.0) in all courses attempted at the University
of Florida. College-specific graduation require-
ments, in addition to these minimums, are listed
in each college's section.
Pending Charge of Academic Dishonesty or Student
Conduct Violation: No degree will be conferred if
a charge of academic dishonesty or conduct vio-
lation is pending where the penalty could be
suspension, expulsion, failing grade or any com-
bination of the above, until such time as the
charge is resolved and degree requirements are
met.
Repeat Course Work: Credit will be allowed only
once for course work which is repeated. Refer to
the Repeat Course Work section. In addition,
students who have taken an advanced level
course may not receive credit for completion of
a subsequent lower level course, as determined
by their college.
Residence Requirements:
* The minimum residence requirement for the
baccalaureate degree is two semesters.
At least 25 percent of the credit hours
applied toward a baccalaureate degree must
be earned while in residence at the Univer-
sity of Florida.
Students are required to complete the last 30
credits toward the baccalaureate degree in
residence at the college from which the stu-
dent will graduate.
Summer Term Enrollment: Students who enter a
university in the State University System with
fewer than 60 credits must earn at least 9 credits
prior to graduation during summer terms at
State University System institutions. Credit
earned through any of the "study abroad" pro-
grams sponsored by the University of Florida
counts toward satisfaction of the summer term
enrollment requirement.
Time-Shortened Degree Opportunities: A variety of
programs may enable students to shorten the
time necessary for completion of their degree
requirements. These opportunities include sev-
eral credit by examination programs and other
options. Refer to the section Time-Shortened
Degree Opportunities and the college sections
for additional information.
Multiple Undergraduate Degrees: Two or more
baccalaureate degrees may be conferred upon
an individual provided that each additional
degree represents at least 30 credits of addi-
tional work and fulfills curriculum and resi-
dence requirements.








Time-Shortened Degree

Opportunities

The University of Florida provides numer-
ous opportunities by which students may accel-
erate their academic careers and reduce the
overall length of time spent in completing
degree requirements. These opportunities are
explained below:

Early Admission:
The Early Admission program allows supe-
rior students admission to the university follow-
ing completion of the junior year in high school.
Applications will be considered on an individ-
ual basis by the Admissions Committee. For
funding purposes, early admission students
from Florida high schools may be considered as
dual credit enrollment students.
For additional information, refer to the
Admissions section of the catalog.

Dual Credit Enrollment:
Dual Enrollment refers to a student taking
on-campus courses simultaneously at both the
University of Florida and another institution. If
the parent institution is a Florida high school,
then the student may qualify for tuition-exempt
high school/college dual credit enrollment and


may receive textbooks or other necessary course
materials on a lend-return basis. There must be
an articulation agreement between the Univer-
sity of Florida and the home county school
board, developmental research school or other
secondary school in compliance with S.229.808
and a secondary curriculum pursuant to
S.232.246. This agreement should describe
recording of grades and payment for and dispo-
sition of instructional materials.
Qualified high school students will be
enrolled as nondegree students and credits
earned prior to high school graduation may be
accepted subsequently for advanced standing
and degree-credit when the student is admitted
to the university.
For more information, high school students
may refer to Academic Regulations (especially
the sections on Dual Enrollment, Nondegree
Registration and Classification of Students).
Increased Course Load:
Capable students who register for more than
the normal 15 hours per semester may complete
the traditional four-year span in a shorter
period of time.
Year-Round Attendance:
Students attending the university every
semester, including summer sessions, may
advance their graduation day by as much as
two semesters.


Credit by Examination:
A student may participate in a variety of
credit by examination programs in order to earn
credit toward a degree awarded by the
University of Florida. Credit received from one
examination program may not be duplicated by
another. A maximum of 30 semester hours may
be earned from one or more of the following
programs.
International Baccalaureate Program: Students
receiving the IB Diploma will receive up to 30
semester hours of credit for scores of 4 or higher
on both higher level and subsidiary level exami-
nations. Students who do not receive the IB
Diploma will receive credit for scores of 5 or
higher on higher level examinations only.
Advanced Placement Program: This credit by
examination opportunity is sponsored by the
College Entrance Examination Board. Under
this program, a student entering the university
offers a nationally-graded examination as evi-
dence of completion of a college-level course
taken in high school. If the results of the exami-
nation meet the minimum requirements listed
below, the student may receive university credit
for courses covering similar material. The
course numbers in parentheses indicate the
approximate University of Florida course equiv-
alencies that will appear on the student's UF
transcript. Advanced Placement credit will
appear on the student's permanent record.


J -2 1
Art History ARH 2050 (3) ARH 2050 (3) ARH 2050 (3) & ARH 2051 (3)
Art Studio-Drawing ART 2001C (2) ART 2001C (2) ART 2001C (2)
Art Studio-General ART 2001C (2) ART 2001C (2) ART 2001C (2)
Biology BSC 2005 (3) BSC 2005 (3), BSC 2006 (3), & BSC 2005L (1) BSC 2006 (3), BSC 2010 (3), & BSC 2010L (1)
Chemistry CCHM 2040 (3) CHM 2045 (3) & CHM 2045L (1) CHM 2045 (3) & CHM 2045L (1)
Computer and Information Sciences A CGS 3462 (3) CGS 3462 (3) CGS 3462 (3)
Computer and Information Sciences AB CIS 3020 (3) CIS 3020 (3) CIS 3020 (3)
Macroeconomics ECO 2013 (3) ECO 2013 (3) ECO 2013 (3)
Microeconomics ECO 2023 (3) ECO 2023 (3) ECO 2023 (3)
English Language and Composition ENC 1101 (3) ENC 1101 (3) & ENC 1102 (3) ENC 1101 (3) & ENC 1102 (3)
English Literature and Composition AML 2012 (3) AML 2012 (3) & AML 2023 (3) AML 2012 (3) & AML 2023 (3)
French Language FRE 2200 (3) FRE 2200 (3) & FRE 2240 (2) FRE 2200 (3), FRE 2201 (3) & FRE 2240 (2)
French Literature FRE 2200 (3) FRE 2200 (3) & FRE 2240 (2) FRE 2200 (3), FRE 2201 (3) & FRE 2240 (2)
German Language GER 2200 (3) GER 2200 (3) GER 2200 (3)
Government and Politics-
American Government POS 2041 (3) POS 2041 (3) POS 2041 (3)
Comparative Government and Politics CPO 2001 (3) CPO 2001 (3) CPO 2001 (3)
European History EUH 2002 (3) EUH 2001 (3) & EUH 2002 (3) EUH 2001 (3) & EUH 2002 (3)
United States History AMH 2020 (3) AMH 2010 (3) & AMH 2020 (3) AMH 2010 (3) & AMH 2020 (3)
Latin Literature LNW 2630 (3) LNW 2630 (3) LNW 2630 (3)
Latin-Vergil LNW 2660 (3) LNW 2660 (3) LNW 2660 (3)
Calculus AB MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3311 (4)
Calculus BC MAC 3311 (4) MAC 3311 (4) & MAC 3312 (4) MAC 3311 (4) & MAC 3312 (4)
Music Listening/Literature MUL 2010 (3) MUL 2010 (3) MUL 2010 (3)
Music Theory MUT 1001 (2) MUT 1001 (2) MUT 1001 (2)
Physics B PHY 2004 (3) PHY 3053 (4), PHY 2005 (3), & PHY 3055L (1) PHY 3053 (4), PHY 3054 (4), & PHY 3055L (1)
Physics C (Mechanics) PHY 3053 (4) PHY 3040 (3) & PHY 3055L (1) PHY 3040 (3) & PHY 3055L (1)
Physics C (Electricity and Magnetism) PHY 3054 (4) PHY 3041 (3) & PHY 3056L (1) PHY 3041 (3) & PHY 3056L (1)
Psychology PSY 2013 (3) PSY 2013 (3) PSY 2013 (3)
Spanish Language SPN 2200 (3) SPN 2200 (3) & SPN 2201 (3) SPN 2200 (3) & SPN 2201 (3)
Spanish Literature SPN 2200 (3) SPN 2200 (3) & SPN 2201 (3) SPN 2200 (3) & SPN 2201 (3)
(Numbers in Parentheses Indicate the Number of Credits Awarded)






TIME SHORTENED DEGREE OPPORTUNITIES


Notes about AP credit:
* Credit by examination will be awarded only
once for the same subject. UF credit awarded
for Dual Enrollment courses takes prece-
dence over AP or IB examination credit. If
AP or IB examination credit is the issue, the
examination yielding the most credit will be
awarded.
AP credit counts toward completion of the
General Education Requirement only if the
UF course identified on the equivalencies
chart awards Gen Ed credit.
AP English, history, art history, government
and politics, music theory and psychology
count toward completion of the Gordon
Rule communication requirement.
AP mathematics and computer science count
toward completion of the Gordon Rule com-
putation requirement.
AP French, Spanish, German and Latin fulfill
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences lan-
guage requirement.
Students who will continue their study of
biology, chemistry, math and physics should
consult an academic adviser for placement.
College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The
College Level Examination Program is another
type of credit by examination opportunity spon-
sored by the College Entrance Examination
Board. By presenting appropriate scores, stu-
dents may receive as many as 30 semester hours
credit toward graduation. Their scores on the
CLEP general examinations must meet the mini-
mums established by the State University
System. Students who plan to apply for credit
must do so before enrolling or, at the latest, prior
to the end of their first term at the university.
CLEP testing is available on campus periodically
and is administered by the Office of Instruc-
tional Resources.
In accordance with the articulation agree-
ment (agreement between public community
colleges and public state universities for the
acceptance of transfer credit), the University of
Florida awards credit for CLEP examinations
based on the following scaled scores:


CLEP
General
Examination
English Comp.
with Essay
Social Sciences
Natural Sciences
Biology
Physical Sciences
Humanities
Mathematics


Minimum
Score
Required for
Credit

Scale Score 500
Scale Score 490
Scale Score 490


Scale Score 490
Scale Score 500


Maximum
Semester
Hours
Credit

6
6

3
3
6
6


NOTE: CLEP credit may not be used to fulfill
the university's General Education require-
ments.
* Students who score a minimum 490 or higher
on the Natural Sciences examination will
receive three semester hours of credit in both
biological and physical science.


* Students should consider seriously their deci-
sion about taking the CLEP general examina-
tion in English. Experience has shown that
those who score below the 75th percentile are
often handicapped because they have not had
college courses in composition. However,
those students who do decide to take the
CLEP English examination are required to
take the essay option so that their scores will
be based in part on a writing sample.
CLEP Subject Area Examinations: Additional
credit may be awarded for satisfactory scores on
certain CLEP subject area examinations. If
English subject examinations (Freshman English
or English Composition) are taken, the essay
option must be taken for English credit. A mini-
mum score ensures that the essay portion of the
exam is eligible for review by UF staff evalua-
tors. This score in itself does not guarantee that
English credit will be received. A favorable
review must be received on the essay. A mini-
mum score of 51 is required for college compo-
sition and a minimum score of 51 is required for
freshman English. The maximum credit allowed
for English credit, if the minimum score is
achieved and the essay is acceptable, is 6 semes-
ter hours.
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences may use CLEP subject area examina-
tions in Spanish, French, and German to exempt
the college language requirement.
Department Examinations: Departments may,
at their option, permit a student to receive credit
through the challenge of departmental course
examinations. For specific information, contact
the relevant department.
A maximum of 30 semester hours may be
granted combining the IB, AP, and CLEP
programs.

SAT II Placement Examinations
Scores on the SAT II are the basic criteria for
placement in English composition, calculus,
chemistry, Spanish, French, German and Latin.
Prior to registration for Summer B 1995 and
thereafter, all freshmen will be required to pre-
sent an SAT II Writing Achievement test score.
Scores also must be submitted by students who
plan to enroll in chemistry, calculus or French,
German, Latin and Spanish. Students may sub-
stitute Advanced Placement or International
Baccalaureate credit for any SAT II examina-
tions. Consult the SAT II information in the
Admissions section of this catalog.
Newly admitted students must take SAT II
tests by June of the senior year in high school.
For information on appropriate course selec-
tions based on student scores, students should
consult the Schedule of Courses, the University
Advising Center in 358 Little Hall or individual
departments.
Superior results allow students to enter
advanced courses at the beginning of their col-
lege careers, to fulfill some requirement by
examination rather than by course work, and in
some instances to earn credit toward the degree.


Undergraduate Student

Academic Tracking

System

The University of Florida offers students
interested in certain academic programs a guar-
antee of necessary courses and graduation in
eight consecutive semesters plus one summer
term. This system begins with the assumption
that undergraduates enter the university for the
purpose of completing a course of study for a
degree. Students participating in the tracking
program must select a degree goal at admission.
For Fall 1995 freshmen, the opportunity to par-
ticipate in the tracking program will be offered
to students choosing majors in the College of
Architecture, the College of Business
Administration, the College of Engineering and
within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
those students majoring in political science or
zoology. In the cases of the College of
Architecture, the College of Engineering and the
zoology major in the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences, participating students are required to
have requisite SAT or ACT scores.
The university will provide students in the
tracking program in these colleges and majors
with an individualized degree track. The
required courses, a range of options for electives
and the sequence of courses will be specified so
that students can complete their degrees with a
minimum investment of time and tuition. These
tracks will serve as an agreement between the
student and the university. It is anticipated that
additional baccalaureate tracks will be estab-
lished during the 1995-96 academic year.
For further information, contact the college
tracking officer in the participating college or
the Director of the Undergraduate Student
Academic Tracking System, Dr. Keith Legg, 352
Little Hall, 392-1519.








Academic Advisement

Mission
The University of Florida is committed to
the concept of a strong program of quality acad-
emic advising for all of its students. The mis-
sion of academic advising is to serve as an ongo-
ing process which assists students in the attain-
ment of their educational goals through the
development and evaluation of their educa-
tional plans. To progress through a degree pro-
gram satisfactorily, students must have avail-
able not only accurate information about
requirements and procedures tailored to indi-
vidual educational needs, but also a knowledge-
able, caring adviser capable of reducing the sys-
tem to human scale. The advising system at the
University of Florida is a diverse and often com-
plex one, involving personnel at the university,
college or school, and departmental levels. This
multifaceted process is the responsibility of both
student and adviser.
Specifically, this mission can be accom-
plished by advisers helping students to coordi-
nate their learning experiences through the
planning of their educational and career objec-
tives commensurate with their abilities and the
review of their academic progress. Further,
advisement should assist students to clarify
their life/career goals and the consequences of
these goals by facilitating self-assessment and
helping students to develop an educational
plan. Finally, academic advising should act as a
source of referral to other campus agencies.

University Responsibilities
The faculty, administration and staff of the
University of Florida share a responsibility to
provide accurate information and effective
advisement to students. The University of
Florida, through the Office of the Provost, is
responsible for:
* ensuring that academic advising is fully rec-
ognized, emphasized, duly supported by
budget and resources, and periodically eval-
uated;
providing students, faculty and other advis-
ing staff with accurate information in the
catalog, Schedule of Courses and other pub-
lications;
coordinating the advising efforts of colleges
and schools;


* synchronizing advising with other units on
campus, such as the Career Resource Center,
Counseling Center, Office of Instructional
Resources, Office of the University Registrar
and the Office for Student Financial Affairs.
The University of Florida, through the
University Advising Center, is responsible for:
* acting as an information and referral center
to provide faculty advisers and students
with timely and accurate information on
university-wide requirements, policies,
procedures and referrals to appropriate ser-
vices;
providing periodic in-service training and
development from which faculty and profes-
sional advisers can receive accurate informa-
tion on academic policies and procedures;
providing primary academic advising for
undeclared majors;
coordinating with the academic units to
advise and to provide counseling services
for students on academic probation;
keeping an up-to-date list of academic coor-
dinators for each program to direct students
to the correct adviser;
maintaining records of students' academic
progress and advising conferences;
reviewing and evaluating the academic
advising program.

College/School and Department
Responsibilities
The dean of each college or school ultimately
is responsible for ensuring that adequate advise-
ment is available and accessible to all students
within the college or school. To fulfill that
responsibility, each dean:
* in consultation with the faculty and the
University Advising Center, shall select an
advisement model in accordance with the
university mission and consistent with stu-
dent needs and program characteristics of
the college;
shall be responsible for providing the
resources and faculty incentives necessary to
maintain an effective and efficient advise-
ment network;
shall be responsible for assuring that student
advisement is part of the regular workload of
every full-time faculty member. This advis-
ing may include meeting individually with
students to provide information about course
requirements and student progress, and


working with students on independent pro-
jects of student and faculty interest. Deans
and/or department chairs, however, may
recognize differential advising responsibili-
ties by appropriate assignment of duties.
shall see that departments and programs
make available to students brochures, hand-
books, and/or checklists of major require-
ments to help acquaint them with depart-
mental requirements and opportunities.

Student Responsibilities
Students ultimately are responsible for
knowing and fulfilling all university, college
and major requirements for graduation, as
stated in the catalog. In order to meet that goal
they are responsible for:
* attending the summer Preview or other ori-
entation program prior to their first semester
of attendance;
taking full advantage of the opportunities
for academic advisement provided by uni-
versity offices and programs;
declaring a major area of interest, as soon as
one crystallizes, to ensure proper advise-
ment.
conferring with an adviser on a regular
basis:
students entering their major should see
an adviser upon acceptance. Further
advisement should be on an as-needed
basis;
students in academic difficulty (i.e.,
below a 2.0 GPA) should see an adviser
each term;
students not yet in a major should see an
adviser on a regular basis to assist them
in the decision of a choice of major;
students who at any time are confused
about academic requirements or their
progress toward a degree, are welcome
and encouraged to see an adviser;
maintaining their own personal academic
records, including the catalog of their year of
admission, transcripts, degree audits, evalu-
ation of transfer work and notes of previous
advising visits;
evaluating (if desired) the academic advising
programs and individual advisers by com-
pleting forms provided by the University
Advising Center or by writing to the depart-
ment chair, the director of the advising center
or the individual responsible for the respec-
tive academic advising unit.









Lower Division

Administered by the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences
358 Little Hall

General Statement
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is
the gateway college for entering freshmen and
other students with fewer than 64 credits, pro-
viding for their academic advisement and their
general education. It also provides advanced
education leading toward degrees in a variety of
disciplinary and cross-disciplinary fields in arts
and sciences.

General Information For Freshmen
and Sophomores
Entering freshmen are classified LS.
Students should apply for admission to the col-
lege of their major at an appropriate point, usu-
ally when they have earned 64 credits, but ear-
lier in the case of some colleges. Each college
specifies admissions requirements in its section
of the catalog. MAPP will allow for automatic
admission of qualified students at 60 hours.

Academic Advisement
Freshmen entering each Summer B or fall
term are registered during advance registration,
Preview, held in the preceding summer months.
Students and their parents have an opportunity
to attend one of approximately 30 two-day pro-
grams. Notices concerning this orientation are
mailed in the late spring to those students who
have been admitted by the university Office of
Admissions. At these summer registration pro-
grams, students and parents attend sessions
relating to career choice, student activities, help-
ing services and course selection. Each student
meets with an academic adviser who assists in
selecting courses to take Summer B or fall.
Those students who cannot attend a summer
registration program may confer with academic
advisers as a part of the registration period held
in the week prior to the beginning of classes.
Students entering college in the spring and
Summer A semesters also will have access to
advisement conferences as part of the registra-
tion period prior to classes.
In the latter part of each semester students
register for their next term. Again, academic
advisers are available to discuss course selec-
tion. It is expected that students shall accept
responsibility for fulfilling curricula require-
ments as stated in the catalog, and students who
are making successful progress are not required
to see an adviser when registering. Students
who are changing majors or who are not main-
taining a C average often are required to talk to
an adviser about academic progress.
In the first few days of each semester (see
deadlines in the front of this catalog) students
should review their course selection and add or
drop courses, as needed. If during the semester
students feel they must drop a course because of


illness or other emergency, they will find acade-
mic advisers available for discussion of the
problem. Advisers also are available during reg-
ular business hours in the University Advising
Center, 358 Little Hall, to help students define
any other academic problems and to find correc-
tive measures.

College Level Academic Skills Test
All students who attain junior standing (60
semester hours) are required to take the College
Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST). A student
may take the CLAST at any time after comple-
tion of 18 credit hours. The awarding of A.A.
certificates and registration after earning 60
hours are contingent upon students passing all
subtests of the CLAST.

Required Courses in
Communication and
Computation Skills (Gordon Rule)
Students must complete (with grades of C or
higher) 12 hours in designated courses that
involve substantial writing. This requirement
can be met by selecting at least 12 hours from
among those designated Composition, Litera-
ture and the Arts, Historical and Philosophical
Studies, International Studies and Diversity,
Social and Behavioral Sciences General Educa-
tion courses which are listed in the current
Schedule of Courses. CLEP credit may not be
used to satisfy the writing requirement.
In addition, each student must complete
with grades of C or higher, 6 credits of course
work in mathematics, at or above the level of
college algebra, OR 3 credits in mathematics
and an additional 3 credits in statistics, com-
puter science or the logic courses PHI 2100 or
PHI 3130.
Acceptable mathematics course prefixes
include : MAA, MAC, MAD, MAP, MAS, MAT,
MGF, MHF or MTG. Courses fulfilling this
requirement are identified with an "M" in the
"CC" field by the section number.
The following courses may NOT be used to
satisfy the mathematical sciences or computa-
tion requirement: CGS 3063 and CRM 4121.
The courses acceptable for the requirement
are identical to those authorized for the General
Education mathematical sciences requirement.
Any student satisfying College Level Examina-
tion Program (CLEP) requirements in mathe-
matics for post-admission exemptions of course
work shall be allowed to exempt three (3) hours
of mathematics required by this rule.
This requirement is sometimes called the
Gordon Rule, a reference to its history in the
Florida State Legislature. Courses taken to ful-
fill Gordon Rule requirements cannot be taken
S-U; grades of C or higher are required. AP
examinations in English, history, art history,
government and politics, music theory and psy-
chology count toward Gordon Rule communi-
cation requirements. AP examinations in math
and computer science count toward Gordon
Rule computation requirements.


General Education
The general education program offers stu-
dents an opportunity to develop as individuals
and as members of society and to gain an appre-
ciation of the world around them. The pro-
gram's goals are to introduce students to the
major areas of academic study and to help stu-
dents enhance their intellectual maturity.
Under the general education program, stu-
dents will take courses in the following areas:
Composition (C)-The ability to read and to
think critically is essential to learning and to
developing as a productive member of society.
Writing is a mode of thinking that involves
making choices and ordering those choices
effectively.
Courses in composition can be found in the
English department.
Literature and the Arts (L)-Familiarity with
various forms of the arts provides students with
an appreciation of the human condition and the
cultural and artistic values of others.
Courses in this area can be found exten-
sively, although not exclusively, in the depart-
ments of art, Germanic & Slavic languages & lit-
eratures, classics, African & Asian languages &
literatures, English, music and romance lan-
guages & literatures.
Historical and Philosophical Studies
(H)-By exploring the nature of history and cul-
ture, students learn to think critically about the
past and about traditions and values that have
shaped our world. Students also will address
moral and ethical issues and will examine the
evolution of science, society and culture.
Courses in this area can be found exten-
sively, although not exclusively,, in the depart-
ments of history, religion, philosophy, anthro-
pology, architecture and Germanic & Slavic
languages & literatures.
International Studies and Diversity (I)-The
general education program at UF recognizes
that, beyond the basic areas of academic study,
there are other contexts of knowing: e.g., lan-
guage, gender, culture, race, ethnicity and class.
The international studies and diversity require-
ment seeks to make students aware that the
United States is part of a world community; to
provide them with the means to understand the
significance of world events; and to help them
develop an appreciation for diversity through
the study of nations, gender, culture, race, eth-
nicity, and class.
Courses in this area can be found exten-
sively, although not exclusively, in the depart-
ments of history, classics, African & Asian lan-
guages & literatures, romance languages & liter-
atures, Germanic & Slavic languages & litera-
tures, art, anthropology, political science, reli-
gion, sociology, and English.
Social and Behavioral Sciences (S)-In this
area, students explore human behavior in its
social context, analyze the structure of societies,
cultures, and institutions, and assess the
processes by which individuals and groups allo-
cate resources.






LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


Courses in this area can be found extensively,
although not exclusively, in the departments of
psychology, political science, anthropology, crim-
inal justice, geography and sociology.
Mathematical Sciences (M)-By taking
courses in mathematical sciences students
acquire skills in logic, inductive and deductive
reasoning, and abstract and quantitative think-
ing. The mathematical sciences also teach stu-
dents to reason critically, think creatively, assess
evidence, and form conclusions based on evi-
dence. Courses in mathematical sciences can be
found in the departments of mathematics, statis-
tics, computer & information sciences, philoso-
phy, aerospace engineering and mechanics &
engineering science.
Physical (P) and Biological (B) Sciences-By
introducing students to the basic concepts of
science and the scientific method, courses in
physical and biological sciences enhance stu-
dent awareness of scientific developments and
their impact on society and the environment.
Courses in this area can be found exten-
sively, although not exclusively, in the depart-
ments of physics, plant pathology, zoology,
botany, geology, psychology, chemistry, astron-
omy, environmental engineering, geography,
soil and water sciences, and entomology &
nematology.
The course offerings section of the
Schedule of Courses lists specific courses for
each category, designated by code: i.e., C =
Composition, I = International Studies &
Diversity, etc., in the column headed "G.E."

STUDENTS WHO ENTERED THE STATE
UNIVERSITY SYSTEM PRIOR TO SUMMER
B 1992:
Please refer to the catalog from your matric-
ulation year (catalog year includes the term of
initial undergraduate enrollment at UF, a
Florida community college, or other state insti-
tution) or to the Schedule of Courses (Gen.
Ed. for catalogs prior to 1992-93) for the appro-
priate General Education Requirement:
English 6 hours; Mathematics 6 hours;
Social and Behavioral Sciences,- 9 hours;
Humanities 9 hours; Physical and Biological
Sciences 9 hours.

Specific Area and Credit Require-
ments For General Education
Areas: Credits:
Composition (C) 6
First-year students generally are advised
to take ENC 1101 (or ENC 1145) and
ENC 1102 to complete the composition
requirement. (Refer to note 5.)
Literature and the Arts (L) 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies (H) 6
International Studies and Diversity (I) 6
An introduction to international studies
and diversity through courses focusing
on foreign languages, other nations or
cultures, or on race, ethnicity or gender.


One may choose from a wide variety of
courses in departments at UF or through
designated overseas programs. Students
who choose the language option are
encouraged to take the entire six credits
in that language.
Social and Behavioral Sciences (S) 6
Mathematical Sciences (M) 6
Students must take a minimum of
3 credits in mathematics.
Physical (P) and Biological Sciences (B) 9
An introduction to the scientific method
and scientific inquiry through the physical
and biological sciences. Students should
take 6 credits in one area and 3 in the other.
TOTAL CREDIT REQUIREMENTS: 45
Please note the following:
(1) The general education program permits
students to take courses at the 1000, 2000, 3000,
or 4000 level; in most colleges, students can pur-
sue completion of these requirements through-
out their undergraduate experience.
(2) First-year students generally are advised
to take introductory classes to complete area
requirements. Those who have the academic
background and the interest, however, are
encouraged to take more advanced-level classes,
but they should consult an academic adviser.
(3) Requirements M (Mathematical Sciences),
P (Physical Sciences), and B (Biological Sciences)
include the study of pure science (e.g., physics,
chemistry, and calculus) and their technological
applications (e.g., nuclear energy, environmental
science, and computer theory). Students are
encouraged to pursue a balanced program of
pure and applied sciences, where possible, to
complete these two area requirements.
(4) All general education courses are listed at
the back of the catalog under departmental
course listings. Courses that have been
approved for general education have received a
letter designation after the course title, which
corresponds to the first letter of the category.
For example: AMH 2010, United States to 1877
(H), fulfills 3 credits in the historical and philo-
sophical studies category.
(5) Not all students have to take ENC 1101 to
complete the composition requirement. We ask
that you discuss this with an academic adviser
and refer to information for freshmen and
sophomores in the English department course
descriptions section of this catalog, or the
Schedule of Courses.
(6) Advanced Placement (AP) and Inter-
national Baccalaureate (IB) credit can be
counted toward completion of the general edu-
cation requirements.
(7) CLEP credit may not be used to satisfy
General Education requirements.

Associate of Arts Certificate
Although not required, students may receive
an A.A. certificate. The Associate of Arts must
be awarded prior to the bachelor's degree. The
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences awards the
A.A. certificate for the university.


The Associate of Arts certificate will be
awarded upon satisfactory completion of:
* 64 credits (At least 36 of the credits must
have been completed at UF.)
General Education Requirements
An overall C average
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST)
Required courses in Communication and
Computation Skills (Gordon Rule)
Application forms for the A.A. certificate are
available from and should be returned to the
Office of the University Registrar.

Choice of Major Impact on
General Education
Students are encouraged to follow a pro-
gram of General Education appropriate for their
particular baccalaureate goals. In other words,
students' General Education courses should be
chosen with an eye to their choice of major and
various limits set by each major. Additionally,
each major has established benchmark stan-
dards for normal progress toward acceptance
into that program. Recommended General
Education courses and standards for admission
for each college or school may be found begin-
ning on the catalog page indicated.
College Catalog Page
Accounting........................................... .. 48
Agriculture ........................................... .. 51
Architecture................................................ 77
Building Construction .................................83
Business Administration .........................87
Education.................................................. 100
Engineering.................................................. 106
Fine Arts.......................................................124
Forest Resources and Conservation..........140
Health and Human Performance .............144
Health Related Professions........................150
Journalism and Communications .............154
Liberal Arts and Sciences...........................162
Medicine-Physician Assistant Program...172
Natural Resources and Environment.......175
Nursing............................................. ....180
Pharmacy ......................................................184

General Academic Regulations
Normal Loads: The normal course load is 12-
16 credit hours. First-semester freshmen may
wish to consider 12 hours of academic courses.
Loads above 17 hours must be approved by the
Director of University Advising, 358 Little Hall.
Adding/Dropping/Withdrawing: Courses
may be dropped or added during the drop/add
period without penalty. After the drop/add
period, a course may be dropped up to the date
established in the university calendar. A grade
of W will appear on the transcript.
All drops after the drop/add period are sub-
ject to the following restrictions:
* No more than two (2) drops will be permitted
to students while classified lower division.
Final approval to drop a course must be
obtained from the University Advising
Center, 358 Little Hall, or a student's college.






LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


* After the deadline students may petition to
drop a course provided they can document
sufficient reasons to drop, usually hardship
or medical condition occurring after the
deadline.
Failure to attend a class will not be
accepted as constituting a drop; the only proce-
dure for dropping a class is the proper process-
ing of a schedule change form, which the stu-
dent must initiate.
Withdrawing from the University: Students
dropping their entire course load must contact
the Office of Student Services, as dropping the
entire load constitutes withdrawal from the uni-
versity and must be handled by withdrawal
procedures established by the registrar. With-
drawal is subject to the published catalog dead-
lines.
Student Petitions: A student who feels that
university regulations cause a particular hard-
ship or injustice may petition for waiver of the
regulation. Information on procedures for sub-
mitting such a petition is available in 215 Criser
Hall.
Correspondence/Extension Work: A student
will not be permitted to register for and work
on correspondence courses while enrolled at the
university unless special permission is obtained
from 358 Little Hall. In order for special permis-
sion to be granted, the student must be in good
academic standing and may not apply more
than 6 semester hours of correspondence credit
toward a university degree.
Class Attendance: The university recognizes
the right of the individual professor to make
attendance mandatory where appropriate. After
due warning, professors may suspend students
with failing grades from individual courses for
excessive absences.
In some "high demand" courses a student
may be dropped by the instructor if he/she
misses the first two hours of class.
CLEP and Advanced Placement: Students
who obtain credit via CLEP or Advanced Place-
ment must do so before starting college, or, at
the latest, prior to the end of their first term at
the university. Some credit by examination may
not serve to accelerate students' programs
because the specific course requirements of their
majors are not satisfied by general subject matter
credit.
Dean's List: At the end of the fall and spring
terms, the Dean's List regularly recognizes out-
standing academic achievement. Inclusion on
the list is awarded to students who earn a grade
point average of 3.5 on a minimum of 15 hours,
exclusive of hours taken under the S-U Option.

Information For Preprofessional
Students
PreLaw Programs
While any undergraduate specialization will
prepare a student for law school, the beginning
law student must possess the fundamental skills
necessary for effective oral and written commu-
nication. The student who lacks writing skills


should study advanced English composition.
Any course that tests one's ability to organize a
body of data and reason from it will be beneficial.
PreLaw students should consult the current
PreLaw Handbook available from the Law
School Admission Council and the Association
of American Law Schools which is available in
many bookstores.
Freshmen and transfer students planning
careers in law should so indicate on their regis-
tration student data sheets each term. In addi-
tion to serving as a central source of information
on all matters relating to prelaw advisement, the
Office of Health and Legal Professions Advising
in 358 Little Hall acts as a clearinghouse for
information and LSAT/LSDAS materials relat-
ing to prelaw preparation and application proce-
dures. The office serves as a central office for col-
lecting and forwarding letters of evaluation for
applicants to law schools. Files for letters of eval-
uation should be set up in the office early in the
year in which applications to law school will be
sent (usually the spring term of the junior year).

Premedical, Predental, and Preoptometry
Programs
The University of Florida allows a premed-
ical, predental or preoptometry student to major
in any program offered by any department or

college within the university.
Students planning careers in medicine, den-
tistry and optometry should so indicate on their
registration student data sheets each term. In
order to inform themselves fully of require-
ments, procedures, and other factors relating to
preprofession preparation, students should
attend a workshop offered through the Office of
Health and Legal Professions Advising, 358
Little Hall.
In addition to serving as a central source of
information on all matters pertaining to the pre-
professional curricula, the Office of Health and
Legal Professions Advising acts as a clearing-
house for information and application forms
relating to medical, dental and optometry
school requirements and admission procedures.
The office serves as a central office for collecting
and forwarding letters of evaluation and certifi-
cation to the professional schools selected by the
applicants.
The preprofessional student must satisfy the
following core requirements (usually prior to
application to professional schools):

Required Core Courses:
A complete general chemistry sequence
terminating with CHM 2046-2046L, or
CHM 2051C.
A complete organic chemistry sequence
terminating with CHM 3211-CHM
3211L, or CHM 3216 and CHM 3216L.
At least 8 semester credits in biology
(usually BSC 2010-BSC 2010L, and BSC
2011-2011L).
A complete physics sequence (terminat-
ing with PHY 3054 and PHY 3056L or
PHY 3042).


One year of college mathematics includ-
ing at least one term of analytic geometry
and calculus (MAC 3311) and at least one
semester of statistics (STA 3023).
One year of college-level English.
These courses also will meet the basic
requirements for schools of chiropractic, osteo-
pathic and podiatric medicine.
Students should consult the catalogs of the
schools to which they intend to apply for any
additional requirements or suggested courses. A
list of suggested elective courses for preprofes-
sional students is available in the Office of
Health and Legal Professions Advising. The list
includes courses in biochemistry, chemistry,
microbiology and zoology which should be
taken in addition to the required courses.
Besides meeting the preprofessional course
requirements, students are urged to gain some
experience in the health care delivery environ-
ment of their career choice. Such experience may
be obtained by participation in the programs of
the National Preprofessional Honor Society
(Alpha Epsilon Delta), the Minority Preprofes-
sional Association (MPA), and the Preprofes-
sional Service Organization (PSO) at the
University of Florida. More details about these
programs and applications are available at the
Office of Health and Legal Professions Advising.
Students in upper division colleges must be
certain that they also are making satisfactory
progress toward a recognized major in the col-
lege.
CLEP Credit: Generally, it is agreed that
receipt of CLEP credit does not imply the equiv-
alent of educational experience received in any
university-level course; therefore, students
should plan on taking courses in every area in
which they have been granted CLEP credit,
especially in English. Unless advised otherwise,
begin with introductory-level courses or courses
at the 2000 level for which you are certain that
you possess the prerequisites.

Optimum Timetable For Preprofessional
Students
1st Year: Chemistry, calculus and general edu-
cation requirements.
2nd Year: Core biology, organic chemistry, and
general education requirements.
3rd Year: Physics, requirements for your major,
and additional biology or chemistry
courses.
January: Contact Office of Health and
Legal Professions Advising to begin
application procedures.
February: Begin studying for MCAT/
DAT, and begin collecting letters of
evaluation with the Office of Health
and Legal Professions Advising.
April: Take MCAT/DAT.
4th Year: Finish major requirements and addi-
tional preprofessional classes.
Fall and spring: Interview with pro-
fessional schools. Maintain good GPA
and course loads.






LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


COURSE LOADS: First term at the university,
take 12-14 hours of academic courses including
two science or mathematics courses. Nonscience
courses should be solid, academic courses.
Lighter loads or easy courses do not enhance
your record. Honors courses are recommended
for superior students willing to do extra work.
After your first term, maintain approximately a
15-hour load including two-or-three science/
math courses. No more than two laboratory
courses are recommended in any one term.

Honors Program
This is an invitational program for students
who have shown potential for superior academic
performance. Invitations are sent after admission
to the university to all students who have scored
1280 (test taken prior to March 1995) or 1350 (test
taken after March 1995) or above on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test, or a 30 composite on
the Enhanced American College Test. Further,
they must have an academic high school grade
point average of not less than 3.6 as computed
by the university. These students are eligible for
special honors classes and housing in an honors
dormitory. To remain in the program, students
must enroll in at least one honors course each
semester in the first two years and maintain an
overall grade point average of 3.0.
Students who do not qualify may apply for
admission into the program in the spring of
their first year after demonstrating their acade-
mic capabilities during the fall semester. Honors
requirements are not in addition to general edu-
cation requirements, but may be used in satis-
faction of those requirements. The small sizes of
the classes and the high quality of the students
make possible more thorough inquiry into
course materials and more independent work.
Students may enhance their skills through
extensive reading, writing of research papers,
and oral presentations in class.
Students who fulfill the requirements of the
honors program with a 3.0 overall average, sat-
isfy the General Education Requirement, and
have 64 semester hours of credit, will receive
the Associate of Arts certificate with honors.
Those with a 3.5 overall grade point average
will receive the certificate with high honors.
After the sophomore year, the honors pro-
gram becomes the responsibility of the depart-
ment in which the student pursues the major
course of study. The departmental honors coor-
dinator should be contacted for admission into
the upper division honors program.
The upper division honors programs in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences lead to the
baccalaureate degree with either honors, high
honors, or highest honors. For graduation with
honors, a student must attain a 3.5 overall
upper division average. For graduation with
high honors or highest honors, the student
must fulfill an overall 3.5 upper division aver-
age and, in addition, submit a thesis, a research
project or other creative work. Upon evaluation
by the department or other responsible group,
the student will be recommended for high or
highest honors.


Eligibility for graduation with honors:
Students who became juniors (a classification.
of 3) in Fall 1991 or later are eligible for the
honors designations established in the 1991-92
and following catalogs. Students who
achieved junior status prior to Fall 1991 follow
the honors designations established in the
1990-91 catalog.

Office of Minority Affairs
The Office of Minority Affairs coordinates
and directs support and enrichment services for
all minority students (African American, Asian
American, Hispanic American and Native
American), including participants in the feder-
ally-funded Upward Bound Program and the
Student Enrichment Services Program, and
other specially-admitted students at the
University of Florida. This office works in close
coordination with the Office of Admissions and
counselors in high schools and community col-
leges to facilitate the admission of minority stu-
dents into the University of Florida.
Once the students are admitted, this office
continues to assist them by providing academic
counseling, advocacy, and tutoring. OMASP
works in close cooperation with the University
Advising Center, which leads the coordination
of all advising services across campus, includ-
ing supplementing and providing training and
information to all special advising programs.
OMASP strives to facilitate the minority stu-
dent's successful negotiation of any and all
processes of the University of Florida and to
stimulate their use of and participation in
resources and enriching activities at the univer-
sity that might impinge on the academic
progress of the student. Tutors are provided in
math and English, and referrals are made and
tutoring arranged in other areas through the
O.I.R. Teaching Center, the Reading and Writing
Center and other supportive campus-wide
offices. The Office of Minority Affairs helps stu-
dents develop coping and social adjustment
skills by providing positive association with suc-
cessful peers and role models. These individuals
assist students in making a smooth transition to
the university environment. Other supportive
and enrichment services offered or arranged
include recruitment, retention workshops and
seminars, academic progress monitoring, orien-
tation programs, research and evaluation activi-
ties, and educational and social activities.
The Office of Minority Affairs, which is
housed in 453 Little Hall (392-0788), works in
close coordination with other university services
and offices to plan and implement programs
designed to increase retention and graduation of
minority students at the University of Florida.

Other Counseling Services
In addition to assistance from academic
advisers (358 Little Hall), students may find that
one or more of the following offices can be of
assistance to solve personal problems, career
selection problems, or problems relating to defi-
ciencies in academic skills. The Student Affairs
section of this catalog describes their specific
services.


Reading and Writing Center (2109 TUR)
Speech and Hearing Center (442 DAU)
Student Health Care Center (Infirmary)
Career Resource Center (G-1 JWRU)
Teaching Center (Broward Hall)
The Office of International Studies and Programs
provides assistance to students who want to
expand their educational experience by study-
ing outside the United States. Programs are
available throughout the world for study either
during the academic year or the summer.
Interested students should contact the Office of
International Studies and Programs in 123
Tigert for information on eligibility, availability
and scholarship possibilities.
The Counseling Center, located in 301
Peabody, provides professional psychological
services to students. These include vocational
counseling, career information, assistance with
academic problems, specialized testing, mar-
riage counseling and personal counseling.
Students and students' spouses may apply in
person for such services as they deem necessary.
No charge is made. The Counseling Center
offers consultative services to university faculty
and staff who are engaged in counseling stu-
dents. Close relationships are maintained with
deans, college advisers, housing personnel, the
Student Health Service and religious centers for
the purpose of expediting both counseling and
consultative services.

Academic Help Guide


Service
Drop a class

Drop a class after the
deadline
Add a class

Admission to a major

Confused about a major
Confused about a career

Stress management

Tutorial help
Correspondence work

Transient status

General Education
Requirement
Gordon Rule
A.A. certification
Degree certification
Withdrawal from the
university


Location
358 Little or your
college
358 Little or your
college
358 Little or your
college
Check with your
college
358 Little
B-1 JWRU/301
Peabody
301 Peabody/
Infirmary
Teaching Center
358 Little or your
college
358 Little or your
college
358 Little or your
college
358 Little
358 Little
Your college
Office for Student
Services in
Peabody Hall









Fisher School
of Accounting

General Statement
The School of Accounting was established
July 1, 1977 and named the Fisher School of
Accounting in 1985. The objective of the Fisher
School is to provide the technical and general
education necessary for graduates to enter the
accounting profession and to progress rapidly
through levels of increasing responsibility. The
field of accounting offers outstanding opportu-
nities in such areas as public accounting, indus-
trial accounting, nonprofit accounting and tax
accounting.
The accountant deals with complex prob-
lems in the business world. This requires a thor-
ough knowledge of business operations and the
environment of business as well as accounting
knowledge. In addition to the technical account-
ing skills, an ability to communicate clearly in
both verbal and written forms is essential.
Interpersonal skills and professional judgment
are important elements in the practice of
accounting. Although accounting is demanding
and requires high motivation in order to suc-
ceed, the rewards are high.

Scholarships
Information about general financial aid can
be obtained from the Office for Student
Financial Affairs, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025. Students who wish
to be considered for scholarships awarded to
fifth-year accounting students should obtain
application forms from the Fisher School of
Accounting offices and should complete them
early in the spring term of their fourth year.

Honorary and Professional
Organizations

BETA ALPHA PSI
This honorary accounting fraternity has 170
chapters nationwide. Upsilon Chapter was the
18th chapter to be founded (in 1938) and is rec-
ognized as one of the leading chapters in the
country. An active professional program is con-
ducted each year and includes guest speakers,
panel discussions, field trips, and other activi-
ties designed to promote professional aware-
ness. Beta Alpha Psi co-sponsors the FICPA/UF
Accounting Conference which annually attracts
more than 220 accounting practitioners.
Membership requirements include high ethical
standards and a minimum grade point average.
Additional information concerning these
requirements may be obtained from the Fisher
School of Accounting.
BETA GAMMA SIGMA
Election to this national business honorary
society is based on scholarship and character.


For additional information, apply to the Office of
the Dean, College of Business Administration.
FLORIDA ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION
The FAA is a professional/social organiza-
tion that is open to all accounting students. Its
aims are to facilitate communication between
accounting students and the accounting profes-
sion and to encourage greater interaction
between students and faculty.
FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING
STUDENT COUNCIL
Members of the Fisher School of Accounting
Student Council are elected by the students of
the school. The council performs a leadership
role in a variety of school activities (student
newsletter, Career Expo., Teacher of the Year
award, orientation sessions) and provides stu-
dent representation on faculty committees.

Center for Accounting Research
and Professional Education
The Center for Accounting Research and
Professional Education provides an umbrella for
both research and professional education activi-
ties of the Fisher School. The research compo-
nent of the center aims to encourage and facili-
tate theoretical and applied research by account-
ing faculty and students. The center publishes
the Journal of Accounting Literature, sponsors
research seminars and a biannual conference,
produces a working paper series, and serves as
a research information source for faculty and
students. The professional education compo-
nent of the center aims to serve the business and
professional communities and to heighten the
school's visibility in those communities through
quality professional education offerings. A CPA
review program is offered through the center,
but the primary emphasis is on one- and two-
day programs that address issues of national
interest.

Program of Study
The recommended curriculum to prepare for
a professional career in accounting is the 3/2
five-year program with a joint awarding of the
Bachelor of Science in Accounting and the
Master of Accounting upon satifactory comple-
tion of the 156-hour program. The recom-
mended entry point into the 3/2 program is the
beginning of the senior year. Interested stu-
dents are encouraged to take the GMAT in
their junior year. Information on the GMAT
and other requirements for admission into the
3/2 program can be obtained at the Fisher
School of Accounting office. The 3/2 program
allows the student to concentrate in an account-
ing specialty; it also provides knowledge of both
the basic accounting framework and the under-
lying business and related disciplines. Details
concerning the 3/2 program, including the spe-
cialization areas of financial/auditing, systems
and tax, are included in the Graduate Catalog,


which can be obtained by writing the Office of
Admissions, Box 114000, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000. Additional informa-
tion also can be obtained by contacting the
Fisher School of Accounting, Box 117160,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-
7160.
Students who choose to complete the four-
year undergraduate program will receive the
Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree. These
graduates will have the requisite accounting,
business and general education to pursue a vari-
ety of career opportunities in accounting and
business and to apply to graduate and profes-
sional degree programs in accounting, business
or law. Students wishing to specialize in profes-
sional accounting should plan to complete the
3/2 program.
Prospective students are cautioned to
become familiar with the five-year postsec-
ondary education requirement to sit for the
Certified Public Accountants Examination in the
state of Florida. Information may be obtained
by contacting the Florida Board of Accountancy
at 4001 NW 43rd Street, Gainesville, FL 32606.

Requirements for Admission
The Fisher School of Accounting expects all
students admitted into their program to have a
basic knowledge of microcomputers, including
familiarity with DOS, electronic spreadsheets
and wordprocessing. Students who are not com-
puter literate are encouraged to take a micro-
computer applications course as an elective.
Additionally, all transfer applicants must
have completed two sequential courses of for-
eign language in secondary school or 8-10
semester hours at the postsecondary level, or
document an equivalent level of proficiency.
Admission Protocols: The Fisher School of
Accounting has established benchmark stan-
dards that prospective accounting students
attending a Florida public community college
or a Florida State University System institution
(including UF) should attempt to meet at the
30-, 45-, and 60-hour levels. These benchmarks
should be used by those students to determine
if they are following an appropriate academic
plan and performing at an appropriate aca-
demic level to gain admission into the Fisher
School of Accounting.
Two sets of standards have been developed
to assist students in monitoring their progress
toward admission into the Fisher School of
Accounting a minimum standard and an ideal
standard.
Community college students who transfer
to Florida SUS institutions who have com-
pleted their A.A. and CLAST, who apply for
admission at the 60-hour level and who meet
the ideal standard for that level, will be admit-
ted into the Fisher School of Accounting.
Students who meet only the minimum stan-
dard will be considered for admission, but are
not guaranteed admission into the school. In
addition to space availability, the student's









Fisher School
of Accounting

General Statement
The School of Accounting was established
July 1, 1977 and named the Fisher School of
Accounting in 1985. The objective of the Fisher
School is to provide the technical and general
education necessary for graduates to enter the
accounting profession and to progress rapidly
through levels of increasing responsibility. The
field of accounting offers outstanding opportu-
nities in such areas as public accounting, indus-
trial accounting, nonprofit accounting and tax
accounting.
The accountant deals with complex prob-
lems in the business world. This requires a thor-
ough knowledge of business operations and the
environment of business as well as accounting
knowledge. In addition to the technical account-
ing skills, an ability to communicate clearly in
both verbal and written forms is essential.
Interpersonal skills and professional judgment
are important elements in the practice of
accounting. Although accounting is demanding
and requires high motivation in order to suc-
ceed, the rewards are high.

Scholarships
Information about general financial aid can
be obtained from the Office for Student
Financial Affairs, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4025. Students who wish
to be considered for scholarships awarded to
fifth-year accounting students should obtain
application forms from the Fisher School of
Accounting offices and should complete them
early in the spring term of their fourth year.

Honorary and Professional
Organizations

BETA ALPHA PSI
This honorary accounting fraternity has 170
chapters nationwide. Upsilon Chapter was the
18th chapter to be founded (in 1938) and is rec-
ognized as one of the leading chapters in the
country. An active professional program is con-
ducted each year and includes guest speakers,
panel discussions, field trips, and other activi-
ties designed to promote professional aware-
ness. Beta Alpha Psi co-sponsors the FICPA/UF
Accounting Conference which annually attracts
more than 220 accounting practitioners.
Membership requirements include high ethical
standards and a minimum grade point average.
Additional information concerning these
requirements may be obtained from the Fisher
School of Accounting.
BETA GAMMA SIGMA
Election to this national business honorary
society is based on scholarship and character.


For additional information, apply to the Office of
the Dean, College of Business Administration.
FLORIDA ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION
The FAA is a professional/social organiza-
tion that is open to all accounting students. Its
aims are to facilitate communication between
accounting students and the accounting profes-
sion and to encourage greater interaction
between students and faculty.
FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING
STUDENT COUNCIL
Members of the Fisher School of Accounting
Student Council are elected by the students of
the school. The council performs a leadership
role in a variety of school activities (student
newsletter, Career Expo., Teacher of the Year
award, orientation sessions) and provides stu-
dent representation on faculty committees.

Center for Accounting Research
and Professional Education
The Center for Accounting Research and
Professional Education provides an umbrella for
both research and professional education activi-
ties of the Fisher School. The research compo-
nent of the center aims to encourage and facili-
tate theoretical and applied research by account-
ing faculty and students. The center publishes
the Journal of Accounting Literature, sponsors
research seminars and a biannual conference,
produces a working paper series, and serves as
a research information source for faculty and
students. The professional education compo-
nent of the center aims to serve the business and
professional communities and to heighten the
school's visibility in those communities through
quality professional education offerings. A CPA
review program is offered through the center,
but the primary emphasis is on one- and two-
day programs that address issues of national
interest.

Program of Study
The recommended curriculum to prepare for
a professional career in accounting is the 3/2
five-year program with a joint awarding of the
Bachelor of Science in Accounting and the
Master of Accounting upon satifactory comple-
tion of the 156-hour program. The recom-
mended entry point into the 3/2 program is the
beginning of the senior year. Interested stu-
dents are encouraged to take the GMAT in
their junior year. Information on the GMAT
and other requirements for admission into the
3/2 program can be obtained at the Fisher
School of Accounting office. The 3/2 program
allows the student to concentrate in an account-
ing specialty; it also provides knowledge of both
the basic accounting framework and the under-
lying business and related disciplines. Details
concerning the 3/2 program, including the spe-
cialization areas of financial/auditing, systems
and tax, are included in the Graduate Catalog,


which can be obtained by writing the Office of
Admissions, Box 114000, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000. Additional informa-
tion also can be obtained by contacting the
Fisher School of Accounting, Box 117160,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-
7160.
Students who choose to complete the four-
year undergraduate program will receive the
Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree. These
graduates will have the requisite accounting,
business and general education to pursue a vari-
ety of career opportunities in accounting and
business and to apply to graduate and profes-
sional degree programs in accounting, business
or law. Students wishing to specialize in profes-
sional accounting should plan to complete the
3/2 program.
Prospective students are cautioned to
become familiar with the five-year postsec-
ondary education requirement to sit for the
Certified Public Accountants Examination in the
state of Florida. Information may be obtained
by contacting the Florida Board of Accountancy
at 4001 NW 43rd Street, Gainesville, FL 32606.

Requirements for Admission
The Fisher School of Accounting expects all
students admitted into their program to have a
basic knowledge of microcomputers, including
familiarity with DOS, electronic spreadsheets
and wordprocessing. Students who are not com-
puter literate are encouraged to take a micro-
computer applications course as an elective.
Additionally, all transfer applicants must
have completed two sequential courses of for-
eign language in secondary school or 8-10
semester hours at the postsecondary level, or
document an equivalent level of proficiency.
Admission Protocols: The Fisher School of
Accounting has established benchmark stan-
dards that prospective accounting students
attending a Florida public community college
or a Florida State University System institution
(including UF) should attempt to meet at the
30-, 45-, and 60-hour levels. These benchmarks
should be used by those students to determine
if they are following an appropriate academic
plan and performing at an appropriate aca-
demic level to gain admission into the Fisher
School of Accounting.
Two sets of standards have been developed
to assist students in monitoring their progress
toward admission into the Fisher School of
Accounting a minimum standard and an ideal
standard.
Community college students who transfer
to Florida SUS institutions who have com-
pleted their A.A. and CLAST, who apply for
admission at the 60-hour level and who meet
the ideal standard for that level, will be admit-
ted into the Fisher School of Accounting.
Students who meet only the minimum stan-
dard will be considered for admission, but are
not guaranteed admission into the school. In
addition to space availability, the student's






ACCOUNTING


entire academic record, including educational
objectives, pattern of courses previously com-
pleted, quality of any previous academic record
and any relevant test data will be considered in
the admission decision. Priority in admission
will be given to those applicants whose record
indicates the greatest likelihood of success in the
program.
Please consult the University Advising
Center in 358 Little Hall for a copy of the Fisher
School of Accounting's current benchmark stan-
dards.
Lower Division UF Students: To be consid-
ered for admission into the Fisher School of
Accounting, a student classified as a lower divi-
sion student at UF must meet the following
requirements:
(a) completed at least 60 semester hours of
course work at the time of admission into the
school;
(b) completed at least 12 of the 15 hours of pre-
professional course work at the time of admis-
sion into the school;
(c) completed ACG 2021, or an equivalent
course, with a grade of B or better at the time of
application to the school;
(d) completed MAC 3233, or an equivalent
course at the time of application to the school;
(e) earned a grade point average that meets the
current minimum benchmark standard; and
(f) passed all parts of the College Level
Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
Students who meet the requirements above
and whose grade point average meets the
"ideal" standard will be admitted into the
Fisher School of Accounting.
Admission standards are always subject to
change. Please contact the Fisher School of
Accounting in 267 Business (392-0155) to obtain
information on the current standards.
Community College Transfer Students: The
eligibility standards for admission of lower divi-
sion UF students (see above) apply equally to
transfer students who have received their AA
degree from a Florida public community college
and who have passed all parts, of the CLAST
Test.
Transfer students who choose to complete a
two-semester Principles of Accounting sequence
(ACG 2001 and ACG 2011) must earn a grade of
B or better in each course prior to applying to
the school.
Community college students are cautioned
that professional course work that is required as
part of the third, fourth or fifth year should only
be taken at the University of Florida.
Community college transfer students are
advised to avoid such courses as Business Law,
Principles of Marketing, Principles of Finance,
Principles of Management, Principles of
Insurance, Principles of Real Estate, Personnel
Management and accounting courses beyond
the introductory level. A maximum of four


semester credits may be allowed for courses
taken during the first two years which are avail-
able only as third- and fourth-year professional
courses in the College of Business Administra-
tion at the University of Florida. Any credit
granted for such work will be granted only in
the form of undistributed elective credit. In no
case may such courses be in accounting. In the
case where a student wishes to waive an upper
division core course and substitute a commu-
nity college course, waivers may be granted on
an individual basis, but the student will be
required to take another course in the area being
waived. The substitute course will be specified
by the department chair of the area.
Four-Year College Transfer Students: The
same standards for admission as those
described above apply equally to transfer stu-
dents from within the Florida State University
System who have earned their A.A. degree and
who have passed all parts of CLAST.
Prospective studentsfrom other than SUS
institutions or applicants who have not com-
pleted their A.A. and CLAST are not guaranteed
admission into the Fisher School of Accounting
upon satisfaction of the ideal benchmark stan-
dard. These students will be considered on a
case-by-case basis and will be admitted selec-
tively when space permits.
Prospective accounting students attending
other four-year institutions should follow a
course of study similar to the general education
and preprofessional requirements taken by
lower division students at UF. Courses that are
a part of the third-, fourth- and fifth-year
requirements should be avoided prior to enter-
ing the University of Florida.

General Regulations
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student
must assume full responsibility for registering
for the proper courses and for fulfilling all
requirements for the degree. The student also is
responsible for completing all courses for which
he or she is registered.
Seniors must file formal application for a
degree in the Office of the University Registrar
early in the semester in which they expect to
graduate. The official calendar indicates the
deadline.
NORMAL LOADS: The normal course load
in the Fisher School is 15 credit hours per
semester. A student may be permitted to regis-
ter for additional hours if, in the opinion of the
academic adviser, his or her academic record
justifies it. Students who wish to take a course
load of fewer than 12 credit hours should be
aware that certain university privileges and
benefits require a minimum registration. It is the
student's responsibility to verify the minimum
registration necessary for these benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to
be applied toward the degree must be com-
pleted in residence in the Fisher School. At least


18 of the 21 semester hours of upper-division
accounting course work required for the B.S.Ac.
degree must be completed at the University of
Florida. Once a student enters the Fisher School,
no courses may be taken by correspondence nor
may required courses (in preprofessional,
accounting and supporting fields) be taken out-
side the University of Florida. No exceptions to
this policy are permitted. Students in the Fisher
School may take elective and general education
courses at other four-year colleges but only if (1)
the student will have more than 30 hours left
until graduation upon completion of such
courses, and (2) advance approval is obtained
from the assistant director.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY
GRADE OPTION: An undergraduate student in
the Fisher School may request the S-U Option
only for those courses which will be counted as
free electives. Courses taken to satisfy commu-
nication requirements for the M.Acc. program
may not be taken on an S-U basis.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students
who do not make satisfactory academic progress
will be dropped from the accounting program.
In addition to the university regulations con-
cerning unsatisfactory academic performance,
the school will exclude students from further
registration for each of the following reasons:
* The student earns two grades below C in
accounting courses numbered above 3000. A
one-term only courtesy registration follow-
ing the receipt of the second sub-C grade
will be allowed for students in this category.
The student's accounting grade point aver-
age, calculated on all attempts of all courses
numbered above 3000, falls below 2.0 and
remains there after one term of enrollment.
The student's University of Florida cumula-
tive grade point average falls below 2.0 and
then remains there after a further term of
enrollment.
The student withdraws from the university
three times after admission to the Fisher
School of Accounting.
In addition:
Students otherwise in good standing will
be excluded from the Fisher School of
Accounting if they fail to register for a
required upper-division accounting
course for two consecutive semesters of
enrollment, and
.* Students who are not in the Fisher School
of Accounting who earn two grades
below C in accounting courses numbered
above 3000 will be denied further regis-
tration in such accounting courses.
DROP POLICY: Courses may be dropped
during the drop/add period without penalty.
After the drop/add period, a course may be
dropped up to the date established as the Fisher
School deadline. All such drops are subject to
the following restrictions:
* No more than two drops after the university
drop/add period will be permitted for any






ACCOUNTING


reason in a student's upper-division aca-
demic career.
After the deadline, students may petition the
university's Committee on Student Petitions
to drop a course.
Students dropping their full course load
must contact the Office of the University
Registrar as this constitutes withdrawal from
the university. Withdrawal in any term (fall,
spring, or any summer term) is counted as
one drop for the purpose of applying the
drop policies. The Fisher School will exclude
students from the accounting program if the
student withdraws from the university three
times after admission to the school.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To
receive the Bachelor of Science in Accounting,
a student must complete the following satisfac-
torily:
* 64 semester credit hours of lower division
requirements;
An approved program in accounting;
Upper division core courses; and
Elective requirements.
A minimum of 124 semester credit hours is
required for graduation, including 60 semester
hours in upper division courses. The waiving of
any required course does not reduce the hours
required for graduation. A student must main-
tain an overall average of 2.0 and a 2.0 average
in all courses which count toward his or her
upper-division degree requirements. A 2.0 aver-
age must also be maintained for all upper-divi-
sion accounting courses. Courses that have been
repeated are included in these averages but do
not carry degree credit. However, if a course is
repeated after an initial grade of C or higher is
earned, the repeat grade and hours will not be
computed in the UF grade point average.

Dean's List and
Graduation With Honors
A student who carries at least 14 hours per
semester with a grade point average of 3.50 will
be placed on the Dean's List for that semester.
To graduate with honors, students must
earn a 3.2 grade point average (honors), a 3.6
grade point average (high honors) and a 3.8
grade point average (highest honors) on all
upper division course work and all major
course work. Upper division course work shall
include all course work in excess of 60 semester
hours. Major course work shall include the
seven required undergraduate accounting
courses. Only course work taken at the
University of Florida will be included in these
computations.


Additional written work will be required for
awarding of the high or highest honors designa-
tion. This requirement must be satisfied either
through completion of TAX 5065 (Tax Research)
or ACG 5655 (Auditing 2) or through comple-
tion of an independent study course under the
supervision of a Fisher School of Accounting
faculty member.
Eligibility for graduation with honors:
Students who become juniors (a classification of
3) in Fall 1991 or later are eligible for the honors
designations established in the 1991-92 and fol-
lowing catalogs. Students who achieved junior
status prior to Fall 1991 follow the honors desig-
nations established in the 1990-91 catalog.

Graduate Degrees and Admission
to Graduate School
Courses are offered in the Fisher School
leading to the Master of Accounting. Require-
ments for this degree and for admission to the
Graduate School are described in the Graduate
Catalog and are available from the Fisher School
of Accounting office.

Curriculum in Accounting
Students who expect to receive a Bachelor of
Science in Accounting must complete satisfacto-
rily (1) the General Education requirements, the
preprofessional requirements (see below), and
elective courses for a total of at least 64 hours;
and (2) the upper division requirements for a
total of at least 60 hours.

General Education and College Distribution
Requirements
The university-wide General Education
Requirement is described in the lower division
section of this catalog.
Credits
Composition, including ENC 1101................6
Literature and the Arts.................................... 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences .....................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ............6
** Mathematical Sciences.......................... .......6
Physical Sciences..................... ........... ....3-6
Biological Sciences................................. 6-3
International Studies and Diversity ..............6
For specific courses to complete these require-
ments, consult the Schedule of Courses.
ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 are accepted by the
Fisher School of Accounting in satisfaction
of this requirement.
** MAC 3233 and STA 3023 are accepted by the
Fisher School of Accounting in satisfaction
of this requirement.


Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
ACG 2021 Introduction to Accounting........3
ECO 2013-2023 Basic Economics 1 and 2 .....6
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I .................3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ...............3
** Electives to make a total of 64 hours.
A grade of B or better is required in ACG
2021 (or equivalent) to register for required
upper division accounting courses and to be
eligible for admission to the Fisher School.

Upper Division Requirements
The upper division curriculum in accoun-
ting requires 60 semester credits.


Required Nonaccounting Courses


Credits


ISM 3011 Information Systems in
Organizations.................................... ............. 2
MAN 3021 Principles of Management ..............3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing................3
FIN 3408 Business Finance............................4
QMB 3250 Statistics for Business Decisions.....3
ECO 3100 Managerial Economics.....................3
BUL 4310 Legal Environment of Business......3
MAN 4504 Operations Management.................3
MAN 4720 Business Policy..................................3
Total 27
Required Accounting Courses
Credits
ACG 3132 Financial Accounting 1 ....................3
ACG 3142 Financial Accounting 2 ................3....
ACG 3342 Cost and Managerial Acct. 1 ............3
ACG 3352 Cost and Managerial Acct. 2............3
TAX 4001 Federal Income Tax Acct. 3.............3
ACG 4451 Accounting Information Systems...3
ACG 4652 Auditing 1.................................... 3
Total 21

Electives
............................................................... 12

A maximum of 6 credits in physical education
and 6 credits in advanced military science may
count for elective credit. A minimum of 6 elec-
tive hours must be taken outside the Fisher
School and College of Business Administration.
AP credits not used to meet lower division elec-
tives may not be used as electives in the upper
division. Students who have not yet had a
speech course or a business communications
course are advised to take these as upper divi-
sion electives. Those intending to complete the
M.Acc. degree are advised to consult a Fisher
School adviser about upper division electives
Total 60









College of Agriculture

The College of Agriculture's mission is to
provide undergraduate students with a high-
quality education that results in knowledge and
skills for employment, productive citizenship
and life-long learning in the areas of food, agri-
culture and natural resources as they relate to
human resources, the environment and com-
munities.


Baccalaureate Degree Programs

MAJORS
The majors offered by the College of
Agriculture are listed on the right. Several of
them have specializations and/or options.
Some of the majors are coordinated by more
than one department and two are part of the
Interdisciplinary Studies Program. Consult a
specific major for its requirements.

DUAL MAJORS
Students may elect to pursue additional
majors within the college. The student must
complete a Decision to Pursue Multiple Majors
form, available in the dean's office. Students
desiring two or more baccalaureate degrees
must complete at least 30 credits of additional
work and fulfill curriculum and residence
requirements for each additional degree.

MINORS
College of Agriculture minors are open to
students in any college, including the College of
Agriculture. Students interested in earning a
minor must complete the Application to Add or
Cancel a Minor form, available in the dean's
office. Students should declare an intention to
pursue a minor as early in their programs as
possible.
Agricultural and Natural Resource Ethics
and Policy
Agricultural Education and Communication
Botany
Entomology and Nemotology
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Forest Resources and Conservation
Horticultural Science
Management and Sales in Agribusiness
Plant Science (Agronomy)
Soil and Water Science
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
In addition to the minors that are offered
under particular majors, the College of
Agriculture offers two specialized minors.
Agricultural and Natural Resources Ethics
and Policy Minor: This minor, offered by the
College of Agriculture and the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences, is available for stu-
dents throughout the university who wish to
either (a) augment their technical education in
the agricultural and resource-related disciplines
with selected liberal arts and science courses


Major Specialization (Option)


Agricultural Education and Communication





Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural Operations Management



Agronomy
Animal Sciences


Botany
Dairy Science
Entomology and Nematology


Environmental Management in Agriculture -
Interdisciplinary Studies

Food and Resource Economics


Food Science and Human Nutrition


Forest Resources and Conservation
Horticultural Science


Human Resource Development -
Interdisciplinary Studies
Microbiology and Cell Science
Natural Resource Conservation
Plant Science





Poultry Science
Soil and Water Science



Statistics
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation


Agricultural Education
Extension
Agricultural Communication
Agricultural Education Co-Major
Extension Co-Major
Agricultural Communication Co-Major
See College of Engineering
Production Management
Manufacturing and Process Management
Technical Sales and Product Support
Bioprocess Management
See Plant Sciences Major
Animal Biology
Animal Industry (Dairy, Equine, Food Animal,
and Poultry)
Option I, Option II
See Animal Sciences
Preprofessional and Basic Science
Biology Education
Urban Pest Management
Economics and Policy
Land and Water Management
Waste Management and Utilization
Agribusiness Management
Natural Resource and Environmental Economics
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science
Dietetics
Nutritional Sciences
See School of Forest Resources and Conservation
General Horticultural Science
Environmental Horticulture (Nursery Management
and Landscape Horticulture, Floriculture and
Foliage Production, Turfgrass Production and
Maintenance, Urban Horticulture)
Fruit Crops
Vegetable Crops
Horticultural Operations Management


Agronomy (Science and Technology, Crop Production
Management, Agronomic Enterprise Management,
Cropping System)
Plant Pathology (Biotechnology, Agricultural
Technology)
Plant Protection
See Animal Sciences
Soil, Water, and Land Use
Environmental Soil and Water Management
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences


Wildlife Resources
Preprofessional
Biology Education







COLLEGES


and policy-related courses in agriculture and
natural resources; or (b) augment business,
humanities, journalism or social sciences educa-
tion with selected courses in the College of
Agriculture that pertain to unique agricultural
and natural resources issues and problems.
This minor can serve as additional preparation
for careers in education, business, law or poli-
tics. Students interested in pursuing this minor
should see the undergraduate coordinator in
food and resource economics.
Management and Sales in Agribusiness
Minor. This minor is to provide students with
the opportunity to gain a basic understanding
and skill level of sales and management tech-
niques in agribusiness. Specific courses in the
minor must be approved in writing at least one
semester prior to graduation by the student's
academic adviser and the undergraduate coor-
dinator in food and resource economics.

PREPROFESSIONAL OPTIONS
There are several majors in the College of
Agriculture which have specializations or
options that facilitate the completion of prepro-
fessional requirements for admission to colleges
of Dentistry, Law, Medicine and Veterinary
Medicine. There are specializations in animal
sciences, entomology and nematology, food sci-
ence and human nutrition, microbiology and
cell science, and wildlife ecology and conserva-
tion that are designed specifically to prepare
students for admission to programs in medicine,
dentistry or veterinary medicine. Food science
and human nutrition and microbiology and cell
science have early admission programs to the
College of Dentistry. Students preparing for the
College of Law may elect any major in the
College of Agriculture. The specific pre-veteri-
nary medicine requirements are listed in the
section on majors.
Dental School Early Admission Program:
Through a cooperative agreement between the
College of Dentistry and the College of
Agriculture, qualified students may be admitted
to dental school when they first enter college as
freshmen. The Dental School Early Admission
Program is designed to help highly motivated
students complete a bachelor's degree and
D.M.D. in a shorter time period than traditional
programs. Early admission program partici-
pants major in either microbiology and cell sci-
ence or food science and human nutrition's
nutritional sciences specialization. Both majors
provide students with the science foundation
necessary for success in dental school.
This seven-year combined B.S./D.M.D. pro-
gram provides dual acceptance into the College
of Agriculture and the College of Dentistry.
Approved students will enroll three years (at
least 98 semester hours) in the bachelor's pro-
gram and four years in the D.M.D. program. To
be considered for the dual acceptance program,
students must be admitted to the University of
Florida; have an overall high school grade point
average of at least 3.4 as computed by the
College of Dentistry; have a total SAT score of at


least 1200, ACT of 28 or EACT of 29; file a for-
mal application with the College of Dentistry;
and be approved by the members of the College
of Dentistry Admission Committee following a
formal interview. Final acceptance into the
College of Dentistry is contingent upon progres-
sion through the prescribed curriculum with no
less than a 3.2 overall grade point average and
3.0 science grade point average; completion of
the College of Dentistry application process;
and completion of the Dental Admission Test
with a score of 15 or higher on each section.
Applicants should apply to the University of
Florida prior to February 1 for entrance in the
fall semester. Students also may be admitted to
the university in the spring and summer semes-
ters. Interested students should write to the
Coordinator of High School and Community
College Relations, Office of the Assistant Dean
for Academic Programs, College of Agriculture,
Box 110270 (2002 McCarty Hall), Gainesville, FL
32611-0270, to initiate the Dental School Early
Admission process and provide the following
information: name, mailing address, telephone
number, social security number, high school's
name, high school graduation date, class rank,
SAT/ACT/EACT scoress, and grade point
average.


Requirements For Admission
Because of the diversity among the degree
programs offered by the College of Agriculture,
the specific lower division requirements for each
major are listed separately under the section
describing each major. Prospective students
should complete the general education and
lower division requirements outlined for their
intended majors and consult the progressions
standards for the college for specific courses to
be completed at 30, 45 and 60 hours. In the event
enrollment quotas become necessary because of
limited space or teaching resources, selection of
those admitted will be on the basis of past acade-
mic performance and completion of lower divi-
sion requirements. Applications from freshmen
and sophomores are encouraged.
All applicants must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language in sec-
ondary school or 8-10 semester hours at the
post-secondary level, or document an equiva-
lent level of proficiency.

LOWER DIVISION STUDENTS
Any student classified lower division (fresh-
man or sophomore) at the University of Florida
will be affiliated (provisionally admitted) to the
College of Agriculture whenever they declare a
major within the B.S. degree programs; their
college classification will change from LS
(Liberal Arts and Sciences) to AG (Agriculture).
These students will maintain their AG classifica-
tion as long as they continue to meet or exceed
the progression standards for their major.
Students who fall below the minimum progres-
sion standards for their major will become a
change major and will revert to an LS classifica-


tion within the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences. These students need to meet with
their academic advisers within the College of
Agriculture in order to determine the appropri-
ate plan of course work that will get them back
on track for admission to the college.

UPPER DIVISION STUDENTS
UF Students: After reaching 60 hours, lower
division students who are affiliated with the col-
lege, and who now meet or exceed the 60-hour
progression standards specified for their majors,
automatically will receive formal admission and
officially will be classified as upper division stu-
dents within the College of Agriculture.
Students who have taken 60 credit hours or
more and have not met the progression stan-
dards for their intended majors should meet
with an adviser to determine the appropriate
steps for admission. Students who are not affili-
ated with the college will be required to make a
formal application for admission.
Transfer Students: To be eligible for admis-
sion to the College of Agriculture, a transfer stu-
dent from a Florida public community college
must have an Associate of Arts degree and must
satisfy the minimum admission requirements
set forth for his/her intended major. Com-
munity college students should consult an acad-
emic adviser and the Articulation and Transfer
Advisement Guidebook published by the uni-
versity to ensure completion of the courses that
will satisfy the admission requirements for their
intended majors within the college. Transfer
students from other universities or non-Florida
public community colleges should complete the
general education and lower division require-
ments listed for their majors.
Transfer students should avoid specialized
lower division courses related to their major.
These courses can be taken to much better
advantage after the student has acquired the
appropriate background in general education,
lower division courses and basic science
courses.
Postbaccalaureate Students
A student who has received a baccalaureate
degree may be admitted, under certain circum-
stances, as a postbaccalaureate student (6AG).
Students desiring postbaccalaureate admission
should meet the admission requirements, listed
in the progression standards for the intended
major. Students may enroll as 6AG to:
Receive a second baccalaureate degree; a
minimum of 30 semester hours are required;
Satisfy requirements for teacher certification;
Meet specific requirements for admission to
graduate or professional school.
Admission requirements for postbaccalaure-
ate students are the same as for transfer stu-
dents. Students must declare a major and meet
with a faculty adviser of that major to have a
program of study planned and approved. In
addition, postbaccalaureate students must com-
ply with college and university rules and regu-
lations and meet all deadlines as printed in the
Undergraduate Catalog.






AGRICULTURE


Graduation Requirements
At least 128 credits must be earned to receive
a Bachelor of Science degree. In addition, stu-
dents must have at least a 2.0 grade point aver-
age BOTH in upper division and in all credits
attempted at the University of Florida. Finally,
students must complete the general education,
lower division and major requirements in effect
at the time of their initial undergraduate enroll-
ment at UF, a Florida public community college,
or other Florida state institution, provided they
maintain continuous enrollment.
Seniors must file an application for degree in
the Office of the University Registrar early in
the semester in which they expect to graduate.
The official calendar shows the latest date on
which this can be done. Seniors must person-
ally request that a degree audit be conducted by
the dean's office of the College of Agriculture at
the beginning of their senior year.

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
The last 30 semester hours to be applied
toward the degree must be completed in resi-
dence in the College of Agriculture. In special
cases the dean's office can waive this require-
ment. Students may complete six semester
hours by correspondence among the 30 semes-
ter credits of residence work required for the
baccalaureate degree, but such work must have
prior approval by the undergraduate coordina-
tor for the major and the college dean for each
course taken. Credit for work by correspon-
dence will not be accepted by the college unless
a student has an upper division grade point
average of 2.0 or higher in all work attempted in
residence.

Honors
DEAN'S LIST
A student who carries 15 hours per semester
(or 12 in summer) with a grade point average of
3.3 or better and no grade less than C in any
course will have his/her name placed on the
Dean's List for that semester.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
To graduate with honors, a student must
have a University of Florida upper division
grade point average of 3.5 or above. For pur-
poses of honors, these courses are defined as all
courses taken at the University of Florida after
the student has earned 64 credits.
To graduate with high honors or highest
honors, the grade point average required is 3.75
and 3.85, respectively. In addition, each acade-
mic unit requires an approved research project
or creative work. Students seeking high honors
or highest honors should consult their under-
graduate adviser for specific requirements.

IFAS AMBASSADORS
IFAS Ambassadors are selected through a
competitive process and commit two semesters
to promote awareness of academic programs in
food, agriculture and natural resources among


students in Florida. In addition to supporting
food, agriculture and natural resources, the
ambassadors participate in a program designed
to enhance their leadership ability. As the offi-
cial student representatives of IFAS, the ambas-
sadors work with students, civic groups and the
food, agricultural and natural resource indus-
tries across the state and at national conferences.
Applications for the fall program are accepted
in the previous spring semester.
GAMMA SIGMA DELTA, THE HONOR
SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURE
Gamma Sigma Delta is an honor society
dedicated to recognizing academic achieve-
ments and accomplishments of students, faculty
and alumni whose work has contributed to
food, agriculture and natural resources. Its pur-
pose is to promote high achievement and to rec-
ognize individuals who excel. Junior and senior
students who rank in the upper 15 percent of
their class scholastically and show promise of
leadership may be nominated for membership.
THE FRATERNITY OF ALPHA ZETA
The Fraternity of Alpha Zeta is a professional
service and honorary agricultural society.
Members are selected from among undergradu-
ate and graduate students of high scholarship
on the basis of character, leadership and per-
sonality. The objectives of Alpha Zeta are to
foster high standards of scholarship, character,
leadership and a spirit of fellowship among its
members.

Graduate Education
The College of Agriculture offers four
advanced degrees: Master of Agriculture,
Master of Science, Master of Agricultural
Management and Resource Development and
Doctor of Philosophy. Students considering
graduate study should consult their advisers to
ensure proper program planning.

General Regulations
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Students are expected to assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper
courses, for fulfilling all requirements for the
degree and for completing all courses. Each
semester the student must consult with his or
her undergraduate adviser to plan and get
approval for the courses in which to enroll.
NORMAL LOADS
The suggested average course load in the
College of Agriculture is 15 credit hours during
fall and spring and 12 credit hours during sum-
mer. A student should not register for more
than 18 credit hours unless approved by the aca-
demic adviser and the dean. Students may reg-
ister for fewer than 12 hours, but should be
aware that certain university privileges and
benefits require a minimum enrollment of 12
hours. It is the student's responsibility to verify
the minimum course load for these benefits.


TRANSFER CREDIT
Credit hours for work completed at a com-
munity college after the student has earned a
total of 64 credit hours at all institutions
attended will not be accepted for transfer credit
at the University of Florida. The courses repre-
sented by such credit hours will be recorded on
the student's University of Florida transcript and
may be used to satisfy curriculum requirements,
but such courses will not reduce the number of
credit hours required to earn a UF degree.

SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY
GRADE OPTION
Undergraduate students in the College of
Agriculture may take elective course work and
earn grades of S (Satisfactory) or U
(Unsatisfactory). Grades earned under the S-U
Option do not carry grade point values and are
not computed in the University of Florida grade
point average. Such grades are included in a
student's permanent academic record and are
reflected on the, transcript. Students should be
aware that other academic institutions, agencies
and organizations may interpret a grade of U as
a failing grade in their grade point average com-
putation.
Students choosing the S-U Option must be
in good standing and may not be on university
or college academic probation. To elect the S-U
Option, students must obtain approvals from
the instructor and academic unit offering the
course, as well as from their academic adviser
and the dean. They may elect the S-U Option
for only one course each term; this option is in
addition to courses which are taught only on an
S-U basis. Courses taken to fulfill general edu-
cation, Gordon Rule, or specific required
courses for the major may not be taken S-U.
For fall, spring and summer C terms, the dead-
line for electing the S-U Option is 4:00 p.m.,
Friday, the third week of classes. For summer A
and summer B terms, the deadline is 4:00 p.m.,
Wednesday, the second week of classes. Once
the S-U Option is approved, students may not
convert to a letter grade.

PROBATION AND SUSPENSION
University Probation: When a student has
an overall UF grade point average (GPA) of less
than 2.0, (s)he is placed on probation and has a
"deficit record." When a student accumulates
fifteen (15) deficit points, (s)he is suspended by
the university for one semester. While on uni-
versity suspension, a student may not enroll at
any other institution. After the one semester
suspension, the student may apply for readmis-
sion and, at the end of the semester that (s)he
returns, (s)he must have fewer than fifteen (15)
deficit points or be suspended permanently
from the University of Florida.
College Probation: A student whose grade
point average falls below 2.0 is also placed on
college probation. When that occurs, the stu-
dent will be notified by the Assistant Dean for
Undergraduate Academic Programs that (s)he is
on probation and must bring his/her University






COLLEGES


of Florida grade point average up to 2.0 during
that semester or (s)he must remove at least three
(3) deficit points. As long as a student has a
deficit record, (s)he must continue removing
three deficit points per semester until his/her
overall University of Florida grade point aver-
age is 2.0. Failure to remove three deficit points
per semester will result in college suspension
for one semester. During college suspension, a
student cannot register as a College of
Agriculture student for that semester. With
approval of the student's undergraduate
adviser and the assistant dean, the student may
complete approved courses at another institu-
tion. If a student does enroll at another institu-
tion, those grades will not reduce the deficit
points on his/her UF record. Upon returning to
the University of Florida, a student must
remove a minimum of three deficit points per
semester to continue his/her enrollment.

DROP POLICY
Courses may be dropped during the
drop/add period without penalty. Thereafter,
courses may be dropped only by College of
Agriculture petition in accordance with the pub-
lished deadline. Drops requiring College of
Agriculture petitions are subject to the follow-
ing rules:
Two unrestricted drops after the university
drop/add period will be permitted for a stu-
dent classified as 1AG and 2AG. Students
classified as 3AG, 4AG, 6AG and OAG are
allowed one unrestricted drop. All drops
must be processed through the dean's office
in the College of Agriculture.
After the college deadline, students must
petition the dean.
Students withdrawing from their full course
load must contact the Office for Student
Services in 202 Peabody Hall.

WITHDRAWAL POLICY
If a College of Agriculture student with-
draws from the university a second time, that
student will be placed on college probation. A
third withdrawal will constitute violation of the
probation and the student will not be allowed to
register again as a student in the College of
Agriculture.

PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
By prior arrangement with an individual's
undergraduate adviser and approval of the
dean, a student may, under competent supervi-
sion, receive credit for practical work experience
relevant to his/her major. Credit is earned at
the rate of one credit per month of full-time
work and may not exceed a total of three credits
in any combination of experiences. A formal
written report must be submitted before a grade
(S-U) will be issued. Academic units offering
this option have listed the course number 4941
in the description of courses. Guidelines estab-
lishing minimum criteria for credit eligibility
and performance are available from the under-
graduate coordinator of the major.


Special Certificates
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
A program for a specialization (with certifi-
cate) in environmental studies is available in the
college. The program provides course selection
to obtain a broad knowledge of the environ-
ment, especially in the interrelationships
between human activities and environmental
quality. Students enrolled in one of the existing
major programs in the college and this special-
ization will apply knowledge in their major dis-
cipline to the solution of environmental prob-
lems.
The environmental studies specialization
includes environmental courses in three basic
groups: biological sciences, physical sciences
and social sciences. At least one course from
each of these three groups is required. A mini-
mum of 14 semester hours credit is required for
the certificate. A minimum of three hours out-
side the college is also required.
The courses required for this specialization
are determined by the student in consultation
with his/her academic adviser from an
approved list of courses prepared by the depart-
ment, the college and the university. In most
cases, these requirements can be met through a
wise choice of electives.

COMPUTER SCIENCES
A program for specialization (with certifi-
cate) in computer sciences is available for those
students who wish to enhance their College of
Agriculture degree program with a coordinated
set of courses in computer sciences. Students
enrolled in any major program in the college
may pursue this certificate program.
To obtain a certificate in computer sciences,
the student must complete a minimum of 13
credits in specific courses offered by the
Department of Computer and Information
Sciences. Each candidate must complete CIS
3020, COP 3530 and CDA 3101. In addition, at
least one of the following courses must be com-
pleted: CEN 3031, COT 4420, COP 4720, CEN
3031 or COP 4620. This sequence will require a
minimum of three semesters beyond the com-
pletion of calculus. A student interested in this
program should consult his/her academic
adviser to determine specific requirements for a
program of study.


Major Programs
The specific requirements for each major are
listed below. Courses that should be used to
satisfy general education requirements have
been listed in the appropriate category. In some
cases, the listed courses are not sufficient to
complete the general education requirement
and the student needs to take another course to
complete the requirement. The courses listed
represent the most expedient way for a student
to fulfill his/her graduation requirements; how-
ever, the student may need or elect to satisfy the
requirements with alternative course sequences.


Specifically, students may take the CHM
2040-2041 sequence or an honors chemistry
course in lieu of CHM 2045. For a calculus
requirement, students may elect to take either
MAC 1142, Precalculus, or MAC 1140 and MAC
1114 prior to enrolling in calculus or they may
take a higher level of the calculus listed. The
College of Agriculture requires all students to
complete an oral and a written communication
requirement above the general education
requirement. In majors where an equivalency is
allowed, students should see their advisers for
approved alternative courses. When majors list
specific courses, students must elect from the
courses listed.

Progression Standards
for the College of Agriculture
Biological and Natural Sciences: Animal
Sciences, Agricultural Operations Management
(bioprocess management specialization),
Botany, Entomology and Nematology
(Preprofessional and Basic Science Option), Food
Science and Human Nutrition, Microbiology
and Cell Science, Plant Science (Science and
Technology Option ), Soil and Water Science,
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation.
For students to continue pursuing admission
into majors in these areas, they must meet the mini-
mum requirements outlined below. Consult
intended major for specific course requirements.
By 30 Hours
12 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
3-4 Hours of General Chemistry'
4 Hours of Core Biology and Labs -
BSC 2010 or BOT 2010C
4 Hours of Precalculus or higher level
3 Hours of Gordon Rule writing
By 45 Hours
In addition to requirements above,
6 Hours of General Education (C, I,L, H, S)
4 Hours of General Chemistry2
4 Hours of Core Biology and Labs -
BSC 2011 or BOT 2011C
3 Hours of Gordon Rule writing
By 60 Hours
In addition to requirements above,
3 Hours of General Education (C,I,L,H,S)
General Chemistry through CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L
Physics or Organic Chemistry3
Complete math requirement
Satisfy Gordon Rule
Cumulative GPA of 2.0, MCB majors
need 2.25 GPA in science courses
Pass the CLAST
SStudents should complete CHM 2040 or
CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L, depending on
the Chemistry Placement Test.
2 Students should complete either CHM 2041,
CHM 2045L or CHM 2046, CHM 2046L,
depending on chemistry sequence being
completed.
3 Not required of Animal Sciences majors at
60 hours.






AGRICULTURE


Food and Agricultural Sciences: Agricul-
tural Education and Communication (agricul-
tural education and extension specializations),
Agricultural Operations Management (produc-
tion management specialization, manufacturing
and process management specialization, techni-
cal sales and product support specialization),
Entomology and Nematology (biology educa-
tion specialization, urban pest management
Specialization), Environmental Management in
Agriculture, Horticultural Science, and Plant
Science (all except science and technology
option).
For students to continue pursuing admission
into majors in these areas, they must meet the mini-
mum requirements outlined below. Consult
intended major for specific course requirements.
By 30 Hours
12 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
4 Hours of Precalculus or higher level
3-4 Hours of General Chemistry'
3 Hours of Gordon Rule writing
By 45 Hours
In addition to the requirements above,
3 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
Complete General Chemistry
4 Biology requirement
Complete math requirement
3 Hours of Gordon Rule writing
By 60 Hours
In addition to the requirements above,
Complete General Chemistry or Physics
Complete biology requirement
6 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
Satisfy Gordon Rule,
Cumulative GPA of 2.02
Pass the CLAST
Students should complete CHM 2040 or
CHM 2045 and CHM 2045L, depending on
the Chemistry Placement Test.
2 Students in Agricultural Education must
have a 2.5 GPA. These are limited access
programs.

Food and Agricultural Social Sciences:
Agricultural Education and Communication
(agricultural communication specialization),
Food and Resource Economics, Human
Resource Development and Statistics.
For students to continue pursuing admission
into majors in these areas, they must meet the mini-
mum requirements outlined below. Consult
intended major for specific course requirements.
By 30 Hours
12 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
3 Hours of biology requirement
4 Hours of Precalculus or higher level
3 Hours of Gordon Rule writing
By 45 Hours
In addition to the requirements above,
6 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
3 Hours of chemistry or physics
Complete math requirement
3 Hours of Gordon Rule writing


By 60 Hours
4 Hours of General Education (C, I, L, H, S)
Complete chemistry or physics
Complete biology requirement
3 Hours of Statistics
Satisfy Gordon Rule
Cumulative GPA of 2.01
Pass the CLAST
Students in Agricultural Communication
must have a 2.5 GPA. These are limited
access programs.

Agricultural Education and
Communication
The Agricultural Education and Communi-
cation major prepares students for careers in
agricultural education, the Cooperative Exten-
sion Service and agricultural communication.
Three specializations are offered in the depart-
ment: teaching, extension and agricultural com-
munication. Each requires a common core of
courses in technical agriculture and preprofes-
sional education. In addition, three co-majors
with other departments are offered and an
extension minor is provided. Department
advisers will advise students in the selection of
electives and requirements to meet career goals.

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
SPECIALIZATION
The education specialization provides the
student with the basic courses for agricultural
education teacher certification in Florida. In
addition to these courses, a graduate must
apply to the Florida Department of Education
for certification. Each applicant who applies for
a full-time Florida teaching certificate must pass
the Florida Teacher Certification Examination,
and have a 2.5 GPA on all technical agriculture
course work.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position.................................... ............. 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics and
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....4-6
Physical and Biological Sciences........................14
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L General Chemistry
and Lab..............................................4.
PHY 2020 Introduction to Principles of
Physics..................... ........................ 3
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006 Biological
Sciences and Lab ........................................... 7
M them atics................................... ................. 6
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra
and Trigonometry...................... ............... 4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement .............................................. ..6


AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) ............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
(or equivalent)........... ........ ............... 3
Upper Division Requirements
Professional Education Requirements
AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in
Agricultural Education ..................................3
AEE 3323 Development and Philosophy of
Agricultural Education ..................................3
AEE 4224 Special Methods in Teaching
Agricultural Education ..................................3
AEE 4227 Laboratory Practices in Teaching
Agricultural Education ..................................2
AEE 4504 Curriculum and Program
Planning for Agricultural Education .............3
AEE 4905 Emerging Technologies in
Agricultural Education ......................................... 3
AEE 4942' Agricultural Education
Internship .................................... ............... 8
EDF 32102 Educational Psychology.................3
Technical Agriculture Requirements and Electives'
AEB 3112L Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications .................................1
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
M anagem ent.................................... ............. 3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and
M maintenance .................................... .............. 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science....4
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L2 General Soils and Lab..4
HOS 3013C General Horticulture or
ORH 4263C Production of Floricultural
C rops......................................... ............... 4
ENY 3005C2Principles of Entomology or
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M anagem ent............................. .............. 3
Select two courses from the following four courses:
(6-8 Credits)
AGR 30052 Introduction to Agronomy ............3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture......4
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables.............................................. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables......................... .............. 3
Select two courses from the following four courses:
(5-6 Credits)
AGG 4433 Issues in International
Agriculture........... .............. ............... 2
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality ..................................3
FOS 3042 Introduction to Food Science ..............3
WIS 3401C Wildlife Ecology and Management..3
Approved Electives ...............................Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Policies governing the teaching internship
are outlined at the end of the agricultural
education and communication section.
2 Meet general education requirement.
3 Substitutions must be approved by the chair
of the Department of Agricultural Education
and Communication.






COLLEGES


EXTENSION SPECIALIZATION
The extension option provides students with
courses which lead to a possible career with the
Cooperative Extension Service or careers such as
international extension, personnel development
officers or other representatives of agricultural
businesses. Students pursuing careers in the
Cooperative Extension Service are encouraged to
specialize in a technical area of agriculture.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position.................................... ............... 6
Literature and Arts .............................................. 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies................ 6
International Studies and Diversity.................. 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences...................... 7-9
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics and
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....4-6
SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology .................3.
Physical and Biological Sciences........................14
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L General Chemistry
and Lab ..................................... ......4
PHY 2020 Introduction t6 Principles of
Physics ..................................... ...... 3
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006 Biological
Sciences and Lab ...........................................7
M them atics .................................... ............... 6
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra
and Trigonometry.,........................................4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent.................................... ............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) ............3.
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
(or equivalent).................................... ... 3
Upper Division Requirements
Professional Education Requirements
AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in
Agricultural Education ..................................3.
AEE 3313 Development and Role of Extension
Education ..................................... .............. 3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development in
Agriculture and Natural Resources ................3
AEE 4034 Agricultural Communication
Strategies ............................................ ....3
AEE 4943' Agricultural Extension
Internship 8
EDF 32102 Educational Psychology.................3
Technical Agriculture Requirements and Electives3
AEB' 3112L Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications ...............................1
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management ................................ ...... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ENY 3005C2Principles of Entomology or
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
Management...........................................3
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L2 General Soils and Lab..4
Select two courses from the following six courses:
(6-8 Credits)
AGR 30052 Introduction to Agronomy ...........3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture...... 4


HOS 3013C General Horticulture.................4.
ORH 4263C Production of Floricultural
C rops.............................. .............. ................. 4
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables.............................................. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables..............................................3
Select three courses from the following five courses:
(8-9 Credits)
AGG 4433 Issues in International
Agriculture........... .............. ............... 2
AOM 3053/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality .................................. ..3
FOR 3003 Forests, Conservation, and
People ........................................... ............... 3
FOS 3042 Introduction to Food Science ........3
WIS 3401C Wildlife Ecology and
M anagem ent.................................... ............. 3
Approved Electives ..............................Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SPolicies governing the extension internship
are outlined at the end of the agricultural
education and communication section.
2 Meet general education requirement.
3Substitutions must be approved by the chair
of the Department of Agricultural Education
and Communication.

AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATION
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed for individu-
als who wish to enter communication profes-
sions that are involved with the agricultural
industry; i.e., publications, electronic media,
graphic arts, advertising or public relations.
Students desiring to enter this specialization
must meet the department and college lower
division requirements and have a minimum
overall GPA of 2.5. In addition, they must pro-
vide evidence of ability to type at least 30
CWPM. Students also are required to complete
MMC 2100, Writing for Mass Communication,
with a grade of C or better.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position .................................... .............. 6
Literature and Arts ............................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics and
ECO 2023 Microeconomics...........................4-6
Physical and Biological Sciences........................16
CHM 1020, CHM 1021 Chemistry and
Society .................................... ............. 6
PHY 2020 Introduction to Principles of
Physics .................................... .............. 3
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006 Biological
Sciences and Lab....................................7
M them atics .................................... ............... 6
MAC 1142 Precalculus: Algebra and
Trigonometry............................... ......4


College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent ..................................... ............ 6
MMC 2100 Writing for Mass
Communications.................... ............... 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
(or equivalent)................................................ 3
Upper Division Requirements
Departmental Requirements
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources............................... ....3
AEE 3939 Agricultural and Natural
Resources Communication Seminar ...............1
AEE 4034 Agricultural Communication
Strategies ..................................... .............. 3
AEE 4035 Agricultural and Natural
Resources Communication Practicum
(Must be taken twice with varying content) .......4
AEE 49481 Agricultural Communication
Internship ..................................... ................ 6
Other Communication Requirements
ADV 3000 Elements of Advertising ................3
JOU 3101 Reporting....................................... 3
PUR 3000 Introduction to Public Relations...3
PUR 3101 Editing and Graphics .....................3
Select one from the following three courses
(3 Credits)
RTV 3200 Fundamentals of Production............3
RTV 3300 Radio News I ...................................3
RTV 4320 Electronic Field Production ..............3
Technical Agriculture Requirements and Electives3
AEB 42242 U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ................................................................... 2
AGR 30052 Introduction to Agronomy ...........3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
FOS 20012 M an's Food ......................................2
HOS 3013C General Horticulture ......................4
Select three courses from the following seven courses
(8-9 Credits)
AEB 4242 International Trade Policy in
Agriculture............ ........... .................. ..2
AEB 4274 Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy........................................ 2
AGR 3001 Food, Man and Environment........2
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality ..................................3
ANS 2002 The Meat We Eat..........................2
FOR 3003 Forests, Conservation and
People ........................................... ............... 3
WIS 2040 Wildlife Issues..............................3
Approved Electives
(Agriculture and/or Communication)......Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SPolicies governing the communication
internship are outlined below.
2 Meet general education requirement.
3 Substitutions must be approved by chair of
the Department of Agricultural Education
and Communication.






AGRICULTURE


EXTENSION DUAL MAJOR
Students majoring in other departments or
colleges who feel the need for a better under-
standing of the techniques and skills related to
the Cooperative Extension Service can also
co-major in agricultural education and commu-
nication.
Professional Education Requirements
Credits
AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in
Agricultural Education ..................................3.
AEE 3313 Development and Role of
Extension Education....................... ............. 3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development in
Agriculture and Natural Resources ................3
AEE 4034 Agricultural Communication
Strategies .................................... ............. 3
AEE 49431 Agricultural Extension
Internship ..................................... ...... 8
EDF 32102 Educational Psychology .................3
Technical Agriculture Requirements and Electives3
AEB 3112L Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications ....................................
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
M anagem ent............................... ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ENY 3005C2Principles of Entomology or
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M management ................................... ...............
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L2 General Soils and Lab..4
Approved Electives.................. Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Policies governing the extension internship
are outlined at the end of the agricultural
education and communication section.
2 Meet general education requirement.
3May be modified with approval of both aca-
demic units.

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION DUAL MAJOR
Students majoring in other departments or
who wish to complete agricultural education
teacher certification requirements may co-major
in the department.

Professional Education Requirements
Credits
AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in
Agricultural Education ....................... .........
AEE 3323 Development and Philosophy
of Agricultural Education..............................3
AEE 4224 Special Methods in Teaching
Agricultural Education .....................................3
AEE 4227 Laboratory Practices in Teaching
Agricultural Education ..................................2.
AEE 4504 Curriculum and Program
Planning for Agricultural Education ..............3
AEE 4905 Emerging Technologies in
Agricultural Education ............................ ........3
AEE 49421 Agricultural Education
Internship ..... ....... ..............................8
EDF 32102 Educational Psychology.................3


Technical Agriculture Requirements and Electives3
AEB 3112L Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications ................................... 1
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management.................................. .......3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and
M maintenance ....................................................... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
HOS 3013C General Horticulture or
ORH 4263C Production of Floricultural
Crops........................................ ................ 4
ENY 3005C2Principles of Entomology or
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M anagement...........................................3
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L2 General Soils and Lab..4
Select two courses from the following four courses:
(6-8 Credits)
AGR 30052 Introduction of Agronomy ............3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture......4
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables..............................................4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables.............................................3
Approved Electives .......................... Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Policies governing the teaching internship
are outlined below.
2 Meet general education requirement.
SMay be modified with approval of both aca-
demic units.

AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATION
DUAL MAJOR
Students majoring in other departments who
desire a strong base of training in communica-
tion skills or who wish to enter communication
professions directly related to their agricultural
majors may co-major in agricultural education
and communication. To enter the program,
MMC 2100 must be completed with a grade of C
or better and students must have an overall
GPA of 2.5.
Departmental Requirements Credits
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication .....3
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources..............................................3
AEE 3939 Agricultural and Natural
Resources Communication Seminar ...............1
AEE 4034 Agricultural Communication
Strategies ................................ .............3
AEE 4035 Agricultural and Natural
Resources Communication Practicum
(Must be taken twice with varying credit).:......... 4
AEE 4948' Agricultural and Natural
Resources Communication Internship ...........6
Other Communication Requirements
ADV 3000 Elements of Advertising ...............3
JOU 3101 Reporting............................. ...... .3
MMC2100 Writing for Mass
Communications............................
PUR 3000 Introduction to Public Relations...3
PUR 3101 Editing and Graphics .................3


Select one of the following three courses:
(3 Credits)
RTV 3200 Fundamentals of Production........3
RTV 3300 Radio News 1...................................3
RTV 4320 Electronic Field Production ...........3
Technical Agriculture Requirements and Electives3
AEB 42242 U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ........................................................ 2
AGR 30052 Introduction to Agronomy ............3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science....4
FOS 20012 Man's Food ...................................2
HOS 3013C General Horticulture...................4
Select three courses from the following seven courses:
(8-9 Credits)
AEB 4242 International Trade Policy in
Agriculture................................... ............... 2
AEB 4274 Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy........................................ 2
AGR 4001C Food, Man and Environment........2
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural
Environmental Quality ..................................3
ANS 2002 The Meat We Eat..........................2
FOR 3003 Forests, Conservation and
People ............................................................. 3
W IS 2040 W wildlife Issues .................................3
Approved Electives
(Agriculture andlor Communication)......Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SPolicies governing the teaching internship
are outlined below.
2 Meet general education requirement.
SMay be modified with approval of both aca-
demic units.

EXTENSION MINOR
The extension education minor is intended
to supplement a student's major program of
study. It is designed to meet the basic educa-
tional needs of undergraduate students who
wish to prepare for careers in the Cooperative
Extension Service. The minor offers course
work in areas such as informal and formal edu-
cational methods, adult education, leadership,
youth programs, communication methods and
field experience.
Upon approval of their adviser in their
major program, all undergraduate students
majoring in the college are eligible to enroll in
the extension education minor. Students in
other colleges may enroll in this minor upon
approval of the chair of the Department of
Agricultural Education and Communication.


Required Courses


Credits


AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in
Agricultural Education .....................................3
AEE 3313 Development and Role of
Extension Education.................................. 3
AEE 3414 Leadership Development in
Agriculture and Natural Resources ................3
AEE 4943' Agricultural Extension
Internship .... ...... ............................... 8






COLLEGES


Supporting Courses (not required)
AEE 4034 Agricultural Communication
Strategies ............................................ ....3
EDF 32102 Educational Psychology
(or equivalent)............ ..................................... 3
SPolicies governing the extension practicum
(internship) are outlined below.
2 Meet general education requirement.

INTERNSHIPS IN AGRICULTURAL
EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION
Students wishing to enroll in one or more of
the three internship courses (AEE 4942, AEE
4943, AEE 4948) mush have advanced senior
standing and meet applicable requirements
listed below:
Teaching Internship "Block" (AEE 4224, AEE
4227, AEE 4905, AEE 4942)
Completion of EDF 3210 or equivalent,
speech or oral communication, and 17 hours
of professional education in agricultural
education.
2.5 or better overall GPA.
2.5 or better GPA in all professional educa-
tion courses in the area of specialization
Grades of less than C in AEE courses will
not be accepted.
Score a total of at least 960 on the SAT on the
April 1995 test or later or a composite score
of 20 or above on the ACT.
Passing scores on all sections of CLAST.
Extension Internship (AEE 4943)
2.0 or better overall GPA.
2.0 or better GPA in all professional educa-
tion courses required in the area of special-
ization.
Completion of the following courses: AEE
3313 and AEE 3200
Communication Internship (AEE 4948)
Completion of the following courses with a
2.5 or better GPA and no grade below C:
AEE 3030C, AEE 3033, AEE 3939, AEE 4034,
AEE 4035 (taken twice with varying content)
Applications for all internships must be sub-
mitted no later than the end of the second week
of the semester immediately prior to internship.
Assignments will be made only to those centers
approved at time of application. Applicants are
NOT guaranteed assignment to their home
county or to a given center. An application con-
stitutes an agreement to accept assignment in
the center where the objectives of the internship
program can best be achieved. Failure to accept
an assignment relieves the department of any
further responsibility to provide internship
experiences and courses for the candidate.

Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
(AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL
ENGINEERING)
The agricultural and biological engineering
curriculum is offered cooperatively by the col-
leges of Agriculture and Engineering. Students


in this major receive basic training in engineering
and agriculture so that they are prepared to
solve the specialized and unique engineering
problems of agricultural production and process-
ing systems and the management and conserva-
tion of agricultural land and water resources.
Since engineering problems in agriculture relate
to biological production and processing of bio-
logical products, training in agricultural and
biological courses is required. Students will
register in the College of Engineering. Refer to
that college for curriculum.

Agricultural Operations
Management
Agricultural operations management is
designed to provide foundations for careers in
technical management. The application of tech-
nology and management to improve agricultural
production, processing, manufacturing, product
support and product education are emphasized.
Fundamental technologies in food engineer-
ing, machinery, power, robotics, irrigation,
electrical power, computer interfacing, manage-
ment, human factors and construction are com-
plemented by courses fn agricultural sciences
and business management.
Four specializations of study are available:
production management, plant and process
management, technical sales and product sup-
port management, and bioprocess management.
Students should consult a department adviser
for guidance.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Production Management,
Manufacturing and Process Management and
Technical Sales and Product Support Specializations
Credits
Com position .................................... ....... ..... 6
Literature and Arts ................................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity ..............6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics and
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....4-6
Physical and Biological Sciences........................19
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L General Chemistry
and Lab ..................................... ...... 4
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L, PHY 2005, PHY 2005L
Applied Physics and Lab............................8
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006 Biological
Sciences and Lab ...................... .............7
M them atics .......................................................10
CIS 3020 Introduction to CIS or
CGS 3531 Introduction to Software..........3
Select one of the following mathematics sequences:
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra and
Trigonometry and MAC 3233 Survey of
Calculus ..................................... ...... 7
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra and
Trigonometry and STA 3023 Introduction
to Statistics 1 .................................... ............... 7
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus and
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............7


PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is for those students
interested primarily in field crop or animal agri-
culture.
SUpper Divison Requirements
Credits
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
M anagem ent.................................... ............ 3
AEB 3144 Introduction to Agricultural
Finance........................... ............. ................ 3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and
M maintenance .................................... .............. 3
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application......................3
AOM 3732C Agricultural Water Management.3
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
AOM 4314C Power and Machinery
M anagem ent................................ ............... 3
AOM4062 Principles of Food Engineering.....4
AOM 4455 Agricultural Operations and
System s........................................ ................ 3
AOM 4642 Environmental Systems for
Agricultural Structures ..................................3
AOM4933 Professional Practices in
Agricultural Operations....................................1
ENY 3005C0Principles of Entomology or
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M anagem ent................................................ 3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L' General Soils and Lab..4
Animal Science, Plant Science or
Crop Courses.................................... ............. 6
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent..................................... ............... 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources or
ENC 4260 Advanced Professional Writing....3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communications.3
Approved Electives
(Consult department for approved ...........Balance of
production management 128 credit hours
specialization elective list) necessary to
graduate
May be used for general education require-
ment.

MANUFACTURING AND PROCESS
MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION
Upper Divison Requirements Credits
ACG 2021 Accounting.......................................3
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for
A griculture.........................................................2
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food
M marketing ................................. ............... 3
AOM3220 Agricultural Construction and
M maintenance .................................... .............. 3
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agriculture and
Environmental Quality ..................................3
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering....4
AOM 4314C Power and Machinery
M anagem ent .................................... ............. 3
AOM4342 Sales and Service of Agricultural
Systems or AEB 3341 Strategic Selling and
the Technical Interface in Agribusiness..........3
AOM 4444C Electrical Power and Electronics
in Agriculture............. ................................ 3
AOM 4455 Agricultural Operations and
System s............................. ........... ................ 3
AOM4642 Environmental Systems for
Agricultural Structures .....................................3






AGRICULTURE


AOM 4933 Professional Practices in
Agricultural Operations............................
EIN 3314C Work Design and Human
Factors.......................................................... 3
FOS 3042 Introductory Food Science.............3
MAN 3021 Principles of Management.............. 3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ................................... ....... 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources or
ENC 4260 Advanced Professional Writing....3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communications.3
Approved Electives
(Production Management Specialization list)......6
Approved Electives
(Manufacturing and Process.........Balance of 128
Management Specialization list) credit hours
necessary to
graduate

TECHNICAL SALES AND PRODUCT
SUPPORT SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is for students seeking
careers in agricultural sales, sales management,
service, product planning, general management,
parts and inventory control, and government
agencies.
Upper Division Requirements
Credits
ACG 2021 'Accounting......................................3
ADV 3000 Elements of Advertising ................3
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food
M marketing .................................... ...... 3
AEB 3424 Human Resource Management
in Agribusiness ............................ ......... 2
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agriculture and
Environm ental Quality .....................................3
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida.......3
AOM4062 Principles of Food Engineering....4
AOM4314C Power and Machinery
M anagem ent.......... .................................. 3
AOM4342 Sales and Service of Agricultural
Systems or AEB 3341 Strategic Selling and
the Technical Interface in Agribusiness ..........3
AOM 4444C Electric Power and Electronics
in Agriculture ............................... ............. 3
AOM4455 Agricultural Operations and
Systems.................... .... .... ..3
AOM4642 Environmental Systems for
Agricultural Systems........................................ 3
AOM4933 Professional Practices in
Agricultural Operations............................
BUL 4310 The Legal Environment of
Business........................... ........... ............... 4
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
College of Agriculture Communications
Requirement ................................... ......6...
AEE 3033 Writing for Agriculture and
Natural Resources or
ENC 4260 Advanced Professional Writing ....3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
in Agriculture ................................................. 3
Approved electives
(production management specialization list) .......6
Approved Electives
(technical sales and product .....................Balance of
support specialization list) 128 credit hours
necessary to
graduate


BIOPROCESS MANAGEMENT
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is for students seeking
careers in biotechnology management, food
safety, food quality, biological system manage-
ment and related fields. This specialization is
more science-based that the other specializa-
tions.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position .......................................... .............. 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including........... 6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics and
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics......4-6
Physical and Biological Sciences........................24
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab...8
PHY 3053, PHY 3055L, PHY 3054, PHY 3056L
Physics and Lab.......................................... 8
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology ..............8.
M them atics ..................................... ............... 6
MAC 1142 Precalculus ....................................4.
MAC 3311 Analytical Geometry and
Calculus 1 .................................... .............. 4
Upper Division Requirements
ACG 2021 Accounting.................. ........
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for
Agriculture............ .. ..........2
AGE 3652C Physical and Rheological
Properties of Biological Materials...............3
AGE 4660 BioProcess Microbiology ...............3
AGR 3303 Genetics..................... .........3
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agriculture and
Environment Quality............................ ...3.
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering....4
AOM4444C Electrical Power and Electronics
in Agriculture............................. ....... 3
AOM 4455 Agricultural Operations and
Systems......................... .......................3
AOM4933 Professional Practices in
Agricultural Operations............................. 1
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry..............4
BCH 4024 Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology.......................................... ..4
FOS 3042 Introduction to Food Science ........3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of
M icroorganism s .....................................
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement....................... ......6.
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources or
ENC 4260 Advanced Professional Writing....3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication ...3
Approved Electives
(bioprocess management......................Balance of
specialization list) 128 credit hours
necessary to
graduate


Agronomy
The Department of Agronomy administers
undergraduate plant science majors in the
agronomy specialization. Students interested in
any of the options under the agronomy special-
ization should contact the department early in
their academic careers.

Animal Sciences
Animal Sciences is a diverse program
offered by the departments of Animal Science
and Dairy and Poultry Sciences. This major
offers two specializations, one in animal biology
and one in animal industry. Students may
select from four options under the animal
industry specialization: dairy, equine, food ani-
mal and poultry. Students are encouraged to
select the appropriate specialization/option and
electives to prepare for specific career objec-
tives. Potential careers for animal sciences
majors include various aspects of livestock pro-
duction (beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, poultry
and horses), livestock processing and utilization
(meat, milk and eggs, performance and recre-
ation), allied service industries (feed, health
care, genetics, equipment, supplies, marketing,
promotion, finance and education), as well as
preparation for postbaccalaureate education in
graduate school or the College of Veterinary
Medicine. Students should meet with the
undergraduate coordinator in animal sciences to
select the appropriate specialization/option and
academic faculty adviser.

ANIMAL BIOLOGY SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed for (1) stu-
dents who want to be a veterinarian working
with species other than livestock or who wish to
be a veterinarian working with livestock but
desire a strong basic science orientation in their
undergraduate program and (2) students who
are interested in entering graduate programs
centered on basic animal research. Students
will be encouraged to elect courses in the animal
sciences, zoology, microbiology, wildlife, and
veterinary science departments to strengthen
their academic portfolios.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position .........................................................6
Literature and Arts ................................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ............
International Studies and Diversity ....................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics ...3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences....... ......16
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab...8
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biological Sciences
and Lab .................... ........... .. 8
Mathematics .............................. .......
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus................................. ...






COLLEGES


STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics I...............3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement .......................................... .............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) ............3.
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
(or equivalent)......................... ............. ... 3
Upper Division Requirements
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3313C Genetic Improvement of Farm
A nim als........................................ ............... 4
ASG 3334 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals ..............3
Select one of the following labs: (1 Credit)
ASG 3335L Techniques in Ruminant
Reproduction............................... ......1
ASG 3336L Techniques in Swine
Reproduction............................... ......1
ASG 3337L Techniques in Horse
Reproduction............................... ...........
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition.....4
ANS 3043C Growth and Development of
Farm Anim als............................. ............... 3
CHM 3210, CHM 3311, CHM 3211L Organic
Chemistry and Lab ............................................ 8
BCH 4024 or CHM 4027 Introduction to
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology..............4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms 5
VME 4103 Livestock Health and Disease
Prevention............ ............. ................ 2
Approved Electives ..........................Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation

ANIMAL INDUSTRY SPECIALIZATION
Industry options include dairy, equine, food
animal and poultry. Students in these options
will be best prepared for careers associated with
the related species. Career preparation can be
strengthened through selection of elective
courses. Students who plan to apply for admis-
sion to the College of Veterinary Medicine in the
equine, food animal, or mixed practice tracks (as
designated by UF College of Veterinary
Medicine) may choose the appropriate industry
option in the animal sciences major.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Com position ................................................... 6
Literature and Arts ........................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences........................16
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab...8
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biological
Sciences and Lab...................................8
Mathematics ............................. ...................6
MAC 1142 Precalculus: Algebra and
Trigonom etry............................................. 4


Additional Hours in MAC, STA or
com puter science............................................2
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... .............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .................3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
(or equivalent)...... ................... ........ .3
Upper Division Requirements
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3313C Genetic Improvement of Farm
Animals .................................................. 4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition.....4
ASG 4931 Senior Seminar ................................
AEB 3112L Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications .............................1
AEB 3133 Introduction to Agribusiness
Management ................................ ....... 3
AEB 3424 Human Resources and Personnel
Relations........................... ........... ................ 2
MCB 2000C Microbiology ...................................4
Select one of the four options.................................. 41
Dairy Industry Option
ASG 3334 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals..............3
ASG 3335L Techniques in Ruminant
Reproduction.................................... .............
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management .............2
DAS 4212C Dairy Cattle Management
System s................................................................4
DAS 4213 Dairy Cattle Management
Techniques.................................... ...... ...... 2
DAS 4411, DAS 4411L Dairy Cattle Nutrition
and Lab................................. .......... ...... 5
DAS 4941 Practical Work Experience.........1-3
Approved Electives .......................................21-23
Poultry Industry Option
ACG 2021 Introduction to Financial
Accounting................................... ............... 3
PSE 4223C Poultry Management..................4.
PSE 4411C Poultry Nutrition ............................3
PSE 4512C Avian Anatomy and Physiology..3
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology or
ANS 4635C Meat Processing...... ......... ...3
Approved Electives............................................. 25
Equine Industry Option
ANS 3043C Growth and Development of Farm
A nim als ....................................... .............. 3
ANS 3934 Junior Seminar.................................
ANS 3079L Relationship of Form to
Function in Horses.............................................2
ANS 3237 Equine Health Management .........2
ANS 3405 Equine Nutrition and Feeding
Management.................................. ..... 2
ANS 4234 Horse Enterprise Management.....2
ASG 3334 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals ..............3
ASG 3337L Techniques in Horse
Reproduction............................... ...........
ANS 4231 Practicum or ANS 4941 Practical
W ork Experience...................... ........ .....1-3
AGR 4231C Forage Science and Range
Management ................................ ......4..
Two courses from AGG 4444 and
upper division AEB courses.........................3-6
Approved Electives .......................................12-17


Food Animal Industry Option
ANS 3934 Junior Seminar.................................1
ANS 3613L Livestock and Meat Evaluation....2
ANS 3404C Food Animal Nutrition and
Feeding ...............................................................2
ANS 3634C M eats.................................................3
ANS 4905 Practicum or
ANS 4941 Practical Work Experience.........1-3
Select two from the following four courses:..........5-6
ANS 4243C Beef Cow-Calf Management......3
ANS 4245C Beef Backgrounding and
Feedlot Management..................................... 2
ANS 4264C Swine Enterprise Management..3
ANS 4635C Meat Processing......................3
ASG 3334 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals..............3
ASG 3335L Techniques in Ruminant
Reproduction or ASG 3336L Techniques
in Swine Reproduction........................... ..1
AGR 4231C Forage Science and Range
Management...........................................4
VME 4103 Livestock Health and Disease
Prevention............. ........... ................. 2
Two courses from AGG 4444 and
upper division AEB and FOS courses.............3-6
Approved Electives ...............................Balance of
128 credit hours
necessary for
graduation

Botany
A major in botany is offered through the col-
lege. Students should consult the undergradu-
ate coordinator as soon as possible. Students
may elect to pursue one of two options.
Option 1
This option is designed for students who do
not plan to attend graduate school.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position .................................... .............. 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6
International Studies and Diversity ..............6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences .................21-24
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab' 8
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and
Biological Chemistry' or
CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry'................... 3-4
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab .................................... .............. 4
Select one biological science sequence:
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab'...8
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany' and
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology' ..............6
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany' and
MCB 2000C Microbiology'.............................7
Mathematics, including....................................... 6
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra
and Trigonometry' ......................................... 4
Students must achieve a grade of C or better.








Upper Division Requirements
AGR 3303 Genetics' or
PCB 3063 Genetics' ........................................3-4
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity'................................4
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy or
BOT 5725C Taxonomy of Vascular Plants'.3-4
PCB 3043C Introduction to Ecology' ................4
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introductory Plant
Physiology and Lab' .......................................... 6
BOT 3303C Introductory Vascular Plant
Morphology or
BOT 5225C Plant Anatomy'..............................4
Two elective courses in botany' ......................6-8
Two elective science courses outside of
botany'....... ........................................... 6-8
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent.................................... ............. 6
ENC 2213 Technical Writing and Business
Composition or
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources........................ ............. 3
SPC 2600 Introduction to Public Speaking
or AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication............................. .....3
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SStudents must achieve a grade of C or better
in Option I requirements.
Option II
This option is designed for students who
desire a strong background in the basic sciences.
It is intended for students who plan to attend
graduate school.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Composition .......................................... .............. 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences .......................26
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L General Chemistry and Lab'.............8
PHY 3053, PHY 3055L, PHY 3054, PHY
3056L Physics and Lab' ...............................10
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Prin. of Biology and Lab' ...........8
M them atics .................................... .............. 6
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus I' ................................................. 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics
(Recommended) ................................................ 3
Students must achieve a grade of C or better.

Upper Division Requirements
AGR 3303 Genetics' or PCB 3063
Genetics'..........................................................3-4
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity'.............................. 4
CHM 3210, CHM 3211 and CHM 3211L
Organic Chemistry' or
CHM 3217, CHM 3218 Organic and
Bioorganic Chemistry'...............................7-8


Select one course each from four of the following
five botanical disciplines (21-23 Credits)
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy' or
BOT 5725C Taxonomy of Vascular Plants'.3-4
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introductory Plant
Physiology and Lab'.......................................... 6
PCB 3043C Introductory Ecology'....................4
BOT 3303C Introductory Vascular Plant
Morphology' or BOT 5225C Plant
Anatom y'................................. .............. 4
CHM 4XXX Chemical Aspects of Cellular
Control and CHM 4XXX Introduction to
Experimental Biochemistry'......................5.
One elective course in botany' .........................3-4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ................................. ......6...
ENC 2213 Technical Writing and Business
Composition or
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resource ..................................3
SPC 2600 Introduction to Public Speaking
or AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication................3.............................3
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation.
Students must achieve a grade of C or better.

BIOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM
Students who plan to teach biology in sec-
ondary education programs may major in
botany, and should see the undergraduate coor-
dinator of botany for information concerning
this program.

MINOR
To qualify as having a minor in botany, a stu-
dent needs a minimum of 15 semester hours of
course work, earned with a grade of C or better.
At least three courses (none of which may be
individual study work) of no fewer than three
credits each must be at the 3000 level or higher.
Of the total credits required, no more than three
may be individual study work. The undergrad-
uate coordinator has further information.

HONORS
To be eligible for honors in botany, a student
must have a minimum grade point average of
3.5 in upper division courses. Students working
for high or highest honors in botany from the
College of Agriculture must have a minimum
grade point average of 3.75 and 3.85, respec-
tively, and will be expected to enroll in BOT
4905 for one or two semesters, respectively, and
produce a thesis based upon independent
Research. Students must carry out the research
under the direction of botany faculty members
and prepare a thesis based on the research,
which is to be submitted to and approved by the
student's research adviser and the dean's office,
2002 McCarty. Approval to undertake honors
work must be secured from the undergraduate
coordinator and the dean's office prior to the
first registration for BOT 4905.


AGRICULTURE


Dairy Science (See Animal Sciences)
Students desiring to prepare for employment
in the dairy industry should major in animal
sciences with the dairy option of the industry
specialization. For efficient completion of
required courses and for selection of appropriate
electives, students should consult an adviser in
the Department of Dairy and Poultry Sciences.


Entomology and Nematology
Entomology and nematology are biological
sciences dealing with insects, mites, ticks, spi-
ders and nematodes. The Department of
Entomology and Nematology offers a major in
entomology and nematology and participates in
the plant protection specialization of the plant
sciences major offered in conjunction with the
Department of Agronomy and the Department
of Plant Pathology. The three specializations
under the entomology and nematology major
are basic science/preprofessional, biology edu-
cation and urban pest management.
Students desiring to enter the department
should contact the undergraduate adviser for
more detailed program information.

PREPROFESSIONAL AND BASIC SCIENCES
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed for students
who desire a strong background in the basic sci-
ences. There are two options under this special-
ization.
Preprofessional Option
The preprofessional option prepares stu-
dents for admission to medical, dental, optome-
try and veterinary schools.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position ..................................... .............. 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ............6
International Studies and Diversity .................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences........................21
CHM 2045, CHM2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab...8
PHY 3053, PHY 3055L Physics 1 and Lab .....5
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab .................8
M them atics .................................... ............... 7
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 1 .................................... ............. 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
Upper Division Requirements
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology ...................................4
CHM 3210, CHM 3211, CHM 3211L Organic
Chem istry .................................... ............... 8
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology or
ENY 3030C Insect Field Biology ...................3






COLLEGES


ENY 4161 Insect Classification ........................3
ENY 4453 Behavioral Ecology and
Systematics (or equivalent).............................. 3
ENY 4660C Medical and Veterinary
Entom ology................................. ............... 3
ENY 4905 Honors, Seminars, Problems.....1-5
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms.5
PCB 3063 Genetics or
AGR 3303 Genetics ........................................3-4
PHY 3054, PHY 3056L Physics 2 and Lab .........4
ZOO 3203C Invertebrate Zoology....................4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ................................. ......6...
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3.
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested Electives, depending upon preprofessional
requirements and specialization (See adviser):
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3313 Genetic Improvement of Farm
Anim als ...................................... .... .. 3
ASG 3334 Reproductive Physiology and
Endocrinology in Domestic Animals ..............3
BOT 3143C Local Flora or BOT 2710 Plant
Taxonomy .................................... ............ 3
BOT 3503 and BOT 3503L Introduction to
Plant Physiology and Lab.................................6
MCB 4203 Bacterial and Viral Pathogens .......3
MCB 4503 General Virology.........................2.
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology ..............3
Basic Sciences Option
The basic sciences option prepares students
for research technical support and graduate
study in entomology and nematology.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Com position .........................................................6
Literature and Arts .......................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ............6.
International Studies and Diversity ....................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including........... 6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences........................20
CHM 2045, CHM2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L General Chemistryl and Lab............8
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab ..................................... ............... 4
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab ......................8
M them atics ........................................................11
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
C alculus 1 ........................................................4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
Upper Division Requirements
CHM 3200, CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry
and Lab.................................. ........ ...... 3
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology or


ENY 3030C Insect Field Biology ...................3.
ENY 4161 Insect Classification.....................3.
ENY 4453 Behavioral Ecology and
Systematics (or equivalent).............................. 3
ENY 4660C Medical and Veterinary
Entom ology.....................................................
ENY 4905 Honors, Seminars, Problems.....1-5
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms.5
PCB 3063 Genetics or
AGR 3303 Genetics ................................3-4
PHY 2005, PHY 2005L Applied Physics 2
and Lab........................ ........................ 4
ZOO 3203C Invertebrate Zoology.....................4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ................................. ......6...
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent).............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............. 3
Approved Electives ......................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested Electives, depending upon interests
to complete 128 hours (See adviser):
EES 3000 Environmental Science and
H um anity .................................... ................ 3
PCB 4044C General Ecology...........................4.
ZOO 3303C Vertebrate Zoology........................4
BOT 3143C Local Flora or BOT 2710 Plant
Taxonom y .................................... ............... 3
BOT 3503 and BOT 3503L Introduction to
Plant Physiology and Lab...............................6
MCB 4203 Bacterial and Viral Pathogens.......3
MCB 4503 General Virology............................2
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology ..............3

BIOLOGY EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed for students
interested in being certified to teach biological
sciences. State certification requirements are
subject to change so students are urged to keep
in close contact with the entomology and educa-
tion advisers to be sure courses are applicable.
General Education Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Com position .........................................................6
Literature and Arts ....................................... 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies
(Recommend select from the following) .............6.
BSC 3113 History of Modern Botany............3
EDF 3514 History of Education in the U.S...3
PHI 2403 Science, Myth and Values..............3
International Studies and Diversity
(Recommend select from the following) .............6.
ANT 2301 Human Sexuality and Culture ....3
EDF 4810 Comparative Education ................3
Social and Behaviorial Sciences .....................6-7
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
(Recommend select from the following)
ANT 3410 Cultural Anthropology ................3
EDF 3210 Education Psychology .................


EDF 3604 Social Foundations of Education .3
PSY 2013 General Psychology........................3
SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology .............3
Physical and Biological Sciences.......................20
CHM 2045, CHM2045L General Chemistry
and Lab .................................... ............... 4
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L, PHY 2005, PHY
2005L Applied Physics and Lab...................8
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab ...................8
Mathematics .......................................................7-8
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and ,
Calculus 1................................. ............... 4
One of the following:
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 2...................................................... 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ............3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... .............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3

Upper Division Requirements
Entomology Requirements
AGR 3303 Genetics or PCB 4745C Animal
Physiology......................... ...................3-5
BOT 3153 Local Flora or BOT 2710 Plant
Taxonom y ..........................................................3
BSC 3096 Human Physiology or PCB
4745C Animal Physiology ................................3
CHM 2046, CHM 2046L General Chemistry II
and Lab................... ...................... 4
CHM 3200, CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry
and Lab.................................. ................ 4
ENY 3030C Insect Field Biology .....................3
ENY 4161 Insect Classification........................3
ENY 4453 Behavioral Ecology and
Systematics (or equivalent).................................3
ENY 4660C Medical and Veterinary
Entom ology................................. ............... 3
ENY 4905 Problems in Entomology...............3
EME 3402 Introduction to Instructional
Com puting.................................. ................ 2
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms.5
PCB 4044C General Ecology or PCB 3043
Introduction to Ecology ............3-4
ZOO 3203C Invertebrate Zoology ......................4
ZOO 3303C Vertebrate Zoology......................4

Education Requirements
Teacher education admission requires a score of at
least 960 on the SAT, a minimum ACT score of 20
or E-ACT score of 21.
EDF 3115 Child Development and
Education .................................... .............. 3
EDF 3214 Learning and Cognition in
Education .................................... .............. 2
EDF 3433 Introduction to Education
M easurem ent.............................. .............. 2
EDF 3609 Sociological and Historical
Functions ..................................... .............. 4
EEX 3070 Exceptional Children...................2
ESE 3034 Current Problems and Issues........2






AGRICULTURE


URBAN PEST MANAGEMENT
SPECIALIZATION
The urban pest management specialization
is for students who desire to enter the pest con-
trol industry. Students study about arthropods,
nematodes, plant diseases and weeds with ref-
erence to pest problems in and around residen-
tial and commercial property. Emphasis also is
given to a business curriculum so that students
are prepared for management responsibilities in
the pest management industry.
General Education Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Composition .............................................6
Literature and Arts.............................. 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ............
International Studies and Diversity ....................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including.......6-7
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences................. 15
General Chemistry and Lab .........................4
Physics (minimum PHY 2020 or equivalent).....3
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab .....................8
Mathematics .......................... ....
MAC 1142 Precalculus: Algebra and
Trigonometry ........ ............. ..... 4
AGG 3333C PC Use in Agriculture ................3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirements......... ......... .....6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .................3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent).................3.
Upper Division Requirements
Entomology Requirements
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ..............3
ENY 3222C Biology and Control of Urban
Pests ............................................... ..... ...... 2
ENY 3225C Principles of Urban Pest
Management...................... ...... .....2
ENY 3541C Tree and Shrub Insects............. 3
ENY 4660C Medical and Veterinary
Entom ology.........................................................3
ENY 4905 Problems in Entomology ..........1-5
ENY 4941 Work Experience in
Entom ology ...................................... ...............1-4
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology ..............3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant
Pathology ................ ..................
PLP 3103C Plant Disease Control .............3
PLS 4601 Weed Science ...................................3
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L General Soils and Lab....4
Business Requirements
Select a minimum of 12 credits from the following:
Minimum 12
ACG 2021 Introduction to Financial
Accounting.......................3
ADV 3000 Elements of Advertising ................3
ADV 3001 Advertising Strategy ..............3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management ........ .......... ......3


MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing.................3
PUR 3000 Introducation to Public Relations.3
Approved Electives ...................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested Electives to be approved by an adviser.
AOM3333 Pesticide Application......................3
BOT 3143C Local Flora........................................ 3
FRC 1010 Growing Fruits for Fun and
Profit .............................................. ..............
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture........................3.
ORH 3513C, ORH 3514C Ornamental Plant
Identification I & II ............................................ 6
PLP 4290C Principles of Plant Disease
Diagnosis. .................................... ...... 2
VEC 3100 Introduction to World's
Vegetables .................................... 2
VEC 3200 Vegetable Gardening...................

MINOR IN ENTOMOLOGY AND
NEMATOLOGY
Students in other departments may work
toward a minor by completing the following:
a minimum of 15 credits with a C or better in
each course
at least 9 credits of upper division work
(exclusive of practical problems); and
no more than three credits of practical prob-
lems.


Minor Requirements


Credits


ENY 3005C Principles of Enotmology
and Lab........................ ....... ......3
ENY 4161 Insect Classification..................3
ENY 4660C Medical and Veterinary
Entomology.......... ................................
ENY 4905 SpecialProblems .............................3
Additional credits in entomology will be cho-
sen according to student interest and must be
approved by the department. Students wishing
to specialize in nematology may do so by com-
pleting six hours of nematology (NEM 3002,
NEM 5705, or acceptable practical problem).


Environmental Management in
Agriculture (Interdisciplinary
Studies Major)
This major is for students in the College of
Agriculture who desire training in agriculture
with substantial emphasis on the environment.
The intent of this major is to produce graduates
who will find employment in the environmental
arena with agricultural producers, agribusiness,
agricultural service agencies and regulatory
agencies.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Composition .......................... ....6
Literature and Arts ................... ......6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..............6
International Studies and Diversity ............6


Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences................23-24
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L General Chemistry and lab...............8
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L, PHY 2005, PHY
2005L Applied Physics and lab.................8
Select one of the following biological sequences:
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006
Biological Sciences and Lab.......................7
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab...8
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany and
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity ...........................7
M them atics .................................. .............. 10
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus I .................................... ............... 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
CGS 3531 Introduction to Software.................3
Upper Division Requirements
Core Requirements All Specializations
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement....... ....... .. ........................ ....
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) ............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalaent)................3
AGG 4932 Environmental Toxicology................3
PMA 3010 Integrated Pest Management........3
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality or
SOS 30222 General Soils....................................3
Select at least nine credit hours from the following
seven courses: (Minimum 9)
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3424 Human Resources Management
in Agribusiness.................. ......
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural Resources
and Environmental Economics ..................3
AEB 4224 U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ................................ ........ 2
AEB 4274 Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy.............. .............2
BUL 4310 The Legal Environment of
Business ...... ............................... 3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
Select one course from the following eight courses:'
(3-4 Credits)
AGR 3005C2Introduction to Agronomy ............3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture......3
HOS 3013C General Horticulture....................4
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture............................3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant
Pathology ......... .........................3
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables...... .......... .. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables..................... ..... .... 3
Courses may not be counted as part of both
the core requirements and specialization
requirements.
2 May be used for general education require-
ment.






COLLEGES


ECONOMICS AND POLICY
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed to prepare
students for employment in agribusiness posi-
tions, such as consulting, chemical manufactur-
ing and sales, or with regulatory agencies.
Specialization Requirements
Select 15 credit hours from the following:'
Credits
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management...........................................3
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural
Resources and Environmental Economics
or ECP 3302 Environmental Economics
and Resource Policy ...................................3.
AEB 4124 Legal Issues in Agriculture............1
AEB 4274 Natural Resources and
Environmental Economics Policy................... 2
AEB 4452 Advanced Natural Resources
and Environmental Economics.....................3.
AGG 4444 Agricultural and Natural
Resource Ethics .................................................. 3
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality ..................................3.
GEO 4554 Regional Development..................3
GEO 4620 Land Use and Urban Form............ 3
POS 3204 Political Behavior ........................3
PUP 3204 Politics and Ecology ....................3.
PUP 4021 Law, Politics and Public Interest ..3
SOS 4231C Soils and Land Use .........................3
URP 4000 Preview of Urban and Regional
Planing............................ .... ..... .... 3
Approved Electives from
Other Specializations....................................9
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SCourses may not be counted as part of both
the core requirements and specialization
requirements.

LAND AND WATER MANAGEMENT
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization prepares students for
employment with agencies and firms that deal
in technical aspects of the environmental man-
agement of land and water resources in agricul-
ture.
Specialization Requirements
Select 15 credit hours from the following:'
Credits
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application..................3.
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management.3
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
AOM 4455 Agricultural Operations and
System s. ........................................................3
EES 4102, EES4102L Environmental
Biology 1 and Lab ..............................................4
EES 4241C Introduction to Water Analysis....3
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L2 General Soils and Lab.4
SOS 3215C/AOM 3503 Agriculture and


Environmental Quality ..................................3.
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility ........... 3
SOS 4231C Soils and Land Use ......................3.
SOS 4242 Wetlands and Water Quality........ 3
SOS 4404 SoilChemistry..............................3.
SOS 4602C Soil Physics ...................................3.
SOS 4715C Environmental Pedology...............3
Approved Electives from
Other Specializations........................................9
Approved Electives....................... Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SCourses may not be counted as part of both
the core requirements and specialization
requirements.
2 May be used for general education require-
ment.

WASTE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization prepares students for
employment with firms and agencies involved in
environmentally sound use and management of
agricultural and other wastes (poultry and dairy
waste, sewage sludge and effluent, yard waste,
hazardous wastes, etc.)
Specialization Requirements
Select 15 credit hours from the following:'
Credits
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management.3
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality .....................................3
EES 4102, EES 4102L Environmental
Biology 1 and Lab ..............................................4
EES 4103 Environmental Biology 2 ...........3.
EES 4201 Introduction to Water Chemistry.3
EES 4241C Introduction to Water Analysis ....3
EES 4401 Public Health Engineering............3
ENV 4330 Hazardous Waste Control .............3
ENV 4601 Environmental Resources
Management...........................................3
FNR 4343 Forest Water Resources.................3
FOR 3162C Silviculture............................... .
MCB 2000C Microbiology ...................................3
SOS 3022, SOS 3022L2 General Soils and Lab..4
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility ...........3
SOS 4231C Soils and Land Use ......................3.
SOS 4242 Wetlands and Water Quality ........ 3
SOS 4404 Soil Chemistry ............................. 3
SOS 4602C Soil Physics ......................................3
Approved Electives from
Other Specializations......................................... 9
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Courses may not be counted as part of both
the core requirements and specialization
requirements.
2 May be used for general education require-
ment.


Agricultural and Natural
Resources Ethics and Policy Minor
This minor can serve as additional prepara-
tion for careers in education, business, law or
politics. The requirements for this minor are
listed below.


Minor Requirements


Credits


AGG 4444 Agricultural and Natural
Resource Ethics .................................................. 3
Courses from Ethics, Social, and Political
Analysis Cluster.......................... ............. 6
Courses from the Agriculture and Natural
Resources Cluster........................... .............. 6
Ethics, Social, and Political Analysis Cluster
ANT 4255 Rural People in the Moder
W orld ........................................... ................ 3
PAD 4604 Administrative Law and
Regulatory Politics................. ............ 3
PHM 3032 Ethics and Ecology......................3
PHM 3202 Political Philosophy....................3
POT 3001 Introduction to Political Theory ...3
PUP 3204 Politics and Ecology ....................3
SYD 3441 Rural Sociology ............................3
Agriculture and Natural Resources Cluster
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural
Resource and Environmental Economics.......3
AEB 4224 U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ........................................ .......................2
AEB 4274 Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy........................................2
AEB 4452 Advanced Natural Resource and
Environmental Economics...............................3
AEB 4454 Contemporary Issues in Natural
Resource and Environmental Economics.......3
AGR 3001 Environment, Food, and Scarcity.3
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality ..................................3
EES 3008 Energy and Environment ..............3
ENV 3003 Environmental Quality and Man..3
FOR 3003 Forests, Conservation and People .3
FOR 3153C Forest Ecology ..............................3
FNR 4660 Natural Resource Policy and
Administration............................................... 3


Food and Resource Economics
Three specializations are offered by the
Department of Food and Resource Economics.
Students should consult a department adviser
for approval of electives. Students must earn at
least a C in AEB 3103 before taking courses that
have AEB 3103 as a prerequisite.
To graduate, FRE majors must complete all
college and department requirements in effect at
the time they entered the college. Majors must
earn a GPA of at least 2.25 in all AEB courses
and not less than a C in departmental core
courses.
Students who have completed 30 credit
hours, but less than 60 credit hours, are
required to have completed mathematics
through precalculus (MAC 1142 or equivalent)






AGRICULTURE


prior to admission to the College of Agriculture.
Students who have completed 60 credit hours or
more are required to have completed mathemat-
ics through calculus (MAC 3233 or equivalent)
prior to admission to the college.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
All Specializations
Credits
Com position ..........................................................6
Literature and Arts ................................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..................
International Studies and Diversity ..............6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics' .................................... ............... 4
Physical and Biological Sciences..................10-13
CHM 1020, CHM 1021 Chemistry and Society
or PHY 2020 Introduction to Physics.....3 -6
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006 Biological
Sciences and Lab ......................................... 7
M them atics .................................... .............. 6
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus ......................3.
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... ............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent)...............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication
(or equivalent)................................................. 3
SDepartmental core course; students must
earn a C or better.

AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is for students with inter-
ests in management, marketing or finance in the
agricultural sector. Graduates may enter
agribusiness management and marketing. In
addition there are opportunities with commer-
cial banks, the Farm Credit Service, insurance
sales and appraisal firms.


Upper Division Requirements


Credits


AEB 3112L' Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications ....................................1
AEB 3510' Quantitative Methods in Food
and Resource Economics ...............................2.
AEB 3550' Agricultural Data Analysis in
Food and Resource Economics .....................2.
Select at least two courses from the following
six policy courses: (4 Credits)
AEB 4224' U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ............................................ ............... 2
AEB 4242' International Trade Policy in
A griculture..................................................... 2
AEB 4274' Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy....................................... 2
AEB 4283' International Development
Policy ........................................... ................ 2
AEB 4284' Policies for Human
Development ............................... ..............2
AEB 4285' State/Local Government Policy
for Rural Areas ................................. .............


Specialization Core
AEB 4141 Advanced Agribusiness
M management ................................ ....... 3
AEB 4342 Agribusiness and Food
Marketing Management ................................3.
AEB 4325 Contemporary Issues in
Agribusiness Management....................... 3
Select at least six credits from the
following nine courses:
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food
M marketing ................................................ .........3
AEB 3306 Futures Markets and Risk
Management in Agriculture....... ............
AEB 3341 Strategic Selling and the
Technical Interface in Agriculture...................3
AEB 3424 Human Resources Management
in Agribusiness...................... .......... 2
AEB 4124 Legal Issues for Agriculture
and Agribusiness .....................................1
AEB 4324 Economics of Agribusiness
Production Decisions................. ................. 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis ...........3
AEB 4941 Practical Work Experience in
Food and Resource Economics ....................2-3
ACG 2021 Financial Accounting......................3
ACG 2071 Managerial Accounting..................2
Select one course from the following two courses:
(3-4 Credits)
ECO 3100 Managerial Economics................3.
ECO 3101 Intermediate Microeconomic
Theory........................................ ................. 4
Select one course from the following two courses:
(3-4 Credits)
ECO 3202 National Income Policy ..................3
ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomic
Theory.................................................... 4
FIN 3408 Business Finance.............................4
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing.................3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
Approved course offered in College of
Agriculture (See adviser) ....................................3
Approved Electives ......................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Departmental core course; students must
earn a C or better.

NATURAL RESOURCE AND ENVIRONMEN-
TAL ECONOMICS SPECIALIZATION
Students majoring in this specialization will
receive a broad background in social sciences,
management and physical sciences. This
diverse background will provide the skills for
an entry-level position with a government
agency or an environmental consulting firm.
Upper Division Requirements Credits
AEB 3112L' Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications .............................1
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural Resource
and Environmental Economics........................3
AEB 3510' Quantitative Methods in Food
and Resource Economics ...............................2


AEB 3550' Agricultural Data Analysis in
Food and Resource Economics .....................2
AEB 4274' Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy.....................................2
Select at least one courses from the following
five policy courses:
AEB 4224' U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ..................................................... .... 2
AEB 4242' International Trade Policy in
A griculture.........................................................2
AEB 4283' International Development
Policy ............................................ ............... 2
AEB 42841 Policies for Human
Developm ent .................................... ............. 2
AEB 4285' State/Local Government Policy
for Rural Areas ................................................ 2
Specialization Core
AEB 4452 Advanced Natural Resource
and Environmental Economics.....................3
AEB 4454 Contemporary Issues in
Natural Resource and Environmental
Economics ..................................... ...... ..3
Select one from each of the following groups,
plus one from any group (12 Credits)
Social Sciences
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management................................. ......3
AEB 3144 Introduction to Agricultural
Finance.............. ........ ...........................3
AEB 4324 Economics of Agribusiness
Production Decisions.........................................3
AGG 4444 Agricultural and Natural
Resource Ethics .................................................. 3
ECO 3530 Public Choice................................3
ECO 4504 Public Finance ...............................3
ECP 4403 Government Regulation of
Business........................... ........... ..... .....
GEO 3502 Economic Geography............ ........3
GEO 3370 Conservation of Resources............3
GEO 4620 Land Use and Urban Form............3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.........,..3
PUP 3204 Politics and Ecology
Management............................ .............3
Physical Sciences
AGR 3001 Man, Food, and Environment.......3
AOM3503/SOS 3215C Agriculture and
Environmental Quality .....................................3
EES 3008 Energy and Environment ..............3
EES 3000 Environmental Science and
Humanity .................. ........ ...... 3. 3
ENV 4601 Environmental Resources
M anagement..... ... ... ........................ 3
GEO 4201C Advanced Physical Geography ....3
GLY 2030C Environmental Geology ................3
SOS 4231C Soils and Land Use .........................3
ACG 2021 Financial Accounting......................3
ACG 2071 Managerial Accounting.................2
Select one course from the following two courses:
(3-4 Credits)
ECO 3100 Managerial Economics .............3
ECO 3101 Intermediate Microeconomic
Theory............................ ............. ................ 4






COLLEGES


Select one course from the following two courses:
(3-4 Credits)
ECO 3202 National Income Policy..............3.
ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomic
Theory...............................................................
Approved course offered in College of
Agriculture (See adviser) ....................................3
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Departmental core course, students must
earn a C or better

FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
SPECIALIZATION
The food and resource economics specializa-
tion is designed to provide a very broad back-
ground rather than depth in an area of spe-
cialty. It is anticipated that many who choose
this specialization are preparing for entry into
an agricultural economics graduate program.
Upper Division Requirements
Credits
AEB 3112L' Introduction to Agricultural
Computer Applications ... .....................1
AEB 35101 Quantitative Methods in Food
and Resource Economics ...............................2.
AEB 3550' Agricultural Data Analysis in
Food and Resource Economics .....................2.
Select at least two courses from the following six
policy courses:(4 Credits)
AEB 4224' U.S. Food and Agricultural
Policy ......................................................... 2
AEB 4242' International Trade Policy in
Agriculture................................... ............... 2
AEB 4274' Natural Resource and
Environmental Policy................. .........2
AEB 4283' International Development
Policy ....................................................... 2
AEB 4284' Policies for Human Development .2
AEB 4285' State/Local Government Policy
for Rural Areas ................................................ 2
Specialization Core
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management...........................................3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Food Marketing........3
Select one course from the following two courses:
AEB 3144 Introduction to Agricultural
Finance....................... ........................... 3
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural Resource
and Environmental Economics.....................3.
Select one course from the following two courses:
AEB 4324 Economics of Agribusiness
Production Decisions.................. ................. 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis ...........3
Approved AEB Electives ..................................5.
ACG 2021 Financial Accounting......................3
ACG 2071 Managerial Accounting.................2
ECO 3101 Intermediate Microeconomic
Theory............................ ............. ................. 4
ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomic
Theory..................... ............ ................. 4


Approved course offered in College of
Agriculture (See adviser) ............................3
Approved Electives ...................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SDepartmental core course, students must
earn a C or better.
2 No more than 2 hours of AEB 4905 will be
allowed as an approved elective.

MINOR IN FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS
A minor consisting of a minimum of 15
semester hours is offered in food and resource
economics. Specific courses in the minor must
be approved in writing at least two semesters
prior to graduation by the student's academic
adviser and the undergraduate coordinator in
FRE. AEB 3103 is not applied toward the minor.

MINOR IN AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT
AND SALES
This minor is to provide students with the
opportunity to gain a basic understanding and
skill level of sales and management techniques
in agribusiness. Specific courses in the minor
must be approved in writing at least one semes-
ter prior to graduation by the student's acade-
mic adviser and the undergraduate coordinator
of the Department of Food and Resource
Economics. AEB 3103 or equivalent shall not be
counted toward the minor. A minimum GPA of
2.0 for all courses counted in the minor is
required.


Minor Requirements


Credits


AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
M anagem ent'......................................................3
AEB 3341 Strategic Selling and the
Technical Interface.............................................3
Select at least one course from the following:'
AEB 3144 Introduction to Agricultural
Finance........................... ............. ................ 3
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food
M marketing .................................... .............. 3
Select six-nine credit hours from the following:'
AEB 3424 Human Resources Management
in Agribusiness.................................... ... 2
AEB 4141 Advanced Agribusiness
Management......................................... 3
AEB 4314 Terminal Markets and
Commodity Exchanges .................................
AEB 4342 Agribusiness and Food
Marketing Management ...................................3
AEB 4932 Agribusiness Practicum.............1-3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
' Students must take either AEB 3144 or AEB
3300. If the student completes AEB 3144,
then AEB 3300 may be counted as part of the
six credit hours. Students from the College
of Business Administration may not enroll in
AEB 3133 or AEB 3144. These students will
be required to select nine credit hours from
the electives list.


Food Science and
Human Nutrition
The Department of Food Science anc
Human Nutrition offers three specializations
food science, dietetics and nutritional sciences
Students in these curricula take a common con
of courses, required courses for the specialize
tion and electives. Students should consult;
departmental adviser for guidance anc
approval of electives.

FOOD SCIENCE SPECIALIZATION
Food science deals with the effects of compo
sition, handling and processing of foods on thei
quality, safety and nutritional value. The cur
riculum provides students with the opportunity)
to enter the food industry or government agen
cies. The program is approved by the Institut(
of Food Technologists and offers further oppor.
tunities in graduate studies. Students ar
expected to acquire a solid background in biol.
ogy, chemistry and processing, and are encour.
aged to seek minors in business, chemistry oi
engineering.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Credit,
Com position .........................................................6
Literature and Arts ................................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6
International Studies and Diversity .................6
Social and Behaviorial Sciences, including.........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics, ECO 2013 Principles of
Macroeconomics, or ECO 2023 Principles
of Microeconomics.....................................3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences........................20
CHM 2045, CHM2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab...8
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab .................................... ................ 4
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab ...................8
Mathematics ................................... ..............11
MAC 3311, MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry
and Calculus ................................... ............ 8
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
Upper Division Requirements
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering.....4
BCH 3025 Fundamentals of Biochemistry.....4
CGS 3531 Introduction of Computer
Softw are............................................................ 3
CHM 3200, CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry
and Lab or
CHM 3210, CHM 3211, CHM 3211L Organic
Chemistry and Lab .................................4-8
FOS 4222, FOS 4222L Food Microbiology
and Lab........................................ ................ 5
FOS 4311C Food Chemistry...............................4
FOS 4321C Food Analysis.......................... 4
FOS 4427C Principles of Food Piocessing.......4
FOS 4435C Food Product and Development..3
FOS 4722C Quality Control in Food Systems.3
FOS 4731 Government Regulations and
the Food Industry .............................................. 2






AGRICULTURE


HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human
N nutrition .................................... ............... 3
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Prokaryotic
and Eukaryotic Cells and Lab or
MCB 2000C Microbiology ...............................4-5
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ................................ ....... 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent)............. 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3.
Approved Electives .......................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

DIETETICS SPECIALIZATION
The dietetics specialization provides a
well-rounded program of applied study in the
biological, chemical, social and behavioral sci-
ences and relates scientific principles to the lives
of individuals. It prepares students for gradu-
ate study and entry into a dietetic internship or
approved preprofessional practice program
(AP4). The curriculum is approved by the
American Dietetic Association.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Composition ............................... ......6...
Literature and Arts .............................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..................6
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behaviorial Sciences ........................9.
EDF 3210 Educational Psychology ................
PSY 2013 General Psychology ..........................3
SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology................. 3
Physical and Biological Sciences......................20
CHM 2045, CHM2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L General Chemistry and Lab..............8
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and lab .................................... ............... 4
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab ....................8
M mathematics .................................... ...... 7
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra
and Trigonometry............................. ...4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
College of Agriculture Economics
Requirement (Choose one)..................................3-4
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and
Resource Economics ................................. 4
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics...3
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3
Upper Division Requirements
BCH 3025 Fundamentals of Biochemistry.....4
AGG 4932 PC Use in Agriculture ..............3.
CHM 3200, CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry
and lab .......................... ............. ..................
DIE 4125C Food Service Management ............3
DIE 4224 Clinical Nutrition Applications....4
DIE 4244C Nutrition and Disease .................3.
FOS 3042 Introductory Food Science.............3
FOS 4222 Food Microbiology ......................4.
FOS 4311C Food Chemistry or
FOS 4321C Food Analysis.................................4


HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human
N utrition........................ ............. ................
HUN 3221 Nutrition and Metabolism.............3
HUN 4934 Current Issues in Nutrition
and Dietetics.................................... ............. 1
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
PET 3320 Applied Human Anatomy ............3
PET 3350C Applied Human Physiology .........3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent ................................. ......6... .
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3.
Approved Electives' ......................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
SElectives may be chosen from specified
courses in the following areas: chemistry,
education, exercise science, health science
education, marketing, management or statis-
tics.

NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES SPECIALIZATION
The nutritional sciences specialization offers
a background in the biological and chemical sci-

ences, and prepares students for graduate study
and research in nutritional sciences and related
fields. The specialization is approved as a pre-
professional curriculum for medical, dental or
other professional health schools.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Composition ............................................ ...6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behaviorial Sciences, including..........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics, ECO 2013 Principles of
Macroeconomics, or ECO 2023 Principles
of Microeconomics.....................................3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences........................24
CHM 2045, CHM2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L General Chemistry and Lab..............8
PHY 3053, PHY 3055L, PHY 3054, PHY
3056L Physics and Lab ..................................8
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab ......................8
M mathematics .................................... ....... 7
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
Upper Division Requirements
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology or BCH 3025
Fundamentals of Biochemistry ........................4
CHM 3210, CHM 3211, CHM 3211L Organic
Chemistry and Lab ....................................8
DIE 4224 Clinical Nutrition Applications ....4
DIE 4244C Nutrition and Disease or
HUN 6245 Advanced Human Nutrition........3
FOS 3042 Introductory Food Science.............3
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human
Nutrition........... .......... ......................... 3


HUN 3221 Nutrition and Metabolism.............3
HUN 4934 Current Issues in Nutrition and
Dietetics..................................... ..................
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms.5
PCB 3063 Genetics, MCB 4303 Genetics of
Micro-organisms, or AGR 3303 Genetics ...3-4
PCB 4723C Animal Physiology ......................4
ZOO 3713C Functional Vertebrate Anatomy ...4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... .............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3
Approved Electives'.................. Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested Electives: analytical chemistry,
computer science, physical chemistry.

MINOR
A minor in food science and human nutri-
tion is offered by the Department of Food
Science and Human Nutrition. A minor con-
sists of a minimum of 15 semester hours and is
open to all students at the university. Each stu-
dent must submit to his/her academic adviser a
proposed minor and specify the courses for the
minor at least two semesters prior to gradua-
tion. The proposal for one of the above areas
must be approved by the student's adviser and
the undergraduate coordinator in Food Science
and Human Nutrition.


Forest Resources and Conservation
Majors are offered in forest resources and
conservation and in natural resource conserva-
tion. Refer to the School of Forest Resources
and Conservation section in this catalog for cur-
ricula requirements.


Horticultural Science
Students majoring in horticultural science
may choose one of five specializations: general
horticultural science, environmental horticul-
ture, fruit crops, vegetable crops or horticultural
operations management. An academic adviser
will be assigned to assist in developing a pro-
gram of course work.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
All Specializations


Credits


Com position ..................... ...... ..................
Literature and Arts.............................. ..............
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6
International Studies and Diversity .................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences..............14-15






COLLEGES


CHM 2045, CHM2045L General
Chemistry and Lab ........................................ 4
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab .................................... ............... 3
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L Integrated Principles
of Biology and Lab or
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany .................3-4
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity...............................4
Mathematics, including....................................... 6
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra
and Trigonom etry..........................................4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent................................................. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3.
Upper Division Requirements
The following core and specialization
requirements must total a minimum of 64 cred-
its.
Horticultural Science Core Requirements
All Specializations Credits
Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics............................................ 3
BCH 3023 Organic and Biological
Chem istry ...........................................................3
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ..............3
HOS 3013C General Horticulture......................4
HOS 4304 Horticultural Physiology ...............5
ORH 3513 Environmental Plant
Identification I.................................................... 3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology .4
SOS 3022', SOS 3022L' General Soils and Lab.. 4
SMeets general education requirements.

GENERAL HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE
SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed for students
who wish to complete a generalized program in
horticulture. Students must complete the fol-
lowing in addition to the horticultural science
core requirements:
General Horticultural Science
Specialization Requirements
Credits
PLS 3221, PLS 3221L Plant Propagation and
Lab ............................................................... 3
Select at least one course from each of the
following specializations:
Environmental Horticulture, Fruit Crops,
and Vegetable Crops (See adviser)..................9-12
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

ENVIRONMENTAL HORTICULTURE
SPECIALIZATION
Students in this specialization study the
improvement of the human environment
through proper selection, propagation, produc-
tion and placement of plants in the exterior and
interior landscapes. The industry which consti-
tutes production and utilization of environmen-


tal plants is the fastest growing segment of agri-
culture and has enormous potential for contin-
ued expansion. Students must complete the fol-
lowing in addition to the horticultural science
core requirements:
Environmental Horticulture Specialization
Requirements
Required for nursery management and landscape
horticulture, floriculture and foliage production, and
turfgrass production and maintenance options
Credits
PLS 3221, PLS 3221L Plant Propagation
and Lab........................................ ................ 3
ORH 4253C Nursery Operations
Management...........................................3
Select two courses from the following five courses:
(Credits 7-8)
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture............................4
ORH 4235C Landscape Practices and
Arboriculture............ .......... ............... 3
ORH 4263C Production of Floriculture Crops.4
ORH 4275C Commercial Production of
Foliage Plants......................................... .. 4
PLS 4242C Micropropagation of Horticultural
Crops...................... .............. ................ 4
Select a minimum of three credit hours from
options listed above (3-5 Credits)
Approved Electives
(Selected with an adviser)..................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

Nursery Management and
Landscape Horticulture Option
Nursery management includes the produc-
tion, storage and marketing of environmental
plants. Landscape horticulture involves plant-
ing and maintenance of trees, shrubs, vines and
turf. Students in this option should select
approved electives from the following: (See
adviser) Credits
Credits
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
ORH 3514C Environmental Plant
Identification II...................................................3
ORH 3815C Introduction to Landscape
H orticulture .................................... ............... 3
ORH 4905 Independent Study in
Environmental Horticulture.........................1-5
ORH 4932 Special Topics in Environmental
Horticulture............................................. 1-4
ORH 4941 Full-time Work Experience in
Environmental Horticulture......................1-3
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M anagement................................ ............... 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility...........3

Floriculture and Foliage Production Option
This option focuses on the growing, han-
dling, shipping and sale of cut flowers and pot-
ted flowering and foliage plants through whole-
sale commission florists and flower and other


retail shops. Students in this option should
select approved electives from the following:
(See adviser)
Credits
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
ORH 3514C Environmental Plant
Identification II.............. ......................... 3
ORH 3611 Retail Florist Shop and Garden
Center Management .......................................... 3
ORH 4280 Orchidology.......................... ..3
ORH 4905 Independent Study of
Environmental Horticulture.........................1-5
ORH 4932 Special Topics in Environmental
Horticulture....................................................1-4
ORH 4941 Full-time Work Experience in
Environmental Horticulture.........................1-3
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
SM anagem ent.................................... ............. 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility...........3

Turfgrass Production and Maintenance Option
This option covers the commercial produc-
tion of turfgrass for sod and maintenance of
grass lawns, golf courses, recreational and sport
areas. Students in this option should select
approved electives from the following: (See
adviser) Credits
Credits
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology ..............3
ORH 4905 Independent Study of
Environmental Horticulture.........................1-5
ORH 4932 Special Topics in Environmental
Horticulture....................................................1-4
ORH 4941 Full-time Work Experience in
Environmental Horticulture.........................1-3
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
Management...........................................3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers afid Soil Fertility...........3

Urban Horticulture
Students in this option study the selection,
planting, maintenance, management and ecolog-
ical associations of plants in the urban environ-
ment. Urban horticulture involves amelioration
of the ecosystem in the cities by enhancement of
quality and quantity of the plants in parks, road-
ways and industrial areas as well as natural
ecosystems, in accordance with comprehensive
plans. This specific option is a joint program
with the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation. The environmental horticulture
specialization requirements for the other options
are replaced with the following:

Urban Horticulture Option Requirements
Credits
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture...........................4
ORH 4235C Landscape Practices and
Arboriculture.............................. ............... 3
ORH 4253C Nursery Operations
M anagem ent................................ ............... 3
FOR 3153C Forest Ecology..............................3
FNR 3131C Dendrology/Forest Plants.............4






AGRICULTURE


Select a minimum of 6 credit hours
from the following:
ORH 3514C Environmental Plant
Identification II...................................................3
ORH 3815C Introduction to Landscape
H orticulture.................................... ............. 3
ORH 4905 Independent Study of
Environmental Horticulture......................1-5
ORH 4932 Special Topics in
Environmental Horticulture.........................1-4
ORH 4941 Full-time Practical Work
Experience in Environmental
Horticulture....................................................1-3
Approved Electives
(See adviser)...................................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

FRUIT CROPS SPECIALIZATION
The fruit crops specialization offers a com-
prehensive program for students planning
careers in citrus and other fruit industries. Job
opportunities in production management, agri-
cultural sales and technical representation, and
extension are available to graduates. Students
specializing in fruit crops must complete the fol-
lowing courses in addition to the horticultural
science core requirements.
Fruit Crops Specialization Requirements
Credits
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture......4
FRC 3252 Tropical and Subtropical Fruits....2
FRC 3272 Small Fruits....................................2.
FRC 3283 Deciduous Tree Fruit Culture.......3
FRC 4223 Citrus Production.........................3
HOS 4933 Horticultural Production
Managers' Seminar.....................................1
Approved Electives
(See adviser)...... ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

VEGETABLE CROPS SPECIALIZATION
The vegetable crops specialty is designed to
give students a foundation in the principles of
vegetable production and marketing. This will
prepare students for primary employment in
any phase of the specialized vegetable industry.
Students must complete the following courses
in addition to the horticultural science core
requirements.
Vegetable Crops Specialization Requirements
Credits
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
M management .......................................... ............ 3
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
HOS 4080C Principles of Postharvest
H orticulture.................................... ............. 3
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................. 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
Management ................................. ...... 3
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables......................... .............. 4


VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables.............................. ............3
Approved Electives
(See adviser)...... ..........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

HORTICULTURAL OPERATIONS
MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION
This specialization is designed to provide
students with technical and business manage-
ment skills required for careers in horticultural
production management and technical sales and
product support. Emphasis is on the applica-
tion of technology and management principles
to improve production, processing and market-
ing of horticultural crops. Students are required
to take all of the horticultural science core
requirements with the exception of AGR 3303
(Genetics). Additionally, students must com-
plete the following courses:
Horticultural Operations
Management Requirements Credits
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management...........................................3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
Select a minimum of nine credit hours from
the following commodity courses:
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture......4
FRC 3252 Tropical and Subtropical Fruits....2
FRC 3272 Small Fruits................................... 2
FRC 3283 Deciduous Tree Fruit Culture.......3
FRC 4223 Citrus Production.........................3
HOS 4080C Principles of Postharvest
H orticulture.................................... .............. 3
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture.........................4
ORH 4235C Landscape Practices and
Arboriculture.................................... ............. 3
ORH 4253C Nursery Operations
Management...........................................3
ORH 4263C Production of Floricultural
Crops........................... ......................... 4
ORH 4275C Commercial Production of
Foliage Plants......................................... .. 4
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of
Warm Season Vegetables..................................4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables..............................................3
Select a minimum of 12 credit hours from the
following management and business courses:
ACG 2021 Introduction to Financial
Accounting................................... ............... 3
ACG 2071 Introduction to Managerial
Accounting.........................................................2
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3144 Introduction to Agricultural
Finance........................... ............. ................
AEB 3300 Agricultural and Food
M marketing ..................................... ...... 3
AEB 3341 Strategic Selling and the Technical
Interface in Agribusiness or
AOM 4342 Sales and Service..........................
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural Resource
and Environmental Economics.....................3.


AEB 3550 Agricultural Data Analysis in
Food and Resource Economics .....................2
AEB 4124 Legal Issues in Agriculture............1
AGG 4444 Agricultural and Natural
Resource Ethics .................................................. 3
AOM3073 Safety in Agriculture ......................2
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality ..................................3
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida........3
MAN4201 Principles of Organization.............3
MAN4310 Problems in Personnel
M anagem ent....................................................4
Approved Electives
(See adviser)............................... Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE MINOR
Students in all disciplines at the university
are allowed to minor in horticulture science by
completing the following requirements. Some
background courses in botany or plant sciences
are assumed and recommended. Students are
required to take a minimum of 15 credit hours.
Minor Requirements Credits
Credits
HOS 3013C General Horticulture...................4
ORH 3513 Environmental Plant
Identification I................................................ 3
Required electives to be selected
with adviser guidance based
on commodity interest within the
five specializations of horticultural
science (HOS, ORH, FRC, VEC, or
PLS courses)................................ ............... 8


Human Resource Development
(Interdisciplinary Studies Major)
The Interdisciplinary Studies human
resource development major provides the gen-
eral and technical education necessary for grad-
uates to enter a career in human resource devel-
opment. This field offers employment opportu-
nities in community and human services,
including public, private, nonprofit and
for-profit organizations. The human resource
development (HRD) major prepares students to
deal with complex problems in human and
community services. It provides the student
with a foundation knowledge of: (a) individual
and family development and functioning in the
community and societal context; (b) contempo-
rary problems facing youth, families and com-
munities; and (c) organizational policies and
programs designed to alleviate the concerns.
The development of knowledge and interven-
tion skills that enable professionals to assist
youth, families and communities in meeting
their needs is also emphasized, including: inter-
personal communication; program planning,
management and administration; social policy;
applied research and evaluation; and commu-
nity-based education. Students interested in
pursuing this major should consult the
Coordinator's Office, 3041 McCarty, for referral
to appropriate adviser.







COLLEGES


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements Credits
Composition ......................................... ............... 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity
(See upper division requirements)..................... 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including
(See upper division requirements) .........................6.
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences..................10-13
CHM 1020, CHM 1021 Chemistry and Society
or PHY 2020 Introduction to Physics......3-6
BSC 2005, BSC 2005L, BSC 2006 Biological
Sciences and Lab ............................................ 7
M them atics ...........................................................7
MAC 1142 Precalculus: College Algebra
and Trigonometry...................................... 4
STA 3133 or STA 3023 Introduction to
Statistics........................ ........... ................ 3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ..................................... ...... 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural
and Natural Resources (or equivalent) .....3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent).............3.
Upper Division Requirements
The student must earn a "C" or better in each class
required for upper division admission and have an
overall 2.25 GPA Cre
Credits
AEB 4284 Human Resources Policy...............2
AEE 4500 Program Planning and
Evaluation of Human Resource Programs.....3
AGG 3480 Introduction to Human
Resource Development..................................4.
AGG 3482 Introduction to Social and
Economic Perspectives on the Community ...3
AGG 3483 Foundations of Youth
Development .................................... ............. 3
AGG 4484 Contemporary Family Problems
and Interventions ............................................... 3
AGG 4485 Urban and Rural America in
Transaction .........................................................3
AGG 4486 Contemporary Youth Problems
and Solutions.................................... ............. 3
SDS 4410 Interpersonal Communication
Skills or SOP 3004 Social Psychology..............3
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
PSY 2013' General Psychology .....................3
SYA 4300 Methods of Social Research ..........3
SYG 20001 Principles of Sociology .............3.
SYG 24301 Marriage and Family2 .....................3
Practicum in Human Resources
Development..................................................4-6
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Students should choose electives in areas
of interest related to family, youth and
community.
SMeet general education requirements.
2 Dual listed in the Department of Sociology
and the College of Agriculture. Special sec-
tions will be taught by College of Agricul-
ture faculty for human resource develop-
ment students.


Microbiology and Cell Science
The curriculum is designed to develop fun-
damental knowledge of bacteria, plant and ani-
mal cells and viruses. It provides a background
for pursuing graduate work in microbiology,
cell biology or biochemistry as well as other
areas of agricultural sciences. It also provides a
background necessary for work in research or
diagnostic laboratories, both governmental and
industrial. The curriculum also provides a
background for entry into the professions of
denistry, medicine and veterinary medicine.
Honors: To qualify for graduation with
honors, high honors or highest honors, a stu-
dent must have an upper division grade point
average of 3.50, 3.75, and 3.85, respectively. (For
purposes of honors, UF upper division courses
are defined as all courses taken at this univer-
sity after the student has earned 64 credits,
wherever taken.) In addition to a minimum
GPA requirement, a candidate for high honors
or highest honors must obtain grades of B or
better in at least four credits of MCB 4905 and in
one of the following courses: MCB 4303L, MCB
5458 or PCB 5136L. A thesis which describes
the results of the research must be written in sci-
entific style and submitted to the faculty
research supervisor and to the undergraduate
coordinator during the last week of the semes-
ter. For students who are candidates for high or
highest honors in the College of Agriculture, a
copy of the thesis must be submitted to the col-
lege office at 2002 McCarty Hall at least three
days before graduation. The final decision on
the honor distinction that the student receives is
determined by the performance in MCB 4905
and an evaluation of the quality of the thesis.
Entry into the honors program requires prior
agreement between the student and the pro-
posed research supervisor. The research will be
supervised by a faculty member in the depart-
ment. A research project that is microbiology or
cell biology in nature may be supervised by a
faculty member not in the department. For this
option, a one-page description of the proposed
undergraduate research must be submitted to
the undergraduate coordinator for approval
prior to registering in MCB 4905 and initiating
the research project.


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position .................................... ............... 6
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behaviorial Sciences, including.........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences'.......................24
CHM 2045, CHM2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L General Chemistry and Lab..............8
CHM 3210, CHM 3211, CHM 3211L
Organic Chemistry........................................ 8
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Principles of Biology and Lab .................8.


Mathematics, including....................... ............. 6
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 1.................................... ............... 4
Must have completed organic chemistry
prior to admission or must register for CHM
3210 during first semester as upper division
student.
Upper Division Requirements
BCH 4024 or CHM 4207 Introduction to
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology..............4
CHM 3120, CHM 3120L Analytical Chemistry
and Lab .................................... ............. 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms.5
MCB 4303 Genetics of Microorganisms..........3
MCB 4403 Prokaryotic Cell Structure and
Function.......................... .. ..... .... 3
PCB 5235 Immunology ................................3....
PHY 3053, PHY 3055L, PHY 3054, PHY 3056L
Physics and Lab..................................... ..10
Departmental Electives
(Including one laboratory course beyond
M CB 3020C) .................................... .............. 7
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... .............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural
and Natural Resources (or equivalent).....3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent).............3
Approved Electives ........................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation

Natural Resource Conservation
The natural resource conservation major is
co-administered by the Department of Wildlife
Ecology and Conservation and the School of
Forest Resources and Conservation. This major
provides an opportunity for students to develop
a personalized program in natural resource con-
servation. Programs of study may range from
the very focused and specific to broad and
multi-disciplinary. Each student prepares
his/her program in consultation with an adviser
in his/her area of interest. Consult the under-
graduate coordinator in Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation for specific degree requirements.

Plant Pathology
The curricula for plant pathology is offered
through the plant science major. Students inter-
ested in the options under the plant pathology
specialization should contact the undergraduate
coordinator early in their academic careers.

Plant Science
Plant science is a diverse major offered by
the departments of Agronomy, Entomology and
Nematology and Plant Pathology. Various spe-
cializations are available. Students are encour-
aged to select the appropriate specialization to
prepare for specific career objectives. Potential
careers for plant science majors are many,
including various aspects of production agricul-








ture, agribusiness sales and marketing, private
consulting in crop production and plant protec-
tion, environmental policy and regulation, inter-
national agriculture, and field or laboratory
technical support, as well as preparation for
graduate school. Students should meet with the
undergraduate coordinators) in one or more of
the aforementioned departments as early as
possible in their academic career.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
All Specializations Credits
Composition .................................... ............ 6
Literature and Arts .............................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..................6
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and
Resource Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences ..................11
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L General Chemistry
and Lab .........................................................4
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab ................................... ....... 4
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany ..................3.
M mathematics .............................................6-7
MAC 1142 Pre-calculus: College Algebra
and Trigonometry................................... 4
One course in computer skills, statistics, or
calculus .................................... .............. 3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement6
AEE 3033 Agricultural Writing or
ENC 2213 Technical Writing and
Business Commmunication, or
ENC 3310 Advanced Exposition, or
ENC 3312 Advanced Argumentative
Writing, or
ENC 4260 Advanced Professional
Writing,
MCC 2100 Writing for Mass
Communications.................... ............... 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication or SPC 2600
Introduction to Public Speaking or
SPC 3602 Advanced Public Speaking .............3
Upper Division Requirements
Plant Science Core Requirements
All Specializations
AGR 3005' Introduction to Agronomy ............3
AGR 3303' Genetics....................................3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and
Biological Chemistry ......................................... 4
SOS 3022,' SOS 3022L' General Soils and Lab.4
' Meet general education requirements.

AGRONOMY SPECIALIZATION
This specialization will provide students
with an understanding and appreciation of the
scientific fundamentals and applied principles
associated with production and improvement of
agronomic crops. Field and forage crops pro-
vide the major food and fiber requirements for
the world's population and are becoming
increasingly important in soil conservation and


sustainability, energy production and environ-
mental issues. There are four different options
offered under this specialization, the choice of
which is dependent on the career choice of the
individual student.
Science and Technology Option
This option is designed for the student who
is interested in a technical career or preparing to
attend graduate school. It emphasizes the basic
sciences.


Option Requirements


Credits


AGR 3931C Seminar in Plant Science
Inform ation.................................... .............. 1
AGR 4210' Field Crop Science ......................3
AGR 4231' Forage Science and Range
M anagem ent................................ ............... 4
BOT 2011C'Plant Diversity.................................4
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy..............3
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introductory Plant
Physiology and Lab........................................... 6
CHM 2046, CHM 2046L General Chemistry
and Qualitative Analysis and Lab...................4
CHM 3200, CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry
and Lab........................................ ................ 4
BCH 3025 Fundamentals of Biochemistry.....4
Suggested Electives
(Select from the following or
see adviser for approval.)............Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding.............................3
AGR 4614C Seed Technology........................3
AGR 4905 Problems in Agronomy..............1-3
AGR 4941 Work Experience in Agronomy.1-3
AGR 5307 Molecular Genetics for Crop
Improvement..........................................
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality .....................................3
ENY 3005C'Principles of Entomology ..............3
MAC 3233' Survey of Calculus 1 ....................3.
MAC 3234' Survey of Calculus 2....................3
MCB 3020C' Basic Biology of Microorganisms..5
MCB 4303, MCB 4303L Genetics of
Microorganisms and Lab.................................5
NEM 3002' Principles of Nematology ..............3
PCB 3043,' PCB 3043L' Introduction to
Ecology and Lab..................................... ..4
PLP 3002C' Fundamentals of Plant
Pathology ..................................... .............. 4
PLS 3221, PLS 3221L Plant Propagation and
Lab ............................. .......................... 3
PLS 4242 Micropropagation of
Horticultural Crops ....................................4
PLS 4601 Weed Science.......................... .3
STA 3023' Introduction to Statistics 1 .............3
STA 3024' Introduction to Statistics 2.............3
' Meet general education requirements.

Crop Production and Management Option
This option is designed for the student who
is interested in crop management, consulting
and agro-product sales. It emphasizes applied
crop production and pest management.
Students completing the curriculum will be
qualified for national and international job
opportunities.


AGRICULTURE


Option Requirements
AGR 3931C Seminar in Plant Science
Inform ation .........................................................1
AGR 4210' Field Crop Science ..........................3
AGR 4214 Applied Field Crop Production....2
AGR 4231C'Forage Science and Range
Management.................................. .......4
BOT 2011C'Plant Diversity................................4
PLS 4601 Weed Science...................................3
SOS 4115' Fertilizers and Soil Fertility...........3
Two of the following three courses: (6-7 Credits)
ENY 3005C'Principles of Entomology ..............3
NEM 3002' Principles of Nematology ..............3
PLP 30020 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology.4
Approved Electives
(Select from the following or
see adviser for approval.) ...............Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AGR 3001' Environment, Food and Society ...3
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding.................................3
AGR 4905 Problems in Agronomy..............1-3
AGR 4941 Work Experience in Agronomy 1-3
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality .....................................3
AOM 3734 Irrigation Practices in Florida.......3
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introduction to
Plant Physiology and Lab...............................6
PCB 3043, PCB 3043L Introduction to
Ecology and Lab'................................... ...4
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
Management...........................................3
PMA 4570C Field Techniques in IPM ................2
VEC 3100 Introduction to World's
Vegetables.................................. ................ 2
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of
Warm Season Vegetables..................................4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables......................... .............. 3
SMeet general education requirements.

Agronomic Enterprise Management Option
This option is designed for the student who
is interested in managing agricultural enter-
prises. It emphasizes the integration of crop
production with personnel management, eco-
nomics and agricultural policy.
Option Requirements
Credits
AGR 3931C Seminar in Plant Science
Inform ation.................................... ..............
AGR 4210' Field Crop Science .......................3
AGR 4231' Forage Science and Range
Management................... ................4
ACG 2021 Introduction to Financial
Accounting.........................................................3
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture..........3
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
M anagem ent...................................................
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agricultural and
Environmental Quality ..................................3
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity.................................4
MAN3021 Principles of Management.............3
Suggested Electives






COLLEGES


(Select from the following or
see adviser for approval.)............ Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AGR 3001' Environment, Food and Society.. 3
AGR 4214 Applied Field Crop Production....2
AGR 4905 Problems in Agronomy............. 1-3
AEB 3341 Strategic Selling and the
Technical Interface in Agribusiness ................3
AEB 3424 Human Resource Management
in Agribusiness.............................................. 2
AGG 4444 Agricultural and Natural
Resource Ethics.................................................. 3
ENY 3005C'Principles of Entomology ..............3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing.................3
NEM 3002' Principles of Nematology ..............3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant
Pathology ..................................... .............. 4
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................3.
Foreign language.................................Minimum 6

Cropping Systems and Environmental
Quality Option
This curriculum is designed for the student
who is interested in the interrelationships
between the environment and agricultural pro-
duction. It emphasizes ecological impacts of
agricultural practices and responsible use of
resources.
Option Requirements
Credits
AGG 2501 Agriculture in the Environment...2
AGR 3001' Environment, Food and Society ...3
AGR 4214 Applied Field Crop Production....2
AGR 3931C Seminar in Plant Science
Inform ation.................................... .............
ENV 3000' Environmental Science and
Hum anity .................................... ............... 3
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................3.
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
Management............ ............ ............... 3
SOS 3215C' Agriculture and Environmental
Quality.................. ............... ................ 3
SOS 4115' Fertilizers and Soil Fertility...........3
SOS 4242 Wetlands ......................................3
Suggested Electives
(Select from the following or
see an adviser for approval.) ........Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AGR 4210' Field Crop Science .......................3.
AGR 4231' Forage Science and Range
M anagem ent......................................................2
AGR 4905 Problems in Agronomy..............1-3
AGR 4941 Work Experience in Agronomy.1-3
AGE 3212C Soil and Water Conservation
Engineering........ ..... ... .....4
AGG 4932 Sustainable Agriculture ............3.
AOM3333 Pesticide Application .....................3
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introduction to Plant
Physiology and Lab ........................................... 6
EES 3008' Energy and Environment ..............3
EES 4241C'Introduction to Water Analysis ....3
ENY 3005C' Principles of Entomology ..............3


FRC 3283 Deciduous Fruit Culture................3
NEM 3002' Principles of Nematology ..............3
PCB 3043, PCB 3043L Introduction to
Ecology and Lab.............................. ............ 4
PLP 3002C'Fundamentals of Plant Pathology..4
SOS 4231C Soils and Land Use ......................3.
SOS 4404 Soil Chemistry.............................. 3
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables.............................................4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables..............................................3
Meet general education requirements.

PLANT PATHOLOGY SPECIALIZATION
The specialization in plant pathology
enables students to learn to diagnose plant dis-
eases, to identify the microbes and the environ-
mental factors that cause disease in plants, and
to study the molecular and genetic principles
governing infection and development of plant
disease and disease epidemics. It further
enables students to work in laboratory and field
settings and to develop and prescribe environ-
mentally safe methods and materials for avoid-
ing or treating plant diseases in agricultural and
urban environments.
Plant Pathology Specialization Requirements
Credits
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introductory Plant
Physiology and Lab........................................... 6
ENY 3005C' Principles of Entomology ..............3
MCB 2000C' Microbiology ...................................4
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology..4
PLP 3103C Plant Disease Control..................3.
PLP 3653C Introductory Mycology..................4
PLP 4931 Seminar in Plant Pathology...........1
At least 9 credits from the following:
BOT 2011C'Plant Diversity..............................4
PCB 3043,' PCB 3043L' Introduction to
Ecology and Lab.................................................4
PLP 3151 Biocontrol of Plant Diseases
and W eeds..................................... ...... 3
PLP 4222C Introductory Plant Virology..........4
PLP 4242C Introduction to Plant
Bacteriology .................................. ....... 3
PLP 4260C Introduction to Plant Pathogenic
Fungi ........................................... ................ 4
PLP 4290C Principles of Plant Disease
Diagnosis .................................... ............... 2
PLP 4905 Problems in Intermediate Plant
Pathology .......................................................1-4
Select one of the options.......................................... 16
' Meet general education requirements.

Biotechnology Option
This option is designed for students who
plan to enter graduate school or to work in
research laboratories of biotechnological firms,
universities or government agencies.
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology .................................4.
MCB 3020C' Basic Biology of Microorganisms...5
PLS 4242 Micropropagation of Horticultural
C rops........................ .... ......................................4


Approved Electives
(Select from the following or
see adviser for approval.)............ Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding..............................3
AGR 5307 Molecular Genetics for Crop
Improvement ............................... ........ ..
AGG 5932 Principles of Genetics ..................3
MCB 4303, MCB 4303L Genetics of
Microorganisms and Lab..................................5
PLP 6303, PLP 6303L Molecular Plant
Pathology and Lab......................................... 4
STA 3023' Introduction to Statistics 1.............3
STA 3024' Introduction to Statistics 2.............3
' Meet general education requirements.

Agricultural Technology Option
This option prepares students to work for
commodity, seed and agrichemical industries
that diagnose and recommend or test for plant
diseases. This option also prepares students to
work as private practitioners and to enter grad-
uate school.
Credits
NEM 3002' Principles of Nematology ..............3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M anagem ent .................................... ............. 3
Approved Electives
(Select from the following or
see adviser for approval) ..............Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management...........................................3
AGR 3001' Environment, Food and Society ...3
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application......................3
PMA 4570C Field Techniques in IPM................2
PLP 6404 Epidemiology of Plant Disease.....4
PLS 4601 Weed Science.................................3
' Meet general education requirements.

PLANT PROTECTION SPECIALIZATION
Students in the plant protection specializa-
tion will receive instruction in related pest sci-
ence areas: entomology, nematology, plant
pathology and weed science. Emphasis is
placed on understanding the crop/plant ecosys-
tem and the need for managing pests. The cur-
riculum focuses on theory and application of
biological, chemical and integrated manage-
ment programs compatible with maintaining a
quality environment.
Students who complete the requirements for
the plant protection specialization will find
employment opportunities in agribusiness or
governmental agencies concerned with pest
management, crop production and environmen-
tal protection. Moreover, successful completion
of the specialization will place the student an
excellent competitive position for graduate
study.






AGRICULTURE


Plant Protection Specialization Requirements
Credits
AGR 4214 Applied Field Crop Production....2
BOT 2011C'Plant Diversity.........................4.
BOT 3503, BOT 3503L Introductory Plant
Physiology and Lab ................... ... 6
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ..............3
ENY 4161 Insect Classification........................3
NEM 30021 Principles of Nematology ..............3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant
Pathology .................... ..................... 4
PLP 3103C Plant Disease Control.................3.
PLS 4601 Weed Science................................3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest
M anagem ent.................................... ............ 3
PMA 4570C Field Techniques in Pest
M anagement.................................. ............. 2
Approved Electives
(Select from the following or
see adviser for approval) ................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
AEB 3133 Principles of Agribusiness
Management............................ ....... 3
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding.............................. 3
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application......... ...3
AOM 3503/SOS 3215C Agriculture and
Environmental Quality ..................................3.
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management 3
BOT 3143C Local Flora.............................. 3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture..... 4
MCB 2000C'Microbiology .................................. 4
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture........................... 4
ORH 3513C Ornamental Plant Identification I..3
ORH 3514C Ornamental Plant
Identification II...................................................3
PCB 3043,' PCB 3043L' Introduction to
Ecology and Lab.................................................4
PLP 3151 Biocontrol of Plant Disease and
W eeds ..........................................3
PLP 3653C Introductory Mycology..................4
PLP 4222C Introductory Plant Virology..........4
PLP 4242C Introduction to Plant
Bacteriology ........................................................3
PLP 4260C Introduction of Plant Pathogenic
Fungi................................. ..... .... 4
PLP 4290C Principles of Plant Disease
Diagnosis ........................................ 2
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation ...........................3
SOS 41151 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility........... 3
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables................. ............. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables................ ..............3
WIS 3401C'Wildlife Ecology and
Management....... .................... .. 3
Meet general education requirements.

AGRONOMY MINOR
Undergraduates whose majors not plant
science can obtain a minor in agronomy. This
program is under the direction of advisers in the
agronomy department and requires a minimum
of 15 credits. Interested students are encour-
aged to consult agronomy advisers early in their
academic career.


Minor Requirements
Credits
AGR 3005 Introduction to Agronomy ................3
Select two of the following six courses (5-8 Credits)
AGR 4210' Field Crop Science ..........................3
AGR 4231C' Forage Science and Range
Management..................... ....4
AGR 4614C Seed Technology.............................3
AGR 4214 Applied Field Crop Production ....2
AGR 5277C Tropical Crops ................................ 3
SOS 3022,' SOS 3022L' General Soils and Lab...4
Select one of the following three courses:
AGR 3303 Genetics.................... ........................3
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding................................3
AGG 5932 Principles of Genetics .................1-4
Select one of the following three courses
AGR 5266C Field Plot Technique.......................3
PLS 4601 W eed Science ................................. 3
PLS 5652 Herbicide Technology................... 3

Poultry Science
(See Animal Sciences)
Students desiring to prepare for employ-
ment in the poultry industry should major in
animal sciences with the poultry option of the
industry specialization. For efficient completion
of required courses and for selection of appro-
priate electives, students should consult an
adviser in the Department of Dairy and Poultry
Sciences.

Preveterinary Medicine Program
Students who intend to pursue a Doctor of
Veterinary Medicine may elect any major. The
majors within the College of Agriculture that
have specializations that will prepare a student
for admission to the College of Veterinary
Medicine are animal sciences, entomology and
nematology, food science and human nutrition,
microbiology and cell sciences, and wildlife
ecology and conservation. Students who pur-
sue another major must complete the necessary
preprofessional courses as part of their acade-
mic program. To be eligible to apply for admis-
sion to the College of Veterinary Medicine, the
following courses must be completed with no
grade less than C.
Credits
Humanities ...................... .....................9
Social and Behavioral Sciences ............................ 6
Composition (ENC 1101, ENC 1102) ...............6
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab......8
MCB 3020C Microbiology.................................... 5
AGR 3303 or PCB 3063 Genetics ....................3-4
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046, CHM
2046L Chemistry and Lab ...................... 8-11
CHM 3210, CHM 2I11, CHM 3211L Organic
Chemistry andLab............ ................................8
BCH 4024 or CHM 4207 Introduction to
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology..............4
PHY 3053, PHY 3055L, PHY 3054, PHY 3056L
Physics and Lab ............... ..............................10


MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus...4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics................3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition.....4
Preveterinary students should consult the
College of Agriculture's designated preveteri-
nary counselor.


Soil and Water Science
Students who desire a major in soil and
water science must complete core requirements
that stress fundamentals of science as applied to
the study of soil and water. Electives, constitut-
ing over a third of the student's upper division
requirements, are selected within a specializa-
tion emphasizing a particular aspect of soil and
water science. The specializations are soil,
water, and land use ( with accent on natural
resources and the environment); environmental
soil and water management (with accent on
agricultural and other applied aspects of soil
and water science); physical sciences (with
accent on chemistry, physics and mathematics);
and biological sciences (with accent on microbi-
ology, botany and/or other biological sciences).
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements Credits
Com position ............................. ... ................
Literature and Arts ................................................ 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6
International Studies and Diversity ................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including...........6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences................19-20
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Lab...8
PHY 2004, PHY 2004L, Applied Physics
and Lab ................................... ...... ..4
Select one of the following biological sequences:
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab.......8
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany and BOT
2011C Plant Diversity..................................... 7
Mathematics
(See upper division requirements)...........................6
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 1 .................................... ............... 4
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirement ................. ................... 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural, and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) ............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ............3
Upper Division Requirements
All Specializations Credits
CHM 3120, CHM 3120L Introduction to
Analytical Chemistry and Lab ..... ...4
MCB 2000C Microbiology...............................
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 2 ................................. ....... .4
PHY 2005, PHY 2005L Applied Physics 2
and Lab..........................................






COLLEGES


SOS 3022, SOS 3022L General Soils and Lab...4
SOS 4404 Soil Chemistry..............................3.
SOS 4602C Soil Physics ...................................3.
SOS 4715C Environmental Pedology...............3
Select at least one of the following four courses:
SOS 3215C Agriculture and Environmental
Q quality .............................................................
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility...........3
SOS 4242 Wetlands and Water Quality ........3
SOS 5303C Soil Microbial Ecology ...................3
Capstone experience, i.e., senior thesis or similar
project, involving one or both of the following
two courses: (2-3 Credits)
SOS 4905 Individual Work......................... 1-3
SOS 4941 Full Time Practical Work
Experience in Soil and Water Science.........1-3
Specialization Electives
(Selected from within one of ..........Balance of 128
the four specializations listed credit hours
below. See adviser for list of necessary for
appropriate electives) graduation

Electives are chosen in consultation with the
student's adviser. Specific areas of specializa-
tion are soil, water, and land use; environmental
soil and water management; physical sciences;
and biological sciences. The student is encour-
aged to take electives from a range of course
groupings. These groupings vary depending on
specialization, but include biology, building
construction, chemistry, earth science, environ-
mental science, hydrology, mathematics,
physics, policy, production systems, program-
ming and statistics.
It is not intended that the areas of specializa-
tion in the soil and water science major be
restricted to the four given above; other areas of
specialization may be developed.


Statistics
A major in statistics is offered through the
College of Agriculture and the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students planning to
major in statistics should have a strong interest
in mathematics and some interest in computing.
A student majoring in statistics can also work
toward a minor in actuarial science. Students
should consult the undergraduate coordinator
for curriculum.
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements
Credits
Com position .................................... .............. 6
Literature and Arts ...............................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, including........... 6
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
Economics or
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics....3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences.................10-13
CHM 1020, CHM 1021 Chemistry and Society
or PHY 2020 Introduction to Physics......3-6
BSC 2005 or BSC 2006, BSC 2005L Biological
Sciences and Lab............................................ 4
M them atics ...........................................................8


MAC 3311, MAC 3312 Analytical Geometry
and Calculus'..................................................8
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... .............. 6
AEE 3033 Writing for Agricultural and
Natural Resources (or equivalent) .............3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication (or equivalent) ................3
SWith an overall average of at least 2.5 in a
combined total of, at most, three attempts
(including the grade of W).

Upper Division Requirements
The courses STA 4210-11 must be taken in
sequence. STA 4212 may be taken before or
after STA 4210-11. It is recommended that STA
4321-22 be completed by the time that the stu-
dent finishes his/her junior year. The three-
course sequence, MAC 3472-74 (Honors
Calculus 1-3) may be substituted for MAC
3311-13.
The student must receive a grade of C, or
better, within two attempts (including with-
drawals) in every required core course and in
every course counted toward the 12-hour elec-
tive requirement. The grades from all attempts
to satisfy the core requirements will be used to
compute a core GPA that must exceed 2.0. In
addition, the student must maintain an overall
GPA of at least 2.0 in all attempts to satisfy the
core and elective requirements.
No undergraduate statistics majors may take
any statistics course at the 3000-level or below
after admission to the major. Also, students
may not retake any core or elective courses) in
which a grade of C+ or better has already been
earned.
Of the 42 credits that are required for the
bachelor's degree, at least 18 credits must have
been earned with a grade of C or better while
the student was enrolled at the University of
Florida. At least 12 of the 15 STA credits in the
core requirement must be included in this
18-hour requirement.
Credits
MAC 3313' Analytical Geometry and
C alculus 3 ......................................................... 4
MAS 3113' Matrices and Vector Spaces or
MAS 3114' Computational Linear Algebra
or MAS 4105' Linear Algebra.......................3-4
STA 4210' Regression Analysis and
STA 4211' Design of Experiments
(taken as a sequence) .....................................6
STA 4212' Nonparametric and Categorical
Data M ethods .................................................. 3
STA 4321', STA 4322' Mathematical Statistics...6
Select two courses from the following four courses:
(6 Credits)
STA 4173 Biostatistics ......................................3
STA 4222 Sample Survey Design ...................3
STA 4664 Industrial Statistics ......................3.
STA 4821 Stochastic Procees ........................3
Select one course from the following six courses:
(3 Credits)
CIS 3020 Introduction to CIS......................3.
CGS 3420 Computer Programming: Fortran.3


CGS 3422, CGS 3422L Computer
Programming for Engineers and Lab .............3
CGS 3462 Introduction to Computing for
N onm ajors................................... ................ 3
COP 3203 FORTRAN for CIS Majors.............3
COP 4350 Introduction to APL....................3
Select one course from the following seven courses:
(3 Credits)
COT 3500 Computation Numerical
A nalysis........................................ ............... 3
ESI 4312 Operations Research 1....................3
MAA 4102 Introduction to Advanced
Calculus for Engineers 1 ................................3
MAA4211 Advanced Calculus 1......................3
MAD 4401 Introduction to Numerical
A nalysis....................................... ................ 3
MAS 4105 Linear Algebra 1 (if not in core)......3
MAS 4106 Linear Algebra 2..........................3
Electives
(excluding courses with.............Balance of 128
STA designation) ...........................credit hours
necessary for
graduation
1 Department core course, student must
receive a grade of C, or better, within two
attempts (including withdrawals)

MINOR IN STATISTICS
A minimum of 15 hours (5 courses) of
4000-level statistics courses are required of all
students desiring a minor in statistics. Of these,
no more than 3 hours may be transfer credits.
All statistics minors are required to complete
STA 4210 and STA 4211. Each statistics minor
whose major requires the completion of MAC
3311-13 is required to complete STA 4321-22.
In addition, all students minoring in statistics
are required to complete all 4000-level statistics
courses with a grade of C or higher, take no
courses counting toward the minor on an S/U
basis and count no individual study courses
toward the minor.


Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
The department offers a major in wildlife
ecology and conservation with three areas of
specialization: wildlife resources; preprofes-
sional; and biology education. The department
also co-administers a major in natural resource
conservation with the School of Forest
Resources and Conservation.

WILDLIFE RESOURCES SPECIALIZATION
The wildlife resources specialization is the
main option of the wildlife ecology and conser-
vation major. It is designed to enable graduates
to qualify for certification as associate wildlife
biologists by The Wildlife Society and for entry-
level professional employment or graduate edu-
cation. The objective of the wildlife resources
specialization is to educate students in the bio-
logical, social, physical and management sci-
ences enabling them to excel at both scientific
and human dimensions of managing wildlife
and related natural resources.






AGRICULTURE


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements Credits
Credits
Composition .......................................... ............... 6
Literature and the Arts.......................................... 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..................6
International Studies and Diversity ....................6
Social and Behavioral Sciences .........................6-7
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics or
AEB 3103 Principles of Resource Economics 3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences ..................15-17
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L General
Chemistry and Lab ........................................ 4
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011,BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab...8
And select one course from the following:
GEO 2200 & GEO 2200L Physical Geography
and Lab ..................................... ............... 4
GLY 2010C Physical Geology........................4.
GLY 2030C Environmental Geology ...............4
PHY 2004 & PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab ..................................... ............... 4
PHY 2020 Introduction to Principles of
Physics ..................................... ............. 3
PHY 3053 & PHY 3055L Physics 1 and Lab ...5
SOS 3022 & SOS 3022L General Soils and Lab4
M them atics ..................................... ............... 9
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 ...................3.
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics 1 ..............3
CGS 3531 Introduction to Computer
Softw are.................................... ............... 3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... ............. 6
ENC 3250 Professional Communication or
ENC 3310 Advanced Exposition or
ENC 3312 Advanced Argumentative
Writing 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral
Communication or
SPC 2600 Introduction to Public Speaking ......3


Upper Division Requirements
Wildlife Ecology Core


Credits


PCB 3043C Introduction to Ecology or
PCB 4044C General Ecology........................4
PCB 3063 Genetics.................... ........................4
WIS 3401C Wildlife Ecology and
M management ............................... ....... .3
WIS 4443C Wetland Wildlife Resources..........3
WIS 4541C Terrestrial Wildlife Resources.......3
WIS 4554 Conservation Biology....................3
WIS 4934 Topics for Wildlife Ecology
and Conservation..........................................
Wildlife Resources Requirements
A. All the following courses:
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy ..............3
FAS 4305C Introduction to Fishery Science ....3
FNR 3131C Dendrology/Forest Plants.............3
FNR 3410C Natural Resource Sampling ..........3
FNR 4660C Natural Resource Policy and
Administration...................................................3
ZOO 3203C Invertebrate Zoology or
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology.........3-4
ZOO 3303C Vertebrate Zoology.........................3
ZOO 4473C Avian Biology or
ZOO 5486C Mammalogy................ 3


B. Select two of the following courses:
AEB 3450 Introduction to Natural Resource
and Environmental Economics........................3
AGG 4444 Agriculture and Natural
Resource Ethics............................ .............. 3
PUP 3204 Politics and Ecology .......................3
PHM 3032 Ethics and Ecology........................
PHI 2403 Science, Myth and Values..............3
POT 3503 Environmental Ethics and Politics.3
Electives............................................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested electives:
ANT 4403 Environmental and Cultural
Behavior ..........................................................3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding .................................... .............. 3
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity...............................4
BOT 3143C Local Flora.............................. 3
BOT 3303C Introductory Vascular Plant
M orphology ................................ ....... 3
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ..............3
FNR 4623C Integrated Natural Resource
M anagem ent ................................. ............ 3
FNR 5335 Agroforestry ..............................3
FNR 5563 Simulation of Ecological Models..3
FOR 3153C Forest Ecology.............................3
FOR 3162C Silviculture................................4
GEO 4124C Air Photo Interpretation................4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms.5
PCB 4745C Animal Physiology.........................5
PCB 4674 Evolution....................................... 3
STA 3024 Introduction to Statistics 2.............3
STA 4212 Nonparametric and Categorical
Data M ethods................................................. 3
WIS 4945C Wildlife Techniques........................2
WIS 5323C Impact of Disease on Wildlife
Populations.................................... .............. 3
WIS 4905,4934,4941,4949 (all individual
study or special topics) .................................. 1-3
ZOO 3513C Animal Behavior ...........................4.
ZOO 4233 Animal Parasitology...................3.

PREPROFESSIONAL SPECIALIZATION
The preprofessional specialization satisfies
the course work requirements for admission to
the program leading to the degree of Doctor of
Veterinary Medicine. Requirements for certifica-
tion as an associate wildlife biologist by The
Wildlife Society can be met by the completion of
additional courses (see below).
General Education and
Lower Division Requirements Credits
Com position .................................... ............... 6
Literature and the Arts.......................................... 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............6.
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavior Sciences ............................6-7
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics or
AEB 3103 Principles of Forest Resource
Economics......... .............. ........3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences.......................16
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L, CHM 2046,
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Q
and Qualitative Analysis Lab .....................8


BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab...8
Mathematics ............................................. ....10
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 1................................. ............. 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ................3
CGS 3531 Introduction to Computer
Software...................................... .......3
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... ............. 6
ENC 3250 Professional Communication or
ENC 3310 Advanced Exposition or
ENC 3312 Advanced Argumentative
W writing .................................... .............. 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication or
SPC 2600 Introduction to Public Speaking.....3
Upper Division Requirements


Wildlife Ecology Core


Credits


PCB 3043C Introduction to Ecology or
PCB 4044C General Ecology..........................4
PCB 3063 Genetics............................................ 4
WIS 3401C Wildlife Ecology and
M anagem ent .......................................................3
WIS 4443C Wetland Wildlife Resources ..........3
WIS 4541C Terrestrial Wildlife Resources.......3
WIS 4554 Conservation Biology .....................3
WIS 4934 Topics for Wildlife Ecology
and Conservation.......................................... 1
Preprofessional Requirements
A. All the following:
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding ........................................................3
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms ..5
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry.................
CHM 3211 & CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry
and Lab........................................ ................ 4
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology.............................4
PHY 3053 & PHY 3055L Physics 1 and Lab......5
PHY 3054 & PHY 3056L Physics 2 and Lab......5
Electives............................................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested electives:
Students also seeking eligibility for certifica-
tion as an associate wildlife biologist by The
Wildlife Society should select six courses,
including: FAS 4305C; FNR 4660C; AGG 4444
or PUP 3204; ZOO 4473C or ZOO 5486C; and
two of the following: BOT 2011C; BOT 2710;
BOT 3143C; BOT 3303C; FNR 3131C; FNR 5335;
FOR 3162C.

AGG 4444 Agriculture and Natural
Resource Ethics ..................................................3
ANT 4403 Environmental and Cultural
Behavior ........................... ................. .. 3
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity.................................4
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy..............3
BOT 3143C Local Flora........................................ 3
BOT 3303C Introductory Vascular Plant
M orphology................................. .... 3
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ..............3
FAS 4305C Introduction to Fishery Science ....3






COLLEGES


FNR 3131C Dendrology/Forest Plants.............4
FNR 3410C Natural Resource Sampling ..........4
FNR 4623C Integrated Natural Resource
Management......................................... 3
FNR 4660C Natural Resource Policy
and Administration ...................................3
FNR 5335 Agroforestry ....................................3
FNR 5563 Simulation of Ecological Models..3
FOR 3153C Forest Ecology.............................3
FOR 3162C Silviculture................ ....... 4
PCB 4745C Animal Physiology .........................
PCB 4674 Evolution................................. 3
PUP 3204 Politics and Ecology ....................3.
STA 3024 Introduction to Statistics 2............3
STA 4212 Nonparametric and Categorical
Data M ethods.................................................. 4
WIS 4945C Wildlife Techniques.......................2
WIS 5323C Impact of Disease on
Wildlife Populations............................... ..3
WIS 4905,4934,4941,4949 (all individual
study or special topics) .................................. 1-3
ZOO 3203C Invertebrate Zoology...................4.
ZOO 3303C Vertebrate Zoology......................4.
ZOO 3513C Animal Behavior ..........................4.
ZOO 4233 Animal Parasitology...................3.
ZOO 4473C Avian Biology .......................... 4
ZOO 5486C Mammalogy....................................4

BIOLOGY EDUCATION SPECIALIZATION
The biology education specialization out-
lined below completes the requirements for a
Bachelor of Science with a major in wildlife ecol-
ogy and conservation with a minor in secondary
education, and satisfies the subject matter
requirements for biological science education
certification. Certification is completed by com-
bining the Bachelor of Science from this pro-
gram with a Master of Education. (Refer to the
admission requirements in Graduate Catalog.)


General Education and
Lower Division Requirements


Credits


Com position .................................... ......6
Literature and the Arts ......................................... 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies ..................6
International Studies and Diversity .................6.
Social and Behavioral Sciences .........................6-7
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics or
AEB 3103 Principles of Resource
Economics................................. ......3-4
Physical and Biological Sciences ..................15-17
CHM 2045, CHM 2045L General
Chemistry and Lab ........................................ 4
BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
Integrated Principles of Biology and Lab...8
Select one course from the following:
GEO 2200 & GEO 2200L Physical
Geography and Lab....................................4
GLY 2010C Physical Geology...........................4
GLY 2030C Environmental Geology ...............4
PHY 2004 & PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab ..................................... ...... 3
PHY 2020 Introduction to Principles
of Physics .................................... ............... 3
SOS 3022 & SOS 3022L General Soils
and Lab .................................... ............... 4


M mathematics ..................................... ...... 8
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 ...................3.
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ............3.
EME 3402 Introduction to Instructional
Com puting.............................. .............. 2
College of Agriculture Communication
Requirem ent .................................... ............... 6
ENC 3250 Professional Communication or
ENC 3310 Advanced Exposition or
ENC 3250 Advanced Argumentative
W writing .................................... .............. 3
AEE 3030C Effective Oral Communication or
SPC 2600 Introduction to Public Speaking.....3
Upper Division Requirements


Wildlife Ecology Core


Credits


PCB 3043C Introduction to Ecology or
PCB 4044C General Ecology ...........................4
PCB 3063 Genetics ...........................................4
WIS 3401C Wildlife Ecology & Management .3
WIS 4443C Wetland Wildlife Resources ..........3
WIS 4541C Terrestrial Wildlife Resources.......3
WIS 4554 Conservation Biology .....................3
WIS 4934 Topics for Wildlife Ecology
& Conservation ..................................................
Upper Division Requirements
A. All the following:
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity................................4
ZOO 3203C Invertebrate Zoology...................3.
ZOO 3303C Vertebrate Zoology......................3.
BSC 3096 Human Physiology or
PCB 4723C Animal Physiology ..................3-5
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms ..5
EDF 3609 Sociological and Historical
Foundations of Education ...............................4
EDF 3214 Learning and Cognition in
Education ..................................... ...... 2
Chemistry (One of the following)
CHM 3200 & CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry
and Lab or BCH 3023 Elementary Organic
and Biological Chemistry or BCH 3025
Fundamentals of Biochemistry .....................4.
Physics (One of the two sequences)
PHY 2004 & PHY 2004L Applied Physics 1
and Lab.................................. ........ ...... 4
PHY 2005 & PHY 2005L Applied Physics 2
and Lab.................................. ........ ...... 4
or
PHY 3053 & PHY 3055L Physics 1 and Lab......5
PHY 3054 & PHY 3056L Physics 2 and Lab......5
B. To Complete Minor in Secondary Education
EDF 3135 The Adolescent................................3
EDF 3433 Introduction to Educational
Measurement and Evaluation.........................2
EEX 3070 The Exceptional Child in the
Mainstream of Education ................................2
Electives............................................Balance of 128
credit hours
necessary for
graduation
Suggested electives:
Students also seeking eligibility for certifica-
tion as an associate wildlife biologist by The
Wildlife Society require 19 credits of specified
courses. See a departmental adviser for options.


AGG 4444 Agriculture and Natural
Resource Ethics.................................................. 3
ANT 4403 Environment and Cultural
Behavior ...................................................... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ....4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding .................................... ............... 3
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy..............3
BOT 3143C Local Flora........................................ 3
BOT 3303C Introductory Vascular Plant
Morphology................................... .......3
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ..............4
FAS 4305C Introduction to Fishery Science ....3
FNR 3131C Dendrology/Forest Plants.............4
FNR 3410C Natural Resource Sampling ..........4
FNR 4623C Integrated Natural Resource
Management.................................. .......3
FNR 4660 Natural Resource Policy and
Adm inistration................................................ 3
FNR 5335 Agroforestry ..................................3
FNR 5563 Simulation of Ecological Models..3
FOR 3153C Forest Ecology ...............................3
FOR 3162C Silviculture......................................4
GEO 4124C Air Photo Interpretation ................3
PCB 4745C Animal Physiology.........................5
PCB 4674 Evolution...................................... 3
PUP 3204 Politics and Ecology .......................3
STA 3024 Introduction to Statistics 2.............3
STA 4212 Nonparametric and Categorical
Data M ethods..................................................... 3
WIS 4945C Wildlife Techniques........................2
WIS 5323C The Impact of Disease on
W wildlife Populations........................ ............. 3
WIS 4905,4934,4941,4949 (all individual
study or special topics) .................................. 1-3
ZOO 3513C Animal Behavior..........................3
ZOO 4233 Animal Parasitology.......................3
ZOO 4473C Avian Biology..................................4
ZOO 5486C Mammalogy.....................................4

MINOR IN WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND
CONSERVATION
Students seeking a minor in wildlife ecology
and conservation should contact the depart-
ment's Student Services Office and submit an
application at least two semesters prior to their
graduation. The minor must include a mini-
mum total of 15 credits and include the follow-
ing courses:
Minor Requirements'
Credits
FNR 3131C Dendrology/Forest Plants.............4
FNR 3410C Natural Resource Sampling..........4
WIS 3401C Wildlife Ecology and
M anagem ent.................................... ............ 3
Two additional WIS courses, 3000 level or
higher................................................................4-6

Prerequisites must be satisfied.








College of Architecture
The College of Architecture provides educa-
tion, research and service for the built and nat-
ural environments of Florida, the nation and the
world. Established as a school in 1925, the col-
lege has grown to be one of the largest design,
planning and construction institutions in the
country. A unique aspect of the college is the
scope of its professional disciplines which, at the
undergraduate level, include architecture, build-
ing construction, interior design and landscape
architecture. Graduate programs are available
through the Department of Urban and Regional
Planning, the M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building
Construction, the Department of Architecture
and the Department of Landscape Architecture.
The college offers a Ph.D. program with concen-
trations in architecture, urban and regional plan-
ning, and building construction.
The college's teaching, research and commu-
nity service philosophy recognizes the interde-
pendence of these professional disciplines. A
number of required and elective courses are
open, on a space-available basis, to all majors
(e.g., ARC 1211, 1701; BCN 1210, 4012, 4237,
4464, 4471; IND 2100, 2130; LAA 1920, 2710,
4935; URP 3001, 4000). In addition, the first one
and one-half years of design course work are
common to the three undergraduate design dis-
ciplines (architecture, landscape architecture and
interior design). Research and service projects
conducted through the research centers and
institutes (described below) often entail multidis-
.ciplinary, cross-campus student input and effort.
The Architecture and Fine Arts Library and
the Visual Resources Center are the largest col-
lections of their kind in the Southeast. Together
they provide books, government documents,
American and foreign periodicals, subject files,
microtext, slides, photographs, reproductions
and other materials for undergraduate and grad-
uate studies. The AFA Library also maintains its
own Rare Book Collection for scholarly research.
Services include a professional reference service
ready to assist in guidance and searches for
information. Students may use additional
resources in the university libraries system.
Students considering application to the
College of Architecture should anticipate, as
part of their budget planning, expenditures for
travel, equipment and tools essential to their
education as design, planning or construction
professionals. For further information in this
regard, students should contact the appropriate
department/school.
The Departments of Architecture and
Landscape Architecture and the M.E. Rinker Sr.
School of Building Construction each have cele-
brated over fifty years of service to the citizens
of Florida.
Student Aid
Students interested in part-time employ-
ment, assistantships, fellowships, loans, prizes
and awards are referred to both individual
departments and information provided by the
university's Office for Student Financial Affairs
in Criser Hall.


Research Centers
The college contributes to community, state,
regional and national efforts to conserve and
improve the quality of the natural and built
environments through research projects
directed by the Florida Architecture and
Building Research Council (FABRIC); the
Research and Education Center for Architec-
tural Presevation (RECAP); the Center for
Tropical and Subtropical Architecture, Planning
and Construction (TROPARC); the Geofacilities
Planning and Information Center (GEOPLAN);
the Center for Architectural Technology
Research (ARCHTECH); the Center for
Community Redevelopment (CCR); Center for
Construction and Environment; Center for Fire
Testing and Research; Center for Construction
Safety and Loss Control; and the Shimberg
Center for Affordable Housing. The college has
established research and training programs of
national and international prominence such as
the Preservation Institute: Nantucket, the
Vicenza Institute of Architecture: Italy and the
Preservation Institute: Caribbean. The latter pro-
gram is part of the college's mission to develop
teaching, research and service programs with
institutions in the Caribbean Basin and Latin
America. The college's new education and
research center is in Miami Beach, adjacent to
the Art Deco Historic District.

Student Organizations
Student Government and student organiza-
tions take an active part in the educational
program of the college. Membership in the
professional organizations of each discipline is
available to students. Student chapters of the
American Institute of Architecture Students, the
American Society of Interior Designers, Institute
of Business Designers, the UF chapter of the
American Society of Landscape Architects, the
Student Planning Association, the UF Student
Chapters of the American Association of Cost
Engineers, the American Institute of
Constructors, the Construction Management
Association of America, the Associated Builders
and Contractors, the Student Contractors and
Builders Association, and Alpha Rho Chi are all
represented. Honorary societies of Tau Sigma
Delta, Sigma Lambda Alpha, Sigma Lambda Chi
and the Gargoyle Society also are represented in
addition to the National Organization of Minor-
ity Architects and the National Association of
Minority Contractors. The college recognizes the
importance of student involvement and encour-
ages and assists participation with professional
groups and societies.

Requirements For Admission
Listed herein are the specific requirements
for admission to this college. It should be under-
stood that admission to the college is selective.
Because it cannot guarantee admission automat-


ically to all applicants who satisfy minimum
requirements, the college has established a
selective admission process. Priority in admis-
sion shall be given to those applicants who, in
the judgment of the appropriate departmental/
school's admissions committee, have the great-
est apparent potential for successful completion
of the program.
To be eligible for consideration for admis-
sion to the college, the student must have
reached junior status and taken the College
Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST; see the
Index). Additionally, all students must have
completed two sequential courses of foreign
language in secondary school or 8-10 semester
hours at the postsecondary level, or document
an equivalent level of proficiency. Students
admitted to the university at less than junior
status are assigned to the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences, lower division, not the College of
Architecture nor the School of Building
Construction. Design students cannot be guar-
anteed space in the preprofessional architecture
courses nor eventual admission to the college.
Students admitted as juniors to colleges other
than the College of Architecture have no prior-
ity for preprofessional or professional courses
and may be considered for enrollment on a
space-available basis, after priority College of
Architecture students have been served.
Admission of students having junior status
falls into two categories: 1) those having com-
pleted all lower division requirements and pre-
pared to study at the third-year professional
course work level and 2) those needing to com-
plete freshman/sophomore preprofessional
courses. Generally, transfer students from uni-
versities or community colleges that do not offer
approved preprofessional programs or courses
required at the University of Florida find them-
selves in the latter category. These students may
require up-to-four semesters at the University of
Florida to complete this work due to the
sequential nature of the courses.
An admissions review process is employed
for all applicants who have completed the pre-
professional requirements. Criteria used in
review by each of the departments/school may
include any or all of the following:
* Quality of work completed, overall GPA.
* Achievements in preprofessional courses
and/or courses related to the student's cho-
sen plan of study.
Pattern of courses completed.
Portfolio review or pin-up (design students).
Benchmark standards for the admission into
the upper division of each department/school
within the college have been established. The
standards relate to progress made at the end of
30, 45 and 60 credit hours. These standards
include GPA requirements and achievement
attained in specific course work as related to the
students' chosen path of study. These advise-
ment standards for the college are listed in each
department's/school's curriculum section.






COLLEGES


Curriculum in Architecture: Through an admis-
sions committee, the Department of
Architecture annually selects students to
enter third-year professional studies. All
students who satisfactorily complete the
two-year preprofessional programs at
University of Florida, Miami-Dade,
Broward, St. Petersburg (Clearwater) and
Hillsborough community colleges are eligi-
ble for consideration for third-year admis-
sion. Applications for transfer from one of
the approved preprofessional programs or
from the lower division of the UF College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences must be filed
by the deadline listed in the university cal-
endar (see Table of Contents). Transfer stu-
dents with provisional admission status
(3AR, 4AR, 5AR or 6AR) must notify the
department office of their wish to be con-
sidered for third-year admission by the
same date.
Curriculum in Interior Design: Transfer students
must consult the program adviser. Students
needing to complete lower division prepro-
fessional requirements are urged to apply
for the summer term for the sequence of
architectural design, building arts and
architectural history. The remaining prepro-
fessional courses may be completed during
the next academic year. Students accepted
for the sequence shall be admitted as provi-
sional students and their records shall be
reviewed for approval to enter the profes-
sional courses in the junior year during the
spring of the next year. Students are admit-
ted selectively to the upper division pro-
gram on the basis of portfolio review, over-
all grade point average, interview and letter
of application. Notification of the decision
of the admissions committee shall be made
prior to the close of the spring semester for
the junior class which begins the following
fall. Contact the department for current
information.
Curriculum in Landscape Architecture: Transfer
and postbaccalaureate students contemplat-
ing the professional degree program must
contact the department to determine admis-
sion timing and eligibility. Students in the
predesign programs at Miami-Dade,
Broward, St. Petersburg and Hillsborough
community colleges must contact the
department regarding preprofessional
courses not available at those colleges. All
students must complete all required general
education and preprofessional course work
prior to admission to professional studies.
Criteria for admission include review of
design performance, transcript, letter and
interview.

Curriculum in Building Construction: See the M.E.
Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
section of this catalog.


Application Deadlines
The programs in architecture, interior design
and landscape architecture will admit students
for third-year professional course work in the
fall semester only. Students needing to complete
some or all of the lower division requirements
shall be reviewed for the fall, spring or summer
semesters. Applications for fall, including all
required credentials, must be received by the
Office of the University Registrar (for transfer
students) or the dean's office (for UF students)
as follows: Architecture February 15; Interior
Design-June 9; and Landscape Architecture -
May 11. The application deadlines for these
departments for spring and summer are given
as stated in the university calendar (see Table of
Contents). Applicants unable to meet these
deadlines may apply on a space-available basis.
The M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building
Construction will admit students for third-year
professional course work in the fall and spring
semesters only. Deadlines for completion of all
application procedures and receipt of official
credentials are March 1 for fall and September 1
for spring admission.

Advisement
Students planning to major in any program
of study in the College of Architecture should
see the proper department chair, program
director, adviser or the assistant dean as soon
as possible.

General Regulations

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOADS
Fifteen-to-eighteen credits in any regular
semester shall be considered a normal load. A
student may be permitted to register for more
than eighteen hours when, in the opinion of the
adviser, the quality of the student's record justi-
fies this. Twelve credit hours is the minimum to
be considered a full-time student; students who
wish to take less than this should be aware that
certain university privileges and benefits
require full-time status. It is the student's
responsibility to verify the minimum academic
load necessary for these benefits.
Students who wish to ask for adjustments in
their academic load may petition the dean
through the Director of Student Services and the
appropriate department chair.

NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
Students must maintain a minimum grade
point average of 2.0 (C average). However,
achieving this minimum does not guarantee
enrollment in the preprofessional and profes-
sional courses. Additionally, these courses must
be taken in a sequence as specified by the school
or department adviser. This sequence, along
with all course requirements, is outlined in this
section of the catalog.


While the preprofessonal and professional
course sequence must be maintained, variation
from the listed positioning of general education
and elective course work may occur. The four-
year plan shown requires an average of more
than sixteen credits per term, which may not be
appropriate for all students. Students are urged
to plan their curricula well in advance, so that
course sequence and credit-hour loads will
accommodate the most effective academic
progress, regardless of the number of terms
required.

DEAN'S LIST
Undergraduate students who demonstrate
excellence in their academic work by complet-
ing a minimum of 12 credits in a semester and
achieving a grade point average of 3.7 or better
will earn a position on the Dean's List. Students
whose term averages are below 3.7 due to
grades of I* or N* are not eligible.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To be eligible for graduation, the student
must earn a minimum grade point average of
2.0 (C) for all work attempted in the appropriate
curriculum while classified in the college.
Courses taken while enrolled in another upper
division college may not apply toward the cal-
culation of the College of Architecture average.
Specific grade requirements for the various cur-
ricula may be obtained from those offices.
Students planning to enter the Graduate
School must maintain a 3.0 (B) average in upper
division work.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
The faculty will consider recommending stu-
dents for graduation with honors, high honors
or highest honors on the following criteria: (a)
grade point average, (b) distribution and quality
of subject matter studied, (c) evaluation of the
students by the faculty, and (d) other pertinent
qualities of his or her work. The student will be
considered for honors, high honors or highest
honors upon earning a minimum academic
average established by the department or
school. The average will be calculated on all
work attempted while the student is classified
in professional studies. Transfer credits will be
excluded from the average; honors, high honors
or highest honors may be awarded upon a mini-
mum of 48 semester hour credits taken at the
University of Florida. For high or highest hon-
ors, a thesis, research project or other creative
work also is required. Students should consult
their academic unit for minimum average
required.
Eligibility for graduation with honors:
Students who became juniors (a classification 3)
in Fall 1991 or later are eligible for the honors
designations established in the 1991-92 and fol-
lowing catalogs. Students who achieved junior
status prior to Fall 1991 follow the honors desig-
nations in the 1990-91 catalog.








STUDENT WORK
The college reserves the right to retain stu-
dent work for the purpose of record, exhibition
or instruction. Work produced while the stu-
dent is enrolled in the College of Architecture is
the property of the college. Adequate documen-
tation will be made available to students whose
work is retained.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
Students are urged to obtain before gradua-
tion some experience in the employment of
practicing professionals in their particular field
or in some allied work which will give an
insight into the problems of professional prac-
tice. Such employment provides an introduction
to the methods of actual practice and enables
the student to derive increased benefit from
advanced work in school. Students should con-
tact their faculty adviser for recommended or
required practical experience best suited to their
individual needs.

FIELD TRIPS
Each year a number of field trips-are
arranged to give students an opportunity to
broaden and extend their educational experi-
ence through study of planning, design and
construction projects of unusual interest.
Students frequently combine such studies with
attendance at state and national meetings of the
professional organizations in their respective
fields. Students should consult their depart-
ments for field trip requirements. Students
considering application to the College of
Architecture should anticipate, as part of their
budget planning, expenditures for field trips,
equipment and tools essential to their education
as design, planning or construction profession-
als. For further information, students should
contact the appropriate department/school.

COMPUTER POLICY
Personal computer design, graphic and
operational competence is an essential compo-
nent of the contemporary professional environ-
ment. Appropriate related computer skills are
now required for most entry-level opportunities
in each of the professional disciplines within the
college. Course content increasingly relies on
student computer skills and access to comput-
ers. While university computer facilities are
widespread, the demands on these facilities are
significant. Therefore, it is strongly recom-
mended that all students purchase, lease or oth-
erwise obtain continuing access to a personal
computer. Each academic unit maintains infor-
mation concerning computer hardware and
software appropriate to its discipline and cur-
riculum.


Curriculum in Architecture
R.S. McCarter, Chairman
The professional program in architecture
leads to the Master of Architecture and, for stu-
dents without a baccalaureate degree in another
discipline, requires both undergraduate and
graduate study. Successful completion of the
undergraduate curriculum results in the grant-
ing of the Bachelor of Design (Architecture), a
non-professional degree. Admission into the
graduate program is selective and information
regarding the criteria for admission is contained
in the Graduate Catalog.
In addition to the courses offered at the
Gainesville campus, the department operates a
year-round program in Vicenza, Italy, for
fourth-year students who are selected to spend
either the fall or spring semester abroad.
Supplemental fees are required for participation
in this program. Summer institutes are con-
ducted on Nantucket Island for the study of
architectural preservation and in the Caribbean
Basin for the study of Caribbean culture and its
conservation. Information on these institutes
may be obtained from the department office.

LIMITED ACCESS PROGRAM
All students (community college transfers
and UF students) must apply for admission to
the upper division Bachelor of Design (Archi-
tecture) program. The number of applicants
who can be accepted into upper division is lim-
ited by available classroom space, studio space
and faculty. The admission process is based on
three criteria: overall lower division grade point
average, architectural grade point average and
an exhibit score based on an evaluation of each
student's pin-up of studio work (1-10 scale). For
the past several years, the average for each crite-
ria has been as follows: overall grade point aver-
age 3.1, architectural grade point average 3.4
and exhibit score 5.5. Students who have not
completed all lower division requirements suc-
cessfully will not be guaranteed admission.
Community college transfers must have com-
pleted the Associate of Arts degree. Students
with an overall grade point average below 2.5,
an architectural grade point average below 2.75
or a pin-up exhibit score below 3.0 will not be
guaranteed admission. It is the department's
policy to admit the best-qualified applicants as
evidenced by their academic achievement and
their potential to complete successfully the
undergraduate program.
The program of study is included below to
show a typical sequence in which courses are
taken. Some courses in the first two years are
offered in semesters in addition to those shown.
Consult the course description section in this
catalog for precise information on offerings.
Registration for lower division courses also may
be limited by available space and faculty
resources; students are accepted based on proce-
dures established by the department.
(A letter designation after any architecture
course listed below indicates what general edu-
cation category that particular course fulfills.)


ARCHITECTURE


FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 1301 Architectural Design 1.....................4
ARC 1211 The Building Arts (H)...................3
Physical/Biological Science..................................3
Literature and the Arts..................................3.
Total Semester Credits 13
Semester 2
ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2..................4
ARC 1701 Architectural History (H,I).............3
* Social Sciences ...................................................3
* Com position ........................................................3
Applied Physics .................................... ............. 3
Required for the Bachelor of Design degree only. -
Total Semester Credits 16
SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3.................5....
ARC 2201 Architectural Theory I (H) ..............3
* CGS 3470 Introduction to Computers
for Architecture Majors (M) ............................3
Required for the Bachelor of Design degree only.
Coreq: ARC 2303 or ARC 2304.
* Com position.................................... .............
* MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I......................3
Required for the Bachelor of Design degree only.-
Total Semester Credits 17
Semester 2
ARC 2304 Architectural Design 4....................5
ARC 2501 Architectural Structures 1.................4
ARC 2461 Materials and Methods
of Construction 1 .................................................. 3
*Literature and the Arts ........................................3
Physical/Biological Sciences............................... 3
Total Semester Credits 18
* The university-wide general education
requirement is described in the Lower
Division section of this catalog. Students are
advised to elect courses satisfying this
requirement early in their university career
and to consult the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences as to the specific courses satisfying
the requirements of the State Board of
Education Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule).

THIRD YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 3320 Architectural Design 5.......................6
ARC 3502 Architectural Structures 2 ............4
ARC 3463 Materials and Methods 1 .............3
* General Education (UF students) .................3**
***Electives (Community college students).......3
Total Semester Credits 16
Semester 2
ARC 3321 Architectural Design 6....................6
ARC 3610 Environmental Technology 1 ............3
ARC 3783 Architectural History 2 (I) ............3
Electives .......................................................... 3
Total Semester Credits 15
FOURTH YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 4322 Architectural Design 7.......................6
ARC 4620 Environmental Technology 2............3
ARC 4220 Architectural Theory 2....................3
Electives.................... ................... .....6
Total Semester Credits 18






COLLEGES
r T


Semester 2
ARC 4323 Architectural Design 8 ..................6
****ARC 6281 Professional Practice
or Elective .................................... .............. 3
** Electives.......................................
Total Semester Credits 18
** Three general education credits (excluding
Gordon Rule courses) may be taken in upper
division. UF students will need 21 credits of
electives.
** Students transferring into the program at the
third-year level from an architecture pro-
gram at a Florida community college will
need 24 credits of electives.
***Suggested elective. Not required for gradua-
tion.
The department requires students to follow
the general education requirements for the
Associate of Arts certificate as specified by the
University of Florida. The number of hours in
each category is listed in the table below. For
more information, and a list of specific courses
that will satisfy the general education require-
ments, consult the Schedule of Courses.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Credits
C Composition 6
L Literature and the Arts 6
H Historical and Philosophical Studies 6
I International Studies and Diversity 6
S Social Sciences 6
M Mathematical Sciences 6
P/B Physical/Biological Sciences 9
(The physical/biological sciences require-
ments must be met by taking 6 credits in one
area and 3 in the other area.)

ADVISEMENT STANDARDS
Completed by end of 30 Hours
Course Requirements;
Completed ARC 1211 (3 hours)*
Completed ARC 1301 (4 hours)
Completed ARC 1302 (4 hours)
Completed ARC 1701 (3 hours)* t
Completed PHY 2004 (3 hours)*
Completed remainder of credit hours in
general education and Gordon Rule courses
Grade Point Average Requirements:
2.90 preprofessional grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
2.75 overall grade point average
(2.00 minimum for continuance)
Completed by end of 45 Hours
In addition to the 30-hour requirements:
Course Requirements:
Completed ARC 2201 (3 hours)*
Completed ARC 2303 (5 hours)
Completed CGS 3470 (3 hours)*t
Completed MAC 3233 (3 hours)* t
Completed remainder of credit hours in
general education and Gordon Rule courses


Grade Point Average Requirements:
2.90 preprofessional grade point average
(2.30 minimum for continuance)
2.75 overall grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
Completed by end of 60 Hours
In addition to the 45-hour requirements:
Course Requirements:
Completed ARC 2304 (5 hours)
Completed ARC 2461 (3 hours)
Completed ARC 2501 (4 hours)
Completed remainder of credit hours in
general education courses
Completed Gordon Rule requirements
Grade Point Average Requirements:
3.00 preprofessional grade point average
(2.50 minimum for continuance)
2.85 overall grade point average
(2.30 minimum for continuance)
Upper Division Exhibit requirement:
Satisfactory completion and exhibit of
design work
Normal total credit hours at the end of 4 semes-
ters is 64
Meets general education requirement
t Meets Gordon Rule requirement
GRADUATING WITH HONORS
Honors designations for graduation in archi-
tecture are calculated on all courses in the pro-
fessional curriculum resulting in the following
GPAs: honors (3.3), high honors (3.6) and high-
est honors (3.65). In addition, for high and high-
est honors, the faculty evaluation of the final
fourth-year design project is required.
EXPENSES
A week-long field trip is required of all
junior- and senior-level students; students
should plan to have adequate funds available.
Supplemental fees also are required for partici-
pation in the Vicenza (VIA) program. It may be
necessary to assess studio fees to defray increas-
ing costs of base maps and other materials.


Curriculum in Interior Design
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design
J. L. Nielson, Chairman
The four-year program in interior design is
accredited by the Foundation for Interior Design
Education Research (FIDER). The curriculum
leads to the first professional degree and is an
essential first step toward professional registra-
tion in the state of Florida, other states and the
Canadian provinces regulating the use of the title
"Interior Designer" or the practice of interior
design.
The design process is studied and applied
creatively to resolve problems of interior envi-
ronments. The interior design faculty seek to
equip the student with a knowledge of design
techniques, materials, resources and an aware-
ness of the interrelated professional responsibil-
ity of interior environmental design problems.


Field trips are required in upper division.
Students should plan to have adequate funds for
field trips and design studio project materials.
Internships are recommended in the summer
session between the junior and senior year of
study.
Interior design career opportunities are
numerous due to the demand for professional
design services by businesses, corporations,
community organizations and government
agencies. Graduates of this program usually
assume positions in interior design offices and
architectural firms, or their own practices.
LIMITED ACCESS PROGRAM
All entering students must consult the
department adviser. This program has addi-
tional admission requirements as follows:
All students (postbaccalaureate, junior col-
lege transfers and UF students) must apply for
admission to the upper division (professional
program). Admission to the professional pro-
gram is selective due to space limitations.

Lower Division Requirements
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Com position ..................................... .............. 6
Literature and the Arts........................................... 6
Historical and Philosophical Studies (a)..............6
International Studies and Diversity (b)...............6
Social Sciences.................................... ............ 6
Mathematical Sciences (c)...................................... 6
Physical Sciences......................... .............. 3-6
Biological Sciences ............................................... 3-6
Students are expected to complete a total of
6 hours of physical and 3 hours of biological sci-
ences. General education requirements which
satisfy preprofessional or major requirements
marked above (a, 6 credits); (b, 6 credits); and (c,
6 credits) are distributed under preprofessional
and professional requirements.
PREPROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS
ARC 1301 4CR
ARC 1211 3CR
IND 1020 1CR
ARC 1302 4CR
IND 2313 3CR
IND 2460C 3CR
ARC 2303 5CR
IND 2100 3 CR(a)
IND 2130 3CR
IND 2214 5CR
IND 2635 3CR
IND 2422 3CR
MAC 3233 or MAC 1142 or 3 or 4 CR (c)
MAC 1102 (3) and 1114 (3) 3 and 3CR (c)
PHY 2004 3CR (b)
Complete lower division courses in the pre-
professional program.
Minimum overall GPA of 2.60 or higher.
Design and install an exhibit of work from
the preprofessional architecture and interior
design courses while enrolled in IND 2214.
Submit a letter of intent outlining your inter-
est in the interior design profession.






ARCHITECTURE


GRADUATING WITH HONORS
Honors designations for graduation in
interior design are calculated on all courses in
the professional curriculum resulting in the fol-
lowing overall GPAs: honors (3.3), high honors
(3.6), and highest honors (3.80). In addition, for
high and highest honors, the faculty evaluation
of a fourth-year design project is required.

ADVISEMENT STANDARDS
Completed by end of 30 Hours
Course Requirements:
Completed IND 1020 (1 hour)
Completed ARC 1211 (3 hours)
Completed ARC 1301 (4 hours)
Completed ARC 1302 (4 hours)
Completed MAC 1142 or
MAC 3233 (3 or 4 hours)* t
Completed six additional credit hours in
general education and Gordon Rule courses
Grade Point Average Requirements:
2.60 preprofessional grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
2.40 overall grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
Completed by end of 45 Hours
In addition to the 30-hour requirements:
Course Requirements:
Completed IND 2100 (3 hours)*
Completed IND 2313 (3 hours)
Completed IND 2460C (3 hours)
Completed ARC 2303 (5 hours)
Completed PHY 2004 (3 hours)*
Completed CGS 3470 (3 hours)*t
Completed one course of three credit hours in
general education and Gordon Rule courses
Grade Point Average Requirements:
2.60 preprofessional grade point average
(2.25 minimum for continuance)
2.40 overall grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
Completed by end of 60 Hours
In addition to the 45-hour requirements:
Course Requirements:
Completed IND 2214 (5 hours)
Completed IND 2635 (3 hours)
Completed IND 2130 (3 hours)
Completed IND 2422 (3 hours)
Completed one course of three credit hours
in general education and Gordon Rule
courses
Grade Point Average Requirements:
2.60 preprofessional grade point average
(2.40 minimum for continuance)
2.40 overall grade point average
(2.30 minimum for continuance)
Upper Division Exhibit requirement:
Satisfactory completion and exhibit of
design work
Normal total credit hours at the end of 4 semes-
ters is 68 or 69 hours
Meets general education requirement
+ Meets Gordon Rule requirement


FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 1301 Architectural Design 1 ............4.
ARC 1211 The Building Arts ......................3.
IND 1020 Intro. Arch. Interiors..................1
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 or
MAC 1142 Precalculus Algebra and
Trig (c) or MAC 1102 College Algebra
and MAC 1114 Trigonometry (3,3) ..3 or 4
*EN C 1101 ..................................... .............. 3
14 or 15
Semester 2
ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2 ............4.
** ARC 1701 Survey of Architectural
History (recommended)(a) ............................. 3
PHY 2004 Applied Physics (b) ...................3.
*ENC 1102 ........................................... ....3
Social Science.............................. .............. 3
16
** Satisfies 3 hours of general education
requirements for International Studies and
Diversity.
SECOND YEAR .............................................Credits
Semester 1
ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3 ............5
IND 2460C Computers in 3-D Design .........3
IND 2313 Interior Graphics......................3
IND 2100 History of Interiors 1 (a) ..............3
Literature and the Arts............. .................3
(Theatre Appreciation Recommended) -
17
Semester 2
IND 2214 Introduction to Architectural
Interiors..................................... ............... 5
IND 2635 Theory of Interior Design ............3
IND 2130 History of Interiors 2 .................3.
IND 2422 Interior Materials ..........................3
Biological Science............................................3
17
The university-wide general education
requirement is described in the lower divi-
sion requirements section of this catalog.
Students are advised to elect courses satisfy-
ing this requirement early in their university
career and to consult the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences as to the specific courses
satisfying the requirements of State Board of
Education Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule).
Admission to the College of Architecture is
selective, as described in the Requirements
for Admission section. Purchase or lease of
a computer is strongly recommended for
upper division course work. Check with the
department office for a listing of recom-
mended equipment and information from
manufacturers on lease or purchase. See
College of Architecture information, else-
where in this catalog.
THIRD YEAR Credits
Semester 1
IND 3468 Environmental Technique for
Interiors.............. ............... .......... .. .. 3
IND 3215 Architectural Interiors 1...............5
IND 3424 Interior Design Construction
Docum ents..................................................4
CGS 3470(c) CADD for Arch./Interior
Design M ajors.........................................3
15


Semester 2
IND 3431 Interior Lighting...........................
IND 3216 Architectural Interiors 2...............5
IND 3424 Interior Design Elective ...............3
Physical Science ................................................3
Literature and the Arts..................................... 3
17
FOURTH YEAR Credits
Semester 1
IND 4500 Professional Practice.....................3
IND 4450C Advanced Interior Design
Detailing and Construction Documents.....4
IND 4225 Advanced Architectural
Interiors 1 .................................... ............... 6
*Social Science........................... .............. 3
16
Semester 2
IND 4226 Advanced Architectural.
Interiors 2.................................... ............... 6
IND 4440 Furniture Design..........................3
Interior Design Elective ................................3
International Studies and Diversity ...............3
15

Curriculum in Landscape
Architecture
H. H. Smith, Chairman.
This curriculum leads to the first profes-
sional undergraduate degree, the Bachelor of
Landscape Architecture. The program is accred-
ited by the Landscape Architectural Accredi-
tation Board and is an essential first step toward
licensing in Florida and other states which regu-
late the practice of landscape architects.
Students become familiar with the art of design,
planning or management, and the arrangement
of natural and man-made elements on the land
through application of cultural and scientific
knowledge. Both resource conservation and the
requirements of the built environment are stud-
ied. Graduates are employed by professional
offices; municipal, state or federal recreation;
landscape architectural or planning agencies;
and the construction, development or horticul-
tural industries. Graduates also may continue in
graduate programs at institutions throughout
the country and at the University of Florida.
A field trip is required for upper division
students; domestic or foreign study opportuni-
ties are available. Students should plan to have
adequate funds for trips and studio materials.
An internship is required.

Lower Division Requirements
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Composition (ENC 1101 and 1102) ......................6
Literature and the Arts............................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies (a)..............6
International Studies and Diversity (b)...............6
Social Sciences .............................. ... ................
Mathematical Sciences .......................................
Physical Sciences ............. .. .............. 3
Biological Sciences (c).......................................... 6






COLLEGES


Satisfaction of the department's preprofes-
sional and professional requirements also will
satisfy (a, 6 cr.); (b, 6 cr.); and (c, 3 cr.), as dis-
tributed under the preprofessional and profes-
sional requirements.
PREPROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Credits
LAA 1920 Landscape Architecture ................3
LAA 2710 History and Theory Landscape
Arch ............................................. .4 (a) or (b)
LAA 2330 Site Analysis.................................4.
LAA 2350 Principles of Land. Arch...............5
ORH 3513C Ornamental Plants I ..............3 (c)
ARC 1701 Survey of Arch. History...........3 (a)
ARC1301 Architectural Design 1....................4
ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2................4.
ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3................5

ADVISEMENT STANDARDS
Completed by end of 30 Hours
Course Requirements:
Completed LAA 1920 (3 hours)
Completed ARC 1301 (4 hours)
Completed ARC 1302 (4 hours)
Completed ARC 1701 (3 hours)* t
Completed BOT 2010 (3 hours)*
Completed GEO/GLY (3 hours)*
Completed MAC 3233 (3 hours)* t
Completed remainder of credit hours in
general education and Gordon Rule courses
Grade Point Average Requirements:
3.00 preprofessional grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
2.75 overall grade point average
(2.20 minimum for continuance)
Completed by end of 45 Hours
In addition to the 30-hour requirements:
Course Requirements:
Completed LAA 2710 (4 hours)*
Completed ARC 2303 (5 hours)
Completed ORH 3513C (3 hours)*
Completed CGS 3470 (3 hours)* t
Completed remainder of credit hours in
general education and Gordon Rule courses
Grade Point Average Requirements:
3.00 preprofessional grade point average
(2.25 minimum for continuance)
2.75 overall grade point average
(2.25 minimum for continuance)
Completed by end of 60 Hours
In addition to the 45-hour requirements:
Course Requirements:
Completed LAA 2330 (4 hours)
Completed LAA 2350 (5 hours)
Completed general education courses
Completed Gordon Rule requirements
Grade Point Average Requirements:
3.00 preprofessional grade point average
(2.45 minimum for continuance)
2.75 overall grade point average
(2.45 minimum for continuance)


Upper Division Exhibit requirement:
Satisfactory completion, exhibit and evalua-
tion of design work
Normal total credit hours at the end of 4 semes-
ters is 68 hours
Meets general education requirement
t Meets Gordon Rule requirement

FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
*EN C 1101 .................................... .............. 3
M AC 3233 .................................... .............. 3
BOT 2010C Introductory Botany ...............3
LAA 1920 Landscape Architecture ...............3
ARC 1301 Architectural Design 1..............4
16
Semester 2
*ENC 1102 ............................... ........ 3
GEO 2200 or 2201 or GLY 2171 or 2010C ...3
Literature and the Arts.................................3
ARC 1701 Survey Arch. History 1 (a)...........3
ARC 1302 Architectural Design 2................. 4
16

SECOND YEAR
Semester 1
SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology ............3.
CGS 3470 or equivalent...............................3.
LAA 2710 History and Theory Landscape
Architecture (a) or (b)....................................4
ARC 2303 Architectural Design 3..............5.
ORH 3513C Orn. Plant Ident. 1 (c).................3
18
Semester 2
Literature and the Arts..................................... 3
Social Sciences ................................................ 3
LAA 2330 Site Analysis...................................4
LAA 2350 Principles Land. Arch .............5.
Historical/Philos. Studies OR International
Studies and Diversity.................................... 3
18
*The university-wide general education
requirement is described in the Lower
Division section of this catalog. Students are
advised to elect courses satisfying this
requirement early in their university career
and to consult the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences as to the specific courses satis-
fying the requirements of State Board of
Education Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule).

LIMITED ACCESS PROGRAM
All entering students must consult the
department adviser. This program has additional
admission requirements as follows: All students
(postbaccalaureate, junior college transfers and
UF students) must apply for admission to the
upper division professional program. Admis-
sion to the professional program is selective due
to space limitations.


THIRD YEAR: PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
Semester 1 Credits
LAA 3350L Landscape Arch. Studio 1...........6
LAA 3420 Landscape Architecture
Construction 1 ................................................ 5
Natural or Behavioral Science Elective..........3
Planning or Management Elective ............3
17
Semester 2
LAA 3351L Landscape Architectural
Studio 2............................................................6
LAA 3421 Landscape Architecture
Construction 2 ................................................ 5
LAA 3530 Landscape Management...............4
15

SUMMER Credits
LAA 4940 Landscape Arch. Internship .........3

FOURTH YEAR: PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
Semester 1 Credits
LAA 4355L Landscape Architecture
Studio 3..................................... ............. 8
LAA 4410L Design Implementation ..............4
Elective (b) .................................... .............. 3
15
Semester 2
LAA 4356L Landscape Architecture
Studio 4............... .............. ............. 8
LAA 4210 Professional Administration.........4
Elective .............................................. .............. 3
15
65 hours (minimum) of professional studies
are required for the Bachelor of Landscape
Architecture. Student progress is evaluated
each semester. It may be necessary to assess
studio fees to defray increasing costs of base
maps and other materials. Students may elect
certain minor certificate programs to fulfill elec-
tive requirements. Landscape Architectural
Internship also is available for elective credit.


GRADUATING WITH HONORS
Honor designations for graduation in land-
scape architecture are calculated on all courses
in the professional curriculum resulting in the
following GPAs: honors (3.2), high honors (3.5)
and highest honors (3.75). In addition, for high
and highest honors, the faculty evaluation of the
final fourth-year design project is required.









Majors and Minors in the College of Architecture
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction


SPECIAL ADMISSION
REQUIREMENTS


MAJOR


DEGREE
AWARDED MINOR ADMISSION INFORMATION


Building Construction B.S.B.C. No See admission requirements. 84


M.E. Rinker Sr. School of
Building Construction

General Statement
The school had its beginning as a defined
curriculum offered through the architecture
program in 1935 and became a department in
1957. In 1976, the School of Building Construc-
tion was established. The school was named the
M.E. Rinker Sr. School of Building Construction
in 1989 and is accredited'by the American
Council for Construction Education.
The school has a normal upper division
enrollment of 250. Graduates receive a Bachelor
of Science in Building Construction and begin
work immediately as assistant project managers,
field engineers, schedulers, cost engineers, assis-
tant superintendents, quality controllers and
estimators.
Courses also are offered leading to the
Master of Building Construction or Master of
Science in Building Construction and the nor-
mal graduate enrollment is 45. For those inter-
ested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree, the College of
Architecture began offering such a program in
1988. For requirements for these degrees and
admission to graduate school, consult the
Graduate Catalog.

Scholarships and Assistantships
Information about general financial aid can
be obtained from the Office for Student
Financial Affairs, Box 114025, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-4025. Information
concerning scholarships available for third- and
fourth-year building construction students can
be obtained from the school.

Honorary and Professional
Organizations

COLLEGE COUNCIL
The School of Building Construction College
Council represents building construction stu-
dents and acts as a liaison between the students
and school's faculty and administration, the
university's administration, Student Govern-
ment and the Gainesville community. The
council's primary responsibility is to support
physically and financially the students' educa-
tional activities as well as to bring student con-
cerns and recommendations to the school's
director.


SIGMA LAMBDA CHI
Sigma Lambda Chi is the national honorary
society of building construction. The purpose of
Sigma Lambda Chi is to recognize outstanding
students in the school for their scholastic
achievements, leadership abilities and extracur-
ricular activities. Sigma Lambda Chi provides
services to students within the school while pro-
moting a channel of communication between
students and the construction industry. The
society is a source of required blueprints for
construction course work. The society also pro-
vides a computerized job search file and tutor-
ing for building construction students and per-
forms volunteer work for the Gainesville com-
munity.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COST
ENGINEERS, INTERNATIONAL
The American Association of Cost Engineers
(AACE) increases knowledge of the science and
art of cost engineering, promotes fellowship and
professionalism, and serves the school, the uni-
versity and the community. The chapter serves
as a bridge between students and professionals
in the construction industry. Membership is
open to all building construction students.
Activities of AACE include monthly attendance
of the Mid-Florida Section chapter meetings and
field trips throughout the mid-Florida area.

STUDENT CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
ASSOCIATION
The Student Contractors and Builders
Association (SCBA) is the student chapter of the
Associated General Contractors of America
(AGC) and the National Association of Home
Builders (NAHB). The purpose of SCBA is to
increase student knowledge of the construction
industry, to promote fellowship and profession-
alism and to provide service to the school, the
university and the community. Membership is
open to all building construction students. The
activities of SCBA include community service
projects, guest speakers, social gatherings, and
attendance at the AGC and NAHB National
Conventions.

STUDENT CHAPTER, ASSOCIATED
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
The purpose of the student chapter of the
Associated Builders and Contractors (A.B.C.) is
to increase student knowledge of the construc-
tion industry, to promote fellowship and profes-
sionalism and to provide service to the school,
the university and the community. Membership
is open to all construction-related majors.


Activities include A.B.C. Job Fair, guest
speakers, social gatherings, attendance at state
and national conventions, as well as monthly
chapter meetings with our parent chapter,
A.B.C. Gulf Coast. The national-level A.B.C.
promotes Merit Shop.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MINORITY
CONTRACTORS
The student chapter of the National Associa-
tion of Minority Contractors (NAMC) plays an
active role in the recruitment and retention of
minority and female students in the school, and
promotes fellowship, equality and professional-
ism among all students. Membership is open to
all building construction students. One of the
most important goals of the NAMC is academic
improvement. To enhance the academic climate,
the NAMC provides tutors and incentives to
motivate students to excel in construction edu-
cation.
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA
The Construction Management Association
of America is the only construction association
devoted to promoting professional construction
management. CMAA at the university is open
to all students. The student chapter sponsors
guest speakers, social gatherings, and presenta-
tion of papers at regional and national meetings.
CMAA has over 200 corporate members who
specialize in construction management and over
1,000 individual members who are construction
managers.
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CONSTRUCTORS
The AIC student chapter is the entry level
into the American Institute of Constructors. AIC
promotes professionalism of the individual
through education, communication within the
profession and establishment of ethical codes
and rules of professional conduct. The student
chapter promotes those ideals through service
to the school, university and the community.
Membership is open to all building construction
students. The chapter takes monthly trips to the
Orlando and Tampa chapter meetings to partici-
pate as a full member in the chapter programs
and meetings.
CHRISTIANS IN CONSTRUCTION
Christians in Construction (CIC) was estab-
lished at the School of Building Construction in
1993. The organization sponsors guest speakers
from the construction industry. CIC has no
membership dues and is open to every student
who wants to put their faith into action within
the construction field.


CATALOG
PAGE






COLLEGES


Computer Policy
Personal computer design, graphic and
operational competence is an essential compo-
nent of the contemporary professional environ-
ment. Appropriate related computer skills are
now required for most entry-level opportunities
in the construction industry. Course content
increasingly relies on student computer skills
and access to computers. While university com-
puter facilities are widespread, the demands on
these facilities are significant. Therefore, it is
strongly recommended that all students pur-
chase, lease or otherwise obtain continuing
access to a personal computer. Information con-
cerning appropriate computer hardware and
software may be obtained from the school.

Job Placement
The Building Construction Job Placement
office is located in Fine Arts Complex C. This
office is invaluable in assisting seniors and
graduate students in obtaining permanent
employment upon graduation. Traditionally,
the majority of graduating BCN students secure
employment before graduation. The Job
Placement office is largely responsible for this
outstanding achievement. Summer employ-
ment also may be obtained through this office.

Program of Study
This four-year program for the Bachelor of
Science in Building Construction is designed for
students interested in professional careers in
construction management, techniques, opera-
tions and related areas in the construction
industry, which draw upon skills in communi-
cation and interpersonal relations, rather than in
architectural and engineering design.
The freshman and sophomore programs of
study are designed to provide easy transfer for
junior and community college graduates.
Prospective junior and community college
transfer students should consult their advisers
or write to the School of Building Construction
for a pie-building construction program of local
study.
Opportunities for advancement and increas-
ing responsibility exist in all areas of the con-
struction industry, a few of which include land
development; home building; public building;
industrialized building systems; commercial,
industrial, marine and heavy construction;
underwater and space-age facilities; materials
and equipment sales and installations; and con-
struction product research, development, sales
and applications.

Application Deadlines
The school will admit students for third-year
professional course work only in the fall and
spring semesters. All application procedures,
receipt of official transcripts and school require-
ments for admission should be completed by
the deadlines stated below.
Fall Semester-March 1,1995
Spring Semester-September 1, 1995


Requirements For Admission
Listed below are the requirements for admis-
sion to this school. It should be understood,
however, that minimum requirements are given
and that admission to the school is selective.
ALL STUDENTS:
* Limited Admissions: The satisfaction of min-
imum requirements does not guarantee
admission. The school has established a
selective process for admission and only a
limited number of new students are accepted
each fall and spring terms. No distinction is
made between internal and external trans-
fers.
Students must attain at least a 2.0 (C) average
in building construction prerequisite course
work and have an overall 2.0 average for all
lower division work required for and leading
to a baccalaureate degree in building con-
struction. All applicants are rank-ordered
and those with the best academic records
(based on building construction prerequisite
course work) are admitted.
Students must have achieved a passing score
on the College Level Academic Skills Test.
Extra credits above the 63 semester hours
required for admission to the school will not
reduce the number of credit hours to be
completed in the upper division to earn a
degree. These courses may not be accepted
for equivalent credit in upper division.
Waiver of Liability: Several courses require
attendance at field trips to receive full bene-
fit from the curriculum. To allow full partic-
ipation in such worthwhile activities, all
students must sign a waiver of liability and
hold harmless agreement as a prerequisite
to acceptance into the School of Building
Construction. In addition, student organiza-
tions are represented at conferences, semi-
nars and projects outside of campus. A sep-
arate and similar waiver form will be used
for students desiring to participate in these
voluntary activities.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENTS:
Students entering the school are required to
comply with the admission criteria for the
benchmarks listed below.
BCN Preprofesional Core Requirements
(Block 1):
BCN 1210 MAC 3233
BCN 1252 PHY 2004
BCN 2405 PHY 2004L
BCN Preprofessional Requirements (Block 2):
BUL 4310 ENC 2213
CGS 3531 ACG 2021
ECO 2013 STA 3023
PHY 2005 GLY 2026
PHY 2005L
30 credit hours completed
Course Requirements:
Complete 21 credit hours of general educa-
tion course work
Complete 3 of 6 BCN core requirements
(Block 1)


Complete 3 of 9 BCN preprofessional
requirements (Block 2)
GPA Requirements:
2.35 Overall GPA for continuance
2.80 Overall GPA for early admission
45 credit hours completed
Course Requirements:
Complete 28 credit hours of general educa-
tion course work
Complete 4 of 6 BCN core requirements
(Block 1)
Complete 4 of 9 BCN preprofessional
requirements (Block 2)
GPA Requirements:
2.40 Overall GPA for continuance
2.80 Overall GPA for early admission
60 credit hours completed
Course Requirements:
Complete 33 credit hours of general educa-
tion course work
Complete 5 of 6 BCN core requirements
(Block 1)
Complete 5 of 9 BCN preprofessional
requirements (Block 2)
GPA Requirements:
2.50 Overall GPA for continuance
2.80 Overall GPA for early admission
In addition,
Complete Gordon Rule requirements
Pass College Level Academic Skills Test
Students with overall grade point averages
between 2.50 and 2.79, who have met all 60-hour
course requirements, must apply to the school
for admission.
Note: GPA requirement must be met in
addition to all general education and all BCN
core and preprofessional course work com-
pleted before students are allowed to begin the
junior year upper-division curriculum.
The number of applicants accepted into
upper division is limited by available classroom
space, faculty and facilities; therefore, the school
has established a selective process for admission
of students and only a limited number of stu-
dents are accepted each fall and spring semester.

M.A.P.P. (MONITORING ACADEMIC
PROGRESS POLICY)
Progress of students toward meeting admis-
sion requirements will be tracked in accordance
with the university's Monitoring Academic
Progress Policy at 30, 45 and 60 hour bench-
marks using the performance criteria indicated
above. Students who have met all requirements
at the 30- and 45-hour benchmarks and are
admitted early must still meet all requirements
at the 60-hour benchmark.

TRANSFER STUDENTS:
To be eligible for admission to the School of
Building Construction, a transfer student must
satisfy the following minimum requirements:
Students attending four-year colleges should
follow a program of general education and pre-






BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


professional courses equivalent to the basic cur-
riculum for students desiring to enter the
school, as outlined further in this section.
Junior college and community college stu-
dents should:
* Complete the university transfer program at
the junior college.
Complete the A.A. degree, and
Complete all prerequisite general education
and preprofessional courses, or acceptable
substitutes, that are listed in this section.
All applicants must have completed two
sequential courses of foreign language in sec-
ondary school or 8-10 semester hours at the
postsecondary level, or document an equivalent
level of proficiency.

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION:
In rare instances and/or in special circum-
stances determined by the director and within
space limitations, students who do not meet the
admission requirements indicated precisely may
be granted provisional admission to the School
of Building Construction. The director of the
school will specify the courses to be completed
and minimum grade points to be earned by the
student during the term of the provisional
admission. Provisional status will be removed
and the student may compete for a space in
upper division course work along with other eli-
gible candidates provided that the student ful-
fills the conditions set forth in the provisional
admission. The student will be excluded from
further enrollment if the student fails to satisfy
the conditions of the provisional admission.

General Regulations
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student
must assume full responsibility for registering
for the proper courses and for fulfilling all
requirements for the degree. The student is also
responsible for completing all courses.
Courses may be dropped with adviser
approval and without petitioning until the end
of the first week of the semester. After the first
week, courses may be dropped or changed
without penalty only through the administra-
tive office of the school (by petition) and the
Office of the University Registrar.
Seniors must file formal application for a
degree in the Office of the University Registrar
early in the semester in which they expect to
receive the degree. The university calendar lists
the deadline.
NORMAL LOADS: The average course load
in the School of Building Construction is 16
credit hours. A student may be permitted to
register for additional hours if, in the opinion of
the academic adviser, the student's academic
record justifies this. Students who wish to'take
fewer than 12 hours should be aware that cer-
tain university privileges and benefits require a
minimum registration. It is the student's respon-
sibility to verify the minimum registration nec-
essary for these privileges and benefits.


STUDENT WORK: The school reserves the
right to retain all student work for the purpose
of record, exhibition or instruction.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students
who do not make satisfactory academic
progress may be excluded from further registra-
tion.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To
receive the Bachelor of Science in Building
Construction a student must complete all of the
following satisfactorily:
* 63 semester hours of building construction
lower division requirements.
The approved program in building construc-
tion.
Elective requirements.
Attain at least a 2.0 overall average.
Attain at least a 2.0 average on all courses
which count toward upper division degree
requirements.
After admission to upper division, students
must attain at least a 2.0 grade point average
on all courses which count toward upper
division degree requirements.
A minimum of 128 semester hours is
required for graduation. The waiving of any
required course does not reduce the hours
required for graduation.
GRADUATE SCHOOL: Students planning to
enter the Graduate School should maintain a 3.0
(B) average in upper division work.

NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The student will have maintained normal
academic progress when the student earns a
minimum grade point average of 2.0 (C) for all
courses attempted in the upper division. In
addition, the student is required to take courses
in sequence as specified by the school director
or adviser. The student may be excluded from a
program of study in the School of Building
Construction if the student fails or refuses to
maintain normal academic progress.

DEAN'S LIST AND
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
A student who has carried a minimum of 12
hours per semester with a grade point average
of at least 3.7 will be placed on the Dean's List
for that semester.
To graduate with honors, a student must
make at least a 3.3 average on all course work
accepted as upper division credit and all course
work (except as noted below) attempted while
registered in the upper division. To graduate
with high or highest honors a student must
make at least a 3.6 or 3.75 average, respectively,
on all work accepted as upper division credit
and all course work (except as noted below)
attempted while registered in the upper divi-
sion. In addition, for high and highest honors,
the student must complete a project or other
creative work.
In calculating requirements for graduating
with honors, high honors or highest honors, the
following policies are followed: Transfer credits


and S-U Option credits are excluded. Credits for
lower division courses taken while registered in
upper division also will be excluded.
Eligibility for graduation with honors:
Students who become juniors (a classification of
3) in Fall 1991 or later are eligible for the honors
designations established in the 1991-92 and fol-
lowing catalogs. Students who achieved junior
status prior to Fall 1991 follow the honors desig-
nations in the 1990-91 catalog.

Curriculum
LOWER DIVISION PROGRAM
General Education Requirement Credits
Composition (ENC 1101-Expos. & Arg.
Writing; ENC 1102-Writing About
Literature)............................. ...... ....
Literature and the Arts.....................................6
Historical and Philosophical Studies (a) .......6
International Studies and Diversity (a).........6
Social and Behavioral Sciences (b) ............6
Physical and Biological Sciences (c)...............9
Mathematical Sciences (d) ............................6
NOTE: The Gordon Rule requires 12 hours of
communication and 6 hours of computation
skills, with grades of C or higher, which must be
met in the above courses.

PREPROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Credits
BCN 1210 Construction Materials.................3
GLY 2026C Geology for Engineers or
GLY 2010C Physical Geology (e)................3
BCN 1252 Construction Drawing I...............3
ECO 2013 Principles of
Macroeconomics (e)...................................... 3
BUL 4310 Legal Environment of
Business.................................. ............... 3
ACG 2021 Intro. to Financial Accounting ....3
ENC 2213 Technical Writing and
Business Communication...............
** MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I (e) ................3
*PHY 2004 Applied Physics I and
PHY 2004L (e).............. ............ ..............4
*PHY 2005 Applied Physics II and
PHY 2005L (e)................ .. ......................4
BCN 2405 Construction Mechanics...............4
CGS 3531 Intro. to Computer Program-
ming and Software Packages (e).................3
STA 3023 Intro. to Statistics 1(e) ................3
NOTES:
(a) BCN 4012 (History of Construction), taken in
the junior year, satisfies 3 credits of the 6
credits required for International Studies
and Diversity and also 3 credits of the 6
credits required for Historical and
Philosophical Studies.
(b) ECO 2013 satisfies 3 credits of the 6 credits
required for Social and Behavioral Sciences.
(c) PHY 2004, PHY 2005 and GLY 2026C satisfy
the Physical and Biological Sciences require-
ment of 9 credits.
(d) CGS 3531, STA 3023 and MAC 3233 satisfy
the Mathematical Sciences requirement.






COLLEGES


(e) Specific courses that may be used to satisfy
general education requirements.
(f) PHY 3053 (4 credits) may be substituted for
PHY 2004 (3 credits). PHY 3054 (4 credits)
may be substituted for PHY 2005 (3 credits).
Minimum C grades are required in ENC
1101, ENC 1102, BCN 1210, ENC 2213, BCN
2405, PHY 2004, and PHY 2005.
** Students who do not have background for
calculus should take MAC 1142 before MAC
3233.

SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE
FRESHMAN YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
ENC 1101 Expository and Argumentative
W riting............................... .............. ............. 3
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I......................3.
Literature and the Arts......................................... 3
BCN 1210 Construction Materials .............3.
*Historical and Philosophical Studies..............3.
15
Semester 2
ENC 1102 Writing About Literature ...............3
PHY 2004 Applied Physics I..........................3
PHY 2004L Laboratory for PHY 2004 .............1
BCN 1252 Construction Drawing I..............3.
STA 3023 Intro. to Statistics 1 .......................3.
*International Studies and Diversity.................3.
16
* The remaining 3 credits of this requirement
will be met by BCN 4012 (History of Construc-
tion) taken in the junior year.


SOPHOMORE YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
ENC 2213 Technical Writing and Business
Communication ................................................3
PHY 2005 Applied Physics 2.........................3.
PHY 2005L Laboratory for PHY 2005 .............1
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics.......3
ACG 2021 Intro. to Financial Accounting .......3
Social and Behavioral Studies ..........................3.

Semester 2 16
GLY 2026C Geology for Engineers ...........3
BCN 2405 Construction Mechanics...............4
BUL 4310 Legal Environment of
Business .................................................3.
CGS 3531 Introduction to Computer
Programming and Software Packages............3
Literature and the Arts......................................... 3
16
Lower Division Subtotal 63

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
JUNIOR YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
BCN 3223 Construction Techniques I -
Soils and Foundations ........................... 4
BCN 3255 Construction Drawing II..................2.
BCN 3281 Construction Methods Lab ................2
BCN 3431 Structures I Steel/
Tim ber Design ................................................... 4
BCN 3500 Mechanical Systems I -
Plumbing and Piping ....................................2
BCN 4012 History of Construction...................3
17


Semester 2
BCN 3224 Construction Techniques II -
Superstructures................................................. 4
BCN 3461 Structures II Concrete/
Formwork Design ................................................ 4
BCN 3521 Electrical Systems .............................2
BCN 3611 Construction Estimating I..............4
BCN 4700 Construction Contracts....................3
17
SENIOR YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
BCN 4510 Mechanical Systems II HVAC.......3
BCN 4612 Construction Estimating II ............4
BCN 4720 Construction Planning and Control..3
BCN 4753 Construction Financing ...................3
Elective (BCN or Approved) ..............................3
16
Semester 2
BCN 4709 Construction Project Management....3
BCN 4750 Construction Human Resources.......3
BCN 4787 Construction Project Simulation........3
BCN 4735 Construction Safety ..........................3
Elective (BCN or Approved)..............................3
15
Upper Division Subtotal 65
TOTAL 128









College of Business
Administration

The business world is changing and the
College of Business Administration is changing
ivith it to prepare students to face the demands
md challenges of the 21st century. Programs are
evaluated continually for their relevance to
:hanging conditions in the state, the nation and
the world. There is new emphasis on "people
skills"- the ability to communicate and work
well with others and on globalization, busi-
ness ethics and cultural diversity.
Since the College of Business Administration
was founded in 1926-27, more than 26,000 stu-
dents have earned business or accounting
degrees a national and international network
providing information, advice and encourage-
ment to today's students. There are now three
undergraduate degree programs offered by the
college: (1) students may obtain a Bachelor of
Science in Accounting (B.S.Ac.) degree from the
Fisher School of Accounting; (2) they may obtain
a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
(B.S.B.A.) degree with a traditional major'in
computer arid information sciences, economics,
finance, insurance, management (decision and
information sciences or general management),
marketing or real estate; or (3) they may obtain a
Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration
(B.A.B.A.) degree with an outside area of special-
ization in any one of more than 80 different
fields.
The college's educational objectives are to
provide a broad formal instructional foundation
for responsible participation in business, the
professions and government; to stimulate inter-
est in social, economic and civic responsibilities;
to develop competence in making business deci-
sions and in evaluating policy; to offer areas of
specialization for students wishing to pursue
the more traditional majors within business; and
especially, to encourage intellectual inquiry of
all students.
To meet these objectives, the college's under-
graduate degree programs are based on a broad
foundation of study outside of the college that
includes the university's general education,
communication and computation requirements.
This educational foundation helps to prepare
students for the college's preprofessional and
business core requirements, which cover the
main functional areas of business. Finally, stu-
dents must then select an area of further special-
ization, either through a traditional major
within the college (B.S.Ac. and B.S.B.A.
degrees), or an approved area of specialized
study outside of the college (B.A.B.A. degree).

The Faculty
The distinguished credentials of the faculty of
the College of Business Administration and the
Fisher School of Accounting are recognized both
within and outside the university, the state and
the nation.


When the state instituted its eminent scholar
program for academic chairs, the College of
Business Administation was the first unit in the
State University System to acquire such a chair.
Now, 13 of the 54 endowed eminent scholar
chairs at the university are in business or
accounting.
The faculty also includes six university-
appointed graduate research professors, four dis-
tinguished service professors, and 16 named pro-
fessorships endowed by business. The college
and the Fisher School faculties include past pres-
idents of the national American Accounting
Association and the Econometrics Society and
two past presidents of the national Association
for Consumer Research.
College faculty have served as editors of
major national scholarly journals in marketing,
accounting, finance, business law and manage-
ment, and in many associate editor or editorial
board positions. National award winners
among the faculty include those honored for
research or teaching in real estate, marketing,
management, economics, accounting and insur-
ance. The Fisher School and every department
of the college ranks fifteenth or higher nation-
ally for their published research. In addition,
faculty from every department within the col-
lege and the Fisher School have been recognized
by the undergraduate students, their depart-
ments and the college for their excellence in
teaching, and many have even been selected for
university-wide teaching awards.
Faculty also head the college's fourteen
research centers, including the Bureau of
Economic and Business Research that provides
official population estimates and projections
used by the state for revenue sharing, planning
and other purposes.


Facilities
The College of Business Administration and
the Fisher School of Accounting are housed in
three buildings informally known as the
"Business Triangle" the Business Building,
historic Bryan Hall and Matherly Hall.
The college's media center is located in
Bryan Hall. The studio facilities (130 BRY) allow
for the advanced taping and broadcasting of
those selected preprofessional and core courses
which are taught live and then subsequently
reshown by televised replay in the classroom. It
is this advanced technology that allows the col-
lege to serve such a large number of students,
yet to maintain adequate resources to keep
upper division and major courses at a reason-
able size for a greater degree of student/faculty
interaction. The media center also is responsible
for operating a modern video-replay facility,
where students are free to view tapes of the
prior week's classes at their leisure.
Students can access the university's main-
frame computer at the Northeast Regional Data
Center (NERDC) through the college's com-


puter lab, which is run by the university's
Center for Instructional and Research
Computing Activities (CIRCA). The college also
maintains a separate graduate computer center
for instructional and research purposes.


Financial Aid
Information about grants, scholarships,
loans, work-study programs and other forms of
financial aid for undergraduate students in the
college may be obtained from the Office for
Student Financial Affairs, 103 Criser Hall, Box
114025, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611-4025.


Membership in National and
Regional Associations
The College of Business Administration is an
accredited member of the American Assembly
of Collegiate Schools of Business, the Southern
Economic Association, the Southern Business
Administrative Association and the National
Retail Merchants' Association. The baccalaure-
ate and master's programs in both business and
accounting are accredited by the American
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business.


Beta Gamma Sigma
Election to this national honorary society is
based on scholarship and character. It is the
business equivalent to Phi Beta Kappa in the
field of classical education. For further informa-
tion, contact the Undergraduate Programs
Office located in 100 Business Building.


Organizations and Activities
The college encourages students to partici-
pate in extracurricular activities to enhance their
educational experience, to foster professional
networks, and to develop communication and
social skills. Committee service within the orga-
nizations also develops leadership skills.
Students may join chapters of the American
Marketing Association, the Association for
Computing Machines, the Undergraduate
Economics Society, the Financial Management
Association, the DIS (Decision and Information
Sciences) Society, the Society for Human
Resource Management and AIESEC (Inter-
national Association of Students in Economics
and Business Management).
The business fraternities Alpha Kappa Psi
and Delta Sigma Pi offer opportunities for
business and accounting students to participate
in community service and social interaction.
Election to Beta Gamma Sigma, the business
equivalent of Phi Beta Kappa in the liberal arts
and sciences, is based on scholarship and char-
acter.






COLLEGES


In addition, students may join the Minority
Business Society, the Hispanic Student Business
Association or the Business Administration
College Council (BACC), the college's student
government organization.
The Fisher School of Accounting has three
student organizations Beta Alpha Psi, the
national accounting honorary; the Fisher School
of Accounting Council, a student government
organization; and the Florida Accounting
Association, a social organization. Many
accounting students also are members of the
business fraternities and the business honorary,
Beta Gamma Sigma.
Many business and accounting groups invite
guest speakers to discuss careers, interviewing,
resume writing and other relevant topics. The
organizations also offer students opportunities
not always available in the classroom for closer
interaction with faculty, business executives and
their peers.


Career Planning
Special days and events for business and
accounting students are designated at the uni-
versity's annual Career Expo, which attracts sev-
eral hundred corporations, government agencies
and public accounting firms to campus to meet
and recruit potential employees. There is also an
Internship Expo for students interested in partic-
ipating in internship opportunities.
The college and its faculty maintain perma-
nent ties with companies through their execu-
tives who serve on advisory councils to the
college, the Fisher School of Accounting and
various research centers. These executives visit
classrooms as guest speakers and their compa-
nies often provide financial support.


International Programs
The College of Business Administration
believes that knowledge of the global market-
place is vital for managers who will lead
American corporations into the 21st century. An
excellent way to obtain such knowledge is to
study abroad for a semester or a full academic
year.
The college has established exchange agree-
ments with numerous foreign universities that
allow UF students to count the credits earned
abroad as part of their UF degree. Programs
include the Helsinki School of Economics and
Business Administration in Mikkeli, Finland;
the Norwegian School of Management in Oslo;
the Harlem Business School in Haarlem, the
Netherlands; Nijenrode University in
Breukelen, the Netherlands; Denmark's
International Study Program in Copenhagen;
and Luigi Bocconni University in Milan, Italy. In
addition, students fluent in German may study
at Leopold Franzens University in Innsbruck,
Austria, and students may learn commercial
French at ESP Lyon in Lyon, France.


Summer programs also are available at the
Finnish and Danish schools; there is a summer
study tour including London, Paris, Brussels,
Berlin and Zurich; and internships in England
are available through Richmond College in
London. Finally, the college is a member of sev-
eral international consortia that expand the
range of opportunities for foreign study. The
possibilities for informal arrangements for trans-
ferable overseas study are virtually unlimited.
Participants in approved programs can
receive financial aid as if they were studying in
Gainesville, can count summer courses taken
abroad as part of their summer study obliga-
tion, can study abroad during the last 30 hours
of their program, and with careful planning and
prior approval, can count course work taken
abroad as part of their major or business core
requirements.
Further information about international
opportunities is available from the Undergrad-
uate Programs Office, 100 Business Building,
Box 117160, College of Business Administration,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611-
7160.

Dean's List
For the fall and spring terms only, students
who have earned a 3.5 or better grade point
average (GPA), based on a minimum of 14
semester hours taken for letter grades, are eligi-
ble for the Dean's List. Students will receive a
certificate in recognition of their achievement.
Hours taken under the S-U Option are not
counted toward the 14 semester hours required.

General Regulations
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Students admitted to the college are expected
to assume full responsibility for registering for
the proper courses, for fulfilling all requirements
for degrees and for completing all courses.
Academic counseling is available in the
Undergraduate Programs Office located in 100
Business Building. Students are encouraged to
meet with an academic adviser during their first
term in the college so they may establish an aca-
demic plan of course work.
NORMAL LOADS
The College of Business Administration
degree programs are full-time programs.
Students are expected to register for a minimum
load of 12 credit hours (6 credit hours during 6-
week summer session). Students also are encour-
aged not to take more than 18 credit hours with-
out first consulting an academic adviser.
NORMAL PROGRESS
A student who falls below a 2.0 UF GPA, a
2.0 GPA in the business core, or either a 2.0 in
the major field course work (B.S.B.A. degree) or
a 2.0 in the outside area of specialization course
work (B.A.B.A. degree), will be placed on col-
lege probation.


Students who do not make satisfactory acad-
emic progress may be excluded from further
registration in the College of Business Adminis-
tration. A student may be deemed as not mak-
ing satisfactory progress under the following
conditions:
1. If a student fails to complete satisfactorily
the terms of his/her college probation;
2. If a student fails to take course work that is
appropriate for progress toward the degree;
3. If a student withdraws from the university
three times. A student who withdraws from
the university twice will be placed automati-
cally on college probation until graduation.
RESIDENCE
The last 30 semester hours applied toward a
degree must be completed in residence in the
college. This requirement may be waived only
in special cases and must be approved in
advance by the undergraduate committee of the
college. In any case, no student may take more
than 6 semester hours by correspondence
among the 60 semester hours of upper division
work required for the baccalaureate degree;
such work must have prior approval for each
individual student by the undergraduate com-
mittee of the college. Students must earn a C or
better in all out-of-residency course work.
Business core courses and courses in a student's
major field may not be taken by correspondence
or at another university for transfer. Students
who are on college probation may not take
courses by extension or correspondence.

SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE
OPTION
Subject to college degree program and
department guidelines, undergraduate students
may take elective course work and earn grades
of S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). Grades
earned under the S-U Option do not carry grade
point values and are not computed in the
University of Florida grade point average. Such
grades are included in a student's permanent
academic record and are reflected on the tran-
script. Students should note that other academic
institutions and agencies may interpret a grade
of U as a failing grade in their grade point aver-
age computation.
Students choosing the S-U Option must be in
good standing and may not be on university aca-
demic probation. To elect the S-U Option, stu-
dents must obtain approvals from the instructor
and department offering the course, as well as
the dean of their own college. They may elect the
S-U Option for only one course each term; this
option is in addition to courses which are taught
only on a S-U basis. Courses taken to fulfill com-
munication or computation requirements
(Gordon Rule) may not be taken S-U.
For fall, spring and Summer C terms, the
deadline for electing the S-U Option is 4:00 p.m.,
Friday, of the third week of classes. For Summer
A and Summer B terms, the deadline is 4:00
p.m., Wednesday, of the second week of classes.
Once the S-U Option is approved, students may
not elect to convert to a letter grade.






BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


COURSEE PREREQUISITES
The college enforces course prerequisites. A
:urrent/revised list of prerequisites for each
:erm may be obtained from the Undergraduate
programss Office located in 100 New Business
building. The deadline for submitting prerequi-
site waivers is the last day of preregistration for
:he upcoming semester.
Students are encouraged not to put off the
more quantitative business core courses until
:he next-to-last semester; students who will
have difficulty meeting the business core GPA
requirements should learn this sooner rather
than later. B.A.B.A. students also are warned
that they must complete all other core courses
ind have senior standing (4BA) before they will
be allowed to take MAN 4720 (Business
Policies). Students who will have difficulty fol-
lowing this policy or deciding how to schedule
their courses correctly should contact an acade-
mic adviser in 100 Business Building.
SUMMER ATTENDANCE
Students having fewer than 60 semester
hours at the time of their first enrollment in a
State University System institution must earn at
least 9 semester hours prior to graduation by
attending one or more summer sessions at a
state university. Petitions for waivers of this
requirement may be submitted for justified
health, academic or financial reasons, but must
include documentation.

INTERNSHIPS
Students are encouraged to take part in an
internship program between their junior and
senior years. Students desiring academic credit
for an internship program should contact the
internship coordinator for their department.
Academic credit for internship programs is
offered only under the S-U Option and no acad-
emic credit will be awarded for an internship
taken in a student's final semester prior to grad-
uation. Internships also are available through
the college's Center for Retail Education and
Research.
FREE ELECTIVES
Elective courses may be taken within or out-
side of the College of Business Administration.
Students in the B.S.B.A. program must take these
electives outside of their major field. Students in
the B.A.B.A. program are limited to taking no
more than one elective course (does not include
the business core) from each given area within
the college. No credit will be awarded by the
college for cooperative education courses.

Minors
Students within the College of Business
Administration are encouraged to obtain minors
offered by other colleges. Students outside of the
College of Business Administration and the
Fisher School of Accounting may apply for
admission to the minor in business administra-
tion.


MINORS IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College of Business Administration
began awarding minors in business administra-
tion in Fall 1988. The objective of the minor in
business administration is to provide a service
for students in majors outside of business by
providing a general overview of the business
environment. The minor in business administra-
tion requires exposure to the major functional
areas in business. The following course work is
required:
ACG 2021 Introduction to Financial
Accounting
ACG 2071 Introduction to Managerial
Accounting
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics
FIN 3408 Business Finance
MAN 3021 Principles of Management
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing
Transfer work will be accepted for ACG
2021, ACG 2071 and ECO 2013 only. A mini-
mum of three (3) upper division courses must
be taken at the University of Florida. If students
already have completed FIN 3408, MAN 3021
and MAR 3023, or their equivalents at another
institution, they will be required to take another
higher-level course in that area to satisfy the
upper division requirement. All courses must be
taken for a grade, not S-U.
Students must be in an upper division col-
lege before they can apply for the minor in busi-
ness administration the minor program is not
available to students in the Fisher School of
Accounting. Students may obtain an application
for admission from 222 Criser Hall. Students
first must obtain the signature of the dean or
authorized representative of their current col-
lege before submitting the completed form to
100 BUS for processing. Application for the
minor should be made as early as possible after
admission to an upper division college, but no
later than one semester prior to graduation.
Admission to the minor is on a selective
basis with limited enrollment. To be considered
for admission, students must have a minimum
2.0 overall grade point average on all University
of Florida course work attempted.
Regardless of other graduation requirements
specified by the student's current college, a 2.0
grade point average on all attempts of the minor
courses is required in order for the College of
Business Administration to certify award of the
minor. For all graduating students who meet
this requirement, the minor will be listed on
their transcripts.
MINOR IN ACTUARIAL SCIENCE
This interdisciplinary minor is sponsored
jointly by the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences and by the College of Business
Administration. The program is designed for
students interested in quantitative techniques
who wish to apply their skills in a business or
government setting.
Upon successful completion, students will
receive a minor in actuarial science that will be
noted officially on their transcripts.
Students may complete the program while
earning a Bachelor of Science in Business


Administration, a Bachelor of Arts in Business
Administration or a Liberal Arts and Sciences
degree. The requirements for the particular
major must be met and, in addition, a number
of courses must be taken in business, statistics,
mathematics and operations research. Students
plan their program in such a way that some of
these courses also count toward the departmen-
tal and degree requirements. Thus, mathematics
or statistics students would take three or four
additional courses to earn their minor while
business students would take four or five addi-
tional courses.
Students seeking further information about
the minor should contact Dr. Bruce Edwards
(mathematics), Dr. David Nye (finance and
insurance) or the statistics department.

Admission Requirements
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION
Lower division students (freshman and
sophomores) at the University of Florida will be
admitted tentatively to the College of Business
Administration whenever they declare a major
within either the B.S.B.A. or the B.A.B.A. degree
programs; their college classification will
change from LS (Liberal Arts and Sciences) to
BA (Business Administration). These students
will be allowed to maintain their BA classifica-
tion as long as they continue to meet or exceed
the admission protocols specified for their par-
ticular degree program. Students who fall below
the minimum admission protocols for their
degree program will become a Change Major
and will revert to an LS classification within the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
After reaching 60 hours, lower division stu-
dents who were admitted tentatively to the col-
lege, and who now meet or exceed the 60-hour
admission protocols specified for their particu-
lar degree program, will automatically receive
formal admission and officially will be classified
as upper division students within the College of
Business Administration. Students who are clas-
sified as "undecided", who have declared a
nonbusiness major previously, or have been
admitted or rejected by another upper division
college, will be required to make a formal appli-
cation for admission.
Transfer students will be admitted to the col-
lege only for the fall, spring and Summer A/C
terms, provided they have an Associate of Arts
degree from a Florida public institution and
meet or exceed the 60-hour admission protocols
for their declared degree program. Application
deadlines are strictly enforced (see the univer-
sity calendar in this catalog). Transfer students
who do not have a completed application on
file, including all required documentation, tran-
scripts, etc., will not be considered for admis-
sion and will be required to make formal appli-
cation for a subsequent term.

ADMISSION TO B.S.B.A. PROGRAM
Students interested in one of the more tradi-
tional areas of study within business (computer
and information sciences, decision and informa-
tion sciences, economics, finance, management,






COLLEGES


insurance, marketing or real estate) should
apply for admission to the B.S.B.A. degree pro-
gram. Admission to this program is a selective
process. Students from the University of Florida
and transfer students from other Florida public
institutions who will receive their Associate of
Arts degree before attending the University of
Florida will be guaranteed admission provided
they have:
1. Earned a minimum of 60 credit hours at the
college level.
2. Satisfied all parts of the College Level
Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
3. Satisfied both the math and writing compo-
nents of the Gordon Rule.
4. Satisfied general education requirements as
defined by the University of Florida, or as
defined by a Florida public institution as
part of the Associate of Arts degree.
5. Completed two sequential courses of foreign
language in secondary school or 8-10 semes-
ter hours at the postsecondary level, or doc-
ument an equivalent level of proficiency.
6. Completed the preprofessional courses:
Introduction to Financial Accounting (ACG
2021, or ACG 2001 and ACG 2011), Introduc-
tion to Managerial Accounting (ACG 2071),
Introduction to Computer Programming and
Software Packages (CGS.3531-formerly CAP
3802), Principles of Macroeconomics (ECO
2013), Principles of Microeconomics (ECO
2023), Survey of Calculus I (MAC 3233 or
MAC 3311) and Introduction to Statistics
(STA 3023).
7. Earned a 2.5 preprofessional grade point
average on all attempts of the preprofes-
sional courses (defined above) as calculated
by the college.
8. Earned a 2.5 overall grade point average. For
UF students this grade point average will be
calculated based on course work completed
at all institutions. For transfer students who
have earned their Associate of Arts degree,
this will be the Associate of Arts grade point
average as reported by the institution
awarding their degree.
Students who have attended the University
of Florida must have at least a 2.0 UF grade
point average and, where applicable, a 2.0 busi-
ness core and a 2.0 major field grade point aver-
age.
Students who have less than a 2.50 prepro-
fessional or 2.50 overall grade point average will
be denied admission.
ADMISSION TO B.A.B.A. PROGRAM
Students wishing the flexibility to design a
unique program of study that meets their partic-
ular interests and needs by combining the fun-
damentals of business with an area of special-
ization outside of the college, should'apply for
admission to the B.A.B.A. degree program.
Admission to this program is also a selective
process. Students from the University of
Florida and transfer students from other Florida
public institutions who will receive their
Associate of Arts degree before attending the


University of Florida will be guaranteed admis-
sion provided they have:
1. Earned a minimum of 60 credit hours at the
college level.
2. Satisfied all parts of the College Level
Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
3. Satisfied both the math and writing compo-
nents of the Gordon Rule.
4. Satisfied general education requirements as
defined by the University of Florida, or as
defined by a Florida public institution as
part of the Associate of Arts degree.
5. Completed two sequential courses of foreign
language in secondary school or 8-10 semes-
ter hours at the postsecondary level, or doc-
ument an equivalent level of proficiency.
6. Completed the preprofessional courses:
Introduction to Financial Accounting (ACG
2021, or ACG 2001 and ACG 2011), Introduc-
tion to Managerial Accounting (ACG 2071),
Introduction to Computer Programming and
Software Packages (CGS 3531-formerly CAP
3802), Principles of Macroeconomics (ECO
2013), Principles of Microeconomics (ECO
2023), Survey of Calculus I (MAC 3233 or
MAC 3311) and Introduction to Statistics
(STA 3023).
7. Earned a 2.0 preprofessional GPA on all
attempts of the preprofessional courses
(defined above) as calculated by the college.
8. Earned a 2.0 overall GPA. For University of
Florida students this GPA will be their UF
GPA. For transfer students who have earned
their Associate of Arts degree, this will be
the Associate of Arts GPA as reported by the
institution awarding the degree.
9. Students who have attended UF must have,
where applicable, a 2.0 business core GPA
and a 2.0 specialization GPA.
ADMISSION PROTOCOLS
Freshmen at the University of Florida are ini-
tially admitted to the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences as lower division students, with an LS
(Liberal Arts and Sciences) classification, and are
under the control of that college. However, stu-
dents who have declared a major within either
the B.S.B.A. or B.A.B.A. degree programs will be
admitted tentatively to the College of Business
Administration and their classification will be
changed to BA (Business Administration).
Each semester the College of Business
Administration will send a SASS (Student
Academic Support Services) degree audit to
every lower division student who has declared
a business major and has been tentatively
admitted to the college. The intent of the audit is
to ensure that all potential B.S.B.A. and B.A.B.A.
students are aware of their current academic
status and their progress toward formal admis-
sion into the college as upper division students.
The College of Business Administration also
has specified a series of admission protocols
that students seeking formal admission to the
college are expected to follow. By agreement,
both the College of Business Administration
and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will
monitor the progress of such students. Students


who fall below the minimum admission proto-
cols for their degree program will become a
Change Major, will revert to an LS classification
within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
and will be required by the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences to seek admission to another
upper division college or to make alternative
academic plans.
Transfer students who will receive their
Associate of Arts degree from a Florida public
institution must meet or exceed the 60-hour
admission protocols if they wish to receive for-
mal admission to the college. The admission
protocols for the B.S.B.A. and B.A.B.A. degree
program are as follows:

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Students must meet the minimum admission
requirements listed below to continue pursuing
guaranteed admission to this program.
By 30 Hours
Course Requirements:
% 3 Hours of English Composition
3 Hours of Literature and the Arts
3 Hours of Historical and Philosophical
Studies
3 Hours of International Studies and
i Diversity
19 Hours of Social Sciencede (Includes: ECO
2013)
SHours of Mathematical Sciences
S(Includes: MAC 3233)
SHours of Physical and Biological Sciences
Goron Rule Requirements:
3 Hours of Gordon Rule Math with grade
of C or higher
6 Hours of Gordon Rule Writing with
grade of C or higher
GPA Requirements:
2.50 Preprofessional GPA on 6 hours
2.50 Overall GPA on 30 hours
By45 Hours
Course Requirements:
3-6 Hours of English Composition
3-6 Hours of Literature and the Arts
3-6 Hours of Historical and Philosophical
Studies
3-6 Hours of International Studies and
Diversity
9-12 Hours of Social Sciences (Includes: ECO
2013, ECO 2023)
6 Hours of Mathematical Sciences
(Includes: MAC 3233, STA 3023)
6-9 Hours of Physical and Biological Sciences
3 Hours of Accounting (Includes: ACG
2021)
Gordon Rule Requirements:
6 Hours of Gordon Rule Math with grade
of C or higher
9 Hours of Gordon Rule Writing with
grade of C or higher
GPA Requirements:
2.50 Preprofessional GPA on 15 hours
2.50 Overall GPA on 45 hours






BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


By 60 Hours
Course Requirements:
6 Hours of English Composition
6 Hours of Literature and the Arts
6 Hours of Historical and Philosophical
Studies
6 Hours of International Studies and
Diversity
12 Hours of Social Sciences (Includes: ECO
2013, ECO 2023)
6 Hours of Mathematical Sciences
(Includes: MAC 3233, STA 3023)
9 Hours of Physical and Biological Sciences
5 Hours of Accounting (Includes: ACG
2021 and ACG 2071)
3 Hours of Computer Literacy (Includes:
CGS 3531 or alternative)
Gordon Rule Requirements:
6 Hours of Gordon Rule Math with grade
of C or higher
12 Hours of Gordon Rule Writing with
grade of C or higher
CLAST Requirements:
Must have taken and passed all sections
of the CLAST exam
GPA Requirements:
2.50 Preprofessional GPA on 17-20 hours
2.50 Overall GPA on 60 hours

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration
Students must meet the minimum admission
requirements listed below to continue pursuing
guaranteed admission to this program.
By 30 Hours
Course Requirements:
3 Hours of English Composition
3 Hours of Literature and the Arts
3 Hours of Historical and Philosophical
Studies
3 Hours of International Studies and
Diversity
9 Hours of Social Sciences (Includes: ECO
2013)
3 Hours of Mathematical Sciences
(Includes: MAC 3233)
6 Hours of Physical and Biological Sciences
Gordon Rule Requirements:
3 Hours of Gordon Rule Math with grade
of C or higher
6 Hours of Gordon Rule Writing with
grade of C or higher
GPA Requirements:
2.00 Preprofessional GPA on 6 hours
2.00 Overall GPA on 30 hours
By 45 Hours
Course Requirements:
3-6 Hours of English Composition
3-6 Hours of Literature and the Arts
3-6 Hours of Historical and Philosophical
Studies
3-6 Hours of International Studies and
Diversity
9-12 Hours of Social Sciences (Includes: ECO
2013, ECO 2023)
6 Hours of Mathematical Sciences
(Includes: MAC 3233, STA 3023)
6-9 Hours of Physical and Biological Sciences


3 Hours of Accounting (Includes: ACG
2021)
Gordon Rule Requirements:
6 Hours of Gordon Rule Math with grade
of C or higher
9 Hours of Gordon Rule Writing with
grade of C or higher
GPA Requirements:
2.00 Preprofessional GPA on 15 hours
2.00 Overall GPA on 45 hours
By 60 Hours
Course Requirements:
6 Hours of English Composition
6 Hours of Literature and the Arts
6 Hours of Historical and Philosophical
Studies
6 Hours of International Studies and
Diversity
12 Hours of Social Sciences (Includes: ECO
2013, ECO 2023)
6 Hours of Mathematical Sciences
(Includes: MAC 3233, STA 3023)
9 Hours of Physical and Biological Sciences
5 Hours of Accounting (Includes: ACG
2021 and ACG 2071)
3 Hours of Computer Literacy (Includes:
CGS 3531 or alternative)
Gordon Rule Requirements:
6 Hours of Gordon Rule Math with grade
of C or higher
12 Hours of Gordon Rule Writing with
grade of C or higher
CLAST Requirements:
Must have taken and passed all sections
of the CLAST exam
GPA Requirements:
2.00 Preprofessional GPA on 17-20 hours
2.00 Overall GPA on 60 hours

Postbaccalaureate Student (6BA)
Depending upon resource and enrollment
constraints, students who have received a bac-
calaureate degree may be admitted for the fol-
lowing purposes:
1. Students who have not received their
B.A.B.A., B.S.B.A. or B.S.Ac. degree may be
admitted only if they wish to receive a
B.A.B.A. or B.S.B.A. degree.
2. Students who have received their B.S.B.A.,
B.A.B.A. or B.S.Ac. degree from the Univer-
sity of Florida, and who are not applying for
graduate programs within the college, may
not receive a second undergraduate degree
from the college and may only be admitted
to complete courses for information pur-
poses.
3. Any student applying for a graduate pro-
gram within the college may, at the discre-
tion of the specific graduate program, be
admitted to take courses in preparation for
admission to the graduate program.
Except for the case of #3 above, admission is
highly selective and is subject to the college's
resource and enrollment constraints. Meeting
the minimum requirements for undergraduate
admission does not ensure admission as a post-
baccalaureate student.


Non-Degree Students (OBA)
Depending on resource and enrollment con-
straints, students may be allowed to register as
non-degree (transient) students provided they:
1. Are state of Florida employees who have not
attended the University of Florida previ-
ously as degree-seeking students, or
2. Have never applied to the University of
Florida as degree-seeking students, and
3. Are enrolled currently in a B.S.B.A. program
at another State University System institu-
tion, and
4. Intend to transfer course work back to their
home institution and have a letter from the
institution requesting that they be given
non-degree status and stating the courses
that they should take.
Students approved for non-degree status are
allowed to enroll in courses only on a space-
available basis during the last day of drop/add
(add only day). Therefore, depending on course
availability, students who must take a specific
course for transfer back to their home institution
may wish to explore other academic alterna-
tives.

Graduate Students
The college participates in graduate pro-
grams and programs of adult and executive
development education. Graduate programs in
accounting, business administration and eco-
nomics are provided under the Graduate School
of Business Administration for advanced stu-
dents with career interests in teaching, research
or business. Courses are offered leading to the
Master of Accounting (see Fisher School of
Accounting), Master of Business Administra-
tion, Master of Arts, Master of Science and
Doctor of Philosophy. For requirements for
these degrees and for admission to the Graduate
School, consult the Graduate Catalog.

Curriculum Leading to the
Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration (B.S.B.A.) and
Bachelor of Arts in Business
Administration (B.A.B.A.) Degrees
The College of Business Administration
awards the B.S.B.A. in eight major fields and
awards the B.A.B.A. degree in more than 80
areas of specialization. Students attempting
either a B.S.B.A. or B.A.B.A. degree in the col-
lege must complete: (1) the university's general
education requirements; (2) the college's distrib-
ution requirements; (3) the college's preprofes-
sional requirements; (4) the college's business
core requirements; (5) either the major field or
outside specialization requirements specified
for the particular program; and (6) sufficient
free-elective courses to give each student a total
of 124 semester hours, as calculated by the col-
lege.






COLLEGES


Graduation Requirements
Seniors must file a formal application for a
degree in the Office of the University Registrar
by the published deadline for the semester in
which they expect to receive a degree. In addi-
tion, students must complete successfully all
course work requirements, credit hour require-
ments, and GPA requirements as specified by
the College of Business Administration.

Course Work Requirements
Students must complete the university's
general education requirements, the college's
distribution requirements and the college's pre-
professional requirements. They also must satis-
factorily complete all business core courses and
a college-approved program of study, either in a
traditional major within the college (B.S.B.A.
degree) or an area of specialization outside the
college (B.A.B.A. degree). Depending on their
program, students may be required to complete
specified electives outside the major.

Credit Hour Requirements
A minimum of 124 credit hours, as calculated
by the college, is required for graduation. The
waiving of any required course does not reduce
the total credit hours required for graduation.
Unless otherwise specified in this catalog, stu-
dents will receive no credit when repeating
equivalent courses. The State Common Course
Numbering System defines courses as equiva-
lent whenever the prefix and the last three digits
of the four-digit course number are the same; as
an example, STA 2023 is defined by the
Common Course Numbering System as equiva-
lent to STA 3023. Finally, students should note
that the college has also specified some non-
common course numbering courses as equiva-
lent and not repeatable for credit. Examples
include MAC 3233 and MAC 3311; MAC 3234
and MAC 3312; ECO 3100 and ECO 3101; ECO
3202 and ECO 3203; and ECO 3700 and either
ECO 3703 or ECO 3704. If in doubt, contact the
Undergraduate Programs Office in 100 Business
Building.

Grade Point Requirements
Students in the B.S.B.A. program must earn
a 2.0 GPA on all course work attempted at the
University of Florida; a 2.0 GPA on all business
core courses attempted at the university; and a
2.0 GPA on all major field courses attempted at
the university. Students in the B.A.B.A. program
must earn a 2.0 GPA on all course work
attempted at the University of Florida; either a
2.0 GPA on all core courses attempted at the
university, or pass all core courses with a grade
of C or better; and a 2.0 GPA on all courses
attempted at the university in the outside area
of specialization.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
To qualify, students must earn a 3.2 GPA
(honors), a 3.6 GPA (high honors) or a 3.8 GPA
(highest honors) on all course work taken at the


University of Florida, all business core course
work taken at the university and all major field
course work (B.S.B.A. degree) or outside area of
specialization course work (B.A.B.A. degree)
taken at the university. Students are required to
take all core and major or specialty course work
in residence.
A thesis will be required for high or highest
honors. Students doing thesis work must enroll
in the appropriate honors thesis course for their
program and have their thesis reviewed by at
least one faculty member chosen by their hon-
ors program coordinator.
To qualify for the thesis option, a student
normally will have completed 100 semester
hours of course work (exceptions may be made
by the honors coordinator) and must be able to
attain the 3.6 GPA required for high honors at
the time they enroll in the thesis option.

Lower Division Requirements
Lower division requirements total 64
semester hours. They include general educa-
tion, college distribution, preprofessional, com-
puter literacy and free-elective requirements.
Requirements are the same for both the
B.S.B.A. and B.A.B.A. degree programs.
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Com position................................. ............... 6
Literature and the Arts...................................6.
Historical and Philosophical Studies...............6
International Studies and Diversity.................6
See college distribution requirements
Social and Behavioral Sciences......................6
See college distribution requirements
See preprofessional courses:
ECO 2013, ECO 2023
Mathematical Sciences........................................ 6
See preprofessional courses:
MAC 3233, STA 3023
Physical and Biological Sciences ...................9.
See college distribution requirements
Subtotal 45
Includes 12 hours of preprofessional courses
The college requires students to follow the
general education requirements for the
Associate of Arts certificate as specified by the
University of Florida. Students transferring to
the university with an Associate of Arts degree
from another Florida public institution will
automatically have met the general education
requirements. To determine whether a particu-
lar course will satisfy this requirement, review
the Description of Courses section of this cata-
log or contact an adviser in the college's
Undergraduate Programs Office, located in 100
Business Building.
Social and behavioral sciences requirements
may be satisfied by taking the preprofessional
courses ECO 2013 and ECO 2023. Mathematical
sciences requirements may be satisfied by tak-
ing the preprofessional courses MAC 3233 and
STA 3023. Students who earn grades of at least
C in these courses will also have satisfied the
Gordon Rule computation requirement.


COLLEGE DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
Credits
Social and Behavioral Sciences 9
9 hours in addition to general education
courses: ECO 2013, ECO 2023
International Studies 3
3 hours in addition to general education
courses: must be international;
may use CBA international courses to
satisfy this requirement.
Physical and Biological Sciences N/A
9 Hours total; at least 3 hours in each area
Subtotal- 12
in addition to 45 general education hours
The college has specified certain distribution
requirements which are in addition to the uni-
versity's general education requirements. The
awarding of an Associate of Arts degree does
not automatically satisfy these requirements.
Students must take an additional 9 hours of
social and behavioral sciences beyond ECO 2013
and ECO 2023. Students must taken an addi-
tional 3 hours of international studies beyond
the 6 hours required of international studies and
diversity within general education; this must be
an international course and students may use
the college's international courses to satisfy this
requirement. Finally, students must take a total
of 9 hours of physical and biological sciences,
with at least 3 hours of physical sciences and 3
hours of biological sciences.
PREPROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Credits
ACG 2021 Introducation to Financial
Accounting 3
or both ACG 2001 and ACG 2011
ACG 2071 Introduction to Managerial
Accounting 2
CGS 3531 Introduction to Computer
Programming & Software
Packages (formerly CAP 3802) 3
May be met in alternate ways:
see undergraduate advisers
in 100lBUS
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics N/A
3 hours; see General Education
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics N/A
3 hours; see General Education
MAC3233 Survey of Calculus I N/A
3 hours; see General Education
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics N/A
3 hours; see General Education
Subtotal- 8
in addition to 45 general education hours
Preprofessional courses may not be taken by
correspondence or under an S/U Option.
Students who wish to use a course from another
institution should first consult the Undergrad-
uate Programs Office to determine whether the
course has been approved for equivalency.
The Department of Mathematics requires all
students.to take a placement test before they
will be allowed to enroll in any beginning calcu-
lus course offered by the department. Computer
and information sciences students are encour-






BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


aged to take MAC 3311 and MAC 3312. The col-
lege does not allow students to receive credit for
both MAC 3233 and MAC 3311 or for both
MAC 3234 and MAC 3312.
All students admitted to the college are
required to have a basic knowledge of micro-
computers and familiarity with DOS, spread-
sheets and word processing. Instructors in busi-
ness courses will expect students to be com-
puter literate and will structure their course
materials and teaching methods accordingly.
The preprofessional computer literacy require-
ment can be met by taking CGS 3531 formerly
CAP 3802 (or its approved equivalent), by tak-
ing a mini-course offered by the Center for
Instructional and Research Computing
Activities (CIRCA), or by passing an exemption
test offered by CIRCA.

ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Students should choose sufficient elective
course hours to complete the 64 semester hours
required in lower division. These electives may
be taken in such areas as mathematics, social
sciences, foreign languages, humanities, etc.
Students should choose their electives with care:
(1) students in the B.S.B.A. program will receive
no credit for taking additional courses, beyond
those required or allowed, in their major field;
(2) students in the B.A.B.A. program may take
additional courses in their outside area of spe-
cialization, but all courses allowed for that area
will count toward the GPA calculated for that
specialization, and (3) students in the B.A.B.A.
program may take no more than one elective
course (in addition to business core courses)
from each given area within the college.

LOWER DIVISION COURSE SEQUENCE
This sequence is designed to provide guid-
ance for students seeking admission to the
College of Business Administration. Although
this sequence will satisfy the admission proto-
cols previously defined, students are encouraged
to make adjustments to this sequence of courses
in light of their personal strengths, weaknesses
and outside constraints. For example, general
education courses between the first and second
semester and between the third and fourth
semester may be exchanged, and students may
wish to take a four-hour general education
course in place of a one-hour free-elective.
Students who need further clarification should
contact an adviser in the college's Undergradu-
ate Programs Office.
Semester 1 Credits
ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics ........3
English Composition .............................................. 3
Historical and Philosophical Studies .............3.
Physical and Biological Sciences..........................3
Social and Behavioral Sciences ..........................3.
Free-Elective .................................................. ....
16


Semester 2 ....................................................Credits
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I ......................3.
International Studies and Diversity ..................3.
Literature and the Arts........................................... 3
Physical and Biological Sciences........................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences .............................3
Free-Elective .................................... ...............
16
Semester 3 ....................................................Credits
ACG 2021 Introduction to Financial
Accounting................................. ............... 3
ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics .........3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics .............3.
English Composition.............................................. 3
Historical and Philosophical Studies .................3
Free-Elective...................................... ..............
16
Semester 4 Credits
ACG 2071 Introduction to Managerial
Accounting................................. ............... 2
CGS 3531 Introduction to Computer
Programming and Software Packages...........3
International Studies and Diversity ..................3.
Literature and the Arts...........................................3
Physical and Biological Sciences..........................3
Free-Elective..................................... .............. 2
16

Upper Division Requirements -
General
Upper division requirements total 60 semes-
ter hours. They include business core require-
ments, free-elective requirements and major
field (B.S.B.A. degree) or outside area of special-
ization (B.A.B.A. degree) requirements.
Students must specify a major or an outside
area of specialization before they will be admit-
ted to the college. Once admitted, students must
seek formal approval before they will be
allowed to change majors. Approval will be
dependent on their performance and the col-
lege's faculty, resource and enrollment con-
straints.
Students will be required to follow the cur-
riculum specified for their program. All busi-
ness core and major or specialty course work
must be taken in residence at the University of
Florida. Students who have taken equivalent
course work at another institution will be
required to either retake the course at the
University of Florida or, subject to the approval
of the college's undergraduate committee, take a
higher-level course in the same subject area.
Additional semester hours are not earned when
equivalent courses are repeated.
BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS
Credits
BUL 4310 The Legal Environment of
Business ................................. ......4..
ECO 3100 Managerial Economics .....................3
Prerequisites: ECO 2023, MAC 3233
FIN 3408 Business Finance...............................4
Prerequisites: ACG 2021, ACG 2071


ISM 3011 Information Systems in
Organizations.............................................. 2
Prerequisites: MAN 3021, CGS 3531
(formerly CAP 3802) or proven
computer literacy
MAN 3021 Principles.of Management...............4
MAN 4504 Operations Management..................4
Prerequisites: MAC 3233, STA 3023
MAN 4720 Business Policies.......................... 2
Prerequisite: Completion of all other
core courses (B.A.B.A. students only)
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing.................4
QMB 3250 Statistics for Business Decisions.....4
Prerequisites: STA 3023
Subtotal- B.A.B.A. -31; B.S.B.A. 25-29
These courses are required of all students in
either the B.S.B.A. or the B.A.B.A. degree pro-
grams, with the exception that CIS majors will
not take ISM 3011 and will take STA 4033
instead of QMB 3250 and only B.S.B.A. students
will take MAN 4720. For all students, the college
will accept ECO 3101 in place of ECO 3100, as
long as it was taken prior to 1994 Spring. Like-
wise, the college also will accept QMB 3600 in
place of MAN 4504, as long as it was taken prior
to 1994 Spring.

ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS
Students should choose sufficient elective
courses to complete the 60 semester hours
required in upper division. As in lower division,
students should choose their electives with care:
(1) students in the B.S.B.A. program will receive
no credit for taking additional courses beyond
those required or allowed in their major field,
(2) students in the B.A.B.A. program may take
additional courses in their outside area of special-
ization, but all courses allowed for that area will
count toward the GPA calculated for that spe-
cialization, and (3) students in the B.A.B.A. pro-
gram may take no more than one elective course
(in addition to business core courses) from each
given area within the college.

B.S.Ac. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Bachelor of Sciences in Accounting (B.S.Ac.)
degree requirements may be found in the Fisher
School of Accounting section.

B.S.B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the lower and upper division
requirements listed above, students in the
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
(B.S.B.A.) degree program must follow the cur-
riculum specified for their major. Major fields of
study include:

Computer and Information
Sciences
The curriculum for computer and informa-
tion sciences (C.I.S.) majors is designed to pre-
pare students for technical and managerial posi-
tions in computer science in public and private
organizations. The curriculum emphasizes three
aspects pertinent to the student's professional




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