Title: Seald-sweet chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075292/00035
 Material Information
Title: Seald-sweet chronicle
Alternate Title: Seald sweet chronicle
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Florida Citrus Exchange
Florida Citrus Exchange
Place of Publication: Tampa Fla
Publication Date: April 15, 1932
Frequency: semimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Citrus fruit industry -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa
Coordinates: 27.970898 x -82.46464 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased on Apr. 15, 1932.
General Note: "Florida's only citrus newspaper."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 4, no. 24 (May 15, 1929).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075292
Volume ID: VID00035
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AJH6537
oclc - 31158390
alephbibnum - 001763371
lccn - sn 97027656

Full Text

J.C. YONQE,
1024 E. JACKSON .




Seald-Sweet Cihronicle
"FLORIDA'S ONLY CITRUS NEWSPAPER"

Entered as Second Clas Mall Matter
Vol. VII WsUBCIPTION PBIC 6s0 cNTB Prn AB TAMPA, FLORIDA, APRIL 15, 1932 at thee Pst Te tampa lrida NO. 22
Under the Act o0 Matrch S. 189.


Citrus Tree Census

Shows Florida Has

24,232,850 Trees

Gain of 10.4 % Since Census
of 1928 Shown by Latest
Report of the Plant-Board

Citrus planting decreased sharply
in Florida during the past three
years, yet in spite of the big decline
a total of 2,2997,136 trees of various
citrus varieties appear on the rec-
ords of the Grove Inspection Depart-
ment, State Plant Board, as new
since Dec. 31, 1928.
Including home lot trees, the total
of all varieties is listed as 24,232,-
850, a gain of 10.4 percent in the
past three years. In terms of acres
this would represent a citrus acreage
of approximately 348,000 acres if
planted 70 to the acre or 374,000
acres at the rate of 65 to the acre.
Annual 3.3% Increase
Figuring the 10.4 percent increase
in three years at an average an-
inual rate, the increase has been
about 3.3 percent a year since 1928,
the previous tabulation date. This
in less than half the yearly rate of
new planting for the period 1923 to
1928 and only one-fourth the rate
between 1919 and 1923. This com-
parison picturizes the remarkable
expansion of the citrus industry
from 1919 to 1923 and the steady
tapering off since then.
SAs the primary work of the in-
spection department is inspection
for disease and pests, the census is
supplemental and includes all the cit-
rus trees, those in residence yards
and on lots as well as groves. No
(Continued on Page 5)


..Horticultural Society

Meets at Gainesville
Citrus has the major place in the
forty-fifth annual meeting of 'the
Florida State Horticultural Society
which will be held at Gainesville,
April 19-21. The program shows
a very wide range of topics, vitru-
ally covering the entire field of cit-
rus culture. Many of the papers will
be of special interest to growers
Special entertainment features in-
clude the seventh annual Rose Show
at the Hotel Thomas, Tuesday, April
19, and the dress parade of the Uni-
versity of Florida cadets, the 20th.


Discontinue "Sealdsweet Chronicle"
The Seald-Sweet Chronicle, official publication of the Florida Citrus Ex-
change, will be discontinued with this issue. This action has been taken by
the Exchange Board of Directors as part of their program of strict economy
in the conduct of the affairs of the organization.
The Chronicle has been published as an independent semi-monthly citrus
newspaper since June 1, 1925. During that time its circulation increased
to over 12,500 citrus growers per issue. Additional subscriptions were main-
tained by governmental agricultural bureaus, libraries, etc., both in this
country and other citrus producing sections in the world.
The-publication attempted to be of service in the dissemination of news
of the industry and the organization. If it succeeded in some measure, much
credit must be given to the helpful suggestions submitted by its friends
throughout the state. Any cause it may have given for criticism is sin-
cerely regretted.



Cut Exchange Operating Costs

at Estimated Saving of $100,000


Saving approximately $100,000
or 12% percent of the established
operating costs of the Florida Cit-
rus Exchange, a number of operat-
ing economies recommended by
General Manager C. C. Commander
have been put into effect.
In addition to a new cut of five
per cent in salaries, the economy
program includes dropping of some
personnel, discontinuance of cer-
tain activities and rearrangement
or combinations of other personnel
and departments where experience
indicated savings could be accom-
plished without loss of efficiency.
Crop Much Less
Recommending the economy ac-
tion to the Board of Directors, Mr.
Commander pointed out that "this
season's fruit crop is considerably
less than that of the past season
and the indications are that the
next season's crop will not be
large." Attention was directed to
the fact that the Exchange has had
considerably more expense this sea-
son with the smaller crop than it
had last season, but that as the re-
sult of economies effected, operat-
ing expenses could be cared for
without a deficit. However, in view
of existing economic conditions and
indications of smaller volume next
season, changes could be made
which would effect considerable
savings, Mr. Commander explained.
Included in the program is dis-
continuance of the "Seald-Sweet


Chronicle" house organ, affecting a
saving of $9,000 a year; curtail-
ment of the force of the traffic de-
partment and certain changes with-
in that department, estimated to
save $4,000 annually; discontin-
uance of the Capitol Fruit Com-
pany, saving about $20,000 a year
and allowing more efficient hand-
ling of certain grades of fruit.
Other measures are reorganiza-
tion of the inspection department,
placing the work in one competent
and thoroughly trained executive,
saving -$1,000; abolishing the po-
sition of general sales manager,
placing full responsibility in the
orange and grapefruit sales man-
agers.
Directors Meet Monthly
Meetings of the Board of Direc-
tors, held every two weeks, will oc-
cur once a month, saving much val-
uable time, increasing efficiency
and making a cash saving of $9,000
a year. Services of Merton L. Co-
rey, serving in a special capacity,
are terminated, saving $4,000 a
year.
Further savings will be made in
a rearrangement and consolidation
in the canned grapefruit depart-
ment, materially reducing the an-
nual expense of more than $40,000.
The program was presented in
detail to the Board at its last meet-
ing and was approved by practically
a unanimous vote.


Exchange Leads

Competitors 21 c

Box in Auction


Shown by Record General
Averages New York and
Chicago to March 31-

In the two barometer markets of
the country, the New York and Chi-
cago auctions, the Florida Citrus Ex-
change has received 21 cents a box
more for all fruit sold this season
than competitors, reports Fred W.
Davis, general sales manager.
In New York, on 1,127,516 boxes
of citrus sold this season up to March
31, the general average of the Ex-
change is $3.03 per box. Competitors
sold 2,309,527 boxes at a general
average of $2.82, giving the Ex-
change a lead of 21 cents.
During March, the Exchange ad-
vantage was even higher. On 262,-
208 boxes, the Exchange received
$3.24 per box average, 28 cents a
box more than competitors got for
502,776 boxes sold during the
month.
The Chicago auction reports show
that the Exchange sold 280,174
boxes up to March 31, at a general
average of $2.86 a box, contrasting
with $2.65 a box received by com-
petitors on 248,736 boxes. The
March sales of the Exchange aver-
aged $2.92 a box, 22 cents a box
above its competitors' general aver-
age for the same period.


Annual Sessions Exchange
And Affiliations Close
The official time for the annual
meetings of associations, sub-ex-
changes, the Florida Citrus Ex-
change and its affiliated Exchange
Supply Company and Growers Loan
and Guaranty Company are close at
hand.
Tuesday, May 3 is the official.date
for the associations. Sub-Exchanges
meet and elect representatives, Tues-
.day, May 17. ,The Exchange annual
meeting and that of its two affilia-
tions is Tuesday, June 7.
.o '






SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE April 15, 1982


The Affect of Bulk Fruit in the Market
By WILLIAM WERT, Cincinnati Division Manager
As I under- are below normal proves conclusively
stand it the ship- that instead of increasing it has
ment o f bulk actually decreased consumption.
fruit was started Cost Growers 25 to 504 a Box
with the idea of I frankly believe that if no bulk
creating wider had been permitted to leave the
distribution and state that the price would have been
larger consump- fully 25 to 50 higher than it is to-
tion. It apparent- day and would have meant millions
ly did that for a of dollars in the pockets of the grow-
short period or future of the industry lies in the
just long enough ers of Florida. I believe that the
for the legitimate absolute abolition of all bulk ship-
William Wert jobber to learn ments retaining our present stand-
that it was impractical for him to ard package and raising a better
handle is satisfactorily and for him fruit, put up in an attractive pack-
to learn that .the shipment of this age and the markets will absorb
bulk fruit put every peddler in the them at living prices to the growers
country in competition with him. but no industry can survive with the
Just as soon as the jobber learned haphazard methods that have been
this he began to sour on this bulk in vogue during the past two seasons.
fruit and he gradually began to draw
away and instead of increasing dis-
tribution it has actually decreased Featuring "Seald-
it in a great many markets. featuring ea -
Bulk fruit gives every peddler and
illegitimate dealer in the country an
opportunity to get in the business,
most of whom have no financial nor
moral responsibility, care nothing .
about the shipper as long as he can
operate and peddle it out at cost or
very little above. This kind of com-
petition has forced prices so low in
the distribution centers that the
legitimate retail merchant cannot
compete with boxed fruit so that he
has made up his mind that unless
he can make some money he will
'be forced to quit handling Florida
fruit. This has brought about a -
condition where the independent re-
tailers in all points that have been
flooded with bulk Florida fruit,
push the sale of California so that
instead of increasing consumption it :-
actually decreased it.
Competition With Packed Fruit
Naturally when the price of bulk ;.M
-fruit is very low the retailer is '"
either forced to handle this class
of fruit or he will be forced to buy
boxes at a price low enough in order .
to enable him to sell at retail in line
with this bulk competition. The
natural result is that the price of
boxed fruit is forced down way be-
low what it would: actually bring
were it not for the cheap price of
bulk fruit. Exchange displays have made the
To substantiate these facts it is Danahy-Faxon chain of 165 stores
only necessary to go through the the-leaders in the distribution of cit-
distribution sheets of our private rus in Buffalo, reports the dealer
sales and you will find that wherever service of the Eastern division.
there was no bulk competition the Danahy-Faxon features the Ex-
price on boxed fruit has remained change brands almost exclusively
at a very satisfactory level on or- throughout the season.
anges and sales have been on a fairly Campaigns on Exchange fruit are
normal basis whereas in every dis- p Excange fruit are
trict where bulk arrived in any quan- run by the chain, assisted by the
tity the private sales havi been ver dealer service. The picture above
much below normalird prices ha shows two of the displays during a
not been satisfactory. The very fact campaign this spring. Several win-
that sales, where bulk has arrived, dow displays were puf up by.th.e-x-


What's Wrong With Florida Citrus!
By ERROL M. ZORN, Eastern Division Manager
Stable stand- considerably below California or-
ards for any arti- anges, forged ahead of the California
cle or commodity product and are held in high esteem
are necessary to by the buying public today. But
instill confidence much of this prestige is being lost,
in the public and in parts of the country, because of
permit of sound the bulk and truck movement of
merchandis- fruit and because of several new
ing. Where such containers which have been used
standards do not recently.


exist, price fluctu-
ations are fre-
quent and erratic.
For a period of Errol M. Zorn
ten years the Florida citrus in-
dustry made noticeable progress
in developing standards for grade,
size, pack, quality, etc., and the
response of the public was re-
flected in better comparative prices.
Florida oranges, which formerly sold



Sweet" in Buffalo


change dealer service which also in-
structed supervisors and managers
of the chain's stores on arranging
window displays and special sales
points on Exchange fruit.
So effective were the displays, re-
ports M. M. Noteware, district man-
ager, that competitive chains copied
them and many independent grocers
called upon the Exchange office for
displays in their stores.
As. soon as the Valencia season is
well under way, Danahy-Faxon plan
for anotherr campaign.


No Cull Piles
Last season many growers looked
upon trucks and bulk shipments as
the salvation of the industry, point-
ing out that cull piles no longer ex-
isted and yet they were receiving
in many instances, as much or more
for cull fruit than was returned to
them for better grades packed in
boxes. They lost sight of the fact,
though, that these cull piles dis-
placed an equal amount of good fruit
and had the culls been left on the
pile, box prices would have been
proportionately higher.
More important, however, is some-
thing which many growers and ship-
pers disregard and few of them yet
realize; the poor fruit shipped by
truck and as bulk, did not give satis-
faction. It created a bad impression
and did much to lower the public's
regard for Florida citrus fruit. To
regain the consumer's confidence
will take time, effort and publicity
and, of course, elimination of these
two objectionable shipping methods.
Exchange Hurt Less
The Exchange has suffered less,
perhaps than smaller shippers be-
cause its Sealdsweet and Morjuce
trademarks have a definite value and
the public, realizing that they stand
for reliable standards, ask for them
by name. But the general price level
has been lowered and low markets
affect all brands, so that while Seald-
sweet and Morjuce have commanded
a premium, still the basic price level
has been such that all brands, ob-
scure and well known, have sold un-
necessarily low.
A return to grade and quality
standards of a few years ago would
do much to help the citrus industry.


Plan Fly Work in Mexico
Texas plans to cary its eradication
program against the Mexican fruit
fly into Mexico, appointing a com-
mittee to plan for a fly free zone
along the border within Mexico. The
Mexican government has evidenced
a willingness to cooperate in past
work against the fly and will con-
sent, it is believed.
Only a minor infestation was dis-
covered in Texas recently, but the
threat brought quick curtailment of
the season and prompt measures to
forestall a spread. A drastic clean-
up campaign was put underway in
the groves with no delay.


.'e li


SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE


April 15, 1932









Developing Summer Citrus in Florida


Though possessed with
the largest citrus acreage
of any state of the union,
Florida soon will send
clear across the continent
to California, its greatest
rival, for summer oranges.
It is that or do without.
The situation is doubly
regrettable. It is more
than a matter of state
pride; authentic govern-
ment records show that
this summer period is the
most profitable for citrus
out of the while 12 months.
Fortunately the indica-
tions are that Florida will
be relieved from her em-
barrassing situation in the
near future. Down on the
lower East Coast pioneer-
ing efforts in commercial production
of oranges are beginning to show
fruit. Broward association, organ-
ized this season and only recently
started in packing operations is con-
crete evidence for the most of its
volume is summer oranges. Its oper-
ation this season even though limited
shows that there is sufficient volume
already to begin group handling.
Signed with the association are ap-
proximately 1,500 acres nearly all of
which is just coming into bearing.
Planting continues at a rate indicat-
ing there will be more than three
times this acreage in summer pro-
duction in a few years.
Average Summer Prices
In view of the government records
of the citrus returns during the
summer period, it is not likely that
this development will slow up. The
government records for 1924 to
1930 show that the New York auc-
tion averaged $5.86 a box for or-
anges in June; $6.09 in July; $6.19
August," and $6.58 in September.
Below are charts showing the aver-
age monthly carlot shipments and
prices over the 1924-30 period.
According to these charts pre-
pared from the government and rail-
road statistics by Flamingo Groves,
Inc., Florida shares slightly in the
peak section of this seven year aver-
age. The sharp upturn in the price
average begins in May, during which


Average Monthly Prices





--O T, l-m-P

,--. ---- CUI SI --PMT -


--- ..... .... ....

i ,... l. is w I i {,. { t i W


month Florida has had average ship-
ments of 1,078 cars. Florida also
has an average of 232 cars in June.
Also in October and November which
ends the high price period of the
season, as shown by the graphs,
Florida ships an average of 715 and
3,253 cars, respectively.
Therefore, from May to Novem-
ber, inclusive, Florida moves 22 per-
cent of its crop. California, to its
great gain ships 53 percent during
the same time. Florida has averaged
only nine cars for July, August and
September, whereas California has
averaged more than 9,000 cars for
the three months from 1924 to 1930.
This break in the marketing of
Florida citrus has been generally
recognized for many years. Allow-
ing California oranges into the state,
however, accentuates the disad-
vantage to which Florida is put and
is focusing attention and interest
upon relief.
Citrus on Muck
It has been slow progress to at-
tain the limited advance that has
been made on the lower East Coast.
Up to recent years it was the gen-
eral opinion in the state that citrus
could not be grown on the muck
lands. This opinion prevailed even
among those active in farming in the
Everglade area.
Drainage was the principal obsta-
cle in the pioneering work. In the


and Shipments-1924-30


PERCWnaIA CHART SHOWING
IuEBrc MoKHu' CAB, SHIPMetS
or FLORIDA ORANGrS
FoYKl*
. '1924-19iso llK ~
J110%


JULy Aue. SEPt
O|0%10%10X


planting of the first groves little re-
gard was given to this point and
most of the early efforts were set
back sharply.
The necessity for proper drain-
age was recognized by those who
entered later and the selection of
locations sufficiently high to pro-
vide drainage and water control be-
came the most important objective.
The few old groves which flourished
invariably were on the higher sites.
'Canals for Drainage and Navigation
Two wide canals, one 90 feet and
the other 110 feet wide, afford ade-
quate drainage and navigation as
well in that section of Broward
county which is being developed to
summer citrus. These canals flow
almost directly into Port Everglade
at Ft. Lauderdale, a 35 foot, deep
water harbor.
The soil is heavy organic with a
sub-soil of sand and a base of very
porous oolitic limestone, a combi-
nation described as like a sponge
drawing the water up by capillary
action, like a wick, when the water
table is held sufficiently high. The
water table is high enough to make
irrigation relatively inexpensive,
while the main and sub-canal system
allows equally inexpensive drainage.
Soil Has High Fertility
The natural fertility of the soil
is high though not complete enough
to allow elimination of all fertiliza-
tion, according to the experience of
Flamingo Groves, Inc., member of
Btoward association. Higher qual-
ity and better sizes follow the use
of small amounts of fertilizer. There
are several individual trees scattered
through the area and one grove
which have been completely neg-
lected for six years or more that
apparently are in a very healthy con-
dtion. However the fruit is small
though it is very juicy and has a fine
flavor.
Native grasses furnish a super-
abundant covercrop which requires
several mowings and hoeings about


.the trees to keep the trees
from being entirely over-
grow. In the neglected
grove mentioned previous-
ly, the natural growth is
as high as the citrus trees
and the cajuput, a special
windbreak tree, has seed-
ed through the grove and
grown into a veritable
forest.
It is the belief of those
in the southern area that
the practically uniform
temperature through the
12 months and the control
of moisture are the prin-
cipal causes of the late
maturity of the citrus in
the southern area. Ma-
turity, it is believed, is
hastened by both temper-
ature and moisture changes. Late
Valencias are the principal variety
planted, in fact, one development,
Flamingo Groves, Inc., plants only
this variety. It matures from May
to September contrasted to ordinary
maturity from March to June.
Big Summer Crop Expected
Production from this area pro-
vides Broward association this sea-
son only the minimum volume for
packing house operation. But Brow-
ard association, though it receives
nearly 100 percent of the fruit of
this new area, will handle this sea-
son only about 15,000 boxes, but
production is expected to increase
materially each season. In only a
few years it is expected to top 100,-
000 boxes and the time should not
be far off when Florida will be able
to discard her embarrassment and
join California in enjoying the sum-
mer citrus market of the country as
well as the state.


An Ideal Windbreak


The cajuput. trees, which flourishes in the
heavy organic soils of the Everglades and
provides one of the finest windbreaks. The
tree shown above was planted 20 years
ago by Dr. David Fairchild, noted plant
explorer, and Edward Simmonds. Its bloom
is a fine source of honey.


Mile long rows in Flamingo Groves, Inc., Davie


April 15, 1932


SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE


= 09W






SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE April 15, 1932


Seald-Sweet

Chronicle


Published twice a month in
the interest of cooperative
marketing and for the infor-
mation of the citrus growers
of Florida.

606 Citrus Exchange Bldg.
Publication Office:
Tampa, Florida
Postoffice Box 2349

Net Grower Circulation
over 12,500

Space Rates: $60.00 per page;
$35.00 half-page; $20.00 one-
quarter page; $2.00 per inch
all space under one-quarter
page. Minimum space: 1 inch.

Vol. VII APRIL 15, 1932. No. 22


Cooperation Gains
Even though commodity prices
suffered a staggering decline follow-
ing 1927-28, the cooperative agricul-
tural business in 1930-31 exceeded
that of 1927-28 by $100,000,000,
reaching a total of $2,400,000,000,
James C. Stone, chairman of the
Federal Farm Board, informed con-
gressmen, early this month.
Had the 1927-28 price level main-
tained in 1930-31, the total coopera-
tive agricultural business would have
been 41 percent greater in 1930-31
as compared with 1927-28, Mr. Stone
stated. On this basis, Mr. Stone re-
lated, the increase in the cooperative
fruits and vegetables business would
have been 28 percent; in wool and
mohair, 614 percent; poultry, 195;
and cotton, 137.
More than 1,250,000 farmers are
members of cooperatives connected
with centralized sales agencies, Mr.
Stone said. He enumerated in the
fruits and vegetables cooperatives a
total of 56,000. The largest mem-
bership is held by the livestock cen-
trals with 297,000 members. Next
are the grain cooperatives with 250,-
000 producers. Other big groups are
the cotton and cotton products, 160,-
000; and the dairy products, 166,000.


Brand Value
Accidental or possibly intentional
use of a "Seald-Sweet" box with an
Exchange competitor's fruit reveals
the distinct standing of Exchange
brands and standards with preferred
consumers and the quickness with
which they notice any deviation
from the Exchange standard.
Recently the New York office of
the Exchange was called by the chef
of a leading hotel inquiring if a cer-
tain brand of fruit was "Seald-
Sweet." Investigation of Errol M.


Zorn, division manager, disclosed
that it was not but that a com-
petitor's fruit was in a "Seald-
Sweet" box. It was traced back to
the wholesaler, who with much
apology explained that in re-packing
a heavily decayed lot of a com-
petitor's fruit, a "Seald-Sweet" box
had been used by mistake.
According to Mr. Zorn this ex-
cuse may or may not be true-an-
other so-called error was found later,
but the principal result was that
the chef informed Mr. Zorn that
hereafter he is going to specify
"Seald-Sweet," specifically, and
that he is going to insist on fruit
that is stamped.
This is not an exceptional case
though its manner of presentation is
unusual. "Seald-Sweet" has gained
the reputation f o r covering
fruit of distinctly high standard. The
incident brings out two points clear-
ly, first the necessity of having and
maintaining a good standard and
second, the value of identifying it
beyond question by stamping the
brand upon the fruit.


Reimbursement
"Florida growers are entitled to
reimbursement if growers anywhere
are entitled to anything," states the
St. Petersburg Independent. "Many
of them sustained both needless and
necessary heavy loss, which they
have borne without undue complaint.
As has been previously stated on
this page, the case of the Florida
growers goes before congress with a
clear record. There have been no
over-and-aver loans, as is the case of
growers in California and other
states. No planting, harvesting and
marketing loans here. Florida grow-
ers have operated on their own and
have made a fairly good job of it.
Their record is better than that of
growers in many other states. All
they ask is a square deal, and cer-
tainly it would be no more than a
square deal to -help them cover losses
occasioned by eradication work. It
is hoped that congress will take due
note of this and see to it that the
square deal is forthcoming."


For Health
"Oranges help to regulate diges-
tion. They keep the blood in right
condition. With most of us the
blood becomes too acid as we ad-
vance in years. Moreover, oranges
being a splendid food, help to keep
our cartilaginous and bony structure
in order. The individual who eats
plenty of oranges seldom develops
trouble with the spine."
This is not taken from advertising
copy, as it may sound, but is from
the paper of Dr. Thomas R. Thor-
burn read to the Osteapathis society
of New York.


At Last! Five Cent GrapeFruit in a Restaurant


Raklios Restaurants, a chain of 31 in Chicago, has inaugurated the
vogue of a half a grapefruit for five cents which promises to spread over
the city. It has more than doubled the sale of grapefruit in some of the
restaurants of the chain. Competitors have run specials occasionally and
it is hoped other chains will do likewise.
Though grapefruit has advanced since Raklios inaugurated the policy
the price of five cents a half has been maintained and will continue until
the fruit costs more than $3.50 a box. So far the chain has been buying 64s.














HELPS THE DEALER

From the standpoint of increased profits, the
dealer finds Brogdexed fruit very satisfactory.
The fact that they keep well enables him to
handle on a smaller margin of profit and still
make more. He does not find it necessary to fix
his selling price sufficiently high to provide a sort
of "Sinking Fund" to take care of the usual
shrinkage losses.

An Indian River packer says he uses Brogdex
because it makes his fruit stand up in the hands
of the dealer. He considers the dealer the most
important factor in the present method of dis-
tribution. Get the dealer sold on your brands
and your troubles are over.

Brogdex brands are keeping brands. They
have snap and life and stay sound and fresh look-
ing long enough for the dealer to sell out of dis-
play stock with little if any replacements nec-
essary.

Give the market this kind of fruit and it will
not be long before you will be doing a bigger,
better and more profitable citrus business.

FLORIDA BROGDEX DISTRIBUTORS


B. C. SKINNER, Pres.


DUNEDIN, FLORIDA


SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE


April 15, 1932










Census of Citrus Trees in Florida-December 31, 1931


(Continued from Page 1)
distinction is made on the record be-
tween the grove trees and those for
home use, and no percentage of
either has been determined, though
it is highly probable that the grove
trees constitute' all except a small
percent. Nursery trees are not in-
cluded in the count.
The census reveals several very in-
teresting facts. New grapefruit
plantings in the past three years
have been at a rate more than double
that of oranges. However, the latter
is the greater numerically. The cen-
sus shows 88,613 new orange trees
or 6.5 percent increase; 820,081 new
grapefruit trees, an increase of 14.8
percent.


Year
1919
1923
1928
1931


Statistics Compiled by the Grove Inspection Department
State Plant Board of Florida
Total Total Total Total Total Tot.
Orange Grapefruit Tangerine Satsuma Misc.(l) Ci


10,912,716 4,780,496
13,660,461 5,592,187
14,549,074 6,412,268


The largest percentage increase
falls to satsumas. A total of 195,-
1945 trees of this variety were planted
since 1928, an increase of 37%.
Due to this increase, Jackson county
in the far northern part of the state
now ranks in number of trees above
several of the better known citrus
counties in the main citrus belt.
Tangerines have shown a marked


609,107 (3) 374,908
1,677,042 528,823 568,201
1,987,894 724,768 649,846


al All
trus


11,356,414
16,677,227
22,026,714
24,323,850


increase during the past three years,
recording 18 percent gain, but this is
far overshadowed by the remarkable
growth of nearly 200 percent during
the five years ending in 1928. The
increase of the past three years is
310,852 trees; for the five year per-
iod, 1,067,000.
Study of the census reveals sev-
eral interesting sidelights. Five


counties, Polk, Orange, Lake Hills-
borough and Volusia have half of all
the citrus trees in the state; four
counties, Polk, Orange, Volusia and
Lake have more than half of all the
tangerine trees; four-Polk, Orange,
Lake and Hillsborough-have half
of the orange trees; also, four-
Polk, Pinellas, Lake and DeSoto have
just a fraction less than half of all
the grapefruit trees.
Grapefruit trees only constitute
approximately one-fourth of all the
citrus trees and oranges much more
than one-half, yet we find five coun-
.ties, Pinellas, Dade, Indian River,
Manatee and Lee with more grape-
fruit than orange trees, several by
a wide margin.


Showing Number of Citrus Trees by Counties and Varieties as of December 31, 1931


ORANGE TREES
Non-
COUNTY Bearing Bearing Total
Polk - - 3,013,705 170,388 3,184,093
Orange - - 1,643,647 170,495 1,814,142
Lake - - 1,154,562 168,179 1,322,741
Hillsborough -- 914,429 63,896 978,325
Highlands - - 557,389 17,464 574,953
Volusia - - 620,538 143,814 764,352
Brevard - - 578,528 99,735 678,263
Pinellas - - 402,338 12,542 414,880
Indian River - 241,601 37,381 278,982
Dade -- 193,829 12,076 205,905
Marion - - 525,160 60,320 585,480
St. Lucie - 291,492 47,336 338,828
Hardee - - 446,623 31,424 478,047
Manatee - 226,442 25,266 251,708
DeSoto - - 355,984 34,768 390,752
Seminole - - 325,113 34,141 359,254
Pasco - - 273,347 36,765 310,112
Lee - - - 179,288 20,095 199,383
Putnam - - 268,490 23,774 292,264
Osceola - 191,022 21,396 212,418
Sarasota - 164,710 2,462 167,172,
Alachua - - 53,783 2,325 56,108
Baker - - 679 57 736
Bay - - - 639 2 641
Bradford - - 2,534 50 2,584
Broward - - 25,015 71,923 96,938
Calhoun - - 706 0 706
Charlotte - - 38,813 5,120 43,933
Citrus - - 40,193 6,504 46,697
Clay - - 4,384 1,023 5,407
Collier - - 11,071 480 11,551
Columbia - - 1,149 272 1,421
Dixie - - 359 33 392
Duval - - 22,469 4,026 26,495
Escambia - - 1,914 1,399 3,313
Flagler - - 19,603 1,578 21,181
Franklin - - 121 4 125
Gadsden - - 313 48 361
Gilchrist - 460 8 468
Glades - - 2,727 487 3,214
Gulf - - 1,534 42 1,576
Hamilton - - 449 194 643
Hendry - - 31,628 4,771 36,399
Hernando - - 64,739 8,496 73,235
Holmes - - 257 4 261
Jackson - - 865 0 865
Jefferson - - 1,353 223 1,576
Lafayette - - 660 0 660
Leon - - 692 178 870
Levy - - 3,431 41 3,472
Liberty - - 212 24 236
Madison - - 718 133 851
Martin - - 42,140 26,937 69,077
Monroe - - 4,671 38 4,709
Nassau - - 1,303 177 1,480
Okaloosa - - 90 0 90
Okeechobee - 20,680 3,124 23,804
Palm Beach - 60,342 1,869 62,211
St. Johns - - 29,940 9,932 39,872
Santa Rosa - 311 0 311
Sumter - - 92,910 2,180 95,090
Suwannee -- 1,279 346 1,625
Taylor - - 604 138 742
Union - - 790 166 956
Wakulla - - 143 46 189
Walton - - 1,245 2 1,247
Washington - 2,662 40 2,702
Total - - 13,160,817 1,388,257 14,549,074
* Lemons, Rough Lemons, Limes and Kumquats


GRAPEFRUIT TREES


Bearing
1,669,237
262,833
422,635
260,727
331,549
80,195
178,935
432,535
334,739
403,858
56,762
219,170
60,792
267,810
100,220
46,672
89,899
221,555
32,777
53,056
65,305
3,847
89
483
71
14,841
51
16,222
6,203
442
12,733
102
9
2,224
310
2,148
5
288
27
1,080
51
19
13,268
32,757
29
362
212
16
239
132
14
90
48,338
3,330
64
62
6,086
31,469
3,149
90
10,668
65
17
61
34
177
91
5,803,326


Non-
Bearing
106,850
29,387
48,578
32,990
10,826
18,437
50,157
51,680
70,720
3,983
4,448
41,173
4,166
55,681
1,301
9,347
14,253
11,803
3,161
4,294
6,758
192
21
10
1
3,612
5
2,119
539
96
442
31
3
556
55
107
0
99
3
143
83
6
1,805
1,437
0
78
81
0
67
6
2
26
12,054
12
28
0
577
3,601
664
0
253
54
11
56
14
0
0
608,942


Total
1,776,087
292,220
471,213
293,717
342,375
98,632
229,092
484,215
405,459
407,841
61,210
260,343
64,958
323,491
101,521
56,019
104,152
233,358
35,938
57,350
72,963
4,039
110
493
72
18,453
56
18,341
6,742
538
13,175
133
12
2,780
365
2,255
5
387
30
1,223
134
25
15,073
34,194
29
440
293
16
296
138
16
116
60,392
3,342
92
62
6,663
35,070
3,813
90
10,921
119
28
117
48
177
91
6,412,268


TANGERINE TREES


Bearing
429,112
242,574
167,605
102,579
70,161
158,053
46,328
44,669
35,903
24,425
55,817
70,737
55,930
10,057
43,200
57,926
39,938
11,074
52,058
36,426
2,596
8,135
6
164
51
2,128
31
5,886
3,757
364
292
14
2
937
16
9,275
0
9
6
159
19
7
1,402
56,889
10
83
6
2
7
105
2
24
3,642
1,811
23
542
2,442
6,756
1,451
2
7,136
28
14
10
2
16
19
1,870,326


Non-
Bearing
8,890
10,310
10,653
1,892
1,274
22,563
5,152
668
3,382
2,056
4,342
7,846
3,278
1,989
S3,236
2,082
8,107
680
3,883
1,735
155
571
0
0
3
4,523
3
318
1,475
123
1
38
0
276
1
901
0
0
0
210
5
1
134
4,376
0
0
0
0
1
3
0
0
161
5
0
0
214
94
101
0
211
0
0
2
0
.0
0
117,044


Total
438,002
252,884
178,258
104,471
71,435
180,616
51,480
45,357
39;285
26,481
60,159
78,583
59,208
11,146
46,436
60,008
48,045
11,754
55,941
38,161
2,751
8,706
6
164
54
6,651
34
6,204
5,232
487
293
52
2
1,213
17
10,176
0
9
6
369
24
8
1,536
61,265
10
83
6
2
8
108
2
24
3,803
1,816
23
542
2,656
6,850
1,552
2
7,347
28
14
12
2
16
19
1,987,894


Total Total
Satsumas Misc.*
Bearing Bearing
& Non- & Non-
Bearing Bearing
784 57,769
4,000 19,282
9,725 18,285
3,967 99,139
80 16,315
3,455 8,349
48 6,109
492 9,079
25 4,518
0 79,187
7,824 4,601
23 15,411
768 11,470
160 15,337
887 8,132
1,149 7,265
203 15,686
31 9,974
11,178 2,075
490 10,704
27 9,775
19,758 1,011
25,184 213
66,125 357
12,959 86
0 8,492
3,551 113
33 2,994
1,864 3,848
57,981 336
6 1,422
2,128 48
50 4
16,088 965
79,915 1,308
761 166
4 7
1,479 92
20 13
3 865
1,395 59
3,429 7
26 1,448
2,001 10,554
2,851 55
174,254 176
15,171 226
37 10
3,423 297
440 38
1,047 22
462 43
100 11,980
1 146,652
942 55
44,427 213
22 5,243
0 17,706
38,205 746
33,514 153
483 2,829
3,217 126
28 31
2,033 20
1,021 13
22,898 195
40,086 147
724,768 649,846


Total
5,456,735
2,382,528
2,000,222
1,479,619
1,005,158
1,055,404
964,992
954,023
728,269
719,414
719,274
693,188
614,451
601,842
547,728
483,695
478,198
454,500
397,396
319,123
251,788
89,622
26 249
67,780
15,755
130,534
4,460
71,505
64,383
64,749
26,447
3,782
460
47,541
84,918
34,539
141
2,328
537 .- '
5,674
3,188
4,112
54,482
181,249
3,206
175,818
17,272
725
4,904
4,196
1,350
1,496
145,352
156,520
2,595
45,334
38,388
121,837
84,188
34,070
116,670
5,115
843
3,138
1,273
24,533
43,045
24,333,850


April 15, 1932


SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE






SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE April 15, 1932


GROVE, FIELD AND CROP NOTES


receipts of fresh fruits and vege-
tables in Philadelphia, last year's re-
ceipts from Florida exceeded by
1,474 cars the unloads of 1930 in
this second largest market for perish-
ables in the country.
The record of movement is a
feather in the hat of Florida. Sec-
ond of all the states which supply
the Quaker City, it showed a gain
in the movement while its greatest
rival California showed a decline,
harrowing considerably the margin
between the two famous winter
produce and fruit states. Undoubted-
ly, Florida citrus was a material
factor both in the total movement of
perishables from the state and in the
gain attained over 1930.
The unloads of oranges in Phila-
delphia was over 1,000 cars more
in 1931 than in 1930. Grapefruit,
also, showed an increase. Total un-
loads of all perishables were 86,519
carloads, a decline of more than
4,000 cars compared with 1930.
Drawing from most sections of the
world, Philadelphia got these sup-
plies from 36 states and 16 foreign
countries.
Big Truck Movement
The record emphasizes the grow-
ing competition of truck transpor-
tation with the railroads. Steadily
increasing during past years, the
truck movement into the city ac-
counted for 31 percent of the total.
Almost incomprehensible is the fact
that the flow of perishables by
motor to this one market was the
equivalent of 25,192 carloads. Motor
trucks brought supplies from 12
states extending as far South as
Florida and as far West as Indiana.
This torrent of trucked supplies
reached flood proportions in August
and September, exceeding the un-
'i loads by railroads in these months.
-j Though it has been steadily ebbing,
the rail movement still predomin-
ates, accounting for 45,989 carloads
in carlots and 705 in less than car-
lots. Water transportation shows
itself as a competitive factor the
rails must consider, accounting for
8,684 carloads or more than 10 per-
cent of the total.


ESTABLISHED 1847

H. HARRIS & CO.

Fruit Auctioneers
Fruit Auction Terminal
Rutherford Avenue
Charleston District
BOSTON, MASS.
Ctler B. Downer Fred'k L. Sprisgford
Harold F. Miles
J. Oliver Daly Clifford E. Myen


Following are the representative auction averages for the past few
weeks, showing the general tendency of the market and the preferences
of the buyers in regard to sizes and grades.
GRAPEFRUIT-Delivered
Week of 36s 46s 54s 64s 70s 80s 96s 126s
Mar. 12 No. Is 2.17 2.35 2.16 2.08 2.05 2.02 1.88 1.65
No. 2s 1.92 2.04 1.88 1.82 1.83 1.83 1.74 1.31
Mar. 26 No. Is 2.47 2.83 2.75 2.65 2.65 2.55 2.23 1.97
No. 2s 2.19 2.57 2.48 2.43 2.45 2.37 2.10 1.84
April 2 No. Is 2.90 3.13 2.95 2.80 2.77 2.73 2.37 2.17
No. 2s 2.37 2.72 2.52 2.45 2.50 2.42 2.11 1.86
April 9 No. Is 2.88 3.16 2.96 2.81 2.81 2.74 2.40 2.07
No. 2s 2.46 2.79 2.65 2.60 2.61 2.58 2.21 1.88


Week of
Mar. 12

Mar. 26

April 2

April 9


No. Is
No. 2s
No. Is
No. 2s
No. Is
No. 2s
No. Is
No. 2s


ORANGES-Delivered
126s 150s 176s 200s
3.41 3.83 4.10 4.17
3.00 3.34 2.65 3.76
3.47 3.71 4.02 4.22
2.98 3.36 3.59 3.79
3.36 3.58 3.83 4.02
3.03 3.38 3.57 3.78
3.32 3.56 3.82 3.95
3.13 3.30 3.53 3.68


Specialists of the Extension Serv-
ice will meet with growers in various
parts of the state this month and
next for discussion of citrus prac-
tices and problems. Among the
topics on which information will be
given are fertilizer practices, dis-
ease and insect control, cover crops,
cultivation, irrigation, lowering pro-
duction costs and record keeping.
Meetings were held in Orange
and Lake counties, April 12-15.
Others are scheduled in Hernando
county, April 26; Pinellas county,
April 27; Hillsborough county,
April 28; Osceola county, May 3;
Highlands county, May 4; and Man-
atee county, May 6.
Speakers are H. G. Clayton, dis-
trict agent, Extension Division; Dr.
J. E. Turlington, Economics depart-
ment, College of Agriculture; E. F.
DeBusk, citriculturist, Extension
Service.

Winter Haven association had its
annual meeting, Tuesday, April 5,
re-electing those of its board whose
terms expired this season. Reports
were given by Pres. G. B. Aycrigg
and Manager George R. Williams.
Mr. Williams estimated that the
total volume of the association for
the season will be 400,000 boxes of
which 147,000 boxes were still to be
shipped. The total Florida move-
ment, he said will be about 47,800
cars, compared with 74,400 cars last
season. California's citrus crop for
the season will be approximately 59,-
000 cars, compared with 64,500 last
year.
President Aycrigg gave a report
on the finances of the association
showing it is in fine condition.
Directors re-elected were: Paul A.
Delmater, J. P. Waldrop, R. S.
Abernethy, C. F. Lathers and H. S.
Rogers. Those carrying over are:
J. B. Scott, H. .E. Cornell, T. L.
Starnes, G. B. Aycrigg, W. F. Boyd
and Prof. W. L. Drew.


216s
4.05
3.71
4.19
3.82
4.16
3.85
4.02
3.75


250s
3.81
3.55
4.07
3.73
4.11
3.88
4.12
3.87


288s
3.47
3.13
3.83
3.46
3.95
3.77
4.10
3.85


324s
3.00
2.74
3.37
3.09
3.65
3.37
3.78
3.56


Increasing more than 200 percent
over the previous season, the Texas
citrus shipments for 1931-32 ex-
ceeded 8 242 cars or more than 3,-
000,000 boxes. The preceding sea-
son, Texas shipped 2,652 cars.
Trucks played a prominent part in
Texas this season as they did in Flor-
ida. The Mission Times estimates
that the equivalent of 1,900 carloads
of citrus were moved by truck; no
less than 23 percent of the total
shipments.
Crop prospects for the coming sea-
son are uncertain. A total of 1,100,-
133 young trees come into bearing,
adding to the annually increasing
production from 2,194,118 older
trees. Bloom has been erratic, be-
ginning with an offseason bloom in
December. Another bloom started
in March only to be checked by the
cold wave. Recently the trees began
blooming again.

California is experimenting with
the bag pack for oranges, recently
filling an order for 19,000 bags to be
shipped by water to New York by
way of the Panama canal. The fruit
is from the Redlands district and
consists of large sizes. The shipment
should afford an interesting study of
the carrying power of the fruit
under the influence of the extended
time required to lay the fruit down
in New York.


In spite of a decline in the total Renresentative Auction Averaaes vb Sizes and Grades


IRRIGATION
COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS FOR
EVERY PURPOSE
Large Stocks Pumps, Pipe and Other Materials for
immediate delivery.
"Sixty-Six Years of Service"

The Cameron & Barkley Co.
TAMPA, FLORIDA


--r------- ---J-- -r -


SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE


April 15, 1932


An experiment in fertilization
which includes studies of the affects
of the rarer chemical elements as
well as the commonly used nitrogen,
phosphate and potash is being con-
ducted by the specialists of the
United States Department of Agri-
culture in various sections.
The main division of the experi-
ment is a comparative study of high
and low analysis fertilizers with sub-
divisions of various-formulas. In
one grove the experimental tract of
five year old trees consists of four
'blocks each; each block including
24 trees. Two of the tracts are given
over to the study of high analysis
fertilizer and the other two to low
analysis. The different formulas
with varying elements and amounts
of the elements are applied in the
small plots.
At the start of the experiment, the
soil was tested and the trees care-
fully checked, measured and re-
corded. The fertilizer is furnished
and applied by the department. Three
applications are made a year.
Each year a record will be kept of
soil analysis, growth of tree, con-
dition, quantity, quality, size and
texture of fruit.

A murder mystery surrounds the
loss by fire last month of the pack-
ing house and canning plant of H. D.
Ulmer, Indian Rocks, member of
Pinellas Sub-Exchange. The body of
a negro employee was found in the
ruins and another negro employee has
been charged with murder.
The plant was completely de-
stroyed at a loss of $75,000. It had
been enlarged and much new equip-
ment installed last summer. Only a
little fruit was in the house at the
time of the fire. Plans for the future
have not been announced. For the
present, the fruit of the company is
being handled by Largo association.
According to reports, the fire was
preceded by an explosion. The body
of the negro was found several hours
after the building had burned down.
At first it was thought that the negro
had sneaked into the building to
sleep and had possibly started the
fire by lighting a match at the color-
ing rooms






April 15, 1932 SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE


GENUINE


'. L7 USE



PERUVIAN


GUAN O AT NEW LOW PRICES


for theSUMMER

APPLICATION
N OT IN YEARS .. perhaps never be-
fore . .has there been a greater
need for organic fertilizers for
the Summer Application to citrus trees.
Now, this summer, you can have the
undisputed excellence of Genuine Pe-
ruvian Guano to give your groves a
square meal of the organic nitrogen
they need and at a price every grower
can afford... the lowest in years!
At today's low prices, and with ample
supplies of Genuine Peruvian Guano on
hand, you are now offered the privilege
of specifying just what percentage of
Nitrogen (up to the full Ammonia con-
tent of the analysis) you want to be de-
rived from Genuine Peruvian Guano in
any of the regular NACO Brand Citrus
Fertilizers ... and at no extra cost!

Why Genuine Peruvian Guano
for the Summer Application?
IT'S A NATURAL ORGANIC.
Genuine Peruvian Guano is nothing
more or less than digested finish . the.
droppings of the millions of fish-eating
birds that live on the Bird Islands of
Peru. Not only is this material a com-
plete fertilizer in itself, but it contains-
many of the rarer elements that science
says are of great benefit to plant life.


IT'S LONG LASTING yet the most
available of all natural organic. Nature
demands that plant food shall be fur-
nished as needed for maximum produc-
tion of the crops under cultivation.
Genuine Peruvian Guano has this un-
usual quality of gradual release of its
plant food . some almost immedi-
ately, for quick growth; some slowly,
for continued development and vigor.

Thus in Using Genuine Peruvian Guano
for the Summer Application You Are
GainingsPrompt Growth; Slow, Steady,
Complete Feeding During the Hot
Months, and a Soil Conditioning EFfect
of Permanent Value

IT ADDS BENEFICIAL BAC-
TERIA SOIL WORKMEN. De-
composition of organic matter is caused
by bacterial action in the soil. When
bacteria are not present in sufficient
number to carry on this process of Na-
ture, plant life suffers.
Genuine Peruvian Guano contains
its-own abundant supply of bacteria
which releases not only the nourish-
ment in the Guano itself, but liberates
such plant food as may already be pres-
ent in the soil.
PERUVIANITE. In the 15 different
analyses of the Genuine PERUVIAN-,
ITE Formula, Genuine Peruvian Guano
is the source of one-half of the Ammo-
nia of these high analysis mixtures.


NITRATE AGENCIES COMPANY
1401 -1407 L Y N C H BU I L D I N G
JACKSONVILLE - FLORIDA


PERUVIAN ITE
F,


You who use PERUVIANITE are
offered the same privilege as users of
the regular NACO Brands. Specify
the percentage of Nitrogen you want
to be derived from Genuine Peruvian
Guano (up to the full Ammonia con-
tent of the analysis) and you will re-
ceive a special mixture, duplicating
the high analysis PERUVIANITE
Formula you have been using and
containing the specified percentage of
Nitrogen from Genuine Peruvian
Guano . at no extra cost!
YOUR NOSE KNOWS GUANO
You cannot mistake the presence of
Genuine Peruvian Guano in any fer-
tilizer. Its odor is as distinctive as the
results it produces in your grove. All
NACO Brands and PERUVIANITE
Formulas have the characteristic odor
cf Genuine Peruvian Guano.
"NATURE'S WINGED FERTILIZER FACTORY"
Send for this illustrated folder which tells the amazing
story of the Guano Birds of the Bird Islands of Peru.
Sign and mail the coupon today!
NITRATE AGENCIES COMPANY, !
Post Office Box No. 1114,
Jacksonville, Florida.
Please send me the folder: I
"NATURE'S WINGED FERTILIZER FACTORY."
Name
(PLrASF. PRINT YOUR NAME)
Address
City
County State __


U -


April 15, 1932


SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE




8 SEALD-SWEET CHRONICLE April 15, 1932



Quality Fertilizer Does

Produce Quality Fruit

The following excerpt from a letter of one of our
customers tells a story most vitally interesting to every
citrus grower in the state.
This customer writes: "We have found from ex-
perience that the only way to make money out of
fruit in good seasons as well as in bad seasons is to
grow the very finest fruit it is possible to grow-and
our constant use of Orange Belt Brand fertilizer dur-
the past seven years has convinced us that we must
credit your splendid fertilizer largely for enabling us
to 'top the market' all these years."
Isn't this example well worth following in YOUR
grove?

EXAMPLE NO. 3
There IS A Difference In Fertilizer

Lyons Fertilizer Company
OFFICES: PLANT:
807 Citrus Exc. Bldg. BELT 4th Ave. & 35th ST.
TAMPA, FLA. TAMPA, FLA.

QUALITY FERTILIZER FOR QUALITY FRUIT




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