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Title: Before the Florida Legislative Investigation Committee ... transcript of testimony, Thursday, February 9, 1961
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 Material Information
Title: Before the Florida Legislative Investigation Committee ... transcript of testimony, Thursday, February 9, 1961
Physical Description: 287, 18 columns : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- Legislative Investigation Committee
Publisher: The Legislature,
The Legislature
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1961
Copyright Date: 1961
 Subjects
Subject: Subversive activities -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Florida -- 1951-   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "Appearances: Representative William G. O'Neil -- et al."--Cover.
General Note: Hearings concerned with subversive ascivities, communist activities, race relations, etc, in the state of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075587
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22250018

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Full Text





BEFORE THE FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE

COMMITTEE ROOM NO. 50

STATE CAPITOL BUILDING

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA



.**




TRANSCRIPT OF TESTIMONY

Thursday, February 9, 1961








APPEARANCES:

Representative William G. O'Neill, Chairman Presiding

Senator W. Randolph Hodges Member

Representative Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. Member

Representative A. J. Ryan, Jr. Member

Mark R. Hawes, Esq. Chief Counsel For The Committee

R. J. Strickland, Esq. Investigator For The Committee








F
316.2
.F56x
1961













BEFORE THE FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE

COMMITTEE ROOM NO. 50

STATE CAPITOL BUILDING

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA








TRANSCRIPT OF TESTIMONY

Thursday, February 9, 1961








APPEARANCES:

Representative William G. O'Neill, Chairman Presiding

Senator W. Randolph Hodges Member

Representative Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. Member

Representative A. J. Ryan, Jr. Member

Mark R. Hawes, Esq. Chief Counsel For The Committee

R. J. Strickland, Esq. Investigator For The Committee


* *










BEFORE THE FLORIDA LEGISLATIVE INVESTIGATION COMMITTEE

COMMITTEE ROOM NO. 50

STATE CAPITOL BUILDING

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA



INDEX

PAGE

ROLL CALL OF COMMITTEE 2

ROLL CALL OF WITNESSES 2

READING OF SENATE BILL NO. 64 3

OPENING STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN 12

TESTIMONY OF R. J. STRICKLAND 19

TESTIMONY OF MRS. C. C. COLLINS 53

TESTIMONY OF ERNEST SALLEY 136

TESTIMONY OF JOSEPH BERNARD HANKERSON 191

TESTIMONY OF ERNEST SALLEY (RECALLED) 195

TESTIMONY OF MRS. C. C. COLLINS (RECALLED) 198

TESTIMONY OF ERNEST SALLEY (RECALLED) 199

TESTIMONY OF MRS. MARY MUELLER 201

TESTIMONY OF MISS JILL ELIZABETH RAYMOND 214

TESTIMONY OF MISS MARY BOLING ROBINSON 224

TESTIMONY OF R. J. STRICKLAND (RECALLED) 229

COMMITTEE'S EXHIBIT NO. 2 & 2-A 35

COMMITTEE'S EXHIBIT NO. 1 40

COMMITTEE'S EXHIBIT NO. 3 46




1-3


INDEX (CONTINUED)


COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S


EXHIBIT NO. 4


EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT


NO. 5

NO. 6 & 7

NO. 8


COMMITTEE'S EXHIBIT NO. 16


COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S

COMMITTEE'S


EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT


COMMITTEE'S EXHIBIT NO.


17

18-A,

19

20

21

22

23-A,

24-A,

25


18-B & 18-C










23-B & 23-C

24-B & 24-C


COMMITTEE'S EXHIBIT NO. 26
CLOSING STATEMENT BY CHAIRMAN
COURT REPORTER'S CERTIFICATE


PAGE

46





PROCEEDINGS

(The Committee met at
ten o'clock, a.m.)


THE CHAIRMAN: All right, gentlemen, the meeting

will come to order. Mr. Strickland, call the roll,

please.

MH. STRICKLAND: Representative William G. O'Neill?

MR. O'NEILL: Here.

MR. STRICKLAND: Senator W. Randolph Hodges?

MR. HODGES: Here.

MR. STRICKLAND: Senator Charley E. Johns?

(No response.)

MR. STRICKLAND: Senator Irlo 0. Bronson?

(No response.)

MR. STRICKLAND: Representative Ben Hill Griffin, Jr

MR. GRIFFIN: Here.

MR. STRICKLAND: Representative John E. Matthews?

(No response.)

MR. STRICKLAND: Representative A. J. Ryan, Jr.?

MR. RYAN: Here.



THE CHAIRMAN: All right, in starting the hearing,

I would like to -- call off the witnesses, Mr. Strickland,

first.

MR. STRICKLAND: Carl Braden?












MR. BRADEN: Present.

MR. STRICKLAND: Joe Hankerson?

MR. HANKERSON: Present.

MR. STRICKLAND: Ernest Salley?

MR. SALLEY: Present.

MR. STRICKLAND: All present and accounted for,

Mr. Chairman.

THE CHAIRMAN: All right. I am going to read the

Senate Bill Number 64 which established the Committee,

Chapter 59-207, Acts of 1959, entitled:

"AN ACT to provide for the creation and

appointment of a committee of the Legis-

lature to make investigations of the

activities in this state of organiza-

tions and individuals advocating violence

or a course of conduct which would con-

stitute a violation of the laws of Flor-

ida; for the conduct of hearings and the

subpoenaing of witnesses, providing for

circuit courts to enforce committee's

processes; for a report of such commit-

tee to the 1961 Legislature; authoriz-

ing the employment of specialized assis-

tance by the committee; providing for

the expenses of the committee; providing












an effective date; and providing for

the extension of the joint committee

set up by Chapter 57-125, laws of

Florida, 1957, until the committee

created by this Act is duly appointed

and organized.

"WHEREAS, the joint committee

set up by chapter 31498, Laws of the

extraordinary session, 1956, has ex-

pired with the filing of its report

to the legislature as provided by

said act; and

"WHEREAS, the joint committee

set up by chapter 57-125, Laws of

Florida, 1957, will expire with the

filing of its report to the legisla-

ture as provided by said act; and

"WHEREAS, the said two commit-

tees' records and reports disclose a

great abuse of the judicial processes

of the Courts in Florida, as well as

certain activities on the part of vari-

ous organizations and individuals which

constitute violence or the threat

thereof, or violations of the laws of












this state and which activities are

inimical to the well-being of the ma-

jority of the citizens of this state;

and

"WHEREAS, the joint committee set

up by chapter 57-125, Laws of Florida,

1957, was created to complete the work

commenced by the joint committee set

up by chapter 31498, Laws of the extra-

ordinary session, 1956; and

"WHEREAS, there is in the commit-

tee's files and records evidence and

sources of evidence disclosing that

the Communist party, its fronts and ap-

paratus and other subversive organiza-

tions, are seeking to agitate and en-

gender ill-will between the races of

this and other states; and

"WHEREAS, the joint committee set

up by chapter 57-125 has diligently

pressed its investigations to deter-

mine the exact nature, extent and ef-

fect of subversive penetration and in-

fluence on the actions of certain or-

ganizations and individuals active in






Florida; and

"WHEREAS, said committee has been

prevented from ascertaining the same

because of the deliberate and almost

unanimous action of the witnesses be-

fore it in resorting to litigation to

frustrate said committee's investiga-

tions, which resulted in said commit-

tee being mired down in numerous law

suits in the Circuit Courts and the

Supreme Court of Florida, all of which

litigation has ended in the Supreme

Court of Florida having twice upheld

the authority of said committee to pur-

sue the investigations it has underta-

ken, and which litigation has now cul-

minated in the United States Supreme

Court having issued a stay order

against said committee on an unsworn

and unverified application for stay

pending application by certain witnes-

ses subpoenaed before the committee

for certiorari in the United States

Supreme Court; and

"WHEREAS, because of lack of time






said proceedings still are lodged un-

disposed of in the United States Su-

preme Court with the committee power-

less to proceed with its investigations

because of that Court's stay order; and

"WHEREAS, the issues embraced in

said litigation involve fundamental

principles of State's rights and State's

sovereignty as against centralized Fed-

eral power and Government by judicial

decree and constitute a fight for State

sovereignty which this State can ill

afford to abandon; and

"WHEREAS, there still exists the

same grave and pressing need for such

a committee to exist in the interim

between the 1959 and 1961 sessions of

the legislature of Florida, to continue

and complete the above two committees'

work, and to participate in and contest

the efforts represented by the above

referred to litigation to whittle away

further at this State's rights and sov-

ereignty, and to be ever ready to inves-

tigate any agitator who may appear in






Florida in the interim,

"NOW, THEREFORE, the following

bill is proposed to be enacted by the

legislature because of all the forego-

ing:

"BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE

OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA:

"Section 1. There is hereby cre-

ated a special committee of the legis-

lature to be composed of seven (7) mem-

bers, three (3) of whom shall be ap-

pointed from the membership of the state

senate by the president, and four (4) of

whom shall be appointed from the member-

ship of the state house of representa-

tives by the speaker. The members of

said committee shall serve as such un-

til discharged by the president of the

senate and the speaker of the house of

representatives upon receipt of their

report at the regular 1961 session of

the legislature.

"Section 2. It shall be the duty

of the committee to make as complete

an investigation as time permits of












all organizations whose principles or

activities include a course of conduct

on the part of any person or group

which would constitute violence, or a

violation of the laws of the state, or

would be inimical to the well-being and

orderly pursuit of their personal and

business activities by the majority of

the citizens of this state. Such inves-

tigations shall be conducted with the

purpose of reporting to this legislature

of the activities of such organizations

to the end that corrective legislation

may be adopted if found necessary to

correct any abuses against the peace

and dignity of the state.

"Section 3. (1) The committee is

authorized to employ such experts, cler-

ical and other assistance as may be re-

quired; to require by subpoena or other-

wise the attendance of such witnesses

and the production of such papers, bonds

and documents, and to administer such

oaths and to take such testimony and to

make such expenditures within the












limitation herein authorized as it

may deem necessary in the performance

of its duties.

"(2) Should any witness fail to

respond to the lawful subpoena of the

committee, or having responded fails

to answer all lawful inquiries or turn

over evidence to this committee, the

committee may file a petition before

any circuit court in Florida setting

up such failure on the part of said

witness. On the filing of such peti-

tion the court snall take jurisdiction

of the witness and the subject matter

of said petition and shall direct the

witness to respond to all lawful ques-

tions and to produce all documentary

evidence in its possession which is

lawfully demanded. The failure of any

witness to respond pursuant to the or-

der of the court shall constitute a di-

rect and criminal contempt of court and

the court shall punish said witness ac-

cordingly.

"Section 4. The committee shall












report to the 1961 regular session

of the legislature the results of its

investigations, together with its recom-

mendations, if any, for necessary legis-

lation. The expenses of this committee,

including necessary and regular expenses

shall be paid from legislative expense,

such total expenses not to exceed sixty-

seven thousand five hundred dollars

($67,500.00), which shall be expended

under the direction of the committee.

"Section 5. The joint committee

set up by chapter 57-125, Laws of Flori-

da, 1957, is hereby extended in all

respects so that it may continue to dis-

charge its responsibilities as a party

litigant on behalf of the state of

Florida in the litigation above re-

ferred to until the appointment and

organization of the committee provided

for in this act shall become effective.

"Section 6. This act shall take

effect immediately upon becoming a law.

"Became a law without the Gover-


nor's approval.






"Filed in Office Secretary of

State June 1, 1959."

The chairman desires to make a further opening

statement. You have heard the law which composed this

Committee. The present hearing will be concerned with

the activities of various organizations which have been

or are presently operating in this state in the fields

of:

First: Race relations.

Second: The coercive reform of social and educa-

tional practices and mores by litigation and pressured

administrative action.

Third: Of labor.

Fourth: Of education.

Fifth: Of other vital phases of life in this

state.

We shall also be concerned with the Communist

party, its members, Communist action and the Communist

front organizations, their range, objectives, and ac-

tivities, and the degree, if any, to which the Communists

and Communist influence has been successful in penetrat-

ing, infiltrating and influencing the various organiza-

tions and members thereof which have been or are now

operating in the above fields.

You have been subpoenaed here as a witness before





this Committee in connection with its current investi-

gation. There are some people who seem to think that

because a witness has been subpoenaed before this Commit-

tee that some inference or accusation that such a person

is a Communist results from his being subpoenaed because

of the nature of this Communist inquiry. It is not the

intention of this Committee to make any such inference

by the mere fact of subpoenaing a witness, and this Com-

mittee has several times publicly stated that no such

inference is to be drawn from the mere fact that a person

has been subpoenaed. If you feel that any unfair infer-

ence has been made or assumed by anyone against you be-

cause you have been subpoenaed before this Body, you may

have the privilege of making a short and concise state-

ment denying that you are now or ever have been a member

of the Communist Party itself or any Communist Front or

active group if you so desire.

Mr. Counsel, that concludes the reading of the law

and the statement of the chairman.

MR. HAWES: The witnesses Braden, Salley, and

Hankerson, please retire to the room at the foot of the

stairs, with the exception of the witness Braden.

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Braden?

MR. BRADEN: Yes, sir.

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Braden, do you have a counsel










present with you?

MR. BRADEN: Yes, I have Mr. Len Holt of Norfolk,

Virginia, a Civil Rights attorney.

THE CHAIRMAN: Is he your attorney?

MR. BRADEN: Yes; and I also have another attorney

who is unable to be present. I would like to have him

entered as a matter of record, the Rt. Rev. C. I. Tucker

of Louisville, Kentucky, a Bishop of the A.M.E. Church

and Civil Rights attorney.

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Braden, you have been subpoenaed

here this morning, and subject to the service of the

subpoena on you you have stated publicly that you have

no intention of answering the questions of this Commit-

tee or any questions propounded by the Counsel of this

Committee or any member thereof. You have written sev-

eral booklets in which you have stated that you refuse

to answer any questions on several grounds, the First

Amendment being the main ground. You have stated in a

letter addressed to me as the chairman of this Commit-

tee and have stated personally over the telephone to me

that you will not answer any questions, you have no in-

tention of answering any questions, and, that being the

case, with that understanding, and with the full knowl-

edge of what you have stated publicly in writing, in

pamphlets, and in speeches that you have made, and in











writings of the"Patriot, the newspaper of which you are

the Field Service Director, or Executive Secretary, that

you have no intentions of answering questions, it has

been decided by the Committee, and it is the Committee's

desire that you will not be forced to answer any ques-

tions; you will not be sworn as a witness unless you so

desire; you will not be asked any questions by the Coun-

sel of this Committee or any one member of the Committee;

but we wanted you here for one purpose: We expect to

elicit and get evidence before this Committee at this

hearing today and possibly tomorrow which will tie you

directly as a Communist, a member of the Communist Front

Organization of which you head, that you are now en-

gaged in and have been so engaged for some time in the

agitation, stirring up of sit-in's, and other racial

agitation, and, as such, that you have no desire to im-

prove the position of the Negro but only the desire to

further the Communist cause in this country, and most

particularly in the State of Florida.

You will have an opportunity to be placed under

oath to refute, deny, and to otherwise contradict any

evidence adduced here today from any witness, with one

understanding: That when you so do take the stand un-

der oath to refute, deny this evidence which will be

adduced here, then you are opening the door, and the






full scope of anything adduced before this hearing, and

all questions propounded about that evidence, that you

will answer those questions. And, with that understand-

ing, sir, you are now free to go, free to stay and lis-

ten, and free to hear what is being said and what will

be said against you, and we want you to have that informa-

tion now. You are free to leave this hearing room, and

we will discharge the subpoena. You are welcome to stay,

and we would be delighted to have you testify under oath

with the privilege of cross examination of our counsel

on any scope of any part of the evidence adduced here

today and your connection therewith.

Mr. Counsel, call your first witness.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, would you inquire of Mr.

Braden what his desire is, whether he intends to stay

or leave?

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Braden, will you state the

answer as to whether you intend to stay, or what?

MR. BRADEN: Mr. Chairman, you have made a long

statement, and I think I ought to have a couple minutes

to talk to my counsel about this.

THE CHAIRMAN: We will give you three or four

minutes, if you so desire. If you would like to retire

to the back or outside, we will wait for you.

MR. BRADEN: All right, sir; thank you very much.





(Thereupon, following a snort recess
the following proceedings were had,
to wit:)

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Braden, have you consulted with

your counsel?

MR. BRADEN: Yes, sir, I have, and thank you for

the opportunity of talking to counsel about this. It is

somewhat of an unusual procedure that you have outlined

and which you have laid down in your long statement. I

must say that I disagree with what you have said. Wrat

you have said is based on inaccuracy, unfounded assump-

tions --

THE CHAIRMAN: Wait just a minute, now, Mr. Braden.

If you desire to take the witness stand after we have

heard from the other witnesses, you will have the oppor-

tunity. The only answer and the only question I asked

you is do you now desire to stay at this hearing, or do

you desire to be excused? If you want to be excused,

I will excuse you. If you want to stay for the hearing,

your subpoena still stands. That is the only question

I want answered. Do you desire to stay at this hearing?

MR. BRADEN: I was answering your question, sir.

THE CHAIRMAN: You can answer that question yes or

no.

MR. BRADEN: Sir?

THE CHAIRMAN: Answer the question yes or rn,.










MR. BRADEN: I would like to answer it in my own

way, sir.

THE CHAIRMAN: I don't want you to answer it -- I

want it answered direct. I don't want a speech. If you

are going to make a speech, we will put you under oath,

and you can testify, and when you do, we are going into

anything that you want to say. You have said you are

not going to answer any questions. Now I want a simple

answer, yes or no. Are you going to stay, or are you

going to leave?

MR. BRADEN: Sir, I was subpoenaed here to testify,

Mr. Chairman.

THE CHAIRMAN: The subpoena, as any subpoena is,

stands so long as the body which issues that subpoena --

MR. BRADEN: Well, I was subpoenaed here today, and

I was, as you say, going to refuse to answer questions,

and I wanted to tell you why.

THE CHAIRMAN: No, I don't want you -- I want you

to tell me if you are going to stay at this hearing, and

that is the only question I have asked you. Now, you

answer that question.

MR. BRADEN: Well, I refuse to testify because you

are violating my rights under the First Amendment to

the United States Constitution.

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Braden, have a seat back there.











Call your first witness, Counsel.



Thereupon:

R. J. STRICKIAND,

being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

THE CHAIRMAN: Proceed.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, before I start, I would

just like to make a comment, that I don't see how in the

world we could be violating this witness' rights when we

are not compelling him to do anything.

THE CHAIRMAN: Counsel, I agree that we are not

violating his rights, and the only question we asked him

is if he wanted to stay or be excused, and he had this

privilege. He has declined to answer that question.

Therefore, the subpoena stands.

EXAMINATION BY MR. HAWES:

Q. Now, Mr. Strickland, state you full name, please, sir, for

the record.

A. R. J. Strickland.

Q. Where do you live?

A. Tallahassee, Florida.

Q. By whom are you employed?

A. The Florida Legislative Investigation Committee.

Q. How long have you been so employed?

A. Since October, 1956, with the exception of about a three-months'






period in 1957.

Q. In connection with your employment, have you had occasion to

make an investigation concerning Carl Braden, that man sitting

over there on the end of that first row in the audience, and

the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.?

A. I have.

Q. In connection with that investigation, have you secured for

this committee any official document from the State of Ken-

tucky concerning Mr. Braden?

A. I have, sir.

Q. I hand you what purports to be a transcript of some testimony

taken in the Jefferson Circuit Court, the Criminal Branch of

the Second Division, of Kentucky, at Louisville, on December

11, 1954, in a case entitled Commonwealth of Kentucky

against Carl Braden, and ask you if that is one of the docu-

ments you received?

A. It is.

Q. Does that transcript contain any sworn testimony concerning

Carl Braden and his affiliation with the Communist Party of

the United States?

A. It does.

Q. Who is the witness who testifies in that regard in that case?

A. The witness is known as Alberta Ahern.

Q. Turn to page 2276 of that transcript of testimony and read

what that witness swore under oath in regard to Mr. Braden.






"Q. Will you please state your

name to the Court?

"A. Mrs. Alberta Ahern.

"Q. And where do you live, Mrs.

Ahern?

"A. 2311 Payne Street.

"Q. And what is your occupation?

"A. Seamstress.

"Q. Mrs. Ahern, I will ask you

if you have been employed in an under-

cover capacity for the Federal Bureau

of Investigation?

"A. I have.

"A. And as such, I will ask you if

you became a member of the Communist

Party?

"A. I have.

"Q. I will ask you, please, whether

or not the defendant, Carl Braden, got

you into the Communist Party?"

Then there was an objection, and

"The Court: No, that is leading.

Objection sustained.

"Very well, Your Honor.

"Q. Now, you are a member of











the Communist Party?

"A. That's right.

"Q. I will ask you' if, of your

own knowledge, the defendant, Carl

Braden, is a member of the Communist

Party?

"A. Mr. Braden is a member of

the Communist Party.

"Q. Now, Mrs. Ahern, I will ask

you whether or not you were a member

of the same group or the same cell of

the Communist Party in Louisville,

Kentucky, with the defendant, Carl

Braden?

"A. I was.

"Q. I will ask you, please, whe-

ther or not on July 9 of this year,

1954, you attended a meeting of the

Communist Party here in Louisville?

If you did, where was that meeting

held?

"A. I attended a Communist Party

meeting at the home of Mr. and Mrs.

Carl Braden, 4403 Virginia Avenue,

Louisville, Kentucky."











Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Turn, Mr. Strickland, to page 2280 of that

transcript of testimony and read what this witness swore un-

der oath further in regard to Mr. Braden.

A. "Q. I will ask you if on June

3, 1954, you attended as a member of

the Communist Party a called meeting

of your cell or group? Did you attend

a meeting on June 3, 1954?

"A.. I did.

"Q. Where was that meeting held?

"A. It was held at the home of

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Braden.

"Q. And who were present, please?

"A. Mr. I. O. Ford, Mr. Carl

Braden, and myself.

"Q. Now, at that meeting, I will

ask you if at that meeting on June 3,

1954, the defendant on trial, Carl

Braden, sold you the April and May

issues, 1954, of 'Political Affairs'?

"A. He did.

"Mr. Housley: That is Common-

wealth's Exhibit 12, if the Court

please.


"Q. I will ask you if at that






meeting the defendant, Carl Braden,

collected from you any funds?

"A. I contributed $5.00 to the

Communist Party, the National Communist

Party Fund Drive.

"Q. And at whose request did you

contribute, or who collected the money

from you?

"A. Mr. Carl Braden.

"Q. Was there any discussion at

that meeting about the Louisville Peace

Crusade?

"A. Yes, there was.

"Q. Was anything said at that

meeting about the H Bomb and the revo-

lution in this country, the Communist

Revolution?

"A. Well, one of the members said

that the United States should be kept

at peace so that they wouldn't blow

the world up with the H Bomb before

the revolution.

"Q. Now, about this donation, I

don't believe I asked you, was that

fund kept here, if you know, or was






that sent to National Headquarters in

the City of New York?

"A. That was sent to the National

Headquarters of the Communist Party in

New York City."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, Mr. Strickland, in the course of your

employment with this Committee, have you had occasion to in-

vestigate an organization known as the Southern Conference

Educational Fund, Inc.?

A. I have, sir.

Q. Do you know whether or not the man, Carl Braden, about whom

you have just been reading and who is sitting over there, is

connected with that organization?

A. I do, sir.

Q. Do you know what his capacity is?

A. He is Field Secretary for the publication of the "Southern

Patriot", which is the official organ of the Southern Con-

ference Educational Fund, Inc.

Q. Do you know whether or not his wife is connected with it?

A. She also is shown as Field Secretary.

Q. Now, Mr. Strickland, were you present at a hearing of the

predecessor to this Committee on February 10, 1958, in this

very room, at which Josqe Brown Matthews testified regarding

the background of the Southern Conference Educational Fund,

Inc.?












A. I was.

Q. I hand you the official transcript of that testimony and ask

you to read Just these three pages of testimony before this

Committee to refresh the Committee members' memory, from page

33 to 36.

A. "Q. Now, do you have any knowledge

as to how the Southern Conference for

Human Welfare was formed?

A. The Southern Conference for Hu-

man Welfare was formed in 1936 at the

direct instigation of the Communist

Party in New York City. A young man

named John Donovan was dispatched from

New York or Washington, or whichever

place he was living at that particular

time -- he did live in both places --

to Birmingham, Alabama, to lay the

ground work for the Southern Conference

for Human Welfare. The organization was

set up in November, 1938. I have for-

gotten whether I said 1936 a moment

ago or not. If so, I would like to

correct that. It was November, 1938.

The organization attracted very prom-

inent support at the time. Among the












speakers at the first conference for

the Southern Conference for Human Wel-

fare were such personages as Mrs.

Eleanor Roosevelt . through the

person of John Donovan in the early

days, but, in later months, by such

persons as James E. Jackson, who is

still the Communist Party's main rep-

resentative for the south, a Negro,

Paul Crouch, recently deceased, who,

for a number of years, was one of

the Communist agents in the south and

one of the known members of the Com-

munist Party who had been running the

show from the inside.

"Q. Now, is that organization ac-

tive today, sir?

"A. No, the Southern Conference

for Human Welfare was transformed in

the twinkling of an eye, as it were,

a few years ago, into the Southern Con-

ference Educational Fund, which today

is operating and has headquarters in

New Orleans. When I say the Southern

Conference for Human Welfare was






transformed into the Southern Confer-

ence Educational Fund, I mean they

kept the same address, the same offi-

ces, the same magazine with the same

name, the same telephone number, the

same executive director, and the same

officers, generally. There was nothing

but a change in name that occurred at

that particular time and on that par-

ticular day.

"Q. In other words, the Southern

Conference Educational Fund simply re-

placed in name the Southern Conference

for Human Welfare?

"A. That is correct. Now, a Com-

mittee of the United States Senate,

namely, the Sub-Committee on Internal

Security, has stated in a recent re-

port that the objective of the Southern

Conference for Human Welfare was to

promote Communism in the south. That

is the charge made by unanimous report

of the United States Senate Committee.

I think the report was made in 1954 as

a result of extensive investigations






by the Committee. The Committee went

on to say that the Southern Conference

Educational Fund retained the same ob-

jective, so that, according to this re-

port of the United States Senate, the

Southern Conference Educational Fund

has as its major objective today the

promotion of Communism in the south.

"Q. Now, I assume that that would

be true wherever it could be found to

be located and operating in the south

today, is that correct?

"A. That is correct."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, Mr. Strickland, have you personally re-

ceived -- been in touch through the mail or otherwise -- re-

ceived any communications from the Southern Conference Educa-

tional Fund since about November, 1959?

A. I have, sir.

Q. State whether or not you registered a fictitious name for

membership in that organization?

A. I did.

Q. Under that fictitious name, state whether or not you received

from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc., and

the defendant, Carl Braden, sitting over there, written re-

ports, letters, and communications?











A. I did.

Q. Regarding the activities of that fund and the defendant,

Carl Braden?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Under what name did you receive your direct communications

from the Fund and Mr. Braden over there?

A. M. J. Linnerman.

Q. State whether or not about November, 1959, you received a

communication from that organization in regard to the organ-

izing of a committee to coordinate the efforts of various or-

ganizations and individuals in the State of Florida?

A. I did.

Q. Do you have that letter?

A. It is in that file.

Q. I hand you a letter that has been marked "Number 2" and ask

you if you can identify that letter?

A. I did, sir; I received this letter.

Q. On what stationery is that letter?

A. Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Q. Who is shown to be the officers of that organization, accord-

ing to that letterhead?

A. President, Aubrey W. Williams; Vice Presidents, Dr. Herman

H. Long, Bishop Edgar A. Love, Modjeska M. Simkins; Secretary,

Dr. James L. Hupp; Assistant Secretary, Mrs. Fred Zengel;

Treasurer, Benjamin E. Smith; Executive Director, James A.











Dombrowski; Field Secretaries, Anne Braden, Carl Braden.

Q. What is the home address of that organization, according to

that letterhead?

A. 822 Perdido Street, New Orleans 12, Louisiana.

Q. What is the date on that particular letter that you have

there?

A. February 23, 1960.

Q. Did that letter come addressed to Mr. Linnerman?

A. It did, sir.

Q. Who signed that letter?

A. Jim Dombrowski.

Q. Turn that letter over, please, sir. Without reading off the

names at this time, what appears on the back of that letter?

A. A list of the names of the Board of Directors as well as the

Advisory Committee and the Medical Advisory Committee of

various states.

Q. Of the Southern Conference Educational Fund?

A. That is correct.

Q. Read that letter into the record, please, sir.

A. "Dear Mr. Linnerman:

"Thank you for your letter of

the 22nd. The meeting of Florida

Friends of the SCEF in Orlando on

March 12th, will be held at the Uni-

tarian Church at 1 p.m., and I hope





I shall have the pleasure of meeting

you there.

"The Rev. C.K. Steele, pastor of

the Bethel Baptist Church and the Rev.

James Hudson at Florida A. & M. proba-

bly will be interested in attending

this meeting, and perhaps you would like

to confer with them about a delegation

from your community.*

"Thanking you for your interest

in writing and assuring you that we

will appreciate your helping us to have

a strong delegation present from Talla-

hassee,

"Sincerely,

"Jim Dombrowski

"* Also Prof. Luella Richey, at F.S.U.

"Mr. M. J. Linnerman,P. 0. Box 1044,

Tallahassee, Fla."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) That letter makes reference to the Rev. C. K.

Steele. Do you know that man?

A. I do, sir.

Q. Do you see him in this Courtroom?

A. Yes, sir, I do.

Q. Where is he sitting?





A. Sitting in the second row, the second seat from the end.

Q. Sitting right behind Mr. Braden there?

A. That is correct.

Q. That letter makes reference to another man from Tallahassee,

Rev. James Hudson. Do you know him?

A. No, sir, I do not know Dr. Hudson.

Q. I hand you another letter. It has been marked "Number 2-A"

and ask if you can identify that letter?

A. I can, sir.

Q. Is that on the official stationery of the Southern Conference

Educational Fund?

A. It is.

Q. Read that letter into the record, please, sir.

A. "February 26, 1960

"Dear Friend of the SCEF:

"The first meeting of the Florida

Friends of the SCEF will be held at 1

p.m., Saturday afternoon, March 12th,

at the Unitarian Church in Orlando.

You are cordially invited to attend.

"This will be a small, unpubli-

cized, and informal meeting. If you

would like to invite one or two others,

please feel free to do so.

"The purpose of the meeting will











be to bring together a few represen-

tative citizens from various parts of

the state to discuss integration prob-

lems and the possibilities of a greater

measure of co-operation between those

who are actively interested in solving

these problems.

"If you plan to attend, will you

please notify Dr. Hal G. Lewis, 1230

S.W. Ninth Road, Gainesville, Florida,

or Mrs. Shirley Zoloth, 5600 Maggiore

Street, Coral Gables, Florida.

"With best wishes,

"Sincerely,

"Jim Dombrowski"

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, Mr. Strickland, do you know whether or

not of your own knowledge that meeting was held in Orlando on

the 12th of March, 1960?

A. I do, sir.

Q. State whether or not you secured any person or persons with-

out naming them or the number or identities, to attend that

meeting?

A. I did.

Q. Did you have people attend that meeting and cover it for this

Committee?











A. I did, sir.

Q. Did you have people attend and cover subsequent meetings of

this organization and their "friends in Florida," as they

term it, as they met from time to time, from March 12, 1960,

to date?

A. I have, sir.

Q. Subsequent to that meeting, did you receive through the mail

any further official communications from the Southern Confer-

ence Educational Fund, Inc.?

A. I have, sir.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, before I proceed any

further, I would like to have these two letters that

have been read into the record marked officially as

exhibits of the Committee, Nos. 2 and 2-A, respectively.

THE CHAIRMAN: Mr. Reporter, they will be so marked.

(Thereupon said instruments were
marked Committee's Exhibits 2 and
2-A, respectively.)

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) I will hand you a document and ask you if you

can identify that, sir?

A. I can, sir.

Q. Did you receive that document, or one just like it, through

the mail?

A. I did, sir.

Q. Did that come under the name of Linnerman?

A. It did, sir.






Q. Now, what does that document purport to be?

A. It is a memorandum directed to the Florida Friends of SCEF.

Q. Who is it from?

A. From Jim Dombrowski.

Q. He is the Executive Director, I believe we have already es-

tablished, of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.?

A. That is correct, sir.

Q. Does it purport to be, on the face of it, at the top, a

Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc., memorandum?

A. It is, sir.

Q. What is the date of it?

A. November 19, 1959.

Q. Now, that was written and received by you before you received

those two letters you referred to before?

A. That is correct, sir.

Q. Can you state positively that that came to you from the

Southern Conference Educational Fund through the mail to

this fictitious name?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Read that document into the record.

A. "November 19, 1959

"TO: Florida Friends of SCEF

"FROM: Jim Dombrowski

"IN RE: State Coordinating

Committee




37

"Representatives of the Southern

Conference Educational Fund, Inc., re-

cently made an extensive tour of Florida

to survey the possibilities of forming a

Florida coordinating committee on civil

rights and civil liberties. This survey

was made at the request of several inte-

gration leaders in Florida and because of

our own feeling that some coordination

of effort was due in Florida.

"Our representatives traveled 1,900

miles in the state, visiting Pensacola,

Tallahassee, Gainesville, La Crosse,

Orlando, Mt. Dora, Winter Park, Cocoa,

Miami, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and Jack-

sonville. They conferred with leaders

of virtually every organization con-

cerned with the work for civil rights

and civil liberties. In several meet-

ings, they outlined the general plan

of operation for the coordinating com-

mittee, if it was agreed that one should

be set up.

"In every place, they found that

people felt the need for such coordination.











It was noted that people in one city

were working on one project that had

statewide implications but nobody in

any other city knew about the project.

This was not only true in one commun-

ity; it was found in several places.

"One particularly horrible event

that took place while SCEF representa-

tives were in Florida was the execu-

tion of two Negro men on November 13th

on the obviously trumped-up charge of

rape. As we all know, such executions

for rape are means used by the segrega-

tionists and their official allies to

attempt to strike terror into the hearts

of people. People in the particular com-

munities where these Negroes lived were

conducting campaigns to get their sen-

tences commuted, but people elsewhere

were unaware of this struggle.

"Another instance of lack of aware-

ness was pointed up by the attack on

leaders of the NAACP by the Florida

legislative investigating committee, for-

merly known as the Johns Committee, but











now the Herrell Committee.

"This is a very serious threat

to the whole movement for integration

and civil liberties in Florida, yet

prominent citizens in one large city

of Florida were not even aware that

the NAACP leadership was under attack--

much less knowing that they had been

cited for contempt and now face jail

sentences (details will be in December

Patriot).

"There was general agreement that

a meeting should be held in Central

Florida in March to work out means of

coordinating the efforts of the vari-

ous groups in the state. It was felt

that the establishment of communication

and the coordinating of projects were

among the advantages to be gained.

"A representative of SCEF will

assist in organizing this meeting and

will help with the work of any coordinat-

ing committee that is to be set up.

"The tentative date for the meet-

ing is March 12th and the place will be






Orlando, so please keep this date clear

on your calendar.

"You will be notified as soon as

possible of the exact time and place."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, that was the official announcement you

received of the intention of setting up this so-called coordin-

ating meeting by the Southern Conference Education Fund?

A. That is correct, sir.

Q. And the very first communication scheduled a meeting for

March 12 in Orlando, which meeting was announced on November

19, 1959, and held on that date?

A. Yes, sir.

MR. HAWES: I ask that that document be marked in

the record as Document No. 1.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 1.)


Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Mr. Strickland, I hand you another communica-

tion and ask you if you can identify that document for me,

please, sir?

A. I can, sir.

Q. It is one that I marked "Number 3," and will you tell me

where you first saw -- where you received that document from?

A. I received it through the mail, sir.

Q. In the manner in which you received the others?






A. Yes, sir.

Q. And does that purport to be a report from the Southern Con-

ference Educational Fund out at 822 Perdido Street, New

Orleans, Louisiana?

A. That is correct, sir.

Q. And what is the heading of that communication?

A. "Meeting in Orlando, Florida, March 12, 1960"

Q. Is that a report that you received for covering that meeting

after it was held?

A. That is correct, sir.

Q. Now, please read that document into the record.

A. "Sixty persons interested in ad-

vancing integration, civil rights, and

civil liberties met at the Unitarian

Church of Orlando on March 12, 1960.

"They were from 21 cities and towns

in Florida and visitors were present

from New York, Oregon, and Sweden.

The participants included members of

the Unitarian, Methodist, Episcopalian,

National Baptist, Jewish, C.M.E., and

A.M.E. churches, the Church of the

Brethren, and the Society of Friends.

"There were leaders in the Florida

Congress of Parents and Teachers, the











Florida Civil Liberties Union, the

Southern Conference Educational Fund,

Ministerial Alliance of Miami, Minis-

terial Alliance of Jacksonville, NAACP,

Florida Council on Human Relations,

American Jewish Congress, Congress of

Racial Equality, Fellowship of Reconcili-

ation, Emergency Civil Liberties Commit-

tee, and the Community Service Committee

of the Unitarian Church.

"Mr. John D. Hull of Orlando was

chosen to preside and the Rev. J.E.

Atkins of Winter Haven was named secre-

tary. It was stated that the meeting

was called because people throughout

Florida had expressed a need for better

communication among various individuals

and groups and also a need for more coop-

eration on projects affecting the whole

state.

"Statewide legislative action was

mentioned as one of the areas in which

help was needed. It was agreed that

cooperation would be difficult without

adequate exchange of information.












"There was also found to be a

need for information about developments

in different parts of the state. It was

noted that Tallahassee is 475 miles from

Miami, for example, and that news about

what is happening in one place is not

printed in the other. This was just

one example of the distances separating

people working for civil rights and civil

liberties.

"It was also noted that statewide

work on registration and voting is of

basic importance, and here again an ex-

change of information would be valuable.

"After several hours of discussion,

it was decided to set up an information

exchange in Orlando. People from most

of the cities represented agreed to send

news clippings and personal reports on

happenings and trends in their communi-

ties. At least one person from each ma-

jor area will read the newspapers in that

area and clip news on integration, civil

rights, and civil liberties which appears

therein.












"This material is to be forwarded

to: Mrs. Arthur Cranman, 420 Jennie

Jewel Drive, Orlando, Florida.

"Mrs. Cranman will edit this ma-

terial and send copies or reprints to

all persons who were at the meeting.

Some funds were contributed at the meet-

ing for payment of expenses, and it was

agreed that Mrs. Cranman and her associ-

ates may request additional contributions

as the need arises. Also, that other per-

sons may subscribe for the service and

their names will be provided to all others

on the list.

"In order to further assist state-

wide cooperation, it was voted to provide

the list of names of all present to all

others who were at the meeting. This list

is attached as a part of these minutes.

Included on it are the names of two key

leaders who were unable to be present be-

cause of illness and who sent their regrets

at having to be absent. They are the Rev.

John Fuller of Orlando and Dr. Hal Lewis

of Gainesville.






"It had been stated during the

discussion that such a list could be

used by persons in a given city to con-

tact others when quick action was needed

on a project or in a situation involving

advocates of civil rights and civil liber-

ties.

"There was also discussion of the

possibility of setting up a bureau at

Tallahassee to report on day-to-day events

and maneuverings in the Legislature when

it is in session. This may develop at a

later date.

"The names of persons from outside

the South who were present at the meeting

are not included on this list.

"Respectfully submitted,

"(Signed)

"(Rev.) J. E. Atkins, Secretary

"Carl Braden, Assistant Secretary"

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, is the list of people attending that

organization attached to that communication?

A. It is, sir.

Q. Are there two pages of them?

A. There are.






Q. Don't read them at this time. That list is of the people

who actually attended the meeting in Orlando on March 12,

with the exception of those from the north?

A. That is correct.

MR. HAWES: I ask that this document be marked as

an exhibit.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 3.)


MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, in order to save time,

we will have some testimony a little later in regard

to the activities of an organization at that meeting

known as the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, which

is referred to in this letter as being one of the or-

ganizations represented at that meeting, and in order

to lay the foundation for what sort of an organization

that is, I am going.to take a little testimony here

from Mr. Strickland out of order.

THE CHAIRMAN: All right, sir.

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Mr. Strickland, according to that document

you just read there, in the second or third paragraph, un-

der the organizations represented at that meeting in Orlando,

is the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee one of those

organizations?

A. It is, sir.











Q. I hand you a document which is a "Guide To Subversive Organi-

zations And Publications," prepared and released by the Com-

mittee on Un-American Activities of the House of Representa-

tives, and ask you, please, sir, to read what that Committee

reports in regard to that organization on page 38 of that

document?

A. "EMERGENCY CIVIL LIBERTIES COM-

MITTEE

"1. 'To defend the cases of

Communist lawbreakers, fronts have

been devised making special appeals in

behalf of civil liberties and reaching

out far beyond the confines of the

Communist Party itself. Among these

organizations are the * Emergency

Civil Liberties Committee. When the

Communist Party itself is under fire

these fronts offer a bulwark of protec-

tion.'

"(Internal Security Subcommittee

of the Senate Judiciary Committee,

Handbook for Americans, S. Doc. 117,

April 23, 1956, p. 91.)"

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, I ask that this document

be made an exhibit.












THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 4.)


MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, there will also be,

later, some testimony concerning activity at that meet-

ing of another organization that is not referred to in

the letter from Mr. Braden reporting on that organiza-

tional meeting, but, nevertheless, it was present, which

is the Sobell Committee, or the Committee to Secure

Justice for Morton Sobell, and I want to put a little

evidence into the record in regard to the nature of

that organization that participated in that meeting

over there out of order.

THE CHAIRMAN: Proceed.

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Mr. Strickland, were you present on February

10, 1958, when I, as Counsel for this Committee, and Senator

Charley Johns, who was then President -- not of this Commit-

tee, but the preceding Committee -- took some testimony from

~bsqhi Brown Matthews in Executive Session in regard to this

Sobell Committee?

A. I was, sir.

Q. I hand you the official court reporter's certified copy of

that transcript and ask you to read what Mr. Matthews testi-

fied concerning that Committee, beginning on page 20 and

ending on page 22, sir.






"Q. Now, you mentioned a moment

ago Marton Sobell, and you said that

he was convicted under one of the sedi-

tion laws; which one?

"A. Atomic espionage. As a mat-

ter of fact, he was convicted at the

same time that Julius and Ethel Rosenberg

were convicted and sentenced to the

electric chair.

"Q. He was involved in that par-

ticular case?

"A. He was a part of the Rosenberg

case.

"Q. And he was sentenced and im-

pri-oned for how long, if you recall?

"A. Thirty years in Alcatraz.

"Q. Now, do you know whether or

not the Communist Party conducted any

campaigns to raise any funds for the

defense of Morton Sobell?

"A. Yes, one of the largest Com-

munist Front organizations of the pre-

sent time is known as the National

Committee to Secure Justice for Morton

Sobell. I had my investigators frequently go to






the offices of this organization for

the purpose of obtaining information

concerning their activities. They

were the subject of a very comprehen-

sive report by the House Committee on

Un-American Activities a year ago in a

report published under the title, 'Trial

By Treason', a report running close to

200 pages.

"Q. Now, did that organization

hold fund-raising campaigns to raise

funds to fight --

"A. Oh, yes.

"Q. -- for Morton Sobell?

"A. Yes, nation-wide rallies.

"Q. Do you know whether or not

any such campaigns and meetings were

held in Miami, Florida?

"A. No, I don't happen to know.

I could check my records and ascertain

whether that was true or not.

"Q. That was a purely Communist

undertaking?

"A. Yes, and I can say this:

From my recollection of the records,






such rallies were not held in the

State of Florida. Florida was dis-

criminated against because they were

held all over the United States.

"Q. Now, assuming one or more

such party rallies were held in Miami,

Florida, by that organization to raise

money for Morton Sobell, would that

have been a Communist undertaking?

"A. Yes, indeed.

"Q. And the people that were di-

rectly involved with it would have

been aiding that Communist undertaking?

"A. Yes, indeed.

"Q. This was a well-known and

well-publicized case, wasn't it?

"A. Yes.

"Q. And you could pretty well ex-

pect it to be pretty general public knowledge

as to who Morton Sobell was when the

campaign was going on, couldn't you?

"A. That is correct.

"Q. Now, under those conditions,

it would be, would it not, rather un-

likely that many people would get










themselves involved in one of those

rallies to raise funds for him?

"A. Well, I think so. In view

of the publicity, if we assume that

people who engaged in that activity

were reasonably well informed and just

moderately well acquainted with the

newspapers, they would have to know

that Morton Sobell was convicted as a

Communist spy and that the rallies for

his defense fund were directed by the

Communists."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Mr. Strickland, did you receive reports from

the people that you secured to join the Southern Conference

Educational Fund and attend its meetings and its organiza-

tional committee meetings around in various parts of the

State?

A. I did, sir.

Q. Now, would you state whether or not among those that you had

attend that original meeting and who reported to you later --

will you state whether or not one of those people was a lady

named Mrs. C. C. Collins?

A. That is correct, sir.

. And when did you arrange for her to attend this original

meeting for you?











A. About three days prior to the Orlando meeting, two or three

days.

Q. Do you see Mrs. Collins in the Courtroom here today?

A. I do.

Q. Will you point her out, please?

A. The third row, the fourth seat down.

MR. HAWES: Now, Mr. Chairman, I ask that Mr.

Strickland be withdrawn temporarily. He will be back a

little later.



Thereupon:

MRS. C. C. COLLINS,

being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

EXAMINATION BY MR. HAWES:

Q. Mrs. Collins, your name is Mrs. C. C. Collins?

A. Yes, it is.

Q. And where do you live, ma'am?

A. I live in Deland, Florida.

Q. And how long have you lived in Florida, Mrs. Collins?

A. All my life.

Q. Do you know Mr. Strickland, sitting here?

A. Yes, sir, I do.

Q. When did you first meet him?

A. I met him about two years ago during the last legislature.

Q. Do you have a family, Mrs. Collins?






A. Yes, I do.

Q. How many children have you?

A. I have three children. N

Q. You are married, of course?

A. Yes.

Q. And did Mr. Strickland ask you to attend a meeting in Orlando

on March 12, 1960?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And did you agree to do that?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. And did you attend the meeting?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. And do you know Mr. Carl Braden, sitting over there?

A. Yes, I know Mr. Braden.

Q. Did you have occasion to see him at that meeting?

A. Yes, Mr. Braden was at that meeting.

Q. Mrs. Collins, can you tell us where that meeting occurred?

A. At the Unitarian Church in Orlando on, I believe it was,

Robinson Street.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, this witness took some

notes from time to time over this period of time, and I

want to get those notes where they will be available to

her.

THE CHAIRMAN: We will stand a temporary recess


for five minutes.






(Thereupon, following a short recess,
the following proceedings were had,
to wit:)

THE CHAIRMAN: Counsel may proceed.

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, Mrs. Collins, have you your little notes

that you made off and on --

A. Yes, sir.

Q. -- to help you there if you need them. Did you attend a

meeting, I believe you said, on March 12, 1960, in Orlando,

at what church?

A. Unitarian Church.

Q. About what time did that meeting commence?

A. About one o'clock.

Q. About one o'clock?

A. Yes.

Q. In the afternoon?

A. Yes.

Q. Now, when you went into that place, you saw Mr. Carl Braden,

sitting over there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did he meet you at the door?

A. Yes, he met me at the door.

Q. Did you receive anything from him?

A. He handed a plain card and asked us to sign our names and

addresses and what organization we represented.

Q. Mr. Braden handed you a card and asked you to sign your name,











your address, and the organization you represented?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Can you state whether or not he handed everybody that attended

that meeting such a card?

A. Yes, sir, they were careful to do so.

Q. Did you see those cards later? What happened to them later?

A. They were collected, and Mr. Braden held the cards and called

off the names on them and asked each person to rise and

identify themselves and tell what organization they represented.

Q. In other words, the cards were picked up before the meeting

started, and later Mr. Braden, I assume standing in the front

of the group, held the cards, and he read one off and the

name and the organization and asked that person to identify

himself, stand up?

A. That's right.

Q. And, Mrs. Collins, you have heard Mr. Strickland read into

the record this document of the Orlando -- regarding the

Orlando March 12 meeting, 1960?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you receive one of those in the mail after that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. One just like that one?

A. Just exactly.

Q. And on the back of it, attached to that two-page letter,

there is a list of people who were there?












A. Yes, sir.

Q. At that meeting. Do you find your name on that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And is this it here?

A. Yes.

Q. Mrs. C. C. Collins?

A. 228 Whitehair Building, Deland, Florida.

Q. That is the address you gave and the name you gave?

A. Yes.

Q. Subsequent to that time, did you receive from time to time

other communications through the mail from the Southern

Conference Educational Fund and Mr. Braden or Jim Dombrowski?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, Mrs. Collins, when you went into that room, were you

given any other material besides this card on which you were

asked to write your name and your organization?

A. Yes, sir, we were given Southern Conference Educational Fund

material, and we were given some material by a woman, a Mrs.

Dorothy Pottruck, on Morton Sobell.

Q. Now, you got some more material from Mr. Braden in regard

to the Southern Conference Educational Fund?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you recall what that material was?

A. It was a -- one of them was a pamphlet called, "Give Decency

a Chance in the South."






Q. What else did you receive?

A. There was -- may I look in my files?

Q. Surely. Do you happen to have that pamphlet with you?

A. I think I do.

Q. Is that little green pamphlet the one you referred to as being

the Southern Conference Educational Fund material that was

handed to you?

A. Yes.

Q. That was given to you at that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who gave you that, do you recall?

A. Mr. Braden, as I came in.

Q. Did everybody there receive one of these?

A. As far as I could tell.

Q. And it shows right on the face of it that it is put out by

the Southern Conference Educational Fund, doesn't it?

A. Yes, sir.

MR. HAWES: Now, Mr. Chairman, I would to have this

little pamphlet marked as an exhibit.

THE CHAIRMAN: It is so ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 5.)


Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Do you have some other material that you re-

ceived there?

A. Yes, sir, I received a reprint from, "The Christian Century,"






an editorial on, "Urge Clemency for Sobell," and also a text

of a statement or the Morton Sobell case by Carleton Beals.

Q. Do you have those two documents there? Let me see them.

These are the two documents that you referred to?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you received both of those there at that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Both urging the release of Morton Sobell, the convicted

Communist spy?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, who gave you these two documents?

A. A Mrs. Dorothy Pottruck.

Q. How do you spell Pottruck?

A. P-o-t-t-r-u-c-k.

Q. Where did she say she was from, Mrs. Collins?

A. She said she was from the Bronx, New York.

Q. Had you ever seen her before?

A. No, sir.

Q. Now, where was she in relation to the meeting there with

the other people when she handed you these two documents?

A. She was at the door.

Q. Right at the doorway?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did she hand these two documents to everybody that came into

that meeting?











A. As far as I could tell.

Q. Did you see a number of them there in the hands of other

people?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. Now, did you hear Mr. Strickland's testimony, or reading of

the testimony of Mr. Matthews in regard to the Sobell Commit-

tee being a Communist undertaking?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the literature was passed out quite openly at that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Have you received any further mail -- did you talk to this

Pottruck woman?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. And do you happen to recall whether or not her name was read

off by Mr. Braden when he had the little cards there reading

off the people's names? Did she have a card there at that

meeting?

A. I will look on my notes.

Q. See if you can recall that. If you can't, why -- do you

have some of your notes on the back of this letter here?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. He did have a card for her?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And what organization was beside her name, do you recall?

A. Women's Community Forum.











Q. Women's Community Forum.

MR. HAWES: Now, Mr. Chairman, I ask that these two

letters or documents identified by the witness be marked

as Committee's Exhibits.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instruments were
marked Committee's Exhibits 6 and 7.)



Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Did you have any conversation with Mrs.

Pottruck there, Mrs. Collins?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did she mingle freely with the group there after passing out

this literature for Morton Sobell?

A. Yes, she did.

Q. And talked freely with the people in attendance there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What was she interested in there?

A. She was interested in the clemency for Morton Sobell.

Q. Is that all you ever heard her talking about there was the

Morton Sobell, getting clemency for Morton Sobell?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is that what she talked to you about?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is that what you heard her talking to the other people there


about?

A. Yes, sir.






Q. What did she ask you to do, if anything, in regard to Morton

Sobell?

A. She asked me whether I would be willing to send some letters

to the President urging clemency for Morton Sobell if she

sent me some material.

Q. And what did you tell her?

A. I told her I would be interested in getting some material.

Q. Did she promise to send you any material?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did she later do so?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you give her your address?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you have the communication you received from her later?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you have an envelope that it came in?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is this it?

A. That is it.

Q. And that is apparently the stationery of "The Florida Spa"

on Maryhead Road, Orlando, Florida, with "Dot" under the return

address?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Addressed to you where at?

A. Mrs. C. C. Collins, 228 Whitehair Building, Deland, Florida.






Q. What came in that letter, Mrs. Collins?

A. Form letters addressed to President Dwight D. Eisenhour,

The White House, Washington, D. C.

Q. Read that letter into the record.

A. "Dear Mr. President:

"Many of our most eminent citi-

zens and publications believe the tri-

al of Morton Sobell to have been unfair,

or the 30-year sentence excessive. In

view of this significant concern, it is

disturbing that no action has yet been

taken in his behalf.

"I wish to add my voice to those

requesting you to commute his sentence

to the time served. Even the possibility

that an innocent man may be imprisoned is

a terrible thing. Each added day of pri-

son that Morton Sobell is made to endure --

and he is already in his 10th year -- com-

pounds this tragic situation for the

Sobell family and for our country.

"Very sincerely yours,"

Q. That was for you to sign and send to the President?

A. Yes, sir.


MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, I ask that this form











letter be made a part of this record.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 8.)



Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, Mrs. Collins, do you see anybody else

here in this audience today who you saw and met for the first

time or otherwise saw at the meeting? Do you see anybody

in the audience that you saw at that meeting in Orlando

there besides Mr. Braden?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who do you see that you saw in that meeting?

A. Dr. Bernard Raymund.

Q. Where is he seated?

A. The second row, the third seat.

Q. Did you see Mr. Strickland here point out Kev. C. K. Steele

over there? Is he sitting beside that man?

A. Yes, sir, I saw him point him out.

Q. He is the elderly gentleman there with the bald head on top

and the blue suit?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. You saw him at that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Bernard Raymund?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you know where he lives?












A. Yes, sir.

Q. Where does he live?

A. Safety Harbor, Florida.

Q. Did you have occasion to have any correspondence with that

gentleman after this meeting?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. Who else did you see down there at that meeting that is here

now?

A. I saw the lady on the third row, the third seat.

Q. The lady in the green dress back there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you see anybody else here that you saw at that meeting?

A. Not that I recognize.

Q. You had some correspondence with Mr. Bernard -- what was his

last name?

A. Raymund.

Q. Raymund, later?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. All right, tell the Committee, Mrs. Collins, who was in

charge of that meeting and who conducted that meeting over

there?

A. Mr. Carl Braden took charge of the meeting, and immediately

they appointed a moderator after they had read the cards,

and this moderator was Mr. John Hull of the Unitarian Church,

the Social Action Chairman.






Q. And from time to time did Mr. Braden take hold of the meeting

as it went along?

A. Several times he got up and spoke.

Q. On that occasion did you see a man whom you learned to be

Edward T. Graham from Miami?

A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you see him at that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did he speak?

A. Yes, sir, he spoke.

Q. Did you see a man whom you met and learned to be James

Dombrowski?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. The Executive Secretary of the Southern Conference Educational

fund?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did he speak?

A. Yes, he did.

Q. I hand you a little pamphlet that Mr. Braden has been kind

enough to make available to this Committee and the whole

world at large entitled, "My beliefs and my associations

are none of the business of this Committee." Have you ever

seen that pamphlet before?

A. Yes, sir, I have.

Q. Referring to page 17, do you see a photograph there of a man






you now know to be Edward T. Graham?

A. Yes, sir, I do.

Q. Is that the man that you saw at that meeting up there?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What organization was placed by his name on his card as the

organization he represented?

A. Edward T. Graham, Negro minister, Miami, Ministerial Alliance,

NAACP, CORE.

Q. Miami Ministerial Alliance, NAACP and CORE?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That is the Congress on Racial Equality?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did the Rev. Graham take an active part in that meeting

there?

A. Yes, he did.

Q. Indicentally, when you heard Mr. Dombrowski speaking there,

did you hear him say anything in regard to membership in the

NAACP, his membership?

A. Yes, he said he was a member.

Q. That is Jim Dombrowski?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. The Executive Secretary of the Southern Conference Educational

Fund made that statement in your presence?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you see anybody else there that was consulted in any way











by Rev. Graham? Did you see a man named Brown there from

Miami?

A. Yes, sir, Dr. Brown.

Q. Dr. Brown? Did you hear any conversation between he, the

Rev. Graham, and Jim Dombrowski in regard to the NAACP or

any of its policies?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you know what organization Dr. Brown was there to repre-

sent at that meeting?

A. The CORE -- Congress on Racial Equality.

Q. Is that the organization read off of his name plate?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, during the course of that meeting there -- incidentally,

how long did this meeting last, Mrs. Collins?

A. It lasted until about five o'clock.

Q. From one until about five?

A. Yes.

Q. And did they undertake to set up any coordinating committee

there in that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And was that coordinating committee to coordinate the efforts

of these individuals and to try to get the organizations they

represented to coordinate their efforts?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And did they set up such a committee there?











A. Yes, sir.

Q. And did you hear any discussions there in regard to the

difficulties of communication between this coordinating com-

mittee and these organizations?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Was there any discussion there in regard to whether or not

the NAACP could handle this communications part of this

coordination?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Tell us what that discussion was.

A. After talking over sending clippings to one person or another

or organization for dissemination and redistributing, someone

suggested that the NAACP might do this, and Graham was asked

when they sent out regular news bulletins to the members.

Dombrowski said if they did, he would like to get one, that

he was a member and did not at present get one. Graham

jokingly said, "And you feel slighted," whereupon all laughed.

Q. Now, go ahead, Mrs. Collins.

A. Then Graham and two other Negro men present, Pinder and Lewis,

said that they get such a paper but that it was intended for

the chairmen of the organization to be read to the members.

Q. What Pinder are you referring to who was present there?

A. A Rev. Finder in Orlando.

Q. And is he colored or white?

A. He is colored.






Q. And he said he got these regular communications from the NAACP

but they were only intended for the local leadership, and was

the leadership supposed to communicate with the membership?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is that what he said?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And who else besides Pinder made that statement there?

A. A man by the name of Lewis -- let me get the right name --

Rev. E. D. Lewis.

Q. And where is he from?

A. Winter Haven.

Q. Is he white or colored?

A. He was colored.

Q. All right, go ahead.

A. Then Graham and two other Negroes present, Pinder and Lewis,

said that they got such a paper but it was intended for the

chairmen of the organization to be read to the members.

Graham said that it was the philosophy of the NAACP to lend

an ear to anything helpful or to be of service; either Leon

Lowry or Robert Saunders at 606 Silo Street, or 900 North

Delaware, Tampa, Florida, would help. They said most of the

letters were information on the special issues, action letters

from the NAACP, that the Negro Field Secretary notifies each

branch president of any action over the state.

Q. In other words, Mrs. Collins, did the Rev. Edward T. Graham






in that meeting undertake to speak for the NAACP there?

A. Yes, sir, in that sense.

Q. In that sense?

A. No, sir, he turned the leadership over to Lowry or Saunders,

as I have read you.

Q. All right, you said that he mentioned Rev. Leon Lowry?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. From Tampa?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And Robert Saunders in Tampa?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And said that they would have to be consulted --

A. He referred to them.

Q. To them?

A. Yes.

Q. To those two?

A. Yes.

Q. Mrs. Collins, do you remember the people that were put on

the letter board that was created there to handle this communi-

cations with the letter bulletin?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And who were they?

A. A Mrs. B. F. Robinson and Mrs. Arthur Cranman.

Q. Where do they live?

A. They both live in Orlando.











Q. Are they white or colored?

A. They were white.

Q. Two white women?

A. Yes.

Q. And what duties did they undertake there as a result of that

meeting?

A. To edit and send out a news clipping service to all of those

present at this meeting.

Q. Now, did you receive in the mail subsequently any of those

letter bulletins or news clippings services?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. And they came to your address that you gave the organization?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And did you later receive any official communications from

the Southern Conference Educational Fund after that meeting?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. Among those, of course, I believe you said, is this document

3?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Mrs. Collins, I am going to hand you a document dated July

6, 1960, and ask you if you received that thing through the

mail?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. And what does that purport to be at the top of it there?

Is it a communication from the Southern Conference Educational











Fund?

Yes, sir.

Personally from Carl Braden as Field Secretary?

Yes, sir.

Addressed to who?

Friends in Florida and Board of SCEF.

In re: what?

Florida Information Exchange.

And w,i in the heading of that document?

"Not For Publication."

Is that in caps?

Yes, sir.

Is it underlined?

Yes, sir.

Is it doubly underlined?

Yes, sir.

Now, you received that in the mail from Carl Braden?

Yes, sir.

Would you just read that, please, ma'am, into this record?

"You will recall that 60 people

from all over Florida met in Orlando

last March to see what could be done

to improve communication between those

working for integration, civil rights,

and civil liberties.






"An Information Exchange was set

up at Orlando under the direction of

Mrs. Mary Cranman and Mrs. Nancy Robinson.

Since then they have been sending out

Bulletins on events in Florida. This

service will be continued, with emphasis

on projects and problems which require

attention from people all over the state.

"It was also decided at the Orlando

meeting that efforts should be made to set

up a bureau in Tallahassee to keep watch

on the Legislature when it is in session.

This bureau would also seek to keep friends

in Florida aware of other developments in

the capital relating to civil rights and

civil liberties.

"Since the March meeting, 25 more

persons throughout the state have agreed

to cooperate in the Information Exchange.

This has increased to 29 the number of

cities and towns where we have people will-

ing to cooperate. It has also increased

the number of organizations represented.

"Cities where we now have people

cooperating are Belle Glade, Bonifay,






Clearwater, Coral Gables, Daytona

Beach, De Land, East Palatka, Eustis,

Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Fruitland

Park, Gainesville; Jacksonville, Key

West, Lake Helen, Lakeland, Melbourne

Beach, Miami, Miami Beach, Orlando,

Ormond Beach, Pensacola, St. Petersburg,

Safety Harbor, Sarasota, Tallahassee,

Tampa, Winter Haven, and Winter Park.

These are in addition to persons on the

SCEF mailing list in other cities.

"Correspondents in all these places

are asked to continue to send information

and clippings to Mrs. Mary Cranman, 420

Jennie Jewel Drive, Orlando, Fla., so

that she may cull them and find projects

and problems that need attention. It

will be recalled that Mrs. Cranman was

authorized at the March meeting to call

upon participants for funds needed to

continue publication of the Bulletin.

"As to the bureau at Tallahassee,

10 persons in that city have agreed to

serve as a committee to keep watch on

the Legislature and the state government




76

in general. They will keep atreast of

developments and trends in the fields

of civil rights, civil liberties, and

integration.

"During the next Legislature,

they will be in touch with some of the

members in order to determine whether

legislation is likely to pass or whe-

ther a bad piece of legislation can

be defeated by proper use of the demo-

cratic processes.

"If the Tallahassee Committee feels

that a piece of good legislation has a

chance of passing, it will notify the

85 to 90 people who have agreed to

serve as alerters in their communities.

The same procedure will be followed if

the Tallahassee Committee feels that

help is needed to defeat a piece of bad

legislation affecting integration, civil

rights, and civil liberties.

"The alerters in each community

have agreed to reach as many people

and organizations as possible and get

them to write, wire, telephone or pay











a personal visit to the representa-

tive and senator from their district.

In this way people all over the state

can speak with a concerted voice on

matters affecting their welfare and

their rights.

"Several newspaper editors are

among those who have agreed to serve

as alerters in their communities.

They will notify people of pending

bills, good and bad, through their pa-

pers and urge them to act on specific

bills.

"Where there is enough time, The

Southern Patriot, published by the

Southern Conference Educational Fund,

will help to spread the word. SCEF can

also help by sending memorandums to its

mailing list in Florida.

:Much further work is needed on

this legislative project. There is to

he a meeting of the Tallahassee Commit-

tee in the fall to discuss just how

bulletins are to be issued and how the

work is to be financed.











"It is believed that with proper

functioning of this committee and the

alerters in the various communities,

much bad legislation can be stopped and

some good legislation may possibly re-

sult. The minimum that can be achieved

is a strengthening of the democratic

process as a result of people letting

their legislators know what they think

about pending legislation. If we don't

get good legislation in 1961, we can at

least lay the groundwork for 1963 and 1965.

"Pending further thought and discus-

sion on the matter, the Tallahassee work

is being called the Florida Legislative

Project. We welcome suggestions for a

name and any other comments you may have

on the whole subject.

"It should be stressed that there

is no intent to confine concerted action

to legislative matters. If you know of

something that needs attention and ac-

tion, such as an injustice to some per-

son or group, please notify Mrs. Cranman

at the Information Exchange in Orlando.






Also write the Editor, Southern Patriot,

4403 Virginia Ave., Louisville, Ky.

"There will be further memos on

this subject as organization continues."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) The plan, there, briefly, in that long com-

munication, is that ten members in Tallahassee, or people

in Tallahassee, have agreed to keep watch on the Legisla-

ture and to notify the eighty-five to ninety alerters over

the communities of Florida who in turn have agreed to con-

tact as many individuals and organizations as they can to

write, wire, telephone, or see personally the members of

the Legislature?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the Tallahassee project in this communication was called,

"The Florida Legislative Project"?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. That was as of July 6, 1960?

A. Yes, sir.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, I ask that that document

be marked as a Committee's exhibit.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 9.)


Q. (By Mr. Hawes) This document was clearly marked, "Not For

Publication"?




80

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, Mrs. Collins, in the course of your further participa-

tion in this organization's activities, did you receive in the

mail the document that I am now handing you that has been

marked No. 4-A?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. And what is the date on that document?

A. October 20, 1960.

Q. October 20, 1960 -- that is subsequent by several months to

the one you have just read?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is that from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And who wrote it?

A. Carl Braden.

Q. Who is it addressed to?

A. "Friends in Florida."

Q. And what is the date of it, October 20?

A. Yes, sir, 1960.

Q. What is there in that communication in regard to publication?

A. "Not For Publication."

Q. Is that in caps?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is it underlined?

A. Yes, sir.











Singly or doubly underlined?

Doubly.

Would you please read that document? You got that in the

mail?

Yes, sir.

Read that document into the record, please.

"More than 100 individuals and

couples in all parts of Florida have

now agreed to cooperate with the Flor-

ida Information Exchange and the Tal-

lahassee Legislative Project. You

will recall that both of these were

formed by friends of civil rights

and civil liberties at a meeting in

Orlando last March.

"At that time the office of the

Information Exchange was set up in

Orlando and bulletins were issued for

a few months. However, these were

discontinued as a result of the ill-

ness of the editor.

"Now the Information Exchange

has been moved to Port Orange, a sub-

urb of Daytona Beach. It will be in

charge of Mrs. Lorraine Calhoun, Box












1936-A, R.R. 1, Port Orange, Fla.

She needs the full cooperation of

all of us in order to carry out the

purpose for which the Information Ex-

change was set up.

"The purpose is to keep informa-

tion flowing among friends of integra-

tion, civil rights, and civil liberties

in all parts of Florida. Each partici-

pant in the Information Exchange should

send Mrs. Calhoun clippings and reports

on happenings in his own community.

She will then assemble them in Bulletins

periodically and mail them to everyone

on the list. In this way, people all

over the state will be able to keep

abreast of happenings in the fields of

civil rights and civil liberties. This

will facilitate joint action by friends

all over Florida. The case of Richard

F. Parker, who was jailed in Jacksonville

recently, is an example of how this pro-

ject will operate.

Please do not send Mrs. Calhoun

clippings telling of events in other






states. She needs clippings and per-

sonal reports by you on what is going

on in Florida, especially in your own

community. Also, the Information Ex-

change will be of no value unless every-

one cooperates by supplying information.

If you hear of lunch places or anything

else being integrated, send a report to

her. If you hear of an injustice done

to someone, notify Mrs. Calhoun. If you

don't have time to write and there is a

clipping or other report available, please

send it to her.

"It is also time for participants

in this project to send Mrs. Calhoun con-

tributions to finance this work. Money

collected for this purpose at the Orlando

meeting has been spent. Please make

checks or money orders payable to Lorraine

Calhoun.

"LEGISLATIVE PROJECT

"Fifteen persons in charge of the

Florida Legislative Project met twice

this month and made plans for keeping

watch on the State Legislature when it






is in session. Their aim is to supply

you with information that will enable

you to help block bad legislation or

assist in passing good legislation in

the fields of civil rights and civil

liberties.

"Our friends in Tallahassee voted

to call themselves the Tallahassee Edu-

cational Committee. They will soon be

in touch with you about what you can

do in preparation for the next session

of the Legislature. They will also

send you their address.

"An immediate task is to elect to

the Florida House and Senate people fa-

vorable to integration, civil rights

and civil liberties. You are urged to

contact candidates for these offices at

once and get commitments from them on

these issues. And, above all, get your

friends and organizations to do the same."

(By Mr. Hawes) Now, the date of that was what, again?

October 20, 1960.

And they finally settled on the name for the Tallanassee

Legislative project as the "Tallahassee Educational Committee"?











A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, as far as you know, has that name ever been changed?

A. No, sir.

Q. That is the final word on the set-up as of now?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And according to this communication, they now have fifteen

members in Tallahassee instead of ten, and they met twice

the month before this letter was written?

A. Yes, sir.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, I ask that this communi-

cation be marked.as a Committee's Exhibit.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 10.)


Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Now, Mrs. Collins, I hand you a document

marked Exhibit 4-B and ask you if you received that communi-

cation through the mail?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. And did that come like the others that you have testified

about?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Is that from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Who wrote it, if you can tell?

A. I can't tell. It doesn't say.











Q. But it is from the Southern Conference Educational Fund?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What is the date of that?

A. January 11, 1961.

Q. And will you please, ma'am, read that communication in to

the record?

A. "TALLAHASSEE, Fla.--Leaders of

the Florida Legislature are sharpen-

ing the ax for sit-in demonstrators

and others working for integration

and civil rights in this state.

"When the Legislature meets in

April, one item on the agenda will be

a threat to jail the Rev. A. Leon

Lowry of Tampa, state president of the

NAACP and a Baptist leader.

"Mr. Lowry is charged with con-

tempt for refusing to cooperate with

a legislative committee which sought

to check NAACP membership lists. The

committee said it was looking for "sub-

versives."

"Recently the Florida Supreme

Court upheld a 6-month jail sentence

given the Rev. Theodore Gibson, head of







the Miami NAACP branch, for his de-

fiance nf the same committee. Father

Gibson, who is rector of Christ Episco-

pal Church, is appealing to the U.S. Su-

preme Court.

"The Florida high court overturned

a similar sentence given the Rev. Edward

T. Graham of Miami, who even refused to

say if he was a member of the NAACP. Mr.

Graham is former president of the Miami

NAACP.

"The three ministers are among 47 per-

sons in the United States who have defied

such legislative committees on the ground

that the purpose of these committees is

to block integration and other social

progress. These 47 take their stand un-

der the First Amendment to the U.S. Con-

stitution, guaranteeing freedom of speech,

press, religion, association and protest.

"Mr. Lowry summed it up when he said:

'It is quite apparent that the committee's

action is an attempt to intimidate and la-

bel an organization and to weaken it. We

have been pressing for our rights in almost







every area and that is why they are

after us.'

"Mr. Graham and Father Gibson

were sentenced after the committee

cited tnem for contempt. In Mr.

Lowry's case, the committee voted to

ask the Legislature to jail the minis-

ter when it meets. The assembly can

keep him in jail during its whole

session if he still refuses to coop-

erate.

"Mr. Lowry declared: 'We have

a right to associate with whomever

we wish. It is not within the power

of the Legislature to deny any citi-

zen that right. There is no attempt

on our part to flout any duly consti-

tuted legislative committee. We are

merely attempting to exercise our

freedom.'

"Father Gibson said recently: 'I

shudder to think what would happen if

the segregationists could get their

hands on the membership lists of an

organization like the NAACP. I don't







look at this as a personal matter at

all, bur rath>;r as something wnich con-

cerns all posterity.'

"Professors and college students

will be the targets of a bill to be spon-

sored and pushed in the Legislature by

Senator Randolph Hodges of Cedar Key,

president-designate of the Florida Sen-

ate.

"Hodges said he expects to obtain

passage of a law to provide for the

firing of any professor and the expul-

sion of any student at state-supported

universities who advocates or takes part

in demonstrations such as lunch-counter

sit-ins.

"NAACP leaders and the Florida

Civil Liberties Union are among groups

fighting efforts to punish ministers, pro-

fessors, students, and others working

for civil rights and integration.

"The Southern Conference Educa-

tional Fund has helped to organize a

state-wide committee to counter efforts

of the courts and the legislature to











penalize these people. Protests to

members of the Legislature and other

public officials have been called for."

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, I ask that this document

be marked as a Committee's Exhibit.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 11.)


Q. (By Mr. Hawes) This document, January llth, 1961, less

than a month ago --

A. Yes, sir.

Q. -- states that the Southern Conference Educational Fund has

helped to organize this committee, and can you state whether

or not from your personal knowledge from that meeting in

Orlando and your communications they have succeeded in

organizing this committee?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, Mrs. Collins, at that meeting in Orlando, did you meet

any woman named Davenport?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. Would you tell me what her first name is and where she lives?

A. Her first name is Vivian, and she lives in Lake Helen.

Q. Lake Helen, Florida?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And is she white or colored?












A. She is white.

Q. And have you had occasion to see either personally or talk

to by telephone or communicate with her through the mails

since that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. How far do you live from Mrs. Davenport?

A. About five miles.

Q. And have you had personal contact with her since this meet-

ing in Orlando?

A. Through the mail, or by telephone?

Q. Telephone and mail.

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And have you received from her any invitation to attend any

meetings of any organizations or groups?

A. Yes, sir, I have.

Q. What organizations or groups has she attended, invited you

to attend meetings of?

A. She has invited me to att ,d a meeting in Orlando where

she said she had a friend who had just returned from ded

China and was going to show some slides. I couldn't go.

She invited me to the Florida Council of Human Relations in

Daytona Beach, and I didn't go. She invited me to a "Drink-

In" at her house for Richard Parker. I didn't go. And she

invited me to hear a lecture by Scott Nearing, and I couldn't

attend.







Q. Where was this lecture by Scott Nearing to be?

A. At her home.

Q. How do you spell Scott Nearing's name?

A. N-e-a-r-i-n-g.

Q. And he was to lecture in her home in Lake Helen, Florida?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you were invited to attend. Do you know when that meet-

ing was supposed to have been?

A. I have the date written down somewhere, if I can find it.

It was on December -- I believe, according to the documen-

tation that I have, it was December 19, 1960 -- no, I would

like to correct that, please.

Q. All right.

A. According to a note which she wrote on this, it was seven

p.m., Saturday, December 10, 1960.

Q. She wrote you this note herself?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. What do you have there in the form of a communication from

her in regard to that?

A. I have a printed announcement, and then a personal note on

the bottom.

Q. From Mrs. Davenport?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you receive this in the mail from Mrs. Davenport whom

you met in this meeting on March 12, 1960, in Orlando?






A. Yes, sir.

Q. Just read

A.


that into this record, please, ma'am.

"The Social Science Institute

Offers Lectures and Discussions by

Scott Nearing dealing with world events

and certain aspects of social science

and sociel engineering.

"Subjects for Single Lectures

"What is Freedom?

"The Myth of National Security

"The Tragedy of Empire

"Struggle for World Power

"End 4ar! Make Peace!

"Economics for the Power Age

"The Brave Ner World

"China and the Communes

"Man's Search for the Good Life

"Lecture Series

"The Road We Are Traveling

"1. The USA, Last of the Empires

"2. The Soviet Union after Sputnik

"3. China's Great Leap

"4. The Choice before us

"What is Happening in America?

"1. The Changing political pattern











"2. Economic Outlook for the USA

"3. Social Decay in the United

States

"4. U.S. Foreign Policy

"Discussion Topics

"Can the West reoccupy Asia?

"Where is Civilization going?

"Can the USA afford Peace?

"Where is Science taking us?

"Scott Nearing, Sociologist and

Economist, has taught in various schools

and colleges, including the Universities

of Pennsylvania, Temple and Toledo, and

Swarthmore College.

"He has written numerous books

and pamphlets, among which are United

World, Democracy is not Enough, The

Tragedy of Empire, The Revolution of

our Time, Economics for the Power Age,

Man's Search for the Good Life, Soviet

Education, and, with Helen K. Nearing,

The Maple Sugar book, Living the Good

Life, Soviet Education and, The Brave

New World.

"Each month he prepares a survey












of world events for Monthly Review.

"He and his wife, Helen, spend

their winters studying, writing, travel-

ing, and teaching. The winter of 1956-57

they spent in Canada, West Europe, Ceylon,

Indonesia, India and Japan; the winter

of 1957-58 in the Soviet Union and Peo-

ple's China.

"For available dates, address

"The Social Science Institute,

Harborside, Maine.

"To be in Florida, December 10-19,

1960."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) That appears to be a regular printed form,

what you have read up to now?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Announcing the subjects that Scott Nearing will be lectur-

ing on, is available to lecture on, and it is put out appar-

ently by an outfit called "The Social Science Institute"?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And you are to write them in order to secure an available

date for his lectures?

A. Yes, rir.

Q. Now, there is a personal communication from Mrs. Davenport


appended to that, isn't there?






A. Yes, sir, there is.

Q. What does she say personally to you, Mrs. Collins?

A. "Dear Mrs. Collins:

"This is mainly to let you in on

what is happening 7 p.m., Sat. the 10th.

I realize you can't come. Tho if by some

chance you can come you'll be very welcome

and am sure you will find Scott Nearing

stimulating. The subjects chosen so

far are those underlined. (Cover all

that in one evening???) If you have

any questions along this general line

you'd like to have discussed, send it

or phone it along. I'll let you know

the general tenor of answers.

"Vivian Davenport."

Q. (By Mr. Hawes) Had you been in communication with this

woman about the possibility of attending this meeting before

she wrote you this?

A. No, sir.

Q. She says she realizes you couldn't come?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Did you have anything without --

A. I would like to change that. I had talked to her over the

telephone, and she said she would notify me of the date and






the time that she would have him.

Q. You had talked to her over the pilcne in regard to this?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Now, without revealing with whom you worked or how it was

done, did you arrange for aid know that somebody was attending

that meeting?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. At the house of Mrs. Davenport that night?

A. Yes, sir, I did.

Q. And you know that somebody did attend it?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. And the three subjects that were underlined for discussion

that night by Scott Nearing were, "Where is Civilization

Going," "Can the USA afford Peace," and "Where is Science

taking us?"

A. Yes, sir.

MR. HAWES: Mr. Chairman, I would like to have

this document marked as a Committee's Exhibit.

THE CHAIRMAN: So ordered.

(Thereupon said instrument was
marked Committee's Exhibit 12.)


Q. (By Mr. Hawes) That meeting was at Lake Helen, Florida,

approximately five miles from your home?

A. Approximately, yes, sir.

Q. Now, Mrs. Collins, Mr. Braden, sitting over there, and the




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