• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Half Title
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Participants in service planni...
 Appendix A. Handouts
 Appendix B. Transparencies
 Appendix C. Case studies
 Appendix D. Answers to self-check...














Group Title: Resource manual for the development and evaluation of special programs for exceptional students ;, v. III-J
Title: Interagency service plans for the profoundly mentally handicapped
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074979/00002
 Material Information
Title: Interagency service plans for the profoundly mentally handicapped
Series Title: A resource manual for the development and evaluation of special programs for exceptional students
Physical Description: 3 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students
Publisher: Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students, Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla.
Publication Date: 1983
 Subjects
Subject: Children with mental disabilities -- Services for -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Children with mental disabilities -- Education -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Pt.1 issued without part number or special title.
General Note: "Florida Department of Education Publications in Exceptional Student Education. BEES"--P.2 of cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074979
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001102866
oclc - 15242226
notis - AFJ8947

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Half Title
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Acknowledgement
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Participants in service planning
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Appendix A. Handouts
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Appendix B. Transparencies
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Appendix C. Case studies
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Appendix D. Answers to self-check exercises
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
Full Text












A RESOURCE MANUAL FOR THE
DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION
OF SPECIAL PROGRAMS
FOR EXCEPTIONAL STUDENTS
VOLUME III-J
Interagency Service Plans For The
Profoundly Mentally Handicapped
Part 2: Partners in Planning-
A Trainer's Guide
Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students



State of Florida
Department of Education
Tallahassee, Florida
Ralph D. Turlington, Commissioner
Affirmative action/equal opportunity employer




JUNE 1983
S^IVE1.S.TY OF FLOr 1i1










HW



S -7 I
11Z







This Trainer's Guide was developed by Leon County Public Schools through
the Special Project, Interagency Development, funded by the State of Florida,
Department of Education, Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students, under
Federal Assistance for the Education of the Handicapped (P.L. 91-230, EHA
Part B, as amended by P.L. 93-380 and P.L. 94-142).














Copyright
State of Florida
Department of State
1983





PARTNERS
IN
PLANNING


TRAINER'S
GUIDE


A Training Program About Coordinating Service Plans
for Profoundly Mentally Handicapped Students









ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This PARTNERS IN PLANNING trainer's guide is one in a series of publications
developed to help Florida school districts provide special programs for excep-
tional students. It was developed by the Interagency Development Project,
Leon County Public Schools under the guidance of:

Charles H. Couch
Superintendent of Schools

Robert M. Connors
Director, Exceptional Student Education

Lynda Roser
Coordinator, Exceptional Student Education

Linda F. Laugen, Project Director
Interagency Development Project

During the field survey conducted in the first year of the Interagency Develop-
ment Project, 52 school district and HRS personnel responded to written ques-
tionnaires, 23 exceptional student education administrators answered questions
through telephone surveys, and 83 individuals were interviewed. A 14-member
advisory committee was also established to oversee project activities and
materials production. The Interagency Development Project recognizes the con-
tributions of these professionals, without which this trainer's guide could not
have been developed. Appreciation is expressed to these individuals for their
willingness to provide constructive content suggestions for the PARTNERS IN
PLANNING training materials and for the companion publication, A Resource
Manual for the Development and Evaluation of Special Programs for Exceptional
Students, Vol. III-J, Interagency Service Plans for the Profoundly Mentally
Handicapped.









CONTENTS
Page
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ........................... -V-

INTRODUCTION .... ........... ....... ........ 1



PRESENTATION GUIDE ........................ 3

Module 1: Participants in Service Planning . . 3

Module 2: Statutes, Rules, and Regulations
Affecting Service Planning for
PMH students ................... .. 12

Module 3: Documents used for Service Planning ... . 20

Module 4: Methods for Cooperative Planning . . .. 28

APPENDIXES . . . . . . . 38

A. Handouts . . . . . . .. 38

B. Transparencies . . . . . .. 57

C. Case Studies . . . . . .. 79

D. Answer Key to Self-Check Exercises . . .. 85


-vii-









INTRODUCTION


This trainer's guide was developed and written by the Interagency Development
Project, a Title VI-B project awarded to the Leon County School Board by the
Florida Department of Education, Bureau of Education for Exceptional students.
The funding period for the grant began July 1, 1981 and ended June 30, 1983.
The project had three major goals for the two-year grant period: first, to
study interagency coordination of service plans for school-aged profoundly
mentally handicapped (PMH) students in Florida; second, to identify practices
for agency coordination; and third, to develop a resource manual and corrple-
mentary training materials for Florida educators interested in improving
interagency coordination of service plans for PMH students.

The resource manual, entitled A Resource Manual for the Development and Eval-
uation of Special Programs for Exceptional Students. Vol. TTT-.: Interagency
Service Plans for the Profoundly Mentally Handicapped, and the two publica-
tions that make up the PARTNERS IN PLANNING training materials (this trainer's
guide and the participant's manual) have been developed to better acquaint
personnel of public schools and the Department of Health and Rehabilitative
Services (HRS) with the statutes, rules, and regulations on which service
plans are based. All three publications describe the service plans used by
local school districts and HRS and suggest ways in which local agencies may
coordinate the development and implementation of these documents. Using
different formats, the resource manual and training materials provide infor-
mation on the agencies that serve PMH students, the legal bases for service
plans, service plan documents, and methods for coordinating planning. The
resource manual and the PARTNERS IN PLANNING training materials may be used
independently or in conjunction for group training.

Use of this trainer's guide

The information in this trainer's guide is intended for the use of group
leaders who want to provide training on the development of interagency service
plans to personnel of public schools, HRS, and other community agencies.
School district superintendents, exceptional student education administrators
and supervisors, school principals, teachers, and other public school personnel
involved in coordinating educational services with HRS can benefit from group
training that addresses the development and coordination of interagency
service plans. The information in the resource manual, this trainer's guide,
and the PARTNERS IN PLANNING participant's manual can also help HRS personnel
understand the procedures local school districts use to provide educational
services. The statutory bases for service planning and the alternatives for
coordination should suggest ways in which both agencies might adjust local
policies and procedures to encourage and enhance cooperative efforts.

The PARTNERS IN PLANNING participant's manual contains a complete set of
materials for self-paced study. This trainer's guide provides instructions
on how to conduct a group session. In making their presentations, group
leaders should use these notes along with the transparencies, handouts, case
studies, and answer keys found in the appendixes of this guide. Before their
presentations, trainers should also study the information provided in the
participant's manual for PARTNERS IN PLANNING and prepare answers for each of




S'I




) .





the questions suggested in this guide. Supplementary information can be found
in the companion publication already mentioned, A Resource Manual for the
Development and Evaluation of Special Programs for Exceptional Students, Vol.
III-J: Interagency Service Plans for the Profoundly Mentally Handicapped.


-2-







PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING

PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


DISPLAY
Transparency
IN PLANNING


1: PARTNERS


EXPLAIN:
1. The title PARTNERS IN PLANNING was chosen to ex-
press the legal and practical responsibilities
of local school systems and the Department of
Health and Rehabilitative services (HRS) in plan-
ning educational services for Profoundly Mentally
Handicapped (PMH) students.


2. HRS and public school service plans go by
different names, are affected by different
and have different purposes.


DISPLAY
Transparency 2: Cover
illustration of PMH
students


DISTRIBUTE
Handout 1: Questions


WAIT, while participants
read


3. PMH students are referred to by different names,
depending on the agency.

4. PARTNERS IN PLANNING is the product of cooper-
ation between the DOE, HRS, and the Leon
County School District. Teachers, trainers, ad-
ministrators, therapists, social workers, pa-
rents, private consultants, and many others
contributed information and expertise to this
project.

5. PMH students include the full range of school-
aged children and youth from age 5 through 18.

6. These students come from different ethnic and
social backgrounds and live in a variety of en-
vironments.

7. The roles played by local school districts and
HRS in planning services for these students are
defined in a complex set of laws, regulations,
and rules.


EXPLAIN:

1. The major objectives of this training will an-
swer the questions in Handout 1. Answers to
these questions will clarify the process and
methods that school and HRS districts can use
to develop interagency service plans.

2. Participants are to use Handout 1 as their own
checklist for finding answers as they work
through the PARTNERS IN PLANNING program.


MODULE 1


laws,










MODI)ULE 1
PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


OBJECTIVE 1:


WRITE
answers on board, flip
chart, or transparency
as they are given










WRITE
S. 228.051, F.S.
SBER 6A-6.30


WRITE
answers on board, flip
chart, or transparency,
as they are given


EXPLAIN:


Recognize which students are classified
as profoundly mentally handicapped (PMH).


The first module concentrates on participants in the
planning of services for PMH students.

ASK:

1. What are the characteristics of PMH students?

2. For educational purposes, what other categories
are mentally handicapped students divided into?

3. What must Florida's local school districts pro-
vide for all mentally handicapped students?

OBJECTIVE 2: Recognize which students receive
services from local school districts
and HRS.

EXPLAIN:

1. Florida law requires that all school districts
provide special educational programs for excep-
tional students from age 5 through age 18.

The law [S. 228.041] and State Board of Educa-
tion Rule [6A-6.30] include the following in
the exceptional student category:

--mentally handicapped
--speech and language impaired
--hearing impaired
--visually impaired
--physically impaired
--emotionally handicapped
--specific learning disabled
--gifted

ASK:

1. Which PMH students receive services from local
school districts and HRS?

2. Ask other questions to prompt the correct answers,
such as "Which age group?" and "Why do these
students qualify for HRS services?" If partici-
pants don't give the correct answers, simply
write down and explain each answer.


-4-









PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


DISPLAY
Transparency 3: Chart
of age categories


EXPLAIN:

1. School districts must serve exceptional students
that are school-aged (between the ages of 5 and
18). Florida law [S. 232.01, F.S.] also permits
school districts to extend their programs to
students beyond the mandated ages to include
students below age 5 and above age 18. Thus
the exact ages of students in the "school-aged"
category vary from school district to school
district.

2. PMH students also qualify as developmentally
disabled under state and federal laws and may
receive HRS services. Thus, both HRS and school
districts serve PMH students that are "school-
aged."


OBJECTIVE 3:


Recognize the different terms agencies
use to refer to PMH students.


ASK:


1. What are some of the terms you have heard used
to describe PMH students?

2. Ask other prompting questions to get answers
from the group. If answers are not volunteered,
give and explain each answer.

3. Which terms are generally used by local school
districts and the DOE? by HRS?

EXPLAIN:

1. Different terminology tends to come from state
and federal laws, regulations, and rules.


WRITE
list of terms used by
school districts and
HRS


2. School districts use these terms:

--Exceptional student
--Profoundly mentally handicapped
--Profoundly handicapped (PH)

3. HRS uses these terms:

--Developmentally disabled
--Mentally retarded
--Profoundly mentally retarded
--Developmental Services Client


-5-


MODULE 1









PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


WRITE
different home
environments as they
are listed


OBJECTIVE 4: Recognize the different home environ-
ments of PMH students.
EXPLAIN:
Local school districts serve PMH students who come
from various types of home environments.

ASK:

1. What different types of home environments do PMH
students come from? If participants do not name
all of the possible home environments, complete
the list and explain why these environments must
also be included (See pages 9-11 of the partici-
pant s manual).

EXPLAIN:

1. The different types of HRS residential facilities
where PMH students may live (Emphasize the special
construction of cluster ICF/MRs).

2. PMH students from Tallahassee and Orlando Sunland
Centers are gradually being transferred to cluster
ICF/MRs all over Florida. This type of resident-
ial facility will play an increasing role in the
lives of PMH students.

ASK:

1. What types of residential facilities for PMH stu-
dents does your school district have?

2. Does your district have one or more cluster facili-
ties? Are any planned for your district?


OBJECTIVE 5:


Recognize the different types of service
plans for PMH students.


EXPLAIN:


Both HRS and local school districts may serve school-
aged PMH students, but they use different service
plans. These plans have different names and different
purposes.

ASK:

1. Whatever name we give a service plan, how would
you describe one? (open discussion)


MODULE 1








PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


WRITE
names of service plans
as they are mentioned


2. What makes a service plan individualized? (con-
tinue discussion)

3. What is the name of the public school service
plan? HRS' service plan? (If names are not vol-
unteered, write Individual Educational Program
(IEP) and habilitation (hab) plan.)


EXPLAIN:

1. Definition of IEP and hab plan.


WRITE
"Implementation Plan"
by IEP and "Active
Treatment Plan" by hab
plan"


2. Implementation plans and Active Treatment Plans
(ATPS) and how they are used.


OBJECTIVE 6:


Recognize how local school systems,
the DOE, and HRS are organized to meet
the needs of PMH students.


WRITE
local school district


EXPLAIN:

Local school districts are organized in different ways
and these organizations affect the way IEPS and pro-
grams for PMH students are developed and implemented.


ASK:


WRITE
participant responses


WRITE
"DOE"

WRITE
"BEES"


1. What are some ways that school districts may make
decisions about programs for PMH students? (open
discussion). If participants do not specifically
name "school-based", "central office-based," or
"shared decision making," list these and explain
the characteristics of each.

2. Who provides technical assistance for PMH stu-
dents at the state level?

3. What does "BEES" stand for?

4. What does "BEES" do?

EXPLAIN:

1. BEES is an acronym for the Bureau of Education for
Exceptional students.

2. BEES provides leadership for the development and
evaluation of special programs for exceptional
students.


MODULE 1









PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


WRITE
--Program Development
--Program Review and
Evaluation
--Program Services
--Resource Management


3. BEES has 4 sections: Program Development; Program
Review and Evaluation; Program Services; and Re-
source Management. (See page 7 of the resource
manual or page 14 of the participant's manual for
a description of sections and responsibilities.)

4. The responsibilities of each section.

5. The role of FDLRS (Florida Diagnostic and Learn-
ing Resources System).

6. Local school districts must submit their district
procedures for serving exceptional students to
BEES each year.

ASK:


1. How does your school district serve
(open discussion)


PMH students?


2. How many PMH students do you have in your school?

3. Where do these students live?


4. Which of the three basic management
your school district use to develop
students?


WRITE
HRS Developmental
Services


systems does
IEPs for PMH


5. Who is most responsible for--

a. identifying exceptional students?
b. developing appropriate programs?
c. developing procedures for exceptional
student education?
d. creating district policy for exceptional
student education?

6. Have you read all or part of your district pro-
cedures document for exceptional student educa-
tion? Where would you find a copy?

7. Who prepares this document for your school dis-
trict?

8. In your district, which terms are used to refer
to PMH students? Do different agencies use
different terms?

EXPLAIN:

1. The Developmental Services Program within HRS is


-8-


MnlIIIF 1


MODULE I









PARTICIPANTS__ IN_ SERVICE_ PLNNN MODULE1


DISTRIBUTE Handout 2:
Services provided by
Developmental Services

WAIT while participants
read

WRITE
Social worker/case
manager




WRITE
Other service programs:
--Children's Medical
Services (CMS)
--Economic Services
--Medicaid Services


responsible for coordinating services to children
and adults who are developmentally disabled.

2. Just as BEES serves other exceptional students in
addition to PMH students, HRS' Developmental
Services Program also serves people who have dis-
abilities other than retardation--such as cerebral
palsy and epilepsy.

3. Our primary interest is in those Developmental
Services clients who are also students in our
classrooms.

4. Developmental services offers a number of differ-
ent services to qualified clients. Notice the
items marked with arrows. PMH students are most
likely to receive these services.

5. The services that a Developmental Services client
is qualified to receive will be listed on the
client's hab plan. After the hab plan is
developed, a Developmental Services social worker
becomes that client's case manager and is re-
sponsible for seeing that needed services are pro-
vided. Developmental Services calls this pro-
cess its Case Management System.

6. Developmental Services is just one of 10 ser-
vice programs that HRS provides for eligible
clients. Three other HRS programs that may serve
PMH students are Children's Medical Services
(CMS), Economic Services, and Medicaid
Services.

ASK:

1. How many PMH students in your school are clients
of Developmental Services?

2. What other HRS services do these students receive?

3. How do these services support and reinforce
what PMH students are learning in school?

4. Which HRS services do you think help the educa-
tional growth of your PMH students? Why? (Go
over HRS services listed on handout 2).

5. How does your school's educational program for
PMH students support and reinforce services they
receive from HRS?


PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


MODULE 1









PARTICIPANTS. IN. SERVICE PLANIN MOUL


6. What are the names of the HRS social workers as-
signed to the PMH students who are also clients
of Developmental Services?


OBJECTIVE 7:


Recognize the need for joint planning
and delivery of services to PMH stu-
dents.


EXPLAIN:


DISPLAY
Transparency 4: Holistic
vs. Fragmented



DISPLAY
Transparency 5: Chart
of coordination
needs


DISTRIBUTE
Handout 3: Module 1
Self-check


Local school districts and HRS deliver services to
many of the same children and youth. Both systems en-
courage the holistic development of these individuals.
Because of differences in agency responsibilities,
however, development is often fragmented.

ASK:

1. When do the services of PMH students need to be
coordinated? (Point out age groups and agency
responsibilities on transparency 5.)

2. Can coordinating the services of local school
districts and HRS make a real difference in the
lives of PMH students? (open discussion)

READ:

The text of case study 1, "Andrew." (see appendix C)

ASK:

1. Were services for Andrew totally coordinated,
partially coordinated, or uncoordinated? (open
discussion)

2. What probable effect did this have on Andrew's
development?

3. How might Andrew's situation have been improved?


SELF-CHECK EXERCISE

EXPLAIN:

The self check exercise is for you to keep for your
own review of obdule 1, but we will go over the an-
swers as a group.


-10-


PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING


MODULE 1








PARTICIPANTS IN SERVICE PLANNING MODULE I

ASK:
1. each question aloud

2. prompting questions to get the answers that
appear in the answer key for Module 1 (see
appendix D).


-11-






MODULE 2
STATUTES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS AFFECTING
SERVICE PLANNING FOR PMH STUDENTS


OBJECTIVE 1:


Recognize differences in the organi-
zational structures of local school
districts and HRS districts.


EXPLAIN:


DISPLAY
Transparency 6: Map
of Florida indicating
HRS and school dis-
tricts


WRITE
School


Districts:


--Teachers

--Principals

--Superintendent

--Local School Board

-DOE (legal require-
ments)


Module 2 concentrates on the legal and agency re-
quirements that affect service planning for PMH stu-
dents. First, however, we will examine some differ-
ences in the organizational structures of local
school districts and HRS districts. Finally, we will
look at some of the things school and HRS personnel
can do to coordinate services and still meet all
of their legal obligations.

ASK:

1. What is the difference in the geographic struc-
ture of school and HRS districts?

2. How many HRS districts are there?

3. Which HRS district serves the most school dis-
tricts? The least?

4. Which HRS district serves your school district?

5. How many other school districts does this HRS
district serve?

6. Where is the headquarters for this HRS district?

7. When an HRS district serves a large number of
school districts, what coordination problems
might you expect? (open discussion)

EXPLAIN:

1. For local school districts, the school board
generally determines policy and procedures.
Teachers report to principals of individual
schools, who report to the superintendent and
the school board. The school board ensures
that the school district is complying with State
Board of Education rules.


-12-









STATIffES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS IJDULE 2


WRITE
HRS Districts:
--District Staff

-Direct Services Super-
visors
4,
---Pram Coordinator

-District administrator

--Assistant Secretary
for HRS

--HRS Secretary

--Governor


WRITE
-Education of
handicapped students
--Services to the
developmentally disabled
--HRS residential
facilities
--Client services in
ICF/MRs


2. HRS districts are part of a more centralized
system, with the headquarters in Tallahassee
determining much of the policy for the 11 HRS
districts. District staff members report to
Direct Services Supervisors or Program Super-
visors. Program Supervisors report to the
Program Coordinator or the District Administra-
tor. The District Administrator reports to the
Assistant Secretary of HRS, who reports to the
Secretary. The HRS Secretary reports to the
Governor.


3. Our laws created these separate organizational
structures, and these structures tend to support
separate communication patterns.

OBJECTIVE 2: Recognize state and federal require-
ments for service plans and service
plan reviews.

EXPLAIN:

1. Federal laws and regulations may lead to the
creation or revision of state laws and rules.
State laws and rules are also developed without
federal laws and regulations as a basis. When
new federal laws affect state laws, our legis-
lature may amend our statutes to comply with
the new federal requirements.

2. When we talk about services for PMH students,
we must consider all of the state and federal
laws, rules, and regulations for:

--the education of handicapped students
--services to the developmentally disabled
--HRS residential facilities
--Client services in ICF/MRs


-13-


MODULE 2


STATUTES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS .









STATUTES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS ,


WRITE
P.L. = Public Law
F.S. =.Florida Statutes
CFR = Code of Federal
Regulations
FAC = Florida
Administrative
Code
SBER = State Board of
Education Rule
S. = Section of state
law
= Section of federal
law


3. Different abbreviations are used for different
laws, rules, and regulations. Here are same
you need to know:


--P.L.
-F.S.
--CFR
--FAC
--SBER
--S.
--4


Public law
Florida Statutes
Code of Federal Regulations
Florida Administrative Code
State Board of Education Rule
Section of state law
Section of federal law


abbreviations will often be used as we
to the various legal bases for service
and service plan reviews.


WAIT for participant
responses and then
WRITE
P.L. 94-142

WAIT for participant
responses and then
WRITE
P.L. 95-602


DISPLAY
Transparency 7:
Legal requirements for
service plans and
service plan reviews


1. Which federal law requires that school systems
develop IEPs?



2. Which federal law requires that HRS develop
habilitation plans?



EXPLAIN:

1. Federal regulations also require that residents
of ICF/MRs have a "written plan of care."

2. State and federal laws require that certain
people attend service plan meetings and that
the plans be reviewed periodically.

ASK:

1. Other questions to elicit information displayed
on Transparency 7, such as "Who is legally re-
quired to attend a hab plan meeting?"

2. Which requirements are similar for school dis-
tricts, HRS, and ICF/MRs?

3. Which requirements are different? From this


-14-


MODULE 2


These
refer
plans


ASK:









N l IIF 9


IJ l ILI i I i.Ji J-u N I IjIUAJL II.LI.J I I I I l U


DISPLAY
Transparency 8: Legal
requirements for
service plan contents


small sample, which agency would you guess has the
most requirements?

EXPLAIN:

1. State and federal laws, rules, and regulations
also indicate what each service plan must con-
tain.

2. Required contents of IEPs, hab plans, and Indi-
vidual Plans of Care (Point out elements on
Transparency 8)

ASK:


1. What do all three plans have to have?


DISPLAY
Transparency 9:
Relationship of service
plans


2. Which plan must use a standard format?

3. Which plan is concerned with the residential
environment of the individual?

4. Other questions to prompt identification of
service plan contents.

EXPLAIN:

1. School districts and HRS Developmental Services
both use one service plan, but ICF/MRs use two:
the Developmental Services hab plan and an
Active Treatment Plan (ATP).

2. Both the IEP and the ATP relate to the hab plan,
but in different ways:

a) The IEP shows educational and related ser-
vices. A hab plan lists all services a De-
velopmental Services client should receive.
Because public schools, not HRS, provide ed-
ucational services, HRS personnel must know
what is in an IEP to indicate the educational
goals and services on the hab plan.

b) The ATP relates to the hab plan much like
the public school implementation plan to the
IEP. It is used in ICF/MRs to prescribe the
methods staff will use to meet the annual
goals listed on the client's hab plan.


-15-


SETUTATS RULES AND R S










STATUTES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS ., ,


WRITE
Chapter 10D-38,
FAC--ICF/MR
regulations for
Florida


ASK:

1. Do all PMH students have an ATP?

2. Do all PMH students who live in an ICF/MR
have a hab plan?

3. Which service plans would PMH students living
in group or foster homes have?

4. How many PMH students in your school have hab
plans? ATPS?

5. How would you expect goals for "education," hab-
ilitation," and "active treatment" to be (a)
similar and interactive? (b) different and con-
flicting? (open discussion)

EXPLAIN:

There are federal and state regulations for the
licensure and certification of ICF/MRs. Chapter
10D-38 of the Florida Administrative Code sets the
requirements for ICF/MRs operating in Florida. This
rule interprets federal regulations for ICF/MRs. HRS
contracts with ICF/MRs for residential services and
encourages the use of these facilities for HRS
clients.


OBJECTIVE 3:


Recognize legal terms found in state
and federal laws, rules, and regula-
tions related to services for PMH stu-
dents.


EXPLAIN:


DISTRIBUTE
Handout 4:
Glossary of terms
WAIT
While participants
read


To work together, school and HRS personnel need to
have a clear understanding of the legal and agency
terms both use in discussing services to students and
clients. Keep this list of the most corron terms
and add any others that you learn during this train-
ing.


ASK:

1. Which terms are used by school personnel? by
HRS? by ICF/MRs?


-16-


MODULE 2











STATUfESJ RULES. AND REGULATIONS .lfMODULF 2


2. Have participants indicate in the margin of their
handout, SD (for school district), HRS, or
ICF/MR for the agency using the term.

3. Other questions designed to encourage study of
the definitions, such as, "Which other disorders
are included in the category of 'developmentally
disabled'?"


OBJECTIVE 4:


Recognize possibilities for agency
coordination of service plans and
service plan reviews.


EXPLAIN:


WRITE as column
headings:
--harmonious
--conflicting
--unrelated


WRITE
--contents
--review
--participants
--reevaluation
--participation by
personnel outside
the agency

DISPLAY
Transparencies 10 and
10A: Legal requirements
for service plans and
service plan reviews


1. So far, this module has shown that school dis-
tricts and HRS districts--

--are organized in different ways
--have different responsibilities
--use different terms when referring to services
for the same individuals
--respond to different laws, rules, and regula-
lations

ASK:

1. Considering these factors, would you expect ser-
vices for PMH students to be harmonious, con-
flicting, or unrelated? (open discussion and
write examples participants give under each term)

EXPLAIN:

To help us determine what is allowed, we need to com-
pare requirements for such things as service plan re-
views, participants, reevaluations, written reports,
and contents of service plans and see where any con-
flicts occur.


ASK:

1. Which of the legal requirements on this chart are
the same?


-17-


M~nlllF 3


STATL~ES, RULES, AM) REGULATIONS....










R, MODULE 2


DISPLAY
Transparency 11:
"Free" options


2. Which would cause conflicts?

3. According to this chart, what could school dis-
tricts and HRS districts do to give more contin-
uity to service planning for PMH students?

4. Ask other probing questions that require par-
ticipants to think about coordination possibili-
ties, such as "Do the laws allow personnel out-
side an agency to participate in annual reviews?"

EXPLAIN:

Many possibilities for improving service planning
exist.


READ ALOUD:

Options listed on Transparency 11.

ASK:


WRITE
"What is the pay-
off?"


1. How many of these options are feasible in your
school district? (allow participants to express
views on the options and their feasibility for
their situation.)

EXPLAIN:

The most important pay-off of the coordination of
service plans is for each PMH student.

READ:


The text of case study 2, "Jeremy."


(see appendix C)


ASK:


1. In Jeremy's case, why was coordination so im-
portant?

2. What things could have gone wrong if Jeremy's
services had not been coordinated?

3. Which of the coordination procedures were le-
gally required?

4. Which of the coordination procedures would you
agree to? (open discussion)


-18-


STATUTES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS,










'in.JIUI-.J.J I\ULJ.Ij NUL, I-AU,~I ,JwnI1.- I I I I I


5. Ask other prompting questions that encourage
participants to consider the need for coord-
inating services for PMH students living in ICF/
MRs.


SELF-CHECK EXERCISE


EXPLAIN:


DISTRIBUTE
Handout 5:
Mbdule 2
Self-check


The self check exercise if for you to keep for your
own review of Module 2, but we will go over the
answers as a group.


ASK:

1. each question aloud

2. prompting questions to get the answers that
appear in the answer key for Module 2.
(see appendix D)


-19-


E, 1 UO F 9


CTI\Tlmc nill Fe n~m nFrlll nirnruc








MODULE 3
DOCL[IENTS USED FOR SERVICE PLANNING


OBJECTIVE 1:


WRITE
Develop -- Implement
the plan

Revise -- Review


Recognize the planning processes for
IEPs and hab plans.


EXPLAIN:
1. Module 3 presents in more detail the components
of IEPs, hab plans, and ATPs. It also summarizes
the planning process for IEPs and hab plans and
points out differences in the number of service
plan reviews and the scheduling of these reviews.
2. Although IEPs and hab plans are used for differ-
ent purposes by different agencies, the proce-
dures each agency used follow the same cycle.
ASK:
1. If planning is the first step in developing a
service plan, what is the next step?
2. Continue to ask questions about each step until
participants have identified this 4-step process:
Develop -- Implement
the plan

Revise ----Review
EXPLAIN:
Because different agencies carry out these procedures
and follow different regulations, the exact process-
es used and schedules for these procedures may be
different. The cycle, however, is the same.


WRITE as column head-
ings: IEP, HRS hab
plan, ICF/MR hab plan


OBJECTIVE 2:


Recognize differences in the number of
required service plan reviews.


ASK:


WRITE under IEP;
annually
WRITE under HRS hab
plan: annually, semi-
annually
WRITE under ICF/MR hab
plan: annually, quarterly,
monthly


1. Do you remember the different requirements for
service plan reviews?
2. How often does an IEP have to be reviewed?

3. How often does an HRS hab plan have to be re-
viewed?

4. How often does an ICF/MR hab plan have to be re-
viewed?

EXPLAIN:
1. In addition to these differences, there are dif-
ferences in the ways that these reviews are
scheduled. IEP reviews may be scheduled any


-20-








DOCUMENT USED FOR SERVICE PLANNING


WRITE in hab plan
column: annual review--
anniversary date of plan;
semi-annual review--six
months after initiation
of plan


WRITE by monthly in
ICF/MR hab plan
column: QMRP

WRITE by quarterly:
team review

WRITE by annually:
all staff and outside
service providers


time during the calendar year or at the anni-
versary date of the IEP. Whatever the date of
the review, an IEP must be in effect at the be-
ginning of the school year.

ASK:

1. When are IEP reviews conducted in your school?

2. Who usually participates in these reviews?

3. What arrangements are made to prepare for
these meetings?

EXPLAIN:

1. Annual reviews of hab plans generally are sche-
duled close to the anniversary date of the last
review. The semi-annual reviews generally are
held six months after the initiation date of
the hab plan. Because clients can enter the
Developmental Services Program at any time,
annual and semi-annual reviews occur every month.

2. In ICF/MRs the QMRP (the professional responsi-
ble for the management of a client's programs),
must review each client's hab plan every month.
Every 3 months, a team of ICF/MR staff members
must review both plans. Annually, all ICF/MR
staff and outside service providers must meet
to review both plans.

ASK:

1. Are hab plan meetings for your PMH students
held at the school or somewhere else?

2. Does anyone from the school go to these meet-
ings? Why or why not?

3. Do any of your students have ICF/MR hab plans?

4. Does your school have copies of hab plans for
your PMH students? Why or why not?

OBJECTIVE 3: Recognize components of the different
service plans.


-21-


MODULE 3









Mci MPNTC IIn [ MPf m. 5RP\/TF P1 A\NNTNCGrnIlF3Jt~~ABS ~~~*~*S~~


ASK:


WRITE
Benefits of Sharing


LIST
Benefits that
participants identify


DISPLAY
Transparency 12:
IEP, page 1


DISPLAY
Transparency 13:
IEP, page 2


1. Would having
and hab plan
the student?


a knowledge of a PMH student's IEP
benefit the student's teacher and
(open discussion)


2. Ask other probing questions that help partici-
pants see the benefits of each agency knowing
what is in the other's plan, such as "What if
a child has an allergy to orange juice or dairy
products? How would a teacher find that out?"
and "Why is it important that teachers know the
special medical needs of their students?"

EXPLAIN:

1. To coordinate and use information on IEPs and
hab plans, school personnel first need to
recognize the elements of each plan and how they
relate.

ASK:

1. What is the purpose of an IEP? (open discussion)

2. Which of these legal requirements are on the
first page?

--present level of performance
--annual goals
--short-term objectives
--specific educational services to be provided
--related services to be provided
--date services will begin
--duration of services
--objective criteria
--evaluation procedures and schedules
--attendance by school district representative,
parentss, student, teacher, and evaluation
specialist

3. Which legally required components appear on the
second page?

4. Would a student's IEP be two pages, or more than
two? Why?

5. How is your district's IEP different from the
sample?


-22-


nnn Ipwz v4Zu )P qrPV rv PI A NNTrv r.


MDllII F 3









DOCUMENTS USED FOR SERVICE PLANNING


EXPLAIN:


DISPLAY
Transparency 14:
Hab plan, page 1


The HRS hab plan is a service planning document
that specifies goals and services for Developmental
Services clients. These are based on a client's
needs identified through assessment and evaluation.
The first page of the hab plan contains basic in-
formation about the client.


ASK:


POINT OUT
items as they
are identified


DISPLAY
Transparency 15:
Hab plan, page 2


1. On the first page, where is the statement of the
client's eligibility for services?

2. Item 8 lists 5 types of disability. All of
these come under what term? (answer: develop-
mental disability)

3. Other questions that help participants identify
information required on page 1.

EXPLAIN:

The second page of the hab plan indicates that
certain assessments have been completed. It also
addresses a specific type of residential place-
ment.


ASK:


1. What assessments appear on page 2?


DISPLAY
Transparency 16:
Hab plan, Certificate
of Eligibility page


2. What type of residential placement is addressed?

3. What are the different types of these residen-
tial facilities?

4. Which type do you suppose would serve PMH
students who need the most physical and medical
attention? (answer: Developmental/Medical)

EXPLAIN:

The next page of the hab plan determines the client's
eligibility to be classified as developmentally
disabled under federal law.

ASK:

1. Questions that help participants identify ele-
ments and how they reflect legal requirements


-23-


MODULE 3








MODULE 3


of P.L. 95-602.


DISPLAY -
Transparency 17:
Hab plan, page C
with measurement
categories indicated


POINT OUT:
Each measurement
category on
the evaluation/goals
page


EXPLAIN:

The evaluation/goals page is the "heart" of the
hab plan, because it lists a client's evaluations
and present levels of performance in specific
areas.

READ:

Measurement categories shown on transparency 16


EXPLAIN:

The information on an IEP relates to this page of
the hab plan.

ASK:

1. Which measurement category would an educational
program relate to? (answer: Section C)

2. Is an IEP divided into the same measurement
categories as Section C? Why or why not?

3. Does your school district measure and write
goals for any of the same skill areas as those
listed under Section C?

EXPLAIN:

HRS regards section C as the educational part of
the hab plan.

ASK:

1. Who fills out section C of a hab plan if the
public schools are providing the educational
program for a client? (answer: HRS staff
typically ask schools to provide a copy of the
student's IEP which they attach to the hab
plan and reference on the evaluation/goals
page.)

2. For a school-aged client, how would HRS know
what to put in section C? (answer: HRS staff
would have to get this information from public
school personnel.)


-24-


DOCUMENTS USED FOR SERVICE PLANNING









fflIIUFNT5C IRfl FAR 5CFPVTrF PI ANNTN(


WRITE
IEP --Implementation
Plan

WRITE
under Implementation
Plan, "Instructional
steps"



WRITE
hab plan-4ATP

WRITE
under ATP
"training methods
and activities"


3. What might HRS use as a substitute for section
C? (answer: a copy of the student's public
school IEP.)

4. Does your school provide HRS with a copy of a
PMH student's IEP every year? Why or why not?
(open discussion)

5. What use would an IEP be to a hab plan commit-
tee?

6. What use would a hab plan be to a student's
teacher, therapist, and other service pro-
viders?

7. Ask other probing questions that encourage par-
ticipants to recognize the importance of
sharing service plans.

EXPLAIN:

After an IEP is developed, teachers use the annual
goals and short-term objectives on the IEP to
develop an implementation plan for the student.
This plan outlines the instructional sequences or
steps to be used in achieving the short-term
objectives on the IEP. The implementation plan
has no required format, and teachers and therapists
usually construct their own forms.

EXPLAIN:

A PMH student who lives in an ICF/MR will also have
an Active Treatment Plan, or ATP. This plan has
basically the same purpose as an implementation
plan. Each service provider must develop an ATP
that lists short-term goals and the training meth-
ods and activities the person will use to meet
the goals on the hab plan.

Like implementation plans, ATPs are not standard-
ized, although Developmental Services has recon-
mended a format for ICF/MRs to use.

ASK:

1. How are IEPs like hab plans? If participants
don't give correct answers, simply write


-25-


mnvlllF 3


J VT I ..I |n .-li vn -FTHi FI i II InI- qrIr/T-- P \









MODULE 3


WRITE
Implementation
Plan/ATP and
similarities
identified by
participants


RE-DISPLAY
Transparency 7:
Legal requirements
for service plans
and service plan
reviews


down and explain that each must include:

--Annual goals for student or client progress
--Specific services to be provided
--A time-line for accomplishing goals and
objectives.
Each must also:
--be developed by an interdisciplinary team
--be reviewed at least annually

2. How is an implementation plan like an ATP? If
participants do not give correct answers, sim-
ply write that both--
--are developed by the professionals serving
the student (teacher, therapist, direct-
care service provider, etc.)
--are based on the goals and objectives in
their respective service plans
--outline instructional strategies and activ-
ties to be used to achieve annual goals and
short-term objectives


OBJECTIVE 4: Recognize relationships among the
different service plans for PMH
students.

EXPLAIN:

A short review of legal requirements for IEPs, hab
plans, and the "Individual Plan of Care" for ICF/MRs
will point out similarities and differences be-
tween the documents.

ASK:

1. Questions about the content of IEPs, hab
plans, implementation plans, and ATPs. If
participants do not readily identify simi-
larities and differences, simply point these
out.

2. How can a knowledge of the different components
of the IEP and hab plan help teachers and
other professionals ensure a PMH student's
progress in education and other life skills?
(open discussion)

READ:

The text of case study 3, "Gloria" (see appendix C)


-26-


DOCUMENTS USED FOR SERVICE PLANNING









UJ LAI U I 3 U L.LJ I \ Jl LIJ\V 1-.. I L.TI II'J I ,'.--


ASK:

1. Why was it important that the professionals
working with Gloria know information in both
the IEP and the hab plan?

2. What could have happened if they had not shared
this knowledge?

3. How did sharing the information on the service
plans help ensure Gloria's progress?

SELF-CHECK EXERCISE


EXPLAIN:


DISTRIBUTE
Handout 6: Module 3
Self-check


The self-check exercise is for you to keep for your
own review of Module 3, but we will go over each
question as a group.

ASK:

1. each question aloud

2. prompting questions to get the answers that
appear in the answer key for Module 3 (see
appendix D)


-27-


IMnll IF "


N\rrMchrrc Ilccn rno ccalrrc~ DI n~~rhir,








MODULE 4
METHODS FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING


OBJECTIVE 1:

EXPLAIN:


WRITE
Combined IEP/hab
plan and advantages
mentioned by partici-
pants


Recall the interactive role of school
and HRS districts in the educational
and hab planning process.


1. Module 4 takes a look at four methods of coopera-
tive planning that focus on the development of
service plans and annual meetings to review
these service plans. It also points out the
contribution that cooperative agreements and
data sharing can make to the development of any
of the four methods.

2. Local school districts and HRS districts have
major responsibilities for PMH students and thus
a great impact on their lives.

ASK:

1. Do you believe that each PMH student should have
an individual plan that addresses the student's
needs? (open discussion)

2. What might be some advantages of having a com-
bined IEP and hab plan?

3. What impact may the absence of communication be-
tween school district and HRS personnel have on
the development of PMH students? (continue dis-
cussion)

EXPLAIN:

1. The IEP, the hab plan, the implementation plan,
and the ATP all contribute to the development of
the total student.


Student


ASK:


REDISPLAY
Transparency 4:
Holistic vs.
Fragmented


1. What is the probable result when these plans are
not coordinated? A total student, or one who is
fragmented?

EXPLAIN:

1. Whatever your role in working with PMH students,


-28-









MODULE 4


WRITE
participants'
observations as
they are mentioned


you have an investment in the progress of PMH
students and a role that involves you in the
complex requirements for planning effective ser-
vices.

2. Many of the PMH students enrolling in public
school will be clients of HRS. The child
will already have a hab plan and may have
received educational services through HRS. The
hab plan may already have been reviewed and re-
vised through several cycles of hab planning that
generated extensive information about the PMH
student.

ASK:

1. How do these facts influence the school district-
HRS interactive role in planning? (open dis-
cussion)


WRITE
PMH student--
one plan/two plans/
three plans


OBJECTIVE 2:

EXPLAIN:


Recognize the names and features of
alternative methods of cooperative
planning.


School-aged PMH students can have one, two, or three
service plans.

ASK:

1. When would a PMH student have only one service
plan? Two? Three?

2. How many meetings would you expect to have when
a student has two plans? Three plans?

3. Might you also expect to have one meeting to
develop one plan? Why or why not? (open dis-
cussion)

4. Who benefits from separate meetings and separate
service plans?

5. Who would benefit from a single meeting and a
single service plan?

EXPLAIN:

1. Since ICF/MR facilities usually combine their hab
plan and ATP reviews, we can reduce the number of


-29-


METHODS FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING










_ETHODS FO COPEATV PLANNING_ MODULE L.


required meetings from three to two.


DISPLAY
Transparency 18:
Four methods of
cooperation


DISPLAY
Transparency 19:
Chart of Conditions
and distribute
Handout 7, a
duplicate chart


2. In this situation, possible options for coor-
dinating service plans and annual reviews in-
clude:

--One meeting to produce one service plan
--One meeting to produce two service plans
--Two meetings with cross-representation of
school and HRS personnel to produce two
service plans
--Two meetings with shared written information
to produce two service plans

3. There are other possible options, but these al-
ternatives are considered among the best choices
for integrated planning.

ASK:

1. What are the principal features of each method?
(Point out features of each method on transpar-
ency 18)


OBJECTIVE 3: Recognize the conditions under which
different methods would be appropriate.
EXPLAIN:

1. Different conditions require different approaches
to planning. Each of the four methods may be
appropriate or inappropriate to a given situa-
tion.


2. Handout 7 lists a number of possible conditions
under which PMH students may be served. The
numbers at the top of the four columns represent
the four methods:

1-1: One meeting/one service plan
1-2: One meeting/two service plans
2X-2: Two meetings with cross-representation/
two service plans
21-2: Two meetings with shared information/two
service plans

ASK:

1. Suppose a high percentage of a school district's


-30-


METHODS FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING


MODULE 4









S uII I .d J.J I u nW -n nuI 1 TI ,V u U-n Lu i Jy J)U PJ.JU n n. -1


PMH students live in HRS operated or HRS vendored
multibed facilities. Which methods might be most
beneficial to the student and practical as well?
(open discussion)

2. Which methods of planning might be feasible under
each of the conditions listed on handout 7?
on transparency, Which of the possible methods for each condition
CHECK methods would benefit PMH students the most? (Discuss
participants each condition and ask participants to check off
agree on feasible methods on their handouts.)

EXPLAIN:

Two meetings with shared information would be feasi-
ble under all of the conditions listed. Since inter-
agency communication in this method is minimal, other
methods with better communication would probably be
more beneficial to the students themselves. (If
participants do not suggest the following alternative
methods for each condition, explain why each is
appropriate.)

1. A large percentage of a school district's PMH
students live in HRS operated or HRS vendored
multi-bed facilities: 1-1, 1-2

2. PMH students live in a variety of settings that
include foster homes, group homes, and multi-bed
facilities: 2X-2

3. A majority of PMH students receive limited HRS
services and programs: 21-2

4. Public school programs for PMH students take
place in one or several centers: 1-1; 1-2

5. PMH programs take place in a variety of public
school settings throughout the district: 2X-2;
21-2

6. The school district employs staffing specialists
or program consultants who chair planning meet-
ings and serve as school district representa-
tives: 1-1; 1-2; 21-2

7. School district representatives are not always
administrators and may not be authorized to cormit
district resources: 2X-2; 21-2


-31-


MNMIII Ic Ci


MFTC~TIC FnR rMPFR~T~VF P1 bhlhllhV:









MODULE 4


8. Both agencies' philosophies lead to the inclu-
sion of behaviorally stated, measurable goals and
objectives on service plans: 1-1; 2X-2

9. School district and HRS requirements for service
plan information differ slightly: 1-1; 1-2;
2X-2; 21-2

10. School district and HRS philosophies and purposes
for service plans vary considerably: 21-2


REDISPLAY
Transparency 18


OBJECTIVE 4:

EXPLAIN:

Whatever the
methods over
vantages and


Recognize the advantages and disad-
vantages of each method.


conditions that favor one or several
others, each method has inherent ad-
disadvantages.


ASK:


WRITE
on board or flip
chart, as column
headings:
--Students and parents
--the school district
--HRS


WRITE
Advantages and
disadvantages of
Method 2; Method 3;
and Method 4, along
with participant
responses for each


1. What are some possible advantages and disadvan-
tages of method one, One meeting/One Service
Plan, for:

a. students and parents
b. the school district
c. HRS

(Possible advantages and disadvantages for each
method are found on pages 102-105 of the partici-
pant 's manual).

2. Ask the same question for each method and add any
from the participant's manual that participants
fail to mention. (You may also ask participants
to refer to the appropriate page of the partici-
pant's manual after a discussion of each method.)


OBJECTIVE 5:

EXPLAIN:


Recognize the requirements for imple-
mentation of each method.


The more interactive the coordination method, the
more likely a school and HRS district will encount-
er implementation concerns.


-32-


METHODS FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING










I'fTHODS FOR (flOPERATIVE PLANNING MODULE 14


ASK:


WRITE
Iiethod 1--
Implementation
and concerns that
participants
mention

WRITE
the other 3
methods and
concerns that
participants
identify for each


1. If you decided that method 1 is feasible for
your district, what kinds of implementation
concerns might you expect to encounter?




2. Ask the same question for each of the other 3
methods. Mention and explain problems listed on
pages 106-108 of the participant's manual that
participants fail to identify.


OBJECTIVE 6:


WRITE
Planning and
Scheduling--
Method 1 and
participant
responses


Recognize practical methods of plan-
ning and scheduling that can be used
to carry out the methods of cooperative
planning.


EXPLAIN:
Each method requires slightly different procedures
for planning and scheduling meetings.
ASK:
1. What procedures would personnel in your school
district have to take to plan and schedule a
joint meeting?



2. What procedures would HRS personnel have to take
to prepare for a joint meeting?

3. Would the planning for method one to be any dif-
ferent from the planning for method two?

4. Ask similar questions for methods 3 and 4.

5. What obstacles to planning and scheduling might
occur for each method?

6. Would you need to alter a method you want to use
to make it fit your school district's circum-
stances? If so, what changes would you make?
(open discussion)


-33-


METHODS FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING


MODULE 4








METHODS FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING


WRITE
Cooperative
agreements--
Ch. 79-184, F.S.



WRITE
--school board
responsibilities
--HRS responsibilities
--Mutual provisions


OBJECTIVE 7: Recognize the contribution of coopera-
tive agreements and data collection to
cooperative planning.
EXPLAIN:
1. Cooperative agreements and shared data can do
much to enhance agency cooperation and service
planning. Some school and HRS districts have
developed formal and informal cooperative agree-
ments and formal and informal systems for shar-
ing data.

2. Chapter 79-184, F.S. requires cooperative agree-
ments between school and HRS districts in which
HRS residential facilities are located. These
agreements may be written in any format and dis-
trict school boards and HRS are free to negotiate
duties, responsibilities, and procedures.

3. Typically a cooperative agreement contains three
sections, one that describes what the school
board will provide and be responsible for, one
that details what HRS will be responsible for;
and one that lists mutual provisions.

4. The school districts serving Sunland residents
have cooperative agreements with the appro-
priate HRS district. These agreements have been
negotiated primarily by school district Excep-
tional Student Education administrators, public
school principals, and Sunland staff. They
generally define each agency's role and responsi-
bilities but vary in detail.

5. Less formal agreements, both written and oral,
may address:

--Attendance of personnel at staffing and other
meetings
--Locations and times for meetings
--Procedures for handling field trips, tardi-
ness, and absence
--Procedures for coordinating goals and objec-
tives, behavior management, methodologies, and
other elements of a student's education,
training, and care.

ASK:

1. Does your school district have a cooperative
agreement with HRS? Why or why not?


-34-


M lll F L


MODULE 4









MI IIITW I VI WOPFATTVF PI ANNT ,.. Inf-,i FW l I


WRITE
Data Collection
and Sharing


DISPLAY
Transparency 20:
Legal requirements
for data collection


2. Does your school district have informal agree-
ments with the HRS district, an HRS facility, or
an ICF/MR? If so, what is covered in these
agreements?

3. Does your school or school district have coordi-
nation needs that might be worked out in written
agreements with HRS? (open discussion)

EXPLAIN:

1. Exchanging data can also help school and HRS
staff plan and sustain complementary programs.


2. No statutes, DOE regulations, or HRS regulations
require specific data collection procedures.
Thus, schools, HRS residential facilities and
ICF/MRs develop their own systems. The result
is widely varying methods of data collection
(ICF/MR data must be stated in measurable, ob-
jective terms, however).

ASK:

1. In the following situations, what might data on
student progress show?

READ AND DISCUSS:
the following situations:

1. An HRS occupational therapist uses cut-out cups
to decrease the suck-swallow response in a stu-
dent. The public school occupational therapist
uses a straw bottle to encourage sucking and
swallowing.

2. A public school teacher is teaching a student to
self-feed. HRS facility staff are feeding the
student.

3. An HRS occupational therapist uses a special
technique to decrease a student's tongue thrust-
ing; the student's teacher used tongue thrust as
a motor imitation task.

4. HRS and school district staffs do not develop
mutually reinforcing short-term objectives to
meet annual goals.


-35-


IUgTCYI~ FIIR MnPFRL\TIVF PI nNNTNT,


mv' l IIF F









METHODS USED FOR COOPERATIVE PLANNING MODULE 4

5. The hab plan and the IEP list radically different
goals for a particular skill area, such as self-
care.

6. Individuals working with the same student never
meet to discuss goals, objectives, methodologies,
program rationales, and data collection.

ASK:

1. How does your school district handle problems
like these?

2. What types of data do HRS and school personnel
need to share?

3. How could your school or school district improve
the coordination of methodologies and data col-
lection? (open discussion)

EXPLAIN:

Some school and HRS districts use these methods:

1. School and HRS staff members hold periodic
conferences on students at the school or at
another mutually acceptable location.

2. Teachers provide ICF/MR staff with narrative
program reports on students who live in the ICF/
MR.

3. School and HRS personnel periodically exchange
information and data, either orally or in writ-
ing.

4. Public school therapists visit their HRS counter-
parts, and vice versa. They use these visits to
discuss students that both serve and to demon-
strate methods,activities, positioning, and other
elements of training.

5. Public school teachers and therapists participate
in joint inservice training with HRS personnel.
Training sessions allow individuals to discuss
methodologies, data collection, and data sharing.

ASK:

1. Which of these options is feasible in your situa-
tion? (open discussion)


-36-









M1WIIBU Z IU 1Z I ml\ MPI FPI TT/ P I ANNTN-- W-H-I I P LI


WRITE
Options for sharing
data and
participant suggestions


REDISPLAY
Transparency 4:
Holistic vs.
Fragmented


DISTRIBUTE
Handout 7:
Module 4
Self-check


2. What options could you add to our list?

EXPLAIN:

1. School districts and HRS have different sets
of laws, rules, and regulations to follow, but
they both have options for building more ef-
fective service systems for PMH students. Both
have considerable freedom to make coordination
choices within the constraints of the laws.

2. You have the freedom, the choices, and the re-
sponsibility, and what you decide or do not de-
cide to do can result in a student whose devel-
opment is holistic or fragmented.


SELF-CHECK EXERCISE

EXPLAIN:

The self-check exercise for Module 4 is for you to
keep, but we will go over the answers as a group.


ASK:


1. each question aloud

2. prompting questions to get the answers that
appear in the answer key for Module 4.


DISMISSAL OF GROUP


DISTRIBUTE
copies of resource
manual, participant's
manual, or both, if
available




<^


EXPLAIN

1. The participant's manual for the PARTNERS IN PLAN-
NING Training Program covers the information you
learned today and has additional exercises and
questions. Use it as a reference or pass it on
to someone you know who is interested in learning
more about coordinating service plans for PMH
students. (If the resource manual is distri-
buted, explain that it presents the same informa-
tion in a different format and in more detail.)


-37-


MFTC~nnC IICFn FnR MYIPFR~TI\IF P1 nNhllhlT:


IVM 11F I h































APPENDIX A
HANDOUTS


-38-








H-1


INTRODUCTION


As you participate in this PARTNERS IN PLANNING program, you will find
the answers to these questions:


From Module 1:

* Which students are classified as profoundly mentally handicapped (PMH)?

* Which PMH students receive services from local school districts and the
Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS)?

* What terms do different agencies use to refer to PMH students?

* What are the different home environments of PMH students?

* What types of service plans do PMH students have?

* How are local school systems, the Department of Education (DOE), and HRS
organized to meet the needs of PMH students?

* Is there a need for joint planning and delivery of services to PMH students?


From Module 2:

* What are soae differences in the organizational structures of local school
districts and HRS districts?

What are the state and federal requirements for service plans and service
plan reviews?

What are same of the legal terms found in state and federal laws, rules, and
regulations related to services for PMH students?

What are scae possibilities for agency coordination of service plans and
service plan reviews?


Fram Module 3:

What are the planning processes for IEPs and hab plans?

What are the differences in the number of required service plan reviews and
the scheduling of these reviews?

What are the components of different service plans?

How are the different service plans for PMH students related?


-39-







Fran Module 4:

* How do local school districts and HRS districts interact in the educational
and habilitation planning process for PMH students?

* What are four possible methods of cooperative planning?

* What are the advantages and disadvantages of each method?

* What are the requirements for implementation of the different methods?

* What are sane practical methods of planning and scheduling that can be used
to carry out the various methods of cooperative planning?

* How can cooperative agreements and shared data collection contribute to
cooperative planning?


-40-







H-2


SERVICES PROVIDED BY DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES


Developmental Services offers many different types of services to eligible
clients. Arrows indicate those services that PMH students are most likely to
receive.

SRecreation to help meet clients' therapeutic needs and develop
leisure-time skills.

Education, Training, and Therapy that address self-care,
pre-vocational, social, academic, daily living, communication,
and motor skills. School-aged clients, however, generally
receive these services from local school districts.

& Parent training that includes classes and individual home
instruction; assessment of client needs and abilities; and
other assistance to parents.

Respite Care that places clients under temporary residential
care for up to 30 days. This service relieves families or
foster parents of stress caused by continuous management and
supervision or by a family crisis.

Supplemental payments to families or caretakers that permit
clients to remain with their families or return to their
homes.

& Medical and dental services identified in a client's hab plan.

Transportation to and from service providers and ccmaunity
families.

Escort services for clients who need help in getting to and
from service providers.

m Health support services that include therapies and other
training to help clients develop self-sufficiency.

SDevelopmental training to develop skills clients need to live
independently.

Residential care that includes foster homes, group homes, hab-
ilitation centers, ICF/MR facilities, and Sunland Centers.

Social group services that help clients cope with personal problems
and learn to function adequately through social, cultural, and
leisure-time experiences.

Counseling that helps clients and their families resolve social,
health, and emotional problems.


-41-







H-3


SELF-CHECK, MODULE 1


Write the answers to these questions on this sheet. This self-check is for
you to keep for your own review of Module 1.
1. Students who are diagosed as profoundly mentally handicapped have a
measured intelligence that generally falls below standard de-
viations below the mean.
2. The mental handicap of PMH students causes them to exhibit behavior
that falls below and _expectations.
3. In general, only the _category of PMH students
receives services from a school district and from HRS.
4. This category must include students aged However, this age
range varies from school district to school district because


5. HRS serves PMH students through the D S
Program, which provides services to both children and adults who qualify
as d d
under state and federal laws.
6. Write "SD/DOE," "HRS," or "both" to indicate which terms are used by local
school districts, the DOE, and HRS.
a. profoundly handicapped d. retarded
b. developmentally disabled e. exceptional student
c. profoundly mentally retarded f. profoundly mentally
handicapped


7. Many PMH students live with their own families or guardians.
Others live in residential facilities such as:
a. G H
b. F H
c. R H C
d. Commmity I
e. S C
8. A particular type of residential facility is being built in school
districts throughout Florida to receive deinstitutionalized PMH clients
from Sunland Centers. The name for this type of a facility is a


-42-








9. The facility has this name because


10. Write "SD" for local school district or "HRS" to indicate which
each plan.
a. Habilitation (hab) plan c. Implementation Plan
b. Individual Education Plan (IEP) d. Active Treatment Plan
for school-aged students
11. Local school districts have different management structures for
tional students, but most use one of these three structures:


agency uses


(ATP)


serving excep-


c.
12. BEES is an acronym for B of E
for E S
13. Four sections within BEES carry out activities for local school districts.
These are: (1) (2)
(3)
and (4)
14. In addition to providing technical assistance for programs for mentally handi-
capped students, BEES has responsibility for other categories of students that
include (name 3) _
and
15. Teachers who want information about exceptional student education might
consult a associate center for materials or in-
service training.
16. These centers are managed by the section of within
BEES.


17. Every year, local school districts must submit their
to BEES for review.
18. HRS is an acronym for Florida's Department of H
and R S
19. In addition to the Developmental Services Program, three other HRS programs


-43-







H-3


that may provide services to PMH students are:
a. C M S
b. E S
c. M S
20. A PMH student's primary contact within the local school district is his
or her teacher. Which person within HRS would be the student's principal
contact?
21. Developmental Services uses a C M
system to plan and supervise each client's program of services.


-44-





H-4


GLOSSARY OF TERMS


As you have already seen, federal and state laws, regulations, and rules
that affect services for PMH students use an assortment of different terms.
Here are a few of the most important:

Active Treatment--An aggressive and organized effort to fulfill each.
ICF/MR resident's fullest functional capacity. It requires an
integrated individually-tailored program of services directed toward
achieving measurable behavioral objectives.

Active Treatment Plan (ATP)--An individualized prescriptive plan
written by an interdisciplinary team of ICF/MR service providers to
implement an ICF/MR client's habilitation plan.

Annual Goals--Those behaviors or skills that an exceptional student
or Developmental Services client is expected to learn within a year.
These goals are recorded on an exceptional student's Individual
Educational Program. For a Developmental Services client, annual
goals appear on the client's habilitation (hab) plan and on the
Active Treatment Plan or other appropriate implementation plan.

Annual Reviews-The annual meetings held by both school system and
HRS personnel to revalidate and make changes in service plans.
School system personnel meet with parents and students (when appro-
priate) to renew and revise Individual Educational Programs. HRS
personnel meet with parents, clients, and service providers to change
or revalidate goals in habilitation plans.

Developmentally Disabled--A term used in Florida law to describe
children and adults who exhibit disorders or syndromes caused by
retardation, cerebral palsy, autism, or epilepsy. For such persons,
these symptoms must constitute substantial handicaps that are likely
to continue indefinitely. Federal law [P.L. 95-602] also defines
"developmental disability" as a severe, chronic disability that--
-is attributable to a mental or physical impairment or combination
of mental and physical impairments;
-is manifested before the person attains the age of 22;
--is likely to continue indefinitely;
-results in substantial functional limitations in three or more of
the following areas of major life activity: self-care, receptive
and expressive language, learning, mobility, self-direction,
capacity for independent living, and economic sufficiency; and
--reflects the person's need for a combination and sequence of
special, interdisciplinary, or generic care, treatment, or other
services that are of life-long or extended duration and are indi-
vidually planned and coordinated.

Exceptional Student--Under Florida law and rule [S. 228.041, F.S.;


-45-







H-4


SBER 6A-6.301], any public school student (or child eligible for en-
rollnmnt) who needs special instruction or special education services
because of physical, mental, emotional, social, or learning excep-
tionality. Exceptional students are those who are mentally handicapped,
speech and language impaired, hearing impaired, visually impaired,
physically impaired, emotionally handicapped, specific learning
disabled, and gifted.

* Habilitation--A process by which a client is assisted to acquire and
maintain those life skills which enable him to cope more effectively
with the demands of his condition and environment and to raise the
level of his physical, mental, and social efficiency. It includes,
but is not limited to, programs of formal structured education and
treatment (Ch. 393, F.S.).

* Habilitation (hab) Plan--An individualized prescriptive plan written
for each Developmental Services client. The habilitation plan
identifies client needs and authorizes the expenditure of state funds
to provide services. The plan describes a client's present level of
functioning or development in each applicable program or service area
and lists annual goals for client performance.

* Habilitation Planning Cormittee (HPC)--Those HRS staff members and
service providers who meet to develop and review a habilitation plan
for a Developmental Services client.

* Individual Educational Program (IEP)--The written service document
that state and federal laws require for every student enrolled in an
exceptional education program. In Florida, public school systems
write IEPs for the exceptional students they serve (ages vary from
school district to school district) and HRS does the same for all HRS
clients below age 22 who are not being served by local school systems.

* Intermediate Care Facility for the Mentally Retarded (ICF/MR)--A
residential facility licensed by the state and certified according
to federal Medicaid regulations. An ICF/MR provides roan and board;
continuous 24-hour-a-day supervision; participation in professionally
developed and supervised activities, experiences or therapies; and
all habilitative, rehabilitative, or treatment services identified
for each client by an interdisciplinary team.

* Qualified Mental Retardation Professional (QMRP)--A professional re-
sponsible for the management of programs provided to clients living
in Intermediate Care Facilities for the Mentally Retarded.


-46-






H-5


SELF-CHECK, MDULE 2


Write the answers to these questions on this sheet. This self-check is for
you to keep for your own review of Module 2.

1. Local school districts and HRS districts cover:
a. the same geographic areas
b. different geographic areas
2. Florida is divided into HRS districts.
a. 12 c. 11
b. 10 d. 9
3. HRS district serves school districts, which is the most served by any
HRS district.
a. 10 c. 14
b. 12 d. 16
4. HRS District 10 encompasses one school district. This district is:
a. Broward c. Hillsborough
b. Dade d. Orange
5. HRS district staff members report to who report to
a. District administrators; the Program Supervisor
b. Direct Services Supervisors; the Program Coordinator or the district
administrator
c. District Supervisors; the HRS assistant Secretary
6. School district policies are approved by
a. School principals c. The superintendent
b. The school board d. The Department of Education
7. What do these abbreviations stand for?
a. CFR d. F.A.C.
b. P.L. e. SBER
c. F.S.
8. Which statements accurately reflect the ways federal regulations and state
laws and rules develop?
a. New federal laws lead to the development of new state laws.
b. New state laws always lead to revisions in federal laws and regulations.
c. New or revised federal laws may lead to revisions in state laws.
d. State laws may be developed without a federal law as a basis.


-47-







H-5


e. State rules are detailed specifications of a state law's requirements.
9. On your sheet, write "SD," "HRS," or "ICF/MR" to indicate the agency that
each requirement applies to. Some regulations may apply to more than one
agency.
a. A written habilitation plan for each individual
b. Monthly review of service plans
c. A written individualized educational program for each individual
d. A meeting of agency personnel to develop individual service plans
e. At least annual review of service plans
f. A written "plan of care"
g. A service plan using a standardized format
h. Service plans that include annual goals
i. Service plans that include statements of specific services to be
provided
10. Write the name of the document for each of the definitions given below:
a. An individualized prescriptive plan written by an interdisciplinary
team of ICF/MR service providers to implement an ICF/MR client's
habilitation plan
b. The written service document that state and federal laws require for
every student enrolled in an exceptional education program.

c. An individualized prescriptive plan written for each Developmental
Services client. The plan identifies client needs and authorizes
the expenditure of state funds to provide services. The plan describes
a client's present level of functioning or development in each ap-
plicable program or service area and lists annual goals for client
performance.
11. Write "annually," "semi-annually," "quarterly," or "monthly" to
indicate how often individual service plans must be reviewed.
a. IEP
b. HRS Developmental Services hab plan
c. ICF/MR hab plan
12. Each agency requires or expects certain people to attend annual reviews
of service plans. Write "SD," "HRS," or "ICF/MR" to indicate the agency
that requires the following participants at these meetings:
a. the student (or client)
b. the parents or guardian
c. the student's teacher


-48-






H-5


d. All staff and outside professional team members involved in the
student's program
e. A committee composed of specific representatives and staff members
f. A local school district representative


-49-







H-6


SELF-CHECK, MODULE 3

Write the answers to these questions on this sheet. This self-check is for
you to keep for your own review of Module 3.
1. The planning procedures for IEPs and hab plans follow the same cycle. In
the following diagram, what do steps 1, 2, 3, and 4 represent?


(1) > (2) --- (3)




(4)


2. School district A schedules meetings to review the IEPs for all of their PMH
students in April and May. School district B schedules these meetings for
different PMH students from month to month throughout the year.
Which school district follows acceptable practice?
a. School district A
b. School district B
c. Both A and B
d. Neither A nor B
3. Public school and Sunland Center staff decide to schedule IEP and hab plan
reviews to coincide. Is this good practice? Why or why not?
4. Which of the following statements are correct?
a. The laws require that IEPs be reviewed annually and semi-annually.
b. ICF/MRs must review their hab plans annually, semi-annually, and
quarterly.
c. HRS hab plans must be reviewed annually and semi-annually.
d. IEPs must be reviewed annually.
e. IEPs must be reviewed quarterly.
f. ICF/MR hab plans must be reviewed annually, quarterly, and monthly.
5. For each component listed below, write IEP, IP (Implementation Plan) HP,
or ATP on your paper to indicate which parts are included in which plans.
a. Student identification information
b. Annual goals
c. Educational services to be provided
d. Related services to be provided
e. Residential placement


-50-










H-6






f. Instructional sequences to be followed

g. Present levels of performance

h. Short-term objectives

i. Evaluation procedures

j. Classification as developmentally disabled

k. Signature of parent or guardian

6. Write IEP, HP, or ATP on your paper to indicate the type of plan shown.

a.


Implementation Date

Projected Caopletion Date


SKILL AREA:


Habilitaticn Plan Short Term Objective Service Provider Actual Ccnpletion
Goal_ (Name and Title) Date


Student Name
Student IDI DOB
Current Assimenact


EXCEPTION ECAIOAL E ION ASSIGNENT(l) i


DATES
Initial IEP
Current IEP
IEP Revie


PLM
INITIATION ANTICIPATED
DATE DURATION


PERSON RESPONSIBLE


(Location / Proir / Organisation / Time)
RELATED SERVICES:


EXTENT TO WHICH STUDENT WILL PARTICIPATE IN BASIC OR VOCATIONAL USE OF DOUBLE BASIC COST FACTOR FOR FULL-TIM STUDENTS:
EDUCATION: (Specify required special aid., services, or equipment)


Subject hours/I of tim Subject hours/I of ti e


Vocational Education
Physical Education __Regular Adptive
IN ATTENDANCE AT NEETINGs Signature Date
LEA Repreentative (Title: ) I
Parent(s), Curdin(s) or Surrogete Parent(s)
Student
Teachers)
Evaluator(s)
Others)


Sitnature Date
__________________/


-51-









H-6







DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
C. Current Hab Plan Date
Reassessed Date
Reassessed Date
Projected Full HPC Date
1. Name 2. SSI
Mailing
3. Address_ Medicaid I
Guardian/
6. Next-of-Kin_ 5. Date of Birth CA
7. Address County____
S. Primary Disability: 9. Secondary Disabilityi
Autism
____Cerebral Palsy
Epilepsy
High Developmental Risk
Mental Retardation
State of
10. Legal Status .Residency
11. Eligible for Services: 393, Florida Statutes Yes No
Public Law 95-602 Yes No
12. Social Worker
13. HPC Chairperson
14. Current Residence Type
15. Recommended Residence Types: 1. 2.
16. Authorized Level of Care: Optimal i7 Interim 7
Foster Care Group and RHC ICF/MR Level of Care
Minimal A__A
I____Moderate B
Mo e Level of Care
Intensive ___C 17. Approved =7 Denied U

UC Coordinator Date
____E



7. Which statements describe the major relationships between IEPs, hab plans,
and ATPs?


a. School districts and HRS agencies have the same assessment procedures
and instruments for determining a student's present level of perfor-
mance.


b. The content areas for assessment are different for the IEP and the
hab plan because IEPs concentrate on educational performance, while
hab plans concentrate on psychological, medical, and other habilita-
tive categories.


c. Components of IEPs overlap with soae components of hab plans and ATPs.


d. IEPs and ATPs include short-term objectives for the referenced sub-
ject or skill areas.


e. IEPs, hab plans, and ATPs all have goal statements that are intended
to express reasonable expectations for the student's progress in a
12-month period.


-52-










H-7


KEY: 1-1 One meeting/one plan

1-2 One meeting/2 plans


2X-2 Two meetings with cross
representation/two plans
21-2 Two meetings with shored
infnrmntinn/twn nlnnm


CONDITIONSDS
CONITIONS 1-1 1-2 2X-2 21-2
A high percentage of a school district's FPM
students live in HRS operated or HRS vendored
multi-bed facilities.
PMH students live in a variety of settings that
include foster homes, group hones, and multi-bed
facilities,
A majority of the PMH students receive limited HRS
services and programs.
Public school programs for PMH students take place
in one or several centers,
F M programs take place in a variety of public
school settings throughout the district.
The school district employs staffing specialistsor
program consultants who chair planning meetings
and serve as school district representatives,
School district representatives are not adninis-
trators and are not authorized to commit district
resources,
Both agencies' philosophies lead to the inclusion
of behaviorally stated, measurable goals and
objectives on service plans.
School district and HRS requirements for service
plan Infomation differ slightly,
School district and HRS philosophies and purposes
for service plans vary considerably.


-53-


RESIDENCE OF
STUDENTS AND
AMOUNT OF
HRS SERVICES








TYPES OF
PROGRAMS




ROLE OF
SCHOOL
DISTRICT
REPRESENTA-
TIVE





AGENCY
PHILOSOPHY/
REQUIREMENTS








H-8


SELF-CHECK. MODULE 4

Circle or otherwise indicate the answers to the following questions. This
self-check is for you to keep for your own review of Module 4.
1. The role of public school personnel in the development and implementa-
tion of IEPs and hab plans is complex. Which of the following would be
most likely to encourage student progress?
a. Teachers and therapists consider only the student's academic skill
levels in planning the educational services for the student.
b. Public school staff obtain information about a student's needs, care,
and services from HRS and use this information to help them plan the
educational services for a PMH student.
c. School personnel who work with a PMH student participate in meetings
to change goals and objectives on a student's IEP.
d. Public school teachers and therapists keep data records on student
progress for use in writing annual goals and short-term objectives.
2. For each of the following statements, write 1-1, 1-2, 2X-2 or 21-2 on your
paper to indicate which coordination method applies.
a. The school district and HRS exchange service plans currently in effect.
Each agency conducts its own service plan review.
b. Both agencies participate in concentrated premeeting coordination. At
the service plan meeting, participants develop one document that
meets the needs of both agencies. Each agency implements the plan
according to its own requirements.
c. Premeeting activities include the selection of co-chairpersons. At
the meeting, a total service plan is first developed; then a public
school IEP and an HRS hab plan.
d. Each agency selects representatives to attend the meeting of the other
agency. Both school district and HRS staff members attend their own
and the other's meeting. After the meeting, school district and
HRS personnel frequently communicate regarding the student's progress.
3. For each condition listed below, write 1-1, 1-2, 2X-2, or 21-2 to indicate
which models might be used under which conditions.
1-1: one meeting/one service plan
1-2: one meeting/two service plans
2X-2: two meetings with cross representation/two
service plans
21-2: two meetings with shared information/two service
plans
a. A high percentage of a school district's PMH students live in HRS-
operated or HRS-vendored multi-bed facilities.
b. PMH students live in a variety of settings that include foster homes,
group homes, and multi-bed facilities.


-54-






H-8


c. A majority of PMH students receive limited HRS services and programs.
d. Public school programs for PMH students are held in one or several
centers.
e. Educational programs for PMH students take place in a variety of public
school settings throughout the district.
f. The school district employs staffing specialists or program consultants
who chair IEP meetings and serve as school district representatives.
g. School district representatives are not administrators and are not
qualified to conmit district resources.
h. Both agencies' philosophies lead to the inclusion of behaviorally
stated, measurable goals and objectives on service plans.
i. School district and HRS requirements for service plan information dif-
fer slightly.
j. School district and HRS philosophies and purposes for service plans
vary considerably.
4. For each advantage listed below, write 1-1, 1-2, 2X-2; or 21-2 to indi-
cate the methods) most likely to produce that advantage.
a. An opportunity to develop a "total" service plan for the student
b. Face-to-face contact between school and HRS personnel
c. Fewer meetings for the student's parents
d. Easily handled logistical arrangements
e. HRS hab plans and public school IEPs meet the specific needs of each
agency
f. The development of a non-contradictory program for the student
g. Opportunities for school district and HRS staff to cooperatively
plan a PMH student's program
5. Write 1-1, 1-2, 2X-2, or 21-2 to indicate which methods) of cooperation
would be most likely to produce the following disadvantages.
a. Parents may be intimidated by the large number of professionals who
attend the meeting.
b. The school district and HRS may find it difficult to schedule meetings
at mutually agreeable times.
c. Each agency may not receive the other's service plan in time for its
review.
d. The school district must provide release time for teachers or other
school personnel to attend the meeting.
e. No face-to-face communication between school district and HRS
personnel takes place.
f. IEP and hab plan goals may not be complementary or may directly con-
flict.


-55-







H-8


g. School system or HRS representatives may not be able to attend meet-
ings.
h. Philosophical differences may cause conflicts.
6. Which of the following represent practical methods for planning coordi-
nated services?
a. Distribute copies of the service plans) to representatives of all
agencies serving the student.
b. Notify appropriate persons in both agencies when the service plans)
need modification.
c. Once the service plans for a student have been developed, communicate
needs for changes only to the parents.
d. Review annual goals and other information provided on the student's
IEP and hab plan.
7. Cooperative agreements between school district and HRS personnel may be
in the form of:
a. Cooperative agreements
b. letters of agreement
c. verbal agreements
d. formalized, written agreements
8. Which of the following issues are usually addressed in cooperative agree-
ments?
a. responsibilities of the school board
b. responsibilities of HRS
c. attendance of personnel at meetings
d. teaching and training methods and activities
9. How does the sharing of data on a PMH student's progress help in planning
services for the student?
a. It doesn't help because school district and HRS requirements are so
different.
b. It can reveal discrepancies in teaching procedures that may affect
the student's progress.
c. It can help school district and HRS staff recognize a need to expand
communication on PMH students.


-56-



































APPENDIX B
TRANSPARENCIES


-57-






T-1


PARTNERS IN PLANNING


A Training Program About Coordinating Service Plans

for Profoundly Mentally Handicapped Students


o
m 4
cW


State of Florida
Department of 1-ducation
Tallahassee, Florida
Ralph D. Turlington, Commissioner
Affirmative action/equal opportunity employer


1 II I l gl.\l l \ I' I I l'II iI


-58-




















































Wki


T-2


-59-


zo--_________________-z_______






T-3


CONTINUUM OF SERVICES TO PMH CLIENTS OF HRS


BIRTH AGE
(VARI


HRS PROVIDES APPROPRIATE
SERVICES, INCLUDING EDU-
CATION, WITHIN EXISTING
RESOURCES. EACH CLIENT
HAS A HAB PLAN AND AN IEP,
BOTH DEVELOPED BY HRS.


;5
ABLE)

I


SCHOOL-AGED*


AGE
VARIAA

I


THE LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PRO-
VIDES THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM.
HRS PROVIDES OTHER APPROPRIATE
SERVICES THAT CAN INCLUDE RE-
SIDENTAL PLACEMENT. EACH
STUDENT HAS A SCHOOL SYSTEM IEP
AND AN HRS HAB PLAN.


18


AGE 21


3LE)




HRS PROVIDES APPROPRIATE
SERVICES, INCLUDING EDU-
CATION, WITHIN EXISTING
RESOURCES. EACH CLIENT
HAS A HAB PLAN AND AN IEP,
BOTH DEVELOPED BY HRS.


HRS PROVIDES TRAIN-
ING AND OTHER DEV-
ELOPMENTAL SERVICES.
SOME LOCAL SCHOOL
DISTRICTS PROVIDE
ADULT BASIC EDU-
CATION.


*Exact ages in the school-aged category vary from school district to school district.










T-4


HOLISTIC VS. FRAGMENTED








THIS?



















OR THIS?


-61-





T-5


PMH STUDENTS REQUIRING INTERAGENCY COORDINATION


TRANSFER OF STUDENTS FROM
TO IOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT.
COORDINATION NEEDED


BIRTH AC
(VAR





IF HRS IS THE ONLY AGENCY
SERVING, COORDINATION IS
NEEDED ONLY WHEN PMH
STUDENTS BEGIN TO RECEIVE
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FROM
THE LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEM.



PMH STUDENTS HAVE:
HRS HAB PLAN
HRS IEP


HRS TRANSFER OF STUDENTS FROM
LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT TO
HRS. COORDINATION NEEDED


E 5
LIABLE)



I.


SCHOOL-AGED*


AGE 18
VARIABLEL



-4


TIW SYSTEMS PROVIDING SERVICES.
COORDINATION NEEDED FOR:
* SERVICE PLANS (IEPs AND HAB
PLANS)
* SERVICE PLAN REVIEWS
* EVALUATION AND DATA COLLECTION


AGE 21
E) I


IF HRS IS THE ONLY AGENCY
SERVING, COORDINATION IS
NEEDED ONLY WHEN PMH
STUDENTS ARE TRANSFERRED
FROM THE LOCAL SCHOOL
DISTRICT TO HRS.



PMH STUDENTS HAVE:
HRS HAB PLAN
HRS IEP


*AS NOTED IN FIGURE 1, THE EXACT AGE RANGE OF PMH STUDENTS ATTENDING PUBLIC SCHOOL VARIES FROM
SCHOOL DISTRICT TO SCHOOL DISTRICT.


PMH STUDENTS HAVE:
* SCHOOL SYSTEM IEP
* HRS HAB PLAN


|


-r













T-6





SCHOOL AND HRS DISTRICTS


HRS DISTRICT

BOUNDARIES

1-11


o1v


-63-










T-7


LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SERVICE PLANS AND SERVICE PLAN REVIEWS


-64-


AGENCY Local school HRS Developmental HRS-ICF/MRs
Systems and the DOE Services

LAWS, RULES, SBER 6A-6.331 and Ch. 393, F.S., Ch. 393, F.S.,
REGULATIONS P.L. 94-142 P.L. 95-602, HRS 42 CFR 442.400,
manual 160-2 Ch. 10D-38, FAC

REQUIREMENTS Written individual Written habilita- Written "plan of
FOR WRITTEN educational program tion plan for care"
PLAN for each handicapped each development-
student ally disabled Functional train-
client ing and habilita-
tion record for
each resident
PARTICIPANTS Meeting of school Meeting of agency Meeting of inter-
IN PLANNING system personnel, personnel, the disciplinary team
parents, and student client, and to plan an indi-
(when appropriate) to parents (when vidualized habi-
develop individualized appropriate) to litation program
educational programs develop the hab for each resident
prior to provision of plan within one month
services after admittance.

PERIODIC At least annual At least annual At least annual
REVIEW OF review of each review of each review of each
PLANS student's IEP client's hab client's hab plan
plan
Quarterly review
Semi-annual by an interdisci-
review by social plinary team
worker
[HRS manual Monthly review of
160-2] each resident's
program plan by a
member of members
of an interdisci-
plinary team






T-8


LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SERVICE PLAN CONTENTS


IEP


SBER.6A-6.331 and

P.L. 94-142 require:





* Statement of the stu-
dent's present levels
of educational per-
formance






Statement of annual
goals and short-term
instructional objec-
tives




Statement of specific
educational and
related services to
be provided

Projected date for
initiation and an-
ticipated duration
of such services



Objective criteria
and evaluation pro-
cedures and schedules


HABILITATION PLAN


*1 r


S. 393.065, F.S. and P.L.

95-602 require:





* Long-term habilitation
goals and intermediate
habilitation objectives
stated in behavioral
or other terms that
provide measurable
indices of progress
(HRS interprets "long-
term" as annual.)

* Specification of all
services authorized






Specific habilitative
services to be provided



The most cost benefi-
cial, least restrictive
environment for accom-
plishment of the
objectives for client
progress

Use of standard habili-
tation plan format


INDIVIDUAL PLAN OF CARE


Interpretive Guidelines

for 45 CFR 249.13 and

Chapter 10D-38, FAC

require:

* Short and long-range
goals that can be
measured in terms of
the individual's
habilitation and
progression from de-
pendent to independent
functioning.


A prescription of an
integrated program of
individually designed
activities, experi-
ences, or therapies
necessary to achieve
short-term objectives


-65-


I '








T-9


RELATIONSHIP OF SERVICE PLANS




HAB PLAN

An HRS management
tool that reflects all
the habilitation
services the client
needs, including educa-
tional services




ATP


-66-


A school district
management tool
that reflects all
educational and
related services
needed by an excep-
tional student


An ICF/MR management
tool written to
implement the resi-
dent's hab plan. It
prescribes the
methods the ICF/MR
will use to meet hab
plan goals.











STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS FOR SERVICE PLANS AND SERVICE PLAN REVIEWS

STATUTORY REQUIREMENT SCHOOL DISTRICT HRS HRS ICF/MR COMMEENTS
A written service plan for each X X X
student or client
Standard form for service plan X X
Service plan to include:
* Long-term (annual) goals X X X

* Short-term objectives written X X X
in measurable terms

* Short-term objectives written X X If short-term objectives on IEPs
in behavioral terms (or other are not written in behavioral
terms that terms, ICF/MR staff must rewrite
can be them to comply with federal
measured) regulations.
* A list of services to be X X X
provided

* A time-line for accomplishing X X X
goals and objectives

Periodic Review of Service Plans
* Annual X X X

* Semi-annual X

* Quarterly X

* Monthly X ICF/MRs must obtain monthly
reports on student progress
from all service providers;
school districts are not re-
quired to provide documentation.


H
0






STATUTORY REQUIREMENT SCHOOL DISTRICT HRS HRS ICF/MR OD3IENTS
Agency staff to be responsible X X X
for service plan review
Periodic Reevaluation or Reassess- ICF/MR regulations need not con-
ment of each student or client flict with public school require-
* Annually X* X ments, since federal statutes
mandate that ICF/MRs be respon-
sible for meeting this require-
ment.
* At least every three years X
Participation by outside service The Federal Code of Regulations
providers: [42 CFR 442.400, Subpart G] re-
* Required attendance at service X X quires all service providers to
plan reviews attend annual service plan re-
views. Chapter 10F-3, FAC
requires that educational person-
nel serve as representatives on
habilitation plan committees.
e Invited attendance at service X X X
olan reviews
* Written accounts of student or X HRS requirements for reports from
client progress service providers reflect acency
regulations rather than legal
mandates. [HRS manual 160-2, 5-3;
5-4] Federal ICF/MR guidelines
and the Florida Administrative
Code [Interpretive Guidelines for
45 CFR 249.13; Rule 10D-38.15,
FAC] require documented, periodic
reports from all service pro-
viders.


Rule 10F-3.14(1), FAC requires annual reassessment and updating of each
client reassessment is not directly addressed.


client's habilitation plan;








T-11

"FREE" OPTIONS

LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS AND HRS:
* Share service plan documents (with parental permission)
* Develop a single service plan form that meets the requirements of both
agencies
* Participate in each other's annual reviews or combine reviews into one meet-
ing
* Agree on camnon or complementary goals, objectives, and methodologies
* Agree on how goals and objectives are to be written
* Coordinate timelines for the accomplishment of goals and objectives
* share evaluation results (with parental permission)
* Encourage appropriate personnel to coordinate educational and training
activities


-69-










Student Name
Student ID# DOB
Current Assignment_


DATES
Initial IEP /
Current IEP /
IEP Review /


EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION ASSIGNMENTSS:







(Location / Program / Organization / Time)

RELATED SERVICES:


FLORIDA
INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL PLAN
INITIATION
DATE


ANTICIPATED
DURATION


EXTENT TO WHICH STUDENT WILL PARTICIPATE IN BASIC OR VOCATIONAL USE OF DOUBLE BASIC COST FACTOR FOR FULL-TIME STUDENTS:
EDUCATION: (Specify required special aids, services, or equipment)


hours/% of time


Subject hours/% of time


Vocational Education
Physical Education ___Regular __Adaptive
IN ATTENDANCE AT IEP MEETING:
LEA Representative (Title: )
Parentss, Guardian(s) or Surrogate Parent(s)
Student
Teachers)
Evaluator(s)
Others)


PERSON RESPONSIBLE


Subject


Signature


Date
/


Signature


Date
/











PERFORMANCE OR SUBJECT AREA:


Student Name
Student ID#
Exceptional Education Assignment


PRESENT LEVEL:


ANNUAL GOAL:


EVALUATION OF SHORT-TERM INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
SHORT-TERM INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
Evaluation Procedures
Criterion for Mastery and Schedule to be used Results/Date











T-14


1. Name

Mailing
3. Address

Guardian/
6. Next-of-Kin


DISTRICT
DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES PROGRAM HAB PLAN
DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
Current Hab Plan Date
Reassessed Date
Reassessed Date
Projected Full HPC Date

2. SS#


4. Medicaid #


5. Date of Birth CA


7. Address

8. Primary Disability: 9. Secondary Disabilil
Autism

Cerebral Palsy

Epilepsy

High Developmental Risk

Mental Retardation
State of
10. Legal Status Residency

11. Eligible for Services: 393, Florida Statutes Yes No
Public Law 95-602 Yes No


Social Worker

HPC Chairperson

Current Residence Type

Recommended Residence Types: 1. 2.

Authorized Level of Care: Optimal / 7 Interim L_/

Foster Care Group and RHC ICF/MR Level of Care

Minimal A

Moderate B
Level of Care
Intensive C 17. Approved /Z/ Dei


D
E


County

ty:


nied / 7


UC Coordinator


Date


Page 1 of Pages


HRS-DS Form 3033A, Sep 82 (Obsoletes previous editions)


Page A


-72-










T-15


MEDICAID INFORMATION SHEET

Name: Medicaid # Date:


I. Categorical Eligibility:

I.Q. Date of Test: I.Q. scores may fluctuate, but do not
affect services. The score is used only for eligibility determination.

Physical Handicap(s):

Behavioral Problem(s):

II. Client is SSI eligible and in need of:

1. Active ICF/MR Treatment in accordancef7__
with Chapter 10D-38, F.A.C. Physician or Psychologist





III. If II (1.), above is checked Level of Care Required (Refer to
Definition on reverse side of page)

1. Developmental/Residential.

2. Developmental/Institutional.

3. Developmental/Non-ambulatory.

4. Developmental/Medical.

IV. Self Administration of Medication:

(This item must be completed regardless of whether the client takes
medication at present or not.)

1. Capable of self-administration of medication.

2. Not capable of self-administration of medication.

Chairperson or Physician Signature:

V. If recommended placement is interim for this 12 month period, justify,
then specify optimal placement.






Page 2 of Pages




HRS-DS Form 3033B, Sep 82 (Obsoletes previous editions) Page B


-73-







DISTRICT
DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES PROGRAM HABILITATION PLAN
CERTIFICATE OF ELIGIBILITY
P.L. 95-602

___SS#_


The above-named client has received an interdisciplinary evaluation and the results of the evaluation substantiate that


(1) The client is at risk of becoming developmentally disabled; the physician's statement is attached
(If this is checked "YES" it is not necessary to complete (II) through (VI).)

(II) The client has a chronic disability which is attributable to a mental or physical impairment
or a combination of both

(III) Manifested before the person attained twenty-two years of age

(IV) Will likely continue indefinitely

(V) Will result in substantial functional limitations in three or more of the following
areas of major life activity:


YES NO



YES NO

YES NO

YES NO


1. Self-Care
Eating-Drinking
Hygiene
Grooming


2. Receptive and
Expressive Language
Receptive
SExpressive


3. Learning
Cognition
Retention
Pre-Academic Skills
Academic Skills


4. Economic Self-
Sufficiency
Pre-Vocational/
Vocational Skills
__ Job Finding
Work Adjustment


5. Mobility 6.
Movement
Gross Motor Control
Fine Motor Control


Self Direction
Interpersonal/
Family Relations
Initiative


7. Capacity for Independent Living
Housekeeping
Money Management
Health and Safety
Using Community Resources


(VI) The individual's disability (does) (does not) reflect a need for a combination and sequence of special,
interdisciplinary or generic care, treatment, or other services which are either lifelong or of an
extended duration


(VII) The client is eligible.


YES NO


HPC Chairperson


Name


Date















T-17


EVAUATION/GOALS


__ DATE


EVALUATION


SECTION 'A

* Psychological
* Psychosocial
* Medical
* Dental
* Nursing
* Physical therapy
* Occupational therapy
* Leisure time activities

SECTION B

* Justification of recommended residential
setting
* Long-range optimal plan

SECTION C

* Basic academic skills
* Self-care skills
* Daily living skills
* Human growth and development
* Communication skills
* Social skills
* Motor skills
* Job-related skills

SECTION D

* Ability to give informed consent to
receive the services described on the
Hab plan


4.


GOAL


Page of Pages
HRS-DS Form 3033C, Sep 82 (Replaces May 80 edition which may be used) Page C


-75-






T-18


FOUR METHODS OF COORDINATING SERVICE PLANS


ONE MEETING/ ONE MEETING/ TWO MEETINGS WITH TWO MEETINGS WITH
ONE SERVICE PLAN TWO SERVICE PLANS CROSS-REPERSENTATION/ SHARED WRIlTEN INFORMATION
TWO SERVICE PLANS TWO SERVICE PLANS


A joint meeting of repre- A joint meeting of repre- Two separate meetings, one Two separate meetings, one
sentatives from the school sentatives from the of school district per- of school district per-
district, the HRS district school district, the HRS sonnel and a representa- sonnel to develop an IEP
and HRS agencies, parents, district and HRS agen- tive of the HRS district based on school system
and others who provide cies, parents, and others to develop the IEP and a data and information pro-
programs for a PMH student who provide programs for second of HRS personnel vided by the HRS district
to develop one service a PMH student to develop and a representative of and a second of HRS person-
plan that satisfies school an IEP and a hab plan the school district to nel to develop a hab plan
district and HRS require- that meet school district develop a hab plan. based on HRS data and
ments. and HRS requirements for information provided by
each plan. the school district.










T-19


KEY: 1-1 One meeting/one plan

1-2 One meeting/2 plans


RESIDENCE OF
STUDENTS AND
AMOUNT OF
HRS SERVICES








TYPES OF
PROGRAMS




ROLE OF
SCHOOL
DISTRICT
REPRESENTA-
TIVE





AGENCY
PHILOSOPHY/
REQUIREMENTS


2X-2 Two meetings with cross
representation/two plans
21-2 Two meetings with shared
infnrrmtinn/twn nlnns


METHODS
CONDITIONS 1-1 1-2 2X-2 21-2

A high percentage of a school district's FMH
students live in HRS operated or HRS vendored
multi-bed facilities,
PMH students live in a variety of settings that
include foster homes, group homes, and multi-bed
facilities,
A majority of the PMH students receive limited HRS
services and programs,
Public school programs for FMH students take place
in one or several centers,
PMH programs take place in a variety of public
school settings throughout the district.
The school district employs staffing specialistsor
program consultants who chair planning meetings
and serve as school district representatives,
School district representatives are not adminis-
trators and are not authorized to camnit district
resources,
Both agencies' philosophies lead to the inclusion
of behaviorally stated, measurable goals and
objectives on service plans,
School district and HRS requirements for service
plan information differ slightly.
School district and HRS philosophies and purposes
for service plans vary considerably.


-77-










T-20


AGENCY REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENT/CLIENT DATA COLLECTION


PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM



No statutes or DOE
regulations address
classroom data
collection.
Responsibilities for
developing data
collection systems
typically rest with
individual princi-
pals and teachers.


HRS DEVELOPMENTAL
SERVICES


HRS-ICF/MRS


-78-


No statutes or HRS
regulations require
training specialists
to collect data in a
specific way.
Facility requirements
vary.


Rule 10D-38.16(6),
FAC requires
"documented evidence
of consistently
applied training
activities." Each
ICF/MR develops its
own system of data
collection and the
consistency of
reporting is moni-
tored by teams from
the HRS Office of
Licensure and Certi-
fication.


RESULT: Widely
varying methods of
data collection.


RESULT: Widely
varying methods of
data collection.


RESULT: Systematic
collection and
reporting of data
stated in measurable,
objective terms.


1 II


I































APPENDIX C
CASE STUDIES


-79-








(Module 1, Case study 1)


ANDREW


Andrew was born with an unknown etiology that caused profound retardation.
When he was 6 months old, it became obvious that he was developmentally
delayed. His parents, already in their mid-forties, decided that Andrew
would receive better care in an institution.

Andrew lived in a Sunland Center until he was 14. At that age, he could
walk; feed, bathe, and toilet himself; and care for a few basic needs.
Because of Andrew's capacity to help care for himself, he was transferred to
a group home for severely and profoundly retarded teenagers.

Prior to his move, Andrew had received his educational services from the public
school program located at the HRS institution. The HRS social worker in his
new camunity referred Andrew to the public school placement specialist, who
arranged Andrew's staffing. Andrew's group home parent, Andrew, a school
district representative, Andrew's teacher, the public school speech therapist,
and the HRS social worker assigned as Andrew's case manager all attended the
meeting.

Shortly afterward, Andrew entered a canmunity public school. Andrew's teacher
quickly noticed Andrew's self-injurious habit of biting his hand when he did
not want to follow his teacher's directions. Andrew was also coming to school
without having bathed. The teacher set up a behavioral program, designed to
reduce hand-biting, but did not feel that Andrew's new program required a
revision in his IEP.

For several weeks, the teacher sent home daily notes concerning Andrew's
personal hygiene. When she received no response, the teacher called the group
home and found out that Andrew refused to bathe himself and follow other
directions of the group home parent. The teacher suggested that the parent
use the behavior management program that she used with Andrew while he was at
school. The group home parent visited Andrew's teacher, who demonstrated her
techniques and gave the parent a copy of the behavior program to use at home.

Five weeks later, Andrew was still biting himself and refusing to bathe. The
parent then decided that the school program was ineffective and called Andrew's
case manager about his problems. The parent and the social worker met two
weeks later and decided that an HRS behavioral program specialist should set
up a program for Andrew and train the parent in the home.

The social worker mentioned that Andrew's hab plan, which she had recently
received from the Sunland Center, listed hand-biting and refusal to bathe
among Andrew's behavior problems.

At school Andrew's teacher continued to use the program she had devised and
assumed that the group home parent was doing the same.

The school and HRS behavior programs were incompatible, and Andrew soon began
to tantrum throughout the day.


-80-









Finally, Andrew's teacher called the group home parent and discovered the
conflict in programs. She asked the parent and the behavioral program
specialist to meet with her to design a compatible school/home behavior
manaqenent program. This meeting took place 3 months after Andrew's pro-
blems were noticed.


(Module 2, Case study 2)

JEREMY

Jeremy, who is now 9 years old, was born with spina bifida (myelamemingocele),
hydrocephalus, and profound mental retardation. Immediately after Jeremy's
birth, he received an operation to conduct excessive brain fluid into his
heart, where it could be absorbed by the blood. Shortly after the first
operation, Jeremy also received surgery to alleviate back and urinary tract
problems.

As an infant, Jeremy received an individualized program at the local United
Cerebral Palsy Association. At age 3, he began a public pre-school program
at a local school. Because of Jeremy's extensive medical, mental, and
physical disabilities, his parents felt they could not care for Jeremy at
home and placed him, at age 8, in a private ICF/MR. After his move to the
facility, his parents, school personnel, and ICF/MR staff decided that Jeremy's
public school program was still the most appropriate educational setting.

Jeremy's medical diagnosis and functional level both suggested a need for
maximum communication between the ICF/MR and the school. The ICF/MR adminis-
trator also explained to the school principal certain ICF/MR regulations for
monthly progress reports, the writing of behavioral objectives, and attendance
by service providers at annual hab plan reviews. The principal, Jeremy's
teacher, and the ICF/MR administrator agreed on the following coordination
procedures:

1. The teacher would provide the ICF/MR with daily reports
on Jeremy's food and fluid intake, body elimination,
and other maintenance programs.

2. Both the school and the ICF/MR would provide daily
coordinated physical therapy.

3. Jeremy's teacher and therapists would keep daily and
monthly graphs of Jeremy's progress toward goals listed
on Jeremy's hab plan.

The collection of daily and monthly data helped the ICF/MR meet its legal
requirements, but transferring data from public school data sheets to those
used by the ICF/MR was a time-consuming task.

The school principal, Jeremy's teacher, and the ICF/MR administrator decided
that a canmon recording form would substantially reduce the paperwork involved.
The three also discussed the possibility of combining the annual IEP and hab
plan reviews into one meeting and coordinating the writing of short-term


-81-










objectives.


All of these coordination procedures are currently in effect. They help to
ensure that Jeremy:

1. receives sufficient food to maintain his body weight;

2. receives sufficient liquids to prevent dehydration;

3. remains free of bowel and urinary complications;

4. receives the repositioning he needs to prevent bed

sores and associated infections;

5. is guaranteed coordinated, mutually reinforcing services.

The school principal, teacher, and other professional staff realize that they
are not legally required to help the ICF/MR meet its regulations, but they
also believe that, in Jeremy's case, coordinated care and training are
essential to his well-being and development.



(Module 3, Case Study 3)

GLORIA

Gloria is a 5-year-old girl living in a large HRS residential facility. Her
movements are stiff and spastic, and she lies in a reclining wheel chair,
unable to care for her basic needs. She must be fed, toileted, and cared for
by facility personnel. She cannot speak, so she is unable to let any of her
needs be known to others. Gloria, however, will smile and laugh whenever
her foster grandparent, a familiar staff member, or her parents come to visit
her.

Gloria was born with cerebral palsy, a disorder or injury to the brain that
affects the voluntary control of her muscles. Because of the increasing
physical care that Gloria needed, her parents felt that they could no longer
care for her adequately at home. Thus, when she was 3 years old, they placed
her in the residential facility.

Gloria's parents have monitored her personal care and progress on a regular
basis throughout the last 2 years. They attend the semi-annual and annual
hab plan meetings, which are required by the state facility. At these meet-
ings, Gloria's hab plan is reviewed and revised. Gloria's current plan lists
her priority needs and those responsible for meeting those needs:

1. self-care--unit staff

2. physical therapy--physical therapy staff

3. medical needs--medical staff


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4. educational needs--public school staff


At age 4, Gloria began school in a ccmmunity-based, public pre-school program
for the profoundly physically and mentally handicapped. Each year the school
has an IEP meeting which is attended by Gloria's parents, a school district
representative, an HRS staff member, a teacher, a physical therapist, an
occupational therapist, and a speech therapist. Gloria's priority educational
goals for this year are a toilet training program; a physical therapy program
to prevent further physical deformities; an oral musculature program to
increase proficiency in eating skills; and a speech therapy program to develop
basic and functional communication.

Each school term, Gloria's teacher attends the annual hab plan review held at
the facility. At these meetings, she provides facility staff with a copy
of Gloria's IEP and reviews Gloria's progress during the preceding year. The
teacher discusses specific IEP objectives and answers any questions related
to Gloria's public school program.

At this year's meeting, she reported that Gloria was responding to her toilet
training program with the use of a specially adapted toilet chair. The teacher
noted that Gloria's new skill was being transferred to her living unit through
access to a similar toilet chair. She indicated that Gloria has also improved
her eating skills (she was eating diced, instead of ground, vegetables) and
had learned to indicate "yes" and "no" by looking at the appropriate symbol
attached to her arm chair.

After the teacher's report, the hab plan committee determined which of Gloria's
new skills were being carried over to her living unit and reinforced by facility
staff.

At the meeting, the teacher learned that over the past year, Gloria had experi-
enced an additional 10% hearing loss in her right ear. She was also told that
Gloria's congenital lung disorder was requiring increased postural drainage and
that she had become allergic to any type of citrus juice. The teacher used
this information to ensure that the school responded to Gloria's particular
health, safety, and programming needs.


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ANSWERS TO EXERCISES


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PARTNERS IN PLANNING ANSWER 1~Y


Answers to Module 1 Self-check Excercise

1. 5
2. age; cultural
3. school-aged
4. 5-18; school districts are
permitted to service students
below age 5 and above age 18.
5. Developmental Services;
developmentally disabled
6. a. SD/DOE d. HRS
b. HRS e. SD/DOE
c. HRS f. SD/DOE
7. a. Group Homes
b. Foster Homes
c. Residential Habilitation Centers
d. Community ICF/MRs
e. Sunland Centers
8. Cluster ICF/MR
9. Three "homes" of eight beds each are
grouped together in a cluster
10. a. HRS
b. SD
c. SD
d. HRS (ICF/MRs)
11. school-based; central office based;
shared decision making
12. Bureau of Education for Exceptional
students

Answers to Module 2 Self-check Exercise


13. Program Development,
Program Review and Eval-
uation, Program Services,
Resource Development
14. Any three of these:
hearing impaired, phys-
ically handicapped,
speech impaired, emotion-
ally handicapped, gifted,
visually impaired, severe
learning disabled
15. FDLRS
16. Program Services
17. district documents
18. Health and Rehabilitative
Services
19. a. Children's Medical
Services
b. Economic Services
c. Medicaid Services
20. the social worker (case
manager)
21. case management


Code of Federal Regulations
Public Law
Florida Statutes
Florida Administrative Code
State Board of Education Rule
c, d, e
HRS, ICF/MR
ICF/MR
SD
SP, HRS, ICF/MR
SD, HRS, ICF/MR
ICF/MR


g. HRS, ICF/MR
h. SD, HRS, ICF/MR
i. SD, HRS, ICF/MR
10. a. Active Treatment Plan
(ATP)
b. Individual Educational
Program (IEP)
c. Habilitation (hab) plan
11. a. Annually
b. Annually, semi-annually
c. Annually, quarterly,
monthly
12. a. SD (when appropriate),
HRS, ICF/MR
b. SD, HRS
c. SD (NOTE: HRS and ICF/
MRs often invite teachers
to attend annual reviews;


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PARTNERS IN PLANNING


ANSWER KEY












PARTNERS IN PLANNING ANSWER KEY

Answers to Module 2 (cont)

however, teachers are not
legally required to attend)
d. ICF/MR
e. HRS
f. SD


Answers to Module 3 Self-check Exercise

1. (1) develop the plan; (2) implement; (3) review; (4) revise

2. c

3. Yes. Scheduling these meetings together helps staffs to coordinate
goals and objectives on the two plans and reduces the number of
meetings for the student and the student's family.

4. c; d; f

5. a. IEP, IP, HP, ATP
b. IEP, HP, ATP
c. IEP, HP
d. IEP
e. HP
f. IP, ATP
g. IEP, HP
h. IEP, IP, ATP
i. IEP, HP
j. HP
k. IEP, HP

6. a. ATP
b. IEP
c. HP

7. b; c; d; e


Answers to Module 4 Self-check Exercise

1. b 3. a. 1-1; 1-2
2. a. 21-2 b. 2X-2
b. 1-1 c. 21-2
c. 1-2 d. 1-1; 1-2; 21-2
d. 2X-2 e. 2X-2; 21-2
f. 1-1; 1-2; 21-2


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ANSWER KEY


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PARTNERS IN PLANNING

Answers to Module 4 (cont)

g. 2X-2; 21-2
h. 1-1; 21-2
i. 1-1; 2X-2
j. 21-2

4. a. 1-1
b. 1-1; 1-2; 2X-2
c. 1-1; 1-2
d. 21-2
e. 1-2; 2X-2; 21-
f. 1-1; 1-2
g. 1-1; 1-2; 2X-2

5. a. 1-1; 1-2
b. 1-1; 1-2; 2X-2
c. 21-2
d. 1-1; 1-2; 2X-2
e. 21-2
f. 21-2
g. 1-1; 1-2; 1X-2
h. 1-1; 1-2; 1X-2

6. a; b; d

7. a; b; c; d

8. a; b; c

9. b; c


2




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