<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Title Page
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Overview of enabling legislati...
 Understanding the problem of child...
 Mission
 1991-1993 goals
 Service delivery plan
 Cooperative agreements with DOE...
 Plan for coordination and...
 Barriers
 Recommendations for change
 Conclusion
 Appendix A. 415.501, Florida statutes...
 Appendix B. Interprogram task...
 Appendix C. Child abuse and neglect...
 Appendix D. Needs/problems considered...
 Appendix E. Child abuse and neglect...
 Appendix F. Summary of district...
 Appendix G. District objective...
 Appendix H. Summary of district...
 Appendix I. Summary of district...
 Appendix J. References














Child abuse and neglect prevention
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075022/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child abuse and neglect prevention
Alternate title: Child abuse and neglect prevention state plan
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services
Florida -- Children, Youth, and Families Program Office
Evaluation Systems Design, Inc
Publisher: Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services
Place of Publication: Miami Fla.?
Creation Date: 1991
Frequency: triennial[<1991/1993>-]
biennial[ former <1987/1988>-]
three times a year
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Child abuse -- Prevention -- Government policy -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Abused children -- Services for -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Issuing Body: Issued by: Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, <1987/1988>- ; Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, The Children, Youth and Families Program Office and Evaluation Systems Design, Inc, <1991/1993>- .
General Note: Description based on: 1987-1988; title from cover.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001860453
oclc - 18025476
notis - AJT4902
lccn - 88647347
System ID: UF00075022:00001

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Acknowledgement
        Acknowledgement
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Overview of enabling legislation
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Understanding the problem of child abuse and neglect
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Mission
        Page 19
    1991-1993 goals
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Service delivery plan
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Cooperative agreements with DOE and FDLE
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Plan for coordination and integration
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Barriers
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Recommendations for change
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Conclusion
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Appendix A. 415.501, Florida statutes prevention of abuse and neglect of children; state plan
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Appendix B. Interprogram task force
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Appendix C. Child abuse and neglect prevention plan district top needs or problems
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Appendix D. Needs/problems considered by district task forces in the needs assessment for child abuse and neglect prevention services
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Appendix E. Child abuse and neglect prevention programs implementation of continuum components by district
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Appendix F. Summary of district child abuse and neglect prevention services
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Appendix G. District objectives
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Appendix H. Summary of district barriers
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Appendix I. Summary of district recommendations
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Appendix J. References
        Page 123
        Page 124
Full Text

-4.


-^











* Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services a
The Children, Youth and Families Program Office
Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention
1317 Winewood Boulevard, Building 8
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(904) 488-4900


* Evaluation Systems Design, Inc. m
700 North Calhoun Street, Suite A-3
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 681-6553


CHILD ABUSE AND

NEGLECT PREVENTION

STATE PLAN: 1991-1993




















In some places children dance
to the joyous music of life
and elsewhere
they only cling to existence.

They are all ours.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS






This publication was a collaborative effort involving members
of the Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Interprogram Task
Force and the eleven district task forces, the Children, Youth
and Families Program Office staff, the HRS/CYF district
contract managers, other district program office staff, and
Evaluation Systems Design, Inc. (ESDI). The success of the
planning process can be attributed to the dedication and
commitment of all participants.

The Interprogram Task Force and district task force members
contributed many hours to fulfilling their responsibilities and
made the district and state plans a cooperative venture among
various prevention and social service providers. The state and
district plans reflect their commitment to cooperation and to
integration of child abuse and neglect prevention services within
Sthe state and local service networks.

CYF prevention staff members, A. Leon Polhill, Program
S Administrator for Prevention, and Chris Christmas, Senior
Human Services Program Specialist, provided guidance and
S were actively involved throughout the planning process. The
district contract managers and prevention providers contributed
S much time and effort to the production of the district plans.

SThanks are offered to Dick Sinclair and the HRS Public
Information Office for the excellent photographs provided for
the plan.

ESDI staff, Dr. Nina Barrios, Gail Myers and Pam Taylor
provided technical assistance to the Interprogram Task Force
and district task forces during the planning process and
compiled information for the Child Abuse and Neglect
Prevention State Plan. Special thanks is given for ESDI support
staff, Heidi Holcomb, Linda Tharney, Lynn Reid, and Lisa
Rowlee.






ii Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993




TABLE OF CONTENTS







Introduction .......................................... 1

Overview of Enabling Legislation .......................... 2

Understanding the Problem of Child Abuse and Neglect ........ 5

Child Maltreatment ................................... 6
Predictive Factors ................................... 10
Critical Problems in Florida ............................ 12

Mission of the Child Abuse and Neglect
Prevention Program .................................... 19

1991-1993 Goals for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention ...... 20

Service Delivery Plan for Child Abuse and Neglect
Prevention ........................................... 22

Current Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Services ......... 22
Other Prevention/Early Intervention Services ............... 28
Goals and Objectives for Service Delivery ................. 33

Cooperative Agreements with Department of Education and
Florida Department of Law Enforcement ................... 40

Current Status ..................................... 41
Goal and Objectives Involving DOE and FDLE .............. 46

Plan for Coordination and Integration ...................... 49

Current Status ..................................... 49
Goal and Objectives for Coordination and Integration ......... 51

Barriers to a Comprehensive Approach to Prevention Services .. 55

Recommendations for Change ........................... 57

Conclusion ......................................... 61

Appendices ......................................... 63










INTRODUCTION





Child abuse and neglect reports have increased dramatically
during the past decade. During this time the Florida
Legislature has allocated millions of dollars for investigation of
reports and intervention in situations of confirmed
maltreatment. Unfortunately, the research literature documents
that treatment efforts are often unsuccessful in changing parent
behavior. There is, however, mounting evidence that
intervention with high-risk families before maltreatment begins
can be expected to improve parenting skills and parent-child
interactions. In Confronting Child Abuse, Daro (1988)
describes specific services such as parenting education, parent
support groups, and home visitor programs that have
demonstrated success in altering parent behaviors and
attitudes, resulting in family situations with fewer of the
preconditions for maltreatment. Further, there is
consistent evidence that high risk families are more
amenable to change than families who have already -H
been involved in maltreatment. In addition, long-
lasting effects on risk factors, although not immediately
apparent, have been demonstrated. Daro points out
that child maltreatment cannot be approached as a J
unidimensional problem with a single solution. In her
words, "reducing the overall level of maltreatment ...
will be achieved not by promoting a single prevention .'
strategy but rather by developing an integrated system
in which each service is but one part of a coordinated
service continuum. The complex nature of
maltreatment and the everchanging nature of ...
families, require that individual prevention efforts join
forces to construct a child abuse prevention system that
will address the many and varied needs of the at-risk
population" (p.146).

In Florida, such an integrated system was initiated in 1982 when
the Legislature provided a statutory base for child abuse and
neglect prevention services and initial funding for statewide,
community-based services. The statute provides the framework
for a planned, comprehensive approach to prevention and
requires the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services
to submit a biennial plan to the House of Representatives and
the Senate by January 1 of alternate years. This document
meets the requirements of F.S. 415.501 by providing a two-year
plan for child abuse and neglect prevention services and related
activities.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


OVERVIEW OF ENABLING

LEGISLATION


In 1982, the Florida Legislature enacted Chapter 415.501, F.S.
which created a service system for child abuse and neglect
prevention services. The statute designed a decentralized
system for planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating.
The funds come to the Children, Youth and Families Program
Office (CYF), then are dispersed to the eleven HRS districts.
A task force operates within each district, comprised of local
citizens including private providers and state agency staff. The
individual task forces conduct a needs assessment biennially,
then make recommendations to the HRS District Administrator
as to the services that should be provided and the providers
with whom to contract. A state level task force was created to
provide overall guidance to the system.


e statute contains three sections. Section 1 of the statute
:sents the legislative intent. The section identifies child abuse
d neglect prevention as one of the priorities for the state.
ecifically, the legislative intent is that "a comprehensive
roach for the prevention of child abuse and neglect be
eloped for the state and that this planned, comprehensive
roach be used as a basis for funding." Section 2 of the
tute specifies the responsibilities for developing a
nprehensive approach to the prevention of child abuse and
neglect. The legislation calls for HRS to develop a
comprehensive state plan in cooperation with an
interprogram task force. Section 3 of the statute
addresses the funding of child abuse and neglect
prevention programs and maintains that budget
requests are to be based on the state prevention plan.
A copy of the statute is provided in Appendix A.

Allowable services. Chapter 415.501, F.S. allows for a
broad range of services and leaves open the definition
of prevention. The definition adopted by CYF includes
primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, defined as:
Primary services to the general public, Secondary -
vices to at-risk populations, and Tertiary services to
idren and their families where there have already been
firmed incidents of abuse or neglect.


In 1989-90, 126,801
reports of child abuse and
neglect were received by
the Florida Protective
Services System Abuse
Registry.
II [I






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


3ml


II I


I m I


Interprogram and District Task Forces. The statute requi
that an Interprogram Task Force for Abuse and Neg]
Prevention be established, comprised of representatives fr
the HRS programs of CYF, Children's Medical Servi(
Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health, Developmer
Services, and the Office of Evaluation. Representatives fr
the Department of Law Enforcement and the Departmenl
Education serve on the task force. In addition to statute
required members, the present task force also inclu
representatives of the State Health Office, Economic Servii
the Office of Program Policy Development, and the Operati
Office. A list of Interprogram Task Force members is
included in Appendix B. Responsibilities of the
Interprogram Task Force include developing action
plans for better coordination and integration of the
goals, activities and funding pertaining to child abuse
and neglect prevention, providing a basic format for
district task forces to use in preparing local action
plans, compiling information for the state plan,
providing technical assistance to district task forces,
examining the local plans for completeness and
deficiencies, preparing the biennial state plan, and
working with the Departments of Education and Law
Enforcement to inform and instruct school children, pare
school and law enforcement personnel, and the general pu
in the detection of child abuse and neglect and proper report
procedures.

District Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Task Foi
operate at the local level to plan prevention services.
members of the district task forces are appointed by the Dist
Administrator, with required membership at the local 1(
reflecting the same agencies and organizations as
Interprogram Task Force. In addition, local prevent
providers and other interested parties may be members of
district task force. District task force responsibilities incl
documenting needed services and developing a district plain
action.


"The prevention of child
abuse and neglect shall be
a priority of this state."
(Chapter 415.501, F.S.)


1





4


inning process. One of the central features of F.S. 415.501
he community-level planning for needed services. The state
d district plans have served as a mechanism for achieving this
ective. These plans provide needs assessment data,
commendationss for service delivery in specific geographic
sas, and general information about the problem of abuse and
glect in each locality. Districts prepare individual plans in
ponse to direction from the Interprogram Task Force. The
ter group then summarizes and compiles the district plans
d presents the overall plan for the state.

Service delivery. The service delivery system is
comprised of local providers under annual contract to
the district CYF Program Offices. Decisions about
specific services to be provided, e.g., parent education,
crisis intervention, etc., are made within each district.
The district task force makes recommendations related
to funding programs to the District Administrator.
Final decisions for funding rest with the District
Administrator and the district CYF Program Office.

In addition to direct client services, the legislation
requires cooperation between HRS and the
Departments of Education, Law Enforcement and other
agencies at the state and local level to instruct agency
personnel in the detection of child abuse and neglect
I in the proper action that should be taken in a suspected
e of child abuse or neglect.


Funding. Child abuse and neglect prevention services in
Florida are funded by both state General Revenue funds and
federal Social Service Block Grant funds. In addition, some
programs have been funded through the National Center for
Child Abuse and Neglect (NCCAN), United Way, and various
local funding sources. No perpetuating fund, i.e., Trust Fund,
for prevention services was established by the Legislature.
Instead, specific appropriations are made each year. This
funding arrangement differs from the funding mechanism of
most states. According to a recent survey (ESDI, 1989), 78%
of the states responding (21 of 27 states) use a Trust Fund
arrangement for child abuse and neglect prevention services.


Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


"The number of abused
and neglected children is
much too high and
represents a serious social
problem that demands a
major societal response."
(U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and
Neglect, 1990)


II


-I --- I


1






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


UNDERSTANDING THE

PROBLEM OF CHILD

ABUSE AND NEGLECT


Child abuse and neglect is one of the
largest health and safety risks for our
nation's children. According to the most
recent national incidence study (NCCAN,
1988), an estimated 2.5 percent of the
children in America (2.4 million children)
are abused or neglected each year. This
involves children of all ages, from all
types of families with varying ethnic
backgrounds and economic status. In
addition, a known 1,100 children died as
a result of abuse or neglect in 1986.


Number
Reports,


140000 -
120000-
100000-
80000


60000-


In Florida, the number of reports of child 40000 /
abuse and neglect has increased 1983-8419
significantly during the past few years.
In 1983-84, fewer than 47,000 reports of Source: FPSS Ar
abuse and neglect were received. In 1988-
89, the number of reports increased to
almost 107,000. In 1989-90, 126,801 reports of child abuse and
neglect were received by Florida Protective Services System
Abuse Registry. As depicted by Figure 1, this upward trend is
expected to continue increasing
yearly. Figure 2 further defines the
problem of abuse and neglect by
displaying the rate of reports taken Rate of I
during FY 1988-89 at the district in
level. The rate of reports taken in
Districts 3, 5 and 6 were substantially Rate per 1,000
higher than the state rate of 43.62
per 1,000, ranging from 50.29 to
54.27 per 1,000. The increase in 4
reporting could be attributed to 30
increased publicity and awareness of 20
the citizens in Florida and across the 10
United States. It is important, 0 2 3
however, to recognize that the
number of abused and neglected
children is much too high and
represents a serious social problem
that demands a major societal FPSS Monthly Statisti
response (U.S. Advisory Board on
Child Abuse and Neglect, 1990).


Figure 1
of Child Abuse and Neglect
FY 1983-84 to FY 1989-90


Number of Reports


84-851985-86 1986-871987-881988-891989-90
Fiscal Year
nual Report, 1989


126801
1069
896
84489
655
4685 704
4685


Figure 2
,buse and Neglect Reports
Florida by District


9 10 11


4 5 6 7 8
HRS Districts


District Rate E State Rate

cal Report, June 90


I --


_a___





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


Figure 3
Number of Child Abuse Deal
Florida By District, Jan 86 -
HRS Districts


.. .. .... .. .
...........
I



1 4
00


0 5 10 15 20
Number of Child D
Annual Report, 1989


II urn


Source: FPSS


The most severe child maltreatment, abuse resulting in the
death of a child, has recently been studied in Florida. At least
155 children died due to abuse during the 3 1/2 year study
which lasted from January 1986 through June 1989. The study
found that boys were more likely than
girls to be victims, with 83 percent of the
child victims being under the age of 4.
hs in Over half (59%) were under the age of
Jun 89 two and about one-third (37%) were less
than one year old. These child deaths
were a result of such severe
maltreatments as beatings (58%), gunshot
wounds (12%), shaken baby syndrome
(11%), suffocation (6.5%), drowning
S........... (5%), fire (4.5%), and stabbing (4%)
26.... (Florida Protective Services System
Annual Report, 1989). Figure 3 presents
Sthe breakdown of child deaths by district
over the 3 1/2 year period. It is
; ,, important to note that in counties with
5 more than 9.9 percent of families below
25 30 35
deaths the poverty level, a 40.8 percent higher
abuse death rate existed.


Child Maltreatment

Child maltreatment, in a general sense, refers to the combined
problems of child abuse and neglect, defined as "any interaction
or lack of interaction between a child and his or her caregiver
which results in non-accidental harm to the child's physical
and/or developmental state" (Helfer, 1982, p. 252). Child
maltreatment, however, is a multifaceted problem. The
American Association for Protecting Children (AAPC), a
division of the American Humane Association, maintains that
child maltreatment consists of several major categories of
behavior. These categories include neglect, physical injury,
sexual abuse, emotional injury and other maltreatment. Each
of these categories must be viewed separately to come to an
accurate understanding of the magnitude of the problem of
child abuse and neglect.


F~71


1 ;:; ;::.


I


I Chld buseandNeglct revntio Pln: 1991199


!


i






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


Neglect

Neglect is characterized by acts of omission. Generally, the
caretaker that is responsible for the child either deliberately, or
by inattentiveness, permits the child to experience suffering or
fails to provide one or more of the ingredients generally
deemed essential for developing a person's physical, intellectual
and emotional capacities (Polanski, N.A., DeSaix, C., & Sharlin,
S.A., 1972).

Neglect is the most frequently reported form of child
maltreatment nationwide. The AAPC data indicate that
neglect, under the classification "Deprivation of Necessities",
was estimated to have occurred at the rate of 67.78 per 10,000
children, involving 429,000 children in 1986. Physical neglect
was the most
prevalent form of
neglect. Educational Fi4
neglect followed with
emotional neglect Percentage of M
being slightly lower, with Typ
Figure 4 represents
the percentage of
children that were
neglected by each
classification for 1989. ------------


Abi
3(



Threatene
139


use
3%
Neg

5,


d H
6


arm

Categories


a 7


gure 4
altreatment Categories
es of Neglect



SMelnutrition
-------------.-----. 12%
Environ. Neglect
24%
Lack of Medical
8%
;lect Inadequate Super.
1%50%
Other Neglect
......... 7%


Types of
Neglect


Source: FPSS Annual Report, 1989


I -1





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


~I~L~


Figure
Percentage of Maltre;
with Types of /


t


Physical abuse. Physical abuse is defined as physical injury,
including death, permanent or temporary disfigurement or
impairment of any bodily part. It is the result of action by a
caretaker, or other person responsible for a child's welfare that
results in injury or
S threatened harm to
a 5 the child (F.S.
415.503).


atment Categories
\buse, 1989


Threatened Harm .---------
L. .


Abuse
. 36%


Neglect
51%


Categories


Types of
Abuse


[Source: FPSS Annual Report, 1989


Based on national
estimates in the
AAPC report (1986),
major physical abuse
occurs at a rate of
3.34 per 10,000
children, minor
physical abuse at a
rate of 18.21 per
10,000, and other
physical injury at a
rate of 13.26 per
10,000. Overall,
220,000 children were
estimated to have
been physically abused
nationally in 1986.


I


In Florida, 51 percent of all 1988-89 reports received by the
Florida Protective Services System were reports of neglect,
including inadequate supervision, environmental neglect, lack of
medical care, inadequate food/malnutrition, and other neglect.
The Florida Protective Services System Monthly Statistical
Report (June, 1990) revealed that 170,652 instances of child
neglect had been cited within the 126,801 total reports received
by the Florida Protective Services System Abuse Registry in the
preceding year. It should be noted that there may be multiple
instances of maltreatment reported for one victim so the count
does not have direct one-to-one correspondence to the number
of children involved or to the number of reports received.

Abuse


I





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 9









In Florida, 36 percent of all reports received in 1988-89 at the
Florida Protective Services System Abuse Registry were reports
of abuse. Figure 5 depicts the percentage of abuse by category
for 1989. The Florida Protective Services System Monthly
Statistical Report (June, 1990) revealed that 127,324 instances
of physical abuse maltreatment had been cited within the
126,801 reports received by Florida Protective Services System
Abuse Registry in the preceding year. It should be noted that
there may be multiple instances of maltreatment reported for
one victim so the count does not have direct one-to-one
correspondence to the number of children involved or to the
number of reports received.

Sexual abuse. Downer (1985) defines sexual abuse as contacts
or interactions between a child and an adult in which the child
is used for the sexual stimulation of the perpetrator or another
person. Sexual abuse may also be committed by a
person under 18 when the person is either significantly
older than the victim or is in a position of power and "Sexual abuse is believed
control over another child. "Sexual abuse is believed to
be the most unreported form of child maltreatment to be the most unreported
because of the secrecy or conspiracy of silence which so form of child maltreatment
often characterizes these cases" (U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services, March 1990). because of the secrecy or

It should also be noted that even with the suspicion of conspiracy of silence
unreported instances of sexual abuse, known sexual which so often
abuse has tripled nationally since 1980. Sexual abuse characterizes these cases."
occurred at a rate of 20.89 per 10,000 children
nationally in 1986, involving an estimated 132,000 (U.S. Department of Health and Human
children (AAPC, 1986). Services, March 1990)

In Florida, 29 percent of all verified abuse reports
received in 1988-89 involved sexual maltreatment. More than
75 percent of sexual abuse victims were white females, which is
comparable to national data which reflect that 77 percent of all
sexual abuse victims are female. Nationally, white children
accounted for 77 percent of all sexual abuse reports. Black
children accounted for 11 percent of sexual abuse reports and
Hispanics accounted for nine percent nationally.






10 chika Abus wo na Negect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Emotional abuse. Emotional abuse is defined as close
confinement, verbal or emotional assault or other abuse. These
emotional abuses can further be described as some
tortuous restriction of movement, a habitual pattern of
belittling, denigrating, scapegoating, or other
nonphysical forms of overtly hostile behavior, as well as
threats of other forms of maltreatment (NCCAN,
1988). Emotional abuse generally occurs in
combination with some other form of child
maltreatment.

In 1986, national data reflected that emotional
maltreatment occurred at a rate of 11.20 per 10,000
children, which affected an estimated 71,000 children.
In Florida, 3.06 per 10,000 children, or 881 incidents
were reported as "Other Mental Injury" to the Florida
Protective Services System Abuse Registry (FPSS
Annual Report, 1989).


Predictive Factors

Knowledge of incidence rates among various sections of
the population should facilitate the identification of
likely perpetrators or victims and the development of
effective service delivery. This is not necessarily the
case. The problem lies in deciding which factors are more
prevalent, where to target services and which approaches work
best. Even so, knowledge of characteristics of victims is helpful
in understanding the problem and in planning for needed
services (ESDI, 1989). To add to our understanding of the
victim characteristics, information from the AAPC and the
NCCAN studies is provided in the following sections.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Gender. Due to greater vulnerability, sexual abuse occurred
more often with females at a rate of 13.1 per 1,000, compared
to a rate of 8.4 per 1,000 for males. Males were more likely to
be emotionally abused rather than sexually abused. It is difficult
to determine whether these differences, particularly in sexual
abuse, are a function of reporting rather than actual incidence.
The similarity in pattern and distribution of child maltreatment
among males and females leads to the conclusion that gender
cannot be used successfully as a predictor, except perhaps with
sexual abuse.

Age. Child abuse and neglect occurs to children of all
ages. Physical abuse, educational neglect and
emotional neglect appeared to be positively correlated A
with age in the NCCAN study. Although children
appeared to be at greater risk with increasing age,
fatalities were more numerous among younger children. in
These data point to the increasing concern that abuse
of younger children remains undetected until those $
children enter school. tit

Race/Ethnicity. According to the NCCAN and AAPC
studies, no significant relationship existed between race
and incidence rates.

Family Income. Family income is a highly significant factor in
the prediction of child abuse and neglect. According to the
NCCAN study (1988), families with annual incomes of less than
$15,000 abused or neglected their children at a higher rate than
families with more income. Abuse was 4.5 times more frequent
and neglect was nine times more frequent. These incidence
rates confirm the literature connecting poverty with child abuse
and neglect.


abuse is 4.5 times more
cely in families with
come of less than
15,000. Neglect is nine
nes more likely.


|1 1






12 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan" 1991-1993










Family Size. Children of families that consisted of more than
four children were more likely to be abused or neglected.
According to the NCCAN study (1988), the rates varied from
21 per 1,000 for families with one child, to 20.1 per thousand
for families with 2-3 children, to 35.6 per 1,000 for families with
four or more children. The trend was slightly higher for neglect.


Critical Problems in Florida

Methodology

District task forces from each of Florida's eleven HRS Districts
rated the critical needs/problems that were most prevalent to
their district by using a systematic method of needs assessment
documented in the Needs Assessment Guidelines (ESDI, 1990).
The task force members rated 30 needs or problems and
identified the ten most critical issues. The rating decisions were
based on a critical review of incidence data and input from key
respondents. Then members ranked the ten most critical
needs/problems.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 I


Results of Needs Assessment

Given Florida's geographic, ethnic and
cultural diversity, it is interesting to note,
that the district criticality rankings were
very similar. For example, ten of the
eleven districts ranked drug-exposed
newborns and drug/substance-involved
parents as the most critical problems in
their district. Appendix C represents the
ranking of each district's needs and
problems with one being the most critical
and ten being the least critical to address
with abuse and neglect prevention
services. Figure 6 graphically depicts the
most critical needs/problems ranked by
all districts. The figure expresses the
number of times these needs/problems
were ranked as either one, two or three.
The Interprogram Task Force completed
a similar process to identify the most


problems for the state as a whole.
closely to the district ratings.

Substance-abusing parents. Use
of drugs and alcohol continue to
be a critical problem in the state
of Florida and nationally. Use of
cocaine is a particularly
significant issue. As documented
in the HRS ADM report
Patterns and trends of alcohol
and drug abuse in Florida (1989),
"cocaine continues to be the
primary substance of abuse for
all admissions to drug treatment
programs" (p. 9). As represented
by Figure 7, admissions to drug
treatment centers for cocaine use
has increased from nine percent
in 1980 to 69 percent in 1989.


critical needs and


Their ratings conformed very


F3]


L_____j1


Figure 6
Most Critical Needs/Problems
as Ranked by All Districts

Critical Need/Problem
Teen/new parents .........
Substance-abusing ''- -
Drug-involved
Alcohol-abusing ZZL4 .
Lack of knowledge
Drug-exposed Infants
Fetal alcohol
Child med/psyc prob ... I IZZ :j
Sexual abuse us e.----_ ---
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Frequency
SRanked 1 i Ranked 2 m Ranked 3

Source: District Child Abuse and
Neglect Prevention Task Forces


Figure 7
Percentage of Admissions to Drug Trtmt.
for Cocaine Use in Fl., FY 1980-FY 1989
Percentage

70%-
60%
80%
40%-
3 0 % ..... .... ........ ........ .. ... ..... ..... ... ...... ...... ... .....

10%
0%
1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989
Year
Source: HRS ADM Program Admissions to
Public Treatment Programs (CODAP)









14 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Cocaine use presents a major concern,
Figure 8 especially among women of child bearing
Age of Perpetrators of age. Sixty-seven percent of the women
Drug-Exposed Newborns in Florida who entered drug treatment in 1989
abused cocaine as their primary drug.
Number of Perpetrators These women put not only themselves at
600 526 risk, but also the children they may
500- 6 already have or any children they may
400- conceive while using cocaine. Drug-
40 involved parents are most prevalent in
300- 8 the 25-29 age group, comprising 38.01
200- ...... percent of all reports taken by Florida
.. ....66 8 Protective Services System Abuse
100o 4 6 Registry. Almost three-fourths of the
0 nj women (71.46 percent) were black.
Under 18 18-24 25-29 30-34 35-44 Over 44 Unknown Figures 8 and 9 represent the age and
Age race of confirmed perpetrators who
Source: FPSS Annual Report, 1989 exposed their newborns to drugs (FPSS
Annual Report, 1989).

Drug-exposed newborns. Drug-exposed newborns have become
the most critical child maltreatment problem in Florida. There
is an alarming upward trend in the number of reported cases by
Florida Protective Services
System and by HRS Public
Health Units. In 1988-89, 4,835
Figure 9 drug-exposed infants were
Race of Perpetrators reported to FPSS. Sixty-nine
of Drug-Exposed Newborns percent of the reports were
substantiated as either verified or
Other having some indication of
.Whie exposure to Schedule I and II
drugs, which excludes exposure
to marijuana and alcohol. Figure
10 represents the upward trend
of drug-exposed newborns.

Black
989

Race
Source: FPSS Annual Report, 1989






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 15









The heavily urban areas of the state have
especially serious problems with the rate Figure 10
of drug-exposed newborns. Figure 11 Number of Drug-Exposed Newborns
targets those HRS districts having rates in Florida
of drug-exposed newborns that are higher
than the state rate. Rates were Number of Drug-Exposed Newborns
determined by calculating the number of .. 219
drug-exposed newborns (HRS Office of
Evaluation Report) and the total number 6000- 32 .
of live births in 1989 (Bureau of Vital 5ooo-
Statistics). As noted by the figure, 4000- 1930
districts 6, 9, 10 and 11 have rates of ooo ...............
drug-exposed newborns ranging from 20 2000-
to 26 per 1,000 which is higher than the 1000ooo
state rate of 18.18 per 1,000 live births. o 1987-88 1988-89 1989-90 *1990-91

Drug-exposed newborns present a Source: HRS ADM Program
number of costly demands, both *projected
monetary and physical. If the drug-
exposed infant lives, he/she will have a
range of health and social problems which will undoubtedly
require later intervention by HRS in the form of health and
social services. Children who are born as drug-exposed are
more likely to be premature, have lower birth weight, and some
will suffer from developmental disabilities, which may hinder
school and later work
performance. Behavioral
problems in school will present Figure 11
extra demands on the classroom Rate of Drug-Exposed Newborns
teacher and school system. in Florida
Many infants who are born as
drug-exposed do not go home 30-
with their parents, but are placed 25
in foster care. Of those who do
go home with their parents, 15is
many eventually enter the
Florida Protective Services 10
System (FPSS) because of the 5
chaotic and often dangerous 0 O 3 4 5 67 8 9 10
home environment that is HRS Districts
associated with parental drug
abuse. District Rate M State Rate

Source: FPSS Annual Report, 1989






16 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Cocaine and other Schedule I and II drugs are not the only
danger to newborns. Another substance abuse problem is use
of alcohol by women during pregnancy. Between one and three
of every 1,000 infants are born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
(FAS), which can have debilitating effects on the child.
Prenatal exposure to alcohol is one of the leading causes of
mental retardation (Abel & Sokol, 1986). In utero alcohol
exposure produces a wide range of effects. Infants that are
exposed in utero to heavy amounts of alcohol will represent the
full effects of FAS. Those infants that are exposed to moderate
amounts of alcohol may experience incomplete effects of FAS
such as cognitive behavior deficits. Many of the fetal alcohol
babies go undetected due to the inadequate mechanism for
reporting. Fetal alcohol babies are not considered "abused" by
FPSS standards, which are based on 415.503, Florida Statutes.
It is, however, an indicator of the larger problem of substance-
abusing parents. The substance-involved parent can place the
infant at high risk for abuse and neglect.

Adequate prenatal care would help
Figure 12 prevent or at least alleviate the problems
Rate of Children on Subsidized Day Care that are associated with drug-exposed and
other substance-exposed infants.
Waiting Lists in Florida
Adequate prenatal care could
Rate per 1,000 significantly improve the health of those
o40 | \ infants that were born to drug-using

other long-term problems. According to
the GAO report on drug-exposed infants
lo- (1990) three basic components of
0ao ..I t prenatal care are recommended: (1)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 early and continued risk assessment, (2)
HRS Districts health promotion, and (3) medical and
District Rate M State Rate psychosocial interventions and follow-up.

Source: HRS Children, Youth Lack of affordable child care. Lack of
and Families, 1990 affordable child care presents a problem
for parents of young children who must
work and those who need occasional
respite from the demands of child care. Whether occasional or
regular, child care allows the parent to work and provides a
break for the parent from the responsibilities of child care,
which should reduce parental stress. Successful child care
programs will also enhance the child's opportunities to be with
other children and facilitate child development.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


In Florida, the Subsidized Child Care Program provic
care for families who cannot otherwise afford it. Pri
services is given to families where abuse or neglect has <
and families at risk of abuse or neglect. Other grc
eligible, such as those whose parents participate
employment and training programs of Project Independi
those entitled under Title IV-A; those whose families
Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AF
Supplemental Security Income (SSI); children of migra
or Native American parents; or those whose families <
than 150% of the federal poverty level (the working
Unfortunately, many families in need are not able to pa
in subsidized child care programs as indicated by the nt
children on a waiting list to enroll in these program
indicated by Figure 12, Districts 2, 4, 5 and 11 are al
state rate of 26.79 per 1,000 with rates ranging from
per 1,000. These rates were calculated by obtaining C
Youth and Families (CYF) Subsidized Child Care Wait
for Services (May 1990). Rates were calculated by u
total number on the subsidized child care waiting list i
total population ages 0-4.

Births to teen mothers. Teen pregnancy
and parenthood are serious problems in
Florida with one of every six infants
being born to teen mothers. This
problem is magnified by the fact that 96
percent of all teen mothers keep their 9000-
babies. Figure 13 represents the number 10oo-
of births to teen mothers in Florida, by 7200-
age group for 1988. 500
4500
3600
2700-
1800-
900
0!


Figure 13
Number of Births to Teen Mothers
in Florida by Age of Mother
Number of Births
17954


6228


4554


17 18 19


Age of Mother
Source: HRS Vital Statistics


3016
.. ... .1454 ]


'15 15 16


H~


I I


| |57]






18 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Statewide, births to teen mothers occur at
Figure 14 a rate of 95.05 per 1,000. As noted in
Rate of Births to Teen Mothers Figure 14, Districts 2, 3, and 6 have the
in Florida highest incidence in the state with rates
of approximately 120 per 1,000. Data
140 provided by the Bureau of Vital Statistics
120- .... were used to calculate the rate. The rate
100oo-t i. ... .a. ..... ....... was calculated by using the number of
so- live births to mothers under age 19 for
60-1989 and the total number of live births
40to all mothers in 1989.

o Economic stress. Economic stress is a
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 significant indicator of abuse and neglect.
HRS Districts
Families earning under $15,000 per year
I District Rate M State Rate are five times more likely to abuse or
I neglect their children. In Florida, the
Source: Bureau of Vital Statistics, 1989 state rate for children in poverty is 213.57
per 1,000. Figure 15 depicts the number
of children, by district, that are below the
poverty level. In 1986, more than one-fifth of all of Florida
children were living below the poverty level. Children under the
age of 5 accounted for 27 percent, Hispanics accounted for 30
percent and Blacks accounted for 45 percent of those children
living below the poverty level. The
highest rates occur in the northern part
Figure 15 of the state. Rates in Districts 1, 2, 3, 4
Rate of Children Below the Poverty Level and 11 range from 238 to 297 per 1,000.
in Florida (Key Facts About Children, 1988). The
rates were calculated by using the
350- number of children living below the
300o poverty level according to projections
250oB.. ..- -L. from 1980 Census data and the total
2001- population 0-17.

S00 There continue to be other needs that
0o- Florida should consider in its prevention
0o efforts. A list of the needs and problems
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
HRS Districts that were identified by the Interprogram
Task Force and considered by the district
SDistrict Rate M State Rate task forces in their ratings and rankings
of critical needs and problems are
Source: EOG OPB State Data Center included in Appendix D.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 19



MISSION





In Chapter 415.501 the Legislature responded to the rapidly
increasing rate of child abuse and neglect in Florida and
nationally. The Legislature recognized the high cost of such
maltreatment in human terms and in terms of immediate costs
to the state for protective investigation, treatment services, and
out-of-home placements for abused and neglected children. The
legislature also acknowledged future costs relating to the need
for alcohol, drug abuse and mental health services, delinquency
and correctional services, and health services.

Previous plans have operationalized the legislative intent into a
mission statement for the Abuse and Neglect Prevention
Program. As part of the planning effort for the 1991-93 Child
Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan, the Interprogram Task
Force reviewed and revised the mission statement for the Child
Abuse and Neglect Prevention Program. According to the task
force, the mission of the Program is as follows:


The mission of Florida's CYF Child Abuse
and Neglect Prevention Program is to
promote and provide funding for programs
designed to reduce the known risk factors
that lead to maltreatment of children and
diminish the effects of child abuse and
neglect The programs should be locally-
planned, community-based, and family-
centered. Coordination is provided by a
state-level Interprogram Task Force which
establishes state goals and objectives,
provides technical assistance to HRS and
local school districts, and helps to balance
local needs with existing resources.






20 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



1991-1993 GOALS






The Interprogram Task Force for Child Abuse and Neglect
Prevention met on nine occasions between July and November,
1990 to conduct the state-level portion of the needs assessment
and, from that information, draft goals to be pursued by the
Prevention Program for the next two years. The draft goals
were submitted to the districts for their consideration in
planning district services and other prevention activities.
Districts reviewed, revised, and adopted the state goals based on
their local needs. Based on the feedback from the districts, the
draft goals were then revised by the Interprogram Task Force.
The goals for 1991-1993 are:

Goal 1
Increase delivery of comprehensive child abuse and neglect
prevention services to families at high risk of child abuse and
neglect, with an increased emphasis on home visiting methods.
High-risk families include, but are not limited to, families with
teen parents or substance-abusing parents, families with failure-
to-thrive infants, participants in subsidized child care or
Voluntary Family Services, and families experiencing significant
stress as a result of economic hardships, homelessness, or
domestic violence.

Goal 2
Increase accessibility for high-risk families to the following
prevention services: subsidized child care, respite child care for
families in crisis or where children are chronically ill or
handicapped, and services for children who have been
physically, sexually, or emotionally abused.

Goal 3
Improve the effectiveness of child abuse and neglect prevention
program management.

Goal 4
Support uniform implementation of a coordinated system to:
(1) inform and instruct school personnel, parents, and local law
enforcement personnel in the detection of child abuse and
neglect and in the proper action that should be taken in a
suspected case of child abuse or neglect, and (2) instruct
students in identification, intervention, and prevention of child
abuse and neglect.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 21











Goal 5
Coordinate and integrate child abuse and neglect prevention
issues and services with other prevention and early intervention
services.

Goals 1, 2 and 3 relate to service delivery
and program planning. Goal 1
recognizes the limited resources available
for prevention services and therefore
targets services to families at high risk of
abuse and neglect. Goal 2 acknowledges
the key role that child care plays as a
prevention strategy and the importance
of treatment services for children who
have been physically, sexually, or
emotionally abused. Goal 3 stresses the
need for follow-through on plan
objectives and implementation of
evaluation recommendations.

Goal 4 addresses the collaboration of
DOE and FDLE with HRS in the effort
to educate parents and children about
prevention of child abuse and neglect and
to inform required reporters of their responsibilities. Much
progress has been made in these areas but more complete and
uniform implementation of curriculum is needed to increase the
effective delivery of these services. This effort will be
implemented in conjunction with the work of the Florida
Interagency Council on Children, Infants, and Toddlers
(FICCIT) and the State Council on Early Childhood Services.

Goal 5 addresses coordination and integration of services. The
goal reflects the need for integrating prevention and early
intervention initiatives. Funding has become fragmented and
distributed throughout many programs and agencies during
recent years. It is imperative that all available resources be
used as efficiently as possible.






22 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN





Current Status of Child Abuse and
Neglect Prevention Services

Continuum of Prevention Services

Clearly there is no single approach to preventing child abuse
and neglect. As a framework for defining services, CYF
adopted the continuum of services defined by the National
Committee for the Prevention of Child Abuse. The continuum
is composed of thirteen general service areas. Two of the areas
address a specific target group of clients, expectant or new
parents, while the remaining categories address specific service
delivery strategies.

Prenatal Support for Expectant Parents. Services include
support, maternity medical care, information about community
resources, and education for expectant parents during the
prenatal period. Low birth weights and medical problems
resulting from poor prenatal care increase the risk of abuse or
neglect among babies. Improving prenatal care and education
for expectant parents can, therefore, reduce the risk of abuse
and neglect for infants.

Postnatal Education and Support. New parents are prepared
for responsibilities relating to infant and child care through
postnatal medical care, information on available community
resources, individual and group education and postnatal support
groups. Postnatal education and support works similarly to
prenatal programs and can be a continuation of prenatal
services. Through education and support programs the parent-
child relationship can be strengthened and bonding enhanced.
Studies suggest that the risk of child abuse and neglect is
reduced significantly when bonding between parent and child is
strong. Additionally, preparing and educating new parents and
providing support can lessen the stress of child rearing
responsibilities, thus reducing the risk of child abuse and
neglect.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










In-Home Education and Support. Information and advice are
provided on child care, routine health needs, nutrition and
home management to isolated families in need of ongoing
support. Again, the demands of a young child and the
additional stress that a child presents to a family can easily
result in abuse and neglect. This is particularly true of young,
inexperienced or single parents, low-income families, or
dysfunctional families. Home visitor programs offer in-home
support to these families, provide education, and act as a first
alert to problems developing within the family which may result
in child abuse and neglect.

Early and Regular Educational, Medical and Psychological
Screening. Screening provides early detection of health,
developmental and psychological problems to children through
home visitor, health-related or school-based programs. The risk
of child abuse and neglect is greater among children with
developmental delays, health and psychological problems. With
early detection of these problems, the risk can be reduced by
helping families to cope more effectively and securing services
for the child.

Medical and Psychological Services.
Comprehensive services are provided for
children at risk of abuse/neglect and
their families based on individual needs.
These services function in the treatment
of problems that may increase the risk of
abuse and neglect.





24 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Child Care. Regular or occasional child care is provided for
children at risk of abuse/neglect. Child care is typically needed
to allow parents to work. In the prevention continuum,
however, child care may be used as a respite for parents who
are overwhelmed by child caring responsibilities or as a
developmental opportunity for children. Giving the parents a
break from child caring responsibilities can reduce parental
stress and serve the added purpose of enhancing the child's
development.

Self-Help Groups. Self-help groups provide an avenue to
reduce the isolation of parents at risk of abuse/neglect by
developing a peer support network. In addition to providing
group social activities, the self-help group can function as a
network of concerned individuals for parents to contact when
stressful situations threaten the safety and well-being of their
children.

Parent Education and Training. With
greater understanding of children's
behavior and care and alternative
methods of discipline, parents are less
likely to be abusive and neglectful.
Parent education classes are designed to
teach necessary child-rearing skills.
Areas of focus include child
development, parent/child relationships,
child discipline and child health care.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 25










Life Skills Training. Training in life skills helps young people
cope with the demands of adult living, e.g., work, relationships,
parenting. It also trains children, adolescents and young adults
not to follow the abusive and neglectful patterns of their
parents, to recognize abuse and neglect, and to protect
themselves. Education for adolescents, particularly in the areas
of sexuality and pregnancy prevention, can impact significantly
on teenage pregnancy and the high risk of abuse and neglect for
children of young parents.

Family Crisis and Intervention Support. Immediate assistance
is offered to parents in crisis or under undue stress, intervening
before a potentially abusive incident can occur or after an
incident to prevent its reoccurrence. Services may include:
telephone hot lines, crisis caretakers, crisis nurseries or child
care, and crisis counseling.

Treatment and Intervention Services. Programs provide
individual and group treatment or therapeutic child care to
minimize the long-term effects of abuse and neglect on children
and their families. Treatment services in the prevention effort
address the cyclical nature of the child abuse and neglect
phenomenon. In treating the victims of child abuse and neglect,
prevention service providers hope to change abusive/neglectful
patterns. Children who have been abused and neglected will
then be less likely to become abusive and neglectful parents.





26 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Community Organization. These programs function to increase
the availability and enhance the coordination of social service,
health and education or other support services to families in an
effort to reduce family and environmental stress. Their target
audience is the community at large and the social service
delivery system existing in the community.

Public Information. Services are based on the philosophy that
being aware of the problem is a first step toward doing
something about it. Media campaigns and public speaking
engagements which emphasize the difficulties of parenting and
provide information on where parents can go if they need help
are part of public information efforts. These efforts increase
community and professional awareness of the dynamics of child
abuse and neglect.

Implementation of the Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention
Service Continuum

The HRS districts have implemented many of the prevention
services delineated in the continuum, although no district has
been able to fund the full continuum of child abuse and neglect
prevention services. Appendix E provides a matrix that
indicates, for each part of the continuum, the districts that fund
each type of service through Chapter 415.501 resources. As
Appendix E illustrates, the prevention funds are used differently
in each district.


I-

All eleven HRS districts
have experienced funding
cuts in prevention services
over the past two fiscal
years.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










During the past biennium, the districts have concentrated their
efforts on two or three areas of the continuum. Some provided
only two or three types of services, (Districts 2, 3, 8, 9 and 10)
while others distributed funding to programs which concentrated
services in a few areas but provided a wider range of services.
Home visitor services, parent education and perinatal education
and support were among the most commonly provided services.
Treatment services were found in four districts (Districts 5, 6,
7 and 10). Community organization or public information
services were available in Districts 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 11.

Funding of Services

Specific appropriations for child abuse and neglect prevention
services are made each year. Prevention services funded under
Section 415.501, F.S. represent one of the 26 appropriation
categories for CYF services. Since the initial appropriation of
$1.1 million in 1983, amounts (combining General Revenue and
Social Service Block Grant funds) increased annually for five
years to a maximum of $4.9 million appropriated in 1988-89.
Funds decreased in 1989-90 and 1990-91 to $3.8 million and
$3.2 million respectively.

From 1983 to 1989, funding was allocated
to the districts based on the number of Fundin
abuse and neglect reports and the number Progra
of children under age 18. During the past
two fiscal years, the reduced legislative $s700000
appropriation has been allocated $60ooooo
selectively by program which resulted in $o00000
some districts being cut more than others. $400000
All eleven HRS districts have experienced 300
funding cuts in prevention services over
the past two fiscal years. Figure 16 shows $200000
the amount of money allocated to each $100000
district for each of the past three fiscal
years.


M 1988-89 1989-90 1990-91


1 1


Figure 16
3 for Child Abuse & Neglect Prev.
mrs, 1988-89, 1989-90, 1990-91





Sl I

11h
3 4 6 6 7 8 9 10 11
HRS Districts






I I


Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









District Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Services

'S Districts distributed prevention funding in a variety of
ways: across types of services, among service providers,
and across target populations. Some districts funded
only one service provider while others contracted with
multiple providers. In 1990-91, 32 providers received
funding under Section 415.501, F.S. Prevention efforts
sometimes were concentrated on one type of service,
e.g., perinatal education and support or treatment and
intervention. In some districts, certain client groups, e.g., teen
parents, were targeted. The specifics of district funding,
providers, and services are included in the district plans. A
summary of the district information is located in Appendix F.


Other Prevention/Early
Intervention Services

Prevention and early intervention services are initiatives for
various state and community agencies. Services may be related
to education of children with an accompanying service
component to their families, health-related services to high-risk
or low-income families, or special services to handicapped
children and their families. Although each prevention service
may have a slightly different focus, the distinction between these
programs and child abuse and neglect prevention services are
sometimes indistinguishable. Eligibility criteria, service delivery
methods, and target populations are quite similar and
individuals may qualify for multiple prevention oriented
services. To familiarize the reader with some of these
programs, the summary statements below provide a general
overview of some of the major initiatives other than Chapter
415.501 prevention services. Much of the information was
derived from Florida's Handicap Prevention Report (April,
1989) or from CYF Program Office material.


In 1990-91, 32 provider
received funding under
Section 415.501, F.S.

















Project Safety Net. In accordance with Sections 402.3125, F.S.
and 402.3135, F.S., case management and transportation services
are provided for children in subsidized child care who are at
risk of child abuse and neglect. Services are available also to
the families of these children. Safety Net services are available
in all eleven HRS districts.

Home Visitor to High-Risk Newborn Project. Contracted
services through the HRS/CYF Program Office are available to
multi-problem, high-risk families expecting newborns or
parenting infants in all HRS districts. In-home services address
pre-natal care, parent-child bonding and infant stimulation,
screening, assessment and follow-up, parent training, parental
stress, and healthy family functioning.

Parents Anonymous. Self-help groups are established which
provide an opportunity for parents to interact and form a
network of supportive individuals who may be contacted in
times of crisis or stress to prevent child abuse or neglect.

Subsidized Child Care. Comprehensive care of preschool and
school age children in licensed child care facilities or family
child care homes is provided through
purchase of service contracts with local
child care providers. A limited number
of child care slots are available for low
income families, children of Project
Independence clients, or children at risk
of abuse or neglect under the protective
supervision of HRS/CYF.






30 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Prekindergarten Early Intervention Programs. Early
educational and developmental experiences are provided to
economically disadvantaged and other high-risk four year olds.
Services may include classroom instruction and
health/education screening and referral. The parent
involvement component of some programs is designed to
enhance parental involvement in their child's educational, social
and physical development.

Chapter 1. Developmental early learning services are provided
for three and four year old children from low-income families.
The program seeks to promote cognitive, social, emotional and
physical development of disadvantaged children. Eligibility is
based on two factors: 1) availability of the program in the
child's school as programs are located only in schools where a
significant proportion of students are economically
disadvantaged, and 2) scoring on a needs assessment survey
which denotes the child as educationally disadvantaged.

Head Start Programs. Language, cognitive, social, emotional
and physical development is emphasized in the Head Start
program. Some medical and dental services are provided.
Parental involvement is also a component. Services are
provided to disadvantaged children, ages three and four, with
special consideration to handicapped children. Estimates are
that less than one fourth of the target population is being
served.

First Start. Services are provided to promote parents as their
children's first teachers and enhance children's early intellectual,
language, physical and social development. A variety of services
are available through Parent Resource Centers to families with
children birth to age three. These include: home visits, group
meetings, lending libraries of toys and books, parent education,
advocacy, and educational, medical and developmental screening
and referral.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 31










Child Care Resource and Referral Network. The network
provides a child care resource and referral service to parents
who need child care services. The statewide Network Office
contracts with child care central agencies to refer parents to
child care centers available in the community and refer eligible
parents to subsidy programs and other family support services,
family child care homes, public prekindergarten/early
intervention programs, Head Start and other programs. In
addition, the central agencies provide resource information,
recruit child care providers, establish lending libraries for
parents, and provide technical assistance to child care providers.

Prekindergarten Handicapped Programs. Services are provided
to children ages birth to five. Home instruction, including
training to the parent or guardian, is provided to handicapped
children ages birth to three. Other services including physical,
occupational and speech therapy are available also. Eligibility
criteria are specified in State Board of
Education Rule 6A-6.03026 (2)(a)(b),
FAC.

Florida Diagnostic Learning Resource .
System (FDLRS). FDLRS provides
inservice training, media and materials,
information and consultation, and
instruction to parents and others who
work with handicapped children. Two
priorities were established: parent
services and prekindergarten programs.

Foster Grandparent/Retired Senior
Volunteer Program. Senior citizens over
age 60 provide support services to high-
risk and handicapped children in child
care centers, prekindergarten programs
and intensive care units.






32 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Community Resource Mothers and Fathers. Programs in the
Hillsborough and Leon County Public Health Units serve low-
income pregnant women and their families. A variety of health-
related and social services are provided, as well as case
management. An Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP) guides
service delivery.

Children's Early Investment Program (CEIP). CEIP provides
intensive early intervention to at-risk expectant mothers and
young children, birth to age one. Services may include:
maternal and child health care, parenting education and
support, information and referral, child care, and home visiting.
Programs are operating only in Boynton Beach, Clewiston, the
Harlem area of Hendry County, and Liberty City in Miami.

Teen Parent/Pregnancy Programs. A variety of health,
education and support, and child care services are available to
teens through HRS and DOE programs. Project Independence
provides educational opportunities for teen parents on public
assistance and a variety of health and parent education training
and child care. Many health-related services are focused on
teen parents and preventing teen pregnancy.

Health-Related Programs. A variety of health-related programs
operate under the auspices of the HRS Health Services and
County Public Health Units. These include: health education,
family planning, teen pregnancy prevention clinics, prenatal
care, parent education, nutrition services for low income
pregnant women (WIC), home health care assessment, Early
and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT),
immunizations. Children's Medical Services provides case
management, perinatal intensive care services, nursing services,
parent education and counseling, medical and respite child care,
and evaluation, intervention and follow up when developmental
problems may be evident.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 33









Migrant Services. Migrant health services for school age
children are available through DOE, Division of Public Schools
in 22 counties and, for preschoolers, through two Redlands
Christian Migrant Associations. In addition, an
early Childhood Learning Program is available to
less than half the migrant population from ages
three to four.

The difficulties in distinguishing one prevention
program from another with similar service
delivery methods and target populations are
obvious. Yet gaps in services exist and specific
target populations continue to be underserved.
To target child abuse and neglect prevention
services and to promote the coordination of
these services with other prevention/early
intervention services offered statewide and in
local communities, specific goals and objectives
were established.


Goals and Objectives for
Service Delivery

To achieve focused service delivery, the
Interprogram Task Force established three
statewide prevention goals related to service
delivery and program planning. These goals
promote the delivery of direct services to high-
risk families, increase the accessibility of certain
support and treatment services to these families, and improve
management of prevention programs at the state and district
levels while recognizing the need for community participation.






34 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Goal 1

Increase delivery of comprehensive child abuse and neglect
prevention services to families at high risk of child abuse and
neglect, with an increased emphasis on home visiting methods.
High-risk families include, but are not limited to, families with
teen parents or substance-abusing parents, families with
failure-to-thrive infants, participants in subsidized child care
or Voluntary Family Services, and families experiencing
significant stress as a result of economic hardships,
homelessness, or domestic violence.

District Objectives for Goal 1

To complement the state goal which promotes direct service
delivery to high-risk families, the districts adopted specific
objectives. These objectives concentrate services to various
target populations such as teen parents, low-income families,
substance-abusing parents, substance-exposed newborns, low
birth weight babies, HIV-infected babies, subsidized child care
users, Voluntary Family Services clients, single parents, parents
in sudden economic stress, spouse abuse victims, and parents
attempting to reunify their family. The district objectives
promoted such direct services as: home visitor services, parent
education, and perinatal education and support. In addition,
professional education and child enrichment groups were
planned by some districts. Some of the districts established
innovative methods of funding child abuse and neglect
prevention programs. The district objectives that promote the
establishment of new programs reflect the hope that funding will
increase over the next two years. A complete listing of district
objectives for each state goal is located in Appendix G.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









State Objectives for Goal 1

The state objectives recommit the Interprogram Task Force and
Children, Youth and Families Program Office to an integrated,
community-based child abuse and neglect prevention service
delivery system. The objectives call for more integrated service
delivery at the local level by clarifying the purposes of the
district task force. In addition, local commitment to prevention
services is clearly needed. The objectives address funding,
public awareness and community commitment to child abuse
and neglect prevention.

1.1 CYF, the Interprogram Task Force, and district
CYF administrators will support local initiatives The Interprogram Task
to generate alternative funding strategies for Force established three
abuse/neglect prevention services.
statewide prevention goals
1.2 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will related o service delivery
explore ways to maximize existing funds anddelivery
identify local resources for prevention services and program planning.
that have been mandated by legislation but not
funded.

1.3 CYF Prevention staff will document the responsibility of
district task force members, prevention providers, and
district prevention specialists for professional education
and public awareness activities relating to prevention of
child abuse and neglect.

1.4 CYF Prevention staff will assist FPSS staff in continuing
statewide public awareness campaigns for child abuse
and neglect prevention.





36 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Goal 2

Increase accessibility for high-risk families to the following
prevention services: subsidized child care, respite child care
for families in crisis or where children are chronically ill or
handicapped, and services for children who have been
physically, sexually, or emotionally abused.

District Objectives for Goal 2

To achieve Goal 2, few districts proposed objectives to establish
additional services. However, it was common for districts to
propose methods for enhancing existing services by increasing
the level of service delivery overall or to target certain
populations and advocate for increased funding. Respite child
care for families was a major concern with only one
district failing to address this issue. Specific objectives
"Reducing the overall level relating to treatment services were few in number.
Several districts addressed providing support services to
of maltreatment... will be handicapped or chronically ill children.
achieved not by promoting
achievednotbypromotState Objectives for Goal 2
a single prevention
strategy but rather by The state objectives call for increasing the accessibility
of supportive services to high-risk families by enabling
developing an integrated these families to secure needed child care and
system in which each treatment services. By informing prevention staff of
y services such as the Community Resource and Referral
service is but one part of a Network, Project Safety Net, Child Find, Children's
coordinated service Medical Services, and others and by enhancing the
coordinated se e delivery of these services in local communities, high-risk
continuum." (Daro, 1988) families may be assured of needed support during times
of crisis. Although Medicaid coverage of treatment
Services would not fully resolve the problem of
accessibility to treatment, it would increase substantially
the availability of these services to a significant proportion of
high-risk families, particularly low-income families who could
not afford the high cost of counseling and other therapeutic
services.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 37









2.1 CYF prevention staff will inform prevention providers
of the services offered by the Community Resource and
Referral Network (CCR&R) to assist parents in
obtaining regular and respite child care.

2.2 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will develop
strategies to inform providers who serve handicapped or
chronically ill children (e.g., CMS, Health, Child Find,
etc.) of the CCR&R services that can assist parents
access respite care for these children.

2.3 CYF will encourage the Child Care Resource and
Referral Network to recruit and train respite care
providers and providers of child care for special needs
children, using the assistance available from
Developmental Services and other providers of services
to special needs children.

2.4 CYF will attempt to refocus funding to promote local
investment and the development of more effective and
accessible programs.

2.5. CYF will investigate the feasibility of extending Project
Safety Net services of transportation and case
management to migrant families and other groups who
qualify for subsidized child care.

2.6. CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will investigate
the feasibility of using Medicaid as a funding source for
counseling and other treatment services to abused and
neglected children.






I I


hild Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









al 3

prove the effectiveness of child abuse and neglect prevention
)gram management.

District Objectives for Goal 3

Districts were concerned with the reporting and
evaluation issues and the operation of the district task
forces. Most districts proposed objectives relating to
completion of action plans and progress reports. One
district planned to conduct a consumer satisfaction
survey to address program effectiveness. Additionally,
district task forces proposed objectives related to the
operation and responsibilities of the task force. Only
two districts failed to propose objectives related to
program management issues.


te Objectives for Goal 3

improve the effectiveness of child abuse and neglect
vention program management, the Interprogram Task Force
ablished state objectives relating to responsibilities for action
inning, monitoring and reporting. The Task Force also calls
implementing recommendations from past evaluation
orts and requesting a prevention specialist for each HRS
rict. These responsibilities involve the Interprogram Task
rce, the Children, Youth and Families Program Office, and
district level task forces.

CYF prevention staff will request a full-time prevention
specialist position for each HRS district to develop and
coordinate abuse/neglect prevention services and local
funding strategies.

CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will develop
action plans which specify activities, responsibilities, and
schedules for the plan objectives and request the same
from the district task forces.


I-

The Interprogram Task
Force established state
objectives relating to
responsibilities for action
planning, monitoring and
reporting.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 39









3.3 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will initiate
biannual progress reports that address the
accomplishment of objectives in the prevention plans
and request the same from the district task forces.

3.4 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will develop an
action plan to implement the agreed-upon
recommendations from the evaluation study completed
during 1989 and the Outcome Evaluation Annual
Reports for 1990 and 1991.

Other Service Delivery Goals and Objectives

District goals were not limited to the goals proposed by the
Interprogram Task Force. Some districts proposed additional
goals related to the specific needs, problems, and existing
services of the districts. Many addressed public and
professional education about child abuse and neglect. Several
districts were concerned about the use of corporal punishment
in the schools.


- w


Some districts proposed
additional goals related to
the specific needs,
problems, and existing
services of the districts.





40 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



COOPERATIVE

AGREEMENTS WITH

DOE AND FDLE


Chapter 415.501, F.S. requires the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services to work cooperatively with:

1) The Department of Education (DOE) "to inform and instruct
parents of school children and appropriate district school
personnel in all school districts in the detection of child
abuse and neglect and in the proper action that should be
taken in a suspected case of child abuse or neglect, and in
caring for a child's needs after a report is made." (Section
415.501 (2)(b),2, F.S.).

2) The Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) to
instruct their personnel "in the detection of child abuse and
neglect and in the proper action that should be taken in a
suspected case of child abuse or neglect" (Section 415.501
(2)(b),3, F.S.).
3) Other appropriate public and private agencies "to emphasize
efforts to educate the general public about the problem of
and ways to detect child abuse and neglect and the proper
action that should be taken in suspected cases of abuse and
neglect" (Section 415.501 (2)(b),4, F.S.).

4) The Department of Education on the "enhancement or
adaptation of curriculum materials to assist instructional
personnel in providing instruction through a multidisciplinary
approach on identification, intervention, and prevention of
child abuse and neglect" for grades K-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12
(Section 415.501(2)(b),5, F.S.).






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 41










Current Status

Department of Education

The Department of Education has worked cooperatively with
HRS on the development and enhancement of curriculum
materials to be implemented by the local school districts. The
Curriculum Development Model is based on the following
assumptions, as stated in the 1989-91 Prevention State Plan:

* "Child abuse and neglect is a family, social and
legal problem requiring solutions which are
cooperatively developed by local family, social
and legal agencies.

* The prevention of child abuse and neglect, as a
content area for inclusion in the public school
curriculum, must be defined and implemented at
the local level by each of Florida's 67 school
districts.

* Interagency sharing of training, information,
resources and responsibilities requires state and
local coordination; however, this sharing will vary
among communities. The HRS district plans
should also incorporate interagency sharing.

* Related curriculum materials and learning
activities are already used in some communities.
This information, however, is usually geared to
adults, while material specifically intended for
children is not always available. The
implementation of instruction about the
prevention of child abuse and neglect should be
a coordinated effort which uses existing
resources in health and safety education, home
economics, social studies and other curricular
programs with compatible objectives.

* The prevention of child abuse and neglect, as a new content
area for inclusion in the public school curriculum, must be
understood and sanctioned by local school boards" (p. 283).






42 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993











The Department of Education led in the development of a
curriculum model. The model assists local interagency
curriculum development committees to enhance, adapt and
implement appropriate curriculum concepts, goals, objectives,
instructional strategies, and resources. The model includes a
scope and sequence for identifying, intervening and preventing
child abuse and neglect at each of the progressional levels, K-3,
4-6, 7-9, 10-12. Instructional objectives should be established at
the local school districts to address the
physical, emotional and sexual abuse,
and neglect. In addition, public school
Recommended Child Abuse and Neglect districts should develop additional
Curriculum Outline objectives, incorporate resources of
local child protection agencies, and
Grades Curriculum Content obtain approval of local child abuse
K-3 u Relationships and neglect curriculum committees,
Safety superintendents and school boards.
a Feelings
A curriculum outline was proposed in
4-6 G Safety the 1989-91 Child Abuse and Neglect
D Growth and development Prevention Plan and is recommended
Decision making
Family life for continued use.

7-9 Mental and emotional health
Interpersonal problems
Coping skills
Mental and emotional health
as related to community health
a Family health
Child abuse and neglect differences
Child abuse and neglect identification
Community organizations available to help
abused and abusing individuals

10-12 Rape, abuse and neglect
Social effects
Physical effects
Psychological effects
Family living, sex education, and mental
health
a Child care, guidance and development
a Problem solving and decision making
a Crisis management
a Coping skills
Family member roles and responsibilities





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 43








Florida schools continue activities related to child abuse and
neglect prevention instruction in the school curriculum.
Information exchange between state and local agencies
has enhanced working relationships and promoted
shared responsibility for services related to the
identification, intervention and prevention of child The prevention of child
abuse and neglect. Both state and local agencies have
designated an individual to work toward planned, abuse and neglect, as a
coordinated activities including curriculum development content area for inclusion
and interagency coordination. Additional coordination
and integration activities promoted by DOE include: in the public school

* Information on child abuse conferences and curriculum, must be
workshops are shared with public school districts, defined and implemented
DOE staff members participate in these meetings a
and encourage school districts to send a e local level y each
representatives, of Florida's 67 school

* Materials relevant to child abuse and neglect districts.
prevention are collected or developed and
disseminated to public school personnel, children,
and parents.

* DOE works with various state organizations toward
preventing child abuse and neglect. Agencies include: the
Florida Association for Supervision and Curriculum
Development, Florida League of Middle Schools, Florida
Association on Children under Six, Florida Elementary
School Principals Association, Florida Personnel Teacher
Education, Florida Association of Professional Health
Educators, Florida Association of School Administrators,
Florida Association of Student Services Administrators,
Florida Congress of Parents and Teachers, Florida
Organization and Instruction Leaders, and Florida
Elementary Commission of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools.






44 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










A child abuse and neglect prevention study group was
formed by the Florida Council on Elementary Education and
meets twice a year.

An interagency agreement between Head Start, HRS, and
DOE exists to establish methods of cooperation.

DOE continues to have a working relationship with the
North East Florida Consortium and the Panhandle Area
Education Consortium. Sessions can be planned and
conducted at meetings of these groups.

Searches continue to locate articles and materials on child
abuse and neglect prevention through the DOE, Public
Schools Resource Center.

DOE staff work with civic, social and educational groups
including various sorority and fraternal groups, honor
societies, and Chambers of Commerce.

DOE Educational Television Unit produces materials for
school districts.

DOE has a Course Code Directory, Student Performance
Standards (grades 6-12), and Curriculum Frameworks
(grades 6-12) which includes child abuse and neglect
prevention topics to assist teachers in providing instruction.

DOE has not standardized instruction to school personnel and
parents but local school districts have used some of the
following techniques to implement the requirements of Section
415.501:

Contract with prevention projects to provide instruction.
Use a videotape and viewers guide to instruct school
personnel.
Provide intensive training to school social workers who then
instruct other school personnel.
Present instruction during a one-day conference.
Ask the Child Protection Team to provide the required
instruction.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 45









Florida Department of Law Enforcement

FDLE has addressed the statute requirement by incorporating
instruction on child abuse and neglect in its basic curriculum
used at the law enforcement academies to train all new FDLE
employees. During 1989 a total of 5,464 (100%) new employees
received the FDLE curriculum training in 215 classes.
The same curriculum and plan for training new
employees is used presently.

In 1985-86, the FDLE, through the Criminal Justice All new FDLE employees
Standards and Training Commission, received special receive training on child
legislative funding to develop training programs on
child abuse investigation. The curriculum includes abuse and neglect.
approximately 16-20 hours of instruction on the
dynamics of child abuse and neglect and emphasizes
detection and correct reporting procedures. The
training programs were designed to educate law
enforcement officers, the judiciary, state attorneys and
HRS personnel who are involved in investigating and taking
legal action in child abuse cases. The training program
includes:

* a Directory of Child Abuse and Neglect Intervention
Training
* a catalog of Child Abuse and Neglect Intervention Training
Materials
* a Participant's Guide to Child Abuse and Neglect
Intervention Training
* a Trainer's Guide to Child Abuse and Neglect Intervention
Training
* a variety of videotapes relating to child physical and sexual
abuse and neglect

These training materials were distributed to a variety of
individuals and groups including law enforcement personnel,
and are available upon request.





S46] Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Goal and Objectives Involving
DOE and FDLE

Goal 4

Support uniform implementation of a coordinated system to:
(1) inform and instruct school personnel, parents, and local law
enforcement personnel in the detection of child abuse and
neglect and in the proper action that should be taken in a
suspected case of child abuse or neglect, and (2) instruct
students in identification, intervention, and prevention of child
abuse and neglect.

Goal 4 stresses the importance of identifying child abuse and
neglect victims before emotional or physical damage, serious
injury or death occurs. To ensure that these children
are identified early, uniform instruction for
professionals in the detection and reporting of
Goal 4 stresses the suspected child abuse and neglect is essential. Student
importance of identifying instruction in identification, intervention and prevention
of child abuse and neglect can alert children to family
child abuse and neglect behavior patterns and personal safety practices which
ims bfre emotional or may cause physical or psychological harm to the child
VICtims before emotional or and encourage children to report these problems to a
physical damage, serious responsible adult. Also, instruction may influence
children to learn adult coping skills and child rearing
injury or death occurs. practices to break the cycle of abuse and neglect which
repeats itself from generation to generation.


District Objectives for Goal 4

Generally, district objectives focused on the implementation of
curriculum in the school setting. The district objectives indicate
that many districts were willing to cooperate in the development
of curriculum and support DOE and local school districts in
fulfilling their responsibilities. Specific strategies were proposed
to facilitate the accomplishment of the goal in the districts.
There was little need for district objectives to address FDLE
responsibilities or cooperation at the local level since child
abuse and neglect is included in the FDLE training curriculum
for new employees.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993











State Objectives for Goal 4

The state objectives encourage HRS/CYF prevention staff,
FDLE training personnel, and DOE student services to work
cooperatively to achieve this goal. Additionally, each school
district and CYF district prevention staff are to ensure that
each school has in place a curriculum designed to provide
instruction on the identification, intervention and prevention of
child abuse and neglect which includes instruction to teachers,
other school personnel, parents and children.

4.1 The Department of Education (DOE) Student Services
will continue to assist local school districts to provide
instruction on the identification, intervention, and
prevention of child abuse and neglect.

4.2 CYF prevention staff will inform district contract
managers and prevention providers of the services
offered by Student Services in each local school district
which inform/instruct school personnel and parents in
the detection, reporting, and prevention of child
abuse/neglect.

4.3 CYF prevention staff will help district prevention
contract managers identify and remove any barriers
related to access of prevention education services
through the local school districts.

4.4 The DOE Prevention Center will provide instructions
regarding implementation of the child abuse/neglect
prevention curriculum in the district school health
education plans.

4.5 The DOE Prevention Center will report annually to the
Interprogram Task Force on the status of district
implementation of the abuse/neglect prevention
curriculum.






48 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










4.6 DOE Prevention Center will maintain a collection and
a catalog of available curriculum and other materials
relating to child abuse and neglect prevention to assist
local school districts in their implementation efforts.

4.7 FDLE will continue to support training academies in
providing instruction to law enforcement officers in the
identification, intervention, and prevention of child
abuse and neglect.

4.8 FDLE will report annually to the Interprogram Task
Force on the status of district implementation of the
abuse/neglect prevention curriculum.


I






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 4g



PLAN FOR COORDINATION

AND INTEGRATION



As required by Chapter 415.501, HRS established an
interprogram task force comprised of representatives from the
following program offices or agencies:

Children, Youth and Families
Children's Medical Services
Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health
Health
Developmental Services
Office of Evaluation
Office of Program Policy Development
Operations Office
Florida Department of Law Enforcement
Department of Education

As one of its required activities, the Interprogram Task Force
is responsible for: "developing a plan of action for better
coordination and integration of the goals, activities, and funding
pertaining to the prevention of child abuse and neglect
conducted by the department in order to maximize staff and
resources at the state level."


Current Status

In 1983, the Interprogram Task Force fulfilled the initial
responsibilities mandated by the law through development of a
policy guide on district task force membership and
responsibilities, a proposed prevention continuum, an
operational plan and a format for local plans. During each of
the past four planning cycles, technical assistance was provided
to the districts through feedback on district plans.






50 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










Efforts to coordinate and integrate child abuse and neglect
prevention services have been primarily the responsibility of the
Children, Youth and Families Program Office prevention staff,
with minimal responsibilities assigned to other representatives
of the Interprogram Task Force. CYF has oversight
responsibility for a variety of child abuse and neglect prevention
programs and for coordination with other prevention/early
intervention initiatives, (e.g., HRS Office of Prevention, the
Ounce of Prevention, an HRS prevention interprogram
workgroup for children birth to age five, the DOE
Prevention/Early Intervention program). No other HRS
program office has specific responsibilities related to child abuse
and neglect prevention. As indicated in An Evaluation
Study of the Florida Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention
Service System, Volume 3, state prevention plans in 1983-
84, 1985-86, 1987-88 and 1989-91 did not include a plan to
coordinate and integrate prevention activities across
agencies or within HRS. Statewide planning by the
Interprogram Task Force has been limited. Their only
designated responsibility in the previous planning phases
was to review the district plans (ESDI, 1989).

During this planning period, however, Interprogram Task
Force members have participated actively in the planning
process by identifying statewide needs and problems,
establishing goals, reviewing district plans, revising state
goals, and establishing state objectives. Their active
involvement has renewed Interprogram Task Force interest
in the planning process. The state goals and objectives
established by the Interprogram Task Force confirm their
commitment to statewide planning and coordination of
prevention services.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 51










Goal and Objectives for Coordination
and Integration

Goal 5

Coordinate and integrate child abuse and neglect prevention
issues and services with other prevention and early intervention
efforts and expand community representation on the
Interprogram Task Force.

District Objectives for Goal 5

District efforts to coordinate and integrate prevention services
depend heavily on the commitment and active involvement of
the district task force membership. Where district task forces
are not operational or very weak, accomplishment of objectives
may be difficult. Most districts planned to produce a
community services directory or to research the directories
already available and update any information related to
prevention services. A few planned to encourage District
Administrators to establish prevention related goals or share the
state and district goals and objectives with the administrator.
Many district objectives addressed the need for members to
participate in other planning groups related to prevention or to
invite members of these groups to join the district Child Abuse
and Neglect Prevention Task Force. By obtaining similar
memberships, issues and concerns will be shared among the
various providers, a mechanism for networking will be
established, and services will be coordinated more effectively
with other local advisory groups, such as the Prekindergarten
Early Intervention Interagency Coordinating Councils and the
child care central agencies. Also, strategies for coordination
between specific services were proposed.





52 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










State Objectives for Goal 5

Coordination and integration of child abuse and neglect
prevention with other prevention/early intervention initiatives
is an issue due to the multiplicity of these programs targeting
at-risk families. As stated in an earlier section, similar
prevention/early intervention programs operate under the
auspices of various program offices within the Department of
Health and Rehabilitative Services, the Department of
Education, and a number of public and private agencies. The
effort to coordinate and integrate these services requires
interagency, interprogram and community cooperation and
planning so that services are not duplicated and unnecessary
expenditures are avoided. To address these issues, the
Interprogram Task Force proposed nine state objectives. These
objectives specify responsibilities of the Children, Youth and
Families Program Office and Interprogram Task Force relating
to development of the HRS/DOE Joint Strategic Plan for
Prevention and Early Intervention, the alignment of objectives
in specific prevention-related planning documents, participation
with other prevention-related work efforts, and the
establishment of prevention goals by the various HRS program
offices. Also, the Interprogram Task Force is charged with
providing technical assistance to the districts to ensure that their
responsibilities for coordination and integration are clear and
that resource directories are developed in a uniform manner.

5.1 Members of the district child abuse and neglect
prevention task force will be included on the
Interprogram Task Force to provide local participation
in state planning.

5.2 A representative for CYF and the Interprogram Task
Force will participate in the development of the
HRS/DOE Joint Strategic Plan for Prevention and
Early Intervention (as mandated by Chapter 411) to
address abuse/neglect prevention issues.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 53









5.3 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will compare the
objectives of the Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention
Plan with the Prevention and Early Intervention Services
Strategic Plan and identify issues of overlapping services
and target populations, and amend the Child Abuse and
Neglect Prevention Plan to avoid duplication and more
effectively address the continuing gaps in the abuse and
neglect prevention continuum of services.

5.4 A representative for CYF and the Interprogram Task
Force will be included on appropriate work groups
established for prevention and early intervention
services mandated by Chapter 411 to improve
coordination and integration of abuse/neglect
prevention services with other prevention and early
intervention services.

5.5 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will
provide technical assistance to the district task Coordination and
forces to ensure that the responsibilities of CYF, in rain f hil a
other HRS programs, school districts, law integration of child abuse
enforcement, and local government/private and neglect prevention
agencies with regard to the abuse/neglect with other pr
prevention continuum of services are clearly ith their evenea
identified, that the relationship of the intervention initiatives is an
abuse/neglect prevention continuum of services
and the prevention and early intervention issue due to the multiplicity
continuum of services in the district is delineated, of these programs
and that remaining gaps in abuse/neglect at
prevention services are documented in the next targeting at-risk families.
abuse/neglect prevention plan.

5.6 CYF and the Interprogram Task Force will help each
HRS program office establish goals related to child
abuse/neglect prevention consistent with the goals
developed in the Prevention and Early Intervention
Strategic Plan and document these goals in the next
abuse/neglect prevention plan and within the strategic
plans of each program office.






5 4 .. .... ....... !










5.7 CYF prevention staff will develop a uniform format and
instructions to be used by districts as a guide for
development of district-specific resource directories that
specify the abuse/neglect prevention services provided
by HRS, DOE, FDLE, and other agencies and, for each
service, describe the key contacts, brief program
description, capacity, eligibility requirements, and
available funding.

5.8 CYF prevention staff will provide instructions to the
districts and monitor the development and periodic
updating of uniform district resource directories.

5.9 HRS will explore the merits of incorporating social
services into future community comprehensive plans and
initiate appropriate action with the Department of
Community Affairs.


I






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 55



BARRIERS






A comprehensive approach to child abuse and neglect
prevention services can be enhanced if certain barriers are
removed. As required by the statute, the district task forces
identified a variety of barriers which impede the effective
delivery of prevention services. The most frequently mentioned
barriers are described below. In Appendix H, summary
statements of the barriers identified in the district plans are
listed.

Overview of District Barriers

Inadequate funding. Almost every district (9 of 11) listed
inadequate funding for prevention as a barrier to providing a
comprehensive approach. Adequate funding from one year to
another ensures continuity of service delivery. Otherwise,
clients will not be guaranteed that services will be maintained
and that their service support system will continue.

Transportation. Nine districts identified transportation as a
barrier to service delivery. Many clients cannot access services
due to the lack of public transportation. Transportation
problems are translated to lack of participation, missed
appointments, and inability to follow through on referrals to
needed services.

Client resistance. Six districts identified client resistance or
refusal as a barrier. In many instances, clients do not admit
their problems and will not participate voluntarily in a variety
of programs such as parenting classes or drug treatment
programs.

Coordination of services. Several districts cited inefficient
coordination within the local service network. This highlights
the need for maximizing existing resources and coordinating
local efforts.






56 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Inadequate child care. Five districts addressed the availability
of subsidized child care or respite care in their listing of
barriers. Funding for additional slots and competitive salaries
impacts not only the availability of child care but also the
quality of child care providers.

Awareness and support for prevention. Four districts addressed
public and agency awareness and support for prevention as a
strategy in the continuum of prevention, intervention and
treatment services. The districts commented on the need for a
statewide public awareness campaign as well as agency
commitment to increasing prevention service delivery rather
than targeting prevention dollars for intervention and treatment
services.

Staffing. Three districts identified staffing issues as barriers.
Trained, experienced professional and volunteer staff are
limited and staff turnover is high. These limitations impact the
quality of prevention programs and continuity of service
delivery.


I






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 57



RECOMMENDATIONS

FOR CHANGE





As required by Chapter 415.501, the district task force
members included in the district plans recommendations for
changes that can be accomplished only at the state program
level or by legislative action. The most frequent categories of
recommendations are described below.

Community involvement. Throughout most district
recommendations was the need to establish a clearly focused
program that is based on the community's commitment to
addressing local needs. To further this concept, the CYF
Program Office needs to evaluate the funding framework and
possibly refocus prevention funds toward needed programs.

Policy development. Districts addressed the need
for policy development in the areas of training
for incarcerated parents, continuing education
requirements for physicians and other health
care providers, parent education for high school
juniors and seniors, use of prevention funds for
treatment services, emphasis on prevention of
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, adoption of a uniform
Family Service Plan, planning in four-year
increments, inclusion of district task force
members on the Interprogram Task Force, and
development of a program for abuse and neglect
prevention services.

Interagency collaboration and cooperation.
Improvements to interagency collaboration and
cooperation were recommended by districts.
Several recommendations simply called for
increased collaboration efforts among
community-based agencies HRS, DOE, and
FDLE. Another addressed cooperation between
HRS and local school districts. Yet another
would identify all treatment costs associated with
cases of child maltreatment. There was a
common theme throughout to develop an
integrated continuum of community-based
services.






58 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993









Program development and expansion. There was a common
element throughout the district recommendations for new and
expanded services. Recommendations for new programs
included to: (1) promote "state-of-the-art" prevention programs,
(2) provide intensive follow-up services to recovering substance-
abusing parents, (3) track at-risk children as they mature, and
(4) provide specialized child care for drug-exposed and HIV-
infected newborns. The following programs were recommended
for program expansion: (1) school dropout programs, (2) child
care, specifically increasing subsidized child care services to
Protective Services clients and providing incentives to child care
providers to serve disabled children. (3) domestic violence
prevention efforts, (4) treatment programs for juvenile sex
offenders, (5) Child Protection Teams, (6) treatment services
for victims of abuse, and (7) subsidized regular and respite child
care for at-risk children. The district recommendations
represented a strong recognition of the value of child abuse and
neglect prevention services.

Coordination of HRS services. Coordination of services within
HRS was addressed. The coordination issues included service
delivery, case management, data gathering, and dissemination
of information and the lack of central direction to districts
regarding implementation.

Advocacy. Advocacy efforts, including preparation of
an advocacy "package" and developing a month-long
public awareness campaign, were recommended.
Fees on birth certificates
e Funding contingencies and incentives. Districts made
were proposed as an suggestions for funding contingencies and incentives.
alternative funding source. These included making funding contingent upon
interagency coordination, making a minimum
appropriation for each child in the state, tying funding
to indicators of high risk such as the number of drug-
exposed newborns in addition to the tie-in with number
of abuse and neglect reports, incentives for child care
centers to serve more handicapped children, and incentives to
use volunteers.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 59









Funding sources. Alternative funding sources for prevention
services, including assessing fees on birth certificates and
mandating that all counties create independent taxing districts,
were identified as recommendations.

Professional education. Higher education institutions should
require instruction in child abuse prevention for all persons
preparing for professions that deal with children. Training
should be mandated for policymakers and the legal community
in prevention programs and referral processes.

Corporal punishment. A statewide ban on corporal punishment
in the schools was recommended.

The district recommendations for 1991-93 are summarized in
Appendix I. The complete listing of district recommendations
are contained in each district plan.


Recommendations For
Legislative Action

Authorize the membership of community representatives of
the District Prevention Task Forces to become voting
members of the Interprogram Task Force.

* Develop legislation geared toward the protection of children
that identifies other services, such as crisis child care,
corporate child care, expanded health care for children and
mothers, domestic violence, prenatal and postnatal
procedures, expanded protection of cocaine and AIDS
babies, and increased parent education.

* Address alternative funding sources for prevention services
and tie funding of prevention services to the numbers of
indicated abuse/neglect cases as well as other indicators of
high-risk children such as low birth weight and drug
dependency.

* Make agency funding contingent upon interagency
collaboration and coordination.
















* Provide for a full range of prevention services, including
parent education and support, to be delivered through the
subsidized child care system (central agencies).

* Expand available services for adults, families and children to
include outpatient services in the community mental health
system.

* Increase services to drug addicted parents and their children.

* Mandate the creation of Children's Services Councils.

* Provide incentives for child care centers to serve more
handicapped children and provide appropriate training for
child care staff and necessary special equipment for children.

* Increase the availability of crisis nurseries and therapeutic
family day care homes.

* Mandate instruction in child abuse awareness and prevention
in all Florida institutions of higher learning for every study
preparing for a profession that deals with children.


* Eliminate corporal punishment in schools.











CONCLUSION





Prevention and early intervention services are the critical
components of a successful program to reduce child abuse and
neglect and to strengthen and preserve the family. It is
important that we marshal community resources and support in
order to assure that our intervention genuinely improves the
quality of life of those we serve. Family needs are diverse,
crossing structural, cultural and ethnic lines. Local communities
are the key to recognizing and addressing these diversities.

Coordination and integration of interagency efforts have been
minimal and are recognized as important to maximizing the
funding and effectiveness of programs. There may be a need
for statutory revision to unify and strongly link interagency
coordinating groups and to allow for community
representation on the Interprogram Task Force to provide
districts with central direction for developing model programs.

The goals and objectives addressed within the 1991-93 State
Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan recognize the value
of community involvement. These goals and objectives
include:

o Coordination and integration of child abuse and neglect prevention
issues and services with other prevention issues and early intervention
efforts, and the development of a community-based delivery system.
t Delivery of comprehensive child abuse and neglect prevention
services to families at high risk of child abuse and neglect, with an
increased emphasis on home visiting methods.

Accessibility for high-risk families to prevention services such as
subsidized child day care, respite day care, and services for children
who have been physically, sexually, or emotionally abused.

Implementation of a system for educating professionals, parents and
children about child abuse and neglect.

Effectiveness of child abuse and neglect prevention program
management.

With clear directives for the next two years, child abuse and
neglect prevention services can more effectively meet the needs
of Florida's high-risk children and their families by prevention
strategies which not only prevent the occurrence of child abuse
and neglect but also enhance a child's development and improve
the chances for success later in life.





62 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 63


APPENDIX A

415.501, Florida Statutes Prevention of Abuse and
Neglect of Children; State Plan






64 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



APPENDIX A


415.501, Florida Statutes Prevention of Abuse and
Neglect of Children; State Plan


1. LEGISLATIVE INTENT The incidence of known child abuse and child neglect has
increased rapidly over the past five years. The impact that abuse or neglect has on the
victimized child, siblings, family structure, and inevitably on all citizens of the state has
caused the Legislature to determine that the prevention of child abuse and neglect shall
be a priority of this state. To further this end, it is the intent of the Legislature that a
comprehensive approach for the prevention of abuse and neglect of children be developed
for the state and that this planned, comprehensive approach be used as a basis for funding.

2. PLAN FOR COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH

(a) The Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services shall develop a state plan
for the prevention of abuse and neglect of children and shall submit the plan to the
Speaker of the House of Representatives, the President of the Senate, and the
Governor no later than January 1, 1983. The Department of Education shall
participate and fully cooperate in the development of the state plan at both the
state and local levels. Furthermore, appropriate local agencies and organizations
shall be provided an opportunity to participate in the development of the state plan
at the local level. Appropriate local groups and organizations shall include, but not
be limited to, community mental health centers; guardian ad litem programs for
children under the circuit court; the school boards of the programs for children
under the circuit court; the school boards of the local school districts; the district
human rights advocacy committees; private or public organizations or programs
with recognized expertise in working with children who are sexually abused,
physically abused, emotionally abused, or neglected and with expertise in working
with the families of such children; private or public programs or organizations with
expertise in maternal and infant health care; multidisciplinary child protection
teams; child day care centers; law enforcement agencies, and the circuit courts,
when guardian ad litem programs are not available in the local area. The state
plan to be provided to the Legislature and the Governor shall include, as a
minimum, the information required of the various groups in paragraph (b).

(b) The development of the comprehensive state plan shall be accomplished in the
following manner:






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 65



1. The Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services shall establish an
interprogram task force comprised of representatives from the Children,
Youth and Families Program Office; the Children's Medical Services
Program Office; the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Program
Office; and the Office of Evaluation. Representatives of the Department
of Law Enforcement and of the Department of Education shall serve as ex
officio members of the interprogram task force. The interprogram task
force shall be responsible for:

a. Developing a plan of action for better coordination and integration
of the goals, activities, and funding pertaining to the prevention of
child abuse and neglect conducted by the department in order to
maximize staff and resources at the state level. The plan of action
shall be included in the state plan.

b. Providing a basic format to be utilized by the districts in the
preparation of local plans of action in order to provide for
uniformity in the district plans and to provide for greater ease in
compiling information for the state plan.

c. Providing the districts with technical assistance in the development
of local plans of action, if requested.

d. Examining the local plans to determine if all the requirements of
the local plans have been met and, if they have not, informing the
districts of the deficiencies and requesting the additional
information needed.

e. Preparing the state plan for submission to the Legislature and the
Governor. Such preparation shall include the collapsing of
information obtained from the local plans, the cooperative plans
with the Department of Education, and the plan of action for
coordination and integration of departmental activities into one
comprehensive plan. The comprehensive plan shall include a
section reflecting general conditions and needs, an analysis of
variations based on populations or geographic areas, identified
problems, and recommendations for change. In essence, the plan
shall provide an analysis and summary of each element of the local
plans to provide a statewide perspective. The plan shall also
include each separate local plan of action.

f. Working with the specified state agency in fulfilling the
requirements of subparagraphs 2, 3, 4, and 5.






66 I Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



2. The Department of Education and the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services shall work together in developing ways to inform
and instruct parents of school children and appropriate district school
personnel in all school districts in the detection of child abuse and neglect
and in the proper action that should be taken in a suspected case of child
abuse or neglect, and in caring for a child's needs after a report is made.
The plan for accomplishing this end shall be included in the state plan.

3. The Department of Law Enforcement and the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services shall work together in developing ways to inform
and instruct appropriate local law enforcement personnel in the detection
of child abuse and neglect and in the proper action that should be taken in
a suspected case of child abuse or neglect.

4. Within existing appropriations, the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services shall work with other appropriate public and private
agencies to emphasize efforts to educate the general public about the
problem of and ways to detect child abuse and neglect and in the proper
action that should be taken in a suspected case of child abuse or neglect.
The plan for accomplishing this end shall be included in the state plan.

5. The Department of Education and the Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services shall work together on the enhancement or
adaptation of curriculum materials to assist instructional personnel in
providing instruction through a multidisciplinary approach on the
identification, intervention, and prevention of child abuse and neglect. The
curriculum materials shall be geared toward a sequential program of
instruction at the four progressive levels, K-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12.
Strategies for encouraging all school districts to utilize the curriculum are
to be included in the comprehensive state plan for the prevention of child
abuse and child neglect.





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 67



6. Each district of the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services shall
develop a plan for its specific geographical area. The plan developed at the
district level shall be submitted to the interprogram task force for
utilization in preparing the state plan. The district local plan of action shall
be prepared with the involvement and assistance of the local agencies and
organizations listed in paragraph (a) as well as representatives from those
departmental district offices participating in the treatment and prevention
of child abuse and neglect. In order to accomplish this, the district
administrator in each district shall establish a task force on the prevention
of child abuse and neglect. The district administrator shall appoint the
members of the task force in accordance with the membership
requirements of this section. In addition, the district administrator shall
ensure that each subdistrict is represented on the task force; and, if the
district does not have subdistricts, the district administrator shall ensure
that both urban and rural areas are represented on the task force. The task
force shall develop a written statement clearly identifying its operating
procedures, purpose, overall responsibilities, and method of meeting
responsibilities. The district plan of action to be prepared by the task force
shall include, but shall not be limited to:

a. Documentation of the magnitude of the problems of child abuse,
including sexual abuse, physical abuse, and emotional abuse, and
child neglect in its geographical area.

b. A description of programs currently serving abused and neglected
children and their families and a description of programs for the
prevention of child abuse and neglect including information on the
impact, cost effectiveness, and sources of funding of such programs.

c. A continuum of programs and services necessary for a
comprehensive approach to the prevention of all types of child
abuse and neglect as well as a brief description of such programs
and services.

d. A description, documentation, and priority ranking of local needs
related to child abuse and neglect prevention based upon the
continuum of programs and services.

e. A plan for steps to be taken in meeting identified needs, including
the coordination and integration of services to avoid unnecessary
duplication and cost, and for alternative funding strategies for
meeting needs through the reallocation of existing resources,
utilization of volunteers, contracting with local universities for
services, and local government or private agency funding.






68 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



f. A description of barriers to the accomplishment of a comprehensive
approach to the prevention of child abuse and neglect.

g. Recommendations for changes that can be accomplished only at the
state program level or by legislative action.

3. FUNDING AND SUBSEQUENT PLANS

(a) All budget requests submitted by the Department of Health and Rehabilitative
Services, the Department of Education, or any other agency to the Legislature for
funding of efforts for the prevention of child abuse and neglect shall be based on
the state plan developed pursuant to this section.

(b) At least biennially, the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services at the
state and district levels and the other agencies listed in paragraph (2)(a) shall
readdress the plan and make necessary revisions. Such revisions shall be submitted
to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate
no later than January 1, 1985, and by January 1 of alternate years thereafter.

History s. 1, ch. 82-62, s. 62, ch. 85-81, s. 10, ch. 85-248.

Note As amended by s. 10, ch. 85-248; s. 11, ch. 85-248 provides that "This legislation is
not intended to duplicate or supersede existing programs in child abuse and neglect
prevention that are being utilized by the local school districts to meet these needs,
provided that all of the elements required by sections 1 through 10 of this act are being
met."

Note Former s. 409-70


Interprogram Task Force

Committee Substitute for House Bill 296 mandated the development of an Interprogram Task
Force (IPTF); specifically it states:

The Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services shall establish an interprogram task force
comprised of representatives from the Children, Youth and Families Program Office, the
Children's Medical Services Program Office, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Program
Office, the health Program Office, the Developmental Services Program Office, and the Office of
Evaluation.





I Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


APPENDIX B


Interprogram Task Force


F69]


I I


I i


I I






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


APPENDIX B


Interprogram Task Force


Appointment


Staff Representative


Jay Kassack
Assistant Secretary
PDCYF-Children, Youth & Family Services
(904) 488-8762

William Ausbon, M.D.
Assistant Secretary
PDCM-Children's Medical Services
(904) 487-2690 (SC) 277-2690


Ivor Groves, Ph.D.
Assistant Secretary
PDADM-Alcohol, Drug Abuse and
Mental Health Program
(904) 488-8304 (SC) 278-8304

Dr. Charles Mahan
Deputy Secretary
PDDH-State Health Offices
(904) 487-2705 (SC) 277-2705

Kingsley R. Ross
Assistant Secretary
PDDS-Developmental Services
Program Office
(904) 488-4257 (SC) 278-4257

Pinky G. Hall
Evaluation and Management Review
(904) 488-1225 (SC) 278-1225

Jim Clark
PDESS-Employment and Training
(904) 487-2380 (SC) 277-2380


A. Leon Polhill
PDCYFC-Child Care & Prevention
Bldg. 6 Room 447
(904) 488-4900 (SC) 278-4900

Susan Potts
PDCMSD-Child Protection Team
Bldg. 5, Room 127
(904) 488-5040 (SC) 278-5040

Jay Whitworth, M.D.
Children's Crisis Center, Inc.
655 W. 8th St.
Jacksonville, FL 32209
(904) 366-2444

Gail Harper
PDADMY-Children's Mental Health Services
Bldg. 6, Room 186-D
(904) 287-2415 (SC) 277-2415


Jean Battaglin
Family Health Services
Tallahassee, FL 32399
(904) 488-2834 (SC) 278-2834

Kathy Winn
PDDS-Developmental Services
Bldg. 5, Room 215
(904) 488-3673 (SC) 278-3673


Vacant



Lonna Cichon
PDESS-Employment and Training
Bldg. 5, Room 112
(904) 487-2380 (SC) 277-2380


I.. I...


I


-






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


I 7I J


The liaison members of the IPTF are:

Robert Williams
PD-Deputy Secretary for Programs
(904) 487-1111 (SC) 277-1111


Peter Digre
OP-Deputy Secretary for Operations
(904) 488-8901 (SC) 278-8901


The ex officio members of the IPTF are:

Michael O'Connell, Chief
Bureau of Training
Florida Dept. of Law Enforcement
P. O. Box 1489
Tallahassee, FL 32302
(904) 488-8547 (SC) 278-8547

Josephine Newton
Student Services Section
Dept. of Education
Florida Education Center, Room 844
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
(904) 488-8974 (SC) 278-8974


Shirley Hammond
PDP-Program Policy Development
Bldg. 1, Room 220
(904) 488-2761 (SC) 278-2761

Jack Ahearn
OPO-Children, Youth and Families
Bldg. 1, Room 300
(904) 487-1161 (SC) 277-1161


Retha Nero
Migrant Child Abuse Prevention
Dept. of Education
Florida Education Center, Room 652
Tallahassee, FL 32301
(904) 487-3504 (SC) 277-3504


1





72 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993




SChild Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


L I


APPENDIX C

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan
District Top Needs or Problems


73






74


I I I


APPENDIX C


Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan
District Top Needs or Problems


Top Needs/Problems


District Ranking


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11


Parent Characteristics


Teen or first time parents
Substance abusing parents
Drug involved parents
Alcohol abusing parents
Lack of knowledge of child development/infant care
Lack of knowledge of effective parenting skills


2 2* 4 3
1* 2


4 1* 1
10 3
8
2 1 4 4


2* 2 2 5
2* 4 4
7 9
4 6 10 9


Child Characteristics


Handicapped children
Premature/low birthweight/failure to thrive
Drug exposed newborns
Fetal alcohol syndrome children
Infants and children with reported STD
Undetected medical/psychological problems
Medical/psychological problems requiring
early intervention
Lack of developmentally appropriate learning
experiences for children
Sexually abused children
Special needs children age 0-36 months


9
10 7
4 1
6


8 5*


9 6 6
1* 7 1* 9* 1 1 1 2
9* 8 3 10
6
5 5
5 5 1 3


10 7


Household Characteristics


Single parents 5
Domestic violence 8
Economic stresses 7
Need for affordable regular day care for at risk families 6 5
Need for affordable respite day care for at risk families 3


4 10 7 7 10 4
6 2 8 8 8 4 6 5 9
2 6 10 8 7
5 3* 5 6 3* 5* 3 7 8
3 3* 9 3* 5* 9 8


Community Factors

Coordination of abuse/neglect prevention services
Public awareness
Corporal punishment in schools
Reporting suspected abuse/neglect by teachers/
professionals


Note: An asterick beside the district ranking indicates that two needs/problems were ranked equally by the district.


Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


7 6
10 10
7
9




I Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


APPPENDIX D

Needs/Problems Considered by District Task Forces
in the Needs Assessment for
Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Services


g






76 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993



APPPENDIX D


Needs/Problems Considered by District Task Forces
in the Needs Assessment for
Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Services



Characteristics of Parents

a Teen parents
a Drug-involved parents
a Alcohol abusing parents
a Lack of knowledge of infant care
a Lack of knowledge of child development
a Lack of knowledge of effective parenting skills
a Poor homemaking practices


Characteristics of Children

a Handicapped children living at home
a Low birth-weight newborns
a Drug-exposed newborns
a Fetal Alcohol Syndrome child
a Ability of child to report abuse and neglect
Knowledge of self protection skills
a Failure to thrive
a Infants and children with reported STD
Undetected medical/psychological problems
Lack of developmentally appropriate learning experiences for pre-school children in at-risk
families


Household Characteristics

Single parents
a Domestic violence
a Economic stresses
a Homeless (especially parents under age 18)
Migrant families
a Need for affordable, regular day care for at-risk families
a Need for affordable, respite day care for at-risk families






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 77



Community Factors

* Public awareness of child abuse and neglect
* Coordination of abuse/neglect prevention services
* Ability of teachers, physicians, and other key individuals to detect and report child abuse and
neglect
Corporal punishment in schools
Availability of peer support groups for parents






78 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993





IChild Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


APPENDIX E

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Programs
Implementation of Continuum Components by District


r I


79





Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


I~::: I


APPENDIX E


Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Programs
Implementation of Continuum Components by District


District

Continuum Area 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11


Prenatal Support for Expectant
Parents

Postnatal Education and Support

In-Home Education and Support

Early and Regular Educational,
Medical and Psychological
Screening

Medical and Psychological
Services

Child Day Care

Self-Help Groups

Parent Education and Training

Life Skills Training

Family Crisis and
Intervention Support

Treatment and
Intervention Services

Community Organization

Public Information

Other


X X


X X X X


X

X X


X X X


X

X X


X

X X X


X X X X


X X


r-]





81


SChild Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


I LJJ81


APPENDIX F

Summary of District
Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Services






I Child Ab~useand NeglectPrevention Plan: 1991-1993


I I


APPENDIX F:
SUMMARY OF DISTRICT CHILD
ABUSE AND NEGLECT PREVENTION
SERVICES


District 1


* Funding:



* Providers:

* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$229,118
$202,486
$177,374


Child Protection Team Prevention Project

A range of prevention services, both primary
and secondary in nature, is offered within the
district including: parent education and
training, pre and postnatal education and
support, in-home education and support
services, a child enrichment group, public
information, and community organization.


District 2


* Funding:



* Providers:

* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$233,053
$229,351
$229,351


Brehon Institute for Human Services

Perinatal education and support services are
concentrated on a specific target population,
pregnant teens, with services extending to six
weeks after birth.


District 3


* Funding:



* Providers:


* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$428,641
$406,917
$366,225


Child Abuse Prevention Project (CAPP),
University of Florida

Primary and secondary prevention services are
provided through parenting education classes
and home visitor services.


F82]






IChild Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


I I


District 4


* Funding:



* Providers:









* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$517,496
$451,968
$427,277


Children's Crisis Center, Inc., Duval and
Volusia Co.
Children's Home Society of Florida, Inc., Duval
Co.
Childbirth and Parenting Education Association
of St. Augustine, Inc.
Visiting Nurse Association of North Florida,
Inc.
Children's Home Society, Daytona Beach

Although a variety of primary, secondary or
tertiary services were offered, the district's
major focus was perinatal education and
support services for one year after birth, parent
education and training, in-home education and
support, and public information.


District 5


* Funding:



* Providers:



* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$356,070
$322,603
$198,714


Family Service Centers of Pinellas County, Inc.
Alternative Human Services, Inc.
Youth and Family Alternatives, Inc.

The district provides an array of primary,
secondary and tertiary prevention services with
emphasis on secondary prevention. Most of the
components of the continuum are available but
programs tend to focus on perinatal education
and support, parent education and training, and
family crisis and intervention support. A
coordinator position was funded early in the
year but was cut as of October, 1990.


F8 3






84 I Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


I C 1


District 6


* Funding:



* Providers:






* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$671,880
$544,923
$544,923


Child Abuse Prevention Program, Peace River
Mental Health Center, Inc.
Manatee Children's Services, Inc.
Intensive Teenage Parenting Program,
Northside Centers, Inc.
Hillsborough County Crisis Center, Inc.

A wide array of primary, secondary and tertiary
prevention services is offered. Emphasis is
placed on treatment and intervention services,
perinatal education and support, home visitor
programs, and parent education and training.
A community awareness program is funded
also. Teenage parents and sexual abuse victims
and their families are targeted specifically.


District 7


* Funding:



* Providers:







* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$469,104
$413,115
$329,154


Wuestoff Hospital
Orlando Regional Medical Center
Child Care Association of Brevard County, Inc.
Ursula Sunshine Child Abuse Prevention, Inc.
Children's Home Society of Florida, Inc.,
Parent Resource Center, Inc.
Great Oaks Village

An array of primary, secondary and tertiary
prevention services exists within the district.
District services emphasize: family crisis and
intervention support, perinatal education and
support, parent education, and in-home services
including several homemaker projects.
Coordinator positions were funded early in 1990
but were cut as of October 1, 1990.


84 I






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 85


District 8


N Funding:


* Providers:



* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$257,722
$222,721
$222,721


Community Coalition for Families, Inc.
Independent Developmental Educational
Associates Services, Inc. (IDEAS)

The district limits the array of services to
secondary prevention with the emphasis on
parent education and in-home education and
support.


District 9


* Funding:


* Providers:



* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$281,610
$249,707
$249,707


Parenting Magic, Children's Home
West Palm Beach
Exchange Club Center, Ft. Pierce


Society,


The district limits the provision of services,
focusing primarily on parent education and in-
home services and eliminated primary
prevention efforts.






86 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


District 10

* Funding:


* Providers:




* Services:


District 11

* Funding:


* Providers:






* Services:


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$323,296
$262,207
$241,915


Child Care Connection of Broward County, Inc.
Kids-In-Distress
Children's Home Society of Florida, Ft.
Lauderdale

Therapeutic child care, a treatment and
intervention service, is the major service
component represented in the district. In
addition, a foster care reunification and
permanency planning project is available, a
program not represented on the prevention
continuum.


1988-89
1989-90
1990-91


$634,925
$514,951
$233,588


Mental Health Care Center of the Lower Keys,
Inc.
James E. Scott Community Association, Inc.
(JESCA)
TOTS Home Visitor Program, Community
Health of South Dade, Inc.

A variety of primary, secondary and tertiary
prevention services are available in District 11.
Emphasis is placed on: parent education, in-
home support services, perinatal education and
support, and public information.




87


I Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993


APPENDIX G

District Objectives


I hl bs n elc rvninPa:19-93










APPENDIX G:

DISTRICT OBJECTIVES



District Objectives for Goal 1

District 1

* Continue in-home and post-natal education and support
services.
* Continue parent education and training.
* Recommend and plan for expansion of home visitor services.
* Continue the Tots Time socialization/enrichment groups for
3 to 7-year-old children.
* Continue to provide a variety of parent support services,
such as Amanda the Panda, Tel-Ed tapes on parenting, a car
seat loan program and direct assistance to families needing
resources not provided by any other agency.

District 2

* Provide increased funding for perinatal services to teenaged
and other at-risk mothers.
* Identify programs that serve substance abusing parents.
* Provide programs for children ages 0-5 who are identified as
prenatally substance exposed (to drugs or alcohol) to
ameliorate or compensate for any pre-birth trauma.
* Provide nutritional training to parents/custodians of low
birth weight children through a child care setting and
outreach to the children's homes.
* Provide funding to neonatal home visitor programs,
especially those using trained nursing personnel.
* Establish providers/referral network for neonates with
identified medical/neurological/ learning problems.

District 3

* Expand and increase home visitor services to every county.
* Expand parent education/support group services to every
county.
Develop a uniform parent education group curriculum.
Encourage referral for parenting education/support services
from local spouse abuse agencies. Expand existing services
to Citrus County spouse abuse shelter.
Establish parenting education/support services in subsidized
child care programs.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 89










District 4

* Expand perinatal services for drug-involved women and their
families.
* Expand group and individual counseling during pre- and
perinatal period.
* Expand home visitor programs and parent training for
continued support of high-risk infants and parents through
the first year of life.
* Expand home visiting services for special needs children,
ages birth to 36 months.
* Expand parent education classes for high-risk parents,
especially families with drug or alcohol problems.
* Expand parent education for teen parents.
* Expand class for parents who are attempting reunification
with their children.
* Expand home visiting to high-risk families that are identified
by HRS, DOE and Public County Health Units to provide
individual parent training.
* Expand case management of high-risk infants, ages birth to
36 months.
* Expand in-home services for parent training and ongoing
assessment of infants/children.
* Expand professional education for physicians and nurses to
include evaluation and new resources available for earlier
intervention.
* Develop and implement professional inservice package on
Domestic Violence.
* Develop a comprehensive team approach for crisis
intervention in domestic violence cases.
* Expand parent education programs for parents of special
needs children.
* Expand prenatal and perinatal services to women who are
pregnant and medically at-risk.






90 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










District 5

Provide follow-up and support groups to completers of
parent education classes.
Support development of parenting classes for Head Start
parents.
Continue specialized education for low-functioning parents.
Participate in Fetal Substance Abuse Campaign.
Advocate for mandatory parenting groups for subsidized
child care users.
Provide post-natal home visitor program with long term
follow-up.

District 6

Provide parent education/support/outreach programs to
high-risk families or single parents.
Provide case management for at-risk families.
Provide intensive teenage parenting program.
Provide parent support outreach programs.
Provide parent education in caregiving skills.

District 7

Help Voluntary Family Services clients obtain services to
detect and treat medical and psychological problems; obtain
on-going medical care.
Heighten awareness of teen parents, substance-abusing
parents, single parents, and parents in sudden economic
stress of risk factors of abuse and neglect.
Coordinate with community service providers to avoid
duplication.
Require use of outcome measures and follow-up contacts to
determine the level of service delivery and client satisfaction
with the programs.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 91










* Compare clients in prevention program with FPSS Abuse
Registry to determine the incidence of abuse and neglect
reports after the provision of prevention services.
* Train professionals in current laws and options in dealing
with domestic violence.
* Develop and implement an action plan to gather information
on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome; determine severity of problem.
* Establish a pilot project of an integrated network of
comprehensive prevention services to high-risk families with
children ages 0-5.
* Assist HRS in locating alternative funding sources for
expansion of above-mentioned network.
* Increase home visitor services to high-risk families by
creating positions of specialized case managers who would
visit the families to identify needs, make referrals to meet
the needs and provide case management.

District 8

* Recruit high-risk families through notification of referral
sources, etc.
* Determine needed services for referred parents.
* Facilitate nurturing skills training through time-limited class
sessions using the Nurturing Program.
* Provide nurturing skills training through home visits to
families in Nurturing Program.
* Facilitate Nurturing Program in class or under Bavolek
format
* Extend Nurturing Program to child care facilities.
* Provide referral system to aide high-risk families in accessing
Nurturing Program.
* Provide resources/training for child care staff working with
high-risk children.
* Inform referral sources of criteria for in-home Nurturing
Program.
* Coordinate services with other home-based program.
* Increase in-home service delivery to high-risk families.






92 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










District 9

Provide High-Risk Newborn Service in Okeechobee, Martin
and Belle Glade.
Coordinate services of Health Departments, Community
Mental Health centers and CYF.
Reduce the incidence of undetected medical/psychological
problems by expanding Medicaid services offered to children
screened by EPSDT.

District 10

Continue funding to providers who are effectively meeting
the needs.
Children's Services Board and Task Force will be asked to
develop RFP's to develop neighborhood-based services, e.g.,
support groups and networking alliances.
Develop proposals for expanded or new programs (and
developing funding mechanisms) for services to
drug/alcohol/HIV-infected babies.
Provide incentives for high-risk families to participate in
programs.
Encourage Law Enforcement to set aside a portion of "drug
confiscation program" dollars to provide funding for services
to high-risk families characterized by drug abuse
involvement.
Maintain and increase availability of parent education and
support to families with children ages 0-5 in subsidized child
care.
Maintain or increase current level of funding for home
visitor services.
Increase availability of community-based parenting education
classes and support groups.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-19930 93










District 11

* Develop a uniform parent education group curriculum.
* Expand parent education for teen parents and alcohol or
drug involved families.
* Provide follow-up classes and support groups for graduates
of parent education classes.
* Provide nurturing skills training through parent education
classes and home visitor programs.
* Conduct follow-up of clients through the FPSS Abuse
Registry.
* Expand therapeutic child care services for children living in
violent homes.
* Expand parent education programs for parents of special
needs children.
* Offer parent education to all parents of children 0-5 in
subsidized child care.
* Develop a transportation program for parents attending
parent education classes.
* Establish a pilot project for an integrated network of
comprehensive prevention services to high-risk families with
children ages 0-5.
* Assist in locating alternative funding sources for the above-
mentioned network.
* Expand perinatal home visitor programs.
* Expand home visitor programs for high-risk children through
two years of age.
* Coordinate all home visitor programs.
* Create positions of specialized case managers to visit
families, identify needs, make referrals, and provide case
management.
* Provide post-natal home visitor program with long-term
follow-up.






94 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










District Objectives for Goal 2

District 1

m Secure funding and produce county Community Service
Directory to distribute to child care centers.
m Task force will develop recommendations relative to
increasing availability and accessibility of the above-
mentioned services.

District 2

Implement and fully utilize Project Safety Net.
Encourage child care providers to expand services to
newborns and infants.
Establish respite child care slots for at-risk families.

District 3

Cooperate with the Interprogram Task Force in preparing a
report which outlines the needs for subsidized child care and
respite care.

District 4

Expand work incentives of AFDC and other welfare
programs with subsidized child care available to all
participants for three years.
Increase number of respite child care slots for at-risk
children.
Expand the number of licensed family child care homes in
the District.
Expand therapeutic child care services for children who are
living in violent homes.
Implement child care at drug treatment centers for parents
receiving treatment.
Expand subsidized/respite child care for high-risk
populations.






Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993 95










District 5

" Provide information about treatment referral services.
a Advocate for additional funding for treatment programs.
" Advocate for increased child care within target
neighborhoods.
" Present workshops to encourage development of child care.
* Encourage development of emergency respite care programs.
" Support development of corporate child care with subsidized
slots.
* Facilitate coordination of transportation for services to
children and families.
* Provide training for child care staff.

District 6

* Develop a referral network to enhance wrap-around services,
(e.g., child care), for at-risk, chronically ill, and handicapped
children.
* Provide individualized treatment planning for abused
children.
* Provide in-home family mental health counseling.
* Develop a referral network to access respite services.

District 7

* Increase accessibility of subsidized child care through
information and referral and case management.
* Increase availability by designing and implementing a pilot
project to help targeted high-risk families develop a support
system and use existing child care services.
* Increase the availability of respite child care for families in
crisis and those who are chronically ill or handicapped.
* Expand the availability of respite child care, especially for
special-needs children.
* Design and implement a pilot project to help families with
chronically ill or handicapped children build a support
system.
* Increase the availability of treatment services to children who
have been abused.






96 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Plan: 1991-1993










District 8

Provide support to child care providers by recommending tax
credits for families with children in child care and informing
the funding source of special needs in child care.
Where appropriate, refer Nurturing Program clients to
subsidized child care.
Collaborate with organizations providing respite to assist
high-risk families in accessing services.
Continue to document and report the need for respite care.
Refer and assist families in accessing needed treatment
services.
Develop an agreement with ADM to refer appropriate
families to the Nurturing Program.

District 9

m Not addressed in plan.

District 10

CYF and Task Force recommend at least one new primary
prevention program or service to be funded annually.
CYF maintain respite care records on services delivered,
waiting lists, services not available, and presenting crises.
HRS District Legal Council will get Legal Aid to offer as a
service the establishment of temporary guardianship for
children who are left in the care of functional guardians so
that the guardians can secure treatment for the children.

District 11

Encourage development of emergency respite child care
programs.
Support development of corporate child care with subsidized
slots.
Advocate for child care providers by promoting mandatory
parenting groups for subsidized child care users and
recommending tax incentives for families with children in
child care.
Implement and fully utilize Project Safety Net.
Implement child care at drug treatment centers.