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Tracking Miami's Growth Activity Sheet


Tracking Miami's Growth


Name:


Complete the activities and answer the questions below using the online introduction to this
topic to guide you.


1) If you look at a map of this area, you will see that Route 27, The Okeechobee Road,
runs south-west of the track. That is the dark line on the modern photo. Can you find that
road on the 1938 photos of the area?


2) Follow the steps below to create a photomosaic index from 1938 aerials captured by the
U.S. Department of Agriculture and compare it to current U.S. Geological Survey
quadrangle maps.
a) Print out the relevant tiles:
i) Go to the University of Florida's Aerial Photography: Florida website.
ii) Select Dade County, select the year 1938, Flight 1.
iii) You will print out tiles number 8, 10, 34, 32, 50 and 52. View each one at 25%
zoom and then print each.
iv) Go back to Flight 2, also in 1938, and print out tiles 11 and 13.


-1-


Aerial Photography: Florida








Tracking Miami's Growth Activity Sheet


3) Once the images are printed, cut them out and tape them together.


4) Using a modern road map (or a U.S. Geological Survey quad sheet), locate and mark
current locations of the transportation centers that serve modern Miami including the
Amtrack station, Miami International Airport, and Interstate highways.





Use this space to make notes:


-2-


Aerial Photography: Florida




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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074932/00002
 Material Information
Title: Tracking Miami’s growth using aerial photography ( 2010 version )
Physical Description: Mixed Material
Creator: Sheard, William
Publisher: UF Libraries
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Subjects
Genre: lesson plan
Spatial Coverage:
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074932:00002


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Tracking Miami's Growth Introduction




Tequesta Indians lived close to Biscayne Bay and the Miami River near what is
present-day Miami. They were mainly hunters and gathers living off the coastal fish
and shellfish and gathering wild plants, nuts and berries. The Tequesta all but
vanished due to war and disease following the arrival of the Europeans in the 1500s.




m In 1998, during excavations for a new high rise, a stone circle
was found on the bank of the Miami River. Scientists believe
that the circle was created by Tequesta Indians and site
artifacts indicate that humans lived on both sides of the river
for some 2,000 years.




Ponce de Le6n was the first to encounter the Miami River Tequesta during
his 1913 expedition to "La Florida." In 1566, Pedro Menendez de Aviles and
his men attempted to build a mission and establish a garrison near the site.
The mission was abandoned after fighting broke out with the Indians. In
1743, the Spanish again attempted to establish a mission. It too failed. ,i s

For many years, very few people lived in south-eastern Florida. Although the
climate was generally mild, much of the land just beyond the coast was
swampy. Mosquitoes spread disease to people and cattle alike.

It wasn't until the late 1830s that a plantation and trading post were
established on the banks of the Miami River at Fort Dallas. Fort Dallas
became the first permanent settlement of a non-native community in this
area.


41L4.








Tracking Miami's Growth Activity Sheet


Tracking Miami's Growth


Name:


Complete the activities and answer the questions below using the online introduction to this
topic to guide you.


1) If you look at a map of this area, you will see that Route 27, The Okeechobee Road,
runs south-west of the track. That is the dark line on the modern photo. Can you find that
road on the 1938 photos of the area?


2) Follow the steps below to create a photomosaic index from 1938 aerials captured by the
U.S. Department of Agriculture and compare it to current U.S. Geological Survey
quadrangle maps.
a) Print out the relevant tiles:
i) Go to the University of Florida's Aerial Photography: Florida website.
ii) Select Dade County, select the year 1938, Flight 1.
iii) You will print out tiles number 8, 10, 34, 32, 50 and 52. View each one at 25%
zoom and then print each.
iv) Go back to Flight 2, also in 1938, and print out tiles 11 and 13.


-1-


Aerial Photography: Florida








Tracking Miami's Growth Activity Sheet


3) Once the images are printed, cut them out and tape them together.


4) Using a modern road map (or a U.S. Geological Survey quad sheet), locate and mark
current locations of the transportation centers that serve modern Miami including the
Amtrack station, Miami International Airport, and Interstate highways.





Use this space to make notes:


-2-


Aerial Photography: Florida