• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Errata
 Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Friends'...
 Sermon by John Comly, at Friends'...
 Sermon by John Comly, at Green...
 Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Darby,...
 Sermon by John Comly, delivered...
 Epistle to friends
 Sandy foundation skaken , &c.
 Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Green...
 Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Friends'...
 Sermon by John Comly, at Friends'...
 Sermon by Townsend Hawkshurst,...
 Sandy foundation shaken, &c. (Extracts...
 Sermon by Edward Stabler, at Green...
 Sermon by Edward Stabler, at Friends'...
 Sandy foundation shaken, &c. (Extracts...
 Sermon by Edward Hicks, at Green...
 Sermon by Edward Hicks, at Carpenters'...
 Sandy foundation shaken, &c. (Extracts...
 Sermon by Thomas Wetherald, at...
 Sermon by Dr. John Moore, at Carpenters'...
 Sermon by Elias Hicks, at Falls...
 Sermon by Abraham Lower, at Green...
 Sandy foundation shaken &c. (Extracts...






Title: The Quaker, being a series of sermons by members of the Society of Friends ..
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074982/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Quaker, being a series of sermons by members of the Society of Friends ..
Physical Description: v. : ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Gould, Marcus Tullius Cicero, 1793-1860 ( reporter )
Hicks, Elias, 1748-1830
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1827-
 Subjects
Subject: Society of Friends -- Sermons   ( lcsh )
Sermons, American   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Taken in short hand by Marcus T. C. Gould ...
General Note: Vol. 4 has title: The Quaker, or a series of sermons by Elias Hicks. 1828.
General Note: Sabin 66931.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074982
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001756929
oclc - 01663566
notis - AJG9968
lccn - 33000851

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Errata
        Errata
    Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Friends' Meeting, Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, June 3, 1827
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Sermon by John Comly, at Friends' Meeting, Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, June 3,1827
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Sermon by John Comly, at Green Street Meeting, Philadelphia, May 17, 1827
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Darby, April 15, 1827
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Sermon by John Comly, delivered at Darby, April 15, 1827, after the preceding
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Epistle to friends
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Sandy foundation skaken , &c.
        Page 48
    Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Green Street Meeting, Philadelphia, April 19, 1827, being the time of yearly meeting
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Friends' Meeting, Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, July 1, 1827
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Sermon by John Comly, at Friends' Meeting, Carpenters' Hall, afternoon of July 1, 1827
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Sermon by Townsend Hawkshurst, delivered at Friends' Meeting, Darby, Nov. 15, 1827
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Sandy foundation shaken, &c. (Extracts continued from page 48)
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Sermon by Edward Stabler, at Green Street Meeting, Philadelphia, July 15, 1827
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Sermon by Edward Stabler, at Friends' Meeting, Carpenters' Hall, in the afternoon of Sunday, July 15,1827
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
    Sandy foundation shaken, &c. (Extracts continued from page 96)
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Sermon by Edward Hicks, at Green Street Meeting, Philadelphia, August 19, 1827
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Sermon by Edward Hicks, at Carpenters' Hall, Philadelphia, Sunday afternoon, August 19, 1827
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
    Sandy foundation shaken, &c. (Extracts continued from page 144)
        Page 208
    Sermon by Thomas Wetherald, at Green Street Meeting, Wednesday, October 15, 1827, during the yearly meeting
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
    Sermon by Dr. John Moore, at Carpenters' Hall, September 2, 1827
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
    Sermon by Elias Hicks, at Falls Meeting, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1826
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
    Sermon by Abraham Lower, at Green Street Meeting, Philadelphia, November 18, 1827
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
    Sandy foundation shaken &c. (Extracts continued from page 208)
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
Full Text




THE


QUAKER,



BEING



A SERIES OF SERMONS



BY


MEMBERS 01 THE SOCIETY O1 IJ'IlIEN)S






VOLUME II.







TAKEN IN SHORT HAND BY MARCUS T G. GOULD,
STENOGRAPHER,

No. 6 North Eighth Street,

PHILADELPHIA.

1827.





























Eastern JDistrict of Pennsylvania, to 7itt:
ir, RBE IT REMEMBERED, that on the twenty-third day of Febr-
L.S. ary, in the fifty-first year of the Independence of the United Statek-
of America, A. D. 1827,
MAncns T. C. Gonr.n,
of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right
whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:
The Quaker, being a series of Sermons by members of the Society of Friends.
Taken in short hand by Marcus T. C. Gould, Stenographer, No. 6, N. Eighth
street, Philadelphia.
In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled,
":An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps,
Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies, during the
times therein mentioned"-And also to the Act, entitled, An Act supple-
mentary to an Act entitled, An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by
securing the Copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprie-
tors of such copies during the times therein mentioned," and extending the
benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and
other prints."
D. CALDWELL,
Clerk of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania,






















C0O N T E ENTSS,


No. 1.
Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Friends'
Meeting, Carpenters' Hall, Phila.
delphia, June 3, 1827, 1
Sermon by John Comly, at Carpen-
ters' Hall, June 3, 1827, 9
Sermon by John Comly, at Green st.
Meeting, Philadelphia, May 17,
1827, 27
Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Darby,
April 15, 1827, 33
Sermon by John Comly, at Darby,
April 15, 1827. 37
Epistle to Friends, 43
Sandy Foundation Shaken, &c. by
William Penn, 48

No. 2.

Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Green
street, April 19, 1827, time of
Yearly Meeting, 49
Sermon by Jesse Kersey, at Carpen-
ters' Hall, July 1, 1827, 60
Sermon by John Comly, at Carpen-
ters' Hall, afternoon of July 1,
1827, 69
Sermon by Townsend Hawkshurst, at
Darby, Nov. 15, 1826, 87
Sandy Foundation Shaken, from
92 to 96


No. 3.
Sermon by Edward Stabler, at Green
street Meeting, July 15, 1827, 97
Sermon by Edward Stabler, at Car-
penters' Hall, afternoon of July 15,
1827, 120
Prayer by Dr. John Moore, at the
same time and place, 140
Sandy Foundation Shaken, 141 to 144
No. 4.
Sermon by Edward Hicks, at Green
st. Meeting, August 19, 1827, 145
Sermon by Edward Hicks, at Car.
penters' Hall, afternoon of August
19, 1827, 17 5
Sandy Foundation Shaken, 20O
No. 5.
Sermon by Thomas Wetheracld at
Green st. Wednesday, Oct. 17,1827,
209
Sermon by Dr. John Moore, at Car-
penters' Hall, Sept. 2, 1827, 238
No. 6.
Sermon by Elias Hicks, at Falls
Meeting, Bucks county, Pa. De-
cember 20, 1826, 249
Sermon by Abraham Lower, at Green
st. Meeting, Nov. 18, 1827, 278
Sandy Foundatiou Shaken, 284to299
George Fox, 30(





























ERRATA.

Page 12, For "All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is
profitable," &c. read, 1ll scripture given by inspiration
of God is profitable," &c.
87, 3d line from the top, for 1827, read 1826.
98, 18th line from the top, instead of "it. Then," read as fol-
lows:-he who runs may read it, that according to the laws
of sovereign wisdom, &c.
151, 1st line-" Cut off the connexion of this"-should read,
Cut off their connexion with this," &c.
209, 4th line from the top, for October 15," read, October 17."
212, 9thline from the top-for, "or placing dependance upon,"
read, "or we can place no dependance upon it."
222, 5th line, for "animate," read, inanimate."
225, 3d and 4th lines, "leads to morality," read, "leads to a
morality."









VOL.. II. No. 1.




THE QUAKER.




JULY, 1827.



[The two succeeding discourses and prayer were delivered at Carpenters' Hall,
Chesnut street, Philadelphia, at the opening of a meeting, under the au-
thority of the Monthly Meeting of Friends of Byberry, and superintended by
a committee of that meeting.
This meeting was opened for the accommodation of those Friends, who, to en-
joy the free exercise of their consciences and religious privileges, have with..
drawn from the Monthly Meeting held for the Southern District of Philadel-
phia, and have been received as members of the society at Byberry. These
meetings were large, and attended with unusual solemnity; and it is believed,
that the contents of the sermons and prayer are worthy of a serious perusal,
notwithstanding, the energy and pathos of the speakers are wanting, to excite
that deep interest which was felt on hearing them delivered.
The Stenographer regrets, that on account of his unfavourable position in these
meetings, he cannot present as perfect a report as he would have done under
different circumstances, especially in the last discourse.]

SERMON BY JESSE KERSEY, AT FRIENDS MEETING, CARPENTERS'
HALL, PHILADELPHIA, JUNE 3, 1827.

I have often been instructed by having brought before
the view of my mind, the testimonies which have been
left behind, by those advocates in the cause of universal
righteousness, that, with us, go under the character of
apostles. The testimony of the great apostle to the Gen-
tiles relative to a very important subject, tha opened upon
my mind in the present opportunity, wherein he hath
said, that the natural man receiveth not the things of the
spirit of God, for they are foolishness unto him ;'neither
can he know them, because they are spiritually discern-
ed."
Now, when I consider that the obligations which relate
VOL. 11.-1







SERMON


to our eternal well-being must necessarily be simple, and
when I contrast this idea with the apostle's testimony, it
would seem as if they might possess a degree of variance
with each other. But 1 believe, my friends, if we come
clearly to comprehend what that great minister had in
view, we shall find that it goes abundantly to simplify
the religion which he was engaged to inculcate. He per-
ceived the distinction due and proper to be made, in the
views which were to be taken of man. He believed in
the existence of the natural man, which I take to be the
outward, the organic, the material man, so far as his phy-
sical powers can be taken into view. All the powers that
the natural man can possibly occupy, we shall, I believe,
readily perceive, have relation exclusively to material
substances. The eye can only discover material bodies,
and every sense, in the construction of the natural man,
is unquestionably bounded by material substances; there
must of course be a difference between that which is ma-
terial and that which is spiritual. And the natural man
occupying those outward natural senses, can never, by the
application of these, reach to any thing higher than they
are competent to; and hence, if brought to the perception
of a spiritual subject and being, I take it, the apostle
believed, he must be brought to this comprehension by
those capacities adapted to that particular end.
Now, as in the natural man, there exists a natural or-
der of senses, and as these are applicable to their special
end; so in the spiritual man there exists an order, and
every subject is comprehensible according to its order. In
the outward, men do not perceive objects but by their cor-
responding senses; and in that form must the spiritual
man, in like manner, come to a perception, by a corres-
ponding process.
The apostle was brought to believe in the existence of







BY JESSE KERSEY.


spiritual perceptive powers, and that, as these were acted
on, they were furnished with evidence of the existence of
the cause which acts upon them. And when it pleases
God, in his infinite, all powerful spirit, to reach forth the
sceptre of his love, and to touch the spiritual, perceptive
powers of the soul, then it is that we are sensible of his
majestic presence. But we can never come to a compre-
hension of that knowledge, as I take it, agreeable to the
testimony of the apostle, and every impression that 1 have
witnessed on my part-we can never come to a compre-
hension of the knowledge of God, except through a spi-
ritual medium. And hence, this knowledge is held up to
be of such vast importance. "And this is life eternal, that
they might know thee, the only true God, and Jesus
Christ whom thou hast sent."
Now, you may perceive, my friends, that we may col-
lect a great deal, and have our minds strengthened with
much which we have received from others, and yet be
void of that quickening perception, of that powerful quick-
ening of God upon the soul of man, which was known
and- experienced on the part of those who declared this
knowledge to be life eternal. It is not, then, so far as I
have been permitted to see, within the reach of any exter-
nal means which man can employ, ever to attain to a dis-
tinct, perceptive knowledge of God. But as we arrive at
a knowledge of objects in the outward and visible crea-
tion, by corresponding powers, so we must arrive at a
knowledge of God, by our spiritual perceptive capacities.
Hence we may perceive the necessity of our becoming ab-
stracted from all material and visible things. when we are
desiring to obtain an interview whit GOd our gracious
Creator. And hence it is, that itl the pious, that-have
given testimony upon the subject, on the ground of their
own practical knowledge, have invariably pre-ented the







SERMON


necessity of an abstracted state, from the world and the
things of the world, in order to obtain this blessed per-
ception. But if our minds are kept abroad in the world,
and are occupied in and amongst the objects that impress
us as natural beings, amongst the visible objects of our af-
fections-if our minds are kept here, we are unprepared
to come to a perception of the knowledge of God; for it is
the spirit that "searcheth all things, yea the deep things
of God."
Whatever men may profess, however elevated their ta-
lents, however extended their literary advantages, if they
have not attained to this retired spiritual state, in which
the faculties of the soul are raised, and brought into a
quickened, perceptive condition, they can know nothing
of God. And when I have followed this consideration,
as I have been induced to do in the present interesting
opportunity, and when I have looked towards the termi-
nation of all visible objects of enjoyment or entertainment,
I have believed that there was nothing so deeply impor-
tant to man, as to be brought into this inward, spiritually
dedicated state, in which the soul immortal can retire from
all outward things, and enter into the presence of him
that lives and reigns for ever; and who, blessed and
magnified be his holy and eternal nature, remains to be
the everlasting Father of his creation.
Whatever opinions may be promulgated, and whatever
doctrines may be imposed upon the human family, the
everlasting Father, the God of the spirits of all flesh, re-
mains to be a being, compassionating every part of his
workmanship, and graciously desiring the good of the
whole. And we are considered, according to the testi-
mony of those who we believe were inspired, as being
formed after the image of God. And the more we are
raised into his blessed image, the more we shall find and







BY JESSE KERSEY.


feel that there are in us, through the all creative power of
God, perceptive capacities, of which many may remain
ignorant many years of their lives-perceptive powers
which reach into the spiritual world, and in which we
richly enjoy the presence of spiritual feelings, that no
language can sufficiently delineate.
When the apostles and primitive believers were in-
structed to wait for this inheritance, they were command-
ed to wait at Jerusalem till they should be endowed with
power from on high. They assembled together, stripped
of every outward dependance; he, on whom they depend-
ed, had been taken away from their society. They sat
down to wait, and witness the fulfilment of the promise
made by God to their fathers, and in this state they be-
came acquainted with the pouring forth of the Holy Spi-
rit, through which the soul of man is led into the nature
of a spiritual being, and into the enjoyment of spiritual
happiness. But although there were some present who
heard the testimony in relation to this important experi-
ence, and although they were themselves, incompetent to
experience it to the full, at that moment, yet no doubt they
were powerfully impressed with the truth of the testimony,
and that others were brought to the perfection of things
which they could only understand in their own tongues
wherein they were born. They were brought into this
situation as men-they felt their condition, and hence the
solicitude was raised, What shall we do to be saved.'
0 my friends! when we are brought into the quicken-
ing feeling of the love of God, and into a spiritual percep-
tion, then it is, that we are anxious to know what we are
to do to be saved-how to escape from the pollutions of
the world, and how to be fitted to belong to the general
assembly and church of the first born whose names are
written in heaven. The way for this, I have no doubt,







SERMON


is, to retire into ourselves and wait upon him who is able
to reach unto his tried subjects, and to open in their
minds a clear sense of what they stand in need of; and I
could ask you to consider, how the soul that is tried and
brought under any weight or exercise of affliction is to
have this removed; and how he is to be made sensible
that it is done away, by any other means than by the
presentation of internal evidence to the soul itself. And
it has been no doubt the blessed experience of not a few
of those in the audience of my voice, that their trials and
afflictions have been lightened by the immediate presence
of that Being who fills the heavens and the earth. By
the immediate impression of his love the minds of many
have been relieved. And how precious a thing it is to
have an evidence that he sustains the character of Hea-
venly Father, and that he is always full of tender com-
passion. This is the greatest source of comfort to the af-
flicted and tried mind; for if he only can get hold of the
conviction that God is love, and that he is over all his
works, how it relieves all anxiety, and the soul reposes on
him as an almighty friend. I wish you all to experience
this; for we are passing along the awful stream of time,
and approaching the spiritual world. And if we are
happy here and forever, I believe it must be in conse-
quence of witnessing a union of soul with God; and this
will only be known by the influence of his eternal spirit
upon the perceptive faculties of our spirits, through those
powers which he has bestowed upon each of us. And as
we become acquainted with this influence, these powers
become enlarged, so that we are rendered quick sighted,
to see when evil presents itself. We shall also see that
we are all standing in need of God's help for our securi-
ty and preservation, and thus we shall be helped along
the dangerous path of time. As these things engaged my







BY JESSE KERSEY.


attention in this interesting assembly, and without an ex-
pectation of saying much, I believed it right for me to
spread them before you, for your weighty and close con-
sideration.

PRAYER BY JESSE KERSEY.

[The first few words were not heard by the reporter.]
Lord of hosts, the God of the spirits of all flesh! it is
cause of consolation and comfort to all those that have
become acquainted with thee, to know and to be sensible,
that thou art indeed a present help in every needful time.
And that while thy sacred eye beholds the evil and the
good, thou remainest to be graciously attentive to those
who are concerned to put their trust in thee, under all the
various conflicts and trials to which we are liable in our
passage through this present probationary scene.
Thou, 0 Lord of hosts, remainest to be graciously
pleased to furnish conclusive evidence, that thy power is
sufficient to support and sustain us, as well in the lowest
regions of affliction, as upon the highest point of elevation.
0 gracious and sovereign Creator! thou beholdest the
present state of thy workmanship-thine eye sees the
many tossing, turnings and overturning that are going on
among thy rational creation. And if it be consistent with
thy holy and ever blessed will, condescend, we pray thee,
to open yet more abundantly, in the understanding and
judgment of all them that are looking toward thy blessed
sanctuary, the way in which they should go. Wilt thou
be pleased, as it regards the great and important work
of the ministration, the instrumental ministration of the
gospel of Christ-we pray thee, to encompass the spirit-
of thy servants, and thy handmaids, every one, more and
more, with a clear and sound discernment, and with a







PRAYER.


correct understanding of what thou in thy wisdom com-
mandest shall be done, and what thou in thy wisdom
commandest shall not be done. Wilt thou bow the
heavens and come down, 0 gracious God, and interpose
the arm of thine own Almighty power, for the great and
glorious purpose of shaking the kingdom and power of
antichrist to its very centre; and may the babes in thy
flock and thy family, that are tried and deeply afflicted
everywhere, wheresoever they may be, have a little
fountain opened in them, by which they may become ac-
quainted with thee, and blessed in thee, and in thy dear
son. And 0 righteous Father, as thou hast solemnized
our minds together, and hast given this day unto many of
us, hearts of feeling, and of brotherly kindness, we ask it
of thee, that thou wilt preserve us in these feelings, and
that the true current of brotherly kindness and brotherly
love, may flow from vessel to vessel, and extend from
sea to sea, and from the rivers to the ends of the earth.
That so, Holy One of Israel, thy kingdom may come, and
thy will be done on earth as it is done in heaven. Thou
knowest, 0 God, the frailties of thy creature man, and
thou canst provide a way for every case, and every cir-
cumstance that rests upon our souls; and Oh! that thou
wouldst be pleased to give us a blessed entrance into the
stream of repentance, that we may repent of all our sins
past, and implore thy merciful forgiveness, and, that thou
wilt enable us to effect the great work of our ransom
from under every power and principle of darkness in
which we have been involved: and may we at last belong
to that glorious and blessed assembly, which surround the
throne of thy glory, that so we may be raised from our
fallen state to join with thy children in ascribing unto
thee, glory, honour, might and majesty, with united devo-
tion, now and for ever. Amen.










SERMON


BY JOHN COMLY, AT FRIENDS' MEETING, CARPENTERS' HALL, PHILA-
DELPHIA, JUNE 3, 1827.

SWhat shall I render unto the Lord for all his bene-
fits toward me?" What shall we render unto the Lord
for all his benefits towards us? This is an inquiry which
I have often found beneficial to myself, and which the
humble christian mind will often recur to, in numbering,
in counting, and reflecting upon the various privileges and
benefits derived from heaven. It is a capacious theme
for silent meditation; and I have felt a care, in rising to en-
deavour to perform a duty that would seem at once to
have a tendency to draw the mind of those present from
this silent meditation, that they may remain undisturbed
by any thing that is without them, lest they should be in
any degree diverted from an attention to the only fountain,
the only power that can qualify them acceptably to wor-
ship. The minds that are gathered, that are centered
within themselves, to the unspeakable gift, which called
forth the feeling of gratitude and thankfulness in an
apostle formerly-as to these who are gathered to this
indescribable gift in themselves, I would hope there was
but little danger of their being diverted with any thing
without them. And all the object and end of vocal com-
munication that is rightly authorized in the wisdom of
Truth, must be to gather the minds of those that are out-
ward, and that are dwelling too much upon the surface-
that these may be gathered to the gift of God that is with-
in. For it is the end and object of all preaching, that it
should have an effect upon those that hear to bring them
inward, to the true teacher. For no man need to place
his dependance on that which is outward, when he
has an ear to hear, and when lie comes into that state of
vol.. 11.-2








SERMON


holy silence, of inward quietude, which is like being
gathered as into the closet of his own heart, that he may
hear with his internal and spiritual ear what the spirit
saith, and what the Lord teaches. And to such as are thus
gathered and brought to depend simply upon that private
instruction and comfort, to be derived from this source,
there is no more need of outward preaching.
My mind has been introduced into a feeling of brotherly
sympathy, for those who have not become so gathered in-
ward, as to attend to the manifestations of that spirit which
is given to every man to profit withal. And in the de-
sire that I have felt, that these may become, more and
more, gradually gathered home, I am induced, in obedi-
ence to an impulse of duty, to attempt a little to turn the
attention of the minds of those who are asking and in-
quiring, who will show us any good ?" That they may
be brought to find within themselves that living fountain
and spring, that will rise up in them as a well of water
springing up into everlasting life." This is among the
benefits that are presented in the dispensation and econo-
my of Infinite Wisdom to the children of men; it is among
those benefits dispensed for the gathering of those child-
ren--for the gathering of those minds, described as not
having attained, or not being gathered to the fold of rest.
' Other sheep I have, which are not of this fold: them al-
so I must bring, and they shall hear my voice; and there
shall be one fold, and one shepherd." Now in order
that these may be brought and gathered to the fold, to the
enclosure, to the quiet habitation, or state of mind wherein
they have no more need to rely on external preaching,
teaching and instruction, there is in the church of Christ
a dispensation of the gift of prophesying, and of speaking
unto men to edification, thereby to draw their attention off
from those things which are outward, by outward means,








BY JOHN COMLY.


to those which are inward and spiritual. It is to call
their attention to the anointing. But ye have an unction
from the Holy One, and ye know all things; and ye need
not, that any man teach you; but as the same anointing
teacheth you of all things, and is truth, and is no lie."
To bring the mind unto the teaching of this anointing, this
unction from the Holy One, seems to be the object, in the
dispensation and economy of perfect wisdom, in his dis-
pensing a gift of gospel ministry, to speak that which we
know, and to testify of that which we have seen. These
are the grounds of all true gospel ministry; and it must
ever rest on the influence of the spirit of God, thus quali-
fying us to declare that which we have heard, which
we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked upon,
and our hands have handled of the word of life." And
whatever metaphors and figures they may use, to draw
the mind to that which is indescribable, the unspeakable
gift which no language is adequate to describe, yet it is
among the greatest benefits conferred upon the human fa-
mily. For there are those who are yet without, who are
as children having their external faculties chiefly exer-
cised in viewing external objects, as they strike upon the
external senses. And in a comparison of religion with
those things which are external, there is need of meta-
phors and parables, to meet those who are in a state of
outward dependence; but it is to draw them to that which
is inward and spiritual. Hence, when the inquiry was,
' Why speakest thou unto them in parables?" The an-
swer given is fraught with deep instruction, and was
given us by the inspiration of God, the only means by
which we can come to a right understanding of those things
which have been written aforetime; and by which only,
and alone, all the scriptures and every thing which is:ex-
ternal, whether it be written, or printed, or'spokein, must







SERMON


be understood. The inspiration of God is given unto us,
but it is not written, it is not printed, it is not spoken.
"All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is pro-
fitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruc-
tion in righteousness." It is in various ways adapted to
the mind that is without; and hence "to those that are with-
out," the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, are wrapped
up in parables, external descriptions, metaphors and
figures; and "unto those that are without, these things are
given in parables:" for those that are outward and dwelling
upon the surface, have their views outward, and could
not understand unless these things were done in para-
bles.
Mark, now, the distinction. *" Unto you it is given to
know the mystery of the kingdom of God; but unto them
that are without, all these things are done in parables,
that seeing they may see, and not perceive; and hearing
they may hear and not understand." Who are these?
There are those in this state of mind ever to be found,
and even in this day-this day, that is called the day of
gospel light and liberty. In this day, and under what
we call strictly the gospel dispensation, there are to be
found those who are in these different states. It is the
object of the exercise that I feel, to draw all our minds
to that one centre, that one gathered point in which it is
given to know, to comprehend and to understand the mys-
teries nf the kingdom of heaven. A state of mind figur-
ed out by the history of the circumstance, that trans-
pired wheA this explanation was given, in which, when
they were alone, all things were expounded unto them,
and to my understanding, when this has been opened, it
has shown a retired state of mind. It shows a state of
loneliness-a sequestration of mind, from all external and
visible objects-a state of silent, quiet waiting on God, in








BY JOHN COMLY.


a belief and confidence in the manifestation of his bless-
ed spirit, which is an unspeakable, indescribable gift.
And as the mind is drawn to this state of quiet and si-
lence, to the operation of this gift upon the understanding,
then, that which was before a mystery, parable, or dark
saying, becomes unfolded and given to us, it is expound-
ed unto us, and here is profit indeed. So that, dear chil-
dren, we see where the profit is derived from. It is not
from idleness, it is not from inactivity, it is not from go-
ing to sleep. No, this state of mind is very different in-
deed, from that state of mind. For herein we are awake,
and the faculties of the mind are in that expecting state,
in that waiting state, that we are looking to, and depend-
ing on, the instruction and teaching of the grace of God
that bringeth salvation, and hath appeared unto all men,
as a teacher, teaching us now: so that we see they are
the disciples, scholars and learners, who are brought to
have their dependence centred on this anointing, this
unction from the Holy One; and that is Christ within, the
teacher of his people, the anointing which is given, as
the precious gift of heaven, to every man to profit withal.
And O that your attention, dear children, and that your
minds may be turned to this, and that your inquiries may
be, "who shall show us any good?" Oh! that you may
be brought into quietude and retirement, and then wait
and feel after, seek after that spirit of God, to give you
an understanding of the things of God, and that you may
adopt the language of one of the disciples who was after-
wards called an apostle. Now, no apostle could declare
this from any external evidence, but from an evidence
that he had in himself. "We know that the son of
God is come"-mark the expression; it is not, lie shall
come, nor he did come-there was nothing external about
it. "We know that the son of God is come, and hath








SERMON


given us an understanding, that we may know him that
is true." Now this was a divine understanding, very
different and distinct from our natural understanding as
men and creatures; and this understanding is always
clear, settled, calm, and undisturbed; and hence the mind
that is brought under the teaching, under the influence
and direction of this unspeakable gift, will never be left
to wander in a maze of uncertainty. It is not left to be
carried about by every wind of doctrine, and by the cun-
ning craftiness of those who may lie in wait to deceive,
for it is never dependent on that which is external and
fluctuating, as all external things are, to a greater or less
extent: but it is brought to depend on that which is describ-
ed as a rock immoveable-here man simply depends on
that which is revealed in the secret of the soul, and in the
silence of all flesh and all fleshly reasoning and cogita-
tions, he is brought to build his hope on this foundation
which is a rock, to use the metaphor and figure so fre-
quently referred to in the scriptures of truth. Upon this
rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall
not prevail against it." Every thing which tends to fluc-
tuation, or to agitate and jostle the mind of man, must be
distinct from this. And when we feel tried and confused,
and are brought into a state of doubting and difficulty,
how rational it is, and often, if we have nothing else to
refer to as men and creatures, how reasonable it is, that
we should retire into quietude; and out of that which may
be well compared to water, which is an unstable element,
and which may be moved by every wind that blows-
and that we should retire into the closet, to this founda-
tion. And here as we have obeyed, we have become set-
tied, and come to know the rising of that power which
can speak the winds and the waves into a calm; and like
,hat which was outwardly related, as being formerly re-







BY JOHN COMLY.


alized, so in the tossed, in the afflicted and not comforted
souls, when the power of the divine word is felt to pro-
duce this holy calm, then may we say-" What shall
I render unto the Lord for all his benefits towards me?"
When we are brought into a state to wait upon God,
into this holy, calm, and quiet, gathered state-when
the mind is brought and centred here, to wait upon that
adorable Being, who is described in the positive and em-
phatic language of figures, then it is that we obtain more
certain knowledge than our outward senses can convey-
an evidence beyond the greatest possible degree of know-
ledge that we can comprehend by means of external
things, or of those powers and faculties intended for con-
tributing to our enjoyment in this life. I refer to the
figures of light and of life, which are descriptive of the
adorable Being, in the testimony of an inspired writer,
which has been left on record. And when we come
livingly to feel after things revealed in us. we shall
know that he has spoken the truth, that "God is
light, and in him is no darkness at all;7' and that
this light shining upon our understanding is that which
gives us light, inward spiritual light; for as God is a spi-
rit--the soul of man partakes of his own blessed nature,
which is light and life, and of this he communicates a
portion to the children of men, and hence the effect is, that
man becomes enlightened. We infer ft'om certain know-
ledge that we have in ourselves, that we are partakers of
this light, that God commanded light to shine out of
darkness, and that this light,hath shined into our hearts.
And the object and purpose for which it hath shined, and
for which it was given is, that through this unspeakable
and inestimable gift, the light and life of this holy spirit,
our spiritual vision might be enlarged, so that we might
see and walk in the light.







SERMON


Mark now, another figure, of walking-it is a progress
sion, that is, an advancing step by step. Hence the pro-
phet could declare: "They that wait upon the Lord
shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with
wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and
they shall walk and not faint." And this advancement
from a state of childhood corresponds with what Paul
said-" When 1 was a child, I spake as a child, and un-
derstood as a child, and thought as a child; but when I
became a man, 1 put away childish things." And the
progressive growth that a christian experiences is under-
stood as a walking in the light, and we know this from
evidence in ourselves, that if we walk in the light, as he
is in the light, we have fellowship one with another.
Here the blessed unity of the spirit is known to stand,
not in any thing external, not in any thing which has been
written or printed. It is nothing which stands in an ex-
ternal medium at all. Our unity is a unity of the one
spirit, which ever has been and ever will be the bond of true
peace; and if this abound in us, whatever may be the degree
of our attainment, whether children, youth, young men,
or strong men-whatever figure may be used to point out
our different states of attainment, yet there is harmony;
there is no jarring, no contradiction, no contrariety: and
however there may be a diversity of gifts and operations,
yet it is all one. And the same spirit; and as we walk in
perfect obedience the light will be revealed, which by
another figure is termed the law of God written in the
heart, for the law is light, and the commandment the
way of life;" and a variety of instructive figures are used,
and however various the figures may be, in the records of
truth, or any other medium which may be used to convey
instruction to the mind of man, there always is a perfect
consistency in the works of infinite wisdom. Hence if







BY JOHN COMLY.


we walk in this light, we walk in the spirit. And when
we come to know the operation, and the power derived from
this all conquering spirit, if we yield to its government,
and come under its power, it is sufficient to remove every
obstruction. And "if we walk in the light as he is in the
light," it will give us this blessed fellowship, or spirit of
communion which is the same; and in the same propor-
tion, 4"the blood of Jesus Christ his son cleanseth us from
all sin," thus enabling us to answer the object and end of
our being. Here the blood of Jesus Christ his son is the
light, the very same light too, and not another; for that light
is only figured out by the term, "the blood" in this ex-
pression, "the blood of Jesus Christ his son cleanseth us
from all sin." And this figure that is used, though it is
a parable to those that are without,--and it is not to be
marvelled at at all, that there are many who view things
according to the external construction, and according to
tradition received through the medium of the external
senses, and who may in viewing such testimonies as this,
attribute it to that which is external and material-yet
those minds that are gathered to the teaching and instruc-
tion of this light are brought into that quiet state, where
in all these parables are expounded to them, that ever
are expounded, and all the scripture that ever is profit-
able, must be given unto them by the inspiration of G od.
And these minds that are gathered here come to derive
understanding of those things which were written afore-
time for our learning, but this is spiritual learning and
not external; for all the powers of external study, or the
studying of external and material things must fall short
of reaching to heaven or to one of the smallest truths of
God revealed by the spirit. "For what man knoweth
the things of a man, save the spirit of man which is in
him? Even so the things of God knoweth no man, but
voL. 11.-3








SERtMON


the spirit of God." The natural man*cannot know them
by any power of his own-they must be spiritually
discerned; and it is thus that God reveals them unto us by
his spirit. Hence the apostle is clear, that the things of
God knoweth no man, but the spirit of God." Yet this
same spirit of God, this unspeakable gift or manifesta-
tion of the spirit, is given to every man to profit withal,
according to our various needs, circumstances, and capa-
cities. He reveals unto us, and teaches us according as we
have need to know, and in proportion to our obedience to
that which is already revealed, that which is clearly made
known of the law written in the heart and unfolded in
the light. And as we maintain a perfect obedience, an
unreserved dedication and obedience to this, the capaci-
ties of the mind are enlarged, so as to comprehend more
and more.
Now perfect obedience to that which is revealed is the
perfection to which we are called. Obedience to the law
is a state of perfection or freedom from sin, and it was
that which the people were called to by the society of
Friends in the days of George Fox and his cotemporaries;
and it is that which will be proclaimed, by those who
come into the liberty of the law of God; for all these come
to see in themselves the effects of obedience to the mani-
fested will of God. Hence I conceive that there is en-
couragement, and I wish it may be administered to every
mind-to all the little children however insignificant they
may feel-to all the little children of the heavenly fa-
ther's family; with whom my mind has been travelling
in exercise for days, and weeks, and months, and now
being permitted to be with you through the adorable
goodness of him who is mindful of the poor, and who re-
membereth us in our low estate, because his mercy endur-
eth forever, I have been brought into the feeling of








BY JOHN COMLY.


a degree of that inquiry-" what shall 1 render unto the
Lord for all his benefits toward me ?" For who can
number his benefits and favours, so as to comprehend
them all. Yet, dear children, be not discouraged, but
endeavour to number your blessings, and to dwell in this
kind of feeling of gratitude and thankfulness, for preser-
vation ; and in this inquiring, this seeking state, in this state
of quietude of soul, how will our daily aspirations arise
to God-c" What shall I render unto the Lord for all his
benefits toward me ?" And whatever he calls for, in an-
swer to your inquiries, this, with a truly dedicated and
obedient mind, render unto him, I entreat it of you; for in
so giving up and yielding to him, what he calls for, how-
ever trying it may be to the animal man; in reference to
whatever part of your conduct, or conversation the requi-
sition may be made, I entreat it of you, that you cheer-
fully and unreservedly yield it all up.
"God is love; and he that dwelleth in love, dwelleth
in God, and God in him." This is a clear, positive, and
emphatic testimony. And what greater happiness do we
derive from any thing, as animals, as men and creatures ?
what greater happiness do we derive from any other af-
fection or feeling, than that which we derive from the
feeling of love, as men, as creatures and animals? And
what would any thing else be worth, if this were not
among us? If any comparison can be made-if it be
right to make a comparison between that which is heaven-
ly and that which is earthly-between that which is eter-
nal and unchangeable, and that which must shortly expire,
here we have it, in the simile and figure, of the description
of love, that God is love, and he that dwelleth in God
dwelleth in love, the same kind of divine love that Jesus
alluded to when he declared, "A new commandment I give
unto you, that ye love one another: as I have loved you,








SERMON


tlat ye also love one another.'" "Greater love hath
no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his
friend." Here we see what kind of love it is when we in-
quire into the nature of these instructions, which we have
read, and which I hope many of you read frequently.
Not that you should read the scriptures thinking to have
eternal life thereby, notwithstanding they do evidently
testify of that source of love-they direct to the fountain
of love. Hence when they are opened upon our under-
standing, and given to us by the inspiration of God, they
do become greatly profitable. And not only those things
which are written in the book called the Bible or New
Testament, for these are only part of the things written;
but every thing written under the influence of the spirit of
God, may become profitable to the children of God in ge-
nerations to come, when handed down to them; but it is
only to be read understandingly, by those who come into
the spirit in which the writer knew what he said, and in
which they must become acquainted with an evidence and
feeling of what they read. This is necessary, in order to pro-
fit by the things which were written aforetime. And this the
apostle no doubt knew, from a certain evidence in him-
self, of being in that kind of love which was not a mere
animal affection; for that would be very inferior to that
happiness that God intended for us; for the only happi-
ness suited to the dignity of man is that which is describ-
ed in the scriptures. Now if we are willing to lay
down our life, and every animal disposition and propen-
sity, and recollect what James has referred to, it may be
profitable to the children of men in the present day.
" What is your life ? It is even a vapour that appeareth
for a little time, and then vanisheth away." But let yours
be that which is hid with Christ in God;" let that be
the object of the -.ik;!, and inquiring soul; and as we








BY JOHN COMLY.


seek for it, it will be given unto us,-to every seeking
mind there will be a state of finding, and if we patiently
wait, quietly hope, and diligently seek, as a condition on
our part, the promise will be fulfilled, and we shall find
that two kinds of life hath double natured man, and
two of death," as said the poet.
We are instructed, and we may be assured, that
where two spirits are striving for the mastery, there will
be contention, and where there is contention, there will be
confusion and every evil work; there will be bitterness, en-
vying and strife, and the animal nature of man will main-
tain a life in this way, thus preventing the rising of the
eternal life and happiness of dwelling in God. Hence
I want us to examine ourselves, prove ourselves, and see
whether we be in the faith. In what faith ? In that
faith that works by love to the purification of the soul--
that practical faith which has its result in the improve-
ment of every thing connected with our being, and in
which the earthly part is brought into subjection and un-
der the government of the heavenly. He that liveth in
love, liveth in God and God in him, if I may be excused
for changing the term; for God is love, and he that lives
in love undisturbed, and if no other rival, no other love
is sufficient to remain in him-he that lives thus in love,
lives in God and God in him. And when the true love
of God is in the soul of man, it brings every thing into
subjection, and puts all things under its feet. Here is
the warfare, the Christian warfare, which is the sum and
the substance, in its simple nature, of every thing
comprehended in the term religion. It is the work of
God in the soul of man, by which the animal, earthly
propensities of the creature are kept and put in their pro-
per places. In the origin and formation of man----for
man was made in the beLJimiiu., and is made now, to be








SERMON


a king and ruler over all the inferior part of his nature--.
the soul of man was designed to govern that which is
animal, earthly, and inferior, and it is described im-
mediately after the creation of man in the beginning.
Here then is the life of God in the soul of man which is
come to have dominion, and to reduce every thing under the
power of the cross, that man through this may work out the
term of his probation, as a candidate for immortality and
eternal life. Thy business is in thee, in the garden of
thine own heart, and thou art called, invited, and persuad-
ed, and that too, by every motive which can affect the
being in this plan of existence, as a creature designed to
associate with his fellows, and as a being formed for im-
mortality and eternal life; thou art called by every thing
that can effect thy happiness in this life or in that which
is to come. Thou art called upon by the faculties of thy
understanding, reflection, and every other consideration,
to come home within thyself, to work in the garden of thy
heart, to cut down every thing that has grown up in the
night of ignorance and darkness. Every thing, there, which
has seemed to live at variance with the life of God, must
be eradicated, and reduced to its proper place and sphere,
for every passion and propensity of the animal nature was
designed in its origin, and is now designed, to occupy a
proper place in the kingdom of heaven that is within thee:
and to produce a subjection of thy passions and strong
will, is the work of the grace of God, which hath appear-
ed unto thee, to bring unto thee salvation, and a resurrec-
tion from under the dominion and bondage of slavery
to thine own lusts and passions. And it is teaching eve-
ry one, that they should be obedient, and that denying
all ungodliness and worldly lusts, they should live so-
berly, righteously and godly, instead of being governed
by sin, and yielding their members unto it as instruments








BY JOHN COMLY.


of unrighteousness. And you are called to yield them
unto God, as servants unto righteousness, that you may
live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world,
keeping your minds in this expecting state, waiting for
the renewing of divine light in your souls, and for
the appearance of the eternal God revealed in thee,
which is adequate for thy every need-a fountain of
wisdom, of divine heavenly wisdom, to direct thee through
the wilderness of this world.
Here then, 1 consider is the dignity of man, in coming
to know this divine government in himself, by which he
brings all his deeds to the light and standard in himself
-when he brings them to judgment, and knows the
judgment to be every day; when he does not put them off
and leave them to follow after; when he brings his works,
deeds, temper, and disposition to the standard of truth.
Here then, thou mayest be prepared to reflect, and to
compare thy conduct, temper, form of mind and disposi-
tion, as exhibited in the actions, the voluntary actions of
every day of thy life. Thou canst bring them to this stand-
ard; and this is where thou wilt be able, if impartial, to
weigh them, or to have them weighed, and that, so as to
know which is of God, and which is of the creature. And
here is a fountain opened, in which we may wash and
bathe, to use another figure of speech, and in which thy
sins may be washed away, in which thy propensities may
be watched against, and that watchful state being lived
in, thy sight, and thy vision will become clearer and clear-
er, and the regulating principle in thee will direct thee in all
thy ways, and thou wilt know its power to be v erified in
the feelings of thine own heart, whether conceived in words
or not; for thou wilt know a temper and disposition, in
which from day to day, "thy kingdom come," will be thy
uppermost desire, and thy will be done," the prominent








SERMON


feature in all thy movements. And here the signs'of the com-
ing of this government, and ofthe need of having every thing
regulated by a power superior to the animal nature, will be
daily, move and more felt, individually. Hence our de-
pendence will not be on ourselves as men, but on the
gift from heaven. Thou wilt not be vain of thyself, nor
attribute any merit to thXself as a creature, but to this
gift, this omnipotent power within thee; and in the feel-
ing of this desire, and it being uppermost, thou wilt be
seeking the kingdom of heaven and its righteousness. It
will be first and uppermost in all thy movements and
ways. It will be thy desire, not to trust in the mere or-
der of time, but in the feeling of tie mind. Then seek
first the kingdom of heaven and its righteousness, and fear
not what follows, as it respects the things of time and of
this world, and the things of heaven which thou standest
in need of shall be given thee.
Here we see is an operative faith, an every day reli-
gion and work--" thy will be done.'--The mind will
become as it were, immediately clothed with this kind of
feeling; in all thy movements and in ;ll thy pursuits it
will be drawn into a state, to which 1 have before advert-
ed, when the apostle inquires, what is your life?" and
where he reproves us for taking our own will and pow-
ers, as men and creatures. In external things, men say,
I will do so and so: whereas ye should say, "if the
Lord will we shall live, and do this or that." My spirit
is clothed with mourning, when I view those who are
making a high profession of the name of Christ, and of
being Christians; and when I feel in myself the painful
influence of those customs in which we have been brought
up, and those habits which are here induced upon our-
selves, for the want of deeper attention to the all regula-
ting principle in the soul.







BY JOHN COMLY.


My spirit has been clothed with mourning when I
have discovered the difficulties, trials, and unhappiness,
that are increasing and multiplying in the human family,
in consequence of the strong will of the creature, under-
taking to settle and devise plans in regard to the things
of this life-and making haste to amass to themselves
that power which is associated with wealth, with honour,
or with fame; and when I see that men become blinded as
with shadows, or with that, which is as a bubble, or va-
pour, that appeareth for a little time and then passeth
away."
O ye parents! If you prize your own happiness and
the welfare of your posterity, may I call your deep atten-
tion to the foundation that is laying in the minds of your
young and tender offspring! When I behold the wide
spreading channels of custom in which the people of this
land are moving, and which I believe to be at variance
with that genuine happiness that was designed for us here,
I am moved with compassion-I am moved with desire
that we, the high professors of the present day, may refer
to the standard of eternal truth, and that it may regulate,
us in all our pursuits, and in all our desires, thus bring-
ing us to be bounded and governed by that principle and
spirit of love and harmony, in which there will be no op-
pression, no contention. For true and genuine religion,
which is the kingdom of God in the soul of man, is calcu
lated in every circumstance and condition to produce the
greatest quantity or degree of happiness and enjoyment
even in this life. And if we live in the light, our eyes
being opened to see the confusion of one thing with anoth-
er, we cannot be connected or concerned in oppression
-for love is diffusive in its nature, and embraces all the
children of the Lord. And when that love of God is
shed abroad in the ,oul which passeth understanding,
VOL. II.-'1







SERMON


agreeably to the prophetic declaration, we shall be far
from oppression, we shall walk in love and in mutual
obedience to this great command of loving one another.
We shall feel for every thing that lives; and we have
left on record the language of a deeply dedicated mind,
which shows, that to profess that we love God whom we
have not seen, and yet at the same time exercise cruelty
towards the least creature moving by his life, or by that
life which was derived from him, is a contradiction in
terms.
Return home then, I entreat it of you, for it is all that
I need to ask, in the expression of words, and in the pour-
ing out before you of the concern that 1 feel. I desire that
you may be gathered out of every thing that jostles or en-
tangles-out of every spirit and disposition that may tend
to produce disorder and confusion in the creation of God;
and that you may be of the meek, that inherit the earth
in the bonds of peace, and that you may know more and
more of a returning to first principles, and into that sim-
plicity and moderation in all things which become Chris-
tians.
And 0 that we may ever remember, that the Lord is
at hand, and is bringing our minds under the government
of his Holy Spirit; and that he will gradually, and in
proportion to our obedience, bless us with his choicest
blessings of peace, quietness, harmony and love. And
that we shall behold every one doing his part, and feeling
the covering of his liinnd to be, "glory to God in the high-
est, and on earth peace, good will towards men." And
thus shall we be more and more, brought to realize, "how
good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together
in unity," in the unity of the one spirit, and in the bond
of peace.










SERMON


1Y JOHN COMLY, AT GREEN STREET MEETING, PHILADELPHIA,
MAY 17, 1827.

There is a great difference between the gospel dispen-
sation as it respects time, and as its respects a state of
mind. We may live in that period of the world, that is
generally reckoned under the gospel dispensation, and
yet we may be unacquainted with that state of mind in
which the gospel dispensation stands. or subsists. For un-
til "the mountain of the Lord's house shall become es-
tablished in the top of the mountains, and be exalted
above the hills"-until that state of mind is known, and is
attained to, in which there shall be nothing to I hurt nor
destroy"-in which "the wolf shall dwell with the
lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid"--in
which every thing like the sword shall be beaten into the
plough-share, and every thing like the spear into the prun-
ing hook-until this becomes our state and experience,
we shall have but a partial claim to living in and under
the gospel dispensation.
It is a prophetic view, that in and under this dispensa-
tion they shall sit every man under his vine, and under
his fig tree; and none shall make them afraid." It is this
state of mind that I consider we are called and invited to
aspire after, to press after, and to strive after; that we may
be adorned with the ornament of a meek and a quiet
spirit, which is in the sight of God, as it ever has been
and ever will be, of great value.
I have remembered with renewed instruction, the cir
cumstance of one who was invited while sitting under the
fig tree; and when the query arose in his mind, Can there
any good thing come out of Nazareth ?" In the answer








SERMON'


of invitation to *' come and see," a testimony was borne
respecting him, which I wish may be borne respecting
every one of us : "Behold an Israelite indeed, in whom
is no guile."
Now my mind has been led into a little view of that
state of mind, wlerin there is no guile, no deceit-where-
in there is an inquiry raised-wherein there is a dispo-
sition to seek after the attainment of that which is good,
and to become established and settled in that gospel dis-
pensation that breathes peace on earth, and good will
to men;" and from- which, alone, can arise those fruits,
by which the Heavenly Father is glorified. I have also
remembered, that "when Israel was a child, then I loved
him :" and the language of the Prophet was-" When Is-
rael was a child, then I loved him, and called my son out
of Egypt."-It was in obedience to this call, and it was
when u Israel came out of Egypt, tihe house of Jacob
from a people of strange language," that Judah was his
sanctuary, and Israel his dominion."
My mind has been drawn, from the history and de
parture of the children of Israel out of Egypt, to that in-
struction that is to be individually received, when we come
into that state in which the Lord loves us ; and into
which lie calls us to come, out of every thing which
stands in opposition to the, government of his pure and
eternal spirit in the soul of man-when the house of Ja-
cob, the wrestling seed, is brought into a disposition and
state of mind in which they are inquiring-in which they
are seeking,--into that state in which the mind is clothed
with meekness and with quietude, when it retires out of all
the storm, the noise, the confusion, and the bustle--that
state of mind in which we are disposed to behold Jerusa-
lem a quiet habitation; and, in the view presented,
feel a desire to dwell therein, and to abide in that state of







BV JOHN COMLY,


quietude. To one that is thus exercised in the nature
and the spirit of Jacob, who is, in plain language, transfer-
red into the same disposition of mind,, and who is engaged
to abide under the cross, and to learn of him, who declared,
"I am meek and lowly in heart"--to the mind that is
seeking, and is desirous of finding rest to itself, here is a
plain path opened. And here, as the mind abides in this
quiet habitation, as it is thus called out of Egypt, and as
it is disposed to obey the call and come out of Egypt, to
take its departure from the land of darkness, front that
state of bondage in which it may have been held, and
when there is a willingness in the heart, to obey fully the
intimations and invitations, of the spirit of Christ, then the
experience is, Come unto me all ye that labour and are
heavy laden and I will give you rest." But it is not un-
til there is a willingness in the heart and in the mind of
man, and a desire of attaining that, which, in prophetic
vision, is held up as a mark for us to attain to, that we
are likely to take our departure and to come out of Egypt,
into this child-like state.
When Israel went out of Egypt, the house of Jacob
from a people of strange language, then Judah was his
sanctuary." And now if Judah is our sanctuary, we shall
know God to be great in Israel. Whatever is the state
of mind in which God is known, and in which he re
veals himself to the soul of man, this is his sanctuary--
this is the state of the soul of man in which his taberna-
cle is. Though the Lord be high, yet hath he regard
unto the lowly." Though he dwell on high in the holy
place, yet C to this man will I look, even to him that is
poor, and of a contrite spirit, and trembleth at my word."
Now the sacrifices of God, in the gospel dispensation,
are a broken, contrite, and humble spirit-it is in this
state of the soul of man, that he makes his sanctuary, and







SERMON


he reveals himself in the sanctuary of the soul of manu
And I desire to invite our attention to this state, that we
may draw near and. strive after it-press after it, leaving
the things that are behind. Let us leave all tumult, all
coinmotion and agitation, in which we may at any time
be involved, and come down, centre down, into this qui-
et habitation, wherein God may reveal himself, that in
us our God may be known-that he may dwell in our
Hearts; and thus we shall find that as we strive, we shall
not strive in vain, but that his appearance hath power, and
will prevail over all opposition. It is in this state of
mind that all these obstructions are removed, as represent-
ed in the figurative language of the Psalmist-in this fig-
urative expression, "The sea sawit and fled;" and when all
the afflictions of the Israelites may appear to have been wit-
nessed, they have been made to depart, and to flee away;
for when the divine presence is revealed in the soul, there
is a calm, there- is 'a quietude, there is a settled resting
place; therefore the foundation that stands sure, is that
which is laid in Zion. And then is this seal, and this
impression, made on every mind that comes intd this qui-
et resting place-an assurance that the Lord knows them
that are his. I speak for the encouragement of the
tossed, and tried, and afflicted; that they may "look
upon Zion, the city of our solemnities: and that their
eyes may behold Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a taberna-
cle that shall not be taken down; not one of the stakes
thereof shall ever be removed, neither shall any of the
cords thereof .be broken." I speak from a little renewed
view of that encouragement that is held out to those minds
that have been tossed and not comforted, that have been
toiling and rowing against winds contrary; that they may
lift up their heads in hope, to God, and feel an assurance
in the power and goodness of him, who is inviting them.







BY JOHN COMLY.


to seek peace and pursue it." And that these may be ani-
mated to hold on their way, in their labour and exercise
of soul, to attain to this quiet habitation, this resting place,
where the divine will may be revealed, let them "study
to be quiet," for this is an important lesson to all minds
in the present day, that we strive to be quiet, and to
come under the covering of a meek and quiet spirit. For
herein is our proper business manifested to us. And as
we dwell in this state of quietude, it is opened to our un-
derstanding, what is our duty, and what is the business
that we are to do. Here every one, who is attending pro-
perly to his business, in this state of quietude, will bd en-
abled to do it, so that no one need to be discouraged nor
to shrink back from that which is pointed out to him as
his business; for however they may feel to doubt like
Gideon of old, who could not be satisfied till he tried the
fleece both wet and dry; yet when they are willing mind
ed-and the Lord's people are always a willing people--
when they are willing minded to go forward and do
what they can, there will always be a sweet reward of
peace and quietness. Now whether this be a business
pointed out to any one individual in his own heart as re-
lates to himself and his own state and condition, or whe-
ther it be in relation to a more active service, as it respects
others, we must be obedient and faithful to that which is
required of each; and if we are faithful in a little, we
shall be made rulers over more, and these obstructions
and hindrances will be removed, by whatever comparison
they may be called, even like this, The sea saw it and
fled; Jordan was driven back. The mountains skipped
like rams, and the little hills like lambs. What ailed thee,
0 thou sea, that thou fleddest? thou Jordan, that thou wast
driven back ? Ye mountains, that ye skipped like rams,
and ye little hills like lambs ?" I have no doubt from







SERMON.


present impressions that there are minds in the present
assembly, that will be brought, as they are obedient, to tra-
vel in the way as it is opened before their view, and in this
state of mind to aspire after and toward the mark, of the
attainment of the gospel state, and that they will have in
the lines of their experience, to refer to feelings not very
different from those, relative to the departure of all that
once appeared as obstacles or hindrances in the way of
the Lord's pe.ople. I speak with the view that there may
be encouragement renewedly administered. There are
some deeply exercised and tried minds in the present as-
sembly, with whom I have felt my spirit dipped into the
sympathy of a brother in travail-thait they may be a lit-
tie encouraged to lift ip their heads in hope, and to draw
nigh in spirit, and. know that there is an abiding in the
sanctuary, where'the Lord is known; and may we all
know his power revealed in us, and may his name become
great in Israel. Oh! that you may dwell here my dear
friends, and when your souls are encircled as in his pa-
vilion, as in the secret of his tabernacle, that he may
hide you, and that in his own due time, he may set the
feet of each of your minds as on a rock, and establish
your goings, that you may know more of the new song
put into your mouths, even praises unto our God.









SERMON


BY JESSE KERSEY, AT DARBY, APRIL 15, 1827.

I count it among the unspeakable blessings, after hav-
ing known and experienced a great variety of circumstan-
ces, to be permitted to possess a mind, calm and quiet
in itself, and I have believed that this possession is at
tainable, only and alone, upon the simple ground of per-
fect resignation to the will of God. In this instructive
view, I have felt, in the present assembly, my soul quick-
ened, and led into the contemplation not only of the ex.
position of christianity, as the name is furnished by its
great founder; but also, of the superior dignity and great
importance that stands connected with the example
which he has furnished, and which becomes peculiarly
striking, in an especial manner, to those who may in some
measure have realized a corresponding condition, accord-
ing to their capacity.
In relation to his example, my mind, in this meeting, has
been led to that period when he was forsaken by all his
disciples, and when, as it related to his outward manhood,
it was stripped of every possible ground of comfort--
when he stood in the judgment hall, and witnessed the
accusations that were multiplied upon him. It is natural
to human nature under circumstances of this kind, to at-
tempt to make its own defence. But the blessed Jesus,
standing in the dignity of the divinity of his character,
was capable of sustaining the whole weight of their accu-
sations; and Pilot marvelled at his silence. He was not
in possession of any evidence, which would go to satisfy
him, how it was possible, for a human subject, such as
he esteemed him to be, under such circumstances to main-
tain a profound and dignified silence. And it seems the
VOL. I. -5







SERMON


company were not aware of the important subject they had
in hand, until they had passed sentence of death upon
him. It was subsequent to this event, that circumstan-
ces concurred to demonstrate that it was no common case.
And their impressions of doubt were occasioned by the ad-
mirable evidence that followed; and which you, who hear
these views, may examine at your leisure. But this un-
equaled example-this blessed and glorious light that
came to enlighten the Gentiles, and for God's salvation
to the ends of the earth, has not only in this instance given
ample proof of the vast powers of his divine nature; but he
has also given demonstration, of the passive ground on
which every disciple in his church should stand. And in the
exposition of the nature of that religion that is from hea-
ven, and which raises the soul of its possessor with a di-
vinity of feeling and sensation that surpasses the cdm-
mon comprehension of man, he states a case, and a ie-
markable case, on being questioned which were the im-
portant commands to be regarded. Thou shalt love
the Lord thy God, with all thy heart, and with all thy
soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength.
This is the first commandment. And the second is like,
namely this, thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.
On these two commandments hang all the law and the
prophets." The inquiry was raised in consequence-
" And who is my neighbour ?" Jesus puts to him a case
of a man that travelled from Jerusalem to a place of dimin-
ished character and condition, Jericho, and that in his way
"he fell among thieves which stripped him of his rai-
ment, and wounded him and departed, leaving him half
dead. And by chance there came down a certain priest
that way; and when he saw him, he passed by on the
other side. And likewise a Levite, when he was at the
place, came and looked on him, and passed by on the
other side." They did not turn their attention to their







BY JESSE KERSEY.


suffering fellow subject, so as feelingly to regard his case.
"But a certain Samaritan (who was despised by the
Jews, and considered beneath the range of their notice)
as he journeyed, came where he was, and when he saw
him he had compassion on him." You may read also
this passage, and it merits the consideration of every pro-
fessing christian, and see whether there was any thing
in the nature and temper of the character developed, that is
proper to be cherished among the rational creation. Here
the inquisitor perceived and had to acknowledge, that he
who showed mercy was the neighbour to him that fell
among thieves.
My soul can never sufficiently adore, magnify and re-
verence, that God who has given me the impression, that
this is the temperament that he enjoins and requires of those
who become members of that kingdom of the increase
and government of which there shall never be an end."
Let us, then, under these considerations say to our-
selves, how are we to be combined in this company?
The way is plain, and the door is wide for our acceptance.
He that is the fountain of life, the Everlasting Father,
and the Prince of Peace, hath invited us to come into his
own heavenly nature, and to live in possession of those
precious feelings, in which our souls can move in tender
love one toward another. Now do you believe, or is it
possible to believe that this is a dangerous state? And can
you believe, that the opposite one is a safe one, where
the soul becomes contracted within an enclosure of its
own, and excludes its fellow creatures ? Do you believe
that such a soul is under subordination to the Prince of
Peace? And if there has not been spread in our day
delusion, to harden the heart, to blind the eye, and close
the way, then I have been, in the evening of my life, de-
ceived; and that without intention-and with a heart dis-
posed, that the latter part of my days might be dedicated







SERMON


to God. It these feelings are deceptive, I am deceived;
and may the deception go with me to the grave, for if
they lead the soul to expand in love to all, they must be
an effect of that grace which is revealed to all God's ra-
tional creation-diversified as we are in our constitutions
-varied as we are in our temperaments and dispositions.
And as it relates to temporal situations, some are drag-
ging along with every faculty bound to the toils of the
world, in the lowest and most trying stages---some are
buoyed up, and supported in all the luxuries of life-
some who have never known any thing else from infan-
cy to maturity, while others have been struggling through
poverty all their days. May we apply to these diversi-
fied situations a salvo ? If it be one which is applicable
to the whole, it must consist in an enlargement of the soul
of man-in that brotherly love and charity which embra-
ces every fellow creature, and which delights in the relief
of the whole. As sure as God can only speak the truth,
so certain is it that they who live in him live in love, and
so certain is it, that while they are in the light of the
sun of righteousness, they never can be separated from
this principle; it will run through all, till all souls and
generations of men gain an inheritance in that kingdom,
" of the increase, government, and peace of which there
shall be no end."
I had no view of expressing much, but my mind was
quickened, and my soul enlarged in that current of devo-
tion which flows unto him, who is the Creator of all things,
and by whom the world was made. And it has seemed
to me that we have experienced his power to be present
in this assembly, bowing every soul with a conviction, that
he is the Everlasting Father, and that he delights in our
entertaining those feelings of tender regard, which will
induce us to sympathise with all who suffer, under every
wrMvdlv trial and disttres.s








SERMON


BY JOHN COMIY, DELIVERED AT DARBY, APRIL 15, 18-27, AFTER THE
PRECEDING.

There was a watch-word which forcibly impressed my
attention in the early gathering of this meeting; and ap-
prehending that it was designed for the benefit of my own
mind, 1 was quite disposed to profit by it myself, and
there to keep it; but it does not seem as if this was the
only object; it may, therefore, possibly be of use to some
other minds on future occasions. I have often needed it, and
there is no doubt that every serious mind may need also,
that kind of exercise, to get into the closet, into that state,
that was comprised in the expression, "Every man to
his tent." It implies to my mind a state of quietude, a
state of calmness, in which the mind is susceptible of di-
vine instruction; of hearing the intimation that is convey-
ed to every one of us, individually, when the divine spir-
it stands at the door and knocks. If any man hear my
voice and open the door, I will come in to him." We of-
ten need this state of quietness and retirement.
"Adam where art thou ?" An inquiry is raised in us,
when there is a state like being gathered into the tent,
into the quiet, or into the closet. And hence the excellency
of the privilege of silent waiting, or, of what we call si-
lent worship, wherein every one may attain to that in-
struction conveyed by the spirit of truth, as suited to his
particular state, without interfering with that of another.
This watch word, or call to this quiet and retired
state of mind, was succeeded by another inquiry, which
has occupied my attention in a renewed investigation, that
I hope, in conformity with the preceding testimony, may
take hold of every mind present. It is an address of the
apostle James, to a state, in which. I have hoped there







38 SERMON

were few or none present-a state included in the answer
of the apostle to that question, What is your life?" This
is a question, which every one may ask who is retired
into his own closet, where the mind is quieted and
brought under that kind of feeling, in which a living
exercise is felt, as to the object of our being asso-
ciated and gathered. And it not only applies to us
when seated in our silent, solemn assemblies; but it
it will apply to us through the whole course of our lives.
And in our daily transactions, we ought ever to keep in
view, the consideration; what is our life? And where-
in does our life consist ? It consists not in the abundance
of our possessions. For we are told that, it is even a va-
pour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth
away." And it is so with every thing under the sun-
every thing created, must thus pass away. And yet there
is in the New Testament, as it is called, the term eternal
life, and this must stand decidedly opposed to that which
is but vapour, and breath, which after a little while van-
isheth away; for eternal life does not vanish away, it
must last for ever.
Now if this eternal life is our life, we come to under-
stand within ourselves the nature of that living fountain
that was preached to the Samaritan woman-it is that
living water, and fountain of life, of eternal life, or life in
the soul of man. Now what is your life?" Where
your treasure is there will your heart be also." "A
good man out of the good treasure of the heart, bringeth
forth good things;" and herein is your Heavenly Fa-
ther glorified, that ye bring forth much fruit." Now
is not this the fruit of divine love in the soul? and has it
not been portrayed in lively colours to our understand-
ing in the preceding communication, in the fruits of that
love that was manifested in the tenderness of feeling,







BY JOHN COMLY.


and compassion shown to the poor man who had fallen
into difficulties and trials, who was not dead but was left
in a deplorable condition, and said to be half dead ? Now
where was the love of the priest, and what was his life?
Now by this we may measure and compare ourselves-we
may come to a certain evidence in ourselves respecting the
feelings in our minds. For it is from the feeling, and the life
that are in the soul, that the works and fruits will always
proceed. Every good tree bringeth forth good fruit,
but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit." Neither do
men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles." It is im-
possible in the nature of things, that such contrarieties
should be produced.
Wherefore, Ye shall know them by their fruits." Ap-
ply this unto thyself, and by thy fruits thou mayest be
known to thyself; for "where your treasure is, there will
your heart be also," and what thy heart is fixed on, that
will be set above every thing else and whatever it may be,
it will be uppermost, as the thing that thou lovest best, pro-
fession to the contrary notwithstanding. It is in a state of
retirement that we are to see and read-and it will be an
easy matter clearly to read ourselves in this quiet, retired
state of mind, if we are only willing to be searched. And
here we should be willing to examine ourselves, to prove
our ownselves whether we be in the faith or not, that faith
which works by love; for all other faith may be over-
come of the world, whereas the faith which works by love
purifies the heart; and the fountain being pure, the
streams will be of a like nature.
Now what is your life ?" and where is your life ?
where are those feelings, those heavenly feelings, or feel-
ings with which the good Samaritan was clothed, and
which distinguished him as neighbour to the one that
fell among thieves? How forcible, how instructive must






SERMON


that parable be, to one that is thus circumstanced to in-
quire, who is my neighbour ? Let us then inquire, who
is my neighbour ? It is an investigation and inquiry pro-
fitable to be raised in the youthful mind; and if the ope-
ration of this gift leads to that inquiry, don't quench it, I
entreat it of you, dear children, but simply regard and
cherish it, and here you will be instructed and taught
by that teacher, which is the grace of God in your own
hearts. This is an all-sufficient teacher, who will show
you with clearness and certainty whether you are in the
faith, whether you are in that living, practical faith,
which stands not in words, letters, books, papers, or in
any thing of the kind; for it is that which operates in the
soul, that constitutes a practical, living faith, which
brings forth the fruits of righteousness, and those feelings
of the mind which lead to do good one to another, as
comprehended in the first and great commandment.
Thus when we rightly consider the subject, and when
love to our Heavenly Father is the supreme object of our
attention-when our life is employed to do that which is
good, and when we delight in feeling a sense of it in our
own minds, then it is, that we can love every body-and
when we feel any thing like hardness or disrespect aris-
ing in the mind, toward a fellow creature, we immediate-
ly suppress it, and counteract it; and in the room thereof
set up the cross to our natural propensities, as animals
and men. And when we take up the cross to these, and
suppress those feelings which would go to harm one ano-
ther, there will rise up in their stead, feelings of good will
to men, and glory to God in the highest-this is the result
-the fruit brought forth by such a disposition as this. And
when there is no action to be performed in an external
sense, such as the Samaritan performed for the suffer-
ing man, yet in the disposition that we feel, we are ac-







BY JOHN COMLY.


cepted. And if this disposition be felt and lived in, we
become prepared for any occasion which may offer for
our active duty; and the disposition being already in the
soul, feelings of love and good-will predominate, and we
shall be prepared for those works of righteousness which
have their origin and their foundation in this eternal spir-
it; and here it is that we can say, glory to God in the
highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men."
Now the profession of Christianity so far as it produ-
ces this effect in individual minds,-so far as it ri-
ses and prevails, gives demonstration where we are,
and if we act to the contrary, still we have an evidence;
for by their fruits shall ye know them-so by our fruits
we may know ourselves, and see what our life is. And
one of our greatest delights in this state will be, to feel
no evil in the heart toward our fellow creatures; and so
will it be our greatest happiness, to feel the heart glowing
in love to our Heavenly Father, and in peace and good
will to men. And this, when uninterrupted, constitutes a
life of God in the soul of man; and when. this life of God
in the soul of man rises so as to have dominion over every
contrary disposition, it is the kingdom of heaven in man;
which, as we come to know it, will enable us to feel and
realize, and we shall give forth gn evidence in our lives,
and a demonstration in our conduct, that we are the disci-
ples of Jesus Christ. And herein as there is a death to
every thing that is contrary to this eternal life in the soul,
we know what it is to be buried by baptism into death;
that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the
glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in new-
ness of life."
Now I would, that encouragement might be adminis-
tered to every mind present, to press after this; for it is
by pressing, striving, and labouring, that we shall in due
VOL. II.-6








SERMON.


time attain to it, if we faint not. There is, therefore, no
cause for being discouraged, though the conflict may seem
long, and we may seem to gain but little. Keep thy eye
on the object, the standard raised in thy view, as a mark
to aim at, and the prize of enjoyment will be obtained.
Fear not, therefore, nor shrink back at the difficulties,
trials, and troubles which you may have to pass through
in this journey. Dwell in littleness and simplicity, and
learn a daily lesson of meekness and lowliness of heart,
and thou wilt find rest to thy soul, and also, that this
eternal life is the life in thee, and that every inferior life
will be absorbed and swallowed up in this. Then fol-
low it up; I intreat you, dear children, to flee from the
dangerous snares of custom which are surrounding you.
You have great need to be watchful; you have great
need to be careful; you have need often to retire into your
tents, and to sit as Mary did, when it was said she had
"chosen that good part, which should not be taken away
from her." And it will never be taken from you, unless
you deprive yourselves of it. Then sit at the feet of
your divine instructor, and hear the gracious words that
proceed from his mouth, and then will your strength be
renewed from day to day, and you will know a feeding
on that divine food, which will nourish this life in the
soul.

-^--

In introducing the following epistle to the notice of our readers, it may be
proper to observe, for the information of those unacquainted with the cir-
cumstances by which, it has been produced, that during the week of the last
Yearly Meeting of Philadelphia, a large number of Friends convened to con-
fer on the state of the Society. An address was adopted and soon after pub-
lished. The meeting then adjourned till Monday the 4th of June, at which
time a conference of about one thousand male Friends, from various parts of
the Yearly Meeting, after a deliberation of two days, issued the following
e-pistle.










EPISTLE TO FRIENDS.


'AT a GENERAL MEETING of FRIENDS, held by ad-
journments, at Green Street Meeting House, in the city of
Philadelphia, on the 4th and 5th days of the 6th month,
1827, pursuant to an adjournment in the fourth month
last, the following Epistle was adopted, and it was di-
rected that seven thousand copies of it should be printed
and circulated amongst our Members. The Friends
who signed the Epistle were requested to attend to its
early distribution.


To Friends of the quarterly and .iMonthly .ll. ;,,gs
within the compass of the farrly .Meeting held in
Philadelphia.

DEAR FRIENDS.

HAVING, through Divine favour, been permitted to
meet together, pursuant to adjournment in the fourth
month last, the state of our religious society was again
brought into view. The wing of Ancient Goodness be-
ing sensibly extended over the several sittings of this
Meeting, we have been enabled weightily to consider the
subjects that came before us. After solemn deliberation,
and a free interchange of sentiment, it was, with much
unanimity, agreed to recommend the following views and
propositions for your serious consideration.
The principal objects of our Religious Association, are
the public worship of God; the edification and comfort of
each other; the strengthening of the w;eak,:and the recov-
ery of those who have wandered from the way of peace
and safety.








EPISTLE TO FRIENDS.


It is only under the blessed influence of Gospel love,
that these objects can be attained. Whenever any among
us, so far forsake this fundamental principle of our
Union, as to act in the spirit of strife and discord, and to
oppose and condemn their brethren, who may conscien-
tiously differ from them in opinion, they break the bond
of Gospel fellowship, and, as far as their influence ex-
tends, frustrate the design of religious society. If such,
after the use of proper means, cannot be reclaimed, the
peace, and harmony, and welfare of the body, require
that they should be separated from our communion.
The Apostle, aware of the evils arising from conten-
tion in religious communities, warned his brethren against
it, declaring that "where envying and strife is, there is
confusion and every evil work;" and they were exhorted
to withdraw from every brother who walked disorderly.
And we know from experience, that wherever this evil
spirit has appeared in any of our meetings, weakness, and
jealousy, and divisions have been introduced; and that
excellent order has been subverted which has not only
preserved us in love and concord, but protected the
rights and privileges of all our Members.
With deep concern and sorrow we have observed the
introduction and increase of this desolating spirit. It is
now about five years since it made its appearance in our
hitherto favoured Society, so as to become a subject of
general concern. For some time it was mostly confined to
individuals acting as officers in the Church. In this stage
of its progress its consequences were grievous. Some
who became infected by it, disregarding the wholesome
order established by our Yearly Meeting, which directs,
in the first pla'e, private labour with such as give cause
of concern, and afterwards, that Monthly Meetings
should treat with them, formed combinations amongst







EPISTLE TO FRIENDS. 45

themselves, unauthorized by the Society and unknown
to its Discipline. Friends travelling in the Ministry, with
certificates from their Monthly and Quarterly Meetings,
were interrupted in their labours, and in some instances
publicly opposed in our meetings for Divine worship. They
and other faithful Friends in the Ministry, were unjustly
charged with preaching infidel doctrines, denying the Di-
vinity of Christ, and undervaluing the Scriptures; toge-
ther with divers other things, generally known to you,
and equally unfounded.
It was not long, however, before the contagion spread,
and made its appearance in some of our Meetings for Dis-
cipline, opening to the exercised Members of the Socie-
ty, scenes of the most painful nature. Measures of a
party character were introduced, and the established or-
der of society was infringed, by carrying those measures
into execution, against the judgment and contrary to the
voice of the larger part of Friends present.
At length the infection, taking a wider range, appeared
in our Yearly Meeting, where its deplorable effects were
equally conspicuous. Means were recently taken therein
to over-rule the greater part of the Representatives, and
a Clerk was imposed upon the Meeting, without their
concurrence or consent. A Committee was there appoint-
ed to visit the Quarterly and Monthly Meetings without
the unity of the Meeting, and contrary to the solid sense
and judgment of much the larger number of the Members
in attendance; and several important subjects were ne-
cessarily dismissed, owing to the disunity and discord
prevalent in that body.
Friends have viewed this state of things amongst us
with deep concern and exercise, patiently waiting in the
hope, that time and reflection would convince our breth-







EPISTLE T6 FRIENDS.


ren of the impropriety of such a course, and that, being
favoured to see the evil consequences of such conduct,
they might retrace their steps. But, hitherto, we have
waited in vain. Time and opportunity for reflection have
been amply afforded, but have not produced these desira-
ble results. On the contrary, the spirit of discord and
confusion has gained strength; and to us there now ap-
pears no way to regain the harmony and tranquillity of the
body, but by withdrawing ourselves--not from the Socie-
ty of Friends, 'nor from the exercise of its salutary disci-
pline-but from religious communion with those who have
introduced, and seem disposed to continue, such disor-
ders amongst us.
The quiet and solemnity of our Meetings for Divine
Worship-the blessings of a Gospel Ministry unshack-
led by human authority-the preservation of our religious
liberty-the advancement of our Christian testimonies--
and the.lrosperity of Truth, so far as it is connected with
our labours, we believe, very much depend upon the early
adoption of this measure.
We, therefore, under a solemn and weighty sense of
the importance of this concern, and with ardent desires
that all our movements may be under the guidance of Him,
who only can lead us in safety, have agreed to propose
for your consideration, the propriety and expediency of
holding a Yearly Meeting for Friends in unity with us,
residing within the limits of those Quarterly Meetings,
heretofore represented in the Yearly Meeting held in
Philadelphia; for which purpose, it is recommended that
Quarterly and Monthly Meetings, which may be prepar-
ed for such a measure, should appoint representatives to
meet in Philadelphia, on the third second day in the
tenth month next, at ten o'clock in the morning, in com-







EPISTLE TO FRIENDS.


pany with other members favourable to our views, there
to hold a Yearly Meeting of men and women Friends,
upon the principles of the early professors of our name,
and for the same purposes that brought them together in
a religious capacity-to exalt the standard of Truth-
promote righteousness and peace in the earth-edify the
churches-and generally to attend to all such concerns as
relate to the welfare of religious society, and the cause of
our holy Redeemer, who is God over all, blessed forever.
Amen.

Signed by direction and on behalf of the meeting by


Stephen Stephens,
Joseph Rhoads,
Jacob Paxson,
James Walton,
Benjamin Smith,
Thomas Carey,
Halliday Jackson,
Jacob Alrichs,
George Peirce,
Stephen Long,
Richard Barnard,


John Mann,
John Cowgill,
Robert Moore,
Asa Rogers,
Anthony Sharp,
Josiah Roberts,
John Ward,
Thomas Borton,
David Davis,
Isaac Kay,
Edward Garrigues.


Extracted from the minutes of the aforesaid Meeting,
WILLIAM GIBBONS,? Cl,,.s
BENJ. FERRIS. lerks.









SANDY FOUNDATION SHAKEN, &c.

BY WILLIAM PENN.

The Trinity of Distinct and Separate Persons in the
Unity of Essence, refuted from Scripture.
And he said, Lord God, there is no God like unto
thee." (1 Kings 8, 24.)-" To whom then will ye liken
me, or shall I be equal, saith the Holy One?" (Isa. 40,
25.) "I am the. Lord, and. th re is none else, there is no
God besides me." (Is. 45, 5;`6.) Thus saith the Lord
thy Redeemer, the Holy One oftlsrael." (Isa. 48, 17.)
"I will also praise thee, 0 my God; unto thee will I
sing, 0 Holy One of Israel." (Psalm 71, 22.) "Jehovah
shall be One, and his name One." (Zac. 14 9.) Which,
with a cloud of other testimonies that might be urged, ev:
idently demonstrate, that in the days of the first covenant,
and Prophets, but One was the Holy God, and God but
that Holy One.-Agaiin: "And Jesus said unto him,
Why callest thou me good? There is none good but
One, and that is God." (Mat. 19, 17.) "And this is life
eternal, that they might know thee (Father) the only true
God." (John 17, 3.) "Seeing it is one God that shall
justify." (Rom. 3, 30.) There be gods many-but unto
us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all
things." (1 Cor. 8, 6.) One God and Father who is
above all things." (Eph. 4, 6.) "For there is one God."
(1 Tim. 2, 5.) "To the only wise God be glory now and
ever." (Jude, ver. 25.) From all which'I shall lay down
this one assertion, that the testimonies of Scripture, both
under the law, and since the gospel dispensation, declare
One to be God, and God to be One, on which I shall
raise this argument.
(To be Continued.)











THE QUAKER.



AUGUST, 1827.



SERMON BY JESSE KERSEY, AT GREEN STREET MEETING, PHILADEL-
PHIA, APRIL 19, 1827, BEING THE TIME OF YEARLY MEETING.

IT is a truth and doctrine, which I humbly hope will
never be attempted to be invaded or limited in the church
of Christ, that "If any thing be revealed to another that
sitteth by, let the first hold his peace."
In this explanation, summarily given, of the views
which obtained among the primitive believers and minis-
ters, to the saints, we discover that they must have relied
chiefly and closely upon a perceptive principle given to
each of them; or otherwise, how could it be possible that
he that should be standing and speaking, should become
impressed with a conviction that the vision to him was
closed, and that the spirit of inspiration was extended to
another, or fellow labourer? In this simple view, my
friends, there is made evident to my understanding the
spirituality that was believed in and maintained, as fun-
damental in the Christian character. And it was under
this blessed, this glorious and heavenly vision given to
the soul, that there was clearly illustrated to the judg-
ment of that eminent minister and witness to the truth,
to wit, Paul, the nature of man.
He distinctly perceived in himself, that he was a be-
ing composed of three component natures, body, spirit,
VOL. II.-7


No. 2.


VOL. II.






SERMON


and soul. And if 1 comprehend him correctly, and of
that, others are as fully at liberty to judge as I am to
think; if I comprehend him correctly, the whole of his
doctrine having relation to predestination stands connect-
ed with this view, and he fully and clearly opens to my
mind a conviction, that each of these natures in man has
its proper station. The body of man is composed of mat-
ter, and is associated with this visible creation, and form-
ed of its elements, being the seat of the natural spirit of
man which is conjointly compounded with the soul im-
mortal, and may be considered as the vessel of dishonour:
while the soul of man stands foreordained of God to eter-
nal life. And the great business which it appears to me
we are called to, and the highest possible point of eleva-
tion is, the redemption of the soul from under the thral-
dom, into which, by transgression, it is liable to fall. And
is there any thing that we can recur to, that can touch it,
that can quicken it, that can give it a perception of its own
condition, which is, in itself, a quality below the nature
of the soul itself? Surely this view presents us with
clear ground of conviction, that all means, however inge-
niously devised, that are not furnished with a power and
principle capable of quickening the soul, and of giv-
ing it a clear perception of its own condition, must fall
short of effecting the end, and so the apostle Paul believ-
ed: and the doctrines which he preached, and which had
such a convincing effect upon the Gentile world stood con-
nected with this consideration, of the nature of man's re-
demption, and of man's salvation.
In the views, into which his mind was led subsequent-
ly to his being renewed and changed from a spirit of per-
secution to a spirit of love-in the views which he-was
furnished with in this latter state, he perceived a quick-
ening, invigorating, penetrating, all powerful principle,








BY JESSE KERSEY.


which he declares to be the word of God, and by which
means, as through the medium of words impressions are
made between man and man; so that term is used as a
figure to point to a principle operating upon the soul of
man. For as it regards spiritual subjects, it is impossible,
in speaking among men not to use such figures-we must
necessarily recur to that kind of figure that comes nearest
to the object designed to be unfolded. He calls this
principle the word, and describes its nature-he says
it is quick. Here is a most distinct and forcible illustra-
tion of it. "For the word of God is quick, and powerful,
and sharper than any two-edged sword." How did he
learn this ? Did he learn it from any outward or mate-
rial cause? Or did he learn it from any thing which he
could have received at the hands of man? Verily, no. He
was taught it by the thing itself-by this very principle,
of which he had obtained a practical and experimental
knowledge. He found that it was quick-and how did
he perceive this? He certainly knew it to be so when the
interrogation arose, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou
me ?" Here he perceived a principle operating internally,
and it was clothed with an irresistible power that pene-
trated the very depths of his soul, saying, Why perse-
cutest thou me?"
I ask this assembly to think for themselves individu-
ally, whether they have ever known a principle thus
quick, simple, immediate, internal and convietive? If
we have, we have known the principle to which this il-
lustrious minister of the gospel points. He found, and
he has given his testimony, that it was a principle, capa-
ble, as it is recorded, of effecting a complete separation of
the soul of man from the thraldom into which he may have
sunk by the power of transgression. For the word of
God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any two







SERMON


edged sword, piercing, even to the dividing asunder of
soul and spirit."
Now there is in man, and we perceive it in children, an
animal spirit, which we may conceive to be of the nature
of those spirits which are perceptible in other animated
nature; but which, in the dignified subject man, is the
seat of the rational understanding. The passions, appe-
tites, and various tendencies becoming associated with this
animal nature in man, go to cloud, darken, and bewilder
the judgment in relation to the nature of thekingdom of hea-
ven, and the glory of it. And there is no power on earth
-there is no principle within the command of man that
can remove this veil, or that can separate the soul immor-
tal, from the company of its confused and disordered com-
panions, and the appetites, tempers, and inclinations to
which we are individually liable. But the apostle found
that this powerful word was amply sufficient to produce
this all important result; and he gave his testimony, that
without faith in this principle it was impossible to please
God.
Now when we feel its quickening effects, and are brought
in our retirement-in moments when we are out of the
sight of our fellow creatures; and when, through the ten-
der mercy of a gracious God, we can look upon our own
follies and see our condition; then it is that our duty calls
to us, and it will unquestionably produce our happiness,
that we yield to this quickening principle like the illustri-
ous Paul; and confer not with flesh and blood, but give
up to the heavenly vision. Thus our souls would be
raised,-however low they may be depressed-however
much they may be degraded by vanity, and consenting to
the various inclinations of man,-they would become rais-
ed, and brought into the liberty, the blessed and glorious
liberty of the sons of God. And here we see with clearness,








BY JESSE KERSEY.


the correctness of the testimony; for this word is the spirit
of God; and we all see the correctness of this testimony:
"As many as are led by the spirit of God, they are the
sons of God." And these have an evidence of it; the
spirit itself bearing witness with their spirit, that they are
the children of God," and that they are not following
any thing like an uncertainty, and they thus become sta-
ble and settled, and are not carried away with every wind
of doctrine. And it is requisite that man, if he be consider-
ed as justly an accountable being, should be furnished with
such a principle; for as far as I have been able to trace the
nature of man practically and experimentally, there appears
to be no other clear, certain, and positive guide, upon which
he may with unequivocal confidence rely. If we attempt
to rely on our reasoning powers, independently of this
quickening principle, we know that these powers are limit-
ed and incompetent to look into futurity. But a principle
or guide, adequate to protect us from all evil on the right
hand and on the left, must be a principle capable of view-
ing futurity-it mustlook into the future, and be able to de-
termine what will be the result. We have an evidence, then,
that reason is not a competent guide. Experience may be
held up as equivalent to the all important end, of consti-
tuting a perfect and safe guide; and how often do we
hear it spoken of as that which may be relied on with
confidence and certainty; but, my friends, the whole
weight of evidence, that is to be collected from a succes-
sive train of events, goes to demonstrate that experience it-
self is incapable-that it is an uncertain guide; because
the change of circumstances, and a variety of causes are
constantly operating upon us, and placing us in new rela-
tions, differing from any thing that is past; for no two
links can be marked in a chain of events, which we can
believe to be exactly and positively, in all things, the








SERMON


same. And experience, to form a proper and safe guide,
must present an exact correspondence, and hence the im-
perfection of experience in our own power as men and
creatures, for we reason by comparison of one thing with
another. From both these, and every other view which
we can take by the natural powers of man, it is evident that
it would not provide us with a rule adequate to preserve
us from all the errors to which we are liable. And were
that our condition, unquestionably we could not be con-
sidered very accountable beings. But there is a rule
above all rules, which renders us accountable; and that is
the quickening and powerful word of God, by which a con-
sciousness in man is kept alive; and there has been and
will be, in all human probability, a variety of ideas ope-
rating upon the understandings of men; but impressions of
consciousness throughout the general mass of creation,
are similar. Now that which is universal, must flow
from a principle that is. universal in its nature ; and con-
sciousness is always the same. Our ideas may vary,
and our conclusions may differ, but our consciousness of
our own case is invariable, and in agreement with each
other. And no man is happy who violates this; neither
is any man miserable who faithfully regards it. But, my
friends, I wish it not to be understood, that I hold up this
consciousness as the word of God, that quickening, pow-
erful principle to which the apostle alluded; but I consi-
der this consciousness in relation to the mind, as feelings in
relation to the body; the mind has feelings, capacities, and
sensibility, as well as the body ; and in this situation it is
the consciousness through which the divine power acts, and
it is always felt and perceived. And those who become
devoted to its government, are instructed in feeling a
sensibility of its presence, and when furnished with this,
they mistake not its testimony for that of another.







BY JESSE KERSEY.


I am aware that objections have been raised to this
view of the subject; and it is astonishing and surprising,
that even in these modern times, objections are attempted
to be raised, with respect to the safety of being govern-
ed by, and relying upon this quickening and powerful
word or manifestation of the spirit of God, and that it
should be thought necessary to place its testimony under
the examination of reason, and to compare it with the testi-
mony given in relation to it-and that, if, on comparing our
impressions with those testimonies given in relation to
similar impressions, we find these not in exact accordance
with the nature of the impression which we feel in the soul,
we are to respect the written testimony, and to suspend
our impressions in opposition thereto. But if this be the
case, then the testimony of the divine word must be go-
verned by something else: but 1 admit not this as a fact;
for in all written testimony there must have been a de-
gree of conformity in the mind of the writer to his own
ideas and impressions; and though the impressions
which he himself received were true to him, and though
the revelation were true, still his mode of expressing or
describing that revelation, would be in correspondence
with his own opinions and prejudices.
It is a remarkable and important circumstance, that it
pleased the Father of creation to give a revealed testimo-
ny to the world; and that, by the power of that word
whereof the apostle speaks, many of the prejudices of ed-
ucation are broken up, as was the case with the apostle
Paul. For prior to writing his epistolary testimony, he
was brought under the power of this word; and the pre-
judices which he had entertained in conformity to the Jew-
ish ideas, were removed by the power of this word. And
now he became prepared to write in relation to his own
experience of facts, which were obligatory upon himself.







SERMON


Hence as it regards these testimonies recorded in the
Scriptures of truth; they have come to us in a purer form.
than we have a right to expect of written testimony in
general, and hence their superiority over other books
which have been written. But however high they may
stand, however justlythey may be estimated by the enlight-
ened sons of God, they never have been placed higher or
above that eternal, quickening spirit of God, which is giv-
en to every man to profit withal; and they never will be
in any clearly enlightened mind. And whatever quib-
bles or objections may be raised against these views, they
are quibbles that may be, with the same propriety, raised
against every blessing that an all gracious God has con-
descended to bestow upon his creature man. There is not
a single blessing but may be abused by human beings; for
many are influenced by ideas arising from the predomi-
nancy of passion, and may allege and dare to say, that
those impressions are from the divine Spirit, but are we
to give credit to these as standing on the right ground,
when they are in direct opposition to what we conceive to
be a manifestation of the spirit of God to the soul? No,
truly, I am not bound so to believe it, but I am bound to
compassionate him as a fellow creature, who is liable, like
myself, to be mistaken.
But to return to the very important and interesting work
of man's salvation, as it has been opened in this assembly,
in the preceding part of my testimony.
You have seen, and it was the apostle's experience, that
we are called on to have implicit faith, not in the testimo-
ny of men, but in that quick and powerful conviction that
we feel in ourselves, that is, that we are to have faith in
the divine manifestations to the soul. Now when Saul
was preached to, through the goodness of God, by this
blessed and heavenly principle, he took the direct course,







BY JESSE KERSEY.


he conferred not with flesh and blood, but gave up to the
heavenly vision, and became a powerful ambassador in
the cause of the Prince of Peace. And had he so much
as continued with his men at that moment of time, ht
might have taken into consideration a variety of objec-
tions,-he might have said, 1 am entrusted with authori-
ty from the chief priests, and they may consider my not
carrying into execution the object of my mission, an evi-
dence that I am a traitor. He might, and he no doubt
did, take into consideration, that by becoming a subject,
and being connected with the most despised class of men,
lie would be rejected, despised, and turned aside from, by
all his former acquaintance. But this illustrious, this pre-
cious, this valuable man, conferred not with flesh and
blood. And when he came into the presence of the king,
agreeable to the account, Festus and others met with great
pomp to hear what he could say in relation to himself.
And how beautifully he shows the grounds on which he
had been induced to change his course. Why should
it be thought a thing incredible with you, that God should
raise the dead?" "King Agrippa, believes thou the
prophets? I know that thou believest" And I may
now say to the present assembly, do you believe in the
existence of this principle, this witness? 1 make a solemn
appeal to what you yourselves have known. I know that
you believe it,-then where is the difficulty? It is on the
part of those who are not willing to become his happy
subjects-it is the same difficulty that existed in the mind
of king Agrippa when he said, "Almost thou persuadest
me to be a Christian." And upon what was that almost
founded? Was there any difficulty as to the evidence,
or as to the ground which was proper to be taken? His
judgment was reached, his understanding was convinced,
but the world stood in his way. He did not possess at
VOL. .I-8








SERMON


that moment of time, the happy independence of Paul,
when he conferred not with flesh and blood, but gave up
to the heavenly vision. This I take to have been the case
with many of my poor fellow creatures down to the pre-
sent day. And I am convinced that it has been lamenta-
bly the case, in the generation in which we live, and with-
in the bounds of that religious society, which has been
dear to me for many years. I am convinced of the fact,
because I have no hesitation in saying, in this large and
very interesting assembly, that had it been otherwise, we
should have had sons and daughters qualified in their
own experience to give testimony, and their testimony
would have spread from the east and from the west, from
the north and from the south, with absolute certainty, on
which the foundation of the church of Christ must he un-
questionably built.
Now I ask of you, in all the tenderness which 1 think
I have once more felt to clothe my tried mind which has
gone through a great deal-no man knows the heights and
depths that I have felt; but I have found this principle to
be a foundation to trust in, even in moments of the deepest
anxiety, and in the bitterest stages of my life. Yes, I
have known this principle to be an all-sufficient power
underneath, which is capable of sustaining the soul that
trusts in it, notwithstanding we may be disposed to cry
out in despair, and however in the weakness of humanity,
we may turn ourselves from it, and become darkened for
a season. But I magnify the name of the invisible and
all-powerful God, that he has given to every one a por-
tion to profit withal, and I ask it of you, my dear young
friends, to regard this persuasive evidence of God; for
the soul of man is foreordained of God to eternal life, and
to rise above the inferior nature of man, through the medi-
um of thi, evangelical and heavenly principle, and to be-








BY JESSE KERSEY.


long to the society of that blessed company who surround
the throne of God; and to be prepared, without alloy, to
assimilate in the ever blessed and unfathomable amen of
love, where, in the sight of angels, we shall be known to
all those who have experienced the same lamb-like nature,
who have been raised to heavenly spirits, and brought in-
to the dominion of God, to triumph over all the powers
of darkness, death, hell, and the grave.
He that knoweth his master's will and doeth it not,
shall be beaten with many stripes. I desire that while I
live in this state of existence, 1 may have an increasing
evidence, that when the time of my departure may be
near at hand, I may bear an unshaken evidence that there
is a crown of righteousness laid up for me, and which my
soul longs for: and which I believe all may enjoy by en-
deavouring to keep a conscience void of offence toward God
and man. He that created us for the purpose of his own
glory, has undoubtedly a right to call us to render up un-
to him our hearts. And as we are concerned to give un-
to him our hearts, he will most assuredly wash and
cleanse all our bodies from the corruption of our fallen na-
ture, and forgive us our trespasses. Therefore, I desire
that we may all become acquainted with him in our own
souls, and settle down in our own hearts, and be still, and
know that he is God.
I should be very thankful that the minds of this as-
sembly should now be solemnized together, and that we
might enter a little into ourselves, and know for ourselves
that our God is at hand, and that he is disposed to bless
us in solemn silence.










SERMON


BY JESSE KERSEY, AT FRIENDS' MEETING, CARPENTERS' HALL, PHI-
LADELPHIA, JULY 1, 1827.

IT would seem extraordinary if the fountain of unlim-
ited wisdom and power, who gave to man his existence,
and all the faculties that he possesses, should have placed
him under circumstances in which there would be an im-
possibility of coming to a knowledge of his duty to the
author of his existence; or, that he should have rendered
it so difficult and mysterious as to be scarcely attainable.
I say it would seem extraordinary if this were the case,
or if we could have any cause to believe, that as it regards
the great concern of our present and everlasting happi-
ness, we were purposely left in the dark, or left subject
to uncertainty and difficulty of attaining the truth. And
it would seem extraordinary too, if we were placed under
circumstances that should render it impossible for us to
distinguish with satisfactory clearness, the way in which
we should go.
I have believed, and that for many years past, in agree-
ment with the excellent testimony delivered by the apos-
tle John, concerning the Almighty, that God is love; and
that, in correspondence with the true nature of his being,
it must have been his great design, in the formation of
creation, and in the production of man, to have made
wide and broad the means of enjoying raitonal and sub-
stantial happiness, And the more I have reflected on
this view, the more 1 have taken into consideration the
many proofs which we have of his benevolence and kind
regard, the more I am convinced that God is love. And
if we examine the external objects with which we are
surrounded, we shall find proof in abundance to confirm







JESSE KERSEY.


this view. If we look to the luxuriant productions adapt-
ed to every sense, we see it most clearly demonstrated,
that they are prepared to please-that they are prepared
to render us comfortable, that they are prepared to make
us happy. We discover this in all the varieties of na-
ture-in the flowers of the field, in the exquisite perfec-
tion of the fruits of the earth--they all go to convince my
understanding, that God is love, and that man is the spe-
cial object of his care; and that he has in the course of
his wisdom, in the formation of things, seen meet to place
us at the head of his creation. For we are informed in
the scriptures of truth, that he gave to man dominion
over the beast of the field, over the fowl of the air, and
over every living thing that moveth upon the earth." He
placed him at the head of his visible creation; and having
done so, he even goes further, he breathes upon him the .
breath of life, he inspires him with the being of immorta-
lity; and opens between his own eternal nature and the
creature he has formed, a happy medium of communica-
tion. And it has appeared to me with an encouraging
degree of clearness, in the present interesting assembly,
that if we are brought to trace these views of our gracious
Creator, and to contemplate him as the everlastingFather,
we shall see that he is graciously attentive to all our wants,
and that he is disposed to lead us in the way we should
go. If, I say, we were brought to contemplate him in
this point of light, I believe it would have a powerful ten-
dency to draw us from an improper devotion to other
things. For as the soul of man becomes enlightened and
enlarged in the comprehension of all the tender mercies
and fatherly cares of a gracious Creator, it must neces-
sarily be enlarged in a desire, that it may in all things
become conformed to his own blessed will. And it ap-
pears to my mind, that the simple path pointed out for







SERMON


man is, a devotion to his Creator's blessed will; and every
soul that lives in devotion to the will of God, must be
happy, both in time, and when time shall be no more. So
that every soul that becomes subject to his government
must be happy. And why? Because he that dwells in
all his works can require nothing that shall go to destroy
the foundation of happiness. And although, in becoming
subject to his government, and becoming passive to the
manifestation of his spirit, we shall be led from many of
the customs and fashions of the world; yet we shall find
that we are in duty bound to separate ourselves from the
customs and habits which prevail, and that this separation
will go to add to our happiness.
These are the consequences that must ever follow a de-
votion to his will; and this is the way in which man,
from the beginning was to go. He was to live in subjec-
tion to the will of God, and to obey the light within, thus
walking in the counsel and demonstration of this living
and eternal principle. And there never was a solitary
instance, where a devoted subject of this kind was ever
rendered unhappy in time, or as I can believe, in eternity.
The mind that becomes devoted to the clear conviction of
feelings in the soul-to the impressions, of duty, and to a
sense of whatGod requires, must have consciousness that
it is pursuing an honest course, and laying a sure founda-
tion, from which it will have nothing to fear; it is thus
that the Lord's children become established, and thus
every man "sits under his vine and under his fig-tree,
and none shall make them afraid."
Now, my friends, if we look into the subject, and enter
into ourselves, and become faithfully devoted to the con-
victions and evidence of truth in ourselves, and follow
these convictions and these impressions, will it not do
away every ground of fear, and relieve uw from every ap-








BY JF.ST: KERSEY.


prehension of danger? I have no doubt of it. But we
have heard occasionally, that there is danger of being led
off, and of our being carried away into visionary ideas,
if we submit ourselves to this internal convicting princi-
ple-that we may be led into extremes, and that there
are many great absurdities in our devotion to this con-
victing feeling, and the impressions made upon the soul
of man.
It is true, my friends, there may be cases of delusion,
but they are in consequence, not of the principle, nor of
being devoted to it, but in consequence of the tendency of
the heart, for there are a variety of ways in which it may
be acted on-the mind of man may be stimulated, and in-
fluenced by various causes. But if we come under the
precious government, and into true devotion to the spirit
of God, as certainly as it is the perfection of wisdom and
power, from which all things proceed, and by which all
things are happily regulated that are regulated, so, truly,
should we be regulated. For he that sustains the perfec-
tion of every plant in the field, and who sustains the per
fiction of every planet in its orbit, would by the same
power sustain that kind of propriety in our conduct which
would support us in every exigency. It is true, that the
unthinking, worldly, and giddy classes of mankind will
call in question the restrictions that they must be laid un-
der when they come into subordination to this principle,
but let them examine and critically decide, and they will
perceive, that whenever these restrictions proceed from
solid impressions upon the mind, made by the influence of
divine power, they must necessarily result in preparing
such individuals to be happy in themselves.
Now, if we go from this foundation where are we to
land? As I said in the beginning, it is very extraordi-
nary, if the great Creator, after having planned out our








SERMON


creation, should have left us in uncertainty, in respect to
the way that we should go. I know that there is in
Christendom a great deal said upon this subject, and a
great-variety of rules and opinions imposed, and attempt-
ed to be urged upon the notice of mankind, and I know
to what extent they are called to an external and outward
test. But this society, in its commencement, appealed to the
light of Christ within; and they bore ample testimony to this
invaluable guide. They held it up as unequivocally pro-
ceeding from unlimited perfection, and they had no doubt
of the safety of being subject to its government. They
believed, and so will every dedicated follower, that no
doctrines were imposed on the mind through the medium
of.this principle, which were contradictory to the doc-
trines unfolded at any prior period of the world. They
believed that they would find a correspondence in the
scriptures of truth, with the impressions which they felt
in their own minds, and this correspondence was abun-
dantly furnished, when the blessed Saviour told his dis-
ciples who were leaning upon him, and upon his outward
communications, "It is expedient for you that I go away:
for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto
you; but if I go away, 1 will pray the Father, and he
shall give you another Comforter."
Now, he saw that his disciples, though they had been
so long in his company, that it would seem. they might
have been prepared to understand; yet they were leaning
upon outward views-this was evident by the questions
which they proposed to him: "Lord, wilt thou at this
time restore again the kingdom to Israel?' They had an
idea of being raised to power and importance in the world,
and while in this state it was impossible that they should
be brought into possession of the Comforter, of whom he
had spoken. It was, therefore, necessary that all those







BY JESSE KERSEY.


outward expectations should be done away. But when
they waited, in conformity to his instructions, at Jerusa-
lem, to he endowed with power from on high, they were
so endowed; for the Holy Ghost came down upon them,
and they were furnished with still deeper testimony, to
the convincement of those who heard them. And no
doubt at all they were satisfied that it was this Holy Spi-
rit, from the character that the blessed Jesus himself had
given concerning it--" But the Comforter, which is the
Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he
shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your re-
membrance."
When man calmly retires, and quietly sits down to
contemplate himself, and to think of his own condition,
the eternal light of the sun of righteousness bursts in up-
on his soul, opens a view of his condition, and brings all
things to his remembrance. Therefore, a believer in this
principle, and in the truth of the testimony that records
this principle, must know that it will not do for him to
rest in the outward testimony. For he feels that he is
bound to come to the thing testified of-to come to the
living power and spirit of truth in himself, and when he
comes under its government, he will be taught all things,
and all things will be brought to his remembrance, and
hence he will be led to see what it is that contributes to
his destruction, and what to his happiness ; and thus he
will be instructed how to pursue his passage through this
world in order to be happy. He is taught by external
testimony and has it confirmed by internal. "If any
man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take
up his cross, and follow me," and he will experience the
reality of this testimony, because he finds in the different
tempers and tendencies of his nature, a liability to excess,
therefore it is requisite that he be placed under a princi-
VOL. Il.--9







SERMON


pie of restraint. And this holy and heavenly restraint is
called the cross of Christ, because it applies to the vari-
ous temperaments in man's nature, and seeing the truth
of the testimony he is satisfied of its reality, because he
finds it impressed with equal force in his own mind, and in
his submission to it he is rendered happy. Take my
yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and low-
ly of heart, and ye shall find rest unto your souls." And
as we are brought under the constraining power and con-
trolling influence of this heavenly spirit, we shall find that
his yoke is easy, and that its restrictions render us com-
fortable and happy in ourselves, and thus prepare us for
the enjoyment of the society of one another.
How plain, beautiful, clear, and excellent, is the path
that God has ordained for man to walk in. How sweet-
ly might we enjoy the happiness of each other's society,
and how cordially we might stand together, and reve-
rence that ever blessed and glorious Being, who, in con-
nection with our being, has associated with and breathed
upon us the breath of life, whereby we have become liv-
ing souls.
O, my friends while I have been standing among you,
and reflecting as I have been led to do, upon the vast
variety of dangers, of trials, and of difficulties, to which
we are liable in our passage through this present pro-
bationary scene, I have been prepared to acknow-
ledge, that I know no guide, that I know no principle ad-
equate to protect us on the right hand and on the left, but
this all comprehensive and eternal principle, that embraces
the past, present, and future. Let us then become subject
to the light of Christ, to this supernatural guide, a guide
that has never yet deceived any of the sons of men.
I wish for the rising generation, and in an especial
manner, in this large city, where the means of deception







BY JESSE KERSEY.


are abundant, and where the fields of iniquity are ex-
tensive, that children would regard the light of truth in
themselves.
When you retire, dear young people, to your bed
chambers, from the busy buz of society, before you lay
your heads upon the pillow, and when the Lord deigns
to visit you and to solemnize your feelings, and to open
your eyes to see the world which lies in iniquity, be en-
treated of him to become his peaceful subjects, and in that
case he will be graciously pleased to preserve you. But
how many there are who are wandering, as it were, upon
the mountains of naked profession, and who are really fit
subjects to be taken by every snare, and to be tossed and
carried along the tide of time, with almost any thing that
is held up to view, and without a sufficient degree of so-
ber integrity for considering what will promote the peace
of their own minds, and what will not! These must be
left till some great sin overtakes them, and till they are
taught by the things they suffer; for thus it is, that they
are left to pursue their course, and we have an evidence
of this in the testimony of the blessed Jesus, for he says,
" Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden,
and I will give you rest." Many have gone abroad in
the world and made experiments, and tried the conse-
quences of indulging a tendency to evil,-who have tried
all these mad experiments,-to all these he says, come
unto me, all you that are weary, who have learned that
all is vanity of vanities, and vexation of spirit-who have
made the experiment and are satisfied, that peaceable
fruits are not to be found on this ground. Now try his
yoke upon you, and learn of him, and I verily believe,
that if this becomes happily the case with many in the au-
dience of my voice,-if they become passive subjects under
this heavenly yoke, they will find themselves established







68 SERMON BY JESSE KERSEY.

upon a foundation, against which, the various storms and
conflicts of time will beat but in vain: for there is a foun-
dation that stands sure, and the Lord knows them that
are his.
I wish for the present company that this foundation may
be individually attained to.
I had not a prospect of saying much, but I felt an open-
ing and spreading of gospel love upon my mind, extend-
ing to the present society, and this simple testimony has
been left with you. And it is consolatory to believe that
God is love, and that lie is continually mindful of us.











SERMON


BY JOHN COMLY, AT FRIENDS MEETING, CARPENTERS' HALL, AFTER-
NOON OF JULY 1, 1827.
SWhy sayest thou, O Jacob, and speakest, O Israel,
My way is hid from the Lord, and my judgment is pass-
ed over from my God?"
Is there an individual-is there a mind here, tried with
a feeling, with a language of this kind? Hast thou not
known"-canst thou not recur to what is past; to feelings
which thou hast had in seasons that are past; to what
thou hast "known?" And if nothing of this can be brought
to thy remembrance, even like the reflection of light from
the sun, communicated to the earth by the moon, appoint-
ed for seasons and to rule the night;--if in thy recollec-
tions, if in thy reflections upon what is past, thou Iart not
able even to take hold on any thing for encouragelment in
the present tried moment, then even recur to what thioi
hast heard from others. "Hast thou not heard"' o'fen
the testimony of others-hast thou not read the testinmony
of others, "that the Lord, the everlasting God, the Creator
of the ends of the earth, faitteth not. neither is weary?:
Now where is thy confidence? Why sayest thou,
O Jacob, and speakest, 0 Israel, My way is hid from the
Lord, and my judgment is passed over from my God ?"
And yet here, in thy recollection of what thou hast heart.
and what thou hast known, is aii evidence sometimes to be
taken hold of even in the most stripped and tried moments.
that the everlasting God, the Lard, the Creator of the
ends of the earth, fainteth not, neither is weary: there
is no searching of his understanding;" notr "canst thou
by searching find out God," nor comprehend all the ways
of his wisdom in his dealing with thee. But it is -.iili -:
w







SERMON


ent for thy understanding, that thou canst see so far that
thou mayst put thy trust in him, and that thy confidence
may be renewed that he never will forsake thee.
And wherever there is sensibility, and a feeling of
thine own poverty, and a state of being stripped and prov-
ed, these are an evidence that there is life and feeling re-
maining in thee. For, even the youth shall faint and be
weary, and the young man shall utterly fall." All the
strength and power of the natural man may be totally una-
vailing, and every effort of thy resolution and faith may fail,
and fall short of bringing thee out of that state of poverty,
trial, and deep affliction, in which thy mind may have
been travailing; and wherein conflicts are within and with-
out, and wherein sorrows are multiplied, and where the
waves and the billows seem to pass over thee, coming
even unto thy very soul.
I know not that there is an individual present, who
has been thus tried and closely proved, or whether it is
to advertise others, that they be watchfully prepared to
"gird up the loins of their mind"-"to watch and be so-
ber." For the Lord's people are a tried people, and he
chooses them in the furnace of affliction, and refines them
not with silver nor with any thing outward, but by his
own eternal spirit-by a baptism of the Holy Spirit, and
of fire-the fire of his divine word, that burns inwardly
like an oven, and will consume nothing but dross and that
which is to be removed, that which cannot "dwell with the
devouring fire," and with everlasting burnings." There
are seasons to be endured like the frosts of winter, or like
the scorching rays of a meridian sun. There are sea-
sons to be patiently endured, when the Lord is turning
his hand upon the little ones, and is about to purge away
the dross, and take away the tin and the reprobate silver
in the furnace of affliction, and when all hope seems as
(







BY JOHN COMLY.


if it were nearly gone, and when in its extremity the mind
is ready to sink, and cast away all hope, and when the
inquiry is raised, Hath God forgotten to be gracious?
Hath he shut up his tender mercies ? Will the Lord cast
off forever ? And will he be favourable no more ?"
But this is no new thing. Do not count it strange then,
concerning this fiery trial, as though some new thing had
happened:" for it remains still to be the economy of per-
fect wisdom and goodness, to lead his children "in ways
which they have not known," and not only to lead them,
but to instruct them when he finds them in a wilderness
state, when their minds are seeking rest and cannot find
it. He sees when they are closely proved; and this bap-
tism is for their purification; although in this tried state,
as the prophet expresses it, the youths shall faint and
be weary, and the young men shall utterly fall." WThere-
fore there is no dependence to be put on the powers of
the natural man, or any thing outward, or any thing short
of the salvation of God. And yet, even to those who are
in this state of poverty and trial, what encouragement is
held out! "They that wait upon the Lord shall renew
their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles;
they shall run, and not be weary; they shall walk, and
not faint."
Are there, then, such precious promises, and can they
be taken hold of? It appears to me, in the exercise and
in the feeling that I have had in this meeting, that there
are minds present, who understand something of this lan-
guage in the lines of their own experience; and who, in
this tried, tossed, afflicted, a?,d not comforted state, have
been almost ready to give out-almost cast beyond hope.
" Why sayest thou, 0 Jaco "-that wrestling seed, that
spirit in thee which has been striving and endeavouring--
canst thou not now appeal, hat however weak and frail,







SERMON


and however short thou mayst have fallen of the stand-
ard that has been held up to thy view, and of the mark
thou wast called to aim at, yet that in sincerity of soul
thou hast endeavoured, and laboured, in this state of
weakness, to walk in the fear of God and to watch over
thy words and thy actions ? And if thou art not sensible
of attaining any nearer to the mark or standard, which
thou hast seen to be a state of quietness, and which
is very desirable indeed,-and thou art thus discour-
aged, and in looking back seest that thou art still as poor,
and as weak, and as frail as ever, give not way too much
to thine own discouragements, and to the dark side of things
to he troubled in thy thoughts to no purpose; but, leaving
tie things that are behind, keep thine eye straight forward
upon the end, and run the race with patience that is set be-
fore thee. However tribulated it may be, however tossed and
tried it may be, yet let not go thy confidence, for the "ever-
lasting God, the creator of the ends of the earth, fainteth not,
neither is weary;" and, therefore, thou needest not faint,
nor be weary. Have confidence in him who has invited
lthee to follow him: and if he seems to lead thee through
paths or tribula:tion, and tbronugh scenes more trying than
those of any other, do not let in the conclusion, that he
deals harder with thee than with others, for thou know-
est not the trials of others; it is enough for thee to know
thine own, and net only to know them, but to manage
them aright, and to keep the word of his patience in this
trying season: for if we let this go, in the impatience of the
creature, we make our case worse, and the will order the
furnace to be heated hotter, than before. For until all
imlpaience of the creature is reduced, there will remain
a source of unhappiness; f li thy ,ill is not brought into
conformity to the divine will. while there is impatience
under sufferings.







BY JOHN COMLY.


A Christian should never be discouraged, however tried
and tempted; he should never give way to discourage-
ment. What has a Christian to be discouraged at ? His
master says, Take up thy cross and follow me." And
shall he be afraid that the captain of his salvation will not
be able to lead him through ? Fear not, little flock, for
it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the king-
dom." And through many tribulations the righteous are
said to become possessed of the kingdom of heaven, which
is in man. This divine government is known and estab-
lished, and is set up in the soul, when the spirit of God
becomes the governing principle in all our actions-when
every thing is brought into subjection to the spirit of God,
then is the heavenly kingdom known; but till every thing
is subject to this, we are not possessors of this kingdom.
Now what has kept men from the happiness intended
for them? It has been a disposition to serve something
else first; and they have thus let out their minds after
visible delights and gratifications comprehended by the
animal senses. Therefore their Gentile nature has been
seeking what to cat, what to drink, and wherewith to be
clothed-these things have employed too much of their
time, and occupied too much of their attention. And I
fear there are some young minds in the present assembly,
who have been too much devoted to these pursuits. And
I am glad in believing, that many have become conscious
that too much time has been wasted in pursuing bawbles
and vanities. The Lord is on his way, causing his light
to shine to the enlightening of many, and bringing into
view more clearly and brightly the necessity of ceasing
from these vanities. And if we would be Christians, we
must first deny ourselves, take up our daily cross and fol-
low this divine light and leader, this divine guide, this
unction from the Holy One-for this will teach us all
voL. 1,-10







SERMON


things. And as your attention is turned to this, you will
be thus enlightened, and called, and invited-you will
have an evidence that in you the gospel has been preach-
ed, which is the power of God unto salvation, manifested
in man; and this is the gospel of Christ. And you will be
taught by its preaching more than any outward preaching
could have done for you. By it you will be drawn into an
inquiry-you will be excited to inquire in the temple of
your own hearts; and this is a much better kind of in-
quiry, and more likely to prove advantageous, than all
the inquiries that could be made through books and men.
May you then turn your attention more at home within
yourselves, and delight more to dwell at home, out of the
nature of Esau, the first nature, the rough man, that de-
lights in hunting for his venison. May you govern, re-
strain and overcome these wandering desires-this seeking
without, for that which can only be found within you.
A desire after happiness has been implanted in the
breast of every intelligent being; and it is a desire im-
planted by our heavenly Father. And when the mind is
opened to see that there is such happiness, and that there
is a life that may be attained to, which expires not with
these animal bodies-that there is a happiness which shall
be continual, and as enduring as the immortal spirit-
when our eyes are opened to behold this pearl of great
price, and when we are called to seek after it in propor-
tion to the importance of the object, and the duration of
the prize, then why do we try to delay it? Why stop
to pluck a few flowers to gratify our senses, in our journey
from Babylon, a state of confusion in our own minds?
Why stop upon our way, and why be diverted from this
pursuit, for the enjoyment of the animal senses? Why
not travel on towards Bethel, the house of God; for
strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth







BY JOHN COMLY.


unto life," and happiness, that true and genuine happiness,
which was intended for us as rational creatures and im-
mortal souls. This is the life that we are called to hun-
ger after; but every creature has to prepare himself for
this state of happiness. Man is designed for a happiness
which shall endure for ever, and brighten to all eternity;
then why not improve the time, and gift, and talent, where-
by he may come to a certain knowledge in himself, inde-
pendent of every external thing ? Let him then use these,
only, as they are of use to him in his journey-as servants,
and not as lords or masters; that is, using the world and
not abusing it; for every good thing may become an evil,
unless the same power that gave it, enable us also to make
a right use of it.
What shall we eat, what shall we drink, and where-
with shall we be clothed ?" Now many are seeking after
these things as their first and primary object; and your
Heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of these
things. But seek first the kingdom of heaven, and those
things shall be added which he knows you have need of.
But when we usurp the place of God, and judge for our-
selves what we have need of, there is great danger of judg-
ing amiss; and as self is active and busy, there is great
danger of our prejudging our own case, and not suffering
our Heavenly Father to tbe judge in us, what it is that
we need. But we are to seek first the kingdom of hea-
ven." And where shall we seek this kingdom? It is in
us, and if it be not found in us it never will be found, for
it is no where else. It is of importance, then, that those
who seek may find; and mark it, the seeking part is our
own business. I want, therefore, that the children should
be encouraged; I want them to seek so as to find, and to
make it a primary object to seek first the kingdom of
heaven," and they will And it is in them, and jst in such







SEI FlMON


proportion, and so far, as they bring every tiing within
them, and about them, under the government, control and
direction of this blessed spirit. And God has freely given
and offered to every one a manifestation of his spirit; and
if God has freely given it to every one to profit withal, we
shall profit in proportion as we become acquainted with
it, and yield every thing up to its requisitions. Hence,
how simple and easy it is to wait upon God. And in so
waiting, however poor and weak we are, and it is a good
thing to know our own weakness as men and creatures,
we must be disposed to have our dependence placed on a
power which is strong enough for all the purposes that
he requires of us; and if we trust in the Lord alone, we
shall find that day by day, according to every occasion,
every circumstance, and every necessity, he will adminis-
ter to us of his wisdom, goodness and power, to enable us
to fulfil every duty that he requires of us. Here, then,
we shall be left without excuse; for it is in vain for us to
complain of our weakness, poverty and inability to do
what we know to be right for us to do, if we are unwilling
to have our strength renewed by simply waiting on God.
Have we not time ? And what is our time lent us for? Art
thou so busy, and hast thou so many engagements about
what to eat, what to drink, and wherewith to be clothed;
about the affairs of this life, the deceitfulness of riches,
and the lust of other things, that there is not time to wait
upon the Lord ? Methinks I hear this complaint-
Truly, this would be very good, and I have no doubt I
should improve faster if I had time to wait on God in re-
tirement and stillness, but my present or customary busi-
ness, and the multitude of my cares, do not admit of this,
from morning to night-so little time have 1 from my
wordly concerns. And now, who gives thee thy time?
At whose disposal is it? Is it at thy disposal at all ?







BY JOHN COMLY. I
Art thou a free agent at all, if thou art a servant to thy
cares? Thy mind is a servant, and seeking after what
the Gentiles seek after, and it is time to come out of cap-
tivity. The prison doors have been thrown wide open,
and they are open now; but of what use is it if the cap-
tives will still remain in prison?
I feel my heart to overflow, on the behalf of every soul
in the present company, and I would advertise them, that
it is time for them to break their chains, to break off from
those things which they see to be wrong, and pursue those
things which they see to be right, proper, and useful for
them; to break off from those lusts, habits, and customs,
which have been so induced upon them; to break off those
chains, those unprofitable customs which have their origin,
not in the wisdom that is from above, but in that wisdom
which is from beneath, the wisdom of this world, which
is a kind of counterfeit of heavenly wisdom-the prudent
care of their families, and of the good things of this life.-
I do not want them to be profligates and spendthrifts ; but
when prudence degenerates into a sordid love of the earth,
and of earthly things-when men's treasures are in the
things of time, it is not a wonder that their hearts should
be bound to them. For where your treasure is, there will
your heart be also." It will be, though of an earthly na-
ture, a God, or a master to us, and if we yield ourselves
servants to it, it is as completely an idol, as those idols
of wood, and stone, and gold, and silver, and brass,
that were made in ancient days. And we might as
well, if it were fashionable, have these images in our
buildings, where our concerns chiefly lie, or where our
hearts are most,-we might as well have these images, and
bow down and pray unto them, as to do what is done in
the present day. Our idolatry is of a more secret kind,
except that by its fruits it is made manifest to those who







SERMON


have been seeking the kingdom of heaven and have been
brought in a degree under the government of the divine
spirit, and whose spiritual faculties are brightened and
enlarged. These see and behold, and mourn over the
desolation that is made among professors of the Christian
name in the view that is sometimes presented of idolatry,
and of the spirit that is prevailing among highly profess-
ing people, in this highly favoured land. Come out of
Babylon, my people; come out of all mixtures and servi-
tudes; for the wisdom of God gives liberty, and the truth
makes us free indeed-free from all this servitude, and
the custom of the times has no influence over us, farther
than it is founded in truth and wisdom from above. I be-
lieve the Lord is on his way, and turning and overturning
the nations; and in this confusion of speech and language
that is made in latter times more and more manifest among
the visible professing churches in Christendom, I believe
he is at work, to bring sons from afar, and daughters from
the ends of the earth; to bring those who believe in his
name, those who have tasted his goodness, and those
whom he has anointed to see into the nature of his peace-
able government and kingdom. These are invited and
called to come out of the mixtures, and to lead a life
more consistent with the doctrines of the Christian reli-
gion than those evince who profess to be a chosen people.
They are called to glorify God, and by their lives, walk,
and consistency of conduct, to evince that they are the
followers of Jesus Christ, who set us an example, and so
far as that example goes, those whose minds have been
opened and called may see, that his example is vastly
different from that set by those who profess to follow him.
"Now, if any man have not the spirit of Christ, he is
none of his;" and if governed by some other spirit, he
must belong to some other church. The church of Christ







BY JOHN COMLY. IW
is always built on one foundation, and it is a conlsolation
to the children of his family in all their trials and trou-
bles, and in all the singularities into which they are
drawn by the convicting influence in their own minds,
leading them to come out of the world's ways and fash-
ions-it is a comfort to these little children that this foun-
dation stands immutably sure. It is the foundation on
which the righteous have built from the beginning of time,
" For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid,
which is Jesus Christ;" and hence it is, that these souls
feel an impression that amidst all their proving and trials,
" the Lord knows them that are his;" and they feel the
obligation upon them, to let every one who names the
name of Christ depart from all iniquity-not come part
way and then turn about, nor be measured by the stand-
ard of others, but let them go on with their work.
You have read the short history of a long travel, of a
young man, in which is set forth his leaving Babylon,
to seek for the house of God. And he set out in the man
ner before adverted to, according to his own account, with
earnestness, resolution and determination adequate, or in
proportion to the great object; for in this house was all
manner of peace and happiness; such was the report,
and such were the impressions and faith of his mind.
And though he had been misled by looking unto men in
various instances, he at length ceased from all dependence
on outward teachers, and his mind was in a wilderness
state, not very different from that which I alluded to when
I first rose in this meeting. While thus mourning over
himself, he saw a little light in the midst of his darkness,
and as he advanced it moved, and as he followed it led
him out of the wilderness, and the more he kept to it the
more he found it his preservation; and the nearer lie kept
to his guide-but I need not follow him through all the







SERMON


instructive description that is given of him in his passage,
But he followed this divine guide, for thus he found it to
be, till he came in sight of the house, and actually to the
house of God, called Bethel-for in the allegory that was
the name of the place where Jacob made his covenant
with his God, and in which is figured out a state of
mind; and I want your minds turned off from the history
to that which is inward; for the more you try to read in-
wardly, the more this outward testimony will be blessed
to you.
When the young man came to the house of God, lie
beheld an outward court, where were many persons who
had hewed out a cistern to catch water from the element;
and there was a great tree that yielded them fruits, and
they appeared to lead a pleasant life-appeared to be
satisfied. But it was the outward court, shall we say a
nominal profession of religion. They had endured many
crosses, and made many sacrifices, and had got to a kind
of settled state, as good as other people, as good as those
who know something about religion, and rest too much
in that which is outward. He says, "I saw my guide
pass through all that had not entered the house." He
saw his guide pass through them all, and enter a little
narrow door. Here is the pinch and trial! And many
in the present day, when they come to this close trial, that
they must strip off all and sell all, then they turn away
sorrowful, because of their great possessions. They have
something else that they love better. Well, he saw that
his guide went through them all, and through this little
narrow door; and when he stood without, he desired that
he might follow into the very house, that he might not be
shut out, and in the agony of his mind, a voice said unto
him, strip ofl every covering that thou hast, and thou
nmayst enter. Now, I want us to get into the inner cor(j,







BV JOHN COMLY.


into inward and spiritual religion, that gives an evidence
that we are of that church which is built upon that foun-
dation, that rock, which is the revelation of the Father's
will in the soul of every man. And when we make
his will our only guide, we can no longer say, We will
go into such a city, and continue there a year, and buy
and sell, and get gain," for we know not what shall be
on the morrow;" but, as the apostle says, Ye ought to
say, if the Lord will, we shall live, and do this or that."
Here, I say, there has been a falling short, and a num-
ber who have been with you have failed; and from what
I know of the goodness and long suffering of a gracious
God, when he beholds our short coming, and sees our de
ficiency, and that we are humbled and contrited in heart,
and brought down into such a state as rightly to seek his
forgiveness, he will graciously afford us strength and
ability in future to act more consistently, and more and
more consult what his will is concerning us, and we shall
know this great I, this Babel builder, to be overcome and
subdued, and all the will that we have, of a spiritual and
temporal nature, will be reduced to the will of our hea-
venly Father. Here will be a dwelling in the inward
court of the Lord's house, and here we can pray as Jesus
taught his disciples and followers; and the same spirit
that was in him will teach every one to ?"
kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is done hi
heaven." And in all our concerns we shall keep a consia?;'
eye to the will of our heavenly Father; and he will g:.
ciously reveal it to our minds. A nd as these minds are
clothed with filial fear-and as there is an humble care and
watchfulness-and as they ire sincerely desirous to do
ll things right, they will seldom be permitted, in his
Fatherly goodness and care, to get much out of the way.
For a mind that is clothed with this continual l4 ion'ii .
VOL. II--11







SERMON


to the will of God, will feel a check or restraint whenever
a presentation is offered contrary to the divine will, and
it will thus be admonished to forbear.
There are thousands of the actions of our lives as inno-
cent as those trees in the garden, that man might freely eat
of: it is only the tree of the knowledge of good and evil,
of which man may not partake; and when we presume
to judge for ourselves, and to eat of this tree, we commit
a great sin, and transgress the divine law; and death
comes upon the innocent life in us. Here, then, is the
great evil, that man undertakes to determine for himself,
and shuts out the divine communication of God's blessed
will; and here we are abundantly prone to this in our
temporal concerns. The reason is, that men are apt to
think their rational faculties sufficient for them; and that
the manifestation of the divine spirit is given, to profit
only in our spiritual concerns. This is the very reason-
ing of the serpent in man; and when a presentation arises
in his mind after some object which lie thinks his natural
powers adequate to accomplish, if instead of keeping in
mind the importance of obeying his heavenly Father's.
will, and being governed by a principle within, he under-
takes to decide independently of this will, he eats of the
tree of good and evil, and reasons as Eve did with the
serpent, as represented in the figure.
And it is no marvel at all, that so much difficulty has
entered into the world; it only goes to show that we are
not what we ought to be, and that we are governed by
something other than the meek and humble spirit of Jesus
-it goes to prove that unhappiness, anxiety, and trouble
in this life, are for want of seeking first the kingdom of
heaven and the righteousness thereof, and coming under
the government of the divine will in all things.







BY JOHN COMLY.


And what a pity it is in this vale of tears-this land of
sorrows, which is evidently not our home or place of rest
-what a pity it is that thinking beings should lose or
waste so much of their time in living to no valuable pur-
pose at all. When at best, short is the space of man's
life, though measured out to the years of fourscore. Oh!
that people were wise, that they would consider their latter
end, their true interest and happiness, in time, and make
preparation for happiness hereafter; for as our lives and
actions are, so are the consequences; and man may be
said, under this view of the subject, to have the liberty of
choice given him for a noble and blessed purpose-so he
makes for himself his own heaven or hell; so he procures
for himself the consequences that result from his choice,
whether a life of content, peace, happiness, and quietude,
sitting under his own vine and fig tree; or a life of anx-
iety, trouble, difficulty, and a mind agitated and tossed,
which becomes at length like a troubled sea that casts up
mire and dirt. Behold, here is the cause of the misery
and affliction that pervade the various ranks of society,
from the highest to the lowest. When men are under the
influence of animal passions and propensities, these re-
main as a fruitful source of multiplied evils, difficulties,
and anxieties.
0 that the dear young people would seek first the king-
dom of heaven and the righteousness thereof, and bend
their necks to the yoke, and love to sit alone, and to know
that it is good to sit alone and keep silence. And if this
be their happy choice in early life, they will soon find it
the source of contentment and peace; and all the various
casualties and vicissitudes that may attend them: in this
probationary state-every thing would be received as dis-
pensed in the wisdom of their heavenly Father, and with
a, firm belief that the God of all the earth will do right,







^I 1'.lfMO.'


and will never ,.Tr any thin t o befall hii, dedicated
children but what will tend to promote their good. Some
have attributed his judgments, as they are called, to a
vindictive character, for sins and transgressions; but,
when brought into a right state, we can say, Thy will
be done."
What cannot resignation do ?
It wonders can perform;
That powerful charm, Thy will be done,'
Can lay the loudest storm."
And here may the minds of the dear children, and the
sincere hearts of the little ones-who feel little and low
in their own estimation-here may they repose in safety
and confidence, that there is an Eternal arm always un-
derneath to support them in what the world calls afflic-
tions. And whether in prosperity or adversity, whether
in health or sickness, or whatever else they may have to
pass through in this life, when their minds are settled
and reposed, and in trust and confidence they cast their
burdens upon the Lord, he will sustain them, and never
suffer the soul of the righteous to be moved. May they
then be encouraged, for there is great room for it in their
minds; and I believe there are not a few, who, as they
abide in, and keep in the everlasting patience-as they
possess, or labour after the possession of a meek and quiet
spirit, which is declared to be of great value--who, as
they learn to know a rule over their own spirits, and to
keep all within themselves in proper order and subjec-
tion, and under the regulation of the spirit of God, will
abundantly go forward and mount upward on the wings
of heavenly love, and with a feeling of devotion and grati-
tude they will remember their blessings day by day; and
in so doing, they will be less disposed to dwell upon the







BVY JOHN COMi,,


dark side of things. For, who cannot iind many things
io be thankful for even in his lowest seasons?
Number your blessings, my friends, and then you need
not be troubled about what are called afflictions, but as
you mount upward, as your souls become more and more
spiritually minded-you will find your qualification in-
creased to run and not be weary," to advance forward
with the rapidity of running, in this high and holy way,
and not be weary of well doing. And though you should
not reach the object according to the desire of your sensi-
tive faculties, yet the goodness of your heavenly Father
will enable you to walk step by step and not faint. And
in this walking in the light, you will know a blessed
spirit of unity one with another. It will be even felt and
realized as "the precious ointment upon the head, that
ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard; that went
down to the skirts of his garment." And this beautiful
figurewill be realized in the enjoyment of one with another.
" Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to
dwell together in unity !" in the precious unity of the
spirit, walking together hand in hand, if I may make the
comparison. The strong will help to bear the infirmities
of the weak, and those who are in the advanced state of
fathers and mothers will feel their hearts turned toward
the children, to feel and sympathize with them in the
various trials with which they are surrounded, and these
will have their hearts turned, in this state, toward those
who feel this concern for them. And I wish that those
who thus feel concerned may attend to it, that they may
be instrumental in affording a word of encouragement to
the dear children-a word of promise, a word of encou-
ragement; yes, and a word of reproof too, often does
more, and has a better eflVcl upon an individual, when
his mind is prepared and ready to attend to it, th:in a







SERIMON 1Y JOHN COINLL.


great deal of preaching, or any other thing, however ex-
cellent in its kind. There are duties which we owe to
one another, and if we are faithful and under the influence
of perfect love it casts out all fear; and even little chil-
dren have often been benefited, and many have benefited
others, by a loving, gentle hand of encouragement, by
feeling for one another, with bowels of tender, sympathy
in theii afflictions-and by visiting the fatherless and
widows in their affliction.
Here is a plain description-here is a religion undefiled
before God and the Father. Mind, it is an active exer-
cise of those feelings of love and charity which are not
merely felt, but which are at proper times and places
practically applied. May the God of all grace and mercy
so unite your souls together in this heavenly and holy
journey, that you may be advancing every one in his own
rank, and being so united and bound together you need
have no fear that any thing will be able to interrupt your
course, but you will walk together in peace and love.
And may the God of peace and love bless you and be
with you: this is the desire that I feel to pervade my
mind on your account.











SERMON


UY TOWNSEND HAWKSHURST, DELIVERED AT FRIENDS' MEETING,
DARBY, NOV. 15, 1827.

"There is a river, the streams whereof shall make glad
the city of God;" whereunto we may all have access, and
whereunto we are all called of God, to come, taste and
see that the Lord is good;" in order that we may be fa-
voured to realize, in our own experience, "the good
things that God hath in store for them that love him."
Hence, let us draw nigh to God, and he will draw nigh
to us, and he will hear our cry, and he will do for us as
he did for his children formerly-if we are plunged down
into difficulty and deep distress, if we call upon the Lord
and cry unto our God, he will hear our cry. For the op-
pression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, now will
I arise, saith the Lord." He brought me up also," says
David, out of a horrible pit, out of the miry clay, and
set my foot upon a rock, and established my goings."
Now my desire hath been, that we may all come to
realize and experience these great truths, while we have
time and opportunity; and that we may be brought to
be what the Lord our God would have us to be. But in
order to do this we must draw nigh in spirit; we must
" cease to do evil, learn to do well," for it is sin and in-
iquity that hide the face of God from us. Hence we are
called on to come away from every thing that may have
a tendency to draw our minds into a dependence on
any thing external, or on things of a temporary nature,
and to come down in humility and self-abasement, to
lie low in the valley of humiliation. Because it is the
Lord, and the Lord alone thaI is able to raise our









drooping spirits, and to enable as to prefer his blessedl
influence to any thing that we can do ourselves, or that
any of our fellow creatures can do for us. But we must
be humbled and brought low; every exalted imagination
lust Ie brought down as into the obedience of Christ.
We must be brought into the same humility and abase-
ment that our great pattern was found in; for in order to
be true Christians we must be Christ-like; holy, harm-
less, undefiled and separate from sinners. And if it be
our concern and desire to be thus cleansed and purified
from dross, tin, and reprobate silver," we must give up
ourselves, soul, body and spirit into the hands of God our
Creator, and keep nothing back; for this is the example
that Jesus Christ set us, that we might follow his steps.
He gave up body, soul and spirit into submission to the
turning and overturning of Divine power, in order that a
perfect and glorious example might be portrayed to the
children of men.
, Now as we are brought to resign all up unto God, i.
will be an offering acceptable; but there is nothing else
that will be taken in lieu of the whole heart. Son, give
me thy heart-daughter, give me thy heart." But when
the heart is given up, all must be given up. Now this is
the propitiatory sacrifice whereinto we are all to make an
entry; it is a surrender by which we are to come up to
the glorious example of our great pattern. Now this re-
signation is necessary, in order that our spirits may become
purified and prepared to be recipients for the holy spirit
to dwell in, for it will not dwell in a defiled temple; they
must be purified as gold and silver." And the prophet
must have had a foresight of this, when he cried out,
" Behold, the day cometh that shall burn as an oven."
And again--" Who may abide the day of his coming ?
and who shall stand when he appeareth or hfI i, like :i







E\ YI (XNSl'N 1) IIANV'Kh I It I -,I.


refiner's fire, and like fuller's soap. And lie shall sit as
a refiner and purifier of silver; and lie shall purify the
sons of Levi, and purge them as gold and silver, that they
may offer unto the Lord an offering in righteousness."
Now an offering in righteousness must be an offering of
the whole; because it is God's right to rule and reign in
the hearts of men.
Every thing that we have, that is good, is from God;
and in occupying these talents, every power and ability
ought to be occupied and employed to the honour of God
our Creator. Hence we must wait in humility and self-
abasement, whereby we may be enabled to come up in the
blessed example of our great pattern. And when this is
the case, I am fully persuaded that the great work of re-
formation will advance and go on, and we shall become as
" a city set on a hill which cannot be easily hid," and we
can then glorify the Heavenly Father in the day of his
visitation.
Now the design of a gospel minister is to turn the minds
of the people to the light of Christ within; and when he
has done this, le has done all that he can do; for no
man can save his brother, nor give to God a ransom for
his soul."
My desire is, that all may turn to the eternal substance,
' which is Christ in you the hope of glory," and which
is the same yesterday, to-day and for ever"-that Christ
that followed Israel through the Red sea. We read that
" they were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in
the sea, and did all eat the same spiritual meat, and did
all drink the same spiritual drink; for they drank ofthat
spiritual rock that followed them, and that rock was
Christ." Now this eternal light, this Christ which is the
power and wisdom of God, is the light whereunto ye
do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in
VOL. HI.-12







ER iMO3N


a dark place until the day dawn, and the day-star arise
in your hearts;" that is, till you feel more strength, that
you may make a little advance farther. May we then be
advancing and growing in grace, and in a saving know-
ledge of Christ. May we come under that governing in-
fluence by which Jesus Christ was enabled to walk, and
by-which we may be enabled to come up in his blessed
example, to he heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ."
But this is to be brought about on this side the grave; for
as a tree falleth there it shall lie. "If the tree fall toward
the south, or toward the north, in the place where the tree
falleth there it shall be;" and as death leaves us, so will
judgment find us.
My desire is, that we may be concerned to gather home.
to this light, the light which illuminated the Gentiles;
for it is the same now that it ever was. For our gracious
Creator is as willing now as he ever was, to manifest his
will unto us. Therefore my desire is, that we-might try
ourselves, and prove ourselves : Know ye not your own
selves, how that Jesus Christ is in you except ye be repro-
bates?" Now this term is variously designated in the
doctrines of the scriptures, but it is one and the same thing
-Christ is not divided, there is but one Lord, one faith,
one baptism." And there never was but one true religion
in the world, and that consists in doing the will of God.
And we all know as rational beings, that to do his will
we must know his will; and hence the necessity, when
convened together, that we should gather inward and wait
upon God, in the secret of our own hearts; and if we ap-
ply 'here, we shall find him; for he is not far from us, for
in him we live, and move, and have our being. There-
fore, consider him not at a great distance; and he is call-
ing on us to come, taste and see that the Lord is good.
We need not say, who shall ascend into heaven" to







BsY TOWNSEND) 11AVRSiMtUSY'


bring this principle down from above, or who shall de-
scend into the deep to bring it up; for the word is nigk
thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart; that is, the
word of faith which we preach." Now it is always the
same, and therefore the object and design of the scriptures
are, to turn the human family to this internal principle of
light within, and that is doing all that the scriptures can
do. And hence the necessity of our being individually
concerned to work out our own salvation with fear and
trembling. For God, in his infinite goodness, waiteth long
to be gracious to us, and to gather us into his heavenly
enclosure, and to make us joyful in his house of prayer,
"' for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all
people." For we know not what we should pray for
as we ought, but the spirit itself maketh intercession for
us with groanings which cannot be uttered," nor written.
What then will become of formal sermons, and formal
preaching? They arc inconsistent and contrary to the
excellency of the gospel dispensation, cI for the prophecy
came not in old times by the will of man, but holy men
of God spake as they were moved by the Holy Ghost."
And we have the same privilege, and should take heed to
the same power of God, or Christ, which dwells in every
Christian in a greater or less degree, and by which they
may come to be a help to each other, and mighty instru-
ments in the hands of God. Blessed be the name of the
Lord, who is calling sons from afar, and daughters from
the ends of the earth ; and may they "< sit every man under
his vine, and under his fig tree, and have none to make
them afraid."
My dear friends and fellow mortals, rally to the stand-
ard of truth, and keeping yourselves in humility and abase-
ment, put your trust in God, for itn him is everlasting
strength .











SANDY FOUNDATION SHAKEN, &c.

(Extracts cohtinned from page 48.)

If God, as the Scriptures testify, hath never been de-
clared or believed, but as the Holy One, then will it fol-
low, that God is not an Holy Three, nor doth subsist in
three distinct and separate Holy Ones. But the before
cited Scriptures undeniably prove that One is God, and
God only is that Holy One. Therefore, he cannot be di-
vided into, or subsist in an Holy Three, or three distinct
and separate Holy Ones. Neither can this receive the
least prejudice from that frequent, but impertinent dis-
tiuction, that he is one in substance, but three in persons
or subsistences; since God was not declared or believed
incompletely, or without his subsistence: nor did he re-
quire homage from his creatures, as an incomplete, or ab-
stracted being, but as God the Holy One: for so he should,
be manifested and worshipped without that which was
absolutely necessary to himself. So that either the testi-
monies of the afore-mentioned Scriptures are to be be-
lieved concerning God, that he is entirely and completely,
not abstractly and distinctly, the Holy One, or else their
authority to be denied by these Trinitarians. And on the
contrary, if they pretend to credit those holy testimonies,
they must necessarily conclude their kind of trinity a fic-
tion.
Refuted from Right Reason.

1. If there be three distinct and separate persons, then
three distinct and separate substances, because every per-
son is inseparable from its own substance. And as there








I;XTRAC 1i"


is no person that is not a substance in common acceptation
among men, so do the Scriptures plentifully agree herein:
and since the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Spi-
rit is God, (which their opinion necessitates them to con-
fess,) then unless the Father, Son, and Spirit, are three
distinct nothings, they must be three distinct substances,
and consequently, three distinct Gods.
2. It is further proved, if it be considered, that either
the divine persons are finite or infinite. If the first, then
something finite is inseparable to the infinite substance,
whereby something finite is in God: if the last, then three
distinct Infinites, three Ournipotents, three Eternals, and
so three Gods.
3. If each person be God, and that God subsists in
three persons, then in each person are three persons or
Gods, and from three they will increase to nine, and so
ad infinitumn.
4. But if they shall deny the three persons or subsis-
tences to be infinite, (for so there would unavoidably be
three Gods,) it will follow that they must be finite, and so
the absurdity is not abated from what it was; for that of
one substance having three subsistences, is not greater,
than that an infinite being should have three finite modes
of subsisting. But though that mode which is finite can-
not answer to a substance that is infinite; yet to try if we
can make their principle to consist, let us conceive that
three persons, which may be finite separately, make up
an infinite conjunctly: however, this will follow, that they
are no more incommunicable or separate, nor properly
subsistences but a subsistence; for the infinite substance
cannot find a bottom or subsistence in any one or two,
therefore jointly. And here I am also willing to over-
look finiteness in the Father, Son, and Spirit, which this
doctrine must suppose.







EXTRACTS.


5. Again, if these three distinct persons are one, with
some one thing, as they say they are with the Godhead,
then are not they incommunicable among themselves; but
so much the contrary, as to be one in the place of another.
For if that the only God is the Father, and Christ be that
only God, then is Christ the Father. So if that one
God be the Son, and the Spirit that one God, then is the
Spirit the Son, and so round. Nor is it possible to stop,
or that it should be otherwise, since if the divine nature
be inseparable from the three persons, or communicated
to each, and each person have the whole divine nature,
then is the Son in the Father, and the Spirit in the Son;
unless that the Godhead be as incommunicable to the per-
sons, as they are reported to be amongst themselves: or
that the three persons have distinctly allotted them such a
proportion of the divine nature, as is not communicable
to each other; which is alike absurd. Much more might
be said to manifest the gross contradiction of this trini-
tarian doctrine, as vulgarly received; but I must be
brief.
Information and Caution.

Before I shall conclude this head, it is requisite 1
should inform thee, reader, concerning its original. Thou
mayest assure thyself, it is not from the Scriptures, nor
reason, since so expressly repugnant; although all
broachers of their own inventions strongly endeavour to
reconcile them with that holy record. Know then, my
friend, it was born above three hundred years after the
ancient gospel was declared; and that through the nice
distinctions, and too daring curiosity of the Bishop of
Alexandria, who being as hotly opposed by Arius, their
zeal so reciprocally blew the fire of contention, animosity,







EXTRACTS.


and persecution, till at last they sacrificed each other to
their mutual revenge.
Thus it was conceived in ignorance, and brought forth
and maintained by cruelty. For though he that was
strongest, imposed his opinion, persecuting the contrary,
yet the scale turning on the Trinitarian side, it has there
continued through all the Romish generations. And not-
withstanding it hath obtained the name of Athanasian
from Athanasius, (a stiff man, witness his carriage towards
Constantine the emperor,) because supposed to have been
most concerned in the framing that creed in which this
doctrine is asserted; yet have I never seen one copy
void of a suspicion, rather to have been the results of pop-
ish school-men; which I could render more perspicuous,
did not brevity necessitate me to an omission.
Be therefore cautioned, reader, not to embrace the de-
termination of prejudiced councils, for evangelical doc-
trine; which the scriptures bear no certain testimony to;
neither was believed by the primitive saints, nor thus
stated by any I have read of in the first, second, or third
centuries: particularly Ireneus, Justin Martyr, Tertul-
lian, Origen, with many others who appear wholly foreign
to the matter in controversy. But seeing that private
spirits, and those none of the most ingenious, have been
the parents and guardians of this so generally received
doctrine; let the time past suffice, and be admonished to
apply thy mind unto that light and grace which brings
salvation; that by obedience thereunto, those mists tradi-
tion bath cast before thy eyes, may be expelled, and thou
receive a certain knowledge of that God, whom to know
is life eternal, not to be divided, but One pure entire and
eternal Being; who in the fulness of time sent forth his
Son, as the true light which enlighteneth every man:
that whosoever followed him, (the Light,) might be trans







i' .XTI A CTS.
!ai.ed fro: the dark notions, and vain conversations of
mln, to this holy Light, in which only sound judgment
and eternal life are obtainable: who so many hundred
years since, in person testified the virtue of it, and has
communicated unto all such a proportion, as may enable
them to follow his example.



THE VULGAR DOCTRINE OF SATISFACTION, BEING DEPEN-
DENT ON THE SECOND PERSON OF THE TRINITY, RE-
FUTED FROM SCRIPTURE.

DOCTRINE. That man having transgressed the righ-
teous law of God, and so exposed to the penalty of
eternal wrath, it is altogether impossible for God to remit
or forgive without a plenary satisfaction; and that there
was no other way by which God could obtain satisfaction,
or save men, than by inflicting the penalty of infinite
wrath and vengeance on Jesus Christ, the second person
of the Trinity, who for sins past, present, and to come,
hath wholly borne and paid it, (whether for all, or bui
some,) to the offended infinite justice of his Father."
I~ErUTATION. 1. "And the Lord passed by before him,
(Moses,) and proclaimed, The Lord, the Lord God, mer-
ciful and gracious, keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving
iniquity, transgression and sin." (Exod. 34, 6,7.) From
whence I shall draw this position, that since God has
proclaimed himself a gracious, merciful, and forgiving
God, it is not inconsistent with his nature to remit, with-
'omI any other consideration than his own love. Otherwise
he could not justly come inder tim imputation of so many
;,acioan, attributes, with whom it is impossible to pardon,
;al tn sary to exact the payment of the utmost "i r hin .
(' 1, lJ e ('.ithinr ed.)




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs