• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Report
 Mileage table
 Schedules
 Circulars
 Complaints and decisions
 Office expense account
 Supreme court decisions
 The Florida railroad commission...














Group Title: Annual report (Florida Railroad Commission)
Title: Annual report of the Railroad Commissioners of Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075583/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Railroad Commissioners of Florida
Uniform Title: Annual report (Florida. Railroad Commission)
Physical Description: 50 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Railroad Commission of the State of Florida
Publisher: The Commission,
The Commission
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1890
Copyright Date: 18881947
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Railroads -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Public utilities -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1st (March 1, 1888)-50th (1946).
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year irregular.
General Note: Title varies.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075583
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 21631557

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Report
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Mileage table
        Page 21
    Schedules
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Circulars
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Complaints and decisions
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Office expense account
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Supreme court decisions
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
    The Florida railroad commission law
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
Full Text










THIRD



ANNUAL REPORT


-OF THE-




RAILROAD COMMISSION


-FOF-



FLO RIDA.


MARCH 1, 1890.





JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA :
DACOSTA PRINTING AND PUBLISHING HOUSE.
IS90.















i c '











TABLE OF CONTENTS.

PAGES.
REPORT .. ..... . . .. . 3 to 18
MILEAGE TALII.E . . .. .... .. 21
SCHEDULES. .. . . . . . 22 to 41
CIRCT:LARS . .. ... .... . . 42 to 59
COMPLAINTS. . . . . . 60 to 120
EXPENSES. ........... . . 121 and 122
SUPREME COURT DECISi)NS . .. . .. .125 to 147
RAILROAD COMMISSION LAWS. . . . .151 to 163
















/





*
















REPORT OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,


OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., March ist, 1890.
His Excellency, Francis P. Fleming, Governor of Florida:
SIR-We have the honor to submit our third annual report.
In our previous annual reports, in addition to an enumera-
tion of the transactions of our office, and as somewhat incidental
thereto, we discussed at some length the general questions of the
relation of the railroads to the State and to the people, as well
as the proper functions and legitimate sphere of authority of
Railroad Commissions. In our opinion there is not, at this time,
any occasion for any discussion of these matters, and we shall
in this report refrain from any further reference to them.
AMENDMENTS TO THE LAW.
Since the date of our last report several important changes
have been made in the law respecting the powers and duties of the
Commission. One of these is contained in section 6 of the new
Act. Section 5 of the former statute directed the Commis-
sioners "to make and fix reasonable and just rates of freight and
Passenger tariffs ;" whereas section 6 of the present law directs
the Commissioners to require-each railroad company "to make a
schedule of just and reasonable rates of charges for the transpor-
tation of freights, passengers and cars, on its railroad, and for all
railroads under its control and management, which schedule,
before being acted upon or put in operation by said railroads,
shall be submitted to the Railroad Commissioners for their re-
vision and adoption, and thereupon the Commissioners shall
carefully investigate said schedules, and revise such sched-
ules in such particulars as they may deem necessary so as to
make all of said rates and charges to b- ju:t, fair and reasonable,
and such schedules as revised and adopted by said Com-
missioners shall be the tariff of rates for freight, passengers and
cars, by which such roads shall be governed respectively."
Provided-that the rules and regulations and schedules hereto-
fore made by said Commissioners, in force at the date of the
passage of the amended act, shall, unless changed or abrogated
by the said Commissioners, be and remain in lull force until the
-schedules herein provided for shall have been made, revised,
adopted or allowed by the Commissioners.


L - -------- ------------------=~'










4

The section further provides "that, in the event any railroad
company shall fail, neglect or refuse to make and submit such
schedule for thirty days after having been so required by the
Commissioners, then the Commissioners shall make and fix a
schedule for such railroad." Section 6, also provides,
further, that "the Commissioners shall from time to time,
and as often as circumstances may require, change and revise any
schedule or schedules."
It will be seen, therefore, that while the provisions of the old
law were mandatory upon the Commissioners to prescribe sched-
ules of rates of charges for the transportation of freight and
passengers, by the amended law the Commissioners are required
to revise the schedules of rates which, by the provisions of the
law, it is made the duty of the Commissioners to require the
roads to make and submit to them.
Section 17 of the amended law also amends the old law in
an important particular with respect to the annual reports of the
roads to the Commission. This section in terms makes it the duty
of the roads annually to make to the Commission, at such time
as the Commission shall designate, and according to forms to be
prescribed by the Commissioners, annual reports, for the current
year ending June 3oth, immediately preceding, which said
reports the Commissioners are required to tabulate and compile
and include in their annual report to the Governor.
Under the old law, the Commissioners required the roads to
make annual reports, but the provisions above recited, as con-
tained in the amended law, were not in the former statute.
Again, the former law required that the Commissioners,
when any schedule had been made or revised, should cause
publication thereof to be made for four successive weeks in one
public newspaper, published in the town of Jacksonville in this
State; while in the amended law this provision is omitted; but
section 6 of the amended law makes it "the duty of the railroads,
when any schedule shall have been made or revised, to post, and
keep continuously posted, in a conspicuous place at all their stations
along their lines of road, a copy of the same. for the protection of
the people."
Section i8 of the amended law, making it the duty of the
Commissioners to compel the roads to afford all reasonable,
proper and equal facilities for the interchange of traffic between
their respective lines, and those connecting therewith, is an
addition to the duties heretofore required of the Commissioners,
the old law containing no provision referring thereto.
There are other modifications of the old statute contained in
the amended law, more or less important, among which is the
elimination of those sections of the former, creating the Board of
Revisers, and the enactment of chapter 3863, prescribing certain


I -- --










5

duties for this Board, in relation to violations of the Inter-State
Commerce Law; but since this report will not embrace any recom-
mendations as to further legislation, and as the present law will
be published in connection with this report, it is deemed unnec-
essary to comment at greater length upon the provisions of the
law prescribing our duties and powers, the foregoing observa-
tions, which are suggested by their significance, in connection
with the transactions of our office contained herein, being in our
opinion sufficient.
THE SCHEDULES SUBMITTED.
The act was approved June 7th, 1889, and went into opera-
tion thirty days later, say July 7th, 1889. Pursuant to its
provisions, the Commission issued Circular 21 (see appendix),
calling upon the railroads to submit their schedules as the
amended law required.
This requirement was met with reasonable promptness by
almost all the railroads within thirty days, the time limited by
the statute.
NOTICE OF MEETINGS.
Thereupon, August 8th, notice was given, as Circular 22 (see
Appendix), by publication to all railroad corporations doing busi-
ness wholly or in part in this State, and to the public generally,
that the roads having submitted their schedules as required by
law, the Commission would hold sessions at certain times and
places therein named, in different sections of the State, the last
being at Tallahassee, and to continue from day to day at the latter
place as long as was necessary to give ample time for all parties
interested to be fully heard, for the purpose of allowing and
adopting a schedule for each railroad after a careful revision of
the same.
Reference in the notice was made also to certain rules and
regulations which the Commissioners had prepared with a view
to adopting them.
The object was declared in the notice to be, to afford a rea-
sonable opportunity to shippers and carriers alike to make sug-
gestions and to furnish such information as would enable the
Commissioners to adopt schedules of just and reasonable rates
for the transportation of passengers, freights and cars on the
railroads of this State. The Commissioners attended each of
the places, except Marianna and Pensacola.
It would perhaps have been a compliance with the letter of the
law, had the Commissioners given notice of the sessions to be
held at their office in the Capitol in Tallahassee. But it was
believed that a freer and more extended intercourse with those
most interested in transportation charges, and if possible a
fuller understanding of all the facts which might have a bearing,


; ri'~~:.-~nr-rlY1;; RIIC! *in~%-










6

would better qualify the Commissioners for the performance of their
responsible duties; and if not, that certainly the holding of the
sessions, and the visits of the Commissioners, would tend to
maintain closer sympathy between the people, the roads and the
Commission.
It is hoped that such has been the result. It is believed
that it has.. Some of the meetings were quite largely attended,
and there was much by way of suggestion and considerable
interchange of opinion. A few of the meetings, chiefly those at
competing points, were but sparsely attended.
REVISION OF THE SCHEDULES.
The Commission proceeded to give most careful considera-
tion to the revision of the schedules which had been submitted,
and to make and fix schedules for railroads that had not submit-
ted schedules.
The questions arising were, are the schedules as
submitted, schedules of just, fair and reasonable rates of charges,
and if not, in what respects and to what extent are they not.
When it is remembered that fixing the rates of freight for the
railroads in this State, under the law, includes the grouping ap-
propriately together thousands of different articles of freight, into
some two dozen classes, and the ascertainment of the sums which
are just and reasonable for the transportation of each, upon
about thirty railroads, for every distance, to hundreds of stations,
it will readily be seen that it was a work of great detail, requir-
ing much thought and investigation.
The schedules of rates submitted by the roads were in a few
instances identically those then in effect. Several of the roads,
however, submitted schedules of rates higher, and in a few in-
stances, and especially with respect to a few articles of freight,
much higher. As revised and adopted in the revision by the
Commissioners, they are not widely different from the former
rates. It is a well known fact that lumber is an article entering
largely into the tonnage of the roads, as well as being one of the
State's most important productions, the local consumption and
exportation of it both being on a large scale. The question of
a reasonable rate for the transportation of it, therefore, very
naturally arose, and it is one of much importance. The rates
charged for carrying it before the organization of the Commission,
were irregular, being in some instances higher than the schedule
rates as now fixed, and in others lower. The rates, as allowed
and adopted by the Commission, were not established until after
the most careful consideration. Even as now fixed, while lower to
a majority of the shippers, they are higher than those voluntarily
made by the roads for shipments made by a few of the larger
shippers. Under these circumstances, the rates are not in every
instance satisfactory. Nevertheless, we believe them, under the


I C -











7

circumstances, to be just, fair and reasonable, and these rates,
that is for carrying lumber (class P), are uniform on all the roads
in the State, excepting.two or three of the shortest roads. With
respect to the rates on fruit and vegetables (articles in classes G
and V), the roads, in the schedules they submitted, insisted on
higher rates, or at all events some of them did. On the other
hand, a number of shippers asked that they be reduced.
These rates as fixed, allowed and adopted in the new sched-
ules, are the same as those prescribed by the Commissioners un-
der the old statute. In the first instance they were carefully
considered; and in the light of our experience and investigations
since, we think them just, fair and reasonable.
A few articles in the classification were left in class S, that
is, they were classed special; the shippers and carriers being free
to agree as to what charges should be paid for carrying them,
subject, however, to a determination by the Commissioners, in
case of complaint, of the justness and reasonableness of any
charges made by the roads. (See Freight Rule No. 3, Circular
No. 23.)
It was believed that as to these articles, including ice, live
stock, wood, cotton in bales, etc., the general advantage of both
shippers and carrier might be promoted by such action.
A committee of the Farmers' Alliance communicated with
the Board and expressed a desire to be heard on the subject of
cotton rates, in connection with their purpose, as expressed in
their correspondence, of shipping it directly to Jacksonville.
We replied to them that we would be ready at any time they
would advise us of their coming, to hear them, and furthermore
said that we knew no reason why satisfactory rates could not
be made. In fact, we think our roads would be glad to see
shipments of cotton consigned to Jacksonville, or any other
point or points in our own State.
So far, the committee to discuss the question of rates on
cotton have not appeared.
We do not mean to say that there ought not to be mileage
rates on cotton, even under present circumstances, but it ap-
peared that fixing such rates might, in the main, have no other
important result than to fix the portion of the rate our State
roads should receive in cases of inter-State shipments, the total
inter-State rate not being changed thereby.
SUBSEQUENT REVISIONS, ETC.
The provisions of our law, hereinbefore recited, direct the
Commissioners from time to time, and as often as circumstances
may require, to change and revise any schedule or schedules.
We have made certain modifications in the classification, and
have fixed definite mileage rates on wood, and on live stock, as


..'.. i 1 i.


-cL .. 1~~-1.~.~--"- I`--EI-i-~-=P===--=~=C~~












will be seen in Circular 25 (see Appendix). Doubtless other
changes will be made in the future, as circumstances shall require.
It will not be expected that in this report we shall discuss all the
details of the revision of the rates We have made someref-
erence to the rates on certain leading classes. On live stock and
lumber they are reduced. On what are known as class goods,
particularly the first six classes, in some cases they are higher,
and in others the same.
RATES AND TRAFFIC GENERALLY.
As a whole, the rates even now are higher than in adjacent
States. On the other hand, the tonnage of our roads is compar-
stively small and therefore their earnings are less than in adjacent
States. It may be remarked, however, that as the general ten-
dency of railroad transportation charges is to lower rates, and as
the Commissioners believe the rates are not now too low, and as
our population is increasing and our commerce enlarging, such
changes in the future as it may appear to be proper to make,
are likely to be in favor of lower rates.
CLASSIFICATION.
Under our former law, the railroads were required to use a.
uniform classification of freights. Most of them preferred the
Southern Railway and Steamship Association Classification.
That, with such modifications as were necessary in view of the
importance in their relation to Florida commerce, of certain ar-
ticles peculiar to our State, was prescribed. But although it
was in the main the Southern Railway and Steamship Association
Classification, it was a separate publication, and because it was
not precisely the same as the former, it came to be known as the
Florida Commissioners' Classification. Our observation and ex-
perience impressed upon our attention the fact that inasmuch as
there were in the United States quite a number of freight classi-
fications, all to some extent unlike, and equally so, that greater
uniformity was not only desirable in itself, but by common con-
sent of all interested a proper end to be attained. We therefore,
as will be seen in Circular No. 23, prescribed the Southern
Railway and Steamship Association Classification, with such
amendments to and changes therein as are contained in said
circular, and would from time to time be made and issued by
the Commission. These modifications of the Southern Railway
and Steamship Association Classification are not numerous, and
are designated as the EXCEPTION SHEET.
PASSENGER RATES.
With respect to passenger rates, the schedules submitted by
the roads for revision were either higher than those previously
prescribed or the same. The Commission, in revising them, al-


~~~______~~~_ L_











lowed and adopted those previously in effect, excepting the fol-
lowing, which were fixed as follows:
The Pensacola Division of the Louisville and Nashville to
be three (3) cents per mile.
The Pensacola and Atlantic to be four (4) cents per mile.
The Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway
to be four (4) cents per mile.
The passenger rates, as the freight rates, are also higher on
our Florida roads than in adjacent States. Since the revision of
the schedules, one road, (the Orange Belt) has voluntarily reduced
its passenger rates from five cents per mile to three cents per mile.
Arid we cannot forbear remarking that this action strikingly il-
lustrates the difference in judgment of many persons, among
them the managers of railroad property, both as to what is in
fact a reasonable rate in itself for carrying passengers, and also
what is the effect upon the volume of travel, and consequently
upon railroad earnings, of maintaining comparatively low passen-
ger rates.
The previous management of the Orange Belt Railway
strongly insisted that not only was a lower charge than five cents
per mile for passage (which had been prescribed by the Com-
mission) on that road: an injustice to the corporation, but that
even it was quite injurious to that road's interests when its com-
petitors maintained lower rates than five cents per mile. Evi-
dently the present management of the Orange Belt Railway be-
lieve that it is good railroad policy for the road to maintain a rate
of three cents per mile.
The subject of passenger rates is one to which the Commis-
sion has given much thought and investigation. Under gener-
ally favorable conditions, we believe that a three-cent per mile
rate for full fare on our leading roads would be adequate com-
pensation. Of course it cannot be maintained that, with a fixed
number of travelers, tne revenues for carrying them will be as
great at three cents per mile as at higher rates, and some mana-
gers affirm that, though reduced rates may slightly increase the
number of travelers, such increase will be but temporary, and
will not even approximately increase the revenues proportionately
with the reduction in rates. From our experience and close ob-
servation we cannot concur in such a conclusion.
It ought not to be forgotten that the prevalence of yellow
fever in the latter part of the summer, the fall and early winter of
1887, and again in 1888, not to mention previous severe freezes,
had so reduced the travel as well as the freight business on
Florida railroads, their expenses in the mean time not being
proportionately reduced, as to impress upon our minds the fact
that we could not justly insist upon lower passenger rates than
have been maintained.










But, luckily, having had more than a year of increasing pros-
perity in our State, and perceiving a decided improvement both
in the condition and prospects of the people and the business of
the roads, both with respect to the increase of travel and larger
freight traffic, it is our purpose during the year most carefully to
consider the propriety under the law, and in the performance of
our duty, of revising the passenger rates.
Having revised, allowed and adopted the schedules of rates,
,and prescribed rules and regulations as required by the statute,
the schedules, accompanied by Circular 23, embracing the rules-
and regulations referred to, were issued and forwarded to the
roads September 23d last, and were directed to be made of
force on and after October 15th thereafter. (See Appendix.)"
NO PROTESTS.
The law provides that parties, either carriers or shippers, may
protest against the rates or other orders of the Commissioners,
but although objections were made by two carriers, no formal
protest was insisted upon, and the rates and various regulations
and requirements of the Commission became effective, and have
remained of force since, with the exception that the Louisville
and Nashville road represented that the time allowed was not
sufficient to enable them to take such steps by way of printing,
making up tables of rates and the like, as would make it possible
for them to establish the new rates within the time allowed, and
after some correspondence, in which that road affirmed that the
delay was only asked for to enable them to put the rates into ef-
fect, the Commission consented to extend the time, so far as the
Pensacola and Atlantic and the Pensacola Division of the Louis-
ville and Nashville were concerned, to January ist, 1890.
It is proper to say in this connection that, with respect to the
classification of freights, the two roads last named, which are a
part of a large system of roads operating in several States, and
upon which a different classification is observed, requested to be
authorized to conform to the classification in force upon the other
portions of the system, of which they are a part.
The Commissioners investigated the two classifications, and
with the exception that classes G and V, as required to be ob-
served by the other roads in the State, were required to be ob-
served by them also, it was allowed them to maintain their clas-
sification, which differs only in comparatively few particulars
from the S. Ry. & S. S. A. classification. Under these condi-
tions, therefore, the lumber rates and some others are not main-
tained on the same mileage basis on the two referred to as on
the other Florida roads; their rates, therefore, in some instances
being higher on short hauls and lower on long hauls.












GENERAL RE
Considered as a whole, the pr
action of the Commission thereunc
good results. The friction between
and the complaints not so numerous


'p *"


CONFERENCE OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS AT WASHINGTON.
Reference was made in our last annual report to the Confer-
ence of Railroad Commissioners, called to be held in Washing-
ton early in last March. It was the voluntary coming together
of the Commissioners of the different States, at the instance of
the Inter-State Commerce Commission, at the rooms of the latter
at Washington. The conference was attended by one of our
number, who, therefore, met the members of the Inter-State Com-
merce Commission and a large number of the Commissioners of
the States.
Notwithstanding any action they might have taken could only
have been advisory, still their discussion of various subjects, the
classification, uniformity in statistics, harmony in legislation, etc.,
was not only edifying, but resulted directly in bringing about a
condition of things, in connection with the railroad statistics of
the whole country, which will, no doubt, be appreciated gen-
erally. We refer to the annual reports. Heretofore the differ.
ent States have had forms for annual statistical reports, all more
or less unlike, and at the conference a form was recommended,
which has been adopted by both the Inter-State Commerce Com-
mission and all, or almost all, the States, with the exception that
in a few the statutes require certain data not included in the form
referred to; but even then, the form agreed upon at Washington
is probably the basis for all the Commissioners' reports. This form
recognizes June 3oth as the end of the fiscal year. Now, since
the Inter-State Commerce Commission requires reports of all the
roads, this action with reference to the fiscal year will go far to-
wards securing uniformity in accounting by the railroads them-
selves. And besides, since the form required by both the State
Commissioners and the Inter-State Commission are the same, the
labor of making the reports is much less.
It was contemplated to hold annual conferences of the Com-
missioners, but, so far as we are advised, no appointment for a
conference this year has been made.
ANNUAL REPORTS -STATISTICS, ETC.-RAILROAD MILEAGE.
We have already alluded to the provisions of the statute des-
ignating June 3oth as the close of the fiscal year, or at least re-
quiring that the annual reports of the roads to the Commission
shall be for the year ending June 3oth.
Our first and second annual reports were made with reference


RESULTS.
visions of the law, and the
ler, appear to have produced
carriers and shippers is less,
is as formerly.


------ -- -- -A











to December. 3ist; that is, we had required reports from the roads
for the year ending December 3ist. As a matter of fact, in
neither the first nor second reports did the Commission, include
statistical features, beyond giving the mileage. But it has been
our purpose to compile for this report from the reports of the
roads to the Commission full statistics, showing not only the
mileage in detail, but also numerous other items, including earn-
ings, expenses, capitalization, number and compensation of em-
ployees, taxes, interest and dividends, etc.
And we have labored to that end constantly; but, in the first
place, a number of the roads have not made the annual reports
to the Commission, as required by the statute. None, excepting
two, now in the hands of receivers appointed by the United
States Court have in terms positively refused, but there are two
or more, yet in the hands of the contractors, who state that they
cannot furnish the.data required; others state that the reports
contemplate a variety and extent of details which, on account of
the system of accounting they have heretofore adopted, they
have so far been unable to furnish.
Another difficulty is that the Savannah, Florida and Western
Railway Company, one of the largest systems reporting to us,
submits a report of its whole road, including its entire system,
its mileage, operations, capitalization, etc., as to which there is
no satisfactory or reliable basis or method of ascertaining what
divisions ought to be made in the totals of each of the items, in
order to show Florida statistics as distinct from Georgia.
Again, since the Commission, in their previous reports, have
not elaborated railroad statistics at a time when the showing
would have been more creditable to the earning capacity of the
roads, it is a question in the minds of the Commission as to
whether this annual report would be the proper one to begin
with in giving to the public the details of the business of the
roads, inasmuch as, should we do so, we would be giving the
greatest prominence to the most disastrous year the roads have
had, bearing in mind that the reports are brought only to June
3oth last, which would, therefore, include the latter part of the
year 1888, when the roads, in consequence of the epidemic, suf-
fered considerable curtailment of earnings, while the current ex-
penses of operations were not materially lessened.
Another fact ought to be mentioned in this connection. It
is, that the same reasons which have existed heretofore, making
it a matter of difficulty for the roads, large and small alike, to
report by one form to the Commission, have operated with at
least equal force with reference to the report required of the
roads of their last year's operations. The form now required to
be used is more elaborate and, in some respects, different from
those heretofore prescribed. Elsewhere in this report the rea-
sons for the use of the form now required are given.









I3

Moreover, statistics of the character we are discussing are
valuable for two reasons: First, on account of what they con-
tain abstractly; and again, on account of what they prove by
way of comparison. Now, if we had in hand, and should pub-
lish in fullest detail, the items embraced in the forms prescribed
(the year reported ending June 3oth), the comparisons made
with the former reports, now on file in our office (the year end-
ing December 3 st), would not be an exhibit of a year's opera-
tions, but rather of six months only, though the reports are nom-
inally annual reports.
It might answer the present purpose to say that this report
does not contain the statistical information we desired and hoped
that it should, because quite a number of the roads failed to fur-
nish it to us; and that partial returns, however carefully pre-
pared, would have practically no value as reliable State statistics.
But such a statement by itself would scarcely be just, either to
the roads or ourselves.
Nevertheless, we have earnestly desired and labored to in-
clude in this report complete and creditable statistical informa-
tion, and only relinquished our design at the last moment, and
with considerable reluctance.
Even now we would persevere, were it not that before the
assembling of the next Legislature we will submit another report,
in which, we have every reason to believe, we shall be able to
include all that we desired for this, and it shall be our purpose
that it shall.
Such reports as we have are, of course, public records, and,
as such, are subject to the inspection of those interested therein.
RAILROAD CONSTRUCTION.
It is a gratifying fact that railroad construction has kept
abreast with the spirit of improvement, going on in the State
generally. The most important addition to our railroad mileage
in this State, by any one line, since our last report, has been
made by the Georgia Southern and Florida, which has just been
completed to Palatka. It enters the State near Jasper, in Ham-
ilton county, and passing through that place, Lake City and
Hampton (on the Southern Division of the Florida Central and
Peninsular), goes on to its terminus at Palatka.
The Clay Springs and Apopka, a short road running from
Clay Springs, in Orange county, to a junction with the Tavares,
Orlando and Atlantic, near Apopka, has been completed.
The Jupiter and Lake Worth, a road from Juno, on Lake B
Worth, to Jupiter, on Indian river, being a' part of the Jackson-
ville, Tampa and Key West system, has been completed.
The St. Augustine and North Beach, a short road running
from the city of St. Augustine to a point on the beach north of
the city, has been built and is in operation.


_ _~111 ~__ I









14

The Silver Springs, Ocala and Gulf is being slowly built, in
a southerly direction, from a point on its completed line in Cit-
rus county.
The Florida Central and Peninsular is being rapidly extended,
a distance of about twenty-five miles, from Plant City to Tampa.
The Orlando and Winter Park is being extended from Winter
Park in the direction of Oviedo, with the object of connecting
the latter place with Orlando. And there is also being built a
road from Orlando to Oakland.
A road is being built from Palatka in the direction of the
Gulf coast, near Tampa Bay.
The Georgia Midland is under construction, and is projected
to run from Valdosta, Ga., to Madison, and on to Deadman's
Bay, on the Gulf.
And there are other enterprises, either under way or taking
shape, which give promise of making considerable addition to
the railroad mileage in Florida.
The recent discovery of phosphate of lime, and the contin-
uous increase of the quantity of it ascertained to exist in many
places in the State, is already suggesting the construction of
more railroads, and for many of those already built gives prom-
ise of largely increased tonnage.
We refer to our table of railroad mileage in the appendix,
from which it will be seen that at this time there are in Florida
2,490 97-100 miles of completed road.
DEVELOPMENT AND PROSPERITY OF THE STATE.
And in this connection we remark, referring not only to the
present condition and future prospects of our roads but to the
general development and prosperity of our State, that numerous
evidences exist on every side, the most important of which is
the new discovery of the natural wealth lying beneath the sur-
face of our land just referred to, giving gratifying and substan-
tial indications of the rapid growth of our State and improve-
ment in the condition of our people.
COMPLAINTS AND DECISIONS.
At the date of our last report there were pending before the
Commission a large number of complaints for overcharges on
orange shipments, which, upon the railroad companies refusing
or neglecting to refund, were turned over to the Attorney Gen-
eral for suit for the penalties prescribed by the statute. Since
the new schedules went into effect, to-wit, since October i5th,
1889, complaints of overcharges, unjust discrimination, or vio-
lations of the law, or of the rules and regulations of the Com-
mission, have not been so numerous as theretofore, but each
complaint has, in almost every instance, been satisfactorily
adjusted. As a part of the "transactions of the office," we












append hereto a report of the complaints which-have been made,
with such of the correspondence connected therewith, as tends
to show the nature and character of each case, according to its
importance, together with our decisions thereon. (See Appen-
dix.)
It will be observed that many of these complaints relate to
matters over which the Commission has no control-such as
inter-State shipments, damages for lost or injured freight, the
killing of cattle by the trains, and the like. We are glad to say,
however, that in a number of instances we have, even in such
cases, been able to bring about satisfactory settlements.
One of the most important questions which has come before
us is the one by the Pierce & Torrey Investment Company,
which operates the Clay Springs and Apopka Railroad, against
the Tavares, Orlando and Atlantic Railroad Company. and of
the latter against the South Florida Railroad Company, for
track connections under section eighteen of the Railroad Com-.
mission law as amended. This is still pending. These are the
only applications under said section which have been made to
us. The railroad companies deny the authority of the Commis-
sion to compel the physical connection referred to, and it may
be that the question will be carried to the courts before it shall
be finally settled.
We do not deem it necessary to repeat what we have said in
our previous reports in this connection, as to want of familiarity
on the part of shippers with the terms and provisions of the law,
and of the powers and duties of the Commissioners thereunder,
or of the reluctance with which they avail themselves of the law
to secure their rights or redress their grievances, except to say
that it is evident that the shipper is becoming more and more
aware of his rights, and as his confidence in the agencies pro-
vided for their enforcement increases his reluctance to resort to
them diminishes; and we believe the disposition of the carriers
to promptly adjust differences and to create and cultivate those
friendly relations which mutual interests demand and mutual
confidence inspires, increases in the same proportion.
PROVISIONS OF OUR LAW WITH RESPECT TO INTER-STATE
COMMERCE.
The Legislature at its last session by a separate and distinct
act, chapter 3863, made it the duty of the Railroad Commis-
sioners when any common carrier from a point within this State
to a point without this State, which is cognizable by the Inter-
State Commission, is charging or receiving more than a tair and
reasonable rate of compensation for the service rendered, or is
guilty of any unjust and unreasonable charge for the transporta-
tion of freight and passengers, or other violation of the Inter-
State Commerce Law affecting the interests of the people of
Florida, that it shall be the duty of the Railroad Commissioners


!; -* .











of Florida to petition the Inter-State Commerce Commission for
the regulation and control of the offending railroad company,
and generally to take all necessary and expedient measures to
secure to the people of Florida the full benefit of the Inter-Com-
merce Law.
It will be observed that the power conferred by the Legisla-
ture on the State Railroad Commissioners to petition the Inter-
State Commerce Commission is broader than the clause of the
Inter-State Act (see section 13), which only confers on the Inter-
State Commission the right to entertain and investigate, at the
request of the State Commissioners, any complaint forwarded by
them. This question is, however, one to be considered by the
Inter-State Commission, and, in correspondence with them on
the subject, they have assured us, through their secretary, that
they would entertain any complaints from us. The Commis-
sioners have not as yet exercised this right, but will probably
find it expedient to do so in the near future.
SUPREME COURT DECISION.
At the time we submitted our last report there was pending
before the Supreme Court appeals by the Pensacola and Atlantic
Railroad Company from judgments of the Circuit Court for pen-
alties aggregating a large amount, upon which a decision was
rendered May Ist, 1889. (See Appendix.)
This case was decided upon the questions of law as raised by
the pleadings. The railroad plead, in substance, that the sched-
ules of passenger and freight rates prescribed by the Commis-
sion for that road were unreasonable and unjust, because, if
compelled to use them, the road would not earn operating ex-
penses. This plea was demurred to; that is, the State admitted
that the plea might be true, yet it was no defense to the action.
The court below sustained the demurrer, and from that decision
the company appealed to the Supreme Court, and the judgment
of the court below awarding damages was reversed and the cases
were remanded to the court below for a new trial, at which, if
issue be joined on the said plea, the question of fact raised by it
will be tried and determined; and if the company shall, by its
proofs (and the burden of proof is upon it under the law),
"make out a prima facie case sustaining the plea," it will then
devolve upon the State (say the court), through the instrumen-
tality of the Commissioners, and any other proper means, to
establish the justice of the action of the Commissioners in fixing
the schedules of passenger and freight rates, etc. "And upon
said trial every source of income of the railroad company can
be inquired into, and the necessity and reasonableness of every
expense investigated and settled." An extended summary of
the questions of law decided by the Supreme Court in this case
is not necessary, particularly as the whole of the decision accom-












panies this report and speaks for itself, but we deem it proper to
note some facts referred to in the decision, which show that not
only was this case decided "upon the pleadings," as stated; but
that, also, other circumstances peculiar to this road were consid-
ered by the court in making up their judgment, and this view of
the case is important, when it is remembered that the Legisla-
ture, after the rendition of the decision, amended the Railroad
Commission Law by requiring the Commissioners, in revising
and allowing schedules of passenger and freight rates "for the
use of any railroad company," to observe the principles enun-
ciated by the Supreme Court in this case. (See last clause of
section 7, chapter 3862, approved June 7th, 1889.)
In discussing passenger rates the court says: Confining
ourselves to the case made by the pleadings, where only one
railroad is shown to traverse the territory in question, it would
be idle to say that we cannot take judicial notice that the only
means of railroad travel from the western portion of West Flor-
ida to the middle and eastern portions of the State were through
the adjoining States of Alabama and Georgia." The court had
previously said: Whether under a general law for the incor-
poration of railroads, like ours, where there is practically no
restriction upon the number of railroads that may be built and
operated, the construction of additional roads in a section of the
State already amply supplied with such transportation facilities
would present a case in which the exaction of prohibitory or
otherwise onerous rates may be prevented, though it result in an
impossibility for some to make expenses, we need not say; no
such case is before us. In view of the undeveloped state of the
law, each case must be decided upon the facts as it arises."
(See Appendix, p. 140.) In other words, "every tub must
stand on its own bottom," and the question suggested by the
court remain open questions at least.
We are glad, in this connection, to repeat that the railroad
companies seem at present to be disposed to act in harmony
with the law and the Commissioners, in the observance of the
new schedules and rules and regulations, which have heen re-
vised and allowed for their use and direction; an indication that
the era of ferment and litigation has substantially subsided.
The circular orders which have been issued from time to
time, the complaints, decisions and correspondence, the laws
now in force prescribing our powers and duties, together with
the statistics, will be found in the succeeding pages. All of
which is respectfully submitted.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WM. HIMES,
Commissioners.











Section 22 of the act creating the Railroad Commission
makes it the duty of the Commissioners to report to the Gov-
ernor the transactions of their office." I concur in the fore-
going report in so far as it relates to the "transactions of this
office. And as to anything beyond this which the report may
contain I express no opinion.
GEO. G. McWHORTER.



















APPENDIX


TO


THIRD ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE


RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS


OF FLORIDA.




MARCH 1, 1890.


_ I ~ I I__











21

RAILROAD MILEAGE MARCH 1, 1890.

Main
Line. Sidings. Total.

Apopka & Atlantic R. R................. 5.00 ...... 5.00
Atlantic & Western R. R ................ 30.00 1.00 31.00
Clay Springs & Apopka R. R............. 00 7.00 ...... 7.00
Florida Central & Peninsular R. R ...... 575.30 21.50 597.00
Florida Midland R. R .................... 26.00 .28 26.28
-Georgia Southern & Florida R. R........ 117.00 2.00 119.00
Jacksonville & Atlantic R. R. ........... 16.25 .12 16.37
Jacksonville, Mayport & Pablo Ry. & N. Co 17.18 .70 17.88
Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West System:
Main Line ...................... .. .. 125.00 11.00 136.00'
DeLand Branch.............. .. 6.00 .25 6.25
Indian River Division................. 41.00 1.00 42.00 1
Sanford & Lake Eustis Division ........ 29.50 .50 30.00
Jupiter & Lake Worth Division........ 7.60 .11 7.71
Florida Southern.................... 293.51 15.31 308.82

Total............................... 502.61 28.17 530.78

Jacksonville. St. Augustine & Hal. River Ry 35.90 2.00 37.90
St. Augustine & Halifax River R. ...... 25.00 .12 25.12
St. Johns Ry.................. ......... 14.50 .50 15.00
St. Johns & Halifax River R. R.......... 52.00 1.00 53.00
Orange Belt Ry................... ...... 152.30 3.80 156.10
Orlando &. Winter Park R. R............. 6.30 ...... 6.30
Pensacola & Atlantic R. R............... 160.28 9.20 169.48
Pensacola Division, L. & N. R. R......... 44.54 8.92 53.46
Pensacola & Perdido R. R................ 9.00 2.00 11.00
Savannah. Florida & Western Rv........ 165.47 21.99 187.46
Silver Springs, Ocala & Gulf Ry.......... 48.83 1.43 50.26
South Florida R. R .................... 214.96 18.98 233.94
St. Augustine & North Beach R. R....... 3.00 ...... 3.00
St. Augustine & South Beach R. R....... 1.33 ...... 1.33
St. Cloud Sugar Belt Ry................. 12.00 ...... 12.00
Suwannee River Rv.................... 21.00 1.00 22.00
Tavares, Apopka & Gulf R. R............ 23.50 .50 24.00
Tavares, Orlando & Atlantic R. R........ 32.28 .83 33.11
Thomasville. Tallahassee & Gulf R. R.... 11.20 ...... 11.20
Western Railway of Florida .............. 35.00 ...... 35.00

2,364.93 126.04 2,490.97
Number of miles December 31. 1888 .......................2,326.98
Number of miles March 1, 1890............................2,490.97

Increase............................ ............... 163.99











8OHEDULE
-OF--
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER TARIFFS,
As revised, allowed and adopted by the COMMISSION, to go into effect
October 15th, 1889.


ATLANTIC AND WESTERN RAILWAY.

20 3 4 m5 6 A d C DE F J K L N 0 P R V
10 miles ;anl under 20 1- 4 10 5 12 1 I 10 17 15 5 0 8 00 OO 50'0o 8
30 miles amd over 10 35 30 26 22 10 14~ 14' 1i 1: 191 0 1 I 70!8 00 7 12 8
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.


CLAY SPRINGS AND APOPKA RAILROAD.

1 2 345 0ABCDEFHJK L M N 0 P R G V
10 miles and under _30 27 24 20 18 15) 1 0 11 9 10 1, Sl 7 $'1 10 S 810 00 8 500 0 8
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.









JACKSONVILLE AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.

3 4 5 A B D E J K L M N 0 P R V

10 miles and under 23 21 1) 1:7 13 10 0 8S.5 1 1' 18 S 8 i 40 13 40 11 40 8 127.5
20 miles and over 10 30 26( 23 22 19) 15 1' 1I9 09 19 201 24 9 1 I 45 15 40 13 80 9 13'8
Full passenger fare, Three (3) cents per mile.




JACKSONVILLE, MAYPORT AND PABLO RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY.

1 34 5 6 A B C D E F HJ K L M N O P R G V

10 miles and under 221 1 11 8. 8 17 17 18 S 8 i1 10 $1 401 8 081 8
20 miles and over 10 I 30 2 21 2 1915 13 10 1 20 240 9 1 20 1 45! 15 40 13 80 9 1219
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.


-- ---- poll- --- -


-- --;~--~..-cnn=rrrr*nnrr












FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULAR RAILROAD.


10 miles and under
20 miles and over 10
30 miles and over 20
40 miles and over 30
50 miles and over 40
60 miles and over 50
70 miles and over 60
80 miles and over 70
90 miles and over 80
100 miles and over 90
110 miles and over 100
120 miles and over 110
130 miles and over 120
140 miles and over 130
150 miles and over 140
160 miles and over 150
170 miles and over 160
180 miles and over 170
190 miles and over 180
200 miles and over 190
210 miles and over 200
220 miles and over 210
230 miles and over 220
240 miles and over 230
250 miles and over 240
260 miles and over 250
270 miles and over 260
280 miles and over 270


1 2 3 4 5
12345

30 27 24 20 18
34 31 28 28 21
38 85 31 26 24
42 38 34 28 26
46 41 37 30 28
50 44 40 32 30
54 47 43 34 32
58 50 40 36 34
62 53 49 36 38
66 56 52 40 38
69 57 54 42 40
72 62 56 44 4
75 65 58 46 44
78 68 60 48 46
80 70 61 50 48
82 72 62 52 49
84 74 63 54 0
86 76 64 56 51
88 78 05 58 52
90 80 66 60 53
92 82 67 61 54
94 84 68 62 55
96 86 69 63 56
98 88 70 64 57
10 90 71 65 58
101 91 66 59
10 91 73 67 0
103 92 74 61


A B

11 10
15 12
17 14
19 15
21 16
23 17
24 18
25 19
26 20
27 21
28 22
29 23
30 24
31 25
33 26
33 27
34 28
35 28
36 29
37 30
38 31
39 32
40 33
41 34
42 85
43 36
44 37
45 38


C D

11 9
12 10
14 11
15 11
16 12
17 13
18 14
19 15
20 15
21 16
22 17
23 18
24 19
35 19
26 20
27 20
28 21
29 21
30 22
31 23
32 23
33 24
34 24
35 25
36 26
37 26
38 26
39 27


E


F H

16 21
18 24
20 27
22 30
24 33
26 36
28 39
30: 42
311 45
32 47
33 49
34 50
35 51
36 52
37 53
38 54
39 55
40 56
41 57
42 58
43 60
44 61
45 62
46 63
47 64
48 65
49 66
50 67


J


L

75
90
1 05
1 20
1 30
1 40
1 50
1 60
1 70
1 75
1 80
1 85
1 90
1 95
2 00
2 05
2 10
2 15
2 16
2 17
2 18
2 19


2 22
2 23
2 24
2.25


M

$1 10
1 20
1 30
1 40
1 50
1 60
1 75

1 80
1 85
1 90
1 95
2 00
2 05)
2 10
2 15


2 22'
2 23

2 24
2 2-5
2 26
2 27
3 28
2 29
2 30
2 31


S P R

S10 00 o 5 00 8
12 00 7 00 9
14 00 8 00 10
15 00 9 00 11
16 00 10 00 12
17 00 11 00 13
18 00 11 00 14
19 00 12 00 15
20 00 13 00 16
21 00 14 00 17
22 00 14 00 18
23: 00 15 00 19
24 00 16 )0 20
25 00 16 00 21
26 00 17 00 22
27 00 17 00 23
28 00 18 00 24
29 00 19 00 24.5
30 00 19 00 25
30 50 20 00 25.5
31 00 20 00 26
31 00 21 00 26.5
31 00 21 00 27
32 00 22 00 27.5
32 00 22 00 28
32 00 22 00 28.5
33 00 28 00 29
33 00 23 00 29.5










290 miles and over 280 104
300 miles and over 290 105
310 miles and over 300 106
320 miles and over 310 107
330 miles and over 320 108
840 miles and over 330 109
350 miles and over 340 109
360 miles and over 350 110
370 miles and over 360 111


92 75 69 62 57 46 39 40 27 57 51 68 20 2 26 2 32 33 00 24 0 0 30 21
93 76 70 63 58 47 40 41 28 57 52 69 20 2 27 2 33" 34 00 24 00 30 21
94 77 71 64 59 48 41 42 28 58 53 70" 21 2 28 2 34 34 00 24 00 31 22
95 'i8 71 64 59 48 41 42 28 58 53 71 21 2 29 2 35 34 00 24 00 31 22
95 78 72 65 60 49 42 43 29 59 54 72 21 2 30 2 36 35 00 25 00 32 22
96 79 72 66 60 49 42 43 30 60 54 73 22 2 31 2 37 35 00 25 00 32 22
96 79 78 66 61 50 43 44 30 60 55 74 22 2 32 2 38 35 00 25 00 33 23
96 80 73 66 61 50 43 44 31 61 55 75 22 2 33 2 39 35 00 25 00 34 23
97 80 73 66 61 50 43 44 31 61 55 76 22 2 34 2 40 35 00 2 00' 34 23


Full passenger fare, Four (4) cents per mile.




FLORIDA MIDLAND RAILROAD.


1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C DE FH J K L M N 0 P R G V

10 miles and under 25 23 20 15 15 12 10 12 7 8 16 15 15 S 5 $ 80 $1 00 S S10 00$ 5 00 7 10 8
20 miles and over 10 32 28 24 20 19 14 13 14 8 10 18 19 21 6 90 1 15 12 00 7 00 8 11 8
30miles and over 20 40 35 30 23 22 17 15 16 9 11 21 20 26 7 1 00 1 25 13 00 8 00 9 12 8
40 miles and over 30 46( 41 37 29 27 21 19 17 10 12 25 21 31 8 1 10 1 35 14 00 9 00 10 12 9
50 miles and over 40 50 46 41 34 30 22 21 18 11 13 27 22 33 9 1 20 1 45 15 00 10 00 11 13 9
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.


-TP`- -T --rrlR~3P-XP~-~_ -




"


---- - ~~-IU- '~'-----'- T1 ~ II--;---------- r -----r~- -~-i--~/


JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA AND KEY WEST SYSTEM.


123

10 miles and under 30 27 24
20 miles and over 10 34 81 21
30 miles and over 20 38 35 31
40 miles and over 30 42 38 3J
50 miles and over 40 46 41 31;
60 miles and over 50 50 4-1 4(
70 miles and over 60 5( 4 4
80 miles and over 70 58 50 4(
90 miles and over 80 62 53 41
100 miles and over 90 66 5i 5S
110 miles and over 100 69 57 5-1
120 miles and over 110 72 62 5
130 miles and over 120 75 65
140 miles and over 130 78 68 6(
150 miles and over 140 80 70 61
160 miles and over 150 82 72 6(
171) miles and over 160 84 74 6E
180 miles and over 170 86 7(6 6
190 miles and over 180 88 78 6.
200 miles and over 190 90 80 6(
210 miles and over 200 92 82 6,
220 miles and over 210 94 84j Oi
230 miles and over 220 96 8) 6i
240 miles and over 230 98 88 7
250 miles and over 240 100 90 71
260 miles and over 250 101 91 7"
270 miles and over 260 102 91l 71
280 miles and over 270 103 92 74
290 miles and over 280 104 92 71-
300 miles and over 290 105 93 7(


5 6A B (

18 15 11 10 1
21 17 15' 12 1
24 19 17 14 1
20 21 19 15 1
28 23 21 16 1
30 2 25 2 17 1
32 27 24 18 1
34 29 25 19 1

38 33 27 214
401 35 28 23
42 37 29 23
44 39 0 2*
46 41 31 25
48 43 32 26
49 44 33 271'
50 45 834 28
51 40 35 28
52 47 36 2'9
5:3 48 37 30
51 49 3s8 :31
55 50 39 322
0 51 40 33
57 52 41 34
58 53 42 325
59 54 43 306
60 55 44 37
61 56 45 38
62 57 46 -1 4
63 58 47 40 4


311) E


F I


L

8 75
90
1 05
1 20
S1 30
1 40
1 50
1 60
1 70
1 75
S1 80
1 85
i 1 90
1 95
5 2 00!
2 05'
3 2 10
3 2 15
3 2 16
S2 17
2 18
2 19
2 20
2 21
2 22
2 23
2 24.
2 25
2 26
2 27


8 5 00
7 00
8 00
9 00
10 00
11 00
11 00
12 00
13 00
14 00
14 00
15 00
16 00
16 00
17 00
17 00
18 00
19 00
19 00
20 00
20 00
21 00
21 00
22 00
22 00
22 00
23 00
23 00
24 00
24 00




_1____7qp1~1Ul~j~ I


JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA AND KEY WEST SYSTEM (Charlotte Harbor Division).

1 2 4 5 A (i A B D E1F J K L M N 0 P R G V
10 miles and under 0 27 21 211 18 1 12 8 8 21 17 23 8 8 ~ 8 10 S 0 00! 5 00 8 10 8
20 miles and over 10 41 3 2 2 18 1 1 21 2 9 1 20 12 00 7 00 9 11 8
30 miles and over 20 5 45 ) 33) 311 29 23 18 17 11 11 2 23 ) 11 1 05 1 30 18 4 00 S 00( 12 8
40 miles and over 30 ,58 0 i 3 1 21) 2', 18 12 11 3 21 5 12 1 20 1 40 15 00 9 00 12 12 9
50 miles nd over 40 2 5: 49 3 31 8 20 2 14 12 38 2i 50 1 1 35 1 50 1 0 10 00( 0 14 13 9
60 miles and over 50) 0 5 52 4:0 388 27 21 14 13 41 27 54 14 1 50 I 17 0 11 00 15 13 9
70 miles an over 60 0, 4 4) 40 3I ) 28 2 3 1 14 41 2 )54 "' 14 1 58 1 70 18 00 11 00 17 14 10
80 miles and over 70 72' 62 50 44' 42 37 2 24 15 14 44 30 59' 14 1 5 1 75 19 00 12 00 18 14 10











OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION, )
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., September 28, 1890. I
To the Jacksonville, Tampa & Key West Railway Company, Jack-
sonville, Fla.:
GENTLEMEN-Herewith please find copy of the schedule of
freight rates as revised and adopted by the Commission for your
company and for all railroads under its management and control,
excepting the Charlotte Harbor Division.
This schedule of rates to be applied in all cases by con-
tinuous mileage as one tariff, excepting that where shipments are
interchanged between the Florida Southern main line and the
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West main line; or between
either of the divisions (or branches) named below and either
main line; or between either division or branch as named
below, and any other division or branch as named below,
the rate to be calculated on the actual distance, plus
twenty-five miles. For example: should a shipment be made
on the St. Johns and Lake Eustis Division and Sanford and
Lake Eustis Division from Leesburg, consigned to Sanford, the
rate to be calculated by the schedule on the actual distance, plus
twenty-five miles.
The divisions (or branches) referred to in the exceptions al-
lowed as stated above, are:
The DeLand Branch, the Indian River Division, the Sanford
and Lake Eustis Division and the St. Johns and Lake Eustis
Division.
In applying this schedule, however, the rates on articles in
classes G and V to be the same from any point on the Jackson-
ville, Tampa and Key West system of roads (excepting the
Charlotte Harbor Division), and Gainesville, Jacksonville, Cal-
lahan or Fernandina, as were in effect July I, 1889, provided
in no case the rate to exceed 20 cents per standard box for
articles in class G, or 16 cents per box for articles in class V
between said points.
Also please find the schedule as revised and adopted by the
Commission for the Charlotte Harbor Division.
The passenger rates on the several roads and divisions are
as follows:
Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West, Jacksonville
to Sanford .. . . ...... 4 cents per mile
DeLand Branch ... . . . 5 cents per mile
St. Johns and Lake Eustis Division ... .. 5 cents per mile
Indian River Division .. . ... 5 cents per mile
Florida Southern, including Rochelle, Citra
and Micanopy branches .. . . 4 cents per mile
St. Johns and Halifax River .. . .... 5 cents per mile
Sanford and Lake Eustis Division . . 5 cents per mile










29

Charlotte Harbor Division . . . .. 5 cents per mile
Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River 4 cents peP mile
St. Johns . . .. .. . . 5 cents per mile
St. Augustine and Palatka (now St. Augustine
and Halifax River Railway) .. . . 4 cents per mile
The schedule of freight rates and the passenger rates thus
revised and allowed to be charged and collected, subject to the
rules and regulations prescribed by the Commission as per Cir-
cular No. 23.
Schedules to go into effect October 15, 1889.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.














JACKSONVILLE, ST. AUGUSTINE AND HALIFAX RIVER; ST. JOHNS; ST. AUGUSTINE
AND HALIFAX RIVER AND ST. JOHNS AND HALIFAX RIVER RAILROADS.

1 I 3 4 5 0A B D E F J K L M N 0 P R G V
10 miles and under t 8 1 12 10 7 8 78 0 OO 14 15 S 5 10 8
20 miles and over 10! 27 20 10 12 10 10 8. 8 16 18 21 76 5 1 06 10 00 7 00 6 11 8
30 miles and over 201 35 130, 2 2 22 19 15 12 11 9 9 19 21 7 88 1 13 11 00 8 00 7 12 8
40 miles and over 380 41 830 33 28 24 18 1( 12 10 9 220 0 8 1 00 1 19 12 00 0 00 8 12 9
50 miles and over 40 45 41 37 33 2 20 18 11 101 25 21 8 1 13 1 25 16 25 10 00 9 13 9 9
60 miles and over 50 48 45 4-1 H3 28 21 2) 14 11 10 2 2 3 9 1 25 1 31 "17 50 11 00 10 18 9 0
7) miles and over 60 ) 4(i 411 36 28 21 21 1 1 11 27 24 30 9 1 31 1 87 18 75 11 00 11 14 10
80 miles and) over 70 4 50 43 3 22. 22 1o o 1 i2 24 9 1 7 14 20 00 12 00 12 14 10
90 miles and (ver 80 560 52 4i6 40 ; 1 24! 24 1 1 3 12 3 2 40 9.5 1 44 1 50 21 25 18 00 13 15 10
100 miles and over c 90, s 584 48! 3 25 18 14 14 1 2 1 40 9.5 1 50 1 50 21 25 14 00 14 15 10
110 miles and over 100 I 55 48 40 :31 25 .1 25 19 14 14 31 29 40 10 1 5i 1 62 22 50 14 00 15 15 11
120 miles and over 110 0(1 550 50 42 33261 26 20 15 14 338 3(0 42 10 1 50) 1 09 22 50 15 00 16 10 11
1)30 miles and over 120 01 558' 53 43 1428 27 21 5 155 3"4 30 43 10 1 02 1 75 23 75 16 00 17 16 11
Jaeksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Raiilway, full passenger fare to be Four (4) cents per mile.
St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway, full passenger fliare t)o lbe Four (4) cents per mile.
St. Johns Railway, full passenger fare to be Five (5) cents per mile.
St. Johns and Halifax River Railway, full passenger fare to be Five (5) cents per mile.










JACKSONVILLE, ST. AUGUSTINE AND HALIFAX RIVER RAILWAY.

Arbitraries for Through Traffic, Effective October 20, 1889.


Phillips, Bowden, Sum-
merville..... ..
Nesbit, Eaton, Sweet-
water, Bayard, Pitts-
burg Junction, Regis-
ter, Clarksville ......
Durbin, Sampson .....
Magnolia, St.Augustine
New St. Augustine ..
Tocoi Jui..:l i .I.',i, l -
Middleton,Armstrong
Rhinebeck, Ro ger s'
( I.. i_. Tocoi......
Holy Branch, Ould's,
Merrifield, Buena Vis-
ta, Pattersonville,
Putnam ............
East Palatka ..........
Yelvington...........
Dinner Island.........
Windermere ..........
Bulow, Harwood......
Tomoka, Ormond....
Holly Hill ...... ..
King.iton, Daytona....


1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C|D E F
--- -----I--

20 18 16 14 12 10 7 8 7 6 14 14



27 28 20 10 16 12 10 10 8 8' 1( 18
28 25 28 20 i 1 1 12 11 91 8 19 20

28 25 23 20 1 1t2 16 12 10 8 20 15



45 41 37 83 27 20 18 13 11 10 25 22



42 38 84 29 24 20 17 14 11 11 27 233
22 20 18 15 12 10 10 1( 10 6 114 12
44 89 37 31 26 23 22 191 19 141 83 29
40 42 89 34 27 24 23 20 20 15) 34 31
50 44 41 85 29 25) 4 21 2 16 86 33
53 48 43 37 81 37 2 23 38

57 52 46 40 38 29 27 25) 3 18 40 37
62 56 49 43 8 31 2 27 5 19 43 38


II J


831 "


K


5


6
7

8


L M N 0


8 63 1 00 S 10 00


75
88

1 00


1 12



1 25
1 25
8 19
2 88
2 5; 1
2 69)

2 81
2 95


1 25



1 30
1 00
2 25
2 38
2 50
2 63

2 75
2 90


16 25



17 50
17 50
27 50
28 5)
29 50
30 50

31 50
32 50


P R G V


6 10 8


i
I
V











OFFICE OF THE RAILROAD COMMISSION,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., September 28, 1889.
To the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Halifax River Railway,
St. Johns Railway, St. Augustine and Palatka Railway,
St. Johns and Halifax Railroad:
The distance tariff, F No. 2, is approved, excepting that the
rate on articles in class P is not to exceed 25 per cent. increase
of the Commissioners' standard; provided, on shipments inter-
changed between the St. Augustine and Palatka and the St.
Johns and Halifax, or the Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Hali-
fax River divisions, or between any of the divisions named
above and any other division named, 20 per cent. higher than
the rate named in said tariff may be charged, excepting on
classes G and V, to which freight rule No. i shall apply.
The freight tariff F No. I, intended to be applicable to ship-
ments coming to or going from Jacksonville, is approved, except
that articles in class G shall not be, for between any points
named in said tariff and Jacksonville, at a rate higher than 20
cents per box; but wherever in said tariff the rates are higher
than 20 cents per box such rates shall be reduced to 20 cents
per box. And excepting that articles in class V shall not be
charged for between any point named in said tariff and Jackson-
ville at a rate higher than 15 cents per crate, but whenever in
said tariff the rates are higher than 15 cents per crate such rates
are reduced to 15 cents per crate. And excepting that ship-
ments of articles in class P shall be charged for only at the
rates allowed in the distance tariff as aforesaid, provided the tariff
of rates in effect July i, 1889, on the St. Johns and Halifax
Railroad may remain in force as applicable to all shipments of
freight wholly on said division, except as to class P, on which
the rate to be 25 per cent. increase of Commissioners' standard.
By order of the board.
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.












ST. JOHNS AND HALIFAX RIVER RAILROAD.


1 2 3 4 5 6 A B
10 miles and under 22 19 19 16 14 13 12 9
20 miles and over 10 24 22 21 1 1 5 141 13 10
80 miles and over 20 28 24 23 20 17 15 14 11
40 miles and over 80 31 28 25 2 19 17 15 1
50 miles and over 40 5 2 2825 21 19 17 15
60 miles and over 50 0 36 31 28 24' 21 1 7 1
Full passenger fare to be Five (5) Cents per mile.


C D E FH J K L M N O P
9 8 18 17 18 8 8 $ 94$1 25i $10 005$ 5 00
10 19 19 9 9 1 13 1 38 11 00 7 00
11 10 21 21 20 10 1 31 1 50 12 00 8 00
12 11 23 281 11 1 44 63 13 00 9 00
13 1 25 25 22 12 1 56 1 75l 14 00 10 00
151 13 281 26 24 13 1 70 1 901 15 00 11 00


R GV
5 10 8
7 11 8
8 12 8
9 12 9
10 13 9
11 14 9


ORLANDO AND WINTER PARK RAILWAY.


1 2 3 4 56 A B C D E F HI K L N 0 P R G V
10 miles and under 80 27 24 21 18 151212 10 8 18 1822 S 6 85 $ 00 10 00 5 00 7 10 8
Full passenger fare, Four (4) cents per mile.

















ORANGE BELT RAILWAY.


10 miles and under
20 miles and over 10
30 miles and over 20
40 miles and over 30
50 miles and over 40
60 miles and over 50
70 miles and over 60
80 miles and over 70
90 miles and over 80
100 miles and over 90
110 miles and over 100
120 miles and over 110
130 miles and over 130
140 miles and over 130
150 miles and over 140
160 miles and over 150


2 3 4


5 6 A
18 15 13
2 17 15
24' 19 17
26 21 19
28 23 1
30 25 2'3
32 27 24
34 29 25
36 31 26
S38 33 27
40 35 28
S42 37 2!
44 39 30(
S46 41 31
48 43 32
49 44 33


B C

10 11
12 13
14 14
15 15
16 16
17 17
18 18
19 19
20 20
21 21
22 22

24 24
25 25
26 26
927 27


EFH

19 16 321
21 18 24
23 20 27
25 22 30
27 24 33
29 26 30
31 28 39
33 30 42
35 31 45
37 32 47
39 33 49
41 34 50
432 35 51
4-4 30 52
47 37 53
48 38 54


K L

7$ 90.
8 1 00
9 110
10 1 20
10.5 1 30
11 1 40
11.5 1 50
12 1 60
12.5 1 70
13 1 75
13.5 1 80
14 1 85
14.5 1 (30
15 1 95
15.5 3 00
16 2 05


N 0 P R

S 810 *, 5 00 8
12 50 7 00 9
14 00 8 00 10
15 00 9 00 11
16 25 10 00 12
S 17 50 11 00 13
S 18 75 11 00 14
20 00 12 00 15
21 25 13 00 16
21 25 14 00 18
22 50 15 00 19
23 00 16 00 20
24 00 16 00 21
S 25 00 17 00 23
26 00 17 00 23
7 00 18 001 24


Full passenger fare, Five (6) cents per mile.
Full passenger fare, Three (3) cents per mile at present, voluntarily made so by the road, and rates filed with the
Commission.


GV

10 8
11 8
12 8
12 9
13 9
13 9
14 10
14 .10
15 10
15 10
15 11
16 11
16 11
16 11
17 12
17 12














PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC R. R.


For o1 miles and less ................
Over Io miles and not over 15 ......
Over 15 miles and not over 20......
Over 20 miles and ot over 25......
Over 25 miles and lnt over 30 ... .
Over 30 miles and not over 35......
Over 35 miles and not over 40...
Over 40 miles and not over 45 ......
Over 45 miles and not over 50......
Over 50 miles and not over 55.....
Over 55 miles and not over 6o .
Over 6 miles and not over 65......
Over 65 miles and not over 70......
Over 70 miles and not over 75 .....
Over 75 miles and not over 80......
Over 80 miles and not over 85 .....
Over 85 miles and not over go......
Over 90 miles and not over 95 ......
Over 95 miles and not over 1oo ......
Over oo miles and not Over 1o ......
Over Ilo miles and not over 120 .....
Over 120 miles and not over 30 ......
Over 130 miles and not over 140.....
Over 140 miles and [lot. over 50 ......
Over 150 miles and not over 16o ..


I i IN


PER Ioo POUNDS.


~---~-`- -I! 213-- 456 A1 B


I 2 3 4 5 6 A B C
I 25 221 18 [7i6 I 15 155 6
2 30 25 21 20 19 IS S. IS 7.
3 32 28- 25 23 21 20, 20! 7
4 35 30 27 25: 23 21121, 21 9
5 37' 32 30 27 24 2 22 2 2 10
6 4 35 32 29 26 23 23 23 11
7 42; 37 33 30 27 2,1 241 24 12
8 43' 40 34 31 28 25 25: 251 J3
9 45: 41 35 32 29 26 26 26 14
10 47 42 36 33 30 27 27 27 15
11 48! 431 37 34' 31 28 28 28' 16
12 50, 414 40i 36 33' 3 301 30, 171
13 52, 451 41 37, 33' 30' 30' 30: 17:
14 551 415 42 38 34! 30 30 3 18,
15 57' 47 43! 39! 35' 31' 31' 31 18
16 s 5s0 44 40' 36 32 32, 32 19
17 60 521 46 41 -' 33 33, 33 19
18 62; 54' 4 43 34 34 3 19,
19 641 56i 5 45 40 36 36 36. 20
20 6615 5 46, 41 37 37 37 21
21 68 6o' 52 47 421 38 38 38 22
22 70 62 53 48 43! 39 39 39 23
23 72; 641 541 4 49 40 4 40 24
24 74 66 55, 50 451 411 .1 41: 25
25 76 68' 56 51 5 461 42 42 42, 25


P Per
S loo lbs


1 E H IF I iL MIN

6 15 15 12 15 7! 5' 3
7 IS' iS1 14 8 9 7 4
7 20 20 14 20 o 7 5
9 2 21 18 21 2 2 S 5
10 22 22 20 22 III 8 6
11 23 23 22 23 12 8 6
12: 24. 2. 24 23 12 8 6
13 25 25 26 24' 13 8 7
4 26 26 28 24] 14 9 7
15 27 27 30 24' 1,5 10 7
16 28 28; 321 2516 1 2. 8
171 30, 3 34; 25' 17. 12
171 3 0 3,0 26: 17i 131
18 3 30 30i 36 26 18' 13' 9
18, 31 3'1 36 26 I 141 9
191 32 3 38 27 19 19: 91
19' 33' 331 38 27 19 15 101
19' 3 3434: 38 27 19 15 o0
20 36 36 40 27' 20 15 10
21 37 -- 42' 28] 21' 6 II
22' 38 44, 28 22 16 11,
231 39 39 46: 23 17 12
24 40 40o 4S 28' 24 17 12!
25: 41 41' 50 28, 25 IS 13!
251 42' 42 50< 28; 26 iS 131


AR LOADS.


Per Per Car.
2000
ibs. -- --------Du---
ibs.
SLive Stock, 'Sheep, Dou. Dk.
Coal. except Hogs Hogs, Single "
$ 6o r0 oo 0 $12 00
8o 14 00 17 oo
90' 14 oo 17 00
100 17 00 20 00
I 05 17 oo 20 oo
I 15 19 00 23 00
120 19 00 23 oo
I 25 21 00 25 00
I 25i 21 00 25 00
S301 23 00 28 00
1 35 23 00oo 28 oo
1o40 25 00 30 oo
451 2 00oo 30 00
50 27 00 32 00
I 50; 27 00 32 00
I 55 29 oo 35 oo
1551 29 00 35 oo
I 6ol 31 00 35 oo
S6o 31 00oo 5 oo
165 32oo 36oo
165 34 00 3800
175 34 oo 39 oo
S75 35 oo 40 oo
I 80, 36 o0 40 oo0
1 90 37 oo 40 oo00


Full passenger fare, Four (4) Cents per mile.

























PENSACOLA DIVISION L. & N. R. R.


PER 1oo POUNDS.



1i 2 3 4 5 6 A 13 C

For 10 ilesan less............ ...... 2 9 8 7 6 6 6
Over 1om iles and lol over 15 ....... 2 15 13 12 I1 Io i 9' 99 6
Over 15 liles and not over 20.... 3 17 17 13 12' I II 7
Over 2 ilead otover 25....... 4 3 20 17 I 14 13 13 I I
Over 25 liles and not over 36....... 5 26 23 20 16 15 15 15 i
Over 30 miles and not over 35....... 6 29 2, 22 19 1 817 17 7I
Over 35 miles and not over 40 ....... 32 27 24 21 1 2! 19 19 19 II
Over 40 miles and o 45 oe ....... 8 1351 ,' 27 23 22' 2 1 2i1 1
Over 45 miles and not over s0 ...... 9 37 321 2! 25 24' 22 22 22 14
Over 50 miles and not over 55....... o 39 34, 30 26] 25. 23 23 23i 5

Full passenger fare, Three (3) Cents per mile.


S6 610 6
S6- 99 12 9
7 7 11 1i 1
1 9 3 131 1l i 131
10 15 15 20 1-5
II 17 17 22 J51
2i 19 g9 22, 19I
S3 21 216 216
4 22 22 21 28 22
1 23 23 30 231


IN CAR LOADS.

Per Per Per Car.
TOO 132S. 2000
oo lbs. 2-o-o

Live Stoclr,lSheep, Dou.Dk'
L MI N Conl. except Hogs Hogs, Single "

5 41 $ 6 $5 00 $ 6 oo
6 5 4 70 6 oo0 7 00
7 6 5 g 7 oo 8 oo
9 7 5 100 8oo 0 oo0
10 7 6 I 05 o 00 12 00
1 8 6 I T5 12 00 14 00
12 8 6 2551 14 oo 17 00
13 8 7 I 25 15 00 18 oo
14 9 7! 25 16 oo 19 oo
15 1o 7! 30 18 oo 22 00


IU


---- --













SAVANNAH, FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY.


1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C D E F 1- J

5miles............. 18 1 15 12 11 9 9 6 4.5 4 11 9 12 S
10 miles............. 24 21 0 15 14 1 12 8 5.5 5 111 15
15 miles............. 27 24 23 1 17 14 14 9 6 5.5 712.5 18 "
20 miles ............. 30 21 2-1 21 18 15 15 10 7 6 18 14 21
25 miles............ 3 30 27 24 20 17 17 11 7.5 7 0!15 24 "
30 miles............. 3 32 29 260 2 17 17 11 7.5 7 21115 26
35 miles............. 39 5 32 20 231 18 1812 8 7.5,2316 29 "
40 miles............. 41 30 38 30 24 18 1812 8 7.52411 30
45 miles............. 44 39 i) 26 20 20 1 8.5 8 2617.5 3 "
50 miles.............. 4 41 37 33 '7 20 20 1:3 9 6 2717.5 33 "
55 miles............. 4 44 3 35 28 121 21 1 9 8.52818 35 "
60 miles............. 49 31 35 28 21 21 14 9 8.5 818 35
65 miles............. 4 4 45 39 35 28 21 21 15 9.5 0 28"19 35
70 miles............. 46 41 36 28 21 21 15 9.5 9 28 1 3 "
75 miles............. 5 49 42 38 29 22 22 16 10 9.5920 38 "
80 miles .............. 501 4 39) 2 2 22 16 10 .5 29 20 39
85 miles..... ...... 5 1 15 40 31 24 2- 1711 10 3121.5 40 "
90 miles ............. 53 4 40 31 21 24 1711 10 311. 40
95miles ............. 6 55 48 40 31 25 251811.5 3123 4 "
100 miles.............. i 551 48 40 31 25 25 18:11 l 3123 40
Full passenger fare main line, Three (3) cents per mile.
Full passenger fare Gainesville Division, Four (4) cents per mile.
Full passenger fare Lake City Branch, Five (5) cents per mile.


K L M

4 .:.,' 55
5 50 80
5.5 55 85
0 60 90
6.5 65 95
7 70 1 00
7.5 75 1 05
8, 80 1 10
8 85 115
8 90 1 20
8 95 1 25
9 95 1 30
9 1 00 1 35
9 1 00 1 40
9.5 1 05 1 45
9.5 1 10 1 50
9.5 1 15 1 55
9.5 1 15 1 600
10 120 1 65
10 1 20 1 70


O P R

S5 50 4 00 4
8 00 5 00 5
9 00 6 00 5.5
10 00 7 00 6
11 00 8 00 6.5
11 00 8 00 7
1200 900 7.5
1200 9.00 8
18 00 10 00 8.5
13 00 10 00 9
1400 1000 9
14 00 11 00 10
15 00 11 00 10
15 00 11 00 11
16 00 12 00 11
16 00 12 00 12
17 00 13 00 12
17 00 13 00 13
17 00 14 00 14
17 001 14 00 14


G V

10 8
10 8
11 8
11 8
12 8
12 8
12 9
12 9
13 9
13 9
18 9
18 9
14 10
14 10
14 10
14 10
15 10
15 10
15 10
15 10


L~rxmm;--,n:I~;~ .~mr-:iir-;-i7r-~r~.wl~s~mc~,~a~~7i r~i~rr.1r.;m ---oa...~.;.. ;,.~-.~.;...


L~ZI~~ -----L~--- --- ~-~-~-- -------~------i-PI_------- --~I~~--- _











SILVER SPRINGS, OCALA AND GULF RAILROAD.

1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C D E FH J K L M N P R GV
10 miles and under 30 27 5 22 18 15, 15 12 1 0 18 20 18 S 8 $1 I 25 S $10 008 5 00 7 10 8
20 miles and over 10 33 30 27 25 22 18 17 5 14 12 2 23 9 1 25 1 4 11 00 7 00 8 11 8
30 miles and over 20 363 3 30 27 25 21 19 17 1( 13 25 20 8 10 1 30 1 50 12 00 8 00 9 12 8
40 miles and over 30 40 3 33 30 28 24 22 20 19 15 28 29 2 12 1 0 1 "6 13 00 9 00 10 12 9
50 miles and over 40 43 40 3 1 33 30 27 4 21 201 10 301 2 35 1 10 15i "0 14 00 10 00 12 13 9
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.



SOUTH FLORIDA RAILROAD.


1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C D E F I
10 miles and under 30 27 24 1 18 15 12 12 1 818 18 22
20 miles and over 10 36 35 30 28 24 18 15 14 10 9 2(0 21 2'
30 miles and over 210 41 36 32 30 6 20 17 10 11 0 21 21 30
40 miles and over 30 42 38 34 32 28 22 18 18 12 11 23 22 35
50 miles and over 40 46 42 38 34 30 24 1920 1 1 25 22 40
60 miles and over 50 50 45 418 383 26 20 21 1 12 27 2 44
70 miles and over 60 52 47 43 41 35 27 21 22 15 12' 7 25 45
80 miles and over 70 54 50 45 4 42 36 28 24 24 10 1: 29 28 46
90 miles and over 80 59 52 47, 43 37 29 25 5 17 80 2) 47
100 miles and over 90 60 54 49 44 38 30 25 26 18 14' 32 81 48
110 miles and over 100 62 55 50 45 39 80 26 28 201 151 34 30 50
120 miles and over 110 62 55 50 45 39 30 20 28 20 15 34 3 50
130 miles and over 120 64 58 54 47 41 3327 29 21 160 34 3 50
Full passenger fare main line, Four (4) cents per mile.
Full passenger fare Indian River Division, Five (5) cents per mile.


L M

8 858 I 001
1 00.) 1 20
1 201 1 20
1 40 1 60
1 4(0 1 60
1 50 1 80
1 501 1 80
1 55i 1 90
1 55 1 95
1 60 2 00
1 65 2 00
1 6(i5 2 00
1 65 2 10


0 P R
S11n .1. 5 00 7
11 00 7 00 8
12 00 8 00 9
13 00 9 00 10
14 00 10 00 11
15 00 11 00 12
16 00 11 00 13
17 00 12 00 14
17 00 13 00 15
18 00 14 00 16
18 00 14 00 17
19 00 15 00 18
19 00 16 00 18


--" **-**--***;--------r-










39
OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., September 28, 1889.
To the South Florida Railroad Company, Sanford, Fla.:
As to the Bartow branch, rule No. i of freight rules to apply
as to articles embraced in classes B, D, F, G, K, L, M, N, O,
P, R and V.
The Pemberton Ferry Branch and the Indian River Division
to be allowed on all classes, and the Bartow Branch on classes
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, A, C, E and H 20 per cent. on straight mile-
age as heretofore provided in circular No. 18, November 30,
i888.
The passenger rate as at present in force to remain without
change.
Subject to the rules and regulations of the Commission, as
prescribed in Circular No. 23.
Schedules to go into effect October 15, 1889.
By order of the Board.
JNO. G WARD, Secretary.











ST. AUGUSTINE AND NORTH BEACH RAILROAD.

12 345 6AB C DEFH J K L NM N O P R GV
10 miles and under 30 27 23 22 18 15 5 12 12 181 1820 22 S 8 $1 01 0o$ 1 'i 00 110 00 6 00 7 10 8
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.


ST. CLOUD SUGAR BELT RAILWAY.

1 2 3 4 5 0 A B C D E F H J K L- M N O P R G V
10 miles and under 30724 21 18 15 12 20 8 18 1822 S 6 00 S10 00500 7 10 8
20 miles and over 10 36 35 30 282418 14 10 9 20 0 27 7 1 0 1 20 11 00 7 00 8 11 8
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.


SUWANNEE RIVER RAILWAY.

12 3 45 A B C D E F H J K L N 0 P R G
10 miles and under 30 27 24 21 18 15 1 12 10 8 18 18 22 S 6 801 00 S 10 00 8 5 00 7 10 8
20 miles and over 10 36 3 0 28 24 18 15 14 10 9 20 2 27 7 $1 00 1 20 11 00 7 00 8 11 8
30 miles and over 20 40 36 32 30 26 20 17 16 11 10 21 21 30 8 1 201 20 12 00 8 00 9 12 8
Full passenger fare, Five (5) cents per mile.















TAVARES, ORLANDO AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD.


1 23 4 5 6 AB C D E F H J K L M N 0 P R G V
10 miles and under 24 21 20 14 12 10 7 8 8.5 7.5 14 15 15 S 5 ( 8 80 S 8 8 00 $ 5 00 5 106
20 miles and over 10 30 27 24 19 16 1 10 10 10.. 8.5 16 17 21 6 60 85 10 00 7 00 6 116.5
30 miles and over 20 36 32 29 22 19 15 121111 9.5 19 19 26 7 70 90 11 00 8 00 7 127
40 miles and over 30 39 34 31 28 24 181611212 10 23 20 30 8 80 95 1200 9 00 8 137
Full passenger fare, Four (4) cents per mile.



WESTERN RAILWAY OF FLORIDA.


1 2 3 4 5 6 A B C D E F H J K L M N 0 P R G V
10 miles and under 2422 1815 13 101 10 14 151 S 5 $ 751 00 S 80 5 00 6 10 8
20 miles and over 10 30 25 24 21 18 1 1 15 911 16 17 21 6 90 1 25 10 00 7 00 7 11 8
Full passenger fare, Four (4) cents per mile.


P I -- - -- --- - -- - :- - -- - -- -- - - A


' - LI














CIRCULARS ISSUED BY THE COMMISSION.


CIRCULAR NO. 21.
OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., July 8th, 1889.
I. You are hereby required to make and submit to the Rail-
road Commissioners, at their office in Tallahassee, a schedule of
just and reasonable rates of charges for the transportation of
freights, passengers and cars on your railroad, and for all
railroads under your control and management.
2. In making your schedule or schedules, you will use the
Southern Railway and Steamship Association Classification
now in force, subject to the changes and additions that have
been made by the Florida Railroad Commissioners, and subject
also to the following changes which will go into effect simulta-
neously with the approval of the schedules, to-wit: Oil, coal,
or its products, in bbls., carrier's convenience, L. C. L., from
class 3--4, released, to class 4-6, released. Oil, coal, or its
products, in bbls., carrier's convenience, C. L., from class 3-6,
released, to class 4-B, released. Cider in wood, from class 2-5,
released, to class B, released. Vinegar in wood, from class 2-5,
released, to class B, released. Insecticide, Eureka, class 4,
released, -(added.)
3. The law allows 30 days from the date of your receipt of
this circular in which to submit your schedule or schedules, but, it
being desirable that the schedules shall be passed upon and go into
effect at as early a day as practicable, the Commissioners
suggest that each railroad company file with the Commission its
schedule or schedules not later than August Ist, next.
4. Pursuant to the provisions of the statute, the Commis-
sioners will, as soon as the schedules of the railroads in this
State shall have been made and submitted, give public notice of
the times and places of their meetings for the purpose of "revis-
ing, fixing, adopting or allowing the same."
5. A copy of the Railroad Commission laws of Florida now
in force has already been forwarded to you.
6. A prompt acknowledgment of this circular is requested.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.
To the . . . ... R. R. Co.,
. .. . . . Fla.











CIRCULAR NO. 22.
OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., August 9th, 1889.
Under the Railroad Commission law as amended (chapter
3862, section 6), which went into effect July 8th, 1889, each
railroad company doing business in this State is directed, upon
the requirement of the Commission, to make and submit within
thirty days, a schedule of just and reasonable rates of charges
for the transportation of freights, passengers and cars on its
railroad, and for all railroads under its control and management,
which schedules, before being acted upon, or put in operation by
said railroads, shall be submitted to said Railroad Commissioners
for their revision and adoption. The law also provides that said
Commissioners, before revising, fixing, adopting or allowing any
such schedules, or prescribing rules and regulations to govern the
transportation of passengers, freights and cars, shall give public
notice of their intended action, in such newspapers and for such
time as shall be deemed fair and advisable by said Commis-
sioners, to all railroad companies to be affected, and to the public
generally, of the times and places of their meetings, and the rail-
road corporations and persons interested shall be entitled to a
full and fair hearing before said Commissioners.
Pursuant to the statute the Commissioners on July 8th, 1889,
the date the law went into effect, required each railroad company
to file such schedules in the office of the Commission, which
was done.
The Commission has also prepared certain rules and regula-
tions, which they propose and intend to adopt for the govern.
ment of the transportation of freights, passengers and cars on
the railroads in this State. Now, therefore,

NOTICE
Is hereby given to all railroad corporations doing business wholly
or in part in this State, and to the public generally, that the
Railroad Commissioners before revising, adopting and allowing
said schedules and rules and regulations, will hold sessions at
the following times and places, to-wit:
Jacksonville . . . .. Friday, August I6th, 1889.
Palatka . . . . . Saturday, August 17th, 1889.
Sanford . . . .. Monday, August 19th, 1889.
Bartow . . . . .. Tuesday, August 2oth, 1889.
Dade City . ..... Thursday, August 22d, 1889.
Leesburg . . . .. .Friday, August 23d, 1889.
Ocala . ............ Saturday, August 24th, 1889.
Gainesville. . . . .. Monday, August 26th, 1889.




I"a7' 1 1 .i i ] -




'--J


44
Live Oak . . . .. Tuesday, August 27th, 1889.
Pensacola . . . ... .Thursday, August 29th, 1889.
Marianna . . . ... .Friday, August 3oth, 1889.
On and after September 2d, 1889, the Commission will be in
continuous session at Tallahassee, from day to day, for the pur-
pose of allowing and adopting a schedule for each railroad
company, after a careful revision of the same, during which time
all persons and railroad companies interested will be heard.
The object of these meetings is to afford a convenient oppor-
tunity to shippers and carriers alike to make suggestions, and to
furnish such information as will enable the Commissioners to
adopt schedules of just and reasonable rates for the transpor-
tation of passengers, freights and cars on the railroads in this
State.
Any who cannot attend in person, may communicate with
the Commission in writing.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD.
Secretary.




_N 4


RULES AND REGULATIONS


GOVERNING



THE TRANSPORTATION

OF--


PASSENGERS AND FREIGHTS

ON THE -



RAILROADS IN FLORIDA,

PRESCRIBED BY THE


RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS,




1r -" *


47

CIRCULAR NO. 23.
OFFICE OF THE RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., September 23, 1889.
The following Rules and Regulations are prescribed for the
government of the transportation of persons and property by the
railroad companies doing business wholly or in part within the
State of Florida, all others conflicting therewith being hereby
repealed:


RULES AND REGULATIONS
FOR THE
GOVERNMENT OF THE TRANSPORTATION OF PERSONS AND PROP-
ERTY ON THE RAILROADS IN FLORIDA.


I. GENERAL RULES.
COMPLAINTS.
i. All complaints made to the Commission shall be in writ-
ing, and shall distinctly set forth the grounds of complaint. In
like manner, all defenses shall be in writing, and distinctly set
forth the grounds of defense.
MONTHLY AND ANNUAL REPORTS.
2. Each railroad company shall make and file in the office of
the Commission, by the last day of each month, a report of its
earnings and operating expenses for the preceding month, ac-
cording to the form prescribed by the Commission. Also, on or
before the first day of October of each year, an annual report of
its earnings, operating expenses and general operations for the
preceding year ending June 3oth, according to the form pre-
scribed by the Commission. The monthly reports to be verified
by the affidavits of the General Manager (if there be one) or Su-
perintendent, or other principal officer in charge, and the Treas-
urer or Auditor; the annual reports to be verified by the affida-
vits of the President, Superintendent or General Manager, and
Auditor or Treasurer.
SECRET REDUCTIONS, REBATES, ETC.
3. There shall be no secret reductions of rates'of freight or
passenger fares, and no rebate, drawback or other advantage in
any form shall be given or paid, either directly or indirectly,
upon shipments made or service rendered to any person not al-
lowed to all persons, but the same shall be uniform to all, and
public.


'I ui - -- - -













POSTING SCHEDULES, ETC.
4. Each railroad company shall post in a conspicuous place,
and keep the same continuously posted, in each of its stations a
copy of the schedule of freight and passenger rates revised and
adopted for the use of such company by the Commission; a copy
of all the Rules and Regulations prescribed by the Commission
for the government of the transportation of freight and passen-
gers applicable to its line of road, and a copy of the official class-
ification; also, copies of all changes made, whether the same
shall be made by such railroad company or by the Commission-
ers; also, a table of distances between each station.
TRAFFIC ARRANGEMENTS, ETC., BETWEEN RAILROADS.
5. Copies of all rate sheets, tariffs and circular orders issued,
and all contracts and agreements between railroad companies as
to the rates of freight and passenger tariffs, and all arrangements
and agreements whatever as to the divisions of earnings of any
kind by competing or connecting lines of railroads doing busi-
ness in this State shall be submitted to the Commission for in-
spection, revision and approval, that it may be seen whether they
are in violation of law, or the Rules and Regulations of said
Commission. (Chapter 3862, section 16.)
FRACTIONS OF A MILE.
6. In the transportation of passengers or property, a fraction
of a mile may be counted as one mile in the computation of dis-
tances.

II. PASSENGER RULES.
BAGGAGE.
I. Each passenger shall be entitled to baggage not exceeding
one hundred and fifty pounds in weight.
LESS THAN MAXIMUM RATES MAY BE CHARGED.
2. Railroads will not be prohibited from charging less than
the rate prescribed for the transportation of passengers, provided
such charge is not an unjust discrimination in favor of or against
persons or localities.
PASSENGERS WITHOUT TICKETS.
3. Passengers without tickets may be required to pay a sum
not exceeding fifteen cents in addition to the regular fare; Pro-
vided, That this rule shall not apply to passengers going aboard
a train where there is no ticket office; And provided further, That
such extra charge shall not be demanded, collected or received
by any railroad company where this rule shall not be conspicu-
ously posted, and kept continuously posted, at such ticket office.




- . .. . . ... "7 -; 'z


49

MINIMUM FARE.
4. Ten cents as a minimum charge may be collected where
the regular fare would be less than that sum.
COMPUTATION OF FRACTIONS.
5. Where the fare-for any distance does not end in o or 5,
.sums ending in 22 and over may be counted as 5, and sums
less than 2 as o. For example, for 422 cents collect 45, and
for 42 cents collect 40 cents. Nothing in this rule shall prevent
any railroad company from giving the exact change in cents.
FREE OR REDUCED RATES, EXCURSIONS, ETC.
6. A railroad company shall not be prevented from the free
carriage of destitute or homeless persons transported by charita-
ble societies, and the necessary agents employed in such trans-
portation; or from the issuance of mileage, excursion, commuta-
tion or round trip passenger tickets; or from giving reduced
rates to ministers of religion; or from giving free carriage to
their own officers and employees; or to prevent the principal
officers of any railroad company or companies from exchanging
passes or tickets with other railroad companies for their officers
and employees; or free carriage or reduced rates to persons in
charge of live stock shipped, from the point of shipment to des-
tination and return; or from issuing second-class tickets, for the
holders of which secood-class tickets so issued second-class ac
commodations shall be furnished; or from granting reduced
rates to immigrants or immigration agents, or persons going to
or returning from any place of meeting within this State of any
agricultural, mechanical, industrial, educational, religious or fruit
and vegetable growers' association or convention, who are di-
rectly connected with or interested in the objects of said associa-
tion or convention.
FULL AND HALF FARE.
7. The passenger fares prescribed for railroads are full fares,
but for children under twelve and over five years of age the fare
shall be one-half full fare.


III. FREIGHT RULES.
CONNECTING RAILROADS UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT.
i. All connecting roads which are under the management
and control by lease, ownership or otherwise, of one and the
same company shall, for the purposes of transportation, in ap-
plying their schedules of freight rates, be considered as consti-
tuting but one and the same road, and the rates shall be com-
puted as upon parts of one and the same road, unless otherwise
specified.













MAXIMUM RATES MAY BE REDUCED.
2. The schedule of rates allowed and adopted by the Rail-
road Commissioners for each railroad are maximum rates, which
shall not be transcended. They may, however, carry at less
than the rates allowed and adopted, provided that if they carry
for less for one person they shall, for the like service, under sim-
ilar circumstances and conditions, carry for the same lessened
rate for all persons, except as mentioned hereafter; and if they
adopt less freight rates for one station they shall make a reduc-
tion of the same per cent. at all stations along the line of road,
so as to make no unjust discrimination as against any person or
locality. But when at any point within this State there are com-
peting lines of transportation, any railroad company injuriously
affected thereby may, at such competing point, make rates below
those allowed or adopted, to meet such competition, without
making a corresponding reduction along the line of road.

FREIGHTS EXEMPT FROM RULE 2.
3. The rates specified, or hereafter to be allowed, for com-
mon brick, bone, lumber, shingles, laths, staves, rough stone,
empty barrels, corn in the ear, melons by the car load, straw,
shucks, fodder, tan bark, saw dust, household goods, moss, pal-
metto leaves and heads are maximum rates, but the railroads are
left free to reduce the same at discretion, and all such rates are
exempt from the operation of rule 2. Any complaint as to such
rates will, upon presentation, be considered. No rates have been
prescribed for articles in the classification designated by the letter
S. Such articles are subject to special contract. The Commis-
sion will entertain complaints of excessive charges for the transpor-
tation of such articles in all cases, except where the price charged
was according to contract between the shipper and carrier.
FREIGHT ON PASSENGER TRAINS.
4. The rate charged for freight service by a regular passenger
train may be one and a half times that allowed for first-class
freight by ordinary freight trains, but railroad companies are not
compelled to transport by passenger trains such freight as is not
proper to be carried by such trains.
CHARGES FOR HANDLING HEAVY FREIGHT.
5. The charge for handling extra heavy freight may be as follows:
Under 2,000 pounds, no charge for extra handling.
2,000 pounds and under 3,000, $3 for extra handling.
3,000 pounds and under 4,000, $5 for extra handling.
4,000 pounds and under 5,000, $7 for extra handling.
5,000 pounds and under 6,000, $8 for extra handling.
6,000 pounds and under 7,000, $o1 for extra handling.
7,000 pounds and over, in proportion.













SHIPPERS TO LOAD AND UNLOAD.
6. Shippers of articles in class L, M, N, O, P and R, may
be required to pay the cost of loading and unloading.
CARLOADS, WEIGHT OF A CARLOAD, CARLOAD CONSIGNMENTS, ETC.
7. In all cases in which the classification provides a rate per
Too pounds, per ton, or per barrel, giving to carload shipments
lower rates than apply to less than carload shipments, the stand-
ard minimum weight of a carload shall b- 24.000 pounds, un-
less otherwise specified. Where the actual weight loaded in a
car is in excess of the minimum weight, such excess may be
charged for in proportion to carload rates, provided that in no
case shall the amount collected on less than a carload exceed
the price per carload.
8. Where a rate per carload is given, the maximum charge
for a carload on narrow gauge railroads, shall not exceed the
pro rata of the rate allowed on standard gauge railroads accord-
ing to weight.
9. The carload rates apply to a carload or more, made by one
shipper at one time, to one and the same point of delivery, to
the same consignee, although the same may in fact be carried
by the railroad company to the point of delivery, in lots less
than the amounts recognized as a carload.
FERTILIZERS, ARTICLES EMBRACED IN.
To. The term fertilizers" embraces the following and like
articles when intended to be used as fertilizers, to-wit : sulphate
of ammonia, ashes, boneblack, ground and dissolved bone, bone
dust, castor pomace, cotton seed meal, cotton seed ashes, cotton
seed, fish scrap, guano, superphosphates, lump and ground
phosphates, gypsum, kainit, German salts, nitre-cake, nitrate
and sulphate of soda, oil cake, potash, fine ground plaster, salt
cake, saltpetre, sulphur, muck, and tank-stuff.
FREE, OR REDUCED RATES.
11. Railroad companies shall not be prevented from the
carriage, storage, or the handling of property free, or at reduced
rates, for charitable purposes, or to or from fairs and expositions
for exhibition threat.
ESTIMATED WEIGHTS.
12. Lumber, coal, lime, brick, stone, and all articles for
which estimated weights are given in the,classification (except
ale and beer, and empty ale and beer packages, L. C. L.,)
shall be taken at actual weight when it can be ascertained, but
when the weight cannot be ascertained, may be charged for at
the following estimated weights; provided, that nothing herein
shall interfere with the duty of the receiving agent to weigh, if
possible, and correct to actual weights.
4




.-" .-.


52

(TO BE USED WHEN ACTUAL WEIGHTS CANNOT BE ASCERTAINED.)
White pine and poplar, thoroughly seasoned, per
1,000 feet... . . . . . . 3,000 Ibs.
White pine and poplar, green, per i,o00 feet .. 4,000 Ibs.
Yellow pine, black walnut, and ash, seasoned, per
,000ooo feet . . . . . . . . 4,000 Ibs.
Yellow pine, black walnut and ash, green, per
1,000 feet . . . . . . . . 4,500 lbs.
Oak, hickory and elm, seasoned, per i,ooo feet .4,500 lbs.
Oak, hickory and elm, green, per I,ooo feet. . 6,000 lbs.
All other kinds of lumber, seasoned, per i,ooo feet 4,000 lbs.
All other kinds of lumber, green, per I,ooo feet 6,o000 bs.
Hoop poles, staves and headings, dry, car loaded to
a depth of 50 inches, per car . . . .. 24,000 lbs.
Hoop poles, staves and headings, green, car loaded
to a depth of 43 inches, per car. . . . 24,000 lbs.
Shingles, green, per 1,000 . . . . .. 350 lbs.
Shingles, dry, per i,ooo .. ......300 Ibs.
Laths, green, per 1,000 .. . . .... 530 lbs.
Laths, dry, per i,ooo .. ..... 450 lbs.
Tan bark, green, per cord .. . . ... . 2,600 lbs.
Tan bark, dry, per cord . . . . . .. 2,000 lbs.
Wood, green, per cord .. . . ...... 3,500 lbs.
Wood, dry, per cord .. . . .... 3,000 Ibs.
Fence posts and rails and telegraph poles, per cord 3,500 lbs.
Clay, per cubic yard .. . . .... 3,000 lbs.
Sand, per cubic yard .. . . .... 3,000 lbs.
Gravel, per cubic yard .. . . .... 3,200 lbs.
Stone, undressed, per cubic foot . . . .. 160 lbs.
Lime and coal, per bushel. . . . . 80 lbs.
Coke, per bushel . . . . . . . 40 lbs.
Portland cement, per barrel .. . ... 400 lbs.
Other cements, per barrel .. . . ... 300 lbs.
13. A ton is two thousand pounds.
RIGHT OF SHIPPER TO ROUTE FREIGHT.
14. The right of a shipper to direct by what line or lines of
railroads in this State his shipments shall be transported, shall
be observed by all the railroads in this State.
RAILROADS MUST ACT AS COMMON CARRIERS.
15. No railroad company shall decline or refuse to act as a
common carrier to transport any article proper for transporta-
tion by the train for which it is offered.
RATES TO INTERMEDIATE POINTS.
16. For intermediate distances, railroads may, at their discre-
tion, make intermediate rates proportioned to such distances.










53

Thus: If the rate for 40 miles be 24 cents, and for 50 miles 28
cents, for any distance between these distances the charge may
be between 24 and 28 cents.

COMPUTATION OF PERCENTAGES.
17. In the computation of percentages, if, after the percent-
age prescribed shall have been added or subtracted, as the case
may be, there should be a fraction, any fraction of a cent less
than one-half of a cent shall be discarded, and any of half a
cent or over, may be counted as one cent.

RATE ON SMALL SHIPMENTS.
18. Whenever the weight of any single article offered for
shipment shall be less than ioo pounds and over 50 pounds, the
charge for transporting the same shall not exceed the class rate
per ioo pounds; if the weight be less than 50 pounds, the charge
shall not exceed the rate for 50 pounds according to the class
rate per Ioo pounds; but a minimum charge of 25 cents may be
made on any shipment, however small.

UNJUSTgDISCRIMINATION IN RECEIVING AND DELIVERING FREIGHT
TO COMPETING STEAMBOAT LINES.
19. Railroad companies shall not make any unjust discrimi-
nation in the receiving of freight from, or the delivery of freight
to, any competing lines of steamboats in this State. (Chapter
3862, Section 4, Laws of Florida.

BLOCKADE OF FREIGHTS.
20. No railroad company shall, by reason of any agreement,
arrangement or understanding as to the transportation of
freights, according to percentage or otherwise, between it and
any other railroad company or companies, permit any blockade
of any class of freight.
CLASSIFICATION.
21. The Southern Railway and Steamship Association Classi-
fication in force July ist, 1889, and the current additions to and
changes therein, as shall be officially announced by said Associa-
tion, will be observed by the railroad companies doing business
in this State, subject, however, to such additions thereto and
changes therein, as have been prescribed by the Railroad Com-
missioners of Florida, as contained in the following "Exception
Sheet," and to such other and further additions and changes as
may be made from time to time hereafter by said Commissioners.











54

EXCEPTION SHEET.
Glass Released.
I. Bananas . . ... .. . . . .. 3
2. Box and barrel stuff, C. L., same as lumber .
3. Box and barrel stuff, L. C. L., 50 per cent. of 6
4. Berry baskets . . . . . . .
5. Brick, common and fire, C. L., (6,ooo bricks, .
or 25,000 pounds) . . . . . P
6. Brick, common and fire, L. C. L., 50 per cent of 6
7. Coal and coke, C. L...... ...... S
8. Coal and coke, L. C. L . . . . A
9. Cotton in bales . . . . . . . S
o1. Cotton seed in sacks, for pLiin'g . . . 6
Ir. Cotton in the seed . . . . . . S
12. Fertilizers, any quantity, (See Freight Rule io). M
13. Fish, fresh, prepared . . . . . 3
14. Fruit-oranges, lemons, limes, peaches, pears,
guavas and grape fruit, standard boxes, one
or more ....... ........ G
(Fruit in barrels, double the rate allowed on
standard orange boxes).
15. Gophers. . . . . . . . . 6
16. Hay, fodder and straw, in bales, L. C. L., 20
per cent. higher tnan. . .. . . D
17. Hoofs and horns, shipper to load and unload K
18. Ice. . . . . . . . . S
19. Insecticide, Eureka . . . . . . 4
20. Live stock . ... . . . . S
21. Lumber, C. L................. P
22. Lumber, L. C. L., 50 per cent. of. . . 6
23. Logs, saw ...... ........... S
24. Melons, C. I.... .. .. ........ .O
25. Melons, L. C. L. .... .... ...... D
26. Oil, lard and linseed . . . . . 5
27. Oil, coal, or its products in barrels, carrier's con-
venience, L. C. L. . . . . . .4 6
28. Oil, coal, or its products in barrels, carrier's
convenience, C. L.. . . . ... 5 B
29. Peas in sacks (not including split peas), . D
30. Pitch in barrels, C. L. . . . . .. R
31. Pitch in barrels, L. C. L . . . . K
32. Poles and posts, see lumber.
33. Rosin, C. L.. . .. . . . . M
34. Rosin, L. C. L. .............. K
35. Sawdust, shipper to load and to unload, 75 per
cent. of (1,200 cubic feet, C. L.) . . P
36. Salt, C. L............ .... O


- .


__


_ __~


_ _L~ ~_ _I


ri
- 1 1;










55

37. Salt, L. C. L., two-thirds of. . . . 6
38. Sugar cane.. . . . . .... S
39. Tar, including coal tar, C. L.. . . . M
40. Tar, including coal tar, L. C. L... . . M
41. Trees and shrubbery boxed or baled, L. C. L 4 6
42. Trees and shrubbery, boxed or baled, C. L. O
43. Turpentine, spirits of, in barrels .. .. R
44. Vegetables, including beans, cucumbers, cauli-
flower, okra, beats, tomatoes, squashes, pota-
toes (sweet and Irish), egg-plants, English
peas, turnips, green corn, onions, cabbages,
melons and the like articles, in standard
crates, one or more, per crate . . . V
(Vegetables same as above, in barrels, or barrel
crates, twice the rate on crates).
45. Vinegar and cider, in wood . . . . B
46. Wood... .............. .. S
FREIGHT RECEIPTS.
22. Each railroad company shall, at each station where
agents are employed, issue freight receipts to each shipper, and
at the request of the shipper the same shall be in duplicate or
triplicate, in which shall be stated the class or classes of freight
shipped, and the freight charges on each class .shipped over its
road; and when freight is to be delivered to connecting roads,
the joint or through rates, if any; and where there are no joint or
through rates, then the rates in use, if known, by each connect-
ing line to the point of destination.
DELIVERY OF FREIGHTS.
23. Railroad companies shall deliver to each consignee of
freight the article or articles mentioned in the receipt (or bill of
lading), on the payment of the rate charged for the class or
classes of freight mentioned in the receipt, and the consignee
shall not be compelled to pay for any article or articles not
received by him. When a part of the articles mentioned in the
receipt shall reach the point of destination, it shall be the duty
of the railroad company at such point to deliver the-same upon
the payment, by the consignee, of the freight charges on said
article or articles, notwithstanding the remainder of the articles
mentioned in the receipt may have been delayed or lost.
This circular to go into effect on the r5th day of October,
1889.
GEORGE G. McWHORTER,
President.
ENOCH J. VANN,
WILLIAM HIMES,
Railroad Commissioners.











CIRCULAR NO. 24.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December 16th, 1889.
To the Railroad Companies doing business in Florida :
Pursuant to section 15 of the Railroad Commission law,
the Commissioners have recently visited a number of stations and
offices in this State, and the result of their investigations con-
strains them to bring to your attention the fact that General Rule
No. 4 (Circular No. 23) in regard to posting schedules of passenger
and freight rates, the classification of freights and the rules and
regulations as revised, adopted and prescribed by the Commis-
sioners, and a distance table showing distances between stations
has not, at any station on any railroad which was visited by the
Commissioners, been fully complied with. At no place were the
rules and regulations of the Commission, nor the classification of
freights posted as the rules and regulations prescribed by the
Commission direct. In fact some of the agents alleged that the
rules and- regulations as embraced in Circular No. 23'had not
been furnished them at all. In most cases, but not all, of the
few instances where any effort was made to do so, they were
hung on a nail in pamphlet form. This last is not a posting, and
is not a compliance with the rules. They should be posted as
are the freight and passenger schedules in placard or foster form
(section 6 Railroad Commission laws). The schedule of passen-
ger and freight rates were found to have been posted in very few
instances, and then very often not in a conspicuous place, as the
law directs. In some instances they were said to have been
torn down, but there was no evidence of any effort to replace
them, and thus to keep them continuously posted.
The new schedules and accompanying regulations, as con-
tained in Circular No. 23, went into effect October i5th, 1889.
Except in one instance, no suggestion has been made to the
Commission that the time allowed was not sufficient in which to
put them into practical operation, and though it would seem that
by this date certainly a sufficient time had elapsed in which to
comply with the law and the rules, still the Commission being
aware of the difficulties arid delays incident to the changes con-
sequent upon the substitution of new schedules and regulations
for the old, and believing the roads are evidencing a disposition
to comply with the law and its terms, and the regulations of the
Commission, do not wish to multiply formal orders about these
matters and have chosen this means of calling your attention
especially to the posting.
When it is remembered that the permanent and conspicuous
posting required by law, is the only channel through which the










r 57

various regulations referred to (which to a large extent determine
and define the conditions upon which the roads and the people
do business together) reach the public, the importance of a care-
ful observance of the requirements of the law is manifest. The
thorough and conspicuous posting creates confidence and good
will, without it distrust arises.
After January ist, 1890, the Commissioners will visit the dif-
ferent stations and offices of each railroad company doing busi-
ness in this State, and hope to find that this suggestion has
prompted the careful posting, in the manner indicated, appro-
priately in the freight and ticket offices the several documents
referred to in General Rule No. 4.
Your attention is also called to General Rule No. 5. While
some of the roads are promptly filing all the documents referred
to, some are doing so only in part, and a few not at all.
By order of the Board,
JNO. G. WARD,
Secretary.


CIRCULAR NO. 25.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 7th, 1890.
The following additions to, and changes in the Exception
Sheetcontained in Circular No. 23, have been made, and will be
observed by the railroad companies doing business wholly or in
part in this State, as a part of the classification.
Box and barrel stuff, K. D. or in bundles, L. C. L., 50 per
cent. of class B. (Added.)
Wood changed from class S to class P.
Live stock, changed from class S to
Live stock, C. L., class i-N released.
Live stock, L. C. L., class 1-2 released. (See Rule 12.)
The schedules of freight rates have been revised, and the fol-
lowing have been fixed and allowed as the rates to be charged by
all railroads doing business in this State for the transportation of
all articles in the classification in class "N."
o1 miles and under, $ 8.o00 80 miles and over 70, $24.00
20 miles and over 10, II.oo 90 miles and over 80, 26.00
30 miles and over 20, 14.00 o00 miles and over 90, 28.oo
40 miles and over 30, I6.oo'iio miles and over 100oo, 29.00
50 miles and over 40, 18.0oo120 miles and over 11o, 30.00
60 miles and over 50, 2o.oo00130 miles and over 120, 31.00
70 miles and over 60, 22.00o140 miles and over 130, 32.00











58


150 miles and over 140,
160 miles and over 15o,
170 miles and over 160,
180 miles and over 170,
190 miles and over 180,
200 miles and over 190,
210 miles and over 200,
220 miles and over 210,
230 miles and over 220,
240 miles and over 230,
250 miles and over 240,
260 miles and over 250,
270 miles and over 260,


$33.00:280 miles and over 270,
34.oo0290 miles and over 280,
35.00 300 miles and over 290,
36 oo0310 miles and over 300,
37.00 320 miles and over 310,
38.00:330 miles and over 320,
38.00,340 miles and over 330,
39.00 350 miles and over 340,
39.00 360 miles and over 350,
40.00:370 miles and over 360,
40.00oo38o miles ald over 370,
41.00o390 miles and over 380,
41.co 400 miles and over 390,


This circular will go into effect from and after March Ist,


1890.
By order of the Board.


JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.


CIRCULAR NO. 26.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February i9th, 1890.
The classification of freight is amended to read as follows:
Box and barrel stuff, loose, L C. L., 50 per cent. of class 6,
released.
This circular will go into effect March ist, 1890.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.


CIRCULAR NO. 27.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 26th, 1890.
It having come to the knowledge of the Commission that
that part of Circular No. 25, dated February 7th, 1890, and to
go into effect March Ist 189o. which reads as follows:
"Box and barrel stuff, K. D. or in bundles, L. C. L., 50 per
cent of class B. (Added.)" has been misconstrued by some of the
railroad companies; all railroad companies are hereby advised


$42.00
42.00
43.00
43.00
44.00
44.00
45.00
45.00
46.00
46.00
47.00
47.00
48.00










59

that the word "added" in parenthesis, refers to'the exception to
the classification, and not that 50 per cent. of class B is to be
added to class B or any other rate, but that the classification of
box and barrel stuff, K. D. or in bundles, L. C. L., shall be, on
and after March ist, 1890, 50 per cent. of class B.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.




"-- ---- ,..'" -.. 1










COMPLAINTS AND DECISIONS.


J. F. FITZGERALD
vs. Overcharge in passenger fare.
PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC R. R.
Mr. Fitzgerald complained that he paid the Pensacola and
Atlantic Railroad Company at Pensacola, January 7, 189o,
$8.95 passenger fare from Pensacola to Tallahassee, and that that
was an overcharge.
Upon referring it to the company, Vice-President Chipley
replied January i 1890: "Give me Mr. Fitzgerald's address,
and I will have the overcharge refunded, as it is the result of an
error." Mr. Chipley was advised that Mr. Fitzgerald had in-
formed the Commission that he would write him from Jacksonville.

PENSACOLA, FLA., January 14th, 1890.
John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-Overcharge in ticket fare Pensacola to Tallahassee.
Several days ago, Mr. Chipley called my attention to a
complaint of the Commission in regard to a ticket sold, Pensa-
cola to Tallahassee.
This was an error caused from the fact that the Pensacola
and Mobile coupon ticket rate sheet is published not by the
Louisville and Nashville Railroad, but by the Southern Associa-
tion and issued from Atlanta, and they have so far failed to
correct the sheet.
I have instructed our agent at Pensacola to ignore the sheet
altogether and have given a basis for making rates to Florida
points, which is in line with the rates allowed by the Commis-
sion. When the new sheet is issued the error in the present
sheet will be corrected.
Yours truly,
F. C. SHEPARD, D. P. A.
Mr. Fitzgerald has not communicated with the Commission,
and the presumption is that the claim was satisfactorily settled.


A. NEWMAN
vs. Overcharge on lumber.
PENSACOLA AND ATLANTIC R. R.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December 6th, 1889.
DEAR SIR-A complaint has been received from Mr. A.
Newman, of Milton, Fla., as to the rates charged on a lot of
lumber shipped from Milligans to Milton.


Li --





-- ~--:----;-- ~~~-~~ --=-~-~~ili-~I----~-












A letter from Mr. Milligan states that the amount of lumber
on the car was 5,000 feet of well-seasoned dressed lumber and
2,000 feet of rough green lumber. The rate charged was on a
car load of 40, ooo lbs. at $24.00.
The Commissioners think that there has evidently been a
mistake made in billing the lumber, and ask that you investigate
the matter and have it adjusted.
Yours truly,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
To F. C. SHEPARD, Esq., D. F. A., P. and A. R. R.,
Pensacola, Fla.

PENSACOLA, FLA., December 11, 1889.
John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-A. Newman, Milton, claim overcharge on
lumber.
I will investigate this matter and if I find that the weight was
less than forty thousand pounds, I will refund to actual weight,
not less than 24,000 Ibs.
Yours truly,
F. C. SHEPARD, D. F. A.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December r2th, 1889.
Capt. A. Newman, Milton, Fla..
DEAR SIR-The complaint of yours against the Pensacola
and Atlantic Railroad, for an overcharge on a shipment of
lumber- from Miligan's to Milton, was laid before the Board by
Commissioner McWhorter, and has been referred to Mr. F. C.
Shepard, the D. F. A. of the road.
Mr. Shepard has made the following reply: "I will inves-
tigate the matter, and if I find the weight was less than forty
thousand pounds, I will refund to actual weight, not less than
24,000 pounds." You can communicate with Mr. Shepard in
regard to the claim.
(Copy.) Yours truly,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
Please let the Board know when the claim is satisfactorily
adjusted.


" I




;-'






62

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December 16th, 1889.
F. C. Shepard, Esq., D. F. A., Pensacola and Atlantic Railroad,
Pensacola, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your favor
of the 13th inst., and to say in reply, that on reference to the
bill made out by your agent at Milton and paid by Mr. Newman,
I find that Mr. Newman was charged on 40,000 lbs. of lumber
at 6 cents per hundred, $24.00
If necessary, I can send you the original bill, which is on
file in this office. Date of bill, November 26th, 1889; waybill
No. 57; car No. 22,982; date of shipment, November 23d, 1889.
Yours truly,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.



PENSACOLA, FLA., December i3th, 1889.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-A. Newman, Milton, claim overcharge on
lumber.
I find on investigation that we only charged on 24,000 lbs.
for this car of lumber.
Mr. Newman is mistaken.
Yours truly,
F. C. SHEPARD, D. F. A.


PENSACOLA, FLA., December 23d, 1889.
John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-A. Newman, Milton, claim overcharge on
lumber. I have your letter of December i6th.
Mr. Beasly, agent at Milton, originally collected on 40,000
lbs., but on the proper representation from Captain Newman as
to the contents of the car, refunded $9.60, in support of which
he sends me a receipt from Captain Newman dated December
2d, 1889, for this amount of money.
When I wrote you on the I3th my impression from the state-
ment by the agent at Milton was that he had only collected on
24,000 lbs. in the first place.
Yours truly,
F. C. SHEPARD, D. F. A.


__












W. F. HUGHEY Overcharge on
vs. cottn seed.
FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULAR R. R.coon seed
HIGH SPRINGS, FLA., March 7th, 1889.
To the Hon. Railroad Commission, Tallahassee, Fla. :
GENTLEMEN-I write to lay a small complaint before you
against the Florida Railway and Navigation Railroad. As you
will see by bill of lading, I had shipped from Madison to this
place 280 lbs. cotton seed on February 12th; on the i8th of said
month I paid $2.18 freight on same. The rate given me was
48 cents per 100, making $1.34. I enclose you invoice and bill
of lading. I sent the paid expense bill to the agent at Madison
believing that he would adjust it. He did not return it or re-
ply to my request. On February 22d I had shipped 40 bushels
from-the same place, weight i,600 lbs., billed out at 48 cents
per ioo lbs., and the freight demanded here is $12.00, $7.68
Florida Railway and Navigation Railroad advanced charges,
thereby breaking up my business in that line, as I would hate
shipped more but for these overcharges.
Respectfully,
W. F. HUGHEY.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., March i4th, 1889.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahassee,
Fla. :
DEAR SIR-I have your favor of the 12th inst., enclosing a
complaint from Mr. W. F. Hughey, High Springs, as to over-
charge on cotton seed. I agree with you that evidently a mis-
take has been made in the freight on the property shipped by
Mr. Hughey, and I assure you I will take pleasure in communi-
cating with Mr. Hughey at once and correcting the error, which
was not made, of course, through any design on our part. Mr.
Hughey could have received the same attention if he had com-
municated direct with me, without troubling you, and I regret
that you have been put to any trouble in the premises.
Yours truly,
N. S. PENNINGTON, T. M.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., March 27th, 1889.
John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-Yours of i2th inst., enclosing letter from W. F.
Hughey, High Springs, Fla, relative to overcharge on shipment
cotton seed from Madison to High Springs. Upon investigation
I find that we have overcharged our proportion on the two ship-
ments, Madison to Live Oak, $5.67.











64

As charged. Should be. Overcharge.
Shipment February I4th . $1.40 . $ .53 . . $ .87
Shipment February 22d. . 7.68 . 2.88 . . 4.80
Total amount due Mr. Hughey, $5.67, voucher for which we
will have made out and sent to him at once.
Yours truly,
N. S. PENNINGTON, T. MA P.

HIGH SPRINGS, FLA., March 29, 1889.
Railroad Commission:
SIRS-I have just been notified by Mr. Pennington that he
has made voucher in my favor for $5.67, rebate on cotton seed
from Madison. Very respectfully,
W. F. HUGHEY.


JAMES A. HARRIS
vs. Overcharge
FLORIDA RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY o l oranges.
(now FLA. CEN. AND PENIN. R. R.). J
At date of second annual report of the Commission there
were pending before the Commission twenty-two complaints for
overcharges on various shipments of oranges which had been
preferred by Mr. Harris against the Florida Railway and Nav-
igation Company, aggregating $1,769.60, which the railroad
company refused to refund, and on April 2oth, 1889, they were
turned over to the Attorney-General for suit for the penalties
prescribed by the statutes.


A. D. CARROLL
vs. Overcharge on cedar.
FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULAR R. R.
CALLAHAN, FLA., June IIth, 1889.
To the Railroad Commission of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla. :
I shipped from Bologne, Fla., on December I7th, 1888, one
car load of cedar (319 feet) consigned to L. Morris, Cedar
Key. It was transferred from the Savannah, Florida and
Western Railway to the Florida Railway and Navigation Com-
pany on the same day at this place. I was charged $36.00
freight on the car from Bologne, $6.00 on the Savannah, Florida
and Western Railway, and $30.00 by the Florida Railway and
Navigation Company. I also shipped on February 2Ist, of this
year, from Callahan (this place) one car load cedar to L. Morris,
at Cedar Key, which was billed here at $20.00, and the freight
was paid at Cedar Key, and on March 7th I received a letter from












Mr. Morris stating that the freight agent at Cedar Key had pre-
sented him a corrected freight bill of $30.00, which he claimed
was the correct rate.
I mentioned the discrepancy to Mr. R. T. Richards, the agent
at this place, who said there was no need of my paying the
extra charge of $io.oo; that they were just trying to beat me
out of $10.00.
Again I shipped one car load cedar consigned to L. Morris,
Cedar Key, from this place, which was billed at $30.00, and
when the bill was presented to Mr. Morris by the Cedar Key
agent, who still claimed the $1o.oo extra as before staled and
Mr. Morris paid it and charged the same to me in settlement on
the cedar.
Am I not charged too much, and if so, what redress is
there for me? Capt. D. E. Maxwell, Superintendent of the
Florida Railway and Navigation Company, told me about the
time, or just before the first car load above referred to was
shipped, that the rate for cedar anywhere over their line was
$20.00.
Please attend to the matter and greatly oblige,
Yours,
A. D. CARROLL.
This was referred to the company, enclosing a letter on the
sume subject from that company, as follows:

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., December 2d, 1887.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahassce,
Fla.:.
DEAR SIR-Rates on cedar. Your letter of 3oth ult. duly
received. In reply I beg to state that our rates on cedar from
Cedar Key to Jacksonville has been five cents per cubic foot.
The car load capacity is 600 feet to the car, but we make this
rate apply on any quantity. This rate we consider a reasonable
one. As you state, cedar is not classified, and we therefore
make it special. Yours truly,
JAS. MENZIES, A. G. F. A.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., July 22d, 1889.
John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-I beg to hand you herewith correspondence in
relation to the above, from which you will note that we have
made a special rate on cedar logs from Callahan to Cedar
Key of $20.00 per car, the capacity of the car being 600 cubic
feet.
Trusting this may be satisfactory, I am
Very truly yours,
D. E. MAXWELL, General Manager.


I_











66

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., June I5th, 1889.
Cedar rates from Callahan.
Mr. N. S. Pennington, Traffic Manager, Building:
DEAR SIR-The attached letter from the Railway Commis-
sion relative to the complaint of Mr. A. D. Carroll, of Callahan,
referred to you for attention. I have made no rates for Mr.
Carroll; I remember him asking me one day what the rate from
Callahan to Cedar Key would be, and I told him I did not
know. It occurs to me, however, that $20.00 per car is a good
rate on cedar from points beyond Callahan, going via that point,
to Cedar Kev, where we will get the return haul out of it.
Yours truly.
D. E. MAXWELL, G. M.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., June 26, 1889.
D. E. Maxwell, Esq., G. M. :
DEAR SIR-Replying to the attached correspondence with
the Railroad Commission relative to the rate on cedar from
Callahan to Cedar Key, I beg toq say that we have issued the
rate of $20.00 per car of 600 cubic feet or less on cedar from
Callahan to Cedar Key, which I trust will be satisfactory to
both Mr. Carroll and the Railroad Commission.
Yours truly,
N. S. PENNINGTON, Trafic Manager.

CALLAHAN, FLA., August 13th, 1889.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahassee,
Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Yours of ist inst. to hand, and in answer will
say that $20.00 per car on cedar from this place and points be-
yond to Cedar Key-and that is the rate that Capt. Maxwell
gave before I had shipped a car-and if they will pay me over-
charges of $io.oo per car on three cars shipped, amounting to
$30.00, I've no further complaint to make, and rates are satis-
factory. Yours truly,
A. D. CARROLL.

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., September 28th, 1889.
A. D. Carroll, Esq., Callahan, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-A press of business has prevented an earlier
reply to your communication of August i3th.
I am directed by the Commission to say that after an ex-
amination of the rates that were in force at the time the ship-
ments of cedar were made by you, and of which you complain
as to overcharges, that the amount charged was not in excess of


'' I










,7 -- '-" . *"-1 ." .. .. .. -" .--' -
-




67

the rates allowed, and therefore there was no overcharge made,
and consequently there can be no demand made on the road for
a refund.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.


P. B. WEVER Overcharge on oranges shieped
F .vs. December 3, 1888.
FLA. CEN. AND PENIN. R. R.
LEESBURG, FLA., September 14, 1889.
Chairman of Railroad Commission, Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Enclosed I send you these duplicates of bills of
lading for shipment of oranges. You will perceive that there is
an overcharge on each bill, the whole amounting to $9.22.
I hope you will consider this matter at once, and deal with
the parties as the law directs.
By so doing you will much oblige,
Yours respectfully,
P. B. WEVER.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., November I, 1889.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahas-
see, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Replying to your favors of September 28th and
October 2d, I return herewith bills of lading which you sent me,
and beg to say that no overcharge has been made on the ship-
ment of oranges referred to.
We have not charged for the transportation of the oranges
more than the rates inserted in the bills of lading attached.
Yours truly,
N. S. PENNINGTON,
Trafc Manager.

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 6, 1890.
P. B. Ever, Esq., Leesbiirg, Fla. :
DEAR SIR -In the case of your complaint against the Florida
Central and Peninsular, or the Florida Railway and Navigation,
the Board have decided that the overcharge was made at a time
when the road was in the hands of a receiver of the United States
Court, and while they regret it, they feel that under the circum-
stances they will be unable to exact the penalty in this case as
the law prescribes.
Respectfully,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.












W. S. I

SAV., FLA. & W
FLA. CEN. & P

Railroad Commissi
DEAR SIRS-I
on live stock in F
stock from Georgi
than it does to shi
It cost $29.00 to
the freight in Sava
while from Savan
$43.00, a different
line of road, for c
This is very m


GLITCH
S.
TEST. RY.,
ENIN. R. R.
SSAVAN
loners of Flo;


AND

NAH, GA., October 26, 1889.


wish to call your attention to the rates of freight
lorida. Why does it cost more to ship live
a to Florida, and pay the freight in Florida,
p from Florida here, and pay the freight here ?
ship from Jacksonville to Savannah, and pay
innah, and from Live Oak here costs the same,
nah to Jacksonville, on the same line, costs
ce of $13.00 for the same distance, on the same
arload lots.
uch against the interest of the State, and as


you ought to look out for the interests of Florida, it would be
well to look into this at once. If I pay freight in Florida for a
distance of 124 miles, I pay $35.00 ; for the same distance in
Georgia I pay $24.00. It cannot be any more expensive to
haul live stock freights in Florida than it is in Georgia, as you
haul the Western fresh meats at the same price that the other
roads do, while you must certainly be aware that the Western
dealers are ruining one of Florida's greatest resources, her live
stock trade. It cost me very near as much per pound to put
my live stock in Jacksonville market, a distance of 124 miles,
as it cost the Western dealers to put theirs there, a distance of
1,600 miles.
I don't know what you think of this, but I think it very un-
just, as I pay a heavy State and county tax, and they pay no
tax. I called the attention of the Georgia Commissioners to this
fact, and they reduced their freight on live stock about one-third.
I hope you will look into it. A load of live stock costs the
road no more to haul than a load of lumber, or a load of flour,
as I ship released, and do my own loading and unloading, and if
anything is killed I get no pay for it, unless it is killed by some
accident to the car.
Please give this matter immediate attention, and oblige,
Yours very truly,
W. S. BLITCH.

After some correspondence with the roads, the following let-
ter, embracing the gist of it, was addressed to Mr. Blitch :


~-lt--- ----~-C-)----~---- -- ---------~I- ----




.- -. .'T





69

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, December 14, 1889. )
W. S. Bitch, Esq., Savannah, Ga. :
)EAR SIR-In regard to the matter of your complaint against
the Florida Central and Peninsular and the Savannah, Florida
and Western roads for excessive charges of live stock, I beg to
forward you copies of letters received from Mr. D. E. Maxwell,
of the Florida Central and Peninsular, and Mr. F. B. Papy, the
Assistant Traffic Manager of the Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway.
Letter of Mr. Maxwell (copying letter to him of Mr. Pen-
nington, Traffic Manager of the road): "Mr. Blitch ships live
stock from Greenville, on which the rate to Jacksonville is
$35.00 per car. I notice the Savannah, Florida and Western
local tariff for 137 miles, from Quitman to Savannah, is $38.00.
This is the comparison Mr. Blitch appears to invite, and it seems
the rates are equitable. The remainder of his remarks relate to
shipments over, I should judge, the Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway, to which we can make no reply. He states that the
rate for a distance of 124 miles in Florida is as high per pound
as is charged on fresh meat hauled from the West to Jackson-
ville, a distance of 1,6oo miles. This, of course, is an absurdity,
as the rate on fresh meat in carloads, from Chicago to Jackson-
ville, is 47 cents per Too pounds. There is no discrimination in
these figures against the Florida beef. Live cattle butchered in
Chicago are hauled to Chicago, in the first place, at a high rate,
and in many instances higher than Mr. Blitch pays to Jacksonville
-is there prepared for consumption and forwarded to Jacksonville
at the figures quoted above, 47 cents per one hundred pounds."
Letter from Mr. Papy, Assistant Traffic Manager of the Sa
vannah, Florida and Western Railway : "Tie gentleman who
communicated the information to you certainly got things mixed,
and I am pleased to correct him. We are always prompt in
obeying the orders of the Commission, whether of Georgia or
Florida, when it specifies a rate for our government; therefore,
immediately upon the receipt of the Georgia Commissioners'
order we issued the attached supplement to Tariff No. I, and
made it effective in both Georgia and Florida.
You will note that the gentleman cannot be correct in the
statement that from Live Oak to Jacksonville the rate is $29.00,
while from Savannah to those stations it is $43.00."
If these letters are not satisfactory to you in explaining the
matter under consideration, the Commissioners will be glad to
hear anything further that you may wish to communicate on the
subject. Respectfully,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.




- "_ -".





70

GREENVILLE, FLA., December 17, 1889.
Hon. Board of Railroad Commissioners:
GENTLEMEN-The letter I have just received from you, and
the copy of letter from Mr. Maxwell, is no answer to my leyer.
As it seems that you cannot comprehend from my letter what
freights I pay on the Savannah, Florida and Western road, I
enclose you one of their rate sheets.
I would be glad if you could give the same rates that that
. road is giving. Respectfully,
W. S. BLITCH.
This closed the correspondence. The Commission, how-
ever, afterward prescribed a schedule of rates for live stock,
restoring that article to class N (see Circular No. 25, February
7, 1890, appendix), by which the rates were made somewhat
lower than theretofore, though not as low as in Georgia, to which
-reference is made in the correspondence.


J. T. HOWARD.
vs. Overcharge on freight, etc.
FLA. CEN. AND PENIN R. R.
QUINCY, FLA., November 16, 1889.
To the Hon. Railroad Commission, Tallahassee :
GENTLEMEN-I herein hand you freight bill on car of lumber
from Ocklocknee to Quincy depot. There were only 6,764 feet
of lumber on this car, a part of which, 2.384 feet, was dressed
lumber, and did not weigh over three pounds to the foot. The
Commission rate on a carload, 24,000 pounds, is $7.00, I think.
This car of lumber did not weigh over that, but estimating the
entire load at four pounds per foot, it would be 27,056 pounds.
I submit if this is not an overcharge that should be refunded by
the Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad. The charge is for
freight on 35,000 pounds.
Yours, etc.,
J. T. HOWARD.
Upon reference of this complaint to the road, the following
reply was received:
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., November 26, 1889.
Jno. G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahassee,
Fla :
DEAR SIR-Replying to your favor of the 2oth inst., I have
to say that if you will kindly send me the expense bill and pa-
pers Mr. Howard has filed with you, and if there has been an
overcharge on the car of lumber he refers to, we will be glad to
refund the overcharges.










71

Mr. Howard might have saved himself, you and the railroad
company additional correspondence by applying direct to this
office for the adjustment of the overcharge.
Yours truly,
N. S. PENNINGTON,
Traffic iManager.

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December 6, 1889.
J. T Howard, Esq., Quincy, Fla:
DEAR SIR-A letter has been received from Mr. N. S. Pen-
nington, General Freight Agent of the Florida Central and Pe-
ninsular road, in which he says that if the expense bill and pa-
pers in your case are sent him, and that if there is an overcharge
made on your shipment, that he will be glad to refund.
I therefore send you the papers that you may communicate
with him with a view to a speedy settlement of your claim.
As to the matter of weight, the rules of the Commission say
that where possible to do so, all articles transported over the
roads in this State shall be weighed; but where it cannot be
done, that they shall be taken at estimated weights, and among
other articles gives the estimated weight on lumber, viz: Yellow
pine, per i,ooo feet, seasoned, 4,000 pounds; same when green,
per i,ooo feet, 4,500 pounds.
Yours truly,
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, January 3, 1890.
J. T. Howard, Esq., Quincy, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-On the 6th of December last I wrote you in re-
gard to your claim against the Florida Central and Peninsular
road for an alleged overcharge on a shipment of lumber, at the
same time returning the papers in the case that you might have
your claim adjusted.
As nothing further has been heard from you, the Commission
will assume that the matter has been settled satisfactorily, and
dismiss the case. Yours truly,
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.
After over a month's delay, Mr. Howard replied as follows:

QUINCY, FLA., February 11, 1890.
Railroad Commission, State of Florida :
GENTS-Yours of January 3d at hand. In regard to the
claim you speak of, Mr. E. P. Dismukes, our State Senator from
this county, agreed to collect the overcharge through your Com-





I" .i




_________________ '--I- N


mission, as we had several conversations in regard to the-over-
charges on the road, he being anxious to make a test case; thou, h
I must confess I have never felt sanguine of ever receiving a:'-,
benefit through the Commission, there being so many gaps open
for the railroad company to crawl through, aud that is exactly
what they have done in this case.
In the first place, they refuse to take shipper's weight. In
the second place, they have no scales at the mill or in Tallahas-
see to weigh on, but put every carload at 35,000 pounds, re-
gardless of what is on the car. If there was but I,ooo pounds
on the car they would bill it at 35,000 pounds and charge for
I1,000 pounds in excess.
In December last I received a car of shingles from Holt's
Station, in West Florida, 66,000 shingles; freight to Quincy,
$55.00. Messrs. Gilmore & Davis, of Tallahassee, received a
car a few days after, the same number of shingles from the same
place, and Davis told me his bill was $35. oo to Tallahassee. Now,
I will give you one more instance: I ordered some lime from
Jacksonville; lime cost $i.oo per barrel there, freight 92 cents
per barrel. I asked next time for special rates, and they gave
me, in 20-barrel lots, 60 cents per barrel. Mr. E. M. Biedel-
man, of this place, ordered lime from Jacksonville without any
rates, and they only charged him 30 cent3 per barrel. They
killed a fine bull for me the 24th day of last December one year
ago. The section boss took the brand and my name and sent
it in. That is the last I have ever heard of it.
I simply make these statements to show to you how much
attention the railroads pay to the Commission.
I have no charge-to prefer against the railroad, as I deem it
useless. Yours respectfully,
JOHN T. HOWARD.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 27, 1890.
J. T. .Howard, Esq, Quincy, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-Replying to your letter of the IIth inst., I am
directed by the Board to say that they regret you should have so
long delayed replying to their communications of December 6th
and January 3d.
It appears that on November 16th, you made a complaint
against the Florida Central and Peninsula, which was brought to
Mr. Pennington's attention, in reply to which he stated that he
would take pleasure in refunding any excess charges if the evi-
dence of the overcharge was sent him.
The Commission repeated this reply of the road to you, sug-
gesting that you communicate direct with Mr. Pennington, but


I




.- ..._ -. . . - .






73

nothing was heard from you, and on January 3d :iiother letter
was written you on the subject.
To this last no reply was received until-your- ..I' ie i rh
inst., in which you take occasion to write at length ,n I:rii r,.:i
of the law, the power of the Commission, and the ip-,!",i ,-_I the
roads, reciting numerous instances of acts which you s. ;l.s .' a
disregard of the Commission.
The Commission do not feel called upon to e-L:, g in a
discussion about these matters, nor is it their duty: Il .-de-, o:,n
case is as much a test case with them as another.
They understand that Mr. Pennington has refused your claim.
They request you now to send the papers you have showing
what the shipment was, the freight or expense bill, and the Com
mission will pass upon the case.
As to your statement about charges on different shipments,
you must know that it is impossible to make investigations pro-
miscuously upon mere verbal accusations of wrong practices.
But if you have a grievance, and will present it, the Commis-
sion will take pleasure in investigating it, only, please do not
delay so long before writing.
Awaiting your reply,
Respectfully,
JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.

To this no reply has been made by Mr. Howard up to the
date of this report.



THOMASVILLE GUANO COMPANY Overcharge on
vs. cotton seed.
FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULAR R. R. se
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., January 14, 1890.
D. E. Maxwell, Esq., G. M., F. C. &' P. R. R.
DEAR SIR-Complaints have been filed in this office by the
Thomasville Guano Company, of Thomasville, Ga., stating that
they had been overcharged on certain shipments of cotton seed
from Tallahassee to River Junction.
The Commissioners have investigated the complaint, and
find that the charge of $2.50 per ton, the charge made to them,
for the transportation of the seed between the points named, is
more than the schedule allowed you, and request an answer
from you in regard to the complaint.
Yours truly,
JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.


~C_ _~ ___ _~













Through Mr. D. E. Maxwell, the General Manager of the
road, the following answer was made:

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., January 14th, 1890.
D. E. Afaxwell, Esq., General Manager:
DEAR SIR--I beg to return herewith correspondence with Mr.
John G. Ward, Secretary of the Florida State Railroad Commis-
sion. We have not overcharged the Thomasville Guano Com-
pany on shipments of cotton seed to River Junction. We hauled
some cotton seed from points on the line of this road via River
Junction to Thomasville, on which the rates were made and ship-
pers notified before the property moved, and the parties inter-
ested were told what this company would charge for the trans-
portation of the cotton seed. Yours truly,
N. S. PENNINGTON,
Traffic Manager.
Whereupon the Commission passed the following order :

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 5, 1890.
THOMASVILLE GUANO Co., THOMASVILLE, GA., )Ovrarge on
VS I Overcharge on
cotton seed.
FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULAR R. R. seed.
From the original receipts of the agent of the Florida Central
and Peninsular Railroad Company, now on file in this office, it
appears that the agent of said company demanded and collected
from complainant, the Thomasville Guano Company, on Sep-
tember 2ist, 1889, twenty four dollars and forty cents ($24.40)
for the transportation of 19,520 pounds of cotton seed from Tal-
lahassee to River Junction, two stations on the line of the said
Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad, which was an over-
charge of twelve dollars and twenty cents ($12.20). Also
On September 3oth, 1889, said agent demanded and col-
lected from complainant the sum of forty dollars and sixty-three
cents ($40.63) for the transportation of 32,500 pounds of cotton
seed from Tallahassee to River Junction, which was an over-
charge of twenty dollars and thirty cents ($20.30). And,
On October 7th, 1889, said agent demanded and collected
from complainant the sum of forty three dollars and fifty cents
($43.50) for the transportation of 34,800 pounds of cotton seed
from Tallahassee to River Junction, which was an overcharge of
twenty-one dollars and seventy-five cents ($21.75)-
This is a violation of the schedule of rates for the transporta-
tion of freights, revised, adopted and allowed by the Commission-


L---, ~-------- ___~_~_LL- - ~c~' II












ers for the said Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad, and you
are hereby directed to refund to said Thomasville Guano Com-
pany said several overcharges of fifty-four dollars and twenty-
five cents ($54.25).
The law allows ten days from the receipt of this notice in
which to refund the above mentioned overcharges.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD,
Secretary.

To THE FLORIDA CENTRAL AND PENINSULAR R. R. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
The company has neglected to refund, and the usual order
transmitting the action of the Commission, and the neglect of the
company to refund will be transmitted to the Attorney-General
to institute suit in the name of the State for the penalty prescribed
by law.
Other overcharges on cotton seed claimed by the complainant
against the company have subsequently, to wit: February 2oth,
1890, been ordered to be refunded, and will take the same course
as above.
Others are pending.


E. BEAN Excessive rates

FLORIDA RAILWAY AND NAVIGATION COMPANY Y, n Small re
(now the FLA. CEN. AND PENIN. R. R. Co.) frigerators.
During the strawberry season of 1889, Mr. E. Bean, of
Jacksonville, who controls a small refrigerator in which he was
engaged in shipping strawberries, complained that the railroad
company had advanced the ra:es to an excessive degree. The
Commission held a meeting at Jacksonville, and Mr. Bean, the
strawberry growers and the railroad company were heard.
After a full discussion of the whole matter, an adjustment be-
tween the road and the shippers was effected whereby the road
promulgated rates which were satisfactory. After the season
in this year began, to-wit: about the middle of February, 1890,
the Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad Company, without
notice, advanced the rates on all small refrigerators largely; so
also did the express company, whereupon the representatives of
several varieties of small refrigerators complained to the Com-
mission. The railroad company, pending these complaints,
issued an order revoking the one advancing the rates, and sub-
stantially restoring those which had been agreed upon the year
before. The express company also took like action.




- -*. --.,.~ .


76

As to the old rates and the action of the railroad company
in restoring them, the shippers and representatives of small re-
frigerators seem to be measurably satisfied, except that they
insist that they have no guaranty that the company may not at
any time, without warning, again raise the rates, and ask the
Commission to prescribe them, so as to avoid the possibility
of the recurrence of such abrupt charges at the will of the
railroad company.
This matter is still pending.



W. C. RIVES Refusing to re.
vs. ceive vegetable
SAVANNAH, FLORIDA AND WESTERN RAILWAY. shipments.
Mr. Rives came before the Commission and filed the follow-
ing letter as a basis of complaint:

NEW YORK, April 22, 1889.
W. C. Rives, Gracy, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Your advice just received for nine cases peas;
will sell to best advantage and report.
Market: Choice stock $1.25 to $1.75; beans, $2.50 to
$3.50-wax, $3.00 to $4.00; beets, $1.75; cukes, $6.00 to
$8.00; tomatoes, $3.00 to$4.oo-if ripe, $4.00 to $5.00; cab-
bage, if large and choice stock, $2.50; small, $1.00oo to $1.50.
Yours respectfully,
G. W. SHALLCROSS & CO.

N. B.-Your seven cases of peas were perfectly worthless, as
they were shipped on the 12th inst., and we received same on
the 20th inst., which made them four or five days overdue; and
they came on the A. C. line; we tried hard to work out even
half the freight, but could not get even an offer, they were in
such bad order. Hope you can collect from transportation
company, as they were overdue.
Yours respectfully,
G. W. S. & CO.

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., May 3, 1889.
AMr. H. S. Haines, General Manager, etc., Savannah, Ga. :
DEAR SIR-Mr. W. C. Rives, Newnansville, Fla., in laying
certain grievances before the Commission, states that his ship-
ments of vegetables, which are perishable and require expedition
in being marketed, are declined for shipment on trains going
north from Gainesville at this station, and are required to be


"


*_










77

first sent south to Gainesville and from there sent north again.
He states that, however, if he wishes to ship his consign-
ments by express, he can send them north by the first train
passing. He states that this regulation subjects his shipments
to delay, and has already been the cause of such deterioration in the
condition of certain of his shipments as to occasion severe losses.
We write to request you to advise the Commission whether
such regulations are maintained by your direction, and if so, to
suggest to you whether in your opinion it would not be a matter of
justice to your patrons, the shippers on your line of road north of
Gainesville, to afford them all the facilities at your command for
the marketing of their crops, including transportation direct
from their respective stations and by the first train going.
Yours truly,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.

SAVANNAH, GA., June 28, 1889.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary, Florida Railroad Commission,
Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-On May 3d you wrote to me with reference to
complaint of W. C. Rives, Newnansville, that his shipments of
vegetables were declined for shipment on trains going north
from Newnansville and are required to be first sent south to
Gainesville, and from there sent north again, but if he wished to
ship by express he can send them north by the first train
passing.
On May 9th I acknowledged receipt of your communication, but
circumstances have unexpectedly kept me away from my office
almost continually since then, and I have been prevented from
making an earlier reply.
Mr. Rives' complaint would convey the idea that vegetables
cannot be shipped north-bound from Newnansville except by
first shipping south-bound to Gainesville, but this is not the
case. There is a daily freight train north-bound by which ship-
ments can be made. -
There is also a fast freight train leaving Gainesville daily, and
running through to Savannah without unnecessary stops, there
connecting with all rail fast freight service to the north.
This train takes carload shipments from the Florida Southern
Railroad and from Gainesville, without transfer, to Savannah.
If it is stopped at every way station north of Gainesville, its
usefulness as a fast freight train would have been destroyed.
But in order to accommodate the vegetable growers north of
Gainesville, arrangements were made for taking their
shipments into Gainesville, free of charge, and there con-
solidating them with the carload shipments from that point. It


i I











78
is this arrangement, intended for the benefit of shippers situated
as Mr. Rives is, which he complains of as a grievance.
Mr. Rives complains that shipments by express north-bound
can be made daily from Newnansville. This can be done for
the reason that the express car is attached to a passenger train
which stops at Newnansville.
Yours very truly,
H. S. HAINES, General Manager.

GRACY POSTOFFICE, ALACHUA Co., FLA., July 8, 1889.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Florida Railroad Commission,
Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Your favor of the 4th to hand, and communica-
tion from Mr. H. S. Haines, General Manager of the Savannah,
Florida and Western Railroad, noted.
It appears that the Commission misunderstood the complaint
as made by myself. I complained that in having to send the
vegetables south to be reloaded at Gainesville caused, in my
instance, a delay of five days, which was shown by letter from G.
W. Shallcross & Co written to myself, and which I handed to
the Commission. The company will carry the freight to Gaines-
ville from my place of shipment without additional charges; but
the delay, and not the additional charges, is what is complained
of. The additional charges were incurred by having to ship the
goods by express at a cost of twenty cents more on the barrel than
that charged by freight transportation. This had to be done to
save delay, the delay having been found detrimental in every
instance. Now, if the shipments were carried to Gainesville and
transferred immediately and sent back the next morning, there
could not, nor would there be any bad effects, but this cannot
be the case, for in every instance there was shown a delay of
four or five days. This, you know, would prove disastrous to
freight as perishable as green vegetables are.
As for the freight trains going north each day, taking the
shipments from here, is entirely wrong, for I heard the agent ask
that the shipments be taken on the train, and the answer would
be, "we have no room for them: their proper route is to Gaines-
ville, to be loaded on the through train;" but the season is now
over, and our losses have been sustained and there is now no
need of complaint as to the present crop, but I do hope the
Commission will give this matter their attention in the future,
for the losses sustained are very heavy.
Yours very truly,
W. C. RIVES.










79

TALLAHASSEE, February 27, 1890.
ion. W. C. Rives, Gracy, Fla. :
DEAR SIR--Referring to your correspondence with the Com-
mission, last summer, on the subject of the facilities given ship-
pers of vegetables north of Gainesville by the Savannah, Florida *
and Western Railway, and to your request that the Commission
would take such action as would enable shippers to have their
consignments go forward without improper delay, I am directed
by the Board to say to you that the road gave assurances of their
determination to consider the interests of the shippers referred
to. Nevertheless, as the season will soon begin, if there is any
difficulty of the character complained of, the Commission would
be glad to be promptly advised of it, when they will give it their
immediate consideration.
Yours truly, *
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.




GEO. F DREW Complaint as to increased rates on
vs. lumber.
SAVA., FLA. AND WEST. RY.
To the Honorab.e Bord of Rjilroat. Coinnissioners of the State of
Florida :
Believing that I have a just cause ot complaint against the
Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company, I beg to
state the case for your consideration:
In the spring of 1886 I was offered some timber lands on the
line of that company's branch road running from Fort White
to Lake City; but before purchasing I went to Savannah for the
purpose of ascertaining from the road officials whether or not
they would allow such rates of freight as would justify the in-
vestment. I consulted Mr. C. D. Owens, Traffic Manager,
and Mr. James L. Taylor, General Freight Agent, and it was
agreed between them and myself that in the event that I purchased
the lands in question and erected a mill at Columbia City (called
Drew's by the railroad), the rate would be $6.22 per car of
35,000 pounds from there to Lake City; and if I bought the
mill at this place (Branford), which was also offered to me, the
rate would be $7.50 per car from here to either Live Oak or
Lake City.
With this understanding I purchased the lands and elected
a mill at Drew's at a cost of about $75,000, and bought the mill
here, which, with lands and putting it in repair, has cost me
about the same.


j ; I












The railroad performed their part without the least complaint
that it was not remunerative, until your Commission was ap.
pointed, when they notified me that they would increase the rate
to the maximum allowed-an advance of 55 per cent.
As that would have been ruinous to my business, I immedi-
ately went to Savannah to see the officials of the road, to find
out from them what it meant, and to see if they would not re-
consider their action, or at least to modify it to an extent that
could reasonably be stood. They told me thatthe Commissioners
of Florida had reduced rates to such an extent, generally, that
they were compelled to increase to wherever it was allowed. I
; told them that I thought it very unjust to tax an industry to a
;: greater limit than it could bear; and stated that if they persisted
in holding up the rates, I would have to abandon my business
and sacrifice ay investments. After considerable discussion of
the matter, they finally agreed to make the rate the same as that
then prevailing in Georgia, for the same distances, which was
even of itself an advance of 32 per cent. over what they had
granted me as an inducement to invest on the line of their road.
I next went to see the officials of the Florida Railway and
Navigation Company, over whose road our shipments are for-
warded from Lake City to Fernandina, and as they agreed not to
advance their rates, I concluded to go on with my business,
Although at a sacrifice of some $5,000 per annum, by reason of
the raise made by the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway.
I have done the best I could under these conditions, although
they have borne heavily, and without complaining, until now,
when I find that my every interest demands that I should protest
against their efforts to place this "last straw" upon us.
On the 27th of May I was again notified that an advance
would soon be made to the maximum allowed by the Commis-
sion; and this, notwithstanding the fact that I had been told by
the General Manager of the company, while in New York last
fall, that there would be no changes in the rates in Florida
during the year.
I relied upon that statement, and was governed accordingly
in making arrangements for the disposal of my lumber for the
year.
And I had not only this assurance from the General Mana-
ger, but it was "backed" by that of the Traffic Manager to the
same effect. I called upon him when passing through Savannah,
after having seen the General Manager, and told him of the un.
derstanding that I had with the latter. He said that he thought that
the mill men of Georgia would use it; but as the General Mana-
ger had agreed to it he would carry it out. In view of all the
facts, I am reluctant to believe that the fear of what the mill
men of Georgia might do, through their Commission, is the real


WMIMMONOMME n ownu- mmair=









81

cause of the presect advance, and I am under the impre'i"on
that this is proven by the road's having voluntarily, under the
plea of the Inter-State law, reduced the rate on this (the Bi di- '
vision to Savannah to 17Y per cent. lower than what the rnte
either of the State Commissions would have allowed, and win:h
I am of the opinion that the Inter-State law would not recquirc.
Take into consideration the cheaper ocean freights from there,
and the advance proposed for Florida, it will be greatly to rhe
advantage of all mill men who can, to ship to Savannah, iod
several that I know of are arranging to avail themselves of it: bu
some of us are so situated we cannot do so. I own a do.:k in
Fernandina, and cannot afford to abandon my property for tile
sake of building up a neighboring city, which I am sure w:!h be
the result if this policy is allowed to prevail. Our own sca-
port will be injured to the advantage of that of another Sta:'., .i
more than half of the shipping, or at any rate until recently. I,.i-
come off the line of the Savannah, Florida and Western fnl- .
way, which will, under the proposed rate, force it into Savaiin l-h.
It will not do to overlook the fact that, as it is, the Ge...i, ii
mill men have the advantage of those in Florida, who ship b
our own ports, of from 8712 cents to $1.oo per thousand feet;
and iV the Florida mill men have to pay the same freights to our
ports as they do to theirs, it will, on that account alone, put us
to the disadvantage of just that much, and force us virtually out
of the market.
I am at a loss to know what the motive of the railroad com-
pany is, unless it is to absorb all of the business for Savannah.
I am quite sure that it is not because they are losing money, for
I have been frequently told by the officials that their roads are
doing better than they have ever done before.
The lumber interest is the least able of any, that I know of,
to stand an advance, as the logs are getting scarcer and more
difficult to obtain, and hence more expensive every year; and if
the railroad companies could afford at one time to carry lumber
at a lower rate, it does not seem just that they should be allowed
to advance that rate when the expense of making the lumber is
yearly increasing.
They held out inducements to me, and I presume did the
same to others; and when they had our money tied up in such a
manner that we are obliged to pay whatever they demand or
else be entirely ruined, they then advance the rates just enough
to permit us to get back a new dollar for an old one.
I trust that your honorable Board will investigate the matter
carefully, and give the lumber interest such relief as is, in your
judgment, just and equitable to all parties.
Your obedient servant,
GEO. F. DREW.
Branford, Fla., fune 6, 1889.


II --











SAVANNAH, GA., May 28, 1889.
Geo. F. Drew, Esq., Branford, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-You are aware of the fact that the rate on lum-
ber, as charged by this company, in Florida is not only less than
the rate fixed by the Commission of that State, but is also less
than the rates established by the Commission and that are
charged the mill men in Georgia. This latter fact, while the mill
men in Georgia are satisfied and pay the rate cheerfully, is a
standing menace to the maintenance of our rates in Georgia,
which, we think, are sufficiently low; indeed, it would be a se-
rious blow to us were the Commissioners of Georgia to force
upon us a less rate in this State than we are now permitted to
charge, and we have reason to fear that a charge less per mile
over one portion of the system than is made upon another will
bring about the result we so much apprehend. I am sure you
will appreciate the situation, and the necessity which compels
us to apply the Florida Commission rate upon lumber, which is
the same as that of Georgia.
While the notice will be issued through the General Freight
Agent's office, I have thought, in view of all the circumstances,
that it would be proper to address you this letter of explanation.
Yours, very respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
2 rffic .Manager.

BRANFORD, FLA., May 31, 1889.
C. D. Owens, Traffic Mifanager, Savanna/, Ga.:
DEAR SIR-Yours of the 28th to hand. I am very much
surprised at the tenor of it, after the conversation we had in Sa-
vannah last November.- While in New York, during October, I
made arrangements for this year's business; but, before doing
this, I went and saw Colonel Haines at his office, and stating to
him what I was about to do, asked if there would be any change
in the rate of freight in Florida. He told me that there world
not be; and, on my return, as I called on you on my way
through your city, I mentioned what he had said, and, while you
met it with the same argument that you use now, you said that
if the General Manager had said so, of course, it was all right, and
you would carry it out. I certainly would not have concluded
my contract in New York, as I did, without this assurance of
Colonel Haines.
In the first place, before building any mills on your system I
went to Savannah and conferred with Colonel Haines, who
turned me over to the freight agent, Mr. Taylor (I find in
looking over a letter referring to this conference about freights,
that Mr. Owens was also present with Mr. Taylor and assisted












in fixing the rate), and with him I made an arrangement to ship
from Branford to either Live Oak or Lake City for $7.50, and
from Drew's for $6.22 per car of 35,000 pounds. On the
strength of that agreement I bought this property here, at a cost
of some $75,000, and erected a mill at Drew's, at about the same
expense; and, as a further inducement, your road even agreed
to, and did, ca ry the lumber, bricks and machinery for the new
mill free of charge. Everything went on according to arrange-
ment, without any complaint that you were not getting fair re-
muneration, until the Commission was established, when you no-
tified us that you would charge the increased rate allowed by it.
As our freight was received from your road by the Florida Rail-
way and Navigation Company, I had reason to believe that they
would also change their rates, which would amount to ruin for
us. I immediately went to Savannah and conferred with your
General Manager and yourself, and stated that there would only
be one of two courses left for me; I either had to get a less rate
or shut down my business, because the price of lumber would
not justify such rates of freight. After some considerable con-
sultation you agreed to take the Georgia rate, and as the Florida
Railway and Navigation did not advance theirs, we have made
out to get along until this time, although your rate now, under
that arrangement, is costing me $5.ooo more per annum than
that established by yourselves in the first place. The reason
you gave for raising was that the Commission had cut you down
so on almost everything else that you had to go up on what you
could; but, while I have made diligent inquiry, I have found
nothing that they have cut you down on lower than the rates
which you had before the Commission was appointed. This
first advance amounted to about 33 per cent. above what your
agent had given me, and now you propose to put on 17 per cent.
more to appease the mill men of Georgia. This appears strange
to me, when you turn around under the inter-State law and re-
duce the rates from points on this division to Savannah to much
less than even your old schedule. I understand that your pres-
ent tariff from Hague, and from points between here and there
to Savannah, is $17.oo for a car of 24,000 pounds, and $24.78
for a car ot 35,000 for a distance of 238 miles, while under your
present Georgia rate it would, for the same distance, be $32.38,
a difference of $7.60 per car, or 32 per cent. less than you charge
Georgia mill men, according to your own statement. This
hardly seems consistent with your apprehensions that the Geor-
gia Commission will reduce your rate there to correspond with
what you are charging on this division. I really cannot see the
logic of your argument in favor of higher rates, and think that it
would be more substantial on the ground that your road is en-
deavoring to force the business to Savannah. However, I can
6












hardly bring myself to believe that Colonel Haines will not stand
by what he told me in New York. Yours truly,
GEO. F. DREW.

SAVANNAH, GA., June 3, 1889.
Geo. F. Drew, Esq., Branford, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-I am in receipt of your favor of the 3 st. In
making reply to that portion of your letter which refers to the
construction of your mill, and your arrangement with Mr. Tay-
lor, the then General Freight Agent of the company, it is only
necessary to say that I accept all that you say upon that subject
as true; so, too, as to your statement detailing your visit to both
Savannah and New York. Having accepted that part of your
letter, a reply to the points that you make is not called for, ex-
-cept to remark that, even when the railroads were not controlled
by law in making rates, a rate, or an arrangement, was never
made in perpetuity. Admitting that the rates named to you by
Mr. Taylor were intended by him to last for all time (which I do
not admit), they cannot be of force now. Why? Because they
were named to you years ago, and before the State of Florida
assumed to control the rates over the roads within that State.
As soon as the Commission entered upon the duty imposed by
the law and established their freight rates, their order announc-
ing the rates that would be permitted to be charged annulled
every contract and agreement and declared them illegal, if they
were in conflict with the rates they had established. The Com-
mission of Florida has prescribed the rate we shall charge; so
has the Commission of Georgia. It is true that the railroads are
permitted to make a less charge than the law prescribes, but the
privilege is accompanied by conditions and penalties which make
it very unwise for a railroad to accept.
I fail to discover wherein you have have cause for complaint.
It has always been the policy of the Savannah, Florida and
Western Railway to charge no more over that portion of its road
in Florida than they were .permitted to charge by the laws of
Georgia over that part which was within the latter State. We
have thought some of the rates fixed by the Georgia law too low,
and we would have charged a greater sum had it been possible-
this, too, before the Florida law was enacted, and there was no
influence to prevent it; but the management adhered to its
policy and the same charge for similar distances in both States
was made. You, in your letter, confirm the truth of this state-
ment. I quote from it: "Everything went on according to
that agreement without any complaint that you were not getting
fair remuneration until the Commission was established, when
you notified us that you would charge the increased rate allowed
by it. As our freight was received from your road by the










85
Florida Railway and Navigation Company, I had reason to be-
lieve that they would also charge their rates, which would
amount to ruin for us. I immediately went to Savannah and
conferred with the general manager and yourself. After consul-
tation, you agreed to take the Georgia rate." This is all true,
and confirms what I said above, that it was, and is, the policy
of the general manager, and his order, that the people of Florida
shall not be charged a greater rate than those in Georgia.
Now, what were the facts at the time of your visit to us ? It
was this: The Commission of Florida established a rate of over
twenty per cent. higher than existed in Georgia. You made the
facts known to the general manager and, true to his promise
and his policy, he ordered that we should not charge any more
in Florida than in Georgia; but subsequently, and long subse-
quently to that time, the Commission of Georgia, after a most
complete investigation of the rates it had fixed, and after listen-
ing patiently to nearly every mill man in interest, and to the
argument of counsel, they increased the rates to the present
figures, which are identically the same as those fixed by the
Commission of Florida. Thus, you see, that the Commissions
of two States have agreed that the rates are not unreasonable.
The rates in Georgia have been advanced by law to those in
Florida, and it would appear manifestly unfair and wrong to
make a less rate over that portion of the line in Florida (for
similar distances) than we do in Gedrgia; even if to do so was
not attended by great danger to the material interests of this
property.
Again your statement: "I understand that your present
tariff from Hague, and points between here and there, to Savan-
nah is $17.00 for a carload of 24,000 lbs., and $24.78 for a
carload of 35,000 lbs., for a distance of 238 miles, while under
your present Georgia rate it would be for the 'same distance
$32.38; a difference of $7.60 per car." I regret if you do not
understand that your mills are included in that rate; they being
included, I fail to appreciate your criticism. Your statement,
however, is proof of another instance of the purpose of this
management, that wherever it is practicable, and it can be legally
done, the producer in Florida will be placed upon an equality
with those in Georgia.
The facts in this case are these: We take the rate to the
farthest mill in Georgia on our line in the direction of Florida,
and we apply that rate to the mills on the line in Florida. It is
done legally and without discrimination. While you may object
to it, I am loth to believe that other producers of lumber on the
line will. You forgot to mention in your letter, in this connec-
tion, the fact that you suggested the rate to Brunswick and
Savannah from Florida points. You will remember that you




. -, 7... < : --. r.v-.r- r ,' ,-' -t '..:X-iV ^ ..Avs.-- ^ ^,^ ..-, I .- _.






86

called upon us and urgently requested that we make the rate to
Brunswick the same as to Fernandina. We did so to oblige
you, and afterwards investigated the legal aspect of the matter,
and found that, with slight modification of your proposition, we
could legally maintain the rates now in effect, and to which you
refer.
Again, you say, "You turn around under the inter-State
law and reduce the rates from points on this division." If we
have done as you say, it was not because we desired to do so;
but it was done in obedience to law. We cannot charge more
for a short than we can for a long haul; but we can make the
rate the same for all stations, hence the $17.00 rate to which
you refer, and for the reason I explained above.
I cannot believe that it will be productive of any good to
discuss motives. You say, "That it woold be more substantial
on the ground that your road is endeavoring to force the busi-
ness to Savannah." I will only reply to that by stating that if
if we have been actuated by a motive, it could not possibly have
been different from the one that produced your protest. L say
that no good can follow a discussion of that charge, and I will
dismiss it.
You will pardon if, in conclusion, I digress and remark that
itsis singular that the lumber produced in Florida cannot bear
the same rate as that produced in Georgia. I invite your atten-
tion to the rates from the Georgia Southern and Florida Rail-
road, upon whose lines a large number of mills have been built.
You will note that they are $26.00 per carload of 24,000 lbs.,
or $38.00 for 35,000 lbs.; $14.oo per carload higher than is
charged the Florida mills. Surely the latter ought not to com-
plain if we make the difference in their favor $14 00 instead
of $6.00.
I have endeavored, Governor, to be full in my reply that
you may understand our position. Our rates should not affect
your totals; that we do not make, and have nothing to do with,
except via Savannah or Brunswick.
Yours truly,
C. D. OWENS, Traffic manager.
Rate sheets and exhibits were filed.

WAYCROSS, GA., June 14, 1889.
SJohn G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Florida Railroad Commission,
Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter
of the 8th inst., written on behalf of the Commission by Com-
missioner Himes, referring to complaint of George F. Drew.









87

I have just returned from Key West and am not informed
on the the points referred to in his complaint. '
I have referred your communication to Mr. C. D. Owens,
our Traffic Manager, and have asked him to visit Tallahassee
and have a personal interview with the Commission on the
subject.
Very truly yours,
H. S. HAINES, General Manager.

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., June 15, 1889.
H. S. Haines, General Manager, etc., Savannah, Ga. :
DEAR SIR-I am directed by the Board to call your atten-
tion to their communication to you of the 8th inst., on the
subject of Gov. Drew's complaint as to rates on lumber, and to
ask you for your reply thereto.
Yours truly,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
The following telegrams were received:

SAVANNAH, GA., June g5, E889.
J. G. Ward, Tallahassee, Fla.:
Mr. Owens and I will be in Tallahassee on Tuesday to talk
lumber rates to the Commission.
F. B. PAPY.

MONTICELLO, FLA., June 17, 1889.
John G. Ward, Tallahassee, Fla.
Will be at your office at three to-morrow, i. \.
F. B. PAPY.

Mr. Drew was notified, and accordingly on June i8th, he,
Mr. Owens, the Traffic Manager, and Mr. Papy, the assistant
Traffic Manager, appeared before the Commission and argued
the case.
Mr. Owens said he was not in Savannah at the time the com-
plaint was referred, and that Mr. Papy had acted for him
throughout.
Mr. Papy spoke at length. He read from the correspond-
ence with Mr. Drtw, and from the proceedings of the Georgia
Commission, showing that the rates charged Mr. Drew were pre-
cisely those allowed by the Georgia Commission, and paid by
the Georgia mill men, who made no complaint.
Mr. Drew replied to the arguments of Messrs. Papy and Ow-
ens, and the matter was taken under advisement by the Board.
As the Commission was then about to enter upon the work
of revising the different schedules which the law, as recently











8,8

amended, required the railroad companies to submit to them for
that purpose, further action in regard to this complaint was de-
ferred until the general revision of all of the freight schedules of
the railroads in this State was completed.
Mr. Drew was personally notified that the Commission, be-
fore finally revising said schedules, would, on certain days, meet
at different points in this State for the purpose of giving all per-
sons interested an opportunity to inspect the schedules submitted
by the railroads, and a suggestion was made to him that the lum-
ber men meet the Commission at these points, or if that was not
practicable, that they unite and meet them at any point named,
and a copy of the notice which was published in the newspapers,
giving notice of said times and places, was also mailed to Mr.
Drew. The Commission held their meetings as published, but
no lumber men came before the Commission, nor were they in-
formed that they wished to come before the Commission at any
time.
In the meantime the following letter (with enclosures) from
Mr. Drew was received:

BRANFORD, FLA., July 4, 1889.
To the Honorable Railroad Cdmmissioners, Tallahassee, Fla. :
GENTLEMEN-I presume the Savannah, Florida and Western
Railroad have made no answer to the complaint filed with you by
myself, as I have heard nothing from you to that effect.
In this connection I have address a personal letter to Colonel
Haines, General Manager, and hand you herewith a copy of the
same, feeling that the contents are a matter for your consideration.
There are one or two points in addition to those referred to in
my letter to Colonel Haines, to which I wish to direct your at-
tention. The first is that the Savannah, Florida and Western
Railroad are carrying lumber cheaper from mills situated at
points which do not ship over the Florida Central and Peninsu-
lar Company's system, as is instanced in my letter to Colonel
Haines, in the case of a mill situated forty-seven miles from Jack-
sonville shipping a rate considerably under the maximum rate
allowed by the Commission. It seems evident that the main
fight in this matter is primarily against the Florida Central and
Peninsular Railroad, and seemingly Mr. Owens or Mr. Papy do
not care who they hit as long as they hit that particular system.
It is therefore also evident that the plea of fearing adverse action
by the Georgia Commission is merely a ruse, and is not deserv-
ing of serious consideration.
Your Commission state that you do not propose to interfere
with existing contracts the railroads may have made, and as an
evidence of the fact the Florida Central and Peninsular have not
advanced the rates from Bucki's, or rather Ellaville. This point


. -Y : - i ~
;


~--.-----~~`~ I I I i I -ra




-.: .."





89

had, formerly, an advantage in freights over us amounting to 40
cents per thousand feet, while with the advance put on by the Sa-
vannah, Florida and Western Railroad it increases this advantage
to 60 cents per thousand feet, and being in direct competition, it is
more than we can stand. Therefore, if the Savannah, Florida
and Western are allowed, under the new schedule filed with you,
to charge this increased rate now in effect, we will be obliged to
go out of the State to Savannah, or abandon our business en-
tirely.
Another point I wish to make is, that lumber is not entitled
to the same ratio of increase on short haul that applies to other
merchandise, as it is neither loaded nor unloaded by the railroad
companies. so that the expense is much nearer proportionate to
the distance than-were the expense of loading and unloading en-
ters.
I have also found out that where stone is being hauled a
greater distance than the lumber from this point, on the Savan-
nah, Florida and Western for 30 cents, while, under the new
tariff, we are paying 67 cents per ton. They may possibly argue
in reply that this difference is owing to the difference in values,
to which I would say that timber in the woods has comparatively
little value, and that the lumber owes its value to the labor ex-
pended on it, which labor is paid for before the lumber is shipped,
and the large outlay of capital to establish the plant. My opin-
ion is that the real cause for this difference lies in the reasoning
that after they have seen the investment in a plant made, they
feel reasonably sure that they have us located on their system,
whereas the man who ships stone, having comparatively no in-
vestment, is not going to ship unless there is a reasonable margin
of profit; consequently a rate is made at what will reasonably
pay for the service rendered.
While I do not ask that the rate on lumber be made as low
as on stone, I do think that the rate made by themselves, before the
Commission was established, and considered by them remuner-
ative, and which formed the exact basis on which our invest-
ments, sales and contracts were made, was a sufficiently high one,
and in equity should be all they should be allowed to charge.
In fact, this would seem to be but common justice to all, for I
fail to find where the great reduction they claim has been made
by the Commission exists, as the reports in your office show, on
the contrary, that their revenue is greater than before the Com-
mission was established, and I must think the claim for reduced
earnings, on account of the Commission, has a poor foundation-
in fact.
In the hurry of compiling the complaint that was sent you,
no copy of it was taken. I wish, therefore, that you would in-
struct your Secretary to make out a coyy of the complaint and




------ ,--p -.7- 11--


send to me, and, would also be further obliged if you make a copy
of Mr. Owen's letter to me for your reference, and send me the
original, as I am going to Savannah shortly to see Colonel
Haines in person, and like to have these documents with me.
I am, yours respectfully,
GEO. F. DREW.
(M. C. C.)
Thus the matter stood until the freight schedules had been
revised by the Commission, and the rates established for the use
of the railroad companies in Florida. This work was completed
the latter part of September, when the following letter was writ-
ten to Mr. Drew:
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., October I, 1889.
Geo. F. Drew,, Es]., Branford, _la. :
DEAR SIR -Referring to your complaint as to lumber rates,
I am directed by the Commissioners to say that, after a careful
consideration of your application for a reduction of the rates on
lumber on the Savannah, Florida and Western and the Florida
Central and Peninsular (late Florida Railway and Navigation),
the Commission have decided not to make any reduction on those
heretofore prescribed.
The rates on lumber now allowed and adopted for all the
railroads in this State are the same as those fixed by the Georgia
Railroad Commission for that article, on all the railroads in Geor-
gia, and the Commission does not, at this time, feel justified in
making them less in this State.
The Commission, last January, had occasion to investigate
the reasonableness of lumber rates on the complaint of Messrs.
Bache Bros., of Live Oak, Fla., and they see no reason why
the decision then arrived at should not be adhered to. (See
second annual report, page 92, case 52.)
The Commissioners, as you are aware, deferred action on
your complaint until they had revised the schedules which the
Railroad Commission law, as amended, required the railroads
in this State to submit for their adoption. Th:s has been done
for each railroad in the State. By order of the Board.
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.
A copy of this decision was forthwith transmitted to Mr.
Drew, but subsequently it having come to the knowledge of the
Commission, from 'reliable sources, that Mr. Drew had been
censuring them for not rendering a decision m his case, the fol-
lowing letter was addressed to him :
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., December 6, 1889.
Geo. F. Drew, Esq., Bradford, Fla.:
DEAR SIR -Rumors having reached the Commission that
you had not received a communication of the Board, giving the


L r I I I I sl




E


91

action of the Commission in the matter of your complaint about
lumber rates, I am directed to say that on the ist of October,
1889, such a communication was addressed to you, and upon
your reply that it was not received, a copy of the same will be
forwarded to you.
By order of the Board.
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.
To this there has been no reply.


A. P. ASHURST & Co., JASPER,
vs. Overcharge on freights.
SAV., FLA. AND WEST. RY.
JASPER, June 18, 1889.
To the Hon. Railroad Commission, Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIRs-We write to inquire if we have any redress from
the following grievances through your honorable body, to wit. :
We have just received a carload, 18,300 pounds, of mar-
ble (rough, from Rutland, Vt., via New York, Jackson-
ville and Live Oak, Fla., the freight from Rutland to
Live Oak being $65.88, a distance of about 800 miles;
the freight from the latter place, Live Oak, distance six-
teen miles, to this place, is $42.09, over the Savannah, Florida
and Western Railroad. Now, we regard this latter charge as
discriminating, unjust, indeed very oppressive, and appeal to
your court for protection against such an outrage. In the event
you have no jurisdiction in the matter, have we no relief through
the Inter-State Commerce Commission or judicial courts ? Are
we not entitled to damages through the latter ? Please reply to
us by early mail, and we shall ever pray.
Your obedient servants,
A. P. ASHURST & CO.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., June 20, 1889.
Messrs. A. P. Ashurst & Co., Jasper, Fla :
GENTrLTFEN-Your favor of the 18th inst., complaining of the
excessive rates charged you on a shipment of marble from Rut-
land, Vt., to Jasper, has been received.
The Commissioners instruct me to say that the shipment is
an Inter-State shipment, and one over which they have no juris-
diction.
They have, however, referred your complaint to the road, and
if you will write to Mr. F. B. Papy, the Assistant Traffic Mana-
ger, he will doubtless Fee that you get the relief that you are enti-
tled to. Respectfully,
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.











92

JASPER, FLA., July 5, 1889.
Railroad Commission State of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla. :
GENTLEMEN-As you suggested, in your letter -to us of the
20th of June, I wrote to Mr. F. B. Papy, Assistant Traffic Mana-
ger Savannah, Florida and Western Railroad, in regard to exces-
sive rate charged us on carload marble from Live Oak to this
place, and I enclose you his answer.
As you will see he says that this rate was fixed by your body,
and says that it is not an unreasonable one. You will under-
stand the case better, perhaps, when we state that the goods in
question were not shipped by railroad into this State, but by
steamer from New York to Jacksonville.
The Savannah, Florida and Western Company did not load
or unload, or furnish the car; simply hauled it over here, sixteen
miles, and charged $42.09. We withhold any comment, except
to say that we, as well as parties with whom we have discussed
the matter, regard it as an outrage that has no parallel.
Your disposition of this case will be watched by all with
much interest.
Trusting your body will do their utmost to protect us from
such gross injustice, we are, etc.,
Your obedient servants,
A. P. ASHURST & CO.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., July 9, 1889.
Messrs. A. P. Ashiursi &' Co., Jasper, Fla. :
GENTLEMEN-The shipment of marble from Rutland, Vt., to
Jasper, in this State, is an Inter-State shipment. The Railroad
Commission of Florida has no jurisdiction of Inter-State ship-
ments, and no authority to issue or enforce any orders with
respect to such shipments. Nevertheless, the Commissioners
frequently are able to have complaints satisfied, with respect to
Inter-State shipments, by reference of the complaints, and advis-
ing the roads to make satisfaction.
In this case we referred your complaint to the Savannah,
Florida and Western Railway, and the answer of Mr. Papy de-
fends the charge, upon the ground that it is no higher than the
Commissioners of both Georgia and Florida allow.
Up to this time no shippers of marble have made complaint
or suggestions to the Commissioners about the rates on marble,
but in approving the rates which the roads are now filling under
the recent law, they will look carefully to the rates on this com-
modity.
The only tribunal that has jurisdiction of Inter-State ship-
ments, is the Inter-State Commerce Commission in Washington.
There is friction between the Savannah, Florida and West-
ern Railway and the Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad


I_-= --_ ----_---- ;---------- ------------- - ._ __ _~O












in regard to Inter-State shipments. Where the shipment is to a
point on the Florida Central and Peninsular, the Savannah,
Florida and Western's rate is generally low, and the Florida Cen-
tral and Peninsular's high. When the case is reversed, as in
your case, it appears to be the other way; the Florida Central
and Peninsular's low, and the Savannah, Florida and Western's
high.
The last Legislature passed a law authorizing and directing
the Florida Commissioners, in certain cases, to become com-
plainants to the Inter-State Commerce Commission, but the law
is not yet in force, and will not be until about August ist, next.
By order of the Board.
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.


BROWN & SON, MCALPIN, FLA.,
vs. Overcharge on C. L. Brick.
SAV., FLA. AND WESTERN RY.
OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., January 15, 18o0.
C. D. Owens, Esq., Traffic Manager, S. F. & W. Ry., Savan-
nah, Ga. :
DEAR SIR-Messrs. Brown & Son, of McAlpin, Fla., make
complaint that they were, in the early part of this month,
charged the sum of $14.00 for the transportation of a car-
load of 30,000 pounds of brick from Live Oak to McAlpin, a dis-
tance of eleven miles over your road, the brick having been de-
livered at Live Oak by the Florida Central and Peninsular.
As this is an overcharge and not in accordance with the rates
allowed by the Commission and published in your local freight
tariff No. io, the Commissioners request that you will explain
how the charge came to be made.
Yours truly,
JNO. G. WARD,
Secretary.
SAVANNAH, GA., January 23, 1890.
Mr. John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Referring to complaint of Brown & Sons, Mc-
Alpin, Fla.: Your letter of the I3th inst. referring to the
charge made on a car-load of brick from Live Oak to McAlpin
to hand.
Please note letter of Mr. Hardee, our general freight agent,
next attached. As stated in a former reply to a similar letter
from you, we apply the same rate on business brought to us by
the Florida Central and Peninsular Railroad as they charge us












on what we deliver to them. I do not believe that you will
deem this course unreasonable, in view of the fact that ship-
ments via Live Oak or Chattahoochee, though destined for
eleven miles from either point, must pay the rate as from Jack.
sonville or Fernandina. Yours truly,
C. D. OWENS,
Traffic Manager.
SAVANNAH, January 20, 1890.
COMPLAINT BROWN & SON, MC.ALPIN.
Mr. C. D. Owens, Traffic MaUnager, City:
DEAR SIR-Returning yours of the i7th inst. and papers, will
say that the charge of $14.00 for a car of brick from Live Oak
to McAlpin, coming from Madison, is based on the same rates
that the Florida Central and Peninsular would charge us for a
shipment going a similar distance on their line, as we charge on
shipments coming from the Florida Central and Peninsular Rail-
road to our stations the same amount they charge us for business
coming from us going to their stations.
Respectfully,
WM. P. HARDEE,
General Freight Agent.
OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 5, 1890.
BROWN & SON, MCALPIN, FLA.,
vs. Overcharge on brick.
SAV., FLA. AND WESTERN RY.
From the complaint of Brown & Son, of McAlpin, Fla.,
now on file in this office, it appears that the agent of the Savan-
nah, Florida and Western Railway Company, demanded and
collected from complainants, Brown & Son, the sum of fourteen
dollars for the transportation of a car-load of 30,000 pounds of
brick, from Live Oak to McAlpin, two stations on the line of
the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway, which is an over-
charge of six dollars and eighty cents ($6.80).
This is a violation of the schedule of rates for the transpor-
tation of freights, revised, adopted and allowed by the Com-
missioners for the said Savannah, Florida and Western Railway,
and you are hereby directed to refund to said Brown & Son
said overcharge of six dollars and eighty cents ($6.80).
The law allows ten days from the receipt of this notice in
which to refund the above mentioned overcharge.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
To the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company,
Savannah, Ga.


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I I I- I , B











95

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, February io, 189o.
Messts. Brown &9 Son, McAlpin, Fla. :
GENTLEMEN-I beg to inform you that the Railroad Com-
missioners, at a meeting held here on the 5th, passed an order
directing the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company
to refund to you the sum of $6.80, this being the amount over-
charged you on a shipment of a car-load of brick from Madison
to McAlpin.
Please advise me when the matter is settled, as I wish to
close the case on the docket.
Respectfully,
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
SAVANNIAH, GA., February 13, 1890.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.:
DEAR SIR-Yours of February 6th to Col. H. S. Haines,
General Manager, received at this office on February roth, and
referred to me for investigation and report.
I will give the matter prompt attention and the General
Manager will reply to your letter as soon as he returns to the
city; this not later than the 7th.
Yours very truly,
C. D. OWENS,
Traffic Manager.

SAVANNAH, GA., February 11, 189o.
Jfon G. TWard, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahassee,
Fla. :
DEAR SIR--Yours of the 6th inst. received, enclosing com-
plaints of Messrs. Pixton and Brown & Son as to alleged over-
charges for shipments to line of S F. & W. Railway, which
shall have early attention and reply.
Yours very truly,
H. S. HAINES, General Manager.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 24, 1890.
C. D. Owens, Esq., Traffic Manager S., F. &' T. Railway,
Savannah, Ga.:
DEAR SIR-Referring to your letter of the i3th, in which
you say that the General Manager of the road would reply to
my communication of the 6th not later than the i7th, I write to












say that no letter has been received from him to date, and I am
directed by the Board to call your attention to the delay, and
request a reply as early as possible.
Yours truly,
JNO. G. WARD,
Secretary.

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION, )
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 27, 1890.
Messrs. Brown Son, McAlpin, Fla.:
GENTLEMEN-On the ioth of this month I wrote you, noti-
fying you that the Commission had, on the 5th inst., passed an
order directing the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway to
refund to you the overcharges made on a car-load of brick, and
requesting that you notify me when the matter was settled, so
that I could close the case on my docket.
An order in a similar case was made at the same time, and
I have a notification from the complainant in that case that the
overcharges have been refunded, and I now write to ask that
you advise me at once if your claim has been satisfied, or if the
road has been in correspondence with you looking to that end.
Respectfully,
JNO. G. WARD, Secretary.

SAVANNAH, GA., February 27, 1890.
John G. Ward, Esq., Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahas-
see, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-I am in receipt of your favor of the 24th inst.,
in which you say that you have not yet received any communi-
cation from the General Manager on the subject of the com-
plaints you referred to him. In explanation of this delay I beg
to say that he referred the papers to me for investigation and
report, which has been made to him.
On receipt he at once returned it with instructions to obey
the order of the Commission, and refund amount charged in
excess of what the law directs we shall charge. I at once gave
the necessary instructions to carry out that order.
Mr. Haines is only awaiting the return of the papers, with
the receipts attached, that he might present with his letter of
reply the evidence that your order had been obeyed.
Yours respectfully,
C. D. OWENS,
Traffic Manager.


i, r r i r I re










97

REV. F. PIXTON
vs. Overcharge on freight.
SAV., FLA. AND WESTERN RY.
This is an overcharge on a shipment of furniture. The Com-
mission passed the following order:

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., February 5, 1890.
REV. F. PIXTON, Jasper, Fla.,
vs. Ovet charge on household goods.
SAV., FLA. AND WESTERN RY.
From the original receipt of the agent of the Savannah,
Florida and Western Railway, now on file in this office, it ap-
pears that said agent demanded and collected from complainant,
Rev. F. Pixton, the sum of three dollars and forty-nine cents for
the transportation of a lot of household goods from Live Oak to
Jasper, two stations on the line of the said Savannah, Florida
and Western Railway, and which was an overcharge of one
dollar and seventy-five cents ($1.75).
This is a violation of the schedule of rates for the transporta-
tion of freights, revised, adopted and allowed by the Commis-
sioners, for the said Savannah, Florida and Western Railway,
and you are hereby directed to refund to said Pixton said over-
charge of one dollar and seventy-five cents ($1.75).
The allows ten days from the receipt of this notice in which
to refund said overcharge.
By order of the Board.
JOHN G. WARD, Secretary.
To the Savannah, Florida and Western Railway Company,
Savannah, Ga.
JASPER, FLA., February 25, 1890.
MAr. John G. Ward:
DEAR SIR-I received yours of February ioth, informing
me that the Commission had directed the Savannnah, Florida
and Western Railway to refund to me $1.75 obercharge on
goods shipped from Live Oak to Jasper. This is to inform you
that the amount was paid me yesterday, February 24, by their
agent here. Very respectfully,
FRED. PIXTON.










98

OFFICE OF RAILROAD COMMISSION,
STATE OF FLORIDA,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., April I, 1890.
BOW.EN & CO.
vs. Detention, and refusal to deliver freight.
FLA. SOUTHERN RY.
SAN ANTONIO, FLA., April I, 1889.
Railroad Commissioners, Tallahassee, Fla.:
GENTLEMEN-We have had several shipments, we presume
some twenty-odd packages in all, shipped to us by three differ-
ent parties from Baltimore, Md.
The South Florida Railroad people have taken our goods to
Pemberton, knowing that they could not deliver them to us,
and notified us that they would put them off at Macon regard-
less, if we would pay them their freight. We wrote them to
return them from where they took them, so as the rightful par-
ties could get them and deliver to us. We also advised the
freight agent of the Orange Belt Railway to get them. You see
his answer enclosed.
Now, we want to know if there is any way to stop railroad
people from stealing our goods, and writing from some remote
point, inaccessible by rail to this point, and telling us to send
them money to pay freight on goods they know they have no
right to touch. This is a common thing. The Florida South-
ern and the South Florida have given us a great deal of
trouble-made us haul goods from Dade City, Macon and else-
where-and there should be some way to stop it.
These goods left Baltimore March 8th, 9th and 16th, and
are long overdue. Would thank you, if in the line of duty, to
see that we get our goods from Pemberton at once, and that this
nuisance is stopped.
Please answer, stating what course we shall pursue.
Very truly yours,
BOWEN & CO.
These people pay no attention to letters; merely hold on to
the goods, thinking that we must do as they require sooner or
later. They don't care a cuss so they get the money.
After considerable correspondence, the following was re-
ceived from the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway
Company :
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., April 27, 1889.
Mfr. John G. Ward, Secretary Railroad Commission, Tallahassee,
Florida:
DEAR SIR-Bowen & Co. claim, San Antonio: I find that
these freights, as soon as refused by the South Florida at Pem-


.




Il


99

berton, were forwarded to their destination via Palatka and
Monroe, and were delivered to the Orange Belt April 3d, and
by them delivered to consignees on or about April 4th.
Yours respectfully,
A. B. MASON,
2d Vice-President.
Messrs. Bowen & Co. have made no further communication
to the Commission.


B. R. FAKES
vs. Overcharge on oranges.
FLORIDA SOUTHERN RAILWAY CO.
On June 27th, 1889, complaints of overcharges on four ship-
ments of oranges by Mr. Fakes, on the Florida Southern Rail-
road, aggregating $59.00, not being refunded as ordered by the
Commission, were transmitted to the Attorney-General for suit.


W. H. YOUNG & Co. Damage for
vs. delayed freight.
JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA AND KEY WEST RY. fr
PLANT CITY, FLA., August 5, 1889.
Florida Railroad Commission, Tallahassee, Fla.:
GENTS-I shipped via South Florida Railroad on December
i4th, 1888, a car-load (300 boxes) oranges consigned to Salamoni
& Post, New Orleans, and the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key
West Railroad carried them into Jacksonville and held them
there seven days, and in consequence of this long delay they were
in a very bad condition when they reached their destination. I
also had the lot sold for $531 net, provided they reached New
Orleans by the 22d of December, and they were not delivered
until P. M. of the 25th, and the parties therefore refused to re-
ceive them. I had them sold and they netted me $281.25.
Through the advice of the President of South Florida Rail-
road I put in a claim for that amount, and now I can get no
satisfactory idea of what they are going to do in the matter, and
I write you, hoping that you can give me some advice in the
matter, which will enable me to bring them to terms.
Any suggestion you will make will be very much appreciated.
Yours truly,
W. H. YOUNG.









I00

TALLAHASSEE, FLA., August 8, 1889.
Messrs. W. H. Young & Co., Plant City, Fla. :
GENTLEMEN-I am directed by the Board to say, in reply to
your letter of August 5th, complaining of detention of freight by
the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West Railway, that it is a mat-
ter that they have no jurisdiction over, and they think your
proper course would be to consult an attorney.
Respectfully,
JNO. G. WARD. Secretary.



P. B. EVER
vs.
FLA. SOUTHERN RAILROAD Co. \ Overcharge on oranges.
(OPERATED BY JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA
AND KEY WEST RAILWAY CO.)
LEESBURG, FLA., September 14, 1889.
Chairman of Railroad Commission, Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-Enclosed I send you these duplicates of bills of
lading for shipment of oranges. You will perceive that there is
an overcharge on each bill, the whole amounting to $9.22.
I hope you will consider this matter at once, and deal with
the parties as the law directs.
By so doing you will oblige,
Yours respectfully,
P. B. WEVER.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA., December 12, 1889.
John G. Ward, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla. :
DEAR SIR-I have received your favor of the 7th in regard to
the claim of P. B. Wever, account of alleged overcharges on
oranges, and note that the Board requests an early reply.
As soon as your first letter was received, we at once set
about investigation of the matter, and wrote to the consignor for
information, but have received no reply to date.
We have been unable to locate any claim having been
presented, but will try to ascertain the facts, so as to make the
reply as requested by the Commission.
Yours respectfully,
D. F. JACK,
General AMinager.


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