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University record

HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 University calendar, 1911-1912
 Board of control
 Officers
 Standing committees
 Military organization
 Gifts
 General information
 Organization
 Graduate school
 College of arts and sciences
 College of agriculture
 College of engineering
 College of law
 Sub-collegiate division
 Division of university extensi...
 Agricultural experiment statio...
 Register
 Index
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
University of Florida Institutional Repository
MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
University record
Uniform Title:
University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher:
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication:
Lake city Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note:
Issues also have individual titles.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
System ID:
UF00075594:00006

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by:
College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by:
University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by:
University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
University record
Uniform Title:
University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher:
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication:
Lake city Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note:
Title from cover.
General Note:
Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note:
Issues also have individual titles.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
System ID:
UF00075594:00006

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by:
College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by:
University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by:
University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
        Page 3
    University calendar, 1911-1912
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Board of control
        Page 6
    Officers
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Standing committees
        Page 12
    Military organization
        Page 13
    Gifts
        Page 14
        Page 15
    General information
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Organization
        Page 49
    Graduate school
        Page 50
        Page 51
    College of arts and sciences
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    College of agriculture
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    College of engineering
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    College of law
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Sub-collegiate division
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
    Division of university extension
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Agricultural experiment station
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
    Register
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
    Index
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
    Back Matter
        Back Matter
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



University


Record


Vol. VI MAY, 1911 No. 2
Published quarterly by the University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida





University of Florida

Gainesville, Florida





Catalogue 1910-11
Announcements 1911-12


Entered September 6, 1906, at the Postoffice at Gainesville, Florida, as second-
class mail matter, under Act of Congress July 16, 1894








University of Florida
Gainesville













Catalogue 1910-11
Announcements 1911-12















CONTENTS
PACE.
CALEN DARS ........................ ..............- . .** .... 4
BOARD OF CONTROL.................................. ....-* 6
OFFICERS ............................................. . . 7
OF ADMINISTRATION ........................................... 7
OF INSTRUCTION ....................................................... 8
OF EXPERIMENT STATION ....................................... 10
OTHER OrrICERS ............................................... 11
STANDING COMMITTEES ................................ 12
MILITARY ORGANIZATION ................................ 13
GIFTS ................... ........................... .... 14
GENERAL INFORMATION.
HISTORY AND LOCATION................................. 16
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS................................. 23
ENDOWMENT ..............................................
EQUIPMENT ............. ................................... 25
LIBRARY ........................................................ 25
M USEUM ......................... ......................... .. 26
LABORATORIES ................................................. 26
SHOPS, ETC. .................................................. 28
GOVERNMENT AND REGULATIONS....................... 30
M EDALS ....................................................... .5
STATEMENT OF EXPENSES ................. ............ 3.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS .................................. 39
TERMS OF ADMISSION ............ .................... 41
ENTRANCE TO THE UNIVERSITY .................................. 41
ADVANCED STANDING IN THE UNIVERSITY ......................... 48
SPECIAL STUDENTS ......................................... .. 48
ORGANIZATION.
GRADUATE SCHOOL ............... .................. ..50
PREREQUISITES ....................................... ......... 50
DEGREEs OFFERED ............................................ 50
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE ....................... 50
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES.
FACULTY ...................................................... 52
GENERAL STATEMENT ....................................... ... 53
CURRICULA ..................................................... 54
DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION................................... 62
Ancient Languages ........................................ 62
Courses in Latin ........ ......... ...................... 62
Courses in Greek........... .................... ........... 63
Biblical Instruction ...................... .................. 6
Botany ....................... ................ .......... 65
Chemistry ..................* ... ............................ 66











CONTENTS 3

DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION.-(Continued.) PAGE.
Education and Philosophy ............... ............... 68
English .................................... ........ 73
Expression and Public Speaking ............................. 76
Geology ............................................... 77
History and Economics .................................. 78
Courses in H istory.................................... ..... 78
Courses in Economics .............................. ..... 79
Courses in Political Science......... .................... 81
Courses in Sociology...................................... 81
Mathematics and Astronomy.............................. 82
Military Science and Tactics ................................ 83
M odern Languages ..................... ... ............. .. 84
Courses in French ................ ....... ............ 85
Courses in German ................. ...................... 85
Courses in Italian ..................................... 86
Courses in Spanish ......................................... 86
Physics .................................................. 86
Zoology and Bacteriology .............. ................ 87
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE.
FACULTY ............................................ ........... 90
GENERAL STATEMENT ...................................... ... 91
CURRICULUM ...................... ......................... 95
DEPARTMENTS OP INSTRUCTION ................................... 100
Agronomy ........................................ ....... 00
Horticulture ................................................. 101
Animal Husbandry .......................................... 103
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.
FACULTY ...................................................... 114
GENERAL STATEMENT .......................................... 115
CURRICULA ............................................. ...... 117
DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION.. ................................ 123
Civil Engineering ....................................... 123
Electrical Engineering ....................................... 125
Mechanical Engineering ............ ..................... 126
COLLEGE OF LAW.
FACULTY ........................................ 131
GENERAL STATEMENT .................. ........ ............... 131
CURRICULUM ................................................... 135
SUB-COLLEGIATE DIVISION .............................. 144
DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION ................. 149
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION ................ 161
REGISTER.
DEGREES AND MEDALS..................................... 166
ROLL OF STUDENTS ....................................... 167
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ..................................... 175
CORRESPONDENCE COURSE IN AGRICULTURE .......... 181










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


University Calendar
1911-1912

1911-September 26, Tuesday..............Summer Recess ends
Examinations for Admission.
Registration of Students.
September 27, Wednesday...........First Semester begins.
October 7, Saturday.................Re-examinations.
October 7, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.......Meeting of General Faculty.
November 20, Monday..............Farmers' Short Course begins.
November 30, Thursday .............Thanksgiving Holiday.
December 16, Saturday..............Farmers' Short Course ends.
December 21, Thursday, 11:30 a. m..Christmas Recess begins.
1912-January 4, Thursday, 9 a. m.........Christmas Recess ends.
January 31, Wednesday ............First Semester ends.
February 1, Thursday.............. Second Semester begins.
February 10, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.... Meeting of General Faculty.
February 19, Monday............... Spring Term for Teachers
begins.
February 22, Thursday ............Field Day.
March 2, Saturday .................Re-examinations.
May 25, Saturday, 2:30 p. m........ Meeting of General Faculty.
May 26 to 28 .......................Commencement.
May 26, Sunday..................Baccalaureate Sermon.
May 27, Monday .................Oratorical Contests.
May 28, Tuesday ............... Graduating Day.
May 29, Wednesday ................Summer Recess begins.
May 31, Friday...................Examinations for Admission.












CALENDAR


1911 1912
JULY OCTOBER JANUARY APRIL
SMTWTFS SMTWTFS BMTWTFS SMTWTF8
.. 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 1 2 3 4 6 ...1 2 3 4 5 6
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9101112 13 1 7 8 910111213 7 8 910111213
91011121314 15 15 16 1718 19 2021 1 15 16 17 18 19 22 115 16 171819 20
16 17 18 19 20 2122 22 23 2 25 26 27 28 21222324 2526 27 2122 23 24 25 26 27
23 24 526 272829 29 3031 ............ 28 29 30 31 ......... 28 29 30 ............
30 31 .. .. .. .. .. ... ... ... ... .. ... .. ...
AUGUST NOVEMBER FEBRUARY MAY
SWTWTF S SMTWTFS SMTWTFS 8MTWTFS
. ... 1 2 3 5 ...... 1 2 3 A ............ 1 2 3 ........ 1 2 3 A
6 7 8 9 101112 5 6 7 8 9 1011 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 6 7 8 9 1011
131416 1171819 12 13 1 1516 1718 1112 13 14 151617 12 13 1 15161718
20 2122 23 2t 25 26 19 20 21 22 23 2 25 18 19 20 2122 23 24 19 20 21 22 23226
2728 29 30 31 .... 227 28 29 30 ..... 25 28 27 28 29 ... 26 27 28 29 30 31...

SEPTEMBER DECEMBER MARCH JUNE
8MTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS SMTWTFS
. .. 1 2 .. .. ... .. ... 1 2 ... ... ... .. 1 2 ... ... ... ... ... ... 1
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3 1 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 1 5 6 7 8
10 11 1213 14 15 15 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 10 11 12 13 16 15 16 9 10 11 1213 1 15
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 17 18 19 20 2122 23 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 202122
4 25 26 27 28 2930 21 25 26 27 28 9 30 4 25 26 27 28 2930 23 2425 26 27 28 29
31 ... ... ... ... .. ... 31 .. .. .. ... .. .. 30 .. ... .......









6 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA







Board of Control
P. K. YONGE, Chairman....................................... Pensacola
T. B. KING .................................................... Arcadia
E. L. WARTMANN ............................................... Citra
F. P. FLEMING, JR..................... ....................Jacksonville
W. D. FINLAYSON ........... ........................ Old Town
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary to the Board, Tallahassee.






State Board of Education
ALBERT W. GILCHRIST, President.............................. Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD ..................................Secretary of State
W. B. KNOTT .................. .........................State Treasurer
PARK TRAMMELL ...................................... Attorney-General
W. M. HOLLOWAY, Secretary.... State Superintendent of Public Instruction






University Council
ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D...................President of the University
JAS. M. FARR, PH. D................... Vice-President of the University
P. H. ROLFS, M. S...................Director of the Experiment Station
JAS. N. ANDERSON, PH. D........Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
J. J. VERNON, M. S. A...............Dean of the College of Agriculture
J. R. BENTON, PH. D.................Dean of the College of Engineering
ALBERT J. FARRAH, A. M., LL. B............. Dean of the College of Law










FACULTY


Officers of Administration, Instruction and
of the Experiment Station



ADMINISTRATION

ALBERT A. MURPHREE, A. M., LL. D.,
President of the University.

JAS. M. FARR, A. M., Ph. D.,
Vice-President of the University.

P. H. ROLFS, M. S.,
Director of the Experiment Station and Superintendent of Farmers'
Institutes and Extension Division.

JAS. N. ANDERSON, M. A., Ph. D.,
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

J. J. VERNON, M. S. A.,
Dean of the College of Agriculture.

J. R. BENTON, Ph. D.,
Dean of the College of Engineering.

ALBERT J. FARRAH, A. M., LL. B.,
Dean of the College of Law.

C. L. CROW, M. A., Ph. D.,
Secretary of the General Faculty.

E. R. FLINT, Ph. D., M. D. (Harvard),
Resident Physician to the University.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


INSTRUCTION

JAS. M. FARR, A. M., Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of English.

EDWARD R. FLINT, B. S., Ph. D. (G6ttingen), M. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Chemistry.

J. R. BENTON, A. B., B. S., Ph. D. (Gottingen),
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering.

C. L. CROW, M. A., Ph. D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Modern Languages.
JAS. N. ANDERSON, M. A., Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of Ancient Languages.
tENOCH MARVIN BANKS, A. M., Ph. D. (Columbia),
Professor of History and Economics.

H. S. DAVIS, Ph. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology.

GEO. M. LYNCH, A. B.,
Professor of Elementary Education and Rural School Inspector.

J. J. VERNON, B. Agr., M. S. A.,
Professor of Agronomy.

H. G. KEPPEL, A. B., Ph. D. (Clark),
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.

MAJOR E. S. WALKER, U. S. A., Retired,
Commandant of Cadets; Professor of Military Science.

*N, H. COX, B. S.,
Professor of Civil Engineering.

W. L. FLOYD, M. S.,
Professor of Botany and Horticulture.

JOHN A. THACKSTON, Ph. D. (New York University),
Head of Department of Education; Professor of Secondary Education and
Inspector of High Schools.

ALBERT J. FARRAH, A. M., LL. B.,
Professor of Law.

tResigned.
*Absent on leave, 1910-1911.










FACULTY


HARRY R. TRUSLER, LL. B.,
Professor of Law.
A. J. WIECHARDT, M. E., M. M. E. (Cornell),
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing.
W. L. SEELEY,
Acting Professor of Civil Engineering.

HARVEY W. COX, A. M., Ph. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Philosophy and Education.

R. D. MALTBY, B. S.,
Assistant Professor of Dairying and Animal Husbandry.
*WM. KIXMILLER, Ph. B., J. D. (Chicago),
Assistant Professor of Law.
M. B. HADLEY, A. B.,
Instructor in Mathematics.

W. S. PERRY, A. B.,
Instructor in Physics and Electrical Engineering.
R. B. HUFFAKER, A. B.,
Instructor in English and Mathematics.
E. H. PINCKNEY, B. S.,
Instructor in Soils and Fertilizers.
JAMES MADISON CHAPMAN, D.O.,
Instructor in Oratory and Public Speaking

ROY HELM, A. B.,
Student Assistant in Latin.
A. G. DAVIS,
Student Assistant in Chemistry.


*Resigned.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


EXPERIMENT STATION

P. H. ROLFS, M. S.,
Director.

A. W. BLAIR, A. M.,
Chemist.

J. M. SCOTT, B. S.,
Animal Industrialist.
E. W. BERGER, Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins),
Entomologist.
H. S. FAWCETT, M. S.,
Plant Pathologist.

B. F. FLOYD, A. M.,
Plant Physiologist.

JOHN BELLING, B. Sc.,
Assistant Botanist and Editor.

S. E. COLLISION, M. S.,
Assistant Chemist.

JOHN SCHNABEL,
Assistant Horticulturist.

O. F. BURGER, A. B.,
Laboratory Assistant.

E. H. PINCKNEY, B. S.,
Laboratory Assistant.

U. C. LOFTIN,
Laboratory Assistant.










.FACULTY


OTHER OFFICERS

C. K. McQUARRIE,
Assistant Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes.

A. P. SPENCER, B. S., M. S.,
Assistant in Extension Work.
K. H. GRAHAM,
Auditor and Bookkeeper.
G. E. PILE,
Physical Director.

M. B. HADLEY, A. B.,
Librarian.

MRS. E. W. BERGER,
Librarian to the Experiment Station.
MRS. S. J. SWANSON,
Matron.
F. Y. STOKES,
Secretary to the President.

T. S. TRANTHAM,
Recording Secretary.

JESSIE URNER,
Secretary to the Experiment Station.
KATE BOULWARE,
Stenographer to Extension Work.
*M. W. SMITH,
Foreman of Shops.

A. G. COLCLOUGH,
Foreman of Model Farm.

M. CREWS,
Foreman of Experiment Station Farm.


*Resigned.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Standing Committees of the Faculty
1911-1912

"The President of the University is ex officio a member of all Standing
Committees.

ATHLETICS
Professors Crow, *Cox and the Commandant.

DISCIPLINE
Professors Flint, *Cox, tBanks and the Commandant.

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION
Professors Farr, Keppel, Anderson, tBanks and Davis.
GRADUATE WORK
Professors Anderson, tBanks, Benton, Davis, Keppel and Vernon.

LIBRARY
Professors Banks, Farr, Crow and Mr. Hadley.

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
Professors Crow, Anderson, Davis and Floyd
PUBLICITY
Professors Crow, Floyd and Keppel.
SCHEDULES
Professors Keppel, *Cox and Flint.

SELF-HELP
Professors Floyd, Wiechardt, Davis and Vernon.

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
Professors Farr, Keppel and Benton.






*Professor Seeley acts on all Committees where the name of Professor
tResigned.











MILITARY ORGANIZATION


Military Organization

COMMANDANT:
MAJOR E. S. WALKER, U. S. A., Retired.

FIELD, STAFF AND NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF:
A. G. DAVIS, Major.
O. E. BARNES, First Lieutenant and Adjutant.
N. S. STORTER, First Lieutenant and Quartermaster.
R. W. SHACXKLFORD, Sergeant Major.

FIELD Music: *
E. R. WAGER, T. E. PRICE, J. A. WILLIAMS.

COMPANY "A."
A. A. BAKER, Captain.
E. A. TAYLOR, First Lieutenant.
W. F. ROBERTSON, Second Lieutenant.
F. G. DAVIS, First Sergeant.
Sergeants:
W. C. PARHAM, L. S. LAFFITTE, R. L. JARRELL AND W. MILLS.
Corporals:
E. T. CASLER, R. R. WHITE, T. B. BIRD, F. E. TREADWELL, J. A. HowzE
AND M. MCNEILL.

COMPANY "B."
T. D. FELTON, Captain.
C. S. BAMBERG, First Lieutenant.
L. A. PERKINS, Second Lieutenant.
R. R. TAYLOR, JR., First Sergeant.
Sergeants:
R. B. FULLER, A. G. STANDS, L. E. TENNEY AND L. B. THRASHER.
Corporals:
W. G. ELLIOTT, W. HENDERSON, L. R. MORGAN, H. HALE, T. J. SWANSON,
AND D. PALMER.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GIFTS TO THE UNIVERSITY
The educational facilities of many of the State institutions of
the South have been materially increased in recent years by sub-
stantial gifts from broad-minded citizens. The University feels
confident that the citizens of Florida will not allow their State
institution to suffer in this respect. All gifts to the University, of
whatever nature or size, will be gratefully received and acknowl-
edged as contributions to the upbuilding of education and culture
in the State.
Chair of Secondary Education.-This opportunity is taken of
acknowledging the generous gift of one thousand dollars ($1,000)
by the General Education Board of New York toward the estab-
lishment and annual maintenance of a Professorship of Secondary
Education in the University. (See page 73.)
The Athletic Field.-The University gratefully acknowledges
a generous gift from a friend (whose name is withheld by re-
quest), to be used towards the equipment of the athletic grounds.
Chair of Elementary Education.-The Southern Education
Board, by a gift of twenty-seven hundred and fifty dollars ($2,-
750.00), has provided for the salary of a Professor of Elementary
Education, in the University, and Supervisor of Rural Schools,
under the direction of the State Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion. While this gift is made directly to the State Department of
Public Instruction, the University participates largely in its bene-
fits and here makes grateful acknowledgment of the same.
Scholarships.-Two scholarships have been recently added to
those formerly offered by the University. There is no method of
contributing to the spread of higher education in our State wiser
or more beneficent than this, which gives a worthy and ambitious
young man the opportunity to avail himself of the advantages
offered by his State University; and the establishment of the two
following scholarships is gratefully acknowledged:
Children of the Confederacy Scholarship.-The Florida branch
of the Children of the Confederacy, through the efforts of Sister
Esther Carlotta of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, has
established a scholarship paying one hundred and twenty dollars
($120.00) per annum, to be awarded to a lineal descendant of a
Confederate soldier.









GIFTS 15

High School Scholarship.-A distinguished citizen of Escam-
bia county, desiring to bring about a closer affiliation between the
senior high schools and the State University, has established a
scholarship, tenable for four years and yielding two hundred dol-
lars ($200.00) a year, to be awarded to a graduate of a senior
high school, preferably of that of Escambia county.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GENERAL INFORMATION

HISTORY
The University of Florida as it now exists represents the
culmination of a movement which originated in territorial days.
The subject was discussed in the Legislative Council as early
as 1824. In the Memoirs of Florida we read: "In 1836 a Uni-
versity of Florida was proposed, of which Joseph M. White, Rich-
ard K. Call, Thomas Randall, J. G. Gamble, and others, were
named as trustees, in the act of Congress which authorized the
sale of lands for its support." (I, 168.) This is the first official
mention which we find of a "University of Florida." Nothing,
however, came of this proposal.
Between this time and the Civil War the movement for public
education, both lower and higher, grew considerably in the State.
In 1845, when Florida was admitted to Statehood, she received
from the general government nearly a hundred thousand acres of
land for the establishment of two seminaries, one east and one
west of the Suwanee River. The East Florida Seminary was
established in 1852. It was first located at Ocala, but in 1866
removed to Gainesville. The West Florida Seminary was estab-
lished at Tallahassee in 1856. However, during this period, no
institution in the State bore the title and exercised the functions
of the University of Florida.
The State Constitution adopted in 1868 contained the follow-
ing provision looking to the establishment of a State University:
"The Legislature shall provide a uniform system of common
schools and a University, and shall provide for the liberal main-
tenance of the same. Instruction in them shall be free." (Art.
VIII, Sec. 2.)
Pursuant to this action, the Legislature of 1869 passed "An
Act to Establish a Uniform System of Common Schools and a
University." Two sections of this act are of particular interest.
It is proposed in Section 11:
"6th. To use the available income and appropriations to the
University or Seminary Fund, in establishing one or more depart-
ments of the University at such place or places as may offer the









GENERAL INFORMATION


best inducements, commencing with the Department of Teaching
and Preparatory Department, etc.
"7th. To keep in view the establishment of a University on
a broad and liberal basis, the object of which shall be to impart
instruction to youth in the professions of teaching, medicine and
the law; in the knowledge of the natural sciences; the theory
and practice of agriculture, horticulture, mining, engineering,
and the mechanic arts; in the ancient and modern languages;
in the higher range of mathematics, literature, and in the useful
and ornamental branches not taught in common schools."
The plan outlined in this section would be a credit to any
State, and shows a high ideal and purpose of which Florida may
well be proud. But, unfortunately, this ideal and purpose found
no tangible manifestation; and the State still continued without
a University.
The State Constitution of 1885 contains the following: "The
Legislature shall provide by general law for incorporating such
educational, agricultural, mechanical, mining, transportation, mer-
cantile, and other useful companies or associations as may be
deemed necessary; but it shall not pass any special law on any
such subject, and any such special law shall be of no effect; pro-
vided, however, that nothing herein shall preclude special legis-
lation as to a University or the public schools, or as to a ship canal
across the State." (Sec. 25.) This action was taken in the sum-
mer of 1885.
In the spring of the same year (February 16, 1885) the Legis-
lature had passed "An Act Recognizing the University of Flor-
ida," which reads as follows:
"Section 1. That the Florida University as organized at the
city of Tallahassee be recognized as the University of the State,
and be known as the University of Florida; provided, there shall
be no expense incurred by the State by reason of this act.
"Sec. 2. That the University continue under its present or-
ganization andofficers until such further action be taken by the
State Legislature as the case may require."
It will be observed that this is "An Act Recognizing The
University of Florida." This phraseology is due to the fact that
two years before this act was passed (i. e., in 1883) the State
Board of Education had formulated a plan of consolidation or
co-ordination, in accordance with which the West Florida Semi-
2-U









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


nary was denominated "The Literary College of the University of
Florida." Accepting this action of the State Board, the Legis-
lature passed this "Act Recognizing the University of Florida."
It seems probable, however, that the State Board had originally
in view a somewhat different plan from that which found expres-
sion in this act of the Legislature.
Meanwhile, in 1870, the State Legislature had passed "An
Act to Establish the Florida Agricultural College," in accordance
with the Act of Congress of 1862, entitled "An Act Donating
Public Lands to the Several States and Territories which may
Provide Colleges for the Benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic
Arts."
For the support of such institutions Section 1 of this act
grants to each State "an amount of public land, to be apportioned
to each State in quantity to equal thirty thousand acres for each
Senator and Representative in Congress to which the States are
respectively entitled by the apportionment under the census of
1860; provided, that no mineral lands shall be selected or pur-
chased under the provisions of this act."
In Section 4 it is required "that all moneys, derived from the
sale of the lands aforesaid by the States to which the lands are
apportioned, and from the sales of land scrip hereinbefore pro-
vided for, shall be invested in stocks of the United States, or of
the States, or some other safe stocks, yielding not less than five
per centum upon the par value of said stocks; and that the
moneys so invested shall constitute a perpetual fund, the capital!
of which shall remain forever undiminished (except so far as
may be provided in Section 5 of this act), and the interests of
which shall be inviolably appropriated by each State which may
take and claim the benefit of this act, to the endowment, support,
and maintenance of at least one college where the leading object
shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies,
and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such man-
ner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe,
in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the
industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life."
Section 5 defines the obligations which the States assume in
accepting these grants:









GENERAL INFORMATION


"First. If any portion of the fund invested, as provided by
the foregoing section, or any portion of the interest thereon, shall,
by any action or contingency, be diminished or lost, it shall be
replaced by the State to which it belongs so that the capital of
the fund shall remain forever undiminished; and the annual inter-
est shall be regularly applied without diminution to the purpose
mentioned in the fourth section of this act, except that a sum not
exceeding ten per centum upon the amount received by any Stdte
under the provisions of this act may be expended for the pur-
chase of lands for sites or experimental farms, whenever author-
ized by the respective Legislatures of said States.
"Second. No portion of said fund, nor the interest thereon,
shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pretense what-
ever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of any
building or buildings."
Section 8 further stipulates "That the Governors of the several
States to which scrip shall be issued under this act shall be re--
quired to report annually to Congress all sales made of such scrip
until the whole shall be disposed of, the amount received for the
same, and what appropriation has been made of the proceeds."
In 1870, as already stated, the Legislature of Florida, by an
act entitled, "An Act to Establish the Florida Agricultural Col-
lege," accepted the Federal grant upon the conditions and under
the restrictions contained in the Act of Congress quoted above.
and thereby entered into a contract with the United States Gov-
ernment to erect and keep in repair all buildings necessary for
the use of the institution.
After decreeing the establishment of a college in accordance
with the Congressional requirements and appointing trustees for
its control, this act (Section 7) authorizes the trustees "to claim
and receive from the Secretary of the Interior the agricultural
college land scrip to which this State is entitled by Act of Con-
gress, July 2, 1862, and acts supplemental thereto."
Section 8 prescribes the disposition of the funds: "Ten per
centum of the proceeds of the sale of the scrip, or of the land,
may be expended for the purpose of a site for an experimental
farm. The remainder of the proceeds shall be invested in. stocks
of the United States, or of some of the States of the Union, bear-
ing an annual interest of not less than six per centum on their
par value, and shall remain a permanent fund forever. The an-









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


nual interest of the fund shall be regularly applied without dimi-
nution to the purposes set forth in Section 2 of this act. Dona-
tions may be made for specific purposes, and shall be applied to
the objects for which they were granted."
Section 9 provides that "No portion of the principal or interest
of the fund shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under any pre-
tense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation, or repairs
of any building or buildings, or for expenses incurred in selling
the scrip, locating the lands, or in managing the funds of the
lands."
In 1872 an act supplementary to the Act of 1870 was passed;
and the State, having availed herself of the Act of 1862, received
ninety thousand acres of land. The proceeds from the sale of
this land were invested in "The Agricultural College Fund" bonds,
the par value of which is one hundred and fifty-three thousand
and eight hundred dollars ($153,800).
In 1873 a site for the college was selected in Alachua county,
but nothing further came of this step. In 1875 the college was
located at Eau Gallie, and a "temporary college edifice" was
erected. No educational work having been accomplished there,
the trustees, in 187S, determined to remove the college, and a
committee from the Board was appointed to decide upon a suit-
able situation. In 1.883 Lake City was selected on account of its
special fitness; and, the citizens having given to the institution
one hundred acres of land and fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000),
the college was established there. Upon the completion of the
main building in the fall of 1884, the doors of the institution were
thrown open to students.
In the second catalogue of the new institution, dated "June,
1887," we find in the roster of the faculty "Rev. J. Kost, LL. D.,
Professor of Moral Philosophy and Geology, and Curator of
Museum." And foot-note adds: "Rev. J. Kost, LL. D., is also
Chancellor of the University of Florida." The exact nature of
the relationship indicated by this statement may be inferred from
the following statement which is found in the same catalogue
(1887):
"At the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees of the
Florida Agricultural College, held at the College, at Lake City,
June 17, 1886, the following resolution was adopted:









GENERAL INFORMATION


"Resolved, That the Board of Trustees of the Florida Agri-
cultural College believe that the educational interests of this State
would be advanced and furthered by the consolidation of the
Agricultural College and the Florida University, under the name
of the University of Florida and Agricultural College, and that
we recommend the same."
In the catalogue of the Agricultural College for the following
year, the statement that Dr. Kost is "Chancellor of the University"
is dropped; but the resolution quoted above is again printed. The
following year the resolution also disappears; and the idea therein
contained seems to have become quiescent.
About this time (i. e. in 1887), in accordance with the Act of
Congress known as the Hatch Act, the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station was established in connection with the State
Agricultural College.
Three years later the Agricultural College became a benefici-
ary of the Morrill Act. The expenditure of this sum is carefully
restricted by the Act of Congress which provides it and which
specifies the purpose for which it may be employed.
As regards the name of the institution, matters continued in
this condition until 1903. In that year the Legislature passed "An
Act Changing the Name of the Florida Agricultural College."
The title of University had never been assumed by the institution
at Tallahassee under the provisions of the Act of 1885; and in
1903 that Act was repealed and the title was transferred to the
Agricultural College. The Act of 1903 reads as follows:
"Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
"Section 1. That the Florida Agricultural College as at
present defined by law be and is hereby changed to and shall be
known as the University of Florida.
"Sec. 2. Any law inconsistent herewith be and the same is
hereby repealed.
"Sec. 3. This act to take effect upon its passage and approval
by the Governor." (Approved April 30, 1903.)
In accordance with this act the Agricultural College at once
assumed the title of the University of Florida, and continued its
activities without interruption for two years.
The year 1905 is memorable in the history of higher education
in the State. Besides the former Agricultural College, then bear-









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ing the title "University of Florida," at Lake City, there existed
five other institutions of higher education, all depending upon
State support for their funds. They were: the Florida State
College at Tallahassee, the Normal School at DeFuniak Springs,
the East Florida Seminary at Gainesville, the South Florida Col-
lege at Bartow, and the Agricultural Institute in Osceola county.
These institutions had failed to make sufficient differentiation
among themselves and to separate their work sufficiently from that
of the high-school system of the State. By an act of the Legis-
lature of 1905 this system of higher education was drastically
revised. The six institutions were reduced to two, clearly dif-
ferentiated from each other and from the high schools.
This act (known as the "Buckman Bill") created two co-
ordinated institutions; one for women at Tallahassee, first
designated the "Florida Female College" and later the "Florida
State College for Women"; and another for men, to be known as
the "University of the State of Florida." For their management
the act provides:
"Sec. 13. That there is hereby created a 'Board of Control'
which shall consist of five citizens of this State who shall be
appointed by the Governor and their terms of office shall be for
four years, except that, of the first board appointed under this act,
two members thereof shall be appointed for the term of two years
and three members thereof shall be appointed for the term of four
years."
The University of the State of Florida, thus established, began
its scholastic work in September, 1905.
By act of the Legislature of 1909, the name of the institution
was changed to the University of Florida.









GENERAL INFORMATION


LOCATION
Acting under a provision of the Buckman Act, to wit:
"Section 16. The Governor, as President of the State Board
of Education, shall cause a meeting of both of said boards to be
held in joint session at the capital, and at said meeting shall deter-
mine the place of location of the University of the State of Florida,
etc."
The State Board of Education and the Board of Control in
joint session, on the sixth day of July, 1905, selected the city of
Gainesville as the location for the new institution.
During the scholastic year 1905-06, the work of the University
was carried on at Lake City, while buildings were in process of
erection for its accommodation at Gainesville. The University
moved into these buildings during the summer of 1906, and the
work of the Institution has since been conducted at Gainesville.
The advantages which Gainesville presents as the seat of the
State University are numerous. It is centrally located and of
easy access, being reached by the leading railroads of the State.
It has well paved, lighted and shaded streets; the water-supply is
exceptionally pure, and the sewerage system good. The citizen-
ship is energetic and progressive, and frequently extends the
hospitality of its homes to the students. The Chautauqua and
Bible Conference held during the winter are valuable adjuncts to
the University. The moral atmosphere is wholesome, and for
many years the sale of intoxicants has been prohibited by law.

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS
The domain of the University comprises five hundred and
twelve acres, situated in the western extremity of the town of
Gainesville. Of this tract, ninety acres are devoted to the Univer-
sity campus, drill ground, and athletic field. Forty acres are
utilized for a farm, under the direction of the College of Agri-
culture of the University. The remainder of the land is used by
the Agricultural Experiment Station.
The buildings of the University are at present six in number:
two dormitories, known as "Thomas Hall" and "Buckman Hall";
a machine shop, a dynamo laboratory, a science hall, and an exoeri-
ment station building. They are lighted with electricity, supplied
with city water, and furnished with modern improvements. In









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


addition to these, there is now in course of erection an engineering
building.
The two Dormitories, Thomas Hall and Buckman Hall, are
brick and concrete structures, three stories in height, sixty feet
in width and three hundred and two hundred and forty feet, res-
pectively, in length. They are built in fireproof sections, each con-
taining twelve suites of dormitory-rooms and on each floor of each
section a shower-bath, lavatories and toilet. At present four
sections of "Thomas Hall" are being used for the library, dining-
hall, assembly-hall, and lecture and laboratory rooms. The other
sections are occupied by the students.
The Machine Shop is a one-story brick building, sixty feet long
and thirty feet wide, with a wing thirty feet long and twenty feet
wide. It provides for the shop work in the engineering courses.
The Dynamo Laboratory is a one-story wooden building,
thirty-five feet long and eighteen feet wide. It provides for the
laboratory work in electrical engineering.
The Science Hall is a brick and concrete building of two stories
and a finished basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet long and
sixty-six feet wide. It contains the classrooms and laboratories of
the Departments of Botany and Horticulture, Chemistry, Physics,
and Zoology and Bacteriology.
The Experiment Station Building is a brick and concrete struc-
ture, of three stories and a finished basement, one hundred and
twenty feet long and sixty feet wide. It contains the offices and
laboratories of the Agricultural Experiment Station.
The Engineering Building is now undergoing construction,
under a contract which calls for its completion by the first of
October, 1911. It is to be a brick and concrete structure, three
stories high, one hundred and twenty-two feet long and seventy-
three wide, providing offices, class-rooms, laboratories, and draft-
ing-rooms for the Departments of Civil Engineering, Electrical
Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

ENDOWMENT
The annual income of the University, apart from legislative
appropriations, is derived principally from three sources-"The
Agricultural College Fund" bonds, yielding an annual interest of
about seventy-seven hundred dollars ($7,700); one-half of the









GENERAL INFORMATION


"Morrill Fund," amounting now to twelve thousand five hundred
dollars ($12,500), and the "East Florida Seminary Fund,"
amounting to about two thousand dollars ($2,000). In addition to
these funds Congress has appropriated $25,000 more to each State
for the purpose of promoting the work of institutions already
beneficiaries of the Agricultural and Morrill Funds. One-half of
this amount will go to the University of Florida, but will not be
fully available until the expiration of five years, as the act of
appropriation provides for an appropriation of $5,000 for the year
1907-08, and an additional $5,000 for each of the four succeeding
years. The entire annual income of the institution thus derived
from various Federal grants amounts at present to about $30,000,
and will be increased by $2,500 a year for the next two years until
it will ultimately amount to about $35,000. This does not include
the Experiment Station funds.
EQUIPMENT
Library.-The University Library numbers about twelve thou-
sand volumes, including those in the Academic, Law and Scien-
tific departments. In the Academic Library, besides general
works, are one hundred volumes on philosophical subjects, two
hundred and twenty-five on economics, one hundred and twenty
on education, one thousand seven hundred and fifty of literature,
eight hundred of general history, and two hundred of United
States history. An effort is being made to place on the shelves all
books extant relating to Florida history. Additional books are
purchased under the direction of the library committee as fast as
funds are available for that purpose.
All books in this library are catalogued and shelved according
to the Dewey system, making them readily available for refer-
ence. Students are encouraged to use the card catalogues, which
are arranged alphabetically, both according to authors and to titles,
and to become familiar with the books themselves by free access
to the stacks. The librarian or student assistants are always in
attendance to explain the arrangement of books and to give aid in
reference work. A taste for good literature is being developed in
many students who have not had access to a good library before
coming here, making this one of the great advantages of the
college career.
As a designated depository of Federal documents, the library









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


receives several hundred volumes of valuable government publi-
cations each year. Files are kept of all Florida State publications,
and of the bulletins and reports of the Agricultural Experiment
Stations throughout the Union.
In the reading-room are about sixty of the best general and
technical periodicals for the students' use. The back numbers of
these are bound and kept on file, and the early volumes purchased
whenever they can be obtained. Here also are received the leading
newspapers of the State, and county papers are added to the list at
the request of the students.
Museum.-The museum occupies a large room on the second
floor of the new Science Hall, and contains a small but well-
selected collection of minerals; a number of fossils and casts, and
a small but representative collection of the lower forms of marine
life. Special efforts are being made to get together as complete
a collection as possible illustrating the fauna of the State.
Laboratories.-The following laboratories are maintained by
the University:
The Botanical Laboratory contains enough dissecting micro-
scopes and instruments, and Bausch and Lomb compound micro-
scopes, magnifying from 80 to 465 diameters, for the individual
use of the students.
There is a Zeiss binocular microscope, a large compound
microscope of very high magnifying power, two demonstration
microscopes, and a McIntosh stereopticon, with projection micro-
scope attachment.
For work in histology there are hand microtomes, section
knives, a sliding microtome, Millers' paraffin bath, and a supply
of reagents, stains and mounts, while for studies in physiology
there are germination boxes, nutrient jars, an osmometer, a
clinostat, and a number of other pieces.
An herbarium has been started, to which students each year
add specimens which they collect, identify and mount. There is a
case of reference books and periodicals in the laboratory, that it
may be within easy reach of the students.
The Chemical Laboratory is equipped with all the necessary
apparatus and material for instruction in general inorganic and
organic, analytical and industrial chemistry, as well as for ad-
vanced work in the science. It includes two delicate balances, a









GENERAL INFORMATION


latest model polariscope, microscope and spectroscope, ample
platinum ware, in the form of crucible dishes, electrodes, wire and
foil, and many special pieces of apparatus for illustrating (upon
the lecture table) chemical principles.
The equipment is entirely modern in every respect and in the
new rooms assigned to this department can be used to the best
advantage. The stock of chemicals is abundant and complete.
The Dynamo Laboratory, providing for practical instruction
on electrical machinery, occupies a small building by itself.
The principal machines are a 2.5-KW General Electric type IB
direct current generator, a 1-HP Westinghouse type R motor,
a 1-KW synchronous motor, and two 2-KW Westinghouse type
S dynamos, designed to be used either as generators or as motors.
The switchboard panel for each machine is placed near it, but
is connected to terminals on a main distribution board for the
whole laboratory. Power is supplied by a 10-HP single-phase
Wagner induction motor, connected to the city alternating current
supply, and driving the main shaft of the laboratory. The various
machines are driven from this shaft, and can be thrown in or out
by friction clutches.
The laboratory is also supplied with transformers, several
types of arc lamps, and numerous measuring instruments of dif-
ferent ranges, chiefly of Weston make.
The Physical Laboratory is well equipped with apparatus, and
meets the needs of such undergraduate work in physics as is usu-
ally carried on in the best American colleges. The western half of
the ground floor of 'Science Hall is devoted to the Department of
Physics. Its quarters include a lecture-room, 25 feet by 23 feet,
with amphitheatered seats; an office and library room; a main
laboratory room, 28 by 25 feet; an electrical laboratory, 30 by 14
feet; a battery room; an optical room, 23 by 10 feet, arranged so
as to be effectively darkened; a work-shop; a store-room; and a
private laboratory room, for research work. Water, gas and
electricity from various circuits, are led to all of the rooms. The
laboratory is provided with several brick piers, on foundations
independent of the rest of the building, for the accommodation of
instruments requiring special stability.
The Zoological and Bacteriological Laboratories are well
equipped for the work of instruction. In addition to the necessary









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


glassware and reagents, there are a number of high-grade
microscopes; dissecting microscopes; two microtomes, one for
celloidin, the other for paraffin sectioning; paraffin bath; steril-
izers, both wet and dry; warm and cool incubators; dark-ground
illuminator; balances; centrifuge; breeding cages; anatomical
preparations and models; a number of the Leukart-Chun zoo-
logical wall charts; one Leitz large compound microscope with
mechanical stage and a full set of apochromatic objectives; and
one Bausch and Lomb projecting lantern with accessories. The
departmental library contains a number of the current periodicals
as well as the more important text-books and reference works.
Shops.-The Wood-Shop is provided with lockers equipped
with full set of tools for bench-work, such as chisels, squares,
saws, gauges, etc. The wood-work machinery consists of nine
wood-turning lathes, a planer, rip-saw, and band-saw.
The Machine-Shop is equipped with an 18-inch Cady lathe, an
11-inch Seneca Falls lathe, a drill press, a Gray Planer, a No. 1
Brown & Sharpe Universal Milling Machine, a Springfield
shaper, a small Barnes lathe, three emery wheels, grindstone,
vises, machine-shop tools.
The Forge-Shop is equipped with six power-blast forges, one
hand forge, six anvils, and a large supply of tools.
Engineering Laboratory and Field Instruments.-The Lab-
oratory now contains a cement testing machine, built in our own
shops, a 50,000-lb. testing machine equipped for all ordinary
tests, weighing machines, computing instruments, etc.
The field instruments consist of two surveyors' compasses, four
wye levels, six transits, complete plane table, several small plane
tables, and a high grade sextant with artificial horizon. The neces-
sary rods, chains, tapes, etc., also barometers, clinometers, pedom-
eters, prismatic compasses, and range finders are all available.
The College Farm.-The Farm connected with the College of
Agriculture consists of 40 acres-about 28 acres for trucking and
general field crops, 2 acres for stock lots, 2 acres for orchard, 5
acres for pasture and 3 acres for buildings and grounds where a
hay and machinery barn stands.
The laboratory equipment in live stock is only well begun, but
the individuals of the herds are of high grade.









GENERAL INFORMATION 29

Athletic Equipment.--The institution has provided a hard
surfaced athletic field including football gridiron, baseball dia-
mond, with grandstand and enclosed field, and ample tennis court
facilities. A basketball court and swimming-pool are also located
on the campus.
The equipment of the gymnasium represents an expenditure
of some $3,000.00 and this collection of apparatus is probably
unsurpassed in the South. All of the above is in charge of a
competent athletic director.









' UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GOVERNMENT AND REGULATIONS

ADMINISTRATION
Board of Control.-The general government of the Univer-
sity of Florida is vested by law in the Board of Control, consist-
ing of five members appointed by the Governor of Florida from
various parts of the State. Appointments to the Board of Control
are made for a term of four years.
The Board of Control appoints the president, and upon the
president's nomination, elects members of the faculties, directs
the general policies of the University, supervises the expenditure
of its funds, prescribes the requirements for admission, with the
advice of the president and faculties, and confers degrees upon
recommendation of the president and faculties.
President.-The direct administration of all affairs of the
University is in the hands of the president, appointed by the
Board of Control and acting under its authority.
Deans and Directors.-For convenience of administration,
the University is organized under the following divisions: The
College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture, the
College of Engineering, the College of Law, the Division of Uni-
versity Extension, and the Agricultural Experiment Station.
Each college has as its executive head a dean, chosen from the
faculty of that college; the Division of University Extension
and the Agricultural Experiment Station have as executive head
a director. These officers are responsible to the president of the
University.
Council of Administration.-The president and vice-presi-
dent of the University, the deans of the several colleges, and the
director of the Experiment Station form a council of administra-
tion, with the following functions: To lay out new lines of work,
inaugurate new enterprises in general, and prepare the annual
budget; and to act as the judicial body of the general faculty
on cases of general discipline not under the authority of the col-
leges, on new courses of study and changes in existing courses,
bringing these matters before the Board of Control, and on ques-
tions of college action referred to it by any member of the general
faculty.









GENERAL INFORMATION


Faculty.-The general faculty of the University includes all
persons engaged in the work of instruction in the University,
excepting laboratory assistants and undergraduate assistants to
the professors. Under the leadership of the president it forms
the general governing body in all matters of instruction and
discipline.
The faculty of each college consists of those members of the
general faculty who gives instruction in that college. It forms
the governing body in matters of instruction and discipline in its
college.
Experiment Station Staff.-The experiment station staff
consists of all persons engaged in scientific work in the Agricul-
tural Experiment 'Station. Under the leadership of the director,
it has authority in all matters of agricultural investigation and
their publication.

DISCIPLINE
Officers.-The immediate supervision of the general life of
the student body is in the hands of an Officer in Charge, who
occupies quarters in the dormitory.
In each section of the dormitory a monitor maintains a gen-
eral oversight and makes reports to the Officer in Charge. Moni-
tors are appointed from among those students who are more than
twenty-one years old.
Offenses Against Good Conduct.-Any offense against good
conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the word, renders a student
liable to discipline, whether or not a formal rule against the
offense has been published.
The following offenses will be treated with especial severity:
Disrespect to an officer of the University; wanton destruction of
property; gambling; debauchery or drunkenness, or having in-
toxicating liquors in possession on the University grounds.
Hazing.-No form of hazing will be tolerated in the Univer-
sity and all former students and candidates for admission are
hereby notified that they will be required on matriculating to sign
the following pledge:
"I hereby promise upon my word of honor, without any
mental reservation whatsoever, to refrain from all forms of haz-
ing while I am connected with the University of Florida."









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


No student will be admitted to his room in the domitories until
he has matriculated and signed the above pledge.
The Honor System.-Every student of the University is
assumed to be a man of honor, and his word is accepted on all
matters. In such rare cases as a student may prove not to be a
man of honor, he is expelled, either by action of the faculty, or
by action of the Board of Governors of the student body, con-
sisting of the presidents of the four academic classes.
Absence from the University.-No undergraduate student is
permitted to be absent from the University over night without
written permission from the Officer in Charge. As a rule, such
permission is granted only upon written request from the parent
or guardian of the student.
Attendance Upon Duties.-A student who without good
cause persistently absents himself from his University duties, is,
after due warning, dishonorably dismissed for the remainder of
the academic year. A student who, by reason of ill health or
outside demands upon his time, finds it impossible to give regu-
lar attention to University duties, is requested to withdraw; but
such request does not in any way reflect upon his good standing.
All delinquencies in University duties are reported to the
Officer in Charge, who promptly brings them to the attention of
the students, and requires a prompt explanation to be made. Care-
ful records of all delinquencies are kept.

REGULATIONS CONCERNING STUDIES
Quantity of Work.-Every undergraduate student must take
studies requiring at least fifteen hours of recitations per week, or
equivalent time in laboratory courses. No student may take more
than twenty-three hours per week, except by special permission
of the faculty of his college.
In counting hours, two hours of laboratory work are consid-
ered equivalent to one hour of recitation.
Avoidance of Conflicts.-Studies must be so chosen as not to
conflict, as shown on the printed schedule for the year.
Assignment to Classes.-Every student must appear before
the Dean of his college at the beginning of each academic
year for assignment to classes. An individual instructor has no









GENERAL INFORMATION


authority to enroll a student in any course, except as authorized
by the Dean of his college.
Choice of Studies.-The choice as to which one of the vari-
ous curricula is to be pursued rests entirely with the individual
student, subject to considerations of proper preparation; but the
group of studies to be taken must be that belonging to one of
the regular years in the chosen curriculum exactly as announced
in the catalogue, unless special reasons exist for deviating from
this arrangement.
Conditions.-A student who is prepared to take up most of
the studies of a certain year in the regular curriculum, but is
deficient in some studies, will be permitted to proceed with the
work of that year. Such a student is said to be conditioned; he
is permitted to proceed subject to the condition that he make up
the studies in which the deficiency occurs. This should be done,
when possible, by study with a private tutor, and examination as
soon as the work is completed; but it may be done by pursuing
the studies in question with a lower class in the University, and
the Committee on Classification has authority to require it to be
done in that way when such procedure seems best. In every case,
provision for all of the lower studies must be made before any
of the higher studies may be taken; and in the event of conflicts
on the schedule, or excessive quantity of work, higher studies
must give way to lower.
Extra Studies.-By special permission from the dean of his
college, a student may take extra studies in addition to those
prescribed in his regular curriculum, provided that can be done
without conflicting with a regular study or exceeding the maxi-
mum number of hours of study. Such permission is not, as a
rule, granted to any conditioned student; and it may be with-
drawn from any student in the event of failure in any of the
regular studies.
Special Students.-Students who may desire to take special
courses will be allowed, upon recommendation of the Committee
on Classification, to take those classes for which they may be
prepared. Such students are subject to all the laws and regula-
tions of the University. These special courses do not lead to any
regular degree.
s-U.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The purpose of permitting students to take special courses,
other than those regularly offered, is merely to provide for the
occasional exceptional requirements of individual students; and
any abuse of this privilege, for the sake of avoiding regular
studies which may be distasteful, can not be tolerated. Accord-
ingly, no minor student is permitted to enter as a special student
except upon written request of his parent or guardian.
Classification of Irregular Students.-A student is deemed
to belong to that class in which the majority of his hours of work
lies. But a special student is not considered as belonging to any
of the regular classes.
Changes in Studies.-After a student is once registered, he
is not permitted to discontinue any class, or to begin any addi-
tional one, without written permission from the dean of his col-
lege, which must be shown the instructor involved.
Grades and Reports.-Each instructor keeps a record of the
quality of work done by each student in his classes, and assigns
grades, on the scale of 100. At the end of each month the
average grades for the month are reported to the office of the
University for permanent record and for entry upon a monthly
report to the parent or guardian of each student.
If the monthly grades show that any student is not doing
satisfactory work, he may be required to drop some of his studies
and substitute studies in a lower class, or he may be required to
withdraw from the University.
Examinations.-At the end of each semester regular ex-
aminations are held on all of the work of that semester.
Failures in Studies.-A final grade for each semester's work
is assigned, based upon the examination and the monthly grades.
If this grade falls below 60 for any student, he is considered to
have failed, and may proceed only subject to a condition in the
study in which failure has occurred.
Re-examinations.-A student who has failed in the work of
a semester is allowed, in case his grade does not fall below 50, to
make up the condition by re-examination, on the first Saturday
of March or the first Saturday of October. To pass by re-ex-
amination, a grade of 70 must be attained. *Only one re-ex-









MEDALS


amination in any subject is allowed to a student; in case of failure
to pass, he must repeat the whole semester's work in the subject
concerned.

ATHLETICS
General Policy.-It is the policy of the University to foster
clean, amateur athletics; not to tolerate professionalism in its
athletics.
Absences on Account of Athletics.-The members of regu-
lar athletic teams, together with necessary substitutes and mana-
ger, are permitted to be absent from University duties for such
time as may be clearly necessary to take part in games away from
Gainesville. All class-work missed on account of an athletic trip
must be made up as promptly as possible after returning, at such
hours as may be arranged by the various professors.
Schedule of Games.-The schedule of games must be ar-
ranged so as to interfere as little as possible with University
duties, and must receive the approval of the Committee on
Athletics.
Eligibility to Athletic Teams.-Any team playing under the
name of the University of Florida must be composed exclusively
of genuine students in good standing in the University. A list
of the players and substitutes for each game must be submitted
to the Committee on Athletics before that game, and must re-
ceive its approval. Negligence of duties, or failure in studies.
excludes a student from the right to play on a team representing
the University.
No student is permitted to play on any of the regular teams,
who is not in proper physical condition, in the opinion of the
University physician. No minor student is permitted to play if
his parent or guardian objects to his doing so.

MEDALS
Medals are offered in the University (1) For the best drilled
man in the whole battalion; (2) for the best declaimer in the
Freshman and Sophomore classes; (3) for the best original
oration in the Junior class of any college; (4) for the best origi-
nal oration in the Senior class of any college. These contests are









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


all settled in public competition at Commencement. The speakers
are limited to four from each class, selected by the faculty.
Through the liberality of Mr. H. H. Buckman, of Jacksonville,
Florida, a handsome medal is offered annually to the student of
the College of Engineering making the highest average grade
for the year.


STATEMENT OF EXPENSES
University Charges.-Tuition.-No tuition is charged to a
student whose home is in Florida, except in the College of Law,
where a tuition charge of forty dollars ($40.00) will be made.
Students who are non-residents of Florida will be required to
pay a tuition fee of twenty dollars ($20.00) per year.
Registration Fee.-A registration fee of five dollars ($5.00)
per year will be charged all students, except one scholarship stu-
dent from each county in Florida.
Damage Deposit.-In order to secure the University property
against damage, the sum of five dollars ($5.00) must be deposited
at registration. Damage known to have been done by any stu-
dent will be charged to his individual account; all other damages
will be prorated among the students.
At the end of the scholastic year this deposit, less the amount
deducted, will be returned to the student.
Infirmary Fee.-An infirmary fee of three dollars ($3.00)
will be charged each student residing on the campus, the proceeds
of which will go towards defraying the salary of a resident nurse.
This will secure the student, in case of illness, the privilege of a
bed in the infirmary which occupies Section A of Thomas Hall;
the services of the nurse, and attention from the University phy-
sician, E. R. Flint, M. D. (Harvard). The payment of this fee
does not increase the University charges made in former years,
as a like amount is deducted from the cost of board and lodging
for the first semester.
Board and Lodging.-Board and lodging will be furnished
by the University at a cost of fifty-seven dollars ($57.00) for
the first semester, not including the Christmas vacation, and
sixty dollars ($60.00) for the second semester. These sums must









EXPENSES


be paid at the beginning of each semester. Board and lodging
will be furnished only by the semester and not by the month. In
very exceptional cases, arrangements may be made to pay in
three instalments, payable in advance. This includes meals in
the dining-hall and room (with heat, light and access to a bath-
room), furnished as stated below. The dining-hall will be closed
during the Christmas holidays.
Room Without Board.-Students occupying a room in the
Dormitories but not taking meals in the dining-hall will be charged
$20.00 per semester for lodging.
Furniture.-All rooms are partially furnished. The furniture
consists of two iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau,
table, washstand and chairs. The students are required to pro-
vide all other articles, including pillows,, bedding, washbowl,
pitcher, mirror, half curtains, mosquito-bar, etc.
Uniform.-All students, except graduate, law, and normal
students, are required to provide themselves with a uniform. This
is of the best quality Charlottesville cadet gray, and is much less
expensive than citizen's clothing of like quality. The uniform
may be worn at all times and is neat and serviceable. In order
to minimize the heat of summer, students may be required at
that time to furnish themselves with a regulation shirt, trousers
and hat, leggins, shoes and tie, and two pairs of whire duck
trousers, obtainable at a slight expense. The expense of uniform
in all is in the neighborhood of $23.00, which amount must be
deposited on entrance.
Books.-The cost of books depends largely upon the course
taken. The cost of required text-books is, in no case, a large
item of expense, though in the higher classes the student is en-
couraged to acquire a few works of permanent value.
The following statement summarizes the minimum expense of
a Florida student registered in the College of Arts and Sciences,
of Agriculture, or of Engineering:










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Tuition ............................................... $ 00.00
Registration Fee ........................................ 5.00
Damage Deposit ............................... ........ 5.00
Infirm ary Fee .................................. ........ 3.00
Board and Lodging........................ ........... 117.00
Uniform (about) ......................................... 23.20
Books (about) ....................................... 10.00
Incidentals (laundry, athletic, literary society, etc., dues),
about.................................................. 20.00

$183.20
Less Damage Deposit returned at end of year.............. 5.00

$178.20
The actual University charges to a law student (including
board and lodging, fees, and tuition, but not including books)
are $165.00.
Graduate and normal students, who are exempt from buying
uniforms, will deduct the cost of uniform from the above table;
and students from other States will add a tuition fee of $20.00.
Remittances.-All remittances should be made to the Auditor,
The University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
Scholarships.-Through the generosity of friends of the Uni-
versity the institution is able to offer needy and deserving young
men the following scholarships:
Three of $100.00 each per year:
1. The Board of Control Scholarship.-Established and main-
tained by the Board of Control. For Florida students.
2. The Kirby Smith Scholarship.-Established and main-
tained by the Kirby Smith Chapter of the Daughters of the
Confederacy. For grandsons of Confederate veterans.
3. The Faculty Scholarship.-Established and maintained by
the faculty of the University.
One of $120 per year:
4. The Children of the Confederacy Scholarship.-For the
lineal descendant of a Confederate soldier.
One of $200 per year:
5. The High School Scholarship.-For a graduate of any
senior high school, preferably that of Escambia county.
Application for these scholarships should be made to the
President of the University, and should be accompanied by a
record of the student's work and statement of his need, and cer-









SCHOLARSHIPS


tificates of his character and dessert. The scholarships will be
awarded on the following principles:
(a) The student must actually need this financial help to
enable him to attend the University.
(b) He must be worthy to receive such help. To be worthy
he must first be a young man of good character and habits;
second, he must be sufficiently far advanced to enter not lower
than the Freshman Class of the University. This means that he
must have completed the work of the eleventh grade of the
public schools, or its equivalent.
Opportunities for Earning Expenses.-It is often possible
for a student to earn a part of his expenses by working during
such hours as are not required for his University duties.
The University gives regular employment to a few students
as waiters in the dining hall, as janitors, and in some other ca-
pacities. Such employment is not, as a rule, given to a student
unless he is financially unable to complete a year at the University
without earning money. In making appointments preference is
given to students in attendance at the University, as compared
with applicants from outside; to members of higher classes, as
compared with those of lower classes; and to students of high
standing as compared with those of low standing. Employment
is not given to a student who fails in any study.
While the employment of students is designed primarily to
assist those in need of funds, the payment for their services is in
no sense a charity. The rate of remuneration is no higher, and
the standard of service demanded is no lower, than would be the
case if the work were done by others than students. If a student
employee fails to give satisfaction in his work, he is promptly
discharged. Otherwise he is continued in his position as long as
he cares to hold it, provided it is not found to interfere with rea-
sonable success in his studies, and provided he does not commit
any breach of general good conduct.
While great credit is due to those young men who are willing
to make the sacrifices required to earn the expenses of their educa-
tion, students are not advised to undertake to earn money while
pursuing their studies, unless such a course of action is quite
unavoidable. Proper attention to studies makes sufficient demand









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


upon the time and energy of a student, without the burden of
outside duties; and such time as the studies leave free can be
spent more profitably in healthful recreation.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
The Young Men's Christian Association.-There is a branch
of the Y. M. C. A. in the University, which meets every Sunday.
At these meetings the practical rather than the theoretical phases
of Christianity are freely and candidly talked over, and the stu-
dents discuss among themselves the special problems which arise
in student life. Members of the faculty, the ministers of the city,
and distinguished Christian workers are frequently invited to
address the association. Bible classes are organized in connection
with the work.
Students, on entering the University, should by all means
become identified with this organization, and parents should
counsel and encourage them in so doing. A note of introduction
to the president of the organization will cause especial attention
to be given a new student.
Literary Societies.-The Yocum Literary Society, the mem-
bers of which come from the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, of
Agriculture, and of Engineering; and the John Marshall De-
bating Society, composed of students in the College of Law, are
valuable adjuncts to the educational work of the University. They
are conducted entirely by the students and maintain a high level
of endeavor. The members obtain much practical experience in
the conduct of public assemblies. They assimilate knowledge of
parliamentary law, acquire ease and grace of delivery, learn to
argue with calmness of thought and courtesy of manner, and are
rained in thinking and in presenting their thought clearly and
effectively when facing an audience.
All students are earnestly advised to connect themselves with
one of these societies, and to take a constant and active part in
its work.
The Transit Club.- This is an organization of the civil
engineering students, having for its object the promotion of both
social and intellectual interests of such men. It was founded in
the spring of 1909 as a natural result of the fraternal feeling
brought about by the close comradeship of camp life, and is the









TERMS OF ADMISSION


pioneer engineering society in this State. Fortnightly meetings
are held in the civil engineering class-rooms, and each member in
turn presents a paper on some topic of interest to civil engineers.
The Teachers' Club.-This is an organization of students in
the Department of Education and of others who are interested
in teaching. It meets once each week, when all phases of modern
educational problems are discussed in the form of reports, essays
and debates. It attempts to acquaint, in a practical manner, the
young teacher with the problems that will confront him in his
regular school work, and especially to show him the advantages
of teachers' meetings and conferences.
Students who contemplate teaching are urged to become mem-
bers and take an active part in the work of this club.
The Agricultural Club.- The purpose of the Agricultural
Club is to promote interest in agriculture; to unify college thought;
to afford training in public speaking; and to prepare for leader-
ship in after-life. The club meets twice during the month. Its
membership is composed of students in the College of Agriculture
and others interested in the subject.
The Kelvin Engineering Club.-This is a society of electrical
and mechanical engineering students. It meets every two weeks
for the discussion of topics of general interest in electrical and
mechanical engineering.
TERMS OF ADMISSION
A candidate for admission must present, along with his schol-
astic record, a certificate of good moral character; and if the
candidate be from another college or university, the certificate
must show that he was honorably discharged.
METHODS OF ADMISSION
There are two methods of gaining admission to the University:
(1) By Certificate.-The University will accept certificates
from the senior high schools of Florida; from accredited acad-
emies and preparatory schools of the State; and from any sec-
ondary school of another State which is accredited by its State
University.
The certificate presented by the candidate for admission must
be officially signed by the principal of the school attended. It
must state in detail the work of preparation and, in- the case of










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Florida high schools, that the course through the eleventh grade
has been satisfactorily completed.
Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired data,
will be sent to all principals and, upon application, to prospective
students.
(2) By Examination.-Candidates not admitted by certificate
will be required to stand written examinations upon the entrance
subjects. These examinations will be held on the Thursday and
Friday following the last Wednesday in May and on the Monday
and Tuesday preceding the last Wednesday in September.

SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS
"Entrance Units."-The scholastic requirements for admission
are measured in "Entrance Units." These units are based upon
the curriculum of the high schools of Florida. A unit represents a
course of study pursued throughout the school year with five
recitation periods of at least forty-five minutes each per week.
Two laboratory periods should be counted as one recitation period.
Number of Units Required.-At present twelve units are
required for entrance, equivalent to the completion of the eleventh
grade of the senior high schools.
Notice is hereby given that with the year 1913-14, the standard
for entrance will be raised to fifteen units, equivalent to graduation
from the senior high schools.
Distribution of Units.-Of the twelve units required for admis-
sion, eight are specified as follows:
English ................................. 3 units
M mathematics ................................... 3 units
History ........................................ 2 units
Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must present
in addition:
Latin .............. ..................... 3 units
The remaining units (for A. B., one; for B. S., four) may be
elected from the following subjects:
Agriculture .................. ................ 1 unit
Botany ........................... ........ or 1 unit
Chemistry ......... ............................ 1 unit
Latin ........................... ............. 3 units
History ....................................... 1 unit
Modern Languages, French, German, or Spanish. 1 unit
Physical Geography........................... 1 unit
Physics ...................................... 1 unit
Zoology ................................. .. or 1 unit










TERMS OF ADMISSION


Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in the College
of Arts and Sciences are strongly urged to elect the three units of
Latin.
Deficiencies.-A deficiency of two units will be allowed a can-
didate, but such deficiency must be removed by the end of the
first year of admission.
DESCRIPTION OF UNIT COURSES
English.-Three units, all required.
The work in English (including Grammar, Composition and
Rhetoric and the recommended Classics) is designed to cover
three years. It is urged that the exercises in Composition and the
use of the Classics be continued through the three years.
(1) Grammar.-A thorough knowledge of English Grammar,
both in its technical aspects and in its bearings upon speech and
writing.
(2) Composition and Rhetoric. -A mastery of the funda-
mental principles of elementary Rhetoric such as is given in any
standard high school text; and constant practice in Composition,
oral and written, during the whole period of preparation.
(3) Classics.-The English Classics now generally adopted by
school and colleges. There are two divisions of this work:
I. Reading.-A certain number of books will be set for
reading (see list subjoined). The candidate will be required
to present evidence of a general knowledge of the subject-
matter and to answer simple questions on the lives of the
authors. The form. of examination will usually be the writing
of a paragraph or two on each of several topics to be chosen
by the candidate from a considerable number-perhaps ten or
fifteen-set before him in the examination paper. The treat-
ment of these topics is designed to test the candidate's power
of clear and accurate expression, and will call for only a
general knowledge of the substance of the books.
II. Study and Practice. -This part of the examination
presupposes the thorough study of each of the works named
in this division. The examination will be upon the subject-
matter, form, and structure. In addition the candidate may
be required to answer questions involving the essentials of
English grammar and on the leading facts in English literary
history to which the prescribed texts belong.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


(a) For Reading.-For 1911 and 1918 ten books,
selected from the following list:
Group I (two to be selected).-Shakespeare's "As You
Like It," "Henry V.," "Julius Caesar," "The Merchant
of Venice," "Twelfth Night."
Group II (one to be selected).-Bacon's Essays; Bun-
yan's "The Pilgrim's Progress," Part I; The Sir Roger de
Coverley Papers in the Spectator; Franklin's Autobiog-
raphy.
Group III (one to be selected).-Chaucer's Prologue;
Selections from Spencer's "Faerie Queene"; Pope's "The
Rape of the Lock"; Goldsmith's "The Deserted Village";
Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (First Series), Books II
and III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray,
Cowper and Burns.
Group IV (two to be selected).-Goldsmith's "The
Vicar of Wakefield"; Scott's "Ivanhoe," "Quentin Dur-
ward"; Hawthorne's "The House of the Seven Gables";
Thackeray's "Henry Esmond"; Mrs. Gaskell's "Cranford";
Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities"; George Eliot's "Silas
Marner"; Blackmore's "Lorna Doone."
Group V (two to be selected.)-Irving's Sketch Book;
Lamb's "Essays of Elia"; De Quincey's "Joan of Arc," and
"The English Mail Coach"; Carlyle's "Heroes and Hero
Worship"; Emerson's Essays (S e e c t e d); Ruskin's
"Sesame and Lilies."
Group VI (two to be selected). Coleridge's "The
Ancient Mariner"; Scott's "Lady of the Lake"; Byron's
"Mazeppa" and "The Prisoner of Chillon"; Palgrave's
"Golden Treasury" (First Series), Book IV, with special
attention to Wordsworth, Keats and Shelley; Macaulay's
'"Lays of Ancient Rome"; Poe's Poems; Lowell's "The
Vision of Sir Launfal"; Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustum";
Longfellow's "The Courtship of Miles Standish"; Tenny-
son's "Gareth and Lynette," "Lancelot and Elaine," and
'"The Passing of Arthur"; Browning's "Cavalier Tunes,"
"The Lost Leader," "How They Brought the Good News
from Ghent to Aix," "Evelyn Hope," "Home Thoughts
from Abroad," "Home Thoughts from the Sea," "Incident









TERMS OF ADMISSION


of the French Camp," "The Boy and the Angel," "One
Word More." "Herv6 Riel," "Pheidippides."
(b) For Study.--For 1911 and 1912: Shakespeare's
"Macbeth"; Milton's "Lycidas," "Comus," "L'Allegro,"
and "11 Penseroso"; Burke's "Speech on Conciliation with
America," or Washington's Farewell Address and Web-
ster's "First Bunker Hill Oration"; Macaulay's Life of
Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns.
No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is
notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom or
division into paragraphs.
Mathematics.-Three units, all required.
(1) Algebra-First Year.-One unit. A thorough knowl-
edge of the elementary operations, factoring, highest common
factor, least common multiple, fractions, simple equations, in-
equalities, involution, evolution, and numerical quadratics. This
is supposed to represent the work of one year in the high school.
(2) Algebra-Second Year.-One unit. This includes: A
thorough study of quadratic equations, ratio and proportion, the
progressions, imaginary quantities, -the binomial theorem, loga-
rithms, and graphic algebra. This is supposed to represent the
work of the second year in algebra in the high school.
(3) Geometry.-One unit. The five books of Plane Geome-
try are required.
History.-Three units: two required, one elective.
Two years of high school work in history, counting two units,
are required for entrance. A third year's work in history cover-
ing a division of the subject not offered for the two year's credits,
will count as an additional unit in making up the twelve units
required for admission to the Freshman class. The candidate may
offer any two (or three) of the following divisions of history:
(1) Ancient History, with particular reference
to Greece and Rome .................... 1 unit
(2) European History since Charlemagne........ 1 unit
(3) English History ................ ... ...... 1 unit
(4) American History ......................... 1 unit
A year's work based on a good text-book of at least 300 or 400
pages is required in the case of each of the above divisions. The
student should always know something of the author of the text-









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


book which he uses and should also be able to give evidence of
having consulted some works in addition to that used as a text.
Latin.-Three units; A. B. requirement; B. S. elective.
At least three years' work in this study is required to cover
the three units. The minimum for each year is as follows:
(1) First Year.-One unit. A first year Latin book, such as
Collar & Daniell's First Year Latin or Potter's Elementary Latin
Course.
(2) Second Year.-One unit. Four books of Caesar's Gallic
War, with constant study of the grammar and constant practice
in prose composition.
(3) Third Year.-One unit. Six of Cicero's Orations, with
grammar and prose composition throughout the year.
Modern Languages.-One unit; elective.
French.-The work should comprise: (1) careful drill in pro-
nunciation; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the inflec-
tion of the regular and the more common verbs, the plural nouns,
the inflection of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of
personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions and conjunc-
tions; the order of words in the sentence, and the elementary rules
of syntax; (3) abundant easy exercises, designed not only to fix
in the memory the forms and principles of grammar, but also to
cultivate readiness in the reproduction of natural forms of expres-
sion; (4) the reading of from 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of
graduated texts, with constant practice of translating into French
easy variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving the
English), and in reproducing from memory sentences previously
read; (5) writing French from dictation.
German.-The work should comprise: (1) careful drill upon
pronunciation; (2) the memorizing and frequent repetition of
easy colloquial sentences; (3) drill upon the rudiments of gram-
mar, that is, upon the inflection of the articles, of such nouns as
belong to the language of every-day life, of adjectives, pronouns,
weak verbs, and the more usual strong verbs; also upon the use
of the more common prepositions, the simpler uses of the modal
auxiliaries, and the elementary, rules of syntax and word-order;
(4) abundant easy exercises designed not only to fix in mind the
forms and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness









TERMS OF ADMISSION


in the reproduction of natural forms of expression; (5) the read-
ing of from 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a reader, with
constant practice in translating into German easy variations upon
sentences selected from the reading-lesson (the teacher giving the
English), and in the reproduction from memory of sentences
previously read.
Spanish.-The work should comprise: (1) careful drill in
pronunciation; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the con-
jugation of the regular and the more common irregular verbs, the
inflection of nouns, adjectives and pronouns, and the elementary
rules of syntax; (3) exercises containing illustrations of the
principles of grammar; (4) the reading and accurate rendering
into good English of from 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of grad-
uated texts, with translation into Spanish of easy variations of the
sentences read; (5) writing Spanish from dictation.
Agriculture.-One unit; required in the College of Agri-
culture.
The preparation should include the study of Agriculture for
Southern Schools, by Duggar, and The Nursery-Book, by Bailey,
or their equivalents. At least one-third of the time should be
devoted to laboratory practice, field work, and carefully planned
visits to successfully and unsuccessfully conducted farms and fruit
plantations.
Physical Geography.-One unit; elective.
The preparation should include the study of at least one of the
modern text-books, together with an approved laboratory and field
course, and should cover the following subjects:
1. The earth as a globe; shape of the earth, how proved; size,
how measured; motions, how determined; map making; different
modes of projection.
2. The ocean; forms and divisions; depth, density, tempera-
ture; ocean movements, waves and currents; character of ocean
floor; life in ocean; tides, character and causes; shore lines.
3. The atmosphere; chemical composition, and how deter-
mined; pressure of, and how determined; circulation of, character
and cause; storms, classification of, and cause.
4. Land, amount and distribution of; topographic charts;
plains, kinds of, and development of; plateaus, kinds of, and









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


development of; volcanoes, distribution and character of; rivers,
life-history of; glaciers, kinds and characteristics of.
Botany.-One-half or one unit; elective.
The preparation should include a careful study of the follow-
ing divisions of the subject: Anatomy and morphology; physiol-
ogy; ecology; the natural history of the plant groups, and classi-
fication. Individual laboratory work by the student is essential
and should receive at least double the amount of time devoted to
recitation.
Zoology.-One-half or one unit; elective.
The candidates should be familiar with the subject of Zoology
as given in a standard high school text, and, in addition to the
theoretical work, at least ten specimens must be dissected, and
note-books with drawings presented on entrance to the University,
showing the character of the work completed.
Physics.-One unit; elective.
Preparation should include recitations on a standard high
school text; and experimental work, consisting of lecture-table
demonstrations and individual laboratory work. The latter should
comprise at least thirty exercises selected from the list of a good
laboratory manual.
Chemistry.-One unit; elective.
The preparation should include individual laboratory work,
comprising at least thirty exercises selected from the list given in
a recognized laboratory manual; instruction by lecture-table
demonstrations, to be used mainly as a basis for questioning upon
the general principles involved in the pupil's laboratory investi-
gations; the study of a standard text-book, to the end that the
pupil may gain a comprehensive and connected view of the most
important facts and laws of elementary chemistry.

ADVANCED STANDING
Graduates of senior high schools will be given credit on their
Freshman year for such courses as they have satisfactorily com-
pleted in the twelfth grade of the high school, the right being
reserved to reclassify them if, after trial, they appear unprepared
in the subject or subjects in which advanced standing is granted.









ORGANIZATION


Candidates who have been admitted to the University from
other colleges or universities will be granted advanced standing
only upon recommendation of the head of the department in which
the standing is desired. The candidate's fitness for advanced
work in the department may be determined by examination or
trial. Students transferred from other colleges or universities of
like standing will ordinarily be classified according to ground
already covered.

SPECIAL STUDENTS
Students who may desire to take special courses will be
allowed to do so by special arrangement. (See page 33.)


ORGANIZATION

In accordance with the recommendation of the Association of
State Universities, the University of Florida has been reorganized
with a view to bringing its organization and nomenclature into
harmony with that of other institutions engaged in similar work
and in order to attain a better co-ordination among its various lines
of activity. This change does not involve any material alteration
in the work of the institution as it has been hitherto conducted;
but gives a consistent nomenclature and a systematic division to
the various fields. While it is recognized that the organization is
somewhat extensive for the present, it is believed that it is wise to
keep distinct the various features of the work with a view to
future development.
The University organization is as follows:
I. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.
II. THE COLLEGE or ARTS AND SCIENCES:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A. B. degree.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree.
(c) A Curriculum leading to the A. B. degree in Education.
III. THE COLLEGE or AGRICULTURE:
A Curriculum leading to the degree of B. S. in Agriculture.
IV. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Civil Engineer-
ing.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Electrical
Engineering.
4-U









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


(c) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Mechanical
Engineering.
V. THE COLLEGE OF LAW:
A Curriculum leading to the degree of LL. B.
VI. THE SUB-COLLEGIATE DIVISION:
(a) The Sub-Freshman Class.
(b) Short Courses in Education.
(c) Short Courses in Agriculture.
(d) Short Courses in Mechanic Arts.
VII. THE DIVISION oF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION:
(a) Farmers' Institutes.
(b) Correspondence Courses in Agriculture.
(c) Lecture and Literary Bureaus.
VIII. THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.



GRADUATE SCHOOL

Organization.-The work in this school is under the direc-
tion of the Committee on Graduate Studies. This committee
consists of Professors Anderson, Banks, Benton, Davis, Keppel
and Vernon.
Degrees Offered.-The University is not in a position at
present to lay any great stress upon the graduate work. Its
work is mainly of a college grade and will doubtless remain so
for a good many years to come. However, for the benefit of
those who wish to carry their studies farther, the University does
offer the degree of Master of Arts (M. A.) and the degree of
Master of Science (M. S.). Many of the departments of the
colleges are prepared to give courses leading to these degrees.
Prerequisite Degrees.-Candidates for the Master's degree
must possess the corresponding Bachelor's degree of this institu-
tion or an institution of like standing.
Applications.-Candidates for the Master's degree must pre-
sent to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Studies a
written application for the degree not later than the first of
November in the year in which the degree is desired. This
application must name the major and minor subjects which are
offered for the degree and must contain the signed approval of
the heads of the departments concerned.









GRADUATE SCHOOL


Time Required.-The student must spend at least one full
academic year in residence at the University of Florida as a
graduate student, devoting his full time to the pursuit of these
studies.
Work Required.-The work is twelve hours per week. Six
hours of this work must be in one subject (the major) and of a
higher grade than any course offered for undergraduate students
in that subject. The other six hours (the minor or minors) are
to be determined and distributed by the professor in charge of
the department in which the major subject is selected. It is
understood, however, that no course designed primarily for
students of a lower grade than the Junior class will be acceptable
as a minor. It is also to be understood that while the major
course is six hours, these hours are not the same as in under-
graduate work. It means that the professor has the privilege
of using these six hours for recitations or examinations, but the
student will find that considerably more time is required to pre-
pare one of these recitations than is the case in an undergraduate
course.
Dissertation.-It is customary to require a dissertation show-
ing original research and independent thinking on some subject
accepted by the professor under whom the major work is taken,
but this requirement may be waived at the option of the professor,
subject to the approval of the Committee on Graduate Studies.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


FACULTY

ALBERT A. MURPHREE, A. M., LL.D.,
President.
JAS. N. ANDERSON, M. A., Ph. D. (John Hopkins),
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Professor of Ancient Languages.
JAS. M. FARR, A. M., Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of English.
EDWARD R. FLINT, Ph. D. (G6ttingen), M. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Chemistry.
J. R. BENTON, A. B., Ph. D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Physics.
C. L. CROW, A. M., Ph. D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Modern Languages.
*ENOCH MARVIN BANKS, A. M., Ph. D. (Columbia),
Professor of History and Economics.
H. S. DAVIS, Ph. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Geology, Zoology and Bacteriology.
H. G. KEPPEL, A. B., Ph. D. (Clark),
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.
MAJOR E. S. WALKER, U. S. A., Retired,
Professor of Military Science.
W. L. FLOYD, M. S.,
Professor of Botany.
GEO. M. LYNCH, A. B.,
Professor of Elementary Education and Supervisor of
Rural Schools.
JOHN A. THACKSTON, Ph. D. (New York University),
Head of Department of Education; Professor of Secondary
Education, and Inspector of High Schools.
HARVEY W. COX, A. M., Ph. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Education and Philosophy.


*Resigned.









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


GENERAL STATEMENT
Aim and Scope.-The tendency of universities at the present
time seems to be to reach out their arms farther and farther into
the domain of knowledge and to become more and more places
where one may expect to be able to acquire any form of useful
knowledge in which he may be interested. In the center of such
an institution, however, there is still found the College of Arts
and Sciences, the pulsating heart, as it were, sending its vivifying
streams to the outermost tips of the institution.
The aim of this college is to prepare for life, it is true, but
not so directly and immediately as the professional schools. It
is a longer, but a better road, for those who are able to travel it,
to distinction and ultimate success in almost any calling. Es-
pecially in the case of the learned professions, it is becoming
clearer that a man should first get a liberal education, if possible,
before entering upon his professional studies.
The purpose and aim of the College of Arts and Sciences
is to impart culture and refinement, to train the mind and
strengthen the intellect, to build up ideals and establish the
character, to enlarge the vision, to ennoble the thoughts, to in-
crease the appreciation of the beautiful and the true, to add charm
to life and piquancy to companionship, to make the man a decent
fellow, a useful citizen, an influential member of society in what-
ever community he may be thrown, in whatever field his life-
course may be run.
But if one wishes to examine the practical side exclusively, he
will find that there is also something practical in all these courses.
For instance, they are all valuable for the one who wishes to
learn to teach those subjects. Moreover, the use of electives in
the junior and senior years gives one an opportunity to specialize
in some branch according to his inclination and in furtherance of
his plans.
Admission.--Twelve entrance units are required for admis-
sion to the College of Arts and Sciences. For candidates for the
Bachelor of Arts degree they are:
English ................... ............... 3 units
M mathematics .................... .............. 3 units
History ...................................... 2 units
Latin .......... .. ........................ 3 units
Elective ....................................... 1 unit
12 units










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


For candidates for the Bachelor of Science, the three units of
Latin may be replaced by other electives, though the Latin is
considered preferable.
For full description of terms of admission and unit courses
see page 41.
Curricula.-The College of Arts and Sciences offers three
curricula: one leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts; another
to the degree of Bachelor of Science; and another to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts in Education. Each of these courses of study
possesses a considerable degree of flexibility because of the free-
dom in the choice of electives, especially in the last two of the
four years.
CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts.
Freshman Year.
NAMEs HoURS DESCRIP-
or NATURE OF WORK. PSR TION SEE
COURSEs. WEzK. PAGE.
]Enllish IA.............American Literature, English
Literature .................. 3 74
French I...............Elementary Course .......... 85
or
German I............Elementary Course ......... 5 85
or
Greek I...............Elementary Course ......... 63
History I...............Modern European History..... 2 78
Latin I.................Livy; Ovid; Virgil; Grammar;
Prose Composition .......... 3 62
Mathematics Ia and Ib. Solid Geometry; Trigonometry 5 82
Military Science I......Regulations .................. 1 84

19
Sophomore Year.
English IIA..:....... Advanced College Rhetoric.... 3 74
French II..............Intermediate Course ......... 85
or
German II.............Intermediate Course ........ 3 85
or
Greek II .............Xenophon; Lucian; Plato
Grammar; Composition ... 63
History II............The United States since 1783.. 3 78
Latin II...............Cicero; Pliny; Horace; Com-
position; Grammar ......... 3 62
Mathematics IIa........Plane Analytic Geometry ;
Higher Algebra ........... 3 82
Military Science II..... Field Regulations; Manual of
Guard Duty ................ 1 84
Physics I...............General Physics ............. 3 87

19











COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Junior Year.
NAMES HOURS DESCRIP-
oF NATURE OF WORK. PUR TION SaZ
CousEs. WEEK. PAGE.
Chemistry I.......... General Inorganic Chemistry... 3 66
SLatin III.......Juvenal; Tacitus; Catullus;
*I and Tibullus; Ovid ........... 62
SGreek III......Attic Orators; Homer; Com-
or position; Grammar........ 63
SFrench III.....Advanced Course ........... 85
t or
German III ....Advanced Course ........... 85
*II and
Modern
Language I...Elementary Course ......... 85,86
'or
English III.....Milton; Shakespeare ........ 75
and
*III English V......Anglo-Saxon Grammar and
or Reading ............... 76
English VII.... American Literature; South-
or ern Literature ............ 6 76
SPhilosophy I...General Psychology ......... 72
*IV and
Philosophy II..Logic and Ethics ........... 72
or
History III....French Revolution and Nine-
*V and teenth Century Europe..... 79
Economics I....Principles of Economics..... 79
or
Bible I.........Biblical History ............ 64
and
*VI f Bible II........The English Bible as Liter-
or ature ..................... 64
Bible III
(Greek VI)..Selections from the Septua-
gint and from the New
Testament ................ 64
Electives ..............To be chosen from Elective
Groups below ............... 9 61

18

*At the beginning of the junior year the student will choose one of
the six groups (I, II, III, IV, V, or VI), in which he will have six hours
of work during his junior year and three hours during his senior year.










56 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Senior Year.
NAMES HouRS DESCRIP-
oF NATURE OF WORK. PSR TION See
COURss. WEEK. PAGE.
SLatin IV.......Plautus and Terence; Seneca;
*I or Tacitus, etc ............. 62
Greek IV.......Herodotus; Thucydides;
or Drama; Lyric ............ 63
SFrench IV......Old French ................. 85
or
German V......Old High German; Middle
*II or High German ............ 86
Modern
Language II..Intermediate Course ........ 85186
or
English IV.....The Novel; Romanticism.... 75
*JII or
SEnglish VI.....Chaucer and Middle English
or Grammar ................. 76
SPhilosophy III..Introduction to Problems of
*IV or Philosophy ................ 3 72
Philosophy IV..History of Philosophy ...... 72
or
SPolitical
Science I.....Government of the United
*V or States .................... 81
Economics
II .......... To be selected .............. 80
or
( Bible II........The English Bible as Liter-
or ature ..................... 64
I Bible III
*VI (Greek VI)..Selections from the Septua-
S or gint and from the New
STestament ................ 64
L Bible IV.......The Bible as an Ethical and
Religious Guide .......... f64
Electives ..........To be chosen from Elective at
Groups ..................... 12

15
*At the beginning of the junior year the student will choose one of
the six groups (I, II, III, IV, V or VI), in which he will have six hours
work during his junior year and three hours during his senior year.











COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 57

CURRICULUM

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science.
Freshman Year.
NAMEs HouRS DEscRIP-
or NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SEE
CouRSES. WEEK. PAGE.
English IA.............American Literature; English
Literature .................. 3 74
Botany I...............General Botany .............. 3 65
French I.............. Elementary Course ......... 85
or 5
German I...............Elementary Course ......... 85
History I...............Modern European History..... 2 78
Mathematics Ia and Ib.Solid Geometry; Trigonometry 5 82
Military Science I..... .Regulations .................. 1 84
I',:;; E 19

Sophomore Year.

Chemistry I...........General Inorganic Chemistry.. 3 66
English IIA............Advanced College Rhetoric..... 3 74
French II.............Intermediate Course ........ 85
or 3
German II............ Intermediate Course ........ 85
Mathematics IIa........Plane Analytic Geometry and
Higher Algebra ............ 3 82
Physics I............. General Physics .............. 3 87
Military Science II..... Field Regulations; Manual of
Guard Duty ............... 1 84
Mathematics IIb........Differential and Integral
and Calculus .............. 3 83
Physics II............. General Laboratory Phy-
or sics .................. 2 87
Zoology I. ...........General Zoology ........ 31 87
and
Chemistry II...........General LaboratoryChem- 5
or istry ................. 2 66
History II.............The United States Since ]
and 1783 ................ 3 78
Chemistry II .........General Laboratory 1
or Chemistry ........ 2 66
Physics II............ General Laboratory
Physics ........... 2 87

21











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Junior Year.
NAMES HouRS DESCRIP-
OF NATURE OF WORK. PER TION Szx
CoURsss. WEEK. PAGE.
*Mathematical-Physical Group:
Mathematics IIIa....... Differential and Integral Cal-
culous, Continued............ 3 83
Mathematics IIIb....... Solid Analytic Geometry ;
Theory of Equations; Ad-
vanced Calculus; Differential
Equations ................ 2 83
A Second Modern
Language .......................................... 3 84-86
Electives ................... .......................... 10 61

18

*Chemical Group:
Chemistry III........Qualitative Analysis Laboratory 3 67
Chemistry IV...........Qualitative Analysis Laboratory 2 Q7
Chemistry V............Chemical Technology ......... 3 67
Geology I and II.......General Geology; Mineralogy.. 5 77
Electives .............To be chosen from Elective
Group ................ ...... 6 61

19

*Natural History Group:
Bacteriology I..........General Bacteriology ....... 88
and 5
Geology I............. General Geology ............ 77
Zoology II............ Histology and Physiology...... 5 88
Electives .............To be chosen from Elective
Group ..................... 8 61

18

*Political Science Group:
History III............ French Revolution and Nine-
teenth Century Europe...... 3 79
Economics I............Principles of Economics...... 3 79
French I..............Elementary Course ......... 85
or 5
German I..............Elementary Course ........ 85
Electives ..............To be chosen from Elective
Group ................... 9 61
20

*At the beginning of the junior year the student will select one of the
four groups offered and will take the required and elective hours of the
group during his junior and senior years.











COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Senior Year.
NAMES HOURS DzscRIP-
or NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SEE
COURSES. WEEK. PAGE.
*Mathematical-Physical Group:
Mathematics IV .......Differential Geometry ......... 3 83
Electives .............To be chosen from Elective
Group .................... 12 61

15

*Chemical Group:
Chemistry VII.........Chemical Laboratory .......... 7 68
Electives .............To be chosen from Elective
Group .................... 8 61

15

*Natural History Group:
Biology ..............To be chosen from Advanced
Courses ................... 5 88
Electives .............To be chosen from Elective
Group .................... 10 61

15

*Political Science Group:
Political Science I......Government of the United
States ...................... 3 81
French II............. Intermediate Course ........ 85
or 3
German II..............Intermediate Course ....... J 85
Electives .............To be chosen from Elective
Group ...................... 9 61

15

*At the beginning of the junior year the student will select one of
the four groups offered and will take the required and elective hours of
the group during his junior and senior years.











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CURRICULUM

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education.
Freshman Year.
NAMES HOURS DESCRIP-
OF NATURE OF WORK. PiE TION SEE
COuRsES. WEEK. PAGE.
Botany I..............General Botany .............. 3 65
Education I............Psychology ................... 2 69
English I............. American Literature; English
Literature .................. 3 74
History I..............Modern European History .... 2 78
Latin I................ Livy; Ovid; Virgil; Grammar;
Composition ............... 3 62
Mathematics la and Ib. Solid Geometry; Trigonometry. 5 82

18

Sophomore Year.

Agronomy I........... General Agriculture ........... 3 100
Chemistry I............General Inorganic Chemistry.. 3 66
Education II a and b.. Methods; School Management
and Supervision ............. 3 69-70
English II.............Advanced College Rhetoric.... 3 74
Physics I..............General Physics ............. 3 87
Zoology I............. General Zoology ............. 3 87

18

Junior Year.

Education III..........History of Education ......... 3 70
Education IV.......... Secondary Education ......... 3 71
Philosophy I............Psychology .................. 3 72
Electives ............ To be chosen from Elective
Group ...................... 9 61

18

Senior Year.

Education V......... Principles and Philosophy of
Education .................. 3 71
Education VI...........Child-Study ................ 71
and 3
Education VII......... Practice Teaching .......... 72
Philosophy II a and b..Logic; Ethics ................ 3 72
Electives .............. To be chosen from Elective
Group ...................... 9 61

18










COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


ELECTIVES
Regulations.-Upon registration for the Junior year, each
student shall submit his choice of electives to the dean of the
College.
In the A. B. Course at least nine hours of Junior and Senior
electives must be taken from the two groups in which the major
subject does not fall. Of these nine hours, at least three must
be taken each year.
In the B. S. Course, and the Course in Education, Juniors
shall elect not more than two subjects in the language and phil-
osophical groups. Seniors shall elect not less than one subject
in the philosophical group, and at least one in the science group.
No student shall elect more than the required number of elec-
tives without the approval of the dean of the College.
In the junior year A. B. Course a modern language may be
substituted for either Latin or Greek, with the approval of the
dean of the College.


I. Language Group.
English,
Latin,
Greek,
French,
German,
Spanish,
Italian.


Elective Groups
II. Philosophy Group. III. Science Group.
Psychology, Mathematics,
Ethics, Agriculture,
Logic, Astronomy,
Bible IV, Chemistry,
History, Physics,
Pedagogy, Geology,
Public Law, Zoology,
Economics, Botany,
Sociology. Physiology,
Bacteriology,
Surveying,
Mechanics,
Drawing,
Descriptive Geom-
etry.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Departments of Instruction
ANCIENT LANGUAGES
PROFESSOR ANDERSON.
The study of the classics contributes largely to general culture.
In addition to the recognized and peculiar disciplinary value of
such studies, and their conspicuous service in cultivating the
literary sense and developing literary taste, they have a more
immediate value and office as aids to the comprehension and
interpretation of modern languages and literature. A thorough
study and a full understanding of the modern languages,
especially the Romance Languages and our own tongue, demand
a considerable preliminary acquaintance with Latin and Greek.
Thus from two points of view, that of their own intrinsic beauty
and value as culture studies, and that of subsidiary aids to the
study of other and modern languages, Latin and Greek command
our attention, and call for a large place in any curriculum which
proposes to issue in a liberal education.
The following courses are offered for the coming year:
LATIN
Latin I.-Livy, Book XXI or XXII or other selections;
Ovid, about 2,000 verses selected from his various works but
mainly from the Metamorphoses; Virgil, Aeneid, Books I-IV;
Versification, with especial reference to the Dactylic Hexameter
and Pentameter; weekly exercises in Prose Composition; Gram-
mar. (Required of A. B. students; both semesters, Freshman
year, 3 hours.)
Latin II.-Selections from the Letters of Cicero and Pliny;
selections from the Satires, Epistles, Odes, and Epodes of Horace
with a study of the Horatian Metres; weekly exercises in Prose
Composition; Grammar. (Required of A. B. students; both
semesters, Sophomore year, 3 hours.)
Latin III.-Juvenal's Satires with some omissions; Tacitus,
parts of the Histories or Annals; Selections from Catullus, Tibul-
lus, Propertius, and Ovid. (Elective; both semesters, Junior
year, 3 hours.)
Latin IV.-Several plays of Plautus and Terence; Tacitus,
Germania or Agricola; selections from Seneca, Gellius and Quin-
tilian. (Elective; both semesters, Senior year, 3 hours.)









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Latin Vb.-History of the Roman Literature, preceded by a
short study of Roman Life and Customs. (Elective; second
semester, 3 hours.)
GREEK
Greek I.-The forms and most important principles of the
syntax will be learned from a beginner's book. The student will
have numerous exercises, partly oral, partly written and some
practice in conversation and sight-reading. Then one book of
Xenophon's Anabasis will be read with exercises in Prose Com-
position and study of the Grammar. (Elective; 5 hours.)
Greek II.-Xenophon's Anabasis, Books II, III and IV;
Selections from Lucian and the easier dialogues of Plato; sight
translation; Prose Composition; Grammar. (Elective; 3 hours.)
Greek III.-Select orations of Lysias or other Attic orators,
with informal talks on Athenian laws and customs; parts of the
Iliad and Odyssey of Homer; Prosody; Prose Composition.
(Elective; 3 hours.)
Greek IV.-Selections from the Greek historians, especially
Herodotus and Thucydides; selections from the Greek dramatists,
especially Euripides and Sophocles; selections from the lyric
fragments of Alcaeus, Sappho, etc. (Elective; 3 hours.)
Greek Va.-A study of the history of Greek Literature pre-
ceded by a short study of Greek Life and Customs. A knowl-
edge of the Greek language is highly desirable but is not required
for this course. (Elective; first semester, 3 hours.)
Greek VI (Bible III.)-Selections from the Septuagint and
from the New Testament. See page 65. (Elective both semesters,
3 hours.)

BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION
PRESIDENT MURPHREE.
The following courses are offered, embracing such aspects of
Biblical study as the University is prepared to give, with a view
to providing a major subject in the Bachelor of Arts curriculum,
which will allow students who desire to begin preparation in
the University for such work as secretary or physical director of
the Young Men's Christian Association, for welfare work in
mills or social settlements, or for the ministry, to specialize in








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


this direction. The courses offered will be conducted by the
instructors in the departments under which the various aspects
of the subject naturally fall and will be given in a spirit free
from any narrow sectarianism.
Bible Ia.-Old Testament History. In the first semester
the student will be made familiar with the history of the Israel-
itish nation as narrated in the historical books of the Old Testa-
ment; the connections between sacred and profane history wil
be discussed; and some conception of the development of the
cultural life of the nation will be gained.
Bible Ib.-New Testament History.-In the second semester,
the student will use as a text primarily the New Testament itself,
and a thorough knowledge of the story of the life of Christ and
the development of the early church under the ministry of the
Apostles will be the main end in view. A correlation of this with
world history, and lectures on wider reaches of the subject will
be attempted. This course will be given by President Murphree.
(Elective for Juniors and Seniors; both semester, 3 hours.)
Bible II.-The English Bible as Literature.-In this course
the various literary types found in the Bible will be studied and
the excellence of the work as compared with other great examples
of literature will be discussed. The diction of the 1611 version
will be compared with that of earlier and more recent transla-
tions, and its effect upon English literature will be demonstrated.
This course will be given by Professor Farr. (Elective for
Tuniors or Seniors; both semesters, 3 hours.)
Bible III (Greek VI).-Old and New Testament Greek.-
Selections from the Septuagint and from the New Testament will
be studied; class and parallel translations; the vocabulary, gram-
mar, and stylistic features of the selections will be noted. This
course will be given by Professor Anderson. (Elective for
Juniors and Seniors; both semesters, 3 hours.)
Bible IV.-The Bible as an ethical and religious guide.-The
time allotted to this course will be spent in the consideration of
the Bible as a guide for human conduct. Those parts of both the
Old and the New Testaments which bring out most vividly and
directly the moral and religious elements will receive most atten-
tion. The course will aim to give to each student that apprecia-









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


tion of the Bible which all men should have. Lectures, Bible
readings, studies of great sermons, and a text on Evidences of
Christianity suggest in a general way how the course will be
conducted. This course will be given by Professor Thackston.
(Elective for Juniors and Seniors; both semesters, 3 hours.)
BOTANY
PROFESSOR FLOYD.
The department is well equipped for carrying on the work.
It has large well-lighted laboratories, furnished with Caldwell
laboratory tables, supplied with dissecting sets and simple and
compound microscopes for each student. There is also physi-
ological apparatus, stains, mounting material, microtomes,
paraffin baths, charts, and a small herbarium to which additions
are made each year.
Plants for study can be easily obtained at all seasons of the
year. The flora of the vicinity is rich in the number of im-
portant species and additional material may be secured from the
horticultural grounds.
Botany I.-General Botany.-This embraces the study in
the classroom and laboratory of the structure, morphology, evo-
lution, and classification of plants. Work is done on special
types, beginning with the simplest and advancing to the more
complex. Field work is undertaken during the spring months.
(Required of Scientific, Agricultural, and Pedagogical students;
both semesters, Freshman year, 3 hours.)
Botany II.-Plant Physiology.-The life processes of plants,
such as how water is taken up and disposed of, relation to the
soil, nutrition, respiration, irritability, etc., are directly investi-
gated. Much of this is done in the laboratory and garden. (Re-
quired of Agricultural students; elective for Scientific Students;
first semester, Sophomore year, 5 hours.)
Botany III.-Histology.-This is largely laboratory work.
The structure and development of the tissues of the higher plants
in relation to their function is studied. Practice is given in
methods of fixing, staining and mounting microscopic slides.
(Required of Agricultural students in Agronomy and Horti-
cultural groups; elective for Scientific students in Junior and
Senior years; second semester, 5 hours.)









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Botany IV.-Plant Pathology.-Lectures and laboratory
work. A study of the nature and cause of plant diseases, includ-
ing a systematic consideration of parasitic fungi. The preven-
tion of disease, the relation of crops and fungicides, are con-
sidered. (Required of Agricultural students in Agronomy and
Horticultural groups; elective for Scientific students, who have
had Botany I and II; first semester, Senior year, 3 hours.)
Botany V.-Advanced Plant Pathology.-Types of fungi of
special economic importance in the State, including those para-
sitic on San Jos6 scale and whitefly are cultivated, their life
histories traced, and their growth and spread on natural hosts
investigated. (Required of Agricultural students in Agronomy
and Horticultural groups; elective for Scientific students who
have had Botany IV; second semester, Senior year, 5 hours.)
CHEMISTRY
PROFESSOR FLINT.
The facilities for instruction in chemistry compare favorably
with those of the larger institutions of the South and are being
steadily improved. The department is equipped with the neces-
sary apparatus and material for instruction in general inorganic
and organic, analytical and industrial chemistry.
Beginning with the Sophomore year, all students in all the
courses are required to take General Chemistry. In the scientific
courses, the Junior year is devoted mainly to Qualitative, the
Senior year to Quantitative Analysis. Abundant laboratory work
is offered in all of these courses.
Chemistry I.-This course is on general Inorganic Chemistry.
During the first semester the non-metallic elements are studied,
by means of a text-book, lectures and recitations. Special atten-
tion is given to the principles underlying chemical union, and the
theories and laws which govern the science.
In the second semester the metals and their more important
compounds are studied in the same manner. (Required of A. B.
students, Junior year; B. S. students, Sophomore year; both
semesters, 3 hours.)
Chemistry II.-This is a laboratory course in general chem-
istry. In order to impress the principles of the science upon the
minds of the students, they are required to repeat in the labora-









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


tory many of the experiments seen in the lecture-room, taking
notes of the same, and writing the chemical reactions as far as
possible. Each one is required to perform over a hundred ex-
periments designed to illustrate' chemical principles, including the
preparation of many of the elements and their most important
compounds.
In the second semester the laboratory work is designed to
study the reactions of the metals with a view to their classifi-
cation. During this semester a portion of the time is devoted to
a thorough course in dry analysis. (Two exercises a week
throughout the Sophomore year, required of all students in the
Chemical and Biological groups of the Scientific curriculum.)
Chemistry III.-This is a laboratory course in qualitative
analysis, in the junior year. (Three exercises a week, elective in
the A. B. course.)
Chemistry IV.-Includes course III, with two additional ex-
ercises a week in the same line of work. (Offered as an elective
in the Science courses, and required in the Chemical course.)
Chemistry Va, a course in Organic Chemistry, and Chem-
istry Vb, a course in Chemical Technology, are given in alternate
years.
During the year 1911-1912 the course in Organic Chemistry
will be given. The course in Organic Chemistry includes lec-
tures, recitations and optional laboratory work. The laboratory
work is designed to illustrate the various principles as given in
the text, as well as practice in making pure organic preparations.
It comprises two periods of two hours each, per week, and is
optiofial to those taking this course.
A short course of lectures on the subject of metallurgy, in
the latter part of the semester, will be given if asked for, in
which the chemistry involved in the reduction and fabrication
of the more useful metals, as iron, copper, zinc, lead and silver, is
explained. (Three hours a week throughout the Junior year, re-
quired of students in the Chemical course.)
The course in chemical technology comprises a consideration
of the chemical principles involved in the manufacture, refining
and preparation of the leading products of commercial impor-
tance. "Thorp's Outlines of Industrial Chemistry" is used as a









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


text, lectures being given occasionally enlarging upon or explain-
ing the subject-matter of the book. Among the subjects studied
may be mentioned fuels, sulphuric acid, the soda industry, the
chlorine industry, fertilizers, cements, glass, pigments, coal tar,
mineral oils, soap, starch, sugar, fermentation industries, explo-
sives, textile industries, paper, leather, etc. In connection with
this visits will be made to such factories and chemical industries
as may be accessible. (Three hours a week throughout the Junior
year, required of students in the Chemical course.)
Chemistry VI.-This is a laboratory course in Quantitative
Analysis. (Elective in the Senior year to students in the B. S.
courses; 3 hours a week.)
Chemistry VII.-In this course five exercises a week are
devoted to laboratory work. During the first semester this is
given to Quantitative Analysis, the exercises being selected with a
view to familiarizing the students with the leading quantitative
operations involved in the gravimetric, volumetric and electrolytic
methods in vogue. As far as possible, the work of each indi-
vidual is selected to aid especially in the line of work he may
wish to pursue in the future, as medicine, pharmacy, analytical
chemistry, etc. (Seven hours a week throughout the Senior year,
required of students in the Chemical course.)
Chemistry VIII.-A course of lectures in Agricultural Chem-
istry, embracing the chemistry of soils, the atmosphere, plant
and animal growth and feeding, fertilizers, dairy products, in-
secticides, etc. (Three hours a week for one semester in thl
Senior year, required of students in the Agricultural course.)
EDUCATION AND PHILOSOPHY
PROFESSOR THACKSTON.
PROFESSOR COX.
PROFESSOR LYNCH.
EDUCATION
This department is designed especially for the purpose of pre-
paring young men for the profession of teaching. It aims (1)
to give that training that will properly fit men to teach in and
become principals of high schools, to be supervisors, county and
city superintendents; (2) to give that information, insight and
appreciation of our educational problems and principles that each
intelligent citizen of every community should possess, and (3)









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


to prepare teachers in the Spring Review Course for the county
certificates, and in the Short Curriculum for the State certificate.
For a teacher to be able to teach proficiently two or three of
the high school subjects, he should have had a thorough collegiate
training in those subjects; and for him to be able to assume the
position of principal he should have a working knowledge of
the principles of education, educational psychology and the his-
tory of education and be able to show those associated with him
how to teach, control and inspire. In fact he should be a trained
educational leader and not a mere teacher. This is what the
Department of Education stands for. That the special academic
training may be gotten, during the junior and senior years, where
each year nine hours of electives are given, the student is re-
quired to select those special studies which he prefers to teach
and to make himself especially proficient in them by pursuing
them two consecutive years.
There is no greater problem that confronts the American
people than the problem of education. All citizens are, or will
be, in some way, directly or indirectly, interested in it, and should
be able to take an intelligent stand when thus confronted. Many
of the following courses in education, psychology and philosophy
are especially suited to give the information and training needed
to meet properly these questions. Those students who are not
registered in this department and who expect to teach for a while
after graduation before they enter other professions will find some
of the following electives especially helpful.
Education I.-Psychology.-This is an elementary course
designed to set forth the main phenomena of mental life, and
furnish the student with the concepts and terms which will con-
stantly recur in his further study. This course will aim especially
to prepare the student for the examination on Psychology for the
State Certificate. The text-book prescribed from time to time by
the State Superintendent of Education will be used in connection
with lectures and much reference work to the standard American
writers. This year Thorndike's Elementary Psychology is the
text. (Required of Freshmen in Educational Curriculum; both
semesters, 2 hours.)
Education IIa.-Elementary Education.-This course aims to
teach the accepted principles of instruction, and general and









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


special methods. Teaching children how to study and how to
use their time outside of the recitation is one of its aims, while to
give methods in the elementary and grammar-school subjects re-
ceives about two-thirds of the time. This course not only teaches
the student how properly to instruct his pupils in the methods
of study, but is of great value to him throughout his whole
college course and future work. Special attention will be given to
the rural schools. The text-books used are How to Study and
Teaching How to Study, McMurry; Methods of Teaching, Win-
terburn; Teaching of Elementary Mathematics, Smith; Teaching
of English, Chubb; Teaching of Geography, Sutherland; Special
Method in Reading, McMurry; Methods in History, McMurry,
etc. (Required of Sophomores in the Educational Curriculum;
first semester, 3 hours.)
Education IIb. -School Management and Supervision. -
This course is designed to give the practical and theoretical
information needed by principals and county superintend-
ents. During the year many practical problems are taken
up and fully discussed. Discipline, school and class hygiene,
purpose of education, organization and classification, grad-
ing and promoting-special plans of promotion being discussed
-programs, time tables, report cards, plan and progress books,
departmental teaching, exercises and intermissions, the recita-
tion, etc. The books used are Classroom Management, Bagley;
School and Class Management, Arnold; Special Method of the
Recitation,. McMurry; School Hygiene, Shaw; Elementary Edu-
cation, Keith; The School and Its Life, Gilbert; Grading of
Schools, Shearer; and many references are given to other books
in the library. (Required of Sophomores in Educational Curric-
ulum; second semester, 3 hours.)
Education III.-History of Education.-This course has two
main purposes. First, endeavor is made to lead the student to
see and appreciate the good things in the many systems of educa-
tion studied and apply them to his own present-day work as far
as possible. In the second place, fine ideals and incentives for
devotion to his calling are furnished by studying the lives and
works of the great educational leaders. Text-book in the History
of Education by Monroe, and Educational Reformers by Quick,









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


are the texts used. (Required of Juniors in the Educational
Curriculum; elective, both semesters, 3 hours.)
Education IV.-Secondary Education.-This course is de-
signed especially to give instruction in the study of the second-
ary and high school. Many problems relating to the high schools
in this and other Southern States are thoroughly gone over for
the purpose of understanding the present situation and planning
for better things. The following special topics may be mentioned:
Psychology and Pedagogy of Adolescence, Technical High
Schools, High-School Athletics, History of Secondary Education,
High-School Course, comparative study of secondary education
in the different countries, etc. Lectures and reference work sup-
plement the reading of several texts on this subject in the class.
(Required of Juniors in the Educational Curriculum; elective;
both semesters, 3 hours.)
Education V.-The Principles and Philosophy of Education.
-This course attempts to select from modern psychology all of
the facts that will aid the teacher in obtaining a clearer insight
into the actual workings of the child's mind in the process of
learning. The following are a few of the topics studied: the
brain and nervous system, the place of the body in education, at-
tention, interest, imitation, the social, moral and religious aspects
of education, etc. The Growth of the Brain, Donaldson; Inter-
est and Education, De Garmo; A Broader Elementary Education,
Gordy; The Philosophy of Education, Home; Social Education,
Scott; The Principles of Education, Bolton. (Required of Sen-
iors in the Curriculum of Education; elective; both semesters,
3 hours.)
Education VI.-Child Study.-The aim of this course is to
give the student an insight into the physical development and
growth of the child, the meaning of protracted infancy, the
origin and development of instincts, development of intellect,
heredity, individuality, abnormalities and the application of facts
learned to school work, etc. Fundamentals of Child Study, Ge-
netic Psychology, Kirkpatrick; Studies in Education, Barnes,
Moral Instruction of Children, Adler; The Development of the
Child, Oppenheim; Physical Nature of the Child, Rowe. (Re-
quired of Seniors in the Curriculum of Education; elective, first
semester, 3 hours.)









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Education VII. Practice Teaching. Knowledge of the
principles, theory and history of education will better fit any
teacher for his work, but these without concrete experiences and
practice under direction will not give the best results. Realizing
this, this course is planned for the purpose of giving this ex-
perience under the supervision and watch-care of the professor in
charge of the department, in which the subject is taught. This
practice teaching will occupy the same position in the teacher's
course as laboratory work does in the science departments and
will have the same proportion of credit as laboratory work. (Re-
quired of Seniors; second semester, 3 hours.)

PIIILOSOPIIY
Philosophy I.-Psychology.-A general introductory course
is given during the first semester when Angell's Psychology
(1908) is used. During the second semester Social Psychology,
by Ross, and Rational Living by King, are used as texts. (Re-
quired of students in Education, Junior year; elective; both se-
mesters, 3 hours.)
Philosophy IIa.-Logic.-An elementary course. Creigh-
ton's "Introductory Logic." Lectures and studies in the history,
development and systems of logic. Exercises. (Required of
Seniors in Education; elective; first semester, 3 hours.)
Philosophy IIb.-Ethics.-A general course. Especial em-
phasis will be laid on the Principles of Ethics. Lectures and
studies in the history of Ethics, and discussion of various ethical
systems. Dewey and Tuft's Ethics. (Required of Seniors in
Education; elective; second semester, 3 hours.)
Philosophy III.-Introduction to the Problems of Philoso-
phy.-In this course the great problues of Philosophy will be
briefly presented and discussed, as, for example, theism, panthe-
ism, materialism, dualism, rationalism, empiricism, etc. Paulsen's
'"Introduction to Philosophy" will be used as a text, and collateral
reading in various authors will be assigned in connection with the
topics studied, Special subjects will be assigned for written dis-
cussion. (Elective; both semesters, 3 hours.)
Philosophy IV.- The History of Philosophy.-This course is
to follow Philosophy III and will give the student a general sur-
vey of ancient, medieval, and modern philosophy. The problems










COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


of Philosophy III will be studied more in detail from the larger
histories of philosophy and from the writings of the great
philosophers. A text-book will be used as a basis for class dis-
cussion. (Elective; both semesters, 3 hours.)
STATE HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTION
This division of the department was made possible by the
generous aid of the General Educational Board of New York.
(See page 14.)
The director of this department will visit and inspect the high
schools in the State, give what aid he can in the establishment of
high schools where ihey do not exist and help to advance those
already established. Where his co-operation is desired, the in-
spector will take great pleasure in conferring with county super-
intendents, school boards, principals, teachers, and citizens on any
educational matter that may tend to the welfare and advance-
ment of the high schools in the State.

RURAL SCHOOL INSPECTION
The inspection of rural schools is a new phase of the work of
the department and was made possible by the munificence of the
Southern Educational Board. This board furnishes all the funds
necessary for the maintenance of this position through the State
Department of Education under the direction of the State Super-
intendent of Education.
Professor Lynch, who has charge of this work, will visit, in-
spect, and in every way aid in the advancement of rural schools
in the State. He will gladly co-operate with county superin-
tendents, school boards, teachers, and citizens in the advancement
of rural education.

ENGLISH
PROFESSOR FARR.
The work of this department is designed to meet the require-
ments for a practical and liberal education, and is regarded both
as a necessary auxiliary to the training in technical courses, and
as an important factor among the liberalizing studies. The three
sides of the subject, Rhetoric, Linguistics, and Literature, are
presented as fully as the time allotted will permit. While
Rhetoric and Composition are especially stressed in the lower









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


classes, literary studies in the higher, and linguistic work in
electives, still the attempt is made to keep the three viewpoints
before all classes as necessary to a mastery of their native
language.
English IAa.-History of American Literature.-The object
of the course is to give the student a general knowledge of the
outlines of American Literary History, a special interest in a few
important topics, and a first-hand acquaintance with some of the
more important pieces of literature. To this end, the class-room
work will consist of recitations upon an elementary text, talks by
the instructor, short papers by the individual students, and a
close study of a few American classics. In addition, the student
will be required to write weekly compositions and to report upon
an assigned private reading list. (First semester; all except
Engineering Freshmen, 3 hours.)
English IAb.-History of English Literature.-The method
of instruction outlined above will, in the second semester, be ap-
plied to the History of English Literature. The weekly composi-
tions and the private reading course on American Literature will
be continued throughout the year. (Second semester; all except
Engineering Freshmen, 3 hours.)
English IB.-Composition and Rhetoric.-This course will be
mainly a composition course, using a text-book in Rhetoric of a
grade somewhat between those of a standard high school text
and of an advanced college type, but giving a minimum of rhet-
orical theory with a maximum of writing. (Both semesters;
Engineering Freshmen, 3 hours.)
English IIA.-Advanced College Rhetoric.-This course is
designed to train the students in methods of clear and forceful
expression. Throughout the year instruction is carried on
simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in rhetorical analysis and in
theme writing, the constant correlation of the three as methods of
approach to the desired goal being kept in view. In addition a
private reading course is assigned to the individual student.
(Throughout the year for all except Engineering Sophomores,
3 hours.)
English IIB.-Exposition.-This course will be a study of a
text on the art of exposition; the analysis of a number of ex-









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


amples of this kind of composition; and the writing of expository
themes, especially those suggested by the student's work in his
major department. (Both semesters, Engineering Sophomores,
1 hour.)
English IIIa.-Milton and the Epic.-This course centers in
a study of the Paradise Lost, around which are grouped studies
in the Age of Milton and in the Epic as a type in Comparative
Literature. The first four books of the poem are read in class.
Written reviews on the remaining books alternate each week with
essays from the student and lectures by the instructor on various
phases of the subject. A reading course in the minor poets of
the age and in the English translations of the great Epics is as-
signed to each student. (Elective; first semester of Junior year,
3 hours.)
English IIIb.-Shakespere and the Drama.-This course fol-
lows the above method. Three of the Shakesperian plays are
read in class.' On eight others a written review is held each
fortnight and on the alternate week essays are written and lec-
tures are given by the instructor. Readings in the English Drama
from the Cycle plays to contemporary production are assigned
to the student. (Elective; second semester of Junior year, 3
hours.)
English IVa.-The English Novel.-In recognition of the
fact that a large part of the reading of most Americans is in this
line a course in the Novel is offered. This subject is studied in
suitable texts from the two sides of chronological development
and of technique; and the student reads a list of novels chosen
to illustrate chronology and variety of species, analyzes minutely
one novel from the technical side, masters the entire work and
life of one novelist, and compares closely a novel and a drama-
tized version of it. It is hoped that the student may be so
grounded in the classics and his taste and judgment so trained
that his reading in this class of literature may not become mere
intellectual dissipation. (Elective; first semester of Senior year,
3 hours.)
English IVb. The Romantic Revival. This course is
planned as a study in literary movement. The causes and forces
which underlie the movement, its phenomena and the authors
and works which exhibit them, and a comparison with other









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


movements in literature will be considered. The work of Prof.
Beers will be used as a basis and the student will be led, by
means of extensive reading, by investigation and essays and by
lectures on the wider ranges of the subjects, to realize the truth
of his statements. (Elective; second semester of Senior year,
3 hours.)
English V.-Anglo-Saxon Grammar and Reading. -The
student is drilled in the forms of the early language and an ele-
mentary view of its relations to the other members of the
Aryan family and its development into Modern English is given.
The texts in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader are studied and Cook's
edition of the Judith is read. (Elective for Juniors, both semes-
ters, 3 hours.)
English VI.-Chaucer and the Middle English Grammar.-
During the first semester the works of Chaucer are read in and
out of class. The pronunciation, grammatical forms, scansion,
condition of text, analogues and sources are closely examined.
During the second semester, Morris and Skeats' Specimens, Part
II, is studied in connection with informal lectures on Middle
English viewed as developing from Anglo-Saxon into Modern
English. (Elective for Seniors who have taken English V; both
semesters, 3 hours.)
English VIIa.-American Poetry.-This course will take a
rapid survey of the development of poetry in the United States
and will then center in a critical study of a few of the more
important authors (Bryant, Whittier, Longfellow, Emerson,
Lowell and Poe). (Elective; first semester, 3 hours.)
English VIIb.-Southern Literature.-A detailed study of
the literature of the South with extensive reading and essay
work, and an examination of the claims of Florida authors, will
be made. (Elective; second semester, 3 hours.)

EXPRESSION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING
MR. CHAPMAN.
Expression and Public Speaking.- In the comparatively
brief course in Expression and Public Speaking during the year
1910-11, particular attention has been given to the importance
of establishing a correct method of breathing, to the correction
of faulty articulation, and to the principles of interpretation by









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


voice, gesture, and facial expression. It is believed that the in-
terest shown in the work of the Department gives promise of a
greatly increased interest during the coming year, and it is con-
fidently expected that it will be possible to offer a much longer
and more comprehensive course than was possible during the
year recently closed.
On account of lack of funds a small tuition fee will be charged
in this department for the present.
GEOLOGY
PROFESSOR DAVIS.
Geology I.-A course in the General Principles of Geology.
-Four hours class and one hour of laboratory work. Attention
is given in the laboratory to the principal types of rocks, and to
the more common fossils. Students who select this course are
expected to be able to take occasional Saturday excursions. (Re-
quired of Juniors of the Natural History and Chemical groups,
and of Agricultural students; elective; first semester, 5 hours.)
Geology II.-Mineralogy.-Moses & Parson's Mineralogy.
Class work on the general character of minerals including the
elements of crystallography. Laboratory determination of min-
erals. (Required of Juniors of the Chemical group; elective;
second semester, 5 hours.)
Geology III.-Historical Geology.-Text and laboratory
work.-The geological history and development of continental
areas. The geological history and development of life. Cham-
berlin & Salisbury's Earth History is used as text for the course.
(. 1lt'ric with Botany and Zoology for Seniors of the Natural
History group; both semesters, 5 hours.)
Laboratory.-The department is provided with a well-lighted,
comfortable laboratory, equipped for the courses offered. The
United States Geological Survey Educational Series of rocks is
accessible for the use of students of geology. For students of
mineralogy there is provided a blowpipe collection of one hundred
selected minerals species; an accessory blowpipe collection of mis-
cellaneous minerals; a crystal collection of fifty natural crystals;
and a reference collection of choice mineral specimens. Historical
Geology students are provided with a collection of fossils illustra-
ing the distribution and development of organisms.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HISTORY AND ECONOMICS
PROFESSOR BANKS.*
This department attempts to introduce the student to the
social sciences in the hope that he may receive an impulse toward
an intelligent appreciation of the forces at work in the complex
Society of which he is a member, and that he may also be in-
spired toward, as well as in some measure equipped for, a wise
discharge of his duties as a citizen. Courses in History find a
place here for the reason that the present structure of our society
can be understood only through a study of its development out
of the past. Work in Economics is given not only because the
struggle for existence and for the material means of satisfying
wants has been in the past one of the dominant forces in social
evolution, but also because that struggle presents today perhaps
the most serious body of problems with which the citizen has to
deal. Political Science is made a subject of study in order that the
student may become acquainted with the nature and functions
of government as an agency of order and of social betterment.
Sociology is the most comprehensive of the subjects that find a
place in this department since it attempts through a study of the
past and through a combination of the principles of economics
and political science with other principles of social psychology to
reach a complete analysis of society as it exists and of the prin-
ciples which underlie its progress in civilization.

HISTORY
History I.-Modern European History.-It is the purpose
of this course to trace the development of the important national
States which are found upon the map of Europe at the present
time. After a brief account of the growth and influence of the
medieval church, the nature and extent of feudalism, and the
beginnings of the national States, the course will survey in a
more detailed way the spirit of the Renaissance, the Protestant
revolt, the political reforms in England, the revolution in France,
and the general changes in Europe during the nineteenth century.
A text-book is used and collateral reading required. (Required
of A. B. and General Science students; both semesters, Freshman
year, 2 hours.)
*Resigned.









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


History II.-The United States since 1783.-After a brief
survey of the colonial development, which culminated in the re-
volt from England, special attention is given to the decline of
the confederation, the formation and adoption of the constitution,
the growth of national and State rights parties, expansion, the
diversity of economic development in the North and South,
slavery debates, secession, reconstruction and its undoing, tariff
and financial legislation, the war with Spain and its results.
Text-books are used in this course but in addition reading in the
standard histories and sources is required. (Required of A. B.
students; both semesters, Sophomore year, 3 hours.)
History III.-The French Revolution and Europe in the
Nineteenth Century.-A study is made of the social and economic
condition of France before the revolution and of the influence
of the philosophers upon the course of events. The career of
Napoleon is studied chiefly for such of his work as had a per-
manent influence. Attention is given the Congress of Vienna,
the subsequent revolutions, the unification of Italy and of Ger-
many, the Eastern question, the Far Eastern question, the par-
tition of Africa, and a brief survey of world politics at the be-
ginning of the twentieth century. Text-books, lectures and
collateral reading. (Junior or Senior elective; both semesters,
3 hours.)
History IVa.-Industrial History of England.-This course
traces the development of English industry and commerce, and
the attempt is made to correlate this development with that of
the political and social life of the nation and the empire. (Junior
or Senior elective; first semester, 3 hours.)
History IVb. Industrial History of the United States. -
This course attempts to survey the growth and diversification of
industrial activities in the United States, and to point out some
of their political and social consequences. (Junior or Senior
elective; second semester, 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS
Economics I.-Principles of Economics.-This is an intro-
ductory course describing the leading characteristics of those
human activities which are called economic, and presenting some
of the general principles which underlie the value and price of
goods as well as those which underlie the distribution of income








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


into rent, wages, interest and profits. Considerable time is de-
voted to the discussion of such practical economic problems as
those that relate to money, international trade and the tariff, the
labor movement, the trusts and the railroads. Socialism and
other plans of social reform also receive some consideration. The
course is based on a text-book, but constant reference is also
made to the works of various authors. (Junior or Senior elective;
both semesters; 3 hours.)
Economics IIa.-Money and Banking.-It is the aim of this
course to analyze the nature and functions of money and credit
and banking, and to trace the history of money and banking in
the United States with incidental reference to the experience of
other countries in these matters. It is also proposed to discuss
schemes of currency reform and other monetary problems. (Elec-
tive for those who have had Economics I; one-half year course,
3 hours.)
Economics IIb.-International Trade and the Tariff.-This
course describes the nature of international trade, traces the his-
tory of the tariff in the United States and the history of our
commercial relations with other countries. (Elective for those
who have had Economics I; one-half year course, 3 hours.)
Economics IIc.-Socialism and Other Plans of Social Re-
form.-A study of the present inequalities in the distribution of
wealth and of the remedies therefore which a series of earnest
reformers have proposed. (Elective for those who have taken
Economics I; one-half year course, 3 hours.)
Economics IId.-Public Finance.-It is the purpose of this
course to study the principles which underlie governmental ex-
penditures and revenues. The revenue systems of the leading
countries are examined comparatively, and the principles of tax-
ation as presented by such writers as Adams, Seligman, Plehn
and Bastable, are studied in order to be able to estimate the
merits and defects of our American methods of taxation in their
national, state and local aspects. (Elective for those who have
had Economics I; one-half year course, 3 hours.)
Economics IIe. History of Economic Thought. This
course traces the development of economic thought from the time
of Adam Smith to the present by reference to the writings of
certain typical economists of England, Germany, Austria and the










COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


United States. (Elective for those who have had Economics I;
one-half year course, 3 hours.)
NOTE.-Economics I is offered each year, while Economics IIa, lib,
IIc, IId, IIe are half-year courses, and it is planned for only two of them
to be given in any one year, thus making three hours per week through-
out the year.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political Science I.-Government of the United States-Na-
tional, State and Imperial.-This course discusses some of the
general principles of political science and applies these principles
in analyzing the structure of the dual system of government in
the United States. A study is made of the original conception of
our Union and the evolution of a new conception which prevailed
in the sixties. The amendments then added are examined in the
light of decisions of the supreme court. After describing in some
detail the organization and functions of the national government,
the organization and functions of the State governments, in both
their central and their local branches, are examined-the gov-
ernment of Florida receiving special consideration in this connec-
tion. The governments now being established in our insular pos-
sessions are also considered. (Junior or Senior elective; both
semesters, 3 hours.)
Political Science II.-European Governments.-An analysis
and comparison of the constitutional systems of the leading States
of Europe is attempted in this course. The government of Eng-
land and her dependencies, including the relation of the latter to
the former, receive special attention. (Senior elective; first semes-
ter, 3 hours.)

SOCIOLOGY
Sociology Ia.-Principles of Sociology.-This is an intro-
ductory course designed' to acquaint the student with some of
the problems of sociology regarded as a scientific description of
society. It embraces a study of early forms of social groupings,
their evolution into later and more complex forms together with
some of the general principles of civilization and progress which
seem to manifest themselves in the social process. (Open to
Seniors and others with sufficient preliminary training; first se-
mester, 3 hours.)
6-U









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Sociology Ib.-Pauperism and Crime.-This course deals
with the causes of pauperism, traces the history of poor-relief
in England and examines the present methods of dealing with
the problem in the leading countries of the world. The nature
of crime is discussed and the modern methods of dealing with the
different classes of criminals are examined. Other dependent
and defective social classes receive some consideration. (Open to
those who have had Sociology la; second semester, 3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY
PROFESSOR KEPPEL.
MATHEMATICS
The work in the Department of Mathematics is planned with
a threefold purpose in view:
1. For students who intend to specialize in Mathematics it
provides the preparation for more advanced work. Several ad-
vanced courses are offered each year for this class of students.
2. To those who need Mathematics as an instrument it offers
opportunities to become familiar with this instrument. The appli-
cation of Calculus not only to Physics, Chemistry and Engineer-
ing, but even to such seemingly remote realms as Psychology
and Political Economy, makes it advisable that this class should
continue the study of Mathematics at least so far as to include
Calculus.
3. To others it gives logical training in Analysis and Proof,
introduces them to that scientific method par excellence of the
Hypothesis, and develops the idea of a deductive system in its
classical form. Elementary (Euclidean) Geometry is studied
with this purpose in view by all members of the Freshman class.
The following courses are offered each year:
Mathematics Ia.--Solid Geometry. (Required of all Fresh-
men; first semester, 5 hours.)
Mathematics Ib.-Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. (Re-
quired of all Freshmen; second semester, 5 hours.)
Mathematics- c.-Spherical Trigonometry. (Required of all
students who offer Plane Trigonometry for entrance but who
have not had the Spherical Trigonometry; second semester, 1
hour.)
Mathematics IIa.-Plane Analytic Geometry and College









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Algebra. (Required of all students except those in Pedagogy, or
those in the College of Agriculture; both semesters, 3 hours.)
Mathematics IIb.-Differential and Integral Calculus. (Re-
quired of students in the College of Engineering and in the Math-
ematical-Physical courses in the College of Arts and Sciences;
both semesters, 3 hours.)
Mathematics IIIa. Differential and Integral Calculus
(continued). (Required of all students in the College of Engi-
neering and in the Mathematical-Physical courses in the College
of Arts and Sciences; both semesters, 3 hours.)
Mathematics IIIb.-Solid Analytic Geometry and Theory of
Equations (first semester). Advanced Calculus and Differential
Equations (second semester). (Required of all students in the
College of Engineering and in the Mathematical-Physical courses
in the College of Arts and Sciences; both semesters, 2 hours.)
The following advanced courses, one of which is required of
students in the Mathematical-Physical course, are offered for
1911-12:
Advanced Calculus with Applications to Geometry.-The
conditions of integrability, the successive extensions to multiple
and curvilinear integrals, integration in series and the trigo-
nometric series will be discussed in the first part of the course;
the application of Calculus to the Theory of Envelopes, Contact,
Curvature and Torsion of twisted curves in the second part.
(Both semesters, 3 hours.)
Mathematical Seminary.-Subject for the year: Higher
Plane Curves. (Both semesters, 3 hours.)
ASTRONOMY
In connection with the Department of Mathematics a course
in General Astronomy will be offered, consisting of lectures
and recitations, with practical exercises. No knowledge of ad-
vanced mathematics is presupposed. (Elective; both semesters,
2 hours.)

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
MAJOR WALKER.
In compliance with the Revised Statutes of the United States
this institution maintains a course of instruction in Military










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Science and Tactics. The aim is to make familiar with the duties
which first confront young officers, those who later, through
emergency or inclination, find themselves in the military service.
Experience has shown that military training not only promotes
physical development and a tendency towards punctuality and
system, but that it also fosters self-reliance and strengthens the
principles of honor and fair dealing. The course is both practical
and theoretical. The practical course consists of drills, target
practice and other military exercises. The drills proper occupy
time not to exceed 3 hours each week.
The theoretical course, set forth below, consists of recitations
supplemented by lectures on pertinent subjects:
Military Science I.-(a) Infantry Drill Regulations; (b)
Small Arms Firing Regulations. (Required of Freshmen, 1 hour
per week.)
Military Science II.-(a) Field Service Regulations; (b)
Manual of Guard Duty. (Required of Sophomores, 1 hour per
week.)
Military Science III.-(a) First Semester. The Service of
Security and Information. Elementary Military Engineering.
(b) Army Regulations, Company Administration and similar sub-
jects. (Elective for Juniors and Seniors; 2 hours per week.)

MODERN LANGUAGES
PROFESSOR CROW.
French, German, Italian, and Spanish are the subjects taught
in this department. Extensive courses of reading, in and out of
class, frequent exercises, oral and written, and studies in the
Literature and Languages of the respective countries form the
chief features of instruction. Carefully prepared English ab-
stracts of nearly all the parallel reading is required.
Authors and text-books vary from year to year. Though
the classics are not neglected, special attention is paid to the
literatures of the nineteenth century.
Since the session of 1906-07 tables have been set apart in the
dining-hall for those wishing to speak German and Spanish.
All of the courses offered below will not be given in any one
year.









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


FRENCH
French I.-Elementary Course.-Drill in pronunciation and
important grammatical forms, elementary syntax, dictation, daily
written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and short poems,
translation. (Modern Language elective for Freshmen; elective;
both semesters, 5 hours.)
French II. Intermediate Course. Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose
,composition, translation. of intermediate and advanced texts,
sight reading, parallel. (Modern Language elective for Sopho-
mores; elective; both semesters, 3 hours.)
French III.-Advanced Course.-Syntax, stylistic, composi-
tion, history of French Literature, selections from the dramatists
or novelists as class may decide. (Elective; both.semesters, 3
hours.)
French IV.-Old French.-A course will be offered in Ro-
mance Philology open only to those who have taken French III,
and Latin II. (Elective; both semesters, 3 hours.)
GERMAN
German I.-Elementary Course.-Drill in pronunciation and
important grammatical forms, elementary syntax, dictation, daily
written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and short poems,
translation. (Modern Language elective for Freshmen; elective;
both semesters, 5 hours.)
German IIa.-Intermediate Course.-Work of elementary
,course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose
composition, translation of intermediate texts, sight reading,
parallel. (Modern Language elective for Sophomores; elective;
both semesters, 3 hours.)
German IIb.-A 'supplementary course in commercial Ger-
man will be offered to students who are taking or have concluded
German IIa. For the present this course will not count towards
:a degree. (Elective; both semesters, 2 hours.)
German III.-Advanced Course.-Syntax, stylistic, compo-
sition, history of German Literature, selections from the drama-
tists or novelists. (Elective; both semesters, 3 hours.)
German IV.-Scientific Reading Course.-A course in read-
ing scientific German will be offered to students who have com-









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


pleted German II. The nature of the course will depend largely
upon the needs of the students taking it. (Elective; both semes-
ters, 3 hours.)
German V.-Courses will be offered in Middle and Old High
German open only to those who have taken German III. (Elec-
tive; both semesters, 3 hours.)

ITALIAN
Italian I.-Elementary.-To students desiring to specialize in
the Romance Languages, an elementary course in Italian is of-
fered. As students who elect this course will already have some
knowledge of formal grammar and of Latin and French, rapid
progress will be made. (Elective; both semesters, 3 hours.)
SPANISH
Spanish I.-Elementary Course.-Drill on pronunciation and
important grammatical forms, elementary syntax, dictation, daily
written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and short poems,
translation. (Elective for Junior or Senior year; both semesters,
3 hours.)
Spanish II. Intermediate Course. Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose
composition, translation, parallel. (Elective for Senior year; both
semesters, 3 hours.)

PHYSICS
PROFESSOR BENTON.
MR. PERRY.
The work of this department is intended to meet the needs, on
the one hand, of those who study physics as a part of a liberal
education, and on the other hand, of those who will have to
apply physics as one of the sciences fundamental to engineering.
Instruction is given by (1) recitations based upon lessons as-
signed in text-books; (2) laboratory work, in which the student
uses his own direct observation to gain knowledge of the sub-
ject; (3) lectures, :n which experimental demonstrations of the
principles under discussion are given; and (4) seminar work in
the advanced courses, in which the various members of the class
take up different special problems requiring extended study or in-
vestigation, and report upon them in turn to the class.









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


The physical laboratory is well equipped for the experiments
usually required in undergraduate laboratory work in the best
colleges. The equipment has been greatly increased in the last
few years, and additions are made to it from year to year.
The following courses are offered:
Physics I.- General Physics, including mechanics, heat,
acoustics, and optic, but not electricity and magnetism. Text-
book to be used in 1911-1912: Duff's Text-book of Physics. (Re-
quired of Sophomores, except in the Agricultural course; 3 recita-
tions per week.)
Physics II. General Laboratory Physics, to accompany
Physics I. Text-book to be used in 1911-1912: Franklin, Craw-
ford and McNutt's Practical Physics. (Required of Sophomores
in the Engineering courses; elective for other students who are
taking or have taken Physics I; 2 exercises of 2 hours each per
week.
Physics III.-General Electricity and Magnetism, being a
continuation of Physics I. Text-book to be used in 1911-1912:
Franklin and McNutt's Elements of Electricity and Magnetism.
(Required of Juniors in the Engineering courses; elective for
Juniors and Seniors in other courses; 2 recitations and 1 laboratory
exercises of 2 hours per week.)
Advanced Courses in Physics.-Preparation has been made
for offering advanced courses in Physics, as electives for Juniors,
Seniors and graduate students. Six such courses have been
planned, as follows: Advanced Experimental Physics, General
Mathematical Physics, Mechanics and Acoustics, Heat, Optics,
Theoretical Electricity. Each of these courses is arranged to
extend through two semesters and to require three hours per
week of classroom work, or equivalent time in the laboratory.
Any one of these courses will be given when elected by three or
more students.

ZOOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY
PROFESSOR DAVIS.
ZOOLOGY
Zoology I.-General Zoology.-Typical examples illustrating
the various groups of the animal kingdom are studied, the object
being to give the student a comprehensive idea of the structure









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


and physiology of animals. (Required of Sophomores in General
Science, Agricultural and Pedagogical courses; elective; both
semesters, 3 hours.)
Zoology II.-Histology and Physiology.-A study of the
microscopic structure and physiology of the principal tissues and
organs of both vertebrates and invertebrates, special attention
being paid to mammals. Thorough training is given in the more
important methods of investigation, each student being expected
to prepare his own slides. (Required of Juniors, Natural History
group; elective; both semesters, 5 hours.)
Zoology III.--Entomology.-Careful attention is given to
the structure of insects in general, after-which the insect orders
are considered, the student being expected to recognize the various
orders and the more common families. Emphasis is given to the
economic side of entomology. (Required of Sophomores, Agri-
cultural course; elective; second semester, 3 hours.)
Zoology IV.-- Vertebrate Morphology. -Lectures on the
comparative anatomy of vertebrates accompanied by laboratory
work on representatives of the principal groups. (Elective; first
semester, 5 hours.)
Zoology V.-Vertebrate Embryology.-Lectures on the de-
velopment of vertebrates with special reference to the early stages.
Laboratory work on the development of the chick. (Elective;
second semester, 5 hours.)
Zoology VI. Evolution and Heredity. A course of lec-
tures on the evolution of animals and the problems of inheri-
tance. Special attention is paid to the results of recent experi-
mental work. Collateral readings will be assigned. (Elective
for Juniors and Seniors; second semester, 3 hours.)
(Note.-Zoology V and VI will be given in alternate years.)
Zoology VII.-Physiology and Hygiene.-A course of lec-
tures and recitations on general physiology, hygiene and sanita-
tion. (Elective; first semester, 3 hours.)
BACTERIOLOGY
Bacteriology I. General Bacteriology. This course is a
general introduction to bacteriology and is designed to afford
the student a comprehensive knowledge of bacteria, especially in
their relation to every-day life. The bacteria found in soil, water,









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES so

sewage, milk, etc., are considered, concluding with a general dis-
*cussion of the pathogenic forms. (Required of Juniors, Natural
History group and of Agricultural students; elective; second
semester, 5 hours.)
Bacteriology II.-Advanced Bacteriology.-This course con-
sists principally of laboratory work along special lines adapted
to the needs of the individual student. Opportunity will be af-
forded for work on bacteria or parasitic protozoa. (Elective;
first semester, 3 hours. Students desiring to elect this course
.must first obtain the consent of the instructor.)
Bacteriology III.-Advanced Bacteriology.-A continuation
,of Bacteriology II. (Elective; second semester, 3 hours.)










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

FACULTY
ALBERT A. MURPHREE, A. M., LI. D.,
President of the University.
J. J. VERNON, B. Agr., M. S. A.,
Dean of the College of Agriculture, Professor of Agronomy.
W. L. FLOYD, M. S.,
Professor of Horticulture and Botany.
R. D. MALTBY, B. S.,
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying.
E. H. PINCKNEY, B. S.,
Instructor in Soils and Fertilizers.
JAS. M. FARR, A. M., Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of English.
EDWARD R. FLINT, B. S., Ph. D. (G6ttingen), M. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Chemistry.
C. L. CROW, M. A., Ph. D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Modern Languages.
JAS. N. ANDERSON, M. A., Ph. D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of Ancient Languages.
*ENOCH MARVIN BANKS, A. M., Ph. D. (Columbia),
Professor of History and Economics.
H. S. DAVIS, Ph. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Geology, Zoology and Bacteriology.
H. G. KEPPEL, A. B., Ph. D. (Clark),
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.
M. B. HADLEY, A. B.,
Instructor in Mathematics.
MAJOR E. S. WALKER, U. S. A., Retired,
Professor of Military Science.
tN. H. COX, B. S.,
Professor of Civil Engineering.
W. L. SEELEY.
Acting Professor of Civil Engineering.
HARVEY W. COX, A. M., Ph. D. (Harvard),
Professor of Philosophy and Education.
MARY DACOSTA, Secretary and Stenographer.
A. G. COLCLOUGH, Farm Foreman.
*Resigned.
tAbsent on leave, 1910-11.









COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Agriculture is intended to meet the require-
ments of the acts of Congress creating and endowing colleges in
the different States. From these acts it is apparent that recogni-
tion of agriculture as a branch of collegiate instruction is a
distinctive feature of the institutions founded upon the provisions
of the national land-grant act. The aim of the college is to offer
young men the best possible equipment for their chosen field of
endeavor. The courses comprise both theory and practice, and
afford opportunity for gaining both technical knowledge and
training in the art of agriculture. Since about one-third of the
student's time is devoted to agricultural branches and the other
two-thirds to the sciences and cultural studies, a broad, thorough
foundation is laid which will enable him, upon graduation, to
become either a leader in educational lines or an effective pro-
ducing agriculturist.
The group courses offered during the Junior and Senior years
afford opportunity for selecting that phase of agriculture best
suited to the qualifications and taste of the individual, and to
better prepare for that particular line of work. Those who wish
to pursue general farming will elect the agronomy or animal hus-
bandry group. Those interested in fruit production or market
gardening will elect the horticultural group. The chemical group
will interest those who wish to become expert agricultural ana-
lysts. There is already a demand for teachers well prepared and
competent to give instruction in agriculture and this demand no
doubt will grow in Florida in the years to come as it has grown
in other agricultural States. In order to meet this demand it
has been thought best to include an agricultural-pedagogical
group. This group will be of special interest to those teachers
who wish to specialize in agriculture and become proficient in this
growing school subject. Teachers who complete this group will
also be competent to give instruction in the sciences required in
the high schools of the State. The present demand for expe-
rienced agricultural teachers cannot be supplied; therefore the
agricultural-pedagogical group forms an attractive and lucrative
line for ambitious young teachers. A certificate stating that the
agricultural-pedagogical group has been pursued will be granted
in addition to the usual degree.









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


In addition to the four-year course in agriculture leading to a
degree, the following short courses are offered:
1. A Two-year Course.
2. A One-year Course.
3. Two Four-month Short Courses.
4. A Farmers' Short Course of Four Weeks.
5. Fourteen Correspondence Courses for Home Study.
Equipment.-The Location of the College of Agriculture.-
'The College of Agriculture is located in Thomas Hall. A strong
hope is entertained that the Legislature of 1911 will appropriate
money for an agricultural building and equipment that will
:adequately provide for all agricultural educational work of the
University.
The College Farm.-The farm connected with the college con-
:sists of 40 acres-about 28 acres for trucking and general field
,crops, 2 acres for stock lots, 2 acres for orchard, 5 acres for
pasture and 3 acres for buildings and grounds, where a hay and
machinery barn now stands and where it is contemplated building,
as soon as money is available, a horse barn, a sanitary dairy barn,
:a fertilizer house, poultry houses and runs, a packing shed, corn
'cribs and a farm foreman's cottage.
Offices, Classrooms and Laboratories. -Agricultural Hall,
when completed, will provide space for department offices; for
,class-rooms in Agronomy, Animal.Husbandry, Horticulture, and
Agricultural Engineering; for laboratories in soils and fertilizers,
crop and grain judging, farm machinery, farm power, irrigation,
farm wood-work, farm iron-work, dairying, stock-judging, agri-
-cultural library, etc.
Live Stock.-The laboratory equipment in live stock is only
well begun, but the individuals of the herds are of high grade.
'There is such great promise for the livestock and dairy industry
in Florida that in future much attention will be given to the sub-
ject. The equipment will be added to from year to year, as
funds become available for the purpose, until representatives of
all the important breeds and classes will be available for giving
thorough courses in breeds of livestock and judging and score-
card work, so helpful in mastering the details connected with
stock-raising.
Library.-The Agricultural Library is small but select. The
leading technical books are on file and a fairly complete set of










COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


State Experiment Station and Government Bulletins are main-
tained. The list is being added to each year. These books and
bulletins are open to the students for reference study or for sup-
plementary reading. The general library is also open to the
students of the college.
The Agricultural Club, inaugurated in 1909, has already
proved an important factor in student life. The objects of the
club are manifold. The following are among the most important:
First, to promote interest in and enthusiasm for agriculture.
Second, through social intercourse to unite in closer bonds of
friendship and sympathy those who desire to have a part in the
promotion of this great industry.
Third, to gain knowledge. Looking to this end the club will
be addressed from time to time by practical and scientific agri-
culturists. Carefully prepared papers, essays, readings and ora-
tions will be presented by the members upon assigned or chosen
subjects of general interest to the club. General discussions on
current agricultural and humanitarian topics will be freely en-
couraged.
Fourth, training in presenting agricultural matter. At the
present time such training is almost as important a factor in suc-
cess as agricultural knowledge. Practice is obtained in parlia-
mentary usage and in presiding over and conducting public so-
cieties. Members in turn are given a place on the program and
they are encouraged to take part in the discussions and business
that may come before the club.
Every student of the College of Agriculture should avail him-
self of the benefits and privileges offered by the club, and stu-
dents of other colleges in the University are cordially invited to
make use of the means thus provided for increasing their knowl-
edge of and sympathy with this important movement, the uplift
of the agricultural industry-an industry which not only supplies
mankind with food, but upon which nearly all other industries
depend.
The officers of the Agricultural Club are as follows:
FRANCIS Y. STOKEs, President.
0. F. BURGER, Vice-President.
J. THAD. GRACE, Secretary-Treasurer.
R. D. MALTBY, Critic.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


New students in the University who are at all interested in
agriculture should make themselves known to the officers of
the Agricultural Club and should early become allied with this
movement, thereby securing the many benefits to be derived from
membership therein.
The Short Course Agricultural Seminar.-The Short Course
Agricultural Seminar was organized this year to meet a special
need of Short Course men. Special training is given in parlia-
mentary usage, in speaking, and in taking part in and presiding
over public gatherings.
Entrance Requirements.-The entrance requirements for ad-
mission to the College of Agriculture are:
English ........................................ 3 units
Mathematics .............................. 3 units
H history ........................................ 2 units
Agriculture .................................... 1 unit
Electives ....................................... 3 units
12 units
For a detailed description of the units, see page 41.
While one unit of agriculture is required, owing to the fact
that agriculture has been so recently included in the curriculum
of the public high schools by legislative enactment, candidates
will be allowed to take the agricultural work in which they are
deficient during the Freshman year. Those who enter the pre-
paratory year will pursue the required agricultural work in class.
Degrees.-The regular four-year course culminating in one
of the five groups-Agronomy, Horticulture, Animal Husbandry,
Agricultural-Chemical or Agricultural-Pedagogical-leads to the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. One year addi-
tional work as prescribed for graduate students leads to the de-
gree of Master of Science in Agriculture.
Certificates.-Certificates will be granted to those who com-
plete any of the Short Courses.










COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


CURRICULUM

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
Freshman Year.
NAMES HouRS DescRIr-
or NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SEE
COURSEa. WEEK. PACE.
(First Semester.)
Agronomy I ...........Soil Physics ................ 5 100
Zootechny I ..........Types and Classes of Live Stock 3 103
Botany I .............General Botany ............... 3 65
English I ............. American Literature .......... 3 74
Mathematics la........Solid Geometry ............. 5 82
Military Science I.....Drill Regulations ........... 1 84

20
(Second Semester.)
Agronomy II ..........Fertilizers .................... 3 100
Horticulture I ....... Olericulture ................ 3 102
Agricultural Engineer-
ing I ............... Farm Machinery and Farm Mo-
tors ....................... 2 101
Botany I .............. General Botany ............... 3 65
English I .............English Literature ....'...... 3 74
Mathematics Ib ........Plane and Spherical Trigonom-
etry ..................... 5 82
Military Science I.....Firing Regulations ........... 1 84

20,

Sophomore Year.

(First Semester.)
Agronomy III ........Crop Production ........... 100
or
Horticulture II......... Greenhouse Construction and 3
Management ............ 102
Botany II ............Plant Physiology ........... 5 65
Zoology I ............General Zoology ............. 3 87
Chemistry I and II.... General Inorganic Chemistry
and Laboratory ........... 5 66
English II ............ Advanced College Rhetoric.... 3 74
Military Science II.....Field Regulations ............. 1 84

20
(Second Semester.)
Bacteriology I ........General Bacteriology ......... 5 88
Zoology I ........... General Zoology ............. 3 87
Zoology III ......... Entomology ................ 3 88
Chemistry I and II.... General Inorganic Chemistry
and Laboratory ........... 5 66
English II ..........Advanced College Rhetoric..... 3 74
Military Science II.....Manual of Guard Duty ....... 1 84

20











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Junior Year.
NAMES HOURS DESCRIP-
or NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SEE
COURSES. WEEK. PACE.
Agronomy Group:
(First Semester.)
Agronomy IV ........Rural Law and Farm Accounts 3 100
Chemistry III ........Qualitative Analysis .......... 3 67
Geology I ...........General Geology .............. 5 77
Surveying I ..........Use of compass, level and tran-
sit ......................... 22 123
Elective ..................................... ...... 4

18
(Second Semester.)
Horticulture III.......Plant Breeding ............... 3 102
Botany III ........... Histology .................... 5 65
Chemistry III ......... Qualitative Analysis .......... 3 67
Elective ............................................... 7

18
Horticultural Group:
(First Semester.)
Agronomy IV ........ Rural Law and Farm Accounts 3 100
Chemistry III .........Qualitative Analysis .......... 3 67
Geology I ...........General Geology .............. 5 77
Surveying I ......... Use of compass, level and tran-
sit ......................... 2/2 123
F elective ................................... ......... 4

18
(Second Semester.)
Horticulture III .......Plant Breeding ................ 3 102
Botany III ............ Histology .................... 5 65
Chemistry III .........Qualitative Analysis ........... 3 67
Elective ........................... ... ................ 7

18
Animal Husbandry Group:
(First Semester.)
Veterinary Elements ................................ 3 104
Chemistry III .........Qualitative Analysis .......... 3 67
Geology I ............. General Geology .............. 5 77
Surveying I .......... Use of compass, level and tran-
sit ......................... 2/2 123
E lective ....................................... .... 4%

18
(Second Semester.)
Zootechny II ......... Breeds of Live Stock.......... 3 103
Zootechny III ....... Poultry ...................... 2 103
Dairying ..............Milk and Butter .............. 3 104
Chemistry III ......... Qualitative Analysis .......... 3 67
Elective ...................................... ...... 7

18











COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Junior Year.
NAMES HIouRs DESCRIP-
Or NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SEE
COURSES. WEEK. PAGE.
Agricultural-Chemical Group:
(First Semester.)
Chemistry IV ......... Qualitative Analysis ........... 5 67
Geology I ............. General Geology .............. 5 77
E elective .......................................... . 8

18
(Second Semester.)
Chemistry IV .........Qualitative Analysis .......... 5 67
Botany III ............H istology .................... 5 65
Elective .................... ... ................... 8

18

Agricultural-Pedagogical Group:
(First Semester.)
Education I .......... Psychology ................... 2 69
Education IIa ........M ethods ...................... 3 69
History II ........... The United States since 1783.. 3 78
Latin A .............. Cicero ...................... 146
or
German I .............Elementary Course ......... 5 85
or
French I ............ Elementary Course ......... 85
Elective ............................ ...... ............ 5

18

(Second Semester.)
Education I ...........Psychology ................... 2 69
Education IIb..........School Management and Super-
vision ...................... 3 .70
History II ...........The United States since 1783.. 3 78
Latin A .............. Cicero ....................... 146
or
German I .............Elementary Course........... 5 85
or
French I ..............Elementary Course ......... 85
E lective ................................ ............ 5

18

NoTE.-Subject to the approval of the dean of the College and the
President of the University, elective courses sufficient to make a total of
not less than 16 nor more than 20 hours per week in the Junior and
Senior Years shall be selected by each student from other groups, or from
other colleges upon approval by the dean of that college.










UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Senior Year.
NAMES HOURS DUsCRIP-
cy NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SIM
COURSES. WEEK. PAGES.
Agronomy Group:
(First Semester.)
Agronomy V ..........Crop Judging ............... 2 101
Botany IV ............Plant Pathology ............. 3 66
Chemistry VIII ........ Agricultural Chemistry ....... 3 68
Economics I ...........Principles of Economics ...... 3 79
Elective .................... ... ......... ............. 7
18
(Second Semester.)
Agricultural Engineer-
ing II ............ Buildings, Roads, Irrigation, etc. 3 101
Horticulture V ........Landscape Gardening.......... 2 102
Botany V ............. Advanced Plant Pathology..... 5 66
Economics I...........Principles of Economics....... 3 79
Elective ............................................. 5
18
Horticultural Group:
(First Semester.)
Horticulture IV ......Pomology ................... 3 102
Botany IV ............Plant Pathology ............. 3 66
Economics I ..........Principles of Economics...... 3 79
Elective ............................................. 9
18
(Second Semester.)
Horticulture V ........Landscape Gardening ......... 2 102
Horticulture VI .......Forestry .................... 3 102
Agricultural Engineer-
ing II .............. Buildings, Roads, Irrigation, etc. 3 101
Botany V ............. Advanced Plant Pathology..... 3 66
Economics I ........... Principles of Economics....... 3 79
Elective ............... .... . ................... 4
18
Animal Husbandry Group:
(First Semester.)
Zootechny IV ........Feeds and Feeding ........... 3 103
Zootechny V .......... Market Classes of Live Stock.. 2 104
Chemistry VIII ....... Agricultural Chemistry........ 3 68
Economics I ......... Principles of Economics ....... 3 79
Elective ................. ........ ... ........... 7
18
(Second Semester.)
Agricultural Engineer-
ing II ...............Buildings, Roads, Irrigation, etc. 3 101
Horticulture V ........Landscape Gardening ......... 2 102
Zootechny VI .........Animal Breeding............. 3 104
Economics I .......... Principles of Economics....... 3 79
Elective ........................................... 7
18










COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Senior Year.
NAMES HOURS DESCRIP-
o' NATURE OF WORK. PER TION SE
CouRSSs. WEEK. PAGE.
Agricultural-Chemical Group:
(First Semester.)
Chemistry VII ........Quantitative Analysis ......... 7 68
Chemistry VIII ........ Agricultural Chemistry........ 3 68
Economics I........... Principles of Economics...... 3 79
Elective ............................................ 5

18
(Second Semester.)
Chemistry VII .........Quantitative Analysis ......... 7 68
Economics I ............ Principles of Economics........ 3 79
Elective .................. ....................... 8
18

Agricultural-Pedagogical Group:
(First Semester.)
Education III ......... History of Education .......... 3 70
Education IV ..........Secondary Education ......... 3 71
Education V .......... Principles and Philosophy of
Education ................ 3 71
Latin I ..............Livy, Ovid, Virgil ........... 62
or
German II ............Intermediate Course .......... 3 85
or
French II .............Intermediate Course ........ 85
Elective ................. ......... ................. 6
18

(Second Semester.)
Education III ........ History of Education.......... 3 70
Education IV .........Secondary Education.......... 3 71
Education V ...........Principles and Philosophy of
Education ................ 3 71
Latin I ............. Livy, Ovid, Virgil........... 62
or
German II ............Intermediate Course ........ 3 85
or
French II ............. Intermediate Course ........ 85
Elective .................. ................... ... ... 6
18