• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Correspondence directory
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Officers of administration
 Critical dates for graduate...
 University calendar
 General information
 Fields of instruction
 Graduate faculty
 Index
 Back Matter
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00016
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Correspondence directory
        Correspondence directory
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Officers of administration
        Page iv
    Critical dates for graduate students
        Page v
    University calendar
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        The Graduate School
            Page 3
        Graduate degrees and programs
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Admission to the graduate school
            Page 5
            Page 6
        General regulations
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Requirements for Master's degrees
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
        Requirements for the degree of Engineer
            Page 15
        Requirements for the Ed.S. and Ed.D.
            Page 16
        Requirements for the Ph.D.
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
        Expenses
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
        Housing
            Page 23
        Financial aid
            Page 24
            Page 25
        Special facilities and programs
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
        Student services
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
    Fields of instruction
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        School of accounting
            Page 44
        Center for African Studies
            Page 45
        Agricultural and extension education
            Page 45
        Agricultural engineering
            Page 46
        Agronomy
            Page 47
        Anatomy
            Page 47
        Animal science
            Page 48
        Anthropology
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Architecture
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Art
            Page 53
        Astronomy
            Page 53
        Biochemistry and molecular biology
            Page 54
        Botany
            Page 55
            Page 56
        School of Building Construction
            Page 57
        Business administration
            Page 57
        Chemical engineering
            Page 58
            Page 59
        Chemistry
            Page 60
            Page 61
        Civil engineering
            Page 62
            Page 63
        Classics
            Page 64
        Clinical psychology
            Page 64
        Coastal and oceanographic engineering
            Page 65
        Communicative disorders
            Page 66
        Computer and information sciences
            Page 66
        Counselor education
            Page 67
        Division of curriculum and instruction
            Page 68
        Dairy science
            Page 69
        Economics
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
        Educational administration and supervision
            Page 72
        Electrical engineering
            Page 73
            Page 74
        Engineering sciences
            Page 75
            Page 76
        English
            Page 77
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 78
        Environmental engineering sciences
            Page 79
            Page 80
        Finance and insurance
            Page 81
        Food and resource economics
            Page 81
        Food science and human nutrition
            Page 82
        School of forest resources and conservation
            Page 83
        Foundations of education
            Page 84
            Page 85
        General teacher education
            Page 86
        Geography
            Page 87
        Geology
            Page 88
        Germanic and slavic languages and literatures
            Page 89
        Center for Gerontological Studies
            Page 90
        Health and hospital administration
            Page 90
        Health education and safety
            Page 91
        Health related professions
            Page 91
        History
            Page 91
        Horticultural science
            Page 92
        Immunology and medical microbiology
            Page 93
        Industrial and systems engineering
            Page 94
            Page 95
        Instructional leadership and support
            Page 96
            Page 97
        Journalism and communications
            Page 98
        Center for Latin American studies
            Page 99
        Liberal arts and sciences
            Page 100
        Linguistics
            Page 100
        Management and administrative sciences
            Page 100
        Marketing
            Page 101
        Materials science and engineering
            Page 102
        Mathematics
            Page 103
            Page 104
        Mechanical engineering
            Page 105
        Medical sciences
            Page 106
        Medicinal chemistry
            Page 107
        Microbiology and cell science
            Page 107
        Music
            Page 108
        Neuroscience
            Page 109
        Nuclear engineering sciences
            Page 110
            Page 111
        Nursing
            Page 112
        Occupational therapy
            Page 113
        Pathology
            Page 113
        Pharmacology and therapeutics
            Page 114
        Pharmacy
            Page 115
        Philosophy
            Page 115
        Physics
            Page 116
            Page 117
        Physiology
            Page 118
        Plant pathology
            Page 118
        Political science
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Poultry science
            Page 121
        Professional physical education
            Page 121
        Psychology
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
        Real estate and urban analysis
            Page 125
        Rehabilitation counseling
            Page 125
        Religion
            Page 126
        Romance languages and literatures
            Page 126
        Sociology
            Page 127
        Soil science
            Page 128
        Special education
            Page 128
            Page 129
        Speech
            Page 130
            Page 131
        Statistics
            Page 132
        Subject specialization teacher education
            Page 133
            Page 134
        Taxation
            Page 135
        Theatre
            Page 136
        Urban and regional planning
            Page 137
        College of veterinary medicine
            Page 138
        Zoology
            Page 139
            Page 140
    Graduate faculty
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
    Index
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    Back Matter
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Back Cover
        Page 170
Full Text
























































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242





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Sols













CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY



Graduate School
223 Grinter Hall-(904)392-4646 'Ed LIB S
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 LIBI IS
UNIVERSITYY of FLOFIlDAA
Application for Admission
Office of the Registrar-Admissions Section
135 Tigert Hall-(904)392-1365

Assistantships
Chairman of the department in which the student
wishes to enroll

Graduate Student Loans
Director, Student Financial Affairs
111 Anderson Hall-(904)392-1275

Housing
University or Off-Campus
Division of Housing-(904)392-2161
S.W. 13th St. & Museum Road

International Student Advisement
Adviser, International Students
International Student Center
Gainesville, Florida-(904)392-1345




The University of Florida does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national or ethnic origin, handi-
cap, or sex, in the administration of educational policies, admission policies, financial aid, employment, or any
other University program or activity.



This public document was promulgated at a total cost of $17,702.24 or $.885 per copy to provide official in-
formation describing the Graduate Program at the University of Florida, including admission requirements,
facilities, fees, fields of instruction and course listing.



This publication has been adopted as a rule of the University pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 120 of the Flor-
ida Statute. Addenda to the University Record Series, if any, are available upon request to the Office of the Regis-
trar.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RECORD
Vol. LXXVI Series 1, No. 1 December 1980
THE UNIVERSITY RECORD PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
ZIP CODE 32611 OFFICE OF PUBLICATIONS, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 0 SECOND CLASS POSTAGE (652 760)
PAID AT GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA, 32601




U. OF F. LIBRARIES


GRADUATE CATALOG


university record of the
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
gainesville 1981/1982





























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TABLE OF CONTENTS








OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION ............................................ iv
CRITICAL DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ................... v
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR ...................................... ............ v
GENERAL INFORMATION .................................... ............ 3
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL .............................................. 3
GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS ........................... 3
Nonthesis Degrees ........................................ .............. 3
Thesis Degrees .............................................................. 4
ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ..................... 5
GENERAL REGULATIONS .................................. ............ 7
REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES ........................ 9
REQUIREMENTS FOR ENGINEER DEGREE ..................... 15
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ED.S. AND ED.D ................. 16
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. ........................................ 17
EXPENSES ................................................. ....................... 20
HO USING .................................. ............ .......... ........... 23
FINANCIAL AID ............................................. ........... .... 24
SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS .......................... 26
Research and Teaching Facilities ...................................... 26
Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies Programs ................. 28
Research Organizations .................................. ............ 32
Interdisciplinary Research Centers ................................... 34
STUDENT SERVICES ......................................... ........... .. 38
FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION .................................. ............ 43
COLLEGES AND AREAS OF INSTRUCTION, INDEXED
BY CO LLEGE ..................................................................... 43
FIELD OF INSTRUCTION, ALPHABETICALLY LISTED ...... 44
GRADUATE FACULTY ............................................................ 141
IN D EX ..................................................................................... 165









OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


BOB GRAHAM
Governor


FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
GEORGE FIRESTONE RALPH D. TURLINGTON
Secretary of State Commissioner of Education


WAYNE MIXSON
Lieutenant Governor


C. DUBOSE AUSLEY
Chairman, Tallahassee

BETTY ANNE STATON
Vice Chairman, Orlando


JAMES C. SMITH
Attorney General

BILL GUNTER
State Treasurer


BOARD OF REGENTS OF FLORIDA
MARSHALL M. CRISER
Palm Beach

J. i. DANIEL
Jacksonville

MURRAY H. DUBBIN
Miami

JAMES J. GARDENER
Fort Lauderdale

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
BARBARA NEWELL
Chancellor


GERALD LEWIS
Comptroller

DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture


WILLIAM L. MALOY
Pensacola

JACK MCGRIFF
Gainesville

GERALD SANCHEZ
Student

T. TERRELL SESSUMS
Tampa


UNIVERSITY

ADMINISTRATION

ROBERT QUARLES MARSTON, M.D., B.Sc. (Oxonian), D.Sc.,
President of the University
JOHN A. NATTRESS, D.E., Executive Vice President
DON L. ALLEN, D.D.S., Dean, College of Dentistry
EMERSON L. BESCH, Ph.D., Acting Dean, College of Veterinary
Medicine
CLIFFORD ALLBN BOYD, Ed.D., Dean, College of Physical Education,
Health, and Recreation
BRISBANE, H. BROWN, JR., Ph.D., Director, School of Building
Construction
ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic
Affairs
WAYNE H. CHEN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Engineering, and Director,
Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station
WILLIAM B. DEAL, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Vice President for Clinical
Affairs, and Dean, College of Medicine
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S., Vice President for Administrative
Affairs
KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER, Ph.D., Acting Vice President for
Health Affairs
RICHARD GUTEKUNST, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health Related
Professions
GUSTAVE ADOLPHUS HARRER, Ph.D., Director, University Libraries
GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D., Associate Vice President for Academic
Affairs
E. L. ROY HUNT, LL.M., Acting Dean, College of Law
MARK T. JAROSZEWICZ, M.A.U.D., Dean, College of Architecture
F. WAYNE KING, Ph.D., Director, Florida State Museum
JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D., Dean, Academic Affairs for Continruing
Education
ROBERT FRANKLIN LANZILLOTTI, Ph.D., Dean, College of Business
Administration
RALPH L. LOWENSTEIN, Ph.D., Dean, College of ournalism and
Communications
ARNETT C. MACE, IR., Ph.D., Director, School of Forest Resources
and Conservation
LOIS MALASANOS, Ph.D., Dean, Collegeof Nursing
IOSEPH I. SABATELLA, M.F.A., Dean, College of Fine Arts
HELEN I. SAFA, Ph.D., Director, Center for Latin American Studies
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D., Vice President forStudent Affairs
HADLEY P. SCHAEFER, Ph.D., Director, School of Accounting
MICHAEL A. SCHWARTZ, Ph.D., Dean, College of Pharmacy
CHARLES F. SIDMAN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences


OF FLORIDA
DAVID C. SMITH, Ph.D., Dean, College of Education
FRANCIS G. STEHLI, Ph.D., Dean for Graduate Studies and Research
KENNETH RAY TEFERTILLER, Ph.D., Vice President for Agricultural
SAffairs
J. ARDENE WIGGINS, B.S.)., Vice President for Development and
Alumni Affairs
FRANCIS A. WOOD, Ph.D., Dean for Research, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences
GERALD L. ZACHARIAH, Ph.D., Dean for Resident Instruction,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
FRANCIS G. STEHLI, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean for Graduate Studies
and Research and Professor of Geology
LINTON E. GRINTER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Dean Emeritus, Graduate
School, and Professor of Engineering
F. MICHAEL WAHL, Ph.D. (Illinois), Associate Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research and Professor of Geology.
MADELYN M. LOCKHART, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Dean for
Graduate Studies, and Professor of Economics
JIMMY C. PERKINS, B.S. (Alabama College), Assistant to the Dean for
Graduate Studies and Research
THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
FRANCIS G. STEHLI (Chairman), Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean for Gradu-
ate Studies and Research and Professor of Geology
RICHARD P. BOYCE, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology
SIDNEY CASSIN, Ph.D. (Texas), Professor of Physiology
ALFRED B. CLUBOK, Ph.D. (Michigan), Chairman and Professor of
Political Science
WILLIAM R. DOLBIER, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Chemistry
KATHERINE C. EWEL, Ph.D. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Forest
Resources and Conservation
DAVID H. HUBBELL, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Professor of Soil Science
C. ARNOLD MATTHEWS, Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Dean, Business
Administration, and Professor of Finance
JOHN E. MOORE, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Professor of Animal Science
MIHRAN JACOB OHANIAN, Ph.D. (Rensselaer), Associate Dean for
Research, College of Engineering; Associate Director, Engineering
and Industrial Experiment Station; and Professor of-Nuclear Engineer-
ing Sciences
MARVIN E. SHAW, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Psychology
DELBERT TESAR, Ph.D. (Georgia Tech), Professor of Mechanical Engi-
neering
CHRISTIAN W. ZAUNER, Ph.D. (Southern Illinois), Professor of Phys-
ical Education, Health, and Recreation







CRITICAL DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


DEADLINE DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


SUMMER QUARTER 1981
University Dates
Admission Application ........................................... May 1
Classes Begin ................................................................. June 22
Late Registration ................... ....................... June 19-24
Admission to Candidacy
for Master's Degrees .................................................. June 5
Midpoint of Quarter ..................................................... July 15
Classes End ................................ .......................... July 31
Commencement ......................................................... August 8
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation ............................. ............... ............. uly 6
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ........... ........................ July 27
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form ....................................... August 3
GSFLT and GRE Test Dates
GRE Application .............................................................. May 8
GRE Examination............................................................. une 13
GSFLT Examination .................................................. June 20



FALL SEMESTER 1981
University Dates
Admission Application ................................. ........... May 1
Classes Begin .................................. ......... August 24
Late Registration ................................... .......... August 21-28
Admission to Candidacy
for Master's Degrees ............................................. July 31
Midpoint of Semester ............................................. October 20
Classes End ........................................ ........... Decem ber 11
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation .................................................. October 26
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ............................... November 25
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form .................................... December 14
GSFLT and GRE Test Dates
GRE Examination ............................... ........... October *
December *
GSFLT Examination .................................................. October 17


SPRING SEMESTER 1982
University Dates
Admission Application ....................................... November 6
Classes Begin .............................................................. January 7
Late Registration .................................................. January 7-13
Admission to Candidacy
for Master's Degrees ............................... December 11
Midpoint of Semester ...................................... .... March 8
Classes End ............................ ........... April 23
Commencement ..................................... May 1
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation ..................... ........ .......................... March 15
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ............................................... April 14
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form ................................................. April 26
GSFLT and GRE Test.Dates
GRE Examination ....................................... ........... January *
February *
GSFLT Examination .............................................. February 20

SUMMER TERM A
University Dates
Admission Application ............................................... March 12
Classes Begin ................................................................. M ay 10
Late Registration ........................................................ May 7-12
Admission to Candidacy for
Master's Degrees (A&B) ......................................... April 23
Classes End ............................. ................................... June 16

SUMMER TERM B
University Dates
Admission Application ...................................... .... April 30
Classes Begin ................................................................. June 28
Late Registration ...................................................... June 25-30
Midpoint of Summer Terms ............................................ July 1
Classes End .................................................................. August 4
Commencement (A&B) .............................................. August 7
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation (A&B) ................................ .......... July 6
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form (A&B) .................................... July 21
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form (A&B) ................................ August 2
-GSFLT and GRE Test Dates
GRE Examination ............................................................ June *
GSFLT Examination ................................................... June 19


*GRE dates were not available at printing-time. These dates will be available in the Graduate School in mid-summer 1961.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


SUMMER QUARTER
1981
May 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance at the Univer-
sity of Florida to'file application for admission for Summer
Quarter, and for those previously in attendance to apply
for registration appointments.
June 5, Friday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day to file application for Admission to Candidacy for a
master's degree to be conferred at end of Summer Quarter.
Last day to request transfer of credit for summer candidates
for degrees.
Last day for those whose applications were filed by the above
deadline to clear admissions. All credentials must have
been received and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
'June 13, Saturday, 900 a.m.
Graduate Record Examination.


June 17-18, Wednesday-Thursday
Registration (including payment of fees) according to as-
signed appointments. No one permitted to start regular reg-
istration after 3:00 p.m., Thursday, June 18.
June 19, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
June 20, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT)
in French, German, and Spanish.
June 22, Monday
Classes begin.
June 24, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Quarter.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections.
June 25, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
Last day to pay fees without being subject to late registration
fee.







CRITICAL DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


DEADLINE DATES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


SUMMER QUARTER 1981
University Dates
Admission Application ........................................... May 1
Classes Begin ................................................................. June 22
Late Registration ................... ....................... June 19-24
Admission to Candidacy
for Master's Degrees .................................................. June 5
Midpoint of Quarter ..................................................... July 15
Classes End ................................ .......................... July 31
Commencement ......................................................... August 8
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation ............................. ............... ............. uly 6
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ........... ........................ July 27
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form ....................................... August 3
GSFLT and GRE Test Dates
GRE Application .............................................................. May 8
GRE Examination............................................................. une 13
GSFLT Examination .................................................. June 20



FALL SEMESTER 1981
University Dates
Admission Application ................................. ........... May 1
Classes Begin .................................. ......... August 24
Late Registration ................................... .......... August 21-28
Admission to Candidacy
for Master's Degrees ............................................. July 31
Midpoint of Semester ............................................. October 20
Classes End ........................................ ........... Decem ber 11
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation .................................................. October 26
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ............................... November 25
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form .................................... December 14
GSFLT and GRE Test Dates
GRE Examination ............................... ........... October *
December *
GSFLT Examination .................................................. October 17


SPRING SEMESTER 1982
University Dates
Admission Application ....................................... November 6
Classes Begin .............................................................. January 7
Late Registration .................................................. January 7-13
Admission to Candidacy
for Master's Degrees ............................... December 11
Midpoint of Semester ...................................... .... March 8
Classes End ............................ ........... April 23
Commencement ..................................... May 1
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation ..................... ........ .......................... March 15
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form ............................................... April 14
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form ................................................. April 26
GSFLT and GRE Test.Dates
GRE Examination ....................................... ........... January *
February *
GSFLT Examination .............................................. February 20

SUMMER TERM A
University Dates
Admission Application ............................................... March 12
Classes Begin ................................................................. M ay 10
Late Registration ........................................................ May 7-12
Admission to Candidacy for
Master's Degrees (A&B) ......................................... April 23
Classes End ............................. ................................... June 16

SUMMER TERM B
University Dates
Admission Application ...................................... .... April 30
Classes Begin ................................................................. June 28
Late Registration ...................................................... June 25-30
Midpoint of Summer Terms ............................................ July 1
Classes End .................................................................. August 4
Commencement (A&B) .............................................. August 7
Thesis and Dissertation
First Submission of
Dissertation (A&B) ................................ .......... July 6
Submit Signed Original Thesis
and Final Exam Form (A&B) .................................... July 21
Submit Signed Dissertation
and Final Exam Form (A&B) ................................ August 2
-GSFLT and GRE Test Dates
GRE Examination ............................................................ June *
GSFLT Examination ................................................... June 19


*GRE dates were not available at printing-time. These dates will be available in the Graduate School in mid-summer 1961.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CALENDAR


SUMMER QUARTER
1981
May 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance at the Univer-
sity of Florida to'file application for admission for Summer
Quarter, and for those previously in attendance to apply
for registration appointments.
June 5, Friday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day to file application for Admission to Candidacy for a
master's degree to be conferred at end of Summer Quarter.
Last day to request transfer of credit for summer candidates
for degrees.
Last day for those whose applications were filed by the above
deadline to clear admissions. All credentials must have
been received and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
'June 13, Saturday, 900 a.m.
Graduate Record Examination.


June 17-18, Wednesday-Thursday
Registration (including payment of fees) according to as-
signed appointments. No one permitted to start regular reg-
istration after 3:00 p.m., Thursday, June 18.
June 19, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. All students regis-
tering late subject to $25 late fee.
June 20, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT)
in French, German, and Spanish.
June 22, Monday
Classes begin.
June 24, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Quarter.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections.
June 25, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
Last day to pay fees without being subject to late registration
fee.







CALENDAR


June 26, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for degree to be con-
ferred at end of Summer Quarter.
July 2, Thursday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to file application with Registrar's Office to change
college gr major department for-the Fall Semester.
July 3, Friday-Independence Day Holiday
Classes suspended.
July 6, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file disserta-
tions, fee receipts forlibrary hardbinding and microfilming,
and all doctoral forms with the Graduate School.
July 15, Wednesday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying exami-
nations.
July 17, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
Last day to withdraw without receiving failing grades in all
courses.
July 27, Monday, 4-00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of master's theses,
Final Examination Reports, abstracts, and binding fee re-
ceipts to Graduate School.
July 31, Friday
All classes end.
August 3, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of dissertations and
Final Examination Reports to 274 GRI.
Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees due in 288
GRI.
Final Examinations begin.
August 6, Thursday, 1000 a.m.
Grades for degree candidates due in Registrar's Office.
August 7, Friday, 1000 a.m.
Report of. colleges on candidates for degrees due in Graduate
School.
August 8, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.


FALL SEMESTER

1981


May 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for currently enrolled students to file application at
the Registrar's Office for admission to Graduate School.
June.26, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance at the Univer-
sity of Florida to file application for admission for Fall
Semester, and for those previously in attendance to apply
for registration appointments.
July 10, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those whose applications were filed by above
deadline to clear admissions. All credentials must have
been received and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
July 31, Friday, 4,00 p.m.
Last day to file application for Admission to Candidacy for
master's degree to be conferred at the end of Fall Semester.
Last day to request transfer of credit for fall candidates for de-
grees.


August 17-20, Monday-Thursday
Registration (including payment of fees) according to as-
signed appointments. No one permitted to start regular reg-
istration after 3:00 p.m., Thursday, August 20.

August 21, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. Students subject
to late registration fee.

August 24, Monday
Classes begin.

August 28, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections.
August 31, Monday, 2:30 p.m.
Last day to pay fees without being subject to late fee.
September 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for degree to be con-
ferred at end of Fall Semester.
September 18, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
Last day to file application with Registrars Office to chahg
college or major department for Spring Semester.
October 16-17, Friday-Saturday
Homecoming. All classes suspended Friday.
October 17, Saturday, 9:00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT)
in French, German, and Spanish.
October 20, Tuesday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying exami-
nation.
October 26, Monday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file disserta-
tions, fee receipts for library hardbinding and microfilming,
and all doctoral forms with the Graduate Schol.
November 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for currently enrolled students to file application at
Registrar's Office for admission to Graduate School.
November 11, Wednesday
Veterans Day. All classes suspended.
November 25, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of master's theses,
Final Examination Reports, abstracts, and binding fee re-
ceipts to Graduate School.
Last day to. withdraw without receiving failing grades in all
courses
November 26-27, Thursday-Friday
Thanksgiving. Classes suspended 10:00 p.m., November 25.
December 11, Friday
All classes end.
December 12, Saturday
Final Examinations begin.
December 14, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of dissertations and
Final Examination Reports to 274 GRI.
Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees due in 288
GRI.
December 17,Thursday, 1000 a.m.
Grades for degree candidates due in Registrar's Office.
December 18, Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Report of colleges on candidates for degrees due in Graduate
School Office.
December 19, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
December 21, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Fall Semester due in Registrar's Office







CALENDAR


SPRING SEMESTER

1981

November 6, Friday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance at the Univer-
sity of Florida to file application for admission for Spring
Semester, and for those previously in attendance to apply
for registration appointments.
December 4, Friday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day for those .whose applications were filed by above
deadline to clear admissions. All credentials must have
been received anrd college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
December 11, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to file application for Admission to Candidacy for a
master's degree to be conferred at end of Spring Semester.
Last day to request transfer of credit for spring candidates for
degrees.



1982.
January 4-5, Monday-Tuesday
Registration (including payment of fees) according to as-
signed appointments. No one permitted to start regular reg-
istration after 3:00 p.m., Tuesday, January 5.
January' 6, Wednesday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. Students subject
to late registration fee.
January 7, Thursday
Classes begin.
January 13, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections.
Last day for completing late registration.
January 14, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
Last day to pay fees without being subject to late fee.
January 20, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for degree to be con-
ferred at end of Spring Semester.
Last day to file application with Registrar's Office to change
college or major departments for next term.
February 4, Friday, 400 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
February 20, Saturday, 9.00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT)
in French, German, and Spanish.
March 4-5, Thursday-Friday
Spring Break. All classes suspended.
March 8, Monday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying exami-
nations.
March 12, Friday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day for currently enrolled students to file application at
Registrar's Office for admission to Graduate School for
Term A,
March 15, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file disserta-
tions, fee receipts for library hardbinding and microfilming,
and all doctoral forms with the Graduate School.
April 9, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to withdraw without receiving failing grades in all
courses.
April 14, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of master's theses,
Final Examination Reports, abstracts, and binding fee re-
ceipts to Graduate School.


April 23, Friday
All classes end.
April 24, Saturday
Final examinations begin.
April 26, Monday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of dissertations and
Final Examination Reports to 274 GRI.
Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees due in 280
GRI.
April 29, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.
Grades for 'degree candidates due in Registrar's Office.
April 30, Friday
Report of colleges on candidates for degrees due in Graduate
School Office by 1000 a.m.
Last day for currently enrolled students to file application at
Registrar's Office for admission to Graduate School for
Term B.
May 1, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
May 3, Monday, 9-00 a.m.
All grades for Spring Semester due in Registrar's Office.


SUMMER TERM A
1982
March 12, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance at the Univer-
sity of Florida to file application for admission for Summer
Term A, and for those previously in attendance to apply for
registration appointments.
April 16, Friday, 4.00 p.m.
Last day for those whose applications were filed by above
deadline to clear admissions. All credentials must have
been received and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
April 23, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to file application for Admission to Candidacy for a
master's degree to be conferred at Summer Commence-
ment Convocation.
Last day to request transfer of credit for summer candidates
for degrees.
May 6, Thursday
Registration (including payment of fees) according to as-
signed appointments. No one permitted to start regular reg-
istration after 3:00 p.m.
May 7, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. Students subject
to late registration fee.
May 10, Monday
Classes begin.
May 12, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections.
Last day for completing late registration.
May 13, Thursday, 2:30 p.m.
Last day to pay fees without being subject to late fee.
May 21, Thursday, '400 p.m.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office for degree to be con-
ferred at end of Summer Term B.
May 31, Monday
Memorial Day. All classes suspended.
June 4, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course. If not made up, grades of
I or X become E.
June 9, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for withdrawing without receiving failing grades in
all courses.







CALENDAR


June 11, Friday, 4-00 p.m.
Last day to apply at Registrar's Office to change college or ma-
jor department for the Fall Semester.
June 16, Wednesday
All classes end.
June 17, Thursday
Final examinations begin.
June 19, Saturday, 9.00 a.m.
Foreign language reading knowledge examinations (GSFLT)
in French, German, and Spanish.
June 21, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Summer Term A due in Registrar's Office.




SUMMER TERM B
1982

April 30, Friday, 4-00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance at the Univer-
sity of Florida to file application for admission for Summer
Term B, and for those previously in attendance to apply for
registration appointments.
June 4, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those whose applications were filed by the above
Deadline to dear admissions. All credentials must have
been received and college changes approved. Those who
clear after this date will be assigned late registration ap-
pointments.
June 24, Thursday
Registration (including payment of fees) according to as-
signed appointments. No one permitted to start regular reg-
istration after 3:00 p.m.
June 25, Friday
Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins. Students subject
to late registration fee.


June 28, Monday
Classes begin.
June 30, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections.
Last day for completing late registration.
July 1, Thursday
Midpoint of summer terms for completiig, doctoral quali-
fying examinations.
Last day to pay fees without late fee.
July 5, Monday
Independence Day Holiday. All classes suspended.
July 6, Tuesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for candidates for doctoral degrees to file disserta-
tions, fee receipts for library hardbinding and microfilming,
and all doctoral forms with the Graduate Schooli
July 21, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of master's theses,
Final Examination Reports, abstracts and binding fee re-
ceipts to Graduate School.
August 2, Monday,4:00 p.m.
Last day to submit signed original copies of dissertations and
Final Examination Reports to 274 GRI.
Final Examination Reports for nonthesis degrees due in 288
GRI.
August 4, Wednesday
All classes end.
Augst 5, Thursday
Final examinations begin.
August 6, Friday, 10:00 a.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in Graduate
School Office.
August 7, Saturday
Commencement Convocation.
August 9, Monday, 9:00 a.m,
All grades for Summer Term B due in Registrar's Office.


NOTE: For some departments, deadlines for receipt of admission applications may be earlier than those stated in the current University Calendar.


CALENDAR












General Information



































Rules, policies, fees, and courses described in this
Catalog are subject to change without notice.










THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY
The Graduate School consists of the dean, associate
dean, assistant dean, the Graduate Council, and the
graduate faculty. General policies and standards of
the Graduate School are established by the graduate
faculty. Any policy change must be approved by the
graduate deans and the Graduate Council. The Grad-
uate School is responsible for the enforcement of
minimum general standards of graduate work in the
University and for the coordination of the graduate
programs of the various colleges and divisions of the
University. The responsibility for the detailed opera-
tions of graduate programs is vested in the individual
colleges, schools, divisions, and departments. In most
of the colleges an assistant dean or other official is
directly responsible for graduate study in his college.
The Graduate Council, of which the graduate dean
is chairman, assists him in being the agent of the grad-
uate faculty for execution of policy related to gradu-
ate study and associated research. The Council con-
siders petitions and recommends the award of gradu-
ate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty, who
are appointed by the dean with the approval of the
Graduate Council, fall into two categories in ac-
cordance with their function: the Graduate Studies
Faculty (GSF), who are appointed to teach graduate
courses and to direct master's theses, and the Doc-
toral Research Faculty (DRF), who are appointed in
addition to direct doctoral dissertations. No staff
member is expected to perform any of these functions
without having been appointed to the graduate facul-
ty, though temporary exceptions may be made in un-
usual circumstances.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study
was very informal. Control was in the hands of a fac-
ulty committee which reported directly to the Presi-
dent. In 1910, however, James N. Anderson, Head of
the Department of Ancient Languages, was appointed
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Director
of Graduate Work, and in 1930 he became the first
Dean of the Graduate School. He was succeeded
upon his retirement in 1938 by T. M. Simpson, Head
of the Department of Mathematics, who held the
position until 1951. C. F. Byers, Head of the Depart-
ment of Biological Sciences in the University College,
served as Acting Dean from June 1951 until August
1952 when .he was succeeded by L. E. Grinter, who
qame from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where
he had been Vice President, Dean of the Graduate
School, and Research Professor. Upon becoming Act-
ihg Vice President in 1969, Dr. Grinter was named
Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School. He was suc-
ceeded by Harold P. Hanson, who came to Florida
from the University of Texas, where he had served as
Chairman of the Department of Physics. In 1971, Dr.
Hanson was appointed Vice President for Academic
Affairs. Alexander G. Smith of the Department of
Physics and Astronomy and a former assistant dean of
the Graduate School, served as Acting Dean until the
appointment of Harry H. Sisler. Dr. Sisler served as
Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences, and Executive Vice
President of the University of Florida prior to being
nakned Dean of the Graduate School in March 1973.
In September 1979, Dr. Sisler returned to teaching as
Distinguished Service Professor of Chemistry and F.
Michael Wahl was appointed Acting Dean. Dr. Wahl


came to Florida from the University of Illinois in 1969.
He served as Professor and Chairman of the Depart-
ment of Geology from 1969 to 1973 when he was
named Associate Dean of the Graduate School. In
June 1980 Francis G. Stehli became Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research. Dr. Stehli came to Florida from
Case Western Reserve University where he had served
as Samuel St. John Professor of Geology, Chairman of,
the Department of Geology, and Dean of Science and
Engineering.
Study leading to graduate degrees has existed at the

University of Florida from the date of the estab-
lishment of the University on its present campus. The
first M.A. was awarded in 1906, the major being Eng-
lish, and the first M.S. in 1908, with a major in en-
tomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D.
were initiated in 1930, and the first degrees were
awarded in 1934, one with a major in chemistry and
,the other with a major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D.
was awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phe-
nomenal growth at the University of Florida. In 1930,
33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 de-
grees were awarded in 16 fields. In 1978-79 the total
number of graduate degrees awarded was 1,462 in
more than 90 fields. The proportion of doctoral de-
grees has increased steadily. In 1950, 18 Ph.D.'s and 5
Ed.D.'s were awarded. In 1979-80 the total was 247
Ph.D.'s and 34 Ed.D.'s



GRADUATE DEGREES

AND PROGRAMS
Refer to the section of this Catalog entitled Fields
of Instruction for specializations in the approved pro-
grams.

NONTHESIS DEGREES
(Asterisk (*) indicates thesis option)
Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)*
Master of Agriculture (M.Ag.), with program in one of
the following:
Agricultural and Extension Food Science and Human
Education Nutrition
Agronomy Horticultural Science:
Animal Science Fruit Crops
Botany Ornamental Horticulture
Dairy Science Vegetable Crops
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Nematology Poultry Science
Soil Science

Master of Agricultural Management and Resource
Development (M.A.M.R.D.) with program in Food
and Resource Economics.
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) with program in
one of the following:
Anthropology Mathematics
English Philosophy
French Political Science
Geography Political Science-
German International Relations
History Psychology
Latin Sociology
Latin American Area Spanish
Studies Speech
Linguistics










THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

ORGANIZATION AND HISTORY
The Graduate School consists of the dean, associate
dean, assistant dean, the Graduate Council, and the
graduate faculty. General policies and standards of
the Graduate School are established by the graduate
faculty. Any policy change must be approved by the
graduate deans and the Graduate Council. The Grad-
uate School is responsible for the enforcement of
minimum general standards of graduate work in the
University and for the coordination of the graduate
programs of the various colleges and divisions of the
University. The responsibility for the detailed opera-
tions of graduate programs is vested in the individual
colleges, schools, divisions, and departments. In most
of the colleges an assistant dean or other official is
directly responsible for graduate study in his college.
The Graduate Council, of which the graduate dean
is chairman, assists him in being the agent of the grad-
uate faculty for execution of policy related to gradu-
ate study and associated research. The Council con-
siders petitions and recommends the award of gradu-
ate degrees. Members of the graduate faculty, who
are appointed by the dean with the approval of the
Graduate Council, fall into two categories in ac-
cordance with their function: the Graduate Studies
Faculty (GSF), who are appointed to teach graduate
courses and to direct master's theses, and the Doc-
toral Research Faculty (DRF), who are appointed in
addition to direct doctoral dissertations. No staff
member is expected to perform any of these functions
without having been appointed to the graduate facul-
ty, though temporary exceptions may be made in un-
usual circumstances.
In the beginning the organization of graduate study
was very informal. Control was in the hands of a fac-
ulty committee which reported directly to the Presi-
dent. In 1910, however, James N. Anderson, Head of
the Department of Ancient Languages, was appointed
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and Director
of Graduate Work, and in 1930 he became the first
Dean of the Graduate School. He was succeeded
upon his retirement in 1938 by T. M. Simpson, Head
of the Department of Mathematics, who held the
position until 1951. C. F. Byers, Head of the Depart-
ment of Biological Sciences in the University College,
served as Acting Dean from June 1951 until August
1952 when .he was succeeded by L. E. Grinter, who
qame from the Illinois Institute of Technology, where
he had been Vice President, Dean of the Graduate
School, and Research Professor. Upon becoming Act-
ihg Vice President in 1969, Dr. Grinter was named
Dean Emeritus of the Graduate School. He was suc-
ceeded by Harold P. Hanson, who came to Florida
from the University of Texas, where he had served as
Chairman of the Department of Physics. In 1971, Dr.
Hanson was appointed Vice President for Academic
Affairs. Alexander G. Smith of the Department of
Physics and Astronomy and a former assistant dean of
the Graduate School, served as Acting Dean until the
appointment of Harry H. Sisler. Dr. Sisler served as
Chairman of the Department of Chemistry, Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences, and Executive Vice
President of the University of Florida prior to being
nakned Dean of the Graduate School in March 1973.
In September 1979, Dr. Sisler returned to teaching as
Distinguished Service Professor of Chemistry and F.
Michael Wahl was appointed Acting Dean. Dr. Wahl


came to Florida from the University of Illinois in 1969.
He served as Professor and Chairman of the Depart-
ment of Geology from 1969 to 1973 when he was
named Associate Dean of the Graduate School. In
June 1980 Francis G. Stehli became Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research. Dr. Stehli came to Florida from
Case Western Reserve University where he had served
as Samuel St. John Professor of Geology, Chairman of,
the Department of Geology, and Dean of Science and
Engineering.
Study leading to graduate degrees has existed at the

University of Florida from the date of the estab-
lishment of the University on its present campus. The
first M.A. was awarded in 1906, the major being Eng-
lish, and the first M.S. in 1908, with a major in en-
tomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D.
were initiated in 1930, and the first degrees were
awarded in 1934, one with a major in chemistry and
,the other with a major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D.
was awarded in 1948. Graduate study has had a phe-
nomenal growth at the University of Florida. In 1930,
33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 de-
grees were awarded in 16 fields. In 1978-79 the total
number of graduate degrees awarded was 1,462 in
more than 90 fields. The proportion of doctoral de-
grees has increased steadily. In 1950, 18 Ph.D.'s and 5
Ed.D.'s were awarded. In 1979-80 the total was 247
Ph.D.'s and 34 Ed.D.'s



GRADUATE DEGREES

AND PROGRAMS
Refer to the section of this Catalog entitled Fields
of Instruction for specializations in the approved pro-
grams.

NONTHESIS DEGREES
(Asterisk (*) indicates thesis option)
Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)*
Master of Agriculture (M.Ag.), with program in one of
the following:
Agricultural and Extension Food Science and Human
Education Nutrition
Agronomy Horticultural Science:
Animal Science Fruit Crops
Botany Ornamental Horticulture
Dairy Science Vegetable Crops
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Nematology Poultry Science
Soil Science

Master of Agricultural Management and Resource
Development (M.A.M.R.D.) with program in Food
and Resource Economics.
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) with program in
one of the following:
Anthropology Mathematics
English Philosophy
French Political Science
Geography Political Science-
German International Relations
History Psychology
Latin Sociology
Latin American Area Spanish
Studies Speech
Linguistics







4 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.)
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) with pro-
gram in business administration:
Accounting Insurance
Economics Management
Finance Marketing
Health and Hospital Real Estate and
Administration Urban Analysis
Master of Education (M.Ed.) with program in one of
the following:
Childhood Education Foundations of Education
Counselor Education Music Education
(available only in conjunc- Secondary Education
tion with Ed.S. degree) Special Education
Curriculum & Instruction Vocational, Technical,
Educational Administration Adult Education
Master of Engineering (M.E.) with program in one of
the following:
Aerospace Engineering* Engineering Science*
Agricultural Engineering* Environmental Engineer-
Chemical Engineering* ing Sciences*
Civil Engineering* Industrial and Systems
.Coastal and Oceano- Engineering*
graphic Engineering* Materials Science and
Electrical Engineering* Engineering*
Engineering Mechanics* Mechanical Engineering*
Nuclear Engineering
Sciences*
Master of Forest Resources and Conservation
(M.F.R.C.)
Master of Health Education (M.H.Ed.)
Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) with program in
one of the following:
Occupational Therapy Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M. in Tax.)
Master of Nursing (M.Nsg.)
Master of Physical Education (M.P.E.)
Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) with program
in one of the following:
Astronomy Mathematics
Botany Microbiology
Chemistry Physics
Geography Psychology
Geology Zoology
Master of Statistics (M.Stat.)
Engineer (Engr.)-A special degree requiring one year
of graduate work beyond the master's degree. For
a list of the approved programs, see those listed
above for the Master of Engineering degree.
(Thesis optional.)
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)-A special degree re-
quiring one year of graduate work beyond the
master's degree. For a list of the approved pro-
grams, see those listed below for the Doctor of Ed-
ucation degree.

THESIS DEGREES
(Dagger (t) indicates nonthesis option)
Master of Arts (M.A.) with program in one of the fol-
lowing:
Anthropology" Frencht
Business Administration: Geography
Finance German
Insurance History
Management Latin
Marketing Latin American Area
Real Estate and Urban Studies
Analysis Linguistics
Economics Mathematicst
English Philosophyt


Political Sciencet
Political Science-
International Relationst


Psychology
Sociology
Spanisht
Speech


Master of Arts in Architecture (M.A.Arch.)
Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)-For a list of the
programs, see those listed above for the Master of
Education degree.
Master of Arts in Health Education (M.A.H.Ed.)
Master of Arts in Journalism and Communications
(M.A.J.C.) with program in Communication.
Master of Arts in Physical Education (M.A.P.E.)
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) with program in one of
the following:
Art Music Theatre
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning
(M.A.U.R.P.)
Master of Science (M.S.) with program in one of the
following:
Aerospace Engineering" Horticultural Science:
Agricultural Engineeringt Fruit Crops
Agricultural and Extension Ornamental Hortlcul-
Education ture
Vegetable Crops
Agronomy Industrial and Systems
Animal Science Engineeringt
Astronomy Materials Science and
Biochemistry and Engineeringt
Molecular Biology Mathematicst
Botany
Chemical Engineeringt Mechanical Engineeringt
Chemistry Medical Sciences:
Civil Engineering Anatomical Sciences
Coastal and Oceano- Immunology and Medi-
graphic Engineeringt cal Microbiology
Computer and Informa- Neuroscience
tion Sciences Pathology
Dairy Science
Electrical Engineeringf
Engineering Mechanicst Pharmacology
Engineering Sciencet Physiology
Entomology and
Nematology Microbiologyt
Environmental Engineer- Nuclear Engineering
ing Sciencest Sciencest
Food and Resource Physicst
Economics Plant Pathology
Food Science and Human
Nutrition Poultry Science
Forest Resources and Psychologyt
Conservation Soil Science
Geography Veterinary Science
Geology Zoologyt
Master of Science in Building Construction (M.S.B.C.)
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.)
Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S.P.) with program
in Pharmaceutical Sciences:
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacy
Master of Science in Statistics (M.S.Stat.)
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) with program in one of
the following:
Counselor Education Educational Adminis-
Curriculum and Instruc- tration
tion Foundations of Education
Special Education
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with program in one
of the following:
Aerospace Engineering Biochemistry and
Agronomy Molecular Biology
Animal Science Botany
Anthropology Business Administration
Astronomy Chemical Engineering







ADMISSIONS / 5


Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Counselor Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Economics
Educational Administration
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Mechanics
English
Entomology and
Nematology
Environmental Engineering
Sciences
Food and Resources
Economics
Food Science and Human
Nutrition
Forest Resources and
Conservation
Foundations of Education
Geography
History
Horticultural Science:
Fruit Crops
Ornamental Horticulture
Vegetable Crops
Industrial and Systems
Engineering
Materials Science
and Engineering
Linguistics
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering


Medical Sciences:
Anatomical Sciences
Immunology and
Medical Microbiology
Neuroscience
Pathotogy
Pharmacology
Physiology
Veterinary Medicine
Microbiology
Nuclear Engineering
Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences:
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacy
Philosophy
Physics
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Political Science-
International Relations
Psychology
Romance Languages:
French
Spanish
Sociology
Soil Science
Special Education
Speech
Statistics
Zoology


ADMISSION TO THE

GRADUATE SCHOOL
Application for Admission.-Admission forms and
information concerning admission procedures may
be obtained from the Registrar and Admissions Of-
fice, 135 Tigert Hall. Prospective students are urged to
apply for admission as early as possible. For some de-
partments deadlines for receipt of admission applica-
tions may be earlier than those stated in the current
University Calendar; prospective students should
check with the appropriate department. Applications
which meet minimum standards are referred to the
graduate selection committees of the various colleges
and departments for approval or disapproval.
To be admitted to graduate study in a given depart-
ment, the prospective student must satisfy the re-
quirements of the department as well as those of the
Graduate School. In some departments, available re-
sources limit the number of students that can be ad-
mitted.
General Requirements-The Graduate School,
University of Florida, requires both a minimum grade
average of B for all upper-division undergraduate
work and a minimum Verbal-Quantitative total score
of 1000 on the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record
Examination. For some departments, and in more ad-
vanced levels of graduate study, an undergraduate
average or Graduate Record Examination scores
above those stated for the Graduate School may be
required. These criteria are on file in the Office of the
Graduate School. Some colleges and departments re-
quire a reading knowledge of at least one foreign lan-
guage. .Exceptions to the above requirements are
made only when these and other criteria such as let-


ters of recommendation are reviewed by the depart-
ment, recommended by the department, and ap-
proved by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Re-
search.
Unqualified admission to the Graduate School is
dependent upon the presentation of a baccalaureate
degree from an accredited college or university. No
application will be considered unless the complete
official transcript of all the applicant's undergraduate
and graduate work is in the possession of the Regis-
trar, and no transcript will be accepted as official un-
less it is received directly from the registrar of the in-
stitution in which the work was done. Official sup-
plementary transcripts are required as soon as they
are available for any work completed after application
for admission has been made. In general, no student
who is a graduate of a nonaccredited institution will
be considered for graduate study in 'any unit of the
University.
The Board of Regents has also ruled that in admit-
ting students for a given academic year, up to 10%
may be admitted as exceptions. Students admitted as
exceptions under the 10% waiver rule must present
both an upper-division grade point average and
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test Score
with their application and meet other criteria re-
quired by the University, such as excellent letters of
recommendation from trusted colleagues, satisfactory
performance in a specified number of graduate
courses taken as postbaccalaureate students, or prac-
tical experience in the discipline for a specified period
of time.
The University encourages applications from quali-
fied applicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial,
religious, and ethnic groups. The University does not
discriminate on the basis of handicap in admission or
access to its programs and activities.


ADMISSIONS EXAMINATIONS
Graduate Record Examination.-In addition to the
Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examination
which is required of all applicants, some departments
encourage the applicant to submit scores on one or
more advanced subject tests of the Graduate Record
Examination. The scores on all tests taken will be con-
sidered in regard to admission.
In the event that an applicant takes the GRE Ap-
titude Test too late for the results to reach the Admis-
sions Office before the proposed date of entry, the
student may apply for conditional admission to the
Graduate School with postponement of the GRE Ap-
titude Test provided satisfactory scores on the Miller
Analogies Test (MAT) are submitted. The scores on
the Miller Analogies Test will be used as a partial basis
for deciding whether conditional admission may be
granted. The Miller Analogies Test is not a substitute
for the Graduate Record Examination. In cases where
conditional admission is granted based on the scores
of the Miller Analogies Test, it is for one term only.
Satisfactory scores on the GRE Aptitude Test must be
submitted before a second registration will be per-
mitted.
The decision on postponing the Graduate Record
Examination Aptitude Test will be based on the scores
on the Miller Analogies Test and the academic
credentials submitted. If these scores and academic
credentials are not satisfactory, submission of the re-
sults of the GRE Aptitude test will be required before
an admission decision is reached. It should be noted







6 / GENERAL INFORMATION


that the Miller Analogies Test may not be repeated
until at least one year has elapsed.
Graduate Study in Business Administration--Stu-
dents applying for admission to the Graduate School
'for study in the College of Business Administration
may substitute satisfactory scores on the Graduate
Management Admission Test (GMAT) for the Gradu-
ate Record Examination. Students applying for admis-
sion to the Master of Business Administration (MBA)
program must submit satisfactory scores on the
GMAT. Applicants are requested to contact the Edu-
cational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, for
additional information.
Graduate Study in Law,-Students applying to the
graduate program leading to the degree Master of
Laws in Taxation must submit satisfactory scores on
the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

FOREIGN STUDENTS
All foreign students seeking admission to the Grad-
uate School are required to submit satisfactory scores
on the GRE Aptitude Test and on the TOEFL (Test of
English as a Foreign Language) with the following ex-
ceptions:
1. Foreign students whose native tongue is English
or who have studied at a United States college or uni-
versity for one year or more need not submit TOEFL
scores but must submit satisfactory scores on the Ap-
titude Test of the Graduate Record Examination
before their application for admission can be con-
sidered.
2. Students educated in foreign countries who ap-
ply for admission while residing outside the United
States may be granted a one semester postponement
of the GRE but not the TOEFL. Permission to register
for subsequent semesters will depend upon the sub-
mission of scores on the Graduate Record Examina-
tion.
3. All foreign students applying for admission to the
Master of Business Administration program must sub-
mit satisfactory scores from the Graduate Manage-
ment Admission Test before their applications for ad-
mission can be considered.
Applicants are requested to write the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, for registration
forms and other information concerning TOEFL,
GMAT, and GRE.

HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
The University of Florida does not discriminate on
the basis of handicap in the recruitment and admls-
sion of students, the recruitment and employment of
faculty and staff, or in the operation of any of its pro-
grams and activities, as specified by federal laws and
regulations. The designated coordinator for com-
pliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, as amended, is Ms. Mary Skorheim, Assistant
Dean for Student Services, 129 Tigert Hall, 392-1261.
The Office of Student Services provides assistance
for disabled students. Services are varied depending
on individual needs and include, but are not limited
to, special campus orientation, registration assistance,
help in securing auxiliary learning aids, and assistance
in general University activities. Handicapped students
are encouraged to contact this office.

CONDITIONAL ADMISSION
Students may be given conditional admission to the


Graduate School to ascertain their ability to pursue
graduate work successfully if previous grade records
or Graduate Record Examination scores are on the
borderline of acceptability.
Students granted conditional admission should be
notified by the major department of the conditions
under which they are admitted. When these condi-
tions have been satisfied, the department must notify
the student in writing, sending a copy of notification
to the Graduate School. Work taken while a student is
in conditional status may be applied toward a gradu-
ate degree.


POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS
Students who have received a bachelor's degree
but have not been admitted to the Graduate School
are classified as postbaccalaureate students (6-) and
may enroll in courses for any of the following reasons:
(1) to validate undergraduate records from nonac-
credited and unevaluated colleges; (2) to provide a
means for students not seeking a graduate degree to
enroll in courses included in this category would
be students who change their professional goals or
wish to expand their academic background; and (3) to
accommodate students who do intend to enter a
graduate program at some future date, but need a
substantial number of prerequisite courses.
Postbaccalaureate students may enroll in graduate
courses but the work taken will not normally be trans-
ferred to the graduate record if the student is subse-
quently admitted to the Graduate School. By petition
in clearly justified cases, it is possible to transfer up to
but no more than six semester hours of course work
earned with a grade of A, B+, or B.
Students in the College of Education who desire
postbaccalaureate classification to obtain teacher
certification must provide the college with a clear
statement of certification goals as a part of the re-
quirements for admission. Interested students should
write to 134 Norman Hall or call 392-0721 for further
information.


FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE
STUDENTS
Members of the faculty of the University of Florida
with a rank of instructor or above (or equivalents), ex-
cept Florida Cooperative Extension Service (IFAS)
county personnel and faculty in the P.K. Yonge Labo-
ratory School, may not receive a graduate degree from
this institution. Exceptions to this policy must be ap-
proved by the Graduate Council. Faculty members
may register for work in the Graduate School.

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
PROGRAMS
Traveling Scholar Program.-The State University
System affords, under the Traveling Scholar Program,
an opportunity for graduate students to take courses
or conduct research activities at any of the universities
in the State System. Course work taken under the aus-
pices of the Traveling Scholar Program at another uni-
versity in the State System will apply for graduate
credit at the student's home campus. The deans of the
graduate schools of the state universities are the coor-
dinators of the program, and interested students






GENERAL REGULATIONS / 7


should contact the dean of the graduate school on
their home campus for additional information.
Cooperative Degree Programs.-In certain degree
programs, faculty from other universities in the State
University System hold graduate faculty status at the
University of Florida. In those approved areas, the in-
tellectual resources of these external graduate faculty
members are available to students at the University of
Florida.



GENERAL REGULATIONS
It is the responsibility of the graduate student to
become informed and to observe all regulations and
procedures required by the program the student is
pursuing. The student must be familiar with those
sections of the Graduate Catalog that outline general
regulations and requirements, specific degree pro-
gram requirements, and the offerings and require-
ments of the major department. Ignorance of a rule
does not constitute a basis for waiving that rule. Any
exceptions to the policies stated in the Graduate
Catalog must be approved by the Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research.
After admission to the Graduate School, but before
the first registration, the student should consult the
college and/or the graduate coordinator in the major
department concerning courses and degree require-
ments, deficiencies if any, and special regulations of
the department. The dean of the college in which the
degree program is located 'or a representative must
approve all registrations.


STUDY LOADS
The University of Florida operates on a semester
system consisting of two 15-week periods and two 6-
week summer terms. A credit under the semester sys-
tem is equal to 1.5 quarter credits.
Maximum registration for a full-time graduate stu-
dent is 18 credits. Minimum registration for a full-time
graduate student is 12 credits. The maximum and min-
imum registrations are reduced for those students
who are graduate assistants or are otherwise em-
ployed. Guidelines for the maximum and minimum
registration for students on appointment are provided
in the Graduate Coordinator's Manual. Any student
on appointment who wishes to register for more than
the maximum or less than the minimum credits must
have the written permission of the Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research.
Students not on appointment are assumed to be
full-time and must register for a minimum of 12 cred-
its. Part-time status may be approved by the Graduate
Coordinator for students who are not pursuing a de-
gree on a full-time basis. Such exceptions must be
clearly justified and the approved registration must be
commensurate with the use of University facilities
and faculty time.

COURSES AND CREDITS
Undergraduate. courses (1000-2999) may not be
used as any part of the graduate degree requirements.
Undergraduate courses (3000-4999) may be used for
minor credit when taken as part of an approved grad-
uate program.
Courses numbered 5000 and above are limited to


graduate students, with the exception described un-
der Undergraduate Registration in Graduate Courses.
Courses numbered 7000 and above are designed pri-
marily for advanced graduate students.
A complete list of approved graduate courses ap.
pears in the section of this Catalog entitled Fields of
Instruction. Departments reserve the right to decide
which of these graduate courses will beoffered in a
given semester and the departments should be con-
sulted concerning available courses.
Correspondence Work.-No courses taken by cor-
respondence may be used for graduate credit.
Extension Work.-No extension courses may be
used for graduate credit except in programs for the
M.Ag., M.Ed., M.A.E., M.A.T., M.S.T., M.H.Ed., M.P.E.,
and Ed.S. degrees. Extension work taken at another in-
stitution, except through the Board of Regents Office
of Continuing Education, may not be transferred to
the University of Florida for graduate'credit.
State Centers for Continuing Education.-Course
work is available in the graduate residence centers es-
tablished in the state. The amount of credit accep-
table for transfer to a degree program varies according
to the degree sought. Residence center work is not
transferable to all degree programs and the student
should consult the requirements for specific degrees
in this Catalog for additional information.
Cooperative Education Program--At the Univer-
sity of Florida, the Cooperative Education Program is
offered primarily for undergraduate students. How-
ever, the course, 4949, Cooperative Work Experience,
one credit, may be recommended to' the Graduate
School for minor credit in master's degree programs
provided this course is above the minimum course re-
quirements for the degree.


GRADES
The only passing grades for graduate students are
A, B+, B, C+, C, and S. Grades of C+ and C in courses
below 5000 level are acceptable for credit toward
graduate degrees if the total program meets the B av-
erage requirement. In 5000-level courses and above,
C+ and C grades count toward a graduate degree if an
equal number of credit hours in courses numbered
5000 or higher have been earned with grades of B+
and A, respectively. Grade points are not designated
for S and U grades; these grades are not used in calcu-
lating the grade-point average.
Grades of S and U are the only grades awarded in
courses numbered 6910 (Supervised Research), 6940
(Supervised Teaching), 6971 (Master's Research), 6973
(Individual Project), and 7980 (Doctoral Research).
Additional courses for which S and U grades apply
are noted in the departmental offerings. With the ex-
ception of those courses listed in the Graduate
Catalog, no course taken for an S/U grade may be
used to satisfy the minimum requirements for a grad-
uate degree.
Graduate students are not permitted to repeat
courses in which they have received failing grades.
Deferred Grade H.-In special situations where it is
not possible to assign a regular grade at the end of a
term a deferred grade (H) may be assigned. This grade
may be used only in special situations where the ex-
pected unit of work may be developed over a period
of time greater than a single term. The grade of H is
not a substitute for a grade of S, U, or I. Courses for
which H grades are appropriate must be so noted in
their catalog descriptions, and must be approved by






8 / GENERAL INFORMATION


the Graduate Curriculum Committee and the Gradu-
ate Council.
Incomplete Grades.-Grades of I (incomplete) re-
ceived during the preceding semester must be re-
moved by the deadline date stated in the University
Calendar. If the grade of I has not been changed ac-
cordingly, the Office of the Registrar will record a'
grade of E for the course. All grades of I must be re-
moved prior to the award of a graduate degree.


UNDERGRADUATE REGISTRATION IN
GRADUATE COURSES
With permission of the instructor and the college
concerned, an undergraduate student at the Univer-
sity of Florida may enroll in graduate-level courses
(5000 and 6000 level) if the student has senior stand-
ing and an upper-division grade-point average of at
least 2.8. After a student has been accepted in the
Graduate School, up, to six hours of graduate-level
courses earned with a grade of A, B+, or B taken un-
der this provision may be applied toward a graduate
degree at the University of Florida provided credit for
the course has not been used for an undergraduate
degree.


CONCURRENT GRADUATE
PROGRAMS
A graduate student who wishes to pursue degrees
in two programs concurrently must have the written
approval of the chairperson of each department in-
volved and the Dean for Graduate Studies and Re-
search. If the request is approved, the student must
be officially admitted to both programs through regu-
lar procedures. If the student is approved to pursue
two master's programs, no more than six hours of
course work from one degree program may be ap-
plied toward meeting the requirements for the sec-
ond master's degree.


INFORMATION FOR VETERANS
The. University of Florida is approved for the educa-
tion and training of veterans under all public laws in
effect; i.e., Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code (Disabled
Veterans); Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold-War
G.I. Bill); and Chapter 35, Title 38, U.S. Code (Chil-
dren of Deceased or Disabled Veterans).
Students who may be eligible for educational bene-
fits under any Veterans Administration program are
urged to contact the Veterans Affairs Office, 124
Tigert Hall, as soon as they are accepted for admis-
sion.
Students expecting to receive benefits under one of
these programs must file an application with the Of-
fice of the Registrar. No certification can be made un-
til the application is on file. Benefits are determined
by the Veterans Administration, and the University
certifies according to these rules and regulations.
The Registrar's Office maintains students' academic
records. A progress report is sent to each student at
the end of the term indicating grades, cumulative
hours, grade points, etc. For information on student
conduct policies, see Undergraduate Catalog.


UNSATISFACTORY SCHOLARSHIP
Any graduate student may be denied further regis-
tration in the University or in a graduate program
should progress toward completion of the planned
program become unsatisfactory to the department,
college, or Dean for Graduate Studies and Research.
Failure to maintain a B average in all work attempted
is, by definition, unsatisfactory progress.


CHANGE OF MAJOR OR COLLEGE
Graduate students who wish to change their major
or college must make formal application through the
Office of the Registrar and receive approval of the ap-
propriate department chairperson, college dean, and
the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. Dead-
line dates for such changes as specified in the current
University Calendar must be met.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMINATION
A foreign language examination is not required for
all degree programs and the student should contact
the graduate coordinator in the appropriate depart-
ment for specific 'information regarding any require-
ment of a foreign language.
If a department requires that a student meet the
foreign language requirement 'by satisfactory per-
formance on the Graduate School Foreign Language
Tests (GSFLT) in French, Spanish, or German, the stu-
dent should contact the Graduate School for applica-
tions and payment of fees. The examination times and
dates are listed in the University Calendar. Educa-
tional Testing Service (ETS) no longer administers this
examination and does not accept application fees or
issue tickets of admission for these tests. Registration
for these examinations and payment of fees will be
handled by the Office of Instructional Resources,
1012 General Purpose Building A.

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
Admission to candidacy is not automatic. It re-
quires a formal application distinct from registration
on or before the dates stipulated in the current Uni-
versity Calendar. Admission to candidacy depends,
among other requirements, upon the maintenance of
a B average or higher in all courses in the major and in
all courses counted toward the degree. All grades of I
and X must be removed.

EXAMINATIONS
The student's supervisory committee is responsible
for the administration of the written and oral quali-
fying examinations as well as the final oral examina-
tion for the defense of the thesis, project, or disserta-
tion. All members of the supervisory committee must
sign the appropriate forms, including the signature
pages, in order for the student to satisfy the require-
ments of the examination.
Qualifying and final examinations for graduate stu-
dents are to be held on the University of Florida cam-
pus. Exceptions to this policy are made only for cer-
tain graduate students whose examinations are ad-
ministered at Eglin Air Force Center, the Agricultural
Research and Educational Centers, or on the cam-









puses of the universities in the State University Sys-
tem that are approved for cooperative graduate de-
gree programs.

PROCEDURE FOR FINAL SEMESTER
It is the student's responsibility to ascertain that all
requirements have been met and that every deadline
is observed. Deadline datesare set forth in the Uni-
versity Calendar and by the college, school, or depart-
ment. Regular issues of Deadline Dates are available
each semester.
When the dissertation or thesis is ready to be put in
final form, the student should get instructions from
the Graduate School Editorial Office and should re-
quest a records check in the Student Information and
Records Office to make certain that all requirements
for graduation have been fulfilled.
When a student registers for the last term, the ap-
propriate fees for the Library permanent binding of
two copies and for microfilming the dissertation must
be paid by the deadline specified in the University
Calendar.
SA student must be registered for an appropriate
load in the University for the term in which the final
examination is given and at the time the degree is re-
ceived.

AWARDING OF DEGREES
The Graduate School will authorize a candidate to
be awarded the degree appropriate to the course of
study under the following conditions, the details of
which can be found under the descriptions of the
several degrees.
1. The candidate. must have completed all course
requirements, including an internship or practicum if
required, in the major and minor fields, observing
time limits, limitations on transfer credit, on nonresi-
dent work, and on level of course work.
2. The candidate must have a grade average of B or
.higher in the major and in all work attempted in the
graduate program. All grades of I and X must be re-
moved.
3. The candidate must have satisfactorily completed
all required examinations, qualifying, comprehensive,
and final, and be recommended for the degree by the
supervisory committee,' major department, and col-
lege.
4. The dissertation or, if required, thesis or equiva-
lent project, must have been approved by the super-
visory committee and accepted by the Graduate
School. Recommendations for the awarding of a de-
gree include meeting all academic and professional
qualifications as judged by the faculty of the appro-
priate department:
5. All requirements for the degree must be met
while the candidate is a registered graduate student.
Students who have been registered in the Graduate
School at least one semester of each successive calen-
dar'year may graduate according to the curriculum
under which they entered, provided the courses are
still offered by the University.

ATTENDANCE AT COMMENCEMENT
Graduates who are to receive advanced degrees are
urged to attend Commencement in order to accept
personally the honor indicated by the appropriate


REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 9

hood. The student may arrange through the Univer-
sity Bookstore for the proper academic attire to be
worn at Commencement.



REQUIREMENTS FOR

MASTER'S DEGREES

GENERAL REGULATIONS
The following regulations represent those of the
Graduate School. Colleges and departments may
have additional regulations beyond those stated
below. Unless otherwise indicated in the following
sections concerning master's degrees, these general
regulations apply to all master's degree programs at
the University.
Course Requirements.-Graduate credit is awarded
for courses numbered 5000 and above. At least 50% of
the minimum course work for a master's degree must
be in graduate level courses. Courses numbered 3000
and above may be accepted only for minor credit
when taken as a part of an approved graduate pro-
gram. The program of course work for a master's de-
gree must be approved by the student's adviser, su-
pervisory committee, or representative of the depart-
ment. No more than six credits from a previous
master's degree program may be applied toward a
second master's degree.
If a minor is chosen, at least six credits of work are
required in the minor field. Two six-credit minors may
be taken with departmental permission. Minor work
must be in a department other than the major; in spe-
cial cases this requirement may be modified, but only
with the written permission of the Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research.
Degree Requirements.-Unless otherwise speci-
fied, for any master's degree, the student must earn a
minimum of 30 credits as a graduate student at the
University of Florida, of which no more than six
semester hours of course work earned with a grade of
A, B+, or B may be transferred from institutions ap-
proved for this purpose by the Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research.
Transfer of Credits.-Only graduate level courses to
the extent of six semester hours earned with a grade
of A, B+, or B may be transferred from an institution
approved for this purpose by the Graduate School.
Credits transferred will be applied toward meeting
the degree requirements but the grades earned will
not be computed in the student's grade-point aver-
age. Acceptance of transfer credit requires approval of
the student's supervisory committee and the Dean for
Graduate Studies and Research. Recommendations
for transfer of credit should be filed with the Gradu-
ate School no later than the last day of classes in the
term preceding the term in which the student expects
to receive the degree. Nonresident or extension work
taken at another institution with the exception of
work taken through the Board of Regents Office for
Continuing Education, may not be transferred to the
University of Florida for graduate credit. No courses
taken by correspondence may be used toward a grad-
uate degree.
Supervisory Committee.-Supervisory committees
for graduate degree programs are nominated by the
representative department chairperson, approved by
the college dean, and appointed by the Dean for






10 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Graduate Studies and Research. Only members of the
graduate faculty may be appointed to supervisory
committees. The Dean for Graduate Studies and Re-
search is an ex-officio member of all supervisory com-
mittees.
The supervisory committee for a master's degree
with a thesis must consist of at least two members
selected from the graduate faculty. The supervisory
committee for a master's degree without a thesis rhay
consist of one member of the graduate faculty who
advises the student and oversees the program. If a mi-
nor is designated, the committee should include one
member of the minor department who has been ap-
pointed to the graduate faculty.
Admission to Candidacy.-Application should be
made through the department no later than the last
day of classes in the semester preceding the semester
in which the student expects to receive the degree.
The Graduate Council reserves the right to deny de-
grees to persons who have failed to comply with this
regulation at the proper time. The student must have
a B average for all graduate work completed and in all
work attempted in order to be admitted to candidacy.
Language Requirements.-(1) The requirement of a
reading knowledge of a foreign language is at the dis-
cretion of the department. The foreign language re-
quirement varies from department to department and
the student should check with the appropriate de-
partment for specific information. (2) The ability to
use the English language correctly and effectively, as
judged by the supervisory committee, is required of
all candidates.
Examination.-A final comprehensive examination,
oral, written or both, must be passed by the candi-
date. This examination, held on campus with all par-
ticipants present, will cover at least the candidate's
field of concentration, and in no case may, it be sched-
uled earlier than six months before the degree is to be
conferred.
Time Limitation.-All work counted toward the
master's degree must be completed during the seven
years immediately preceding the date on which the
degree is to be awarded.


MASTER OF ARTS AND MASTER OF
SCIENCE
The requirements for the Master of Arts and the
Master of Science degrees also apply to the following
degrees, except as they are individually described
hereafter: Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts
in Health Education, Master of Arts in Journalism and
Communications, Master of Arts in .Physical Educa-
tion, Master of Science in Building Construction, and
Master of Science in Pharmacy.
Course Requirements.-The minimum course work
required for a master's degree with thesis is 30 credits
including up to six hours of the research course num-
bered 6971. All students seeking a master's degree
with thesis must register for an appropriate number of
hours in 6971. The minimum course work require-
ment for a master's degree without a thesis or the
master's taken with the.nonthesis option is 32 credits
excluding credits for which grades of S and U are giv-
en. Students pursuing the nonthesis option may not
use courses numbered 6971 or 7980 to meet the credit
requirement. Students who elect the nonthesis option
may enroll for 6910-Supervised Research, or 6940-
Supervised Teaching in their final term. Since 6910
and 6940 courses are graded S/U registration in these


courses must be in excess of the 32 credit minimum
requirement for the degree.
For both nonthesis option and thesis programs at
least half the required credits, exclusive of 6971 or
7980, must be in a field of study designated the major.
One or two minors of at least'six credits each may be
taken, but a minor is not required by the Graduate
School. Minor work must be in a department other
than the major except in music. The work in the major
field must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For
work outside the major, courses numbered 3000 or
above may be taken.
Thesis.-Candidates for the master's or Engineer
degree with thesis must prepare and present theses
(or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to their
supervisory committees and the Graduate School. The
candidate should consult the Graduate School Edito-
rial Office for instructions concerning the form of the
thesis. The University Calendar specifies final dates
fo submitting three copies of the abstract to the of-
fice of the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research
and for submitting the original copy of the thesis
bound with an abstract. The college copy should be
submitted to the college or department by the speci-
fied date. Two title pages should be inserted in the or-
iginal and college copies. After the thesis is accepted,
these two copies will be permanently bound and de-
posited in the University Libraries.
Change from Thesis to Nonthesis Option.A stu-
dent who wishes to change from the thesis to the
nonthesis option for the master's degree must obtain
the permission of the supervisory committee to make
such a change. This permission must be forwarded to
the Graduate School at least one full semester prior to
the intended date of graduation. The candidate must
meet all the requirements of the nonthesis option as
specified above. A maximum of three credits earned
in 6971 (Master's Research) can be counted toward
the degree requirements only if converted to credit as
Individual Work. The supervisory committee must in-
dicate that the work was productive in and by itself
and warrants credit as a special problem or special
topic course.
Supervisory Committee.-The student's super-
visory committee should be appointed as soon as pos-
sible after the student has been admitted to the Grad-
uate School but, in no case, later than the end of the
second semester of study. The duties of the super-
visory committee are to advise the student, to check
on the student's qualifications and progress, to super-
vise the preparation of the thesis, and to conduct the
final examination.
Admission to Candidacy.-Application for admis-
sion to candidacy for the master's degree should be
made no later than the last day of classes in the
semester prior to the semester in which the student
plans to receive the degree.
The Graduate Council may deny degrees to persons
who have failed to comply with this regulation at the
proper time. In order to be admitted to candidacy, the
student must have (1) maintained a B average or
higher in the major and in all work attempted, (2)
chosen a thesis topic, (3) satisfied the supervisory
committee, department chairperson and the college
dean that the student is qualified to become a candi-
date for the degree. It is the responsibility of the su-
pervisory committee at this time to make such in-
vestigation as is necessary to determine the student's
eligibility.
Comprehensive Examination.-The student who
elects the nonthesis option must pass a com-









prehensive written examination on the major field of
study and on the minor if a minor is designated. This
comprehensive examination must be taken within six
months of the date the degree is to be awarded.
Final Examination.-When the student's course
work is completed, or practically so, and the thesis is
in final form, the supervisory committee is required to
examine the student orally or in writing on (1) the
thesis, (2) the major subjects, (3) the minor or minors,
and (4) matters of a general nature pertaining to the
field of study.
At least three faculty members and the candidate
must be present at the final examination, but only the
members of the official supervisory committee are re-
quired to sign the final examination report. The thesis
must be approved unanimously and signed by the su-
.pervisory committee members. A written announce-
ment of the examination must be sent to the Dean for
Graduate Studies and Research. Using the form pro-
vided for the purpose, the supervisory committee
shall report in writing to the Dean for Graduate Stud-
ies and Research not later than one week before the
time for conferring the degree whether all work has
been completed in a satisfactory manner and whether
on the basis of the final examination the student is
recommended for a degree. This examination may not
be scheduled earlier than six months before the de-
gree is to be conferred without special approval of the
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research.

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING AND
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING
These degrees are designed for graduate students
majoring in departments of the various colleges of the
University who intend to teach in junior or four year
colleges. Requirements for admission are the same as
those for the regular M.A. and M.S. degrees in the var-
ious colleges, and programs leading to the M.A.T. and
M.S.T. may, with proper approval, be incorporated
into programs leading to the Ph.D.
The requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language.if
required by the student's major department.
2. Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits of
work while registered as a graduate student; at least
50% of these credits must be in courses open only for
graduate credit, with work distributed as follows:
a. At least 18 credits in the major and six credits in
the minor.
b. Six credits in a departmental internship in teach-
ing. Three years of successful teaching experience
may be substituted for the internship requirement,
and credits thus made available may be used for
further work in the major, the minor, or in educa-
tion.
c. At least one course in each of the following: edu-
cational psychology, sociology, and curriculum
dealing with the community college. These
courses may be used to comprise a minor.
3. Off-Campus Work: A minimum of 8-16 credits (at
the department's discretion), including registration
for at least six credit hours in a single semester, must
be earned on the Gainesville campus. Beyond that,
credits, including those at the 5000 and 6000 level,
earned in courses offered off-campus by the Univer-
sity of Florida which have been approved by the
Graduate School shall be accepted, provided they are
appropriate to the student's degree program as de-
termined by the supervisory committee.


REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 11

4. At the completion of this degree, the student, for
certification purposes, must present from the under-
graduate and graduate degree programs no fewer
than 36 semester credits in the major field.
5. A final comprehensive examination, either writ-
ten, oral, or both, must be passed by the candidate.
This examination will cover the field of concentration
and the minor.


MASTER OF ACCOUNTING
The Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) is the pro-
fessional degree for students seeking careers in public
accounting, business organizations, government, or
continuation in the Ph.D. program. The M.Acc. pro-
gram offers specializations in each of the four areas of
auditing/financial accounting, management account-
ing, accounting systems, and taxation.
The requirements for the degree are 36 semester
credits of course work, of which a minimum of 16
semester credits must be in graduate level accounting
courses. At least half of the 36 semester credits must
be in graduate level courses. Courses below the grad-
uate level must have the approval of the major ad-
viser. A final comprehensive examination is required
of all students. Additional requirements are listed un-
der the General Regulations section for all master's
degrees.


MASTER OF AGRICULTURE
The degree of Master of Agriculture is designed for
those students who wish additional training for busi-
ness occupations or professions, rather than for those
interested primarily in research.
The general requirements are the same as those for
the Master of Science degree without thesis except
that 12, credits of graduate courses in a department
constitute a major. Credit toward the degree for
courses taken through the Division of Continuing Ed-
ucation is limited to 16 credits. The student's super-
visory committee must consist of at least 2 members
of the graduate faculty. A comprehensive written
qualifying examination, given prior to the beginning
of the semester of graduation, and a final oral exami-
nation are required. Both examinations must be given
on campus with all participants present.


MASTER OF AGRICULTURAL
MANAGEMENT AND RESOURCE
DEVELOPMENT (M.A.M.R.D.)
The M.A.M.R.D. degree program provides an op-
portunity for graduate study for students who plan to
enter management careers in business firms or gov-
ernment agencies; it is not recommended for those
who plan careers in research and university teaching.
Areas of concentration include farm management, ag-
ricultural marketing, and resource planning and eco-
nomic development
The general requirements are the same as those for
the Master of Science degree without thesis except
that 12 credits of graduate courses in food and re-
source economics constitute a major. The supervisory
committee and examination requirements are the
same as those for the Master of Agriculture degree.







12 / GENERAL INFORMATION


MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE
The degree of Master of Arts in Architecture is a
professional degree for those students who wish to
qualify for registration as an architect.
The general requirements are the same as those for
other Master of Arts degrees with thesis except that
the minimum registration required is 52 credits in-
cluding no more than six credits in ARC 6971. In some
areas, with permission from the departmental gradu-
ate faculty, a terminal project requiring six credits in
ARC 6265 may be elected in lieu of a thesis.


MASTER OF ARTS IN URBAN AND
REGIONAL PLANNING
The degree of Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning is a professional degree for students who
wish to practice urban and regional planning and
qualify as members of the American Institute of
Certified Planners. The program is recognized by the
American Planning Association.
The general requirements are the same as those for
other Master of Arts degrees with thesis except that
the minimum registration required is 48 credits in-
cluding no more than six credits in URP 6971. In some
study areas, with permission from the departmental
graduate faculty, a terminal project requiring six cred-
its may be elected in lieu of a thesis.
Law/Urban Planning joint Degree Program.-A
four-year program leading to a Juris Doctor and a
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning is of-
fered under the joint auspices of the College of Law
and the College of Architecture, Department of Ur-
ban and Regional Planning. The program provides
students interested in the legal problems of urban
and regional planning with an opportunity to blend
law studies with relevant course work in the planning
curriculum. The student receives both degrees at the
end of a four-year course of study whereas separate
programs would require five years. Students must
take the GRE and the LSAT prior to admission and
must complete the first year of law school course
work before comingling law and planning courses. A
thesis is required upon completion of the course
work'
Interested students should apply to both the
Holland Law Center and to the Graduate School, not-
ing on the application the joint nature of their admis-
sion requests. Alternatively, students may apply to the
Graduate School during their first year of Law School.
Further information on the program is available from
the Holland Law Center and from the Department of
Urban and Regional Planning.

MASTER OF BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
The degree of Master of Building Construction is
designed for those students who wish to pursue ad-
vanced work in management of construction, con-
struction techniques, and research problems in the
construction field.
The general requirements are the same as those for
,Master of Science degrees without thesis except that a
minimum of 33 credits is required. At least 24 credits
must be in the School of Building Construction in
graduate level courses of which at least 15 credits
must be earned at the 6000 level. The remaining nine


credits may be earned in other departments at the
3000 level or above when these courses are included
as a part of an approved program of study. A thesis is
not required, but an independent research study
(BCN 6934) of at least three credits is required. In ex-
ceptional cases with the approval of the graduate fac-
ulty this independent study can be taken for up to
five credits.
When the student's course work is completed, or
practically so, and the independent research report is
complete, the supervisory committee is required to
examine the student orally or in writing on (1) the in-
dependent research report, (2) the major subjects, (3)
the minor or minors and (4) matters of a general na-
ture pertaining to the field of study. The examination
must be given on campus with all participants pres-
ent.


MASTER OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
The requirements for the Master of Business Ad-
ministration degree are designed to give students (1)
the conceptual knowledge for understanding the
functions and behavior common to all organizations,
and (2) the analytical, problem-solving, and decision-
making skills essential for effective management. The
emphasis isupon developing the student's capacities
and skills for business decision making.
The curriculum is structured so students may
deepen their knowledge in a specialized field by
selecting an approved concentration. Included in
these concentrations are accounting, economics, fi-
nance, health and hospital administration, insurance,
law, management, marketing, and real estate. Several
areas of specialization having different emphases are
offered within some concentrations. Students may
also expand their knowledge in several areas instead
of specializing- and pursue a generalist option by
selecting approved courses from more than one field
of business administration.
Admission.-Applicants for admission must submit
satisfactory scores on the Graduate Management
Admissions Test (GMAT) as well as transcripts for all
previous academic work. Significant work experience
is considered favorably. Applicants whose native lan-
guage is not English are required to submit, in addi-
tion, scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Lan-
guage (TOEFL).
A heterogeneous student body is seen as an impor-
tant asset of the program. Accordingly the under-
graduate background of students includes a wide
range of disciplines. While the curriculum assumes no
previous academic work in managerial disciplines or
business administration, there are four basic prerequi-
sites an individual must have taken prior to entering
the program: differential and integral calculus, in-
troductory statistics, intermediate macroeconomics,
intermediate microeconomics. In some cases appli-
cants may be admitted subject to completion of these
prerequisites.
Students are admitted in the fall semester only. Ap-
plications should be made as early as possible during
the preceding academic year. Applications received
after May 1 will be considered on the basis of avail-
able space. For more specific information on admis-
sion as well as other aspects of the program, contact
the Director of the Master of Business Administration
Program, College of Business Administration.









Work Required.-A minimum of 57 credits of
course work is required including 36 credits of re-
quired courses, nine credits of concentration elec-
tives, six credits of nonconcentration electives, three
credits of a quantitative elective, and three credits of
business environment.
Concentration.-A minimum of nine credits is re-
quired in the concentration. All courses to be counted
toward satisfying this requirement must be approved
by the concentration adviser. Some concentrations
may require more than the. minimum nine credits.
Moreover, students may be required to take addi-
tional preparatory courses if their backgrounds are
not sufficient.
Concentration in Health and Hospital Adminis-
tration.-The Master of Business Administration de-
gree with a concentration in health and hospital.
administration is offered by the College of Business
Administration in conjunction with the College of
Health Related Professions. In addition to meeting
the usual requirements for admission to the Graduate
School, students who apply for this concentration
must communicate directly with the Chairman of the
Program in Health and Hospital Administration, who
will arrange for a personal interview with members of
a faculty selection committee. The number of stu-
dents accepted for each class is limited and applica-
tions submitted after April 1 may not be considered.
MBA/JD Program.-A program of concurrent stud-
ies leading to a Master of Business Administration and
-a Juris Doctor is offered under the joint auspices of
the College of Business Administration and the Col-
lege of Law. Both degrees are awarded after a four-
year course of study. Students must take both the
LSAT and the GMAT prior to admission and meet the
curriculum requirements of both degrees.
MASTER OF EDUCATION
The degree of Master of Education is a professional
degree designed to meet the need for professional
personnel to serve a variety of functions required in
established and emerging educational activities of
modern society. A thesis is not required.
A minimum of 36 credits is required in all master's
programs with at least half of these credits in courses
at the 5000 level or above. Twenty-one credits in edu-
cation, with 15 at the graduate level, and five credits
in courses outside education are included. Two ex-
ceptions are (1) only 12 credits in education, all at the
graduate level, are required for students having at
least 21 credits in a baccalaureate program for teacher
preparation, and (2) 15 credits in courses outside edu-
cation are required for these same students if their
master's programs are in subject specialization teach-
er education, vocational, technical and adult educa-
tion, or foundations of education.
At least 16 credits must be earned while enrolled as
a graduate student in courses offered on the
Gainesville campus of the University of Florida, in-
cluding registration for at least six credits.in a single
semester.

MASTER OF ENGINEERING
A student seeking a master's degree in the field of
engineering may become a candidate for the Master
of Engineering degree with or without thesis, pro-
vided such a candidate has a bachelor's degree in en-
gineering from an ECPD-accredited curriculum or has
taken sufficient articulation course work to meet the
minimum requirements specified by ECPD. Students


REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES / 13

who do not meet these requirements may become a
candidate for the Master of Science degree, provided
they meet departmental requirements for admission.
The general intent in making this distinction is to en-
courage those who are professionally oriented to seek
the Master of Engineering degree, and those who are
more scientifically oriented and those who have
science-based backgrounds to seek the Master of Sci-
ence degree.
Work Required.-The minimum course work re-
quired for the master's degree with thesis is 30 credits
which may include up to six credits of the research
course numbered 6971 in all departments. At least 12
credits, excluding 6971, must be in the student's major
field of study. A minimum of 32 credits of course
work is required, with at least 16 credits in the
student's major field for both of the above degrees
without thesis. At least 50% of the required 32 credits
must be in graduate level courses, excluding those
graded as S/U. Courses in the major must be graduate
level. If a minor is chosen, at least five credits of work
are required; two five-credit minors may be taken. In
addition, a multidisciplinary minor in departments
other than the major may be authorized by the super-
visory committee or program adviser. Courses num-
bered 3000 and above may be taken for the minor.
Degree Credit.-In order to qualify for course work
toward the Master of Engineering degree, a student
must first be admitted to the Graduate School at the
University of Florida. The amount of course work
toward this degree that may be taken at an off-cam-
pus center will depend upon the student's individual
program and the courses provided through the cen-
ter.
Examinations.-A student seeking the Master of En-
gineering degree with or without thesis is required to
pass a comprehensive oral or written examination, ad-
ministered on campus with all participants present, at
the completion of the course work. A student who is
a candidate for a nonthesis degree who takes less
than half the course work on the Cainesville campus
will be required to pass a comprehensive written ex-
amination administered on the University of Florida
campus by an examining committee recommended
by the Dean of the College of Engineering and ap-
pointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Re-
search. At least one member of the examining com-
mittee must be either the student's program adviser
or a member of the supervisory committee. If a minor
is taken, another member selected from the Graduate
Studies Faculty must be chosen from outside the ma-
jor department to represent the student's minor.
The requirement for an on-campus comprehensive
written examination also applies to the nonthesis op-
tion of the Master of Science degree for students in
the College of Engineering.
Examination requirements for the Master of Science
degree are covered in the section Master of Arts and
Master of Science.


MASTER OF FINE ARTS
The College of Fine Arts offers the Master of Fine
Arts degree with majors in art, music, and theatre. The
requirements for this degree are the same as those for
the Master of Arts with thesis except that a minimum
of 48 credits is required, including six to'ten credits in
6971 (Research for Master's Thesis). Students may
elect to substitute 6973 (Individual Project), creative
work in lieu of the written thesis. Students intending







14 / GENERAL INFORMATION


to pursue this option should follow the general pro-
cedures below:
1. Obtain approval of a proposed project from the
supervisory committee.
2. Include in the proposal a description of the na-
ture of the project, the method and sources of re-
search material, and how the project will be recorded
-i.e., slides, tapes, scripts, program notes, etc.
3. Make the project conform to the departmental
format. To insure future accessibility and for record
keeping purposes, a copy of the results must be de-
posited in a designated library.
Two years of work in residence, are usually neces-
sary to complete degree requirements.
Students applying for admission to the Master of
Fine Arts program should have completed an under-
graduate degree program or equivalent in the area of
specialization they wish to pursue at the graduate
level. In addition, candidates are required to submit
slides and/or a portfolio of their creative work, or to
audition, prior to being accepted into the program.
Art--The MFA degree with a major in art is de-
signed for those who wish to prepare themselves as
teachers of art in colleges and universities and for
those who wish to attain a professional level profi-
ciency in studio work or advanced work in art history.
Specialization is offered in art history and art studio
(ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, sculpture). The MFA is generally ac-
cepted as the terminal degree in the studio area.
In addition to the general requirements stated
above, a minimum of 21 credits in the major and a
minimum of 6 credits in non-art electives, ARH 6897 is
required for all graduate majors. ARH 5805 is required
for all students who select the written thesis, or who
major in art history. The remaining credits may be
taken in advanced courses in the areas of special-
ization listed above including one art history class.
Music.-The MFA degree with a major in music is
designed primarily for those who wish to prepare for
careers as teachers in colleges and universities, per-
formers, music historians, music critics, church musi-
cians, composers, and conductors. Recipients of the
MFA degree will be prepared to continue doctoral
study in the various areas of music listed above.
In addition to the general requirements stated
above, registration in courses numbered MUS 6716-
3 credits; MUH 6930 and MUL 6931-9 credits; and
MUT 6930-6 credits is required.
Theatre.-The MFA degree with a major in theatre
is designed primarily for those interested in
production-oriented theatrical careers. Specialization
is offered in the areas of directing and acting, design
and technical theatre, costume, and dance and stage
movement. The craft skills encompassed in the pro-
gram are given subsequent application in public and
studio productions.
In addition to the general requirements stated
above, course work must include TPA 6219-3 credits;
THE 6521-3 credits; a total of 18 credits of theatre
practicum activities; and a total of 12 credits of ad-
vanced study in the student's area of specialization.
The balance of the program, exclusive of six credits in
thesis research, is to be completed with elective
theatre courses.

MASTER OF FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION
The Master of Forest Resources and Conservation
program is designed for those students who wish ad-


ditional professional preparation, rather than for
those interested primarily in research. This nonthesis
degree is offered in the same specializations as the
Master of Science degree. The basic requirements, in-
cluding those for admission, supervisory committee,
plan of study, and admission to candidacy, are the
same as those indicated under General Regulations
for master's degrees in this Catalog.
Work' Required.-A minimum of 32 credits of
course work is required, with at least 16 credits in
graduate level courses. A minimum of 12 credits must
be in a selected area of specialization in graduate
level courses. A thesis is not required, but the student
must submit a technical paper in an appropriate field.
A comprehensive written qualifying examination, giv-
en by the supervisory committee is required one
semester prior to graduation. A final oral examination,
covering the candidate's entire field of study, is re-
quired. Both examinations must be given on campus.

MASTER OF HEALTH EDUCATION
The program leading to the degree of Master of
Health Education is designed to meet the need for ad-
vanced preparation of health educators to serve in
positions of leadership in school and community set-
tings.
Work Required.-A minimum of 34 credits of
course work is required, of which at least 50% must be
graduate level courses in health education. Of the re-
maining 50% at least three health related courses or
special skills of health education must be taken out-
side the Department of Health Education and Safety.
Course approval must be obtained from the student's
academic adviser.
Off-Campus Work.-The regulations governing the
use of off-campus work are the same as those for the
Master of Education degree.
Supervisory Committee.-A committee of the fac-
ulty of the Department of Health Education and Safe-
ty, with the Dean of the College, or a designated rep-
resentative, serving as chairperson and the Dean for
Graduate Studies,and Research as an ex-officio mem-
ber, will supervise the work of students registered in
this program.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to this pro-
gram is not a guarantee that the student will be ad-
mitted to candidacy for the degree. The student
should apply for admission to candidacy no later than
the last day of classes in the semester prior to the
semester of anticipated graduation.
Final Examination.-The candidate must pass a
final written or oral examination taken on campus
upon completion of course work. This written or oral
examination will be confined largely to the student's
major field of study.

MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE
The Master of Health Science degree is designed to
meet the need for leadership personnel in allied
health to serve a variety of functions required in es-
tablished and emerging health care programs. The
areas of concentration are occupational therapy and
rehabilitation counseling.
In occupational therapy, a foundation program is
required; i.e., evidence of completion of an ac-
credited basic professional curriculum in occupa-
tional therapy. The work required is satisfactory com-
pletion of a minimum of 36 credits of academic
course work. At least 50% of these credits must be at









the 5000 level or above, including at least 28 credits in
the major area. The concentration in occupational
therapy requires appropriate practicum experiences
and an internship. A thesis is not required but the
candidate in occupational therapy must complete an
approved departmental study or research project as a
part of the degree requirements.
The rehabilitation counseling concentration re-
quires evidence of relevant work experience, educa-
tion, and interest in the profession. The department
requires completion of a minimum of 35 credits in the
major area, including five credits for a one semester
internship and nine credits for clinical practice prior
to the internship. Students fulfilling the internship re-
quirement in the summer terms also must complete
15 weeks of full-time work in a rehabilitation setting.
They will receive their degrees at the fall commence-
ment. The remaining credits for completing the 50
credit total are selected from courses which comple-
ment the student's academic background for re-
habilitation counseling.
Additional requirements are listed under the Gen-
eral Regulations section for all master's degrees.

MASTER OF LAWS IN TAXATION
(LL.M. IN TAX.)
The instructional program leading to the degree
Master of Laws in Taxation offers advanced instruc-
tion in taxation, with emphasis on federal taxation
and particularly federal income taxation, for law grad-
uates who plan to specialize in such matters in the
practice of law.
Work Required.-Degree candidates must com-
plete 24 credit hours in graduate level courses, 20 of
which are in law college courses in taxation, including
a research course in which the candidate is enrolled
for an entire academic year.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING
AND MASTER OF NURSING
The College of Nursing offers the Master of Science
in Nursing and Master of Nursing degrees with
clinical specializations in women's and infants' nurs-
ing, child health nursing, family and community
health, adult health nursing, and psychiatric-mental
health nursing. In addition to the clinical special-
ization, each student is expected to acquire the
knowledge and skills essential to one of the func-
tional areas of practice: teaching or administration.
-Work Required.-A minimum of 48 semester hours
is required for graduation. Candidates for the Master
of Science in Nursing must prepare and present
theses acceptable to their supervisory committees
and the Graduate School. Candidates for the Master
of Nursing degree are required to complete a project.
Final Examination.-During the final semester each
student in the Master of Science in Nursing program
must pass an oral examination in defense of the
thesis. A final comprehensive oral or written examina-
tion must be passed by candidates for the Master of
Nursing degree. These examinations must be taken
on campus with all participants present.

MASTER OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Work Required.-A minimum of 34 credits of
course work is required, of which at least 50% must be
selected from graduate-level courses offered in the


REQUIREMENTS FOR ENGINEER DEGREE / 15

Department of Professional Physical Education. All
course work must be approved by the chairperson of
the student's supervisory committee. If knowledge
deficiencies are identified, additional course work
may be required.
Off-Campus Work.-The regulations governing the
use of off-campus work are the same as those for the
Master of Education degree.
Supervisory Committee.-A committee of the fac-
ulty of the College of Physical Education, Health, and
Recreation, with the Dean of the College, or a desig-
nated representative, serving as chairperson, and the
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research as an ex-of-
ficio member, will supervise the work of students reg-
istered in this program.
Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to this pro-
gram is not a guarantee of admission to candidacy.
Application should be made no later than the last day
of classes in the term prior to that in which the stu-
dent expects to graduate.
Final Examination.The candidate must pass a
final examination taken on campus upon completion
of the course work. This written or oral examination
will be confined largely to the student's major field of
study.
MASTER OF STATISTICS
The minimum credits required for the Master of
Statistics degree are 36, including no less than 20 cred-
its in the major field. Courses in the degree program
will be selected in consultation with the major adviser
and approved by the student's supervisory commit-
tee. The work in the major field must be in courses
approved for graduate major credit. At least half the
36 credits must be in graduate level courses. The stu-
dent will be required to pass, as judged by the super-
visory committee, a comprehensive written and oral
examination covering the major. This examination
must be taken on campus.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

DEGREE OF ENGINEER
For those engineers who need additional technical
depth and diversification in their education beyond
the master's degree, the College of Engineering offers
the degree of Engineer.
This degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours
of graduate work beyond the master's degree. It is not
to be considered as a partial requirement toward the
Ph.D. degree. The student's objective after the
master's degree should be the Ph.D. or the Engineer
degree.
Admission to the Program.-To be admitted to the
program, students must have completed a master's
degree in engineering at an accredited institution ap-
proved by the Graduate School, University of Florida,
and apply for admission to the Graduate School of the
University of Florida. The master's degree is regarded
as the essential foundation for the degree of Engineer.
Course and Residence Requirements.-A total reg-
istration in an approved program of at least 30
semester credit hours beyond the master's.degree is
required. This minimum requirement must be earned
through the University of Florida. These credits may
be completed in any graduate program administered
by the College of Engineering. The last 30 semester
credit hours must be completed within five calendar
years.







16 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Supervisory Committee.-Each student admitted
to the program will be advised by a supervisory com-
mittee consisting of at least three members of the
graduate faculty. Two members are selected from the
major department and at least one from a supporting
department. In addition, every effort should be made
to have a representative from industry as an external
adviser for the student's program.
This committee will inform the student of all regu-
lations pertaining to the degree program. The com-
mittee is nominated by the department chairperson,
approved by the Dean of the College of Engineering,
and appointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and
Research. The Dean for Graduate Studies and Re-
search is an ex-officio member of all supervisory com-
mittees and should be notified in writing in advance
of all committee meetings. If a thesis or report is a re-
quirement in the plan of study, the committee will
approve the proposed thesis or report and the plans
for carrying it out. The thesis also must be submitted
to the Graduate School. The committee will also con-
duct the final examination on campus when the plan
of'study is completed.
Plan of Study.-Each plan of study is developed on
an individual basis for each student. Thus, there are
no specific requirements for the major or minor; each
student is considered as a separate case. If the plan of
study includes a thesis, the student may register for
from 6 to 12 semester credit hours of thesis research in
a course numbered 6971.
Admission to Candidacy.-Application for admis-
sion to candidacy should be made no later than the
last day of classes in the semester prior to the
semester in which the student plans to receive the de-
gree.
Thesis.-The thesis should represent performance
at a level above that ordinarily associated with the
master's degree. It should clearly be an original con-
tribution; this may take the form of scientific research,
a design project, or an industrial project approved by
the supervisory committee. Work on the thesis may
be conducted in an industrial or governmental labo-
ratory under conditions stipulated by the supervisory
committee.
Final Examination.-After the student has com-
pleted all work on the plan of study, the supervisory
committee conducts a final comprehensive oral or
written examination, which also involves a defense of
the thesis if one is included in the program. This ex-
amination must be taken on campus with all partici-
pants present.



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

ED.S. AND ED.D.
The College of Education offers programs leading
to the degrees Specialist in Education, Doctor of Edu-
cation, and Doctor of Philosophy. These programs are
available in five areas: administration and super-
vision, curriculum and'instruction, foundations of ed-
ucation, counselor education, .and special education.
The Specialist in Education degree is awarded for, a
two-year program of graduate study. The Doctor of
Education degree requires writing a doctoral disserta-
tion. Foreign languages are not required. The Doctor
of Philosophy degree in the College of Education is
described under Requirements for the Ph.D.


Programs leading to these degrees are administered
through the individual departments in the College of
Education. It is the responsibility of the department's
chairperson to carry out the policies of the Graduate
School and the graduate committee of the College of
Education. More specific information about the vari-
ous programs and departmental requirements may be
obtained from the individual departments. General
information or assistance is available through the Of-
fice of Student Services in Education, Room 134, Nor-
man Hall.
Admission to the Ed.S., Ed.D., and Ph.D. programs is
open only to persons who have met the following re-
quirements:
1. Successfully completed 36 credits of professional
course work in education. Applicants for admission to
advanced degree programs in the College of Educa-
tion who meet all the requirements except for suc-
cessfully completing 36 credits of professional educa-
tion courses may be given provisional admission and
full admission when they have completed the re-
quired 36 credits.
2. Presented a record of successful professional ex-
perience, the appropriateness of which will be de-
termined by the instructional department passing on
the applicant's qualifications for admission. In some
instances, departments may admit students with the
understanding that further experience may be re-
quired before the student will be recommended for
the degree.
Admission to advanced degree programs is based
on the following criteria:
1. High scholastic average for previous graduate
work (3.5 grade-point average or above, as computed
at the University of Florida, will be considered evi-
dence of good scholarship).
2. Satisfactory scores on the Aptitude Test of the
Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
The judgment concerning admission of an individ-
ual student is made according to the above criteria by
the major department.

SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION
Primary emphasis in an Ed.S. program is placed on
the development of the competencies needed for a
specific job. Programs are available in the various
areas of concentration within the Departments of Ed-
ucational Administration and Supervision, Founda-
tions of Education, Counselor Education, and Special
Education and within the Division of Curriculum and
Instruction.
To study for this degree, the student must apply
and be admitted to the Graduate School of the Uni-
versity of Florida. The student must also apply and be
admitted to candidacy for the degree no later than
the term prior to that in which the degree is to be
awarded'. All work for the degree must be completed
within seven years after admission to the Graduate
School.
The Ed.S. degree is awarded at the completion of a
planned program with a minimum of 72 credits
beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of 36
credits beyond the master's degree. All credits ac-
cepted for the program must contribute to the unity
and the stated objective of the total program. Stu-
dents .are tested (in no case earlier than six months
prior to receipt of degree) on both a written and oral
examination, given on campus, by a committee
selected by the department chairperson. A thesis is






REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 17


not required; however, each program will include
continuing attention to a research component rele-
vant to the professional role for which the student is
preparing.
Students who enter the program with an appropri-
ate master's degree from another accredited institu-
tion must complete a minimum of 36 credits of post
master's study to satisfy the following requirements.
1. Twenty-one credits in graduate level courses.
2. At least 12 credits in graduate level professional
education courses.
3. At least one semester of full-time residence on
campus in Gainesville.
Twelve credits for appropriate courses offered off-
campus by the University of Florida may be trans-
ferred to the program. Six credits may be transferred
from another institution of the State University Sys-
tem or from any institution offering a doctoral degree;
however, credit transferred from another institution
reduces proportionately the credit transferred from
University of Florida off-campus courses.
Students who enter the program with a bachelor's
degree only must, during their 72 credit program, sat-
isfy these requirements in addition to the require-
ments of the Master of Education degree or its equiva-
lent.

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
A doctoral candidate is-expected to achieve under-
standing of the broad field of education and com-
petence in an area of specialization. Programs are
available in the various areas of concentration within
the Departments of Educational Administration and
Supervision, Foundations of Education, Counselor Ed-
ucation, Special Education, and the Division of Cur-
riculum and Instruction.
Admission to a program of work leading to the de-
gree of Doctor of Education requires admission to the
Graduate School.
All courses beyond the master's degree taken at an-
other institution, to be applied toward the Doctor of
Education degree, must be taken at an institution of-
fering the doctoral degree and must be approved for
graduate credit by the Graduate School of the Univer-
sity of Florida.
Minors.-Minor work or work in cognate fields is
required. Minor work may be completed in any de-
partment, other than the major department, approved
for master's or doctoral degree programs as listed in
this Catalog. If one minor is selected, at least 15 cred-
its of work therein will be required; if two minors are
chosen, one must have at least 12 credits of course
work, the other at least 5 credits.
Courses in physical education approved by the Col-
lege of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation
and the Graduate School as subject matter or content
courses may be used in the cognate work or as a mi-
nor.
In lieu of a.minor or minors, the candidate may
present a suitable program of no fewer than 15 credits
of cognate work in at least two or more departments.
If two fields are included, there shall be no fewer than
five credits in either field. If three or more fields are
included, the five credit requirement for each field
does not apply. This program must have the approval
of the student's supervisory committee. The College
of Education faculty will expect the candidate to be
prepared to answer questions, at the time of the oral
examination, in any of the areas chosen.


Admission to Candidacy.-Admission to candidacy
for the degree of Doctor of Education requires suc-
cessful completion of the qualifying examinations
and approval of a dissertation topic. Recommenda-
tion to the Graduate School for admission to can-
didacy is based on the action of the supervisory com-
mittee. Application for admission to candidacy
should be made as soon as the qualifying examination
has been passed and a dissertation topic has been ap-
proved by the student's supervisory committee.
Qualifying Examination.-The applicant is recom-
mended for the qualifying examination by the super-
visory committee after completion of sufficient
course work.
The examination, administered on campus by the
student's major department, consists of (1) a general
section; (2) a field of specialization section; (3) exami-
nation in the minor or minors, where involved; and
(4) an oral examination conducted by the applicant's
supervisory committee.
If the student fails the qualifying examination, a re-
examination will not be given unless recommended
for special reasons by the supervisory committee and
approved by the Graduate School. At least one
semester of additional preparation is considered es-
sential before re-examination.
Research Preparation Requirement.-EDF 7486
(Methods of Educational Research) or its equivalent,
for which a basic course in statistics is a prerequisite,
is a minimum requirement in all programs. Additional
requirements vary with the department and with the
student's plans for doctoral research.
For information relating to Residence, the Super-
visory Committee, Time Lapse, the Dissertation, and
the Final Examination, the student is referred to the
material presented under the heading Requirements
for the Ph.D. These statements are applicable to both
degrees.



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE

PH.D.
Doctoral study consists of the independent mastery
of a field of knowledge and the successful pursuit of
research: For this reason, doctoral students act, in
large measure, on their own responsibility; conse-
quently, doctoral programs are more flexible and var-
ied than those leading to other graduate degrees. The
Graduate Council does not specify what courses will
be required for the Ph.D. degree. The general require-
ment is that the program should be unified in relation
to a clear objective and that it should have the con-
sidered approval of the student's entire supervisory
committee.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
The course requirements for doctoral.degrees vary
from field to field and from student to student. The
student's supervisory committee has the responsi-
bility for recommending individual courses of study
for each doctoral student subject to the approval of
the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. A mini-
mum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor's degree is re-
quired for the doctoral degree.
Major.-The student working for the Ph.D. must
elect to do the major work in a department specifical-






18 / GENERAL INFORMATION


ly approved for the offering of doctoral courses and
the supervision of dissertations. These departments
are listed under Graduate Programs.
Minor.-With the approval of the supervisory com-
mittee, the student may choose one or more minor
fields. Minor work may be completed in any depart-
ment, other than the major department, approved for
master's or doctor's degree programs as listed in this
Catalog.
If one minor is chosen, the representative of the mi-
nor department on the supervisory committee shall
suggest from 12 to 24 credits as preparation for a qual-
ifying examination. A part of this background may
have been acquired in the master's program. If two
minors are chosen, each must include at least eight
credits. Competence in the minor area may be dem-
onstrated through a written examination conducted
by the minor department or through the oral quali-
fying examination.
Course work in the minor at the doctoral level need
not be restricted to the courses of one department,
provided that the minor has a clearly stated objective
and that the combination of courses representing the
minor shall be approved by the Graduate School. This
procedure is not required for a departmental minor.

SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Supervisory committees are nominated by the de-
partment chairperson, approved by the dean of the
college concerned, and appointed by the Dean for
Graduate Studies and Research. The committee
should be appointed as soon as possible after the stu-
dent has begun doctoral work, and in general no later
than the end of the second semester of equivalent
full-time study. The Dean for Graduate Studies and
Research is an ex-officio member of all supervisory
committees and should be notified in writing well in
advance of all examinations conducted by such com-
mittees.
Duties and Responsibilities.-Duties of the super-
visory committee follow:
1. To inform the student of all regulations govern-
ing the degree sought. It should be noted, however,
that this does not absolve the student from the re-
sponsibility of informing himself concerning these
regulations. (See Student Responsibility.)
2. To meet immediately after appointment to pass
on the qualifications of the student and to discuss
and approve a program of study.
3. To meet to discuss and approve the proposed
dissertation project and the plans for carrying it out.
4. To conduct the qualifying examination or, in
those cases where the examination is administered by
the department, to take part in it. In either event, no
fewer than five faculty members shall be present with
the student for the oral portion of the examination.
This examination must be given on campus.
5. To meet when the work on the dissertation is at
least one-half completed to review procedure,
progress, and expected results and to make sugges-
tions for completion.
6. To meet on campus when the dissertation is
completed and conduct the final oral examination to
assure that the dissertation is a piece of original re-
search and a contribution to knowledge. No fewer
than five faculty members shall be present with the
candidate for this examination, but only the members
of the official supervisory committee are required to
sign the dissertation. The dissertation must be ap-


proved unanimously by the official supervisory com-
mittee.
Membership.-The supervisory committee for a
candidate for the doctoral degree shall consist of no
fewer than three members selected from the graduate
faculty. At least two members will be from the college
or department recommending the degree, and at least
one member will be drawn from a different educa-
tional discipline. The chairperson and at least one ad-
ditional member of the committee will be members
of the Doctoral Research Faculty of the University of
Florida.
If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee will
include at least one person selected from the gradu-
ate faculty from outside the discipline of the major for
the purpose of representing the student's minor. In
the event that the student elects more than one mi-
nor, each- minor area may, at the discretion of the de-
partments concerned, be represented on the super-
visory committee.
When a minor is not designated, the supervisory
committee will include at least one member of the
graduate faculty from outside the discipline of the
major. The Graduate Council desires each supervisory
committee to function as a university committee, as
contrasted with a departmental committee, in order
to bring university-wide standards to bear upon the,
various doctoral degrees.
In unusual cases the doctoral research may require
the guidance of a specialist from an area of study oth-
er than that of the chairperson of the supervisory
committee. In such cases the department head may
recommend appointment of a chairperson and a
cochairperson, with the latter being a member of the
graduate faculty but not necessarily the Doctoral Re-
search Faculty. A cochairperson may also be ap-
pointed to serve during a planned absence of the
chairperson; in this case both the chairperson and the
cochairperson must be appointed to the Doctoral Re-
search Faculty.


LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
Any foreign language requirement, or a substitute
therefore, for the Ph.D. is established by the major de-
partment with approval of the college. The student
should check with the graduate coordinator of the
appropriate department for specific information. The
foreign language departments offer special classes for
graduate students who are beginning the study of a
language. See the current Schedule of Courses for the
languages in which this assistance is available.
The ability to use the English language correctly
and effectively, as judged by the supervisory commit-
tee, is required of all candidates.


RESIDENCE
Candidates for the doctoral degree must satisfy the
minimum residence requirements by completing
beyond the master's degree (1) 30 semester hours in
one calendar year, or (2) 36 semester hours in no more
than four semesters within a period of two calendar
years on the Gainesville campus of the University of
Florida.
Candidates in the College of Agriculture may do
their research at certain branch stations of the Univer-
sity of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station where
adequate staff and facilities are available.






REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D. / 19


QUALIFYING EXAMINATION
The qualifying examination, which is required of all
candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy,
may be taken during the second term of the second
year of graduate study. The examination, conducted
by the supervisory committee, with the aid of the ma-
jor and minor departments, is both written and oral
and covers the major and minor subjects. At least five
faculty members must be present with the student at
the oral portion. The supervisory committee has the
responsibility at this time of deciding whether the
student is qualified to continue work toward the
Ph.D. degree.
If a student fails the qualifying examination, the
Graduate School must be notified. A re-examination
may be requested, but it must be recommended by
the supervisory committee and approved by the
Graduate School. At least one semester of additional
preparation is considered essential before re-exami-
nation.
An announcement of the scheduling of each
student's qualifying examination must be submitted
in writing to the Dean for Graduate Studies and Re-
search. If the student does not file for admission to
candidacy immediately after the qualifying examina-
tion, a written report of the result of the examination
must be filed with the Graduate School Office.
Time Lapse.-Between the qualifying examination
and the date of the degree there must be a minimum
of two semesters if the-candidate is in full-time resi-
dence, or a calendar year if the candidate is on less
than a full-time basis. The semester in which the qual-
ifying examination is passed is counted, provided that
the examination occurs before the midpoint of the
term.


ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
A graduate student does not become an actual can-
didate for the Ph.D. degree until granted formal ad-
mission to candidacy. Such admission requires the ap-
proval of the student's supervisory committee, the
department chairperson, the college dean, and the
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research. The ap-
proval must be based on (1) the academic record of
the student, (2) the opinion of the supervisory com-
mittee concerning overall fitness for candidacy, (3) an
approved dissertation topic, and (4) a qualifying ex-
amination as described above. Application for admis-
sion to candidacy should be made as soon as the qual-
ifying examination has been passed and a dissertation
topic has been approved by the student's supervisory
committee.

DISSERTATION
Every candidate for a doctoral degree is required to
prepare and present a dissertation that shows inde-
pendent investigation and is acceptable in form and
content to the supervisory committee and to the
Graduate School. Since all doctoral dissertations will
be published by microfilm, it is necessary that the
work be of publishable quality and that it be in a form
suitable for publication.
The original copy of the dissertation must be pres-
ented to the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research
on or before the date specified in the University
Calendar. It must contain an abstract and be accom-


panied by four unpaged separate copies of the ab-
stract, a letter of transmittal from the supervisory
chairperson, and all doctoral forms. After corrections
have been made, and no later than the specified
formal submission date, the fully signed copy of the
dissertation, together with the signed Final Examina-
tion Report, should be returned to the Graduate
School. The original copy of the dissertation is sent by
the Graduate School to the Library for microfilming
and hardbinding. A second signed copy, reproduced
on required thesis paper, should be given to the office
of the college dean or the graduate coordinator for
subsequent delivery to the Library for hardbinding.
The supervisory chairperson and the candidate will
each need a copy and, if required, another should
also be provided for the departmental library.
Publication of Dissertation.-All candidates for the
Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees are required to pay the sum
of $30 to Student Financial Services, the Hub, for mi-
crofilming their dissertations, and to sign an agree-
ment authorizing publication by microfilm.
Copyright.-The candidate may choose to
copyright the microfilmed dissertation for a charge of
$20 payable by a certified or cashier's check or money
order to University Microfilms attached to the signed
microfilm agreement form. To assure receipt of the
valuable Copyright Registration Certificate, candi-
dates must give permanent addresses through which
they can always be reached.


FINAL EXAMINATION
After submission of the dissertation and the com-
pletion of all other prescribed work for the degree,
but in no case earlier than six months before the con-
ferring of the degree, the candidate will be given a
final examination, oral or written or both, by the su-
pervisory committee meeting on campus. An an-
nouncement of the scheduled examination must be
sent to the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research.
At least five faculty members must be present with
the candidate at the oral portion of this examination.
At the time of the defense all committee members
should sign the signature pages and all committee
and attending faculty members should sign the Final
Examination Report. These may be retained by the su-
pervisory chairman until acceptable completion of
corrections.
Satisfactory performance on this examination and
adherence to all Graduate School regulations out-
lined above complete the requirements for the de-
gree.
Time Limitation.-All work for the doctorate must
be completed within five calendar years after the
qualifying examination, or this examination must be
repeated.


CERTIFICATION
Doctoral candidates who have completed all re-
quirements for the degree, including satisfactory de-
fense and final acceptance of the dissertation, may re-
quest certification to that effect prior to receipt of the
degree. Certification Request Forms, available in the
Graduate School Editorial Office, should be filled out
by the candidate, signed by the college dean, and re-
turned to the Graduate School for verification and
processing.







20 / GENERAL INFORMATION


EXPENSES

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University
must be accompanied by an application fee of $15.
Application fees are nonrefundable. Further instruc-
tions will be found in the Admissions section of this
Catalog.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-
FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
(Section 6C-7.05, Florida Administrative Code)
(1) For the purpose of assessing registration and tui-
tion fees, a student shall be classified as a "Florida"
or "non-Florida" student.
(a) A "Florida student" is a person who has domi-
cile in and who shall have resided in the state of
Florida for at least twelve (12) consecutive
months immediately preceding the first day of
classes of the academic term in which the'stu-
dent enrolls. In determining residency, the uni-
versity may require evidence such as voter regis-
tration, driver's license, automobile registration,
location of bank account, rent receipts or any
other relevant materials as evidence that the ap-
plicant has maintained continuous residency.
Physical presence for the entire twelve-month
period need not be required so long as the con-
duct of the student, taken in total, manifests an
intention to make Florida his or her permanent
dwelling place. If such a student is a minor, it
shall mean that the parent or parents, or legal
guardian of the student shall have domicile in
and have resided in the state of Florida for the
period stated above. "Florida student" classifica-
tion shall also be construed to include students
who held an Immigration and Naturalization
Form 1-151, Resident Alien Registration Receipt
Card, or Cuban Nationals or Vietnamese Refu-
gees who are considered as Resident Aliens, pro-
vided such students meet the residency require-
ment stated above and comply with subsection
(2) below. The burden of establishing facts which
justify classification of a student as a resident and
domiciliary entitled to "Florida student" regis-
tration rates is on the applicant for such classifi-
cation.
(b) In applying this policy:
1. "Student" shall mean a person admitted to
the, or a person allowed to register at the in-
stitution on a space available basis.
2. "Minor" shall mean a person who has not at-
tained. the age of 18 years, and whose dis-
abilities of minority have not been removed by
reason of marriage or by a court of competent
jurisdiction.
3. "Domicile" for fee paying purposes shall de-
note a person's true, fixed, and permanent
home and place of habitation. It is the place
where the applicant lives and remains and to
which he expects to return when he leaves,
without intent to establish domicile elsewhere.
4. "Parent" shall mean a minor's father or
mother, or if one parent has custody of a minor
applicant, it is the parent having court assigned


financial responsibility for the education of the
student; or if there is a court appointed guard-
ian or legal custodian of the minor applicant, it
shall mean the guardian or legal custodian.
5. The term "dependent student," as used in
this rule is the same as a dependent as defined
in sections 151(e)(1)(2)(3) and (4) of the In-
ternal Revenue Code of 1954. A copy of these
provisions in the Internal Revenue Code of
1954 is incorporated in this rule by reference.
6. A "non-Florida" student is a person not
meeting the requirements of subsection (a)
above.
(2) In all applications for admission or registration
at the institution on a space available basis, a Flor-
ida applicant, or if a minor, the parent or legal
guardian of the minor applicant, shall make and file
with such application a written statement, under
oath, that the applicant is a bonafide citizen, resi-
dent, and domiciliary of the state of Florida, en-
titled as such to classification as a "Florida student"
under the terms and conditions prescribed for
citizens, residents, and domiciliaries of the state of
Florida. All claims to "Florida student" classification
must be supported by evidence as stated in
6C-7.05(1) if requested by the registering authority.
(3) A "non-Florida student" or, if a minor, his pa-
rent or guardian, after having been a resident and
domiciliary of Florida for twelve (12) consecutive
months, may apply for and be granted reclass-
ification prior to the first day of classes of any sub-
sequent term, provided, however, that those stu-
dents who are non-resident aliens or who are in the
United States on a non-immigration visa will not be
entitled to reclassification. An application for re-
classification as a "Florida student" shall comply
with provisions of subsection (2) above. An appli-
cant who has been classified as a "non-Florida" stu-
dent at time of original enrollment shall furnish evi-
dence as stated in 6C-7.05(1) to the satisfaction of
the registering authority that the applicant has
maintained continuous. residency in the state for
the twelve months required to establish residence
for tuition purposes. In the absence of such evi-
dence, the applicant shall not be reclassified as a
"Florida student." In addition, the application for
reclassification must be accompanied by a certified
copy of a declaration of intent to establish legal
domicile in the state, which intent must have been
filed with the Clerk of'the Circuit Court, as pro-
vided by Section 222.17, Florida Statutes. If the re-
quest for reclassification and the necessary docu-
mentation is not received by the registrar prior to
the last day of registration for the term in which the
student intends to be reclassified, the student will
not be reclassified for that term.
(4) Unless evidence to the contrary appears, it shall
be presumed by the registering authority of the in-
stitution at which a student is registering that:
(a) The spouse of any person who is classified or
is eligible for classification as a "Florida student"
is likewise entitled to classification as a "Florida
student." This provision will not apply in the case
of students who are non-resident aliens or who
are in the United States on a non-immigration
visa.
(b) If an applicant's eligibility for classification as
a "Florida student" is based on the residency of
the spouse, the spouse shall make and file with






EXPENSES / 21


the application a written statement under oath,
that said person is the spouse of the applicant
and a bonafide citizen, resident and domiciliary
of the state of Florida, entitled as such to classifi-
cation as a "Florida student."
(c) No person over the age of 18 years shall be
deemed to have gained residence while attend-
ing any educational institution in this state as a
full-time student, as such status is defined by the
Board of Regents, in the absence of a clear dem-
onstration that he has established domicile and
residency in the state, as provided under subsec-
tion (3) above.
(d) Any "Florida student" who remains in the
state, after his parent previously domiciled in
Florida or stationed in Florida on military orders
removes from this state, shall be entitled to re-
main classified as a "Florida student" so long as
his or her attendance at a school or schools in
Florida shall be deemed "continuous." However,
such student claiming continuous attendance
must have been enrolled at a school, college or
university for a normal academic year in each
calendar year, or the appropriate portion or por-
tions thereof, from the beginning of the period
for which continuous attendance is claimed.
Such a student need not attend summer sessions
or other such intersession beyond the normal ac-
ademic year in order to render his attendance
"continuous."
(5) Appeal from a determination denying Florida
student status to any applicant therefore may be in-
itiated after appropriate administrative remedies
are exhausted by the filing of a petition for review
pursuant to Section 120.68 F.S. in the District Court
of Appeal in the appellate district in which the in-
stitution maintains its headquarters or where a
party resides.
(6) Any student granted status as a "Florida stu-
dent," which status is based on a sworn statement
which is false shall, upon determination of such
falsity, be subject to such disciplinary sanctions as
may be imposed by the president of the university.
(7) Special Categories-The following categories
shall be treated as Florida residents for tuition
purposes if adequate documentation is provided:
(a) A member of the Armed Services of the Unit-
ed States who is stationed in Florida on active
duty pursuant to military orders, the spouse and
dependent students.
(b) A veteran of the Armed Forces of the United
States of America with twenty (20) or more years
of active military service, including the spouse
and dependent students of such veteran's im-
mediate family, provided that the veteran is in
Florida at time of retirement or moves to Florida
within one year following retirement and files a
declaration of Florida domicile.
(c) Full-time elementary, secondary, and com-
munity college faculty members under current
teaching contracts in the state of Florida and their
spouses and dependent students.
(d) Full-time faculty, administrative and pro-
fessional and career service employees of the
University System and their spouses and depen-
dent students.
(e) A student certified by his respective state for
participation in the Academic Common Market
Program of the Southern Regional Education


Board who is enrolled in a program approved by
the Florida Board of Regents.
(f) Florida domiciliaries living in the Panama
Canal Zone who have not established domicile
elsewhere, including the spouse and dependent
students.
(g) Florida residents who had their residency in
SFlorida interrupted by service in the U. S. armed
forces, the Peace Corps or other similar volunteer
organizations fostered by the United States gov-
ernment shall be deemed to have had residency
in Florida during times of service in the afore-
mentioned organizations.
(8) Reciprocal Agreements. The Board of Regents
may enter into agreements with appropriate agen-
cies and institutions of higher education in other
states and foreign countries providing for the
reciprocal exchange of students enrolled, and pros-
pective in higher educational institutions to facil-
itate utilization of public higher educational in-
stitutions in this State and other states or countries.
Such agreements may include provisions for waiver
or reduction of nonresident tuition for designated
categories of students and may include contractual
payments to such other state or country, subject to
the availability of appropriations. Such agreements
shall have as their purpose the mutual improve-
ment of educational advantages for residents of this
State and such other states or countries with whom
agreements may be made.
To establish Flofida residence a student applying
for admission should complete the residence affidavit
on the application form.
To change status from non-Florida a student must
present to the Registrar's Office a copy of the Declara-
tion of Intent and the completed Residence Affidavit
Form. To claim the military exception the student
must furnish the Registrar's Office a copy of the mili-
tary orders showing assignment to Florida. A public
school official must submit a written statement from
his or her superior as to his or her public school status.
A University employee must submit a statement from
his or her employer as to his or her employment sta-
tus.


REGISTRATION AND INSTRUCTIONAL
FEES
The University Calendar appearing at the front of
this Catalog sets forth the beginning and ending dates
of each semester.
The following fees and charges are proposed at this
time. However, since the Catalog must be published
considerably in advance of its effective date, it is not
always possible to anticipate changes, and the fee
schedule may be revised. Every effort will be made to
publicize changes for any semester in advance of the
registration date for that term.
Fees are payable on the dates listed in the Calendar
or the date given on the statement sent those partici-
pating in advance registration. Payment of fees is an
integral part of the registration process. Registration
(including payment of fees) must be completed on or
before the proper due date. Mail payments must be
received at Student Financial Services, the Hub, by
that date. All payments, or properly executed author-
ization for payment in cases where fees are to be paid
by a previously approved loan, scholarship, etc.,






22 / GENERAL INFORMATION


whether for full- or part-time students, received after
the due date are subject to a late fee.
The fees charged are based on the classification of
a student as Florida or non-Florida, full-time or part-
time. Unless otherwise noted, the fees for each term
include charges for matriculation, student health serv-
ices, student activities, and a general building fee. Lia-
bility is incurred for all credit hours remaining on the
Registrar's record of a student at the close of the
drop/add period each term.
Fees assessed graduate students per semester hour
are as follows:
Florda Non-Florida
Students Students
Courses numbered 3000-4999. Per credit: $24.75 $77.25*
Courses open only for graduate credit
(5000- and above). Per credit $33.00 $93.00
Thesis and dissertation courses
(6971 and 7980). Per credit: $35.00 $96.00
*$68.25 per semester credit hour for Summer Term A or B.

Any graduate student who is utilizing University fa-
cilities and/or faculty time must register for an appro-
priate load, in nocase less than three credits.
Students must assess and pay their own fees. Uni-
versity personnel will not be held responsible for
proper assessment or mathematical accuracy of calcu-
lations.


STATE EMPLOYEE FREE COURSE
ENROLLMENT
Detailed information on the waiver of registration
fees for permanent full-time employees of the state
may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.
Those who have been employed on a permanent
full-time basis for at least six months may be per-
mitted to enroll for six credit hours per term on a
space available basis.


SPECIAL FEES
Audit Fee.-Fees for audited courses are the same
as those listed above for Florida students. The audit
fee is the same for Florida and non-Florida students.
Student Health Fee.-Students registered for six or
more credits per semester are required to pay an $18
Student Health Fee. This fee is optional for students
registered for five credits or less. Students registered
in off-campus programs may request a waiver of this
fee and the Student Activity and Service Fee through
their department chairs. Fee waiver is granted at the
discretion of the University Controller.
Late Registration Fee.-A fee of $25 will be assessed
for failure to initiate registration during the regis-
tration period or failure to pay fees within the time
period specified.
Reinstatement Fee-Cancellation and Reinstate-
ment.-(1) The University will cancel the registration
of a student whose fee account for enrolled instruc-
tional courses is in arrears beyond the close of busi-
ness on the twenty-eighth day after the opening day
of classes. A student whose registration is cancelled is
not entitled to a refund beyond the circumstances
covered under the refund policy. (2) Reinstatement
will require approval of the University, payment of all
delinquent liabilities and payment of a reinstatement
fee of $25 in addition to the late registration fee.


Graduate Record Examination.-The Aptitude Test
of the Graduate Record Examination is required, for
admission to the Graduate School. A fee of $20 is
scheduled to increase before the effective date of this
Catalog. Students who take one of the Advanced
Tests of the GRE in combination with the Aptitude
Test currently are paying $40. These fees are payable
to the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New
Jersey 08540.
Graduate School Foreign Language Test.-A fee of
$13 is assessed to cover the cost of this examination.
Administrative arrangements to register for this exam-
ination and the payment of fees must be made
through the Office of Instructional Resources, 1012
GPA.
Library Permanent Binding Fee.-Each candidate
for a degree with a thesis or dissertation must pay a
fee of $14 for the permanent hardbinding of the two
copies of the thesis or dissertation to be deposited in
the University Libraries. This fee is payable at Student
Financial Services, the Hub. A copy of the receipt for
this fee must be presented at the Graduate School
Editorial Office.
Microfilm Fee.-A fee of $30 is charged for the pub-
lication of the doctoral dissertation by microfilm. This
fee is payable at Student Financial Services, the Hub.
A copy of the receipt for this fee must be presented at
the Graduate School Editorial Office.

REFUND OF FEES
Fees will be refunded in full for:
1. Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
2. Courses cancelled by the University.
With the exception of amounts required for collec-
tion under bond and trust obligations, fees may be re-
funded in instances of:
1. Involuntary call to active duty.
2. Death of a student.
3. Illness of the student of such duration or severity,
as confirmed by a physician, that completion of
the semester is precluded, or
4. Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the
University President.
Refunds may be requested at Student Financial
Services, 114 Hub. Proper documentation must be
presented when a refund is requested. A waiting pe-
riod for processing may be required. Refunds are not
applied automatically against current or subsequent
fee liabilities.

PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All students' accounts are due and payable at Stu-
dent Financial Services, the Hub, at the time such
charges are incurred.
University regulations prohibit registration, gradu-
ation, granting of credit, or release of transcript for
any student whose account with the University is de-
linquent.

TRAFFIC AND SAFETY REGULATIONS
All students must register their automobiles or mo-
torcycles at the University Traffic and Parking Depart-
ment during their first registration period at the Uni-
versity. There is a fee for registration and schedule of
fines for on-campus vehicle violations. A complete set
of rules governing traffic, parking, and vehicle regis-






HOUSING / 23


tration may be secured at the Traffic and Parking Of-
fice, Room 108D, Johnson Hall. Each student should
become familiar with these regulations upon regis-
tering at the University.



HOUSING
For Married Graduate Students.-Apartment ac-
commodations on the University campus are avail-
able for some married graduate students. Applica-
tions should be made as soon as possible. NOTE:
There is up to one year waiting for Fall and three to
nine months at other times.
For Single Graduate Students.-Two modern air
conditioned residence halls, Yulee Scholarship Hall,
and one apartment village are open to graduate and
upper-division students. Housing agreements for all
single students are for the agreement year of two
semesters (August-April) if enrolled. A separate
agreement is available for summer term residents.
NOTE: Housing may be available only for Spring
Semester, and definitely for Summer terms.

APPLICATIONS
Each student must make personal arrangements for
housing, either by applying to the Office of the Direc-
tor of Housing for assignment to University housing
facilities or by obtaining accommodations in private
housing: All inquiries concerning University housing
facilities should be addressed to the Director of Hous-
ing, University of Florida. Inquiries about private
housing accommodations should be addressed to the
Off-Campus Housing Office, Division of Housing,
University of Florida.
An application for on-campus housing may be filed
at any time after a student is admitted to the Univer-
sity. Students are urged to apply as early as possible
because of the housing demand.
Graduate students living in University housing are
required to qualify as full-time students as defined by
the University, and they must continue to make nor-
mal progress toward a degree as determined by their
supervisory committees.
Roommate requests are honored whenever pos-
sible, provided the individuals wishing to room to-
gether submit their applications at the same time,
clearly indicate on their respective applications their
desire to room together, and are within similar aca-
demic classifications. Any student interested in a
room assignment with an international student
should indicate this preference on the application.

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE
STUDENTS
Some variety in types of accommodations is pro-
vided.by the University. The double room for two stu-
dents is the most common type. Several of the larger
rooms or suites are designated as triple rooms. Single
rooms are available in limited number. Suites for two
students consist of two connected rooms-a bed-
room and a study room. Suites for four, which are
available in Beaty Towers, include two bedrooms, a
private bath, and a study-kitchenette. Single assign-
ments to regular apartments are available in other
housing accommodations.


Beaty Towers are completely carpeted and air-con-
ditioned. Yulee Scholarship Hall, where student
rooms are not air-conditioned, has centrally located
air-conditioned study and recreation rooms. For in-
formation on rental rates, contact the Director of
Housing, University of Florida.

COOPERATIVE LIVING
ARRANGEMENTS
There are five different cooperative living groups at
the University of Florida. Three of these groups are lo-
cated on campus, ard the other two are located off
campus.
Among the qualifications for membership are scho-
lastic ability and reference of good character. These
cooperative living groups are specifically operated by
and for students with limited financial means for at-
tending the University.
Inquiries pertaining to cooperative living on cam-
pus are made to the Director of Housing, University
of Florida. The cooperative living organizations on
campus currently are the Reid Hall Co-op, the North
Hall Co-op, and the Buckman Co-op. Off-campus co-
ops are the Collegiate Living Organization (coed), 117
N.W. 15th Street, and Georgia Seagle Hall (men), 1002
West University Avenue. Inquiries should be made to
these addresses.


FAMILY STUDENT HOUSING
The University operates five apartment villages for
eligible students. To be eligible to apply for and oc-
cupy apartment housing on campus, the following are
necessary:
A married student or student parent without
spouse who has legal care of minor children must
meet the requirements for admission to the Univer-
sity of Florida, qualify as a full-time student as de-
fined by the University, and continue to make normal
progress toward a degree as determined by the head
of the student's college or school.
The married student must be a part of a family unit,
defined as: (1) husband and wife with or without one
or more children; or (2) divorced or widowed person
who has legal care of minor children.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own
linens, dishes, rugs, curtains, or other similar items.
Utilities are an extra expense and are billed with the
rent.
Corry Memorial Village (216 units), of modern
brick, concrete and wood construction, contains
almost an equal number of one and two bedroom
apartments, with a few three-bedroom units. These
apartments are carpeted and furnished with basic
equipment, as available, in the living room, kitchen,
dining area, and one bedroom.
Diamond Memorial Village consists of 208 apart-
ments similar in construction, furnishings, and equip-
ment to those in Corry Village. Special features in-
clude a community building with air-conditioned
study-meeting room, and a study cubicle in each two-
bedroom apartment.
Tanglewood Manor Apartments, located approx-
imately 1'1 miles south of the central campus, consists
of 208 furnished and unfurnished efficiency, one- and
two-bedroom, and two-bedroom townhouse units.
All units are carpeted, centrally heated and air-condi-
tioned. All units have disposals and two-bedroom







24 / GENERAL INFORMATION


units have dishwashers. All one- and two-bedroom
units have 1 baths. Community facilities include a
large recreation hall, laundry facilities, and two swim-
ming pools.
University Village South and Maguire Village con-
sist of 348 centrally heated and air-conditioned one-
and two-bedroom apartments. Community facilities
include a laundry and a community room. Individual
apartments are not furnished but are carpeted. The
kitchens are equipped with stove and refrigerator.
For Maguire Village Only, the married, widowed, or
divorced student must be part of a family with a com-
bined gross annual income (including grants-in-aid,
VA benefits, scholarships, fellowships and grants)
which does not exceed, during the period of oc-
cupancy; the following maximum income limitations:
two persons, $10,850; three persons, $12,200; four per-
sons, $13,600; five persons, $14,450; and six persons,
$15,300.


OFF CAMPUS HOUSING
The Off Campus Housing Office is a listing and re-
ferral agency for rental housing of all types. It is not an
enforcement agency. It does not make rental reserva-
tions.
The purpose of the Off Campus Housing Office is
to assist University of Florida students, faculty, and
staff in obtaining adequate off campus housing ac-
commodations.
Persons who desire to use off campus housing serv-
ices should request by mail or pick up in person at the
Off Campus Office an off campus housing packet.
This packet contains a list of major apartment hous-
ing developments in the Gainesville area with handy
zone map locations. Also in the packet is an informa-
tion brochure on rental leases, deposits, rates, and in-
surances; a city bus route map and schedule; and util-
ity application and hook-up forms. The Off Campus
Office also maintains updated vacancy information
on shares (roommate wanted), mobile homes, rental
houses, rooms, and other rental listings for reference
during housing business hours, Monday-Friday, 8-12
and 12:30-4:30. At other times, lighted listing boards
are available outside the north entrances of the Hous-
ing Office.




FINANCIAL AID
Qualified graduate students in every department
are eligible for a number of fellowships, as-
sistantships, and other awards. In general, such
awards are available to students pursuing either a
master's or a doctoral degree. Unless otherwise speci-
fied, all applications for financial support should be
made to the appropriate department head, University
of Florida, by February 15 of each year.
Fellows and graduate assistants must pay the ap-
propriate Florida or non-Florida tuition. Fellows and
trainees are expected to devote full time to their stud-
ies and their stipend is excludablee from income for
tax purposes." Graduate assistants who have part-
time teaching or research duties should register for
appropriately reduced study loads. income received.
from their services is subject to Withholding tax.
Graduate students with an assistantship, fellow-
ship, or traineeship must not accept other em-


ployment. Required registration will be inaccordance
with the following schedule.
Minimum Credit Maximum Credit
Registration Registration
Students not on
appointments 12 18
Fellows and Trainees 12 18
1/4-time Assistants 12 15
1/3-time Assistants 9 15
1/2-time Assistants 8 15
3/4-time Assistants 6 9
Full-time Assistants 3 6


UNIVERSITY-WIDE AWARDS
Graduate Council Fellowships are available an-
nually to academically superior students. These
awards provide maximum stipends of $7200 for 12
months. Special fellowships and scholarships are
available for minority and economically disadvan-
taged students and for women entering nontradi-
tional careers. These awards require no service and
provide full academic residence. All fellows must pay
the appropriate Florida or non-Florida tuition unless a
non-Florida student is awarded a tuition waiver.
Non-Florida Tuition Waivers are available, at de-
partmental discretion, for non-Florida students who
hold fellowships or assistantships, or qualify through
special programs:
Graduate Assistantships up to one-half time are
available through individual departments and pro-
vide stipends up to $8000 for nine months. Actual
rates paid are determined by the employing depart-
ment or unit. Duties in teaching or research and as-
sociated responsibilities are commensurate with the
percentage time of the appointment and will not ex-
ceed 20 hours per week for one-half-time appointees.
All assistants pay resident registration fees and those
classified as non-Florida students pay additional non-
Florida tuition unless awarded a non-Florida tuition
waiver.
In certain areas special research awards may be
available at higher stipends. Inquiries to the area of
interest are invited.
Interested students should inquire at their depart-
ment offices concerning the availability of as-
sistantships and the procedure for making applica-
tion. Prospective students should write directly to
their major departments as well as to the Admissions
Office. Early inquiry is essential in order to be assured
of meeting application deadlines. Appointments are
made on the recommendation of the department
chairperson, subject to admission to the Graduate
School and to the approval of the Dean for Graduate
Studies and Research. Clear evidence of superior abil-
ity and promise is required. Reappointment to as-
sistantships requires evidence of continuation of
good scholarship.

TITLE VI-FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND
AREA STUDIES FELLOWSHIPS
STitle VI fellowships are available to graduate stu-
dents, whose academic programs are either Latin
America or Africa oriented. Applicants must be U.S.
'citizens or permanent residents, and must be regis-
tered.for a full-time course load including a language
relevant to the area of their choice, specifically,
Spanish, Portuguese, or Aymara for recipients through
the Center for Latin American Studies; Shona, Swahili,
or Yoruba for recipients through the Center for
African Studies.









Applicants may choose to major in any discipline or
department where a Latin American or African em-
phasis is possible. Remuneration will consist of a
$2,925 stipend for the academic year plus payment of
all tuition and fees.
For further information, please contact the Director
of either the Center for Latin American Studies (319
Grinter Hall), or the Center for African Studies (470
Grinter Hall), University of Florida.

NDEA-RELATED FULBRLGHT-HAYS
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS FOR
STUDY ABROAD
The purpose of this program is to enable graduate
students who plan to teach in U.S. institutions of
higher education to undertake non-Western lan-
guage and area study and research abroad.
In general, fellows will be expected to study in the
world area of their academic interests during their pe-
riods abroad, and fellows following a full-time pro-
gram of formal study will normally be expected to
carry on their studies in a single country. In certain
cases, however, approval may be given for disserta-
tion research which would involve (a) visits to several
countries, or (b) study outside the geographic area in-
volved if it is demonstrated that specialized or superi-
or research facilities exist elsewhere.
Stipends will be individually computed on the basis
of the cost of living in the foreign country. The award
will also cover travel expenses, fees for tuition which
the fellow may need to carry out the approved pro-
gram, and an allowance to help meet the cost of re-
search and incidental expenses.

AGRICULTURE
H. Harold Hume Fellowship of the Florida Feder-
ation of Garden Clubs.-This fellowship, established
by the Florida Federation oden of Garden Clubs, has for its
object the investigation of special problems of or-
'namental horticulture in Florida. The work is under
the direction of the Department of Ornamental Horti-
culture within the program of Horticultural Science.
The fellowship carries a stipend of $2,700 annually.

EDUCATION
Many graduate students in education receive finan-
cial aid through assistantships and traineeships made
available by federal and foundation grants for re-
search and special programs. The number and nature
of these awards vary with each academic year and
during the year. Qualified students interested in fi-
nancial support should maintain contact with the
chairperson of the major department.
The Bingham Environmental Education Foundation
grants a $300 award annually for a graduate student
interested in environmental science or education.
Contact Dr. Art Lewis for additional information.

ENGINEERING
Financial aid to graduate students in engineering is
available through between 250 and 300 research and
teaching assistantships requiring one-third- to one-
half-time work loads with stipends of $377 per month
and up. Information regarding application for these
positions may be obtained from the graduate coordi-


FINANCIAL AID / 25

nator of the department of interest or from the Office
of the Dean, College of Engineering.
Florida Steel Fabricators and Florida Rock Industries
each provide $5,000 for a one year fellowship for civil
engineering students pursuing a Master of Engineer-
ing degree.


LAW (TAXATION)
Limited financial aid is available. For information
contact the Graduate Tax Office, College of Law,
Holland Law Center.


MEDICINE
Predoctoral fellowships and part-time teaching and
research assistantships are available for graduate stu-
dents in the various basic medical science depart-
ments participating in the Ph.D. program. In addition
some clinical and basic science departments offer
postdoctoral fellowships to selected recent recipients
of the M.D. or Ph.D. degree who wish extensive re-
search experience in these disciplines. For informa-
tion write the Assistant Dean for Graduate Education,
College of Medicine, ). Hillis Miller Health Center.

NURSING
Limited financial aid is available. For information
contact the Graduate Coordinator, College of Nurs-
ing, J. Hillis Miller Health Center.

PHARMACY
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Educa-
tion Fellowships.-A number of graduate fellowships
are offered by the American Foundation for Pharma-
ceutical Education, which carry stipends of $4,200 per
year, $350 per month. Holders of these fellowships
may pursue graduate work at the University of Flor-
ida. Applications should be made to the Foundation,
Rodburn Plaza Building, 14-25 Plaza Road, Fair Lawn,
New Jersey 07410. It is the policy of the College of
Pharmacy that each graduate student receive support
from either outside fellowships or University graduate
assistantships.

PSYCHOLOGY
Financial support is available to assist students to
pursue graduate work leading to the doctor's degree.
In addition to University-wide awards, current finan-
cial assistance includes U.S. Public Health Train-
eeships, Graduate Teaching and Research Assistant-
ships, and the Center for Neurobiological Sciences
Fellowships. For information write the Stipend Com-
mittee, Department of Psychology.

SPEECH
The Department of Speech administers a number
of traineeships, fellowships, and assistantships from
such sources as the National Institutes of Health, the
U.S. Office of Education, and the University of Flor-
ida.
Additional information may be obtained from the
Department of Speech.







26 / GENERAL INFORMATION


LOANS
Long-term loans are available to graduate students
from four sources: Federally Insured Loans, University
of Florida Institutional Loans, National Direct Student
Loans and loans awarded by the student's college or
department. All programs are long-term low interest
loans that need not be repaid while the student is en-
rolled full-time (or approved for fewer hours).
Loan maximums range from $1,000 to $5,000 per ac-
ademic year, repayable after termination of en-
rollment, at interest rates varying from 3 to 7% an-
nually. The actual amount of each National Direct
Loan or institutional loan award is based on financial
need as determined by the information provided by
the student on the College Scholarship Service Finan-
cial Aid Form (FAF). Application for all loans except
the Federally Insured loan should be made to the Of-
fice for Student Financial Affairs, 111 Anderson Hall,
between December 1 and March 1 for the following
academic year. Applications received after this date
will be considered for aid if sufficient funds remain
after those applications which arrived by the March 1
deadline have been processed. Applications for. the
FIL are accepted year-around; however, lender dead-
lines vary.
Determination of financial need is not required for
the Federally Insured Loan, but the student will need
to obtain a lender (bank, savings & loan, credit union,
etc.) who participates, in the program. Applications
may be obtained by coming by or writing the Office
for Student Financial Affairs.
Students interested in applying for a college-de-
partment controlled loan should consult their college
for eligibility requirements and application pro-
cedures.

PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT
Employment through the Federal College Work-
Study Program is available to graduate students on a
part-time basis. Every effort is made to refer appli-
cants to positions that will complement their educa-
tional goals. Part-time employment under the College
Work Study Program is awarded to applicants who
apply using the general application from December 1
to March 1, for the following academic year. Applica-
tions for part-time employment under the Federal
College Work Study Program are available in 111 An-
derson Hall during the application period mentioned
above. Applications for the State funded OPS (Other
Personnel Services) program'are available from Stu-
dent Employment in 111 Anderson Hall. Approx-
imately 2000 positions are staffed through the OPS
program on campus.

NEXUS SYSTEM
The Office for Student Financial Affairs has pre-
pared a series of tapes explaining the procedures for
applying for financial aid in addition to explaining the
individual programs. To use this system students
should call 392-1683 and a'sk for any or all of the fol-
lowing tapes: 402A-Applying for Financial Aid, 402B
-Loans, 402C-Federally Insured Loans, 402D-Fi-
nancial Aid for the Graduate Student, 402E-Student
Budgets, 402F-Part-Time Employment, 402G-
Grants, 402H-Scholarships, 4021-How Much Does
College Cost? 402J-Telephone Numbers, or 402K-
How to Pick-up your Financial Aid.


SPECIAL FACILITIES AND

PROGRAMS

RESEARCH AND TEACHING
FACILITIES

ART GALLERIES
The University Gallery is an integral part of the Ar-
chitecture and Fine Arts complex. The Gallery is.lo-
cated on the campus facing S.W. 13th Street (U.S.
441). An atrium and reflecting pool are two pleasing
features of the Gallery's distinctive architectural style.
The Gallery, with 3000 square feet of display space, is
completely modern, air-conditioned, and maintains a
varied exhibition schedule of the visual arts during
the year. The contents of exhibitions displayed in the
University Gallery range from the,creations of tradi-
tional masters to the latest and most experimental
works by the modern avant garde. The minor arts of
Yesterday and today, along with the creations of ori-
ental and primitive cultures, form topics for sched-
uled exhibitions. Each exhibition shows for approx-
imately a month, and the Gallery's hours are from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except Sunday, when they are
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Gallery is closed Saturdays,
holidays, and during the month of September.
The Department of Art's Gallery is located adjacent
to the department's office area, on the third floor of
the classroom building in the Colleges of Architecture
and fine Arts complex. As a direct and physical ad-
junct to the Art Department's teaching program, this
gallery displays smaller traveling exhibitions of merit,
as well as student exhibitions and one-man shows by
faculty artists. The Gallery is open Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. It is closed Saturdays and Sundays.

COMPUTATIONAL FACILITIES
(NERDC AND CIRCA-UF)
In addition to numerous smaller digital and hybrid
computers on campus, the University of Florida
houses the central facilities of the Northeast Regional
Data Center (NERDC) of the State University System.
Facilities available to students, faculty, and staff in-
clude an Amdahl 470 V/6-11 computer (running under
OS/MVS with JES 2) with 10 megabytes of real memo-
ry, more than 26 IBM 3350 disk drives, eight IBM 3330
disk drives, seven 9-track tape drives, and one 7-track
tape drive. NERDC facilities are used for adminis-
trative, instructional, and research computing for
almost all areas of campus and for other state educa-
tional institutions in northern Florida.
The Center supports batch processing, 200 high-
speed cathode ray tube terminals, and more than 200
low-speed interactive terminals. These terminals sup-
port interactive APL/SV, BASIC, WATFIV, ATS, CICS,
TSO and a locally written interactive editing and
remote-job-entry facility. More extensive output is
printed on two centrally, located high-speed printers.
High-speed remote-batch terminals located on cam-
pus are also used for batch input and output. Com-
puter Output Microfiche (COM) is also available.
Extensive software is provided for batch processing
supporting the major high-level languages including









FORTRAN, ASSEMBLER, COBOL, PL/1; the SYSTEM
2000 data-base-management system and MARK IV
and EASYTRIEVE file handlers and report generators;
student-oriented compilers and interpreters includ-
ing WATFIV, PL/C, ASSIST, WATBOL; most major
statistical packages including SPSS, BMDP, SAS; text-
editing programs such as TEXT360, ATS, SCRIPT, and
FORMAT; several libraries of scientific and mathemat-
ical routines including IMSL and the HARWELL li-
brary; a large number of program packages and
special-purpose languages, plotting software; mini
and micro computer support; and many others.
The Center for Instructional and Research Comput-
ing Activities at the University of Florida (CIRCA-UF)
provides consulting, programming, equipment repair
and data-entry services; open-shop unit-record
equipment, interactive terminals, and remote batch
terminals; and plotting facilities through Gould 5100
Electrostatic, CalComp Incremental Line, and Print-
ronix dot-matrix plotters.
Access through NERDC to four other regional data
centers in the State is available through the State Uni-
versity System Computer Network.
More information is available through the NERDC's
User Manual and monthly newsletter.


LIBRARIES
The library system consists of two central units, Li-
brary West and Library East, and branch libraries serv-
ing the Colleges of Architecture, Education, Engineer-
ing, Fine Arts, and Law, as well as the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, the Departments of Chemistry and Music,
and P.K. Yonge Laboratory School. In addition, read-
ing room facilities have been provided for journalism
and Communications, Physical Education, Health and
Recreation, Physics, and the dormitory areas.
The holdings of the Libraries number over 2 million
cataloged volumes and a large number of un-
cataloged documents and newspapers. Many other
materials are in the form of microtext.
The main reference and bibliography collection,
which includes the basic bibliographies, abstracting
and indexing services, and catalogs of other libraries,
is located on the first floor of Library West.
Among the special collections of the library system
are the Rare Book Collection; the Isser and Rae Price
Library of Judaica; the Baldwin Library, which consists
of pre-1900 literature for children; the Belknap Collec-
tion for the Performing Arts; the P.K. Yonge Library of
Florida History; the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Collec-
tion, which consists of manuscripts, typescripts, and
memorabilia of one of America's distinguished nov-
elists; and the Collection of Creative Writing, which
includes work sheets, manuscripts, and other literary
papers of significant contemporary American and
British authors. Special emphasis has been placed
upon the Libraries' outstanding Latin American Col-
lection which has particularly strong holdings of West
Indian and Caribbean materials.


MONOGRAPH SERIES
The Graduate School sponsors two monograph
series devoted to the publication of research primarily
by present and former members of the scholarly com-
munity of the University. The Social Sciences Mono-
graphs are published each year with subjects drawn


SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS / 27

from anthropology, economics, history, political sci-
ence, sociology, education, geography, law, and psy-
chology. The Humanities Monographs are published
each year with subjects drawn from art, language and
literature, music, philosophy, and religion.


FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
The Florida State Museum was created by an act of
the Legislature in 1917 as a department of the Univer-
sity of Florida. Through its affiliation with the Univer-
sity it carries dual responsibility as the State Museum
of Florida and as the University Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of reserach in an-
thropology and natural history. Its accessory functions
as an educational arm of the University are carried
forward through interpretive displays and scientific
publications. Under the administrative control of the
director are the three departments of the Museum:
Natural Sciences, staffed by scientists and technicians
concerned with the study and expansion of the re-
search collections of animals; Social Sciences, whose
staff members are concerned with the study of his-
toric and prehistoric people and their cultures;
Interpretation, staffed by specialists in the interpreta-
tion of knowledge through museum exhibit tech-
niques and education programs. Members of the sci-
entific and educational staff of the Museum hold dual
appointments in appropriate teaching departments.
Through these appointments, they participate in both,
the undergraduate and graduate teaching programs.
Graduate assistantships are available in the
Museum in areas emphasized in its research pro-
grams.
The Museum is located at the corner of Museum
Road and Newell Drive in a modern facility com-
pleted in 1970. The public halls are open from 9 a.m.
until 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m.
on Sunday. The Museum is closed on Christmas Day.
There is no admission charge.
The research collections are under the care of
curators who encourage the scientific study of the
Museum's holdings. Materials are constantly being
added to the collection both through gifts from
friends and as a result of research activities of the
Museum staff. The archaeological and ethnological col-
lections are noteworthy. There are extensive study
collections of birds, mammals, mollusks, reptiles, am-
phibians, fish, invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, and
a bioacoustic archive consisting of original recordings
of animal sounds. Opportunities are provided for stu-
dents, staff, and visiting scientists to use the collec-
tions. Research and field work are presently spon-
sored in the archaeological, paleontological, and
zoological fields. Students interested in these special-
ties should make application to the appropriate teach-
ing department.

UNIVERSITY PRESSES OF FLORIDA
The University of Florida is host to the State Univer-
sity System's scholarly publishing facility, University
Presses of Florida. The goals of the systemwide pub-
lishing program implemented by University Presses of
Florida are expressed in Board of Regents' policy:
... to publish books, monographs, journals, and
other types of scholarly or creative works. The
Press shall give special attention to works of dis-
tinguished scholarship in academic areas of par-
ticular interest and usefulness to the citizens of







28 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Florida. The Press shall publish original works by
state university faculty members, but it may also
publish meritorious works originating elsewhere
and may republish out-of-print works.
Each university's faculty publishing committee is
independently responsible for selecting works for
publication through the facilities of University Presses
of Florida. At the University of Florida, the University
Press Board of Managers oversees the locally de-
termined publishing program.
The purpose of the University of Florida Press is to
encourage, seek out, and publish original and scholar-
ly manuscripts which will aid in developing the Uni-
versity as a recognized center of research and scholar-
ship. In addition to its broad range of state, regional,
and Latin American titles, the Press publishes books
of general interest and five separate series in Flori-
diana, gerontology, humanities, Latin American stud-
ies, and social sciences.
The Press Board of Managers, 15 faculty experts ap-
pointed by the President of the University, de-
termines policies of publication relating to the accep-
tance or rejection of manuscripts and the issuance of
author contracts. Each year the board examines, nu-
merous manuscripts submitted not only by the Uni-
versity faculty but by authors from all over the United
States, Europe, and Latin America.
University Presses of Florida is a member of the As-
sociation of American University Presses and of the
Association of American Publishers, Inc.
Students and members of the faculty and staff are
cordially invited to visit the Press offices at 15 N.W.
15th Street, adjacent to the campus.


INTERDISCIPLINARY GRADUATE
STUDIES PROGRAMS

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
As the leading institution ofshigher education in the
State, the University of Florida has long been aware of
Florida's unique international position. By the begin-
ning of the century, the University had begun to focus
its attention on the Latin American nations. Advanced
degrees were given in Latin American studies as early
as 1927, and by the midcentury a School of Inter-
American Studies had been formed.
During the last two decades, the University of
Florida's commitment to international studies has ex-
panded rapidly. This expansion has resulted in the
creation of a Center for Latin American Studies, a
Center for African Studies, a Center for Tropical Agri-
culture, a program in International Relations, and an
English Language Institute for speakers of other lan-
guages. Programs in Asian Studies, Soviet and East Eu-
ropean Studies, and West European Studies have
been added to the undergraduate curriculum. The
University of Florida has participated in programs of
assistance and development in many major areas of
the world: Africa, South America, Middle America,
and Southeast Asia. There has also been a correspond-
ing increase in the number of faculty members in-
volved in teaching and in.research within the field of
international studies.
As evidence of its commitment to international
programs, the University opened, in January 1971, the
$1.6 million federally funded Graduate School and In-
ternational Studies Building, dedicated and named


Linton E. Grinter Hall. The modern four story building
contains 60 faculty offices, 102 study cubicles, and
nine seminar rooms, as well as the.office of the Grad-
uate School and Sponsored Research.
The expansion of efforts in these directions repre-
sents a conviction on the part of the University that
today's students must be aware, in more than a super-
ficial way, of developments and trends outside our
national boundaries if they are to live in a world of
peace and'harmony. International education is essen-
tial for the citizenry and leaders of the twenty-first
century-the students of today.
The English Language,Institute offers a noncredit,
nondegree program in English as a second language
for students with some knowledge of the language
who wish to increase their competence. The program,
which may be taken any semester of the academic
year, emphasizes the oral and written skills needed by
students who plan to attend a university in the United
States. In addition to regular English Language In-
stitute testing, institutional administration of TOEFL is
given near the end of each semester.
Further information is available from the Director,
English Language Institute, Norman Hall.
The Center for African Studies, established with fi-
nancial assistance under Title VI of the National De-
fense Education Act, is responsible for the direction
and coordination of interdisciplinary instructional
and research activities related to Africa. It cooperates
with departments in administering and staffing a co-
ordinated Certificate Program in African Studies. This
program provides a broad foundation for students
preparing for teaching or other professional careers in
which a knowledge of Africa is essential.
Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships.-Stu-
dents admitted to the Graduate School in pursuit of a
degree through a specific department are eligible to
compete for graduate assistantships and Title VI
(FLAS) fellowships through the Center for African
Studies.
Extracurricular Activities.-The Center regularly
sponsors conferences on African topics, and a collo-
quium series-BARAZA-with invited lecturers. The
Center has a fairly wide ranging set of outreach ac-
tivities addressed to public school teachers as well as
community colleges and other universities. The Cen-
ter is responsible for editing the African Studies Re-
view, which is the journal of the African Studies As-
sociation. Two additional major functions are the
publication of the Bulletin of the Southern Associa-
tion of Africapists, and a traveling African art exhibit.
Library Resources.-The Center supports directly as
well as through various departments selective library
acquisitions to meet the instructional and research
needs of the faculty and students. The Office of In-
structional Resources holds a number of educational
films on African topics, and the audiovisual library of
the Department of Art holds approximately 5,000
African art slides.
African Art-The University Gallery holds 121
pieces of African sculpture. The Rosenbloom Collec-
tion, 37 pieces of African sculpture, is housed at the
Florida State Museum.
Graduate Degree Programs.-The African Studies
Center does not offer interdisciplinary graduate de-
grees. With the cooperation of its participating de-
partments, it offers a Certificate in African Studies in
conjunction with the master's and doctoral degrees.
Requirements for the Certificate in African Studies
with a master's degree are (a) at least 18 credits of
course work in a departmental major, 15 of which









should relate to Africa; (b) 9 credits of course work re-
lated to Africa and distributed in at least two other
departments; (c) LIN 3733; and (d) a thesis on an
African topic.
Requirements for the Certificate in African Studies
with the doctoral degree are (a) the doctoral require-
ments of the major department; (b) 18 credits of
course work related to Africa in two or more other de-
partments; (c) a dissertation on an African topic based
on field work in Africa; (d) knowledge of a language
appropriate to the area of specialization.
Inquiries about the various programs and activities
of the Center should be addressed to the Director,
Center for African Studies, 470 Grinter Hall.
International Relations, a field of specialization
leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, is offered in
programs through the Department of Political Sci-
ence. In addition to the M.A. and Ph.D. with a major
in political scierice which may emphasize interna-
tional relations, the University offers an M.A. and
Ph.D. with a major in international relations. For the
M.A. the requirements are the same as for the M.A. in
political science. For the Ph.D. the student has the op-
tion of taking either 1) four fields of political science
and a single or composite.minor, or 2) three fields of
political science (plus two graduate courses in a
fourth field) and two minor fields or a composite mi-
nor.
The Center for Latin American Studies is respon-
sible for directing and coordinating graduate training,
research, and other academic activities related to the
Latin American area.
Master of Arts Degree in Latin American Area Stud-
ies.-The interdisciplinary area degree offered
through the Center can be pursued in two options.
The first is a traditional program which emphasizes
training and research focused on developing a greater
appreciation and understanding of Latin America's
cultures, traditions, and languages. Requirements for
the major concentration are 14 credits consisting pri-
marily of Latin American language or area courses in
one department, which may be agricultural and ex-
tension education, anthropology, economics, food
and resource economics, geography, history, political
science, Romance languages (Spanish and Portu-
guese), or sociology.
The second alternative clusters course work and re-
search along a selected topical field, with the em-
phasis placed on training in interdisciplinary
problem-solving methodologies and their application
to contemporary Latin American problems. Under
this option, and especially with regard to the training
of students from Latin America, ar individualized
program of instruction is developed to build on prior
professional or administrative experiences and pre-
pare the.individual for technical and professional
work in the home country. Requirements for the ma-
jor are 14 credits in an interdisciplinary, applied
course of study focused on Latin America which may
include such fields as rural or urban development, re-
gional analysis, demography, social change, tropical
agriculture, natural resource management; health de-
livery, or mass communications.
Other requirements, common to both options, in-
clude 12 credits of Latin American language and/or
area courses in at least two other departments; a
thesis on a Latin American topic for which up to six
credits are given through registration in LAS 6971; and
a reading, writing, and speaking knowledge of a Latin
Amerian language.


SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS / 29

The M.A. with a program in Latin American Area
Studies is intended primarily as a terminal degree for
persons who are not aiming at a teaching career in tra-
ditional academic departments but who require
either a broad knowledge of Latin American cultures
and appropriate language competence or in-
terdisciplinary, problem-related, area-focused train-
ing for their professional career objectives. This pro-
gram is so structured, however, that students may
move directly from it into departmental Ph.D. pro-
grams without interrupting or slowing down their ac-
ademic progress.
Minimum requirements for admission to the pro-
gram are (1) a grade average of B (3.00) for all upper-
division undergraduate work; (2) a combined Verbal-
Quantitative score of at least 1000 on the Graduate
Record Examination; (3) an adequate proficiency in
reading, writing, aural comprehension, and speaking
of either Spanish or Portuguese. Students not meeting
the required proficiency will be required to take an
appropriate remedial course.
Exceptions to the above requirements are made
only when these and other criteria, such as letters of
recommendation, are reviewed by the Center, recom-
mended by the Center, and approved by the Dean for
Graduate Studies and Research.
Master's Degree with a Certificate in Latin Ameri-
can Studies.-Through agreement with departments
of participating colleges (Liberal Arts and Sciences,
Business Administration, Education, journalism and
Communications, and Agriculture) students in
master's programs requiring theses may earn a Certifi-
cate in Latin American Studies. The requirements are
(a) at least 20 credits of work in the major department
with a Latin American concentration, (b) a six-credit
minor with Latin American content in another depart-
ment, (c) a thesis on a Latin American topic for which
up to six credits are given, and (d) a reading knowl-
edge of a Latin American language.
Certificates in Latin American Studies may be
awarded to students in nonthesis programs who (a)
satisfy departmental requirements for the major and
minor, (b) include in their courses of study at least 12
hours of Latin American content courses divided be-
tween at least two disciplines other than the major,
(c) complete at least 36 credit hours of graduate
course work, and (d) demonstrate a reading knowl-
edge of a Latin American language. In choosing area
courses, the student taking this option should work
closely with the graduate coordinator of the Center
for Latin American Studies. Only those courses specif-
ically approved by the coordinator will be counted
toward the required 12 hours of Latin American con-
centration.
Doctoral Program with a Certificate in Latin Ameri-
can Studies.-The Center does not offer an in-
terdisciplinary Latin American Area Studies degree at
the doctoral level. However, it does provide a Certifi-
cate in Latin American Studies which is awarded in
conjunction with doctoral degrees in the following
areas: agriculture, anthropology, business adminis-
tration, economics, education, food and resource eco-
nomics, 'geography, history, political science, soci-
ology, and Spanish. Requirements for the doctoral
certificate are (a) Latin American concentration
within the major department; (b) an area minor of at
least 20 credits consisting principally of Latin Ameri-
can language and area courses in two or more depart-
ments outside the major and including at least three
credits of LAS 6938, Latin American Area Seminar; (c)







30 / GENERAL INFORMATION


a dissertation on a Latin American subject; (d) a read-
ing speaking, and writing knowledge of one Latin
American language and a reading knowledge of an-
other; (e) residence in Latin America normally of at
least six months duration and devoted primarily to
dissertation research.
A Certificate in Latin American Demographic Stud-
ies may be earned in conjunction with an M.A. or
Ph.D. program in economics, geography, or sociology.
Graduate Fellowships and Assistantships.-In addi-
tion to University fellowships and assistantships avail-
able to students on a competitive basis in the pro-
grams described above, the Center for Latin American
Studies administers financial assistance from outside
sources, including Title VI, NDFL fellowships.
Research.-The Center supports or participates in a
number of interdisciplinary research programs which,
in addition to their primary objectives, provide op-
portunities for training and financial support of grad-
uate students.
Library Resources.-The several libraries on the
campus of the University of Florida, including the
Latin American Collection of the main library, have
Latin American holdings totaling over 160,000 vol-
umes as well as important manuscript materials in the
original, in transcription, and on microfilm. In terms
of subject matter, holdings are strongest in history
and the social sciences, but increasing attention is
being given to the environmental sciences and to lit-
erature. In terms of region, they are strongest in the
Caribbean and circum-Caribbean, but Brazilian mate-
rials are being augmented rapidly.
Other Activities.-The Center sponsors conferences
and colloquia on Latin American topics, supports
publication of scholarly books, monographs, and pa-
pers, and cooperates with other University units in
conducting developmental programs in Latin Ameri-
ca.
Inquiries about the various programs and activities
of the Center should be addressed to the Director,
Center for Latin American Studies, 319 Grinter Hall.
The Center for Tropical Agriculture, within the In-
stitute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, seeks to
stimulate interest in research and curriculum related
to the tropical environment and its development.
Minor in Tropical Agriculture.-An interdisciplinary
minor in tropical agriculture may be planned at both
the master's and doctoral levels by students majoring
in agriculture, forestry, and other fields where knowl-
edge of the tropics is relevant. The minor may include
courses treating characteristics of the tropics: its soils,
water, vegetation, climate, agricultural production,
and the language and culture of tropical countries.
Certificate Programs.-A program for a special-
ization (with certificate) in tropical agriculture for
graduate students in the College of Agriculture is
available. The program provides course selection to
broaden the normal degree requirements for those in-
terested in specializing in tropical agriculture. Ap-
proved courses must be selected from four basic
groups as follows: area studies, international econom-
ics, tropical ecosystems, and tropical agriculture. For
nonagriculture students a similar program with a Cer-
tificate in Tropical Studies is available. Students in-
terested in these programs should consult the Dean
of the College of Agriculture.
Research.-The Center provides research grants to
faculty members and their graduate students and as-
sists in the coordination of interdisciplinary research
funded elsewhere. Development assistance contracts


in agriculture and related fields frequently have re-
search components.
Student Support.-Students within the College of
Agriculture and the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation pursuing a minor in tropical agriculture
are eligible for research grants awarded by the Center
through academic departments.
Other Activities.-The Center seeks a broad dis-
semination of knowledge about tropical agriculture
through the sponsoring of conferences and seminars
featuring leading authorities on the tropics; publica-
tion of books, monographs and proceedings; and
through acquisition of materials for the library and
the data bank.
The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is a
consortium of major educational and research institu-
tions in the United States and abroad, created to pro-
mote understanding of tropical environments and
their intelligent use by man. The University of Florida
is a charter member. Graduate field courses in Central
America are coordinated from the regional office in
Costa Rica. Courses with varying content are offered
in the agricultural sciences, earth sciences, forestry,
geography, marine science, meteorology, and ter-
restrial biology during the winter, spring, and summer
terms. Additional courses are being planned. Students
are selected on a competitive basis from universities
throughout the country. A University of Florida grad-
uate student may register for eight credits in an ap-
propriate departmental course cross-listed with OTS,
e.g., PCB 6357C or GEA 6109. The University of Florida
does not require tuition for OTS courses. OTS offers
pilot-study research grants to junior faculty and grad-
uate students who have had limited tropical experi-
ence. Further information can be obtained from the
OTS campus office located in the Division of Biologi-
cal Sciences, 223 Bartram Hall.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
The Division of Biological Sciences is organized
within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to pro-
vide coordination in the biological sciences. The
Division, with a staff from, many disciplines, has or-
ganized graduate programs in ecology and popu-
lation biology, physiology, tropical biology, evolu-
tionary biology, marine biology, paleobiology, and
systematics. Each faculty is responsible for developing
and supervising a core program in its special area. In
addition to cross-department programs, the Division
serves to coordinate biological science wherever it ex-
ists in the University and to operate marine research
stations on the east and west coasts of Florida. It rep-
resents the University in the Organization for Tropical
Studies, a consortium of 29 major U.S. universities
which operates three tropical field stations and an ex-
tensive field course program in Costa Rica. Many
biology graduate students here are able to participate
in these OTS graduate courses and expand their re-
search projects from the courses into thesis or dis-
sertation topics. The Departments of Zoology and
Botany are the units corhposing the Division of Bio-
logical Sciences.
The University of Florida Marine Laboratory at
Seahorse Key is located 57 miles west of Gainesville
on the Gulf Coast, 3 miles offshore, opposite Cedar
Key. Facilities include a 20x40-ft. research and teach-
ing building, and a 10-room residence, with two
kitchens and a dining-lounge, which provides
dormitory accommodations for 24 persons. The labo-









ratory, which owns a 32-ft. research vessel equipped
for offshore work and several smaller outboard-pow-
ered boats for shallow water and inshore work, is
used for research by graduate students from the vari-
ous departments of the Division of Biological Sci-
ences.
The University of Florida Cornelius Vanderbilt
Whitney Marine Laboratory at Marineland is de-
signed for research and instruction in marine biologi-
cal sciences. Facilities are available for research in all
fields of modern biology encompassing the tech-
niques of biophysics, biochemistry, microbiology,
morphological and functional biology, pathology,
marine medicine, pharmacology, and nutrition. Field
studies involve both ecological and environmental
problems. Research opportunities for graduate stu-
dents are available through faculty members who use
this laboratory.
Biophysics and bioengineering are interdisciplinary
areas which bring the concepts and methods of the
basic and applied physical sciences to bear upon bio-
logical problems. Students may elect one or another
of these programs depending upon their back-
grounds, the extent of their interest and abilities in
physical sciences, and their concern with and com-
petence in development of new physics or engineer-
ing for use in biology.
One program is conducted under the supervision
of a Biophysics Council, which includes represent-
atives from the Colleges of Agriculture, Liberal Arts
and Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Several de-
partments offer biophysics options at the graduate
level. A student interested in such an option must
qualify for graduate study in a department and satisfy
the advanced degree requirements established by the
departmental faculty. The Biophysics Council may
then provide individual guidance in curricular mat-
ters. For information on this program, write to the rep-
resentative of the Biophysics Council in one of the
following departments: Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Electrical
Engineering, Entomology and Nematology, Materials
Science and Engineering, Microbiology and Cell Sci-
ence, and Zoology. The Council representative in
Physics should be consulted for advice on courses
and seminars in biological physics.
The Departments of Chemical and Electrical Engi-
neering offer master's and doctoral study programs in
biochemical and biomedical engineering, respective-
ly; and advanced study and research in biomaterials is
available in the Department of Materials Science and
Engineering. Write to the department concerned for
further information.
A program in biological physics is conducted within
the Department of Physics. Students in this option
must qualify for admission to graduate studies in
physics and satisfy all of the requirements for a regu-
lar advanced degree in the department. In addition
these students must prepare themselves in organic
and physical chemistry and general biology, to the ex-
tent that they can' study and demonstrate knowl-
edgeability in molecular biology, cytology, and physi-
ology. Research studies are generally conducted in
collaboration with scientists in biological or medical
fields on this campus or elsewhere. Doctoral candi-
dates must contribute to new knowledge in both
physics and biology, and demonstrate ability to select
for themselves significant new problems in biology.
This program is monitored by the graduate faculty in
physics and by two interdisciplinary advisory commit-
tees; of the latter two, one is comprised of members


SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS / 31

from pertinent physical and biological disciplines on,
this campus, and the other of bioscientists from out,
side the University. For further information write to
the Biological Physics Program, Department of Phys-
ics.
Attention should also be given to the program of,
the Center for Sensory Studies, as described in the
section on Interdisciplinary Research Centers, since
that Center includes other biophysical programs.


THE CENTER FOR ALLIED HEALTH
INSTRUCTIONAL PERSONNEL
The Center (CAHIP) is a project jointly sponsored
by the Colleges'of Education and Health Related Pro-
fessions, and was originally funded under the terms
of a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
Persons who desire to enroll in graduate programs
for the master's or doctoral degree as preparation for
careers in teaching or administration in the allied
health professions should possess (a) a baccalaureate
degree, (b) credentials acceptable for admission to
the Graduate School of the University of Florida, and
(c) a stated plan for teaching or leadership positions
in the allied health fields in two-year or four-year col-
leges or universities.
Students accepted for admission to any advanced
degree program will fulfill the basic requirements of
that program and such other courses of study relating
to allied health as may be appropriate for their stated
goals. Each individual's program is planned, insofar as
possible, according to these objectives.
Applicants who desire to assume teaching responsi-
bilities should have a minimum two years em-
ployment experience in a clinical field, and should
possess appropriate licensure, registration, or
certification in that field. Those who have had no pre-
vious teaching experience will be required to com-
plete a two-term teaching practicum. Examples of a
few of the clinical fields from which students will be
considered (but not limited to) include medical tech-
nology, nursing, occupational therapy, physical thera-
py, radiologic technology, respiratory therapy tech-
nology, cardiovascular technology, medical records
technology, dental hygienic technology, dentistry,
dental laboratory technology and physicians' assist-
ing.
Requests for further information should be sent to
the Director, Center for Allied Health Instructional
Personnel, ILS Department, Norman Hall.

CHEMICAL PHYSICS PROGRAM
The Chemical Physics Program, with the partici-
pation of the faculty of the Departments of Chemis-
try, Physics, and Chemical Engineering, is concerned
with graduate education and research in the theo-
retical, experimental, and computational aspects of
problems in the borderline between chemistry and
physics. Graduate students join one of the above de-
partments and follow a special curriculum. The stu-
dent receives, in addition to the Ph.D. degree, a Cer-
tificate in Chemical. Physics issued by the Graduate
School.

ENGINEERING: STATE CENTER
The College of Engineering has established an off-
campus graduate engineering education center at







32 / GENERAL INFORMATION


Eglirn Air Force Base where qualified personnel may
enroll in courses leading to the master's degree. For
admission to the graduate program, the prospective
student must file an application with the Graduate
School as outlined in the Admissions section of this
Catalog.
For additional.information, visit the Eglin Air Force
Base, or write the Dean, College of Engineering, Uni-
versity of Florida.

THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES
The University of Florida is a sponsor of Oak Ridge
Associated Universities (ORAU), a nonprofit educa-
tion and research management corporation of 46 col-
leges and universities. ORAU, which was established
in 1946, conducts programs of research, education, in-
formation, and human resource development for a
variety of government and private organizations. It
makes extensive use of the facilities and resources of
the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is particularly
interested in three areas: energy, health, and the envi-
ronment.
Among ORAU's activities are competitive programs
to bring undergraduates, graduate students, and fac-
ulty members td work on research problems at the re-
search facilities of the United States Department of
Energy. Participants are selected by ORAU and the
staffs of the facilities participating in the ORAU pro-
grams--Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the Oak
Ridge Y-12 Plant; the Opk Ridge Gaseous Diffusion
Plant; the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion
Laboratory in Oak Ridge; the Savannah River Labora-
tory and Savannah River Ecology Laboratory in Aiken,
S.C.; the Comparative Animal Research Laboratory in
Oak Ridge; the Puerto Rico Nuclear Research Center;
and the Energy Research Centers at Bartlesville, Okla.,
Pittsburgh, Pa., and Morgantown, W. Va. The ORAU
Institute for Energy Analysis, the Special Training
Division and the Medical and Health Sciences
Division are also open to qualified students and facul-
ty members.
Undergraduate.-The ORAU Undergraduate Re-
search Training Program offers juniors majoring in the
sciences, engineering, and mathematics an opportun-
ity to spend 10 weeks during the summer working in
directed research programs at these sites.
Graduate.-The ORAU Laboratory Graduate Partic-
ipation Program enables a candidate for an advanced
degree, upon completion of all requirements for
work-in-residence except research, to work toward
completion of a research problem and preparation of
the thesis at one of the participating sites.
Faculty.-University of Florida faculty members un-
der the ORAU Faculty Research Participation Program
can go to a Department of Energy facility for varying
periods up to three months for advanced study and
research. It is also possible to combine a University of
Florida faculty development grant, with a longer
ORAU Faculty Research Participation appointment.
Stipends are available. The student stipends are at
fixed rates that change from time to time. Faculty
stipends are individually negotiated, based upon the
current University salary.
Copies of the bulletin and announcement of the
ORAU-DOE university-laboratory programs are avail-
able in the offices of the Graduate School. Bulletins
also may be obtained by writing to the University Pro-
grams Office, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc.,
P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830.


Interested persons should ask for assistance from
the Dr. F. E. Dunnam (2121 GPA; 392-2263) who serves
as the ORAU Counselor at the University of Florida.
All arrangements for these research programs will be
made between the Dean for Graduate Studies and
Research and Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
A complete description of the programs in public
administration is included in the departmental listing
for Political Science.


RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS

FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT
STATIONS
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations are re-
sponsible for research leading to the improvement of
all phases of Florida's widely varied agricultural pro-
duction, processing, and marketing. The statewide re-
search program is administered from the University of
Florida campus by the Dean for Research and in-
cludes main station departments as well as Agricultur-
al Research and Education Centers operating as an
integral administrative unit. As a statewide agency
having agricultural research as its primary objective,
each station cooperates closely with numerous Flor-
ida agricultural agencies and organizations.
Many members of the research staff of the Agricul-
tural Experiment Stations are also members of the fac-
ulty of the College of Agriculture as are some in the
Cooperative Extension Service and the Center for
Tropical Agriculture. These three agricultural units of
the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agri-
cultural Sciences work cooperatively in many areas
under the administration of the Vice President for Ag-
ricultural Affairs.
Funds for graduate assistants are made available to
encourage graduate training and professional scien-
tific improvement.
Research at the main station is conducted within 21
areas-Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural and Ex-
tension Education, Agronomy, Animal Science, Bot-
any, Dairy Science, Entomology and Nematology,
Food and Resource Economics, Food Science and Hu-
man Nutrition, School of Forest Resources and Con-
servation, 4-H, Fruit Crops, Home Economics, Micro-
biology and. Cell Science, Ornamental Horticulture,
Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soil Science,
Statistics, Vegetable Crops, and Veterinary Medicine.
In addition to the above, the main station has six units
vital to its research programs, namely, editorial, li-
brary, facilities operations, planning, business affairs,
and the grants office.
The Agricultural Research Centers are located at
Monticello, Brooksville, Ft. Pierce, Immokalee, Dover,
Ft. Lauderdale, Hastings, Ona, Apopka, Marianna,
Live Oak, Leesburg, Jay, and Ocala.
The locations of the Agricultural Research and Edu-
cation Centers are at Homestead, Belle Glade, Brad-
enton, Lake Alfred, Quincy, Sanford, and Tallahassee
(FAMU).
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations'are co-
operating with the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research
Station, Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its
beef cattle and pasture production and management






SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS / 33


programs and with the National Weather Service,
Ruskin, in the agricultural weather service for Florida.
In addition to the above, research is conducted
through the International Programs office, the Cen-
ters for Environmental Programs and for Rural Devel-
opment and the Florida Medical Entomological Labo-
ratory at Vero Beach.

DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH
The Division has two general functions: (1) the ad-
ministration and promotion of the sponsored re-
search program and (2) the support of the total re-
search program of the University in a manner which
produces maximum benefit to the University and the
greatest service to the State of Florida. All proposals
or the sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid, training
grants, or educational service agreements must re-
ceive the approval of the Dean for Graduate Studies
and Research. Subsequent negotiations with poten-
tial contracting agencies or sponsors of research
projects are carried on under the Dean's supervision.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research
are intended to stimulate growth and to assist in ex-
panding a balanced research program throughout the
University. These activities are intimately related to
the support of the graduate program. They are also in-
tended to relieve principal investigators and depart-
ments of many of the detailed administrative and
reporting duties connected with some sponsored re-
search. The duties and responsibilities of the Division
are designed to assist principal investigators in seek-
ing sponsors for their projects. In direct contacts be-
tween a principal investigator and a potential spon-
sor, however, prior clearance should be obtained
from the Division to insure a uniformity in contract
requirements and to avoid duplication of nego-
tiations with the same sponsor.
The Dean for Graduate Studies and Research is ad-
ministratively responsible to the Vice President for
Academic Affairs. Policies and procedures for the op-
eration of the Division are developed by a Board of
Directors working with the Dean within the general
framework of the administrative policies and pro-
cedures of the University. The Graduate Council
serves as adviser on scientific matters and on matters
relating to the graduate program.
The law establishing the Division of Sponsored Re-
search enables the utilization of some recovered in-
direct cost funds in the support of innovative re-
search. The Board of Directors of the Division has the
responsibility for the award of these funds. For in-
formation write the Dean for Graduate Studies and
Research, Division of Sponsored Research, 219 Grinter
Hall.


FLbRIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL
EXPERIMENT STATION
The Station (EIES) developed from early research
activities of the engineering faculty and was officially
established in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral
part of the College of Engineering. Its mandate is "to
organize and promote the prosecution of research
projects of engineering and related sciences, with
special reference to such of these problems as are im-
portant to the industries of Florida."
The College and the Station are inextricably in-
tertwined-the two activities cannot be separated


functionally; they comprise the two arms of the whole
engineering body. This is particularly true at the grad-
uate level. In many instances a program initiated
primarily as a research activity has developed into a
full-fledged academic department of the College,
demonstrating the close interlocking relationship of
the research and teaching functions.
Since the fall term of 1967, seven departments of
the College of Engineering and the Experiment Sta-
tion have moved into some 310,000 sq. ft. in seven
modern new buildings and one remodeled building.
These improvements, including equipment, have
raised the value of the physical plant of the college to
over $13 million.
The laboratories, staff, and facilities of other
divisions of the University are also available to the
Station research faculty through many outstanding in-
terdisciplinary programs which provide Station sup-
port of graduate students in the physical sciences
such as physics and chemistry, as well as engineering.
With the close relationship that exists between teach-
ing and research, students are exposed to many engi-
neering and industrial problems normally not encom-
passed in a college program.
The Station receives only a small portion of its oper-
ating revenue from the state. The major support of its
research activities is derived from contracts with gov-
ernment agencies, foundations, and industrial organi-
zations. Large and small manufacturers avail them-
selves of the finest engineering research laboratories
in the Southeast. The Station has superior facilities
and staff in such fields as microelectronics and inte-
grated circuits, power systems, metallurgy, ceramics,
coastal engineering, soil mechanics, transport phe-
nomena and fluid dynamics, energy conversion, air
and water pollution control, electrochemistry, fast
neutron physics, nuclear rocket propulsion, dynamics
and vibrations, communications, kinetics, ionics,
gaseous electronics and plasmas, computer and in-
formation science, and systems analysis.
The Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Labo-
ratory, a unit of EIES, administered through the De-
partment of Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering,
conducts research on problems of the shoreline and
of coastal and inland waters and renders advisory
service to public agencies and industry. In-
terdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research and
graduate instruction are closely coordinated and re-
lated to applications of the coastal zone. Many gradu-
ate students are supported by research programs of
the COE Laboratory which include (1) air-sea interac-
tion and the generation of surface waves; (2) scale
models of inlets and shore structures; (3) transporta-
tion of sediment by waves and currents; (4) wave and
current effects at offshore nuclear power plants; (5)
water temperature variations near power-generating
plants; (6) tidal variations in inland waters; (7) littoral
transport under wave action and many others; (8)
coastal defense measures.
Laboratory research facilities include (1) a large area
for carrying out hydraulic model studies of coastal
phenomena; (2) an air-sea interaction facility to in-
vestigate wave generation phenomena; (3) an internal
wave facility to investigate subsurface wave phenom-
ena; (4) a wave tank.in which the effects of waves on
structures, sand motion, etc., can be investigated; and
(5) a hydraulic tilting flume for basic studies of the in-
teraction of flows with sediments. Field investiga-
tions, representing a substantial portion of the re-
search effort, are supported by a mobile field station,
three small boats, and a complete range of tide re-






.34 / GENERAL INFORMATION


orders, current meters, sounding and other auxiliary
equipment.


INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH
CENTERS

ACCOUNTING RESEARCH CENTER
The Center, established in 1976 as an integral part
of the School of Accounting, is supported by the Uni-
versity of Florida and research grants. Principal fields
of research include utilization of accounting informa-
tion in decision making, the association of accounting
information and security prices, human information
processing in accounting contexts, accounting policy
and rule making, and the public policy consequences
of accounting methods, rules and systems. The ARC
serves as a forum for interdisciplinary research in the
School. Research results are published in professional
accounting journals and in journals in other dis-
ciplines and are also contained in a working paper
series. The Center holds frequent research seminars
and organizes a biennial national symposium on a
current topic. For information, contact Director, Ac-
counting Research Center, 217 Bryan Hall.

INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY OF THE
COMMUNICATION PROCESSES
The Institute for Advanced Study of the Com-
munication Processes (IASCP) is designed to provide
opportunities for University faculty and advanced
students to carry out research in the area of the com-
munication processes. Organizationally, it is struc-
tured on an interdisciplinary base, with membership
drawn from appropriate units and departments-pri-
marily from colleges such as Liberal Arts and Sciences,
Engineering, Medicine, Dentistry and Fine Arts. While
IASCP's main site is at the University of Florida in
Gainesville, it is structured to serve the entire State
University System; currently there are active partici-
pants from Florida State University, the University of
South Florida, and Florida International University.
Moreover, the IASCP faculty includes members lo-
cated at other universities and research laboratories
both within the continental United States and
abroad. The overall objective of IASCP is the main-
tenance of a scientific center of excellence focused on
human communicative behavior. The institute's pro-
gram includes (but is not confined to) three broad
areas: 1) the communicator(s), i.e., the physiologi-
cal/physical/psychological processes by which indi-
viduals generate and transmit communicative signals
(speech), 2) the respondentss, how their receptive
(hearing) and neural mechanisms function to process
signals within a variety of environments, and 3) the
message, i.e., the codes and signs (language) that con-
stitute the sum total of these communicative
messages. The IASCP faculty includes students and
scientists with a variety of interests and training. Ex-
pertise is represented by the phonetic sciences, psy-
chology, psycholinguistics, linguistics, psy-
choacoustics, auditory neurophysiology, electrical en-
gineering, computer sciences, physics, communica-
tion studies, biocommunication, dentistry, and medi-
cine. As stated, IASCP's overall research effort is
basically an interdisciplinary one, but the focus of
each investigator's interests is the advancement of


knowledge about human communication. For in-
formation, write the Director, Institute for Advanced
Study of the Communication Processes, 63 Arts and
Sciences Building.

CENTER FOR AERONOMY AND OTHER
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES
The Center (ICAAS) is a community of scholars
drawn from many disciplines represented at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Each scholar has an established pro-
fessional knowledge and research capability in the
atmospheric sciences or in physical, biological, or so-
cietal disciplines that relate closely to our at-
mospheric environment. As an interdisciplinary cen-
ter, ICAAS promotes pure and applied research in the
atmospheric sciences and provides machinery for
translating research into forms relevant to societal
needs. The aeronomical research of the Center deals
with physical, chemical, and electrical processes in
the upper atmosphere, e.g., the stratospheric,
ionospheric, and thermospheric regions of the earth.
Other activities include a diverse range of
tropospheric and micrometeorological research as
well as biological, ecological, and technological re-
search related to the quality of the air we breathe.
These activities are dispersed widely in the Colleges
of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, Engineering,
Medicine, Law, and Business Administration.
Interdisciplinary projects of ICAAS encompass: 1)
studies of ultraviolet radiation levels reaching the
ground, and the possible influences of perturbations
of the stratospheric ozone layer from supersonic
transport effluents and chlorofluorocarbons; 2) in-
fluence of clouds on ultraviolet levels penetration to
earth's surface; 3) correlation of ground level, ul-
traviolet and total ozone measurements with National
Aeronautics and Space Administration NIMBUS 4 and
7 satellites measurements; 4) studies of community
noise levels, architectural \building codes and noise
control for the Florida Northeast Regional Area; 5)
evaluation of environmental impact for locating Flor-
ida electric generating plants and 6) interplay of en-
ergy production needs relative to air quality standards
covering the technical, scientific, medical, agricultur-
al, psychological, economic and legal aspects of the
energy/air quality problems.
Center emphasis on sulfur oxide effects on Flori-
dians, dose-response modeling, risk-benefit analysis,
decision modeling, and public policy alternatives re-
sulted in our report, "An Interdisciplinary Study of the
Health, Social and Environmental Economics of Sulfur
Oxide Pollution in Florida," published to assist the
Florida Environmental Regulation Commission on sul-
fur oxide regulations. Alternate pollution abatement
methodologies and their transformation into public
policy are being studied as a followup to the study.
The correlations between air quality and property val-
ues in Florida have also been studied by an in-
terdisciplinary project team.
.The Center's present emphasis is on the in-
terdisciplinary assessment of the impact of increased
coal use. The scoping phase culminated in a 33-au-
thor book, "Coal Burning Issues," published by the
University Presses of Florida in February 1980. Ex-
pansion of this effort to the Southeast region is cont-
ingent on further funds beyond state support.
The primary function of ICAAS is to provide coordi-
nation, direction, and focus to strengthen existing
programs and to expand them in directions that will









help mitigate the socio-technical problems arising
from the degradation of our atmospheric environ-
ment. The Center will also help the training of able
students at the undergraduate, graduate, and post-
doctoral levels in various pure and applied aspects of
the atmospheric sciences. For information, write the
Director, Center for Aeronomy and Other At-
mospheric Sciences, 221 Space Sciences Research
Building.


CENTER FOR APPLIED MATHEMATICS
The Center consists of faculty from the Depart-
ments of Engineering Science and Mathematics.
These faculty are interested in the application of
mathematics to research problems in the physical, en-
gineering, social, and biological sciences. Codirectors
are Professors A. R. Bednarek and K.T. Millsaps.


CENTER FOR APPLIED THERMODYNAMICS
AND CORROSION
The Center facilitates cooperation between re-
search teams at the University of Florida and the
Belgian Corrosion Research Center at Brussels. Re-
search is conducted in electrochemistry, in high tem-
perature oxidation, and in physical and process
metallurgy, with applications in corrosion-related en-
vironmental problems, such as pollution, water de-
salination, atomic energy, and surgical implants. For
information, write the Director, Center for Applied
Thermodynamics and Corrosion, 132 Rhines Hall.


CENTER FOR AQUATIC SCIENCES
The Center is responsible for intensive develop-
ment and coordination of University-wide activities
in the freshwater, estuarine, and coastal marine sci-
ences. With major emphasis on Florida and con-
tiguous waters, the Center provides leadership for in-
terdisciplinary programs of benefit to the state. The
broad spectrum of curricula, facilities, and faculty at
the University allows students great latitude in de-
veloping their specific interests in the aquatic sci-
ences. Field research facilities are available at nearby
Cedar Key, Welaka, and Marineland. Interested per-
sons should contact the Director, Center for Aquatic
Sciences, 2001 McCarty Hall.


CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER
The Center, part of the Shands Teaching Hospital,
provides a carefully controlled medical research envi-
ronment in which scientists can define and attempt to
conquer unsolved disease problems affecting hu-
mans.
A discrete unit, funded entirely through a grant by
the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Center is
administered through the College of Medicine of the
University of Florida. The grant provides for a
metabolic kitchen and its staff, a laboratory and staff,
and nursing and administrative personnel. The NIH
provide coverage of all research charges for patient
care and also support an out-patient function on the
Center.


SPECIAL FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS /.35

For information.write Clinical Research Center, Box
J-322, ,. Hillis Miller Health Center.


COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER
The Center conducts pure and applied research in a
variety of fields of mass communication. It also serves
as a resource for college faculty and students in their
own research, assists the media and other organiza-
tions in their research pursuits, and sponsors other
programs related to the mass communication needs
of the many communities served bythe University.
For information, write the Director, Communication
Research Center, 2000 journalism Building.


CENTER FOR CONSUMER RESEARCH
The Center conducts basic and applied research on
factors influencing consumer decision making and
behavior. It provides an organization through which
faculty members from a number of disciplines may ef-
fectively work together to study the interface be-
tween consumers, various institutions, activities of
governmental and private organizations and policy
alternatives. The needs and behavior df special con-
sumer groups (e.g., the elderly, children) and the im-
pact of particular consumer attitudes and.choice be-
havior in relation to their owner and societal goals are
of particular interest. For information, write the Direc-
tor, Center for Consumer Research, Matherly Hall.


CENTER FOR DYNAMIC PLASTICITY
The Center conducts research and educational pro-
grams and disseminates information on the behavior
of materials at high rates of deformation. In addition
to structural materials (such as metals, polymers, and
composites), the Center is concerned with biological
materials (bones and soft tissues) and with dynamic
soil mechanics. The Center has established a coopera-
tive arrangement with the University of Bucharest to
enhance international cooperation and exchange of
information and personnel. For information, address
the Director, Center for Dynamic Plasticity, 231 Aero
Building.


BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS
RESEARCH
The Bureau is the research division of the College
of Business Administration. A part of the Bureau's
work is designed to further understanding of the
economy of Florida and the Southeast. Economic,
business, and related research supported by grant and
the contract funds is undertaken in subject areas of
interest to the faculty. Graduate students are involved
also in these projects.
The Bureau publishes six periodicals, Dimensions,
Economic Leaflets, Population Studies, The Florida
Outlook, Florida Economic Indicators and an annual
publication, Florida Statistical Abstract. Through
these publications and through monographs, the Bu-
reau disseminates the results of research and
statistical studies on population, personal income,
employment, building construction, and other sub-
jects. For information, write the Director, Bureau of
Economic and Business Research, 221 Matherly Hall.







36 / GENERAL INFORMATION


FLORIDA ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDING
RESEARCH CENTER
As the research arm of the College of Architecture,
the Center promotes, encourages, and coordinates re-
search activities among the College's five academic
disciplines: architecture, building construction, urban
and regional planning, landscape architecture, and in-
terior design. Principal current research interests of
the Center are in energy efficient building design and
construction, building regulation processes, in-
novative development management techniques, and
environmental design. In carrying out this research
the Center maintains cooperative contacts with other
departments on campus and with institutions in the
United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean
Basin. For information, write the Director, Florida Ar-
chitecture and Building Research Center, 360 GPB.


FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH
CENTER
The Center, funded by the Department of the In-
terior, was established in 1964 as a result of the pas-
sage of P. L. 88-379--The Water Resources Research
Act of 1964--"to stimulate, sponsor, provide for, and
supplement present programs for conduct of re-
search, investigation, experiments, and the training of
scientists in the fields of water and of resources which
affect water."
Under the administration of the Center, current wa-
ter research projects pertaining to the achievement of
adequate statewide water resource management, and
water quality and quantity are being conducted by
staff members in various departments at the Univer-
sity of Florida and at four other colleges and univer-
sities in the state. For information, write the Director,
Florida Water Resources Research Center, 424 A. P.
Black Hall.


CENTER FOR GERONTOLOGICAL STUDIES
The Center provides an organization through which
faculty members from many disciplines may work ef-
fectively both within and outside the University to
study the problems of aging, to develop programs of
benefit to the aged, to provide career-related experi-
ences for graduate and professional students, and to
disseminate information derived from research in
health care, housing, transportation, and other areas.
The Summer Institute on Gerontology and several
in-service training workshops and seminars for aca-
demic and continuing education credit are sponsored
annually by the Center. Conference Proceedings and
statistical reports are published by the University
Presses of, Florida. For information write the Director,
Center for Gerontological Studies, 3357 CPA.


HEALTH SYSTEMS RESEARCH DIVISION
The Division is an interdisciplinary activity or-
ganized within the Office of the Vice President for
Health Affairs, J. Hillis Miller Health Center. Its func-
tion is to conduct research to improve the effective-
ness and efficiency of the health services delivery
system and of the health manpower education and
training system and to develop methods for the op-


timal allocation of health care resources. Research
projects are carried out for the academic units of the
health center, the Shands Teaching Hospital and
Clinics, Inc., and other health care facilities within the
University and community. Ip addition, research is
conducted through contracts and grants for health or-
ganizations and agencies at the state and national
level.
The staff of the Division consists of faculty, stu-
dents, and career service employees representing a di-
versity of backgrounds and disciplines. Among these
are operations research, industrial and systems engi-
neering, health and hospital administration, com-
puter science, economics, medicine, dentistry, and
health related professions. Student support is pro-
vided through assistantships and fellowships. For
information, write the Director, Health Systems Re-
search Division, Box J-177, J. Hillis Miller Health Cen-
ter.


INSTITUTE OF HIGHER EDUCATION
The Institute of Higher Education is an agency
within the College of Education, responsible at the
same time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs,
and is defined as a research and service agency of the
University focused upon higher education. Operating
under the Institute are several organizational struc-
tures: The Florida Community College Interinstitu-
tional Research Council, a consortium of community
colleges in Florida with focus upon institutional and
system-wide research; the Community College Lead-
ership Program, with a focus on developing and im-
proving administrative leadership in community col-
leges; the State Leadership Program in Higher Educa-
tion, a partnership program with Florida State Univer-
sity, for preparing and improving state agency staff
personnel; and special projects of both research and
service orientation which are assigned from time to
time, often on a contract basis.
Many advanced graduate students find research
projects of their own interests among the many ac-
tivities of the IHE. For information, write the Director,
Institute of Higher Education.


CENTER FOR INFORMATION RESEARCH
The Center (CIR) is responsible for directing, coor-
dinating, and conducting advanced studies and re-
search activities in computer and information system
sciences as they apply to multiple disciplines. The
Center is staffed by scholars and scientists drawn
from the many academic disciplines represented at
the University. The interdisciplinary nature of the CIR
creates a stimulating environment for basic and ap-
plied research to seek new insights in and optimal
solutions to engineering, physical, biological, medi-
cal, management, environmental, and social prob-
lems. The Center staff is concerned with solving time-
ly and relevant problems by using modern computer
technology and the latest developments in informa-
tion science.
The primary functions of CIR are (1) to conduct re-
search in developing the theory and techniques for
the design of computer systems and software to solve
contemporary problems created by knowledge ex-
plosion; (2) to develop advanced technology for the
design of information automation systems for office






SPECIAL FACILITIES AND SERVICES / 37


operation; (3) to assist industry, as well as state and
federal governments, in augmenting productivity via
innovative applications of computer technology and
intelligent machines; (4) to initiate and coordinate in-
terdisciplinary attacks on complex technological, so-
cioeconomic and health problems; and (5) to provide
internship opportunities for graduate students in in-
formation science, computer technology, and related
areas.
The research laboratories are equipped with a PDP
11/40 computer system, an Optronics P-1000 pre-
cision microdensitometer, a DeAnza IP 5000 image ar-
ray processor and high resolution color display, the
Graphic 1 interactive graphics system, a pictorial data
acquisition computer (PIDAC), and a DIVA mass
storage system. In addition, the Center maintains a
large software library representing many years of re-
search and applications in the areas of pattern recog-
nition, image processing, database management, and
knowledge transfer. Center-developed intelligent sys-
tems include the generalized information retrieval
system, Telebrowsing, the Medical Knowledge Sys-
tem (MEDIKS), the Universal Image Processing Sys-
tem (UNIPS), the Agricultural Productivity Improve-
ment Knowledge System (APRIKS), and -the Auto-
matic Typewriter Identification System (ATID). The
significant software resources of the Center allow re-
searchers to develop new applications with a mini-
mum software development effort.
The Center sponsors the International Symposia on
Computer and Information Science (COINS Sym-
posia), cooperates with other University units in or-
ganizing and conducting conferences, seminars, short
courses, and developmental programs in information
science, and supports publication of scholarly books,
monograph series, and an international journal on
computer and information science.
Graduate student support is provided through re-
search assistantships at all levels of graduate study. In-
quiries about the various programs and activities of
the CIR should be addressed to the Director, Center
for Information Research, 339 Larsen Hall.


CENTER FOR MACROMOLECULAR SCIENCE
The Center is developing a unified research and
teaching faculty, drawing its members from the fields
of chemical engineering, chemistry, biochemistry,
materials science- and engineering, and environ-
mental engineering. Current research includes syn-
thetic polymer chemistry, mechanistic and structure
studies, solution and solid state properties of
polymers, biological application of polymers and lim-
ited studies on industrial applications of polymers.
For information, write the Director, Center for Macro-
molecular Science, 420 Space Sciences Research
Building.


MANAGEMENT CENTER
The Management Center was established to pro-
vide management education in all areas of business,
and provide an opportunity for participants to in-
teract with people from other firms and industries as
well as the university community.
The flagship program of the Management Center is
the Florida Executive Program. The expanded two-
week format will allow more in-depth coverage of a


variety of business programs. The specific objectives
of the program are to make available critical manage-
rial information, to learn to identify the environment
in which the organization operates, and to improve
problem solving in a number of functional areas.
The Florida Management Program will be initiated
February 1981 to provide a broad based management
development course for mid-level management. The
instructional faculty, drawn primarily from the Uni-
versity of Florida, leads a series of half day discussions
on such topics as How to Live with Regulation, Get-
ting the Most from Problem Managers, and Managing
Consumers and Markets. Lectures, group discussions,
exercises, simulations and case studies will be used, as
necessary, to clarify the various topics.
The Management Center has also developed a
number of short two-day courses on specific topics.
Programs cover areas such as Financial Management
for Professionals, Productivity Improvement, Fore-
casting, Marketing for Service Industries, Basic Skills
Training for Supervisors, Increasing Management Ef-
fectiveness, Managing the Smaller, Rapidly Growing
Manufacturing Firm, Finance for Nonfinancial Man-
agers, Managerial Communication and Persuasion,
and Time Management.
To aid in course development and evaluation, the
Management Center has formed an advisory board.
Composed primarily of management development
executives from major Florida firms, the Board helps
to identify needs in University sponsored programs.
In addition to courses offered to the public, the
Management Center is also working with private
firms and professional organizations to develop
courses specifically tailored to their needs. More in-
formation on these programs can be obtained by con-
tacting the Management Center.
Additional information on any of the programs may
be obtained by contacting the Director, Management
Center, 106 Matherly Hall.



CENTER FOR MATHEMATICAL SYSTEM
THEORY
The Center was established in 1972 to advance re-
search in all areas of system theory dependent on
mathematical methodology. Both pure and applied
problems are emphasized. The Center is operated on
an interdisciplinary basis in cooperation with the De-
partments of Mathematics, Electrical Engineering, In-
dustrial and Systems Engineering, Statistics, and Engi-
neering Sciences.
The permanent faculty of the Center presently in-
cludes Professors R. E. Kalman (Director), V. M.
Popov, and T. Bullock. There are numerous affiliated
faculty members and many visitors of international
stature. An active research seminar is conducted
throughout the year on recent developments in sys-
tem theory, as well as certain aspects of computer sci-
ence and biology.
Principal interest is currently in algebraic methods
in system theory, such as theory of linear systems over
a ring; algebraic-geometric structure of classes of lin-
ear systems; algebraic theory of infinite-dimensional
continuous-time systems; classical theory of in-
variants as related to decoupling and other structural
problems. Recent work has also been directed toward
the identification of dynamical systems and funda-
mental aspects of decentralized and hierarchical con-
trol.






38 / GENERAL INFORMATION


CENTER FOR NEUROBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
The purpose of the Center is to promote intellec-
tual interchange and scientific collaboration among
faculty and students interested in the nervous system.
A training grant supports students specifically in-
volved in the investigation of brain-behavior rela-
tionships. The training program is conducted through
formal courses, seminars, symposia and participation
in laboratory research. Trainees are affiliated with the
Center through a basic science or clinical department.
For information, write the Director, Center for Neu-
robiological Sciences, Box J-224, J. Hillis Miller Health,
Center.



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING
SERVICES
The Clearing Service is a research and service ad-
junct of the Department of Political Science in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It carries on a
continuous program of research in public adminis-
tration, political behavior, and public policy in Flor-
ida; publishes research studies and surveys of admin-
istrative and political problems in both scientific and
popular monograph form; and publishes a Civic In-
formation Series annually for assistance to citizen
groups in their study of current issues in the state. For
information, write the Director, Public Administration
Clearing Services, 3326 General Purpose Building A.



CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON HUMAN
PROSTHESIS
The Center fosters interchange between the
biomedical and engineering sciences in research on
the development of prosthetic devices for neu-
rosensory organs and limbs, particularly for visual
prosthesis. For information, write the Director, Center
for Research on Human Prosthesis, Box J-284, J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.


CENTER FOR SENSORY STUDIES
Sensory studies deal with those systems which pro-
vide an organism with information about its internal
or external environment. Traditionally, these topics
range from vision and hearing to biological clocks and
homing activity. Sensory studies at the University of
Florida provide a special opportunity to the talented
student because of the unusual convergence of a
strong faculty, a set of unique facilities which are
available within the University and which are peculiar
to the State of Florida and its regional location in the
United States.
The graduate program envisioned by the faculty
calls for broad training in an established academic
discipline (psychology, physiology, etc.), an introduc-
tory survey of the senses, in-depth training in one or
more sense modalities (vision, hearing, chemical, etc.)
and special advanced studies in basic or applied tech-
niques. The intent is to develop a broad perspective
as well as necessary skills within an established aca-
demic discipline. This provides the foundation upon
which sensory studies will be developed. Affiliation


with an academic degree granting program will also
provide an additional basis for future professional af-
filiation. Since students will enter the sensory pro-
gram with differing backgrounds, the program of
studies will be tailored to the perceived needs of the
student.
Correspondence concerning admission to the Sen-
sory Studies Program should be directed to the Direc-
tor, Center for Sensory Studies, Physics Department,
274 Williamson Hall.


URBAN AND REGIONAL RESEARCH CENTER
The Center stimulates and, coordinates in-
terdisciplinary research on urban and regional affairs
and works closely with faculty and graduate students
in any discipline concerned with local, state, regional,
national, or international human settlements. Since
the major thrust of URRC is research, no formal
courses or degree programs are offered. However,
URRC seeks the participation of faculty and graduate
students who are interested in research on urban and
regional topics. The Center maintains an updated list-
ing of grant announcements and is ready to assist in
the development of research proposals. Further in-
quiries should be made to the Director, Urban and
Regional Research Center, 2326 General Purpose
Building A.


CENTER FOR WETLANDS
The Center for Wetlands is an intercollege research
division dedicated to wetlands, their ecology, prob-
lems, management, and effective land use. The Cen-
ter advances knowledge through special research
approaches as systems ecological modelling and sim-
ulation, energy cost benefit analysis and planning,
field experiments on vegetation response to water
control and regional planning.
The Center fosters campus and statewide com-
munication through a central workshop activity, or-
ganized research projects of county and state con-
cern, wetlands publications, conferences and short
courses, research data collections, and proposals for
curricula. Support of faculty and graduate students is
provided by active projects. The Center is jointly
sponsored by the Colleges of Engineering, Liberal Arts
and Sciences, Agriculture, and Architecture.
Representative research projects include Cypress
Wetlands for Water Management, Recycling, and
Conservation, funded by The Rockefeller Foundation
and the RANN Division of National Science Founda-
tion. Work of the Center includes a section on energy
analysis, evaluating environmental alternatives with
data on energy flows.
Interested persons should contact the Director,
Center for Wetlands, Phelps Lab.




STUDENT SERVICES

CAREER RESOURCE CENTER
The Center, Suite G-22, J. Wayne Reitz Student Un-
ion, is the central agency for career planning, job






STUDENT SERVICES / 39


placement, and cooperative education assistance for
all students and alumni of the University. It also coor-
dinates these activities with those graduate programs
that provide direct employment assistance to their
students.
Graduate students desiring to orient career in-
terests, formulate job search plans, gain proficiency in
job related communications, to interview or other-
wise identify and contact potential employers are in-
vited to visit the Center and utilize its services.
For those seeking individual assistance in resolving
problems relating to any of the activities of the Cen-
ter, vocational counselors are available for personal
appointments.
The Center provides reproduction and distribution
services for the professional files (Qualification Re-
cords, Resumes, Vitae, References, and other related
papers) of students and alumni. A modest charge is
assessed to cover labor and materials for reproduction
and mailing of copies of these credentials to em-
ployers when so directed by students or alumni.
A significant on-campus job interview program
with representatives from business, industry, govern-
ment, and education seeking graduating students in
most career fields is available to all graduate students
registered with the Center.
GRAD II is a computerized program matching em-
ployers with prospective qualified employees. GRAD
II input forms are available at the Center.
Other functions of the Center include (1) serving as
liaison between students and employers; (2) conduct-
ing studies on the employment outlook, salary trends,
progress of graduates in the working world and re-
lated matters; (3) serving in a public relations capacity
in dealing with employers and the public; and (4)
providing speakers from business, industry, govern-
ment, education, and the Center to academic classes
and student organizations to talk on professional sub-
jects of interest.



UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
The University Counseling Center offers free psy-
chological and vocational counseling to all students
of the University and their spouses. The Center is
staffed by psychologists whose primary interests are
to facilitate the growth and development of individ-
uals in the University setting. Psychological services
are available to students experiencing academic,
personal, social, or marital difficulties. Vocational
services include testing, career information, and
counseling. The Center offers consultative services to
University faculty and staff who are engaged in advis-
ing or counseling students.


EDITORIAL ASSISTANCE AND INFORMATION
The Graduate School Editorial Office provides a
Guide for Preparing Theses and Dissertations to assist
the student in the preparation of the manuscript and
offers suggestions and advice on such matters as the
preparation and reproduction of illustrative materials,
the treatment of special problems, the use of
copyrighted material, and how to secure a copyright
for a dissertation. The following procedures apply to
the Graduate School's editorial services to students.
1. The responsibility for acceptable English in a


thesis or dissertation, as well as the originality and ac-
ceptable quality of the content, lies with the student
and the supervisory committee.
2. The Graduate School editorial staff acts only in
an advisory capacity but will answer questions regard-
ing correct grammar, sentence structure, and accep-
table forms of presentation.
3. If the student will bring the final rough draft to
the Editorial Office of the Graduate School, the staff
will examine a limited portion and make recommen-
dations concerning the form of the thesis or disserta-
tion before the final typing.
4. After the first submission of the dissertation in
final form, the Editorial Office staff checks the format,
paper stock, and pagination and reads portions of the
text for general usage, references, and bibliographical
form. Master's theses are checked for paper stock,
format, reference style, and pagination.
5. Upon final submission, the signature pages and
Final Examination forms for all theses and disserta-
tions are checked against the Admission to Candidacy
forms for the signatures of the college dean (except
for the Colleges of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Business
Administration, and Education' which require a spe-
cial statement on the signature page) and all mem-
bers of the supervisory committee.
It is the responsibility of the student and the super-
visory chairman to notify the Graduate School in
writing of any changes which have been made in the
structure of the supervisory committee.
6. The Editorial Office maintains a file of experi-
enced thesis typists, manuscript editors, and
draftsmen which the student may examine to find as-
sistance in the mechanical preparation of the man-
uscript.



ADVISER TO FOREIGN STUDENTS
The Office of International Student Services is the
center for services performed on behalf of foreign stu-
dents from their arrival on campus until their de-
parture for home. The office coordinates with other
University agencies and is charged with responsi-
bilities involving evaluation of financial statements,
issuance of certificates of eligibility (Forms 1-20 and
IAP-66) for visa application, reception, orientation,
off-campus housing, finances, health, immigration
matters, practical training, employment, liaison with
embassies, consulates, foundations and United States
government agencies, correspondence, legal prob-
lems, life counseling, referrals and community rela-
tions. The Office for International Student Services
also assists foreign faculty members. The office is lo-
cated at 1504 West University Avenue.. Mail can be
addressed to the Director, International Student Serv-
ices, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.



STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
The Student Health Service provides a spectrum of
medical services which includes primary medical care,
health education, health screening programs, and
mental health consultation and counseling.
The service consists of an out-patient clinic and a
nine-bed in-patient unit staffed by physicians,
physician's assistants, nurses, psychologists, pharma-
cists, laboratory and x-ray technicians, and supporting






40 / GENERAL INFORMATION


personnel. It is housed in the Infirmary, which is cen-
trally located on.the campus.
The Service is a unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center with its Colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and
Health Related Professions. The facilities of the
Health Center are available by consultation and refer-
ral through the Student Health Service. Specialty
clinics are available in the Infirmary for allergy, minor
surgery, orthopedics, mental health, and women's
health care.
The health fee is part of the tuition fee paid by all
full-time students. Part-time students have the option
of paying the health fee which would entitle them to
the same use of the Service as a full-time student. The
health fee covers ordinary out-patient visits and some
laboratory tests. When more complicated diagnostic
studies or hospitalization is required, additional


charges are made. For this reason, the supplemental
student government health insurance plan is highly
recommended.
' A personal health history questionnaire completed
by the student is required before registration at the
University.


SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Clinic, Room 442, Arts and Sciences Building,
offers services without charge to any Universty stu-
dent who has a speech or hearing disorder. This as-
sistance is available at any time during the year and
therapy sessions are adjusted to individual schedules.
The student is encouraged to visit.the Clinic and to
use this service.












Fields of Instruction


































1goo


















r:Ls










FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


COLLEGES AND AREAS OF
INSTRUCTION
AGRICULTURE
Agricultural and Extension Education
Agronomy
Animal Science
Botany
Dairy Science
Entomology and Nematology
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Forest Resources and Conservation,
School of
Horticultural Science
Fruit Crops
Ornamental Horticulture
Vegetable Crops
Microbiology and Cell Science
Plant Pathology
\Poultry Science
Soil Science
Veterinary Medicine-IFAS
ARCHITECTURE
Architecture
Building Construction, School of
Urban and Regional Planning
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
General
Accounting, School of
Computer and Information Sciences
Economics
Finance and Insurance
Health and Hospital Administration
Management and Administrative Sciences
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
EDUCATION
Counselor Education
Curriculum and Instruction, Division of
General Teacher Education
Instructional Leadership and
Support
Subject Specialization Teacher
Education
Educational Administration and
'Supervision
Foundations of Education
Special Education
ENGINEERING
Agricultural Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Computer and Information Sciences
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Sciences
Aerospace Engineering
Engineering Science and Mechanics
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences


FINE ARTS
Art
Music
Theatre
GERONTOLOGICAL STUDIES, CENTER FOR
HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS
General
Clinical Psychology
Communicative Disorders
Health and Hospital Administration
Occupational Therapy
Rehabilitation Counseling
JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
LAW
Taxation
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
General
African Studies, Center for
Anthropology
Astronomy
Botany
Chemistry
Classics
Latin
Communicative Disorders
Computer and Information Sciences
English
Geography
Geology
Germanic and Slavic Languages and
Literatures
History
Latin American Studies, Center for
Linguistics
Mathematics
Philosophy"
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Romance Languages and Literatures
French
Portuguese
Spanish
Sociology
Speech
Statistics
Zoology
MEDICINE-MEDICAL SCIENCES
General
Anatomy
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Immunology and Medical Microbiology
Neuroscience
Pathology
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Physiology
NURSING
PHARMACY-PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacy
PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND
RECREATION
Health Education and Safety
Professional Physical Education







44 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING
College of Business Administration
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Director: H. P. Schaefer. Graduate Coordinators: B. B.
Ajinkya; D. Snowball. Graduate Research Professor: A.
R. Abdel-khalik. Professors: I. N. Gleim; J. K. Simmons;
S. C. Yu. Associate Professors: W. A. Collins; J. L.
Kramer; C. L. McDonald; E. D. Smith; D. Snowball. As-
sistant Professors: B. B. Ajinkya; J. V. Boyles; W. F.
Messier.
The School of Accounting offers graduate work
leading to the degrees Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)
and Ph.D. with a major in business administration
and an accounting concentration. The M.Acc. degree
program offers specialization in each of the four areas
of auditing/financial accounting, management ac-
counting, accounting systems, and taxation. The
Ph.D. accounting concentration is designed to pre-
pare students for a career in teaching and research at
the university or college level or for research-oriented
careers in business and government. Specific details
for the M.Acc. and Ph.D. programs will be supplied by
the graduate coordinators upon request. The.degree
Master of Business Administration with an accounting
concentration is offered by the College of Business
Administration. Requirements for the MBA are in-
cluded in the front section of the Catalog.
The M.Acc. and the Ph.D. accounting programs re-
quire admission standards of at least the following:
For the M.Acc. program, a combined verbal and quan-
titative score of 1100 on the Graduate Record Exami-
nation (GRE); a combined Graduate Record Examina-
tion score of 1250 for the Ph.D. program; or a score of
500 for the M.Acc. and 550 for the Ph.D. program on
the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).
Either the GRE or the GMAT scores are acceptable;
but admission to the M.Acc. or Ph.D. accounting
graduate programs cannot be granted until scores are
received. Foreign students must submit a TOEFL test
score of at least 500 and a satisfactory GMAT or GRE
score.
Admission to graduate courses in accounting re-
quires that students have, or complete without gradu-
ate credit, approximately the courses required of an
undergraduate accounting major. With this back-
ground the M.Acc. degree can normally be earned in
three semesters.
The M.Acc. degree requires 36 credits of course
work. A minimum of 16 credits must be graduate level
accounting courses. The remaining credits are
selected from recommended elective courses that
vary by area of specialization.
Thesis Option: Requirements include 12-14
semester hours of graduate accounting courses and
the balance of the 24 course credits in one or two mi-
nor fields (finance, operations research, management,
etc,). A thesis'on an accounting-related topic is re-
quired. The total number of course and thesis credits
required is 30.
Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include a core
of courses in mathematical methods, statistics, re-
search methodology, and economic theory; one or
two minor fields selected by the student; and major
field of accounting. Students are expected to acquire
teaching experience as part of the Ph.D. degree pro-
gram. Grants-in-aid will be awarded for this teaching.
Students are expected to enroll in ACC 6940 for a max-
imum of three credits. Fulfillment of a research skill
and a dissertation on an accounting-related topic are
also required.


ACC 5011-Financial Accounting (3), May not be taken by
students who have completed ACC 2001. Designed primarily
for MBA candidates and other graduate students. Not open
to accounting majors. Functions and underlying principles
of accounting stressed. Emphasis on analysis of financial
conditions and business operations through 'an Onder-
standing of accounting statements.
ACC 5214-Advanced Financial Accounting for Complex
Organizations (4) Analysis of accounting procedures for
consignment and installment sales, partnerships, branches,
consolidations, foreign operations, governmental account-
ing and other advanced topics.
ACC 5443-Advanced Cost and Management Accounting (3)
Prereq: ACC 3401 and QMB 3700. Interpretive accounting for
management purposes.
ACC 5510-Tax Factors in Management Decisions (3) Course
open to MBA students and undergraduate students who
have not received credit for ACC 4507. Examines the income
and deduction concepts, the taxation of property trans-
actions, the taxation of business entities, the selection of a
business form and its capital structure, employee compensa-
tion, formation and liquidation of a corporation, changes in
the corporate structure, and the use of tax shelters..
ACC 5511--Advanced Federal Income Tax Accounting (3)
Prereq: ACC 4501. This course is not open to persons in the
tax concentration. A continuation of Federal Income Tax Ac-
counting I; This course covers basic tax research, taxation of
corporations, partnerships, and fiduciaries, as well as the ex-
cise' taxes levied upon transfers of property at death and as
gifts.
ACC 5512-Federal Income Taxation Procedures and Re-
search (4) Prereq: ACC 4501. Examines the basic techniques
for researching federal income tax questions as well as statu-
tory provisions specifying the duties and-responsibilities of
the IRS and the taxpayers to each other. Topics include: use
of computerized tax research tools, IRS ruling procedures,
tax reporting and collection procedures, the audit process
for tax returns, the administrative and judicial processes gov-
erning tax controversies, and tax return-preparer rules.
ACC 5513-Transactions Involving Shareholders and Corpo-
rations (3) Prereq: ACC 5512. Examination of the fundamen-
tal legal concepts, the statutory provisions and the computa-
tional procedures applicable to economic transactions and
events involving the formation, operation, and liquidation
of the corporate entity. Consideration is also given to ac-
quisitive and divisive changes to the corporate structure.
ACC 5514-Transactions Involving Partners and Partner-
ships (3) Prereq: ACC 5512. Examines the tax 'aspects of the
partnership as a business entity. Topics included the acquisi-
tion of a partnership interest; the reporting of partnership
profits, losses, and distributions; transactions between part-
ners and the partnership; transfers of a partnership interest;
and retirement or death of a partner.
ACC 5515-Taxation of Foreign Related Transactions (3) Pre-
req: ACC 5512. Examines the tax aspects of transactions in-
volving foreign parties. Topics include: the foreign tax credit,
taxation of U.S. citizens abroad, taxation of nonresident al-
iens doing business in the U.S., tax treaties, taxation of in-
come from investments abroad, taxation of export opera-
tions; foreign currency translation, intercompany pricing and
boycott and bribe related income.
ACC 5531-Federal Estate and Gift Taxation (3) Examination
of the federal excise tax levied on transfers of property via
gift or from decedents estates.
ACC 5632-Auditing Theory and Internal Control II (3) A
continuation of ACC 4602 with detailed coverage of field
work procedures for internal control and substantive audit
testing, statistical sampling, operational auditing and audit
software packages.
ACC 5745-Analysis and Design of Business Systems.(3) Ex-
amination of systems theory in relation to the.accountant's
function of providing information for management.
ACC 5846-Advanced Accounting Analysis for the Con-
trollership Function (3) A study of planning and control as
they relate to management of organizations. The course
draws from cases and journals to integrate managerial ac-
counting concepts.
ACC 5865--Public Administration Accounting (3)
SACC 5870-CPA Examination Review (3) Consent of instruc-







AFRICAN STUDIES / 45


tor required. This course may not count toward fulfilling de-
gree requirements.
ACC 6290-Accounting Theory, and Financial Reporting
Standards (4) Current developments in accounting concepts
and principles and their relevance to the status of current ac-
counting practices. Special topics in financial accounting
and current reporting problems facing the accounting pro-
fession. Review of current authoritative pronouncements.
ACC 6411-Cost Accounting Theory and Applications (4)
ACC 6692-Auditing and Financial Accounting Issues and
Cases (3) A study of recent and projected future develop-
ments in financial reporting and auditing emphasizing cases,
journal articles, and pronouncements.
ACC 6739-Management Information Systems Seminar (3)
ACC 6811-Social and Economic Accounting (3)
ACC 6821-Interdisciplinary Considerations in Accounting
Theory Development (3) Developments in related dis-
ciplines, such as economics, law and behavioral sciences,
analyzed for their contribution to accounting thought.
ACC 6831-Accounting and Analytical Methods (3) Utili-
zation of logic, including mathematics, in formulation of al-
ternative accounting valuation models and in clarification of
accounting concepts.
ACC 6905-Individual Work in Accounting (1-4; max: 7) Pre-
req: approval of Graduate Coordinator. Reading and re-
search in areas of accounting.
ACC 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ACC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ACC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ACC 7292--Philosophy of Science and Research in Financial
Accounting (5) Study of general principles of theory con-
struction and verification and their application to the devel-
opment of accounting thought. Also, intensive study of em-
pirical research in financial accounting from both substan-
tive and methodological viewpoints.
ACC 7395-Research in Managerial Accounting and In-
formation Economics (5) Study of accounting information
and other decision tools used for planning and control in or-
ganizations, including the impact of managerial behavior
and incentive structures. Also, discussion of the problem of
information asymmetry and alternative institutional arrange-
ments.
ACC 7805-Development of Thought in Accounting Theory
(3) Inquiry into criteria for choice among income-determina-
tion and asset-valuation rules in context of public reporting.
ACC 7925--Accounting Research Workshop (4; max: 8) In-
depth analysis of current research topics in accounting. Pa-
per presentation and critiques by visiting scholars, faculty,
and doctoral students.
ACC 790-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)



CENTER FOR AFRICAN STUDIES
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Director: R. H. Davis. Graduate Research Professors:
M. Harris; W. W. McPherson. Professors: R. A. Blume;
R. Craven; C. G. Davis; H. Der-Houssikian; B. M. du
Toit; R. Lemarchand; A. J. Lewis; M. Lockhart; P.
Magnarella; D. McCloud; D. Niddrie; H. Popenoe; R.
R. Renner; J. S. Vandiver. Associate Professors: H.
Armstrong; B. A. Cailler; W. A. Colette; R. H. Davis; J.
K. Dow; L. D, Harris; M. A. Hill-Lubin; P. A. Kotey; J.
Simpson; A. Spring. Assistant Professors: A. Hansen; E.
Scott; P. J. van Blokland; J. Yellin.
The Center for African Studies offers the Certificate
in African Studies for master's and doctoral students
in conjunction with disciplinary degrees. Graduate
courses on Africa or with African content are available
in the Colleges or Departments of Agriculture, An-
thropology, Art, Botany, Economics, Education, Eng-
lish, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources
and Conservation, Geography, History, Humanities,


Law, Linguistics, Music, Political Science, and Soci-
ology.
A description of the certificate program in African
Studies may be found in the section Special Programs.
Listings of courses may be found in individual de-
partmental descriptions or may be obtained from the
Director, 470 Grinter Hall.


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman & Graduate Coordinator: C. E. Beeman.
Professors: C. E. Beeman; J. T. Woeste. Associate Pro-
fessors: J. G. Cheek; W. S. Farrington; M. B. McGhee;
A. A. Straughn. Assistant Professors: M. F. Cole; M. F.
Smith; W. R. Summerhill; C. L. Taylor.
The master's programs in agricultural and extension
education are designed for those persons engaged in
teaching agriculture (at all levels) in the public
schools of Florida, those in the Cooperative Extension
Service including home economics, agriculture, 4-H,
etc., and others in educational and leadership posi-
tions in agriculture and/or extension education who
desire additional professional training.
The Department of Agricultural and Extension Edu-
cation offers major work for the degrees of Master of
Science and Master of Agriculture. The Master of Sci-
ence, with emphasis on research requires a thesis,
which the Master of Agriculture does not (see Re-
quirerrents for Master's Degrees).
A prospective graduate student need not have ma-
jored in agricultural and extension education as an
undergraduate. However, students with an insuffi-
cient background in either agricultural and extension
education or technical agriculture will need to in-
clude some basic courses in these areas in their pro-
gram.
AEE 5643-Comparative Extension Education (2) Prereq: AEE
3313. A comparative analysis of the various systems 6f ex-
tension education on a worldwide, basis and the factors af-
fecting the programs and organization within the various
systems.
'AEE 6206-Advanced Instructional Techniques in Agricul-
tural and Extension Education (3) Prereq: approval of de-
partment chairman. Effective use of instructional materials
and methods in agricultural and extension education. Em-
phasis on application of visual and nonvisual techniques of
instruction.
AEE 6300-Methodology of Planned Change (3) Processes
by which professional change agents influence the introduc-
tion, adoption, and diffusion of technological changes-. Ap-
plicable to those who are responsible for bringing about
change.
AEE 6325-History and Philosophy of Agricultural Education
(2) Historical and philosophical antecedents to current voca-
tional agriculture programs. Examines social influences
which support vocational education and current trends in
vocational, agricultural and career education.
AEE 6417-Advanced Agricultural and Extension Leadership
(2) Principles and practices related to the effective adminis-
tration and supervision of agricultural education and ex-
tension education. Emphasis will be placed on adminis-
trative and supervisory structures and roles at the national,
state, and local levels.
AEE 6426-Development of a 4-H Volunteer Leadership Pro-
gram (3) The development and management of a 4-H volun-
teer leadership program with particular emphasis on identi-
fication, recruitment, training, retention, and supervision of
volunteer leaders.







AFRICAN STUDIES / 45


tor required. This course may not count toward fulfilling de-
gree requirements.
ACC 6290-Accounting Theory, and Financial Reporting
Standards (4) Current developments in accounting concepts
and principles and their relevance to the status of current ac-
counting practices. Special topics in financial accounting
and current reporting problems facing the accounting pro-
fession. Review of current authoritative pronouncements.
ACC 6411-Cost Accounting Theory and Applications (4)
ACC 6692-Auditing and Financial Accounting Issues and
Cases (3) A study of recent and projected future develop-
ments in financial reporting and auditing emphasizing cases,
journal articles, and pronouncements.
ACC 6739-Management Information Systems Seminar (3)
ACC 6811-Social and Economic Accounting (3)
ACC 6821-Interdisciplinary Considerations in Accounting
Theory Development (3) Developments in related dis-
ciplines, such as economics, law and behavioral sciences,
analyzed for their contribution to accounting thought.
ACC 6831-Accounting and Analytical Methods (3) Utili-
zation of logic, including mathematics, in formulation of al-
ternative accounting valuation models and in clarification of
accounting concepts.
ACC 6905-Individual Work in Accounting (1-4; max: 7) Pre-
req: approval of Graduate Coordinator. Reading and re-
search in areas of accounting.
ACC 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ACC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ACC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ACC 7292--Philosophy of Science and Research in Financial
Accounting (5) Study of general principles of theory con-
struction and verification and their application to the devel-
opment of accounting thought. Also, intensive study of em-
pirical research in financial accounting from both substan-
tive and methodological viewpoints.
ACC 7395-Research in Managerial Accounting and In-
formation Economics (5) Study of accounting information
and other decision tools used for planning and control in or-
ganizations, including the impact of managerial behavior
and incentive structures. Also, discussion of the problem of
information asymmetry and alternative institutional arrange-
ments.
ACC 7805-Development of Thought in Accounting Theory
(3) Inquiry into criteria for choice among income-determina-
tion and asset-valuation rules in context of public reporting.
ACC 7925--Accounting Research Workshop (4; max: 8) In-
depth analysis of current research topics in accounting. Pa-
per presentation and critiques by visiting scholars, faculty,
and doctoral students.
ACC 790-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)



CENTER FOR AFRICAN STUDIES
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Director: R. H. Davis. Graduate Research Professors:
M. Harris; W. W. McPherson. Professors: R. A. Blume;
R. Craven; C. G. Davis; H. Der-Houssikian; B. M. du
Toit; R. Lemarchand; A. J. Lewis; M. Lockhart; P.
Magnarella; D. McCloud; D. Niddrie; H. Popenoe; R.
R. Renner; J. S. Vandiver. Associate Professors: H.
Armstrong; B. A. Cailler; W. A. Colette; R. H. Davis; J.
K. Dow; L. D, Harris; M. A. Hill-Lubin; P. A. Kotey; J.
Simpson; A. Spring. Assistant Professors: A. Hansen; E.
Scott; P. J. van Blokland; J. Yellin.
The Center for African Studies offers the Certificate
in African Studies for master's and doctoral students
in conjunction with disciplinary degrees. Graduate
courses on Africa or with African content are available
in the Colleges or Departments of Agriculture, An-
thropology, Art, Botany, Economics, Education, Eng-
lish, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources
and Conservation, Geography, History, Humanities,


Law, Linguistics, Music, Political Science, and Soci-
ology.
A description of the certificate program in African
Studies may be found in the section Special Programs.
Listings of courses may be found in individual de-
partmental descriptions or may be obtained from the
Director, 470 Grinter Hall.


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman & Graduate Coordinator: C. E. Beeman.
Professors: C. E. Beeman; J. T. Woeste. Associate Pro-
fessors: J. G. Cheek; W. S. Farrington; M. B. McGhee;
A. A. Straughn. Assistant Professors: M. F. Cole; M. F.
Smith; W. R. Summerhill; C. L. Taylor.
The master's programs in agricultural and extension
education are designed for those persons engaged in
teaching agriculture (at all levels) in the public
schools of Florida, those in the Cooperative Extension
Service including home economics, agriculture, 4-H,
etc., and others in educational and leadership posi-
tions in agriculture and/or extension education who
desire additional professional training.
The Department of Agricultural and Extension Edu-
cation offers major work for the degrees of Master of
Science and Master of Agriculture. The Master of Sci-
ence, with emphasis on research requires a thesis,
which the Master of Agriculture does not (see Re-
quirerrents for Master's Degrees).
A prospective graduate student need not have ma-
jored in agricultural and extension education as an
undergraduate. However, students with an insuffi-
cient background in either agricultural and extension
education or technical agriculture will need to in-
clude some basic courses in these areas in their pro-
gram.
AEE 5643-Comparative Extension Education (2) Prereq: AEE
3313. A comparative analysis of the various systems 6f ex-
tension education on a worldwide, basis and the factors af-
fecting the programs and organization within the various
systems.
'AEE 6206-Advanced Instructional Techniques in Agricul-
tural and Extension Education (3) Prereq: approval of de-
partment chairman. Effective use of instructional materials
and methods in agricultural and extension education. Em-
phasis on application of visual and nonvisual techniques of
instruction.
AEE 6300-Methodology of Planned Change (3) Processes
by which professional change agents influence the introduc-
tion, adoption, and diffusion of technological changes-. Ap-
plicable to those who are responsible for bringing about
change.
AEE 6325-History and Philosophy of Agricultural Education
(2) Historical and philosophical antecedents to current voca-
tional agriculture programs. Examines social influences
which support vocational education and current trends in
vocational, agricultural and career education.
AEE 6417-Advanced Agricultural and Extension Leadership
(2) Principles and practices related to the effective adminis-
tration and supervision of agricultural education and ex-
tension education. Emphasis will be placed on adminis-
trative and supervisory structures and roles at the national,
state, and local levels.
AEE 6426-Development of a 4-H Volunteer Leadership Pro-
gram (3) The development and management of a 4-H volun-
teer leadership program with particular emphasis on identi-
fication, recruitment, training, retention, and supervision of
volunteer leaders.







46 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


AEE 6512-Program Development in Extension Education
(3) Concepts and processes drawn from the social sciences
that are relevant to the development of youth and adult ex-
tension education programs.
AEE 6521-Group Dynamics in Agricultural and Extension
Education (3) Techniques and approaches used in dealing
and working with groups and individuals within groups.
Special emphasis will be placed upon extension education
and agricultural education situations.
AEE 6523-Planning Community and Rural Development
Programs (3) Principles and practices utilized in community
and rural development efforts. Examination of approaches
used in determining community needs and goals. Students
will be involved in a community development project.
AEE 6524-Citizen Participation in Decision-Making (3) A
theoretical and practi&l study of citizen participation in
decision-making, with particular emphasis on Extension ad-
visory councils.
AEE 6541-Developing Curriculum Materials in Agricultural
and Extension Education (3) Planning and production of
written and visual instructional materials for programs in ag-
ricultural education and extension education. Students are
required to develop a major instructional product.
AEE 6552-Evaluating Programs in Extension Education (3)
Concepts and research drawn from the social sciences that
are relevant to evaluating youth and adult extension pro-
grams.
AEE 6606-Principles and Practices of Extension Education
(2) Principles and practices involved in executing extension
education, programs.
AEE 6611-Agricultural And Extension Adult Education (2)
Basic theories and concepts in teaching adults in agricultural
and extension programs.
AEE 6704--xtension Administration and Supervision (3)
Principles and practices for effective administration and su-
pervision of the cooperative extension service program at
the county and state levels.
AEE 6905--Problems n Agricultural and Extension Educa-
tion (1-3; max: 8) Prereq: Approval of depWtinent chairman.
For advanced students to select and study a problem related
to agricultural and/or extension education.
AEE 6912-Nonthesis Research In Agricultural and Extension
Education (1-3; max: 6) Library and workshop related to
methods in agricultural and extension education, including
study of research work, review of publications, and develop-
ment of written reports.
AEE 6933-Seminar in Agricultural and, Extension Education
(1; max: 3) Exploration, in a seminar setting, of current topics
and trends related to agricultural and/or extension educa-
tion.
AEE 6935-Topics in Agricultural and Extension Education
(1-3) Special topics on selected aspects of agricultural educa-
tion and/or extension education.
AEE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
AEE 6946-Supervised Occupational Experiences in Agricul-
tural Education (2) Basic problems in planning and super-
vising programs of occupational experiences in view of
changes occurring in agricultural occupations.
AEE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Acting Chairman: R. E. Choate. Graduate Coordinator:
R. C. Fluck. Professors: R. E. Choate; R. C. Fluck; D. S.
Harrison; J. W. Jones; J. M. Myers; A. R. Overman; L. N.
Shaw; J. D. Whitney; G. L. Zachariah. Associate Pro-
fessors: L. O. Bagnall; C. D. Baird; D. E. Buffington; K.
L. Campbell; j. J. 'Gaffney; C. F. Kiker; W. M. Miller; J.
W. Mishoe; R. A. Nordstedt; J. S. Rogers; S. F. Shih; G.
H. Smerage. Assistant Professors: A. B. Bottcher; K. V.
Chau; D. G. Haile; E. P. Lincoln; A. G. Smajstrla.
The degrees Master of Science, Master of Engineer-


ing, and Engineer are offered students with graduate
programs in agricultural engineering.
The Master of Science and Master of Engineering
degrees are offered in the following areas of research:
soil and water conservation engineering, waste man-
agement, power and machinery; structures and envi-
ronment, and electric power and processing. The
Master of Science degree is also offered in the area of
mechanized agriculture. Through a cooperative pro-
gram jointly administered with the Department of
Food Science and Human Nutrition, a student can
pursue a graduate program in food engineering.
A student with a degree in a related field may enter
the graduate program if adequate articulation courses
are included in the program. A normal master's pro-
gram may be completed in three or four semesters.
Students interested in graduate work in agricultural
engineering should consult departmental advisers.
Candidates for an engineering master's degree are
normally required to take AGE 6931, 6986, 6031, and at
least one of the following: AGE 6252, 6152, 6332, 6442,
and 6933. Other course work is taken in applicable
basic and applied sciences to meet educational objec-
tives and to comprise an integrated program as ap-
proved by the student's supervisory committee.
Courses from other disciplines may be approved for
graduate major credit.
Prerequisite for admission to any agricultural engi-
neering graduate course is the approval of the instruc-
tor.

AGE 5643C-Biological and Agricultural Systems Analysis
(3) Prereq: MAC 3312. Conceptual and mathematical mod-
eling; concepts and analysis of system behavior; physi-
ological, populational, and agricultural applications.
AGE 5646C-Biological and Agricultural Systems Simulation
(3) Prereq: MAC 3312, COP 3110 or 3212. Digital computer
simulation of mathematical models of biological and agri-
cultural systems; CSMP and GASP IV languages.
AGE 6031--Instrumentation in Agricultural Engineering Re-
search (3) Principles and application of measuring instru-
ments and devices for obtaining experimental data in agri-
cultural engineering research.
AGE 6152-Advanced Farm Machinery (3) Machines and
mechanized systems used in agriculture and related fields,
with emphasis on functional design requirements, design
procedures, and performance evaluation.
AGE 6252-Advanced Soil and Water Management Engi-
neering (3) Physical and mathematical analysis of problems
in infiltration, drainage, and groundwater hydraulics.
AGE 6332-Advanced Agricultural Structures (3) Design
criteria for agricultural structures including structural
strength, steady and unsteady heat transfer analysis, envi-
ronmental' modification, plant and animal environment
physiology, and structural systems analysis.
AGE 6442-Advanced Agricultural Process Engineering (3)
Engineering problems in handling and processing agricultur-
al products.
AGE 6905-Individual Work in Agricultural Engineering (1-4;
max: 6) Special problems in agricultural engineering.
AGE 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
AGE 6931-Seminar (1) Discussions of research, current
trends, and practices in agricultural engineering. S/U.
AGE 6933-Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering (1-4;
max: 6) Lectures, laboratory and/or special projects covering
special topics in agricultural engineering.
AGE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
AGE 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
AGE 6986-Research Methods in Agricultural Engineering
(3) Approaches to scientific research, scientific method, de-
sign of experiments, research practices and techniques, and
presentation of results.







AGRONOMY / 47


AGRONOMY
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: C. E. Dean. Graduate Coordinator: E. G.
Rodgers. Professors: C. E. Dean; W. G. Duncan; J. R.
Edwardson; W. B. Ennis, Jr.; M. H. Gaskins; V. E.
Green, Jr.; K. Hinson; E. S. Horner; A. E. Kretschmer, Jr.;
D. E. McCloud; G. O. Mott; A. J. Norden; P. L. Pfahler;
H. L. Popenoe; G. M. Prine; E. G. Rodgers; O. C.
Ruelke; S. C. Schank; R. L. Smith; I. D. Teare; S. H.
West; E. B. Whitty; M. Wilcox. Associate Professors: L.
H. Allen, Jr., R. D. Barnett; K. J. Boote; B. J. Brecke; W.
L. Currey; A. E. Dudeck; L. S. Dunavin; G. J. Fritz; R. N.
Gallaher; L. A. Garrard; D. W. Gorbet; W. T. Haller; R.
S. Kalmbacher; F. le Grand; P. Mislevy III; K. H.
Quesenberry; V. N. Schroder; D. L. Sutton; D. H.
Teem. Assistant Professors: S. L. Albrecht; J. B.
Brolmann; P. S. Chourey; D. A. Knauft; W. R. Ocum-
paugh; D. L. Wright.
The Department of Agronomy offers the Doctor of
Philosophy and the Master of Science degrees with
specialization in crop ecology, crop nutrition and
physiology, crop production, weed science, genetics,
cytogenetics, or plant breeding. Specializations for
the Doctor of Philosophy degree also include forest
genetics and physiology. A nonthesis degree, Master
of Agriculture, is offered with a major in agronomy.
Graduate programs emphasize the development
and subsequent application of basic principles in
each specialization to agronomic plants in Florida and
throughout the tropics. The continuing need for in-
creased food supplies is reflected in departmental re-
search efforts. When compatible with a student's pro-
gram and permitted by prevailing circumstances,
some thesis and dissertation research may be con-
ducted wholly or in part in one or more of several
tropical countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathe-
matics, chemistry, botany, microbiology, and physics
is required of new graduate students. In addition to
graduate courses in agronomy, the following courses
in related areas are acceptable for graduate credit as
part of the student's major: ANS 6368-Quantitative
Genetics; ANS 6388--Genetics of Animal Improve-
ment; ANS 6715-Ruminant Physiology and Metabo-
lism; BOT 6566-Plant Growth and Development;
BOT 6646-Ecology of Aquatic Plants; HOS 6231-Bi-
ochemical Genetics of Higher Plants; HOS 6611-Ag-
ricultural Meteorology;, HOS 6631-Environmental
Measurements; PCB 6307-Limnology; PCB 6356-
Ecosystems of the Tropics; PLS 5652-Herbicide Tech-
nology; PLS 6623-Weed Ecology; SOS 6136-Soil
Fertility; STA 6168-Advanced Methods of Statistics.
AGR 6233-Tropical Pasture and Forage Science (4) Prereq:
AGR 4231 and ANS 5446, or consent of instructor. Potential
of natural grasslands of tropical and subtropical regions. De-
velopment of improved pastures and forages and their utili-
zation in livestock production.
AGR 6237--Agronomhic Methods of Forage Evaluation (3)
Prereq or coreq: STA 6168. Experimental techniques for field
evaluation of forage plants. Design of grazing trials and pro-
cedures for estimating yield and botanical composition in
the grazed and ungrazed pasture.
AGR 6307-Advanced Genetics (2) Prereq: AGR 3033, AGR
4321, or ASG 3313. Advanced genetic concepts and modern
genetic theory.
AGR 6311-Population Genetics (2) Prereq: AGR 3033, STA
6166. Application of statistical principles to biological popu-
lations in relation to gene frequency, zygotic frequency,
mating systems, and the effects of selection, mutation, and
migration on equilibrium populations.


AGR 6323-Advanced Plant Breeding (3) Prereq: AGR 3210,
AGR 4321, AGR 6311, and STA 6167. Genetic basis for plant-
breeding procedures.
AGR 6353-Cytogenetics (3) Prereq: basic courses in genet-
ics and cytology. Genetic variability with emphasis on inter-
relationships of cytologic and genetic concepts.
Chromosome structure and number, chromosomal aberra-
tions, apomixis, and application of cytogenetic principles.
AGR 6380-Genetics Seminar (1; max: 3) Current literature
and developments in genetics.
AGR 6422-Crop Nutrition (2) Prereq: BOT 3503C. Nutri-
tional influences on differentiation, composition, growth,
and yield of agronomic plants.
AGR 6442-Physiology of Agronomic Plants (3) Prereq: BOT
5505C. Yield potentials of crops as influenced by photosyn-
thetic efficiencies, respiration, translocation, drought, and
canopy architecture.
AGR 6511-Crop Ecology (4) Prereq: AGR 3210, BOT 3503C,
PCB 3043C, or equivalent. Relationships of ecological factors
and climatic classification to agroecosystems, and crop mod-
eling of the major crops.
AGR 6661-Sugarcane Processing Technology (2) Prereq:
CHM 3200, 3200L. Chemical and physical processes required
for crystallization and refining of sugar.
AGR 6751--iochemistry of Herbicides (2) Prereq: CHM
5235. Metabolism, mechanism of action, and structure-ac-
tivity relationships of herbicides.
AGR 6905-Agronomic Problems (1-5; max: 8) Prereq: mini-
mum of one undergraduate course in agronomy or plant sci-
ence. Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory or field
studies of agronomic plants.
AGR 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
AGR 6932-Topics in Agronomy (2-3; max: 8) Critical review
of selected topics in specific agronomic areas.
AGR 6933-Graduate Agronomy Seminar (1; max: 3) Re-
quired of all graduate students in agronomy. Current liter-
ature and agronomic developments.
AGR 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
AGR 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
AGR 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
PLS 5652-Herbicide Technology (3) Prereq: CHM 3200, PLS
4601, or consent of the instructor. Classification, mode of ac-
tion, principles of selectivity, and plant responses to
herbicides. Weed, crop, environmental, and pest manage-
ment associations in developing herbicide programs.
PLS 6623-Weed Ecology (2) Prereq: PCB 3033C and PLS
4601, or equivalent. Environmental influences on behavior
and control of weeds; influences of common methods of
weed control on the environment.


ANATOMY
College of Medicine
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: M. H. Ross. Graduate Coordinator: T. G.
Hollinger. Professors: C. M. Feldherr; L. H. Larkin; M.
H. Ross. Associate Professors: E. Kallenbach; L. J.
Romrell; K. E. Selman. Assistant Professors: D. A. Hay;
T. G. Hollinger; C. M. West.
The Department of Anatomy offers programs lead-
ing to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in medical sci-
ences and, only in special cases, the Master of Science
degree. Areas of research and training in anatomy in-
clude cell biology, developmental and reproductive
biology, and mammalian morphology.
Applicants should have a strong background in
biology and have taken undergraduate courses in in-
organic chemistry, organic chemistry, calculus, and
physics. Deficiencies can be made up during the first
year of graduate study.,
BMS 5100C-Gross Anatomy (6)
BMS 5110C-Microscopic Anatomy (4)
BMS 5121-Human Embryology (2)
BMS 5168C-Applied Gross Anatomy (4)







AGRONOMY / 47


AGRONOMY
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: C. E. Dean. Graduate Coordinator: E. G.
Rodgers. Professors: C. E. Dean; W. G. Duncan; J. R.
Edwardson; W. B. Ennis, Jr.; M. H. Gaskins; V. E.
Green, Jr.; K. Hinson; E. S. Horner; A. E. Kretschmer, Jr.;
D. E. McCloud; G. O. Mott; A. J. Norden; P. L. Pfahler;
H. L. Popenoe; G. M. Prine; E. G. Rodgers; O. C.
Ruelke; S. C. Schank; R. L. Smith; I. D. Teare; S. H.
West; E. B. Whitty; M. Wilcox. Associate Professors: L.
H. Allen, Jr., R. D. Barnett; K. J. Boote; B. J. Brecke; W.
L. Currey; A. E. Dudeck; L. S. Dunavin; G. J. Fritz; R. N.
Gallaher; L. A. Garrard; D. W. Gorbet; W. T. Haller; R.
S. Kalmbacher; F. le Grand; P. Mislevy III; K. H.
Quesenberry; V. N. Schroder; D. L. Sutton; D. H.
Teem. Assistant Professors: S. L. Albrecht; J. B.
Brolmann; P. S. Chourey; D. A. Knauft; W. R. Ocum-
paugh; D. L. Wright.
The Department of Agronomy offers the Doctor of
Philosophy and the Master of Science degrees with
specialization in crop ecology, crop nutrition and
physiology, crop production, weed science, genetics,
cytogenetics, or plant breeding. Specializations for
the Doctor of Philosophy degree also include forest
genetics and physiology. A nonthesis degree, Master
of Agriculture, is offered with a major in agronomy.
Graduate programs emphasize the development
and subsequent application of basic principles in
each specialization to agronomic plants in Florida and
throughout the tropics. The continuing need for in-
creased food supplies is reflected in departmental re-
search efforts. When compatible with a student's pro-
gram and permitted by prevailing circumstances,
some thesis and dissertation research may be con-
ducted wholly or in part in one or more of several
tropical countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathe-
matics, chemistry, botany, microbiology, and physics
is required of new graduate students. In addition to
graduate courses in agronomy, the following courses
in related areas are acceptable for graduate credit as
part of the student's major: ANS 6368-Quantitative
Genetics; ANS 6388--Genetics of Animal Improve-
ment; ANS 6715-Ruminant Physiology and Metabo-
lism; BOT 6566-Plant Growth and Development;
BOT 6646-Ecology of Aquatic Plants; HOS 6231-Bi-
ochemical Genetics of Higher Plants; HOS 6611-Ag-
ricultural Meteorology;, HOS 6631-Environmental
Measurements; PCB 6307-Limnology; PCB 6356-
Ecosystems of the Tropics; PLS 5652-Herbicide Tech-
nology; PLS 6623-Weed Ecology; SOS 6136-Soil
Fertility; STA 6168-Advanced Methods of Statistics.
AGR 6233-Tropical Pasture and Forage Science (4) Prereq:
AGR 4231 and ANS 5446, or consent of instructor. Potential
of natural grasslands of tropical and subtropical regions. De-
velopment of improved pastures and forages and their utili-
zation in livestock production.
AGR 6237--Agronomhic Methods of Forage Evaluation (3)
Prereq or coreq: STA 6168. Experimental techniques for field
evaluation of forage plants. Design of grazing trials and pro-
cedures for estimating yield and botanical composition in
the grazed and ungrazed pasture.
AGR 6307-Advanced Genetics (2) Prereq: AGR 3033, AGR
4321, or ASG 3313. Advanced genetic concepts and modern
genetic theory.
AGR 6311-Population Genetics (2) Prereq: AGR 3033, STA
6166. Application of statistical principles to biological popu-
lations in relation to gene frequency, zygotic frequency,
mating systems, and the effects of selection, mutation, and
migration on equilibrium populations.


AGR 6323-Advanced Plant Breeding (3) Prereq: AGR 3210,
AGR 4321, AGR 6311, and STA 6167. Genetic basis for plant-
breeding procedures.
AGR 6353-Cytogenetics (3) Prereq: basic courses in genet-
ics and cytology. Genetic variability with emphasis on inter-
relationships of cytologic and genetic concepts.
Chromosome structure and number, chromosomal aberra-
tions, apomixis, and application of cytogenetic principles.
AGR 6380-Genetics Seminar (1; max: 3) Current literature
and developments in genetics.
AGR 6422-Crop Nutrition (2) Prereq: BOT 3503C. Nutri-
tional influences on differentiation, composition, growth,
and yield of agronomic plants.
AGR 6442-Physiology of Agronomic Plants (3) Prereq: BOT
5505C. Yield potentials of crops as influenced by photosyn-
thetic efficiencies, respiration, translocation, drought, and
canopy architecture.
AGR 6511-Crop Ecology (4) Prereq: AGR 3210, BOT 3503C,
PCB 3043C, or equivalent. Relationships of ecological factors
and climatic classification to agroecosystems, and crop mod-
eling of the major crops.
AGR 6661-Sugarcane Processing Technology (2) Prereq:
CHM 3200, 3200L. Chemical and physical processes required
for crystallization and refining of sugar.
AGR 6751--iochemistry of Herbicides (2) Prereq: CHM
5235. Metabolism, mechanism of action, and structure-ac-
tivity relationships of herbicides.
AGR 6905-Agronomic Problems (1-5; max: 8) Prereq: mini-
mum of one undergraduate course in agronomy or plant sci-
ence. Special topics for classroom, library, laboratory or field
studies of agronomic plants.
AGR 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
AGR 6932-Topics in Agronomy (2-3; max: 8) Critical review
of selected topics in specific agronomic areas.
AGR 6933-Graduate Agronomy Seminar (1; max: 3) Re-
quired of all graduate students in agronomy. Current liter-
ature and agronomic developments.
AGR 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
AGR 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
AGR 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
PLS 5652-Herbicide Technology (3) Prereq: CHM 3200, PLS
4601, or consent of the instructor. Classification, mode of ac-
tion, principles of selectivity, and plant responses to
herbicides. Weed, crop, environmental, and pest manage-
ment associations in developing herbicide programs.
PLS 6623-Weed Ecology (2) Prereq: PCB 3033C and PLS
4601, or equivalent. Environmental influences on behavior
and control of weeds; influences of common methods of
weed control on the environment.


ANATOMY
College of Medicine
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: M. H. Ross. Graduate Coordinator: T. G.
Hollinger. Professors: C. M. Feldherr; L. H. Larkin; M.
H. Ross. Associate Professors: E. Kallenbach; L. J.
Romrell; K. E. Selman. Assistant Professors: D. A. Hay;
T. G. Hollinger; C. M. West.
The Department of Anatomy offers programs lead-
ing to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in medical sci-
ences and, only in special cases, the Master of Science
degree. Areas of research and training in anatomy in-
clude cell biology, developmental and reproductive
biology, and mammalian morphology.
Applicants should have a strong background in
biology and have taken undergraduate courses in in-
organic chemistry, organic chemistry, calculus, and
physics. Deficiencies can be made up during the first
year of graduate study.,
BMS 5100C-Gross Anatomy (6)
BMS 5110C-Microscopic Anatomy (4)
BMS 5121-Human Embryology (2)
BMS 5168C-Applied Gross Anatomy (4)







48 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


BMS 6105-Advanced Gross Anatomy (2-4; max: 6) Regional
and specialized anatomy of the human body taught by labo-
ratory dissection, conferences, and demonstrations.
BMS 6120C-Embryology and Organogenesis (3) Prereq:
ZOO 3703 or BMS 5100C. Human and higher mammalian de-
velopment, physiological and clinical considerations
stressed where pertinent.
BMS 6150-Anatomy Seminar (1-2)
BMS 6166-Advanced Microscopic Anatomy (2-3; max: 6)
Prereq: BMS 5110C or ZOO 5755. Histological approaches
and techniques relevant to selected research areas. Lectures,
microscopic study, and laboratory project relating structural
and functional aspects of problem.
BMS 6173-Submicroscopic Anatomy (3) Prereq: histology
or cytology; approval of staff. Ultrastructure in cells and tis-
sues of vertebrate forms. Current research trends and func-
tional connotations where pertinent.
BMS 6175C-Research Methods'in Anatomy (1-4; max: 8)
Research techniques of histochemistry, radiation biology,
experimental embryology, teratology, endocrinology, or
electron microscopy under supervision of staff member.
BMS 6176-Special Topics in Anatomy (1-4; max: 10) Read-
ings in recent research literature of anatomy and allied dis-
ciplines.
BMS 6182C-Techniques in Electron Microscopy (2-4) Pre-
req: courses and/or experience in histology and cytology.
Theory and practice of electron microscopic techniques in-
-*luding tissue preparation, sectioning, use of the electron
microscope, and photography. Offered in even-numbered
years.
BMS 6185-Fertilization and Gametogenesis (2) Prereq: BCH
4313 and 4203 or equivalent; a general course in develop-
mental biology or embryology. Supervised study of publica-
tions in specific areas of reproductive biology; including
oogenesis, spermatogenesis, fertilization, and immuno-re-
production. Weekly conferences, reports, and lectures.
BMS 6905C-Individual Study (1-3; max: 8) Supervised study
in areas not covered by other graduate courses.
BMS 7643-Membrane Biology (2) Examination of structure,
composition, and turnover of plasma and intracellular mem-
branes; consideration of topics relating to membrane func-
tion, including pinocytosis, regulation of intracellular ex-
change, cell recognition, cell communication, and virus
formation.
GMS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
GMS 790--Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)


ANIMAL SCIENCE
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: H. D. Wallace. Graduate Coordinator: G. E.
Combs, Jr. Professors: C. B. Ammerman; F. S. Baker; F.
W. Bazer; j. E. Bertrand; E. L. Besch; R. E. Bradley, Sr.;
P. T. Cardeilhac; J. W. Carpenter; H. L. Chapman, Jr.;
G. E. Combs, Jr.; J. H. Conrad; M. Drost; K. L. Dur-
rance; G. T. Edds; J. P. Feaster; D. J. Forrester; J. L. Fry;
K. N. Gelatt; R. R. Gronwall; R. H. Harms; H. H. Head;
J. F. Hentges, Jr.; J. A. Himes; R. F. Kahrs; M. Koger; P.
E. Loggins; S. P. Marshall; J. E. Moore; J. T. Neilson; E.
A. Ott; A. Z. Palmer; R. L. Shirley; C. F. Simpson; W. W.
Thatcher; H. H. Van Horn, Jr.; D. L. Wakeman; H. D.
Wallace; A. C. Warnick; F. W. White; C. J. Wilcox; H.
R. Wilson; J. M. Wing. Associate Professors: R. L. As-
quith; M. J. Burridge; D. D. Buss; C. D. Chen; J. R.
Crockett; B. L. Damron; C. R. Douglas; E. P. Gibbs; D.
D. Hargrove; S. Lieb; L. R. McDowell; W. P. Palmore; F.
M. Pate; R. S. Sand; D. C. Sharp, III; K. L. Smith; R. L.
West. Assistant Professors: R. J. Collier; J. L. Copelin; J.
F. Easley; M. J. Fields; E. C. Greiner; D. M. Janky; A. F.
Jilek; T. A. Olson; M. F. Richter; C. E. White.
The Department of Animal Science offers the de-
grees of Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, and
Doctor of Philosophy in the following areas: (1)


animal nutrition, (2) meats, (3) animal breeding and
genetics, and (4) animal physiology. A student may
work on a problem covering more than one area of
study. Large animals (beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine,
poultry, and sheep) and laboratory animals are avail-
able for various research problems. Adequate nutri-
tion and meats laboratories are available for detailed
chemical and carcass quality evaluations. Special ar-
rangements can be made to conduct research prob-
lems at the various branch agricultural experiment
stations throughout Florida. A Ph.D. degree may be
obtained in animal science, with dissertation research
under the direction of members of the Departments
of Dairy Science, Poultry Science, and Animal Sci-
ence, and the College of Veterinary Medicine.
Departmental prerequisites for admission to gradu-
ate study:include a sound science background, with
basic courses in bacteriology, biology, mathematics,
botany, and chemistry.
The following courses in related areas will be ac-
ceptable for graduate credit as part of the candidate's
major: AGR 6233-Tropical Pastures and Forage Sci-
ence; AGR 6307-Advanced Genetics; AGR 6311-
Population Genetics; AGR 6353--Cytogenetics; AGR
6380-Genetics Seminar; DAS 6212-Advanced Dairy
Cattle Management; DAS 6281-Dairy Science Re-
search Techniques; DAS 6322-Introduction to
Statistical Genetics; DAS 6512-Advanced Physiology
of Lactation; DAS 6531-Endocrinology; DAS 6541-
Energy Metabolism; FOS 6226-Advanced Food Mi-
crobiology; FOS 6315-Food Chemistry; PCB 5545-
Physiological Genetics; PSE 6415-Advanced Poultry
Nutrition; PSE 6522-Avian Physiology; VES 6242C-
Veterinary Physiology I.
ANS 5446-Animal Nutrition (3) Prereq: ASG 3402C, BCH
3023 or permission of instructor. Carbohydrates, fats, pro-
teins, minerals and vitamins and their functions in the
animal body.
ANS 6288-Experimental Technics and Analytical Pro-
cedures in Meat Research (3) Experimental design, analytical
procedures; technics; carcass measurements and analyses as
related to livestock production and meat studies.
ANS 6368-Quantitative Genetics (3) Prereq: STA 6166. Ge-
netics and biometric principles underlying genetic charac-
ters that exhibit continuous variation.
ANS 6388--Genetics of Animal Improvement (3) Prereq:
ANS 6368. Application of statistical techniques and design in
animal breeding research.
ANS 6448-Nitrogen and Energy in Animal Nutrition (3) Pre-
req: CHM 3210. Utilization of dietary nitrogen and energy
sources by ruminants with comparative information on oth-
er species.
ANS 6452-Principles of Forage Quality Evaluation (2) Pre-
req: ANS 5446, AGR 4237C. Definition of forage quality in
terms of animal performance, methodology used in forage
evaluation, and proper interpretation of forage evaluation
data.
ANS 6458-Advanced Methods in Nutrition Technology (3)
Prereq: CHM 2043. For graduate students but open to seniors
by special permission. Demonstrations and limited per-
formance of procedures used in nutrition research.
ANS 6472-Vitamins (3) Prereq: organic chemistry. Historical
development, properties, assays, and physiological effects.
ANS 6636-Meat Technology (3) Chemistry, physics, his-
tology, bacteriology, and engineering involved in the han-
dling, processing, manufacturing, preservation, storage, dis-
tribution, and utilization of meat.
ANS 6711-Equine Nutrition and Physiology (3) Prereq: ANS
5446. Principles affecting absorption and assimilation of
nutrients and basic physiology of growth, reproduction, and
exercise of the horse.
ANS 6715-Ruminant Nutrition and Digestive Physiology
(2) Prereq: ANS 5446. Review and correlation of the funda-
mental biochemical, physiological, and bacteriological re-
search upon which the feeding of ruminants is based. Ex-







ANIMAL SCIENCE--GENERAL / 49


perimental methodology of rumen physiology and metabo-
lism.
ANS 6721-Swine Nutrition (2) Prereq: ANS 5446. Basic prin-
ciples affecting absorption and assimilation of nutrients re-
quired for growth, reproduction, and lactation of swine.
ANS 6723-Mineral Nutrition and Metabolism (3) Physi-
ological effect of macro- and micro-elements, mineral inter-
relationships.
ANS 6751-Physiology of Reproduction (3) Prereq: VES 6242,
ASC 4334. The interactions between the hypothalamus,
pituitary gland and reproductive organs during the estrous
cycle and pregnancy in the female and sperm production in
the male. Embryonic and placental development from
fertilization through parturition and factors affecting repro-
ductive efficiency.
ANS 6905-Problems in Animal Science (1-4; max: 8)
ANS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ANS 6932-Topics in Animal Science (3) New developments
in animal nutrition and livestock feeding, animal genetics,
animal physiology, and livestock management.
ANS 6933-Graduate Seminar in Animal Science (1)
ANS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ANS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ANS 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1.15)


ANIMAL SCIENCE-GENERAL
College of Agriculture
The Departments of Animal, Poultry, and Dairy Sci-
ence have combined their curricula into an animal
science curriculum. ASG 5221 is a cross-departmental
course taught by the faculty of the three departments.
ASG 5221-Animal Production in the Tropics (3) Prereq:
ANS 4242C, 4264C, DAS 3211 or permission of instructor.
Management and environment factors which affect animal
production in the tropics.


ANTHROPOLOGY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairperson: H. R. Bernard. Associate Chairperson: A.
Spring. Graduate Coordinator: P. Magnarella. Gradu-
ate Research Professors: M. Harris; S. Kimball (Emer-
itus); C. Wagley. Distinguished Service Professor: C.
H. Fairbanks. Professors: H. R. Bernard; E. A. Cook;*
M. C. Dougherty; P. L. Doughty; B. M. duToit; E. M.
Eddy; M. J./ Hardman-de-Bautista; S. Kramer; P.
Magnarella; W. R. Maples; N. N. Markel; J. A.
Paredes;* H. I. Safa; W. H. Sears;t 0. von Mering; G.
Weiss;t E. S. Wing. Associate Professors: K. A.
Deagan;* J. D. Early;t B. T. Grindal;* T. Ho;* R. D.
Lawless; M. L. Margolis; J. T. Mianich; T. A. Nunez, Jr.;
A. R. Oliver-Smith; B. A. Purdy; A. Spring; J. W.
Stoutami're.* Assistant Professors: A. F. Burns; D.
Foodym; D. G. Gantt;* A. G. Hansen; W. J. Kennedy;t
L. S. Lieberman; M. E. Pohl;* P. M. Rice; C. E. Taylor.
These members of the faculty of the Florida State University(*) and
Florida Atlantic University (f) are also members of the graduate fac-
ulty of the University of Florida and participate in the doctoral degree
program in the University of Florida Department of Anthropology.
The Department of Anthropology at Florida offers
graduate work leading to the Master of Arts (thesis or
nonthesis option), Master of Arts in Teaching, and
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate training is of-
fered in applied anthropology, social and cultural an-
thropology, archeology, anthropological linguistics
and physical anthropology.
The Master of Arts with thesis provides students
with training in all fields of anthropology. A minimum
of 30 semester hours (including up to 6 hours of ANT


6971) is required, including the following: ANT 6917
and 6038; ANT 5467 or 5546; ANT 6186 or equivalent;
and one of the following: ANT 4266, 5423, 5479, 6279,
6428, 6434 or 6728. As a prerequisite to the above
graduate courses, students must have taken ANT 3511
or 4586, and one of the following: ANT 2141, 3142,
3144, or an equivalent; one graduate level anthropol-
ogy course in linguistics plus its prerequisites or
equivalents. A written comprehensive examination is
offered each semester to M.A. candidates. Knowledge
of a foreign language may be required by the
student's committee. Satisfactory completion of a
thesis is required for this degree. Students specializing
in archeology are required to complete nine credits of
field school before receiving the M.A. Undergraduate
credit hours earned in archeological field schools may
be used to fulfill all or part of this requirement.
The Master of Arts degree with nonthesis option
prepares students for positions in business and edu-
cation, and in public and private service agencies
where anthropological training in combination with
other skills is of practical use. The general require-
ments for this degree are ANT 6917, plus at least 40
graduate semester credits with a minimum 3.0 GPA of
which four credits may be earned for a supervised in-
ternship. Students may obtain expertise in two major
areas of the discipline or in one major discipline and
one or two related disciplinary subfields and/or
minor(s) outside the department. Knowledge of a for-
eign language may be required by the student's com-
mittee. A supervised internship and an interpretive
report based on the internship are also required for
this degree.
The Master of Arts in Teaching is designed for stu-
dents who intend to teach in secondary schools or
junior colleges. The required distribution of work
leading to this degree includes ANT 6917 and at least
36 graduate semester hours with a minimum GPA of
3.0. These hours must include at least six credits in a
departmental internship in teaching and six credits in
a minor. At least three courses (which may be used as
the minor) are required in educational psychology,
sociology and curriculum dealing with the junior col-
lege. Knowledge of a foreign language may be re-
quired by the student's committee. A written com-
prehensive examination is also required.
Students enrolled in the M.A. nonthesis option or
M.A.T. program who plan to apply to the Ph.D. pro-
gram in anthropology should meet the course distri-
bution requirements of the M.A. with thesis program
and take the M.A. with thesis comprehensive exami-
nation. Admission to the Ph.D. program generally re-
quires an honors pass in the comprehensive examina-
tion and a 3.5 graduate grade record.
The Doctoral Degree Program. Entry into the doc-
toral program requires M.A. level competence in gen-
eral anthropology. Students must pass the M.A. com-
prehensive examination at the University of Florida or
have attained a master's degree in anthropology or in
a broadly equivalent behavioral science field, either
at another university or at the University of Florida,
and be evaluated by the departmental com-
prehensive examination committee.
The University of Florida requires candidates for
the Ph.D. to satisfy the minimum residence require-
ments by completing beyond the master's degree 30
semester hours in one calendar year or 36 semester
hours in no more than four semesters within a period
of two calendar years on the Gainesville campus.
Courses completed at other universities may be ap-
plied toward this degree within the limitations out-







50 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


lined by the Graduate School and the stipulations of
the student's supervisory committee. Students may
not register for dissertation research (ANT 7980) until
the semester in which they take the qualifying exami-
nation.
In consultation with the supervisory committee,
each student selects three areas of specialization
around which course work and readings are arranged.
A minimum of 90 semester hours beyond the B.A. is
required, and a minimum GPA of 3.0 must be main-
tained. In most cases, students must achieve com-
petency in a language other than their native tongues.
Candidates for the Ph.D. must pass a doctoral quali-
fying examination and satisfactorily complete a dis-
sertation.
Students who wish departmental certification in
applied cultural anthropology must include in their
minimum hours: ANT 4266, 5479, 5485, 6038, 6707 and
6833; two area courses; ANT 5615 or 6619; two of the
following: ANT 5477, 5717, 6708, 6719; two of the fol-
lowing ANT 6428, 6447, 6478, 6725; and CAP 3800, STA
6126 and 6127 or their equivalents. Students in this
program are expected to take a minimum of six
courses from anywhere in the university in their- area
of specialization (e.g. medicine, agriculture, educa-
tion, architecture) and must complete an internship
in consultation with the supervisory committee.
Study for the Ph.D. degree in anthropology at the
University of Florida by qualified master's degree reci-
pients at Florida Atlantic University and Florida State
University is facilitated by a cooperative arrangement
in which appropriate faculty members of these uni-
versities are members of the graduate faculty of the
University of Florida.
ANT 5175-Historical Archeology (3) Prereq: ANT 2141 or
ANT3142 or ANT 3144, or consent of instructor. An examina-
tion of the methods and theoretical foundations of historical
archeology as it relates to the disciplines of anthropology,
history, historic preservation and conservation. An introduc-
tion to pertinent aspects of material culture during the his-
toric period.
ANT 5195-Zooarcheology (3) Prereq: consent of instructor.
Human use of animal resources, with emphasis on pre-
historic hunting and fishing practices. Origins of animal
domestication.
ANT 5246-Ritual and Symbolic Systems (3) Explores the
various approaches to the understanding of symbolism
through an examination of the structures, properties, and
functions of myth and ritual. Systems of thought as de-
scribed in the anthropological studies of traditional African,
Oceanian, Australian, and American societies provide the
data.
ANT 5255-Peasant Society and Culture (3) Prereq: ANT
2402, ANT 2410 or permission of the instructor. A com-
parative and historical study of peasantry. Unique character-
istics, institutions, and problems of peasant life, stressing es-
pecially rural-urban relationships and emphasizing Europe-
an and Latin American peasant populations.
ANT 5267-The Food Crisis and Small Farmers (3) An in-
terdisciplinary examination of world food and population
trends. Focuses on small farmers and peasants and examines,
their farming systems and development efforts aimed at
them.
ANT 5336-The Peoples of Brazil (3) Ethnology of Brazil. His-
torical, geographic, and socioeconomic materials and repre-
sentative monographs from the various regions of Brazil are
studied as is the contribution of the Indian, Portuguese, and
African to modern Brazilian culture.
ANT 5337-Peoples of the Andes (3) The area-cotradition.
The Spanish Conquest and shaping and persistence of colo-
nial culture. Twentieth-century communities-their social,
land tenure, religious, and value systems. Modernization,
cultural pluralism, and problems of integration.
ANT 5338-The Tribal Peoples of Lowland South America
(3) Survey of marginal and tropical forest hunters and


gatherers and horticulturalists of the Amazon Basin, Central
Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, and other areas of South Ameri-
ca. Considers social organization, subsistence activities,
ecological adaptations, and other aspects of tribal life.
ANT 5346-Caribbean Cultural Patterns (3) Investigation
into cultural contact that has taken place in the Caribbean
and results of that contact in terms of peoples and soci-
ocultural units produced and processes of culture change in-
volved.
ANT 5354-The Anthropology of Modern Africa (3) Study of
continuity and change in contemporary African societies,
with special reference to cultural and ethnic factors in
modern nations.
ANT 5423-Kinship and Descent (3) Systematic and
analytical treatment of marriage, descent, and alliances on a
cross-cultural basis. Examination of social behavior and ter-
minologies related to kinship systems drawn from traditional
and modern societies.
ANT 5464-Culture and Aging (3) Prereq: two of following:
ANT 2410, SOC 2000 or introductory psychology course.
Cross-cultural perspectives of adult development and aging
in traditional and industrial society. This course includes
comparative assessment of culturally mediated, life-cycle
transformations into old age and health related and human
service policy issues.
ANT 5467-Culture and Nutrition (3) Recommended prereq:
HUN 3221. The theory, methodology, and substantive mate-
rial of nutritional anthropology. Emphasis on cross-cultural
bio-behavioral patterns.
ANT 5477-Human Organization and Change (3) Theory
and practice in applied anthropology. A case study approach
to innovation and change in social institutions and cultural
practices, with emphasis upon problems of planning and ad-
ministration.
ANT 5479-Theories of Cultural Change (3) Study of the
background, conditions and nature of cultural change and
stability; cultural change theories and processes such as dif-
fusion, acculturation, modernization, and revitalization.
ANT 5485-Research Design in Anthropology (3) Examina-
tion of empirical and logical basis of anthropological in-
quiry; analysis of theory construction, research design, prob-
lems of data collection, processing, and evaluation.
ANT 5486-Quantitative Methods for Anthropology (3) Pre-
req: ANT 5485 or consent of instructor. Introductory survey
of relevant quantitative procedures for collecting, analyzing,
and interpreting anthropological data.
ANT 5546-Semirlar. Biological Basis of Social Behavior (3)
Prereq: consent of instructor. Social behavior among animals
from the ethological-biological viewpoint; the evolution of
animal societies; the relevance of the ethological approach
for the study of human development.
ANT 5615-Language and Culture (3) Principles and prob-
lems of anthropological linguistics. The cross-cultural and
comparative study of language. Primarily concerned with
the study of non-Indo-European linguistic problems.
ANT 5622-Phonology: Anthropological Field Methods (3)
Prereq: ANT 5625. Phonetics and phonemics, phonemic
analysis, phonological theory, transcription, primary interest
on non-Indo-European systems. Informants are used.
ANT 5624-Introduction to Anthropological Linguistic Field
Methods (3) Prereq: ANT 5625, 5622, or equivalent. Field
procedures, collections, and processing of language data.
ANT 5675-Laboratory Work in Anthropological Linguistics
(1-3; max: 10)
ANT 5717-Cross-Cultural Studies of Complex Organiza-
tions (3) The structure, function and culture of planned so-
cial units within contemporary societies. Cross-cultural per-
spectives on specialized social organizations, such as bu-
reaucracies, factories, hospitals, prisons and other planned
social systems.
ANT 5724-Ethnographic Methods in Educational Settings
(3) Prereq: ANT 5728. An examination of anthropological
methods and techniques used in educational description,
practices and evaluation; includes ethnography, com-
parative analysis, case studies and participant observation.
ANT 5728-Anthropology and Education (3) Comparative
study of teaching and learning processes in societies of dif-
fering complexity and cultural variability. Empirical data ex-
amined from an anthropological perspective and in the con-







ARCHITECTURE / 51


text of theories about culture and perception, world view,
rites of passage, culture and personality, and change.
ANT 603--Seminar in Anthropological History and Theory
(3) Theoretical principles and background of anthropology
and its subfields.
ANT 6127-Laboratory Training in Archeology (3) Prereq:
ANT 2141 or ANT 3142 or ANT 3144. Processing of data re-
covered in field excavation; includes cleaning, identifica-
tion, cataloguing, classification, drawing, analysis, responsi-
bilities of data reporting.
ANT 6186-Seminar in Archeology (3; max: 10) Selected top-
ic.
ANT 6188-Advanced Archeological Field Methods (6) Pre-
req: consent of instructor. Planning, directing, and reporting
archeological excavations. Students encouraged to prepare
publishable papers.
ANT 6276--Principles of Political Anthropology (3) Prob-
lems of identifying political behavior. Natural leadership in
tribal societies. Acephalous societies and republican struc-
tures. Kingship and early despotic states. Theories of bu-
reaucracy.
ANT 6286-Seminar in Ethnology (3; max: 10) Areas treated
are North America, Central America, South America, Africa,
Oceania.
ANT 6356-Peoples and Culture in Southern Africa (3) Pre-
historic times through first contacts by explorers to settlers;
the contact situation between European, Khoisan, and
Bantu-speaking; empirical data dealing with present politi-
cal, economic, social, and religious conditions.
ANT 6387-Seminar on the Anthropology of Latin America
(3; max: 10) Prereq: reading knowledge of Spanish or Portu-
guese and consent of instructional staff. Material from the
major branches of anthropology.
ANT 6388-Ethnographic Field Methods (3) Methods for col-
lecting ethnographic data. Entry into the field; role and im-
age conflict. Participant observation, interviewing, content
analysis, photography and documents, data retrieval, analy-
sis of data.
ANT 6428-Culture and Community (3) Prereq: 15 to 20
credits in social sciences. Examination of the method and
theory of the empirical, inductive, natural history approach
in the study of communities. Existing community studies are
utilized to provide comparative analyses of social structure,
culture patterns, and process of change.
ANT 6429-Ethnicity (3) Prereq: consent of instructor. Com-
parative anthropological perspectives on the geographic-
ecological context and culture-historical main currents of
ethnic groups. Pluralistic basis of contemporary community
systems and socioeconomic and political consequences of
multiculturalism examined. Problems of multiethnic
stratification within national cultures stressed.
ANT 6434-Transcultural Psychiatry (3) Recent and contem-
porary theoretical and methodological developments in the
cultural aspects of cognitive and perceptual socio- and
psycho-linguistic interactional and transactional processes.
Ordinary and abnormal developmental experiences in dif-
ferent cultural contexts related to personal character and so-
cial identity formation.
ANT 6445-Seminar in African Studies (3) Current condi-
tions and problems flowing from detribalization, accultura-
tion, and urbanization. Changes in values, attitudes, and in-
stitutions, as well as the reaction among the peoples of
Africa in the form of traditional survivals, cultural revivals
and innovations.
ANT 6447-Seminar in Urban Anthropology (3) Prereq: con-
sent of instructor. Anthropological view of the city through
interaction of spatial and temporal behavior, ecology, cul-
ture institutions, and urban morphology.
ANT 6478-Small Groups in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3)
Prereq: 15 to 20 credits in social sciences. Comparative analy-
sis of structure and process of natural groups in animal and
human societies based on empirical studies of nonhuman
primates, hunting bands, simple agriculturists, and natural
groups in complex societies.
ANT 6487-Evolution of Culture (3) Prereq: ANT 3141. Theo-
ries of culture growth and evolution from cultural begin-
nings to dawn of history. Major inventions of man and their
significance.
ANT 6547-Human Adaptation (3) Prereq: ANT 3511 or per-


mission of instructor. An examination of adaptive processes
--cultural, physiological, genetic-in past and contemporary
populations.
ANT 6588-Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3; max: 10)
Selected topic.
ANT 6619-Seminar in Language and Culture (3; max: 10)
Prereq: ANT 5625. Selected topic.
ANT 6627-Seminar in Anthropological Linguistic Field
Methods (3; max: 10) Prereq: ANT 5624. Analysis of a particu-
lar language through an informant.
ANT 6707-Seminar on Applied Anthropology (3) Prereq:
ANT 5477 or instructor's permission. Consideration of
planned socio-cultural and technological change and devel-
opment in the United States and abroad; special and cultural
problems in the transferral of technologies; community de-
velopment and aid programs. Comparative program eval-
uation.
ANT 6708-Anthropology and Public Policy (3) Prereq: ANT
5467, 5479, or 5717 or consent of instructor. An examination
of the intercultural aspects of national and international so-
cial policy formulation, implementation and modification.
ANT 6716-Problems of National Integration in Latin Ameri-
ca (3) Conceptual problems of the society and culture of
selected nation-states: nationalism, urbanization, peasant
revitalization movements as integrative or divisive forces.
Vertical institutions: church, school, markets, plantation, in
particular communities.
ANT 6719-Anthropology and Evaluation Research (3) Pre-
req: ANT 5485; and ANT 5477 or 6707. An examination of
contemporary approaches to the evaluation of social pro-
grams.
ANT 6725-Culture and Learning (3) Prereq: ANT 6728, or 15
credits in social sciences. Cultural learning as a function of
social environment based on studies of socialization prac-
tices in primate and human societies.
ANT 6735-Seminar in Cross-Cultural Epidemiology (3) Pre-
req: consent of instructor. Disease patterns; health and well-
being examined on a comparative cultural basis.
ANT 6737-Medical Anthropology (3) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. Theory of anthropology as applied to nursing, med-
icine, hospital organization, and the therapeutic environ-
ment. Course includes instrument design and techniques of
material collection.
ANT 6905-4ndividual Work (1-3; max: 10) Guided readings
on research in anthropology based on library, laboratory or
field work.
ANT 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ANT 6915-Resarch Projects in Social, Cultural and Applied
Anthropology (1-3; max: 10) Prereq: consent of instructor.
For students undertaking directed research in supplement to
regular course work.
ANT 6917-The Profession of Anthropology (2) Required of
all graduate students. Organization of the anthropological
profession in teaching and research. Relationship between
subfields and related disciplines; the anthropological experi-
ence; ethics.
ANT 6933-Special topics in Anthropology (3; max: 10) Pre-
req: consent of instructor.
ANT 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ANT 6945-Internship in Applied Anthropology (1-8; max:
8) Prereq: permission of graduate coordinator. Required of
all students registered in programs of nonacademic anthro-
pology and/or nonthesis M.A. program. Students are ex-
pected to complete 4-8 hours.
ANT 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ANT 790-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)


ARCHITECTURE
College of Architecture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Dean: M. T. Jaroszewicz. Chairman: A. F. Butt. Gradu-
ate Coordinator: H. B. Hamacher. Professors: A. F.
Butt; E. E. Crain; H. B. Hamacher; M. T. Jaroszewicz; H.
W. Kemp; B. Y. Kinzey, Jr.; J. M. McRae;'H. C. Merritt,
Jr.; F. B. Reeves; L. G. Shaw; B. F. Voichysonk; W. G.







52 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Wagner. Associate Professors: A. J. Dasta; M. T. Foster;
R. W. Haase, F. F. Lisle, Jr.; G. Ridgdill; G. Scheffer; M.
M. Solis; K. S. Thorne; I. H. Winarsky. Assistant Pro-
fessors: C. F. Morgan; P. E. Prugh; T. R. White; P. P.
Wisley.
The Department of Architecture offers graduate
work leading to the first professional degree, Master
of Arts in Architecture. Two years in residence are
normally required for completion. Prerequisite to ad-
mission to the Master of Arts in Architecture program
is an undergraduate degree in architecture equivalent
to the University of Florida Bachelor of Design (Archi-
tecture) or a program of studies deemed by the facul-
ty to be equivalent thereto. In addition to satisfying
University requirements for admission, applicants are
required to submit to the Department of Architecture,
231 GPB, University of Florida, the following: a
portfolio of their work in architecture and related
fields; a statement of intent and their objectives; and
three letters of recommendation from teachers or em-
ployers. This material must be received by March 1 for
consideration for admission in the following fall. Ap-
plications for graduate admission, including tran-
scripts and GRE scores, must be received in the Office
of the Registrar by March 1, also.
The graduate professional Core I is taught only in
the fall semester, is required of all graduate students,
and is prerequisite to the remaining course work. Af-
ter completion of Professional Core I, the student is
expected to pursue studies related to a special field of
interest-architectural design, architectural history,
architectural structures, environmental technology, or
architectural preservation. Concentration in this spe-
cial field of interest should prepare the student for
architectural practice with an emphasis upon pro-
fessional team membership. Additional information
concerning programs for each of these areas is avail-
able from the department. The student's overall col-
lege experience, including undergraduate programs
in architecture and the two-year graduate program, is
intended to be a complete unit of professional educa-
tion leading toward practice in architecture or related
professions.
Under special circumstances, the graduate faculty
of the department may elect to admit students who
have a Bachelor of Architecture degree from a five-
year program for a one-year graduate program leading
to the Master of Arts in Architecture. In these cases,
the minimum registration required is 30 credits, in-
cluding six credits in ARC 6971 or ARC 6265.
The department reserves the right to retain student
work for the purposes of record, exhibition, or in-
struction.
ARC 5535-Architectural Structures (3) Prereq: ARC 4561.
ARC 5791-Problems in Architectural History (3) Prereq:
ARC 4782.
ARC 5800-Survey of Architectural Preservation, Restora-
tion, and Reconstruction (3)
ARC 5810-Techniques of Architectural Documentation (3)
ARC 5890-Historic Preservation and Restoration (3)
ARC 6241-Professional Core I (9) Required for all graduate
students. Architectural theory emphasizing cultural and
technological factors with application to architectural solu-
tions, including urban scale architecture and development.
ARC 6265-Terminal Project (1-10) Course work in lieu of
thesis, subject to approval of the supervisory committee. If
work is a team project, the individual student must show ev-
idence of his/her portion of the work accomplished. H.
ARC 6275-Professional Core II (1) Prereq: sixth-year stand-
ing. Required for all graduate students.
ARC 6347C-Architectural Design I (9) Design of buildings


within an urban complex and within an architectural com-
plex of established character. Influence of physical and so-
cial planning on design.
ARC 6355C-Architectural Design II (9) An in-depth analysis
of building design to integrate the structural, mechanical,
and detail systems. H.
ARC 6391C-Architecture, Energy, and Ecology (3) Integra-
tion of energetic ahd environmental influences on architec-
tural design.
ARC 6393C-Advanced Architectural Connections (3) Pre-
req: sixth year standing. An analysis of architectural connec-
tions and details relative to selected space, form, and struc-
tural systems.
ARC 6521-Advanced Architectural Structures VII (3) Study
of various soil properties and their applications in solving
architectural .design problems.
ARC 6541-Advanced Architectural Structures I (3) Prin-
ciples and application of timber construction to architectural
design problems.
ARC 6552-Advanced Architectural Structures 11 (3) Coreq:
ARC 6555. Theory and behavior of structural steel systems
and their responses to the solution of, architectural prob-
lems.
ARC 6555-Advanced Architectural Structures III (4) Coreq:
ARC 6552. Applications of structural steel systems to selected
architectural problems.
ARC 6565-Advanced Architectural Structures IV (3) Coreq:
ARC 6566. Theory and behavior of reinforced concrete sys-
tems and their responses to.the solution of architectural
problems.
ARC 6566-Advanced Architectural Structures V (4) Coreq:
ARC 6565. Applications of reinforced concrete systems to
selected architectural problems.
ARC 6571-Advanced Architectural Structures VI (3) Design
and applications of precast and/or prestressed concrete ele-
ments in architecture.
ARC 6591-Advanced Architectural Structures VIII (3) In-
vestigation of selected problems in the field of architectural
structures. Emphasis on student special interests.
ARC 6632-Environmental Systems Design Laboratory II (3)
Coreq: ARC 6633. Problems in the thermal and atmospheric
control of buildings.
ARC 6633-Environmental Systems Design II (3) Coreq: ARC
6632. Studies in thermal and atmospheric control of build-
ings.
ARC 6642-Environmental Systems Design Laboratory III (3)
Coreq: ARC 6643. Problems in architectural acoustics.
ARC 6643-Environmental Systems Design III (3) Coreq:
ARC 6642. Studies in architectural acoustics.
ARC 6684-Environmental Systems Design I (3) Studies in
lighting and electric power for buildings.
ARC 6685-Environmental Systems Design IV (3) Studies
and problems in sanitation and fire protection systems for
buildings.
ARC 6691-Environmental Systems Design V (3) Special
studies in environmental systems related to current develop-
ments.
ARC 6713-Architectural History 1 (3) History of western
civilization, with emphasis on architectural developments in
their historical, physical, ideological, artistic, and social con-
text.
ARC 6735--Architectural History II (3) Prereq: ARC 6713.
ARC 6742-Architectural History 111 (3) Prereq: ARC 6735.
ARC 6750-Architectural History: American (3) Develop-
ment of American architecture and the determinants affect-
ing its function, form, and expression.
ARC 6761-Architectural History: Area Concentration (3;
max: 9) Prereq: ARC 6742. Development of techniques for re-
search in architectural history.
ARC 6771-Architectural History: Literature and Criticism
(3; max: 9) Prereq: ARC 6773. Individual research with con-
centration on-writing and architectural criticism.
ARC 6793-Architectural History: Regional (3) Prereq: ARC
6750. Group and individual studies of architecture unique to
specific geographic regions.
ARC 6851-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Meth-
ods I (3) Materials, elements, tools, and personnel of tradi-
tional building.







ART / 53


ARC 6852-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Meth-
ods II (3) Prereq: ARC 6857.
ARC 6853-Technology of Preservation: Problems and Pro-
cesses (3)
ARC 6854C-Technology of Preservation: Programming and
Design (3) Prereq: ARC 6851.
ARC 6860-Techniques of Preservation: Legal and Economic
Processes (3)
ARC 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ARC 6911-Architectural-Research I (1-6) Special studies ad-
justed to individual needs. H.
ARC 6912-Architectural Research II (1-6) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6913-Architectural Research III (1-6) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ARC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


ART
College of Fine Arts
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman and Graduate Coordinator: R. H. Westin.
Graduate Research Professor: J. N. Uelsmann. Distin-
guished Service Professor: H. D. Williams. Professors:
R. C. Craven, Jr.; E. E. Grissom; K. A. Kerslake; J. G.
Naylor; J. J. Sabatella; P. A. Ward. Associate Professors:
M. J. Isaacson; J. A. O'Connor; E. Y. Streetman; J. L.
Ward. Assistant Professors: N. S. Smith; W. W. Wilson;
J. W. Yellin.
Master of Fine Arts Degree: The Department of Art
offers the MFA degree with concentration in
ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, sculpture, multi-media, and the history
of art. Enrollment is competitive and limited. Candi-
dates for admission should have adequate under-
graduate training in art. Deficiencies may be cor-
rected before beginning graduate study. Applicants
for admission to a studio major must submit a
portfolio by April 1, for fall admission. Two years resi-
dency is normally required for completion of the re-
quiremerts for this degree. Participation in the juried
MFA show is required.
ARH 6897 is required for all graduate majors. ARH
5805 is required of all students who select the written
thesis, or who major in art history. Students electing
to substitute the creative project in lieu of the written
thesis should see the graduate coordinator for depart-
ment requirements. All other graduate courses may
be repeated for credit with change of content. Some
of the courses listed are offered regularly, while oth-
ers are offered only as needed.
The department reserves the right to retain student
work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruc-
tion.
ARH 5805-Methods of Research and Bibliography (3)
ARH 5905-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12)
ARH 6791-Research in Methods and Materials of the Artist
(3-4)
ARH 6897-Seminar Problems in the History, Theory, and
Criticism of Art I (5)
ARH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5;' max: 12)
ARH 6911-Advanced Study-(3-4; max: 16) Prereq: major in
fine arts.
ARH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ART 5905C-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12)
ART 6835-Research in Methods and Materials of the Artist
(3-4; max: 8)
ART 6910C-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 12)
ART 6927C-Advanced Study (3-4; max: 16) Prereq: major in
fine arts. Ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, or sculpture.


ART 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ART 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ART 6973C--ndividual Project (1-10; max: 10) Creative
project in lieu of written thesis.


ASTRONOMY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: H. K. Eichhorn. Graduate Coordinator: G.
R. Lebo. Graduate Research Professor: A. E. S. Green.
Professors: J. R. Buchler; T. D. Carr; K-Y Chen; F. E.
Dunnam; H. K. Eichhorn; J. H. Hunter, Jr.; G. C. Omer,
Jr.; A. G. Smith; R. E. Wilson; F. B. Wood. Associate
Professors: H. L. Cohen; S. T. Gottesman; R. J. Leacock;
G. R. Lebo; J. P. Oliver; H. C. Smith, Jr.; C. A.
Williams.*
*This member of the faculty of the University of South Florida is also
a member of the graduate faculty of the University of Florida and par-
ticipates in the doctoral degree program in the University of Florida
Department of Astronomy.
The Department of Astronomy offers graduate
work in astronomy and astro-physics leading to the
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso-
phy. Current research fields include radio astronomy,
astrometry and data adjustment theory, cosmology,
photometry of close binaries and intrinsic variables,
photometry of quasars and galaxies, dynamical
astronomy, and certain topics of theoretical stellar
astrophysics.
For unqualified admission to the program, a stu-
dent should have an acceptable undergraduate de-
gree in physics or astronomy. Students with degrees
in related fields, such as engineering or mathematics,
may be admitted with the understanding that certain
foundation courses will have to be taken. If desirable,
an individual with a strong background in physics
may perform the graduate research work in
astronomy but take the qualifying examination and.
degree in physics, rather than astronomy. All degree
candidates are required as part of their training to as-
sist in the department's teaching program. Complete
details of the program and research facilities may be
obtained by writing the Chairman, Room 211, Space
Science Research Building.
ASI 6105C-Techniques of Optical Astronomy I (2) Prereq:
AST 3019. Fundamental principles of optical imaging in
astronomical instruments. Principles of photographic and
photoelectric detectors. Includes laboratory exercises.
ASI 6106-Techniques of Optical Astronomy II (2) Prereq:
ASI 6105C. Design of instrumentation for optical astronomy:
telescopes, photometers, spectrographs. Observational tech-
niques and data reduction. Includes laboratory exercises.
ASI 6115-Radio Astronomy Instrumentation (2) Prereq: ASI
6205. A survey of Radio Astronomy instrumentation, includ-
ing basic principles and methods of operation. Includes
study of antennas and arrays, interferometers, polarimeters,
receivers, recorders, and calibration devices.
ASI 6115L-Radio Astronomy Laboratory (1) Coreq: ASI
6115. Laboratory experiments and observatory sessions de-
signed to accompany ASI 6115.
ASI 6205-Basic Principles of Radio Astronomy (2) Prereq:
AST 3019. Coreq: PHY 5325. An introduction to radio
astronomy, including early history, measurement parame-
ters, applicable radio physics, relevant mathematical tech-
niques, properties of band-limited gaussian noise, and limi-
tations on radio telescope sensitivity and resolution.
ASI 6206-Radio Astrophysics (2) Prereq: ASI 6205.
Astrophysical plasmas, radio source emission mechanisms
and spectra, principal types of results obtained in radio
astronomy and their astrophysical implications.
AST 5043-History of Astronomy (2) Prereq: AST 1002 or







ART / 53


ARC 6852-Technology of Preservation: Materials and Meth-
ods II (3) Prereq: ARC 6857.
ARC 6853-Technology of Preservation: Problems and Pro-
cesses (3)
ARC 6854C-Technology of Preservation: Programming and
Design (3) Prereq: ARC 6851.
ARC 6860-Techniques of Preservation: Legal and Economic
Processes (3)
ARC 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ARC 6911-Architectural-Research I (1-6) Special studies ad-
justed to individual needs. H.
ARC 6912-Architectural Research II (1-6) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6913-Architectural Research III (1-6) Special studies
adjusted to individual needs. H.
ARC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ARC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


ART
College of Fine Arts
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman and Graduate Coordinator: R. H. Westin.
Graduate Research Professor: J. N. Uelsmann. Distin-
guished Service Professor: H. D. Williams. Professors:
R. C. Craven, Jr.; E. E. Grissom; K. A. Kerslake; J. G.
Naylor; J. J. Sabatella; P. A. Ward. Associate Professors:
M. J. Isaacson; J. A. O'Connor; E. Y. Streetman; J. L.
Ward. Assistant Professors: N. S. Smith; W. W. Wilson;
J. W. Yellin.
Master of Fine Arts Degree: The Department of Art
offers the MFA degree with concentration in
ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, sculpture, multi-media, and the history
of art. Enrollment is competitive and limited. Candi-
dates for admission should have adequate under-
graduate training in art. Deficiencies may be cor-
rected before beginning graduate study. Applicants
for admission to a studio major must submit a
portfolio by April 1, for fall admission. Two years resi-
dency is normally required for completion of the re-
quiremerts for this degree. Participation in the juried
MFA show is required.
ARH 6897 is required for all graduate majors. ARH
5805 is required of all students who select the written
thesis, or who major in art history. Students electing
to substitute the creative project in lieu of the written
thesis should see the graduate coordinator for depart-
ment requirements. All other graduate courses may
be repeated for credit with change of content. Some
of the courses listed are offered regularly, while oth-
ers are offered only as needed.
The department reserves the right to retain student
work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruc-
tion.
ARH 5805-Methods of Research and Bibliography (3)
ARH 5905-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12)
ARH 6791-Research in Methods and Materials of the Artist
(3-4)
ARH 6897-Seminar Problems in the History, Theory, and
Criticism of Art I (5)
ARH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5;' max: 12)
ARH 6911-Advanced Study-(3-4; max: 16) Prereq: major in
fine arts.
ARH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ART 5905C-Individual Study (3-4; max: 12)
ART 6835-Research in Methods and Materials of the Artist
(3-4; max: 8)
ART 6910C-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 12)
ART 6927C-Advanced Study (3-4; max: 16) Prereq: major in
fine arts. Ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, or sculpture.


ART 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ART 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ART 6973C--ndividual Project (1-10; max: 10) Creative
project in lieu of written thesis.


ASTRONOMY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: H. K. Eichhorn. Graduate Coordinator: G.
R. Lebo. Graduate Research Professor: A. E. S. Green.
Professors: J. R. Buchler; T. D. Carr; K-Y Chen; F. E.
Dunnam; H. K. Eichhorn; J. H. Hunter, Jr.; G. C. Omer,
Jr.; A. G. Smith; R. E. Wilson; F. B. Wood. Associate
Professors: H. L. Cohen; S. T. Gottesman; R. J. Leacock;
G. R. Lebo; J. P. Oliver; H. C. Smith, Jr.; C. A.
Williams.*
*This member of the faculty of the University of South Florida is also
a member of the graduate faculty of the University of Florida and par-
ticipates in the doctoral degree program in the University of Florida
Department of Astronomy.
The Department of Astronomy offers graduate
work in astronomy and astro-physics leading to the
degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso-
phy. Current research fields include radio astronomy,
astrometry and data adjustment theory, cosmology,
photometry of close binaries and intrinsic variables,
photometry of quasars and galaxies, dynamical
astronomy, and certain topics of theoretical stellar
astrophysics.
For unqualified admission to the program, a stu-
dent should have an acceptable undergraduate de-
gree in physics or astronomy. Students with degrees
in related fields, such as engineering or mathematics,
may be admitted with the understanding that certain
foundation courses will have to be taken. If desirable,
an individual with a strong background in physics
may perform the graduate research work in
astronomy but take the qualifying examination and.
degree in physics, rather than astronomy. All degree
candidates are required as part of their training to as-
sist in the department's teaching program. Complete
details of the program and research facilities may be
obtained by writing the Chairman, Room 211, Space
Science Research Building.
ASI 6105C-Techniques of Optical Astronomy I (2) Prereq:
AST 3019. Fundamental principles of optical imaging in
astronomical instruments. Principles of photographic and
photoelectric detectors. Includes laboratory exercises.
ASI 6106-Techniques of Optical Astronomy II (2) Prereq:
ASI 6105C. Design of instrumentation for optical astronomy:
telescopes, photometers, spectrographs. Observational tech-
niques and data reduction. Includes laboratory exercises.
ASI 6115-Radio Astronomy Instrumentation (2) Prereq: ASI
6205. A survey of Radio Astronomy instrumentation, includ-
ing basic principles and methods of operation. Includes
study of antennas and arrays, interferometers, polarimeters,
receivers, recorders, and calibration devices.
ASI 6115L-Radio Astronomy Laboratory (1) Coreq: ASI
6115. Laboratory experiments and observatory sessions de-
signed to accompany ASI 6115.
ASI 6205-Basic Principles of Radio Astronomy (2) Prereq:
AST 3019. Coreq: PHY 5325. An introduction to radio
astronomy, including early history, measurement parame-
ters, applicable radio physics, relevant mathematical tech-
niques, properties of band-limited gaussian noise, and limi-
tations on radio telescope sensitivity and resolution.
ASI 6206-Radio Astrophysics (2) Prereq: ASI 6205.
Astrophysical plasmas, radio source emission mechanisms
and spectra, principal types of results obtained in radio
astronomy and their astrophysical implications.
AST 5043-History of Astronomy (2) Prereq: AST 1002 or







54 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


2003C-2004C or 3019C. A general survey of the history of
astronomy from the earliest times down to the present day.
AST 5113-Solar System Astrophysics I (2) Prereq: two years
of college physics. Survey of the solar system, including its
origin and laws of planetary motion. The earth as a planet;
geophysics, aeronomy, geomagnetism, and the radiation
belts. Solar physics and the influenceof the sun on the earth.
AST 5114--Solar System Astrophysics I (2) Prereq: AST5113.
The moon and planets; exploration by ground-based and
spacecraft techniques. The lesser bodies of the solar system,
including satellites, asteroids, meteoroids, comets; the in-
terplanetary medium.
AST 5205-Stellar Spectra (2) Prereq: AST 3019C. A review of
stellar spectroscopy and an introduction to the classification
of stellar spectra at low dispersion.
AST 5210--ntroduction to Astrophysics (3) Prereq: AST
3019C. An introduction to astrophysics with particular em-
phasis upon the fundamentals of radiative transfer and a de-
tailed development of Planck's expression for the specific in-
tensity of blackbody radiation. The basic equations of stellar
structure are derived, and particular solutions of these equa-
tions are considered along with their astronomical implica-
tions.
AST 5273-Interacting Binary Stars (2) Prereq: AST 3019C. A
description of the various aspects of interacting binary stars
designed chiefly for students who plan to complete their
dissertations in other branches of astronomy. Also suitable
for undergraduate majors in the department.
AST 5600--Computational Astronomy (4) Prereq: MAS 4104.
A course designed to familiarize the student with the
statistical .tools of astronomical data reduction and the em-
pirical establishment of the positional and kinematical pa-
rameters of the bodies in the universe, and the physical and
geometric significance of these parameters. The laboratory
consists of the numerical (and theoretical) solution of rele-
vant problems.
AST 6165--Radlororopagation and Ionospheric Physics I (2)
Prereq: PHY 4324. Propagation of electromagnetic waves in
magnetoionic media, with emphasis on the terrestrial
ionosphere, and cosmic conditions such as solar corona and
interstellar media.
AST 6166-Radiopropagation and Ionospheric Physics 11 (2)
Prereq: AST 6165. Ionospheric electron density and ion com-
position profiles; diurnal, seasonal, and global variations;
presunrise effects; electron and ion temperatures; solar flare
and magnetic storm effects.
AST 6167--Atomic Physics of Planetary Atmospheres (2)
Prereq: basic physics and mathematics through integral cal-
culus. Atomic and quantum theory, quantum mechanics and
the central field problem, atomic and molecular spec-
troscopy, collisional cross sections for aeronomy.
AST 6168-Physics of the Earth's Upper Atmosphere (2) Pre-
req: AST 6167. Solar-terrestrial relations, aurora, airglow, and
ionospheric phenomena. .Remote sensing of atmospheric
emissions and scattered solar radiation.
AST 6169-Physics of Planetary Atmospheres (2) Prereq: AST
6168. Radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, from x-ray
to radio regions. Discussion of recent studies of the atmo-
spheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and other planets.
AST 6214-Stellar Astrophysics I: Atmosphere (3) Prereq:
AST 5210 or equivalent. Theoretical approach to the study of
stellar atmosphere.
AST 6215-Stellar Astrophysics II: Interior (3) Prereq: AST
6214. Theoretical approach to the study of stellar structures.
AST 6216-Stellar Astrophysics III: Evolution (2) Prereq: AST
6215. Theoretical approach to the study of stellar evolution.
AST 6265-Variable Stars (2) Prereq: AST 3019C. Classifica-
tion, light and spectral changes, population distribution,
physical processes causing variability, the place of variables
in stellar evolution. Use of variable stars in galactic and ex-
tragalactic studies.
AST 6275-Visual and Spectroscopic Binary Stars I (2) Pre-
req: AST 3019C, ASI 6106. Theoretical studies and analyses of
observations of both visual and spectroscopic binaries.
AST 6276-Visual and Spectroscopic Binary Stars II (2) Pre-
req: AST 6275.
AST 6277-Eclipsing Binary Stars I (2) Prereq: AST 3019C, ASI
6706. Theoretical Studies and analyses of observations of
eclipsing variables.


AST 6278--Edipsing Binary Stars II (2) Prereq: AST 6277.
AST 6309-Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy (4) Prereq:
AST 3019C. Observations and interpretations of the
kinematics, dynamics, and structure of the Milky Way
Galaxy, extragalactic objects and galaxy clusters.
AST 6316-Stellar Dynamics (3) Prereq: partial differential
equations, complex variables. Introduction to dynamics of
stellar systems, with emphasis on cluster dynamics. Three
main approaches are treated: analytic, statistical-mechanical,
and experimental (computer simulations). Basic techniques
are presented, and dynamical evolution of clusters is de-
scribed.
AST 6336-Interstellar Matter (3) Prereq: AST 5210. A course
dealing with the complex interplay of physical processes
that determine the structure of the interstellar medium in
our galaxy; emphasis is placed upon a comparison of ob-
servational data with theoretical prediction.
AST 6416-Cosmology (3) Prereq: PHS 6606. An introduction
to the observational background and to the theory of cos-
mology.
AST 6506-Celestial Mechanics I (2) Prereq: AST 3019C, PHY
5225. Analytical and numerical computation of orbits.
AST 6507-Celestial Mechanics II (2) Prereq: AST 6506
AST 6607--Positional Astronomy (4) Prereq: AST 5600. Nu-
merical methods (interpolation, errors, least squares) used in
astronomy, especially positional astronomy, coordinate sys-
tems and their conversion, reduction of observations (espe-
cially reduction to apparent place), time systems, and the
determination of proper motion and parallax.
AST 6905-Individual work (1-3; max: 6) Supervised study or
research in areas not covered by other courses.
AST 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
AST 6935-Seminar in Modem Astronomy (1; max: 6) Recent
developments in theoretical and observational astronomy
and astrophysics. S/U.
AST 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
AST 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
AST 7157-The Giant Planets (2) Prereq: AST 5114 or ASI
6206. Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus; their origins and
evolution, interiors, gravitational and magnetic fields, atmo-
spheres, ionospheres, magnetospheres, electromagnetic
emissions, and satellites. Emphasis is on Jupiter.
AST 7279-Close Binary Stars (2) Prereq: AST 6278. Role of
close binaries in stellar evolution. Nonperiodic phenomena,
mass loss and exchange, novae and nova-like variables, pe-
riod changes.
AST 7939-Special Topics (2; max: 12) Assigned reading, pro-
grams, seminar, or lecture series in a new field of advanced
astronomy.
AST 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
PHS 6606-Special and General Relativity (4) Prereq: PHY
6246, tensor analysis, invariance. Einstein's special and gen-
eral theories of relativity; relativistic cosmology.

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR
BIOLOGY
College of Medicine
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: M. Young. Graduate Coordinator P. M.
Mcpuire. Professors: C. M. Allen, Jr.; R. P. Boyce; P. W.
Chun; C. M. Feldherr; W. R. Fisher; M. Fried; R. J.
Mans; T. W. O'Brien; R. M. Roberts; D. N. Silverman;
G. S. Stein; M. Young. Associate Professors: R. D.
Brown, Jr.; R. J. Cohen; B. M. Dunn; P. J. Laipis; K. D.
Noonan; A. Stevens. Assistant Professors: M. S. Kappy;
M. S. Kilberg; P. M. McGuire; J. F. Remsen; J. L. Stein.
The Department of Biochemistry and. Molecular
Biology offers the Master of Science and. Doctor of
Philosophy degrees in biochemistry with special-
ization in physical biochemistry, molecular biology,
cell biology, and medical biochemistry. The depart-
ment, as one of the basic medical sciences, also offers
,these subjects as part of the program leading to the
M.S. and Ph.D. in medical sciences.







BOTANY / 55


Specific areas of study include structure and func-
tion of cellular and nuclear membranes in mam-
malian cells; transport of molecules into the cell; regu-
lation of cell division and gene expression;
biochemistry of differentiation; biochemical genetics;
mdTecular biology of nucleic acids; replication and re-
pair in bacterial and eukaryotic cells; biosynthesis and
structure of nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides,
lipids, lipoproteins; isoprenoid metabolism; physical
biochemistry of nucleic acids and proteins; mecha-
nism of enzyme action; and marine biochemistry.
New graduate students should have adequate train-
ing in general, organic, quantitative, and physical
chemistry as well as in physics, biology, and calculus.
Minor deficiencies may be made up immediately after
entering Graduate School.
Doctoral candidates are required to take a core of
biochemistry courses which include BCH 6065, 6156,
6206, 6415, 6876 and 6936. Depending upon interests
and background of the student, additional courses are
recommended from the following list: BCH 6296,
6746, 7077 and 7257. The course of graduate study for
doctoral candidates also includes advanced organic
and physical chemistry, physiology, microbiology,
and genetics.
BCH 6065-Advanced Physical Biochemistry (4) Prereq: gen-
eral biochemistry and physical chemistry or consent of in-
structor. Physical chemistry of biological molecules and the
techniques for their study. Constitutes one of the three core
biochemistry courses.
BCH 6156C-Research Methods in Biochemistry (1-4; max:
8) Prereq: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415. Only by special arrange-
ment. Biochemical research in which the student refines his
research techniques in physical biochemistry, intermediary
metabolism, molecular biology, and cell biology under su-
pervision of a staff member.
BCH 6206-Advanced Metabolism (3) Prereq: general
biochemistry or consent of instructor. The reactions of in-
termediary metabolism with emphasis upon their integra-
tion, mechanism, and control. Constitutes one of the three
core biochemistry courses.
BCH 6296-Advanced Topics in Metabolic Control (2) Pre-
req: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415, or consent of instructor. Study of
the thermodynamic, allosteric, endocrinologic, and genetic
control of metabolic reactions.
BCH 6415-Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology (5) Prereq:
general biochemistry or consent of instructor. An advanced
course combining the molecular biology of pro- and
eukaryotes with cell biology. Topics will include DNA
replication, chromosome organization; RNA and protein
synthesis; as well as the biochemistry of cell organelles. Con-
stitutes one of the three core biochemistry courses.
BCH 6746-Advanced Topics in Physical Biochemistry (2)
Prereq: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415, or consent of instructor. Study
of the physical chemistry of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids,
enzymes, as well as their modes of interaction.
BCH 6876-Recent Advances in Biochemistry (1) Prereq:
BCH 6065 or equivalent. Areas of biochemistry and
molecular biology, selected by the faculty, discussed
critically and in depth. Emphasis on current controversy and
theory, data interpretations, and scientific writing. Classes
held informally in small groups during each semester, in-
volving all biochemistry faculty on a rotating basis. S/U.
BCH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 12) Prereq: Con-
sent of instructor. Nonthesis, individually supervised re-
search.
BCH 6936-Biochemistry Seminar (1) Required of graduate
students in biochemistry; open to others by special arrange-
ment. Research reports and discussions of current research
literature given by the departmental staff, invited speakers,
and graduate students. S/U.
BCH 6940--Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 12) Prereq: Con-
sent of instructor. Teaching and conducting of discussions
under direct supervision.
BCH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


BCH 7077-Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology (2) Pre-
req: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415, or consent of instructor. The bio-
chemical basis.of molecular biology and genetics with em-
phasis on the mode of control surrounding the replication
and expression of the pro- and eukaryotic genome.
BCH 7257-Advanced Topics in Cell Biology (2) Prereq: BCH
6415 or equivalent. Biochemistry of selected cell organelles
with emphasis on compartmentation and integrated cellular
function.
BCH 7627-Biochemistry of Disease (2) Prereq: general
courses in biochemistry. The molecular basis of human
pathobiology. Biochemical mechanisms underlying selected
disease states.
BCH 798-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)


BOTANY
Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences
and Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: W. L. Stern. Graduate Coordinator: G. E.
Bowes. Graduate Research Professors: E. S. Deevey; I.
K. Vasil. Professors: H. C. Aldrich; D. S. Anthony; J. S.
Davis; D. G. Griffin, III; T. E. Humphreys; J. W. Kim-
brough; J. T. Mullins; H. L. Popenoe; L. Shanor; R. C.
Smith; W. L. Stern; D. B. Ward. Associate Professors:
G. E. Bowes; J. J. Ewel; T. W. Lucansky. Assistant Pro-
fessors: T. L. Crisman; W. S. Judd.
The Department of Botany offers graduate work
leading to the degrees of Master of Science, Master of
Agriculture, Master of Science in Teaching, and Doc-
tor of Philosophy.
Specific areas of specialization in botany include
anatomy/morphology with emphasis on tropical
ferns and aquatic plants; bryology; development of
seed plants, -prtoplast, cell and tissue culture; ecol-
ogy; mycology with emphasis on morphology system-
atics and development; phycology with emphasis on
algae of brine ponds; physiology/biochemistry with
emphasis on ion uptake, photosynthesis and
photorespiration, sugar metabolism and transport,
hormonal control of fungal reproduction; systematics
with emphasis on monographic and floristic studies.
For admission to graduate standing a student
should present credits equivalent to those required
for undergraduate majors in the department. Under-
graduate major requirements include 24 credits in
botany, a course in genetics with laboratory, mathe-
matics through differential calculus, one year of col-
lege physics, and chemistry through organic. Those
admitted without full equivalents of an under-
graduate major will be required to make up the defi-
ciencies by passing appropriate courses early in their
graduate programs. A reading knowledge of a foreign
language and credit for basic courses in zoology and
bacteriology are desirable. The program of graduate
study for each student will be determined by a super-
visory committee. No more than 7 credits of BOT 6905
may be used to satisfy the credit requirements for a
master's degree. Each student pursuing the Ph.D. de-
gree will be required to pass a written departmental
examination on designated major areas of botany
prior to the qualifying examination.
There are, in addition to the facilities of the,depart-
ment for graduate work, the following special re-
sources that may be utilized in support of graduate
student training and research: (1) the Florida Agricul-
tural. Experiment Stations, (2) the Marine Sciences
Center on the Gulf of Mexico for studies in estuarine








56 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


and marine habitats, (3) the resources of the Welaka
Conservation Reserve, and (4) the Center for Tropical
Agriculture, which can support studies in tropical and
subtropical areas.
APB 5415-Radioisotope Theory and Techniques (4) Prereq:
CHM 3120C or consent of instructor. Theory of radioactivity,
of interaction with matter, radioactive decay, etc., given in
sufficient detail to make the laboratory techniques and prac-
tices thoroughly understood.
BOT 5225C-Plant Anatomy (3) Prereq: BOT 2011C or 3303C
or consent of instructor. Origin, structure, and function of
principal tissues and organs of seed plants.
BOT 5405C-Algology (4) Prereq: BOT 2011C or 3303C or
consent of instructor. Algae, especially their structure, repro-
duction, growth, classification, and evolution. Emhasis on
Florida marine and fresh water species.
BOT 5435C-Introductory Mycology (3) Prereq: BOT 2011C
or 3303C. Fungi, with emphasis on comparative morphology.
BOT 5485C-Mosses and Liverworts (3) Prereq: SOT 2011C
or 3303C. Morphology of the major groups of bryophytes,
with emphasis on collection, identification, and ecology of
these plants in Florida.
BOT 5505C--ntermediate Plant Physiology (3) Prereq: BOT
3503, 3503L, and CHM 3200, 3200L, or equivalent. Funda-
mental physical and chemical processes underlying the wa-
ter relations, nutrition, metabolism, growth, and reproduc-
tion of higher plants.
BOT 5625-Plant Geography (2) Prereq: BOT 3153 or BOT
5725C. Geography of the floras and types of vegetation
throughout the world, with emphasis on problems of the
distribution of taxa, and the main factors influencing types
of vegetation.
BOT 5695-Ecosystems of Florida (3) Prereq: PCB 3043C or
equivalent and consent of instructor. Major ecosystems of
Florida in relation to environmental factors and man's rela-
tionship to them. Emphasis of all day Saturday field trips is
on field problems, techniques and research.
BOT 5725C-Taxonomy of Vascular Plants (4) Prereq: BOT
2011C or 3303C or equivalent. Vascular plants, their classifi-
cation, gross morphology, and evolutionary relationships.
BOT 5755C-Biology of Ferns and their Allies (3) Prereq:
BOT 3303C and 3153C or 5725C or consent of instructor. Liv-
ing and fossil representatives of ferns and other vascular
cryptogams, with emphasis on their structure, evolution, and
classification.
BOT 6256C-Plant Cytology (3) Prereq: MCB 4403 or equiva-
lent. Fundamental structures of plant cells, their functions,
reproduction and relation to inheritance; recent research
and techniques.
BOT 6316C-Developmental Morphology of Flowering
Plants (3) Prereq: BOT 3303C. Developmental morphology
of the vegetative and reproductive organs of flowering
plants with particular emphasis on form and function as re-
vealed by recent experimental techniques.
BOT 6326C-Methods and Applications of Plant Cell and
Tissue Culture (3) Prereq: BOT 6316C. Laboratory techniques
for the culture of plant protoplasts, cells, tissues, and organs,
and their applications in the study of cellular differentiation,
development, genetics, and agriculture.
BOT 6346C-Biology and Taxonomy of Myxomycetes and
Phycomycetes (3) Prereq: BOT 5435C. Morphology, devel-
opment, and taxonomy of slime molds, water molds, and al-
lied taxa emphasized.
BOT 6446C-Biology and Taxonomy of the Basidlomycetes
(3) Prereq: BOT 54356. Isolating, collecting, and identifica-
tion of field material required.
BOT 6466C-Biology and Taxonomy of Ascomycetes, Their
Imperfect Stages, and Lichens (4) Prereq: BOT 5435C. Mor-
phology, development, and taxonomy of the Ascomycetes,
Fungi Imperfecti, and lichens with emphasis on their identi-
fication. Field work required.
BOT 6496C-Fungal Physiology (3).Comparative physiology
of growth, development, metabolism, and reproduction of
selected fungi.
BOT 6516-Plant Metabolism (2) Prereq: BOT 5505C, BCH
4203. Metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and nitrogen com-
pounds in higher plants; cell structure as related to metabo-
lism; metabolic control mechanisms.


BOT 6526-Plant Nutrition (2) Prereq: BOT 5505C. Plant
nutrition including essentiality of elements, absorption of
ions, utilization of minerals in plants, and water metabolism.
BOT 6566-Plant Growth and Development (2) Prereq: BOT
5505C. Ways in which environmental factors influence plant
growth and development.
BOT 6576-Photophysiology of Plant Growth (3) Prereq:
BOT 5505C. Effects of light on the physiology and
biochemistry of plants. Photosynthesis and photorespiration
emphasized. Properties of light sources, photochemistry,
phytochrome action, photomorphogenesis, photoperi-
odism, and phototropism examined.
BOT 6646C-Ecology of Aquatic Plants (3) Prereq: PCB
3043C. Aquatic plants, their morphology, physiology,
anatomy and role in aquatic ecosystems. Field trips empha-
size the flow of energy and system structure.
BOT 6716C-Advanced Taxonomy (2) Prereq: BOT 5725C
Problems in the classification of vascular plants. Published
taxonomic studies reviewed as demonstration of techniques
and principles involved in classification; intensive individual
work required in field and herbarium application of pro-
cedures.
BOT 6905-Individual Studies in Botany (1-3) Prereq: ap-
proval of department chairman and consent of instructor.
Individual, nonthesis, research problem in one of the follow-
ing areas of botany: ecology, physiology and biochemistry,
cryptogamic botany, morphology and anatomy of vascular
plants, systematics, cytology and ultrastructure. Work
selected to meet the interests and needs of the students.
BOT 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
BOT 6927-Advances in Botany (1-3) Supervised study in
specific areas of botany.
BOT 6936-Graduate Student Seminar (1) Readings and oral
presentation on general topics in botany. S/U.
BOT 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
BOT 6951-Tropical Biology: An Ecological Approach (8) In-
tensive field study of ecological concepts in tropical envi-
ronments. Eight weeks in different principal kinds of tropical
environments. Offered Summer Quarter in Costa Rica as
part of the program of the Organization for Tropical Studies.
BOT 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
BOT 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
PCB 5046C-Advanced Ecology (2) Prereq:, PCB 3043C or
equivalent; physics, chemistry, statistics, physiology and cal-
culus are desirable. Diversity measures, population dynam-
ics, ecosystem classification, quantitative plant sociology,
nutrient cycles, energy flow, productivity, modeling and
computer simulation, and budgets at the ecosystem level.
PCB 5115C-Cytology (4) Prereq: BXC 2010C or equivalent.
Microscopic components of plant and animal cells. Struc-
ture, chemical constitution and function of the cell wall,
protoplasm, cytoplasmic constituents.and nucleus.
PCB 6176-Electron Microscopy of Biological Materials (2)
Prereq: PCB 5775C or PCB 3136 or equivalent. Use of the
electron microscope, including fixation, embeding, section-
ing, freeze-etching, negative staining, and use of the vacu-
um evaporator.
PCB 6176L-Laboratory in Electron Microscopy (2) Coreq:,
PCB 6176 and consent of instructor required. Laboratory
training in use of electron microscopes, ultramicrotomes,
vacuum evaporators, and freeze-etch machines.
PCB 6216-Cytochemistry (3) Prereq: PCB 6176L or consent
of instructor. Cellular organization, cell function, and cyto-
chemical technique.
PCB 6356C-Ecosystems of the Tropics (3) Prereq: PCB
3043C. Natural and man-dominated tropical ecosystems,
their structure, function, and relation to man.
PCB 6626C-Fungal Genetics (3) Compartive genetics of
mating type and sexual development, chromosome map-
ping, polyploidy, gene structure and function, and
pathogenicity of selected fungi.
PCB 6691-Topics in Genetics (1-2)
PLP 6622-Biology, Ecology and Taxonomy of Mycorrhizae
(3) Prereq: basic course in botany and plant pathology or
their equivalent. Coreq: BOT 5435C or equivalent. A survey of
the'taxonomy, morphology and ecology of organisms form-
ing plant mycorrhizae, and the biological and physiological
effects and economic aspects of mycorrhizae on plants.







BUILDING CONSTRUCTION / 57


ZOO 6126--Historical Ecology of the Pleistocene (3)
Pleistocene environments and ecosystems with emphasis on
worldwide chronology and correlation and intermediate
term historical processes that require 102 to 10* years for sig-
nificant expression.



SCHOOL OF BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
College of Architecture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Director: B. H. Brown. Graduate Coordinator: R. E.
Cox. Professors: B. H. Brown, R. E. Cox, B. G. Eppes, D.
A. Halperin. Associate Professor: H. F. Holland.
Courses are offered leading to the degrees of Mas-
ter of Science in Building Construction (thesis) and
'Master of Building Construction (nonthesis). An indi-
vidual plan of study is prepared for each student to
insure that the student's goals are achieved within the
broad policy guidelines of the School. Specialization
may be in areas related to construction such as the
construction manager concept, planning and sched-
uling, cost control, high rise construction, materials,
techniques and structural concepts.
There is.no foreign language requirement. The ob-
jectives of this graduate program arp to (1) provide
advanced construction courses, (2) provide opportun-
ity for study of construction problems and subjects in
depth, (3) broaden the student's base of knowledge
and understanding in the construction areas, (4) pre-
pare for teaching, and (5) prepare for research.
All BCN graduate students are required to take an
examination on their ability to communicate properly
in the English language. Failure to make a satisfactory
score on this examination will result in a prerequisite
course or courses in English being added to the
student's plan of study. These prerequisite English
courses are in addition to the courses for the BCN
graduate degree. The examination must be taken dur-
ing the first registration period that the student is en-
rolled.
Holders of a four-year undergraduate degree in
Building Construction or its equivalent in related
fields may normally complete the requirement for the
master's degree in one academic year (two semesters)
as full-time students. "Equivalent- in related fields"
should include studies in construction materials and
methods, structures, and management. Students with
undergraduate degrees but with deficiencies in these
related fields may need longer residence for the
master's degree, as they will be required to take speci-
fied basic courses to provide a foundation for ad-
vanced courses.
No more than 5 credits of BCN 6934 or BCN 6971
may be used to satisfy the credit requirements for a
master's degree without written permission of the di-
rector. Candidates are required to take BCN 5463,
BCN 5625 and BCN 5715. Foreign students, at the dis-
cretion of the graduate coordinator, may substitute
another course for BCN 5715.
The department reserves the right to retain student
work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruc-
tion.
BCN 5226-Advanced Construction Techniques (3) Prereq:
BCN 3225. Advanced study of the methods of constructing
unique structures.
BCN 5463-Advanced Construction Structures (4) Prereq:
BCN 3461. Study of soils, dewatering and the temporary


structures that contractors have to build in order to build the
primary structure.
BCN 5463L-Laboratory in Advanced Construction Struc-
tures (1) Laboratory training in the testing of construction
materials.
BCN 5470-Construction Methods Improvement (3) Meth-
ods of analyzing and evaluating construction techniques to
improve project time and cost control. Includes work sampl-
ing, productivity ratings, crew balance studies, time lapse
photography and time management.
BCN 5528-Survey of Construction Techniques (4) Designed
for students from allied disciplines such as Architecture and
Engineering who want to learn the work methods, material
and equipment employed on residential, commercial and
industrial construction projects.
BCN 5625-Construction Cost Analysis (3) Prereq: ACC
2001, BCN 4612. Study of the elements of cost engineering,
cost distribution and comparative analysis of actual and esti-
mated cost as used for project control.
BCN 5715-Advanced Construction Labor Problems (3) Pre-
req: graduate status. Study of labor problems in the con-
struction industry and the associated legislation. How to ef-
fectively work -with unionized labor on construction
projects.
BCN 5722-Advanced Construction Planning and Control
(3) Prereq: COP 3110, BCN 4612. Time-cost relationships for
various construction operations.
BCN 5905-Special Studies in Construction (1-5; max: 13)
Prereq: Graduate status or special permission of the instruc-
tor. Special studies provide opportunities for students re-
quiring supplemental work in the building construction
.area.
BCN 6748-Construction Law (4) A broad survey of con-
struction law as it pertains to the formation of a company,
licensing, the bid process, general contracts, subcontracts,
plans and specifications, performance, mechanics liens, in-
surance, bonds and remedies as they relate to the building
constructor. Case studies.
BCN 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
BCN 6931-Construction Management (1-5; max: 13) Studies
in construction management or in specialized areas of the
construction field.
BCN 6932-Building Construction Management (1-5; max:
12) Studies in building technology and management or in
specialized areas of the building construction field.
BCN 6933-Advanced Construction Management (1-5; max:
12) Studies of the financial and technological changes affect-
ing construction and the management of construction
projects. H.
BCN 6934-Construction Research (1-6; max: 12) Independ-
ent studies and research of selected problems in the field of
construction. H.
BCN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
BCN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION-
GENERAL
College of Business Administration
Graduate programs offered by the College of Busi-
ness Administration are the Doctor of Philosophy in
economics, the Doctor of Philosophy in business ad-
ministration; the Master of Arts in economics; the
Master of Arts in business administration with a tract
in finance, insurance, management, marketing, or real
estate and urban analysis; the Master of Business Ad-
ministration; and the Master of Science in computer
and information sciences. The Master of Accounting
degree (M.Acc.) is offered through the School of Ac-
counting. Fields of concentration and requirements
for the MBA are given under Requirements for
Master's Degrees in the front section of the Catalog.
Requirements for the Ph.D. in economics and for all
M. A. degrees may be found under the description for
the respective department.







BUILDING CONSTRUCTION / 57


ZOO 6126--Historical Ecology of the Pleistocene (3)
Pleistocene environments and ecosystems with emphasis on
worldwide chronology and correlation and intermediate
term historical processes that require 102 to 10* years for sig-
nificant expression.



SCHOOL OF BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
College of Architecture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Director: B. H. Brown. Graduate Coordinator: R. E.
Cox. Professors: B. H. Brown, R. E. Cox, B. G. Eppes, D.
A. Halperin. Associate Professor: H. F. Holland.
Courses are offered leading to the degrees of Mas-
ter of Science in Building Construction (thesis) and
'Master of Building Construction (nonthesis). An indi-
vidual plan of study is prepared for each student to
insure that the student's goals are achieved within the
broad policy guidelines of the School. Specialization
may be in areas related to construction such as the
construction manager concept, planning and sched-
uling, cost control, high rise construction, materials,
techniques and structural concepts.
There is.no foreign language requirement. The ob-
jectives of this graduate program arp to (1) provide
advanced construction courses, (2) provide opportun-
ity for study of construction problems and subjects in
depth, (3) broaden the student's base of knowledge
and understanding in the construction areas, (4) pre-
pare for teaching, and (5) prepare for research.
All BCN graduate students are required to take an
examination on their ability to communicate properly
in the English language. Failure to make a satisfactory
score on this examination will result in a prerequisite
course or courses in English being added to the
student's plan of study. These prerequisite English
courses are in addition to the courses for the BCN
graduate degree. The examination must be taken dur-
ing the first registration period that the student is en-
rolled.
Holders of a four-year undergraduate degree in
Building Construction or its equivalent in related
fields may normally complete the requirement for the
master's degree in one academic year (two semesters)
as full-time students. "Equivalent- in related fields"
should include studies in construction materials and
methods, structures, and management. Students with
undergraduate degrees but with deficiencies in these
related fields may need longer residence for the
master's degree, as they will be required to take speci-
fied basic courses to provide a foundation for ad-
vanced courses.
No more than 5 credits of BCN 6934 or BCN 6971
may be used to satisfy the credit requirements for a
master's degree without written permission of the di-
rector. Candidates are required to take BCN 5463,
BCN 5625 and BCN 5715. Foreign students, at the dis-
cretion of the graduate coordinator, may substitute
another course for BCN 5715.
The department reserves the right to retain student
work for purposes of record, exhibition, or instruc-
tion.
BCN 5226-Advanced Construction Techniques (3) Prereq:
BCN 3225. Advanced study of the methods of constructing
unique structures.
BCN 5463-Advanced Construction Structures (4) Prereq:
BCN 3461. Study of soils, dewatering and the temporary


structures that contractors have to build in order to build the
primary structure.
BCN 5463L-Laboratory in Advanced Construction Struc-
tures (1) Laboratory training in the testing of construction
materials.
BCN 5470-Construction Methods Improvement (3) Meth-
ods of analyzing and evaluating construction techniques to
improve project time and cost control. Includes work sampl-
ing, productivity ratings, crew balance studies, time lapse
photography and time management.
BCN 5528-Survey of Construction Techniques (4) Designed
for students from allied disciplines such as Architecture and
Engineering who want to learn the work methods, material
and equipment employed on residential, commercial and
industrial construction projects.
BCN 5625-Construction Cost Analysis (3) Prereq: ACC
2001, BCN 4612. Study of the elements of cost engineering,
cost distribution and comparative analysis of actual and esti-
mated cost as used for project control.
BCN 5715-Advanced Construction Labor Problems (3) Pre-
req: graduate status. Study of labor problems in the con-
struction industry and the associated legislation. How to ef-
fectively work -with unionized labor on construction
projects.
BCN 5722-Advanced Construction Planning and Control
(3) Prereq: COP 3110, BCN 4612. Time-cost relationships for
various construction operations.
BCN 5905-Special Studies in Construction (1-5; max: 13)
Prereq: Graduate status or special permission of the instruc-
tor. Special studies provide opportunities for students re-
quiring supplemental work in the building construction
.area.
BCN 6748-Construction Law (4) A broad survey of con-
struction law as it pertains to the formation of a company,
licensing, the bid process, general contracts, subcontracts,
plans and specifications, performance, mechanics liens, in-
surance, bonds and remedies as they relate to the building
constructor. Case studies.
BCN 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
BCN 6931-Construction Management (1-5; max: 13) Studies
in construction management or in specialized areas of the
construction field.
BCN 6932-Building Construction Management (1-5; max:
12) Studies in building technology and management or in
specialized areas of the building construction field.
BCN 6933-Advanced Construction Management (1-5; max:
12) Studies of the financial and technological changes affect-
ing construction and the management of construction
projects. H.
BCN 6934-Construction Research (1-6; max: 12) Independ-
ent studies and research of selected problems in the field of
construction. H.
BCN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
BCN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION-
GENERAL
College of Business Administration
Graduate programs offered by the College of Busi-
ness Administration are the Doctor of Philosophy in
economics, the Doctor of Philosophy in business ad-
ministration; the Master of Arts in economics; the
Master of Arts in business administration with a tract
in finance, insurance, management, marketing, or real
estate and urban analysis; the Master of Business Ad-
ministration; and the Master of Science in computer
and information sciences. The Master of Accounting
degree (M.Acc.) is offered through the School of Ac-
counting. Fields of concentration and requirements
for the MBA are given under Requirements for
Master's Degrees in the front section of the Catalog.
Requirements for the Ph.D. in economics and for all
M. A. degrees may be found under the description for
the respective department.







58 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


The Ph.D. in business administration requires a
principal or major field in one of the following: ac-
counting, finance, insurance, management, market-
ing, or real estate and urban analysis. Requirements.
for the specific departments and specialties within
the departments are stated in the departmental de-
scriptions in this Catalog. All candidates for the Ph.D.
in business administration must satisfy the following
core requirements.
GEB 5805-Mathematical Methods and Their Application to
Business and Economics Analysis (4)
STA 4321-Mathematical Statistics I (3)
STA 4322-Mathematical Statistics II (3)
MAN 6108'-Concepts and Methods in the Behavioral Sci-
ences (3)
ECO 6206-Macro Economic Theory (3)
ECO 6116-Price Theory (3)
*Students may substitute one of a list of approval
courses for MAN 6108. Procedures for waiving these
core requirements have been established. Addi-
tionally, the candidate must meet requirements for
one or two minors. More detailed information may be
obtained from the Associate Dean, College of Busi-
ness Admistration, Matherly Hall.
Admission Requirements: Applicants for all gradu-
ate programs in the College of Business Adminis-
tration must meet the Graduate School's admission
standards. These applicants may, however, use the
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) rath-
er than the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude
Test. Candidates for admission to the MBA program
are required to take the GMAT.
CAP 5009-Computer Concepts in Business (2) Designed for
MBA candidates who lack adequate preparation for utilizing
computer hardware and software systems in managerial
problem solving. Mechanics and functioning of computer
systems emphasizing applications of software packages in
managerial decision making and and problem solving.
CAP 5021--Computer-Based Business Management (3) Pre-
req: COP 3110, or consent of instructor. Principles of data-
processing management and the application of computers in
solving business problems.
FIN 6937-Advanced Finance Topics (3) Prereq: ACC 5011,
FIN 5405. Analysis of organizational problems from a finan-
cial perspective integrating concepts from various organiza-
tional functions such as production, marketing, and per-
sonnel.
CEB 5215-Problem Analysis and Presentation in Business I
(1) Designed for MBA candidates. A basic course designed
to improve written and oral communications in a business
environment.
GEB 5216-Problem Analysis and Presentation in Business II
(1) Designed for MBA candidates. Prereq: GEB 5215. A basic
course designed to improve written and oral communica-
tions in a business environment.
GEB 5756--ntroduction to Managerial Statistics (4) De-
signed for MBA candidates. Prereq: basic statistics, calculus.
Basic concepts and methods of probability and statistics
stressing applications in analyzing and solving business
problems.
GEB 5795-International Business (3) Designed for MBA
candidates. The major characteristics, motivations, interac-
tions, and structural realities of the international environ-
ment are explored via the functional areas of business. A
multinational framework is developed within which the firm
can operate effectively and efficiently.
GEB 5805-Mathematical Methods and Their Applications
to Business and Economic Analysis (4) Matrix algebra and
calculus applied to business and economic analysis.
GEB 6705-Managerial Accounting (3) Designed for MBA
candidates. Prereq: ACC 5011, GEB 5756. Periodic income
measurement; relation of accounting techniques to control
of business operations; effects of federal income taxes on
management decisions.,


GEB 6757-Managerial Quantitative Analysis (4) Prereq: CAP
5001, GEB 5756, GEB 6705. Mathematical approaches and
techniques applicable to the analysis and solution of man-
agerial problems, with careful attention to problem formula-
tion, mathematical analysis, and solution procedures. In-
volves substantial case work.
MAN 5505-Operations Management (3) Designed for MBA
candidates. Prereq: GEB 5756. Purpose of course is to in-
troduce the student to the general class of problems as-
sociated with managing production facilities.
MAN 6156-Organizational Behavior I (3) Designed for
MBA candidates. Relationship between the individual ad-
ministrator and supervisors, the employees supervised, and
associates at a comparable level in the organization.
MAN 6721-Business Policy (4) Designed for MBA candi-
dates and taken last quarter before graduation. Prereq: all
MBA required courses. Integrating and applying the various
functional and support areas of business administration; the
course approaches business policy making and adminis-
tration from the perspective of general manager.
MAR 6716-Problems and Methods of Marketing Manage-
ment (3) Designed for MBA candidates, Prereq: ACC 5011,
GEB 5756. Concepts and techniques for resolving marketing
management problems with students gaining experience in
making application.
STA 6358-Statistical Analysis for Managerial Decisions (3)
Designed for MBA candidates. Prereq: CAP 5009, GEB 5756,
MAN 5505. Data analysis techniques which have broad ap-
plication to managerial problems. Emphasis is placed upon
difficulties which can arise in the application of the tech-
niques and in the interpretation of results. Includes experi-
ence in the use of computerized procedures and may re-
quire a substantial amount of case analysis.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: J. C. Biery. Graduate Coordinator: F. P.
May. Professors: J. C. Biery; S. S. Block; R. W. Fahien; R.
J. Gordon; F. P. May; J. P. O'Connell; D. O. Shah; M.
Smutz; M. Tyner; R. D. Walker, Jr. Associate Pro-
fessors: L. E. Johns, Jr.; D. W. Kirmse. Assistant Pro-
fessors: H. H. Lee; G. B. Hoflund.
Graduate work for the Ph.D., M.E., and M.S. de-
grees in chemical engineering emphasizes these
areas: (1) chemical engineering science-transport
phenomena, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics,
kinetics, statistical mechanics, microstructure of mat-
ter, and materials science; (2) chemical engineering
systems-chemical reaction engineering, process con-
trol, process dynamics, optimization, separations pro-
cesses; and (3) interdisciplinary chemical engineering
-energy conversion and fuel cells, polymer science,
microelectronics, process economics, biofluid me-
chanics, and bioengineering.
Beyond the Graduate School requirements, admis-
sion to graduate work in chemical engineering de-
pends upon the qualifications of the student, whose
record and recommendations are carefully and indi-
vidually studied. During registration week each grad-
uate student registering for the first time is counseled
to develop an initial study program. The results of a
brief examination covering the field of chemical engi-
neering are also utilized by the graduate committee to
guide the student. As a consequence, a program may
include some undergraduate courses, if needed, to
prepare for graduate course work.
The program of all students will involve research
experience through the courses ECH 6905, 6971, or
7980. All new graduate students are expected to be-
come proficient in computer programming during
their first semester on campus.







CHEMICAL ENGINEERING / 59


CHM 5272-The Organic Chemistry of Polymers (2) Classifi-
cation of polymerization types and mechanisms from a
mechanistic, organic point of view. Structure of synthetic
and natural polymers and polyelectrolytes. Reactions of
polymers. Practical synthetic methods of polymer prepara-
tion.
CHM 5511-The Phypics and Physical Chemistry of Polymers
(2)
ECH 5344L-Process Systems Laboratory (2) Prereq: ECH
4323. Measuring instruments, analog data manipulation and
signal transmission in chemical process systems.
ECH 5708-Disinfection, Sterilization, and Preservation (2)
Description of problems and need for these treatments;
causative agents and their nature; nature and use of chemi-
cal and physical antimicrobial agents; specific problems and
solutions.
ECH 6126-Thermodynamics of Reaction and Phase
Equilibria (3) Methods for treating chemical and phase
equilibria in multicomponent systems through the applica-
tion of thermodynamics and molecular theory.
ECH 6146-Applied Statistical Mechanics (2) Methods of
wave mechanics and statistical mechanics in engineering
problems.
ECH 6147-Statistical Thermodynamics (2) Use of statistical
mechanics to describe, predict, and correlate
thermodynamic properties of compounds and mixtures.
ECH 6159-Advanced Seminar in Thermodynamics (2; max:
8) Prereq: consent of instructor. Research and current liter-
ature.
ECH 6206-Turbulent Transport Phenomena (2) Prereq: ECH
6285. Statistical theory of turbulence; correlation coeffi-
cients, energy spectra, isotropy and homogeneity, eddy dif-
fusivity, and viscosity tensors. Boundary layer theory.
ECH 6207-Rheology (2) Analysis and characterization of
theological systems.
ECH 6208-Non-Newtonian Fluid Dynamics (2) Constitutive
equations for non-Newtonian fluids (including viscoelastic
substances) such as polymers, plastics, paints, and slurries.
ECH 6226-Heat Transfer Operations (2) Process design of
equipment for heat transfer operations based on per-
formance and economic optima.
ECH 6261-Introduction to Transport Phenomena (3) Pre-
req: MAC 3202. Basic equations of change for heat, mass,
and momentum. Applications of conservation and flux
equations for laminar and turbulent flow. Transfer coeffi-
cients, macroscopic balances.
ECH 6263-Advanced Transport Phenomena (2-3) Prereq:
ECH 6261. Multicomponent equations of change, coupling
of fluxes, angular momentum equation, differential macro-
scopic balances, population balances, transport in porous
media, electrochemical systems, interfaces and the atmo-
sphere, statistical theory of turbulence.
ECH 6269-Advanced Seminar in Transport Phenomena (2;
max: 8) Prereq: ECH 6285. Research and current literature.
ECH 6285-Transport Phenomena (1-3) Prereq: ECH 6261.
Continuation of ECH 6261.
ECH 6286--nterfacial Transport Phenomena (2) Prereq: ECH
6285. Transport of heat, mass and momentum at interfaces.
Heat and mass transfer coefficients, drag coefficient, and
friction factor. Boundary layer theory.
ECH 6296-Transport Properties and Irreversible Thermody-
namics (2) Prereq: ECH 6726. Molecular models and
statistical mechanical methods useful in the prediction and
correlation of viscosity, diffusivity, and thermal conductivity
,of fluids. Boltzmann equation, radial distribution function,
cell models, absolute rate theory, corresponding states prin-
ciple.
ECH 6306-Process Dynamics I (2) Dynamics and control of
chemical processing systems, with emphasis on the dynam-
ics of the unit operations and chemical reactions. Analog
simulation of chemical processing systems.
ECH 6307-Process Dynamics II.(2)
ECH 6326-Computer Control of Processes (2) Prereq: ECH
6627. Application of computers to control of chemical pro-
cess, including the practical work involved in planning, or-
ganizing, managing, and executing a computer control
project.
ECH 6328-Advanced Seminar in Process Control (2; max: 8)
Prereq: ECH 6306, 6307. Research and current problems.



ECH 6406-Mass Transfer Operations (2) Process design of
equipment for mass transfer operations based on per-
formance and economic optima.
ECH 6413-Stagewise Separations Processes (2) Theory,
design, and evaluation of separation processes such as dis-
tillation columns, extractors, and absorbers. Multicompo-
nent-multistage distributions using rigorous digital com-
puter computational methods. Real-time modeling for pro-
cess automation.
ECH 6428-Advances in Separations Processes (2) Prereq:
ECH 6413. Separations processes such as thermal diffusion,
molecular distillation, fractional crystallization, absorption
fractionation, and zone refining.
ECH 6506-Chemical Engineering Kinetics (3) Fundamental
aspects of chemical reactors, including collision theory, tran-
sition rate theory, unimolecular rate theory, homogeneous
gas and liquid phase kinetics, and heterogeneous kinetics.
ECH 6526-Reactor Design and Optimization (3) Funda-
mentals of heterogeneous reactor design including the char-
acterization of catalytic reactions and support, the develop-
ment of global rate of the intrinsic reaction affected by
chemical and physical deactivation of catalyst, intra- and in-
terphase mass and heat transfer, and the design and op-
timization of various types of heterogeneous reactors.
ECH 6606-Process Economy Analysis (2) Economics in de-
sign and operation of chemical engineering equipment.
Analysis for decision under conditions of certainty and un-
certainty with applications of queuing, Monte Carlo, Markov
Processes, and geometric and dynamic programming.
ECH 6626-Optimization Techniques (2) Prereq: ECH 4842
or 6845. Introduction to optimization techniques used in
chemical process operations, process control,,and systems
engineering.
ECH 6627-Process Systems Optimization (2) Optimization
of chemical processes and systems, with particular emphasis
on dynamic programming and the maximum principle.
ECH 6646-Process Equipment Design (2) Unit operations,
with emphasis on design of equipment to'perform the serv-
ice required, considering capacity, materials, equipment,
and economics.
ECH 6647-Process and Plant Design (2) Techniques in the
design of various complex chemical processes and plants.
ECH 6666-Design Techniques for Process Systems (2)
Computer-aided process simulation and design. Decom-
position techniques for system synthesis, analysis, and op-
timization.
ECH 6688-Advances in Process Systems Engineering (2)
Prereq: ECH 6666.
ECH 6706-Chemical Energy Conversion (2) Prereq: ECH
4264 or 6261. Principles of thermodynamics and transport
phenomena applied to the analysis and design of chemical
energy conversion devices.
ECH 6707-Process Engineering (2) Application of chemical
engineering operations and processing to industrial opera-
tions, such as petroleum refinery, manufacture of phos-
phates and fertilizers, and paper pulp processing.
ECH 6726-Interfacial Phenomena 1(2) Prereq: CHM 2043C,
PHY 2052. Air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces; surface-ac-
tive molecules, adsorption at interfaces, foams, micro and
macroemulsions, retardation of evaporation and damping of
waves by films, surface chemistry of biological systems.
ECH 6727-Interfacial Phenomena 11(2) Prereq: CHM 2043C,
PHY 2052. Solid-gas, solid-liquid, solid-solid interfaces.
Adsorption of gases and surface-active molecules on metal
surfaces, contact angle and spreading of liquids, wetting and
dewetting, lubrication, biolubrication, flotation, adhesion,
biological applications of surfaces.
ECH 6747-Biochemical Engineering (2) Physical and chemi-
cal peculiarities of living organisms and their products. Ma-
terial and energy transfer in living systems, unit operations in
biological processes, and industrial biochemical engineering
processes.
ECH 6766-Particulate Systems (2) Dynamics of fluid-solid,
flid-fluid, and biological systems; generalized population
balances, macroscopic particle balance, kinetics of particle
growth, birth and death functions, particle size determina-
tion. Crystallization, filtration, aerosols, entrainment, free
molecule flow, and fluidized reactors.







60 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ECH 6826-Engineering Properties of Organic Materials (2)
Theoretical studies in molecular science. Correlation of com-
position, microstructure,. and morphology of organic materi-
als with macroscopic engineering properties.
ECH 6827-Macromolecular Materials (2) Formation, struc-
ture, and physical and chemical properties of macro-
molecules. Polymerization and processing methods. Com-
mercial techniques in forming. Applications.
ECH 6844-Chemical Engineering Calculations (2) Calcu-
lation techniques used in advanced engineering problems.
ECH 6845-Models and Methods (3) Prereq: ECH 6844.
Mathematical modeling and application to engineering
problems of differential-equations, operational calculus,
computation techniques, complex variables, integral equa-
tions, and matrix methods.
ECH 6846-Multidimensional and Discrete Systems (2) Ap-
plications of the mathematics of multidimensional and dis-
crete systems to engineering problems. Matrix methods. Cal-
culus of finite differences. Linear programming.
ECH 6847-Applied Field Theory (2) Field equations of heat,
mass, and momentum transport, and electromagnetic theory
in orthogonal and nonorthogonal Euclidean and non Eucli-
dean geometries. Covariant and convective differentiation
of tensors. Surface geometries. Applications of Laplace,
Hemholtz, diffusion, and wave equations.
ECH 6848-Applied Statistics and Probabilistic Systems (2)
Prereq: ECH 6845. Applications of random variables and
-probability distributions; stochastic models, Monte Carlo
techniques; statistical inference, sampling distributions, tests
of significance, and. experimental design.
ECH 6849-Advances in Numerical and Analytical Computa-
tion (2) Prereq: ECH 6845, 6846. Numerical and analytical
techniques such as iterative matrix methods, hybrid com-
putation, direct vector methods, functional analysis, and
adaptive models.
ECH 6905-Individual Work (1-6; max: 12) Individual engi-
neering projects suitable for a nonthesis Master of Engineer-
ing degree.
ECH 6910-Supervised Research (1-5; max: 10)
ECH 6926-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 10)
ECH 6936-Advanced Seminar in Chemical Engineering (1-2;
max: 8) Research and current literature.
ECH 6937-Special Topics in Chemical Engineering I (1-4;
max: 9) Separations processes, reactor design, applied
molecular and kinetic theory, thermodynamics, particulate
systems. Properties of chemical substances, transport phe-
nomena, non-Newtonian fluid dynamics, turbulence, ap-
plied mathematics, computer science, biochemical and elec-
trochemical engineering.
ECH 6939-Special Topics in Chemical Engineering III (1-4;
max: 9)
ECH 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ECH 6969-Independent Proposal Preparation for Ph.D.
Qualifying (1-2; max: 4)
ECH 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ECH 7938-Advanced Special Chemical Engineering Topics
for Doctoral Candidates (1-4; max: 8)
ECH 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)


CHEMISTRY
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: N. Y. Ohrn. Graduate Coordinator: W. S.
Brey, Jr. Graduate Research Professors: H. A. Laitinen;
P. O. L6wdin; J. D. Winefordner. Distinguished Serv-
ice Professor: H. H. Sisler. Professors: R. G. Bates; M. A.
Battiste; T. Bieber;* W. S. Brey, Jr.; H. C. Brown; G. B.
Butler; J. A. Deyrup; W. R. Dolbier, Jr.; R. D. Dresdner;
R. J. Hanrahan; J. F. Helling; T. E. Hogen Esch; W. M.
Jones; D. A. Micha; M, L. Muga; E. E. Muschlitz, Jr.; N.
Y. Ohrn; G. A. Palenik; W. B. Person; J. R.
Perumareddi;* G. E. Ryschkewitsch; F. A. Schultz;* P.
Tarrant; M. T. Vala, Jr.; C. A. VanderWerf; W. Weltner,
Jr.; J. A. Zoltewicz. Associate Professors: S. O. Colgate;


J. R. Eyler; A. Lombardo;* G. H. Myers; C. E. Reid; G.
M. Schmid; P. A. Snyder;* R. C. Stoufer. Assistant Pro-
fessors; J. G. Dorsey; E. V. Dose; R. A. Yost.
*These members of the faculty of Florida Atlantic University are also
members of the graduate faculty of the University of Florida and par-
ticipate in the doctoral program in the University of Florida Depart-
ment of Chemistry.
The Department of Chemistry offers the Master of
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees with spe-
cialization in analytical, organic, inorganic, or physical
chemistry. The nonthesis degree Master of Science in
Teaching.is also offered with a major in chemistry.
New graduate students should have adequate un-
dergraduate training in inorganic, analytical, organic,
and physical chemistry. Normally this will include as a
minimum a year of general chemistry which may in-
clude qualitative analysis, one semester of quantita-
tive analysis, one year of organic chemistry, one year
of physical chemistry, and one semester of advanced
inorganic chemistry. Additional courses in instrumen-
tal analysis, advanced physical and organic chemistry
are desirable. Deficiencies in any of these areas may
be corrected during the first year of graduate study.
Such deficiencies are determined by a series of place-
ment tests given prior to registration, and the results
.of these tests are used in planning the student's pro-
gram.
The offerings CHM 5157, 5300, 6470, 6471, 6620,
6710, 6720, 6730, and CHS 5110 constitute a series of
core courses designed to provide graduate students
with a well-rounded background in the broad area of
chemistry. Doctoral candidates are required to com-
plete CHM 6470 plus three other core courses outside
the major area. Additional courses are taken upon,
recommendation of the student's supervisory com-
mittee or major professor, so that the total number of
credits in courses acceptable for graduate credit is at
least 28 hours. At least 16 semester hours 'of these
courses must be in 6000 level or higher courses in
chemistry.
Candidates must serve not less than one year as
teaching assistants. This requirement will be waived
only when, in the opinion of the department, unusual
circumstances justify such action.
A chemical-physics option is offered for students
who will be doing research in areas of physical chem-
istry which require a strong background in physics.
For this option, the requirement in chemistry is CHM
6470, plus two other core courses. In addition, a mini-
mum of 15 credits in 4000 level or higher physics
courses or a minimum of eight such credits in physics
and eight in 4000 level or higher mathematics courses
is required.
Candidates for the master's degree are required to
complete any two core courses. The Master of Science
degree in chemistry requires a thesis. The nonthesis
degree Master of Science in Teaching is offered with
a major in chemistry and requires a written paper of
substantial length (30-50 pages) on an approved topic
pertaining to some phase of chemistry, under the
course CHM 6905.
CHM 5157-Analytical Processes (3) Prereq: CHM 3120C and
CHM 4411. Fundamental principles of analytical chemistry,
with emphasis on the non-instrumental aspects of the sub-
ject: statistics, sampling, standards, equilibrium theory, acids
and bases, precipitation, complexation, electroanalysis, re-
dox phenomena, analytical kinetics, and separation pro-
cesses.
CHM 5224-Basic Principles for Graduate Organic Chemis-
try (2) Prereq: One year of undergraduate organic chemistry.
A review of the basic principles and concepts of organic
chemistry at the honors or advanced undergraduate level for







CHEMISTRY / 61


those students intending to enroll in the Advanced Organic
Sequence CHM 6225, 6226, 6227.
CHM 5235-Organic Spectroscopy (3) Prereq: CHM 3211.
Advanced study of characterization and structure proof of
organic compounds by spectral methods, including IR, UV,
NMR and mass spectrometry.
CHM 5272-The Organic Chemistry of Polymers (3) Prereq:
CHM 3210, 3200, or equivalent. Classification of polymeriza-
tion types and mechanisms from a mechanistic organic point
of view. The structure of synthetic and natural polymers and
polyelectrolytes. Reaction of polymers. Practical synthetic
methods of polymer preparation.
CHM 5300-Chemistry of Biological Molecules (3) Prereq:
CHM 3211 or 3216 and 4412 or 3401 or consent of instructor.
Mechanistic organic biochemistry. Emphasis on model sys-
tems, enzyme active sites, and physical and organic chemis-
try of biomacromolecules.
CHM 5413L-Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
Prereq: CHM 4412L. Laboratory techniques used in ex-
perimental research; techniques of design and fabrication of
scientific apparatus. Advanced experiments involving op-
tical, electronic, and high vacuum equipment.
CHM 5511-The Physics and Physical Chemistry of Polymers
(3) Prereq: CHM 4411 or equivalent. Structure, configura-
tion, confirmation, and thermodynamics of polymer solu-
tions, gels, and solids. Thermal, mechanical, optical, and
theological properties of plastics and rubbers.
CHM 5511L-Polymer Chemistry Laboratory (1) Prereq or
coreq: CHM 5511. Laboratory experiments designed to ac-
company CHM 5511.
CHM 5514-Chemical Computations (2) Prereq: CHM 4412
and knowledge of FORTRAN programming. Solution of dif-
ficult chemical problems in equilibrium, kinetics, and spec-
troscopy. Applications of computers to chemical research-
control of experimental procedures and data reduction.
CHM 5626-Modern Inorganic Chemistry (3) Prereq: CHM
3610 and CHM 4410. Topics of current interest in inorganic
chemistry, e.g., coordination chemistry, organometallic
chemistry, inorganic polymers, nonclassical polyhedral com-
pounds.
CHM 5631L-Inorganic Synthesis (2) Prereq: CHM 3610. Syn-
thesis and characterization of inorganic compounds.
CHM 6140-Advanced Research Techniques in Chemistry
(2-3; max: 8) A special topics course in advanced techniques
employed in chemical research.
CHM 6153-Electrochemical Processes (2) Principles of elec-
trochemical methods, ionic solutions, and electrochemical
kinetics.
CHM 6153L-Electrochemical Methods Laboratory (1)
Coreq: CHM 6753. Laboratory experiments designed to ac-
company CHM 6153.
CHM 6154-Chemical Separations (2) Theory and Practice of
modern separation methods with emphasis on gas and liq-
uid chromatographic techniques.
CHM 6154L-Chemical Separation Methods Laboratory (1)
Coreq: CHM 6154. Laboratory experiments designed to ac-
company CHM 6154.
CHM 6155-Spectrochemical Methods (2) Principles of
atomic and molecular spectrometric methods; discussion of
instrumentation, methodology, applications.
CHM 6155L-Spectrochemical Methods Laboratory (1)
Coreq: CHM 6155. Laboratory experiments designed to ac-
company CHM 6155.
CHM 6158C--Electronics and Instrumentation (1-3; max: 6)
Principles of operation of instruments, optimization of in-
strumental conditions, and interpretation of instrumental
data for qualitative and quantitative analysis.
CHM 6180-Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (1-3;
max: 9) Prereq: Two courses of graduate level analytical
chemistry. Lectures or conferences covering selected topics
of current interest in analytical chemistry.
CHM 6190-Analytical Chemistry Seminar (1) Attendance
required of graduate majors in the analytical area. Prereq:
graduate course in analytical chemistry. Presentation of one
seminar. May be repeated for credit. S/U option.
CHM 6225-Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) Prereq: CHM
3211, 5235. Advanced organic chemistry intended to present
a useful interpretation of descriptive fact and unifying theo-
ry.


CHM 6226-Advanced Organic Chemistry (2)
CHM 6227--Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) Prereq: CHM
6226. Synthesis of complex organic molecules, with em-
phasis on recent developments in approaches and methods.
CHM 6251-Organometallic Compounds (3) Properties of
organometallic compounds, the nature of the carbon-metal
bond, compounds of metals in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, and
transition metals.
CHM 6260-Physical-Organic Chemistry (2) Theory and ap-
plication of physical methods in the study of the behavior of
organic compounds.
CHM 6270-The Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds (2)
Prereq: CHM 6225, 6226, 6227.
CHM 6271-Chemistry of High Polymers (2) Fundamental
approach to the chemistry of high polymers, with emphasis
on the mechanisms of polymerization reactions and the rela-
tionship of physical properties to chemical constitution.
CHM 6271L-High Polymer Chemistry Laboratory (1) Prereq
or coreq: CHM 6271. Two three-hour laboratories per week
or their equivalent. Preparation of representative members
of the high polymer family and determination of their physi-
cal properties, methods of polymerization, and determina-
tion of fundamental polymer properties.
CHM 6381-Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3; max:
9) Prereq: CHM 6225, 6226. Chemistry of selected types of or-
ganic compounds, such as alkaloids, carbohydrates, natural
products, steroids.
CHM 6390-Organic Chemistry Seminar (1) Attendance re-
quired of graduate majors in the organic area. Presentation
of one seminar. May be repeated for credit. S/U.
CHM 6430-Chemical Thermodynamics (3) Energetics, prop-
erties of ideal and nonideal systems primarily from the
standpoint of classical thermodynamics.
CHM 6440-Advanced Chemical Kinetics (3) Prereq: CHM
6720 or equivalent. Rates and mechanisms of chemical reac-
tion.
CHM 6449-Photochemistry (2) Prereq: CHM 6440 or 6720.
Experimental and theoretical aspects of chemical reactions
induced by visible and ultraviolet radiation. Fluorescence
and chemiluminescence.
CHM 6461-Statistical Thermodynamics (3) Prereq: CHM
6430. Fundamental principles of statistical thermodynamics
with applications to systemsof'chemical interest.
CHM 6470-Chemical Bonding and Spectra I (3) Basic meth-
ods and applications of quantum chemistry; atomic struc-
ture; chemical bonding in diatomic and polyatomic
molecules. Brief introduction to molecular spectroscopy.
CHM 6471--Chemical Bonding and Spectra II (2) Prereq:
CHM 6470. Theory of symmetry and its Chemical applica-
tions; semiempirical molecular orbital treatment of simple
inorganic and organic molecules; further applications to in-
organic and organic chemistry.
CHM 6480-Elements of Quantum Chemistry (3) Prereq:
CHM 6471. Brief treatment of the Schrodinger equation, fol-
lowed by a survey of applications to chemical problems.
CHM 6481-Quantum Theory of Matter I (3) Prereq: CHM
6470 or PHY 5624. Quantum mechanics of atoms; Hartree-
Fock theory; interaction of radiation and matter; relativistic
theory.
CHM 6482--uantum Theory of Matter II (3) Prereq: CHM
6481. Diatomic and polyatomic molecules; symmetry proper-
ties and group theory.
CHM 6490-Theory of Molecular Spectroscopy (3) Coreq:
CHM 6471. Molecular energy levels, spectroscopic selection
rules; rotational, vibrational, electronic and magnetic reso-
nance spectra of diatomic and polyatomic molecules.
CHM 6510-Physical Chemistry of Surfaces and Colloids (3)
Liquid-gas and solid-gas interface; adsorption and heter-
ogeneous catalysis; properties. of colloidal and macro-
molecular systems.
CHM 6512-The Physical Chemistry of Polymers (2) Prereq:
CHM 3211, 4410, 4411, and calculus through differential
equations. Configuration of polymer chains; solution prop-
erties of polymers and polyelectrolytes; solid state properties
of polymers.
CHM 6515-Radiation Chemistry (2) Prereq: CHM 6440 or
6720. Chemical and physical effects caused by ionizing radi-
ations. Kinetics and mechanism of radiation-induced reac-
tions.







62 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


CHM 6520-Chemical Physics (3) Interatomic and in-
termolecular forces. Energy transfer and reaction in
molecular collision processes. Computational aspects of
scattering theory.
CHM 6580-Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1-3; max:
12) Lectures or conferences covering selected topics of cur-
rent interest in physical chemistry.
CHM 6590-Physical Chemistry Seminar (1) Attendance re-
quired of graduate majors in physical chemistry. Prereq:
graduate course in physical chemistry. Presentation of one
seminar. S/U option.
CHM 6620-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) The
crystalline state, acid-base, nonaqueous solvent, inorganic
mechanisms.
CHM 6622C-4norganic Preparations (4) Lectures and labo-
ratory experiments showing the reactions and techniques
used in the synthesis of inorganic compounds.
CHM 6623-Chemistry of the Metals (3) Prereq: CHM 6471,
6730. Relation of properties to atomic, molecular, and crystal
structures.
CHM 6624-Chemistry of the Nonmetals (3) Prereq: CHM
6730. Relations of properties to atomic, molecular and crystal
structures.
CHM 6680-Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1-3; max:
12) Lectures or conferences on selected topics of current re-
search interest in inorganic chemistry.
CHM 6690-Inorganic Chemistry Seminar (1) Attendance re-
quired of graduate majors in inorganic chemistry. Prereq:
graduate course in inorganic chemistry. Presentation of one
seminar. May be repeated for credit. S/U option.
CHM 6710-Applied Molecular Spectroscopy (3) Applica-
tions and comparison of methods in analysis and molecular
structure determination.
CHM 672-Chemical Dynamics (3) Basic concepts of rate
laws, collision theory, and transition state theory; an in-
troduction to reaction dynamics, structural dynamics, and
quantitative structure-reactivity correlations.
CHM 6730-Chemical Transformations (3) Important types
of chemical reactions and their application to organic and
inorganic synthesis.
CHM 6905--ndividual Problems, Advanced (3-5; max: 10)
Prereq: consent of faculty member supervising the work.
Double registration permitted. Assigned reading program or
development of assigned experimental problem. S/U Op-
tion.
CHM 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
CHM 6935-Chemistry Colloquium (1; max: 7) Topics pres-
ented by visiting scientists and local staff members. S/U.
CHM 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
CHM 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
CHM 7485-Special Topics in Theory of Atomic and
Molecular Structure (1-3; max: 9) Prereq: CHM 6482 or PHS
6226, or equivalent. Mathematical techniques used in atom-
ic, molecular, and solid-state theory. The one-electron ap-
proximation and the general quantum-mechanical many-
body problem. Selected advanced topics.
CHM 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
CHS 5110-Radiochemistry (2) Prereq: CHM 3401 or CHM
4412 or consent of instructor. Properties of radioactive nu-
clei, nature of radioactivity, nuclear structure, nuclear reac-
tions, interaction of radiation with matter, chemical aspects
of radioactivity, and applications of nucleonics to chemistry.
CHS 5110L-Radiochemistry Laboratory (1) Prereq: CHM
3120C and 3401 or 4412, or consent of instructor. Radio-
activity detection, radiochemical separations and analyses,
radiochemistry laboratory techniques, the practice of radio-
logical safety, and tracer applications of radioisotopes in
chemistry and other fields.
CHS 6120-Nuclear Chemistry (3) Prereq: CHS 5110. Radio-
activity, nuclear structure, decay processes, nuclear reac-
tions.

CIVIL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman & Graduate Coordinator: J. H. Schaub. Pro-
fessors: B. A. Benedict; H. K. Brooks; B. A. Christensen;


D. U. Deere; B. E. Ruth; J. H. Schaub; J. H.
Schmertmann; M. W. Self; B. D. Spangler; J. A. Wat-
tleworth. Associate Professors: C. A. Collier; K. G.
Courage; J. L. Davidson; J. L. Eades; C. O. Hays; G.
Long; J. D. Rumble; W. H. Zimpfer. Assistant Pro-
fessor: J. M. Lybas.
The following graduate degrees are offered to pre-
pare qualified students for the professional practice
of civil engineering: Master of Engineering, Master of
Science, Engineer, and Doctor of Philosophy. All de-
gree programs include areas of concentration in the
specialties of construction, geotechnical engineering,
hydraulics, structures, and transportation engineer-
ing. All degrees except the Ph.D. are available in a
thesis or nonthesis program.
Resident graduate students are required to register
for a minimum of two credits at one credit per
semester for ECI 6936. This credit is not applicable to
the requirement for any degree. Nonthesis degree
students must successfully complete a report of sub-
stantial engineering content for a minimum of two
hours credit in ECI 6974. Minor or supporting work is
encouraged from a variety of related or allied fields of
study.
CES 5305-Design of Structural Systems (2). Prereq: CES
4705, 4607. Fundamental characteristics of structural systems.
Economic and architectural considerations. Building frames
and connections. Plate girders. Special structures.
CES 5325-Design of Highway Bridges (3) Prereq: CES 4607,
5726. Analysis by influence lines, slab and girder bridges,
composite design, prestressed concrete, continuity, arch
bridges, design details, highway specifications.
CES 5607-Behavior of Steel Structures (3) Prereq: CES 4607.
Plastic analysis and design of beams and frames. Buckling
and stability problems. Connections.
CES 5726-Design of Concrete Systems (3) Prereq: CES 4705.
Strength design of members and frames, torsion, two-way
slabs, design of building systems, prestressed concrete.
CES 5801--Design and Construction in Timber (2) Prereq:
consent of instructor. Analysis and design in timber. Beams,
columns and connections. Timber structure. Plywood
beams, panels, diaphragms. Laminated beams and frames,
Formwork.
CES 6106-Advanced Structural Analysis II (4) Prereq: ECM
3400, CES 6708. Continuation of CES 6108. Finite element
method. Numerical methods, topics in structural dynamics,
code provisions for seismic and wind loading.
CES 6108-Advanced Structural Analysis I (4) Prereq: CES
4607, 4705. Traditional methods of analyses for forces and
deformations; modern matrix methods including direct stiff-
ness method.
CES 6136-Advanced Structural Laboratory (2) Prereq: CES
4607, 4705. Model studies and analysis. Mechanics of simili-
tude and dimensional analysis applied to static and dynamic
structural problems. Research topics.
CES 6526-Nonlinear Structural Analysis and Design (2) Pre-
req: CES 6108. Sources of nonlinearity. Tangent stiffness
method. Beam-columns on elastic foundations. Discrete
methods for soil-structure interaction.
CES 6551-Design of Folded Plates and Shells (3) Prereq:
CES 4607, 4705. Analysis for membrane stresses; pressure
vessels, secondary bending stresses. Design of shell systems
and folded plates. Design details.
CES 6706-Advanced Reinforced Concrete (3) Prereq: CES
4704, 5726. Torsion in structural members. Ultimate load the-
ories and application to design. Yield-line theory for slabs.
Shear walls, combined shear walls and frames. Research top-
ics.
CES 6716-Advanced Prestressed Concrete (2) Prereq: CES
4704, 5726. Continuity in prestressed concrete; design of
connections, post-tensioning applications, segmental con-
struction. Circular prestressing. Research topics.
ECI 5124-Civil Engineering Systems (3) Civil engineering
applications of operations research techniques, models of
scheduling, linear programming, queueing theory, and sim-
ulation.







CIVIL ENGINEERING / 63


ECI 5125-Construction Equipment.and Procedures (2) Pre-
req: ECI 4145 or consent of instructor. Design and optimiza-
tion of equipment systems for heavy construction.
ECI 5147-Construction Planning and Scheduling (2) Prereq:
ECI 4145. Planning, scheduling, organizing and control of
civil engineering projects with CPM and PERT. Application
of optimization techniques.
ECI 5156-Value Engineering Theory (3) Value engineering
concepts, function analysis system techniques (FAST), dia-
gramming, creativity, matrix evaluation, design-to-cost, life
cycle costing, human relations and strategies for organizing,
performing' and implementing value engineering work.
ECI 5157-Civil Engineering Feasibility Analysis (3) Prereq:
ECI 4137 or equivalent studies in time-value of money. Theo-
ry and practice of feasibility studies for proposed civil engi-
neering projects and other related areas of interest.
ECI 5166-Legal Aspects of Civil Engineering (3) Engineer's
view of contracts for design and construction. Legislation
and policy affecting labor-management relationships in con-
struction.
ECI 5186-Public Works Planning (3) Functional approach to
planning and implementing public works for urban areas.
Examines public works needs of residential, commercial, in-
dustrial and other land uses.
ECI 5235-Open Channel Hydraulics (3) Prereq: ECI 4274 or
consent of instructor. Classification of flow. Normal depth.
Specific energy and critical depth. Gradually varied flow.
Transitions.
ECI 5265-Hydraulics Machinery (2) Prereq: ECI 4214 or con-
sent of instructor. Selection and operation of hydraulic mo-
tors, pumps and transmissions. Specific speed. Cavitation.
Surge tanks.
ECI 5325-Foundation Design (3) Prereq: CES 4705, ECI 4305
or consent of instructor. Investigations, bearing capacity,
and the analysis and design of shallow footings, walls, and
deep piled foundations.
ECI 5335--nsitu Measurement of Soil Properties (3) Prereq:
ECI 4305, 4314 or consent of instructor. Methods of soil ex-
ploration; techniques of soil sampling and insitu testing. Em-
phasis on field work and demonstrations.
ECI 5355-Earth and Rockfill Dams (2) Prereq: ECI 4305. De-
sign requirements, construction techniques, compaction
control, soil testing and sampling, foundation preparation,
and field instrumentation.
ECI 5437-Experimental Determination of Soil Properties I
(3) Prereq: ECI 4305. Advanced laboratory determination of
engineering properties of soils; hydrometer analysis, con-
trolled rate of strain consolidation, soil suction, per-
meability, and triaxial testing.
ECI 5575-Remote Sensing Methods and Engineering Appli-
cations (3) Prereq: TTE 4104. Introduction into.remote sen-
sing and imaging systems including photographic and digital
processing methods for image analysis. Emphasis on use of
LANDSAT imagery and aerial photography for engineering
applications.
ECI 5625-Groundwater Flow I (3) Prereq: ECI 4214 or con-
seht of instructor. Porous media flow. Darcy's law. Conserva-
tion of mass. LaPlace equation. Flownets. Well hydraulics.
ECI 6045-Computer Applications in Geotechnical Engi-
neering (2) Prereq: ECI 4041, 6316 or consent of instructor.
Application of computer solutions to geotechnical engineer-
ing problems.
ECI 6153-Civil Engineering Practice (2-4; max: 4) Prereq:
graduate status. Problems and case histories of civil engi-
neering projects including social, legal, environmental, and
technical aspects.
ECI 6154-Civil Engineering Operations (2-4; max: 4) Prereq:
graduate status. Applications of quantitative methods of de-
cision, making to major civil engineering problem areas.
ECI 6223-Numerical Models in Hydraulics (3) Prereq: ECI
4214 or consent of instructor. Application of numerical
methods to hydraulic engineering' problems; dispersion,
porous media flow, river and estuarine mechanics, thermal
diffusion.
ECI 6227-Diffusive and Dispersive Transport (2) Prereq: ECI
4214 or consent of instructor. Introduction to diffusive and
dispersive transport processes in flowing water. Fick's law.
ECI 6228-Hydraulic Laboratory and Field Practice (3) Pre-
req: ECI 4214 or consent of instructor. Hydraulic model laws


and their use in undistorted and distorted models with mov-
able or fixed beds. Instrumentation. Data acquisition system.
ECI 6233-Sediment Transport II (2) Prereq: ECI 6237 or con-
sent of instructor. Review of fundamental laws of scour in-
itiation and sediment transport. River morphology. Movable
bed hydraulic models.
ECI 6234-Hydraulics of Stratified Flow (2) Prereq: ECI 5235
or consent of instructor. Uniform and nonuniform flow in
multilayered systems. Oscillatory motion and interfacial mix-
ing.
ECI 6237-Sediment Transport I (2) Prereq: ECI 5235 or con-
sent of instructor. Sediment properties. Scour initiation. In-
fluence of slope. Stable channels. Bed forms. Transport as
bed load and suspended transport.
ECI 6238-Transient Flow in Channels and Pipes (3) Prereq:
ECI 5235 or consent of instructor. Water hammers in singular
pipes and systems. Governing differential equations. Nu-
merical methods. Unsteady open channel flow equations.
ECI 6316-Advanced Soil Mechanics (3) Prereq: ECI 4305,
4314, or consent of instructor. Nature and origin of soil.
Stresses within a soil body. Stress-strain behavior and shear
strength of dry, saturated no flow, and saturated transient
flow soils.
ECI 6317-Theoretical Soil Mechanics (2) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Nature of soil-water systems; analysis of stress,
strains, equations of states; theological behavior of soils; fail-
ure in soil media.
ECI 6346-Soil Dynamics (2) Dynamic principles; lumped
systems; elastic half-space theory; soil behavior under dy-
namic loading; foundation design problems, earthquakes.
ECI 6416-Properties, Design and Control of Concrete (3)
Prereq: ECI 3403. Portland cement and aggregate properties
relating to design, control, and performance of concrete.
Concrete forming and construction methods. Laboratory
testing and analysis.
ECI 6426-Bituminous Materials (3) Prereq: TTE 4104. Analy-
sis of strength and deformation mechanism for asphalt con-
crete, properties, and their effect on flexible pavement per-
formance. Pavement construction and quality assurance
methods, testing and evaluation of asphalts and mixture.
ECI 6436-Experimental Determination of Soil Properties II
(3) Prereq: ECI 5437 or consent of instructor. Factors influen-
cing stress-deformation response, elastic-plastic constitutive
relationships, failure criteria, centrifugal modeling, stress
path effects.
ECI 6576-Air Photo Interpretation: Terrain Analysis (3) Pre-
req: ECI 4314 or consent of instructor. Interpretive tech-
niques used to identify landforms, soils, rocks, and potential
engineering problems from aerial photography. Analysis for
site selection and planning of soil exploration programs.
ECI 6605Rock Mechanics and Engineering Geology (2)
Prereq: ECI 4305. Behavior of rock subjected to stress. Appli-
cation of rock mechanics and geology to the Ilanning, de-
sign and construction of engineering structures.
ECI 6610-Groundwater Problems in Geotechnical Engi-
neering (2) Prereq: ECI 4305, 4314 or consent of instructor.
Darcy's law, coefficient of permeability, flow nets; seepage
forces. Engineering applications-dewatering systems, slope
stability, filter design, earth dams, drainage.
ECI 6616-Groundwater Flow II (2) Prereq: ECI 5625 or con-
sent of instructor. Continuation of ECI 5625. Two and three-
dimensional groundwater flow cases. Transient flow. Solute
transport in porous media. Saltwater intrusion.
ECI 6645-Advanced Geotechnical Engineering I (4) Prereq:
ECI 6316 or consent of instructor. Application of soil me-
chanics to the design and analysis of settlement and slope
stability problems.
ECI 6646-Advanced Geotechnical Engineering II (4) Prereq:
ECI 6316 or consent of instructor. Application of soil me-
chanics to the design and analysis of bearing capacity and
earth pressure problems.
ECI 6905-Special Problems in Civil Engineering (1-6; max:
10) Studies in areas not covered by other graduate courses.
ECI 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ECI 6936-Graduate Civil Engineering Seminar (1; max: 2)
ECI 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ECI 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ECI 6974-Master of Engineering or Engineer Degree Report
(1-6) Individual work culminating in a professional practice-







64 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


oriented report suitable for the requirements of the Master
of Engineering or Engineer.degree. Two credits only are ap-
plicable toward the requirements ofeach degree.
ECI 7980--Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
ENV 5625-Water Resources Engineering Design (3) Prereq:
ECI 4214 or consent of instructor. Design oriented courses
based on methods developed in ECI 4214. Introduction to
water resources systems and management.
TTE 5006-Transportation Systems Planning (4) Prereq:
graduate standing or consent of instructor. Analytical tech-
niques for estimating future travel demands, planning,
transportation facilities and locations. Review of transporta-
tion technology and future systems.
TTE 5105-Pavement Design (2) Prereq: TTE 4104 or consent
of instructor. Design of flexible and concrete pavements.
TTE 5256-Traffic Engineering (4) Prereq: TTE 4007 or equiva-
lent. Traffic studies, operations, flow, signals, signs and
markings; regulation of traffic, pedestrian and bicycle opera-
tion, parking lot operations, highway lighting.
TTE 5701-Geometric Design of Transportation Facilities (3)
Prereq: TTE 4104 or consent of instructor. Geometric design
criteria and controls of highways and intersections.
TTE 6106-Soil Stabilization (2) Prereq: graduate standing or
consent of instructor. Highway soil stabilization, methods of
stabilization and behavior of materials.
TTE 6107-Highway Safety Analysis (2) Statistics and charac-
teristics of accidents, accident reconstruction, accident
causation and reduction.
TTE 6257-Traffic Control Systems (4) Prereq: TTE,5256. Traf-
fic controller operation, compIter controlled signal systems,
modeling and optimization of traffic control systems, system
selection 'implementation and management.
TTE 6267-Traffic Flow Theory (3) Prereq: TTE 5256. Opera-
tional techniques used to optimize traffic flow including
control systems. Maintenance operations. Freeway opera-
tions and control. Intersection channelization.
TTE 6307-Freeway Design and Operations (3) Prereq: TTE
5256. Operation of freeway systems, effects of design, ad-
vanced analysis techniques, freeway optimization tech-
niques.
TTE 6516---Transportation Planning Decisions (2) Prereq: ECI
4137 or equivalent. Decisions on public investment analysis
methods, cost-benefit and delphi techniques, identification
and assessment of physical, social, and economic impacts of
transportation alternatives, costs of vehicle operations, acci-
dents, value of time, safety, other factors.
TTE 6526-Airport Planning and Operations (2) Prereq: TTE
6257. Location, configuration, air connections; ground, bag-
gage, and freight movements; passenger transfers; aircraft
delay analysis; airport access; parking needs; simulation of
operations; flight scheduling and control.
TTE 6606-Urban Transportation Models (4) Prereq: TTE
5006, ECI 4041 or consent of instructor. Calibration and ap-
plication of UTPS computer models for urban transportation
planning; land use and urban activity models for forecasting
and allocation. H.

CLASSICS
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: G. L. Schmeling. Professor: G. L. Schmeling.
Associate Professors: S. K. Dickison; K. V. Hartigan; D.
G. Miller; L. A. Sussman.
The department offers a program leading to the
Master of Arts with a major in Latin, which may be
combined with a minor in Greek, history, or philoso-
phy.
LAT 6840-History of the Latin Language (3)
LNW 5905-Special Study in Latin (3)
LNW 6902-Special Study in Latin Literature (3; max: 9) Sam-
ple topics: Horace, Juvenal, Roman comedy, Roman his-
torians.
LNW 6905-Individual Work (2-4; max: 10) Readings, con-.
ferences and reports. Subjects in language, literature, and
civilization for which there are no special course offerings.


LNW 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
LNW 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
LNW 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)



CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
College of Health Related Professions
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: N. W. Perry, Jr. Graduate Coordinator; H.
Davis. Professors: B. Barger; E. Cohen; L. D. Cohen; H.
Davis; J. R. Goldman; K. M. Heilman; M. Hollower
(Emeritus); F. D. McGlynn; W. L. Mealiea; B. G.
Melamed; M. E. Meyer; N. W. Perry, Jr.; A. S.
Schumacher (Emeritus). Associate Professors: C. D.
Belar; R. K. Blashfield; M. K. Goldstein; R. K.
Hornberger; J. H. Johnson; W. J. Rice; V. D. Van De
Riet. Assistant Professors; D. Bowers; E. B. Fennell; S.
B. Johnson; M. H. McCaulley; J. Tucker; R. E.
Vuchinich.
The Department of Clinical Psychology is a gradu-
ate program department in the College of Health Re-
lated Professions. The department's programs are its
predoctoral clinical psychology program leading to-
the Ph.D. degree in psychology; the Psychology
Clinic, a teaching and service unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center's Teaching Hospital and Clinics; a pre-
doctoral internship program, and postdoctoral studies,
and research. The master's degree is offered as part of
the doctoral program studies.
The clinical psychology program involves academic
ties with other colleges and departments within the
University and with the Veteran's Administration
training and service programs.
Courses offered by the faculty of the department
are listed below. Progress of the program is de-
termined by departmental policies which are consis-
tent with American Psychological Association accredi-
tation standards.
Admission to the department is through appropri-
ate application to the department's admissions com-
mittee. A bachelor's degree, along with one under-
graduate course in both experimental psychology and
statistics and courses in at least three of the following
areas: developmental, learning, perception, person-
ality, physiological and social, is generally adequate
preparation for graduate admission.
CLP 6375-Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3) Prereq:
admission to CLP program. Seminar on issues and concept
concurrent with field observation and participation.
CLP 6407-Psychological Treatment I (3) Prereq: admission
to CLP program or consent of instructor. Current dynamic
and personality theories, practices, and related research in
psychotherapy.
CLP 6417--Psychological Treatment II (4) Prereq: admission
to CLP program or consent of instructor. Current behavorial
theories, practices, and related research.
CLP 6437-Behavioral Assessment (3) Prereq: admission to
CLP program or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and
basic procedures including observational and interview
techniques.
CLP 6441-Intellectual Assessment (3) Prereq: admission to
CLP program or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and
basic procedures in assessing intellectual functions.
CLP 6448-Personality Assessment (3) Prereq: admission to
CLP program or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and
basic procedures including objective and projective tech-
niques.
CLP 6449-Life History Research in Psychopathology (3)
Prereq: CLP 6497 or consent of instructor. Recent and longi-
tudinal developments in life history approaches to psy-
chopathology and related behavioral disorders.







64 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


oriented report suitable for the requirements of the Master
of Engineering or Engineer.degree. Two credits only are ap-
plicable toward the requirements ofeach degree.
ECI 7980--Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
ENV 5625-Water Resources Engineering Design (3) Prereq:
ECI 4214 or consent of instructor. Design oriented courses
based on methods developed in ECI 4214. Introduction to
water resources systems and management.
TTE 5006-Transportation Systems Planning (4) Prereq:
graduate standing or consent of instructor. Analytical tech-
niques for estimating future travel demands, planning,
transportation facilities and locations. Review of transporta-
tion technology and future systems.
TTE 5105-Pavement Design (2) Prereq: TTE 4104 or consent
of instructor. Design of flexible and concrete pavements.
TTE 5256-Traffic Engineering (4) Prereq: TTE 4007 or equiva-
lent. Traffic studies, operations, flow, signals, signs and
markings; regulation of traffic, pedestrian and bicycle opera-
tion, parking lot operations, highway lighting.
TTE 5701-Geometric Design of Transportation Facilities (3)
Prereq: TTE 4104 or consent of instructor. Geometric design
criteria and controls of highways and intersections.
TTE 6106-Soil Stabilization (2) Prereq: graduate standing or
consent of instructor. Highway soil stabilization, methods of
stabilization and behavior of materials.
TTE 6107-Highway Safety Analysis (2) Statistics and charac-
teristics of accidents, accident reconstruction, accident
causation and reduction.
TTE 6257-Traffic Control Systems (4) Prereq: TTE,5256. Traf-
fic controller operation, compIter controlled signal systems,
modeling and optimization of traffic control systems, system
selection 'implementation and management.
TTE 6267-Traffic Flow Theory (3) Prereq: TTE 5256. Opera-
tional techniques used to optimize traffic flow including
control systems. Maintenance operations. Freeway opera-
tions and control. Intersection channelization.
TTE 6307-Freeway Design and Operations (3) Prereq: TTE
5256. Operation of freeway systems, effects of design, ad-
vanced analysis techniques, freeway optimization tech-
niques.
TTE 6516---Transportation Planning Decisions (2) Prereq: ECI
4137 or equivalent. Decisions on public investment analysis
methods, cost-benefit and delphi techniques, identification
and assessment of physical, social, and economic impacts of
transportation alternatives, costs of vehicle operations, acci-
dents, value of time, safety, other factors.
TTE 6526-Airport Planning and Operations (2) Prereq: TTE
6257. Location, configuration, air connections; ground, bag-
gage, and freight movements; passenger transfers; aircraft
delay analysis; airport access; parking needs; simulation of
operations; flight scheduling and control.
TTE 6606-Urban Transportation Models (4) Prereq: TTE
5006, ECI 4041 or consent of instructor. Calibration and ap-
plication of UTPS computer models for urban transportation
planning; land use and urban activity models for forecasting
and allocation. H.

CLASSICS
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: G. L. Schmeling. Professor: G. L. Schmeling.
Associate Professors: S. K. Dickison; K. V. Hartigan; D.
G. Miller; L. A. Sussman.
The department offers a program leading to the
Master of Arts with a major in Latin, which may be
combined with a minor in Greek, history, or philoso-
phy.
LAT 6840-History of the Latin Language (3)
LNW 5905-Special Study in Latin (3)
LNW 6902-Special Study in Latin Literature (3; max: 9) Sam-
ple topics: Horace, Juvenal, Roman comedy, Roman his-
torians.
LNW 6905-Individual Work (2-4; max: 10) Readings, con-.
ferences and reports. Subjects in language, literature, and
civilization for which there are no special course offerings.


LNW 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
LNW 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
LNW 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)



CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
College of Health Related Professions
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: N. W. Perry, Jr. Graduate Coordinator; H.
Davis. Professors: B. Barger; E. Cohen; L. D. Cohen; H.
Davis; J. R. Goldman; K. M. Heilman; M. Hollower
(Emeritus); F. D. McGlynn; W. L. Mealiea; B. G.
Melamed; M. E. Meyer; N. W. Perry, Jr.; A. S.
Schumacher (Emeritus). Associate Professors: C. D.
Belar; R. K. Blashfield; M. K. Goldstein; R. K.
Hornberger; J. H. Johnson; W. J. Rice; V. D. Van De
Riet. Assistant Professors; D. Bowers; E. B. Fennell; S.
B. Johnson; M. H. McCaulley; J. Tucker; R. E.
Vuchinich.
The Department of Clinical Psychology is a gradu-
ate program department in the College of Health Re-
lated Professions. The department's programs are its
predoctoral clinical psychology program leading to-
the Ph.D. degree in psychology; the Psychology
Clinic, a teaching and service unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center's Teaching Hospital and Clinics; a pre-
doctoral internship program, and postdoctoral studies,
and research. The master's degree is offered as part of
the doctoral program studies.
The clinical psychology program involves academic
ties with other colleges and departments within the
University and with the Veteran's Administration
training and service programs.
Courses offered by the faculty of the department
are listed below. Progress of the program is de-
termined by departmental policies which are consis-
tent with American Psychological Association accredi-
tation standards.
Admission to the department is through appropri-
ate application to the department's admissions com-
mittee. A bachelor's degree, along with one under-
graduate course in both experimental psychology and
statistics and courses in at least three of the following
areas: developmental, learning, perception, person-
ality, physiological and social, is generally adequate
preparation for graduate admission.
CLP 6375-Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3) Prereq:
admission to CLP program. Seminar on issues and concept
concurrent with field observation and participation.
CLP 6407-Psychological Treatment I (3) Prereq: admission
to CLP program or consent of instructor. Current dynamic
and personality theories, practices, and related research in
psychotherapy.
CLP 6417--Psychological Treatment II (4) Prereq: admission
to CLP program or consent of instructor. Current behavorial
theories, practices, and related research.
CLP 6437-Behavioral Assessment (3) Prereq: admission to
CLP program or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and
basic procedures including observational and interview
techniques.
CLP 6441-Intellectual Assessment (3) Prereq: admission to
CLP program or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and
basic procedures in assessing intellectual functions.
CLP 6448-Personality Assessment (3) Prereq: admission to
CLP program or consent of instructor. Research, theory, and
basic procedures including objective and projective tech-
niques.
CLP 6449-Life History Research in Psychopathology (3)
Prereq: CLP 6497 or consent of instructor. Recent and longi-
tudinal developments in life history approaches to psy-
chopathology and related behavioral disorders.









CLP 6497-Psychological Disturbances of Adults (3) Prereq:
admission to CLP or PSY program or consent of instructor.
Theories and related research to etiology, clinical descrip-
tion, and diagnosis with implications for treatment.
CLP 6526-Introduction to Clinical Research and Design (2)
Prereq: admission to CLP or PSY program or consent of in-
structor. Survey emphasizing both laboratory and clinical ex-
periment methodology; computer data analysis techniques
employed.
CLP 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 12) Reading or re-
search in areas of clinical psychology.
CLP 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
CLP 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
CLP 6943-Practicum in Clinical Psychology (4; max: 8) Pre-
req: CLP 6375, 6437, 6441, 6448, 6497, DEP 6216. Supervised
training in appropriate work settings. S/U.
CLP 6947-Advanced Practicum in Clinical Psychology (1-4;
max: 8) Prereq: consent of Clinical Director. Designed for in-
dividual with special interests and needs. S/U.
CLP 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
CLP 7348-Theory and Practice of Psychological Consulta-
tion (3) Prereq: CLP 6375, CYP 6709. Includes multiple roles,
intervention strategies used by consultants as agents of
.change. Field experience in community settings.
CLP 7404-Special Issues, Methods, and Techniques in Psy-
chological Treatment (3; max: 6) Prereq: CLP 6375, 6407, 6417
or consent of instructor.
CLP 7406-Psychodynamic Theory (3; max: 6) Prereq: CLP
6375, 6407, 6417, or consent of instructor. Emphasis on dis-
turbed adolescents and young adults.
CLP 7408-Gestalt Therapy and Techniques (3; max: 6) Pre-
req: CLP 6375, 6407, 6417, or consent of instructor. Ex-
perimental didactic and other humanistic approaches to per-
sonality theory and psychotherapy.
CLP 7409-Marital Dysfunction (3) Prereq: CLP 6375, 6407,
6417. Issues, problems and techniques of psychotherapy
with couples.
CLP 7427-Neuropsychological Assessment (3) Prereq: CLP
6441,.6448, PSB 6067. Research, theory and basic procedures.
CLP 7438-Selected Methods in Clinical Assessment (3; max:
6) Prereq: CLP 6437, 6441, 6448.
CLP 7468-Psychological Treatment with Groups (3) Cur-
rent theories and practices of group therapy as a form of psy-
chological treatment. Exploration of group'therapy interven-
tion techniques.
CLP 7488--Clinical Treatment of Adolescents (3) Prereq: CLP
6375, 6407, 6417. Application of a variety of treatment tech-
niques.
CLP 7936-Medical Psychology (3) Prereq: admission to CLP
program or consent of instructor. Seminar on the relevance
of psychological research and clinical practice for medical
patient populations.
CLP 7938-Forensic Psychology (3) Concerned with issues
of the interface between law and psychology relating to the
psychologist's function in this role.
CLP 7942-Practicum in Behavior Therapy (3) Prereq: CLP
6375, 6407, 6417. Application of behavioral treatment tech-
niques to actual patient and client needs.
CLP 7949-Internship (3) Prereq: admission to candidacy for
the doctorate, successful completion of the qualifying exam-
ination and consent of the Clinical Director. Reading assign-
ments and conferences. Must include 1500 work hours; de-
signed as a two semester sequence.
CLP 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
CYP 6709-Theory and Research in Community Clinical Psy-
chology (3) Principles, consultation, mental health educa-
tion, early identification, intervention. Research methods
and current literature.
CYP 7308-Advanced Community Intervention (3) Prereq:
CLP 6375, CYP 6709 or consent of instructor. Theory and
strategy methods developed specifically for utilization in
practice of community clinical psychology.
DEP 6216-Psychological Disturbances of Children (3) Pre-
req: admission to CLP or PSY program or consent of instruc-
tor. Stresses both affective and cognitive.
DEP 7217--Minimal Brain Dysfunction (3) Prereq: admission
to CLP or PSY program or consent of instructor. Theory, re-
search, and applications in clinical psychology.


COASTAL AND OCEANOGRAPHIC ENGINEERING / 65

DEP 7408-Clinical Psychology of Aging (3) Prereq: per-
mission of instructor. A developmental sequence that
focuses on the psychopathology, neuropsychology, and
treatment issues confronting the clinician dealing with an
aged population.


COASTAL AND OCEANOGRAPHIC
ENGINEERING
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Acting Chairman and Graduate Coordinator: D. M.
Sheppard. Professors: T. Y. Chiu; M. K. Ochi; E.
Partheniades; O. H. Shemdin. Associate Professors: A.
J. Mehta; D. M. Sheppard.
The Department of Coastal and Oceanographic En-
gineering offers the Master of Engineering, Master of
Science, and Engineer degrees. The Doctor of Philoso-
phy degree is offered by other departments in the
College of Engineering in cooperation with the De-
partment of Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering.
Areas of specialization include coastal processes,
ocean processes, coastal structures, ocean structures,
and coastal and ocean measurements. Courses taught
by the faculty of Coastal and Oceanographic Engi-
neering Department are listed below.- A number of
other courses on related subjects, within and outside
of the College of Engineering, are available for gradu-
ate credit in this department.
EOC 5052-Ocean Engineering (3) Prereq: EGN 3353, MAP
3302. Linear wave theory; wave forces on fixed structures;
static stability of floating bodies; response of floating bodies
to simple waves; moored and towed bodies.
EOC 5310--Acoustics in Liquid (3) Prereq: MAP 3302. Propa-
gation of acoustics in liquids; electroacoustic transducers;
acoustic characterization of targets.
EGM 5816-Intermediate Fluid Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGN
3353, MAP 3302. Basic laws of fluid dynamics, introduction
to potential flow, viscous flow, boundary layer theory and
turbulence.
EOC 5860-Port and Harbor Engineering (3) Prereq: OCE
4016. Principles of port design; wave penetration; harbor os-
cillations; sediment movement and pollutant mixing; port
structures; port operations; case studies.
EOC 6196-Littoral Processes (3) Prereq: OCP 6165.
Shoreline developments; nearshore hydrodynamics; sedi-
ment transport phenomena by waves and wind; methods of
determining littoral transport quantities; effects of groins,
jetties, and other coastal structures on littoral processes.
EOC 6415-Hydrodynamics of Coastal and Ocean Structures
(3) Prereq: EOC 5052, STA 5855. Wave loads on fixed struc-
tures; forces on a pile due to regular and irregular waves,
forces on marine structures. Wave loads on floating struc-
tures; inertia, damping and hydrostatic forces, equation of
motions in regular waves, evaluation of loads in random
seas.
EOC 6430-Coastal and Offshore Structures I (3) Prereq:
OCP 6165. Design principles for breakwaters, jetties,
seawalls, shore protection; fixed, floating, submerged, and
semi-submerged offshore structures.
EOC 6431-Coastal and Offshore Structures II (3) Prereq:
EOC 6430 Individual or group design of coastal and offshore
structures.
EOC 6850-Simulation Techniques (3) Prereq: OCP 6165.
Mechanics of similitude, similitude laws; similarity by
dimensional analysis; models of coastal problems; storm
surge, littoral drift, wave generation, estuary flushing, inlet
improvements, beach-dune erosion, wave runup, etc.
EOC 6905-Individual Study in Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering (1-4; max: 8)
EOC 6932-Selected Field and Laboratory Problems. (1-4)
Field and/or laboratory investigations employing modern
research techniques and instrumentation.






66 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


EOC 6934-Advanced Topics in Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering (1-6) Waves; wave-structure interaction; coastal
structures; ocean structures; sediment transport; instrumen-
tation; advanced data analysis techniques.
EOC 6939-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Guest lecturers;
lecturers by COE faculty and students. S/U.
EOC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
OCC 5050-Introduction to Ocean Chemistry for Engineers
(3) Prereq: MAC 3314 and CHM 2047. Chemical composition
of sea water; transport and mixing processes; sampling tech-
niques and methods of analysis; wave damping due to sur-
face films; dispersion of oil films; chemical properties of
sediments.
OCP 6056-Physical Oceanography (3) Prereq: MAP 3302,
EGN 3353. Structure of ocean basins; physical and chemical
properties of sea water; basic physical laws used in oceanog-
raphy; ocean current; thermohaline effects; numerical
models; heat budget.
OCP 6165-Ocean Waves I: Linear Theory (3) Prereq: MAP
3302, EGN 3353. Ocean wave classification; solution of the
linearized boundary value problem; simple harmonic waves;
shoaling effects; internal waves.
OCP 6167-Ocean Waves II: Nonlinear Theory (3) Prereq:
OCP 6165. Perturbation development of nonlinear water
wave theories; regions of validity of various theories; dynam-
ics and kinematics of nonlinear wave trains composed of
single and multiple fundamental components.
OCP 6169-Random Sea Analysis (3) Prereq: STA 5855, OCP
6165. Mathematical presentation of random seas; wave spec-
tral analysis, spectral formulations; joint prediction of wave
height and period, directionality of random seas, bispectral
analysis; principle of hindcastipg and forecasting seas.
OCP 6295-Estuarial Hydromechanics and Engineering I (3)
Prereq: OCRi6165. Tidal Theory, analytical and numerical
methods for computation of one- and two-dimensional
propagation of tides and storm surges in estuaries and bays;
method of characteristics; hydraulic bore; seiches; solitary
wave.
OCP 6296-Estuarial Hydromechanics and Engineering II (3)
Prereq: OCP 6295. Salinity intrusion in tidal estuaries; dif-
fusion, disperion, entrainment and mixing; analytical and
numerical methods for predicting salinity intrusion and dis-
tribution of pollutants; laboratory exercises.
OCP 6291-Estuarial Hydromechanics and Engineering III
(3) Prereq: OCP 6296. Estuary shoaling and dredging prac-
tices; tidal' energy; model investigations and study of
selected case histories.
OCP 6555--Air-Sea Interaction (3) Prereq: OCP 6165. Equa-
tions of motion and stresses at the air-sea'interface; the clas-
sical instability theory; air-sea fluxes and energy transfer;
thermodynamic considerations; the growth of waves; wave
forecasting.
STA 5855-Stochastic Processes for Coastal and Ocean Engi-
neers (3) Prereq: undergraduate calculus. Principles of spec-
tral analysis; cross-spectral analysis; linear system; threshold
crossing and prediction of period; prediction of random
amplitudes; prediction of extreme values and its application
to coastal and ocean engineering problems.


COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS
Colleges of Health Related Professions
and Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman & Graduate Coordinator: K. R. Bzoch. Pro-
fessors: K. R. Bzoch; L. C. Hammer. Associate Pro-
fessors: F. J. Kemker; W. N. Williams. Assistant Pro-
fessors: W. H. Cutler; L. L. LaPointe; E. Scroggie, Jr.
The faculty of communicative disorders is primarily
responsible for interdisciplinary clinical teaching and
research for the College of Health Related Pro-
fessions, Medicine, Dentistry, and Nursing in aspects
of speech pathology and audiology related to the pro-
fessional degree programs of these colleges.


Courses and degrees in speech pathology and
audiology are offered by the Department of Speech in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The descrip-
tive listings of courses in speech pathology and
audiology may be found under Department of
Speech in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs.
The following courses are customarily taught by facul-
ty of the College of Health Related Professions who
also hold appointments in the Department of Speech.
HSC 6905-Individual Study in Health Related Professions
(4)
SPA 5242-Communicative Disorders Related to Cleft Lip
and Palate (3) Prereq: SPA 5202, 5211, 5403. Lectures, discus-
sions and laboratory study of the "team approach" and in-
terdisciplinary aspects of correcting communicative dis-
orders in the cleft palate individual.
SPA 6208-Seminar in Cerebral Palsy and Neurogenic
Articulation Disorders (3)
SPA 6245L-Lab: Cleft Palate (1)
SPA 6313-Peripheral Disorders of Hearing (4) Prereq: SPA
5304. Techniques for the assessment of peripheral auditory
disorders. Medical contributions to hearing loss and test in-
terpretation.
SPA 6345-Seminar in Audiology: Hearing Aids (3) Prereq:
SPA 6313. Coreq: SPA 6133.



COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES
Colleges of Business Administration,
Engineering, and Liberal Arts and
Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: R. W. Elliott. Graduate Coordinator: S. B.
Navathe. Graduate Research Professor: J. T. Tou. Pro-
fessors: R. W. Elliott; R. G. Selfridge; S. Y. W. Su. As-
sociate Professors: S. B. Navathe; L. H. Oliver; F. D.
Vickers. Assistant Professor: J. D. Brownsmith.
The Department of Computer and Information Sci-
ences offers the Master of Science degree. Students
may enroll in any one of three colleges Business
Administration, Engineering, or Liberal Arts and Sci-
ences.
Areas of specialization include computer organiza-
tion, information systems, and software systems.
These specializations permit study in a wide range of
areas including programming languages, database
management, software engineering, graphics, pattern
recognition, business information systems, operating
systems, compilers, performance measurement,
artificial intelligence, etc.
Applications for admission must be approved by
both the department and the college in which the
student wishes to enroll. Students without under-
graduate degrees in computer and information sci-
ences may be admitted to the program but be re-
quired to take a program of specified courses for
which they will not receive graduate credit. These re-
medial programs will typically involve 13 hours of
course work. Students who wish to obtain a degree
from a college other than the one from which they re-
ceived their undergraduate degrees and students with
inadequate backgrounds in mathematics and
statistics will be required to do additional remedial
work specified by the department's graduate coordi-
nator and approved by the new college. The remedial
work will generally include the core requirements for
the new college.






66 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


EOC 6934-Advanced Topics in Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering (1-6) Waves; wave-structure interaction; coastal
structures; ocean structures; sediment transport; instrumen-
tation; advanced data analysis techniques.
EOC 6939-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Guest lecturers;
lecturers by COE faculty and students. S/U.
EOC 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
OCC 5050-Introduction to Ocean Chemistry for Engineers
(3) Prereq: MAC 3314 and CHM 2047. Chemical composition
of sea water; transport and mixing processes; sampling tech-
niques and methods of analysis; wave damping due to sur-
face films; dispersion of oil films; chemical properties of
sediments.
OCP 6056-Physical Oceanography (3) Prereq: MAP 3302,
EGN 3353. Structure of ocean basins; physical and chemical
properties of sea water; basic physical laws used in oceanog-
raphy; ocean current; thermohaline effects; numerical
models; heat budget.
OCP 6165-Ocean Waves I: Linear Theory (3) Prereq: MAP
3302, EGN 3353. Ocean wave classification; solution of the
linearized boundary value problem; simple harmonic waves;
shoaling effects; internal waves.
OCP 6167-Ocean Waves II: Nonlinear Theory (3) Prereq:
OCP 6165. Perturbation development of nonlinear water
wave theories; regions of validity of various theories; dynam-
ics and kinematics of nonlinear wave trains composed of
single and multiple fundamental components.
OCP 6169-Random Sea Analysis (3) Prereq: STA 5855, OCP
6165. Mathematical presentation of random seas; wave spec-
tral analysis, spectral formulations; joint prediction of wave
height and period, directionality of random seas, bispectral
analysis; principle of hindcastipg and forecasting seas.
OCP 6295-Estuarial Hydromechanics and Engineering I (3)
Prereq: OCRi6165. Tidal Theory, analytical and numerical
methods for computation of one- and two-dimensional
propagation of tides and storm surges in estuaries and bays;
method of characteristics; hydraulic bore; seiches; solitary
wave.
OCP 6296-Estuarial Hydromechanics and Engineering II (3)
Prereq: OCP 6295. Salinity intrusion in tidal estuaries; dif-
fusion, disperion, entrainment and mixing; analytical and
numerical methods for predicting salinity intrusion and dis-
tribution of pollutants; laboratory exercises.
OCP 6291-Estuarial Hydromechanics and Engineering III
(3) Prereq: OCP 6296. Estuary shoaling and dredging prac-
tices; tidal' energy; model investigations and study of
selected case histories.
OCP 6555--Air-Sea Interaction (3) Prereq: OCP 6165. Equa-
tions of motion and stresses at the air-sea'interface; the clas-
sical instability theory; air-sea fluxes and energy transfer;
thermodynamic considerations; the growth of waves; wave
forecasting.
STA 5855-Stochastic Processes for Coastal and Ocean Engi-
neers (3) Prereq: undergraduate calculus. Principles of spec-
tral analysis; cross-spectral analysis; linear system; threshold
crossing and prediction of period; prediction of random
amplitudes; prediction of extreme values and its application
to coastal and ocean engineering problems.


COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS
Colleges of Health Related Professions
and Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman & Graduate Coordinator: K. R. Bzoch. Pro-
fessors: K. R. Bzoch; L. C. Hammer. Associate Pro-
fessors: F. J. Kemker; W. N. Williams. Assistant Pro-
fessors: W. H. Cutler; L. L. LaPointe; E. Scroggie, Jr.
The faculty of communicative disorders is primarily
responsible for interdisciplinary clinical teaching and
research for the College of Health Related Pro-
fessions, Medicine, Dentistry, and Nursing in aspects
of speech pathology and audiology related to the pro-
fessional degree programs of these colleges.


Courses and degrees in speech pathology and
audiology are offered by the Department of Speech in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The descrip-
tive listings of courses in speech pathology and
audiology may be found under Department of
Speech in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs.
The following courses are customarily taught by facul-
ty of the College of Health Related Professions who
also hold appointments in the Department of Speech.
HSC 6905-Individual Study in Health Related Professions
(4)
SPA 5242-Communicative Disorders Related to Cleft Lip
and Palate (3) Prereq: SPA 5202, 5211, 5403. Lectures, discus-
sions and laboratory study of the "team approach" and in-
terdisciplinary aspects of correcting communicative dis-
orders in the cleft palate individual.
SPA 6208-Seminar in Cerebral Palsy and Neurogenic
Articulation Disorders (3)
SPA 6245L-Lab: Cleft Palate (1)
SPA 6313-Peripheral Disorders of Hearing (4) Prereq: SPA
5304. Techniques for the assessment of peripheral auditory
disorders. Medical contributions to hearing loss and test in-
terpretation.
SPA 6345-Seminar in Audiology: Hearing Aids (3) Prereq:
SPA 6313. Coreq: SPA 6133.



COMPUTER AND INFORMATION
SCIENCES
Colleges of Business Administration,
Engineering, and Liberal Arts and
Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: R. W. Elliott. Graduate Coordinator: S. B.
Navathe. Graduate Research Professor: J. T. Tou. Pro-
fessors: R. W. Elliott; R. G. Selfridge; S. Y. W. Su. As-
sociate Professors: S. B. Navathe; L. H. Oliver; F. D.
Vickers. Assistant Professor: J. D. Brownsmith.
The Department of Computer and Information Sci-
ences offers the Master of Science degree. Students
may enroll in any one of three colleges Business
Administration, Engineering, or Liberal Arts and Sci-
ences.
Areas of specialization include computer organiza-
tion, information systems, and software systems.
These specializations permit study in a wide range of
areas including programming languages, database
management, software engineering, graphics, pattern
recognition, business information systems, operating
systems, compilers, performance measurement,
artificial intelligence, etc.
Applications for admission must be approved by
both the department and the college in which the
student wishes to enroll. Students without under-
graduate degrees in computer and information sci-
ences may be admitted to the program but be re-
quired to take a program of specified courses for
which they will not receive graduate credit. These re-
medial programs will typically involve 13 hours of
course work. Students who wish to obtain a degree
from a college other than the one from which they re-
ceived their undergraduate degrees and students with
inadequate backgrounds in mathematics and
statistics will be required to do additional remedial
work specified by the department's graduate coordi-
nator and approved by the new college. The remedial
work will generally include the core requirements for
the new college.






COUNSELOR EDUCATION / 67


All students must satisfy a core requirement by
completing four specified graduate level courses (12
credits) or their approved equivalents. Students must
maintain an average of at least 3.0 on the core courses,
and no more than one course out of the four may
have a grade below B. An additional 12 credits of
course work must be taken which includes six gradu-
ate level credits in courses designed for a selected
area of specialization within computer information
sciences, and at least six credits from courses offered
by some other department in the college in which the
student in enrolled. All students are also required to
take a one-credit seminar and write a thesis. A mini-
mum of five credit hours must be taken toward thesis
work. No foreign language is required.
The Dean for Graduate Studies and Research, act-
ing on the recommendations of the Chairman of the
CIS Department and the dean of the college in which
the student is enrolled, will appoint a supervisory
committee for each student consisting of two mem-
bers of the CIS graduate faculty and one member of
the graduate faculty of some other department from
the college. Each student will be required to pass a
written comprehensive examination administered
twice a year by the department.
The Center for Information Research, the Database
Systems Research and Development Center, and a
number of other campus research centers provide op-
portunities for students enrolled in the program.
CAP 5722-Computer Graphics (3) Prereq: COP 3530. Dis-
plays, storage, and generation. Interactive vs. passive
graphics. Analog vs. digital graphic storage. Pattern recog-
nition. Projections and the hidden line problem.
CAP 6652-Advanced Computer Applications (3) Prereq:
CDA 3101, COP 3530 or equivalent. A survey of state-of-the-
art computer applications including natural language pro-
cessing, computer vision systems, image processing, robot-
ics, modeling and representation of knowledge, office auto-
mation, decision support systems and intelligent machines.
CDA 6125-Microprogramming (3) Prereq: CDA 4041/EEL
4713C or 'equivalent. The function and design of micro-
programmable control units. Typical instruction sets and
their microcode implementation. "High-level" micro-
programming languages. Efficient algorithms for performing
arithmetic operations. Emulation and interpretation. Case
studies.
CIS 5041-Information Retrieval (3) Prereq: COP 3530. The
structure and operation of information retrieval systems.
CIS 6120-Data Base Management Systems (3) Prereq: COP
3530, 4620, or equivalent. An introduction to systems and
procedures for managing large computerized data bases.
CIS 6123-Data Base Design and Implementation (3) Prereq:
CIS 6122; a working knowledge of data base system architec-
ture, data models, sublanguages, storage structures and ac-
cess techniques, file organizations, and access methods. A
study of systematic, integrated data base design and im-
plementation including the subjects of corporate require-
ment analysis, semantic modeling, view integration, data
mapping to DBMS schema and subschema, physical data
base design and evaluation, and data base restructuring and
conversion. A term project is required.
CIS 6905-Individual Study (1-3) Prereq: consent of faculty
member supervising the study. Readings and/or research in
a selected area of CIS. May be taken up to a maximum of 3
hours in the master's program. S/U option.
CIS 6934-Special Topics in CIS (1-3) Prereq: vary depend-
ing on topics. Topics vary. In-depth discussions of recent de-
velopments in computer or information sciences.
CIS 6935-Graduate Seminar (1) Prereq: graduate status in
CIS. Presentations by graduate students, faculty members,
and visiting researchers, Preparation of research papers.
CIS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
COP 5622-Operating Systems (3) Prereq: COP 4620. The
concepts and techniques of efficient management of all sys-
tem resources.


COP 5630-Software Engineering (3) Prereq: COC 3110 or
EIN 3114. Principles of software design and engineering. In-
cludes topics in project organization, specification tech-
niques, reliability measurement, documentation.
COP 5641-Computer Language Translators (3) Prereq: COP
4644. Advanced concepts and techniques in language com-
pilation and interpretation.
COP 6505-Survey of Programming Langbages (3) Prereq:
CDA 3101, COP 3530, or equivalent. Survey of higher-level
programming languages emphasizing language features and
implementation techniques.
CRM 6201-Computer System Measurement and Evaluation
(3) Prereq: COP 5622 and basic course in probability and
statistics. Presents computer measurement tools and tech-
niques, analytical techniques for computer system modeling
and evaluation, simulation techniques, performance meas-
urement and evaluation in performance improvement prob-
lems, and performance evaluation in computer comparison
and selection problems.


COUNSELOR EDUCATION
College of Education
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
-Chairperson: P. J. Wittmer. Graduate Coordinator: L.
C. Loesch. Distinguished Service Professor: R. O.
Stripling. Professors: D. Avila; P. W. Fitzgerald; G.
Greenwood; T. Landsman; L. C. Loesch: R. D. Myrick;
H. C. Riker; P. G. Schauble; B. L. Sharp; B. Soldwedel;*
E. L. Tolbert; P. J. Wittmer. Associate Professors: A. G.
Cranney; M. K. Dykes; T. Goodale; R. Jester; J. J.
Larsen; J. H. Lombana;* R. J. McDavis; M. R. McMillin;
W. M. Parker; J. P. Saxon. Assistant Professors: E. S.
Amatea; R. M. Bollet; R. R. Kavanaugh;t L. E. Percy;t
J. H. Pitts; J. L. Resnick; G. D. Seiler.
These members of the faculties of the University of North Florida
(). and the University of Central Florida (t) are also members of the
graduate faculty of the University of Florida and participate in the
doctoral program in the University of Florida Department of Coun-
selor Education.
Programs leading to the degrees of Master of Edu-
cation (awarded only.upon completion of the Special-
ist in Education degree), Specialist in Education, Doc-
tor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy are of-
fered through this department. Program areas include
(1) school counseling and guidance (Ed.S., doctorate)
and (2) school psychology (Ed.S., doctorate) for posi-
tions in elementary, middle, and secondary schools;
(3) student personnel in higher education (Ed.S,, doc-
torate) for positions in community colleges,
vocatibnal-technical schools, colleges, universities
and other post-secondary school settings; (4) agency,
correctional, and developmental counseling (Ed.S.);
(5) counseling psychology (Ph.D.) in cooperation
with the Department of Psychology with course work
being taken through both departments; and (6) coun-
selor education (doctorate).
Family, marital, pastoral counseling, and counseling
older adults, minorities, and women are possible em-
phases in various program areas listed above. Voca-
tional development and research are integral parts of
preparation in all programs listed above.
Candidates for admission are urged to complete a
course in basic statistics before entering the program.
In any event, this requirement must be met during the
first semester of graduate work.
Study for the Ed.D. degree in counselor education
at the University of Florida by qualified master's de-
gree recipients at the University of North Florida and
at the University of Central Florida is facilitated by a
cooperative arrangement in which appropriate mem-







68 / FIELDS OF'INSTRUCTION


bers of the faculty of UNF and UCF are members of
the graduate faculty of the University of Florida.
EGC 6005-Principles of Guidance: The Helping Rela-
tionship (3) Prereq or coreq: EDF 6355 or PPE 5055.
EGC 6045-Counseling With Children (3) Prereq: EGC 6416,
6447, EQF 6113, or equivalent.
EGC 6054-Problems in Personnel Work (2-7) Seminar in
special problems in personnel work arranged by depart-
ment.
EGC 6055-Student Personnel Services in Higher Education
(3) Prereq: EGC 6005, 6057.
EGC 6057-The College Community and the Student (3)
Prereq or coreq: EGC 6005.
EGC 6225-Personnel Testing (3) Prereq: a course in basic
statistics.
EGC 6317-Vocational Development (3)
EGC 6405-Modern Counseling and Personnel Work (3) Not
open to majors in counselor education.
EGC 6416-Counseling Theory (4) Prereq: EGC 6005. Coreq:
EGC 6447.
EGC 6426-Counseling in Community Settings (3) Prereq:
EGC 6416, 6447, 7446. Coreq: current enrollment in a com-
munity agency practicum or internship.
EGC 6438-Play Counseling and Play Process with Children
(3) Prereq: EGC 6416, 6447, EDF 6113 or equivalent.
EGC 6447-Laboratory in Counseling (1) Coreq: EGC 6416.
EGC 6461-Counseling with Drug Abuse Cases (3)
EGC 6463-Counseling Ethnic Minorities (3) Prereq: EGC
6416, 6447.
EGC 6465-Counseling for Mid-Life and Pre-Retirement (3)
EGC 6466-Counseling Needs of Older Persons (3)
EGC 6467-Counseling Older Persons: Theories and Tech-
niques (3) Prereq: EGC 6416, 6447.
EGC 6505-Group Procedures in Guidance and Personnel
Work (3) Prereq: EGC 6416, 6447.
EGC 6545-Group Counseling (3) Prereq or coreq: EGC 6505,
7446.
EGC 6606-Organization and Administration of Guidance
and Personnel Programs (3) Prereq: EGC 6416.
EGC 6726--Sensitivity Exploration Laboratory (1) Coreq:
EGC 6505.
EGC 6905-Individual Work (2-4; max: 12) Prereq: consent of
staff members and graduate coordinator; approval of pro-
posed project.
EGC 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
EGC 6933-Seminar in Professional Development (1)
EGC 6938-Special Topics (1-4; max: 12) Prereq: consent of
department chairperson.
EGC 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
EGC 7056-Seminar in Higher Education Student Personnel
(1-2; max: 4) Prereq: ECC 6055, 6057.
EGC 7318-Laboratory in Career Development (4)
EGC 7329-Seminar in Career Development
EGC 7446-Practicum in Counseling (4; max: 12) Prereq: EGC
6416, 6447, and written application to the practicum coordi-
nator at least six weeks in advance of registration, S/U.
EGC 7485-Seminar in Counseling Research (2) Prereq: ad-
mission to candidacy for the doctorate in counselor educa-
tion.
EGC 7585-Practicum in Group Counseling (4; max: 12) Pre-
req: EGC 6545, eight credits in EGC 7446, and written appli-
cation to the practicum coordinator at least six weeks in ad-
vance of registration.
EGC 7616-Evaluative Research in Guidance, Counseling,
and Personnel Work (4) Prereq: EGC 6225.
EGC 7706-Consultation Procedures (3) Admission limited
to students in the Advanced School. Prereq: 8 credits of EGC
7446.
EGC 7840-Practicum in Student Personnel Work (4; max:
12) Prereq: 8 credits in EGC 7446 and written application to
the practicum coordinator at least six weeks in advance of
registration.
EGC 7852-Practicum in Counseling Older Persons (4; max:
8) Prereq: EGC 6416, 6447, 6467, and written application to
the practicum coordinator at least six weeks in advance of
registration.
EGC 7890-Internship in Personnel Work (6; max: 12) Pre-
req: Completion of all practice required for the Ed.S., Ph.D.,


or Ed.D. degree and written application to the internship co-
ordinator at least six weeks in advance of registration. S/U.
EGC 7892--Practicum in Psychological Assessment (4) Pre-
req: EGC 6225, 8 credits in EGC 7446, written application to
the practicum coordinator at least six weeks in advance of
registration.
EGC 7937-Seminar in Personnel Work (4) Limited to stu-
dents in the Advanced School who are near completion of
course work for a degree.
EGC 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
PCO 6216-Personal Counseling (2-3)
PCO 6258-Introduction to Family Counseling (3) Prereq:
EGC 6416 and 8 credits of EGC 7446.
PCO 6316C-Evaluation in Intelligence (3)
PCO 6317C-Evaluation in Personality (3)
PCO 6717-Sexual Identity in the Counseling Process (3)
PCO 6939-Seminar Current Topics in Counseling Psy-
chology (1-4)
PCO 7259-Advanced Seminar in Family Counseling (3) Pre-
req: PCO 6258.
PCO 7948-Practicum in Counseling Psychology (4; max: 12)
Prereq: EGC 6416, 6447, or equivalents; written application to
the practicum coordinator at least six weeks in advance of
registration; open only to students' officially enrolled in the
counseling psychology program.
PCO 7949-Internship in Counseling Psychology (6; max:
18) Prereq: 72 credits of PCO 7948and written application to
internship coordinator at least six weeks in advance of regis-
tration; open only to students officially enrolled in the coun-
seling psychology program.
SPS 7949-Internship in School Psychology (6; max: 18) Pre-
req: 12 credits of EGC 7446 and written application to in-
ternship coordinator at least six weeks in advance of regis-
tration; open only to students officially enrolled in the
school psychology program.


DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND
INSTRUCTION /
College of Education
Director & Graduate Coordinator: P. S. George.
The Division of Curriculum and Instruction offers
advanced degrees in cooperation with three depart-
ments: General Teacher Education, Instructional
Leadership and Support, and Subject Specialization
Teacher Education. Through these departments the
following degrees are granted: Master of Education
(nonthesis), Master of Arts in Education (thesis), Spe-
cialist in Education, Doctor of Education, Doctor of
Philosophy. Degrees are offered in the following spe-
cializations:
General Teacher Education: Early Childhood; Ele-
mentary; Middle School.
Instructional Leadership and Support: Curriculum
and Instruction Theory and Research; Educational
Media and Instructional Design; Postsecondary; Read-
ing; Supervision and Curriculum Development; Voca-
tional, Technical, and Adult Education.
Subject Specialization Teacher Education: Art Edu-
cation; Business Education; Foreign Language Educa-
tion; Language Arts Education; Mathematics Edu-
cation; Music Education; Science Education; Social
Studies Education.
Advanced degrees (specialist.and doctorate) are of-
fered with specialization in building construction,
music education and physical education with the co-
operation of the respective departments.
Study for the Ed.S. and Ed.D. degrees in curriculum
and instruction at the University of Florida and at Flor-
ida International University, University of Central
Florida and University of North Florida, is possible
through a cooperative arrangement ir which appro-






DAIRY SCIENCE / 69


private members of the respective faculties are mem-
bers of the graduate faculty of the University of Flor-
ida.


DAIRY SCIENCE
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: H. H. Van Horn, Jr. Graduate Coordinator:
H. H. Head. Professors: B. Harris, Jr.; S. P. Marshall; W.
W. Thatcher; H. H. Van Horn, Jr.; C. J. Wilcox; J. M.
Wing. Associate Professors: K. C. Bachman; H. H.
Head; D. W. Webb. Assistant Professor: R. J. Collier.
The Dairy Science Department offers the Master of
Science and Master of Agriculture degrees (special-
ization in dairy production'and dairy foods and prod-
ucts) and, in collaboration with the Departments of
Animal Science, Microbiology and Cell Science, and
Food Science and Human Nutrition, the Doctor of
Philosophy degree (specialization in animal physi-
ology, food science, genetics, and nutrition).
Areas of interest include quantitative genetics, ru-
minant nutrition, reproductive and lactational physi-
ology, endocrinology, biochemistry, management,
microbiology, milk chemistry, and the processing of
milk and milk products.
A departmental prerequisite for admission to grad-
uate study in dairy science is a strong undergraduate
background in the physical or biological sciences. A
prospective graduate student need not have majored.
in dairy science as an undergraduate.
The following courses in related areas will be ac-
ceptable for graduate credit as part of the candidate's
major: ANS 6368-Q-uantitative Genetics; ANS 6448-
Nitrogen and Energy in Animal Nutrition; ANS 6715-
Ruminant Nutrition and Digestive Physiology; ANS
6723-Mineral Nutrition and Metabolism; ANS 6751-
Physiology of Reproduction; STA 6168-Advanced
Methods of Statistics.
DAS 6212C-Advanced Dairy Cattle Management (2)
Modern scientific basis for management of Florida dairy cat-
tle, including nutrition, physiology, and genetics. Group
feeding, reproduction, and management under subtropical
conditions.
DAS 6281-Dairy Science Research Techniques (3) Prereq:
STA 6168. Methods employed in research in specialized dairy
fields; genetics, nutrition, physiology, microbiology, chemis-
try or dairy technology.
DAS 6322-Introduction to Statistical Genetics (2) Prereq:
ANS 6368, STA 6168. Development and application of
statistical and quantitative genetic theory to estimation of
genetic parameters and selection.
DAS 6512C-Advanced Physiology of Lactation (2) Prereq:
VES 6243C. Anatomy and development of the mammary
gland; endocrine regulation of mammary growth and milk
secretion; the physiology and biochemistry of milk secretion;
factors affecting milk yield and composition.
DAS 6531-Endocrinology (4) Prereq: BCH 4203, 4313, VES
6243C The endocrine system including anatomy of the
brain, neuroendocrine control, gland function, hormone
structure and biosynthesis, and relationship to reproduction,
lactation, growth, and metabolism.
DAS 6541-Energy Metabolism (3) Prereq: BCH 3023, ANS
5446 or permission of instructor. Animal energetic with a
systematic evaluation of nutritional, physiological, environ-
mental, biochemical and anatomical factors affecting the
partitioning of feed energy within the body below and
above maintenance and for productive functions. A critical
review of pertinent research and its relationship to animal
feeding systems will be included.
DAS 655-Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals
(3) Prereq: VES 6242C, 6243C. An examination of the interac-


tion between environmental factors such as temperature,
humidity, and photoperiod, and homeostatic mechanisms in
domestic animals such as endocrine regulation, water bal-
ance, and feed intake. Effects on reproduction, lactation,
and growth will be studied.
DAS 6617-Advanced Dairy Technology (1-4; max: 4) Theo-
ries and analytical techniques associated with chemical,
physical, and microbiological -changes of milk constituents
during secretion, processing, and storage of dairy products.
DAS 6905-Problems in Dairy Science (1-5; max: 12) Re-
search problems in dairy husbandry or dairy manufacturing.
DAS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
DAS 6931-Graduate Seminar in Dairy Science (1)
DAS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
DAS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


ECONOMICS
College of Business Administration
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: F. D. Arditti. Graduate Coordinator: A. R.
Horowitz. Graduate Research Professors: G. S. Mad-
dala; W. Woodruff. Professors: F. D. Arditti; R. D.
Blair; R. H. Blodgett (Emeritus); J. R. Davis; C. H.
Donovan (Emeritus); W. J. Frazer; E. L. Jackson (Emer-
itus); P. E. Koefod (Emeritus); M. R. Langham; R. F.
Lanzillotti; M. M. Lockhart; J. W. Milliman; J. R. Ver-
non. Associate Professors: J. G. Ballentine, S. V. Berg;
W. Bomberger; D. A. Denslow; C. W. Fristoe (Emer-
itus); F. O. Goddard; A. R. Horowitz; W. G. Tyler. As-
sistant Professors: J. D. Adams; H. H. Fishkind; S. K.
Smith:
The Department of Economics offers the Master of
Arts (thesis and nonthesis option) and Doctor of Phi-
losophy degrees with specializations in econometrics,
economic development, economic history, economic
theory, history of economic thought, human resource
economics (including labor and health care econom-
ics), industrial organization and social control, in-
ternational economics, Latin America and African
area studies, mathematical economics, monetary eco-
nomics, public finance, public utilities, and urban-re-
gional economics. The Master of Business Adminis-
tration degree is also offered with a concentration in
economics.
M.A. Requirements.-A minimum of 54 credits of
course work is required for both the M.A. with and
without thesis, A maximum of nine credits of research
course ECO 6971 may be included for a master's de-
gree with thesis. The following core courses are re-
quired: GEB 5805 or equivalent, ECO 5424 or equiva-
lent, ECO 6116, ECO 6206.
Ph.D. Requirements.-Students in the Ph.D. pro-
gram must complete the following core courses: GEB
5805 or equivalent, ECO 5416, ECO 5424, ECO 6116,
ECO 6117, ECO 6206, ECO 6207. All except ECO 5416
and ECO 5424 must be completed in the first year.
ECO 5416 and ECO 5424 must be completed by the
end of the second year.
Admission to the Ph.D. program is conditional
upon receiving a grade of Ph.D. Pass on the Ph.D. Pre-
liminary Examination which must be taken prior to
the start of the student's second year.
ACC 6811-Social and Economic Accounting (4) Social ac-
counts and comparative economic accounting systems. Em-
phasis on national income accounting, the national balance
sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds analysis.
ECO 5111-Microeconomic Theory (4) Determination of
prices in a market economy; their role in allocating con-
sumer and producer goods, in distributing incomes, and in
effecting efficient combinations of resources in production.






DAIRY SCIENCE / 69


private members of the respective faculties are mem-
bers of the graduate faculty of the University of Flor-
ida.


DAIRY SCIENCE
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: H. H. Van Horn, Jr. Graduate Coordinator:
H. H. Head. Professors: B. Harris, Jr.; S. P. Marshall; W.
W. Thatcher; H. H. Van Horn, Jr.; C. J. Wilcox; J. M.
Wing. Associate Professors: K. C. Bachman; H. H.
Head; D. W. Webb. Assistant Professor: R. J. Collier.
The Dairy Science Department offers the Master of
Science and Master of Agriculture degrees (special-
ization in dairy production'and dairy foods and prod-
ucts) and, in collaboration with the Departments of
Animal Science, Microbiology and Cell Science, and
Food Science and Human Nutrition, the Doctor of
Philosophy degree (specialization in animal physi-
ology, food science, genetics, and nutrition).
Areas of interest include quantitative genetics, ru-
minant nutrition, reproductive and lactational physi-
ology, endocrinology, biochemistry, management,
microbiology, milk chemistry, and the processing of
milk and milk products.
A departmental prerequisite for admission to grad-
uate study in dairy science is a strong undergraduate
background in the physical or biological sciences. A
prospective graduate student need not have majored.
in dairy science as an undergraduate.
The following courses in related areas will be ac-
ceptable for graduate credit as part of the candidate's
major: ANS 6368-Q-uantitative Genetics; ANS 6448-
Nitrogen and Energy in Animal Nutrition; ANS 6715-
Ruminant Nutrition and Digestive Physiology; ANS
6723-Mineral Nutrition and Metabolism; ANS 6751-
Physiology of Reproduction; STA 6168-Advanced
Methods of Statistics.
DAS 6212C-Advanced Dairy Cattle Management (2)
Modern scientific basis for management of Florida dairy cat-
tle, including nutrition, physiology, and genetics. Group
feeding, reproduction, and management under subtropical
conditions.
DAS 6281-Dairy Science Research Techniques (3) Prereq:
STA 6168. Methods employed in research in specialized dairy
fields; genetics, nutrition, physiology, microbiology, chemis-
try or dairy technology.
DAS 6322-Introduction to Statistical Genetics (2) Prereq:
ANS 6368, STA 6168. Development and application of
statistical and quantitative genetic theory to estimation of
genetic parameters and selection.
DAS 6512C-Advanced Physiology of Lactation (2) Prereq:
VES 6243C. Anatomy and development of the mammary
gland; endocrine regulation of mammary growth and milk
secretion; the physiology and biochemistry of milk secretion;
factors affecting milk yield and composition.
DAS 6531-Endocrinology (4) Prereq: BCH 4203, 4313, VES
6243C The endocrine system including anatomy of the
brain, neuroendocrine control, gland function, hormone
structure and biosynthesis, and relationship to reproduction,
lactation, growth, and metabolism.
DAS 6541-Energy Metabolism (3) Prereq: BCH 3023, ANS
5446 or permission of instructor. Animal energetic with a
systematic evaluation of nutritional, physiological, environ-
mental, biochemical and anatomical factors affecting the
partitioning of feed energy within the body below and
above maintenance and for productive functions. A critical
review of pertinent research and its relationship to animal
feeding systems will be included.
DAS 655-Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals
(3) Prereq: VES 6242C, 6243C. An examination of the interac-


tion between environmental factors such as temperature,
humidity, and photoperiod, and homeostatic mechanisms in
domestic animals such as endocrine regulation, water bal-
ance, and feed intake. Effects on reproduction, lactation,
and growth will be studied.
DAS 6617-Advanced Dairy Technology (1-4; max: 4) Theo-
ries and analytical techniques associated with chemical,
physical, and microbiological -changes of milk constituents
during secretion, processing, and storage of dairy products.
DAS 6905-Problems in Dairy Science (1-5; max: 12) Re-
search problems in dairy husbandry or dairy manufacturing.
DAS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
DAS 6931-Graduate Seminar in Dairy Science (1)
DAS 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
DAS 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)


ECONOMICS
College of Business Administration
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: F. D. Arditti. Graduate Coordinator: A. R.
Horowitz. Graduate Research Professors: G. S. Mad-
dala; W. Woodruff. Professors: F. D. Arditti; R. D.
Blair; R. H. Blodgett (Emeritus); J. R. Davis; C. H.
Donovan (Emeritus); W. J. Frazer; E. L. Jackson (Emer-
itus); P. E. Koefod (Emeritus); M. R. Langham; R. F.
Lanzillotti; M. M. Lockhart; J. W. Milliman; J. R. Ver-
non. Associate Professors: J. G. Ballentine, S. V. Berg;
W. Bomberger; D. A. Denslow; C. W. Fristoe (Emer-
itus); F. O. Goddard; A. R. Horowitz; W. G. Tyler. As-
sistant Professors: J. D. Adams; H. H. Fishkind; S. K.
Smith:
The Department of Economics offers the Master of
Arts (thesis and nonthesis option) and Doctor of Phi-
losophy degrees with specializations in econometrics,
economic development, economic history, economic
theory, history of economic thought, human resource
economics (including labor and health care econom-
ics), industrial organization and social control, in-
ternational economics, Latin America and African
area studies, mathematical economics, monetary eco-
nomics, public finance, public utilities, and urban-re-
gional economics. The Master of Business Adminis-
tration degree is also offered with a concentration in
economics.
M.A. Requirements.-A minimum of 54 credits of
course work is required for both the M.A. with and
without thesis, A maximum of nine credits of research
course ECO 6971 may be included for a master's de-
gree with thesis. The following core courses are re-
quired: GEB 5805 or equivalent, ECO 5424 or equiva-
lent, ECO 6116, ECO 6206.
Ph.D. Requirements.-Students in the Ph.D. pro-
gram must complete the following core courses: GEB
5805 or equivalent, ECO 5416, ECO 5424, ECO 6116,
ECO 6117, ECO 6206, ECO 6207. All except ECO 5416
and ECO 5424 must be completed in the first year.
ECO 5416 and ECO 5424 must be completed by the
end of the second year.
Admission to the Ph.D. program is conditional
upon receiving a grade of Ph.D. Pass on the Ph.D. Pre-
liminary Examination which must be taken prior to
the start of the student's second year.
ACC 6811-Social and Economic Accounting (4) Social ac-
counts and comparative economic accounting systems. Em-
phasis on national income accounting, the national balance
sheet, sector accounts, and flow of funds analysis.
ECO 5111-Microeconomic Theory (4) Determination of
prices in a market economy; their role in allocating con-
sumer and producer goods, in distributing incomes, and in
effecting efficient combinations of resources in production.







70 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ECO 5206-Macroeconomic Theory (4) Macroeconomic the-
ory with respect to determinants of national employment,
aggregate income, economic fluctuations, inflation, and the
price level.
ECO 5227-Central Banking and Monetary Policy (4) Prereq:
ECO 3213 or equivalent. Critical study of the relationship be-
tween the Federal Reserve System, the money market, gov-
ernmental finance, business fluctuations, and the internal
and external value of money in the United States.
ECO 5416-Statistical Methods in Economics (4) Prereq: STA
3024. Introduction to fundamental statistical concepts: esti-
mation, hypothesis testing, linear regression, and analysis of
variance.
ECO 5424-Econometric Models and Methods I (4) Prereq:
ECO 5416. Introduction to econometrics, including a survey
of the classical econometric models as well as the scope and
method of econometrics.
ECO 5545-Central Government Finance (4) Prereq: ECO
2013-2023. Economic effects of public expenditures; war fi-
nance; personal income and estate taxes; corporate income
and profit taxes; excise taxes; debt problems.
ECO 5556-State and Local Finance (4) Prereq: ECO
2013-2023. Allocation of government functions and re-
sources; property taxation, sales taxes, highway finance,
business taxation; debt financing and control. Emphasis on
Florida problems.
ECO 5566-Government Budgeting and Financial Adminis-
tration (2) Prereq: permission of department. Budget process
at various levels. Analysis of the operating behavior of gov-
ernments in managing expenditure, debt, budgets, records,
and reports.
ECO 5716-Foreign Exchange and International Financial In-
stitutions (2) Prereq: permission of department. Study of the
theoretical and practical aspects of foreign exchange.
ECO 6116-Microeconomic Theory I (3) Prereq: QMB 5805
or equivalent. Analysis, criticism, and restatement of neo-
classical price and production theories. Demand, supply,
cost of production, and price determination under various
conditions of the market.
ECO 6117-Microeconomic Theory II (4) Prereq: ECO 6116
and permission of the department. Imperfect competition,
general equilibrium, welfare, and optimization over time.
ECO 6155-Neoclassical Economics (4) Analysis, criticism,
and restatement of neoclassical theories concerning distri-
bution of income. Rent, interest, wages, profits, personal dis-
tribution, supplementary distribution, and noncapitalistic
distribution. The writings of Marshall, Hicks, Cassel, Bould-
ing, Pigou, Fisher, Douglas, Knight, Stigler, and Schumpeter
provide background for the discussion.
ECO 6206-Macroeconomic Theory I (3) Classical, Key-
nesian, and post-Keynesian aggregate income and em-
ployment analysis. Determination of price level and interest
rate.
ECO 6207-Macroeconomic Theory II (4) Prereq: ECO 6206
arid permission of the department. Dynamic macro-
economic models. Inflation, unemployment and expecta-
tions. The role of capital accumulation.
ECO 6216-Monetary Economics I (4) Contemporary mone-
tary theory. The demand for money. Monetary policy and in-
flation, interest rates and employment. The role 6f infla-
tionary finance.
ECO 6236-Seminar in Monetary Economics (4) Current top-
ics of research in the journals, studies by government agen-
cies, and other published and unpublished materials.
ECO 6257-Stabilization Policy (4) Tools for promoting eco-
Snomic stabilization and growth. Opposing viewpoints as to
proper scope and relation of monetary and fiscal controls.
ECO 6266-Monetary Economics II (4) Economic in-
stabilities in capitalistic society. Emphasis on forces operat-
ing to bring about changes in the general level of prices,
including prices of productive agents, employment, and in-
come.
ECO 6305-The Development of Economic Thought I (4) Ec-
onomic thought chronologically from Greek to contempo-
rary times-including the chief schools in Great Britain, the
Continent, and the United States. Marx and the socialists,
nonorthodox thinkers, and critics of the classical school are
treated equally with the main tradition.


ECO 6306-The Development of Economic Thought II (4)
The two chief approaches in economic thought. Emphasis
on philosophical outlook and methodology. Analytical ap-
proach and role of mathematics; calculus surveyed and re-
lated to the neoclassical theory. Relates the institutional ap-
proach of history and other social sciences; cultural theory of
capitalist evolution.
ECO 6315-Present-Day Schools of Economic Thought (4)
Contemporary American and English economic thinking
with particular reference to developments occurring be-
tween the two World Wars. The writings of Hansen,
Mitchell, Clark, and Commons in the United States, and of
Keynes, Cole, Robinson, and Hobson in England.
ECO 6405-Mathematical Economics I (4) Prereq: QMB 5805
or equivalent. Mathematical approach to microeconomic
theory, including theory of the firm, theory of consumer be-
havior, and selected topics in market conditions.
ECO 6406-Mathematical Economics II (4) Prereq: ECO
6405. Probability and simulation models of economic behav-
ior; mathematical models from monetary economics.
ECO 6407--Nonstochastic Models (4) Prereq: MAS 3113 or
ESI 4567. General linear programming model and its basic
theorems, integer and nonlinear programming. Spatial
equilibrium, input-output, and game theory models.
ECO 6426-Econometric Methods I (4) Prereq: STA 4322 and
MAS 3113 or ESI 4567. Stochastic models. The general linear
model and problems associated with its use in econometric
research. Theory of the simultaneous equation approach,
model construction, and estimation techniques.
ECO 6427-Econometric Methods II (4) Prereq: ECO 6426 or
AEB 6571. Single equation topics, errors in variables, non-
spherical disturbances, and lagged variables. Dynamic si-
multaneous equation models, and miscellaneous topics in
multivariate analysis. Spectral and cross-spectral analysis.
ECO 6428-Research Seminar in Econometrics (1-4) Prereq.
ECO 6426. Empirical measurement in applied economics.
Empirical problem requiring the construction, estimation,
and defense of a quantitative economic model.
ECO 6433-Macroeconomic Models and the Firm (4) Prereq:
ECO 5204, 5111, STA 6606, 6358. Synthesis and application of
macroeconomic theory and economic forecasting models to
managerial decision making, with emphasis on under-
standing effects'on the firm of economic actions taken by
foreign and domestic governments.
ECO 6435-Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting
(4) Problems of linear operation regression analysis which
may be used by managers as a basis for decision making. It
will add to the student's knowledge of sophisticated
statistical methods to aid in the analysis of current business
problems.
ECO 6516-Public Revenue and Distribution (4) Prereq:
ECO 6116. Topics include the incidence of taxation, the ex-
cess burden of taxation, and the design of optimal tax sys-
tem.
ECO 6526-Welfare Economics (4) A survey of welfare eco-
nomics. Technical welfare formulation related to organic
concepts of welfare and to political action in a democracy.
Possibilities of normative economics evaluated.
ECO 6536-Public Expenditures and Collective Decisions (4)
Prereq: ECO 6206, 6116. Topics include the theory of goods
and externalities, the evaluation of public expenditures, the
nature of collective choice, and voting behavior.
ECO 6617-The United States in the World Economy
(1783-1970) (4) The interrelatedness of the United States'
economy with other lands.
ECO 6626-The American Economy to 1860 (4) A functional
approach. World economic conditions that led to the settle-
ment of America; the colonial period; the period of econom-
ic transition; the westward movement and the rise of a na-
tional economy; economic causes of the Civil War.
ECO 6627-The American Etonomy Since 1860 (4) The clos-
ing of the economic frontier. The development of a capital-
istic economy and the trend toward economic and financial
imperialism. Economic problems of the wars of 1914-18 and
1939-45, and postwar economic adjustments, domestic and
foreign.
ECO 6706-Theory of International Trade (4) Historical and
economic background of foreign trade; theory of interna-






ECONOMICS / 71


tional trade; fundamentals of international exchange; in-
ternational commercial policies and international trade;
exchange fluctuations and their control; international mone-
tary institutions.
ECO 6717-International Economic Relations (4) Capital
formation in the underdeveloped countries, economic inte-
gration, balance of payments and international monetary re-
form, the economic consequences of population pressures
and economic relations between the advanced and other
nations.
ECO 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ECO 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ECO 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ECO 7118-Advanced Microeconomic Theory (4) Prereq:
ECO 6117. Advanced topics in microeconomic theory. Ax-
iomatic development of utility functions, stochastic and.
nonstochastic utility models. Static and dynamic production
functions and investment criteria. General equilibrium and
stability conditions.
ECO 7206-Advanced Macroeconomic Theory (4) Prereq:
ECO 6207. Advanced topics in macroeconomic theory, in-
cluding wealth effects and money illusion, the homogeneity
postulate and exceptions to classical doctrine. The role of ex-
pectations and stability analysis.
ECO 7938-Advanced Economics Seminar (1-4; max: 8) For
advanced graduate students in economics. Prereq: student
must have completed graduate core program and have pre-
liminary dissertation topic. Special topics.
ECO 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
ECP 5106-Economics of Human Resource Development (2)
Prereq: ECO 3100 or equivalent. The capital concept applied
to human resources. Effects of education, health, population
policies, and discrimination on the stock of human capital.
Role of human capital in economic development.
ECP 5205-Economics of the Labor Market (4) Prereq: ECP
3203. Intensive analysis of the economics of the labor mar-
ket; theoretical and practical aspects of wage determination;
impact of collective bargaining on wages, employment, and
prices; economic effects of legislation dealing with the oper-
ating of the labor market.
ECP 5606-Special Problems in Urban and Regional Eco-
homics (4) Prereq: ECP 5624, 5614. Focuses on a specific ur-
ban and regional economic problem that is analyzed in
depth. Topical coverage varies among such areas as: hous-
ing, land use, metropolitan financing, forecasting.
ECP 5614-Urban Economics (4) Prereq: ECO 2013, 2023 and
permission of department. Economic analysis of urban-
ization and regional interdependence. Applicability of loca-
tion theory and other economic analysis. Criteria for de-
termining public expenditures and allocating costs in urban
areas.
ECP 5624-Regional Economics (4) Prereq: ECO 2013, 2023 or
permission of instructor. Regional economic phenomenon
and the spatial distribution of economic activities. Analytical
tools are developed and applied to urban and regional prob-
lems such as growth and decay, housing, land use, and trans-
portation.
ECP 6207-Labor Demand and Market Equilibrium (4) The
derived demand for labor, and other inputs with applica-
tions to discrimination and the minimum wage. Topics in la-
bor market equilibrium: compensating wage differentials,
migration, monopsony unemployment.
ECP 6208-Labor Supply and Household Behavior (4) Labor
supply of men and women; household production; marriage
and divorce; fertility; the transmission of human and non-
human wealth from generation to generation; the demand
for education; the determination of earnings.
ECP 6225-Labor Markets, Manpower, and Public Policy (4)
Labor markets and the role of unions as collective decision
organizations; theories of collective choice. Unemployment
as an economic and social problem. Analysis of various pub-
lic and private labor-oriented programs, including social in-
surance, manpower training, poverty, and others.
ECP 6405-Industrial Organization and Social Control (4)
Economic and other characteristics' of modern industrial
structures. Relationships between industrial structure, busi-
ness conduct, and economic performance. Measurement of
concentration and evaluation of performance. Public poli-
cies toward monopoly, conspiracy, and competition.


ECP 6407-Problems in Social Control (4) Nature and causes
of market failure. Problems in developing and applying con-
cepts of public interest in a market economy. Institutional
restraints to economic solutions; coordination of political
and market decisions concerning the allocation of resources.
ECP 6426-Economics of Regulated Industries (4) Types and
techniques of public control. Economic analysis and eval-
uation of regulatory and promotional policies. Adminis-
trative and legal aspects of the regulatory process. Special
problems in particular industries.
ECP 6536-Health Care Economics I (4) Prereq: ECO 6116.
Fundamental economic relations governing the production,
consumption and financing of health care services. Charac-
teristics of demand and production relationships; response
of supply, "shortages," and possibilities for factor substitu-
tion; insurance and organizational alternatives.
ECP 6537-Health Care Economics II (4) Prereq: ECO 6116.
Theoretical and empirical evaluations relating to the eco-
nomic performance of the health care sector. Optimal price
and output policy including distributional considerations;
cost-benefit analysis, public production, research and cen-
tralized vs. decentralized control.
ECP 6615-Urban Economics (4) Prereq: ECO 4205, 4101 or
equivalent. Salient aspects of urban phenomena including
theoretical explanations of the process of urbanization; city
structures and models. Urban problems including poverty
and race, housing, transportation and environment. The ur-
ban public economy, and urban public services.
ECP 6625-Regonal Economics (4) Prereq: ECO 4205,4101 or
equivalent. Definition of regions and elements of regional
economic analysis. Location theory, regional interdepen-
dence and spatial equilibrium. Regional economic change,
including economic accounts and other measures of activity;
cycles, growth, and planned development.
ECP 6705-Economics of Business Decisions (3) Designed
primarily for MBA candidates. Prereq: ECO 5111, ACC 6311,
STA 6606, 6357, 6358, FIN 5405. Synthesis and application of
microeconomic theory and related business administration
principles to managerial decision making through a
problem-solving orientation.
ECP 6905-Individual Work in Economics (1-4; max: 8) Read-
ing and/or research in the several areas of economics.
ECS 5005-Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems (3)
Prereq: permission of department. Theoretical and empirical
study of contemporary societal economic systems.
ECS 5115-Contemporary Economic Problems in Sub-Saha-
ra Africa (2) Current developments in production, trade, and
transportation, with emphasis on development plans in vari-
ous countries.
ECS 5425-Financial Institutions and Fiscal Policies of
Selected Latin American Countries (2) Public finances, mon-
ey systems, and banking policies of representative countries
of Latin America.
ECS 6006-Economic Systems Seminar (4) Market and non-
market types of economies, their characteristics and eco-
nomics, and their different significance for systems of gov-
ernment and general social orders, legal and juridical
systems, and for business and public policy.
ECS 6015-Theory of Economic Development (4) Broad
analytical, nonhistorical framework for examining economic
underdevelopment and possible escape therefrom. Transi-
tion to secular economic growth and principles by which an
underdeveloped country can achieve development objec-
tives.
ECS 6025-Economic Development Seminar (4) Theory and
problems of economic development pertinent to market
and nonmarket economies. Emphasis on the relationship be-
tween economic system development and economic
growth.
ECS 6405-The Economy of Spanish Latin America (4) Con-
temporary economic and commercial problems in Spanish
Latin America; current developments in production, trans-
portation, and trade of the various countries.
ECS 6415-The Economy of Brazil (4) Economic develop-
ment and contemporary economic and commercial prob-
lems of Brazil; production, transportation, and trade from
both a national and a regional point of view.







72./ FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ECS 6426-Financial and Fiscal Institutions of Selected Sub-
Saharan Countries(4) Public finances and the money and
banking policies of representative countries of Africa.


EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION &
SUPERVISION
College of Education
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: J. L. Wattenbarger. Graduate Coordinator:
J. Hale. Professors: S. K. Alexander, Jr.; P. A. Clark; T.
W. Cole, Sr.; J. A. Hale; R. B. Kimbrough; R. B. Mautz;
H. H. McAshan;* M. Y. Nunnery; C. A. Sandeen; E. A.
Todd; J. L. Wattenbarger; E. F. White.* Associate Pro-
fessors: T. C. Healy;* j. W. Longstreth; J. M. Nickens.
Assistant Professor: H. Franklin.
*These members of the faculty of the University of North Florida are
also members of the graduate faculty of the University of Florida and
participate in the doctoral program of the University of Florida De-
partment of Educational Administration and Supervision.
Programs leading to the degrees Master of Arts in
Education, Master of Education, Specialist in Ed.uca-
tion, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy
are offered through the Department of Educational
Administration and Supervision.
Areas of specialization include general adminis-
tration with emphasis on elementary and secondary
administration and higher education administration
with specialization in community college leadership,
university leadership, vocational-technical adminis-
tration, and administrative theory. Special programs
in the administration of allied health programs in
higher education and.in school and college business
management are also available.
The Institute of Higher Education provides ad-
vanced graduate students many opportunities for re-
search and study in all areas of post high school edu-
cation. Similarly, the Center for Community Educa-
tion and the Institute for Educational Finance provide
opportunities with special emphasis in those areas.
A candidate for admission to the department will
be judged not only on the basis of quantitative
criteria (listed elsewhere in this Catalog) but also in
relation to prior experience, especially as it relates to
future career goals.
Cooperative arrangements between the University
of Florida, the University of North Florida, and Florida
International University make it possible forqualified
persons with master's degrees to obtain Ed.S. and
Ed.D. degrees in'educational administration and su-
pervision from the University of Florida. Appropriate
members of the faculties of UNF and FIU are or will
be members of the graduate faculty of the University
of Florida.
ADE 6260-Organization and Administration of Adult Edu-
cation (3) Overview of adult education in the United States;
the role of administration in adult education; the job of the
local director of adult education; Florida law and regulations
relating to adult education in the public schools.
EDA 6061-Educational Organization and Administration
(3) Foundation course in school administration. Basic con-
cepts, principles, and practices in local, state, and federal or-
ganization and administration.
EDA 6105-Operations Research in Education Adminis-
tration (3) Application of select quantitative systems tech-
niques from management and operations research to educa-
tional administration; utilities, queuing theory, graph theory,
decision theory, game theory, simulation, and modeling.
EDA 6192-Educational Leadership I (3) Basic course on the
nature of educational leadership. Emphasis on the role of of-


ficial leadership in group development, improving group
structure, and program improvements.
EDA 6195-Educational Leadership II (3) Contemporary re-
search on diffusion of innovations, planning of change, or-
ganizational theory, and political power in policy decision
making. Role of administrators and instructional leaders in
establishing educational policies.
EDA 6201-Business Affairs in Education (3) Role and func-
tion of the business office and a review of current research
and administrative procedures related to purchasing and
supply management, school food service, transportation, in-
surance, indebtedness, and office management.
EDA 6203-Educational Budgeting and Accounting Systems
(3) Contemporary theory and research in fiscal budgeting
processes in colleges and universities, elementary and sec-
ondary schools, with simulated practical application through
case studies and problems dealing with annual budgets and
cost effectiveness.
EDA 6222-Administration of School Personnel (3) Prob-
lems of the professional school staff and administration of
staff personnel in public schools.
EDA 6225-Labor Relations in Public Education (3) In-
troduction to problems and issues. Emphasis on various
aspects of employee, union, and management relationships
in the public sector, including elementary, secondary, and
higher education.
EDA 6232-Public School Law (3) A general course for
school administrators and teachers on the law as it affects
the public school operation in America. Emphasis is placed
on religion; desegregation; compulsory attendance; torts;
curriculum; student control and discipline; and teacher free-
doms, employment and dismissal.
EDA 6242-Public School Finance (3) State, local, and feder-
al financing of education; simulation of alternative programs
of school financing; principles and criteria of taxation for ed-
ucation.
EDA 6271-Utilization of Computers in Educational Admin-
istration (3) Man-machine systems in educational adminis-
tration. Electronic data processing and the school adminis-
trator, educational information systems, and other computer
applications.
EDA 6300-Principles of Community Education Adminis-
tration (3) The developing concepts and application of the
basic principles to administration of educational institutions
and community agencies.
EDA 6306-Theories and Practices of Community Education
Administration (3) Prereq: EDA 6300. Contemporary theories
and practices, with emphasis on interagency coordination
and cooperation, programming for lifelong learning and
community member involvement in educational decision
making.
EDA 6503-The Principalship (3) Organization and adminis-
tration of the school; emphasis on competencies necessary
for leadership and management of the school center, both
elementary and secondary.
EDA 6905-Individual Work (1-5)
EDA 6931-Special Topics (1-5)
EDA 6935-Problems in School Administration and Super-
vision (1-5) In-service training course through regularly
scheduled on-campus work conferences open only to super-
intendents and supervisors; or a problems course, offered
through extension or on campus, for superintendents, su-
pervisors, principals, junior college administrators, and train-
ees for such positions. S/U.
EDA 6948-Supervised Practice in School Administration
(1-5) Only advanced graduate students are permitted to en-
roll. Students are given an opportunity to perform adminis-
trative duties under supervision. S/U.
EDA 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
EDA 7103-Theories of Educational Administration (3) Pre-
req: one year of graduate study. Consideration of theoretical
constructs relative to the organization and administration of
educational institutions.
EDA 7205--ducational Planning (3) Cooperative planning
of educational programs. Skills and methodologies as-
sociated with developing annual and long-range com-
prehensive plans for meeting educational needs of school
districts, colleges, and universities.






ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING / 73


EDA 7236-The Law and Higher Education (3) A basic course
for higher education majors in educational administration.
Analyzes the legal structure of higher education, religion, ac-
ademic freedom of faculty, employment, due process, stu-
dents' rights of speech and expression, search and seizure,
desegregation and tort liability.
EDA 7244-The Financing of Higher Education (3) Financing
of higher education, junior college through university.
Course includes theoretical basis for use of tax funds for ed-
ucation, student fees and tuition, state methods for financ-
ing, planning, cost benefit, budgeting, federal role, and capi-
tal outlay.
EDA 7260-Planning Educational Facilities (3) School plant
survey methods and planning of educational facilities. Field
experience available.
EDA 7550-Higher Education Administration (3) Educa-
tional policies, functions, and practices.
EDA 7565-Coordination of State Systems of Higher Educa-
tion (3) Organizational structure and the basic principles of
coordination and control of higher education at state and re-
gional levels. Principles of leadership expressed through
controlling and coordinating boards; role of boards and staff
in planning development and operation; state, regional, and
national accrediting agencies.
EDA 7945-Practicum in Supervision and Administration
(1-10) A seminar and an internship in administration and su-
pervision. S/U.
EDA 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
EDA 7990-Research Design in Educational Administration
(3) Open only to students in the Advanced School. Prereq:
EDF 6481 or the equivalent. Individually identified problems
in administration conceptualized in theoretical, terms and
appropriate research procedures determined.
EEX 6511-Administration in Special Education (3) Prereq:
EEX 3010 or 6051 or permission of the instructor. Local, state,
and federal organization and administration, with emphasis
on the administration of services to handicapped children.
EEX 7535-Seminar in Administration and Supervision of
Special Education (3; max: 6) Prereq: EDA 6061, EEX 6511.
Current problems in the provision of special education serv-
ices in local, state, and federal programs.
EEX 7945-Practicum: Special Education Administration
(3-9; max: 12) Prereq: EEX 7535, six credits of special educa-
tion, six credits of educational administration, and written
request to enroll six weeks prior to registration.
EVT 6264-Administration of Vocational Education (3) Basic
principles of administering a program on national, state, and
local levels.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: B. E. Cherrington. Graduate Coordinator:
M. A. Uman. Graduate Research Professors: R. E.
Kalman; J. T. Tou; A. van der Ziel. Professors: T. E. Bul-
lock; W. H. Chen; E: R. Chenette; B. E. Cherrington; D.
G. Childers; K. L. Doty; O. I. Elgerd; J. G. Fossum; R. C.
Johnson, Jr.; S. S. Li; F. A. Lindholm; A. H. Nevis; J. R.
O'Malley; R. A. Ramey, Jr.; C. V. Shaffer; J. R. Smith; S.
Y. W. Su; R. L. Sullivan; A. D. Sutherland; M. A. Uman;
K. M. van Vliet; J. K. Watson. Associate Professors: R.
L. Bailey; L. W. Couch, II; M. H. Latour; A. Neu-
groschel. Assistant Professors: D. R. MacQuigg. Eglin
AFB Extension Service: K. E. Dominiak; R. Yii.
The Department of Electrical Engineering offers the
Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Engineer,
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The department
offers graduate study and research in biomedical en-
gineering, computer engineering, communications,
systems and circuits, physical electronics, applied
electronics, fields and waves, electric energy engi-
neering, and other engineering disciplines.
Graduate students in the Department of Electrical


Engineering have bachelor's degrees from many areas
--electrrcal engineering, other engineering dis-
ciplines, mathematics, physics, chemistry, and other
technical fields.
A thesis is required for all master's degree candi-
dates, although exceptions are possible by petition.
The minimum course work required for the master's
degree is 36 semester credits, including no less than 30
semester credits of regular course work and up to six
semester credits of research taken under course
number EEL 6971.
All prospective Ph.D. students must take the Ph.D.
entrance exam at the earliest opportunity. The exam,
which may include both written and oral portions,
can be administered at any time during the year.
Study for the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering
at the University of Florida by qualified master's de-
gree recipients at the University of Central Florida is
facilitated by a cooperative arrangement in which ap-
propriate members of the faculty of UCF are members
of the graduate faculty of the University of Florida.
The following course listing indicates the major
areas of faculty interest. Special topics courses, EEL
5934 and 6935, and individual work courses, EEL 5905
and 6905, cover a variety of subjects for which there
are no present courses.

CDA 6106-Advanced Computer Architecture (3) Prereq:
EEL 4713C, EEL 6824. Evaluation, study and comparison of
computer systems. Development of formal and informal
models of computer architectures. Topics of current interest
in computer organization.
COP 5630-Software Engineering (3) Prereq: COC 3110 or
EIN 3114. Principles of software design and engineering. In-
cludes topics in project organization, specification tech-
niques, reliability measurement, documentation.
EEL 5134-Analysis of Nonlinear Systems (2) Prereq: EEL
5182. Analysis of nonlinear systems by Liapunov theory, per-
turbation, and describing functions.
EEL 5182-State Variable Methods in Linear Systqm (3) Pre-
req: EEL 3135. Linear algebra and state variable methods for
design and analysis of discrete and continuous linear sys-
tems.
EEL 5370C-Applied Electronics (4) Modern communication
circuits. Laboratory.
EEL 5485-Applied Magnetics (3) Properties and processes in
magnetic materials are introduced through examples such as
inductors, pulse transformers, memory elements, dc to dc
converter, and tape recording.
EEL 5544-Noise in Linear Systems (3) Passage of electrical
noise and signals through linear systems. Statistical represen-
tation of random signals, electrical noise, and spectra.
EEL 5562-4mage Processing and Computer Vision (3) Pic-
torial data representation; feature encoding; spatial filtering;
image enhancement; image segmentation; cluster seeking;
2-D z-transforms; scene analysis; picture description lan-
guage; object recognition; pictorial database; interactive
graphics; picture understanding machine.
EEL 5631-Digital Control Systems (3) Prereq: EEL 4657, EEL
3701. A study of the digital computer as a control element,
classical sampled data control theory, and applications with
microcomputers.
EE( 5718-Computer Communications (3) Prereq: EEL 4514.
Design of data communication networks: modems, termi-
nals, error control, multiplexing, message switching, and
data concentration.
EEL 5719C-Digital Filtering (3) Analysis and design of
digital filters for discrete signal processing; spectral analysis;
fast Fourier transform. Laboratory.
EEL 5744C-Microcomputer Hardware and Software (4) Pre-
req: EEL 3701, EEL 3304. Functional behavior of micro-
processsors, memory, peripheral support integrated circuit
hardware; microcomputer system and development soft-
ware; applications. Laboratory.
EEL 5761-Hardware-Software Interactions: Time Sharing
System (3) Prereq: EEL 4714C. Input-output control and in-






74 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


terface, resource sharing and allocation. Software (hard-
ware) extensions of hardware (software) functions. Digital'
system evaluation.
EEL 5768-Computer Interfacing (2) Prereq: EEL 4713C. Func-
tional, logical, and timing requirements in the control of per-
ipheral equipment. Peripheral-processor communication
and protocol.
EEL 5821-Data Base Engineering (3) Prereq: EEL 4713C. Ar-
chitecture of a data base management system (DBMS), data
models, data sublanguages, current research topics in data
base engineering.
EEL 5905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 8) Prereq: consent of
department chairman. Selected problems or projects.
EEL 5934-Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (1-3; max:
8).
EEL 6156-Advanced Circuit Analysis (3) Advanced tech-
niques of circuit .analysis. Design objectives, performance
functions, optimization techniques applied to circuit design.
EEL 6171-Advanced System Theory I (3) Structural analysis
of linear dynamical systems. Invariance, F mod G invariance,
constrained reachability, pole assignment and stability, ad-
vanced topics in linear algebra useful in mathematical sys-
tem theory.
EEL 6172--Advanced System Theory II (3) Disturbance de-
coupling, unknown-input observability, synthesis of ob-
servers, output controllability, realization theory.
EEL 6264-Advanced Electric Energy Systems I (3) Prereq:
EEL 4215 or consent of instructor. Energy systems planning
and operation with emphasis on advanced analysis method-
ologies and computer simulation.
EEL 6265-Advanced Electric Energy Systems II (3) Prereq:
EEL 6264. Continuation of EEL 6264 with additional emphasis
given to the new electric energy technologies.
EEL 6267-Advanced Electromechanical Energy Conversion
(2) Electromechanical energy conversion processes from a
field theory point of view. Dynamics of media in the pres-
ence of electric and magnetic fields.
EEL 6311-Electronic Circuits I (3) Prereq: required under-
graduate electronics and control sequences. Analysis and
design of operational amplifier circuits, other topics in
quasi-linear electronic circuits.
EEL 6312-Electronic Circuits II (3) Prereq: EEL 6311. Design
of active circuits, analysis and design of phase-locked loops
and frequency synthesizers.
EEL 6315-Solid-State Circuits I (2) Prereq: EEL 3396, EEL
4331C Advanced IC design. Design rules, use of computer in
circuit simulation and mask layout. Each student designs a
small CMOS system or circuit to be included on the class
chip.
EEL 6316-Solid-State Circuits II (2) Prereq: EEL 6315. Con-
tinuation of EEL 6315.
EEL 6317-Solid-State Circuits III (2) Prereq: EEL 6316. Con-
tinuation of EEL 6315 series.
EEL 6381-Network Representation of Solid-State Devices I
(2) Prereq: EEL 3396 or consent of instructor. Relationship be-
tween equivalent-circuit models and the physical mecha-
nisms governing device operation. Special attention given to
approximations and methods of reasoning. Emphasis on
large-signal, dynamic models for MOS transistors and re-
lated devices.
EEL 6382-Semiconductor Physical Electronics I (3) Crystal
structures; imperfections; statistics; lattice dynamics; energy
band theory. Equilibrium properties of electrons and holes
in semiconductors. Electronic transport phenomena.
Boltzmann's equation and transport coefficients in semi-
conductors.
EEL 6383-Semiconductor Physical Electronics II (3) Prereq:
EEL 6382. Scattering mechanisms. Recombination-generation
and trapping processes; optical properties. Excess carrier
phenomena. Photoelectric effects in semiconductors. Opto-
electronic devices. junction and MOS devices.
EEL 6388-Fluctuation Phenomena (3) Prereq: EEL 5544.
Noise theory with applications to electrical engineering.
Sources of noise in electronic devices; statistical and spectral
representation. Influence of noise upon the performance of
circuits and systems. Limitation of detectors and instruments
due to noise.
EEL 6397-Semiconductor Device Theory I (3) Prereq: EEL
4352 or consent of instructor. Semiconductor material prop-


erties, equilibrium and nonequilibrium processes, quasi-
Fermi levels; pn junctions; charge-control modeling; high-
level injection, heavy-doping effects.
EEL 6396-Semiconductor Device Theory 11 (3) Prereq: EEL
6397. Basic mechanisms in bipolar junction transistors, low-
and high-current effects; fundamental principles of the
MOS system, surface effects on pn junctions, MOS field-ef-
fect transistors.
EEL 6442-Physical Optics for Engineers (3) Fourier analysis
approach to physical optics; spread and transfer functions,
effects of optical spectrum limitations. Noise. Holography.
Abberations, lens system design and optimization.
EEL 6443-Electro-Optical Devices (3) Laser oscillators and
amplifiers: gaseous, liquid, solid, and semiconductor lasers.
Crystal optics: nonlinear optics, second harmonic gener-
ation, parametric amplifiers and oscillators. Electro-optical
modulators, detectors, optical transmission lines and anten-
nas. Integrated optics.
EEL 6486-Electromagnetic Field Theory and Applications 1
(3) Prereq: undergraduate course in fields and waves. Ad-
vanced electrostatics, magnetostatics, time-varying elec-
tromagnetic fields, wave propagation, waveguides.
EEL 6487-Electromagnetic Field Theory and Applications II
(3) Prereq: EEL 6486. Electromagnetic radiation, antennas,
wave propagation in anisotropic media.
EEL 6489-Current Topics in Applied Magnetics (3) Physical
principles of applied magnetism are examined in the con-
tent of current areas of research and development.
EEL 6503-Signal Representation and Design (3) Prereq: EEL
4516 or equivalent. Representation of signals and noise by
sampling. Fourier and other transform methods, complex
variable techniques. Criteria of optimality in communication
and ranging systems. Analytical signal theory; digital signal
design.
EEL 6505-Digital Signal Processing (3) Prereq: EEL 5544, EEL
5719C. Measurement andvat alysis of signals and noise.
Digital filtering and special analysis; fast Fourier transform.
EEL 6509-Space Communicatins (3) Prereq: EEL 6534. Tele-
metering systems, space communication links, satellite com-
munications systems, space tracking, and navigation sys-
tems.
EEL 6524-Statistical Decision Theory (3) Prereq: EEL 5544.
Hypothesis testing of signals in the presence of noise by
Bayes, Neyman-Pearson, minimax criteria; estimation of sig-
nal parameters.
EEL 6534-Theory of Communication I (3) Prereq: EEL 5544.
Filtering, modulation, and demodulation of signals cor-
rupted by noise; passage of electrical noise and signals
through nonlinear filters and systems.
EEL 6535-Theory of Communication II (3) Prereq: EEL 5544.
Optimum receiver principles; analysis of digital and analog
communication systems in the presence of noise; modeling
of communication channels.
EEL 6614-Modem Control Theory I (3) Prereq: EEL 5182.
Optimization of systems using the calculus of variation, dy-
namic programming, and the maximum principle. Extensive
study of the linear plant with a quadratic performance index.
Observers and dynamic compensators.
EEL 6615-Modem Control Theory II (3) Prereq: EEL 6614 or
consent of instructor. Kalman-Bucy filters. Discrete and con-
tinuous filtering. Computational techniques. Smoothing and
system identification techniques.
EEL 6733-Abstract Machines and Languages (3) Logic, set
theory, modern algebra, finite and infinite state machines,
grammars, language oriented machines.
EEL 6769-Hardware-Software Interactions: Nonnumeric
Processing (3) Prereq: EEL 5821 or consent of instructor. In-
formation .representations; content and context search
methods; associative memories, retrieval language mapping;
parallel processing; hardware and software garbage collec-
tions.
EEL 6824-Algorithm Design and Analysis (3) Prereq: EEL
6733. Methods and techniques for developing and eval-
uating algorithms. Functional complexity, computational
bounds, program verification and proof methods.
EEL 6825-Pattern Recognition and Intelligent Systems (3)
Decision functions; optimum decision criteria; training
algorithms; unsupervised learning; feature extraction; data
reduction; potential functions; syntactic pattern description;
recognition grammars; machine intelligence.







ENGINEERING SCIENCES / 75


EEL 6827-Topics in Computer Engineering (3) Prereq: EEL
5821. Data manipulation and description languages; in-
formation network, systems evaluation, question-answering
and man-machine communication.
EEL 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 8) Prereq: consent of
department chairman. Selected problems or projects.
EEL 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
EEL 6932-Graduate Seminar (1) Discussion of topics in
fields of graduate study and research. S/U.
EEL 6935-Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (1-4; max:
12, including EEL 6905)
EEL 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
EEL 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
EEL 7900-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
ELR 5112-Automatic Speech Processing (3) Prereq: EEL
3135. Various models of speech production and perception,
speech analysis and synthesis, speaker and speech recog-
nition by automatic means.
ELR 5210-Cybernetics (3) Topics in communication, con-
trol, information processing, and intelligence in man and
machines, man-machine, and machine-machine interac-
tions.
ELR 6225-Electrical Activity of the Nervous System (2) Pre-
req: MAP 3302, EEL 3135, or PHY 2712L. Coreq: EML 3100 or
PHY 4523. Analysis of the electrical signals of peripheral
nerve and brain, with application of systems engineering
techniques.
ELR 6226-Biophysical Models of Nerve Impulse Propaga-
tion (2) Prereq: ELR 6225. Analysis of chemical, electrical,
hydrodynamic, and solid-state models of axonic and syn-
aptic nerve transmission.

ENGINEERING SCIENCES
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: K. T. Millsaps. Associate Chairman: M. A.
Eisenberg. Graduate Coordinator: C.-C. Hsu. Gradu-
ate Research Professors: N. Cristescu; A. E. S. Green; R.
E. Kalman. Professors: R. C. Anderson; R. L. Bispl-
inghoff; W. H. Boykin, Jr.; M. H. Clarkson; I. K. Eb-
cioglu; M. A. Eisenberg; R. L. Fearn;,G. W. Hemp; J. W.
Hoover; U. H. Kurzweg; B. M. Leadon; E. R. Lindgren;
L. E. Malvern;' K. T. Millsaps; G. E. Nevill, Jr.; E.
Partheniades; C. A. Ross; O. H. Shemdin; R. L.
Sierakowski; C.-T. Sun; E. K. Walsh; H. E. Wilhelm. En-
gineers: H. W. Doddington; J. E. Milton. Associate Pro-
fessors: C. G. Edson, C.-C. Hsu; S. Y. Lu.
The Department of Engineering Sciences offers the
Master of Engineering, Master of Science, and Engi-
neer degrees in aerospace engineering, in engineering
mechanics, and in engineering science. The Doctor of
Philosophy degree is offered in aerospace engineer-
ing and in engineering mechanics, with specialized
tracks in the latter discipline in coastal and oceano-
graphic engineering, in engineering analysis and ap-
plied mathematics, and theoretical and applied me-
chanics.
Areas of specialization include aerodynamics, ap-
plied mathematics, applied optics, atmospheric sci-
ence, biomechanics, coastal hydraulics and water
quality control, coastal hydrodynamics and oceanog-
raphy, control theory, creative design, fluid mechan-
ics, solid mechanics, and structural mechanics.
Aerospace Engineering
The following Engineering Common Courses are available
for graduate major credit: ENU 6730--ntroduction to
Plasmas; ENU 6731-Plasna Theory; ENU 6741L-Plasma
Laboratory; EGM 5816-Intermediate Fluid Dynamics; EGM
6321-Principles of Engineering Analysis I; EGM 6322-Prin-
ciples of Engineering Analysis II; EGM 6323-Principles of
Engineering Analysis III; EGM 6324-Principles of Engineer-
ing Analysis IV; EGM 6811-Fundamentals of Fluid Dynam-
ics; EGM 6812-Inviscid Fluid Flow; EGM 6813-Viscous


Fluid Flow; EGM 6835-Boundary Layer Theory; EGM 6845-
Turbulent Fluid Flow.
EAS 6135 The Dynamics of Real Gases I (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Introductory kinetic theory, the perfect gas law,
transport phenomena, absorption and dispersion of ul-
trasonic waves, relaxation phenomena. Rarefied flow. Radi-
ation gasdynamics.
EAS 6136-The Dynamics of Real Gases II (3) Prereq: con-
sent of instructor. Effects of viscosity, thermal diffusivity, dif-
fusion of species and chemical reactions in nozzle and
boundary layer flows.
EAS 6138-Gasdynamics (3) Prereq: EAS 4112, 4112L. Theory
of sound waves, subsonic and supersonic flows,
shockwaves, explosions and implosions.
EAS 6141-Advanced Plasma Theory (3) Kinetic theory of
plasmas based on the equations of Vlasov, Boltzmann and
Lenard-Balescu. Applications to electromagnetic waves and
transport properties in plasmas, and diode and gas discharge
theory.
EAS 6221-Advanced Aerospace Structures (3) Prereq: EAS
4200, 4210 or equivalent. Introduction to wing and fuselage
stress analysis. Diagonal semi-tension field design. Sandwich
construction and design. Fatigue analysis, fail-safe design.
EAS 6225-Aerodynamics of Wings and Bodies (3) Prereq:
EAS 4106, EAS 4112 or equivalent. Classical aerodynamic the-
ory including thin-wing theory, slender-body theory and
three-dimensional wings in steady flow.
EAS 6242-Advanced Structural Composites I (2) Prereq:
EAS 4240 or equivalent. Micro and macro behavior of lamina.
Macro behavior of laminates. Static and dynamic analysis of
laminated plates.
EAS 6243-Advanced Structural Composites II (2) Prereq:
EAS 6242. Fracture mechanics of continuous and chopped
fiber composites. Failure theories for anisotropic materials.
Introduction to topics in anisotropic elasticity.
EAS 6415--Guidance and Control of Aerospace Vehicles (3)
Prereq: EAS 4412 or equivalent. Application of modern con-
trol theory to aerospace vehicles. Parameter identification
methods applied to aircraft and missiles.
EAS 6720-Advanced Aerospace Design (1-6; max: 12) Ad-
vanced aerospace design projects.
EAS 6905-Aerospace Research (1-6; max: 12)
EAS 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
EAS 6935-Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Discussion of topics
in fields of graduate study and research. S/U.
EAS 6939-Special Topics in Aerospace Engineering (1-6;
max: 12) Laboratory, lectures, or conferences covering
selected topics in space engineering.
EAS 6940--Supervised Teaching (1-5)
EAS 6971-Research for Masters Thesis (1-15)
EAS 7900-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
Engineering Science and Mechanics
The following Engineering Common Courses are available
for graduate major credit: ENU 6730-Introduction to
Plasmas; ENU 6731-Plasma Theory; ENU 6741L-Plasma
Laboratory; EGM 5816-Intermediate Fluid Dynamics
EGM 5005-Laser Principles and Applications (3) Prereq:
consent of instructor. Operating principles of solid, electric
discharge, gas dynamic and chemical lasers. Applications of
lasers to lidar, aerodynamic and structural testing and for
cutting and welding of materials.
EGM 5111L--Experimental Stress Analysis (3) Prereq: EGM
3520. Introduction to techniques of experimental stress anal-
ysis in static systems. Lecture and laboratory include applica-
tions of electrical resistance strain gauges, photoelasticity,
brittle coatings, moir6 fringe analysis and x-ray stress analy-
sis.
EGM 5421-Modern Techniques of Structural Dynamics I (3)
Prereq: EGM 3400 or 3420, EGM 3311, EGM 3520 and COP
3212. Modern methods of elastomechanics applied to sys-
tematic analysis and -automatic computation. Finite dif-
ference techniques, matrix force and displacement methods,
finite element modeling. Application of digital computers.
EGM 5430-Intermediate Dynamics (3) Prereq: EGM 3400 or
3420, and EGM 3311. Motion of particles and rigid bodies un-
der constant and variable force fields. Introduction to Ham-
ilton and Lagrange equations.







76 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


EGM 5533-Advanced Mechanics of Solids and Structures
(3) Prereq: EGM 3520. Analysis of stress and strain in de-
formable bodies. Elastic stress-strain relations. Theories of
failure. Shear center. Unsymmetrical bending of beams.
Curved beams. Beams on elastic foundations. Torsion of
bars. Energy methods.
EGM 5550-ElevatedTemperature Stress Analysis (3) Prereq:
EML 4140. EGM 3520. Sources of heat and heat transfer. Tran-
sient temperatures and stresses in tubes, rings, shafts, beams
and built-up structures. Elementary problems of plates and
shells. Material properties at elevated temperatures. Design
procedures for elevated temperatures.
EGM 5905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 6) Prereq: EGM 3400
or 3420 and MAC 3313. Individual research projects in solid
and fluid mechanics at an advanced undergraduate and be-
ginning graduate level.
EGM 6215-Theory of Structural Vibrations I (3) Prereq:
EGM 4200. Lagrange's equations. Multiple degree of free-
dom systems. Free and forced motions. Normal coordinates.
Effect of damping. Use of matrix methods, computers,
Rayleigh-Ritz and other approximation techniques.
EGM 6225-Theory of Structural Vibrations II (3) Prereq:
EGM 6215. Longitudinal and torsional vibrations of bars, lat-
eral vibrations of bars, membranes and plates. Normal
mode, lumped parameter, and transformation methods.
Transmission and reflection of stress waves in isotropic
elastic media.
EGM 6235--Nonlinear Vibrations (3) Prereq: EGM 4200 or
6215. Phase plane and singular point methods. Limit cycles.
Method of averaging. Application to one degree of freedom
autonomous and nonautonomous systems. Nonlinear reso-
nance. Stability of solutions. Parametrically excited systems.
Method of perturbations.
EGM 6245-Random Vibrations (3) Prereq: EGM 6215.
Statistical analysis, response of discrete single and multiple
degree of freedom dynamical systems to stationary random
forces and parametric excitation. Extension to continuous
systems and nonstationary excitation. Applications to engi-
neering problems.
EGM 6250-Theoretical Acoustics (3) Prereq: basic course in
vibrations and some background with partial differential
equations. Fundamentals of wave phenomena in vibrating
solid and fluid media. Analytical methods of attacking
acoustical problems.
EGM 6321-Principles of Engineering Analysis I (3) Prereq:
EGM 4313 or MAP 4305. Solution of linear and nonlinear or-
dinary differential equations. Method of Frobenius, classifi-
cation of singularities. Integral representation of solutions.
Treatment of the Bessel, Hermite, Legendre, hypergeometric
and Mathieu equations. Asymptotic methods including the
WBK and saddle point techniques. Treatment of nonlinear
autonomous equations. Phase plane trajectories and limit
cycles. Thomas-Fermi, Emden and van der Pol equations.
EGM 6322-Principles of Engineering Analysis II (3) Prereq:
EGM 4313 or MAP 4341. General analytic methods for solv-
ing partial differential equations of first and second order.
Treatment of elliptic,parabolic and hyperbolic equations in-
cluding reduction to canonical form. Detailed discussion of
the equations of wave propagation, heat conduction and
potential theory. Application of similarity transforms for re-
duction to ordinary differential equations. Solution of cer-
tain nonlinear partial differential equations arising in hydro-
dynamics via use of perturbation expansions.
EGM 6323-Principles of Engineering Analysis III (3) Prereq:
EGM 6322 or equivalent. Dirichlet and Neumann boundary
value problems. Green's function for Laplace's equation in
two and three dimensions. Conformal mapping techniques
and spherical harmonics. Treatment of the Helmholtz,
Poisson, and Schroedinger equations. Use of integral trans-
form techniques to solve certain equations arising in applied
physics, hydrodynamics, and electromagnetic theory.
EGM 6324-Principles of Engineering Analysis IV (2) Prereq:
ECM 4313 or MAP 4305. Solution of Volterra and Fredholm
integral equations of the first and second kind. Inversion of
self-adjoint operators via Green's function, properties of
symmetric kernels, Hilbert Schmidt theory and the bilinear
formula. Treatment of the singular integral equations of
Abel and Carleman. Iteration and approximation tech-
niques.


EGM 6341-Numerical Methods of Engineering Analysis I
(3) Prereq: EGM 4313 or equivalent. Finite-difference calcu-
lus; interpolation and extrapolation; roots of equations; solu-
tion of algebraic equations; eigenvalue problems; least-
squares method; quadrature formulas; numerical solution of
ordinary differential equations; methods of weighted re-
siduals. Use of digital computer.
EGM 6342-Numerical Methods of Engineering Analysis II
(3) Prereq: EGM 6341 or consent of instructor. Finite-dif-
ference methods for parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic par-
tial differential equations. Application to heat conduction,
solid and fluid mechanics problems.
EGM 6351-Finite Element Methods (3) Prereq: EGM 6341
and EGM 6611, or consent of instructor. Displacement meth-
od formulation; generalization by means of variational prin-
ciples and methods of weighted residuals; element shape
functions. Application to heat conduction, solid and fluid
mechanics problems. Use of general purpose computer
codes.
EGM 6422-Modem Techniques of Structural Dynamics II
(2) Prereq: EGM 5421 and 6215. Modeling of complex struc-
tural systems occurring in aeronautical, mechanical, and
structural engineering. Response of such systems to impulse,
shock and random excitations, emphasizing computer tech-
niques.
EGM 6444-Advanced Dynamics I(3) Prereq: EGM 5430. Dy-
namics of particles and rigid bodies applied to advanced en-
gineering problems utilizing variational and transformation
principles.
EGM 6445-Advanced Dynamics II (3) Prereq: EGM 6444.
Theory and application of Lagrangian equations to engineer-
ing problems. Hamilton-Jacobi theory and its applications.
EGM 6460-Stability of Dynamical Systems (3) Prereq: EGM
4200 or 5430. Basic concepts of stability, stability and
asymptotic behavior of motion. Forced oscillations of sys-
tems with nonlinear characteristics. Floquet theory, Mathieu
and Hill equations, Liapunov's direct method, criteria of
Routh-Hurwitz, Popov and others.
EGM 6476-Inertial Guidance and Control (3) Prereq: EEL
6614. Modern navigational and vehicle guidance and control
techniques based on use of inertial reference.
EGM 6478-Nonlinear Control Systems (3) Prereq: EEL 5182.
Stability of nonlinear systems using Liapunov's second
method, the Popov and other frequency domain criteria.
EGM 6551-Introduction to Theory of Thermal Stresses (2)
Prereq: EGM 5550. Theory of thermal distortion and induced
thermal stresses. Strain energy principles. Two- and three-
dimensional problems. Creep. Thermal instability.
EGM 6584-Principles of Mechanics in Biomedical Engineer-
ing (3) Rheological behavior of biological materials subject
to steady-state and dynamic loading. Mathematical models
and analytical techniques used in the biosciences. Ex-
perimental techniques for material property investigation of
representative body tissues.
EGM 6611--Continuum Mechanics I (3) Prereq: EGM 3520.
Foundations of continuum mechanics. Analysis of motion
and deformation. Conservation laws; tensor properties of
stress and strain. Constitutive theory. Thermodynamics of
continuous media.
EGM 6612-Continuum Mechanics II (3) Prereq: EGM 6611.
Specific constitutive classes of continuous media; elastic sol-
ids, Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Materials which
exhibit plastic and viscoelastic behavior. Formulation of spe-
cific problems.
EGM 6613-Advanced Continuum Mechanics (2) Prereq:
EGM 6612. Comprehensive, unified treatment of mathemat-
ical theories of solid and fluid mechanics, including gases.
EGM 6652-Introduction to Elasticity (3) Prereq: EGM 3520.
Analysis of stress. Analysis of strain. Stress-strain relations of
elasticity. Compatibility equations. Plane elasticity in
Cartesian and polar coordinates. Solution of two-
dimensional problems by means of complex variable meth-
ods.
EGM 6653-Theory of Elasticity (3) Prereq: EGM 6652. Three-
dimensional problems including torsion, bending, stress
concentration. Thermal stress and stress wave propagation.
Energy principles and variational methods.
ECM 6670-Introduction to Inelastic Behavior of Materials
(3) Prereq: EGM 3520 Metal plasticity theory: emphasis on







ENGLISH / 77


ideal plasticity with applications; slip-line fields; limit analy-
sis. Linear viscoelasticity; analysis of creep, relaxation and al-
ternating load response; application to initial-boundary val-
ue problems.
EGM 6671-Theory of the Inelastic Continuum (3) Prereq:
EGM 6611, 6670. Constitutive theories of work-hardening
metal plasticity and viscoplasticity; formulation of theories
for analytical and numerical problem solution; selected ap-
plications.
EGM 6682-Theory of Viscoelasticity (2) Prereq: EGM 6611,
6670. Theories of solid and fluid materials which exhibit his-
tory dependence. Development from Boltzmann linear vis-
coelasticity to general thermodynamic theories of materials
with memory.
EGM 6683-Dynamic Plasticity (2) Prereq: EGM 6611, 6670.
Analysis of propagation of impact induced transient loading
and unloading waves of uniaxial stress or strain in inelastic
solids. Rate-dependent and rate-independent constitutive
assumptions. Experimental verifications. Combined stress
waves.
EGM 6684-Special Topics in Dynamic Plasticity (1-3; max:
6) Prereq: EGM 6683.
EGM 6716-Theory of Plates (3) Prereq: EGM 3520. Funda-
mental equations for the bending and stretching of thin
plates. Small deformation. Various loading and boundary
conditions. Large deformation and nonlinear considerations.
Transverse shear effects. Thermal stresses. Energy methods.
Vibration of plates. Anisotropy and plasticity.
EGM 6717-Theory of Shells I (3) Prereq: EGM 6776.
Curvilinear coordinates. Surface of shells. General theory of
thin, elastic shells. Shallow shells. Membrane shells of revo-
ldtion. Bending of shells. Static and dynamic analysis of lin-
ear equations for elastic shells.
EGM 6718-Theory of Shells II (3) Prereq: ECM 6717. Or-
thotropic and anisotropic shells. Transverse shear and nor-
mal stress effects. Nonlinear geometric theory. Plastic shells.
Interaction with fluids. Variational methods. Finite dif-
ference and finite element methods.
EGM 6736-Theory of Elastic Stability (3) Prereq: EGM 6717.
Stability criteria. Elastic stability of bars, frames, plates; cylin-
drical, conical, spherical and shallow shells. Postbuckling be-
havior of plates. Plates and shells under dynamic loading.
EGM 6811-Fundamentals of Fluid Dynamics (3) Prereq:
EGN 3353 or equivalent. Cauchy's stress principle, condi-
tions for streamline fluid motion. Kinematics. The general
deformation of a fluid, constitutive relationships. Integral
and differential equations of motion. Thermodynamics,
thermal conductivity.
EGM 6812-4nviscid Fluid Flow (3) Prereq: EGM 6811 or
equivalent. Hydrostatics, equilibrium conditions. Potential
flow theory, harmonic functions. Dynamics, the motion of
immersed rigid bodies, hydrodynamic drag and lift. The
momentum transport theorem, gravity waves. Surface ten-
sion, capillary waves. Sound, propagation of sound waves
EGM 6813-Viscous Fluid Flow (3) Prereq: EGM 6811 or
equivalent. Laminar flow, boundary conditions. Equations of
motion. Creeping flows, the flow around a sphere. The lami-
nar boundary layer, flow separation. ,Exact solutions of
Navier-Stokes equations. Thermal conduction, similarity in
heat transfer. Heat transfer in boundary layers. Free convec-
tion.
EGM 6835-Boundary Layer Theory (3) Prereq: EGM 6873.
Definitive treatment of the Prandtl boundary layer concept
for laminar and turbulent flows. Integral methods from
Karman-Pohlhausen through current investigators. Thermal
boundary layers in forced and natural convection.
EGM 6845-Turbulent Fluid Flow (3) Prereq: EGM 6811 or
equivalent. Definition of turbulence, basic equations of mo-
tion. Instability and transition. Statistical methods, correla-
tion and spectral functions. Experimental methods, flow vis-
ualization. Isotropic homogeneous turbulence. Shear turbu-
lence, similitude, the turbulent boundary layer, rough tur-
bulent flow. Jets and wakes. Heat convection, thermally
driven turbulence.
EGM 6905-Individual Study (1-6; max: 12)
EGM 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
EGM 6934-Special Topics in Engineering Mechanics (1-6;
max: 12)
EGM 6936--Graduate Seminar (1; max: 6) Discussions and


presentations in the fields of graduate study and research.
S/U.
EGM 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
EGM 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
EGM 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)

ENGLISH
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: M. New. Graduate Coordinator: J. M. Per-
lette. Graduate Research Professor: A. L. Williams.
Professors: G. E. Bigelow; R. A. Bryan; C. S. Carnell; W.
C. Childers; H. E. Crews; A. M. Duckworth; W. S.
Frazer; W. P. Goldhurst; R. H. Green; W. Hellstrom; M.
S. Kirkpatrick; P. Lisca; M. New; J. B. Pickard; W. R.
Robinson. Associate Professors: B.J. Ariderson; T. K.
Beyette; R. E.' Brantley; A. C. Bredahl, Jr.; R., H.
Carpenter; I. Clark; R. A. de Beaugrande; M. F. Deakin;
R. C. Foreman, Jr.; A. M. Gordon; M. A. Hill-Lubin; S.
R. Homan, Jr.; R. B. Kershner, Jr.; D. M. Locke; W. A.
Losaho; M. M. Malvern; K. M. McCarthy; M. Nelson; J.
M. Perlette; H. B. Shaw; J. Smith; C. G. Snodgrass; B. R.
Straus; J. R. Sunwall; F. H. Taylor; R. M. Thompson; R.
S. Thomson; C. E. Tillman; J. B. Twitchell; G. L. Ulmer.
Assistant Professors: B. R. McCrea; J. C. Scott.
The Department of English offers the Master of Arts
with specialization in literature, creative writing, com-
munity college teaching, and linguistics and the Doc-
tor of Philosophy with specialization in literature and
linguistics. A nonthesis option for the Master of Arts is
offered with specialization in literature and com-
munity college teaching.
Specific areas of specialization for the Doctor of
Philosophy include linguistics, Medieval, Renais-
sance, Restoration and 18th-century, 19th-century
British, American literature to 1900, contemporary
British and American literature. Specialization in the
literary study of film, rhetoric, and folklore is also pos-
sible.
New graduate students should have completed an
undergraduate English major of at least 24 semester
hours, while doctoral students should have a Master
of Arts degree in English. All doctoral students must
take a course in bibliography and methods of research
and complete an internship in college teaching.
AML 6341-Stu4ies in American Literature Before 1900 (3;
max: 12)
AML 6342-Studies in 20th Century American Literature (3;
max: 12)
CRW 6250-Fiction Writing (3; max: 12)
CRW 6350-Verse Writing (3; max: 12)
CRW 6550--The Writing of Children's Literature (3; max: 12)
ENG 5905-Special Study in English (1-5)
ENG 6063-Bibliography and Methods of Research (3)
ENG 6143--The Language of Film (3)
ENG 6144-Studies in the Movies (3; max: 12)
ENG 6154-Communications and Popular Culture (3) Study
of the origins and qualities of the popular arts in modern so-
ciety.
ENG 6217-Studies in Fiction (3; max: 12)
ENG 6437-Studies in Drama (3; max: 12)
ENG 6595-Studies in English Linguistics (3)
ENG 6718-Stylistics (3)
ENG 6755-Studies in Verse (3; max: 12y
ENG 6839-Studies in Literary Criticism (3; max: 12)
ENG 6905-Individual Work (1-3; max: 12)
ENG 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ENG 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ENG 7938-Seminar in Variable Topics (1-5; max: 12)
ENG 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
ENL 6148-Studies in Shakespeare (3)







78 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


ENL 6304-Studies in Old English (3; max: 12)
ENL 6314-Studies in Middle English (3; max: 12)
ENL 6323-Studies in Renaissance Literature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6394-Studies in Restoration and 18th-Century Liter-
ature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6423-Studies in Romantic Literature (3; max: 12)
ENL 6426-Studies in Victorian Literature (3; max. 12)
ENL 6447-Studies in 20th-Century British Literature (3;
max: 12)
LAE 6379-The Teaching of Business and Technical Writing
(3)
LAE 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
LAE 6947-Practicum in the Teaching of College English (3)
LIN 7938-Seminar in Linguistics (3; max: 12)
LIT 5373-Studies in Irish Literature (3; max: 12)
LIT 6283-Studies in Folklore (3; max: 12)
LIT 6934-Variable Topics (1-5; max: 12) Studies in topics not
normally offered in the regular curriculum, including in-
tensive study of topics within a literary period, extensive
study of motifs crossing several periods, and studies in vari-
ous national or ethnic literatures (African, Afro-American,
Jewish, Scots).
RED 6380-Principles of Community College and Adult
Reading Instruction (3) Study of the psychology of adult
learners, diagnosis of reading problems, and teaching the
skills of the reading process.
RED 6480-Laboratory in Community College and Adult
Reading Instruction (3) Observation of and instruction by
in-service community college teachers in diagnosis, materi-
als, and study skills.
SPC 6239-Studies in Rhetorical Theory (3) Variable topics
in the theory and history of rhetoric.


ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: D. L. Shankland. Graduate Coordinator: S.
H. Kerr. Graduate Research Professor: R. I. Sailer. Pro-
fessors: G. E. Allen; R. M. Baranowski; L. Berner; R. F.
Brooks; A. K. Burditt, Jr.; W. F. Buren; P. S. Callahan; D.
L. Chambers; E. W. Clark; H. L. Cromroy; D. W.
Dickson; A. G. Fairchild; D. H. Habeck; D. W. Hall; S.
H. Kerr; J. E. Lloyd; C. S. Lofgren; D. R. Minnick; P. B.
Morgan; J. L. Nation; A. J. Overman; V. G. Perry; H. L.
Rhoades; R. H. Roberts; F. A. Robinson; D. E. Short; D.
L. Silhacek; G. C. Smart, Ir; B. J. Smittle; J. R. Strayer; A.
C. Tarjan; T. J. Walker; H. V. Weems; D. E. Weidhaas;
M. J. Westfall, Jr.; W. H. Whitcomb; R. C. Wilkinson,
Jr.; B. R. Wiseman. Associate Professors: A. Ali; J. F.
Butler; D. A. Carlson; D. A. Dame; R. A. Dunn; S. M.
Ferkovich; J. L. Foltz; J.. H. Frank; P. D. Greany; D. C.
Herzog; F. A. Johnson; P. G. Koehler; N. C. Leppla; R.
L. Lipsey; M. S. Mayer; C. W. McCoy, Jr.; E. R. Mitchell;
J. K. Nayer; H. Oberlander; R. S. Patterson; J. A. Re-
inert; D. J. Schuster; J. A. Seawright; J. H. Tsai; J. H.
Tumlinson, III; K. W. Vick; V. H. Waddill; R. E. Waites;
R. E. Woodruff; R. B. Workman. Assistant Professors:
T. R. Ashley; J. C. Ball; C. S. Barfield; R. V. Dowell; D.
A. Focks; D. W. Hagstrum; A. B. Hamon; M. D. Huet-
tel; E. L. Matheny, Jr.; J. R. McLaughlin; H. N. Nigg; J. R.
Rich; J. L. Sharp; J. L. Stimac; D. E. Stokes; D. F. Wil-
liams; D. P. Wojcik; D. G. Young, S. S. Yu.
The Department of Entomology and Nematology
offers the Master of Agriculture, Master of Science,
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in entomology and
nematology. Members of the graduate faculty include
the departmental resident faculty, faculty located on
University of Florida campuses away from Gainesville,
scientists of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
scientists with other State of Florida agencies such as
the Division of Plant Industry, Florida State Depart-


ment of Agriculture and Consumer Service. The grad-
uate faculty is qualified to direct graduate students in
all specialties of entomology, nematology, and
acarology.
New graduate students should have background in
biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics and
knowledge of basic entomology or nematology. Mi-
nor deficiencies may be made up after entering grad-
uate school.
General requirements for graduate degrees are es-
tablished by the Graduate School and listed
elsewhere in this Catalog. A specific program of study
is prepared by the appointed supervisory committee
for each student. Supervisory committees for students
pursuing the Ph.D. will plan programs of study having
at least 60 hours of graduate credit other than thesis or
dissertation research. As many as 30 of these hours
may be transferred from another graduate school.
Ph.D. qualifying examinations are administered on
campus by the student's supervisory committee plus
two other faculty members appointed by the chair-
man of the department.
ENY 5561-Tropical Entomology (3) Prereq: ENY 3005 or
3004 or equivalent. Biologies, life histories, and various ap-
proaches to control of major agricultural insect and arachnid -
pests encountered in the tropics.
ENY 5781C-Nematodes of Major World Crops (4) Prereq:
ENY 3707 or equivalent. The nematode diseases of major
economic plants grown throughout the world. Economic val-
ue, distribution, and cultural aspects of each crop will be
covered. Laboratory periods are on identification of the
more important plant nematodes.
ENY 6202C-Quantitative 'Aproaches to Insect Ecology (3)
Prereq: ENY 6203 or equivalent and STA 6166 or equivalent.
Quantitative methods for describing and studying insect
populations, computer simulation of insect-plant system dy-
namics, applications of modeling to insect ecology.
ENY 6203-Insect Ecology (4) Prereq: PCB 4043 or consent of
instructor. Ecology of insects with special emphasis.on evo-
lutionary and population aspects. Discussions of primary lit-
erature; field projects.
ENY 6241--iological Control of Insects (4) Prereq: ENY
3005. Principles involved in the natural and biological con-
trol of insects.
ENY 6261-Insect Resistance in Crop Plants I (3) Principles
of plant resistance to insects.
ENY 6262-Insect Resistance in Crop Plants II (2) Methods
of developing plant resistance to insects.
ENY 6321-Comparative Anatomy of the Hexapoda (3) Pre-
req: ENY 4353. Includes comparative histology of selected
species, with reference to the new electron microscopy find-
ings; the laboratory will cover insect histological techniques.
ENY 6401-Insect Physiology (4) Prereq: ENY 4353, organic
chemistry or equivalent. Physiological study of the various
organs and tissues of insects.
ENY 6451-Insect Behavior (2) Principles of animal behavior
with an evolutionary perspective. Genetics, physiology,
ecology, and evolution of behavior; especially communica-
tion, reproduction, predator-prey interactions. Field and re-
search work, critiques and discussions.
ENY 6502-Aquatic Insects (4) Prereq: ENY 4161. Life his-
tories and ecologies of aquatic insects.
ENY 6591--Mosquitoes (4) Prereq: ENY 4660. Collection,
identification, bionomics, and relationship to the health of
man.
ENY 6601-Growth and Development in Insects (3) Analysis
of insect development, with emphasis on determination,
pattern, formation, regeneration, and hormone action.
ENY 6611-Immature Insects (4) Prereq: ENY 4161. Structure
and identification of immature forms of insects, especially
the Holometabola.
ENY 6651C-lnsect Toxicology (3) Prereq: ENY 3005, organic
chemistry or equivalent. Chemistry, toxicity, mode of action,
metabolism, and environmental considerations of insec-
ticides and related compounds. Mechanisms of, resistance to
insecticides.









ENY 6660--Medical and Veterinary Entomology I (4) Prereq:
ENY 4660 or 4161. Taxonomy, morphology, and biology of
arthropods of medical and veterinary importance. A collec-
tion and project proposal will be required.
ENY 6662-Medical and Veterinary Entomology 11 (4) Prereq:
ENY 6660. Host parasite interactions, epidemiology, and
methods of vector control. The.course will include several
overnight field trips. An original research project based on
the proposal from ENY 6660 will be required.
ENY 6711-Taxonomy of Nematodes (4) Prereq: ENY 6731.
Taxonomy and identification of members of the Phylum
Nemata.
ENY 6723-Phytonematology (4) Prereq: ENY 5781 or equiv-
alent. Behavior, biology, population dynamics, host-parasite
interaction, and control of plant parasitic nematodes.
ENY 6731-Nematode Morphology and Physiology (4) Pre-
req: ENY 3701. Anatomical study of the organs of nematodes
and their vital functions.
ENY 6780C-Marine Nematology (4) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. Taxonomy, morphology, physiology, ecology, and
life cycles of free living marine nematodes.
ENY 6801-Radiation in Insect Studies (4) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Specialized topics and current research on radi-
ation in entomology.
ENY 6810-Information Techniques ip Entomology (1)
Sources of entomological information and methods for ac-
quiring, storing, and retrieving it.
ENY 6821-Insect Pathology (4) Prereq: MCB 3013 or con-
sent of instructor. Interrelationship of insects and
pathogenic microorganisms; history, classification, morphol-
ogy, mode-of-action, ahd epidemiology of entomogenous
bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi.
ENY 682-Microbial Control of Insects (4) Principles of the
utilization of insect pathogens in arthropod control: mass
production, safety, compatibility with other control meth-
ods, utilization of natural epizootics and the role of
pathogens in pest management programs.
ENY 6905-Problems in Entomology and Nematology (1-4;
max: 12) Individual study under faculty guidance. Student
and instructor to agree on problem and credits prior to regis-
tration.
ENY 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ENY 6932-Special Topics in Entomology and Nematology
(1-2; max: 4) Reports and discussions pertaining to selected
topics announced in advance. S/U.
ENY 6934-Selected Studies in Entomology and Nematology
(1-4, max: 8) Current issues. Subject matter variable, may be
repeated with different subject each time.
ENY 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ENY 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
ENY 6966-Research Techniques in Entomology (4) Demon-
stration and use of modern techniques, equipment, and pro-
cedures n research on insects. Conducted principally in the
U.S.D.A. Entomology Research Laboratory.
ENY 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)


ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
SCIENCES
College of Engineering
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman & Graduate Coordinator: E. E. Pyatt. Gradu-
ate Research Professor: H. T. Odum. Professors: H. A.
Bevis; W. E. Bolch, Jr.; P. L. Brezonik; B. G. Dunavant;
J. P. Heaney; W.C. Huber; D. A. Lundgren; E. E. Pyatt;
C. E. Roessler; J. E. Single. Associate Professors: G. Bit-
ton; J. Zoltek, Jr. Assistant Professors: W. B. Arbuckle;
T. L, Crisman; K. C. Ewel. Assistant Research Scientist:
G. R. Best.
Graduate study is offered leading to the degrees of
Master of Engineering, Master of Science, Engineer,
and Doctor of Philosophy in the field of environ-
mental engineering sciences. Areas in which the stu-
dent may specialize include air resources, water


ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES / 79

supply and water pollution control, environmental
resources management, environmental biology, water
chemistry, radiological health, and systems ecology
and energy analysis.
Both master's degrees are available in cooperation
with the Departments of Civil and Coastal and
Oceanographic Engineering with an area of concen-
tration in public works engineering.
Direct admission into the Master of Science pro-
gram requires a bachelor's degree in engineering or in
a basic science such as chemistry, physics, biology, or
mathematics. Persons with a degree in a nontechnical
field may also be admitted into this program upon the
completion of specified articulation.
Direct admission into the Master of Engineering
program requires that the student be a graduate engi-
neer. Other persons wishing to enter this program will
be required to take articulation work sufficient to
bring their backgrounds into substantial agreement
with those with undergraduate engineering training.
The specific program of study must be approved by
the student's supervisory committee.
It normally requires one calendar year to complete
the requirements for a master's degree. If articulation
work is required, it may take longer, depending upon
the extent of the student's deficiency.
ECI 6630-Surface Hydrology (3) Prereq: MAP 3302 or EGM
3311, ECI 3213 or EGN 3353. Occurrence and distribution of
water by natural processes including atmospheric thermody-
namics, precipitation, runoff, infiltration, water losses, flood
routing, and catchment characteristics. Hydrograph analysis
-and methods for runoff prediction. Current hydrologic coin-
puter models.
ECI 6631-Operational Hydrology (4) Prereq: ECI 6630, STA
4321. Stochastic hydrology. Probability and statistics applied
to hydrologic problems. Synthesis of data. Correlation and
spectral analysis. Linear systems theory applications to
hydrologic cycle components and rainfall-runoff processes.-
Hydrologic instruments and networks.
EES 5007C-Ecological and General Systems (4) Prereq:'MAP
3302 or consent of instructor. Systems ecology, including ex-
amples, languages, theoretical formulations, and models for
design, synthesis, and prediction of systems of man and na-
ture.
EES 5105-Environmental Biology (3) Prereq: consent of in-
structor. The role of microorganisms and other biota in ma-
jor environmental problems, wastewater processes and nat-
ural bodies of water.
EES 5245-Water and Wastewater Analysis (3) Prereq: one
year of general chemistry. Principles of analytical chemistry
and their applicationsto determination of chemical compo-
sition of natural waters. Emphasis on methods used in rou-
tine determinations of water quality and wastewater
strength.
EES 5306-Energy Analysis and Ecological Engineering (3)
Principles for guiding the self design of systems of nature
and humanity including regional patterns and technological
interfaces; use of energy to evaluate alternatives of environ-
ment and public policy.
EES 6006-Environmental Toxicology (3) Prereq: basic
biology. Effects of toxic chemicals on human health.
EES 6036--Environmental Instrumentation (2) Basic in-
strumentation and instrumental techniques for the meas-
urement of environmental parameters and pollutants.
EES 6106-Environmental Microbiology (3) Interaction be-
tween microbial populations. Behavior of microorganisms in
freshwater, marine, and soil environments. Stress of pollu-
tion on microbial communities. Adsorption of micro-
organisms to surfaces.
EES 6136-Aquatic Autotrophs (3) The function of algae and
macrophytes in lake systems. Environmental problems as-
sociated with excessive growth of algae and macrophytes,
and methods for their control.
EES 6166-Aquatic Heterotrophs (3) The role of
zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish in freshwater








80 / FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


systems. Emphasis is placed-on trophic-level interactions,
nutrient cycling, and the potential of each group for predict-
ing water quality.
EES 6207-Environmental Chemistry (3) Prereq: one year of
general college chemistry or consent of the instructor. This is
a survey course in the application of chemical principles of
environmental problems. Aspects of chemical control of the
quality of air, earth, and water will be covered.
EES 6208-Principles of Water Chemistry I (2) Prereq: EES
6207. Application of chemical principles to reactions and
composition of natural waters; emphasis on equilibrium and
thermodynamic concepts.
EES 6209-Principles of Water Chemistry II (2)
EES 6246-Advanced Water Analysis (3) Advanced chemical
procedures used in water chemistry research. Application of
instrumental methods for determination of trace inorganic
and organic natural water constituents.
EES 6356-Estuarine Systems (3) Coastal systems, their com-
ponents, processes, systems, models and management in-
cluding tropical, arctic, and man-affected types, field trip
and literature review.
EES 6506-Occupational Health (3) Effects, assessment, and
control of physical and chemical factors in man's working
environment, including chemical agents, electromagnetic
radiation, temperature, humidity, pressures, illumination,
noise, and vibration.
EES 6936-Water Science Seminar (1-4; max: 6) Chemical,
physical, and biological science of the behavior of natural
waters presented by area specialists.
ENV 5005-Environmental Health (3) Effects of environ-
mental pollution upon health. Methods of evaluation, treat-
ment, and prevention.of pollutants of health significance.
ENV 5126-Introduction to Air Pollution (3) Principal types,
sources, dispersion, effects, and physical, economic, and le-
gal aspects of control of atmospheric pollutants.
ENV 5206-Survey of Radiological Health (3) Oriented
toward ENV majors not specializing in radiological health.
Quantitative overview of radiation principles, sources, de-
tection, measurement, and protection.
ENV 5306-Municipal Refuse Disposal (3) Quantities and
characteristics of municipal refuse and hazardous materials.
Collection methods, transfer stations, equipment, and costs.
Refuse disposal practices, regional planning, and equip-
ment.
ENV 5517-Treatment of Wastewater (4) Prereq: ENV 4514
and EES 5245 or consent of instructor. In-depth study of the
physical, chemical, and biological processes utilized in the
treatment of wastewater, with special, emphasis on cause
and effect of physical and biological actions. Operation of
wastewater treatment plants with field work.
ENV 5930-Special Topics in Environmental Engineering I
(1-4; max: 8) Prereq: consent of instructor. Laboratory, lec-
tures, or conferences covering specially selected topics.
ENV 6006--Graduate Environmental Engineering Seminar
(1-2) S/U.
ENV 6050-Pollutant Transport (3) Prereq: MAP 3302 or EGM
3311, ECI 3213 or EGN 3353. Distribution of pollutants in nat-
ural waters and the atmosphere. Advective and diffusion
transport phenomena. Analytical and numerical prediction
methods. Air and water quality models. Ocean outfall dif-
fuser design.
ENV 6070-Water and Wastewater Process I (3) Prereq: per-
mission of instructor. Study of the theory and current re-
search associated with physical and chemical processes of
water and wastewater treatment processes, with sedimenta-
tion, filtration, adsorption, disinfection, and membrane pro-
cesses emphasized.
ENV 6071-Water and Wastewater Processes II (3) Prereq:
permission of instructor. Theory and current research as-
sociated with biological treatment processes and with
physical/chemical processes associated with them.
ENV 6115-Air Pollution Control Design (3) Design, analy-
sis, operational limitations, cost and performance evaluation
of control processes and equipment. Field visits to and in-
spection of industrial installations.
ENV 6116-Air Pollution Sampling and Analysis (3) De-
termination of the concentration of normally encountered


ambient pollutants. Methodology of source sampling. Prac-
tical experience in ambient and source sampling.
ENV 6117-Environmental Meteorology (3) Prereq: MAP
3302 or EGM 3311 and PHY 3042. Dynamics and thermody-
namics of the atmosphere related to environmental prob-
lems. Analysis of weather charts. Climatology. Ecological in-
teractions. Diffusion, air pollution applications.
ENV 6118-Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling (3) Prediction
of downwind pollutant concentrations from point, line, and
area sources. Theory of turbulence and phenomena related
to problems in diffusion and dispersion of contaminants in
the lowest layer of the atmosphere.
ENV 6130-Aerosol Mechanics (4) Generation, collection,
and measurement of aerosols. Theory of the fluid dynamic,
optical, electrical, and thermal behavior of gas-borne parti-
cles.
ENV 6211-Health Physics (3) Prereq: consent of instructor.
Techniques of hazard evaluation and radiation control;
monitoring methods; survey techniques; biological sampl-
ing; instrument calibration; exposure standards and radi-
ation protection regulation; on-site radiation safety surveys
and evaluation.
ENV 6216-Radioacti*e Wastes (3) Prereq: ENV 5206 and
consent of instructor. Source, treatment, and disposal of'ra-
dioactive wastes. Emphasis on prevention of environmental
contamination.
ENV 6236-Radiological Techniques (4) Prereq: ENV 5206 or
consent of instructor. Application of radiological techniques
to environmental engineering. Theory and operation of ad-
vanced detection instrumentation. Laboratory experiments
on measurement and control of radionuclides in the envi-
ronment.
ENV 6409-Advanced Water Treatment Process Design (3)
Prereq: EES 5245, 6207, or consent of instructor. Advanced
concepts in chemical processes of examination and treat-
ment of potable water.
ENV 6437-Advanced Sewage System Design (3) Prereq:
ENV 6516. Layout and design of sanitary sewage systems,
pumping stations, force mains, wastewater treatment plants,
and methods of effluent disposal. Design parameters, cost,
and financing.
ENV 6438-Advanced Potable Water System Design (3) De-
velopment of water supplies, layout and design of distribu-
tion systems, pumping and storage facilities, and water treat-
ment plants. Design parameters, cost, and financing.
ENV 6516-Advanced Waste Treatment Operations (3) Pre-
req: ENV 5517. Biological, physical, and chemical processes
used in the treatment of domestic and industrial wastewater.
Development of design parameters and operating pro-
cedures based on experimentally derived data.
ENV 6606-Environmental Resources Engineering (3) Stan-
dards and criteria for evaluation of environmental resources
projects. Formulation of mathematical models and environ-
mental problems. Application of economics and operations
research as aids in decision making.
ENV 6656-Urban Environmental Engineering (3) Overall
problem of developing and maintaining high quality physi-
cal environment in urban areas. Integrative approach to air,
land, and water quality management problems.
ENV 6666-Water Quality Management (3) Prereq: consent
of instructor. Water quality management applied to streams,
lakes, and tidal estuaries and embayments. Influence and ef-
fects of municipal and industrial wastes on public water sup-
plies, shellfish, storage, recreational uses, industrial uses, and
wildlife.
ENV 6905-Individual Work (1-4; max: 8) Faculty-supervised
individual research or study of material not covered in
formal courses.
ENV 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
ENV 6916--Nonthesis Project (1-2; max: 2) Individual project
under faculty guidance to satisfy requirement for nonthesis
master's degree.
ENV 6932-Special Problems in Environmental Engineering
(1-4; max: 8)
ENV 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
ENV 6971-Research for Masters Thesis (1-15)
ENV 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)







FINANCE AND INSURANCE / 81


FINANCE AND INSURANCE
College of Business Administration
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: A. A. Heggestad. Graduate Coordinator: R.
H. Pettway. Graduate Research Professor: E. F.
Brigham. Professors: L. C. Andersen; F. D. Arditti; A. A.
Heggestad; W. M. Howard, C. A. Matthews; R. H. Pett-
way. Associate Professors: R. L. Crum; W. A. Mc-
Collough; D. J. Nye; R. C. Radcliffe. Assistant Pro-
fessors: R. Chiang; S. Manaster.
The Department of Finance, Insurance, and Real Es-
tate offers the nonthesis degree, Master of Business.
Administration, and the thesis degree, Master of Arts,
in finance with specializations in financial manage-
ment, financial markets and institutions, and invest-
ments. It also offers a major and minor in the Doctor
of Philosophy degree in business administration. Each
of these degrees is also offered in risk and insurance.
New graduate students should have adequate un-
dergraduate training in mathematics and statistics or
be willing to devote sufficient time to acquire the
necessary foundation in these areas. Though no grad-
uate major may be completed without adequate
course work on the 5000 or higher level, certain un-
dergraduate courses in finance and insurance are
available for graduate credit as a part of a candidate's
major. These include RMI 4135 and 4805.
For admission to courses 5000 level and above, the
student must have been admitted to the Graduate
School and normally should have undergraduate
courses in fields pertinent to the graduate courses
selected; or, where necessary, special arrangements
may be made with the approval of the department
chairman.

FIN 5354-Financial Markets and Institutions (3) Prereq: in-
termediate macroeconomics. Financial management of fi-
nancial institutions in a regulatory and market environment.
FIN 5405-Business Financial Management (3) Required of
all MBA degree candidates who have had no basic business
finance course. Prereq: ACC 5011, GEB 5756. Analysis of
business financing and investing decisions.
FIN 5425-Corporate Finance (3) Prereq: FIN 4414 or consent
of instructor.'The application of business finance problems.
Students prepare written solutions to case problems.
FIN 5525-Security Markets and Pricing (3) Prereq: FIN 5405
or consent of instructor. An examination of security market
structure and the theory of security selection and pricing.
FIN 6246-Money and Capital Markets (4) Prereq: FIN 4244,
college-level mathematics, and statistics. Financial markets,
with emphasis on flow of funds, interest rate determination,
and allocation of resources.
FIN 6446-Problems in Corporate Finance (4) Prereq: FIN
6937 or consent of instructor. The firm's investment and fi-
nancing decisions are analyzed under conditions of uncer-
tainty in theory/practice format.
FIN 6456-Quanttitative Analysis of Financial Decisions (4)
Prereq: MAN 5511 or consent of instructor. Application of
quantitative methods to the solution of specific financial
problems with special reference to mathematical program-
ming, simulation, and other methods of discrete optimiza-
tion.
FIN 6816-Seminar in Investments (4) Prereq: FIN 5524. Indi-
vidual research and group discussion employing materials
from publications and reports by governmental agencies
and groups in industry.
FIN 6826-Seminar in Financial Institutions (4) Prereq: FIN
4313 and/or FIN 5354. Monopoly and competition as applied.
to banking; bank organization and structure, adequacy of
bank capital, problems of asset management and providing
successor management.
FIN 6905-ndividual Work in Finance (1-4; max: 7) Prereq:
permission of department and Director of Graduate Studies.


Reading and/or research in finance as needed by graduate
students.
FIN 6940-Supervised Teaching (1-5)
FIN 6971-Research for Master's Thesis (1-15)
FIN 780-Theory of Finance I (4) Normative investment and
financing criteria examined for the individual and the corpo-
ration when capital markets are imperfect and investment
returns uncertain.
FIN 7809-Theory of Finance II (4) Mean-variance and state
preference approaches to security market equilibrium; ef-
ficacy of stochastic dominance rules in ordering uncertain
prospect and the multiperiod portfolio decision.
FIN 7938Finance Research Workshop (3; max: 7) Analysis
of current research topics. Paper presentation and critiques
by doctoral students, faculty, and visiting scholars.
FIN 7980-Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15)
RMI 6195-Seminar in Life Insurance (3) Prereq: RMI 4735.
Problems in life insurance and related fields.
RMI 6296-Seminar in Property and Liability Insurance (3)
Prereq: RMI 3206, 3207. Meaning, economic influences, so-
cial values, principles and practices of property and liability
insurance.
RMI 6910-Supervised Research (1-5)
RMI 6936-Problems in Risk Management (3) Insurance haz-
ards of business concerns and governmental units, with con-
sideration of insurance protection available.


FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
College of Agriculture
GRADUATE FACULTY 1980-81
Chairman: L. Polopolus. Graduate Coordinator: W. W.
McPherson. Graduate Research Professor: W. W.
McPherson. Professors; C. O. Andrew; D. L. Brooke; H.
B. Clark; C. D. Covey; C. G. Davis; H. E. Drummond; J.
Holt; K. W. Kepner; M. R. Langham; W. K. Mathis; J.
W. Milliman; L. Polopolus; F. J. Prochaska; J. E. Rey-
nolds; C. N. Smith; J. R. Strain; K. R. Tefertiller; R. W.
Ward. Associate Professors; J. C. Cato; W. A. Colette;
J. K: Dow; R. D. Emerson; G. F. Fairchild; 1. R. Gordon;
D. L. Gunter; C. F. Kiker; G. D. Lynne; E. Pagoulatos; J.
R. Simpson; D. S. Tilley; G. A. Zepp. Assistant Pro-
fessors; J. Alvarez; W. C. Boggess; R. R. Carriker; R. L.
Kilmer; J. Y. Lee; B. E. Melton; J. W. Milon; W. D.
Mulkey; J. S. Shonkwiler; T. H. Spreen; P. J. van
Blokland.
The degrees of Master of Agriculture Management
and Resource Development (MAMRD), Master of Sci-
ence, and Doctor of Philosophy are offered. Areas of
specialization include agricultural business manage-
ment, marketing, production, economic develop-
ment, econometrics, and resource and environmental
economics. The department participates in the pro-
grams of the Centers for Latin American Studies,
African Studies, Tropical Agriculture, Rural Develop-
ment, and Environmental Programs, and the Univer-
sity Sea Grant College.
Students who hold a bachelor's degree with their
major fields of study in areas other than food and re-
source economics should consult with the graduate
coordinator concerning acceptance for graduate
study.
In addition to the courses listed, there are seminars
for organized discussion of current topics and for re-
view of graduate students' research.
AEB 5612-Foreign Agricultural Development Planning (3)
Prereq: AEB 3103. Special reference given to low-income
countries.
AEB 6182-Intermediate Agricultural Production Economics
(3) Basic concepts of producer choice and theory of the firm.
AEB 6184-Economics of Agricultural Production I (3) Pre-
req: AEB 4511, 6182. Producer decisions including theoretical




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