• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendars
 Florida's first university
 Administration
 General information
 Time-shortened degree opportun...
 Lower division requirements
 Colleges
 Departments of instruction
 Florida's statewide course numbering...
 Course prefixes listing
 Description of courses
 Staff and faculty
 Index














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00027
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Calendars
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
    Florida's first university
        Page xi
    Administration
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Admissions
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
        Expenses
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
        Student affairs
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Student life
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
        Student academic regulations
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
    Time-shortened degree opportunities
        Page 41
    Lower division requirements
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Colleges
        Page 48
        Fisher school of accounting
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        College of agriculture
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
        College of architecture
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        School of building construction
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
        College of business administration
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        College of dentistry
            Page 78
        College of education
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
        College of engineering
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        College of fine arts
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
        School of forest resources and conservation
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
        College of health and human performance
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
        College of health related professions
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
        College of journalism and communications
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
        Center for Latin American studies
            Page 138
        College of law
            Page 139
        College of liberal arts and sciences
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
        College of medicine
            Page 151
        College of nursing
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
        College of pharmacy
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
        College of veterinary medicine
            Page 162
            Page 163
        Division of military science
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
    Departments of instruction
        Page 167
        Page 168
    Florida's statewide course numbering system
        Page 169
        Page 170
    Course prefixes listing
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Description of courses
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
    Staff and faculty
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        University of Florida agricultural extension service county and home economics agents
            Page 373
            Page 374
            Page 375
            Page 376
            Page 377
        Members of the faculty who retired since 1982
            Page 378
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
    Index
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
        Page 385
Full Text



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD

of the UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA













The Undergraduate Catalog
has been adopted as a rule of the
University pursuant to the provi-
sion of Chapter 120 of the Flor-
ida Statute. Addenda to the
University Record Series, if any,
are available upon request to the
Office of the Registrar.












VOLUME LXXXII SERIES 1 NUMBER 2 MARCH 1987
THE UNIVERSITY RECORD (USPS 652-760) PUBLISHED QUAR-
TERLY BY THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, OFFICE OF PUBLICA-
TIONS, GAINESVILLE, FL 32611. SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA, 32601. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS
CHANGES TO OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR, UNIVERSITY OF FLOR-
IDA, GAINESVILLE, FL 32611.












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TABLE OF CONTENTS
University Calendar ................ ... ........... v
Florida's First University........................... xi
Board of Education ......... ....................... xii
Administrative Council of the University. ................. xii
General Information ................ ............... 1
Adm missions .................................... 11
Expenses ......................................... 19
Student Affairs.................................. 23
Student Life-Sciences, Facilities, Activities ............... 30
Student Academic Regulations ........................ 35
Time Shortened Degree Opportunities .................. 41
Lower Division Requirements:
General Information for Freshmen and Sophomores...... 42
Colleges, Schools, and Curricula
Fisher School of Accounting ........................ 48
College of Agriculture ............................ 51
College of Architecture .......................... 65
School of Building Construction ..................... 70
College of Business Administration ............... 74
College of Dentistry ............................ 78
College of Education ........................... 79
College of Engineering ............................. 85
College of Fine Arts ............ ..............'.. 102
School of Forest Resources and Conservation .......... 113
College of Health and Human Performance ...........117
College of Health Related Professions ................ 124
College of Journalism and Communications........... 131
Center of Latin American Studies .................... 138
College of Law .................................. 139
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................. 140
College of Medicine .............................. 151
College of Nursing .............................. .152
College of Pharmacy ............................ 155
College of Veterinary Medicine ................... 162
Division of Military Science ................... .... 164
Departments of Instruction (Index) .................. 167
Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System.......... 169
Course Prefixes Listing ............... ............. 171
Description of Courses ............................. 175
Staff and Faculty .................... ......... 322
Index .......................................... 382


This publication was produced at an annual cost of $48,584 or $1.079 per
copy to inform students, parents, University faculty, and other interested per-
sons of degree programs and curricula offerings at the University of Florida.








-CALENDAR FOR
1987


JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S SM T W T F S
1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4 5
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30
30 31

OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F'S SM T W T F S SM T W T F S
1 2 3 1' 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 29 30 27 28 29 30 31



CALENDAR FOR
1988


JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S SM T W T F S
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
10 11 12 13 14, 15 16 14 15 16 17. 18 19 20 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 27 28 29 30 31
31
APRIL MAY JUNE
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30

JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F SM T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F SM T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
30 31








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR, 1987-88



APPLICATION DEADLINES
The application deadlines indicated below apply to former University of Florida students, or new students seeking admission to the University of Florida
for the first time, and currently enrolled students submitting an Application to Change Classification.
The application deadlines refer to completion of all application procedures including receipt of all required credentials and the completion of depart-
mental requirements, if any. Applications for admission to limited access programs received after the deadline may be returned unprocessed. Applica-
tions for admission to other programs received after the deadline will be processed only on a space available basis. Applications for admission to certain
programs will be considered only for the terms) indicated below.


LOWER DIVISION
Beginning Freshmen
Freshman & Sophomore Transfers
UPPER DIVISION
Juniors, Seniors & Postbaccalaureate
Architecture
Building Construction
Clinical & Community Dietetics
Graphic Design
Interior Design
Journalism
Landscape Architecture
Medical Technology
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
Physician Assistant
All Other Undergraduate Programs
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Architecture
Master of Business Administration
Clinical Psychology
Master of Laws in Taxation
*All Other Graduate Programs
(if available)


1987 FALL


March 2
June 19


February 2
March 2
February 16
April 1
May 11
April 3
May 11
February 16
June 19
February 16
March 2
February 16
NA
June 19

January 15
April 1
February 16
June 29

June 19


1988 SPRING


November 2
November 2


November 2
October 1
NA
NA
October 30
November 2
October 30
NA
November 2
NA
NA
NA
NA
November 2


November 2


1988 SUMMER
TERMS A & C

March 1
March 1


March 1
NA
NA
NA
March 1
March 1
March 1
"NA
February 1
NA
NA
NA
NA
March 1


March 1


TERM B

March 1
April 25


April 25
NA
NA
NA
April 25
April 25
April 25
NA
April 25
NA
NA
NA
December 15
April 25

NA
NA
NA
NA

April 25


*NOTE: Some departments have found it necessary to establish deadlines for receipt of applications and all supporting records that are earlier than the
deadline established by the Graduate School. All graduate applicants are advised to check with the appropriate department regarding application
deadlines.
PROFESSIONAL COLLEGES
Applicants for admission to the professional colleges of-Law, Dentistry, Medicine or Veterinary Medicine are advised to check directly with the college
regarding application deadlines.


OTHER IMPORTANT DATES
1987 FALL


Registration
Classes Begin
Drop/Add
Add Only
Deadline to Apply to Graduate
Deadline to Drop a Course by
College Petition
Deadline to Withdraw from
the University
Classes End
Final Examinations
Commencement


August 18-20
August 24
August 21-26
August 27
September 18

* October 30

November 25
December 11
Dec. 12-18
December 19


1988 SPRING 1988 SUMMER
TERM A


January 4
January 5
January 5-7
January 8
January 22

March 18

April 8
April 22
April 23-30
April 30


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR 1987-88
FALL SEMESTER

1987
January 15, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for graduate program in Architec-
ture.
February 2, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Architecture.
February 16, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and


May 6
May 9
May 9-11
None
May 11

June 3

June 10
June 17
In Class
None


TERM B
June 24
June 27
June 27-29
None
June 29

July 22


July 29
August 5
In Class
August 6


TERM C
May 6
May 9
May 9-11
None
May 11

July 22

July 29
August 5
In Class
August 6


receipt of official transcripts for Clinical and Community Die-
tetics, Medical Technology, Occupational Therapy, Physical
Therapy and graduate program in Clinical Psychology.
March 2, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including receipt of official transcripts for
Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this date
may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Building Construction and
Pharmacy.
March 14, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
April 1, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Graphic Design and graduate
program in Business Administration (MBA).
V








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


April 3, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Journalism.
May 11, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of.official transcripts for Interior Design and Land-
scape Architecture.
June 13, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
June 19, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Nursing.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for all graduate programs except
those listed with an earlier deadline date under the preceding
section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for all undergraduate programs
except those listed with an earlier deadline date under the
preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Univer-
sity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for the
Fall term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Fall term, except
for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under the pre-
ceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
June 29, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Master of Laws in Taxation
program.
August 18-20, Tuesday-Thursday
Orientation and registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration on Thursday,
August 20, after 3:00 p.m.
August 21, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students register-
ing late subject to $25 late fee.
August 24, Monday-Classes begin.
August 26, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course and for changing sections. Stu-
dents liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any
change after this date will be according to individual college
petition procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and prior
to the date WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or military
reasons. Students who withdraw from the University after this
date and until September 18 may receive a 25% refund of
course fees less.mandatory fees.
August 27, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Fall Semester and for
adding a course (no drops permitted). No one permitted to
start registration on Thursday, August 27, after 1:00 p.m.
Last day for filing S-U option application in Registrar's Office.
August 28, Friday, 2:30 p.m.
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be
established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to pay
fees with Student Financial Services by this date will be sub-
ject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence hall, in order to receive fee statement, if
applicable, at new address.
September 7, Monday-Labor Day
Classes suspended.
September 18, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding term,
except in a modular course.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless with-
drawal is for medical or military reasons.,
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office for
a degree to be conferred at the end of the Fall Semester.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts certif-
icate to be awarded at the end of the semester.


September 23, Wednesday, Sundown, to September 25, Friday,
Sundown, Rosh Hashanah (religious holiday).
If possible, examinations should not be scheduled during this
time.
September 26, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
October 16-17, Friday-Saturday-Homecoming
All classes suspended Friday.
October 30, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by college petition. No drop per-
mitted after this date without receiving WF grade.
November 11, Wednesday-Veterans Day
Classes suspended.
November 25, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
November 26-27, Thursday-Friday-Thanksgiving
Classes suspended 10:10 p.m. November 25.
November 30, Monday, 7:25 a.m.
Classes resume.
December 4, Friday, 10:10 p.m.
No examinations, class quizzes or progress tests may be given
after this date and prior to the final examination period.
December 10-11, Thursday-Friday
Discretionary review days.
December 11, Friday
All classes end.
December 12, Saturday, 7:30 a.m.
Final Examinations begin.
December 17, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
December 18, Friday, 3:00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of the
Registrar.
December 19, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
December 21, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Fall Semester including those
given extension by Department Chairman.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR 1987-88
SPRING SEMESTER

1987
October 1, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Building Construction.
October 30, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Interior Design and Land-
scape Archaieclure.
November 2, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures including receipt of official transcripts for
Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this date
may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Architecture, Journalism, and
Nursing.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for all undergraduate and gradu-
ate programs except those listed with an earlier deadline date
under the preceding section APPUCATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Univer-
sity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for the
Spring term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Spring term,
except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under
the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


1988
January 4, Monday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one per-
mitted to start registration on Monday, January 4, after 3:00
p.m.
January 5, Tuesday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students register-
ing late subject to $25 late fee.
January 5, Tuesday-Classes begin.
January 7, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course and for changing sections. Stu-
dents liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any
change after this date will be according to individual college
petition procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol -
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and prior
to the date WF's are assigned.
Last day students may withdraw from the University and receive
refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or military rea-
sons. Students who withdraw from the University after this day
and until January 29 may receive a 25% refund of course fees
less mandatory fees.
January 8, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Spring Semester and
for adding a course (no drops permitted). No one permitted to
start registration on Friday, January 8, after 1:00 p.m.
Last day for filing S-U option application in Registrar's Office.
January 11, Monday, 2:30 p.m.
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be
established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to pay
fees with Student Financial Services by this date will be sub-
ject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement, if
applicable, at new address.
January 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office for
a degree to be conferred at the end of he Spring Semester.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts certif-
icate to be awarded at the end of the semester.
January 29, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive,
25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless with-
drawal is for medical or military reasons.
February 5, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding term,
except in a modular course.
February 29-March 4, Monday-Friday-Spring Break.
All classes suspended Monday thru Friday.
March 12, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
March 18, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by a college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
April 8, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
April 15, Friday, 10:10 p.m.
No examinations, class quizzes or progress tests may be given
after this date and prior to the final examination period.
April 21-22, Thursday-Friday
Discretionary review days.
April 22, Friday
All classes end.
April 23, Saturday, 7:30 a.m.
Final examinations begin.
April 28, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
April 29, Friday, 3:00 p.m.
Report from colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.
April 30, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
May 2, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Spring Semester including
those given extension by Department Chairman.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR 1987-88
SUMMER TERM A

1988
February 1, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures including receipt of official transcripts for
Nursing.
March 1, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion.of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Architecture, Interior Design,
Journalism and Landscape Architecture.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures including receipt of official transcripts for
Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this date
may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for all undergraduate and gradu-
ate programs except those listed with an earlier deadline date
under the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Univer-
sity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for the
Summer A term.
Last date to apply to change classification for the Summer A
term, except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed
under the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
May 6, Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one per-
mitted to start registration on Friday, May 6, after 3:00 p.m.
May 9, Monday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration beginsAIIl students register-
ing late subject to $25 late fee.
May 9, Monday-Classes begin.
May 11, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Term A. No
one permitted to start registration on Wednesday, May 11, af-
ter 1:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students liable
for fees for all hours for which registered. Any change after this
date will be according to individual college petition proce-
dures.until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol will be as-
signed for courses dropped after this date and prior to the date
WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or military
reasons. Students who withdraw from the University after this
date and until May 17 may receive a 25% refund of course fees
less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office for
a degree to be conferred at the end of the Summer Term A.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts certif-
icate to be awarded at the end of Summer Term A.
May 12, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be
established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to pay
fees with Student Financial Services by this date will be sub-
ject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement, if
applicable, at new address.
May 17, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless with-
drawal is for medical or military reasons.
May 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding term
except in a modular course.
May 30, Monday-Memorial Day
Classes suspended.
June 3, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by a college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
June 4, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


June 10, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
June 17, Friday-All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
June 18, Saturday-Graduation date.
No commencement ceremony.
June 20, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Summer Term A.
June 21, Tuesday, 2:00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of the
Registrar.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR 1987-88
SUMMER TERM B

1988
December 15, 1987, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Physician Assistant Program.
March 1, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures including receipt of official transcripts for
Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this date
may be considered on a space available basis.
April 25, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Architecture, Interior Design,
journalism, 'Landscape Architecture, and Nursing.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for all undergraduate and gradu-
ate programs except those listed with an earlier deadline date
under the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Univer-
sity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for the
Summer B term.
Last day to change classification for the Summer B term, except
for programs with earlier deadlines listed underthe preceding
section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
June 24, Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one per-
mitted to start registration on Friday, June 24, after 3:00 p.m.
June 27, Monday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students register-
ing late subject to $25 late fee.
June 27, Monday-Classes begin..
June 29, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Term B. No
one permitted to start registration on Wednesday, June 29, af-
ter 1:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students liable
for fees for all hours forwhich registered. Any change after this
date will be according to individual college petition proce-
dures until date WF's are assigned. A.W symbol will be as-
signed for courses dropped after this date and prior to the date
WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or military
reasons. Students who withdraw from the University after this
date and until July 6 may receive a 25% refund of course fees
less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option application in Registrar's Office.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office for
a degree to be conferred at the end of the Summer Term B.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts certif-
icate to be awarded at the end of Summer Term B.
June 30, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be
established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to pay
fees with Student Financial Services by this date will be sub-
ject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement, if
applicable, at new address.


July 4, Monday-Independence Day Holiday
Classes suspended.
July 6, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless with-
drawal is for medical or military reasons.
July 15, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding term
except in a mpdular course.
July 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by a college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
July 29, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
August 4, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
August 5, Friday-All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of the
Registrar 3:00 p.m.
August 6, Saturday-Commencement
August 8, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Summer Term B.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR 1987-88
SUMMER TERM C

1988
February 1, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures including receipt of official transcripts for
Nursing.
March 1, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures including receipt of official transcripts for
Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this date
may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for Architecture, Interior Design,
Journalism, and Landscape Architecture.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all appli-
cation procedures, including departmental requirements, and
receipt of official transcripts for all undergraduate and gradu-
ate programs except those listed with an earlier deadline date
under the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Univer-
sity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for the
Summer C term.
Lastday to apply to change classification for the Summer C term,
except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under
the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
May 6, Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one per-
mitted to start registration on Friday, May 6, after 3:00 p.m.
May 9, Monday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students register-
ing late subject to $25 late fee.
May 9, Monday-Classes begin.
May 11, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Term C. No
one permitted to start registration on Wednesday, May 11, af-
ter 1:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students liable
forfeesforall hours forwhich registered. Anychangeafter this
date will be according to individual college petition proce-
dures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol will be as-
signed for courses dropped after this date and prior to the date
WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or military
reasons. Students who withdraw from the University after this
date and until May 27 may receive a 25% refund of course fees
less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option application in Registrar's Office.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office for
a degree to be conferred at the end of the Summer Term C.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts certif-
icate to be awarded at the end of Summer Term C.
May 12, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must be
established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to pay
fees with Student Financial Services by this date will be sub-
ject to late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement, if
applicable, at new address.
May 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and receive
25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding term
except in a modular course.
May 30, Monday-Memorial Day
Classes suspended.
June 4, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
June 17, Friday-All term C classes end for summer break.


June 20-24, Monday-Friday
Summer break-classes suspended.
June 27, Monday-Term C classes resume.
July 4, Monday-Independence Day Holiday
Classes suspended.
July 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by a college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades,
July 29, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiving
failing grades in all courses.
August 4, Thursday, 9:00 a.m.
Degree candidates grades due.
August 5, Friday-All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of the
Registrar 3:00 p.m.
August 6, Saturday-Commencement
August 8, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Summer Term C.





































&i































































NI











FLORIDA'S FIRST UNIVERSITY


A COMPLETE UNIVERSITY
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA is one of America's'truly dis-
tinctive universities. Along with Ohio State and the University
of Minnesota, the University of Florida offers more academic
programs on a single campus than any of the nation's other uni-
versities, private and public. It is also the nation's 10th largest
university; yet its division into 20 colleges and schools, with
their 140 departments, gives students the opportunity-to know
and work closely with their classmates and teachers. Its loca-
tion in Gainesville, dedicated from its founding to serve as a
home away from home for college students, adds immeasur-
ably to the educational and social opportunities for students.
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA was admitted in 1985 to the
Association of American Universities (AAU), the most presti-
gious organization in higher education. Headquartered in
Washington, D.C., the AAU is composed of North America's
finest higher education institutions, 54 of them in the U.S. and
2 in Canada. Those universities judged to be preeminent in
graduate and professional education and research are invited to
membership in the AAU and must receive a three-fourth's vote
of the body, which includes Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford,
MIT, Berkeley, Michigan, Southern California, and Columbia
among others. UF now joins its sister institutions-Duke, North
Carolina, Rice, Texas, Tulane, and Vanderbilt-as the outstand-
ing universities in the South. ,
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA is a residential campus, with
rich resources available because of its size, that provides a
learning and living environment for the whole person: Daily
contacts-in class, in clubs, between classes and in campus res-
idence halls or apartments-with other students from every
spectrum of society and with virtually every career goal...
Daily opportunities to attend concerts, theatre productions, art
shows, seminars, athletic contests, lectures, and a myriad of
other events featuring nationally and internationally known tal-
ents... Daily communications with a faculty that is comprised
of some of the nation's leading scholars... Working in labora-
tories and libraries among the best in the nation. More than
2,000 faculty members and graduate students are awarded re-
search and training grants annually, ranking the University of
Florida among the nation's top 35 research universities.

UNDERGRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES
Because it is a complete university-freshmen through pro-
fessional and postdoctoral-the University of Florida offers
more for its undergraduate students.
Undergraduates aspiring to graduate or professional degrees
can study in libraries and laboratories equipped for almost
every advanced degree offered anywhere in the world. They
study alongside advanced graduate and professional students.
They can begin their research as early as they desire, even as
freshmen. They can receive counseling from a faculty that has
been assembled from major universities in the nation and the
world. The University of Florida ranks among the nation's top
25 ituiversities whose bachelor's degree holders move into
graduate programs. Its preparatory programs for admission to
graduate and professional schools are recognized by the
world's leading universities.
Students desiring only bachelor's degrees can choose from
over 100 majors, almost all of them strengthened by correlative
graduate degree programs. This means students can enrich
their bachelor's degree programs with advanced courses de-
signed for both undergraduates and graduates. It also means a
wider selection of course opportunities outside a student's ma-
jor field of study. Above all, it means an undergraduate student
pursues studies in a complete academic atmosphere.


COSMOPOLITAN STUDENT BODY
Students attending the University of Florida come from every
county in the state, every state in the nation, and last year from
100 foreign countries. Eighty-seven per cent of the university's
entering freshmen earned admission test scores above the na-
tional mean. Over half the student enrollment in the univer-
sity's upper division colleges are transfers from Florida's
community colleges and other institutions. They experience no
difficulty competing academically with students who begin
their work at the University of Florida. The University of Florida
ranks nationally 5th among state universities and 12th among
all universities in the nation in the number of national merit and
merit achievement scholars in attendance. But the University of
Florida is not an elitist university. And it does not want to be.
Students who do not qualify academically for admission to a
Florida state university may be admitted under special pro-
grams. These students,'and any others who desire, are offered
special instructional programs to help them progress scholasti-
cally. These programs have the central goal of equipping stu-
dents with the ability to complete their degrees.

LEADERSHIP TRAINING
Perhaps above all else, the University of Florida offers its stu-
dents leadership training and experience. Its results are proven.
Half of Florida's cabinet members, in addition to the Governor,
are UF graduates, as are approximately one-third of the state
senators, members of the state House of Representatives, Flo-
ridians in the U.S. Congress and state Supreme Court justices.
Florida's most influential governmental, professional and busi-
ness persons have attended the University of Florida. Thou-
sands of other Florida graduates occupy key positions in every
known professional endeavor throughout the state, in the na-
tion, and in many parts of the world.
These are reasons behind the University of Florida's leader-
ship training success. The contained campus-in a larger com-
munity whose principal focus is on the University-provides
thousands of leadership opportunities. Student Government at
the University of Florida is one of the nation's most indepen-
dent and influential. Every college has its own student council.
Almost every committee for governance of the university as a
whole-and there are dozens of them-has student members.
The University turns many of its activities over to students to
implement. Students serve on advisory boards and councils in
city and county government. Hundreds of students are em-
ployed in career-developing positions and serve internships in
Gainesville area institutions. More than 300 student organiza-
tions, including fraternities and sororities, require full slates of
officers. Virtually every academic offering provides opportuni-
ties for membership in chapters of national student organiza-
tions. Churches and civic groups in the community provide
special programs and opportunities just for University of Flor-
ida students. More than 500 participate in a student volunteer
action organization, providing companionship and assistance
to children, the elderly, the handicapped, the incarcerated, the
underprivileged,-and the lonely in 14 separate programs. It is
the largest student volunteer action group in the nation. A
nationally-recognized Student Services Office offers counsel-
ing programs for dozens of special student problems-both
academic and personal-as well as leadership training pro-
grams.
The University of Florida sees every student as a whole per-
son. It has planned its programs and activities accordingly.










FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
BOB MARTINEZ
Governor
State of Florida.
BOBBY BRANTLEY
Lieutenant Governor
State of Florida
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State
State of Florida
ROBERT BUTTERWORTH
Attorney General
State of Florida
GERALD A. LEWIS
Comptroller
SState of Florida
BILL GUNTER JR.
State Treasurer and Insurance Commissioner
State of Florida
DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture
State of Florida
BETTY CASTOR
Commissioner of Education
State of Florida

BOARD OF REGENTS


T. TERRELL SESSUMS, J.D.
Chairman
Tampa, Florida
RALEIGH GREENE, J.D.
Vice Chairman
St. Petersburg, Florida
SUSAN AJOC
Student Regent
North Miami, Florida
C. DUBOSE AUSLEY, J.D.
Tallahassee, Florida
J. HYATT BROWN, B.S., B.A.
Daytona Beach, Florida
CECILIA BRYANT
Jacksonville, Florida


BETTY CASTOR, M.A.
Tallahassee, Florida
ROBIN GIBSON, J.D.
Lake Wales, Florida
WILLIAM F. LEONARD, J.D.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
RAUL MASVIDAL
Miami, Florida
JOAN DIAL RUFFIER, M.A.
Orlando, Florida
FRANK P. SCRUGGS, II, J.D.
Miami, Florida


STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
CHARLES B. REED, Ph.D.
Chancellor
State University System

ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL
OF THE UNIVERSITY


MARSHALL M. CRUISER, J.D.
President
ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN, Ph.D.
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
ALVIN V. ALSOBROOK, B.S.Adv., B.S.J.M.
Vice President for University and Government Relations
DAVID R. CHALLONER, M.D.
Vice President for Health Affairs
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S., C.P.A.
Vice President for Administrative Affairs


DONALD PRICE, Ph.D.
Vice President for Research
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D.
Vice President of Student Affairs
RICHARD T. SMITH, M.D.
Vice President for University of Advancement
KENNETH RAY TEFERTILLER, Ph.D.
Vice President for Agricultural Affairs
KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs










GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
HELEN L. MAMARCHEV, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President of Student Affairs
GERALD SCHAFFER, B.S., B.A.
Associate Vice President for Administrative Affairs
GEROLD L. SCHIEBLER, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs
CATHERINE A. LONGSTRETH, Ed.D.
Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs
PATRICK JOSEPH BIRD, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Health &
Human Performance
ANTHONY JAMES CATANESE, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Architecture
WAYNE H. CHEN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Engineering
JAMES M. DAVIDSON, Ph.D.
Dean of Research,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
WILLIAM B. DEAL, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Medicine
KIRK N. GELATT, V.M.D.
Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine
RICHARD R. GUTEKUNST, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Health Related Professions
JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D.
Dean of Academic Affairs for Continuing Education
DONALD W. LEGLER, D.D.S.
Dean of the College of Dentistry


MADELYN M. LOCKHART, Ph.D.
Dean of Graduate School and International Studies
RALPH L. LOWENSTEIN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Journalism and Communications
ARNETT C. MACE, D.F.
Director of the School of Forest Resources
and Conservation
LOIS MALASANOS, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Nursing
ALAN G. MERTEN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Business Administration
FRANK T. READ, J.D.
Dean of the College of Law
JOSEPH SABATELLA, M.F.A.
Dean of the College of Fine Arts
MICHAEL A. SCHWARTZ, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Pharmacy
CHARLES F. SIDMAN, JR., Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
DAVID C. SMITH, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Education
JOHN THEODORE WOESTE, Ph.D.
Dean for Extension,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
GERALD L. ZACHARIAH, Ph.D.
Dean for Resident Instruction,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES OF THE FACULTY


CARL BARFIELD, Ph.D.
Professor of Entomology and Nematology
LINDA BENJAMIN, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Home Economics
SANFORD V. BERG, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology


GLENNA CARR, Ed.D.
Professor of Economic Education
DAVID J. ORBAN, M.D.
Associate Professor of Surgery
RUSSELL L. ROBINSON, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Music


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STUDENT BODY


PAMELA BINGHAM
President of the Student Body
DEBBIE WASSERMAN
President of the Student Senate
RUSSELL BERGIN
Vice President of the Student Body


WILLIAM WALKER
Treasurer of the Student Body
PHILLIP DINGLE
Chancellor of the Honor Court
LOREEN TRESSLER
Chief Justice of the Traffic Court


PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES


BILL ARNSPARGER, M.Ed.
Director, Intercollegiate Athletics
JOHN BATTENFIELD, M.A.
Director, University Relations
T. PETER BENNETT, Ph.D.
Director of the Florida State Museum
BUDD BISHOP, M.F.A.
Director of the Harn Museum of Art
BRISBANE H. BROWN, JR., Ph.D.
Director, School of Building Construction
ROBERT A. BUTTON, M.Litt.,
Director, Human Resources
DALE CANELAS, Ph.D.
Director, University Libraries
JOHN CARLSON, B.S.
Director, Facilities Planning
BARBARA COHEN, M.Ed.
Executive Assistant to the President
THOMAS WINSTON COLE, Ed.D.
Dean, Academic Affairs


ROBERT D. CREMER, JR., M.S.
Director, Physical Plant Division
LINDA GRAY, M.A.
Director, Information and Publications Services
MICHAEL J. GREENBERG, Ph.D.
Scientific Director of the Whitney Marineland Lab
R..T. "JACK" HADLEY, B.S.B.A.
Director, Administrative Computing Service
MARK HALE, Ph.D.
Director, CIRCA
MICHAEL R. HARRIS, M.B.A.
Director, Budget and Analysis
JACQUELYN D. HART, Ph.D.
Affirmative Action Coordinator
JOSEPH P. HOUGH, B.S.B.A.
University Controller, Finance and Accounting
CHARLES T. HURST, B.S.
Director, Internal Audit
ROBERT R. LINDGREN, J.D.
Director, University Development










TERRY L. MCCOY, Ph.D.
Director, Center for Latin American Studies
R. WAYNE McDANIEL, B.A.
Director of Alumni Affairs
J. EDWARD POPPELL, M.Ed.
Assistant to the Vice President for
Administrative Affairs
WILLIAM S. PROPERZIO, Ph.D.
Director, Environmental Health and Safety
R.D. REEVES, II, M.S.
Coordinator, ROTC
HADLEY P. SCHAEFER, Ph.D.
Director, Fisher School of Accounting


JAMES E. SCOTT, Ph.D.
Dean for Student Services
L. VERNON VOYLES, B.A.
University Registrar
JUDITH S. WALDMAN; J.D.
University Attorney
THOMAS E. WALSH, Ph.D.
Director of Research for Sponsored Programs
JEANINNE N. WEBB, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Instructional Resources
VICTOR YELLEN, M.S.
Assistant to the Provost


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
JOHN E. IVES, M.S.
Executive Vice President, Shands Teaching Hospital
DAVID CARDWELL, J.D.
President of the University of Florida Alumni Association
J. MALCOLM RANDALL, M.H.A.
Director of the Veterans Administration Hospital










General Information

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CREED
1. We believe the University of Florida stands for the primacy
of truth, and for the integrity of the individual, the state,
and the nation.
2. We believe the University of Florida exists to serve the so-
cial, cultural, industrial, and political institutions of the
state.
3. We believe the University of Florida exists to'improve the
quality of life of the people of Florida.
4. We believe the University of Florida must continue the
two-fold task of institutions of higher learning: to wit, the
task of preserving existing knowledge through teaching,
and the task of developing new knowledge through re-
search.
5. We believe that research must include pure research to ad-
vance knowledge and applied research to seek solutions
for the problems of society.
6. We believe the University must consist of a community of
scholars in which emphasis is placed on intellect, on learn-
ing and discipline, and on the sharing of knowledge.
7. We believe the University of Florida serves well its pur-
poses for existence because of its inclusive, and mutually
supportive, programs in the arts, the humanities, the sci-
ences, and the professions.
8. We believe the University of Florida in order to fulfill its
functions must have talented students, distinguished fac-
ulty, a comprehensive library, adequate support personnel
for its programs, and sufficient and well-maintained equip-
ment and physical plant. -
9. We believe the University of Florida has an obligation to
make its programs and services known to the people and to
the government of the state, in order to best serve the pur-
poses for which the University exists.
10. We believe that, by fulfilling its proper functions, the Uni-
versity of Florida upholds and enhances the values of soci-
ety and the nation.
The University of Florida is accredited by the Southern Asso-
ciation of Colleges and Schools-Commission on Colleges.

HISTORY
Florida's oldest, the University of Florida traces its beginnings
to the takeover of the private Kingsbury Academy in Ocala by
the state-funded East Florida Seminary in 1853. The Seminary
was moved to Gainesville following the Civil War. It was con-
solidated with the state's land-grant Florida Agricultural Col-
lege, then in Lake City, to become the University of Florida in
Gainesville in 1906, with an initial enrollment of 102. Until
1947, UF was the men's school and one of only three state col-
leges. Since 1947, when the student body numbered 8,177
men and 601 women, UF has grown to more than 35,000, larg-
est in the south and 10th largest in the nation.

SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT
The University of Florida is located in Gainesville, a city of
more than 85,000 situated in north central Florida, midway be-
tween the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. The city is
known as an agricultural and small industrial center.
In addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville offers many
other advantages to students of the University. A golf course is
within easy reach of the campus, and swimming and boating
accommodations are available at nearby springs and rivers. The
lakes in the vicinity abound in freshwater fish, while the Atlan-
tic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico are within a two hours' drive.
As the seat of Alachua County, the city is the focal point of diver-
sified industrial and farming activities.
Practically every religious denomination is represented in the
Gainesville area including: Presbyterian, Baptist, Lutheran,
Methodist, Catholic, Episcopal, Christian, Seventh Day Advent-
ist, Church of Christ Scientist, Church of Christ, Christian and
Missionary Alliance, Advent Christian, Jewish, Church of Jesus


Christ of Latter Day Saints, Church of the Nazarene, Assembly
of God, Apostolic Church of Christ, Church of God, Disciples
of Christ, Pentecostal Holiness, United Church of Christ, and
Unitarian-Universalist. Several of these denominations main-
tain chapels adjacent to the campus. These include St. Augus-
tine Chapel (Catholic Student Center), the Baptist Student
Union, Wesley Foundation (Methodist Student Center), Chapel
of the Incarnation (Episcopal Student Center), Church of Christ,
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation (Jewish), the Lutheran Student
Association, the Latter Day Saints (Mormon), Disciples-
Presbyterian Student Center, and the Society of Friends
(Quaker). All the chapels carry on extensive programs of vital
interest to University students.

TRANSPORTATION
A schedule of daily bus service, with connections to all points
of the United States, is maintained by Southeastern Greyhound
Lines and Trailways Bus System. The Regional Transit system
serves the City of Gainesville. Eastern Airlines has daily flights
with connections to all parts of the U.S. Several commuter air-
lines serve major areas of the state.


*


GOVERNMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY
Direct supervision over the University of Florida, its policies
and affairs, is vested in the Board of Regenfs, a body composed
of eleven citizens who are appointed by the Governor for six-
year terms, one student appointed for one year, and the State
Commissioner of Education. University affairs are administered
by the President with the advice and assistance of the Univer-
sity Senate and various committees elected by the Senate and
appointed by the President.

ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS is
the chief business officer of the University. He is responsible for
establishing policy relating to university business matters; coor-
dinating the preparation and control of the operating budget;
collecting and disbursing funds in accordance with state stat-
utes; managing campus security, auxiliary services and the
maintenance of the physical plant and grounds; directing pur-
chasing, the administrative computer, staff personnel, property
control, and environmental health and safety.

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS-PROVOST
THE VICE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS is the chief
academic officer of the University and the Provost. In this ca-
pacity he supervises the allocation of resources in the academic
areas, the improvement of instruction, the correlation of in-
structional activities, the development and improvement of re-
search activities, the evaluation of university academic activity,
and the establishment of policy with respect to employment,
promotion, and tenure of the academic staff. In the absence of
the President, he acts with the authority and responsibility of
the President.

STUDENT AFFAIRS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS is the chief
student affairs officer for the University. The office is responsi-
ble for administering the various programs and departments
which deliver out-of-class services to students. It is also respon-
sible for establishing policy relating to student affairs matters.
Activities in this area include operation, career and cooperative
education, placement, health services, recreation, financial
aid, housing, individual and group counseling, student organi-
zations, the Reitz Union, judicial programs and leadership






General

GENERAL INFORMATION


training. A complete section on Student Affairs follows in this
catalog.


UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT,
acting as Executive Director, directs all operations associated
with the receipt, management, and administration of resources
generated for and by the University of Florida Foundation and
the National Alumni Association. This office further coordi-
nates with the Foundation and Alumni organizations the activi-
ties of development operations headed by the Director of
University Development and with the Vice President for Re-
search in operations of the Research Park.

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY AND GOVERN-
MENT RELATIONS is the chief officer of units responsible for
the University's relations and activities with governmental
agencies and groups (including the state legislature and the
U.S. Congress), the news media and the various publics, in-
cluding the Gainesville and University communities and other
citizen groups and individuals. The offices of Governmental
Relations, University Information (including the Division of In-
formation and Publications Services), and Internal Relations re-
port to the Vice President.





SEMESTER SYSTEM
The University of Florida operates on a semester system. The
academic year begins in August and ends the following August.
During this period there are two semesters averaging 15 weeks
of instruction plus a week of final examinations and two six-
week summer terms. Semesters begin in August and January
with the first summer term beginning in May, and the second
beginning in June. In most colleges of the University, courses
are scheduled in such a way that a student may enter in any
term and proceed normally through an appropriate sequence of
courses. Consult the individual college sections of the catalog
to determine programs that begin only in designated terms.

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING offers a curricula
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Accounting. The
bachelor's degree may be completed as part of the five-year
program leading to the degree Master of Accounting. Refer to
Fisher School of Accounting in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, a unit of the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences, offers curricula in all of the
major fields of agriculture and grants the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture. Refer to College of Agriculture section
in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE offers curricula in archi-
tecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban and re-
gional planning, and building construction. It confers the
degrees of Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Landscape Archi-
tecture, and Bachelor of Building Construction; Master of Arts
in Architecture, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning,
Master of Science in Building Construction, and Master of
Building Construction. Refer to College of Architecture section
in the Table of Contents.
THE SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION offers cur-
ricula leading to the degrees Bachelor of Building Construc-
tion, Master of Building Construction, and Master of Science in
Building Construction. Also, a Ph.D. program is offered in con-
junction with the College of Education. Refer to School of
Building Construction section in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION offers cur-
ricular programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in


Business Administration (refer to College of Business Adminis-
tration section in the Table of Contents) and a Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Accounting degree (refer to Fisher School of
Accounting section in the Table of Contents). The College also
offers the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree,
the Master of Arts (M.A.), the Master of Science (M.S.), and the
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY,an integral partof theJ. Hillis
Miller Health Science Center, graduated its first students in June
1976. The College offers an innovative modular curriculum
leading to the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine and has
initiated postgraduate programs in various dental specialities.
Refer to College of Dentistry section in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, a professional college, has
undergraduate programs in Elementary Education, Special Edu-
cation, and Art Education leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Arts in Education. In Elementary Education and Special Educa-
tion, students must complete a'Master of Education degree
prior to recommendation for teacher certification. In the vari-
ous areas of secondary education, a student must complete an
undergraduate degree through the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences and a Master of Education degree prior to recommen-
dation for teacher certification. Teacher education programs at
the University of Florida are NCATE approved and lead to certi-
fication in Florida and 30 other states where NCATE standards
provide the basis for reciprocal agreements. Refer to College of
Education section in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING offers curricula leading to
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, in
Civil Engineering, in Electrical Engineering, in Industrial and
Systems Engineering, and in 'Mechanical Engineering. The
Bachelor of Science in Engineering is awarded with majors in
Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Computer
and Information Sciences, Engineering Science, Environmental
Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Nuclear
Engineering. The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded with
majors in Chemical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Sci-
ences, and Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies. The College
also offers the Bachelor of Science in Surveying and Mapping
degree. Refer to College of Engineering section in the Table of
Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS offers curricula in the studio
arts, history of art, ceramics, graphic design, art education, mu-
sic, music education, theatre, and dance and confers the de-
grees Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of
Music, Bachelor of Music Education, and Master of Fine Arts.
Also, several graduate degrees including the Ph.D. in college
music teaching are offered in conjunction with the College of
Education. Refer to College of Fine Arts section in the Table of
Contents.
THE SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVA-
TION is a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
The School offers the Bachelor of Science in Forest Resources
and Conservation with majors in Forestry, Wildlife and Range
Sciences, and Resource Conservation. Refer to School of Forest
Resources and Conservation section in the Table of Contents.
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL offers programs leading to the de-
grees of Doctor of Philosophy in 75 fields, Doctor of Education,
Specialist in Education, Engineer, Master of Accounting, Master
of Agriculture, Master of Agricultural Management and Re-
source Development, Master of Architecture, Master of Arts,
Master of Arts in Mass Communication, Master of Arts in Teach-
ing, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning, Master of
Building Construction, Master of Business Administration,
Master of Education, Master of Engineering, Master of Exercise
and Sport Sciences, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Forest Re-
sources and Conservation, Master of Health Science Education,
Master of Health Science, Master of Laws in Taxation, Master of
Nursing, Master of Science, Master of Science in Building Con-
struction, Master of Science in Exercise and Sport Sciences,
Master of Science in Health Science Education, Master of Sci-
ence in Nursing, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Sci-
ence in Recreational Studies, Master of Science in Statistics,
Master of Science in Teaching, and Master of Statistics. All in-
struction is carried on by the faculties of the colleges and
schools listed here.







GENERAL INFORMATION


THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
offers services and programs through the departments of Exer-
cise and Sport Sciences; Health Science Education; and Recrea-
tion, Parks and Tourism. All the departments within the College
offer professional preparation programs leading to undergradu-
ate degrees in exercise and sport sciences; health science edu-
cation; and recreation, parks and tourism. Professional areas of
preparation include: teachers of physical education or health
education, health educators for public or voluntary agencies,
and recreation directors. The General Physical Education Pro-
gram in the Exercise and Sport Sciences department offers
courses for University students other than majors. Refer to Col-
lege of Health and Human Performance section in the Table of
Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS, a unit
of the J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center, offers programs
leading to a Bachelor of Health Science degree in the fields of
Clinical and Community Dietetics, Medical Technology, Occu-
pational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, and,
Rehabilitative Services. The College also offers programs lead-
ing to the degree of Master of Health Science in Health Services
Administration, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and
Rehabilitation Counseling. The Health Services Administration
Program is available only as part of a joint MBA/MHS degree
program offered in cooperation with the College of Business
. Administration. In addition, a Ph.D. degree in Clinical Psychol-
ogy is offered, and clinical and research opportunities for grad-
uate students in speech pathology and audiology in the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences is offered through the Department
of Communicative Disorders. Refer to College of Health Re-
lated Professions section in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICA-
TIONS offers curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in Advertising,
Bachelor of Science in Public Relations, and Bachelor of Sci-
ence in TelecommUnication. It offers sequences in magazines,
technical communications, and public relations in criminal jds-
tice.
There are areas of specialization in reporting, editing, photo-
journalism, and journalism education. Refer to College of Jour-
nalism and Communications section in the Table of Contents.
Campus Page, GainesvilleSun, is produced up to fourtimes a
week by advanced reporting, editing, and photojournalism stu-
dents of the College. It appears in the city edition of the Gaines-
ville Sun.
Magazine majors in the College produce two issues of a
campus-oriented magazine each year.
Gainesville Cable Press is a pioneer "electronic newspaper."
It appears on Channel 13 of the Cox Cablevision system in
Gainesville24 hours aday, and is produced by students from all
departments of the College.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW offers a curriculum leading to the
degree of Juris Doctor and a graduate program in taxation lead-
ing to the degree Master of Laws. Refer to College of Law sec-
tion in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES offers cur-
ricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of
Science in 33 disciplines which encompass the physical sci-
ences, the biological sciences, the mathematical sciences, the
humanities, and the social sciences. In addition, the College is
the academic home for Freshmen and Sophomores at the Uni-
versity and provides 95 percent of all general education course-
work required for the fulfillment of graduation requirements.
Enrollments in the College at the Junior and Senior classifica-
tions surpass those of any other College on campus. Thirty-
three undergraduate and twenty-five graduate degrees are
offered through the twenty-three departments and eight teach-
ing programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Refer
to College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section in the Table of
Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Science Center, offers a curriculum leading to the pro-
fessional degree of Doctor of Medicine. Master's and Ph.D. de-
grees in basic medical sciences are offered through the
Graduate School. A special medical scientist training program


leading to the combined degree of Doctor of Medicine-Doctor
of Philosophy is available jointly through the College of Medi-
cine and the Graduate School. Refer to College of Medicine
section in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF NURSING, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Science Center, offers a curriculum leading to the Bach-
elor of Science in Nursing degree. The college also offers a cur-
riculum leading to the Master of Nursing degree or a Master of
Science in Nursing degree. Refer to College of Nursing section
in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Science Center, offers a curriculum leading to the Doc-
tor of Pharmacy degree. A Bachelor of Science in the pharma-
cological sciences program is also offered. In addition the
Ph.D. and M.S. degrees are offered in pharmaceutical sciences
through the Graduate School. Refer to College of Pharmacy
section in the Table of Contents.
THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, a teaching unit
of theJ. Hillis Miller Health Science Center, offers a curriculum
leading to the professional degree of Doctor of Veterinary Med-
icine. Refer to College of Veterinary Medicine section in the
Table of Contents.


DIVISION OF
CONTINUING EDUCATION
During the last year more than 32,000 people took advantage
of the many University-sponsored opportunities made avail-
able through the Division of Continuing Education. More than
25,000 people participated in noncredit conferences, work-
shops, institutes and seminars. More than 5,000 students en-
rolled in Independent Study by Correspondence courses (both
credit and noncredit). Over 1,700 students studied in credit ex-
tension classes throughout the State. Additionally, numerous
international programs were offered through this division last
year. Backed by the resources of the University, the Division of
Continuing Education sees the State as its campus and the peo-
ple as its student body.


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL
UNITS SERVING ALL
COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE INTERCOLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER AND
.INFORMATION SCIENCES. During the last three decades elec-
tronic information processing machines with capabilities many
orders of magnitude beyond their predecessors have come into
being. Though still in their infancy, they are already extending
man's capability to solve problems in every field of human ac-
tivity. Toward this end the Intercollege Department of Com-
puter and Information Sciences was created in 1971. The
Department currently offers undergraduate and graduate de-
gree programs in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
Business Administration, Engineering, and an area of speciali-
zation in the technical communications degree program in the
College of Journalism and Communications. Degree programs
within other colleges are under study.
Subject areas found within the CIS curricula include pro-
gramming, systems analysis, software development tech-
niques, information representation and transformation,
language translators, operating systems, computer organiza-
tion, and applications.
The background prepares the student for a wide range of ca-
reers in the business, industrial, scientific, civic, and academic
worlds wherein information flow and analysis is of critical im-
portance to decision making.
In addition to the degree programs, several service courses
are available for those who need experience in computer appli-
cations for proper career preparation. For further information,
contact the CIS department office in 512 Weil Hall.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES is the Univer-
sity unit responsible for directing or coordinating interdiscipli-
nary instructional research programs related to the Latin





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


American and Caribbean area. It is a budgeted unit within the
University and is administered by a Director immediately re-
sponsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
The Center sponsors conferences, publishes the results of
scholarly research related to Latin America, and cooperates
with other University units in overseas development and train-
ing prograrps. It administers summer language and culture pro-
grams in Bogota, Colombia, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the
State University System and offers undergraduate, graduate,
and advanced graduate Certificates in Latin American Studies
and an interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Latin American Stud-
ies.
The Center also administers specialized research and training
programs in Caribbean migration and the Amazon.
THE CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND PRO-
GRAMS functions as a conduit for all international programs
and studies, excluding those operating in the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, on the campus. It is primarily a ser-
vice organization to facilitate administrative functions involved
with international student and faculty exchanges: coordination
and enrichment of exchange and research programs which
have an interdisciplinary relationship; provide the vehicle for
application for and receipt of federally funded institutional area
studies programs; assist administratively in functions involving
interdisciplinary technical assistance programs abroad; coun-
sel students interested in study abroad; assist faculty in seeking
funds for support of international education and research of
whatever nature; and develop proposals for such funds. The
Center is a source of faculty resource capabilities available at
the University for coordination of multiuniversity or consortia
interdisciplinary international research efforts, as well as a
source of material for study abroad programs.
A number of opportunities are available to students who wish
to broaden their education with studies in another country. Fif-
teen semester credit hours may be earned each semester on,any
academic year program abroad, and all UF summer programs
abroad satisfy UF summer residency requirements. Financial
aid may be used on all UF programs. Students must have com-
pleted their freshman year and have a 2.5 GPA to participate in
overseas programs. For detailed information contact the Center
for International Studies and Programs, 168 Grinter Hall, 392-
4904.
Study abroad programs at the University of Florida are open
to students of other universities also and include the following:
Beijing, China Haifa-Jerusalem-Tel-Aviv,
Bogota, Colombia Israel
Bonn-Tubingen, Germany Innsbruck, Austria
Copenhagen, Denmark London-Cambridge, England
Osaka, Japan Salamanca, Spain
Paris-Montpellier, France Rome, Italy
Poros, Greece Utrecht-Nijenrode,
Poznan, Poland The Netherlands
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
THE DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE offers the four-
year program and the two-year program of Army ROTC. Com-
pletion of either of these programs by a student leads to a
commission in one of the branches of the United States Army,
U.S. Army Reserve, or the Army National Guard. Freshman/
Sophomore AROTC carries no service obligation. Two, three,
and four year scholarships are available to interested students
who can qualify.
THE DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE offers a two-year
and a four-year program of Navy-Marine ROTC. Upon success-
ful completion of this officer training program, the graduate
receives a commission in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps
and is immediately assigned to active duty. Scholarships cover-
ing two, three, or four full years of study are available to male
and female students who can qualify.
THE DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES offers male
and female students both two-year and four-year programs in
Air Force ROTC. Completion of either of these officer education
programs leads to a commission in the United States Air Force.
Two, three, and four year scholarships are available on a com-
petitive basis to students enrolled in the program. Qualified in-
dividuals may compete for Pilot Training assignments and
begin learning to fly during their Junior year.


THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC has the responsibility for such
musical organizations as the University Bands, Orchestras,
Choruses, and Glee Clubs, and offers courses in the following
areas: (1) Theory of Music, (2) Composition, (3) History and
Literature, (4) Music Performance, (5) Church Music, (6) Music
Education, (7) Opera Workshop, and (8) Ensembles.
THE DEPARTMENT OF EXERCISE AND SPORT SCIENCES
General Physical Education Program offers a wide variety of
physical activity courses to all students enrolled at the Univer-
sity. The Department operates on the premise that although all
people need physical activity, all do not need or care for the
same kind. Consequently, tHe department offers many avenues
for the student to enhance physical health and understand its
relation to total health.
It is hoped that by developing competency in physical activ-
ity, students will be able to make self-determining decisions
concerning the role that exercise will play in their personal
lives.
Students may elect to take any course under the satisfactory-
unsatisfactory option. For further information see course offer-
ings and descriptions under the Exercise and Sport Sciences
heading in this catalog.


INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS
THE OFFICE OF INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES encourages
experimentation in teaching and individualized services to stu-
dents. Reporting directly to the Office of Academic Affairs, it
provides support for the innovation of alternative approaches
to instruction in the colleges and departments of the University;
assists faculty members in the development of instructional
modules or systems for specific courses; and furnishes techni-
cal assistance in the development and use of teaching materials
and media, analysis and improvement of teaching, and the eval-
uation of student performance. Three units include media pro-
diuction, testing and evaluation services, and an instructional
improvement section.
Other units emphasizing individualized instruction include
the Reading and Writing Center, the OIR Teaching Center,
Mathematics Laboratory, and the Language Laboratory. Se-
lected self-paced noncredit courses are available in reading,
writing, study habits, and language skills. Research consulta-
tion, course enrichment, and evaluation services are also of-
fered to interested faculty.
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR has charge of the admis-.
sion of students to the University of Florida and the distribution
throughout Florida and the country of information concerning
admission requirements and degree programs offered at the
University.
The services provided by this office include registration for
coursework, evaluating transcripts from other institutions, stu-
dents' petitions, scheduling classroom space, residency classi-
fication, VA certification, grade processing, and monitoring
academic regulations. The academic records of all currently en-
rolled students as well as those of all students who have previ-
ously been enrolled are maintained by this office.
The Office of the Registrar publishes the Schedule of
Courses, the Undergraduate Catalog, the Graduate Catalog in
conjunction with the Graduate School, the Commencement
Program in conjunction with the Commencement Committee,
and various brochures containing admissions and curricula in-
formation about each of the 13 undergraduate colleges on cam-
pus and the Graduate School.
THE COUNSELOR TO FOREIGN AGRICULTURE STU-
DENTS. Foreign students in Agriculture are requested to con-
tact the Office of International Programs in McCarty Hall. This
office aids foreign students to integrate their American educa-
tion more completely with actual conditions in their home-
lands and also gives information to all students interested in
foreign agricultural problems and careers in the tropics.







GENERAL INFORMATION


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY SERVICE
The Library consists of two central units, Library East and Li-
brary West, and branch libraries in the areas of Architecture and
Fine Arts, Music, Education, Engineering, Law, the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences, the J. Hillis Miller Health Sci-
ence Center, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, and the P.K. Yonge
Laboratory School. In addition, reading room facilities have
been provided for Business Administration, Health and Human
Performance, Journalism and Communications, and the resi-
dence hall areas.
The holdings of the libraries number over 2,400,000 cata-
loged volumes and a large number of uncataloged interna-
tional, federal, and state documents and newspapers. Many of
the materials are in micromaterial format (microfilm, micro-
card, and microfiche). The University'of Florida is a member of
the Association of Research Libraries, and its collection is one
of the largest in the Southeast.
A number of nationally significant research collections are
maintained as part of the library system. Since 1977, the li-
braries have opened the Isser and Rae Price Library of Judaica,
the largest collection of its kind in the Southeast; the Baldwin
Library, among the world's greatest collections of literature for
children; and housed in the Department of Rare Books and
Manuscripts, the Parkman D. Howe Collection of American Lit-
erature, which contains important first editions and manu-
scripts of every New England author writing before 1900. In the
rare books and manuscripts area, the researcher will also find
the papers of many well-known authors, such as Marjorie Kin-
nan Rawlings and John D. McDonald, and the Margaret Dreier
Robins papers, which are vital to the history of the women's
Trade Union League in America.
The P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History is the State's preemi-
nent Floridiana collection, and its holdings of Spanish Colonial
documents concerning the southeastern United States is the
largest of its kind in North America.
The Map Library is an extensive repository of maps, atlases,
aerial photographs, and remote sensing imagery with particu-
lar collection strengths for the southeastern U.S., Florida, Latin
Amea anrica, and Africa south of the Sahara.
Florida's interest and heritage is reflected in the Latin Ameri-
can Collection. The department maintains the most compre-
hensive collection of Caribbean materials found in a United
States university library.
A rich collection of serials, ephemera, and reference materi-
als dealing with the performing arts has been gathered into the
Belknap Collection.
Reference service is provided in Library West and in the vari-
ous branch libraries and reading rooms. The Reference Depart-
ment, located on the first floor of Library West, is a
comprehensive collection including indexes, abstracts, bibli-
ographies, handbooks, statistical sources, etc. Other services
include the searching of computerized bibliographic data ba-
ses and numeric, nonbibliographic databases such as the U.S.
census.
The main union catalog is also located within Library West on
the first floor. In 1983, the UF library system introduced a new
computerized catalog system, FOCUS (Florida Online Com-
puterized User System). It enables library users to have ex-
panded and rapid access to a large segment of library materials
in all campus libraries.
The regular schedule for the central libraries is Monday
through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m.; Sunday, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. The libraries serving
the various academic colleges and schools observe a similar
schedule with variations. Photoduplication and reserve mate-
rial services are available.


THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the Legis-
lature in 1917 as a department of the University of Florida.
Through its affiliation with the University it carries the dual re-


sponsibility of the State Museum of Florida and the University
Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of research in natural his-
tory. Its functions as an educational arm of the University are
carried forward through interpretive displaysand scientific and
popular publications. Under the administrative control of the
Director are the three departments of the Museum: Natural Sci-
ences is concerned with the study and expansion of the re-
search collections as well as research in a variety of areas in
functional and evolutionary biology, sociobiology and ecol-
ogy; Anthropology is concerned with the study of human varia-
tion and cultures, both historic and prehistoric; Interpretation is
concerned with the interpretation of knowledge through mu-
seum education and exhibit techniques. Members of the scien-
tifiE and educational staff of the Museum hold dual
appointments in appropriate teaching departments. Through
these appointments they participate in both the undergraduate
and graduate teaching programs and supervision of graduate
students.
Scientific reports are published in the Bulletin of the Florida
State Museum, Biological Sciences, the Ripley P. Bullen Mono-
graphs in Anthropology and History, and in the Contributions
of the Florida State Museum, Anthropology and History.
The research collections are under the care of curators who
encourage the scientific study of the Museum's holdings. Mate-
rials are constantly being added to the collections both through
gifts from froriends and as the result of research activities of the
Museum staff. There are extensive study collections of birds,
mammals, mollusks, reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrate
and vertebrate fossils, as well as archives of animals' sounds
associated with the bioacoustics laboratory. The archaeologi-
cal and ethnological collections are noteworthy.
The Allyn Museum of Entomology, Sarasota, Florids, is a unit
of the Department of Natural Sciences, Florida State Museum.
The combined Sarasota and Gainesville holdings in Lepidop-
tera rank the Allyn Museum of Entomology as the largest in the
western hemisphere and the premier Lepidoptera research cen-
ter in the world. The Allyn Museum of Entomology publishes
the Bulletin of the Allyn Museum of Entomology and sponsors
the Karl Jordan Medal. The Allyn Collection serves as a major
source for taxonomic and biogeographic research by a number
of Florida State Museum and Department of Zoology faculty
and students, as well as a great many visiting entomologists
from around the world.
The Florida State Herbarium is a unit of the Department of
Natural Sciences, Florida State Museum. It is an important sci-
entific resource in which some 250,000 specimens are curated.
Largest in the state and one of the largest in the Southeast, the
herbarium contains the most complete collections in existence
of Florida vascular plants and fungi. It also contains important
collections of tropical American bryophytes and Florida li-
chens. In addition, there is a particularly complete collection of
seeds. The portfolio of botanical illustrations and the growing
botanical library complement the ever-expanding collections
of plant specimens.
Opportunities are provided for students, staff, and visiting
scientists to use the collections. Research and fieldwork are
presently sponsored in all natural history fields. Students inter-
ested in these specialties should make application to the appro-
priate teaching department.
Graduate assistantships are available in the Museum in areas
of specialization emphasized in its research programs. Facili-
ties are available for graduate students.
The Museum is located at the corner of Museum Road and
Newell Drive in a modern facility completed in 1970. The pub-
lic halls are open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. each weekday,
including Saturday, and from 1:00-5:00 p.m. on Sundays and
holidays (closed Christmas Day). There is no admission charge.
The Museum is frequently used by University and public
school classes. Classes for children and special public pro-
grams are also offered for members of the University commu-
nity and the general public.





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL STATE AND
UNIVERSITY AGENCIES
THE FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE. The
transfer and application of knowledge through nonresident ed-
ucational programs is the primary purpose of the Florida Coop-
erative Extension Service, a component of the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences. The educational programs are tai-
lored to fit the needs of many audiences in areas of agricultural
production including energy, management, marketing, and uti-
lization; home economics; community resource development;
natural resource management; 4-H youth development; en-
ergy; and marine sciences. Audiences include adults and
youth, rural and urban citizens, minorities and people from all
economic levels. The Cooperative Extension Service is admin-
istered by the University of Florida under a memorandum of
understanding with USDA. There is also a cooperative program
funded through federal grants with Florida A&M University.
The basic legislative authority makes provision for cooperation
with local government. In Florida, county programs are carried
out jointly between the University and respective county gov-
ernments in the 67 counties. The Extension Service along with
Resident Instruction and Research in IFAS form a functional
model typifying the tripartite organizational structure envi-
sioned in the Morrill Act for the Land-Grant College System.
THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION AND PUBLICATIONS
SERVICES serves University central administration and Univer-
sity Educational and General budgeted academic units, depart-
ments, service offices, and other campus-related organizations
by distributing information through mass media outlets and
providing communication services for the campus community.
It interprets the University's programs, policies, and objectives
through newspapers and magazines, radio and television
broadcasts, publications, photographs, audiovisual presenta-
tions, special displays and exhibits, and community relations
projects. The Division produces the University Digest printed
in the Independent Florida Alligator and has complete video
tape production facilities used to develop television program-
ming for both commercial and public broadcasting stations. It
assists other units by coordinating copy content, design, and
preliminary production for booklets, folders, brochures, and
other printed material and assists in preparing bid specifica-
tions for printing.
THE OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS is
the campus headquarters for the University of Florida National
Alumni Association, Inc. and the University of Florida Founda-
tion, Inc.
The University of Florida National Alumni Association, Inc.
brings together the organized efforts of alumni and the promo-
tion of the interests and needs of the University and strives to
encourage continuous participation by alumni in the life of the
University.
The University of Florida Foundation exists to encourage sup-
port from the private sector to the University for both operating
and capital purposes. It is a private corporation organized to
hold funds for the benefit of the University, to invest them, and
to insure the maximum value of the University's private sup-
port.
THE FLORIDA FOUNDATION FOR FUTURE SCIENTISTS
was authorized in 1957 by the State Legislature for the purpose
of fostering and encouraging talented young people towards
careers-in science and engineering. With this objective, the
FFFS oversees the statewide network of 30 Regional Science
and Engineering Fairs in Florida schools for students in grades K
through 12. The Foundation also directly sponsors state-level
events each year in various locations throughout the state.
On the campus of the University of.Florida, the Florida Foun-
dation for Future Scientists operates as a center for precollege
academic achievers, reporting to the University of Florida Pro-
vost and the Office for Academic Affairs. High school students
who have demonstrated academic talent are regularly invited
to participate in residential programs sponsored by the FFFS.
Opportunities other than those usually available in high
schools are offered to qualified students through academic pro-
grams that utilize faculty and facilities of the University of Flor-
ida.


The Student Science Training Program (SSTP) is an 8-week
residential, research participation program for high ability pre-
college students who have expressed interest in science and.
engineering. It is held annually from mid-June until mid-August
and is a component of the Florida Governor's Summer Program
for Gifted and Academically Talented Students.
The Junior Science, Engineering, and Humanities Sympo-
sium is an annual 3-day meeting held in early February. High
school students and their teachers are invited to participate in
laboratory sessions, seminars, and workshops, and programs in
the humanities.
The FFFS also assists the UF colleges in planning and operat-
ing other on-campus programs for high school students. The
office cooperates with alumni affairs in the summer-visit pro-
gram for merit scholar semifinalists and with the Registrar's Of-
fice in coordinating Dual Enrollment for eligible high school
students requesting approved University coursework.
The Florida Foundation for Future Scientists is located at 111
Norman Hall, in offices at the corner of SW 5th Avenue and SW
12th Street.
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY is an integral part of the College
of Fine Arts. The Gallery is located on the campus facing South-
west 13th Street (or U.S. 441). An atrium and a contemporary
sculptural, fountain are two pleasing features of the Gallery's
distinctive architectural style. The Gallery, with 3000 square
feet of display space, is completely modern, air-conditioned,
and maintains a varied exhibition schedule of the visual arts
during the year. Thecontentof exhibitions displayed in the Uni-
versity Gallery range from the creations by traditional masters
to the latest and most experimental works by the modern avant
garde. The minor arts of yesterday and today along with the
creations of oriental and primitive cultures form topics for
scheduled exhibitions. Besides its regularly scheduled exhibi-
tions, which show for approximately four to six weeks, the Gal-
lery originates several unique exhibitions from its own and
other museums' collections each year. The Gallery's hours are
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except Sunday when they are 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. The Gallery is closed on Saturdays and holidays.
THE ART DEPARTMENT GALLERY, the teaching gallery, is
located adjacent to the Department's Office area on the third
floor of the classroom building (FAC) in the Architecture and
Fine Arts complex. As a direct and physical adjunct to the Art
Department's teaching program, this Gallery displays smaller
traveling exhibitions of merit as well as one man shows by fac-
ulty artists and student exhibitions. The Gallery is open Mon-
day through Friday from 8 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. It is closed Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND TROPICAL ARTS
is an interdisciplinary Center that provides coordination, direc-
tion, and focus to strengthen existing programs related to the
fine arts within the College of Fine Arts. The Center's faculty is
bound together by a desire to relate their research and teaching
activities to the broader concepts concerned with the fine arts
of various world cultures. The Center broadens and strengthens
existing interdepartmental relations and provides additional
stimuli and mechanisms for translating results of research into
ways of addressing societal needs. It also establishes more ef-
fective lines for training students at the undergraduate, gradu-
ate, and adult education levels in various aspects of the fine
arts.
THE UNIVERSITY BROADCAST FACILITY is operated by the
College of journalism and Communications. It includes WUFT,
Channel 5, a public broadcasting television station (PBS);
WUFT-FM, a noncommercial radio station (NPR) 89.1 MHz;
WRUF-AM, a commercial radio station (CBS) 850 KHz; and
WRUF-FM, a commercial FM station (CBS), stereo, 103.7 MHz.
Approximately 100 students are employed in these broad-
casting operations. Thus, in addition to the broad academic
background provided in the University's classrooms and labo-
Sratories, these work opportunities provide a valuable experi-
ence in day-to-day operations typical of the industry. Students
perform such functions as reporter, anchor-person, news pro-
ducer, recording engineer, director, cameraman, and an-
nouncer, all under the guidance of professional broadcasters.
The college has earned a nationwide reputation for the demon-
strated effectiveness of this academic and work experience
training.







GENERAL INFORMATION


WUFT-TV operates at the maximum power authorized for a
television station of its classification: 100,000 watts visual and
20,000 watts aural. The over-air broadcast signal encompasses
a 65-mile radius from the station's transmitter site northwest of
Gainesville and reaches 16 counties in North Central Florida.
WUFT-TV's signal is carried by more than 20 cable companies
in the state, expanding the coverage area even beyond these
broadcast boundaries. The station's programming is a mixture
of programs acquired through the Public Broadcasting Service
(PBS), Florida Public Broadcasting, Inc. (FPB), various public
broadcasting consortium, independent distributors, and lo-
cally produced programs. Of the latter category, WUFT-TV pro-
duces an evening newscast and a television magazine program,
both aired on weeknights, in addition to specially produced
features and documentaries. The station has won numerous lo-
cal, regional, and national awards for outstanding promotion
and advertising campaigns it has conducted in support of pro-
grams and activities, and WUFT-TV consistently ranks at or near
the top in percentage of viewership compared to other public
TV stations in the nation.
WUFT-FM, with .100,000 watts of power, reaches 16 North
Central Florida counties. The only public radio station in that
area, WUFT-FM broadcasts on a 24-hour a day schedule, year
round. The station presents classical, jazz, and folk music, in
addition to news and public affairs information. The station
provides a variety of on-air, production, and reporting experi-
ence for broadcast majors of the College of journalism and
Communications. These students are under the direct guidance
of professional public radio broadcasters. With a strong empha-
sis on local production and programming, WUFT-FM is a satel-
lite member station of the National Public Radio and Florida
Public Radio Networks and aims to service and reflect the di-
verse needs of the communities of North Central Florida.
WRUF-FM serves the contemporary music audience with al-
bum rock, while WRUF-AM's music is of a more adult nature,
featuring adult middle-of-the-road music from the 40's, 50's,
and 60's. Student communicators produce and broadcast regu-
lar news programs over both stations under faculty supervision.
The student's proximity to and participation in this diverse
broadcast operation brings a greater understanding of the op-
portunities and obligations that exist in the field of broadcast-
ing.
THE UNIVERSITY PRESSES OF FLORIDA. The University of
Florida is host to the State University System's scholarly pub-
lishing facility, University Presses of Florida. The goals of the
systemwide publishing program implemented by University
Presses of Florida are expressed in Board of Regent's policy:
... to publish books, monographs, journals, and other types
of scholarly or creative works. The Press shall give special
attention to works of distinguished scholarship in academic
-areas of particular interest and usefulness to the citizens of
Florida. The Press shall publish original works by state univer-
sity faculty members, but it may also publish meritorious
works originating elsewhere and may republish out-of-print
works.
Each university's faculty publishing committee is indepen-
dently responsible for selecting works for publication through
the facilities of University Presses of Florida. At the University
of Florida, the University Press Board of Managers oversees the
locally determined publishing program.
The purpose of the University of Florida Press is to encour-
age, seek out, and publish original and scholarly manuscripts
which will aid in developing the University as a recognized
center of research and scholarship.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and 15
faculty experts appointed by the President of the University,
determines policies of publication relating to the acceptance or
rejection of manuscripts and the issuance of author contracts.
Each year the board examines numerous manuscripts submit-
ted not only by the University faculty but by authors from all
over the United States, Europe, and Latin America.
University Presses of Florida is a member of the Association
of American University Presses and of the Association of Ameri-
can Publishers, Inc.


ORGANIZED RESEARCH
THE DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH-was estab-
lished by an act of the legislature to support and to foster spon-
sored research and training as a resource essential to excellence
in education and to provide maximum service to the State. The
Division is a development arm of the University, directed by the
Vice President for Research.
All proposals for sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid, and
training grants are approved by the Director. Negotiations on
administrative matters with potential contracting agencies or
sponsors of research and training projects are carried out by the
Division.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are in-
tended to stimulate growth and to assist in expanding a bal-
anced research and training program throughout the University.
These activities are intimately related to the support of the grad-
uate and professional program. The services provided are de-
signed to relieve the principal investigators in many
departments of detailed administrative and reporting duties
connected with some sponsored programs. The duties and re-
sponsibilities of the Division, of course, do not supplant the
prerogative of the principal investigator who seeks sponsors for
his own project nor the responsibility of the investigator for the
Scientific integrity of the project. In direct contacts between a
principal investigator and a potential sponsor, however, coordi-
nation with the Division is necessary to ensure uniformity in
contract requirements and to avoid duplication of negotiations
with the same sponsor.
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, the research
function unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS), has the responsibility of developing new knowledge and
technology toward solution of agricultural problems in the
State. Research is administered through the office of the Dean
for Research located on the University of Florida campus. IFAS
research is conducted throughout the State. Departments lo-
cated on campus include-Agricultural Engineering, Agricul-
tural and Extension Education, Agronomy, Animal Science,
Botany, Dairy Science, Entomology and Nematology, Food and
Resource Economics, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 4-H
and Other Youth Programs, Fruit Crops, Home Economics, Mi-
crobiology and Cell Science, Soil Science, Statistics, Vegetable
Crops, and Preventive Medicine (College of Veterinary Medi-
cine). In addition, five units vital to its research programs,
namely: Editorial, Library, Business Service, and Centers for En-
vironmental Programs and Biomass, are located on campus.
The School of Forest Resources and Conservation includes De-
partments of Forestry, Wildlife and Range Sciences, and Fish-
eries and Aquaculture.
In order to best serve the varied needs of Florida's diversified
agriculture, Agricultural Research and Educational Centers are
located at numerous locations having different climatic condi-
tions, soil types and crops. Intensive research is conducted in
all fields of agriculture such as citrus, vegetable, field crops,
livestock, pastures, and many others. Agricultural Research and
Education Centers are located in Homestead, Belle Glade, Bra-
denton, Lake Alfred, Quincy, Sanford, and Tallahassee (Florida
A & M University). A Research and Education Center is also
located at Welaka, Florida, and is concerned largely with bio-
logical research programs and youth programs. Agricultural Re-
search Centers are located in Monticello, Ft. Pierce,
Immokalee, Dover, Ft. Lauderdale, Hastings, Ona, Apopka,
Mariana, Live Oak, Leesburg, and jay. Cooperative research is
conducted with the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its beef cattle and pas-
ture production and management programs; with the National
Weather Service, Ruskin, in the Federal Frost Warning Service
for fruit and vegetable producers and shippers; and with numer-
ous Florida agricultural agencies and organizations.
Results of IFAS research are published in scientific journals,
bulletins, monographs, circulars, and mimeograph reports
which are available to Florida residents usually without charge
upon request to the Editorial Department of the Agricultural
Experiment Station in Gainesville. The Agricultural Experiment
Station cooperates closely with the Cooperative Extension Ser-
vice in providing research findings for prompt dissemination.





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


THE FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERI-
MENT STATION (EIES) developed from early research activities
of the engineering faculty and was officially established in
1941 by the Legislature as an integral part of the College of
Engineering. Its mandate is "to organize and promote the pros-
ecution of research projects of engineering and related sci-
ences, with special reference to such of these problems as are
important to the industries of Florida."
The College and the Station form a close interlocking rela-
tionship with the EIES serving as the research arm of the Col-
lege. In this capacity the EIES fulfills its function of conducting
research on many of Florida's most significant problems rang-
ing from energy to water resources, environmental issues to
health-related activities. Of course many of these problems
transcend the state and are also of national concern. The Station
has developed a national and international reputation in many
areas, and the faculty are at the forefront of their fields. This has
a major positive impact on the College since it makes good
teaching possible, exposes students to many important engi-
neering problems normally not encountered in a college pro-
gram, and helps the faculty better instill students with the
qualifications necessary for the successful practice of their pro-
fession. Moreover, both undergraduate and graduate students
frequently find employment and research projects.
The Station receives a small but important portion of its oper-
ating funds from the State; this funding base results in a near 10
to 1 return from contracts and grants with governmental agen-
cies, foundations, and industrial organizations. The Station has
excellent facilities and faculty in many diverse fields; a few such
examples are: solarenergy, bioengineering, manufacturing and
automation sciences, energy conservation and conversion, ce-
ramics, new materials development, device physics, robotics,
geotechnics, transportation research, coastal and oceano-
graphic engineering, microelectronics, air and water pollution
control, nuclear pumped lasers, systems analysis, fluid dy-
namics and hydrology, technology for enhanced oil recovery,
lightning research, and hazardous wastes management:
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING RE-
SEARCH CENTER, the research arm of the College of Architec-
ture, promotes, encourages, and coordinates research activities
among the College's five academic disciplines: Architecture,
Building Construction, Urban and Regional Planning, Land-
scape Architecture, and Interior Design. Principal, current re-
search interests of the Center include architectural acoustical
modeling, energy efficiency development codes, roofing, com-
puter resource mapping, central city redevelopment, architec-
tural preservation, and construction management. The Center
maintains cooperative contacts with other departments on
campus and with institutions within the United States, Latin
America, and the Caribbean Basin. For information write: The
Director, Florida Architecture and Building Research Center,
360 ARCH Building.
THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
is a service and research center within the College of Business
Administration. Its activities are organized under three research
programs: population, forecasting, and sample survey. Students
are involved as research assistants in these programs.
The Bureau disseminates the results of its research through a
publication program. Bureau publications include Florida Sta-
tistical Abstract, BEBR Monographs, The Florida Outlook, Pop-
ulation Studies, Florida Estimates of Population, Economic
Leaflets, and Building Permit Activity in Florida. For nforma-
tion, write the Director, Bureau of Economic and Business Re-
search, 221 Matherly Hall.
THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING SERVICE is a re-
search, publication, and service adjunct of the Department of
Political Science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It
carries on a continuous program of research on public adminis-
tration and public policy in Florida; it publishes research and
surveys of governmental and administrative problems in both
scientific and popular monograph form. In addition, the public
Administration Clearing Service coordinates the programs of
instruction and public service training in cooperation with
other units of the University.
THE COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER, the research
arm of the College of Journalism and Communications, con-


ducts pure and applied research in a variety of fields of mass
communication, including advertising, broadcasting, jourrnal-
ism, and public relations. It also serves as a resource for College
faculty and students in their own research, assists the media and
other organizations in their research pursuits, and sponsors
programs related to the mass communication needs of the
many communities served by the University.
THE DIVISION OF BUDGET AND ANALYSIS is the primary
unit responsible for financial and budgetary planning and con-
trol for the University. The Division is instrumental in seeking
the resources necessary to achieve the goals of the University
and works with the Vice Presidents to achieve the most effective
allocation of the resources. Data Administration for the Univer-
sity is coordinated by the staff, who also conduct extensive in-
stitutional research.
FACILITIES PLANNING performs the analysis and planning
required to ensure that available fixed capital outlay resources
are used in providing adequate facilities for the many and di-
verse programs of the University of Florida at minimum long-
range cost. Work is carried out by the professional staff and
related committees in the areas of campus planning, space as-
signment, coordination of architectural design, and construc-
tion of facilities.
FLORIDA FREEDOM OF INFORMATION CLEARING
HOUSE is supported by a permanent endowment contributed
by media throughout the state and nation. It keeps extensive
files on all freedom of information problems in the State of Flor-
ida and produces the Florida Freedom of Information Clearing
House Newsletter 10 times a year.
THE FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER,
which is funded by the Department of the Interior, was estab-
lished in 1964 at the University of Florida as the result of the
passage of P.L. 88-379 The Water Resources Research Act of
1964 "to stimulate, sponsor, provide for, and supplement
present programs for conduct of research, investigation, experi-
ments, and the training of scientists in the fields of water and of
resources which affect water." The Center's Director operates
under the general policy guidance of an advisory committee
appointed by the President of the University. Research projects
administered by the Center and pertaining to the achievement
of adequate statewide water resource management, water qual-
ity, and water quantity are being conducted by professors in
various departments at the University of Florida and other col-
leges and universities in the state. Graduate assistants may be
employed on these projects or other activities of the Center.

COMPUTATIONAL FACILITIES
NORTHEAST REGIONAL DATA CENTER (NERDC). The Uni-
versity of Florida is the host campus for the Northeast Regional
Data Center (NERDC) of the State University System of Florida.
The NERDC's facilities are used for instructional, administra-
tive, and research computing for the University of Florida and
for other state educational institutions and agencies in northern
Florida. The organizations directly responsible for supporting
computing activities at the University of Florida are the Center
for: Instructional and Research Computing Activities (CIRCA-
UF), University of Florida Administrative Computing Services,
Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics, Inc. Data Processing Di-
vision, the J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center, and the Insti-
tute for Food and Agricultural Sciences. Access through NERDC
to four other Regional Data Centers in the state is available
through the State University System (SUS) Computer Network.
The SUS network links the Northeast Regional Data Center, the
Northwest Regional Data Center (in Tallahassee), the Florida
State University Computing Center (at Florida State University
in Tallahassee), the Central Florida Regional Data Center (at the
University of South Florida in Tampa), and the Southeast Re-
gional Data Center (at Florida International University in Mi-
ami). Access is also available to the Florida Information
Resource Network (FIRN) and to BITNET.
Facilities available to students, faculty, and staff through the
NERDC include three central-site computers: IBM 3081 D with
32 megabytes of main memory (running under MVS/XA), and
IBM 3033 Model N-16 with 16 megabytes (running under OS
MVS/SP-JES2), and an IBM 4341 Model Group 2 with 8 mega-







GENERAL INFORMATION


bytes (running under VM/SP). These are supported by a combi-
nation of IBM 3330, 3350, 3370, and 3380 disk drives, 9-track
and 7-track tape drives, two 3203 Model 5 high-speed printers,
three 3705 communication controllers, and one 3725 com-
munications controller. An IBM 4955 Series/1 supports proto-
col conversion for selected ASCII CRT terminals for-emulating
full-screen 3270-type terminals.
The NERDC provides facilities for input and output in the
form of punched cards, magnetic tape, disks, graphics, and
SComputer Output Microfiche (COM). The NERDC supports job
submission/retrieval and interactive processing through more
than 2,000 interactive terminals. These terminals support inter-
active language processors (e.g., ASSEMBLER, BASIC, COBOL,
COGO, FORTRAN, PL/I, SCRIPT, VS APL and WATFIV) and in-
teractive facilities (e.g., ATMS, CIC/VS, PANVALET, TSO, and
VM/CMS). Graphics output is available through a Gould 5100
Electrostatic Plotter operated at the NERDC's central site.
Extensive software is provided for batch processing support-
ing the major high-level languages including ALGOL, ASSEM-
BLER, COBOL, FORTRAN, LISP, PASCAL, and PL/I; the
INQUIRE data base management system; MARK IV and EASY-
TRIEVE file handlers and report generators; student-oriented
compilers and interpreters including ASSIST, PASCAL, PL/C,
SPITBOL, WATBOL, and WATFIV; most major statistical pack-
ages including BMDP, SAS, SPSS, and TROLL; test-editing pro-
grams such as ATMS, DCF, and SCRIPT with spell-checking
capabilities; a local SCRIPT-based formatter for producing the-
ses and dissertations according to UF Graduate School require-
Sments; libraries of scientific and mathematical routines
including IMSL and the HARWELL library; graphics programs
such as GDDM, Gould plotting software, PLOT79, SAS/
GRAPH, and SURFACE II; financial spreadsheets and modellers
such as FSCALC and IFPS; mini- and micro-computer support;
and many other program packages, local and IBM utilities, and
special-purpose languages.
More information is available through the NERDC's Guide-
book for New Users, the NERDC's monthly newsletter
(/Update), volumes of the NERDC User's Manual, and NERDC
User Services at 107 SSRB, University of Florida, (904) 392-
2061, SUNCOM 622-2061.
CENTER FOR INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH COM-
PUTING ACTIVITIES (CIRCA). The Center for Instructional and
Research Computing Activities (CIRCA) provides a variety of
computing services for University of Florida students and fac-
ulty. CIRCA provides consulting, programming and analysis,
data base design and implementation, statistical analysis,
equipment repair, data entry services, open-shop unit-record
equipment, interactive terminals, and remote-batch operations
which are available at several locations across the UF campus,
CIRCA operates two VAX 11/780 computers for'instructional
use, each with 8 megabytes of real memory, an RM80 124-
megabyte systenmdrive, an RPO7 516-megabyte user drive, and
a TU78 tape drive. In addition, CIRCA operates a VAX 11/750
computer with 5 megabytes of real memory and two RAGO
disk drives with 205 megabytes of real memory. The machines
communicate via DECNET and run the VMS operating system.
Terminals are connected through a Gandalf port selector pro-
viding local and remote terminal access to both NERDC and
CIRCA computers. Dial-up facilities are also provided. Soft-
ware includes APL, BASIC, BMDP, CERRITOS graphics, CO-
BOL, FORTRAN, IMSL, MINITAB, PASCAL, SNOBOL, SPICE,
TSP, and support for IMLAC and GIGI graphics terminals.
Additional information is available from the CIRCA Consult-
ant on Duty in 411 Weil Hall, University of Florida, (904) 392-
0906, SUNCOM 622-0906.

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
THE INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCI-
ENCES (IFAS) is the University of Florida's statewide agricul-
tural research and educational organization. IFAS programs
extend into every county and reach people in virtually every
* community in Florida.


In April, 1964, the creation of IFAS was approved by the Flor-
ida Board of Control. This action consolidated into one overall
budgetary unit four previously separate budgetary units the
College of Agriculture, the Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tions, the Florida Cooperative Extension Service, and the
School of Forestry. Today IFAS also includes the College of Vet-
erinary Medicine as well as the Florida Seagrant Extension Pro-
gram and the Energy Extension Service. IFAS, through its
unique organization, not only transmits the benefits of the land
grant system to all Floridians alike but also is known worldwide
for excellence in teaching, research, and extension activities.
The primary mission of IFAS is to help Florida realize its maxi-
mum potential for agricultural development and to contribute
to the solution of many social, economic, environmental, and
cultural problems of concern to the people of the state. This
vital developmental mission is carried out through the three
functions of resident instruction, research, and extension.
These are carefully interrelated to provide a highly coordinated
effort for the benefits of Florida its citizens and its industry.
This effort is guided by the Vice President for Agricultural Af-
S fairs.
The offices of the Vice President as well as the Deans for Resi-
dent Instruction, Research, and Extension are located near the
center of campus in McCarty Hall. Administrative offices of the
School of Forest Resources and Conservation are located in
Newins-Ziegler Hall. The Hume Agricultural Library is located
in the McCarty Hall complex.
The resident instruction programs conducted through the
College of Agriculture and the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation are concerned with educating young men and
women for the nation's growing and increasingly complex agri-
cultural industry. The curricula for the different fields of study
are structured to provide the business, technological, and sci-
ence education necessary for graduates to meet the ever chang-
ing needs of a diverse and highly specialized agriculture as well
as related business and industry. All academic departments of-
fer an undergraduate program leading to a Bachelor of Science
in Agriculture. The School of Forest Resources and Conserva-
tion offers an undergraduate program which leads to the Bache-
lor of Science in Forest Resources and Conservation. Graduate
programs at the master's level are offered by all academic units.
The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in 12 specialties.
The mission of the IFAS research programs is one of develop-
ment as well as improving existing technology to enable Flori-
da's agricultural industry to become more efficient, particularly
in reducing dependence on consumption of fossil fuels; to im-
prove consumer health and nutrition; and to improve the social
and economic well-being of producers and consumers of agri-
cultural commodities and resources. Through the network of
22 research and education centers, located in various areas of
the state, applied as well as basic research efforts develop new
and improved technology to meet the agricultural needs of
Florida. Additional IFAS research information is contained un-
der THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION of the Orga-
nized Research section.
The Florida Cooperative Extension Service is administered by
IFAS in cooperation with the several Boards of County Commis-
sioners in the state and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Ex-
tension offices in all 67 counties are responsible for the transfer
and application of knowledge through nonresident educa-
tional programs. These programs are tailored to fit the needs of
the many audiences in agricultural production, marketing, and
utilization; home economics; community resource develop-
ment; marine sciences; and energy. Audiences include adults
and youth, rural and urban citizens, minorities, and people
from all economic levels.
The Center for Natural Resources was created in October
1973 to provide statewide coordination for the IFAS research
and education programs concerned with solving some of the
serious environmental and natural resources problems related
to agriculture throughout Florida. The Center is involved in de-
veloping ways to protect managed agriculture ecosystems from
environmental damage, integrating environmental practices
into agricultural production technology, and protecting and en-
hancing the quality of all of Florida's environment.






General

GENERAL INFORMATION


In 1980, IFAS received approval for the establishment of the
Center for Biomass Energy Systems. The Center coordinates
planning, development, and implementation of research re-
lated to production of various types of plant biomass, methods
of converting biomass to practical forms of fuel, and systems for
utilizing bio-fuels and their co- and by-products.
The creation of an Office of International Programs in 1966
formalized the international commitment of IFAS. The Office of
International Programs is responsible-for administration, coor-
dination, and development of all activities which build or
strengthen the international dimension of IFAS. This includes
participation in the determination of contract and grant policy,
development of outside funding sources for international re-
search and training projects, and assistance in the initiation of
new education programs. Integration of international programs
into each department is a specific objective. This provides a
unique opportunity for focusing maximum resources available
on the project. Both faculty in the state and those overseas ben-
efit by the interchange of ideas. Education and research is han-
dled under the same office by the Center for Tropical
Agriculture established in 1965.


THE J. HILLS MILLER
HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER
Outreach to people through patient care, education, re-
search, and community service has been the guiding rule of
the University of Florida's j. Hillis Miller Health ScienceCenter
since its founding in 1956.
Today these services emanate from a modern institution that
encompasses six colleges Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy,
Health Related Professions, Dentistry, and Veterinary Medicine
- and two teaching hospitals Shands for human patients and
the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for animals.
Shands Hospital, under private corporate management since
1980, serves as a major referral center for modern patient care


and clinical training of students in the health professions. The
Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital serves the state's practic-
ing veterinarians by providing a modern, well-equipped facility
for referring animal patients with rare or complicated diseases.
The state's first College of Dentistry became operational at
the Health Center in 1975, followed by the first College of Vet-
erinary Medicine in late 1977.
The care of patients and the education of health practitioners
are strengthened by the Health Center's affiliations with the
nearby Veterans Administration Medical Center, plus a cooper-
ative educational program with 11 urban hospitals, 3 colleges
in Jacksonville, and educational affiliations with hospitals in
Pensacola and Orlando.
Presently some 3,600 students are receiving training at the
Health Center through 44 different health professions pro-
grams. These academic programs help the students to under-
stand that health care involves the health team: the physician;
the nurse; the dentist; the pharmacist; persons in health related
professions; the researcher; the educator; and the counselor..
Students learn that by training together, and later by working
Together, they will contribute more effectively to the patient's
well-being.
In addition, the Health Center's extensive involvement in re-
search (a multimillion dollar enterprise of its own) brings the
students and health care practitioners in touch with some of the
latest information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and preven-
tion of illness.
Since the opening of its first units the Colleges of Medicine
and Nursing the Health Center has become a leading center
for health care, education, and research in the Southeast. The
institution is located on the southern edge of the University of
Florida campus and is named for the late president of the uni-
versity, Dr. J. Hillis Miller. Dr. Miller's vision and determination
helped formulate the early planning of the health complex as an
integral part of the university.










Admissions

APPLICATIONS FOR ADMISSIONS
Application for admission to any undergraduate College,
School, or Division of the University must be made to the Ad-
missions Section of the Office of the Registrar on the forms pre-
scribed and by the dates indicated below. It is quite proper to
correspond with Deans, Directors, or Department Chairper-
sons, but such contact with University Officers does not in any
way eliminate the necessity for filing a formal application in the
Office of the Registrar by the dates specified.
How to Apply: An applicant should address a request to the
Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, University of Flor-
ida, asking for application forms. Forms and directions for com-
pletion of applications vary with the level of entry at the
University and the applicant should indicate that forms are be-
ing requested for admission as a Freshman, Undergraduate
Transfer, Postbaccalaureate, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medical,
Veterinary Medicine, or Special student, as the case might be.
IMPORTANT NOTE: An application for admission must be
filed for the specific term that the student wishes to enter the
University and will be considered for entrance in that term
ONLY. Applicants wishing to change their planned entry date
should contact the Admissions Office for application instruc-
tions. An approval for admission is valid ONLY for entrance in
the term specified in the admission notice and does not in any
way imply that approval would also be given for entrance in any
other term.

GENERAL STATEMENT
The University encourages applications from qualified appli-
cants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic
groups. The University does not discriminate on the basis of
handicap or age in admission or access to its programs and ac-
tivities. Both the Educational Testing Service (SAT) and the
American College Testing Program (ACT) have brochures de-
scribing special testing arrangements for handicapped appli-
cants, and there are alternate admissions procedures for
handicapped applicants who are unable to take the required
tests.
A brief summary of the general requirements for admission or
readmission to any college or division of the University is given
below:
1. A satisfactory academic record. Each applicant must fur-
nish a complete chronological record of educational institu-
tions previously attended. Official transcripts must be
submitted in accordance with instructions which accompany
the application form.
2. Satisfactory scores on achievement tests or aptitude tests
as noted in the application instructions.
3. A satisfactory conduct record.
4. Students whose native language is not English must sub-
mit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores in
addition to other required test scores.
NOTE: Board of Regents regulations provide that furnishing
false or fraudulent statements or information in connection
with an application for admission or residence affidavit may
result in disciplinary action, denial of admission, and invalida-
tion of credits or degrees earned.
The specific requirements for readmission (at the same or a
different level) of a student previously enrolled at the University
of Florida are given in the Student Academic Regulations sec-
tion of this catalog (see Table of Contents).
The specific requirements for admission to the University of
Florida for the first time as a Freshman, Undergraduate Transfer,
Postbaccalaureate, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medical, Veterinary
Medicine, or Special student may be found in the appropriate
sections which follow. It should be understood, however, that
minimum requirements are given and that admission to the
University is a selective process. The satisfaction of minimum
requirements does not automatically guarantee admission. Un-
der Board of Regents policy up to ten percent of the students


admitted during the academic year at any level may be admitted
as exceptions to the minimum requirements. The University
Admissions Committee is the agency at the University of Flor-
ida that is responsible for the admission of undergraduate stu-
dents under this exception policy. For additional information
regarding this policy, contact the Director for Minority and Dis-
advantaged Admissions, Office of the Registrar.
The admission requirements have been arrived at after a very
careful study of the experiences of thousands of students over a
long period of years. In every case minimum requirements have
evolved from studies of student performance at the University
of Florida. These studies have had as a primary objective the
identification of factors that would indicate a reasonable
chance for successful completion of academic work at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
The University Admissions Committee is responsible for ad-
ministering all admissions to the University and its various
components including applicants approved as exceptions to
the minimum admission requirements set forth in this catalog.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida
for the first time will be considered for admission as follows.
1. Beginning Freshmen: students who have never.attended
college. (See following section, ADMISSION AS A FRESH-
MAN),
2. Undergraduate Transfers: students who have previously
attended any college or university, regardless of amount of
time spent in attendance or credit earned, but who have not
received a Bachelor's degree. (See following section, ADMIS-
SION AS A TRANSFER STUDENT TO UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES)
3. Postbaccalaureate Students: students who have received
a Bachelor's degree but do not wish to be admitted to gradu-
ate study. (See following section, ADMISSION AS A POST-
BACCALAUREATE STUDENT)
4. Graduate Students: candidates for Master's or Doctor's
degrees. (See following section, ADMISSION TO GRADU-
ATE SCHOOL)
5. Dental Students: candidates for admission to the College
of Dentistry. (See following section, ADMISSION TO THE
COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY)
6. Law Students: candidates for admission to the College of
Law. (See following section, ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
OF LAW)
7. Medical Students: candidates for admission to the Col-
lege of Medicine. (See following section, ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE)
8. Veterinary Medicine Students: candidates for admission
to the College of Veterinary Medicine. (See following sec-
tion, ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MED-
ICINE)
9. Special Students: applicants who do not fall in one of the
above categories. (See following section, ADMISSION AS A
SPECIAL STUDENT)
10. Transient Students: applicants who wish to enroll for one
term only in order to complete work for transfer back to par-
ent institution. (See following section, ADMISSION AS A
TRANSIENT STUDENT)

TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The Traveling Scholar Program affords graduate students at
State University System institutions an opportunity to take
coursework or conduct research activities at any of the other
institutions in the System. Coursework taken under the auspi-
ces of the Traveling Scholar Program at another university in the
System will apply for graduate credit at the student's home insti-
tution. The deans of the graduate schools of the State universi-
ties are the coordinators of the program. For details regarding
the Traveling Scholar Program and approval to participate in it,
a student must apply to the dean of the graduate school on his/
her home campus.





General

ADMISSIONS


UNDERGRADUATE
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION PROGRAM
The Undergraduate Interinstitutional Registration Program
enables students at State University System institutions to take
advantage of special resources and programs available on an-
other campus in the System but not available at their home in-
stitution, e.g., special course offerings, research opportunities,
unique laboratories, overseas study programs, and library col-
lections. Courseworktaken under the Undergraduate Interinsti-
tutional Registration Program will be accepted for credit at the
student's home institution. A student must be recommended to
participate in the program by his/her own academic dean, who
will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate dean at
the host institution.

PERSONAL HEALTH
HISTORY REQUIREMENT
Each student accepted for admission shall submit, prior to
registration, proof of immunization for measles and,rubella.
When the application for admission is approved, a form will be
forwarded for the student to complete and return. No student
will be allowed to register until the admissions office has re-
ceived the form and it has been forwarded to and approved by
the University Student Health Service.

ADMISSION AS A FRESHMAN

(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NEVER ATTENDED COLLEGE)
When to Apply: No application will be considered for the
Freshman Class more than one year in advance of the term for
which entrance is sought. The best time to apply is the early
part of the Senior year in secondary school. Priority in admis-
sion to the Fall class will be given to qualified applicants whose
applications and supporting records are received in the Admis-
sions Office prior to March 1st. Applications for the Fall class
received after March 1 st will be considered on a "space avail-
able" basis only. The deadlines for receipt of applications for
other terms are listed in the University Calendar.
Admission of students is on a selective basis. The availability
of community junior colleges and other state universities in
Florida has caused the Board of Regents to assign to the Univer-
sity of Florida a role in the total state system of higher education
which demands that the entering Freshman Class be limited in
number. Such limitation does not prevent students from subse-
quently applying for admission to upper division and profes-
sional schools of the University since they may attend junior
colleges or other universities and if qualified, then transfer to
the University's upper division colleges in accordance with
rules printed elsewhere in this catalog.
The requirements for admission set forth below are desig-
nated to give priority to those applicants whose potential on the
basis of their record indicates the greatest likelihood of success
and the obtaining of maximum benefits from the Lower Divi-
sion program at the University of Florida.

A. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION-FLORIDA
STUDENTS
For consideration a student must meet the following mini-
mums:
1. Graduation from an accredited secondary school or the
equivalent (G.E.D., etc.).
2. Nineteen (19) academic units in college preparatory
courses.The following distribution of the 19 academic units
is required.
English (3 of which include substantial writing
requirements) ............................. 4
Math (at the Algebra I and above levels) ............. 3


Natural Science (2 of which include
substantial laboratory requirements) ............. 3
Social Science.............................. ... 3
Foreign Language ............ .............. 2
Academic Electives................... .. .... 4
3. An overall C average as computed by the University of
Florida in academic courses.
4. A total score of at least 840 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT) with a minimum verbal score of 340, a minimum quan-
titative score of 400, and a minimum score of 30 on the Test of
Standard Written English (TSWE). On the American College
Testing Program (ACT), a composite score of 17 is required
with a minimum of 14 on the English subsection and a mini-
mum of 13 on the math subsection.
5. State University System Freshman Eligibility Index
Academic ACT SAT
GPA Composite Total
3.0 17 840
2.9 18 860
2.8 18 870
2.7 18 880
2.6 19 890
2.5 19 900
2.4 20 930
2.3 21 960
2.2 22 990
2.1 23 1020
2.0 24 1050
6. A record of good conduct. Major or continuing difficulty
with school or other officials may make an applicant ineligi-
ble regardless of academic qualifications/
Please note: Applicants who present scores on the G.E.D.
(General Equivalency Diploma) for satisfaction of the high
school graduation requirement must also present records from
secondary schools attended and test scores in order to be con-
sidered for admission. The applicant's overall academic back-
ground as manifested in these records will be considered in the
decision-making process. Any Florida student who meets the
above minimum admission requirements and is interested in
attending the University of Florida is urged to submit an appli-
cation. The University will do everything possible to accept all
qualified applicants who apply before the application deadline
date. If the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number
that the University is permitted to enroll, admission will be oqn a
selective basis. An applicant's total high school record includ-
ing grades, test scores, educational objective and pattern of
courses completed, rank in class, school recommendation, and
personal record will be considered in the selection process.
Composite pictures of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
results of recent Freshman classes at the University of Florida
indicate that more than 50 percent score 500 or above on the
Verbal section and more than 75 percent score 500 or above on
the Math section. In addition, more than 50 percent of each
entering class has earned a B or better average in high school
academic subjects. While there is no minimum grade average
or test score which in itself assures a student of admission or
success in college, prospective applicants are urged to discuss
the meaning and implication of these data with their school
counselors when considering the University of Florida.

B. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION-NON-FLORIDA
STUDENTS
Because of a limited entering Freshman class each Fall, only a .
small number of highly qualified students from states other than
Florida may be admitted. The minimum requirements for con-
sideration are essentially the same as for Florida students ex-
cept that priority in consideration for admission will be given to
those applicants who present scores of at least 600 on each
section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance
Examination Board and an academic average of B or better.







ADMISSIONS


OTHER INFORMATION OF
INTEREST TO PROSPECTIVE
FRESHMAN APPLICANTS
Early Admission
Applications for Early Admission (i.e. admission following
completion of the Junior year in high school) from superior stu-
dents are encouraged and will be considered on an individual
basis by the University's Admissions Committee. Applications
should be submitted in accordance with deadlines published in
the University Calendar.
In addition to the application, the following items are needed
for processing Early Admission applicants.
1. A written statement by the student setting forth reasons for
requesting early admission.
2. An official transcript of the applicant's secondary school
record covering 9th, 10th, and 11 th years. Generally, an over-
all academic average of B + is expected.
3. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the
American College Testing Program (ACT). Generally a score
of approximately 600 on each section of the SAT or a compos-
ite score of 28 on the ACT is expected.
4. A letter of recommendation from the student's high school
principal or guidance counselor. The letter should give spe-
cific reasons as to why the applicant would profit more from
Early Admission than by completion of the Senior year in high
school.
An applicant for Early Admission may be required to come to
the campus for interviews by members of the Admissions Com-
mittee before a decision is made on the application. The Admis-
sions Office will advise the applicant if interviews will be
required after all of the above items have been received and
evaluated. IMPORTANT: Please note than an applicant should
NOT report for interviews until advised by the Admissions Of-
fice.
The University of Florida provides numerous opportunities
other than Early Admission by which a student may accelerate
graduation. For additional information, please refer to the sec-
tion of this catalog entitled Time Shortened Degree Opportuni-
ties.
Candidate's Reply Date. Applicants accepted for admission
to the Fall Freshman class must indicate their enrollment plans
within 30 days after acceptance.
Advance Housing Payment. Entering freshmen are required
to make a housing deposit within 30 days after acceptance if
they desire to live in the University housing. The housing de-
posit, less a $15.00 service charge, is refundable until May 1st
for applicants accepted for admission to the Fall Freshman
class.
Admission with Advanced Standing. The University of Flor-
ida is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program (APP)
and in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the
College Entrance Examination Board. Under the Advanced
Placement Program a student entering the University offers a
nationally graded examination as evidence of completion of a
college-level course taken in high school. Depending on the
results of the examination, the student may receive University
credit for courses covering similar material or exemption from
such courses without credit. Under the College Level Examina-
tion Program, the University grants credits for satisfactory
scores in each of the five areas of the CLEP General Examina-
tions. For further information, please refer to the section of the
catalog entitled Time Shortened Degree Opportunities.
Early Decision for Superior Students. Students with superior
secondary school records (academic average at least 3.5) and
Junior year high school SAT test scores (approximately 600 each
on the Verbal and Mathematic sections) may apply for early
decision. The student must certify that this is his or her only
application and this statement must be received by November
1, and, if admitted, the student must make a commitment to
attend the University of Florida, accompanied by his or her
housing payment, by December 1. *


ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER
STUDENT TO UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE ATTENDED ANY COLLEGE OR
UNIVERSITY, REGARDLESS OF.THE AMOUNT OF TIME
SPENT IN ATTENDANCE OR CREDIT EARNED, ARE CONSID-
ERED AS TRANSFER STUDENTS.)
When to Apply: Applications may be submitted not more
than one year in advance, and applicants are strongly urged to
apply at least six months prior to the date they plan to enter.
Applicants should referto the DEADLINES FOR APPLYING sec-
tion of the University Calendar published in this catalog as well
as consult the portion of this catalog pertaining to the individ-
ual college to which they intend to apply for specific informa-
tion regarding application deadlines. (NOTE: In a number of
undergraduate programs, the sequence of professional courses
begins ONLY in the Fall Term of the junior year.) An applicant
who waits until the last possible date to file an application may
find that it is impossible to furnish the necessary supporting
records in time to permit a decision for the term that admission
is desired.
In this section are listed the general requirements for admis-
sion of undergraduate transfer students. It should be observed,
however, that ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY IS A SELEC-
TIVE PROCESS AND SATISFYING THESE GENERAL REQUIRE-
MENTS DOES NOT GUARANTEE ACCEPTANCE. Attention is
also directed to the fact that Upper Division colleges of the
University have established enrollment quotas because of limi-
tations of space and facilities. Transfer applicants who meet the
minimum admission requirements will be referred to the selec-
tion committee of the appropriate College for consideration of
their enrollment within the college's established quotas.
A transfer applicant should refer to the General Information
and Colleges sections of this catalog for an explanation of the
academic organization of the University. (See the Table of Con-
tents.)
If an applicant is accepted for admission, courses which rea-
sonably parallel the curriculum of the University of Florida that
were completed with grades of D or higher at other accredited
institutions are acceptable for transfer credit. It is the preroga-
tive of the college (within the University) that administers the
work for the degree being sought to determine how transfer
credit may be used in satisfying that degree's specific course
requirements. Not more than 64 semester hours (or 96 quarter
hours) of credit transferred from or through a junior college may
be applied toward the total credit hours requirement for a Uni-
versity of Florida degree. Courses completed at a junior college
in excess of a total of 64 semester hours may serve to meet
specific course requirements for a University of Florida degree
but the credit hours represented by those courses will not re-
duce the number of credit hours to be completed at the Univer-
sity.

A. FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES
This section applies ONLY to students seeking to transfer di-
rectly from a Florida public junior college with the Associate of
Arts degree in a university parallel program. All other junior
college applicants and undergraduate transfer applicants from
four-year or upper division colleges and universities should
consult Section B which follows.
The University of Florida subscribes to the Articulation
Agreement between the State Universities and Public Junior
Colleges of Florida. Under this agreement, any graduate of a
State approved, Florida public junior college is eligible for ad-
mission to nonlimited access programs at the University if the
student has completed the university parallel program and re-
ceived the Associate of Arts degree, provided the degree has
been awarded on the basis of the following:
1. At least 60 semester hours of academic work exclusive of
occupational courses;
2. An approved general education program of at least 36 se-
mester hours;
3. A grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 system on all
college level academic courses attempted.





General

ADMISSIONS


By law, all applicants seeking admission to a program in
teacher education must submit scores on the Scholastic Apti-
tude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT). These scores
should be forwarded to the Admissions Office as soon as possi-
ble after an application for admission has been submitted.
Some colleges with enrollment quotas may require applicants
to submit test scores as a part of their selection process. When
test scores are required by an Upper Division college, the appli-
cants will be advised directly by that college.
An undergraduate transfer applicant who will enter the Uni-
versity of Florida with junior class standing (AA degree from a
Florida public community college or 60 semester hours of ac-
ceptable transfer credit) must have satisfactorily completed the
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) in order to be ad-
mitted in a degree-seeking status.
Within space and fiscal limitations, applicants who have sat-
isfied the above minimum requirements will be considered for
admission attheJunior level to an Upper Division college. Such
students may be required to take additional preprofessional
courses not completed at the junior college. However, such
courses will not reduce the number of credits required in the
Upper Division for a degree.

B. TRANSFER APPLICANTS OTHER THAN GRADUATES
FROM A FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE
This section applies to students seeking to transfer from a
Florida public junior college without an Associate of Arts de-
gree in a university parallel program and to all undergraduate
transfer applicants from other colleges or universities.

I. Requirements for Admission to the Lower Division
1. Eligible for admission as a beginning Freshman: An appli-
cant must have been eligible for admission to the University
of Florida as a beginning Freshman in order to be considered
for admission to the Lower Division as a transfer student. (See
section, ADMISSION AS A FRESHMAN.)
2. Good standing: An applicant must be in good standing
and eligible to return to any institution previously attended. A
student who for any reason will not be allowed to return to an
institution previously attended cannot be considered for ad-
mission to the University of Florida.
3. Satisfactory record: An applicant must have an average of
C or higher (as computed by the University of Florida) on all
work attempted at each institution previously attended. No
application can be considered until complete official tran-
scripts of all the applicant's undergraduate work are in the
possession of the Admissions Office. An official transcript
must be furnished from each institution attended regardless
of length of attendance or credit earned. Official supplemen-
tary transcripts are required, as soon as they are available, for
any work completed after making application. Since an aver-
age of C or higher is required for graduation from the Univer-
sity of Florida, one who has failed to maintain this average at
another institution is not eligible for admission. Regardless of
the average earned, courses completed at other institutions
.must reasonably parallel the curriculum at the University of
Florida.
4. Satisfactory test scores: An applicant who will present less
than 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of acceptable
college courses (including not more than 4 semester hours in
Military Science and/or basic required Physical Education) as
credit for advanced standing must present satisfactory scores
on an acceptable general ability test. Any of the following
tests may satisfy this requirement: the Scholastic Aptitude
Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board or the
American College Testing Program (ACT). The minimum ac-
ceptable score on these tests will vary with the amount and
quality of academic study the applicant will have completed
prior to transfer.
5. Satisfactory conduct record: An applicant must present a
satisfactory conduct record. Regardless of other qualifica-
tions, an applicant who has experienced serious or continu-
ing difficulty with school or other authorities because of
improper conduct may find his or her application disap-
proved.


II. Requirements for Admission to an Upper Division
College
With the exception of items 1 and 4, an applicant for admis-
sion to an Upper Division College must satisfy the require-
ments listed above for admission to the Lower Division. By law,
all applicants seeking admission to a program in teacher educa-
tion must submit scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or
the American College Test (ACT). These scores should be for-
warded to the Admissions Office as soon as possible after an
application for admission has been submitted. Some colleges
with enrollment quotas may require applicants to submit test
scores as a part of their selection process. When test scores are
required by an Upper Division College, the applicant will be
advised directly by that college. In addition, the following re-
quirements must also be satisfied.
1. Advanced standing credit: An applicant must present a
minimum of 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of ac-
ceptable college courses, not more than four semester hours
of which are in Military Science and/or basic required Physi-
cal Education as credit for advanced standing.
2. Specific course requirements: An applicant must present
the courses listed as required for admission by.the Upper Di-
vision College of his or her choice, or acceptable substitutes,
as part of the courses offered for advanced standing credit.
(See appropriate college section of this catalog.) Upon rec-
ommendation by the Upper Division College, an applicant
lacking some of the specific course requirements may be per-
mitted to enroll in that college and complete them if all other
requirements for admission are met; however, such Lower Di-
vision courses will not reduce the number of credits required
in the Upper Division for a degree.
3. College Level Academic Skills Test: By law, all'applicants
admitted in a degree-seeking status to an Upper Division Col-
lege at an institution in the State University System of Florida
must have satisfactorily completed the College Level Aca-
demic Skills Test (CLAST).

C. TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY
If an applicant is accepted for undergraduate transfer admis-
sion, courses completed at other regionally accredited institu-
tions of higher education with grades of D or higher which
reasonably parallel the curriculum at the University of Florida
will be accepted for transfer credit. The determination of how
transfercredit may be used to satisfy the specific course require-
ments for a degree is the prerogative of the College within the
University that administers the work for the degree sought.
Substantially equivalent courses applicable to the student's
degree program at the University of Florida completed at non-
regionally accredited institutions of higher education may be
accepted for transfer credit on an individual basis subject to
validation by the student's subsequent performance at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
Credit hours for work completed at a community or junior
college after the student has earned a total of 64 semester hours
(or 96 quarter hours) of acceptable transfer credit at all institu-
tions attended will not be accepted for transfer credit at the
University of Florida. The courses represented by such credit
hours will be recorded on the student's University of Florida
record and may be used to satisfy experience requirements but
such courses will not reduce the number of credit hours to be
completed in the Upper Division at the University of Florida in
order to earn a degree.

ADMISSION AS A
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENT
When to Apply: Applications may be submitted up to one
year in advance and applicants are urged to apply as early as
possible. Applications MUST BE SUBMITTED by the deadline
established for the term. Some departments have found it nec-
essary to establish deadliDes for the receipt of applications and
their supporting records that are earlier than the deadlines es-
tablished for the University and published in the catalog. All
applicants are advised to refer to the DEADLINES FOR APPLY-







ADMISSIONS


ING section of the University Calendar published in this cata-
log and to check with the appropriate department regarding
departmental deadlines.
Postbaccalaureate students may wish to enroll in courses for
any of the following reasons:
1. To validate undergraduate records from nonaccredited or
unevaluated institutions;
2. To expand their academic background;
3. To earn a second bachelor's degree; or
4. To complete prerequisite courses for admission to gradu-
ate study at some future date.
Application for admission as a postbaccalaureate student
must be made to the Admissions Section, Office of the Regis-
trar, on forms supplied by that office. Applications are referred
to the appropriate department for approval or disapproval. No
application will be considered unless complete official tran-
script(s) of all the applicant's prior collegiate work are in the
possession of the Admissions Office, and no transcript will be
considered official unless it is received directly from the Regis-
trar of the institution at which the work was performed. Official
supplementary transcripts) are required, as soon as they are
available, for any work completed after the application was
filed.
Students who desire postbaccalaureate status in the College
of Education to obtain teacher certification must provide the
college with a clear statement of certification goals as a part of
the requirements for admission. Interested students should
contact the College of Education for further information.
A student whose native tongue is not English applying for
admission as a postbaccalaureate student must submit accept-
able scores on Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A
minimum TOEFL score of 550 is required for admission to all
colleges.

ADMISSION TO
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
Application for Admission. Admission forms and informa-
tion concerning admission procedures may be obtained from
the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, 135 Tigert Hall.
Prospective students are urged to apply for admission as early
as possible. For some departments, deadlines for receipt of ad-
mission applications may be earlier than those stated in the cur-
rent University Calendar; prospective students should check
with the appropriate department. Applications which meet
minimum standards are referred to the graduate selection com-
mittees of the various colleges and departments for approval or
disapproval.
To be admitted to graduate study in a given department, the
prospective student must satisfy the requirements of the college
and department as well as those of the Graduate School. In
some departments, available resources limit the number of stu-
dents that can be admitted.
General Requirements. The Graduate School, University
of Florida, requires both a minimum grade average of B for all
upper-division undergraduate work and a minimum Verbal-
Quantitative total score of 1000 on the Aptitude Test of the
Graduate Record Examination. For some colleges and depart-
ments, and in more advanced levels of graduate study, an un-
dergraduate average or Graduate Record Examination score
above those stated for the Graduate School may be required.
These criteria are on file in the Office of the Graduate School.
Some colleges and departments require a reading knowledge
of at least one foreign language. Exceptions to the above re-
quirements are made only when these and other criteria includ-
ing letters of recommendation are reviewed and recommended
by the department and approved by the college and the Dean
for Graduate Studies and Research.
Unqualified admission to the Graduate School is dependent
upon the presentation of a baccalaureate degree from an ac-
credited college or university. No application will be consid-
ered unless the complete official transcript of all the applicant's
undergraduate and graduate work is in the possession of the
Registrar, and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it


is received directly from the Registrar of the institution in which
the work was done. Official supplementary transcripts are re-
quired as soon as they are available for any work completed
after application for admission has been made. In general, no
student who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will be
considered for graduate study in any college or department of
the University.
The Board of Regents has also ruled that in admitting students
for a given academic year, up to ten percent may be admitted as
exceptions. Students admitted as exceptions under the ten per-
cent waiver rule must present both an upper-division grade
point average and Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test
Score with their application and meet other criteria required by
the University, including excellent letters of recommendation
from colleagues, satisfactory performance in a specified num-
ber of graduate courses taken as postbaccalaureate students, or
practical experience in the discipline for a specified period of
time.
The University encourages applications from qualified appli-
cants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic
groups. The University does not discriminate on the basis of
handicap or age in admission or access to its programs and ac-
tivities.

ADMISSION EXAMINATIONS
Graduate Record Examination. In addition to the Aptitude
Test of the Graduate Record Examination which is required of
all applicants, some departments encourage the applicant to
submit scores on one or more advanced subject tests of the
Graduate Record Examination. The scores on all tests taken will
be considered in regard to admission.
Graduate Study in Business Administration. Students ap-
plying for admission to the Graduate School for study in the
College of Business Administration may substitute satisfactory
scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT)
for the Graduate Record Examination. Students applying for ad-
mission to the Master of Business Administration (MBA) pro-
gram must submit satisfactory scores on the GMAT. Applicants
are requested to contact the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey, for additional information.
Graduate Study in Law. Students applying to the graduate
program leading to the degree Master of Laws in Taxation must
submit satisfactory scores on the Law School Admissions Test
(LSAT).

FOREIGN STUDENTS
All foreign students seeking admission to the Graduate
School are required to submit satisfactory scores on the GRE
Aptitude Test and on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign
Language) with the following exceptions:
1. Foreign students whose native tongue is English or who
have studiedat a United States college or university for one year
or more need not submit TOEFL scores but must submit satisfac-
tory scores on the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Exami-
nation before their applications for admission can be
considered.
2. Students educated in foreign countries where the GRE is
not available who apply for admission while residing outside
the United States may be granted, at the discretion of the de-
partment, a one semester postponement of the GRE but not the
TOEFL. Permission to register for subsequent semesters will de-
pend upon the submission of scores on the Graduate Record
Examination.
3. All foreign students applying for admission to the Master
of Business Administration program must submit satisfactory
scores from the Graduate Management Admission Test before
their application for admission will be considered.
Foreign students, whose scores on the TOEFL and verbal por-
tion of the GRE are not indicative pf adequate writing skills, are
required to write a short essay for examination. If the skills dem-
onstrated in the essay are not acceptable for pursuing graduate
work the examination will be used as a diagnostic tool for
placement in appropriate courses which will not count toward
a graduate degree.





General

ADMISSIONS


Graduate students whose native language is not English may
be asked to submit satisfactory scores on the Test of Spoken
English (TSE) to be eligible for teaching assistantships.
Applicants are requested to write the Educational Testing Ser-
vice, Princeton, New Jersey, for registration forms and other
information concerning TOEFL, TSE, GMAT, and GRE.

CONDITIONAL ADMISSION
Students who are not eligible for direct admission may be
granted conditional admission to the Graduate School. Stu-
dents may be granted conditional admission to defer final ad-
mission decisions until requisite examination scores or final
grade records are available. Students may also be granted con-
ditional admission to ascertain their ability to pursue graduate
work at the University of Florida if previous grade records or
Graduate Record Examination scores are on the borderline of
acceptability or when specific prerequisite courses are re-
quired.
Students granted conditional admission should be notified
by the department of the conditions under which they are ad-
mitted. When these conditions have been satisfied, the depart-
ment must notify the student in writing, sending a copy to the
Graduate School. Eligible coursework taken while a student is
in conditional status is applicable toward a graduate degree.
Students failing to meet any condition of admission will be
barred from further registration.

ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
When to Apply: The Application Request Card for the Ameri-
can Association of Dental Schools Application Service (AAD-
SAS) may be obtained after May 15 from the Office of
Admissions, College of Dentistry. The request card should be
sent directly to the AADSAS, P.O. Box 1003, Iowa Cit, Iowa
52240. Upon receiving the application materials from the
AADSAS, the completed forms and supporting documents
must be returned directly to the AADSAS no later than October
15 of the year prior to anticipated enrollment in dental school.
Failure to meet this deadline will prevent the Dental Admis-
sions Committee from evaluating your record.
The data compiled by the AADSAS will be carefully evalu-
ated by the Dental Admissions Committee and promising appli-
cants will be sent formal application forms which request
additional information. The submission of a preprofessional
committee evaluation or letters of recommendation from peo-
ple in academics will not be necessary until the formal applica-
tion forms are filed. The formal application forms and
supporting materials should be submitted as early as possible,
but no later than November 15 of each application year.
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation are
expected of the applicant. The student of Dentistry must pos-
sess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic prepa-
ration of the highest order because of the vast area of science
which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly personal
relationship between patient and dentist places the latter in a
position of trust, which demands maturity, integrity, intellectual
honesty, and a sense of responsibility. A broad representation of
the ethnic mixture of the State is sought in the student body
through an active recruitment program. The College strictly ad-
heres to the principle of ethnic, racial, religious, and social
equality among its student body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a Bachelor's degree. However,
qualified students may be accepted without fulfilling the de-
gree requirements, provided'they show evidence of sufficient
preparation for the study of Dentistry. Applicants with an over-
all B average as a minimum will receive strongest consideration
for admission to the College of Dentistry.
Every applicant must take the Dental Admission Test, prefera-
bly in the Spring preceding the submission of his/her initial ap-


plication or, at the latest, the Fall testing period. The test is given
twice a year at many college and university testing centers. Fol-
lowing a review of all application materials and Dental Admis-
sion Test scores by the Dental Admissions Committee,
interviews with members of this Committee will be arranged
for competitive applicants.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Dentis-
try bulletin.)

ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF LAW
When to Apply: Applications can be accepted as indicated in
the College of Law catalog.
Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the Col-
lege of Law must have received a baccalaureate degree from a
regionally accredited college or university and achieved a satis-
factory score on the Law School Admission Test.
The minimum acceptable score on the Law School Admis-
sion Test required for admission varies with the total grade
point average achieved by the applicant on all college work
attempted by the applicant prior to receipt of the first Bachelor's
degree. The lower the grade point average, the higher the Law
School Admission Test Score must be to qualify for admission.
All applicants (including present and former University of Flor-
ida students) must register with the Law School Data Assembly
Service (LSDAS) in lieu of requesting transcripts from each insti-
tution of higher education attended. For more detailed informa-
tion on admission to the College of Law, please see the College
of Law catalog.
Advanced Standing Students: For information on admission
to the College of Law with advanced standing see the College of
Law catalog.

ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
When to Apply: Because the number of places in the first year
class of the College of Medicine is limited, it is important that a
candidate make application as early as possible during the
Summer or Fall of the year preceding his/her intended date of
entry.
Personal qualities of high order-character, responsibility,
and maturity-are the primary requirements for admission. The
student must have demonstrated superior intellectual achieve-
ment. A Bachelor's degree is strongly recommended. The qual-
ity of the academic background as well as the performance of
the student in relation to the load attempted will be weighed. A
genuine interest in human welfare is important. Efficient meth-
ods of study and effective powers of reasoning are essential.
The College admits both men and women. A limited number
of out-of-state students, in proportion to the number in the Uni-
versity as a whole, may be admitted. Students who have failed
academically or are ineligible to continue in another medical
school will not be admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in an-
other medical school will be considered provided (1) the stu-
dent is eligible to continue in his/her present medicalschool,
(2) the school he/she is now attending is a member of the Asso-
ciation of American Medical Colleges, and (3) space is avail-
able.
Prospective applicants must take the Medical College Admis-
sions Test, preferably by the Spring preceding the submission of
the application. A personal interview will be required for final
acceptance.
Graduate students who are candidates for the Ph.D. degree in
medical sciences should apply through the Graduate School.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Medi-
cine catalog.)






ADMISSIONS


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
When to Apply: Application forms are available between
September 1 and December 1 from the Office of the Dean for
Student Services, College of Veterinary Medicine. The applica-
tion package (residency status, application forms, fees, letters
of recommendation, GRE scores, etc.) must be received by the
Admissions Office by 4:30 P.M., December 15, for the appli-
cant to be considered for admission.
Candidates seeking admission to programs leading to the
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree with empha-
sis on animal disease problems should apply through the Grad-
uate School.
(See also the College of Veterinary Medicine in the Colleges
section of this catalog.)

ADMISSION AS
A SPECIAL STUDENT
When to Apply: Each applicant for admission as a special
student must be reviewed by the University Admissions Com-
mittee. Applications cannot be considered if they are received
after the dates specified in the University Calendar; and it
would be desirable for a person considering application as a
special student to initiate such an application at least three
months in advance of the term he/she wishes to enter, in order
to allow time for additional evidence to be presented if it
should be requested by the Admissions Committee.
Special students may be admitted to the various schools and
colleges of the Upper Division only by approval of the Univer-
sity Admissions Committee. Each case will be considered on an
individual basis. Applications for admission as a special stu-
dent must include: (1) records of previous educational experi-
ence (high school or college transcripts); (2) a statement as to
the type of studies to be pursued; (3) a brief statement of the
reasons for selecting a special program in place of a regular one;
(4) satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies; (5)
satisfactory scores on such ability or achievement tests as may ,
be prescribed in individual cases by the University Admissions
Committee.

ADMISSION AS
A TRANSIENT STUDENT
Subject to availability of faculty, space, and facilities, a regu-
lar undergraduate student in good standing at another accred-
ited collegiate institution may be permitted to enroll at the
University of Florida as a transient student in order to complete
work to transfer back to the parent institution. No evaluation
will be made of work previously completed, and it is the stu-
dent's responsibility to secure such approval as the parent insti-
tution may require.
Transient students are registered as NONDEGREE students
and no application for admission is required. The appropriate
forms for enrolling as a NONDEGREE student should be re-
quested from the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar.
Since registration is subject to the availability of space, ap-
proval to enroll as a nondegree student cannot be given prior to
the first day of classes in the term for which the student wishes
to enroll.
Credit earned in a NONDEGREE status is not automatically
applicable to a University of Florida degree should the student
later be admitted in a regular status. Admission as a NON-
DEGREE student in no way implies future admission as a regu-
lar student to the University of Florida.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION
AND SOCIAL SECURITY
The University of Florida is approved for the education and
training of veterans under all public laws now in effect, i.e.,
Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code (Disabled Veterans), Chapter
32, Title 38, U.S. Code (Veterans Educational Assistance Pro-
gram), Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold War G.I. Bill), and
Chapter 35, Title 38, U.S. Code (Children of Deceased or Dis-
abled Veterans). Students who may be eligible for educational
benefits under any Veterans Administration program are urged
to contact the local Veterans Administration representative as
soon as accepted by the University. Students expecting to re-
ceive benefits under one of these programs must file an applica-
tion for benefits. No certification can be made until the
application is on file. Benefits are determined by the Veterans
Administration and the University certifies according to their
rules and regulations.
Inquiries relating to Social Security benefits should be di-
rected to the student's local Social Security Office. The Office
of the Registrar will submit enrollment certificates issued by the
Social Security Administration for students eligible to receive
educational benefits under the Social Security Act, providing
the undergraduate student registers for 12 semester hours or
more.
A full-time load for VA or Social Security benefits is 12 hours
per semester for undergraduates.

ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
FOREIGN STUDENTS

APPLICATION DEADLINE
The University receives a large number of applications from
international students each year. Because of the time required
to complete processing of the application and for the student to
make visa and financial arrangements, deadlines have been es-
tablished after which applications cannot be processed. The
following schedule should be carefully noted in submitting an
application for admission:
Desired Date Application Must Be Received
of Entrance Prior to this Date
August February 1
January July 1
May November 1
June January 1

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION
International students seeking to enter the University.of Flor-
ida are considered for admission as follows:
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT: An applicant who has not
earned a university degree equivalent to a U.S. Bachelor's de-
gree.
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENT: An applicant who has
earned a university degree equivalent to a U.S. Bachelor's de-
gree but who is not seeking admission to graduate study.
GRADUATE STUDENT: An applicant who has earned a univer-
sity degree equivalent to a U.S. Bachelor's degree and is seek-
ing admission to graduate study.
The following items must be submitted by an international
student seeking admission to the University of Florida.

UNDERGRADUATE APPLICANT
(Applicant who has not earned a university-level degree)
1. International Student Application for Admission form
completely and accurately filled out.
2. Nonrefundable application fee of $15 (U.S. currency). An
application will not be considered without the required ap-
plication fee.
3. Proper transcripts (or certificates) of all academic records
or examination results for each year of study from the first year





General

ADMISSIONS


of secondary school and for all postsecondary or university-
level work attempted. All documents must be accompanied
by certified English translations.
4. Test Scores. (See section on TEST SCORE REQUIRE-
MENTS below.)
5. Confidential Financial Statement completely and accu-
rately filled out. This document will be kept strictly confiden-
tial.

POSTBACCALAUREATE APPLICANT
1. Same as No. 1 above.
2. Same as No. 2 above.
3. Proper transcripts of academic records covering all
university-level work. These documents must be accompa-
nied by certified English translations.
4. Test Scores. (See section on TEST SCORE REQUIRE-
MENTS below.)
5. Same as No. 5 above.

GRADUATE APPLICANT
1. Same as No. 1 above.
2. Same as No. 2 above.
3. Proper transcripts of academic records covering all
university-level work. These documents must be accompa-
nied by certified English translations.
4. Test Scores. (See section on TEST SCORE REQUIRE-
MENTS below.)
5. Same as No. 5 above.

TEST SCORE REQUIREMENTS
Except as noted below, all international students seeking ad-
mission to the University of Florida are required to submit satis-
factory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL).
1. Foreign students whose native tongue is English or who
have studied at a United States college or university for one
year or more are not required to submit TOEFL scores but
must submit satisfactory scores on an appropriate admissions
test. Undergraduate applicants must submit scores on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test
(ACT). Graduate applicants must submit scores on the Gradu-
ate Record Examination (GRE).
2. In some cases, students educated in foreign countries
where the GRE is not available who apply for admission to
graduate study while residing outside the United States may
be granted, on the basis of hardship, a one term postpone-
ment of the GRE but NOT the TOEFL. Permission to register
for subsequent terms will depend upon the submission of
scores on the Graduate Record Examination.
3. All foreign students applying for admission to the Master
of Business Administration (MBA) program must submit satis-
factory scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT) before their application for admission can be consid-
ered.


TOEFL information and registration forms are available in
many locations outside the United States; usually at U.S. em-
bassies and consulates, at offices of the United States Informa-
tion Agency, from U.S. educational commissions and
foundations, at Binational Centers, and from many private or-
ganizations such as the Institute of International Education (IIE),
.he American Friends of the Middle East (AFME), African Amer-
Ican Institute (AAI), and the American-Korean Foundation. Can-
didates who cannot obtain information locally on TOEFL, GRE,
GMAT, or SAT should write: Educational Testing Service, Prince-
ton, NJ 08540, U.S.A.

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission must be accompanied by a
nonrefundable application fee of $15 (U.S. currency). An appli-
cation will not be processed without the application fee. If you
find it difficult to submit the application fee because of cur-
rency restrictions in your country, we suggest that you request a
friend or relative in the United States to submit the fee in your
behalf.

ACADEMIC RECORDS
Consideration of an application for admission cannot be
given until ALL required credentials as indicated in the section
APPLYING FOR ADMISSION are received by the Admissions
Office. All documents must be accompanied by certified En-
glish translations and become the property of the University.
Credentials of applicants who do not enroll will be destroyed
and cannot be returned or forwarded elsewhere.
IMPORTANT: Send all applications and credentials to the
Admissions Office, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611, U.S.A.

NOTICE OF ADMISSION
If a student's application for admission to the University of
Florida is approved, an official notice of acceptance will be sent
by the University. Admission is for a SPECIFIC term. If the stu-
dent is unable to enroll for the term indicated in the notice of
acceptance, the Admissions Office should be informed imme-
diately. If the student wishes to be considered for entrance to a
different term, the Admissions Office must be advised. Under
no circumstances should an applicant make definite plans to
depart for Gainesville until officially notified by the University
that approval has been given to the application for admission. A
student who comes to the campus without first receiving an
official notice of acceptance does so entirely at his/her own
risk. The student's presence on campus will not influence the
decision on an application for admission. Because of the lim-
ited resources available in terms of faculty, staff, and physical
facilities, only those international students who submit supe-
rior academic records can be approved for admission.










Expenses

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be ac-
companied by an application fee of $15.00. Application fees
are nonrefundable. Further instructions will be found in the Ad-
missions section 6f this catalog (see Table of Contents).

GENERAL
STUDENTS SHOULD BRING SUFFICIENT FUNDS OTHER
THAN PERSONAL CHECKS TO MEET THEIR IMMEDIATE
NEEDS. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact amount
of fees.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-
FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
(Section 6C-7.05, Florida Administrative Code)
(1) For the purpose of assessing registration and tuition fees,
a student shall be classified as a resident or a nonresident.
A "resident for tuition purposes" is a person who quali-
fies for the in-state tuition rate; a "nonresident for tuition
purposes" is a person who does not qualify for the in-
state tuition rate.
(a) To be classified as a "resident for tuition purposes," a
person, or, if a dependent child, the child's parent or par-
ents, shall have established legal residence in Florida and
shall have maintained legal residence in Florida for at
least twelve (12) months immediately prior to his or her
qualification. A dependent child is a person who may be
claimed by his or her parent as a dependent under the
Federal Income Tax Code. Every applicant for admission
to a university shall be required to make a statement as to
the length of residence in the state and, shall also estab-
lish his or her presence, or, if a dependent child,'the pres-
ence of his or her parent or parents, in the state for the
purpose of maintaining a bona fide domicile in accor-
dance with the provisions of Section 240.1201(2)(b),
Florida Statutes.
(b) With respect to a dependent child, the legal resi-
dence of such individual's parent or parents shall be
prima facie evidence of the individual's legal residence in
accordance with the provisions of Section 240.1201(4),
Florida Statutes. Prima facie evidence may be reinforced
or rebutted by evidence of residency, age, and the general
circumstances of the individual in accordance with the
provisions of Rule 6C-7.05(2).
(c) In making domiciliary determinations related to the
classification of persons as residents or nonresidents for
tuition purposes, the domicile of a married person, irre-
spective of sex, shall be determined in accordance with
the provisions of Section 240.1201(5), Florida Statutes.
(d) Any nonresident person, irrespective of sex, who
marries a legal resident of this state or marries a person
who later becomes a legal resident, may, upon Iecoming
a legal resident of this state, accede to the benefit of the
spouse's immediately precedent duration as a legal resi-
dent for purposes of satisfying the 12-month durational
requirement.
(e) No person shall lose his or her resident status for tui-
tion purposes solely by reason of serving, or, if a depen-
dent child, by reason of the parent or parents serving, in
the Armed Forces outside this state.
(f) A person who has been properly classified as a resi-
dent for tuition purposes, but who, while enrolled in an
institution of higher education in this state, loses resident
tuition status because the person, or, if a dependent child,
the parent or parents, establish domicile or legal resi-
dence elsewhere, shall continue to enjoy the in-state tui-
tion rate for a statutory grace period. This grace period
shall be measured in accordance with the provisions of
Section 240.1201(8), Florida Statutes.


(g) The legal residence of a dependent child whose par-
ents are divorced, separated, or otherwise living apart
shall be deemed to be Florida if either parent is a legal
resident of Florida, regardless of which parent is entitled
to claim, and does in fact claim, the minor as a dependent
pursuant to federal individual income tax provisions.
(h) Any person who ceases to be enrolled at or graduates
from an institution of higher education while classified as
a resident for tuition purposes and who subsequently
abandons Florida domicile shall be permitted to reenroll
at an institution of higher education in this state as a resi-
dent for tuition purposes in accordance with the provi-
sions of Section 240.1201(10), Florida Statutes. ,
(i) A member of the Armed Forces on active duty sta-
tioned in Florida, and the spouse and dependents of such
member, shall be classified as residents for tuition pur-
poses.
(j) Full-time instructional and administrative personnel
employed by state public schools, community colleges,
and institutions of higher education, and the spouses and
dependent children of such individuals, shall be classi-
fied as residents for tuition purposes.
(2) An'individual shall not be classified as a resident for tui-
tion purposes and, thus, shall not be eligible to receive
the in-state tuition rate, until the individual has provided
satisfactory evidence as to his or her legal residence and
domicile to appropriate university officials. In determin-
ing residence, the university shall require evidence such
as a voter registration, driver's license, automobile regis-
tration, location of bank account, rent receipts or any
other relevant materials as evidence that the applicant
has maintained 12 months residence immediately prior
to qualification. To determine if the student is a depen-
dent child, the university shall require evidence such as
copies of the aforementioned documents: In addition,
the university may require a notarized copy of the par-
ent's IRS return. If a nonresident wishes to qualify for resi-
dent tuition status in accordance with Section (1)(d)
above, the applicant must present evidence of the
spouse's legal residence with certified copies of the
aforementioned documents. "Resident student" classifi-
cation shall also be construed to include students to
whom an Immigration Parolee card or a'Form 1-94 (Parole
Edition) was issued at least one year prior to the first day
of classes for which resident student status is sought, or
who have had their resident alien status approved by the
United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, or
who hold an Immigration and Naturalization Form 1-151,
1-551 or a notice of an approved adjustment of status ap-
plication, or Cuban Nationals or Vietnamese Refugees or
other refugees or asylees so designated by the United
States Immigration and Naturalization Service who are
considered as Resident Aliens, provided such students
meet the residence requirements stated above and com-
ply with subsection (4) below. The burden of establishing
facts which justify classification of a student as a resident
and domiciliary entitled to "resident for tuition pur-
poses" registration rates is on the applicant for such clas-
sification.
(3) In applying this policy:
.(a) "Student" shall mean a person admitted to the institu-
tion, or a person allowed to register at the institution on a
space available basis.
(b) "Domicile" shall denote a person's true, fixed, and
permanent home, and to which whenever the person, is
absent the person has theintention of.returning.
(c) "Parent" shall mean an individual's father or mother,
or if there is a court appointed guardian or legal custo-
dian of the individual, other than the father or mother, it
shall mean the guardian or legal custodian.
(d) The term "dependent child," as used in this rule, is
*the same as a dependent as defined in the Internal Reve-
nue Code of 1954.
(4) In all applications for admission or registration at the in-
stitution on a space available basis a "resident for tuition
purposes" applicant, or, if a dependent child, the parent
of the applicant, shall make and file with such applica-
tion a written statement, under oath, that the applicant is





General

EXPENSES


a bona fide resident and domiciliary of the state of Flor-
ida, entitled as such to classification as a "resident for
tuition purposes" under the terms and conditions pre-
scribed for residents and domiciliaries of the State of Flor-
ida. All claims to "resident for tuition purposes"
classification must be supported by evidence as stated in
6C-7.05(1), (2) if requested by the registering authority.
(5) A "nonresident" or, if a dependent child, the individual's
parent, after maintaining a legal residence and being a
bona fide domiciliary of Florida for twelve (12) months,
immediately prior to enrollment and qualification as a
resident, rather than for the purpose of maintaining a
mere temporary residence or abode incident to enroll-
ment in an institution for higher education, may apply for
and be granted classification as a "resident for tuition pur-
poses;" provided, however, that those students who are
nonresident aliens or who are in the United States on a
nonimmigration visa will not be entitled to reclassifica-
tion. An application for reclassification as a "resident for
tuition purposes" shall comply with provisions of subsec-
tion (4) above. An applicant who has been classified as a
"nonresident for tuition-purposes" at time of original en-
rollment shall furnish evidence as stated in 6C-7.05(1) to
the satisfaction of the registering authority that the appli-
cant has maintained residency in the state for the twelve
months immediately prior to qualification required to es-
tablish residence for tuition purposes. In the absence of
such evidence, the applicant shall not be reclassified as a
"resident for tuition purposes." It is recommended that
the application for reclassification be accompanied by a
certified copy of a declaration of intent to establish legal
domicile.in the state, which intent must have been filed
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, as provided by Section
222.17, Florida Statutes. If the request for reclassification
and the necessary documentation is not received by the
registrar prior to the last day of registration for the term in
which the student intends to be reclassified, the student
will not be reclassified for that term.
(6) Appeal from a determination denying "resident for tui-
tion purposes" status to applicant therefore may be initi-
ated after appropriate administrative remedies are
exhausted by the filing of a petition for review pursuant to
Section 12b.68 Florida Statutes.
(7) Any student granted status as a "resident for tuition pur-
poses," which status is based on a sworn statement which
is false shall, upon determination of such falsity, be sub-
ject to such disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by
the president of the university.
Specific Authority 240.209(1), (3)(m) FS. Law Implemented
120.53(1)(a), 240.209(1), (3)(d), (m), 240.233, 240.235,
240.1201 FS. History-Formerly 6C-2.51, 11-18-70, Amended
8-20-71, 6-5-73, 3-4-74, Renumbered 12-16-74, Amended 1-
13-76, 12-13-77, 8-11-81, 6-21-83, 12-14-83, 6-10-84,


REGISTRATION AND STUDENT FEES

REGISTRATION
Pursuant to Section 6C1.3.37, Florida Administrative Code,
registration consists of three major components:
1. Admission-Registrant must comply with, and be admit-
ted pursuant to, University procedures.
2. Enrollment-Registrant must be enrolled in accordance
with the requirements of the particular departments, courses,
and sections and/or college.
3. Payment of Fees-Registrant must pay all assessed regis-
tration and tuition fees, as well as satisfy all due/delinquent
amounts payable to the University.
The University Calendar appearing at the front of this catalog
sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each semester. Reg-
istration must be completed on or before the proper due date as
specified in the calendar. Students are not authorized to attend
class unless they are on the class roll or have been approved to
audit and have paid the audit fees.


FEE LIABILITY
A student is liable for all fees associated with all courses in
which he/she is registered at the end of the drop/add period.
The fee payment deadline is 2:30 p.m. of the first business day
after the end of the drop/add period.

ASSESSMENT OF FEES
Pursuant to Section 6C-7.02, Florida Administrative Code:
Fees are based on the total number of credit hours and the
course level for which the student is enrolled. Students must
assess and pay their own fees. UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL WILL
NOT BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR PROPER ASSESSMENT -
OR MATHEMATICAL ACCURACY OF CALCULATIONS.
A SCHEDULE OF REGISTRATION AND TUITION FEES FOR
ALL PROGRAMS CAN BE OBTAINED BY CONTACTING STU-
DENT FINANCIAL SERVICES, ROOM 100 THE HUB, GAINES-
VILLE, FLORIDA 32611.

Health, Scientific Laboratory, Athletic, and Activity and
Service Fees
Health Fee-The health fee is for the purpose of maintaining
the University's Student Health Service and for the student's
privilege of utilizing said service. This fee is not part of any
health insurance a student may purchase.
The health fee is assessed on a per semester hour basis and is
included in the basic hourly rate per credit hour.
Scientific Laboratory Fee-Scientific laboratory fees are now
being assessed for certain courses where laboratory classes are
part of the curriculum. Your department can advise you of the
respective courses, or you can contact Student Financial Ser-
vices at 392-0181.
Athletic Fee-All students must pay a specified athletic fee
per credit hour each term. Half-time graduate research and
teaching assistants enrolled for eight (8) or more credit hours
during the Fall or Spring semesters and all other students en-
rolled for nine (9) or more credit hours are eligible to purchase
football tickets at the student rate.
Activity and Service Fee-All students must pay a specified
activity and service fee per credit hour.
Waiver of Health, Athletic, and Student Activity Fees-The
University may waive the student health service fee, athletic
fee, and activity fee for students enrolled in a special program
(e.g., Utrecht, Mexican Law) or course of study located more
than 50 miles from Gainesville, Florida, which precludes their
being on campus for an entire term, including the periods of
regular registration, dead week, and final examinations.
A request for approval of such a waiver should be originated
by the dean or department chairman in charge of the program
upon request from the student enrolled in the program. The
department must complete a "Request for Waiver of Student
Health, Athletic and Activity Fees" (Form FA-SFS-211W-3/15/
84) and return to Student Financial Services; students request-
ing the waiver of health, athletic and activity fees must also
complete the bottom portion of the form and deliver it with
their tuition payment to Student Financial Services, 200 Hub,
on or before the fee payment deadline shown in the front of this
catalog for the semesters requested. Requests submitted after
that date will not be honored nor will refunds be issued. It will
be the responsibility of the student's college to notify the stu-
dents who are eligible. Health, Athletic and Activity Fees will
only be waived as a single unit. The student may not waive
specific fees such as only the health fee.

Late Registration/Payment Fee
Late Registration Fee (6C1-3.37(3), Florida Administrative
Code)-A student is subject to a late registration fee of $25.00 if
the student fails to apply and qualify for admission prior to the
late registration date published in the University calendar. If the
student qualifies to register during the late registration period, a
"late registration" appointment may be assigned and the stu-
dent shall be required to pay the late registration fee. Any stu-
dent who is assigned a regular registration appointment and
who fails to complete registration during the regular registra-
tion-period will be subject to the $25.00 late registration fee.







EXPENSES


Late Payment Fee (6C1-3.37 4), Florida Administrative
Code)-Any student who fails to pay all fees due or obtain a
written deferral as described under the heading "Fee Defer-
ments" (elsewhere in this document) by the fee payment dead-
line will be subject to a late payment fee of $25.00.
Waiver of Late Fees-A student who believes that any of the
late charges should not be assessed, because of University error
or because extraordinary circumstances prevented all conceiv-
able means of complying with established deadlines, may peti-
tion for a waiver of the late fees by submitting a petition for the
waiver with the appropriate office as follows:
Late Registration Fee: Office of the Registrar
135 Tigert Hall
'Late Payment Fee: Student Financial Services
Room 100 Hub
The University reserves the right to require documentation to
substantiate the extraordinary circumstances.
The late registration fee is nondeferrable.

Special Fees and Charges
Application Fee-Each application for admission to the Uni-
versity must be accompanied by an application fee of $15.00.
Application fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions will
be found in the Admissions section of this catalog.
Audit Fee-Fees for audited courses are the same as those
listed above for Florida Students. The audit fee is the same for
Florida and non-Florida students.
College Level Examination Programs-Examinations are ad-
ministered on campus on the third Saturday of every month.
Applications should be completed in the Office of Instructional
Resources, 1012 GPA, 15 working days before the day a test is
to be given. The fee for the first examination is $28.00 and
$28.00 for each additional test. Checks should be made pay-
able to College Level Examination Program.
Graduate Record Examination-The Aptitude Test of the
Graduate Record Examination is required for admission to the
Graduate School. A fee of $27.00 covers the cost of this exami-
nation. These fees are payable to the Educational Testing Ser-
Svice, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Graduate School Foreign Language Test-All students wish-
ing to be certified as proficient in a leading knowledge of
French, German, or Spanish, must take the Educational Testing
Service (ETS) Graduate School Foreign Language Tests. A fee of
$5.00 covers the cost of each examination. Administrative ar-
rangements to register and pay for this examination will be
made through the Office of Instructional Resources, 1012 GPA.
Library Binding Charge-Candidates for a graduate degree
with a thesis or dissertation pay a $14.00 charge for the perma-
nent binding of the two copies deposited in the University of
Florida Library. This charge is payable at Student Financial Ser-
vices, the Hub, by the date specified in the Graduate Catalog. A
copy of the receipt must be presented at the Graduate School
Editorial Office, 109 Grinter Hall.
Microfilm Fee-A fee of $40.00 is charged for the publication
of the doctoral dissertation by microfilm. This fee is payable at
Student Financial Services, the Hub. A copy of the receipt for
this fee must be presented at the Graduate School Editorial Of-
fice, 109 Grinter Hall.
Nursing students must pay a fee of $30.00 for publication of
their thesis. Again, this fee is payable at Student Financial Ser-
vices, the Hub, and a copy of the fee receipt must be presented
to the Graduate School Editorial Office, 109 Grinter Hall.
The above charges may be subject to change without notice.

PAYMENT OF FEES
Payment of fees is an integral part of the registration proce-
dure. Fees are payable on the dates listed in the University Cal-
endar appearing at the front of this catalog, or the dates shown
on statements sent those/ participating in advance registration,
and are processed by the University Cashier at Student Finan-
cial Services, the Hub. Checks, cashier's checks, and money
orders written in excess of the assessed fees will be processed ,
and the difference,refunded according to University policy.
Checks from foreign countries must be payable through a


United States bank in United States dollars. The University re-
serves the right to refuse three-party checks, altered checks, and
checks that will not photocopy.
Fees may be paid in person by Master Card or Visa. The card -,
must be in the name of the student paying fees or a parents' card
with student's signature. The student may present his/her card
and picture identification to the Head Cashier at Student Finan-
cial Services, Room 100 Hub.
In collecting fees, the University may impose additional re-
quirements as deemed appropriate, including advance pay-
ment or security deposit for the services to be provided by the
University of Florida.

Deadlines
Students are reminded that deadlines are strictly enforced.
The University does not have the authority to waive late fees
unless it has been determined that the University is primarily
responsible for the delinquency or that extraordinary circum-
stances warrant such waiver.

Cancellation and Reinstatement
The University shall cancel the registration of any student
who has not paid any portion of his/her fee liability by the pub-
lished deadlines.
Reinstatement shall require the approval of the University
and payment of all delinquent liabilities including the late reg-
istration or late payment fees as applicable by cash, cashier's
check, or money order. A student whose registration has been
cancelled must request a reinstatement letter at Student Finan-
cial Services, the Hub. To expedite reinstatement the student
must deliver the letter td Registrar Records, 34 Tigert Hall, Sta-
tion 2.
In the event a student has not paid the entire balance of his/
her fee liability by the published deadlines, the University shall
temporarily suspend further academic progress of the student.
This will be accomplished by flagging the student's record
which will prevent the student from receiving grades, tran-
scripts or a diploma, and his/her registration will be denied for
future terms until his/her.account has been settled in full. If a
student's records have been flagged, the student must request in
person that his/her records be cleared at Customer Service,
Room 100 the Hub after his/her account is settled.

Deferral of Registration and Tuition Fees
A fee deferment allows students to pay fees after the fee pay-
ment deadline without being subject to either cancellation of
registration for nonpayment of fees prior to the established
deadline, or the late payment fee. The University may award
fee deferments upon application from students in the following
circumstances:
1. Students whose State or Federal financial assistance is de-
layed due to circumstances beyond the control of the student.
2. Veterans and other eligible students receiving benefits un-
der Chapter 32, Chapter 34, or Chapter 35 of Title 38 USC,
and whose benefits are delayed.
3. Students for whom formal arrangements have been made
with the University for payment by an acceptable third-party
donor.
Fee deferments must be established with Student Financial
Services, the Hub, prior to the fee payment deadline. Failure to
establish the deferment will subject the student to payment of
the late payment fee and/or cancellation of registration.

Waiver of Fees
The University may waive student fees as follows:
1. All fees except those amounts required for collection un-
der bond and trust obligations (building fee, capital improve-
ments fee) for participants in sponsored institutes and
programs where substantially all the direct costs are paid by
the sponsoring agent.
2. Any dependent child of a special risk member killed in the
line of duty is entitled to a full waiver of undergraduate fees as
provided in Section 240.235(3), Fees, Florida Statutes.





General

EXPENSES


3. State employees who have been employed on a perma-
nent, full-time basis for at least six months may be permitted
to waive fees up to a maximum of six credit hours per term on
a space available basis only.
4. Intern supervisors for institutions within the State Univer-
sity System may be given one nontransferrable certificate (fee
waiver) for each full academic term during which the person
serves as an intern supervisor.
5. Students who earn credit in courses toward a high school
diploma and an associate or baccalaureate degree as pro-
vided by Section 236.081(1)(h)1, Florida Statutes.
6. Persons 60 years of age or older are entitled to a waiver of
fees as provided by Section 240.235(4), Florida Statutes.

REFUND OF FEES
Tuition and registration fees will be refunded in full in the
circumstances noted below:
1. If notice of withdrawal from the University is approved
prior to the end of the drop/add period and written documen-
tation is received from the student.
2. Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
3. Courses cancelled by the University.
4. Involuntary call to active military duty.
5. Death of the student or member of his/her immediate fam-
ily (parent, spouse, child, sibling).
6. Illness of the student of such severity or duration, as con-
firmed in writing by a physician, that completion of the se-
mester is precluded.
7. Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the Univer-
sity President or his/her desigriee(s).
A refund of 25% of the total fees paid (less building, capital
improvement and late fees) is available if written notice of with-
drawal of enrollment from the University is approved prior to
the end of the fourth week of classes for full semesters or a
proportionately shorter period of time for shorter terms, and
written documentation is received from the student.
Refunds must be requested at Student Financial Services,
Room 100 the Hub. Proper documentation must be presented
when a refund is requested. A waiting period for processing
may be required. Refunds will be applied against any Univer-
sity debts.

OTHER GENERAL FISCAL INFORMATION

General
Students should bring sufficient funds, other than personal
checks, to meet their immediate needs. Personal checks will be


accepted at Student Financial Services for the exact amount of
fees and/or other amounts owed the University. Student Finan-
cial Services does not cash checks or make cash refunds.
Checks written in excess of assessed fees or other amounts paid
the University will be accepted and processed, but the excess
will be refunded to the student at a later date by mail.

Cashing of Checks
Students may cash checks at the Reitz Union and the Campus
Bookstore. There are separate check cashing policies for each
area. Generally students must have a current validated fee card
and a picture ID.
Students who have three or more returned checks forfeit the
privilege of cashing checks on campus and jeopardize their',
ability to receive certain types of financial aid.

Picture I.D.
A CURRENT VALID PHOTO I.D. MUST BE PRESENTED IN
ORDER TO TRANSACT BUSINESS AT THE OFFICE OF STU-
DENT FINANCIAL SERVICES AND TO CASH CHECKS AT THE
REITZ UNION AND CAMPUS BOOKSTORE. Picture ID's can
be obtained from Equipment Distribution, 1215 GPA.

Local Address
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO BE SURE
THAT A CORRECT CURRENT LOCAL ADDRESS IS ON FILE
WITH THE REGISTRAR AT ALL TIME. Change of address forms
may be obtained from the Registrar's Office.

Past Due Student Accounts
All students' accounts are due and payable at Student Finan-
cial Services, the Hub, at the time such charges are incurred.
University regulations prohibit registration, graduation,
granting of creditor release of transcript for any student whose
account with the University is delinquent. Delinquent ac-
counts, which include those debts for which the students' re-
cords are flagged, may require payment by cash, cashier's
check, or money order.










Student Affairs

The following information describes the responsibilities of
the various offices charged with assistance to students at the
University of Florida. Additional information may be found in
THE FLORIDA STUDENT GUIDE and THE CAMPUS DIREC-
TORY.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS
The goals of the Division of Student Affairs include: develop-
ing effective and efficient services and programs for students
through the various departments within Student Affairs; inte-
grating student affairs and academic affairs; directly involving
students in the affairs of the institution; encouraging a sense of
community among students, faculty, and administration; and
increasing accessibility to and attractiveness of the University
of Florida to a wide variety of persons.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is located
in 124 Tigert Hall and is open to assist individual students and
groups in matters concerning them. All students are encour-
aged to share in the responsibility for enabling the various divi-
sions of the U.niversity of Florida community to meet the needs
of the students.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs has ad-
ministrative responsibility for the following offices and pro-
grams at the University of Florida: Office for Student Services,
Student Housing Office, Office for Student Financial Affairs,
Career Resource Center, J. Wayne Reitz Union, and University
Counseling Center.

OFFICE FOR
STUDENT SERVICES
The Office for Student Services at the University of Florida is
committed to the total development of students. The major pur-
pose of this department's programs, services, and activities is to
facilitate and enhance the intellectual, psychological, per-
sonal, and social development of students. The staff of the Of-
fice for Student Services, which includes deans and directors,
are responsible for planning, coordinating, and implementing a
variety of programs and services Which are designed to provide
students with the opportunity to reach their full potential, aca-
demically as well as in their personal lives.
Other major objectives of the Office for Student Services in-
clude making students aware of and encouraging the use of the
resources of the University; interpreting the goals, objectives,
and actions of the University to students; and encouraging a
sense of community among students, faculty and staff.
A number of program functions emerge from these overall
purposes and are carried out by the Office for Student Services.
These programs include:
1. individual and group advising
2. planning and carrying out programs and services for new
students including orientation to the University
3. assisting and advising minority students
4. student conduct and discipline "
5. assisting veteran students and coordinating VA benefits.
with the Veterans Administration
6. coordinating services and programs for disabled stu-
dents
S7. programs and services for older students
8. programs and services for women students
9. student leadership development and recognition pro-
grams
10. child care services (Baby Gator Nursery)
11. alcohol education programs
12. committee responsibility for student petitions and ad-
missions
13. providing exit interviews for students withdrawing from
Sthe university
14. fraternity and sorority advising and coordination


15. liaison and advising Student Government and other stu-
dent organizations.
The International Student Center and the Institute of Black
Culture are also operational units of the Office for Student Ser-
vices.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
The International Student Services Center assists interna-
tional students in adjusting to the changing lifestyle and study
habits in a new and sometimes perplexing environment. Spe-
cial services are provided related to foreign educational and
cultural backgrounds; language, legal, employment, aca-
demic, and personal matters; U.S. immigration and other gov-
ernment agency responsibilities as aliens; and currency
exchange. The focus is on helping international students
achieve their educational goals, while providing an insight into
the culture of the United States through a program of social
activities, orientation seminars, and community visits.

INSTITUTE OF BLACK CULTURE
The Institute of Black Culture is an educational t6ol for stu-
dents at the University of Florida. It is a facility for enlighten-
ment and Black awareness where Afro-Americans can focus on
their history, literature, art, culture, and lifestyle. It is also a
place where all ethnic groups can develop a better understand-
ing of Blacks and an appreciation of Black contributors to
American society. The center sponsors programs, exhibits and
related activities.

SERVICES FOR DISABLED STUDENTS
The Office for Student Services provides assistance for dis-
abled students. Services are varied dependent on individual
needs, and include but are not limited to: special campus orien-
tation, registration assistance, securing auxiliary learning aids,
and assistance in general University activities. Students with
disabilities are encouraged to contact this office to obtain any
needed assistance.

STUDENT HOUSING
The University of Florida offers resident students a unique
and exciting residence hall program. Living on campus is a prof-
itable educational experience that students will long remem-
ber. The Division of Housing provides accommodations and
programs to meet the needs of students while promoting the
overall educational goals and objectives of the University.
The University of Florida has a large resident population of
both in-state and out-of-state students, as well as students from
100 different foreign countries. Since students come from dif-
fering environmental backgrounds and social experiences,
they bring with them varying needs and expectations. Because
of this diversity in the student body, it would be a disservice to
students to take a unilateral approach in developing the resi-
dence hall program. Therefore, the Division of Housing has
developed a program based upon alternatives and choices. Stu-
dents may select from various housing accommodations and
environments that best fit their needs.

GENERAL INFORMATION
All freshmen who ard admitted to the University will receive a
Housing Application Card with their formal letter of admission
from the Admissions Office until housing facilities are full.
The University of Florida has no residency requirement for
freshmen attending the University for the first time during the
Fall Semester. Freshmen entering the University during the
Summer Term(s) must live on campus during the summer to be
eligible for Fall Semesteron-campus housing. Entering students
are free to choose either on-campus or off-campus accommo-
dations. Students who voluntarily contract for on-campus hous-
ing normally must do so for the entire academic year (August to
May) if enrolled. However, residents must be full-time students
to be eligible to reside in the residence halls. Full-time enroll-
ment for residence is defined as being enrolled in 12 credit
hours if an undergraduate and 9 credit hours if a graduate stu-
dent.





General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


All students other than beginning freshmen must initiate their
own arrangements for housing either by (1) applying to: Assign-
ments Office, Division of Housing, University of Florida,,
Gainesville, FL 32611, or (2) obtaining accommodations in pri-
vate housing. (See Off-Campus Housing later in this section.)
All correspondence concerning application for University
housing should be addressed to the Division of Housing, As-
signments Office, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611. An application for residence hall space for students
other than beginning freshmen may be filed nine months prior
to the semester or summer term for which admission is being
sought. Prospective students are urged to apply as early as pos-
sible because of the demand for housing.
For all students other than beginning freshmen, application
requests are considered first-come, first-served, on a space-
available basis.
Roommate requests will be considered if the individuals
wishing to room together submit their Housing Agreements
clearly indicating their desire to room together and elect the
same visitation choice and assignment options.
Disabled students are also offered housing on a first-come,
first-served, space-available basis. Accessible housing is avail-
able for disabled students once they are offered housing. Stu-
dents with special needs should indicate these needs on their
Housing Agreement.

ROOM STYLES
There are several room styles to fit the individual student's
preference. The most prevalent is the double room, accommo-
dating two students, with central floor bath facilities. Doubles
are found in every area except Beaty Towers and range from air-
conditioned units in Hume Hall, to nonair-conditioned rooms
with bay windows in Murphee. Typically, only a few single
rooms are available.
All permanent rooms have an individual closet, storage
space, dresser, bed and mattress, study desk, and chairs.
Room rates vary depending on such features as air condition-
ing, phone service, and floor space. Refer to the rental rate
chart for specific charges available from the Housing Office.
Beaty Towers provide apartment style living on campus.
These snall two-bedroom apartments are fully contained with
their own bathroom, study, kitchen, and two separate bed-
rooms for four students. Each apartment is fully carpeted, air-
conditioned, and has a telephone jack.
The Murphee Residential Area offers many suites for two stu-
dents. Each suite is made up of two rooms-one designed as a
study and living area, the other as a bedroom with a laboratory.
The majority of rooms in this area are nonair-conditioned.
However, Sledd and Fletcher Halls, which comprise approxi-
mately one-third of the area are newly renovated, air-
conditioned facilities.

THE RESIDENCE HALL STAFF
AND STUDENT GOVERNMENT
A full complement of professional and paraprofessional staff
members is available to assist students in becoming a part of
campus life. The staff in residence act as referral agents in ac-
quainting students with the many resources of the University.
Our staff is also involved in a range of activities, from initiating
social andlntramural athletic programs-to supplementing the
various academic and developmental programs. In addition,
staff members supervise and enforce policies designed to cre-
ate an atmosphere conducive to learning and growth.
Each floor or section is supervised by an undergraduate Resi-
dent Assistant, the RA. Working in close conjunction with the
RA is a graduate Hall Director who coordinates the area activi-
ties and ensures, through the RAs, an environment for learning.
The Assistant Director of Housing for Residence Life is a profes-
sional staff member who is responsible for the overall adminis-
trative and educational functions within the residence area. The
entire housing staff is committed to servicing our students in the
most effective and responsible way possible. The student is
why the staff exists, and his/her development is our primary
goal.


INTER RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION
All students in the residence halls are encouraged to partici-
pate in organizational activities which can play a significant
part in their educational, cultural, social, and recreational life.
The Inter Residence Hall Association was established to help
stimulate this participation. IRHA represents the collective in-
terests of all resident students. The organization also serves as a
channel of communication between residence area govern-
ment councils, the University community, and other outside
interests. This self-government program at both the hall and
area levels offers residents the opportunity to help establish
guidelines for group living and to assist in the planning of social
and educational activities for their fellow students.

GENERAL SERVICES
TELEPHONES. Currently, a telephone jack is conveniently lo-
cated in each student room except in Buckman Coop. Students
should provide their own phone. Each room telephone jack
provides 24-hour service on campus and within the Gainesville
area; cost of local service is included in the rental rate. AT&T
CampusNet, the university approved discount long distance
service, is available on a voluntary basis to students and can
operate from any 395-phone. Long distance operator assisted
calls can also be made by students whopossess other long dis-
tance company charge cards or wish to call collect. CampusNet
bills the students directly each month for long distance charges.
FOOD SERVICE. Gator Dining Service, a private food service
operation, maintains cafeterias and snackbars on campus and
offers meal plans. Hume Hall and Broward Hall have cafeterias.
Snackbars are located in Tolbert Hall and Graham Hall. Cafete-
rias are also located in Johnson Hall, the Reitz Student Union
and the Medical Center. It is the policy of the University to pro-
vide wdll-prepared food at the lowest possible price.
REFRIGERATOR RENTAL. The cost of refrigerators is not in-
cluded in the room rent (except Beaty Towers, apartments, and
selected suites for four). In most cases, it is best to make ar-
rangements for a refrigerator after arriving on campus when
roommates can share the cost and decide on available space in
the room. Residents may opt to rent a refrigerator by contacting
Collegiate Products, Inc. (CPI), the authorized university ven-
dor, at 371-6321. If students bring their own refrigerators, they
must make arrangements for installation and removal. No re-
fund will be granted if a student brings a refrigerator to a hall
already furnishing such units.
CUSTODIAL SERVICE. Each residence hall (except coops)
has a staff of experienced custodians assigned to do general
cleaning of public areas, bathrooms, lounges, and hallways.
Other specific tasks are done in order to maintain good house-
keeping throughout the halls. Student room cleaning is the re-
sponsibility of each student.
INTERNAL SECURITY. Residence hall security is monitored
by the residence hall staff; external building security generally
is the responsibility of the University Police Department.
Trained Housing Division Security Assistants patrol the areas
immediately adjacent to the residence halls.
VENDING. Various vending machines are conveniently lo-
cated in all residence halls for the comfort and pleasure of stu-
dents desiring such services.
LAUNDRY FACILITIES. Coin-operated washers and dryers
are provided in each residence area. Most students provide
their own irons; however, some area governments provide irons
on a checkout basis.

SPECIAL HOUSING AREAS
Recognizing the diversity of students' needs, the Division of
Housing offers several different living environments.
New students are assigned primarily to double or permanent
triple rooms when first applying to the University, but once on
campus they may qualify for specialized areas.
QUIET FLOORS. Students wishing to live on a "Quiet Floor"
should request Tolbert Area. These spaces are reserved for stu-
dents who value an environment that is more noise restrictive.
Students who request and are assigned to a quiet floor are re-







STUDENT AFFAIRS


quired to sign a separate letter agreeing to abide by specific
standards designed to assure a quiet living environment for all
floor residents.
EAST HALL. Qualifying freshmen may be invited to live in the
"Honors Hall" (East Hall) with other selected freshmen and
continuing students to participate in an accelerated academic
program. Special forms available from the Admissions Office
must be completed and returned in order to be assigned to East
Hall. Contact: Admissions Officer for Superior Student Appli-
cations, Admissions Office, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL 32611, (904) 392-1365.
YULEE SCHOLARSHIP HALL. Yulee Scholarship Hall pro-
vides single rooms for those students who qualify with a re-
quired minimum grade point average of 3.0 and have
Sophomore or above classifications. Students who are 21 years
of age or older are eligible regardless of their class rank if they
have an established 3.0 grade point average.
COMPUTER INTEREST SECTION. Computer majors or stu-
dents with an interest in computers can request to live in the
Computer Interest section in Fletcher Hall. Each room in this
section has direct access to the various programming languages
and printing facilities of the University's central computer. Also
special programming will take place utilizing computer sci-
ence faculty. Students with their own computer must furnish
connecting cables, plugs, adapter, etc. Two university terminals
will be provided in the first floor library'for students who do not
have their own terminals or microcomputers.
BEATY TOWERS. This hall has a high percentage of upper
division and graduate students as residents. Four students share
an apartment with two bedrooms, complete kitchen, and pri-
vate bath.
SCHUCHT VILLAGE. Apartments in Schucht Village are
available to graduate students with priority being given to stu-
dents in medical, dental or veterinary school. Applications for
Schucht Village may be obtained by writing to the Division of
Housing Office, Assignments Section, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611.
DISABLED STUDENT HOUSING. Avarietyof facilities in the
Residence Halls is available for disabled students. Broward,
Jennings, and Yulee Halls each have easily accessible rooms.
The Quiet Floor Areas in Tolbert Hall for men and South Hall for
women are also accessible.
In most cases, only specially modified central bath facilities
are available. Building ramps are provided and reserved park-
ing is available. While additional remodeling is continuing, our
facilities are limited. In order that proper arrangements may be
made, early contact should be made with the Division of Hous-
ing. Please explain the nature of your disability in detail when
you write. Disabled students, as all students, must meet the
standard guidelines used in determining housing eligibility.
FAMILY HOUSING. A student may apply for on-campus stu-
dent family housing prior to admittance to the University. How-
ever he/she must be registered as a full-time student as defined
by his/her college or school during the semester in which hous-
i is ing is desired in order to qualify for a family housing apartment
assignment. In order to maintain occupancy, the student must
make normal progress toward a degree as determined by his/
her college or school as well as abide by the conditions of the
rental agreement. As applicable, proof of marriage will be re-
quired or the necessary documents to support that a minor chil-
d(ren) is in the-legal care of a student parent without a spouse.
Family housing apartments are reserved for married students
and their children (if any), and student parents without spouses
who have dependent minor children under their legal care or
who qualify under the provisions of Federal Regulations, Title
IX.
Family housing facilities consist of'one- and two-bedroom
apartments, a few townhouses, and efficiencies. Most units are
unfurnished except for 45 apartments in Corry Village. Apart-
ments are available with and without central air conditioning.
Almost all family housing villages are located on campus.
Family income limits are set by the Department of Housing
and Urban Development for Maguire Village only. There are no
income limits for Corry, Diamond, Tanglewood, or University
Village South.


To receive application materials, write or call Division of
Housing, Family Housing Office, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, FL 32611, telephone (904) 392-2176.

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
The Housing Office functions as a listing and referral agency
for privately owned rental housing of all types listed with the
University for referral to students, faculty and staff.
This office maintains extensive listings of apartments,
houses, and rooming units offered for rent to students, faculty,
and staff. Each spring, the office compiles a comprehensive list
of major apartment and rooming unit developments. This list is
available to anyone who requests it in person or by mail from
the Off-Campus Housing Office.
It is recommended that the student make a personal inspec-
tion of the rental facility and have a conference with the owner
(or agent) prior to making a deposit or signing a lease agree-
ment. Persons seeking off-campus housing should plan to ar-
rive in Gainesville well in advance of the semester in which
housing is needed. For example, Fall Semester arrangements
are possible as early as April, Spring Semester after mid-
November, etc. For best results, visit during the week-not
weekends-after preliminary information on available rentals
has been obtained.
Landlord/tenant problems are handled by Student Govern-
ment's attorney, Room 302, Reitz Union, telephone (904) 392-
1623.
Inquiries about off-campus housing should be directed to the
Division of Housing, Off-Campus Housing Office, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, telephone (904) 392-2161.
Off-campus cooperative living opportunities are also avail-
able. Qualifications for membership are scholastic ability and
reference of good character. Inquiries should be addressed to:
Collegiate Living Organization (co-ed), 117 NW 15th St., and
Georgia Seagle Hall (men), 1002 W. University Avenue.


STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
The Office for Student Financial Affairs (SFA) coordinates and
administers most student financial aid programs at the Univer-
sity of Florida and provides financial assistance and counseling
to University of Florida students.
SFA awards aid to students according to financial need the
difference between current educational costs and what individ-
ual students can pay toward these costs. A national needs anal-
ysis service, the College Scholarship Service in Princeton, New
Jersey, evaluates financial need for UF students from informa-
tion they and their families supply on the Financial Aid Form.

What Is Financial Aid?
Financial aid is money provided to students and their families
as either "gift aid" or "self-help" to help pay college costs. "Gift
aid," as the name implies, is free money such as scholarships
and grants. Students do not have to repay these awards. "Self-
help" programs include loans and employment and are so
named because students must repay loans and must work for
money awarded through employment programs. Awards to stu-
dents consist of scholarships, grants, loans and work, singly or
as a package.

When To Apply
Applications are available January 1 each year, and students
need to send their forms to the appropriate processor as soon as
possible after that date. Although there is no application "dead-
line," students are considered for aid according to the date their
aid file becomes complete (all required application data re-
ceived) at Student Financial Affairs. Most campus-based money
is awarded by April, so to be considered for this assistance stu-
dents should apply as early as possible after January 1. A few
programs such as the Pell Grant program, Guaranteed Student
Loans, and OPS employment are open for application through-
out the year (see Important Deadlines below).





General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


SFA cannot award financial aid to students until they have
been officially admitted to the University of Florida. However,
students should not wait to be admitted to apply for aid but
should apply as soon as possible after January 1.

How To Apply
Students must complete and submit a University of Florida
Application for Financial Aid to Student Financial Affairs and a
College Scholarship Service (CSS) Financial Aid Form to the
CSS office in Princeton, NJ. Transfer students are also responsi-
ble for a Financial Aid Transcript. When completing these
forms, students should provide accurate financial figures, taken
directly from completed 1986 income tax forms. The Office for
Student Financial Affairs is required to verify students' and par-
ents' financial information, and incorrectly completing appli-
cation forms can cause aid to be delayed or denied. Students
should keep copies of all their financial aid documents.
Financial aid applications are not sent to students automati-
cally when they apply for admission. For applications and de-
tailed procedures for applying, write to Student Financial
Affairs, 111 Anderson Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL 32611, or call (904) 392-1275. Applications also are avail-
able from most Florida community colleges and high school
guidance offices.
/
Important Deadlines
Financial aid applications should be completed and sent to
the appropriate processor as soon as possible after January 1. To
be considered for a Florida Student Assistance Grant, students
must apply early enough so that the College Scholarship Ser-
vice receives their Financial Aid Form by April 15. The deadline
for applying for a Pell Grant for the 1987-88 academic year is
May 1, 1988. Guaranteed Student Loan on-time deadlines are
set by semester. For instance, the on-time deadline for applying
for an insured loan for Fall 1987 is May 15, 1987. Individual
colleges and private organizations have their own deadlines for
applying for aid.

Graduate Aid
Graduate students at the University of Florida may be eligible
for part-time employment and loans through SFA and/or for as-
sistantships and fellowships through their colleges. To apply for
College Work Study and loans, graduate students must follow
the procedures in HOW TO APPLY, including applying as early
as possible. Off-campus jobs and the state-funded OPS job pro-
gram are not based on need and are available through the Stu-
dent Employment Office in 20 Anderson Hall. For other
graduate aid such as fellowships and assistantships, students
should apply through the Dean of the Graduate School and the
Dean's office of their colleges.

Types of Aid
SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded based on academic perfor-
mance and financial need. SFA awards a limited number of
scholarships to academically outstanding undergraduates with
documented need. Most academic achievement scholarships
are awarded through the Office of Admissions. Individual col-
leges within the University also offer scholarships to under-
graduates. For information on these, students should contact
the dean of their college. Many private donors also offer schol-
arships, selecting the recipients) directly; students should
check with civic clubs, service organizations, private corpora-
tions, and other resources in their home community. /
GRANTS are awarded to undergraduate students with finan-
cial need. The three largest grant programs available at UF are
the federally-funded Pell Grant and Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grant programs and the state-funded Florida Stu-
dent Assistance Grant. Awards range from $200 to $2,000.
LOANS for UF students are long-term or short-term. Long-
term loans are low-interest (5-12 percent) with payment de-
ferred until the borrower graduates, withdraws or drops to less
than half-time status (six hours). Short-term loans are emer-
gency loans for temporary needs and must be repaid by the first
day of the last month of the semester in which the money is



borrowed. Through this program, students can borrow up to
$200 or the amount of in-state fees.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT through the University is offered
to about 6,000 students each year. In addition, many students
work off-campus in the Gainesville community. Students nor-
mally work 15-20 hours a week, 3 or 4 days a week, and earn at
least minimum wage. Most hiring departments help students
arrange their working hours around their academic schedule.

Student Employment Office
The SFA Student Employment Office in Anderson Hall is a
clearinghouse for part-time employment and maintains a cur-
rent listing of on- and off-campus jobs. The jobs list is updated
weekly and copies are posted on bulletin boards in Anderson
Hall, the Reitz Union, Weil Hall, Norman Hall, McCarty Hall,
and Tigert Hall. Currently, Student Employment administers
two employment programs: the federal College Work Study
Program (awarded to students as a part pf their overall financial
aid package based on financial need) and the state-funded
Other Personnel Services Program which is not based on need.

Information and Counseling
Student Financial Affairs is open for student service from
12:30-4:15, Monday through Friday. For financial aid informa-
tion, applications and counseling, students can go to the Ander-
son Hall offices or call 392-1275. A telephone counselor is
available from 8:00-4:30 daily.
Another resource for financial aid information is the NEXUS
telephone tap series. Tapes 402-A through 402-L contain cur-
rent information on financial aid programs at the University of
Florida. The telephone number for the NEXUS system is 392-
1683.

Academic Progress Requirements for Financial Aid
Recipients*
A. Undergraduates
1. Qualitative Measure of Progress
a. Students must have a cumulative 2.0 grade point av-
erage by the end of their second academic year and
must maintain at least a cumulative 2.0 grade point
average for the duration of their undergraduate en-
rollment.
1) Students who have 1-9 grade points less than a
2.00 cumulative grade point average will be
placed on financial aid warning.
2) Students who have 10-19 grade points less than a
2.00 cumulative grade point average will be
placed on financial aid probation.
3) Students who have 20 or more grade points less
than a 2.00 cumulative grade point average will
be suspended from financial aid for one term.
4) Students who do not reduce their grade point def-
icit to less than 20 deficit grade points the follow-
ing term of enrollment will be terminated from
financial aid.
5) Students who reduce their grade point deficit to
less than 20 grade points below a 2.00 cumula-
tive GPA will return to the appropriate status out-
lined in a., 1) and 2) of this section.
b. Until the completion of the second academic year of
study, progress for financial aid purposes will be
evaluated under the same standards approved by the
University Senate for determining eligibility for con-
tinued enrollment.
c. Any action taken by the University Senate Commit-
tee on Student Petitions regarding students' appeals
of their suspended enrollment because of grade
point deficit will also apply to the financial aid com-
ponents of the academic progress policy.
2. Time-frame for Completing Degree Objectives
Students will not be eligible for aid if they do not earn a
baccalaureate degree after carrying 150 credit hours
(whether or not they received aid for all terms), with the
following exception:
Students may carry up to 160 credit hours for pro-
grams that regularly require more than 130 earned
hours to achieve a baccalaureate degree.







STUDENT AFFAIRS


3. Measurement of Progress Within This Time-frame
a. Students classified as freshmen must earn 75% of
their hours carried arid achieve sophomore status (30
earned hours) after carrying a maximum of 40 credit
hours.
b. Students classified as sophomores must earn 78% of
their total credit hours carried and achieve junior sta-
tus (60 earned hours) after carrying a maximum of 77
credit hours.
c. Students classified as juniors (including 3UF) must
earn 82% of their total credit hours carried and
achieve senior status (90 earned hours) after carrying
a maximum of 110 credit hours.
d. Students classified as seniors must earn 87% of their
total hours carried and must have earned a baccalau-
reate degree after carrying a maximum of 150 credit
hours with the following exception:
Students who have earned more than 130 credit
hours and are enrolled in a program requiring
more than 130 earned credit hours for a bacca-
laureate degree must earn 91% of their hours car-
ried and must earn a baccalaureate degree after
carrying a maximum of 160 credit hours.
e. Students who do not earn the minimum percentage
of credit hours specified will be placed on financial
aid probation for one term. During the following
term of enrollment students must raise the percent-
age of their credit hours earned to the specified mini-
mum. Students who do not will be suspended from
aid until they meet this standard.
4. Maximum Terms for Receiving Financial Aid
a. Students may receive up to ten full-time terms of aid
(or the equivalent) with the following exceptions:
1) Students admitted under the Board of Regents
10% admissions policy may receive up to eleven
full-time terms (or the equivalent) of aid.
2) Students in programs requiring more than 130
credit hours to earn a baccalaureate degree may
receive up to eleven full-time terms (or the equiv-
I alent) of aid.
3) Students admitted under the Board of Regents
10% admissions rule in a program requiring
more than 130 credit hours may receive up to
twelve full-time terms (or the equivalent) of aid.
b. The maximum number of terms students transferring
to the University of Florida may receive aid will be
pro-rated based on their entering enrollment status.
For example, a student enrolling as a junior may re-
ceive a maximum of five terms of aid to earn a bacca-
laureate degree. Aid received at another institution
will not count toward this limit.
B. Post-baccalaureate Students
Students enrolled in post-baccalaureate studies must peti-
tion the Financial Aid Appeals Committee to continue to
receive financial aid.
C. Graduate Students
Since many courses require research projects which de-
mand more than a semester to complete, grades of "1" are
routinely posted until the coursework has been finished.
Therefore, the following satisfactory progress standards
have been designed to take this grading practice into ac-
count.
1. Qualitative Measure of Progress
Students must maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade
point average or meet the academic standards required
by their Departments, whichever are higher.
2. Time-frame for Completing Degree Objectives
a. Students will be ineligible for aid if they do not
achieve their degree objectives after carrying the
maximum number of credit hours listed below
(whether or not they have received aid for all terms):
1) 70 credit hours at the graduate level for a Master's
degree program.
2) 200 credit hours at the graduate level for a Doctor
of Pharmacy degree (including undergraduate
hours).


3) 100 credit hours at the graduate level for a Spe-
cialist's degree program (including Master's de-
gree hours).
4) 120 credit hours at the graduate level for a doc-
toral degree program (including Master's degree
hours).
3. Measurement of Progress Within This Time-frame
a. Students must earn 75% of their credit hours carried
at the graduate level.
b. Students who do not earn 75% of the credit hours
carried will be on financial aid probation for one
term. During the following term of enrollment these
students must raise their percentage of credit hours
earned to the minimum. If they do not, they will be
suspended from aid until the standard is met.
D. Law Students
1. Qualitative Measure of Progress
Students must maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade
point average,or meet the academic standards required
by the College of Law, whichever is higher.
2. Time-frame for Completing Degree Objectives
a. Students will be ineligible for aid if they do not
achieve their degree objective after carrying the max-
imum credit hours listed below (whether or not they
received aid for those terms):
1) 45 credit hours at the graduate level for students
enrolled in the Master of Laws in Taxation pro-
gram
2) 100 credit hours at the graduate level for students
enrolled in the juris Doctor program
3. Measurement of Progress Within This Time-frame
a. Students must earn 88% of their credit hours carried
while enrolled in the College of Law.
b. Students who do not earn 88% of the credit hours
carried will be placed on financial aid probation for
one term. During the following term of enrollment
these students must raise their percentage of credit
hours earned to the minimum. If they do not, they
will be suspended from aid until the standard is met.
E. Professional Students in the Colleges of Medicine, Dentis-
try, and Veterinary Medicine
1. Qualitative Measure of Progress
Since professional schools use a non-traditional grading
system (one not based upon GPA) to assess satisfactory
completion of course work, the same policy (a similar
non-traditional approach) will be used to measure quali-
tative progress for continuing financial aid eligibility.
2. Time-frame for Completing Degree Objectives
Students must earn their degrees within four years.
3. Measure of Progress Within This Time-frame
a. Students will be evaluated annually in September to
determine advancement to the next class level.
b. Students who do not advance to the next class level
but are still eligible for enrollmentwill be on finan-
cial aid probation for the following year. Students
who have not advanced to the next class level by the
end of the' probationary period will no longer be eli-
gible for financial aid.
F. Additional Policies which Apply to All Students
1. Withdrawal Policy
a. Students who withdraw from school once while re-
ceiving financial aid will be on financial aid proba-
tion.
b. Students who withdraw from school more than once
while receiving financial aid will no longer be eligi-
ble for financial aid.
c. Withdrawal from a summer A or B term will consti-
tute one-half of a withdrawal.
2.' Treatment of Course Withdrawals, Incompletes, Course
Repetitions, and Remedial Courses
a. Treatment of course withdrawals, incomplete and
course repetitions will conform to the academic
standards used by the University of Florida for deter-
mining grade point average.





General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


b. Remedial courses are not offered at the University of
Florida.
3. Appeals
Students who think they have extenuating circum-
stances that have contributed to their failure to maintain
satisfactory academic progress may petition the Finan-
cial Aid Appeals Committee for reassessment of their
status.
G. Students who enroll in curriculums not specifically ad-
dressed in this policy must petition the Financial Aid Ap-
peals Committee to continue to receive financial aid.

*Final interpretations) of the 1986 Amendments to the Higher
Education Act have not been resolved as of this printing.


CAREER RESOURCE CENTER
The Career Resource Center provides career planning, coop-
erative education/work experience opportunities, and job
placement assistance to all University of Florida students and
alumni.
The Center's objective is to assist students in:
(1) developing career plans related to academic interests,
(2) acquiring career related work experiences, and
(3) developing personal strategies that ensure successfulem-
ployment upon graduation.
The entire program focuses upon the student from freshmen
career exploration to serious seeking employment. Students
can use the services of the Center at any point in their college
careers. Services are (ree to students. Services include:.
Individual Counseling for students seeking career planning,
career changes, work experience programs, and job search
campaigns. Seven professional counselors are available to per-
sonally aid students.
CHOICES, a computerized career exploration and occupa-
tional information delivery system is available free to students.
CHOICES helps students match career interests with occupa-
tions and provides each student a personal printout for review.
A Career Mini School that offers 14 different seminar ses-
sions on a weekly basis. Sessions are usually 50 minutes each.
Topics include Career Planning, Career Advisement for Minori-
ties, Cooperative Education, Summer jobs and Internships, Lib-
eral Arts Careers, Job Search Corresp6ndence, Resume
Preparation, and Interview Techniques.
A Cooperative Education Program which enables students to
gain professional work experience related to classroom educa-
tion. It also provides a source of income to pay college ex-
penses and enables students to become more competitive
when entering the job market.
College Career W6rk Experience Program (CCWEP) is a pro-
gram that provides financial assistance to students in part-time
career-related employment in the'Gainesville area. Students
must have an unmet financial need, have a 2.0 G.P.A., and be
enrolled for at least six semester hours of coursework per se-
mester.
On Campus Interview Program, the largest in the state, wel-
comes 200 + employers to campus each semester to interview
graduating students. Last year 573 total employers interviewed
11,800 students for national jobs.
job Placement Service. Students and alumni can review hun-
dreds of immediate job openings each week. The Center re-
ceives requests daily from major national employers seeking
full-time, part-time, Summer and Cooperative Education posi-
tions. Federal, State and local governmental agencies also list
job openings as well as international employers.
SCareer Days. The Center sponsors a number of these special
events each semester. Career Day offers all U.F. students an in-
formal opportunity to meet and discuss career and employment
opportunities with hundreds of national corporations.
A Career Resources Library containing information on sev-
eral thousand employers and related occupations; employer
contact lists; directories for business, industry, education, and
government; lists of American firms operating overseas; refer-


ence and informational material on graduate and special stud-
ies programs including fellowships and assistantships; and
many other materials and resource data such as, research data
on job trends, outlook and economic forecasts, labor market
statistics, manpower bulletins for various career fields, special
directories and publications giving reports and ratings on most
employers.
An Audiovisual Department with study carrels and a library
of over 150 slide/tape, video, and audio programs covering ca-
reer choices, employer information, selection of academic pro-
grams, and job search and interview techniques.
A Qualification Record Repository and Referral Service is
available to students and alumni. Copies of credentials are sent
upon request of the students and alumni to potential employ-
ers. In addition, the Center refers qualified persons on file and
seeking employment to interested employers requesting candi-
dates to fill job vacancies.
An "Outreach Program" in which professional staff mem-
bers are available to hold seminars for student organizations,
for lecture presentations to classes on all phases of career plan-
ning and job search preparation, and to develop "Career Day"
programs in conjunction with colleges.
For additional information, students, alumni, and faculty are
invited to visit the Center located on the ground floor of the
Reitz Union. Staff members will be happy to discuss ideas, con-
cerns, and needs for individuals or groups.

J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the center of campus activities
for the University, providing a wide variety of facilities, ser-
vices, and programs for all members of the University commu-
-nity, but with primary emphasis on serving the out-of-class
needs of students. Policy for the Reitz Union is established by
the Board of Managers, which consists of eight students and six
faculty members, with a student chairperson.
The Reitz Union was opened May 1, 1967, and named after
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, President of the University of Florida from
1955 to 1967. Among the facilities and services offered are mu-
sic listening rooms, art gallery areas, an arts and crafts center,
photographic darkrooms, a games area with bowling, billiards,
table tennis, and table soccer, a video game room, a browsing
library, the University Box Office, a branch of the Campus Shop
and Bookstore, a barbershop, automatic bank tellers, a check
cashing service, a duplicating and poster service, a'travel
agency, information desks, a lost and found service, display
cases, a free Notary Public, passenger and ride-wanted bulletin
boards, and a voter registration service. A large ballroom, an
auditorium, lounges, and conference and meeting rooms are
available for use by University organizations, and the Union
has 36 guest rooms available for use by official guests of the
University, students, and guests of students, faculty and staff.
The Union offers a wide range of dining and food service
facilities, with a cafeteria, a snack bar, the Arredondo dining
room, the Sugar Cone ice cream and bake shop, the Orange and
Brew beverage and sandwich shop with an outdoor terrace, and
a complete catering service for receptions and small or large
banquets.
The Student Activities Center, located on the third floor, is of
particular significance to the educational program of the Uni-
versity. A distinctive arrangement of offices and work space for
Student Government, the Student Honor Court, Student Legal
Services, and many other student organizations enhances the
effectiveness of the total student activities program of the Uni-
versity.
The Reitz Union sponsors a continuing program of activities
for the campus community, including a performing arts series,
dinner theatres, speakers, bands, a leisure course program, art
exhibits, movies, an outdoor recreation program, arts and crafts
sales, and campus and intercollegiate tournaments in bowling,
billiards, table tennis, video games, bridge, chess, table soccer,
and College Bowl.
A distinctive area of the Reitz Union is the H. P. Constans
Theatre, a 464-seat facility for the dramatic arts which provides
.excellence in design, equipment for staging and lighting, and
acoustics.







STUDENT AFFAIRS


UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
The University Counseling Center offers a variety of counsel-
ing and student development services to students and their
spouses. The Center is staffed by psychologists whose primary
interests are to facilitate the growth and development of each
student and to assist students in getting the most out of their
college experience. Services offered at the Center include the
following:
Counseling Individual, couples, and group counseling is
available to help students with personal, career, and academic
concerns. Appointments to see a Counselor can be made by
calling the Center at 392-1575 or in person at 311 Little Hall.
Students initially have an intake interview in which the student
and the counselor make. decisions about the type of help
needed. Students requiring immediate help are seen on a non-
appointment emergency basis. Information concerning coun-
seling interviews is confidential.
Consulting Center psychologists are available for consult-
ing with students, staff, professionals, and faculty. These con-
sultations often focus on working with individual students,
special programs, organizational problems, ways of improving
student environments, or other issues that may have important
psychological dimensions.
Career Development In addition to career counseling, the
Center offers vocational interest testing, career workshops, and
a career library. The Center also provides referral information to
students seeking specific career information.
Group and Workshop Program The Center offers a wide
variety of groups and workshops. A number of them, such as the
women's support group and the Black women's enrichment
group are designed for special populations. Others such as the
math confidence groups, assertiveness workshops, and coun-
seling groups are formed to help participants deal with com-
mon problems and learn specific skills. A list of available
groups and workshops is published at the beginning of each
term.
Teaching/Training The Center provides a variety of practi-
cum and internship training experience for students in Coun-
seling Psychology and Counselor Education. Center
psychologists also teach undergraduate and graduate courses
in some of these departments.
CounseLine A self-help tape program designed to provide
information on how to cope with the problems of daily living is
,sponsored by the Center. Students may call 392-1683 and ask
for any of the 34 tapes that are available. A list of the tapes is
published periodically in the student newspaper and is also
available at the Center.

GATOR DINING SERVICE
Gator Dining Service offers food service in 14 convenient on-
campus locations. You can enjoy the endless variety of popular
foods from soup and salad bars, deli bars, made-to-order sand-
wiches, "made on campus" baked goods, delicious hot entrees
and nutritious vegetables, or let us tempt you with our "Gator
Burger" or a late-nite pizza delivered to your resident hall
room, or our convenience store in the Graham Area.
Gator Dining Service offers you a new food service program
"The Gator Club." An account in "The Gator Club" provides
you, the student, convenience, flexibility, and numerous advan-
tages that are exclusively yours. For further information on be-


coming a "Gator Club" member, call us at (904) 392-2491, or
come by our office at 110 Johnson Hall.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Student Health Service provides a spectrum of out-patient
medical services including primary medical care, health
screening programs, health education, sexual assault recovery
service, and mental health consultation and counseling.
The service is staffed by physicians, physician's assistants,
nurses, advanced registered nurse practitioners, psychiatrists,
psychologists, pharmacists, laboratory and x-ray technologists,
and support personnel. Specialty clinics are available for al-
lergy injections, dermatology, orthopedics, wart removal, and

women's health care.
All students are required to pay a Health Fee along with their
tuition fee. Not all services are covered by the Health Fee and
the supplemental Student Government-sponsored health insur-
ance plan is highly recommended as a means of defraying these
extra costs.
Students are required to complete a personal health history
questionnaire and provide a physician's documentation of
Measles-Rubella immunity before registering at the-University.

DENTAL CARE
The College of Dentistry provides a broad range of dental
services at reduced fees through its student clinics. For informa-
tion or scheduling of appointments, call 392-4261.
Entry to the College of Dentistry clinics (the Blue Zone on the
first floor) is via the west entrance to the Health Sciences Center
on Center Drive. Parking is available in the visitor's parking ga-
rage with access from Mowry Road.

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Program in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology,
Department of Speech, offers services to persons who have
speech, hearing or language disorders.
The clinic operates from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday when the University is in session. The clinic is a
donation-based service. Those interested are encouraged to
call the clinic (392-2041-Voice & TDD) or stop by the Arts &
Sciences Building, Room 442, for information and to schedule
an appointment for services.

READING AND WRITING CENTER
The University Reading and Writing Center, located in 2109
TUR, is a free service offered to staff and students at all levels.
The Center can be contacted between 8:30 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
The Center provides credit classes and workshops as well as
noncredit, individual instruction based on a diagnosis of each
student's needs. The reading program is designed to improve
comprehension, rate, vocabulary, and study skills. The writing
program is designed to aid students with the organization and
development of papers and with spelling, punctuation, and
grammar skills.














29











Student Life

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND
ORGANIZATIONS
Student Government: Student Government at the University
of Florida is a cooperative organization for advancing student
interests and is based on mutual confidence among and be-
tween the student body, the faculty, and the administration.
Considerable authority has been granted the student body for
the regulation and conduct of student affairs. The criterion in
granting authority to the Student Government has been the dis-
position of UF students to accept responsibility commensurate
with the resources at its disposal to fulfill its mission; including
the allocation of approximately three million dollars per year in
student activity and service fees, substantial authority in the
regulation of co-curricular activities, and administration of the
Student Court. The University of Florida faculty and staff feel
that training in acceptance of responsibility for the conduct of
student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educa-
tional growth and development of the individual student.
Student Government is a body politic, occupying its fran-
chise under grant from the Board of Regents and subject to its
continued approval. Student Government is patterned on the
state and national form of government but adapted to the local
needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Student Sen-
ate; (2) judicial, which is embodied in the Student Honor Court
and the Traffic Court; (3) executive embodied in the President
and the Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three
branches are elected directly by the Student Body, of which all
UF students are members. In addition to elected offices, many
appointed positions have been established in Student Govern-
ment, including Cabinet'and sub-Cabinet, Student Court, and
the Traffic Court posts.
Student Government, recognizing its limitations as a true
"government," attempts to exercise influence on governments
at all levels through conferences, lobbying, research, and the
advancement of proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions within the student
government structure by contacting the Student Government
offices on the third floor of the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Student Senate: The Student Senate is composed of repre-
sentatives elected from the colleges and living areas on the
campus and, in general, acts as the Legislative Branch of Stu-
dent Government.
Religious Activities: The University of Florida welcomes the
contributions of religious traditions to the campus community.
The churches, centers, and organizations associated with the
University offer a rich variety of programs and ministries. There
are also interdenominational and non-denominational activi-
ties fostered by the Department of Religion and the Campus
Ministries Cooperative.
Social Fraternities: Thirty-three national social fraternities
have established chapters at the University. The general work of
the fraternities is supervised by the Interfraternity Council,
composed of the President of each fraternity. The national fra-
ternities at the University of Florida are Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha
Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta
Pi, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Delta Sigma Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta
Upsilon, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Sigma, Lambda
Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Gamma Delta,
Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Al-
pha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Tau
Epsilon Phi, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Zeta Beta Tau.
Nineteen women's sororities have established chapters at the
University. Fifteen have built chapter houses and four live in
other housing arrangements. These living quarters serve as the
centerof the activities of the individual sororities. Primary juris-
diction in sorority matters is vested in the Panhellenic Council.
The chapters at the University of Florida are Alpha Chi Omega,
Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Xi Delta, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Kappa


Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta
Gamma, Delta Phi Epsilon, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha
Theta, Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Phi Mu, Pi Beta Phi,
Sigma Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta, and Zeta Tau Alpha.
Professional and Honorary Fraternities:
ADVERTISING SOCIETY
AGRONOMY & SOILS
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA, Preprofessional Honorary
ALPHA EPSILON RHO, Broadcasting
ALPHA KAPPA DELTA, Sociology
ALPHA KAPPA PSI, Business
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA, Honorary Freshman Scholastics
ALPHA NU SIGMA, Nuclear Engineering
ALPHA PI MU, Industrial Engineering
ALPHA PSI OMEGA, Theatre
ALPHA SIGMA MU, Material Science Engineering
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS &
ASTRONAUTICS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGICAL &
PETROLEUM ENGINEERS
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN MEDICAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN MEDICAL WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN NUCLEAR SOCIETY
AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY, Military
ASSOCIATED BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
ASSOCIATION FOR COMPUTING MACHINERY
ASSOCIATION OF CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
BETA ALPHA PSI, Accounting
BETA ETA SIGMA, Honorary Scholastics
BILLY MITCHELL DRILL TEAM, Military
BLOCK AND BRIDLE CLUB, Agriculture
CITRUS CLUB
COUNSELOR EDUCATION STUDENT ASSOCIATION
CRIMINAL JUSTICE SOCIETY
DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB
DELTA PSI KAPPA, Physical Education
DELTA SIGMA PI, Business
DELTA SIGMA RHO, Forensics
ENTOMOLOGY-NEMATOLOGY STUDENT ORGANIZATION
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW SOCIETY
EPSILON LAMBDA CHI, Engineering Leadership Honorary
ETA KAPPA NU, Electrical Engineering
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION-HONOR
SOCIETY
FLORIDA ALPHA PREPROFESSIONAL JOURNAL SOCIETY
FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGY STUDENT ASSOCIATION
FLORIDA BLUE KEY, Leadership
FLORIDA CHAPTER OF ALPHA ZETA, Agriculture
FLORIDA ENGINEERING SOCIETY
FLORIDA EQUESTRIAN CLUB
FLORIDA HORSE JUDGING TEAM
FLORIDA PLAYERS, Theatre
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS CLUB
FORESTRY CLUB
GATOR 4-H CLUB
GEOLOGY CLUB
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
HEALTH AND HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
INTERCOLLEGIATE LIVESTOCK JUDGING TEAM
JOHN MARSHALL BAR ASSOCIATION
KAPPA EPSILON, Pharmacy
KAPPA PSI, Pharmacy
LAMBDA GAMMA PHI, Pre-veterinary Medicine
LEISURE EDUCATION AND PARKS STUDENTS
LINGUISTICS CLUB
MINORITY BUSINESS SOCIETY







STUDENT LIFE


MINORITY PREPROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION
MORTAR BOARD
NATIONAL LAWYERS GUILD
NATIONAL RESIDENCE HALL HONORARY
NATIONAL STUDENT SPEECH, LANGUAGE, HEARING
ASSOCIATION
ORDER OF OMEGA
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE CLUB
PEER COUNSELORS FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
PHI DELTA PHI, Law
PHI THETA KAPPA, Community College Honorary
PHYSICIANS FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY-
STUDENT AFFILIATE
POETRY AND FICTION UNION
PRE-LEGAL SOCIETY
PREPROFESSIONAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION
PSI CHI
REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION
RHO CHI, Pharmacy
RHO EPSILON, Real Estate
RHO PI PHI, Pharmacy
SAVANT, Leadership
SCABBARD.AND BLADE HONOR SOCIETY, Military
SENIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE
SIGMA LAMBDA ALPHA, Landscape Architecture
SIGMA LAMBDA CHI, Building Construction
SIGMA TAU SIGMA, Scholastics
SLAVIC CLUB
SOCIETY FOR BLACK STUDENT ARCHITECTS
SOCIETY FOR BLACK STUDENT ENGINEERS
SOCIETY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES
SOCIETY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS
SOCIETY OF WOMEN ENGINEERS
SPECIAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OF GRADUATE
STUDENTS
SPEECH AND DEBATE SOCIETY
STUDENT AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION
STUDENT ART LEAGUE
STUDENT ASSOCIATION OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS
STUDENT CHAPTER AMERICAN CONGRESS ON
SURVEYING & MAPPING
STUDENT CHAPTER AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
CONSTRUCTORS
STUDENT CHAPTER'OF THE WILDLIFE SOCIETY
STUDENT CHAPTER, AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
BOVINE PRACTITIONERS
STUDENT CHAPTER, AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL
ASSOCIATION
STUDENT CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS ASSOCIATION
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
STUDENT MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL CONFERENCE-
STUDENT PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION
STUDENT PLANNING ASSOCIATION
STUDENTS FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF
GERONTOLOGICAL EDUCATION
STUDENTS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION
TAU BETA PI, Engineering
TAU BETA SIGMA, Music
TAU SIGMA DELTA, Architecture
UNDERGRADUATE ECONOMICS SOCIETY
UNIVERSITY CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
UPSILON PI EPSILON, Computer Science
ZOOLOGICAL AND WILDLIFE MEDICINE CLUB
In addition to the above-mentioned professional and honor-
ary fraternities there are over 150 additional organizations
ranging from service to political to religious groups. There are
also a number of intramural organizations.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
The University of Florida expects students to be honest in all
of their University classwork. Therefore, students are required
to commit themselves to academic honesty by signing the fol-
lowing statement as part of the admissions process.


"1 understand that the University of Florida expects its stu-
dents to be honest in all of their academic work. I agree to ad-
here to this commitment to academic honesty, and understand
that my failure to comply with this commitment may result in
disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the
University."
This statement serves to remind students of the obligations
they assume as students at the University of Florida. Matters of
violations of academic honesty are adjudicated by the Student
Honor Court.


ACADEMIC HONESTY GUIDELINES
CHEATING: The giving or taking of any information or mate-
rial of academic work considered in the determination of a
course grade. Taking of information includes, but is not limited
to, copying graded homework assignments from another stu-
dent; working together with another individuals) on a take-
home test or homework when not specifically permitted by the
teacher, looking or attempting to look at another student's pa-
per during an examination; looking or attempting to look at text
or notes during an examination when not permitted. Tendering
of information includes, but is not limited to, giving your work
to another student to be used or copied; giving someone an-
swers to exam questions either when the exam is being given or
after having taken an exam; informing another person of ques-
tions that appear or have appeared on an exam in the same
academic term; giving or selling a term paper or other written
materials to another student.
PLAGIARISM: When an individual attempts to pass off the
work of another as the product of his or her own thought,
whether the other's work is published or unpublished, or sim-
ply the work of a fellow student. Plagiarism includes, but is not
limited to, copying homework answers from your text to hand
in for grade; quoting text or other written materials without cita-
tion thereto on an exam, term paper, homework, or other writ-
ten materials submitted to a teacher when requested by the
teacher to present your own work; handing in a paper as your
own work which was purchased from a term paper service; re-
typing a friend's paper and handing it in as your own work;
taking a paper from fraternity/sorority files and handing it in as
your own work.
BRIBERY: The offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of any-
thing of value to influence a grade. Bribery includes, but is not
limited to, offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting money or
any item or service to a teacher or any other person so as to gain
academic advantage for yourself or another.
CONSPIRACY: Planning with one or more persons to commit
any form of academic dishonesty, including but not limited to,
giving your term paperto another student whom you know will
plagiarize it.
MISREPRESENTATION: Having another student do your
computer program and handing it in as your work; lying to a
teacher to increase your grade; or any other act or omission
with intent to deceive a teacher as to the authorship of oral or
written materials submitted or presented to a teacher which
would affect your grade.


STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
I. Introduction: Students enjoy the rights and privileges that
accrue to membership in a university community and are sub-
jectt the responsibilities which accompany that membership.
In order to have a system of effective campus governance, it is
incumbent upon all members of the campus community to no-
tify appropriate officials of any violations of regulations and to
/assist in their enforcement. All conduct regulations of the Uni-
versity are printed and made available to all students and are
applicable upon publication in the Independent Florida Alliga-
tor, the University Catalog, the UF Student Guide, or other rea-
sonable means of notification.
II. Authority: The President is charged with the responsibility
for establishing and enforcing regulations governing student
life. Regulations are designed to enable the University to pro-






General

STUDENT LIFE


tect against the conduct of those who, by their actions, impair
or infringe on the rights of others or interfere with the orderly
operations of the University. Discipline may be imposed for
offenses against the Code occurring at any of the following lo-
cations or activities:
A. University campus;
B. University owned or controlled property;
C. Property or housing units assigned for responsibility to
the University, including, but not limited to, fraternity and
sorority property;
D. Activities sponsored by the University;
E. Activities officially approved by the University which are
conducted by University chartered organizations; and
F. Activities occurring off campus as provided in paragraph
VI.
Ill. Rules of Procedure: The primary judicial bodies autho-
rized by the President and charged with the administration and
enforcement of this code shall formulate and furnish to students
charged with an offense, rules of procedure which shall ensure
basic procedural fairness including, but not limited to:
A. The right to be notified in writing of the charges against
him/her with sufficient detail and time to prepare for the
hearing;
B. The right to a prompt hearing before an appropriate offi-
cial, committee, or court;
C. The right to know the nature and source of the evidence
which will be used against him/her;
D. The right to present evidence in his/her own behalf;
E. The right to freedom against compulsory self-
incrimination; and
F. The right to appear with an advisor at the hearing.
IV. Suspension of Student Pending Hearing: Violations of the
Student Conduct Code, Section V.A. 12 and V.A. 18, may result
in immediate suspension. If in the determination of the Direc-
tor of Student Judicial Affairs, the student poses a significant
danger of imminent and serious physical harm to himself/
herself or others at the University, or immediate suspension is
necessary to protect the health, safety or welfare of the student
or others at the University, the Director of Student judicial Af-
fairs, with approval of the Vice President for Student Affairs,
may suspend the student pending a hearing before the appro-
priate hearing body. The hearing will take place within a rea-
sonable time after notification of the suspension.
V. Violations of the Code of Conduct:
A. The following are violations of the Student Conduct Code
and may result in expulsion or any lesser sanction;
1. Furnishing false information to the University.
2. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University docu-
ments, records, or identification cards.
3. Unauthorized use, taking or destruction of publicor
private property on campus, or acts committed with
disregard of possible harm to such property.
4. Actions or statements which amount to intimida-
tion, harassment, or hazing.
5. Participation in or continued attendance at, after
warning td disperse by a University official or any
lawenforcement officer, a raid on a University living
area.
6. Disorderly conduct.
7. Disrupting the orderly operation of the University as
defined in Florida Statutes and the Demonstration
Policy of the University.;
8. Failure to comply with any University rule or regula-
tion, including, but not limited to, the Academic
Honesty Guidelines.
9. Violations of Housing, Inter-Residence Hall Associ-
ation, and Area Government regulations.
10. Violation of conduct probation.
11. Possession, use, or delivery of controlled substances
as defined in Florida Statutes.
12. Possession, use, or delivery of a firearm on the Uni-
versity campus except as specifically authorized in
writing by the University.
13. Action(s) or conduct which hinders, obstructs or
otherwise interferes with the implementation or en-
forcement of the Student Conduct Code.


14. Failure to appear before any of the disciplinary au-
thorities and to testify as a witness when reasonably
notified to do so. Nothing in this subsection shall be
construed to compel self-incrimination.
15. Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the
State of Florida, law of the United States, or rule
promulgated by the Florida Board of Regents.
16. Ticket scalping, i.e., selling tickets to any University
of Florida function or event, or any event being held
or to be held on the University of Florida campus,
for more than $1 over the original price.
17. Possession or use of fireworks, explosives, danger-
ous chemicals, ammunition or weapons (including,
but not limited to, bows and arrows or switch-blade
knives).
18. Actions which are committed with disregard of the
possible harm to an individual or group, or which
result in injury to an individual or group.
19. Any actions, including those of a sexual nature or
involving sexual activities, which are intimidating,
harassing, coercive or abusive to another person, or
which invade the right to privacy of another person.
20. Any action without authorization from the Univer-
sity which does or causes to, assess, use, modify,
destroy, disclose or take data, programs or support-
ing documentation residing in or relating in any way
to a computer, computer systems or computer net-
work or causes the denial of computer system ser-
vices to an authorized user of such system.
B. The Student Honor Court may recommend expulsion or
any lesser penalty for academic dishonesty as defined by
the Student Conduct Code and Academic Honesty
Guidelines. Conflicts in jurisdiction will be resolved by
the Director of Student judicial Affairs.
C. Residence Hall Conduct Boards may recommend penal-
ties as set forth by the Office for Student Services for vio-
lation of the Student Conduct Code, Inter-Residence Hall
Association, and/or Area Government regulations.
D. Student Traffic Court may impose authorized penalties.
for violation of University traffic, parking, and vehicle
registration regulations.
E. The Health Center Student Conduct Standards Commit-
tee hears cases of alleged academic dishonesty by a stu-
dent of the Health Center colleges. The committee is
comprised of faculty and students from the Health Center,
appointed by the President. Recommendations of guilt or
innocence and sanctions, if appropriate, are made to the
Dean for Student Services for final action.
F. Other judicial bodies may be established and vested with
jurisdiction by appropriate authority.
VI. Off-Campus Conduct: When a student violates city, state
or federal law, by an offense committed off the campus and
which is not associated with a University-connected activity,
the disciplinary authority of the university will not be used
merely to duplicate the penalty awarded for such an act under
applicable ordinances and laws. The University will take disci-
plinary action against a student for such an off-campus offense
only when it is required by law to do so or when the nature of
the offense is such that in the judgement of the Director of Stu-
dent judicial Affairs, the continued presence of the student on
campus is likely to interfere with the educational process-or the
orderly operation of the University; the continued presence of
the student on campus is likely to endanger the health, safety, or
welfare of the University community or its property; or the of-
fense committed by the student is of such a serious nature as to
adversely affect the student's suitability as a member of the Uni-
versity community. If the Director of Student Judicial Affairs de-
termines that disciplinary action is warranted, the Director of
Student Judicial Affairs shall so notify the student in accordance
with Rule 6C1-4.16(5). The action of the University with re-
spect to any such off-campus conduct shall be made indepen-
dently of any off-campus authority.
VII. Postponement of Hearing Due to Pending or Possible
Criminal or Civil Charges: If the student charged with a viola-
tion of the Student Conduct Code, regardless of which primary
judicial body may hear the matter, wishes to have the hearing







STUDENT LIFE


postponed because there is pending or possible civil or crimi-
nal litigation which he/she feels might be prejudiced by the
findings of the hearing such postponement may be granted pro-
vided the student agrees to accept conduct probation or sus-
pension, depending upon the gravity of the offense. Such
probation or suspension will be determined and activated by
the Director of Student judicial Affairs and will remain in force.
until such time as the student requests a hearing before the ap-
propriate primary judicial body and the hearing is held. The
student shall be informed whether he/she would be placed on
probation or suspended prior to making a decision to postpone
the hearing.
VIII. Student Waiver of Right to Hearing: In the event a student
charged with a violation of the Student Conduct Code desires to
waive the right to a hearing by the appropriate official or hear-
ing body, and the student so indicates in writing, the Director of
Student judicial Affairs, provided he/she agrees to accept juris-
diction, may make a determination of fact and take appropriate
action concerning the alleged violation.
IV. Summary Hearing: In the event a student charged with a
violation of the Student Conduct Code, which in the opinion of
the Director of Student Judicial Affairs, if proven, would not
warrant a penalty in excess of two semesters probation, and the
student does not waive his or her right to a hearing before the
appropriate official or hearing body, the Director of Student Ju-
dicial Affairs may require a hearing to be held before the chair-
person of the Committee on Student Conduct or the
chairperson's designated representative rather than before the
full committee.
X. Conflict of jurisdiction: In the event that the offense is
within the jurisdiction of more than one primary judicial body,
the Director of Student Judicial Affairs shall determine which
judicial body shall hear the charge.
XI. Penalties: A student adjudicated guilty of violations of the
Student Conduct Code shall be subject to sanctions commen-
surate with the offense and any aggravating and mitigating cir-
cumstances, which may include one or more of the following
penalties, unless otherwise expressly provided:
A. Reprimand-The student is given formal written notice
and official recognition is taken of the offense commit-
ted.
B. Conduct Probation--The student is deemed not in good
standing and cannot represent the University on any ath-
letic team other than intramurals or hold an office in any
student organization registered with the University. In the
event a student on conduct probation is found in violation
of the terms of such probation or of the Student Conduct
Code which includes the Academic Honesty Guidelines
prior to the completion of the probation period, he/she
may receive expulsion or any other lesser penalty. The
duration of any probation period or any conditions or
penalty(ies) imposed for the violation shall be in propor-
tion to the seriousness of the violation.
C. Suspension-The student is required to leave the Univer-
sity for a given or indefinite period of time, the termina-
tion of:which shall depend upon specified acts of the
student's own volition related to mitigation of the offense
committed.
D. Expulsion-The student is deprived of his/her opportu-
nity to continue at the University in any status, perma-
nently.
E. Payment of Damages-The student is required to pay for
damages to University property, provided that such pay-
ment shall be limited to the actual cost of repair or re-
placement of such property.
F. Reduced or Failing Grade-The student is given a re-
duced or failing grade for the class in which the offense
occurred for violations of the Academic Honesty Guide-
lines, but only by the faculty member involved and upon
recommendation thereto.
XII. Appeals: Decisions regarding student conduct sanctions
recommended by the Student Honor Court and the Residence
Hall Conduct Board can be appealed to the Director of Student
SJudicial Affairs. Decisions regarding student conduct sanctions
recommended by the Student Conduct Committee and the


Health Center Student Conduct Standards Committee or im-
-posed by the Director of Student Judicial Affairs can be ap-
pealed to the Dean for Student Services. Appeals to the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs and the Dean for Student
Services must be made in writing within two working days after
notice of last action taken, unless otherwise agreed upon in
writing by the appellant and the person to whom the appeal is
directed. Appeal of the disciplinary adjudication including any
personal conferences between the appellant and the reviewing
authority must be completed within ten calendar days of notice
of last action taken, unless otherwise agreed upon in writing by
the appellant and the person to whom the appeal is directed.
Disciplinary sanctions which may result in limits being placed
on extra-curricular activities and/or registration, do not result in
loss of those privileges until any appeal request has been com-
pleted. If no appeal is requested, the final action with respect to
the above will take effect two business days after notice of the
last action taken, unless otherwise agreed upon in writing by
the student and the authority taking the last action.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
University of Florida athletic teams compete in 16 sports in
men's and women's programs which make a comprehensive,
high-caliber level of competition on a regional and national ba-
sis.
Men's teams compete in the Southeastern Conference and
the National Collegiate Athletic Association in football, basket-
ball, baseball, cross country, swimming, track, golf, and tennis.
Women's teams compete in the Southeastern Conference and
the National Collegiate Athletic Association, fielding teams in
gymnastics, swimming, golf, tennis, track, cross country, bas-
ketball, and volleyball.
Physical facilities include Florida Field stadium (capacity
72,000), a baseball diamond, varsity tennis stadium, golf
course, running track, two football practice fields, and an excit-
ing facility, Stephen C. O'Connell Center, which houses a
12,000-seat basketball arena, an indoor track, an indoor swim-
ming pool and diving tank, and various other student activity
segments.


INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS
Intramural-Recreational Sports is a significant part of the total
educational community at the University of Florida. All stu-
dents, faculty, and staff are encouraged to participate voluntar-
ily in the program which has become an important phase of
extracurricular activities on the campus and offers opportunity
for exercise, recreation, social contacts, and friendly competi-
tion.
Strident administration is a tradition in the intramural Pro-
gram at the University. Students officiate the games, manage
the leagues, and act as Student Directors in the Intramural Of-
fice.
The checkout of equipment and the use of all facilities are
free to students, and competition between groups and clubs is
encouraged. Friendship, new games, skills, and good times are
guaranteed. For more information contact the Recreational
Sports Office, room 214 Florida Gym at 392-0581.

Intramural Leagues
For structured competitive play, the program organizes tour-
naments in the following leagues: All-University Special
Events, Women's Independent, Co-Recreational, Fraternity, Lit-
tle Sisters, Men's Independent, Professional, Men's and Wom-
ens Resident Halls, Married Students, Sorority and Student
Wives. These leagues participate in all major team and individ-
ual sports.

Sports Clubs
The Sports Club program provides structured, competitive
athletic opportunities between different institutions in nonvar-
sity sports. The program offers instruction, recreation, and
competition in approximately 43 different clubs. Individual





General

STUDENT LIFE


sports clubs who represent the University of Florida will be as-
sisted by the Sports Club Council in becoming organized, uti-
lizing facilities, checking out equipment, and general resources
for participation purposes.

Lake Wauburg
The Lake Wauburg Recreational Center is located eight miles
south of the University on US 441 and is available for use by
students, faculty, staff, and their guests. The specific activities
and facilities available at Lake Wauburg include sailing, board-
sailing, canoeing, volleyball, sunbathing, rowboats, fishing
boats, and picnic facilities.
The newly opened south end of the lake offers 60 acres of
land in its natural state. There are nature trails, jogging paths,
and also playing fields that can accommodate every field sport
imaginable. For your relaxation, there are sunbathing decks
overlooking the lake and also three large barbeque pits and nu-
merous small ones for your enjoyment.
In addition, four large buildings are available for reservation
to university groups of 50 or more. The lodge and pavilions can
house approximately 100 persons. All activities are free and are
open year-round from noon to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Friday,
and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays; facilities are
closed on Mondays.


AUTOMOBILE AND TRAFFIC
REGULATIONS
Any student of the University of Florida is eligible to register
and operate a vehicle on campus. Parking eligibility is deter-
mined by the student's local address and academic classifica-.
tion.
Students desiring to register a vehicle on campus must
present their current fee card, reflecting their current status, and
their vehicle registration to the Traffic & Parking Department.
Rules and Regulations are distributed at the time of the vehicle
registration and all registrants should thoroughly familiarize
themselves with the Rules and Regulations before operating or
parking a motorized vehicle on campus.
Illegally operated or parked vehicles will be issued a citation.
Failure to respond to a citation within the prescribed time will
result in additional costs, failure to receive transcripts, failure to
register for classes, and the towing of the vehicle.
Any questions regarding the use of vehicles on campus
should be directed to the Traffic & Parking Department (392-
2241).










Student Academic

Regulations

Additional information relative to graduation, social activi-
ties, failure in studies, conduct, etc. may be found in the Stu-
dent Guide and the sections of the catalog containing
regulations of the separate colleges and schools. Each student
should become familiar with rules and regulations of the Uni-
versity and is responsible for applying them as appropriate.

READMISSIONS
APPLICATION FOR READMISSION
The information contained in the section applies only to stu-
dents who have been previously admitted at any level to the
University of Florida. Requirements for admission for a student
seeking to enroll in the University of Florida for the first time
will be found in the Admissions section of this catalog (see the
Table of Contents).
How to Apply for Readmission: An applicant should address
a request to the Office of the Registrar for application forms.
Forms and directions vary with the level of readmission. The
applicant should indicate in the request the college and the
level of last enrollment at the University of Florida as well as the
college and level for which he or she wishes to apply. Applica-
tions must be received in the Office of the Registrar by the dead-
line date for the term, as published in the University Calendar.

READMISSION OF STUDENTS
1. Satisfactory Academic Record
a. An applicant must be eligible to return to the University
of Florida on the basis of one's previous academic record at
this institution. If the applicant has attended any college or
university subsequent to enrollment at the University of
Florida, he or she must also have an average of C or higher
(as computed by the University of.Florida) on all work at-
tempted at each institution. A student must list and furnish
transcripts of every institution attended when seeking read-
mission to the University of Florida. The applicant must
also be in good standing and eligible to return to each insti-
tution previously attended.
b. An applicant for readmission must meet the current ad-
mission requirements of the college or school he or she
expects to enter. (Consult the appropriate college section of
the catalog for specific admission requirements.)
S2. Satisfactory Conduct Record
a. An applicant must present a satisfactory record of con-
duct. Regardless of other qualifications, an applicant who
has experienced major or continuing difficulties with
school or other authorities since the last enrollment at the
University of Florida may find his or her application for re-
admission disapproved.
3. Submission of Request
a. An applicant for readmission should indicate the name
under which he or she was registered when last enrolled
and the social security number.

CREDITS
The word credit as used in this catalog refers to one semester
hour.

DEGREES AND GRADUATION
The University of Florida will confer the degree appropriate
to the course pursued under the following conditions:
1. Curriculum Requirements: Certification by the dean of the
college concerned that all requirements of the course of study
as outlined in the college announcement, or its equivalent, as
determined by the faculty of the college offering the course,
have been completed.


2. Recommendation of the Faculty of the College Awarding
the Degree.
3. Residence Requirements: (a) The minimum residence re-
quirement for the baccalaureate degree is two semesters. (b)
Students are required to complete the last 30 credits applied
toward the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in
the college from which the student is to be graduated. Excep-
tion to this regulation may be made only upon written petition
approved by the faculty of the college concerned. (c) For resi-
dence requirements for degrees in the Colleges of Law, Medi-
cine, Dentistry, or Veterinary Medicine, refer to the catalog of
each college. (d) For residence requirements of the various
graduate degrees, refer to the Graduate School catalog.
4. Average Required: In order to secure a degree, a student
must have a C average or better in all credits required toward
that degree.
5. Two Degrees: Two degrees of the same rank, e.g., B.A. and
B.S., may be conferred upon the same individual provided that
the second degree represents at least 30 credits of additional
work, with the necessary qualitative and residence require-
ments.
6. Continuous Attendance: When a student's attendance is
continuous, graduation according to the curriculum under
which he or she entered is permitted, provided the courses re-
quired are offered by the University. If some or all of the re-
quired courses are no longer offered, the faculty of the college
concerned will make such adjustments for the individual stu-
dents as are appropriate for the curriculum involved. As long as
a student attends the University as much as one semester (not
including summer terms) during any calendar year, his or her
residence is continuous.
7. Summer Term Enrollment: All students entering a university
in the State University System with less than 60 hours credit
shall be required to earn at least 9 credit hours prior to gradua-
tion by attendance at one or more summer terms. University
presidents may waive the application of this rule in cases of
unusual hardship to the individual.
8. Application for Degree: Students expecting to graduate
must file an application for the degree in the Registrar's Office
on or before the date indicated in the current University Calen-
dar. Students must apply in the semester in which they expect to
graduate, regardless of previous applicationsin previous se-
mesters.
9. Time Limit: To receive a degree a candidate must have com-
pleted: (a) all residence work required for graduation at least 24
hours prior to the scheduled meeting of the College Faculty
voting on the candidates for degrees; (b) all extension work at
least two weeks prior to the scheduled meeting of the College
Faculty voting on the candidates for degrees.
10. Time-Shortened Degree Opportunities: A variety of pro-
grams is offered by the University of Florida which may enable
students to shorten the length of the time necessary for them to
complete their degree requirements. These opportunities in-
clude several credit by examination programs, and other op-
tions. For specific information, refer to the section
Time-Shortened Degree Opportunities. Also refer to the col-
lege sections for additional information.
11. Extension Work Permitted: (Note: Extension work as used
below refers to both extension classes and correspondence
study.)
a. Students may take a maximum of 12 credits of extension
work during any academic year.
b. Students may not take more than 9 credits of extension
work during a semester.
c. The amount of extension work which a student may apply
toward degree requirements may not exceed one-fourth of
the amount required for the degree. For additional or unique
restrictions on extension work allowed toward a degree, stu-
dents should refer to the appropriate section of this catalog or
consult with the dean of the college concerned.
d. Students may not take, by extension work, more than 12 of
the last 36 credits necessary for a baccalaureate degree.
e. Simultaneous registration in on-campus and extension
work is permitted provided that approval has been obtained
from the dean of the college in which the student is regis-
tered.
12. Registration of Graduate Students: A student must be regis-
tered in the University for the term in which the candidate's





General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

final examination is given and at the time he or she receives a
degree.
13. Repeat Coursework: Credit will not be allowed on re-
peated coursework if the course that is repeated contains essen-
tially the same course content as it did when the student
initially enrolled for the course. In addition, a student who has
taken work at an advanced level cannot receive credit for work
taken subsequently at a lower level.
14. Pending Charge of Academic Dishonesty or Code of Stu-
dent Conduct Violation: No degree will be conferred upon a
student against whom there is pending an unresolved charge of
either Academic Dishonesty or Code of Student Conduct viola-
tion where the penalty for such violation would likely be:
a. Suspension
b. Expulsion
c. Failing Grade
d. Any combination of the above
until such time as the charge is resolved and degree require-
ments are met.
15. College Level Academic Skills Test: Effective with the 1984
Fall Term, students seeking admission to the upper division
must satisfactorily complete the College Level Academic Skills
Test (CLAST).
16. Communication-Computation Requirement: Beginning
with the 1983 Spring Term all students who enter college for the
first time must complete, with a grade of Cor higher, 12 hours in
designated courses that involve substantial writing. This re-
quirementcan be met by selecting at least 12 hours from among
those English, Humanities, and Social Sciences General Educa-
tion courses which are listed under Authorized Courses for
General Education and which are marked with an asterisk. Col-
lege Level Examination Program (CLEP) credit cannot be used
to satisfy the writing requirement. In addition, each student
must satisfactorily complete, with a grade of C or higher, 6
hours of coursework that involve numerical analyses, 3 hours of
which must be in a course that goes under the general title of
mathematics, at the level of college algebra or above. The other
3 hours may be in mathematics, statistics, or appropriate
courses in computer information sciences. This requirement
can be met by completing the General Education requirement
in mathematical sciences. The Communication-Computation
coursework must be satisfactorily completed prior to earning
60 hours credit.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
Some colleges have a maximum load which is stated in the
catalog. In the absence of such a statement, the general Univer-
sity regulation applies. This regulation allows a maximum load
of 15 credits for a student who earned an average below a C the
preceding semester of attendance. The minimum load for all
undergraduate students is 12 hours. The minimum load for a
six-week summer term is 6, and for the twelve-week term 12.
Simultaneous enrollment in correspondence courses or ex-
tension work at another college or university is counted in com-
puting the maximum but not the minimum load.
At the time of registration, a student, upon the approval of his
or her dean, may register for less than the minimum or more
than the maximum load. After the late registration period
closes, no student attending under the above conditions will be
permitted to drop below the minimum load, unless the student
successfully petitions the college in which he or she is enrolled.
The minimum load for fulltime benefits from the Veterans Ad-
ministration or Social Security is 12 hours per semester for un-
dergraduate students.

DUAL ENROLLMENT
1. Definition: Dual Enrollment, as used in this regulation, re-
fers to a student taking on-campus courses simultaneously at
BOTH the University of Florida and another institution. Special
regulations 'govern High School/College Dual-Credit Enroll-
ment for academically advanced students in Florida Public
High Schools; see additional information under Time-
Shortened Degree Opportunities.


2. Dual Enrollment will be permitted ONLY under the follow-
ing conditions:
a. Approval in writing for the dual enrollment must have
been secured by the student from the appropriate official at
EACH institution. A copy of such approval must be furnished
at the time of registration to the Registrar at the University of
Florida.
b. A student will not be permitted to register at the University
of Florida for a course which is a part of the curriculum at the
student's parent institution. This requirement also applies if
courses are available at the parent institution which might be
evaluated as equivalent or acceptable substitutes for the Uni-
versity of Florida course. The converse of these statements
also applies to University of Florida. students registering for
courses at another institution.
c. Priority in assignment to classes at the University of Flor-
ida will be given to regularly enrolled students.
d. A student taking courses at the University of Florida will
be required to register and attend classes under the University
of Florida calendar.
e. The student will pay appropriate fees at the University of
Florida based on the number of credit hours for which he or
she is registered at this institution.
It is the student's responsibility to ensure that an official tran-
script of work completed under a dual registration is forwarded
to the parent institution. Certification to Social Security and Vet-
erans Administration programs is also the responsibility of the
individual student who must request each individual institution
to furnish records as might be necessary.

NONDEGREE REGISTRATION
A student not previously registered at the University of Flor-
ida may, with college approval, register for one semester only
as a nondegree student. Faculty and staff members, high
school/college dual-credit enrollees, and those with special
permission from their college may be permitted to register as
nondegree students for more than one semester. Registration
will be on a space available basis. Procedures for registering are
available from the Registrar's Office.

GRADES
Results of student's work are recorded in the Registrar's Of-
fice as follows:
1. Undergraduate Students: Passing grades are A, B+, B,
C +, C, D +, D, in order of excellence, and S Satisfactory.
Failing grades are E Failure, I Incomplete, U Unsatis-
factory, X Absent from examination, and WF Withdrew
failing.
Grades of I and X are considered as failing grades unless a
change of grade is processed through the Registrar's Office.
In special situations where it is not possible to assign regu-
lar grades at the end of the term, a deferred grade may be
assigned. The symbol for a deferred grade is a grade of H. This
grade may be assigned only in special cases, such as modular
courses, confined to infirmary, and similar circumstances. A
grade of H will not be computed in a student's grade point
average.
A symbol of W will be assigned for any course dropped
through the college after the end of the official drop/add per-
iod and prior'to the date for assigning WF grade. The W
symbol is an official notation of an action taken in a course
and will appear on the student's transcript.
The degree-granting college may require a minimum grade
of C in a particular course or courses.
2. Graduate Students: Passing grades for graduate students
are A, B +, B, C+, C and S. Grades of C + and C in courses
below 5000-level are acceptable for credit toward graduate
degrees only if the total program meets the B-average require-
ment. C+ and C grades in 5000-level courses and above
count toward a graduate degree only if an equal number of
credit hours in courses numbered 5000 or above have been
earned with grades of B + and A, respectively.








STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION
It is the University's desire to allow students to receive as
broad an education as possible. Therefore, students are encour-
aged to take courses in disciplines in which they may not have
the proper background. They may take such coursework as
electives and receive a grade of S Satisfactory or U Unsatis-
factory. These grades become a part of a student's record but do
not count in the grade point average as computed by the Uni-
versity of Florida. NOTE: Other agencies or institutions might
count the grade of U as a failing grade in their grade point aver-
age computation.
,To be eligible to enroll under the S-U option, a student must
1 be in good standing may not be on any type of probation or
warning, 2) be classified as an undergraduate student, and 3)
have approval from proper university officials.
Only one course will ordinarily be approved in any one term.
Approvals for exception to this policy must be obtained from
the dean of the college in which the student is registered.
The deadline for electing the S-U option is the last day for
dropping or adding a course as published in the calendar. In
addition, students who elect the S-U option may subsequently
request that their instructors assign a.standard grade, but the
converse is not permitted.

AVERAGES
1. Definitions: The term "average," as used in any university
regulations concerning probation or suspension, always re-
fers to the average on work attempted at the University of
Florida. Grades received at other institutions are not averaged .
with grades received at the University of Florida for the pur-
pose of meeting any University average requirement. Most
honorary societies take into consideration the quality of the
work done at other institutions in meeting any average re-
quirements they may have.
2. How computed: Averages are determined by computing
the ratio of grade points to semester hours recorded as at-
tempted. Grade points are established by equating each se-
mester hour as follows: A with 4.0, B + with 3.5, B with 3.0,
C+ with 2.5, Cwith 2.0, D+ with 1.5, Dwith 1.0, and E, WF,
I, and X with 0.0. In computing averages, a course repeated is
counted as many times as grades for it are recorded. However,
if a course is repeated after an initial grade of C or higher has
been earned, the repeat grade and hours will not be com-
puted in the University of Florida grade point average. Hours
for grades of S, U, and H are not computed in the University
of Florida grade point average.
3. Grade Point Averages: Students' grade point averages will
be based on their overall work at the University of Florida.
That is, when students are admitted to the University of Flor-
ida their grade point averages begin and their academic aver-
ages will be based upon work taken at the University of
Florida. While work transferred from other institutions to-
ward a degree program at the University of Florida will count
in total hours earned, such hours will not be a part of the
University of Florida grade point average.


PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND
EXCLUSION FOR ACADEMIC
REASONS
The University of Florida isresponsible for providing the best
possible education in an economical and efficient manner. In
order to discharge this responsibility, the University expects
and requires reasonable academic progress from its students.
Continuation of students who have demonstrated a lack of the
necessary ability, preparation, industry, or maturity to benefit
reasonably from a program of university study is inconsistent
with the University's responsibility as a tax supported institu-
tion.
The University of Florida Senate has enacted regulations cov-
ering probation, suspension, and exclusion. These regulations
are directed toward enforcing the academic standards of the


University. The academic standards of the University require
both the maintenance of grade point averages consistent with a
reasonable chance of satisfactory completion of the University
programs and reasonable conformance to the catalog descrip-
tion of the program of study in which the student is engaged.
Any college of the University may specify additional academic
standards and students are responsible for observing the regula-
tions pertaining to such standards.

PROBATION BECAUSE OF
UNSATISFACTORY ACADEMIC
ACHIEVEMENT
The purpose of academic probation is to recognize formally
the fact that a student may not be making satisfactory progress.
The conditions of academic probation are intended to: (1)
relate to quality of achievement below standards required ulti-
mately to graduate; (2) recognize unsatisfactory work at an
early date; (3) be sufficiently significant to make clear to the
student, and the administration, the shortcomings of the stu-
dent's performance; (4) provide occasion for counseling; (5)
give students whose ultimate success is doubtful further oppor-
tunity to demonstrate adequate performance.
All Undergraduate Students:
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall for
University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship warn-
ing if he or she has a grade point deficit which is less than 10.
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall for
University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship pro-
bation if he or she has a grade point deficit of 10 or more, but
less than 20.
Any student who is eligible to return to the University after a
suspension because of academic reasons will be placed on final
scholarship probation for his or her next term.
In addition to University probation, students may be placed
on probation by the colleges in which they are registered if they
do not maintain normal academic progress in the program of
study in which they are engaged.
Figuring Your GPA and Deficit Points
Given that:
A = 4.0 points C = 2.0 points
B+ 3.5 points D+ = 1.5 points
B = 3.0 points D 1.0 points
C+ = 2.5 points E = 0 points
Multiply grade value times the credit hours to get grade points.
Add total hours, and total grade points. Divide grade points by
hours. *Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory (S-U) option courses do not
figure into hours or grade points.
Sample:


Course
AML 2020
PSY 2013
SPN 1110
PSC 1420


Grade
B+,
S*
C
D


Grade
Value
3.5
0
2.0
1.0


Grade
Points
10.5
0
10.0
3.0
23.5


23.5 divided by 11 2.14 grade point average.
Whenever you have less than a 2.00 GPA you have a grade point
deficit. Multiply your total hours carried for a grade by 2 (for
2.00 GPA) and subtract your total grade points to determine
your deficit. For instance, you have taken 100 hours for a grade.
You therefore need 200 grade points for a 2.00 GPA. If you only
have 196 grade points, you have a deficit of 4 points. Except for I
and X grades being replaced by D or D +, only grades better
than C will lower a deficit. Every credit of C + earned removes
.5 from a deficit (a C+ in a three-credit course removes 1.5
deficit points); every credit of B removes 1 deficit point, etc.





General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


CONTINUATION OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
'A student's scholarship warning shall be continued as long as
he or she has a grade point deficit of less than 10. A student's
scholarship probation shall be continued as long as he or she
has a grade point deficit of 10 but less than 20. If the grade point
deficit places him or her in another probation category, the stu-
dent shall be subject to the provisions of that category.

REMOVAL OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
Scholarship probation or scholarship warning will be re-
moved when a student's grade point deficit has been reduced to
zero.
Removal of College Probation:
A student will be removed from college probation when it is
deemed by his or her college that the student is making satisfac-
tory academic progress in the program of study in which he or
she is engaged.

SUSPENSION
The purpose of suspension from the University for academic
reasons is to remove from the University community any stu-
dent who would not ultimately meet requirements for gradua-
tion if he or she continued at his or her current level of progress.
The conditions of academic suspensions are intended to (1)
select any student whose performance indicates that he or she
will not fulfill the requirements for graduation; (2) encourage a
student to leave the University as soon as a high probability of
failure is evident.
All Undergraduate Students:
A student with a grade point deficit of 20 or more in his or her
University of Florida work shall be suspended from the Univer-
sity for one semester.
A student reenrolling after a one semester suspension will be
on final scholarship probation. If the grade point deficit is 20 or
more at the end of the term the student re-enrolls, he or she will
be suspended without the possibility of reregistering except by
committee action.

EARNING CREDIT WHILE SUSPENDED
A student under any kind of suspension (academic or con-
duct) at the University of Florida may not earn credit toward a
degree at the University of Florida by taking work in residence
at another institution or through extension or correspondence
courses.
However, a student who was suspended for academic reasons
and who has not yet earned the Associate of Arts Certificate
who subsequently graduates from an accredited Florida com-
munity college may appeal to the Petitions Committee for rein-
statement. The Petitions Committee may then, upon the
recommendation of the college in which the student wishes to
enter, admit the student on academic probation to that college
or school. Credits earned by such students while under suspen-
sion from the University of Florida may be transferred in accor-
dance with other rules and regulations of the University of
Florida.

COLLEGE LEVEL ACADEMIC SKILLS
TEST AND COMMUNICATION -
COMPUTATION REQUIREMENT
The State of Florida has developed a test of college-level com-
munication and computation skills. The test is called the Col-
lege Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).


The CLAST is designed to test the communication and com-
putation skills that are judged by state university and commu-
nity college faculty to be generally associated with successful
performance and progression through the baccalaureate level.
The test is required by Florida statutes and rules of the State
Board of Education.
The CLAST is administered toward the end of the sophomore
year to university students as well as to community college stu-
dents who are completing Associate of Arts degree programs
and to community college students who are completing Associ-
ate of Science degree programs and are seeking admission to
upper division programs in state universities in Florida. Stu-
dents who do not satisfactorily complete the test will-not be
awarded the Associate of Arts nor will they be admitted to up-
per division status in state universities in Florida. The CLAST
requirements also apply to students transferring to state univer-
sities in Florida from private colleges in Florida and from out-of-
state colleges.
The Office of Instructional Resources located at 1012
Turlington Hall, phone 392-1715, can tell you how and when
to apply to take the CLAST.
The Academic Advisement Center located at 358 Little Hall,
phone 392-1521, can provide you with a list of CLAST skills
and can tell you where the communication and computation
skills are taught in the curriculum.
In addition to the CLAST the State Board of Education re-
quires completion of coursework in English and Mathematics
prior to earning 60 credit hours. This Communication-
Computation requirement includes 12 semester hours of
coursework in which the student is required to demonstrate
writing skills and 6 hours of mathematics coursework at the
level of college algebra or higher. Three (3) hours of the mathe-
matics requirement may be fulfilled by approved courses in Sta-
tistics or Computer and Iriformation Sciences. Specific courses
to meet the Communication-Computation requirement can be
found in the listing of Authorized Courses for General Educa-
tion.

EXCLUSION
Freshman and Sophomore Students:
A student classified UF who has attempted 80 semester hours
(this includes all work attempted at each university or junior
college previously attended and all work attempted at the Uni-
versity of Florida) shall be ineligible for further registration at
the University unless he or she applies for a change of classifica-
tion and is formally admitted to a degree program. In addition, a
student who does not take CLAST or fulfill the Communication-
Computation Requirement by the completion of 60 semester
hours is not eligible to be admitted to the upper division.
All Undergraduate Students:
A student may be excluded from a program of study by the
College responsible for the program if the student fai Is to main-
tain normal academic progress. Such exclusion does not pro-
hibit the student from enrolling in other programs or colleges if
he or she meets the requirements.
Graduate Students:
A graduate student may be denied further registration in the
University or in his or her graduate major when the student's
progress toward completion of his or her planned graduate pro-
gram becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory progress has been
defined by the Graduate Council to include failure to maintain
an accumulative grade average of B in all work attempted in the
Graduate School.

DROPPING COURSES
No student will be allowed to drop a course after the deadline
date for each semester as published in the University Calendar.
Any student seeking an exception to this policy must petition
the University Petitions Committee.







STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


WITHDRAWALS
All Undergraduate Students:
It is the responsibility of each student to make every effort to
complete the full semester at the University. If any student with-
draws after the deadline date published in the University Calen-
dar, he or she shall be assigned grades of WF (withdrew failing)
in all courses and will be subject to the suspension and exclu-
sion regulations.
A student on scholarship probation who withdraws from the
University prior to the final date published in the calendar will
be continued on scholarship probation for the next semester.
A student on University Senate Committee probation must
meet the terms of probation specified by the committee.

ABSENCES OR UNSATISFACTORY
WORK
Students are responsible for satisfying the entire range of aca-
demic objectives as they are defined by the instructor in any
course. For students whose names appear on the initial class
roll, absences count from the first meeting of the class.
Any student who has not attended at least one of the first two
class meetings of a course or laboratory in which he or she is
registered and has not contacted the department which offers
the course to indicate intent to remain in the course may be
dropped by the chairman of the department which offers the
course if the chairman deems his action necessary to provide
space for other students who wish to add the course. Students
dropped from courses or laboratories through the procedure
will be notified by notice posted in the department office. Such
students may be reinstated in the course or laboratory on a
space available basis if documented evidence excusing the ab-
sences is presented to the department chairman.
NOTE: Students must not assume that they are automatically
dropped if they fail to attend the first few days of class since
these actions may not necessarily be taken in all courses and
laboratories.
TWELVE-DAY RULE: No student shall absent himself or her-
self from the University for more than 12 scholastic days per
semester in order to participate in athletic or in'extracurricular
activities. (A scholastic day is any day on which regular class-
work is scheduled.)
The 12-day rule applies to individual members of the group
rather than to the group as a whole. Consequently, a schedule
of more than 12 days for any group should be rotated so that no
student is absent from the campus for more than 12 scholastic
days.
A student who has been warned for absences or unsatisfac-
tory work in any class should not incure additional absences in
that course, even though he or she has not been absent from the
University for 12 scholastic days. It is the responsibility of the
student to see that his or her classwork and attendance are satis-
factory.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: Students themselves remain
fully responsible for satisfying the entire range of academic ob-
jectives as they are defined by the instructor in any course.
Under University policy, students are not authorized to at-
tend class unless they are on the class roll or have been ap-
proved to audit and have paid the audit fees.

RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS: BOARD OF
REGENTS POLICY STATEMENT
Board of Regents policy regarding observance of religious
holidays follows:
1. Each student shall, upon notifying his/her instructor, be
excused from class to observe a religious holy day of his/her'
faith.
2. While the student will be held responsible for the material
covered in his/her absence, each student shall be permitted a
reasonable amount of time to make up any work missed.


3. No major test, major class event, or major University ac-
tivity will be scheduled on a major religious holiday.
4. Professors and University administration shall in no way
Penalize students who are absent from academic or social
activities because of religious observance.
In regard to this Board of Regents policy statement, the Uni-
versity of Florida urges faculty and administrators not to sched-
ule exams or major events on evenings or days that will be
observed as holy days by a significant number of students.,Stu-
dents who ask to be absent because of religious reasons will not
be required.to provide second-party certification that they are
observant.

POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
The probation, suspension, and exclusion regulations that
apply to undergraduate students also apply to postbacca-
laureate students.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Students will be classified by the Registrar each semester as
follows:
0. Special transient students, qualified high school students,
and other nondegree students who have been permitted to reg-
ister at the University of Florida will be classified as 0.
1. A student with less than 30 hours credit will be classified
as 1.
2. A student who has earned 30 semester hours or more, but
less than 60, will be classified as 2.
3. A student who has earned 60 semester hours or more, but
less than 90, will be classified as 3.
4. A student who has earned 90 semester hours or more will be
classified as 4.
5. A student who is a candidate for a degree in a program
which normally requires 10 semesters and has earned 120 se-
mester hours or more will be classified as 5.
6. Postbaccalaureate students: Degree-holding students who
'have been admitted to postbaccalaureate status will be classi-
fied as 6.
7. A graduate student who is seeking a Master's degree will be
classified as 7.
8. A graduate student who has earned a Master's degree, or has
earned 36 or more hours while seeking a degree beyond the
Master's degree (but has not been admitted to doctoral candi-
dacy), will be classified as 8.
9. A graduate student who has been admitted to doctoral can-
didacy will be classified as 9.

PETITIONS AND APPEALS
In case the operation of a student academic regulation ap-
pears to result in an undue hardship on an individual student,
he or she may petition for waiver of the regulation.
Petitions requesting permission to drdp/add (after the official
Drop/Add period and prior to the date for assigning a WF grade)
should be presented to the school or college in which the stu-
dent is enrolled. After that date all drop/add petitions must be
presented to the Committee on Student Petitions. Exceptions to
the minimum-maximum load regulation are presented to the
school or college for a decision. Petitions approved by the
school or college must be reported to the Registrar's Office be-
fore the action becomes official.
All other petitions should be presented to the Registrar who
will refer them to the University Senate Committee on Student
Petitions. No petition for readmission may be filed after regular
registration has started for the term.
The student seeking waiver of a regulation through petition
must remember that no committee on petitions can direct an
instructor to change a student's grade, nor can the Senate Com-
mittee require any college or school to grant a degree by waiv-
ing any of these regulations.





General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
All actions taken under these regulations shall be reflected by
appropriate notations on the student's record.

MAINTENANCE OF STUDENT
RECORDS
The Registrar's Office maintains students' academic records.
A progress report is sent to each student at the end of the term
indicating his or her grades, cumulative hours and grade points,
probationary status, if any, and degrees awarded, if any.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT
RECORDS
The University of Florida assures the confidentiality of stu-
dent educational records in accordance with State University
System rules, state statutes, and the Family Educational Rights
and Privacy Act of 1974, known as the Buckley Amendment.














































40


Information which can be released to the public on any stu-
dent is name; class, college, and major; dates of attendance;
degrees) earned; awards received; local and permanent ad-
dress, and4elephone number.
In general, a present or former student has the right to person-
ally review his or her own educational records for information
and to determine the accuracy of these records. Parents of de-
pendent students, as defined by the Internal Revenue Service,
have these same rights. A photo 1.D. or other equivalent docu-
mentation or personal recognition by custodian of record will
be required before access is granted.

AUDITING COURSES
Auditing may be approved on a space-available basis. The
approval of the instructor and dean is required, in addition to
payment of course fees. Florida residents who are sixty years of
age or older may apply for a waiver of payment of auditor's
course fees. Procedures for auditing courses are available at the
Registrar's Office.











Time-Shortened Degree

Opportunities

The University of Florida provides numerous opportunities
by which students may accelerate their academic careers and
reduce the overall length of time spent in completing degree
requirements. These opportunities are explained below:
.1. Early Admission: The Early Admission program allows su-
perior students to be admitted to the University following
completion of the Junior year in high school. Applications are
encouraged and will be considered on an individual basis by
the Admissions Committee. For additional information, refer
to the Admissions section of the catalog.
2. Dual Enrollment: Dual Enrollment refers to a student tak-
ing on-campus courses simultaneously at both the University
of Florida and another institution. If the parent institution is a
Florida public high school, then the student may qualify for
tuition-exempt High School/College Dual Credit and may re-
ceive textbooks or other necessary course materials on a
lend-return basis. Several levels of permission are necessary
requiring Florida State Department of Education Forms.
Qualified high school students will be enrolled as nonde-
gree students and credits earned prior to high school gradua-
tion may subsequently be accepted for advanced standing
and degree-credit when the student is admitted to the Univer-
sity.
For more information, high school students may refer to:
Student Academic Regulations (especially the sections on
Dual Enrollment, Nondegree Registration, and Classification
of Students).
3. Increased Course Load: Capable students who register for
more than the normal 15 hours per semester may complete
the traditional four-year span within three years.
4. Year-Round Attendance: Students attending the Univer-
sity every semester, including Summer sessions, may ad-
vance their graduation day by as much as two semesters.
5. Credit by Examination: A student may participate in a va-
riety of credit by examination programs in order to earn credit
toward a degree awarded by the University of Florida. Credit
received from one examination program may not be dupli-
cated by another. The various credit by examination pro-
grams are explained below.
International Baccalaureate Program: The University awards
credit for International Baccalaureate higher level subjects. Six
semester hours of appropriate credit will be granted for each
higher level exam, upon our receipt of official results showing
scores of 5, 6, or 7.
Advanced Placement Program: This credit by examination
opportunity is sponsored by the College Entrance Examination
Board. Under this program, a student entering the University
offers a nationally graded examination as evidence of comple-
tion of a college level course taken in high school. If the results
of the examination meet the minimum requirements listed be-
low, the student may receive University credit for courses cov-
ering similar material.


Advanced
Placement
Examination
American History
Art History
Art, Studio
Biology
Chemistry
Computer & Infor-
mation Science
English Language-
Composition*
English Composition-
Literature*
European History
French Language


Score
Required Course
for Credit Title
3,4 or 5 US History: Colonial
to Present
3, 4, or 5 Introduction to
Western Art
3, 4, or S5 Beginning Art
3, 4, or 5 Introduction to
Biology
3, 4, or 5 Introduction to
Chemistry
Introduction to
3, 4, or 5 Data Processing
3, 4, or 5 Introductory English


3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5


Ser
H
CI


Introductory English
Introduction to
European History
French Composition &
Conversation


nester
ours
redit
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6


French Literature
German Language
German Literature
Latin (Vergil)
Latin
(Catullus-Horace)
Calculus AB**
Calculus BC**
Calculus BC**
Music, Listening &
Literature
Music Theory
Physics B**
Physics C
(Mechanics)* *
Physics C (Electricity
& Magnetism)***
Spanish Language
Spanish Literature


3, 4, or 5 Introduction to French
Literature
3, 4, or 5 German Language
3, 4, or 5 German Literature
3, 4, or 5 Latin (Vergil)
Latin
3, 4, or 5 (Catullus-Horace)
3, 4, or 5 Calculus
3 Calculus
4 or 5 Calculus
Music, Listening &
3, 4, or 5 Literature
3, 4, or 5 Introductory Music
Theory
3, 4, or 5 General Physics
Introductory Physics
3, 4, or 5 w/Calculus
Introductory Physics
3, 4, or 5 w/Calculus
3, 4, or 5 Spanish Composition
& Conversation
3, 4, or 5 Introduction to
Spanish Literature


*Credit allowed for only 1 English exam
*Credit allowed for only 1 Calculus exam
***Credit allowed for Physics B or Physics C exams only
College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The College
Level Examination Program is another type of credit by exami-
nation opportunity sponsored by the College Entrance Exami-
nation Board. By presenting appropriate scores, students may
receive as many as 30 semester hours credit toward completion
of general education requirements. Their scores on the CLEP
general examinations must meet the minimums established by
the State University System. In addition, students who plan to
apply for credit must do so before enrolling or, at the latest,
prior to the end of their first term at the University. CLEP testing
is periodically available on the campus and is administered by
the Office of Instructional Resources.
In accordance with the Articulation Agreement (agreement
between public community colleges and public state universi-
ties on the acceptance of credit by transfer), the University of
Florida awards credit for CLEP examinations based on the fol-
lowing scaled scores:


CLEP
General
Examination
*English Comp. with Essay
Social Sciences
Biology
*Physical Sciences
Humanities
Mathematics


Minimum
Score
Required for
Credit
Scale Score 500
Scale Score 488
Sub Score 50
Sub Score 49
Scale Score 489
Scale Score 497


Maximum
Semester
Hours
Credit
6
6


*Students should seriously consider their decision about tak-
ing the CLEP general examination in English. Experience has
shown that those who score below the 75th percentile are often
handicapped because they have not had college courses in
composition. However, those students who do decide to take
the CLEP English examination are required to take the option
that includes an essay examination so that their scores will be at
least partially based on a writing sample.
Additional credit may be awarded for satisfactory scores on
certain CLEP subject area examinations. The maximum amount
of credit that may be earned or transferred under the CLEP pro-
gram, both general and subject examinations combined, is 45
semester hours or 67.5 quarter hours. If English Subject Exami-
nations (Freshman English or English Composition) are taken, it
is imperative that the essay option be taken if credit is to be
received for English. A minimum score ensures that the essay
portion of the exam is eligible for review by UF staff evaluators.
This score in itself does not guarantee that credit will be re-
ceived for English. A favorable review must be received on the
essay portion of the exam. A minimum score of 51 is required
for College Composition and a minimum score of 51 is required
for Freshman English. The maximum credit allowed for English
credit, if the minimum score is achieved and the essay is accept-
able, equals 6 semester hours.
Department Examinations: Departments may, at their option,
permit a student to receive credit through the challenge of de-
partmental course examinations. For specific information, con-
tact the relevant department.










Lower Division

Requirements:

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR
FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES

(ADMINISTERED BY THE COLLEGE OF
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES)

General Statement
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the gateway col-
lege for entering freshmen and other students with fewer than
64 credits, providing for their academic advisement and their
general education. It also provides advanced education leading
toward degrees in a variety of disciplinary and cross-
disciplinary fields in arts and sciences.
Entering freshmen are classified UF. They retain this classifi-
cation up to but not beyond 80 attempted credits. Students
should apply for admission to the college of their major at the
appropriate point, usually 64 credits but earlier in the case of
some colleges. All students who attained junior standing (60
semester hours) after the end of the Fall 1982 term are required
to take the College Level Academic Skills Test. Each college
specifies admission requirements in its section of the catalog.

Associate of Arts Certificates
To be eligible to receive the Associate of Arts certificate, stu-
dents must complete a General Education program. The Col-
lege'of Liberal Arts and Sciences awards the Associate of Arts
certificate for the University.
The Associate of Arts certificate will be awarded upon satis-
factory completion of:
1. 64 credits including authorized credits in General Educa-
tion as indicated for the student's major (At least 36 of the
credits, including 20 hours of General Education courses,
must have been completed at the University of Florida)
2. An overall C average
3. The College Level Academic Skills Test
4. Required Courses in Communication and Computatiorn
Skills.
Application forms for the Associate of Arts certificate are
available from the Office of the Registrar and should be re-
turned to the Office of the Registrar, 34 Tigert Hall.

College Level Academic Skills Test
Students must take the College Level Academic Skills Test
(CLAST). Starting with the 1984 Fall Semester awarding of AA
certificates and registration after earning 60 hours will be con-
tingent upon students' making passing scores on the tests.

Required Courses in Communication
and Computation Skills
Students who entered college Spring 1983 or later must com-
plete with a grade of C or higher 12 hours in designated courses
that involve substantial writing. This requirement can be met by
selecting at least 12 hours from among those English, Humani-
ties, and Social Sciences General Education courses which are
listed under Authorized Courses for General Education and
which are marked with an asterisk. The asterisks apply to
courses in a given academic year and are subject to change in
any given year. Students, therefore, should always be guided by
the Catalog and Schedule of Courses for the current year in se-
lecting General Education courses and the designated required
courses in Communication and Coriputation skills. CLEP


credit cannot be used to satisfy the writing requirement. In ad-
dition, each student must complete with a grade of C or higher
six hours of courses that involve computational skills. Three of
these hours must be in a Mathematics course with the remain-
ing three in acceptable courses in Mathematics, Statistics, Com-
puter Science, or PHI 2100. The courses acceptable for the
requirement are identical to those authorized for the General
Education Mathematical Sciences requirement.

GENERAL EDUCATION

General Statement
The purpose of General Education at the University of Florida
is to lay a foundation for lifelong enrichment of the human ex-
perience and for lifelong contribution to society. The objective
is to encourage all-around development of students as individ-
uals and as members of society so they may bring balance and
perception to every field of their activity.
In summary, the goal of General Education at the University
of Florida is to prepare students:
1. To think clearly and independently in fields outside their
fields of specialty.
2. To express ideas effectively in speech and writing.
3. To develop a basic understanding of mathematics as lan-
guage.
4. To gain an understanding of people and the complexity of
societies, both their own and others.
5. To develop aesthetic interest and sensibility.
6. To gain an understanding of the scientific method and the
societal consequences of research as exemplified by biologi-
cal'and physical sciences.

General Education Requirements
The General Education requirements include (a) Basic Cul-
tural Skills (English and Mathematics), (b) Social and Behav-
ioral Sciences, (c) Natural Sciences, and (d) the Humanities. All
students will take a minimum of 39 semester hours of credit
from lists of courses especially constructed to provide intellec-
tual balance and breadth.
In planning each semester's program students should balance
general and professional courses, science and nonscience
courses. All students should take care to make progress in ful-
filling their General Education requirements even though they
may be sampling courses in specific majors or enrolling in re-
quired preprofessional courses. Typically students complete
the greater part of their General Education in the first two years
while also taking the preprofessional courses specified for their
majors.
In selecting courses students should study course descrip-
tions in the back of the catalog, since course titles alone give
insufficient information. Freshmen and sophomores are cau-
tioned not to take courses for which they may not be prepared.
Where prerequisites are stated, they must be adhered to. Stu-
dents should consult college and departmental advisers as to
whether particular General Education courses hereafter listed
may be used to satisfy college distribution and major preprofes-
sional requirements.
The Director of the Honors Program in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences is authorized to approve for each honors stu-
dent up to 12 hours of freshman and sophomore Honors Semi-
nars IDH 2931 and IDH 3931 to meet General Education
requirements in appropriate General Education distribution ar-
eas.

AUTHORIZED COURSES FOR
GENERAL EDUCATION
The following courses have been approved by the Council on
General Education for use in satisfying General Education re-







LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


quirements. In selecting from among the courses, students
should keep in mind that the General Education part of their
university program should serve to increase their fund of knowl-
edge outside the major and should broaden their intellectual
horizons.

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES
(Minimum Credits Required)...................... 6
Six (6) semester hours in Mathematical Sciences, at least 3
hours of which shall be in Mathematics and the balance of
which shall be taken in either Mathematics, Statistics, Com-
puter and Information Sciences, or PHI 2100. The following'
courses may not be used to satisfy the Mathematical Sciences
requirement: MAE 3810, MAE 3811, COC 3400 and CRM
4121.
The Computation Skills requirement is identical to the Gen-
eral Education Mathematical Sciences requirement.

ENGLISH
(Minimum Credits Required)..................... 6
*ENC 1101(3) Expository and Argumentative Writing
*ENC 1102 (3) Writing about Literature
t*ENG 2935 (3) College Honors English
t*ENG 2937 (3) College Honors English
I*AML 2012 (3) Survey of American Lit:
From Beginning to Crane
t*AML 2023 (3) Survey of American Lit:
From Crane to Present
t*ENL 2012 (3) Survey of English Lit: Medieval to 1750
t*ENL 2022 (3) Survey of English Lit: 1750 to Present
t*ENL 2330 (3) Introduction to Shakespeare
* LIT 2110 (3) Survey of World Lit: Ancient to Renaissance
t*LIT 2120 (3) Survey of World Lit: 17th Century to Present
*Qualified students, with the approval of the English Depart-
ment, may take higher-level literature or composition courses
for General Education credit in English.
tStudents who begin with ENC 1102 or a higher course and re-
ceive an A or B in the course need not take ENC 1101 but may
go on to another literature or composition course to fulfill their
English requirement.
All English courses except LIN 2340 satisfy the General Educa-
tion requirement.

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
(Minimum Credits Required)..................... 9
The requirements in the Behavioral and Social Sciences enable
the student (1) to become acquainted with the approach of the
Social Sciences disciplines to the study of human beings and
their societies, and (2) to become acquainted with how a Social
Sciencediscipline is applied to or is useful in understanding the
social world. The curriculum offered allows flexibility to sam-
ple the offerings of more than one discipline and to choose
courses around a theme which may be of special interest to the
student. Each student must select two courses from Group I and
one course from Group II. No more than two of the three
courses chosen may be from the same department.

Social/Behavioral
GROUP I. Foundations of the Social/Behavioral Sciences
Credit

Anthropology
*ANT 2301 (3) Human Sexuality and Culture
ANT 2402 (3) Anthropology and Modern Life
*ANT 2410 (3) Cultural Anthropology

Economics
*ECO 2000 (3) Economic Concepts and Institutions
*ECO 2013 (3) Basic Economics I

Geography
GEO 1010 (3) Geography for a Changing World


GEO 2410 (3) Social Geography

History


AMH 2010 (3)
AMH 2020 (3)
AMS 2030 (3)

Interdisciplinary
SS12110 (3)
SSI 2120 (3)

Political Science
INR 2002 (3)
POS 2041 (3)
POS2112 (3)


Psychology
*PCO 2714
PSY 2013
SOP 2513

Religion
*REL 2322

Sociology
*SYG 2000
*SYG 2004
*SYG 2010


U.S. History to 1877
U.S. History Since 1877
Introduction to American Studies


American Institutions I
American Institutions II


International Relations
American Federal Government
American State and Local Government


Personal Growth
General Psychology
Human Conflict


(3) Patterns of American Religion


(3) Principles of Sociology
(3) Principles of Sociology: Honors
(3) Social Problems


Speech
SPC 2212 (3) Introduction to Speech Communication

GROUP II. Uses of the Social/Behavioral Sciences

Credit


Anthropology
ANT 2141
*ANT 2610
*ANT 3241
ANT 3302
*ANT 3433


Development of World Civilization
Language and Culture
Anthropology of Religion
Sex Roles: A Cross Cultural Perspective
Culture and Personality


Computer and Information Sciences
*COC 3400 (3) Computers and Modern Society


Geography
GEO 2420
GEO 2500


(3) Geography of World Societies
(3) Geography of World Economies


History
*AMH 3460 (3) U.S. Urban History
*AMH 3530 (3) Immigration and Ethnicity

Interdisciplinary
AFS 2002 (3) The African Experience
ASN 2001 (3) Asia and Its Peoples
BES 2121 (3) Creative and Critical Thinking
*WST 3010 (3) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Women
RTV 3405 (3) Television and the American Family

Political Science
CPO 2002 (3) Comparative Politics
INR 2054 (3) Alternative World Futures
INR 3102 (3) U.S. and World Affairs
POT 2001 (3) Power, Ethics, and the Modern State
PUP 3204 (3) Politics, Ecology, and Energy

Psychology
DEP 3003 (3) Developmental Psychology
(Prereq: PSY 2013)






Colleges

LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


*EDF 3210
EXP 3604

PPE 3004
SOP 3004

Religion
*REL 2021

Sociology
CCJ 3024
*SYG 2430
*SYP 3510
*SYD 3600
*SYD 3630
*SYD 3700


(3) Educational Psychology
(3) Introduction to Cognition and
Perception
(3) Psychology of Personality
(3) Social Psychology (Prereq:'PSY 2013)


(3) The individual and Religious Experience


(3) Advanced Principles of Criminal justice
(3) Marriage and the Family
(3) Deviance
(3) Community Growth and Change
(3) Latin American Studies
(3) Minorities in American Society


Speech
*SPC 3710 (3) Patterns of Intercultural Communication

HUMANITIES (Minimum Credits Required)............. 9
The requirements in the Humanities provide the student broad
opportunities to develop insights into humanistic studies from
both topical and chronological perspectives. Each student must
take three courses in humanities. No more than two of the three
courses may be selected from any one of the following subject
categories: History, Interdisciplinary, Literature, Philosophy,
Religion, Fine Arts, and Humanities and the Professions.

GROUP I. Ancient Times through the Renaissance

Credit

Fine Arts
ARH 2050 (4) Introduction to Principles and History of
Art I
*MUH 3211 (3) Introduction to Music History I


History
*EUH 2000

HIS 2463

HIS 3470


Interdisciplinary
*ARC 1701 (3)
CLA 1100 (3)
CLA 1120 (3)
CLT 2370 (3)
HUM 2210 (3)

*HUM 2229 (3)


Literature
*CHT 3110
*CLT 2230
CLT 3340
*ENL 2012

*FRT 2420

*LIT 2110

*LIT 3374
*SCA 2502


Philosophy-Religioi
CLT 2371 (3)
*PHH 2100 (3)
*REL 2202 (3)
*REL 3500 (3)
*REL 3600 (3)


Western Civilization: From Early Times
to Middle Ages
Introduction to the History of Science:
Origins to the Renaissance
History of Technology I


Survey of Architectural History I
The Glory That Was Greece
The Grandeur That Was Rome
Myths of the Greeks and Romans
Western Humanities: Ancient to
Renaissance -
Western Humanities: College Honors


Chinese Literature in Translation
The Ancient Novel
Greek and Roman Epic
Survey of English Literature Medieval to
1750
The French Literary Heritage I: Medieval
to Classical
Survey of World Literature: Ancient to
Renaissance
The Bible as Literature
Norse and Germanic Mythology

n
Religions of the Graeco-Roman World
Philosophical Origins I
Survey of Biblical History and Religion
History of Christianity
Introduction to Judaism Classical
Period


GROUP II. Renaissance to Modern Times

Credit


Fine Arts
ARH 2051
*MUH 3212

History


(3) Introduction to History of Art II
(3) Survey of Music History II


*EUH 2001 (3) Western Civilization: Middle Ages to
18th Century
*EUH 2002 (3) Western Civilization: 18th Century to :
Present
HIS 2464 (3) Introduction to the History of Science:
Renaissance to Present

Interdisciplinary
*AFA 2000 (3) Introduction to Afro-American Studies
HUM 2230 (3) Western Humanities: Renaissance to the
Present
*HUM 2239 (3) Western Humanities: Renaissance to the
Present Honors
LIT 4461 (3) Literature and Opera

Literature
*AML 2012 (3) Survey of American Literature:
From the Beginnings to Crane
*AML 2023 (3) Survey of American Literature:
From Crane to the Present
*AML 3271 (3) Afro-American Literature
*ENL 2022 (3) Survey of English Literature:'
1750 to the Present
*FOT 2120 (3) Masterpieces of Continental Literature
*FRT 2460 (3) The French Literary Heritage II:
Classical to Modern
*GET 2480 (3) German Literary Heritage
*LIT 2120 (3) Survey of the World Literature:
17th Century to Modern
*LIT 3353 (3) Ethnic Literature
*RUT 2110 (3) Russian Masterpieces
*SPT 2118 (3) Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
*SPT 2231 (3) The Modern Spanish-American Novel in
English Translation

Philosophy-Religion
*PHH 2400 (3) Philosophical Origins II
*PHI 2630 (3) Contemporary Moral Issues
*REL 3420 (3) Contemporary Religious Thought
*REL 3494 (3) Human Image in the West
*REL 3601 (3) Introduction to Judaism: Modern Period

GROUP III. Special Topics in the Humanities

Credit

Fine Arts
ARH 2002 (3) Introduction to Art: The Artistic
Experience *
*HUM 2515 (3) Shock of the New
*MUH 3541 (3) Latin American Music
*MUH 4016 (3) History of Jazz
*MUH 4501 (3) Non-Western Music
MUH 4561 (3) Music of Black Americans
*MUL 2010 (3) Introduction to Music Listening
*MUL 2012 (3) Masterworks of Music
THE 2000 (3) Theatre Appreciation

History


AFH 2003
*CHI 3500
*CLA 3791
HIS 3471
*JPN 3500
*LAH 2020


Africa in World History
Chinese Culture
The Ancient City
History of Technology II
Japanese Culture
Introduction to Latin American History







LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


*EGN 4834
*HIS 3490
*HIS 3491
PHI 4633


Philosophy-Religion
*PHI 2403 (3) Science, Myth, and Value
*PHM 2204 (3) Social Issues and Social Thought
*REL 2001 (3) Religion in Human Experience,
A (Western)
*REL 2002 (3) Religion in Human Experience,
B (Asian)
*REL 3321 (3) Judaism and Christianity
*Course satisfies the communication requirement.

PHYSICAL SCIENCES (3-6 credits See note below).
The requirements in the Physical Sciences enable the student
(1) to become acquainted with the basic concepts and methods
of scientific inquiry in the Physical Sciences, and (2) to become
acquainted with the application and/or implications of the
Physical Sciences. The curriculum allows flexibility to sample
the offerings of more than one discipline or to choose a theme
to pursue which may be of special interest to the student.
Option A. Recommended for nonscience majors: One course
from Group I, followed by one course from Group II. Some
courses in Group II have prerequisites from Group I.

GROUP I. Foundations of the Physical Sciences

Credit


AST 1002
CHM 1020
GEO 2200
GLY 1000
PHY 2020


Discovering the Universe
Chemistry and Society
Physical Geography
Exploring the Geological Sciences
Introduction to Principles of Physics


GROUP II. Uses of the Physical Sciences

Credit


AST 2037
AST 2039 .
AST 2046
CHM 1021
GEO 2201
GEO 2340

GLY 1817
GLY 2121

MET 1010
OCE 2005
PHY 3400


Life in the Universe
Exploration of the Universe
History of Astronomy through Newton
Chemistry and Society
Physical Landscapes
Human Interactions with the
Bio-Physical Environment
Mineral Resources of the World
Physiographic Features of the United
States
Introduction to Weather and Climate
Introductory Oceanography
Light, Color and Holography


Option B. Recommended for science majors, engineering ma-
jors, and preprofessional students: For explanation of and de-
tails on the various Physical Sciences sequences, students
should consult the Course Descriptions portion of the catalog


under the appropriate Physical Science department. Prerequi-
sites must be adhered to.


Humanities and Engineering
History of Western Medicine
Social History of American Medicine
Ethical Issues in Medicine


Islamic Civilization
Humanities Forum
Asian Humanities
African Humanities
African Cultures and Literatures
Latin American Humanities
Museum Without Walls
Asian Arts and Concepts
The Ascent of Mankind
Social Ethics
Language and People


CHM 2040 (3)
CHM 2041 (3)
CHM 2045 (3)

CHM2045L (1)

CHM 2046 (3)

CHM2046L (1)

CHM 2050C (4)
CHM 2051C (4)
CHM 2053C (4)
GLY2015 (3)
GLY 2100 (3)
GLY 2991C (4)
PHY 2004-5 (3;3)
PHY 2039 (2)
PHY 3040 (4)
PHY 3048-9 (3;3)
PHY 3053-4 (4;4)
PHY 3060-1 (5;5)


NOTE: The science requirements call for at least 3 credits in the
Physical Sciences or the Biological Sciences with an additional
6 credits from the other.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (3-6 credits See note below).
The requirements in the Biological Sciences are designed to
enable a student to understand the bases for scientific inquiry
and to use this knowledge to understand our biological envi-
ronment and the place of humans in it. Two courses of study
have been devised: (1) for natural science majors, and (2) for
nonscience majors.
Recommended for Science Majors and Preprofessional Stu-
dents (premedical, predental, preoptometry, preveterinary).
Prerequisites must be adhered to.

Credit

BSC 2010C (4) Integrated Principles of Biology I
BSC 2011C (4) Integrated Principles of Biology II
BSC 2040C (4) Integrated Principles of Biology I,
SHonors Laboratory
BSC 2041C (4) Integrated Principles of Biology II,
Honors Laboratory
Some courses in Group II have a prerequisite from Group I.

Group I
APB 2150 (3) Biological Sciences I: Cells, Organisms,
and Genetics
APB 2991 (3) Honors Biological Sciences I: Cells,
Organisms, and Genetics
APB 2170 (4) Microbiology
BOT 2010C (3) Introductory Botany
HUN 2201 (3) Fundamentals of Human Nutrition

GROUP II


APB 2151

APB 2162
APB 2992

ANT 3511

PSB 3004
BOT 2800


(3) Biological Sciences II: Evolution,
Ecology, and Behavior
(3) Genetics and Society
(3) Honors Biological Sciences II: Evolution,
Ecology, and Behavior
(4) Human Evolution and Adaptation;
Primate Behavior
(3) Introduction to Physiological Psychology
(3) Plants in Human Affairs


NOTE: The science requirements call for at least 3 credits in the
Physical Sciences orthe Biological Sciences, with an additional
6 credits from the other.
Some of these courses may not be acceptable in some colleges.
Students should check the requirements of their colleges.


Humanities and the Professions


Introductory General Chemistry
General Chemistry
General Chemistry and Qualitative
Analysis
General Chemistry and Qualitative
Analysis Laboratory
General Chemistry and Qualitative
Analysis
General Chemistry and Qualitative
Analysis Laboratory
General Chemistry Honors 1
General Chemistry Honors II
General Chemistry Honors II
Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Physical Geology-Honors
Applied Physics I, II
Prelude to Physics
General Physics
Physics with Calculus I, II
Physics I, II
Physics Honors I, II


Interdisciplinary
*ANT 3365 (3
HUM 2020 (3
*HUM 2410 (3
*HUM 2420 (3
*HUM 2424, (3
HUM 2460 (3
*HUM 2513 (3
*HUM 3411 (3
IDS 2190 (3
*IDS 3181 (3
LIN 2000 (3





Colleges

LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


PLANS OF STUDY BY COLLEGE OF
MAJOR
Students are expected to follow the program of General Edu-
cation specified for their particular baccalaureate goal. In other
words, the particulars of students' General Education depend
upon their choice of major and choice of courses within the
limits set by the major. The General Education requirements for
each college or school may be found on the catalog page indi-
.'cated.
College Catalog Page
Accounting ............... ................. 48
Agriculture .............. .............. 51
Architecture .. ............................... 65
Building Construction ........................... 70
Business Administration ............ ........... 74
Education .......... ....... ................ 79
Engineering. ............. ................ 85
Fine Arts ....................................... 102
Forest Resources and Conservation .................. 113
Health and Human Performance.................... 117
Health Related Professions ................. .... 124
journalism and Communications ................... 131
Liberal Arts and Sciences ........... ........... 140
Nursing .................................. 152
Pharmacy ...................... .............. 155


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT
Initial registration as a freshman for each Fall class is con-
ducted during the preceding summer months. Students and
their parents have an opportunity to attend one of fifteen two-
day programs. Notices concerning this are mailed in the late
Spring to those students who have been admitted by the Univer-
sity Admissions Office. At these Summer Registration Pro-
grams, students and parents attend sessions relating to career
choice, student activities, helping services, and course selec-
tion. Each student meets with an academic adviser who assists
in selecting courses to take in the Fall.
Those Fall students who cannot attend a Summer Registration
Program confer with academic advisers as a part of the registra-
tion period held in the week prior to the beginning of classes in
the Fall. Students entering college in the Spring or Summer se-
mesters also have advisement conferences as part of the regis-
tration period prior to classes.
In the latter part of each semester students register for their
next semester. Again academic advisers are available to discuss
course selection. It is expected that students shall accept re-
sponsibility for fulfilling curricula requirements as stated in the
catalog, and students who are making successful progress are
not required to see an adviser when registering. Students who
are changing majors or who are not maintaining a "C" average
are required to talk to an adviser about course selection.
In the first few days of each semester (see deadlines in the
University Calendar printed in the front of this catalog) students
should review their course selection and add or drop courses if
needed to make a reasonable load for the semester, in view of
past grades and current goals. If during the semester students
feel they must drop a course because of illness or other emer-
gency, they will find academic advisers available for discussion
of the problem. Advisers are also available during regular busi-
ness hours to help students define any other academic prob-
lems and find corrective measures. Please come to the
Academic Advisement Center, 358 Little Hall.


HONORS PROGRAM
This is an invitational program for students who have shown
potential for superior academic performance. Invitations are
sent after admission to the University to all students who have
scored 1260 or above on the Scholastic Aptitude Tests, with not
less than 600 on the verbal portion (or 29 composite on the
American College Test, with not less than 29 on the English
portion), and who have an academic high school grade point


average of not less than 3.5 as computed by the University.
These students are eligible for special honors classes and hous-
ing in an honors dormitory. To remain in the program, students
must enroll in not fewer than two honors courses each semester
in the first two years and maintain an overall grade point aver-
age of 3.0. All honors students must take a two-semester Fresh-
man Honors Seminar and a two-semester sophomore
interdisciplinary course as one of the required honors courses
each semester. Honors requirements are not in addition to Gen-
eral Education requirements but may be used in satisfaction of
those requirements. The small sizes of the classes and the high
quality of the students make possible more thorough inquiry
into course materials and more independent work. Students
Smay enhance their critical faculties through extensive reading,
writing of research papers, and oral presentations in class. Stu-
dents who fulfill the requirements of the Honors Program with a
3.0 overall average, satisfy the General Education require-
ments, and have 64 semester hours of credit, will receive the
Associate of Arts with honors. Those with a 3.5 overall grade
point average will receive the certificate with high honors. After
the sophomore year, the Honors Program becomes the respon-
sibility of the department in which the student pursues the ma-
jor course of study. The departmental honors coordinator
should be contacted for admission into the upper-division hon-
ors program. The upper-division honors programs in the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences lead to the baccalaureate
degree with either honors or high honors. On the basis of per-
formance in honors courses, if required, a minimum upper-
division grade point average of 3.5, and a senior thesis or
project, each department will decide whether the student will I
graduate with honors or high honors.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

Academic Enrichment and Recruitment Services (AERS)
The AERS office works closely with minority high school and
community college students to facilitate their matriculation at
the University of Florida. Once these students are enrolled, the
office continues helping them by providing academic advise-
ment and career guidance. Academic counselors are available
to assist students in reviewing career goals, course selection,
and curricular and admission requirements.
In addition to academic advisement and recruitment ser-
vices, the AERS office serves as a central source of information
pertaining to academic enrichment services offered at the Uni-
versity of Florida. The office coordinates and directs minority
academic affairs (i.e. admissions, advisement, drop petitions,
preprofessional education) for the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences and is an adjunct to the CLAS Academic Advisement
Center.

Special Services/PACT
The Special Services Program and the Program for Academic
Counseling and Tutoring (PACT) are designed to give education-
ally disadvantaged students who qualify for admission to the
University of Florida assistance in developing those academic
skills needed for successful academic and social progress at the
University. The supportive services offered or arranged for by
these programs include counseling, academic advisement, tu-
toring, study skills, reading and writing labs, and special
classes. Peer counselors are assigned to students to assist them
in making the smooth transition to the university environment.
While admission to the federally funded Special Services Pro-
gram is selective and only a limited number of students can
participate, the State-supported PACT serves all other incoming
students who would benefit from the academic assistance pro-
vided through these programs.
Both of these programs work in close coordination with other
supportive services in the planning and implementation of vari-
ous programs designed to increase retention and graduation
efforts at the University of Florida.


I







LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS


COUNSELING AND
RELATED SERVICES
In addition to assistance from academic advisers (358 Little
Hall), students may find that one or more of the following of-
fices can be of assistance in solving personal problems, career
selection problems, or problems relating to deficiencies in aca-
demic skills. The Student Affairs section of this catalog de-
scribes their specific services.
1. Reading and Writing Center (2109 TUR)
2. Speech and Hearing Center (442 ASB)
3. Student Health Service (Infirmary)


4. Career Resource Center (G-1 JWRU)
The Psychological and Vocational Counseling Center (311
Little Hall) provides professional psychological services to stu-
dents. These include vocational counseling, career informa-
tion, assistance with academic problems, specialized testing,
marriage counseling, and personal counseling. Students and
students' spouses may apply in person for such services as they
deem necessary. No charge is made. The Counseling Center
offers consultative services to university faculty and staff who
are engaged in counseling students. Close relationships are
maintained with deans, college advisers, housing personnel,
the Student Health Service, and religious centers for the pur-
pose of expediting both counseling and consultative services.










Fisher School

of Accounting

GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Accounting was established July 1, 1977 and
named the Fisher School of Accounting in 1985. The objective
of the Fisher School is to provide the technical and general edu-
cation necessary to enter the accounting profession and pro-
gress rapidly through levels of increasing responsibility. The
field of accounting offers outstanding opportunities in such ar-
eas as public accounting, industrial accounting, nonprofit ac-
counting, and tax accounting.
The accountant deals with complex problems in the business
world. This requires a thorough knowledge of business opera-
tions and the environment of business as well as accounting
knowledge. In addition to the demanding technical skills, an
ability to communicate clearly in both verbal and written form
is essential. Interpersonal skills and professional judgment are
important elements in the practice of accounting. Although ac-
counting is unusually demanding and requires a high achieve-
ment motivation in order to succeed, the rewards are high.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained from
the Director of Student Financial Aid, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. To be considered for scholarships
awarded to fourth and fifth year accounting students, applica-
tion forms (available at the Fisher School of Accounting offices)
should be completed early in the Spring Term.

HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS

Beta Alpha Psi
This honorary accounting fraternity has 115 chapters nation-
ally. Upsilon Chapter was the 18th chapter to be founded (in
1938) and is recognized as one of the best chapters in the coun-
try. An active professional program is conducted each year in-
cluding guest speakers, panel discussions, field trips, and other
activities designed to promote professional awareness. Beta Al-
pha Psi cosponsors the Graduate Accounting Conference
which annually attracts more than 100 accounting practition-
ers. Membership requirements include high ethical standards
and a minimum grade point average. Additional information
concerning these requirements may be obtained from the
Fisher School of Accounting.

Beta Gamma Sigma
Election to this national business honorary society is based
on scholarship and character. For additional information, apply
to the Office of the Dean, College of Business Administration.

Florida Accounting Association
The FAA is a professional/social organization that is open to
all accounting students. Its aims are to facilitate communica-
tion between accounting students and the accounting profes-
sion and to encourage greater interaction between students and
faculty.

Fisher School of Accounting Student Council
Members of the Fisher School of Accounting Student Council
are elected by the students of the School. The Council performs
a leadership role in a variety of school activities (student news-
letter, Career Expo, Teacher of the Year Award, orientation ses-
sions) and provides student representation on faculty
committees.


ACCOUNTING RESEARCH CENTER
The Accounting Research Center was organized in 1976 to
sponsor and encourage both frontier-seeking research and re-
search that has immediate benefit to the profession. The Center
provides an opportunity for graduate students to become in-
volved in specific research projects on a regular basis. Research
projects occasionally provide a similar opportunity for under-
graduate students. The Center publishes research results in a
working paper series. For information contact the Director of
the Accounting Research Center, Fisher School of Accounting,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.

PROGRAM OF STUDY
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a professional
career in accounting is the five-year program leading to the
Master of Accounting degree. The five-year program allows the
student to concentrate in an accounting specialty in addition to
providing knowledge of both the basic accounting framework
and the underlying business and related disciplines. Details
concerning the five-year program including the specialization
areas of financial/auditing, managerial/cost, systems, and tax
are included in the Graduate School catalog which can be ob-
tained by writing the Director of Admissions, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Additional information can
also be obtained by contacting the Fisher School of Account-
ing, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
Students who successfully complete the first four years of the
five-year program will receive the Bachelor of Science in Ac-
counting degree. Graduates will have the requisite accounting,
business, and general education to pursue a variety of career
opportunities in accounting and business and to apply to grad-
uate and professional degree programs in accounting, busi-
ness, or law. Students wishing to specialize in professional
accounting should plan to complete the final year of the five-
year program.
Prospective students are cautioned to become familiar with
the five-year requirement to sit for the Certified Public Account-
ants Examination in the State of Florida.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the Fisher School encourage
applications from qualified students of both sexes from all cul-
tural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are the
specific minimum requirements for admission to the Fisher
School. It should be understood however that these are mini-
mum requirements and that admission to this School is subject
to enrollment capacity and is a selective process. The satisfac-
tion of minimum requirements does not automatically guaran-
tee admission. A student's total record including educational
objective, pattern of courses previously completed, quality of
previous academic record, and test data will all be considered
in evaluating an application for admission. Priority in admis-
sion will be given to those applicants whose total record indi-
cates the greatest likelihood of success in the program
requested.
Students Classified UF: To be eligible for admission to the
Fisher School, a student classified UF must have (a) completed
at least 60 semester hours of coursework (current coursework is
included in the 60 hours); (b) completed at least 12 semester
hours of preprofessional coursework, including MAC 3234 and
ACG 2001, or equivalent courses (current coursework is not
counted toward these requirements); (c) earned a grade of B or
better in ACG 2001 or equivalent coursess; (d) earned a grade
point average that meets minimum standards for the amount of
preprofessional work completed; and (e) taken the College
Level Academic Skills Test (see Index). Information on current
minimum standards may be obtained from the Fisher School
Office.
Transfer Students: The applicant should complete, as far as
possible, the courses required for the desired curriculum. Com-
pletion of these courses and receipt of the AA degree does not
guarantee acceptance to the Fisher. School. The eligibility


I










Fisher School

of Accounting

GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Accounting was established July 1, 1977 and
named the Fisher School of Accounting in 1985. The objective
of the Fisher School is to provide the technical and general edu-
cation necessary to enter the accounting profession and pro-
gress rapidly through levels of increasing responsibility. The
field of accounting offers outstanding opportunities in such ar-
eas as public accounting, industrial accounting, nonprofit ac-
counting, and tax accounting.
The accountant deals with complex problems in the business
world. This requires a thorough knowledge of business opera-
tions and the environment of business as well as accounting
knowledge. In addition to the demanding technical skills, an
ability to communicate clearly in both verbal and written form
is essential. Interpersonal skills and professional judgment are
important elements in the practice of accounting. Although ac-
counting is unusually demanding and requires a high achieve-
ment motivation in order to succeed, the rewards are high.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained from
the Director of Student Financial Aid, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. To be considered for scholarships
awarded to fourth and fifth year accounting students, applica-
tion forms (available at the Fisher School of Accounting offices)
should be completed early in the Spring Term.

HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS

Beta Alpha Psi
This honorary accounting fraternity has 115 chapters nation-
ally. Upsilon Chapter was the 18th chapter to be founded (in
1938) and is recognized as one of the best chapters in the coun-
try. An active professional program is conducted each year in-
cluding guest speakers, panel discussions, field trips, and other
activities designed to promote professional awareness. Beta Al-
pha Psi cosponsors the Graduate Accounting Conference
which annually attracts more than 100 accounting practition-
ers. Membership requirements include high ethical standards
and a minimum grade point average. Additional information
concerning these requirements may be obtained from the
Fisher School of Accounting.

Beta Gamma Sigma
Election to this national business honorary society is based
on scholarship and character. For additional information, apply
to the Office of the Dean, College of Business Administration.

Florida Accounting Association
The FAA is a professional/social organization that is open to
all accounting students. Its aims are to facilitate communica-
tion between accounting students and the accounting profes-
sion and to encourage greater interaction between students and
faculty.

Fisher School of Accounting Student Council
Members of the Fisher School of Accounting Student Council
are elected by the students of the School. The Council performs
a leadership role in a variety of school activities (student news-
letter, Career Expo, Teacher of the Year Award, orientation ses-
sions) and provides student representation on faculty
committees.


ACCOUNTING RESEARCH CENTER
The Accounting Research Center was organized in 1976 to
sponsor and encourage both frontier-seeking research and re-
search that has immediate benefit to the profession. The Center
provides an opportunity for graduate students to become in-
volved in specific research projects on a regular basis. Research
projects occasionally provide a similar opportunity for under-
graduate students. The Center publishes research results in a
working paper series. For information contact the Director of
the Accounting Research Center, Fisher School of Accounting,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.

PROGRAM OF STUDY
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a professional
career in accounting is the five-year program leading to the
Master of Accounting degree. The five-year program allows the
student to concentrate in an accounting specialty in addition to
providing knowledge of both the basic accounting framework
and the underlying business and related disciplines. Details
concerning the five-year program including the specialization
areas of financial/auditing, managerial/cost, systems, and tax
are included in the Graduate School catalog which can be ob-
tained by writing the Director of Admissions, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Additional information can
also be obtained by contacting the Fisher School of Account-
ing, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
Students who successfully complete the first four years of the
five-year program will receive the Bachelor of Science in Ac-
counting degree. Graduates will have the requisite accounting,
business, and general education to pursue a variety of career
opportunities in accounting and business and to apply to grad-
uate and professional degree programs in accounting, busi-
ness, or law. Students wishing to specialize in professional
accounting should plan to complete the final year of the five-
year program.
Prospective students are cautioned to become familiar with
the five-year requirement to sit for the Certified Public Account-
ants Examination in the State of Florida.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the Fisher School encourage
applications from qualified students of both sexes from all cul-
tural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are the
specific minimum requirements for admission to the Fisher
School. It should be understood however that these are mini-
mum requirements and that admission to this School is subject
to enrollment capacity and is a selective process. The satisfac-
tion of minimum requirements does not automatically guaran-
tee admission. A student's total record including educational
objective, pattern of courses previously completed, quality of
previous academic record, and test data will all be considered
in evaluating an application for admission. Priority in admis-
sion will be given to those applicants whose total record indi-
cates the greatest likelihood of success in the program
requested.
Students Classified UF: To be eligible for admission to the
Fisher School, a student classified UF must have (a) completed
at least 60 semester hours of coursework (current coursework is
included in the 60 hours); (b) completed at least 12 semester
hours of preprofessional coursework, including MAC 3234 and
ACG 2001, or equivalent courses (current coursework is not
counted toward these requirements); (c) earned a grade of B or
better in ACG 2001 or equivalent coursess; (d) earned a grade
point average that meets minimum standards for the amount of
preprofessional work completed; and (e) taken the College
Level Academic Skills Test (see Index). Information on current
minimum standards may be obtained from the Fisher School
Office.
Transfer Students: The applicant should complete, as far as
possible, the courses required for the desired curriculum. Com-
pletion of these courses and receipt of the AA degree does not
guarantee acceptance to the Fisher. School. The eligibility


I







FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


standards for admission for students classified UF (see above)
apply equally to transfer students.
A. Students attending four year colleges who wish to transfer
after two years should follow a program of general education
and preprofessional courses similar to the Basic Curriculum
for the Freshman and Sophomore years for students desiring
to enter the Fisher School. Courses should not be taken dur-
ing the first two years which are offered only at the upper
division level at the University of Florida.
B. Junior College and Community College students should:
1. Complete the General Education requirements estab-
lished for the junior college.
2. Complete, insofar as possible, all of the preprofessional
courses.
3. Avoid professional coursework that is available at the
University of Florida only as 3rd and 4th year courses.
TRANSFER STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO AVOID SUCH
COURSES AS BUSINESS LAW, PRINCIPLES OF MARKET-
ING, PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE, PRINCIPLES OF MAN-
AGEMENT, PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE, PRINCIPLES OF
REAL ESTATE, PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, AND AC-
COUNTING COURSES BEYOND THE INTRODUCTORY
LEVEL. A maximum of four semester credits may be al-
lowed for courses taken during the first two years which are
available only as third and fourth year professional courses
in the College of Business Administration at the University
of Florida. Any credit granted for such work will be granted
only in the form of undistributed elective credit. IN NO
CASE MAY SUCH COURSES BE IN ACCOUNTING. In the
case where a student wishes to waive an upper division
core course and substitute a community college course,
waivers may be granted on an individual basis but the stu-
dent will be required to take another course in the area
being waived. The substitute course will be specified by
the Department Chairman of the area.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper courses and for ful-
filling all requirements for the degree. The student is also re-
sponsible for completing all courses for which he or she is
registered.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Office
of the Registrar early in the semester in which they expect to
receive the degree. The official calendar shows the latest date
by which this can be done.
Seniors should make an appointment for a graduation check
with the Fisher School at the beginning of their senior year.
NORMAL LOADS: The normal course load in the Fisher
School is 15 credit hours per semester. A student may be per-
mitted to register for additional hours if in the opinion of the
academic adviser his or her academic record justifies it. Stu-
dents who wish to take a lower course load should be aware
that certain university privileges and benefits require a mini-
mum registration. It is the student's responsibility to verify the
minimum registration necessary for these benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to be applied toward
the degree must be completed in residence in the Fisher
School. At least 20 semester hours of upper-division account-
ing coursework required for the B.S.Acc. degree must be com-
pleted at the University of Florida. Once a student enters the
Fisher School, no courses may be taken by correspondence nor
may required courses (in preprofessional, accounting, and sup-
porting fields) be taken outside the University of Florida. No
exceptions o this policy are permitted. Students at the Fisher
School may take elective and general education courses at
other four-year colleges but only if (1) the student will have
more than 30 hours left to graduation upon completion of such
courses, and (2) advance approval is obtained from the Assis-
tant Director.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An un-
dergraduate student in the Fisher School may take on the S-U
basis only those courses which will be counted as free electives
in fulfilling degree requirements. Courses taken to satisfy com-


munication requirements for the five-year program may not be
taken on an S-U basis.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress will not be allowed to re-
main in the Accounting program. More than one grade below C
in upper division accounting coursework is considered unsatis-
factory progress.
DROP POLICY: Courses may be dropped during the drop/
add period without penalty. After the drop/add period, a course
may be dropped up to the date established as the School dead-
line. All such drops are subject to the following restrictions:
(1) No more than two drops after the University drop/add
period will be permitted in a student's upper-division aca-
demic career for any reason.
(2) After the deadline, students may petition the University's
Committee on Student Petitions to drop a course.
(3) Students dropping their full course load must contact the
Office of the Registrar as this constitutes withdrawal from the
University. Withdrawal in any term (Fall, Spring, or any Sum-
mer term) is counted as one drop for the purpose of applying
the drop policies..The School will exclude students from the
accounting program if the student withdraws from the Uni-
versity of Florida three times after admission to the Fisher
School of Accounting.
(4) Students dropping an Accounting course for which there
was a waiting list at the end of the drop/add period may be
assigned the lowest priority for enrolling in that course during
the next academic term.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To receive the degree
Bachelor of Science in Accounting a student must satisfactorily
complete the following:
1. 64 semester credit hours of lower division requirements.
2. An approved program in accounting.
3. Upper division core courses.
4. Elective requirements.
A minimum of 124 semester credit hours is required for grad-
uation including 60 semester hours in upper division courses.
The waiving of any required course does not reduce the hours
required for graduation. A student must maintain an overall av-
erage of 2.0 and a 2.0 average on all courses which count to-
.ward his or her upper-division degree requirements. A 2.0
average mustalsobe maintained for all upper-division account-
ing courses. Courses that have been repeated are included in
these averages but do not carry degree credit.

DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
A student who carries 14 hours per semester with a grade
point average of 3.50 will be placed on the Dean's List for that
semester.
The grade point average required for graduation with Honors
or High Honors is based only on required upper division ac-
counting and business courses taken at the University of Flor-
ida. To graduate with High Honors the average must be at least
3.60; to graduate with Honors the average must be at least 3.20.
At least 40 semester hours of upper division credit must have
been earned at the University of Florida.

GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses are offered in the Fisher School leading to the degree
of Master of Accounting. For requirements for this degree and
for admission to Graduate School, consult the Graduate Cata-
log.

CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTING
Students who expect to receive a Bachelor of Science degree
in Accounting must satisfactorily complete (1) the General Edu-
cation Requirements, the Preprofessional Requirements (see





Colleges

FISHER SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


below), and elective courses for a total of at least 64 hours; and
(2) the upper division requirements for a total of at least 60
hours.

General Education Requirements
Credits
ENC English, including ENC 1101 .................... 6
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I ...................... 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences. ...................... 9
The Humanities................................... 9
Physical Sciences ................................ 3-6
Biological Sciences ....................... 6-3
For specific courses to complete these requirements, consult
"Authorized Courses for General Education" in the Lower Divi-
sion section of this catalog (see Index).

Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
*ACG .2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
COP 3120 Introduction to COBOL Programming... ..... 3
**ECO 2013-2023 Basic Economics .................... 6
***MAC 3234 Survey of Calculus 2 ...................... 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics .................... 3
Electives to make a total of 64 hours.
*A grade of B or better is required in ACG 2001 (or equivalent) to
register for required upper division accounting courses and to
be eligible for admission to the Fisher School.
**May not be used for General Education Social Science credit.
***MAC 3234 must be completed to be eligible for admission to
the Fisher School.

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
The upper division curriculum in Accounting requires 60 se-
mester credits.


Required Nonaccounting Courses:
Credits
QMB 3700 Operations Research and Management....... 3
MAN 3021 Principles of Management ................. 3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing .................... 3
FIN 3408 Principles of Finance. ................. ... 4
GEB 3121 Advanced Business Statistics ................ 3
ECO 3100 Prices and Markets ... .................... 3
BUL 4200 Business Law Problems .................... 4
MAN 4720 Business Policy.................. ....... 3
Total 26

Required Accounting Courses:
Credits
ACG 3132 Financial Accounting I. ................... 4
ACG 3142 Financial Accounting II ................... 4
ACG 3342 Cost and Managerial Accounting I ........... 2
ACG 3352 Cost and Managerial Accounting II ........... 4
TAX 4002 Federal Income Tax Accounting I ............. 4
ACG 4652 Auditing I ............................ 4
ACG 4451 Information Systems for Management
SPlanning and Control ................ ............ 4
Total 26
Electives: No accounting courses (except ACG 4941) may be
counted for elective credit. A maximum of 3 credits in physical
education and 6 credits in advanced military science may be
counted for elective credit. A minimum of 4 elective hours must
be taken outside the Fisher School and College of Business Ad-
ministration. CLEP credits and APE credits not used to meet
lower division electives may not be used as electives in the up-
per division. Students are advised to include a Speech course
among their electives; those intending to complete the M.Acc.
degree are'advised to consult a Fisher School advisor about
upper division electives.
........................................ ..... 8
Total 60










College of Agriculture

The aim of the College of Agriculture is to provide students
with the best education possible for service in agricultural busi-
ness, technology, and science.
The departments in the College are Agricultural and Exten-
sion Education, Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural Opera-
tions Management, Agronomy, Animal Science, Dairy Science,
Entomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Economics,
Food Science and Human Nutrition, Fruit Crops, Microbiology
and Cell Science, Ornamental Horticulture, Plant Pathology,
Poultry Science, Soil Science, and Vegetable Crops. Degree
programs are available through the College of Agriculture in the
Botany and Statistics departments administered by the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The School of Forest Resources
and Conservation is a specialized faculty within the College of
Agriculture.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Agriculture en-
courage applications from qualified students of both sexes from
all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below
are the specific requirements for admission to this College. In
the event enrollment quotas become necessary because of lim-
ited space or teaching resources, selection of those admitted
will be on the basis of past academic performance.

Lower Division Students
Any student with a UF classification who has finalized his or
her decision to study in the College of Agriculture may apply for
admission to the College. Applications from Freshmen and
Sophomores are encouraged.

Upper Division Students
To be eligible for admission to the College of Agriculture up-
per division students must have demonstrated by selection of
preprofessional courses an intent to pursue a program in agri-
culture.
Transfer Students. To be eligible for admission to the College
of Agriculture, a transfer student must satisfy the minimum re-
quirements set forth in the ADMISSIONS section of this cata-
log. Additionally, the applicant should satisfy the following
specific requirements for consideration by the College of Agri-
culture:
(1) Complete the General Education requirements of the
University of Florida as described in the Lower Division Re-
quirements section of this catalog; or, complete an Associate of
Arts degree.
(2) Complete the preprofessional requirements of the Col-
lege of Agriculture for the major field.
The following recommendations will serve as a guide in ex-
pediting transfer to the College of Agriculture in compliance
with the above requirements:
A. Students attending four-year colleges who wish to transfer
after two years should follow a program of general education
and preprofessional courses similar to the Suggested Course
Sequence on the next page of this catalog.
B. Junior college students should consult with an adviser
and the Transfer Advisement Manual published by the Uni-
versity of Florida to develop a program of study that will sat-
isfy the above requirements. Some general guidelines to be
followed include:
1. Complete the two-year college parallel program at the
junior college.
2. Satisfy the General Education requirements established
for the junior college.
3. Complete a program of general chemistry through qual-
itative analysis and mathematics through college algebra
and trigonometry.
4. Complete basic courses in biology or botany and zool-
ogy.
5. Complete a course in general economics.
6. Complete a course in general physics.


7. Choose elective courses in fulfilling the required total
hours in the college-parallel program from the areas of
speech, English, and the basic sciences.
8. Avoid specialized professional courses. Preprofessional
courses can be taken to much better advantage after the
student has acquired the appropriate background in gen-
eral education and basic science courses.

Special Postbaccalaureate Students
A student who has received a baccalaureate degree may be
admitted under certain circumstances as a special postbacca-
laureate student (6AG). Students may enroll as 6AG in order to:
(1) Receive a second baccalaureate degree;
(2) Satisfy requirements for a second major;
(3) Take basic requirements for admission to Graduate or
Professional School; or
(4) Complete courses for information only.
Admission requirements for postbaccalaureate students are
the same as for transfer students. In addition, postbaccalaureate
students must comply with College and University rules and
regulations and meet all deadlines as printed in the catalog for
undergraduate students.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper courses and for ful-
filling all requirements for the degree. Each semester the stu-
dent should consult with his or her departmental adviser to
plan a program of studies. The adviser will complete a Course
Approval Form (Form 1) which must be approved by the Dean's
office prior to submitting the course request form to the Regis-
trar. Seniors must file a formal application for a degree in the
Office of the Registrar early in the semester in which they ex-
pect to receive the degree. The official calendar shows the latest
date on which this can be done. Seniors should request that a
graduation check be conducted by the Dean's Office of the Col-
lege of Agriculture at the beginning of their senior year.
NORMAL LOADS: The suggested average course load in the
College of Agriculture is 15 credit hours. A student may be per-
mitted to register for additional hours if, in the opinion of the
academic adviser and the Dean, the student's academic record
justifies this. Students may register for less than 12 hours, but
should be aware that certain university privileges and benefits
require the minimum of 12 hours. It is the student's responsibil-
ity to verify the minimum course load for these benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to be applied toward
a degree must be completed in residence in the College of Agri-
culture. In special cases this requirement may be waived by the
Dean's office. Students may complete 12 semester credit hours
by extension or correspondence among the 30 semester credits
of residence work required for the baccalaureate degree but
such work must have prior approval by the major department
and the College Dean for each course taken. Credit for work by
correspondence will not be accepted by the College unless a
student has an upper division grade point average of 2.0 or
higher in all work attempted in residence.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An un-
dergraduate student in the College of Agriculture may take on
the S-U basis only those courses which will be counted as elec-
tives in fulfilling the requirements for the degree.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress and drop 20 honors points
below a 2.0 average will be suspended for one term and then
may return for a term but must lower their deficit below 20
points or face final suspension.
DROP POLICY: Courses may be dropped during the drop/
add period without penalty. Thereafter, courses may be
dropped only by College of Agriculture petition until a dead-
line for college petitions is reached. Drops requiring College of
Agriculture petitions are subject to the following rules:
(1) Two free drops after the University drop/add period will
be permitted for a student classified as 1AG or 2AG. Students
classified as 3AG, 4AG, 6AG, and OAG are allowed one free





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


drop. These drops will be processed according to the stu-
dent's classification. Records of free drops will be maintained
in the Dean's office; therefore all drops must be processed
through that office.
(2) After the College deadline, students may petition the
University Committee on Student Petitions to drop a course
provided they can document sufficient reasons to drop.
(3) Students dropping their full course load must contact the
Office of the Registrar as this constitutes withdrawal from the
University.
WITHDRAWAL POLICY: If a College of Agriculture student
withdraws from the University for a second time, that student
will be placed on College probation. A third withdrawal will
constitute violation of the probation and the student will not be
allowed to register again as a student in the College of Agricul-
ture.


AGRICULTURE: LOWER DIVISION
Students planning to enter the College of Agriculture should
take, while in lower division, the following program of study.
The sequence in which courses are to be taken will depend
upon the department in which a student takes his or her upper
division major and will be determined by departmental advis-
ers in the College of Agriculture.

GENERAL EDUCATION
Credits
English ......................................... 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences........................ 9
The Humanities ................................... 9
Mathematical Sciences* ....... ... ................. 6
*Must take MAC 1142 Algebra and Trigonometry. An additional
course in Mathematics, Statistics or Computer and Information
Sciences will complete this requirement.n
For specific courses to complete ie tieril Education require-
ments see the Lower Division Requirements section of this cata-
log.

PREPROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS*
Credits
CHM 2040, 2041, 2045L, 2046 and 2046L or CHM 2045,
2045L, 2046 and 2046L Introductory Chemistry and
Q ualitative Analysis ........................... 8-11
PHY 2004 & 2004L Applied Physics .................. 4
BSC 2010C Integrated Principles of Biology I............ 4
BSC 2011C Integrated Principles of Biology 2 or
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity ....... .. ..... ..... 3-4
AEB 3103 Principles of Food & Resource Economics...... 4
Communications................... ............... 6
Selected from SPC 3601, ENC 3213, AGG 4603,
ENC 3312, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, MMC 2100 and
SPC 3605
Electives...... ........................... 5-8
* Prospective majors in Animal Science, Dairy Science, Entomol-
ogy, Nematology, Food Science and Human Nutrition, Poultry
Science, pre-Veterinary Medicine, and Microbiology and Cell
Science should take courses listed above plus BSC 2011C. Mi-
crobiology and Cell Science majors may substitute BOT 201 1C
for BSC 2011C.
**Prospective majors in Agricultural Operations Management,
Dairy and Poultry Management may satisfy the Chemistry re-
quirements by completing CHM 2040, 2041, and 2045L.
* *Prospective majors in Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Hor-
ticulture, Plant Pathology, Plant Sciences, Soil Science, and
Vegetable Crops must take BOT 2011C.
**Prospective majors in Food and Resource Economics should
take the courses listed above but may substitute MAC 3311 or
MAC 3233 for PHY 2004 and 2004L and may fulfill Chemistry
requirements by completing CHM 2040, 2041, and 2045L or
CHM 1020 and 1021.
* *Prospective majors in Agricultural & Extension Education, Agri-
cultural Operations Management, Food and Resource Econom-
ics may satisfy Biology requirements by completing APB 2150,
APB 2151, APB 2152L.


* Prospective majors in Microbiology and Cell Science must sat-
isfy Mathematics and Physics requirements by completing
MAC 3311 and PHY 3053, 3054 with laboratories.
**Prospective majors in the Nutrition & Dietetics Curriculum in
Food Science and Human Nutrition must take PSY 2013 to sat-
isfy the BES requirement.
Suitable electives in Agriculture: AGR 3005, 3300, 3503; MAG
3220 and 3312; ASG 3003; ENY 3005; FOR 2003; FOS 2001
and 2002; PLP 3002; SOS 3022; PLS 2031; ORH 3513C; FRC
3212, and others according to prerequisites completed.

Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Credits
English ................................... ...3
Social/Behavioral Sciences .......................... 3
Math including MAC 1142 Algebra and Trigonometry..... 6
CHM 2040 General Chemistry..................... 3
English ........................................ 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences......................... 6
CHM 2041, 2045L Chemistry. ....................... 4
PHY 2004 and 2004L .............................. 4
Electives ................... ....... ........... 1
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Humanities .................................... 3
CHM 2046 Chemistry. ................ ........... 3
CHM 2046L General Chemistry and Qualitative
Analysis Laboratory............................. .1
BSC 2010C Integrated Principles of Biology I............4
Communications .................................. 3
Electives .........................................2
Humanities ..................... ................ 3
AEB 3103 Food and Resource Economics............... 4
BSC 2011 Integrated Principles of Biology II ........... 4
Humanities ............................. ... 3
Communications ............. ................. 3


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
AGRICULTURE

BASIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
At least 128 credits must be earned to receive the Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture degree. In addition, students must have
at least a 2.0 grade point average BOTH in Upper Division and
in all credits attempted at the University of Florida. Finally, stu-
dents must complete the General Education, Preprofessional,
and Departmental requirements in effect at the time the student
begins continuous attendance leading to completion of a de-
gree. Departmental requirements must include a minimum of
13 credits in the department. Students completing above 27
hours in a major must complete an equal number of hours
above the 128 required for graduation.

DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
A student who carries 15 hours per semester (or 12 in sum-
mer) with a grade point average of 3.3 or better and no grade
less than C in any course will have his/her name placed on the
Dean's List for that semester.
Students completing the requirements for the B.S. in Agricul-
ture degree are eligible to be considered for graduation with
Honors or High Honors.
To graduate with Honors a student must have a University of
Florida 'Upper Division grade point average of 3.5 or above.
(For purposes of honors the University of Florida Upper Divi-
sion courses are defined as all courses taken at this University
after the student has earned 64 credits, wherever taken.)
To graduate with High Honors the same requirements apply
as for Honors except that the grade point average must be 3.75
or above.


I







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
By prior arrangement with individual Department advisers
and approval of the Dean, students may, during their Upper
Division course of study, receive credit for practical work under
competent supervision in any recognized and approved agri-
cultural or related pursuit relevant to their college program.
Credit is normally earned at the rate of one credit per month of
full-time work and may not exceed a total of three in anycombi-
nation of experiences. A formal written report must be submit-
ted before a grade (S-U) will be issued.
Departments offering this option have listed the course num-
ber 4941 in the catalog listing of courses. Guidelines are avail-
\able from the College and individual departments establishing
minimum criteria for credit eligibility and performance.

GRADUATE TRAINING IN AGRICULTURE
The College of Agriculture offers four advanced degrees:
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, Master of Agricultural
Management and Resource Development, and Doctor of Phi-
losophy.
Students contemplating graduate study should consult with
their advisers as early as possible to ensure proper program
planning.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CERTIFICATE IN TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
A program for a specialization (with certificate) in Tropical
Agriculture for undergraduate and graduate students is avail-
able through the College of Agriculture. The program provides
course selection to broaden the normal degree requirements
for those interested in specializing in Tropical Agriculture. Stu-
dents enrolled in any one of the existing major programs in the
College of Agriculture may pursue this program. The program is
also available to nonagriculture students with the approval of
the college.
The Certificate in Tropical Agriculture (CTA) requires a mini-
mum of 27 hours of appropriately selected courses. Some and
possibly all of these hours will be in addition to the require-
ments for the current degree sought by the student. Up to even
hours of research credit, or its equivalent, may be applied to-
wards CTA requirements when this research and experience
has a clear relationship to agriculture in developing countries.
All candidates must showa level of competence in an appropri-
ate foreign language, though no language hours are required in
the CTA.
The 27 hours of requirements are divided into Social Studies
and Agricultural Sciences. Nine hours are needed in Social
Studies, five of which must be area specific courses. The Agri-
cultural Sciences require 18 hours, made up with 13 hours from
natural sciences and five from other agricultural sciences.
It would be desirable for candidates to have some farming
experience, preferably in the tropics. Candidates without this
experience will be encouraged to spend 3 to 4 months in insti-
tutions such as Escuela Agricola Pan Americana (Honduras),
CIAT (Colombia) or CATIE (Costa Rica). They may receive up to
seven credits for their work there.
Students will work with their adviser and interdisciplinary
faculty committee of three members to select appropriate
courses to fulfill the objectives of the program. Students'inter-
ested in this program should contact the Dean for Resident In-
struction, College of Agriculture.

CERTIFICATE IN PEST MANAGEMENT
AND PLANT PROTECTION
Students in the Pest Management and Plant Protection Spe-
cialization will receive instruction in the principles of entomol-
ogy, nematology, plant pathology, and weed science. An
understanding of the component parts of the crop-plant ecosys-
tem as related to management of all groups of pests through the
application of biological, chemical, and integrated systems
compatible with a quality environment will be provided.


Students who select the Pest Management and Plant Protec-
tion Specialization will major in one of the following programs
in the College of Agriculture: Agronomy, Entomology pnd
Nematology, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture, Plant Pa-
thology, Plant Sciences, or Vegetable Crops. Students who com-
plete the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree with
this specialization should find many employment opportuni-
ties in agribusiness enterprises or government agencies con-
cerned with plant pest management, crop production, and
environmental protection. Moreover, the successful comple-
tion of this undergraduate program will place the student in an
excellent competitive position as a candidate for graduate stud-
ies in any one of the departments cooperating in the undergrad-
uate major program at the University of Florida or any other
university.
An interested student should contact an academic adviser in
his/her department and must indicate (register) with the chair-
man of the interdisciplinary committee on systems of Pest Man-
agement and Plant Protection. The following required courses
should be completed in addition to the major program require-
ments. The requirements of this specialization can usually be
met through the course requirements of the major program and
a wise choice of electives within the 128 credits required for the
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.

Credits
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management ........... 2
PMA 3323C Pesticide Application .................... 2
PMA 3931 Seminar in Basic Pest Management .......... 1
PMS 3941 Internship in Pest Management .............. 1
PMS 4401C Understanding & Implementing Pest
Management Strategies in Agricultural Systems......... 3
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production............. 3
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ................... 3
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology .................. 3
PLS 4601 Weed Science ....................... ....... 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............. 4
PCB 3043 Introduction-to Ecology .................... 5
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant'Physiology ............... 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ..... 2
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry ............... ....................... 4
SOS 3022C General Soils ......................... 4
AGR 3303 Genetics ............. .................. 3

CERTIFICATE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
A program for a specialization (with certificate) in environ-
mental studies is available in the College of Agriculture. The
program provides course selection to obtain a broad knowl-
edge of the environment, especially in the interrelationships
between the activities of man and environmental quality. Stu-
dents enrolled in one of the existing major programs in the Col-
lege of Agriculture and this specialization will learn to apply
their major discipline to the solution of environmental prob-
lems:
The environmental studies specialization will include envi-
ronmental courses in three basic groups as follows: biological
sciences, physical sciences, and social sciences. At least one
course from each of these three groups is required. A minimum
of 12 semester hours credit is required for the certificate.
Courses required for the major cannot be counted toward the
certificate requirement. A minimum of three hours outside the
College of Agriculture is required.
The courses required for this specialization will be deter-
mined by the student in consultation with his/her departmental
adviser from an approved list of courses prepared by the depart-
ment, the College of Agriculture, and the University. In most
cases these requirements may be met through a wise choice of
electives. Students interested in this minor should consult their
departmental adviser.

CERTIFICATE IN COMPUTER SCIENCES .
A program for specialization (with certificate) in computer
sciences is available for those students who wish to enhance
their College of Agriculture degree program with a coordinated
set of courses in computer sciences. Students enrolled in any





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


existing major program in the College of Agriculture may pur-
sue this certificate program.
Td obtain a Certificate in Computer Sciences, the student
must complete a minimum of 13 credits in specific courses of-
fered by the Department of Computer and Information Sci-
ences. Each candidate must complete COC 3110, COP 3530
and CDA 3101. In addition, at least one of the following
courses must be completed: COP 3603, COT 4125, CIS 4321,
COP 4540, COP 4620, or COP 4640. Because of the prerequi-
site structure for the courses in the program, a minimum of
three semesters beyond the completion of calculus will be nec-
essary to fulfill the requirements of this certificate program. A
student interested in this program should consult with his/her
departmental adviser early in order to determine specific re-
quirements and to develop a program of study.

PREVETERINARY MEDICINE
The College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida,
admits a limited number of students each fall for the pursuit of a
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree. The following courses
must be completed with no grade less than C and a minimum
grade point average of 2.75 to be eligible to apply for admission
to the College of Veterinary Medicine.
\ Credits
BSC 2010C and BSC 2011C Integrated Principles
of Biology I and II ................................ 8
Microbiology (MCB 3020 and 3020L) ................. 6
Genetics (AGR 3303 or PCB 3063) .................. 3-4
Chemistry .............................. 19-22
Chemistry (General and Qual.)
lecture and laboratory (CHM 2040, 2041,
2045L, 2046 and 2046L; or CHM 2045,
2045L, 2046 and 2046L).... f. ............. 8-11
Organic Chemistry, lecture and laboratory
(CHM 3210, CHM 3211-3211L).!'. -............. 8
Introduction to Physical Biochemistry' ...
and Molecular Biology (BCH 40241 ................. 3
Physics (PHY 3053, 3055L, 3054, 3056L) ............. 10
Mathematics: Calculus* (MAC 3311) .: ................ 4
Animal Science:
Introduction to Animal Science (ASG 3003) ........... 4
Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding (ASG 3402C) ..................... 4
Humanities** ................. ............... 9
Social/Behavioral Sciences ..................... .. 9
English ........................................ 6
For specific courses to complete these requirements, see AU-
THORIZED COURSES FOR GENERAL EDUCATION in this
catalog.
Electives. .................................. 9-12
(e.g., Agriculture, Computer Science,
Economics, Humanities, Journalism,
Political Science, Psychology, Social
Sciences, Statistics, etc.) .................. Total 90
*Trigonometry and Algebra at the high school or college level
are required for admission to courses in Calculus.
**Six semester credits will be accepted if taken as a requirement
for an Associate of Arts degree.
Preveterinary students should consult the Dean of the Col-
lege of Agriculture before registering for the preveterinary cur-
riculum.
Students who will have completed the preveterinary require-
ments in June can be considered for admission in the Fall of the
same year. The Office of Admissions at the College of Veteri-
nary Medicine'should be contacted early in the Fall term of the
year preceding anticipated admission.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
(Agricultural Engineering)
The Agricultural Engineering curriculum is offered coopera-
tively by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engineer- -


ing. Students in'this major receive basic training in engineering
and agriculture so that they are prepared to solve the special-
ized and unique engineering problems of agricultural produc-
tion and processing systems and the management and
conservation of agricultural land and water resources. Since en-
gineering problems in agriculture relate to biological produc-
tion and processing of biological products, training in
agricultural and biological courses is obtained. Students desir-
ing careers in Agricultural Engineering will register in the Col-
lege of Engineering. See College of Engineering for curriculum.

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
The Agricultural and Extension Education curriculum is de-
signed to prepare students for careers in agricultural education
and the cooperative extension service. Students majoring in
this department have a common core curriculum which com-
bines courses in technical agriculture, professional education,
and/or extension methodology. The department chairperson or
one of the departmental advisers will advise the student major-
ing in this.department in the selection of electives and require-
ments to meet the student's career goals.
The agricultural education (teaching) program provides the
student with the basic courses for teacher certification in Flor-
ida. In addition to these courses, a graduate must still apply to
the State Department of Education for certification. Each appli-
cant who applies for a full-time Florida teaching certificate shall
be required to present a passing score on each subtest of the
Florida Teacher Certification Examination as part of the require-
ments to establish eligibility for certification.
Students wishing to enroll in AEE 4942 "Agricultural and Ex-
tension Education Practicum" (teaching internship) must meet
the following criteria:
1. Advanced senior standing.
2. Completion of EDF 3135 or equivalent, speech, and 16
hours of professional education in agricultural education.
3. C average (2.0) or better.
4. C average (2.0) or better in all professional education
courses required in the area of specialization.
5. Grades of less than C in Agricultural Education courses
will not be accepted.
6. Score a total of at least 835 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT) or a composite score of 17 or above on the American
College Testing Program (ACT).
Students wishing to enroll in AEE 4943 "Agricultural Exten-
sion Practicum" (extension internship) must meet the following
criteria:
1. Advanced senior standing.
2. C average (2.0) or better.
3. C average (2.0) or better in all professional education
courses required in the area of specialization.
4. Completion of the following courses:
a. AEE 3313
b. AEE 4424
c. AEE 3200
(b and c may be modified with approval of departmental
chairperson)
Assignment to an internship center is an involved process and
is not taken lightly. Every consideration is given to student re-
quests. However, applicants are specifically NOT guaranteed
assignment to their home county, to the immediate or general
vicinity of the campus, or to a given center on request. Assign-
ments will be made only to those centers indicated at time of
application. Submission of an application by a candidate con-
stitutes an agreement to accept assignment in the center where
it is determined that the objectives of the internship program
can best be achieved. Failure to accept an assignment negoti-
ated by Department personnel relieves the Department of any
further responsibility to provide internship experiences and
courses for the candidate.
The student completing this program will be required to sat-
isfy the College of Agriculture core curriculum requirements.
All students will take a basic skills assessment examination
while enrolled in AEE 3323. This examination includes sec-







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


tions on mathematics, reading, and writing. A student must
have a successful score on all sections of the basic skills assess-
ment examination prior to admission to the teaching internship
experience.
Departmental Requirements 28 Credits
Credits
*AEE 3323 Development & Philosophy of Agricultural
Education .................................... 3
*AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in Agricultural
Education............... ........ ........... 3
*AEE 4504 Organization of Agricultural Education
Programs ................................... 3
*AEE 4224 Special Methods in Teaching Vocational
Agriculture..... ....................... 3
*AEE 4227 Laboratory Practices in Teaching
Agricultural Ed ................... .............. 2
*AEE 4424 Agricultural Youth Programs ................. 3
*EDF 3135 The Adolescent (or equivalent)............... 3
*AEE 4942 Agricultural and Extension Practicum ........ 6-8
AEE 4943 Agricultural Extension Practicum ........... 8
AEE 4624 Career and Prevocational Education in
Agriculture ................ ........ ........... 2
AEE 3313 Development and Role of Extension Education .. 3
AEE 4905 Individual Work in Agricultural & Extension
Education ........... ... .. ............... 1-5
Other Requirements and Electives 36 Credits*
Credits
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and
Maintenance ................... ..... ......... 3
AOM 4225 Management of Agricultural Power .......... 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Lab................ 1
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Science: ............. 4
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy................. 3
S;or
AGR 4210 Field Crop Science ................... ... 3
or
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management....... 4
SOS 3022C General Soils......... ........... 4
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 3
ORH 3008 Introduction to Residential Horticulture ...... 3
***Electives in Agriculture ........................... 8-9
*The student planning to qualify to teach in the public schools
will complete a minimum of 28 semester hours from the above
list of professional courses. The courses indicated byan asterisk
(*) are required. The curriculum for students interested in ex-
tension education will be planned by a departmental coun-
selor.
Substitutions must be approved by the chairperson of Agricul-
tural and Extension Education.
***To be planned by department advisers.


AGRICULTURAL OPERATIONS
MANAGEMENT
The Agricultural Operations Management curriculum is de-
signed to provide foundations in the area of technical manage-
ment. The application of high technology and principles of
management toward improving agricultural production, proc-
essing, manufacturing, product support, and product educa-
tion are emphasized.
Fundamental technologies in food engineering, machinery,
power, robotics, irrigation, electrical power, computer interfac-
ing, management, human factors, and construction are comple-
mented with the agricultural sciences and business
management.
Three options of study in Agricultural Operations Manage-
ment are available. The options are (1) production manage-
ment; (2) plant and process management; and (3) technical
sales and product support management. The option selected by
the student will depend upon the nature of his or her interest in
the field. Students should consult a departmental advisor for


guidance in making their choice of an option and for approval
of electives.
All curriculum options include the College of Agriculture's
basic lower division requirements and:
Pre-Professional Requirements 18 Credits
Credits
AGG 4603 Agricultural Communications
or
ENC 4260 Advanced Professional Writing .............. 3
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 .................... 4
or
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ................. 3
PHY 2005 Applied Physics 2 ........................ 3
PSY 2013 General Psychology ...... ..... ......... 3
COP 3210 Computer Programming with FORTRAN ...... 2

OPTION A PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for those students interested pri-
marily in training for field crop or animal agriculture.
Departmental Requirements and Electives 63 Credits
Credits
MAN 3021 Principles of Management ................. 3
AEB 4141 Agricultural Finance ................... ... 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ................... 3
SOS 3022 General Soils ......................... 4
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 3
Animal Science, Plant Sci or Crop Courses. .............. 6
AOM 3333 Pesticide Application ....... ................. 3
AOM 4225 Management of Agricultural Power .......... 3
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management............. 3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and Maintenance.... 3
AOM 3312 FariT Machinery ........................ 3
AOM 4642 Environmental Systems for Ag Structures ...... 3
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering ............. 4
AOM 3734 Principles of Irrigation .................... 3
AOM 4933 Professional. Practices in Agr Operations ...... 1
Approved Elettives fromrPlan A List ................. 15
[Consult department for approved plan A elective list.]

OPTION B PLANT AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for tRose students interested in
pursuing technical management careers in agricultural manu-
facturing, food processing, handling, and transport of agricul-
tural products.
Departmental Requirements and Electives 63 Credits
Credits
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing .................. .. 3
MAN 3021 Principles of Management ................. 3
ACG 2001 Accounting ......................... 3
AEB 3111 Linear Programming. ................... .. 2
FOS 3042 Introd Food Science ................... ... 3
FOS 4731 Gov't Regulations and the Food Industry....... 1
AOM 4444 Electrical Power and Electronics in Ag ........ 3
EIN 3314L Work Design and Human Factors ............ 3
AOM 4342 Sales and Service.of Ag Systems ............. 3
AOM 4225 Management of Agricultural Power .......... 3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and Maintenance.... 3
AOM 3312 Farm Machinery ........................ 3
AOM 4642 Environmental Systems for Ag Structures ...... 3
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering.............. 4
AOM 3503 Agricultural and Environmental Quality....... 3
AOM 4933 Professional Practices in Agr Operations ...... 1
Ag Science Electives* ...................... .......... 6
Approved Plan B Electives. ... ..................... 13
*from Plan A elective list
[Consult department for approved plan B elective list.]

OPTION C TECHNICAL SALES AND PRODUCT
SUPPORT
This curriculum is designed for students seeking careers in
sales, sales management, service, product planning, general
management, parts and inventory control, and governmental
agencies.





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Departmental Requirements and Electives 63 Credits
Credits
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ..................... 3
MAN 3021 Principles of Management ................. 3
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture ................ 3
ACG 2001 Accounting ......................... 3
ADV 3000 Elements of Advertising................... 3
MAN 4310 Problems in Personnel Management ......... 4
AOM 4342 Sales and Service of Agricultural Systems...... 3
AOM 3312 Farm Machinery.......................... 3
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and Maintenance .... 3
AOM 3732 Water Management ...................... 3
AOM 4642 Environmental Systems for Ag Structures ...... 3
AOM 4062 Principles of Food Engineering.............. 4
AOM 4444 Electric Power & Electronics in Ag ........... 3
AOM 3503 Agricultural and Environmental Quality....... 3
AOM 4933 Professional Practices in Ag Operations....... 1
Agricultural Science Electives* .............. ....... 6
Approved Plan C Electives .................. ...... 12
*from Plan A elective list
[Consult department for approved plan C elective list.]


AGRONOMY
Agronomy students receive scientific and technical instruc-
tion in the various aspects of field and forage crop production


and utilization as well as in genetics and plant
mum of 64 total credits is required. Student
Agronomy major should contact the Departm
for information early in their academic career
Departmental Requirements 40-4

AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy....
AGR 3303 Genetics .................
AGR 4931 Agronomy Seminar ..........
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and
Biological Chemistry.......... ......
BOT 3503C Introductory Plant Physiology..
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology La
PLS 4601 Weed Science ................
SOS 3022C General Soils............
One course in Computer Science ........
Two of the following 3 course
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology .....
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology......
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology .
Minimum of 9 credits from the fol
AGR 4001C Man, Food, and Environment ..
AGR 4210 Field Crop Science ...........
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Manag
AGR 4242 Rice..... ..................
AGR 4244 Sugarcane ..................
AGR 4246 Oilseed Crops ...............
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding ...............
AGR 4624C Seed Technology............
*AGR 4905 Problems in Agronomy........
*AGR 4941 Work Experience in Agronomy..
Approved Electives 22-24 Cre
*A combined maximum of 4 credits from these
counted towards the departmental requirement


ANIMAL SCIENCE
The Animal Science curriculum is designed to give students a
foundation in the basic sciences and fundamental training in
the various phases of the beef cattle, swine, horse, sheep and
meat industries. In addition, it provides a background for gradu-
ate study and for entry into the College of Veterinary Medicine.
The curriculum consists of core requirements and electives.
Through proper selection of electives, students can direct their
programs toward their career interests, such as production, ag-
ribusiness, advanced degrees, and preprofessional programs.


56


Students with limited livestock experience should, with the as-
sistance of their advisor, select courses to acquire such experi-
ence.
Early in their college planning, students should meet with
their departmental academic advisor assigned by the Animal
Science Undergraduate Coordinator, to discuss career goals
and plan their program of study.
Credits
Departmental Requirements ........................ 20
Other Requirements ............................. 19
Electives ................................. 25-26
Total 64
Departmental Requirements
ANS 3934 Junior Seminar .................... ..... 1
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science............. 4
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition and Feeding ... 4
ASG 4931 Seminar ................................ 1
Minimum of 10 additional departmental credits selected
from the following courses in groups A and B. A minimum of 3
credits required from each group.
Group A
ASG 3313 Principles of Animal Breeding ............. 3
ASG 4334C Reproduction in Farm Animals ............ 3
ANS 3613 Livestock and Meat Evaluation .............. 2
ANS 3634 Meats .............. .......... ....... 3


breeding.A mini- Group B
s interested in an
ent of Agronomy ANS 4234C Horse Enterprise Management ........... 3
enr. ANS 4243C Beef Cow-Calf Management ............... 3
ANS 4245C Beef Backgrounding and Feedlot Management. 2
3 Credits ANS 4264C Swine Production .................... 3
Credits ANS 4274C Sheep Production ....................... 2
....... ... 3 Other Requirements and Electives
............ AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
.........4 AGR 3303 Genetics ............... ............ 3
........ 3 AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management....... 4
laboratory ..... 2 BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and
3 Biological Chemistry or
.......... CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry ................ 3 or 4
...........2-3 MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms
or APB 2170C Microbiology ........................ 4
es Free Electives .............................. 25-26
............ 3 Students are encouraged to elect additional courses in Sci-
... : .... .... 3 ence, Technology, Economics, and Business relating to a career
......... 4 interest.
lowing
............ 2 BOTANY
............ 3
,ement....... 4 A major in botany is offered through the College of Agricul-
............ 3 ture. Students should consult with the Undergraduate Coordi-
. ........... 2 nator for curriculum. (See Botany, College of Liberal Arts and
............ 2 Sciences for course listing.)

....... 3.... 3
........ 1-3 DAIRY SCIENCE
. ...... 1-3
ds The two curricula give broad foundations in science and tech-
edits nology of the dairy industry. Students should consult with the
se courses can be chairman or departmental adviser for assistance in choosing
ent. the curriculum and selecting electives.


CURRICULUM I DAIRY SCIENCE
This is designed primarily for students interested in dairy pro-
duction or graduate study and provides a background for entry
into the College of Veterinary Medicine.
Departmental Requirements 12 Credits
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management ................. 2
DAS 4411 Dairy Cattle Nutrition ..................... 3


I








COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Minimum of 7 additional departmental credits
selected from the following courses:
Credits
ASG 4931 Dairy Seminar .......................... 1
ASG 4992 Dairy judging........................... 1
DAS 3214 Dairy Cattle Evaluation .................... 1
DAS 4213 Dairy Management Techniques .............. 2
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation ............... .... 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology. ........................ 4
DAS 4905 Problems in Dairy Science ................ 1-4
DAS 4941 Practical Work Experience in Dairy
Science ...................................... 1-3
DAS 5212C Dairy Management Systems ............... 4
Other Requirements and Electives 52 Credits
Credits
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
AGR 3303 Genetics .............................. 3
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management ...... 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ............. 4
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition and
Feeding ......................................... 4
ASG 4334 Reproduction in Farm Animals .............. 3
BCH 3023 Elem. Organic & Biological Chemistry ........ 4
or
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry....................... 3
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms ........... 4
Electives .................................... 22-23

CURRICULUM II DAIRY MANAGEMENT
This is designed primarily for students interested in managing
dairies or dairy enterprises or careers in allied agribusiness.
Departmental Requirements 12 Credits'
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management .................. 2
DAS 4411 Dairy Cattle Nutrition .................. ... 3
Minimum of 7 additional departmental credits
selected from the following courses:
Credits
ASG 4931 Dairy Seminar .......................... 1
ASG 4992 Dairy Judging. ........................... 1
DAS 3214 Dairy Cattle Evaluation ............... .... 1
DAS 4213 Dairy Management Techniques ............ 2
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation .................... 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology. ...................... .. 4
DAS 4905 Problems in Dairy Science ................ 1-3
DAS 4941 Practical Work Experience in Dairy
Science .................................... 1-3
DAS 5212C Dairy Management Systems ............... 4
Other Requirements and Electives 52 Credits
Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ............... .. 3
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture ........... 2
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
AGR 3303 Genetics .............................. 3
or
APB 2170 Microbiology ............................ 4
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management....... 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences .............4
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding .............................. ... 4
ASG 4334 Reproduction in Farm Animals .............. 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic & Biological
Chem istry ..................................... 4
Electives .................. .................. 20-21


ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
Entomology and nematology are biological sciences dealing
with two principal groups of invertebrate animals. The curricu-
lum is designed to give basic training in entomology and nema-
tology and specialized programs in various areas of these two
sciences.


Within the pest management program, specialized emphasis
may be given to areas like crop protection, animal protection,
or urban entomology and pest control. In the latter, students are
trained in insects, plant disease, and weed control with special
reference to problems in and around residential and other
buildings. Emphasis is also given to business management so
that students are prepared for administrative duties as well. Stu-
dents will be prepared to take the Florida Board of Health certi-
fication examination. Specific requirements for these programs
can be obtained by contacting the Department of Entomology
and Nematology.

ENTOMOLOGY/PEST MANAGEMENT
Entomology and
Pest Management Requirements 21 Credits
Credits
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ...... ...... ... 3
ENY 3931 Undergraduate Seminar. .;.... ............ 1
ENY 4353 Insect Physiology and Morphology ............. 3
ENY 4161 Insect Identification ....................... 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management.......... 2
PMA 4401 Understanding and Implementing Pest ,
Management Strategies in Agricultural Systems.......... 3
6 credits from among the following:
ENY 3521 Field Crop Insects ......... ....... ........2
ENY 4660 Medical and Veterinary Entomology .......... 3
ENY 4905 Problems in Entomology.......... ..... 1-5
PMA 3931 Seminar in Basic Pest Management.......... 1
PMA 3941 Internship in Pest Management.. ............. 1
PMA 3323 Pesticide Application ................... .. 2
21
COURSES OUTSIDE OF ENY/PMA
Credits
Required
AGR 3303 Genetics ................... ........... 3
SOS 3022 General Sils.. .. ....................... 4
BCH 3023 Elementary, Organic and Biological
Chemistry or equivalent ................... ...... 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology ...................3
or
PCB 4044 Geperal Ecology. ......................... 4
12 credits from among the following:
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production............. 3
NEM 3701 Principles of Nematology ........ ......... 3
PLS 4601 Weed Science .......... ... ..... 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Basic Plant Pathology......... 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............... 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory .....2
APB 2170 Microbiology ............ ;.............. 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Science .......... .... 4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition and Feeding..... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management... ................. 3
AGR 4210 Field Crop Science .... ................... 3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ............... 3
PLS 4701 Field Plot Techniques ..... ................. 2
VEC 3221 Commercial Vegetable Production, I .......... 4
ZOO 3203 Invertebrate Zoology ... .................. 4
ZOO 3513 Animal Behavior. ........................ 4
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry. .... ................. 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ...... ...... ........... 3
GLY 4610 Invertebrate Paleontology...... .............. 3
Other Approved Electives
Free and Approved Electives .................. .. 16-17
64

FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
Six curricula are offered by the Department of Food and Re-
source Economics. The curriculum selected by the student will
depend upon the nature of his or her interest in the field. Stu-
dents should consult a departmental adviser for guidance in
making their choice of a curriculum and for approval of elec-
tives.






Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


In addition to completing all of the requirements of a curricu-
lum, a student must earn at least a 2.5 grade point average in all
AEB courses attempted.

CURRICULUM I FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for those students interested pri-
marily in training as professional agricultural economists or in
preparing for graduate study.
I Departmental Requirements 26 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ................. ... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................. 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms ..... 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior ..'................................ 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Economics.................................. 3
AEB 3935'Food and Resource Economics Seminar........ 1
Other Requirements and Electives 34-35 Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
ACG 2302 Elementary Managerial Accounting........... 2
MAC 3233 and 3234 Survey of Calculus 1 and 2 ......... 6
ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory .................... 4
ECO 4203 Macroeconomic Theory .................. 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics .................... 3
At least one course from the following:
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ........... 4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Cultur .............. 3
SOS 3022C General Soils .: .. ... ....... 4
Free and Approved Electives .... ...i. : ........ 12-13

CURRICULUM II AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS
MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for those students interested in
administrative and service aspects of agricultural or related
businesses.
Departmental Requirements 28-29 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ..................... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................. T
At least 3 credits from the following ............... ... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334'Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Economics ..................................... 3
AEB 3935 Food and Resource Economics Seminar........ 1
Electives in Food and Resource Economics ............ 4-6
Other Requirements and Electives 32-33 Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
ACG 2302 Elementary Managerial Accounting........... 2
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I ................... 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ....... 3-4
ECO 3202 or ECO 4203 Macroeconomic Theory....... 3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ........... ..... .3
At least one course from the following:
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ........... 4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture .............. 3
SOS 3022C General Soils ......................... 4
Free and Approved Electives ..................... 12-15


CURRICULUM III CO-MAJOR WITH OTHER
DEPARTMENTS
Students majoring in other departments or colleges who feel
the need for a better understanding of the economics of agricul-
ture and the relationship of agriculture to the general economy
can also take a co-major in Food and Resource Economics.
Departmental Requirements 21 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................... 3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ..................... 3
At least 2 credits from the following ................... 2
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................. 3
At least 3 credits from the following ................... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Economics.......... ..........................3
Other Requirements and Electives 39-40 Credits
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 ............. .... 3
At least one course from the following:
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ...... .... 4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture............. 3
SOS 3022C General Soils ......................... 4
Free and Approved Electives ..................... 33-34

CURRICULUM IV HUMAN RESOURCE AND
COMMUNITY ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed to train professionals to work on
problems affecting people and their communities.
Departmental Requirements 23 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics 4
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................. 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Economics.................................. 3
AEB 3935 Food and Resource Economics
Seminar ....... ............................ 1
At least 3 credits from the following ................... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
At least 5 credits from the following ................... 5
ECO 4504 Public Finance
AEB 4421 Agricultural Labor Economics
AEB 4444 Regional Economics and Policy Analysis
Electives in Food and Resource Economics ............ 2-3
Other Requirements and Electives 37-38
Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
ACG 2302 Elementary Managerial Accounting........... 2
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I ...................... 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ....... 3-4
ECO 3202 or ECO 4203 Macroeconomic Theory....... 3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics .................... 3
At least one course from the following:
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science........... 4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture .............. 3
SOS 3022C General Soils ................... .... 4
Free and Approved Electives ................... .. 17-20

CURRICULUM V FOOD MARKETING AND
DISTRIBUTION
This curriculum is designed for students interested in em-
ployment at the managerial level in the food industry.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Departmental Requirements 25 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .... 4
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ..................... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4314 Terminal Markets and Commodity Exchanges ... 1
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture ........... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................. 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior.. .. ... ................. ...... 3
AEB 4342 Food Distribution Management .............. 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Economics ... ..................... ... ...3
AEB 3935 Food and Resource Economics
Seminar ....................................... 1
Other Requirements and Electives 40-41 Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ............... 3
ACG 2302 Elementary Managerial Accounting.......... 2
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 ..................... 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ....... 3-4
ECO 3202 or ECO 4203 Macroeconomic Theory....... 3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ......... .... .... 3
At least one course from the following:
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ........... 4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture .............. 3
SOS 3022C General Soils ................. .... .. 4
Free and Approved Electives ................... .. 21-24

CURRICULUM VI NATURAL RESOURCE AND
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for students interested in natural
resources and environmental quality.
Departmental Requirements 24-25 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .... 4
AEB 3413 Economics of Environmental Policy.......... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................. 3
At least 3 credits from the following ................... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
AEB 4434 Land and Water Economics ................. 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Economics.................................. 3
AEB 3935 Food and Resource Economics
Seminar ............................. .... 1
Electives in Food and Resource Economics ............ 2-3
Other Requirements and Electives 35-37 Credits
Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
ACG 2302 Elementary Managerial Accounting........... 2
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I ......................... 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ....... 3-4
ECO 3202 or ECO 4203 Macroeconomic Theory....... 3-4
STA 3023% production to Statistics ................. 3
At least one course from the following:
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ........... 4
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture............. 3
SOS 3022C General Soils .........................4
Free and Approved Electives ..................... 16-19


FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN
NUTRITION
The Food Science and Human Nutrition Department offers
three curricula, Food Science, Nutrition and Dietetics and Nu-
trition Sciences. Students in these curricula take a common
core of courses, required courses for their area of concentra-
tion, and electives. Students should consult the departmental
advisers for guidance and approval of electives.


The Food Science curriculum is designed to utilize the princi-
ples of chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, engineering,
other basic sciences, and management in applications related
to the manufacturing, processing, preserving, distribution, and
packaging of food and food products for immediate or future
utilization. General areas of study include: chemical, microbi-
ological, and nutritional properties of raw and processed foods;
role of processing and engineering in modifying food proper-
ties; food deterioration and spoilage; role of additives and other
ingredients; food safety; food fermentation and new food prod-
uct innovations. An opportunity is offered for students to inten-
sify in areas of specialization such as general food processing,
citrus processing, seafood processing, food chemistry, food en-
gineering, food microbiology, management, food marketing,
nutrition, public health and consumer protection. Cooperative
programs are available with theappropriate commodity depart-
ments for students desiring to specialize in dairy, meat, poultry
or fruit, and vegetable processing. An excellent foundation for
graduate study and research in Food Science or related fields is
also provided.
The Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum is designed to give
students a foundation in nutrition and, if desired, for dietetic
internship upon graduation. The Nutrition and Dietetics curric-
ulum provides an excellent undergraduate education for stu-
dents planning to enter a graduate program in human nutrition.
Students preparing for the professions of medicine, dentistry, or
veterinary medicine normally complete the minimum program
and additional courses chosen with the help of their advisers.
See Curriculum III.
Department Core Requirements 33 Credits
Credits
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition .......... 3
HUN 3246 Agricultural and Nutritional Biochemistry..... 3
FOS 3042 .Introductory Food Science .................. 3
FOS 4311C Food Chemistry ................... ..... 4
FOS 4222C Food Microbiology ......... .............. 4
FOS 4321C Food Analysis .................. ........ 4
FOS 4931 Food Science and Human Nutrition Seminar.... 1
CHM 3200 and 3200L Organic Chemistry
and Laboratory.............................. ... 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms
with Laboratory .. .. ......................... 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ..................... 3

CURRICULUM I FOOD SCIENCE
Additional requirements and electives 31 Credits
Credits
AOM 4062C Principles of Food Engineering ............ 4
FOS 4427C Principles of Food Processing .............. 4
FOS 4722C Statistical Quality Control and Sensory
Evaluation of Foods .............. ............ 2
FOS 4731 Government Regulations and
the Food Industry .............................. 1
MAC S311 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I............. 4
In addition, students will be required to complete any two of
the following:
FOS 4522C Seafood Technology....................... 3
FOS 4551C Fruit, Vegetable and Citrus Processing. ...... 3
ANS 4635C Meat Processing ........................ 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology..... .... ............. 4
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology ............... 3
Electives*.................................... 9-10

CURRICULUM II NUTRITION AND DIETETICS
Additional requirements and electives 31 Credits
Credits
DIE 4125 Food Systems Management................... 3
DIE 4244 Nutrition and Disease ........... ... ..... 3
DIE 4255 Technical Aspects of
I Clinical Dietetics .......... ................. 3
HUN 3221 Nutrition and Metabolism ................... 3
PET 3350 Applied Human Physiology .................. 2
PET 3350L Applied Human Physiology Laboratory ....... 1
EDF 4210 Educational Psychology ................... 3
MAN 3010 Principles of Management ................. 3
Electives* ......................................10






Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


CURRICULUM III NUTRITIONAL SCIENCES
Additional requirements and electives 31 Credits
Credits
HUN 3221 Nutrition and Metabolism ................ 3
DIE 4244 Nutrition and Disease ...................... 3
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology. ........................... 4
ZOO 3703 Functional Vertebrate Anatomy ............. 4
PCB 4745 Animal Physiology...... ..... 4
Electives* .. .................................. 13
*Suggested Electives: Analytical Chemistry, Computer Science,
Physical Chemistry.

FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION
(For Bachelor of Sciernce Degree Requirements, see listings
under School of Forest Resources and Conservation)

FRUIT CROPS
The Department of Fruit Crops at the University of Florida in
Gainesville offers an outstanding undergraduate program for
students planning to enter the citrus and other fruit industries in
the state. Job opportunities in production management, agri-
cultural sales and technical representation, extension, and
many other areas are available to graduates.
Students receive a broad foundation in the science and tech-
nology of fruit production, handling, and marketing. Core lec-
ture and laboratory courses in Entomology, Biochemistry, Plant
Pathology, Soils, Plant Physiology, Weed Science, and Farm
Firm Management are taken. ,
Students wishing to pursue a production, business, or sci-
ence specialization will choose appropriate electives in consul-
tation with their advisor.
Core Requirements L'-36 Credits
S Credits
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry ........ .... 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology.............. 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ..... 2
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................ 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............. 4
SOS 3022 General Soils ....................... ..... 4
PLS 4601 Weed Science ............................ 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................. 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture .............. 4
FRC 4223 Citrus Production ................. .. ..... 4
FRC 4933 Citrus Production Manager's Seminar ......... 1
Approved Electives
(minimum of 4 courses, 10 credits)
Credits
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management ............. 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers & Soil Fertility ................. 3
FRC 4244 Citrus Production, Harvesting &
Research in Florida ............................ 4
FOS 4551 Fruit, Vegetable and Citrus Processing ........ 3
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture........... 2
COC 3111 Introduction to Computing for
Nonmajors .................. ............... ...... 3
COP 3110 Introduction to Computer Programming....... 2
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ............... .... 3
ORH 3023 Plant Propagation ......... ........... 2
ORH 3023L Plant Propagation Laboratory ............. 1
FRC 4253 Principles of Tropical Fruit Culture............ 2
FRC 3283 Temperate Zone Fruit Crops............... 3
AOM 3323 Pesticide Application ..................... 2
AOM 3503 Agriculture & Environmental Quality......... 3
AGR 3303 Genetics ............... .. ..... .3
BOT 5225 Plant Anatomy ....................... .... 4
BOT 5505 Intermediate Plant Physiology............... 3


AGR 5266C Field Plot Technique ................... .. 2
APB 2170 Microbiology ........... ........ ..... 4
MCB 3020 Basic Biology of Microorganisms ............ 4
BOT 5285 Plant Microtechnique ................ .... 3
BOT 5435 Introduction to Mycology .................. 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology .................. ... 3


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL SCIENCE
The curriculum is designed to develop fundamental knowl-
edge of bacteria, plant and animal cells, and viruses. It provides
a background for pursuing graduate work in microbiology, cell.
biology, or biochemistry as well as other areas of agricultural
sciences. It also provides a background necessary for work in
research or diagnostic laboratories, both governmental and in-
dustrial. The curriculum also provides a background for entry
into the professions of dentistry, medicine and veterinary medi-
cine.
Departmental Requirements 23 Credits
Credits
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology ......................... 4
MCB 3020 Basic Biology of Prokaryotic and
Eukaryotic Cells : ..... ............. ......... 4
MCB 3020L Laboratory for Basic Biology of
Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells .................... 2
MCB, APB, and PCB Electives .................... 13
(One laboratory course beyond MCB 3020 is required)
Other Requirements and Electives 41 Credits
Credits
CHM 3120 Analytical Chemistry ..................... 3
CHM 3120L Analytical Chemistry Laboratory ........... 1
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry... ................ 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ................... ... 3
CHM 3211 L Organic Chemistry Laboratory.............2
PHY 3053 Physics 1 .... ..................... ..... 4
PHY 3055L Laboratory for PHY 3053.................. 1
PHY 3054 Physics 2 .................... .. .. ... 4
PHY 3056L Laboratory for PHY 3054................. 1
MAC 3311 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1 ......... 4
Electives ..................... .... .... .. .....15


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
Students majoring in Ornamental Horticulture may special-
ize in general ornamental horticulture, ornamental horticul-
tural science, nursery and landscape horticulture, floriculture,
foliage, or turf/grass production and maintenance. According
to your specialization, you will be assigned an academic ad-
viser to assist in developing a program of coursework. Students
majoring in ornamental horticulture should complete the fol-
lowing requirements:
Plant Sciences Core Requirements 23 Credits*
Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics ................... ....... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological !-
Chemistry .................... ...... ....... 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ................ 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology
Laboratory. ............................. 2
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............. 4
SOS 3022C General Soils. .............. ........ 4
Departmental Requirements 24-27 Credits
ORH 3023 Plant Propagation .................... .... 2
ORH 3023L Plant Propagation Lab................... 1
ORH 3513 Fundamentals of Ornamental Plant
Identification 1 .............................. .. 3
ORH 3292 Cultural Factors in Ornamental Plant
Production ..................................... 3
ORH 3422 Environmental Factors in Ornamental Crop
Production ................. ................ 3








COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


All students will be required to enroll in at least two (2) of the
following five (5) courses for a total of 6-7 credits.
ORH 3222C Turfgrass Culture........................ 3
ORH 3514 Ornamental Plant Identification II ........... 3
ORH 4224 Turfgrass Science............ ... ......... 3
ORH 4263 Production of Floricultural Crops............ 4
ORH 4275 Commercial Production of Foliage Plants...... 3
To complete the remaining elective credits students may enroll
in any of the available Ornamental Horticulture classes de-
pending on their area of specialization with the exception of
ORH 3008 (a nonmajor course).
*An average grade of 2.0 in ORH courses is required for gradua-
tion.
SPECIALIZATIONS: Students should declare an area of speciali-
zation and complete 6-9 hours from the list of suggested
courses.
A. General Ornamental Horticulture. This option is de-
signed for those students who do not declare a specific com-
modity interest area and wish to complete a more
generalized program in Ornamental Horticulture.
B. Ornamental Horticultural Science. Students desiring to
complete advanced degrees (M.S., Ph.D.) should select this
specialization. Accordingly, students will select courses to
strengthen and prepare them for graduate school.
Credits
BCH 4203 Introduction to Intermediary
Metabolism ............................. 4
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry &
Molecular Biology. ........................ 4
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy ............... 3
BOT 3153C Local Flora ......................... 2
BOT 3303 Introductory Vascular Plant Morphology ... 4
BOT 4283 Plant Microtechnique ................. 2
CHM 3120C Analytical Chemistry I............. 4
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry................. 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics I................ 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry.................... 3
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry Lab .............. 2
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ........ 4
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II........ 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms
with Laboratory....... ....................... 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology ................. 5
PHY 2005 Applied Physics 2 .................... 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers ana Soil Fertility .............. 3
C. Nursery and Landscape Horticulture. Nursery Manage-
ment includes the production, storage, and marketing of or-
namental trees, shrubs, and vines. Landscape horticulture
deals with the location, care, and maintenance of ornamental
trees, shrubs, and vines for the improvement and beautifica-
tion of the environment.
Credits
ORH 3731 Biological Illustrations ................. 3
ORH 4235 Landscape Practices and Arboriculture .... 3
ORH 3815 Introduction to Landscape Horticulture.... 3
ORH 4276 Foliage and Nursery Production
Laboratory. ... ........................... 2
ORH 4941 Full Time Practical Work Experience..... 1-3
ORH 4905- Independent Study of Ornamental
Horticulture ......................... 1-5
or
ORH 4932 Special Topics in Ornamental
Horticulture ............... ............. 1-4
AOM 3734 Irrigation Principles and
Practices in Fla .............................. 3
PLS 4601 Weed Science ......... .............. 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management........ 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility ............. 3
D. Floriculture Production. The growing, handling, ship-
ping, and sale of cut flowers and potted flowering plants
through wholesale commission florists, flower shops, and
other retail shops.
Credits
AOM 3734 Irrigation Principles and
Practices in Fla............................. 3


ORH 3611 Retail Florist and Garden Center
M management ....... ..................... 3
ORH 4276L Nursery and Foliage Production Lab ..... 2
ORH 4280 Orchidology ....................... 3
ORH 4905 Independent Study of Ornamental
Horticulture ............................. 1-5
ORH 4932 Special Topics in Ornamental
Horticulture ................. ............ 1-4
ORH 4941 Practical Work Experience in Ornamental
Horticulture ................... ....... 1-3
PLS 4601 Weed Science .............. .. ....... 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management........ 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility ............... 3
E. Foliage. Production, shipping or sale of foliage plants
through wholesale or retail outlets, as well as installation and
maintenance of plants in interiorscapes.
Credits
AOM 3734 Irrigation Principles and
Practices in Fla .............................. 3
ORH 4235 Landscape Practices and Arboriculture .... 3
ORH 4276L Nursery and Container Production Lab ... 2
ORH 3611 Retail Florist Shop and Garden Center
Management .................. ..... 3
ORH 3815 Introduction to Landscape Horticulture.... 3
ORH 4905 Independent Study of Ornamental
Horticulture ............................ .1-5
ORH 4932 Special Topics in Ornamental
Horticulture ............................. 1-4
ORH 4941 Practical Work Experience in
Ornamental Horticulture ................... ..1-3
PLS 4601 Weed Science .................. ...... 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management........ 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility ............. 3
F. Turfgrass Production and Maintenance. The production of
turfgrass for sod and maintenance of grasses for lawns, golf
courses, and recreational areas.
Credits
AOM 3734 Irrigation Principles and
Practices in Fla. .......................... 3
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology ............... 3
ORH 4235 Landscape Practices and Arboriculture .... 3
ORH 4905 Independent Study of Ornamental
Horticulture .............. ............. 1-5
ORH 4941 Full Time Practical Work Experience in
Ornamental Horticulture ..................... 1-3
PLS 4601 Weed Science........................ 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management........ 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility .............. 3
Electives: Fourteen to seventeen (14-17) hours of electives
may be selected to complete your degree program. Suggested
areas of coursework can be taken in accounting, economics,
fruit crops, and vegetable crops.


PLANT PATHOLOGY
The curriculum in Plant Pathology permits students to learn
the principles of Plant Pathology and their applications to scien-
tific agriculture. The following program is offered for a major in
Plant Pathology with specialization in either Agricultural Sci-
ence or Agricultural Technblogy. Students must consult the cat-
alog statement for courses approved for the specialization in
Pest Management and Plant Protection.
Departmental Requirements 19-23 Credits
Credits
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............ 4
PLP 4102 Principles of Plant Disease Control............ 3
PLP 4931 Seminar in Plant Pathology .................. 1
BOT 5435 Introductory Mycology .................... 4
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology .................. 3
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms with
Laboratory or APB 2170C Microbiology ............... 4
*PLP 4905 Problems in Intermediate
Plant Pathology. ............... ........... 1 to 4






Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Other Requirements 23 Credits
Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics ............................ 3
BOT 2011C Plant Diversity ....................... 3
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry .. .. .............................. 4
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 3
ORH 3023 Plant Propagation ....................... 2
ORH 3023L Plant Propagation Laboratory ............. 1
SOS 3022C General Soils..... ........... ......... 4
Approved Electives 18-22 Credits
*Departmental elective.


PLANT SCIENCES General
Students in the General Plant Science curriculum must com-
plete a minimum of 64 credits of coursework in the basic and
applied plant sciences as indicated below. Electives including
courses for the optional specialization in Pest Management and
Plant Protection should be selected with the advice and ap-
proval of the assigned Plant Science adviser. Interested students
initially should consult the Department of Agronomy.
Plant Sciences Core Requirements 29 Credits
Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics ......... ................... .. 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry ................ .................. 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............... 3
BOT 3053L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ..... 2
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 2
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............ 4
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation ....... ........... ... 2
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ,. .............. 1
SOS 3022C General Soils ........................ .. 4
PLS 4601 Weed Science ... .................. ..... 3
Other Requirements 35 Credits
Approved electives in AGR, FRC, ORH, VEC
(with a minimum of 3 credits in each
of the four departments) ........................ 13
Other approved electives .......................... 22

POULTRY SCIENCE
Two curricula are offered by the Department of Poultry Sci-
ence. Students should consult the chairman or the departmen-
tal adviser for guidance in making their curriculum choice and
for approval of electives.

CURRICULUM I General or Science
This curriculum is designed for those students interested in
training in poultry production and graduate study and provides
a background for entry into the College of Veterinary Medicine.
Science Core Requirements 28 Credits
Credits
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ................... 3
AGR 3303 Genetics .............................. 3
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ............. 4
ASG 3403 Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding .............. ................ 4
ASG 4931 Seminar ............. ........... 1
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry
or CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry .................... 4
MCB 3020 Basic Biology of Microorganisms or
APB 2170 Applied Microbiology.................... 4
VES 3202C Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic
Animals or CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis .......... 4
Departmental Requirements 12 Credits
Students selecting this curriculum are required to take the fol-
lowing Poultry Science courses:


PSE 3211C Incubation, Brooding and Rearing ........... 3
PSE 4223 Poultry Management. ......... .......... 3
PSE 4411C Poultry Nutrition...................... 3
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology................. 3
Electives (free and approved) .......... ........ 24

CURRICULUM II Management or Business,
This curriculum is designed for those students who plan a
career in any of various phases of the poultry or allied industries
with major emphasis on the management or business aspect.
Management Core Requirements 30 Credits
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture ........... 2
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory .......... 1
AGR 3303 Genetics ......... ................... 3
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ............. 4
ASG 3403 Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding ................................ 4
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chem istry ................................ 4
VES 3202C Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic
Animals ....................................4
Departmental Requirements 12 Credits
Students are required to take the following Poultry Science
courses:
PSE 3211 Incubation, Brooding and Rearing ........... 3
PSE 4223 Poultry Management ...................... 3
PSE 4411 Poultry Nutrition ........................ 3
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology ............... 3
Electives (free and approved) ..... .................. 24


SOIL SCIENCE
The Department of Soil Science-offers three curricula (Soil
Science, Soil Technology, and Soils and Land-Use), each of
which is designed to meet the specific needs of the individual.
Students should consult the chairman of the department or the
departmental adviser for approval of electives in their field of
specialization.

SOIL SCIENCE
This program of study emphasizes the fundamental sciences.
Students following this curriculum can qualify for graduate
study and research in Soil Fertility, Soil Chemistry, Soil Microbi-
ology, Soil Physics, or Soil Genesis and Classification by a care-
ful selection of elective courses.
Departmental Requirements 20 Credits
Credits
SOS 3022C General Soils. ................... ....... 4
SOS 4303 Soil Microbiology ........................ 3
SOS 4404C Soil Chemistry................... ....... 3
SOS'4602 Soil Physics .......................... 3
SOS 4715C Soil Genesis, Classification, and Survey ...... 4
Electives in Soil Science .......................... 3
Other Requirements and Electives 44 Credits
Credits
APB 2170 Microbiology .. .......................... 4
BOT 3503, 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology ........ 5
GLY 2015 Physical Geology ........................ 4
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 ... ...... 4
PHY 3053, 3055L Physics 1 .................. .......5
PHY 3054, 3056L Physics 2...... .............. 5
CHM 3120, 3120L Analytical Chemistry 1.............. 4
Free and Approved Electives ........................ 13

SOIL TECHNOLOGY
This program of study is designed primarily for the student
who desires employment in one of the many applied fields of
agriculture after obtaining the bachelor's degree. By a careful
selection of electives the student may prepare for a career ac-
cording to his or her specific interests.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Departmental Requirements 22 Credits
Credits
SOS 3022C General Soils. .................. ............ 4
SOS 4115 Fertilizers & Soil Fertility ................... 3
SOS 4303 Soil Microbiology ....................... 3
SOS 4404C Soil Chemistry ........................ 3
SOS 4602 Soil Physics ................. .......... 3
SOS 4715C Soil Genesis, Classification, and Survey ...... 4
SOS 4718 Soils of Florida .......... ........... 2
Other Requirements and Electivel-' 42 Credits
Credits
AGR 3005 Introduction to Agronomy.................. 3
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management............. 3
APB 2170 Microbiology ......... .................. 4
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ............... 3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............ 4
VEC 3221 Commercial Vegetable Production 1 .......... 4
Free and Approved Electives ........................ 18

SOILS AND LAND USE
This curriculum is recommended for students desiring a fun-
damental knowledge of soils requisite to their conservation and
the formulation of sound land-use decisions for a wide variety
of purposes to meet the needs of our rapidly expanding popula-
tion. These include agricultural, industrial, urban, and recrea-
tional developments.
Departmental Requirements 22 Credits
SOS 3022C General Soils ......... ................. 4
SOS 3215 Agricultural and Environmental Quality ........ 3
SOS 4231 Soils and Land Use. ....................... 3
SOS 4404 Soil Chemistry ........... .... ..... .. 3
SOS 4602 Soil Physics ............................. 3
SOS 4715C Soil Genesis, Classification, and Survey ...... 4
SOS 4718 Soils of Florida ........................... 2
SOS 4732 Soil Survey ............................... 3
Other Requirements and Electives 42 Credits
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture ........... 2
AGR 3005C Introduction to Agronomy ............... 3
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water.Management. ............ 3
GLY 2015 Physical Geology ........................ 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology .................... 3
REE 3043 Real Estate Analysis ....................... 4
URP 4000 Preview of Urban and
Regional Planning ........................... 2
Free and Approved Electives ....................... 21


STATISTICS
A major in Statistics is offered through the College of Agricul-
ture. Students should consult with the Undergraduate Coordi-
nator for curriculum. (See College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
requirements)


VEGETABLE CROPS
The major in Vegetable Crops is designed to give students a
foundation of basic plant science and the principles of produc-
tion and marketing of vegetables. The curriculum will prepare
them for, primary employment in any phase of the specialized
vegetable industry.
SStudents may select a curriculum within vegetable crops to
prepare them for long term career goals. The areas are produc-
tion technology, business, and science.
All students will complete the vegetable crop requirements as
listed. A curriculum may be completed by electing the appro-
priate number of hours from the suggested listing of courses
described for each. These hours are included in the 23 elective
hours.
Vegetable Crops Requirements
AGR 3303 Genetics ............................... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry ............. .. .................. 4


BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............... 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ..... 2
ENY 3005C Principles of Entomology ................. 3
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ............ 4
SOS 3022C General Soils ............... .......... 4
PLS 4601 Weed Science ................................ 3
VEC 3221 Commercial Production of Warm
Season Vegetables ............ ... ............. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Production of Cool
Season Vegetables .......... .............. 3
VEC 4410 Vegetable Crbps Nutrition. .................. 2
VEC 4432 Growth and Development of Vegetable
S C rops...... .... ............................. 3
VEC 4452 Principles of Postharvest Horticulture ......... 3
Approved Electives ...............................23

Production Technology Curriculum
This option is designed for those students interested in the
actual growing and management of vegetables in the broadest
sense. Students must select two courses from each section be-
low (Group 1, Group 2).
Group 1
AOM 3220 Agricultural Construction and Maintenance.... 3
AOM 4225 Management of Agricultural Power .......... 3
AOM 3312 Farm Machinery......................... 3
AOM 3503 Agricultural and Environmental Quality....... 3
AOM 3732 Agricultural Water Management.............. 3
NEM 3002 Principles of Nematology...:............... 3
ENY 4571C Apiculture ............................. 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management.. ........ 2
PMA 4401C Understanding and Implementing Pest
Management Strategies in Agricultural Systems......... 3
PMA 3323C Pesticide Application .................... 2
PLP 4102 Principles of Plant Disease Control ............ 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility ................. 3
SOS 4404C Soil Chemistry. ....................... 3
Group 2
ACG 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................. 3
ACG 2302 Elementary Managerial Accounting........... 2
FIN 3105 Investments for Individuals .................. 3
RMI 3015 Risk and Insurance ........................ 3
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture ................. 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management........ ............. 3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ................... .. 3
AEB 4152 Farm Business Analysis. .................... 3
AEB 4164 Management of Farms in Tropical Areas........ 3
FOS 2002 Food and Consumer Protection .............. 2
FOS 4551C Fruit, Vegetable and Citrus Processing........ 3
MAN 3021 Principles of Management ................. 3

Business Curriculum
The business curriculum offers students an opportunity to
. take selected courses in the area of business. Four courses must
be selected from the Group 2 list under the Production Technol-
ogy option.

Science Curriculum
The science curriculum is designed for those students who
intend to pursue advanced studies in vegetable production.
The courses are intended to strengthen and prepare students for
M.S. and Ph.D. programs. Four courses must be taken from the
following list to complete the requirements:
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding ................... ...... 3
BCH 4203 Introduction to Intermediary Metabolism ...... 3
BCH 4024 Introduction to Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology...... ........................ 3
BOT 3153C Local Flora ............................ 2
BOT 3173C Weed Identification ............. ...... 2
BOT 4283C Plant Microtechnique ................ 2
PCB 3043C Introduction to Ecology... ............ 3
CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry ....................... 3
CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry Laboratory ............. 1
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition........... 3
GLY 2015C Physical Geology ................... .... 4






Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


GLY 4155 Geology of Florida....... ................. 3
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ........... 4
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II........... 4
PLS 4701 Field Plot Techniques ...................... 2
SOS 4602C Soil Physics .... ..................... 3
SOS 4715C Soil Genesis, Classification, and Survey ...... 4


STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics I.................. 3
STA 3024 Introduction to Statistics II .................. 3
STA 4202 Applied Statistics I. ........................ 3
STA 4203 Applied Statistics II ......................... 3
SOS 4303C Soil Microbiology ....................... 3


1 ,










College of Architecture

GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Architecture, which was established as a
school in 1925, has grown to be one of the largest design and
construction institutions in the country.'A unique aspect of the
college is the scope of its professional disciplines which at the
undergraduate level include Architecture, Building Construc-
tion, Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture. Graduate
programs are available through the Department of Urban and
Regional Planning, the School of Building Construction, and
the Department of Architecture. The architecture graduate pro-
gram includes options in Architectural Design, Preservation,
Structures, and Environmental Technologies.
The College's teaching, research, and community service
philosophy stresses interdisciplinary work. A growing number
of required and elective courses are open, on a space available
basis, to all majors (e.g. ARC 1211, 1701, 3783, 4801; BCN
1210, 4012, 4227, 4471, 4901L, 4902L, 5528; IND 2100,
2130; LAA 1920,2710,2711,3713,4935; URP4000). In addi-
tion, the first 2 years of design coursework are common to all
three undergraduate design disciplines (architecture, land-
scape architecture, and interior design). The College's internal
research award competition requires multidisciplinary faculty
teamwork and, in turn, involves students from units throughout
the College. Other research and service projects conducted
through the research centers and institutes (described below)
often entail multidisciplinary, cross-campus student input and
effort.
The Architecture and Fine Arts Library and the Visual Re-
sources Center are the largest collections of their kind in the
Southeast. Together they provide books, government docu-
ments, American and foreign periodicals, subject files, micro-
text, slides, photographs, reproductions, and other materials
for undergraduate and graduate studies. The AFA Library also
maintains its own Rare Book Collection for scholarly research.
Services include a professional reference service ready to assist
in guidance and searches for information. Students may use
additional resources in the University Libraries system.
The Departments of Architecture and Landscape Architec-
ture and the School of Building Construction have each cele-
brated over fifty years of service to the citizens of Florida.

STUDENT AID
Students interested in part-time employment, assistantships,
fellowships, loans, prizes, and awards are referred to individual
departments and information provided by the University Office
of Student Financial Affairs.

RESEARCH CENTERS
The College contributes to community, state, regional, and
national efforts to conserve and improve the quality of the natu-
ral and built environments through research projects directed
by the Florida Architecture and Building Research Center (FAB-
RIC), the Research and Education Center for Architectural Pres-
ervation (RECAP), and the Center for Tropical and Subtropical
Architecture, Planning and Construction (TROPARC). The col-
lege has established research and training programs of national
prominence through the Preservation Institute: Nantucket and
the Preservation Institute: Caribbean. The latter program, di-
rected by RECAP and TROPARC, is part of the College of Archi-
tecture's drive to develop new links with institutions in the
Caribbean Basin and Latin America.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Student organizations take an active part in the educational
program of the College. Membership in the professional orga-
nizations of each discipline is available to the student chapters.
Student chapters of the American Institute of Architecture Stu-


dents and the American Society of Interior Designers, Institute
of Business Designers, the UF Chapter of the American Society
of Landscape Architects, the Student Planning Association, the
UF Chapterof the Student Constructors and Cost Engineers, the
Student Chapter of the Associated Builders and Contractors,
and the Student Contractors and Builders Association are all
represented. Honorary societies of Tau Sigma Delta, Sigma
Lambda Alpha, Sigma Lambda Chi, and the Gargoyle Society
are also represented in addition to the Society for Black Student
Architects. The College recognizes the importance of student
involvement and encourages and assists participation with pro-
fessional groups and societies.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Architecture en-
courage applications from qualified students of all cultural, ra-
cial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed herein are the specific
requirements for admission to this College. It should be under-
stood that only minimum requirements are given and that ad-
mission to the College is a selective process. Having satisfied
minimum requirements does not automatically guarantee ad-
mission. Limitations in faculty, staff, and facilities make it nec-
essary that the College establish a selective process for the
admission of students. Priority in admission'shall be given to
those applicants who, in the judgement of the admissions com-
mittee, have the.greatest apparent potential for successful com-
pletion of the program.
To be eligible for consideration for admission to the College,
the student must have reached junior status, earned a minimum
C average in all courses attempted regardless of the type of
coursework completed, and taken the College Level Academic
Skills Test (CLAST; see the Index). If preprofessional courses are
a part of the total credits, a minimum C average is required in
these courses also. Students admitted to the University at less
than junior status are in the College of Liberal Arts and Sci-
ences, Lower Division, not the College of Architecture, and ad-
mission in this manner does not in itself guarantee space in the
preprofessional architecture courses nor eventual admission to
the College. Students admitted as juniors to Colleges other than
the College of Architecture have no priority for preprofessional
or professional courses and may be considered for enrollment
on a space available basis, after priority College of Architecture
students have been served.
Admission of students having junior status falls into two cate-
gories: 1) those having completed all Lower Division require-
ments and prepared to study at the third year professional
coursework levels and 2) those needing to complete freshman/
sophomore preprofessional courses. Generally, transfer stu-
dents from universities or community colleges which do not
offer approved preprofessional programs find themselves in the
latter category. These students may require up to four semesters
at the University of Florida to complete this work due to the
sequential nature of the courses.
An admissions review process is employed for all applicants
at this point. Criteria used in review may include any or all of
the following:
Quality of work completed
Achievement in preprofessional courses or courses related to
disciplines of study
Pattern of courses completed
Personal interview
Portfolio review
Work experience
Recommendations by teachers and/or employers
1. Curriculum in Architecture: Through an Admissions Com-
mittee the Department of Architecture annually selects stu-
dents to enter third year professional studies. All students
who satisfactorily complete the two-year preprofessional pro-
granrs at Miami-Dade, Broward, and St. Petersburg (Clearwa-
ter) Community Colleges are eligible for consideration for
third year admission. Applications for transfer from one of the
approved preprofessional programs or from the Lower Divi-
sion of the UF College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must be





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


filed by the deadline listed in the University Calendar (see
Table of Contents). Transfer students with provisional admis-
sion status (3AR, 4AR, 5AR, or 6AR) must notify the Depart-
ment office of their wish to be considered for third year
admission by the same date.
2. Curriculum in Interior Design: Transfer students mustcon-
suit with the program adviser. Students needing to complete
Lower Division preprofessional requirements are urged to ap-
ply for the Summer term for the sequence of architectural
design, building arts, and architectural history. The remain-
ing preprofessional courses may be completed during the
next academic year. Students accepted for the sequence shall
be admitted as provisional and shall be reviewed during the
Spring of the next year for approval to enter the professional
courses in the junior year. Students are selectively admitted to
the Upper Division program on the basis of portfolio review,
overall grade point average, interview, and letter of applica-
tion. Notification of the decision of the admissions commit-
tee shall be made prior to the close of the Spring Semester for
the junior class which begins the following Fall. Contact the
department for current information.
3. Curriculum in Landscape Architecture: Transfer students
contemplating the professional degree program must contact
the Department Adviser to determine admission timing and
eligibility. Students in the predesign programs at Miami-
Dade, Broward, and St. Petersburg (Clearwater) Community
Colleges must contact the Department Adviser regarding pre-
professional courses not available at those colleges. Transfer
students from community colleges not offering an equivalent
predesign program are urged'to begin their preprofessional
course work in the Summer term in order to complete re-
quired classes in three semesters. Calculus, botany, and phys-
ical science requirements, in addition to general education
requirements, can normally be fulfilled at the community
college. Students with Associate of Science degrees must
complete all required general education and preprofessional
coursework prior to admission to professional studies.
4. Curriculum in Building Construction: See the School of
Building Construction section of this catalog.

APPLICATION DEADLINES
The programs in Architecture, Interior Design, and Land-
scape Architecture will admit students for third year profes-
sional coursework in the Fall semester only. Students needing to
Complete some or all of the Lower Division requirements shall
be reviewed for the Fall, Spring or Summer semesters. Applica-
tions for Fall, including all required credentials, must be re-
ceived by the Registrar's Office (for transfer students) or the
Dean's Office for UF students, as follows: Architecture Feb-
ruary 1; Interior Design and Landscape Architecture- May 11.
The application deadline for these Departments for Spring and
Summer is as stated in the University Calendar (see Table of
Contents). Applicants unable to meet these deadlines may ap-
ply on a space available basis.
The School of Building Construction will admit students for
third year professional coursework in the Fall and Spring semes-
ters only. Deadlines for completion of all application proce-
dures including School requirements and receipt of official
credentials is March 2 for Fall and October 1 for Spring admis-
sion. Applicants unable to meet these deadlines may apply on a
space available basis.
Building Construction applicants needing to complete some
or all of the Lower Division requirements may be admitted to
the College of Architecture on.a provisional basis not to exceed
two semesters. Those in this category must meet the require-
ments of the Dean's Office and have the recommendation of
the Director of the School. Students in this category are not
considered admitted to the School of Building Construction
and are not eligible to enroll in Upper Division BCN courses.
Deadlines for students in this category are as stated in the Uni-
versity Calendar (see Table of Contents) under "All Other Pro-
grams."


ADVISEMENT
Students planning to major in any program of study in the
College of Architecture should see the Director of Student Ser-
vices or the proper departmental chairman, program director or
adviser as soon as possible.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOADS
Fifteen to eighteen semesters hours in any regular semester
shall be considered a normal load. A student may be permitted
to register for more than eighteen hours when, in the opinion of
the adviser, the quality of the student's record justifies this.
Twelve credit hours is the minimum to be considered a full-time
student; students who wish to take less than this should be
aware that certain University privileges and benefits require
full-time status. It is the student's responsibility to verify the
minimum academic load necessary for these benefits.
Students who wish to ask for adjustments in their academic
load may petition the Dean through the Director of Student
Services and the appropriate Departmental Chairman.

NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
Students must maintain a minimum grade point average of
2.0 (C average). However, achieving this minimum does not
guarantee enrollment in the professional and preprofessional
courses. Additionally, these courses must be taken in a se-
quence as specified by the college or department advisor. This
sequence, along with all course requirements, is outlined in
this section of the catalog.
While the preprofessional and professional course sequence
must be maintained, variation from the listed positioning of
general education and elective coursework may occur. The
four-year plan shown requires an average of.more than sixteen
credits per term, which may not be appropriate for all students.
Students are urged to plan their curricula well in advance, so
that course sequence and credit-hour loads will accommodate
the most effective academic progress, regardless of the number
of terms required.

DEAN'S HONOR LIST
Undergraduate students who demonstrate excellence in their
academic work by completing a minimum of 15 semester hours
credit in a semester and achieving a grade point average of 3.5
or better will earn a position on the Dean's Honor List. Students
whose term averages are below 3.5 due to grades of I or X are
not eligible.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To be eligible for graduation, the student must earn a mini-
mum grade point average of 2.0 (C) for all work attempted in the
appropriate curriculum while classified in the College. Courses
taken while enrolled in another Upper Division College may
not apply toward the calculation of the College or Architecture
average. Specific grade requirements for the various curricula
may be obtained from the department or Dean's Offices.
Students planning to enter the Graduate School must main-
tain a 3.0 (B) average in Upper Division work.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS AND HIGH HONORS
The faculty will consider recommending students for gradua-
tion with HONORS or HIGH HONORS on the following crite-
ria: (a) grade point/average, (b) distribution and quality of
subject matter studied, (c) evaluation of the students by the fac-
ulty, and (d) other pertinent qualities of the subject and his or
her work.
The studentwill be considered for HONORS or HIGH HON-
ORS upon earning a minimum academic average established
by the department or program. The average will be calculated
on all work attempted while the student is classified in the Up-
per Division. Transfer credits will be excluded from the aver-
age; HONORS or HIGH HONORS may be awarded upon a







COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


minimum of 48 semester hour credits taken at the University of
Florida. Students should check with their department or pro-
gram director for minimum average required.

STUDENT WORK
The College reserves the right to retain student work for the
purpose of record, exhibition, or instruction.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
Students are urged to obtain before graduation some experi-
ence in the employ of practicing professionals in their particu-
lar field or in some allied work which will give an insight into
the problems of professional practice. Such employment pro-
vides an introduction to the methods of actual practice and en-
ables the student to derive increased benefit from advanced
work in school. Students should seek the counsel of their fac-
ulty adviser as to the type of practical experience best suited to
their individual needs.

FIELD TRIPS
Each year a number of field trips are arranged to give students
an opportunity to broaden and extend their educational experi-
ence through study of planning, design, and construction pro-
jects of unusual interest. Students frequently combine such
studies with attendance at state and national meetings of the
professional organizations in their respective fields. Students
should check with their departments for field trip requirements.

GRADUATE DEGREES
The College offers the degrees of Master of Architecture,
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning, Master of Sci-
ence in Building Construction, and Master of Building Con-
struction. The School of Building Construction has a Ph.D.
program in conjunction with the College of Education. To meet
the needs and goals of each student, graduate programs are pre-
pared in consultation with a designated member of the Gradu-
ate Faculty of the College of Architecture. For further
information, see the Graduate School Catalog.


I. CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE
Leading to the degree Bachelor of Design (Architecture).
McRae, J. M., Chairman; Shaw, L. G., Undergraduate Program
Director.
The professional program in architecture, which is accredited
by the National Architectural Accrediting Board, consists of
both the undergraduate and graduate curricula. The undergrad-
uate curriculum leads to the degree Bachelor of Design (Archi-
tecture). Although this is not a professional degree, it is
excellent preparation for careers in the architectural field
where registration is not a requirement.
Completion of the two-year graduate curriculum leads to the
professional degree Master of Architecture, which meets the
educational requirements of Florida statutes for architectural
registration.
In the graduate program, optional courses of study are in Ar-
chitectural Design, Architectural Structures, Environmental
Technologies, and Architectural Preservation. These options
permit the student to study in an area of particular interest;,
however, all options lead to the same professional degree and
each prepares the graduate for a career in professional practice.
For detailed information see the Graduate School Catalog.
The Department of Architecture has a number of summer
programs that may be pursued for academic credit:
The program, which is conducted in Vicenza, Italy, includes
three basic courses: Architectural Design, Architectural His-
tory, and a third course which includes Italian language, culture
and folklore. Many study tours are included, and participation
by noted professionals and visiting critics augments the pro-
gram. Al I Architecture students of good academic standing who
have complete third-year requirements are eligible. Applica-
tion deadline is the end of November, and applications may be
obtained from the Department office.


Preservation Institute: Nantucket (PI:N) offers courses in his-
toric preservation to advanced undergraduate and graduate stu-
dents, directing multidisciplinary projects in historical
research, documentation, building analysis and maintenance,
and planning. This Institute was established in 1972 in this con-
temporary community which is noted for its heritage of history,
architecture, and urban design. Students are selected from
schools all over the United States.
Preservation Institute: Caribbean (PI:C) focuses on the his-
tory, built environment, cultural values and traditions of the
Caribbean. The total program is divided into three eight-week
summer sessions, dealing with various aspects of architectural
historic preservation. Participants are young professionals or
advanced students from various academic disciplines from all
nations in the Greater Caribbean region. The Institute location
varies from year to year.
The program of study is included below to show a typical
sequence in which courses are taken. Some courses in the first
two years are offered in semesters in addition to those shown.
Consult the course description section in the back of the cata-
log for precise information on offerings.
FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 1312 Architectural Design 1 ..................... 4
ARC 1211 The Building Arts. ........................ 2
Physical Sciences .. .............. .. .......... 3
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 ...................... 3
*Humanities .......... .................... 3
*Social/Behavioral Science.......................... 3
18
Semester 2
ARC 1314 Architectural Design 2 .................. .. 4
**ARC 1701 Survey of Arch. History 1 ................... 3
*Social/Behavioral Science. ... ...................... 3
*English ......... ...... ................... 3
PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 ..................... 3
16
**Satisfies 3 hours of General Education requirement for Human-
ities.
SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 3. .................... 4
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods of Construction 1 ........ 3
ARC 2201 Theory of Architecture....................... 2
*English ........................................ 3
Biological Science. ........................... 3
15
Semester 2
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 4 .................. .. 3
ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1 .................. 4
ARC 2681 Environmental Technology 1 ................ 2
COC 3111 Introduction to Computers .... ............ 3
*Humanities .................................... 3
16
*Students are advised to check with the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences as to the specific courses satisfying the require-
ments of State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.30
THIRD YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 3381 Architectural Design 5 ............. ....... 5
ARC 3682 Environmental Technology 2 ................ 4
ARC 3783 Survey of Architectural History 2............. 3
*Social/Behavioral Science..........................3
Elective ................. .......................... 3
18
Semester 2
ARC 3382 Architectural Design 6.................... 5
ARC 3551 Architectural Structures 2 .................. 4
ARC 3463 Materials & Methods.of Construction 2........ 3
Electives ....... .. ...... ......................... 4
16





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


FOURTH YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 4384 Architectural Design 7.................... 6
ARC 4561 Architectural Structures 3 .................. 4
ARC 4464 Materials & Methods of Construction 3........ 3
ARC 4274 Professional Administration........... ..... 3
16
Semester 2
ARC 4385 Architectural Design 8.................... 6
ARC 4784 Survey of Architectural History 3 ............ 3
ARC 4683 Environmental Technology 3 ................ 4
***Electives . ......................... 5
15
***Students transferring into the program at the third year from an
architecture program at a Florida Community College will need
6 credits of electives.
A week-long field trip is required of all Junior and Senior level
students; students should plan to have adequate funds avail-
able. It may be necessary to assess studio fees to defray increas-
ing costs of base maps and other generally used materials.


II. CURRICULUM IN INTERIOR
DESIGN
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design.
Nielson, J. L., Chairman.
The four-year program in Interior Design is accredited by the
Foundation for Interior Design Education Research. The course
of study has been developed for those students who plan a ca-
reer in the profession of Interior Design. The curriculum is
structured to provide a knowledge of the principles of the hu-
manities, social and physical sciences, and the manner in
which they are integrated and applied in the design process to
creatively resolve problems of the interior environment. The
interior design faculty seeks to equip the student with a knowl-
edge of design techniques, materials, resources, and an aware-
ness of the interrelated professional responsibility of
environmental problems. Interior Design career opportunities
are numerous due to the demand for professional design ser-
vices by businesses, corporations, community organizations,
and governmental agencies. Graduates of this program usually
assume positions in interior design offices, architectural firms,
or generate their own practices. All entering students must con-
sult with the adviser.
FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 1312 Architectural Design 1 .................. .. 4
ARC 1211 The Building Arts ........................ 2
Physical Science .............. ........ ........ 3
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 or
MAC 1142 Precalculus Algebra & Trig............ 3 or 4
*English . .............................. 3
15 or 16
Semester 2
ARC 1314 Architectural Design 2. .................. 4
**ARC 1701 Survey of Architectural History ............... 3
PHY 2004 Applied Physics ......................... 3
*English ........................................ 3
*Social Science. ................ ................. 3
16
**Satisfies 3 hours of General Education requirements for Hu-
manities.
SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 3. ................... 4
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods of Construction 1 ........ 3
ARC 2201 Theory of Architecture ..................... 2
IND 2100 History-of Interiors 1 ........ ............ 3
*Humanities .................................... 3
(Theatre Appreciation Recommended)
Biological Science................................. 3
/ 18


Semester 2
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 4 ..................... 4
ARC 2681 Environmental Technology 1 ................ 2
IND 2130 History of Interiors 2 ................... ... 3
*Humanities ................. ................ 3
COC 3111 Introduction to Computers ................. 3
15
*Students are advised to check Lower Division Requirements
section (see Table of Contents) as to the specific courses satisfy-
ing the requirements of State Board of Education
(Communication/Computation) Rule 6A-10.30. See College of
Architecture section for Upper Division selective admission in-
formation.
THIRD YEAR Credits
Semester 1
IND 3313 Interior Graphics .................. ....... 3
IND 3215 Architectural Interiors 1 ................. 5
IND 3422 Materials & Estimating .................. .. 3
Behavioral Science ..................... ...... .... 3
Social Science .......... ........................... 3
17
Semester 2
IND 3431 Interior Lighting......................... 3
IND 3216 Architectural Interiors 2 .................. 5
IND 3424 Technologies of Interior Materials ............ 3
Electives ................. .................... 6
17
FOURTH YEAR Credits
Semester 1
IND 4500 Professional Practice ...................... 3
IND 4450 Interior Detailing & Design ................. 4
IND 4225 Advanced Architectural Interiors 1............ 6
Electives ........................ ...............3
16
Semester 2
IND 4226 Advanced Architectural Interiors 2............ 8
IND 4421 Furniture Design ....................... 3
Electives .................................. ..... 6
17
A week-long field trip is required of all senior-level students,
and students should plan to have adequate funds available. It
may be.necessary to assess studio fees to defray increasing costs
of field trip materials.


III. CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
H. H. Smith, Chairman.
This curriculum leads to the first professional degree, Bache-
lor of Landscape Architecture. The program is accredited by the
Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board and is an essen-
tial first step toward legal identity in Florida and other states
Which regulate the practice of landscape architects. Students
become familiar with the art of design, planning or manage-
ment, and the arrangement of natural and man-made elements
on the land through application of cultural and scientific
knowledge. There is concern for resource conservation and
stewardship and belief that the built environment serves useful
and enjoyable purposes. Graduates are employed by profes-
sional offices, municipal, state or federal recreation, landscape
architectural or planning agencies, and the construction of hor-
ticultural industries. Graduates may also continue in graduate
programs at institutions throughout the country.
Since Landscape Architecture is a selective program, please
see Requirements for Admission, College of Architecture. All
entering students must consult with the Department Adviser for
course scheduling and sequencing.
FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
***English 1101 Exp. and
Argumentative Writing ............................ 3
GLY 2015 Phys. Geology ........................... 4







COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


*BOT 2010C Introductory Botany ................. ... 3
ARC 1211 The Building Arts. ............... ...... 2
ARC 1312 Architectural Design 1 .................... 4
15
Semester 2
***English 1102 Writing About Literature ............... 3
*BOT 2710 Prac. Plant Taxonomy or
BOT 2800 Plants in Human Affairs .................. 3
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus 1 ...................... 3
**ARC 1701 Survey of Arch. History 1.................... 3
ARC 1314 Architectural Design 2................... 4
LAA 1920 Land. Arch. Colloquium.................... 2
18
*Students with general biology background should take BOT
2710.
Satisfies 3 hours of General Education requirement for Human-
ities.
SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
***Humanities ...................................... 3
COC 3111 Introduction to Computers ................. 3
LAA 2710 Landscape Architecture 1 .................. 4
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 3 .................... 4
ORH 3513 Orn. Pit. Ident. 1 ................... ..... 3
17
Semester 2
***Humanities ................ ............... .... 3
***SOC 2000 Intro. to Soc., or PSY 2013 ................. 3
LAA 2711 Landscape Architecture 2; .................. 4
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 4..................... 4
BOT 3153 or Equiv. ........................... 3
17
***Students are advised to check the Lower Division Require-
ments section (see Table of Contents) as to the specific courses
satisfying the requirements of State Board of Education
(Communication/Computation) Rule 6A-10.30.
The first two years of coursework must be completed prior to
admission to professional studies. Minimum hours 68.
THIRD YEAR: PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Credits
Semester 1
LAA 3330 Site Analysis. ........................... 5
LAA 3350 Landscape Architecture Studio 1 ............. 5
LAA 3420 Landscape Architecture Construction 1 ........ 5
Social/Behavioral Science (Group I) ................... 3
18


Semester 2
LAA 3351 Landscape Architecture Studio 2.......... 5
LAA 3421 Landscape Architecture Construction 2 ........ 5
LAA 3510 Planting Design ........................ 5
LAA 3530 Land. Management or Management Elective .... 3
18
FOURTH YEAR: PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Credits
Semester 1
LAA 4355 Landscape Architecture Studio 3 ............ 8
LAA 4410 Design Implementation .................... 3
LAA 4930 Seminar ................ ............. 2
Social/Behavioral Science (Group II). .................. 3
16
Semester 2
LAA 4356 Landscape Architecture Studio 4 ............. 8
LAA 4210 Professional Administration ................. 3
Elective .................................... 3
Elective .................... .................... 3
17
69 hours (minimum) of professional coursework is required for
the degree, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture.
A week-long field trip is required of all Junior level students;
students should plan to have adequate funds available. It may
be necessary to assess studio fees to defray increasing costs of
base maps and other generally used materials. Students may
elect certain minor certificate programs to fulfill elective re-
quirements. Landscape Architectural Internship is also avail-
able for elective credit. A studies abroad program is offered.


IV. CURRICULUM IN BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
(See the School of Building Construction)


V. CURRICULUM IN URBAN AND
REGIONAL PLANNING
The Department of Urban and Regional Planning does not
yet offer a complete undergraduate program. However, two un-
dergraduate courses are available and described under Urban
and Regional Planning in the section entitled Descriptions.










School of Building

Construction

GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Building Construction was established in 1976
but a curriculum in Building Construction in the College of Ar-'
chitecture has been offered continuously since 1935. While a
few programs were begun before that, none of them are still in
operation today.
The UF program in 1977 was recognized by the Associated
General Contractors Education and Research Foundation as
outstanding in the United States. In 1981, the School was the
first to receive its five-year reaccreditation from the American
Council for Construction Education.
Graduates of the UF School of Building Construction begin
work immediately as project managers, field engineers, project
schedulers, cost engineers, assistant superintendents, quality
controllers and estimators.
The School has a normal Upper Division enrollment of 260,
plus 40 graduate students. Also, a Ph.D. program is offered in
conjunction with the College of Education.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained from
the Office of Student Financial Affairs, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida. Information concerning scholarships
available specifically for third and fourth year Building Con-
struction students can be obtained from the School.

HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS

COLLEGE COUNCIL
The School of Building Construction's College Council is a
cooperative organization based on mutual confidence among
students, the faculty and the Director. Considerable authority
has been granted to the Council members, all of whom are
elected to represent their peers in dispersing Student Govern-
ment funds to the School's organizations as well as bringing
student concerns and recommendations to the School's Direc-
tor.

SIGMA LAMBDA CHI
The purpose of Sigma Lambda Chi is to recognize outstand-
ing students in Building Construction for scholastic achieve-
ment and extracurricular activities. Semester membership
averages 30 active members. Sigma Lambda Chi provides ser-
vices to BCN students through plans for construction course-
work, guest lecturers, a job reference file and tutoring. Sigma
Lambda Chi provides a channel of communication between
students and outstanding alumni in the construction industry.

STUDENT CONSTRUCTORS AND
COST ENGINEERS
This is a joint Student Chapter of two major professional orga-
nizations in the construction industry the American Institute
of Constructors and the American Association of Cost Engi-
neers. The chapter serves as a bridge between students and pro-
fessionals in the construction industry.
Membership is open to all undergraduate and.graduate
Building Construction majors.


STUDENT CONTRACTORS AND
BUILDERS ASSOCIATION
The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) ac-
tively supports the Student Contractors and Builders Associa-
tion whose purposes are to better the student's awareness of the
construction industry and to promote the School of Building
Construction to both the industry and the community. Any
Building Construction student can and is encouraged to be-
come a member.
The activities of this organization include inviting guest
speakers, organizing the Homecoming festivities, operating
the Building Construction test bank, carrying out community
service projects, and having semester social gatherings.

STUDENT CHAPTER, ASSOCIATED
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
The purpose of the Student Chapter of the Associated Build-
ers and Contractors is to increase student knowledge of the con-
struction industry, promote fellowship and professionalism,
and to provide service to the School of Building Construction,
the University of Florida and the community. Membership is
open to all construction related majors.
The activities include A.B.C. Job Fair, guest speakers, social
gatherings, attendance at state and national conventions, as
well as monthly chapter meetings with our parent chapter,
A.B.C. Gulf Coast. A.B.C. promotes Merit Shop.

PROGRAM OF STUDY
This four-year program for a Bachelor of Building Construc-
tion degree is for students who are interested in preparing for
professional careers in construction, management, techniques,
operations, and related areas in the construction industry, to
include the arts of communications'and interpersonal rela-
tions, rather than in architectural and engineering design.
Graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Sci-
ence in Building Construction and Master of Building Con-
struction are offered, as well as a Ph.D. program in conjunction
with the College of Education.
The Freshman and Sophomore programs of study are de-
signed to provide easy transfer for junior and community col-
lege graduates. With proper course planning, transfer students
with'A.A. degrees may complete the four-year degree program
in four remaining semesters at the University. Prospective jun-
ior and community college transfer students should consult
their advisers or write to the School of Building Construction
for a pre-Building Construction program of local study.
Opportunities for advancement and increasing responsibili-
ties exist in all areas of the construction industry, a few of which
include land development; home building; public building; in-
dustrialized building systems; commercial, industrial, marine,
and heavy construction; underwater and space age facilities;
materials and equipment sales and installations; and construc-
tion product research, development, sales, and applications.

APPLICATION DEADLINES
A. GENERAL
1. The School will admit students for third year professional
coursework only in the Fall and Spring semesters. All applica-
tion procedures, receipt of official transcripts, and School re-
quirements for admission should be completed by the
deadlines stated below. Applicants unable to meet.these
deadlines may apply on a space available basis.
B. FALL SEMESTER March 2, 1987
C. SPRING SEMESTER October 1, 1987







SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the School of Building Con-
struction encourage applications from qualified students of
both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups.
Listed below are the specific requirements for admission to this
'school. It should be understood, however, that minimum re-
quirements are given and that admission to the school is a selec-
tive process.
ALL STUDENTS:
A. LETTER OF INTENT: The applicant must send a letter of
intent to the Director of the School of Building Construction
indicating the student's career objectives in construction. The
letter must contain a resume of all construction experience to
include name, address, and phone number of employers and
be received with the application by the deadline date listed in
the University Calendar.
B. LIMITED ADMISSIONS: The satisfaction of minimum re-
quirements does not automatically guarantee admission.
Limitations in staff, faculty, and facilities permit the School to
admit only a limited number of new students each Fall and
Spring term. Selection will be based on best academic re-
cord.
C. Students must attain at least a 2.0 (C) average in preprofes-
sional coursework and have an overall 2.0 average for all
Lower Division work.
D. Students will not be accepted if there is a grade point defi-
cit for courses taken at the University of Florida.
E. Students must have taken the College Level Academic
Skills Test.
F. Extra credits above the 64 semester hours required for ad-
mission to the school will not reduce the number of credit
hours to be completed in the Upper Division to earn a degree
and may not be accepted for equivalent credit in Upper Divi-
sion.
G. WAIVER OF LIABILITY: Several courses require attend-
ance at field trips to receive full benefit from the curriculum.
To allow full participation in such worthwhile activities, all
students must sign a "Waiver of Liability and Hold Harmless
Agreement" as a prerequisite to acceptance into the School of
Building Construction. In addition, student organizations are
represented at conferences, seminars, and projects outside of
campus. A separate and similar waiver form will be used for
students desiring to participate in these voluntary activities.
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES STUDENTS:
Students must have completed all preprofessional and general
education courses (or equivalents) as outlined in this section.
TRANSFER STUDENTS: To be eligible for admission to the
School of Building Construction, a transfer student must satisfy
the following minimum requirements:
A. Students attending four-year colleges should follow a pro-
gram of general education and preprofessional courses
equivalent to the basic curriculum for students desiring to
enter the School of Building Construction, which is outlined
further in this section.
B. Junior College and Community College students should:
1. Complete the university transfer program at the junior
college.
2. Complete the general education requirements estab-
lished for the junior college.
3. Complete all of the prerequisite general education and
preprofessional courses, or acceptable substitutes, which
are listed further in this section.
C. Students lacking some of the prerequisite courses may ap-
ply for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
or the College of Architecture.
PROVISIONAL ADMISSION: In rare instances and within
space limitations, students who do not meet precisely the ad-
mission requirements indicated may be granted provisional ad-
mission to the School of Building Construction. The Director of
the School of Building Construction will specify the courses to
be completed and minimum grade points to be earned by the
student during the term of the provisional admission. Provi-
sional status will be removed and the student may compete for
a space in Upper Division coursework along with other eligible
candidates provided the student fulfills the conditions set forth


in the provisional admission. The student will be excluded from
further enrollment in the School of Building Construction if the
student fails to satisfy the conditions of the provisional admis-
sion.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper courses and for ful-
filling all requirements for the degree. The student is also re-
sponsible for completing all courses for which the student
registered.
Courses may be dropped with adviser approval until the end
of the first week of the semester without petitioning. After the
first week, courses may be dropped or changed without penalty
only through the administrative office of the School (by peti-
tion) and the Registrar.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Office
of the Registrar early in the semester in which they expect to
receive the degree. The official calendar shows the latest date
on which this can be done.
NORMAL LOADS: The average course load in the School of
Building Construction is 16 credit hours. A student may be per-
mitted to register for additional hours if in the opinion of the
academic adviser, the student's academic record justifies this.
Students who wish to take less than 12 hours should be aware
that certain university privileges and benefits require a mini-
mum registration. It is the student's responsibility to verify the
minimum registration necessary for these students.
EXTENSION WORK: Students may take a maximum of 6
credits by extension work or correspondence courses among
the 64 semester credits of Upper Division work required for the
baccalaureate degree.
STUDENT WORK: The School reserves the right to retain all
student work for the purpose of record, exhibition or instruc-
tion.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress may be excluded from fur-
ther registration.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To receive the degree
Bachelor of Building Construction a student must satisfactorily
complete all of the following:
A. 64 semester hours of Lower Division requirements.
B. The approved program in Building Construction.
C. Elective requirements.
D. Attain at least a 2.0 overall average.
E. Attain at least a 2.0 average on all courses which count.
toward his or her Upper Division degree requirements.
F. Subsequent to being admitted to Upper Division, on all
courses which count toward Upper Division degree require-
ments, attain at least a 2.0 grade point average.
A minimum of 128 semester hours is required for graduation.
The waiving of any required course does not reduce the hours
required for graduation.
GRADUATE SCHOOL: Students planning to enter the Gradu-
ate School should maintain a 3.0 (B) average in Upper Division
work.
NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The student will have maintained normal academic progress
when the student earns a minimum grade point of 2.0 (C) aver-
age for all work attempted in the Upper Division. In addition,
the student is required to take courses in sequence as specified
by the School Director or adviser. The student may be excluded
from a program of study in the School of Building Construction
if the student fails or refuses to maintain normal academic pro-
gress.
DIRECTOR'S LIST AND GRADUATION WITH HONORS OR
HIGH HONORS
A student who carried a minimum of 15 hours per semester
with a grade point average of at least 3.5 will be placed on the
Director's List for that semester.
To graduate WITH HONORS, a student must make at least a
3.3 average on all coursework accepted as Upper Division





Colleges

SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


credit and all coursework (except as noted below) attempted
while registered in the Upper Division. To graduate WITH
HIGH HONORS, a student must make at least a 3.6 average on
all work accepted as Upper Division credit and all coursework
(except as noted below) attempted while registered in the Up-
per Division. In calculating requirements for graduating WITH
HONORS or WITH HIGH HONORS, the following policies are
followed: the student must have completed at the University of
Florida at least 48 semester hours of Upper Division credit to-
ward a degree in Building Construction, transfer credits and S-
U grade credits being excluded; and credits for Lower Division
courses taken while registered in Upper Division will also be
excluded.


GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses are offered in the School of Building Construction
leading to the degree Master of Building Construction or Master
of Science in Building Construction. Also, a Ph.D. degree is
offered in conjunction with the College of Education. For re-
quirements for these degrees and for admission to Graduate
School, consult the Graduate School catalog.


CURRICULUM
LOWER DIVISION PROGRAM


Courses
English
Math and Computer
Sciences
Physical Sciences
Biological Science
Social and
Behavioral Sciences
*Humanities
Electives
Other Professional
Requirements
Totals


General
Education Preprofessional Total
6 3 9


0 19 19
21 43 64


*Select one Humanities course which satisfies at least 3 credits
of the 12-credit English requirement.
**Specific courses may be used to satisfy General Education re-
quirements.

LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
General Education Requirements
Credits
*English ENC 1101 Expos. & Arg. Writing: ENC 1102
W writing About Literature ......................... 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences (b) ................ ... 6
Humanities .................................... 9
NOTE: For other specific courses to complete these require-
ments, consult "Authorized Courses in General Education" in
the Lower Division section of this catalog (see Index).
Preprofessional Requirements
*BCN 1210 Construction Materials .................. 3
***GLY 2026 Geology for Engineers ..................... 3
BCN 1252 Construction Drawing I.................... 3
ECO 2013 Basic Economics I (b) ..................... 3
Business Law................................... 3
Principles of Accounting ............... ........... 3
*ENC 3213 Technical Writing & Business Comm (a) ..... 3
Biological Science I APB 2150 (a). .................. 3
**MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I (a) ................... 3
*PHY 2004 Applied Physics I and PHY 2004L (a) ........ 4
*PHY 2005 Applied Physics II and PHY 2005L (a)......... 4
*BCN 2405 Construction Mechanics ................... 4
****COC 3111 Introduction to CIS for nonmajors (a) ........ 3
Elective ..................................... .1
*Minimum C grades are required in ENC 1101, ENC 1102, BCN
1210, ENC 3213, BCN 2405 and in either PHY 2004 or PHY.
2005, but not both.
72


*Students who do not have background for calculus should take
MAC 1142 before MAC 3233. Credits may be used for the elec-
tive.
***GLY 2015 may be substituted for GLY 2026.
****COC 3111 may be used to satisfy the mathematical science
requirement.
NOTES: (a) Specific courses that may be used to satisfy Gen-
eral Education requirements.
(b) ECO 2013 satisfies 3 credits of the 9 credits re-
quired for Social/Behavioral Sciences.
(c) PHY 3053 (4 credits) may be substituted for PHY
2004 (3 credits). PHY 3054 (4 credits) may be substi-
tuted for PHY 2005 (3 credits).

Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
ENC 1101 Expository and Argumentative Writing ........ 3
MAC 3233 Survey of Calculus I ..................... 3
APB 2150 Biological Sciences I ......... .......... 3
BCN 1210 Construction Materials .................... 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences .......................... 3
15
Semester 2
ENC 1102 Writing About Literature .................. 3
PHY 2004 Physics I...... ......................... 3
PHY 2004L Physics Laboratory ...................... 1
BCN 1252 Construction Drawing I..... ............... 3
Humanities ..................................... 3
Social/Behavioral Sciences .................. ....... 3
16
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Semester 1 .Credits
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business Comm ........ 3
PHY 2005 Physics II ................. ..........3
PHY 2005L Physics Laboratory. .................. .... 1
ECO 2013 Basic Economics I ........... ..... .. .... 3
Principles of Accounting .......................... 3
Humanities ..................................... 3
16
Semester 2
GLY 2026 Geology for Engineers .................... 3
BCN 2405 Construction Mechanics ................... 4
*Business Law .................................. 3
**COC 3111 Introduction to CIS for nonmajors ........... 3
Humanities .............. ........................ 3
Elective ................ ...................... 1
17
Lower Division Subtotal 64
*If taken at UF, BUL 4200 is required.
**Special sections for BCN majors.

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
JUNIOR YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
BCN 3233 Construction Techniques I. ................. 5
BCN 3256 Construction Drawing II ................... 2
BCN 3281 Construction Methods Lab (Surveying) ........ 2
BCN 3431 Structures I (Steel and Timber)............... 4
BCN 3500 Environmental Technology I ................ 3
16
Semester 2
BCN 3224 Construction Techniques II ................. 5
BCN 3461 Structures II (Formwork and Concrete) ........ 4
BCN 3611 Construction Estimating I ........ :......... 4
BCN 4521 Environmental Technology II.............. 3
16
SENIOR YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
BCN 4510 Environmental Technology III ............... 3
BCN 4612 Construction Estimating II................ 4
BCN 4700 Construction Management I ................ 4







SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


BCN 4720 Construction Planning & Control ............ 3
BCN 4901 L Construction Seminar I ................. 1
15
Semester 2
BCN 4012 History of Construction .................... 3
BCN 4709 Construction Management III ............... 3
BCN 4750 Construction Management II................ 4


BCN 4751 Construction Entrepreneurship .............. 3
BCN 4902L Construction Seminar II................... 1
Elective (BCN or Approved) ......................... 3
17
Upper Division Subtotal 64
TOTAL 128










College of Business

Administration

The College of Business Administration of the University of
Florida was organized in 1926-1927 and includes programs of
study in accounting, economics, finance, insurance, real estate
and urban analysis, management and administrative sciences,
marketing, and computer and information sciences.
The College's educational objectives are (a) to provide a
broad formal instructional foundation for responsible partici-
pation in business, the professions, and government; (b) to stim-
ulate interest in social, economic, and civic responsibilities; (c)
to develop competence in making business decisions and in
evaluating policy; and (d) to offer fields of specialization in
business or economics and, especially, to encourage intellec-
tual inquiry.
The guiding principle of this College is a broad foundation of
study outside the college, which prepares the student for spe-
cialization through limited concentration in certain fields of
business administration and economics. To this end, each pro-
gram of study is constructed around a core of courses in eco-
nomics and the major functional areas of business.
Graduate programs in business administration and econom-
ics are provided under the Graduate School of Business Admin-
istration for advanced students with interest in careers in
teaching, research, or business. The College participates in pro-
grams of adult and executive development education.
In addition to the University computer center, the College
maintains a college computer center for instructional and re-
search purposes.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND OTHER
FINANCIAL AID
Information about scholarships and other financial aid for
students in the College may be obtained from the Director of
Student Financial Aid, University of Florida, Gainesville, Flor-
ida 32611.
Information on graduate student financial support may be ob-
tained from the Director of Graduate Studies, Graduate School
of Business Administration, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611.

MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND
REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
The College of Business Administration is an accredited
member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of
Business, the Southern Economic Association, the Southern
Business Administrative Association, and the National Retail
Merchants' Association. The baccalaureate and MBA programs
in both business and accounting are accredited by the Ameri-
can Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business.

BETA GAMMA SIGMA
Election to this national honorary society is based on scholar-
ship and character. It fills the place in education for business
that Phi Beta Kappa holds in the field of classical education. For
further information, apply to the Office of the Assistant Dean
for Undergraduate Programs.

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Six professional fraternities are represented in the College of
Business Administration: Alpha Kappa Psi, Delta Sigma Pi, and
Phi Chi Theta in Business; Omicron Delta Epsilon in econom-
ics; Alpha Mu Alpha in marketing; and Rho Epsilon in real es-
tate.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The College of Business Administration encourages applica-
tions from qualified students of both sexes from all cultural,
racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Admission to the College is
a selective process and fulfilling minimum requirements does
not automatically guarantee admission. A student's total re-
cord, including educational objectives, courses completed,
quality of academic record, and test data all are considered in
evaluating applications for admission. Priority in admission is
given to applicants whose academic potential indicates the
highest likelihood of success.
To be considered for admission to the College of Business
Administration, a student must have taken with satisfactory per-
formance the College Level Academic Skills Test (see Index) and
have accomplished the following minimum standards:
UF STUDENTS:
(a) earned a 2.5 cumulative grade point average (2.75 for
Computer & Information Science majors) on all work at-
tempted at the University of Florida,
(b) earned a 2.5 grade point average (2.75 for CIS majors) on
all preprofessional coursework attempted, and
(c) completed the preprofessional courses: Introduction to
Accounting, Elementary Managerial Accounting, Basic Eco-
nomics I and II, Survey of Calculus I and II, Introduction to
Statistics, and Computer Programming using Fortran (not re-
quired of nor can credit be earned by CIS majors).
FLORIDA COMMUNITY/JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENTS:
(a) earned 2.5 cumulative grade point average (2.75 for Com-
puter and Information Science majors) on all college work
attempted,
(b) earned a 2.5 grade point average (2.75 for CIS majors) on
all preprofessional coursework attempted,
(c) completed the preprofessional courses at the community/
junior college, and
(d) satisfied the General Education requirements established
at the community/junior college.
Community/junior college transferstudents should avoid tak-
ing upper division professional courses such as business law,
principles of marketing, principles of management, principles
of insurance, principles of real estate, personnel management,
and principles of finance.
OTHER TRANSFER STUDENTS:
(a) earned 2.5 cumulative grade point average on all college
Work attempted,
(b) earned a 2.5 grade point average on all preprofessional
coursework attempted, and
(c) completed the preprofessional courses or their equiva-
lency.
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS (6BA):
A student who has received a baccalaureate degree who is
not seeking admission to Graduate School may be admitted
under the following circumstances:
(a) to receive second baccalaureate degree,
(b) to satisfy requirements for second major,
(c) to complete courses for information, and
(d) to take basic requirements for admission to graduate
school.
Admission requirements for a, b, and c above are the same as
for undergraduate transfer students. Admission requirements
for d will depend on the graduate program desired. In addition,
postbaccalaureate students must comply with College and Uni-
versity rules and regulations and meet all deadlines as printed
in the catalog for undergraduate students.
Requests for waivers in core course are considered on an indi-
vidual basis. When approved, students will be required to sub-
stitute another course in the same area.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: Students admitted to the Col-
lege are expected to assume full responsibility for registering
for the proper courses, for fulfilling all requirements for de-
grees, and for completing all courses. Academic counseling is
available in individual departments.







COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Office
of the Registrar early in the semester in which they expect to
receive the degree.
NORMAL LOADS: The average course load in the College is
15 credit hours per semester. The minimum and maximum
course loads as stated in the student academic regulations are
enforced in the College. Students may be permitted to register
for fewer than 12 hours with prior approval of petition commit-
tee or more than 18 hours it approved by the academic adviser
and the Assistant Dean.
NORMAL PROGRESS: The College of Business Administra-
tion degree programs are full-time programs. Students are ex-
pected to carry a minimum of 12 hours per semester (6 in a
six-week session) and to complete the requirements for gradua-
tion in five registrations.
A student who falls below 2.0 overall GPA, 2.0 GPA in busi-
ness core, and/or 2.0 GPA in major and specified coursework
will be placed on college probation.
. Students who do not make satisfactory academic progress
may be excluded from further registration in the College of
Business Administration. A student may be deemed as not mak-
ing satisfactory academic progress under the following condi-
tions:
(1) If student withdraws from the University three times. A
student who withdraws from the University twice will auto-
matically be placed on College probation until graduation.
(2) If student fails to satisfactorily complete the terms of Col-
lege probation.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to be applied toward
a degree must be completed in residence in the College. This
requirement may be waived only in special cases and must be
approved in advance by the College. In any case, no student
may take more than 6 semester credit hours by extension or
correspondence among the 60 semester credits of upper divi-
sion work required for the baccalaureate degree; such work
must have prior approval foreach individual student by the Pe-
titions Committee of the College. Students must earn a C or
better in all out-of-residency coursework. After enrollment in
the College, the business core coursework must be taken in
residence at the University of Florida except by prior approval
of the Petitions Committee of the College. Courses in a stu-
dent's major field may not be taken by extension or correspon-
dence, or at another university for transfer. Students enrolled in
the University whose grade point average falls below 2.0 may
not take courses by extension or correspondence.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An un-
dergraduate student in the College may take on the S-U basis
only free electives in fulfilling the requirements for the BSBA
degree.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A student must satisfactorily complete the following for grad-
uation from the College of Business Administration:
1. Coursework requirements:
a. The University General Education requirements and
preprofessional requirements
b. A College approved program in the major field of study
c. Elective requirements outside the student's major field
(a maximum of 7 semester hours may be specified by the
major department).
2. Credit requirements: A minimum of 124 semester hours is
required for graduation. The waiving of any required course
does not reduce the total hours required for graduation.
3. Grade point requirements:
a. 2.0 grade point average for all coursework taken at Uni-
versity of Florida
b. 2.0 grade point average on all courses attempted in
business core at the University of Florida
c. 2.0 grade point average on all courses attempted in ma-
jor and specified courses at the University of Florida.


DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
Dean's List: Students must achieve a 3.5 or better average for
a minimum of 14 credit hours taken for letter grades.
Graduation with Honors or High Honors requires comple-
tion of at least 40 semester hours including all courses in the
major and at least 20 hours of core, at the University of Florida.
Honors: A student must achieve 3.2 GPA on all UF course-
work, 3.2 GPA on business core taken at the University of Flor-
ida, and 3.2 GPA on major coursework.
High Honors: A student must achieve 3.6 GPA on all UF
coursework, 3.6 GPA on business core taken at the University of
Florida, and 3.6 GPA on major coursework.

GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses are offered in the Graduate School of Business Ad-
ministration leading to the degree of Master of Business Admin-
istration, Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of
Philosophy. For requirements of these degrees and for admis-
sion to Graduate School, consult the Graduate School catalog:

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
BACHELOR OF-SCIENCE IN BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION DEGREE
The College of Business Administration awards the Bachelor
of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) in seven major
fields. Students attempting a degree in the College must com-
plete: (1) the General Education courses and the Preprofes-
sional requirements listed below and elective courses fora total
of at least 64 hours; and (2) satisfactorily complete the upper
division requirements.
Students planning to major in Accounting should consult the
section headed "School of Accounting."

LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
General Education Requirements
(All majors in Business Administration)
Credits
English ................... ......................6
Social Sciences and Behavioral Sciences ............... 9
Humanities .................. .................. 9
**Physical Sciences....... .....................3-6
**Biological Sciences ............................. 3-6
For specific courses to complete these requirements, consult
"Authorized Courses in General Education" in the Lower Divi-
sion section of this catalog (see Index). The College of Business
Administration requires students to follow the General Educa-
tion requirements for the Associate of Arts degree. Students
should follow the appropriate groupings within each General
Education requirement.

Preprofessional Requirements
(All majors in Business Administration)
Credits
ACG 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting ........... 3t
ACG 2302 Elem. Managerial Accounting .............. 2t
ECO 2013, 2023 Basic Economics I & II ........... .. .6t
*MAC 3233, 3234 Survey of Calculus I & II ............. 6t
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ................... 3t
***COP 3210 Computer Programming Using Fortran ....... 2t
Electives to make a total of 64 hours
*Credit can be earned toward graduation for MAC 3311 or MAC
3233 and MAC 3312 or MAC 3234.
**Students are expected to complete 9 hours of the sciences.
***CIS majors are not required to take COP 3210
Choose elective courses needed to complete the total 64 se-
mester hours from such areas as mathematics, natural sciences,
social science, foreign language, and humanities.
tThese courses can be taken by correspondence only by prior
approval from the College Petitions Committee.





Colleges

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
The upper division curriculum in Business Administration re-
quires 60 semester credits. The program centers around a core
which is required of all students. In addition, each student is
required to select one of seven major fields as an area of con-
centration. The pattern of the upper division requirements is as
follows:
Courses Credits
QMB 3700 Quantitative Methods for Business and
Economic Analysis ......... ....... ............ 3
**GEB 3121 Advanced Business Statistics ................ 3
*ECO 3202 National Income Determinants and Policy ..... 3
*ECO 3100 Prices and Markets ....................... 3
FIN 3408 Business Finance. ......... ............ 4
**MAN 3021 Principles of Management ............... 3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing ................... 3
BUL 4100 Business Law or
**BUL 4200 Business Law Problems or .
ECP 4403 Government Regulation of Business ......... 3-4
MAN 4720 Business Policy. ........... ............ 3
***STA 4033 Mathematical Statistics with
Computer Applications ................. ..2
Total Core Requirements 27-29
*Students majoring in Economics are required to register for
ECO 4203 and ECO 4101 instead of ECO 3202 and ECO 3100.
**FIN, ECO, MKT, MGT, INS, REE are required to take GEB 3121.
Students may receive credit for GEB 3121 or ECO 3411 and
MAN 3010 or MAN 3021 and BUL 4112 or BUL 4200.
***CIS majors are required to take STA 4033.

UPPER DIVISION
The College of Business Administration requires a minimum of
27 hours of upper division (3000-4000) business core course-
work for all majors. If a student takes a lower division course
(1000-2000) which automatically substitutes for an upper divi-
sion business core course, the student must take an additional
upper core division course in the subject area.
The College of Business Administration requires the following
minimum semester hours of upper division (3000-4000 level)
major coursework to be taken in residence at the University of
Florida: CIS-27 semester hours, ES-12 semester hours, FIN-
13 semester hours, INS-12 semester hours, MAN-15 semes-
ter hours, MAR-16 semester hours, and REE-20 semester
hours. A student may petition to have a nonresident course sub-
stituted for a major course requirement. If accepted, the student
must take additional upper division (3000-4000 level) major
course in order to meet the resident hour requirement for the
major.

OTHER UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the upper division core, each,student must follow
the curriculum pattern indicated below.

MAJOR FIELD
Required courses are listed under the appropriate "major"
headings, beginning in the next section.

FREE ELECTIVES
Electives may be taken within or outside of the College of Busi-
ness Administration, but must be taken outside the major field.
A maximum of six semester credits (three for Computer and
Information Sciences majors) of CLEP, Advance Placement or
1000 and 2000 level military science courses may be used as
free electives. A maximum of six semester hours in advanced
military science courses may be used as free electives. No
credit will be awarded for cooperative education courses.


I. ACCOUNTING
(For Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree requirements,
see listing under Fisher School of Accounting.)


II. COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES
This curriculum is designed to prepare students for technical
and managerial positions in computer science in public and
private organizations. The curriculum emphasizes three as-
pects pertinent to the student's professional career: the func-
tions to which computers are applied in organizations, the
professional skills for the design of computing applications,
and the decision-making techniques for the efficient and effec-
tive utilization of computing resources.
Required Courses Credits
COC 3100 Introduction to Computer
Information Science. ............................ 3
CDA 3101 Introduction to Computer Organization ....... 3
COP 3121 Data Processing Languages ................. 3
COP 3530 Data and Program Structures................ 4
CIS 4300 Information Resources .. .................. 3
CIS 4321 Introduction MGT Systems .................. 3,
Balance of 5 to 6 credits in courses from
approved list. ............................ 5-6
Total 24-25
One of the following courses:
QMB 4703 Managerial Operations Analysis III .......... 3
or
ESI 4523 Discrete System Simulation ............... 3
Total 3

III. ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed to provide students with a basic
core of courses in Economics, plus electives from a variety of
courses.
Economics majors are required to substitute ECO 4203 and
ECO 4101 for ECO 3202 and ECO 3100 in the College of Busi-
ness Administration core program. In addition, majors must
complete 12-18 credit hours of economic courses that require
ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 as prerequisites.


IV. FINANCE
The curriculum core provides a broad academic background
in Finance. The electives permit the student to study specific
topics or areas in Finance in greater detail. Students desiring a
major in Finance must achieve a grade of C or better in FIN
3408 and maintain a 2.0 GPA for the courses in the major.
Required Courses Credits
FIN 4244 Debt and Money Markets ................... 3
FIN 4414 Financial Management ..................... 4
FIN 4504 Equity arid Capital Markets ................. 3
At least one but no more than two courses:
FIN 4313 Financial Management of Financial
Institutions .................................... 3
FIN 4514 Investment........................... 3
FIN 4604 International Finance ...................... 3
13-16

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE STUDY
PROGRAM
This interdisciplinary program is jointly sponsored by the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and by the College of Busi-
ness Administration at the University of Florida. The program is
designed for students interested in quantitative techniques who
wish to apply their skills in a business or government setting.
Upon completion of the program, students will receive a Certif-
icate in Actuarial Science which will attest to their interest in


I







COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


actuarial science and to the completion of coursework ex-
pected to enhance the skills needed to pass the first three exams
leading to an Associate or Fellowship in the major national ac-
tuarial societies.
Students may complete the program while earning a Business
Administration degree or a Liberal Arts and Science degree.
The requirements for the particular major must be met, and in
addition a number of courses must be taken in business, statis-
tics, mathematics, and operations research. Students plan their
certificate program in such a way that some of these courses
also count toward the departmental major and degree require-
ments. Thus, mathematics or statistics students would take
three or four additional courses to earn their certificate while
business students would take four or five additional courses.
Inquiries on the program should be directed to Dr. Bruce
Edwards (Mathematics), Dr. David Nye (Finance and Insur-
ance), Dr. John Saw (Statistics), or to Dr. Ronald Akers (Sociol-
ogy).

V. INSURANCE
The primary objective of the curriculum in risk and insurance
is an understanding of risk its varied forms, sources, and
methods of treatment. The curriculum stresses decision making
necessary in the management of personal, commercial, and so-
cial risks.
The courses provide useful background for business and non-
business majors alike with interests in the nature of risk. Stu-
dents majoring in this program are prepared for positions in the
administration of risk management programs of business, gov-
ernment, and the insurance industry. Students desiring a major
in Insurance must achieve a grade of C or better in FIN 3408.'
Required Courses Credits
RMI 3015 Risk and Insurance ....................... 3
RMI 4305 Risk Management. .................. .. 3
RMI 4135 Group Insurance and Pension Plans........... 3
One of the following courses:
FIN 4313 Financial Management of Financial
Institutions ........................... 3
FIN 4414 Financial Management ....................4
FIN 4504 Equity and Capital Markets ................ 3
RMI 4805 Estates, Trusts, and Insurance .................. 3
Total 12


VI. MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for students interested in general
management, industrial management, industrial relations, or
personnel management. Appropriate courses include quantita-
tive analysis of business and organizational behavior.
Required Courses Credits
MAN 3151 Organization Behavior.................... 3
One of the following courses:
MAN 4504 Operations Management .................. 4
QMB 4701 Managerial Operations Analysis 1 ........... 3
QMB 4702 Managerial Operations Analysis 2 ........... 3
QMB 4703 Managerial Operations Analysis 3 ........... 3
Three of the following courses:
MAN 4052 Management Philosophy and Practice........ 3
MAN 4053 Managerial Planning ................... 3


MAN 4109 Applications in Organization Behavior ....... 3
MAN 4110 Applications in Personnel Management....... 3
MAN 4201 Organization Theory and Design............ 3
MAN 4203 Organization Development ................ 3
MAN 4310 Problems in Personnel Management ......... 4
MAN 4410 Collective Bargaining ..................... 4
*MAN 4504 Operations Management .................. 4
*QMB 4701 Managerial Operations Analysis I ........... 3
*QMB 4702 Managerial Operations Analysis 2 ........... 3
*QMB 4703 Managerial Operations Analysis 3 ........... 3
Total 15
*Three are required for all quantitative management majors.


VII. MARKETING
This curriculum is designed to develop an understanding of
the marketing and distribution system for goods and services,
the social and economic forces which act on the system, and
the determinahts of consumer choice behavior. The program
emphasizes analytical and behavioral science approaches to
marketing management and consumer behavior. Students de-
siring a major in marketing must achieve a grade of C or better
in MAR 3023.
Required Courses Credits
MAR 3503 Consumer Behavior ...................... 4
MAR 4613 Marketing Research ............ ........ 4
MAR 4713 Marketing Management ..................... 4
One or two of the following courses:
MAR 3203 Management of Channel Systems and
Institutions ................................ 4
MAR 4243 International Marketing ................... 4
MAR 4303 Promotional Strategy and Management ...... 4
MAR 4403 Sales Management ....................... 4
MAR 4614 Research in Marketing and
Consumer Behavior ........................... 4
MAR 4933 Special Topics in.Marketing ................ 4
Total 16-20


VIII. REAL ESTATE
This curriculum is designed to prepare analysts in real estate
generally, real estate departments of regional or national firms,
financial institutions, or state or federal agencies. The program
stresses the use of modern concepts and technology in the solu-
tion of real estate problems.
Required Courses Credits
REE 3043 Real Estate Analysis .................. .... 4
REE 4100 Real Estate Valuation.................. .... 3
REE 4204 Real Estate Financial Analysis ................ 3
REE 4311 Real Estate Feasibility Analysis .............. .. 5
REE 4430 Real Estate Law .................... .... 3
Total 18
One of the following courses:
BCN 1210 Construction Materials .................. 3
ECP 5614 Urban Economics ....................... 3
MAR 3503 Consumer Behavior ...................... 4
MAR 4613 Marketing Research .................... .4
An advanced computer programming course,
as approved by student's adviser ............... 2 to 4
Total 2-4










College of Dentistry

,.. The College of Dentistry is one of the six colleges which con-
stitute theJ. Hillis Miller Health Science Center. The College of
Dentistry, as well as the other units of the Health Science Cen-
ter, is an integral component, both geographically and func-
tionally, of the University of Florida. Many conjoint projects
between the College and other units of the Health Science Cen-
ter and University have been formulated and implemented.
In 1957 the Florida Legislature authorized the development
of a College of Dentistry in Gainesville, but it was not until the
late 1960s that faculty members were recruited and program
development initiated.
The twelve departments which make up the College of Den-
tistry are Community Dentistry, Dental Biomaterials, Dental
Education, Endodontics, Operative Dentistry, Oral Biology,
Oral Diagnostic Sciences, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Or-
thodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Periodontics, and Prosthodon-
tics. A modular curriculum has been developed based on
multidisciplinary teaching by these departments. The curricu-
lum is designed to permit students flexibility and individualiza-
tion in their program. It is a competency-based curriculum in
which behavioral objectives serve as the primary guidelines for
student advancement. The curriculum is flexible, but students
must complete an appropriate portion of the total curriculum
each semester.
The goals of this College are to prepare the graduate to enter
private dental practice, to enter graduate programs in any of the
dental specialties, to enter into research activities, and to be
prepared for a lifetime of continuing education.
The first class of students was graduated in 1976. The College
offers the Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree. (The
D.M.D. and D.D.S. degrees are synonymous.) The College
presently offers Advanced Educational programs in the follow-


ing areas: one-year programs in Dental Public Health, Ad-
vanced Education in General Dentistry, and General Practice
Residency; two-year programs in Orthodontics, Pediatric Den-
tistry, and Periodontics; and a four-year Oral and Maxillofacial
Surgery Residency.
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation are
expected of the applicant. The studentof dentistry must possess
a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic prepara-
tion of the highest order because of the vast amount of science
which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly personal
relationship between patient and dentist places the latter in a
position of trust, which demands maturity, integrity, intellectual
honesty, and a sense of responsibility. A broad representation of
the ethnic mixture of the state is sought in the student body
through an active recruitment program. The College strictly ad-
heres to the principle of ethnic, racial,"sexual, religious, and
social equality among its student body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree. However,
outstanding students may be accepted without fulfilling the de-
gree requirements, provided they show evidence of sufficient
preprofessional preparation for the study of dentistry. Appli-
cants with an overall B average as a minimum will receive
strongest consideration for admission to the College of Dernis-
try. Applicants should initiate the application process approxi-
mately 15 months prior to anticipated enrollment by
submitting an application through the centralized American
Association of Dental Schools Application Service.(AADSAS),
P.O. Box 4000, Iowa City, Iowa 52240.
SFurther detailed information will be found in the College of
Dentistry Bulletin. Copies may be obtained by writing to the
Office of Admissions, College of Dentistry, University of Flor-
ida, Box J-445, JHMHC, Gainesville, Florida 32610.










College of Education

GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Education is the officially designated unit of
the University of Florida that is responsible for teacher educa-
tion. University teacher education programs are approved by
the State Department of Education and the National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education.
The University of Florida has undergraduate programs lead-
ing toward the preparation of teachers in Agricultural and Ex-
tension Education through the College of Agriculture; Art
Education through the College of Fine Arts or the College of
Education;'Health Education and Physical Education through
the College of Health and Human Performance; Music Educa-
tion through the College of Fine Arts; the various areas of Sec-
ondary Education through the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences; and Elementary and Special Education through the
College of Education.
In the program areas of Agricultural and Extension Education,
Art Education, Health Education, Music Education and Physi-
cal Education, students will be recommended for initial teacher
certification upon the completion of their undergraduate de-
grees. In the program areas of elementary education, special
education, and various areas of secondary education, students
must complete an additional year of academic study In the Col-
lege of Education which may lead to the Master of Education
degree prior to recommendation for initial teacher certifica-
tion.

PROTEACH

(A program for the Preparation of Professional Teachers)
Teaching is a more difficult and demanding profession today
than ever before. Conditions teachers face in the classroom are
more complex and stressful than those in the past. At the same
time, parents, other adults, and young people are increasingly
aware that a sound educational background is essential to suc-
cess in later life. The bottom line is that more is expected of
teachers than ever before.
In response to this challenge, the faculty of the College of
Education has developed a new, experimental program for the
preparation of professional teachers in elementary education,
special education, and the various areas of secondary educa-
tion. PROTEACH (from PROfessional TEACHer) is a strong, rig-
orous program consisting of five years of intensive work in
general background knowledge, professional studies, and aca-
demic specialization designed to culminate in a Master of Edu- -
cation degree.
The curriculum of PROTEACH incorporates the best avail-
able information about effective teachers' knowledge, skills,
and personal attributes. The latest developments in instruc-
tional approaches and new technologies are used. PROTEACH
is not built upon the previous program but upon a reconcep-
tualization of what a beginning teacher should know, should be
able to do, and should be as a model for youth. Distinguishing
characteristics of PROTEACH include an increase in course-
work outside the College of Education and expanded founda-
tional studies and clinical experiences.
Within the five-year teacher education program, Elementary
Education majors are required to have 81-93 semester hours
outside the College of Education, including 12-24 hours of spe-
cialized study in one or two academic disciplines. Majors in
Special Education are required to have 70 hours outside the
College of Education, including 18 hours in one academic dis-
cipline. Students in the various subject areas of secondary edu-
cation are required to have an undergraduate major in the
subject they are planning to teach and will receive their Bache-
lor's degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. They
will take 9 additional hours in their teaching field as a part of
their Master's degree from the College of Education.
All students in PROTEACH, regardless of their chosen teach-
ing field, take the expanded foundational studies in education.


Those foundational studies include the social, philosophical,
and historical foundations of education; human growth and de-
velopment; ethical principles governing teachers; legal provi-
sions affecting education; the nature of handicapped children
in regular classrooms; educational diagnosis and evaluation;
-interpersonal relations; learning and cognitive process in edu-
cation; instructional design and implementation; and the use of
computers in the classroom,
The extensive clinical component of PROTEACH begins in
the third year and continues through the fifth year. Students en-
gage in early observation, supervised practice, and a conclud-
ing internship in the public schools as well as campus-based
clinical experiences including microteaching, simulation, and
other controlled situations. Methods of instruction and clinical
experiences are concurrent and coordinated; academic and
clinical aspects of course objectives are planned together; and
methods instructors are also clinical supervisors.
Academically able students who are committed to teaching
are encouraged to become a part of this challenging new pro-
fessional program.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Education en-
courage applications from qualified students of both sexes from
all cultural, racial, religious and ethnic groups. The College of-
fers undergraduate programs in Art Education, Elementary Edu-
cation, and Special Education. In Elementary Education and
Special Education, a student must complete an additional aca-
demic year of study which may lead to the Master df Education,
degree prior to recommendation for initial teacher certifica-
tion. In the various areas of secondary education, a student
must complete an undergraduate degree from the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences and complete an additional academic
year of study in the College of Education which may lead to the
Master of Education degree prior to recommendation for initial
teacher certification.
Listed below are the specific requirements for admission to
the undergraduate programs in the College of Education. It
should be understood, however, that minimum requirements
are given and that admission to the College is a selective proc-
ess.The satisfaction of minimum requirements does not auto-
matically guarantee admission. A student's total record,
including educational objectives, pattern of courses previously
completed, quality of previous academic records and test data
will be considered in evaluating an application for admission.
Priority for admission will 'be given to those applitants'whose
potential on the basis of their total record indicates the greatest
likelihood of success in the program requested.
A student who does not meet all of the requirements for ad-
mission may petition to the College of Education for admission.
A limited number of students may be admitted through this pro-
cedure. A petition for admission cannot be considered unless a
student has an American College Test score or a Scholastic Apti-
tude Test score.
Students Classified UF:
Students classified UF should apply for admission to the Col-
lege of Education during the semester in which they will com-
plete 64 semester hours of work. Applications should be filed in
both the Registrar's Office and the College of Education Office
of Student Services, Room 134, Norman Hall. To be considered
for admission to the College, students will be required to:
1. Have a University of Florida GPA of at least 2.6 and an
overall GPA of at least 2.6
2. Have a composite score of eighteen (18) on the American
College Test (ACT) or a composite score of eight hundred fifty
(850) on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
3. Meet minimum standards of physical and mental health.
4. Have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the
College of Education. The Committee will review the appli-
cation of each candidate with respect to qualities considered
to be essential for effective teaching. The student is expected
to speak and to write the English language effectively.
5. Take the College Level Academic Skills Test (see the In-
dex).





Colleges

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


6. In addition to the requirements stated above, students
who are seeking admission to a program in Special Education
will be asked to provide tangible evidence of commitment to
special education.
Transfer Students:
1. From other upper division colleges, University of Florida.
University of Florida students desiring to transfer from an up-
per division college to the College of Education must file ap-
plications with both the Registrar's Office and the College of
Education Office of Student Services. To be considered for
admission, applicants will be expected to meet the require-
ments for admission outlined for students classified UF.
2. From other four-year institutions. To be eligible for admis-
sion to the College of Education, a transfer student from a
four-year institution must satisfy the minimum requirements
for admission to an Upper Division College that are set forth
in the ADMISSIONS section of the catalog.Additionally, the
applicant will be expected to meet the requirements for ad-
mission outlined for students classified UF.
3. From junior and community colleges. To be eligible for
admission to the College of Education, a transfer student from
a junior or community college must complete the Associate
of Arts degree and the general education requirements of the
junior or community college. Additionally, the applicant will
be expected to meet the requirements for admission outlined
for students classified UF.

ADMISSION TO THE ADVANCED
'PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE
(For students in Art Education, Health Education, Music Educa-
tion and Physical Education)
Students in Art Education, Health Education, Music Educa-
tion and Physical Education must be admitted to the Advanced
Professional Sequence prior to enrollment in EDG 4203.
Admission to the Advanced Professional Sequence requires:
1. A special application submitted to the College of Educa-
tion Office of Student Services, Room 134 Norman Hall, no
later than one month prior to the proposed registration for
EDG 4203.
2. Enrollment in the appropriate upper division college.
3. Completion of the general preparation requirements. The
general preparation requirements include the general educa-
tion requirements plus additional general education electives
to total 45 semester hours.
4. Completion of the speech requirement.
5. Art Education students in the College of Education must
have a planned program and a picture on file in Room 134,
Norman Hall.
6. A C average or better.
7. A C average or better in professional education courses
and in courses in the area of specialization.

ADMISSION TO STUDENT TEACHING
(For students in Art Education, Health Education, Music Educa-
tion, and Physical Education)
Assignments to student teaching for each semester are made
by the College of Education Office of Student Services. Stu-
dents in Art Education in the College of Education are assigned
a semester for student teaching when they are admitted to the
College. Students in other colleges should see the Coordinator
of Undergraduate Studies, Room 134 Norman Hall, for a stu-
dent teaching assignment as early in their junior year as possi-
ble.
Prior to acceptance to student teaching, a student must have
fulfilled the following requirements:
1. Have completed all general preparation requirements.
2. Have satisfied the speech requirement.
3. Have at least a C average in all coursework at the Univer-
sity of Florida, the area of specialization courses, and profes-
sional education courses.
4. Students in Art Education and Music Education must have
completed'successfully all sections of the Basic Skills Test.


5. Have been admitted to the Advanced Professional Se-
quence and have completed the following work:
(a) Art Education: EDF 3110 or EDF 3135 or EDF 3210,
EDG 4023, ARE 4242, ARE 4243, ARE 4244, and at least
two-thirds of the coursework in the teaching area.
(b) Health Education: EDF 3110, EDG 4023, HES 2000,
2001, 3301,4302, PET 3320, APB 2170, and two-thirds of
the coursework in the teaching area.
(c) Music Education: EDF 3110, EDG 4023, MUE 3113,
3320, 3030, 4412, 4411 or 4404, and two-thirds of the
coursework in the teaching field.
(d) Physical Education: EDF 3110, EDG 4203, PET 3461,
4442, and two-thirds of the coursework in the teaching
field.
Students must make special application to the Director of Stu-
dent Teaching, Room 100, Norman Hall. Applications for the
Fall Semester may be picked up after February 1 and must be
received no later than April 1. Applications for the Spring Se-
mester may be picked up after April 15 and must be received no
later than September 15.
Students have the responsibility for making arrangements to
live in the community where student teaching is to be done and
to assume living expenses in addition to regular on-campus ex-
penses.

RETENTION REQUIREMENTS
Basic Skills Assessment
All College of Education students will take a basic skills as-
sessment examination during their first semester in the college.
This examination includes sections on English, mathematics,
reading, and writing. A student in Art Education must have a
successful score on all sections of the basic skills assessment
examination prior to admission to the internship experience. A
student in Elementary Education or Special Education must
have a successful score on all sections of the basic skills assess-
ment examination prior to receiving the Bachelor's degree.

Grade Point Average Requirement
Students in Elementary Education and Special Education
must make a grade point average of 3.00 or above on course-
work taken after admission to the College of Education in order
to remain IN GOOD STANDING. Students who are not IN
GOOD STANDING may be denied further enrollments in the
College of Education. Any student so denied may petition this
decision to the College Petitions Committee.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To receive an undergraduate degree from the College of Edu-
cation in Art Education, a student must satisfactorily complete
the following:
1. 45 semester hours of general preparation.
2. A College-approved program in Art Education.
3. The speech requirement.
4. All sections of the Basic Skills Examination.
5. A minimum of 125 semester hours of credit.
6. At least a 2.00 overall grade point average, at least 2.00 in
professional education courses and at least a 2.00 in the area
of specialization. Grades below C will not fulfill require-
ments in either professional education or in the area of spe-
cialization.
To receive an undergraduate degree from the College of Edu-
cation in Elementary Education or Special Education, a student
must satisfactorily complete the following:
1. A College approved undergraduate program in Elemen-
tary' Education or Special Education.
2. The speech requirement.
3. All sections of the Basic Skills Examination.
4. A minimum of 125 semester hours of credit.
5. At least a 3.00 overall grade point average. Grades below
C will not fulfill requirements in these programs.






COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


DEGREE OFFERED
A student who completes an undergraduate degree program
in the College of Education is awarded the Bachelor of Arts in
Education degree.

HONORS
For students admitted to undergraduate programs in the Col-
lege of Education prior to the Fall Semester 1985, requirements
for honors or high honors are as follows: To graduate from the
College of Education with honors, the student will be required
to earn on all college work an academic average of 3.2 for hon-
ors and an average of 3.5 for high honors. He or she must have
earned at least 60 credits, with the appropriate average, at the
University of Florida.
For students admitted to undergraduate programs in the Col-
lege of Education in the Fall Semester 1985 and thereafter, re-,
quirements for honors and high honors are as follows: To
graduate from the College of Education with honors, the stu-
dent will be required to earn on all college work taken while in
the upper division at the University of Florida an academic av-
erage of 3.5 for honors and an average of 3.75 for high honors.
Additionally, for high honors, a student must be recommended
for this honor by the student's department.

TEACHER CERTIFICATION
An applicant for initial teacher certification in Florida must
receive a passing score on a teacher certification examination
administered by the State Department of Education prior to reg-
ular certification. Also, an applicant for initial teacher certifica-
tion in Florida must complete a beginning teacher program
prior to regular certification.
Applications for Florida teacher certification are available in
the College of Education Office of Student Services, 134 Nor-
man Hall.

GENERAL REGULATIONS: PLANNED
PROGRAMS
Before the end of the first term of enrollment in the College of
Education, the student should plan a program for the remainder
of work required for the degree. All planned programs must
have the approval of the student's counselor and the Coordina-
tor of Undergraduate Studies.
Each student is responsible for registering for the proper
courses and fulfilling all requirements for the degree. Courses
can be dropped or changed without penalty only upon ap-
proval of the counselor, the College of Education Office of Stu-
dent Services, and the Registrar.

LOADS
Sixteen semester hours is considered a normal load. A stu-
dent may be permitted to register for additional hours if, in the
opinion of a counselor, the quality of the record justifies this. At
the time of registration, a student, with the approval of a coun-
selor, may register for fewer than sixteen semester hours if con-
ditions warrant this.

RESIDENCE
The last 30 semester hours to be applied toward a degree
must be completed in residence in the College of Education. In
special cases this requirement may be waived by petition when
a student has completed most of his or her previous work in the
upper division of the College of Education.
No part of the teacher preparation program can be taken by
correspondence, home study, or extension unless such courses
have been planned with the student's upper division counselor
and approved by the College of Education Office of Student


Services. In addition to these requirements University regula-
tions pertaining to correspondence and extension work apply
to College of Education students.

PETITIONS
If a student feels that the College regulations cause a peculiar
hardship or injustice in his or her case, he or she may petition
for waiver of the particular regulation. The student should con-
tact his or her adviser or the College of Education Office of
Student Services regarding this procedure.

UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION IN
GRADUATE COURSES
With the permission of the instructor, an undergraduate stu-
dent in the College of Education may enroll in 5000 or 6000
level courses if he or she has Senior standing and an upper divi-
sion grade point average of at least 2.8. The student's registra-
tion during any term for which he or she is enrolled in a
graduate course may not exceed 17 hours. Graduate fees are
charged for 5000 and 6000 level courses. After a student has
been accepted in the Graduate School, up to 6 hours of
graduate-level courses earned with a grade of A, B +, or B taken
under this provision may be applied toward a graduate degree
at the University of Florida provided credit for the course has
not beep used for an undergraduate degree.

MUSIC ENSEMBLE CREDIT
Undergraduate majors in education may count 4 hours of
music ensemble credit toward graduation

SCHOLARSHIP AND LOANS
The College of Education Office of Student Services, 134
Norman Hall, has information about the Florida Teacher Schol-
arship Loan Program. Additionally, the Office has information
about other very limited scholarships and loan funds available
in the College-of Education. Information regarding other finan-
cial aid for undergraduate students may be obtained from the
Office of Student Financial Aid.

CURRICULUM IN EDUCATION
The College of Education offers undergraduate programs in
Art Education, Elementary Education, and Special Education.
Students in Art Education will be recommended for initial
teacher certification upon completion of their undergraduate
degree programs. Students in Elementary Education and Spe-
cial Education must complete an additional year of academic
study in the College of Education which may lead to the Master
of Education degree prior to recommendation for initial teacher
certification. Students who plan to become teachers in the vari-
ous areas of secondary education must complete a Bachelor's
degree in the appropriate area in the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences and an additional year of academic study in the Col-
lege of Education which may lead to the Master of Education
degree prior to recommendation for initial teacher certifica-
tion.
Students who expect to receive the undergraduate degree
from the College of Education must (1) complete General Edu-
cation and other general requirements listed below and (2)
complete the preprofessional and program requirements for
one of the programs on the following pages.

General Education Requirements
Credits
*English ........... ....... ......... .. .. 6
**Physical Sciences ......... ...................... 6
**Biological Sciences............... ............. 6
***Social and Behavioral Sciences.................... ..9





Colleges

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


***Humanities ..................................... 9
Mathematical Sciences ............ .............. 6
For specific courses to complete the requirements consult "Au-
thorized Courses for General Education" in the Lower Division
section of this catalog (see Index). Please note the restrictions
for College of Education students revealed-by the asterisks that
follow. Also, please note the professional requirements for each
program on the following pages.
*Acceptable courses to meet the English requirement are limited
to ENC 1101, ENC 1102, ENC 3213, ENC 3310, ENC 3312,
ENC 4260, CRW 2100, CRW 2300, CRW 3110, CRW 3311,
ENG 2131, ENG 2935, LIN 3370, LIN 4100 and LIT 2931.
*One semester of Physical Science or of Biological Science may
either be omitted or taken as an elective. Students may not use
ACG 2501, ECH 3783, FOR 2010, FOS 2001, HUN 2201 or
SOS 3215 to meet the biological science requirement.
***Six of the nine semester hours of Social and Behavioral Sci-
ences must be from the areas of History, Anthropology, Sociol-
ogy, Political Science, Economics and Geography.
***Students may not use history courses to meet the Humanities
requirements.

Other General Requirements
1. At least 64 semester hours of credit are required for admis-
sion to the College of Education.
2. A speech requirement may be completed in the Sopho-
more year or delayed until the junior year.
3. In addition to the General Education requirements listed
above, a student in Art Education must take additional Gen-
eral Education electives to a total of 45 semester hours of
General Education coursework.


ART EDUCATION
Florida teachers are certified to teach art in kindergarten
through the twelfth grade. Students may enroll in either the Col-
lege of Education or the College of Fine Arts.

ART: Credits
*Preprofessional (ART 1201-1203, ART 1300, 1301,
ART 2050,2051) ...............................20
Required (ART 3110, ART 3400, ART 3701) ........... 12
**Electives ................ ............ .... 12.

ART EDUCATION:
EDF 3110 or 3135 or 3210 ......................... 3
EDF 3514 or 3604 or 4542 or 4710 ................... 3
EDG 4203............. ....................... 3
EME 3402 and ESE 4905 ........................... 3
ESE 4943 ................... ....... ............ 11
ARE 4242, ARE 4243, ARE 4244 .................... 10
TOTAL HOURS 77
*Students must complete ART 1201, 1203, 1300, 1301 prior to
enrolling in ARE 4242.
**Art electives must include a minimum of three closely related
studies courses in a single advanced area (Studio Art or Crafts).
Studio Art includes Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking, Drawing,
and Creative Photography. Crafts include Ceramics, Wood-
working, Metalcraft, and Crafts.


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (grades 1-6)
Preprofessional Requirements
*MAE 3811, Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 2
HUM 2510 Design for Understanding the Visual and Perform-
ing Arts (Students who complete their first two years of study at
another institution may substitute a comparable Fine Arts
course from that institution.)
**A literature course
**A history course
**A statistics course
* *A sociology course or a cultural anthropology course or a cul-
tural geography course
**An economics course or a political science course


**A biological science course with a laboratory
**A physical science course with a laboratory
Courses in a foreign language are recommended but not re-
quired.
*The requirement for MAE 3811 will be waived for students who
have completed two college courses in algebra, geometry and/
or calculus with grades of B or better.
S*These courses may be used to meet General Education require-
ments.
The Elementary Education Program is a six-semester course
of study. The components of the program include professional
methods classes, clinical experience in classes and in the pub-
lic school, and two areas of specialization, one of 12 semester
hours in classes outside the College and the other of 12 semes-
ter hours either within or outside the College. In addition, an
assortment of content and teaching methods classes taught in
departments outside the College is required.
Specialization I consists of 12 semester hours of a discipline,
such as Mathematics, Biology or other science, English, Span-
ish, History, or other Social Science, Physical Education,
Health, and Fine Arts. Since students may take courses toward
the specialization before admission to this program, counseling
is available in Room 2215 Norman Hall to assist students in
their selections.
Specialization II consists of an additional 12 semester hours
taken in a discipline as mentioned in the paragraph above de-
scribing Specialization I, or the student may choose a specialty
in the College such as Early Childhood, Middle School, Bilin-
gual, Reading, Special Education, or Instructional Computing.
The six-semester program for elementary education in-
cludes:
FIRST SEMESTER
*EDE 3801 Preprofessional Studies ................... 2
*RED 3312 Classroom Reading I ................. .... 3
EDF 3115 Child Development and Education .......... 3
EDF 3609 Social and Historical Foundations of Education.. 4
EME 3402 Introduction to Instructional Computing ....... 2
EDF 3214 Learning and Cognition in Education......... 2
16
SECOND SEMESTER
*EDE 4930 Clinical Seminar in Elementary Education...... 4
**EDE 3804 Professional Studies (Language Arts) .......... 3
**EDE 3804 Professional Studies (Mathematics) ........... 3
EDE 3804 Professional Studies (Art) ................. .. 3
EDE 3481 Research in Elementary Education............. 3
16
THIRD SEMESTER
*EDE 4930 Clinical Seminar in Elementary Education ......4
**EDE 3804 Professional Studies (Social Studies) .......... 3
**EDE 3804 Professional Studies (Science) ............... 3
Specialization 2 (in or outside college) ................. 6
16
FOURTH SEMESTER
EDF 3433 Educational Measurement and Evaluation ...... 2
or 4430 Measurement and Evaluation in Education ..... 3
EEX 3070 Exceptional Child in Mainstream of Education... 2
MUE 3210 Music for the Elementary Child ............. 4
Specialization 1 (outside college) .................. ... 3
SSpecialization 2 (in or outside college) ................. 3
PET 3461 Physical Education in the Elementary School.... 2
or HSC 3301 Elementary School Health Program ....... 3
16-18
*Must be taken during the assigned term
**Must be taken with EDE 4930 except in the summer
NOTE: EDE 4930 Clinical Seminar is not offered in the sum-
mer.
Upon completion of a minimum of 125 semester hours and
the program shown above, a Bachelor of Arts in Education de-
gree will be awarded. The third year is necessary to complete
the requirements for initial elementary education certification.







COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


THE THIRD YEAR
During the third year of the Elementary Proteach Program,
students have two choices. Those who wish to complete a mas-
ter's degree and who meet the requirements for admission to
Graduate School may follow that plan. Others may decide to
follow the non-degree route. Either plan successfully com-
pletes the Elementary Proteach Program, a program approved
by the State of Florida and by the National Council for the Ac-
creditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
THE MASTER'S OF EDUCATION DEGREE
FIFTH SEMESTER
(First Half Semester)
*EDE 6225 Practices in Childhood Education ........ .. 3
EDG 6427 Parenting and Interpersonal Relationships ..... 3
*EDE 6932 Media in Elementary Education ............. 1
(Full Semester)
*EDE 6948 Internship in Elementary School ............ 11
18
SIXTH SEMESTER
EDE 7248 Master's Seminar ....................... 3
LAE 6714 Children's Literature in Childhood Curriculum .. 3
or LAE 6407 Early Children's Literature..... ......... 3
RED 6346 Classroom Reading II....................... 3
Specialization 1 (outside college) ................... .. 6
Specialization 2 (in or outside college) ................. 3
18
*Must be taken during the same semester.
NOTE: EDE 6948 Internship is not offered in the summer.
THE NON-DEGREE FIFTH YEAR
FIFTH SEMESTER
(First Half Semester)
*EDE 6225 Practices in Childhood Education ............ 3
*EDE 6932 Media in Elementary Education .............. 1
(Full Semester)
*EDE 6948 Internship in Elementary School ............ 11
15
SIXTH SEMESTER
LAE 6714 Children's Literature in Childhood Curriculum .. 3
or LAE 6407 Early Children's Literature ............... 3
RED 6346 Classroom Reading II ............... ..... 3
**Specialization 1 (outside college) .................. .. 3
or Specialization 2 (in or outside college) ............ 3
9
*Must be taken during the same semester.
**A total of 18 hours in specializations 1 and 2 with a minimum of
6 hours in each. This includes work taken before the third year.
NOTE: EDE 6948 Internship is not offered in the summer.

SECONDARY EDUCATION (grades
7-12)
(Biology, Chemistry, English, French, Language Arts,
Mathematics, Physics, Social Studies, Spanish)
The teacher education program in the various areas of sec-
ondary education is a five-year program culminating in a Mas-
ter's degree from the College of Education. Students who plan
to complete a program in one of the areas of secondary educa-
tion must complete their undergraduate degree in the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences in the appropriate subject area
field. Students who plan to complete teacher education pro-
grams in Chemistry, English, French, Mathematics, Physics or
Spanish will major as undergraduates in those departments in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students who plan to
complete teacher education programs in Biology will major as
undergraduates in Botany or Zoology. Students who plan to
complete teacher education programs in Language Arts will
major as undergraduates in English or Speech. Students who
plan to complete teacher education programs in Social Studies
will major as undergraduates in Anthropology, Economics, Ge-
ography, History, Political Science, or Sociology. For more in-
formation about undergraduate degree requirements, a student


should check the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section
of this catalog.
A student who plans to complete a teacher education pro-
gram in one of the various subject areas of secondary education
should take the following courses as an undergraduate:
Credits
EDF 3609 Sociological and Historical Foundations of
Education. .................................. 4
EDF 3115 Child Development and Education............ 3
EDF 3214 Learning and Cognition in Education.......... 2
EDF 3433 Introduction to Educational Measurement
and Evaluation ................................. 2
EEX 3070 The Exceptional Child in the Mainstream of
Education........ .. ......................... 2
ESE 3034 Current Problems and Issues in Secondary
Education....... ............................ 2
Additionally, the following courses are suggested asappro-
priate general education or elective courses for prospective
teachers; they are not required:
ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology................. 3
HUM 2510 Design for Understanding the Visual and
Performing Arts ............. .............. 3
PSY 2013 General Psychology ...... ............... 3
SYG 2000 Principles of Sociology...................... 3
For more information about this program, please come to
Room 134 Norman Hall.

SPECIAL EDUCATION
Preprofessional Requirements
*Principles of Sociology
*Cultural Anthropology
*Statistics
*General Psychology
*May be used to satisfy General Education Requirements.
The Special Education Program is a six-semester course of
study beyond the first two years which may lead to a Master's
degree and recommendation for initial teacher certification in
two of the following exceptionalities: (1) Mental Retardation,
(2) Learning Disabilities, (3) Emotionally Handicapped, and (4)
Motor Disabilities. The program is divided into two tracks. The
first track emphasizes severe handicapping conditions whereas
the second track emphasizes mild handicapping conditions. At
the end of the first semester of study in the Department of Spe-
cial Education, each student must select either Track 1 or Track
2.
Within the Special Education Program, students will com-
plete at least 18 semester hours in one of the following areas:
Health Related Services, Fine Arts, Adaptive Physical Educa-
tion, Sociology, Psychology, Computer Science, Foreign Lan-
guage, Mathematics, Science, Social Science, English, Speech
and Language, Geography, Agriculture, Recreation, Health Ed-
ucation. Students may take as many as 9 of these 18 semester
hours during their first two years of college and are encouraged
to do so. Counseling is available in Room G 315, Norman Hall,
to assist students in their selections.
Students having successfully fulfilled the minimum require-
ments for a Bachelor's degree at the end of their fourth semester
of studies will receive the Bachelor's degree without teacher
certification. At the completion of the sixth semester of studies,
students will receive recommendation for initial certification in
two of the areas of exceptionalities listed above. Students hav-
ing met the admission requirements for the master's program
and who have successfully completed the sixth semester of
studies will receive a Master's degree and recommendation for
initial teacher certification in two of the areas of exceptionali-
ties listed above.
The six-semester program for Special Education includes:
FIRST YEAR
Semester 1: Credits
EDF 3115 Child Development and Education............ 3
EDF 3214 Learning and Cognition in Education.......... 2
EEX 3010 Exceptional People ........................ 3





Colleges

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


SPA 3001 Survey of Communication Disorders ......... 3
EEX 4224L Direct Observation and Recording for Special
Educators................ .................... 2
Select two from the following courses (4 credits):
EMR 3011 The Mentally Retarded Child................ 2
EPH 4033 The Severely Multihandicapped .............. 2
EED 4011 Introduction to Behavior Disorders ........... 2
ELD 6015 Foundations in the Field of SLD..... ........ 2
TOTAL HOURS 17
Semester II: Credits
Required courses:
EEX 3220 Evaluation and Assessment of Special Education
Students .............. .................. ...... 2
EEX 3220L Laboratory. .......... .................. 2
EEX 3243 Precision Teaching: Managing Instructional
Decisions ................... ................. 2
EEX 32.43L laboratory ........................... 2
EDF 3609 Sociological and Historical Foundations ..... 4
EME 3402 Introduction to Instructional Computing .......2
EDF 3433 Introduction to Educational Measurement...... 2
TOTAL HOURS 16
SECOND YEAR
Semester I:
Select from one of the following blocks of courses (4 credits):
EMR 4330 Methods and Materials for the Trainable
Mentally Handicapped (2)
EMR 4330L Laboratory (2)
ELD 4312 Teaching Academic Skills to Exceptional
Children (2)
ELD 4312L Laboratory (2)........ ................ 4
EDG 4930 Methods of Teaching Mathematics ........... 3
EEX 3601 Management of Special Education Students ..... 2
EEX 3601L Laboratory. ................ ............. 2
RED 4147 Techniques of Teaching Reading ............. 3
EEX 4280 Career/Vocational Education for the
Handicapped Student .. ............. ........ 2
EEX 4280L Laboratory: Career/ocational Education for
the Handicapped Student ......................... 1
TOTAL HOURS 17
Semester II:
Required courses:
ECG 4033 Interpersonal Communication Skills .......... 3
Select from the following block of courses (4 credits):
EED 6241 Educational Programming for Children and
Youth with Behavioral Problems (2)
EED 6241L Laboratory (2)
EPH 6321 Educational Management of the Physically
Impaired/Multiple Handicapped (2)
EPH 6005 Laboratory in Special Education Assessments
of Severely Handicapped Children (2) ............... 4
A course in curriculum ......................... 3
ELECTIVES .............. ...................... 6*
TOTAL HOURS 16
*Severe track elect EPH 6395
Upon completion of a minimum of 125 semester hours and
the program shown above, a Bachelor of Arts in Education de-
gree will be awarded. The third year is necessary to complete
requirements for initial special education teacher certification.
Those students who are admitted to the Graduate School will
earn a Master of Education degree upon completion bf the
three-year program.
THIRD YEAR
Semester 1: Credits
EEX 6863 Student Teaching.......................... 12
EEX 6786 Transdisciplinary Services for Exceptional
Students........ .. ....... ........... 3
EEX 6786L Laboratory: Transdisciplinary Services for
Exceptional Students ........................... 3
TOTAL HOURS 18
Semester II:
EEX 6521 Organization and Program Planning in
Special Education ............................ 3
Course in Educational Research ................. .....3
Thesis/Project ................................... 3


APPROVED ELECTIVES (to include 6 hours taken
outside of the College of Education) ................. 9
TOTAL HOURS 18


MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION
The Middle School Education Program is an 11 semester hour
block composed of EDM 6005, 3 semester hours, and EDM
6945, 8 semester hours. Upon successful completion of the
Middle School Education program and a teacher education pro-
gram in Elementary Education or Secondary Education, stu-
dents will be eligible for middle-school certification in one or
more of the following areas: Language Arts, Mathematics, Sci-
ence, or Social Studies.
Students interested in Middle School Education should be
aware of the extensive requirements in this program. These re-
quirements include:
1. A course in Reading.
2. The successful completion of a teacher education pro-
gram in Elementary or Secondary Education.
3. At least 10 semester hours beyond general preparation re-
quirements in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or So-
cial Studies.
Specific subject area requirements include:
LANGUAGE ARTS
At least one course in grammar or linguistics.
At least one course in composition.
At least one course in American literature, world literature,
speech, drama, or journalism.
MATHEMATICS
At least two courses in the area of mathematics for the ele-
mentary, middle, or junior high school; or the equivalent of
such courses. Other courses from algebra, geometry, calcu-
lus, statistics, or computer science.
SCIENCE
At least one course in either chemistry or physics.
At least one course in biology.
At least one course in geology.
Others from agronomy, astronomy, entomology, forest re-
sources and conservation, health, and human nutrition.
SOCIAL STUDIES
At least one survey course in American History.
At least one survey course in the history of the following
world areas: Western Europe, Russia, Africa, Latin America,
Asia.
At least one course from each of two of the following areas:
Anthropology, Political Science, Geography, Sociology, Eco-
nomics, Social Psychology.
Additional information about the Middle School Program can
be obtained in Room 134, Norman Hall.

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
For the Agricultural and Extension Program, see the College
of Agriculture section of this catalog.

HEALTH EDUCATION/DRIVER
EDUCATION AND SAFETY
For the Health Education/Driver Education and Safety Pro-
gram, see the College of Health and Human Performance sec-
tion of this catalog.

MUSIC EDUCATION
For the Music Education Program, see the College of Fine Arts
section of this catalog.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
For the Physical Education Program, see the College of
Health and Human FPrformance section of this catalog.










College of Engineering

GENERAL STATEMENT
The engineer engages in creative design and construction
and in research and development serving as a bridge be-
tween human needs and the storehouse of theoretical knowl-
edge. In applying science to the common purpose of life, the
engineer couples science with the management of people,
money, time, machines, and materials. Engineering challenges
the individual, stimulating ingenuity and resourcefulness, and
yielding a rewarding sense of creative accomplishment.
The engineer deals with real problems in the real world. This
requires a thorough working knowledge of mathematics and
the sciences as well as an understanding of the legal, economic,
and social restrictions of contemporary society. Clear and pre-
cise communications, whether oral or written, are required of
the engineer when delivering judgments, plans, and decisions.
A sound knowledge of the engineering field and of related dis-
ciplines is required so that the engineer can work effectively
with others other engineers, scientists, and technicians in
fulfilling engineering assignments. Above all, the engineer is
expected to be a responsible citizen.
The various undergraduate programs in the College of Engi-
neering are founded on mathematics and the physical sciences.
Additional emphasis is placed upon the humanities and social
sciences to develop judgment, perspective, and curiosity. Many
graduates continue their formal education beyond the bache-
lor's degree. The education of an engineer should not stop
upon completion of a degree program. Education, formal or
otherwise, is a lifelong process for the successful engineer.
The curricula of the College of Engineering are planned to
achieve these objectives and to provide a wide range of choices
to the student selecting a degree objective. The department is
the basic organizational unit within the College of Engineering
and has both academic and administrative responsibilities for
programs leading to the bachelor's degree. Departments with
baccalaureate degree responsibilities and the bachelor's de-
grees they offer are:
Agricultural Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Agricultural Engineering)
Chemical Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering
Bachelor of Science (Chemical Engineering)
Civil Engineering Department.
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Surveying and Mapping
Computer and Information Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Computer and
Information Engineering Sciences)
Electrical Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Electrical.Engineering
Engineering Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Aerospace Engineering)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Engineering Science)
Environmental Engineering Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Environmental Engineering)
Industrial and Systems Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering
-Materials Science and Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Materials Sciences and
Engineering) .
Mechanical Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Nuclear Engineering)
Bachelor of Science (Nuclear Engineering Sciences)
In addition the College of Engineering offers a program in
Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies, administered by the


Dean's Office, and leading to the Bachelor of Science (Interdis-
ciplinary Engineering Studies) degree.
For information relative to graduate degrees in engineering
refer to the various curricula sections or the Graduate School
catalog.
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accredita-
tion Board for Engineering and Technology (formerly the Engi-
neers' Council for Professional Development) has accredited
programs in the College of Engineering leading to the following
degrees:
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Aerospace Engineering)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Agricultural Engineering)
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Computer and Information Engineering Sciences)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Engineering Science)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Environmental Engineering)
Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Materials Science and
Engineering), for the Specialty areas of Ceramic
Engineering and Metallurgical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Nuclear Engineering)
Master of Engineering with a major in Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering
The Related Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation
Board for Engineering and Technology (formerly The Engi-
neers' Council for Professional Development) has accredited a
program in the College of Engineering leading to the following
degree:
Bachelor of Science in Surveying and Mapping

Essential Preparation
Modern engineering education demands much in the way of
specific high school preparation not required in other college
programs. The beginning engineering student'should have a
good understanding of the basic physical sciences, a highly de-
veloped ability in mathematics, and the competence to read
rapidly and with comprehension. The College of Engineering
considers that a minimum adequate preparation follows:
In high school, the student should include the following sub-
jects:
Esssentials Year
Elementary algebra ....................... ..... 1
Intermediate and advanced algebra ................... 1
Plane geometry.............. ...... .. ........ ..
Trigonometry. ................ ................. /
Chemistry ..................................... 1
Physics ............... ....................... 1
Desirable
Additional Mathematics ............... ........... ..1/2
Deficiencies in the above subjects may be overcome by regis-
tering in certain foundation courses before proceeding with
parts of the regular engineering program.

The General Plan of Study
The study program leading to the bachelor's degrees in engi-
neering described under the separate headings on the follow-
ing pages are carefully planned into an organized sequence.
The aggressive, strongly motivated student with proper high
school preparation can complete one of these programs in
about 41/2 years, including a summer term, by carrying course
loads of approximately 15 credit hours. Many students will re-
quire more than this length of time.
Some students, fordifferent reasons, are not prepared to enter
directly into one of the curricula described below. For example,
a student may have attended a high school which did not offer




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