• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Calendars
 Introduction
 Board of education
 General information
 Colleges
 Departments of instruction
 Course numbering system
 Course prefixes listing
 Course descriptions
 Staff and faculty
 Index
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00020
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Calendars
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    Introduction
        Page x
        Page xi
    Board of education
        Page xii
        Page xiii
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Admissions
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Expenses
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
        Student affairs
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
        Student life
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Student academic regulations
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
        Time shortened degree opportunities
            Page 35
    Colleges
        Page 36
        The school of accounting
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        College of agriculture
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
        College of architecture
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
        The school of building construction
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
        The college of business administration
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
        College of dentistry
            Page 64
        College of education
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        College of engineering
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
        College of fine arts
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
        School of forest resources and conservation
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
        College of health related professions
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
        College of journalism and communications
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
        Center for Latin American studies
            Page 118
        College of law
            Page 119
        College of liberal arts and sciences
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
        College of medicine
            Page 135
        College of nursing
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
        College of pharmacy
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
        College of physical education, health, and recreation
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
        College of veterinary medicine
            Page 148
            Page 149
        Division of military science
            Page 150
            Page 151
    Departments of instruction
        Page 152
    Course numbering system
        Page 153
    Course prefixes listing
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Course descriptions
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
    Staff and faculty
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        University of Florida agricultural extension service county and home economics agents
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
        Members of the faculty who retired since 1972
            Page 344
            Page 345
            Page 346
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
    Index
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
    Back Cover
        Page 355
Full Text


















'I, -' -










































3783
FHO
VOLL .78


1i AR.UNVRIYO L I
159 3


;^ r













Now that you have the University of Florida's undergraduate catalog, you might like help in using it. Ac-
cording to Webster, a catalog is a complete enumeration of things arranged systematically with descriptive
detail. But to find exactly what you want to know it helps to know the system.
This undergraduate catalog is organized into three main sections. The first explains the University ad-
ministration as it relates to the student; the second presents a description of the academic units, and the
third section lists the course descriptions. Other information is provided including a calendar of critical
dates at the front and a listing of faculty and administrators in the back. An index is placed at the end of
the catalog.
In addition to ge ;| it section has specific details
about admission, exp ,
A student at the University ; '. e.,csi ih ci n of 19 c(': ceg. iJr schools. The second section
of the catalog explains the program in each of these academic units. Major fields of study, degrees offered,
requirements for admission or graduation for this unit and other pertinent information are located here.
The second section should help the student determine an academic program for a bachelor's degree.
Here you learn about the individual departments of the colleges, something of the philosophy on which the
curriculum is based and the career or competence toward which this training is aimed.
The third section lists the actual courses and their descriptions. This part is set up alphabetically by de-
partments of instruction. It tells you which undergraduate courses will be taught in each of the semesters.
This section is partially in a code (course prefix and number) which identifies the statewide course number
and the University of Florida designation.
For example, ZOO 2014 is shorthand for the course Principles of Animal Biology. Following the title are
the letters F, S, SS meaning it is offered in each of the semesters-Fall, Spring and Summer. The course car-
ries four credit hours. It lists as prerequisites ZOO 2013C (Introductory Zoology Laboratory) and CHM 2042
and CHM 2042L (General Chemistry), meaning they must be completed satisfactorily before registration for
ZOO 2014. A separate schedule of courses is printed each semester and used in conjunction with the catalog
during registration.

FOR ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS:
"Could I be admitted?" For admission requirements, refer to Admission
section in general section and to your specific
college section.
"How much does it cost?" See Expenses in general section.
"Where can I live?" Check Housing section.
"When do classes start? See University calendar and critical dates in front
What about vacations?" section.
"What programs are available? Look at descriptions of colleges in second
What courses can I take?" section. Check requirements for specific courses.
"Where can I find out about See Academic Regulations, general section.
grades, probation and sus-
pension?"
"What could I major in and See college descriptions.
what degrees are offered?"
"What about financial aid?" See Student Affairs in general section.
"What is special about the See A Complete University page x.
University of Florida?"


On Our Cover


THE STUDENT UNION











THE UNIVERSITY RECORD

of the UNIVERSITY

OF FLORIDA







The Undergraduate Catalog
has been adopted as a rule of
the University pursuant to the
provisions of Chapter 120 of the
Florida Statute. Addenda to the
University Record Series, if any,
are available, upon request to
the Office of the Registrar.








VOLUME LXXVIII SERIES 1 NUMBER 2 MARCH 1983
THE UNIVERSITY RECORD PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA ZIP CODE
32611 0 OFFICE OF PUBLICATIONS, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
SECOND CLASS POSTAGE (652 760) PAID AT GAINESVILLE,
FLORIDA, 32601




























vo(752
S6cQ I
vD 7~



H 33









TABLE OF CONTENTS




TABLE OF CONTENTS
University Calendar ................ ................ v
A Complete University ................................... .............. x
Board of Education ........................................................... xii
Administrative Council of the University ..................... xiii
General Information ........................ ......... .............. 1
Admissions .......................... ................... 10
Expenses ..................................................................... ....... 18
Student Affairs ........................................................... ... 21
Housing ............................................... ........................ 21
Student Life Services, Facilities, Activities ................. 26
Student Academic Regulations ................................ 30
Time Shortened Degree Opportunities ...................... 35
College, Schools, and Curricula
School of Accounting ............................................. 36
College of Agriculture ............................... .......... 39
College of Architecture ................................................. 52
School of Building Construction ................................ 57
College of Business Administration .......................... 60
College of D entistry ...................................... .... .. 64
College of Education ............................................. 65
College of Engineering .................................................. .. 72
College of Fine Arts ............................................ .. 89
S School of Forest Resources and Conservation ........ 100
College of Health Related Professions .................... 103
"h College of Journalism and Communications .......... 111
\ Center of Latin-American Studies ............................ 118
College of Law ............................................................. 119
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ....................... 120
College of M medicine .................................................... 135
College of Nursing ............................................. 136
College of Pharm acy ................................................... 139
College of Physical Education, Health, and
Recreation :.................................................. .... .. 142
College of Veterinary Medicine ................................ 148
M military Department ................................................... 150
Instructional Departments .............................................. 152
Table of Statewide Course Prefixes ............................... 154
Description of Courses ................................................. 158
Staff and Faculty .............................................................. 293
Index ........................................... ................................... 351


This public document was promulgated at a total cost of $45,850 or 92
cents per copy to inform students, parents, University faculty, and other
interested persons of degree programs and curricula offerings at the Uni-
versity of Florida.












CALENDAR For 1983

JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER
1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10,
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
30 31




CALENDAR For 1984

JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S SM T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2' 3 4 1 2 3
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 *23 24 25 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
29 .30 31 26 27 28 29 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

APRIL MAY JUNE
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 1 2
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
29 30 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S
.1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 1
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30
OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 .4 5 6 1 2 3 1
7 8 9 10 11 12. 13 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
_30 31





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CALENDAR, 1983-84


APPLICATION DEADLINES
The application deadlines indicated below apply to former University of Florida students, currently enrolled University of Florida students, or new
students seeking admission to the University of Florida for the first time.
The application deadlines refer to completion of all application procedures including receipt of all required credentials and the completion of de-
partmental requirements, if any. Applications for admission to limited access programs received after the deadline may be returned unprocessed.
Applications for admission to other programs received after the deadline will be processed only on a space available basis. Applications for admis-
sion to certain programs will be considered only for the terms) indicated below.


LOWER DIVISION
Beginning Freshmen
Freshman & Sophomore
Transfers

UPPER DIVISION
Juniors, Seniors &
Postbaccalaureate
Architecture
Building Construction
Clinical & Community
Dietetics
Interior Design
Graphic Design
Landscape Architecture
Medical Technology
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
Physician's Assistant
All Other Programs

GRADUATE SCHOOL
Clinical Psychology
Master of Law in Taxation
*All Other Graduate Programs,
if available


1983 FALL


March 1

June 24



February 1
March 1

February 15
May-12
April 1
May 12
February 15
April 1
February 15
March 1
February 15
January 14
June 24

February 15
June 1

June 24


1984 SPRING


November 4
November 4



November 4
October 3

NA
November 4
NA
November 4
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
November 4

NA
NA

November 4


1984 SUMMER
TERMS A & C TERM B


March 1

March 1



March 1
NA

NA
March 1
NA
March 1
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
March 1

NA
NA

March 1


April 27

April 27



April 27
NA

NA
April 27
NA
April 27
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
April 27

NA
NA

April 27


*NOTE: Some departments have found it necessary to establish deadlines for receipt of applications and all supporting records that are earlier
than the deadline established by the Graduate School. All graduate applicants are advised to check with the appropriate department re-
garding application deadlines.

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS
Applicants for admission to the professional schools of Law, Dentistry, Medicine or Veterinary Medicine are advised to check directly with the
school regarding application deadlines.


OTHER CRITICAL DATES
1983 FALL


Registration
Classes Begin
Classes End
Final. Examinations
Commencement
Grades Due (Graduating Seniors)
Grades Due (All)


August 15-18
August 22
December 9
December 9-17
December 17
December 15
December 19


1984 SPRING

January 3
January 4
April 20
April 20-28
April 28
April 26
April 30


TERM A
May 4
May 7
June 15
In Class
None
None
June 18


1984 SUMMER
TERM B
June 21-22
June 25
August 3
In Class
August 4
August 2
August 6


TERM C
May 4
May 7
August 3
In Class
August 4
August 2
August 6


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR 1983-84
FALL SEMESTER


1983
January 14, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
Splication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Physician's As-
sistant Program.
February 1, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Architecture.


February 15, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Clinical and
Community Dietetics, Medical Technology, Occupational
Therapy, Physical Therapy and graduate program in Clinical
Psychology.



March 1, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including receipt of official tran-
scripts for Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after
this date may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Building Con-
struction and Pharmacy.




University Calendar


April 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Graphic Design
and Nursing.
May 12, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Interior Design
and Landscape Architecture.
June 1, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Master of Law
in Taxation program.
June 24, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for all under-
graduate and graduate programs except'those listed with
an earlier deadline date under the preceding section AP-
PLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Uni-
versity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for
the Fall term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Fall term, ex-
cept for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under
the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.

August 15-18 Monday-Thursday
Orientation and registration according to appointments as-
signed. No one permitted to start registration on Thursday,
August 18, after 3:00 p.m.
August 19, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
August 22, Monday--Classes begin.

August 26, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Fall Semester. No
one permitted to start registration on Friday, August 26 af-
ter 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any change
after this date will be according to individual college peti-
tion procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and
prior to the date WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or
military reasons. Students who withdraw from the Univer-
sity after this date.for medical or military reasons may apply
for a refund of fees less mandatory fees. Students who
withdraw from the University after this date and until Sept.
16 may receive a 25% refund of course fees less mandatory
fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.
August 29, Monday
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must
be established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged
to pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date will
be subject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement,
if applicable, at new address.

September 5, Monday-Labor Day
Classes suspended.
September 9, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of the Fall Semester.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certificate to be awarded at the end of the semester.
September 16, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive 25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless
withdrawal is for medical or military reasons. ,


October 1, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
October 21-22, Friday-Saturday-Homecoming
All classes suspended Friday.
November 11, Friday-Veterans Day
Classes suspended.
November 23, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
Last day for withdrawing from University without receiving
failing grades in all courses. A W symbol will be assigned
for courses from which the student withdrew.
November 24-25, Thursday-Friday-Thanksgiving
Classes suspended 10:00 p.m. November 23.
November 28, Monday, 8:00 a.m.
Classes resume.
December 2, Friday, 10:00 p.m.
No examinations, class quizzes or progress tests may be given
after this date and prior to the final examination period.
December 9, Friday, 5:30 p.m.
All classes end.
December 9, Friday, 5:30 p.m.
Final examinations begin.
December 15, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
December 16, Friday, 3:00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.
December 17, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
December 19, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Fall Semester including
those given extension by Department Chairman.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR, 1983-84
SPRING SEMESTER


1983
October 3, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Building Con-
struction.
November 4, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures including receipt of official transcripts
for Beginning Freshmen, Applications received after this
date may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Architecture,
Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for all under-
graduate and graduate programs except those listed with
an earlier deadline date under the preceding section AP-
PLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Uni-
versity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for
the Spring term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Spring term,
except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under
the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.






University Calendar


1984
January 3, Tuesday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one
permitted to start registration on Tuesday, January 3, after
3:00 p.m.
January 4, Wednesday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
January 4, Wednesday--Classes Begin.

January 10, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Spring Semester.
No one permitted to start registration on Tuesday, January
10, after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any change
after this date will be according to individual college peti-
tion procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and
prior to the date WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or
military reasons. Students who withdraw from the Univer-
sity after this date for medical or military reasons may apply
for a refund of fees less mandatory fees. Students who
withdraw from the University after this date and until
January 31 may receive a 25% refund of course fees less
mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.

January 11, Wednesday
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must
be established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged
to pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date will
be subject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if
not living in residence halls, in order to receive fee state-
ment, if applicable, at new address.
January 20, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of the Spring
Semester.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certificate to be awarded at the end of the semester.
January 31, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive 25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless
withdrawal is for medical or military reasons.
February 3, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
March 10, Saturday
College Level Academic Skills Test date.
March 12-16, Monday-Friday-Spring break.
All classes suspended Monday thru Friday.
April 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by a college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiv-
ing failing grades in all courses. A W symbol will be as-
signed for courses from which the student withdrew.
April 13, Friday, 10:00 p.m.
No examinations, class quizzes or progress tests may be given
after this date and prior to the final examination period.
April 20, Friday, 5:30 p.m.
All classes end.
April 20, Friday, 5:30 p.m.
Final examinations begin.
April 26, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
April 27; Friday, 3:00 p.m.
Report to colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.


April 28, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
April 30, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Spring Semester including
those given extension by Department Chairman.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR, 1983-84
SUMMER TERM A


1984
March 1, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures including receipt of official transcripts
or Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this
date may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Architecture,
Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for all under-
graduate and graduate programs except those listed with
an earlier deadline date under the preceding section AP-
PLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Uni-
versity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for
the Summer A term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Summer A
term, except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed
under the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
May 4, Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one
permitted to start registration on Friday, May 4, after 3:00
p.m.
May 7, Monday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
May 7, Monday--Classes begin.

May 9, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Term A.
No one permitted to start registration on Wednesday, May
S9 after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any change
after this date will be according to individual college peti-
tion procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and
prior to the date WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or
military reasons. Students who withdraw after this date for
medical or military reasons may apply for a refund of fees
less mandatory fees. Students who withdraw from the Uni-
versity after this date and until May 16 may'receive a 25%
refund of course fees less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of Summer Term A,
June 16, 1984.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certificate to be awarded at the end of Summer Term A,
June 16, 1984.
May 10, Thursday
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must
be established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged
to pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date will
be subject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if
not living in residence halls, in order to receive fee state-
ment, if applicable, at new address.






University Calendar


May 16, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive 25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless
withdrawal is for medical or military reasons.
May 28, Monday-Memorial Day
Classes suspended.
June 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
June 8, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
Last day for withdrawing from the University without receiv-
ing failing grades in all courses. A W symbol will be as-
signed for courses from which the student withdrew.
June 15, Friday-All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
June 16, Saturday-Graduation date
No commencement ceremony.
June 18, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Summer Term A.
June 19, Tuesday, 2:00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR, 1983-84
SUMMER TERM B


1984
April 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures including receipt of official transcripts
for Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this
date may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Architecture,
Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for all under-
graduate and graduate programs except those listed with
an earlier deadline date under the preceding section AP-
PLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Uni-
versity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for
the Summer B term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Summer B
terrp, except for programs with earlier deadlines listed un-
der the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.
June 21-22, Thursday-Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one
permitted to start registration on Friday, June 22, after 3:00
p.m.
June 25, Monday
Drop/Add begins, Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
June 25, Monday-Classes Begin.

June 27, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Term B.
No one permitted to start registration on Wednesday, June
27, after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any change
after this date will be according to individual college peti-
tion procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and
prior to the date WF's are assigned.


Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or
military reasons. Students who withdraw after this date for
medical or military reasons may apply for a refund of fees
less mandatory fees. Students who withdraw from the Uni-
versityafter this date and until July 3 may receive a 25% re-
fund of course fees less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of Summer Term B,
August 4, 1984.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certificate to be awarded at the end of Summer Term B, Au-
gust 4, 1984.
June 28, Thursday
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must
be established. Anyone who has not paid or arranged to
pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date will be
subject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement,
if applicable, at new address.
July 3, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive 25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless
withdrawal is for medical or military reasons.
July 4, Wednesday-Independence Day Holiday ,
Classes suspended.
July 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
Last day for withdrawing from University without receiving
failing grades in all courses. A W symbol will be assigned
for courses from which the student withdrew.
August 2, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
August 3, Friday-All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
August 3, Friday, 3:00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.
August 4, Saturday-Commencement

August 6, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Summer Term B.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR, 1983-84
SUMMER TERM C


1984
March 1, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures including receipt of official transcripts
for Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this
date may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Architecture,
Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for all under-
graduate and graduate programs except those listed with
an earlier deadline date under the preceding section AP-
PLICATION DEADLINES.
Last day for students who have previously attended the Uni-
versity of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for
the Summer C term.
Last day to apply to change classification for the Summer C
term, except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed
under the preceding section APPLICATION DEADLINES.





University Calendar


May 4, Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one
permitted to start registration on Friday, May 4, after.3:00
p.m.
May 7, Monday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
May 7, Monday-Classes begin.

May 9, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Term C.
No one permitted to start registration on Wednesday, May
9 after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered. Any change
after this date will be according to individual college peti-
tion procedures until date WF's are assigned. A W symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped after this date and
prior to the date WF's are assigned.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or
military reasons. Students who withdraw after this date for
medical or military reasons may apply for a refund of fees
less mandatory fees. Students who withdraw from the Uni-
versity after this date and until May 25 may receive a 25%
refund of course fees less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.

May 10, Thursday
All undeferred fee payments are due in full. All waivers must
be established. Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged
to pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date will
be subject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office, if
not living in residence halls, in order to receive fee state-
ment, if applicable, at new address.
May 25, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive 25% refund of course fees, less mandatory fees, unless
withdrawal is for medical or military reasons.
May 28, Monday-Memorial Day
Classes suspended.


june 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
June 15, Friday-All term C classes end for summer break.

June 18-22, Monday-Friday
Summer break-classes suspended.
June 25, Monday-Term C classes resume.

June 27, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of Summer Term C,
August 4, 1984.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certificate to be awarded at the end of Summer Term C,
August 4, 1984.

July 4, Wednesday-Independence Day Holiday
Classes suspended.
July 27, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course by college petition. No drops
permitted after this date without receiving WF grades.
Last day for withdrawing from University without receiving
failing grades in all courses. A W symbol will be assigned
for courses from which the student withdrew.

August 2, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.
Degree candidates' grades due.
August 3, Friday-All classes end.
Final examinations will be held in regular class periods.
August 3, Friday, 3:00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.
August 4, Saturday-Commencement

August 6, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
Last day for submitting grades for Summer Term C.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDAS FIRST UNIVERSITY


A COMPLETE UNIVERSITY
Florida's first the University of Florida is also one of
America's truly distinctive universities. Along with Ohio
State and the University of Minnesota, the University of Flor-
ida offers more academic programs on a single campus than
any of the nation's other universities, private and public. It is
also among the nation's 25 largest universities; yet its
division into 20 colleges and schools, with their 140 depart-
ments, gives students the opportunity to know and work
closely'with most of their classmates and teachers. Its loca-
tion in Florida's University City Gainesville, dedicated
from its founding to serve as a home away from home for
college students adds immeasurably to the educational
and social opportunities for students.
In short, the University of Florida is a residential campus,
with rich resources available because of its size, that pro-
vides a learning and living environment for the whole per-
son: Daily contacts in class, in clubs, between classes and
in dormitories and apartments with other students from
every spectrum of society and with virtually every career
goal known to humanity .... Daily opportunities to attend
concerts, theater productions, art shows, seminars, athletic
contests, lectures, and a myriad of other events featuring na-
tionally and internationally known talents Daily com-
munications with a faculty that is comprised of some of the
nation's leading scholars in their fields, working in labora-
tories and libraries among the best in the nation. More than


1,400 faculty members and graduate students are awarded
research and training grants annually, ranking the University
of Florida among the nation's top 40 research universities.

UNDERGRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES
Because it is a complete university freshmen through
professional and postdoctoral the University of Florida of-
fers more for its undergraduate students.
Undergraduates aspiring for graduate or professional de-
grees can study in libraries and laboratories equipped for
almost every advanced degree offered anywhere in the
world. They study alongside advanced graduate and pro-
fessional students. They can begin their research as early as
they desire, even as freshmen. They can receive counseling
from a faculty that has been assembled from major univer-
sities in the nation and the world. The University of Florida
ranks among the nation's top 25 universities, whose
bachelor's degree holders move into graduate programs. Its
preparatory programs for admission to graduate and pro-
fessional schools are recognized by the world's leading uni-
versities.
Students desiring only bachelor's degrees can choose from
111 majors, almost all of them strengthened by correlative
graduate degree programs. This means students can enrich
their bachelor's degree programs with advanced courses de-
signed for both undergraduates and graduates. It also means










a wider selection of course opportunities outside a student's
major field of study. Above all, it means an undergraduate
student pursues his studies in a complete academic atmos-
phere.


COSMOPOLITAN STUDENT BODY
Students attending the University of Florida come from
every county in the state, every state in the nation, and last
year from 96 foreign countries. Eighty-five per cent of its en-
tering freshmen earned admission test scores above the na-
tional mean. Thirty-eight per cent of the undergraduates are
transfers from community and other colleges. They experi-
ence no difficulty competing academically with students
who begin their work at the University of Florida. The Uni-
versity of Florida ranks fifth among state universities and
14th among all universities in the nation in the number of
National Merit and Merit Achievement Scholars who choose
to attend. But the University of Florida is not an elitist uni-
versity. And it does not want to be. Students who do not
qualify academically for admission to a Florida state univer-
sity may be admitted under special programs. These stu-
dents, and any others who desire, are offered special instruc-
tional programs to help them progress scholastically. These
programs have the central goal of equipping students with
the ability to complete their degrees.


LEADERSHIP TRAINING
Perhaps above all else, the University of Florida offers its
students leadership training and experience. Its results are
proven. Half of Florida's Cabinet members, in addition to
the Governor, are UF graduates, as are approximately one-
third of the state senators, members of the state House of
Representatives, Floridians in the U.S. Congress and state Su-


preme Court justices. Half of ten persons named in 1978 as
Florida's most influential governmental, professional and
business persons had attended the University of Florida.
Thousands of other Florida graduates occupy key positions
in every known professional endeavor throughout the state,
in the nation and in many parts of the world.
There are reasons behind the University of Florida's lead-
ership training success. The contained campus in a larger
community whose principal focus is on the University -
provides thousands of leadership opportunities. Student
Government at the University of Florida is one of the
nation's most independent and influential. Every college has
its own student council. Almost every committee for gov-
ernance of the University as a whole and there are dozens
of them have student members. The University turns
many of its activities over to students to implement. Stu-
dents serve on advisory boards and councils in city and
county government. Hundreds of students are employed in
career-developing positions and serve internships in
Gainesville area institutions. More than 200 student organi-
zations, plus fraternities and sororities, require full slates of
officers. Virtually every academic offering provides oppor-
tunity for membership in chapters of national student organ-
izations. Churches and civic groups in the community pro-
vide special programs and opportunities just for University
of Florida students. More than 500 participate in a student
volunteer action organization, providing companionship
and assistance to children, the elderly, the handicapped, the
incarcerated, the underprivileged apd the lonely in 14 sepa-
rate programs. It is the largest student volunteer action
group in the nation. A nationally-recognized Student Serv-
ices Office offers counseling programs for dozens of special
student problems both academic and personal as well
as leadership training programs.
The University of Florida sees every student as a whole
person. It has planned its programs and activities accord-
ingly.





BOARD OF EDUCATION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
BOB GRAHAM
Governor
State of Florida
WAYNE MIXSON
Lieutenant Governor
State of Florida
GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State
State of Florida
JAMES C. SMITH
Attorney General
State of Florida
GERALD A. LEWIS
Comptroller
State of Florida
BILL GUNTER, JR.
State Treasurer
State of Florida
DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture
State of Florida
RALPH D. TURLINGTON
Commissioner of Education
State of Florida



BOARD OF REGENTS'


C. DUBOSE AUSLEY, J.D.
Chairman
Tallahassee, Florida
BETTY A. STATON, B.S.
Vice Chairman
Orlando, Florida
CHRISTINE MAZZARA
Student Regent
Tallahassee, Florida
J. HYATT BROWN, B.S., B.A;
Daytona Beach, Florida

CECILIA BRYANT
Jacksonville, Florida

MURRAY H. DUBBIN, LL.B.
Miami, Florida


ROBIN GIBSON, J.D.
Lake Wales, Florida

RALEIGH GREENE, J.D.
St. Petersburg, Florida


WILLIAM F. LEONARD, J.D.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
WILLIAM L. MALOY, Ed.D.
Pensacola, Florida
FRANK P. SCRUGGS, II, J.D.
Miami, Florida
T. TERRELL SESSUMS, J.D.
Tampa, Florida
RALPH D. TURLINGTON, M.B.A:
Tallahassee, Florida


STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
BARBARA W. NEWELL, Ph.D.
Chancellor
State University System










ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL
OF THE UNIVERSITY
ROBERT Q. MARSTON, M.D.
President a
JOHN A. NATTRESS, Ph.D.
Executive Vice President
ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN, Ph.D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S., C.P.A.
Vice President for Administrative Affairs
DAVID R. CHALLONER, M.D.
Vice President for Health Affairs
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D.
Vice President of Student Affairs
KENNETH RAY TEFERTILLER, Ph.D.
Vice President for Agricultural Affairs
J. ARDENE WIGGINS
Vice President for Alumni & Development
KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs
GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
GERALD SCHAFFER, B.S.B.A.
Associate Vice President for Administrative Affairs
CLIFFORD ALLEN BOYD, Ed.D.
Dean of the College of Physical Education,
Health and Recreation
WAYNE H. CHEN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Engineering
WILLIAM K. COLLETT, D.D.S.
Acting Dean of the College of Dentistry
WILLIAM B. DEAL, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean of College of Medicine
KIRK N. GELATT, V.M.D.
Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine
RICHARD R. GUTEKUNST, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Health Related Professions
MARK T. JAROSZEWICZ, M.Arch.
Dean of the College of Architecture
JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D.
Dean of Academic Affairs for Continuing Education
ROBERT FRANKLIN LANZILLOTTI, Ph,D.
Dean of the College of Business Administration
RALPH L. LOWENSTEIN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Journalism and Communications
ARNETT C. MACE, D.F.
Director of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation
LOIS MALASANOS, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Nursing
FRANK T. READ, J.D.
Dean of the College of Law
JOSEPH J. SABATELLA, M.F.A.
Dean of the College of Fine Arts
MICHAEL A. SCHWARTZ, Ph.D.
Dean of Pharmacy
CHARLES F. SIDMAN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
DAVID C. SMITH, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Education
DON PRICE, Ph.D.
Acting Dean of Graduate Studies and Research
JOHN THEODORE WOESTE, Ph.D.
Dean for Extension,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
FRANCIS A. WOOD, Ph.D.
Dean of Research,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
GERALD L. ZACHARIAH, Ph.D.
Dean for Resident Instruction,
,Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences


ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES OF THE FACULTY
HERSCHEL H. CONNER, III, M.A.
Assistant Professor of Broadcasting
RALPH A. EASTWOOD, PH.D.
Professor of Food & Resource Economics
MELVIN FRIED, PH.D.
Professor of Medical Biochemistry
TERRY L. MCCOY, Ph.D.
Associate Profesor of Latin American Studies
DANNY R. MINNICK, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, IFAS
LINDA M. WEBB, PH.D.
Assistant Professor of Speech


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STUDENT BODY
STEVE SUTHERLAND
President of the Student Body
HAL PHILLIPS
President of Student Senate
CHARLOTTE MATHER
Vice President of the Student Body


PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES
JOHN BATTENFIELD, M.A.
Director, University Relations
THOMAS WINSTON COLE, Ed.D
Dean, Academic Affairs
GEORGE B. RIEFLER, M.S.
Coordinator, ROTC
HUGH W. CUNNINGHAM, JR., M.A.
Director, University Information &
Press Secretary to President.
.F. WAYNE KING, Ph.D.
Director of the Florida State Museum
WILLIAM C. CARR III, M.Ed.
Director, Intercollegiate Athletics
MICHAEL R. HARRIS, M.B.A.
Director, Budget 'and Analysis
JACQUELYN D. HART, E.D.S.
Affirmative Action Coordinator
GUSTAVE ADOLPHUS HARRER, Ph.D.
Director of University Libraries
R. WAYNE McDANIEL, B.A.
Director of Alumni Affairs
GARY E. KOEPKE, B.S.
Director, Facilities Planning
CATHERINE A. LONGSTRETH, Ed:D.
Special Assistant to the President
JAMES E. SCOTT, Ph.D.
Dean for Student Services
L. VERNON VOYLES, B.A.
University Registrar


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
JOHN E. IVES, M.S.
Director of Shands Teaching Hospital
FRAN CARLTON
President of the University of Florida Alumni Association
J. MALCOLM RANDALL, M.H.A.
Director of the Administration Hospital






General Information


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CREED
1. We believe the University of Florida stands for the
primacy of truth, and for the integrity of the individual,
the state, and the nation.
2. We believe the University of Florida exists to serve the so-
cial, cultural, industrial, and political institutions of the
state.
3. We believe the University of Florida exists to improve the
quality of life of the people of Florida.
4. We believe the University of Florida must continue the
two-fold task of institutions of higher learning: to wit, the
task of preserving existing knowledge through teaching,
and the task of developing new knowledge through re-
search.
5. We believe that research must include pure research to
advance knowledge, and applied research to seek solu-
tions for the problems of society.
6. We believe that the University must consist of a com-
munity of scholars in which emphasis is placed on in-
tellect, on learning and discipline, and on the sharing of
knowledge.
7. We believe that the University of Florida serves well its
purposes for existence because of its inclusive, and
mutually supportive, programs in the arts, the humanities,
the sciences, and the professions.
8. We believe the University of Florida, in order to fulfill its
functions, must have talented students, distinguished fac-
ulty, a comprehensive library, adequate support personnel
for its programs, and sufficient and well maintained
equipment and physical plant.
9. We believe the University of Florida has an obligation to
make its programs and services known to the people and
to the government of the state, in order best to serve the
purposes for which the University exists.
10. We believe that, by fulfilling its proper functions, the
University of Florida upholds and enhances the values of
society and of the nation.
The University of Florida is accredited by the Southern As-
sociation of Colleges and Schools--Commission on Col-
leges.


HISTORY
Florida's oldest, the University of Florida traces its begin-
nings to the takeover of the private Kingsbury Academy in
Ocala by the state-funded East Florida Seminary in 1853. The
Seminary was moved to Gainesville following the Civil War.
It was consolidated with the state's land-grant Florida Agri-
cultural College, then in Lake City, to become the University
of Florida in Gainesville in 1906, with an initial enrollment of
102. Until 1947, UF was the men's school and one of only
three state colleges. Others were Florida State College for
Women (now FSU) and Florida A&M. Since 1947, when the
student body numbered 8,177 men and 601 women, UF has
grown to more than 33,000, largest in the state, alternating
years with the University of Tennessee as the South's largest,
18th largest in the nation.


SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT
The University of Florida is located in Gainesville, a city of
81,371 situated in north central Florida, midway between the
Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. The city is known as an
agricultural and small industrial center.
In addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville offers many
other, advantages to students of the University. A golf course
is within easy reach of the campus, and swimming and boat-
ing accommodations are available at nearby springs and
rivers. The lakes in the vicinity abound in fresh water fish,
while the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico are within
a two hours' drive. As the seat of Alachua County, the city is
the focal pojnt of diversified industrial and farming ac-
tivities.
Practically every religious denomination is represented in
the Gainesville area including: Presbyterian, Baptist, Luther-
an, Methodist, Catholic, Episcopal, Christian, Seventh Day


Adventist, Church of Christ Scientist, Church of Christ,
Christian and Missionary Alliance, Advent Christian, Jewish,
Church of Latter Day Saints, Church of the Nazarene, As-
sembly of God, Apostolic Church of Christ, Church of God,
Disciples of Christ, Pentecostal Holiness, United Church of
Christ, and Unitarian-Universalists. Several of these de-
nominations maintain chapels adjacent to the campus.
These include St. Augustine Chapel (Catholic Student Cen-
ter), the Baptist Student Union, Wesley Foundation (Meth-
odist Student Center), Chapel of the Incarnation (Episcopal
Student Center), Church of Christ, B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion (Jewish), the Lutheran Student Association, the Latter
Day Saints (Mormon), Disciples-Presbyterian Student Cen-
ter and the Society of Friends (Quaker). All the chapels carry
on extensive programs of vital interest to University stu-
dents.


TRANSPORTATION
A schedule of daily bus service, with connections to all
points of the United States, is maintained by Southeastern
Greyhound Lines and Trailways Bus System. The Regional
Transit system serves the city of Gainesville. Eastern Airlines
has daily flights with connections to all parts of the U.S.
Charter Air and Air Florida serve all major areas of the state.


GOVERNMENT OF THE
UNIVERSITY
Direct supervision over the University of Florida, its poli-
cies and affairs, is vested in the Board of Regents, a body
composed of 11 citizens who are appointed by the Governor
for six-year terms, one student appointed for one year, and
the State Commissioner of Education. University affairs are
administered by the president with the advice and assistance
of the University Senate and various committees elected by
the senate and appointed by the president.


ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS is
the chief business officer of the University. He is responsible
for establishing policy relating to university business mat-
ters; coordinating the preparation of and control of the oper-
ating budget; collecting and disbursing funds in accordance
with state statutes; managing campus security, auxiliary serv-
ices and the maintenance of the physical plant and grounds;
directing purchasing, the administrative computer, staff per-
sonnel and property control, and environmental health and
safety.

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
THE VICE. PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS is the
chief academic officer for the University. In this capacity he
supervises the allocation of resources in the academic areas,
the improvement of instruction, the correlation of instruc-
tional activities, the development and improvement of re-
search activities, the evaluation of university academic ac-
tivity, and the establishment of policy with respect to em-
ployment, promotion, and tenure of the academic staff. In
the absence of the President and Executive Vice President he
acts with the authority and responsibility of the President.


STUDENT AFFAIRS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS is the chief
student affairs officer for the university. The office is respon-
sible for administering the various programs and depart-
ments which deliver out-of-class services to students. It is
also responsible for establishing policy relating to student
affairs matters. Activities in this area include orientation, ca-
reer and cooperative education, placement, health services,





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


recreation, financial aid, housing, individual and group
counseling, student organizations, the Reitz Union, judicial
programs and leadership training. A complete section on
Student Affairs follows in this catalog.


SEMESTER SYSTEM
The University of Florida operates on a semester system.
The academic year begins in August and ends the following
August. During this period there are two semesters averag-
ing 15 weeks of instruction plus a week of final examinations
and two six weeks summer terms. Semesters begin in August
and January with the first summer term beginning in May
and the second beginning in June. In most colleges of the
University courses are scheduled in such a way that a stu-
dent may enter in any term and proceed normally through
an appropriate sequence of courses. Consult the individual
college sections of the catalog to determine programs that
begin only in designated terms.


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING offers curricula leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Accounting. The
bachelor's degree may be completed within the five year
program leading to the degree Master of Accounting. See
School of Accounting, page 36.
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, a unit of the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, offers curricula in all of
the major fields of agriculture and grants the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. See Page 39.
THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE offers curricula in ar-
chitecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban
and regional planning and building construction. It confers
the degrees of Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Landscape
Architecture, and Bachelor of Building Construction; Master
of Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning, Master of Science in Building Construction, and
Master of Building Construction. See page 52.
THE SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION offers cur-
ricula leading to the degrees Bachelor of Building Construc-
tion, Master of Building Construction, and Master of Science
in Building Construction. Also, a Ph.D. program is offered in
conjunction with the College of Education. See page 57.
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION offers
curricular programs leading to the degree-of Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Business Admininstration (see Page 60) and a
Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree (see School of Ac-
counting, Page 36). The College also offers the Master of
Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree, the Master of Arts
(M.A.), the Master of Science (M.S.), and the Doctor of Phi-
losophy (Ph.D.).
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY, an integral part of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, graduated its first students in
June, 1976. The College offers an innovative modular cur-
riculum leading to the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine
and has initiated post-graduate programs in various dental
specialities. See Page 64.
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION has curricula in elemen-
tary and secondary school instruction leading to the degrees
of Bachelor of Science in Education or Bachelor of Arts in Ed-
ucation. It also provides an inservice program for the teach-
ers of the state. The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, a unit of
the College of Education, enrolls pupils from the kin-
dergarten through the secondary school. Undergraduate
teacher preparation programs are NCATE approved and lead
to certification at pre-school, elementary, and secondary
levels in Florida and thirty other states where NCATE stan-
dards provide the basis for reciprocal agreements. See Page
65.
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING offers curricula leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineer-
ing, in Civil Engineering, in Electrical Engineering, in In-
dustrial and Systems Engineering, and in Mechanical Engi-
neering. The Bachelor of Science in Engineering is awarded


with majors in Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineer-
ing, Computer and Information Sciences, Engineering Sci-
ence, Environmental Engineering, Materials Science and En-
gineering and Nuclear Engineering. The Bachelor of Science
degree is awarded with majors in Chemical Engineering, Nu-
clear Engineering Sciences, and Interdisciplinary Engineering
Studies. The college also offers the Bachelor of Land Survey-
ing degree. See page 72.
THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS offers curricula in the studio
arts, history of art, ceramics, graphic design, art education,
music, music education, theatre, and dance and confers the
degrees Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Arts in Art, Bachelor
of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education
and Master of Fine Arts. See Page 89.
THE SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVA-
TION is a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences. The School offers the Bachelor of Science in Forest
Resources and Conservation Degree with majors in Forestry,
Wildlife Ecology, and Resource Conservation. See page 100.
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL offers programs leading to the
degrees of Doctor of Philosophy in 72 fields; Doctor of Edu-
cation, Specialist in Education, Engineer, Master of Account-
ing, Master of Agriculture, Master of Agricultural Manage-
ment and Resource Development, Master of Arts, Master of
Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of
Arts in Health Education, Master of Arts in journalism and
Communications, Master of Arts in Physical Education, Mas-
ter of Arts in Teaching, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning, Master of Building Construction, Master of Busi-
ness Administration, Master of Education, Master of Engi-
neering, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Forest Resources and
Conservation, Master of Health Education, Master of Health
Sciences, Master of Laws in Taxation, Master of Nursing,
Master of Physical Education, Master of Science, Master of
Science in Building Construction, Master of Science in Nurs-
ing, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science in Sta-
tistics,. Master of Science in Teaching, and Master of
Statistics. All instruction is carried on by the faculties of the
colleges and schools listed here.
THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS, a
unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center, offers programs
leading to a Bachelor of Health Science degree in the fields
of Allied Health, Clinical and Community Dietetics, Medical
Technology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Physi-
cian Assistant and Rehabilitative Services. The College also
offers programs leading to the degree of Master of Health
Science in Occupational Therapy or Rehabilitation Counsel-
ing, and a Ph.D. degree in Clinical Psychology. A graduate
program in Health and Hospital Administration is offered in
cooperation with the College of Business Administration
and clinical and research opportunities for graduate stu-
dents in speech pathology and audiology in the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences is offered through the Department
of Communicative Disorders. See Page 103.
THE COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICA-
TIONS offers curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in Advertising,
and Bachelor of Science in Broadcasting. It offers sequences
in magazines, public relations, technical communications
and criminal justice public relations.
There are areas of specialization in reporting, editing,
photojournalism, journalism education, broadcast news and
public affairs, broadcast production, and broadcast manage-
ment. See Page 111.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW offers a curriculum leading to the
degree of Juris Doctor and a graduate program in taxation
leading to the degree Master of Laws. See Page 119.
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES offers
curricula leading to degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor
of Sciences, with opportunities for specializing in many sci-
ence and liberal arts fields. It offers the courses in mathemat-
ics, biological sciences, physical sciences, social sciences and
humanities required in the curricula of the professional col-
leges. The College is the academic home for Freshmen and
Sophomores while they prepare for admission to one of the
other colleges. It provides courses in general education and
awards the Associate of Arts Certificate. See Page 120.






GENERAL INFORMATION


THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, a unit of J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the pro-
fessional degree of Doctor of Medicine. Ph.D. degrees in
basic medical sciences are offered through the Graduate
School. A special medical scientist training program leading
to the combined degree of Doctor of Medicine-Doctor of
Philosophy is available jointly through the College of Medi-
cine and the Graduate School. See Page 135.
THE COLLEGE OF NURSING, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree. The College also offers a cur-
riculum leading to the Master of Nursing degree or a Master
of Science in Nursing degree. See Page 136.
THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, a unit of the Hillis Miller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and the Doctor of Pharma-
cy Degree. In addition the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees are of-
fered in pharmaceutical sciences through the Graduate
School. See Page 139.
THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH,
AND RECREATION offers services and programs through the
departments of General Physical Education, Professional
Physical Education, Health Education and Safety, and Recre-
ation. The department of General Physical Education pro-
vides programs for university students other than majors.
The departments of Professional Physical Education, Health
Education and Safety, and Recreation offer professional
preparation programs leading to undergraduate degrees in
physical education, health education, and recreation. Pro-
fessional areas of preparation include: teachers of physical
education or health education, health educators for public
or voluntary agencies, and recreation directors. See Page 142.
THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, a teaching
unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center, offers a curriculum
leading to the professional degree of Doctor of Veterinary
Medicine. See Page 148.


DIVISION OF
CONTINUING EDUCATION
During the last year more than 32,000 people took advan-
tage of the many University sponsored opportunities made
available through the Division of Continuing Education.
More than 25,000 people participated in non-credit con-
ferences, workshops, institutes and seminars. More than
5,000 students enrolled in Independent Study by Correspon-
dence courses (both credit and non-credit). Over 1,700 stu-
dents studied in credit extension classes throughout the
State. Additionally, ten international programs were offered
through this Division last year. Backed by the resources of
the University, the Division of Continuing Education sees
the State as its campus and the people as its student body.


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL
UNITS SERVING ALL
COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE INTERCOLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER AND
INFORMATION SCIENCES. During the last three decades
electronic information processing machines with capability
many orders of magnitude beyond their predecessors have
come into being. Though still in their infancy they are al-.
ready extending man's capability to solve problems in every
field of human activity. Against this background, the organi-
zation of a curriculum dedicated to a broad sector of human
endeavor was necessary. Toward this end the Intercollege
Department of Computer and Information Sciences was
created in 1971.,The department currently offers degree pro-
grams in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business
Administration, Engineering and an area of specialization in
the technical communications degree program in the Col-
lege of journalism and Communications. Degree programs
within other colleges are under study.


Subject areas found within the CIS curricula include pro-
gramming, systems analysis, software development tech-
niques, information representation and transformation, lan-
guage translators, operating systems, computer organization,
and applications.
This background prepares the student for a v;ide range of
careers in the business, industrial, scientific, civic and aca-
demic worlds wherein information flow and analysis is of
critical importance to decision making.
In addition to the degree programs, several service courses
are available for those who need experience in computer ap-
plications for proper career preparation. For further informa-
tion, contact the CIS department office in 512 Weil Hall.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES is the Uni-
versity unit responsible for directing or coordinating in-
terdisciplinary instructional and research programs related
to the Latin.American and Caribbean area. It is a budgeted
unit within the University and is administered by a Director
immediately responsible to the Vice President for. Academic
Affairs.
The Center sponsors conferences, publishes the results of
scholarly research related to Latin America, and cooperates
with other University units in overseas development and
training programs. It administers a program with Univer-
sidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia and a program in Bra-
zil for the State University System and offers programs in
Latin American Studies leading to a B.A. degree, and B.S.,
M.A. and Ph.D. Certificates in Latin American Studies; and
an interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Latin American Studies.
The Center also administers specialized research and train-
ing programs in Caribbean migration and the Amazon.
The DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE offers the four
year program and the two year program of Army ROTC.
Completion of either of these programs by a student leads to
a commission in one of the branches of the United States
Army, U.S. Army Reserve or the Army National Guard.
Freshman/Sophomore AROTC carries no service obligation.
Two, three and four year scholarships are available to in-
terested students who can qualify.
THE DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE offers a two-year
and a four-year program of Navy-Marine ROTC. Upon suc-
cessful completion of this officer training program, the grad-
uate receives a commission in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine
Corps and is immediately assigned to active duty. Scholar-
ships covering two, three, or four full years of study are avail-
able to male and female students who can qualify.
THE DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES offers male
and female students both two-year and four-year programs
in Air Force ROTC. Completion of either of these officer ed-
ucation programs leads to a commission in the United States
Air Force. Two, Three and Four year scholarships are avail-
able on a competitive basis to students enrolled in the pro-
gram. Qualified individuals may compete for Pilot Training
assignments and begin learning to fly during their junior
Year.
THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC has the responsibility for
such musical organizations as the University Bands, Or-
chestras, Choruses, and Glee Clubs, and offers courses in the
following areas: (1) Theory of Music, (2) Composition, (3)
History and Literature, (4) Music Performance, (5) Church
Music, (6) Music Education, (7) Opera Workshop and (8) En-
sembles.
THE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
OFFERS a wide variety of physical activity courses to all stu-
dents enrolled at the University. The Department operates
on the premise that although all people need physical ac-
tivity, all do not need or care for the same kind. Conse-
uently, the department offers many avenues for the stu-
ent to enhance physical health and understand its relation
to total health.
It is hoped that by developing competencies in at least
one physical activity, students will be able to make self-de-
termining decisions concerning the role that exercise' will
play in their personal lives.
Students may elect to take any course under the
satisfactory-unsatisfactory option. For further information





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


see course offerings and descriptions under the General
Physical Education heading in this catalog.


INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS
THE OFFICE OF INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES en-
courages experimentation in teaching and individualized
services to students. Reporting directly to the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs, it provides support for the innovation of alter-
native approaches to instruction in the colleges and depart-
ments of the University; assists faculty members in the de-
velopment of instructional modules or systems for specific
courses; and furnishes technical assistance in the develop-
ment and use of teaching materials and media, analysis and
improvement of teaching and the evaluation of student per-
formance. Three units include media production, testing
and evaluation services, and an instructional improvement
section.
Other units emphasizing individualized instruction in-
clude the Reading and Writing Center; the O.I.R. Teaching
Center, Mathematics Laboratory and the Language Labora-
tory. Selected self-paced non-credit courses are available in
reading, writing, study habits, tutoring and language skills.
Research consultation, course enrichment and evaluation
services are also offered to interested faculty.
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR has charge of the admis-
sion and registration of students, the maintenance of aca-
demic records, the scheduling of courses, and the issuance
of transcripts of student records.
THE COUNSELOR TO FOREIGN AGRICULTURE STU-
DENTS. Foreign students in Agriculture are requested to
contact the Office of International Programs in McCarty
Hall. This office aids foreign students to integrate their
American education more completely with actual conditions
in their homelands and also gives information to all students
interested in foreign agricultural problems and careers in the
tropics.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY SERVICE
The library consists of two central units, Library East and
Library West, and branch libraries in the areas of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts, Education, Engineering, Law, the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, Chemistry and the P.K. Yonge Laboratory School. In
addition, reading room facilities have been provided for
Business Administration. journalism and Communications.
Music, Physical Education, Health and Recreation, Physics
and the dormitory areas.
The holdings of the libraries number over 2,300,000
cataloged volumes and a large number of uncataloged
documents and newspapers. Many of the materials are in
the form of microfilm and microcards.
A number of nationally significant research collections are
maintained as part of the library system. Since 1977, the Li-
braries have opened the Isser and Rae Price Library of
Judaica, the largest collection of its kind in the southeast, the
Baldwin Library, among the world's greatest collections of
literature for children, and housed in the Department of
Rare Books and Manuscripts, the Parkman D. Howe Collec-
tion of American Literature, which contains important first
editions and manuscripts of every New England author writ-
ing before 1900. In the rare books and manuscript area the
researcher will also find the papers of many well known au-
thors, such as Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and John D. Mac-
Donald, and the Margaret Dreier Robins papers, which are
vital to the history of the Women's Trade Union League in
America.
The P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History is the state's pre-
eminent Floridiana collection and its holdings of Spanish
Colonial documents concerning the southeastern United
States is the largest of its kind in North America.
Florida's interest and heritage is reflected in the Latin
American Collection. The department maintains the most


comprehensive collection of Caribbean materials found in a
United States university library.
A rich collection of serials, ephemera, and reference mate-
rials dealing with the performing arts has been gathered into
the Belknap Collection.
Reference service is provided in Library West and in the
various branch libraries and reading rooms. A major collec-
tion of bibliographies and reference books and the union
catalog are located on the first floor of Library West.
Photoduplication services are available. The regular
schedule for the central libraries is Monday through Friday,
8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.; Saturday, 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.;
Sunday, 10:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M. The libraries serving the var-
ious academic colleges and schools observe a similar sched-
ule with variations.


THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the
Legislature in 1917 as a department of the University of Flor-
ida. Through its affiliation with the University it carries the
dual responsibility as the State Museum of Florida and the
University Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of research in the natu-
ral sciences and anthropology. Its functions as an educa-
tional arm of the University are carried forward through in-
terpretive displays and scientific and popular publications.
Under the administrative control of the Director are the
three departments of the Museum: Natural Sciences is con-
cerned with the study and expansion of the research collec-
tions as well as research in a variety of areas in functional
and evolutionary biology, sociobiology and ecology; Social
Sciences is concerned with the study of human variation and
cultures, both historic and prehistoric; Interpretation is con-
cerned with the interpretation of knowledge through
museum education and exhibit techniques. Members of the
scientific and educational staff of the Museum hold dual ap-
pointments in appropriate teaching departments. Through
these appointments they participate in both the under-
graduate and graduate teaching programs and supervision of
graduate students.
Scientific reports are published in the Bulletin of the Flor-
ida State Museum, Biological Sciences, the Ripley P. Bullen
Monographs in Anthropology and History, and in the Con-
tributions of the Florida State Museum, Anthropology and
History.
The research collections are under the care of curators
who encourage the scientific study of the Museum's hold-
ings. Materials are constantly being added to the collections
both through gifts from friends and as the result of research
activities of the Museum staff. The archaeological and
ethnological collections are noteworthy. There are extensive
study collections of birds, mammals, mollusks, reptiles, am-
phibians, fish, invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, as well as
archives of animal sounds associated with the bioacoustics
laboratory.
The Allyn Museum of Entomology, Sarasota, Florida, is a
unit of the Department of Natural Sciences, Florida State
Museum. The combined Sarasota and Gainesville holdings
in Lepidoptera rank the Allyn Museum of Entomology as the
largest in the western hemisphere and the premier Lepidop-
tera research center in the world. The Allyn Museum of En-
tomology publishes the Bulletin of the Allyn Museum of En-
tomology and sponsors the Karl Jordan Medal..The Allyn
Collection serves as a major source for taxonomic and
biogeographic research by a number of Florida State
Museum and Department of Zoology faculty and students,
as well as a great many visiting entomologists from around
the world.
, The Florida State Herbarium is a unit of the Department of
Natural Sciences, Florida State Museum. It is an important
scientific resource in which some 250,000 specimens are
curated.. Largest in the state and one of the largest in the
Southeast, the herbarium contains the most complete col-
lections in existence of Florida vascular plants and fungi. It
also contains important collections of tropical American







GENERAL INFORMATION


bryophytes and Florida lichens. In addition, there is a partic-
ularly complete, collection of seeds. The portfolio of
botanical illustrations and the growing botanical library
complement the ever-expanding collections of plant spec-
imens.
Opportunities are provided for students, staff, and visiting
scientists to use the collections. Research and fieldwork are
presently sponsored in the anthropological, paleontological
and zoological fields. Students interested in these specialties
should make application to the appropriate teaching depart-
ment.
Graduate assistantships are available in the Museum in
areas of specialization emphasized in its research programs.
Facilities are available for graduate students.
The Museum is located at the corner of Museum Road and
Newell Drive in a modern facility completed in 1970. The
public halls are open from nine until five each weekday, in-
cluding Saturday, and from one to five on Sundays, and
holidays (closed Christmas Day). There is no admission
charge. The Museum is frequently used by University and
public school classes. Classes for children and special public
programs are also offered for members of the University
community and the general public.


GENERAL STATE AND
UNIVERSITY AGENCIES
THE FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE.
The transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational programs is the primary purpose of the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service, a component of the
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The educational
programs are tailored to fit the needs of many audiences in
areas of agricultural production including energy manage-
ment, marketing and utilization; home economics; com-
munity resource development; natural resource manage-
ment, 4-H youth development, energy and marine sciences.
Audiences include adults and youth, rural and urban
citizens, minorities and people from all economic levels. The
Cooperative Extension Service is administered by the Uni-
versity of Florida under a memorandum of understanding
with USDA. There is also a cooperative program funded
through federal grants with Florida A&M University. The
basic legislative authority makes provision for cooperation
with local government. In Florida, county programs are car-
ried out jointly between the University and respective
county governments in the 67 counties. The Extension Serv-
ice along with Resident Instruction and Research in IFAS
form a functional model typifying the tripartite organiza-
tional structure envisioned in the Morrill Act for the Land
Grant College system.
The OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS is responsible
for the development of public relations, including visitor re-
ception, cooperating with all campus agencies and organiza-
tions in the planning and implementation of their public re-
lations activities and serving as the University representative
with civic organizations which work with the University and
are not professionally related to a particular school or col-
lege. University Relations coordinates with all campus agen-
cies dealing with off-campus publics in a continuing effort
to develop two-way communications with the public and to
encourage public support and understanding of the Univer-
sity, its programs and higher education.
The DIVISION OF INFORMATION AND PUBLICATIONS
SERVICES serves University central administration and Uni-
versity Educational and General budgeted academic units,
departments, service offices and other campus-related or-
ganizations by distributing information through mass media
outlets, and providing communication services for the cam-
pus community. It interprets the University's programs, poli-
cies and objectives through newspapers and magazines, ra-
dio and television broadcasts, publications, photographs,
audio-visual presentations, special displays and exhibits, and
community relations projects. The Division produces the
University Digest printed in the Independent Alligator, and
has complete video tape production facilities used to de-


velop television programming for both commercial and pub-
lic broadcasting stations. It assists other units by coordi-
nating copy content, design and preliminary production for
booklets, folders, brochures, and other printed material, and
assists in preparing bid specifications for printing.
The OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS is
the campus headquarters for the University of Florida Na-
tional Alumni Association, Inc. and the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc.
The University of Florida National Alumni Association,
Inc. brings together the organized efforts of alumni and the
promotion of the interests and needs of the University and
strives to encourage continuous participation by alumni in
the life of the University.
The University of Florida Foundation exists to encourage
support from the private sector to the University for both
operating and capital purposes. It is a private corporation or-
ganized to hold funds for the benefit of the University, to in-
vest them and to insure the maximum value of the
University's private support.
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY is an integral part of the Fine
Arts college. The Gallery is located on the campus facing
Southwest 13th Street (or U.S. 441). An atrium and a contem-
porary sculptural fountain are two pleasing features of the
Gallery's distinctive architecture style. The Gallery, with 3000
square feet of display space, is completely modern, air-con-
ditioned and maintains a varied exhibition schedule of the
visual arts during the year. The content of exhibitions dis-
played in the University Gallery'range from the creations by
traditional masters through to the latest and most ex-
perimental works by the modern avant garde. The minor arts
of yesterday and today along with the creations of oriental
and primitive cultures form topics for exhibitions scheduled.
Besides its regularly scheduled exhibitions, which show for
approximately four to six weeks, the Gallery originates sever-
al unique exhibitions from its own and other museums' col-
lections each year. The Gallery's hours are from 9 A.M. to 5
P.M. daily except Sunday when they are 1 P.M. to 5 P.M. The
Gallery is closed on Saturdays and holidays.
ART DEPARTMENT GALLERY, the teaching gallery, is lo-
cated adjacent to the Department's office area on the third
floor of the Classroom Building in the Artchitecture and Fine
Arts complex. As a direct and physical adjunct to the Art
Department's teaching program, this Gallery displays smaller
traveling exhibitions of .merit as well as one man shows by
the faculty artists and student exhibitions. The Gallery is
open Monday through Friday from 8 A.M. to noon and from
1 P.M. to 5 P.M. It is closed Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND TROPICAL
ARTS is an interdisciplinary Center that provides coordi-
nation, direction, and focus to strengthen existing programs
related to the Fine Arts within the College of Fine Arts. The
Center's faculty is bound together by a desire to relate their
research and teaching activities to the broader concepts con-
cerned with the fine arts of various world cultures. The Cen-
ter broadens and strengthens existing interdepartmental re-
lations and provides additional stimuli and mechanisms for
translating results of research into more viable forms that re-
late directly to societal needs. It also establishes more effec-
tive lines for the training of able students at the under-
graduate, graduate, and adult education levels in various
aspects of the fine arts.
THE UNIVERSITY BROADCAST FACILITY is operated by
the College of journalism and Communications It includes
WUFT, Channel 5, a public broadcasting television station
(PBS), WUFT-FM, a non-commercial radio station (NPR) 89.1
MHz, WRUF-AM, a commercial radio station (CBS) 850 KHz,
and WRUF-FM, a commercial FM station, (CBS) stereo, 103.7
MHz.
Approximately 100 students are employed in these broad-
casting operations. Thus, in addition to the broad academic
background provided in the university's classrooms and lab-
oratories, these work opportunities provide a valuable expe-
rience in day-to-day operations typical of the industry. Stu-
dents perform such functions as reporter, anchor-person,
news producer, recording engineer, director, cameraman,
and announcer, all under the guidance of professional

5


I





General

.GENERAL INFORMATION


broadcasters. The college has earned a nationwide reputa-
tion for the demonstrated effectiveness of this academic and
work experience training.
WUFT-TV operates at the maximum power authorized for
a television station of its classification; 100,000 watts visual
and 20,000 watts aural. The over-air broadcast signal encom-
passes a 65-mile radius from the station's transmitter site
northwest of Gainesville, and reaches 16 counties in North
Central Florida. WUFT-TV's signal is carried by more than 20
cable companies in the state, expanding the coverage area
even beyond these broadcast boundaries. The station's pro-
gramming is a mixture of programs acquired through the
Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), Florida Public Broad-
casting, Inc. (FPB), various public broadcasting consortium,
independent distributors and locally produced programs. Of
the latter category WUFT-TV produces an evening newscast
and a television magazine program, both aired on week-
nights, in addition to specially produced features and
documentaries. The station has won numerous local, re-
gional and national awards for outstanding promotion and
advertising campaigns it has conducted in support of pro-
grams and activities, and WUFT-TV consistently ranks at or
near the top in percentage of viewership compared to other
public TV stations in the nation.
SWUFT-FM, with 100,000 watts of power, reaches 16 North
Central Florida counties. The only public radio station in that
area, WUFT-FM broadcasts on a 24 hour a day schedule, year
round. The station presents classical, jazz and folk music, in
addition to news and public affairs information. The station
provides a variety of on-air, production and reporting expe-
rience for broadcast majors of the College of Journalism and
Communications. These students are under the direct gui-
dance of professional public radio broadcasters. With a
strong emphasis on local production and programming,
'WUFT-FM is a satellite member station of the National Pub-
lic Radio and Florida Public Radio Networks and aims to
serve and reflect the diverse needs of the communities of
North Central Florida.
WRUF-FM serves the contemporary music audience with
album rock, while WRUF-AM's music is of a more adult na-
ture, featuring adult middle-of-the-road music from the 40's,
50's, and 60's. Student communicators produce and broad-
cast regular news programs over both stations under faculty
supervision.
The student's proximity to, and participation in, this di-
verse broadcast operation brings a greater understanding of
the opportunities and obligations that exist in the field of
broadcasting.
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS
The Univerity of Florida is host to the state university
system's scholarly publishing facility, University Presses of
Florida. The goals of the systemwide publishing program im-
plemented by University Presses of Florida are expressed in
Board of Regents' policy:
". to publish books, monographs, journals, and other
types of scholarly or creative works. The Press shall give
special attention to works of distinguished scholarship in
academic areas of particular interest and usefulness to
the citizens of Florida. The Press 'shall publish original
works by state university faculty members, but it may
also publish meritorious works originating elsewhere and
may republish out-of-print works."
Each university's faculty publishing committee is inde-
pendently responsible for selecting works for publication
through the facilities of University Presses of Florida. At the
University of Florida, the University Press Board of Managers
oversees the locally determined publishing program.
The purpose of the University of Florida Press is to en-
courage, seek out, and publish original and scholarly man-
uscripts which will aid in developing the University as a rec-
ognized center of research and scholarship.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and
fifteen faculty experts appointed by the President of the
University, determines policies of publication relating to the
acceptance or rejection of manuscripts and the issuance of
author contracts. Each year the board examines numerous
manuscripts submitted not only by the University faculty


but by authors from all over the United States, Europe, and
Latin America.
University Presses of Florida is a member of the Associa-
tion of American University Presses and of the Association of
American Publishers, Inc.


ORGANIZED RESEARCH
THE DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH was estab-
lished by an act of the legislature to support and to foster
sponsored research and training as a resource essential to ex-
cellence in education and to provide maximum service to
the State. The Division is a development arm of the Univer-
sity, coordinating its efforts closely with the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs. The Division of Sponsored Research is
directed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research.
All proposals for sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid,
and training grants are approved by the director. Nego-
tiations on administrative matters with potential contracting
agencies or sponsors of research and training projects are
carried out by the Division.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are
intended to stimulate growth and to assist in expanding a
balanced research and training program throughout the Uni-
versity. These activities are intimately related to the support
of the graduate and professional program. The services pro-
vided are designed to relieve the principal investigators in
many departments of detailed administrative and reporting
duties connected with some sponsored programs. The
duties and responsibilities of the Division, of course, do not
supplant the prerogative of the principal investigator who
seeks sponsors for his own project nor the responsibility of
the investigator for the scientific integrity of the project. In
direct contacts between a principal investigator and a poten-
tial sponsor, however, coordination with the Division is nec-
essary to insure uniformity in contract requirements and to
avoid duplication of negotiations with the same sponsor.
The Division of Sponsored Research is administratively re-
sponsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Policies
and procedures for the Division are developed by a board of
directors working with the director within the general
framework of the administrative policies and procedures of
the University.
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT .STATION, the re-
search function unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS), has the responsibility of developing new
knowledge and technology toward solution of agricultural
problems in the State. Research is administered through the
office of the Dean for Research located on the University of
Florida campus. IFAS research is conducted throughout the
State. Twenty-one departments are located on campus-Ag-
ricultural Engineering, Agricultural and Extension Education,
Agronomy, Animal Science, Botany, Dairy Science, En-
tomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Economics,
Food Science and Human Nutrition, 4-H and Other Youth
Programs,. School of Forest Resources and Conservation,
Fruit Crops, Home Economics, Microbiology and Cell Sci-
ence, Ornamental Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Sci-
ence, Soil Science, Statistics, Vegetable Crops, and Preven-
tive Medicine (College of Veterinary Medicine). In addition,
six units vital to its research programs, namely: Editorial, Li-
brary, Business Service, and Centers for Rural Development,
Environmental Programs, and Biomass are located on cam-
pus.
In order to best serve the varied needs of Florida's diver-
sified agriculture, Agricultural Research and Education Cen-
ters are located at numerous locations having different
climatic conditions, soil types and crops. Intensive research
is conducted in all fields of agriculture such as citrus, vegeta-
ble, field crops, livestock, pastures, and many others. Agri-
culture Research and Education Centers are located in
Homestead, Belle Glade, Bradenton, Lake Alfred, Quincy,
Sanford, and Tallahassee (Florida A & M University). A Re-
search and Education Center is also located at Welaka, Flor-
ida and is concerned largely with biological research pro-
gams and youth programs, Agricultural Research Centers are







GENERAL INFORMATION


located in Monticello, Ft. Pierce, Immokalee, Dover, Ft.
Lauderdale, Hastings, Ona, Apopka, Marianna, Live Oak,
Leesburg, and Jay. Cooperative research is conducted with
the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station, Brooksville, a
USDA field laboratory, in its beef cattle and pasture produc-
tion and management programs, with the National Weather
Service, Ruskin, in the Federal Frost Warning Service for fruit
and vegetable producers and shippers, and with numerous
Florida agricultural agencies and organizations.
Results of IFAS research are published in scientific jour-
nals, bulletins, monographs, circulars, and mimeograph re-
ports which are available to Florida residents usually without
charge upon request to the Editorial Department of the Agri-
cultural Experiment Station in Gainesville. The Agricultural
Experiment Station cooperates closely with the Cooperative
Extension Service in providing research findings for prompt
dissemination.
THE FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERI-
MENT STATION (EIES) developed from early research ac-
tivities of the engineering faculty and was officially estab-
lished in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral part of the
College of Engineering. Its mandate is "to organize and pro-
mote the prosecution of research projects of engineering
and related sciences, with special reference to such of these
problems as are important to the industries of Florida."
The College and the Station form a close interlocking rela-
tionship with the EIES serving as the research arm of the Col-
lege. In this capacity the EIES fulfills its function of conduct-
ing research on many of Florida's most significant problems
ranging from energy to water resources, environmental is-
sues to health-related activities. Of course many of these
problems transcend the State and are also of national con-
cern. The Station has developed a national and international
reputation in many areas and the faculty are at the forefront
of their fields. This has a major positive impact on the Col-
lege since it makes good teaching possible, exposes students
to many important engineering problems normally not en-
countered in a college program, and helps the faculty better
instill students with the qualifications necessary for the suc-
cessful practice of their profession. Moreover, both under-
graduate and graduate students frequently find em-
ployment on research projects.
The Station receives a small but important portion of its
operating funds from the State; this funding base results in a
near 10 for 1 return from contracts and grants with govern-
ment agencies, foundations and industrial organizations.
The Station has excellent facilities and faculty in many di-
verse fields; a few such examples are; solar energy,
bioengineering, energy conservation and conversion,
ceramics, new materials development, device physics, robot-
ics, geotechnics, transportation research, coastal and
oceanographic engineering, microelectronics, air and water
pollution control, nuclear pumped lasers, systems analysis,
fluid dynamics and hydrology, technology for enhanced oil
recovery, lightning research.
THE FLORIDA-ARCHITECTURE & BUILDING RESEARCH
CENTER is a unit of the College of Architecture established
to foster and encourage research related to the disciplines
represented in the college. These include architecture, build-
ing construction, landscape architecture, interior design, and
urban and regional planning. The Center also provides as-
sistance to faculty and graduate students in establishing co-
operative efforts with other units of the University.
THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
is the research arm of the College of Business Adminis-
tration. Through its four programs-forecasting, population,
survey, and publications-the Bureau generates and dis-
seminates demographic, economic and business informa-
tion about Florida. Major sources of this information are the
annual Florida Statistical Abstract and the biennial Older
People in Florida published by the Bureau. Reports of Bu-
reau research are published in the monthly Economic
Leaflets and Florida Economic Indicators, both free to Flor-
ida residents, and Florida Building Permits; in the quarterly
Business and Economic Dimensions, Population Studies,
and The Florida Outlook; in the annual Florida Estimates of
Population for state, counties and municipalities; and spe-
cial reports. The Bureau makes it possible for teaching pro-


fessors to engage in organized research and provides re-
search training for undergraduate and graduate students.
THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING SERVICE is a
research, publication, and service adjunct of the Depart-
ment of Political Science in the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences. It carries on a continuous program of research on
public administration and public policy in Florida; it pub-
lishes research and surveys of governmental and adminis-
trative problems in both scientific and popular monograph
form. In addition, the Public Administration Clearing Service
coordinates the programs of instruction and public service
training in cooperation with other units of the University.
THE COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER, the re-
search arm of the College of Journalism and Communica-.
tions, conducts pure and applied research in a variety of
fields of mass communication, including advertising, broad-
casting, journalism and public relations. It also serves as a re-
source for college faculty and students in their own research,
assists the media and other organizations in their research
pursuits, and sponsors programs related to the mass com-
munication needs of the many communities served by the
University. The Center is also headquarters for the Florida
Opinion Poll.
THE DIVISION OF BUDGET AND ANALYSIS is the prima-
ry unit responsible for financial and budgetary planning and
control, for the University. The Division is, instrumental in
,seeking the resources necessary to achieve the goals of the
University and works with the Vice Presidents to achieve the
most effective allocation of these resources. Data Adminis-
tration for the University is coordinated by the staff, who
also conduct extensive institutional research.
FACILITIES PLANNING performs the analysis and plan-
ning required to ensure that available fixed capital outlay re-
sources are used in providing adequate facilities for the
many and diverse programs of the University of Florida at
minimum long-range cost. Work is carried out by the pro-
fessional staff and related committees in the areas of campus
planning, space assignment, coordination of architectural
design and construction of facilities.
THE FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER,
which is funded by the Department of the Interior, was es-
tablished in 1964 at the University of Florida as the result of
the passage of P.L. 88-379--The Water Resources Research
Act of 1964-"to stimulate, sponsor, provide for, and supple-
ment present programs for conduct of research, investiga-
tion, experiments, and the training of scientists in the fields
of water and of resources which affect water." The Center's
Director operates under the general policy guidance of an
advisory committee appointed by the President of the Uni-
versity. Research projects administered by the Center and
pertaining to the achievement of adequate statewide water
resource management, water quality and water quantity are
being conducted by professors in various departments at the
University of Florida, and other colleges and universities in
-the State. Graduate assistants may be employed on these
projects or other activities of the Center.


COMPUTATIONAL FACILITIES
NORTHEAST REGIONAL DATA CENTER (NERDC)
In addition to numerous small digital and hybrid com-
puters located on the campus, the University of Florida
serves as the host site for the Northeast Regional Data Cen-
ter (NERDC) of the State University System of Florida. Facil-
ities available to students, faculty, and staff through the
NERDC include three central-site computers: an Amdahl 470
V/6-II with 10 megabytes, an IBM 3033 Model N-12 with 12
megabytes (both running under OS MVS/SP-JES2), and an
IBM 4341 Model Group II with 8 megabytes running under
VM/SP. These are supported by a combination of IBM 3330,
3350, 3370, and 3380 disk drives, 9-track and 7-track tape
drives, two 3203 Model 5 high-speed printers, and three 3705
Communication Controllers.
NERDC is a State University System support facility for the
University of Florida and for other state educational institu-
tions and agencies in northern Florida. NERDC's facilities are
7





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


used for instructional, administrative, and research comput-
ing. The organizations directly responsible for computing at
the University of Florida are the Center for Instructional and
Research Computing Activities (CIRCA-UF), University of
Florida Administrative Computing Services, Shands Teaching
Hospital & Clinics, Inc. Data Processing Division, the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center, and the Institute for Food and Agricul,
tural Sciences. Access through NERDC to four other Regional
Data Centers in the State is available through the State Uni-
versity System Computer Network. The Network links the
Northeast Regional Data Center, the Northwest Regional
Data Center (in Tallahassee), the Florida State University
Computing Center (at Florida State University in Talla-
hassee), the Central Florida Regional Data Center (at the
University of South Florida in Tampa), and the Southeast Re-
gional Data Center (at Florida International University in Mi-
ami).
NERDC provides facilities for input and output in the form
of punched cards, magnetic and paper tape, disks, graphics,
and Computer Output Microfiche (COM). NERDC supports
batch processing through more than 1000 interactive termi-
nals, These terminals support interactive VM/CMS, VS APL,
CICS/VS, ATMS, TSO, MUSIC, ASSEMBLER, BASIC, WATFIV,
FORTRAN, several versions of SCRIPT, PL/I, COGO, PAN-
VALET, and the Terminal Control Program (TCP), a locally
written editor and remote-job entry facility. Graphics output
is available through a Gould 5100 Electrostatic Plotter oper-
ated at NERDC's central site.
Extensive software is provided for batch processing sup-
porting the major high-level languages including FORTRAN,
ASSEMBLER, COBOL, PL/I, PASCAL, and ALGOL; the SYS-
TEM 2000 and INQUIRE data base management systems;
MARK IV and EASYTRIEVE file handlers and report gener-
ators; student-oriented compilers and interpreters including
WATFIV, PL/C, ASSIST, PASCAL, WATBOL, and SPITBOL;
most major statistical packages including SAS, SPSS, SCSS,
BMDP, and TROLL; text-editing programs such as ATMS and
SCRIPT; several libraries of scientific and mathematical rou-
tines including IMSL and the HARWELL library; graphics pro-
grams such as SAS/GRAPH, PLOT79, SURFACE II, GDDM,
and Gould plotting software; mini and micro computer sup-
port; and many other program packages, local and IBM utili-
ties, and special-purpose languages.
More information is available through the NERDC's
Guidebook for New Users, NERDC's monthly newsletter
(/UPDATE), volumes of the NERDC User's Manual, and from
the NERDC User Services section.





CENTER FOR INSTRUCTIONAL
& RESEARCH COMPUTING ACTIVITIES (CIRCA)
The Center for Instructional and Research Computing Ac-
tivities (CIRCA) provides a variety of computing services for
University of Florida students and faculty. CIRCA provides
consulting, programming and analysis, data base design and
implementation, statistical analysis, equipment repair, data
entry services, open-shop unit-record equipment, interac-
tive terminals, and remote-batch operations which are avail-
able at several locations across the UF campus.
CIRCA operates two VAX 11/780 computers for instruc-
tional use, each with two megabytes of real memory, an
RM80 124-megabyte system drive and an RPO7 516-mega-
byte user drive, and a TU78 tape drive. The machines com-
municate via DECNET and run the VMS operating system.
Terminals are connected via a Gandalf port selector provid-
ing local and remote terminal access to both NERDC and
CIRCA computers. Dial-up facilities are also provided. Soft-
ware includes FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, PASCAL,
SNOBOL, APL, IMSL, TSP, SPICE, MINITAB, BMDP, CER-
RITOS Graphics, and support for Imlac and GiGi graphics
terminals.
Additional information is available from the CIRCA Con-
sultant on Duty in 411 Weil Hall, UF, (904) 392-0906, SUN-
COM 622-0906.


INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
THE INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCI-
ENCES is the University of Florida's statewide agricultural re-
search and educational organization. IFAS programs extend
into every county, and reach people in virtually every com-
munity in Florida.
The primary mission of IFAS is to help Florida realize its
maximum potential for agricultural development, and to
contribute to the solution of many social, economic, envi-
ronmental and cultural problems of concern to the people
of the state. This vital developmental mission is carried out
through the three functions of resident instruction, research,
and extension. These are carefully interrelated to provide a
highly coordinated effort for the benefit of Florida its
citizens and its industry. This effort is guided by the Vice
President for Agricultural Affairs.
The offices of the Vice President, as well as the Deans for
Resident Instruction, Research and Extension are located
near the center of campus in McCarty Hall. Administrative
offices of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation
are located in Newins-Ziegler Hall. The Hume Agricultural
Library is located in the McCarty Hall complex.
The resident instruction programs conducted through the
College of Agriculture and the School of Forest Resources
and Conservation, are concerned with educating young men
and women for the nation's growing and increasingly com-
plex agricultural industry. The curricula for the different
fields of study are structured to provide the business, tech-
nological and science education necessary for graduates to
meet the ever changing needs of a diverse and highly spe-
cialized agriculture, as well as related business and industry.
All academic departments offer an undergraduate program
leading to a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. The School
of Forest Resources and Conservation offers an under-
graduate program which leads to the Bachelor of Science in
Forest Resources and Conservation. Graduate programs at
the masters level are offered by all academic units. The Doc-
tor of Philosophy degree is offered in 12 specialties.
The mission of the IFAS research programs is one of devel-
opment, as well as improving existing technology to enable
Florida's agricultural industry to become more efficient, par-
ticularly in reducing dependence on consumption of fossil
fuels; to improve consumer health and nutrition and to im-
prove the social and economic well-being of producers and
consumers of agricultural commodities and resources.
Through the network of 23 research and education centers,
located in various areas of the state, applied as well as basic
research efforts develop new and improved technology to
meet the agricultural needs of Florida. Additional IFAS re-
search information is contained under THE AGRICULTURAL
EXPERIMENT STATION of the Organized Research section.
The Florida Cooperative Extension Service is administered
by IFAS in cooperation with the several Boards of County
Commissioners in the state and the U.S. Department of Agri-
culture. Extension offices in all 67 counties are responsible
for the transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational programs. These programs are tailored
to fit the needs of the many audiences in agricultural pro-
duction, marketing and utilization; home economics; com-
munity resource development, marine sciences and energy.
Audiences include adults and youth, rural and urban
citizens, minorities and people from all economics levels.
In 1972, the Center for Community and Rural Develop-
ment was established to provide statewide coordination of
education programs in community development for rural
and non-rural .metropolitan areas. This center is concerned
with improving the economic conditiontio's in these areas so
that people have better employment opportunities. Through
support of undergraduate and graduate education the Cen-
ter is assisting in the training of young people to provide
leadership in planning and developing local programs.
Courses of study in the economics of environmental quality,
natural resource planning and development, rural income
and employment, and regional economic planning help
them make definite contributions toward improving the ec-







GENERAL INFORMATION


onomic and social conditions of non-urban areas.
The Center for Environmental and Natural Resources Pro-
grams was created in October, 1973, to provide statewide co-
ordination for the IFAS research and education programs
concerned with solving some of the serious environmental
and natural resources problems related to agriculture
throughout Florida. The Center is involved in developing
ways to protect managed agriculture ecosystems from envi-
ronmental damage, integrating environmental practices into
agricultural production technology and protecting and
enhancing the quality of all of Florida's environment.
In 1980, IFAS received approval for the establishment of
the Center for Biomass Energy Systems. The center coordi-
nates planning, development and implementation of re-
search related to production of various types of plant
biomass, methods of converting biomass to practical forms
of fuel and systems for utilizing bio-fuels and their co- and
by-products.
The creation of an Office of International Programs in
1966, formalized the international commitment of IFAS. The
Office of International Programs is responsible for adminis-
tration, coordination and development of all activities which
build or strengthen the international dimension of IFAS. This
includes participation in the determination of contract and
grant policy, development of outside funding sources for in-
ternational research and training projects, and assistance in
the initiation of new education programs. Integration of in-
ternational programs into each department is a specific ob-
jective. This provides a unique opportunity for focusing
maximum resources available on the project. Both faculty in
the state and those overseas benefit by the interchange of
ideas. Education and research is handled under the same of-
fice by the Center for Tropical Agriculture established in
1965.


THE J. HILLIS MILLER'HEALTH CENTER
Outreach to people through patient care, education,
research and community service has been the guiding
rule of the University of Florida's J. Hillis Miller Health Cen-
ter since its founding in 1956.
Today, these services emanate from a modern institution


that encompasses six colleges medicine, nursing, pharma-
cy, health related professions, dentistry and veterinary medi-
cine and two teaching hospitals Shands for human pa-
tients and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for
animals.
Shands Hospital, recently granted official status as a
private non-profit corporation, serves as a major referral cen-
ter for modern patient care and clinical training of students
in the health professions. The Veterinary Medical Teaching
Hospital serves the state's practicing veterinarians by provid-
ing a modern, well-equipped facility for referring animal pa-
tients with rare or complicated diseases.
The state's first college of dentistry became operational at
the Health Center in 1975, followed by the first college of
veterinary medicine in late 1977.
Both the care of patients and the education of health prac-
titioners are strengthened by the Health Center's affiliations
with the nearby Veterans Administration Medical Center,
plus a well-developed, cooperative education program with
11 urban hospitals-and three colleges in Jacksonville, and an
educational affiliation with four hospitals in Pensacola.
Presently, some 3,500 students are receiving training at the
Health Center through 42 different health professions pro-
grams. These academic programs help'the students to un-
derstand that health care involves the health team: the phy-
sician; the nurse; the dentist; the pharmacist; persons in
health related professions; the researcher; the educator; the
counselor. Students learn that by training together, and later
by working together, they will contribute more effectively to
the patient's well being.
In addition, the Health Center's extensive involvement in
research (a multi-million dollar enterprise of its own) brings
the students and health care practitioners in touch with
some of the latest information regarding diagnosis, treat-
ment and prevention of illness.
Since the opening of its first units the Colleges of Medi-
cine and Nursing -the Health Center has become a leading
center for health care, education and research in the South-
east. The institution is located on the southern edge of the
University of Florida campus and is named for the late presi-
dent of the university, Dr. J. Hillis Miller. Dr. Miller's vision
and determination helped formulate the early planning of
the health complex as an integral part of the university.










ADMISSIONS



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSIONS
Application for admission to any undergraduate College,
School or Division of the University must be made to the
Admissions Section of the Office of the Registrar on the
forms prescribed and by the dates indicated below. It is
quite proper to correspond with Deans, Directors or Depart-
ment Chairmen, but such contact with University officers
does not in any way eliminate the necessity for filing a
formal application in the Office of the Registrar by the dates
specified.
How to Apply: An applicant should address a request to
the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, University of
Florida asking for application forms. Forms and directions for
completion of applications vary with the level of entry at the
University and the applicant should indicate that forms are
being requested for admission as a Freshman, Under-
graduate Transfer, Postbaccalaureate, Graduate, Dental,
Law, Medical, Veterinary Medicine, or Special student, as the
case might be.
IMPORTANT NOTE: An application for admission must be
filed for the specific term that the studeht wishes to enter
the University and will be considered for entrance in that,
term ONLY. Applicants wishing to change their planned en-
try date should contact the Admissions Office for applica-
tion instructions. An approval for admission is valid ONLY
for entrance in the term specified in the admission notice
and does not in any way imply that approval would also be
given for entrance in any other term.


GENERAL STATEMENT
The University encourages applications from qualified ap-
plicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious, and
ethnic groups. The University does not discriminate on the
basis of handicap in admission or access to its programs and
activities. Both the Educational Testing Service (SAT) and
The American College Testing Program (ACT) have
brochures describing special testing arrangements for handi-
capped applicants and there are alternate admissions pro-
cedures for handicapped applicants who are unable to take
the required tests.
A brief summary of the general requirements for admis-
sion or readmission to any college or division of the Univer-
sity is given below:
1. A satisfactory academic record. Each applicant must
furnish a complete chronological record of educational in-
stitutions previously attended. Official transcripts must be
submitted in accordance with instructions which accom-
pany the application form. '
2. Satisfactory.scores on achievement tests or aptitude
tests as noted in the application instructions.
3. A satisfactory conduct record.
NOTE: Board of Regents regulations provide that
furnishing false or fraudulent statements or information in
connection with an application for admission or residence
affidavit may result in disciplinary action, denial of admis-
sion, and invalidation of credits or degrees earned.
The specific requirements for readmission (at the same or
a different level) of a student previously enrolled at the Uni-
versity of Florida are given in the STUDENT REGULATIONS
section of this catalog. Consult the index for page number.
The specific requirements for admission to the University
of Florida for the first time as a Freshman, Undergraduate
Transfer, Postbaccalaureate, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medi-
cal, Veterinary Medicine, or Special student may be found in
the appropriate sections which follow. It should be under-
stood, however, that minimum requirements are given and
that admission to the University is a selective process. The
satisfaction of minimum requirements does not auto-
matically guarantee admission. Under Board of Regents pol-


icy up to ten per cent of the students admitted during the
academic year at any level may be admitted as exceptions to
the minimum requirements. The University Admissions
Committee is the agency at the University of Florida that is
responsible for the admission of undergraduate students un-
der this exception policy. For additional information regard-
ing this policy, contact the Minority and Disadvantaged Ad-
missions Officer, Office of the Registrar.
The admission requirements have been arrived at after a
very careful study of the experiences of thousands of stu-
dents over a long period of years. In every case minimum re-
quirements have evolved from studies of student per-
formance at the University of Florida. These studies have
had as a primary objective the identification of factors that
would indicate a reasonable chance for successful comple-
tion of University of Florida work.
The University Admissions Committee is responsible for
administering all admissions to the University and its various
components including applicants approved as exceptions to
the minimum admission requirements set forth in this
catalog.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Flor-
ida for the first time will be considered for admission as fol-
lows:
1. Beginning Freshmen: students who have never at-
tended college. (See following section, ADMISSION AS A
FRESHMAN).
2. Undergraduate Transfers: students who have previously
attended any college or university, regardless of amount
of time spent in attendance or credit earned, but who
have not received a bachelor's degree. (See following sec-
tion, ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER STUDENT TO UNDER-
GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES).
3. Postbaccalaureate Students: students who have re-
ceived a bachelor's degree but do not wish to be admitted
to graduate study. (See following section, ADMISSION AS
A POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENT.)
4. Graduate Students: candidates for Master's or Doctor's
degrees. (See following section, ADMISSION TO GRADU-
ATE SCHOOL).
5. Dental Students: candidates for admission to the Col-
lege of Dentistry. (See following section, ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY).
6. Law Students: candidates for admission to the College
of Law. (See following section, ADMISSION TO THE COL-
LEGE OF LAW).
7. Medical Students: candidates for admission to the Col-
lege of Medicine. (See following section, ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE).
8. Veterinary Medicine Students: candidates for admission
to the College of Veterinary Medicine. (See following sec-
tion, ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE).
9. Special Students: applicants who do not fall in one of
the above categories. (See following section, ADMISSION
AS A SPECIAL STUDENT).
10. Transient Students: applicants who wish to enroll for
one term only in order to complete work for transfer back
to parent institution. (See following section, ADMISSION
AS A TRANSIENT STUDENT).



TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The Traveling Scholar Program affords graduate students
at State University System institutions an opportunity to take
course work or Conduct research activities at any of the other
institutions in the System. Course work taken under the aus-
pices of the Traveling Scholar Program at another university
in the System will apply for graduate credit at the student's
home institution. The deans of the graduate schools of the
State universities are the coordinators of the Program. For
details regarding the Traveling Scholar Program and ap-
proval to participate in it, a student must apply to the dean
of the graduate school on his home campus.







ADMISSIONS


UNDERGRADUATE
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION PROGRAM
The Undergraduate Interinstitutional Registration Pro-
gram enables students at State University System institutions
to take advantage of special resources and programs avail-
able on another campus in the System but not available at
their home institution, e.g., special course offerings, research
opportunities, unique laboratories, overseas study programs,
and library collections. Course work taken under the Under-
graduate Interinstitutional Registration Program will be ac-
cepted for credit at the student's home institution. A student
must be recommended to participate in the Program by his
own academic dean, who will initiate a visiting arrangement
with the appropriate dean at the host institution.


PERSONAL HEALTH
HISTORY REQUIREMENT
A personal healthhistory completed by you and reported
on forms supplied by the University Physician are required
prior to initial enrollment at the University of Florida. If your
application for admission is approved, the health history
form will be forwarded to you for you to complete and re-
turn to the University Physician. Your form should be re-
ceived by the University Physician at least two weeks prior to
your planned date of entrance.


ADMISSION AS A FRESHMAN
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NEVER ATTENDED COLLEGE)
When to'Apply: No application will be considered for the
Freshman Class more than one year in advance of the term
for which entrance is sought. The best time to apply is the
early part of the Senior year in Secondary School. Priority in
admission to the Fall class will be given to qualified appli-
cants whose applications and supporting records are re-
ceived in the Admissions Office prior to March 1st. Applica-
tions for the Fall class received after March 1st will be con-
sidered on a "space available" basis only. The deadlines for
receipt of applications for other terms are listed in the Uni-
versity Calendar.
Admission of students is on a selective basis. The avail-
ability of community junior colleges and other state univer-
sities in Florida has caused the Board of Regents to assign to
the University of Florida a role in the total state system of
higher education which demands that the entering
Freshman Class be limited in number. Such limitation does
not prevent students from subsequently applying for admis-
sion to upper division and professional schools of the Uni-
versity since they may attend junior colleges or other univer-
sities and if qualified, then transfer to the University's upper
division colleges in accordance with rules printed elsewhere
in this Catalog.
The requirements for admission set forth below are desig-
nated to give priority to those applicants whose potential on
the basis of their record indicates the greatest likelihood of
success and the obtaining of maximum benefits from the
Lower Division program at the University of Florida.
A. Requirements for admission Florida students
For consideration a student must meet the following mini-
mums:
1. Graduation from an accredited secondary school.
2. Twelve academic units in college preparatory courses.
The following distribution of the required twelve aca-
demic units is recommended.
English (2 of which include substantial writing
requirements.) .............................. .................... 3
Math (At the Algebra I and above levels) .................... 2
Natural Science (1 of which includes substan-
tial laboratory require ents) ...................................... 2


Electives ....................... ......................................... 5
(From the areas of English, Mathematics,
Foreign Languages, Natural Sciences,
Social Sciences.)
3. An overall "C" average as computed by the University
of Florida in academic courses.
4. A total score of at least 840 on the Scholastic Aptitude
Test (SAT) or a composite score of 17 or above on the
American College Testing Program (ACT).
5. A record of good conduct. Major or continuing dif-
ficulty with school or other officials may make an appli-
cant ineligible regardless of academic qualifications.
Any Florida student who meets the above minimum ad-
mission requirements and is interested in attending the Uni-
versity of Florida is urged to submit an application. The Uni-
versity will do everything possible to accept all qualified ap-
plicants who apply before the application deadline date. If
the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number that
the University is permitted to enroll, admission will be on a
selective basis. An applicant's total high school record in-
cluding grades, test scores, educational objective and pat-
tern of courses completed, rank in class, school recommen-
dation and personal record will be considered in the selec-
tion process.
Composite pictures of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
results of recent Freshmen classes at the University of Florida
indicate that more than 50 percent score 500 or above on the
Verbal section and more than 75 percent score 500 or above
on the Math section. In addition, more than 50 percent of
each entering class has earned a "B" or better average in
high school academic subjects. While there is no minimum
grade average or test score which in itself assures a student
of admission or success in college, prospective applicants are
urged to discuss the meaning and implication of these data
with their school counselors when considering the Univer-
sity of Florida.
B. Requirements for admission- Non-Florida Students.
Because of a limited entering Freshman class each Fall,
only a small number of highly qualified students from states
other than Florida may be admitted. The minimum require-
ments for consideration are essentially the same as for Flor-
ida students except that priority in consideration for admis-
sion will be given to those applicants who present scores of
at least 600 on each section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of
the College Entrance Examination Board and, an academic
average of "B" or better.
C. Admission by examination alone
All freshman applicants must submit a transcript of their
high school record and scores on either the SCholastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) as in-
dicated in the application instructions. Applicants who be-
lieve their preparation for college is not accurately reflected
by their high school grades and/or aptitude test scores are
encouraged to also submit their scores on the College Board
Achievement Tests.
A student can qualify for admission as an entering
freshman on the basis of College Board Achievement Tests
.alone. Scores must be submitted on at least three tests in-
cluding: (1) English Composition, (2) Mathematics, and (3)
one test from among the sciences or social studies. A Florida
student must present a total score on the three tests of at
least 1500 with a minimum score of at least 500 on each test.
A non-Florida student must present a total score of at least
1600 with a minimum score of at least 500 on each test. This
option is not available to students who take college courses
in the above subject areas prior to completing the College
Board Achievement Tests.
A student can also qualify for admission as an entering
freshman on the basis of College Board Advanced Place-
ment Tests alone. Scores must be submitted on at least three
tests including: (1) English-Language Composition, (2) Cal-
culus AB or Calculus BC, and (3) one test from among the
sciences or social sciences. A Florida student must present a
total score on the three tests of at least 9 with a minimum

11





General

ADMISSIONS


score of at least 3 on each test. A non-Florida student must
present a total score of at least 10 on the three tests with a
minimum score of at least 3 on each test. Advanced place-
ment credit will be awarded for each test in which the stu-
dent achieves a score of 3 or higher. This option is not avail-
able to students who take college courses in the above sub-
ject areas prior to completing the College Board Advanced
Placement Tests.



OTHER INFORMATION OF
INTEREST TO PROSPECTIVE
FRESHMAN APPLICANTS
Early Admission
Applications for Early Admission (i.e. admission following
completion of the Junior year in high school) from superior
students are encouraged and will be considered on an indi-
vidual basis by the University's Admissions Committee. Ap-
plications should be submitted in accordance with dead-
ines published in the University Catalog.
In addition to the application, the following items are
needed for processing Early Admission applicants.
1. A written statement by the student setting forth reasons
for requesting early admission.
2. An official transcript of the applicant's secondary school
record covering the 9th, 10th and 11th years. Generally, an
overall academic average of B+ is expected.
3. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or
the American College Testing Program (ACT). Generally, a
score of approximately 600 on each section of the SAT or
a composite score of 28 on the ACT is expected.
4. A letter of recommendation from the student's high
school principal or guidance counselor. The letter should
give specific reasons as to why the applicant would profit
more from Early Admission than by completion of the Sen-
ior year in high school.
An applicant for Early Admission may be required to come
to the campus for interviews by members of the Admissions
Committee before a decision is made on the application.
The Admissions Office will advise the applicant if interviews
will be required after all-of the above items have been re-
ceived and evaluated. IMPORTANT: Please note that an ap-
plicant should NOT report for interviews until advised by
the Admissions Office.
The University of Florida provides numerous op-
portunities other than Early Admission by which a student
may accelerate graduation. For additional information,
please refer to the section of this catalog entitled Time
Shortened Degree Opportunities.
Candidates' Reply Date. Applicants accepted for admis-
sion to the Fall Freshman class must indicate their en-
rollment plans within 30 days after acceptance.
Advance Housing Payment. Entering freshmen are re-,
quired to make a housing deposit within 30 days after accep-
tance if they desire to live in University housing. The hous-
ing deposit, less a $10.00 service charge, is refundable until
May 1st for applicants accepted for admission to the Fall
Freshman Class.
Admission with Advanced Standing. The University of
Florida is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program
(APP) and in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
of the College Entrance Examination Board. Under. the Ad-
vanced Placement Program a student entering the University
offers a nationally graded examination as evidence of com-
pletion of a college level course taken in high school. De-
pending on the results of the examination, the student may
receive University credit for courses covering similar materi-
al or exemption from such courses without credit. Under the
College Level Examination Program, the University grants
credits for satisfactory scores in each of the five areas of the
CLEP General Examinations. For further information, please
refer to the section of the Catalog entitled Time Shortened
Degree Opportunities.


Early Decision for Superior Students. Students with supe-
rior secondary school records (academic average at least 3.5)
and Junior year high school SAT test scores (approximately
600 each on the verbal and mathematics sections) may apply
for early decision. The student must certify that this is his
only application and this statement must be supported by
the signatures of his parents and appropriate school official.
The completed application must be received by November
*1, and, if admitted, the student must make his commitment
to attend the University of Florida, accompanied by his
housing payment, by December 1.


ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER
STUDENT TO UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE ATTENDED ANY COLLEGE OR
UNIVERSITY, REGARDLESS OF THE AMOUNT OF. TIME
SPENT IN ATTENDANCE OR CREDIT EARNED, ARE CON-
SIDERED AS TRANSFER STUDENTS.)
When to Apply: Applications may be submitted not more
than one year i(i advance and applicants are strongly urged
to apply at least six months prior to the date they plan to
enter. Applicants should refer to the DEADLINES FOR AP-
PLYING section of the University Calendar published in this
catalog as well as consult the portion of this catalog per-
taining to the individual college to which they intend to ap-
ply for specific .information regarding application deadlines.
(NOTE: In a number of undergraduate programs, the se-
quence of professional courses begins ONLY in the Fall Term
of the junior year.) An applicant who waits until the last pos-
sible date to file an application may find that it is impossible
to furnish the necessary supporting records in time to permit
a decision for the term that admission is desired.
In this section are listed the general requirements for ad-
mission of undergraduate transfer students. It should be ob-
served however, that ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY IS A
SELECTIVE PROCESS AND SATISFYING THESE GENERAL RE-
QUIREMENTS DOES NOT GUARANTEE ACCEPTANCE. At-
tention is also directed to the fact that Upper Division col-
leges of the University have established enrollment quotas
because of limitations of space and facilities. Transfer appli-
cants who meet the minimum admission requirements will
be referred to the selection committee of the appropriate
college for consideration of their enrollment within the
college's established quotas.
A transfer applicant should refer to the General Informa-
tion and Colleges sections of this catalog for an explanation
of the academic organization of the University.
If an applicant is accepted for admission, courses which
reasonably parallel the curriculum of the University of Flor-
ida that were completed with grades of "D" or higher at oth-
er accredited institutions are acceptable for transfer credit. It
is the prerogative of the college (within the University) that
administers the work for the degree being sought to de-
termine how transfer credit may be used in satisfying that
degree's specific course requirements. Not more than 64
semester hours (or 96 quarter hours) of credit transferred
from or through a junior college may be applied toward the
total credit hours requirement for a University of Florida de-
gree. Courses completed at a junior college in excess of a to-
tal of 64 semester hours may serve to meet specific course re-
quirements for a University of Florida degree but the credit
hours represented by those courses will not reduce the
number of credit hours to be completed at the University.

A. FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES
This section applies ONLY to students seeking to transfer
directly from a Florida public junior college with the As-
sociate in Arts degree in a university parallel program. All
other junior college applicants and undergraduate transfer
applicants from four-year or upper division colleges and
universities should consult Section B which follows.
The University of Florida subscribes to the Articulation
Agreement between the State Universities and Public Junior







ADMISSIONS


Colleges of Florida. Under this agreement, any graduate of a
State approved Florida public junior college is eligible for
admission to non limited access programs at the University if
the student has completed the university parallel program
and received the Associate in Arts degree, provided the de-
gree has been awarded on the basis of the following:
1. At least 60 semester hours of academic work exclusive of
occupational courses;
2. An approved general education program of at least 36
semester hours;
3. A grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 system on
all college level academic courses attempted.
By law, all applicants seeking admission to a program in
teacher education must submit scores on the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT). These
scores should be forwarded to the Admissions Office as
soon as possible after an application for admission has been
submitted. Some colleges with enrollment quotas may re-
quire applicants to submit test scores as a part of their selec-
tion process. When test scores are required by an Upper
Division college, the applicant will be advised directly by
that college.
An undergraduate transfer applicant who will enter the
University of Florida with junior class standing (AA degree
from a Florida public community college or 60 semester
hours of acceptable transfer credit) in the 1982-83 Spring
Term or later must have completed the College Level Aca-
demic Skills Project (CLASP) test in order to be admitted in
a degree-seeking status.
Within space and fiscal limitations, applicants who have
satisfied the above minimum requirements will be con-
sidered for admission at the junior level to an Upper
Division college. Such students may be required to take ad-
ditional preprofessional courses not completed at the junior
college. However, such courses will not reduce the number
of credits required in the Upper Division for a degree.

B. TRANSFER APPLICANTS OTHER THAN GRADUATES
FROM A FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE
This section applies to students seeking to transfer from a
Florida public junior college without an Associate in Arts de-
gree in a university parallel program and to all under-
graduate transfer applicants from other colleges or univer-
sities.
I. Requirements for admission to the Lower Division
1. Eligible for admission as a beginning Freshman: An ap-
plicant must have been eligible for admission to the Uni-
versity of Florida as a beginning Freshman in order to be
considered for admission to the Lower Division as a
transfer student. (See section, ADMISSION AS A
FRESHMAN.)
2. Good standing: An applicant must be in good standing
and eligible to return to any institution previously at-
tended. A student who for any reason will not be allowed
to return to an institution previously attended cannot be
considered for admission to the University of Florida.
3. Satisfactory record: An applicant must have an average
of "C" or higher (as computed by the University of Flor-
ida) on all work attempted at each institution previously
attended. No application can be considered until com-
plete official transcripts of all the applicant's under-
graduate work are in the possession of the Admissions Of-
fice. An official transcript must be furnished from each in-
stitution attended regardless of length of attendance or
credit earned. Official supplementary transcripts are re-
quired, as soon as they are available, for any work com-
pleted after making application. Since an average of "C"
or higher is required for graduation from the University of
Florida, one who has failed to maintain this average at an-
other institution is not eligible for admission. Regardless
of the.average earned, courses completed at other institu-
tions must reasonably parallel the curriculum at the Uni-
versity of Florida.
4. Satisfactory test scores: An applicant who will present
less than 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of accep-
table college courses (including not more than 4 semester


hours in Military Science and/or basic required Physical
Education) as credit for advanced standing must present
satisfactory scores on an acceptable general ability test.
Any of the following tests may satisfy this requirement. If
taken prior to first enrollment in college: the Florida
Twelfth Grade Placement Test, the Scholastic Aptitude
Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination Board, or
the American College Testing Program (ACT). Otherwise,
the applicant should furnish scores on the School and Col-
lege Ability Test, College Level (SCAT). The minimum ac-
ceptable score on these tests will vary with the amount
and quality of academic study the applicant will have
completed prior to transfer.
5. Satisfactory conduct record: An applicant must present
a satisfactory conduct record. Regardless of other quali-
fications, an applicant who has experienced serious or
continuing difficulty with school or other authorities be-
cause of improper conduct may find his application disap-
proved.
II. Requirements for admission to an Upper Division
College.
With the exception of items 1 and 4, an applicant for ad-
mission to an Upper Division College must satisfy the re-
quirements listed above for admission to the Lower Division.
By law, all applicants seeking admission to a program in
teacher education must submit scores on the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT). These
scores should be forwarded to the Admissions Office as
soon as possible after an application for admission has been
submitted. Some colleges with enrollment quotas may re-
quire applicants to submit test scores as a part of their selec-
tion process. When test scores are required by an Upper
Division college, the applicant will be advised directly by
that college. In addition, the following requirements must
also be satisfied.
1. Advanced Standing credit. An applicant must present a
minimum of 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of ac-
ceptable college courses, not more than four semester
hours of which are in Military Science and/or basic re-
quired Physical Education as credit for advanced standing.
2. Specific course requirements. An applicant must pres-
ent the courses listed as required for admission by the Up-
per Division college of his choice, or acceptable sub-
stitutes, as part of the courses offered for advanced stand-
ing credit. (See appropriate college section of this catalog).
Upon recommendation by the Upper Division college, an
applicant lacking some of the specific course require-
ments may be permitted to enroll in that college and com-
plete them if he meets all other requirements for admis-
sion; however, such Lower Division courses will not re-
duce the number of credits required in the Upper Division
for a degree.
3. College Level Academic Skills Project Test. By law, all
applicants admitted in a degree-seeking status to an upper
division college at an institution in the State University
System of Florida must have satisfactorily completed the
College Level Academic Skills Project Test (CLASP).
C. TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY
If an applicant is accepted for undergraduate transfer ad-
mission, courses completed at other regionally accredited
institutions of higher education with grades of "D" or higher
which reasonably parallel the curriculum at the University of
Florida will be accepted for transfer credit. The determina-
tion of how transfer credit may be used to satisfy the specific
course requirements for a degree is the prerogative of the
College within the University that administers the work for
the degree sought.
Substantially equivalent courses applicable to the
student's degree program at the University of Florida com-
pleted at non-regionally accredited institutions of higher ed-
ucation may be accepted for transfer credit on an individual
basis subject to validation by the student's subsequent per-
formance at the University of Florida.
Credit hours for work completed at a community or junior
college after the student has earned a total of 64 semester





General

ADMISSIONS


hours (or 96 quarter hours) of acceptable transfer credit at all
institutions attended will not be accepted for transfer credit
at the University of Florida. The courses represented by such
credit hours will be recorded on the student's University of
Florida record and may be used to satisfy experience re-
quirements but such courses will not reduce the number of
credit hours to be completed in the upper division at the
University of Florida in order to earn a degree.


ADMISSION AS A
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENT
When to Apply: Applications may be submitted up to one
year in advance and applicants are urged to apply as early as-
possible. Applications MUST BE SUBMITTED by the dead-.
line established for the term. Some departments have found
it necessary to establish deadlines for the receipt of applica-
tions and their supporting records that are earlier than the
deadlines established for the University and published in
the catalog. All applicants are advised to refer to the DEAD-
LINES FOR APPLYING section of the University Calendar
published in this catalog and to check with the appropriate
department regarding departmental deadlines.
Postbaccalaureate students may wish to enroll in courses
for any of the following reasons:
1. To validate undergraduate records from non-accredited
or unevaluated institutions;
2. To expand their academic background;
3. To earn a second bachelor's degree, or
4. To complete prerequisite courses for admission to grad-
uate study at some future date.
Application for admission as a postbaccalaureate student
must be made to the Admissions Section, Office of the Reg-
istrar, 'on forms supplied by that office. Applications are re-
ferred to the appropriate department for approval or disap-.
proval. No application will be considered unless complete
official transcripts) of all the applicant's prior collegiate
work are in the possession of the Admissions Office, and no
transcript will be considered official unless it is received
directly from the Registrar of the institution at which the
work was performed. Official supplementary transcripts)
are required, as soon as they are available, for any work com-
pleted after the application was filed.
Students who desire postbaccalaureate status in the Col-
lege of Education to obtain teacher certification must pro-
vide the college with a clear statement of certification goals
as a part of the requirements for admission. Interested stu-
dents should contact the College of Education for further in-
formation.
All students whose native tongue is not English making
application for admission as a Postbaccalaureate Student
must submit acceptable scores on Test of English as a For-
eign Language (TOEFL). A minimum TOEFL score of 500 is
required for admission to the College of Agriculture. A mini-
mum TOEFL score of 550 is required for admission to all oth-
er colleges.


ADMISSION TO
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
When.to Apply: Applications may be submitted up to one
year in advance and applicants are urged to apply as early as
possible. Applications. MUST BE SUBMITTED by the dead-
line established for the term. Some departments have found
it necessary to establish deadlines for the receipt of applica-
tions and their supporting records that are earlier than the
deadlines established for the University and published in
the catalog. All applicants are advised to check with the ap-
propriate department regarding departmental deadlines.
Application for admission to the Graduate School must be
made to the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, on
forms supplied by that office and at the times stipulated in
the University Calendar. Applications which meet minimum


standards for admission are referred to the graduate selec-
tion committees of the various colleges and divisions for ap-
proval or disapproval.
No application will be considered unless the complete of-
ficial transcripts of all the applicant's undergraduate and
graduate work are in the possession of the Admissions Sec-
tion,and no transcript will be accepted as official unless it is
received directly from the Registrar of the institution in
which the work was done. Official supplementary tran-
scripts are required, as soon as they are available, for any
work completed after making application.
In general, no student who is a graduate of a non-ac-
credited institution will be considered for graduate study in
any unit of the University.
All foreign students whose native tongue is. not English
making application for admission to the Graduate School of
the University of Florida must present their scores on TOEFL
(Testing of English as a Foreign Language). Each applicant is
asked to write TOEFL Educational Testing Service, Princeton,
New jersey, U.S.A., requesting a Bulletin of Information and
registration form. It is important to remember that final con-
sideration can not be granted a foreign student's application
for admission until his scores on this test are received by: Ad-
mission Section, Office of The Registrar, Uniersity of Flor-
ida, Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A.
Undergraduate Record: Unqualified admission to the
Graduate School is dependent upon the presentation of a
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or univer-
sity with an average of B for the Junior and Senior years. In
some units of the Graduate School and on the more ad-
vanced levels of graduate study, an undergraduate average
considerably above B may be required. In some units admis-
sion may be considered with an undergraduate average
slightly below B. College graduate admission selection com-
mittees take into account not only the general grade aver-
age, but the distribution of the course work and the quality
and extent of preparation for the graduate program which
the student proposes to undertake.
While the general admissions requirements described
above apply to both master's and doctoral candidates, it
should be noted that doctoral candidates must meet certain
additional requirements, which vary according to the pro-
grams established by the departments and colleges.
Furthermore, it is desirable for students planning to enter
certain colleges and departments to have a reading knowl-
edge of one foreign language.
Graduate Record Examination: A satisfactory average score
on the Graduate Record Examination is required for admis-
sion. Each applicant for admission must submit scores on the
aptitude test of the GRE, but either at the request of the de-
partment concerned or on his own volition, the applicant is
encouraged to submit in addition the score on one or more
advanced subject-matter tests of the GRE. The scores on all
tests taken will be weighed in regard to admission.
The GRE is given six times a year in October, December,
January, February, April and June at a great many loca-
tions in the United States, including Gainesville, Florida. To
determine exact dates and the most convenient locations,
students should write to the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey. Applications are required several
weeks prior to the examination, and scores are received
about a month after the examination. Hence, it is necessary
to apply to take the GRE in early September for admission to
the University in January; in early January for admission in
May or June; and in early March for admission in August.
Other GRE examinations are given for which application
must be made in November, December or May, but the GRE
examinations indicated above are the ones best correlated
with the University's admission deadlines.
Graduate Study in Business Administration.-Students
applying for admission to the Graduate School for study in
the College of Business Administration may substitute satis-
factory scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT) for the Graduate Record Examination. Students ap-
plying for admission to the Master of Business Adminis-
tration (MBA) program must submit satisfactory scores on
the GMAT. Applicants are requested to contact the Educa-







ADMISSIONS


tioral Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, for additional
information.
.Graduate Study in Law.-Students applying to the gradu-
ate program leading to the degree Master of Laws in Taxa-
tion must submit satisfactory scores on the Law School Ad-
missions Test (LSAT).


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
When to Apply: The Application Request Card for the
American Association of Dental Schools Application Service
(AADSAS) may be obtained after May 15, from the Office of
Admissions, College of Dentistry. The request card should
be sent directly to the AADSAS, P. O. Box 1003, Iowa City,
Iowa 52240. Upon receiving the application materials from
the AADSAS, the completed forms and supporting docu-
ments must be returned directly to the AADSAS no later
than October 15 of the year prior to anticipated enrollment
in dental school. Failure to meet this deadline will prevent
the Dental Admissions Committee from evaluating your re-
cord.
The data compiled by the AADSAS will be carefully eval-
uated by the Dental Admissions Committee and promising
applicants will be sent Formal Application forms which re-
quest additional information. The submission of a pre-
professional committee evaluation or letters of recommen-
dation from people in academics will not be necessary until
the Formal Application forms are filed. The Formal Applica-
tion forms and supporting materials should be submitted as
early as possible, but no later than November 15 of each ap-
plication year.
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation are
expected of the applicant. The student of dentistry must
possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic
preparation of the highest order because of the vast area of
science which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly
personal relationship between patient and dentist places the
latter in a position of trust, which demands maturity, integ-
rity, intellectual honesty, and a sense of responsibility. A
broad representation of the ethnic mixture of the State is
sought in the student body through an active recruitment
program. The College strictly adheres to the principle of
ethnic, racial, religious and social equality among its student
body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree. How-
ever, qualified students may be accepted without fulfilling
the degree requirements, provided they show evidence of
sufficient preparation for the study of dentistry. Applicants
with an overall "B" average as a minimum will receive
strongest consideration for admission to the College of Den-
tistry.
Every applicant must take the Dental Admission Test,
preferably in the Spring preceding the submission of his In-
itial Application or, at the latest, the Fall testing period. The
test is given twice a year at many college and university test-
ing centers. Following a review of all application materials
and Dental Admission Test scores by the Dental Admissions
Committee, interviews with members of this Committee will
be arranged for competitive applicants.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Den-
tistry bulletin.)


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF LAW
When to Apply: Applications can be accepted as indicated
in the College of Law Catalog.
Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the
College of Law must have received a baccalaureate degree
from a regionally accredited college or university and


achieved a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission
Test.
The minimum acceptable score on the Law School Admis-
sion Test required for admission varies with the total grade
point average achieved by the.applicant on all college work
attempted by the applicant prior to receipt of the first
bachelor's degree. The lower the grade point average, the
higher the Law School Admission Test Score must be to qual-
ify for admission. All applicants (including present and
former University of Florida students) must register with the
Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS) in lieu of re-
questing transcripts from each institution of higher educa-
tion attended. For more detailed information on admission
to the College of Law, please see the College of Law Catalog.
Advanced Standing Students: For information on admis-
sion to the College of Law with advanced standing see the
College of Law Catalog.


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
When to Apply: Because the number of places in the first
year class of the College of Medicine is limited, it is impor-
tant that a candidate make application as early as possible
during the Summer or Fall of the year preceding his in-
tended date of entry.
Personal qualities of high order-character, responsibility
and maturity are the primary requirements for admission.
The student must have demonstrated superior intellectual
achievement. A bachelor's degree is strongly recommended.
The quality of the academic background as well as the per-
formance of the student in relation to the load attempted,
will be weighed. A genuine interest in human welfare is im-
portant. Efficient methods of study and effective powers of
reasoning are essential.
The College admits both men and women. A limited
number of out-of-state students, in proportion to the
number in the University as a whole, may be admitted. Stu-
dents who have failed academically or are ineligible to con-
tinue in another medical school will not be admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in
another medical school will be considered provided (1) the
student is eligible to continue in his present medical school,
(2) the school he is now attending is a member of the As-
sociation of American Medical Colleges, and (3) space is
available.
Prospective applicants must take the Medical College Ad-
missions Test, preferably, by the Spring preceding the sub-
mission of the application. A personal interview will be re-
quired for final acceptance.
Graduate students who are candidates for the Ph.D. de-
ree in medical sciences should apply through the Graduate
School.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Med-
icine catalog.)


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
When to Apply: Application forms are available between
September 1 and December 1 from the Office of the Dean
for Student Services, College'of Veterinary Medicine. The
application package (residency status, application forms,
fees, letters of recommendation, GRE scores, etc.) must be
received by the Admissions Office by 4:30 P.M., December
15, for the applicant to be considered for admission.
Candidates seeking admission to programs leading to the
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree with em-
'phasis on animal disease problems should apply through the
Graduate School.
(See also the section on the College of Veterinary Medi-
cine on page 148.)

15





General

ADMISSIONS


ADMISSION AS
A SPECIAL STUDENT
When to Apply: Each application for admission as a spe-
cial student must be reviewed by the University Admissions
Committee. Applications cannot be considered if they are
received after the dates specified in the Catalog; and it
would be desirable for a person considering application as a
special student to initiate such an application at least three
months in advance of the term he wishes to enter, in order
to allow time for additional evidence to be presented if it
should be requested by the Admissions Committee.
Special students may be admitted to the various schools
and colleges of the Upper Division only by approval of the
University Admissions Committee. Each case will be con-
sidered on an individual basis. Applications for admission as
a special student must include: (1) records of previous edu-
cational experience (high school or college transcripts); (2) a
statement as to the type of studies to be pursued; (3) a brief
statement of the reason or reasons for selecting a special
program other than a regular one; (4) satisfactory evidence
of ability to pursue these studies for example, a student to
enroll as a special student for some technical courses and
who feels qualified to do so by reason of employment or
other experience; (5) satisfactory scores on such ability or
achievement tests as may be prescribed in individual cases
by the University Admissions Committee.


ADMISSION AS
A TRANSIENT STUDENT
Subject to availability of faculty, space and facilities, a reg-
ular undergraduate student in good standing at another ac-
credited collegiate institution may be permitted to enroll at
the University of Florida as a transient student in order to
complete work to transfer back to the parent institution. No
evaluation will be made of work previously completed and
it is the student's responsibility to secure such approval as
the parent institution may require.
Transient students are registered as NON-DEGREE stu-
dents and no application for admission is required. The ap-
propriate forms for enrolling as a NON-DEGREE student
should be requested from the Office of the Registrar. Since
registration is subject to the availability of space, approval to
enroll as a non-degree student cannot be given prior to the
first day of classes in the term for which the student wishes
to enroll.
Credit earned in a NON-DEGREE status is not auto-
matically applicable to a University of Florida degree should
the student later be admitted in a regular status. Admission
as a NON-DEGREE student in no way implies future admis-
sion as a regular student to the University of Florida.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION,
AND SOCIAL SECURITY
The University of Florida is approved for the education
and training of veterans under all public laws now in effect,
i.e., Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code (Disabled Veterans),
Chapter 32, Title 38, U.S. Code (Veterans Educational As-
sistance Program), Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold War
G.I. Bill), and Chapter 35, Title 38, U.S. Code (Children of
Deceased or Disabled Veterans). Students who may be
eligible for educational benefits under any Veterans Admin-
istration program are urged to contact the local Veterans Ad-
ministration representative as soon as accepted by the Uni-
versity. Students expecting to receive benefits under one of
these programs must file an application for benefits. No
certification can be made until the application is on file.
Benefits are determined by the Veterans Administration and
the University certifies according to their rules,and regu-
lations.


Inquiries relating to Social Security Benefits should be
directed to the student's local Social Security Office. The Of-
fice of the Registrar will submit enrollment certificates is-
sued by the Social Security Administration for students
eligible to receive educational benefits under the Social Se-
curity Act, providing the undergraduate student registers for
twelve semester hours or more.
A full time load for VA or Social Security benefits is twelve
hours per semester for undergraduates.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
FOREIGN STUDENTS
APPLICATION DEADLINE
The University receives a large number of applications
from international students each year. Because of the time
required to complete processing of the application and for
the student to make visa and financial arrangements, dead-
lines have been established after which applications cannot
be processed. The following schedule should be carefully
noted in submitting an application for admission:


Desired Date
of Entrance
August
January
May
June


Application Must Be Received
Prior to this Date
March 1
July 1
November 1
January 1


APPLYING FOR ADMISSION
International students seeking to enter the University of
Florida are considered for admission as follows:
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT: (An applicant who has not
earned a university degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's
degree).
POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDENT: (An applicant who has
earned a university degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's
degree but who is not seeking admission to graduate study).
GRADUATE STUDENT: (An applicant who has earned a uni-
versity degree equivalent to a U.S. bachelor's degree and is
seeking admission to graduate study)
The following items must be submitted by an interna-
tional student seeking admission to the University of Florida.
UNDERGRADUATE APPLICANT
(Applicant who has not earned a university-level degree)
1. International Student Application for Admission form
completely and accurately filled out:
2. Non-refundable application fee of $15 (U.S. currency):
An application will not be considered without the re-
quired application fee.
3. Proper transcripts (or certificates) of all academic re-
cords or examination results for each year of study from
the first year of secondary school and for all post-secon-
dary or university-level work attempted. All documents
must be accompanied by certified English translations.
4. Test Scores. (See section on TEST SCORE REQUIRE-
MENTS)
5. Confidential Financial Statement completely and ac-
curately filled out. This document will be kept strictly con-
fidential.
POST-BACCALAUREATE APPLICANT
1. Same as No. 1 above.
2. Same as No. 2 above.
3. Proper transcripts of academic records covering all
university-level work. These documents must be accom-
panied by certified English translations.
4. Test Scores. (See section on TEST SCORE REQUIRE-
MENTS)
5. Same as No. 5 above.
GRADUATE APPLICANT
1. Same as No. 1 above.
2. Same as No. 2 above.







ADMISSIONS


3. Proper transcripts of academic records covering all
university-level work. These documents must be accom-
panied by certified English translations.
4. Test Scores. (See section on TEST SCORE REQUIRE-
MENTS)
5. Same as No. 5 above.
TEST SCORE REQUIREMENTS
Excepted as noted below, all international students seek-
ing admission to the University of Florida are required to
submit satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL).
1. Foreign students whose native tongue is English or who
have studied at a United States college or university for
one year or more are not required to submit TOEFL scores
but must submit satisfactory scores on an appropriate ad-
missions test. Undergraduate applicants may submit
scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the Ameri-
can College Test (ACT). Graduate applicants must submit
scores on the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE).
2. In some cases, students educated in foreign countries
who apply for admission to graduate study while residing
outside the United States may be granted a one term post-
ponement of the GRE but NOT the TOEFL. Permission to
register for subsequent terms will depend upon the sub-
mission of scores on the Graduate Record Examinations.
3. All foreign students applying for admission to the Mas-
ter of Business Administration (MBA) program must sub-
mit satisfactory scores on the Graduate Management Ad-
mission Test (GMAT) before their application for admis-
sion can be considered.
TOEFL information and registration forms are available in
many locations outside the United States; usually at U.S. em-
bassies and consulates, at offices of the United States In-
formation Agency, from U.S. educational commissions and
foundations, at Binational Centers, and from many private
organizations such as the Institute of International Educa-
tion (IIE), the American Friends of the Middle East (AFME),
African American Institute (AAI), and the American-Korean
Foundation. Candidates who cannot obtain information lo-
cally on TOEFL, GRE, GMAT or SAT should write: Educa-


tional Testing Service, Princeton, NJ, 08540, U.S.A.
APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission must be accompanied by a
non-refundable application fee of $15 (U.S. currency). An
application will not be processed without the application
fee. If you find it difficult to submit the application fee be-
cause of currency restrictions in your country, we suggest
that you request a friend or relative in the United States to
submit the fee in your behalf.
ACADEMIC RECORDS
Consideration of an application for admission cannot be
given until ALL required credentials as indicated in the sec-
tion APPLYING FOR ADMISSION are received by the Ad-
missions Office. All documents must be accompanied by
Certified English translations and become the property of the
University. Credentials of applicants who do not enroll will
be destroyed and cannot be returned or forwarded
elsewhere.
IMPORTANT: Send all applications and credentials to the
Admissions Office, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32611, U.S.A.
NOTICE OF ADMISSION
If a student's application for admission to the University
of Florida is approved, an official notice of acceptance will
be sent by the University. Admission is for a SPECIFIC term.
If the student is unable to enroll for the term indicated in the
notice of acceptance, the Admissions Office should be in-
formed immediately. If the student wishes to be considered
for entrance to a different term, the Admissions Office must
be advised. Under no circumstances should an applicant
make definite plans to depart for Gainesville until officially
notified by the University that approval has been given to
the application for admission. A student who comes to the
campus without first receiving an official notice of accep-
tance does so entirely at his own risk. The student's presence
on the campus will not influence the decision on an applica-
tion for admission. Because of the limited resources avail-
able in terms of faculty, staff and physical facilities, only
those international students who submit superior academic
records can be approved for admission.










Expenses


APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be
accompanied by an application fee of $15.00. Application
fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions will be found in
the Admissions section of this catalog.


GENERAL
STUDENTS SHOULD BRING SUFFICIENT FUNDS, OTHER
THAN PERSONAL CHECKS TO MEET THEIR IMMEDIATE
NEEDS. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact
amount of fees.


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-
FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
(Section 6C-7.05, Florida Administrative Code)
(1) For the purpose of assessing registration and tuition
fees, a student shall be classified as a "Florida" or "non-
Florida" student.
(a) A "Florida student" is a person who has domicile in
and who shall have resided in the state of Florida for at
least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately pre-
ceding the first day of classes of the academic term in
which the student enrolls. In determining residency,
the university may require evidence such as voter regis-
tration, driver's license, automobile registration, loca-
tion of bank account, rent receipts or any other relevant
materials as evidence that the applicant has maintained
continuous residency. Physical presence for the entire
twelve-month period need not be required so long as
the conduct of the student, taken in total, manifests an
intention to make Florida his or her permanent dwell-
ing place. If such a student is a minor, it shall mean that
the parent or parents, or legal guardian of the student
shall have domicile in and have resided in the state of
Florida for the period stated above. "Florida student"
classification shall also be construed to include stu-
dents who hold an Immigration and Naturalization
Form 1-151, Resident Alien Registration Receipt Card,
or Cuban Nationals or Vietnamese Refugees who are
considered as Resident Aliens, provided such students
meet the residency requirement stated above and com-
ply with subsection (2) below. The burden of establish-
ing facts which justify classification of a student as a
resident and domiciliary entitled to "Florida student"
registration rates is on the applicant for such classifica-
tion.
(b) In applying this policy:
1. "Student" shall mean a person admitted to the in-
stitution or a person allowed to register at the institu-
tion on a space available basis.
2. "Minor" shall mean a person who has not attained
the age of 18 years, and whose disabilities of minority
have not been removed by reason of marriage or by a.
court of competent jurisdiction.
3. "Domicile" for fee paying purposes shall denote a
person's true, fixed, and permanent home and place
of, habitation. It is the place where the applicant lives
and remains and to which he expects to return when
he leaves, without intent to establish domicile,
elsewhere.
4. "Parent" shall mean a minor's father or mother, or
if one parent has custody of a minor applicant, it is
the parent having court assigned financial responsi-
bility for the education of the student; or if there is a
court appointed guardian or legal custodian of the
minor applicant, it shall mean the guardian or legal
custodian.
5. The term "dependent student," as used in this rule


is the same as a dependent as defined in sections
151(e)(1)(2)(3) and (4) of the Internal Revenue Code
of 1954. A copy of these provisions in the Internal
Revenue Code of 1954 is incorporated in this rule by
reference.
6. A "non-Florida" student is a person not meeting
the requirements of subsection (a) above.
(2) In all applications for admission or registration at the
institution on a space available basis, a Florida applicant,
or if a minor, the parent or legal guardian of the minor ap-
plicant, shall make and file with such application a written
statement, under oath, that the applicant is a bonafide
citizen, resident, and domiciliary of the state of Florida,
entitled as such to classification as a "Florida student" un-
der the terms and conditions prescribed for citizens, resi-
dents, and domiciliaries of the state of Florida. All claims
to "Florida student" classification must be supported by
evidence as stated in 6C-7.05(1) if requested by the regis-
tering authority.
(3) A "non-Florida student" or, if a minor, his parent or
guardian, after having been a resident and domiciliary of
Florida for twelve (12) consecutive months, may apply for
and be granted reclassification prior to the first day of
classes of any subsequent term, provided, however, that
those students who are non-resident aliens or who are in
the United States on a non-immigration visa will not be
entitled to reclassification. An application for reclass-
ification.as a "Florida student" shall comply with pro-
visions, of subsection (2) above. An applicant who has
been classified as a "non-Florida" student at time of ori-
ginal enrollment shall furnish evidence as stated in
6C-7.05(1) to the satisfaction of the registering authority
that the applicant has maintained continuous residency in
the state for the twelve months required to establish resi-
dence for tuition purposes. In the absence of such evi-
dence, the applicant shall not be reclassified as a "Florida
student." In addition, the application for reclassification
must be accompanied by a certified copy of a declaration
of intent to establish legal domicile in the state, which in-
tent must have been filed with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, as provided by Section 222.17, Florida Statutes. If
the request for reclassification and the necessary docu-
mentation is not received by the registrar prior to the last
day of registration for the term in which the student in-
tends to be reclassified, the student will not be reclassified
for that term.
(4) Unless evidence to the contrary appears, it shall be
presumed by the registering authority of the institution at
which a student is registering that:
(a) The spouse of any person who is classified or is
eligible for classification as a "Florida student" is like-
wise entitled to classification as a "Florida student."
This provision will not apply in the case of students
who are non-resident aliens or who are in the United
States on a non-immigration visa.
(b) If an applicant's eligibility for classification as a
"Florida student" is based on the residency of the
spouse, the spouse shall make and file with the applica-
tion written statement under oath, that said person is
the spouse of the applicant and a bonafide citizen, resi-
dent and domiciliary of the state of Florida, entitled as
such to classification as a "Florida student."
(c) No person over the age of 18 years shall be deemed
to have gained residence while attending any educa-
tional institution in this state as a full-time student, as
such status is defined by the Board of Regents, in the
absence of a clear demonstration that he has estab-
lished domicile and residency in the state, as provided
under subsection (3) above.
(d) Any "Florida student" who remains in the state, af-
ter his parent previously domiciled in Florida or sta-
tioned in Florida on military orders removes from this
state, shall be entitled to remain classified as a "Florida
student" so long as his or her attendance at a school or
schools in Florida shall be deemed "continuous." How-
ever, such student claiming continuous attendance
must have been enrolled at a school, college or univer-






EXPENSES


sity for a normal academic year in each calendar year, or
the appropriate portion or portions thereof, from the
beginning of the period for which continuous atten-
dance is claimed. Such a student need not attend sum-
mer sessions or other such intersession beyond the nor-
mal academic year in order to render his attendance
"continuous."
(5) Appeal from a determination denying Florida student
status to any applicant therefore may be initiated after ap-
propriate administrative remedies are exhausted by the fil-
ing of a petition for review pursuant to Section 120.68 F.S.
in the District Court of Appeal in the appellate district in
which the institution maintains its headquarters or where
a party resides.
(6) Any student granted status as a "Florida student,"
which status is based on a sworn statement which is false
shall, upon determination of such falsity,.be subject to
such disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by the pres-
ident of the university.
(7) Special Categories-The following categories shall be
treated as Florida residents for tuition purposes if ade-
quate documentation is provided:
(a) A member of the Armed Services of the United
States who is stationed in Florida on active duty
pursuant to military orders, the spouse and dependent
students.
(b) A veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States
of America with twenty (20) or more years of active mil-
itary service, including the spouse and dependent stu-
dents of such veteran's immediate family, provided that
the veteran is in Florida at time of retirement or moves
to Florida within one year following retirement and
files a declaration of Florida domicile.
(c) Full-time elementary, secondary, and community
college faculty members under current teaching con-
tracts in the state of Florida and their spouses and de-
pendent students.
(d) Full-time faculty, administrative and professional
and career service employees of the University System
and their spouses and dependent students.
(e) A student certified by his respective state for partici-
pation in the Academic Common Market Program of
the Southern Regional Education Board who is enrolled
in a program approved by the Florida Board of Regents.
(f) Florida domiciliaries living in the Panama Canal
Zone who have not established domicile elsewhere, in-
cluding the spouse and dependent students.
(g) Florida residents who had their residency in Florida
interrupted by service in the U. S. armed forces, the
Peace Corps or other similar volunteer organizations
fostered by the United States government shall be de-
emed to have had residency in Florida during times of
service in the aforementioned organizations.
(8) Reciprocal Agreements. The Board of Regents may
enter into agreements with appropriate agencies and in-
stitutions of higher education in other states and foreign
countries providing for the reciprocal exchange of stu-
dents enrolled and prospective in higher educational in-
stitutions to facilitate utilization of public higher educa-
tional institutions in this State and other states or coun-
tries. Such agreements may include provisions for waiver
or reduction of non-resident tuition for designated cate-
gories of students and may include contractual payments
to such other state or country, subject to the availability of
appropriations. Such agreements shall have as their
purpose the mutual improvement of educational advan-
tages for residents of this State and such other states or
countries with whom agreements may be made.

To claim Florida residence a student applying for admis-
sion should complete the residence affidavit on the applica-
tion form.
To change status from non-Florida a student must present
to the Registrar's Office a copy of the Declaration of Intent,
the completed Residence Affidavit Form, and evidence of
Florida residency as stated in (1)(a) above. To claim the mili-


tary exception (7a), the student must furnish the Registrar's
Office a copy of the military orders showing assignment to
Florida. A public school teacher must submit a written state-
ment from his or her employer as to his or her employment
status. A University employee must submit a statement from
the personnel office as to his or her employment status.


DEFINITION OF REGISTRATION
Registration consists of three major components:
1. The registrant must supply information requested by
the university for the purpose of establishing and adminis-
tering academic, financial and community relationships
between the university and the student;-
2. The registrant must supply course and schedule in-
formation needed to establish and administer his
matriculation in particular departments, courses and sec-
tions;
3. The registrant must pay all assessed registration and tui-
tion fees as well as satisfy all current or delinquent
amounts payable to the university.


REGISTRATION AND
INSTRUCTIONAL FEES
The University Calendar appearing at the front of this
Catalog sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each
semester. Registration, which includes the payment of fees,
must be completed on,or before the proper due date as
specified in the calendar.
FEE PAYMENT
Payment of fees is an integral part of the registration pro-
cedure. Fees are payable on the dates listed in the University
of Florida Calendar appearing at the front of the Catalog, or
the dates shown on statements sent those participating in
advance registration, and are processed by the University
Cashier at Student Financial Services, the Hub. Checks,
cashier's checks, and money orders written in excess of the
assessed fees will be processed and the difference refunded
according to University policy. Checks from foreign coun-
tries must be payable through a United State bank in United
States dollars. The University reserves the right to refuse
three party checks, altered checks, and checks that will not
photocopy.
FEE LIABILITY
LIABILITY IS INCURRED FOR ALL CREDIT HOURS REMAIN-
ING ON A STUDENT'S SCHEDULE AT THE CLOSE OF THE
DROP/ADD PERIOD EACH SEMESTER.
ASSESSMENT OF FEES
SStudents must assess and pay their own fees. UNIVERSITY
PERSONNEL WILL NOT BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR
PROPER ASSESSMENT OR MATHEMATICAL ACCURACY OF
CALCULATIONS.
FEE STRUCTURE WAS UNDER REVISION AT THE TIME OF
THIS PRINTING. FEE INFORMATION FOR ALL PROGRAMS
CAN BE OBTAINED AFTER JULY 1, 1983, BY CONTACTING
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES, ROOM 100 THE HUB,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32611.
STATE EMPLOYEES
FREE COURSE ENROLLMENT
Detailed information on the waiver of registration fees for
permanent full-time employees of the state may be ob-
tained from the Office of the Registrar.
Those who have been employed on a permanent full-time
basis for at least six months may be permitted to enroll for
six credit hours per term on a space available basis only.
STUDENT HEALTH FEE
Mandatory
The Infirmary Charge is Mandatory if you are taking 7 hours
or more. This charge is NOT part of any health insurance you
may have purchased. This charge is payable at Student Fi-




General

EXPENSES


nancial Services in the Hub by the fee payment deadline.
Optional
The Infirmary Charge is Optional for students registered for
6 hours or less. The payment of the optional health charge al-
lows students the privilege of receiving Infirmary services on
the same basis as full-time students. The Optional Health
Charge must be paid at the Student Health Infirmary.,Checks
are to be made payable to Student Health Services. Payment
may also be mailed to:
University of Florida
Student Health Services
Infirmary Building
Gainesville, Florida 32611
Health Fees are due by the regular fee payment deadline.

WAIVER OF HEALTH AND STUDENT
ACTIVITY AND SERVICE FEES
The University Controller may waive the Student Health
Fee and the Service and Activity Fee for students partici-
pating in such off-campus credit programs as the Mexican
Law Summer Program and the Utrecht Program.
These fees may also be waived at the discretion of the
Controller for those whose studies require them to be off-
campus for an entire semester or for such a duration as to
preclude their use of university facilities funded from these
fees.
A request for approval of such a waiver should be ori-
ginated by the dean or department chairman in charge of
the program upon request from the student enrolled in the'
program.
Approved waivers must be delivered to Student Financial
Services, the HUB, prior to the deadline for fee payments
shown in the front of this catalog for the semesters re-
quested. Waivers of this.type will not be processed after this
date nor shall refunds be issued.
CANCELLATION AND REINSTATEMENT.
1. The university will cancel the registration of a student
whose fee account for enrolled instructional courses is in,
arrears beyond the close of business on the twenty-eighth
day after the opening day of classes. A student whose reg-
istration is cancelled is not entitled to a refund beyond the
circumstances covered under the refund policy.
2. Reinstatement will require approval of the university
and payment of all delinquent liabilities.
A student whose registration has been cancelled or
flagged must request a reinstatement letter or request his
records be cleared at Student Financial Services, the HUB.
To expedite reinstatement, the student should deliver the'
letter to Registrar Records, Room 34, Tigert Hall.

DEADLINES
Students are reminded that deadlines are.enforced strictly.
The University does not have the authority to waive late
registration fees unless it has been determined that the
University is primarily responsible for delinquency in a
student account or that extraordinary circumstances war-
rant such waiver.
LOCAL ADDRESS
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO BE SURE
THAT A CORRECT CURRENT LOCAL ADDRESS IS ON
FILE WITH THE REGISTRAR AT ALL TIMES. Change of Ad-
dress forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office.
PICTURE I.D.
A CURRENT VALID PHOTO I.D. MUST BE PRESENTED IN
ORDER TO TRANSACT BUSINESS AT THE OFFICE OF
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES AND TO CASH CHECKS
AT THE REITZ UNION AND CAMPUS BOOKSTORE. Pic-
ture ID's can' be obtained from Equipment Distribution,
1215 GPA.


CASHING OF CHECKS
Students may cash checks at the Reitz Union and the
Campus Bookstore. There are separate check cashing poli-
cies for each area. Generally, students must have a current
validated fee card and a picture ID.

SPECIAL FEES AND CHARGES
AUDIT FEE. Fees for audited courses are the same as those
listed above for Florida students. The audit fee is the same
for Florida and non-Florida students.
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAMS. Examinations
are administered on campus on the third Saturday of every
month. Applications should be completed in the Office of
Instructional Resources, 1012 GPA, fifteen working days
before the day a test is to be given. The fee for the first exam-
ination is $25.00 and $22.00 for each additional test. Check
should be payable to College Level Examination Program.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION. The Aptitude Test of
the Graduate Record Examination is required for admission
to the Graduate School. A fee of $27.00 covers the cost of this
examination. These fees are payable to the Educational Test-
ing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
GRADUATE SCHOOL FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEST. All stu-
dents wishing to be certified as proficient in a reading
knowledge of French, German, or Spanish, must take the Ed-
ucational Testing Service. (ETS) Graduate School Foreign
Language Tests. A fee of $29.00 covers the cost of each exam-
ination. This fee is payable at Student Financial Services, The
Hub. Administrative arrangements to register for this exami-
nation will be made through the Office of Instructional Re-
sources.
LIBRARY BINDING CHARGE. Candidates for a graduate de-
gree with a thesis or dissertation pay a $14.00 charge for the
permanent binding of the two copies deposited in the Uni-
versity of Florida Library. This charge is payable at Student
Financial Services, The Hub, by the date specified in the
Graduate Catalog. A copy of the receipt must be presented
at the Graduate School office.
The above charges may be subject to change without notice.


REFUND OF FEES
1. Fees will be refunded in full for:
a. Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
b. Courses cancelled by the University.
2. With the exception of amounts required for collection un-
der bond and trust obligations, fees may be refunded in in-
stances of:
a. Involuntary call to active duty.
b. Death of a student.
c. Illness of the student of such duration or severity, as
confirmed by a physician, that completion of the quarter
is precluded, or
d. Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the Uni-
versity President.
Refunds may be requested at Student Financial Services,
Room 114, the HUB. Proper documentation must be pres-
ented when a refund is requested. A waiting period for pro-
cessing may be required. REFUNDS ARE NOT APPLIED AU-
TOMATICALLY AGAINST CURRENT OR SUBSEQUENT FEE
LIABILITIES.


PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All students' accounts are due and payable at Student Fi-
nancial Services, The Hub, at the time such charges are in-
curred.
University regulations prohibit registration, graduation,
granting of credit or release of transcript for any student
whose account with the University is delinquent.




General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


Student Affairs

The following information describes the responsibilities of
the various offices charged with assistance to students at the
University of Florida. Additional information may be found
in THE FLORIDA STUDENT GUIDE and THE CAMPUS DI-
RECTORY.


VICE PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS
The goals of the Division of Student Affairs include: de-
veloping effective and efficient services and programs for
students through the various departments within Student
Affairs; integrating student affairs and academic affairs;
directly involving students in the affairs of the institution;
encouraging a sense of community among students, faculty,
and administration; and increasing accessibility to and at-
tractiveness of the University of Florida to a wide variety of
persons.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is lo-
cated in 123 Tigert Hall and is open to assist individual stu-
dents and groups in matters concerning them. All students
are encouraged to share in the responsibility for enabling
the various divisions of the University of Florida community
to meet the needs of students.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs has ad-
ministrative responsibility for the following offices and pro-
grams at the University of Florida: Office for Student Serv-
ices, Student Housing Office, Office for Student Financial
Affairs, Career Resource Center, J. Wayne Reitz Union, and
University Counseling Center.


OFFICE FOR
STUDENT SERVICES
The Office for Student Services at the University of Florida
is committed to the total development of students. The ma-
jor purpose of this department's programs, services, and ac-
tivities is to facilitate and enhance the intellectual, psycho-
logical, personal, and social development of students. The
staff of the Office for Student Services, which includes deans
and directors, are responsible for planning, coordinating,
and implementing a variety of programs and services which
are designed to provide students with the opportunity to
reach their full potential, academically as well as in their per-
sonal lives.
Other major objectives of the Office for Student Services
include making students aware of and encouraging the use
of the resources of the University; interpreting the goals, ob-
jectives, and actions of the University to students; and en-
couraging a sense of community among students, faculty,
and staff.
A number of program functions emerge from these overall
purposes and are carried out by the Office for Student Serv-
ices. These programs include:
1. individual and group advising
2. planning and carrying out programs and services for
new students including orientation to the University
3. assisting and advising minority students
4. student conduct and discipline
5. assisting veteran students and coordinating VA benefits
with the Veterans Administration
6. coordinating services and programs for disabled stu-
dents
7. programs and services for older students
8. programs and services for women students
9. student leadership development and recognition pro-
grams
10. child care services (Baby Gator Nursery)
11. alcohol awareness programs


12. committee responsibility for student petitions and ad-
missions
13. providing exit interviews for students withdrawing
from the University
14. fraternity and sorority advising and coordination
15. liaison and advising Student Government and other
student organizations.
The International Student Center and the Institute of
Black Culture are also operational units of the Office for Stu-
dent Services.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
The International Student Services Center assists interna-
tional students in adjusting to the changing lifestyle and
study habits in a new and sometimes perplexing environ-
ment. Special services are provided related to foreign educa-
tioral and cultural backgrounds; language, legal, em-
ployment, academic, and personal matters; U.S. immigration
and other government agency responsibilities as aliens; and
currency exchange. The focus is on helping international
students achieve their educational goals, while providing an
insight into the culture of the United States through a pro-
gram of social activities, orientation seminars, and com-
munity visits.
INSTITUTE OF BLACK CULTURE
The Institute of Black Culture is an educational tool for
students at the University of Florida. It is a facility for en-
lightment and black awareness where Afro-Americans can
focus on their history, literature, art, culture, and lifestyle. It
is also a place where all ethnic groups can develop a better
understanding of blacks and an appreciation of black con-
tributions to American society. The center sponsors pro-
grams, exhibits and related activities.
SERVICES FOR HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
The Office for Student Services provides assistance for dis-
abled students. Services are varied dependent on individual
needs, and include but are not limited to: special campus
orientation, registration assistance, securing auxiliary learn-
ing aids, and assistance in general University activities. Stu-
dents with disabilities are encouraged to contact this office
to obtain any needed assistance.


STUDENT HOUSING
The University of Florida offers its resident students a
unique and exciting residence hall program. It is our belief
that living on campus is a profitable educational experience
that the students will long remember. Our desire is to pro-
vide accommodations and programs to meet the needs of
our students while promoting the overall educational goals
and objectives of the University.
The University of Florida has a large resident population
Composed of both in-state and out-of-state students, as well
as students from 90 different foreign countries. Since our
students come from differing environmental backgrounds
and social experiences, they bring with them varying needs
and expectations. Because of this diversity in our student
body, we feel it would be a disservice to our students to take
a unilateral approach in developing our residence hall pro-
gram. Therefore, we have developed a program based upon
alternatives and choices. Our students may select from vari-
ous housing accommodations and environments that best fit
their needs.


GENERAL INFORMATION
All freshmen who apply for admission to the University
will receive a Housing Application Card with their formal
letter of admission from the Admissions Office.
The University of Florida has no residency requirement for
freshmen attending the University for the first time during
the Fall Semester. Freshmen entering the University during

21




General -

STUDENT AFFAIRS


the Summer Term(s) must live on campus to be eligible for
Fall Semester on-campus housing. Entering students are free
to choose either on-campus or off-campus accommoda-
tions. Students who voluntarily contract for on-campus
housing normally must do so for the entire academic year
(August to May) if enrolled. However, residents must be
full-time students to be eligible to reside in the residence
halls. Full-time enrollment for residence is defined as being
enrolled in 12 credit hours if an undergraduate and 9 credit
hours if a graduate student.
All students other than beginning freshmen must initiate
their own arrangements for housing either by (1) applying to
the Division of Housing, Assignments Office for assignment
to University Housing facilities, or (2) obtaining accom-
modations in private housing (see Off Campus Housing)..
All correspondence concerning application for University
housing should be addressed to the Division of Housing, As-
signments Office, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida,
32611. An application for residence hall space for students
other than freshmen may be filed at any time after an appli-
cation for admission to the University has been approved.
Prospective students are urged to apply as early as possible
because of the demand for housing.
For all students other than beginning freshmen, applica-
tion requests are considered first-come, first-served, on a
space-available basis.
Roommate requests shall be considered if the individuals
wishing to room together submit their Housing Agreements
on the same date, clearly indicate their desire to room to-
gether on their respective Agreements, elect the same visita-
tion choice and assignment option, and are within similar
academic classification.
Disabled students are also offered housing on a first-
come, first-served, space-available basis. Accessible housing
is available for handicapped students once they are offered
housing. Students with special needs should indicate these
needs on their Housing Agreement.
ROOM STYLES
There are several room styles to fit the individual student's
preference. The most prevalent is the double room, accom-
modating two students, with central floor bath facilities.
Doubles are found in every area except Beaty Towers and
range from air-conditioned units with phones in Hume Hall,
to rooms with bay windows in Murphree.
All rooms have individual closets, storage space, dresser,
,bed and mattress, study desk and chairs.
Room rates vary, depending on such features as air condi-
tioning, phone service, and floor space. See rental rate chart
for specific charges.
Beaty Towers provide apartment living on campus. These
two-bedroom apartments are fully contained with their own
bathroom, study, kitchen, and two separate bedrooms for
four students. Each apartment is fully carpeted, air condi-
tioned, and has a telephone.
The Murphree Residential Area offers suites for two stu-
dents. These non-air-conditioned facilities offer the student
more individual living space. Each suite is made up of two
rooms one designed as a study and living area, the other
as a bedroom with a lavatory.
THE RESIDENCE HALL STAFF
AND STUDENT GOVERNMENT
A full complement of professional and para-professional
staff members is available to assist students in becoming a
part of campus life. The staff in residence act as referral
agents in acquainting students with the many resources of
the University. Our staff are also involved in a range of'ac-
tivities, from initiating social and intramural athletic pro-
grams to supplementing the various academic and develop-
mental programs. In addition, staff members supervise and
enforce policies designed to create an atmosphere con-
ducive to learning and growth.
Each floor or section is supervised by an undergraduate
Resident Assistant, the RA. Working in close conjunction
with the RA is a graduate student, the Hall Director, who co-


ordinates the area activities and insures, through the RAs, an
environment for learning. The Assistant Director of Housing
for Residence Life is a professional staff member and is re-
sponsible for the overall administrative and educational
functions within the residence area. The entire housing staff
is committed to servicing our students in the most effective
and responsible way possible. The student is why the staff
exists, and his/her development is our primary goal.

INTER RESIDENCE HALL ASSOCIATION
All students in the residence halls are encouraged to par-
ticipate in organizational activities which can play a signifi-
cant part in their educational, cultural, social, and recrea-
tional life. The Inter Residence Hall Association was estab-
lished to help stimulate this participation. IRHA represents
the collective interests of all resident students. The organiza-
tion also serves as a channel of communication between res-
idence area government councils, the University com-
munity, and other outside interests. This self-government
program at both the hall and area levels offers residents the
opportunity to help establish guidelines for group living and
to assist in the planning of social and educational activities
for their fellow students.

GENERAL SERVICES
TELEPHONES. Telephone services offered to students are
presently under review. Students will be notified of changes
in telephone service if they occur. Currently, a telephone is
conveniently located in each student room except in Buck-
man Co-op. Each room telephone provides 24-hour service
on campus and within the Gainesville area; cost of local serv-
ice is included in the rental rate. Charges for long-distance
calls are billed monthly to each room by Southern Bell, and
each student is responsible for paying directly to the tele-
phone company.
FOOD SERVICE. Gator Dining Service, a private food serv-
ice operation, maintains cafeterias and snackbars on campus
and offers meal plans. Hume Hall and Broward Hall have
cafeterias, Snackbars are located in Tolbert Hall and Graham
Hall. Cafeterias are also located in Johnson Hall, the Reitz
Student Union, and the Medical Center. It is the policy of
the University to provide well-prepared food at the lowest
possible price.
REFRIGERATOR RENTAL. The cost of refrigerators is not
included in the room rent (except Beaty Towers, apartments,
and selected suites for four). In most cases; it is best to make
arrangements for a refrigerator after arriving on campus
when roommates can share the cost and decide on available
space in the room. Upon check-in, the resident may opt to
rent a refrigerator for the room by contracting for a refrig-
erator at the Area Office. Presently, EMD Services, a privately
owned rental company, and authorized University service
(Phone: 373-3985) provides refrigerators to students. If stu-
dents bring their own refrigerators, they must make arrange-
ments for installation and removal. No refund will be
granted if a student brings a refrigerator to a hall already
furnishing such units.
CUSTODIAL SERVICE. Each residence hall (except co-ops)
has a staff of experienced custodians assigned to do general
cleaning of public areas, bathrooms, lounges, and hallways.
Other specific tasks are done in order to maintain good
housekeeping throughout the halls. Student room cleaning
is the responsibility of each resident.
INTERNAL SECURITY. Residence hall security is
monitored by the residence hall staff; external building se-
curity generally is the responsibility of the University Police
Department. Trained Housing Division Security Assistants
patrol the areas immediately adjacent to the residence halls.
VENDING. Various vending machines are conveniently lo-
cated in all residence halls for the comfort and pleasure of
students desiring such services.
LAUNDRY FACILITIES. Coin-operated washers and dryers
are provided in each residence area. Most students provide
their own irons; however, some area governments provide
irons on a check-out basis.






STUDENT AFFAIRS


SPECIAL HOUSING AREAS: HONORS, FAMILY
Recognizing the diversity of students' needs, the Division
of Housing offers several different living environments.
New students are assigned primarily to double or per-
manent triple rooms when first applying to the University,
but once on campus they may qualify for specialized areas.
Qualifying freshmen may be invited to live in the "Honors
Hall"(East Hall) with other selected freshmen and partici-
pate in an accelerated academic program. For more informa-
tion as to your eligibility to qualify for the "honors" program
and the Honors Hall, contact the Admissions Advisor for Su-
perior Students, (telephone (904) 392-1365).
Family Housing apartments are reserved for married stu-
dents and their children (if any), and student parents with-
out spouses who have dependent minor children under
their legal care or who qualify under the provisions of Feder-
al Regulations, Title IX.
A student must have applied for admission to the Univer-
sity of Florida prior to applying for on-campus family stu-
dent housing. He/she must be registered as a full-time stu-
dent as defined by his/her college or school during the
semester in which housing is desired in order to qualify for
a family housing apartment assignment. In order to maintain
occupancy, the student must make normal progress toward
a degree as determined by his/her college or school. As ap-
plicable, proof of marriage will be required, or the necessary
documents to support that a minor children) is in the legal
care of a student parent without a spouse.
Family housing facilities consist of one- and two-bedroom
apartments, a few townhouses and efficiencies. These units
come furnished, unfurnished, air conditioned and non-air
conditioned. Most all Family Housing villages are located on
campus or within a mile and a half of the University's main
campus.
Family income limits are set by the Department of Hous-
ing and Urban Development For Maguire Village only. There
are no income limits for Corry, Diamond, Tanglewood, or
University Village South.
For additional information, write or call Division of Hous-
ing, Family Housing Office, University of Florida,
Gainesville, 32611, telephone (904) 392-2176.

OFF CAMPUS HOUSING
The Housing Office functions as a listing and referral
agency for privately owned rental housing of all types listed
with the University for referral to students, faculty, and staff.
This office maintains extensive listings of apartments,
houses, and rooming units offered for rent to students, fac-
ulty, and staff. Each spring, the office compiles a com-
prehensive list of major apartment and rooming unit devel-
opments. This list is available to anyone who requests it in
person or by mail from the Off Campus Housing Office.
It is recommended that the student make a personal in-
spection of the rental facility and have a conference with the
owner (or agent) prior to making a deposit or signing a lease
agreement. Persons seeking off-campus housing should plan
to arrive in Gainesville well in advance of the semester in
which housing is needed. For example, Fall Semester ar-
rangements are possible as early as April, Spring Semester af-
ter mid-November, etc. For best results, visit during the
week-not week-ends-after preliminary information on
available rentals has been obtained.
Landlord/tenant problems are handled by Student
Government's attorney, Room 302, Reitz Union, telephone
(904) 392-1623..
Inquiries about off-campus housing should be directed to
the Division of Housing, Off Campus Housing Office, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, 32611, telephone (904)
392-2181.
Off-Campus Cooperative Living opportunities are also
available. Qualifications for membership are scholastic abili-
ty, and reference of good character. Inquiries should be ad-
dressed to: Collegiate Living Organization (Co-ed), 117 NW
15th St., and Georgia Seagle Hall (men), 1002 W. University
Avenue.


STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
The Office for Student Financial Affairs (SFA) in Anderson
Hall provides financial assistance and counseling to Univer-
sity of Florida students who need help paying college ex-
penses, administering more than 100 federal, state and in-
stitutional student aid programs. Awards to eligible students
may include scholarships, grants, loans or part-time em-
ployment, singly or as a package. The University adheres to
the national philosophy that students and their parents have
the primary responsibility to pay for college expenses. When
family resources are insufficient to meet the full cost of edu-
cation, financial aid is available to help meet the deficit.
The amount and types of aid for which a student may be
eligible depend on the individual's need in relation tb col-
lege costs. For financial aid purposes, need is defined as the
difference between college costs and the amount students
and their families can reasonably afford to contribute. A na-
tional needs analysis service, the College Scholarship Service
(CSS) in Princeton, New Jersey, evaluates financial need for
University of Florida students from information they and
their families supply on the CSS Financial Aid Form.
When To Apply
January 1 through March 1 of each year is the primary ap-
plication period for aid awarded by the University for the
next academic year. Students who apply by March 1 have
priority for available financial aid and applications sub-
mitted after March 1 are considered only if funds remain,
Several major aid programs, including the federal Pell Grant
program, Guaranteed Student Loans, OPS and off-campus
jobs, are open for application throughout the year. But to be
considered for all possible aid programs, students should BE
SURE TO MEET THE MARCH 1 DEADLINE.
SFA cannot make official financial aid awards to students
until they have been admitted to the University. However,
students should not wait for official acceptance to the Uni-
versity to apply for financial aid; they should apply as soon
after January 1 as possible.
How To Apply
To apply for aid, students must complete two forms (three
for transfer students). First, they must fill out the University
of Florida Statement of Educational Purpose and return it to
SFA before March 1 of each year. Second, they must com-
plete and mail the College Scholarship Service Financial Aid
Form (FAF) to the Princeton, New Jersey, address listed on
the form. Transfer students who have received aid at another
postsecondary institution must submit a third form, the Fi-
nancial Aid Transcript (FAT). Students who fill out and sub-
mit these forms by the March 1 deadline are considered au-
tomatically for all programs administered by SFA, except in-
sured loan programs, which have separate applications.
Students can request financial aid applications by writing
to Student Financial Affairs, 111 Anderson Hall, UF,
Gainesville, FL 32611. Application packets are also available
from most Florida community colleges and from high school
guidance offices. Applications for Guaranteed Student
Loans and other insured loan programs can be obtained by
writing to the SFA Insured Loan Department in 104 An-
derson Hall. Students should allow at least three months for
processing an insured loan in order to have their money
when they need it.
Graduate Aid
Graduate students at the University of Florida may be
eligible for student employment and insured loans through
SFA and for assistantships and fellowships through their col-
lege. To apply for College Work Study, graduate students
must follow the procedures in How to Apply. Off-Campus
Jobs and the state-funded Other Personnel Services program
are not need-based and are available through the Student
Employment Office in 20 Anderson Hall. CSS Financial Aid
Forms and Guaranteed Student Loan applications may be
picked up at the SFA office in Anderson Hall. For other grad-
uate aid such as fellowships or assistantships, students
should apply through the Dean of the Graduate School and
the Dean's Office of their college.

23




General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


Student Employment Office
The SFA Student Employment Office is a clearinghouse for
part-time employment, maintaining a current list of jobs
available through the federal College Work Study Program
and the state-funded Other Personnel Services program, and
through off-campus jobs. Student Employment updates job
lists weekly and posts them on bulletin boards at these loca-
tions: Anderson Hall, Weil Hall, the Reitz Union, McCarty
Hall, Norman Hall and Tigert Hall.
Types of Aid
SCHOLARSHIPS are awards based on academic 'per-
formance and financial need; they do not have to be repaid.
SFA awards approximately 400 scholarships annually to the
most outstanding undergraduates showing financial need as
determined by the College Scholarship Service. Some schol-
arships are'available to incoming freshmen through the Of-
fice of Admissions, and individual colleges also offer schol-
arships to undergraduates. Many private donors offer schol-
arships to students, selecting the recipient directly. Students
should consult the resources of their home community, civic
clubs, service organizations and private corporations.
GRANTS are gift aid available to undergraduates. No re-
payment is necessary. The three largest grant programs avail-
able at UF are the federally funded Pell Grant and Sup-
plemental Educational Opportunity Grant programs and
state-funded Florida Student Assistant Grants.
LOANS for UF students are long-term or short-term. Long-
term loans are low-interest (5 percent to 14 percent) with
payment deferred until the borrower graduates, withdraws
or drops to below half-time (six hours) status. Short-term
loans are emergency loans for temporary needs and must be
repaid by the first day of the last month of the semester in
which the loan is borrowed. Through this program students
can borrow up to $200 or the amount of in-state fees.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT through the University is of-
fered'to approximately 4,500 UF students each year. In addi-
tion, many students work off-campus in the Gainesville
community. Normally students work a total of 15-20 hours, 3
or 4 days a week, and wages range from minimum wage up,
depending on skill and experience.
Mini-Courses: How to Apply for Aid
Each year, during the January 1 through March 1 applica-
tion period, SFA conducts mini-courses on how to apply for
aid. These workshops, held on the University campus several
times a week, are conducted by a financial aid professional
and are open to students and their families.
Another resource for financial aid information is the
NEXUS telephone tape series. Tapes 402-A through 402-L
contain current information on financial aid programs at the
University of Florida. The telephone number for the NEXUS
system is 392-1683.
Student Financial Affairs is open daily from 9:00-12:00 and
from 12:30-4:00, Monday through Friday. For financial aid in-
formation, applications and counseling, students can go to
the Anderson Hall offices or call 392-1275.


CAREER RESOURCE CENTER
The Career Resource Center provides career development,
job placement, and cooperative education programs for all
University of Florida students and alumni.
The objective of the Center is to assist students in de-.
veloping 1) viable career plans compatible with academic in-
tersts, and 2) strategies that insure marketability and em-
ployment opportunity upon graduation. Thus, the entire
program focuses upon the student-during early under-
graduate years, approaching graduation, and after gradu-
ation as an alumnus. The program is designed to permit stu-
dents to enter at any point in their college careers. Program
resources include:
Individual advisement for students seeking personal ca-
reer development and job search assistance.
A career mini-school offering many different career in-


vestigations and job search preparation short courses weekly
(50-minutes each). Subjects include career planning, career
information for minorities, job market projections for vari-
ous career fields, job search planning, resume and letter writ-
ing, interview techniques, part-time and summer jobs, tips
on using the Center, and other specialized information for
business, industry, and education job seekers.
A cooperative education program by which students may
-through supervised practical work experiences-add re-
levance to their classroom education, gain professional ex-
perience in chosen fields, provide a source of funds to help
defray college expenses, and in many cases, become more
competitive when entering the job market upon graduation.
An extensive placement service for students and alumni
comprising the largest on-campus job interviewing program
in the state representing all career fields, and Gator Match, a
computer program matching students and alumni with
potential employers. The Center also publishes current em-
ployer job listings representing hundreds of positions-full-
time, part-time and summer-for students, new graduates,
and experienced alumni.
A career resources library containing information on sev-
eral thousand employes and related occupations; employer
contact lists; directories for business, industry, education
and government; lists of American firms operating overseas;
reference and informational material on graduate and spe-
cial studies programs including fellowships and as-
sistantships; and many other materials and resource data
needed by students planning a career, entering the job mar-
ket, or contemplating graduate school. A special feature of
the library facilities is the "Trends Desk" containing research
data on job trends, outlook and economic forecasts, labor
market statistics, manpower bulletins for various career
fields, special directories and publications giving reports and
ratings on most employers.
An audio visual department with study carrels and a li-
brary of over 150 slide/tape, video, and audio programs cov-
ering career choices, employer information, selection of aca-
demic programs, and job search and interview techniques.
A qualification record repository and referral service is
available to students and alumni. Copies of credentials are
sent upon request of the students and alumni to potential
employers. In addition, the Center refers qualified persons
on file and seeking employment to interested employers re-
questing candidates to fill job vacancies.
An "outreach program" in which professional staff mem-
bers are available to hold seminars for student organizations,
for lecture presentations to classes on all phases of career
planning and job search preparation, and to develop "Ca-
reer Day" programs in conjunction with colleges.
For additional information, students, alumni, and faculty
are invited to visit the Center located on the ground floor of
the Reitz Union. Staff members will be happy to discuss
ideas, concerns, and needs for individuals or groups.


J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the center of campus ac-
tivities for the University, providing a wide variety of facil-
ities services and programs for all members of the University
community, but with primary emphasis on serving the out-
of-class needs of students. Policy for the Reitz Union is es-
tablished by the Board of Managers, which consists of eight
students and six faculty members, with a student chair-
person.
The Reitz Union was opened May 1, 1967, and named after
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, President of the University of Florida
from 1955 to 1967. Among the facilities and services offered
are music listening rooms, art gallery areas, an arts and crafts
center, photographic darkrooms, a games area with bowling,
billiards, table tennis and table soccer, a video game room, a
browsing library, the University Box Office, a branch of the
Campus Shop and Bookstore, a barbershop, automatic bank
tellers, a check cashing service, a duplicating and poster serv-
ice, information desks, a lost and found service, display
cases, a free Notary Public, passenger and ride wanted bul-






STUDENT AFFAIRS


letin boards, and a voter registration service. A large
ballroom, an auditorium, lounges, and conference and
meeting rooms are available for use by University organiza-
tions, and the Union has thirty-six guest rooms available for
use by official guests of the University, students, and guests
of students, faculty and staff.
The Union offers a wide range of dining and food service
facilities, with a cafeteria, a snack bar, the Arredondo dining
room, the Sugar Cone ice cream and bake shop, the Orange
and Brew beverage and sandwich shop, and a complete
catering service for receptions and small or large banquets:
The Student Activities Center, located on the third floor, is
of particular significance to the educational program of the
University. A distinctive arrangement of offices and work
space for Student Government, the Student Honor Court,
Student Legal Services, and many other student organiza-
tions enhances the effectiveness of the total student ac-
tivities program of the University.
The Reitz Union sponsors a continuing program of ac-.
tivities for the campus community, including a performing
arts series, dinner theatres, speakers, bands, a leisure course
program, art exhibits, movies, an outdoor recreation pro-
gram,.arts and crafts sales, and campus and intercollegiate
tournaments in bowling, billiards, table tennis, video games,
bridge, chess, table soccer and College Bowl.
A distinctive area of the Reitz Union is the H. P. Constans
Theatre, a 464-seat facility for the dramatic arts which pro-
vides excellence in.design, equipment for staging and light-
ing, and acoustics.


UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
The University Counseling Center offers a variety of coun-
seling and student development services to students and'
their spouses. The Center is staffed by psychologists whose
primary interests are to facilitate the growth and develop-
ment of.each student and to assist students in getting the
most out of their college experience. Services offered at the
Center include the following:
SCounseling- Individual, couples and group counseling is
available to help students with personal, career and aca-
demic concerns. Appointments to see a Counselor can be
made by calling the Center at 392-1575 or in person at 311
Little Hall. Students initially have an intake interview in
which the student and the counselor make decisions about
the type of help needed. Students requiring immediate help
are seen on a non-appointment emergency basis. Informa-
tion concerning counseling interviews is confidential.
Consulting Center psychologists are available for con-
sulting with students, staff, professionals and faculty. These
consultations often focus on working with individual stu-
dents, special programs, organizational problems, ways of
improving student environments, or other issues that may
have important psychological dimensions.
Career Development In addition to career counseling,
the Center offers vocational interest testing, career work-
shops, and a career library. The Center also provides referral
information to students seeking specific career information.
Group and Workshop Program The Center offers a
wide variety of groups and workshops. A number of them,
such as the women's support group and the black women's
enrichment group are designed for special populations.
Others such as the math confidence groups, assertiveness
workshops, and counseling groups are formed to help partic-
ipants deal with common problems and learn specific skills.
A list of available groups and workshops is published at the
beginning of each term.
Teaching/Training The Center provides a variety of
practicum and internship training experience for students in
Counseling Psychology, ,Counselor Education, and Re-
habilitation Counseling. Center psychologists also teach un-
dergraduate and graduate courses in some of these depart-
ments.


CounseLine A self-help tape program designed to pro-
vide information on how to cope with the problems of daily
living is sponsored by the Center. Students may call 392-1683
and ask for any of the thirty-four tapes that are available. A
list of the tapes is published periodically in the student
newspaper and is also available at the Center.


GATOR DINING SERVICE
Gator Dining Service provides food service in ten loca-
tions on campus convenient to residence halls and class-
rooms.
Students are offered high quality food at reasonable prices
in campus cafeterias and snack bars, as well as the Orange
and Brew, Rathskeller, and the Arredondo Room.
It is the policy of the University to provide well-prepared
food at the lowest possible cost. Students may effect a sav-
ings by participating in one of the three voluntary meal
plans. The seven-day plan, 19 meals a week (two on Satur-
day and Sunday,-three meals Monday through Friday); the
seven day plan, two meals a day or the five day plan (Mon-
day through Friday) any two meals a day. For further in-
formation contact the Gator Dining Service Office, 110 John-
son Hall.


STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Student Health Service provides a spectrum of medical
services which include primary medical care, health educa-
tion, health screening programs, and mental health con-
sultation and counseling.
The service consists of an out-patient clinic and a 9-bed
in-patient unit staffed by physicians, nurses, psychologists,
pharmacists, laboratory and x-ray technicians, and support-
ing personnel. Specialty clinics are available for allergy, mi-
nor surgery, orthopedics, mental health, and women's
health care.
The health fee is part of the tuition fee paid by all full-time
students; it is optional for part-time students: Because not all
services are covered by the health fee, the supplemental stu-
dent government health insurance plan is highly recom-
mended.
A personal health history questionnaire completed by you
is required before registration at the University.


SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Program in Speech-Language Pathology and
Audiology, Department of Speech, offers services to persons
who have speech, hearing, or language disorders.
The clinic operates when the University is in session. The
clinic is a donation-based service. Those interested are en-
couraged to call the clinic (392-2041) or stop by the Arts &
Sciences Building, Room 442, for information and to sched-
ule an appointment for services.


READING AND WRITING CENTER
The University Reading and Writing Center, located in
2107 GPA, is a free service offered to staff and students at all
levels. The Center can be contacted between 8-5 Monday
through Friday.
Both the reading and writing programs offer credit classes
as well as non-credit individual instruction based on a
diagnosis of each student's needs. The reading program is
designed to improve comprehension, rate, vocabulary, and
study skills. The writing program is designed to aid students
with the organization and development of papers and with
spelling, punctuation, and grammar skills.










Student Life


STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND
ORGANIZATIONS
Student Government: Student Government at the Univer-
sity of Florida is a cooperative organization for advancing
student interests and is based on mutual confidence among
and between the student body, the faculty, and the adminis-
tration. Considerable authority has been granted the student
body for the regulation and conduct of student affairs. The
criterion in granting authority to the Student Government
has been the disposition of UF students to accept responsi-
bility commensurate with the.authority granted them. Stu-
dent Government has several resources at its disposal to
fulfill its mission, including the allocation of approximately
three million dollars per year in student activity and service
fees, substantial authority in the regulation pf co-curricular
activities, and administration of the Student Court. The Uni-
versity of Florida faculty and staff feel that training in accep-
tance of responsibility for the conduct of student affairs at
the University is a valuable part of the educational growth
and development of the individual student.
Student Government is a body politic, occupying its
franchise under grant from the Board of Regents and subject
to its continued approval. Student Government is patterned
on the state and national form of government but adapted
to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are dis-
tributed into the three branches: (1) legislative, which is em-
bodied in the Student Senate; (2) judicial, which is em-
bodied in the Student Honor Court and the Traffic Court; (3)
executive, embodied in the President and the Treasurer of
the Student Body. Members of all three branches are elected
directly by the Student Body, of which all UF students are
members. In addition to elected offices, many appointed
positions have been established, in Student Government, in-
cluding Cabinet and sub-Cabinet, Student Court, and the
Traffic Court posts.
Student Government, recognizing its limitations as a true
"government," attempts to exercise influence on govern-
ments at all levels through conferences, lobbying, research,
and the advancement of proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions within the stu-
dent government structure by contacting the Student Gov-
ernment offices on the third floor of the J. Wayne Reitz Un-
ion.
Student Senate: The Student Senate is composed of repre-
sentatives elected from the colleges and living areas on the
campus and, in general, acts as the Legislative Branch of Stu-
dent Government.
Religious Activities: The University of Florida welcomes
the contributions of religious traditions to the campus com-
munity. The churches, centers, and organizations associated
with the University offer a rich variety of programs and min-
istries. There are also interdenominational and non-
denominational activities fostered by the Department of Re-
ligion and the Campus Ministries Cooperative.
Social Fraternities: Thirty national social fraternities have
established chapters at the University in addition to one na-
tional colony. The general work of the fraternities is super-
vised by the Interfraternity Council, composed of the Presi-
dent of each fraternity. The national fraternities at the Uni-
versity of Florida are Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Gamma Rho,
Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi,
Delta Chi, Delta Sigma Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Upsilon,
Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi
Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi
Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma
Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, Theta Chi,
and Zeta Beta Tau. The national colony is Delta Sigma Phi.
Nineteen women's sororities have established chapters at
the University. Sixteen have built chapter houses and four
live in other housing arrangements. These living quarters
serve as the center of the activities of the individual


sororities; Primary jurisdiction in sorority matters is vested in
the Panhellenic Council. The chapters at the University of
Florida are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha Xi Delta,
Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi,
Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Phi
Epsilon, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Del-
ta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Phi Mu, Sigma Delta Tau, Sigma
Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta, and Zeta Tau Alpha.
Professional and Honorary Fraternities:
AIR FORCE ROTC PRE-COMMISSIONED OFFICER'S CLUB
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION SOCIETY
AGRONOMY & SOILS
ALPHA DELTA SIGMA, Advertising
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA, Pre-Med
ALPHA EPSILON RHO, Broadcasting
ALPHA KAPPA DELTA, Sociology
ALPHA KAPPA PSI, Business
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGICAL &
PETROLEUM ENGINEERS
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN NUCLEAR SOCIETY
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY, Military
BETA ALPHA PSI, Accounting
BETA ETA SIGMA, Honorary Scholastics
BILLY MITCHELL DRILL TEAM, Military
BLACK AMERICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
BLOCK AND BRIDLE, Agriculture
COUNSELOR EDUCATION STUDENT ASSOCIATION
DELTA PSI KAPPA, Physical Education, Health, Recreation
DELTA SIGMA PI, Business
DELTA SIGMA RHO, Speech
ENVIRONMENTAL GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW SOCIETY
EPSILON LAMBDA CHI, Engineering Leadership
ETA KAPPA NU, Electrical Engineering
ETA SIGMA PHI, Classics
FAUNUS, Zoology
FLORIDA ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION
FLORIDA BLUE KEY, Leadership
FLORIDA ENGINEERING SOCIETY
FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW JOURNAL
FLORIDA PLAYERS
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS CLUB
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS GRADUATE STU-
DENT ASSOCIATION
FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION CLUB
FORESTRY CLUB
GARGOYLE HONOR SOCIETY, Architecture
GATOR RAIDERS, Military
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERS
INTERNATIONAL LAW SOCIETY
JOHN MARSHALL BAR ASSOCIATION
KAPPA EPSILON, Pharmacy
KAPPA KAPPA PSI, Band
KAPPA PSI, Pharmacy
LAW ASSOCIATION FOR WOMEN
LAMBDA GAMMA PHI, Veterinary Medicine
LEISURE EDUCATION AND PARKS STUDENTS
MINORITY BUSINESS SOCIETY
MINORITY PREPROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION
MORTAR BOARD
NATIONAL STUDENT SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING AS-
SOCIATION
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA, Leadership and Scholastics
ORDER OF OMEGA, Fraternity/Sorority Leadership
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE CLUB
PHI ALPHA DELTA, Law
PHI ALPHA THETA, History
PHI CHI THETA, Business







STUDENT LIFE


PHI DELTA KAPPA, Education
PHI DELTA PHI, Law
PHI ETA SIGMA. Freshmen Scholastics
PHI LAMBDA SIGMA, Pharmacy
PI SIGMA ALPHA, Political Science
PUBLIC RELATIONS STUDENT SOCIETY OF AMERICA
RHO CHI, Pharmacy
RHO PI PHI, Pharmacy
SAVANT-UF, Leadership and Service
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA, Music
SIGMA TAU SIGMA, Honorary Tutoring
SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS
SOCIETY FOR BLACK STUDENT ENGINEERS
SOCIETY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES
SOCIETY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS
SOCIETY OF WOMEN ENGINEERS
SPANISH AMERICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
SPECIAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OF GRADUATE STU-
DENTS
STUDENT AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION
STUDENT CHAPTER-AMERICAN CONGRESS ON SURVEY-
ING AND MAPPING
STUDENT CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS ASSOCIATION
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
STUDENT DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
STUDENT OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION
STUDENT PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION
STUDENT PLANNING ASSOCIATION, Urban and Regional
Planning
TAU BETA PI, Engineering
TAU BETA SIGMA, Music
TAU SIGMA DELTA, Architecture
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CHEMISTRY SOCIETY
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA REHABILITATION ASSOCIA-
TION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENT CHAPTER-AMERICAN
INSTITUTE OF CONSTRUCTORS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENT CHAPTER OF THE
WILDLIFE SOCIETY
-UPSILON PI EPSILON, Computer Science
XI SIGMA PI, Forestry
In addition to the above-mentioned professional and
honorary fraternities there are over 100 additional organiza-
tions ranging from service to political to religious groups.
There are also a number of intramural organizations.


ACADEMIC HONESTY
The University of Florida expects students to be honest in
all of their University class work. Therefore, students are re-
quired to commit themselves to academic honesty by sign-
ing the following statement as part of the admissions pro-
cess, and again each semester on their course request regis-
tration form.
"I understand that the University of Florida expects its stu-
dents to be honest in all of their academic work. I agree to
adhere to this commitment to academic honesty, and under-
stand that my failure to comply with this commitment may
result in disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion
from the University."
This statement serves to remind students of the obligation
they assume as students at the University of Florida. Matters
of violations, of academic honesty are adjudicated by the
Student Honor Court.


STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
I. Introduction: Students enjoy the rights and privileges
that accrue to membership in a university community and
are subject to the responsibilities which accompany that
membership. In order to have a system of effective campus
governance, it is incumbent upon all members of the cam-
pus community to notify appropriate officials of any vio-
lations of regulations and to assist in theirenforcement. All
conduct regulations of the University are printed and made,
available to all students and are applicable upon publication


in the Independent Florida Alligator, the University Catalog,
the UF Student Guide, or other reasonable means of
notification.
II. Authority: The President is charged with the responsi-
bility for establishing and enforcing regulations governing
student life. Regulations are designed to enable the Univer-
sity to protect against the conduct of those who, by their ac-
tions, impair or infringe on the rights of others or interfere
with the orderly operations of the University. Discipline may
be imposed for offenses against the Code occurring at any of
the following locations or activities:
A. University campus;
B. University owned or controlled property;
C. Property or housing units assigned for responsibility to
the University, including, but not limited to, fraternity
and sorority property;,
D. Activities sponsored by the University;
E. Activities officially approved by the University which
are conducted by University chartered organizations; and
F. Activities occurring off campus as provided in para-
graph VI.
III. Rules of Procedure: The primary judicial bodies author-
ized by the President and charged with the administration
and enforcement of this Code shall formulate and furnish to
students charged with an offense, rules of procedure which
shall insure basic procedural fairness including, but not lim-
ited to:
A. The right to be notified in writing of the charges
against him/her with sufficient detail and time to pre-
pare for the hearing;
B. The right to a prompt hearing before an appropriate
official, committee, or court;
C. The right to know the nature and source of the evi-
dence which will be used against him/her;
D. The right to present evidence in his/her own behalf;
E. The right to freedom against compulsory self-in-
crimination; and
F. The right to appear with an adviser at the hearing..
IV. Suspension of Pending Hearing: Certain situations un-
der the University Policy on Possession and Use of Firearms
on Campus call for immediate suspension in the event of vi-
olation. If a student is suspended under this policy without
a hearing, he/she shall, upon request, be entitled to a pre-
liminary hearing at the earliest practical time. Such hearing
shall be solely to determine if the suspending official acted
within the scope of his/her authority and that there is.proba-
ble cause to believe that the student has violated a Univer-
sity policy. The hearing board shall be appointed by the Pres-
ident and shall report its determinations to the President.
This presidential action shall be interim until the Student
Conduct Committee shall hear the matter and make recom-
mendations to the President.
V. Violation of the Code of Conduct.
A. The Committee on Student Conduct may recommend
to the President expulsion or any lesser penalty for the
following offenses:
1. Furnishing false information to the University with
intent to deceive.
2. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University docu-
ments, records, or identification cards.
3. Unauthorized use, taking or destruction of public
or private property on campus, or acts committed
with disregard of possible harm to such property.
4. Actions or statements which by design or conse-
quence amount to intimidation or hazing.
5. Participation in or continued attendance at,'after
warning to disperse by a University official, a raid on
a University living unit.
6. Disorderly conduct.
7. Disrupting the orderly operation of the University
as defined in Florida Statutes, Board of Regents' Poli-
cies, and the Demonstration Policy of the University.
8. Failure to comply with a University rule or regu-
lation.
9. Violations of Housing, Inter-residence Hall As-
sociation, and Area Government regulations.






General

STUDENT LIFE


10. Violation of conductyprobation.
11. Possession use, or delivery of illegal drugs as de-
fined in Florida Statutes.
12. Possession of a firearm on the University campus
except as specifically authorized by University Policy
on the Possession and Use of Firearms.
13. Actions or conduct which hinders, obstructs, or
otherwise interferes with the implementation or en-
forcement of the Student Conduct Code.
14. Failure to appear before the Committee on Stu-
dent Conduct or the Director of Student judicial Af-
fairs and to testify as a witness when reasonably
notified to do so. Nothing in this subsection shall be
construed to compel self-incrimination.
15.'Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the
State of Florida, or law of the United States.
16. Ticket scalping: Selling tickets to any University of
Florida function for more than the original price.
17. Possession or use of fireworks, explosives, danger-
ous chemicals, ammunition and weapons (including
bows and arrows or switch-blade knives).
18. Actions which are committed with disregard of the
possible harm to an individual or group, or which re-
sult in injury to an individual.
19. Violation of the University Academic Honesty
Guidelines.
B. The Student Honor Court may recommend ex-
pulsion or any lesser penalty for academic dishonesty as
defined by the Student Body Constitution. The Student
Honor Court may impose any penalty provided for in the
Student Body Constitution for other offenses against the
student body as provided for in the Student Code of
Conduct. Conflicts in jurisdiction will be resolved by the
Director of Student judicial Affairs.
C. Conduct Boards may recommend penalties as set
forth by the University Housing Committee for violation
of University Housing, Inter-Residence Hall Association,
and/or Area Government regulations.
D. Student Traffic Court may impose authorized penal-
ties for violation of University traffic, parking, and vehi-
cle registration regulations.
E. Other judicial bodies may be established and vested
with jurisdiction by appropriate authority.
VI. Off-Campus Conduct: When a student violates Section
V-A-15 of this Student Conduct Code by an offense com-
mitted off the campus and which is not associated with a
University-connected activity, the disciplinary authority of
the University will not be used merely to duplicate the pen-
alty awarded for such an act under applicable ordinances
and laws. The University will take disciplinary action against
a student for such an off-campus offense only when it is re-
quired by law to do so or when the nature of the offense is
such that in the judgment of the Director of Student judicial
Affairs, the continued presence of the student on campus is
likely to interfere with the educational process and the or-
derly operation of the University; the continued presence of
the student on campus is likely to endanger the health, safe-
ty, or welfare of the University Community or its property; or
the offense committed by the student is of such a serious na-
ture as to adversely affect the student's suitability as a mem-
ber of the university community.
If the Director of Student judicial Affairs determines the
offense affects the University as stated above, then the Com-
mittee on Student Conduct shall hold a prompt hearing to
consider whether the offense is of such nature as set out
above; whether or not the student committed the offense;
and recommend appropriate action. The action of the Com-
mittee on Student Conduct shall be made independent of
any off-campus authority.
VII. Postponement of Hearing Due to Pending or Possible
Criminal or Civil Charges: If the student charged with a vio-
lation of the Student Conduct Code, regardless of which pri-
mary judicial body may hear the matter, wishes to have the
hearing postponed because there is pending or possible civil
or criminal litigation which he/she feels might be prejudiced


by the findings of the hearing, such postponement may be
granted provided the student agrees to accept conduct pro-
bation or suspension, depending upon the gravity of the of-
fense. Such probation or suspension will be determined and
activated by the Director of Student judicial Affairs and will
remain in force until such time as the student requests a
hearing before the appropriate primary judicial body and
the hearing is held. The student shall be informed whether
hshe would be placed on probation or suspended prior to
making a decision to postpone the hearing.
VIII. Student Waiver of Right to Hearing: In the event a
student charged with an offense under paragraph V-A
wishes to waive in writing the right to a hearing by the ap-
propriate official or hearing body and the Director of Stu-
dent Judicial Affairs wishes to accept jurisdiction, the Direc-
tor of Student Judicial Affairs may make a determination of
fact and make a recommendation of appropriate action.
IX. Summary Hearing: When' a student is accused of a vio-
lation of paragraph V-A of this Code, which in the opinion of
the Director of Student Judicial Affairs, if proven, would not
warrant a penalty in excess of two quarters probation, then
the Director of Student Judicial Affairs may require such
hearing to be held before the Chairperson of the Committee
on Student Conduct or his/her designated representative.
The hearing shall be held in accordance with paragraph III of
this Code.
X. Conflict of jurisdiction: In the event that the offense is
within the jurisdiction of more than one primary judicial
body, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs shall determine
which judicial body shall hear the charge.
XI. Penalties: A student adjudged guilty of violations un-
der paragraph V or the Academic Honesty Guidelines shall
be subject to a penalty commensurate with the offense and
any aggravating and mitigating circumstances, which may
include one of more of the following penalties, unless other-
wise expressly provided:
A. Reprimand-The student is given formal written no-
tice and official recognition is taken of the offense com-
mitted.
B. Conduct Probation-The student is deemed not in
good standing with the University for a specific period of
time. Conditions of probation may be imposed in rela-
tion to the offense committed. If the student is found to
Shave violated the probation by subsequent violation of
the Code or any appropriate condition, he/she shall be
subject to expulsion or any lesser penalty. The duration
of the probationary period and conditions shall be in
proportion to the seriousness of the offense.
C. Suspension -The student is required to leave the
University for a given or indefinite period of time, the
termination of which shall depend upon specified acts of
the student's own volition related to mitigation of the of-
fense committed.
D. Expulsion -The student is deprived of his/her op-
portunity to continue at the University in any status, per-
manently.
E. Payment of Damages-The student is required to
pay for damages to University property, provided that
such payment shall be limited to the actual cost of repair
or replacement of such property.
XII. Appeal: Disciplinary action taken by any judiciary
agency may be appealed to the next level of the University
Disciplinary System. All appeals must be made in writing
within two working days of notification of the decision by
the agency of original jurisdiction or appellate agent.


INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS.
University of Florida athletic teams compete in 16 sports in
men's and women's programs which make a comprehensive,
high-calibre level of competition on a regional and national
basis.
Men's teams compete in the Southeastern Conference
and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in football,
basketball, baseball, cross country, swimming, track, golf








STUDENT LIFE


and tennis. Women's teams compete in the Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women in Region III, fielding
teams in gymnastics, swimming, golf, tennis, track, cross
country, basketball, softball and volleyball.
Physical facilities include Florida Field stadium (capacity
72,000) a baseball diamond, women's softball diamond,
varsity tennis stadium, golf course, running track, two foot-
ball practice fields, and an exciting facility, Stephen C.
O'Connell Center, which houses a 12,000-seat basketball
arena, an indoor track, an indoor swimming pool and diving
tank and various other student activity segments.

Intramural-Recreational Sports
Intramural-Recreational Sports is a significant part of the
total educational community at the University of Florida. All
students, faculty and staff are encouraged to participate vol-
untarily in the program which has become an important
phase of extra-curricular activities on the campus and offers
opportunity for exercise, recreation, social contacts and
friendly competition.
Student administration is a tradition in the intramural pro-
gram at the university. Students officiate the games, manage
the leagues and act as Student Directors in the Intramural
Office.
For unstructured leisure time activities, the university
community may picnic, boat and swim at Lake Wauburg,
check-out equipment from the equipment rooms on cam-
pus, play on any of the 16 football fields, 14 softball fields, 16
volleyball courts, 30 tennis courts, 12 four-wall or 16 three-
wall handball-racquetball courts, 2 squash courts, 4 indoor
or 5 outdoor basketball courts, swim in Florida Pool or ex-
ercise in the weight-training rooms. The Stephen C.
O'Connell Center is an exciting addition to the University of
Florida as a recreational sports facility. The center has 8 vol-
leyball courts, 16 badminton courts as well as an indoor track
olympic size swimming pool, fencing-karate room, Nautilus


equipped weight room, and many other indoor facilities that
will enhance the intramural program.
For structured competitive play, the department organizes
tournaments in the following leagues: All-University Special
Events, Women's Independent, Co-Recreational, Engineer-
ing, Fraternity, Law, Little Sisters, Men's Independent, Men's
and Women's Dormitory, Married Students, Sorority and
Student Wives. The intramural clubs program offers instruc-
tion, recreation and competition in approximately 43 clubs.
Areas of interest include clubs in: dance related clubs, indi-
vidual and team sports, field sports, water related clubs, rec-
reational sports clubs and martial arts.


AUTOMOBILE AND TRAFFIC
REGULATIONS
Any student of the University of Florida is eligible to reg-
ister and operate a vehicle on campus. Parking eligibility is
determined by the student's local address and academic
classification.
Students desiring to register a vehicle on campus must
present their current fee card, reflecting their current status
and their vehicle registration to the Traffic & Parking Depart-
ment. Rules and Regulations are distributed at the time of
the vehicle registration and all registrants should thoroughly
familiarize themselves with the Rules and Regulations
before operating or parking a motorized vehicle on campus.
Illegally operated or parked vehicles will be issued a cita-
tion. Failure to respond to a citation within the prescribed
time will result in additional costs, failure to receive tran-
scripts, failure to register for classes and the towing of the
vehicle.
Any questions regarding the use of vehicles on campus
should be directed to the Traffic & Parking Department
(392-2241).











Student Academic

Regulations

Additional information relative to graduation, social ac-
tivities, failure in studies, conduct, etc., may be found in the
Student Guide and the sections of the catalog containing
regulations of the separate colleges and schools. Each stu-
dent should become familiar with rules and regulations of
the University, and is responsible for applying them as ap-
propriate.


READMISSIONS
APPLICATION FOR READMISSION
The information contained in this section applies only to
students who have previously been admitted at any level to
the University of Florida. Requirements for admission for a
student seeking to enroll in the University of Florida for the
first time will be found in the Admissions section of this
catalog. Please consult the INDEX for page numbers.
How to Apply for Readmission: An applicant should ad-
dress a request to the Office of the Registrar for application
forms. Forms and directions vary with the level of readmis-
sion. The applicant should indicate in the request the col-
lege and the level of last enrollment at the University of Flor-
ida as well as the college and level for which he or she
wishes to apply. Applications must be received in the Office
of the Registrar by the deadline date for the term, as pub-
lished in the University Calendar.
READMISSION OF STUDENTS
1. Satisfactory academic record.
a. An applicant must be eligible'to return to the Univer-
sity of Florida on the basis of one's previous academic
record at this institution. If the applicant has attended
any college or university subsequent to enrollment at
the University of Florida, he or she must also have an av-
erage of "C" or higher (as computed by the University
of Florida) on all work attempted at each institution. A
student must list and furnish transcripts of every institu-
tion attended when seeking readmission to the Univer-
sity of Florida. The applicant must also be in good stand-
ing and eligible to return to each institution previously
attended.
b. An applicant for readmission must meet the admis-
sion requirements of the college or school he or she ex-
pects to enter. (Consult the appropriate college section
of the catalog for specific admission requirements.)
2. Satisfactory conduct record
a. An applicant must present a satisfactory record of
conduct. Regardless of other qualifications, an applicant
who has experienced major or continuing difficulties
with school or other authorities since the last en-
rollment at the University of Florida may find his or her
application for readmission disapproved.
3. Submission of Request
a. An applicant for readmission should indicate the
name under which he or she was registered when last
enrolled and the social security number.


Credits
The word credit as used in this catalog refers to one
semester hour.


DEGREES AND GRADUATION
The University of Florida will confer the degree appropri-
ate to the course pursued, under the following conditions:
1. Curriculum requirements: Certification by the dean of the
college concerned that all requirements of the course of


study as outlined in the college announcement, or its equiv-
alent, as determined by the faculty of the college offering
the course, have been completed.
2. Recommendation of the faculty of the college awarding
the degree.
3. Residence requirements: (a) The minimum residence re-
quirement for the baccalaureate degree is two semesters. (b)
Students are required to complete the last thirty credits ap-
plied toward the baccalaureate degree during regular resi-
dence in the college from which the student is to be gradu-
ated. Exception to this regulation may be made only upon
written petition approved by the faculty of the college con-
cerned. (c) For residence requirements for degrees in the
Colleges of Law, Medicine, Dentistry, or Veterinary Medi-
cine, see the catalog of each college. (d) For residence re-
quirements of the various graduate degrees, see the Gradu-
ate School Catalog.
4. Average Required: In order to secure a degree, a student
must have a "C" average or better in all credits required
toward that degree.
5. Two Degrees: Two degrees of the same rank, e.g., B.A. and
B.S. may be conferred upon the same individual provided
that the second degree represents at least thirty credits of
additional work, with the necessary qualitative and resi-
dence requirements.
6. Continuous Attendance: When a student's attendance is
continuous, graduation according to the curriculum under
which he or she entered is permitted, provided the courses
required are offered by the University. If some or all of the
required courses are no longer offered, the faculty of the col-
lege concerned will make such adjustments for the individ-
ual students as are appropriate for the curriculum involved.
As long as a student attends the University as much as one
semester during any calendar year, his or her residence is
continuous.
7. Summer Term Enrollment: All students entering a univer-
, sity in the State University System with less than 60 hours
credit shall be required to earn at least 9 credit hours prior to
graduation by attendance at one or more summer terms.
University Presidents may waive the application of this rule
in cases of unusual hardship to the individual.
8. Application For Degree: Students expecting to graduate
must file an application for the degree in the Registrar's Of-
fice on or before the date indicated in the current University
Calendar. Students must apply in the semester in which they
expect to graduate, regardless of previous applications in
previous semesters.
9. Time Limit: To receive a degree a candidate must have
completed: (a) all residence work required for graduation at
least 24 hours prior to the scheduled meeting of the College
Faculty voting on the candidates for degrees; (b) all ex-
tension work at least two weeks prior to thescheduled meet-
ing of the College Faculty voting on the candidates for de-
grees.
10. Time-Shortened Degree Opportunities: A variety of pro-
grams is offered by the University of Florida which may
enable students to shorten the length of the time necessary
for them to complete their degree requirements. These op-
portunities include several credit by examination programs,
and other options. For specific information, refer to the sec-
tion listed in the table of contents entitled "Time Shortened
Degree Opportunities." Also refer to the college descrip-
tions for additional information.
11. Extension Work Permitted: (Note: Extension work as used
below refers to both extension classes and correspondence
study.)
a. Students may take a maximum of twelve credits of ex-
Stension work during any academic year.
b. Students may not take more than nine credits of ex-
tension work during a semester.
c. The amount of extension work which a student may ap-
ply toward degree requirements may not exceed one-
fourth of the amount required for the degree. For addi-
tional or unique restrictions on extension work allowed
toward a degree, students should refer to the appropriate
section of this catalog or consult with the death of the col-








STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS
\


lege concerned.
d. Students may not take, by extension work, more than
twelve of the last thirty-six credits necessary for a bacca-
laureate degree.
e. Simultaneous registration in on-campus and extension
work is permitted provided that approval has been ob-
tained from the dean of the college in which the student
is registered.
12. Registration of Graduate Students: A student must be
registered in the University for the term in which the
candidate's final examination is given and at the time he or
she receives a degree.
13. Repeat Course -Work: Credit will not be allowed on re-
peated course work if the course that is repeated contains
essentially the same course content as it did when the stu-
dent initially enrolled for the course. In addition, a student
who has taken work at an advanced level cannot receive
credit for work taken subsequently at a lower level.
14. Pending Charge of Academic Dishonesty or Code of Stu-
dent Conduct Violation: No degree will be conferred upon a
student against whom there is pending an unresolved
charge of either Academic Dishonesty or Code of Student
Conduct violation where the penalty for such violation
would likely be:
a. Suspension
b. Expulsion
c. Failing Grade
d. Any combination of the above until such time as the
charge is resolved and degree requirements are met.
15. College Level Academic Skills Test: Effective with the
1982 Fall term, students seeking admission to the upper
division must take the College Level Academic Skills Test
(see page 33).


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
Some colleges have a maximum load which is stated in the
catalog. In the absence of such a statement, the general Uni-
versity regulation applies. This regulation allows a maximum
load of 15 credits for a student who earned an average below
a "C" the preceding semester of attendance. The minimum
load for all undergraduate students is 12 hours. The mini-
mum load for a six-week summer term is 6, and for the
twelve-week term 12.
Simultaneous enrollment in correspondence courses, ex-
tension work at another college or university is counted in
computing the maximum, but not the minimum load.
At the time of registration, a student, upon the approval of
his or her dean, may register for less than the minimum or
more than the maximum load. After the late registration pe-
riod has closed, no student attending under the above con-
ditions will be permitted to drop below the minimum load
unless the student successfully petitions the college in
which he or she is enrolled. The minimum load for fulltime
benefits from the VA or Social Security is 12- hours per
semester for undergraduate students.


DUAL ENROLLMENT
-1. Definition: Dual Enrollment, as used in this regulation, re-
fers to a student taking on-campus courses simultaneously
at BOTH the University of Florida and another institution.
2. Dual Enrollment will be permitted ONLY under the fol-
lowing conditions:
a. Approval in writing for the dual enrollment must have
been secured by the student from the appropriate official
at EACH institution. A copy of such approval must be
furnished at the time of registration to the registrar at the
University of Florida.
b. A student will not be permitted to register at the Uni-
versity of Florida for a course which is a part of the cur-
riculum at the student's parent institution. This require-
ment also applies if courses are available at the parent in-
stitution which might be evaluated as equivalent or


acceptable substitutes for the University of Florida course.
The converse of these statements also applies to Univer-
sity of Florida students registering for courses at another
institution. I
,c. Priority in assignment to classes at the University of Flor-
ida will be given to regularly enrolled students.
d. A student taking courses at the University of Florida will
be required to register and attend classes under the Uni-
versity of Florida calendar.
e. The, student will pay appropriate fees at the University
of Florida based on the number of credit hours for which
he or she is registered at this institution.

It is the student's responsibility to insure that an official
transcript of work completed under a dual registration is
forwarded to the parent institution. Certification to social se-
curity and veterans administration programs is also the re-
sponsibility of the individual student who must request each
individual institution to furnish records as might be neces-
sary.


NON-DEGREE REGISTRATION
A student not previously registered at the University of
Florida may, with college approval, register for one semester
only as a non-degree student. Members of the faculty and
staff and those with special permission from their college
may be permitted to register as non-degree students for
more than one semester. Registration will be on a space
available basis. Procedures for registering are available from
the Registrar's Office.


GRADES
Results of student's work are recorded in the Registrar's
Office as follows:
1. Undergraduate Students: Passing grades are A, B+, B,
C+, C, D+, D, in order of excellence, and S-Satisfactory.
Failing grades are E Failure, I Incomplete, U Un-
satisfactory, X Absent from examination, EW -
Dropped for nonattendance or unsatisfactory work; and
WF Withdrew failing. The grade of EW is not a valid
grade after 1979-80.
Grades of I and X are considered as failing grades. They
must be changed to passing grades in accordance with the
dates set in the University Calendar, or be converted to
grades of E.
In special situations where it is not possible to assign
regular grades at the end of the term, a deferred grade may
be assigned. The symbol for a deferred grade is a grade of
H. This grade may be assigned only in special cases, such
as modular courses, confined to infirmary, and similar cir-
cumstances. A grade of H will not be computed in a
Student's grade point average.
A,symbol of W will be assigned for any course dropped
through the college after the end of the official drop/add
period and prior to the date for assigning a WF grade. The
W symbol is an official notation of an action taken in a
course, and will appear on the student's transcript.
The degree-granting college may require a minimum
grade of C in a particular course or courses.
2. Graduate students: Passing grades for graduate students
are A, B+, B, C+, C and S. Grades of "C+," and "C" in
courses below 5000-level are acceptable for credit toward
graduate degrees only if the total program meets the B-av-
erage requirement. C+ and C,grades in 5000-level courses
and above count toward p graduate degree only if an
equal number of credit hours in courses numbered 5000 or
above have been earned with grades of B+ and A, respec-
tively.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION
It is the University's desire to allow students to receive as
broad an education as possible. Therefore, students are en-






General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


courage to take courses in disciplines in which they may
not have the proper background. They may take such course
work as electives and receive a grade of S satisfactory or
U unsatisfactory. These grades become a part of a
student's record, but do not count in the grade point aver-
age as computed by the University of Florida. NOTE: Other
agencies or institutions might count the grade of U as a fail-
ing grade in their grade point average computation.
To be eligible to enroll under the S-U option, a student
must 1) be in good standing -- may not be on any type of
probation, or warning, 2) be classified as an undergraduate
student, and 3) have approval from proper university of-
ficials.
Only one course will ordinarily be approved in any one
term. Approvals for exception to this policy must be ob-
tained from the dean of the college in which the student is
registered.
The deadline for electing the S-U option is the last day for
dropping or adding a course as published in the calendar. In
addition, students who elect the S-U option may subse-
quently request that their instructors assign a standard
grade, but the converse is not permitted.


AVERAGES
1. Definitions: The term "average," as used in any univer-
sity regulations concerning probation or suspension,
always refers to the average on work attempted at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Grades received at other institutions are
not averaged with grades received at the University of
Florida for the purpose of meeting any University average
requirement. Most honorary societies take into considera-
tion the quality of the work done at other institutions in
meeting any average requirements they may have.
2. How computed: Averages are determined by computing
the ratio of grade points to semester hours recorded as at-
tempted. Grade points are established by equating each
semester hour as follows: A with 4.0, B+ with 3.5, B with
3.0, C+ with 2.5, C with 2.0, D+'with 1.5, D with 1.0, and
E, WF, EW, I, and X with 0.0. The grade of EW is not a valid
grade after 1979-80. In computing averages, a course re-
peated is counted as many times as grades for it are re-
corded. Hours for grades of S, U, and H are not computed
in the University of Florida grade point average.
3. Grade Point Averages: Students' grade point averages
will be based on their overall work at the University of
Florida. That is, when students are admitted to the Univer-
sity of Florida their grade point averages begin and their
academic averages will be based upon work taken at the
University of Florida. While work transferred from other
institutions toward a degree program at the University of
Florida will count in total hours earned, such hours will
not be a part of the University of Florida grade point aver-
age.


PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND
EXCLUSION FOR
ACADEMIC REASONS
The University of Florida is responsible for providing the
best possible education in an economical and efficient
manner. In order to discharge this responsibility, the Univer-
sity expects and requires reasonable academic progress from
its students. Continuation of students who have demon-
strated a lack of the necessary ability, preparation, industry,
or maturity to benefit reasonably from a program of univer-
sity study is inconsistent with the University's responsibility
as,a tax supported institution.
The University of Florida Senate has enacted regulations
covering probation, suspension, and exclusion. These regu-
lations are directed toward enforcing the academic stan-
dards of the University. The academic standards of the Uni-
versity require both the maintenance of grade point aver-
ages consistent with a reasonable chance of satisfactory


completion of the University programs and reasonable con-
formance to the catalog description of the program of study
in'which the student is engaged. Any college of the Univer-
sity may specify additional academic standards and students
are responsible for observing the regulations pertaining to
such standards.


PROBATION BECAUSE OF
UNSATISFACTORY
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
The purpose of academic probation is to recognize
formally the fact that a student may not be making satisfac-
tory progress.
The conditions of academic probation are intended to: (1)
relate to quality of achievement below standards required
ultimately to graduate; (2) recognize unsatisfactory work at
an early date; (3) be sufficiently significant to make clear to
the student, and the administration, the short-comings of
the student's performance; (4) provide occasion for counsel-
ing; (5) give students whose ultimate success is doubtful
further opportunity to demonstrate adequate performance.
All undergraduate students:
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
warning if he or she has a grade point deficit which is less
than ten.
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
probation if he or she has a grade point deficit of ten or
more, but less than twenty.
Any student who is eligible to return to the University af-
ter a suspension because of academic reasons will be placed
on final scholarship probation for his or her next term. t
In addition to University probation, students may be
placed on probation by the colleges in which they are regis-
tered if they do not maintain normal academic progress in
the program of study in which they are engaged.


CONTINUATION OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
A student's scholarship warning shall be continued as
long as he or she has a grade point deficit of less than ten. A
student's scholarship probation shall be continued as long
as he or she has a grade point deficit of ten but less than
twenty. If the grade point deficit places him or her in anoth-
er probation category, the student shall be subject to the
provisions of that category.


REMOVAL OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
Scholarship probation or scholarship warning will be re-
moved when a student's grade point deficit has been re-
duced to zero.
Removal of college probation:
A student will be removed from college probation when it
is deemed by his or her college that the student is making
satisfactory academic progress in the program of study in
which he or she is engaged.


SUSPENSION
The purpose of suspension from the University for aca-
demic reasons is to remove from the University community
any student who would not ultimately meet requirements
for graduation if he or she continued at his or her current
level of progress.
The conditions of academic suspensions are intended to
(1) select any student whose performance indicates that he







STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


or she will not fulfill the requirements for graduation; (2) en-
courage a student to leave the University as soon as a high
probability of failure is evident.
All undergraduate students:
A student with a grade point deficit of twenty or more in
his or her University of Florida work shall be suspended
from the University for one semester.
A student re-enrolling after a one semester suspension
will be on final scholarship probation. If the grade point def-
icit is twenty or more at the end of the term the student re-
enrolls, he or she will be suspended without the possibility
of re-registering except by committee action.



EARNING CREDIT
WHILE SUSPENDED
, A student under any kind of academic suspension at the
University of Florida may not earn credit toward a degree at
the University of Florida by taking work in residence at an-
other institution or through extension or correspondence
courses.
Howeyer,a student who was suspended for academic rea-
sons and who has not yet earned the Associate of Arts Cer-
tificate who subsequently graduates from an accredited Flor-
ida community college may appeal to the Petitions Commit-
tee for reinstatement. The Petitions Committee may then,
upon the recommendation of the college in which the stu-
dent wishes to enter, admit the student on academicproba-
tion to that college or school. Credits earned by such stu-
dents while under suspension from the University of Florida
may be transferred in accordance with other rules and regu- -
lations of the University of Florida.



COLLEGE LEVEL ACADEMIC SKILLS
TEST
The State of Florida has developed a test of college-level
communication and computation skills. The test is called the
College Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST).
The CLAST is designed to test the communication and
computation skills that are judged by state university and
community college faculty to be generally associated with
successful performance and progression through the bacca-
laureate level. The test is required by Florida statutes and
rules of the State Board of Education.
The CLAST is administered toward the end of the
sophomore year to university students as well as to com-
munity college students who are completing Associate of
Arts degree programs and to community college students
who are completing Associate of Science degree programs
and are seeking admission to upper division programs in
state universities in Florida. Students who do not take the
test will not be awarded the Associate of Arts, nor will they
be admitted to upper division status in state universities in
Florida. The CLAST requirements also apply to students
transferring to state universities in Florida from private col-
leges in Florida and from out-of-state colleges.
Effective August 1, 1984, the State Board of Education will
establish minimum CLAST score standards for the award of
the Associate of Arts and for admission to upper division sta-
tus in state universities in Florida. Prior to August 1, 1984, the
use of CLAST scores is limited to student counseling and to
curriculum improvement.
The Office of Instructional Resources located at 1012 GPA,
phone 392-1715 can tell you how and when to apply to take
the CLAST.
The Academic Advisement Center located at 358 Little
Hall, phone 392-1521 can provide you with a list of CLAST
skills and can tell you where the communication and com-
putation skills are taught in the curriculum.


EXCLUSION
Freshman and Sophomore students:
A student classified UF who has attempted 80 semester
hours (this includes all work accepted by transfer and all
work attempted at the University of Florida) shall be in-
eligible for further registration at the University unless he or
she applies for a change of classification and is formally ad-
mitted to a degree program. In addition, a student who does
not take CLAST by the end of her or his last sophomore term
is not eligible to be admitted to the upper division.
All undergraduate students:
A student may be excluded from a program of study by
the College responsible for the program if the student fails
or refuses to maintain normal academic progress. Such ex-
clusion does not prohibit the student from enrolling in other
programs or colleges if he or she meets the requirements.
Graduate students:
A graduate student may be denied further registration in
the University or in his or her graduate major when the
student's progress toward completion of his or her planned
graduate program becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory
progress has been defined by the Graduate Council to in-
clude failure to maintain an accumulative grade average of B
in all work attempted in the Graduate School.


DROPPING COURSES
No student will be allowed to drop a course during the
last two weeks of regularly scheduled classes without receiv-
ing failing grades. A proportionate date will be established
for shortened terms. Any student seeking an exception to
this policy must petition the University Petitions Committee.


WITHDRAWALS
All undergraduate students:
It is the responsibility of each student to make every effort
to complete the full semester at the University. If any stu-
dent withdraws after the date published in the calendar, he
or she shall be assigned grades of WF (withdrew failing) in
all courses, and will be subject to the suspension and ex-
clusion regulations.
A student on scholarship probation who withdraws from
the University prior to the final date published in the calen-
dar will be continued on scholarship probation for the next,
semester.
A student on University Senate Committee probation
must meet the terms of probation specified by the Commit-
tee.


ABSENCES OR
UNSATISFACTORY WORK
Students are responsible for satisfying the entire range of
academic objectives as they are defined by the instructor in
any course. For students whose names appear on the initial
class roll, absences count from the first meeting of the class.
Any student who has not attended at least one of the first
two class meetings of a course or laboratory in which he or
she is registered and has not contacted the department
which offers the course to indicate intent to remain in the
course may be dropped by the chairman of the department
Which offers the course if the chairman deems this action
necessary to provide space for other students who wish to
add the course. Students dropped from courses or labora-
tories through this procedure will be notified by 'notice
posted in the department office. Such students may be re-
instated in the course or laboratory on a space available
basis if documented evidence excusing the absences is pres-
ented to the department chairman.
NOTE: Students must not assume that they are auto-
matically dropped if they fail to attend the first few days of





General
STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


class since these actions may not necessarily be taken in all
courses and laboratories.
TWELVE-DAY RULE: No student shall absent himself or
herself from the University for more than 12 scholastic days
per semester in order to participate in athletic or in extracur-
ricular activities. (A scholastic day is any day on which regu-
lar class work is scheduled.)
The 12-day rule applies to individual members of the
group rather than to the group as a whole. Consequently, a
schedule of more than 12 days for any group should be ro-
tated so that no student is absent from the campus for more
than 12 scholastic days.
A student who has been warned for absences or un-
satisfactory work in any class should not incur additional
absences in that course, even though he or she has not been
absent from the University for 12 scholastic days. It is the re-
sponsibility of the student to see that his or her class work
and attendance are satisfactory.
Student Responsibility: Students, themselves, remain fully
responsible for satisfying the entire range of academic objec-
tives as they are defined by the instructor in any course.
Under University policy, students are not authorized to at-
tend class unless they are on the class roll or have been ap-
proved to audit and have paid the audit fees.


POST BACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
-The probation, suspension, and exclusion regulations that
apply to undergraduate students also apply to post-bacca-:
laureate students.


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Students will be classified by the Registrar each semester
as follows:
0. Special transient or other non-degree students who have
been permitted to register at the University of Florida will be
classified as 0.
1. A student with less than 30 hours credit will be classified
as 1.
2. A student who has earned 30 semester hours or more, but
less than 60, will be classified as 2.
3. A student who has earned 60 semester hours or more, but
less than 90, will be classified as 3.
4. A student who has'earned 90 semester hours or more will
be classified as 4.
5. A student who is a candidate for a degree in a program
which normally requires 10 semesters and has earned 120
semester hours or more will be classified as 5.
6. Post-Baccalaureate students: Degree-holding students
who have been admitted to post-baccalaureate status will
be classified as 6.
7. A graduate student who is seeking a Master's degree will
be classified as 7.
8. A graduate student who has earned a Master's degree, or
has earned 36 or more hours while seeking a degree beyond
the Master's degree (but has not been admitted to doctoral
candidacy), will be classified as 8.
9. A graduate student who has been admitted to doctoral
candidacy will be classified as 9.

PETITIONS AND APPEALS
In case the operation of a student academic regulation ap-


pears to result in an undue hardship on an individual stu-
dent, he or she may petition for waiver of the regulation.
Petitions requesting permission to drop/add should be
presented to the school or college in which the student is
enrolled until the date specified in the calendar. After that
date all drop/add petitions must be presented to the com-
mittee on Student Petitions. Exceptions to the minimum-
maximum load regulation are presented to the school or col-
lege for a decision. Petitions approved by the school or col-
lege must be reported to the Registrar's Office before the ac-
tion becomes official.
All other petitions should be presented to the Registrar
who will refer them to the University Senate Committee on
Student Petitions. No petition for readmission may be filed
after regular registration has started for the term.
The student seeking waiver of regulation through petition
must remember that no committee on petitions can direct
an instructor to change a student's grade, nor can the Senate
'Committee require any college or school to grant a degree
by waiving any of these regulations.


ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
All actions taken under these regulations shall be reflected
by appropriate notations on the student's record.,


MAINTENANCE OF
STUDENT RECORDS
The Registrar's Office maintains students' academic re-
Sords. A progress report is sent to each student at the end of
the term indicating his or her grades, cumulative hours and
grade points, probationary status, if any, and degrees
awarded, if any.


CONFIDENTIALITY OF
STUDENT RECORDS
The University of Florida assures the confidentiality of stu-
dent educational records in accordance with State Univer-
sity System rules, state statutes, and the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, known as the Buckley
Amendment.
In general, a present or former student has the right to
personally review his or her own educational records for in-
formation and to determine the accuracy of these records.
Parents of dependent students, as defined by the Internal
Revenue Service, have these same rights. A photo I.D. or oth-
er equivalent documentation, or personal recognition by
custodian for record will be required before access is
granted.



AUDITING COURSES
Auditing may be approved on a space-available basis. The
approval of the instructor and Dean is required, in addition
to payment of course fees. Florida residents who are sixty
years of age or older may apply for a waiver of payment of
auditor's course fees. Procedures for auditing ,courses are
available at the Registrar's Office.











Time Shortened

Degree Opportunities
The University of Florida provides numerous op-
portonities by which students may accelerate their academic
careers and reduce the overall length of time spent in com-
pleting degree requirements. These opportunities are ex-
plained below:
1. Early Admission: The Early Admission program allows,
superior students to be admitted to the University follow-
ing completion of the junior year in high school. Applica.,
tions are encouraged and,will be considered on an indi-
vidual basis by the Admissions Committee. For additional
information, refer to the Admissions section of the
catalog.
2. Dual Enrollment: Dual Enrollment refers to a student
taking on-campus courses simultaneously at both the Uni-
versity of Florida and another institution. For example, a
high school student could register at the University as a
non-degree student. The credits earned prior to high
school graduation could then be accepted for advanced
standing placement and degree-credit when the student is
admitted to the University. For more information, high
school students may refer to the description of non-de-
gree registration within the Student Academic Regulations
section.
University of Florida students may also earn additional
credit through the dual enrollment program. For more in-
formation, refer to the discussion of dual enrollment
within the Student Academic Regulations section.
3. Increased Course Load: Capable students who register
for more than the normal 15 hours per semester may com-
plete the traditional four-year span within three years.
4. Year-Round Attendance: Students attending the Uni-
versity every semester, including Summer sessions, may
advance their graduation date by as much as two
semesters.
5. Credit by Examination: A student may participate in a
variety of credit by examination programs in order to earn
credit toward a degree awarded by the University of Flor-
ida. Credit received from one examination program may
not be duplicated by another. The various credit by exami-
nation programs are explained below:
Advanced Placement Program: This credit by examination
opportunity is sponsored by the College Entrance Examina-
tion Board. Under this program, a student entering the Uni-
versity offers a nationally graded examination as evidence of
completion of a college level course taken in high school. If
the results of the examination meet the minimum require-
ments listed below, the student may receive University cred-
it for courses covering similar material.


Advanced Sc
Placement
Examination
American History

Art History

Art, Studio
Biology

Chemistry
English Language-
Composition*
English Composition-
Literature*
European History

French Language

French Literature

German Language
German Literature
Latin (Vergil)


ore Required
for Credit

3, 4, or 5

3, 4, or 5'

3, 4, or 5 .
3, 4, or 5

3, 4, or 5


US His
Pres
Introdu
,Wes
Beginn
Introdu
Biol
Introdi
Che


Course Semester
Title Hours
Credit
tory: Colonial to
ent 6
action to -
tern Art 6
ing Art 6
action to
ogy 6
action to
mistry 6


3, 4, or 5 Introductory English


3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5

3, 4, or 5

3, 4, or 5

3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5


Introductory English
Introduction to
European History
French Composition &
Conversation
Introduction to French
Literature
German Language
German Literature
Latin (Vergil)


Latin (Catullus-Horace)
Calculus AB**
Calculus BC**
Calculus BC**
Music, Listening &
Literature

Music Theory

Physics 8***
Physics C
(Mechanics)***

Physics C (Electricity
& Magnetism)***

Spanish Language

Spanish Literature


General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

3, 4, or 5 Latin (Catullus- Horace) 3
3, 4, or 5 Calculus 4
3 Calculus 4
4 or 5 Calculus 8

3, 4, or 5 Music Listening &
Literature 6
3,4, or 5 Introductory Music
Theory 6
3, 4, or 5 General, Physics 6

3, 4, or 5 Introductory Physics
w/Calculus 3

3, 4, or 5 Introductory Physics
w/Calculus 3
3, 4, or 5 Spanish Composition
& Conversation 6
3, 4, or 5 Introduction to
Spanish Literature 6


*Credit allowed for only 1 English exam
**Credit allowed for only 1 Caculus exam
***Credit allowed for Physics B or Physics C exams only
College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The College
Level Examination Program is another type of credit by ex-
amination opportunity sponsored by the College Entrance
Examination Board. By presenting appropriate scores, stu-
dents may receive as many as 30 semester hours credit
toward completion of general education requirements. Their
scores on the CLEP general examinations must meet the min-
imums established by the State University System. In addi-
tion, students who plan to apply for credit must do so before
enrolling or, at the latest, prior to the end of their first term
aat the University. CLEP testing is periodically available on the
campus and is administered by the Office of Instructional
Resources.
In accordance with the Articulation Agreement (agree-
ment between public community colleges and public state
universities on the acceptance of credit by transfer), the Uni-
versity of Florida awards credit for CLEP examinations based
on the following scaled scores:
Maximum
CLEP Minimum Score Semester
General Required for Hours
Examination Credit Credit
#English Comp. with Essay Scale Score 610 6
Social Sciences Scale Score 488 6
Biology Sub Score 50 3
Physical Sciences Sub Score 49 3
Humanities Scale Score 489 6
Mathematics Scale Score 497 6
#Students should seriously consider their decision about
taking the CLEP general examination in English. Experience
has shown that those who score below the 75th percentile
are often handicapped because they have not had college
courses in composition. However, those students who do
decide to take the CLEP English examination are required to
take the option that includes an essay examination so that
their scores will be at least partially based on a writing sam-
ple.
Additional credit may be awarded for satisfactory scores
on certain CLEP subject area examinations. The maximum
amount of credit that may be earned or transferred under
the CLEP program, both general and subject examinations
combined, is 45 semester hours or 67.5 quarter hours. If Eng-
lish Subject Examinations (Freshman English or English Com-
position) are taken, it is imperative that the essay option be
taken if credit is to be received for English. A minimum score
insures that the essay portion of the exam is eligible for re-
view by UF staff evaluators. This score in itself does not guar-
antee that credit will be received for English. A favorable re-
view must be received on the essay portion of the exam. A
minimum score of 47 is required for College Composition
and a minimum score of 47 is required for freshman English.
The maximum credit allowed for English credit, if the mini-
mum score is achieved and the essay is acceptable, equals 6
semester hours.
Departmental Examinations: Departments may, at their
option, permit a student to receive credit through the
challenge of departmental course examinations. For specific
information, contact the relevant department.





Colleges


The School of

Accounting


GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Accounting of the University of Florida was
established July 1, 1977. The objective of the School of Ac-
counting is to provide the technical and general education
for graduates to assimilate the proficiency necessary to enter
the accounting profession and progress rapidly through
levels of increasing responsibility. The field of accounting
offers outstanding opportunities in such areas as public ac-
counting, industrial accounting, nonprofit accounting, and
tax accounting.
The accountant deals with complex problems in the busi-
ness world. This requires a thorough knowledge of business
operations and the environment of business as well as ac-
counting knowledge. In addition to the demanding techni-
cals skills, an ability to communicate clearly in both verbal
and written form is essential. Interpersonal skills and pro-
fessional judgement are important elements in the practice
of accounting. Although accounting is unusually demanding
and requires a high achievement motivation in order to suc-
ceed, the rewards are high.


SCHOLARSHIPS AND
ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained
from the Director of Student Financial Aid, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. To be considered for
scholarships awarded to fourth and fifth year accounting
students, application forms (available at the School of Ac-
counting offices) should be completed early in the Spring
term.


HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS
Beta Alpha Psi
This honorary accounting fraternity has 115 chapters na-
tionally. Upsilon Chapter was the 18th chapter to be
founded (in 1938) and is recognized as one of the best chap-
ters in the country. An active professional program is con-
ducted each year including guest speakers, panel discus-
sions, field trips, and other activities designed to promote
professional awareness. Beta Alpha Psi cosponsors the Grad-
uate Accounting Conference which annually attracts more
than 100 accounting practitioners. Membership require-
ments include high ethical standards and a minimum grade
point average. Additional information concerning.these re-
quirements may be obtained from the School of Accounting.
Beta Gamma Sigma
Election to this national business honorary society is based
on scholarship and character. For additional information ap-
ply to the Office of the Dean, College of Business Adminis-
tration.
Florida Accounting Association
The FAA is a professional/social organization that is open
to all accounting students. Its aims are to facilitate com-
munication between accounting students and the account-
ing profession, and to encourage greater interaction be-
tween students and faculty.
School of Accounting Student Council
Members of the School of Accounting Student Council are
elected by the students of the School. The Council performs
a leadership role in a variety of School activities (student
newsletter, Business'Day, Teacher of the Year Award, orien-


station sessions) and provides student representation on fac-
ulty committees.


ACCOUNTING RESEARCH CENTER
The Accounting Research Center was organized in 1976 to
sponsor and encourage both frontier-seeking research and
research that has immediate benefit to the profession. The
Center provides an opportunity for graduate students to be-
come involved in specific research projects on a regular
basis. Occasionally research projects provide a similar op-
portunity for undergraduate students. The Center publishes
research results in a working paper series. For information
contact the Director of the Accounting Research Center,
School of Accounting, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611.


PROGRAM OF STUDY
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a pro-
fessional career in accounting is the five-year program lead-
ing to the Master of Accounting degree. The five-year pro-
gram allows the student to concentrate in an accounting
specialty in addition to providing knowledge of both the
basic accounting framework and the underlying business
and related disciplines. Details concerning the five year pro-
gram including the specialization areas of financial/audit-
ing, managerial/cost, systems and tax are included in the
Graduate School Catalog which can be obtained by writing
the Director of Admissions, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. Additional information can also
be obtained by contacting the School of Accounting, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
Students who successfully complete the first four years of
the five-year program will receive the Bachelor of Science in
Accounting degree. Graduates will have the requisite ac-
counting, business, and general education to pursue a varie-
ty of career opportunities in accounting and business and to
apply to graduate and professional degree programs in ac-
counting, business or law. Students wishing to specialize in
professional accounting should plan to complete the final
year of the five-year program.
Prospective students are cautioned to become familiar
with the pending change to a five year requirement to sit for
the Certified Public Accountants Examination.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the School of Accounting
encourages applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific minimum requirements for admission to this
School. It should be understood however that these are min-
imum requirements and that admission to this School is sub-
ject to enrollment capacity and is a selective process. The
satisfaction of minimum requirements -does not auto-
matically guarantee admission. A student's total record in-
cluding educational objective, pattern of courses previously
completed, quality of previous academic record, and test
data will all be considered in evaluating an application for
admission. Priority in admission will be given to those appli-
cants whose potential on the basis of their total record in-
dicates the greatest likelihood of success in the program re-
quested.
Students Classified UF: To be eligible for admission to the
School of Accounting, a student classified UF must have: (a)
completed at least 60 semester hours of coursework (current
coursework is included in the 60 hours); (b) completed at
least 12 semester hours of preprofessional coursework, in-
cluding MAC 3223, MAC 3224 and ACC 2001, or equivalent
courses (current coursework is not counted toward these re-
quirements); (c) earned a grade of B or better in ACC 2001 or
equivalent coursess; (d) earned a grade point average that
meets minimum standards for the amount of pre-
professional work completed; and (e) taken the College


36





Colleges


The School of

Accounting


GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Accounting of the University of Florida was
established July 1, 1977. The objective of the School of Ac-
counting is to provide the technical and general education
for graduates to assimilate the proficiency necessary to enter
the accounting profession and progress rapidly through
levels of increasing responsibility. The field of accounting
offers outstanding opportunities in such areas as public ac-
counting, industrial accounting, nonprofit accounting, and
tax accounting.
The accountant deals with complex problems in the busi-
ness world. This requires a thorough knowledge of business
operations and the environment of business as well as ac-
counting knowledge. In addition to the demanding techni-
cals skills, an ability to communicate clearly in both verbal
and written form is essential. Interpersonal skills and pro-
fessional judgement are important elements in the practice
of accounting. Although accounting is unusually demanding
and requires a high achievement motivation in order to suc-
ceed, the rewards are high.


SCHOLARSHIPS AND
ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained
from the Director of Student Financial Aid, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. To be considered for
scholarships awarded to fourth and fifth year accounting
students, application forms (available at the School of Ac-
counting offices) should be completed early in the Spring
term.


HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS
Beta Alpha Psi
This honorary accounting fraternity has 115 chapters na-
tionally. Upsilon Chapter was the 18th chapter to be
founded (in 1938) and is recognized as one of the best chap-
ters in the country. An active professional program is con-
ducted each year including guest speakers, panel discus-
sions, field trips, and other activities designed to promote
professional awareness. Beta Alpha Psi cosponsors the Grad-
uate Accounting Conference which annually attracts more
than 100 accounting practitioners. Membership require-
ments include high ethical standards and a minimum grade
point average. Additional information concerning.these re-
quirements may be obtained from the School of Accounting.
Beta Gamma Sigma
Election to this national business honorary society is based
on scholarship and character. For additional information ap-
ply to the Office of the Dean, College of Business Adminis-
tration.
Florida Accounting Association
The FAA is a professional/social organization that is open
to all accounting students. Its aims are to facilitate com-
munication between accounting students and the account-
ing profession, and to encourage greater interaction be-
tween students and faculty.
School of Accounting Student Council
Members of the School of Accounting Student Council are
elected by the students of the School. The Council performs
a leadership role in a variety of School activities (student
newsletter, Business'Day, Teacher of the Year Award, orien-


station sessions) and provides student representation on fac-
ulty committees.


ACCOUNTING RESEARCH CENTER
The Accounting Research Center was organized in 1976 to
sponsor and encourage both frontier-seeking research and
research that has immediate benefit to the profession. The
Center provides an opportunity for graduate students to be-
come involved in specific research projects on a regular
basis. Occasionally research projects provide a similar op-
portunity for undergraduate students. The Center publishes
research results in a working paper series. For information
contact the Director of the Accounting Research Center,
School of Accounting, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida 32611.


PROGRAM OF STUDY
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a pro-
fessional career in accounting is the five-year program lead-
ing to the Master of Accounting degree. The five-year pro-
gram allows the student to concentrate in an accounting
specialty in addition to providing knowledge of both the
basic accounting framework and the underlying business
and related disciplines. Details concerning the five year pro-
gram including the specialization areas of financial/audit-
ing, managerial/cost, systems and tax are included in the
Graduate School Catalog which can be obtained by writing
the Director of Admissions, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611. Additional information can also
be obtained by contacting the School of Accounting, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.
Students who successfully complete the first four years of
the five-year program will receive the Bachelor of Science in
Accounting degree. Graduates will have the requisite ac-
counting, business, and general education to pursue a varie-
ty of career opportunities in accounting and business and to
apply to graduate and professional degree programs in ac-
counting, business or law. Students wishing to specialize in
professional accounting should plan to complete the final
year of the five-year program.
Prospective students are cautioned to become familiar
with the pending change to a five year requirement to sit for
the Certified Public Accountants Examination.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the School of Accounting
encourages applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific minimum requirements for admission to this
School. It should be understood however that these are min-
imum requirements and that admission to this School is sub-
ject to enrollment capacity and is a selective process. The
satisfaction of minimum requirements -does not auto-
matically guarantee admission. A student's total record in-
cluding educational objective, pattern of courses previously
completed, quality of previous academic record, and test
data will all be considered in evaluating an application for
admission. Priority in admission will be given to those appli-
cants whose potential on the basis of their total record in-
dicates the greatest likelihood of success in the program re-
quested.
Students Classified UF: To be eligible for admission to the
School of Accounting, a student classified UF must have: (a)
completed at least 60 semester hours of coursework (current
coursework is included in the 60 hours); (b) completed at
least 12 semester hours of preprofessional coursework, in-
cluding MAC 3223, MAC 3224 and ACC 2001, or equivalent
courses (current coursework is not counted toward these re-
quirements); (c) earned a grade of B or better in ACC 2001 or
equivalent coursess; (d) earned a grade point average that
meets minimum standards for the amount of pre-
professional work completed; and (e) taken the College


36








SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


Level Academic Skills Test (see page 33). Information on cur-
rent minimum standards may be obtained from the School
of Accounting office.
Transfer Students:' The applicant should complete, as far
as possible, the courses required for the desired curriculum.
Completion of these courses and receipt of the AA degree
does not guarantee acceptance to the School of Accounting.
The eligibility standards for admission for students classified
UF (see above) apply equally to transfer students.
A. Students attending four year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of gener-
al education and preprofessional courses similar to the
Basic Curriculum for the Freshman and Sophomore years
for students desiring to enter the School of Accounting.
Courses should not be taken during the first two years
which are offered only at the upper division level at the
University of Florida.
B. Junior College and Community College students
should:
1. Complete the general education requirements estab-
lished for the junior college.
2. Complete, insofar as possible, all of the pre-
professional courses.
3. Avoid professional coursework that is available at the
University of Florida only as 3rd and 4th year courses.
TRANSFER STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO AVOID SUCH
COURSES AS BUSINESS LAW, PRINCIPLES OF MAR-
KETING, PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE, PRINCIPLES OF
MANAGEMENT, PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE, PRIN-
CIPLES OF REAL ESTATE, PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT,
AND COMPUTER MANAGEMENT COURSES. A max-
imum of four semester credits may be allowed for
courses taken during the first two years which are avail-
able only as third and fourth year professional courses
in the College of Business Administration at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Any credit granted for such work will
be in the form of undistributed elective credit without
reference to specific courses taken. IN NO CASE MAY
SUCH COURSES BE IN ACCOUNTING. In the case
where a student wishes to waive an upper division core
course and substitute a community college course,
waivers may be granted on an individual basis but the
student will be required to take another course in the
area being waived. The course will be specified by the
Department Chairman of the area.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper courses and for
fulfilling all requirements for the degree. The student is also
responsible for completing all courses for which he or she is
registered.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Of-
fice of the Registrar early in the semester in which they ex-
pect to receive the degree. The official calendar shows the
latest date on which this can be done.
Seniors should make an appointment for a graduation
check with the School of Accounting at the beginning of
their senior year.
NORMAL LOADS: The normal course load in the School
of Accounting is 15 credit hours per semester. A student may
be permitted to register for additional hours if in the opinion!
of the academic adviser, his or her academic record justifies
it. Students who wish to take a lower course load should be
aware that certain university privileges and benefits require
a minimum registration. It is the student's responsibility to
verify the minimum registration necessary for these benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to be applied
toward the degree must be completed in residence in the
School of Accounting. A student may not take more than six
semester credit hours by extension or correspondence
among the 60 semester credits of upper-division work re-
quired for the baccalaureate degree and such work must
have prior approval from the Associate Director of the
School. REQUIRED ACCOUNTING COURSES TAKEN BY EX-


TENSION, BY CORRESPONDENCE, OR AT ANOTHER UNI-
VERSITY MAY NOT BE TRANSFERRED AND APPLIED
TOWARD REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An
undergraduate student in the School of Accounting may
take on the S-U basis only those courses which will be
counted as free electives in fulfilling degree requirements.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress will be excluded from
further registration. More than one grade below C in upper
division accounting course work is considered unsatisfactory
progress.
DROP POLICY: Courses may be dropped during the
drop/add period without penalty. After the drop/add pe-
riod, a course may be dropped up to the date established as
the School deadline. All such drops are subject to the follow-
ing restrictions:
(1) No more than two drops after the University drop/add
period will be permitted in a student's upper-division aca-
demic career, for any reason.
(2) After the deadline, students may petition the
University's Committee on Student Petitions to drop a
course.
(3) Students dropping their full courseload must contact
the Office of the Registrar as this constitutes withdrawal
from the University.
(4) Students dropping an Accounting course for which
there was a waiting list at the end of the drop/add period
will have the lowest priority for enrolling in that course
during the next academic term.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To receive the degree
Bachelor of Science in Accounting a student must satisfac-
torily complete the following:
1. 64 semester credit hours of lower division requirements.
2. An approved program in accounting.
3. Upper division core courses.
4. Elective requirements.
A minimum of 124 semester credit hours is required for
graduation including 60 semester hours in upper division
courses. The waiving of any required course does not reduce
the hours required for graduation. A student must maintain
an overall average of 2.0 and a 2.0 average on all courses
which count toward his or her upper-division degree re-
quirements. A 2.0 average must also be maintained for all
upper-division accounting courses. Courses that have been
repeated are included in these averages, but do not carry de-
gree credit.
DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS:
A student who carries 14 hours per semester with a grade
point average of 3.5 will be placed on the Dean's list for that
semester.
To graduate With Honors, a student must make at least a
3.2 average on all course work accepted as Upper Division
credit and all course work (except as noted below) at-
tempted while registered in the Upper Division. To graduate
With High Honors, a student must make at least a 3.6 aver-
age on all work accepted as Upper Division credit and all
course work (except as noted below) attempted while regis-
tered in the Upper Division. In calculating requirements for
graduating With Honors or With High, Honors, the following
policies are followed: the student must have completed at
the University of Florida at least 40 semester hours for Upper
Division credit toward a degree in Accounting; transfer cred-
its and S-U grade credits will be excluded; and credits for
Lower Division courses taken while registered in the Upper
Division will be excluded.


GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses are offered in the School of Accounting leading to






Colleges

SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


the degree of Master of Accounting. For requirements for
this degree and for admission to Graduate School, consult*
the Graduate Catalog..


CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTING
Students who expect to receive a Bachelor of Science de-
gree in Accounting must satisfactorily complete (1) the Gen-
eral Education Requirements, the Professional Requirements
(see below), and elective courses for a total of at least 64
hours; and (2) the upper division requirements for a total of
at least 60 hours.

General Education Requirements
Credits
ENC English, including ENC 1101 ......................................... 6
*MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ....................... .................. 3
Social and Behavioral Sciences .............................. ............ 9
The Humanities ............................... ................... 9
Physical Sciences ............................... ...................... 3-6
Biological Sciences ................................ ......... ........... 6-3
For specific courses to complete these requirements; see
pages 123 through 126 in this catalog.
Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
**ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................................... 5
ECO 3411 Economics and Business Statistics .......................... 3
***ECO 2013-2023 Basic Economics ............................................... 6
*MAC 3224 Survey of Calculus 2 .............................................. 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ........................................... 3
Electives to make a total of 64 hours.
*Both MAC 3223 (which is also considered a preprofessional
course) and MAC 3224 must be completed to be eligible for'
admission to the School of Accounting.
**A grade of "B" of better is required in ACC 2001 (or equiva-
lent) to register for required upper division accounting
courses and to be eligible for admission to the School of Ac-
counting.
***May not be used for General Education Social Science credit.


UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
The upper division curriculum in Accounting requires 60
semester credits.
Required Nonaccounting Courses:
Credits
QMB 3700 Operations Research and Management ............ 3
MAN 3010 Principles of Management ................................. 3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing ............................... 3
FIN 3408 Principles of Finance .............................................. 4
COP 3120 Introduction to Cobol Programming .................. 3
ECO 3100 Prices and Markets ................................................ 3
BUL 4112 Business Law ................................. .. ............. 4
Business Policy .............................. ................ ............ 3

Total, 26
Required Accounting Courses:
Credits
ACC 3123 Financial Accounting I ......................................... 4
ACC 3143 Financial Accounting II ....................................... 4
ACC 3401 Cost and Management Accounting........................ 4
ACC 4501 Federal Income Tax Accounting I ........................ 4
ACC 4602 Auditing I .......................................... .............. 4
ACC 4741 Information Systems for Management Planning
and Control ................................................. ................. 4

Total 24
Electives: No accounting courses (except ACC 4940) may be
counted for elective credit. A maximum of 6 credits of
advanced military science may be counted for elective
credit. A minimum of 4 elective hours must be taken
outside the School of Accounting and College of Business
Administration. CLEP credits and APE credits not used to
meet lower division electives may not be used as electives
in the upper division. Students are advised to include a
Speech course among their electives; those intending to
complete the M.Acc. degree are advised to consult a School
of Accounting advisor about upper division electives.
........................................ 10

Total 60








COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


College of Agriculture
The aim of the College of Agriculture is to provide stu-
dents with the best education possible for service in agricul-
tural business, technology, and science.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural and Ex-
tension Education, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy,
Animal Science, Dairy Science, Entomology and Nematolo-
gy, Food and Resource Economics, Food Science and Human
Nutrition, Fruit Crops, Microbiology and Cell Science, Or-
namental Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soil
Science, Vegetable Crops, and Veterinary Science. Degree
programs are available through the College of Agriculture in
Botany and Statistics departments administered in the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The School of Forest Re-
sources and Conservation is a specialized faculty within the
College of Agriculture.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSIONS
The University of Florida and the College of Agriculture
encourage applications from qualified students from all cul-
tural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific requirements for admission to this college.
Any student with a UF classification who has finalized his
decision to study Agriculture may apply for admission to the
College of Agriculture after completing one semester in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
To be eligible for admission students must have a mini-
mum of a C average on all work completed, have demon-
strated by selection of preprofessional courses their intent to
pursue a program in agriculture, and have taken the College
Level Academic Skills Test (see page 33).
Transfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the Col-
lege of Agriculture, a transfer student must satisfy the mini-
mum requirements for admission to an Upper Division Col-
lege that are set forth in the ADMISSIONS Section of this
catalog. Additionally, the applicant must satisfy the follow-
ing specific requirements for consideration by the College of
Agriculture: (1) Complete the courses required for the de-
sired curriculum as indicated in the program for the
Freshman and Sophomore years at the University of Florida
and, (2) pass all required preprofessional courses with a min-
imum grade of C. The following conditions will serve as a
guide in expediting transfer to the College of Agriculture in
compliance with the above requirements. In the event en-
rollment quotas become necessary because of limited space
or teaching resources, selection of those admitted will be on
the basis of past academic performance.
A. Students attending four-year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of gener-
al education and preprofessional courses similar to the
Basic Curriculum for the Freshman and Sophomore years
for students planning to enter the College of Agriculture
as outlined in the Lower Division section of this catalog.
B. Junior College students should:
1. Complete the two-year college parallel program at
the junior college.
2. Satisfy the general education requirements estab-
lished for the junior college.
3. Complete a program of chemistry through qualitative
analysis and mathematics through college algebra and
trigonometry.

4. Complete basic courses in biology or botany and
zoology.
5. Complete a course in general economics.
6. Complete a coury in general physics.
7. Choose elective courses in fulfilling the required total
hours in the college-parallel program from the areas of


speech, journalism, English, and the basic sciences.
Speech and journalism are considered preprofessional
requirements for students majoring in Agricultural and
Extension Education.
8. Avoid specialized professional courses. Professional
courses can be taken to much better advantage after the
student has acquired the appropriate background in
general education and basic science courses.
Special post-baccalaureate student (6AG): A student who
has received a baccalaureate degree but who is not seeking
admission to Graduate School may be admitted under cer-
tain circumstances as a special student. Examples of these
circumstances are:
a) to receive a second baccalaureate degree
b) satisfy requirements for a second major
c) take basic requirements for admission to Graduate School
and
d) to complete courses for information only.
Admission requirements are the same as for transfer stu-
dents. In addition, post-baccalaureate students must comply
.with College and University rules and regulations and meet
all deadlines as printed in the catalog for undergraduate stu-
dents.,


GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper courses and for
fulfilling all requirements for the degree. The student should
also visit with the college counselor for advisement and sig-
nature for course approval (Form 1). Seniors must file a
formal application for a degree in the Office of the Registrar
early in the semester in which they expect to receive the de-
gree. The official calendar shows the. latest date on which
this can be done.
NORMAL LOADS: The suggested average course load in
the College of Agriculture is 15 credit hours. A student may
be permitted to register for additional hours if, in the opin-
ion of the academic adviser and the Dean, the student's aca-
demic record justifies this. Students may register for less
than 12 hours, but should be aware that certain university
privileges and benefits require the minimum of 12 hours. It
is the student's responsibility to verify the minimum course
load for these benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to be applied
toward a degree must be completed in residence in the Col-
lege of Agriculture. In special cases this requirement may be
waived by the Dean's office. Students may complete 12
semester credit hours 'by extension or correspondence
among the 30 semester credits of residence work required
for the baccalaureate degree; and such work must have prior
approval for each individual student by the major depart-
ment and the College Dean. Credit for work by correspon-
dence will not be accepted by the College unless a student
has a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher in all
work attempted in residence.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An
undergraduate student in the College of Agriculture may
take on the S-U basis only those courses which will be
counted as free electives in fulfilling the requirements for
the degree.
'PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress and drop 20 honor
points below a 2.0 average will be suspended for one term
and then may return for a term but must lower their deficit
below 20 points or face final suspension.
DROP POLICY: Courses may be dropped during the
drop/add period without penalty. After the drop/add pe-
riod, a course may be dropped based on the date established
by the College deadline. All drops are subject to the follow-
ing restrictions:
(1) One free drop after the University drop/add period
will be permitted for a student classified as 1AG or 2AG.
Students classified as 3AG, 4AG, 6AG and OAG are allowed
one free drop. These drops will be processed according to






Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


his/her classification. Records of free drops will be main-
tained in the Dean's office; therefore all drops must be
processed through that office.
(2) After the College deadline, students may petition the
University Committee on Student Petitions to drop a
course provided they can document sufficient reasons to
drop, usually hardship or medical.
(3) Students dropping their full courseload must contact
the Office of the Registrar as this constitutes withdrawal
from the University.


AGRICULTURE
Students planning to enter the College of Agriculture
should take, while in lower division, the following program
of study. The sequence in which courses are to be taken will
depend upon the department in which a student takes his
upper division major and will be determined by counselors
in the College of Agriculture.
Credits
English .. ................. ... .... ......... ... 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences ....................................... 9
The Humanities ........................... ................ ..................... 9
For specific courses to complete these requirements, see
page 123 through page 126 in this catalog.
*Math including Algebra and Trigonometry ............................. 6
CHM 2040 Introductory General Chemistry ....................... 3
PHY 2004 & 3055L Applied Physlcs ...................................... 4
BSC 2010C Integrated Principles of Biology I ........................ 4
*Course in statistics or computer science plus trigonometry
will meet the requirement.
Preprofessional Requirements
CHM 2041, 2042L and 2043C General Chemistry and
Q ualitative Analysis .............................................. ..... 8
AEB 3103 Principles of Food & Resource Economics .............. 4
Com m unications ....................................... .......................... 6
Selected from SPC 3601, ENC 3213, AGG 4603,
ENC 3312, ENC 3310, MMC 2100 and SPC 3605
Electives ......... ..... .......................... ...... ................................... 5-8

A. Prospective majors in Animal Science, Dairy Science,
Food Science, Poultry Science, pre-Veterinary Medicine,
and Microbiology and Cell Science should take courses
listed above plus BSC 2011C. Microbiology majors should
substitute BOT 2011C for BSC 2011C.
B. Prospective majors in Mechanized Agriculture, Dairy,
and Poultry Management may satisfy the Chemistry re-
quirements by completing CHM 2040,2041, and 2042L.
C. Prospective majors in Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Or-,
namental Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Soil Science, and
Vegetable Crops should take the courses listed above
plus BOT 2011C.
D. Entomology majors should take BSC 2011C in addition
to the above to complete biology requirements.
E. Prospective majors in Food and Resource Economics
should take the courses listed above but may substitute
MAC 3311 or MAC 3223 for PHY 2004 and 2004L and may
fulfill Chemistry requirements by completing CHM 2040,
2041, and 2042L or CHM 1020 and 1021.
F. Prospective majors in Agricultural Education, Mecha-
nized Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics may
satisfy Biology requirements by completing APB 2150,
APB 2151, APB 2152L.
G. Prospective majors in Microbiology and Cell Science
must satisfy Mathematics and Physics requirements by
completing MAC 3311 and PHY 3053, 3054 with labora-
tories.
H. Prospective majors in Food Science must take PSY
2013 to satisfy the BES requirement.
Suitable electives in Agriculture: AEB 3133 or 3300, MAG


3220 and 3312, ASG 3003, ENY 3005, FOR 2003, FOS 2001 and
2002, PLP 3002, SOS 3022, PLS 2031, ORH 3513C, FRC 3212
and other according to prerequisites completed.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
,Credits
Eng lish .................................................. ................ ............... 3
Social /Behavioral Sciences .................................................... 3
Math including MAC 1132 Algebra
and Trigonom etry .......................................... .............. 6
CHM 2040 General Chemistry ............................................... 3
English .................................. ............... ........................ 3
Behavioral Sciences ................................................................ 6
CHM 2041, 2042L Chemistry .................................. .......... 4
PHY 2004,and 3055L ......................... .......... ............... 4
Electives ............................................ ....................... 2
SOPHOMORE YEAR
H um anities ....................................... ................................ 3
CHM 2043C Chem istry ...................................... .............. 4
BSC 2010C Integrated Principles of Biology I .................... 4
Com m unications ............................. .............. ............... 3
Electives ............................................ .................................. 2
Hum anities .......................................... ....................... 3
AEB 3103 Food Resource Economics .................................... 4
BSC 2011 Integrated Principles of Biology II ...................... 4
Hum anities ...................................................................... 3
Communications ....................................... .... ............... 3


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
BASIC CURRICULUM
In addition to the 64 semester credits required for en-
trance to the College of Agriculture, 64 credits must be
earned in the College of Agriculture curriculum for a com-
bined total of 128 credits required for the Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Agriculture degree.
In addition, students must have a 2.0 grade point average
both in Upper Division and all credits'attempted at the Uni-
versity of Florida. The following curriculum to all areas of ag-
riculture designates specific requirements and electives for
the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. Some of these
courses may be taken as electives in the Lower Division. It is
especially important that students in junior colleges, plan-
ning to transfer to the College of Agriculture, select courses
from the core requirements as electives.
Curriculum College of Agriculture 64
Requirements and electives in student's major
department ............................................... min. 73- max. 27
(Students completing above 27 hours in a major must com-
plete equal number of hours above 128 required for gradu-
ation.)
Other requirements, free and approved electives ....... 37-51

DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
A student who carries 15 hours per semester with a grade
point average of 3.3 or better and no grade less than C in any
course will have his name placed on the Dean's list for that
semester.
Students completing the requirements for the B.S. in Agri-
culture degree are eligible to be considered for graduation
with Honors or High Honors.
To graduate with Honors a student must have a University
of Florida Upper Division grade point average of 3.5, or
above. (For purposes of honors the University of Florida Up-
per Division courses are defined as all courses taken at this
University after the student has earned 64 credits, wherever
taken.)
To graduate with High Honors the'same requirements ap-
ply as for Honors except that the grade point average must
be 3.75 or above.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
By prior arrangement with individual Department
Chairmen and approval of the Dean, students may, during
their upper division course of study, receive credit for prac-
tical work under competent supervision in any recognized
and approved agricultural or related pursuit relevant to their
college program. Credit is normally earned at the rate of one
credit per month of full-time work and may not exceed a to-
tal of four in any combination of experiences. A formal writ-
ten report must be submitted before a grade (S-U) will be is-
sued.
Departments offering this option have listed the course
number 4941 in their catalog listing courses. Guidelines are
available from the College and individual departments, es-
tablishing minimum criteria for credit eligibility and per-
formance.
GRADUATE TRAINING IN AGRICULTURE
The College of Agriculture offers four advanced degrees:
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, Master of Agricul-
tural Management and Resource Development, and Doctor
of Philosophy.
Students contemplating graduate study should consult
with their advisers as early as possible to insure proper pro-
gram planning.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND BUSINESS
Students in agriculture may specialize in one of three
broad areas of knowledge-Agricultural Science, Agricultur-
al Technology, and Agricultural Business, all within the
framework of 128 credits for the degree Bachelor of Science
in Agriculture.
For a specialization in Agricultural Science at least 12 cred-
its of the 128 total are required in one or more of the areas
of the Physical (CHM, GPY, PHY) and Biological Sciences
(BSC, BOT, ENY, PLP, AGR) and Mathematics (MAC), in ad-
dition to those required in the Lower Division.
For program in Agricultural Technology a choice of
courses in applied agriculture is planned by the separate de-
partments of the College of Agriculture in areas of the
student's special interest.
For Agricultural Business Specialization at least 13 credits
of the 128 total required must be completed from the areas
of Food and Resource Economics (AEB) and Business Admin-
istration (ACC, ECO, FIN, MAN, MAR), in addition to those
required in Lower Division plus a departmental major.
The academic adviser of the department in which the stu-
dent majors will assist the student in arranging his course of
study, and make necessary recommendations to the Dean.
The student's courses for each semester are subject to the
approval of the Dean and the Department Chairman.
TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
A program for a specialization (with certificate) in Tropical
Agriculture for Undergraduate and Graduate students is
available through the College of Agriculture. The program
provides course selection to broaden the normal degree re-
quirements for those interested in specializing in Tropical
Agriculture. Students enrolled in any one of the existing ma-
jor programs in the College of Agriculture may pursue this
program. The program is also available to non-agriculture
students with the approval of their college.
The Certificate in Tropical Agriculture (CTA) requires a
minimum of 27 hours of appropriately selected courses.
Some, and possibly all of these hours will be in addition to
the requirements for the current degree sought by the stu-
dent. Up to seven hours of research credit, or its equivalent,
may be applied towards CTA requirements when this re-
search and experience has a clear relationship to agriculture
in developing countries. All candidates must show a level of
competence in an appropriate foreign language, though no
language hours will be counted in the CTA.


The 27 hours of requirements are divided into Social Stud-
ies and Agricultural Sciences. Nine hours are needed in So-
cial Studies, five of which must be area specific courses. The
Agricultural Sciences require 18 hours, made up with 13
hours from natural sciences and five from other agricultural
sciences.
Students will work with their advisor and an in-
terdisciplinary faculty committee of three members to select
appropriate courses to fulfill the objectives of the program.
Students interested in this program should contact the Dean
for Resident-Instruction, College of Agriculture.
PEST MANAGEMENT AND PLANT PROTECTION
Students in the Pest Management and Plant Protection
Specialization will receive instruction in the principles of En-
tomology, Nematology, Plant Pathology, and Weed Science.
An understanding of the component parts of the crop-plant
ecosystem as related to management of all groups of pests
through the application of biological, chemical, and inte-
grated systems compatible with a quality environment will
be provided.
Students who select the Pest Management and Plant Pro-
tection Specialization will major in one of the following pro-
grams in the College of Agriculture: Agronomy, Entomology
and Nematology, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture,
Plant Pathology, Plant Sciences, or Vegetable Crops. Stu-
dents who complete the requirements for the Bachelor of
Science degree with this specialization should find many
employment opportunities in agri-business enterprises or
government agencies concerned with plant pest manage-
ment, crop production, and environmental protection.
Moreover, the successful completion of this undergraduate
program will place the student in an excellent competitive
position as a candidate for graduate studies in any one of the
departments cooperating in the undergraduate major pro-
gram at the University of Florida or any other university.
SAn interested student should contact an academic adviser
in his/her department and must indicate (register) with the
chairman of the interdisciplinary committee on Systems of
Pest Management and Plant Protection. The following re-
quired courses should be completed in addition to the major
program requirements. The requirements of this special-
ization can usually be met through the course requirements
of the major program and a wise choice of electives within
the 128 credits required for the Bachelor of Science in Agri-
culture.
Credits
.PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management ................... 2
PMA 3323C Pesticide AppEication .......................................... 2
PMA 3931 Seminar in Basic Pest Management .................... 1
PMA 3941 Internship in Pest Management .......................... 1
PMA 4401C Understanding & Implementing Pest
Management Strategies in Agricultural Systems ............. 3
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production ........................ 3
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ................................... 2
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory ................. 1
ENY 3701 Principles of Nematology ..................................... 3
PLS 4601 W eed Science ...................................... .............. 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ...................... 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology ........................ 5
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............... ............. 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ........ 2
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry ...................... ............... ... 4
SO S 3022C General Soils .... ................... .......................... 4
AGR 3303 Genetics ...................................... ... .......... 3
CERTIFICATE MINOR IN
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
A program for a minor (with certificate) in environmental
studies has been developed. The program provides course
selection to obtain a broad knowledge of the environment,
especially the inter-relationships between the activities of
man and environmental quality. Students enrolled in one of
the existing major programs in the College of Agriculture
and for this minor will learn to apply their major discipline
to the solution of environmental problems.





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


The environmental studies minor will include environ-
mental courses in three basic groups as follows: biological
sciences, physical sciences, and social sciences. At least one
course from each of these three groups is required. A mini-
mum of 12 semester hours credit is required for the minor.
Courses required for the major cannot be counted toward
the minor requirement. A minimum of three hours outside
the College of Agriculture is required,
The courses required for this minor will be determined by
the students in consultation with their departmental adviser
from an approved list of courses prepared by the depart-
ment, the College of Agriculture and the University. In most
cases these requirements may be met through a wise choice
of electives. Students interested in this minor should consult
their departmental adviser.
PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE
The College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida,.
admits a limited number of students each fall for the pursuit
of a degree Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. The following
courses must be completed with no grade less than C and a
minimum grade point average of 2.75.
Semester Credits
BSC 2010C and BSC 2011C Integrated Principles
of Biology I and II ......................................................... 8
Microbiology (MCB 3020C) ................................... ........ 4
Genetics (AGR 3303 or PCB 3063) ........................ ....... 3-4
Chem istry: ...................................................................... 20-23
Inorganic Chemistry (General and Qual.);
lecture and laboratory (CHM 2040, 2041,
CHM 2042L and CHM 2043C; or CHM 2041,
CHM 2042L, CHM 2043C) ..................................... 8-11
Organic Chemistry; lecture and laboratory
(CHM 3210; CHM 3211-3211L) ............................... 8
Analytical Chemistry I (CHM 3120C) ........................ .... 4
Physics (PHY 3053, 3055L, 3054, 3056L) ......................... 10
Mathematics: Calculus* (MAC 3311) ................................... 4
Animal Science:
Introduction to Animal Science (ASG 3003) ................... 4
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding ............... ........................................ ............ 4
H um anities ............................. ............................. ....... 9**
Social /Behavioral Sciences ........................................... 9
English ................................................... ...................... ..... 6
For specific courses to complete.these requirements, see
page 123 through page 126 in this catalog.
Electives .................................... ......................................... 8-12
(e.g., Agriculture, Computer Science,
Economics, Humanities, Journalism,
Political Science, Psychology, Social
Sciences, Statistics, etc.) Total 90
*Trigonometry and Algebra at the high school or college level
are required for admission to courses in-Calculus.
**Six semester credits will be accepted if taken as a require-
ment for an Associate of Arts degree.
Because of the rigid course requirements, most students re-
quire somewhat more than two years to complete this cur-
riculum. Also, since admission to Veterinary School is com-
petitive, students usually need to make considerably more
than the minimum grade point average of 2.75.
Pre-veterinary students should consult the Dean of the Col-
lege of Agriculture before registering for the pre-veterinary
curriculum.
Students who will have completed the pre-veterinary re-
quirements in June can be considered for admission in the
Fall of the same year. The Office of Admissions at the Col-
lege of Veterinary Medicine should be contacted early in the
Fall term of the year preceding anticipated admission.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING (Agricultural
Engineering)
The Agricultural Engineering curriculum is offered cooper-


atively by the College of Agriculture and the College of Engi-
neering. Students in this major receive basic training in engi-
neering and agriculture so that they are prepared to solve
the specialized and unique engineering problems of agricul-
tural production and processing systems and the manage-
ment and conservation of agricultural land and water re-
sources. Since engineering problems in agriculture relate to
biological production and processing of biological products,
training in agricultural and biological courses is obtained.
Students desiring careers in Agricultural Engineering will reg-
ister in the College of Engineering. See College of Engineer-
ing for curriculum.


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
The Agricultural and Extension Education curriculum is
designed to prepare students for careers in agricultural edu-
cation and the cooperative extension service. Students ma-
joring in this department have a common core curriculum
which combines courses in technical agriculture, pro-
fessional education, and/or extension methodology. The de-
partment chairperson or one of the departmental advisers
will advise students majoring in this department in the selec-
tion of electives and requirements to meet the students' ca-
reer goals.
The agricultural education (teaching) program provides
the.student with the basic courses for teacher certification in
Florida. In addition to these courses, a graduate must still ap-
ply to the State Department of Education for certification.
Each applicant who applies for a full-time Florida teaching
certificate shall be required to present a passing score on
each subtest of the Florida Teacher Certification Examina-
tion as part of the requirements to establish eligibility for
certification.
Students wishing to enroll in AEE 4942 "Agricultural and
Extension Education Practicum" (teaching internship) must
meet the following criteria:
1. Advanced senior standing.
.2. Completion of EDF 4210 or equivalent, speech and 16
hours of professional education in agricultural education.
3. A "C" average (2.0) or better.
4. A "C" average (2.0) or better, in all professional educa-
tion courses required in the area of specialization.
5. Grades of less than "C" in Agricultural Education
courses will not be accepted.
6. Score a total score of at least 835 on the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) or a composite score of 17 or above on
the American College Testing Program (ACT).
Students wishing to enroll in AEE 4943 "Agricultural Ex-
Stension Practicum" (extension internship) must meet the fol-
lowing criteria:
1. Advanced senior standing.
2. A "C" average (2.0) or better.
3. A "C" average (2.0) or better in all professional educa-
tion courses required in the area of specialization.
4. Completion of the following courses:
a. AEE,3313
b. AEE 4424
c. AEE 3200
(b and c may be modified with approval of departmen-
tal chairperson)
Assignment to an internship center is an involved process
and is not taken lightly, Every consideration is given to stu-
dent requests. However, applicants are specifically NOT
guaranteed assignment to their home county, to the im-
mediate and general vicinity of the campus or to a given
center on request. Assignments will be made only to those
centers indicated at time of application. Submission of an
application by a candidate constitutes an agreement to ac-
cept assignment in the center where it is determined that the
objectives of the internship program can best be achieved.
Failure to accept an assignment negotiated by Department
personnel relieves the Department of any further responsi-
bility to provide internship experiences and courses for the
candidate.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


The student completing this program will be required to
satisfy the College of Agriculture core curriculum require-
ments.
All students will take a basic skills assessment examination
while enrolled in AEE 3323. This examination includes sec-
tions on mathematics, reading and writing. A student must
have a successful score-on all sections of the basic skills
assessment examination prior to admission to the teaching
internship experience.

Departmental Requirements 28 credits
Credits
*AEE 3323 Development & Philosophy of Agricultural
Education ..................................... ....... ... ...... 3
*AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in Agricultural
Education ..... ........................................................... ... 3
*AEE 4504 Organization of Agricultural Education
Program s .......:............................. 3
*AEE 4224 Special Methods in Teaching Vocational
A gricu ltu re ............................................................................... 3
*AEE 4227 Laboratory Practices in Teaching Agricultural Ed .. 2
*AEE 4424 Agricultural Youth Programs ..................................... 3
*EDF 3135 The Adolescent (or equivalent) ............................. 3
*AEE 4942 Agricultural and Extension Practicum .............. 4-8
AEE 4943 Agricultural Extension Practicum ........................ 4-8
AEE 4624 Career and Prevocational Education in
Agriculture ........................................................... ................. 2
AEE 3313 Development and Role of Extension Education .... 3
SAEE 4905 Individual Work in Agricultural &.Extension
Education .......................................................................... 1-5

Other Requirements and Electives 36 credits**
Credits
MAG 3220 Agricultural Mechanicsl ......................................... 3
MAG 4225 Agricultural Mechanics II ........................................ 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ............................... V..... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Lab ........................... 1
SASG 3003 Introduction toAnimal Science ....................... 4
AGR 3005 Fundamentals of Agronomy ................................. 3
or
AGR 3210 Field Crop Science ........................................ 3
or
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management ............... 4
SOS 3022 General Soils ................................. ........... 4
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ................................. 2
ENY 3006 Principles of Entomology Lab ................................... 1
ORH 3008 Introduction to Residential Horticulture ............. 3
***Electives in Agriculture ........................................................ 9-10
*The student planning to qualify to teach in the public
schools will complete a minimum of 28 semester hours from
the above list of professional courses. The courses indicated
by an asterisk (*) are required. The curriculum for students'
interested in extension education will be planned by a de-
partmental counselor.
**Substitutions must be approved'by the chairperson of Agri-
cultural and Extension Education.
***To be planned by department advisers.


AGRONOMY
Agronomy students receive scientific and technical in-
struction in the various aspects of field and forage crop pro-
duction ahd utilization as well as in genetics and plant
breeding. A minimum of 64 total credits is required. A spe-
cialization in Pest Management and Plant Protection is avail-
able. Students interested in an Agronomy major should con-
tact the Department of Agronomy for information early in
their academic career.
Departmental Requirements-38-39 Credits
Credits
AGR 3005 Introduction to Agronomy .................................... 3
AGR 3303 Genetics ............................................. ........... 3
AGR 4931 Agronomy Seminar .............................................. 1
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and
Biological Chem istry ............................... ................... 4
BOT 3503C Introductory Plant Physiology ........................ 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ........ 2


PLS 4601 W eed Science ............:................ :........................... 3
SO S 3022C General Soils ....................................... ............. 4
Two of the following 3 'courses
ENY 3005 and 3006L Principles of Entomology
and Laboratory ................. ...................... ............. ......... 3
ENY 3701 Principles of Nematology ....................... ........ 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ................... 4
Minimum of 9 credits from the following
AGR 4001C Man, Food, and Environment .......................... 2
AGR 4210 Field Crop Science ................................................. 3
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management ........... 4
AGR 4242 Rice ..................... ......... ........... 3
AGR 4244 Sugarcane ......... ....................................... 2
AG R 4246 O ilseed Crops ....................................:................. 2
AG R 4321 Plant Breeding ...................................................... 3
AGR 4624C Seed Technology ................................ 3
*AGR 4905 Problems in Agronomy .. ..................................... 1-3
*AGR 4941 Work Experience in Agronomy ............................ 1-3
Approved Electives-25-26 Credits
*A combined maximum of 4 credits from these courses can be
counted towards the departmental requirement.



ANIMAL SCIENCE
The curriculum in Animal Science meets the educational
requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Animal Sci-
ence is designed to give students a foundation in the basic
sciences and fundamental training in the various phases of
the beef cattle, swine, horse, sheep and meat industries.
Early in their college planning, students should discuss the
programs and their implications with the Department Chair-
man or his counseling representatives.
Credits
Departmental Requirements ............ ................................ 20
Other Requirements and Electives ................................... 44
Total 64

Departmental Requirements
ANS 3934 Junior Sem inar ........................... ........... .......... 1
ASG 3003C Introduction to Animal Science ................:........ 4
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition and Feeding ... 4
ASG 4931 Sem inar ........................................ ................. ... 1

Minimum of 10 additional Departmental Credits selected
from the following courses in groups A and B. A minimum of
3 credits required from each group.
Group A
ASG 3313 Principles of Animal Breeding ............................ 3
ASG 4334C Reproduction in Farm Animals ........................ 3
ANS 3613 Livestock and Meat Evaluation ......................... 2
ANS 3634 M eats ...................................... ................... 2
Group B
ANS 4234C Horse Enterprise Management .......................... 3
ANS 4242C Beef Cattle Science
and Range Management ......... ... ...... ........ 4
ANS 4264C Swine Production .................................. 2
ANS 4274C Sheep Production ....................... ............... 2
Other Requirements and Electives
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ..................... .......... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ................ 1
AGR 3303 Genetics ... .... ...... ........... .... 3
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management ........... 4
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and
Biological Chemistry .. ....................... 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms ................. 4
Free Electives ;..................................... .............. ................. 25
Students are encouraged to elect additional courses in.Sci-
ence, Technology, Economics and Business relating to a ca-
reer interest.





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


BOTANY
A major in botany is offered through the College of Agri-
culture. Students should consult with the Undergraduate
Coordinator for curriculum. (See Botany, College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences for course listing.)


DAIRY SCIENCE
The tvo curricula give broad foundations in science and
technology of the dairy industry. Students should consult
with the chairman or departmental adviser for assistance in
choosing the curriculum and selecting electives.
CURRICULUM I DAIRY SCIENCE
This is designed primarily for students interested in dairy
production, pre-veterinary medicine or post-graduate study.
Departmental Requirements-18 Credits
Credits
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management ..:................................. 2
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding .......................................... ... ... ........ 4
DAS 4411 Dairy Cattle Nutrition ......................:......... 3
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation or ASG 4334
Reproduction in Farm Animals ......................................... 3
Minimum of 6 additional Departmental Credits
selected from the following courses:
Credits
DAS 3214 Dairy Cattle Evaluation ................................ 1
DAS 4213 Dairy Management Techniques ...................... 1-4
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation ....................................... 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology ........................................ 4
DAS 4905 Problems in Dairy Science ......................... 1-4
DAS 4941 Practical Work Experience in Dairy
Science ................................... 1-4
ASG 4334 Reproduction in Farm Animals .................. 3
ASG 4992 Dairy judging ......................................... ....... 1
Other Requirements and Electives-46 Credits
Credits
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ...................................... 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ................... 1
AG R 3303 G enetics ........................................... ............... 3
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management ........... 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ..................... 4
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic & Biological -
C hem istry ............................................................................ 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms ....... ............. 4
VES 3202C Anatomy & Physiology of Domestic
A nim als ................................................. 4
Electives ....................................................... ....................... 19
CURRICULUM II DAIRY MANAGEMENT
This is designed primarily for students interested in
managing dairies or dairy enterprises, or careers in allied
agribusiness.
Departmental Requirements-18 Credits
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management ................................... 2
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition ,
and Feeding ............................................ ...... ............... 4
DAS 4411 Dairy Cattle Nutrition .......................................... 3
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation or ASG 4334 Reproduction
in Farm A nim als ............................................................ 3
Minimum of 6 additional Departmental Credits
selected from the following courses:
Credits
DAS 3214 Dairy Cattle Evaluation ................................... 1
DAS 4213 Dairy Management Techniques .....................:. 1-4
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation ........................................ 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology ........................................:........ 4
DAS 4905 Problems in Dairy Science .......................... 1-3
DAS 4941 Practical Work Experience in Dairy
Science ....................................... ............... ....................... 1-3
ASG 4334 Reproduction in Farm Animals ..................3... 3
ASG 4992 Dairy Judging ........................ ........................ 1


Other Requirements and Electives-46 Credits
Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ............ ... 5
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture ................. 2
AEB 3133 farm Firm Management ........................................ 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ................. 1
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management ........... 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ........................ 4
BCH 3023 Elementary, Organic & Biological
Chemistry ..................................... ..... ...... ..
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I ....................... 4
VES 3202C Anatomy & Physiology of Domestic
Anim als ......................................................... 4
Electives ..................................................................................... 15


ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
Entomology and nematology are biological sciences deal-
ing with two principal groups of invertebrate animals. The
curriculum is designed to give basic training in entomology
and nematology and specialized programs in various areas
of these two sciences.
Within the pest management program, specialized em-
phasis may be given to areas like crop protection, or animal
protection, or urban entomology and pest control. In the lat-
ter, students are trained in insect, plant disease, and weed
control with special reference to problems in and around
residential and other buildings. Emphasis is also given to
business management so that students are prepared for ad-
ministrative duties as well. Students will be prepared to take
the Florida Board of Health certification examination. Specif-
ic requirements for these programs can be obtained by con-
tacting the Department of Entomology and Nematology.
ENTOMOLOGY/PEST MANAGEMENT
Entomology and
Pest Management RequireMents 21 credits
Credits
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ..................................... 2
ENY 3006 Principles of Entomology Laboratory ................. 1
ENY 3931 Undergraduate Seminar ........................................ 1
ENY 4353 Insect Physiology and Morphology .................... 3
ENY 4161 Insect Identification .............................................. 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management ................. 2
PMA 4401 Understanding and Implementing Pest
Management Strategies'in Agricultural Systems .............. 3
6 credits from among the following:
ENY 3511 Fruit Insects ...................................................... ......... 1
ENY 3513 Vegetable Insects ................................................... 1
ENY 3515 Ornamental and Turf Insects .............................. 1
ENY 3521 Field Crop Insects ....................... ............................ 2
ENY 4660 Medical and Veterinary Entomology ................. 3
ENY 4905 Problems in Entomology ..................................... 1-5
PMA 3931 Seminar in Basic Pest Management .................... 1
PMA 3941 Internship in Pest Management .......................... 1
.PM A 3323 Pesticide Application ............................................ 2
21
COURSES OUTSIDE OF ENY/PMA
Credits
Required
AGR 3303 Genetics ....................................... 3
SO S 3022 General Soils .................................... .............. 4
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry or
equivalent ..................................................................... 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology ........................................ 3
or
PCB 4044 General Ecology ...................................... ........... 4
12 credits from among the following:
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production ...................... 3
NEM 3701 Principles of Nematology ............................... 3
PLS 4601 W eed Science ............................................ .............. 3
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Basic Plant Pathology ............... 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............................ 3






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


BOT 3504 Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory .......... 2
APB 2170 M icrobiology :............................................... .......... 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Science ........................... 4
ASG 3402 Principles of Animal Nutrition and Feeding ...... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ........................................ 3
AGR 3210 Field Crop Science ................................................ 3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ............................ 3
PLS 4701 Field Plot Techniques ........................................ 2
VEC 3221 Commercial Vegetable Production, I ................... 4
ZOO 3203 Invertebrate Zoology ............................... .... 4
ZO O 3513 Animal Behavior ...................................... ........... 4
CHM 3210 O rganic Chem istry .................................. ....... .... 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ......................................... 3
GLY 4610 Invertebrate Paleontology ...................................... 3
Other Approved Electives
Free and Approved Electives ................................. 16-17

64


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS
Six curricula are offered by the Department of Food and
Resource Economics. The curriculum selected by the student
will depend upon the nature of his or her interest in the
field. Students should consult a departmental adviser for
guidance in making their choice of a curriculum and for ap-
proval of electives.
CURRICULUM I FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for those students interested
primarily in training as professional agricultural economists
or in preparing for graduate study.
Departmental Requirements-26 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics...... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ........................................ 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ................. 1
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ..................................... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ............................... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms ........ 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
. Behavior ......................... .......... .......... ..... ............. 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Econom ics ........................................................ ............... 3
AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics Senior
Sem inar ......................... ........... ...... ...................... 1
Other Requirements and Electives-38 Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ................................ 5
MAC 3223 and 3224 Survey of Calculus 1 and 2 ................. 6
ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory .................................. 4
ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory ....................................... 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ....................................... 3
Free and Approved Electives .............................................. 16
CURRICULUM II AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS
MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for those students interested
in administrative and service aspects of agricultural or re-
lated businesses.
Departmental Requirements--29 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics ...... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ........................................ 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ........1....... 1
AEB 3300 Agricultural M marketing ......................................... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................................... 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior ............................................... 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Econom ics .......... ............................................................... 3


AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics Senior
Sem inar .................................................. ....................... 1
Electives in Food and Resource Economics* ...................... 6
*AEB 3111 may not be counted as a Food and Resource Eco-
nomics elective.
Other Requirements and Electives-35 Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ..................................... 5
M AC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ............................................. 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ................ 3-4
ECO 3251 or ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory ............... 3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ......................................... 3
Free and Approved Electives ...................... ..................... 16-18
CURRICULUM III CO-MAJOR WITH OTHER
DEPARTMENTS
Students majoring in other departments or colleges who
feel the need for a better understanding of the economics of
agriculture and the relationship of agriculture to the general
economy can also take a Co-Major in Food and Resource Ec-
onomics.

Departmental Requirements-21 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics ...... 4
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ........................................ 3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ......................................... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................................. 3
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior .................................................. ....................... 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Econom ics .............................:.................. 3
Other Requirements and Electives-43 Credits
M AC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ............................................ 3
Free and Approved Electives .............................................. 40
CURRICULUM IV HUMAN RESOURCE AND
COMMUNITY ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed to train professionals to work
on problems affecting people and their communities.
Departmental Requirements-24. Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics ...... 4
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................................. 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Econom ics .................................. ................... .............. 3
AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics Senior
Sem inar ................................................... ....................... 1
At least 3 credits from the following ................................... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
At least 5 credits from the following ................................... 5
ECO 4504 Public Finance
AEB 4421 Agricultural Labor Economics
AEB 4444 Regional Economics and Policy Analysis
AEB 4726 Income and Employment of Rural People
Electives in Food and Resource Economics* ................. 3
AEB 3111 may not be counted as a Food and Resource Eco-
nomics elective.
Other Requirements and Electives-40 Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ........................ ......... 5
M AC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 .......................................... 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ............... 3-4
ECO 3251 or ECO 4205 Macroecohomic Theory .............. 3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ....................................... 3
Free and Approved Electives ............................................ 21-23
CURRICULUM V FOOD MARKETING AND
DISTRIBUTION
This curriculum is designed for students interested in em-
ployment at the managerial level in the Food Industry.
Departmental Requirements-20 Credits




Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics ...... 4
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing .......... .............. ......... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4314 Terminal Markets.and Commodity Exchanges ... 1
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavio r ............................... ........................... ... 3
AEB 4342 Food Distribution Management ..................... 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Econom ics ...... ........................... .. .......... .... .. 3
AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics Senior
Sem inar .............. ..... ............. ................. 1
Other Requirements and Electives 44 Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting .............. ........ 5
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ............................................. 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ............. 3-4
ECO 3251 or ECO 4205 Macroeconomics Theory ............ 3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ....................................... 3
Free and Approved Electives .................................... 25-27
CURRICULUM VI NATURAL RESOURCE AND
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for students interested in nat-
ural resources and environmental quality.
Departmental Requirements-25 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics ...... 4
AEB 3413 Economics of Environmental Quality ..........:...... 3
AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture ... 2
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ................................. 3
At least 3 credits from the following ................................... 3
AEB 4324 Production Decisions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
AEB 4434 Land and Water Economics ................................. 3
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
Econom ics ........................................................ ............ .......... 3
AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics Senior
Sem inar ..................................... ................................ 1
Electives in Food and Resource Economics* ........................ 3
* AEB 3111 may not be counted as a Food and Resource Eco-
nomics elective.
Other Requirements and Electives 39 Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting .... .................. 5
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ........................................... 3
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory ........... 3-4
ECO 3251 or ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory .............3-4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ........................................ 3
Free and Approved Electives ................................ 20-22


FOOD SCIENCE AND
HUMAN NUTRITION
The Food Science ard Human Nutrition Department of-
fers two curricula, Basic Food Science and Nutrition and
Dietetics. Students in these curricula take a common core of
courses, required courses for their area of concentration, and
electives. Students should consult the departmental advisers
for guidance and approval of electives.
The Basic Food Science curriculum is designed to utilize
the principles of chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, en-
gineering, other basic sciences, and management in applica-
tions related to the manufacturing, processing, preserving,
distribution and packaging of food and food products for
immediate or future utilization. General areas of study in-
clude: chemical, microbiological, and nutritional properties
of raw and processed foods;,role of processing and engineer-
ing in modifying food properties; food deterioration and
spoilage; role of additives and other ingredients; food safety;
food fermentation and new food product innovations. An
opportunity is offered for students to intensify in areas of
specialization such as general food processing, citrus pro-
cessing, seafood processing, food chemistry, food engineer-
ing, food microbiology, management, food marketing, nutri-



tion, public health and consumer protection. Cooperative
programs are available with the appropriate commodity de-
partments for students desiring to specialize in dairy, meat,
poultry or fruit and vegetable processing. An excellent foun-
dation for graduate study and research in Food Science or re-
lated fields is also provided.
The Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum is designed to give
students a foundation in nutrition and, if desired, for a gen-
eral dietetics internship program upon graduation. The
Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum provides an excellent un-
dergraduate education for students planning to enter a grad-
uate program in human or animal nutrition. Students prepar-
ing for the professions of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary
medicine normally complete the minimum program and ad-
ditional courses chosen with the help of their advisers.
Department Core Requirements-30 Credits
Credits
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition .................... 3
FOS 3042 Introductory Food Science ..................................... 3
FOS 4311C Food Chemistry ............................ .......... 4
FOS 4222C Food Microbiology .................................... 4
FOS 4321C Food Analysis .......................................... ............. 4
FOS 4931 Food Science and Human Nutrition Seminar .... 1
CHM 3200 O organic Chemistry ................................................ 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms
w ith Laboratory .................................... ........ .............. 4
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ......................................... 3
CURRICULUM I BASIC FOOD SCIENCE
Additional requirements and electives 34 Credits
,Credits
FOS 4427C Principles of Food Processing ........................... 4
FOS 4722C Statistical Quality Control and Sensory
Evaluation of Foods ............................ ............................ 2
FOS 4731 Government Regulations and
the Food Industry ..................................... ................ 1
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I ....................... 4
MAG 4062C Principles of Food Engineering ...................... 4
In addition, students will be required to complete any two
of the following:
FOS 4522C Seafood Technology ........... .................. 3
FOS 4551C Fruit, Vegetable and Citrus Processing ............. 3
ANS 4635C M eat Processing .................................. ............ 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology .................................................. 4
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology ................................ 3
Electives ....................... ........... ........ ........... .... 12-13
CURRICULUM II NUTRITION AND DIETETICS
Additional requirements and electives 34 Credits
Credits
DIE 4125 Food Systems Management .................................. 3
D IE 4244 Nutrition and Disease .............................................. 3
HUN 3221 Introductory Nutrition .......................................... 3
HUN 3246 Agricultural and Nutritional Biochemistry ........ 3
HUN 4241 Human Nutrition .................................. ........... 3
APB 3203 Basic Anatomy & Physiology ................................. 4
EDF 4210 Educational Psychology .......................................... 3
MAN 3010 Principles of Management ................................. 3
MAN 3151 Foundations of Organizational Behavioral ....... 3
SO C 2000 Principles of Sociology ........................................... 3


FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION
(For Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements, See Listings
under School of Forest Resources and Conservation.)


FRUIT CROPS
The Department of Fruit Crops at the University of Florida
in Gainesville offers an outstanding undergraduate program
for students planning to enter the citrus and other fruit in-
dustries in the state. Job opportunities in production man-
agement, agricultural sales and technical representation, ex-
tension and many other areas are available to our graduates.






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Students receive a broad foundation in the science and
technology of fruit production, handling and marketing.
Core lecture and laboratory courses in Entomology,
Biochemistry, Plant Pathology, Soils, Plant Physiology and
Plant Propagation are taken.
For graduation, the student completes certain core
courses, a group of required departmental courses, specified
curriculum electives (chosen to meet the requirements of a
specialization within Fruit Crops) and other electives chosen
in consultation with the departmental counselor. Programs
of study can be designed to allow specialization in one of 2
areas:
1. Production Management
2. Business
Core courses required of all Fruit Crops students in either
specialization include the following:
Credits
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chem istry ........................................... ................... ................. 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............................ 3
ENY 3004 Principles of Entomology ..................................... 2
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory ................. 1
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ......................... 4
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation .................................................... 2
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ............................. 1
SOS 3022C General Soils ............................... ............. 4
Departmental Requirements 15 Credits
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ............................ 3
FRC 4223 Citrus Production .................................. ............ 3
FRC 4224L Field Production Practices in Fruit Crops ......... 2
FRC 4411 Physiology of Fruit Production ............................ 3
FRC 4612C Citrus Maturity and Packingh6use
Procedures ....................... ......................... .............. 4
FRC 4933 Citrus Production Managers' Seminar ................. 1
PRODUCTION MANAGERS CURRICULUM
Students specializing in Production Management take the
core courses, the required departmental courses and 4 cur-
riculum electives.
Curriculum Electives
Two electives from each group below (Business, Agricul-
ture) must be taken to graduate in Fruit Crops with the Pro-
duction Management Specialization:
Business Credits
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ................. ............. 3
AEB 3111 Computers and Linear Programming ................... 4
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing .......................................... 3
AEB 3006 Agricultural Commodity Marketing ...............;...... 2
MAN 3010 Principles of Management ................................. 3
AEB 3123 Law Applied To Agriculture ................................. 3
AEB 4421 Agricultural Labor Economics ............................... 2
ACC 2001 Introduction to.Accounting .................................. 5
AEB 4141 Agricultural and Rural Appraisal .................... 3
AEB 4152 Farm Business Analysis .................... ........... 3
Agriculture Credits
PLS 4601 Weed Science ................... .............. .... 3
MAG 3732 Water Management ...................................... 3
SO S 4115 Fertilizers & Soil Fertility ........................................ 3
FRC 4424 Citrus Production, Harvesting
and Research in Florida .................................. ........... 4
FRC 4251 Tropical and Temperate Zone Fruit
Crops in Florida ............................... ....................... 4
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management ................... 2
MAG 3312 Farm Machinery .............................. ............... 3
PLP 4102 Principles of Plant Disease Control .................... 3
MAG 3503 Agricultural & Environmental Quality ............ 3
FOS 4451 Fruit & Vegetable Processing ................................ 3
MAG 3220 Agricultural Mechanics ................................... 3
PMA 3323 Pesticide Application ........................................ 2
BUSINESS CURRICULUM
The Business specialization affords interested students an
opportunity to pursue in-depth studies into the business
aspects of fruit production and marketing. This special-


ization consists of the core and departmental requirements
plus 4 curriculum business electives selected from the list of
courses suggested under the Production Management cur-
riculum. The requirement of 2 Agricultural electives is
waived for the 2 extra Business courses.
The curricula for the various specializations leave some
room for other electives for students without deficiencies.
Many fine elective courses are available in Fruit Crops as
well as in other departments. Faculty advisers will be able to
assist students with selection of the best electives to suit ca-
reer interests.


MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE
The Mechanized Agriculture curriculum is-designed to
provide expertise in the application of principles and man-
agement of physical systems for improving production igri-
culture and the handling, processing, and storage of agricul-
tural products. Emphasis is also placed on efficient resource
utilization and environmental quality protection in agricul-
ture practices. The technology of mechanized agriculture is
complemented with emphasis on agricultural sciences and
business management.
Students graduating with a degree in Mechanized Agricul-
ture are prepared for careers in one of four general areas (1)
operations manager in production agriculture; (2) sales and
service representative for agri-business firms; (3)-agricultural
extension; and (4) specialists with governmental agencies,
agricultural organizations, insurance companies, banks, etc.
The curriculum is structured to encourage concentration-in
one of the career areas. Concentration is achieved through
selection of electives in consultation with the faculty aca-
demic adviser.
Credits
**ENC 4260 Advanced Professional'Writing ............................. 3
Mechanized Agriculture Requirements 61 Credits
*M AC 3223 Survey of Calculus I ............................:................. 4
or
*STA 3023 Introduction to'Statistics ........................................... 3
*PHY 2005 Applied Physics ...................................... 3
ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting ........................... 5
or five credits from the following:
AEB 4131 Agricultural Finance ....................... ................ 3
AEB 3503 Computer and Data Anal.
for Agriculture ............................ .... .................... 2
COP 3210 Computer Programming using FORTRAN ........ 2
COP 3120 Introduction to COBOL......... ........ 3
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture.................... 2
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management...................................... 3
SOS 3022C General Soils ...................................... ......... 4
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ......................... ............ 2
ENY3006L Principles of Entomology Lab........................... 1
Animal Science Requirement (ASG 3003**) ........................... 4
Plant Science Requirement (PLS 2031**) .............................. 3
MAN 3010 Principles of Management.................. 3
MAG 4342 Sales and Service of Agricultural Systems ............ 3
MAG 4225 Management of Agricultural Power ................. 3
MAC 3732 Water Management.... .......................... 3
MAC 3220 Agricultural Construction and Maintenance....... 3
MAG 3312 Farm M achinery .......... ..................................... 3
MAC 4642 Environmental Systems for Agricultural
Structures ................................. ............................................ 3
MAC 4062 Principles of Food Engineering .............................. 4
MAG 3503 Agricultural and Environmental Quality............. 3
Approved Electives ........................... ........................ 15-16
Approved electives should place strong emphasis in Busi-
ness, Management, Computer Production or Extension.
*Should be taken within first 64 hours
**Or approved alternatives.


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL SCIENCE
The curriculum is designed to develop fundamental
knowledge of bacteria, plant and animal cells, and viruses. It





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


provides a background for pursuing graduate work in micro-
biology, cell biology, or biochemistry as well as other areas
of agricultural sciences. It also provides a background neces-
sary for work in research or diagnostic laboratories, both
governmental and industrial. The curriculum also provides a
background for entry into the professions of dentistry, medi-
cine and veterinary medicine.
Departmental Requirements 24 Credits
Credits
BCH 4313 General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ... 3
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms with
Laboratory .................................. ............................... 4
PCB 3136 Eukaryotic Cell-Structure and Function .............. 3
MCB, APB, and PCB Electives ............................................ 14
(BCH 4203 may count toward the 14 credits)
(One laboratory course beyond MCB 3020C is required)
Other Requirements and Electives 40 Credits
Credits
CHM 3120 Analytical Chemistry ........................................... 3
CHM 3120L Analytical Chemistry Laboratory ..................... 1
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry ............................................... 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ............................................... 3
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory ........................ 2
PHY 3053 Physics 1 .................... ................................ 4
PHY 3055L Laboratory for PHY 3053 ...................................... 1
PHY 3054 Physics 2 .................................................. 4
PHY 3056L Laboratory for PHY 3054 .................................... 1
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 ................... 4
Electives ............................... ................ ........................ 14


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
Students majoring in Ornamental Horticulture may spe-
cialize in general ornamental horticulture, ornamental horti-
cultural science, nursery and landscape horticulture,
floriculture and foliage, or.turfgrass production and main-
tenance. According to your specialization, you will be as-
signed an academic adviser to assist in developing a program
of course work. Students majoring in ornamental horti-
culture should complete the following requirements:
Plant Sciences Core Requirements 26 Credits*
Credits
AGR 3303 Genetics ............................... ..................... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chem istry ............................................ ................................... 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ................... .......... 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology
Laboratory .................................................. ...................... 2
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ..................................... 2
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology
Laboratory ..... .......................... ..... ............. 1
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ................... .... 4
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation .................................. ........... 2
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ............................. 1
SOS 3022C General Soils ............................. .............. 4
Departmental Requirements ............................. 22-26 credits
ORH 3513 Fundamentals of Ornamental Plant
Identification I ................................................. ... ........ 3
ORH 4411 Physiological Aspects of Ornamental Plant
Production ............................................................. 3 '
ORH 4931 Ornamental Horticulture Seminar ...................... 1
According to the selected area of specialization, students
will take any three of the following five courses for 8-10
credits.
ORH 3514 Ornamental Plant Identification ....................... 3
ORH 4221 Turfgrass Culture ........ ............................... 4
ORH 4255 Principles of Nursery Operations ...................... 2
ORH 4263 Production of Floricultural Crops ....................... 3
ORH 4275 Commercial Production of Foliage Plants ......... 3
To complete the remaining elective credits students may en-
roll in any of the available Ornamental Horticulture classes
depending on their area of specialization with the exception
of ORH 3008 (a non-major course).


SPECIALIZATIONS: Students should declare an area of spe-
cialization and complete 5-7 hours from the list of suggested
courses.
A. General Ornamental Horticulture. This option is de-
signed for those students who do not declare a specific
commodity interest area and wish to complete a more
generalized program in Ornamental Horticulture. Select
from ORH courses except ORH 3008.
B. Ornamental Horticultural Science. Students desiring to
complete advanced degrees (M.S., Ph.D.) should select
this specialization. Accordingly, students will select
courses to strengthen and prepare them for graduate
school.
Credits
BCH 4203 Introduction to Intermediary
M etabolism .................. .......................... .............. 4
BCH 4313 General Biochemistry & Molecular
Biology ............................................................ ............. 3
BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonomy ............................ 3
BOT 3153C Local Flora ................. ........... .......... 2
BOT 3303 Introductory Vascular Plant Morphology ... 4
BOT 4283 Plant Microtechnique ................................... 2
CHM 3120C Analytical Chemistry I .............................. 4
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry ....................................... 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics I ............................. 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ....................................... 3
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry ...................................... 2
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ............. 4
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II ............ 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms
w ith Laboratory ........................................................... 4
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology ............................... 5
PHY 2005 Applied Physics 2 ............................. ............... 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Associated Soil Reactions .... 3
C.* Nursery and Landscape Horticulture. Nursery Manage-
ment includes the production, storage, and marketing of
ornamental trees, shrubs, and vines. Landscape horti-
culture deals with the location, care and maintenance of
ornamental trees, shrubs and vines for the improvement
and beautification of man's environment.
Credits
ORH 3731 Biological Illustrations ..................... .. 3
ORH 3231 Grounds Maintenance ............................... 3
ORH 3534 Relationships of Ornamental Plants to the
Urban Environment ............................................... 2
ORH 3815 Introduction to Landscape Horticulture .... 3
ORH 4276 Foliage and Nursery Production
Laboratory ...................... ..................................... 2
ORH 4941 Full Time Practical Work Experience ...... 1-3
ORH 4905 Special Topics and Independent
Study ..... ............................................... ... 1-5
D. Floriculture and Foliage. The growing of cut flowers,
potted plants, foliage plants and transplants in the green-
house or field, and the sale of these crops through whole-
sale commission florists, flower shops and other retail out-
lets.
Credits
ORH 3611 Retail Florist Shop Management ................. 3
ORH 3534 Relationship of Ornamental Plants to the
Urban Environment .................................................. 2
ORH 4276 Foliage and Nursery Production
Laboratory ...................................... ............... ........... 2
ORH 4941 Full-Time Practical Work Experience...... 1-3
ORH 4263L Floriculture Lab I ....................................... 1
ORH 4905 Special Topics and Independent
Study or, ORH 4941 Full-Time Practical
W ork Experience ....................................... ........... 1-3
ORH 4280 Orchidology ......................................... 3
E. Turfgrass Production and Maintenance. The production
of turfgrass for sod and maintenance of grasses for lawns,
golf courses, and recreational areas.
Credits
ORH 3231 Grounds Maintenance ... ............................. 3
ORH 3534 Relationships of Ornamental Plants to the
Urban Environment .................................. ............ 2
ORH 4276 Foliage and Nursery Production
Laborato ry ....................................................................... 2
ORH 4941 Full-Time Practical Work Experience ...... 1-3







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


ORH 4905 Special Topics and Independent
Study ................................. ................................ 1-5
PLS 4601 W eed Science .................................... ...... .... 3'
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Associated Soil Reactions .... 3
ENY 3701 Principles of Nematology .......... ..... ... 3
ENY 4221 Principles of Insect Control ......................... 5
Electives: Eleven to sixteen (11-16) hours of electives may
be selected to complete your degree program. Suggested
areas of coursework can be taken in accounting, econom-
ics, fruit crops, vegetable crops.
*An average grade of 2.0 in ORH courses is required for grad-
uation.

PLANT PATHOLOGY
The curriculum in Plant Pathology permits students to
learn the principles of Plant Pathology and their applications
to scientific agriculture. The following program is offered for
a major in Plant Pathology with specialization in either Agri-
cultural Science or Agricultural Technology. Students must
consult the catalog statement for courses approved for the
Specialization in Pest Management and Plant Protection.
Departmental Requirements-14-16 Credits
Credits
PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ......................... 4
PLP 4102 Principles of Plant Disease Control .....................3
PLP 4931 Seminar in Plant Pathology ................................... 1
*BOT 5435 Introductory Mycology ........................ ............. 4
*NEM' 3701 Principles of Nematology ...................................... 3
*MCB 3020 Basic Biology of Microorganisms with
Laboratory ... ...... ................................ 4
*M CB 4503 General Virology ..................................... ....... .... 3
**PLP 4905 Problems in Intermediate
Plant Pathology .........................:.................... ........ 1 to 4
Other Requirements-23 Credits
Credits
AG R 3303 Genetics ................................................................ 3
BO T 2011 Plant Diversity ................................... ............... 3
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............................... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
C hem istry .. ................................ ................ ........................ 4
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ..................................... ... 2
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology
Laborato ry ............................................ .......................... 1
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation ................................................. 2
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ................................ 1
SO S 3022C General Soils ........................................... .... 4
Approved Electives-25-27 Credits
*Two of these four courses required.
**Departmental elective

PLANT SCIENCES-General
Students in the General Plant Science curriculum must
complete a minimum of 64 credits of course work in the
basic and applied plant sciences as indicated below. Elec-
tives, including courses for the optional specialization in
Pest Management and Plant Protection should be selected
with the advice and approval of the assigned Plant Science
adviser. Interested students initially should consult the De-
partment of Agronomy.
Plant Sciences Core Requirements-29 Credits*
r: Credits
AG R 3303 G enetics ............................................ ............... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chem istry .................................. .................................... 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology ............................ 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ........ 2
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ...................... ... 2
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory ................. 1
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ..................... 4
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation .................................. ........... 2
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ............................. 1
SOS 3022C General Soils .................................. ..... 4
PLS 4601 W eed Science :....................... ........ .............. 3


Other Requirements-35 Credits
Approved electives in AGR, FRC, ORH, VEC
(with a minimum of 3 credits in each
of the four departments) ............................ 13
O their approved electives .................................................... 22


POULTRY SCIENCE
Two curricula are offered by the Department of Poultry
Science. Students should consult the Chairman or the de-
partmental adviser for guidance in making their curriculum
choice and for approval of electives.
CURRICULUM I-General or Science
This curriculum is designed for those students interested
in training in poultry production, pre-veterinary medicine or
in preparing for graduate study.
Science Core Requirements 28 Credits
Credits
AEB 3133 Farm Firm M management .......................................... 3
AG R 3303 Genetics ........................................... ............... 3
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ........................ 4
ASG 3403 Principles of Animal Nutrition ............................ 4
ASG 4931 Sem inar .................................. ........... ............... 1
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry
or CHM 3210 O rganic Chemistry ........................................ 4
MCB 3020 Basic Microbiology of Microorganism or APB 2170
Applied M icrobiology .......................................................... 4
VES 3202 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic
Animals or CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis ................... 4
Departmental minimum requirements-12 Credits
Students selecting this curriculum are required to take the
following Poultry Science courses:
PSE 3211C Incubation, Brooding and Rearing .................... 3
PSE 4223 Poultry M management .............................................. 3
PSE 4411C Poultry Nutrition ................................................ 3
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology ................................ 3
Electives (free and approved) ...................................... .. 24
CURRICULUM II-Management or Business
This curriculum is designed for those students who plan a
career in any of various phases of the poultry or allied in-
dustries with major emphasis on the management or busi-
ness aspect.
Management Core Requirements 30 Credits
Credits
ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting ...................... 5
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture .................. 2
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .................. ................. 3
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ................ 1
AG R 3303 G enetics ..................................... ........ ............ 3
ASB 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ......................... 4
ASG 3403 Principles of Animal Nutrition ............................ 4
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
C hem istry ............................................... ........................ 4
VES 3202 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic
Anim als .......................................... ................................. 4
Departmental Requirements 12 Credits
Students are, required to take the following Poultry Science
courses:
PSE 3211 Incubation, Brooding and Rearing ...................... 3
PSE 4223 Poultry Management ................................. .......... 3
PSE 4411 Poultry Nutrition ........................................... ........ 3
PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology ............................ .... 3
Electives (free and approved) ..................................... .. 22


SOIL SCIENCE
The Department of Soil Science offers three curricula (Soil
Science, Soil Technology, and Soils and Land-Use) each of
which is designed to meet the specific needs of the individ-
ual. Students should consult the chairman of the depart-





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


ment or the departmental adviser for approval of electives in
their field of specialization.
SOIL SCIENCE
This program of study emphasizes the fundamental sci-
ences. Students following this curriculum can qualify for
graduate study and research in Soil Fertility, Soil Chemistry,
Soil Microbiology, Soil Physics, or Soil Genesis and Classifi-
cation by a careful selection of elective courses.
Departmental Requirements 19 Credits
Credits
SO S 3022 General Soils ..................................... .............. 4
SO S 4404 Soil Chem istry .....................:............... ............. 3
SOS 4303 Soil M icrobiology .............................................. 3
SOS 4715 Soil Genesis & Classification ................................ 3
SO S 4602 Soil Physics ....................................... ............... 3
Electives in Soil Science ............................................... 3
Other Requirements and Electives 45 Credits*
Credits
APB 2170 M icrobiology ..................................... .............. 4
BOT 3503, 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology .................. 5
GLY 2015 Physical Geology .................................................. 3
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 .................... 4
PHY 3053, 3055L Physics 1 .................................. ............ 10
PHY 3054, 3056L Physics 2 .............................................. 5
CHM 3120, 3120L Analytical Chemistry 1 ............................:. 4
*Free and Approved Electives ..........:..................................... 14

SOIL TECHNOLOGY
This program of study is designed primarily for the student
who desires employment in one of the many applied fields
of agriculture after obtaining the bachelor's' degree. By a
careful selection of electives one may prepare for a career
according to his or her specific interests.
Departmental Requirements 21 Credits
Credits
SO S 3022C General Soils ............ ........................................ 4
SO S 4404C Soil Chem istry ........... .......................................... 3
SOS 4303 Soil Microbiology .......................................... 3
SO S 4115 Fertilizers & Soil Fertility ..................... .................. 3
SO S 4602 Soil Physics ....................................... ............... 3
SOS 4715 Soil Genesis and Classification ........................... 3
SOS 4718 Soils of Florida ............... ........... ........... 2

Other Requirements and Electives 43 Credits
Credits
AGR 3005 Introduction to Agronomy ............................... 3
APB 2170 M icrobiology ............................................................ 4
ENY 3005, 30061 Principles of Entomology ........................ 3
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ...................... 3
MAG 3732 Agriculture Water Management ....................... 3
PLP 3002 Basic Plant Pathology .............................. ... 4
VEC 3221 Commercial Vegetable Production 1 ................... 4
*Free and Approved Electives .................................................. 19

SOILS AND LAND USE
This curriculum is recommended for students desiring a
fundamental knowledge of soils requisite to their conserva-
tion and the formulation of sound land-use decisions for a
wide variety of purposes to meet the needs of our rapidly ex-
panding population. These include agricultural, industrial,
urban, and recreational developments.
Departmental Requirements 24 Credits
Credits
SOS.3022C General Soils ......................................... 4
SOS 3215 Agricultural and Environmental Quality ............. 3
SOS 4231 Soils-and Land Use ...................................... 3
SOS 4404 Soil Chemistry .................................. ............. 3
SOS 4602 Soil Physics ................................................ 3
SOS 4715 Soil Genesis and Classification ............................ 3
SOS 4732 Soil Survey ...................................................... 3
SOS 4718 Soils of Florida ............ ....... ....................... 2
Other Requirements and Electives 40 Credits


Credits
AEB 3111 Linear Programming for Agriculture ................... 2
AGR 3005 Introduction to Agronomy .................................... 3
SGLY 2015 Physical Geology ..................,...................... 3
MAG 3732 Agicultural Water Management ....................... 3
ORH 3534 Relationship of Ornamental Plants to Urban
Environment ......................................................................... 2
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology .................................. 3
REE 3043 Real Estate Analysis .........................;........................ 4
URP 4000 Preview of Urban and
Regional Planning ........:....................... ............................ 2
*Free and Approved Electives .................................................. 17



STATISTICS
A major in Statistics is offered through the College of Agri-
culture. Students should consult with the Undergraduate
Coordinator for curriculum. (See College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences for requirements)


VEGETABLE CROPS
The major in Vegetable Crops is designed to give students
a foundation of basic plant science and the principles of.
production and marketing of vegetables. The curriculum will
prepare them for primary employment in any phase of the
specialized vegetable industry.
Students may select a specialization within vegetable
crops to prepare them for long term career goals. The areas
of specialization are production technology, business, and
science.
All students will complete the vegetable crop require-
ments as listed. A specialization may be completed by elect-
ing the appropriate number of hours from the suggested list-
ing of courses described for each. These hours are included
in the 23 elective hours.

Vegetable Crops Requirements
AG R 3303 Genetics .............................................. ............... 3
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chem istry ............................... ................... ................. 4
BOT 3503 Introductory Plant Physiology .............................. 3
BOT 3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory ........ 2
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ................:...................... 2
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory ................. 1
or
ENY 3513 Vegetable Insects ............................... ..... 1
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ..................... 4
SO S 3022C General Soils .................................. .............. 4
PLS 4601 W eed Science ........................................ .............. 3
VEC 3221 Commercial Vegetable Production I .................. 4
VEC 3222 Commercial Vegetable Production II ....:............. 3
VEC 4410 Vegetable Crops Nutrition ................................... 2
VEC 4432 Growth and Development of Vegetable
C ro s ..............: ................ ... ................................... 3
VEC 4452 Principles of Postharvest Horticulture ................. 3
A approved Electives .................................. .............................. 23


SPECIALIZATIONS
Production Technology
This option is designed for those students interested in the
actual growing and management of vegetables in the
broadest sense. Students must select two courses from each
section below (Group 1, Group 2).
Group 1
NEM 3701 Principles of Nematology ...................................... 3
ENY 4571C Apiculture ........................................................ ... 3
MAG 3220 Agricultural Mechanics ..................'..................... 3
MAG 4225 Agricultural Mechanics II ................................... 3
MAG 3312 Farm Machinery ......................................... ............ 3







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


MAG 3503 Agricultural and Environmental Quality ........... 3
MAG 3732 Water Management ............................................ 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management ................. 2
PMA 4401C Understanding and Implementing Pest
Management Strategies in Agricultural Systems .............. 3
PMA 3323C Pesticide Application ...................................... 2
PLP 4102 Principles of Plant Disease Control .................... 3
SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Soil Fertility .................................. 3
SO S 4404C Soil Chem istry ..................................................... 3
Group 2
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting .................................. 5
ACC 2301 Elementary Managerial Accounting .................. 2
FIN 3105 Investments for Individuals .................................. 3
RMI 3015 Risk and Insurance ............................................... 3
AEB 3123 Law Applied to Agriculture .................................. 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ......................... .......... 3
AEB 3300 Agricultural Marketing ....................................... 3
AEB 4152 Farm Business Analysis ....................................... 3
AEB 4164 Management of Farms in Tropical Areas ............ 3
AEB 4314 Terminal Markets and Commodity'Exchanges ... 1
FOS 2002 Food and Consumer Protection ........................:... 2
FOS 4551C Fruit, Vegetable and Citrus Processing ............. 3
MAN 3010 Principles of Management ................................. 3

Business
The specialization offers students an opportunity to take
selected courses in the area of business. Four courses must
be selected from the Group 2 list under the Production
Technology option.


Science
The science curriculum is designed for those stduents who
intend to pursue advanced studies in vegetable production.
The courses are intended to strengthen and prepare stu-
dents for M.S. and PhD. programs. Four courses must be
taken from the following list to complete the requirements.
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding ................................... ............ 3
BCH 4203 Introduction to Intermediary Metabolism ......... 3
BCH 4313 Introduction to Physical Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology ..;.......................... ........................ 3
BOT 3153C Local Flora ...................................... .............. 2
BOT 3173C Weed Identification ............................................. 2
BOT 4283C Plant Microtechnique ........................................ 2
PCB 3043C Introduction to Ecology ....................................... 3
CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry ................................................ 3
CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry Laboratory ...............:.......... 1
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition .................. 3
GLY 2015C Physical Geology .................................. ......... 4
GLY 4155 Geology of Florida ........................................... 3
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I ................... 4
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .................. 4
PLS 4701 Field Plot Techniques ............................................. 2
SOS 4602C Soil Physics ....................... ............................ 3
SOS 4715 Soil Genesis and Classification ............................. 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics I ...................................... 3
STA 3024 Introduction to Statistics II ................................... 3
STA 4202 Applied Statistics I ................................... ......... 3
STA 4203 Applied Statistics II ......................................... 3
SOS 4303C Soil Microbiology .......................................... 3






Colleges


College of Architecture


GENERAL STATEMENT
Established in 1925, the College of Architecture has grown
to be one of the largest design and construction institutions
in the country. A unique aspect of the college is the scope of
its professional disciplines which, at the undergraduate
level, include: Architecture, Building Construction, Interior
Design, and Landscape Architecture. Graduate programs are
available through the Department of Urban and Regional
Planning, the School of Building Construction, and the De-
partment of Architecture. The architecture graduate program
includes options in Design, History, Preservation, Structures,
and Environmental Technologies.
The Architecture and Fine Arts Library and the Visual Re-
sources Center are the largest collections of their kind in the
Southeast. Together they provide books, government docu-
ments, American and foreign periodicals, subject files,
micro-text, slides, photographs, reproductions and other
materials for undergraduate and graduate studies. The AFA
Library also maintains its own Rare Book Collection for
scholarly research. Services include professional reference
service ready to assist in guidance and searches for informa-
tion. Students may use additional resources in the University
Libraries system.


STUDENT AID
Students interested in part-time employment, as-
sistantships, fellowships, loans, prizes, and awards are re-
ferred to individual departments and information provided
by the Office of Student Financial Affairs, University of Flor-
ida.


RESEARCH CENTERS
The College contributes to community, state, regional,
and national efforts to conserve and improve the quality of
the natural and built environments through research
projects directed by the Florida Architecture and Building
Research Center, (FABRIC), the Research and Education
Center for Architectural Preservation, (RECAP), and the Cen-
ter for Tropical and Subtropical Architecture, Planning and
Construction, (TROPARC). The college has established re-
search and training programs of national prominence
through the Preservation Institute: Nantucket and the Pres-
ervation Institute: Caribbean. The latter program, directed
by RECAP and TROPARC, is part of the College of
Architecture's drive to develop new links with institutions in
the Caribbean Basin and Latin America.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Student organizations take an active part in the educa-
tional program of the College. Membership in the pro-
fessional organizations of each discipline is available to the
student chapters. Student chapters of the American Institute
of Architects and the American Society of Interior Designers,
Institute of Business Designers, the UF Chapter of the Amer-
ican Society of Landscape Architects, the Student Planning
Association, the UF Chapter of the American Institute of
Constructors and the Student Contractors and Builders As-
sociation are all represented. In addition, honorary societies
of Tau Sigma Delta, Sigma Lambda Alpha, Sigma Lambda
Chi, and the Gargoyle Society are represented. The College
recognizes the importance of student involvement and en-
courages and assists participation with professional groups
and societies.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Architecture


encourage applications from qualified students of all cul-
tural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed herein are
the specific requirements for admission to this College. It
should be understood that only minimum requirements are
given and that admission to the College is a selective pro-
cess. Having satisfied minimum requirements does not auto-'
matically guarantee admission. Limitations in faculty, staff,
and facilities make it necessary that the College establish a
selective process for the admission of students. Priority in
admission shall be given to those applicants who, in the
judgment of the admissions committee, have the greatest
apparent potential for successful completion of the pro-
gram.
To be eligible for consideration for admission to the Col-
lege, the student must have reached junior status, earned a
minimum "C" average in all courses attempted regardless of
the type of coursework completed, and taken the College
Level Academic Skills Test (see page 33). If preprofessional
courses are a part of the total credits, a minimum "C" aver-
age is required in these courses also. Students admitted to
the University at less than junior status are in the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Lower Division, not the College of
Architecture, and admission in this manner does not in itself
guarantee space in the preprofessional architecture courses
nor eventual admission to the College. Students admitted as
juniors to Colleges other than the College of Architecture
have no priority for preprofessional or professional courses
and may be considered for enrollment on a space available
basis, after priority College of Architecture students have
been served.
Admission of junior status students to the College in any
of the disciplines of study falls into two categories: 1) those
having completed all Lower Division requirements and pre-
pared to study at the third year professional cou'rsework
levels and 2) those needing to complete freshman/sopho-
more preprofessional courses. Generally transfer students
from universities or community colleges which do not offer
approved preprofessional programs find themselves in the
latter category. These students may expect to require up to
four semesters at the University of Florida to complete these
courses.
An admissions review process is employed for all appli-
cants at this point. Criteria used in review may include any or'
all of the following:
Quality of work completed
Achievement in preprofessional courses or courses related
to disciplines of study
Pattern of courses completed
Personal interview
Portfolio review
Work experience
Recommendations by teachers and/or employers
1. Curriculum in Architecture: Through an Admissions
Committee the Department of Architecture selects from
eligible applicants approximately 100 students annually
to enter third year professional studies. All students
who satisfactorily complete the two year pre-
professional programs at Miami-Dade, Broward and St.
Petersburg (Clearwater) community colleges are eligible
for.consideration for third year admissions. Applicants
for transfer from one of the approved preprofessional
programs or from the Lower Division of the UF College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences must be filed by the dead-
line listed in the front of the catalog (approximately
February 1). Transfer students with provisional admis-
sion status, (3AR, 4AR, 5AR, or 6AR) must notify the De-
partment office of their wish to be considered for third
year admissions by the same date.
2. Curriculum in Interior Design: Transfer students must
consult with the program adviser. Students needing to
complete Lower Division preprofessional requirements
are urged to apply for the summer term for the se-
quence of drawing, building arts and architectural his-
tory. The remaining preprofessional courses may be
completed during the next academic year. Students ac-
cepted for the sequence shall be admitted as pro-







COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


visional, and shall be reviewed during the spring of the
next year for approval to enter for the professional
courses in the junior year. Notification of the decision of
the admissions committee shall be made prior to the
close of the spring semester for the junior class which
begins the following fall.
3. Curriculum in Landscape Architecture: Transfer stu-
dents contemplating the professional degree program
must contact the Department Adviser to determine ad-
mission timing and eligibility. Students completing the
pre-design programs at Miami-Dade, Broward, and St.
Petersburg (Clearwater) Community Colleges must
complete LAA 2710 and LAA 2711 during the summer
term proceeding admission to professional studies;
these students must also have the equivalent botany
and physical science courses. Transfer students from
community colleges not offering an equivalent pre-de-
sign program are urged to begin their preprofessional
course work in the summer term in order to complete
required classes in three semesters. Calculus, botany,
and physical science requirements, in addition to gener-
al education requirements, can normally be fulfilled at
the Community College. Students with Associate of Sci-
ence degrees must complete all required general educa-
tion and preprofessional course work prior to admission
to professional studies.
4. Curriculum in Building Construction: see The School
of Building Construction.




APPLICATION DEADLINES
The programs in Architecture, Interior Design and Land-
scape Architecture will admit students for third year pro-
fessional coursework in the Fall semester only. Students
needing to complete some or all of the Lower Division re-
quirements shall be reviewed for the Fall, Spring, or Summer
semesters. Applications for Fall, including all required
credentials, must be received by the Registrar's Office (for
transfer students) or the Dean's Office for UF students, as
follows: Architecture February 1; Interior Design and Land-
scape Architecture May 12. The application deadline for
these Departments for Spring and Summer is as stated in the
front of the catalog. Applicants unable to meet these dead-
lines may apply on a space available basis.
The School of Building Construction will admit students
for third year professional course work in the Fall and Spring
semester only. Deadlines for completion of all application
procedures, including School requirements and receipt of
official credentials is March 1 for Fall and October 3 for
Spring admission. Applicants unable to meet these dead-
lines may apply on a space available basis. -
Building Construction applicants needing to complete
some or all of the Lower Division requirements may be ad-
mitted'to the College of Architecture on a provisional basis
not to exceed two semesters. Those in this category must
meet the requirements of the Dean's Office and have the
recommendation of the Director of the School. Deadlines
for students in this category are as stated in the front of this
catalog under "All Other Programs."




ADVISEMENT
Students planning to major in any program of study in the
College of Architecture should see the Director of Student
Services or the proper Upper Division departmental chair-
man, program director or adviser as soon as possible.
Each Upper Division student in the College is assigned a
faculty member as an adviser who remains as that student's
adviser. This adviser can assist with academic processes and
personal problems as well. The students are encouraged to
take full advantage of this assistance.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOADS
Fifteen to eighteen semester hours in any regular semester
shall be considered a normal load. A student may be per-
mitted to register for more than eighteen hours when, in the
opinion of the adviser, the quality of the student's record
justifies this. Twelve credit hours is the minimum to be con-
sidered a full time student; students who wish to take less
than this should be aware that certain University privileges
and benefits require full time status. It is the student's re-
sponsibility to verify the minimum academic load necessary
for these benefits.
Students who wish to ask for adjustments in their aca-
demic loads may petition the Dean through the Director of
Student Services.
NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The student will have maintained normal academic
progress when he earns a minimum grade point of 2.0 (C)
average for all work attempted in the Upper Division. In ad-
dition, he is required to take courses in a sequence as speci-
fied by his departmental chairman or adviser. The student
may be excluded from a program of study in the College of
Architecture through failure or refusal to maintain normal
academic progress.
DEAN'S HONOR LIST
Undergraduate students who demonstrate excellence in
their academic work by completing a full course load (mini-
mum of 15 semester hours credit) in a semester term and
achieving a grade point average of 3.5 or better will earn a
position on the Dean's Honor List. Students whose term av-
erages are below 3.5 due to grades of I or X are not eligible.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To be eligible for graduation, the student must earn a min-
imum grade point average of 2.0 (C) for all work attempted
in the appropriate curriculum while classified in the College.
Courses taken while enrolled in another Upper Division Col-
lege may not apply toward the calculation of the College of
Architecture average. Specific grade requirements for the
various curricula may be obtained from the departmental or
Dean's Offices.
Students planning to enter the Graduate School should
maintain a 3.0 (B) average in Upper Division work.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS AND HIGH HONORS
The faculty will consider recommending students for
graduation with HONORS or HIGH HONORS on the follow-
ing criteria: (a) grade point average, (b) distribution and
quality of subject matter studied, (c) evaluation of the stu-
dents by the faculty, and (d) other pertinent qualities of the
student and his or her work.
The student will be considered for HONORS or HIGH
HONORS upon his earning a minimum academic average
established by the department or program. The average will
be calculated on all work attempted while the student is
classified in the Upper Division. Transfer credits will be ex-
cluded from the average; HONORS or HIGH HONORS may
be awarded upon a minimum of 48 semester hour credits
taken at the University of Florida. Students should check
with their department or program director for minimum av-
erage required.
STUDENT WORK
The College reserves the right to retain student work for
the purpose of record, exhibition, or instruction.
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
Students are urged to obtain before graduation some ex-
perience in the employ of practicing professionals in their
particular field, or in some allied work which will give an in-
sight into the problems of professional practice. Such em-
ployment provides an introduction to the methods of actual





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


practice, and enables the student to derive increased benefit
from advanced work in school. Students should seek the
counsel of their faculty adviser as to the type of practical ex-
perience best suited to their individual needs.
FIELD TRIPS
Each year a number of field trips are arranged to give stu-
dents an opportunity to broaden and extend their educa-
tional experience through study of planning, design and
construction projects of unusual interest. Students fre-
quently combine such studies with attendance at state and
national meetings of the professional organizations in their
respective fields.


GRADUATE DEGREES
The college offers the degrees of Master of Arts in Archi-
tecture, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning, Mas-
ter of Science in Building Construction, and Master of Build-
ing Construction. To meet the needs and goals of each stu-
dent, graduate programs are preparedlin consultation with a
designated member of the. Graduate Faculty of the College
of Architecture. For further information, see the Graduate
School catalog.


I. CURRICULUM IN
ARCHITECTURE
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Design (Architecture).
McRae, J.M., Acting Chairman; Crain, E.E., Adviser.
The professional program in architecture, which is ac-
credited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board,
consists of both the undergraduate and graduate curricula.
The undergraduate curriculum leads to the degree Bachelor
of Design (Architecture). Although this is not a professional
degree, it is excellent preparation for careers in the architec-
tural field where registration is not a requirement.
Completion of the two-year graduate curriculum leads to
the professional degree Master of Arts in Architecture, which
meets the educational requirements of Florida statutes for
architectural registration.
In the graduate program optional courses of study are in
architectural design, architectural structural design, environ-
mental technologies, architectural history, and architectural
preservation. These options permit the student to study in
an area of particular interest; however, all options lead to the
same professional degree and each prepares the graduate for
a career in professional practice. For detailed information
see the Graduate Catalog.
The program of study is included below to show a typical
sequence in which courses are taken. Some courses in the
first two years are offered in semesters in addition to those
shown. Consult the course description section in the back of
the catalog for precise information on offerings.
FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 1126 Architectural Design 1 ............................... 4
ARC 1211 Building Arts ...................... .................... 2
Physical Sciences ......... ........................................... ............. 3
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 .............................................. 3
*Hum anities .................................................................. 3
*Social/Behavioral Science ................................................... 3

18
Semester 2
ARC 1131 Architectural Design 2 ............................................ 4
**ARC 1701 Survey of Arch. History 1 ....... .................................. 3
*Social/Behavioral Science ..................................................... 3
*English .............. .......................................................... 3
PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 ................................................... 3

16
**Satisfies 3 hours of General Education requirement for Hu-
manities.


SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 3 ............................................ 4
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods of Construction 1 ................. 3
ARC 2201 Theory of Architecture ............................................. 2
*English ...................................................... .......................... 3
Biological Science ................... .................................................... 3

15

Semester 2
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 4 .............................................. 4
ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1 ....................................... 4
ARC 2681 Environmental Technology 1 ................................... 2
COC 3111 Introduction to Computers ..................................... 3
*H u m an ities ............................................. ............................... 3

16
*Students are advised to check with the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences as to the specific courses satisfying the re-
quirements of State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.30.

THIRD YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 3381 Architectural Design 5 .....................:....................... 5
ARC 3463 Materials & Methods of Construction 2 ............... 3
ARC 3783 Survey of Architectural History 2 ............................. 3
Social/Behavioral Science ...................................... ..... 3
Electives ......... .............. ............ ..................... .................... 4

18

Semester 2
ARC 3382 Architectural Design 6 ........................................... 5
ARC 3551 Architectural Structures 2 ....................................... 4
ARC 3682 Environmental Technology 2 ................................. 4
ARC 3801 Survey of Architectural Preservation .................... 2
Electives ................................. ..... ......................... 3

18

FOURTH YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 4384 Architectural Design 7 .............................................. 6
ARC 4561 Architectural Structures 3 ....................................... 4
ARC 4683 Environmental Technology 3 ................................. 4
Electives ............................ ......... ................. .......... 3

17

Semester 2
ARC 4385 Architectural Design 8 ......................................... 6
' ARC 4464 Materials & Methods of Construction 3 ................. 3
ARC 4783 Survey of Architectural History 3 ....................:........ 3
ARC 4274 Professional Administration ................................... 3

15


II. CURRICULUM IN
INTERIOR DESIGN
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design. M. Young, Di-
rector and Adviser.
The four-year program in Interior Design is accredited by
the Foundation for Interior Design Education and Research.
The course of study has been developed for those students
who plan a career in the profession of Interior Design. The
curriculum is structured to provide a knowledge of the prin-
ciples of the humanities, social and physical sciences, and
the manner in which they are integrated and applied in the
design process to creatively resolve problems of the interior
environment. The interior design faculty seeks to equip the
student with a knowledge of design techniques, materials,
resources, and an awareness of the inter-related professional
responsibility of environmental problems. Interior Design
career opportunities are numerous due to the demand for
professional design services by businesses, corporations,







COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


community organizations, and governmental agencies.
Graduates of this program often assume positions in interior
design offices, architectural firms, or generate their own
practices. All entering students must consult with the pro-
gram coordinator for course scheduling and sequencing. In-
terior Design is a limited entry program therefore it is pru-
dent to consult program coordinator.

FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 1126 Architectural Design 1 ........................ .......
ARC 1211 Building Arts ..................................................... 2
Physical Science ........................................ ........ ............... 3
MAC 3223 Algebra and Trig. or Survey of Calculus 1 ........ 4
*English ........................ .............. ............................... 3
16
Semester 2
ARC 1131 Architectural Design 2 ....................................... 4
**ARC 1701 Survey of Architectural History ............................. 3
Physical Science ............................................... ............ 3
*English ............................................ .......... ........................ 3
*Social Science ............................................ .. ...... ... .......... 3
16
**Satisfies 3 hours of General Education requirement for Hu-
manities.

SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 3 .................................... 4
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods of Construction 1 .............. 3
ARC 2201 Theory of Architecture ................................... 2
IND 2100 History of Interiors 1 ........................................ 3
*Hum anities ........................................................................ 3
(Recommend Theatre Appreciation)
Biological Science ............................... ........... ........... 3.
18

Semester 2
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 4 ........................................... 4
*Social Science ............................................... ...................... 3
IND 2130 History of Interiors 2 ............................................ 3
*H u m anities .................................................................... 3
COC 3111 Introduction to Computers ................................... 3
16
*Students are advised to check with the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences as to the specific courses satisfying the re-
quirements of State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.30.

THIRD YEAR Credits
Semester 1
IND 3430 Light &.Graphics 1 ................................................... 3
IND 3215 Architectural Interiors 1 ....................................... 5
PHS 2802 Introduction to Acoustics ................................. 2
Behavioral Science ................................... .................. 3
**Elective ........................................ 3...... ......... 3
(Recommend Stagecraft and Design)
16

Semester 2
IND 3431 Light & Graphics 2 ................. ...................... 3
IND 3421 Furniture Design ...................... .. .................. 3
IND 3216 Architectural Interiors 2 ....................................... 5
IND 3424 Technologies of Interior Materials ........................ 3
Elective .................................................................................. 3
17

FOURTH YEAR Credits
Semester 1
IND 4500 Professional Practice ....................................:...... 3
IND 4450 Interior Detailing & Design ................................. 4
IND 4225 Advanced Architectural Interiors 1 .................... 6
Electives ...... ...................... ..................... 3
16


Semester 2
IND 4422 Materials and Estimating ........:.............................. 3
IND 4226 Advanced Architectural Interiors 2 .................... 8
Electives .......................................... ............ .... ........... 6
17



III. CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
H.H. Smith, Program Chairman and Adviser
This curriculum leads to the first professional degree,
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. The program is ac-
credited by the LAAB, and is an essential first step toward le-
gal identity in Florida and other states which regulate the
practice of landscape architects. Students become familiar
with the art of design, planning or management, and the ar-
rangement of natural and man-made elements on the land
through application of cultural and scientific knowledge.
There is concern for resource conservation and stewardship
and that the built environment serves useful and enjoyable
purposes. Graduates are employed by professional offices,
municipal, state or federal recreation, landscape architec-
tural or planning agencies and the construction or horti-
cultural industries. Graduates may also continue in graduate
programs at other institutions throughout the country.
Since landscape architecture is a selective program, please
see Requirements for Admission, College of Architecture. All
entering students must consult with the Department Adviser
for course scheduling and sequencing.

FIRST YEAR Credits
Semester .1
***English 1101 Exp. and
Argumentative W writing ..................... ................ ........ 3
GLY 2015 Phys. Geology ................................. ............... 4
*BO T 1010 Botany ...... ............................................. .................. 3
ARC 1211 Building A rts ........................................ ..................... 2
ARC 1126 Architectural Design 1 .......................................... 4
16

Semester 2
***English 1102 Writing About Literature ................................... 3
BO T 2011 Pit. D iv. ................................................ ............... 3
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ................................... 3
**ARC 1701 Survey of Arch. History 1 .................................... 3
ARC 1131 Architectural Design 2 ........................................... 4
16
*Students with general biology background should take BOT
2710.
**Satisfies 3 hours of General Education requirement for Hu-
manities.

SECOND YEAR Credits
Semester 1
***H um anities ...................... ............... ......... ... .................... 3
COC 3111 Introduction to Computers ................................... 3
LAA 2710 Landscape Architecture 1 ................................:......... 4
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 3 ....... ................................... .. 4
O RH 3513 O rn.Plt. Ident. 1 ...................................... ............ 3
17

Semester 2
***Humanities ..................................... 3
***SO C'2000 Intro. to Soc., or PSY 2013 ......................................... 3
LAA 2711 Landscape Architecture 2 ........................................ 4
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 4 ....................................... 4
O RH 3514 or BOT 3153 ................................. ..... .......... ............. 3
17
***Students are advised to check with the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences as to the specific courses satisfying the re-
quirements of State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.30.





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


The first two years of coursework must be completed prior
to admission to professional studies. Minimum hours 66.

THIRD YEAR: PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Credits
Semester 1
LAA 3350 Landscape Architecture Studio 1 .................... ........ 5
LAA 3420 Landscape Architecture Construction 1................. 5
LAA 3330 Site Analysis .......................... .. .... 5
Social/Behavioral Science ................................... ........... 3

18
Semester 2
LAA 3351 Landscape Architecture Studio 2 ........................... 5
LAA 3421 Landscape Architecture Construction 2 ................. 5
LAA 3510 Planting Design .............................. .............. 5
LAA 3530 Land. Management or Management Elective........ 3

18
FOURTH YEAR: PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Credits
Semester 1
LAA 4355 Landscape Architecture Studio 3 ........................... 8
LAA 4410 Design Implementation ......................................... 3
LAA 4930 Sem inar ............................................... ............... 2
Social/Behavioral Science ................................... ........ 3

16
Semester 2
LAA 4356 Landscape Architecture Studio 4 ............................. 8
LAA 4210 Professional Administration ................................. 3


Elective ..................................................................................... 3
S Elective .................................................................................... 3

17

69 hours (minimum) of professional course work required
for the degree, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture.
A week-long field trip is required of all Junior level students;
students should plan to have adequate funds available. It
may be necessary to assess studio fees to defray increasing
costs of base maps and other generally used materials. Stu-
dents may elect certain minor certificate programs to fulfill
elective requirements. Landscape Architectural Internship is
also available for elective credit. A studies abroad program is
offered.


IV. CURRICULUM IN BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
(See The School of Building Construction)


V. CURRICULUM IN URBAN AND
REGIONAL PLANNING
The Department of Urban and Regional Planning does not
as yet offer a complete undergraduate program. However,
two undergraduate courses are available and described un-
der Urban and Regional Planning in the section entitled De-
scriptions.








SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


The School of Building

Construction


GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Building Construction was established in
1976 but a curriculum in Building Construction in the Col-
lege of Architecture has been offered continuously since
1935. While a few programs were begun before that, none of
them are still in operation today.
The UF program in 1977 was recognized by the Associated
General Contractors Education and Research Foundation as
outstanding in the United States. In 1981, the School was the
first to receive its five-year reaccreditation from the Ameri-
can Council for Construction Education.
Graduates of the UF School of Building Construction
begin work immediately as project managers, field engi-
neers, project schedulers, cost engineers, assistant super-
intendents, quality controllers and estimators.
The school has a normal Upper Division enrollment of
240, plus 35 students working toward a graduate degree.
Also, a Ph.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Col-
lege of Education.


SCHOLARSHIPS AND
ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained
from the Office of Student Financial Affairs; University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. Information concerning schol-
arships available specifically for third and fourth year Build-
ing Construction students can be obtained from the School.


HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS

SIGMA LAMBDA CHI
The purpose of Sigma Lambda Chi is to recognize outstan-
ding students in Building Construction for scholastic
achievement and extracurricular activities. Semester mem-
bership averages 30 active members. Sigma Lambda Chi pro-
vides services to BCN students through academic scholar-
ships, plans for.construction coursework, guest lecturers, a
job reference file, and extracurricular skill development
courses. Sigma Lambda Chi provides a channel of com-
munication between students and outstanding alumni in
the construction industry.


AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
CONSTRUCTORS
The Student Chapter of the American Institute of Con-
structors is a professional organization which serves as a
bridge between students and professional constructors.
Membership is open to all Building Construction majors--
both undergraduate and graduate students.


STUDENT CONTRACTORS AND
BUILDERS ASSOCIATION
The Associated General Contractors of America (AGC) ac-
tively supports the Student Contractors and Builders As-
sociation whose purposes are to better the student's aware-
ness of the construction industry and to promote the School
of Building Construction to both the industry and the com-
munity. Any Building Construction student can, and is en-
couraged to become a member.


The activities of this organization include inviting guest
speakers, organizing the Homecoming festivities, operating
the Building Construction test bank, carrying out com-
munity service projects, and having semester social gather-
ings.


PROGRAM OF STUDY
This four year program for a Bachelor of Building Con-
struction degree is for students who are interested in prepar-
ing for professional careers in construction, management,
techniques, operations, and related areas in the construction
industry, to include the arts of communications and in-
terpersonal relations, rather than in architectural and engi-
neering design.
Graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of
Science in Building Construction and Master of Building
Construction are offered, as well as a Ph.D. program in con-
junction with the College of Education.
The Freshman and Sophomore programs of study are de-
signed to provide easy transfer for junior and community
college graduates. With proper course planning, transfer stu-
dents with A.A. degrees may complete the four-year degree
program in four remaining semesters at the University. Pros-
pective junior and community college transfer students
should consult their advisers or write to the School of Build-
ing Construction for a pre-Building Construction program of
local study.
Opportunities for advancement and increasing responsi-
bilities exist in all areas of the construction industry, a few of
which include land development; home building; public
building; industrialized building systems; commercial, in-
dustrial, marine and heavy construction; underwater and
space age facilities; materials and equipment sales and in-
stallations; construction product research, development,
sales, and applications.

APPLICATION DEADLINES
A. GENERAL
1. The School will admit students for third year pro-
fessional coursework only in the Fall and Spring semesters.
All application procedures, receipt of official transcripts,
and School requirements for admission should be com-
pleted by the deadlines stated below. Applicants unable
to meet these deadlines may apply on a space available
basis.
B. FALL SEMESTER: March 1, 1983
C. SPRING SEMESTER: October 3, 1983

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the School of Building Con-
struction encourage applications from qualified students
from all cultural, racial, religious and ethnic groups. Listed
below are the specific requirements for admission to this
school. It should be understood, however, thatminimum re-
quirements are given and that admission to the school is a
selective process.
ALL STUDENTS:
A. LIMITED ADMISSIONS: The satisfaction of minimum
requirements does not automatically guarantee admis-
sion. Limitations in staff, faculty and facilities permit the
School to admit only a limited number of new students
each Fall and Spring term. Selection will be based on best
academic record. A letter of intent must be sent to the Di-
rector of the School of Building Construction indicating
the student's career objectives in construction. The letter
must contain a resume of all construction experience to
include name, address and phone number of employers
and be received with the application by the deadline date
listed in the University Calendar.
B. Students must attain at least a 2.0 (C) average in pre-
professional coursework and have an overall 2.0 average
for all Lower Division work.






Colleges

SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


C. Students will not be accepted if there is a grade point
deficit for courses taken at the University of Florida.
D. Students must have taken the College Level Academic
Skills Test (see page 33).
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES STUDENTS:
Students must have completed all preprofessional and gen-
eral education courses (or equivalents) as outlined further
on in this. section.
TRANSFER STUDENTS: To be eligible for admission to the
School of Building Construction, a transfer student must sat-
isfy the following minimum requirements:
A. Students attending four-year colleges should follow a
program of general education and preprofessional courses
equivalent to the basic curriculum for students desiring to
enter the School of Building Construction, which is out-
lined further on in this section.
B. Junior College and Community College students
should:
1. Complete the university transfer program at the jun-
ior college.
2. Complete the general education requirements estab-
lished for the junior college.
3. Complete all of the prerequisite general education
and preprofessional courses, or acceptable substitutes,
which are listed further on in this section.
C. Students lacking some of the prerequisite courses may
apply for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sci-
ences.
PROVISIONAL ADMISSION: Within space limitations,
students who do not meet precisely the admission require-
ments indicated may be granted provisional admission to
the School of Building Construction. The Director of the
School of Building Construction will specify the courses to
be completed and minimum grade points to be earned by
the student during the term of his provisional admission.
Provisional status will be removed and the student may
compete for a space in Upper Division coursework along
with other eligible candidates provided the student fulfills
the conditions set forth in his provisional admission. The
student will be excluded from further enrollment in the
School of Building Construction if the student fails to satisfy
the conditions of his provisional admission.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume full
responsibility for registering for the proper courses and for
fulfilling all requirements for the degree. The student is also
responsible for completing all courses for which the student
registered.
Courses may be dropped with adviser approval until the
end of the first week of the semester without petitioning. Af-
ter the first week, courses may be dropped or changed with-
out penalty only through the administrative office of the
School (by petition) and the Registrar.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Of-
fice of the Registrar early in the semester in which they ex-
pect to receive the degree. The official calendar shows the
latest date on which this can be done.'
NORMAL LOADS: The average course load in the School
of Building Construction is 16 credit hours. A student may be
permitted to register for additional hours if in the opinion of
his academic adviser, his academic record justifies this. Stu-
dents who wish to take less than 12 hours should be aware
that certain university privileges and benefits require a mini-
mum registration. It is the student's responsibility to verify
the minimum registration necessary for these benefits.
EXTENSION WORK: Students may take a maximum of 6
credits by extension work or correspondence courses among
the 64 semester credits of Upper Division work required for
the baccalaureate degree. *
STUDENT WORK: The School reserves the right to retain
all student work for the purpose of record, exhibition or in-
struction.


PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress may be excluded from
further registration.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: To receive the degree
Bachelor of Building Construction a student must satisfac-
torily complete the following:
A. 64 semester hours of Lower Division requirements.
B. The approved program in Building Construction.
C. Elective requirements.
D. Attain at least a 2,0 overall average.
E. Attain at least a 2.0 average on all courses which count
toward his or her Upper Division degree requirements.
A minimum of 128 semester hours is required for gradu-
ation. The waiving of any required course does not reduce
the hours required for graduation.
GRADUATE SCHOOL: Students planning to enter the
Graduate School should maintain a 3.0 (B) average in Upper
Division work.
NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The student will have maintained normal academic
progress when the student earns a minimum grade point of
2.0 (C) average for all work attempted in the Upper Division.
In addition, the student is required to take courses in se-
quence as specified by the School Director or adviser. The
student may be excluded from a program of study in the
School of Building Construction if the student fails or re-
fuses to maintain normal academic progress.
DIRECTOR'S LIST AND GRADUATION WITH HONORS OR
HIGH HONORS

A student who carried a minimum of 15 hours per
semester with a grade point average of at least 3.5 will be
placed on the Director's List for that semester.
To graduate WITH HONORS, a student must make at least
a 3.2 average on all course work accepted as Upper Division
credit and all course work (except as noted below) at-
tempted while registered in the Upper Division. To graduate
WITH HIGH HONORS, a student must make at least a 3.5
average on all work accepted as Upper Division credit and
all course work (except as noted below) attempted while
registered in the Upper Division. In calculating requirements
for graduating WITH HONORS or WITH HIGH HONORS,
the following policies are followed: the student must have
completed at the University of Florida at least 48 semester
hours of Upper Division credit toward a degree in Building
Construction, transfer credits and S-U grade credits being
excluded; and credits for Lower Division courses taken while
registered in Upper Division will also be excluded.


GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
, Courses are offered in the School of Building Construction
leading to the degree Master of Building Construction or
Master of Science in Building Construction. Also, a Ph.D de-
gree is offered in conjunction with the College of Education.
For requirements for these degrees and for admission to
Graduate School, consult the Graduate School Catalog.


CURRICULUM
LOWER DIVISION PROGRAM


Courses
English
Math and Computer
Sciences
.Physical Sciences
Biological Science
Social and
Behavioral Sciences


General
Education
6


Preprofessional Total
3** 9


.0


0 9








SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


*Humanities
Elective
Other Preprofessional


0 9
2 2


Requirements 0 19 19

Totals 24 40 64
*Humanities courses require extensive writing which is
equivalent to at least 3 credits of English to meet the 12-cred-
it English requirement.
**Specific courses that may be used to satisfy General Educa-
tion requirements.


LOWER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
General Education Requirements'
Credits
English ENC 1101 Expos. & Arg. Writing; ENC 1102
Writing About Literature ...............:............................... 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences ............................................... 9
H um anities ........................................................... ............... 9
NOTE: For other specific courses to complete these require-
ments, see page 123 through 126 in this catalog.
Preprofessional Requirements
*BCN 1210 Construction Materials ........................................... 3
***GLY 2026 Geology for Engineers .............................................. 3
BCN 1252 Construction Drawing I .......................................... 3
ECO 2013 Basic Economics I ................................................. 3
Principles of Accounting ..................................... ............. 3
*ENC 3213 Technical Writing & Business Comm ................... 3
Biological Science I APB 2150 .......................................... 3
**MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus I ............................................. 3
*PHY 2004, 2005 Applied Physics. I & II, PHY 2004L ................. 7
*ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1 ....................................... 4
****COP 4930 Computer Programming Using Fortran ................ 3
Elective .................................................................................. 2
*Minimum C grades are required in BCN 1210, ENC 3213, ARC
2580 and in either PHY 2004 Or PHY 2005, but not both.
**Students who do not have background for calculus should
take MAC 1132, or MAT 1033 and MAC 1132L, before MAC
3223. Credits may be used for the elective.
***GLY 2015 may be substituted for GLY 2026.
****COP 4930 may be used to satisfy the mathematical science
requirement.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Semester Credits
ENC 1101 Expository and Argumentative Writing ................ 3
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus I .............................................. 3
APB 2150 Biological Sciences I ................................................. 3
BCN 1210 Construction Materials ....................................... 3
Social Sciences ...........,..: ........................................................... 3
15

Semester 2
ENC 1102 Writing About Literature ... .................................. 3
PHY 2004 Physics I .................................. .......... ................ 3
*BCN 1252 Construction Drawing I ............................................ 3
H u m anities .............................................................. ........... 3
Social Sciences ............................................ ........ ................ 3
15


SOPHOMORE YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business Comm ................. 3
PHY 2005 Physics II .....:........................................ ............ 3
PHY 2004L Laboratory for PHY 2004 and PHY 2005 ................ 1
Behavioral Studies .................................................................... 3
. Principles of Accounting .................................... ............. 3
H um anities .................................................. ....................... 3
16

Semester 2
GLY 2026 Geology for Engineers ......................:.. ..................... 3
ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1 ....................................... 4
ECO 2013 Basic Economics I ................................. .......... 3
*COP 4930 Computer Programming using Fortran ................ 3
H um anities .....;............................................ ....................... 3
Elective .............. ................................ ............................... 2
18
Lower Division Subtotal 64
*Special sections for BCN majors.'
UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
JUNIOR YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
BCN 3223 Construction Techniques I .................................... 5
BCN 3256 Construction Drawing I .......................................... 2
BCN 3281 Construction Methods Lab (Surveying)................. 2
SBCN 3431 Structures I (Steel and Timber) ............................. 4
*Business Law ............. ; ............................ ... ...... ........... 3
16

Semester 2
BCN 3224 Construction Techniques II ................................... 5
BCN 3461 Structures II (Formwork and Concrete) ................. 4
BCN 3500 Environmental Technology I .................................. 3
BCN 3611 Construction Estimating I ...................................... 4
16

*If taken at UF, BUL 4112 is required.
SENIOR YEAR
Semester 1 Credits
BCN 4521 Environmental Technology II ............................... 3
BCN 4612 Construction Estimating II ............................... 4
BCN 4700 Construction Management I ................................... 4
BCN 4720 Construction Planning & Control ......................... 3
BCN 4901L Construction Seminar I ......................................... 1
15

Semester 2
BCN 4012 History of Construction ............................................ 3
BCN 4510 Environmental Technology III ................................ 3
BCN 4750 Construction Management II ................ ................. 4
BCN 4751 Construction Entrepreneurship ............................ 3
BCN 4902L Construction Seminar II ....................................... 1
Elective ........................................... .......... ........................... 3
17
Upper Division Subtotal 64

TOTAL 128





Colleges


The College of Business

Administration
The College of Business Administration of the University
of Florida was organized in 1926-1927, and includes program
of study in accounting; economics, finance, insurance, real
estate and urban analysis, management and administrative
sciences, marketing, and computer and information sci-
ences.
The College's educational objectives are (a) to provide a
broad formal instructional foundation for responsible partic-
ipation in business, the professions and government; (b) to
stimulate interest in social, economic and civic responsi-
bilities, (c) to develop competence in making business de-
cisions and in evaluating policy; and (d) to offer fields of
specialization in business or economics, and, especially, to
encourage intellectual inquiry.
The guiding principle of this College is a broad foundation
of study outside the college, which prepares the student for
specialization through limited concentration in certain fields
of business administration and economics. To this end, each
program of study is constructed around a core of courses in
economics and the major functional areas of business.
Graduate programs in business administration and eco-
nomics are provided under the Graduate School of Business
Administration for advanced students with interest in ca-
reers in reaching, research, or business. The College partici-
pates in programs of adult and executive development edu-
cation.
In addition to the University computer center, the College
maintains a college computer center for instructional and re-
search purposes.


SCHOLARSHIPS AND OTHER
FINANCIAL AID
Information about scholarships and other financial aid for
students in the College may be obtained from the Director
of Student Financial Aid, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
Information on graduate student financial support may be
obtained from the Director of Graduate Studies, Graduate
School of Business Administration, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.

MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND
REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
The College of Business Administration is an accredited
member of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of
Business, the Southern Economic Association, the Southern
Business Administrative Association and the National Retail
Merchants' Association. The baccalaureate and MBA pro-
grams in both business and accounting are accredited by the
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business.


BETA GAMMA SIGMA
Election to this national honorary society is based on
scholarship and character. It fills the place in education for
business that Phi Beta Kappa holds in the field of classical
education. For further information, apply to the Office of
the Dean for undergraduate studies.


PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Six professional fraternities are represented in the College
of Business Administration: Alpha Kappa Psi, Delta Sigma Pi,
and Phi Chi Theta in Business, Omicron Delta Epsilon in ec-
onomics, Alpha Mu Alpha in marketing and Rho Epsilon in
real estate.


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The College of Business Administration encourages appli-
cations from qualified students from all cultural, racial, re-
ligious, and ethnic groups. Admission to the College is a
selective process and fulfilling minimum requirements does
not automatically' guarantee admission. A student's total re-
cord, including educational objectives, courses completed,
quality of academic record, and test data all are considered
in evaluating applications for admission. Priority in admis-
sion is given to applicants whose academic potential in-
dicates the highest likelihood of success.
1. Students with a UF classification, who have completed
at least one semester at the University of Florida and who
have completed the two course calculus requirement may
apply for admission to the College. Prior to admission to
the Upper Division, students must take the College Level

Academic Skills Test (see page 33).
2. Admission is competitive, and is based on grade-point
.average, preprofessional hours completed, and the avail-
ability of a limited number of spaces. Completion of six
hours of calculus is necessary to be considered for admis-
sion to the College. The preprofessional requirements are
listed in this section of the catalog, under "Curriculum in
Business Administration."
3. Transfer students: Admission to the College is based
upon prerequisite courses completed, and completion of
the two calculus requirements, and the student's earned
grade point average.
4. Junior College and Community College students should
complete:
(a) the general education requirements established for
the junior college;
(b) all of the preprofessional courses, including six
hours of calculus: and
(c) the College Level Academic Skills Test (see page 33).
5. Transfer students are advised that such courses as busi-
ness law, principles of marketing, principles of manage-
ment, principles of insurance, principles of real estate,
personnel management, principles of finance, and com-
puter management must be taken as upper division stu-
dents at the University of Florida. A maximum of 4
semester credits in the form of undistributed elective cred-
it may be allowed for such courses taken prior to enrolling
in the University of Florida. In no case may such courses
be in the student's major.
6. Requests for waivers in core course are considered on
an individual basis. When approved, students will be re-
quired to substitute another course in the same area.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: Students admitted to the Col-
lege are expected to assume full responsibility for registering
for the proper courses, for fulfilling all requirements for de-
grees, and for completing all courses. Academic counseling
is available in individual departments.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Of-
fice of the Registrar early in the semester in which they ex-
pect to receive the degree.
NORMAL LOADS: The average course load in the College
is 15 credit hours per semester. Students may be permitted to
register for additional hours if approved by the academic ad-
viser and tlie Dean. Students wishing to take less than 12
hours should be aware that they may not qualify for certain
University privileges and benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 30 semester hours to be applied
toward a degree must be completed in residence in the Col-
lege. This requirements may be waived only in special cases,
and must be approved in advance by the College. In any
case, no student may take more than 6 semester credit hours
by extension or correspondence among the 60 semester
credits of upper division work required for the baccalaureate
degree; such work must have prior approval for each indi-
vidual student by the Petitions Committee of the College.
Courses in a student's major field may not be taken by ex-







COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


tension, by correspondence, or at another university for
transfer. Students enrolled in the University, whose grade-
point average falls below 2.0, may not take courses by ex-
tension or correspondence.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An
undergraduate student in the College may take on the S-U
basis only free electives in fulfilling the requirements for the
BSBA degree.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
A student must satisfactorily complete the following for
graduation from the College:
1. 64 semester hours of lower division requirement.
2. A College approved program in the major field of study.
3. Elective requirements outside the student's major field
(a maximum of 7 semester hours may be specified by the
major department).
A minimum of 124 semester hours is required for gradu-
ation. The waiving of any required course does not reduce
the total hours required for graduation.
Students must maintain an overall average of at least 2.0,
and a 2.0 average on all courses fulfilling upper division de-
gree requirements.


DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS:
Students carrying 14 hours per semester with a grade point
average of 3.5 qualify for the Dean's list.
Graduation with Honors: Students must achieve at least a
3.2 average on all courses accepted as Upper Division credit.
Graduation with High Honors: Students must achieve at
least a 3.6 average on all courses accepted as Upper Division
credit. Graduation with Honors or with High Honors is
based on the following policies: (a) students must have
completed at the University of Florida at least 40 semester
hours for Upper Division credit toward a degree in Business
Administration, (b) transfer credits and S-U grade credits will
be excluded; (c) and credits for Lower Division courses
taken while registered in the Upper Division will be ex-
cluded.


GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses are offered in the Graduate School of Business
Administration leading to the degree of Master of Business'
Administration, Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. For
requirements of these degrees and for admission to Gradu-
ate School, consult the Graduate School Catalog.


CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
The College offers degrees in seven major fields. Students
attempting a degree in the College must complete: (1) the
General Education courses and the Preprofessional require-
ments listed below and elective courses for a total of at least
64 hours; and (2) satisfactorily complete the upper division
requirements.
Students planning to major in Accounting should consult
the section headed "School of Accounting."


General Education Requirements
(All majors in Business Administration)


Credits


English ........................................................................ .......... 6
*MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus I ............................................. 3
Social Sciences and Behavioral Sciences .............................. 9


H um anities .................................................. ....................... 9
**Physical Sciences .................................................................... 3-6
**Biological Sciences .................................................................. 6-3
For specific courses to complete these requirements, see the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog.
Preprofessional Requirements
a. Finance, Economics, Insurance, Management, Marketing
and Real Estate and Urban Analysis majors:
Credits
ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting ...................... 5
ECO 2013, 2023 Basic Economics ......................................... 6
MAC 3224 Survey of Calculus II ........................................... 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ......................................... 3
ECO 3411 Economic and Business Statistics ................ 3
Electives to make a total of 64 hours
b. Computer Information Sciences majors:
Credits
ACC 2001 Accounting .............................................................. 5
ECO 2013, 2023 Basic Economics ............................................ 6
COC 3110 Introduction to Computer Information
Science ........................ .................... 3
MAC 3224 Survey of Calculus II ............................................. 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ......................................... 3
STA 4033 Mathematical Statistics with Computer
Applications .................................. ................. ............. 2
CDA 3101 Introduction to Computer Organization ........... 3
Electives to make a total of 64 hours

*MAC 3223 is also considered a preprofessional course.
**Students are expected to complete 9 hours of the Sciences.
Choose elective courses needed to complete the total 64
semester hours from such areas as mathematics, natural sci-
ences, social science, foreign language, and humanities.

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
The upper division curriculum in Business Administration
requires 60 semester credits. The program centers around a
core which is required of all students. In addition, each stu-
dent is required to select one of 7 major fields as an area of
concentration. The pattern of the Upper Division require-
ments i as follows:
Courses Credits
QMB 3700 Quantitative Methods for Business and
Econom ic Analysis ........................................ ............... 3
*ECO 3251 National Income Determinants and Policy ........... 3
*ECO 3100 Prices and M markets .................................................. 3
FIN 3408 Business Finance .................................. ............. 4
MAN 3010 Principles of Management...................................... 3
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing ..................................... 3
BUL 4100 Business Law or
BUL 4112 Business Law or
ECP 4403 Government Regulation of Business ................. 3-4
**COP 3110 Introduction to Computer Programming .............. 2
**COP 3210 Computer Programming Using Fortran ................. 2
Business Policy ......................................................... ................. 3
Total Core Requirements 25-28

*Students majoring in Economics are required to register for
ECO 4205 and ECO 4101 instead of ECO 3251 and ECO 3100.
**Students majoring in Economics, Marketing, Insurance and
Real Estate are required to register for COP 3110. Students
.majoring in Management and Finance are required to reg-
ister for COP 3210. CIS majors will not be required to take
COP 3110 or 3210.

OTHER UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the upper division core, each student must
follow the curriculum pattern indicated below:
MAJOR FIELD
Required courses are listed under the appropriate "major"
headings, beginning in the next section. Minimum require-
ments range from 12 to 19 hours depending upon major.





Colleges

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


FREE ELECTIVES
Electives may be, within or outside the College of Business
Administration, but must be outside the major field. A max-
imum of 7 hours may be specified by major department. A
maximum of 6 credits in Advanced Military Science may be
counted toward free elective credit. CLEP credits and APE
credits not used to meet lower division requirements or low-
er division electives may not be used as electives in the up-
per division.

I. ACCOUNTING
(For Bachelor of Science in Accounting Degree Require-
ments, See Listing Under School of Accounting).

II. COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES
This curriculum is designed to prepare students for techni-
cal and managerial positions in computer science in public
and private organizations. The curriculum emphasizes three
aspects pertinent to the student's professional career; the
functions to which computers are applied in organizations,
the professional skills for the design of computing applica-
tions, and the decision-making techniques for the efficient
and effective utilization of computing resources.
Required Courses Credits
COP 3121 Data Processing Languages ........................... 3
COP 3530 Data and Program Structures ............................. 4
CIS 4300 Information Resources ........................................... 3
CIS 4321 Introduction MGT Systems ..............................:...... 3
Balance of 5 to 6 credits in courses from
approved list ............................. ............ 5-6
Total 18-19
Students majoring in CIS are required to take the following
course:
QMB 4703 Managerial Operations Analysis III
or ESI 4523 Discrete Systems Simulation ......................... 3

Total 3

III. ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed to provide students with a
basic core of courses'in Economics, plus electives from a va-
riety of courses.
Economics majors are required to substitute ECO 4205 and
ECO 4101 for ECO 3251 and ECO 3100 in the College of Busi-
ness core program. In addition, majors must complete 12-18
credit hours of economic courses that require ECO 2013 and
ECO 2023 as prerequisites.


V. INSURANCE
The primary objective of the curriculum in risk and insur-
ance is an understanding of risk-its varied forms, sources,
and methods of treatment. The curriculum stresses decision
making necessary in the management of personal, com-
mercial, and social risks.
The courses provide useful background for business and
non-business majors alike, with interest the nature of risk.
Students majoring in this program are prepared for positions
in the administration of risk management programs of busi-
ness, government, and the insurance industry.
Required Courses Credits
RMI 3015 Risk and Insurance ............................................... 3
RM I 4305 Risk M management .................................. .......... 3
RMI 4135 Group Insurance and Pension Plans .................. 3
One of the following courses:
FIN 4313 Financial Management of Financial
Institutions ......:......................... ................. ................. 3
FIN 4414 Business Finance Topics ..................:...................... 4
FIN 4504 Investm ents ............................................. .......... 3
RMI 4805 Estates, Trusts, and Insurance .............................. 3

Total 12


VI. MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for students interested in gen-
eral management, industrial management, industrial rela-
tions or personnel management. Appropriate courses in-
clude quantitative analysis of business and organizational
behavior.
Required Courses Credits
MAN 3151 Organization Behavior ............................... 3
MAN 4720 Business Policy ....................................... ............. 4
One of the following courses:
QMB 4701 Managerial Operations Analysis 1 .................... 3
QMB 4702 Managerial Operations Analysis 2 .................... 3
QMB 4703 Managerial Operations Analysis 3 ...................... 3
Three of the following courses:

MAN 4052 Management Philosophy and Practice .............. 4
MAN 4109 Applications in Organization Behavior ........ 1-4
MAN 4110 Applications in Personnel Management .......... 3
MAN 4201 Organization Theory and Design ....................... 4
MAN 4310 Problems in Personnel Management ................. 4
MAN 4410 Collective Bargaining ............................................ 4
*QMB 4701 Managerial Operations Analysis 1 ........................ 3
*QMB 4702 Managerial Operations Analysis 2 ........................ 3
*QMB 4703 Managerial Operations Analysis 3 ....................... 3

Total 19


I *Required for all quantitative management majors.
IV. FINANCE


The curriculum provides a general academic base in fi-
nance, as well as more specialized courses of interest to
those students considering careers in commercial banking or
other financial institutions. Students desiring a major in Fi-
nance must achieve a grade of C or better in FIN 3408, Busi-
ness'Finance and maintain a 2.0 GPA on courses taken in the
major.
Required Courses Credits
FIN 4244 Money and Capital Markets .............................. 3
FIN 4414 Business Finance Topics ........................................ 4
FIN 4504 Investm ents .............................................................. 3
One or two of the following courses:
FIN 4313 Financial Management of Financial
Institutions ...................... .... ........ ... 3
FIN 4514 Investm ent Analysis ................................................ 3
FIN 4604 International Finance ..:............................................ 3

Total 13-19


VII. MARKETING
This curriculum is designed to develop an understanding
of the marketing and distribution system for goods and serv-
ices, the social and economic forces which act on the system,
and on the determinants of consumer choice behavior. The
program emphasizes analytical and behavioral science ap-
proaches to marketing management and consumer behav-
ior.
Required Courses Credits
MAR 3503 Consumer Behavior ............................................. 4
M AR 4613 M marketing Research ................................................ 4
MAR 4713 Marketing Management ....................................... 4
One or two of the following courses:
MAR 3203 Management of Channel Systems and
Institutions .................................. .... ................... 4
MAR 4243 International Marketing ................................... 4
MAR 4303 Promotional Strategy and Management ............ 4







COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


MAR 4403 Sales Management .................................... 4
MAR 4614 Research in Marketing and
Consumer Behavior ............................... .................... 4
MAR 4933 Special Topics in Marketing ................................ 4
Total 16-20


VIII. REAL ESTATE
This curriculum is designed to prepare analysts in real es-
tate generally, real estate departments of regional or na-
tional firms, financial institutions, or state or federal agen-
cies. The program stresses the use of modern concepts and
technology in the solution of real estate problems.
Required Courses Credits
REE 3043 Real Estate Analysis ................................... ........ ... 4


REE 4100 Real Estate Valuation .............................................. 3
REE 4204 Real Estate Financial Analysis ............................... 3
REE 4311 Real Estate Feasibility Analysis ............................. 5
REE 4430 Real Estate Law ............................................ ............. 3
Total 18
One of the following courses:
BCN 1210 Construction Materials ......................................... 3
ECP 5614 Urban Economics (prereq. 2013-2023 and
perm mission) .............................................................................. 3
MAR 3503 Consumer Behavior (prereq. MAR 3023) .......... 4
MAR 4613 Marketing Research (prereq. MAR 3023, QMB
3700) ................................... .............................. ..... .............. 4
An advanced computer programming course, as approved
by student's adviser ................................................. 2 to 4
Total 2-4





Colleges


College of Dentistry
The College of Dentistry is one of the six colleges which
constitute the J. Hillis Miller Health Center. The College of
Dentistry, as well as the other units of the Health Center, is
an integral component, both geographically and func-
tionally, of the University of Florida. Many conjoint projects
between the College and other units of the Health Center
and University have been formulated and implemented.
The 1957 the Florida Legislature authorized the develop-
ment of a College of Dentistry in Gainesville, but it was not
until the late 1960's that faculty memberswere recruited and
program development initiated.
The thirteen departments which make up the College of
Dentistry are Basic Dental Sciences, Community Dentistry,
Dental Biomaterials, Dental Education, Endodontics, Oc-
clusion and Fixed Prosthodontics, Operative Dentistry, Oral
Medicine, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Orthodontics,
Pediatric Dentistry, Periodontics, and Removable Pros-
thodontics. A modular curriculum has been developed
based on multidisciplinary teaching by these departments.
The curriculum is designed to permit students the maximal
degree of flexibility and individualization in their program. It
is a competency-based curriculum in which behavioral ob-
jectives, rather than time, serve as the primary guidelines for
student advancement. The length of time in the curriculum
is flexible but students must complete at least one-twelfth of
the total curriculum each semester. The self-paced cur-
riculum is planned so that a student may complete the pro-
gram in less than four calendar-years. Self-instruction con-
stitutes a significant part of the teaching methodology.
The goals of this College are to prepare the graduate to
enter private dental practice, to enter graduate programs of
any of the dental specialties, to enter into research activities,
and to be prepared for a lifetime of continuing education.
The Dental Sciences Building was first occupied in August,
1975, and was officially dedicated March 6, 1976. The first
class of students was graduated in 1976. The College offers
the Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree. (The


D.M.D. and D.D.S. degrees are synonymous.) The College
presently offers Advanced Educational programs in Dental
Public Health, Oral Pathology, Orthodontics, Pediatric Den-
tistry, and Periodontics. In addition, a one-year General
Practice Residency program and a three-year Oral and Max-
illofacial Surgery Residency program are available.
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation are
expected of the applicant. The student of dentistry must
possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic
preparation of the highest order because of the vast area of
science which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly
personal relationship between patient and dentist places the
latter in a position of trust, which demands maturity, in-
tegrity, intellectual honesty, and a sense of responsibility. A
broad representation of the ethnic mixture of the state is
sought in the student body through an active recruitment
program. The College strictly adheres to the principle of
ethnic, racial, sexual, religious and social equality among its
student body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree. How-
ever, outstanding students may be accepted without fulfill-
ing the degree requirements, provided they show evidence
of sufficient academic preparation and the personal charac-
teristics necessary for the study of dentistry. Applicants with
an' overall B average as a minimum will receive strongest
consideration for admission to the College of Dentistry. A
limited number of out-of-state students, in proportion to the
number in the University as a whole, may be admitted. Ap-
plicants should initiate the application process approx-
imately fifteen months prior to anticipated enrollment by
submitting an application through the centralized American
Association of Dental Schools Application Service
(AADSAS), P.O. Box 4000, Iowa City, Iowa 52240.
Further detailed information will be found in the College
of Dentistry Bulletin. Copies may be obtained by writing to
the Office of Admissions, College of Dentistry, University of
Florida, Box J-445, JHMHC, Gainesville, Florida 32610.







COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


College of Education


GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Education, a professional college, has as its
purpose the preparation of qualified personnel for positions
in service, leadership, and, research in education. The Col-
lege of Education is the officially designated unit of the Uni-
versity of Florida that is responsible for teacher education
programs. University teacher education programs are ap-
proved by the State Department of Education and the Na-
tional Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.
The College of Education has undergraduate programs
leading to the preparation and certification of teachers in
elementary education, secondary education, and K-12 pro-
grams in art and special education (mental retardation). Pro-
grams of study in guidance and counseling, school adminis-
tration, and college teaching are available at the graduate
levels only. Undergraduate students interested in these
areas will usually complete their bachelor's degree in one of
the teaching fields found on the following pages.
Classroom teaching is only one of the many careers avail-
able to graduates from the College of Education. School ad-
ministrators, supervisors, counselors, school social workers,
school psychologists, attendance workers, speech therapists,
and reading clinicians are among the many careers found in
education. Other career opportunities for those having de-
grees in education are in the areas of development and dis-
tribution of educational materials, educational television,
personnel work, counseling, foreign service, peace corps, as.
educational specialists and training officers in industry, and
in educational research.
The University of Florida teacher education programs are
designed to assist students with developing three broad
areas of competence: (1) general preparation consisting of a
background of liberal education; (2) the professional se-
quence consisting of work in psychological and social foun-
dations of education, the school program, and internship or
student teaching; and (3) the teaching field or specialization
in the area of subject matter to be taught.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Education en-
courage applications from qualified students from all cul-
tural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific requirements for admission to this College. It
should be understood, however, that minimum require-
ments are given and that admission to this College is a selec-
tive process. The satisfaction of minimum requirements does
not automatically guarantee admission. A student's total re-
cord, including educational objectives, pattern of courses
previously completed, quality of previous academic record,
and test data, will be considered in evaluating an application
for admission. Priority for admission will be given to those
applicants whose potential on the basis of their total record
indicates the greatest likelihood of success in the program
requested.
Teacher education programs at the University of Florida
have been approved by the State of Florida Department of
Education. Each teacher education program of an institution
of higher learning within the state which has been approved
by the Department of Education shall require, as a prerequi-
site for admission into the teacher education program, that a
student shall receive a composite score of seventeen (17) on
the American College Test or a composite score of eight
hundred thirty-five (835) on the Scholastic Aptitude Test.
This requirement may be waived, by petition, for up to 10
(10) percent of those admitted to the teacher education pro-
gram.
Students Clasified UF:
Students classified UF should apply for admission to the
College of Education during the semester in which they are
completing 64 semester hours of work. Applications should


be filed in both the Registrar's Office and the College of Ed-
ucation Office of Student Services, Room 134, Norman Hall.
To be considered for admission to the College, students will
be required to:
1. Have a University of Florida G.P.A. of at least 2.5 and an
overall G.P.A. of at least 2.5. Applicants for the program in
Audiology and Speech Pathology must have a University
of Florida G.P.A. of at least 2.8, and an overall G.P.A. of at
least 2.8.
2. Have a composite score of seventeen (17) on the Ameri-
can College Test (ACT) or a composite score of eight hun-
dred thirty-five (835) on the Scholastic Aptitude Test
(SAT).
3. Meet minimum standards of physical and mental
health.
4. Have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of
the College of Education. The Committee will review the
application of each candidate with respect to qualities
considered to be essential for effective teaching. The stu-
dent is expected to speak and to write the English lan-
guage effectively.
5. Take the College Level Academic Skills Test (see page
33).
Transfer Students
1. From other upper division colleges, University of Flor-
ida. University of Florida students desiring to transfer from
an upper division college to the College of Education
must file applications with both the Registrar's office and
the College of Education Office of Student Services. To be
considered for admission, applicants will be expected to
meet the requirements for admission outlined for stu-
dents classified UF.
2. From other four-year institutions. To be eligible for ad-
mission to the College of Education, a transfer student
from a four-year institution must satisfy the minimum re-
quirements for admission to an Upper Division College
that are set forth in the ADMISSIONS section of the
catalog. Additionally, theapplicant will be expected to
meet the requirements for admission outlined for stu-
dents classified UF.
3. From junior and community colleges. To be eligible for
admission to the College of Education, a transfer student
from a junior or community college must complete the
Associate Arts Degree and the general education require-
ments of the junior or community college. Additionally,
the applicant will be expected to meet the requirements
for admission outlined for students classified UF.


BASIC SKILLS ASSESSMENT
All College of Education students will take a basic skills
assessment examination during their first quarter in the col-
lege. This examination includes sections on mathematics,
reading and writing. A student must have a successful score
on ,all sections of the basic skills assessment examination
prior to admission to the internship experience.


ADMISSION TO PHASES OF THE
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
I. Admission to the Teacher Education Program for stu-
dents enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who
wish to enroll in a Teacher Education Program must make
application for admission to the program. Application forms
may be obtained in Room 134 Norman Hall.
Application should be made as soon as possible after ad-
mission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; applica-
tion to the program cannot be made before a student has
been accepted into the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
The student must be admitted to the Teacher Education Pro-
gram before he can apply for the Advanced Professional Se-
quence.
The criteria used in considering students from the College





Colleges

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the Teacher Education Pro-
gram will be the same as those used for admitting students
into the College of Education.
II. Admission to the Advanced Professional Sequence
A student who proposes to enter a Teacher Education Pro-
gram, whether through the College of Education or one of
the cooperating colleges, must be admitted to the Advanced
Professional Sequence prior to enrollment in certain pro-
fessional courses. For K-12 Education programs this is EDG
4203; for Secondary Education this is ESE 4210, for Special Ed-
ucation this is at the time of enrollment for the second
methods course, and for Childhood Education this is prior to
the third semester in the program.
Admission to the Advanced Professional Sequence re-
quires:
1. A special application submitted to the College of Educa-
tion Office of Student Services, Room 134 Norman Hall,
no later than one month prior to the proposed registration
for the courses indicated above. Admission to the College
of Education is not to be interpreted as automatic admis-
sion to the Advanced Professional Sequence.
2. Enrollment in an upper division college.
3. Completion of the general preparation requirements.
(See General Preparation).
4. Completion of the speech requirement by successfully
completing a public speaking course or by passing the
speech screening examination administered by the
Speech Department. All English, Language Arts and
Health Education students must meet this requirement by
completing the speech course.
5. A planned program on file in Room 134, Norman Hall.
6. A picture on file in Room 134, Norman Hall.
7. A "C" average or better.
8. A "C" average, or better, in specific professional courses
and in the area of specialization.
Special Education majors, and Secondary Education ma-
jors in either the College of Education or the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences should note that no grade less
than "C" meets a requirement in the professional educa-
tion courses or in the field of specialization.
9. Students in Elementary Education and Early Childhood
Education must complete successfully a reading screening
examination.
III. Admission to Student Teaching in any Teacher Educa-
tion Program
Assignments to student teaching for each semester are
made by the College of Education Office of Student Serv-
ices. Students in the College of Education are assigned a.
semester for student teaching when they are admitted to the
College. Students from the College of Liberal Arts and Sci-
ences are assigned a semester for student teaching when
they, are admitted to the Teacher Education Program. Stu-
dents in other colleges should see the Coordinator of Un-
dergraduate Studies, Room 134 Norman Hall, for a student
teaching semester as early in their junior year as possible.
Prior to acceptance to student teaching in a Teacher Edu-
cation Program, a student must have fulfilled the following
requirements: /
1. Have completed all general preparation requirements.
2. Have satisfied the speech requirement.
3. Have at least a "C" average in all course work at the Uni-
versity of Florida, the area of specialization courses, and
professional education courses. Foreign Language majors
must demonstrate proficiency in all languages for which
they seek certification.
4. Teacher Education students in the College of Education
and the College of Liberal Arts and.Sciences must have
completed, successfully, all sections of the Basic Skills
Assessment Test prior to admission to student teaching.
5. Have been admitted to the Advanced Professional Se-
quence and have completed the following work:
(a) Elementary -MUE 2402 and MUE 3401; HES 3301
and PET 3462; ENG 4161; EDE 3804; RED 4147; MAE 3811
and EDF 3110.


(b) Teaching Fields K-12 EDF 3110; EDG 4023; at least
two-thirds of the coursework in the teaching area in
which student teaching is to be done and the following
courses:
Art: ARE 4242, ARE 4243, ARE 4244
Health Education: HES 2000, 2001, 3301, 4302, PET
3320, and APB 2170
Music: MUE 3113, 3320, 3030, 4412, 4411 or 4404
Special Education: EEX 3010, EMR 3011, EEX 3220, EMR
3800, EMR 4202, 4330, 4214, SPA 3001
Physical Education: PET 3461 and 4442
(c) Secondary-At least 9 hours in education, including
EDF 3135 or EDF 4210, ESE 4210, and a methods course in
the area of specialization, and at least three-fourths of
the coursework in the teaching area in which student
teaching is to be done.
Students must make special application to the Director of
Student Teaching, Room 100, Norman Hall. Applications for
the Fall Semester may be picked up after February 1 and
must be received no later than April 1. Applications for the
Spring Semester may be received no later than September
15.
Students have the responsibility for making arrangements
to live in the community where student teaching is to be
done and to assume living expenses in addition to regular
on-campus expenses.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To graduate from the College of Educationa student must
satisfactorily complete the following:
1. Forty-five semester hours of general preparation.
2. A College approved program in his major field of study.
3. Required professional education courses appropriate to
his field of study.
4. Speech requirement.
5. Successful completion of all sections of the Basic Skills
Assessment Examination.
A minimum of 125 semester hours is required for gradu-
ation. A student must maintain at least a 2.0 overall grade
point average and have at least a 2.0 average in all pro-
fessional education courses and in his area of specialization.
In the departments of Subject Specialization and Special Ed-
ucation, grades below "C". will not fulfill requirements in
either professional education or in the area of specialization.


DEGREES OFFERED
The degrees Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor of
Science in Education are offered in the College of Education.
The Bachelor of Science in Educaton Degree is granted to
students whose area of specialization is in science or mathe-'
matics; other curricula lead to the Bachelor of Arts in Educa-
tion Degree.


HONORS
To graduate from the College of Education with honors,
the student will be required to earn on all college work an
academic average of 3.2 for honors and an average of 3.5 for
high honors. He must have earned at least 60 credits, with
the appropriate average, at the University of Florida.
Kappa Delta Pi (men and women) and Pi Lambda Theta
(women) are honor societies in education. Membership is by
invitation.


TEACHER CERTIFICATION
An applicant for initial regular certification in Florida must
receive a passing score on a teacher certification examina-
tion administered by the State Department of Education
prior to regular certification. Also, an applicant for initial reg-
ular certification in Florida must complete a beginning








COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


teacher program or have three years of satisfactory teaching
experience prior to regular certification.
Applications for Florida teacher certification are available
in the College of Education Office of Student Services, 134
Norman Hall.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
PLANNED PROGRAMS
Before the end of the first term of enrollment in the Col-
lege of Education, the students should plan a program for
the remainder of work required for his degree. All planned
programs must have the approval of the student's counselor
and the Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies.
Each student is responsible for registering for the proper
courses and fulfilling all requirements for his' degree.
Courses can be dropped or changed without penalty only
upon approval of the counselor, the College of Education
Office of Student Services, and the Registrar.
LOADS
Sixteen semester hours is considered a normal load. A stu-
dent may be permitted to register for additional hours if, in
the opinion of his counselor, the quality of his record justi-
fies this. At the time of registration, a student, with the ap-
proval of his counselor, may register for less than sixteen
semester hours if conditions warrant this.
DEADLINES
Graduating Seniors must file an application for a degree in
the Office of the Registrar early in the semester in which
they expect to receive the degree. The University calendar
shows the latest date on which this can be done.
Students applying to enter the Advanced Professional Se-
quence must file an application in the College of Education
Office of Student Services 30 days prior to registration in
these courses.
Students must make special application to the Director of
Student Teaching, Room 100, Norman Hall. Applications for
the Fall Semester may be picked up after February 1 and
must be received no later than April 1. Applications for the
Spring Semester may be picked up after April 15 and must be
received no later than September 15.
RESIDENCE
The last 30 semester hours to be applied toward a degree
must be completed in residence in the College of Education.
In special cases this requirement may be waived by petition
when a student has completed most of his previous work in
upper division of the College of Education.
No part of the teacher preparation program can be taken
by correspondence, home study, or extension unless such
courses have been planned with the student's upper
division counselor and approved by the College of Educa-
tion Office of Student Services. In addition to these require-
ments University regulations pertaining to correspondence
and extension work apply to College of Education students.
PETITIONS
If a student feels that the College regulations cause a pe-
culiar hardship or injustice in his tase, he may petition for
waiver of the particular regulation. The student should con-
tact his adviser or the College of Education Office of Student
Services regarding this procedure.
UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION IN
GRADUATE COURSES
With the permission of the instructor, an undergraduate
student in the College of. Education may enroll in 5000 or
6000 level courses if he has Senior standing and an upper
division grade point average of at least 2.8. His registration
during any term for which he is enrolled in a graduate course
may not exceed 17 hours. Graduate fees are charged for 5000
and 6000 level courses. After a student has been accepted in


the Graduate School, up to 6 hours of graduate-level courses
earned with a grade of A, B+, or B taken under this provision
may be applied toward a graduate degree at the University
of Florida provided credit for the course has not been used
for an undergraduate degree.
MUSIC ENSEMBLE CREDIT
Undergraduate majors in education may count 4 hours of
music ensemble credit toward graduation.


SCHOLARSHIP AND LOANS
The College of Education Office of Student Services has
information about very limited scholarship and loan funds
available in the College of Education. Information regarding
other financial aid of undergraduate students may be ob-
tained from the Office of Student Financial Aid.


CURRICULUM IN EDUCATION
The College of Education offers undergraduate programs
in elementary education, special education (mental retarda-
tion), art education and nine areas of secondary education.
An add-on program in early childhood education is available
for students who complete programs in elementary educa-
tion. An add-on program in middle school education is
available for students who complete programs in elementary
or secondary education. Students who expect to receive a
degree from the College of Education must (1) complete the
general education and preprofessional requirements listed
below and (2) complete one .of the teacher education pro-
grams shown on the following pages.
General Education Requirements
Credits
*English ...... ............................ .. 6
**Physical Sciences ................... .................... 6
**Biological Sciences ............................................. ............... 6
***Social and Behavioral Sciences .................................................. 9
****H um anities ...................................... ...... .............. ............. 9
M them atical Sciences ............................................ ............... 6
For specific courses to complete these requirements, see
page 123 through page 126 in this catalog. Please note the re-
strictions for College of Education students revealed by the
astericks that follow.
"Acceptable courses to meet the English requirement are lim-
ited to ENC 1101, ENC 1102, ENC 3213, ENC 3310, ENC 3312,
ENC 4260, CRW 2100, CRW 2300, CRW 3110, CRW 3311, ENG
2131, ENG 2935, LIN 3370, LIN 4100 and LIT 2931.
**One semester of Physical Science or of Biological Science
may either be omitted or taken as an elective. Students may
not use AGG 2501, ECH 3783, FOR 2010, FOS 2001, HUN 2201
or SOS 3215 to meet the biological science requirement. Sci-
ence education majors should take CHM instead of PSC and
ZOO and BOT instead of APB. Science education majors
also take MAC courses instead of MFG.
***Six of the nine semester hours of Social and Behavioral Sci-
ences must be from the areas of History, Anthropology, Soci-
ology, Political Science, Economics and Geography.
****Students may not use history courses to meet the Human-
ities requirements.
Preprofessional Requirements
1. In addition to the general education requirements listed
above, a student must take additional general education
electives to a total of 45 semester hours of general educa-
tion coursework.
2. At least 64 semester hours of credit are required for ad-
mission to the College of Education.
3. A speech requirement may be completed in the
Sophomore year or delayed until the Junior year. This
requirement is met by successful completion of SPC 2300
or 3601 or by successfully passing the speech screening
test administered by the Speech Department. English and
Language Arts majors may meet this requirement only by






Colleges

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


successful completion of SPC 2300 or 3601. Information
about the speech screening test is available in Room 134,
Norman Hall.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
(Grades one through six)
The Elementary Education Program is an innovative ap-
proach to the professional preparation of educators. The
program is based upon four major assumptions: that a per-
son learns best when (1) learning is made personally mean-
ingful and relevant, (2) learning is adjusted to the rates and
needs of the individual, (3) there is a great deal of self direc-
tion, and (4) there is a close relationship between theory and
practice.
Aside from the 26 semester hours of required courses
listed below, there are no courses as such in the Elementary
Program. Instead, each semester in the program, the student
enrolls in the appropriate section of professional studies in
education (EDE 3804), for a variable number of hours to total
29 by the completion of the program. In addition, the stu-
dent will register for a total of 11 semester hours in EDE 4943
-Student Teaching in the Elementary School.
Each semester the professional studies will comprise par-
ticipation in (a) seminar a small discussion group which
gives continuity and direction to the program by providing
students with a place to share their meanings and problems
in interaction with their peers while building a personal ed-
ucational belief system; (b) study of content selected from
among the.following areas (each of which must be mastered
by graduation) curriculum, language arts, math, reading, sci-
ence, social studies, art, and music. In each areas, students
pace their own progress, attend special lectures, participate
in small study groups or workshops, and pursue independ-
ent study; (c) an appropriate field experience carried out in
a local public or private school or community agency.
Students' work 'within the program is graded on a
Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory (S-U) basis. The student con-
tinues his work in a given learning area until he demon-
strates satisfactory competence in the area.
The program in Elementary Education will provide aca-
demic and field learning activities which place emphasis on
the development and teaching of the child from age six
through age twelve.
The four semester professional program for elementary
education includes:
Credits
1) Professional Studies in Childhood Education
(ED E 3804) .............................................. ............ .......... 29
2) EDE 4943-Student Teaching in the Elementary
School ............................................. ................ 11
3) ED F 3110 ............................................... ...... ................. 3
4) ED F 3604 ............ .............................................................. 3
5) RED 4147 .......................................... .............................. 3
6) Courses taken outside the College of Education:
M U E 2402- M usic Skills .............................................. ........ 3
MUE 3401-Music for the Elementary Child .................. 3
PET 3462-Elementary School Physical Education
for the Classroom Teacher ........................................ 2
HES 3301-Elementary School Health Program .............. 3
LIT 4331- Children's Literature ......................................... 3
MAE 3811-Mathematics for Elementary School
Teachers ......... ............................................................... 3
7) Additional elective hours as necessary to meet the mini-
mum graduation requirement of 125 hours, and to have at
least 79 semester hours outside the Childhood Education
Program.
Early Childhood certification may be earned by complet-
ing the Elementary Education program as shown above with
the following: Seven semester hours credit in EEC 3800 in the
areas of art, curriculum, language arts, mathematics, reading,
science, and social studies. Four semester credits of EEC 3800
-Seminar should be substituted for four credits of EDS 3804
-Seminar. Appropriate field experience in kindergarten and
nursery schools are required. -


MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION
The Middle School Education Program is a 11 semester
hour block composed of EDM 6005, 3 semester hours and
EDM 6945, 8 semester hours. Upon successful completion of
the program, students will be eligible for Middle School
certification in one or more of the following areas: Language
Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies.
SStudents interested in Middle School Education should be
aware of the extensive requirements in this program. These
requirements include:
1. A course in Reading.
2. The successful completion of an undergraduate pro-
gram in Elementary or Secondary Education.
3. At least 10 semester hours beyond general preparation
requirements in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or
Social Studies.
Specific subject area requirements include:-
LANGUAGE ARTS
At least one course in grammar or linguistics.
At least one course in composition.
At least one course in American literature, world liter-
ature, speech, drama, orjournalism.
MATHEMATICS
At least two courses in the area of mathematics for the
elementary, middle, or junior high school; or the equiva-
lent of such courses. Other courses from algebra, geome-
try, calculus, statistics, or computer science.
SCIENCE
At least one course in either chemistry or physics.
At least one course in biology.
At least one course in geology.
Others from agronomy, astronomy, anthropology, en-
tomology, food science and human nutrition, forest re-
sources and conservation, health.
SOCIAL STUDIES
At least one survey course in American History.
At least one survey course in the history of the following
world areas: Western Europe, Russia, Africa, Latin Ameri-
ca, Asia.
At least one course from each of two of the following
areas: Anthropology, Political Science, Geography, Soci-
ology, Economics, Social Psychology.
Additional information about the Middle School Program
can be obtained in Room 134, Norman Hall.


HEALTH EDUCATION/DRIVER
EDUCATION AND SAFETY
For the Health Education/Driver Education and Safety
Program, see the College of Physical Education, Health and
Recreation section of the catalog.


MUSIC EDUCATION
For the Music Education Program, see the College of Fine
Arts section of the catalog.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION
For the Physical Education Program, see the College of
Physical Education, Health and Recreation section of the
catalog.


SPECIAL EDUCATION
The bachelor's degree in special education, with a major
area 'of concentration in mental retardation, is offered
through the Department of Special Education.
No course in which the grade earned is below "C" meets
a requirement in this program.








COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


Required Upper Division Courses Credits
Introduction to Special Education
EEX 3010, EMR 3011, SPA 3001 ...................................... ... 9
Foundations of Education
EDF 3110 (or 3122, 3135, 4144, 4210) and
EDF 3604 (or 3514, 4542, 4710) .......................................... 6
Special Education
EEX 3220, EEX 3601, EMR 3800 (taken twice), EPH 4033,
EMR 4202, EMR 4214, EMR 4330 ................................. 24
Teaching Skills
RED 4147, MAE 4350 .... ....................... ..... 6
EEX 4814 ........................... ...... ...... .......... ............ 3
Student Teaching EEX 4861 ............................................ 3

Competencies
Each of the listed competencies must be achieved prior to
internship. The basic skills competencies (#4) must be com-
pleted prior to enrollment in EMR 4202. The competencies
must be verified in Room 134 by use of the appropriate form
to be kept in the student's official folder.
1. First Aid
The student must have a valid current certification in first aid
or must have successfully completed HES 2400.
2. Audio Visual
The student must have completed the modules entitled
"Equipment Operation" and "Production of Materials" in
the Educational Media Center, Norman Hall.

3. Public Speaking
The student must have demonstrated competency in public
speaking by completing a public speaking test. These tests
will be given once per semester by the department.
Core Electives
ARE 3312, ART 3100, BES 2132, DEP 3003,
DEP 4204, DEP 4704, EDF 3110, EDF 3122,
EDF 3135, EDF 3514, EDF 3604, EDF 4114,
EDF 4210, EDF 4430, EDF 4542, EDF 4710,
EDF 4780, EED 4011, EEX 4905, EGC 4033,
EIA 3291, ENG 4161, ENG 4163, EPH 4033,
ESE 3034, EVT 3065, EVT 3365, EVT 4302,
HES 2000, HES 2400, HES 3144, HES 3301,
HES 3404, HES 3431, HES 4302, HES 4450,
HES 4451, HES 4540, HES 4561, LEI 4760,
LEI 4770, LIN 3710, MAF 2200, MUE 2402,
MUE 3113, MUE 3320, MUE 3401, PEO 3041,
PET 3640, PEQ 2126, SED 4335, SPC 2300,
SPC 2330, SPC 3601, STA 3013, STA 3023,
VEC 3200 ..................................................... 12
Major fields of concentration in other areas of special educa-
tion are available only at the graduate level. Students in-
terested in such areas as learning disabled, emotionally dis-
turbed, and/or physically handicapped children should con-
sult with staff members in special education concerning
electives at the undergraduate level.

SUBJECT SPECIALIZATION TEACHER
EDUCATION
The Department of Subject Specialization Teacher Educa-
tion is.composed of the following specializations: art educa-
tion, audiology and speech pathology, business education,
foreign language education, mathematics education, music
education, psychology education, science education, and
social studies education. Degree programs in these special-
izations are available at the undergraduate (BAE and BSE)
level and graduate level (MAE, MEd, EdS, EdD and PhD)
through the Department of Subject Specialization and/or
the Division of Curriculum and Instruction with these ex-
ceptions: (1) audiology/speech pathology is available at the
undergraduate level only; (2) music education is available at
the graduate level only; and (3) business education is avail-
able at the advanced degree level only.
Graduate students seeking teaching certification must
complete the same program requirements expected of un-


dergraduate students in teacher education programs offered
by the department. These students can be enrolled in only
one program area. These students must be admitted as grad-
uate students in the SSTE department and can be enrolled in
only one certification area at a time.
Professional Education Requirements for Programs in
Subject Specialization Teacher Education
Secondary Education Programs (7-12) include:
ED F 3135 or 4210 .............................................. ............... 3
EDF 3514 or 3604 or 4542 or 4710 ......................................... 3
ESE 4011 ........................................................................... 3
ESE 4210 and an appropriate methods course ................... 6
ESE 4943 .............................................. ................................ 11
Elective in Education
(College of Education students only) .......................... 1-3

Art Education and Audiology and Speech Pathology Pro-
grams (K-12) include:
ED F 3110 or 3135 or 4210 .......................... ................ ........ 3
EDF 3514 or 3604 or 4542 or 4710 ......................................... 3
ED G 4203 ......................................................... ................ 3
EDG 3501 and ESE 4905 ........................................ .............. 3
ESE 4943 (Art only) ............................. ........... ............. 11
EEX 3010 and EEX 4141 (Speech Path only) ........................ 4


ART EDUCATION
Florida teachers are certified to teach art in kindergarten
through the twelfth grade. Students may enroll in either the
College of Education or the College of Fine Arts.
ART:
*Preprofessional (ART 1201-1203, ART 1300, 1301,
ART 2050-2051 ......................................... ............... ........... .... 20
Required (ART 3110, ART 3401, ART 3701) ........................... 12
**Electives ........................ ........................................ ......... 12
ART EDUCATION:
Methods Courses (ARE 4242, ARE 4243, ARE 4244) ............ 10
Total: 54
*Students must complete ART 1201, 1203, 1300, 1301 prior to
enrolling in ARE 4242.

**Art electives must include a minimum of three closely re-
lated studies courses in a single advanced area (Studio Art or
Crafts). Studio Art includes Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking,
Drawing,and Creative Photography. Crafts include Ceramics,
Woodworking, Metalcraft, and Crafts.


AUDIOLOGY AND SPEECH
PATHOLOGY
Students desiring to specialize in Audiology and Speech
Pathology may enroll in either the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences or the College of Education. The under-
graduate program is pre-professional and requires a mini-
mum of 32 semester hours of Speech. No grade below "C"
meets a requirement in this program.
Information about the Audiology and Speech Pathology
programs may be obtained through the Department of
Speech, 442 Arts and Sciences Building, or the Office of Stu-
dent Services, 134 Norman Hall. Students in the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences must confer with their adviser prior
to admission to the Division of Audiology and Speech Pa-
thology.
Majors are expected to complete approximately 32 hours
of acceptable speech pathology-audiology courses, 16 hours
of education courses and 10 hours of related area courses.
They are expected to work out a planned program with their
Speech Department adviser which, when signed by the stu-
dent, the Speech Department adviser and the College of Ed-
ucation adviser will constitute the student's contract for
graduation.
To qualify for the certificate of Clinical competence in





Colleges
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


Audiology or Speech Pathology awarded by the American
Speech and Hearing Association or to obtain endorsement
by the College of Education and the Department of Speech
for the State Department of Education certification in
Speech Correction or Hearing Disabilities, it is necessary to
complete a master's degree or equivalent.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
This is a joint program with the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences leading to certification at the secondary school
level in (A) English, (B) English/Speech (and Journalism if
desired by a student) and (C) English/Religion.
A. English Specialization: Students wishing to complete a
program in English only must satisfy the requirements
listed below:
1. One course in the English language. LIN 4100 (History of
the English Language) is recommended. LIN 3370 (Modern
English Structure) will also satisfy this requirement.
2. One course in literary theory or criticism. The following
courses will satisfy this requirement: ENG 3011 (The Major
Critics), ENG 3010 (The Theory and Practice of Modern
Criticism), LIT 3003 (Forms of Narrative), LIT 4001 (Studies
in Literary Genres).
3. One writing course. ENC 3310 (Advanced Exposition) or
ENC 3312 (Advanced Argumentative Writing) are recom-
mended.
4. Survey courses in British and American literature: (a)
ENL 2012 (Survey of English Literature: Medieval to 1750)
and (b) either ENL 2022 (Survey of English Literature: 1750
to Present) or AML 2012 (Survey of American Literature:
From the Beginnings to Crane) or AML 2023 (Survey of
American Literature: 20th Century). If they wish to do so
students may substitute comparable advanced courses. If
they do make these substitutions they still must satisfy the
survey criterion of this requirement.
5. The electives for the English specialization consist of
four courses. It is recommended that students use some of
these four courses to establish an area of emphasis within
their specialization suited to their individual needs and
preferences.
6. Six semester hours of speech, including SPC 2300 or.
3601. It is recommended that the other speech course be
SPC 2260 or ORI 2001.
The requirements for the above specialization consists of a
minimum of 27 semester hours of English courses, in addi-
tion to the general education requirement of six semester
hours and six semester hours of speech. At least 19 of the 27
hours of English must be in courses numbered 3000 or
above.
B. English Speech: Students wishing to complete pro-
grams in both English and speech must'major in one of
them and minor in the other.
1. The English specialization (major) requirements are the
same as listed above. The speech minor must include 18
semester hours and must contain these courses: SPC 2300
or 3601; SPC 2260 or ORI 2001; SPC 3440 or 3420 or 3513;
LIN 2711.
2. The speech specialization (major) requirements include
a total of 24 semester hours and must include these
courses: SPC 2300 or 3601; SPC 2260 or ORI 2001; SPC 3440,
3420, or 3513; LIN 2711; SED 4335; THE 4730 or 4760. The
English minor must include 18 semester hours and must
contain required course work in English and American lit-
erature surveys, advanced composition, and English lan-
guage study. Students wishing to add journalism to the
English-Speech program above must take MMC 2100 and
JOU 4800.
C. English Religion: Students wishing to complete pro-
grams in both English and Religion must major in English
and minor in Religion. The English major requirements are
the same requirements listed above for the English special-
ization. The minor in religion must include 18 semester
hours encompassing work in (1) World Religions, (2)
Bible, (3) History of Religion in the West, and (4) Religion
in America.


No course either required or elective, used to complete
Sany of the above programs may be included if the grade
earned in it is below "C."


FOREIGN LANGUAGE
This is a joint program with the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences and leads to certification in a foreign language. Stu-
dents may enroll in either the College of Education or the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Basic requirements for certification in a single modern for-
eign language include a minimum of 24 semester hours
above the second year college level, plus LIN 3142, making a
total of 27 semester hours. Course work should include the
following areas: conversation, grammar and composition,
linguistics, culture, and literature.
Students who wish certification in a second foreign lan-
guage must complete 18 semester hours in that language. No
course in which the grade earned is below "C" meets a re-
quirement in this program.


MATHEMATICS
This is a joint program with the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences. Students may enroll in either the College of Educa-
tion or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. No course in
which the grade earned is below "C" meets a requirement in
this program.
REQUIRED COURSES:
Credits
MAC 3311, 3312 or MAC 3472, 3473 ..................................... 8
MAS 3113 or MAS 3114 or MAS 4103 ................................. 3-4
COP 3212 and COP 3212L or COC 3110 .............................. 3
STA 3023 or STA 4321 ............................................... ...... .. 3
M AS 3301 and M AS 4311 ..................................... ................ 6
M TC 3212 ...................................................... ......................... 4
ELECTIVE COURSES:
The elective course must be chosen from MAC 3313, MAP
3302, MAS 3203, MHF 3202 and any course at the 4000-level
or above with the prefix MAA, MAD, MAP, MAS MHF, or
M TG ......................................... .................... .. ....... ... 3

Total 30-31


SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS
BIOLOGY
The biology specialization leads to certification to teach
biology at the high school level. Students may enroll in
either the College of Education or the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences. No course in which the grade earned is below
"C" meets a requirement in this program.
Course Credit
Mathematics:
M AC 3311 ............................................................................. 4
Biology:
*BOT 1010 and BSC 2010 or BOT 2021C and BSC 2010............ 7
BOT 3503 or PCB 4745 ................ ......................................... 3-4
BOT 3153 and ZOO 3203 or ZOO 3203 and ZOO 3303 ...... 6-8
PCB 3063 or PCB 3653 or PCB 5046 ........................................... 4
AGR 3303 or AGR 3305 or PCB 4044.................................. 3-4
M CB 3020, M CB 3020L ........................... ..................:.......... 3
Chemistry:
CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L or CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C or CHM
2051C, 2052C .................................................................... 8-11
Physics:
PHY 1001 or PHY 3048, 3055L .................................. ............... 4

Total 45-52
*Transfer students with a year of Biology should not take BOT
1020.








COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


CHEMISTRY
The chemistry specialization leads to the certification to
teach chemistry at the high school level. Students may enroll
in either the College of Education or the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences. No course in which the grade earned is
below "C" meets a requirement in thisprogram.
Course Credit
M them atics: M AC 3311 ........................................ ............. 4
Chemistry: .,
CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L, 2043C or CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C
2043C or CHM 2051C, 2052C ....................................... 8-11
CHM 3200, 3200L or CHM 3210, 3211 .............................. 4-6
CHM 3400,3401 ............................................................................... 6
CHM 3120, 3120L ....................................................... 4.........4
Physics:
PHY 3048, 3055L, 3049, 3056L, or PHY 3053, 3055L,
3054, 3056L ....................................... ........... 8-10
Total 34-41
Recommended Electives:
GLY 2015, 2100, MAC 3302, 3313, 3314, PHY 3123, PHY 3423,
PHY 4222, PHY 4822-


EARTH SCIENCES IN THE
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
This specialization prepares teachers to teach the earth
sciences and general science in the junior high school. Stu-
dents may enroll in either the College of Education or the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to pursue their degree.
No grade less than "C" meets a requirement in this
program.*
Course Credit
Mathematics:
M AC 3311 ............;...................................... .. ..................... 4
**Geology:
GLY 2015, 2100 and four of the following:
GLY 4155, 4200, 4210, 4301, 4400, 4511, 4610,
O CE 4005 ................................................................. .......... 18
MET 2701, 3711; AST 2003, 2004, 3017 ..:...................:............. 6-9
Physics:
PHY 3048, 3055L .................................. .. ...................... 4
Chemistry:
CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L, 2043C or CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C,
or CHM 2051C, 2052C ................................................. 8-11
Total 40-46
Recommended Electives: .
AST 3018C, AST 3019C, AST 3652, AST 3653, MET 4460,
CHM 3200.
*Students taking this program will take Chemistry and Physics
instead of PSC 1420, 1510, 1502.
**This major in Geology is a Science Education major, not a
Professional Geology major.


PHYSICS
The Physics specialization leads to the certification to
teach Physics at the high school level. Students may enroll in
either the College of Education or the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences. No course in which the grade earned is below
"C" meets a requirement in this program. This major in Phys-
ics is a Science Education major, not a Professional Physics
major.
Course Credits
Mathematics:
M AC 3311, 3312 .................................. ..................... 8
Chemistry:
CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L or CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043 ........ 8-11
Physics:
PHY 3048, 3055L, 3049, 3056L ....................................... 8
PHY 3123, 3221, 3321, 3802L, 4803 ............................ ....... 13
AST 2003, 2004, 3018, PHY 4124, 4222, 4322, 4444 .............. 6
Total 43-46
Recommended Electives: Any course in Physics at the 4000 or
5000 level not used to satisfy the above programs; GLY 2015,
2100, MAP 3302.


SOCIAL STUDIES SPECIALIZATION
This is a joint program with the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences. Students may enroll in either the College of Educa-
tion or the College of Arts and Sciences.
A minimum of 42 hours in social science beyond the basic
general education course is required. No course in which the
grade earned is below "C" may be counted in these 42
hours.
A student may elect to concentrate in one of the following
social sciences: anthropology, economics, geography, his-
tory, political science, or sociology. For those majoring in a
field other than history, 12 hours of history are required. The
student who elects the program outlined below will be
eligible for teacher certification in social studies if his distri-
bution includes credit in at least four separate social studies
subjects. A student should plan a program, in consultation
with his adviser, which includes the following minimum re-
quirements:
Credits
Major field (Anthropology, Economics, Geography,
History, Political Science, or Sociology) ...............,......... 24
*History (to include at least two courses of U.S. History and
two courses other than U.S. History) ............................ .... 12
Social Science Electives ....................... ........... ........... ... 12
Total 48**
*For students majoring in History, the required 12 hours in
History may be a part of the 24 hour major.
**Six semester hours of the total may be basic general educa-
tion course credits. This may be either CSS or transferred so-
cial science credit that is not otherwise used in the teaching
field.






Colleges


College of Engineering


GENERAL STATEMENT
The engineer engages in creative design and construction,
and in research and development serving to bridge be-
tween human needs and the storehouse of theoretical
knowledge. In applying science to the common purpose of
life, the engineer couples science with the management of
people, money, machines, and materials. Engineering
challenges the individual, stimulating ingenuity and re-
sourcefulness, and yielding a rewarding sense of creative ac-
complishment.
The engineer deals with real problems in the real world.
This requires a thorough working knowledge of mathemat-
ics and the sciences as well as an understanding of the legal,
economic, and social restrictions of contemporary society.
Clear and precise communications, whether oral or written,
are required of the engineer when delivering judgments,
plans, and decisions. A sound knowledge of the engineering
field and of related disciplines is required so that the engi-
neer can work effectively with others other engineers, sci-
entists, and technicians in fulfilling engineering assign-
ments. Above all, the engineer is expected to be a respon-
sible citizen.
The various undergraduate programs in the College of En-
gineering are founded on mathematics and the physical sci-
ences. Additional emphasis is placed upon the humanities
Sand social sciences to develop judgment, perspective and
curiosity. Although many graduates continue their formal
,education beyond the bachelor's degree, the education of
an engineer should not stop upon completion of a degree
program: education, formal or otherwise,, is a lifelong pro-
cess for the successful engineer.
The curricula of the College of Engineering are planned to
achieve these objectives and to provide a wide range of
choices to the student selecting a degree objective. The de-
partment is the basic organizational unit within the College
of Engineering, and has both academic and administrative
responsibilities for programs leading to the bachelor's de-
gree. Departments with baccalaureate degree responsi-
bilities and the bachelor's degrees they offer are:
Agricultural Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Agricultural Engineer-
ing)
Chemical Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering
Bachelor of Science (Chemical Engineering)
Civil Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
Bachelor of Land Surveying
Computer and Information Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Computer and In-
formation Sciences)'
Electrical Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
Engineering Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Aerospace Engineering)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Engineering Science)
Environmental Engineering Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Environmental Engi-
neering)
Industrial and Systems Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Materials Science and
Engineering)
Mechanical Engineering Department
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Nuclear Engineering)
Bachelor of Science (Nuclear Engineering Sciences)


In addition the College of Engineering offers a program in
Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies, administered by the
Dean's Office, and leading to the Bachelor of Science (In-
terdisciplinary Engineering Studies) degree.
For information relative to Graduate degrees in engineer-
ing refer to other sections of this catalog, or the Graduate
School catalog.
The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accred-
itation Board for Engineering and Technology (formerly, the
Engineers' Council for Professional Development) has ac-
credited programs in the-College of Engineering leading to
the following degrees:
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Aerospace Engineer-
ing)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Agricultural Engineer-
ing)
Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering .
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Engineering Science)
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Environmental Engi-
neering)
Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Materials Science and
Engineering), for the specialty areas of Ceramic Engi-
neering and Metallurgical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Nuclear Engineering)
Master of Engineering with a major in Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering
Essential Preparation
Modern engineering education demands much in the way
of specific high school preparation not required in other col-
lege programs. The beginning engineering student should,
have a good understanding of the basic physical sciences, a
highly developed ability in mathematics, and the com-
petence to read rapidly and with comprehension. The Col-
lege of Engineering considers that a minimum adequate
preparation follows:
In high school, the student should include the following
subjects:
'Essentials Year
Elementary algebra ................................ ........ ... ............... 1
Intermediate and advanced algebra .................................... 1
Plane geometry ..................................... ............. ............... 1
Trigonom etry ............................... ................ ........... ...... '
C hem istry ......................................................... ............. 1
Physics ................................... ........................ 1
Desirable
Additional M mathematics ........................................... ............. /
Deficiencies in the above subjects may be overcome by
registering in certain foundation courses before proceeding
with parts of the regular engineering program.
The General Plan of Study
The study programs leading to the bachelor's degrees in
engineering, described under the separate headings on the
following pages, are carefully planned into an organized se-
quence. The aggressive, strongly motivated student with
proper high school preparation can complete one of these
programs in about 41/2 years, including a summer term, by
carrying course loads of 16 credit hours. Many students will
require more than this length of time.
Some students, for different reasons, are not prepared to
enter directly into one of the curricula described below. For
example, a student may have attended a high school which
did not offer all the preparatory courses necessary for entry
into an engineering program. Or possibly the student's ob-
jectives changed late in the high school program, resulting in
a preparation deficient in areas required of potential engi-
neering students. In all such cases, the time required to com-
plete the degree requirements can be expected to increase.







COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


As a general rule, subjects basic to all fields of engineering
are studied while the student is enrolled in the first two
years of the University, or in a pre-engineering program of a
community or junior college. Then, when specialized study
is taken in the third and later years in the College of Engi-
neering, the program of course work can be tailored to the
student's interests and abilities.


FINANCIAL AID
Information about general financial aid can be obtained
from the Director of Student Financial Aid, University of
FLorida, Gainesville, Florida. The College of Engineering
does not offer financial aid for students at the freshman or
sophomore level since students are not normally admitted
into the College until their junior year. The only exceptions
involve students who plan to major in Agricultural Engineer-
ing or Chemical Engineering and minority students. The Ag-
ricultural Engineering Department and Chemical Engineer-
ing Department have a few small industry supported schol-
arships for students at the freshman level and the Chemical
Engineering Department also has a few awards for students
transferring at the junior level. Minority students planning to
major in Engineering should contact the Director of Minority
Affairs in the College of Engineering for information about
financial aid.
After a student is enrolled in the College he or she may ap-
ply for a scholarship. The awards, which are limited in
number, are made each spring for the following academic
year. Most are based on financial need, as well as scholastic
performance. Applications are available from the depart-
ment counselors.
An emergency short-term loan fund is available through
the Dean's Office to assist students through emergency situ-
ations.


HONORARY, PROFESSIONAL, AND
TECHNICAL SOCIETIES
Students in the College of Engineering are encouraged to
participate in extracurricular activities including active mem-
bership in honorary, professional, and technical organize:
tions both at the college and the departmental level. Almost
all of the nationally recognized engineering organizations
having student chapters are represented including:

Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineering Honor Society)
Alpha Nu Sigma (Nuclear Engineering Honor Society)
Alpha Pi Mu (Industrial & Systems Engineering Honor Socie-
ty)
Alpha Sigma Mu (Metallurgical Engineering Honor Society)
American Ceramic Society
American Congress on Surveying and Mapping
American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics
American Institute of Chemical Engineers
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum
Engineers
American Nuclear Society
American Society of Agricultural Engineers
American Society of Civil Engineers
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Association for Computing Machinery
Benton Engineering Council (Engineering College Council)
'Epsilon Lambda Chi (Engineering Leadership Society)
Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering Honor Society)
Florida Engineering Society
Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers
Institute Industrial Engineers
Keramos (Ceramic Engineering Honor Society)
National Association of Corrosion Engineers
Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering Honor Society)
Society of Black Student Engineers
Society of Engineering Sciences
Society of Environmental Engineers
Society of Plastics Engineers
Society of Women Engineers


Tau Beta Pi (Engineering Honor Society)
Upsilon Pi Ipsilon (Computer and Information Sciences
Honor Society)


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The College of Engineering encourages applications from
all persons regardless of their sex, race, religion, or cultural
background.
Because of the limitations on space, facilities and number
of faculty the College of Engineering has had to become a
selective admission college. The two major criteria for ad-
mission are grade point average and completion of prerequi-
site courses. In addition, students must have taken the Col-
lege Level Academic Skills Test (see page 33). All applicants
are referred to the departments for selection, with g.p.a.
being most important. In future terms the minimum g.p.a.
will vary with number of applicants, availability of space,
and numbers of faculty in a given program. Florida residents
are given priority. Nonresidents are admitted only after qual-
ified resident applicants have been admitted.
Specific requirements for admission to the College are
listed below.
Direct Admission: Requirements for direct admission to
the College are given in the Admissions section of this
catalog.
, Students Classified UF: A student in a lower division col-
lege can request transfer to the College of Engineering any
time after completion of the freshman year.
Many departments require substantial completion of the
mathematics, physics, chemistry and English course se-
quences of the pre-engineering program, described under
Freshman and Sophomore Requirements below, for a stu-
dent to be considered for admission.
Transfer from Community and Junior Colleges: A student
in a community or junior college who has completed the as-
sociate degree or 60 semester hours of credit is eligible to
transfer directly into the College of Engineering. Students
who do not meet either of these criteria must enroll in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for at least one semester
before transferring into the College of Engineering.
Students wishing to transfer into the College of Engineer-
ing after completing the associate degree in a community or
junior college should tailor their associate-degree program
as follows:
1. Satisfy the general education requirements of the com-
munity or junior college.
2. Take the following recommended course work:
a. mathematics through analytic geometry, and calculus
of several variables 12 semester hours
b. Chemistry including general chemistry and quali-
tative analysis 8 semester hours
c. general physics with calculus and laboratory,- 8
semester hours
d. engineering graphics, if required in the proposed ma-
jor department 2 semester hours
,e. biological sciences 3 semester hours
3. Avoid taking technical education courses. Such courses
are not normally creditable towards an engineering de-
gree.
Departments with Restricted Admission: Because they re-
ceive applications from many more students than they can
accommodate, several departments have established admis-
sion standards above the minimum requirements for the
College of Engineering. These departments are:
Aerospace Engineering (see Engineering Sciences)
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Computer and Information Sciences
Engineering Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering






Colleges

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


FRESHMAN AND
SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS
The program below is described for students whose high
school preparation meets the criteria previously described.
The minimum course load for full-time students is 12 cred-
it hours each semester, but most students take 14 to 16 credit
hours. At this rate, it takes at least 41/2 years, including a sum-
mer term, to earn a B.S. degree. It will take somewhat longer
for students who need preparation courses before entering
the program below.
In planning the physical science and mathematics portion
of the academic program, a freshman should talk with a Col-
lege of Engineering faculty adviser.
The requirements in Social Sciences, English, Humanities,
and (in most departments) Biological Sciences can be met
only by (a) appropriate College Level Examination Program
(CLEP) credits or (b) courses selected from the listing in the
Authorized Courses for General Education section of this
catalog. In a few cases as noted below, the College of Engi-
neering requires specific courses in fulfilling the General Ed-
ucation requirements for these subject areas.
Courses Credits
Social and Behavioral Sciences (see note 1 below) ............ 6
ENC 1101 Expository and Argumentative Writing .......... 3
ENC 1102 W writing about Literature ........................................ 3
Biological Sciences (see note 2) .............................................. 3
Humanities (see note 3) ..... ............................... ............ 9
CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C, General Chemistry
(see note 4) ... .......................... ........................ 8
MAC 3311, 3312, 3313, Analytical Geometry
and Calculus ............................................ ..... ........... .... 12
MAP. 3302 Elementary Differential Equations or EGM 3311
Introduction to Engineering Analysis (see note 5) ......... 3
.PHY 3048, 305.L, 3049, 3056L Physics with
Calculus ..................... .................................... .......... 8
COP 3212 Computer Programming for Engineers
(see note 6) ............................................... ............ .. 2
EGN 1111C Engineering Graphics (see note 7) .................. 2
Departmental courses and Electives (see note 8)

Total Hours 55-63*
*Total hours required varies depending on department

Note 1:Three credits must come from Group 1, and 3 credits
must come from Group II.
Note 2:Environmental Engineering Sciences requires BSC
2010 to meet this requirement.
Note 3: Part or all of the humanities requirement may be de-
ferred to the junior and. senior years. Courses relat-
ing humanities to engineering and the sciences, as
listed in Group III of the humanities subsection of
the General Education section of this catalog, are es-
pecially recommended.
Note 4:All students are required to take the Chemistry
Placement Examination, given each term by the
Chemistry Department, prior to initial registration in
CHM 2040 or CHM 2042. Students who achieve an
acceptably high score on the Examination may pro-
ceed with the CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C sequence.
Rtudents achieving a lower score should take the
CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L, 2043C course sequence.
Note 5:Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Science stu-
dents must take EGM 3311.
Note 6: Not required for students in Computer and Informa-
tion Sciences. Chemical Engineering requires CAP
3210 (4 credit hours) instead of COP 3212. Industrial
and Systems Engineering students take COP 3212L if
available.
Note\7:Not required for students entering Chemical, Elec-
trical, Environmental, and Nuclear Engineering Pro-
grams.
Note 8:Students should consult the Departmental Cur-
riculum or faculty adviser in the department they in-
tend to enter when selecting these courses.


COLLEGE REGULATIONS
English Requirement: Responsibility for the correct and ef-
fective use of his or her spoken and written English rests pri-
marily upon the student. Any instructor in the College of En-
gineering may, at any time, with the approval of the Chair-
man of the department and the Dean of the College of Engi-
neering, require a student who shows a deficiency in English
to complete additional courses, over and above the cur-
riculum requirements for the degree.
Each student in the College is required to complete the
course ENC 3213, Technical Writing, with a grade of C or bet-
ter, after being classified as a 3EG student.
Thesis: A thesis is not required of candidates for the bacca-
laureate degree in the College of Engineering. However, ex-
ceptional students may be granted permission by the Dean
of the College, upon recommendation of the chairman of
the department, to undertake a thesis in lieu of required or
elective work in the department in which the student is en-
rolled. Not more than four semester hours will be allowed
for such thesis work.
Credit for Special Work. ,
1. Upon the recommendation of the chairman of the de-
partment and the approval by the Dean, a student during
the course of study may do practical work under approved
supervision in industry. By submitting a satisfactory report,
based upon a previously approved outline, and by passing
an examination, college credit may be received not to ex-
ceed three semester hours. Students will register for the
proper departmental course to receive such credit.
2. Where it is determined by the department concerned
that an exceptional student may profit by supplementing
the regular program of course work ip a particular area,
the student may register for special problems in the
chosen field. Credit for such work should not exceed six
semester hours. To receive such credit, the student must
register for the departmental course number 4905.
A student may not have more than eight semester hours
total for work in industry, special problems, and High Hon-
ors project.
Elective Credit: It is the policy of the College that students,
classified 3EG and higher, are not normally allowed to use
freshman level courses for technical and nontechnical elec-
tive credit. Foreign language credits at the freshman level
may, within the discretion of the department, be credited as
non-technical electives, provided that the student presents
at least two semesters of work with a grade of "C" or better
in the same language.
Grade-Average Required for Graduation: The requirement
for graduation with a Bachelor's degree is a grade average of
"C" or higher in all work taken after being classified as a jun-
ior, as well as for all UF work, and.successful completion of
all required courses.,
Maintenance of Academic Standards: If at any time after
admission to the College of Engineering a student's college
grade point average falls below 2.00 the student will be
placed on college probation. A student may also be placed
on probation if normal academic progress is not maintained
in the program of study. The section of this catalog on 'Stu-
dent Regulations' authorizes any college to set its own stan-
dards for exclusion of a student who fails or refuses to main-
tain normal academic progress. It is the policy of the College
of Engineering that any ,undergraduate student who
withdraws from the University for the second time will be
automatically placed upon college probation which will
continue until graduation. Any student on college probation
for this reason who withdraws for a third time from the Uni-
versity may be ineligible for further registration in the Col-
lege of Engineering. Failure to satisfactorily complete the
terms of probation will result in the ineligibility of the stu-
dent for further registration in the College of Engineering.
Advanced ROTC: Some engineering students may elect to
enroll in the advanced ROTC programs offered by the Army,
Navy and the Air Force. Graduates of these programs are








COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


commissioned as second lieutenants or ensigns as described
elsewhere in this catalog.
It is the policy of the Accreditation Board for Engineering
and Technology which accredits engineering curricula, that
student enrollment in advanced ROTC programs represents
a second career objective quite apart from that of pro-
fessional engineering. Accordingly,advanced courses in Mil-
itary Science are only acceptable on a limited basis, with de-
partment approval, for credit as technical or non-technical
electives toward a degree in engineering.
Correspondence Courses: (See Student Academic Regu-
lations-- "Degrees and Graduation.")
A student in the College will not be permitted to register
for and work on correspondence courses while enrolled in
the College unless special permission is obtained from the
Dean of the College and the Registrar. A student on proba-
tion must have permission of the Dean to register for cor-
respondence courses when not enrolled in the College. A
student who has been suspended will not be permitted to
take correspondence courses for credit until the suspension
is removed. A grade of "C" or better is required to receive
credit for a correspondence course.
Dean's List:
Each semester there is compiled a Dean's List of those stu-
dents whose work for the preceding semester has been of a
high order. This recognition is accorded to students in the
College of Engineering who:
a. received a minimum of 14 hours of credit during the
semester;
b. received a 3.2 average during the semester; and
c. have no grade below "C" for the semester.
Drop Policy: Students classified 1 and 2EG are allowed a
total of two drops after the published drop-date. Similarly,
students classified 3, 4, 5, and 6EG are allowed a total of two
unrestricted drops. A student with an initial course load of
15 credits or more will be permitted to drop a course without
penalty or use one of the free drops, provided this is done by
the end of the seventh week of class and the toTal credits re-
maining are 12 or more. There is no petition appeal from this
policy.



HONOR STUDENTS
Honors: Students in the College of Engineering are desig-
nated as Honor Students when they have met all the follow-
ing conditions:
1. have achieved a college grade point average of 3.30 or
higher (college g.p.a. is defined as all work taken after
being classified as a junior);
2. have been registered in the College for at least one
semester;
3. have completed at least 16 credit hours at the University
of Florida after being classified as 3EG or higher;
4. have been recommended by the major department after
the departmental faculty have reviewed the student's re-
cord for satisfactory conduct and academic progress.
For honor students, the grade point average referred to in
condition 1 above is termed the honor point average.
Special consideration is given honor students who wish to
substitute courses, provided that they have maintained the
conditions for honor student designation. The student peti-
tions the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for such sub-
stitutions.
Graduation with honors requires, in addition to the nor-
mal requirements for graduation,
1. completion of all work required by the major depart-
ment and a college grade point average of 3.30 or higher;
2. recommendation of the major department.
High Honors: Certain honor students may be invited by the
faculty of the major department to participate in a special
program leading to graduation with High Honors.
Eligibility for the high honors program requires: .
1. a college honor point average of 3.50 or higher;


2. recommendation by the faculty of the major depart-
ment.
Participation in the high honors program requires that the
student:
1. accept in writing the invitation to participate in the pro-
gram no later than the end of the term before graduation;
2. carry out a high honors project and submit a thesis
based on the project.
If the student accepts the invitation to participate in the
program, the Dean appoints a committee to oversee and ap-
prove all stages of the thesis project. The committee, recom-
mended to the Dean by the department chairman, is com-
posed of two faculty members from the student's major de-
partment and one faculty member from another department
of the University.
The thesis project is normally not waived unless the stu-
dent has an honor point average of 3.80 or higher, but this is
discretionary with the committee in exceptional cases. In
planning the student's program, the committee takes into
account the academic goals of the student. The committee
supervises the High Honors project and/or the oral examina-
tion; upon satisfactory completion of all requirements, the
committee recommends the candidate to the faculty of the
major department.
Graduation with High Honors requires (a) completion of
all required work of the major department and a college
honor point average of at least 3.50 and (b) recommendation
of the major department.
When a high honors project is a part of the program, credit
may be obtained by registration in courses carrying the pre-
fix of the appropriate department. Not more than a total of
eight credit hours will be allowed for high honors project
work, special projects, and practical work in industry. Regis-
tration for variable credit of one to four hours per semester
requires Committee approval.

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
The undergraduate and graduate degree programs in
aerospace engineering are administered by the Department
of Engineering Sciences. The Bachelor of Science in Engi-
neering (Aerospace Engineering) program is designed to
prepare its graduates for careers in aeronautical engineering
and space-related engineering fields. It also prepares stu-
dents for the post-baccalaureate education appropriate in
preparation for careers in advanced research and develop-
ment.
The program incorporates a solid foundation of physical
and mathematical fundamentals which provides the basis
for the development of the engineering principles essential
to the understanding of both atmospheric and extra-at-
mospheric flight. Aerodynamics, light-weight structures,
flight propulsion and related subjects typical of aeronautical
engineering are included. Also, there are courses which in-
troduce problems associated with space flight and its re-
quirements. Integration of fundamental principles into use-
ful applications is made in design work in the junior and sen-
ior years. Thus, the program prepares the student to con-
tribute to the future technological growth which promises
exciting and demanding careers in aerospace engineering.
Areas of individual interest may be pursued through
counseled choice of elective work. Examples of concentra-
tion areas are:
Aerodynamics
Design
Flight Propulsion
Flight Structures
Space Technology
Stability, Control and Guidance
Graduates of the Aerospace Engineering program are pre-
pared for employment in the aerospace industry in Florida
and elsewhere. Their broad scope of fundamental prepara-
tion also suits them for specialized work in related industries
and government laboratories.
Admission Requirements: The baccalaureate program in






Colleges

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Aerospace Engineering is a selective admission program. Ad-
mission decisions are made by a faculty committee accord-
ing to the following criteria:
1. Students making normal progress toward completion of
pre-engineering prerequisite courses and who have
earned an overall gradepoint average of 2.7 or higher will
ordinarily be admitted; those with 2.3 or lower will or-
dinarily not be admitted.
2. The admissions committee will consider the following ad-
ditional factors in reaching its final decision: performance
in calculus, physics, and chemistry courses completed,
and other evidence of motivation and suitability for a ca-
reer in Aerospace Engineering including performance in
relevant work experience.
These criteria are applicable to all students, independent
'of the location of their lower division work.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
(AEROSPACE ENGINEERING)
Courses Credits
ENGLISH, HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES
*En g lish .....................:............................... ........ ............... ............ 6
*Hum anities .......................... ........... 9
*Social Sciences ................................... ............... ................. 6
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and
Business Communication ............ ...................... 2
AhNALYTICAL AND DESIGN TOOLS
*MAC 3311 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1 ................... 4
*MAC 3312 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 2 .................... 4
*MAC 3313 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 3 ................:.... 4
*EGM 3311 Introduction to Engineering Analysis.................... 3
EGM 4312 Engineering Analysis Field Theory ..................... 4
EGM 4313 Engineering Analysis Differential
Eq uatio ns ................................................. ............ ........ 4
EGM 4344 Introduction to Numerical Methods of
Engineering Analysis ................................ .................... 3
*EGN 1111 Engineering Graphics ................................ .... 2
*COP 3212 Computer Programming for Engineers .................. 2
BASICSCIENCE
*CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C General Chemistry ........................ 8
(or CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L, 2043C)
*Biological Science ................................ ..................... 3
*PHY 3048 Physics with Calculus 1 ........................................... 3
*PHY 3055L Lab for PHY 3048 .................................... ........... 1
*PHY 3049 Physics with Calculus 2 ...................................:......... 3
*PHY 3056L Lab for PHY 3049 ........... ......................... 1
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND
DESIGN
**EGM 3420 Engineering Mechanics ...................................... 4
(or EGM 3511 and EGM 3400)
**EGM 3520 Mechanics of Materials ......................................... 3
EM A 3010C M materials 1 .................................................. ......... 3
EM L 3100 Thermodynamics .................................. ........... 3
EGM 4200 M echanical Vibrations ............................................. 3
EEL 3111 Electrical Engineering ............................................... 3
EAS 3001 Applied Aerodynamics 1 ................................ 3
EAS 4105 Applied Aerodynamics 2 .......................................... 3
EAS 4803 Aerospace Instrumentation ..................................... 3
EAS 4106 Low Speed Aerodynamics ........................................ 3
EAS 4106L Subsonic W ind Tunnel Lab. ............................... 1
EAS 4112 High Speed Aerodynamics ........................................ 3
EAS 4112L Supersonic Wind Tunnel Lab. ............................... 1
EAS 4200 Aerospace Structures 1 .............................................. 3
EAS 4201L Aerospace Structures Laboratory 1 ..................... 1
EAS 4210 Aerospace Structures 2 ............................................... 3
EAS 4211L Aerospace Structures Laboratory 2 ....................... 1
EAS 4300 Aerospace Propulsion ................................................ 3
EAS 4700 Aerospace Design 1 ..............:.................... .......... 3
EAS 4710 Aerospace Design 2 ....... ..................................... 3
EAS 4933 Senior Seminar ....................... .......... ...... 1
***Technical Elective ........................... .......... ................ 3
***Aerospace Electives ................. .. ......... ........... .... 6
Total Credits 135


*Pre-engineering program requirements
**A grade of 'C' or better isrequired in EGM 3420 (or EGM 3511
and EGM 3400) and EGM 3520.
***Electives must be approved by the student's department
counselor.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
The agricultural and food industry is the largest single in-
Sdustry in the United States and in Florida. The growth of ag-
riculture and technology have proceeded together and now
agricultural production and processing industries require
advanced machines and systems. The industries providing
these machines and the related systems require engineering
skills which agricultural engineers provide. The agricultural
engineer is also involved in natural resources conservation
in his drainage and watershed hydrology activities.
Agricultural engineering is unique in its concern for the
engineering problems of biological production and pro-
cessing. The agricultural engineer solves the engineering
problems associated with agriculture such as the conversion
of the sun's energy into biological (food) products using soil
nutrition resources and water in controlled ways. He uses his
basic engineering training combined with knowledge of ag-
ricultural and biological systems to design functional ma-
chines and equipment to process and handle these products
so that quality is enhanced. No challenge could be greater
and more rewarding than that related to food production
and processing in view of the population explosion and
projected world food shortage.
The education of the agricultural engineer includes basic
physical and engineering sciences and also courses in
biology, soils, plant science and animal science. The courses
in agricultural engineering unify the concepts learned into a
practical ability to solve a broad range of engineering prob-
lems confronting the agricultural and food industry.
Agricultural engineers have numerous career op-
portunities in various segments of the large Florida agricul-
tural industry and.with manufacturers of equipment and
supplies for agriculture throughout the nation. Agricultural
engineers are sought by state and federal agencies for ca-
reers in irrigation, drainage and water resource management
and pollution control. Excellent opportunities are available
for graduate study. This program is offered cooperatively
with the College of Agriculture.
Degree programs: The Agricultural Engineering Depart-
ment offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Science in En-
gineering (Agricultural Engineering), Master of Engineering,
Master of Science, the Engineer Degree, and Doctor of Phi-
losophy.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
(AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING)
Courses Credits
Freshman and Sophomore requirements ........................ 59
CNM 3100 Numerical Techniques .......................................... 2
EGM 3420 Engineering Mechanics, Statics, Dynamics ........ 4
EGM 3520 Mechanics of Materials ....................................... 3
EGN 3353 Fluid M echanics .................................. ............ 3
or ECI 3213 Hydrodynamics (4) .....................................
EEL 3003 Elements of Electrical Engineering ......................... 3
EM L 3100 Thermodynam ics ..................................................... 3
SUR 3101 Engineering Measurements .................................. 2
SO S 3022C General Soils .................................. .............. 4
STA 3032 Engineering Statistics ............................................. 3
ENC 3213 Technical W writing ................................................... 2
Animal Science Requirement (ASG 3003*) or .................. 3
Plant Science Requirement (PLS 2031*)
AGE 3012 Introduction to Design and Analysis
for Agricultural Engineering ............................... 3
AGE 3612 Heat ahd Mass Transfer in Biological Systems .. 4
AGE 4112 Agricultural Power Units ........................................ 3








COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


AGE 4212 Soil and Water Conservation Engineering ......... 3
AGE 4321 Environmental Systems Design
for Animals, Plants and Produce ................................... 3
AGE 4413 Post Harvest Operations ........................................ 3
AGE 4652 Physical and Rheological Properties of
Biological Materials
or ECI 3403 Civil Engineering Materials ............................ 3
AGE 4931 Agricultural Engineering Seminar ........................ 1
In addition to the above courses, each student must com-
plete one 22 credit group of courses from the seven groups
listed below.
General Program
AGE 4121 Agricultural Field Machines .................................. 4
AGE 4232 Drainage and Irrigation Engineering ................. 3
AGE 4312 Agricultural Structures Design and Analysis ...... 2
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design .......................... 2
**Approved Electives ............................................... 11

TOTAL 136
Food Engineering
AGE 4812 Food Engineering Unit Operations ................. 3
FOS 3042 Introduction to Food Science ............................... 3
FOS 4427 Principles of Food Processing .............................. .... 4
FOS 4731 Government Regulations & The Food Industry..... 1
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design ........................... 2
**Approved Electives ........... .................. ............................ 9

TOTAL 136
Postharvest Operations
VEC 4452 Principles of Postharvest Horticulture .................. 3
FOS 4551 Fruit, Vegetable & Citrus Processing ..................... 3
AGE 4812 Food Engineering Unit Operations ....................... 3
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design ........................... 2
**Approved Electives ................................ ...................... 11

TOTAL 136
Power and Machinery
EM L 3260 M machine Dynam ics ................................................... 3
EML 4500 Machine Analysis and Design I.............................. 3
AGE 4121 Agricultural Field Machines ................................... 3
AGE 4142 Hydraulic Power Transmission
and Control Systems ....................................... .......... ............. 2
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design ........................... 2
**Approved Electives ............................................................. 9

TOTAL 136
Structures and Environment
AGE 4312 Agricultural Structures Design and Analysis ......... 2
AGE 4712 Animal Waste Management .................................. 3
EML 4601 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning ........................ 3
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design ............................. 2
**Approved Electives ............................................. ........... .... 12

TOTAL 136
Soil and Water
AGE 4232 Drainage and Irrigation Engineering ...................... 3
ECI 4630 Hydrology ................................................ ............... 3
SO S 4602 Soil Physics ............................................ ............... 3
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design .......................... 2
**Approved Electives ............................................ ........... ... 11

TOTAL 136
Waste Management
SOS 3215C Agricultural and Environmental Quality ............. 3
AGE 4712 Animal Waste Management ................................... 3
AGE 4232 Drainage and Irrigation Engineering .................... 3
AGE 4905 Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering ....... 2
(area of waste management)
AGE 4042 Agricultural Engineering Design ............................. 2
**A approved Electives ........................... .......................................... 9

TOTAL 136

*Or approved alternatives
**Elective credits specifically selected in consultation with the


Departmental adviser, to support the student engineering
objective.


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Although chemical engineering has existed as a field of
engineering for only about sixty years, its name is no longer
completely descriptive of this dynamic, growing profession.
For the work of the chemical engineer is neither restricted to
the chemical industry nor limited to chemical changes or
chemistry. Instead, modern chemical engineers, who are also
called process engineers, are concerned with all the physical
and chemical changes that matter is made to undergo to
produce economically a product or result that is useful to
mankind. More than most fields, the education of the chem-
ical engineer has been based on the fundamental sciences of
physics and chemistry, on mathematical and computer tech-
niques, and on basic engineering principles. Such a broad
background has made the chemical engineer extremely ver-
satile and capable of working in a wide variety of industries:
chemical, petroleum, aerospace, nuclear, materials, micro-
electronics, sanitation, food processing, and computer tech-
nology. The chemical industry alone provides an opportun-
ity for the chemical engineer to participate in the research,
development, design or operation of plants for the produce,
tion of new synthetic fibers, plastics, chemical fertilizers, vi-
tamins, antibiotics, rocket fuels, nuclear fuels, paper pulp,
photographic products, paints, fuel cells, transistors, and the
thousands of chemicals that are used as intermediates in the
manufacture of the above products.
In practice, the activities of the chemical engineer are suf-
ficiently diversified to attract a wide range of talents and
abilities. The chemical engineers working in process design
determine the sequence of steps to be followed in produc-
Sing a useful product, calculate the sizes of the equipment re-
quired and the total cost, those working in development re-
search do small scale studies on new processes or products;
those working in production improve and coordinate the
operation of plants and equipment. Others do fundamental
research on the laws of science and their application. Many
chemical engineers work in technical sales, cost estimation,
patent law, and plant supervision. A chemical engineering
background is often the best route to top-level management
positions.
Degree Programs: The following degrees are offered by
the Chemical Engineering Department: Bachelor of Science
in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Science, Master of En-
gineering, Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy.
The University of Florida and the Department of Chemical
Engineering encourage application from all cultural, racial,
religious and ethnic groups. However, because of rigorous
requirements of technical competency to complete the pro-
fessional program, and limitations of staff and facilities, ad-
mission is a selective process. Applicants are expected to ex-
ceed the requirements listed below, but doing so does not
guarantee admission.
The admission committee will consider such factors as
lower division grades (generally a GPA of 2.8 in technical
courses is required), test data and adequacy of prerequisites.
If the circumstances indicate these factors are incompletely
indicative of qualification, other factors shall be considered
such as motivation for a Chemical Engineering career, per-
sonal record and characteristics of suitability for the pro-
fession.
While applications are accepted up to the dates as speci-
fied in the front of the catalog admission standards may be
higher for later applicants, particularly when most decisions
have already been made (approximately March 15 for Fall
admission, two months before other intended entrance
times).
All Chemical Engineering majors shall maintain satisfac-
tory progress (GPA of 2.0 or higher) in Chemical Engineering
professional courses as well as in overall record. Also, to pro-
ceed to succeeding courses, "C" grades or better must be
obtained in ECH 3012, 3023, 3203, and CAP 3210. However,
since enrollment in selected courses prerequisite to senior
level professional courses may be limited by insufficient






Colleges

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


staff and facilities, minimum performance may not guaran-
tee completion of the curriculum.
All prospective students are urged to contact the Depart-
ment directly for more detailed information about careers
and degree programs.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
Credits
Pre-Engineering Program ................................... ........... 55
ECH 3012 Elements of Chemical Engineering .................... 3
ECH 3023 Introduction to Chemical Engineering ................ 3
EEL 3003 Elements of Electrical Engineering ....................... 3
Subtotal 64
Engineering Science Courses
CAP 3210 Mathematical and Numerical Methods .......... 4
EGM 3420 Statics and Dynamics ................................ 4
ECH 4824 ChE Materials ............................ ... 2
ECH 4504 Chemical Kinetics ....................... 3
ECH 4524 Reactor Dynamics and Design ........................ 2
ECH 4123 ChE Thermodynamics 2 ................................... 4
ECH 4264 Transport Phenomena ................................. 3
EMA 4666 Polymer Processing
or CHM 5511 The Physics and
Physical Chemistry of Polymers .................................... 3
Subtotal 25
Advanced Chemistry
CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry ............................................ 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ........................... ..... 3
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry Lab ................................... 2
CHM 4411, 4412 Physical Chemistry .................................. 7
Subtotal 15
Engineering Analysis and Design
ECH 3203 Chemical Engineering Operations 1 ................ 3
ECH 4403 Chemical Engineering Operations 2 ................ 3
ECH 4323 Process Control Theory ..................................... 4
ECH 4224L Chem. Eng. Operations Laboratory 1 .......... 3
ECH 4404L Chem. Eng. Operations Laboratory 2 ........... 2
ECH 4604 Cost Estimation of Process Designs ................. 3
ECH 4644 Process Design ................................................... 3
Subtotal 21
Other Required Courses
STA 3032 Engineering Statistics ......................... .......... 3
ECH 4934 Sem inar ....................................... ........................... 1
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and
Business Com m unication ................................................ 2
*Non Technical Electives ...................... ................. 4
Subtotal 10
* Option Courses Subtotal 8
Total BSCHE Program 143
*Nontechnical courses may not include significant mathemat-
ics, science or engineering content. A list of generally used
courses is available. In case of doubt, the Department Chair-
man shall determine suitability.
*An option consists of technical courses, at least 8 of which
must make a coherent theme such as mathematics; biology;
materials science; computer and information science; aero-
space, agriculture, civil, coastal, electrical, environmental,
mechanical or nuclear engineering; business, etc. Technical
courses are defined as those with significant science and/or
mathematical content. A list of suitable courses is available.
Military courses cannot be used for technical or non-
technical electives. Usually 9 semesters is required to obtain
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE & TO THE
MASTERS DEGREE IN
ENGINEERING
The Department has also developed an alternative route
for above-average students to attain high-level knowledge
in applied science and chemical engineering fundamentals.
This program consists of a bachelor's degree directly
coupled to a Master of Engineering degree which can be
completed within 5/2 years.
The bachelor's degree contains most of the same ChE
courses as for the BSCHE degree and is awarded to students
who have been admitted to the Graduate School. The ME
degree involves the same spectrum of Chemical Engineering
areas but with more sophisticated material than is contained
in the BSCHE degree.
In the minimum of 156 semester credits, the student will
have earned a Master's degree and reached a significant
level of professional education and will b6 capable of enter-
ing essentially all process industries in positions ranging
from research to design, development, analysis, or opera-
tions.
The undergraduate program parallelsthe BSCHE program
until the last three terms when the material in some courses
and most electives are postponed to the graduate level
where it is upgraded and supplemented. Details of the grad-
uate program can be obtained from the Graduate Coordi-
nator.
The curriculum consists of all courses required for the
BSCHE degree except for ECH 4323, 4264. Also, 3 credits of
non-technical electives and 0 credits of option courses are
required.
Total Credits Upper Division ............................................... 61
Total Credits Lower Division ............................................... 64
Total BS degree 125


CIVIL ENGINEERING
Civil Engineering is directly concerned with the activities
of mania and his environment. It is the oldest and most di-
verse branch of engineering and includes the design and
construction of bridges, buildings, dams, waterways, coastal
protection works, airports, pipe lines, missile launching facil-
ities, blast shelters, railroads, highways, sanitary systems,
ocean structures and facilities, foundations, harbors, water
works, and many other systems and.structures upon which
modern civilization depends. In its broadest sense, the func-
tion of the civil engineer may be defined as the adaptation
of the physical features of the earth to the needs of man. Ap-
proximately one-fourth of all engineers are engaged in Civil
Engineering.
The concentration of population into cities, the mass use
of the automobile and the airplane, the increasing demands
of industry for greater quantities of power and the public's
demand for clean streams and beaches, for clean air, and the .
potential for man's expansion into space and the oceans
present the civil engineer with many challenging problems.
To assist the young engineer to, meet these challenges, the
Civil Engineering Department offers a basic program that
provides the minimum education for practice in this broad
field of engineering services to society. Beyond the
bachelor's degree, advanced degrees may be obtained in
several of the major areas of civil engineering such as trans-
portation, hydraulics, structural, soil mechanics, foundations
and construction.
While it is essential that the civil engineer understand the
fundamentals of his chosen field, it is also necessary that he
understand the role other branches of engineering play in
the completed work. The Civil Engineering curriculum
therefore includes courses from other engineering dis-
ciplines, and because of this brad program, it provides an
excellent basic engineering education. Thus, the student







COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


who is not sure which field of engineering to choose is pro-
vided with the broadest of engineering backgrounds, a
springboard, so to speak, to specialization.
Degree Programs:
The Civil Engineering Department offers the following de-
grees: Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Bachelor of
Land Surveying; Master of Engineering, Master of Science,
the Engineer Degree, and Doctor of Philosophy.
The program of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Civil Engineering has been established to meet
the requirements for entry into the professional practice of
civil engineering and to meet the general education require-
ments of the University of Florida. The program is divided
into two parts: a two year pre-engineering program and the
upper division professional portion. The pre-engineering
program may be completed while classified as UF in the Col-
ege of Liberal Arts and Sciences or, in most instances, with
the pre-engineering Associate of Arts degree program of-
fered by the various community colleges in Florida.
Civil Engineering is a broad discipline of study that in-
fluences the life of all society. The requirements to enter the-
profession are rigorous and the academic program is longer,
therefore, than those of many other disciplines. The program
requires 'completion of 140 semester hours and most stu-
dents should plan on an educational period of five years.
All courses required for the BSCE degree will be listed in
the University of Florida Bulletin with an indication of the
probable term, Fall or Spring, in which they will be taught.
Courses will be offered as announced but there is no cer-
tainty they will be offered at other times during the year.
Students should familiarize themselves with the degree re-
quirements and arrange their schedule accordingly. Faculty
advisers will assist the students in planning their program.
Admissions Requirements:
Students entering the College of Engineering for study in
Civil Engineering at the 3EG entry level are expected to have
completed the pre-professional program described in the
College of Liberal Arts and Science section of this bulletin or
a pre-engineering program leading to the Associate of Arts
degree. A minimum grade point average of 2.25 is required
for admission to the Department of Civil Engineering. A min-
imum C average is required on all attempts for all sequential
courses including a grade of C or better in the final course of
the sequence. In addition, a minimum grade of C is required
in all English courses, Engineering Statistics, and FORTRAN
Programming. A minimum C grade is required in all upper
division courses taken prior to application for admission to
the Department.
Degree Requirements:
A minimum grade of C is required for Statics, Dynamics,
Strength of Materials, all courses shown as Group B, and
those courses that are prerequisites for more advanced
courses in the program. An upper division minimum grade
point average of 2.0 is required for graduation.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
See the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Students
Classified UF) portion for pre-engineering curriculum.
Pre-Engineering Requirements ............................ ........ 59
*EGM 3511 Engineering Mechanics-Statics ................ 3
SUR 3101 Engineering M easurements ...................................... 2
Students must complete all of the pre-engineering courses
or be co-registered for the final courses of this portion of the
program before they will be permitted to register for upper
division courses.
GROUP A-These courses may be completed at any time af-
ter the student has achieved upper division status and has
satisfied the necessary prerequisites for each.
EEL 3003 Elements of Electrical Engineering ............................ 3
SUR 4201 Route Geometrics .................... 3
TTE 4104 Fundamentals of Transportation Engineering ........ 3


ECI 4137 Civil Engineering Cost Analysis ......................... 3
ECI 4145 Construction Methods and Management .............. 3
STA 3032 Engineering Statistics ............................................... 2
EM L 3100 Thermodynam ics ................................................... 3
GLY 2026 Engineering Geology ................................................ 3
GROUP B-These courses must be completed satisfactorily
before any of the courses in Group C are attempted. A stu-
dent may register for Group C courses during the term in
which he is taking the last of the Group B courses. The pre-
or co-requisite requirements for any courses listed here must
be satisfied before registration for the course.
*EGM 3520 Mechanics of Materials ............................................ 3
*EGM 3400 Engineering Mechanics (Dynamics) .................... 2
ECI 3213 Hydrodynam ics ..................................... ............. 4
CES 3123 Mechanics of Engineering Structures .................... 4
ECI 4314 Soil M echanics ..................................... .............. 3
ECI 3403 Civil Engineering Materials ...................................... 3
Free Elective ................................................. ...................... 2
GROUP C-All courses in Group B must be completed satis-
factorily and all prerequisites satisfied before courses in this
group may be attempted. The technical elective (design)
may not be taken earlier than the student's penultimate
term..
ECI 4131 Construction Contracts and Specifications ............. 2
ECI 4214 Hydraulics .................................... ....... ................ 3
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business
Com m unication ..................................................... .............. 2
CES 3103 Stress Analysis ........................ ........................ 2
ECI 4305 Geotechnical Engineering .......................................... 3
CES 4705 Analysis and Design in Reinforced Concrete......... 3
ECI 4041 Computer Programming for Civil Engineers ........... 3
ENV 4404 Water Supply and Wastewater Renioval ............... 3
ENV 4514 Treatment of Water and Wastewater ..................... 3
CES 4607 Analysis and Design in Steel ................................... 2
EGN 4036 Engineering Professionalism and Ethics ............... 2
**Technical Elective (Design) ......................................................... 3
*Students may choose the option of taking the 4/3 sequence
in engineering mechanics instead of the 3/3/2 as shown.
**This course must be chosen from the following list. Devia-
tion from this list must have Departmental approval.
ECI 4635 Advanced Hydrology ................................................... 3
TTE 4724 Transportation Facility Design .................... ............. 3
CES 4704 Design of Reinforced Concrete :............................... 3
CES 4034 Civil Engineering Estimating ................................... 3
ECI 5325 Foundation Design ..................................................... 3
Total hours 141


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
LAND SURVEYING
A degree program in Land Surveying is offered through
the Civil Engineering Department. Present land values and
high rates of land development require today's surveyor to
perform professional services and make decisions that have
far reaching effects. The land surveying degree program pre-
pares the student for a lifetime of work in this challenging
profession. The curriculum not only includes courses in sur-
veying, but also provides a broad background in com-
munications, basic science, mathematics, business prin-
ciples, and computer utilization. A co-op program is re-
quired and is provided through the efforts of professional
surveyors to insure that all surveying graduates serve a two
semester training period before graduation.
Pre-Land Surveying Requirements
Com prehensive English ...................................... .................... 6
Social Science ........................................................................ 6
H um anities .......................... ................................. ........... 9
CHM 2040 General Chemistry ............................... 4
MAC 3311 Analytical Geometry & Calculus 1 .................... 4
MAC 3312 Analytical Geometry & Calculus 2 ...................... 4
MAC 3313 Analytical Geometry & Calculus 3 .................... 4
PHY 3053/3055L Physics 1 and Lab ........................................... 5
PHY 3054/3056L Physics 2 and Lab .......................................... 5





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


COP 3212 Computer Programming for Engineers .............. 2
SUR 3660 Professional Drafting for Surveyors ................... 1
SUR 3101 Engineering Measurements .................................. 2
ACC 2001 Intro to Accounting ............ ................... 4
*BOT Biological Science Elective ......................... ................. 3

Subtotal 59
*This course must deal with the identification and classifica-
tion of plants.
Upper Division Requirements
Construction/Business/Planning
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business
Com m unication .............................................................. 3
ECI 4145 Construction Methods & Management................... 3
ECI 4137 Civil Engineering Cost Analysis ................................. 3
REE 3043 Real Estate Analysis .................................................. 4
REE 4430 Real Estate Law ................................. ........ ........... 3
**Land Planning Elective ........................................ ............ 3
Science
AST 3623 Kinematic Astronomy ............................................... 2
GLY 2026 Geology for Engineers ............................................. 3
Measurement Science
STA 3032 Engineering Statistics ............................................... 3
SUR 3520 Measurement Science ............................................. 4
SUR 3521 Field Measurement Systems ................................. 3
SUR 3640 Surveying Computations ........................................ 2
SUR 3331 Photogrammetry ................................................ 2
SUR 3620 Interactive Land Data Computer Systems .............. 3
Surveying/Mapping
SUR 4452 Land Development Systems ..................................... 2
SUR 4501 Geodetic & Control Surveying ............................... 4
SU R 4462 Subdivisions ............................................ .......... 2
SUR 3403 Land Surveying Principles ....................................... 3
SUR 4430 Land Surveying Practice .......................................... 3
SUR 4350 Photogrammetric Geometronics ........................... 3
SUR 4201 Route Geometrics ................................................ 3
SU R 4912 Senior Project .............................................................. 2
***SUR Surveying Elective ................................ .. ........... 1
SUR 4949 Co-operative Work Experience ................................ 2
**Land Planning elective may be chosen from the following
list:
URP 4000 Urban & Regional Planning ...................................... 5
REE Urban Land Use Analysis ............. ................ 5
ECI 5186 Public Works Planning ............................................. 3
***Surveying elective may be chosen from the following list:
SUR 3010 Forest Surveying .................................. ............. 1
SUR 3202 Construction Surveying .......................................... 1
SUR 4305 Marine Surveying and Mapping .............................. 2
SUR 4450 Cadastral Information .................................. 1
Total 125


COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES
Bachelor's degrees in Computer and Information Sciences
are offered by the inter-college department of Computer
and Information Sciences. The engineering curriculum in-
volves a sound background in mathematics, science, and en-
gineering as a part of the common engineering core. In addi-
tion to these courses, students receive courses which pro-
vide basic knowledge related to theory, design, and applica-
tions of computers and information processing techniques.
Students may then specialize in several related areas in-
cluding information processing, software systems, computer
systems, and the application of computers in engineering.
Graduates of the program are prepared for employment in
the computer industry) in Florida and elsewhere. The broad
scope of the program .enables the student to pursue many
different career paths related to computers and their uses.
Opportunities for cooperative education are available.
The department also offers degrees through the colleges of
Business Administration and Liberal Arts and Sciences.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: Because the CIS Depart-
ment receives applications from many more students than it


can accommodate it has established higher admission re-
quirements than the minimum for the College of Engineer-
ing. Students desiring admission should inquire at the CIS
Department to determine current admission requirements.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN ENGINEERING (COMPUTER
AND INFORMATION SCIENCES)
The curriculum in Computer and Information Sciences re-
quires a minimum of 135 semester credits as shown in the
following list.
Credits,
Pre-Engineering Program .................................. ............. 57
COC 3110 Introduction to CIS .............................................. 3
CDA 3101 Introduction to Computer Organization............ 3
COP 3530 Data and Program Structures ...................... 4
COP 3603 Software System Design ...................................... 3
COP 4620 Systems Programming .......................................... 3
'COP 4640 Translators and Translator Writing Systems ...... 3
COT 3001 Applied Discrete Structures ................................ 3
CNM 4110 Numerical Analysis-A Computational
Approach .................................. .................................... 3
EEL 3701 Introduction to Computer Engineering ............... 4
EEL 4744 M icroprocessors ............................................ ............. 4
EIN 4354 Engineering Economy ............................................. 2
CIS 4905 Senior Project ...................................... .............. 3
M AS 3114 Linear A lgebra ......................................................... 3
STA 3032 Engineering Statistics ............................................. 3
STA 4033 Mathematical Statistics with Computer
Applications ......................................... .................. ............. 2
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business
Com m unication ........................................ ......... .......... 2

Engineering Core ........................................... ............. 9
Restricted Technical Electives ............................................. 5
Technical Electives ................................................ ............... 8
Non-Technical Electives ............................................................ 5
Free Electives ...................................................... ............. 3
Total 135


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Electrical Engineering is a science oriented branch of engi-
neering primarily concerned with all phases and develop-
ment of the transmission and utilization of power and in-
telligence. The study of electrical engineering is commonly
divided into the academic areas of circuits, electronics,
fields, electric energy engineering, communications, control,
and computer engineering.
Because of the extremely rapid growth and changes relat-
ing to the application of electrical engineering principles,
the curriculum is designed for concentration on a solid core
of the basic foundation courses rather than on a sampling of
application courses which may soon become obsolete. Be-
cause of the strong core program, the electrical electives are
considered primarily as courses to be taken according to in-
dividual interest in order to permit a student to delve deeply
into subject matter previously introduced. Technical elec-
tives, as well as nontechnical electives, must be selected
from the approved lists of the Electrical Engineering Depart-
ment.
The department's extensive laboratory facilities and varied
research programs will assist in highlighting both the ex-
perimental and theoretical approaches to electrical engi-
neering.
Beyond the baccalaureate degree the department offers
graduate programs for students interested in advanced de-
grees. As more and more students are continuing to further
their education in the graduate schools of the nation, it is
advisable that 'those who may become qualified seek early
counseling. Even as early as the sixth and seventh semesters,







COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


the course work in many cases may be directed toward
future graduate work. Certainly, the choice of electives
taken during the last few semesters of the undergraduate
curriculum may relate to areas of interest to be pursued in
the graduate program.
Degree Programs: The Electrical Engineering Department
offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Science in Electrical
Engineering, Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Engi-
neer, and Doctor of Philosophy.
Admission: The number of applicants who can be ac-
cepted is limited by the available classroom and laboratory
space, laboratory facilities, and faculty. That number varies
because of normal fluctuations in the number of students
who graduate and who leave the program. It is the
department's policy to admit the best-qualified applicants as
demonstrated by high academic achievement, within the
enrollment limitations discussed above.
Accordingly, those applicants with less than an overall 2.5
grade point average or less than a 2.7average in calculus and
physics (with calculus) lecture courses will ordinarily not be
admitted. Regardless of the number of openings available,
those applicants with an overall 2.7 grade point average and
with a 3.0 average in both calculus and physics (with calcu-
lus) lecture course ses will ordinarily be admitted. These admis-
sion standards will be lowered if there are more openings
than usual.
Once admitted to the program, an electrical engineering
student shall maintainsatisfactory progress generally C or
better in gll required courses-and an overall grade point av-
erage of 2.0 or higher. In particular, an electrical engineering
student cannot take an electrical engineering course without
having earned a minimum grade of C in the prerequisite
electrical engineering courses.
In addition to the other requirements for a B.S.E.E., a stu-
dent must have at least a 2.0 grade point average in all elec-
trical engineering courses taken, both required and elective.
If a course is repeated, both grades count in this grade point
average.



CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The curriculum in electrical engineering requires comple-
tion of the following program in addition to the freshman-
sophomore requirements.
Pre-Engineering Program ...................................... ............... 60
Upper Level Program Credits
EEL 3111 Circuits 1. ................................................ .......... 3
EEL 3112C Circuits 2 ................................................ ......... 4
EEL 3304 Electronic Circuits ................................................... 4
EEL 3396 Solid-State Electronic Devices ............................... 3
EEL 3135 Signals and System s .................................. .......... .. 3
EEL 3472 Electromagnetic Fields and Applications 1 .......... 3
EEL 3701C Introduction to Computer Engineering ............. 4
EEL 3211 Basic Electric Energy Engineering ......................... 3
EEL 4514 Communication Systems and Components ......... 3
EEL 4657 Linear Control Systems .......................................... 3
At least four of the five following laboratories must be taken:
EEL 3303L, 4201L, 4304L, 4514L, 4914L
Electrical Engineering Laboratories ......................... .... 4
Mathematics or Statistics Elective ....................................... 3
*EM L 3100 Thermodynamics ................................. ............ 3
*EGM 3511 Statics ................................ ....................... 3
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business
Com m unication .......................... .... ........... ................. 2
**Technical Electives ........................................................................... 21
Nontechnical Electives ...................................... ............... 4
Free Electives .................................... .............................. 2
Total Credits Required 135
*May substitute other courses from an approved list, copies
of which may be obtained from the Electrical Engineering
Departmental Office in LAR 216.


**Must include at least 12 hours of electrical engineering elec-
tives.


ENGINEERING SCIENCES
The Department of Engineering Sciences offers bachelor's
degree programs in Aerospace Engineering and in Engineer-
ing Science. At the graduate level it offers programs leading
to master's degrees and the Engineer degree in Aerospace
Engineering, in Engineering Mechanics, and in Engineering
Science. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in Aero-
space Engineering and in Engineering Mechanics, with spe-
cialized tracks in the latter discipline in engineering analysis
and applied mathematics and in theoretical and applied me-
chanics, and coastal and oceanographic engineering.
The department is committed to excellence in both teach-
ing and research. Through active and diverse research pro-
grams, the professional competence of the faculty is main-
tained and both undergraduate and graduate students have
opportunities to participate in exciting programs dealing
with problems at the forefront of science, technology, and
societal needs.
Admission Requirements: The baccalaureate programs,
both in Aerospace Engineering and in Engineering Science,
are selective admission programs. Admission decisions are
made by a faculty committee according to the following
criteria:
1. Students making normal progress toward completion of
pre-engineering prerequisite courses and who have
earned an overall grade point average of 2.7 or higher will
ordinarily be admitted; those with 2.3 and lower will or-
dinarily not be admitted.
2. The admissions committee will consider the following
additional factors in reaching its final decision: per-
formance in calculus, physics, and chemistry courses com-
pleted, and other evidence of motivation .and suitability
for a career in Engineering Science or Aerospace Engineer-
ing, as appropriate, including performance in relevant
work experience.
These criteria are applicable to all students, independent
of the location of their lower division work.
Aerospace Engineering Program: See alphabetical listing
of degree programs under College of Engineering section for
details of the curriculum.


UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN
ENGINEERING SCIENCE
Engineering Science is a fully accredited Engineering de-
gree program providing a broad, strong foundation fouat in math-
ematics, science and engineering, coupled with unusual
flexibility to create individualized, nontraditional, nonio areas of
emphasis or concentration. The program is intended for
good students who wish to design personalized curricula
satisfying special interests and objectives. Commonly, these
students are seeking a program emphasizing:
combinations of conventional disciplines,
Sa particularly broad foundation for graduate study in a
chosen field,
preparation for professional schools such as medicine,
law or management,
new, uncommon or recently significant areas of study
which do not fit well within traditional curricula.
The Engineering Science program accommodates this
wide range of objectives by providing a large selection of
elective courses. Students and their advisors cooperate in
choosing these electives to custom design curricula to fit in-
dividual interests and educational goals. The number of pos-
sible areas of concentration is almost limitless and new con-
centrations are continually being created by students. Re-
cently designed concentrations include:
Applied Mathematics and Computer Science
Applied Physics
Automation and Manufacturing Systems





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Avionics
Biomechanics
Biomedical Engineering :
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Composite Materials
Control of Dynamical Systems
Creative Product Design
Optics and Lasers
Environmental Engineering
Energy Management and Planning
Experimental Mechanics
S-Fluid Mechanics
Hospital Administration
Instrumentation of Mechanical Systems
Operations Research
Pre-dental
Pre-law
Pre-medical
Regulatory and Consumer Protection
SStructural Mechanics
Technical Management
Wave Propagation
Wind Engineering
These concentrations illustrate the broad spectrum of
study areas which may be followed within the framework of
this program. You may choose,any of these areas or build a
coherent program in some other area to meet your individ-
ual objective. Our advisers will guide you in designing your
program. The Engineering Science Program requires a mini-
mum of 135 credits and, for most students, at least nine
semesters of residence. A sample term-by-term schedule is
available on request.
Because of the individualized nature of the Engineering
Science program it is recommended that students contact
the Department of Engineering Sciences as early as possible.
For additional information about any of the concentrations
listed or to investigate creating your own, write, phone or
visit the Department.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
(ENGINEERING SCIENCE)
Courses Credits
ENGLISH, HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES
*English ............................................................. ............... 6
*Humanities .................................. .... ............ ........ 9
*Social Sciences ........................................................ ...... 6
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business
Com m unication ................................................ ................ 2
ANALYTICAL AND DESIGN TOOLS
*MAC 3311 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1 .................... 4
*MAC 3312 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 2 ..................... 4
*MAC 3313 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 3 ................ 4
*EGM 3311 Intro. to Engineering Analysis ............................... 3
EGM 4312 Engineering Analysis-Field Theory ................ ...... 4
EGM 4313 Engineering Analysis-Differential
Eq uations ..................................................................... 4...........4
EGM 4344 Intro. to Numerical Methods of Engineering
A analysis .......................................................... ............. 3
*EGN 1111 Engineering Graphics ;............... : ................... 2
*COP 3212 Computer Programming for Engineers ............ 2
Statistics Elective .............................. ............................... ... 3
BASICSCIENCE
*CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C General Chemistry ........................ 8
(or CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L, 2043C)
*Biological Science .................................. ............ ................ 3
*PHY 3048 Physics with Calculus 1 ............................................ 3
*PHY 3055L Lab for 3048 ....................................... .............. 1
*PHY 3049 Physics with Calculus 2 ..... .;.......................... 3
*PHY 3056L Lab for PHY 3049 ................................................... 1
PHY 3123 M odern Physics 1 ..................................................... 3
ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND DESIGN
EAS 4412 Synthesis of Guidance and Control Systems .......... 3


EAS 4803 Instrumentation System Synthesis .......................... 3
**EEL 3003 Elements of Electrical Engineering .......................... 3
**EEL 3303L Electronics Laboratory 1 ......................................... 1
***EGM 3420 Engineering Mechanics .......................................... 4
(or EGM 3511 and EGM 3400)
EGM 3520 Mechanics of Materials ................................ 3
EGM 4000 Engineering Design 1 ........................................... 3
EGM 4001 Engineering Design 2 ............................................... 3
EGM 4008 Intro. to Engineering Optics .................................... 3
EGN 3353 Fluid M echanics ................................................ 3
EM A 3010C M materials 1 ............................................................. 3
Therm odynam ics Elective ......................................................... 3
****General Electives ........................... .............. ............ .... 22

Total 135
*Pre-engineering Program Requirements
**May be replaced by EEL 3111 and EEL 3112 by students
whose career goals require more intensive EEL preparation.
***A minimum grade of'C' in either EGM 3420 or EGM 3511 is
required.
****General electives shall include at least 3 credits of
humanistic/social science, and at least 10 credits of
engineering-related courses. Subject to these restrictions,
the student may choose electives from throughout the Uni-
versity, provided they form a coherent group of courses
directed toward a clearly defined objective and are ap-
proved by the student's departmental counselor.

ENVIRONMENTAL
ENGINEERING SCIENCES
Environmental Engineering Sciences is a rapidly develop-
ing field in which the application of engineering and scien-
tific principles is used to protect and preserve human health
and well-being through the control of the environment. In-
itially concerned only with water resources and the treat-
ment or protection of drinking water supplies, the field first
became known as Sanitary Engineering. Now, since it em-
braces the broad field of the general environment, including
air, food, shelter, radiological health, transportation and ac-
cident prevention as well as water, the term Environmental
Engineering Sciences is preferred.
During recent years, there has been such an un-
precedented demand for environmental engineers that
there are many more positions open than there are properly
qualified graduates to fill them. It has been estimated that
the number of environmental engineers employed in health
departments alone will have to be more than doubled to
supply the present need. Increasing activities in many appli-
cations of nuclear energy are likewise demanding individ-
uals with special training in environmental control. Hazards
and wastes from research, reactor operation, radiological
procedures and tracer techniques are problems which are
properly the concern of these specialists and require more
qualified persons than are presently available.
Water resources are under constant threat of pollution
from the sewage of an ever expanding population and from
the multitude of new chemicals being developed by our
technological society. Handling and disposing of toxic
wastes has become one of the most critical problems facing
environmental engineers today, and unfortunately, there is a
severe shortage of specialists trained in this field.
The growing importance of atmospheric pollution prob-
lems has led many industries to give increased attention to
this phase of waste disposal. Graduates from Environmental
Engineering Sciences programs are being called upon by in-
dustry to apply their special knowledge in conducting sur-
veys and formulating abatement programs which will not
merely transfer the pollution from the air to other areas of
the environment.
The reasons for this expanding field of opportunity are
due largely to the impact of advancing technology on
modern community living. With each new development
there has been a period of transition during which the pollu-
tion control specialist has been called upon to broaden ac-
tivities to keep pace with progress and new developments in
environmental protection and public health.







COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


This process of evolution has manifested itself in so many
different aspects of environmental concern that environ-
mental engineering has become one of the broadest and
most challenging of all careers. Advances in technology
create more demands for environmental engineers Every
new manufacturing plant, every new chemical industry, new
improvements in nuclear science and in transportation all
increase the number and magnitude of problems'for these
specialists to solve.
It is becoming increasingly apparent that the environment
cannot be sectionalized, but rather, it must be viewed as one
continuous entity consisting of air, water, land, and people.
This ecological concept has given rise to a new approach to
environmental problems known as environmental systems
management or systems ecology. To function in this area, an
individual needs a broad background, not only in the basic
sciences and engineering but also in medical sciences, law,
economics, and political science. Students in other fields are
encouraged to join with the engineers in this program by
selecting environmental engineering sciences courses and,
when suitable, to undertake master's and doctoral research
at the interface between environmental engineering sci-
ences and their major field.
Historically, degree programs in Environmental Engineer-
ing Sciences have been at the graduate level. However, re-
sponding to the tremendous demand for people trained in
this field, the Department of Environmental Engineering Sci-
ences initiated an undergraduate degree in 1972. The re-
quirements for this degree, Bachelor of Science in Engineer-
ing (Environmental Engineering), are given below. In addi-
tion, the Department of Chemical Engineering, the Depart-
ment of Civil Engineering and the Department of Engineer-
ing Sciences permit their students to pursue technical con-
centration in Environmental Engineering Sciences. This is ac-
complished through the selection of appropriate technical
elective courses taught by the Department of Environmental
Engineering Sciences. Persons with pre-medical interests can
satisfy admission requirements for medical school with this
program and judicious selection of electives. Students from
other departments are also welcome to take courses in Envi-
ronmental Engineering Sciences to the extent allowed by
their backgrounds.
Degree Programs: The Department of Environmental Engi-
neering Sciences offers the following degrees: Bachelor of
Science in Engineering, Master of Engineering, Master of Sci-
ence, the Engineer Degree and Doctor of Philosophy.


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN ENGINEERING
(ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING)
The curriculum for the Bachelor of Science in Engineering
(Environmental Engineering) is as follows:
Required Courses Credits
Pre-Engineering Program .................................. ............. 57
BSC 2010 & 2011 Integ. Princ. of Biol I and II ...................... 8
EES 2001 Concepts of Environ. Engr. Sci ................. ......... 1
ENV 4404C Water Supply & Wastewater Removal ............ 3
ENV 4514C Treatment of Water and Wastewater .............. 3
EES 4004 Environmental Resources Management ................ 3
EM A 4001 M materials I ............................................................... 3
EEL 3003 Electrical Engineering ............................................. 3
EGN 3353 Fluid Mechanics (or ECI 3213
Hydrodynamics) ............................... ....... .......... 3 (4)
ENV 3420 (or EGM 3511 & EGM 3400)
Statics & Dynam ics .......................................................... 4 (5)
*EM L 3100 Thermodynamics I ................................................... 4
AEB 3103 Prin. of Food and Resource Economics ................... 3
STA 3032 Engineering Statistics .............................. 2
ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business
Com m unication .................................... ............. ................ 2
ENV 4104 Elements of Atmospheric Pollution ...................... 3
EES 3020 Comput. Methods in Env. Engr. Sci ....................... 3
EES 4101C Environmental Microbiology .............................:.... 3


ENV 4201 Introduction to Radiological Health .......................
EES4035 Environmental Instrumentation ............................ 2
Subtotal 114
Restricted Science and Engineering Electives (select 9 cred-
its)
Courses Credits
EES 4241C Introduction of Water Analysis ........................... 3
EES 5007C Ecological and General Systems .................:........... 4
EES 4401 Public Health Engineering .......................................... 3
ENV 4351 Solid Waste Management ...................................... 3
OCE 4016 Intro. to Coast. & Ocean. Engr ............................... 3
PCB 3043 Intro. to Ecology ........................................................ 3
GLY 2026 Geology for Engineers .......................................... 4
ECI 4137 Civil Engr. Project Cost Analysis ........................ 3
CHM 3200 O rganic Chem istry ................................................ 3
,PHY 3123 Modern Physics I ............................ 3
EGN 1111C Engineering Graphics ......... .......... ...... 2
EM L 4416 Solar Energy ................................... ................. 3
*XXX YYYY Undesignated Technical Elective ........................... 3
9
Restricted Engineering Design Electives (select 9 credits)
Courses Credits
ENV 4431 Sewerage System Design .......................................... 3
ENV 4432 Potable Water System Design ............................... 3
ENV 4408 Water Treatment Process Design .......................... 3
ECI 4214 Hydraulics and Water Resources Engr .................... 3
ENV 4021C Basic Concepts of Water & Wastewater Treat. ... 4
*XXX YYYY Undesignated Desigr, Elective ............................. 6
9
**Non-Technical Electives ....................... ......... .............. 6

Total Semester Hours 138
*Approval by Advisor Required
**At Least 3 Credits of the General Electives must be in a
Socio-Humanistic Area.
The Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences re-
quires a C or better grade in all courses with ENV and EES
prefixes.
This program has been accredited by the Accreditation
Board for Engineering and Technology.


INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS
ENGINEERING
Rapid industrial growth has created unusual opportunities
for the industrial and systems engineer. The advent of auto-
mation and the emphasis on increased productivity coupled
with higher levels of systems, sophistication are providing
impetus to the demand for the engineering graduate with a
broad interdisciplinary background.
The industrial engineering option prepares the student for
industrial practice in such areas as product design, process
design, plant operation, production control, quality control,
facilities planning, work system analysis and evaluation, and
economic analysis of operational systems.
The systems engineering option emphasizes the integra-
tion of knowledge and technology from the engineering, bi-
ological, and physical sciences to carry out the processes of
description, analysis, synthesis, and optimization in both the
industrial and non-industrial setting. Furthermore a student
in this area learns to define problems from a broad per-
spective in which the contributions of individual compo-
nents to a total mission are clearly seen.
Students in both options are trained to use engineering
principles in the solution of problems encountered in envi-
ronments and situations where a quantitative basis for de-
cision making is desirable. Such decision making requires
the application of the tools of economics, operations re-
search, statistics, mathematics, and engineering analysis,
with dependence on the computer. The industrial engineer-
ing option equips the student for professional engineering
practice while the systems engineering option further pre-





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


pares the student to carry out analysis and design of large
scale operations requiring diversified inputs. Both options
provide the training necessary for admission to.graduate
study.
Degree Programs: The Industrial and Systems Engineering
Department offers the following degrees: Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Industrial and Systems Engineering, Master of Engi-
neering, Master of Science, the Engineer Degree, and Doctor
of Philosophy.
Admission Requirements: The Department of Industrial
and Systems Engineering is a "selective admissions depart-
ment." A student should apply one term prior to the com-
pletion of those chemistry, physics, and calculus courses
which are part of the pre-engineering requirements. Stu-
dents with a 2.7 cumulative average as well as a 2.7
cumulative average in physics and calculus are usually as-
sured of admission. Those whose cumulative average and
average of the physics and calculus grades are below 2.4 will
usually be denied admission. In borderline cases grades in
required chemistry, computer programming, and differential
equations courses will also be taken into consideration.
Some students may be admitted on a probationary basis
which requires that they be placed on a "planned program."
Special Grade Requirements: A grade of C or better is to
be earned in each required statistics course and each re-
quired course taught by the Industrial and Systems Engineer-
ing Department in order for that course to count toward
graduation. Students earning less than a C grade in such a
course will be required to repeat the course as soon as pos-
sible. Note that statistics or departmental courses taken as
electives do not fall under this rule.
Departmental Probation Policy: The Department enforces
a probation policy which is more stringent than either that of
the University or the College. A student is automatically
placed on Departmental Probation when his/her Upper
Division Grade Point Deficit equals or exceeds the follow-
ing: 15 for 3EG students, 10 for 4EG students, and 5 for 5EG
students. A student who is on Departmental Probation at the
start of a term of attendance is expected to rectify this condi-
tion at the end of the same term. For additional details, con-
sult the Departmental Office.
Technical Electives: Normally technical elective credit is
restricted to approved courses in engineering, computer sci-
ence, mathematics, and statistics. Provision is also made for
receiving up to three credits for approved industrial em-
ployment, for certain sequence of courses taken as part of
advanced ROTC, and for certain approved business adminis-
tration courses.


CURRICULA LEADING TO THE
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS
ENGINEERING
This degree may be achieved through either (A) the In-
dustrial Engineering option, or (B) the Systems Engineering
option: The two curricula are presented below.
(A) INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING OPTION
(1) The following courses are normally taken as part of the
pre-engineering program:
English .......................................................... 6
(See approved list of general education requirements)
General Chem istry ............................................................ 8
(1) CHM 2042, 2042L, 2043C, or
(2) CHM 2040, 2041 concurrently with 2042L, 2043C
M them atics ................................................. ....................... 15
(1) MAC 3311, 3312, 3313, and
(2) MAP 3302 or EGM 3311
Physics w ith Calculus ............................ ...................... .... 8
PHY 3048, 3055L, 3049, 3056L
Com puter Program m ing .................................................. ...... 2
COP 3212

39


(2) The following courses may be taken at any time (subject
to prerequisite constraints) during the program:
H um anities .................................. ................... ............... 9
(See approved list of general education requirements and
those approved courses included in the Humanities Per-
spectives on the Professions)
Social Science ........................ ...... ................................ 6
(See approved list of general education requirements)
Biological Sciences ............................... ....................... 3
(See approved list of general education requirements)
Accounting ...................................... .................... 3
ACC 2001
Graphics ......... .......................... 2
EGN 1111
Physical Education ............................................................ 0
Num erical M ethods ............................................. .............. 2
CNM 3100

25
(3) Most of the following required courses are normally
taken after admission to the Department:
Statistics ..................................... ..................... 6
STA 4321, 4322
M echanics ............................... ........................... 7
(1) EGM 3420, 3520, or
(2) EGM 3511, 3400, 3520
Electrical Engineering ......................... ........... .............. 3
(1) EEL 3111, or
(2) EEL 3003
Thermodynamics .................................... ...................... 3
EML 3100
M materials ......................................... .............................. .. 3
EMA 3010C
Technical Writing and Business Communication .............. 2
ENC 3213
Microeconomics .................................. ....................... 3
(1) AEB 3103, or ECO 4101
(2) Counselor-approved substitute in microeconomics
Technical Electives .................................................... 12
Counselor-approved courses which must include at least
one of the following:
(1) ESI 4161C Industrial Applications of
M icroprocessors ............................................. ............... 3
(2) ESI 3123 Analog Computer Principles .................... '2
(3) ESI 3154C Process Control Computer
Program m ing ........................................ ................ ............... 3
(4) EEL 3701C Introduction to Computer Engineering ... 4
(5) Other departmentally approved courses.
Major Courses (Subject to prerequisite constraints these
courses are listed in the approximate order in which they
should be taken)
*ESI 4567 Matrix Methods in Systems Engineering ................. 3
*ESI 4221 Industrial Quality Control/............................ 3
*ESI 4568 Transform Methods in Systems Engineering ............ 3
*EIN 4354 Engineering Economy ................................................ 2
*ESI 4312,4313 Operations Research 1, 2 ................................. 6
*EIN 3314L Work Design and Human Factors ......................... 3
*EIN 4365 Facilities Planning and Materials Handling ............. 3
*ESI 4523 Industrial Systems Simulation .................................. 3
*EIN 4333 Production and Inventory Control ......................... 4
*EIN 4335 Production Systems Analysis and Design ............... 3

72
Total 136
(B) SYSTEMS ENGINEERING OPTION
The curriculum for this option may be obtained from the
Industrial Engineering option by deletion of:
1) ACC 2001 ............................... ......... ............. ............. 3
2) EG M 3520 ...............:.............................. .................... 3
3) AEB 3103 (or its approved substitute) ........................ 3
4) EIN 4365 .......................... ..... ........................... 3

12
followed by the addition of:
1) EEL 4657 Linear Contr9l Systems .................................. 3
2) Another counselor-approved EEL course ................... 3




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