• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Purpose
 Goals
 Program
 Criteria for participation
 Personnel
 Governance
 Funding
 Schedule of implementation
 Part II
 Summary of activities
 Bibliography of data
 Estimated prevalence of Severly...
 Proposed geographic distribution...














Title: Report of the study to determine the need for educational centers for emotionally disturbed students
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075019/00001
 Material Information
Title: Report of the study to determine the need for educational centers for emotionally disturbed students
Physical Description: vi, 62 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students
Wood, Mary M
Carroll, Janice
Laneve, Ron
Publisher: Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: [1981]
 Subjects
Subject: Children with mental disabilities -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Children with mental disabilities -- Education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Children with mental disabilities -- Care -- Florida   ( lcsh )
School facilities -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 50-54.
Statement of Responsibility: prepared for the Commissioner of Education by Florida Department of Education, Division of Public Schools, Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "Consultant panel Mary M. Wood, Janice Carroll, Ron Laneve."
General Note: "February 1981."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075019
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917891
oclc - 17375542
notis - AEM8214

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page vi
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Purpose
        Page 3
    Goals
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Program
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Criteria for participation
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Personnel
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Governance
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Funding
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Schedule of implementation
        Page 33
    Part II
        Page 34
    Summary of activities
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Bibliography of data
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Estimated prevalence of Severly Emotional Disturbed Students in Florida
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Proposed geographic distribution for educational centers and satellites
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
Full Text









REPORT OF THE STUDY

TO DETERMINE THE NEED FOR

EDUCATIONAL CENTERS

FOR

EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED STUDENTS


Prepared for the
Commissioner of Education

Florida Department of Education
Division of Public Schools
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students


February, 1981














Consultant Panel
Mary M. Wood, Ed.D., University of Georgia, Chairman
Janis Carroll, North Carolina Department of Education
Ron Laneve, Ph.D., Mark Twain School, Rockville, Maryland


State of Florida
Department of Education
Tallahassee, Florida
Ralph D. Turlington, Commissioner
Affirmative action/equal opportunity employer


FLORIDA: A STATE OF EDUCATIONAL DISTINCTION. "On a statewide average, educational
achievement in the State of Florida will equal that of the upper quartile of states within five
years, as indicated by commonly accepted criteria of attainment." Adopted, State Board of Education, Jan. 20, 1981


Vo 1. LC 1 ;5-V ;




. a


HV




d 1


0 STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

o, TALLAHASSEE 32301
RALPH D. TURLINGTON BUREAU OF EDUCATION
FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS
COMMISSIONER DIVISION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS







March 31, 1981



Ralph D. Turlington, Commissioner
Department of Education
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Dear Mr. Turlington:

This letter serves to transmit to your office the study to deter-
mine the need for educational centers for emotionally disturbed
students, as provided in Item 511, Chapter 80-411, Laws of Florida.

The entire panel enjoyed working with staff from the Florida
Department of Education and the Department of Health and Rehabil-
itative Services. These individuals, along with representatives
of local school districts and other agencies who participated in
the study, provided valuable information to the study. This infor-
mation has been incorporated into a final report which has hopefully
captured the needs of severely emotionally disturbed students in
Florida. The recommendations contained in this report have been
made after consideration of all data and input available to the
study panel, and it is hoped that the recommendations will result
in a comprehensive program to serve the severely emotionally
disturbed school-age population in Florida.

Sincerely,



Mary M. Wood, Ed.D.
Chairperson/Study Panel

MMW:dwb


Affirmative action/equal opportunity employer






PREFACE

A. History of the Study

Both federal and state laws have required a free appropriate public

education for all handicapped students, regardless of the severity of

their handicaps. The responsibility of education agencies under these

laws requires the provision of special education and related services to

all students, at no cost to parents. The cooperative provision of special

education and related services through inter-agency agreements is certainly

not precluded; however, the ultimate responsibility for ensuring the pro-

vision of these services rests with the state education agency (Florida

Department of Education).

In the past, funds have been allocated to the school districts

for education and related services and to the Department of Health and

Rehabilitative Services for mental health support services such as evalua-

tion, counseling, treatment and purchase of residential placements for

severely emotionally disturbed children and adolescents. Absent from these

efforts has been a collaborative statewide effort between agencies to provide

a full range of services for severely emotionally disturbed students.

A survey conducted in 1978 by Department of Health and Rehabilitative

Services (DHRS) staff pointed to the need for additional mental health services

for children in the state, and recommendations were drafted for the develop-

ment of a core continuum of mental health services for children.

HRS district level staff indicated that community based residential faci-

lities for children were the top priority at that time. An increase over

the past two years in the number of public school students being placed







in nonpublic residential treatment centers certainly lends support to

these perceived priorities. During the 1979-80 school year, public schools

contracted for seventy-two (72) such placements; during the 1980-81 school

year eighty-three (83) such placements were made as of February, 1981.

Item 511, Chapter 80-411, Laws of Florida provided for an appropriation

to study the need for educational centers for emotionally disturbed students

in Florida. The appropriations language reads as follows:

THE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION SHALL STUDY THE NEED
FOR EDUCATIONAL CENTERS FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED
STUDENTS IN FLORIDA. SUCH STUDY SHALL INCLUDE
CRITERIA FOR PARTICIPATION BY STUDENTS IN THE PRO-
GRAMS OF SUCH CENTERS; THE NUMBER OF FULL-TIME
EQUIVALENT STUDENTS ANTICIPATED; GOVERNANCE, REC-
OMMENDED GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS, PROGRAMS, AND STAFF-
ING; START-UP COST AND CONTINUING ANNUAL COSTS;
AND A SCHEDULE FOR IMPLEMENTATION. THE COMMISSIONER
SHALL REPORT THE RESULTS OF SUCH STUDY TO THE CHAIR-
MEN OF THE APPROPRIATE COMMITTEES IN THE HOUSE OF
REPRESENTATIVES AND IN THE SENATE BY FEBRUARY 1,
1981.

The Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students, Division of Public

Schools was given the responsibility for organizing and implementing this

study. Three consultants with expertise in the area of programs for emotion-

ally disturbed students were selected to conduct the study and prepare the

final report. Support was provided by staff from the Community Mental Health

Program Office (DHRS) and from the Bureau of Education for Exceptional

Students.

The following individuals served as consultants for this study:

Mary M. Wood, Ed.D., Chairperson Ron Laneve, Ph.D.
Professor of Special Education Principal, Mark Twain School
University of Georgia and Rockville, Maryland
Director of Developmental Therapy Institute
Athens, Georgia

Janis Carroll, M.S.
Chief Consultant
Programs for Emotionally Handicapped
Division for Exceptional Children
State Department of Public Instruction
Raleigh, North Carolina








B. Panel Activities

The study panel was assembled during January and February, 1981 to

review data, conduct invitational conferences, analyze the information, and

produce a written report. An organizational meeting was held in Tallahassee

for three days. During this time the panel reviewed information, heard

testimony from legislative staff, Department of Education and Department

of Health and Rehabilitative Services, other state level organizations, and

school district personnel, and organized to carry out the task. Two additional

meetings were held in Miami and Tampa to receive input from various school

district and mental health personnel, organizations and community agencies.

Specific schedules and names of participants are contained in Appendix A. A

list of documents and other references reviewed by the panel is contained

in Appendix B.









TABLE OF CONTENTS


PART I


Introduction . .


Purpose . . .


Goals . . .


Program . . .


Criteria for Participation .

Personnel . . .


Governance . . .

Funding . . .


Schedule of Implementation .


PART II


Appendix A Summary of Activities


Appendix B Bibliography of Data


Appendix C Estimated Prevalence/E


. . . . 35


. . . 50


;ED . . ... .55


Appendix D Proposed Geographic Distribution


List of Exhibits

Exhibit A The Educational Center's Role
in the Continuum of Services
Needed for SED Students . .


Exhibit B Proposed Staffing Pattern
and Organizational Structure
for an Educational Center . .


Exhibit C Proposed Governance
for a Statewide Network . .


Exhibit D Educational Centers-Personnel . .

Exhibit E Projected FTE for Educational Centers


Exhibit F DHRS Costs for Residential Programs .


Page




3


4
. . . 1


. . . .
. . . 4


. . . 6


. . . 18


. . . 20

. . . 22


. . . 26


. . . 33


. . 59







5




. . 21



. . 25

. 29


. . 31

. . 32








PART. I


INTRODUCTION


In response to the charge to study the need for Educational Centers

for Emotionally Disturbed students in Florida and draft recommendations

for delivery of needed services, the Study Panel submits its recommendations

for a master plan in Part I of this report.

Part II contains a series of appendices with information referred to

in the body of this report. The information obtained from more than seventy-

five (75) individuals who spoke with the Study Panel, and the reports and

state documents reviewed have led to the following general principles which

were used as guides to the preparation of the master plan in Part I.

1. Both exceptional student education and mental health services for

severely emotionally disturbed (SED) students must be provided in

one, integrated system.

2. Combined exceptional student and mental health services should be

provided in the least restrictive setting possible. This setting

is preferably a school or a community building rather than a clinical

or hospital environment.

3. Alternative, therapeutic living arrangements must be available

to SED students in the local areas, when family support is no

longer possible, so that they may continue to receive services

in the least restrictive way possible.

4. All local agencies involved in services to SED students should

have an integrated multi-professional system of identification,

referral, assessment, diagnostic procedures, program planning,

implementation, and evaluation of student progress.








5. A complete continuum of services must be available if these

students are to be served adequately in the least restrictive

setting possible. This continuum involves educational alterna-

tives, therapeutic alternatives, and residential/living alterna-

tives.

6. Highly skilled and experienced personnel from several pro-

fessional fields are essential if SED students are to improve.

7. Every program serving SED students should have access to

emergency psychiatric care in the local area.

8. Every program serving SED students should have a system for

access to longer-term, residential psychiatric services or

respite care services when needed.

9. SED students should not be subjected to residential schools

or hospitals because of lack of local treatment resources,

either educational or residential.

10. Education personnel or agencies should not be in the business

of operating residential living facilities. However, an SED

student's living environment plays an essential role in a

program of rehabilitation. It is, therefore, the responsi-

bility of Education to include support for the student's

living environment in the student's therapeutic program.

11. To ensure that Florida's SED students are equitably and ade-

quately served, multi-district pooling of resources and skilled

personnel is essential. There are neither sufficient personnel,

programs, or funds to do otherwise.








EDUCATIONAL CENTERS NETWORK
FOR SEVERELY EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED
STUDENTS



1. PURPOSE



To provide intensive, integrated exceptional student education and

mental health treatment services.for severely emotionally disturbed children

and youth through a network of multi-district Educational Centers with

satellite extensions and liaison with the student's home and community.

1.1. The network will provide access for all SED students,

throughout the state, to a continuum of exceptional student

education and mental health services.

1.2. The centers will provide for the multi-district clustering

of resources for skilled and specialized diagnosis and

treatment of severe emotional disturbance of children and

youth.

1.3. The centers will provide a full range of exceptional student

education programs, mental health treatment and environmental

services.

1.4. The satellites will provide for services in a less

restrictive/less expensive setting, close to or in the home

communities.






2. GOALS

The goal of the Educational Centers Network is to provide services

for all of the severely emotionally disturbed students in Florida, which

will reduce dependency and allow for these students to fully participate

in all aspects of life.

The specific program goals for each Educational Center in the Network

are:

2.1. To enable severely emotionally disturbed students to develop

appropriate behaviors and demonstrate academic and vocational

skills through a therapeutic educational and residential

environment.

2.2. To develop individualized programs for severely emotionally

disturbed students which include educational, residential,

and therapeutic components.

2.3. To select only those programs and services which are necessary

for each individual student.

2.4. To provide programs and services located as close as possible

to the student's home.

2.5. To include the student's family or surrogate family in the

therapeutic process as needed.

2.6. To integrate a wide range of services which are necessary to

support the severely emotionally disturbed student and family.





EXHIBIT A

The Educational Center's Role in the
Continuum of Services
Needed for SED Students*


Residential Support

Immediate
family

T
Extended
family


T


Education

Regular class

T
Resource Room

Part-time special
class


Therapeutic Support

Special curriculum materials
and materials

T
Special Education Consultation

T
School mental health services
(e.g., school psychologist,
school social worker,
guidance counselor,
vocational counselor)


-----------1-------- --
ALTERNATIVE f -THE EDUCATIONALt )CLINICAL SERVICES:
COMMUNITY LIVING: CENTER
SATELLITES
SATELLITES


Foster family

T
Therapeutic
foster home

T
Therapeutic
group home


-----------I---------


Community
hospital bed

T
Residential
school

T
Psychiatric Hospital;
short term respite
care service


Full-time a
special
Day treaty
in school
community


nd part-time Individual & group counseling;
Classes; Parent/family work;
lent classes Adaptive P.E.;
L or other Recreation, art,
:y agency music, & dance
therapies;
Psycho harmacology

- - - - - - - - - - -


Community Hospital/Homebound
Teacher Service

Special class in
Residential school
or hospital


Residential
clinical services:
Individual & group counseling;
Parent/family work;
Adaptive P.E.;
Recreation, art,
music, & dance
therapies;
Psychopharmacology


*Arrows indicate the importance of continual movement in delivery of services
toward the least restrictive setting.







3. PROGRAM

An Educational Center's program will have three basic service

components and two additional components which are utilized by the three

basic components. The basic service components are (1) education,

(2) residential support and (3) therapeutic support. The additional

components are (4) assessment and evaluation and (5) liaison services.

The program of each student is developed with the flexibility to include or

exclude these services as needed. Exhibit A illustrates the continuum of

services needed for severely emotionally disturbed students in each of the

three basic service areas. Exhibit A also illustrates the role of the

Educational Center in the middle of this continuum. Because of the impor-

tance of all three basic services and because of the frequent, often unpre-

dictable changes in the severely emotionally disturbed students, the

Educational Center must have flexible program alternatives. Consequently,

case management must be provided to obtain and integrate needed services

anywhere on the continuuI of services in each of the three basic service

areas outlined in Exhibit A.

The Therapeutic IEP. Central to the success of comprehensive services

for severely emotionally disturbed students is the concept of a "therapeutic

individual educational plan" ((T)IEP). This term is used to describe an

individual educational plan which includes a mental health treatment

component. There are several reasons to combine both education and treat-

ment in the plan:

1. Both exceptional student education and mental health services are

essential for rehabilitation of severely emotionally disturbed

students.

2. Both areas are involved with the same aspects of student-behavior,

emotions, attitudes, interpersonal relations, cognitive processes,









social learning, and communication processes. Thus separating

exceptional student education and mental health services into

distinctly different services creates a dual system of delivery

which is neither necessary nor efficient.

3. Combining both areas into a unitary "therapeutic IEP" ensures the

establishment of combined goals which do not duplicate efforts

and do not work at cross purposes. Instead, the (T)IEP provides

for efficient utilization of each service in support of the other.

In the Educational Centers Network the term (T)IEP, for the severely

emotionally disturbed, is used to include all of the requirements as

specified by State Board of Education Rules (SBER 6A-6.331(3), SBER 6A-15.14(3)),

and includes also the mental health treatment plan. Specific needs for resi-

dential and family support are considered a necessary aspect of this combined

mental health/educational plan.

3.1. The Education Component

The Education Component of an Educational Center is designed to

provide both small group and individual education, full or part

time, as indicated by a student's (T)IEP. The education program

can provide a range of basic instruction in reading, language arts

(writing, speaking, listening), mathematics, social science, natural

science, physical skill development, and the arts. Programs to

develop basic social and vocational skills are included for high

school students. In addition to individual and group instruction,

times for group interaction, group play, and group discussion are

included each day.








Instructional groups are established on the basis of students'

ages, social-emotional needs, and program objectives. Group size

is limited to a maximum of six students per teacher and aide. How-

ever, group size may be as low as four students per teacher and

aide. Classes for preschool and elementary age students are

physically separated from classes for adolescents.

Within the Educational Center's classrooms, learning activities

and management procedures are integrated around each student's overall

(T)IEP plan which includes the mental health needs of the student.

The classroom teacher, aide, and a clinical person from the Thera-

peutic Support Component, serve as the primary treatment team for all

of the students in a particular group. The treatment team manager is

the clinical person on the team, with major responsibility to coor-

dinate the implementation of therapeutic management of the students

in the educational setting.

3.2. The Therapeutic Support Component

The Therapeutic Support Component of the Educational Center will be

concerned with providing the clinical expertise to assist in the

effective implementation of each (T)IEP in the classroom and in the

student's living environment. The (T)IEP, as described previously,

will integrate educational and mental health needs into a single

psychoeducational program plan involving a student's school and

living environments.

If indicated in the (T)IEP, individual therapy also will be provided

by clinical staff to a student as a supplement to the daily psycho-

educational program in the classroom. Some adjunctive therapies








such as adaptive physical education, and recreation, art, music,

dance, and drama therapies will be provided routinely as a part of the

daily psychoeducational program of the Educational Center. Other

therapies such as physical, occupational, or speech/language therapies,

or psychopharmacology will be obtained on an "as needed" basis.

Additional handicaps such as visual or hearing impairments would be

addressed with supplemental instruction.

The clinical personnel also will serve as the program link between

the psychoeducational program implemented by the Educational Center

and the student's living environment. The clinical personnel will

provide services to students' families (or surrogate families) such

as parent counseling, training in behavior management, or supple-

mentary home programs, as indicated in a student's (T)IEP. Parents

or surrogate parents in need of additional mental health services for

themselves will be assisted in locating appropriate services.

When a student is receiving community foster care, clinical personnel

of the Educational Center will serve as the therapeutic link between

the home and Educational Center providing the clinical expertise to

assist in implementing aspects of the (T)IEP in the student's living

environment. In addition, clinical personnel will provide support

services to foster parents or group home staff when indicated in a

student's (T)IEP.

3.3. The Residential Support Component

The Residential Support Component of an Educational Center will be

concerned with ensuring that a student has an appropriate supportive

living environment. In order to accomplish this the Residential










Support staff must establish clear lines of communication with DHRS

personnel and committees responsible for residential placements. In

addition, the staff must have the resources to purchase appropriate

residential services in the event that there are no appropriate DHRS

programs available or that a particular client may not be eligible

for DHRS services.

When a foster home, therapeutic foster home, therapeutic group home,

or other DHRS supported residential program is needed for a student,

the Educational Center's responsibility is to locate (or develop)

such a placement in conjunction with HRS personnel. These placements

must be structured and operated to complement and actively assist

in the implementation of the student's (T)IEP developed by the

Educational Center. In this way the foster care placement is designed

to be a twenty-four hour therapeutic environment for a student.

Case management personnel will have responsibility to assist and

support individual foster families, as indicated in a student's (T)IEP.

When a student is placed in a therapeutic foster home, therapeutic

group home, or other DHRS supported residential placement, the

Educational Center's clinical staff has responsibility for coordinating

their services with the appropriate DHRS personnel in order to assist

the foster parents or residential staff in developing, conducting,

and monitoring the residential aspects of the student's psycho-

educational program. Decisions regarding changes in a student's

residential program or placement requires review by the Educational

Center's (T)IEP planning group and would occur subsequent to changes

in the (T)IEP.








Because of the present lack of sufficient alternative living

services for severely emotionally disturbed students, each Educational

Center will be expected to develop therapeutic foster home programs

and a therapeutic group home for adolescents in collaboration with

the appropriate DHRS district within two years. Guidelines and

Rules established by the Department of Health and Rehabilitative

Services for Therapeutic Foster and Group Homes will be used.

3.4. The Assessment and Evaluation Component

The Assessment and Evaluation Component of an Educational Center

has responsibility for receiving referrals, conducting assessments,

participating in placement decisions, developing therapeutic (T)IEP

plans, case review for reassessing and modifying (T)IEP plans,

establishing and implementing ongoing formative and summative evaluation

of student progress in accomplishing (T)IEP objectives at the Center

and in the residential settings, and following progress of students

who have exited the program.

Access/Referral Process: Local school districts are responsible for

ensuring that all children and youth with special educational needs in the

district are identified, located and evaluated including students in other

state agencies and private agencies within their jurisdiction. Florida Statute

and State Board of Education Rules provide procedures for Health and Rehabili-

tative Services to cooperate with school districts by:

1. notifying the superintendent of the local school system of all

students within their jurisdiction who have special education needs

(Chapter 232.13,F.S., SBER 6A-15.23),

2. cooperating with the local school districts in planning and providing

for appropriate educational/treatment programs (SBER 6A-15.23),









3. establishing a unitary access/intake process for all children

with special needs into appropriate educational/treatment

programs (SBER 6A-15.15, 6A-15.23),

4. sharing of records and other information needed to provide an

appropriate therapeutic and educational program (SBER 6A-15.13,

6A-15.23).

The exceptional student education program in each school district served

will identify and determine those students who may need services of the

educational center, and where appropriate, referrals will be forwarded to

the educational center.

Referrals also will be accepted for students from HRS, community mental

health programs, private medical/psychiatric sources, and parents.

Receiving referrals. All referrals will be screened by an educational

center committee comprised of the representative from the public school system

exceptional student education program, local HRS, community mental health,

children and youth services, a local representative of the Juvenile Justice

system (when appropriate), the Educational Center director and the Coordinators

of each of the five Center components. The committee will make one of the

following recommendations:

1. There is need for additional observation and/or diagnostic infor-

mation.

2. The student can be more appropriately served at another agency.

3. Additional interventions should be implemented at the local school

and community level.

4. The student's referral is accepted for program planning and placement

purposes by the Educational Center Network.








In each recommendation, the committee will assist appropriate persons

in accessing or developing the needed services. Disagreements between

agencies will be settled through mutually agreed upon procedures developed

locally and approved by the local Advisory Board.

Conducting assessments. Whenever possible, assessments will be con-

ducted by the referring school or agency prior to referral to the Educa-

tional Center. It is not necessary to repeat such assessment procedures.

However, assessments will be provided by the Educational Center as needed.

All assessments will meet the requirements of State Board of Education

Rule 6A-6.3016 and 6A-6.331(1).

Any SED student enrolled in an Educational Center for eighteen (18)

months must receive a reevaluation including a psychiatric assessment, a

repeat of assessment procedures at the time of enrollment, and any new

assessment procedures as needed.

Placement and (T)IEP Planning. The committee to review referrals

(described above) also serves as the placement and (T)IEP planning

committee. Ad hoc members of the committee include the student's regular

school teacher, the principal, the student's parents) or surrogate parent

and other agency representatives who have worked with the student. A mental

health clinician who has actually worked with the student must be present

to provide input into the therapeutic aspects of the (T)IEP. All IEP

procedures will meet the requirements of SBER 6A-6.331(3).

Case Review. Each student's (T)IEP shall be reviewed on a scheduled

basis at least three times a year by staff of the Assessment and Evaluation

component of the Educational Center in consultation with the student's case

manager. If the review results in proposed changes in program, the (T)IEP must

be reviewed in a meeting which includes the parentss, as required by SBER

6A-6.331(3). Results of the amended (T)IEP are submitted in written form







to the Educational Center director for review and are filed in the

student's record.

In addition to the scheduled reviews agency staff or a

parent may request a case review on an "as needed" basis. The same

procedure described above will be followed.

Documentation of student progress. Staff in the Assessment and

Evaluation Component of the Educational Center will be responsible for

implementing a system for documentation of student progress and follow-up

after exiting the program. The system will include data collection as

required by the statewide Network coordinator. Prior to implementation

the system must be approved by the local Advisory Board, the statewide

network Governing Board, and the Network coordinator (see Section 6 -

Governance). The evaluation system also is subject to revision upon

recommendation by the Network coordinator and its governing board.

This documentation of student progress based on the evaluative

criteria in the (T)IEP must be submitted to the parentss, to the referring

school or agency, and to the local advisory board, at least annually.

3.5. The Liaison Services Component

The Liaison Services Component of an Educational Center has

responsibility for each student's case management and the effective

utilization of needed resources in the least restrictive manner to

accomplish the objectives of the (T)IEP. Liaison Services staff will

serve as case managers, advocates, and interagency facilitators on

behalf of the students. They will link services at the Educational

Center with other agencies and the residential/home services.








If a student is sent to a residential school or hospital the Educa-

tional Center case management component continues in that role and

works closely with the residential staff to affect a rapid return to

the Educational Center, home, and community.

When a student exits the Educational Center to return to regular

school the case manager continues to assist personnel in the student's

regular school to accomplish a successful mainstream reentry.

3.6. Center Facilities

An Educational Center typically should be housed in a facility which

is close to or a part of an existing regular education program.

However, center facilities may vary from region to region according

to available space and program requirements. For example, an existing

school building, a community mental health building, an unused wing

of a school, or a rented facility might be used.

Guidelines for selection of a center facility should include the

following:

1. Sufficient space is available for classrooms, counseling

rooms, outside play areas, diagnostic, liaison, clinical

and parent services, and administration functions.

2. Classrooms, counseling rooms, and outside play areas for

adolescent students are physically separated from those

for elementary and preschool students.

3. Clinical and administrative staff areas are closely

accessible to the areas for both adolescent and younger

students.









4. The interior of the facility can be readily adapted to the

particular needs of the clinical and educational program

components.

5. An elementary, middle, and high school should be in close

proximity to the Educational Center to serve as receiving

schools so that mainstreaming, liaison services, partial

placements, and reentry processes can be provided.

6. Food preparation facilities and eating areas are not

necessary unless the students are in attendance during

the lunch hour. Students receiving part-time services

at the Center typically will attend their regular school

for lunch, while students receiving full day services will

be provided lunch on-site.

3.7. Satellites

A satellite can be defined as a smaller extension of an Educational

Center, in another location. A satellite can be housed in any existing

community facility and in accordance with the guidelines described

above for the Educational Center. The overall square footage of the

satellite will depend upon the number of children to be served in

classrooms at the satellite and the proportionate number of clinical

and liaison personnel working there. Little space will be needed for

administration at a satellite as this function will be conducted at

the Educational Center. A senior staff person at the satellite will

be designated as satellite coordinator. In addition to classrooms

and outside play space at the satellite, space will be needed for

parent services and for the part-time personnel providing therapeutic

support and liaison support services.







Satellite locations will allow for services provided in areas away

from the main Educational Center. Satellites will be established

in areas where:

1. More than fifty severely emotionally disturbed students are

identified, or

2. Students would be traveling for an unreasonable distance to

receive services.

The full range of Educational Center services will be available

at each satellite location. However, in sparsely settled areas

the full range of services may not be available on a daily basis

as they would be at the main Center. Typically, the Education

Program staff and theLiaison Support staff would reside in the

satellite area and conduct classes and liaison services on a daily

basis. Therapeutic Support:staff, Assessment and Evaluation staff,

and Residential Support staff would typically provide services

at the satellite one day a week from the main Center.









4. CRITERIA FOR PARTICIPATION


The Educational Center Network is designed to serve severely

emotionally disturbed students. The Department of Education definition

of the severely emotionally disturbed is found in SBER 6A-6.3016 as follows:

6A-6.3016 Special programs for students who are emotionally handi-

capped.

1. Emotionally handicapped -- one who after receiving supportive

educational assistance and counseling services available to all

students, still exhibits persistent and consistent severe behavioral

disabilities which consequently disrupt the student's own learning

process. This is the student whose inability to achieve adequate

academic progress or satisfactory interpersonal relationships

cannot be attributed primarily to physical, sensory or intellectual

deficits. For purposes of funding, emotionally handicapped students

shall be classified as:

(a) Emotionally handicapped -- one who meets criteria as defined in

Rule 6A-6.3016, FAC, and is placed in programs as defined in

Rule 6A-6.311(l)(a) through (d), FAC.

(b) Severely emotionally disturbed -- one who meets criteria as

defined in Rule 6A-6.3016, FAC, and is placed in programs as

defined in Rule 6A-6.311(1)(d) through (f), FAC, and who requires

a special program for the full school week.

2. Criteria for eligibility. All of the following criteria, consistent

with the definition, shall be used to determine each student's

eligibility for special programs for emotionally handicapped.







(a) Evidence that the student, after receiving supportive

educational assistance and counseling, still exhibits severe

emotional handicaps.

(b) Evidence that a severe emotional handicap, as determined by

documented observations and psychological evaluation, exists

over an extended period of time.

(c) Evidence that the behavior disrupts the student's own learning,

reading, arithmetic or writing skills, social-personal develop-

ment, language development or behavioral progress and control.

(d) Evidence that the primary problem of the student cannot be

attributed primarily to physical, sensory or intellectual

deficits.

3. Criteria for eligibility for programs for severely emotionally

disturbed. An addition to (2) above, the following shall be used

to determine each student's eligibility for special programs for

the severely emotionally disturbed:

(a) Evidence that the student requires a program for the full school

week which provides a highly structured cognitive and affective

[therapeutic] curriculum, individual or group counseling, and

parent counseling or education; and

(b) Evidence that a program provided in a less restrictive environ-

ment has not met the individual student's needs.

In addition, no student may be excluded from Educational Center Network

services because of severity of the emotional disturbance except in instances

where a psychiatric recommendation for full-time residential care has been

made.








5. PERSONNEL

A model for personnel organization for an Educational Center is

contained in Exhibit B. Each Center must provide the five service components

and must provide, at minimum, the personnel specified for each component.

However, depending upon the size of the Center, the personnel positions

may not necessarily be full time or there may be several positions of a

particular type in order to meet the case load. In addition, a single

professional position may be proportioned across several components. For

example, a psychiatric consultant may be employed three days a week. One

day may be specified for the Assessment and Evaluation component while the

second day may be specified for 50% in the Therapeutic Support Services

component and 50% in the Residential Support Services component.

The recommendations for personnel for Centers are contained in Exhibit B.







EXHIBIT B
Proposed staffing Pattern
and Organizational Structure
for an Educational Center*


fLocal Advisory Board


Center Director ILocal Fiscal Agent


Residential Thel
Support S
Services Sei
Coordinator Cooi



-Psychiatric
Consultant

-Psychiatric
Social Workers

-Clinical
Psychologist

-(Adjunctive
Therapists
(e.g., art,
music, adap-
tive P.E.)




-(Case Managers) <


rapeutic Education Assessment
ipport Services and
rvices Coordinator Evaluation
rdinator ICoordinator


-Psychiatric
Consultant

-Psychiatric
Social Workers

-Clinical
Psychologist

-Mental Health
Paraprofessional

-(Adjunctive
Therapists
e.g., art,
music, adap-
tive P.E.)

(Case managers)
-(Case Mlanagers) < ----


-Satellite Staff

-Special
Education
(SED) Teachers

-Teaching
Aides

-Reading/
Learning
Disability
Specialist

-Adjunctive
Therapists
(e.g., art,
music, adap-
tive P.E.)

(Case managers) <


Liaison/Field
Services
Coordinator


-Psychiatric
Consultant

-Psychiatric
Social Workers

-Educational
Diagnostician

-Clinical/
School
Psychologist

-Data Manager




-(Case Managers) -


-Inservice and
preservice
personnel
trainer








-Case Managers
(Social Workers,
Guidance Counse-
lors and Special
Education
Teachers)

__I1


*Number of individuals and portions of time needed in each position will vary among Centers as a function of
Center size (case load and geographic area). Not all positions listed are full time.









6. GOVERNANCE


Network governance should be by multiagency authority with single

agency responsibility. That is, the Department of Education should have

fiscal and program responsibility for administering the Educational

Centers Network. However, the Department of Health and Rehabilitative

Services (DHRS) should have a portion of authority over the program be-

cause of the extensive involvement of DHRS programs in Network services.

Exhibit C illustrates the proposed governance structure and program

relationships.

The Board of Governors will represent each of the geographic districts

corresponding to the Educational Centers' service areas. The Board should

have authority to oversee the network administration and make Network

policy decisions. Board action should be subject to review and approval

by the Commissioners of Education and the Secretary of Health and Rehabil-

itative Services.

The Executive Coordinator will be responsible for statewide development

of the Network, maintenance of Network standards by each Center, the fiscal

management of funds flowing to each Center, technical assistance to the

Network, personnel development, and annual program review and evaluation.

Each Educational Center Director will be employed by the fiscal agent

upon recommendation and approval by the Local Advisory Board. The Educational

Center Director will be administratively responsible for regional service

delivery, maintenance of Network standards, and fiscal management and

administration of the Educational Center.








Each Center shall have a Local Advisory Board, composed of citizens,

Mental Health Planning Board representatives, superintendents of all

school districts served by the Center and local directors of Health

and Rehabilitative Services for each district served by the Center.

The Board should have responsibility to review the Center's documen-

tation of service delivery at least annually, advise the Center

director about local needs, and provide an advocacy group for citizens

and students. Each local Advisory Board will meet annually with the

Board of Governors and the Network's Executive Coordinator. Additional

meetings can be held at any time on an "as needed" basis.

The Advisory Board also serves the fiscal agent as an ad hoc

personnel committee for annual review of the Center Director's perfor-

mance, merit pay, and continuation or termination of employment.

6.1. Compliance Monitoring

Compliance monitoring will be conducted as outlined in State

Board of Education Rule 6A-1.453, with the following addition:

Audits of Educational Center programs shall include a local

representative of the appropriate division of Health and

Rehabilitative Services, e.g., Mental Health, Children, Youth

and Families Services, Vocational Rehabilitation.

6.2. Program Monitoring

Each school district shall be responsible for monitoring the

individual educational/treatment program for students served by

an Educational Center who are legal residents of the district.

Monitoring activities shall include the following:








1. Appropriate representation from other involved agencies

will be included on the school staff committees, e.g.,

Mental Health, Vocational Rehabilitation, Family and

Children Services.

2. The Educational Center will send documentation of student

progress, at least annually, to each student's school

district and to the local Advisory Board.

3. The Educational Centers will submit annual evaluation

data and documentation of student progress to the Network

Coordinator. These data will be summarized for review

by the Board of Governors.









EXHIBIT C


Proposed Governance for a Statewide
Network of Educational Centers
Showing Program Relationships


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


Board of Governors


Local
Advisory
I Board ;



L Satellite
Programs


Education Center Network

Executive Coordinator
to
Education Center Network

F Regional Technical
_ Educational ___ Assistance
Center and SED
Directors Personnel
Development

Education Therapeuti
SCenter Foster Hom
I Programs Programs
/ I -
/ s -


Office for
Children Youth
and Families
(HRS Districts)


Community
Mental Health
Programs


- Vocational
Rehabilitation
I Programs


Regular Special
Education Education
Programs; Programs


I Psychiatric
Hospital
Programs


cE
e








7. FUNDING


Monies for the Educational Center Network should flow primarily

to the Department of Education, Division of Public Schools. A separate

allocation of funds should go to the Department of Health and Rehabilitative

Services specifically designated to provide therapeutic foster homes and

therapeutic group homes and other support services as part of the Educa-

tional Center's program.

7.1. Criteria for Funding

Funding of an Educational Center by the state should occur when

a Local Advisory Board submits to the Division of Public Schools

and Board of Governors a detailed proposal which

1. meets Network guidelines as determined by the Network

Coordinator and the Board of Governors;

2. includes a plan to develop, within two years, a collaborative

program with HRS, to provide a therapeutic foster home program

and to operate at least one therapeutic group home and other

alternative residential placements;
3. has been approved by the Superintendent of each school district

to be served by the proposed Center;

4. has been approved by the HRS District Administrator in each

HRS district to be served by the proposed Center;

5. has been approved by the Mental Health Planning Board in each

area to be served by the proposed Center;

6. designates a local fiscal agent such as a school district,

community mental health program, or city government;

7. provides assurances that the services will be provided at no

cost to parents.







7.2. Funding Formula

A system of grant funds combined with FTE should be used to fund

the Network of Educational Centers. The cost factor for SED (6.5)

does not provide sufficient funding to maintain the highly specialized

services needed for these students. There are several reasons for

using a combined funding mechanism:

1. A small nucleus of highly skilled, support personnel and

clinical child specialists must be provided as an integral

part of the program.

2. The goal to return students to regular education involves

gradual reentry with continuing support; thus each student

will receive a period of service from Educational Center

staff while participating, at the same time, in regular

education as a part of the reentry process.

3. Services to severely emotionally disturbed students must

include assistance to parents or surrogate parents so that

a student's therapeutic program involves the living/residential

environment.

Allocations for individual Educational Centers and satellites

should be made on the basis of student population and geographic

distribution. Appendix C contains the student population, by age

and county for 1979-80 (Source: Statistical Report, Florida Department

of Education, Division of Public Schools' MIS, Series 80-15, March,

1980). A prevalence figure of .5% (.005) is used to obtain the

numbers of severely emotionally disturbed in each age group and for

the totals.*


*Although estimates of numbers of students who are severely
emotionally disturbed typically report a higher percentage, actual
experience in several states which offer a full range of community
services to the severely emotionally disturbed indicates that this
figure is fairly accurate and results in no waiting lists.
27






The proposed geographic locations for Educational Centers and satel-

lites based on student population and geographic distribution is

contained in Appendix D.

The time allowed for this study did not allow for the panel

to develop complete estimates of start-up and continuing annual

costs for the Educational Center Network. A number of variables

will contribute to the cost of developing such a system, in-

cluding available facilities, personnel patterns for rural vs. urban

areas, salary scales in various areas of the state, and current

level of mental health resources in various areas of the state.

Accurate estimates of the number of students who would require

residential facilities are nonexistent for the state as a whole,

making it difficult to project accurately. Exhibit D provides es-

timated personnel costs for a typical center. This exhibit does not

include the cost of the educational component staff which would be

provided under existing FEFP funds.

Exhibit E provides information on the amount of Florida Education

Finance Program (FEFP) that would be generated by students eligible

for the profound cost factor (6.5), assuming that approximately

40% of the students would be in Center classes at any one

time. It is projected that the remaining 60% would be receiving

other services from the Center such as evaluation, liaison

and therapeutic support services.

Exhibit F provides comparative cost information for residential

placements such as therapeutic foster homes and therapeutic group

homes.

The following section on implementation provides recommendations

which will allow the state to develop start-up cost and continuing

annual cost information.








EXHIBIT D


SAMPLE EDUCATIONAL CENTER
BUDGET*


Position
1. Education Services Staff
a. Coordinator
b. Teachers
c. Teaching Assistants


Time


(100%)
(per 115
students
in
classes)


(SUB-TOTAL)
2. Other Personnel
Administrative Staff
a. Director
b. Secretary
c. Custodian
(SUB-TOTAL)
Liaison and Field Services Staff
a. Coordinator/Senior Case Manager
b. Case Managers (2)
(Social Workers/Teachers)
c. Personnel Trainer
(SUB-TOTAL)
Assessment and Evaluation Staff
a. Coordinator/Psychologist
b. Psychiatric Consultant
c. Psychiatric Social Worker
d. Educational Diagnostician
e. Data Manager
(SUB-TOTAL)
Therapeutic Support Services Staff
a. Clinical Coordinator/Psychologist
b. Psychiatric Consultant
c. Psychiatric Social Worker
d. Mental Health Paraprofessional
e. Adjunctive Therapist(art, music)
(SUB-TOTAL)


(100%)
(100%)
(100%)


( 50%)
(200%)

( 50%)




( 50%)
(5%)
( 50%)
( 50%)
(100%)




( 50%)
( 10%)
(100%)
(100%)
(100%)


Grant Funds FEFP Funds


$ 18,000.00


$747,500.00**


($ 18,000.00)


20,000.00
11,000.00
6,000.00
37,000.00)


9,000.00
28,000.00

7,000.00
44,000.00)


9,000.00
2,500.00
8,000.00
7,500.00
12,000.00
39,000.00)


9,000.00
5,000.00
16,000.00
8,000.00
14,000.00
52,000.00)





Grant Funds FEFP Funds


Residential Support Services Staff
a. Coordinator
b. Psychiatric Social Worker
c. Clinical Psychologist
d. Psychiatric Consultant
(SUB-TOTAL)


( 50%)
( 50%)
( 50%)
(5%)


$ 9,000.00
$ 8,000.00
$ 9,000.00
$ 2,500.00
($ 28,500.00)


OPERATING COSTS


(15% of grant fund personnel)

ONE-TIME START-UP COSTS


$ 24,775.00


(including equipment
renovation @ $200.00
288 children)


and building
per child for


$ 57,600.00


TOTAL BUDGET AMOUNT


$300,875.00


$747,500.00


*This sample budget is designed for an Educational Center serving 288 severely
emotionally disturbed students, an estimated 115 (40%) of whom will be served
in classes at any given time. Budgets for Centers designed to serve more
students or fewer students should be adjusted proportionately.

**See Exhibit E for FEFP, using Alachua Cty. as an example.)








EXHIBIT E


Projected Costs
for the Educational Components of
16 Educational Centers Based on FEFP


Educational
Centers




Bay
Leon
Volusia
Brevard
Lee
Marion
Alachua
Escambia
Palm Beach
Pinel'las
Polk
Orange
Duval.
Hillsjorough
Broward
Dade


16


SED
Population
in Area
Served


206
208
228
243
261
288
288
417
534
565
626
631
644
653
'677
1,079


7,548


40% in
Center and
Satellite
Classes


82
83
91
97
104
115
115
167
214
226
250
252
257
261
,271
:431

3,016


Projected
FEFP for
40% in Classes
at 6.5 cost factor


$ 533,000
539,500
591,500
630,500
744,276
747,500
747,500
1,085,500
1,391,000
1,469,000
1,625,000
1,638,000
1,670,500
1,696,500
1,761,500
2,801,500


19,672,276


TOTALS:






EXHIBIT F

DHRS COSTS FOR

RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS *


Therapeutic Foster Home

$41.15 per day, per child

$15,019.75 per year, per child

Therapeutic Group Home

$35.50 per day, per child

$12,957.50 per year, per child

Psychiatric Residential Care (eg. private)

$80.00 per day, per child

$29,200.00 per year, per child

DHRS Mental Health Hospital

$45.00 per child, per day

$16,425.00 per child, per year



* Source: Mental Health Program Office
Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services








8. SCHEDULE OF IMPLEMENTATION


The proposed Network should be developed over a five year period.

This will give the state time to evaluate the initial plan and make

refinements and corrections as needed. It also will allow the state

time to develop the skilled personnel needed for successful implemen-

tation of the Network.

It is recommended that the Department of Education fund two model

programs, one in a predominately urban, heavily populated area and a

second in a smaller, rural area. It is estimated that the urban center

would require $200,000 and the rural center $100,000 for start-up and

implementation.

These model programs would generate cost data which would allow for

further'statewide planning and development of a complete Educational

Center Network for the severely emotionally disturbed students in the

state.

Guidelines for funding a model program should include the following:

1. An area is currently planning or implementing services for

the severely emotionally disturbed and wants to participate

in the Educational Centers Network.

2. An area has a nucleus of professional personnel skilled in

working with severely emotionally disturbed students who

also will be available to work in the Educational Center

programs.

3. Appropriate space to house the Center and its proposed

satellites has been identified and can be made available.

4. A local advisory group with multidistrict and multiagency

representation has been formed and planning has occurred.


































PART II

APPENDICES


Appendix A:

Appendix B:

Appendix C:

Appendix D:


Summary of Activities

Bibliography of Data

Estimated Prevalence of SED Students in Florida

Proposed Geographic Distribution for
Centers and Satellites


































APPENDIX A

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES






FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
DIVISION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS
BUREAU OF EDUCATION FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS


ED Study Panel


Conf. Room (Rm. 32)
Senate Office Bldg.
January 14-16, 1981


Agenda


Wednesday, January 14, 1981


10:00 12:00

12:00 1:00

1:30 2:00


2:00 2:30


2:30 3:00


3:00 3:30


3:30 4:00


4:00 5:00


Thursday, January 15, 1981


9:00 11:00


11:00 12:00

12:00 1:30

1:00 5:00

1:30 2:00


Orientation and Planning


Lunch


Welcome and Comments Landis M. Stetler
Chief, Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students

Education of Emotionally Handicapped Students
Diana Wells, Consultant, Bureau of Education for
Exceptional Students

Mental Health Services Dave Schmeling
Mental Health Program Office, DHRS

The Perspective from Florida Council for
Community Mental Health Centers -
Ms. Chris Ziegler, Director

The Perspective from Parents and Advocates -
Jon Rossman, Director, Governor's Commission on
Advocacy for Developmentally Disabled

Summaries, Discussion and Plan for next day


Leon Co. School Board
2751 W. Pensacola
Tallahassee
Conference Room

Leon County and HRS District II staff
Residential Treatment needs of mid-size
school districts

Group Discussion

Lunch

Conference Room C (32) Senate Office Building


Future Planning and Proposal Options
DOE perspective






-2-


Thursday, January 15, 1981, continued

2:00 3:00 Future Planning and Proposal
Options DHRS Perspective
Bob Constantine, Ph.D. Mental Health Program
Office, DHRS

3:00 5:00 Committee Discussion and Planning


Friday, January 16, 1981 Conference Room D (32)
Senate Office Building

8:30 9:00 Dave Lycan, House Appropriations

9:00 11:00 Committee Work Session

11:00 12:00 Ed Deluzain, Ph.D., Resource Teacher, Bay County
Schools

12:00 1:30 Lunch

1:30 5:00 Committee Work Session







PARTICIPANTS


Mrs. Wendy Cullar, Chief
Bureau of Education for Exdeptional Students
Florida Department of Education
Knott Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Landis M. Stetler, Ed.D., Administrator
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students
Florida Department of Education
Knott Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Mr. Daivd Schmeling, Acting Supervisor
Children & Youth Unit
Mental Health Community Section
Mental Health Program Office
1317 Winewood Blvd.
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Ms. Chris Ziegler, Director
Florida Council for Community Mental Health Center
1030 E. Lafayette, Suite 102
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Mr. Jon Rossman, Esquire
Governor's Commission
Advocacy for Developmentally Disabled
Capitol Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Mr. Chip Carbonne
Mental Health Program Specialist
Mental Health Program Office
1323 Winewood Blvd., Building 6
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Ms. Fran Kimber
Mental Health Program Analyst
Mental Health Program Office
1323 Winewood Blvd., Building 6
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Ms. Chris Johnson
Center for Children and Youth
102 S. Calhoun Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Bob Constantine, Ph.D.
Staff Director
Mental Health Program Office
1323 Winewood Blvd., Building 6
Tallahassee, Florida 32301







Participants (cont.)


Mr. Howard Hinesley, Ph.D., Director
Exceptional Student Education
Pinellas County Public Schools
1895 Gulf-to-Bay Blvd.
Clearwater, Florida 33515

Ed Deluzain, Ph.D.
Resource Teacher for Emotionally Handicapped Program
Bay County Public Schools
1819 Liddon Ave., Building A
Panama City, Florida 32401

Mr. Dave Lycan
Chief Legislative Analyst
House Appropriations Committee
219 Capitol
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Diana Wells, Consultant
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students
Florida Department of Education
Knott Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Mr. Bob Connors, Director
Exceptional Student Education
Leon County Public Schools
2757 W. Pensacola
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

Ms. Lynda Roser, Coordinator
Exceptional Student Education
Leon County Public Schools
925-D Miccosukee Rd.
Tallahassee, Florida 32303

Mr. Ward Spisso
Education Specialist
Emotionally Handicapped Program
Leon County Public Schools
925 Missocukee Rd.
Tallahassee, Florida 32303

Ms. Rosanne Wood, Principal
SAIL School
Lincoln Neighborhood Center
725 N. McComb Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32303







Participants (Cont.)


Donald Johnson, Ph.D.
Associate Superintendent for Instruction
Leon County Public Schools
2757 West Pensacola Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

Mr. Charles Mould, Supervisor
Mental Health Program
HRS District II
Cedar Executive Center
2639 N. Monroe, Suite 200-A
Tallahassee, Florida 32312

Mr. George Brown, Supervisor
Children Youth, Family Program
HRS District II
Cedar Executive Center
2639 N. Monroe, Suite 200-A
Tallahassee, Florida 32312

Ms. Martha Scott
Program Specialist
Gadsden County Public Schools
P. 0. Box 818
Quincy, Florida 32351

Vernon Cain, Ph.D., Consultant
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students
Florida Department of Education
Knott Building
Tallahassee, Florida 32301





FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
DIVISION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS
BUREAU OF EDUCATION FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS


ED Study Panel Dade County School System
Miami, Florida
January 19, 1981

Agenda

Monday, January 19, 1981

8:00 12:00 Program visits, Dade County

1. Centennial Jr. (STARS Program)
8601 S.W. 212 Street, Miami, Florida 33161
Telephone: 235-1581 (305)
Ms. Loren Kanter Director

2. Dade Youth and Family Services
17025 S.W. 84 Street, Miami, Florida 33157
Telephone: 271-2211 (305)
Dr. Weiner, Dr. White (Program Directors)

3. Grant Center Hospital
20601 S.W. 157 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33194
Telephone: 251-0710 (305)
Ms. Sandra Weiss (Educational Director)

4. Howard Drive Elementary (TOPS Program)
7750 S.W. 136 Street, Miami, Florida 33161
Telephone: 235-1412 (305)
Dr. Arlene Lownstein (Project Manager)

5. McArthur South (Alternative School)
11035 S.W. 84 Street, Miami, Florida 33173
Telephone: 271-2721 (305)
Mr. Ranson Hill, Principal

6. Montanari Clinical School
291 E. 2nd Street, Hialeah, Florida 33010
Telephone: 887-7543
Dr. A. Montanari, Director

7. Palmetto Elementary (BACC/DCPS Cooperative Program)
12401 S.W. 74 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33156
Telephone: 238-4306 (305)
Mrs. Sue Dennison, ACSW Clinical Director

12:00 1:00 Lunch







1:00 5:00


Invitational Conference
Holiday Inn Airport Lakes

Invitational Conference Speakers

1. Dr. Wylamerle G. Marshall, Executive Director
Division of Exceptional Student Education
Dade County Public Schools
1410 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33132

2. Mrs. Charlette St. John, Executive Director
Dade Monroe Mental Health Board
200 S. Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33219

3. Ms. Sue T. Dennison, ACSW Clinical Director
Bertha Abess Children Center (BACC)
2600 S.W. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33133

4. Dr. A. Montanari, Director
Montanari Clinical School
291 East 2nd Street
Hialeah, Florida 33010

5. Ms. Janet Reno
State Attorney, Dade County Florida
1351 N.W. 12th Street
Miami, Florida 33135

6. Dr. Ron Shellow, M.D., Chairman
Purchase of Services Committee
Dade Monroe Mental Health Board
200 S. Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33133

7. Dr. Sol Landau, President
Dade County Mental Health Association
800 Bickell Plaza
Miami, Florida 33131

8. Mr. George Robinson, Executive Director
Metatherapy Institute
27200 Old Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33030







INVITATIONAL CONFERENCE ATTENDERS


Ms. Sandra Weiss
Grant Center Hospital
20601 S.W. 157 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33187

Dr. Arlene Loewenstein
Howard Drive Elementary
7750 S.W. 136 Street
Miami, Florida 33161

Ms. Charlotte St. John
Dade Mental Health Board
200 S. Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33219

Ms. Laura Katz, M.S.
Educational Information Planning Association
Miami, Florida
Parent Incorporated
4004 Campbell Road, Suite B
Val Paraiso, Indiana 46383

Ms. Rita Rad
Mental Health Program Office
HRS District I

Ms. Susan Dennison
Bertha Abess Children Center
2600 S.W. Second Ave.
Miami, Florida 33133

Mrs. Susan Renick
North Central Program Director, ESE
Dade County Public Schools
Miami, Florida

Dr. Eleanor Levine
Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resource Systems
Associate Center
3196 S.W. 62nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33155

Dr. Douglas Hiester
Youth and Family Services
1701 N.W. 30th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33142








Attenders (Cont.)


Dr. Elizabeth Smith Gammel
Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resource Systems
Associate Center
3196 S.W. 62nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33155

Mrs. Betty Shkoler
South Central Area Program Director, ESE
Dade County Public Schools

Mrs. Shirley West
Dade County Public Schools

Dr. Sol Landau, President
Dade County Mental Health Association
800 Brickell Plaza
Miami, Florida 33131

Mrs. Estelle Wild
Parent Information Specialist
Dade County Public Schools

Mrs. Martha Boden
Director of ESE Programs
Dade County Public Schools

Mr. Russell Wheatley
Dade County Public Schools

Mr. L. J. Gross
Dade County Public Schools

Dr. Peter Paraskeva, Consultant
Dade County Public Schools

Dr. A. Montanari, Director
Montanari Clinical School
291 East 2nd Street

Mr. Jim Duncan
Coordinator, Emotionally Handicapped
Dade County Public Schools

Ms. Janet Reno
State Attorney, Dade County Florida
1351 N.W. 12th Street
Miami, Florida 33135






Attenders (Cont.)


Mr. George Robinson, Executive Director
Metatherapy Institute
27200 Old Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida 33030

Dr. Carol Fineman
Dade County Public Schools

Mr. Michael Exelbert
Educational Specialist
Dade County Public Schools

Dr. Wylamerle G. Marshall
Executive Director
Division of Exceptional Student Education
Dade County Public Schools
1410 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33132

Mr. Bob Hoffman
Dade County Public Schools






FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
DIVISION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS
BUREAU OF EDUCATION FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS


ED Study Panel Hillsborough County
School System
Tampa, Florida
January 20, 1981

Agenda

Tuesday, January 20, 1981

8:00 12:00 Program visits, Hillsborough County

1. Florida Mental Health Institute
13301 North 30th Street, Tampa, Florida 33612
Telephone: 974-4483 (813)
Mr. Edward McDowell, Educational Coordinator
PACT Program
CIRT Program
Adolescent Program

2. Northside Community Mental Health Center
13301 North 30th Street, Tampa, Florida 33612
Telephone: 977-8700 (813)
Mr. Edward McDowell, Educational Coordinator
Adolescent Program
3. Dorothy Thomas School
Route 8, Box 520, Tampa, Florida 33618
Telephone: 961-1246 (813)
Mr. Bill Troutman, Principal

12:00 1:00 Lunch

1:00 5:00 Invitational Conference
Exceptional Student Education Office
411 E. Henderson Avenue






PARTICIPANTS


Mrs. Oma Pantridge
Director of Special Education
Exceptional Student Education
2609 US Highway 41 North
,Land 0' Lakes, Florida 33539

Mrs. Carolyn Baldwin
Supervisor, Emotionally Handicapped Program
Exceptional Student Education
2609 US Highway 41 North
Land O' Lakes, Florida 33539

Mr. Kenneth Marsh
School Psychologist
Exceptional Student Education
215 Manatee Avenue, West
Bradenton, Florida 33506

Mr. Jim McNally
Director
Hillsborough County Mental Health
Hillsborough .County

Mrs. Coleen Bevis
Mental Health Board
Hillsborough County

Mr. Terry Terrill
Site Administrator
Hillsborough County Children's Services
Hillsborough

Dr. Caroline Barnard
Supervisor, Psychological Services
Hillsborough County Schools

Mr. Raymond Ciemniecki, Director
Exceptional Student Education
215 Manatee Avenue, West
Bradenton, Florida 33506

Ms. Carol Thackham
Supervisor, School Social Workers
Hillsborough County Schools

Mr. Anthony Scolaro
Elementary School Principal
Hillsborough County Schools







Participants (Cont.)


Mr. Edward McDowell
Educational Coordinator
Florida Mental Health Institute School
13301 North 30th Street
Tampa, Florida 33612

Mr. John Parsons
Executive Director of Children's Home, Inc.
Children's Home, Inc.
Tampa, Florida

Mr. Bill Troutman
Coordinator
Dorothy Thomas School
Route 8, Box 520
Tampa, Florida 33618

Mr. Ed Herranz
Counselor
Dorothy Thomas School
Route 8, Box 520
Tampa, Florida 33618

Dr. Harold E. Edwards
Clinical Psychologist
Hillsborough County Children's Service
Hillsborough County

Ms. Sharon Brown
CAMS HRS
Hillsborough County

Phil Drash, Ph.D., Director
Florida Mental Health Institute
13301 North 30th Street
Tampa, Florida 33612

Ms. Carnella Stewart
Supervisor, FDLRS
Hillsborough County Schools

Mr. Mike McHugh
Exceptional Student Education
Sarasota County Schools

Ms. Carol S. Bryant, Coordinator
Emotionally Handicapped
Sarasota County Schools






Participants (Cont.)


Mr. Ed Herrance, Counselor
Dorothy Thomas Schools
Route 8, Box 520
Tampa, Florida 33618

Mr. Paul Hill
Director, Hillsborough County Children's Homes
Hillsborough County

































APPENDIX B

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF DATA







DOCUMENTS, MANUALS,
PAMPHLETS, REPORTS


Bay County School Board. The Need For Residential Facilities for
Emotionally Handicapped Students in Florida by Edward Deluzain,
Ph.D. Panama City, Florida, 16 January 1981.

Cheltenham Center. A Comprehensive Approach to Programming for Seriously
Emotionally Disturbed Children and Adolescents in the Least
Restrictive Environment. Cheltenham, Maryland.

Children's Services. Division of Mental Health Service Programs. National
Institute of Mental Health. A Special Report for the National Plan
for the Chronically Mentally Ill by Ira S. Lourie, M.D., Assistant
Director. 10 September 1980.

Dade County Mental Health Board. The Study Committee on Mental Health
Needs of Young Persons in Dade County. Miami, Florida, 4 March 1974.

Dade County School Board. Abstract from a Proposal for A Residential
Clinical School for Severely Emotionally Disturbed School Age Students.
Miami, Florida, Winter 1980.

Dade County School Board. District Procedures Document. Procedures for
Provision of Programs Available Within the District. 1980-1981.
10 October 1980.
Florida Center for Children and Youth., Children in State Mental Hospitals:
Problem Statement. Tallahassee, Florida, 1980.

Florida Center for Children and Youth. Community-Based Mental Health Services
for Children: Problem Statement. Tallahassee, Florida, 1980.

Florida Center for Children and Youth. The State and the Child: Florida 1980.
Tallahassee, Florida, 1980.

Georgia Psychoeducational System. Personnel Information. Typical Personnel
Costs, Type A Center, Type B Center, Type C Center.

State of Georgia. Department of Education. Office of Instructional Programs.
FY 81 Psychoeducational Center Proposal for (0-14): Funding Requirements
Abstract. March 1980.

Leon County School Board. District Procedures Document. Contractual
Arrangements Between the Leon School Board and Apalachee Community
Mental Health Services, Inc., for the Provision of Services. Tallahassee,
Florida, 31 July 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. A Resource Manual for
the Development and Evaluation of Special Programs for Exceptional
Students Volume I-B. Florida Statutes and State Board of Education
Rules Excerpts for Programs for Exceptional Students. Tallahassee,
Florida, March 1980.









Documents, Manuals, Pamphlets, Reports (Cont.)


State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. A Resource Manual for the
Development and Evaluation of Special Programs for Exceptional Students,
Volume I-E: Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules; Florida
School for the Deaf and Blind. Florida Department of Health and Rehab-
ilitative Services. Tallahassee, Florida, April 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Department
of Children, Youth, and Family Services. Excerpts From the CYF One-
and Five-Year Plan Submitted to Gov. 1 January 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Florida
Administrative Code. Chapter 10 E-4. Community Health Regulation.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Florida
Administrative Code. Chapter 10 E-10. Psychotic and Emotionally
Disturbed Children, Purchase of Residential Services Regulation.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Guide
to Minimum Staffing Pattern Standards for State Mental Health Facilities
in Florida. HRS Pamphlet No. 155-1, 1 May 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Mental
Health Services for Children (draft). 8 February 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Office
of the Inspector General, Office of Evaluation. Programs for the
Emotionally Disturbed Children and Adolescents: A Review of Issues.
Pamphlet E-80-19. 9 December 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Mental
Health Program Office. Specialized Childrens' Programs (Residential
Only). 15 June 1979.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Children
and Youth Services. District IV. The Need, The Plan to Meet the Need.
January 1981.

State of Florida, Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services. Florida
Mental Health Institute. Therapeutic Foster Homes in Florida: A
Status Report by Robert M. Friedman. Tampa, Florida, September 1980.









STATISTICS


State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. A Recent Summary
of Due Process Hearings Conducted in Florida, September 1979 -
August 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Contracts with
Nonpublic Schools for Emotionally Disturbed/Handicapped 1979-1980.
Tallahassee, Florida, 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Contracts with
Nonpublic Schools for Emotionally Handicapped 1980-81. Tallahassee,
Florida, January 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Cooperative
Agreements for Day Treatment for Emotionally Handicapped Students.
Tallahassee, Florida, January 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Estimated Number of
Severely Emotionally Disturbed Students by Age and Counties.
Tallahassee, Florida, January 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Exceptional Student
Membership Survey. Tallahassee, Florida, 28 April 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Exceptional Student
Percentage of Membership. Emotionally Handicapped Special Class
1979-80. Tallahassee, Florida.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. School Districts
with Residential Facilities for Emotionally Handicapped Students.
Tallahassee, Florida, January 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services.
Approved Funding for Residential Treatment Services for Emotionally
Disturbed Children. 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services.
Florida Mental Health Hospital Admissions by Race, Sex and Age
Group. July 1, 1979 June 30, 1980.








Statistics (Cont.)


State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools'
MIS. Statistical Report. Students by Racial/Ethnic Category.
Staff by Sex and Racial/Ethnic Category 1979-1980. Tallahassee,
Florida, Series 80-15, March 1980, Reprinted October 1980.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services.
Summary of PDMC/CY Residential Programs for Emotionally Disturbed
Children and Adolescents. 13 January 1981.



MAPS

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Intensive Service
Models for Emotionally Handicapped Students in Florida. Tallahassee,
Florida, January 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. Proposed Geographic
Distribution of Educational Center and Satellites in Florida.
Tallahassee, Florida, February 1981.

State of Florida. Department of Education. Division of Public Schools.
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students. State of Florida,
Total School Population (Pre-Kindergarten Grade 12) Fall, 1979.
Tallahassee, Florida.

State of Florida. Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services.
Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitative Service District
Boundaries. Tallahassee, Florida.





























APPENDIX C

ESTIMATED PREVALENCE

of

SEVERELY EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED STUDENTS

IN FLORIDA






2/81


Estimated Number of Severely Emotionally
Disturbed Students by Age Groups and Counties


County


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Orange


Grade Levels


Grade Levels
7-12


1 I r I


Pop.
Total


11,584
1,902
10,410
2,179
22,585
69,579
1,092
2,864
3,634
8,722
7,460
2,830
100,888
2,029
828
54,251
22,548
955
989
5,096
724
570
1,203
1,265
2,251
2,471
3,420
3,849
58,219
1,829
4,655
4,472
1,295
517
8,931
15,586
11,845
2,126
499
1,802
11,480
11,265
4,605
4,096
4,219
12,501
2,433
41,967


SED
(.5%)


Pop.
Total


4- 4 4 -


57.92
9.51
52.05
10.90
112.93
347.90
5.46
14.32
18.17
43.61
37.30
14.15
504.44
10.15
4.14
271.26
112.74
4.78
4.95
25.48
3.62
2.85
6.015
6.33
11.26
12.36
17.10
19.25
291.10
9.15
23.28
22.37
6.48
2.59
44.66
77.93
59.23
10.63
2.50
9.01
57.40
56.33
23.03
20.48
21.10
62.51
12.17
209.84


9,843
1,515
9,033
1,668
25,998
65,642
1,010
3,998
4,090
8,062
6,379
3,373
107,221
1,692
819
46,728
19,834
712
812
3,737
709
481
1,170
965
1,702
1,997
3,099
3,388
52,461
1,601
4,207
3,564
973
426
8,165
13,598
9,580
1,772
430
1,548
8,581
10,502
4,246
3,586
3,406
12,275
1,923
40,059


Totals


SED
(.5%)


Pop.
Total*


SED
(.5%)


49.22
7.58
45.17
8.34
129.99
328.21
5.05
19.99
20.45
40.31
31.90
16.87
536.11
8.46
4.10
233.64
99.17
3.56
4.06
18.69
3.55
2.41
5.85
4.83
8.51
9.99
15.50
16.94
262.31
8.01
21.04
17.82
4.87
2.13
40.83
67.99
47.90
8.86
2.15
7.74
42.91
52.51
21.23
17.93
17.03
61.38
9.62
200.30


21,516
3,417
19,468
3,847
48,612
135,313
2,102
6,862
7,724
16,784
13,868
6,203
208,109
3,721
1,647
100,979
42,382
1,667
1,801
8,833
1,433
1,051
2,373
2,230
3,953
4,468
6,519
7,237
110,680
3,430
8,862
8,036
2,268
943
17,096
29,246
21,483
3,898
988
3,350
20,061
21,767
8,851
7,683
7,625
24,776
4,356
82,026


107.58
17.08
97.34
19.23
243.06
676.57
10.51
34.31
38.62
83.92
69.34
31.02
1040.55
18.61
8.24
504.90
211.91
8.34
9.01
44.17
7.17
5.26
11.87
11.15
19.77
22.34
32.60
36.19
553.40
17.15
44.31
40.18
11.34
4.72
85.48
146.23
107.42
19.49
4.94
16.75
100.31
108.84
44.26
38.42
38.13
123.88
21.78
410.13


- ----









County


Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwanee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton
Washington


TOTAL








*Statistical Report,
Florida Department
Division of Public
Management Informat:


Gra


de Levels
K-6


Grade Levels
7-12


Totals


I I .1 -j


Pop.
Total


4,545
36,601
13,139
44,578
58,732
5,270
4,546
7,897
6,307
12,502
19,203
2,343
2,497
1,922
762
18,350
1,343
2,028
1,597


769,682


Series 80-.
if Education
schools
on Services


SED
(.5%)


22.73
183.01
65.70
222.89
293.66
26.35
22.73
39.49
31.54
62.51
96.02
11.72
12.49
9.61
3.81
91.75
6.72
10.14
7.99


3,848.41


Pop.
Total


3,995
34,362
11,713
43,710
27,226
4,464
3,505
5,993
6,006
11,631
16,440
2,129
2,272
1,452
672
17,627
1,117
1,694
1,475


716,063


SED
(.5%)


Pop.
Total


4 4


19.98
171.81
58.57
218.55
136.13
22.32
17.53
29.97
30.03
58.16
82.20
10.65
11.36
7.26
3.36
88.14
5.59
8.47
7.38


3,580.32


8,540
70,963
24,852
88,288
85,958
9,734
8,051
13,890
12,313
24,133
35,643
4,472
4,769
3,374
1,389
35,977
2,460
3,722
3,072


1,506,215


SED
(.5%)


42.70
354.82
124.26
441.44
429.79
48.67
40.26
69.45
61.57
120.67
178.22
22.36
23.85
16.87
6.95
179.89
12.30
18.61
15.36


7,565.86


I. I ____ ___


5, March, 1980


_ __ __ __ ____





ESTIMATED PREVALENCE


OF

SEVERELY EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED STUDENTS

IN FLORIDA


2b


SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND
DHRS DISTRICTS IN FLORIDA


4a


4b


Sc


-4 S
-' r


2/81





























APPENDIX D

PROPOSED GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

FOR

EDUCATIONAL CENTERS AND SATELLITES




Rev. 5/82


PROPOSED GEOGRAPHIC
DISTRIBUTION OF CENTERS AND SATELLITES


ESTIMATED


AND
SED POPULATION


R=Rural U=Urban
School Districts Districts Served and SED Population
HRS Districts with Centers Satellite (*) Locations to be Served


IEscambia R (212) *Santa Rosa (62)

*Okaloosa (124)
Walton (19)
417

II-A Bay R (97) Washington (15)

*Jackson (40)
Holmes (17)
Calhoun (11)

Gulf (12) 208

II-B Leon R (107) *Franklin (9)
Liberty (5)
*Gadsden (44)
Wakulla (12)

*Taylor (17)
Jefferson (11)
Madison (17) 206

III-A Alachua R (108) Bradford (19)

*Putnam (49)

*Columbia (31)
Union (7)
Hamilton (11)
Suwannee (24)

*Dixie (8)
Levy (19)
Gilchrist (7)
Lafayette (5) 288






School Districts Districts Served and SED Population
HRS Districts with Centers Satellite (*) Locations to be Served

III-B Marion R (109) *Lake (85)
Sumter (22)

*Citrus (39)
Hernando (33) 288

IV-A Duval U (505) *Clay (84)
Nassau (38)
Baker (17) 644

IV-B Volusia R (180) *St. Johns (40)
Flagler (8) 228

V Pinellas U (441) *Pasco (124) 565

VI Hillsborough-U(553) *Manatee (100) 653

VII-A Orange U (410) Osceola (43)
*Seminole (178) 631

VII-B Brevard R (243) None 243

VIII-A Polk R (293) *Highlands (36)
Hardee (20)

VIII-B *Sarasota (121)
DeSoto (19) 489

VIII-C Lee R (146) Charlotte (34)
Hendry (22)
Glades (5)
*Collier (69) 276

IX Palm Beach-U (355) Martin (44)

*St. Lucie (69)
Indian River (44)
Okeechobee (22) 534

X Broward U (677) None 677

XI Dade U (1041) *Monroe (38) 1079

TOTAL 16 Centers 22 Satellites 7426 SED Students




*


2/8.


PROPOSED GEOGRAPHIC
DISTRIBUTION OF EDUCATION

CENTERS AND SATELLITES


2a


2b


4b


SCHOOL DISTRICTS
WITH CENTERS

SCHOOL DISTRICTS
WITH SATELLITES


* do



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