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Group Title: Annual report (Florida Railroad Commission)
Title: Annual report of the Railroad Commissioners of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075583/00002
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Railroad Commissioners of Florida
Uniform Title: Annual report (Florida. Railroad Commission)
Physical Description: 50 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Railroad Commission of the State of Florida
Publisher: The Commission,
The Commission
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1888
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Railroads -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Public utilities -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st (March 1, 1888)-50th (1946).
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year irregular.
General Note: Title varies.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075583
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 21631557

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    Errata
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
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    Appendix
        Page 41
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Full Text





QGF IRS T


ANNUAL REPORT


OF THE- .



RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS,


ZOF-0F Z



FLORIDA,-



I-A.&- CI I, 1888.





TALLAHASSEE, FLA. :
N. M. BOWEN,Printer.
1888.








ERRATA.



Page 3.--Lst line, read forms for form."
Page 4.-Line 32, read sections for section."
Page 11.-Line 45, read pp. 52 and 59 for pp. 2 and 5."
Page 11.-Line 46, read p. 68 for p. 1."
Page 12.-For correct figures, mileage &c., see Table A. p. 103.
Page 13.-Line 13, read "commanded for demanded."
Page 13.-Line 42, read "p. 59 for p. 7."
Page 16-Line 35, read "cost" for costs."
Page 17.-Line 18, read discovered for discover."
Page 17.-Line 39, read rates to be allowed" for rates allowed."
Page 17.-Line 28, read "cost" for costs."
Page 24.-Line 26, read rules" for "rates."
Page 26.-Line 15, read "prompts" for points."
Pige 28.-Line 12, read statute" for statutes."
Page 58.-Line 39, read "p. 77 for "p. 13."
Page 103.-Read Rolleston for Ralleston."
Page 103.-Read Flomaton for Flormaton."
Page 107.-Line next to last, read railroad for railroads."
Page 111.-Line 38, read fixed for filed."













OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, March 1st, 1888.
To His Excellency, E. A. Perry, Governor of Florida:
SIB: We have the honor, pursuant to the statute creating
the Railroad Commission of Florida, to present our first annual
report:
The law provides that it shall be the duty of the Commis.
sioners, by the first day of March, in every year, to make to
the Governor annual reports of the transactions of their office,
and to recommend, from time to time, such legislation as they
may deem advisable under the provisions of this act."-(Chap.
3746. Sec. 22.)
As the next Legislature does not convene in regular session
until April, 1889, we defer any recommendations we may
deem advisable to make as to legislation until our next report
and shall confine this report chiefly to the transactions" of
our office, which embrace a period of nearly seven months, to
wit: from the 9th day of August, 1887, to March 1st, 1888,
the date of this report.
While it may be deemed advisable that hereafter our reports
shall embrace the transactions" of this office for the preced-
ing year, ending December 31st, and those alone, although such
report is not required to be made until the 1st day of
March in every year, yet, in consideration of the fact that the
rules, regulations and schedules prescribed by us, as directed
by the statute for the regulation of the transportation of per-
sons and property by the railroads of this State, had been in
force for only one month before the beginning of this year-
we have thought proper to embrace in this report the transac,
tions of this office for the time indicated.
It would seem that the law contemplated, and the necessity
of the case required, that there should be given such opportu-
nity after the end of the fiscal year as would afford the railroad
companies a reasonable time in which to make their respective
annual reports statistical, financial and otherwise, and to give
the commissioners a like opportunity to prepare their annual
report, after such reports had been filed, and accordingly we
prescribed the following regulation or rule: "Each railroad
company doing business in this State shall make and file in the
office of the Commission, by the 20th day of each month, a re-
port of its earnings, expenses, etc., for the preceding month,
and by the first of February of each year, an annual report of
its condition and operations for the preceding year, ending De-
cember 31st, reports to be according to form prescribed by the











Commission. The monthly reports, in accordance with form
'A,' to be verified by the affidavit of the General Manager, if
there is one, or Superintendent, and the Treasurer or Auditor.
The annual report, to be in accordance with form B," to be
verified by the affidavits of the President, Superintendent, or
General Manager and Auditor or Treasurer."
We have not been able to prepare form B," and have it
printed, and placed in the hands of the different railroad
companies in time for use by us now, and are compelled to
make this report without the valuable information thereby
sought for and expected, but shall ask the privilege of filing a
supplemental report embodying the same as soon, as the re-
turns shall have been filed in this office. Much of the informa-
tion these reports will contain has already been furnished the
Commission in the reports heretofore filed by the railroads at
different times during and since the hearings given by us to
them preliminary to the fixing of rates, making schedules and
preparing rules and regulations, by us, as required by law, and
much of it has been obtained from reports made by them to
the public both before ard since the Railroad Commission was
organized, but we think that the data required by form B"
will convey the items of information required in a more suita-
ble and satisfactory manner than could be made -by a ref-
erence to, or a compilation of the returns now on file, the lat-
ter involving the necessity of the examination of several re-
ports filed by the railroads at different times.
The Commission organized at Tallahassee August 9th, 1887,
chose a presiding officer, and selected Mr. John G. Ward as
Secretary.
Under the last clause of section 6 of the statute which pro-
vides that the Commissioners should not exercise any of the
powers granted in section 5 and 6 "until after having given due
notice by publication in such newspapers and for such time as
deemed fair and advisable by the Commissioners, to all railroad
companies to be affected, and to the public generally, of the
times and places of their meetings, to adopt rules and regula-
tions, make rates of charges," &c., we, on the 10th day of Au-
gust, 1887, issued the following notice, to wit:
NOTICE.
To all Corporations, Companies, or Individuals, now owning
or operating any railroad, in whole or in part, in this State,
and the public generally :
Take notice, that the Railroad Commissioners of the State
of Florida will meet at Tallahassee on Tuesday, the sixth day
-of September next, for the purpose of fixing reasonable and
just rates for the transportation of freight and passengers, to











be observed by all railroad companies doing business in this
State, and for the purpose of making just rules and regulations
as to charges at any and all points for the necessary handling
and delivery of freight, and for the making such just and 'rea-
sonable rules and regulations as may be necessary for pre-
venting unjust discrimination in the transportation of freight
and passengers and reasonable and just rates of charges for
the use of railroad cars carrying freight.
Such railroad companies, by their agents or attorneys, and
.other persons interested, will be fully and family heard by said
*Commissioners on the day above mentioned.
GEO. G. McWHORTER, President.
E. J. VAIN, )
W. JHIMESA Commissioners.

JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
Pursuant to said notice, on the 6th day of September,.and
several days ensuing, the following railroad companies appeared
and were heard through their respective representatives, to wit:
The Florida Southern Railway, The Jacksonville Tampa and
Key West Railway, The Savannah, Florida and Western Rail-
way, The South Florida, The Orange Belt, The Silver Springs,
Ocala and Gulf, The Florida Railway and Navigation Compa-
ny, The Pensacola and Atlantic, and the Louisville and Nash-
ville-nine companies--and representing at that time some-
thing less than 1800 miles of railroad operated in Florida. The
following, representing about 200 miles, were not represented
.at that time, to wit: The Blue Springs, Orange City and At-
lantic, now the Atlantic and Western ; The Florida Midland,
The Jacksonville and Atlantic, The Palatka and St. Augustine,
and St. Johns Railway, The Pensacola and Perdid,, The St.
Johns and Halifax, The Tavares, Apopka and Gulf, The Ta-
vares, Orlando and Atlantic, and the Western Railway of
Florida.
The number of miles operated by each railroad, including
divisions, leased roads, and branches, are set forth in "Table
A," appendix.
CLASSIFICATION OF FREIGHTS.
The statute provides that all railroad companies operating
in this State shall adopt a uniform classification of freights."
The matter was brought to the attention of the different rail-
roads at the outset, and tl.e one adopted and used by most of
the railroads south of the Ohio and Potomac and east of the
Mississippi rivers, to wit: The Southern Railway and Steam-
ship Association classification of April 1st, 1887, was in the
main adopted. (See Circular No. 3, appended.)
Since then, on the application of the railroads and of ship-
pers,'at different times, such modifications as appear in Circu-











lar No.5, November 29th, 1887, Circular No. 13, January 17th,
1888, and Circular No. 14, January 25, 1888, were made.
Other changes will doubtless be made from time to time as
they'shall appear to be just and reasonable.
Before the Commission organized, all of the railroads doing
business, wholly or in part, in this State, used this classifica-
tion, or have since adopted it, except the Louisville and
1 ashville Railroad and Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad Com-
panies.
Those companies have refused and still refuse to adopt it,
using one of their own, which is different in many important
particulars from that which was adopted by all the other rail-
roads, as stated.
As touching upon this very important matter, we quote from
the report of Senate Committee on Inter-State Commerce, to
the 1st session of the 49th Congress, January, 1886.
"The purpose of the classification is to determine the rela-
tive differences in the contributions which different articles
should make towards the payment of the fixed charges, and to
simplify the difficulty of rate making, by grouping together
those which are handled at about the same average expense,
and should rightfully make the same contributions towards the
general burden. The freight classification is an essential part
ofthe tariff or schedule of rates. The tariff fixes the rate upon-
the articles in each class for given distances and quantities.
The classification, by grouping every known article of ship-
ment into classes, determines in that way the rate to be
charged upon each. Classification implies variation and the
discrimination which permeates the entire system of railroad
rates may fairly be said to have its foundation in the classifica-
tion of freights, and in its arrangement all the conditions that
necessitate variations in rates may rightfully receive considera-
tion. These are of almost endless variety and too numerous
to he readily stated."
After discussing the considerations that enter into the matter
of just classification, the report continues:
"That the classifications now in use (by the different rail-
roads in the United States) have been fairly arranged, and
with due regard to all the considerations which have been al-
luded to, cannot be justly claimed by the railroad authorities,
under existing methods the railroad officials are the sole
judges of the weight that should properly be given to the
endless variety of conditions and circumstances which influ-
ence variations in rates. Upon such questions disinterested
persons will honestly disagree, and there is ample room for dif-
ference of opinion."
"Is it any wonder, then, that the judgment of the officials











should often prove imperfect, and that, in the hurry of busi-
ness, mistakes should be made? Or is it to be wondered at
that the shipper, having had no voice in the determination of
the question involved and not informed as to their nature,
should be disposed to complain of variations, which he is from
his point of observation unable to comprehend or account for
except on the ground of unjust discrimination? The vast
majority of shippers must deal with subordinate agents,
whose only duty is to carry out their instructions and who are
unable to give the desired information even if disposed to do so.
Nor is it always easy for the ordinary shipper to reach the officials
in control of a great corporation. Nor do their enquiries and
complaints always receive attention and consideration,as they
would if they communicated through authorized representa-
tives of the public. This is particularly the case with regard
to the question involved in the classification of freights. These
present so many opportunities for arbitrary discrimination that
the committee believe it essential that any method which may
be decided upon for the prevention of unjust discrimination,
should include the regulation of' the classification which begins
and ends upon a basis of discrimination."
"Distinct classifications were originally used by almost ev-
ery railroad, and the great advance made in recent years by the
adoption of uniform classifications by the various pooling asso-
ciations furnishes the best evidence that could be desired tlfat
further improvement is possible. Marked differences have been
found in the classifications in use in different parts of the coun-
try for which no satisfactory reasons have been given by the
railroad officials, and which are accounted for only by the fact
that the different classifications are arranged independently,
and that the judgments of men differ upon these matters as
widely as upon any other. This want of uniformity may be
made the means of extortion and overcharge, and is in any
event a fruitful source of misunderstanding."
Uniformity in this respect has been asked for almost unani-
mously by shippers. It is certainly much to be desired, &o."
It is quite evident, therefore, that the adoption of a uniform
classification was a very important matter-a duty absolutely
necessary, as without it there could be no proper and intelli-
gent enforcement of the statute, in the making and fixing of
rates and schedules for the railroads of the State.
DUE NOTICE AND A FULL AND FAIR HEARING.
Immediately after the issuance and publication of the notice
to the railroads and to the public before mentioned, one of our
number went with the approval of the Commission to Atlanta,
Georgia, to confer with the Georgia Commissioners, and to
study the. workings of the law under their management. As












is well known our statute creating the Railroad Commission,
and prescribing its powers and duties, is almost an exact copy
of the Georgia statute-ours differing chiefly in the fact that
from any action of the Commissioners, an appeal lies to a Board
of Revisers. The Georgia statute had been in operation since
1879, and it was reasonable to suppose that a conference with
those who had been appointed to enforce its provisions would
afford much valuable aid and assistance to us in formulating
rules and regulations fixing rates, &c., in the enforcement of a
similar law in this State. We also forthwith put ourselves in
communication with the Commissioners of the 26 other States
and Territories, from Massachusetts and Alabama to California
and Nebraska, with a view of securing for the use of this office,
the laws and annual reports of the Commissions of each State and
Territory in the United States, and we are gratified in stating
that a large majority of them responded promptly and liberally,
so much so, that we have over 75 volumes of reports, embracing
periods from the first organization of their respective Commis-
sions to the year 1887. The valuable decisions and rules
and regulations of the Inter-State Commerce Commission have
also been furnished to this office from time to time as they were
issued. We have also the voluminous, able and comprehensive
report, with the testimony accompanying it, of the U. S. Sen-
ate committee on Inter-State Commerce, in which almost
every conceivable question in regard to railway management
has been thoroughly investigated and discussed, and other val-
uable reports and works, in which the very important, inter-
esting and difficult questions that have arisen-and are continu-
ally arising in regard to transportation generally, and by rail-
roads in particular, have been exhaustively treated, and the
operations of the different laws in the different States and Ter-
ritories which have attempted to regulate the same, tully re-
ported. These were carefully studied by us, in connection with
the returns, reports, statistics, financial and otherwise, and ar-
guments of the different railroads of this State, made before us,
and filed in this office, and not until after a full and fair hear-
ing of and after full and fair notice to all concerned, as the law
directs, did we venture to take any definite action.
STANDARD TARIFF.
It is well known that the powers and duties imposed upon
the Commissioners of the different States are as different as the
conditions and circumstances that obtained in each State and
the motives that actuated the law-making power; and that
there are few, if any, (besides Illinois, and perhaps Mississippi
and California,) that have conferred the powers and imposed
the duties upon their respective Commissioners in the matter
of making and fixing rates for the transportation of persons












and property on railroads as were conferred by the Railroad
Commission Laws of the States of Georgia and Florida. Geor-
gia is the only State in which a standard tariff of what is called
maximum freight rates has been adopted and it is the only
State that has a law almost exactly like ours. In all the States
and elsewhere, where transportation by railway exists, the prin-
ciple is conceded that ordinarily less in proportion for a long,
than for a short haul, should be charged. If a charge of $10
for a haul of 10 miles be just and reasonable, one of $200 for
200 miles would be unjust and unreasonable, for obvious rea-
sons. But that a rule may be adopted whereby it can be ascer-
tained with reasonable certainty what would be a proper rate
for 200 or any other number of miles on a given class un-
der given circumstances, is not questioned, and such a system
or method has been adopted by every railroad everywhere,
without exception, each differing according to the different sur-
rounding conditions, but all based upon the same principle.
Of necessity, each particular carrier, must gauge and proportion
the charge or rate for the transportation according to the par-
ticular circumstances and conditions that surround or attend it,
in order to be just, and it is obvious that a gradation that
would be just and reasonable for a given road would not be
just and reasonable for another, unless the conditions were the
same, and-as no two are exactly alike, no gradation of any two
given 'lines should be exactly alike.
But while this is the case, it is practicable, as a matter of
convenience, to make a standard of maximum freight rates that
will be just and reasonable. Because such a standard is pre-
scribed affords no good reason for the charge that such a regu-
lation is inflexible and unchangeable in its nature. It is sim-
ply a scale or measure by which to determine, regulate and ad-
just a rate for a given article or class of freights for a given
distance or a given railroad; and its application is ready and
simple. If, on first class freights, a charge of 20 cents per 100
pounds, for 10 miles, 58 cents for 100 miles, 85 cents for 200
miles, and $1.03 cents for 400 miles, is not reasonable, but is too
low or too high for any particular railroad; for instance, if it
is too low or too high by 25 or any other per cent., such per-
centage can be added or subtracted; and so likewise for any
particular distance, or for different groups of distances in a.haul
of 400 miles or less, the rate allowed for such distance respect-
ively on any particular railroad could be adjusted accordingly.
For 20 miles (or other distance) such percentage could be added
to or subtracted from the standard rates for over 20 miles and
under 30 miles, for over 30 miles and under 40 miles, and so on
accordingly, as might from all the facts and circumstances sur-
rounding any particular railroad, proper percentages could be











added or subtracted, so as to reach and fit any just and rea-
sonable rate required. And so with all the other figure and
letter classes.
It is a fact worthy ot note, that while our action in this and
other respects has, in certain quarters, been severely criticized
by the managers of some of the railroad companies in this
State as being inflexible in its nature and application, or un-
suited to their particular lines of road, and several protests and
many exceptions taken to the action of the Commission in other
respects, as they affected each railroad respectively, yet, in no
instance, has anything been filed in this office, or urged in ar-
gument before us, by any railroad company, to the effect that
the gradation or scale fixed by us for an average road in Flori-
da, is not correct in its proportions. To mention the further
fact, that this standard was based upon a full and careful con-
sideration and comparison of all the freight tariff rate sheets of
all the main lines in this State and other States, we think we
can safely say that, in this respect, our action was just and rea-
sonable.
On the 1st day of October, when Circular No. 2 was made
and published, we had prepared a standard for classes 1, 2, 3,
4, 5, 6, A, B, C, D, E, F, H, and J, only, and in said circular
gave notice as follows:
"The Commission will postpone until its next session fixing
the rates on classes G, K, L, M, N, O, P, R, S and V, and in
the meantime respectfully invite fuller information concerning
them from the railroad companies and from the public gener-
ally. The standard freight tariff will be the basis upon which
such changes as appear to be just and-reasonahle, from time to
time, will be made. Meantime parties interested may submit
in writing or orally, to the Commission, at their office in Talla-
hassee, reasons why changes in the same should be made. The
Commission will meet in session, in their office in Tallahassee,
Monday, October 24th instant, and will then and thereafter
hear and consider such reasons, and make whatever modifica-
tions and changes as shall seem just and reasonable."
On the 24th day of October, 1887, pursuant to such notice,
the different railroads desiring to be heard, were fully and pa-
tiently heard, and no suggestions as to the rates in the classes
which had been deferred, nor any modifications of the rates
that had been already fixed as standard freight rates were made
by any of the railroads, and on the 29th day of October, 1887,
the standard freight tariff for such classes was completed and
published. (See Circulars 2 and 5, Appendix.)
It may be well to mention the further fact, which is so plainly
set.forth in the Circular, that this standard was never intended
or expected by us to be used by all the railroads at the rates so











fixed, though, of course, they were at liberty to do so, but that'
it was expected that each railroad not satisfied with it, would ask.
for modifications suited to its line of road, and that of course"
such changes would be made as after due notice and after a full.
investigation and hearing in each case would appear to be
reasonable and just.
It is a somewhat significant fact, that, when the schedules
were made by us for each railroad, as the law requires, many of
the railroads asked for very few changes from the rates as pre-
scribed in the standard tariff.
We have dwelt upon this feature of the operations of this
office because of the criticisms of certain persons connected'
with railroads, who, through the public press, presume uponr
the fact that the public have not studied the intricate and
complex questions of transportation in this State or country,,
in order to prejudice them against the law, known as the Rail-
road Commission Law.
Aside from that, it is due to the public and the Legislature,.
before whom our reports will be placed, that we should give
the reasons that prompted our action, not only in regard to,
this, but. as to every matter of importance within the purview
of our duty and authority under the law.
It may be proper to add, that, in the event the circumstances-
that attend railroad management in this State, in consequence
of conditions that may be peculiar to it, should demonstrate
the fact that the application or use of this standard is imprac-
ticable, it will be abandoned and such other method adopted as
may be deemed just and reasonable to all concerned.
LIMIT FOR A CHANGE OF FREIGHT RATES.
As will be seen from an inspection of the standard tariff, ten-
miles has been fixed as the usual limit for a change of freight-
rates." The statute gives the Commission "full power by
rules and regulations to designate and fix the difference in the
rates of freight and passenger transportation to be allowed for"
longer and shorter distances on the same or different railroads,
and to ascertain what shall be the limits of longer and shorter
distances." In some States this limit is one mile, in others
five miles, and in others, as in this State, 10 miles. In every
instance the limit is increased as the distance increases, so
that in some cases it is 20, in some 30, and sometimes 40
miles before a change is made, this being regulated according.
to the character or class of freight carried, &c., &c.
This standard, with the rules and regulations prescribed by-
us for the transportation of freights, appear in Circulars 2 an&c
5, pp. 2 and 5.
Afterwards (Circular No. 7, p. 1, R. 20,) a rule was pre--
scribed whereby railroads were allowed to "group at the sam e











freight rates, any station or stations, not more than five miles
beyond the limit of any ten mile haul, thus: Each station over
30 miles and up to 35 miles, may be placed in the group be-
tween twenty and 30 miles."
PASSENGER RATES.
The standard passenger tariff was fixed at three cents per
mile for full fare and one and a half cents for half fare. As in
the case of the standard freight tariff, the railroads were heard
and changes were made in several instances, from time to time,
resulting in an increase being allowed to most of the railroad
.companies. The rate or schedule made for each road, and as
they stand at the date of this report, is contained in table "A"
of Appendix, by which it will be seen that the whole number
of miles of railroad operated in this State is about 2097 miles,
,of which, 3 cents per mile is the rate on ................ 1220
31 C tm " i t ................ 37
4 ................ 247
5 ............... 593

2097
It was urged at various rehearings that the rate of 3 cents
per mile for full passenger fare was too low, and as before-sta-
ted, several changes in favor of the railroads have been made.
In three instances, to wit: In the cases of the L. & N., P. &
A., and the J. T. & K. W., upon a hearing upon their separate
protests before the Board of Revisers, the 3 cent rate fixed by
the Commission was not disturbed. The rate of 4 cents fixed
for the Indian River Division of the J. T. & K. W. railway,
was raised by the Board of Revisers from four to five cents for
full fare. The Commission raised the passenger fare on the
following main lines as follows: For the Cedar Key Division
of the F. R. & N., 70 miles, from three to four cents; on the
Southern Division of the Florida Southern, 76 miles, from four
to five cents; on the J. T. & K. W. as follows: On the San-
ford and Lake Eustis Division, 29 miles, from four to five cents,
and on the St. Augustine Division, 37 miles, from three to three
and a half cents for full fare, respectively; half fares in propor-
tion.
The applications of the F. R. & N. and Florida Southern for
an increase of the rate of passenger fare on their respective
roads are still before the Commission and are soon to be con-
sidered and disposed of in connection with the whole question
of earnings and expenses under the rates so fixed by us; and
it remains to be seen whether other changes may jot be prop-
.rly made.
In another part of this report a statement of the reasons











which controlled us in fixing the passenger rates to be observed,
by the different railroads in this State, will be found.
SCHEDULES OF RATES MADE FOR EACH RAILROAD.
Pursuant to the notices contained in the Circulars referred to,
the Commission met on the 24th of October, 1887, for the pur-
pose of making and fixing "reasonable and just rates of freight
and passenger tariffs, to be observed by all railroad compa-
nies doing business in this State, on the railroads there-
of," and to make for each of the railroad corporations
doing business in this State, a schedule of just and reasonable
rates of charges for the transportation of passengers and freights-
and cars, on each of said railroads," as sections 5 and 6 of the
statute imperatively demanded us to do. At that time and
during the session of the Commission in November ensuing,
and before rates were fixed and schedules were made, all of
the railroads of the State were represented. It may be proper
to add, that from the first organization of the Commission,
communications from individual shippers from various parts of
the State were, at different times, transmitted to this office in
the nature of complaints, and that occasionally individuals rep-
resenting their own, or the public interests, also appeared be-
fore us, some while the railroad officials were present, all of
which aided us much in the investigations we were making,
and we trust, in arriving at just conclusions.
For good and sufficient reasons, as we concluded, we, on the
joint application of the railroads, on the 28th of October, 1887,.
after a full hearing of all concerned, postponed the operation
of Circulars Nos. 1, 2 and 3, as to passenger and freight rates,.
until December 1st, 1887, and gave notice as follows:
"The Commissioners have set apart the time embraced be-
tween the 7th and 12th of November, 1887, inclusive, during.
which to hear and consider, at their office in Tallahassee, sug-
gestions from the different railroads and the public at large, as
to any modifications or changes that may be deemed just as.
to the tariffs and rules and regulations embraced in this and
all preceding Circulars issued by this Board, to the end that a
schedule of just and reasonable rates of charges for the trans-
portation of passengers and freights, to go into effect Decem-
ber 1st, 1887, on each railroad, may be made," and the partic-
ular day on which each railroad would be heard was designated,
(See Circulars Nos. 4 and 5, p. 7). Again, the railroads, as
well as persons who represented local, public, or private inter-
ests, were fully heard during the time embraced in the notice
aforesaid.
The Commission had now been in existence for about three
months, and the railroads and the public had been fully and
fairly heard as to all matters pertinent to the duties of the











,Commission. During this time we had called upon each rail-
,road to furnish to this office, in addition to length and gauge of
roads, and freight and passenger tariffs used by each road,
monthly reports since January, 1st, 1887, giving the details of
its earnings and operating expenses, as embraced in a form,
-" Form A," which was furnished them, and to include the month
of October, and also a copy of the last annual report of each
railroad company. Many of the older corporations included
-in their reports earnings and operating expenses and other
data dating previous to January, 1887, but only one, the F. R.
.A N., furnished a copy of its last annual report.
The monthly reports furnished us were alleged to be true
and correct statements and reports for our information and
guidance, and no evidence from any source to the contrary was
brought to our attention. If they were untrue, we had no ade-
,quate means of ascertaining that fact; but, if true, they showed
beyond peradventure or question, that very few were paying
little more than operating expenses; and, as to some of them,
that they were, or had been, losing money continually. Con-
fronted with this state of affairs, we entered upon the discharge
.of the delicate and difficult duty which the law imperatively
imposed upon us, of making and fixing just and reasonable
rates and schedules for the different railroads. The most diffi-
.cult duty imposed by the law upon the Commission was the
.making for each railroad corporation doing business in this
State, a schedule of just and reasonable rates of charges for
the transportation of passengers and freights.
Upon the very threshold of entering upon the performance
of this duty, many difficulties were encountered. The mana-
gers who had exercised unrestricted administration, charging
tolls at will, high or low, making rates at discretion, whether
.uniform and fair to all alike, or advancing the interests of in-
dividuals and towns upon the one hand, and laying burdens
upon whomsoever they saw fit, upon the other; granting free
passes to large numbers, and for that reason necessitating
higher rates to others, they declared that any control by law,
.especially if looking to fixing rates, was an innovation, and
they stoutly insisted that it was the manifest duty of the
Commission to legalize their existing tariffs and adopt the sched-
ules then in force. They affirmed that the charges then being
.made for transportation of passengers and freights were just
and reasonable, that any lower rates of charges would not al-
low such earnings as to enable them to do efficient service.
They pointed out that the money invested in railroads was pri-
vate capital; that if men of means saw fit to embark in rail-
road enterprises, there was no just reason why restriction
should be put upon them.











And yet, while protesting energetically against any modifica-
tions by the Commission, they were in the main courteous and
expressed a willingness to give any information the Commis-
sion should desire at their hands. They did not fail, however,
to remind the Commission, with emphasis, that only those who
had had the benefit of long experience in railroad service were
qualified to perform such duties as the Commissioners were en-
tering upon. But the law was mandatory upon us to make and
fix and publish schedules of rates of charges and rules and reg-
ulations.
We trust that we had a proper appreciation of the responsi-
bility that rested upon us. Not only was the prosperity and
development of our young and growing State, the rights of her
individual citizens, the needs of her towns, and the fostering
of the various industries in the State to be considered, but we
also recognized that, by virtue of the authority vested in us,
it was our duty to observe a due regard for the interests of
those who had invested their earnings in railroad property.
Immediately upon organizing, we called upon each of the
roads to send the Commission copies of its tariffs. And from
time to time detailed statements of earnings and expenses and
other statistical information were furnished. We made a care-
ful study of these. Wide differences were found to exist be-
tween the rates charged on roads, even where the conditions
were not greatly dissimilar. One road was charging for pas-
engers three cents per mile, full fare, others charged four and
a half, and others five, the latter rate, however, was the rule.
So of freight. On one road, first class was for 10 miles, twenty
cents per 100 lbs; on others, the charge was 30, and on others
yet much higher. So, also, the ratio of increase in freight
charges, according to distance, was irregular in the tariffs.
These differences, however, are not alluded to as being in every
case wrong in themselves. An examination and study of the
earnings and expenses, and as best we could, of the. real value
of the investments, discovered many variations in amount as
to each of these items.
Nothing in this accumulation of statistics could be deduced
which could guide us with certainty in what we were never-
theless obliged to do, viz: make a determination of what were
just and reasonable rates.
What, then, are the considerations that enter into the deter-
mination of just and reasonable rates? The managers affirmed
that rates of charges which applied to the business done by a
railroad, would yield a revenue equal to the cost of the ser-
vice and reasonable interest on the investment, were just and
reasonable. But it occurred to the Commission that such a
proposition could not be maintained in view of another which











they submitted, viz: That the population in the districts
through which the roads ran was small, smaller than in most
if not all the other States; that, therefore, the travel was light
and the tonnage of freights inconsiderable. In this connection
a number of the managers stated that even if the rates were
greatly increased above those being charged, still there would
be a deficiency in earnings as compared with expenses and in-
terest on investment as represented by the stock and bonds.
The cost of operating and maintaining a railroad is great, and
a large proportion of such cost is not proportionate to the vol-
ume of business done, such, for instance, as renewal of ties and.
bridges, and to some extent compensation of employees, &c.
Now if, with a heavy outlay of money inevitable, one under-
takes to maintain a railroad, and the patronage naturally, or
even possibly tributary to it, is small, so as that the earnings
at what are ordinarily recognized as average rates, cannot ap-
proximate the amount necessary to the maintenance and opera-
tion of it, shall the Commission say that such a railroad shall
be justified in charging tolls which, to yield adequate revenue,
must be many times over higher than they would prescribe
under different circumstances? Will the Legislature, or did
the Legislature assume to provide that immediately, without
reference to the public need of such a railroad, to the cost of it,
or to its management, the Commission should simply deter-
mine the amount necessary to operate and maintain it, and pay
a fair interest on its funded liability, and a reasonable dividend
on its stock, and then proceed to assess it, as best they could,
upon those who are to be its patrons ? Is it the duty of the
Commission simply to see to it, that all investments in rail-
roads in Florida, of every character, shall, from the beginning,
or indeed at any other time, become paying investments, even
at the expense of other interests?
We do not mean to declare by this argument that the man-
agers or others asked of us in terms to adopt such a policy.
But it appeared to us to be evident that the costs of the ser-
vice in the transportation of passengers and freights is not the
sole guide to the determination of the just value of it. Un
questionably the justness and reasonableness of rates fixed on
such a basis would quickly come in review for being too high.
On the other hand, to assume, that because the cost of trans-
portation is not the sole factor in determining the just value
thereof, therefore no regard should be had for the financial in-
terests of the owners of railroads, would have been error. For,
if the charges allowed to be collected were in all instances
made so low as not to afford the means of operating the road,
of transporting the freights, passengers and mails, and carry-
ing on the commerce of the country; if the roads under favor-










able conditions as regards patronage and administration were
deprived of revenues necessary to the carrying of passengers
with safety; if the restrictions should be of such character as
to discourage the honest efforts of men trying to develop the
interests of the State, while animated by the hope that though
yet unremunerative still in the future they would become so;
if the Commission and its official action should be of such
character as to express a hostility to the railroads it would be.
subversive of public policy and in utter antagonism to the
whole legislative intent, as expressed in the statutory enact-
ments of the State.
The Commission found itself in the attitude of standing be-
tween the people and the railroads, charged with the duty of pre-
scribing the terms and conditions upon which, as shipper and car-
rier, respectively, they might do business together, upon prin-
ciples just and reasonable to both-the rates to be neither ex-
tortionate to the people nor ruinous to the railroads. But, even
these conclusions only discover the extremes to which we imust
not go; they did not indicate to us that exact middle ground
upon which, in the contemplation of the law, the diverse but
not conflicting interests of the people and the roads would find
harmony in just and reasonable rates. We sought precedents.
Mr. Albert Fink, of New York, who is justly regarded as high
authority on all subjects connected with railroad transporta-
tion, in his testimony before the U. S. Senate Committee, Sep-
tember 17, 1883, said :
A' 1st. The principle that railroad charges should be based on
the value of the services rendered rather than the costs is, I
think, the correct one.
2d. You have always to go back to the foundation, and
that is: What are the charges ? Are they reasonable in them-
selves ? The amount of dividend paid does not enter intd the
question at all.
3d. do n',t think the people have anything to do with
how you got the railroad or what you paid for it. The ques-
tion is whether you make reasonable charges."
The Board of Railroad Commissioners of Georgia, in their
report of 1885, say: In arranging rates for railroads no at-
tention whatever ought to be given to the effect which the
rates allowed may have on the value of railway stocks or
bonds on the market. The only proper question to be con-
sidered in making rates is what is the reasonable and just value
of the services to be rendered." And again, The value of
the services rendered by a railroad company in any given case
is the most difficult of the many complicated questions which
2











railway managers are required to solve. This difficulty can
only be met and overcome by making frequent adjustments of
rates, as experience may show that necessity exists requiring
such changes to be made."
The Iowa Commissioners, in their report of 1885, say:
Value of service, the true and only basis for rates, is so
.changeable that the determination thereof becomes a special'
study in every case."
The Kansas Commissioners, in their report for 1884, in dis-
cussing "methods of arriving at a conclusion as to what rates
should be put into a rate schedule and should be pronounced
reasonable by a board sitting in judgment upon them," sug-
gest as one way in which to arrive at just and reasonable rates
a comparison of tariffs prevailing upon different roads in va-
rious States, the character and volume of business done upon
such roads operating under the tariffs examined and compared,
and the earnings made and the expenses incurred in their op-
eration."
The Commissioners of Michigan, in their 2d report, 1873,
say, referring to the subject of reasonable rates, But the dif-
ficulty lies in determining what rates are reasonable. They
can neither be just nor reasonable unless they are proportioned
to the cost of labor performed."
The foregoing are a few of the numerous authorities on rates.
Even they shed but little light. In fact, taken altogether, the
best reports, opinions and arguments bearing upon the subject
of reasonable rates show unmistakably that each Commission
for themselves have had the same difficulties to encounter as
ourselves.
They suggest that the policy of the control of the railroads
in any State by a Commission, subject, of course, to the statu-
tory limitations upon them, must have reference more especially
to the conditions existing in it, rather than to the experience
of others in the matter of rates. Indeed there is reason for
saying more. Not only do the railroads in any State comprise
a system within themselves, as related to a Commission pre-
scribing legal rates to be charged upon them, but each road is
a unit.
The expense of operating, the character and volume of ton-
nage, the proportion of earnings from passengers to earnings
from freights, the physical structure of the roads, some with nu-
merous and longer trestles involving greater outlay in maintain-
ing them, some with a mileage of hundreds of miles, others so
S .short as that a necessary equipment cannot be fully utilized,
all these differences, which exist more or less every where, were
potent influences in deciding. for us, that the work of the
Commission in Florida must be founded in the judgment of











the Commission, in view of existing conditions surrounding
them.
Cost of service is to a great extent an unknown quantity.
To determine it, must the reckoning be upon the cost of the
road, or upon the value of it? If the former, what cost,
the proceeds at a decretal sale or the cost of construction ?
What is the cost of a road acquired in exchange for certificates
of stock, or bonds of a different corporation, which though pos-
sessing a nominal value may be intrinsically much more or
much less valuable.
If upon the valne, how is the value to be ascertained?
From the tax books, or from Poor's Manual, or from casting
up an aggregate of the floating.funded and stock liability ? If
the stock of a railroad be a part either of its cost or value,
what is the amount of it ? Is it the amount nominally stated
in the charter, the amount actually paid in, or the amount
which the owners may have issued as representing the supposed
value of the property? But as best we could, a study of the
cost of service; of the volume and class of tonnage; of the rel-
ative value of the freight charges to the. articles transported; of
the travel over the different roads; of the rates of charges for
passenger and freight transportation previously made on Flor-
ida roads in relation to the business done by them, compared
with the same, in adjacent and more distant States of the fact
that Florida roads do not participate in hauling freights and
passengers, which are strictly through business, business com-
ing.from beyond the boundaries of any State, and passing
through it to points beyond, whereby our State as related to
the railroad system of the country at large is a terminal State;
of those features of the passenger travel and the commerce of
the State peculiar to Florida; of the relation of the roads to
eact, other; of the relation of the roads to the water ways; of
the effect ot the rates of charges by inter-State carriers over
which we could assume no control upon the roads which were
subject to our jurisdiction; of the rights and interests of the
investors in and owners of railroad property; of the relation
of the railroads as a whole to the people, their patrons, and to
the State which had given them large bounties in lands and con-
ferred upon them the right of eminent domain; of those true prin-
ciples of sound public policy which under the law through the
medium of the Commission should harmonize the growing rail-
road interests in a young and advancing State, and the inter-
ests of the citizens whose present patronage sustained the roads,
and whose future prosperity, expanding commerce and quick-
ened enterprise must measure and indeed assure their ultimate
success; these, and indeed every other material consideration,
we studied carefully, recognizing the magnitude and variety of











interests which our work would affect, as well as that it would
be subjected to the most rigid scrutiny.
It occurred to the Commission that a given reduction in rates
need not always diminish revenue, at least, not correspond-
ingly.
That on long lines of railroad, where the passage rates were
5 cents per mile, at which the public complained much, if the
charges were reduced the travel would increase, and this we are
confident is true. Moreover, Florida is a young and growing
State. Her people and her railroads alike are interested in se-
curing immigration and encouraging travel. The annual tide
of travel is a feature of this State. But for two years previous
the travel was less, the number of settlers less, the general pros-
perity less. And when the Commissioners proposed to reduce
passenger rates the managers answered that though reduced
rates might increase the travel the increase would be small, that
to bring travelers low through rates would have to be made,
and that to enable the roads to maintain low through rates
high local rates must be charged.
As to the matter of rates to and from points beyond the
limits of the State, this was entirely beyond our jurisdiction.
And to have fixed rates of charges for passenger travel, high
in all cases,for local application, and low on through travel,
would have been in violation of the spirit and letter of the
law.
The Commission believed that reasonable rates of charges
for passengers-reasonable compared with such charges else-
where-reasonable in themselves-reasonable in the general
estimation of all travelers, would greatly increase the travel,.
and that though the immediate effect might be to diminish the
earnings, that ultimately, and at no distant period, itwould in-
crease travel to such a degree as to increase the earnings. They
believed that persons contemplating a visit or removal to this
State would not only consider the cost of reaching the State,
but would make calculations, upon the cost of traveling in it
after arriving. How far they were correct in this opinion sub-
sequent events may indicate.
It appeared to the Commission to be their plain duty to fix
the passenger rates on a basis lower than the charges previous-
ly made, and yet the extent of the reduction proper to be made,
was then, as it may be yet, of course at least in some degree
uncertain.
The work of making a satisfactory determination of just and
reasonable charges for the transportation of freights was still
more difficult. The average earning capacity of Florida rail-
roads is certainly much less than in most if not all the other
States. This is true for two reasons, one being the fact that











the State is as yet thinly populated in many parts, and the to-
tal traffic therefore comparatively small; theother that in those
towns and sections of the State where the travel and tonnage
are greatest, it is largely competitive between boats on the St.
Johns river, and a number of railroads. Nevertheless, it was
plain that there had existed many discrimination and inequal-
ities; that in many instances greatly excessive tolls had been
levied: For instance, for hauling a car-load of oranges, say
300 boxes, 24,000 pounds, distances ranging from 50 to 150
miles, as much as from $75.00 to $105.00 were charged. So of
vegetables, the freight on these being similarly high. These
are products peculiar to the State, yielding already a very large
proportion of the revenue accruing to the roads, and giving
promise, under fair conditions, of making railroad property
much more valuable in the future. But it is wrong in princi-
ple, and suicidal in policy, to charge for the transportation of
products a price which prohibits production. It is following a
peculiar rule, said to be familiar to railroad men, charging
what the traffic will bear," out beyond the end of the rule to
what it will not bear.
There were other instances of inequalities, but these are
mentioned as apt illustrations. But this was not universal. -In-
deed, there were instances where the charges were low. Nei-
ther is it true that all freights were high. Lumber, for in-
stance, in car-load lots, was hauled in some instances at, or
very nearly so, prices as low, so far as the Commission is ad-
vised, as are known to have been charged anywhere in the
United States. But discrimination existed, and rebates were
paid. Large shippers were offered facilities and given rates
which were denied to others. Free passes to the number of
hundreds, if not of thousands, were given.
The provisions of the statute were clear as to our duty with
regard to these, matters. But the fact existed nevertheless
that large average reductions in all freights could not be made
at once without depriving the railroads of the revenue neces-
sary to the efficient operation and maintenance of the roads.
The Commission were aware that whatever basis might be
adopted, or whatever schedules might be made, the test of ex-
perience would probably disclose errors in, but we knew also
that we had authority to modify the rates whenever they were
demonstrated to be either too high or too low, that we would
promptly make such modifications, and that in any event the
right of appeal to the Board of Revisers had been pro-
vided. There were some other very important facts or consid-
erations which entered as potent factors in enabling us to come
to correct and just conclusions. We found nearly one-third of
the mileage of the railroads in the hands of a Receiver.












The freeze of 1885-6 had produced a depressing influence upon
every interest in this State, and the railroad- were not the
smallest sufferers thereby; and just as the hope of a better day
for all interests was dawning, and all began to be inspired with
a new life, an epidemic of yellow fever broke out in South Flor-
ida, and was raging whilst the investigations and deliberations
just detailed were in progress. And while it will not be con-
tended that the reports of the operations of the different rail-
roads in this Stc:te since the freeze and during the yellow fever
scourge should be taken as a fair test of the earning capacity
ot the railroads, particularly of those more immediately affected
thereby, still there was the silver lining of promise almost
visible, and a well grounded hope that upon the disappearance
of the pestilence every interest would again rebound in the di-
rection of increased confidence and prosperity to the develop-
ment and maintenance of which the inauguration and progress
of the different railroad enterprises in t;is State have under the
liberal policy of the State largely contributed.
Under these circumstances, and in view of other considera-
tions which suggest themselves to every reasonably disposed
thinking man, we were disposed to interfere as little as possible
with freight rates, and only when it was absolutely nece-sary
for, and was consistent with the welfare of the railroad and the
people alike, deferring and trusting to the future, the making
of such other changes as might from time to time suggest them-
selves to the end that the object for which the law was enacted,
i. e., exact justice as far as human agencies can accomplish that
end, should be done to every interest involved. This we know
cannot be done in a moment. A reasonable time must be al-
lowed in which to act, and thus the desired results, which simi-
lar agencies have wrought out in other States, be secured to our
own.
Upon a careful examination of all the reports, returns, sched-
ules, &c., made by the roads, it was evident that there was in
many instances a lack of uniformity of charges on the same ar-
ticles, as before stated, for the same service, rendered under sub-
stantially like circumstances and conditions on different lines
of roads-the fact of water or other competition, and other cir-
cumstances that go tojustify apparently unjust differences as to
persons and localities, being taken into consideration.
One of the objects of the law was to prevent unjust discrimi-
nation, and to give to every shipper, and we may add, to every
carrier, the same rights and opportunities.
To the end that this work might be done with a justice as ex-
act as it was possible in the nature of the case to do it, we re-
quired of each rail oad company to furnish to the Commission
such a schedule of freight rates, based upon the Standard Tar.-












iff of the Commission, as would allow to it substantially the
same rates that such road was then using on all classes of
freight, except those we had fixed on Classes G and V. (Or-
anges and Vegetables.)
The only material changes we proposed to make at that time
in freight rates were those in regard to oranges and vegetables,
and such as to other articles as would necessarily follow from
an attempt at an equalization of such as were deemed un-
just as they stood, discriminating either against persons or lo-
calities, or both. This important as well as difficult task was
completed on the 19th day of November, and a schedule of
freight rates for each railroad thus prepared, together with cer-
tain other rules regulating the transportation of passengers and
property, were embodied in Circular No. 7, and published to go
into effect December 1, 1887.
The irregular, or so to speak, zigzag manner in which the
schedules exhibited to the Commission were constructed by al-
most every railroad doing business in the State, rendered it at
that time impracticable for us to allow them the rates asked for,
even after our effort at equalization as stated, by giving a per-
centage on the Standard Tariff, and so we were compelled in such
cases to prepare a schedule in full for each class, and for every
distance, indicating by a cypher the standard rates, and by fig-
ures the other rates allowed.
W e adopted this method at first in order to allow a reason-
able time in which to compare results, and then as occasion
might seem to warrant, make such changes as should appear to
be just and reasonable.
Accordingly, after the making and publication of Circular
No. 7, containing the schedules prepared for each railroad, as
just detailed, other circulars, numbering from 8 to 14 inclusive,
making such changes in the rules and regulations and schedule
rates, classification of freights, &c., of the several railroads as
were deemed just and reasonable, were made and published.
These were made, some at rehearings after protest, some on
the applications of railroads which did not make any formal
protest, and others on the application of individual shippers.
Other applications from various sources before us now are
under consideration, asking for modifications and alterations,
in many respects, and if found to be reasonable and just, will
be made, whether it shall result in raising or lowering a pas-
senger or freight rate, or amending or abrogating any rule or
regulation that may be found to have worked unjustly to the
shipper or carrier, or the making of others that may be deemed
to have become necessary.
The fact that the interests of the public and those of the
railroads are identical, has grown into an axiom. The people












and the railroads allowed by them are each, under the new or-
der of things developed in this country and throughout the
world, necessary to each other, and in order to work out the
greatest good, they should work in harmony. The policy of
regulating railroads by law in the States and Federal Govern-
ment of this country, or wherever they exist, has become a
fixed fact. It has come to stay, and as long as the people are
willing to be just to the railroads, and shall insist, by appro-
priate legislation, and the use of proper agencies, such as Rail-
road Commissions, that the railroads shall be just to the pub-
lic, such a policy will work, as it has already done in Europe
and in the United States, beneficent results to every interest.
The system of the regulation of railroads by law should be
flexible, and thus easily adapted promptly as they occur to the
changes that are continnally presenting themselves, and no
pride of opinion, or other improper motive or reason, should at
any time prevent those into whose hands the high trust is con-
fided, from making such changes promptly whenever they shall
be just and reasonable to the carrier and shipper alike. In the
language of the Commissioners of one of the States, in their
annual report, The mistakes of yesterday must be corrected
to-day."
Under the provisions of our statute, which allows any rail-
road company in this State to present its protest "against the
enforcement of any one of, or all the rates of freight and pas-
senger tariffs, or other rates and regulations made by the Rail-
road Commissioners," and providing that upon the presenta-
tion of such protest to the Commissioners within twenty days
after the Commissioners "shall have made and fixed any rates
of freights and transportation tariffs, and any rules and regu-
lations required to be made under sections 5 and 6 of the
act, the following railroad companies presented their protests
within the time limited, to-wit: The Louisville & Nashville,
the Pensacola & Atlantic, the F. R. & N., the Florida South-
ern, the South Florida, the Jacksonville, Tampa & K. W., and
the S. S. 0. & G., seven in all. Those of the L. & N., and P.
& A. were the first that were presented, and though they in-
cluded an objection to the schedule of freight rates, the chief
and if not the only ground of complaint urged in the argu-
ment was as to the passenger rate of three cents per mile. The
Commission decided, in the language of the statute, that the
points of said protests were not well taken," and declined to
make any alteration in their previous action.
Next came the protest of the J., T. & K. W., and after sev-
eral hearings the Commission made several changes, but over-
ruled the protest as to some of its points.
From these decisions appeals were taken to the Board of Re-












visers, and the Commission was sustained on all points as to
each railroad aforesaid, except one, to-wit, as to the passenger
rate of four cents fixed by the Commission for the Indian River
Division of the J., T. & K. W. R.'y, which was raised by the
Board of Revisers to five cents, to go into effect March 15,
1888.
The protest of the South Florida railroad has also been fully
heard and decided by us, but as yet no appeal has been taken
to the Board of Revisers.
The protests of the F. R. & N., Fla. Southern and S. S. O. &
G. railroads, have been argued before us from time to time, but-
have not yet been fully disposed of. Some changes have ale
ready been made as to each of these roads, and others may be
made when these protests shall come to a final hearing. Some
of the points raised have already been decided in the cases of
the other protests upon which appeals were taken.
At the various hearings and rehearings on these protests,
such changes as appeared to be reasonable and just were made.
Changes, upon the application of other railroads which had not
protested, and on all the railroads, on the application of ship-
pers, have also been made from ,ime to time, as will be seen by
reference to Circulars 10 to 14, inclusive, in the Appendix be-
fore referred to.
A copy of the protest of each railroad, the decision of the
Commission on such as have been finally disposed of, and the de-
cision of the Board of Revisers in each case, are hereto an-
nexed as part of the Appendix for reference.
ATTITUDE OF THE RAILROADS.
Our experience and observation have been similar to those
of other Railroad Commissioners in the other 26 States and
Territories upon their organization and in their first efforts to
enforce the law. Naturally, rail-oad companies look upon the
action of the law-making power as an unwarranted interference
with them. With one voice, in almost every State, they have
protested against such interference, and insisted that the build-
ing of railroads would be checked; that the development of
the resources of the State in its manifold interests would cease ;
that the Northern, foreign and other capital would no
longer seek investment in the State, and that confiscation
and utter ruid of their capital invested and all interests in-
volved would follow; and that they should deny that they
were guilty of exacting more than a fair and reason-
able toll or compensation for the transportation of
passengers or freights of any description, or of unjust
discrimination in the transportation of freights and pas-
sengers on their railroads, or gave any rebate or bonus, direct-
ly or indirectly, or were guilty of misleading or deceiving the












public in any manner as to the r al rie-ei h uliri I fr freight
and passengers, or that any of their supErintendents or agents,
or other employees were guilty of any unjust. discrimination
in their rates and charges of tolls or compensation for the
transportation of passengers or freights of any description,
(some of the evils enumerated in the statute) is also equally
natural.
But it must be conceded by all fair-minded men, that the
very fact that such laws have been enacted in a State, is a strong
presumption that evils existed, or, to say the least, were appre-
hended. The larger part, if not the whole of remedial or pu-
nitory legislation, has been prompted by existing evils. It is
very seldom that a statute is purely anticipatory. It most
often evolves from existing evils and wrongs. The experience
of the past points the erection of safeguards for the future.
Some one has said, "show me the laws of a country and I will
tell who the people are, or were." Indeed, it has ablost crys-
talized into an axiom, that the fact of the enactment of a law
prescribing remedies and imposing Ienalties presupposes the
existence of the evils, wrongs, injuries or abuses it prohibits
and seeks to remedy or punish.
In a word, "The wise legislation of the world is generally
that which is the product of a mature public opinion, which
has gradually formed behind it, and of which it has become the
mere legislative expression."
Notwithstanding the feeling or attitude of the railroads of
this State, in common with that of those elsewhere, has mani-
fested itself, more or less, in every quarter in this State since
the organization of the Commission, and with considerable em-
phasis in some particular instances, still we are constrained
to say that, in the main, the railroads, with the exception of
the L. & N. & P. & A., have exhibited a disposition to com-
ply with the provisions of the law, and the rules and regula-
tions of the Commission prescribed thereunder. As a general
thing they have, with commendable promptitude, furnished to
this office su.h information as the Commissioners required of
them from time to time. The L. & N. & P. & A. have openly re-
fused to operate under the rates and schedules of freights and
passengers, and it has not adopted the classification of freights
prescribed by the Commission, but they make monthly reports
of earnings and operating expenses, as required by our rules
and regulations. An appeal has been made by that manage-
ment to the courts, in which it is alleged that the questions of
the constitutionality of the law and of the justness and reason-
ableness of the rates fixed by the Commission for that railroad
company, will be raised. Several cases, some involving the
violation of our rules, and as to freight rates, and some as to












passenger rates, have ripened for suit against said railroad,
and accordingly, under the statute, we have commenced action
in the name of the State of Florida, through the Attorney-
General.
It remains, that the questions involved in these cases shall
be decided by the courts, and there we leave them, forbearing
at present any comments as to our views of what would be'
proper decisions.
It is hardly necessary to refer to matters which, in certain
quarters, have been made prominent by such as prefer to assail
the actsand personnel of the Commission. The purposes for
which such methods are resorted to, are obvious. Whether'
the end inview will be accomplished remains to be seen. We
have not thought it necessary or proper that we should allow
ourselves to be drawn into newspaper controversies, however
tempting or manifestly easy it might be to vindicate the acts
complained of. The acts of all public officials are the legiti-
mate object of public criticism. "An office is a public trust,"
and those to whom a trust is committed should be held to a
strict accountability. Just criticism may do good ; unjust ani-
madversion usually carries with it its own antidote, which, with
time and a just and intelligent public sentiment, will effect a
cure.
With the exceptions above mentioned the railroad companies
in every instance of a complaint ofover charges, or of unjust,
discrimination, or otherwise, have promptly complied with the'
decisions and recommendation of the Commission. No suits-
have been ordered against any of the other railroads, because-
as yet there has been no occasion for them. On the whole we
may say that the attitude of the railroads towards the Comn-
mission is quite as satisfactory as, under all the circumstances of
the case, could reasonably have been expected, and we trust
that after the formative or transition state shall have
been passed, all friction apparent or real will be removed. A
certain degree of effervescence is often necessary, and the qual-
ity of the resultant, is almost always enhanced by the opera-
tion.
COMPLAINTS.
The provisions of the statute which direct its enforcement as-
far as any power conferred upon the Commission is concerned
are embraced in section 17, and are as follows:
"SEc. 17. That if any railroad company doing business in
this State, by its agents or employees, shall be guilty of a vio-
lation of the rules and regulations provided and prescribed by
said Commissioners, and if after due notice of such violation
given to the principal office thereof, ample and full recompense
for the wrong or injury done thereby to any person or corpora-











tion as may be directed by said Commissioners, shall not be
made within thirty days from the time of such notice, such
company shall incur a penalty for each offence of not less than
one hundred dollars, nor more than five thousand dollars, to be
fixed by the presiding judge. An action for the recovery of
the penalty shall lie in any county in the State where such vio-
lation has occurred, oi wrong has been perpetrated, and shall be
in the name of the State of Florida. The Commissioners shall
institute such action through the Attorney-General or State
Attorney."
The latter part of this section refers to the wilful violation of
section 4 of the statutes, and declares such offence a misde-
meanor and punishes it by fine and imprisonment.
This is a State case already, and the statute does not impose
upon the Commission the duty of instituting a prosecution.
Prosecutions under it are instituted and conducted in the
same manner as are other criminal offences under other criminal
statutes.
Our method of procedure when a complaint is made is to re-
fer it forthwith to the railroad company against which it is pre-
ferred and inviting immediate attention and reply. A docket
is kept in which the parties complainant and respondent are
named, and a brief statement of the nature of the grievance
complained of, is entered. In this docket is kept a history of
the case by noting every step taken as it occurs with an account
of its final disposition. Upon the answer of the respondent, if
the grievance is admitted, the complainant is notified. If, as
in case of an overcharge, either of freight or passenger rates,
*the amount is reminded, or in case of discrimination, it is dis-
continued, no further action is taken by the Commission, hut
the case on the docket is closed. If, upon investigation, the
complaint turns out to be unfounded, it is dismissed.
When a complaint is resisted the Commission, after a full and
fair hearing, secured with as little formality and delay as prac-
ticable, render their decision, and direct that ample and full
recompense shall be made, and if this is not complied with within
the thirty days, limited by the statute, suit is forthwith institu-
ted as the law directs for the recovery of the penalty prescribed.
Quite a number of complaints have been made, of which the
Commission had no jurisdiction,
It will be observed that while the statute provides that due
notice shall be given to the principal office' of the respondent
railroad it is silent as to the manner of the service of the notice.
In the cases of the L. & N. and P. & A., our letters to the princi-
pal office of the P. & A. at Pensacola, Fla., and to the principal
.office of the L. & N., at Louisville, Ky., conveying notices were
,not acknowledged, and thus there was no evidence that notice











was served, and it was not until we directed that the notices.
be forwarded by registered letter that we got a reply. This
occasioned some little delay, so that it was too late to institute-
suits in time in some of the counties for a hearing at the spring
term.
In our next report we will append lists of all complaints that
shall have been made to the Commission, together with all the
proceedings in each case, and in time for the next Legislature.
OFFICE AND OFFICE EXPENSES.
A room in the basement of the Capitol building was fitted upa
for the use of the Commissioners, and is now occupied by them
as their office, thus saving to the State the expense of renting
one.
We transmit herewith a detailed statement and account of
the current expenses of this office to March 1, 1888. Of neces-
sity the total is greater than it will be likely to be for any sub-
sequent year. Particularly is this the case in regard to print-
ing, from the fact that printing of the rules and regulations pre-
scribed for the transportion of persons and property and a vol-
uminous classification will not be required to be published as a
whole again:
THE NECESSITY FOR THE CONTROL OF RAILROADS BY LAW.
Upon the necessity for the control of railroads by law the
New York Commissioners in their report for 1883, Vol. 1, p .6,,
say: "Railroads have revolutionized the age, and in their in-
fluence upon the commerce and industries of the State have be-
come a power passive and active not dreamed of in their incep-
tion, and the possibilities-of which in the future is a problem of
great importance.
"In the fierce rivalries, in the strong competions and gigantic
contests of capital that accompanied this enormous extension
and rapid development, it too often occurred ihat the rights of
the individual citizen and of communities were overlooked and&
outraged.
"The corporations had derived their power and privileges from,
the people, yet too often their grantors were forgotten. In this
great struggle for the end and object aimed at, consciously or
unconsciously, nevertheless, with a blunted and indifferent
sense of equity and justice, undoubtedly wrongs were done,
and grievances widely spread. To these were added alle--
legations of wrongs or ills, as a consequence ot the mismanage-
ment, arrogance and corruption of the corporations which were-
possibly chargeable more to the inevitable revolutions they had
wrought than to the turpitude of the corporations that managed
them.
Out of this sense of injury and of danger apprehended by











the public'grew an agitation for the supervision of the corpo-
rations by the government, and for a control which should put
them under the restraints which the Legislature had sought to
impose by its statutes, but which had fallen short in their ex'e-
cution, either from a violation of them, or from lack of power
to enforce them.
"That capital exercising powers and rights of a quasi public
nature, under charters conferred by the State and conditioned
upon beneficial results to the people, while serving itself, should
be the sole judge of what was proper, in the exercise of the
privileges thus obtained, was in the minds of a large and influ-
ential class, an idea entirely at variance with the theories of a
sovereignty based upon the will of the people. A widespread
public sentiment throughout, except among those engaged in
railroad operation, or who were in the enjoyment of privileges
not attainable to all, reached the same conclusion. This agita-
tion grew until the demand for governmental supervision was
forced upen the attention of the Legislature. Some of the
wiser and more sagacious managers perceived this and favored
the idea, but by far the greater number contended strenuously
against the project."
The Board of Commissioners of Kentucky in the report of
1887, p. 41, say: "The subject of governmental control of rail-
roads has passed the stage of speculation. Intelligent public
opinion has long regarded railroad corporations as but the
creatures of the sovereign power. Jurists have contended and
courts have decided that railroads are public agencies, and are
and ought to be subject to the supreme authority of the State.
* The right of the government to control railroad cor-
porations is no longer a question, and the necessity of exercis-
ing that right is manifest to the mnost*casual observcri of public
affairs. The policy of State regulation of railroads is
no longer an experiment."
The report of the Senate Select Committee on Inter-State
Commerce, 1886, pp. 180, 181, contains a statement of the
causes of complaint against railroads which we include as
appropos :
1. That local rates are unreasonably high, compared with
through rates.
2. That both local and through rates are unreasonably high,
at non-competing points, either from the absence of competi-
tion, or in consequence of pooling agreements, that restrict its
operation.
"3. That rates are established without apparent regard to
the actual cost of the service performed, and are based largely
on what the traffic will bear.
"4. That unjustifiable discrimination are constantly made











between individuals, in the rates charged for like service, under
similar circumstances.
5. That improper discrimination are made between arti-
cles of freight and branches of business of a like character, and
between different quantities of the same class of freight.
"6. That unreasonable discrimination are made between
localities similarly situated.
"7. That the effect of the prevailing policy of railroad man-
agement is, by an elaborate system of secret special rates, re-
bates, drawbacks and concessions, to foster monopoly, to en-
rich favored shippers and to prevent free competition in many
lines of trade in which the item of transportation is an impor-
tant factor.
8. That such favoritism and secrecy introduce an element
of uncertainty into legitimate business, that greatly retards
the development of our industries and commerce.
9. That the secret cutting of rates and the sudden fluctua-
tions that constantly take place, are demoralizing to all busi-
ness, except that of a pure speculative character, and frequent-
ly occasion great injustice and heavy losses.
10. That in the absence of national and uniform legislation,
the railroads are able, by various devices, to avoid their re-
sponsibility as carriers, especially on shipments over more than
one road, or from one State to another, and that shippers find
great difficulty in recovering damages for the loss of property
or for injury thereto.
11. rhat railroads refuse to be bound by their own con-
tracts, and arbitrarily collect large sums in the shape of over-
charges, in addition to the rates agreed upon at the time of
shipment.
12. That railroads often refuse to recognize or be responsi-
ble for the acts of dishonest agents, acting under their au-
thority.
13. That the common law fails to afford a remedy for such
grievances, and that in cases of dispute the shipper is com-
pelled to submit to the decision ot the railroad manager or
pool commissioner, or run the risk of incurring further losses
by greater discrimination.
14. That the differences in the classifications in use in va-
rious parts of the country and sometimes for shipments over the
same roads, in different directions, are a fruitful source of mis-
understandings, and are often made a means of extortion.
"15. That a privileged class is created by the granting of
passes, and that the cost of the passenger service is largely in-
creased by the extent of this abuse.
16. That the capitalization and bonded indebtedness of the
roads, largely exceed the actual cost of their construction, or











their present value, and that unreasonable rates are charged in
the effort to pay dividends on watered stock, and interest on
bonds improperly issued.
17. That railroad corporations have improperly engaged
in lines of business entirely distinct from that of transportation,
and that undue advantages have been afforded to business en-
terprises in which railroad officials were interested.
18. That the management of the railroad business is ex-
travagant and wasteful, and that a needless tax is imposed
upon the shipping and traveling public by the unnecessary ex-
penditure of large sums in the maintenance of a costly force of
agents, engaged in a reckles- strife for competitive business."
Mr. Chas. Francis Adams, Jr., who is at present President of
the Union Pacific Railroad Company, and who was, from its or-
ganization and for many years thereafter,Chairman of the Board
of Railroad Commissioners of Massachusetts, and who has
given to the subject of railroad operations and management
much study, and who has written at length upon the subject,
and who is perhaps as apt authority as can easily be referred
to, in the fourth annual report of the Commissioners of Massa-
chusetts, took occasion to review thoroughly the circumstances
under which the commission system was adopted and has be-
come popular.
Discussing the origin and expansion of the railroad systems
of the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany and Bel-
gium, he enters into an elaborate description ot the relation of
the railroads in each to the Government. In all, the railroads
in one way or another are subject to governmental control. In
France, Germany and Belgium the railroads, partaking insen-
sibly of the characteristics of the institutions and people of
those countries, the connection between them and the govern-
ment is necessarily rather bureaucratic and ministerial as op-
posed to the more legislative features of.control in Great Brit-
tain and the United States.
Without quoting from him in detail it will serve the present
purpose to say that, referring to Great Brittain more particu-
larly, as early as the year 1840 Parliament was already appre-
hensive of the danger to the people from the power and abuses
of the railroads. He states how, from time to time, Parliament
legislated in different ways on the subject, at one time fixing
rates of charges and rules of operation by statutory en-
actment, at another time prescribing merely maxima rates, at
another concluding that an enlightened view of their own in-
terests would always compel managers of railroads to have a
due regard to the general advantage of the public. But in
1872 a Parliamentary Committee, after a lengthy review of the
whole history of the investigations, reports and legislation up-










on the general subject, reached the conclusion that the only
remedy was in the organization of a Board of Railway and
Canal Commissioners, to consist of three persons.
There are State Commissions in each of the States and Ter-
ritories of the United States, pamed below, which were organ-
ized at the dates given: Alabama 1881, California 1876, Col-
orado 1885, Connecticut 1853, Dakota 1885, Florida 1887,
Georgia 1879, Illinois 1871, Iowa 1878, Kansas 1883, Kentucky
1880, Maine 1858, Massachusetts 1869, Michigan 1873, Minne-
sota 1875, Mississippi 1884, Missouri 1875, Nebraska 1885, New
Hampshire 1844, New Jersey New York 1883, Ohio 1867,
Rhode Island 1872, South Carolina 1878, Vermont 1885, Vir-
ginia 1877, Wisconsin 1874-27 in all. This enumeration does
not include the Inter-State Commerce Commission, consisting
of five eminent men, with jurisdiction of inter-State commerce,
which was created by the provisions of the Act of Congress,
approved February 4th, 1887, the act itself having become
a law after an exceedingly thorough hnd exhaustive discussion,.
consideration and investigation of all and singular the entire
subject matter of the control of railroads by the commissioner
system.
In five of the other States and Territories--Nevada, North
Carolina, Oregon, Texas and Montana, there are legislative re-
strictions upon the statute books, but no Boards of Commis-
sioners. In these latter the legislation is in the general direc-
tion of control through commissioners, and, doubtless, they
will yet create them.
In one State only has the commission law been abolished,
viz.: in Tennessee. Even there the hindrance to the enforce-
ment of the law was on account of verbal omissions in and
technical objections to the statute. See 6 Federal Reporter, p.
426. It is likely Tennessee will soon take her place in line with
the majority and re-enact the commission law.
We have cited the foregoing authorities in connection with a
history of the commissioner system, and a few allusions to the
tendency of legislation, as pertinent to the general subject.
They throw much light upon the necessity for legal control, as
well as upon the circumstances under which and how it has
been exercised generally. There is no uniformity, however,
either in the powers conferred or in the precise manner in
which the Boards of Commissioners in the different States have
proceeded. Ir New Hampshire, for instance, where, in 1844, a
Commission was-organized, the law at first limited the Corr-
missioners to inspection duties and to matters pertaining to the
safety of travellers. Since, however, the law has been amended
and now they have power to make rates.










In Illinois the Commission was organized in 1871. Changes
from time to time have been made in the law with regard to
their powers, but it is quite stringent.
In Georgia also the Commissioners have large powers, and it
is their duty to make rates and regulations.
In Alabama the Commissioners revise all tariffs and reduce
rates in cases where they appear to be excessive.
There are several of the States in which the Commissioners'
powers and duties are much the same as in Alabama. They
are not required, affirmatively, to make tariffs, but have ample
power to revise and reduce them.
In other States the Commissioners' relation to the roads is
supervisory. In Massachusetts the powers of the board are
quite limited, while, on the other hand, in California the consti-
tutional provisions for the regulation of railroads are extremely
rigid. And, in this respect, it is an exceptional State, being
the only one in which, in addition to the power of making
rates, by the provisions of the Constitution, the Commission
are empowered to hear and determine complaints, take testi-
mony and punish for contempt.
In several of the States the powers and duties of the Com-
missioners include jurisdiction of the physical condition of the
roads, the location of depot sites, depot facilities, the deter-
mination of the necessity for repairs and renewals of bridges,
safety of cars, and an investigation into and report upon the
causes and results of accidents.
The foregoing is but a brief reference to the functions
of the different Boards of Commissioners in the other
States. The limits of this report will not justify a thorough
review of them all, but it will sufficiently appear that the pow-
ers vested in and the duties required of this board are quite in
harmony with the general policy of legal control of railroads
prevailing throughout the United States.
With respect to the law, which unquestionably grew out of
a belief that Florida, like her sister States, should put a limita-
tion upon railroad abuses, if it shall be demonstrated to be
wrong in principle or imperfect in detail, the same authority
that made it is competent to modify, repeal or continue it, and
will do so.
With respect to the Board, they are conscious of a sincere
desire and effort to perform their full duty impartially under
the law as they understand it. If they err, errors are good to
profit by, but we shall hasten to correct such when we discover
them.
But we believe the result will justify the reasonable expecta-
tions of those who were parties to the creation of this board.
In this connection we cannot forbear allusion to a subject










concerning which numerous complaints have been made, some
of which were loud, viz: the effect of legal control of railroads
upon the future construction of them. It has been declared
with emphasis that not only would the Commissioners' control
in Florida retard the building of roads, but that it would stop
it wholly.
It was evident in the minds of the Commission that lament-
able as it might be, prejudicial to the public prosperity as the
entire cessation of railroad construction might be, still some in-
terest cold be pointed to that would be unqualifiedly promoted
thereby. Such an instance is where a railroad enjoying large
patronage is threatened with competition by the building of a
new road somewhat parallel to it, and entering territory hereto-
fore altogether tributary to it.
Now if it has been the case that these complaints, of the char-
acter alluded to have emanated from sources such as we have
described, by the very circumstances, those making such com-
plaints are liable to the imputation that they and not the Com-
mission are attempting to get in the way of new railroads.
.If the loudest and most aggressive complaints of the charac-
ter referred to, against the Commission and the law have come
from representatives of railroads whose uncontested occupation
of large and profitable territory was, when such complaints were
made, and are at this writing, ominously threatened by certain
preliminary indications of more roads in that same territory,
what then ? Is it not an attempt to fight off, over the heads
of the Commission, and through an effort to bring the law into
disrepute, the new railroad, rather than a prophetic warning
against danger that no other railroads will be built ? If so,
such complaints from such sources have small significance.
The reports now in our office show that in all the other States
where the Commissioners have been in existence longest just
such complaints and predictions have been made. But what
are the facts ? In those very States where the Commissioners'
powers are most ample, and where the Commissioners have
been in existence longest, is the largest railroad mileage.
The mileage in Illinois is greatest, 9,597 miles. In this State
the Commission was organized in 1871.
In Kansas the Commission was organized in 1883. During
the time in which the Commission in this State has been in ex-
istence a mileage amounting to about 4,300 miles has been
added up to close of 1887.
Ohio. In this State the Commission dates back to 1867. In
1866 the mileage was 3,197 miles. At close of 1886 it was
7,246 miles.
In Virginia in 1878 there was a mileage of 1,692 miles. At
close of 1886 it was 2,719 miles.












Without going into further detail, we add that Georgia and
Alabama are both conspicuous illustrations of the error of the
statement that Railroad Commissions prevent railroad develop-
ment.
So in greater or less degree do the official reports of all the
other State Boards, with their accompanying statistical data,.
refute the charge. But the State reports referred to all disclose
the same state of facts, viz: the railroad managers protested
against restriction and Commissioners' control, saying substan-
tially, these are our roads ; no one is compelled to patronize
them; our rates are just and reasonable; we can't stand re-
duction, and if you attempt to control us you stop railroad con-
struction, and bring ruin to our State."
The law creating the Commission does not charge them in,
terms, either with fostering or hindering railroad construction.
The absolute proof of what the policy of the State with respect
to railroads is will be found upon her statute books. Millions
of acres of land and the exercise of the right of eminent domain
from the State, valuable privileges from municipalities and
large gifts from individuals are characteristics of Florida's pol--
icy with respect to her railroads.
Our present argument is only to make answer to the charge
that the Commission means and will work ruin to the railroad
interest.
If the experience of other States has value for us no such re-
sult will follow. On the other hand, is it not a reasonable ex-
pectation that monthly statements of earnings and expenses,
annual reports of the general condition of each road, including
tonnage, receipts, expenses, assets, liabilities and profits, all un-
der oath and public, under State supervision, with an impartial
determination of the interests and rights of the people and the
roads will produce results in Florida similar to what they have-
effected in other States.
POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE COMMISSION.
An inspection of the letters and complaints on file in this
office discloses the fart that the ideas and notions of many per-
sons in this State in regard to the powers and duties of the
Commissioners, as prescribed by the statute creating the Com-
mission, are very much exaggerated and misunderstood. There
is scarcely a grievance felt or fancied by shippers, growing out
of their relation to the railroads, which has not, even within the
compatatively short time the Commission has been in existence,
been brought to the attention of the Commission in some form,
and not infrequently when the Commission has failed to act
upon them, for the reason that they had no power under the
law to do so, furnished a pretext for blaming the Commission-
ers, or for inveighing against the law itself, or both. It seems











to have been taken for granted by such persons, that the Rail-
road Commission law furnished a panacea for every ill incident
to railway transportation in this State, and that the Commis-
-sioners had been invested with full power and authority to ap-
ply it. The powers conferred and the duties imposed by the
statute upon the Commissioners are plain and explicit, and
show to the most careless and cursory reader, beyond perad-
venture or dispute, that no power was given the Commission-
ers in regard to the physical condition of the railroads in this
State, i. e., to examine and ascertain whether the road bed, roll-
ing stock, bridges, trestles, &c., are in good or bad condition,
to the end that persons and property may be protected against
injury or loss, and the like; nor to require railroads to erect
stations or warehouses, or supply other facilities, however con-
venient and necessary for the accommodation of the traveling
public, or the care and safety of freights, nor to compel rail-
roads to make close connections, construct side tracks or
switches, or regulate wharfage, pierage, or other terminal
charges; nor to compel the railroads to pay for lost or dam-
aged freights; nor to fine summarily (as, at least, one shipper
insisted,) railroad corporations or their employees, for making
over charges, or for violations of the rules and regulations pre-
scribed by the Commissioners for the transportation of persons
or property, nor to order suits against railroad companies for
putting passengers off their trains, or for refusing to transport
persons or freight, nor to regulate the carrying of freight
which comes from or goes beyond the boundaries of the State,"
(Inter-State Commerce matters, which is expressly forbidden
by the statute,) yet, as before stated, complaints have been
made referable to one or more of the foregoing enumerations,
and others of like nature, and afford occasion for animadver-
sions against the statute, or the manner of its enforcement.
In all such cases the Commissioners could only remand the
parties to the statutes (if any) expressly enacted for the pur-
pose of furnishing remedies for the grievances complained of,
or punishing violations of their provisions, or, in the absence
of such laws, to such relief as may be furnished by the Com-
mon Law of England, in force in this State. The Commis-
sioners may not usurp powers not conferred by law; they
are confined to the authority delegated to them by the stat-
ute, and if such grievances serve to suggest omissions or de-
fects in the laws, the obvious course to pursue is to apply to
the law-making power of the State to supply or remedy them.
The Commission will bring these matters and others to the
attention of the next Legislature in our next report to your
Excellency, and will recommend such changes in the law as
they may deem advisable.












RAILROAD CONSTRUCTION.
Since the organization of the Commission, the Orange Belt
Railway Company has finished the construction of its line from
Clermont, forty-two miles from its initial terminus, to Tarpon
Springs, for 117 miles, and there is every assurance that it will, in
a very short time, be completed to St. Petersburg, the other
terminus, a total length of 150 miles.
The Thomasville, Tallahassee & Gulf Railroad Company has
built several miles of road from Carrabelle, and is pushing for
ward towards Tallahassee.
The Jacksonville, Mayport & Pablo Railway and Naviga-
tion Company is also building a road-from Mayport to Jack-
sonville, and there is every indication that the line will be com-
pleted and in operation by May or June next.
The Silver Springs, Ocala & Gulf Railroad is extending its
line south from Dunnellon.
The Florida Midland, we are advised, is being extended in
the direction of Kissimmee.
The road from Thomasville, Ga., to Monticello, Fla., is now
under construction.
The road from Macon, Ga., via Valdosta, to some point on
the St. Johns river is, as we are advised, being pushed rapidly
southward.
An extension of the St. Johns & Halifax road is being made
at this time.
Various other railroad enterprises are in contemplation, or
on foot, to-wit: from Jacksonville to PalaLka, from a point on
the South Florida to Lake Charm; from Kissimmee to some
point on the Atlantic coast; from St. Augustine, southward;
from Leesburg, or some point near by, westward; and others
including lines from points in Alabama into Florida.
LAND GRANTS TO RAILROADS, ETC.
From the data on file in this office, or which we have been
able to procure up to this time, we find that we cannot now
give, with any desirable degree of accuracy, the number of
acres of-land that each railroad has received, or has disposed
of, or has on hand, but shall endeavor to have such information *
in convenient and reliable shape for our next annual report.
It is strenuously contended by some of the railroad compan-
ies that the munificent land grants which have been received by
them from the United States or the State of Florida should
have no weight with the Commission in making rates and
schedules for the transportation of passengers and property on
their lines; but, however that may be (and we shall not now
discuss that matter) we do not deem it inconsistent with our
duties as a legislative agency, particularly when the facilities












at hand for that purpose are considered, to collect, collate and
report such like data in regard to the railroads of our State,
whether they shall serve for our own guidance or the informa-
tion of the Legislature and the public. It shall be our effort
to embody in our Annual Reports all the information acces-
sible to us that may be of value to us, touching the duties that
devolve upon us under the law creating the Commission, or
that may serve to suggest legislation in the premises,
although, by a strict construction, the same may not come
within what the statute terms the transactions of this office."
While; strictly speaking, this may not be required, it is not
forbidden. This is certainly in line with the course pursued
by other Railroad Commissioners in all the other States having
Commissions in making their annual reports.
Our subsequent reports will contain complete information in
detail, as far as attainable, on all subjects connected with rail-
way building, operation and management, such as the official
directory; organization and construction; characteristics of
roads; enumeration and average compensation of employees;
construction and equipment; stock and debt; mileage, traffic,
&c.; tonnage of articles transported ; analysis of earnings
and expenses by months; interest and dividends; lands; and
a general balance sheet. The absence of such information from
this report is elsewhere accounted for.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WM. HIMsB,
Railroad Commissioners of Florida.
Section 22 of the act creating the Railroad Commission makes
it the duty of the Commissioners to report to the Governor
"the transactions of their office." I concur in the foregoing
report in so far as it relates to the transactions of this office."
And as to anything beyond this which the report may contain
1 express no opinion. GEo. G. MCWHORTER.



















APPENDIX
TO
FIRST ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS,
OF FLORIDA,
MARCH 1, 1888.















APPENDIX.



CHAPTER 3746-[No. 66.]
AN ACT to Provide for the Regulation ot Railrotd Freight and Passen-
ger Tariffs in this State, to Prevent Unjust Discrimination in the
Rates Charged for Transportation of Passengers and Freights, and to
Prohibit Railroad Companies, Corporations and Lessees in this State
trom Charging other than Just and Reasonable Rates, and to Punish
the Same, and Prescribe a Mode of Procedure and Rules of Evidence
in Relation thereto, and to Appoint Commissioners and to Prescribe
their Powers and Duties in Relation to the Same.
Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:
SECTION 1. That there shall be three Commissioners appoint-
ed by the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate,
to carry out the provisions of this act.
The terms of office of the Commissioners shall be four years,
but in making the first appointments the Governor shall desig-
nate one of the Commissioners to serve for two years, one for
three years, and one for four years, and thereafter their succes-
sors shall be appointed for four years. The salary of each
Commissioner shall be twenty-five hundred dollars per annum
and their railroad fare in traveling on business connected with
their offices, to be paid from the Treasury of the State.
Any Commissioner may be suspended from office by order
of the Governor, who shall report the fact of such suspension
and the reason therefore to the next Legislature, and if a major-
ity of each branch of the Legislature declare that said Commis-
sioner shall be removed from office, his term of office shall ex-
pire, and during the suspension of said officer he shall forfeit
his salary. The Governor shall have the same power to fill
vacancies in the office of Commissioners as to fill other vacan--
cies, and if for any reason said Commissioners are not appoint-
ed during the present session of the Legislature, the Governor
shall appoint them thereafter, and report the appointment to
the next Senate, who shall confirm or reject the same. Said
Commissioners shall take an oath ot office to be framed by the
Governor, and shall not jointly or severally or in any manner
be holders of any railroad stocks or bonds, or be agent or. em-
ployee of any railroad company, or have any interest in any
way in any railroad, and shall so continue during the term of
office. In any case of suspension the Governor may fill the











vacancy until the suspended Commissioner is restored or re-
moved.
SEc. 2. That said Commissioners may employ a secretary or
clerk at a salary of twelve hundred dollars per annum, and all
railroad fare at the expense of the State. The office of said
Commissioners shall be at the Capital at Tallahassee, but they
may hold sessions anywhere within the State at their discre-
tion; and all sums of money authorized to be paid by this act
out of the State Treasury shall be paid only on the order of the
(Governor.
SEc. 3. That from and after the passage of this act, if any
railroad corporation doing business in this State, under any act
of incorporation or general law of this State now in force, or
which may hereafter be enacted, or any railroad corporation
organized, or which may hereafter be organized, under the laws
.of any other State, and doing business in this State, shall will-
fully charge, collect, demand or receive more than a fair and
reasonable rate of toll or compensation for the transportation
of passengers or freight of any description, or for the use and
transportation of any railroad car upon its track or any of the
branches thereof, or upon any railroad within this State which
it has the license or permission to use, operate or control, the
-same shall be deemed guilty of extortion, and upon conviction
-thereof shall be dealt with as hereinafter provided.
SEc. 4. That if any superintendent, agent or other employee
of any railroad corporation, as aforesaid, shall make any unjust
-iscrimination in its rates or charges of tolls or compensations
for the transportation of passengers or freights of any descrip-
tion, or for the use and transportation of any railroad car upon
its said road, or upon any of the branches thereof, or upon any
railroads connected therewith which it has a right, license or
permission to operate, control or use within the State, such
person and such railroad corporation shall be deemed guilty of
having violated the provisions of this act, and upon conviction
thereof shall be dealt with as hereinafter provided; Provided,
That this section shall apply to making any unjust discrimina-
tion in the delivery of freight to any competing lines of steam-
boats in this State after the rules of discrimination shall have
been established by the Commissioners.
SEc. 5. That the Commissioners appointed as hereinbefore
provided shall, as provided in the next section of this act, make
and fix reasonable and just rates of freights and passenger tar-
iffs, to be observed by all railroad companies doing business in
this State, on the railroads thereof; shall make reasonable and
just rules and regulations to be observed by all railroad compa-
nies doing business in this State, as to charges at any and all
points for the necessary handling and delivering of freights;











shall make such just and reasonable rules and regulations as
may be necessary for preventing unjust discrimination in the
transportation of freight and passengers on the railroads in this
State; shall make reasonable and just rates of charges for use
of railroad cars carrying any and all kinds of freights and pas-
sengers on said railroads, no matter by whom owned or car-
ried, and shall make just and reasonable rules and regulations
to be observed by said railroad companies on said railroads, to
prevent giving of any rebate or bonus, directly or indirectly,
and from misleading or deceiving the public in any manner as
to the real rates charged for freight and passengers; Provided,
That nothing in this act contained shall be taken as in any
manner abridging or controlling the rates for freight charged
by any railroad company in this State, for carrying freight
which comes from or goes beyond the boundaries of the State,
and on which freight less than local rates on railroad carrying
the same are charged by such railroad, but said railroad com-
panies shall possess the same power and right to charge such
rates for carrying such freights as they possessed before the
passage of this act, and said Commissioners shall have full
power by rules and regulations to designate and fix the differ-
. ence in the rates of freight and passenger transportation to be
@allowed for longer and shorter distances on the same or differ-
ent railroads, and to ascertain what shall be the limits of longer
and shorter distances.
SEC. 6. That the said Railroad Commissioners are hereby au-
thorized and required to make for each of the railroad corpora-
tions doing business in this State, as soon as practicable, a
schedule of just and reasonable rates of charges for the trans-
portation of passengers and freights and cars, on each of said
railroads, and said schedules shall, in (any suit) brought against
any such railroad corporations wherein is involved the charges
of any such railroad corporations for the transportation of any
passengers or freight or cars, or unjust discrimination in rela-
tion thereto, be deemed and taken in all courts of this State as
sufficient evidence that the rates fixed therein are just and rea-
sonable rates of charges for the transportation of passengers and
freights and cars upon the railroads, and said Commissioners
shall from time to time and as often as circumstances may re-
quire, change and revise said schedules. When any schedule
shall have been made or revised as aforesaid, it shall be the#
duty of said Commissioners to cause publication thereof to be
made for four successive weeks in one public newspaper, pub-
lished in the town of Jacksonville, in this State; and after the
same shall be so published, it shall be the duty of all such rail-
road companies to post at all their respective stations in a con-
spicuous place a copy of said schedule for the protection of the










people; Provided, That the schedules thus prepared shall not
be taken as evidence as herein provided until the same shall have
been prepared and certified to by the Commissioners and pub-
lished as aforesaid, for all the railroad companies now organized
under the laws of this State, or that may be organized at the
time of said publication; all such schedules purporting to be
printed and published as aforesaid shall be received and held in
all suits asprimafaciethe schedules of said Commissioners with-
out further proof than the production of the schedule desired
to be used as evidence, with a certificate of the Railroad Com-
mission that the same is a true copy of the schedule prepared
by them for the railroad company or corporation therein named,
and that the same has been duly published as required by law,
stating the name of the paper in which the same was published,
together with the date and place of said publication; Pro-
vided further, That the said Commissioners shall not exercise
i any of the powers granted in sections 5 and 6 of this act until
after having given notice by publication in such newspapers,
and for such time as shall be deemed fair and advisable by said
Commissioners, to all railroad companies to be affected, and to
the public generally, of the times and places of their meetings
to adopt rules and regulations, make rates of charges or to
change and revise schedules, and all corporations and persons.
interested shall be entitled to a full and fair hearing before said
Commissioners.
SEC. 7. That within thirty days after the said Railroad Com-
missioners shall have made and fixed any rates of freight and
passenger tariffs and any rules and regulations required to b3
made by them under the provisions of sections five and six of
this act any railroad company in this State may present its pro-
test to the said Railroad Commissioners protesting against the
Enforcement of any one of or all of the rates of freight and pas-
senger tariffs, or other rules and regulations made by said Rail-
road Commissioners, and any railroad company so protesting
shall set forth in its protest the points depended upon to show
why the action of the Commissioners protested against should
not be enforced. The Railroad Commissioners upon the pre-
sentation of such protest shall set a.day for the hearing thereof,
which day shall not be more than 20 days from the presentation
of said protest, at which day said Railroad Commissioners shall
consider said protest and hear the representatives of the rail-
road company thereon, and such other persons or corporations
as may desire to be heard. And should said Railroad Com-
missioners upon such hearing be satisfied that any point or
points set forth in said protest are well taken, said Commission-
ers shall make such alteration in their previous action as will
be just and reasonable; but should they decide that the points










in said protest are not well taken they shall make no alteration
in their previous action.
SEc. 8. That the Comptroller, Secretary of State, Commis-
sioner of Agriculture and Attorney-General and Treasurer be ,
and are hereby constituted a Board of Revisers for the pur-
poses hereinafter provided.
SEc. 9. That whenever any railroad company shall present
its protest and be dissatisfied with the decision of the Railroad
Commissioners thereon, such railroad company shall have the
right to have said protest heard by the said Board of Revisers,
and it shall be the duty of said Board of Revisers, upon the
application to them of any such railroad company, to fully in-
vestigate the action of said Railroad Commissioners in regard
to the matters protested against, and said Board of Revisers is
hereby vested with full power and authority to change, abro-
gate, revise or remodel any action of the said Railroad Com-
missioners so protested against, and the action of said Board
of Revisers in such cases shall be established as the rule gov-
erning the questions upon which the said Board of Revisers
shall be called upon to hear. And in order that said Board of
Revisers may properly hear and determine all such protests, it
shall be the duty of said Railroad Commissioners to give said
Board of Revisers free access to all papers, records and docu-
ments in their custody or control, and all changes made by
said Board of Revisers in the rules and regulations established
by the said Railroad Commissioners shall be carefully noted by
said Railroad Commissioners, and shall become a part of their
rules and regulations, and control their action in all matters
affected thereby; but after the expiration of one year from the
time any such changes are made, the Railroad Commissioners
may make application to the Board of Revisers to have any de-
cision of said Board of Revisers rescinded or amended, and
said Board of Revisers shall have power, upon such applica-
tion, to rescind, amend, alter or abrogate any previous decision
made by it; Provided, That before said Railroad Commission-
ers can make such application they shall give to the railroad
company interested in the subject of the application 20 days' no-
time of the time when such application will be made.
SEc. 10. That whenever said Railroad Commissioners shall
change or revise any schedule, rates or tariffs, or other rule or
regulation made by them, any railroad company affected by
such change or revision may protest against the enforcement of
such change or revision in the manner provided for hearing pro-
tests in the preceding section, both before the Railroad Commis-
sioners and the Board of Revisers.
SEc. 11. That the expense incurred in consequence of any
protest made under the provisions of this act shall be paid








S48

either by the railroad company making the protest or by the
State of Florida, as shall be ordered in each case by the Board
of Revisers.
SEc. 12. The Secretary of the Railroad Commissioners shall
be the Secretary of the Board of Revisers.
SEC. 13. The majority of said members of the Board of Re-
visers shall constitute a quorum to transact all business.
SEC. 14. That all the rights given railroad companies by sec-
tions 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 to protest against any action of the
Railroad Commissioners are hereby given also to any individ-
ual, corporation, firm or partnership who shall desire to
make such protest as is provided that railroad companies may
make.
SEC. 15. That it shall be the duty of said Commissioners to
investigate the books and papers of all railroad companies do-
ing business in this State to ascertain if the rules and regula-
tions aforesaid have been complied with, and to make personal
visitations of railroad offices, stations, and other places of busi-
ness for the purpose of examination, and make rules and regu-
lations concerning such examinations, which rules and regula-
tions shall be observed and obeyed as the other rules and regu-
lations aforesaid. Said Commissioners shall also have full
power ard authority to examine all agents and employees of
said railroad companies and other persons, under oath or other-
wise, in order to procure the necessary information to make
just and reasonable rates of freight and passenger tariffs, and
to ascertain if such rules and regulations are observed or vio-
lated, and to make necessary and proper rules and regulations
concerning such examinations, and which rules and regulations
herein provided for shall be obeyed and enforced as other rules
and regulations provided for in this act.
SEc. 16. That all contracts and agreements between railroad
companies doing business in this State, as to rates of freight
and passenger tariffs, shall be submitted to said Commissioners
for inspection and correction, that it may be seen whether or
not they are a violation of the law, or of this act, or of the
rules and regulations of said Commissioners; and all arrange-
ments and agreements whatever as to the division of earnings
of any kind by competing railroad companies doing business
in this State shall be submitted to said Commissioners for in-
spection and approval in so far as they affect rules and regula-
tions made by said Commissioners to secure to all persons do-
ing business with said companies just and reasonable rates of
freight and passenger tariffs, and said Commissioners may make
such rules and regulations as to such contracts and agreements
as may then be deemed necessary and proper.
Szo. 17. That if any railroad company doing business in this










State, by its agents or employees, shall be guilty of a violation
of the rules and regulations provided and prescribed by said
Commissioners, and if, after due notice of such violation given
to the principal office thereof, ample and full recompense for
the wrong or injury done thereby to any person or corporation,
as may be directed by said Commissioners, shall not be made
within thirty days from the time of such notice, such company
shall incur a penalty for each offence of not less than one hundred 4
dollars, nor more than five thousand dollars, to be fixed by the
presiding Judge. An action for the recovery of such penalty
shall lie in any county in the State where such violation has
occurred, or wrong has been perpetrated, and shall be in the
name of the State of Florida. The Commissioners shall insti-
tute such action through the Attorney-General or State At-
torney. Any superintendent, agent or other employee of any
railroad company in this State, who wilfully violates any of the
provisions of section 4 of this act, shall be deemed guilty of a.
misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be punished by a.
fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment,
not exceeding six months in the jail of the county in which
such person is convicted.
SEC. 18. That if any railroad company doing business in this
State shall, in violation.of any rule or regulation provided by
the Commissioners aforesaid, inflict any wrong or injury on any
person, such person shall have a right of action and recovery
for such wrong or injury in the county where the same was
done in any court having jurisdiction thereof; and the damages
to be recovered shall be the same as in action between indi-
viduals, except thr.t in cases of wilful violation of law such
railroad companies shall be liable to exemplary damages; Pro-
vided, That all suits under this act shall be bought within
twelve months after the commission of the alleged wrongor im-
jury.
SEC. 19. That in all cases under the provisions of this act the
rules of evidence shall be the same as in civil actions, except as
hereinbefore otherwise provided. All fines recovered under the
provisions of this act shall be paid into the County Treasury,
to be used for county school purposes in the county where the
fine was imposed. The remedies hereby given the persons in-
jured shall be regarded as cumulative to the remedies now
given by law against railroad corporations, and this act shall
not be construed as repealing any statute giving such reme-
dies.
SEc 20. That the terms "railroad corporation or" railroad
company," contained in this act, shall be deemed and taken to
mean all corporations, companies or individuals now owning or
4











operating or which may hereafter own or operate any railroad
in whole, or in part, in this State, and the provisions of this
act shall apply to all persons, firms and companies, and to all
associations of persons, whether incorporated or otherwise, that
shall do business as common [carriers] upon any of the lines of
railroads in this State (street railroads excepted) the same as
to railroad corporations hereinbefore mentioned.
SEc. 21. That all railroad companies operating railroads in
'this State shall adopt a uniform classification and issue dupli-
*cate freight receipts to shippers where station agents are em-
iployed, in which shall be stated the class or classes of freight
,shipped, the freight charges over the road giving the receipt,
and so far as practicable shall state the freight charges over
,other roads that carry such freight.. When the consignee pre
sents the railroad receipt to the agent of the railroad that de-
livers such freight, such agent shall deliver the articles shipped
at the point named in the receipt, provided the company has
-transportation connection with said point, on payment of the
rate charged for the class of freights mentioned in the receipt.
If any railroad company shall violate the provisions of the
statute, such railroad company shallincur a penalty, to be fixed
and collected as provided in section 17 of this act; Provided,
That the consignee shall pay the freight charges on goods,
merchandise and other freights received, and shall not be com-
pelled to pay for goods, merchandise and other freights not re-
ceived.
SEc. 22. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioners here-
in provided for by the first day of March in every year to make
to the Governor annual reports of the transactions of their
office, and to recommend from time to time.such legislation as
they may deem advisable under the provisions of this act.
SEc. 23. That said Railroad Commissioners, in making any
examination for the purpose of obtaining information pursuant
to this act, shall have power to issue subpoenas for the attend-
ance of witnesses by such rules as they may prescribe, and said
witnesses shall receive for such attendance two dollars per day,
and five cents per mile traveled by the nearest practicable
route in going to and returning from the place of meeting of
,said Commissioners, to be ordered paid by the Governor upon
presentation of subpoenas sworn to by the witnesses as to the
number of days served and miles traveled, before the clerk of
said Commissioners, who is hereby authorized. to administer
oaths. In case any person shall wilfully fail or refuse to obey
such subpoena, it shall be the duty of the County Judge of any
,county, upon application of said Commissioners, to issue an
attachment for such witness, and compel him to attend before
the Commissioners and give his testimony upon such matters as











shall be lawfully required by such Commissioners, and said
court shall have power to punish for contempt, as in other cases
of refusal to obey the process and order of such court.
SEC. 24. That every officer, agent or employee of any rail-
road company, who shall wilfully neglect or refuse to make and
furnish any report required by the Commissioners as necessary
to the purpose of this act, or who shall wilfully and unlawfully
hinder, delay or obstruct said Commissioners in the discharge
of the duties hereby imposed upon them, shall forfeit and pay
a sum of not less than one hundred nor more than five thou-
sand dollars for each offence, to be recovered in an action of
debt in the name of the State.
Approved June 7th, 1887.

NOTICE.
'TO ALL CORPORATIONS, COMPANIES OR INDIVIDUALS NOW OWNING
OR OPERATING ANY RAILROAD IN WHOLE OR IN PART
IN THIS STATE AND THE PUBLIC GENERALLY.
Take notice that the Railroad Commissioners of the State of
Florida will meet at Tallahassee on TUESDAY, THE SIXTH DAY
OF SEPTEMBER NEXT, for the purpose of fixing reasonable and
just rates for the transportation of freight and passengers, to be
observed by all railroad companies doing business in this State,
and for the purpose of making just rules and regulations as to
charges at any and all points for the necessary handling and
delivery of freight, and for the making such just and reasona-
ble rules and regulations as may be necessary for preventing
unjust discrimination in the transportation of freight and pas-
sengers and reasonable and just rates of charges for the use of
railroad cars carrying freight.
Such railroad companies, by their agents or attorneys, and
other persons interested, will be fully and fairly heard by said
Commissioners on the day above-mentioned.
G. G. MCWHORTER, President.
E. J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES,
Commissioners.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, October 1, 1887. )
CIRCULAR No. 1.
The following Standard Passenger Tariff and Rules Govern-
ing the Transportation of Passengers are published for the
information of all concerned.












They will go into effect upon the Railroads doing business-
in this State on and after November 1st, 1887 :
STANDARD PASSENGER TARIFF.
The rate of transportation for passengers for each railroad!
in this State shall be (3) three cents per mile for each person.
over twelve years of age, and one and a half (14) cents per
mile for each person under twelve years and over five years of
age.
RULES GOVERNING TRANSPORTATION OF PASSENGERS.
1. Each passenger shall be entitled to baggage not exceed-
ing one hundred and fifty pounds in weight, without additional
charge. Baggage in excess of one hundred and fifty pounds-
to be charged for at double that charged for first-class freight.
2. No additional charge to the schedule rate shall be charged
any passenger not having a ticket where such passenger came
aboard the train at a station where there was no ticket office,
or at a junctional point where it is impracticable from want of
time to obtain one, or where the ticket office at a station is not
open a reasonable time before the departure of a train.
3. Railroad companies will not be prohibited from charging.
less than the rate prescribed, provided such a charge is not an
unjust discrimination in favor of or against persons or localities.
4. The minimum charge for any distance shall not be less
than ten (10) cents. Between this date and November 1st,
1887, Railroad Companies or others may submit to the Com-
mission at their office in Tallahassee, either in writing or orally,
reasons why changes should be made in said Tariff and Rules.
And on and after October, 24th instant, the Commission will
meet at their office in Tallahassee to hear and consider such
reasons, and such changes will be made as to them shall seem
just and reasonable.
G. G. McWHORTER, President.
ENOCH J. VANN, Commissioners.
WILLIAM HIMES,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, October 1st, 1887.
CIRCULAR NO. 2.
The following Standard Freight Tariff and Rules governing
the Transportation of Freight are published for the informa-
tion of all concerned. They will go into effect upon the rail-
roads doing business in this State on and after November st,.
1887:




















STANDARD FREIGHT TARIFF.


CLASSES.

Per 100 Pounds.


DISTANCES. 1 a 234 5 6 A


10 miles and under... 20 181614 12 10 7
20 over 10. 27 232019 10 12 10
:30 20.. 53026 22 19 1612
40 30.. 41368328241816
0 40... 4 41 3733 27 20 18
0 0. 48 44136 28 2120
70 60.. 046 4136282121
80 70.. 46043 39292222
90 80.. 6524640 312424
100 90.. 58 448 4031 2 25

110 o "100.. 558484031 2 26
120 110.. 60 55 0 42 8 20 26
180 "120.. 61563 43 34 28 2
140 "10.. 74 2 50 44 36 29 2
150 140.. 77 6 7 4 3 0 3

100 10.. 77 6 8 4 3 30 3Co
170 10. 8067 59 4638313]
180 170.. 837 60 4839833
190 180.. 86736143934 3
00 "190.. 8574614940 4 34
210 "200.. 8574 6149 404 34
220 "210.. 8677 62 50 403434
230 220 88 7964 52 41 33
240 "20.. 89 82 6 53 41 36 3
260 "240.. 908466 54 42 3631
260 20.. 91 85 67 6 42 86 3
270 260. 92 8 67 55 43 37
280 27.. 86 68 5643 38 31
290 280.. 86 68 56 44 8 8 31
300 290.. 96887058464041
310 300.. 9789715846414
320 "'310.. 989072 5947 42
330 20. 99 90 72 59 47424
340 330.. 99 90 72 59 4742 4
350 "340.. 1009178604834
30 30.. 1019178 6048434
370 360. 10 91 7 6048 4 4
380 370. 102 92 74 1 49 444
390 380.. 10292 74 6149 444
400 "3 90.. 103 92 74 61 49 444


k I


SI


SF OH J K LM NO P


1411 1612
1614 21 16%
19 15 26 18
2316 30 20%
26517% 33 23
27 18 30 25
27 19 30 26%
2920 3927%
30 21% 40 29
3123 4030

31 23 40 31
3324 42 32%
3426 43 33%
36 20% 44 36
3 27 44 36

36 28% 46 37
3831 46 38%
39 31 48 39%
39 33 49 41
39 33 4942
40 33% 49 43
40 33 50 44%
41 836% 52 45%
41 36% 63 47
42 38 54 48
4238 65 49
43 40 55 50%
4340 56 61%
4442 66 63
4642 68 54
47 43 58 6
48 43 69 36
48 44 59 57
4844 9 68
4946 609
404 6060
49 46 60 61
5060 62 62
50 50 62163
50 50 6264












The Commission will postpone until its next session fixing
the rates on classes G, K, L, M, N, 0, P, R, S and V, and in
the meantime respectfully invite fuller information concerning
them from the Railroad Companies and from the public gener-
ally.
The Standard Freight Tariff will be the basis upon which
such changes as appear to be just and reasonable from time to
time will be made. Meantime parties interested may submit
in writing or orally to the Commission, at their office in Talla-
hassee, reasons why changes in same should be made.
The Commission will meet in session in their office in Talla-
hassee Monday, October 24th instant, and will then and there-
after hear and consider such reasons, and make whatever mod-
ifications and changes as shall seem just and reasonable.
RULES GOVERNING THE TRANSPORTATION OF FREIGHTS.
1. All connecting railroads which are under the management
and control by lease, ownership or otherwise, of one and the-
same company, shall for purposes of transportation in applying
this tariff be considered as constituting but one and the samn
road, and the rates shall be computed as upon parts of one and
the same road unless otherwise specified.
2. A minimum charge of 25 cents may be made on any ship-
ment however small..
3. The rates fixed by the Commission are maximum rates
which shall not be transcended by the railroads. They may,
however, carry at less than the rates fixed, provided that it
they carry for less for one person they shall for the like service
carry for the same lessened rate for all persons, except as men-
tioned hereafter, and if they adopt less freight rates from one
station they shall make a reduction of the same per cent. at all
stations along the line of road so as to make no unjust discrim-
ination as against any person or locality. But when from any
point in this State there are competing lines of transportation,
any railroad may at such competing point make rates below
those fixed by the Commission to meet such competition with-
out making a corresponding reduction along the line of road.
4. The rates specified, or hereafter to be made, for common
brick, bone, lumber, shingles, laths, staves, empty barrels,
wood and coal, corn in the ear, fruit and vegetables, cotton in
the seed, melons by the car-load, fertilizers, straw, shucks, hay,
bran by the car-load, fodder, tan-bark, rosin, turpentine, tar
and household goods, including also articles designated by the
letter S," for which no rates have been or may be fixed, are
maximum rates, but the roads are left free to reduce them at
discretion; and all such rates are exempt from the operations









55

of rule 3. Any complaintsas to such rates will, upon presenta-
tion, be duly heard.
5. Where articles in the classification are designated by the-
letter "S," such articles are subject to special contract, to be
made between the shipper and railroad. This rule to apply
also to classes G, K, L, M, N, O, P, R, V, until the rates there-
of shall have been fixed by the Commission.
6. The rate charged for freight service by regular passenger
train may be one and a half times that for first-class freight by
ordinary freight trains, but the railroad companies are not com-
pelled to transport by regular passenger trains such freight as
is not proper to be carried by such trains.
7. The charge for handling extra heavy articles may be as-
follows:
Under 2,000 pounds, no charge for extra handling.
2,000 pounds and under 3,000 pounds, $3 for extra handling..
3,000 pounds and under 4,000 pounds, $5 for extra handling.
4,000 pounds and under 5,000 pounds, $7 for extra handling.
5,000 pounds and under 6,000 pounds, $8 for extra handling.
6,000 pounds and under 7,000 pounds, $10 for extra hand-
ling.
7,000 pounds and over in proportion.
8. Car-load rates apply to a shipment of a car-load or more,
made by one shipper, at one time, to one and the same point of
delivery, to the same consignee. Although the same may in
fact be carried by the railroad company to the point of delivery
in lots less than the amount recognized as a car-load.
9. The term fertilizers embraces the following and like artic-
les when intended to be used as fertilizers. Sulphate of Am-
monia, Ashes, Bone Black, Ground and Dissolved Bone, Bone:
Dust, Castor Pomace, Cotton Seed Meal, Cotton Seed Ashes,
Cotton Seed, Fish Scrap, Guano and Superphosphates, Lump
and Ground Phosphates, Gypsum, Kainit, German Salts, Nitre
Cake, Nitrate and Sulphate of Soda, Oil Cake, Potash, Plaster
of Paris, Land Plaster, German Potash, Muriate and Sulphate of
Potash, Fine Ground Plaster, South Carolina Phosphate,
ground and lump, Salt Cake, Salt Petre, Sulphur, Sulphate of
Soda and tank stuff.
10. There shall be no secret reduction of rates, and no rebate,
bonus, drawbacks or other advantages in any form shall be
given, either directly or indirectly, upon shipments made, or
service rendered to any person, not allowed to all other persons,
but the rate shall be uniform to all and public.
11. None of the rules and regulations established by the Com-
mission shall be so construed as to prevent any railroad com-
pany from transporting freights and persons free of charge, or
at reduced rates for any religious, charitable or benevolent pur-













pose, or for any industrial exposition, fair or association of a
public nature, or for pleasure excursions.
12. Each railroad company shall post at all its stations, in a
conspicuous place, at each of its freight and ticket offices, a
copy of the schedule of the rates fixed by the Commission for
the transportation of passengers and freights respectively for
such railroads, or which may hereafter be changed or fixed, and
keep the same continuously posted. This rule shall apply to
all rates made by railroads at. competing points under the ex-
ceptions to rule 3.
13. No railroad company shall by reason of any agreement,
arrangement or understanding as to the transportation of
freights, according to percentage or otherwise, between it and
any other railroad companies, permit any blockade of any class
of freight.
14. Connecting roads may pro rate (as they may agree) on
freight rates, where freight passes over more than one line;
Provided, The total charge is within the maximum limit fixed
by the Commission for such distance on one road, but copies of
all such agreements must be filed in the office of the Commis-
sion.
15. Unjust discrimination in the delivery of freight to any
competing lines of steamboats in this State is forbidden.
ESTIMATED WEIGHTS.
16. Lumber, coal, lime, brick, stone, and all articles for which
estimated weights are given in the classification (except live
stock, ale and beer, and empty ale and beer packages, L. C. L.),
shall be taken at actual weight when it can be ascertained, but
when the weight cannot be ascertained, may be charged for at
the following estimated weights; Provided, That nothing here-
in shall interfere with the duty of the receiving agent to weigh,
if possible, and correct to actual weight.
(To be used when actual weights cannot be ascertained) :
White pine and poplar, thoroughly seasoned, per 1,000 feet.... 3,000 lbs-
White pine and poplar, green, per 1,000 feet ................ 4,000 lbs.
Yellow pine, black walnut and ash, seasoned, per 1,000 feet.... 4,000 lbs.
Yellow pine, black walnut and ash, green, per 1,000 feet.. ... 4,500 lbs.
Oak, hickory and elm, seasoned, per 1,000 feet ............... 4,500 lbs.
Oak, hickory and elm, green, per 1,000 feet ............... 6,000 lbs.
All other kinds of lumber, seasoned, per 1,000 leet............ 4,009 lbs.
All other kinds of lumber, green, per 1,000 feet ............... 6,000 lbs.
S Hoop poles, staves and headings, dry, car loaded to a depth of 50
inches, per car ................... ....................24,000 lbs.
Hoop poles, staves and headings, green, car loaded to a depth of
43 inches, per car..................................... 24,000 lbs.
Shingles, green, per 1,000................................. 350 lbs.
Shingles, dry, per 1,000.................. .................. 300 lbs.
Laths, green, per 1,000 .... .............. .... ............. 530 lbs.
Laths, dry, per 1,000....................... ....... ...... 450 lbs.










57

Tan bark, green, per cord ......... ................ ...... 2,600 lbs.
Tan bark, dry, per cord..... ........................... 2,000 lbs.
Wood, green, per cord..................................... 3,500 Ibs.
W ood, dry, per cord....... ............ ............... 3,000 Ibs.
Fence-posts and rails, and telegraph poles.................. 3,500 Ibs.
Clay, per cubic yard ................... ................... 3,000 Ibs.
Sand, per cubic yard.... ........................ .... 3,000 lbs.
Gravel, per cubic yard............. ...... .......... ... 3,200 lbs.
Stone, undressed, per cubic foot.............................. 160 lbs.
Lime, per bushel ............ ....... ........... ......... 80 lbs.
Coal, per bushel.. ............. ............... .......... 80 Ibs.
Coke, per bushel...................................... 40 lbs.
Portland cement, per barrel................................ 400 lbs.
Other cements, per barrel .................. ......... ... 800 lbs.
LIVE STOCK.
To be fed by the owner, or at his expense. Weights esti-
mated until amount charged shall equal car-load rates, in less
than car-loads, as follows:
1 horse or mule...................................... 2,000 lbs.
2 horses or mules............................... ........ 3,000 Jbs.
Each additional horse or mule............................ 1,000 lbs.
One mare and colt................. ..................... 2,500 Ibs.
Stallions, jacks or bulls .............................. 2,000 lbs.
1 cow or steer..................... ......... .. ... ...... 1,000 lbs.
Same in lots of 4 or less, each.............................. 1,000 lbs.
Same, over 4, each........................ .......... ..... 800 lbs.
Yearling cattle...................... ....... ...... ..... ... 500 bs.
Calves and sheep, each................................... 125 lbs.
Same in lots of five or more, each........................... 100 lbs.
Lambs, each...................... ...... .............. ... 100 lbs.
Same in lots of 5 or more, each .......................... 50 bs.
Hogs for market, each..................................... 300 lbs.
Pigs and stock hogs, each.................................. 100 lbs.
Pigs, hogs, sheep, etc., boxed, actual weight.
17. In every case where .the C. L. rate is lower than L. C. L.
rate, whether per 100 lbs., per barrel or per ton, the standard
maximum weight of a car-load shall be 24,000 lbs. Excess over
this weight may be charged in proportion, but when the classi-
fication establishes a lower minimum C. L., then such lower
minimum shall govern, and excess of said minimum may be
charged for in proportion; Provided, That in no case shall the
amount collected on L. C. L. exceed the price per C. L.
18. A ton is 2,000 pounds.
10. All contracts and agreements between railroad compa-
nies doing business in this State, as to rates of freight and pas-
senger tariffs, and all arrangements and agreements whatever
as to the division of earnings of any kind by competing railroad.
companies doing business in this State, shall be submitted to
the Commissioners for inspection, revision and approval, to the
end that it may be seen whether they are in violation of the
law, or of the rules and regulations of the said Commissioners.
(See sec. 16, Chap. 3746.)









58

GENERAL RULES.
1. After the standard schedule takes effect the Commission
will entertain complaints of any alleged violation thereof. Such
complaints must be in writing.
Persons complaining will bear in mind that the Commission
has no jurisdiction of rates or charges on freight which comes
from or goes beyond the boundaries of the State." It only has
the power to regulate rates when the place from whence and
the place to which the goods are shipped are both within the
State.
2. Each railroad company doing business in this State shall
make and file in the office of the Commission, by the 20th day
of each month, a report of its earnings, expenses, etc., for the
preceding month, and by the first of February of each year an
annual report of its condition and operations for the preceding
year ending December 31st, reports to be according to forms
prescribed by the Commission. The monthly reports, in ac-
cortance with form A," to be verified by the affidavit of the
General Manager, if there is one, or Superintendent, and the
Treasurer or Auditor. The annual report to be in accordance
with form lI," to be verified by the affidavit of the President,
Superintendent or General Manager, and Auditor or Treasurer,
G. G. McWHORTER, President.
ENOH J. VANN, Commissioners.
WILLIAM -IIMES,
Attest: JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, October 1, 1887.
CIRCULAR No. 3.
The following classification of freights is published for the
information of all persons interested therein.
The Commission will make changes from time to time, as
may seem to them necessary, and will consider suggestions of
sufficient reasons for such modifications and changes.
The railroad companies doing business in this State are re-
quired to adopt and use this uniform classification on and after
November 1st, 1887. (See Section 21, Chapter 3746.) (See
page 13 for remainder of this Circular.)
G. G. McWHORTER,
President.
S President. Commissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIA HIMES. J
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.













OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, October 28, 1887.
CIRCULAR No. 4.
It is ordered that the operations of Circulars Nos. One, Twor
and Three, advertised to go into effect on Novedber 1, 1887, be'
suspended until December 1, 1887.
GEO. G. McWHORTER, President.
ENOCH J. VANN, Co mission
WILLIAM HIMES. ~Commissioners.-
WILLIAM HIMES.
Attest: JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

G. G. McWHORTER,
President. ICommissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN, Commissioners.
WILLIAM HIMES, J
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, October 29, 1887. )
CIRCULAR No. 5.
The following changes have been made in the classification?
of freights, to wit:
Class if
Class Releas'd,
Bananas, changed from Class G to............................. 3
Beeswax, changed from Class 4 to.. ........................ 3
Bone Black, L. C. L., changed from Class M to................ 3
Box and Barrel Stuff, L. C. L., changed from Class 6 to........ A
Brick, Common and Fire, 6,000 (or 25,000 Ibs) ................
Clock Weights, changed from Class 5 to ................... 2
Oil Cake, changed from Class M to ........ ............... D
Fish,fresh, prepaid, L. C. L., changed from Class B Released to 3
Fish, fresh, prepaid, C. L., changed trom Class L to............ 3
Fruils, Grapes and Berries, changed from Class 6 Released to.. 1
Fruit, Apples. N. O. S., changed from Class 6 Released to...... 3
Iron, Bar, Bands, Boiler, Sheet and Plate Iron and Steel, all un-
packed, and Cut Nails and Spikes, in kegs, changed from 60
per cent. of 6th Class to.................................... 6
Iron, Roofing in boxes, Jail Plate, Pipe, released; Bolts, in
kegs, casks or drums; Nuts, in kegs, casks or drums ;
Rivets, in kegs, casks or drums; Wagon Tires, Castings,.
not Machinery, each piece weighing 200 pounds or over,
not packed, owner's risk of breakage; Car Wheels and
Axles; Wagon and Carriage Axles; Wagon and Carriage
Skeins and Boxes, packed in kegs or barrels, -or casks, re-
leased; Plow Points; Plow Molds; Plow Wings; Plow Sheet;
Fish Bars and Fastenings; Horse and Mule Shoes; Fence
Wire; Sash Weights, unpacked, changed from 66% per cent.
of 6th Class to .......................................... ..
Nails and Spikes, Iron, in boxes, changed from 5th Class to..... 2
Peas, Dried or Split; in bags or barrels, changed from Class D
to ....... ...... ..... .......... ......................... 5
Paper, in rolls, (add Class A, Released)......................
Saltpetre, N. 0. 8., changed from Class 4 to...................













2. The following is the Standard Freight Tariff for freights
as applicable to Classes G, K, L, M, N, O, P, R and V:

STA.NIARD FREIGHT TARIFF.

CLASSES.


MILES. 6


GK

10 and under............ 10 5
20 over 10............... 11 6
.S0 over 20.............. 12 7
40 over 80............... 12 8
,50 over 40............... 13 8
,60 over 50............. 13 9
70 over 60......... ..14 9
.80 over 70.............. 14 9
:90 over 80............... 15 9j
100 over 90.......... .. 15 9+
110 over 100............15 10
120 over 110............. 1610
130 over 120............. 16 10
140 over 130............. 16 10j
150 over 140............. 17 10
160 over 150............. 17 10
170 over 160 ............. 1711
180 over 170......... ... 1 11
190 over 180............. 1811
200 over 190..... .......18 11
210 over 200............. 19 12
220 over 210............. 19 12
230 over 220............. 19 12
240 over 230............ 2012
250 over 240............. 0 12
200 over 250............ 20 13
270 over 260............. 20 13
280 over 270..... .... 21 13
290 over 280............ 21 13
800 over 290............. 21 13
310 over 300............ 22 14
820 over 810........... 22 14
380 over 320............ 22 14
340 over 3880........... 22 14
350 over 840............ 23 14
.360 over 850............. 83 15
870 over 360............ 23 15
880 over 370..; ......... 23 14
390 over 880. ......... 25 15
400 over 890............. 25 15


Per Ton.


LM

$ 50 $ 80
60 85
70 90
80 95
90 100
100 105
105 110
110 116
115 120
120 125
125 130
125 185
180 140
180 145
185 150
185 155
140 160
140 165
145 170
145 175
150 180
150 185
155 190
155 195
160 200
160 205
165 205
165 210
170 210
170 215
175 215
175 220
180 220
180 225
190 225
190 2830
195 280
195 281
200 231
200 231


Car Loads.


N 0 P

$1000 $8 00 $4 00
140 1000 5 60
1700 1100 640
1900 1200 720
2100 1300 800
2800 1400 880
2500 1500 880
2700 1600 960
2900 1700 1040
8100 1700 1120
3200 1800 1120
3200 1800 1200
3500 19 00 1280
3500 1900 1280
3600 2000 1360
3700 2000 13 60
3700 2100 14 40
3800 2100 15 20
3800 2200 1520
3900 2200 1600
3900 2300 1600
4000 23 00 16 80
4000 2800 1680
4100 24 00 17 60
4100 2400 1760
4200 24 00 1760
4200 25 00 1840
4300 2500 1840
4300 25 00 1920
4400 2600 1920
4400 26 00 1920
4500 26 00 1920
4500 27 00 2000
4600 2700 2000
4600 2700 2000
4700 27 00 20 00
4700 2800 2100
4800 2800 2100
48 0 2800 21 00
4800 2800 21











3. The following additional rule regulating the transporta-
tion of passengers has been adopted as Rule 5, to wit: In ap-
plying the Standard Passenger Tariff, when the fare for any
distance does not end in 0 or 5, sums of 2- and over may be'
counted as 5, and sums less than 2J as 0. For example, for
42J cents collect 45, and for 42 cents collect 40.
4. The Commissioners have set apart the time embraced be-
tween the 7th and 12th of November, 1887, inclusive, during
which to hear and consider, at their office in Tallahassee, sug-
gestions from the different railroads, and the public at larger
as to any modifications or changes that may be deemed just as
to the tariff and rules and regulations embraced in this and all
preceding Circulars issued by this Board, to the end that a
schedule of just and reasonable rates of charges for the trans-
portation of passengers and freights to go into effect Decem-
ber 1st, 1887, on each railroad may be made.
On Monday, November 7th, the following roads will be
heard: St. Johns and Halifax R. R.; Orange Belt R. R.
Tavares, Orlando and Atlantic R. R.; St. Johns and St.
Augustine and Palatka R. R.; Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf
R. R.; Florida Midland R. R.; Jacksonville and Atlantic R.
R.; Blue Springs, Orange City and Atlantic R. R.; Western
Railway of Florida, and Tavares, Apopka and Gulf R. R.
On November 8th, the South Florida R. R. and the Savan-
nah, Florida and Western Ry.
On November 9th, the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West
Ry.
On November 10th, The Florida Southern Ry., Penscola
Division of the Louisville and Nashville R. R., and the Pensa-
cola and Atlantic R. R.; and on November 11th, the Florida
Railway and Navigation Co.
This Circular to go into effect as to all railroads doing busi-
ness in this State on December 1st, 1887.
GEO. G. McWHORTER,
President. Comm
ENOCH J. VANN, Commissioners
WILLIAM HIMES,
Attest: JOHN. G. WARD, Secretary.

OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, November 14, 1877.
CIRCULAR NO. 6.
The following standard passenger tariff for the railroads do-
ing business in this State, is published for the information of
all concerned, and shall go into effect on and after December
1, 1887:












ORANGE BELT RAILROAD.
Passemger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
-two and one-half cents per mile.
FLORIDA MIDLAND RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
JACKSONVILLE AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be three cents per mile, and half fare to be
,one and one-half cents per mile.
WESTERN RAILWAY OF FLORIDA.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
BLUE SPRINGS, ORANGE CITY AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
SILVER SPRINGS, OCALA AND GULF RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
ST. JOHNS RAILWAY.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
ST. JOHNS AND HALIFAX RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
TAVARES, APOPKA AND GULF RAILROAD.
.Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
ST. AUGUSTINE AND PALATKA RAILWAY.
Passenger fare to be four cents per mile, and half fare to be
two cents per mile.
PENSACOLA AND PERDIDO RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be four cents per mile, and half fare to be
two cents per mile.
TAVARES, ORLANDO AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.
Passenger fare to be four cents per mile, and half fare to be
two cents per mile.
SAVANNAH, FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY.
Main line passenger fate to be three cents per mile, and half
fare to be one and one-half cents per mile.









63

FOR WHITE AND LAKE /CITY BRANCH.
passenger fare to be four cents lIer mile, and half fare to be
jwo cents per mile.
SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD.
Main line and Pemberton Ferry Branch: Passenger fare to
be three cents per mile, and hal'i fare to be one and one-half
cents per mile.
BARTOW RANCH.
Passenger fare to be four cepts per mile, and half fare to be
two cents per mile.
SANFORD AND I/DIAN RIVER DIVISION.
Passenger fare to be five ents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per naile.
JACKSONVILLE, TAM A AND KEY WEST RAILWAY.
Main line and St. AuguStune Branch: Passenger fare to be
three cents per mile, and lalf fare to be one and one-half cents
per mile.
INDIAN RIVER AND S NFORD AND LAKE EUSTIS DIVISIONS.
Passenger fare to be f ur cents per mile, and half fare to be
two cents per mile..

ELAND BRANCH.
Passenger fare to be/five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cent per mile.
FLOR DA SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
Main line: Passenger fare to be three cents per mile, and
half fare to be one ad one-half cents per mile.
ST. JOHNS AND LA EUSTIS AND CHARLOTTE HARBOR DVIIS1ONS.
Passenger fare o be four cents per mile, and half fare to be
two cents per mjie.
ROC ELLE, CITRA AND MICANOPY BRANCHES.
Passengerfare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and o e-half cents per mile.

PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.
Pa singer fare to be three cents per mile, and half fare to be
one and one-half cents per mile.



'j :/
/









64

LOUISVILLE AND NASHVI LE RAILROAD-PENSACOLA DIVISION.
Passenger fare to be thiee cents per mile, and half fare to be
one and one-half cents per mile.
FLORIDA RAILWAY /AND NAVIGATION COMPANY.
On all divisions except St. Marks, Monticello and the Sum
terville branch, passenger fare to be three cents per mile, and
half fare to be one and one-half cents per mile.
ST. MARKS AND MONTICELLO DIVISIONS AND SUITERVILLE AND
SILVER SPRINGS BRANCHES.
Passenger fare to be five cents per mile, and half fare to be
two and one-half cents per mile.
Rule No 2, Circular No..1, is amended to read as follows:
No additional charge to the schedule rate shall be charged
any passenger not having a ticket where such passenger came
aboard the train at a station where there was no ticket-office,
or at a junctional point where it is impracticable from want of
time to obtain one, or where the ticket office at a station is not
open a reasonable time before the departure of a train. But
railroad companies may make such'other regulations as to all
other passengers without tickets as they may deem necessary ;
Provided, That no extra charge of mpre than one cent per mile
in such cases shall be made for full fare, and one-half
cent per mile for half fare. But, int every case where more
than the regular fare is charged any passenger without a
ticket, such passenger shall be enti led to a drawback for
such excess, collectable at any station where there is an
agent, provided such drawback is pres eted within thirty days
after being issued.
The following rule has been adopted in lieu of rule No. 4,
Circular No. 1:
Twenty cents as a minimum full fare and ten cents as half
fare may be collected when the full fare would be less than
those amounts.
GEO. G. McWHORTER, '
President. Commissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES, J
Attest:
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.




















OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSBE, FLORIDA, November 19, 1887.

CIRCULAR NO. 7.
The following schedule of rates for each railroad doing business, in whole or in part,
in Florida, to go into effect December 1st, 1887, is published for the information of all
concerned, to wit:
BLUE SPRINGS, ORANGE CITY AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.

lMEe. 1 2 4 5 6ABCDEIFIH J K L M N O P RV
10and under.. 0 0 0115 0|12|12 910 017 01 0 0 00$ o000 $00 8 006 00 0 0,
8and over 10000000 4 1113 0 21 0_ 0 0 1 0000 000 00 00
W 0 Commissioners' Standard.

FLORIDA MIDLAND RAILROAD.

MILES. 1 2 3 4 6 ABC D E FG H J K L M N 0 P RV
10andunder.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 5% 0 0 0 0 85$ 0$00$500 00
2andover00000000087 00000000 90 0 0070000
20 and over 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 00 0 00 00 0 0
30 and over 20 0 0 0 0 010 0 0 0 l9 1 0 0000 0 0 00 0 00 80010I0
40 and over 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0I10 8 0 0 0 0 00 00105 0 00 9 00 0 0
50 and over40 0 0 0 0 0 00 8 0 00 0 001 10 0 00100000
3"-0 Commissioners' Standard.

FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
(Except Charlotte Harbor Division.)


1 2 3
30 25 22
32110 25
03229
0 0 0
0 0 0
50 0 0
52 0 0
0 0 0
59 0 0
62 0 0
62 0 0
66 0 0
70 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 00
0 0 0o

000


4 5 0
20 18 15
22 20 17
26 21 18
30 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
01 0
42 0 0
42 0 0
45 35 0
4540 0
47 42 35
50 45 37
50 45 40
52 47 42
55 50 45
56 5146
56 51 46


ABC D
12 010 8
15 0 8
17 011 8
18 012 9
20 0 18 9
0 0 14 9
0 0 15 10
0 016 10
0 6 1710
0 01811
0 0 20 11
0 021 12
0 022 12
0 025 13
0 025 13
0 026 13
0 027115
0 027 15
0 0 8 0
0 028 0


E
18
20
21
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
35
40
42
45
45
47
50
51
51


FQG H
15 020
15 0 0
16 0 0
17 0 0
0 0 0
01 0 0
0 0 0
0 0 0
25 0 0
80 042
30 042
30 045
35 045
35 0 V
35 0 50
35 0 5
35 0 52
85 0 55
40 o 5
40 056


K L M N
6 $ 75 $1 00 $ 0
7 90 1 05 0
8 95 1 10 0
8 1 00 1 15 0
9 1 1 1125 0
9 1 25 1 30 0
9 1 30 1 35 0
9% 1 35 1 40 0
10 1 45 1 45 0
10 1 50 1 50 0
10% 1 55 1 55 0
10% 1 60 1 60 0
11 1 60 1 65 0
11 1 65 1 70 0
12 1 65 1 75 0
12 1 70 1 80 0
12 1 70 1 85 0
13 175 1 90 0
13 1 75 1 95 0
18 1 80 2 00 0
I' "


O PR

$10 00 5 00 7
11 00 7 00 8
1200 800 9
13 00 9 00 10
14 00 10 00 11
15 0 11 00 12
16 00 11 0013
17 00 12 0014
17 1 13 00 15
18 00 14 00 16
18 00 14 00 17
19 0 150018
19 00 16 00 18
20 00 16 00 19
20 00 17 00 19
21 00 17 0020
21 00 18 00 20
22 00 19 00 20
22 00 19 0021
2300 20 00 21


WO0 Commissioners' Standard.
For Charlotte Harbor Division add 50 per cent. to standard on all classes except G and V.


MILES.
10 and under..
20 and over 10
30 and over 20
40 and over 30
50 and over 40
60 and over 50
70 and over 60
80 and over 70,
90 and over 80
100 and over 90
110 and over 100
120 and over 110
130 and over 120
140 and over 130
150 and over 140
160 and over 150
170 and over 160
180 and over 170
190 and over 180
200 and over 190


---












66

FLORIDA RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY.

MILES. 11 21 3i 41 51 6IAIBICIDIE F GI HI IJ K L I M NI 0 P IRIV

10 and under.....3025 222018 1512 0 10 8 18 15 020 0 6 75 $100 $0 $1000$ 500 7 0
:20 and over 10.... 2 30 25 2220 1715 010 820 1 0 0 0 7 90 105 0 1100 7 00 8 0
.30 and over 20.... 3229 26211817 011 821 1 0 0 0 8 95 110 0 1200 8009 0
40 and over 30.... 0 0 30 0 18 012 9 017 0 0 0 8 100 115 0 1300 90010 0
50and over 40 .... 0 0 0 0 020 013 9 0 0 0 0 0 9 10 125 0 1400 10 0011 0
40 andover50.... 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 014 9 0 0 0 0 0 125 130 0 1500 110012 0
,70 and over 60.... 52 0 0 0 00 0 1510 0 0 00 9% 1 30 1 5 16 00 110013 0
;80 and over 70..... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 10 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 40 017 00 12 0014 0
.90 a.,d over 80.... 59 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 10 025 0 0 010 1 45 1 45 0 17 00 13 00 1 0
1100andover 90.... 62 0 04 0 0 0 0 1811 0 30 042 10 150 150 18 00 140016 0
a110 and over 100... 62 0 0 4 0 0 0 2011 0130 042 010% 155 155 0 1800 140017 0
.12 and over 110... 66 0 0 4E35 00 021123530 045 010 160 160 0 1900 N60018 0
130 and over 120... 70 0 04540 0 0 0221240 35 045 011 1 0 165 0 1900 160018 0
140 and over 10... 0 0 47 42 350 0 13 0 0 13 47 0 11 11 70 0 2000 1 00 19 0
150 and over 140... 0 0 50 45 37 0 025134535 050 012 165 1 75 0 20 00 17 0019 0
160 and over 150... 0 0 50 45 40 0 026 134535 50 0 12 1 70 1 80 0 2100 17 0020 0
1170 and over 160... 0 0 5247 42 0 271547 5 0 52 012 1 70 1 85 0 2100 180020 0
180 and over 170... 0 0 0555045 0 027 1550350 55 013 1 75 1 90 0 2200 190020 0
190 and over 180.... 0 0 5 51 46 0 0 28 0 5140 0 50 13 1 75 1 9 0 22 00 19 0021 0
S200 and over 190 .. 0 0 56 51 46 0 0 28 0 5140 0 56 0 13 1 80 2 00 0 23 00 20 00 21 0
210 and over 200... 0 0 56 51 46 0 029 05140 056 014 190 2 05 0 2400 200022 0
220 and over2L0... O 0 0 57 1 46 0 29 05240 0 57 0 14 1 90 2 10 24 00 200022 0
230 and over 220.. 0 0595247 0 030 05242 058 014 1 95 2 15 0 2400 200022 0
240 and over 280... 0 0 0 60 52 47 0 30 0 05342 0 5 0 14 1 95 2 20 0 25 00 210023 0
250 and over 240... 0 0615348 o 031 05345 00 014 200 225 0 25 00 210023 0
260 and over 250.. 0 62 53 48 0 31 0 5445 0 61 0 15 2 00 2 30 0 25 00 21 00 23 0
270 andover260... 0 0 06254 9 0 032 05447 0 61 0 15 205 230 0 2600 22 00 23 0
280 and over 270... 0 0 0 6354 50 0 0 32 0 55 47 062 0015 2 06 2 35 0 26 00 220024 0
290 and over 280.. 0 o 06355 5 00 33 0 5549 062 0 15 210 235 0 26 00 23 0024 0
.300 and over 290... 0 0 0 6557 52 0 0 56490 64 0 1 1 240 21 40 7 00 230024 0
.310 and over 300... 0 0 00557 53 0 0 34 057151 0 64 0 1 25 2 40 0 27 00 23 0024 0
320 and over 310... 0 0 0l66 58 5 0 0 34 0 58 ,1 0 65 6 16 215 45 0 27 00 23 00 25 0
330 and over 320... 0 0 66 58 54 0 0 35 0 5952 0 65 0 16 20 245 0 28 00 24 0025 0
340 and over 30. 0 0 06858 54 0 0 35 05952 0 65 0 1 2 20 2 50 0 28 00 24 0025 0
360 and over 340. 0 079 55 0 0 36 05953 066 01 225 2 50 0 2800 240026 0
360 and over 350.. .0 0 67 59 55 0 03 0 59'53 0 66 0 17 2 25 2 55 0 28 00 24 00 25
AM- 0 Commissioners' Standard.
JACKSONVILLE AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.
To Class P, on all shipments, from South Jacksonville, add 50 per cent. to Standard.
'To all other classes, add to Standard Tariff, ferriage paid at Jacksonville.
JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA AND KEY WEST RAILWAY.
All distances.-Add to Commissioners' Standard, as follows:
On Classes 0, D, F, L, O and M, 25 per cent.
On Class P, 50 per cent.
On all other Classes apply Standard Tariff.
3PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC, AND PENSACOLA DIVISION LOUISVILLE AND NASH-
VILLE RAILROAD.

MILUs. | 1 21 3 41 5 6 A BIC DIE F G HI J K L M NI 0 P RV

10 and under....... 0 0 0 0 0 15 1 10 8 15 15 0 0 0 0$ 0 0 0 $1000 $720 0 0
:20 and over 10 .... 0 0 20 20 10 10 20 10 0 0 0 0 0 11 00 7 20 0 0
80 and over 20..... 0 0 0 0 02222 11 11 22 16 0 0 0 0 0 1200 9 60
40 and over 30...... 0 0 0 0 0 42 2412 11 24 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 00 10 80 0 0
B0andover40...... 0 0 0 0 026 13 12 26 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 00 10 80 0
60 and over 50...... 0 00 0 28 28 14 13 28 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 00 12 00 0
70 and over 60......0 0 0 0 02330 30 15 14 30 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 00 13 20 0 0
:80 and over 70...... 0 0 0 24131 31 16 153120 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0013 20 0 0
90 and over 80...... 0 0 0 2533 33 17 15 33 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 00 13 20 0 0
1100 and over...... 0 0 0 027 3 318 16 6 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 0013 20 0 0
v110 and over 100..... 0 0 0 0 28 37 37 20 17 37 30 0 0 0 0 00 18 00 13 20 0 0
,20 and over 110..... 0 0 0 029383821 17 38 30 0 0 00 130 0 0 19 00 13 20 0 0
130 and over 120.... 0 0 0 0 303939 2218393 0 0 0 0 35 0 0 19 0018 20 0 0
140 and over 130 ... 0 0 0 0 40 40 25 18 40 35 0 00 0 1 40 0 0 20 00 13 20 0 0
150 and over40 0 0 0 0 041 412519 4135 0 0 1 0 20001320 0 0
A.0 and over 150. 0 0 0 0 4242 2204235 0 1 50 0 0 21 0013 20 0 0
o0 Cominissioners' Standard.












67


ORANGE BELT RAILROAD.


MILES. 11 11 21 3 4' 5 6IAIBIIDIEI FIGIHI Jl K L I MINI O I P IRIV

10andunder........ 2201817 113 014 9 8 018 0 o0 00 $00 5950$ 0 5 0
20 and overl0....... 282422201916 01510 9 019 0 0 0 70 100 0 0 700 0 0
30andover 20...... 027242118 0171110 021 0 0 0 0 85 110 0 0 800 0 0
40andover30....... o 0 o0 021 018111 03 0 0 0 0 95 115 0 0 900 0 0
50 and over 4...... 0 0 0 025 0 1513 025 0 0 0 110 120 0 0 1000 0 0
I" 0 Commissioners' Standard.

SAVANNAH, FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY.


MILEs. 12 3 4 5 6AB DE FG H J K L M N O P RV
10andunder....... 24212015141212 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 $0 Soo 00o 000$500 0 0
20 and over 10...... 302724218115 0 0 018 0 0 0 0 0 00 90 1200 0 700 0 0
30 and over 20...... 36322912621 17117 0 0 021 0 0 0 0 0 00 100 15 00 0 8000 0
40andover 30 ... 0 0 0 0 00018 0 0 024 0 0 0 0 0 00 110 18 00 0 900 0 0
50 and over40.... 0 0 0 00020 0 0 02 0 0 0 0 0 120 2000 1000 0 0
60 and over 50...... 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 00 0 0 01 0 0 95 130 22 00 0 1100 0 0
70 and over 6....... 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 0 0 000 0 1 00 1 35 24 00 011 00 0 0
80 and over 0....... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 01 10 1 40 26 00012 00 0 0
90 and over 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 145 2800 001300 0 0
90 nd over 80...... 1o o o 1 0 1
00and over 90 ...... 62 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 00 0 14 00 0 0

ga 0 Commissioners' Standard.
SILVER SPRINGS, OCALA AND GULF RAILROAD


MILEr. 12 3 4 6 ABOD F G JK L M N 0 P RV
10 and under...... 2422201615151510 8 718 15 0 75 $1 00 $12 10 00 00 6 0
30 and over 20...... 36 025242018171414132225 0 21 0 90 1 50 1800 00 800 8 0

JW 0 Commissioners' Standard.

SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD.


MILES. 1 2 3 4 5 6 ABCDE G El J K L M N 0 P RV
10 and under......... 0 0 00 0 0 12110 8 015 0 22 0 0 7651000 0 $00 0 0
20 and over lo........ 0 0 0 0 0 0 1410 9 015 027 0 9010 0 0 800 0 0
30 and over 20........ 0 0 0 0 0 00161110 017 030 0 0 95 110 0 0 800 0
40 and over 30........ 0 0 0 0222 0181211 018 035 0 0100110 0 1000 0 0
50 and over 40........ 0 0 030 24 0 20 1311 021 0 40 0 0 1 10 1 25 0 0 1200 0 0
60 and over 50........ 0 0 38 33 26 021 14 12 022 0 44 0 0 1 2 130 0 0 1200 0 0
70 and over 60........ 0 0 43 4135 27 0221512 0 25 045 0 0 1 30 1 0 0 12000 0
80 and over 70........ 0 464236 2824 41613 028 046 0 01 35 140 0 0 13000 0
90 and over 80 ....... 0 0 43 37 29 25 25 17 13 0 29 047 0 01 45 1 45 0 0 13 00 0 0
100 and over 90........ 0 443830 026181432 0 048 0 0 1 50 1 60 0 0 14 00 0 0
110 and over00....... 0 045 3930 027 1914 3 30 049 0 01 55 1 6 0 0 14 00 0 0
120 and overll....... 0 0 439 30 028 2015340 00 0 0 1 60 10 0 0 14 CO 0 0
130andover 120 ....... 0 0474133 0292116 034 060 0 016 165 0 0 1800 0

ga 0 Commissioners' Standard.











68

ST. JOHNS AND HALIFAX RAILROAD.

MiLBs. 1 2 34 5AB CDEF GHJK L M N 0 P RV
10 andunder......... 22191916 141812 9 9 818 17 0 18 0 8$75$100 01000 0 6
20and over 10...... 242221 01514 13 0 10 91919 0 19 0 90 10 0 11 00 60 7 0
30 and over 20......... 24 2017 1 14 011102121 0 0 10105 1 20 0 12 00 8 40 8 0
40and over 30...... 3128 2219171131211 023 0 21 11 1 0 0 13 00 9 20 9 0
50 and over 40......... 32 25 2119 17 12 0 2 0 22 1 21 1 40 0 14 0010 0010 0
y 0 Commissioners' Standard.
TAVARES, APOPKA AND GULF RAILROAD.

MLas. 1 2346AB ODE FGH JKL M N 0 P RV
10and under..... 11 98 81616 01714 876$100 1200$1000 0
30 and over 10....... 332272222020141414232 0242110 90 10 15 00 1300 800 8 0
g 0 Commissioners' Standard.
TAVARES, ORLANDO AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.

LEs. 1 2 3 4 6ABC D EFGH JK L M N 0 P RV
10and under .......24212 0 0 8 7 015 0 0 0 0 $ O 00 0
20 and over 10...... 30 27 24 0 0 0 0 0 10 17 0 0 0 0 0 070 0 0
30andover20...... 363229 0 0 0 011 019 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 800 0 0
40 and over 30....... 3934 3 0 0 0012 10 020 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 00 0 0
g3' 0 Commissioners' Standard.
WESTERN RAILWAY OF FLORIDA.

MILES. 1 2 3 4 5 6ABCDEFGHJK L M N O P RV
10and under........... 24222018111014 8101416 0 0 0$765100 $ O 0$600 6 0
20 and over 10.......... 0224 21 18 1 12 16 91116 17 0 0 0 90 1 2 0 0 700 7 0
N" 0 Commissioners' Standard.
The following Branches and Divisions are exempted from the opera-
tions of Rule 1, Circular No. 2, except as to Classes C, D, F, G, M, and
V, to wit:
Of the Florida Railway and Navigation Co., the St. Marks, Monti-
cello and Sumterville Branches.
Of the Florida Southern Railway, the Citra, Micanopy and Gainesville
Branches, and the Charlotte Harbor and Lake Eustis Divisions.
Of the South Florida Railroad, the Sanford and Indian River Division
and the Bartow Branch.
Of the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway, the Indian River,
and Sanford and Lake Eustis Divisions, and the DeLand and St. Johns,
St. Augustine and Halifax River Branches.
Of the Savannah, Florida and Western, the Fort White and Lake
City Branch.
The following are adopted as Rules 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24, regulat-
ing the transportation of freights, to wit:
20. Railroads may at their discretion group at the same freight rates
any station or stations not more than 5 miles beyond the limit of any ten
mile haul, thus: Each station over 30 miles and up to 35 miles may be
placed in the group between 20 and 30 miles.











21.' For intermediate distances railroads may at their discre-
tion make intermediate rates proportionate to such distances.
Thus: If the rate for 40 miles be 24 cents, and for 50 miles be
28 cents, for any distance between these distances the charge
may be between 24 and 28 cents.
22. In the computation of distances a fraction of a mile may
be counted as one mile.
23. In the computation of percentage on Standard Tariff, if
after the percentage allowed shall have been added there should
be a fraction, any fraction of a cent less than J, to be discarded,
and any of j cent and over, to be counted as one cent.
24. Shippers of car loads of articles in Classes L, M, N, O, P
and R may be required to pay cost of loading and unloading.
GEO. G. McWHORTER, President.
ENOCH J. VANN, Commissioners.
WILLIAM HIMES.C iBIDO .
Attest: JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.


'G. G. McWHoRTER,
President.
PrENO J.e Commissioners.
'EwOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, November 22, 1887.
CIRCULAR No. 8.
The following additional rules have been adopted, to wit:
PROTESTS.
1. Upon the filing of a protest by any railroad against any
action of the Commission the Secretary shall forthwith notify
such railroad of the time and place fixed by the Commission
for the hearing thereof. Whereupon such railroad shall give
notice to the public by publication of the time and place so
fixed by the Commission, stating the grounds of the protest,
for at least 10 days before the day fixed for the hearing, as fol-
lows, to wit:
By any railroad operating wholly or in part, east of Chatta-
hoochee and north of Gainesville, in a newspaper published in
each of the following places, to wit: Jacksonville, Gainesville
and Tallahassee.
By any south of Gainesville, in any newspaper published in
Ocala, Orlando and Tampa, and by any west of Chattahoo- /
chee, in any newspaper published in Pensacola and Marianna,









70

At the hearing proper evidence shall be filed with the Com-
mission, showing that this rule has been complied with.
2. When a protest shall be made by any person other'than a
railroad, it shall be made in duplicate, and the Secretary of the
Commission shall forthwith notify the person protesting and
the railroad or railroads affected by such protest, of the time
and place of hearing the same by the Commission, furnishing a
Scopy of the protests to such railroad or railroads.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

G. G. McWHORTER,
President.
ENOCH J. VANN, Commissioners.
WILLIAM HIMES, J
OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, November 23, 1887.
CIRCULAR No. 9.
Rule No. 11, Circular No. 2, is amended to read as follows :
Railroad companies will be permitted to transport freight
free of charge, or at reduced rates for any benevolent or reli-
gious purpose, or for any industrial exhibition, fair or associa-
tion, and the household goods of immigrants.
They may also transport at such rates immigrants, clergy-
men and persons going on pleasure excursions, all persons go-
ing to or returning from any place of meeting within the State
of any agricultural, mechanical, industrial or fruit and vegeta-
ble growers' association or convention, who are directly con-
nected with or interested in the objects of said association or
convention.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

G. G. McWHORTER,
President.
ENOcH .vPr Commissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HImMES.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, December 3, 1887.
CIRCULAR No. 10.
Upon the request of the Orange Belt Railroad the schedule
of freight rates for that road is extended from 50 miles as fol-
lows, to wit:










71

ORANGE BELT RAILROAD-EXTENDED SCHEDULE.


mLas. 1 2 346 6ABODEFGHJK L M N 0 A V
00 and over 50...... 504641362826 020 1614 026 0 0 0 o$120 $100 $ 0 $10 0 "
70 and over 60..... 4 0 44 39 3027 021 17 15 028 038 26 0 1 2 1 36 0 11 5I 0 8
80 and over 70..... 56 524640 33 29 0 2218 16 0O30 0 27 0 10 46 0 01200 0 8
90 and over 80..... 58 4 48 42 8 30 0231917 030 0 0 09 1 35 10 0 0 12 50 0 0
100 and over 90..... 60 55 65 43 36 31 02420 18 0 31 0 0 0 10 1 40 1 55 0 0 13 00 0 0
110 and over100.... 63 58 63 44 37 32 0252119 0 31 0 0 0 0 145 1 0 0 0 13 25 0 0
120 and over 110.... 74 6256473933 0272220 0 32 0 32 0 1 50 1 0 0 13 60 0 9
130 and over120.... 77 65 5748 40 34 028 2321 033 0 83 0 1 55 1 7 0 0 14 00 010'
140andover130.... 80 6759504236 0 29 24 22 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 8 0 0 10 010,
150 and overl40.... 8 7362544540 302523 035 0 0 1 65 190 00 100 0 10
The following rule governing the transportation of passengers has-
been adopted as Rule No. 6:
In the computation of distances a fraction of a mile may be counted
as -a mile.
By order of the Board. JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.




G. G. McWHORTER,)
President. Commissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, December 7, 1887.
CIRCULAR No. 11.
The application of the Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf Railroad for
a change in its schedule of freight rates to go into effect forthwith, be-
ing considered just and reasonable, is allowed as follows, to wit:
MILES. 1 2 3 4 5 6 A B.
10 and under............. 30 25 22 20 18 15 12 8.
MILES C D E F G H J K
10 and under............ 10 8 18 15 10 20 12 6,
MILES. L M N 0 P R V
10 and under......... 75 $1.00 $10.00 $10.00 $5.00 7 6.
Circular No. 8 is amended as follows:
After the words "to wit," in line 10, section 1, strike out all down
to the word Marianna," and insert in lieu thereof the following :
In the public newspaper published in the town of Jacksonville,
which shall at the time of publication of such protest be the medium
for the publication of the current orders of the Railroad Commis-
sioners.
By order of the Board. JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.











G. G. McWHORTER,
President.
President. Commissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF )
RAILROAD COMnISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, December 21, 1887.
CIRCULAR NO. 12.
The following changes in classifications, schedules and rules
are published for the information of all concerned :
Rule No. 11, Circular No. 2, as amended in Circular No. 9,
is amended to read as follows: Railroad companies will be
permitted to transport freights free.of charge, or at reduced
rates for any benevolent or religious purpose, or for any indus-
trial exhibition, fair or association, and the household goods of
immigrants.
They may also transport at such rates immigrants, clergy-
men and persons going on pleasure excursions, all persons go-
ing to or returning from any place of meeting within the State
of any agricultural, mechanical, industrial, educational or fruit
and vegetable growers' association or convention, who are di-
rectly connected with or interested in the objects of said asso-
ciation or convention.
The classification of cotton is changed from Class J to S.
The Cedar Key Division of the Florida Railway and Navi-
gation Company and all branch roads are exempted from the
operations of Rule 1, Circular No. 2, as to all classes of freight,
and so much of Circular No. 7 as conflicts therewith is re-
pealed.
The schedule of the Florida Southern Railway as to Class F
is changed to read as follows:
For thirty miles and over twenty, 20 cents.
For forty miles and over thirty, 21 cents.
For fifty miles and over forty, 211 cents.
For sixty miles and over fifty, 22 cents.
For seventy miles and over sixty, 23 cents.
For eighty miles and over seventy, 24 cents.
The schedule of freight rates of the Florida Railway and
Navigation Company is changed as follows:
On the Cedar Key Division-
Add 25 per cent. to present schedule on all classes.
On the Southern Division-
For distances over seventy miles and under one hundred and
sixty miles, add to present schedule on Classes 6, B, C and F,
20 per cent.; on Class D, 30 per cent, and on Class E, 10 per
cent.









73

On the Western Division, on Classes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, A, B, C,
E and H-
For thirty miles and under, add to present schedule 50 per
cent.
For fifty miles and over thirty, add to present schedule 40
per cent.
For eighty miles and over fifty, add to present schedule 30
per cent.
For one hundred miles and over eighty, add to present sched-
ule 20 per cent.
For one hundred and thirty miles and over one hundred,
add to present schedule 10 per cent.
On Classes D and F-
For thirty miles and under, add to present schedule 100 per
cent.
For eighty miles and over thirty, add to present schedule 60
per cent.
For one hundred miles and over eighty, add to present
schedule 40 per cent.
For one hundred and thirty miles and over one hundred, add
to present schedule 20 per cent.
The schedule of passenger tariffs on the Jacksonville, Tampa
and Key West Railway is changed as follows:
On the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Divis-
sion-Three and one-half cents per mile for full fare, and for
children under 12 years of age and over 5, half fare.
On the Sanford and Lake Eustis Division-Five cents per
mile for full fare and for children under 12 years of age and
over 5, half fare.
The following changes have been made in the freight sched-
ule, to-wit:
On all lines of the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Rail-
way, except the Sanford and Lake Eustis Division, add to
present schedule 25 per cent. on standard freight tariff of the
Commission on Classes M and R, and on the Sanford and Lake
Eustis Division for freight schedule the same that is now al-
lowed the Florida Southern Railway on the St. Johns and
Lake Eustis Division. By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.











G. G. MCWHORTER,
President.
EN President. Commissioners.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES, J
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF )
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, January 17, 1888.
CIRCULAR No. 13.
SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD-REVISED SCHEDULE.

XILEs. 12 4 5ABCDEFGHJ K. L M N O P RV
10 and under...... 3027 24 21 1 12 110 1 1 10 22 0 $ 85 $100 $10 00 $1000 $ 00 710
20 and overl0. 36 50 28 24 8 1 410 92 20 1127 0 7 1 00 1 20 14 0 11 00 8 00 810
30 and over20..... 40 32 3 26 2017 1 110 21211230 0 8 120 1 20 17 00 12 00 800 910
40 andover3..... 42 38 343228 2218 18 12 1123 2212 85 0 8 1 4 160 1900 13 00 10001010
50 and over40. 46423834 302419 20131125221340 0 9 140 160 2100 14 00 12001110
00 andover..... 50 45 41 38332 20 21141227 23 144 0 9 1 0 180 24 00 15 00 12001210
70 and over 0..... 5247 441 52721221512 27251446 0 9 1 0 1 80 26 00 18 00 12 00 13 11
80 and over7..... 54045423628242410 1329281446 0 9% 155 190 27 00 17 00 13001411
90 andover80.. 59 5247 43372925 25 1713830291547 0 9% 1 55 1 95 29 00 17 00 13001511
100 and over 0.... 604 494438 3025 218143230148 010 160 2 00 81 00 1800 14 001611
110 and over 100... 6255 60 4393026 28 20 15 34 0 15 0 010 1 0 200 32 00 18 00 14001711
120 and over110... 6255 50453930228 20 153430 1650 010% 1 6 200 3200 19 00 15 00 1811
130 and over 120... 4 5854 47 41 3327 29 2116 34 50 010% 165 2 10 3400 1900 1 00 18 12

The above schedule of freight rates for the South Florida Railroad
is adopted in lieu of that now in force, and applies to all shipments be-
ginning and ending on the main line, or beginning and ending on either
of the branches.
To shipments beginning on the main line and ending at some point on a
branch line, and shipments beginning on a branch line and ending at
some point on the main line, or on another branch of the main line,
twenty per cent. to the above schedule may be added.
Changes have been made in the classification of freights as follows:
Lumber, L. C. L., from Class 6 to 50 per cent. of Class 6.
Box and barrel stuff, loose, L. C. L., from Class A to 50 per cent. of
Class 6.
Box and barrel stuff, K. D. or in bundles, from Class "A" to 50 per cent.
of Class B.
Brick, common, L. C. L, from Class 6 to 50 per cent. of Class B.
Brick, fire, L. C. L., from Class 6 to 50 per cent. of Class 6.
Hay, fodder and straw, in bales, L. C. L., from Class 5 to 20 per cent.
higher than Class D.
The following changes have been made in passenger rates:
FLORIDA RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY.
On the Cedar Key and Wildwood Divisions.
Passenger fares to be four (4) cents per mile, and half fares two (2)
cents per mile.










75

FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
Charlotte Harbor Division.
Passenger fares to be five (5) cents per mile, and half fares tor
be two and one half (2j) cents per mile.
SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD.
Pemberton Ferry Branch.
Passenger fares to be four (4) cents per mile, and half fares
to be two (2)cents per mile.
The following changes have been made in freight rates:
On the
FLORIDA RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY.
The freight schedule is revised so as to allow that company
to charge on class B 12 cents per 100 lbs.; on class D 10 cents
per 100 lbs.; and on class F. 20 cents per barrel, where their'
present rates are less.
The increase in freights allowed in Circular No. 12 to be
applied on the Southern .Division of the Florida Railway an
Navigation Company is extended so as to include distances'
over seventy and under one hundred and ninety miles.
SAVANNAH, FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY.
The same percentage of increase in freight rates, and for cor--
responding distances, as were in Circular No. 12, allowed to the"
Western Division of the Florida Railway and Navigation
Company, are granted to the Savannah, Florida and Western
Railway.
The standard freight tariff, as published in Circular No. 5, is
amended as to class V as follows:
Miles..... ......... 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100"
Cents.............. 10 10 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11
Miles...............110 120 130 146 150 160 170 180 190 200'
Cents ............. 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 12 13 13
Miles ...... ...... 10 220 280 240 250 260 270 280 290 300
Cents.............. 13 13 18 13 13 14 14 14 14 14
Miles.............. 310 320 330 340 358 360 870 380 390 400"
Cents.............. 14 14 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 1


Byeorder of the Board,


JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.,












G. G. MCWHORTER,
President.
ENOCH J. VANN, om
WILLIAM HImEs,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
OFFICE OF
RAILROAD COMMISSION, STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, January 25, 1888.

CIRCULAR No. 14.
The following has been adopted as
FREIGHT RULE NO. 25.
Where a rate per car load is given the maximum charge for
!a car load on narrow gauge roads shall not exceed the pro rata
-of the rate allowed on standard gauge roads according to
weight.
The following changes are made in the classification of
Freights, viz. :
Lard and Linseed Oil from Class 4 released, to Class 5 re-
leased.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.














CLASSIF]J
EXPLANATORY CHARACTERS.
1 stands for first class.
2 stands for second class.
8 stands for third class.
4 stands for fourth class.
5 stands for fifth class.
6 stands for sixth class.
1% stands for one and a half times
first class.
D. 1 stands for double first class.
3 T. 1 stands for three times first
class.
4 T. 1 stands for four times first
class.
A,B, D, E, F, G H, J, K, L, M,
N, O, P, R and V, represent classes, A
to V, respectively.
C. L. represents car-load.
L. C. L. represents less than car-
load.
N. O. S. represents not otherwise
specified.
K. D. represents knocked down.
"S." specials, i. e., articles not clas-
sified, and rates to be agreed upon be-
tween shipper and railroads.
The first column in classification
contains articles shipped at the car-
rier's risk, and the second column
contains articles in classes shipped at
the otner's risk.
Articles not enumerated will be
classed with similar or analogous arti-
cles.
Class i
Class Reles'd
Agricultural implements,
C. L., not less than 24,-
000 pounds, owners to
load and unload....... 4 5
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS,
L. C. L., AS FOLLOWS:
Cleaners, Cotton Seed... 1% 1
Condensers and Feeders,
Cotton Gin............ 2 3
Cradles, Grain, set up....3 T 1 D 1
Cradles, Grain, K. D., in
bdls. or boxed......... 1 2
Crushers, Corn and Cob. 3 ....
Cultivators, K. D., pack'd 1 ....
Cultivators, set up.......3 T 1 D 1
Cutters, Ensilage, Straw
and Hay, set up........ 1% ....
Cutters, Ensilage, Straw
and Hay, K. D., and
packed................ ....
Distributors, Guano, set
up............... .... 1
Distributors, Guano, K.D. 2 ....
Drills, Grain, set up...... 13 1
Drills, Grain, K. D.,


ICA.TION.
Class if
Class Reles'd
packed................ 2 ..., .
Dusters, Bran, set up.... 3 T 1 D1
Dusters, Bran, K. D.,
packed................ 2 ....
Elevators, Hay.......... 1 ...
Evaporators, Fruit...... 1% 1
Evaporators, Sugar...... D 1 1%
Fans, Wheat...........S. T1 D
Feeders and Condensers,
Cotton Gin. See Con-
densers.
Forks, Hay and Manure,
in bundles............ 3 ....
Furnaces, Evaporator.... 1 ...
Gins, Cotton............ 2 8
Harrows and Harrow
Frames................ 3 4
Harrow Teeth, packed... 4 ....
Hoes, in bundles..... .. 8 ..
Hoes, without handles, in
barrels or casks........ 4 ...
Horse Powers, K.D...... 1 ....
Horse Powers, Railroad
or Endless Chain....... 1 ...
Hullers, Cotton Seed and
Clover............... 1% 1
Incubators, K. D., and
packed................ D 1 ....
Knives, Hay, packed..... 2 ....
Machines, Hemp ........ 1 ....
Machines, Smut.......... ...
Machines, N. O. S. See
Machines.
Mi dlings, Purifiers .....3 T 1 D1
Mills, Burr-stone, Porta-
ble................... 3
Mills, Cane, Corn, Homi-
ny and Sorghum....... 3
Mills, Fan.............3 T1 D 1
Mills, with Trains, Sugar.3 T 1 D 1
Mills, N. O. S. See Mills.
Mowing and Reaping Ma-
chines, Binders and
Harvesters, whether
combined or separate,
K. D. and partly boxed. '3 ...
Mowing and Reaping Ma-
chines, Binders and Har-
vesters, whether com-
bined or separate,set up 1% 1
Mowers, Lawn........... 1 ...
Planters, Corn and Cot-
ton, K. D., in bundles or
boxes................. 2 ...
Planters, Corn and Cot-
ton, set up............ 1% 1
Plow Handles, and other
wood in shape for im-
plements, boxed, "rat'd
or bundled............ 4 ...
Plow Irons, Mold Boards,











78

Class if
Class Reles'd
,low Plates, Points,
Wings, Castings and
Steel. See Iron.
flows. Gang and Sulky..3 T 1 D 1 A
Flows, set up, N. O. S... 1 2
Plows, N. 0. 8., K. D.... 4
Presses, Hay and Cotton, A
set up................. D1 ..
esses, Hay and Cotton,
PrK. D.................. 4 .... A
Presses, N. O. S. See
Presses.
Rakes, Hand, in bundles. 3 ....
Rakes, Horse, set up.....3 T 1 D 1 A
Bakes, Horse, K. I)...... 1 .
Rollers, Field and Road.. 3
Scrapers, Road and Pond 3 ...
Scythes, in bundles...... 1 .... A
Scythes, in boxes........ 2
BScythe Snaths......... 1 .... A
Separators. See Thresh-
ers, Agricultural Imple-
ments.
Sellers, Corn........... 1 .... A
Shovels and Spades, in
bundles.............. 3 ....
readersr, Manure, set up 1% 1
Spreaders, Manure, K.D., A
boxed................. ....
Sulky Plows. See Plows, A
Agricultural Imple- A
ments. A
Threshers and-Separators 1 ....
Wheelbarrows, Iron..... 3 .... A
Wheelbarrows, Railroad,
common, carrier's con- A
venience............. 1 ....
'Wheelbarrows, Wood, set A
up..................... D1 ....
Wheelbarrows, Wood, K. A
D. and packed or bun- A
died................... 3 .... A


A
Accoutrements, Military. 1
Acids, N. 0. 8.......... D1
Acids, Carbolic.......... 3
Acids, Dry.......... ... 3
Acids, Muriatic and Sul
phuric, in carboys, box-
ed, L. C.L............. D1
Acids, Muriatic and Sul-
phuric, in carboys, box-
ed, C. L............. 2
Acid, Sulphuric, in iron
casks ................. 3
Acid, Sulphuric, in tank
cars................... 6
A rated Waters (such as
Moxie). See Waters.
Alcohol, same as Whisky.
Ale and Beer, in wood, es-
timated weights: bbl.
350 lbs., half bbl. 180


A
A
A
A

A

A

A

A

A
A
A
A

A


Ibs., quarter bbl. 100
lbs., eighth bbls. 50 lbs.,
L. C. L..............
le and Beer,in wood (es-
timated weights as
above), C. L..........
le and Beer Bbls., half
Bbls. or Kegs, empty.
See Bbls.
le, Beer and Porter, in
glass, packed, L. C. L.,
securely wired and seal-
ed or locked..........
le, Beer and Porter, in
glass, packed, C. L., se-
curely wired and sealed
orlocked.............
le, Beer and Porter
Boxes. See Boxes.
le, Ginger, in glass,
packed, securely wired
and sealed or locked, L.
C. L.............. ...
le, Ginger, in glass,
packed, securely wired
and sealed or locked,
C. L. ...............
Imanacs and Trade Cir-
culars, prepaid........
lum, in barrels or casks
lum, N. O. S........
mmonia, Sulphate of, L.
C. L.................
mmonia, Sulpbate of, C.
L., same as Fertilizers.
mmoni. Waters. See
Waters.
mmonia Water Casks.
See Casks.
ammunition, N. O. S....
nchors.... ........
ntimony, Crude........
ntimony, Metal........
nvils..................
pples. See Fruit.
rgols, in boxes, barrels
or casks...............
rsenic, Crude, in kegs,
boxes or barrels........
asbestos, in barrels or
casks............... ..
asbestos Packing. See
Packing.
shes and Meal, Cotton
Seed. See Meal.
shes, Wood...........
shphaltum, packed.....
xes....................
xles and Wheels, Car.
See Iron.
xles, Carriage and Wag-
on. See Iron.


Class if
Class Reles'd

2 4

4 E





2 4


4 E




2 4













Class if
Class lele'sd
B.
Babbitt Metal............ 4 ....
Bacon. See Meats.
Baggage, Army.......... 1 ....
Baggage, Personal Effects.
See Trunks.
Bagging, in rolls, N. O. S. A ....
Bagging, N.O. ., in bales 1 2
Bagging. Oil Press......... 1
Bags, Burlap............ 6 .....
Bags, Cotton, for Flour.. 6 ....
Bags, Gunny............ 6 ....
Bags, Paper.............. 6 ....
Bags, Traveling.......... 1
Baking Powders........ 3 ....
Bananas............... .... 3
Barilla .................. 3
Bark, Ground, in b:,gs or
bbls., N. 0. 8.......... 5
Bark, Tan, in sacks...... 5 ....
Barley, L. C. L........... 6 ...
Barley. C. L............ D ...
Barley, Pearl............. ..
Barrel and Box Material,
C. L. See Lumber.
Barrel and Box Material,
L. U. L............... A ...
Barrels, half Barrels and
Kegs, empty,except Ale
and Beer, L. C. L....... 2 ....
Barrels, half Barrels and
Kegs, empty, except Ale
and Beer, C. L., charged
at not less than 10,000
pounds................ 4 ....
Barrels, half Barrels and
Kegs, empty, Ale and
Beer, estimated weights:
barrel 100 lbs.,half barrel
50 Ibs., keg 30 lbs...... E
Barrels, Paper, in nests,
packed........... .... 2
Barrels, Paper, not nest'd4 T 1
Barytes, L. C. L.......... 6
Barytes, C. L........... 8
Base Balls and Bats...... 1 ...
Baskets, Cotton, Folding
(Wooden Rim with Bur-
laps body),K.D., pack'd
or in bundles, L. C. L.. 5 ...
Baskets, Cotton, Folding
(Wooden Rim with Bur-
laps body), C. L., not
less than 24,000 lbs. to
be charged for......... 6
Baskets, Cotton, Folding
(Wooden Rim with Bur-
laps body), set up, not
nested, L. C. L........ D1
Baskets, Cotton, Folding
(Wooden Rim with Bur-
laps body), set up, nest-
ed, L. C. L............ 1
Baskets, N. 0. 8......... D1


Class if
Class Reles'd
Baskets, in nests........ 1 ....
Bath Boilers ............ 1 ....
Bath Tubs. See Tubs.
Batting, Cotton.......... D1 ....
Beans in boxes ......... ....
Beans, in barrels and
sacks ..... ..... ..... 5 ....
Beef and Pork, Canned,
in boxes.............. 4 B
Beef, Fresh. See Meats.
Beef, Smoked, in boxes
or barrels............. 4 ....
Beef and Pork, Salted, in
bbls. estimated weight
3001bs.... ........... B
Beef and Pork, Salted, in
quarter and half bbls.
actual weight......... B ....
Beer, same as Ale.
Bees, in Hives........... D1 1
Bee Smokers, boxed..... 1 ....
Beeswax ................ 3 ....
Beets, in barrels. See
Vegetables.
Bellows ................ 1 ....
Bells, Bell Metal or Brass 1 ....
Bells, Cast Iron.......... ....
Bells, Sheet Iron, packed 3 ....
Belting, Leather......... 2 ....
Belting, Rubber......... 3
Berries. See Fruit.
Billiard Tables and Bil-
liard Table Beds, boxed 1 ....
Binders. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Binders' Boards. See Pa-
per.
Bitters, same as Liquor,
N. 0. 8.
Blacking, Shoe and Stove,
except in glass, packed 4 ....
Blacking,iShoe and Stove,
in glass, packed....... 3 ....
Black lead, in kegs or
barrels ................ 5 ....
Blankets... ............ 1 ....
Blinds, Doors and Frames
C. L................. 6
Blinds,Doorsand Frames,
L. C. L............... 4 ....
Blocks, Pulley. See Pul-
ley Blocks............. 4 ....
Blocks, Shuttle, Rough.. 3
Blueing .................. 1 ....
Blue Stone.............. 5
Boats, Row and Pleasure, S
Bobbins, packed......... 2 ....
Boilers, Bath and Range, 1 ....
Boilers, Engine, or any
part of Engines or Ma-
chinery, C. L., not less
than 20,000 lbs. to be
charged for. Rule 7.. 4 5
Boiler Flues, See Flues.











80

Class ill
Class Reles'd


Boilers, Sectional, same
as Boilers, but not to
be taken as Castings... 2
Boilers, Steam, 30 feet
and over. Rule 7...... 1
Boilers, Steam, under 30
feet. Rule 7.......... 3
Bolts. See Iron.
Boneblack, L. C. L..... 3
Bones and Bone Dust, L.
C. L................. M
Bonnetts, same. as Dry
Goods.
Book Cases, Iron. See
Furniture.
Books..... ............ 1
Boots and Shoes, same as 1
Dry Goods.
Borax, packed.......... 4
Bottle Covers. See Cov-
ers.
Bottles. See Glass.
Box and Barrel Stuff, C.
L. See Lumber.
Box and Barrel Stuff, L.
C. L................... A
Boxes, Ale, Beer and Por-
ter, returned with emp-
ty bottles.............. 4
Boxes Fruit, L. C. L..... 1
Boxes, Cigar, empty,
packed............... D1
Boxes, Cracker, returned
empty ............... 2
Boxes, empty, including
Egg Crates, L. C. L..... 1
Boxes, Fruit, empty, in-
cluding Egg Crates, C.
L., 24.000 lbs. to be
charged for............ A
Boxes, empty, N. 0. 8... 1
Boxes, Match, wooden.. 2
Boxes, Paper, in nests,
packed................ 1
Boxes, Paper, in nests,
packed in barrels,
weighing not less than
100 lbs. .............. 2
Boxes, Paper, not nested 4 T 1
Boxes, Paper, folding, K.
1). and packed......... 2
Boxes, Postoffice Letter 2
Boxes, Tobacco, empty.. 1
Boxes, Vehicle, Iron. See
Vehicles.
Brackets, Insulator. See
Telegraph.
Bran, Shorts, Mill and
Ship Stuff............ D
Brandy. See Liquors.
Brass, N. 0. 8, in boxes,
barrels or casks........ 2
Brass Bearings, in boxes,


Cla


barrels or casks........
Brass Flues. See Flues.
Brass Scrap, loose.......
Brass Scrap, packed.....
Brass Valves. See Valves.
Brass Vessels, in boxes,
barrels or casks........
Bread ...................
Brick, Common and Fire,
C. L., 6,000, or 25,000 Ibs
Brick, Common and Fire,
L. C. L........ ......
Brick, Bath ............
Brimstone, in boxes, L. C.
L.. ........... ...
Brimstone, in bbls.,L.C.L.
Brimstone, C. L, for man-
ufacture of Fertilizers,
same as Fertilizers.-
Rule 9.
Bristles .................
Britannia Ware..........
Broom Corn, compressed
Broom Corn. C. L.. not
less than 24,000 lbs.
charged for...........
Broom Corn and Broom
Handles, C. L., 24,000
lbs. charged for, mixed,
same as above.
Brooms.................
Brushes..................
Buckets, N. 0. S., same as
Wooden Ware.
Buckets, Coal............
Buckets, Well..........
Buckwheat, Flour......
BuffaloRobes ........... D
Bungs ..... ...........
Burial Cases. See Coffins.
Burlaps ...............
Burr Blocks, same as
Mill Stones.
Butter, in cans, not taken
unless boxed or crated.
Butter, in kegs and firkins
Better, in buckets, pails
and tubs.............. I
Butter, Apple and other
Fruits, in wood........
Butterine and Oleomar-
garine, same as Butter.


Class if
ss Reles'd,
2 ....

2 ...
5 ..

2 ..
3 ....

P

6
6 ....
5

1
3 ...



1

3 ....
3

6



1
1


C.
Cabbages, packed, N. O. 8 3
Cabbage, loose, C. L..... 3
Cabinet Ware. See Fur-
niture.
Cages, Bird, boxed...... 3 T1
Cages, Bird, K. D., nested
and packed.......... D
Cake, Nitre, L. C. L..... 5
Cake, Nitre, C. L. Rule 9.













C
Class R
Cake Oil., L. C. L........ D
Cake Oil, C. L. Rule 9.
Cake, Salt, L, C. L....... 5
Cake, Salt, C. L. See
Rule 9.
Calcicake............... 5
Calicoes and Prints. See
Dry 1ioods.
Camphene.............. 13%
Camphor................ 1
Candles, boxed.......... 4
Candy. See Confection-
ery.
Conned Beef and Pork,
in boxes .............. 4
Canned Goods, N. O. 8., 4
Cannon ................. 1
Cans, empty, N. O. 8....3 T 1
Cans, empty, racked or
boxed................. 1
Cans, Paper, crated..... 4 T 1
Cans, Tobacco, empty.... 1
Caps and Hate, same as
Dry Goods.
Caps, Percussion......... 1
Capstans................ 8
Carboys. See Glass.
Card Clothing, packed.. 1
Cards, Cotton and Wool-
en. Hand, packed..... 1
Cards, Cotton and Wool-
en. See Machinery.
Cards, Playing.......... 1
Cards, Show. See Signs.
Carpeting, well covered. 1
Carpet Lining........... 2
Cars, Logging. See Log-
ging Cars.
Cars, Mining. See Min-
ing Cars.
Cartridges, Metallic..... 1
Cases and Crates, Egg.
See boxes.
Cases, Show. See Show
Cases.
Casks, Iron, Ammonia
Water, Naptha, etc.,
returned empty......... 6
Cassia, same as Pepper.
Castings, Iron. See Iron.
Castings, Plaster. See
Plaster.
Castor, Pomace See
Rule 9.
Catsup, in wood........ 4
Catsup. in glass, boxed, 1
Caustic, Soda See Soda.
Cement in barrels, C. L. L
Cement, in barrels, L. C.
L..................... 6

.6


lass if
eles'd Class
.... Cement, Glue, packed... 2
Chain, Cotton, Woolen
.... and Hempen. See Dry
Goods.
Chains, Iron, loose...... 3
.... Chains, Iron, Cable...... 5
Chains, Iron, in casks,
barrels, boxes, or kegs. 5
1 Chalk................. 5
.... Chalk, Crayons.......... 4
... Chalk, Prepared......... 1
Charcoal, in barrels or
casks, L. C. L.......... 5
Charcoal, in barrels or
B casks, C. L., not less
.... than 24,000 lbs. to be
.... charged for........... A
.... Cheese ................. 4
Cheese Safes or Covers,
... boxed................. 3T1
.... Chestnuts. See Nuts.
... Chests, Commissary..... 1
Chests, Ice............. 1
Chickory ............... 4
.... Chimogene, same as Oil,
.... Coal.
China Ware............. 1
.... Chloride of Lime. See
Lime.
.... Chocolate ............... 1
Chromos, same as Paint-
ings.
.... Chufas. See Nuts
Churns, same as Wooden
.... Ware.
.... Cider, in wood........... 2
Cider, in glass, packed 2
Cigar Lighters........... 1
Cigars, boxed and strap-
ped or corded and
.... sealed ................ 1
Cigars, not packed as
above, not taken.
Citron .................. 2
Clay, in boxes, barrels or
casks, L. C. L.......... 6
Clay, C. L...............
.... Clay, Burnishing, packed 5
Clay, Fire, L. C. L....... 6
Clay, Fire, C. L.......... S
Clay, German........... 5
Cleaners. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Clocks, boxed........... 1
.... Clock Weights, packed.. 2
2 ClothesLines. SeeRope.
Clothes Pins. See Pins.
.... Clothing, same as Dry
Goods.
.... Clothing, Card. See Card


Class if
Reles'd














C
Clothing.
Clothing, Rubber. See
Rubber.
Coal and Coke, in boxes,
barrels, or casks.......
Coal and Coke, C L.....
Coal Tar. See Tar.
Cocoa..................
Cocoa Nuts. See Nuts.
Codfish. See Fish.
Coffee. Extr ct or Es-
sence of. See extract.
Coffee, Green, single
sacks.............
Coffee, Green, double
sacks..... ......
Coffee, Ground or Roast-
ed, in sacks...........
Coffee, Ground, in 'boxes
or barrels...........
Coffee, Roasted, in boxes
or barrels............
Coffins, N. 8..........
Coffins, in nests.........
Coffins, K. D............
Coffins, Metalic ....
Coke. See Coal
Collars, Horse. See Sad-
dlery.
Collars, Paper, packed...
Cologne................
Compounds. See Pow-
ders.
Condensers. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Confectionery, Candy,
value limited to 6 cents
per pound and so speci-
fied on Bill of Lading..
Confectionery, Caudy,
value limited to 20
cents per pound, and so
specified on Bill of Lad-
ing................ ..
Contectionery, N. 0. S...
Coolers and Filters, Wa-
ter, boxed............
Copal. See Gum.
Coperas, in barrels or
casks........ ........
Coperas, N. O. 8........
Copper and Brass, in
boxes, barrels or casks.
Copper and Brass, Scrap,
packed..............
Copper and Brass, Scrap,
loose..................
Copper and Brass Vessels,
in boxes, barrels or
casks.................
Copper Bottom, Copper
Plates, Sheets, Bolts,
Wire and Rods........
Copper Flues. See Flues.


Cl
lass Re



A
L

1




4

6

3

4

5

2
3-
2


1
*1






4



3
1

1


5
4

2

5

2

2


2


ass if Class if
les'd Class Reles'd
Copper Ingots, Pigs and
M ats ....... .......... 4 ....
Copper Stills, to be crated3 T 1 ....
Copying Presses. See
.... Presses.
.... Cordage................ 3 ....
Cork.... ................. 1
.... Corn........ ........... D ....
Corn Flour, same as
Starch.
Corn Seed) in boxes. See
Seed.
Corsets.. .............. 1 ....
.... Cotton, in bales.......... J
Cotton Duck. See Duck.
.... Cotton Linters or Re-gins.
See Re-gins.
.... Cotton in seed, any quan-
tity................... M ....
.... Cotton Seed, in sacks for.
planting .............. 6 ....
...Cotton Seed, Cotton Seed
.... Meal, Ashes, L. C. L.
.and Oil Cake.......... M ....
.... Cotton Seed, Cotton Seed
.... Meal, Ashes and Oil
Cake, C. L., M., Rule 9.
Cotton Seed Oil Cake. See
Cake.
.... Cotton Softener (Liquid)
.... in barrels .............. 4 ....
Cotton Waste. See Waste.
Covers and Safes. See
Cheese.
Covels, Bottles, Paper,
Straw or Wooden,
packed, or pressed in
bales..................
5 Covers, Wooden. See
Wooden Covers.
Crackers ................
Cracklings.............. 4 ....
Cradles, Grain. See Agri-
4 cul rural Implements.
.... Cranberries.............. 3 ....
Crates and Cases, Egg.
.... See Boxes.
Crayons. Chalk........ 4
Creameries.............. T 1 D1
... Cream Tartar, in boxes or
.. kegs................... ....
Cream Tartar, in barrels
.... or hogsheads ......... 3 ....
Crockery, same as Earth.
.... ern Ware.
Croquet Sets, in boxes.. 2 ....
.... Cross Arms. See Tele-
Sgraph.
Crow Bars. See Iron.
.... Crucibles ............... 1 ....
Crushers. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
.... Crystals. Washing...... 4 ....













Class if
Class Reles'd


Cultivators. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Currants. See Fruit.
Cutch.................. 4
Cutlery................. 1
Cutters. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
D
Dates. See Fruit.
Deer, boxed............3 T1
Deer Tongue, in barrels
or boxes.............. 1
Deer Tongue, in bales.... 8
Demijohns. See Glass.
Denims. See Dry Goods.
Dessicated Meats and
Vegetables ............ 4
Detergent ............... 4
Disinfectants, in glass,
packed............... 1
Disinfectants, N. 0. S.,
in barrels ............. 4
Distributors. See Agri-
cultural Implements.
Doors, Iron. See Iron.
Doors and Frames. See
Blinds.
Drills, Grain. See Agri-
cultural Implements.
Drugs and Medicines, N.
O. .................. 1
Drums .................3 T
Dry Goods, viz: Bleached
Cottons, Brown Cot-
tons, Cotton Flannels,
Cotton Checks, Cotton
Stripes, Cottonades,
Cotton Yarns, Cotton
Drillings, Cotton Duck,
Cotton Tickings, Cot-
Ston Jeans, Calicoes.
Denims, Cotton Ging-
hams, Cotton Sheeting
and Shirting and other
articles of similar value,
manufactured entirely
of Cotton, in bales, each
package to be stenciled
"Cotton Piece Goods,"
owner's risk of chafing,
L. C. L................
Dry Goods, the same as
above, C. L., not less
than 20,000 lbs., to be
charged for, and all ex-
cess charged propor-
tionately.............. 4
Dry Goods, in cases...... 1
Dry Coods, in trunks. See
runs.
Dry Goods, N. O. S., in
bales, owner's risk of
chafing................. 1


Class if
Class Reles'd
Duck, Cotton. See Dry
Goods.
Dusters. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Dye (Liquid) or Wood,
Liquor, in barrels...... 3 4

Dye Stuff, in boxes or bar-
rels.. ................. 1 ....
Dye Wood, in boxes or
barrels ............... 2 ....
Dye Woods, in stick..... 4 ....


Earthenware, Jugware or
Stoneware, loose, L. C.
L.................... 1
Earthenware, Jugware or
Stoneware, loose, C. L.,
24,000 lbs.............. 4
Earthenware, Jugware or
Stoneware, in boxes or
barrels............... 1
Earthenware, Jugware or
.Stoneware, in tierces or
casks................. 3
Earthenware, Jugware or
Stoneware, in crates or
hogsheads............. 4
Egg Cases and Crates.
See Boxes.
Eggs, packed............ 1
Electric Light Carbons,
packed, L. C. L........ 2
Electric Light Carbons,
packed, C. L.......... 3
Elevators. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Emery, value 4 cents per
pound.................. 3
Emery, N. O. 8..........
Engines, Boilers or any
part of Engines or Ma-
chinery, C. L., not less
than 20,000 lbs. to be
charged for. See Rule 7 4
Engines, Caloric. Fire,
Portable and Stationery
See Rule 7............ 2
Equipage (Milita'y)Camp,
Garrison and Horse..... 1
Evaporators. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Excelsior, pressed, in
bales................ 4
Exhibitors. See Wire
Work.
Essences. See Extract.
Explosives. See Powder.
Extinguishers,Fire, Hand,
glass or grenade, packed 1%
Extinguishers, Fire, on
W heels................ D I













Class if
Class Reles'd
Extract Bark, for tanning,
in wood............... 5 ....
Extract Bark, for tanning,
in glass, packed......... 2 ....
Extract of Indigo, in bar-
rels................... 3 4
Extract of Logwood..... 2 ....
Extract of Logwood,
Dry, C. L.............. 4 ....
Extract of Malt, in glass,
packed, same as Ale.
Extracts or Essence of
Coffee................ 2 ....
Extract and Essences, N.
0. 8.................. 1 ....
F
Facing, Iron and Coal, in
barrels ................ 4 ....
Fans, in boxes ........... D 1 ...
Fans, Palm Leaf, pressed. 1
Fans, Wheat. See Agri-
cultural' Implements.
Farina ................. 2 ...
Faucets, boxed.......... 2
Feathers................. D 1
Feeders. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Felloes. See Vehicles.
Felt, Roofing. See Roof-
ing.
Felting.................. 2 ...
Fence, Wire and Wood
(Combination)......... 5 ....
Fencing. See Iron.
Fertilizers, C. L. See
Rule 9 ................ M
Fertilizers, L. C. L...... M
Fibre, Palmetto and Pine,
pressed in bales........ 6 ....
Figs. See Fruit.
Figures. See Images.
Filters. See Coolers.
Findings, Shoe.......... 1
Fire Arms............... 1
Fire Crackers and Fire-
works, packed, (so
marked)............... 1
Fire Extinguishers. See
Extinguishers.
Fish, in cans, boxed...... 4 ...
Fish, pickled or salted, in
barrels, half barrels,
kegs or kits............ 3 6
Fish, Dry halted, etc.,
packed. ............. 5
Fish, Dry Salted, in bun-
dles.................. 1
Fish, Fresh, prepaid.......... 3
Fish, Fresh, prepaid C. L. .... 3
Fish, Smoked, in boxes.. 2 ...
Fishing Rods............ D 1 ...
Fittings, Iron, Pipe, in
boxes ................. 2 ...


Class if
Class Reles'd
Fittings, Iron, Pipe, in
kegs, casks or barrels.. 6 ....
Fittings, Iron, Pipe, in
bundles, wired........ D ....
Fixtures, Gas, packed.... 2
Fixtures, Grate, packed.. 2 3
Fixtures, Grate, loose.... 1% 1
Fixtures, Tobacco. See
Machinery.
Flax, pressed, in bales.... 3
Flax Seed. See Seed.
Flour, in barrels, estima-
ted weight, 200 pounds. F ....
Flour, in sacks, estimated
weights as follows:
Flour, in sacks, 98 pounds C ....
Flour, in half sacks, 49
pounds................ C ....
Flour, in quarter sacks,
243 pounds............ C ....
Flour, Buckwheat........ 6 ....
Flour, Corn, same as
starch.
Flour, Self-raising, in
packages ..... ........ C ....
Flues, Copper and Brass,
boxed................ 2 ....
Flues,Iron.............. 4 ....
Flues, Tobacco (Sheet
Iron)...............:... 1 ....
Fluor Spar, L. C. L...... 6 ....
Fluor Spar, C. L......... S
Fodder. See Hay.
Foil, Tin, in boxes...... 1
Food Preservative,packed 3 ....
Forges, Portable......... 3 ....
Forks. See Agricultural
Implements.
Fountains, Soda, fully
boxed................S. T1 1
Fountains, Soda, not ta-
ken unless fully boxed.
Fowls. See Poultry.
Frames, Bed. See Fur-
niture.
Frames, Door and Win-
dow. See Blinds.
Frames, Picture and Mir-
ror. See Furniture.
Freezers, Ice Cream.... 1 ....
Fruit, in cans, boxed, N.
O.8 ................ 4 ....
Fruit, in glass, packed... 1 2
Fruit, Berries, Dried..... 4 ....
Fruit, Berries, Green, pre-
paid................... .... 1
Fruit, Dates............. 1
Fruit, Dried Currants.... 2 3
Fruit, Dried, N. 0. ..... 3 ....

Fruit, Dried Apples and
Peaches ...... ....... 4 ....
Fruit, Grapes, prepaid... .... 1














Class 11
Class Reles'd
Fruit, Gieen, N. O. S.,
prepaid or guaranteed. .... 3
Fruit, Oranges, Lemons,
Limes, Peaches, Pears,
GuavaS, and Grape
Fruit, Istandard boxes,
one or more........... G ....
Fruit, Barrels, estimated
double for boxes.
Furnaces, Evaporators... 1 ....
Furs, N. O. 8., Skins and
Peltries. See Skins.
Furs, in bags............3 T1
Furs, in boxes, bundles
and trunks, strapped.. D1 ....
Fuse................... D ....
FURNITOCtE CLASSIFICA-
STION:
Furniture, when in car
loads, as follows (not
less than minimum
weight to be charged
for; excess in propor-
tion, 24,000 lbs. being
minimum weight unless
otherwise specifed),viz:
Bedsteads, manufactured
of Pine, Poplar or other
common woods. Fin-
ished or in the White,
minimum weight 15,-
000 pounds............ 3 4
Bedsteads, manufactured
of Walnut, Mahogany,
Rosew od, Chestnut or
other hard woods, min-
imum weight 15,000
pounds............... 2 3
Furniture, all articles of
Furniture, N. O. S.,
when manufactured of
Pine, poplar or other
common woods, mini-
mum weight 15,000 lbs. 3 4
Furniture, all articles of
Furniture, N. 0. S.,
when manufactured of
Walnut, Mahogany,
Rosew od, Chestnut or
other hard woods, minus
imum weight 15,000
pounds............... 2 3
Furniture, when in less
than car loads, and
when manufactured of
Pine, Poplar or other
common woods, as fol-
lows: .
Beds, folding, wrapped or
crated ............... 1 2
Bedstead wrapped or
crated. ............... 2 3


Class if
Class Reles'd
Bureaus, wrapped or cra-
ted.................... 2 3
Bureau Glass Frames, in
bundles............... 1 2
Chairs, Cane, Splint and
Wood Beat, set up..... 1% 1
Chairs, Stuff, K. D., in
bundles or boxes...... 3 4
Cots, set up............. 1 2
Cots, K. D., or folded.... 2 3
Cribs, K. D, or folded.... 2 3
Desks, wrapped or crated 1. 2
Furniture, N. 0.S.,set up,
wrapped or crated..... 1% 1
Furniture, N. O. S., K.D.,
boxed, crated or wrap-
ped....... .... ....... 2 3
Hall Stands, wrapped or
crated................. 2 3
Lounge Frames, set up.. 1 1
Lounge Frames, backs
taken off. ............. 1 2
Safes, Kitchen, set up.... 1% 1
Safes, Pantry, Meat or
Kitchen, K. D., pack'd. 1 2
School Desks and Seats,
set up................. 2 3
School Desks and Seats,
K. D................. 3 4
Settees, same as Chairs.
Tables, wrapped or crat'd 1% 1
Tables, K. D., flat....... 2 3
Table Legs,Slides, Leaves
and Supports......... 2 3
Wardrobes, set up, wrap-
ped or crated........... .1% 1
Wardrobes, K. D., wrap'd
or crated.............. 2 3
Washstands, wrapped or
crated................. 2 3
Furniture, when in less
than car loads,and when
manufactured of Wal-
nut, Mahogany, Rose-
wood and Chestnut or
other hard woods, as
follows, viz:
Beds, folding, wrapped or
crated................ 1 2
Bedsteads, wrapped or
crated................ 1 2
Book-cases, wrapped or
crated ................ 1 1
Bureaus, wrapped or cra-
ted................... 1 2
Bureau Glass Frames, in
bundles........ ....... 1 2
Chairs, Barber and Den-
tal, boxed or crated.... 1% 1
Chairs, Camp and Fold-
ing Seats.............. 1% 1
Chairs, K. D., in bundles
orboxes............... 3 4














Class
Class Reles
Chairs, N. 0. 8., set up,
wrapped or crated..... 1% 1
Chairs, Rattan and Will'w 1%3 1
Chairs, Cane, Splint and
Wood Seat, set up..... 1 1
Chair Stock, K. D., in
bundles or boxes...... 2 3
Cots, set up............. 1% 1
Cots, K. D., or folded.... 2 3
Cribs, K. D., or folded... 1 2
Desks, wrapped or crated 1 2
Furniture, N. 0. 8., set
up, wrapped or crated.. D 1 13
Furniture, N. O. S, K. D.,
boxed, crated or wrap-
ped.................. 1 2
Hall Stands, wrapped or
crated ................ 1 2
Hat Racks, K. D., or fold
ed..................... 1 2
Hat Racks, wrapped or
crated............... 1% 1
Lounges, upholstered,
backs taken off........ 1% 1
Lounges,Willow and Rat-
tan................... 1% 1
Lounge Frames, set up... 1% 1
Lounge Frames, backs
taken off............... 1 2
Marble for Furniture,
boxed or crated........ 1 2
Mattresses, Hair, Spring
or Woven............. 1% ...
Mattresses, Shuck, Excel-
sior, or N. O. S. ..... 2 ...
Parlor Frames........... 1% 1
Refrigerators, packed or
wrapped.... .......... 2 3
School Desks and Seats,
set up ................ 1 2
School Desks and Seats,
K. D........... ... .. 2 3
Settees, same as Chairs.
Sideboards, wrapped or
crated................ 1% 1
Sofas and Tete-a-Tetes,
wrapped or crated..... 13 1
Spring Beds, set up...... 1% ...
Spring beds, folded...... 1 .
Spring-beds, K. D., packd 2 3
Springs, Iron, Bed, in bar-
rel.................. 3 ...
Tables, set up, wrapped
or crated.............. D 1 13
Tables, K. D., flat........ 1 2
Table Legs, Slides, Leaves
and Supports.......... 2 3
Wardrobes, set up, wrap-
ped or crated .........D 1 1
Wardrobes, K. D., wrap-
ped or crated.......... 1 2
Washstands, wrapped or
crated ................ 1 2


if C
'd Class Ri
G
Gambier.................. 4
Game, same as poultry.
Gasoline See Oil.
Gauges, Steam. See Machinery.
Gelatine ................ 1
Generators, Gas......... 2
Ginger, Ground, in boxes. 2
Ginger, in bags.......... 3
Gins. See Agricultural
Implements.
Ginseng ............ .... 1
SGlass Signs, prepaid.....3 T 1
Glass, Stained...........3 T 1
Glass, Bottles and Tum-
blers, common, packed. 2
Glass Carboys, empty.... D 1
Glass Chimneys.......... 2
Glass Demijohns, empty,
not packed ..........4 T 13
Glass Demijohns, filled,not
packed or boxed, not
taken.
Glass Demijohns, filled,
boxed................. D 1
Glass Demijohns, empty,
packed ................ D 1
Glass Floor Light, rough
and heavy............. 5
Glass Fruit Jars, comimionu,
packed, any quantity... 2
Glass Insulators, packed. 4
lass Lanters, packed... I
Glass Oil Cans, with met
al jackets, packed, same
as empty cans.
Glass Plate, 7x12 feet, or
under................ D 1;
Glass Plate, over 7x12 l .3 T 1 D
Glass Roofing and Sky-
light, notWindow Glass 2
Glass Vault Lights, rough
and heavy..... ...... 5
Glassware, fine cut or en.
graved................ D 1
Glassware, N. 0. 8....... 2
Glass,Wlndow, 14x16 inch-
es and under........... 3
. Glass, Window, over 14x
16 inches and not over
32x44 ........ ...... .. 2
. Glass, Window, over 82x
44.................... D 1
Glucose, same as Molasses.
Glue...... ......... 3
Glue, Scrap............. 5
Glycerine, in cans, boxed. 1
Glycerine, in barrels or
casks.................. 3
Glycerine, in iron drums. 3
Glycerine, Nitro, plainly
marked or labelled, L. C.
L....................4 T1


lass if
eles'd


1
1

3
4
4
rT





1%



4





1
1

3


1
&
4

3
1




4
4














Class if
Class Reles'd
Glycerine, Nitro, plainly
marked or labelled, C. L T 1
Gophers................ 6 ..
Grain.................... D
Granite. See Marble.
Granite, Roofing. See
Roofing.
Grapes. See Fruit.
Grate Baskets, packed... 2 4
Grate Baskets, loose..... 1 3
Grate Fixtures. See Fix-
tures, Grate.
Grates, completely pack'd 2 3
Grates, completely loose. 1% 1
Grave Stones. See Mar-
ble.
Grease, Axle............ 6 ....
Grease, Car, in barrels... 6 ....
Grenades. See Extin-
guishers.
Grindstones.... ......... 6 ....
Grits (Corn) in barrels... F ...
Grits (Wheat) in barrels.. F ..
Grits in boxes........... 2 ....
Groceries, N. 0. 8....... 2 ....
Guano. See Fertilizers.
Rule 9.
Gum, Camphor. See Cam-
phor.
Gum, Copal, Kowrie and
Shellac................
Gums, N. O. S........... ..
Gun, Cotton............. D1 ....
Gunny Bags. See Bags.
Gunpowder. See powder.
Guns, Rifles. See Fire
Arms.
Gypsum, Land Plaster,
Fertilizers. See Rule 9.
Gums, Chewing.......... 1 ....
H
Hair, in sacks........... 1 ....
Hair, Cattle, for plaster-
ing, pressed in bales... 4 ....
Hair, Curled, pressed in
bales, and Hair Rope.. 1 ....
Hair Goods,manufactur'd,
packed in boxes........ D1 ....
Hames, in bundles or
packed............... 3 ....
Hammocks and Fixtures. 1% 1
Hams, same as Bacon.
Handles, N. 0. S., boxed
or crated.............. 4 ..
Handles, Broom, boxed
or crated, L. C. L...... 4 ....
Handles, Broom, C.L.,not
less than 24,000 Ibs. to
be charged for......... 6 ....
Handles, Broom, an d
Broom Corn, C. L.,
mixed, same as above.


Class if
Class Reles'd


Handles, Plow. See Ag-
ricultural Implements.
Hangers. See Machinery.
Hardware, boxed, N. O. S 2
Harness. See Saddlery.
Harrows. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Hats and Caps, same as
Dry Goods.
Haversacks..... ........ 1
Hay, Fodder and Straw,
pressed, in bales, C. L.,
or over, minimum
weight 20,000 lbs.to car
load, all excess to be
charged for at propor-
tionate rate............ D
Hay, Fodder and Straw,
pressed, in bales, L. C.
L..5..... .... .... . 5
Heading. See Shooks.
Head Lights, boxed...... D 1
Heaters, Steam. See Ma-
chinery.
Hemp, in bales.......... 3
Herbs. See Roots.
Hessians, in original
bales ................. 6
Hides, Dry, loose........ 1
Hides, Dry, in bales...... 3
Hides, Dry, in bales,com-
pressed................ 4
Hides, Green............ 4
Hides, Green, salted..... 5
Hinges and Hooks, in bar-
rels or casks........... 3
Hinges and Hooks, in
boxes ................ 2
Hives, Bee, empty, set up 1
Hives, Bee, K.D., crated. 6
Hobby Horses, entirely
boxed or crated........ D 1
Hobby Horses, unboxed..4 T 1
Hoes. See Agricultural
Implements.
Hods, Coal. See Buckets.
Hollow Ware, loose, L. C.
L.......... ......... 1
Hollow Ware, loose,
shipped separately from
Stoves, C. L., not less
than 15,000 pounds to be
charged for............ 3
Hollow Ware, packed... 3
Hominy, except in boxes,
same as Flour.
Hominy, in boxes, same
Grits.
Honey, in glass or tin,
boxed................. 1
Honey, in comb, boxed.. 1
Honey, in barrels or
kegs .................. 1


. oo
3T1



3



5
4




3
3

5
















fHousehold Goods and
old Furniture, pack'd,
value over $5.00 per
100 pounds, and full
value express ed in bill
of lading, said valua-
tion only to apply in
case of total loss.....
Household Goods and
old Furniture, packed,
value limited to $5.00
per 100 pounds, and
so expressed in bill
lading, said valuation
only to apply in case
of total loss, L. C. L..
tHousehold Goods and
iU old Furniture, well
packed, C. L., 20,000
Pounds to be charged
. for, value limited to
o $5.00 per 100 pounds,
said valuation only to
apply in case of total
loss................
SHousehold Goods and
S old Furniture, with
SLive Stock, one at-
tendant to have pas-
sage free on same
Strain as car, C. L., val-
s ue limited to $5.00
per 100 pounds, said
valuation only to ap-
c ply in case of total
A loss............... .
o EXPLANATIONS:
l--All Bundles of Bed-
Q ding.Trunks of Cloth-
ingHousehold Goods
*g or similar articles
h (not Furniture) will
4 not be received for
I transportation unless
Q packed. Chests of
I similar articles must
N be strapped or se-
curely nailed. This
does not apply to C.
L.. of Household
Goods.
2-Bills Lading and
Way Bills must desig-
nate character and
number of packages.
3-These instructions
apply to old and sec-
ond-hand Furniture,
Clothing, Bedding,
etc., not to new ar-
ticles.


Class if
Class Reles'd


1 4







2 6








1 5


Class if
Class Reles'd
Honey Extractors, crated 1 ....
Honey, Section Boxes and
Frames in crates or
boxes ................ 3 4
Hoofs and Horns. To be
loaded and unloaded by
shipper, L. C. L............ K
Hoop Poles. See Poles.
Hoop Skirts .......... D 1 ....
Hoops, Barrels, wooden,
same as Box Stuff.
Hoops, Truss, Cooper's.. 1 ....
Hops, baled............. ....
Hops, in boxes.......... 1 ....
Horns. See Hoofs.
Horse and Mule Shoes,
in kegs or boxes. See
Iron.
Horse Powers. See Agri-
cultural Implements.
Hose Carriages. See Ve-
hicles.
Hose, Leather........... ....
Hose, Rubber............ 3 ....
Hospital Stores.......... 1 ....
Hubs and Felloes. See
Vehicles.
Hullers. See Agricultural
Implement.
Husks. in bales.......... D
Hydrants and Fire Plugs. 5 ....


Ice, L. C. L., in casks or
sacksprepaid..........
Ice, C. ..............
Images and Figures,
Bronze or Metal,packed,
not Iron Statuary..... 3
Incubators. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Indigo.................
Indigo Extract. See Ex-
tract.
Infusorial Earth, same as
Food Preservatives.
Ink and Printing Ink in
wood..................
Ink, Writing Fluid, in
glass or stone, boxed..
Insulators. See Glass.
Iron-Bar, Band, Boiler,
Sheet and Plate Iron or
Steel, all unpacked, and
Cut Nails and Spikes, in
kegs.................
[ron-Roofing, in boxes;
Jail Plate,Pipe, released;
Bolts, in kegs, casks or
drums; Nuts, in kegs,
casks or drums; Rivets,















C
in kegs, casks or drums;
Washers, in kegs, casks
or drums; Wagon Tires;
Castings, not machin-
ery, each piece weigh-
ing 200 pounds, or over,
not packed, owner's risk
of breakage; Car Wheels
and Axles; Wagon and
Carriage Skeins and
Boxes, packed in kegs,
barrels or kegs, relens'd;
Plow Plates; Plow
Points; Plow Moulds;
Plow Wings; Plow
Steel; Fish Bars and
Fastenings; Horse and
Mule Shoes; Fence
Wire; Sash Weights,
unpacked ............
Iron Castings, in boxes..
Iron Bolts, Nuts, Rivets
and Washers, in other
packages .............
Iron, Bridge, Pig, Scrap,
Railroad, Spikes,Chairs,
Frogs, L. C. L..........
Iron, Bridge, Pig, Scrap,
Railroad, Spikes,Chairs,
Frogs, C. L...........
Iron Castings, not machin-
ery, unpacked, each
piece under 200 pounds.
Iron Castings, not machin-
ery or sewing maehlnes,
in kegs or casks........
Iron Crow Bars..........
Iron Carriage Springs....
Iron Drums, empty or re-
turned.................
Iron Fence Posts........
Iron Forgings...........
Iron Flues. See Flues.
Iron Fronts, Girders and
Beams for buildings...
Iron, Hoop and Galvan-
ized, in rolls or bundles,
wired or crated........
Iron, Hoop, Sheet and
Galvanized, boxed. ...
Iron Mantels, Grate Bas-
kets, Fronts, Fenders
and Frames, packed....
Iron Mantels, Grate Bas
kets, Fronts, Fencers
and Frames, notpacked
Iron Nail Rods, packed..
Iron Nail Rods, not
packed ..............
Iron Picks and Mattocks,
in bundles or packed...
Iron Railing and Fenc-
ing...................


Class if
)lass Reles'd

















6
2

2

6 ....

M

3 5


4 6


2 4


Class if
Class Reles'd


Iron Retorts. See Re-
torts.
Iron Roofing, in rolls,
wired or crated........ 5
Iron Roofing, N. 0. 8.... 8
Iron, Russia, in rolls or
bundles, wired or cra-
ted.................. 4
Irons, Sad. See Sad Irons.
Iron, Scrap, Sheet, in rolls
or bundles, wired or
crated.... ............. 6
Iron Seat Springs........ 6
Iron, N. O. S., boxed or
crated................ 1
Iron Shutters and Doors. 4
Iron Sponge (Purifying
Material)............. 8
Iron Statuary, Chairs and
Lawn Ornaments, box'd
or crated............. 1
Iron Urns............... 3
Iron Vault and Prison
Work................. 4
Iron Wedges and Sledges,
in barrels ............. 5
Iron Wedges and Sledges,
loose ................. 3
Iron Work, Galvanized.. 2
Isinglass................3 T 1
Ivory ................... 1
Ivory Black............. 3
J
Jack Screws and Wagon
Jacks.................. 3
Japan Ware............. 1
Japonica................. 4
Jars, Glass. See Glass
Jars.
Jellies in Glass, packed.. 1
Jellies, in cans, boxed.... 4
Jellies, in wood, N. O. S. 3
Jugs. See Earthenware.
Junk and Jute........... 6
Jute Butts.............. A
Jute Waste or Tailing.
See Waste.
K
Kainit. Rule 9.
Kalsomine, same as Paints.
Kegs, empty, N. O. S.,
same as barrels.
Kegs, empty, N. 0. 8;, in
crates ........... ..... 3
Kegs. Ale and Beer,
empty,estimated weight
30 pounds............. E
Kettles, Large Iron...... 4
Kindlings............... 6
Knapsacks............... 1
Kowrie. See Gum.


2




2
5





4
















L
Ladders, not over 30 feet
long..................
Ladders, over 30 feet long
Ladders, step .........
Lampblack, in casks, bar-
rels or boxes..........
Lamps and lamp goods,
packed ................
Lanterns. See Glass.
Lard ...................
Lasts, shoe..............
Laths, actal weight. See
Lumber.
Lead, in boxes...........
Lead, in casks or pigs....
Lead, bar or sheet........
Lead, Black. See Black
Lead.
Lead Pipe. See Pipe.
Lead, White, same as
Paints.
Leather, loose, N. 0. S...
Leather, in rolls or boxes
Leather, scrap, in.bales..
Leaves, Powdered, in
boxes or barrels.......
Lemons. See Fruit.
Lentils, in bags, Boxes or
barrels ................
Licorice, in sticks, roots
or mats ...............
Licorice, in mass, boxed.
Lightning Rods, in boxes.
Lightning Rods, in bun-
bles ...................
Lightning Rod Fixtures,
packed ...............
Lemon or Lime Juice, in
barrels..................
Lemon or Lime Juice, in
glass, packed..........
Lime, in casks or barrel.,
L. C L................
Lime, in casks or barrels,
C. L........ ........ .
Lime, Chloride of, in bar-
rels or casks...........
Lime, Chloride of,N. 0. S.
Lime (Liquid), prepared
for Whitewashing, can-
ned and packed........
Limestone, same as Mar-
ble and Granite.
Linseed. See Seed.
Liquors, in glass, boxes
or baskets, N. 0. S....
Liquors, in wood, N. O.S.
Liquors, Whisky, Domes-
tic Brandies and Domes-
tic Wines,in wood,own-
er's risk of leakage, val-


Class if
Class Reles'd


5



13 1
1 2


Class if
Class Reles'd
ue limited to 75c. per
gallon and so endorsed
on bill of lading.......... H
Liquors, Whisky, in wood,
N. 0. 8............... 2 3
Liquors, Whisky,in boxes
or baskets............ 1 2
Lithographic Stone...... 1 2
Live gtock, C. L......... 1 N
Live Stock, L. C. L...... 1 2
Locomotives. See Vehi-
cles.
Locomotive Head Lights,
boxed.................. D ....
Locomotive Tires. See
Tires.
Logs, Saw. See Saw Logs.
Logging Cars, K. D., or
set up, C. L., 24,000 lbs.
charged for................ 6
Logging C a r s, smaller
parts boxed........... .... 5
Logging Cars, set up, L.
C. L................... 4
Logwood. See Extract.
Looking Glasses, same as
Mirrors.
Lumber, L. C. L......... 6 ...
Lumber, C. L....... .... P ....
Lye, Concentrated....... 5 ....


* MACHINERY.
. Boilers, Engines, or any
part of Engine or Ma-
cbinery, C. L. not less
than 20,000 pounds to
Sbe charged for. See
Rule 7.................. 4 5
. Brick Machines. See
Rule 7............... 4 ....
Cotton Presses. See Ae-
ricultural Implements.
. Cotton and Woolen, ex-
cept Looms, set up.... D 1 1l
. Cotton and Woolen, ex-
cept Looms, crated.... 1% 1
. Cotton and Woolen, ex-
cept Looms, K. D., and
boxed................. 1 2
Hoistig, K. D. See
Rule 7... ............. 4 ....
Looms........ ..........3 T 1 1%
Machinery, C. L, 20,000
lbs. to be charged for.
See Rule 7............. 4 5
Machinery, N. 0. S., L. C.
L. See Rule 7......... 2 3
Machinists' Tools (Pla-
ners, Lathes, etc.)..... 2 3
Printing dresses, K. D.,
boxed or crated....... 3 ....














Class if
Class Reles'd


Printing Presses, K. D.,
not boxed............. 1
Printing Presses, setup.. D 1
Saw Mills, unboxed, in
parts. See Rule 7..... 1
Saw Mills,boxed in parts.
See Rule 7............. 4
Shafting, Hangers, Pul
levs, etc.............. 4
Shingle Machines......... 2
Steam Gauges........... 1
Steam Heaters, packed.. 4
Steam Heaters,not packed 2
Tobacco Screws and Fix-
tures................. 4
Water Whe'ls, Turbine.
See Rule 7............. 3
Wood Working, set up.
See Rule 7............. 13
Wood Working, packed,
K. D. SeeRule 7..... 3
Machines, Brick. See
Machinery.
Machines, Fence......... 2
Machines, Hemp. See Ag-
ricultural Implements.
Machines, Meat Cutters.. 2
Machines, Mowing. See
Agricultural Implem'ts.
Machines, Sewing, un-
boxed................3 T 1
Machines, Sewing, or
parts, set up, crated or
boxed ................ 131
Machines,Sewing or p'rts,
K. D. and boxed or cra-
ted.................... 8
Machines, Shingle. See
Machinery.
Machines, Smut. See Ag-
ricultural Implements.
Machines, Washing...... 2
Macaroni ............... 1
Madder................. 3
Malt................... D
Malt, in boxes........... 1
Malt, Extract. See Ex-
tract
Manganese, Crude....... 8
Manganese,Groun d,pck'd 5
Manilla................. 3
Mantles, Iron. See Iron.
Mantles, Slate, packed... 2
Maps, boxed..... .... 1
Marble and Granite Bases
and Shafts for Monu-
ments, unlettered...... 3
Marble and Granite,rough,
C. L................... 6
Marble and Granite,dress-
ed, boxed or crated, L.
C. L............ ...... 4


3


S1


5


Class if
Class Relees'a


Marble and Granite,
rough, L. C. L......... 5
Marble and Granite,dress-
ed, except Gravestones
and Monuments, C. L.. 4
Marble and Granite Grave-
stones and Monuments,
packed, and prepaid at
option of Initial Road.3 T 1
Marble Dust, same as Ce-
ment.
Marbles,in casks or boxes 4
Marble Tiles. See Tiles.
Matches, properly mark-
ed and packed, alone... 1
Match Splints, packed in
cases.................. 3
Mats and Rugs, N. O. S.. 1
Mats, Grass, Hemp, Hair
and Cocoa............ 2
Mats, Oil............... 1
Mats, Steel, Wire and
Rubber, same as Grass
and Cocoa.
Matting........ ..... ... 2
Mattocks and Picks. Sec
Iron.
Matresses. See Furniture.
Meal and Ashes, Cotton
Seed, L. C. L.......... M
Meal and Ashes, Cotton
Seed, C. L. See Rule 9 M
Meal, Corn.. ........... D
Meal, Oat, in barrels..... 6
Meal, Oat, in boxes...... 2
Measures. Same as Wood-
en ware.
Meat, in bulk, C. L., not
less than 24,000 pounds. 3
No freight charge to be
made for Salt in same
car with Meat, used to
preserve it in transit.
Meat Cutters. See Ma-
chines.
Meat, Bacon, in bulk, L.
C. L................... 1
Meat, Bacon, in bulk, C.
L., not less than 24,-
000pounds............ 3
Meat, Bacon, packed in
wood ................ B
Meat, Bacon, in bags.... 3
Meat Racks, packed..... 1
Meats, Dessicated. See-
Dessicated.
Meats, Fresh, prepaid, L..
C. L ........ .......... ....
Meats, Fresh Beef, Sau-
sage, Fresh Poultry,
Dressed, C. L., not less
than 24,000 pounds


6

6


B-


2

B














Class if
Class Reles'd
charged for................ B
Meats, Fresh Beef, Sau-
sage, Fresh Poultry,
Dressed Bacon and oth-
er articles in Class B,
mixed, C. L., same as
above.
'Medicines and Drugs, N.
. 8. .................. 1 .
Medicines, Patent, L.C.L. 1
Medicines, Patent C. L.. 1 3
Melodeons. See ianos.
Melons, freight guaran-
teed, L. C. L.......... D ....
Melons, C. L., prepaid or
guaranteed ............ O ...
Meters, Gas, boxed....... 1 ....
Meters, Gas, not boxed,
not taken.
Meters, Water, boxed.... 3 ....
Meters,Water, not boxed,
not taken.
M ica ............ ........ T ....
Milk, Condensed, boxed. 4 ....
Millinery Goods, same as
SDry Goods.
Millo Maize............. 3 ....
Mills, Barilla Bark and
Cob................... 4 ....
Mills, Coffee and Paint,
set up....... ......... 2 ....
Mills, Cotton Seed...... 2 .
Mills, Flour, Roller..... 2
Mills, N. O. 8 .......... 2
Mill Stones, finished..... 4 ....
Mill Stones, rough....... 5 ....
Mill Stuff................ D ....
Mince Meat............. 4 ....
Mining Cars and Wagons,
same as Logging Cars.
Mirrors, three feet or un-
der, packed...........3 T 1 2
Mirrors, over three feet,
not exceeding 7x12,
packed................3 T 1 1
Mirrors, over 7x12, pck'd3 T 1 D 1
Molasses, in cans, boxed
or in kegs........... 3 4
Molasses or Syrups, in
barrels or hogsheads.. R ....
'Monuments and Grave-
stones, metal, packed,
value not over $300.... D 1 2
Monuments and Grave-
stones, value over $300. S ....
Monuments and Grave-
stones. See Marble.
M ops................... 1 ....
Moss, in sacks........... 1 ....
,Moss, pressed in bales... 4 ....
Moss, Stable, same as Hay.
Motes, Cotton. S e e
Sweepings.


Class if
Class Reles'd
Moulder's Dust or Sand.
See Sand.
Mouldings, boxed....... 2 ....
Mouldings, in bundles... 1 ....
Mouldings, common, for
building purposes...... 4
Mouldings, N. 0. ...... D 1 ....
Mouse Traps. See Traps.
Mowers. See Agricultural
Implements.
Mucilage, packed....... 2 ....
Musical Implements, N.
O.8 ................... D 1 1
Mustard, Ground, in bx's 2 ....
Mustard, Prepared, in
glass, packed.... ..... 2 ....
Mustard, Prepared, in
kegs or barrels........ 3 ....


Nails, Brass and Copper,
well packed, in boxes
or kegs...............
Nails, for Horse or Mule
Shoes, in boxes.......
Nails and Spikes, Iron, in
bags................
Nails and Spikes, Iron, in
boxes................
Nails and Spikes, Iron, in
kegs. See Iron.
Naptha, in iron casks....
Naptha Casks. See Casks.
Nitre Cake. See Cake.
Notions, same as Dry
Goods.
Nutmegs...............
Nuts, Chestnuts, prepaid
Nuts, Pecans, in barrels
or double sacks, L.C.L.
Nuts, Pecans, in barrels,
or double sacks, C. L..
Nuts, Cocoa, packed or
sacked, L. C. L........
Nuts, Cocoa, C. L.......
Nuts, Edible, in bags, N.
0 ..................
Nuts, Edible, in barrels
or casks, N. 0. 5.......
Nuts, Peanuts and Chufas,
L. C. L................
Nuts, Peanuts and Chufas,
C. L.............
0
Oakum ................
Oats ..... ..........
Oil Cake. See Cake. Rule
9, C. L.............
Oil Cloth, 16 feet long or
over, boxed............
Oil Cloth, less than 16 ft.
long, boxed..........











9,

Class if
Class Reles'd
Oil Cloth, baled.......... 1% 1
Oil Cloth, not boxed or
baled, not in shipping
order.
Olives, in glass, packed. 1 2
Olives, in barrels or casks 4 ....
Onions, in barrels or box-
es. See Vegetables.
Onion sets.............. 3 ..
Opera Chairs, Iron K. D.,
and packed............ 1% 1
Oranges and Lemons.-
See Fruit.
Ordnance Stores, N. O. 8, 1 ....
Ores, Copper and Iron, L.
C. L....... ........... 6 ....
Ores, Copper and Iron, C.
L .................... S
Ores Samples or Speci-
mens, must be prepaid.
Organs. See Pianos.
Organs, Pipe, K. D. and
boxed................ 1% 1
Organ Pipes. See Pipes.
Oysters, in cans or kegs. 4 ...
Oyster Shell, in barrels.. .... 5
Oysters, Shell, in bulk, C.
L........................ 6
Oysters, in glass, packed 1 2
Oyster Shells, C. L....... S ....
Oil, Castor, in glass, pack-
ed ................... 1 2
Oil, Castor, in barrels... 3 ....
Oil, Coal, or its products,
in bbls., carrier's con-.
venience, L. C. L...... 3 4
Oil, Coal, or its products,
barrels, C. L........... 3 6
Oil, Coal, or its products,
in cans................ D1 1
Oil, Coal, or its products,
in cans, boxed, L. C. L. 1 3
Oil, Coal, or its products,
in cans, boxed, C. L.... 2 4
Oil, Coal, or its products,
in tank cars. ............. 6
Oil, Coal, or its products,
in tank cars, must al-
ways be charged at ac-
tual weight.
Oil, Cocoa, in original
packages............... 1 2
Oil, Cocoa, in barrels.... 3 4
Oil, Cotton Seed or Palm,
crude. L. C. L ........ 4 5
Oil, Cotton Seed, C. L... 5 6
Oil. Cotton Seed, crude,
N. O. 8...... ....... 3 4
Oil, Kerosene. See Coal
Oil.
Oil, Lard and Linseed.. 3 4
Oil, Lubricating, the pro-
duct of Coal Oil, same
as Coal Oil.


Class if
Class Reles'di
Oil, Pine, same as Coal
Oil.
Oil, Sassafras, in glass or
cans, boxed........... 3T1 D1
Oil, Tanners'........... 3 ...
Oils, in glass or cans,
packed, except Coal Oil
and Sassafras Oil...... 1 2
Oils, in jars, not packed,
not taken.
Oils, N. O. 8., in barrels. 3 4


Packing, Asbestos, in ca-
ses............... ....
Packing, Asbestos, in
rolls ...................
Packing Hemp..........
Packing, Metallic ........
Packing, Rubber........
Paintings, Pictures, Chro-
mos, etc.,value not over
$5 per 100 pounds.....
Paintings and Pictures,
well boxed, value of
each box not to exceed
$200............... .
Paintings and Pictures
over $200 in value.....
Paints, bulk, in barrels or
casks, dry.............
Paints, bulk, in barrels,
casks, or kegs, liquid,
Paints, in pails or cans,
packed..............
Paints, in pails or cans,
unpacked ...........
Paints, Metallic, same as
Paints.
Paper Bags.............
Paper Barrels. See bar-
rels.
Paper, Binders and Straw
Boards................
Paper, Binders and Straw
Boards, in bundles.....
Paper, Bottle Covers. See
Covers.
Paper Boxes. See Boxes.
Paper, Card............
Paper Collars. See Col-
lars.
Paper Hangings, in bun-
dles, ..................
Paper Hangings, boxed..
Paper in rolls, for the
manufacture of bags..
Paper, Medicated or Clo-
set............. ..
Paper, Pasteboard.......
Paper, Printing, Wrap-
ping and Roofing, in
bundles.......... ......
Paper, same as above, in


2

4 ...
4
2 ....
3

1 2


3T1 D

8 ...,

6

5 ....

3 4

1 ...

6 ...


2 ...

6


1















boxes, C. L. and L. C.
L.... .............
paper, Roofing..........
Paper, Sand and Flint...
Paper Stock, in barrels or
hogsheads.............
Paper Stock, in sacks....
Paper Stock, pressed in
bales.................
Xaper,Wall, any quantity,
in bundles............
.Paper, Wall, any quanti-
ty, in boxes..........
Paper Ware, N. O. 8...
Paper, Writing, Book or
Blotting, in boxes.....
Paris White, same as
Paint.
Paste, in barrels.........
Peaches. See Fruit.
Peach Stones, packed....
peanuts. See Nuts.
Pearl Ash..............
JPeas, in boxes. See veg-
etables.
Peas, Dried or Split, in
bags or barrels........
Pegs, Shoe, in bags......
Pegs, Shoe, in barrels or
boxes.. .............
.Peltries. See Skins.
Pencils, Slate............
Pepper and Spices,. in
bags..................
Pepper and Spices, N. O.
s., ground, in boxes..
Pepper Sauce, In glass,
packed.............. .
Perfumery.............
'Petroleum. See Coal Oil.
Photographic Material..
Pianos, Organs and Melo-
deous boxed..........
Pianos, Organs and Melo-
deons, unboxed, -not
take.
Pckers, Cotton, Raw
H ide..................
Pickles, in glass, packed
Pickles, in barrels or
casks ................
.Pickles, in cans, boxed..
Picks and Mattox. See
Iron.
Picture Backing, in pack-
ages ............... ...
Picture Frames. See
Furniture.
Pictures. Sae Paintings.
Pigs' feet................
Pigs' feet, in glass, pack-
ed ............... ....
Pine Apples. See Fruit.


Class if
Class Reles'd


Pins, in cases............
Pins, Clothes, boxed....
Pins, Insulators. See
Telegraph.
Pipe, Copper, Brass or
Metal, N. 0. S.........
Pipe, Cooper, Brass or
Metal, N. 0. S., boxed
Pipe and Tile, Drain or
Roofing, L. C. L.......
Pipe ana Tile, Drain or
Roofing, C. L.........
Pipe, Earthen and Con-
crete, L. C. L..........
Pipe, Earthen and Con-
crete, C. L...........
Pipe, Earthen (not Drain)
'L. C. L................
Pipe, Earthen (not Drain)
C. L .............. .
Pipe Fittings. See Fit-
ings.
Pipe, Iron. See Iron.
Pipe, Lead, in rolls or
reels..................
Pipe, Lead, in casks....
Pipe. Sheet Iron, Spiral..
Pipe, Stove.............
Pipe, Tin, boxed........
Pipe, Wood, L. C. L.....
Pipe, Wood, C. L.......
Pipes, Organ, boxed.....
Pipes, Tobacco. in boxes
Pitch, in barrels, L. C. L.
Pitch, C. L..............
Planters. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Plaster, Calcined........
Plaster, Castings........
Plaster, Land. See Rule 9.
Plaster of Paris .........
Plated or White Ware...
Plates, paper and Wood,
L. C. L..... .......
Plates, Paper and Wood,
C. L., not less than 24,-
000 lbs. charged for...
Plows. See Agricultural
Implements.
Plow Material. See Ag-
ritural Implements.
Plumbago ............
Plumbers' Material, pack-
ed, N. O. S............
Poles, Tent. See Tents.
Poles and Posts. See
Lumber.
Polishing Powders and
Compounds. See Pow-
ders.
Polish, Stove and Shoe,
same as Blacking.
Porcelain Ware..........


(


Class if
lass Reles'd
1 ....
2


4
5
1
D1
2
3
4
1
K
R

6
D1

6
1

3


6



5 ..

4







1 2













Class if
Class Reles'd
Pork and Beef. See Beef.
Porter, same as Ale.
Polish, Ball. packed..... 5
Potash, N. O. S......... 5 ....
Potish, German, Muriate
of and Sulphate of, L.
C. L................. M
Potash, German, Muriate
of and Sulphate of, C.
L.- See Rule 9.
Potatoes, estimated 175
lbs. per barrel, N. O. 8. 6 R
Poultry, Dressed. See
Meats.
Poultry, Live,in coops.. 1 ....
Poultry, Live, C. L. See
Live Stock.
Powder, Baking and
Yeast....... ........ ....
Powder, Bleaching. See
Chloride of Lime.
Powder, Gun, and other
Explosives, L. C. L..... D1 ....
Powder, Gun, and other
Explosives, C. L., 5,000
lbs. orover............ 1 ....
Powdered Leaves See
Leaves.
Powders and Washing
Compounds, etc...... 4 ....
Powders, Cattle, Horse,.
or Condition.......... 1 ....
Powders, Polishing,
Compounds, etc....... 3 ....
Powers, Horse. See Ag-
ricultural Implements.
Preserves, in glass, pack-
ed................... 1 2
Preserves, in cans, boxed 4 ....
Preserves, in wood, N. 0.
8......................
Presses, Cider........... 4 ....
Presses, Copying........ 2
Presses. Printing. See
Machinery.
Presses. N. 0. S. See
Agricultural Imple-
ments.
Printed Matter, in sheets,
boxed, prepaid......... 2 ....
Printers' Roller Compo-,
sition................ 3 ....
Prunes, in boxes or kegs 1 ....
Prunes, in casks......... ....
Pulley Blocks........... 4 ....
Pulleys. See Machinery.
Pulp, Paper............ A ....
Pulp, Wood (Fibre) ..... A ....
Pumice Stone........... 3 ....
Pumps and Pump Mate-
rial, wooden, L. C. L.. 3 ....
Pumps and Pump Mace-
rial, wooden, C. L..... 4 ....


Pumps, Hand, not packed
Pumps, Sleam and Power
Pumps, Hand, Steam and
Power, K. D., packed..
Purifiers. See Agricul
tural Implements.
Putty............. .....
Q.
Quicksilver, in iron flasks
R.
Radiators, not packed...
Radiators, packed.......
Rags, in barrels or hogs-
heads.................
Rags, in sacks or crates..
Rags, pressed in bales...
Railing. See Iron.
Raisins, strapped........
Kaisins, not strapped....
Rakes. See Agricultural
Implements
Range Boilers. See boil-
ers.
Rattan ..................
Rat Traps. See Traps.
Reapers. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Red Lead. same as Paints.
Reeds. See Willow.
Reflectors, packed.......
Refrigerators, packed or
wrapped................
Refrigerators, thoroughly
and completely taken
part and packed In sec-
tions ..................
Re-gins or Corton Linten,
same as Cotton.
Retorts, Clay...........
Retorts, Copper..........
Retorts, Iron .............
Retorts, Soda Water.....
Rice, N. 0. 8.............
Rice, C. L..............
Rice, Rough............
Rice, in boxes or kegs...
Rivets. See Iron.
Rollers, Field. See Agri-
cultural Implements.
Rollers, Printers'........
Rollers, Sugar, same as
Iron Castings.
Roofing, Composition....
Roofing, Felt, in bundles
or rolls................
Roofing, Glass. See Glass.
Roofing, Granite, packed.
Roofing, Iron. See Iron.
Roofing, Slate, L. C. D...
Roofing, Slate, C. L......
Roofing, Tile. See Pipe.


Class if
Class Reles'd
1 ....
2
3 4

5

1

1
3

4 ....
8 ....
A ....

2 ....
2
1 ...









D ....

2 8


....

1 3
2
6
4
6 ....
C ....
R
3


1

4

5

5

6
P













Class if
Class Reles'dl


Roofing, Tin, in rolls. See
Tin.
Root, Angelica, in barrels
or boxes............... 1
Roots and Herbs, value
not over 10 cents per
pound ................ 4
Roots and Herbs, value
over 10 cents per pound 3
Rope, N. 0. 8............ 3
Rope, Bed Cord.......... 3
Rope, Clothes Line...... 3
Rope, Wire.............. 4
Rosin, L. C. L........... K
Rosin, C. L............. M
Rubber Belting. See Belt-
ing.
Rubber Car Springs. See
Springs.
Rubber clothing and Rub-
ber Goods, N. 0. 8..... 1
Rubber Hose. See Hose.
Rubber Packing. See
Packing.
Rugs. See Mats.
Rustic Work, not boxed.8 T 1
Rustic Work, crated..... 1
Rustic Work, entirely
boxed.................. 2
Rye .................... D
S
Sacks. See Bags.
Saddlery ............... 2
Saddlery, Horse Collars.. 2
Saddlery, Harness, boxed. 2
Saddlery, Harness, in bun-
dles .................. 1
Saadles, not boxed...... 1
Saddles, boxed........... 2
Saddle Trees, not boxed.. 1
Saddle Trees, boxed..... 2
Sadirons, packed in bar-
rels........... .... ... 5
Sadirons, packed in boxes. 2
Safes, Iron, each weighing
3,000 pounds or less.... 4
Safes, Iron, each weighing
over 3,000 pounds, and
not over 6,000 pounds.. 3
Safes, Iron, each weighing
over 6,000 pounds, and
not over 10,000 pounds. 2
Safes, Iron, each weighing
over 10,000............. S
Safes, Meat and Pantry,
set up............... t1
Safes, Meat, Pantry or
Kitchen, K. D., packed. 1
Safes, or covers, Cheese.
See Cheese.
Sago, in bags, boxes or
barrels ............... 3


Sails......................
St. John's Bread, in bar-
rels or boxes..........
SAlaratus ................
Salt, in sacks, L. C. L....
Salt, in sacks, C. L.......
Salt, Cake. See Cake.
Rule 9.
Sdt, Table.............
Salts, Bleaching, in bar-
Srels or casks..........
Salts, Bleaching, N. 0. S.
Salts, Epsom, in casks or
barrels................
Salts, Epsom, N. O. S....
Saltpetre, L. C. L., when
used as fertilizers......
Saltpetre,C. L. See Rule 9.
Saltpetre, N. 0. 8........
Samp, same as Hominy.
Sand, C. L...............
Sand, L. C. L., in barrels.
Sand or Dust, Moulding.
Saratoga Chips, same as
Crackers.
Sardines. See Fish.
Sash, Doors and Blinds.
See Blinds.
Sash, Glazed, L. C. L....
Sash, Glazed, C. L.......
Sash Weights, unpacked.
See Iron.
Sauce, Pepper, in glass,
packed................
Sauces, N. 0. 8..........
Sauer Kraut, in barrels...
Sausage.................
Saw Logs................
Saw Mills. See Machin-
ery.
Saws, Circular, packed..
Saws, Drag .............
Saws, Drag, with Horse
Power.................
Saws, N. 0. S., packed..
Scales and Scale Beams,
unboxed, wrapped.....
Scales and Scale Beams.
K. D, packed..........
Scrapers. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Screens. See Wire.
Scythe Stones...........
Scythes. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Sea Grass, pressed in bales
Seed Corn, in boxes......
Seed. Cotton, when used
as Fertilizers, any quan-
tity......... ..........
Seed, Cotton, C. L.......
Seed, Flax..............
Seed, Garden...........


(


Class if
Class Reles'd
1 .
1
4
7 ..
S ....

4

6 ....
4
5 ...





1 4
5 6




1 4
5 6













Class if
Class Reles'd
Seed, Grass and Clover... ....
Seed, Linseed ........... 3 ....
Seed, Millet............. 3
Seed,. Mustard............ 3 ....
Seed, N. 0. S............ 2 ....
Separators. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Shadines. See Fish.
Shafting. See Machinery.
Sheathing, Metallic,box'd,
crated, or in bundles,
wired.................. 3 .
Sheeting. See Dry Goods.
Shellac, See Gum.
Shellers. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Shells, Sea, ornamental,
L. C. L., prepaid....... D1 1
Shells, Sea,common,C. L.,
prepaid. See Oyster
Shells.
Shingles, (actual weight).
See Lumber.
Shingles, Metallic, boxed. 4 ....
Ship Stuff. See Bran.
Shirting. See Dry Goods.
Shirts. ................ 1 ....
Shoe Findings. See Find-
ings.
Shoe Lasts. Ste Lasts.
Shoe Pegs. See Pegs.
Shoe Polish, same as
Blacking.
Shoes and Boots. See
Boots.
Shoes, Horse and Mule.
See Horse Shoes.
Shooks and Headinr,
same as Barrel Material.
Shorts. See Bran.
Shot, in bags or boxes.... 2 ....
Shot, in kegs or double
sacked.... ........... 5 ....
Shovels. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Show Cards. See Signs.
Show Cases..............4 T 13T1
Show Cases, entirely
boxed ................. D 1 1%
Shrubbery. See Trees.
Shucks, in bales, rough.. D ...
Shucks, Prepared, baled.. 4 ...
Shuttle Blocks. See
Blocks.
Sieves, Tin, nested, pack'd
in boxes ............... 2 ....
Sieves, Wire, packed..... T 1 ...
Signs, Card, Metallic or
Wood, boxed, prepaid. 2 ...
Signs, Glass, prepaid. See
Glass.
Signs, Trade, prepaid.... 1 2


Class if
Class Reles'd
Sizing, for Factories, L. C.
L...................... 4 ....
Sizing, for Factories, C. L. 5 ....
Skins, Deer, pressed in
bales ................. ....
Skins, Fur and Peltries,
value limited to 25 cents
per pound, in bags..... D 1 1
Skins, Fur and Peltries,
value limited to 25 cents
per pound, pressed, in
bales.................. 1. 2
Skins, Fur and Peltries,
N. O. S............. D ...
Skins, Sheep, Dry, baled. 1 ....
Skins, Sheep, Green, in
bundles .............. 2 ....
Skin, Sheep, Salted, in
bundles ............... 3 ....
Slate Mantels. See Man-
tels.
Slate Pencils. See Pen-
cils.
Slate Roofing. See Roof-
ing.
Slates, School, boxed.... 2.
Slats. See Funiture.
Sledges. See Iron.
Slush, Soap Stock, or
similar material for
manufacturing soap, in
barrels ............... 6
Smoke Stacks. See Rule
7.................... 1
Snaths. See Agricultural
Implements.
Snff, in casks, barrels or
boxes.... ............. 2 ....
Snuff, in jars, packed..... 2 ....
Snuff, in jars, not packed. D ....
Soap, Castile and Fancy.. 2 ....
Soap, Common, in boxes. 6 ....
Soap Softener, (liquid) in
barrels .............. 4 ....
Soap Stock. See Slush.
Soap Stone, Crude, C. L.. P ....
Soap Stone, packed...... 2 ....
Soda, in kegs, boxes and
drums................. 5 ....
Soda, Ash and Sal Soda.. 6 ....
Soda. Caustic, in iron
casks or drums........ 6 ....
Soda Fountains. See
Fountains.
Soda Fountain Retorts... 4 ....
Soda,Nitrate and Sulphate
of, L. C. L. See Rule 9. 6 ....
Soda, Nitrate of, C. L.
See Rule 9.
Soda, Silicate of.......... 6
Solder................. 5
Sorghum, in barrels or













Class if
Class Reles'd


hogsheads............ R
Spades. See Agricultu-
ral Implements.
Spelter, in slabs or casks. 5
Spices. See Pepper.
Spikes. See Iron.
Spokes and Shafts. See
Vehicles.
Sponge................. D 1
Spreaders. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
;Springs, Bed. See Furni-
ture.
:Springs, Car. N. O. ... 6
;Springs, Car, Rubber,
loose.................. 4
Springs, Car, Rubber,
boxed................ 5
Springs, Vehicles. See
Vehicles.
Sprigs, Wire, packed in
barrels .............. 1
:Starch, Corn............. 3
'Starch,except Corn Starch 4
Stationery .............. 2
Statues ............... 3 T 1
Staves. See Lumber.
Steam Gauges. See Ma-
chinery.
Steam Heaters. See Ma-
chinery.
Steel, not packed. See
Iron
Steel, packed, same as
Hardware.
Steel, wired or strapped. 8
Steel Bars, each 200
pounds and over....... 5
Steelyards, K. D., and
packed................ 2
Steelyards, unboxed..... 1
Stills. See Copper.
Stone, Common Rough.. S
Stone, N. O. S. See Mar-
ble and Granite.
Stoneware, same as Earth-
enware.
'Stools, Piano........... 1
Stove Boards, boxed or
crated.................. 3
Stove Pipe. See Pipe.
Stoves, Gas and Oil,
boxed.................. 1
Stoves, Stove Plates and
Stove Furniture and
Hollow Ware, L. C. L. 1
Stoves, Stove Plates and
Stove Furniture and
Hollow Ware, C. L.,not
less than 20,000 pounds 8
Straw. See Hay.
.Straw Boards. See Paper.


D1


4


Class if
Class Reles'd
Straw Goods, same as Dry
Goods.
Straw or Wooden Bottle
Covers. See Covers.
Sugar, in b gs........... 2 4
Sugar, in boxes, strapped 4 5
Sugar, in boxes, not
strapped.............. 2 4
Sugar, in barrels and
hogsheads ............ 6 ....
Sugar Cane, prepaid..... 6
Sugar, Grape............ 6 ....
Sulphates. See Ammonia,
Potash and Soda.
Sulohur, in boxes,L.C. L. 1 ....
Sulphur, in barrels, L. C.
L ................... 3
Sulphur, for manufacture
of Fertilizers, C. L.,
same as Fertilizers.
Rule 9.
Sumac, Ground.......... 4
Sumac. Leaf, C. L., esti-
mated weight 20,000 lbs 5 ....
Sweepings and Motes,
Cotton.............. A ....
Sweepings, Factory..... A ....
Syrups, in barrels or
hogsheads............ R ....
Syrups, in cans, boxed or
in kegs............... 3 4
Syrups, in glass, boxed.. 1 2


Tables, Billiard. See Bil-
liard Tables.
Tacks................... 2
STale ................... 6
Tallow, in barrels....... B
.Tallow, N.O. S.......... 5
STamarinds, in boxes or
ke s.................. 2
. Tanks, N. 0. S..........3 T1
Tanks, Iron, Cotton Seed
Oil, etc............... D 1
Tanks, Wood, set up.... D 1
Tanks,Wood, K.D.,pck'd 6
STapioca, in boxes, barrels
or bags .............. 3
STar, L. C. L............ 5
Tar, C. L.............. M
Tar, Coal, in barrels,L.C.
. L...................... 5
Tar, Coal, C. L...... ... M
Tea..... ............... 1
Telegraph Cross Arms &
Insulator Brackets or
Pins.. .. .. .... .... '..6
Telephones, boxed......3 T 1
Tents, Tent Poles and
Pins.................. 2
Terra Cotta, in packages 2


D 1

3















C
Terra Japonica..........
Thread.................
Threshers. See Agricul-
tural Implements.
Ties, Cotton and Hay....
Tile, Drain and Roofing.
See Pipe.
Tile, Fire, for Lining....
Tile, Floor and Marble..
Tile, Hollow, Fireproof,
C. L.................
Tin, Block and Pig......
Tin Foil. See Foil.
Tin Plate, in boxes......
Tin Roofing, in rolls....
Tin, Scrap, in rolls or
bundles,wired or crat'd
Tinners' Trimmings, N.
S.................
Tinware and Tin Stamp'd
Ware, boxed..........
Tires, Locomotive.......
Tires, Wagon. See Iron.
Tobacco Box Material,
same as Box Stuff.
Tobacco, Cut, in boxes,
barrels or bales........
Tobacco, Leaf, in cases.
Tobacco, Plug, in boxes
or kegs...............
Tobacco Screws and Fix-
tures. See Machinery.
Tobacco, Smoking......
Tobacco Stems, prized..
Tobacco Stems,notpriz'd
Tobacco, Unmanufactur-
ed, not prized.........
Tobacco, Unmanufactur-
ed, prized.............
Tongues, Pickled, in bar-
rels or kegs.........
Tongues, Smoked.......
Tonqua Beans, in boxes
or barrels.............
Tools, Edge...........
Tools, Mechanic, boxed.
Toothpicks..............
Tow,in bales...........
Tow, in bales, compres'd
Toys, boxed...........
Trains, Sugar. See Agri-
cultural Implements.
Traps, Fly.............
Traps, Mouse and Rat...
Traveling Bags:.........
Tree Nails.............
Trees and Shrubbery,bxd
or baled, prepaid or
guaranteed, C. L......
Trees and Shrubbery,bxd
or haled, prepaid or
guaranteed, L. C. L....
Tripe........ ...........


Class if
lass Reles'd
4
1 .

A ....


1
6
1

D1 1

2 4

4 ....
3 ....

1 ....
2
2
2
3
D ....


D ....
1 ....
1 ...
6

S ....

4 6
6 ....


Class if
Class Reles'd
Tripoli................ 4 ....
Trucks, Warehouse..... 1 ....
Trunks, Empty or filled
with m er chandise,
corded or wrapped.... 1 ....
Trunks, filled with mer-
chandise, not corded or
wrapped.............. D ....
Trunks, N. O. 8......... D 1 ....
Trunks, Samples........ D1 1
Trunks, fill-d with per-
sonal effects, corded or
wrapped..............3T1 1
Tubs, N. 0. 8., same as
Wooden Ware.
Tubs, Bath, boxed....... 1
Tubs, Bath, unboxed.... D 1 ....
Tubs, Bath, in netts..... 2
Tumblers. SeeGlass.
Turnips. See Vegetables.
Turpentine, Spirits, in
cans,boxed........... D1 2
Turpentine, Spirits, in
barrels, L. C. L........ R
Turpentine, 8 p i r its or
Crude, C. L........... R .....
Twine .................. ....
Type, boxed............ 2 ...
Type Writers, boxed....3 T1 Dl


Umbrellas, boxed.......
Urns, Iron. See Iron.
V

VEHICLES AND MATERIALS
FOR VEHICLES, AS FOL-
LOWS:
Lows:
In all items under head-
ingofVehicles, the
term "Wagons" is in-
tended only to apply to
rough, cheap farm wag-
ons, with or without
springs, and is not in-
tended for buggies or
varnished pleasure or
business wagons,which
articles, and articles of
like character, tak e
same classes as Bug-
gies, Trotting Wagons,
etc.
Bicycles. See Velocipedes.
Carriages, Buggies, Gigs,
Sulkies and Trotting
Wagons, C. L., boxed
or well crated, charged
at not less than 15,000
pounds, excess weight
in proportion.........




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